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Sample records for adenocarcinoma mouse prostate

  1. Characterization of prostatic epithelial cell lines derived from transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model.

    PubMed

    Foster, B A; Gingrich, J R; Kwon, E D; Madias, C; Greenberg, N M

    1997-08-15

    To develop a syngeneic transplantable system to study immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of prostate cancer, three cell lines were established from a heterogeneous 32 week tumor of the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. TRAMP is a transgenic line of C57BL/6 mice harboring a construct comprised of the minimal -426/+28 rat probasin promoter driving prostate-specific epithelial expression of the SV40 large T antigen. TRAMP males develop histological prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia by 8-12 weeks of age that progress to adenocarcinoma with distant metastases by 24-30 weeks of age. The three cell lines (TRAMP-C1, TRAMP-C2, and TRAMP-C3) express cytokeratin, E-cadherin, and androgen receptor by immunohistochemical analysis and do not appear to have a mutated p53. Although TRAMP-C1 and TRAMP-C2 are tumorigenic when grafted into syngeneic C57BL/6 hosts, TRAMP-C3 grows readily in vitro but does not form tumors. The T antigen oncoprotein is not expressed by the cell lines in vitro or in vivo. The rationale for establishing multiple cell lines was to isolate cells representing various stages of cellular transformation and progression to androgen-independent metastatic disease that could be manipulated in vitro and, in combination with the TRAMP model, provide a system to investigate therapeutic interventions, such as immunotherapy prior to clinical trials. PMID:9269988

  2. Extra-prostatic Transgene-associated Neoplastic Lesions in Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D.; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Bolon, Brad; Oglesbee, Michael J.; Clinton, Steven K.; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih; La Perle, Krista

    2014-01-01

    Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice are frequently used in prostate cancer research because their prostates consistently develop a series of pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Disease progression in TRAMP mouse prostates culminates in metastatic, poorly differentiated carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. The androgen dependence of the rat probasin promoter largely limits transgene expression to the prostatic epithelium. However, extra-prostatic transgene-positive lesions have been described in TRAMP mice, including renal tubulo-acinar carcinomas, neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urethra, and phyllodes-like tumors of the seminal vesicle. Here we describe the histologic and immunohistochemical features of two novel extra-prostatic lesions in TRAMP mice: primary anaplastic tumors of uncertain cell origin in the midbrain, and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the submandibular salivary gland. These newly characterized tumors apparently result from transgene expression in extra-prostatic locations rather than representing metastatic prostate neoplasms because lesions were identified in both male and female mice as well as in male TRAMP mice without histologically apparent prostate tumors. In this paper we also calculate the incidences of the urethral carcinomas and renal tubulo-acinar carcinomas, further elucidate the biological behavior of the urethral carcinomas, and demonstrate the critical importance of complete necropsies even when evaluating presumably well characterized phenotypes in genetically engineered mice. PMID:24742627

  3. Extra-prostatic transgene-associated neoplastic lesions in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice.

    PubMed

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Bolon, Brad; Oglesbee, Michael J; Clinton, Steven K; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih; La Perle, Krista M D

    2015-02-01

    Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice are frequently used in prostate cancer research because their prostates consistently develop a series of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Disease progression in TRAMP mouse prostates culminates in metastatic, poorly differentiated carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. The androgen dependence of the rat probasin promoter largely limits transgene expression to the prostatic epithelium. However, extra-prostatic transgene-positive lesions have been described in TRAMP mice, including renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urethra, and phyllodes-like tumors of the seminal vesicle. Here, we describe the histologic and immunohistochemical features of 2 novel extra-prostatic lesions in TRAMP mice: primary anaplastic tumors of uncertain cell origin in the midbrain and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the submandibular salivary gland. These newly characterized tumors apparently result from transgene expression in extra-prostatic locations rather than representing metastatic prostate neoplasms because lesions were identified in both male and female mice and in male TRAMP mice without histologically apparent prostate tumors. In this article, we also calculate the incidences of the urethral carcinomas and renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, further elucidate the biological behavior of the urethral carcinomas, and demonstrate the critical importance of complete necropsies even when evaluating presumably well characterized phenotypes in genetically engineered mice.

  4. Decreased expression of Toll-like receptor 4 and 5 during progression of prostate transformation in transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Ju-Hee; Park, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Chang, Seo-Na; Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Park, Jae-Hak; Kim, Dong-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been considered an important risk factor for development of prostate cancer. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize microbial moieties or endogenous molecules and play an important role in the triggering and promotion of inflammation. In this study, we examined whether expression of TLR4 and TLR5 was associated with progression of prostate transformation in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. The expression of TLR4 and TLR5 was evaluated by immunohistochemisty in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded prostate tissue from wild-type (WT) and TRAMP mice. Normal prostate tissue from WT mice showed strong expression of TLR4 and TLR5. However, TLR4 expression in the prostate tissue from TRAMP mice gradually decreased as pathologic grade became more aggressive. TLR5 expression in the prostate tissue from TRAMP mice also decreased in low-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), high-grade PIN and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Overall, our results suggest that decreased expression of TLR4 and TLR5 may contribute to prostate tumorigenesis.

  5. Benzyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Prostate Cancer Development in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) Model, Which Is Associated with the Induction of Cell Cycle G1 Arrest.

    PubMed

    Cho, Han Jin; Lim, Do Young; Kwon, Gyoo Taik; Kim, Ji Hee; Huang, Zunnan; Song, Hyerim; Oh, Yoon Sin; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is a hydrolysis product of glucotropaeolin, a compound found in cruciferous vegetables, and has been shown to have anti-tumor properties. In the present study, we investigated whether BITC inhibits the development of prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Five-week old, male TRAMP mice and their nontransgenic littermates were gavage-fed with 0, 5, or 10 mg/kg of BITC every day for 19 weeks. The weight of the genitourinary tract increased markedly in TRAMP mice and this increase was suppressed significantly by BITC feeding. H and E staining of the dorsolateral lobes of the prostate demonstrated that well-differentiated carcinoma (WDC) was a predominant feature in the TRAMP mice. The number of lobes with WDC was reduced by BITC feeding while that of lobes with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia was increased. BITC feeding reduced the number of cells expressing Ki67 (a proliferation marker), cyclin A, cyclin D1, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2 in the prostatic tissue. In vitro cell culture results revealed that BITC decreased DNA synthesis, as well as CDK2 and CDK4 activity in TRAMP-C2 mouse prostate cancer cells. These results indicate that inhibition of cell cycle progression contributes to the inhibition of prostate cancer development in TRAMP mice treated with BITC. PMID:26907265

  6. Gastric adenocarcinoma with prostatic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Roshni, S; Anoop, Tm; Preethi, Tr; Shubanshu, G; Lijeesh, Al

    2014-06-01

    Metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma to the prostate gland is extremely rare. Herein, we report a case of gastric adenocarcinoma in a 56-year-old man with prostatic metastasis diagnosed through the analysis of biopsy specimens from representative lesions in the stomach and prostate gland. Immunohistochemistry of the prostatic tissue showed positive staining for cytokeratin 7 and negative staining for prostate-specific antigen (PSA), whereas the serum PSA level was normal, confirming the diagnosis of prostatic metastasis from carcinoma of the stomach. PMID:25061542

  7. Gastric Adenocarcinoma with Prostatic Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Roshni, S; Preethi, TR; Shubanshu, G; Lijeesh, AL

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma to the prostate gland is extremely rare. Herein, we report a case of gastric adenocarcinoma in a 56-year-old man with prostatic metastasis diagnosed through the analysis of biopsy specimens from representative lesions in the stomach and prostate gland. Immunohistochemistry of the prostatic tissue showed positive staining for cytokeratin 7 and negative staining for prostate-specific antigen (PSA), whereas the serum PSA level was normal, confirming the diagnosis of prostatic metastasis from carcinoma of the stomach. PMID:25061542

  8. Chemopreventive effects of Korean Angelica vs. its major pyranocoumarins on two lineages of transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Su-Ni; Zhang, Jinhui; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Peixin; Puppala, Manohar; Zhang, Yong; Xing, Chengguo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2015-01-01

    We showed previously that daily gavage of Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root ethanolic extract starting 8 weeks of age inhibited growth of prostate epithelium and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NE-Ca) in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Since decursin (D) and its isomer decursinol angelate (DA) are major pyranocoumarins in AGN extract, we tested the hypothesis that D/DA represented active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP carcinogenesis. Three groups of male C57BL/6 TRAMP mice were gavage-treated daily with excipient vehicle, AGN (5 mg per mouse) or equimolar D/DA (3 mg per mouse) from 8 weeks to 16 or 28 weeks of age. Measurement of plasma and NE-Ca D, DA and their common metabolite decursinol indicated similar retention from AGN vs. D/DA dosing. The growth of TRAMP dorsolateral prostate (DLP) in AGN-and D/DA-treated mice was inhibited by 66% and 61% at 16 weeks and by 67% and 72% at 28 weeks, respectively. Survival of mice bearing NE-Ca to 28 weeks was improved by AGN, but not by D/DA. Nevertheless, AGN-and D/DA-treated mice had lower NE-Ca burden. Immunohistochemical and mRNA analyses of DLP showed AGN and D/DA exerted similar inhibition of TRAMP epithelial lesion progression and key cell cycle genes. Profiling of NE-Ca mRNA showed a greater scope of modulating angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal-transition, invasion-metastasis and inflammation genes by AGN than D/DA. The data therefore support D/DA as probable active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP epithelial lesions, and they cooperate with non-pyranocoumarin compounds to fully express AGN efficacy against NE-Ca. PMID:26116406

  9. Chemopreventive Effects of Korean Angelica versus Its Major Pyranocoumarins on Two Lineages of Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Su-Ni; Zhang, Jinhui; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Peixin; Puppala, Manohar; Zhang, Yong; Xing, Chengguo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2015-09-01

    We showed previously that daily gavage of Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root ethanolic extract starting 8 weeks of age inhibited growth of prostate epithelium and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NE-Ca) in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Because decursin (D) and its isomer decursinol angelate (DA) are major pyranocoumarins in AGN extract, we tested the hypothesis that D/DA represented active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP carcinogenesis. Three groups of male C57BL/6 TRAMP mice were gavage treated daily with excipient vehicle, AGN (5 mg per mouse), or equimolar D/DA (3 mg per mouse) from 8 weeks to 16 or 28 weeks of age. Measurement of plasma and NE-Ca D, DA, and their common metabolite decursinol indicated similar retention from AGN versus D/DA dosing. The growth of TRAMP dorsolateral prostate (DLP) in AGN- and D/DA-treated mice was inhibited by 66% and 61% at 16 weeks and by 67% and 72% at 28 weeks, respectively. Survival of mice bearing NE-Ca to 28 weeks was improved by AGN, but not by D/DA. Nevertheless, AGN- and D/DA-treated mice had lower NE-Ca burden. Immunohistochemical and mRNA analyses of DLP showed that AGN and D/DA exerted similar inhibition of TRAMP epithelial lesion progression and key cell-cycle genes. Profiling of NE-Ca mRNA showed a greater scope of modulating angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion-metastasis, and inflammation genes by AGN than D/DA. The data therefore support D/DA as probable active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP epithelial lesions, and they cooperate with non-pyranocoumarin compounds to fully express AGN efficacy against NE-Ca.

  10. A null-mutation in the Znt7 gene accelerates prostate tumor formation in a transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decrease of cellular zinc in the epithelium of the prostate has been implicated in the development of prostate cancer. To investigate whether ZnT7, a zinc transporter involved in intracellular zinc accumulation, plays a role in prostate cancer development, we have generated and characterized a trans...

  11. A high-fat diet containing whole walnuts (Juglans regia) reduces tumour size and growth along with plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary fat is linked to prostate cancer (PCa), the most commonly diagnosed male cancer, but the nature and strength of the relationships between total fat, n-6 and n-3 fatty acids and PCa remain incompletely understood. Transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice (N=10-12 per grou...

  12. Metastasis of Prostate Adenocarcinoma to the Testis

    PubMed Central

    Campara, Zoran; Simic, Dejan; Aleksic, Predrag; Spasic, Aleksandar; Milicevic, Snjezana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prostate carcinoma is the most frequently diagnosed carcinoma in the male population. The most typical places of the metastases are pelvic lymphatic glands, bones and lungs, and very rarely it metastasizes into a testis. The prognostic importance of testicular metastasis of prostate cancer is not yet well-known, due to a very few published cases. According to the known facts, it is certain that a metastasis of the prostate carcinoma into a testis is a sign of an advanced disease. Case report: This work presents a 48-year-old patient, to whom an adenocarcinoma of the prostate has been proven by the pathohistological finding of transrectal biopsy, performed due to the elevated level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Nine years after the initial diagnosis, due to a gradual rise of PSA and tumorous enlargement of the left testis, left inguinal orchectomy and right orchectomy were performed. Metastatic dissemination of prostate adenocarcinoma into a testis was determined by a pathohistological analysis of the left testis. Conclusion: The metastasis of the prostate carcinoma into a testis, as a rare localization of the metastatic dissemination, after additionally performed orchectomy along with further oncological therapy, can provide a continuation of a good life quality as well as a control of the disease in a longer time period. PMID:27703299

  13. A high-fat diet containing whole walnuts (Juglans regia) reduces tumour size and growth along with plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate model.

    PubMed

    Davis, Paul A; Vasu, Vihas T; Gohil, Kishorchandra; Kim, Hyunsook; Khan, Imran H; Cross, Carroll E; Yokoyama, Wallace

    2012-11-28

    Prostate cancer (PCa) has been linked to fat intake, but the effects of both different dietary fat levels and types remain inconsistent and incompletely characterised. The effects on PCa in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) cancer model of an elevated fat (20 % of energy as fat) diet containing 155 g of whole walnuts were compared to those of an elevated fat (20 % of energy as soyabean oil) diet with matched macronutrients, tocopherols as well as a low-fat (8 % of energy as soyabean oil) diet. Mice, starting at 8 weeks of age, consumed one of the three different diets ad libitum; and prostates, livers and blood were obtained after 9, 18 or 24 weeks of feeding. No differences were observed in whole animal growth rates in either high-fat (HF) diet group, but prostate tumour weight and growth rate were reduced in the walnut diet group. Walnut diet group prostate weight, plasma insulin-like growth factor 1, resistin and LDL were lower at 18 weeks, while no statistically significant prostate weight differences by diet were seen at 9 or 24 weeks. Multiple metabolites in the livers differed by diet at 9 and 18 weeks. The walnut diet's beneficial effects probably represent the effects of whole walnuts' multiple constituents and not via a specific fatty acid or tocopherols. Moreover, as the two HF diets had dissimilar effects on prostate tumour growth rate and size, and yet had the same total fat and tocopherol composition and content, this suggests that these are not strongly linked to PCa growth.

  14. Prostate Adenocarcinomas Aberrantly Expressing p63 Are Molecularly Distinct from Usual-Type Prostatic Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hsueh-Li; Haffner, Michael C.; Esopi, David M.; Vaghasia, Ajay M.; Giannico, Giovanna A.; Ross, Hillary M.; Ghosh, Susmita; Hicks, Jessica; Zheng, Qizhi; Sangoi, Ankur R.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Lotan, Tamara L.

    2014-01-01

    We have described a rare group of prostate adenocarcinomas that show aberrant expression of p63, a protein strongly expressed in prostatic basal cells and absent from usual-type acinar prostate cancers. The partial basal-like immunophenotype of these tumors is intriguing in light of the persistent debate surrounding the cell-of-origin for prostate cancer, however their molecular phenotype is unknown. We collected 37 of these tumors on radical prostatectomy and biopsy and assessed subsets for a diverse panel of molecular markers. The majority of p63-expressing tumors were positive for the ΔNp63 isoform (6/7) by immunofluorescence and p63 mRNA (7/8) by chromogenic in situ hybridization. Despite p63 positivity, these tumors uniformly expressed luminal-type cytokeratin proteins such as CK18 (13/13), CK8 (8/8) and markers of androgen axis signaling commonly seen in luminal cells, including androgen receptor (10/11), NKX3.1 (8/8) and prostein (12/13). Conversely, basal cytokeratins such as CK14 and CK15 were negative in all cases (0/8) and CK5/6 was weakly and focally positive in 36% (4/11) of cases. Pluripotency markers including β-catenin, Oct4 and c-kit were negative in p63-expressing tumors (0/11). Despite nearly universal expression of androgen receptor and downstream androgen signaling targets, p63-expressing tumors lacked ERG rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization (0/14) and ERG protein expression (0/37). No tumors expressed SPINK1 or showed PTEN protein loss (0/19). Surprisingly, 74% (14/19) of p63-expressing tumors expressed GSTP1 protein at least focally, and 33% (2/6) entirely lacked GSTP1 CpG island hypermethylation by bisulfite sequencing. In contrast to usual prostatic adenocarcinomas, prostate tumors with p63-expression show a mixed luminal/basal immunophenotype, uniformly lack ERG gene rearrangement and frequently express GSTP1. These data strongly suggest that p63-expressing prostate tumors represent a molecularly distinct subclass and

  15. Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate: histogenesis, biology and clinicopathological features.

    PubMed

    Seipel, Amanda H; Delahunt, Brett; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Egevad, Lars

    2016-08-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate (DAC) is recognised as a subtype of prostatic adenocarcinoma, but its diagnostic criteria and biology remain controversial. DAC was first thought to stem from Müllerian duct remnants, but further studies suggest a prostatic origin. DAC is composed of tall, columnar, pseudostratified epithelium with a papillary, cribriform, glandular or solid architecture. The diagnosis is based on morphology alone with papillary architecture being the most helpful diagnostic feature. The tumour is rare in a pure form and most cases are combined with acinar adenocarcinoma. The most common differential diagnoses of DAC are intraductal carcinoma of the prostate and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Patients often present at an advanced clinicopathological stage. High rates of extra-prostatic extension, seminal vesicle invasion, local and regional metastases, and positive surgical margins are seen after radical prostatectomy. DAC metastasises to sites that are less commonly seen for prostate cancer such as lung, brain, testis and penis. The morphology and the unusual metastatic locations make the accurate diagnosis of metastases challenging, but a positive immunostain for prostate specific markers may be helpful. The correct identification of DAC has implications for treatment as well as outcome. PMID:27321992

  16. Non-Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen-Avid Metastatic Lung Nodule From Primary Prostatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Deepa; Loh, Han; Bui, Chuong; Mansberg, Robert; Hadjashrafi, Amirazin; Do, Viet

    2016-10-01

    Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT is increasingly used to evaluate recurrent prostatic malignancy due to its high specificity. A 56-year-old man with previous history of treated prostate cancer 4 years earlier presented with rising prostate-specific antigen level and underwent Ga-PSMA PET/CT, which demonstrated an enlarging pulmonary nodule without PSMA avidity. The pulmonary nodule, however, showed moderate uptake on a corresponding FDG PET/CT study, suspicious of primary lung malignancy. Cytological and histopathological examination of the pulmonary nodule confirmed a metastatic deposit from ductal prostatic adenocarcinoma, an uncommon variant of prostatic malignancy.

  17. Beyond Prostate Adenocarcinoma: Expanding the Differential Diagnosis in Prostate Pathologic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Mongan, John; Behr, Spencer C; Sud, Seema; Coakley, Fergus V; Simko, Jeffry; Westphalen, Antonio C

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the prostate gland have dramatically improved the ability to detect and stage adenocarcinoma of the prostate, one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men and one of the most frequently diagnosed pathologic conditions of the prostate gland. A wide variety of nonadenocarcinoma diseases can also be seen with MR imaging, ranging from benign to malignant diseases, as well as infectious and inflammatory manifestations. Many of these diseases have distinctive imaging features that allow differentiation from prostate acinar adenocarcinoma. Early recognition of these entities produces a more accurate differential diagnosis and may enable more expeditious clinical workup. Benign neoplasms of the prostate include plexiform neurofibroma and cystadenoma, both of which demonstrate distinctive imaging features. Stromal neoplasms of uncertain malignant potential are rare tumors of uncertain malignant potential that are often difficult to distinguish at imaging from more-malignant prostate sarcomas. Other malignant neoplasms of the prostate include urothelial carcinoma, primary prostatic carcinoid, carcinosarcoma, endometrioid or ductal adenocarcinoma, and mucinous adenocarcinoma. Prostatic infections can lead to abscesses of pyogenic, tuberculous, or fungal origins. Finally, miscellaneous idiopathic disorders of the prostate include amyloidosis, exophytic benign prostatic hyperplasia, and various congenital cysts. Considerable overlap can exist in the clinical history and imaging findings associated with these prostate pathologic conditions, and biopsy is often required for ultimate confirmation of the diagnosis. However, many diagnoses, including cystadenoma, mucinous adenocarcinoma, sarcoma, and abscesses, have distinct imaging features, which can enable the informed radiologist to identify the diagnosis and recommend appropriate clinical workup and management. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27315446

  18. Inflammation and focal atrophy in prostate needle biopsy cores and association to prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Ines; Bettin, Alfonso; Reyes, Niradiz

    2016-10-01

    The possible origin of proliferative inflammatory atrophy in the regenerative proliferation of prostate epithelial cells in response to injury caused by inflammation, and their relation to prostate adenocarcinoma have not been defined. Inflammation and focal atrophy are common pathological findings in prostate biopsies, currently not routinely included in surgical pathology reports. The objective of the study was to determine the correlation between inflammation and focal atrophy with prostate adenocarcinoma. Prostate needle biopsies from 203 patients with clinical parameters suspicious for malignancy were evaluated for the presence and extent of chronic inflammation, type and grade of focal atrophy, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and adenocarcinoma. Relations among them and with age were also analyzed. χ(2) tests and binary logistic regression were used to estimate associations. Chronic inflammation was observed in 77.3% of the biopsies, significantly associated to adenocarcinoma (P = .031). Moderate/severe inflammation in at least 1 biopsy core increased the risk of prostate adenocarcinoma (odds ratio, 2.94; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-6.8), whereas glandular localization of inflammation decreased the risk. Focal atrophy was present in 72.9% of the biopsies, proliferative inflammatory atrophy was the most common type, and its grade was significantly associated to inflammation (P < .0001) and inflammation intensity (P = .003). An association between prostate adenocarcinoma and inflammation was found, with higher odds in presence of moderate/severe inflammation in at least 1 biopsy core. Increasing grades of proliferative inflammatory atrophy were associated to high levels of inflammation, supporting its previously proposed inflammatory nature. PMID:27649956

  19. Comparative in vitro and in vivo evaluation of two 64Cu-labeled bombesin analogs in a mouse model of human prostate adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Shan; Zhang, Xianzhong; Xiong, Zhengming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2006-04-01

    Bombesin (BBN), an analog of human gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), binds to the GRP receptor (GRPR) with high affinity and specificity. Overexpression of GRPR has been discovered in mostly androgen-independent human prostate tissues and, thus, provides a potential target for prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy. We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using 64Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-[Lys3]BBN to detect GRPR-positive prostate cancer. In this study, we compared the receptor affinity, metabolic stability, tumor-targeting efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of a truncated BBN analog 64Cu-DOTA-Aca-BBN(7-14) with 64Cu-DOTA-[Lys3]BBN. Binding of each DOTA conjugate to GRPR on PC-3 and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells was evaluated with competitive binding assay using 125I-[Tyr4]BBN as radioligand. In vivo pharmacokinetics was determined on male nude mice subcutaneously implanted with PC-3 cells. Dynamic microPET imaging was performed to evaluate the systemic distribution of the tracers. Metabolic stability of the tracers in blood, urine, tumor, liver and kidney was studied using high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that 125I-[Tyr4]BBN has a K(d) of 14.8+/-0.4 nM against PC-3 cells, and the receptor concentration on PC-3 cell surface is approximately 2.7+/-0.1 x 10(6) receptors per cell. The 50% inhibitory concentration value for DOTA-Aca-BBN(7-14) is 18.4 +/- 0.2 nM, and that for DOTA-[Lys3]BBN is 2.2 +/- 0.5 nM. DOTA-[Lys3]BBN shows a better tumor contrast and absolute tumor activity accumulation compared to DOTA-Aca-BBN(7-14). Studies on metabolic stability for both tracers on organ homogenates showed that 64Cu-DOTA-[Lys3]BBN is relatively stable. This study demonstrated that both tracers are suitable for targeted PET imaging to detect the expression of GRPR in prostate cancer, while 64Cu-DOTA-[Lys3]BBN may have a better potential for clinical translation.

  20. Prostate adenocarcinoma associated with prostatic infection due to Schistosoma haematobium. Case report and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Jacinta Chaves; Richter, Joachim; Borja, Nilo; Balaca, Antonino; Costa, Sandra; Belo, Silvana; Grácio, Maria Amélia

    2015-02-01

    Schistosomiasis affects more than 240 million people worldwide, an infection which may cause urogenital manifestations including, among others, squamous bladder cancer and prostate involvement. We describe the first case of a prostate adenocarcinoma associated with prostatic Schistosoma haematobium infection occurring in Angola. Prostate carcinoma was suspected because of high levels of prostate-specific antigen. This observation prompted us to review the literature on schistosomiaisis with respect to genital pathology and prostate cancer. Described genital manifestations in men include funiculitis, epididymitis, granulomata of the seminal vesicles, testicular masses, and prostate lesions which may cause haematospermia and infertility. In contrast to bladder cancer, only 12 reports including the present case on 17 cases on prostate carcinoma associated with schistosomiasis have been published worldwide. The rarity of reports on prostate carcinoma associated with schistosomiasis is partly due to diagnostic constraints, and its incidence is underestimated. However, in emerging countries, the incidence of prostate cancer appears to increase mainly as a result of urbanization and improved access to health care where schistosomiasis prevalence is decreasing.

  1. Raman Spectroscopy Study of Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Bulk Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devpura, S.; Dai, H.; Thakur, J. S.; Naik, R.; Cao, A.; Pandya, A.; Auner, G. W.; Sarkar, F.; Sakr, W.; Naik, V.

    2009-03-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer among men. The mortality rate for this disease can be dramatically reduced if it can be diagnosed in its early stages. Raman spectroscopy is one of the optical techniques which can provide fingerprints of a disease in terms of its molecular composition which changes due to the onset of disease. The aim of this project is to investigate the differences in the Raman spectra to identify benign epithelium (BE), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and adenocarcinoma of various Gleason grades in archived bulk tissues embedded in paraffin wax. For each tissue, two adjacent tissue sections were cut and dewaxed, where one of the sections was stained using haematoxylin and eosin for histological examination and the other unstained adjacent section was used for Raman spectroscopic studies. We have collected Raman spectra from 10 prostatic adenocarcinoma dewaxed tissue sections using Raman microscope (785 nm excitation laser). The data were analyzed using statistical methods of principal component analysis and discriminant function analysis to classify the tissue regions. The results indicate that Raman Spectroscopy can differentiate between BE, PIN and Cancer regions.

  2. Genetic deletion of osteopontin in TRAMP mice skews prostate carcinogenesis from adenocarcinoma to aggressive human-like neuroendocrine cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Giorgio; Jachetti, Elena; Comuzzi, Barbara; Dugo, Matteo; Arioli, Ivano; Miotti, Silvia; Sangaletti, Sabina; Di Carlo, Emma; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario P.

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted glycoprotein, that belongs to the non-structural extracellular matrix (ECM), and its over expression in human prostate cancer has been associated with disease progression, androgen independence and metastatic ability. Nevertheless, the pathophysiology of OPN in prostate tumorigenesis has never been studied. We crossed TRansgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mice with OPN deficient (OPN−/−) mice and followed tumor onset and progression in these double mutants. Ultrasound examination detected the early onset of a rapidly growing, homogeneous and spherical tumor in about 60% of OPN−/− TRAMP mice. Such neoplasms seldom occurred in parental TRAMP mice otherwise prone to adenocarcinomas and were characterized for being androgen receptor negative, highly proliferative and endowed with neuroendocrine (NE) features. Gene expression profiling showed up-regulation of genes involved in tumor progression, cell cycle and neuronal differentiation in OPN-deficient versus wild type TRAMP tumors. Down-regulated genes included key genes of TGFa pathway, including SMAD3 and Filamin, which were confirmed at the protein level. Furthermore, NE genes and particularly those characterizing early prostatic lesions of OPN-deficient mice were found to correlate with those of human prostate NE tumours. These data underscore a novel role of OPN in the early stages of prostate cancer growth, protecting against the development of aggressive NE tumors. PMID:26700622

  3. Iodine uptake and prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse model.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Caltzontzin, Paloma; Delgado, Guadalupe; Aceves, Carmen; Anguiano, Brenda

    2013-11-08

    Iodine supplementation exerts antitumor effects in several types of cancer. Iodide (I⁻) and iodine (I₂) reduce cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP and DU-145). Both chemical species decrease tumor growth in athymic mice xenografted with DU-145 cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the uptake and effects of iodine in a preclinical model of prostate cancer (transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate [TRAMP] mice/SV40-TAG antigens), which develops cancer by 12 wks of age. ¹²⁵I⁻ and ¹²⁵I₂ uptake was analyzed in prostates from wild-type and TRAMP mice of 12 and 24 wks in the presence of perchlorate (inhibitor of the Na⁺/I⁻ symporter [NIS]). NIS expression was quantified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Mice (6 wks old) were supplemented with 0.125 mg I⁻ plus 0.062 mg I₂/mouse/day for 12 or 24 wks. The weight of the genitourinary tract (GUT), the number of acini with lesions, cell proliferation (levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA] by immunohistochemistry), p53 and p21 expression (by qPCR) and apoptosis (relative amount of nucleosomes by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) were evaluated. In both age-groups, normal and tumoral prostates take up both forms of iodine, but only I⁻ uptake was blocked by perchlorate. Iodine supplementation prevented the overexpression of NIS in the TRAMP mice, but had no effect on the GUT weight, cell phenotype, proliferation or apoptosis. In TRAMP mice, iodine increased p53 expression but had no effect on p21 (a p53-dependent gene). Our data corroborate NIS involvement in I⁻ uptake and support the notion that another transporter mediates I₂ uptake. Iodine did not prevent cancer progression. This result could be explained by a strong inactivation of the p53 pathway by TAG antigens.

  4. Seminal Vesicle Leiomyoma Mimicking Extra-prostatic Extension of Prostatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Stacy J; Lin, Frank C; Eldersveld, Jordan M; Phung, Michael C; Walker, Jonathan R; Nguyen, Tan T

    2016-05-01

    Leiomyomas are common smooth muscle neoplasms; however, leiomyomas of the seminal vesicles are extremely rare. We report a case of seminal vesicle leiomyoma in a 55-year-old African American male who underwent robot assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) for Gleason 8 (4 + 4) adenocarcinoma. An incidental nodule arising from the left seminal vesicle was discovered during surgery, complicating the surgical dissection and suggesting extra-prostatic extension. The histologic findings in this case raised the possibility that this seminal vesicle leiomyoma may have arisen from a remnant of the mid-portion of the Müllerian duct; however, a thorough immunohistochemical (IHC) workup disproved this theory.

  5. Seminal Vesicle Leiomyoma Mimicking Extra-prostatic Extension of Prostatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Stacy J.; Lin, Frank C.; Eldersveld, Jordan M.; Phung, Michael C.; Walker, Jonathan R.; Nguyen, Tan T.

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas are common smooth muscle neoplasms; however, leiomyomas of the seminal vesicles are extremely rare. We report a case of seminal vesicle leiomyoma in a 55-year-old African American male who underwent robot assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) for Gleason 8 (4 + 4) adenocarcinoma. An incidental nodule arising from the left seminal vesicle was discovered during surgery, complicating the surgical dissection and suggesting extra-prostatic extension. The histologic findings in this case raised the possibility that this seminal vesicle leiomyoma may have arisen from a remnant of the mid-portion of the Müllerian duct; however, a thorough immunohistochemical (IHC) workup disproved this theory. PMID:27169020

  6. Osteogenic differentiation associated with x-ray therapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland

    SciTech Connect

    Locke, J.R.; Soloway, M.S.; Evans, J.; Murphy, W.M.

    1986-03-01

    A case of osteogenic differentiation in a prostate gland associated with high-dose x-irradiation for adenocarcinoma is reported. Heterologous cancerous elements in adults are extremely unusual in the prostate and their occurrence after treatment has rarely been documented. The relationship of this lesion to the primary glandular neoplasm is discussed.

  7. Synchronous prostate and rectal adenocarcinomas irradiation utilising volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sweet Ping; Tran, Thu; Moloney, Philip; Sale, Charlotte; Mathlum, Maitham; Ong, Grace; Lynch, Rod

    2015-12-01

    Cases of synchronous prostate and colorectal adenocarcinomas have been sporadically reported. There are case reports on patients with synchronous prostate and rectal cancers treated with external beam radiotherapy alone or combined with high-dose rate brachytherapy boost to the prostate. Here, we illustrate a patient with synchronous prostate and rectal cancers treated using the volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) technique. The patient was treated with radical radiotherapy to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions to the pelvis, incorporating the involved internal iliac node and the prostate. A boost of 24 Gy in 12 fractions was delivered to the prostate only, using VMAT. Treatment-related toxicities and follow-up prostate-specific antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen were collected for data analysis. At 12 months, the patient achieved complete response for both rectal and prostate cancers without significant treatment-related toxicities. PMID:27512575

  8. Effect of gyromagnetic fields on human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hongen; Xu, Yongde; Guan, Ruili; Li, Meng; Hui, Yu; Gao, Zhezhu; Yang, Bicheng; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the biological effect of gyromagnetic fields (GMFs) on cell proliferation and apoptosis of human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods PC-3 cells were grouped into normal control (NC) and GMF treatment groups. Cell proliferation was analyzed with kit-8 and Ki67 immunofluorescence staining, while cell apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry double staining of Annexin V-PE/7-AAD. The Akt and p38 MAPK/Caspase signaling pathways were analyzed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining, and cell polarization was analyzed with PARD3. Results Cell proliferation and activity of the Akt pathway were significantly decreased by the GMF, while cell apoptosis, activity of p38 MAPK, and PARD3-positive cell number were significantly increased in the GMF group compared to the NC group. Conclusion GMFs inhibit cell proliferation, induce apoptosis, and regulate tumor cell polarity conditions, potentially through down-regulating Akt, activating the p38 MAPK/Caspase pathway, and promoting PARD3 expression in PC-3 cells. PMID:26648740

  9. Prostatic adenocarcinoma with mandibular metastatic lesion: case report.

    PubMed

    Reyes Court, Daniel; Encina, Susana; Levy, Irene

    2007-10-01

    Metastatic lesions of primary tumors, which originate in different parts of the body, comprise almost 1 % of different types of oral cancers. These lesions can affect either bones or soft tissues in the maxillofacial region. Whenever the maxillofacial area is affected, the most common location is in the molar region of the mandible. The clinical presentation of mandibular metastasis follows a clinical pattern characterized by irradiated dental pain in the third molar region. The most frequent sign is parethesia of the area innervated by the mandibular alveolar dental nerve. Differential diagnosis and treatment of these patients can be extremely difficult because there a number of pathologic conditions with similar symptoms and because diagnostic examination can be highly confusing. The aim of this article is to present a case of prostatic adenocarcinoma where the only metastasis was found in the jaw. A literature review will be presented, hoping to contribute to the scarce information regarding this lesion, due to its low frequency and atypical expression of this type of metastasis in terms of etiology, biological behavior and treatment.

  10. JNK and PTEN cooperatively control the development of invasive adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Anette; Mulholland, David J.; Standen, Claire L.; Karasarides, Maria; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Barrett, Tamera; Chi, Hongbo; Greiner, Dale L.; Tournier, Cathy; Sawyers, Charles L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Wu, Hong; Davis, Roger J.

    2012-01-01

    The c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signal transduction pathway is implicated in cancer, but the role of JNK in tumorigenesis is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the JNK signaling pathway reduces the development of invasive adenocarcinoma in the phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) conditional deletion model of prostate cancer. Mice with JNK deficiency in the prostate epithelium (ΔJnk ΔPten mice) develop androgen-independent metastatic prostate cancer more rapidly than control (ΔPten) mice. Similarly, prevention of JNK activation in the prostate epithelium (ΔMkk4 ΔMkk7 ΔPten mice) causes rapid development of invasive adenocarcinoma. We found that JNK signaling defects cause an androgen-independent expansion of the immature progenitor cell population in the primary tumor. The JNK-deficient progenitor cells display increased proliferation and tumorigenic potential compared with progenitor cells from control prostate tumors. These data demonstrate that the JNK and PTEN signaling pathways can cooperate to regulate the progression of prostate neoplasia to invasive adenocarcinoma. PMID:22753496

  11. Fractal Analysis and the Diagnostic Usefulness of Silver Staining Nucleolar Organizer Regions in Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stepan, Alex; Simionescu, Cristiana; Pirici, Daniel; Ciurea, Raluca; Margaritescu, Claudiu

    2015-01-01

    Pathological diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma often requires complementary methods. On prostate biopsy tissue from 39 patients including benign nodular hyperplasia (BNH), atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH), and adenocarcinomas, we have performed combined histochemical-immunohistochemical stainings for argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) and glandular basal cells. After ascertaining the pathology, we have analyzed the number, roundness, area, and fractal dimension of individual AgNORs or of their skeleton-filtered maps. We have optimized here for the first time a combination of AgNOR morphological denominators that would reflect best the differences between these pathologies. The analysis of AgNORs' roundness, averaged from large composite images, revealed clear-cut lower values in adenocarcinomas compared to benign and atypical lesions but with no differences between different Gleason scores. Fractal dimension (FD) of AgNOR silhouettes not only revealed significant lower values for global cancer images compared to AAH and BNH images, but was also able to differentiate between Gleason pattern 2 and Gleason patterns 3–5 adenocarcinomas. Plotting the frequency distribution of the FDs for different pathologies showed clear differences between all Gleason patterns and BNH. Together with existing morphological classifiers, AgNOR analysis might contribute to a faster and more reliable machine-assisted screening of prostatic adenocarcinoma, as an essential aid for pathologists. PMID:26366372

  12. The effect of prolactin on the Dunning R3327H rat prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, A; Slaunwhite, W R

    The Dunning R3327 rat prostatic adenocarcinoma contains specific binding sites for iodo-oPRL (ovine prolactin) in the membrane fraction (100,000 X g pellet). These are normally present at a low level, but immunization with oPRL produces a dramatic increase in tumor binding in either sex (females bear an implant of testosterone propionate pellet). Under these experimental conditions, the ventral prostate of rats bearing the tumors have no detectable PRL receptors. 5 alpha-Reductase activity, on the other hand, is lower in the tumors than in the normal prostates. Immunization also decreased somewhat the rate of growth of the tumors. PMID:6323127

  13. Expansion of prostate epithelial progenitor cells after inflammation of the mouse prostate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Zoetemelk, Marloes; Chitteti, Brahmananda R.; Ratliff, Timothy L.; Myers, Jason D.; Srour, Edward F.; Broxmeyer, Hal

    2015-01-01

    Prostatic inflammation is a nearly ubiquitous pathological feature observed in specimens from benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer patients. The microenvironment of the inflamed prostate is highly reactive, and epithelial hyperplasia is a hallmark feature of inflamed prostates. How inflammation orchestrates epithelial proliferation as part of its repair and recovery action is not well understood. Here, we report that a novel epithelial progenitor cell population is induced to expand during inflammation. We used sphere culture assays, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry to show that this population is increased in bacterially induced inflamed mouse prostates relative to naïve control prostates. We confirmed from previous reports that this population exclusively possesses the ability to regrow entire prostatic structures from single cell culture using renal grafts. In addition, putative progenitor cells harvested from inflamed animals have greater aggregation capacity than those isolated from naïve control prostates. Expansion of this critical cell population requires IL-1 signaling, as IL-1 receptor 1-null mice exhibit inflammation similar to wild-type inflamed animals but exhibit significantly reduced progenitor cell proliferation and hyperplasia. These data demonstrate that inflammation promotes hyperplasia in the mouse prostatic epithelium by inducing the expansion of a selected epithelial progenitor cell population in an IL-1 receptor-dependent manner. These findings may have significant impact on our understanding of how inflammation promotes proliferative diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer, both of which depend on expansion of cells that exhibit a progenitor-like nature. PMID:25925259

  14. Conversion of Prostate Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Carcinoma-Like by Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Borges, Gisely T; Vêncio, Eneida F; Quek, Sue-Ing; Chen, Adeline; Salvanha, Diego M; Vêncio, Ricardo Z N; Nguyen, Holly M; Vessella, Robert L; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Ware, Carol B; Troisch, Pamela; Liu, Alvin Y

    2016-09-01

    The lineage relationship between prostate adenocarcinoma and small cell carcinoma was studied by using the LuCaP family of xenografts established from primary neoplasm to metastasis. Expression of four stem cell transcription factor (TF) genes, LIN28A, NANOG, POU5F1, SOX2, were analyzed in the LuCaP lines. These genes, when force expressed in differentiated cells, can reprogram the recipients into stem-like induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Most LuCaP lines expressed POU5F1, while LuCaP 145.1, representative of small cell carcinoma, expressed all four. Through transcriptome database query, many small cell carcinoma genes were also found in stem cells. To test the hypothesis that prostate cancer progression from "differentiated" adenocarcinoma to "undifferentiated" small cell carcinoma could involve re-expression of stem cell genes, the four TF genes were transduced via lentiviral vectors into five adenocarcinoma LuCaP lines-70CR, 73CR, 86.2, 92, 105CR-as done in iPS cell reprogramming. The resultant cells from these five transductions displayed a morphology of small size and dark appearing unlike the parentals. Transcriptome analysis of LuCaP 70CR* ("*" to denote transfected progeny) revealed a unique gene expression close to that of LuCaP 145.1. In a prostate principal components analysis space based on cell-type transcriptomes, the different LuCaP transcriptome datapoints were aligned to suggest a possible ordered sequence of expression changes from the differentiated luminal-like adenocarcinoma cell types to the less differentiated, more stem-like small cell carcinoma types, and LuCaP 70CR*. Prostate cancer progression can thus be molecularly characterized by loss of differentiation with re-expression of stem cell genes. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2040-2047, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. [A case of ductal adenocarcinoma of prostate associated with retroperitoneal multiple cysts].

    PubMed

    Soda, Tetsuji; Fukumoto, Ryo; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Oka, Daizo; Fujimoto, Nobumasa; Koide, Takuo; Akamaru, Yusuke; Kasugai, Tsutomu

    2012-10-01

    A 61-year-old man came to our hospital with a complaint of lower abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) around his abdominal area showed large multiple cysts in the pelvis suggesting a malignant tumor. He showed high levels of serum carbohydrate antigen 19- 9 (CA19-9) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The complete diagnostic studies, including upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy examinations, failed to demonstrate the presence of alimentary primary tumors. With the diagnosis of cystic tumor in the pelvis, the operation was performed. The cysts adhered firmly to the surrounding organs including bladder and peritonium, which could not be resected completely. A histopathological diagnosis was papillary adenocarcinoma positive for prostate specific antigen (PSA). Because the level of serum PSA was 9.39 ng/ml, prostate biopsy was performed and ductal adenocarcinoma of prostate was revealed. After the operation, the levels of serum CA19-9 and CEA decreased to a normal level. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) was started, and the level of PSA was normalized one month later. Ductal adenocarcinoma forming cysts is rare. We reviewed 15 cases reported in the Japanese literature.

  16. Olaparib With or Without Cediranib in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma With Focal Neuroendocrine Differentiation; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Prostate Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Adenocarcinoma

  17. Computer-aided identification of prostatic adenocarcinoma: Segmentation of glandular structures

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yahui; Jiang, Yulei; Eisengart, Laurie; Healy, Mark A; Straus, Francis H; Yang, Ximing J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Identification of individual prostatic glandular structures is an important prerequisite to quantitative histological analysis of prostate cancer with the aid of a computer. We have developed a computer method to segment individual glandular units and to extract quantitative image features, for computer identification of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Methods: Two sets of digital histology images were used: database I (n = 57) for developing and testing the computer technique, and database II (n = 116) for independent validation. The segmentation technique was based on a k-means clustering and a region-growing method. Computer segmentation results were evaluated subjectively and also compared quantitatively against manual gland outlines, using the Jaccard similarity measure. Quantitative features that were extracted from the computer segmentation results include average gland size, spatial gland density, and average gland circularity. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was used to combine quantitative image features. Classification performance was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: Jaccard similarity coefficients between computer segmentation and manual outlines of individual glands were between 0.63 and 0.72 for non-cancer and between 0.48 and 0.54 for malignant glands, respectively, similar to an interobserver agreement of 0.79 for non-cancer and 0.75 for malignant glands, respectively. The AUC value for the features of average gland size and gland density combined via LDA was 0.91 for database I and 0.96 for database II. Conclusions: Using a computer, we are able to delineate individual prostatic glands automatically and identify prostatic adenocarcinoma accurately, based on the quantitative image features extracted from computer-segmented glandular structures. PMID:21845231

  18. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate.

    PubMed

    Gamat, Melissa; Malinowski, Rita L; Parkhurst, Linnea J; Steinke, Laura M; Marker, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO) to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effect in mediating

  19. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Gamat, Melissa; Malinowski, Rita L.; Parkhurst, Linnea J.; Steinke, Laura M.; Marker, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO) to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effect in mediating

  20. Accumulation of D- vs. L-isomers of alanine and leucine in rat prostatic adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, P.S.; Schmall, B.; Bigler, R.E.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Kleinert, E.; Whitmore, W.F. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    It has been reported that tumor tissue may accumulate some D-amino acids preferentially over the L-isomers. In order to investigate the potential use of carbon-11 labeled amino acid isomers for in vivo tumor studies with positron emission tomography in patients, the tissue distributions of alanine and leucine, substrates for the A-type and L-type amino acid transport systems, respectively, were studied in Copenhagen rates bearing the Dunning R3327G prostatic adenocarcinoma. The authors have previously reported differences in the accumulation of A-type vs. L-type amino acids in rat prostatic adenocarcinoma and normal tissues. All compounds were labeled with C-14 in the carboxyl position with specific activities of 30.0-56.6 mCi/mmol. Higher levels of C-14 activity (Relative Concentration (RC)=dpm found per gm tissue + dpm inject per gm animal mass) were observed in tumor tissue using D-alanine (0.71) compared to L- (0.21) or DL-alanine (0.27) at 45 min post-injection. While tumor/prostate and tumor/liver ratios were above 2 for all three substrates, tumor/blood and tumor/muscle were above one for only the D-isomer. Comparisons made with D-, L-, and DL-leucine also demonstrated a higher level of RC in tumor tissue with the D-isomer (0.84) vs. the L-(0.66) and DL-leucine (0.63). In this case, however, tumor/blood, tumor/prostate, and tumor/muscle ratios were above one for all three substrates, while tumor/liver ratios were below one. These results support the observation of a preferential accumulation of D-amino acids in tumor tissue over the natural L-isomers. Observed differences in the accumulation of the isomers in normal tissues are discussed.

  1. Chromosomal changes in high- and low-invasive mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell strains derived from early passage mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, Linda M. Ensell, Mang X.; Ostvold, Anne-Carine; Baldwin, Kimberly T.; Kashon, Michael L.; Lowry, David T.; Senft, Jamie R.; Jefferson, Amy M.; Johnson, Robert C.; Li Zhi; Tyson, Frederick L.; Reynolds, Steven H.

    2008-11-15

    The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the lung is increasing in the United States, however, the difficulties in obtaining lung cancer families and representative samples of early to late stages of the disease have lead to the study of mouse models for lung cancer. We used Spectral Karyotyping (SKY), mapping with fluorescently labeled genomic clones (FISH), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays, gene expression arrays, Western immunoblot and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to analyze nine pairs of high-invasive and low-invasive tumor cell strains derived from early passage mouse lung adenocarcinoma cells to detect molecular changes associated with tumor invasion. The duplication of chromosomes 1 and 15 and deletion of chromosome 8 were significantly associated with a high-invasive phenotype. The duplication of chromosome 1 at band C4 and E1/2-H1 were the most significant chromosomal changes in the high-invasive cell strains. Mapping with FISH and CGH array further narrowed the minimum region of duplication of chromosome 1 to 71-82 centimorgans (cM). Expression array analysis and confirmation by real time PCR demonstrated increased expression of COX-2, Translin (TB-RBP), DYRK3, NUCKS and Tubulin-{alpha}4 genes in the high-invasive cell strains. Elevated expression and copy number of these genes, which are involved in inflammation, cell movement, proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis and telomere elongation, were associated with an invasive phenotype. Similar linkage groups are altered in invasive human lung adenocarcinoma, implying that the mouse is a valid genetic model for the study of the progression of human lung adenocarcinoma.

  2. Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of Prostate in a 28-Year-Old Male: The outcome is poor in young patients?

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Renu; Singh, Lavleen; Haresh, Kunhi Parambath; Rath, Goura Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is common in older patients. Rarity in younger population limits the study of natural history and prognosis in this population. Most of the published data has reported poor outcome in younger patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Here, we report a case of prostate cancer in 28-year-old male who presented with bone metastasis. After bilateral inguinal orchidectomy, he was started on anti-androgen therapy and received palliative radiotherapy for bone metastasis. There was only a slight decrease in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and pelvic disease post treatment. Subsequently, he was started on opioid analgesics (by World Health Organization, WHO, step ladder) in view of persistent pain. The index case is being presented for its rarity and probable poor outcome in young patients and to stress on the fact that the possibility of primary prostatic adenocarcinoma should be investigated in a male presenting with bone metastasis irrespective of the age. PMID:26009681

  3. Deep RNA sequencing analysis of readthrough gene fusions in human prostate adenocarcinoma and reference samples

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Readthrough fusions across adjacent genes in the genome, or transcription-induced chimeras (TICs), have been estimated using expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries to involve 4-6% of all genes. Deep transcriptional sequencing (RNA-Seq) now makes it possible to study the occurrence and expression levels of TICs in individual samples across the genome. Methods We performed single-end RNA-Seq on three human prostate adenocarcinoma samples and their corresponding normal tissues, as well as brain and universal reference samples. We developed two bioinformatics methods to specifically identify TIC events: a targeted alignment method using artificial exon-exon junctions within 200,000 bp from adjacent genes, and genomic alignment allowing splicing within individual reads. We performed further experimental verification and characterization of selected TIC and fusion events using quantitative RT-PCR and comparative genomic hybridization microarrays. Results Targeted alignment against artificial exon-exon junctions yielded 339 distinct TIC events, including 32 gene pairs with multiple isoforms. The false discovery rate was estimated to be 1.5%. Spliced alignment to the genome was less sensitive, finding only 18% of those found by targeted alignment in 33-nt reads and 59% of those in 50-nt reads. However, spliced alignment revealed 30 cases of TICs with intervening exons, in addition to distant inversions, scrambled genes, and translocations. Our findings increase the catalog of observed TIC gene pairs by 66%. We verified 6 of 6 predicted TICs in all prostate samples, and 2 of 5 predicted novel distant gene fusions, both private events among 54 prostate tumor samples tested. Expression of TICs correlates with that of the upstream gene, which can explain the prostate-specific pattern of some TIC events and the restriction of the SLC45A3-ELK4 e4-e2 TIC to ERG-negative prostate samples, as confirmed in 20 matched prostate tumor and normal samples and 9 lung cancer

  4. Impact of Prostate Inflammation on Lesion Development in the POET3+Pten+/− Mouse Model of Prostate Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Burcham, Grant N.; Cresswell, Gregory M.; Snyder, Paul W.; Chen, Long; Liu, Xiaoqi; Crist, Scott A.; Henry, Michael D.; Ratliff, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence linking prostatitis and prostate cancer development is contradictory. To study this link, the POET3 mouse, an inducible model of prostatitis, was crossed with a Pten-loss model of prostate cancer (Pten+/−) containing the ROSA26 luciferase allele to monitor prostate size. Prostatitis was induced, and prostate bioluminescence was tracked over 12 months, with lesion development, inflammation, and cytokine expression analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 months and compared with mice without induction of prostatitis. Acute prostatitis led to more proliferative epithelium and enhanced bioluminescence. However, 4 months after initiation of prostatitis, mice with induced inflammation had lower grade pre-neoplastic lesions. A trend existed toward greater development of carcinoma 12 months after induction of inflammation, including one of two mice with carcinoma developing perineural invasion. Two of 18 mice at the later time points developed lesions with similarities to proliferative inflammatory atrophy, including one mouse with associated carcinoma. Pten+/− mice developed spontaneous inflammation, and prostatitis was similar among groups of mice at 8 and 12 months. Analyzed as one cohort, lesion number and grade were positively correlated with prostatitis. Specifically, amounts of CD11b+Gr1+ cells were correlated with lesion development. These results support the hypothesis that myeloid-based inflammation is associated with lesion development in the murine prostate, and previous bouts of CD8-driven prostatitis may promote invasion in the Pten+/− model of cancer. PMID:25455686

  5. Impact of prostate inflammation on lesion development in the POET3(+)Pten(+/-) mouse model of prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Burcham, Grant N; Cresswell, Gregory M; Snyder, Paul W; Chen, Long; Liu, Xiaoqi; Crist, Scott A; Henry, Michael D; Ratliff, Timothy L

    2014-12-01

    Evidence linking prostatitis and prostate cancer development is contradictory. To study this link, the POET3 mouse, an inducible model of prostatitis, was crossed with a Pten-loss model of prostate cancer (Pten(+/-)) containing the ROSA26 luciferase allele to monitor prostate size. Prostatitis was induced, and prostate bioluminescence was tracked over 12 months, with lesion development, inflammation, and cytokine expression analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 months and compared with mice without induction of prostatitis. Acute prostatitis led to more proliferative epithelium and enhanced bioluminescence. However, 4 months after initiation of prostatitis, mice with induced inflammation had lower grade pre-neoplastic lesions. A trend existed toward greater development of carcinoma 12 months after induction of inflammation, including one of two mice with carcinoma developing perineural invasion. Two of 18 mice at the later time points developed lesions with similarities to proliferative inflammatory atrophy, including one mouse with associated carcinoma. Pten(+/-) mice developed spontaneous inflammation, and prostatitis was similar among groups of mice at 8 and 12 months. Analyzed as one cohort, lesion number and grade were positively correlated with prostatitis. Specifically, amounts of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells were correlated with lesion development. These results support the hypothesis that myeloid-based inflammation is associated with lesion development in the murine prostate, and previous bouts of CD8-driven prostatitis may promote invasion in the Pten(+/-) model of cancer.

  6. The detection and upgrade rates of prostate adenocarcinoma following transperineal template-guided prostate biopsy – a tertiary referral centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Telford, Robert; Viney, Richard; Patel, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We aim to present transperineal template-guided prostate biopsy (template biopsy) outcomes at a tertiary referral centre. Furthermore, to identify the detection rate of prostate cancer in those with a previous negative transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy and the upgrade rate of those on active surveillance for Gleason 3 + 3 = 6 prostate adenocarcinoma. Material and methods We conducted a prospective study of 200 consecutive men who underwent template biopsy over a 22-month period in a tertiary referral centre, using a standard 24 region template prostate biopsy technique. Indications and histology results, as well as complications, were recorded. Results Median age was 67 years and median PSA was 10 ng/mL. Overall detection rate was 47%. 39.5% of cases with previous negative transrectal biopsies were found to have prostate adenocarcinoma. 47.5% of cases on active surveillance for Gleason 3 + 3 = 6 prostate adenocarcinoma were upgraded. The most frequent complication was acute urinary retention at a rate of 12.5%, however, the use of a single prophylactic dose of tamsulosin was found to be beneficial, with 13 cases needed to treat to prevent one episode. Conclusions Template biopsies are safe and efficacious with an overall detection rate of 47% in the present series. Due to the high detection rate, one must consider template biopsy following one negative transrectal biopsy where there is persistent clinical suspicion. Furthermore, those considering active surveillance for Gleason 3 + 3 = 6 disease should be offered template biopsy to confirm the grade of their disease. PMID:27123325

  7. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2-ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for

  8. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization

    PubMed Central

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2–ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for

  9. Response and resistance to NF-κB inhibitors in mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen; Meylan, Etienne; Oliver, Trudy G.; Feldser, David M.; Winslow, Monte M.; Bronson, Roderick; Jacks, Tyler

    2011-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is a frequently diagnosed cancer type and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. We recently demonstrated in an autochthonous mouse model of this disease that genetic inhibition of the NF-κB pathway affects both the initiation and maintenance of lung cancer, identifying this pathway as a promising therapeutic target. In this study, we tested the efficacy of small molecule NF-κB inhibitors in mouse models of lung cancer. In murine lung adenocarcinoma cell lines with high NF-κB activity, the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib efficiently reduced nuclear p65, repressed NF-κB target genes and rapidly induced apoptosis. Bortezomib also induced lung tumor regression in vivo and prolonged the survival of tumor bearing KrasLSL-G12D/wt;p53flox/flox mice. In contrast, KrasG12D/wt lung tumors, which have low levels of nuclear NF-κB, do not respond to Bortezomib, suggesting that nuclear NF-κB may be a biomarker to predict treatment response to drugs of this class. Following repeated treatment, initially sensitive lung tumors became resistant to Bortezomib. A second NF-κB inhibitor, Bay-117082, showed similar therapeutic efficacy and acquired-resistance in mice. Our results using preclinical mouse models support the NF-κB pathway as a potential therapeutic target for a defined subset of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:21874163

  10. Gray level entropy matrix is a superior predictor than multiplex ELISA in the detection of reactive stroma and metastatic potential of high-grade prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaopeng; Sun, Yanan; Wang, Baozhi

    2014-12-01

    Recent reports have indicated that not only the primary glandular tissue but also the surrounding stromal tissue plays an active role in the progression of carcinoma. Such is true for cancer tissues arising in the prostate. However, the precise role of stromal tissue in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate adenocarcinoma is not well described. We undertook this current investigation to examine the changes in orientation of the extracellular matrix and correlate with prostatic cancer progression. We used a novel form of image analysis called gray level entropy matrix (GLEM) texture analysis to evaluate morphometric changes in stromal tissues. We used normal prostatic tissue obtained from cadaveric specimen and compared with BPH, prostatic intraepithelium neoplastic, hormone responsive prostatic adenocarcinoma and castration-resistant prostatic adenocarcinoma tissues. GLEM showed higher entropy in disease-resistant prostatic tissues, compared with benign forms of all spectra of pathologically diagnosed prostatic tissues (P < 0.05, ANOVA, between groups). Higher entropy is reflective of the disorganized morphological organization of the stroma, possibly reflecting the reactive matrix. In contrast, ELISA revealed that although individually correlated with the progressive stages of benign and carcinomatous prostatic tissues and trend correlation between groups, intergroup comparisons failed to arrive at statistical significance of comparisons between markers of neovasculogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (beta1-integrin, E-cadherin, MMP3) and osteogenic metastasis (RANKL and osteoprotegerin). The results of our study demonstrate the potential of GLEM entropy of gray level pixel in providing quasiquantitative estimate of a reactive stroma in advance stages of prostatic adenocarcinoma and thus can be routinely used in clinical decision making.

  11. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Key statistics for prostate cancer What is prostate cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  12. Pomegranate ellagitannin-derived metabolites inhibit prostate cancer growth and localize to the mouse prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Seeram, Navindra P; Aronson, William J; Zhang, Yanjun; Henning, Susanne M; Moro, Aune; Lee, Ru-Po; Sartippour, Maryam; Harris, Diane M; Rettig, Matthew; Suchard, Marc A; Pantuck, Allan J; Belldegrun, Arie; Heber, David

    2007-09-19

    Our group has shown in a phase II clinical trial that pomegranate juice (PJ) increases prostate specific antigen (PSA) doubling time in prostate cancer (CaP) patients with a rising PSA. Ellagitannins (ETs) are the most abundant polyphenols present in PJ and contribute greatly towards its reported biological properties. On consumption, ETs hydrolyze to release ellagic acid (EA), which is then converted by gut microflora to 3,8-dihydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b, d]pyran-6-one (urolithin A, UA) derivatives. Despite the accumulating knowledge of ET metabolism in animals and humans, there is no available data on the pharmacokinetics and tissue disposition of urolithins. Using a standardized ET-enriched pomegranate extract (PE), we sought to further define the metabolism and tissue distribution of ET metabolites. PE and UA (synthesized in our laboratory) were administered to C57BL/6 wild-type male mice, and metabolite levels in plasma and tissues were determined over 24 h. ET metabolites were concentrated at higher levels in mouse prostate, colon, and intestinal tissues as compared to other tissues after administration of PE or UA. We also evaluated the effects of PE on CaP growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice injected subcutaneously with human CaP cells (LAPC-4). PE significantly inhibited LAPC-4 xenograft growth in SCID mice as compared to vehicle control. Finally, EA and several synthesized urolithins were shown to inhibit the growth of human CaP cells in vitro. The chemopreventive potential of pomegranate ETs and localization of their bioactive metabolites in mouse prostate tissue suggest that pomegranate may play a role in CaP treatment and chemoprevention. This warrants future human tissue bioavailability studies and further clinical studies in men with CaP.

  13. Novel In Vivo Model for Combinatorial Fluorescence Labeling in Mouse Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiaolan; Gyabaah, Kenneth; Nickkholgh, Bita; Cline, J. Mark; Balaji, K.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The epithelial layer of prostate glands contains several types of cells, including luminal and basal cells. Yet there is paucity of animal models to study the cellular origin of normal or neoplastic development in the prostate to facilitate the treatment of heterogenous prostate diseases by targeting individual cell lineages. METHODS We developed a mouse model that expresses different types of fluorescent proteins (XFPs) specifically in prostatic cells. Using an in vivo stochastic fluorescent protein combinatorial strategy, XFP signals were expressed specifically in prostate of Protein Kinase D1 (PKD1) knock-out, K-RasG12D knock-in, and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and PKD1 double knock-out mice under the control of PB-Cre promoter. RESULTS In vivo XFP signals were observed in prostate of PKD1 knock-out, K-RasG12D knock-in, and PTEN PKD1 double knock-out mice, which developed normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic prostate, respectively. The patchy expression pattern of XFPs in neoplasia tissue indicated the clonal origin of cancer cells in the prostate. CONCLUSIONS The transgenic mouse models demonstrate combinatorial fluorescent protein expression in normal and cancerous prostatic tissues. This novel prostate-specific fluorescent labeled mouse model, which we named Prorainbow, could be useful in studying benign and malignant pathology of prostate. PMID:25753731

  14. Contractions of the mouse prostate elicited by acetylcholine are mediated by M(3) muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    White, Carl W; Short, Jennifer L; Haynes, John M; Matsui, Minoru; Ventura, Sabatino

    2011-12-01

    Increased smooth muscle tone in the human prostate contributes to the symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia. In the mouse prostate gland, cholinergic innervation is responsible for a component of the nerve-mediated contractile response. This study investigates the muscarinic receptor subtype responsible for the cholinergic contractile response in the mouse prostate gland. To characterize the muscarinic receptor subtype, mouse prostates taken from wild-type or M(3) muscarinic receptor knockout mice were mounted in organ baths. The isometric force that tissues developed in response to electrical-field stimulation or exogenously applied cholinergic agonists in the presence or absence of a range of muscarinic receptor antagonists was evaluated. Carbachol elicited reproducible and concentration-dependent contractions of the isolated mouse prostate, which were antagonized by the presence of muscarinic receptor antagonists. Calculation of antagonist affinities (pA(2) values) indicated a rank order of antagonist potencies in the mouse prostate of: darifenacin (9.08) = atropine (9.07) = 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (9.02) > cyclohexyl-hydroxy-phenyl-(3-piperidin-1-ylpropyl)silane (7.85) > cyclohexyl-(4-fluorophenyl)-hydroxy-(3-piperidin-1-ylpropyl)silane (7.39) > himbacine (7.19) > pirenzipine (6.88) > methoctramine (6.20). Furthermore, genetic deletion of the M(3) muscarinic receptor inhibited prostatic contractions to electrical-field stimulation or exogenous administration of acetylcholine. In this study we identified that the cholinergic component of contraction in the mouse prostate is mediated by the M(3) muscarinic receptor subtype. Pharmacological antagonism of the M(3) muscarinic receptor may be a beneficial additional target for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia in the human prostate gland.

  15. Mutational landscape of EGFR-, MYC-, and Kras-driven genetically engineered mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, David G.; Politi, Katerina; Bhutkar, Arjun; Chen, Frances K.; Song, Xiaoling; Pirun, Mono; Santiago, Philip M.; Kim-Kiselak, Caroline; Platt, James T.; Lee, Emily; Hodges, Emily; Rosebrock, Adam P.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Jacks, Tyler; Varmus, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of cancer are increasingly being used to assess putative driver mutations identified by large-scale sequencing of human cancer genomes. To accurately interpret experiments that introduce additional mutations, an understanding of the somatic genetic profile and evolution of GEMM tumors is necessary. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing of tumors from three GEMMs of lung adenocarcinoma driven by mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras), or overexpression of MYC proto-oncogene. Tumors from EGFR- and Kras-driven models exhibited, respectively, 0.02 and 0.07 nonsynonymous mutations per megabase, a dramatically lower average mutational frequency than observed in human lung adenocarcinomas. Tumors from models driven by strong cancer drivers (mutant EGFR and Kras) harbored few mutations in known cancer genes, whereas tumors driven by MYC, a weaker initiating oncogene in the murine lung, acquired recurrent clonal oncogenic Kras mutations. In addition, although EGFR- and Kras-driven models both exhibited recurrent whole-chromosome DNA copy number alterations, the specific chromosomes altered by gain or loss were different in each model. These data demonstrate that GEMM tumors exhibit relatively simple somatic genotypes compared with human cancers of a similar type, making these autochthonous model systems useful for additive engineering approaches to assess the potential of novel mutations on tumorigenesis, cancer progression, and drug sensitivity. PMID:27702896

  16. Erlotinib resistance in mouse models of epidermal growth factor receptor-induced lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Katerina; Fan, Pang-Dian; Shen, Ronglai; Zakowski, Maureen; Varmus, Harold

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Seventy-five percent of lung adenocarcinomas with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations respond to treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib; however, drug-resistant tumors eventually emerge. In 60% of cases, resistant tumors carry a secondary mutation in EGFR (T790M), amplification of MET, or both. Here, we describe the establishment of erlotinib resistance in lung tumors, which were induced by mutant EGFR, in transgenic mice after multiple cycles of drug treatment; we detect the T790M mutation in five out of 24 tumors or Met amplification in one out of 11 tumors in these mice. This preclinical mouse model, therefore, recapitulates the molecular changes responsible for resistance to TKIs in human tumors and holds promise for the discovery of additional mechanisms of drug resistance in lung cancer. PMID:20007486

  17. Erlotinib resistance in mouse models of epidermal growth factor receptor-induced lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Politi, Katerina; Fan, Pang-Dian; Shen, Ronglai; Zakowski, Maureen; Varmus, Harold

    2010-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of lung adenocarcinomas with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations respond to treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib; however, drug-resistant tumors eventually emerge. In 60% of cases, resistant tumors carry a secondary mutation in EGFR (T790M), amplification of MET, or both. Here, we describe the establishment of erlotinib resistance in lung tumors, which were induced by mutant EGFR, in transgenic mice after multiple cycles of drug treatment; we detect the T790M mutation in five out of 24 tumors or Met amplification in one out of 11 tumors in these mice. This preclinical mouse model, therefore, recapitulates the molecular changes responsible for resistance to TKIs in human tumors and holds promise for the discovery of additional mechanisms of drug resistance in lung cancer.

  18. Gross Findings of Widespread Visceral Metastasis of Prostatic Adenocarcinoma With Neuroendocrine Features: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Habibian, David J; Dao, Alexander E; Kumar, Shauna; Schiff, Jeffrey; Kosinski, Kaitlin E; Katz, Aaron E

    2016-09-01

    Although prostate cancer is common in the western world and is associated with favorable overall survival, neuroendocrine prostate cancer is difficult to detect and is known to aggressively metastasize throughout the body. This subset of disease thus has a poor prognosis, and early detection and treatment of neuroendocrine prostate cancer may increase overall survival. We present a case of a now deceased 63 year old male with extensive epicardial, respiratory, hepato-bilary, adrenal, genitourinary, and osseous tissue metastasis. PMID:27489779

  19. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-05-01

    From 1971--1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF{sub 1} mice irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. Absence of any of these fragments on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. Tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southern blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, 1 of 6 tumors from {gamma}-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice showed a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5{prime} region of the mRb gene.

  20. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1993-04-01

    From 1971 to 1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF{sub 1} mice irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons; normal and tumor tissues from mice in these studies were preserved in paraffin blocks. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been developed to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene in the paraffin-embedded tissues. Microtomed sections were used as the DNA source in PCR reaction mixtures. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. The absence of any of these fragments (relative to control PCR products) on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. The tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice (569 cGy of {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays or 60 cGy of JANUS neutrons, doses that have been found to have approximately equal biological effectiveness in the BCF, mouse) were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies, all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southem blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, I of 6 tumors from {gamma}-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice had a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5{prime} region of the mRb gene.

  1. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    From 1971 to 1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF[sub 1] mice irradiated with [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons; normal and tumor tissues from mice in these studies were preserved in paraffin blocks. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been developed to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene in the paraffin-embedded tissues. Microtomed sections were used as the DNA source in PCR reaction mixtures. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. The absence of any of these fragments (relative to control PCR products) on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. The tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice (569 cGy of [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays or 60 cGy of JANUS neutrons, doses that have been found to have approximately equal biological effectiveness in the BCF, mouse) were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies, all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southem blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, I of 6 tumors from [gamma]-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice had a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5[prime] region of the mRb gene.

  2. Progression and survival in prostatic adenocarcinoma: a comparison of clinical stage, Gleason grade, S-phase fraction and DNA ploidy.

    PubMed

    Vesalainen, S; Nordling, S; Lipponen, P; Talja, M; Syrjänen, K

    1994-08-01

    Clinical data were reviewed in 325 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma followed up for a mean of 13 years. Paraffin-embedded tumour biopsy specimens from the primary tumours were available for flow cytometry (FCM) in 273 cases. Intra-tumour heterogeneity in DNA index (DI) was found in 4% of the tumours (54 cases were analysed). S-phase fraction (SPF) and DNA ploidy were significantly interrelated. Aneuploidy and high SPF were significantly related to both a high T category and high Gleason score. The progression in T1-2M0 tumours was related to Gleason score (P = 0.009), DNA ploidy (P = 0.006) and SPF (P = 0.007), while the Gleason score (P = 0.0013), DNA ploidy (P = 0.002) and SPF (P < 0.001) had prognostic value in univariate survival analysis. In the entire cohort, the T category (P < 0.001), M category (P < 0.001), Gleason score (P < 0.001), DNA ploidy (P < 0.001) and SPF (P < 0.001) were significant prognostic factors. In Cox's analysis, the M category (P < 0.001), Gleason score (P < 0.001), T category (P = 0.003), age (P = 0.001) and SPF (P = 0.087) were independently related to prognosis. In the T1-2M0 tumours, Gleason score (P < 0.001), T category (P = 0.022) and SPF (P = 0.058) were independent predictors. A novel classification system in which the DNA ploidy or SPF and the Gleason score were combined was found to be of significant prognostic value in all M0 tumours (P < 0.001). The results suggest that FCM can be used as an adjunct to conventional histological assessments for determination of the correct prognostic category in prostatic adenocarcinoma.

  3. Anti-Tumor Effect of the Alphavirus-based Virus-like Particle Vector Expressing Prostate-Specific Antigen in a HLA-DR Transgenic Mouse Model of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riabov, V.; Tretyakova, I.; Alexander, R. B.; Pushko, P.; Klyushnenkova, E. N.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if an alphavirus-based vaccine encoding human Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) could generate an effective anti-tumor immune response in a stringent mouse model of prostate cancer. DR2bxPSA F1 male mice expressing human PSA and HLA-DRB1*1501 transgenes were vaccinated with virus-like particle vector encoding PSA (VLPV-PSA) followed by the challenge with Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate cells engineered to express PSA (TRAMP-PSA). PSA-specific cellular and humoral immune responses were measured before and after tumor challenge. PSA and CD8 reactivity in the tumors was detected by immunohistochemistry. Tumor growth was compared in vaccinated and control groups. We found that VLPV-PSA could infect mouse dendritic cells in vitro and induce a robust PSA-specific immune response in vivo. A substantial proportion of splenic CD8+ T cells (19.6±7.4%) produced IFNγ in response to the immunodominant peptide PSA65–73. In the blood of vaccinated mice, 18.4±4.1% of CD8+ T cells were PSA-specific as determined by the staining with H-2Db/PSA65–73 dextramers. VLPV-PSA vaccination also strongly stimulated production of IgG2a/b anti-PSA antibodies. Tumors in vaccinated mice showed low levels of PSA expression and significant CD8 T cell infiltration. Tumor growth in VLPV-PSA vaccinated mice was significantly delayed at early time points (p=0.002, Gehan-Breslow test). Our data suggest that TC-83-based VLPV-PSA vaccine can efficiently overcome immune tolerance to PSA, mediate rapid clearance of PSA-expressing tumor cells and delay tumor growth. The VLPV-PSA vaccine will undergo further testing for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer. PMID:26319744

  4. Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Prostatic Adenocarcinoma: Correlation with Tumor Grading and Treatment-Related Changes

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Bruno Jim; Ginori, Alessandro; Barone, Aurora; Calandra, Calogera; Crivelli, Filippo; De Falco, Giulia; Gazaneo, Sara; Tripodi, Sergio; Cevenini, Gabriele; del Vecchio, Maria Teresa; Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death. The androgen deprivation therapy is the standard treatment for advanced stages. Unfortunately, virtually all tumors become resistant to androgen withdrawal. The progression to castration-resistance is not fully understood, although a recent paper has suggested translationally controlled tumor protein to be implicated in the process. The present study was designed to investigate the role of this protein in prostate cancer, focusing on the correlation between its expression level with tumor differentiation and response to treatment. We retrieved 292 prostatic cancer specimens; of these 153 had been treated only by radical prostatectomy and 139 had undergone radical prostatectomy after neoadjuvant treatment with combined androgen blockade therapy. Non-neoplastic controls were represented by 102 prostatic peripheral zone specimens. In untreated patients, the expression of the protein, evaluated by RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry, was significantly higher in tumor specimens than in non-neoplastic control, increasing as Gleason pattern and score progressed. In treated prostates, the staining was correlated with the response to treatment. An association between protein expression and the main clinicopathological factors involved in prostate cancer aggressiveness was identified. These findings suggest that the protein may be a promising prognostic factor and a target for therapy. PMID:25667934

  5. Effect of perphenazine on growth and /sup 65/Zn uptake of the rat prostatic adenocarcinoma, R 3327

    SciTech Connect

    Rosoff, B.; Diamond, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    Prolactin affects the growth and function of both normal and carcinatomous prostate tissue. Therefore, the effect of modifying prolactin secretion on the growth of the adenocarcinoma of the rat prostate (R3327) was studied, utilizing chronic administration of the dopamine antagonist perphenazine. At 4 and 8 weeks after tumor inoculation, perphenazine (0.5 and 1.0 mg per dose) was injected for 12-16 weeks. Tumors weighed at autopsy showed that the 0.5 mg dose resulted in significantly smaller and the 1.0 mg dose, in significantly larger tumors than the controls. Perphenazine at both doses increased serum prolactin, but the increase was greater when 0.5 mg was administered. There was a higher uptake of /sup 65/Zn when the tumor growth was inhibited as in the animal receiving 0.5 mg of perphenazine. Several possible explanations are offered for the results, including the fact that prolactin might follow a bell-shaped curve in its effect on the tumor and that perphenazine might have other mechanisms of action besides dopamine antagonism.

  6. Adenocarcinoma of the prostrate

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, A.W.; Trachtenberg, J.

    1987-01-01

    This books contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Imaging Techniques in the Diagnosis and Pelvic Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Radiotherapy; The Case for External Beam Radiotherapy of Certain Adenocarcinomas of the Prostate; and Chemotherapy of Prostatic Cancer.

  7. Identification of isolated and early prostatic adenocarcinoma in radical prostatectomy specimens with correlation to biopsy cores: clinical and pathogenetic significance.

    PubMed

    Mai, Kien T; Landry, Denise C; Yazdi, Hossein M; Stinson, William A; Perkins, D Garth; Morash, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    Prostatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is a multifocal disease. In this study, we identified isolated and small foci of PAC (ISPAC) in radical prostatectomy specimens, described the histopathologic features, investigated their zonal distribution in the prostate and their relationship with large tumor nodules, and correlated the findings with those of preceding biopsy cores. One hundred and thirty radical prostatectomy specimens performed for PAC or for urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder with incidental PAC were reviewed for identification of ISPAC. Prostates were serially sectioned in the horizontal plane and submitted in toto for microscopic examination. ISPAC were defined as foci of PAC measuring less than 3 mm in maximum diameter. There were 461 ISPAC identified in 114 cases. They were distributed in the transitional zone (TZ) (18 foci), the apex (73 foci), the anterior horn of the non-TZ (NTZ) (118 foci), the base (8 foci), and the remaining NTZ (244 foci). ISPAC usually consisted of groups of small acini with a GS ranging from 2 to 7 (3 + 4). GSs of ISPAC consisted of single grade or two consecutive grades equal to or lower than those of the main PAC. ISPAC were more often located in close proximity to large tumor nodules. The number of ISPAC increased with the tumor volume up to 3 cm3, then decreased as the PAC became more extensive (p value = 0.02, statistically significant). Prostates with NTZ PAC <1.5 cm3 and TZ PAC or prostates containing 4 or more than 4 ISPAC tended to be frequently associated with small foci of PAC in biopsy cores In this study, we identified ISPAC that likely represent foci of PAC in early development and account for the multicentricity and heterogeneity of PAC. ISPAC in the NTZ were common and may account for small foci of PAC or atypia in biopsy cores. Although these small foci of PAC or atypia in biopsy cores without accompanying higher GS PAC were often associated with significant PAC, they may also occasionally represent

  8. PD-1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 expression in mouse prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shijie; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Wang, Alun R; You, Zongbing

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and its ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2 play critical roles in maintaining an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. The purpose of the present study was to assess expression of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 in mouse prostate tumors. A total of 33 mouse prostate tumors derived from Pten-null mice were examined using immunohistochemical staining for PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2. The animals were either with interleukin-17 receptor c (Il-17rc) wild-type or knockout genotype, or fed with regular diet or high-fat diet to 30 weeks of age. We found that Il-17rc wild-type mouse prostate tumors had significantly higher levels of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 than Il-17rc knockout mouse prostate tumors. High-fat diet-induced obese mice had significantly higher levels of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 in their prostate tumors than lean mice fed with regular diet. Increased expression of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 was associated with increased number of invasive prostate tumors formed in the Il-17rc wild-type and obese mice compared to the Il-17rc knockout and lean mice, respectively. Our findings suggest that expression of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 may enhance development of mouse prostate cancer through creating an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

  9. Differences in toxicity and outcome associated with circadian variations between patients undergoing daytime and evening radiotherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Feng-Ming; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Wang, Chia-Chun; Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Tsai, Yu-Chieh; Yu, Hong-Jeng; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study tested the hypothesis that disease control and treatment-related toxicity in patients undergoing high-dose radiotherapy (HDRT) for prostate cancer varies in a circadian manner. Patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma receiving HDRT (median 78 Gy) to the prostate and involved seminal vesicle(s) without elective pelvic irradiation were divided into a daytime treatment (before 5 PM) group (n = 267) and evening treatment (after 5 PM) group (n = 142). Biochemical failure (Phoenix definition), acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary toxicities (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4), biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) and freedom from late toxicity were assessed. Analyses were performed by binary logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard regression. The median follow-up was 68 months, and 75% of patients were ≥70 years old. Evening HDRT was significantly associated with worse freedom from ≥grade 2 late GI complications (hazard ratio = 2.96; p < 0.001). The detrimental effect of evening HDRT was significant in patients older than 70 years old (p < 0.001) but not in younger patients (p = 0.63). In a subgroup of propensity score-matched cohort with T2b-T3 disease (n = 154), the 5-year BFFS was worse in the evening group than the daytime group (72% vs. 85%, hazard ratio = 1.95, p = 0.05). Our study indicates that evening HDRT may lead to more GI complications, especially in older patients, and worse BFFS in patients with T2b-T3 disease. PMID:26818960

  10. Lectin-binding sites in epithelial cells of the mouse prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, Kentaro; Yoshida, Ayaka; Muragishi, Ryoki; Yoshinaga, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    The prostate is an exocrine gland in the male reproductive tract that secretes seminal fluids. To gain insight into the cytochemical properties of prostatic epithelial cells, the characteristics of glycoconjugates in mouse prostate sections were examined by lectin histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Characteristic staining patterns were observed, depending on the type of lectins present in the epithelia. Luminal cells reacted specifically with mannose-binding lectins (Galanthus nivalis lectin, Hippeastrum hybrid lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin) and Maclura pomifera lectin in all lobes of the prostate. Luminal cells also expressed galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), and fucose residues in the lateral and ventral lobes. Basal cells expressed GlcNAc and fucose, and reacted with Datura stramonium lectin and Aleuria aurantia lectin in all lobes. These results indicate that in the mouse prostate, the selectivity of lectin-binding sites for distinct cell types and lobe-dependent staining may relate to cellular and regional differences in function. Furthermore, some lectins selectively bound to prostatic epithelial cells, indicating their potential use as markers for the histopathological evaluation of prostatic diseases, cancer diagnosis, or male infertility. PMID:26004072

  11. Dietary gamma-linolenate attenuates tumor growth in a rodent model of prostatic adenocarcinoma via suppression of elevated generation of PGE(2) and 5S-HETE.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung; Vang, Kao; Ziboh, Vincent A

    2006-04-01

    Prostate cancer poses considerable threat to the aging male population as it has become a leading cause of cancer death to this group. Due to the complexity of this age-related disease, the mechanism(s) and factors resulting in prostate cancer remain unclear. Reports showing an increase risk in prostatic cancer with increasing dietary fat are contrasted by other studies suggesting the beneficial effects of certain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in the modulation of tumor development. The n-6 PUFA, gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), has been shown to suppress tumor growth in vitro. Therefore, using the Lobund-Wistar (L-W) rat model of prostate cancer, we tested the hypothesis whether dietary supplementation of GLA could suppress tumor growth and development in vivo. Prostatic adenocarcinomas were induced in two groups of L-W rats, the experimental group (N-nitroso-N-methylurea, NMU/testosterone propionate, TP) and the GLA group (NMU/TP/GLA fed) undergoing similar treatment but fed a purified diet supplemented with GLA. Our findings revealed a decrease in prostate growth in the NMU/TP/GLA-fed group as determined by weight, tissue size, DNA content and prostate-specific antigen (tumor marker of prostate cancer). Comparison between the two groups showed a significant increase in 5S-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and prostaglandin E(2) in the NMU/TP group. These increases paralleled the increased protein expression and activity of cyclooxygenase-2 as well as increased activity of 5-lipoxygenase. Taken together, the findings showed that intake of GLA-enriched diet does reduce prostatic cancer development in L-W rats and could serve as a non-toxic adjunct in management of human prostatic cancer. PMID:16567086

  12. Efficacy of targeted AKT inhibition in genetically engineered mouse models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    De Velasco, Marco A; Kura, Yurie; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Kazuto; Davies, Barry R; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2016-03-29

    The PI3K/AKT pathway is frequently altered in advanced human prostate cancer mainly through the loss of functional PTEN, and presents as potential target for personalized therapy. Our aim was to determine the therapeutic potential of the pan-AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. Here we used a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer to evaluate the in vivo pharmacodynamic and antitumor activity of AZD5363 in castration-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer. An additional GEM model, based on the concomitant inactivation of PTEN and Trp53 (P53), was established as an aggressive model of advanced prostate cancer and was used to further evaluate clinically relevant endpoints after treatment with AZD5363. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated that AZD5363 effectively inhibited downstream targets of AKT. AZD5363 monotherapy significantly reduced growth of tumors in castration-naïve and castration-resistant models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. More importantly, AZD5363 significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival and progression-free survival in PTEN/P53 double knockout mice. Our findings demonstrate that AZD5363 is effective against GEM models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer and provide lines of evidence to support further investigation into the development of treatment strategies targeting AKT for the treatment of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

  13. Efficacy of targeted AKT inhibition in genetically engineered mouse models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Velasco, Marco A.; Kura, Yurie; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Kazuto; Davies, Barry R.; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2016-01-01

    The PI3K/AKT pathway is frequently altered in advanced human prostate cancer mainly through the loss of functional PTEN, and presents as potential target for personalized therapy. Our aim was to determine the therapeutic potential of the pan-AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. Here we used a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer to evaluate the in vivo pharmacodynamic and antitumor activity of AZD5363 in castration-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer. An additional GEM model, based on the concomitant inactivation of PTEN and Trp53 (P53), was established as an aggressive model of advanced prostate cancer and was used to further evaluate clinically relevant endpoints after treatment with AZD5363. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated that AZD5363 effectively inhibited downstream targets of AKT. AZD5363 monotherapy significantly reduced growth of tumors in castration-naïve and castration-resistant models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. More importantly, AZD5363 significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival and progression-free survival in PTEN/P53 double knockout mice. Our findings demonstrate that AZD5363 is effective against GEM models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer and provide lines of evidence to support further investigation into the development of treatment strategies targeting AKT for the treatment of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. PMID:26910118

  14. Clinical applications of IMRT to adenocarcinoma of the prostate: Portal dose verification and intensity modulated neutron radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Santanam, Lakshmi

    2005-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) provides an improvement in the conformality of radiotherapy dose distributions. Its application to photon radiotherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma is well established. A quality assurance tool for verifying photon IMRT treatment and the potential application of intensity modulation to neutron radiotherapy (IMNRT) to prostate cancer are investigated here. This study evaluates the use of an amorphous silicon flat panel imager for dose verification of photon IMRT fields. Various correction factors were developed to allow accurate estimation of the absorbed dose using this portal imager. The ratio of the dose measured with the portal imager to that measured using an ionization chamber was found to be 0.991{+-}0.026 for 23 measured IMRT fields. The study also yielded an accurate estimate of the relative beamlet intensity (fluence) at the plane of the detector. The raw difference between the relative beamlet intensity predicted by the EPID and that of the planning system for 23 IMRT fields was found to be -0.65{+-}2.69. These results demonstrate the capabilities of this imager as a robust IMRT quality assurance tool. An in-house optimization algorithm was used to optimize forward planned segments for the treatment of prostate cancer using IMNRT. The applicability of two different algorithms was investigated for IMNRT dose calculation, namely, the differential scatter air ratio (DSAR) and the finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithms. Measured profiles and absolute point doses were compared to results calculated by the treatment planning system. Dual ion-chamber measurements were performed to determine the individual neutron and gamma doses and to estimate the whole body dose equivalent. IMNRT plans retrospectively calculated for five prostate cancer patients provided dose distributions superior to conventional fast neutron therapy. When normalized to provide equivalent target coverage, the volume of the rectum and bladder receiving

  15. Disruption of PPARγ signaling results in mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia involving active autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming; Fernandez, Suzanne; Jerome, W. Gray; He, Yue; Yu, Xiuping; Cai, Hui; Boone, Braden; Yi, Yajun; Magnuson, Mark A.; Roy-Burman, Pradip; Matusik, Robert J.; Shappell, Scott B.; Hayward, Simon W.

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) regulates the interface between cellular lipid metabolism, redox status and organelle differentiation. Conditional prostatic epithelial knockout of PPARγ in mice resulted in focal hyperplasia which developed into mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN). The grade of PIN became more severe with time. Electron microscopy (EM) showed accumulated secondary lysosomes containing cellular organelles and debris suggestive of autophagy. Consistent with this analysis the autophagy marker LC3 was found to be upregulated in areas of PIN in PPARγ KO tissues. We selectively knocked down PPARγ2 isoform in wild-type mouse prostatic epithelial cells and examined the consequences of this in a tissue recombination model. Histopathologically grafted tissues resembled the conditional PPARγ KO mouse prostates. EM studies of PPARγ- and PPARγ2-deficient epithelial cells in vitro were suggestive of autophagy, consistent with the prostatic tissue analysis. This was confirmed by examining expression of beclin-1 and LC3. Gene expression profiling in PPARγ-/γ2-deficient cells indicated a major dysregulation of cell cycle control and metabolic signaling networks related to peroxisomal and lysosomal maturation, lipid oxidation and degradation. The putative autophagic phenotypes of PPARγ-deficient cells could be rescued by re-expression of either γ1 or γ2 isoform. We conclude that disruption of PPARγ signaling results in autophagy and oxidative stress during mPIN pathogenesis. PMID:19834493

  16. NOGGIN IS REQUIRED FOR NORMAL LOBE PATTERNING AND DUCTAL BUDDING IN THE MOUSE PROSTATE

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Crist; Vezina, Chad M.; Hicks, Sarah M.; Shaw, Aubie; Yu, Min; Peterson, Richard E.; Bushman, Wade

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal expression of the BMP antagonist NOGGIN during prostate development plays a critical role in pre-natal ventral prostate development and opposes BMP4-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation during postnatal ductal development. Morphologic examination of newborn Noggin-/- male fetuses revealed genitourinary anomalies including cryptorchidism, incomplete separation of the hindgut from the urogenital sinus (UGS), absence of the ventral mesenchymal pad and a complete loss of ventral prostate (VP) budding. Examination of lobe-specific marker expression in the E14 Noggin-/- UGS rescued by transplantation under the renal capsule of a male nude mouse confirmed a complete loss of VP determination. More modest effects were observed in the other lobes, including decreased number of ductal buds in the dorsal and lateral prostates of newborn Noggin-/- males. BMP4 and BMP7 have been shown to inhibit ductal budding and outgrowth by negatively regulating epithelial cell proliferation. We show here that NOGGIN can neutralize budding inhibition by BMP4 and rescues branching morphogenesis of BMP4-exposed UGS in organ culture and show that the effects of BMP4 and NOGGIN activities converge on P63+ epithelial cells located at nascent duct tips. Together, these studies show that the BMP-NOGGIN axis regulates patterning of the ventral prostate, regulates ductal budding, and controls proliferation of P63+ epithelial cells in the nascent ducts of developing mouse prostate. PMID:18028901

  17. Androgen receptor is the key transcriptional mediator of the tumor suppressor SPOP in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Geng, Chuandong; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Shah, Shrijal S; Shou, John; Eedunuri, Vijay Kumar; Foley, Christopher; Fiskus, Warren; Rajendran, Mahitha; Chew, Sue Anne; Zimmermann, Martin; Bond, Richard; He, Bin; Coarfa, Cristian; Mitsiades, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    Somatic missense mutations in the substrate-binding pocket of the E3 ubiquitin ligase adaptor SPOP are present in up to 15% of human prostate adenocarcinomas, but are rare in other malignancies, suggesting a prostate-specific mechanism of action. SPOP promotes ubiquitination and degradation of several protein substrates, including the androgen receptor (AR) coactivator SRC-3. However, the relative contributions that SPOP substrates may make to the pathophysiology of SPOP-mutant (mt) prostate adenocarcinomas are unknown. Using an unbiased bioinformatics approach, we determined that the gene expression profile of prostate adenocarcinoma cells engineered to express mt-SPOP overlaps greatly with the gene signature of both SRC-3 and AR transcriptional output, with a stronger similarity to AR than SRC-3. This finding suggests that in addition to its SRC-3-mediated effects, SPOP also exerts SRC-3-independent effects that are AR-mediated. Indeed, we found that wild-type (wt) but not prostate adenocarcinoma-associated mutants of SPOP promoted AR ubiquitination and degradation, acting directly through a SPOP-binding motif in the hinge region of AR. In support of these results, tumor xenografts composed of prostate adenocarcinoma cells expressing mt-SPOP exhibited higher AR protein levels and grew faster than tumors composed of prostate adenocarcinoma cells expressing wt-SPOP. Furthermore, genetic ablation of SPOP was sufficient to increase AR protein levels in mouse prostate. Examination of public human prostate adenocarcinoma datasets confirmed a strong link between transcriptomic profiles of mt-SPOP and AR. Overall, our studies highlight the AR axis as the key transcriptional output of SPOP in prostate adenocarcinoma and provide an explanation for the prostate-specific tumor suppressor role of wt-SPOP.

  18. Salmonella Bacterial Monotherapy Reduces Autochthonous Prostate Tumor Burden in the TRAMP Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, Robert A; Gentry, Bettina; Mumm, Tyler; Schatten, Heide; Eisenstark, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium injected in the circulatory system of mammals selectively targets tumors. Using weekly intraperitoneal injections of attenuated Salmonella strain CRC2631, we tested for regression and/or inhibition of tumor development in the TRAMP prostate tumor mouse model, which utilizes SV40 early region expression for autochthonous formation of prostate tumors that progress into metastatic, poorly differentiated prostatic carcinomas in an immunocompetent murine model. Thirteen weekly intraperitoneal administrations of 105-107 CFU CRC2631 into 10 week old mice were well tolerated by the TRAMP model. Sacrifice and histological analysis of TRAMP prostates at 22 weeks indicated that Salmonella monotherapy at administrated levels decrease visible tumor size (>29%) but did not significantly inhibit previously described SV40 expression-driven TRAMP tumor progression to undifferentiated carcinomas when histologically examined. In conclusion, this work demonstrates baseline results for CRC2631 Salmonella monotherapy using the immunocompetent TRAMP prostate tumor model in preparation for study of combination therapies that resolve autochthonously generated TRAMP prostate tumors, further reduce tumor size, or inhibit prostate tumor progression. PMID:27504973

  19. Prostatic inflammation induces fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Wong, Letitia; Hutson, Paul R; Bushman, Wade

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the prostate is strongly correlated with development of lower urinary tract symptoms and several studies have implicated prostatic fibrosis in the pathogenesis of bladder outlet obstruction. It has been postulated that inflammation induces prostatic fibrosis but this relationship has never been tested. Here, we characterized the fibrotic response to inflammation in a mouse model of chronic bacterial-induced prostatic inflammation. Transurethral instillation of the uropathogenic E. coli into C3H/HeOuJ male mice induced persistent prostatic inflammation followed by a significant increase in collagen deposition and hydroxyproline content. This fibrotic response to inflammation was accompanied with an increase in collagen synthesis determined by the incorporation of 3H-hydroxyproline and mRNA expression of several collagen remodeling-associated genes, including Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Mmp2, Mmp9, and Lox. Correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation of inflammation severity with collagen deposition and immunohistochemical staining revealed that CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes were abundant in inflamed prostates at the time point coinciding with increased collagen synthesis. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an increased percentage of these CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes among collagen type I expressing cells. These data show-for the first time-that chronic prostatic inflammation induces collagen deposition and implicates fibrocytes in the fibrotic process. PMID:24950301

  20. Salmonella Bacterial Monotherapy Reduces Autochthonous Prostate Tumor Burden in the TRAMP Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kazmierczak, Robert A.; Gentry, Bettina; Mumm, Tyler; Schatten, Heide; Eisenstark, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium injected in the circulatory system of mammals selectively targets tumors. Using weekly intraperitoneal injections of attenuated Salmonella strain CRC2631, we tested for regression and/or inhibition of tumor development in the TRAMP prostate tumor mouse model, which utilizes SV40 early region expression for autochthonous formation of prostate tumors that progress into metastatic, poorly differentiated prostatic carcinomas in an immunocompetent murine model. Thirteen weekly intraperitoneal administrations of 105–107 CFU CRC2631 into 10 week old mice were well tolerated by the TRAMP model. Sacrifice and histological analysis of TRAMP prostates at 22 weeks indicated that Salmonella monotherapy at administrated levels decrease visible tumor size (>29%) but did not significantly inhibit previously described SV40 expression-driven TRAMP tumor progression to undifferentiated carcinomas when histologically examined. In conclusion, this work demonstrates baseline results for CRC2631 Salmonella monotherapy using the immunocompetent TRAMP prostate tumor model in preparation for study of combination therapies that resolve autochthonously generated TRAMP prostate tumors, further reduce tumor size, or inhibit prostate tumor progression. PMID:27504973

  1. Evidence of Heavy Methylation in the Galectin 3 Promoter in Early Stages of Prostate Adenocarcinoma: Development and Validation of a Methylated Marker for Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Hafiz; Cappello, Francesco; Rodolico, Vito; Vasta, Gerardo R

    2009-01-01

    Galectins, soluble intracellular and extracellular β-galactoside-binding proteins, are known to be involved in the progression and metastasis of various cancers, including prostate adenocarcinoma, but the detailed mechanism of their biological roles remains elusive. In the prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and DU-145, galectin 3 (gal3) is present at normal levels, whereas in LNCaP, its expression is silenced. In LNCaP, the gal3 promoter was heavily methylated, whereas PC-3 or DU-145 cells showed negligible or no methylation in the gal3 promoter indicating a negative correlation between gal3 promoter methylation and its expression. On immunohistochemical analysis of normal and tumor prostate tissues, gal3 was found expressed both in nucleus and cytoplasm of benign prostatic hyperplasia, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and stage I. The expression of the gal3 was found drastically downregulated in advanced stages and, interestingly, mostly in the cytoplasm. On methylation analysis, the gal3 promoter in stage II prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa) was found heavily methylated, whereas in stages III and IV, it was only lightly methylated. However, in stage I PCa, both heavy and light methylations were observed in the gal3 promoter. In normal and benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues, the gal3 promoter was almost unmethylated. The differential cytosine methylation in the gal3 promoter in stages I to IV PCa enabled us to develop and validate a methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction-based sensitive assay specific for stages I and II PCa. These stages are considered the critical stages for successful intervention, thus underscoring the significance of this diagnostic assay. PMID:19701499

  2. Conformal Postoperative Radiotherapy in Patients With Positive Resection Margins and/or pT3-4 Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bellavita, Rita; Massetti, Michela; Abraha, Iosief; Lupattelli, Marco; Mearini, Luigi; Falcinelli, Lorenzo; Farneti, Alessia; Palumbo, Isabella; Porena, Massimo; Aristei, Cynthia

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcome and toxicity of high-dose conformal radiotherapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Between August 1998 and December 2007, 182 consecutive patients with positive resection margins and/or pT3-4, node-negative prostate adenocarcinoma underwent postoperative conformal RT. The prescribed median dose to the prostate/seminal vesicle bed was 66.6 Gy (range 50-70). Hormone therapy (a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue and/or antiandrogen) was administered to 110/182 (60.5%) patients with high-risk features. Biochemical relapse was defined as an increase of more than 0.2 ng/mL over the lowest postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value measured on 3 occasions, each at least 2 weeks apart. Results: Median follow-up was 55.6 months (range 7.6-141.9 months). The 3- and 5-year probability of biochemical relapse-free survival were 87% and 81%, respectively. In univariate analysis, more advanced T stages, preoperative PSA values {>=}10 ng/mL, and RT doses <70 Gy were significant factors for biochemical relapse. Pre-RT PSA values >0.2 ng/mL were significant for distant metastases. In multivariate analysis, risk factors for biochemical relapse were higher preoperative and pre-RT PSA values, hormone therapy for under 402 days and RT doses of <70 Gy. Higher pre-RT PSA values were the only independent predictor of distant metastases. Acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities occurred in 72 (39.6%) and 91 (50%) patients, respectively. There were 2 cases of Grade III GI toxicity but no cases of Grade IV. Late GU and GI toxicities occurred in 28 (15.4%) and 14 (7.7%) patients, respectively: 11 cases of Grade III toxicity: 1 GI (anal stenosis) and 10 GU, all urethral strictures requiring endoscopic urethrotomy. Conclusions: Postoperative high-dose conformal RT in patients with high-risk features was associated with a low risk of biochemical relapse as well as minimal morbidity.

  3. Synchrotron FTIR shows evidence of DNA damage and lipid accumulation in prostate adenocarcinoma PC-3 cells following proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipiec, Ewelina; Bambery, Keith R.; Heraud, Phil; Hirschmugl, Carol; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Tobin, Mark J.; Vogel, Christian; Whelan, Donna; Wood, Bayden R.

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron Radiation Fourier Transform Infrared (SR-FTIR) spectra of single human prostate adenocarcinoma PC-3 cells, irradiated with a defined number of 2 MeV protons generated by a proton microbeam along with non-irradiated control cells, were analysed using multivariate methods. A number of different Principal Component Analysis (PCA) models were tested and the spectral ranges associated with nucleic acids, proteins and lipids were analysed separately. The results show a dose dependent shift of the Osbnd Psbnd O asymmetric stretching mode from 1234 cm-1 to 1237 cm-1, consistent with local disorder in the B-DNA conformation along with a change in intensity of the Osbnd Psbnd O symmetric stretching band at 1083 cm-1 indicative of chromatin fragmentation - the natural consequence of a high number of DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSBs). 2D mapping of characteristic functional groups at the diffraction limit shows evidence of lipid deposition and chromatin condensation in cells exposed to protons indicative of cell apoptosis following irradiation. These studies lay the foundation for understanding the macromolecular changes that occur to cells in response to radiation therapy, which has important implications in the treatment of tumours.

  4. Tracer-cocktail injections for combined pre- and intraoperative multimodal imaging of lymph nodes in a spontaneous mouse prostate tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Anne C.; Buckle, Tessa; Bendle, Gavin; Vermeeren, Lenka; Valdés Olmos, Renato; van de Poel, Henk G.; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.

    2011-01-01

    To improve surgical guidance toward prostate draining lymph nodes, we investigate the potential of intraoperative fluorescence imaging and combined pre- and intraoperative multimodality imaging approaches. Transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate mice with spontaneous prostate tumors are injected intratumorally with: 1. a cocktail of patent blue (Pb) and indocyanine green (ICG); 2. a cocktail of albumin radiocolloids (99mTc-NanoColl), Pb, and ICG; or 3. a cocktail of radiolabeled albumin (99mTc-Vasculosis), Pb, and ICG. The distribution of these imaging agents over the lymph nodes (LNs) are studied at different time points after injection. We find that at 60-min postinjection, ICG significantly improves the detection of the LNs compared to Pb, 53 versus 7%, respectively. Moreover, a cocktail of ICG and 99mTc-NanoColl improves the fluorescent detection rate to 86%, equalling that of the clinically applied 99mTc-NanoColl. A similar overlap is observed in our initial clinical pilot data. Fluorescent detection of the LNs using a ICG with 99mTc-Vasculosis gives similar results as ``free'' ICG (58% 60 min). A 99mTc-NanoColl, Pb, and cocktail ICG enriches the standard 99mTc-NanoColl approach by adding optical detection of the sentinel lymph nodes. Furthermore, this approach improves fluorescent-based guidance and enables both accurate surgical planning and intraoperative detection, based on a single injection.

  5. Whole-body irradiation increases the magnitude and persistence of adoptively transferred T cells associated with tumor regression in a mouse model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ward-Kavanagh, Lindsay K.; Zhu, Junjia; Cooper, Timothy K.; Schell, Todd D.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in a subset of clinical and preclinical studies, but the T cells used for therapy often are rendered rapidly non-functional in tumor-bearing hosts. Recent evidence indicates that prostate cancer can be susceptible to immunotherapy, but most studies using autochthonous tumor models demonstrate only short-lived T-cell responses in the tolerogenic prostate microenvironment. Here, we assessed the efficacy of sublethal whole-body irradiation (WBI) to enhance the magnitude and duration of adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. We demonstrate that WBI promoted high-level accumulation of granzyme B (GzB)-expressing donor T cells both in lymphoid organs and in the prostate of TRAMP mice. Donor T cells remained responsive to vaccination in irradiated recipients, but a single round of WBI-enhanced adoptive immunotherapy failed to impact significantly the existing disease. Addition of a second round of immunotherapy promoted regression of established disease in half of the treated mice, with no progressions observed. Regression was associated with long-term persistence of effector/memory phenotype CD8+ donor cells. Administration of the second round of adoptive immunotherapy led to reacquisition of GzB expression by persistent T cells from the first transfer. These results indicate that WBI conditioning amplifies tumor-specific T cells in the TRAMP prostate and lymphoid tissue, and suggest that the initial treatment alters the tolerogenic microenvironment to increase antitumor activity by a second wave of donor cells. PMID:24801834

  6. A systematic review and meta-analysis of bone metabolism in prostate adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis could be associated with the hormone therapy for metastatic prostate carcinoma (PCa) and with PCa per se. The objective of this review is to determine the incidence of bone loss and osteoporosis in patients with PCa who are or are not treated with hormone therapy (ADT). Methods The Medline, Embase, Cancerlit, and American Society of Clinical Oncology Abstract databases were searched for published studies on prostate cancer and bone metabolism. The outcomes assessed were: fracture, osteoporosis and osteopenia. Results Thirty-two articles (116,911 participants) were included in the meta-analysis. PCa patients under ADT had a higher risk of osteoporosis (RR, 1.30; p < 0.00001) and a higher risk of fractures (RR, 1.17; p < 0.00001) as compared to patients not under ADT. The total bone mineral density was lower in patients under ADT when compared with patients not under ADT (p = 0.031) but it was similar to bone mineral density found in healthy controls (p = 0.895). The time of androgen deprivation therapy correlated negatively with lumbar spine and total hip bone mineral density (Spearman's rho = -0.490 and -0.773; p = 0.028 and 0.001, respectively) and with total hip t score (Spearman's rho = -0.900; p = 0.037). Conclusion We found consistent evidence that the use of androgen deprivation therapy in patients with PCa reduces bone mineral density, increasing the risk of fractures in these patients. PMID:20482867

  7. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jie; Cozzi, Paul; Hung, Tzong-Tyng; Hao, Jingli; Graham, Peter; Li, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA) imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8). Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r(2) = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively) and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001). The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  8. Hormone resistant prostatic adenocarcinoma. An evaluation of prognostic factors in pre- and post-treatment specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Berner, A.; Nesland, J. M.; Waehre, H.; Silde, J.; Fosså, S. D.

    1993-01-01

    Pre- and post-treatment specimens from 47 patients with hormone resistant prostatic carcinoma were compared with each other regarding histological grade and immunoreactivity for p53 protein, neuron specific enolase and c-erbB-2 protein. Significantly more specimens expressed a high malignancy grade when the tumour had become hormone resistant than at the time of initial diagnosis (Gleason P: < 0.0001, WHO P:0.0003). p53 protein immunoreactivity increased significantly with disease progression (P:0.006), while tissue PSA immunoreactivity was reduced in post-treatment specimens (P:0.011). p53 protein expression did not correlate with histological grade or PSA expression and seems to be an independent parameter which participates late in the neoplastic transformation. Thirty-two percent of the tumours were neuron specific enolase positive, but this parameter did not correlate with development of hormone resistance. c-erbB-2 protein reactivity was not recognised. Images Figure 1 PMID:7688548

  9. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jarad M.; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To assess in a prospective trial the feasibility and late toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinical stage T1c-2cNXM0 disease. They received 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with intensity-modulated radiotherapy including daily on-line image guidance with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results: Between June 2001 and March 2004, 92 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The cohort had a median prostate-specific antigen value of 7.06 ng/mL. The majority had Gleason grade 5-6 (38%) or 7 (59%) disease, and 82 patients had T1c-T2a clinical staging. Overall, 29 patients had low-risk, 56 intermediate-risk, and 7 high-risk disease. Severe acute toxicity (Grade 3-4) was rare, occurring in only 1 patient. Median follow-up was 38 months. According to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the rate of biochemical control at 14 months was 97%. According to the previous American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, biochemical control at 3 years was 76%. The incidence of late toxicity was low, with no severe (Grade {>=}3) toxicity at the most recent assessment. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with image guidance is feasible and is associated with low rates of late bladder and rectal toxicity. At early follow-up, biochemical outcome is comparable to that reported for conventionally fractionated controls. The findings are being tested in an ongoing, multicenter, Phase III trial.

  10. An inducible knockout mouse to model the cell-autonomous role of PTEN in initiating endometrial, prostate and thyroid neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Mirantes, Cristina; Eritja, Núria; Dosil, Maria Alba; Santacana, Maria; Pallares, Judit; Gatius, Sónia; Bergadà, Laura; Maiques, Oscar; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. The role of PTEN in carcinogenesis has been validated by knockout mouse models. PTEN heterozygous mice develop neoplasms in multiple organs. Unfortunately, the embryonic lethality of biallelic excision of PTEN has inhibited the study of complete PTEN deletion in the development and progression of cancer. By crossing PTEN conditional knockout mice with transgenic mice expressing a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-ERT under the control of a chicken actin promoter, we have generated a tamoxifen-inducible mouse model that allows temporal control of PTEN deletion. Interestingly, administration of a single dose of tamoxifen resulted in PTEN deletion mainly in epithelial cells, but not in stromal, mesenchymal or hematopoietic cells. Using the mT/mG double-fluorescent Cre reporter mice, we demonstrate that epithelial-specific PTEN excision was caused by differential Cre activity among tissues and cells types. Tamoxifen-induced deletion of PTEN resulted in extremely rapid and consistent formation of endometrial in situ adenocarcinoma, prostate intraepithelial neoplasia and thyroid hyperplasia. We also analyzed the role of PTEN ablation in other epithelial cells, such as the tubular cells of the kidney, hepatocytes, colonic epithelial cells or bronchiolar epithelium, but those tissues did not exhibit neoplastic growth. Finally, to validate this model as a tool to assay the efficacy of anti-tumor drugs in PTEN deficiency, we administered the mTOR inhibitor everolimus to mice with induced PTEN deletion. Everolimus dramatically reduced the progression of endometrial proliferations and significantly reduced thyroid hyperplasia. This model could be a valuable tool to study the cell-autonomous mechanisms involved in PTEN-loss-induced carcinogenesis and provides a good platform to study the effect of anti-neoplastic drugs on PTEN-negative tumors. PMID:23471917

  11. Inter-observer reproducibility before and after web-based education in the Gleason grading of the prostate adenocarcinoma among the Iranian pathologists.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Alireza; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Meysamie, Alipasha; Bakhshandeh, Mohammadreza; Hosseinzadeh, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed at determining intra and inter-observer concordance rates in the Gleason scoring of prostatic adenocarcinoma, before and after a web-based educational course. In this self-controlled study, 150 tissue samples of prostatic adenocarcinoma are re-examined to be scored according to the Gleason scoring system. Then all pathologists attend a free web-based course. Afterwards, the same 150 samples [with different codes compared to the previous ones] are distributed differently among the pathologists to be assigned Gleason scores. After gathering the data, the concordance rate in the first and second reports of pathologists is determined. In the pre web-education, the mean kappa value of Interobserver agreement was 0.25 [fair agreement]. Post web-education significantly improved with the mean kappa value of 0.52 [moderate agreement]. Using weighted kappa values, significant improvement was observed in inter-observer agreement in higher scores of Gleason grade; Score 10 was achieved for the mean kappa value in post web-education was 0.68 [substantial agreement] compared to 0.25 (fair agreement) in pre web-education. Web-based training courses are attractive to pathologists as they do not need to spend much time and money. Therefore, such training courses are strongly recommended for significant pathological issues including the grading of the prostate adenocarcinoma. Through web-based education, pathologists can exchange views and contribute to the rise in the level of reproducibility. Such programs need to be included in post-graduation programs. PMID:24902017

  12. A dual yet opposite growth-regulating function of miR-204 and its target XRN1 in prostate adenocarcinoma cells and neuroendocrine-like prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Miao; Lin, Biaoyang; Li, Tao; Liu, Yuanyuan; Li, Yuhua; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Miao, Maohua; Gu, Jinfa; Pan, Hongjie; Yang, Fen; Li, Tianqi; Liu, Xin Yuan; Li, Runsheng

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer (PCa) causes neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) of prostatic adenocarcinomas (PAC) cells, leading to recurrence of PCa. Androgen-responsive genes involved in PCa progression including NED remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrated the importance of androgen receptor (AR)-microRNA-204 (miR-204)-XRN1 axis in PCa cell lines and the rat ventral prostate. Androgens downregulate miR-204, resulting in induction of XRN1 (5′-3′ exoribonuclease 1), which we identified as a miR-204 target. miR-204 acts as a tumor suppressor in two PAC cell lines (LNCaP and 22Rv1) and as an oncomiR in two neuroendocrine-like prostate cancer (NEPC) cell lines (PC-3 and CL1). Importantly, overexpression of miR-204 and knockdown of XRN1 inhibited AR expression in PCa cells. Repression of miR-34a, a known AR-targeting miRNA, contributes AR expression by XRN1. Thus we revealed the AR-miR-204-XRN1-miR-34a positive feedback loop and a dual function of miR-204/XRN1 axis in prostate cancer. PMID:25797256

  13. Sensitivity and mechanisms of taxol-resistant prostate adenocarcinoma cells to Vernonia amygdalina extract.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Keyuna S; Howard, Carolyn B; Izevbigie, Ernest B; Hill, Brandon J; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2013-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) patients once Paclitaxel (TAX) treatment responsive later develop hormone refractory PC, thus becoming TAX-insensitive. This underscores the urgent need to develop novel anti-PC therapies. Vernonia amygdalina (VA) could be one such candidate agent. We have shown that androgen-independent PC-3 cells are sensitive to VA treatment in vitro. VA extract (0.01, 0.1 and 1 mg/ml) inhibited DNA synthesis by 12%, 45% (p<0.05), and 73% (p<0.01) respectively. In contrast, TAX (0.01, 0.1, and 1 μM) failed to significantly affect cell growth, suggesting TAX resistance. We tested molecular mechanisms which may lend to the observed PC-3 cell VA sensitivity/TAX resistance. Though both VA and TAX stimulated MAPK activity, VA's induction was more intense, but transient, compared to TAX's sustained action. NF-κB activation was inhibited on average by 50% by either 1 mg/ml VA or 1 μM TAX. VA extract caused 35% and 45% increases in c-Myc activity at 10 and 60 min intervals respectively, with the highest stimulation attained 1h after treatment. In contrast, similar levels were attained by TAX rapidly (within 5 min) and were sustained compared to the slow/multi-phasic action of VA. VA extract treatments had no effect on AKT gene expression, while TAX treatments yielded a four-fold (P<0.01) increase; and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity was inhibited by VA and stimulated by TAX, compared to control (basal ATPase activity). This study shows that TAX-resistant PC-3 cells are sensitive to VA, perhaps explained by differential regulatory patterns of MAPK, c-Myc, AKT, and Pgp activities/expressions. PMID:23238229

  14. The residual nonadrenergic contractile response to nerve stimulation of the mouse prostate is mediated by acetylcholine but not ATP in a comparison with the mouse vas deferens.

    PubMed

    White, Carl W; Short, Jennifer L; Haynes, John M; Evans, Richard J; Ventura, Sabatino

    2010-11-01

    Neuronal release of noradrenaline is primarily responsible for the contraction of prostatic smooth muscle in all species, and this forms the basis for the use of α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists as pharmacotherapies for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Previous studies in mice have demonstrated that a residual nonadrenergic component to nerve stimulation remains after α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonism. In the guinea pig and rat prostate and the vas deferens of guinea pigs, rats, and mice, ATP is the mediator of this residual contraction. This study investigates the mediator of residual contraction in the mouse prostate. Whole prostates from wild-type, α(1A)-adrenoceptor, and P2X1-purinoceptor knockout mice were mounted in organ baths, and the isometric force that tissues developed in response to electrical field stimulation or exogenously applied agonists was recorded. Deletion of the P2X1 purinoceptor did not affect nerve-mediated contraction. Furthermore, the P2-purinoceptor antagonist suramin (30 μM) failed to attenuate nerve-mediated contractions in wild-type, α(1A)-adrenoceptor, or P2X1-purinoceptor knockout mice. Atropine (1 μM) attenuated contraction in prostates taken from wild-type mice. In the presence of prazosin (0.3 μM) or guanethidine (10 μM), or in prostates taken from α(1A)-adrenoceptor knockout mice, residual nerve-mediated contraction was abolished by atropine (1 μM), but not suramin (30 μM). Exogenously administered acetylcholine elicited reproducible concentration-dependent contractions of the mouse prostate that were atropine-sensitive (1 μM), but not prazosin-sensitive (0.3 μM). Acetylcholine, but not ATP, mediates the nonadrenergic component of contraction in the mouse prostate. This cholinergic component of prostatic contraction is mediated by activation of muscarinic receptors.

  15. Stabilin-1 is expressed in human breast cancer and supports tumor growth in mammary adenocarcinoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Riabov, Vladimir; Yin, Shuiping; Song, Bin; Avdic, Aida; Schledzewski, Kai; Ovsiy, Ilja; Gratchev, Alexei; Verdiell, Maria Llopis; Sticht, Carsten; Schmuttermaier, Christina; Schönhaber, Hiltrud; Weiss, Christel; Fields, Alan P.; Simon-Keller, Katja; Pfister, Frederick; Berlit, Sebastian; Marx, Alexander; Arnold, Bernd; Goerdt, Sergij; Kzhyshkowska, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Stabilin-1 is a multifunctional scavenger receptor expressed on alternatively-activated macrophages. Stabilin-1 mediates phagocytosis of “unwanted-self” components, intracellular sorting, and endocytic clearance of extracellular ligands including SPARC that modulates breast cancer growth. The expression of stabilin-1 was found on tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) in mouse and human cancers including melanoma, lymphoma, glioblastoma, and pancreatic insulinoma. Despite its tumor-promoting role in mouse models of melanoma and lymphoma the expression and functional role of stabilin-1 in breast cancer was unknown. Here, we demonstrate that stabilin-1 is expressed on TAM in human breast cancer, and its expression is most pronounced on stage I disease. Using stabilin-1 knockout (ko) mice we show that stabilin-1 facilitates growth of mouse TS/A mammary adenocarcinoma. Endocytosis assay on stabilin-1 ko TAM demonstrated impaired clearance of stabilin-1 ligands including SPARC that was capable of inducing cell death in TS/A cells. Affymetrix microarray analysis on purified TAM and reporter assays in stabilin-1 expressing cell lines demonstrated no influence of stabilin-1 expression on intracellular signalling. Our results suggest stabilin-1 mediated silent clearance of extracellular tumor growth-inhibiting factors (e.g. SPARC) as a mechanism of stabilin-1 induced tumor growth. Silent clearance function of stabilin-1 makes it an attractive candidate for delivery of immunomodulatory anti-cancer therapeutic drugs to TAM. PMID:27105498

  16. Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT) enhances the therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel and Abraxane® for treatment of human prostate adenocarcinoma in mice.

    PubMed

    van Wamel, Annemieke; Sontum, Per Christian; Healey, Andrew; Kvåle, Svein; Bush, Nigel; Bamber, Jeffrey; de Lange Davies, Catharina

    2016-08-28

    Acoustic cluster therapy (ACT) is a novel approach for ultrasound mediated, targeted drug delivery. In the current study, we have investigated ACT in combination with paclitaxel and Abraxane® for treatment of a subcutaneous human prostate adenocarcinoma (PC3) in mice. In combination with paclitaxel (12mg/kg given i.p.), ACT induced a strong increase in therapeutic efficacy; 120days after study start, 42% of the animals were in stable, complete remission vs. 0% for the paclitaxel only group and the median survival was increased by 86%. In combination with Abraxane® (12mg paclitaxel/kg given i.v.), ACT induced a strong increase in the therapeutic efficacy; 60days after study start 100% of the animals were in stable, remission vs. 0% for the Abraxane® only group, 120days after study start 67% of the animals were in stable, complete remission vs. 0% for the Abraxane® only group. For the ACT+Abraxane group 100% of the animals were alive after 120days vs. 0% for the Abraxane® only group. Proof of concept for Acoustic Cluster Therapy has been demonstrated; ACT markedly increases the therapeutic efficacy of both paclitaxel and Abraxane® for treatment of human prostate adenocarcinoma in mice. PMID:27297780

  17. Folic Acid supplementary reduce the incidence of adenocarcinoma in a mouse model of colorectal cancer: microarray gene expression profile

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Whether Folic acid is a potential drug that may prevent the progression of colorectal carcinoma and when to use are important healthy issues we focus on. Our study is to examine the effect of folic acid on the development of the CRC and the optimal time folic acid should be provided in a mouse-ICR model induced by 1, 2-Dimethylhydrazine. Also, we investigated the gene expression profile of this model related to folic acid. Method Female ICR mouse (n = 130) were divided into 7 groups either with the treatment of 1, 2-Dimethylhydrazine (20 mg/kg bodyweight) weekly or folic acid (8 mg/kg bodyweight) twice a week for 12 or 24 weeks. Using a 4 × 44 K Agilent whole genome oligo microarray assay, different gene expression among groups (NS, DMH, FA2, FA3) were identified and selected genes were validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Animals with a supplementary of folic acid showed a significant decrease in the incidence, the maximum diameter and multiplicity of adenocarcinomas (P < 0.05). Furthermore, there were fewer adenomas or adenocarcinomas developed in the group of folic acid supplementation in pre-adenoma stage compared to group of post-adenoma stage. Meanwhile, about 1070 genes that were changed by 1, 2-Dimethylhydrazine can be reversed by folic acid and 172 differentially genes were identified between the groups of pre- and post- adenoma stage using microarray gene expression analysis. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that folic acid supplementary was significantly associated with the decrease risk of CRC. And the subgroup of providing folic acid without precancerous lesions was more effective than that with precancerous lesions. PMID:22206623

  18. A novel method for somatic transgenesis of the mouse prostate using the Sleeping Beauty transposon system

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Kimberly D.P.; Alsop, Jim; Buresh-Stiemke, Rita A.; Frantskevich, Katsiaryna; Malinowski, Rita; Roethe, Laura; Powers, Ginny L; Marker, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In vivo ectopic gene expression is a common approach for prostate research through the use of transgenes in germline transgenic mice. For some other organs, somatic transgenesis with the Sleeping Beauty transposon system has allowed in vivo ectopic gene expression with higher throughput and lower cost than germline transgenic approaches. METHODS Mouse e16 urogenital sinuses (UGSs) were co-injected with plasmids expressing the Sleeping Beauty transposase and plasmids with control or activated BRAF expressing transposons. Following electroporation, the transduced UGSs were grown as allografts in mouse hosts for 8 weeks, and the resulting allografts were evaluated for several endpoints. RESULTS Transposon-transduced UGS allografts developed into prostatic tissue with normal tissue structure and cellular differentiation. Integration of transposon vectors into the genomes of transduced allografts was confirmed using linker-mediated PCR, sequencing, and in situ PCR. Transduction of UGS allografts with transposons expressing activated BRAF resulted in ectopic BRAF expression that was detectable at both the mRNA and protein levels. Prostatic ducts over-expressing activated BRAF also had ectopic activation of the ERK1/2 mitogen activated kinases and increased epithelial cell proliferation. CONCLUSIONS The Sleeping Beauty transposon system can be used to achieve somatic transgenesis of prostatic allografts. This new method for achieving ectopic gene expression in the prostate will complement other existing approaches such as ectopic gene expression in cell lines and in germline transgenic mice. Advantages of this new approach include preservation of stromal-epithelial interactions not possible with cell lines, and higher throughput and lower cost than traditional germline transgenic approaches. PMID:24647932

  19. Feature-based analysis of mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in histological tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Valkonen, Mira; Nykter, Matti; Visakorpi, Tapio; Latonen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes work presented at the Nordic Symposium on Digital Pathology 2015, in Linköping, Sweden. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) represents premalignant tissue involving epithelial growth confined in the lumen of prostatic acini. In the attempts to understand oncogenesis in the human prostate, early neoplastic changes can be modeled in the mouse with genetic manipulation of certain tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. As with many early pathological changes, the PIN lesions in the mouse prostate are macroscopically small, but microscopically spanning areas often larger than single high magnification focus fields in microscopy. This poses a challenge to utilize full potential of the data acquired in histological specimens. We use whole prostates fixed in molecular fixative PAXgene™, embedded in paraffin, sectioned through and stained with H&E. To visualize and analyze the microscopic information spanning whole mouse PIN (mPIN) lesions, we utilize automated whole slide scanning and stacked sections through the tissue. The region of interests is masked, and the masked areas are processed using a cascade of automated image analysis steps. The images are normalized in color space, after which exclusion of secretion areas and feature extraction is performed. Machine learning is utilized to build a model of early PIN lesions for determining the probability for histological changes based on the calculated features. We performed a feature-based analysis to mPIN lesions. First, a quantitative representation of over 100 features was built, including several features representing pathological changes in PIN, especially describing the spatial growth pattern of lesions in the prostate tissue. Furthermore, we built a classification model, which is able to align PIN lesions corresponding to grading by visual inspection to more advanced and mild lesions. The classifier allowed both determining the probability of early histological changes for uncategorized

  20. A Tmprss2-CreERT2 Knock-In Mouse Model for Cancer Genetic Studies on Prostate and Colon.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong; Zhan, Yu; Di, Wei; Moore, Amanda R; Sher, Jessica J; Guan, Youxin; Wang, Shangqian; Zhang, Zeda; Murphy, Devan A; Sawyers, Charles L; Chi, Ping; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Fusion between TMPRSS2 and ERG, placing ERG under the control of the TMPRSS2 promoter, is the most frequent genetic alteration in prostate cancer, present in 40-50% of cases. The fusion event is an early, if not initiating, event in prostate cancer, implicating the TMPRSS2-positive prostate epithelial cell as the cancer cell of origin in fusion-positive prostate cancer. To introduce genetic alterations into Tmprss2-positive cells in mice in a temporal-specific manner, we generated a Tmprss2-CreERT2 knock-in mouse. We found robust tamoxifen-dependent Cre activation in the prostate luminal cells but not basal epithelial cells, as well as epithelial cells of the bladder and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The knock-in allele on the Tmprss2 locus does not noticeably impact prostate, bladder, or gastrointestinal function. Deletion of Pten in Tmprss2-positive cells of adult mice generated neoplasia only in the prostate, while deletion of Apc in these cells generated neoplasia only in the GI tract. These results suggest that this new Tmprss2-CreERT2 mouse model will be a useful resource for genetic studies on prostate and colon. PMID:27536883

  1. A Tmprss2-CreERT2 Knock-In Mouse Model for Cancer Genetic Studies on Prostate and Colon

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yu; Di, Wei; Moore, Amanda R.; Sher, Jessica J.; Guan, Youxin; Wang, Shangqian; Zhang, Zeda; Murphy, Devan A.; Sawyers, Charles L.; Chi, Ping; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Fusion between TMPRSS2 and ERG, placing ERG under the control of the TMPRSS2 promoter, is the most frequent genetic alteration in prostate cancer, present in 40–50% of cases. The fusion event is an early, if not initiating, event in prostate cancer, implicating the TMPRSS2-positive prostate epithelial cell as the cancer cell of origin in fusion-positive prostate cancer. To introduce genetic alterations into Tmprss2-positive cells in mice in a temporal-specific manner, we generated a Tmprss2-CreERT2 knock-in mouse. We found robust tamoxifen-dependent Cre activation in the prostate luminal cells but not basal epithelial cells, as well as epithelial cells of the bladder and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The knock-in allele on the Tmprss2 locus does not noticeably impact prostate, bladder, or gastrointestinal function. Deletion of Pten in Tmprss2-positive cells of adult mice generated neoplasia only in the prostate, while deletion of Apc in these cells generated neoplasia only in the GI tract. These results suggest that this new Tmprss2-CreERT2 mouse model will be a useful resource for genetic studies on prostate and colon. PMID:27536883

  2. A pilot study on the expression of microRNAs resident on chromosome 21 in laser microdissected FFPE prostate adenocarcinoma samples.

    PubMed

    Mihala, Adrian; Alexa, Andreea Anda; Samoilă, Corina; Dema, Alis; Vizitiu, Anda Cornelia; Anghel, Andrei; Tămaş, Liviu; Marian, Cătălin Valer; Sîrbu, Ioan Ovidiu

    2015-01-01

    The tremendous research effort of the last decades added a new, epigenetic layer of complexity to the already complex image of prostate cancer pathogenesis. Here we use quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to investigate the expression of the microRNAs resident on chromosome 21 (miR-ch21) in laser capture microdissected (LCM) tissues from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archived, prostate adenocarcinoma samples. We show a strong, specific down-regulation of miR-ch21 in tumoral epithelia and stromae as compared to normal counterparts, results at odd with the current paradigm on the involvement of these microRNAs in prostate oncogenesis. By comparing this result with the expression of two well-known pluripotency associated microRNA, hsa-miR-372 and miR-373, we suggest that miR-ch21 down-regulation might be the result of specific silencing of miR genes mapped to chromosome 21. Further studies, of larger sample size are needed to confirm our preliminary data.

  3. Validation of International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading for prostatic adenocarcinoma in thin core biopsies using TROG 03.04 'RADAR' trial clinical data.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, B; Egevad, L; Srigley, J R; Steigler, A; Murray, J D; Atkinson, C; Matthews, J; Duchesne, G; Spry, N A; Christie, D; Joseph, D; Attia, J; Denham, J W

    2015-10-01

    In 2014 a consensus conference convened by the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) adopted amendments to the criteria for Gleason grading and scoring (GS) for prostatic adenocarcinoma. The meeting defined a modified grading system based on 5 grading categories (grade 1, GS 3+3; grade 2, GS 3+4; grade 3, GS 4+3; grade 4, GS 8; grade 5, GS 9-10). In this study we have evaluated the prognostic significance of ISUP grading in 496 patients enrolled in the TROG 03.04 RADAR Trial. There were 19 grade 1, 118 grade 2, 193 grade 3, 88 grade 4 and 79 grade 5 tumours in the series, with follow-up for a minimum of 6.5 years. On follow-up 76 patients experienced distant progression of disease, 171 prostate specific antigen (PSA) progression and 39 prostate cancer deaths. In contrast to the 2005 modified Gleason system (MGS), the hazards of the distant and PSA progression endpoints, relative to grade 2, were significantly greater for grades 3, 4 and 5 of the 2014 ISUP grading scheme. Comparison of predictive ability utilising Harrell's concordance index, showed 2014 ISUP grading to significantly out-perform 2005 MGS grading for each of the three clinical endpoints.

  4. Utility of GATA3 immunohistochemistry in differentiating urothelial carcinoma from prostate adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix, anus, and lung.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex; Amin, Ali; Gabrielson, Edward; Illei, Peter; Roden, Richard B; Sharma, Rajni; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2012-10-01

    Distinguishing invasive high-grade urothelial carcinoma (UC) from other carcinomas occurring in the genitourinary tract may be difficult. The differential diagnosis includes high-grade prostatic adenocarcinoma, spread from an anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), or spread from a uterine cervical SCC. In terms of metastatic UC, the most common problem is differentiating spread of UC to the lung from a primary pulmonary SCC. Immunohistochemical analysis (IHC) for GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3), thrombomodulin (THROMBO), and uroplakin III was performed on a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 35 cases of invasive high-grade UC. GATA3 IHC was also performed on TMAs containing 38 high-grade (Gleason score ≥8) prostatic adenocarcinomas, representative tissue sections from 15 invasive anal SCCs, representative tissue sections from 19 invasive cervical SCCs, and TMAs with 12 invasive cervical carcinomas of the cervix [SCC (n=10), SCC with neuroendocrine features (n=1), and adenosquamous carcinoma (n=1)]. In addition, GATA3 IHC was performed on representative tissue sections from 15 pulmonary UC metastases and a TMA with 25 SCCs of the lung and 5 pulmonary non-small cell carcinomas with squamous features. GATA3, THROMBO, and uroplakin III were positive in 28 (80%), 22 (63%), and 21 (60%) cases of high-grade UC, respectively. All cases of GATA3-positive staining were nonfocal; 25 (89%) cases demonstrated moderate to strong staining, and 3 (11%) demonstrated weak staining. Of the 7 cases that failed to express GATA3, 5 were positive for THROMBO and/or uroplakin III, whereas 2 were negative for all 3 markers. None of the 38 high-grade prostatic adenocarcinomas was positive for GATA3. Weak GATA3 staining was present in occasional basal cells of benign prostate glands, in a few benign atrophic glands, and in urothelial metaplasia. Of the 15 cases of anal SCCs, 2 (7%) cases showed focal weak staining, and 1 (3%) showed focal moderate staining. Weak staining was also rarely

  5. Assessment and optimization of electroporation-assisted tumoral nanoparticle uptake in a nude mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    West, Derek Lamont; White, Sarah B; Zhang, Zhouli; Larson, Andrew C; Omary, Reed A

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a particularly lethal form of cancer. In 2012, the incidence of PDAC was 43,920. Five-year survival for patients with PDAC is around 6%, regardless of staging, making PDAC one of the deadliest forms of cancer. One reason for this dismal prognosis is chemoresistance to the current first-line therapy, gemcitabine. There are multiple factors that contribute to the chemoresistance observed in pancreatic cancer. Among them, desmoplasia has been increasingly seen as a significant contributor to chemoresistance. To overcome desmoplastic chemoresistance, several novel methods of treatment have been developed. Electroporation is one such novel treatment. High electrical fields are applied to cells to create pores that increase cell permeability. It has been previously demonstrated that electroporation enhances the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs in pancreatic tumor models. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems constitute a second novel method to overcome desmoplastic chemoresistance. Due to their intrinsic design advantages, nanoparticles have been shown to increase the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents, while further reducing or even eliminating side effects. To date, there have been no studies evaluating the cumulative effect of combining both nanoparticle and electroporation strategies to overcome chemoresistance in PDAC. Our preliminary studies assessed the in vitro and in vivo uptake of doxorubicin-loaded iron oxide nanoparticles as a function of electroporation voltage and timing of administration in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Our studies demonstrated that addition of electroporation to administration of nanoparticles significantly increased the amount of intracellular iron oxide nanoparticle uptake by a PANC-1 cell line in an athymic nude mouse model of PDAC. Further, electroporation-assisted nanoparticle uptake could be significantly altered by changing the timing of application of electroporation.

  6. Ratio of Active Matrix Metalloproteinases and Proenzymes during Growth and Metastasizing of Mouse Lewis Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kisarova, Ya A; Kaledin, V I; Bogdanova, L A; Korolenko, T A

    2015-08-01

    Ratio between proMMP and active MMP was studied in the dynamics of growth of the Lewis lung adenocarcinoma with lung metastasis. It was shown that tumor growth is associated with an increase in the content of proMMP (day 20; terminal stage), but the level of active MMP in tumor tissue did not signifi cantly change. The development of lung metastasis was accompanied by accumulation of active MMP (days 7, 15, and 20) and a decrease in the content of pro-MMP (days 7, and 20) in comparison with the control. In the spleen of these mice (metastasis-free organ), an increase in the levels of proMMP (day 20) and especially active MMP (days 7, 15, and 20) were found. The results suggest that tumor development shifts the proportion between active MMP and proenzymes in the tumor, lungs with metastasis, and spleen without metastasis. PMID:26392281

  7. Ratio of Active Matrix Metalloproteinases and Proenzymes during Growth and Metastasizing of Mouse Lewis Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kisarova, Ya A; Kaledin, V I; Bogdanova, L A; Korolenko, T A

    2015-08-01

    Ratio between proMMP and active MMP was studied in the dynamics of growth of the Lewis lung adenocarcinoma with lung metastasis. It was shown that tumor growth is associated with an increase in the content of proMMP (day 20; terminal stage), but the level of active MMP in tumor tissue did not signifi cantly change. The development of lung metastasis was accompanied by accumulation of active MMP (days 7, 15, and 20) and a decrease in the content of pro-MMP (days 7, and 20) in comparison with the control. In the spleen of these mice (metastasis-free organ), an increase in the levels of proMMP (day 20) and especially active MMP (days 7, 15, and 20) were found. The results suggest that tumor development shifts the proportion between active MMP and proenzymes in the tumor, lungs with metastasis, and spleen without metastasis.

  8. Predicting Gleason score using the initial serum total prostate-specific antigen in Black men with symptomatic prostate adenocarcinoma in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nnabugwu, Ikenna I; Udeh, Emeka I; Ugwumba, Fredrick O; Ozoemena, Francis O

    2016-01-01

    Background Men of Black African descent are known to have the highest incidence of prostate cancer. The disease is also more aggressive in this group possibly due to biologically more aggressive tumor or late presentation. Currently, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assay plays a significant role in making the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, the obtained value of serum PSA may not directly relate with the Gleason score (GS), a measure of tumor aggression in prostate cancer. This study explores the relationship between serum total PSA at presentation (iPSA) and GS. Patients and methods The iPSA of patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer was compared with the obtained GS of the prostate biopsy specimens. The age of the patients at presentation and the prostate volumes were also analyzed with respect to the iPSA and GS. The data were analyzed retrospectively using IBM SPSS Version 20. Pearson correlation was used for numeric variables, whereas Fisher’s exact test was used for categorical variables. Significance was set at P≤0.05. Results There were 205 patients from January 2010 to November 2013 who satisfied the inclusion criteria. iPSA as well as age at presentation and prostate volume were not found to significantly correlate with the primary Gleason grade, the secondary Gleason grade, or the GS. However, the presence of distant metastasis was identified to significantly correlate positively with GS. Conclusion GS may not be confidently predicted by the iPSA. Higher iPSA does not correlate with higher GS and vice versa. PMID:27486316

  9. Magnesium sulfate induced toxicity in vitro in AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cells and in vivo in mouse gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xulong; Bo, Agula; Chi, Baofeng; Xia, Yuan; Su, Xiong; Sun, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium sulfate is widely used as a food additive and as an orally administered medication. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible cytotoxicity of magnesium sulfate on AGS human gastric adenocarcinoma cells and gastric mucosa in mice. A trypan blue exclusion assay was used to determine the reduction in viability of AGS cells exposed to magnesium sulfate, and then effects on cell proliferation were quantified. The role of magnesium sulfate-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine production in AGS cells was also investigated. mRNA expression for IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α was determined by RT-PCR, and secretion of these cytokines was measured by ELISA. Immunohistochemical evaluation of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α expression was conducted in mouse gastric mucosa. Addition of 3 to 50 mM magnesium sulfate to AGS cells inhibited both cell proliferation and cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Magnesium sulfate had little effect on production of IL-1β or IL-6 but significantly inhibited production of IL-8. The animal model demonstrated that magnesium sulfate induced production of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. These preliminary data suggest that magnesium sulfate had a direct effect on the stomach and initiates cytotoxicity in moderate concentrations and time periods by inhibiting viability and proliferation of AGS cells and by regulating expression and/or release of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  10. Targeting tissue factor on tumor vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells for immunotherapy in mouse models of prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Garen, A

    2001-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of an immunoconjugate (icon) molecule, composed of a mutated mouse factor VII (mfVII) targeting domain and the Fc effector domain of an IgG1 Ig (mfVII/Fc icon), was tested with a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human prostatic cancer and an immunocompetent mouse model of mouse prostatic cancer. The SCID mice were first injected s.c. with a human prostatic tumor line, forming a skin tumor that produces a high blood titer of prostate-specific antigen and metastasizes to bone. The icon was encoded in a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector that was injected directly into the skin tumor. The tumor cells infected by the vector synthesize and secrete the icon into the blood, and the blood-borne icon binds with high affinity and specificity to mouse tissue factor expressed on endothelial cells lining the lumen of the tumor vasculature and to human tissue factor expressed on the tumor cells. The Fc domain of the icon activates a cytolytic immune attack against cells that bind the icon. The immunotherapy tests in SCID mice demonstrated that intratumoral injections of the adenoviral vector encoding the mfVII/human Fc icon resulted in long-term regression of the injected human prostatic tumor and also of a distant uninjected tumor, without associated toxicity to the mice. Comparable results were obtained with a SCID mouse model of human melanoma. At the end of the experiments the mice appeared to be free of viable tumor cells. This protocol also could be efficacious for treating cancer patients who have vascularized tumors.

  11. Targeting tissue factor on tumor vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells for immunotherapy in mouse models of prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Garen, A

    2001-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of an immunoconjugate (icon) molecule, composed of a mutated mouse factor VII (mfVII) targeting domain and the Fc effector domain of an IgG1 Ig (mfVII/Fc icon), was tested with a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human prostatic cancer and an immunocompetent mouse model of mouse prostatic cancer. The SCID mice were first injected s.c. with a human prostatic tumor line, forming a skin tumor that produces a high blood titer of prostate-specific antigen and metastasizes to bone. The icon was encoded in a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector that was injected directly into the skin tumor. The tumor cells infected by the vector synthesize and secrete the icon into the blood, and the blood-borne icon binds with high affinity and specificity to mouse tissue factor expressed on endothelial cells lining the lumen of the tumor vasculature and to human tissue factor expressed on the tumor cells. The Fc domain of the icon activates a cytolytic immune attack against cells that bind the icon. The immunotherapy tests in SCID mice demonstrated that intratumoral injections of the adenoviral vector encoding the mfVII/human Fc icon resulted in long-term regression of the injected human prostatic tumor and also of a distant uninjected tumor, without associated toxicity to the mice. Comparable results were obtained with a SCID mouse model of human melanoma. At the end of the experiments the mice appeared to be free of viable tumor cells. This protocol also could be efficacious for treating cancer patients who have vascularized tumors. PMID:11593034

  12. Cryptosporidium parvum-induced ileo-caecal adenocarcinoma and Wnt signaling in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Benamrouz, Sadia; Conseil, Valerie; Chabé, Magali; Praet, Marleen; Audebert, Christophe; Blervaque, Renaud; Guyot, Karine; Gazzola, Sophie; Mouray, Anthony; Chassat, Thierry; Delaire, Baptiste; Goetinck, Nathalie; Gantois, Nausicaa; Osman, Marwan; Slomianny, Christian; Dehennaut, Vanessa; Lefebvre, Tony; Viscogliosi, Eric; Cuvelier, Claude; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Creusy, Colette; Certad, Gabriela

    2014-06-01

    Cryptosporidium species are apicomplexan protozoans that are found worldwide. These parasites constitute a large risk to human and animal health. They cause self-limited diarrhea in immunocompetent hosts and a life-threatening disease in immunocompromised hosts. Interestingly, Cryptosporidium parvum has been related to digestive carcinogenesis in humans. Consistent with a potential tumorigenic role of this parasite, in an original reproducible animal model of chronic cryptosporidiosis based on dexamethasone-treated or untreated adult SCID mice, we formerly reported that C. parvum (strains of animal and human origin) is able to induce digestive adenocarcinoma even in infections induced with very low inoculum. The aim of this study was to further characterize this animal model and to explore metabolic pathways potentially involved in the development of C. parvum-induced ileo-caecal oncogenesis. We searched for alterations in genes or proteins commonly involved in cell cycle, differentiation or cell migration, such as β-catenin, Apc, E-cadherin, Kras and p53. After infection of animals with C. parvum we demonstrated immunohistochemical abnormal localization of Wnt signaling pathway components and p53. Mutations in the selected loci of studied genes were not found after high-throughput sequencing. Furthermore, alterations in the ultrastructure of adherens junctions of the ileo-caecal neoplastic epithelia of C. parvum-infected mice were recorded using transmission electron microscopy. In conclusion, we found for the first time that the Wnt signaling pathway, and particularly the cytoskeleton network, seems to be pivotal for the development of the C. parvum-induced neoplastic process and cell migration of transformed cells. Furthermore, this model is a valuable tool in understanding the host-pathogen interactions associated with the intricate infection process of this parasite, which is able to modulate host cytoskeleton activities and several host-cell biological

  13. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-22

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  14. Race and Survival Following Brachytherapy-Based Treatment for Men With Localized or Locally Advanced Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Winkfield, Karen M.; Chen Minghui; Dosoretz, Daniel E.; Salenius, Sharon A.; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We investigated whether race was associated with risk of death following brachytherapy-based treatment for localized prostate cancer, adjusting for age, cardiovascular comorbidity, treatment, and established prostate cancer prognostic factors. Methods: The study cohort was composed of 5,360 men with clinical stage T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer who underwent brachytherapy-based treatment at 20 centers within the 21st Century Oncology consortium. Cox regression multivariable analysis was used to evaluate the risk of death in African-American and Hispanic men compared to that in Caucasian men, adjusting for age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, clinical T stage, year and type of treatment, median income, and cardiovascular comorbidities. Results: After a median follow-up of 3 years, there were 673 deaths. African-American and Hispanic races were significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.77 and 1.79; 95% confidence intervals, 1.3-2.5 and 1.2-2.7; p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). Other factors significantly associated with an increased risk of death included age (p < 0.001), Gleason score of 8 to 10 (p = 0.04), year of brachytherapy (p < 0.001), and history of myocardial infarction treated with stent or coronary artery bypass graft (p < 0.001). Conclusions: After adjustment for prostate cancer prognostic factors, age, income level, and revascularized cardiovascular comorbidities, African-American and Hispanic races were associated with higher ACM in men with prostate cancer. Additional causative factors need to be identified.

  15. Therapeutic efficacy evaluation of 111in-VNB-liposome on human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wan-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Chang, Ya-Fang; Lu, Yi-Ching; Ting, Gann; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the liposome encaged with vinorelbine (VNB) and 111In-oxine on human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) using HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts. HT-29 cells stably transfected with plasmid vectors containing luciferase gene ( luc) were transplanted subcutaneously into the male NOD/SCID mice. Biodistribution of the drug was performed when tumor size reached 500-600 mm 3. The uptakes of 111In-VNB-liposome in tumor and normal tissues/organs at various time points postinjection were assayed. Multimodalities, including gamma scintigraphy, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and whole-body autoradiography (WBAR), were applied for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy when tumor size was about 100 mm 3. The tumor/blood ratios of 111In-VNB-liposome were 0.044, 0.058, 2.690, 20.628 and 24.327, respectively, at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h postinjection. Gamma scinitigraphy showed that the tumor/muscle ratios were 2.04, 2.25 and 4.39, respectively, at 0, 5 and 10 mg/kg VNB. BLI showed that significant tumor control was achieved in the group of 10 mg/kg VNB ( 111In-VNB-liposome). WBAR also confirmed this result. In this study, we have demonstrated a non-invasive imaging technique with a luciferase reporter gene and BLI for evaluation of tumor treatment efficacy in vivo. The SCID mice bearing HT-29/ luc xenografts treated with 111In-VNB-liposome were shown with tumor reduction by this technique.

  16. IV Administered Gadodiamide Enters the Lumen of the Prostatic Glands: X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy Examination of a Mouse Model

    DOE PAGES

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Ward, Jesse; Dougherty, Urszula; Zamora, Marta; Markiewicz, Erica; Binder, David C.; Antic, Tatjana; Vogt, Stefan; Karczmar, Gregory S.; et al

    2015-09-01

    In our objective, we descibe how dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has become a standard component of multiparametric protocols for MRI examination of the prostate, and its use is incorporated into current guidelines for prostate MRI examination. Analysis of DCE-MRI data for the prostate is usually based on the distribution of gadolinium-based agents, such as gadodiamide, into two well-mixed compartments, and it assumes that gadodiamide does not enter into the glandular lumen. However, this assumption has not been directly tested. The purpose of this study was to use x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) imaging in situ to measure the concentration of gadodiamidemore » in the epithelia and lumens of the prostate of healthy mice after IV injection of the contrast agent. For our materials and methods, six C57Bl6 male mice (age, 28 weeks) were sacrificed 10 minutes after IV injection of gadodiamide (0.13 mmol/kg), and three mice were sacrificed after saline injection. Prostate tissue samples obtained from each mouse were harvested and frozen; 7-μm-thick slices were sectioned for XFM imaging, and adjacent 5-μm-thick slices were sectioned for H and E staining. Elemental concentrations were determined from XFM images. Our results show mean (± SD) baseline concentration of gadolinium of 0.01 ± 0.01 mM was determined from XFM measurements of prostatic tissue samples when no gadodiamide was administered, and it was used to determine the measurement error. When gadodiamide was added, the mean concentrations of gadolinium in the epithelia and lumens in 32 prostatic glands from six mice were 1.00 ± 0.13 and 0.36 ± 0.09 mM, respectively. In conclusion, our data suggest that IV administration of gadodiamide results in uptake of contrast agent by the glandular lumens of the mouse prostate. We were able to quantitatively determine gadodiamide distributions in mouse prostatic epithelia and lumens.« less

  17. IV Administered Gadodiamide Enters the Lumen of the Prostatic Glands: X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy Examination of a Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Ward, Jesse; Dougherty, Urszula; Zamora, Marta; Markiewicz, Erica; Binder, David C.; Antic, Tatjana; Vogt, Stefan; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Oto, Aytekin

    2015-09-01

    In our objective, we descibe how dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has become a standard component of multiparametric protocols for MRI examination of the prostate, and its use is incorporated into current guidelines for prostate MRI examination. Analysis of DCE-MRI data for the prostate is usually based on the distribution of gadolinium-based agents, such as gadodiamide, into two well-mixed compartments, and it assumes that gadodiamide does not enter into the glandular lumen. However, this assumption has not been directly tested. The purpose of this study was to use x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) imaging in situ to measure the concentration of gadodiamide in the epithelia and lumens of the prostate of healthy mice after IV injection of the contrast agent. For our materials and methods, six C57Bl6 male mice (age, 28 weeks) were sacrificed 10 minutes after IV injection of gadodiamide (0.13 mmol/kg), and three mice were sacrificed after saline injection. Prostate tissue samples obtained from each mouse were harvested and frozen; 7-μm-thick slices were sectioned for XFM imaging, and adjacent 5-μm-thick slices were sectioned for H and E staining. Elemental concentrations were determined from XFM images. Our results show mean (± SD) baseline concentration of gadolinium of 0.01 ± 0.01 mM was determined from XFM measurements of prostatic tissue samples when no gadodiamide was administered, and it was used to determine the measurement error. When gadodiamide was added, the mean concentrations of gadolinium in the epithelia and lumens in 32 prostatic glands from six mice were 1.00 ± 0.13 and 0.36 ± 0.09 mM, respectively. In conclusion, our data suggest that IV administration of gadodiamide results in uptake of contrast agent by the glandular lumens of the mouse prostate. We were able to quantitatively determine gadodiamide distributions in mouse prostatic epithelia and lumens.

  18. LACK OF EXPRESSION OF EGF AND TGF-ALPHA IN THE FETAL MOUSE ALTERS FORMATION OF PROSTATIC EPITHELIAL BUDS AND INFLUENCES THE RESPONSE TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lack of Expression of EGF and TGF in the Fetal Mouse Alters Formation of Prostatic Epithelial Buds and Responsiveness to TCDD-Induced Impairment of Prostatic Bud Formation.

    Barbara D. Abbott, Tien-Min Lin, Nathan T. Rasmussen, Robert W. Moore,
    Ralph M. Albrecht, Judi...

  19. Klf5 Deletion Promotes Pten Deletion–Initiated Luminal-Type Mouse Prostate Tumors through Multiple Oncogenic Signaling Pathways12

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Changsheng; Ci, Xinpei; Sun, Xiaodong; Fu, Xiaoying; Zhang, Zhiqian; Dong, Eric N.; Hao, Zhao-Zhe; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5) regulates multiple biologic processes. Its function in tumorigenesis appears contradictory though, showing both tumor suppressor and tumor promoting activities. In this study, we examined whether and how Klf5 functions in prostatic tumorigenesis using mice with prostate-specific deletion of Klf5 and phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten), both of which are frequently inactivated in human prostate cancer. Histologic analysis demonstrated that when one Pten allele was deleted, which causes mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN), Klf5 deletion accelerated the emergence and progression of mPIN. When both Pten alleles were deleted, which causes prostate cancer, Klf5 deletion promoted tumor growth, increased cell proliferation, and caused more severe morphologic and molecular alterations. Homozygous deletion of Klf5 was more effective than hemizygous deletion. Unexpectedly, while Pten deletion alone expanded basal cell population in a tumor as reported, Klf5 deletion in the Pten-null background clearly reduced basal cell population while expanding luminal cell population. Global gene expression profiling, pathway analysis, and experimental validation indicate that multiple mechanisms could mediate the tumor-promoting effect of Klf5 deletion, including the up-regulation of epidermal growth factor and its downstream signaling molecules AKT and ERK and the inactivation of the p15 cell cycle inhibitor. KLF5 also appears to cooperate with several transcription factors, including CREB1, Sp1, Myc, ER and AR, to regulate gene expression. These findings validate the tumor suppressor function of KLF5. They also yield a mouse model that shares two common genetic alterations with human prostate cancer—mutation/deletion of Pten and deletion of Klf5. PMID:25425963

  20. Characterization of the cell of origin and propagation potential of the fibroblast growth factor 9-induced mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Arai, Daisuke; Hegab, Ahmed E; Soejima, Kenzo; Kuroda, Aoi; Ishioka, Kota; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Naoki, Katsuhiko; Kagawa, Shizuko; Hamamoto, Junko; Yin, Yongjun; Ornitz, David M; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2015-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) is essential for lung development and is highly expressed in a subset of human lung adenocarcinomas. We recently described a mouse model in which FGF9 expression in the lung epithelium caused proliferation of the airway epithelium at the terminal bronchioles and led to rapid development of adenocarcinoma. Here, we used this model to characterize the effects of prolonged FGF9 induction on the proximal and distal lung epithelia, and examined the propagation potential of FGF9-induced lung tumours. We showed that prolonged FGF9 over-expression in the lung resulted in the development of adenocarcinomas arising from both alveolar type II and airway secretory cells in the lung parenchyma and airways, respectively. We found that tumour cells harboured tumour-propagating cells that were able to form secondary tumours in recipient mice, regardless of FGF9 expression. However, the highest degree of tumour propagation was observed when unfractionated tumour cells were co-administered with autologous, tumour-associated mesenchymal cells. Although the initiation of lung adenocarcinomas was dependent on activation of the FGF9-FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) signalling axis, maintenance and propagation of the tumour was independent of this signalling. Activation of an alternative FGF-FGFR axis and the interaction with tumour stromal cells is likely to be responsible for the development of this independence. This study demonstrates the complex role of FGF-FGFR signalling in the initiation, growth and propagation of lung cancer. Our findings suggest that analysing the expressions of FGF-FGFRs in human lung cancer will be a useful tool for guiding customized therapy.

  1. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M.; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting. PMID:26431498

  2. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2015-10-13

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting.

  3. A Critical Role of the PTEN/PDGF Signaling Network for the Regulation of Radiosensitivity in Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Michael; Najy, Abdo J.; Snyder, Michael; Movilla, Lisa S.; Kim, Hyeong-Reh Choi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Loss or mutation of the phosphate and tensin homologue (PTEN) is a common genetic abnormality in prostate cancer (PCa) and induces platelet-derived growth factor D (PDGF D) signaling. We examined the role of the PTEN/PDGF axis on radioresponse using a murine PTEN null prostate epithelial cell model. Methods and Materials: PTEN wild-type (PTEN{sup +/+}) and PTEN knockout (PTEN{sup −/−}) murine prostate epithelial cell lines were used to examine the relationship between the PTEN status and radiosensitivity and also to modulate the PDGF D expression levels. PTEN{sup −/−} cells were transduced with a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentiviral vector containing either scrambled nucleotides (SCRM) or sequences targeted to PDGF D (shPDGF D). Tumorigenesis and morphogenesis of these cell lines were evaluated in vivo via subcutaneous injection of male nude mice and in vitro using Matrigel 3-dimensional (3D) culture. Effects of irradiation on clonogenic survival, cell migration, and invasion were measured with respect to the PTEN status and the PDGF D expression level. In addition, apoptosis and cell cycle redistribution were examined as potential mechanisms for differences seen. Results: PTEN{sup −/−} cells were highly tumorigenic in animals and effectively formed foci in 3D culture. Importantly, loss of PDGF D in these cell lines drastically diminished these phenotypes. Furthermore, PTEN{sup −/−} cells demonstrated increased clonogenic survival in vitro compared to PTEN{sup +/+}, and attenuation of PDGF D significantly reversed this radioresistant phenotype. PTEN{sup −/−} cells displayed greater migratory and invasive potential at baseline as well as after irradiation. Both the basal and radiation-induced migratory and invasive phenotypes in PTEN{sup −/−} cells required PDGF D expression. Interestingly, these differences were independent of apoptosis and cell cycle redistribution, as they showed no significant difference. Conclusions: We propose

  4. Bitter melon extract impairs prostate cancer cell-cycle progression and delays prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in TRAMP model.

    PubMed

    Ru, Peng; Steele, Robert; Nerurkar, Pratibha V; Phillips, Nancy; Ray, Ratna B

    2011-12-01

    Prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men. Earlier diagnosis increases survival rate in patients. However, treatments for advanced disease are limited to hormone ablation techniques and palliative care. Thus, new methods of treatment and prevention are necessary for inhibiting disease progression to a hormone refractory state. One of the approaches to control prostate cancer is prevention through diet, which inhibits one or more neoplastic events and reduces the cancer risk. For centuries, Ayurveda has recommended the use of bitter melon (Momordica charantia) as a functional food to prevent and treat human health related issues. In this study, we have initially used human prostate cancer cells, PC3 and LNCaP, as an in vitro model to assess the efficacy of bitter melon extract (BME) as an anticancer agent. We observed that prostate cancer cells treated with BME accumulate during the S phase of the cell cycle and modulate cyclin D1, cyclin E, and p21 expression. Treatment of prostate cancer cells with BME enhanced Bax expression and induced PARP cleavage. Oral gavage of BME, as a dietary compound, delayed the progression to high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in TRAMP (transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate) mice (31%). Prostate tissue from BME-fed mice displayed approximately 51% reduction of proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression. Together, our results suggest for the first time that oral administration of BME inhibits prostate cancer progression in TRAMP mice by interfering cell-cycle progression and proliferation. PMID:21911444

  5. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26840261

  6. Animal models of human prostate cancer: The Consensus Report of the New York Meeting of the Mouse Models of Human Cancers Consortium Prostate Pathology Committee

    PubMed Central

    Ittmann, Michael; Huang, Jiaoti; Radaelli, Enrico; Martin, Philip; Signoretti, Sabina; Sullivan, Ruth; Simons, Brian W.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Robinson, Brian D.; Chu, Gerald C.; Loda, Massimo; Thomas, George; Borowsky, Alexander; Cardiff, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models, particularly mouse models, play a central role in the study of the etiology, prevention and treatment of human prostate cancer (PCa). While tissue culture models are extremely useful in understanding the biology of PCa, they cannot recapitulate the complex cellular interactions within the tumor microenvironment that play a key role in cancer initiation and progression. The NCI Mouse Models of Human Cancers Consortium convened a group of human and veterinary pathologists to review the current animal models of PCa and make recommendations regarding the pathological analysis of these models. Over 40 different models with 439 samples were reviewed including genetically engineered mouse models, xenograft, rat and canine models. Numerous relevant models have been developed over the last 15 years and each approach has strengths and weaknesses. Analysis of multiple genetically engineered models has shown that reactive stroma formation is present in all the models developing invasive carcinomas. In addition, numerous models with multiple genetic alterations display aggressive phenotypes characterized by sarcomatoid carcinomas and metastases, which is presumably a histological manifestation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The significant progress in development of improved models of PCa has already accelerated our understanding the complex biology of PCa and promises to enhance development of new approaches to prevention, detection and treatment of this common malignancy. PMID:23610450

  7. Xanthohumol Impairs Human Prostate Cancer Cell Growth and Invasion and Diminishes the Incidence and Progression of Advanced Tumors in TRAMP Mice

    PubMed Central

    Venè, Roberta; Benelli, Roberto; Minghelli, Simona; Astigiano, Simonetta; Tosetti, Francesca; Ferrari, Nicoletta

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding the biological basis of prostate cancer, management of the disease, especially in the phase resistant to androgen ablation, remains a significant challenge. The long latency and high incidence of prostate carcinogenesis provides the opportunity to intervene with chemoprevention to prevent or eradicate prostate malignancies. In this study, we have used human hormone-resistant prostate cancer cells, DU145 and PC3, as an in vitro model to assess the efficacy of xanthohumol (XN) against cell growth, motility and invasion. We observed that treatment of prostate cancer cells with low micromolar doses of XN inhibits proliferation and modulates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and AKT phosphorylation leading to reduced cell migration and invasion. Oxidative stress by increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was associated with these effects. Transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) transgenic mice were used as an in vivo model of prostate adenocarcinoma. Oral gavage of XN, three times per week, beginning at 4 wks of age, induced a decrease in the average weight of the urogenital (UG) tract, delayed advanced tumor progression and inhibited the growth of poorly differentiated prostate carcinoma. The ability of XN to inhibit prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo suggests that XN may be a novel agent for the management of prostate cancer. PMID:22952060

  8. PPARγ isoforms differentially regulate metabolic networks to mediate mouse prostatic epithelial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Strand, D W; Jiang, M; Murphy, T A; Yi, Y; Konvinse, K C; Franco, O E; Wang, Y; Young, J D; Hayward, S W

    2012-08-09

    Recent observations indicate prostatic diseases are comorbidities of systemic metabolic dysfunction. These discoveries revealed fundamental questions regarding the nature of prostate metabolism. We previously showed that prostate-specific ablation of PPARγ in mice resulted in tumorigenesis and active autophagy. Here, we demonstrate control of overlapping and distinct aspects of prostate epithelial metabolism by ectopic expression of individual PPARγ isoforms in PPARγ knockout prostate epithelial cells. Expression and activation of either PPARγ 1 or 2 reduced de novo lipogenesis and oxidative stress and mediated a switch from glucose to fatty acid oxidation through regulation of genes including Pdk4, Fabp4, Lpl, Acot1 and Cd36. Differential effects of PPARγ isoforms included decreased basal cell differentiation, Scd1 expression and triglyceride fatty acid desaturation and increased tumorigenicity by PPARγ1. In contrast, PPARγ2 expression significantly increased basal cell differentiation, Scd1 expression and AR expression and responsiveness. Finally, in confirmation of in vitro data, a PPARγ agonist versus high-fat diet (HFD) regimen in vivo confirmed that PPARγ agonization increased prostatic differentiation markers, whereas HFD downregulated PPARγ-regulated genes and decreased prostate differentiation. These data provide a rationale for pursuing a fundamental metabolic understanding of changes to glucose and fatty acid metabolism in benign and malignant prostatic diseases associated with systemic metabolic stress.

  9. Histological changes caused by meclofenamic acid in androgen independent prostate cancer tumors: evaluation in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Soriano-Hernández, Alejandro D.; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Alejandrina; Galvan-Salazar, Héctor R.; Montes-Galindo, Daniel A.; Martinez-Martinez, Rafael; Valdez-Velazquez, Laura L.; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Rafael; Espinoza-Gómez, Francisco; Newton-Sanchez, Oscar A.; Lara-Esqueda, Agustín; Guzman-Esquivel, Jose

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Meclofenamic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has shown therapeutic potential for different types of cancers, including androgen-independent prostate neoplasms. The antitumor effect of diverse nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been shown to be accompanied by histological and molecular changes that are responsible for this beneficial effect. The objective of the present work was to analyze the histological changes caused by meclofenamic acid in androgen-independent prostate cancer. Tumors were created in a nude mouse model using PC3 cancerous human cells. Meclofenamic acid (10 mg/kg/day; experimental group, n=5) or saline solution (control group, n=5) was administered intraperitoneally for twenty days. Histological analysis was then carried out on the tumors, describing changes in the cellular architecture, fibrosis, and quantification of cellular proliferation and tumor vasculature. Meclofenamic acid causes histological changes that indicate less tumor aggression (less hypercellularity, fewer atypical mitoses, and fewer nuclear polymorphisms), an increase in fibrosis, and reduced cellular proliferation and tumor vascularity. Further studies are needed to evaluate the molecular changes that cause the beneficial and therapeutic effects of meclofenamic acid in androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:26689527

  10. New bone formation in nude mouse calvaria induced by canine prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    LeRoy, Bruce E; Bahnson, Robert R; Rosol, Thomas J

    2002-11-29

    Osteoblastic metastases are common in patients with advanced prostate cancer. The pathophysiology of the new bone formation at metastatic sites is not currently known, but it is hypothesized that growth factors secreted by the prostate may be involved. Unfortunately, most rodent models of prostate cancer with metastasis to bone are osteolytic and not osteoblastic. Significant osteolysis by tumor cells at metastatic sites also may lead to fractures or bone instability. Misinterpretation of new periosteal bone due to bone instability as tumor-cell osteo-induction is another disadvantage of the osteolytic models. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a model system of new bone formation in the calvaria of nude mice stimulated by normal canine prostate tissue. Collagenase-digested normal prostate tissue was implanted adjacent to the calvaria of nude mice. Calvaria were examined at 2 weeks post-implantation for changes in the bone microenvironment by histology, calcein uptake at sites of bone mineralization, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining for osteoclasts. The prostate tissue remained viable and induced abundant new woven bone formation on the adjacent periosteal surface. In some cases new bone formation also was induced on the distant or concave calvarial periosteum. The new bone stained intensely with calcein, which demonstrated mineralization of the bone matrix. The new bone formation on prostate-implanted calvaria significantly increased (1.7-fold) the thickness of the calvaria compared with control calvaria. New bone formation was not induced in calvaria of mice implanted with normal canine kidney, urinary bladder, spleen, or skeletal muscle tissue, or mice with surgically-induced disruption of the periosteum. Osteoclast numbers in the medullary spaces and periosteum of calvaria were mildly increased (61%) in mice with implanted prostate tissue. In conclusion, this animal model will be useful for investigating the roles of prostate

  11. TCDD inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling disrupts prostatic bud formation in mouse urogenital sinus.

    PubMed

    Branam, Amanda M; Davis, Nicole M; Moore, Robert W; Schneider, Andrew J; Vezina, Chad M; Peterson, Richard E

    2013-05-01

    In mice, in utero exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p- dioxin (TCDD) reduces the number of dorsolateral prostatic buds resulting in a smaller dorsolateral prostate and prevents formation of ventral buds culminating in ventral prostate agenesis. The genes and signaling pathways affected by TCDD that are responsible for disrupting prostate development are largely unknown. Here we show that treatment of urogenital sinus (UGS) organ cultures with known inhibitors of canonical Wnt signaling also inhibits prostatic bud formation. In support of the hypothesis that TCDD decreases canonical Wnt signaling, we identify inhibitory effects of TCDD on multiple components of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway in the UGS that temporally coincide with the inhibitory effect of TCDD on prostatic bud formation: (1) expression of R-spondins (Rspo2 and Rspo3) that promote canonical Wnt signaling is reduced; (2) expression of Lef1, Tcf1, and Wif1, established canonical Wnt target genes, is decreased; (3) expression of Lgr5, a RSPO receptor that activates canonical Wnt signaling, is reduced; and (4) expression of Dickkopfs (Dkks), inhibitors of canonical Wnt signaling, is not increased by TCDD. Thus, the TCDD-induced reduction in canonical Wnt signaling is associated with a decrease in activators (Rspo2 and Rspo3) rather than an increase in inhibitors (Dkk1 and Dkk2) of the pathway. This study focuses on determining whether treatment of TCDD-exposed UGS organ cultures with RSPO2 and/or RSPO3 is capable of rescuing the inhibitory effects of TCDD on canonical Wnt signaling and prostatic bud formation. We discovered that each RSPO alone or in combination partially rescues TCDD inhibition of both canonical Wnt signaling and prostatic bud formation.

  12. ALTERED SENSITIVITY OF THE MOUSE FETUS TO IMPAIRED PROSTATIC BUD FORMATION BY DIOXIN: INFLUENCE OF GENETIC BACKGROUND AND NULL EXPRESSION OF TGF-ALFA AND EGF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Altered sensitivity of the mouse fetus to impaired prostatic bud formation by dioxin: Influence of genetic background and null expression of TGF and EGF.
    Rasmussen, N.T., Lin T-M., Fenton, S.E., Abbott, B.D. and R.E. Peterson.
    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)...

  13. Optoacoustic imaging of an animal model of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Michelle P.; Arsenault, Michel; Riley, Chris; Kolios, Michael; Whelan, William M.

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is currently the most common cancer among Canadian men. Due to an increase in public awareness and screening, prostate cancer is being detected at earlier stages and in much younger men. This is raising the need for better treatment monitoring approaches. Optoacoustic imaging is a new technique that involves exposing tissues to pulsed light and detecting the acoustic waves generated by the tissue. Optoacoustic images of a tumour bearing mouse and an agematched control were acquired for a 775 nm illumination using a reverse-mode imaging system. A murine model of prostate cancer, TRAMP (transgenetic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate), was investigated. The results show an increase in optoacoustic signal generated by the tumour compared to that generated by the surrounding tissues with a contrast ratio of 3.5. The dimensions of the tumour in the optoacoustic image agreed with the true tumour dimensions to within 0.5 mm. In this study we show that there are detectable changes in optoacoustic signal strength that arise from the presence of a tumour in the prostate, which demonstrates the potential of optoacoustic imaging for the monitoring of prostate cancer therapy.

  14. Frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas-1 demonstrates oncogenic properties in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Xiong, Hua; Zou, Yanmei; Xu, Sanpeng; Quan, Lanping; Yuan, Xianglin; Xu, Ningzhi; Wang, Yihua

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer-associated mortality for males worldwide. Although dysregulation of the β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) pathway has been previously reported in prostate cancer, the mechanisms underlying this process remain unknown. Frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas-1 (FRAT1) functions as a positive regulator of the β-catenin/TCF signaling pathway. However, to the best of our knowledge, the molecular association between FRAT1 and the β-catenin/TCF pathway in prostate cancer has not been investigated. In the present study, FRAT1 expression was analyzed in normal prostate tissues and prostate adenocarcinoma samples using publicly available databases, a commercial tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry techniques. In addition, FRAT1 expression levels were altered by overexpression or RNA interference-mediated depletion in prostate cancer cells. The effects of FRAT1 expression on tumor growth were determined using cell growth curves in vitro and xenografts in nude mice in vivo. The effects of FRAT1 on β-catenin/TCF activity were measured using the TOPFLASH reporter assay. FRAT1 was expressed exclusively in the nuclei of normal prostate basal cells, and nuclear FRAT1 was detected in 68% (40/59) of prostate adenocarcinoma samples. In addition, FRAT1 activated the TCF luciferase reporter gene promoter in prostate cancer cells, and was observed to promote the growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro. Furthermore, FRAT1 expression was sufficient to transform NIH3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and lead to tumor formation in vivo. These results suggest that FRAT1 demonstrates oncogenic properties in prostate cancer, potentially by suppressing the inhibitory effect of nuclear glycogen synthase 3β against β-catenin/TCF activity, thus activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and promoting cell growth. PMID:27599661

  15. Frequently rearranged in advanced T‑cell lymphomas‑1 demonstrates oncogenic properties in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xiong, Hua; Zou, Yanmei; Xu, Sanpeng; Quan, Lanping; Yuan, Xianglin; Xu, Ningzhi; Wang, Yihua

    2016-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer‑associated mortality for males worldwide. Although dysregulation of the β‑catenin/T‑cell factor (TCF) pathway has been previously reported in prostate cancer, the mechanisms underlying this process remain unknown. Frequently rearranged in advanced T‑cell lymphomas‑1 (FRAT1) functions as a positive regulator of the β‑catenin/TCF signaling pathway. However, to the best of our knowledge, the molecular association between FRAT1 and the β‑catenin/TCF pathway in prostate cancer has not been investigated. In the present study, FRAT1 expression was analyzed in normal prostate tissues and prostate adenocarcinoma samples using publicly available databases, a commercial tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry techniques. In addition, FRAT1 expression levels were altered by overexpression or RNA interference‑mediated depletion in prostate cancer cells. The effects of FRAT1 expression on tumor growth were determined using cell growth curves in vitro and xenografts in nude mice in vivo. The effects of FRAT1 on β‑catenin/TCF activity were measured using the TOPFLASH reporter assay. FRAT1 was expressed exclusively in the nuclei of normal prostate basal cells, and nuclear FRAT1 was detected in 68% (40/59) of prostate adenocarcinoma samples. In addition, FRAT1 activated the TCF luciferase reporter gene promoter in prostate cancer cells, and was observed to promote the growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro. Furthermore, FRAT1 expression was sufficient to transform NIH3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and lead to tumor formation in vivo. These results suggest that FRAT1 demonstrates oncogenic properties in prostate cancer, potentially by suppressing the inhibitory effect of nuclear glycogen synthase 3β against β‑catenin/TCF activity, thus activating the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway and promoting cell growth. PMID:27599661

  16. Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate in the ejaculatory duct.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Salazar, Alma J; Basler, Joseph W; Nicolas, Marlo M

    2010-08-01

    Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate (IDCP) involving prostatic ducts and acini is a well-known phenomenon typically seen in a background of high-grade invasive prostatic adenocarcinoma. The current case of prostatic adenocarcinoma with Gleason score of 9 (4 + 5) invades the ejaculatory ducts, left seminal vesicle, and extraprostatic tissue. The tumor involving the left ejaculatory duct spans the lumen with preservation of native duct architecture, including basal cells, similar features described in IDCP involving prostatic ducts and acini. PMID:20444733

  17. Akt-mediated phosphorylation of Bmi1 modulates its oncogenic potential, E3 ligase activity, and DNA damage repair activity in mouse prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nacerddine, Karim; Beaudry, Jean-Bernard; Ginjala, Vasudeva; Westerman, Bart; Mattiroli, Francesca; Song, Ji-Ying; van der Poel, Henk; Ponz, Olga Balagué; Pritchard, Colin; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien; Zevenhoven, John; Tanger, Ellen; Sixma, Titia K.; Ganesan, Shridar; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major lethal malignancy in men, but the molecular events and their interplay underlying prostate carcinogenesis remain poorly understood. Epigenetic events and the upregulation of polycomb group silencing proteins including Bmi1 have been described to occur during PCa progression. Here, we found that conditional overexpression of Bmi1 in mice induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and elicited invasive adenocarcinoma when combined with PTEN haploinsufficiency. In addition, Bmi1 and the PI3K/Akt pathway were coactivated in a substantial fraction of human high-grade tumors. We found that Akt mediated Bmi1 phosphorylation, enhancing its oncogenic potential in an Ink4a/Arf-independent manner. This process also modulated the DNA damage response and affected genomic stability. Together, our findings demonstrate the etiological role of Bmi1 in PCa, unravel an oncogenic collaboration between Bmi1 and the PI3K/Akt pathway, and provide mechanistic insights into the modulation of Bmi1 function by phosphorylation during prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:22505453

  18. [Urachal adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Dakir, M; Dahami, Z; Sarf, I; Tahri, A; Elmrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2001-09-01

    Cancer of the urachus is very unusual. The lesion is a mucosecretory adenocarcinoma. The diagnosis is usually established late, and has a serious prognosis because of a long clinical latency. We report a case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the urachus revealed by hematuria. A review of the literature allows us to demonstrate the rarity of this tumour and to demonstrate its various clinical, histological, radiological and therapeutical aspects.

  19. Prostate biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate biopsy; Fine needle biopsy of the prostate; Core biopsy of the prostate; Targeted prostate biopsy; Prostate biopsy - transrectal ultrasound (TRUS); Stereotactic transperineal prostate biopsy (STPB)

  20. Protective effects of seahorse extracts in a rat castration and testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia model and mouse oligospermatism model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-Hui; Wang, Li-Hong; Mei, Xue-Ting; Li, Bing-Ji; Lv, Jun-Li; Xu, Shi-Bo

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of seahorse (Hippocampus spp.) extracts in a rat model of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and mouse model of oligospermatism. Compared to the sham operated group, castration and testosterone induced BPH, indicated by increased penile erection latency; decreased penis nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity; reduced serum acid phosphatase (ACP) activity; increased prostate index; and epithelial thickening, increased glandular perimeter, increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) index and upregulation of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in the prostate. Seahorse extracts significantly ameliorated the histopathological changes associated with BPH, reduced the latency of penile erection and increased penile NOS activity. Administration of seahorse extracts also reversed epididymal sperm viability and motility in mice treated with cyclophosphamide (CP). Seahorse extracts have potential as a candidate marine drug for treating BPH without inducing the side effects of erectile dysfunction (ED) or oligospermatism associated with the BPH drug finasteride.

  1. The metaplastic effects of estrogen on mouse prostate epithelium: proliferation of cells with basal cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Risbridger, G P; Wang, H; Frydenberg, M; Cunha, G

    2001-06-01

    The exogenous administration of estrogens to male mice alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and reduces androgen levels, leading to a regression of the prostatic epithelium. As well, a specific direct response to estrogens is the induction of epithelial squamous metaplasia. The aims of this study were to identify the process by which the prostatic epithelium is transformed in intact adult male mice using the synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol. A comparison of the effects of diethylstilbestrol in the three lobes revealed a hierarchy of response, with the anterior lobe being the most responsive, the dorsolateral lobe less responsive, and the ventral lobe the least responsive. The effect of castration was used to distinguish between the epithelial responses to estrogen administration and androgen deprivation. The results demonstrate that transformation of the epithelium involved proliferation of cells with a basal cell phenotype, the onset of cytokeratin 10 expression, up-regulation of progesterone receptor expression, and loss of the cell cycle inhibitor, p27(Kip1) expression; none of these changes was observed after castration. Mice lacking functional estrogen receptor alpha failed to respond, demonstrating a requirement for estrogen receptor alpha in the epithelium and/or stroma to mediate the proliferative response to estrogen in the prostate gland.

  2. Stromal microcalcification in prostate.

    PubMed

    Muezzinoglu, B; Gurbuz, Y

    2001-06-01

    Prostatic calcification is most commonly encountered as calculus or intraluminal calcifications within atypical small glandular proliferations. This study was undertaken to detect stromal microcalcifications in prostate tissue. All slides from 194 needle biopsies were retrospectively reviewed. Six cases (3.1%) had stromal microcalcifications constantly associated with mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate around the each focus. Association with prostatic glands was not seen in any of the microcalcification foci. Three cases had simultaneous adenocarcinoma and one had high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, all of which were apart from the microcalcification foci. In conclusion, stromal microcalcification is a dystrophic, inflammation-mediated, benign process.

  3. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  4. ERK and AKT signaling drive MED1 overexpression in prostate cancer in association with elevated proliferation and tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Feng; Irshad, Shazia; Yu, Wei; Belakavadi, Madesh; Chekmareva, Marina; Ittmann, Michael M; Abate-Shen, Cory; Fondell, Joseph D

    2013-07-01

    MED1 is a key coactivator of the androgen receptor (AR) and other signal-activated transcription factors. Whereas MED1 is overexpressed in prostate cancer cell lines and is thought to coactivate distinct target genes involved in cell-cycle progression and castration-resistant growth, the underlying mechanisms by which MED1 becomes overexpressed and its oncogenic role in clinical prostate cancer have remained unclear. Here, we report that MED1 is overexpressed in the epithelium of clinically localized human prostate cancer patients, which correlated with elevated cellular proliferation. In a Nkx3.1:Pten mutant mouse model of prostate cancer that recapitulates the human disease, MED1 protein levels were markedly elevated in the epithelium of both invasive and castration-resistant adenocarcinoma prostate tissues. Mechanistic evidence showed that hyperactivated ERK and/or AKT signaling pathways promoted MED1 overexpression in prostate cancer cells. Notably, ectopic MED1 overexpression in prostate cancer xenografts significantly promoted tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, MED1 expression in prostate cancer cells promoted the expression of a number of novel genes involved in inflammation, cell proliferation, and survival. Together, these findings suggest that elevated MED1 is a critical molecular event associated with prostate oncogenesis.

  5. Therapeutic efficacy and molecular mechanisms of snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom-loaded silica nanoparticles in the treatment of breast cancer- and prostate cancer-bearing experimental mouse models.

    PubMed

    Badr, Gamal; Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K; Rabah, Danny M

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of drug-resistant cancer is a clinical challenge, and thus screening for novel anticancer drugs is critically important. We recently demonstrated a strong enhancement of the antitumor activity of snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom (WEV) in vitro in breast carcinoma, prostate cancer, and multiple myeloma cell lines but not in normal cells when the venom was combined with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NP). In the present study, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of WEV+NP in breast cancer- and prostate cancer-bearing experimental mouse models. Xenograft breast and prostate tumor mice models were randomized into 4 groups for each cancer model (10 mice per group) and were treated with vehicle (control), NP, WEV, or WEV+NP daily for 28 days post tumor inoculation. The tumor volumes were monitored throughout the experiment. On Day 28 post tumor inoculation, breast and prostate tumor cells were collected and either directly cultured for flow cytometry analysis or lysed for Western blot and ELISA analysis. Treatment with WEV+NP or WEV alone significantly reduced both breast and prostate tumor volumes compared to treatment with NP or vehicle alone. Compared to treatment with WEV alone, treatment of breast and prostate cancer cells with WEV+NP induced marked elevations in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydroperoxides, and nitric oxide; robust reductions in the levels of the chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL12, CXCL13, and CXCL16 and decreased surface expression of their cognate chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR4, CXCR5, and CXCR6; and subsequent reductions in the chemokine-dependent migration of both breast and prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that WEV+NP strongly inhibited insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated proliferation of breast and prostate cancer cells, respectively, and enhanced the induction of apoptosis by increasing the activity of caspase-3,-8, and -9 in both breast and

  6. Therapeutic efficacy and molecular mechanisms of snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom-loaded silica nanoparticles in the treatment of breast cancer- and prostate cancer-bearing experimental mouse models.

    PubMed

    Badr, Gamal; Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K; Rabah, Danny M

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of drug-resistant cancer is a clinical challenge, and thus screening for novel anticancer drugs is critically important. We recently demonstrated a strong enhancement of the antitumor activity of snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom (WEV) in vitro in breast carcinoma, prostate cancer, and multiple myeloma cell lines but not in normal cells when the venom was combined with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NP). In the present study, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of WEV+NP in breast cancer- and prostate cancer-bearing experimental mouse models. Xenograft breast and prostate tumor mice models were randomized into 4 groups for each cancer model (10 mice per group) and were treated with vehicle (control), NP, WEV, or WEV+NP daily for 28 days post tumor inoculation. The tumor volumes were monitored throughout the experiment. On Day 28 post tumor inoculation, breast and prostate tumor cells were collected and either directly cultured for flow cytometry analysis or lysed for Western blot and ELISA analysis. Treatment with WEV+NP or WEV alone significantly reduced both breast and prostate tumor volumes compared to treatment with NP or vehicle alone. Compared to treatment with WEV alone, treatment of breast and prostate cancer cells with WEV+NP induced marked elevations in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydroperoxides, and nitric oxide; robust reductions in the levels of the chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL12, CXCL13, and CXCL16 and decreased surface expression of their cognate chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR4, CXCR5, and CXCR6; and subsequent reductions in the chemokine-dependent migration of both breast and prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that WEV+NP strongly inhibited insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated proliferation of breast and prostate cancer cells, respectively, and enhanced the induction of apoptosis by increasing the activity of caspase-3,-8, and -9 in both breast and

  7. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Male Breast Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  8. Comparison of fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of isolated nuclei and routine histological sections from paraffin-embedded prostatic adenocarcinoma specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, J.; Bostwick, D. G.; Takahashi, S.; Borell, T. J.; Brown, J. A.; Lieber, M. M.; Jenkins, R. B.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful tool for quantitative analysis of chromosomes and genes and can be applied in a variety of specimens, including cell cultures, isolated nuclei from fresh and fixed tissues, and histological tissue sections. However, the results of FISH analysis of isolated nuclei in prostate cancer have not been previously compared with those from histological sections from the paraffin-embedded tissue blocks. To compare these methods, we studied isolated nuclei derived from 50-microns sections and adjacent 5-microns tissue sections from 10 cases of benign nodular hyperplasia of the prostate and 16 cases of prostatic carcinoma. FISH analysis employed centromere-specific probes for chromosomes 7, 8, 11, and 12. In benign tissue, the percentage of nuclei with three or more signals for chromosomes 7, 8, 11, and 12 was less than 3% for both isolated nuclei and tissue sections. However, the percentage of nuclei with no and one signals was less than 8% for isolated nuclei and more than 24% for tissue sections. In prostatic carcinoma, numeric chromosomal anomalies were found in 75% of cases by both FISH methods. However, isolated nuclei had more chromosomal tetrasomy than tissue sections (mean, 9.2 to 11.0% versus 5.1 to 5.6%, respectively). Conversely, intratumor heterogeneity of chromosomal anomalies was identified in 5 cases by FISH analysis of tissue sections but not in isolated nuclei. Cancer ploidy analysis by FISH correlated well with ploidy analysis by flow cytometry, although FISH was more sensitive for aneuploidy. We conclude that FISH analysis of isolated nuclei and histological tissue sections from paraffin blocks are reliable methods for detection of chromosomal anomalies in archival tissue of prostate cancer, although each method has advantages and disadvantages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8863668

  9. Dendritic cells serve as a “Trojan horse” for oncolytic adenovirus delivery in the treatment of mouse prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao-lun; Liang, Xuan; Li, He-cheng; Wang, Zi-ming; Chong, Tie

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer, in which replication of the virus itself is the anticancer method. However, the success of this novel therapy is limited due to inefficient delivery of the virus to the target sites. In this study, we used dendritic cells (DCs) as carriers for conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) in targeting prostate carcinoma (PCa). Methods: Four types of CRAds, including Ad-PC (without PCa-specific promoter and a recombinant human tumor necrosis factor, rmhTNF, sequence), Ad-PC-rmhTNF (without PCa-specific promoter), Ad-PPC-NCS (without an rmhTNF sequence) and Ad-PPC-rmhTNF, were constructed. The androgen-insensitive mouse PCa RM-1 cells were co-cultured with CRAd-loading DCs, and the viability of RM-1 cells was examined using MTT assay. The in vivo effects of CRAd-loading DCs on PCa were evaluated in RM-1 xenograft mouse model. Results: Two PCa-specific CRAds (Ad-PPC-NCS, Ad-PPC-rmhTNF) exhibited more potent suppression on the viability of RM-1 cells in vitro than the PCa-non-specific CRAds (Ad-PC, Ad-PC-rmhTNF). In PCa-bearing mice, intravenous injection of the PCa-specific CRAd-loading DCs significantly inhibited the growth of xenografted tumors, extended the survival time, and induced T-cell activation. Additionally, the rmhTNF-containing CRAds exhibited greater tumor killing ability than CRAds without rmhTNF. Conclusion: DCs may be an effective vector for the delivery of CRAds in the treatment of PCa. PMID:27345628

  10. Adenocarcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Compared to adenomas, adenocarcinomas show greater cytological atypia, increased frequency of mitoses, regional variation in growth pattern, more papillary structures, have size over 5 mm in diameter, show invasion of vessels, large airways or pleura, as well as lymphatic and hematogenous metastases.

  11. A Review of the Existing Grading Schemes and a Proposal for a Modified Grading Scheme for Prostatic Lesions in TRAMP Mice

    PubMed Central

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D.; Sargeant, Aaron M.; Rosol, Thomas J.; Rengel, Robert C.; Clinton, Steven K.; Chen, Ching-Shih; Kulp, Samuel K.

    2014-01-01

    The transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model is well established and offers several advantages for the study of chemopreventive agents, including its well-defined course of disease progression and high incidence of poorly differentiated carcinomas within a relatively short length of time. However, there is no consensus on the grading of prostatic lesions in these mice. In particular, agreement is lacking on the criteria for differentiating prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) from well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, specifically as it relates to evidence of invasion. This differentiation is critical for evaluating the effects of putative chemopreventive agents on progression to neoplasia. Moreover, only one of the published grading schemes assigns numerical grades to prostatic lesions, which facilitate statistical analysis. Here, we review five currently available grading schemes and propose a refined scheme that provides a useful definition of invasion for the differentiation of PIN from well-differentiated adenocarcinoma and includes a numerical scoring system that accounts for both the most severe and most common histopathological lesions in each of the lobes of the prostate and their distributions. We expect that researchers will find this refined grading scheme to be useful for chemoprevention studies in TRAMP mice. PMID:22021166

  12. Long-Term Treatment Sequelae After External Beam Irradiation With or Without Hormonal Manipulation for Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Studies 85-31, 86-10, and 92-02

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A. Bae, Kyoungwha; Pilepich, Miljenko; Hanks, Gerald; Shipley, William

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: Late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) morbidity from external beam irradiation used to treat adenocarcinoma of the prostate continue to be a concern of physicians and patients alike. In addition, for locally advanced/high-risk cancer, the appropriate use of hormonal manipulation in addition to radiation therapy (RT) may increase toxicity. We analyzed three large Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) studies (85-31, 86-10, and 92-02) to try to address these issues. Methods and Materials: A total of 2,922 patients were accrued with a median follow-up of 10.3 years for surviving patients. The RTOG scoring scheme was used to assess GI, GU, and other toxicities. Toxicity reported was Grade 3 or higher late toxicity. Patient toxicity level was assessed by study and by treatment type combining RT only vs. RT + short-course hormone therapy (STH) vs. RT + long-term hormone therapy (LTH). Results: Multivariate analysis reveals that age >70 was statistically significantly associated with a decrease in late any Grade 3+ toxicity (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78, p = 0.0476) adjusted for treatment type. Comparing treatment type, patients treated with RT+STH had a statistically significant lower probability of Grade 3+ GI, GU, and other toxicity compared with RT alone (p = .00006; p = 0.0037; p = 0.0127, respectively). Patients treated with RT+LTH had a statistically significant lower probability of Grade 3+ GU toxicity compared with RT alone (p = 0.023). Conclusions: These data show that external beam radiation therapy remains a safe option for locally advanced/high-risk prostate cancer, and the use of hormonal manipulation does appear to be protective for GU and GI toxicity depending upon length of treatment.

  13. PARP-1 regulates epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in prostate tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Hong; Horbinski, Craig; Hensley, Patrick J.; Matuszak, Emily A.; Atkinson, Timothy; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is involved in key cellular processes such as DNA replication and repair, gene transcription, cell proliferation and apoptosis. The role of PARP-1 in prostate cancer development and progression is not fully understood. The present study investigated the function of PARP-1 in prostate growth and tumorigenesis in vivo. Functional inactivation of PARP-1 by gene-targeted deletion led to a significant reduction in the prostate gland size in young PARP-1−/− mice (6 weeks) compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. To determine the effect of PARP-1 functional loss on prostate cancer onset, PARP-1−/− mice were crossed with the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Pathological assessment of prostate tumors revealed that TRAMP+/−, PARP-1−/− mice exhibited higher grade prostate tumors compared with TRAMP+/− PARP-1+/+ (16–28 weeks) that was associated with a significantly increased proliferative index and decreased apoptosis among the epithelial cells in TRAMP+/− PARP-1−/− prostate tumors. Furthermore tumors harboring PARP-1 loss, exhibited a downregulation of nuclear androgen receptor. Impairing PARP-1 led to increased levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and Smads that correlated with induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), as established by loss of E-cadherin and β-catenin and upregulation of N-cadherin and ZEB-1. Our findings suggest that impaired PARP-1 function promotes prostate tumorigenesis in vivo via TGF-β-induced EMT. Defining the EMT control by PARP-1 during prostate cancer progression is of translational significance for optimizing PARP-1 therapeutic targeting and predicting response in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:25173886

  14. 3-D photoacoustic and pulse echo imaging of prostate tumor progression in the mouse window chamber

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Daniel R.; Olafsson, Ragnar; Montilla, Leonardo G.; Witte, Russell S.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the tumor microenvironment is critical to characterizing how cancers operate and predicting their response to treatment. We describe a novel, high-resolution coregistered photoacoustic (PA) and pulse echo (PE) ultrasound system used to image the tumor microenvironment. Compared to traditional optical systems, the platform provides complementary contrast and important depth information. Three mice are implanted with a dorsal skin flap window chamber and injected with PC-3 prostate tumor cells transfected with green fluorescent protein. The ensuing tumor invasion is mapped during three weeks or more using simultaneous PA and PE imaging at 25 MHz, combined with optical and fluorescent techniques. Pulse echo imaging provides details of tumor structure and the surrounding environment with 100-μm3 resolution. Tumor size increases dramatically with an average volumetric growth rate of 5.35 mm3∕day, correlating well with 2-D fluorescent imaging (R = 0.97, p < 0.01). Photoacoustic imaging is able to track the underlying vascular network and identify hemorrhaging, while PA spectroscopy helps classify blood vessels according to their optical absorption spectrum, suggesting variation in blood oxygen saturation. Photoacoustic and PE imaging are safe, translational modalities that provide enhanced depth resolution and complementary contrast to track the tumor microenvironment, evaluate new cancer therapies, and develop molecular contrast agents in vivo. PMID:21361696

  15. 3-D photoacoustic and pulse echo imaging of prostate tumor progression in the mouse window chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Daniel R.; Olafsson, Ragnar; Montilla, Leonardo G.; Witte, Russell S.

    2011-02-01

    Understanding the tumor microenvironment is critical to characterizing how cancers operate and predicting their response to treatment. We describe a novel, high-resolution coregistered photoacoustic (PA) and pulse echo (PE) ultrasound system used to image the tumor microenvironment. Compared to traditional optical systems, the platform provides complementary contrast and important depth information. Three mice are implanted with a dorsal skin flap window chamber and injected with PC-3 prostate tumor cells transfected with green fluorescent protein. The ensuing tumor invasion is mapped during three weeks or more using simultaneous PA and PE imaging at 25 MHz, combined with optical and fluorescent techniques. Pulse echo imaging provides details of tumor structure and the surrounding environment with 100-μm3 resolution. Tumor size increases dramatically with an average volumetric growth rate of 5.35 mm3/day, correlating well with 2-D fluorescent imaging (R = 0.97, p < 0.01). Photoacoustic imaging is able to track the underlying vascular network and identify hemorrhaging, while PA spectroscopy helps classify blood vessels according to their optical absorption spectrum, suggesting variation in blood oxygen saturation. Photoacoustic and PE imaging are safe, translational modalities that provide enhanced depth resolution and complementary contrast to track the tumor microenvironment, evaluate new cancer therapies, and develop molecular contrast agents in vivo.

  16. Increasing intracellular bioavailable copper selectively targets prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cater, Michael A; Pearson, Helen B; Wolyniec, Kamil; Klaver, Paul; Bilandzic, Maree; Paterson, Brett M; Bush, Ashley I; Humbert, Patrick O; La Fontaine, Sharon; Donnelly, Paul S; Haupt, Ygal

    2013-07-19

    The therapeutic efficacy of two bis(thiosemicarbazonato) copper complexes, glyoxalbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(gtsm)] and diacetylbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(atsm)], for the treatment of prostate cancer was assessed in cell culture and animal models. Distinctively, copper dissociates intracellularly from Cu(II)(gtsm) but is retained by Cu(II)(atsm). We further demonstrated that intracellular H2gtsm [reduced Cu(II)(gtsm)] continues to redistribute copper into a bioavailable (exchangeable) pool. Both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm) selectively kill transformed (hyperplastic and carcinoma) prostate cell lines but, importantly, do not affect the viability of primary prostate epithelial cells. Increasing extracellular copper concentrations enhanced the therapeutic capacity of both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm), and their ligands (H2gtsm and H2atsm) were toxic only toward cancerous prostate cells when combined with copper. Treatment of the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model with Cu(II)(gtsm) (2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced prostate cancer burden (∼70%) and severity (grade), while treatment with Cu(II)(atsm) (30 mg/kg) was ineffective at the given dose. However, Cu(II)(gtsm) caused mild kidney toxicity in the mice, associated primarily with interstitial nephritis and luminal distention. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that Cu(II)(gtsm) inhibits proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity, a feature further established as being common to copper-ionophores that increase intracellular bioavailable copper. We have demonstrated that increasing intracellular bioavailable copper can selectively kill cancerous prostate cells in vitro and in vivo and have revealed the potential for bis(thiosemicarbazone) copper complexes to be developed as therapeutics for prostate cancer.

  17. Zinc Ionophore (Clioquinol) Inhibition of Human ZIP1-Deficient Prostate Tumor Growth in the Mouse Ectopic Xenograft Model: A Zinc Approach for the Efficacious Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Renty B.; Zou, Jing; Zheng, Yao; Naslund, Michael J.; Costello, Leslie C.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths in males. This is mainly due to the absence of an available efficacious chemotherapy despite decades of research in pursuit of effective treatment approaches. A plausible target for the treatment is the established clinical relationship that the zinc levels in the malignant cells are markedly decreased compared to the normal epithelium in virtually all cases of prostate cancer, and at all stages malignancy. The decrease in zinc results from the downregulation of the functional zinc uptake transporter, ZIP1; which occurs during early development of prostate malignancy. This is an essential requirement for the development of malignancy to prevent the cytotoxic/tumor-suppressor effects of increased zinc on the premalignant and malignant cells. Thus prostate cancer is a ZIP1-deficient malignancy. This relationship provides the basis for a treatment regimen that will facilitate the uptake and accumulation of zinc into the premalignant and malignant cells. In this report we employed a zinc ionophore (clioquinol) approach in the treatment of mice with human ZIP1-deficient prostate tumors (ectopic xenograft model). Clioquinol treatment resulted in 85%inhibition of tumor growth due to the cytotoxic effects of zinc. Coupled with additional results from earlier studies, the compelling evidence provides a plausible approach for the effective treatment of human prostate cancer; including primary site malignancy, hormone-resistant cancer, and metastasis. Additionally, this approach might be effective in preventing the development of malignancy in individuals suspected of presenting with early development of malignancy. Clinical trials are now required in leading to the potential for an efficacious zinc-treatment approach, which is urgently needed for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26878064

  18. An Evaluation of Hemi-Ablation Therapy Using High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound in the Treatment of Localized Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Hashim Uddin; Freeman, Alex; Allen, Clare; Kirkham, Alex; Illing, Rowland; Emberton, Mark

    2007-05-01

    The current choice for men with localised prostate cancer lies between active surveillance and radical therapy. The best evidence for the difference between these two extremes of care is 5% in terms of cancer-related absolute mortality at 8 years. It is generally accepted that this small difference will decrease for men diagnosed in the PSA-era. Therein lays a dilemma for men. If they choose active surveillance they accept anxiety of living with a cancer diagnosis and risk of under-treatment in the long term. On the other hand, radical therapy carries significant toxicity (incontinence, impotence, rectal problems) because it treats the whole gland and damages surrounding structures in up to half of men. With increasing PSA screening practices men are diagnosed younger with lower risk disease — early stage, lower Gleason grade and lower volume of cancer. Many have unifocal or unilateral disease. We propose a new concept whereby only the tumour focus and a margin of normal tissue is treated. With emerging techniques that can accurately localise tumour in the gland and technology that can treat to within millimetre accuracy, focal therapy of prostate cancer is now possible. By treating focally, the psychological burden of active surveillance is avoided. Equally, it is proposed that toxicity will decrease whilst at the same time retaining effective cancer control.

  19. Icaritin suppresses development of neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer through inhibition of IL-6/STAT3 and Aurora kinase A pathways in TRAMP mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng; Zhang, Zhi Wei; Tan, Ee Min; Lim, Z L Ryan; Li, Yu; Wang, Xiao Chong; Chua, Seok Eng; Li, Jun; Cheung, Edwin; Yong, Eu-Leong

    2016-07-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC) has a poor prognosis, with a median survival of less than 1 year after diagnosis. Following androgen deprivation therapy, prostate adenocarcinoma cells have been observed to develop an androgen receptor-negative, terminally differentiated and indolent neuroendocrine-like phenotype. However, several molecular events, including interleukin 6 (IL-6) stimulation, in the prostate microenvironment result in the appearance of aggressive, highly proliferative castrate-resistant NEPC. In this study, we examined the mechanistic effects of a natural prenylflavonoid, icaritin (ICT), on neuroendocrine differentiation in IL-6-induced LNCaP cells and NEPC development in the male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. TRAMP mice received daily intraperitoneal injection of ICT or vehicle. ICT induced apoptosis in prostate tumor, suppressed NEPC development and, accordingly, improved overall survival in TRAMP mice. Expression of neuroendocrine markers (synaptophysin) and androgen receptor in TRAMP mice and neuroendocrine-like LNCaP cells were inhibited by ICT. Suppression of neuroendocrine and NEPC development by ICT was associated with dose-dependent inhibitory effects on abnormally elevated IL-6/STAT3 and Aurora kinase A in vitro and in vivo Since ICT demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profiles with marked enrichment in prostate tissues, our study provides evidence for the development of prenylflavonoid as a multimodal therapeutic agent against NEPC. PMID:27207661

  20. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of ETV1, YK-4-279, Prevents Prostate Cancer Growth and Metastasis in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Rahim, Said; Minas, Tsion; Hong, Sung-Hyeok; Justvig, Sarah; Çelik, Haydar; Kont, Yasemin Saygideger; Han, Jenny; Kallarakal, Abraham T.; Kong, Yali; Rudek, Michelle A.; Brown, Milton L.; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Üren, Aykut

    2014-01-01

    Background The erythroblastosis virus E26 transforming sequences (ETS) family of transcription factors consists of a highly conserved group of genes that play important roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and invasion. Chromosomal translocations fusing ETS factors to promoters of androgen responsive genes have been found in prostate cancers, including the most clinically aggressive forms. ERG and ETV1 are the most commonly translocated ETS proteins. Over-expression of these proteins in prostate cancer cells results in a more invasive phenotype. Inhibition of ETS activity by small molecule inhibitors may provide a novel method for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Findings We recently demonstrated that the small molecule YK-4-279 inhibits biological activity of ETV1 in fusion-positive prostate cancer cells leading to decreased motility and invasion in-vitro. Here, we present data from an in-vivo mouse xenograft model. SCID-beige mice were subcutaneously implanted with fusion-positive LNCaP-luc-M6 and fusion-negative PC-3M-luc-C6 tumors. Animals were treated with YK-4-279, and its effects on primary tumor growth and lung metastasis were evaluated. YK-4-279 treatment resulted in decreased growth of the primary tumor only in LNCaP-luc-M6 cohort. When primary tumors were grown to comparable sizes, YK-4-279 inhibited tumor metastasis to the lungs. Expression of ETV1 target genes MMP7, FKBP10 and GLYATL2 were reduced in YK-4-279 treated animals. ETS fusion-negative PC-3M-luc-C6 xenografts were unresponsive to the compound. Furthermore, YK-4-279 is a chiral molecule that exists as a racemic mixture of R and S enantiomers. We established that (S)-YK-4-279 is the active enantiomer in prostate cancer cells. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that YK-4-279 is a potent inhibitor of ETV1 and inhibits both the primary tumor growth and metastasis of fusion positive prostate cancer xenografts. Therefore, YK-4-279 or similar compounds may be

  1. Mouse Models in Prostate Cancer Translational Research: From Xenograft to PDX

    PubMed Central

    del Vecchio, Vitale; Palma, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Antonio; Falco, Michela; Luciano, Antonio; De Biase, Davide; Perdonà, Sisto; Facchini, Gaetano; Arra, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advancement of clinical and preclinical research on PCa, which resulted in the last five years in a decrement of disease incidence by 3-4%, it remains the most frequent cancer in men and the second for mortality rate. Based on this evidence we present a brief dissertation on numerous preclinical models, comparing their advantages and disadvantages; among this we report the PDX mouse models that show greater fidelity to the disease, in terms of histopathologic features of implanted tumor, gene and miRNA expression, and metastatic pattern, well describing all tumor progression stages; this characteristic encourages the translation of preclinical results. These models become particularly useful in meeting the need of new treatments identification that eradicate PCa bone metastases growing, clarifying pathway of angiogenesis, identifying castration-resistant stem-like cells, and studying the antiandrogen therapies. Also of considerable interest are the studies of 3D cell cultures derived from PDX, which have the ability to maintain PDX cell viability with continued native androgen receptor expression, also showing a differential sensitivity to drugs. 3D PDX PCa may represent a diagnostic platform for the rapid assessment of drugs and push personalized medicine. Today the development of preclinical models in vitro and in vivo is necessary in order to obtain increasingly reliable answers before reaching phase III of the drug discovery. PMID:27294148

  2. Mouse Models in Prostate Cancer Translational Research: From Xenograft to PDX.

    PubMed

    Rea, Domenica; Del Vecchio, Vitale; Palma, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Antonio; Falco, Michela; Luciano, Antonio; De Biase, Davide; Perdonà, Sisto; Facchini, Gaetano; Arra, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advancement of clinical and preclinical research on PCa, which resulted in the last five years in a decrement of disease incidence by 3-4%, it remains the most frequent cancer in men and the second for mortality rate. Based on this evidence we present a brief dissertation on numerous preclinical models, comparing their advantages and disadvantages; among this we report the PDX mouse models that show greater fidelity to the disease, in terms of histopathologic features of implanted tumor, gene and miRNA expression, and metastatic pattern, well describing all tumor progression stages; this characteristic encourages the translation of preclinical results. These models become particularly useful in meeting the need of new treatments identification that eradicate PCa bone metastases growing, clarifying pathway of angiogenesis, identifying castration-resistant stem-like cells, and studying the antiandrogen therapies. Also of considerable interest are the studies of 3D cell cultures derived from PDX, which have the ability to maintain PDX cell viability with continued native androgen receptor expression, also showing a differential sensitivity to drugs. 3D PDX PCa may represent a diagnostic platform for the rapid assessment of drugs and push personalized medicine. Today the development of preclinical models in vitro and in vivo is necessary in order to obtain increasingly reliable answers before reaching phase III of the drug discovery.

  3. Mouse model of human ovarian endometrioid adenocarcinoma based on somatic defects in the Wnt/beta-catenin and PI3K/Pten signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rong; Hendrix-Lucas, Neali; Kuick, Rork; Zhai, Yali; Schwartz, Donald R; Akyol, Aytekin; Hanash, Samir; Misek, David E; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Williams, Bart O; Fearon, Eric R; Cho, Kathleen R

    2007-04-01

    One histologic subtype of ovarian carcinoma, ovarian endometrioid adenocarcinoma (OEA), frequently harbors mutations that constitutively activate Wnt/beta-catenin-dependent signaling. We now show that defects in the PI3K/Pten and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathways often occur together in a subset of human OEAs, suggesting their cooperation during OEA pathogenesis. Deregulation of these two pathways in the murine ovarian surface epithelium by conditional inactivation of the Pten and Apc tumor suppressor genes results in the formation of adenocarcinomas morphologically similar to human OEAs with 100% penetrance, short latency, and rapid progression to metastatic disease in upwards of 75% of mice. The biological behavior and gene expression patterns of the murine cancers resemble those of human OEAs with defects in the Wnt/beta-catenin and PI3K/Pten pathways.

  4. A novel type of cellular senescence that can be enhanced in mouse models and human tumor xenografts to suppress prostate tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Alimonti, Andrea; Nardella, Caterina; Chen, Zhenbang; Clohessy, John G.; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Trotman, Lloyd C.; Cheng, Ke; Varmeh, Shohreh; Kozma, Sara C.; Thomas, George; Rosivatz, Erika; Woscholski, Rudiger; Cognetti, Francesco; Scher, Howard I.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Irreversible cell growth arrest, a process termed cellular senescence, is emerging as an intrinsic tumor suppressive mechanism. Oncogene-induced senescence is thought to be invariably preceded by hyperproliferation, aberrant replication, and activation of a DNA damage checkpoint response (DDR), rendering therapeutic enhancement of this process unsuitable for cancer treatment. We previously demonstrated in a mouse model of prostate cancer that inactivation of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (Pten) elicits a senescence response that opposes tumorigenesis. Here, we show that Pten-loss–induced cellular senescence (PICS) represents a senescence response that is distinct from oncogene-induced senescence and can be targeted for cancer therapy. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we determined that PICS occurs rapidly after Pten inactivation, in the absence of cellular proliferation and DDR. Further, we found that PICS is associated with enhanced p53 translation. Consistent with these data, we showed that in mice p53-stabilizing drugs potentiated PICS and its tumor suppressive potential. Importantly, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of PTEN drives senescence and inhibits tumorigenesis in vivo in a human xenograft model of prostate cancer. Taken together, our data identify a type of cellular senescence that can be triggered in nonproliferating cells in the absence of DNA damage, which we believe will be useful for developing a “pro-senescence” approach for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:20197621

  5. Olfactomedin 4 deficiency promotes prostate neoplastic progression and is associated with upregulation of the hedgehog-signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongzhen; Liu, Wenli; Chen, Weiping; Zhu, Jianqiong; Deng, Chu-Xia; Rodgers, Griffin P.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) gene expression is associated with the progression of human prostate cancer, but its role and the molecular mechanisms involved in this process have not been completely understood. In this study, we found that Olfm4-knockout mice developed prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and prostatic adenocarcinoma. Importantly, we found that the hedgehog-signaling pathway was significantly upregulated in the Olfm4-knockout mouse model. We also found that restoration of OLFM4 in human prostate-cancer cells that lack OLFM4 expression significantly downregulated hedgehog signaling-pathway component expression. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the OLFM4 protein interacts with sonic hedgehog protein, as well as significantly inhibits GLI-reporter activity. Bioinformatic and immunohistochemistry analyses revealed that decreased OLFM4 and increased SHH expression was significantly associated with advanced human prostate cancer. Thus, olfactomedin 4 appears to play a critical role in regulating progression of prostate cancer, and has potential as a new biomarker for prostate cancer. PMID:26581960

  6. Androgen deprivation induces phenotypic plasticity and promotes resistance to molecular targeted therapy in a PTEN-deficient mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    De Velasco, Marco A; Tanaka, Motoyoshi; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Hatanaka, Yuji; Koike, Hiroyuki; Nishio, Kazuto; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2014-09-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer is an incurable heterogeneous disease that is characterized by a complex multistep process involving different cellular and biochemical changes brought on by genetic and epigenetic alterations. These changes lead to the activation or overexpression of key survival pathways that also serve as potential therapeutic targets. Despite promising preclinical results, molecular targeted therapies aimed at such signaling pathways have so far been dismal. In the present study, we used a PTEN-deficient mouse model of prostate cancer to show that plasticity in castration-resistant tumors promotes therapeutic escape. Unlike castration-naïve tumors which depend on androgen receptor and PI3K/AKT signal activation for growth and survival, castration-resistant tumors undergo phenotypic plasticity leading to increased intratumoral heterogeneity. These tumors attain highly heterogeneous phenotypes that are characterized by cancer cells relying on alternate signal transduction pathways for growth and survival, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase and janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, and losing their dependence on PI3K signaling. These features thus enabled castration-resistant tumors to become insensitive to the therapeutic effects of PI3K/AKT targeted therapy. Overall, our findings provide evidence that androgen deprivation drives phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer cells and implicate it as a crucial contributor to therapeutic resistance in castration-resistant prostate cancer. Therefore, incorporating intratumoral heterogeneity in a dynamic tumor model as a part of preclinical efficacy determination could improve prediction for response and provide better rationale for the development of more effective therapies. PMID:24986896

  7. Methylseleninic Acid Superactivates p53-Senescence Cancer Progression Barrier in Prostate Lesions of Pten-Knockout Mouse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Guo, Xiaolan; Wang, Ji; Jiang, Cheng; Bosland, Maarten C; Lü, Junxuan; Deng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    Monomethylated selenium (MM-Se) forms that are precursors of methylselenol, such as methylseleninic acid (MSeA), differ in metabolism and anticancer activities in preclinical cell and animal models from seleno-methionine that had failed to exert preventive efficacy against prostate cancer in North American men. Given that human prostate cancer arises from precancerous lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-PIN), which frequently have lost phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) tumor suppressor permitting phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (AKT) oncogenic signaling, we tested the efficacy of MSeA to inhibit HG-PIN progression in Pten prostate-specific knockout (KO) mice and assessed the mechanistic involvement of p53-mediated cellular senescence and of the androgen receptor (AR). We observed that short-term (4 weeks) oral MSeA treatment significantly increased expression of P53 and P21Cip1 proteins and senescence-associated-β-galactosidase staining, and reduced Ki67 cell proliferation index in Pten KO prostate epithelium. Long-term (25 weeks) MSeA administration significantly suppressed HG-PIN phenotype, tumor weight, and prevented emergence of invasive carcinoma in Pten KO mice. Mechanistically, the long-term MSeA treatment not only sustained P53-mediated senescence, but also markedly reduced AKT phosphorylation and AR abundance in the Pten KO prostate. Importantly, these cellular and molecular changes were not observed in the prostate of wild-type littermates which were similarly treated with MSeA. Because p53 signaling is likely to be intact in HG-PIN compared with advanced prostate cancer, the selective superactivation of p53-mediated senescence by MSeA suggests a new paradigm of cancer chemoprevention by strengthening a cancer progression barrier through induction of irreversible senescence with additional suppression of AR and AKT oncogenic signaling.

  8. Diagnosis of "Poorly Formed Glands" Gleason Pattern 4 Prostatic Adenocarcinoma on Needle Biopsy: An Interobserver Reproducibility Study Among Urologic Pathologists With Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Li, Jianbo; Cheng, Liang; Egevad, Lars; Deng, Fang-Ming; Kunju, Lakshmi Priya; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Melamed, Jonathan; Mehra, Rohit; Mendrinos, Savvas; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Paner, Gladell; Shen, Steve S; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Trpkov, Kiril; Tian, Wei; Yang, Ximing; Shah, Rajal B

    2015-10-01

    Accurate recognition of Gleason pattern (GP) 4 prostate carcinoma (PCa) on needle biopsy is critical for patient management and prognostication. "Poorly formed glands" are the most common GP4 subpattern. We studied the diagnostic reproducibility and the quantitative threshold of grading GP4 "poorly formed glands" and the criteria to distinguish them from tangentially sectioned GP3 glands. Seventeen urologic pathologists were first queried for the definition of "poorly formed glands" using cases representing a spectrum of PCa glandular differentiation. Cancer glands with no or rare lumens, elongated compressed glands, and elongated nests were considered "poorly formed glands" by consensus. Participants then graded a second set of 23 PCa cases that potentially contained "poorly formed glands" with a fair interobserver agreement (κ = 0.34). The consensus diagnoses, defined as agreement by > 70% participants, were then correlated with the quantitative (≤ 5, 6 to 10, >10) and topographic features of poorly formed glands (clustered, immediately adjacent to, and intermixed with other well-formed PCa glands) in each case. Poorly formed glands immediately adjacent to other well-formed glands regardless of their number and small foci of ≤ 5 poorly formed glands regardless of their location were not graded as GP4. In contrast, large foci of >10 poorly formed glands that were not immediately adjacent to well-formed glands were graded as GP4. Grading "poorly formed glands" is challenging. Some morphologic features are, however, reproducible for and against a GP4 diagnosis. This study represents an important step in standardization of grading of "poorly formed glands" based on quantitative and topographic morphologic features.

  9. Metastatic Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinoma with Osteoblastic Activity: A Case Report of Esophageal and Colonic Primaries

    PubMed Central

    Shabaik, Ahmed S.

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma with osteoblastic metastases is classically seen in prostate, breast, and lung primaries. Less common primary sites include thyroid, kidney, and stomach. We present two cases of primary gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma with metastatic osteoblastic activity from two previously unreported sites. The first case represents an esophageal adenocarcinoma arising in a background of intestinal metaplasia that metastasized with osteoblastic activity to the deltoid muscle. The second case demonstrates a Stage IV sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma with osteoblastic metastases to the liver and lymph nodes. The findings indicate that metastases from various gastrointestinal primary adenocarcinomas can have prominent bone formation. PMID:27738541

  10. Triple orbital metastases from prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tun, Kagan; Bulut, Turgay

    2016-01-01

    Prostate carcinoma, when metastatic, typically involves bone and produces both osteoblastic and osteolytic changes. A 73-year-old man was admitted to our department because of unilateral progressive proptosis and visual blurriness for 3 months. The patient had a history of prostate adenocarcinoma diagnosis 5 years ago. We report a case of orbital involvement presented that intraorbital mass (including periocular structures), temporal bone and temporal muscle from prostate cancer. The mass was removed with total excision. Despite the frequency of bone metastasis in prostatic carcinoma, triple orbital metastases are extremely rare. The best of our knowledge, prostate adenocarcinoma and its triple (temporal bone, temporal muscle and intraorbital mass) orbital metastases have not been published previously. Metastatic orbital tumor secondary to prostate cancer should be considered in patients who have varying degrees of eye symptoms. PMID:27591068

  11. The Feasibility of Assessing Branched-Chain Amino Acid Metabolism in Cellular Models of Prostate Cancer with Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Ketoisocaproate

    PubMed Central

    Billingsley, Kelvin L.; Park, Jae Mo; Josan, Sonal; Hurd, Ralph; Mayer, Dirk; Spielman-Sun, Eleanor; Nishimura, Dwight G.; Brooks, James D.; Spielman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements in the field of hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have yielded powerful techniques capable of real-time analysis of metabolic pathways. These non-invasive methods have increasingly shown application in impacting disease diagnosis and have further been employed in mechanistic studies of disease onset and progression. Our goals were to investigate branched-chain aminotransferase (BCAT) activity in prostate cancer with a novel molecular probe, hyperpolarized [1-13C]-2-ketoisocaproate ([1-13C]-KIC), and explore the potential of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism to serve as a biomarker. Using traditional spectrophotometric assays, BCAT enzymatic activities were determined in vitro for various sources of prostate cancer (human, transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mouse and human cell lines). These preliminary studies indicated that low levels of BCAT activity were present in all models of prostate cancer but enzymatic levels are altered significantly in prostate cancer relative to healthy tissue. The MR spectroscopic studies were conducted with two cellular models (PC-3 and DU-145) that exhibited levels of BCAA metabolism comparable to the human disease state. Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-KIC was administered to prostate cancer cell lines, and the conversion of [1-13C]-KIC to the metabolic product, [1-13C]-leucine ([1-13C]-Leu), could be monitored via hyperpolarized 13C MRS. PMID:24907854

  12. Precursors of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, David G; Cheng, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) is the only accepted precursor of prostatic adenocarcinoma, according to numerous studies of animal models and man; other proposed precursors include atrophy and malignancy-associated changes (with no morphologic changes). PIN is characterized by progressive abnormalities of phenotype and genotype that are intermediate between benign prostatic epithelium and cancer, indicating impairment of cell differentiation and regulatory control with advancing stages of prostatic carcinogenesis. The only method of detection of PIN is biopsy because it does not significantly elevate serum prostate-specific antigen concentration and cannot be detected by ultrasonography. The mean incidence of PIN in biopsies is 9% (range, 4%-16%), representing about 115,000 new cases of isolated PIN diagnosed each year in the United States. The clinical importance of PIN is its high predictive value as a marker for adenocarcinoma, and its identification warrants repeat biopsy for concurrent or subsequent carcinoma, especially when multifocal or observed in association with atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP). Carcinoma develops in most patients with PIN within 10 years. Androgen deprivation therapy and radiation therapy decrease the prevalence and extent of PIN, suggesting that these forms of treatment may play a role in prevention of subsequent cancer. Multiple clinical trials to date of men with PIN have had modest success in delaying or preventing subsequent cancer. PMID:22212075

  13. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Cleveland, Elyse; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Shevrin, Daniel; Kaul, Karen; Brendler, Charles; Iozzo, Renato V.; Seth, Prem

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle to establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.

  14. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Cleveland, Elyse; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Shevrin, Daniel; et al

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle tomore » establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.« less

  15. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-19

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic theMYCamplification andPTENloss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27044116

  16. Characterisation of prostate cancer lesions in heterozygous Men1 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations of the MEN1 gene predispose to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome. Our group and others have shown that Men1 disruption in mice recapitulates MEN1 pathology. Intriguingly, rare lesions in hormone-dependent tissues, such as prostate and mammary glands, were also observed in the Men1 mutant mice. Methods To study the occurrence of prostate lesions, we followed a male mouse cohort of 47 Men1+/- mice and 23 age-matched control littermates, starting at 18 months of age, and analysed the prostate glands from the cohort. Results Six Men1+/- mice (12.8%) developed prostate cancer, including two adenocarcinomas and four in situ carcinomas, while none of the control mice developed cancerous lesions. The expression of menin encoded by the Men1 gene was found to be drastically reduced in all carcinomas, and partial LOH of the wild-type Men1 allele was detected in three of the five analysed lesions. Using immunostaining for the androgen receptor and p63, a basal epithelial cell marker, we demonstrated that the menin-negative prostate cancer cells did not display p63 expression and that the androgen receptor was expressed but more heterogeneous in these lesions. Furthermore, our data showed that the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1B (p27), a Men1 target gene known to be inactivated during prostate cell tumorigenesis, was notably decreased in the prostate cancers that developed in the mutant mice. Conclusion Our work suggests the possible involvement of Men1 inactivation in the tumorigenesis of the prostate gland. PMID:20663219

  17. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-19

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic theMYCamplification andPTENloss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics.

  18. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K.; Phillips, John W.; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N.

    2016-01-01

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic the MYC amplification and PTEN loss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1–transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1–transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27044116

  19. Efficient targeting and tumor retardation effect of pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF)-specific RNA replacement in pancreatic cancer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Hee; Moon, Ju Young; Kim, Eun-Ok; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kang, Se Hun; Kim, Seok Ki; Heo, Kyun; Lee, Yusun; Kim, Hana; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Daehong; Song, Min Sun; Lee, Seoung-Wook; Lee, Yangsoon; Koh, Sang Seok; Kim, In-Hoo

    2014-03-28

    The soluble protein pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) plays an important role in pancreatic tumor progression and has begun to attract attention as a therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. We herein present PAUF RNA-targeting gene therapy strategies with both targeting and therapeutic function using trans-splicing ribozyme (TSR) in pancreatic cancer. We developed adenoviral PAUF-targeting TSR (Rz) containing a PAUF-specific internal guide sequence (IGS) determined by library screening. This Rz harbors suicide gene, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) or firefly luciferase (Luc) as a transgene for 3' exon replacement of PAUF RNAs. Ad-Rz-TK, Rz harboring the HSV-tk, showed significant inhibition of tumor growth in vivo as well as PAUF-dependent cell death in vitro via a successful trans-splicing reaction. Selective induction of Rz-controlled transgene in PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer was confirmed through noninvasive in vivo imaging; a luminescence signal from Rz harboring Luc (Ad-Rz-Luc) was detectable only in pancreatic tumor sites, not in normal mice. In addition, a [(125)I] FIAU signal reflecting thymidine kinase expression through SPECT and ex vivo biodistribution was co-localized with the tumor sites when we treated with Ad-Rz-TK in orthotopic xenograft model. Taken together, these results imply that PAUF-targeting TSR can contribute to successful targeted gene therapy for pancreatic cancer.

  20. Molecular aspects of prostate cancer with neuroendocrine differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Zhang, Connie S.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine differentiation (NED), which is not uncommon in prostate cancer, is increases in prostate cancer after androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and generally appears in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Neuroendocrine cells, which are found in normal prostate tissue, are a small subset of cells and have unique function in regulating the growth of prostate cells. Prostate cancer with NED includes different types of tumor, including focal NED, pure neuroendocrine tumor or mixed neuroendocrine-adenocarcinoma. Although more and more studies are carried out on NED in prostate cancer, the molecular components that are involved in NED are still poorly elucidated. We review neuroendocrine cells in normal prostate tissue, NED in prostate cancer, terminology of NED and biomarkers used for detecting NED in routine pathological practice. Some recently reported molecular components which drive NED in prostate cancer are listed in the review. PMID:27041934

  1. Safety and chemopreventive effect of Polyphenon E in preventing early and metastatic progression of prostate cancer in TRAMP mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Joon; Amankwah, Ernest; Connors, Shahnjayla; Park, Hyun Y; Rincon, Maria; Cornnell, Heather; Chornokur, Ganna; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Choi, Junsung; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Engelman, Robert W; Kumar, Nagi; Park, Jong Y

    2014-04-01

    Prostate cancer treatment is often accompanied by untoward side effects. Therefore, chemoprevention to reduce the risk and inhibit the progression of prostate cancer may be an effective approach to reducing disease burden. We investigated the safety and efficacy of Polyphenon E, a green tea extract, in reducing the progression of prostate cancer in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. A total of 119 male TRAMP and 119 C57BL/6J mice were treated orally with one of 3 doses of Polyphenon E (200, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg/day) in drinking water ad libitum replicating human achievable doses. Baseline assessments were performed before treatments. Safety and efficacy assessments during treatments were performed when mice were 12, 22, and 32 weeks old. The number and size of tumors in treated TRAMP mice were significantly decreased compared with untreated animals. In untreated 32 weeks old TRAMP mice, prostate carcinoma metastasis to distant sites was observed in 100% of mice (8/8), compared with 13% of mice (2/16) treated with high-dose Polyphenon E during the same period. Furthermore, Polyphenon E treatment significantly inhibited metastasis in TRAMP mice in a dose-dependent manner (P = 0.0003). Long-term (32 weeks) treatment with Polyphenon E was safe and well tolerated with no evidence of toxicity in C57BL/6J mice. Polyphenon E is an effective chemopreventive agent in preventing the progression of prostate cancer to metastasis in TRAMP mice. Polyphenon E showed no toxicity in these mouse models. Our findings provide additional evidence for the safety and chemopreventive effect of Polyphenon E in preventing metastatic progression of prostate cancer.

  2. Small cell carcinoma of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Rosa; Schweizer, Michael; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Eisenberger, Mario A.

    2015-01-01

    Pure small-cell carcinoma (SCC) of the prostate is a rare entity and one of the most aggressive malignancies of the prostate. Histologically, prostatic SCCs of the prostate are part of a spectrum of anaplastic tumours of the prostate and are similar to SCCs of the lungs. In most cases, SCC of the prostate is associated with conventional prostatic adenocarcinoma. Both components of these mixed tumours frequently share molecular alterations such as ERG gene rearrangements or AURKA and MYCN amplifications, suggesting a common clonal origin. The clinical behaviour of small-cell prostate carcinomas is characterized by extensive local disease, visceral disease, and low PSA levels despite large metastatic burden. Commonly, the emergence of the SCC occurs in patients with high-grade adenocarcinoma who are often treated with androgen deprivation treatment (ADT). However, SCCs do not usually benefit from ADT. A biopsy of accessible lesions is strongly recommended to identify those with SCC pathological features, as management is undoubtedly affected by this finding. Chemotherapy is the standard approach for treating patients with either localized or advanced prostatic SCC. Despite the emergence of more-aggressive treatment modalities, the prognosis of men with prostatic SCC remains dismal. PMID:24535589

  3. Inhibition of mouse breast adenocarcinoma growth by ablation with intratumoral alpha-irradiation combined with inhibitors of immunosuppression and CpG.

    PubMed

    Confino, Hila; Schmidt, Michael; Efrati, Margalit; Hochman, Ilan; Umansky, Viktor; Kelson, Itzhak; Keisari, Yona

    2016-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that aggressive in situ tumor destruction (ablation) could lead to the release of tumor antigens, which can stimulate anti-tumor immune responses. We developed an innovative method of tumor ablation based on intratumoral alpha-irradiation, diffusing alpha-emitters radiation therapy (DaRT), which efficiently ablates local tumors and enhances anti-tumor immunity. In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor potency of a treatment strategy, which combines DaRT tumor ablation with two approaches for the enhancement of anti-tumor reactivity: (1) neutralization of immunosuppressive cells such as regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and (2) boost the immune response by the immunoadjuvant CpG. Mice bearing DA3 mammary adenocarcinoma with metastases were treated with DaRT wires in combination with a MDSC inhibitor (sildenafil), Treg inhibitor (cyclophosphamide at low dose), and the immunostimulant, CpG. Combination of all four therapies led to a complete rejection of primary tumors (in 3 out of 20 tumor-bearing mice) and to the elimination of lung metastases. The treatment with DaRT and Treg or MDSC inhibitors (without CpG) also resulted in a significant reduction in tumor size, reduced the lung metastatic burden, and extended survival compared to the corresponding controls. We suggest that the therapy with DaRT combined with the inhibition of immunosuppressive cells and CpG reinforced both local and systemic anti-tumor immune responses and displayed a significant anti-tumor effect in tumor-bearing mice. PMID:27495172

  4. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  5. Perturbation of NK cell peripheral homeostasis accelerates prostate carcinoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Lu, Shengjun; Wang, Xuanjun; Page, Stephanie T; Higano, Celestia S; Plymate, Stephen R; Greenberg, Norman M; Sun, Shaoli; Li, Zihai; Wu, Jennifer D

    2013-10-01

    The activating receptor NK cell group 2 member D (NKG2D) mediates antitumor immunity in experimental animal models. However, whether NKG2D ligands contribute to tumor suppression or progression clinically remains controversial. Here, we have described 2 novel lines of "humanized" bi-transgenic (bi-Tg) mice in which native human NKG2D ligand MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence B (MICB) or the engineered membrane-restricted MICB (MICB.A2) was expressed in the prostate of the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model of spontaneous carcinogenesis. Bi-Tg TRAMP/MICB mice exhibited a markedly increased incidence of progressed carcinomas and metastasis, whereas TRAMP/MICB.A2 mice enjoyed long-term tumor-free survival conferred by sustained NKG2D-mediated antitumor immunity. Mechanistically, we found that cancer progression in TRAMP/MICB mice was associated with loss of the peripheral NK cell pool owing to high serum levels of tumor-derived soluble MICB (sMICB). Prostate cancer patients also displayed reduction of peripheral NK cells and high sMIC levels. Our study has not only provided direct evidence in "humanized" mouse models that soluble and membrane-restricted NKG2D ligands pose opposite impacts on cancer progression, but also uncovered a mechanism of sMIC-induced impairment of NK cell antitumor immunity. Our findings suggest that the impact of soluble NKG2D ligands should be considered in NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy and that our unique mouse models should be valuable for therapy optimization. PMID:24018560

  6. Metastasis of prostate cancer and melanoma cells in a preclinical in vivo mouse model is enhanced by L-plastin expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor cell migration and metastasis require dynamic rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Interestingly, the F-actin cross-linking and stabilizing protein L-plastin, originally described as a leukocyte specific protein, is aberrantly expressed in several non-hematopoietic malignant tumors. Therefore, it has been discussed as a tumor marker. However, systematic in vivo analyses of the functional relevance of L-plastin for tumor cell metastasis were so far lacking. Methods We investigated the relevance of L-plastin expression and phosphorylation by ectopical expression of L-plastin in human melanoma cells (MV3) and knock-down of endogenous L-plastin in prostate cancer (PC3M). The growth and metastatic potential of tumor cells expressing no L-plastin, phosphorylatable or non-phosphorylatable L-plastin was analyzed in a preclinical mouse model after subcutaneous and intracardial injection of the tumor cells. Results Knock-down of endogenous L-plastin in human prostate carcinoma cells led to reduced tumor cell growth and metastasis. Vice versa, and in line with these findings, ectopic expression of L-plastin in L-plastin negative melanoma cells significantly increased the number of metastases. Strikingly, the metastasis promoting effect of L-plastin was not observed if a non-phosphorylatable L-plastin mutant was expressed. Conclusions Our data provide the first in vivo evidence that expression of L-plastin promotes tumor metastasis and, importantly, that this effect depends on an additionally required phosphorylation of L-plastin. In conclusion, these findings imply that for determining the importance of tumor-associated proteins like L-plastin a characterization of posttranslational modifications is indispensable. PMID:24438191

  7. High-Grade Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, David G; Liu, Lina; Brawer, Michael K; Qian, Junqi

    2004-01-01

    High-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia is considered the most likely precursor of prostatic carcinoma. The only method of detection is biopsy; prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) does not significantly elevate serum prostate-specific antigen concentration and cannot be detected by ultra-sonography. The incidence of PIN in prostate biopsies averages 9% (range, 4%–16%), representing 115,000 new cases of PIN diagnosed each year in United States. PIN has a high predictive value as a marker for adenocarcinoma, and its identification warrants repeated biopsy for concurrent or subsequent invasive carcinoma. Carcinoma will develop in most patients with PIN within 10 years. PIN is associated with progressive abnormalities of phenotype and genotype that are intermediate between normal prostatic epithelium and cancer, indicating impairment of cell differentiation and regulatory control with advancing stages of prostatic carcinogenesis. Androgen deprivation therapy decreases the prevalence and extent of PIN, suggesting that this form of treatment may play a role in chemoprevention. PMID:16985598

  8. An immunocytochemical analysis of TGF alpha expression in benign and malignant prostatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Harper, M E; Goddard, L; Glynne-Jones, E; Wilson, D W; Price-Thomas, M; Peeling, W B; Griffiths, K

    1993-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) expression was analyzed immunocytochemically on formalin-fixed wax-embedded sections obtained from 24 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) specimens and 76 prostatic carcinoma tissues, 3 human prostatic tumor xenografts, normal kidney, and salivary gland. Low amounts of TGF alpha immunopositivity were encountered in the epithelium of BPH glandular tissues, whereas in the prostatic adenocarcinoma samples, a greater heterogeneity and intensity of TGF alpha immunostaining was observed. The most intense staining was exhibited by the least differentiated tumors, although a few of these were weakly stained. Statistical analysis of the relationship of histopathological grade of tumor with TGF alpha expression in the carcinomas showed a significant correlation of these parameters, 0.01 > P > 0.001. The expression of the proliferation markers Ki-67 and PCNA was also analyzed in the carcinoma specimens, and the relationship of these to TGF alpha expression indicated that there was no significant correlation in this series of tumors between increased growth activity and TGF alpha expression (p approximately 0.25 with both markers). The prostatic carcinoma xenografts TEN12 and TEN15 contained low levels of immunoreactive TGF alpha, which was uniformly distributed, whilst heterogeneous immunostaining was observed in the uroepithelial xenograft TEN16. In the normal human kidney, TGF alpha was concentrated in the epithelium of the distal convoluted tubules (DCT) and the collecting tubules (CT), and lower amounts were identified in the proximal convoluted tubules (PCT). As in the prostatic carcinomas, the immunostaining was eliminated by prior absorption of the antibody with pure TGF alpha and not with human or mouse EGF. No crossreactivity of the TGF alpha antibody with salivary EGF was demonstrated. This study concludes that, in prostate carcinoma, the least differentiated tumors more often expressed greater amounts immunoreactive TGF

  9. Assessment of Perigenital Sensitivity and Prostatic Mast Cell Activation in a Mouse Model of Neonatal Maternal Separation.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Isabella M; Pierce, Angela N; O'Neil, Pierce T; Christianson, Julie A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) has a lifetime prevalence of 14% and is the most common urological diagnosis for men under the age of 50, yet it is the least understood and studied chronic pelvic pain disorder. A significant subset of patients with chronic pelvic pain report having experienced early life stress or abuse, which can markedly affect the functioning and regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Mast cell activation, which has been shown to be increased in both urine and expressed prostatic secretions of CP/CPPS patients, is partially regulated by downstream activation of the HPA axis. Neonatal maternal separation (NMS) has been used for over two decades to study the outcomes of early life stress in rodent models, including changes in the HPA axis and visceral sensitivity. Here we provide a detailed protocol for using NMS as a preclinical model of CP/CPPS in male C57BL/6 mice. We describe the methodology for performing NMS, assessing perigenital mechanical allodynia, and histological evidence of mast cell activation. We also provide evidence that early psychological stress can have long-lasting effects on the male urogenital system in mice. PMID:26327525

  10. Decoding c-Myc networks of cell cycle and apoptosis regulated genes in a transgenic mouse model of papillary lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Ciribilli, Yari; Singh, Prashant; Spanel, Reinhard; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The c-Myc gene codes for a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor protein and is reported to be frequently over-expressed in human cancers. Given that c-Myc plays an essential role in neoplastic transformation we wished to define its activity in lung cancer and therefore studied its targeted expression to respiratory epithelium in a transgenic mouse disease model. Using histological well-defined tumors, transcriptome analysis identified novel c-Myc responsive cell cycle and apoptosis genes that were validated as direct c-Myc targets using EMSA, Western blotting, gene reporter and ChIP assays. Through computational analyses c-Myc cooperating transcription factors emerged for repressed and up-regulated genes in cancer samples, namely Klf7, Gata3, Sox18, p53 and Elf5 and Cebpα, respectively. Conversely, at promoters of genes regulated in transgenic but non-carcinomatous lung tissue enriched binding sites for c-Myc, Hbp1, Hif1 were observed. Bioinformatic analysis of tumor transcriptomic data revealed regulatory gene networks and highlighted mortalin and moesin as master regulators while gene reporter and ChIP assays in the H1299 lung cancer cell line as well as cross-examination of published ChIP-sequence data of 7 human and 2 mouse cell lines provided strong evidence for the identified genes to be c-Myc targets. The clinical significance of findings was established by evaluating expression of orthologous proteins in human lung cancer. Taken collectively, a molecular circuit for c-Myc-dependent cellular transformation was identified and the network analysis broadened the perspective for molecularly targeted therapies. PMID:26427040

  11. Decoding c-Myc networks of cell cycle and apoptosis regulated genes in a transgenic mouse model of papillary lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ciribilli, Yari; Singh, Prashant; Spanel, Reinhard; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Jürgen

    2015-10-13

    The c-Myc gene codes for a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor protein and is reported to be frequently over-expressed in human cancers. Given that c-Myc plays an essential role in neoplastic transformation we wished to define its activity in lung cancer and therefore studied its targeted expression to respiratory epithelium in a transgenic mouse disease model. Using histological well-defined tumors, transcriptome analysis identified novel c-Myc responsive cell cycle and apoptosis genes that were validated as direct c-Myc targets using EMSA, Western blotting, gene reporter and ChIP assays.Through computational analyses c-Myc cooperating transcription factors emerged for repressed and up-regulated genes in cancer samples, namely Klf7, Gata3, Sox18, p53 and Elf5 and Cebpα, respectively. Conversely, at promoters of genes regulated in transgenic but non-carcinomatous lung tissue enriched binding sites for c-Myc, Hbp1, Hif1 were observed. Bioinformatic analysis of tumor transcriptomic data revealed regulatory gene networks and highlighted mortalin and moesin as master regulators while gene reporter and ChIP assays in the H1299 lung cancer cell line as well as cross-examination of published ChIP-sequence data of 7 human and 2 mouse cell lines provided strong evidence for the identified genes to be c-Myc targets. The clinical significance of findings was established by evaluating expression of orthologous proteins in human lung cancer. Taken collectively, a molecular circuit for c-Myc-dependent cellular transformation was identified and the network analysis broadened the perspective for molecularly targeted therapies.

  12. N-Myc Drives Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Initiated from Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Smith, Bryan A; Park, Jung Wook; Stoyanova, Tanya; McCaffrey, Erin F; Baertsch, Robert; Sokolov, Artem; Meyerowitz, Justin G; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M; Shokat, Kevan M; Gustafson, W Clay; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-11

    MYCN amplification and overexpression are common in neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC). However, the impact of aberrant N-Myc expression in prostate tumorigenesis and the cellular origin of NEPC have not been established. We define N-Myc and activated AKT1 as oncogenic components sufficient to transform human prostate epithelial cells to prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC with phenotypic and molecular features of aggressive, late-stage human disease. We directly show that prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC can arise from a common epithelial clone. Further, N-Myc is required for tumor maintenance, and destabilization of N-Myc through Aurora A kinase inhibition reduces tumor burden. Our findings establish N-Myc as a driver of NEPC and a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27050099

  13. Skin metastasis, an uncommon course of prostate carcinoma: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Telis, L; Wolf, V; Yaskiv, O; Pearson, B J; Katsigeorgis, M; Jazayeri, S B; Samadi, D B; Unger, P D

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers among men worldwide and in the USA. Most prostate cancer progression either locally invades to seminal vesicles or metastasizes distally to bone. Skin is not a common site of metastasis for the majority of malignancies including prostate cancer. This paper reports two extremely rare cases of prostate carcinoma metastatic to the skin: a 74-year-old man previously treated with radiation for prostate cancer with cutaneous metastases to the shoulder and a 68-year-old man with prostate adenocarcinoma and cutaneous metastases to the groin. Both patients were diagnosed with skin punch biopsy and later confirmed with immunohistochemical staining for PSA and prostate specific acid phosphatase, specific for prostatic carcinoma. Although unusual, development of multiple skin lesions in patients with prostate adenocarcinoma should raise the flags of cutaneous metastases. PMID:27568675

  14. Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ERα)-Associated Fibroblasts Promote Cell Growth in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Da, Jun; Lu, Mujun; Wang, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) is expressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in the stromal compartment of cancerous prostate. However, the effect of ERα in CAF cells on prostate cancer (PCa) cell growth remains unclear. We used lentiviral transduction to stably express ERα in CAF cells isolated from transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate model. MTT and 3D colony-formation assays demonstrated that conditioned medium from ERα-expressing CAF cells (CAF-ERα+) promoted cell proliferation and colony growth of various PCa cell lines, such as PC3, LNCaP, 22RV1, and C4-2. We further confirmed the in vitro data by orthotopically co-implanting 22RV1, transfected with firefly luciferase, and CAF-ERα+ cells in vivo using mouse model. Mice co-implanted with CAF-ERα+ exhibited stronger luciferase signals and bigger tumor size compared to animals co-implanted with CAF that do not express ER. Our results demonstrate that ER expressed in CAF might play a pro-proliferative role in PCa. PMID:27259327

  15. Enhancement of broccoli indole glucosinolates by methyl jasmonate treatment and effects on prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ann G; Juvik, John A; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Clinton, Steven K; Erdman, John W

    2014-11-01

    Broccoli is rich in bioactive components, such as sulforaphane and indole-3-carbinol, which may impact cancer risk. The glucosinolate profile of broccoli can be manipulated through treatment with the plant stress hormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Our objective was to produce broccoli with enhanced levels of indole glucosinolates and determine its impact on prostate carcinogenesis. Brassica oleracea var. Green Magic was treated with a 250 μM MeJA solution 4 days prior to harvest. MeJA-treated broccoli had significantly increased levels of glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassicin, and gluconasturtiin (P < .05). Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice (n = 99) were randomized into three diet groups at 5-7 weeks of age: AIN-93G control, 10% standard broccoli powder, or 10% MeJA broccoli powder. Diets were fed throughout the study until termination at 20 weeks of age. Hepatic CYP1A was induced with MeJA broccoli powder feeding, indicating biological activity of the indole glucosinolates. Following ∼ 15 weeks on diets, neither of the broccoli treatments significantly altered genitourinary tract weight, pathologic score, or metastasis incidence, indicating that broccoli powder at 10% of the diet was ineffective at reducing prostate carcinogenesis in the TRAMP model. Whereas broccoli powder feeding had no effect in this model of prostate cancer, our work demonstrates the feasibility of employing plant stress hormones exogenously to stimulate changes in phytochemical profiles, an approach that may be useful for optimizing bioactive component patterns in foods for chronic-disease-prevention studies.

  16. [Bilateral testicular metastasis of cancer of the prostate].

    PubMed

    el Moussaoui, A; Sarf, I; Dakir, M; Zamiati, S; Benjelloun, S

    1997-01-01

    Testicular metastasis of prostate cancer rarely occurs. Bilateral localization is exceptional. We report a new case of prostate adenocarcinoma with bilateral testicular metastasis. The diagnosis was made on clinical and ultrasonic arguments, and confirmed on the pathological specimen. Treatment consisted in a bilateral orchidectomy, associated with nonsteroid androgens.

  17. Oncolytic vaccinia virus as a vector for therapeutic sodium iodide symporter gene therapy in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, D C; Kyula, J N; Rosenfelder, N; Chao-Chu, J; Kramer-Marek, G; Khan, A A; Roulstone, V; McLaughlin, M; Melcher, A A; Vile, R G; Pandha, H S; Khoo, V; Harrington, K J

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic strains of vaccinia virus are currently in clinical development with clear evidence of safety and promising signs of efficacy. Addition of therapeutic genes to the viral genome may increase the therapeutic efficacy of vaccinia. We evaluated the therapeutic potential of vaccinia virus expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in prostate cancer models, combining oncolysis, external beam radiotherapy and NIS-mediated radioiodide therapy. The NIS-expressing vaccinia virus (VV-NIS), GLV-1h153, was tested in in vitro analyzes of viral cell killing, combination with radiotherapy, NIS expression, cellular radioiodide uptake and apoptotic cell death in PC3, DU145, LNCaP and WPMY-1 human prostate cell lines. In vivo experiments were carried out in PC3 xenografts in CD1 nude mice to assess NIS expression and tumor radioiodide uptake. In addition, the therapeutic benefit of radioiodide treatment in combination with viral oncolysis and external beam radiotherapy was measured. In vitro viral cell killing of prostate cancers was dose- and time-dependent and was through apoptotic mechanisms. Importantly, combined virus therapy and iodizing radiation did not adversely affect oncolysis. NIS gene expression in infected cells was functional and mediated uptake of radioiodide both in vitro and in vivo. Therapy experiments with both xenograft and immunocompetent Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mouse models showed that the addition of radioiodide to VV-NIS-infected tumors was more effective than each single-agent therapy, restricting tumor growth and increasing survival. In conclusion, VV-NIS is effective in prostate cancer models. This treatment modality would be an attractive complement to existing clinical radiotherapy practice. PMID:26814609

  18. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 2 promotes tumor angiogenesis in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Toshihiro; Iyama, Shinji; Toshima, Shotaro; Sakata, Akiko; Usui, Shingo; Minami, Yuko; Sato, Yukio; Hizawa, Nobuyuki; Noguchi, Masayuki

    2016-02-01

    Although embryonal proteins have been used as tumor marker, most are not useful for detection of early malignancy. In the present study, we developed mouse monoclonal antibodies against fetal lung of miniature swine, and screened them to find an embryonal protein that is produced at the early stage of malignancy, focusing on lung adenocarcinoma. We found an antibody clone that specifically stained stroma of lung adenocarcinoma. LC-MS/MS identified the protein recognized by this clone as dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 2 (DDAH2), an enzyme known for antiatherosclerotic activity. DDAH2 was found to be expressed in fibroblasts of stroma of malignancies, with higher expression in minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) and invasive adenocarcinoma than in adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS). Moreover, tumors with high stromal expression of DDAH2 had a poorer prognosis than those without. In vitro analysis showed that DDAH2 increases expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), inducing proliferation and capillary-like tube formation of vascular endothelial cells. In resected human tissues, eNOS also showed higher expression in invasive adenocarcinoma than in AIS and normal lung, similarly to DDAH2. Our data indicate that expression of DDAH2 is associated with invasiveness of lung adenocarcinoma via tumor angiogenesis. DDAH2 expression might be a prognostic factor in lung adenocarcinoma.

  19. Prostatic carcinosarcoma with lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Stefanie R; Kang, David J; Armas, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Carcinosarcoma of the prostate is an uncommon malignancy with poor long-term prognosis. The cancer is typically discovered at an advanced stage, and with less than 100 reported cases, there is limited literature concerning treatment options. Our patient presented with a history of benign prostatic hypertrophy, erectile dysfunction, and nocturia. Biopsy of his prostate indicated that the patient had prostatic adenocarcinoma, but histopathology after prostatectomy revealed carcinosarcoma. It has been over six years since this patient's diagnosis of carcinosarcoma. Over this span of time, he has received a radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy, and androgen ablative therapy. The patient also developed multiple lung metastases that have been treated with video-assisted thoracic surgery and stereotactic body radiosurgery. Overall, he has remained unimpaired and in good condition despite his aggressive form of cancer. PMID:24294528

  20. Prostatic carcinosarcoma with lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Stefanie R; Kang, David J; Armas, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Carcinosarcoma of the prostate is an uncommon malignancy with poor long-term prognosis. The cancer is typically discovered at an advanced stage, and with less than 100 reported cases, there is limited literature concerning treatment options. Our patient presented with a history of benign prostatic hypertrophy, erectile dysfunction, and nocturia. Biopsy of his prostate indicated that the patient had prostatic adenocarcinoma, but histopathology after prostatectomy revealed carcinosarcoma. It has been over six years since this patient's diagnosis of carcinosarcoma. Over this span of time, he has received a radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy, and androgen ablative therapy. The patient also developed multiple lung metastases that have been treated with video-assisted thoracic surgery and stereotactic body radiosurgery. Overall, he has remained unimpaired and in good condition despite his aggressive form of cancer.

  1. Estrogen receptors in prostate development and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Da, Jun; Song, Wenbin; Fazili, Anees; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is an androgen-sensitive disease, which can be pharmacologically controlled by androgen blockade. To date, a growing body of evidence showed that estrogen and estrogen receptors (ERs) could regulate prostate development, as well as cancer initiation and progression. This review will address the expression levels and function of ERs in different stages of PCa progression. The functions of ERs in different types of prostate cells, the ligand effect, and the potential applications of selective estrogen modulators (SERMs) will also be discussed. To further dissect ERs’ roles in prostate development, cell type specific ER knockout mouse models were generated. Results collected from the prostate cell type-specific ERαKO mouse models provided new insights about the cell type specific ERα roles in prostate development prenatally and postnatally. The results of ERs’ roles in mouse PCa mode and the correlation of ERs expression and biomedical outcome will also be discussed. PMID:25374919

  2. LL-37 as a therapeutic target for late stage prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Jonathan A.; Chanda, Diptiman; Kumar, Sanjay; Sawant, Anandi; Grizzle, William E.; Siegal, Gene P.; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The antimicrobial peptide, LL-37 (leucine-leucine-37), stimulates proliferation, angiogenesis and cellular migration, inhibits apoptosis and is associated with inflammation. Since these functional processes are often exaggerated in cancer, the aim of the present study was to investigate the expression and role of LL-37 in prostate cancer (PCa) and establish its value as a therapeutic target. METHODS We evaluated the expression of LL-37 and the murine orthologue, Cathelicidin Related Anti-Microbial Peptide (CRAMP) in human and murine prostate tumors, respectively. Compared to normal/benign prostate tissue, both LL-37 and CRAMP were increasingly over-expressed with advancing grades of primary prostate cancer and its metastasis in human tissues and in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model, correspondingly. We subsequently knocked down CRAMP in the highly tumorigenic TRAMP-C1 cell line via a RNA interference (RNAi) strategy to examine the importance of CRAMP on cellular proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, apoptosis, activation of signaling pathways and tumor kinetics. RESULTS Abrogation of CRAMP expression led to decreased proliferation, invasion, type IV collagenase, and the amount of phosphorylated Erk1/2 and Akt signaling in vitro. These results were paralleled in vivo. Syngenic implantation of TRAMP-C1 cells subjected to CRAMP knock-down resulted in a decreased tumor incidence and size, and the down regulation of pro-tumorigenic mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS CRAMP knockdown in a murine prostate cancer model analogously demonstrated the tumorigenic contributions of LL-37 in PCa and its potential as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of PCa and potentially, other cancers over-expressing the peptide. PMID:20957672

  3. Lack of evidence for green tea polyphenols as DNA methylation inhibitors in murine prostate.

    PubMed

    Morey Kinney, Shannon R; Zhang, Wa; Pascual, Marien; Greally, John M; Gillard, Bryan M; Karasik, Ellen; Foster, Barbara A; Karpf, Adam R

    2009-12-01

    Green tea polyphenols (GTP) have been reported to inhibit DNA methylation in cultured cells. Here, we tested whether oral consumption of GTPs affects normal or cancer-specific DNA methylation in vivo, using mice. Wild-type (WT) and transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice were given 0.3% GTPs in drinking water beginning at 4 weeks of age. To monitor DNA methylation, we measured 5-methyl-deoxycytidine (5mdC) levels, methylation of the B1 repetitive element, and methylation of the Mage-a8 gene. Each of these parameters were unchanged in prostate, gut, and liver from WT mice at both 12 and 24 weeks of age, with the single exception of a decrease of 5mdC in the liver at 12 weeks. In GTP-treated TRAMP mice, 5mdC levels and the methylation status of four loci hypermethylated during tumor progression were unaltered in TRAMP prostates at 12 or 24 weeks. Quite surprisingly, GTP treatment did not inhibit tumor progression in TRAMP mice, although known pharmacodynamic markers of GTPs were altered in both WT and TRAMP prostates. We also administered 0.1%, 0.3%, or 0.6% GTPs to TRAMP mice for 12 weeks and measured 5mdC levels and methylation of B1 and Mage-a8 in prostate, gut, and liver tissues. No dose-dependent alterations in DNA methylation status were observed. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling using the HpaII tiny fragment enrichment by ligation-mediated PCR assay also revealed no significant hypomethylating effect of GTP. These data indicate that oral administration of GTPs does not affect normal or cancer-specific DNA methylation in the murine prostate.

  4. Prostate brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... plan and then place the seeds that deliver radiation into your prostate. The seeds are placed with ...

  5. Dietary tomato and lycopene impact androgen signaling- and carcinogenesis-related gene expression during early TRAMP prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lei; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Pearl, Dennis K; Erdman, John W; Moran, Nancy E; Clinton, Steven K

    2014-12-01

    Consumption of tomato products containing the carotenoid lycopene is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. To identify gene expression patterns associated with early testosterone-driven prostate carcinogenesis, which are impacted by dietary tomato and lycopene, wild-type (WT) and transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice were fed control or tomato- or lycopene-containing diets from 4 to 10 weeks of age. Eight-week-old mice underwent sham surgery, castration, or castration followed by testosterone repletion (2.5 mg/kg/d initiated 1 week after castration). Ten-week-old intact TRAMP mice exhibit early multifocal prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Of the 200 prostate cancer-related genes measured by quantitative NanoString, 189 are detectable, 164 significantly differ by genotype, 179 by testosterone status, and 30 by diet type (P < 0.05). In TRAMP, expression of Birc5, Mki67, Aurkb, Ccnb2, Foxm1, and Ccne2 is greater compared with WT and is decreased by castration. In parallel, castration reduces Ki67-positive staining (P < 0.0001) compared with intact and testosterone-repleted TRAMP mice. Expression of genes involved in androgen metabolism/signaling pathways is reduced by lycopene feeding (Srd5a1) and by tomato feeding (Srd5a2, Pxn, and Srebf1). In addition, tomato feeding significantly reduced expression of genes associated with stem cell features, Aldh1a and Ly6a, whereas lycopene feeding significantly reduced expression of neuroendocrine differentiation-related genes, Ngfr and Syp. Collectively, these studies demonstrate a profile of testosterone-regulated genes associated with early prostate carcinogenesis that are potential mechanistic targets of dietary tomato components. Future studies on androgen signaling/metabolism, stem cell features, and neuroendocrine differentiation pathways may elucidate the mechanisms by which dietary tomato and lycopene impact prostate cancer risk. PMID:25315431

  6. Expression level and DNA methylation status of Glutathione-S-transferase genes in normal murine prostate and TRAMP tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mavis, Cory K.; Kinney, Shannon R. Morey; Foster, Barbara A.; Karpf, Adam R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glutathione-S-transferase (Gst) genes are down-regulated in human prostate cancer, and GSTP1 silencing is mediated by promoter DNA hypermethylation in this malignancy. We examined Gst gene expression and Gst promoter DNA methylation in normal murine prostates and Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) tumors. METHODS Primary and metastatic tumors were obtained from TRAMP mice, and normal prostates were obtained from strain-matched WT mice (n=15/group). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to measure GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1 mRNA expression, and Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining was used to measure GstM1 and GstP1 protein expression. MassARRAY Quantitative Methylation Analysis was used to measure DNA methylation of the 5’ CpG islands of GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1. TRAMP-C2 cells were treated with the epigenetic remodeling drugs decitabine and trichostatin A (TSA) alone and in combination, and Gst gene expression was measured. RESULTS Of the genes analyzed, GstM1 and GstP1 were expressed at highest levels in normal prostate. All five Gst genes showed greatly reduced expression in primary tumors compared to normal prostate, but not in tumor metastases. Gst promoter methylation was unchanged in TRAMP tumors compared to normal prostate. Combined decitabine + TSA treatment significantly enhanced the expression of 4/5 Gst genes in TRAMP-C2 cells. CONCLUSIONS Gst genes are extensively downregulated in primary but not metastatic TRAMP tumors. Promoter DNA hypermethylation does not appear to drive Gst gene repression in TRAMP primary tumors; however, pharmacological studies using TRAMP cells suggest the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in Gst gene repression. PMID:19444856

  7. Real-Time GFP Intravital Imaging of the Differences in Cellular and Angiogenic Behavior of Subcutaneous and Orthotopic Nude-Mouse Models of Human PC-3 Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Toneri, Makoto; Ma, Huaiyu; Yang, Zhijian; Bouvet, Michael; Goto, Yusuke; Seki, Naohiko; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-11-01

    There are two major types of mouse xenograft models of cancer: subcutaneous implantation and orthotopic implantation. Subcutaneous transplant models are widely used with both cancer cell lines and human-tumor specimens. Recently, subcutaneous models of patient tumors, termed patient-derived xenographs (PDX) have become highly popular and have acquired such names as "Avatar" and "Xenopatients." However, such s.c. models rarely metastasize and are therefore not patient-like. In contrast, orthotopic models have the capability to metastasize. If intact fragments of tumor tissue are implanted by surgical orthotopic implantation (SOI), the metastatic potential can match that of the donor patient. The present study images in real time, using green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression, the very different tumor behavior at the orthotopic and subcutaneous sites of human prostate cancer PC-3 in athymic nude mice. By day-2 after tumor implantation, the orthotopic tumor is already highly vascularized and the cancer cells have begun to migrate out of the tumor. In contrast, the subcutaneous tumor only begins to be vascularized by day-3 and cells do not migrate from the tumor. Angiogenesis is much more extensive in the orthotopic tumor throughout the 2-week observation period. The orthotopic PC-3-GFP tumor progresses very rapidly and distinct metastasis have appeared in lymph nodes by day-3 which rapidly appear in many areas of the abdominal cavity including portal lymph nodes by day-7. At day-14, no invasion or metastasis was observed with the s.c. tumor even when the animal was extensively explored. These results explain why orthotopic tumors mimimc clinical metastatic tumors in nude mice and why subcutaneous tumors do not. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2546-2551, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27012365

  8. Real-Time GFP Intravital Imaging of the Differences in Cellular and Angiogenic Behavior of Subcutaneous and Orthotopic Nude-Mouse Models of Human PC-3 Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Toneri, Makoto; Ma, Huaiyu; Yang, Zhijian; Bouvet, Michael; Goto, Yusuke; Seki, Naohiko; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-11-01

    There are two major types of mouse xenograft models of cancer: subcutaneous implantation and orthotopic implantation. Subcutaneous transplant models are widely used with both cancer cell lines and human-tumor specimens. Recently, subcutaneous models of patient tumors, termed patient-derived xenographs (PDX) have become highly popular and have acquired such names as "Avatar" and "Xenopatients." However, such s.c. models rarely metastasize and are therefore not patient-like. In contrast, orthotopic models have the capability to metastasize. If intact fragments of tumor tissue are implanted by surgical orthotopic implantation (SOI), the metastatic potential can match that of the donor patient. The present study images in real time, using green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression, the very different tumor behavior at the orthotopic and subcutaneous sites of human prostate cancer PC-3 in athymic nude mice. By day-2 after tumor implantation, the orthotopic tumor is already highly vascularized and the cancer cells have begun to migrate out of the tumor. In contrast, the subcutaneous tumor only begins to be vascularized by day-3 and cells do not migrate from the tumor. Angiogenesis is much more extensive in the orthotopic tumor throughout the 2-week observation period. The orthotopic PC-3-GFP tumor progresses very rapidly and distinct metastasis have appeared in lymph nodes by day-3 which rapidly appear in many areas of the abdominal cavity including portal lymph nodes by day-7. At day-14, no invasion or metastasis was observed with the s.c. tumor even when the animal was extensively explored. These results explain why orthotopic tumors mimimc clinical metastatic tumors in nude mice and why subcutaneous tumors do not. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2546-2551, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Phase II Evaluation of Early Oral Estramustine, Oral Etoposide and Intravenous Paclitaxel in Combination with Hormone Therapy in Patients with High-Risk Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) S0032

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David C.; Tangen, Cathy M.; Hussain, Maha H.A.; Van Veldhuizen, Peter J.; Harrer, Grant W.; Stuart, Robert K.; Mills, Glenn M.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Thompson, Ian M.

    2012-01-01

    Background This multicenter cooperative group single arm trial assessed the efficacy of a multiagent taxane-based chemotherapy in combination with hormonal therapy in men with metastatic androgen-dependent prostate cancer. Methods Forty-one patients with newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer involving both the axial and appendicular skeletons or viscera were enrolled. Thirty-five were treated with combined androgen blockade and up to 4 cycles of oral estramustine (280 mg orally 3 times per day) and etoposide (50 mg/m2 daily) for 14 days of each 21 day cycle, with paclitaxel (135 mg/m2 IV over 1 hour) on day 2 of each cycle. Chemotherapy was started within 30 days of initiation of hormonal therapy. Patients were followed to determine progression-free survival. Results The median progression-free survival for the evaluable population was 13 months (95% CI 10–16 mo) with a median overall survival of 38 months (95% CI 28–49 mo). The main toxicities were myelosuppression with 9 patients with ≥ grade 3 neutropenia, and 1 with grade 4 thrombocytopenia. One patient died with neutropenic infection. Four episodes of thrombosis embolism occurred (3 grade 4, 1 grade 3) with one episode of grade 4 cardiac ischemia. Conclusions Administration of chemotherapy to this population is feasible with moderate toxicity. This is a high-risk population with poor prognosis and this study serves as a basis for ongoing phase III trials assessing this approach in metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:21334731

  10. Plasma metabolic profiling reveals age-dependency of systemic effects of green tea polyphenols in mice with and without prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Teichert, Friederike; Verschoyle, Richard D; Greaves, Peter; Jones, Donald J L; Wilson, Ian D; Farmer, Peter B; Steward, William P; Gescher, Andreas J; Keun, Hector C

    2010-10-01

    Green tea polyphenols (GTP) have been widely investigated for their potential to prevent prostate cancer. However, results from epidemiological and clinical studies are equivocal. Studies in the TRAMP (TRansgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate) mouse suggest that the chemopreventive efficacy of GTP is higher in young animals with early stages of carcinogenesis than in old ones. Here, effects of GTP on prostate carcinogenesis in TRAMP mice were assessed by comparing pathological changes with (1)H-NMR metabolic profiling of plasma and extracts of prostate tissue. Mice received 0.05% GTP in their drinking water for 4 or 25 weeks after weaning. Age-matched wild-type mice were included in the study in order to establish differences in GTP effects between normal and TRAMP mice. Dietary GTP did not markedly alter prostate carcinogenesis as reflected by pathology and prostate tissue metabolic profile. However, a systemic effect of GTP consumption was observed in young mice, regardless of genotype. Plasma lipid signals were decreased in 8 week old mice which received GTP compared to age-matched controls by 19, 61, 27, 34 and 15% (p

  11. RAF/MEK dependence of KRAS mutant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Aphrothiti J.; Solit, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Sentence Studies employing genetically engineered mouse models indicate that RAF activation is sufficient to induce pancreas intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs) suggesting that MEK inhibitor-based combination approaches may have clinical utility in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22886659

  12. MAGI-2 in prostate cancer: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Jeffery; Borowsky, Alexander D; Goyal, Rajen; Roland, Joseph T; Arnold, Shanna A; Gellert, Lan L; Clark, Peter E; Hameed, Omar; Giannico, Giovanna A

    2016-06-01

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinase, WW and PDZ domain-containing protein 2 (MAGI-2) is a scaffolding protein that links cell adhesion molecules, receptors, and signaling molecules to the cytoskeleton and maintains the architecture of cell junctions. MAGI-2 gene rearrangements have recently been described in prostate cancer. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of MAGI-2 protein in prostate tissue. Seventy-eight radical prostatectomies were used to construct 3 tissue microarrays consisting of 512 cores, including benign tissue, benign prostatic hyperplasia, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), and adenocarcinoma, Gleason patterns 3 to 5. Immunohistochemistry for phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and double-stain MAGI-2/p63 was performed and analyzed by visual and image analysis, the latter as percent of analyzed area (%AREA), and mean optical density multiplied by %AREA (STAIN). By visual and image analysis, MAGI-2 was significantly higher in adenocarcinoma and HGPIN compared with benign (benign versus HGPIN P < .001; benign versus adenocarcinoma, P < .001). HGPIN and adenocarcinoma did not significantly differ by either modality. Using visual intensity to distinguish benign tissue and adenocarcinoma, a receiver operating curve yielded an area under the curve of 0.902. A STAIN threshold of 1470 yielded a sensitivity of 0.66 and specificity of 0.96. There was a significant correlation between PTEN and MAGI-2 staining for normal and benign prostatic hyperplasia, but this was lost in HGPIN and cancer. We conclude that MAGI-2 immunoreactivity is elevated in prostate cancer and HGPIN compared with normal tissue, and suggest that MAGI-2 may contribute to prostate carcinogenesis. This is the first report of MAGI-2 staining by immunohistochemistry in prostate cancer.

  13. Unilateral proptosis: an unusual presentation of prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pouncey, Anna Louise; Fox, Thomas Peter; Bryant, Catherine Anne

    2013-01-01

    A 68-year-old man presented acutely with periorbital pain and proptosis of the right eye, on a background of generalised pain and weight loss. Imaging showed bilateral signal abnormalities in the basal skull extending into the extraconal orbits with compression of the right optic nerve. His medical history revealed symptoms in keeping with benign prostatic hypertrophy. However, the prostate was irregular on rectal examination and prostate-specific antigen was markedly raised at 1880 ng/dl. A provisional diagnosis of metastatic prostatic carcinoma was made based on the clinical and radiological picture. This was later confirmed to be metastatic adenocarcinoma through means of tissue diagnosis. PMID:23715843

  14. Solid adenocarcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Uniformly solid character of the lesions is usually indicative of a well differentiated tumor. No solid adenocarcinomas have observed in our series. However, rare cases have been described by others. In human pathology this diagnosis is usually based on detection of mucin after periodic acid-Schiff reaction with diastase (α-amylase) digestion.

  15. Development of a reactive stroma associated with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in EAF2 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Laura E; Ai, Junkui; Masoodi, Khalid Z; Wang, Yujuan; Wang, Dan; Eisermann, Kurtis; Rigatti, Lora H; O'Malley, Katherine J; Ma, Hei M; Wang, Xinhui; Dar, Javid A; Parwani, Anil V; Simons, Brian W; Ittman, Michael M; Li, Luyuan; Davies, Benjamin J; Wang, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    ELL-associated factor 2 (EAF2) is an androgen-responsive tumor suppressor frequently deleted in advanced prostate cancer that functions as a transcription elongation factor of RNA Pol II through interaction with the ELL family proteins. EAF2 knockout mice on a 129P2/OLA-C57BL/6J background developed late-onset lung adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, B-cell lymphoma and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. In order to further characterize the role of EAF2 in the development of prostatic defects, the effects of EAF2 loss were compared in different murine strains. In the current study, aged EAF2(-/-) mice on both the C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ backgrounds exhibited mPIN lesions as previously reported on a 129P2/OLA-C57BL/6J background. In contrast to the 129P2/OLA-C57BL/6J mixed genetic background, the mPIN lesions in C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ EAF2(-/-) mice were associated with stromal defects characteristic of a reactive stroma and a statistically significant increase in prostate microvessel density. Stromal inflammation and increased microvessel density was evident in EAF2-deficient mice on a pure C57BL/6J background at an early age and preceded the development of the histologic epithelial hyperplasia and neoplasia found in the prostates of older EAF2(-/-) animals. Mice deficient in EAF2 had an increased recovery rate and a decreased overall response to the effects of androgen deprivation. EAF2 expression in human cancer was significantly down-regulated and microvessel density was significantly increased compared to matched normal prostate tissue; furthermore EAF2 expression was negatively correlated with microvessel density. These results suggest that the EAF2 knockout mouse on the C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ genetic backgrounds provides a model of PIN lesions associated with an altered prostate microvasculature and reactive stromal compartment corresponding to that reported in human prostate tumors.

  16. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and chemoprevention

  17. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  18. Diabetes Protects from Prostate Cancer by Downregulating Androgen Receptor: New Insights from LNCaP Cells and PAC120 Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa-Desongles, Anna; Hernández, Cristina; De Torres, Ines; Munell, Francina; Poupon, Marie-France; Simó, Rafael; Selva, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes has been associated with decreased risk of prostate cancer in observational studies, and this inverse association has been recently confirmed in several large cohort studies. However the mechanisms involved in this protective effect remain to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to explore whether different features of type 2 diabetes (hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) protect against the development of prostate cancer. For this purpose LNCaP cells were used for in vitro experiments and nude mice in which PAC120 (hormone-dependent human prostate cancer) xenografts had been implanted were used for in vivo examinations. We provide evidence that increasing glucose concentrations downregulate androgen receptor (AR) mRNA and protein levels through NF-κB activation in LNCaP cells. Moreover, there was a synergic effect of glucose and TNFα in downregulating the AR in LNCaP cells. By contrast, insulin had no effect on AR regulation. In vivo experiments showed that streptozotocin-induced diabetes (STZ-DM) produces tumor growth retardation and a significant reduction in AR expression in PAC120 prostate cancer mice. In conclusion, our results suggest that hyperglycemia and TNF-α play an important role in protecting against prostate cancer by reducing androgen receptor levels via NF-κB. PMID:24058525

  19. Prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillejos-Molina, Ricardo Alonso; Gabilondo-Navarro, Fernando Bernardo

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent tumor found in men worldwide and in Mexico in particular. Age and family history are the main risk factors. The diagnosis is made by prostate biopsy in patients with abnormalities detected in their prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels or digital rectal exam (DRE). This article reviews screening and diagnostic methods as well as treatment options for patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. PMID:27557386

  20. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from ... and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It ...

  1. [Low grade sinonasal adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Sayilgan, Ayşe Tülay; Kamali, Gülçin; Ozcan, Deniz; Emre, Funda; Hatıpoğlu, Ayşe

    2012-01-01

    Sinonasal adenocarcinoma is a rare neoplasm which is classified as 'intestinal' or 'nonintestinal' type, depending on its resemblance to gastrointestinal mucosa. These tumors are associated with occupational and environmental carcinogens. In this study, a fifty-year-old oil-painter male patient with a low-grade nonintestinal type sinonasal adenocarcinoma originating from the left middle concha and ethmoid sinus is presented. Microscopical examination revealed many infiltrative glandular structures, most of which were cystically dilated and some of which were smaller in diameter, arranged back to back in loose fibrous stroma as well as intraglandular papillary and micropapillary structures forming complex branches or a cribriform pattern. The glands were lined by epithelial cells that were faintly eosinophilic and relatively abundant cubical/ cylinderical cytoplasms and mildly pleomorphic round/oval nuclei, with rare mitotic figures. Intraluminal and focally intracytoplasmic mucin was demonstrated with Alcian Blue, mucicarmin and PAS stains. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were strongly and diffusely positive with CK7; focally and weakly positive with CK20 and negative with CDX2 in accordance with the nonintestinal type. S-100, Actin and p63, applied for investigating the myoepithelial and salivary glandular origins, were all negative. Prognostic markers, TTF-1 and p53 were negative; while the Ki-67 index was 2%. The fact that intestinal type sinonasal adenocarcinomas are generally high grade, while nonintestinal tumors are histologically low grade makes this morphological and immunohistochemical-based classification valuable in predicting the prognosis of the disease. In addition to the morphological and immunohistochemical findings, clinical information stands out in the differentiation of the tumor from benign or malignant primary lesions or metastatic adenocarcinoma.

  2. Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy caused by prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, Keiko; Kinoshita, Tatsuya; Nagai, Keisuke; Hongyo, Hidenari; Kishimoto, Kentaro; Inoue, Atsuo; Takamura, Manabu; Choi, Soomi

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM) is a fatal malignancy-related condition that involves rapidly progressing hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension. We report a case of PTTM caused by prostate carcinoma, which was diagnosed before autopsy in an 81-year-old man. Computed tomography showed diffuse ground-glass opacities, consolidation, and small nodules in the peripheral regions of the lung. Autopsy showed adenocarcinoma cells embolizing small pulmonary arteries with fibrocellular intimal proliferation, which was consistent with PTTM caused by prostate carcinoma.

  3. Suppression of prostate epithelial proliferation and intraprostatic progrowth signaling in transgenic mice by a new energy restriction-mimetic agent.

    PubMed

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Chu, Po-Chen; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Bolon, Brad; Wang, Dasheng; Yang, Tiffany; Clinton, Steven K; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2013-03-01

    Cells undergoing malignant transformation often exhibit a shift in cellular metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. This glycolytic shift, called the Warburg effect, provides a mechanistic basis for targeting glycolysis to suppress carcinogenesis through the use of dietary caloric restriction and energy restriction-mimetic agents (ERMA). We recently reported the development of a novel class of ERMAs that exhibits high potency in eliciting starvation-associated cellular responses and epigenetic changes in cancer cells though glucose uptake inhibition. The lead ERMA in this class, OSU-CG5, decreases the production of ATP and NADH in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. In this study, we examined the effect of OSU-CG5 on the severity of preneoplastic lesions in male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Daily oral treatment with OSU-CG5 at 100 mg/kg from 6 to 10 weeks of age resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the weight of urogenital tract and microdissected dorsal, lateral, and anterior prostatic lobes relative to vehicle controls. The suppressive effect of OSU-CG5 was evidenced by marked decreases in Ki67 immunostaining and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in the prostate. OSU-CG5 treatment was not associated with evidence of systemic toxicity. Microarray analysis indicated a central role for Akt, and Western blot analysis showed reduced phosphorylation and/or expression levels of Akt, Src, androgen receptor, and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor in prostate lobes. These findings support further investigation of OSU-CG5 as a potential chemopreventive agent.

  4. Suppression of Prostate Epithelial Proliferation and Intraprostatic Progrowth Signaling in Transgenic Mice by a New Energy Restriction-Mimetic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D.; Chu, Po-Chen; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Bolon, Brad; Wang, Dasheng; Yang, Tiffany; Clinton, Steven K.; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2013-01-01

    Cells undergoing malignant transformation often exhibit a shift in cellular metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. This glycolytic shift, called the Warburg effect, provides a mechanistic basis for targeting glycolysis to suppress carcinogenesis through the use of dietary caloric restriction and energy restriction-mimetic agents (ERMA). We recently reported the development of a novel class of ERMAs that exhibits high potency in eliciting starvation-associated cellular responses and epigenetic changes in cancer cells though glucose uptake inhibition. The lead ERMA in this class, OSU-CG5, decreases the production of ATP and NADH in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. In this study, we examined the effect of OSU-CG5 on the severity of preneoplastic lesions in male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Daily oral treatment with OSU-CG5 at 100 mg/kg from 6 to 10 weeks of age resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the weight of urogenital tract and microdissected dorsal, lateral, and anterior prostatic lobes relative to vehicle controls. The suppressive effect of OSU-CG5 was evidenced by marked decreases in Ki67 immunostaining and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in the prostate. OSU-CG5 treatment was not associated with evidence of systemic toxicity. Microarray analysis indicated a central role for Akt, and Western blot analysis showed reduced phosphorylation and/or expression levels of Akt, Src, androgen receptor, and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor in prostate lobes. These findings support further investigation of OSU-CG5 as a potential chemopreventive agent. PMID:23275006

  5. Variant Prostate Carcinoma and Elevated Serum CA-125

    PubMed Central

    Bilen, Mehmet Asim; Reyes, Adriana; Bhowmick, Deb; Maa, April; Bast, Robert; Pisters, Louis L.; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Tu, Shi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Introduction About 10% of tumors derived from nongynecologic, noncoelomic tissues react with the OC125 antibody. Some patients with advanced prostate cancer were found to have elevated serum CA-125 level. Materials and Methods We examined the clinical history of 11 patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and an elevated serum CA-125 level. Pathological review and immunohistochemical staining were performed on tumors from 8 of these patients. Results Patients with advanced prostate cancer and an elevated serum CA-125 level responded to androgen ablative therapy (median duration, 27 months). They were predisposed to develop persistent or recurrent urinary symptoms and visceral metastases. Eight of 11 patients had a low or undetectable serum prostate-specific antigen level (≤4 ng/ml) or an elevated serum carcinoembryonic antigen level (>6 ng/ml). In 3 of 7 patients whose specimens were available for further review, the tumors contained histologic features compatible with a diagnosis of ductal or endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Conclusions Patients with prostate cancer and an elevated serum CA-125 level have unique clinical and pathologic characteristics. Some of these patients possess tumors compatible with a subtype of prostate cancer known as ductal adenocarcinoma. Additional studies need to be performed to elucidate the biologic basis of the various subtypes of prostate cancer. PMID:25347368

  6. Early Growth Inhibition Is Followed by Increased Metastatic Disease with Vitamin D (Calcitriol) Treatment in the TRAMP Model of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karasik, Ellen; Gillard, Bryan; Moser, Michael T.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.; Foster, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin D3, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) has antiproliferative effects in non-aggressive prostate cancer, however, its effects in more aggressive model systems are still unclear. In these studies, effects of calcitriol and a less-calcemic vitamin D analog, QW-1624F2-2 (QW), were tested in vivo, using the aggressive autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. To study prevention of androgen-stimulated prostate cancer, vehicle, calcitriol (20 µg/kg), or QW (50 µg/kg) were administered to 4 week-old TRAMP mice intraperitoneal (i.p.) 3×/week on a MWF schedule for 14 weeks. Calcitriol and QW slowed progression of prostate cancer as indicated by reduced urogenital tract (p = 0.0022, calcitriol; p = 0.0009, QW) and prostate weights (p = 0.0178, calcitriol; p = 0.0086, QW). However, only calcitriol increased expression of the pro-differentiation marker, cadherin 1 (p = 0.0086), and reduced tumor proliferation (p = 0.0467). By contrast, neither vitamin D analog had any effect on castration resistant prostate cancer in mice treated pre- or post-castration. Interestingly, although vitamin D showed inhibitory activity against primary tumors in hormone-intact mice, distant organ metastases seemed to be enhanced following treatment (p = 0.0823). Therefore, TRAMP mice were treated long-term with calcitriol to further examine effects on metastasis. Calcitriol significantly increased the number of distant organ metastases when mice were treated from 4 weeks-of-age until development of palpable tumors (20–25 weeks-of-age)(p = 0.0003). Overall, data suggest that early intervention with vitamin D in TRAMP slowed androgen-stimulated tumor progression, but prolonged treatment resulted in development of a resistant and more aggressive disease associated with increased distant organ metastasis. PMID:24586868

  7. Role of lycopene and tomato products in prostate health.

    PubMed

    Stacewicz-Sapuntzakis, Maria; Bowen, Phyllis E

    2005-05-30

    Epidemiological evidence associating the decreased risk of prostate cancer with frequent consumption of tomato products inspired us to conduct a small intervention trial among patients diagnosed with prostate adenocarcinoma. Tomato sauce pasta was consumed daily for 3 weeks before their scheduled prostatectomy, and biomarkers of tomato intake, prostate cancer progression and oxidative DNA damage were followed in blood and the available prostate tissue. The whole food intervention was so well accepted by the subjects that the blood lycopene (the primary carotenoid in tomatoes responsible for their red color) doubled and the prostate lycopene concentration tripled during this short period. Oxidative DNA damage in leukocytes and prostate tissues was significantly diminished, the latter mainly in the tumor cell nuclei, possibly due to the antioxidant properties of lycopene. Quite surprising was the decrease in blood prostate-specific antigen, which was explained by the increase in apoptotic death of prostate cells, especially in carcinoma regions. Prostate cancer cell cultures (LNCaP) were also sensitive to lycopene in growth medium, which caused an increased apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle. A possible explanation of these promising results may reside in lycopene effects on the genes governing the androgen stimulation of prostate growth, cytokines and on the enzymes producing reactive oxygen species, all of which were recently discovered by nutrigenomic techniques. Other phytochemicals in tomato may act in synergy with lycopene to potentiate protective effects and to help in the maintenance of prostate health. PMID:15949687

  8. Microsatellite instability in adenocarcinoma of the prostrate

    SciTech Connect

    Terrell, R.B.; Willie, A.H.; Cheville, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Instability of tandem repeat sequences (microsatellites) has been reported to play a major etiologic role in familial colon cancer, as well as a potential role in the carcinogenesis of other sporadic neoplasms. These replication errors are the result of faulty DNA excision/repair function controlled at the gene level. In order to examine this phenomenon in prostate cancer, we screened 40 tumors with di-, tri- and tetranucleotide markers spanning eleven chromosomal loci. Microsatellite instability was observed overall in 3 of the 40 cases (7.5%). All changes were identified solely in tetranucleotide sequences (3 of 11 total markers analyzed). One tumor demonstrated repeat length expansions at two loci, while the other tumors did so at a single locus. Both Type 1 (>4 base pairs) and Type II (4 base pairs) mutations were identified. One of these cases also included metastatic nodal disease. Analysis of the metastatic tumor tissue revealed allelic patterns identical to the normal tissue control. A secondary screening of the mutated tumors demonstrated no repeat length alterations in 16 additional markers. A CAG repeat in the androgen receptor (AR) gene was also studied and demonstrated that 3 of 40 (7.5%) tumors contained mutations within this repeat. We concluded that microsatellite instability is uncommon in prostate adenocarcinoma appearing to occur more often in tetranucleotide repeat sequences and in an AR gene repeat. Additionally, these findings suggest that dysfunctional DNA excision/repair mechanisms, as evidenced by the low frequency of replication errors, are unlikely to play a major role in the natural history of prostate cancer.

  9. Long-Term Results of an RTOG Phase II Trial (00-19) of External-Beam Radiation Therapy Combined With Permanent Source Brachytherapy for Intermediate-Risk Clinically Localized Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Yan, Yan; Lee, W. Robert; Gillin, Michael; Firat, Selim; Baikadi, Madhava; Crook, Juanita; Kuettel, Michael; Morton, Gerald; Sandler, Howard

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: External-beam radiation therapy combined with low-doserate permanent brachytherapy are commonly used to treat men with localized prostate cancer. This Phase II trial was performed to document late gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity as well as biochemical control for this treatment in a multi-institutional cooperative group setting. This report defines the long-term results of this trial. Methods and Materials: All eligible patients received external-beam radiation (45 Gy in 25 fractions) followed 2-6 weeks later by a permanent iodine 125 implant of 108 Gy. Late toxicity was defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late radiation morbidity scoring scheme. Biochemical control was defined by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus definition and the ASTRO Phoenix definition. Results: One hundred thirty-eight patients were enrolled from 20 institutions, and 131 were eligible. Median follow-up (living patients) was 8.2 years (range, 2.7-9.3 years). The 8-year estimate of late grade >3 genitourinary and/or gastrointestinal toxicity was 15%. The most common grade >3 toxicities were urinary frequency, dysuria, and proctitis. There were two grade 4 toxicities, both bladder necrosis, and no grade 5 toxicities. In addition, 42% of patients complained of grade 3 impotence (no erections) at 8 years. The 8-year estimate of biochemical failure was 18% and 21% by the Phoenix and ASTRO consensus definitions, respectively. Conclusion: Biochemical control for this treatment seems durable with 8 years of follow-up and is similar to high-dose external beam radiation alone or brachytherapy alone. Late toxicity in this multi-institutional trial is higher than reports from similar cohorts of patients treated with high-dose external-beam radiation alone or permanent low-doserate brachytherapy alone, perhaps suggesting further attention to strategies that limit doses to

  10. TRAMP prostate tumor growth is slowed by walnut diets through altered IGF-1 levels, energy pathways, and cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsook; Yokoyama, Wallace; Davis, Paul Andrew

    2014-12-01

    Dietary changes could potentially reduce prostate cancer morbidity and mortality. Transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) prostate tumor responses to a 100 g of fat/kg diet (whole walnuts, walnut oil, and other oils; balanced for macronutrients, tocopherols [α-and γ]) for 18 weeks ad libitum were assessed. TRAMP mice (n=17 per group) were fed diets with 100 g fat from either whole walnuts (diet group WW), walnut-like fat (diet group WLF, oils blended to match walnut's fatty acid profile), or as walnut oil (diet group WO, pressed from the same walnuts as WW). Fasted plasma glucose was from tail vein blood, blood was obtained by cardiac puncture, and plasma stored frozen until analysis. Prostate (genitourinary intact [GUI]) was weighed and stored frozen at -80°C. Plasma triglyceride, lipoprotein cholesterol, plasma multianalyte levels (Myriad RBM Rat Metabolic MAP), prostate (GUI), tissue metabolites (Metabolon, Inc., Durham, NC, USA), and mRNA (by Illumina NGS) were determined. The prostate tumor size, plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), high density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol all decreased significantly (P<.05) in both WW and WO compared to WLF. Both WW and WO versus WLF showed increased insulin sensitivity (Homeostasis Model Assessment [HOMA]), and tissue metabolomics found reduced glucose-6-phosphate, succinylcarnitine, and 4-hydroxybutyrate in these groups suggesting effects on cellular energy status. Tissue mRNA levels also showed changes suggestive of altered glucose metabolism with WW and WO diet groups having increased PCK1 and CIDEC mRNA expression, known for their roles in gluconeogenesis and increased insulin sensitivity, respectively. WW and WO group tissues also had increased MSMB mRNa a tumor suppressor and decreased COX-2 mRNA, both reported to inhibit prostate tumor growth. Walnuts reduced prostate tumor growth by affecting energy metabolism along with decreased plasma IGF-1 and cholesterol. These effects are

  11. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  12. Eosinophilic prostatitis and prostatic specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Miller, P D; Holmes, S A; Christmas, T J; Kirby, R S

    1992-01-01

    Eosinophilic prostatitis is a rare form of abacterial prostatitis with uncertain aetiology. Its clinical presentation, like other types of abacterial prostatitis, commonly mimics carcinoma of the prostate. Transrectal ultrasound may be helpful in the diagnosis of prostatitis but histological confirmation is necessary. Prostatic specific antigen has been widely used in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with prostatic carcinoma. High levels of this antigen (greater than 30 micrograms/l) have been claimed to be highly specific for prostate cancer, although lesser elevations may also occur in patients with large benign prostate glands and in bacterial prostatitis. We report 3 patients with histologically proven eosinophilic prostatitis and high levels of prostatic specific antigen. This diagnosis may closely mimic carcinoma of the prostate and must be excluded by histological examination of biopsy material before treatment for presumed prostate carcinoma is initiated.

  13. Reduced 64Cu Uptake and Tumor Growth Inhibition by Knockdown of Human Copper Transporter 1 in Xenograft Mouse Model of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Huawei; Wu, Jiu-sheng; Muzik, Otto; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Lee, Robert J.; Peng, Fangyu

    2015-01-01

    Copper is an element required for cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Human prostate cancer xenografts with increased 64Cu radioactivity were visualized previously by PET using 64CuCl2 as a radiotracer (64CuCl2 PET). This study aimed to determine whether the increased tumor 64Cu radioactivity was due to increased cellular uptake of 64Cu mediated by human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) or simply due to nonspecific binding of ionic 64CuCl2 to tumor tissue. In addition, the functional role of hCtr1 in proliferation of prostate cancer cells and tumor growth was also assessed. Methods A lentiviral vector encoding short-hairpin RNA specific for hCtr1 (Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA) was constructed for RNA interference–mediated knockdown of hCtr1 expression in prostate cancer cells. The degree of hCtr1 knockdown was determined by Western blot, and the effect of hCtr1 knockdown on copper uptake and proliferation were examined in vitro by cellular 64Cu uptake and cell proliferation assays. The effects of hCtr1 knockdown on tumor uptake of 64Cu were determined by PET quantification and tissue radioactivity assay. The effects of hCtr1 knockdown on tumor growth were assessed by PET/CT and tumor size measurement with a caliper. Results RNA interference–mediated knockdown of hCtr1 was associated with the reduced cellular uptake of 64Cu and the suppression of prostate cancer cell proliferation in vitro. At 24 h after intravenous injection of the tracer 64CuCl2, the 64Cu uptake by the tumors with knockdown of hCtr1 (4.02 ± 0.31 percentage injected dose per gram [%ID/g] in Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-PC-3 and 2.30 ± 0.59 %ID/g in Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-DU-145) was significantly lower than the 64Cu uptake by the control tumors without knockdown of hCtr1 (7.21 ± 1.48 %ID/g in Lenti-SCR-shRNA-PC-3 and 5.57 ± 1.20 % ID/g in Lenti-SCR-shRNA-DU-145, P < 0.001) by PET quantification. Moreover, the volumes of prostate cancer xenograft tumors with knockdown of hCtr1 (179 ± 111 mm3 for Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-PC-3

  14. Targeting Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Acidic Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Roland, Christina L.; Deng, Defeng; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Moshnikova, Anna; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Logsdon, Craig D.

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the USA, accounting for ~40,000 deaths annually. The dismal prognosis for PDAC is largely due to its late diagnosis. Currently, the most sensitive diagnosis of PDAC requires invasive procedures, such as endoscopic ultrasonography, which has inherent risks and accuracy that is highly operator dependent. Here we took advantage of a general characteristic of solid tumors, the acidic microenvironment that is generated as a by-product of metabolism, to develop a novel approach of using pH (Low) Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs) for imaging of PDAC. We show that fluorescently labeled pHLIPs can localize and specifically detect PDAC in human xenografts as well as PDAC and PanIN lesions in genetically engineered mouse models. This novel approach may improve detection, differential diagnosis and staging of PDAC.

  15. Evaluating the Anticancer Properties of Liposomal Copper in a Nude Mouse Xenograft Model of Human Prostate Cancer: Formulation, In Vitro, In Vivo, Histology and Tissue Distribution Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zeng, San; Lin, Tien-Min; Krugner-Higby, Lisa; Lyman, Doug; Steffen, Dana; Xiong, May P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although copper (Cu) complexes have been investigated as anticancer agents, there has been no description of Cu itself as a cancer killing agent. A stealth liposomal Cu formulation (LpCu) was studied in vitro and in vivo. Methods LpCu was evaluated in prostate cancer origin PC-3 cells by a metabolic cytotoxicity assay, by monitoring reactive oxygen species (ROS), and by flow cytometry. LpCu efficacy was evaluated in vivo using intratumoral and intravenous injections into mice bearing PC-3 xenograft tumors. Toxicology was assessed by performing hematological and blood biochemistry assays, and tissue histology and Cu distribution was investigated by elemental analysis. Results LpCu and free Cu salts displayed similar levels of cell metabolic toxicity and ROS. Flow cytometry indicated that the mechanisms of cell death were both apoptosis and necrosis. Animals injected i.t. with 3.5 mg/kg or i.v. with 3.5 and 7.0 mg/kg LpCu exhibited significant tumor growth inhibition. Kidney and eye were the main organs affected by Cu-mediated toxicities, but spleen and liver were the major organs of Cu deposition. Conclusions LpCu was effective at reducing tumor burden in the xenograft prostate cancer model. There was histological evidence of Cu toxicity in kidneys and eyes of animals treated at the maximum tolerated dose of LpCu 7.0 mg/kg. PMID:24848339

  16. A Preliminary Analysis of Calcifying Particles in the Serum and Prostates of Patients with Prostatic Inflammation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Carlson, Grant; Kajander, E. Olavi; Warmflash, David; Taylor, Karen; Ayala, Gustavo; Shoskes, Daniel; Everett, Meg; Feedback, Dan; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    2006-01-01

    Chronic diseases of the prostate such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) & chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) have associated findings of chronic inflammation, despite a lack of causal relationship. Numerous attempts to define an infectious agent responsible for the clinical findings have been inconsistent. The possibility of an infectious agent, that has not been uncovered with routine culturing methods, forms the basis for this study. Serum from 940 healthy Finnish men were compared with serum from 40 Crohn's, 40 path dx prostatitis, & 40 with path dx carcinoma, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA), to detect antigens specific to Nanobacteria(NB) utilizing monoclonal antibodies (Ab) 5/3 and 8D10. This ELISA has not been validated for detecting NB-associated with clinical prostatic disease, yet cross-reactivity with other bacterial species is low. Immunohistochemistry was performed on de-paraffinized prostatic tissue slides, de-calcified with EDTA and stained with the DAKO Catalyzed Signal Amplification kit, employing 8D10 as the primary (target/antigen-detecting) Ab. The mean (plus or minus SD) & median concentrations of NB antigen (U/50 L) were 379.59 (plus or minus 219.28) & 640.00 for patients with prostatitis (BPH) vs 3.31 (plus or minus 3.55) & 2.94 for prostate adenocarcinoma, 1.88 (plus or minus 2.94) & 0.80 for Crohn's disease, & 7.43 (plus or minus 25.57) & 0.00 for patients with no clinical prostatic disease. Unpaired t-tests revealed statistically significant differences between the prostatitis (BPH) sera & each of the other groups with p less than 0.005, but no differences between the other groups themselves. Preliminary studies with immunohistochemistry & 3-D confocal microscopy reveal 16/24 tissue sections + for NB Ag in BPH vs. only 2/22 tissue sections with prostate cancer. The preliminary findings of this serum screening study suggest that NB antigen may be commonly found in the serum of patients with the pathological diagnosis

  17. Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Urethra: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Venyo, Anthony Kodzo-Grey

    2015-01-01

    Background. Clear cell adenocarcinoma of the urethra (CCAU) is extremely rare and a number of clinicians may be unfamiliar with its diagnosis and biological behaviour. Aims. To review the literature on CCAU. Methods. Various internet databases were used. Results/Literature Review. (i) CCAU occurs in adults and in women in the great majority of cases. (ii) It has a particular association with urethral diverticulum, which has been present in 56% of the patients; is indistinguishable from clear cell adenocarcinoma of the female genital tract but is not associated with endometriosis; and probably does not arise by malignant transformation of nephrogenic adenoma. (iii) It is usually, readily distinguished from nephrogenic adenoma because of greater cytological a-typicality and mitotic activity and does not stain for prostate-specific antigen or prostatic acid phosphatase. (iv) It has been treated by anterior exenteration in women and cystoprostatectomy in men and at times by radiotherapy; chemotherapy has rarely been given. (v) CCAU is aggressive with low 5-year survival rates. (vi) There is no consensus opinion of treatment options that would improve the prognosis. Conclusions. Few cases of CCAU have been reported. Urologists, gynaecologists, pathologists, and oncologists should report cases of CCAU they encounter and enter them into a multicentric trial to determine the best treatment options that would improve the prognosis. PMID:25685552

  18. Neoadjuvant therapy for gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Samalin, Emmanuelle; Ychou, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas are one of the main causes of cancer-related death worldwide. While the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma is decreasing, the incidence of gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma is rising rapidly in Western countries. Considering that surgical resection is currently the major curative treatment, and that the 5-year survival rate highly depends on the pTNM stage at diagnosis, gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma management is very challenging for oncologists. Several treatment strategies are being evaluated, and among them systemic chemotherapy, to decrease recurrences and improve overall survival. The MAGIC and FNCLCC-FFCD trials showed a survival benefit of perioperative chemotherapy in patients with operable gastric and lower esophageal cancer, and these results had an impact on the European clinical practice. New strategies, including induction chemotherapy followed by preoperative chemoradiotherapy, targeted therapies in combination with perioperative chemotherapy and the new cytotoxic regimens, are currently assessed to improve current standards and help developing patient-tailored therapeutic interventions. PMID:27298768

  19. Adenocarcinoma of the cervical stump

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, H.M.; Niloff, J.M.; Buttlar, C.A.; Welch, W.R.; Marck, A.; Feuer, E.J.; Lahman, E.A.; Jenison, E.; Knapp, R.C. )

    1989-11-01

    Sixteen women with adenocarcinoma of the cervical stump were treated over a 15-year period. The median survivals of 40 months for stage IB and 17 months for stages II and III were significantly worse compared with those for patients treated for cervical adenocarcinoma of the intact uterus or squamous carcinoma of the cervical stump. The poor results were due to both local and distant failure. Implications regarding tumor radiosensitivity and adjuvant therapy in these high-risk patients are discussed.

  20. Adenocarcinoma arising in a gastrocystoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Balachandra, B; Swanson, P E; Upton, M P; Yeh, M M

    2007-01-01

    Gastrocystoplasty is a form of surgical bladder augmentation or neobladder used to restore bladder capacity and compliance in children and in patients with neurogenic bladder. Other forms of bladder augmentation include ileocystoplasty and colocystoplasty. Reported complications of gastrocystoplasty include post‐operative bleeding, haematuria, stricture, metabolic alkalosis and rupture of the gastric segment. There are reports of adenocarcinomas arising in the setting of ileocystoplasty and colocystoplasty. However, the first case of adenocarcinoma arising in the setting of a gastrocystoplasty is reported. PMID:17213351

  1. Adenocarcinoma arising in a gastrocystoplasty.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, B; Swanson, P E; Upton, M P; Yeh, M M

    2007-01-01

    Gastrocystoplasty is a form of surgical bladder augmentation or neobladder used to restore bladder capacity and compliance in children and in patients with neurogenic bladder. Other forms of bladder augmentation include ileocystoplasty and colocystoplasty. Reported complications of gastrocystoplasty include post-operative bleeding, haematuria, stricture, metabolic alkalosis and rupture of the gastric segment. There are reports of adenocarcinomas arising in the setting of ileocystoplasty and colocystoplasty. However, the first case of adenocarcinoma arising in the setting of a gastrocystoplasty is reported.

  2. Notch signaling in prostate cancer: refining a therapeutic opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qingtai; Xin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Summary Notch is an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway that plays a critical role in specifying cell fate and regulating tissue homeostasis and carcinogenesis. Studies using organ cultures and genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that Notch signaling regulates prostate development and homeostasis. However, the role of the Notch signaling pathway in prostate cancer remains inconclusive. Many published studies have documented consistent deregulation of major Notch signaling components in human prostate cancer cell lines, mouse models for prostate cancers, and human prostate cancer specimens at both the mRNA and the protein levels. However, functional studies in human cancer cells by modulation of Notch pathway elements suggest both tumor suppressive and oncogenic roles of Notch. These controversies may originate from our inadequate understanding of the regulation of Notch signaling under versatile genetic contexts, and reflect the multifaceted and pleiotropic roles of Notch in regulating different aspects of prostate cancer cell biology, such as proliferation, metastasis, and chemo-resistance. Future comprehensive studies using various mouse models for prostate cancer may help clarify the role of Notch signaling in prostate cancer and provide a solid basis for determining whether and how Notch should be employed as a therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26521657

  3. Influence of Anti-Mouse Interferon Serum on the Growth and Metastasis of Tumor Cells Persistently Infected with Virus and of Human Prostatic Tumors in Athymic Nude Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Lola M.; Minato, Nagahiro; Gresser, Ion; Holland, John; Kadish, Anna; Bloom, Barry R.

    1981-02-01

    Baby hamster kidney or HeLa cells form tumors in 100% of athymic nude mice. When such cells are persistently infected (PI) with RNA viruses, such as mumps or measles virus, the tumor cells either fail to grow or form circumscribed benign nodules. Neither the parental nor the virus PI tumor cells form invasive or metastatic lesions in nude mice. Previous studies have indicated a correlation between the susceptibility of virus-PI tumor cells in vitro and the cytolytic activity of natural killer (NK) cells and their failure to grow in vivo. Because interferon (IF) is the principal regulatory molecule governing the differentiation of NK cells, it was possible to test the relevance of the IF--NK cell system in vivo to restriction of tumor growth by treatment of nude mice with anti-IF globulin. This treatment was shown to reduce both IF production and NK activity in spleen cells. Both parental and virus-PI tumor cells grew and formed larger tumors in nude mice treated with anti-IF globulin than in control nude mice. The viral-PI tumor cells and the uninfected parental cells formed tumors in treated mice that were highly invasive and often metastatic. Some human tumor types have been notoriously difficult to establish as tumor lines in nude mice (e.g., primary human prostatic carcinomas). When transplanted into nude mice treated either with anti-IF globulin or anti-lymphocyte serum, two prostatic carcinomas grew and produced neoplasms with local invasiveness and some metastases. The results are consistent with the view that interferon may be important in restricting the growth, invasiveness, and metastases of tumor cells by acting indirectly through components of the immune system, such as NK cells.

  4. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ): National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www. ...

  5. Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Lilja, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Two groundbreaking trials have this year reported conflicting results as to the benefit of screening for prostate cancer. Careful interpretation in the light of contemporary data might, however, reveal the true value of this intervention. PMID:19498406

  6. Enlarged prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Possible side effects include decreased sex drive and impotence . Antibiotics may be prescribed to treat chronic prostatitis ( ... less-invasive procedures carry a lower risk for impotence and incontinence than TURP, although the risk with ...

  7. Prostatitis - bacterial

    MedlinePlus

    ... emptying the bladder Foul-smelling urine Weak urine stream Other symptoms that may occur with this condition: ... the risk of spreading bacteria into the blood stream. The exam may reveal that the prostate is: ...

  8. Low-lycopene containing tomato powder diet does not protect against prostate cancer in TRAMP mice.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Lauren E; Wallig, Matthew A; Erdman, John W

    2015-10-01

    Previously, tomato powder (TP) diets initiated postweaning have been shown to be effective in reducing prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. The TRAMP model develops and progresses through all stages of carcinogenesis similarly to humans. We hypothesized that a 10% TP diet intervention after puberty would reduce carcinogenesis at 12, 16, and 20 weeks of age in TRAMP mice. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6 X FVB F1 TRAMP mice were randomized to consume either an AIN-93G + 10% TP diet (n = 90) or the AIN-93G control diet (n = 88) and randomized to 1 of 3 end point ages: 12 (n = 59), 16 (n = 60), or 20 (n = 59) weeks of age. There was no difference between diets in overall cancer incidence at any time point. However, at 16 weeks of age, TP significantly increased high-grade PIN (P = .014) and significantly decreased poorly differentiated (P = .024) lesions compared with the control diet suggesting a delay in the progression of prostate cancer. Two variables that may explain the modest effect of TP in this study are as follows: the low amount of lycopene in the TP diet (12.3 ppm) and the timing of the intervention (8 weeks of age). The TP diet contained 30-fold less lycopene than previous studies in our laboratory. In addition, the initiation of the diet intervention time of 8 weeks of age instead of 4 weeks of age may have been too late in cancer progression to substantially impact carcinogenesis. In conclusion, a low-lycopene TP intervention failed to reduce carcinogenesis in TRAMP mice. PMID:26255194

  9. Neuroendocrine prostate cancer: subtypes, biology, and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rahul; Zhang, Tian; Small, Eric J; Armstrong, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC) encompasses various clinical contexts, ranging from the de novo presentation of small cell prostatic carcinoma to a treatment-emergent transformed phenotype that arises from typical adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The development of resistance to potent androgen receptor signaling inhibition may be associated with the emergence of aggressive phenotype, advanced castration-resistant NEPC. Clinically, small cell prostate cancer and NEPC are often manifested by the presence of visceral or large soft tissue metastatic disease, a disproportionately low serum prostate-specific antigen level relative to the overall burden of disease, and a limited response to targeting of the androgen signaling axis. These tumors are often characterized by loss of androgen receptor expression, loss of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor copy number or expression, amplification of Aurora kinase A and N-Myc, and activation of the PI3K pathway. However, a consensus phenotype-genotype definition of NEPC has yet to emerge, and molecularly based biomarkers are needed to expand on traditional morphologic and immunohistochemical markers of NEPC to fully define the spectrum of this aggressive, androgen receptor-independent disease. Emerging studies implicate a shared clonal origin with prostatic adenocarcinoma in many cases, with the adaptive emergence of unique cellular programming and gene expression profiles. Ongoing clinical studies are focused on developing novel targeted therapeutic approaches for this high-risk, lethal subset of disease, to improve on the limited durations of response often observed with traditional platinum-based chemotherapy.

  10. SOX4 is essential for prostate tumorigenesis initiated by PTEN ablation | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Understanding remains incomplete of the mechanisms underlying initiation and progression of prostate cancer, the most commonly diagnosed cancer in American men. The transcription factor SOX4 is overexpressed in many human cancers, including prostate cancer, suggesting it may participate in prostate tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated this possibility by genetically deleting Sox4 in a mouse model of prostate cancer initiated by loss of the tumor suppressor Pten.

  11. Primary adenocarcinoma of the seminal vesicles. A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Katafigiotis, Ioannis; Sfoungaristos, Stavros; Duvdevani, Mordechai; Mitsos, Panagiotis; Roumelioti, Eleni; Stravodimos, Konstantinos; Anastasiou, Ioannis; Constantinides, Constantinos A

    2016-03-31

    Primary adenocarcinoma of the seminal vesicles (SV) are extremely rare and approximately only 60 cases have been reported in the literature. Due to the lack of specific symptoms the patients often present in an advanced stage of their disease. The only clinical examination that can indicate the presence of a neoplasm in the SVs is the digital rectal examination (DRE). Serum prostatic specific antigen (PSA) and prostate specific acid phosphatase (PAP) are usually normal in patients with primary adenocarcinoma of the SV and only CA-125 can be proved a useful blood biomarker contributing to the diagnosis and the follow up of the SV adenocarcinoma. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FDG-PET/CT have been used for the diagnosis and the staging of the SV adenocarcinoma. Various combinations of radical surgery, radiotherapy androgen deprivation therapy and chemotherapy have been proposed for the management of the disease but the prognosis is poor and the mean survival is two years after the diagnosis.

  12. Cysteine-rich secretory protein-3: a potential biomarker for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kosari, Farhad; Asmann, Yan W; Cheville, John C; Vasmatzis, George

    2002-11-01

    Electronic profiling of publicly available expressed sequence tag databases identified a gene, cysteine-rich secretoryprotein-3 (CRISP-3), that is up-regulated in prostate cancer, and of which the expression is relatively prostate-specific. The objective of this study was to examine the potential of CRISP-3 as a biomarker for prostate cancer. In transient transfection studies, CRISP-3 was found to be a secretory protein. Using a multiple tissue dot blot experiment, CRISP-3 transcript was identified in a limited number of human tissues including the prostate. In situ hybridization experiments indicated that CRISP-3 mRNA is epithelial-specific and is up-regulated in prostate adenocarcinoma compared with benign prostate tissue. CRISP-3 mRNA overexpression in cancer was confirmed using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription-PCR using benign prostatic epithelia and adenocarcinoma (in 5 of 5 cases) isolated by laser capture microdissection, as well as bulk tissues (in 20 of 23 cases) from surgically resected human prostates. These findings suggest that CRISP-3 is a potential biomarker for prostate cancer.

  13. Calcifications in prostate and ejaculatory system: a study on 298 consecutive whole mount sections of prostate from radical prostatectomy or cystoprostatectomy specimens.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jae Hee; Gardner, Jerad M; Kee, Keun H; Shen, Steven; Ayala, Alberto G; Ro, Jae Y

    2008-06-01

    Although calcifications in the prostate are a common manifestation, the relationship between calcifications and prostate cancer is not clearly documented as in breast cancer. In addition, anatomical distribution of calcifications by zones of the prostate and ejaculatory system has not been systematically studied. To study the frequency and patterns of calcifications within the prostate and ejaculatory system, we reviewed the whole mount sections of 298 consecutive prostatectomy or cystoprostatectomy specimens. Calcifications were evaluated in the prostate (central, peripheral and transition zones, and verumontanum), ejaculatory ducts, and seminal vesicles. We graded the degree of calcifications as mild, moderate, or severe. Calcifications in the prostate and ejaculatory system were common, and their frequency in our series is as follows: 88.6% (264/298) of prostates, 58.1% (173/298) of seminal vesicles, and 17.1% (51/298) of ejaculatory ducts. The prostatic calcifications occurred mostly in benign glands and/or stroma of all zones and the verumontanum. Calcifications were more common in the transition zone than other zones. There were 4 cases of prostatic calcifications in the areas of prostatic adenocarcinoma: 3 cases with calcifications in the tumor glands and 1 case with calcifications in tumor stroma but not in the accompanying tumor glands. In conclusion, calcifications are a very common finding in prostatectomy specimens and seem mostly to be associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia. However, calcifications can occur in direct association with prostatic adenocarcinoma, although the incidence of this association is not as high as in breast carcinoma. Also, ejaculatory system calcifications are not an infrequent finding.

  14. Organoid culture systems for prostate epithelial tissue and prostate cancer tissue

    PubMed Central

    Drost, Jarno; Karthaus, Wouter R.; Gao, Dong; Driehuis, Else; Sawyers, Charles L.; Chen, Yu; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Summary This protocol describes a recently developed strategy to generate 3D prostate organoid cultures from healthy mouse and human prostate (either bulk or FAC-sorted single luminal and basal cells), metastatic prostate cancer lesions and circulating tumour cells. Organoids derived from healthy material contain the differentiated luminal and basal cell types, whereas organoids derived from prostate cancer tissue mimic the histology of the tumour. The stepwise establishment of these cultures and the fully defined serum-free conditioned medium that is required to sustain organoid growth are outlined. Organoids established using this protocol can be used to study many different aspects of prostate biology, including homeostasis, tumorigenesis and drug discovery. PMID:26797458

  15. The essential role of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Barbara A.; Karasik, Ellen; Gillard, Bryan; Morrison, Carl; Mohler, James; Phillips, James G.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic epithelial cells secrete high levels of acetylated polyamines into the prostatic lumen. This distinctive characteristic places added strain on the connected pathways, which are forced to increase metabolite production to maintain pools. The methionine salvage pathway recycles the one-carbon unit lost to polyamine biosynthesis back to the methionine cycle, allowing for replenishment of SAM pools providing a mechanism to help mitigate metabolic stress associated with high flux through these pathways. The rate-limiting enzyme involved in this process is methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), which, although commonly deleted in many cancers, is protected in prostate cancer. We report near universal retention of MTAP expression in a panel of human prostate cancer cell lines as well as patient samples. Upon metabolic perturbation, prostate cancer cell lines upregulate MTAP and this correlates with recovery of SAM levels. Furthermore, in a mouse model of prostate cancer we find that both normal prostate and diseased prostate maintain higher SAM levels than other tissues, even under increased metabolic stress. Finally, we show that knockdown of MTAP, both genetically and pharmacologically, blocks androgen sensitive prostate cancer growth in vivo. Our findings strongly suggest that the methionine salvage pathway is a major player in homeostatic regulation of metabolite pools in prostate cancer due to their high level of flux through the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. Therefore, this pathway, and specifically the MTAP enzyme, is an attractive therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26910893

  16. Pten Regulates Epithelial Cytodifferentiation during Prostate Development

    PubMed Central

    Lokody, Isabel B.; Francis, Jeffrey C.; Gardiner, Jennifer R.; Erler, Janine T.; Swain, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression and functional studies have indicated that the molecular programmes involved in prostate development are also active in prostate cancer. PTEN has been implicated in human prostate cancer and is frequently mutated in this disease. Here, using the Nkx3.1:Cre mouse strain and a genetic deletion approach, we investigate the role of Pten specifically in the developing mouse prostate epithelia. In contrast to its role in other developing organs, this gene is dispensable for the initial developmental processes such as budding and branching. However, as cytodifferentiation progresses, abnormal luminal cells fill the ductal lumens together with augmented epithelial proliferation. This phenotype resembles the hyperplasia seen in postnatal Pten deletion models that develop neoplasia at later stages. Consistent with this, gene expression analysis showed a number of genes affected that are shared with Pten mutant prostate cancer models, including a decrease in androgen receptor regulated genes. In depth analysis of the phenotype of these mice during development revealed that loss of Pten leads to the precocious differentiation of epithelial cells towards a luminal cell fate. This study provides novel insight into the role of Pten in prostate development as part of the process of coordinating the differentiation and proliferation of cell types in time and space to form a functional organ. PMID:26076167

  17. Whole-Body and Microenvironmental Localization of Radium-223 in Naïve and Mouse Models of Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Abou, Diane S.; Ulmert, David; Doucet, Michele; Hobbs, Robert F.; Riddle, Ryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bone-metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (bmCRPC) represents a lethal stage of the most common noncutaneous cancer in men. The recent introduction of Radium-223 dichloride, a bone-seeking alpha particle (α)–emitting radiopharmaceutical, demonstrates statistically significant survival benefit and palliative effect for bmCRPC patients. Clinical results have established safety and efficacy, yet questions remain regarding pharmacodynamics and dosing for optimized patient benefit. Methods: We elucidated the biodistribution of 223Ra as well as interaction with the bone and tumor compartments in skeletally mature mice (C57Bl/6 and CD-1, n = 3–6) and metastasis models (LNCaP and PC3, n = 4). Differences in uptake were evaluated by µCT and histological investigation. Novel techniques were leveraged on whole-mount undecalcified cryosections to determine microdistribution of Radium-223. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: 223Ra uptake in the bones (>30% injected activity per gram) at 24 hours was also accompanied by non-negligible remnant activity in the kidney (2.33% ± 0.36%), intestines (5.73% ± 2.04%), and spleen (10.5% ± 5.9%) Skeletal accumulation across strains did not correspond with bone volume or surface area but instead to local blood vessel density (P = .04). Microdistribution analysis by autoradiography and α camera revealed targeting of the ossifying surfaces adjacent to the epiphyseal growth plate. In models of PCa metastasis, radioactivity does not localize directly within tumors but instead at the apposite bone surface. Osteoblastic and lytic lesions display similar intensity, which is comparable with uptake at sites of normal bone remodeling. Conclusions: Profiling the macro- and microdistribution of 223Ra in healthy and diseased models has important implications to guide precision application of this emerging α-therapy approach for bmCRPC and other bone metastastic diseases. PMID:26683407

  18. Preventive Effects of Fermented Brown Rice and Rice Bran against Prostate Carcinogenesis in TRAP Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, Toshiya; Nagano, Aya; Mori, Yukiko; Kato, Hiroyuki; Nagayasu, Yuko; Naiki-Ito, Aya; Suzuki, Shugo; Mori, Hideki; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Fermented brown rice and rice bran with Aspergillus oryzae (FBRA) is considered to have the potential to prevent chemically-induced carcinogenesis in multiple organs of rodents. In the present study, we evaluated the possible chemopreventive effects of FBRA against prostate tumorigenesis. Six-week-old male rats of the transgenic rat for adenocarcinoma of prostate (TRAP) strain were fed diets containing 5% or 10% FBRA for 15 weeks. Animals were sacrificed at 21 weeks of age, and the ventral and lateral prostate were removed for histopathological evaluation and immunoblot analyses. FBRA decreased the incidence of adenocarcinoma in the lateral prostate and suppressed the progression of prostate carcinogenesis. Treatment with FBRA induced apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation in histologically high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasias. Phospho-AMP-activated kinase α (Thr172) was up-regulated in the prostate of rats fed the diet supplemented with FBRA. These results indicate that FBRA controls tumor growth by activating pathways responsive to energy deprivation and suggest that FBRA has translational potential for the prevention of human prostate cancer. PMID:27409632

  19. Cutaneous Metastases From Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Stamatina; Georgia, Doulami; Gavriella-Zoi, Vrakopoulou; Dimitrios, Mpistarakis; Stulianos, Katsaragakis; Theodoros, Liakakos; Georgios, Zografos; Dimitrios, Theodorou

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present 2 rare cases of cutaneous metastases originated from adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction, thus, underline the need for early diagnosis and possible treatment of suspicious skin lesions among patients with esophageal malignancy. Metastatic cancer to the skin originated from internal malignancies, mostly lung cancer, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer, constitute 0.5 to 9% of all metastatic cancers.5,8,15 Skin metastases, mainly from squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus, are rarely reported. Cutaneous metastasis is a finding indicating progressiveness of the disease.17 More precisely, median survival is estimated approximately 4.7 months.2,14 This study is a retrospective review of 2 cases of patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and a review of the literature. Two patients aged 60 and 32 years old, respectively, underwent esophagectomy. Both pathologic reports disclosed adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction staged T3 N2 M0 (stage IIIB). During follow-up time, the 2 patients were diagnosed with cutaneous metastases originated from the primary esophageal tumor 11 and 4 months after surgery, respectively. The first patient is alive 37 months after diagnosis, while the second one died 16 months after surgery. Cutaneous metastasis caused by esophageal adenocarcinoma is possible. Therefore, follow-up of patients who were diagnosed with esophageal malignancy and underwent esophagectomy is mandatory in order to reveal early surgical stages. PMID:25785344

  20. [Endolymphatic sac adenocarcinoma: case report].

    PubMed

    Silveira, Roberto Leal; Gusmão, Sebastião Silva; Pittella, José Eymard H; Santos, Sinval Pereira

    2002-09-01

    A case of endolymphatic sac adenocarcinoma is reported and the literature is reviewed. The clinical picture was presented by vertigo and progressive hearing loss caused by a tumor of the endolymphatic sac. The surgical removal was complete, via a retro and translabyrinthine approach. Endolymphatic sac tumors are locally invasive, involve the petrous bone and the mastoid. The radical surgery presents good outcome.

  1. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  2. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... finasteride who did have prostate cancer had more aggressive tumors . The number of deaths from prostate cancer ... men that did not. The number of less aggressive prostate cancers was lower, but the number of ...

  3. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread of the cancer. But it does not cure the cancer. If prostate cancer spreads even after hormone therapy, ... the Gleason score) when you are diagnosed. A cure is possible if the cancer has not spread. Hormone treatment can improve survival, ...

  4. Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy caused by prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, Keiko; Kinoshita, Tatsuya; Nagai, Keisuke; Hongyo, Hidenari; Kishimoto, Kentaro; Inoue, Atsuo; Takamura, Manabu; Choi, Soomi

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM) is a fatal malignancy-related condition that involves rapidly progressing hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension. We report a case of PTTM caused by prostate carcinoma, which was diagnosed before autopsy in an 81-year-old man. Computed tomography showed diffuse ground-glass opacities, consolidation, and small nodules in the peripheral regions of the lung. Autopsy showed adenocarcinoma cells embolizing small pulmonary arteries with fibrocellular intimal proliferation, which was consistent with PTTM caused by prostate carcinoma. PMID:27635254

  5. Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy caused by prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Daisuke; Kuriyama, Keiko; Kinoshita, Tatsuya; Nagai, Keisuke; Hongyo, Hidenari; Kishimoto, Kentaro; Inoue, Atsuo; Takamura, Manabu; Choi, Soomi

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM) is a fatal malignancy-related condition that involves rapidly progressing hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension. We report a case of PTTM caused by prostate carcinoma, which was diagnosed before autopsy in an 81-year-old man. Computed tomography showed diffuse ground-glass opacities, consolidation, and small nodules in the peripheral regions of the lung. Autopsy showed adenocarcinoma cells embolizing small pulmonary arteries with fibrocellular intimal proliferation, which was consistent with PTTM caused by prostate carcinoma. PMID:27635254

  6. Prostatitis and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, Saad; McGill, John; Agarwal, Ashok

    2013-11-01

    The prostate gland plays an important role in male reproduction. Inflammation of the prostate gland (prostatitis) is a common health problem affecting many young and middle aged men. Prostatitis is considered a correctable cause of male infertility, but the pathophysiology and appropriate treatment options of prostatitis in male infertility remain unclear. This literature review will focus on current data regarding prostatitis and its impact on male infertility.

  7. Renal capsule xenografting and subcutaneous pellet implantation for the evaluation of prostate carcinogenesis and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tristan M; Uchtmann, Kristen S; Valdez, Conrad D; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Miralem, Tihomir; Ricke, William A

    2013-01-01

    New therapies for two common prostate diseases, prostate cancer (PrCa) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), depend critically on experiments evaluating their hormonal regulation. Sex steroid hormones (notably androgens and estrogens) are important in PrCa and BPH; we probe their respective roles in inducing prostate growth and carcinogenesis in mice with experiments using compressed hormone pellets. Hormone and/or drug pellets are easily manufactured with a pellet press, and surgically implanted into the subcutaneous tissue of the male mouse host. We also describe a protocol for the evaluation of hormonal carcinogenesis by combining subcutaneous hormone pellet implantation with xenografting of prostate cell recombinants under the renal capsule of immunocompromised mice. Moreover, subcutaneous hormone pellet implantation, in combination with renal capsule xenografting of BPH tissue, is useful to better understand hormonal regulation of benign prostate growth, and to test new therapies targeting sex steroid hormone pathways. PMID:24022657

  8. Computer-Aided Detection of Prostate Cancer on Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yahui; Jiang, Yulei; Chuang, Shang-Tian; Yang, Ximing J.

    2009-01-01

    We report an automated computer technique for detection of prostate cancer in prostate tissue sections processed with immunohistochemistry. Two sets of color optical images were acquired from prostate tissue sections stained with a double-chromogen triple-antibody cocktail combining alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR), p63, and high-molecular-weight cytokeratin (HMWCK). The first set of images consisted of 20 training images (10 malignant) used for developing the computer technique and 15 test images (7 malignant) used for testing and optimizing the technique. The second set of images consisted of 299 images (114 malignant) used for evaluation of the performance of the computer technique. The computer technique identified image segments of AMACR-labeled malignant epithelial cells (red), p63-and HMWCK-labeled benign basal cells (brown), and secretory and stromal cells (blue) for identifying prostate cancer automatically. The sensitivity and specificity of the computer technique were 94% (16/17) and 94% (17/18), respectively, on the first (training and test) set of images, and 88% (79/90) and 97% (136/140), respectively, on the second (validation) set of images. If high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), which is a precursor of cancer, and atypical cases were included, the sensitivity and specificity were 85% (97/114) and 89% (165/185), respectively. These results show that the novel automated computer technique can accurately identify prostatic adenocarcinoma in the triple-antibody cocktail-stained prostate sections. PMID:19417626

  9. High expression of a specific T-cell receptor γ transcript in epithelial cells of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Essand, Magnus; Vasmatzis, George; Brinkmann, Ulrich; Duray, Paul; Lee, Byungkook; Pastan, Ira

    1999-01-01

    We have identified expression of T-cell receptor γ chain (TCRγ) mRNA in human prostate and have shown that it originates from epithelial cells of the prostate and not from infiltrating T-lymphocytes. In contrast, the T-cell receptor δ chain (TCRδ) gene is silent in human prostate. The major TCRγ transcript in prostate has a different size than the transcript expressed in thymus, spleen, and blood leukocytes. It is expressed in normal prostate epithelium, adenocarcinoma of the prostate, and the prostatic adenocarcinoma cell line LNCaP. The RNA originates from an unrearranged TCRγ locus, and it is initiated within the intronic sequence directly upstream of the Jγ1.2 gene segment. The prostate-specific TCRγ transcript consists of the Jγ1.2 and Cγ1 gene segments, and it has an untranslated sequence including a polyadenylation signal and poly(A) sequence at the 3′end. The finding that prostate epithelial cells express a high level of a transcript from a gene that was thought to by exclusively expressed by T-lymphocytes is highly unexpected. PMID:10430935

  10. Application of vibro-acoustography in prostate tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alizad, Azra; Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Mitri, Farid G.; Davis, Brian J.; Sebo, Thomas J.; Mynderse, Lance A.; Kinnick, Randall R.; Greenleaf, James F.; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of the imaging modality vibro-acoustography (VA) for imaging of the prostate. Methods: Excised cadaver prostate specimens were embedded in tissue mimicking gel to simulate the properties of surrounding soft tissues. The samples were imaged at various depths using a laboratory prototyped VA imaging system. The recorded signals were used for offline processing and image reconstruction. In a selected subgroup of tissue samples, conventional ultrasound (B-mode) and x-ray imaging were performed for further analysis, evaluation, and validation of the VA images. Results: The imaging results of prostate tissue samples indicate the capability of VA imaging to detect prostatic nodules and lesions. In the prostate sample with an adenocarcinoma, the lesion appears with a clear contrast with respect to its surrounding tissue. The VA images could also identify the presence of calcifications deep inside the prostate tissue. Further, quantifications of the imaging results demonstrate that VA imaging has higher sensitivity to detect the calcifications compared to conventional ultrasound imaging. VA is also capable of visualizing prostatic tissue structures and in some cases can identify the anatomical zones. More specifically, the observed higher texture level in peripheral zones demonstrates the ability of VA to differentiate between prostatic anatomical zones. Conclusions: Imaging results of ex vivo prostate tissues, reveals the potency of VA as a promising tool to detect abnormalities, delineate tissue structures and anatomical zones, and locate calcifications. The results of this pilot study suggest that in vivo VA imaging of the prostate may be of clinical utility. PMID:23387773

  11. Post-radiation epithelioid angiosarcoma of the urinary bladder and prostate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Black, Peter C.; Skinnider, Brian F.; Hayes, Malcolm M.; Jones, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Angiosarcoma of the lower urinary tract is exceedingly rare. A minority of cases are associated with local radiotherapy. Epithelioid angiosarcoma is a variant of angiosarcoma composed of large rounded epithelioid endothelial cells that are positive for cytokeratin on immunostaining. There are only two cases of post-radiation epithelioid angiosarcoma reported in the urinary bladder, and none in the prostate gland. We report a case of epithelioid angiosarcoma involving the urinary bladder and prostate in a patient with a history of radiotherapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma. A brief review of literature regarding post-radiation epithelioid angiosarcomas in the lower urinary tract is discussed.

  12. Hepatoid Adenocarcinoma of the Urachus

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Carlos Andrés; Carrascal, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the urachus is a rare condition. We present the case of a 51-year-old female who developed abdominal pain and hematuria. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reported an urachal mass with invasion to the bladder that was resected by partial cystectomy. On light microscopy the tumor resembled liver architecture, with polygonal atypical cells in nest formation and trabecular structures. Immunochemistry was positive for alfa-fetoprotein (AFP) and serum AFP was elevated. Hepatoid adenocarcinomas have been reported in multiple organs, being most commonly found in the stomach and the ovaries. Bladder compromise has been rarely described in the literature, and it has been associated with poor prognosis, low remission rates, and early metastasis. PMID:27803830

  13. Androgen Regulated Genes in Human Prostate Xenografts in Mice: Relation to BPH and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Love, Harold D.; Booton, S. Erin; Boone, Braden E.; Breyer, Joan P.; Koyama, Tatsuki; Revelo, Monica P.; Shappell, Scott B.; Smith, Jeffrey R.; Hayward, Simon W.

    2009-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma (CaP) are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ) human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1) highly expressed in prostate, 2) had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3) encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues. PMID:20027305

  14. Lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA suppresses tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingchang; Wang, Fen; Dai, Lianzhi; Cai, Heguo; Zhan, Yanyan; Gang, Song; Hu, Tianhui; Xia, Chun; Zhang, Bing

    2016-02-16

    Targeted molecular therapy has gradually been a potential solution in cancer therapy. Other authors' and our previous studies have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase γ (PLCγ) is involved in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying PLCγ-dependent tumor growth and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma and whether PLCγ may be a potential target for tumor therapy in human gastric adenocarcinoma are not yet well determined. Here, we investigated the role of PLCγ inhibition in tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma using BGC-823 cell line and a nude mouse tumor xenograft model. The results manifested that the depletion of PLCγ1 by the transduction with lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) vector led to the decrease of tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the Akt/Bad, Akt/S6, and ERK/Bad signal axes were involved in PLCγ1-mediated tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma. Therefore, the abrogation of PLCγ1 signaling by shRNA could efficaciously suppress human gastric adenocarcinoma tumor growth and metastasis, with important implication for validating PLCγ1 as a potential target for human gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:26811493

  15. Lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA suppresses tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bingchang; Wang, Fen; Dai, Lianzhi; Cai, Heguo; Zhan, Yanyan; Gang, Song; Hu, Tianhui; Xia, Chun; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Targeted molecular therapy has gradually been a potential solution in cancer therapy. Other authors' and our previous studies have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase γ (PLCγ) is involved in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying PLCγ-dependent tumor growth and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma and whether PLCγ may be a potential target for tumor therapy in human gastric adenocarcinoma are not yet well determined. Here, we investigated the role of PLCγ inhibition in tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma using BGC-823 cell line and a nude mouse tumor xenograft model. The results manifested that the depletion of PLCγ1 by the transduction with lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) vector led to the decrease of tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the Akt/Bad, Akt/S6, and ERK/Bad signal axes were involved in PLCγ1-mediated tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma. Therefore, the abrogation of PLCγ1 signaling by shRNA could efficaciously suppress human gastric adenocarcinoma tumor growth and metastasis, with important implication for validating PLCγ1 as a potential target for human gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:26811493

  16. Renal-type clear cell carcinoma of the prostate: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Patne, Shashikant C U; Johri, Nidhi; Katiyar, Richa; Trivedi, Sameer; Dwivedi, Uday Shankar

    2015-01-01

    A 72-year-old male presented with urinary symptoms. His serum prostate specific antigen level was 65.2 ng/ml. His radical prostatectomy specimen showed clear cell lesion reminiscent of the clear cell renal cell carcinoma along with acinar type of prostatic adenocarcinoma, Gleason score 4 + 4. The lesional clear cells were positive for pancytokeratin, epithelial membrane antigen, CD10, vimentin, and AMACR while negative for 34βE12, CK7, prostate specific antigen, and PAX8. The final diagnosis was renal-type clear cell carcinoma of the prostate. A follow-up of 20 months did not show metastasis. We herein report fifth case of renal-type clear cell carcinoma of the prostate. PMID:26498435

  17. Computer aided analysis of prostate histopathology images Gleason grading especially for Gleason score 7*

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jian; Sadimin, Evita T.; Wang, Daihou; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Foran, David J.; Qi, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Clinically, prostate adenocarcinoma is diagnosed by recognizing certain morphology on histology. While the Gleason grading system has been shown to be the strongest prognostic factor for men with prostrate adenocarcinoma, there is a significant intra and interobserver variability between pathologists in assigning this grading system. In this study, we present a new method for prostate gland segmentation from which we then utilize to develop a computer aided Gleason grading. The novelty of our method is a region-based nuclei segmentation to get individual gland without using lumen as prior information. Because each gland region is surrounded by nuclei, individual gland can be segmented by using the structure features and Delaunay Triangulation. The precision, recal and F1 of this approach are 0.94±0.11, 0.60±0.23 and 0.70±0.19 respectively. Our method achieves a high accuracy for prostate gland segmentation with less computation time. PMID:26736926

  18. The diet as a cause of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nelson, William G; Demarzo, Angelo M; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Asymptomatic prostate inflammation and prostate cancer have reached epidemic proportions among men in the developed world. Animal model studies implicate dietary carcinogens, such as the heterocyclic amines from over-cooked meats and sex steroid hormones, particularly estrogens, as candidate etiologies for prostate cancer. Each acts by causing epithelial cell damage, triggering an inflammatory response that can evolve into a chronic or recurrent condition. This milieu appears to spawn proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) lesions, a type of focal atrophy that represents the earliest of prostate cancer precursor lesions. Rare PIA lesions contain cells which exhibit high c-Myc expression, shortened telomere segments, and epigenetic silencing of genes such as GSTP1, encoding the π-class glutathione S-transferase, all characteristic of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer. Subsequent genetic changes, such as the gene translocations/deletions that generate fusion transcripts between androgen-regulated genes (such as TMPRSS2) and genes encoding ETS family transcription factors (such as ERG1), arise in PIN lesions and may promote invasiveness characteristic of prostatic adenocarcinoma cells. Lethal prostate cancers contain markedly corrupted genomes and epigenomes. Epigenetic silencing, which seems to arise in response to the inflamed microenvironment generated by dietary carcinogens and/or estrogens as part of an epigenetic "catastrophe" affecting hundreds of genes, persists to drive clonal evolution through metastatic dissemination. The cause of the initial epigenetic "catastrophe" has not been determined but likely involves defective chromatin structure maintenance by over-exuberant DNA methylation or histone modification. With dietary carcinogens and estrogens driving pro-carcinogenic inflammation in the developed world, it is tempting to speculate that dietary components associated with decreased prostate cancer risk, such as intake of

  19. Transurethral resection of the prostate

    MedlinePlus

    TURP; Prostate resection - transurethral ... used to remove the inside part of your prostate gland using electricity. ... if you have benign prostatic hyperplasia ( BPH ). The prostate gland often grows larger as men get older. ...

  20. Rb and p53 gene deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from irradiated and control mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1997-08-01

    This study was conducted on mouse lung adenocarcinoma tissues that were formalin-treated and paraffin-embedded 25 years ago to investigate the large gene deletions of mRb and p53 in B6CF{sub 1} male mice. A total of 80 lung tissue samples from irradiated mice and 40 lung samples from nonirradiated controls were randomly selected and examined in the mRb portion of this study. The results showed a significant (P < 0.05) higher percentage of mRb deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to 60 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses than those from mice receiving 24 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses at low doses and low dose rates; however, the percentage was not significantly different (P > 0.05) from that for spontaneous lung adenocarcinomas or lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to single-dose {gamma} irradiation at a similar total dose. mRb fragments 3 (71%) and 5 (67%), the parts of the gene that encoded the pocket binding region of Rb protein to adenovirus E1A and SV40 T-antigen, were the most frequently deleted fragments. p53 gene deletion analysis was carried out on normal lungs and lung adenocarcinomas that were initially found to bear mRb deletions. Exons 1,4,5,6, and 9 were chosen to be analyzed.

  1. Single luminal epithelial progenitors can generate prostate organoids in culture

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Chee Wai; Shibata, Maho; Lei, Ming; Toivanen, Roxanne; Barlow, LaMont J.; Bergren, Sarah K.; Badani, Ketan K.; McKiernan, James M.; Benson, Mitchell C.; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Shen, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic ability to display self-organizing morphogenetic properties in ex vivo culture may represent a general property of tissue stem cells. Here we show that single luminal stem/progenitor cells can generate prostate organoids in a three-dimensional culture system in the absence of stroma. Organoids generated from CARNs (castration-resistant Nkx3.1-expressing cells) or normal prostate epithelium exhibit tissue architecture containing luminal and basal cells, undergo long-term expansion in culture, and display functional androgen receptor signaling. Lineage-tracing demonstrates that luminal cells are favored for organoid formation, and generate basal cells in culture. Furthermore, tumor organoids can initiate from CARNs after oncogenic transformation, and from mouse models of prostate cancer, and can facilitate analyses of drug response. Finally, we provide evidence supporting the feasibility of organoid studies of human prostate tissue. Our studies underscore the progenitor properties of luminal cells, and identify in vitro approaches for studying prostate biology. PMID:25241035

  2. Intraductal Carcinoma of the Prostate Gland: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Divatia, Mukul K.

    2016-01-01

    Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate (IDC-P) is characterized by prostatic carcinoma involving ducts and/or acini. The presence of IDC-P is usually associated with a high-grade Gleason score, large tumor volume, and adverse prognostic parameters, including extraprostatic extension and seminal vesicle invasion. When present, IDC-P is associated with worse outcomes, regardless of treatment status. IDC-P is included in a broader diagnostic category of atypical cribriform lesions of the prostate gland. This category of lesions also includes high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), urothelial carcinoma involving prostatic ducts or acini, and prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma, amongst other intraductal proliferations. Differentiating between these entities is important as they have differing therapeutic and prognostic implications for patients, although differential diagnosis thereof is not always straightforward. The present review discusses IDC-P in regards to its morphological characteristics, molecular features, and clinical outcomes. Given the current state of knowledge, the presence of IDC-P should be evaluated and documented correctly in both radical prostatectomy and needle biopsy specimens, and the clinical implications thereof should be taken into consideration during treatment and follow up. PMID:27401634

  3. [Hyperthermia in the treatment of prostatic diseases: preliminary results. Proceedings of the 34th meeting of Lombard Urologists. Milan, 19 November 1989].

    PubMed

    1989-06-01

    At the Division of Urology-Institute San Raffaele-Milan, 198 patients with prostatic diseases (164 cases of benign prostatic hypertrophy, 19 cases of chronic abacterial prostatitis, 14 cases of prostatic adenocarcinoma) were submitted to local prostatic hypertermia. The prostate was heated up to 42-43 +/- 0.5 degrees C depending on the specific disease. Hyperthermia was delivered in 5-10 sixty minute long outpatient sessions. Both subjective ad objective symptoms were markedly ameliorated in 70% of patients evaluated at the three month follow-up date. The accurate evaluation from a clinical, ecographic, histological and ultrastructural standpoint confirmed the efficacy and safety of local prostatic hyperthermia. This new procedure can be considered as a valid therapy for strictly selected patients. PMID:2525276

  4. MicroRNA-33b inhibits lung adenocarcinoma cell growth, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition by suppressing Wnt/β-catenin/ZEB1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jingjing; Li, Min; An, Jian; Zhao, Bingrong; Zhong, Wen; Gu, Qihua; Cao, Liming; Yang, Huaping; Hu, Chengping

    2015-12-01

    Altered expression of microRNA (miRNA) is associated with lung carcinogenesis and metastasis. Our previous study of lung cancer miRNAs using the gene chip assay demonstrated altered miR-33b expression in lung adenocarcinoma. The present study further investigated miR-33b expression, function, and gene regulation in lung cancer cells in vitro and in nude mouse xenografts. Our data showed that the level of miR-33b expression was dramatically decreased in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and tissues and that the reduced miR-33b expression was associated with tumor lymph node metastasis. Furthermore, restoration of miR-33b expression inhibited lung adenocarcinoma cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and tumor cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in vitro. Luciferase assay revealed that miR-33b bound to ZEB1 3'-UTR region and inhibited ZEB1 expression, while expression of ZEB1 mRNA and miR-33b was inversely associated with lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and tissues. Subsequently, we found that miR-33b suppressed the activity of WNT/β-catenin signaling in lung adenocarcinoma cells and in turn suppressed tumor cell growth and EMT in vitro and in vivo nude mouse xenografts. In conclusion, the present study provided novel insight into the molecular mechanism of lung adenocarcinoma progression. MicroRNA-33b should be further investigated as a potential therapeutic target in human lung adenocarcinoma.

  5. PDEF in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sood, Ashwani K; Kim, Hyung; Geradts, Joseph

    2012-05-01

    Prostate-derived Ets factor (PDEF) is a relatively recently described member of the Ets family of transcription factors. It differs from other family members in its restricted and epithelial-specific expression in normal tissues and its unique DNA-binding motif that together may impart interesting specificity to its function. This communication reviews our current understanding of the expression characteristics of PDEF in normal prostate and in prostate cancer. Also, the biochemical and genetic evidence relating to the role of this transcription factor in prostate cancer is reviewed. Most evidence is consistent with an oncogenic role for PDEF in prostate cancer. Specific observations about the loss of PDEF expression in prostate tumors and its apparent role as a prostate tumor suppressor are also discussed. PDEF is one of the few transcription factors with potential to have a significant impact on the management of prostate cancer. A better understanding of its biology and its role in prostate cancer is urgently needed.

  6. Spontaneous colonic adenocarcinoma in marmosets.

    PubMed

    Lushbaugh, C C; Humason, G L; Swartzendruber, D C; Richter, C B; Gengozian, N

    1978-01-01

    We find that colonic adenocarcinoma, which is an extremely rare neoplasm of all animals except man and carcinogen-treated rodents, occurs spontaneously in some marmosets. The cotton-topped Saguinus oedipus oedipus is particularly prone to develop it, but we have found it also at necropsy in Callimico goeldii (Goeldi's marmoset). Numerous metastases to regional lymph nodes develop. The cancers arise de novo in the mucosa and early invade the submucosa and lymphatic apparatus and paracolonic lymph nodes. These findings and the continuing occurrence of this cancer in our colony suggests that the marmoset may be the long-sought primate model for experimental intestinal carcinogenesis.

  7. Novel Therapeutics for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Maeve A; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2015-08-01

    The last decade has seen significant developments in the use of combination systemic therapy for advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), with median survival approaching 1 year for select patients treated with FOLFIRINOX in the metastatic setting. However, it is sobering that these developments have been achieved with the use of traditional cytotoxics rather than from successes in the more modern fields of molecularly targeted therapies or immunotherapy. This article highlights several promising therapeutic approaches to PDAC currently under clinical evaluation, including immune therapies, molecularly targeted therapies, strategies for stromal depletion, and targeted therapy for genetically selected patients.

  8. Oncocytic adenocarcinoma of salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Goode, R K; Corio, R L

    1988-01-01

    Oncocytic adenocarcinoma of salivary gland origin is an extremely rare neoplasm. The diagnosis is established on the basis of oncocytic cellular features in conjunction with dysplastic change. These dysplastic changes may occur in benign oncocytomas or arise de novo. The tumor occurs most commonly in the parotid glands of persons over 60 years of age. Tumors that measure less than 2 cm at the initial surgical procedure appear to have a better prognosis than larger tumors. Aggressive surgical intervention at the initial presentation of the neoplasm, compared to simple enucleation, seems to offer a more favorable prognosis. Recurrence is an ominous feature. Metastasis, when it occurs, is widespread.

  9. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Morote, Joan; Maldonado, Xavier; Morales-Bárrera, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    The Vall d'Hebron multidisciplinary prostate cancer (PC) team reviews recent advances in the management of this neoplasm. Screening studies with long follow-up show a reduction in mortality, whereas active surveillance is emerging as a therapeutic approach of non-aggressive cancers. New markers increase the specificity of PSA and also allow targeting suspected aggressive cancers. Multiparametric magnetic resonance (mMRI) has emerged as the most effective method in the selection of patients for biopsy and also for local tumor staging. The paradigm of random prostatic biopsy is changing through the fusion techniques that allow guiding ultrasonography-driven biopsy of suspicious areas detected in mMRI. Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiotherapy (RT) are curative treatments of localized PC and both have experienced significant technological improvements. RP is highly effective and the incorporation of robotic surgery is reducing morbidity. Modern RT allows the possibility of high tumor dose with minimal adjacent dose reducing its toxicity. Androgen deprivation therapy with LHRH analogues remains the treatment of choice for advanced PC, but should be limited to this indication. The loss of bone mass and adverse metabolic effects increases the frequency of fractures and cardiovascular morbimortality. After castration resistance in metastatic disease, new hormone-based drugs have demonstrated efficacy even after chemotherapy resistance.

  10. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Morote, Joan; Maldonado, Xavier; Morales-Bárrera, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    The Vall d'Hebron multidisciplinary prostate cancer (PC) team reviews recent advances in the management of this neoplasm. Screening studies with long follow-up show a reduction in mortality, whereas active surveillance is emerging as a therapeutic approach of non-aggressive cancers. New markers increase the specificity of PSA and also allow targeting suspected aggressive cancers. Multiparametric magnetic resonance (mMRI) has emerged as the most effective method in the selection of patients for biopsy and also for local tumor staging. The paradigm of random prostatic biopsy is changing through the fusion techniques that allow guiding ultrasonography-driven biopsy of suspicious areas detected in mMRI. Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiotherapy (RT) are curative treatments of localized PC and both have experienced significant technological improvements. RP is highly effective and the incorporation of robotic surgery is reducing morbidity. Modern RT allows the possibility of high tumor dose with minimal adjacent dose reducing its toxicity. Androgen deprivation therapy with LHRH analogues remains the treatment of choice for advanced PC, but should be limited to this indication. The loss of bone mass and adverse metabolic effects increases the frequency of fractures and cardiovascular morbimortality. After castration resistance in metastatic disease, new hormone-based drugs have demonstrated efficacy even after chemotherapy resistance. PMID:25727526

  11. Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) Analysis in Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Treatments for Prostate Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil

    2009-05-01

    Studies have shown that as many as 8 out of 10 men had prostate cancer by age 80.Prostate cancer begins with small changes (prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia(PIN)) in size and shape of prostate gland cells,known as prostate adenocarcinoma.With advent in technology, prostate cancer has been the most widely used application of IMRT with the longest follow-up periods.Prostate cancer fits the ideal target criteria for IMRT of adjacent sensitive dose-limiting tissue (rectal, bladder).A retrospective study was performed on 10 prostate cancer patients treated with radiation to a limited pelvic field with a standard 4 field arrangements at dose 45 Gy, and an IMRT boost field to a total isocenter dose of 75 Gy.Plans were simulated for 4 field and the supplementary IMRT treatments with proposed dose delivery at 1.5 Gy/fraction in BID basis.An automated DVH analysis software, HART (S. Jang et al., 2008,Med Phys 35,p.2812)was used to perform DVH assessments in IMRT plans.A statistical analysis of dose coverage at targets in prostate gland and neighboring critical organs,and the plan indices(homogeneity, conformality etc) evaluations were also performed using HART extracted DVH statistics.Analyzed results showed a better correlation with the proposed outcomes (TCP, NTCP) of the treatments.

  12. Are Histological Findings of Thulium Laser Vapo-Enucleation Versus Transurethral Resection of the Prostate Comparable?

    PubMed

    Carmignani, Luca; Macchi, Alberto; Ratti, Dario; Finkelberg, Elisabetta; Casellato, Stefano; Bozzini, Giorgio; Maruccia, Serena; Marenghi, Carlo; Picozzi, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    We investigated if an adequate histological diagnosis can be made from tissue after Thulium laser vapo-enucleation of the prostate (ThuVEP) and whether it is comparable to transurethral prostate resection (TURP) tissue findings in patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. We analyzed 350 ThuLEP and 100 matched TURP tissue specimens from patients who underwent one of the two procedures between January 2009 and June 2014. Thulium Laser Enucleation of Prostate (ThuVEP) was combined with mechanical morcellation of the resected lobe. Each histological specimen was reviewed by two pathologists. Preoperative prostate ultrasound volume, total serum prostatic specific antigen and postoperative tissue weight were evaluated. Microscopic histological diagnosis was assessed by standard histological techniques and immunohistochemical evaluation. Patients were comparable in terms of age and preoperative total serum prostate specific antigen. Incidental adenocarcinoma and high grade PIN of the prostate were diagnosed in a comparable percent of specimens in the 2 groups (2.5 % in the ThuVEP group versus 3 % in the TURP group). Tissue thermal artifacts induced by the Thulium laser are mostly due to coagulation as that of the conventional monopolar diathermy in TURP. Tissue quality was maintained in the ThuVEP histological specimens. Tissue maintain histological characteristics and proprieties without modification for successive immunoistochemical analysis. The pathologist ability to detect incidental prostate cancer and PIN was maintained even if there is a quoted of vaporized tissue.

  13. Calcification of multipotent prostate tumor endothelium.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Andrew C; Khan, Zia A; Shih, Shou-Ching; Kang, Soo-Young; Zwaans, Bernadette M M; Bischoff, Joyce; Klagsbrun, Michael

    2008-09-01

    Solid tumors require new blood vessels for growth and metastasis, yet the biology of tumor-specific endothelial cells is poorly understood. We have isolated tumor endothelial cells from mice that spontaneously develop prostate tumors. Clonal populations of tumor endothelial cells expressed hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell markers and differentiated to form cartilage- and bone-like tissues. Chondrogenic differentiation was accompanied by an upregulation of cartilage-specific col2a1 and sox9, whereas osteocalcin and the metastasis marker osteopontin were upregulated during osteogenic differentiation. In human and mouse prostate tumors, ectopic vascular calcification was predominately luminal and colocalized with the endothelial marker CD31. Thus, prostate tumor endothelial cells are atypically multipotent and can undergo a mesenchymal-like transition.

  14. Duodenal Adenocarcinoma Metastatic to the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haibo; Song, Hongliang; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Duodenal adenocarcinoma, a very rare malignant gastrointestinal tumor, mainly metastasizes via the lymphatic system. Metastases from duodenal adenocarcinomas to the breast are very uncommon. A 31-year-old woman presented at our department with a left breast tumor. She had a past medical history of duodenal adenocarcinoma. Physical examination on admission confirmed a 2.5-cm-diameter tumor in the outer lower quadrant of the left breast. Computed tomography (CT) examination showed a soft lesion with tissue-like density and enlarged axillary lymph nodes. Local excision was performed to remove the breast lesion. The findings of cytologic, histologic, and immunohistochemistry examination indicated a breast metastasis from the previous duodenal adenocarcinoma. The patient was treated with palliative chemotherapy. Metastases from duodenal adenocarcinoma to the breast are rare. The diagnosis depends on medical history, imaging, and pathologic examination including immunohistochemistry. An accurate diagnosis is important to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:26986146

  15. Advanced mucinous adenocarcinoma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Angioli, R; Yasin, S; Estape, R; Janicek, M; Adra, A; Sopo, C; Minhaj, M; Penalver, M

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of masses in pregnancy is estimated to occur in 1/81 to 1/2,500 pregnancies. The development of colorectal carcinoma during pregnancy is a more rare event, with less than 30 cases above the peritoneal reflection reported in the last 70 years. The differential diagnosis of mucinous adenocarcinoma of ovarian vs. gastrointestinal origin is often difficult. We report a pregnant patient affected by advanced colorectal cancer, who presented with an asymptomatic unilateral adnexal mass on ultrasound. A 28-year old woman was referred to our hospital after a routine ultrasound examination at 26 weeks gestation showing a right adnexal mass. At elective exploratory laparotomy, the patient was found to have metastatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Diagnostic and treatment choices of such a cancer in a pregnant patient were explored. The final diagnosis of colorectal cancer was made only at the time of a subsequent emergency laparotomy. The goal of an obstetrician/gynecologist and other care givers of pregnant patients, is to achieve a healthy mother and child. Unfortunately, physicians may unwillingly sacrifice the health of the mother by denying or delaying her procedures or treatments simply because she is pregnant. It is especially important in the case of adnexal masses and their related pathology, due to the difficulty in detection and management of such cases during pregnancy, that doctors actively assume the responsibility of assuring that pregnant patients receive the proper care they need.

  16. Human ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas express extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, M.; Trautmann, B.; Göttler, M.; Peters, S.; Zauner, I.; Maillet, B.; Klöppel, G.

    1994-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas are characterised by a dense connective tissue reaction. To test the hypothesis that stroma components are synthesised and produced by the tumour cells themselves, eight cell lines as well as six xenografted tumours from human ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas were examined for the expression of extracellular matrix proteins (ECM), using cDNA probes and antibodies to collagen types I, III and IV, vitronectin, fibronectin, undulin and laminin. All tumour cell lines (CAPAN-1, CAPAN-2, AsPC-1, BxPC-3, PANC-1, PaCa-2, PaCa-3, PaCa-44) and xenografted human pancreatic tumours expressed at least one of the examined ECM at the RNA (collagen type IV > laminin = fibronectin = vitronectin > collagen type III > undulin > collagen type I) or protein level (collagen type IV = collagen type III > vitronectin > laminin > collagen type I = fibronectin > undulin). In nude mouse tumours expression of laminin and collagen I was most pronounced in well-differentiated carcinomas. In a few tumours, collagen type III, vitronectin and undulin were expressed on the luminal side of the neoplastic glands, suggesting loss of normal polar differentiation. Incubation with fetal calf serum modulated ECM RNA levels to a varying extent in all but one cell line (AsPC-1). The results suggest that human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas cells are capable of synthesising and producing extracellular matrix proteins in vitro and in vivo, but that the extent and pattern of ECM expression differs between the various tumours and conditions tested. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8286197

  17. Triple cancer: chronic lymphocytic leukemia with bladder and prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gajendra, Smeeta; Sharma, Rashi; Sahoo, Manas Kumar

    2015-08-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) is a common lymphoproliferative disorder with an increased risk of developing subsequent neoplasms of epithelial and mesenchymal origin. The decreased immunity and B-cell dysfunction in CLL probably accounts for this emergence of second malignancies. We report a case of synchronous bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and prostatic carcinoma with CLL. A 74-year-old male who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia 2 years before, presented with recurrent urinary tract infection. Peripheral blood smear revealed leukocytosis with absolute lymphocytosis (absolute lymphocyte count: 37870 cells/mm³). Flow cytometric immunophenotyping revealed 75% abnormal lymphoid cells which were positive for CD 19, CD5, CD23, CD22, CD200, CD20 (moderate) with lambda light chain restriction and negative for CD3, CD10, FMC7, CD38, CD138, IgM, CD103, CD123. F Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) showed increased metabolic activity of the left lateral wall of the urinary bladder extending to the left UV junction, adjacent part of trigone and bladder neck region along with multiple heterogeneous enhancing areas with increased FDG avidity within the prostate. Transurethral resection of the bladder tumour by cystoscopy was performed. Histopathology showed high grade, muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma. Due to presence of uptake in the prostate, transurethral resection of the prostate was done and histopathology revealed adenocarcinoma of prostate (prostate specific antigen- positive), Gleason grade III+III and Gleason score 6. A high index of suspicion is required to detect synchronous and metachronous malignancies. Ancillary studies such as immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and PET/CT are often essential for detection and an accurate diagnosis.

  18. Prostate resection - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    Laser prostatectomy; Transurethral needle ablation; TUNA; Transurethral incision; TUIP; Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate; HoLep; Interstitial laser coagulation; ILC; Photoselective vaporization of the prostate; PVP; Transurethral ...

  19. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ... Physicians The full report is titled “Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ...

  20. Prostate cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    ... not do an accurate job of screening for prostate cancer. ... and anxiety, even if you do not have prostate cancer. Side effects from further testing. If your PSA test is higher than normal, you may need to ...

  1. Enlarged prostate - after care

    MedlinePlus

    BPH - self-care; Benign prostatic hypertrophy - self-care; Benign prostatic hyperplasia - self-care ... Your health care provider may have you take a medicine called alpha-1- blocker. Most people find that these drugs help ...

  2. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  3. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the needles to the prostate gland. Then, very cold gas passes through the needles, creating ice balls that destroy the prostate gland. Warm salt water will flow through the catheter to keep your urethra (the tube from the bladder to ...

  4. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  5. FGF signalling in prostate development, tissue homoeostasis and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yongshun; Wang, Fen

    2010-04-09

    The FGFs (fibroblast growth factors) regulate a broad spectrum of biological activities by activating transmembrane FGFR (FGF receptor) tyrosine kinases and their coupled intracellular signalling pathways. In the prostate, the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions mediated by androgen signalling and paracrine factors are essential for gland organogenesis, homoeostasis and tumorigenesis. FGFs mediate these mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in the prostate by paracrinal crosstalk through a diverse set of ligands and receptors. Gain- and loss-of-function studies in mouse models have demonstrated the requirement for the FGF signalling axis in prostate development and homoeostasis. The aberrant induction of this axis in either compartment of the prostate results in developmental disorders, disrupts the homoeostatic balance and leads to prostate carcinogenesis. FGFs are also implicated in mediating androgen signalling in the prostate between mesenchymal and epithelial compartments. Therefore studying FGF signalling in the prostate will help us to better understand the underlying molecular mechanisms by which the gland develops, maintains homoeostasis and undergoes carcinogenesis; as well as yield clues on how androgens mediate these processes and how advanced-tumour prostate cells escape strict androgen regulations.

  6. [A new WHO classification of prostate tumors].

    PubMed

    Frank, G A; Andreeva, Yu Yu; Moskvina, L V; Efremov, G D; Samoilova, S I

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews the 2016 WHO classification of prostate tumors, notes the alterations made, and describes approaches to the diagnosis of cancer types and grades. It also gives original photomicrographs from the authors' collection. The main alterations were as follows: - The types of prostate adenocarcinoma were added by pleomorphic giant-cell carcinoma; oncocytic (8290/3) and lymphoepithelial (8082/3) carcinomas were excluded. - Grade III prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) was substituted for high grade PIN (8148/2). - Intraductal carcinoma (8500/2) was added. - Basal cell adenoma (8147/0) was excluded. - Carcinoids were referred to as low-grade neuroendocrine tumors according to the current terminology; large cell neuroendocrine cancer (8013/3) was added. - Paraganglioma (8613/3) and neuroblastoma (9500/3) were excluded. Stromal tumors were grouped with mesenchymal neoplasms. -Malignant fibrous histiocytoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, chondroma, and hemangiopericytoma were excluded. - Synovial sarcoma (9040/3), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (8825/1), osteosarcoma (9180/3), undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (8802/3), solitary fibrous tumor (8815/1), and malignant solitary fibrous tumor (8815/3) were added. The section of lymphoproliferative diseases was extended. The tumors of unknown origin included paraganglioma and neuroblastoma from a group of neuroendocrine tumors. The TNM staging was completely consistent with the 2010 AJCC version. PMID:27600780

  7. [A new WHO classification of prostate tumors].

    PubMed

    Frank, G A; Andreeva, Yu Yu; Moskvina, L V; Efremov, G D; Samoilova, S I

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews the 2016 WHO classification of prostate tumors, notes the alterations made, and describes approaches to the diagnosis of cancer types and grades. It also gives original photomicrographs from the authors' collection. The main alterations were as follows: - The types of prostate adenocarcinoma were added by pleomorphic giant-cell carcinoma; oncocytic (8290/3) and lymphoepithelial (8082/3) carcinomas were excluded. - Grade III prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) was substituted for high grade PIN (8148/2). - Intraductal carcinoma (8500/2) was added. - Basal cell adenoma (8147/0) was excluded. - Carcinoids were referred to as low-grade neuroendocrine tumors according to the current terminology; large cell neuroendocrine cancer (8013/3) was added. - Paraganglioma (8613/3) and neuroblastoma (9500/3) were excluded. Stromal tumors were grouped with mesenchymal neoplasms. -Malignant fibrous histiocytoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, chondroma, and hemangiopericytoma were excluded. - Synovial sarcoma (9040/3), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (8825/1), osteosarcoma (9180/3), undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (8802/3), solitary fibrous tumor (8815/1), and malignant solitary fibrous tumor (8815/3) were added. The section of lymphoproliferative diseases was extended. The tumors of unknown origin included paraganglioma and neuroblastoma from a group of neuroendocrine tumors. The TNM staging was completely consistent with the 2010 AJCC version.

  8. Extremely Early Diagnostic Test for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    James, Veronica Jean

    2011-11-17

    This article reports the results of a blinded fiber diffraction study of skin samples taken from TRAMP mice and age-matched controls to determine whether changes noted in fiber diffraction studies of human skin were present in these TRAMP mice studies. These mice are bred to progress to Gleeson Type 3 to Type 5 prostate cancer. Small strips, 1 mm x 5 mm, cut from the mouse skin samples were loaded into cells in the same way as human samples and slightly stretched to remove the crimp. They remained fully hydrated throughout exposure to the synchrotron beam. The added change that was reported for prostate cancer in 2009 was obtained for all TRAMP mice samples, indicating that this change can be read as High Grade Cancer in human diagnostic tests. These changes were evident for all 3 and 7 week old TRAMP mice samples but not for any of the control samples. This indicates that the changes in the fibre diffraction patterns appear much earlier than in any other available prostate cancer diagnostic test, as none of these can verify the presence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mice before 10 weeks of age. The fiber diffraction test is therefore the most accurate and earliest test for high grade prostate cancer.

  9. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-03

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  10. A Study of Molecular Signals Deregulating Mismatch Repair Genes in Prostate Cancer Compared to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sanmitra; Majumder, Subhadipa; Bhowal, Ankur; Ghosh, Alip; Naskar, Sukla; Nandy, Sumit; Mukherjee, Subhabrata; Sinha, Rajan Kumar; Basu, Keya; Karmakar, Dilip; Banerjee, Soma; Sengupta, Sanghamitra

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality among aging males. There is an unmet requirement of clinically useful biomarkers for early detection of prostate cancer to reduce the liabilities of overtreatment and accompanying morbidity. The present population-based study investigates the factors disrupting expression of multiple functionally related genes of DNA mismatch repair pathway in prostate cancer patients to identify molecular attributes distinguishing adenocarcinoma from benign hyperplasia of prostate. Gene expression was compared between tissue samples from prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia using real-time-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Assessment of genotypes of seven single-nucleotide-polymorphisms of three MMR genes was conducted using PCR-coupled RFLP and sequencing. Promoter methylation was interrogated by methylation-specific-PCR and bisulfite-sequencing. Interaction between microRNAs and MMR genes was verified by 3'UTR-based dual luciferase assays. Concurrent reduction of three MMR genes namely hMLH1, hMSH6 and hMSH2 (34-85%, P<0.05) was observed in prostate cancer tissues. hMSH6 polymorphism rs1800932(Pro92Pro) conferred a borderline protection in cancer patients (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.15-0.75). Relative transcript level of hMLH1 was inversely related (r = -0.59, P<0.05) with methylation quotient of its promoter which showed a significantly higher methylation density (P = 0.008, Z = -2.649) in cancer patients. hsa-miR-155, hsa-miR-141 and hsa-miR-21 gene expressions were significantly elevated (66-85%, P<0.05) in tumor specimens and negatively correlated (r = -0.602 to -0.527, P<0.05) with that of MMR genes. hsa-miR-155 & hsa-miR-141 and hsa-miR-155 & hsa-miR-21 were demonstrated to bind to their putative seed sequences in hMLH1 and hMSH6 3’UTRs respectively. Relatively higher expression of DNA methyl-transferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) and HIF-1α genes (34-50%, P<0.05) were also detected in tumor tissues

  11. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: treating a systemic disease with systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Sohal, Davendra P S; Walsh, R Matthew; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Khorana, Alok A

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma, even when resectable, remains highly lethal. Although surgical outcomes have improved considerably, median overall survival after surgery and adjuvant therapy such as single-agent gemcitabine remains less than 2 years. We discuss preclinical and clinical data supporting the contention that even early-stage pancreatic cancer is a systemic disease. Autopsy series reveal that 70% to 85% of patients die of systemic recurrence, rather than local disease, after pancreatic cancer resection. Preclinical studies using genomics and mouse models reveal evidence of metastatic spread even before histopathologic evidence of a pancreatic tumor. Analogous to breast cancer, we propose that the Halstedian approach of treating pancreatic cancer as a local, surgical problem should be replaced by Fisher's alternative hypothesis of cancer as a systemic disease. Newer multiagent chemotherapy regimens have shown meaningful response rates and improvement in overall survival in the metastatic setting and, for the first time, offer investigators an opportunity to use effective systemic therapy. We emphasize that a surgery-first approach is not resonant with our current understanding of pancreatic adenocarcinoma biology and that an upfront systemic approach for even resectable pancreatic cancer warrants testing in clinical trials.

  12. [GIPC: a new target for therapy in pancreatic adenocarcinoma?].

    PubMed

    Muders, M H; Baretton, G B; Aust, D E; Dutta, S K; Wang, E; Ikeda, Y; Spaller, M R; Datta, K; Mukhopadhyay, D

    2007-01-01

    GIPC is highly expressed in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma and is a central protein for the stability of IGF-1R in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines (15). The goal of this study was to prove the importance of GIPC in vivo and to evaluate possible therapeutic strategies that target this protein and its PDZ domain. In vivo effects of GIPC knockout were studied after lentiviral transduction of luciferase-expressing MiaPaCa2 pancreatic cancer cells with shRNA against GIPC; growth characteristics were monitored with bioluminiscence. Knockdown of GIPC led to a significant inhibition of pancreatic tumor cell growth in vivo in different mouse models. To test a possible therapeutic approach, the PDZ domain of GIPC was targeted by a short peptide composed of the amino acid sequence PSQSSSEA. This octapeptide was designed based on the C-terminal binding motif of GAIP. Targeting GIPC with this peptide inhibited the association between IGF-1R and GIPC. The subsequent downregulation of IGF-1R decreased proliferation in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, our findings suggest that targeting GIPC and its PDZ domain-mediated interaction with the tyrosine kinase receptor IGF-1R could be a promising new treatment option for pancreatic cancer.

  13. Enlarged Prostate (BPH)

    MedlinePlus

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine out of the body. As men age, their prostate grows bigger. If it gets too large, it ...

  14. [Alpha Fetoprotein-producing Lung Adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Komori, Kazuyuki; Tabata, Toshiharu; Sato, Kimiaki; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Minowa, Muneo; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) -producing lung adenocarcinoma. A 53-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to right pneumothorax. Computed tomography showed right moderate pneumothorax, a solid tumor in the upper lobe (S3) and mediastinal lymph node swelling. The serum AFP level was as high as 223.0 ng/ml. Frozen examination revealed a low-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Based on the pathological and immunohistochemical findings, the tumor was diagnosed as AFP-producing lung adenocarcinoma.

  15. Colorectal adenocarcinoma in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, M B; Greenstein, A J; Sachar, D B; Barth, J; Balasubramanian, S; Harpaz, N; Heimann, T M; Aufses, A H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors' aim was to review the clinical features and estimate the long-term survival of patients with colorectal carcinoma complicating Crohn's disease. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Recent studies have demonstrated a significantly increased risk of colorectal carcinoma in patients with Crohns disease. METHODS: The authors reviewed retrospectively the medical records of 30 patients with Crohn's disease admitted to The Mount Sinai Hospital between 1960 and 1989 in whom colorectal adenocarcinoma developed. All patients were operated on and follow-up was complete for all patients to 10 years after operation, to the time of death, or to the closing date of the study in December 1989. RESULTS: The 30 patients in the series had 33 colorectal adenocarcinomas; three patients (10%) presented with two synchronous cancers. The patients were relatively young (mean age, 53 years) and had long-standing Crohn's disease (duration >20 years in 87%). The 5-year actuarial survival was 44% for the overall series: 100% for stage A, 86% for stage B, 60% for stage C. All five patients with excluded bowel tumor died of large bowel cancer within 2.4 years; by contrast, the actuarial 5-year survival for patients with in-continuity tumors was 56%. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence, characteristics, and prognosis of colorectal carcinoma complicating Crohn's disease are similar to the features of cancer in ulcerative colitis, including young age, multiple neoplasms, long duration of disease, and greater than a 50% 5-year survival rate (without excluded loops). These observations suggest the advisability of surveillance programs for Crohn's disease of the colon similar to those for ulcerative colitis of comparable duration and extent. PMID:8597513

  16. Targeted antivascular therapy with the apolipoprotein(a) kringle V, rhLK8, inhibits the growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Jeong; Yu, Hyun-Kyung; Papadopoulos, John N; Kim, Seung Wook; He, Junqin; Park, Yong-Keun; Yoon, Yeup; Kim, Jang-Seong; Kim, Sun Jin

    2012-04-01

    Antivascular therapy has emerged as a rational strategy to improve the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer owing to the necessity of establishing a vascular network for the growth and progression of the primary and metastatic tumor. We determined whether recombinant human apolipoprotein(a) kringle V, rhLK8, produces therapeutic efficacy in an orthotopic human prostate cancer animal model. Fifty thousand androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells (PC-3MM2) were injected into the prostate of nude mice. After 3 days, these mice were randomized to receive the vehicle solution (intraperitoneally [i.p.], daily), paclitaxel (8 mg/kg i.p., weekly), rhLK8 (50 mg/kg i.p., daily), or a combination of paclitaxel and rhLK8 for 4 weeks. Treatment with paclitaxel or rhLK8 alone did not show significant therapeutic effects on tumor incidence or on tumor size compared with the control group. The combination of rhLK8 and paclitaxel significantly reduced tumor size and incidence of lymph node metastasis. Significant reduction in microvessel density and cellular proliferation and induction of apoptosis of tumor cells, and tumor-associated endothelial cells, were also achieved. Similarly, PC-3MM2 tumors growing in the tibia showed significant suppression of tumor growth and lymph node metastasis by the combination treatment with rhLK8 and paclitaxel. The integrity of the bone was significantly preserved, and apoptosis of tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells was increased. In conclusion, these results suggest that targeting the tumor microenvironment with the antivascular effect of rhLK8 combined with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy could be a new and effective approach in the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer and their metastases.

  17. Survey of Clinical and Pathological Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients With Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, M.; Alizadeh, S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The importance of implementation: Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Therefore, further studies about the protests of disease, diagnosis and timely treatment are essential. Study Method: In this study, 80 prostate cancer patients admitted to Imam Khomeini Hospital, Urmia in Iran from 2000 to 2008 were reviewed. Patients were studied according to their age, clinical protests, Gleason scoring, positive family history, smoking, type of treatment and post-treatment conditions. Questionnaires were adjusted based on the objectives and the data were extracted from the medical records of patients and the desired results were achieved. Results: In this study, the most common age group for prostate cancer is older than 60 years (92/5%). The most common type of pathology for prostate cancer is adenocarcinoma that 93.75% of cases are included. Secondary TCC with secondary source is present in 5% and sarcoma in 1.25% of cases. 46.25% of patients with prostate cancer are smokers. The most common clinical symptoms among patients are obstructive symptoms (56.25%), and irritation of the urinary tract (52.81%). Hematuria in 26.25% and urinary incontinence in 5% of cases have been recorded. 16.3% of patients referred with metastatic symptoms. Most patients with prostate cancer have Gleason score 5-7 (40%). All patients were undergoing prostatectomy (82.5% TURP and 17.5% SPP) and 47.5% of cases were bilateral orchiectomy. The cases reviewed, 22 were followed that included 27.5% of cases. Among them, 6 people have died due prostate cancer (27.27%) that the mean age of the patients after diagnosis until death was 34.4 months. 2 others died from other causes (9.09%). The remaining 14 cases were elder patients with a mean follow-up duration of 44 months. Conclusion: According to the results obtained in the present study, the most common type of prostate cancer pathology is adenocarcinoma

  18. Prostatic carcinoma: limited field irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rounsaville, M.C.; Green, J.P.; Vaeth, J.M.; Purdon, R.P.; Heltzel, M.M.

    1987-07-01

    This is a retrospective study of 251 patients with histologically proven adenocarcinoma treated primarily with limited field radiotherapy techniques, under the principle direction of authors JMV and JPG, between 1968 and 1981 in San Francisco, California. All patients are followed for a minimum of 3 years; mean follow-up is 7.3 years. Routine clinical staging procedures included: HandP, digital prostate exam, cystoscopy, biopsy, blood studies including serum acid phosphatase, and imaging studies including chest X ray, IVP, bone survey or radionucleotide bone scan, and in recent years, pelvic CT scans. Twelve patients are Stage A1, 37-Stage A2, 50-Stage B, 140-Stage C1 and 12-Stage C2. Ninety percent of all cases and 85% of Stage C patients were treated with limited fields to the prostate and periprostatic volume only. Total doses were prescribed at midplane or isocenter and were generally 6500-7000 cGy, daily doses of 180-200 cGy, 5 days per week. Actuarial 5- and 10-year survival rates are: entire population-69% and 47%; Stage A1-74% and 50%; Stage A2-81% and 67%; Stage B-84% and 53%; Stage C1-63% and 42%; Stage C2-32% and 11%. The 5- and 10-year disease-free actuarial survivals are: entire population-71% and 50%; Stage A1-89% and 74%; Stage A2-82% and 69%; Stage B-71% and 52%; Stage C1-67% and 44%; Stage C2-0%. Sites of recurrence, alone or as a component of the failure pattern are: 37 (15%) local, 11 (4%) symptomatic regional recurrence (lower extremity edema, pelvic pain/sciatica, hydroureteronephrosis), and 87 (35%) distant metastasis. Seven (3%) had unknown sites of failure. Local-regional failure occurred in 42% of Stage C2 patients.

  19. Activation of Notch1 synergizes with multiple pathways in promoting castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanova, Tanya; Riedinger, Mireille; Lin, Shu; Faltermeier, Claire M.; Smith, Bryan A.; Zhang, Kelvin X.; Going, Catherine C.; Goldstein, Andrew S.; Lee, John K.; Drake, Justin M.; Rice, Meghan A.; Hsu, En-Chi; Nowroozizadeh, Behdokht; Castor, Brandon; Orellana, Sandra Y.; Blum, Steven M.; Cheng, Donghui; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Reiter, Robert E.; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the primary cause of prostate cancer-specific mortality. Defining new mechanisms that can predict recurrence and drive lethal CRPC is critical. Here, we demonstrate that localized high-risk prostate cancer and metastatic CRPC, but not benign prostate tissues or low/intermediate-risk prostate cancer, express high levels of nuclear Notch homolog 1, translocation-associated (Notch1) receptor intracellular domain. Chronic activation of Notch1 synergizes with multiple oncogenic pathways altered in early disease to promote the development of prostate adenocarcinoma. These tumors display features of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a cellular state associated with increased tumor aggressiveness. Consistent with its activation in clinical CRPC, tumors driven by Notch1 intracellular domain in combination with multiple pathways altered in prostate cancer are metastatic and resistant to androgen deprivation. Our study provides functional evidence that the Notch1 signaling axis synergizes with alternative pathways in promoting metastatic CRPC and may represent a new therapeutic target for advanced prostate cancer. PMID:27694579

  20. Molecular mechanisms of curcumin and its semisynthetic analogues in prostate cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Brian C; Mock, Charlotta D; Thilagavathi, Ramasamy; Selvam, Chelliah

    2016-05-01

    Primary prostate cancer, also known as prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa), is a devastating cancer in men worldwide. Europe and developing countries of Asia have fewer reported cases of prostate cancer compared to increasing cases in the United States with higher incidence in Black men. Risk factors associated with prostate cancer are aging, genetics, lifestyle, high body mass index as well as carcinogenic exposure to carbon-containing fuels, tobacco, and charbroiled meats. Hormone therapy and radical prostatectomy are commonly implemented treatments. The >20.000 prostate cancer deaths of 2013 suggest that there exists a need for enhanced chemopreventive and therapeutic agents for prostate cancer treatment. Fruits, vegetables, and red wines contain high levels of polyphenolic levels. Consumption of these products may provide chemoprevetion of PCa. Curcumin, the major compound from the turmeric rhizome Curcuma longa has long been used for medicinal purposes as an antiseptic and wound healing. This review focuses on curcumin's therapeutic effectiveness in vitro and in vivo in prostate cancer models. The review will highlight the mechanisms of actions of curcumin in the signaling pathways of prostate cancer. PMID:27018446

  1. Interleukin-27 Gene Delivery for Modifying Malignant Interactions Between Prostate Tumor and Bone

    PubMed Central

    Zolochevska, Olga; Ellis, Jayne; Parelkar, Sangram; Chan-Seng, Delphine; Emrick, Todd; Wei, Jingna; Patrikeev, Igor; Motamedi, Massoud

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We have examined the role of a novel cytokine, interleukin-27 (IL-27), in mediating interactions between prostate cancer and bone. IL-27 is the most recently characterized member of the family of heterodimeric IL-12-related cytokines and has shown promise in halting tumor growth and mediating tumor regression in several cancer models, including prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is frequently associated with metastases to the bone, where the tumor induces a vicious cycle of communication with osteoblasts and osteoclasts to induce bone lesions, which are a significant cause of pain and skeletal-related events for patients, including a high fracture risk. We describe our findings in the effects of IL-27 gene delivery on prostate cancer cells, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts at different stages of differentiation. We applied the IL-27 gene delivery protocol in vivo utilizing sonoporation (sonodelivery) with the goal of treating and reducing the growth of prostate cancer at a bone metastatic site in vivo. We used a new model of immune-competent prostate adenocarcinoma and characterized the tumor growth reduction, gene expression, and effector cellular profiles. Our results suggest that IL-27 can be effective in reducing tumor growth, can help normalize bone structure, and can promote enhanced accumulation of effector cells in prostate tumors. These results are promising, because they are relevant to developing a novel IL-27-based strategy that can treat both the tumor and the bone, by using this simple and effective sonodelivery method for treating prostate tumor bone metastases. PMID:24028178

  2. Biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Danil V; Loeb, Stacy; Getzenberg, Robert H; Partin, Alan W

    2009-01-01

    The development of biomarkers for prostate cancer screening, detection, and prognostication has revolutionized the management of this disease. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a useful, though not specific, biomarker for detecting prostate cancer. We review the literature on prostate cancer biomarkers, including serum markers (PAP, tPSA, fPSA, proPSA, PSAD, PSAV, PSADT, EPCA, and EPCA-2), tissue markers (AMACR, methylated GSTP1, and the TMPRSS2-ETS gene rearrangement), and a urine marker (DD3PCA3/UPM-3). Future research should focus on validation of already existing biomarkers and the discovery of new markers to identify men with aggressive prostate cancer.

  3. The many faces of neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Terry, Stéphane; Beltran, Himisha

    2014-01-01

    In normal prostate, neuroendocrine (NE) cells are rare and interspersed among the epithelium. These cells are believed to provide trophic signals to epithelial cell populations through the secretion of an abundance of neuropeptides that can diffuse to influence surrounding cells. In the setting of prostate cancer (PC), NE cells can also stimulate surrounding prostate adenocarcinoma cell growth, but in some cases adenocarcinoma cells themselves acquire NE characteristics. This epithelial plasticity is associated with decreased androgen receptor (AR) signaling and the accumulation of neuronal and stem cell characteristics. Transformation to an NE phenotype is one proposed mechanism of resistance to contemporary AR-targeted treatments, is associated with poor prognosis, and thought to represent up to 25% of lethal PCs. Importantly, the advent of high-throughput technologies has started to provide clues for understanding the complex molecular profiles of tumors exhibiting NE differentiation. Here, we discuss these recent advances, the multifaceted manner by which an NE-like state may arise during the different stages of disease progression, and the potential benefit of this knowledge for the management of patients with advanced PC. PMID:24724054

  4. TU-F-12A-01: Quantitative Non-Linear Compartment Modeling of 89Zr- and 124I- Labeled J591 Monoclonal Antibody Kinetics Using Serial Non-Invasive Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in a Pre-Clinical Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, EK; Cheal, SM; Chalasani, S; Fareedy, SB; Punzalan, B; Humm, JL; Osborne, JR; Larson, SM; Zanzonico, PB; Otto, B; Bander, NH

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the binding kinetics of human IgG monoclonal antibody J591 which targets prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in a pre-clinical mouse cancer model using quantitative PET compartmental analysis of two radiolabeled variants. Methods: PSMA is expressed in normal human prostate, and becomes highly upregulated in prostate cancer, making it a promising therapeutic target. Two forms of J591, radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I, were prepared. {sup 89}Zr is a radiometal that becomes trapped in the cell upon internalization by the antigen-antibody complex, while radioiodine leaves the cell. Mice with prostate cancer xenografts underwent non-invasive serial imaging on a Focus 120 microPET up to 144 hours post-injection of J591. A non-linear compartmental model describing the binding and internalization of antibody in tumor xenograft was developed and applied to the PET-derived time-activity curves. The antibody-antigen association rate constant (ka), total amount of antigen per gram tumor (Ag-total), internalization rate of antibody-antigen complex, and efflux rate of radioisotope from tumor were fitted using the model. The surface-bound and the internalized activity were also estimated. Results: Values for ka, Ag-total, and internalization rate were found to be similar regardless of radiolabel payload used. The efflux rate, however, was ∼ 9-fold higher for {sup 124}I-J591 than for {sup 89}Zr-J591. Time-dependent surface-bound and internalized radiotracer activity were similar for both radiolabels at early times post-injection, but clearly differed beyond 24 hours. Conclusion: Binding and internalization of J591 to PSMA-expressing tumor xenografts were similar when radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I payload. The difference in efflux of radioactivity from tumor may be attributable to differential biological fate intracellularly of the radioisotopes. This has great significance for radioimmunotherapy and antibody

  5. Importance of an Early Diagnosis in Primary Adenocarcinoma of the Seminal Vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Dell’Atti, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of seminal vesicle (SV) adenocarcinoma is often poor due to delayed diagnosis. About 95% of the patients die in less than 3 years. Diagnosis is difficult due to the absence of early clinical signs as hematuria, hematospermia and/or dysuria. We present the case of a 61-year-old Caucasian man with a left SV mass detected by transrectal ultrasound. SV ultrasound-guided biopsy showed an adenocarcinoma. The tumor was uniformly strongly immunoreactive for cytokeratin-7 and carcinoembryonic antigen. There was no immunoreactivity for prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP) and CK-20. These tumors have been reported to be also positive for CA-125. Therefore a combination of positive staining for CK-7, CEA and CA-125; with negative staining for CK-20, PSA and PSAP is the pattern of immunohistochemical findings noted for this rare tumor. The computed tomography of the abdomen-pelvis and chest X-ray was negative for metastases. The patient underwent a radical prostatectomy and lymphadenectomy. The prostate, rectum, bladder and lymph nodes were free from tumor involvement. The patient did not receive any adjuvant chemotherapy or radiation; and remains free of disease 3 years post-surgery. PMID:27134716

  6. Neoplastic transformation of a human prostate epithelial cell line by the v-Ki-ras oncogene.

    PubMed

    Parda, D S; Thraves, P J; Kuettel, M R; Lee, M S; Arnstein, P; Kaighn, M E; Rhim, J S; Dritschilo, A

    1993-01-01

    Investigations of mechanisms of human prostate carcinogenesis are limited by the unavailability of a suitable in vitro model system. We have demonstrated that an immortal, but nontumorigenic, human epithelial cell line (267B1) established from fetal prostate tissue can be malignantly transformed by a biological carcinogen, and can serve as a useful model for investigations of the progression steps of carcinogenesis. Activated Ki-ras was introduced into 267B1 cells by infection with the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus. Morphological alterations and anchorage-independent growth were observed; when cells were injected into nude mice, poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas developed. These findings represent the first evidence of malignant transformation of human prostate epithelial cells in culture, and support a role for Ki-ras activation in a multistep process for prostate neoplastic transformation.

  7. Targeting Btk/Etk of prostate cancer cells by a novel dual inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Guo, W; Liu, R; Bhardwaj, G; Yang, J C; Changou, C; Ma, A-H; Mazloom, A; Chintapalli, S; Xiao, K; Xiao, W; Kumaresan, P; Sanchez, E; Yeh, C-T; Evans, C P; Patterson, R; Lam, K S; Kung, H-J

    2014-01-01

    Btk and Etk/BMX are Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases. Btk has previously been reported to be expressed primarily in B cells and has an important role in immune responses and B-cell malignancies. Etk has been shown previously to provide a strong survival and metastasis signal in human prostate cancer cells, and to confer androgen independence and drug resistance. While the role of Etk in prostate carcinogenesis is well established, the functions of Btk in prostate cancer have never been investigated, likely due to the perception that Btk is a hematopoietic, but not epithelial, kinase. Herein, we found that Btk is overexpressed in prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer cells. The level of Btk in prostate cancer tissues correlates with cancer grades. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of prostate cancer cells, but not that of the normal prostate epithelial cells, which express very little Btk. Dual inhibition of Btk and Etk has an additive inhibitory effect on prostate cancer cell growth. To explore Btk and Etk as targets for prostate cancer, we developed a small molecule dual inhibitor of Btk and Etk, CTN06. Treatment of PC3 and other prostate cancer cells, but not immortalized prostate epithelial cells with CTN06 resulted in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk/Etk signals. The killing effect of CTN06 is more potent than that of commonly used inhibitors against Src, Raf/VEGFR and EGFR. CTN06 induces apoptosis as well as autophagy in human prostate cancer cells, and is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for metastatic prostate cancer patients. CTN06 also impeded the migration of human prostate cancer cells based on a 'wound healing' assay. The anti-cancer effect of CTN06 was further validated in vivo in a PC3 xenograft mouse model. PMID:25188519

  8. Targeting Btk/Etk of prostate cancer cells by a novel dual inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Guo, W; Liu, R; Bhardwaj, G; Yang, J C; Changou, C; Ma, A-H; Mazloom, A; Chintapalli, S; Xiao, K; Xiao, W; Kumaresan, P; Sanchez, E; Yeh, C-T; Evans, C P; Patterson, R; Lam, K S; Kung, H-J

    2014-01-01

    Btk and Etk/BMX are Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases. Btk has previously been reported to be expressed primarily in B cells and has an important role in immune responses and B-cell malignancies. Etk has been shown previously to provide a strong survival and metastasis signal in human prostate cancer cells, and to confer androgen independence and drug resistance. While the role of Etk in prostate carcinogenesis is well established, the functions of Btk in prostate cancer have never been investigated, likely due to the perception that Btk is a hematopoietic, but not epithelial, kinase. Herein, we found that Btk is overexpressed in prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer cells. The level of Btk in prostate cancer tissues correlates with cancer grades. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of prostate cancer cells, but not that of the normal prostate epithelial cells, which express very little Btk. Dual inhibition of Btk and Etk has an additive inhibitory effect on prostate cancer cell growth. To explore Btk and Etk as targets for prostate cancer, we developed a small molecule dual inhibitor of Btk and Etk, CTN06. Treatment of PC3 and other prostate cancer cells, but not immortalized prostate epithelial cells with CTN06 resulted in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk/Etk signals. The killing effect of CTN06 is more potent than that of commonly used inhibitors against Src, Raf/VEGFR and EGFR. CTN06 induces apoptosis as well as autophagy in human prostate cancer cells, and is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for metastatic prostate cancer patients. CTN06 also impeded the migration of human prostate cancer cells based on a ‘wound healing' assay. The anti-cancer effect of CTN06 was further validated in vivo in a PC3 xenograft mouse model. PMID:25188519

  9. Catumaxomab for Treatment of Peritoneal Carcinomatosis in Patients With Gastric Adenocarcinomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-13

    Gastric Adenocarcinoma With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Siewert Type II Adenocarcinoma of Esophagogastric Junction With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Siewert Type III Adenocarcinoma of Esophagogastric Junction With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

  10. Clinical Impact of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in a Patient With Biochemical Recurrence of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Marcelo A; Viana, Publio; Santos, Allan; Bastos, Diogo; Etchebehere, Elba; Cerri, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    A 64-year-old man with history of prostate adenocarcinoma underwent radical prostatectomy in 2003. He remained with undetectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels until 2014, when he then presented rising serum PSA levels and performed a Tc-MDP bone scan that was negative for metastases. In August 2015, his PSA was 4.89 ng/dL, and restaging images with pelvic MR and F-FDG PET/CT were both negative. Therefore, the patient underwent a Ga-PSMA PET/CT that showed marked tracer uptake in a single mediastinal lymph node. Histopathology demonstrated metastatic adenocarcinoma secondary to prostate cancer, altering patient management to hormone therapy instead of pelvic radiotherapy. PMID:27276202

  11. Extrapulmonary Small Cell Carcinoma of the Seminal Vesicles and Prostate Demonstrated on 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Tabrizipour, Amir Iravani; Shen, Lily; Mansberg, Robert; Chuong, Bui

    2016-02-01

    Extrapulmonary primary small cell carcinomas arising from the urogenital tract is infrequent. It can rarely arise from the prostate and even more rarely from the seminal vesicles. We present a 79-year-old male who was admitted due to acute renal failure with a history of radical radiotherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma 13 years ago. The prostate specific antigen level was not elevated. An abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan showed markedly enlarged seminal vesicles causing bilateral ureteral obstruction and a mildly enlarged prostate. Further evaluation with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/CT demonstrated extensive 18F-FDG uptake in the pelvis with diffuse involvement of both seminal vesicles and the prostate without pathologic uptake in the lungs or elsewhere in the body. Core biopsies of the prostate and both seminal vesicles revealed diffuse involvement by small cell carcinoma. Therapy could not be instituted due to a rapid deterioration in the patient's clinical condition.

  12. Enlarged prostate - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... body? What does the prostate gland do? What causes the prostate gland to enlarge? Do many other men have prostate problems? How do I know my problem is not prostate cancer? What are the symptoms of an enlarged prostate? ...

  13. Therapeutic effect of anti CEACAM6 monoclonal antibody against lung adenocarcinoma by enhancing anoikis sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kwon Pyo; Shin, Mi Hyang; Yoon, SangSoon; Ji, Gil Yong; Moon, Yoo Ri; Lee, Ok-Jun; Choi, Song-Yi; Lee, Yong-Moon; Koo, Ji Hae; Lee, Ho-Chang; Lee, Geon Kook; Kim, Seung Ryul; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Han, Hye-Suk; Choe, Kang Hyeon; Lee, Ki Man; Hong, Jong-Myeon; Kim, Si-Wook; Yi, Jae Hyuk; Ji, Hyeong-Jin; Kim, Yun-Bae; Song, Hyung Geun

    2015-10-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) plays a crucial role in tumorigenesis of lung cancer. However, the therapeutic potential for anti CEACAM6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) has only been limitedly explored. Here, we evaluate the therapeutic potential of naked anti CEACAM6 mAb against lung adenocarcinoma. Clone 8F5, recognizing B domain of CEACAM6, is established by immunizing A549 cells and screening for clones double positive for A549 and CEACAM6-Fc recombinant protein. We found that 85.7% of 70 resected lung adenocarcinoma tissue sections were positive for CEACAM6, whereas all squamous cell carcinoma examined were negative. A549 cells with high levels of CEACAM6 demonstrated more aggressive growth nature and showed increased paclitaxel chemosensitivity upon 8F5 binding. Treatment with 8F5 to A549 decreased cellular CEACAM6 expression and reversed anoikis resistance. 8F5 also decreased cellular status of Akt phosphorylation and increased apoptosis via caspase activation. In a mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma with xenotransplanted A549 cells, 8F5 treatment alone demonstrated 40% tumor growth inhibition. When combined with paclitaxel treatment, 8F5 markedly enhanced tumor growth inhibition, up to 80%. In summary, we demonstrate that anti CEACAM6 mAb is an effective therapeutic treatment for lung adenocarcinoma whose effect is further enhanced by combined treatment with paclitaxel.

  14. Metastatic Colonic Adenocarcinoma in Breast: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kothadia, Jiten P.; Arju, Rezina; Kaminski, Monica; Ankireddypalli, Arvind; Duddempudi, Sushil; Chow, Jonathan; Giashuddin, Shah

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic adenocarcinoma to the breast from an extramammary site is extremely rare. In the literature, the most current estimate is that extramammary metastases account for only 0.43% of all breast malignancies and that, of these extramammary sites, colon cancer metastases form a very small subset. Most commonly seen metastasis in breast is from a contralateral breast carcinoma, followed by metastasis from hematopoietic neoplasms, malignant melanoma, sarcoma, lung, prostate, and ovary and gastric neoplasms. Here we present two rare cases, in which colonic adenocarcinomas were found to metastasize to the breast. In both cases, core biopsies were obtained from the suspicious areas identified on mammogram. Histopathology revealed neoplastic proliferation of atypical glandular components within benign breast parenchyma which were morphologically consistent with metastatic adenocarcinoma. By immunohistochemical staining, it was confirmed that the neoplastic components were immunoreactive to colonic markers and nonreactive to breast markers, thus further supporting the morphologic findings. It is extremely important to make this distinction between primary breast cancer and a metastatic process, in order to provide the most effective and appropriate treatment for the patient and to avoid any harmful or unnecessary surgical procedures. PMID:25883818

  15. Bisphenol A Promotes Human Prostate Stem-Progenitor Cell Self-Renewal and Increases In Vivo Carcinogenesis in Human Prostate Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wen-Yang; Shi, Guang-Bin; Hu, Dan-Ping; Majumdar, Shyama; Li, Guannan; Huang, Ke; Nelles, Jason L.; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Walker, Cheryl Lyn; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in rodent models have shown that early-life exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) reprograms the prostate and enhances its susceptibility to hormonal carcinogenesis with aging. To determine whether the human prostate is similarly sensitive to BPA, the current study used human prostate epithelial stem-like cells cultured from prostates of young, disease-free donors. Similar to estradiol-17β (E2), BPA increased stem-progenitor cell self-renewal and expression of stem-related genes in a dose-dependent manner. Further, 10 nM BPA and E2 possessed equimolar membrane-initiated signaling with robust induction of p-Akt and p-Erk at 15 minutes. To assess in vivo carcinogenicity, human prostate stem-progenitor cells combined with rat mesenchyme were grown as renal grafts in nude mice, forming normal human prostate epithelium at 1 month. Developmental BPA exposure was achieved through oral administration of 100 or 250 μg BPA/kg body weight to hosts for 2 weeks after grafting, producing free BPA levels of 0.39 and 1.35 ng/mL serum, respectively. Carcinogenesis was driven by testosterone plus E2 treatment for 2 to 4 months to model rising E2 levels in aging men. The incidence of high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia and adenocarcinoma markedly increased from 13% in oil-fed controls to 33% to 36% in grafts exposed in vivo to BPA (P < .05). Continuous developmental BPA exposure through in vitro (200 nM) plus in vivo (250 μg/kg body weight) treatments increased high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia/cancer incidence to 45% (P < .01). Together, the present findings demonstrate that human prostate stem-progenitor cells are direct BPA targets and that developmental exposure to BPA at low doses increases hormone-dependent cancer risk in the human prostate epithelium. PMID:24424067

  16. Incidental Prostate Cancer at the Time of Cystectomy: The Incidence and Clinicopathological Features in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Jianjun; Yang, Hu; Xu, Fan; Xuan, Hanqing; Li, Dong; Huang, Yiran

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the incidence and the clinicopathological features of incidental prostate cancer detected in radical cystoprostatectomy (RCP) specimens in Chinese men and to estimate the oncological risk of prostate apex-sparing surgery for such patients. Methods The clinical data and pathological feature of 504 patients who underwent RCP for bladder cancer from January 1999 to March 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Whole mount serial section of the RCP specimens were cut transversely at 3–4 mm intervals and examined in same pathological institution. Results Thirty-four out of 504 patients (6.8%) had incidental prostate cancer with a mean age of 70.3 years. 12 cases (35.2%) were diagnosed as significant disease. 4 cases were found to have apex involvement of adenocarcinoma of the prostate while in 5 cases the prostate stroma invasion by urothelial carcinoma were identified (one involved prostate apex). The mean follow-up time was 46.4±33.8 months. Biochemical recurrence occurred in 3 patients but no prostate cancer-related death during the follow-up. There was no statistical significance in cancer specific survival between the clinically significant and insignificant cancer group. Conclusions The prevalence of incidental prostate cancer in RCP specimens in Chinese patients was remarkably lower than in western people. Most of the incidental prostate cancer was clinically insignificant and patient's prognosis was mainly related to the bladder cancer. Sparing the prostate apex was potentially associated with a 1.0% risk of leaving significant cancer of the prostate or urothelial carcinoma. PMID:24722643

  17. Familial prostate cancer: the damage done and lessons learnt

    PubMed Central

    Taherian, Nassim; Hamel, Nancy; Bégin, Louis R.; Bismar, Tarek A.; Goldgar, David E.; Feng, Bing-Jian; Foulkes, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Background A 51-year-old French Canadian man commenced screening for prostate cancer at the request of his family physician given his extensive family history of prostate cancer in five brothers, his father and two paternal uncles. His prostate specific antigen (PSA) level was 4.9ng/ml and a subsequent six-core biopsy revealed the presence of a prostate adenocarcinoma with a Gleason score of 7 (3+4). He was treated with a radical prostatectomy. Repeat PSA tests revealed a gradual rise in PSA levels despite androgen deprivation therapy with bicalutamide and goserelin over the course of 3 years. Genetic evaluation was undertaken in view of his personal and family history. The proband died a year later of widespread metastasis, at the age of 58. Investigations Doppler ultrasound for the proband’s leg, abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) scan with intravenous (IV) and oral contrast as well as chest CT with IV contrast for the assessment of metastatic prostate cancer; genetic counselling and mutation analysis for French Canadian founder mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes; mutations specific analysis of the mother’s formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast tissue blocks; examination of loss of heterozygosity at the BRCA2 gene locus; immunohistochemistry to determine the expression of the ERG nuclear oncoprotein in prostate tumours; genotyping with eight selected risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); genetic testing for the G84E variant in the HOXB13 gene Diagnosis Early-onset and aggressive prostate cancer associated with a missense French Canadian BRCA2 founder mutation, c.5857G>T (p.Glu1953*). Management Radical prostatectomy, hormone therapy with bicalutamide and goserelin, palliative chemotherapy initially with docetaxel plus prednisone then with mitoxantrone plus prednisone, as well as genetic counselling and testing for the proband and his family members. PMID:23318356

  18. Protein profiling of alpha-fetoprotein producing gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Liang; Ye, Fei; Qu, Linlin; Wang, Daguang; Cui, Miao; Wei, Chengguo; Xing, Yanpeng; Lee, Peng; Suo, Jian; Zhang, David Y.

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) producing gastric adenocarcinoma is considered as a rare subtype of gastric adenocarcinoma. Compared with AFP non-producing gastric adenocarcinoma, our study and other previous studies showed that AFP producing gastric adenocarcinoma is more aggressive and prone to liver metastasis. Using the Protein Pathway Array, 11 of out of 286 proteins tested were found to be differentially expressed between AFP producing (n=32) and AFP non-producing (n=45) gastric adenocarcinoma tissues. In addition, the high level expression of XIAP and IGF-Irβ in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues was independent factors for poor prognosis in AFP producing gastric adenocarcinoma patients. A risk model based on the XIAP and IGF-Irβ expression levels can separate AFP producing gastric adenocarcinoma patients into 2 subgroups and each subgroup had a distinct set of signaling pathways involved. In conclusion, AFP producing gastric adenocarcinoma is a heterogeneous cancer with different clinical outcomes, biological behaviors and underlying molecular alterations. PMID:27057629

  19. Organoid culture systems for prostate epithelial and cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Drost, Jarno; Karthaus, Wouter R; Gao, Dong; Driehuis, Else; Sawyers, Charles L; Chen, Yu; Clevers, Hans

    2016-02-01

    This protocol describes a strategy for the generation of 3D prostate organoid cultures from healthy mouse and human prostate cells (either bulk or FACS-sorted single luminal and basal cells), metastatic prostate cancer lesions and circulating tumor cells. Organoids derived from healthy material contain the differentiated luminal and basal cell types, whereas organoids derived from prostate cancer tissue mimic the histology of the tumor. We explain how to establish these cultures in the fully defined serum-free conditioned medium that is required to sustain organoid growth. Starting with the plating of digested tissue material, full-grown organoids can usually be obtained in ∼2 weeks. The culture protocol we describe here is currently the only one that allows the growth of both the luminal and basal prostatic epithelial lineages, as well as the growth of advanced prostate cancers. Organoids established using this protocol can be used to study many different aspects of prostate biology, including homeostasis, tumorigenesis and drug discovery.

  20. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Preventing and treating prostate cancer spread to bones Vaccine treatment for prostate cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  1. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  2. Primary versus castration-resistant prostate cancer: modeling through novel murine prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Chamaa, Farah; Hamdar, Layal; Mouhieddine, Tarek H.; Shayya, Sami; Eid, Assaad; Kobeissy, Firas; Liu, Yen-Nien; Abou-Kheir, Wassim

    2016-01-01

    Cell lines representing the progression of prostate cancer (PC) from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent state are scarce. In this study, we used previously characterized prostate luminal epithelial cell line (Plum), under androgen influence, to establish cellular models of PC progression. Cells derived from orthotopic tumors have been isolated to develop an androgen-dependent (PLum-AD) versus an androgen-independent (PLum-AI) model. Upon immunofluorescent, qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses, PLum-AD cells mostly expressed prostate epithelial markers while PLum-AI cells expressed mesenchymal cell markers. Interestingly, both cell lines maintained a population of stem/progenitor cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that both cell lines are tumorigenic; PLum-AD resulted in an adenocarcinoma whereas PLum-AI resulted in a sarcomatoid carcinoma when transplanted subcutaneously in NOD-SCID mice. Finally, gene expression profiles showed enrichment in functions involved in cell migration, apoptosis, as well as neoplasm invasiveness and metastasis in PLum-AI cells. In conclusion, these data suggest that the newly isolated cell lines represent a new in vitro model of androgen-dependent and –independent PC. PMID:27036046

  3. Primary versus castration-resistant prostate cancer: modeling through novel murine prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Georges; Monzer, Alissar; Bahmad, Hisham; Chamaa, Farah; Hamdar, Layal; Mouhieddine, Tarek H; Shayya, Sami; Eid, Assaad; Kobeissy, Firas; Liu, Yen-Nien; Abou-Kheir, Wassim

    2016-05-17

    Cell lines representing the progression of prostate cancer (PC) from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent state are scarce. In this study, we used previously characterized prostate luminal epithelial cell line (Plum), under androgen influence, to establish cellular models of PC progression. Cells derived from orthotopic tumors have been isolated to develop an androgen-dependent (PLum-AD) versus an androgen-independent (PLum-AI) model. Upon immunofluorescent, qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses, PLum-AD cells mostly expressed prostate epithelial markers while PLum-AI cells expressed mesenchymal cell markers. Interestingly, both cell lines maintained a population of stem/progenitor cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that both cell lines are tumorigenic; PLum-AD resulted in an adenocarcinoma whereas PLum-AI resulted in a sarcomatoid carcinoma when transplanted subcutaneously in NOD-SCID mice. Finally, gene expression profiles showed enrichment in functions involved in cell migration, apoptosis, as well as neoplasm invasiveness and metastasis in PLum-AI cells. In conclusion, these data suggest that the newly isolated cell lines represent a new in vitro model of androgen-dependent and -independent PC. PMID:27036046

  4. CDX-2 Expression in Primary Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Morgan L; Li, Qing K; Illei, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma with enteric differentiation is a rare subtype of lung adenocarcinoma that is recognized as a variant type of primary adenocarcinoma in the 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung tumors. Published immunohistochemistry studies show variable staining pattern for CDX-2 ranging from positivity in 71% of the cases to no staining. As little is known about CDX-2 expression in lung adenocarcinomas lacking histologic features of enteric differentiation, our aim was to determine the rate of CDX-2 positivity in non-enteric-type lung adenocarcinomas. We performed immunohistochemistry for CDX-2, CK7, CK20, TTF-1, napsin A, and p40 using 4-μm sections of a previously constructed tissue microarray containing 93 primary lung adenocarcinomas that lack morphologic evidence of enteric differentiation. The cohort included 22 well, 54 moderately, and 17 poorly differentiated tumors (55 female, 38 male; age range: 42 to 86, median: 64.5). All 93 tumors were strongly CK7 positive, whereas variable CK20 staining was seen in 4 tumors (1 strong, 1 moderate, and 2 focal). Both TTF-1 and napsin A were positive in 81 of 93 (87%) tumors with only 6 of 93 (6.5%) tumors negative for both the markers. Eleven tumors were CDX-2 positive (5 strong, 3 moderate, and 3 weak), all of which were also TTF-1 and napsin A positive and p40 negative. One CDX-2-positive tumor showed focal CK20 staining. Mutation studies for EGFR/K-ras/ALK were performed in four CDX-2-positive tumors and detected a K-ras mutation in one of them. CDX-2 positivity can be seen in a subset (12%) of lung adenocarcinoma. These tumors are CK7, TTF-1, and napsin A positive and p40 negative. Focal CK20 staining is only seen in rare cases. CDX-2 positivity should not be used as the only criteria to exclude lung origin. PMID:26469326

  5. CDX-2 Expression in Primary Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Morgan L; Li, Qing K; Illei, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma with enteric differentiation is a rare subtype of lung adenocarcinoma that is recognized as a variant type of primary adenocarcinoma in the 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung tumors. Published immunohistochemistry studies show variable staining pattern for CDX-2 ranging from positivity in 71% of the cases to no staining. As little is known about CDX-2 expression in lung adenocarcinomas lacking histologic features of enteric differentiation, our aim was to determine the rate of CDX-2 positivity in non-enteric-type lung adenocarcinomas. We performed immunohistochemistry for CDX-2, CK7, CK20, TTF-1, napsin A, and p40 using 4-μm sections of a previously constructed tissue microarray containing 93 primary lung adenocarcinomas that lack morphologic evidence of enteric differentiation. The cohort included 22 well, 54 moderately, and 17 poorly differentiated tumors (55 female, 38 male; age range: 42 to 86, median: 64.5). All 93 tumors were strongly CK7 positive, whereas variable CK20 staining was seen in 4 tumors (1 strong, 1 moderate, and 2 focal). Both TTF-1 and napsin A were positive in 81 of 93 (87%) tumors with only 6 of 93 (6.5%) tumors negative for both the markers. Eleven tumors were CDX-2 positive (5 strong, 3 moderate, and 3 weak), all of which were also TTF-1 and napsin A positive and p40 negative. One CDX-2-positive tumor showed focal CK20 staining. Mutation studies for EGFR/K-ras/ALK were performed in four CDX-2-positive tumors and detected a K-ras mutation in one of them. CDX-2 positivity can be seen in a subset (12%) of lung adenocarcinoma. These tumors are CK7, TTF-1, and napsin A positive and p40 negative. Focal CK20 staining is only seen in rare cases. CDX-2 positivity should not be used as the only criteria to exclude lung origin.

  6. Antioxidant Treatment Promotes Prostate Epithelial Proliferation in Nkx3.1 Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Erin E.; Anderson, Philip D.; Logan, Monica; Abdulkadir, Sarki A.

    2012-01-01

    Discordant results in preclinical and clinical trials have raised questions over the effectiveness of antioxidants in prostate cancer chemoprevention. Results from the large-scale Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) showed that antioxidants failed to prevent, and in some cases promoted, prostate cancer formation in men without a history of the disease. One possible explanation for these alarming results is the notion that the effects of antioxidant treatment on the prostate are modified by specific, intrinsic genetic risk factors, causing some men to respond negatively to antioxidant treatment. Loss of expression of the homeobox transcription factor NKX3.1 in the prostate is frequently associated with human prostate cancer. Nkx3.1 mutant mice display prostatic hyperplasia and dysplasia and are used as a model of the early stages of prostate cancer initiation. While the mechanisms by which Nkx3.1 loss promotes prostate tumorigenicity are not completely understood, published data have suggested that elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with Nkx3.1 loss may be a causative factor. Here we have tested this hypothesis by treating Nkx3.1 mutant mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) for 13 weeks post-weaning. Surprisingly, while NAC treatment decreased ROS levels in Nkx3.1 mutant mouse prostates, it failed to reduce prostatic epithelial hyperplasia/dysplasia. Rather, NAC treatment increased epithelial cell proliferation and promoted the expression of a pro-proliferative gene signature. These results show that ROS do not promote proliferation in the Nkx3.1-null prostate, but instead inhibit proliferation, suggesting that antioxidant treatment may encourage prostate epithelial cell proliferation early in prostate tumorigenesis. Our findings provide new insight that may help explain the increased prostate cancer risk observed with vitamin E treatment in the SELECT trial and emphasize the need for preclinical studies using accurate

  7. De novo calcification of liver and nodal metastases in prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, P; Santosa, A C; Lin, G Y; Downs, T M

    2006-01-01

    Prostate cancer has a distinctly recognized pattern of metastases: multifocal and osteoblastic lesions involving the axial skeleton and non-calcified lymph nodes in the pelvic and lumbar aortic groups. Most adenocarcinomas are capable of producing macrocalcification. We report a case of prostate cancer with de novo calcified metastases to the liver and retroperitoneal lymph nodes mimicking the pattern usually seen in mucin-producing adenocarcinomas arising from the gastrointestinal tract. To our knowledge, this is the first such case to be reported in the literature. We propose a multifactorial mechanism that supports dystrophic calcification in this case. The knowledge of atypical presentation of metastatic disease can prevent diagnostic delay and prompt initiation of therapy.

  8. Adenocarcinoma of the rete testis with prominent papillary structure and clear neoplastic cells: morphologic and immunohistochemical findings and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Wen; Chang, Kuo-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the rete testis is rare, and its etiology is unknown. The definite diagnosis merely depends on the exclusion of other tumors and histological features. We first describe a 38-year-old man with a carcinoma arising in the rete testis. The tumor was characterized by clear neoplastic cells and branching papillary growth. Focal stromal invasion and transition of normal rete epithelium to neoplastic cells were seen. The neoplastic cells were positive for epithelial membrane antigen, Ber-Ep4, vimentin, renal cell carcinoma marker, and CD10, while negative for Wilms' tumor 1, thyroid transcription factor-1, estrogen receptor, prostate specific antigen, placental alkaline phosphate, CD117, and alpha-1-fetoprotein. According to the above features, we diagnosed this tumor as adenocarcinoma of the rete testis. To our best knowledge, this is the first reported case of adenocarcinoma of the rete testis with prominently papillary structure and clear neoplastic cells. The rarity of adenocarcinoma of the rete testis and the unique features in our case cause diagnostic pitfalls. A complete clinicopathological study and thorough differential diagnosis are crucial for the correct result. PMID:25885143

  9. Irinotecan, Cisplatin, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  10. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Androgen deprivation therapy; ADT; Androgen suppression therapy; Combined androgen blockade ... Androgens cause prostate cancer cells to grow. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer lowers the effect level of ...

  11. Differential Immunohistochemical Profiles for Distinguishing Prostate Carcinoma and Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Woo Jin; Chung, Arthur Minwoo; Kim, Jee Soon; Han, Ji Heun; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Yeol; Choi, Yeong Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background The pathologic distinction between high-grade prostate adenocarcinoma (PAC) involving the urinary bladder and high-grade urothelial carcinoma (UC) infiltrating the prostate can be difficult. However, making this distinction is clinically important because of the different treatment modalities for these two entities. Methods A total of 249 patient cases (PAC, 111 cases; UC, 138 cases) collected between June 1995 and July 2009 at Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital were studied. An immunohistochemical evaluation of prostatic markers (prostate-specific antigen [PSA], prostate-specific membrane antigen [PSMA], prostate acid phosphatase [PAP], P501s, NKX3.1, and α-methylacyl coenzyme A racemase [AMACR]) and urothelial markers (CK34βE12, p63, thrombomodulin, S100P, and GATA binding protein 3 [GATA3]) was performed using tissue microarrays from each tumor. Results The sensitivities of prostatic markers in PAC were 100% for PSA, 83.8% for PSMA, 91.9% for PAP, 93.7% for P501s, 88.3% for NKX 3.1, and 66.7% for AMACR. However, the urothelial markers CK34βE12, p63, thrombomodulin, S100P, and GATA3 were also positive in 1.8%, 0%, 0%, 3.6%, and 0% of PAC, respectively. The sensitivities of urothelial markers in UC were 75.4% for CK34βE12, 73.9% for p63, 45.7% for thrombomodulin, 22.5% for S100P, and 84.8% for GATA3. Conversely, the prostatic markers PSA, PSMA, PAP, P501s, NKX3.1, and AMACR were also positive in 9.4%, 0.7%, 18.8%, 0.7%, 0%, and 8.7% of UCs, respectively. Conclusions Prostatic and urothelial markers, including PSA, NKX3.1, p63, thrombomodulin, and GATA3 are very useful for differentiating PAC from UC. The optimal combination of prostatic and urothelial markers could improve the ability to differentiate PAC from UC pathologically. PMID:27498545

  12. NPM1 Silencing Reduces Tumour Growth and MAPK Signalling in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Loubeau, Gaëlle; Boudra, Rafik; Maquaire, Sabrina; Lours-Calet, Corinne; Beaudoin, Claude; Verrelle, Pierre; Morel, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The chaperone nucleophosmin (NPM1) is over-expressed in the epithelial compartment of prostate tumours compared to adjacent healthy epithelium and may represent one of the key actors that support the neoplastic phenotype of prostate adenocarcinoma cells. Yet, the mechanisms that underlie NPM1 mediated phenotype remain elusive in the prostate. To better understand NPM1 functions in prostate cancer cells, we sought to characterize its impact on prostate cancer cells behaviour and decipher the mechanisms by which it may act. Here we show that NPM1 favors prostate tumour cell migration, invasion and colony forming. Furthermore, knockdown of NPM1 leads to a decrease in the growth of LNCaP-derived tumours grafted in Nude mice in vivo. Such oncogenic-like properties are found in conjunction with a positive regulation of NPM1 on the ERK1/2 (Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinases 1/2) kinase phosphorylation in response to EGF (Epidermal Growth Factor) stimulus, which is critical for prostate cancer progression following the setting of an autonomous production of the growth factor. NPM1 could then be a target to switch off specifically ERK1/2 pathway activation in order to decrease or inhibit cancer cell growth and migration. PMID:24796332

  13. Screening for prostate cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite recent advances in both the survival and cure rates for many forms of cancer, unfortunately the same has not been true for prostate cancer. In fact, the age-adjusted death rate from prostate cancer has not significantly improved since 1949, and prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in American men, causing the second highest cancer mortality rate. Topics discussed include the following: serum testosterone levels; diagnosis; mortality statistics; prostate-sppecific antigen (PSA) tests; and the Occupational Medicine Services policy at LeRC.

  14. Bone Matrix Osteonectin Limits Prostate Cancer Cell Growth and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kapinas, Kristina; Lowther, Katie M.; Kessler, Catherine B.; Tilbury, Karissa; Lieberman, Jay R.; Tirnauer, Jennifer S.; Campagnola, Paul; Delany, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding prostate cancer metastasis to bone and the interaction of these cells with the bone microenvironment. Osteonectin/SPARC/BM-40 is a collagen binding matricellular protein that is enriched in bone. Its expression is increased in prostate cancer metastases, and it stimulates the migration of prostate carcinoma cells. However, the presence of osteonectin in cancer cells and the stroma may limit prostate tumor development and progression. To determine how bone matrix osteonectin affects the behavior of prostate cancer cells, we modeled prostate cancer cell-bone interactions using the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3, and mineralized matrices synthesized by wild type and osteonectin-null osteoblasts in vitro. We developed this in vitro system because the structural complexity of collagen matrices in vivo is not mimicked by reconstituted collagen scaffolds or by more complex substrates, like basement membrane extracts. Second harmonic generation imaging demonstrated that the wild type matrices had thick collagen fibers organized into longitudinal bundles, whereas osteonectin-null matrices had thinner fibers in random networks. Importantly, a mouse model of prostate cancer metastases to bone showed a collagen fiber phenotype similar to the wild type matrix synthesized in vitro. When PC-3 cells were grown on the wild type matrices, they displayed decreased cell proliferation, increased cell spreading, and decreased resistance to radiation-induced cell death, compared to cells grown on osteonectin-null matrix. Our data support the idea that osteonectin can suppress prostate cancer pathogenesis, expanding this concept to the microenvironment of skeletal metastases. PMID:22525512

  15. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic characteristics of the diseased canine prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Troisi, Alessandro; Orlandi, Riccardo; Bargellini, Paolo; Menchetti, Laura; Borges, Paulo; Zelli, Riccardo; Polisca, Angela

    2015-11-01

    The work was carried out on a total of 26 male dogs that on the basis of clinical examination, prostate ultrasound and prostate biopsy, were divided prospectively into four groups: (1) normal dogs (control group; n = 8); (2) dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia (group BPH; n = 8); (3) dogs suffering from prostatitis (group prostatitis; n = 4); (4) dogs with prostatic tumors (group tumors; n = 6). The examination of the prostate by means of contrast medium and dedicated ultrasound system allowed a detailed qualitative and quantitative analysis of prostatic vessels in normal and diseased conditions, enabling the detection and characterization of different disease states, and quantification of parameters such as peak intensity of perfusion (%), arrival time of the contrast medium to its maximum value of video intensity (time to peak [TTP; seconds]), regional blood volume, regional blood flow, and mean transit time (MTT [seconds]). The hemodynamic indices TTP (P < 0.01) and MTT (P < 0.001) of diseased prostate groups were significantly lower than those in the normal prostate group although there were no differences among diseases. Optimal cutoff values were 31 seconds (Sensitivity: 72%; Specificity: 88%) and 47 seconds (Sensitivity: 100%; Specificity: 88%) while area under receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.86 (P < 0.01) and 0.97 (P < 0.01) for TTP and MTT, respectively. The qualitative evaluation of vascular patterns showed differences between normal and diseased prostate glands. The latter were characterized by an alteration of the normal vascular appearance consisting of loss of the subcapsular arterioles and lack of a centripetal vascular pattern. The qualitative aspect of the study highlighted the different vascular architecture between BPH, prostatitis, adenocarcinoma, and lymphoma. This study shows how contrast-enhanced ultrasound represents a valid and noninvasive method for highlighting and characterizing prostatic vasculature

  16. Down-regulation of beta 1C integrin, an inhibitor of cell proliferation, in prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, M.; Tallini, G.; Bofetiado, C. J.; Bosari, S.; Languino, L. R.

    1996-01-01

    The beta 1C integrin, a member of the cell adhesion receptor superfamily, is an alternatively spliced variant of the beta 1A subunit and, in contrast to its wild-type counterpart, inhibits cell proliferation in vitro. The expression of beta 1C integrin in tumor cell growth was investigated. In benign and neoplastic human prostate tissues, immunohistochemical analysis performed using affinity-purified antibodies specific for beta 1C demonstrated a predominant epithelial expression of beta 1C in benign prostate glands with marked staining of the apical, basal, and lateral surfaces. In the adjacent prostate adenocarcinoma glands, the beta 1C variant was dramatically down-regulated in 27 of 34 (79%) analyzed cases, whereas the expression and distribution of its wild-type counterpart, beta 1A, remained unchanged. Tumors exhibiting different Gleason's patterns showed that beta 1C was down-regulated in comparison with the benign tissue regardless of the histological grade. Immunoblotting analysis, using affinity-purified antibodies specific for beta 1C, was performed, in a quantitative manner, to compare beta 1C expression in benign and tumor prostate tissue. The results showed that beta 1C was expressed in benign prostate tissue whereas it was undetectable in prostate adenocarcinoma. Taken together, these data show that beta 1C integrin down-regulation in prostate tissues correlates with a neoplastic phenotype consistent with its in vitro growth-inhibitory properties. These findings indicate a novel pathophysiological role for this integrin variant in tumorigenesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8780381

  17. Modeling Prostate Cancer in Mice: Limitations and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Patrick J.; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    The complex dynamics of the tumor microenvironment and prostate cancer heterogeneity have confounded efforts to establish suitable preclinical mouse models to represent human cancer progression from early proliferative phenotypes to aggressive, androgen-independent, and invasive metastatic tumors. Current models have been successful in capitulating individual characteristics of the aggressive tumors. However, none of these models comprehensively mimics human cancer progression, establishing the challenge in their exploitation to study human disease. The ability to tailor phenotypic outcomes in mice by compounding mutations to target specific molecular pathways provides a powerful tool toward disruption of signaling pathways contributing to the initiation and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Each model is characterized by unique features contributing to the understanding of prostate tumorigenesis, as well as limitations challenging our knowledge of the mechanisms of cancer development and progression. Emerging strategies utilize genomic manipulation technology to circumvent these limitations toward the formulation of attractive, physiologically relevant models of prostate cancer progression to advanced disease. This review discusses the current value of the widely used and well-characterized mouse models of prostate cancer progression to metastasis, as well as the opportunities begging exploitation for the development of new models for testing the antitumor efficacy of therapeutic strategies and identifying new biomarkers of disease progression. PMID:21680808

  18. Androgens and prostate disease

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lori A; Page, Stephanie T

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of literature has established the anabolic benefits of testosterone (T) therapy in hypogonadal men. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding the risks of exogenous androgen use in older men and the potential for adverse effects on the prostate gland. Whether T therapy in older, hypogonadal men might worsen lower urinary tract symptoms or exacerbate, unmask, or even incite prostate cancer development has tempered enthusiasm for T therapy, while known prostatic disease has served as a relative contraindication to T therapy. Androgens are necessary for the development and maintenance of the prostate gland. However, epidemiologic studies do not consistently find a positive relationship between endogenous serum androgen concentrations and the risk of prostate disease. Recent data demonstrate that 5α-reductase inhibitors decrease the risk of low-grade prostate cancer, suggesting that modifying androgen metabolism may have beneficial effects on prostate health, yet similar reductions in high-grade disease have not been observed, thereby questioning the true clinical benefits of these agents for chemoprevention. Knowing how to best investigate the relationship between androgens and the development of prostate disease given the lack of large, randomized trials is difficult. Accumulating data challenges the assumption that alterations in serum androgens have parallel effects within the prostate hormonal environment or change androgen-regulated processes within the gland. Long-term intervention studies are needed to truly ascertain the effects of androgen manipulation on prostate tissue and disease risk. However, available data do not support the notion that restoring serum androgens to normal physiologic ranges drives prostate disease. PMID:24407178

  19. Divergent clonal evolution of castration-resistant neuroendocrine prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Himisha; Prandi, Davide; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Benelli, Matteo; Puca, Loredana; Cyrta, Joanna; Marotz, Clarisse; Giannopoulou, Eugenia; Chakravarthi, Balabhadrapatruni V S K; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Tomlins, Scott A; Nanus, David M; Tagawa, Scott T; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Elemento, Olivier; Sboner, Andrea; Garraway, Levi A; Rubin, Mark A; Demichelis, Francesca

    2016-03-01

    An increasingly recognized resistance mechanism to androgen receptor (AR)-directed therapy in prostate cancer involves epithelial plasticity, in which tumor cells demonstrate low to absent AR expression and often have neuroendocrine features. The etiology and molecular basis for this 'alternative' treatment-resistant cell state remain incompletely understood. Here, by analyzing whole-exome sequencing data of metastatic biopsies from patients, we observed substantial genomic overlap between castration-resistant tumors that were histologically characterized as prostate adenocarcinomas (CRPC-Adeno) and neuroendocrine prostate cancer (CRPC-NE); analysis of biopsy samples from the same individuals over time points to a model most consistent with divergent clonal evolution. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis revealed marked epigenetic differences between CRPC-NE tumors and CRPC-Adeno, and also designated samples of CRPC-Adeno with clinical features of AR independence as CRPC-NE, suggesting that epigenetic modifiers may play a role in the induction and/or maintenance of this treatment-resistant state. This study supports the emergence of an alternative, 'AR-indifferent' cell state through divergent clonal evolution as a mechanism of treatment resistance in advanced prostate cancer.

  20. Acid ceramidase in prostate cancer radiation therapy resistance and relapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Joseph C.

    Prostate tumor cell escape from ionizing radiation (IR)-induced killing can lead to disease progression and relapse. Sphingolipids such as ceramide and sphingosine 1-phosphate influence signal transduction pathways that regulate stress response in cancer cells. In particular, metabolism of apoptotic ceramide constitutes an important survival adaptation. Assessments of enzyme activity, mRNA, and protein demonstrated preferential upregulation of the ceramide deacylating enzyme acid ceramidase (AC) in irradiated cancer cells. Promoter-reporter and ChIP-qPCR assays revealed AC transcription by activator protein 1 (AP-1) is sensitive to pharmacological inhibition of de novo ceramide biosynthesis, identifying a protective feedback mechanism that mitigates the effects of IR-induced ceramide. Deregulation of c-Jun, in particular, induced marked radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo, which was rescued by ectopic AC over-expression. AC over-expression in prostate cancer clonogens surviving 80 Gray fractionated irradiation was associated with increased radioresistance and proliferation, suggesting a role in radiotherapy failure and relapse. Indeed, immunohistochemical analysis of human prostate cancer tissues revealed higher levels of AC after radiotherapy failure than therapy-naive adenocarcinoma, PIN, or benign tissues. By genetically downregulating AC with small interfering RNA (siRNA), we observed radiosensitization of cells using clonogenic and cytotoxicity assays. Finally, treatment with lysosomotropic small molecule inhibitors of AC, LCL385 or LCL521, induced prostate cancer xenograft radiosensitization and long-term suppression, suggesting AC is a tractable target for adjuvant radiotherapy.

  1. Spinal cord compression due to ethmoid adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Johns, D R; Sweriduk, S T

    1987-10-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the ethmoid sinus is a rare tumor which has been epidemiologically linked to woodworking in the furniture industry. It has a low propensity to metastasize and has not been previously reported to cause spinal cord compression. A symptomatic epidural spinal cord compression was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan in a former furniture worker with widely disseminated metastases. The clinical features of ethmoid sinus adenocarcinoma and neoplastic spinal cord compression, and the comparative value of MRI scanning in the neuroradiologic diagnosis of spinal cord compression are reviewed.

  2. Detection of circulating tumor cells in patients with esophagogastric or pancreatic adenocarcinoma using the CellSearch® system: An observational feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Piegeler, Tobias; Winder, Thomas; Kern, Sabine; Pestalozzi, Bernhard; Schneider, Paul Magnus; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood of cancer patients have been demonstrated to be of prognostic value regarding metastasis and survival. The CellSearch® system has been certified for the detection of CTCs and as a prognostic tool in patients with metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer. Few studies have evaluated the detection of CTCs originating from esophagogastric or pancreatic cancer with the CellSearch® system. In the present small pilot study, a total of 16 patients with either esophagogastric (n=8) or pancreatic (n=8) adenocarcinomas at various disease stages were randomly screened and included. A total of 7.5 ml of blood was drawn from each patient and analyzed for CTCs using the CellSearch® device. CTCs could be detected in 1 out of 8 patients (12.5%) with esophagogastric and in 7 out of 8 patients (87.5%) with pancreatic cancer. The preliminary data obtained from this observational feasibility study suggested that the CellSearch® system may become a valuable tool for the detection of CTCs in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, whereas the usefulness in patients with early-stage esophagogastric adenocarcinoma may be limited. This study clearly points towards a requirement for larger studies focusing on patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma at various disease stages and assessing CTCs, whereas patients with esophagogastric adenocarcinomas should be part of further pilot studies. PMID:27446462

  3. Identification of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) in human prostate: expression site of the estrogen receptor in the benign and neoplastic gland.

    PubMed

    Rago, V; Romeo, F; Giordano, F; Ferraro, A; Carpino, A

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens are involved in growth, differentiation and pathogenesis of human prostate through the mediation of the classical estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is a 'novel' mediator of estrogen signaling which has been recently recognized in some human reproductive tissues, but its expression in the prostate gland is still unknown. Here, we investigated GPER in benign (from 5 patients) and neoplastic prostatic tissues (from 50 patients) by immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting. Normal areas of benign prostates revealed a strong GPER immunoreactivity in the basal epithelial cells while luminal epithelial cells were unreactive and stromal cells were weakly immunostained. GPER was also immunolocalized in adenocarcinoma samples but the immunoreactivity of tumoral areas decreased from Gleason pattern 2 to Gleason pattern 4. Furthermore, a strong GPER immunostaining was also revealed in cells of pre-neoplastic lesions (high-grade prostatic intra-epithelial neoplasia). Western blot analysis of benign and tumor protein extracts showed the presence of a ~42 kDa band, consistent with the GPER molecular weight. An increase in both pAkt and p cAMP-response-binding protein (pCREB) levels was also observed in poorly differentiated PCa samples. Finally, this work identified GPER in the epithelial basal cells of benign human prostate, with a different localization with respect to the classical estrogen receptors. Furthermore, the expression of GPER in prostatic adenocarcinoma cells was also observed but with a modulation of the immunoreactivity according to tumor cell arrangements.

  4. The Prostate Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Frederico R.; Romero, Antonio W.; Filho, Thadeu Brenny; Kulysz, David; Oliveira, Fernando C., Jr.; Filho, Renato Tambara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To help students, residents, and general practitioners to improve the technique, skills, and reproducibility of their prostate examination. Methods: We developed a comprehensive guideline outlining prostate anatomy, indications, patient preparation, positioning, technique, findings, and limitations of this ancient art of urological…

  5. Cryosurgery for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, W E; Bissada, N K

    2003-01-01

    Choice of management for patients with prostate cancer is influenced by patient and disease characteristics and life expectancy. Management options include expectance (watchful waiting), radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and cryosurgical ablation of the prostate (CSAP). The role of cryotherapy in the management of prostate cancer is still evolving. Continued research has allowed the introduction of efficient and safe cryosurgical equipment exemplified by the current third-generation cryosurgical machines. CSAP can be performed in an ambulatory surgery setting or as inpatient surgery with overnight stay. The procedure is performed under continuous ultrasonic monitoring. Mature data from the use of second-generation cryosurgical equipment indicate that CSAP is an effective therapeutic modality for managing patients with prostate cancer. Current data with the third-generation cryosurgical equipment are not mature. However, the favorable side effect profile and the good early responses seem to indicate that this modality will have a prominent role in the management of patients with prostate cancer.

  6. Prostatic carcinoma: limited field irradiation.

    PubMed

    Rounsaville, M C; Green, J P; Vaeth, J M; Purdon, R P; Heltzel, M M

    1987-07-01

    This is a retrospective study of 251 patients with histologically proven adenocarcinoma treated primarily with limited field radiotherapy techniques, under the principle direction of authors JMV and JPG, between 1968 and 1981 in San Francisco, California. All patients are followed for a minimum of 3 years; mean follow-up is 7.3 years. Routine clinical staging procedures included: H&P, digital prostate exam, cystoscopy, biopsy, blood studies including serum acid phosphatase, and imaging studies including chest X ray, IVP, bone survey or radionucleotide bone scan, and in recent years, pelvic CT scans. Twelve patients are Stage A1, 37-Stage A2, 50-Stage B, 140-Stage C1 and 12-Stage C2. Ninety percent of all cases and 85% of Stage C patients were treated with limited fields to the prostate and periprostatic volume only. Total doses were prescribed at midplane or isocenter and were generally 6500-7000 cGy, daily doses of 180-200 cGy, 5 days per week. Actuarial 5- and 10-year survival rates are: entire population-69% and 47%; Stage A1-74% and 50%; Stage A2-81% and 67%; Stage B-84% and 53%; Stage C1-63% and 42%; Stage C2-32% and 11%. The 5- and 10-year disease-free actuarial survivals are: entire population-71% and 50%; Stage A1-89% and 74%; Stage A2-82% and 69%; Stage B-71% and 52%; Stage C1-67% and 44%; Stage C2-0%. Sites of recurrence, alone or as a component of the failure pattern are: 37 (15%) local, 11 (4%) symptomatic regional recurrence (lower extremity edema, pelvic pain/sciatica, hydroureteronephrosis), and 87 (35%) distant metastasis. Seven (3%) had unknown sites of failure. Local-regional failure occurred in 42% of Stage C2 patients. Concomitant hormonal therapy has no survival impact on Stage C1 patients and poorly differentiated histology is associated with decreased determinate and disease-free survival rate of 5 years. Complications correlate with treatment technique, being more frequent with single field per day treatment plans. In patients treated with

  7. Intramedullary conus medullaris metastasis of periurethral adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ramakonar, H H; Thomas, A; Lind, C R P

    2011-04-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis to the conus medullaris is very rare. We report a 44-year-old woman with an intra-axial conus medullaris metastasis from periurethral adenocarcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature. We also discuss the clinical features, possible pathophysiological mechanisms and treatment options for intramedullary spinal cord metastasis to the conus medullaris.

  8. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  9. Elevated expression of UBE2T exhibits oncogenic properties in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Mingxin; Kwon, Yongwon; Wang, Yongsheng; Mao, Jian-Hua; Wei, Guangwei

    2015-01-01

    Increased expression of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2T (UBE2T) is reported in human prostate cancer. However, whether UBE2T plays any functional role in prostate cancer development remains unknown. We here report the first functional characterization of UBE2T in prostate carcinogenesis. Prostate cancer tissue array analysis confirmed upregulation of UBE2T in prostate cancer, especially these with distant metastasis. Moreover, higher level of UBE2T expression is associated with poorer prognosis of prostate cancer patients. Ectopic expression of UBE2T significantly promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation, motility and invasion, while UBE2T depletion by shRNA significantly inhibits these abilities of prostate cancer cells. Xenograft mouse model studies showed that overexpression of UBE2T promotes whereas UBE2T depletion inhibits tumor formation and metastasis significantly. Collectively, we identify critical roles of UBE2T in prostate cancer development and progression. These findings may serve as a framework for future investigations designed to more comprehensive determination of UBE2T as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26308072

  10. Linneg Sca-1high CD49fhigh prostate cancer cells derived from the Hi-Myc mouse model are tumor-initiating cells with basal-epithelial characteristics and differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saha, Achinto; Blando, Jorge; Fernandez, Irina; Kiguchi, Kaoru; DiGiovanni, John

    2016-05-01

    A cell line was established from ventral prostate (VP) tumors of one-year-old Hi-Myc mice. These cells, called HMVP2 cells, are LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh with high CD44 and CD29 expression and express CK14, Sca-1 and CD49f (but not CK8), suggesting basal-epithelial characteristics. Furthermore, HMVP2 cells form spheroids and both the cells and spheroids produce tumors in syngeneic mice. After four days of culture, HMVP2 spheroids underwent a gradual transition from LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression to LinnegSca-1lowCD49flow while a subpopulation of the cells retained the original LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression pattern. Additional cell subpopulations expressing Lin positive markers were also present suggesting further differentiation of HMVP2 spheroids. Two additional highly tumorigenic cell lines (HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2) were isolated from HMVP2 cells after subsequent tumor formation in FVB/N mice. Concurrently, we also established cell lines from the VP of 6 months old Hi-Myc mice (named as HMVP1) and FVB/N mice (called NMVP) having less aggressive growth properties compared to the other three cell lines. AR expression was reduced in HMVP2 cells compared to NMVP and HMVP1 cells and almost absent in HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2 cells. These cell lines will provide valuable tools for further mechanistic studies as well as preclinical studies to evaluate preventive and/or therapeutic agents for prostate cancer.

  11. Linneg Sca-1high CD49fhigh prostate cancer cells derived from the Hi-Myc mouse model are tumor-initiating cells with basal-epithelial characteristics and differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Irina; Kiguchi, Kaoru; DiGiovanni, John

    2016-01-01

    A cell line was established from ventral prostate (VP) tumors of one-year-old Hi-Myc mice. These cells, called HMVP2 cells, are LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh with high CD44 and CD29 expression and express CK14, Sca-1 and CD49f (but not CK8), suggesting basal-epithelial characteristics. Furthermore, HMVP2 cells form spheroids and both the cells and spheroids produce tumors in syngeneic mice. After four days of culture, HMVP2 spheroids underwent a gradual transition from LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression to LinnegSca-1lowCD49flow while a subpopulation of the cells retained the original LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression pattern. Additional cell subpopulations expressing Lin positive markers were also present suggesting further differentiation of HMVP2 spheroids. Two additional highly tumorigenic cell lines (HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2) were isolated from HMVP2 cells after subsequent tumor formation in FVB/N mice. Concurrently, we also established cell lines from the VP of 6 months old Hi-Myc mice (named as HMVP1) and FVB/N mice (called NMVP) having less aggressive growth properties compared to the other three cell lines. AR expression was reduced in HMVP2 cells compared to NMVP and HMVP1 cells and almost absent in HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2 cells. These cell lines will provide valuable tools for further mechanistic studies as well as preclinical studies to evaluate preventive and/or therapeutic agents for prostate cancer. PMID:26910370

  12. Linneg Sca-1high CD49fhigh prostate cancer cells derived from the Hi-Myc mouse model are tumor-initiating cells with basal-epithelial characteristics and differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saha, Achinto; Blando, Jorge; Fernandez, Irina; Kiguchi, Kaoru; DiGiovanni, John

    2016-05-01

    A cell line was established from ventral prostate (VP) tumors of one-year-old Hi-Myc mice. These cells, called HMVP2 cells, are LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh with high CD44 and CD29 expression and express CK14, Sca-1 and CD49f (but not CK8), suggesting basal-epithelial characteristics. Furthermore, HMVP2 cells form spheroids and both the cells and spheroids produce tumors in syngeneic mice. After four days of culture, HMVP2 spheroids underwent a gradual transition from LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression to LinnegSca-1lowCD49flow while a subpopulation of the cells retained the original LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression pattern. Additional cell subpopulations expressing Lin positive markers were also present suggesting further differentiation of HMVP2 spheroids. Two additional highly tumorigenic cell lines (HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2) were isolated from HMVP2 cells after subsequent tumor formation in FVB/N mice. Concurrently, we also established cell lines from the VP of 6 months old Hi-Myc mice (named as HMVP1) and FVB/N mice (called NMVP) having less aggressive growth properties compared to the other three cell lines. AR expression was reduced in HMVP2 cells compared to NMVP and HMVP1 cells and almost absent in HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2 cells. These cell lines will provide valuable tools for further mechanistic studies as well as preclinical studies to evaluate preventive and/or therapeutic agents for prostate cancer. PMID:26910370

  13. In Silico Functional Pathway Annotation of 86 Established Prostate Cancer Risk Variants

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Lenora W. M.; Fong, Aaron Y. W.; Cheng, Iona; Le Marchand, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    Heritability is one of the strongest risk factors of prostate cancer, emphasizing the importance of the genetic contribution towards prostate cancer risk. To date, 86 established prostate cancer risk variants have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To determine if these risk variants are located near genes that interact together in biological networks or pathways contributing to prostate cancer initiation or progression, we generated gene sets based on proximity to the 86 prostate cancer risk variants. We took two approaches to generate gene lists. The first strategy included all immediate flanking genes, up- and downstream of the risk variant, regardless of distance from the index variant, and the second strategy included genes closest to the index GWAS marker and to variants in high LD (r2 ≥0.8 in Europeans) with the index variant, within a 100 kb window up- and downstream. Pathway mapping of the two gene sets supported the importance of the androgen receptor-mediated signaling in prostate cancer biology. In addition, the hedgehog and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways were identified in pathway mapping for the flanking gene set. We also used the HaploReg resource to examine the 86 risk loci and variants high LD (r2 ≥0.8) for functional elements. We found that there was a 12.8 fold (p = 2.9 x 10-4) enrichment for enhancer motifs in a stem cell line and a 4.4 fold (p = 1.1 x 10-3) enrichment of DNase hypersensitivity in a prostate adenocarcinoma cell line, indicating that the risk and correlated variants are enriched for transcriptional regulatory motifs. Our pathway-based functional annotation of the prostate cancer risk variants highlights the potential regulatory function that GWAS risk markers, and their highly correlated variants, exert on genes. Our study also shows that these genes may function cooperatively in key signaling pathways in prostate cancer biology. PMID:25658610

  14. Assessment of vascular perfusion kinetics using contrast-enhanced ultrasound for the diagnosis of prostatic disease in dogs.

    PubMed

    Vignoli, M; Russo, M; Catone, G; Rossi, F; Attanasi, G; Terragni, R; Saunders, Jh; England, Gcw

    2011-04-01

    Vascular perfusion was assessed in 10 dogs without prostatic abnormalities and 26 dogs with prostatic disease using contrast-enhanced ultrasound. The time to reach peak contrast intensity (TTP) and peak perfusion intensity (PPI) were measured, and histological biopsies were collected from each dog. Biopsies confirmed normal prostate (n = 10), benign prostatic hyperplasia (n = 11), mixed benign pathology (n = 9), prostatitis (n = 1), prostatic malignancy [adenocarcinoma (n = 4); leiomyosarcoma (n = 1)]. In normal dogs, mean PPI was 16.8% ± 5.8 SD, and mean TTP was 33.6 ± 6.4 s. Benign conditions overall were not statistically different from normal dogs (p > 0.05); for benign prostatic hyperplasia, mean PPI was 16.9 ± 3.8%, and mean TTP was 26.2 ± 5.8 s; for mixed benign pathology mean PPI was 14.8 ± 7.8%, and mean TTP was 31.9 ± 9.7 s; for prostatitis, PPI was 14.2%, and TTP was 25.9 s. The malignant conditions overall had perfusion values that differed from the normal dogs (p < 0.05), although evaluation of the data for individual malignancies did not demonstrate a consistent trend; for adenocarcinomas, the PPI was numerically higher with a mean of 23.7 ± 1.9%, and the mean TTP was 26.9 ± 4.8 s, whilst for the dog with leiomyosarcoma values were numerically lower with a PPI of 14.1% and TTP of 41.3 s. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound appears to offer some ability to document differences in perfusion that may differentiate between malignant and benign lesions, although studies with larger numbers of animals are required to confirm this contention.

  15. Bilateral ethmoid sinusitis with unilateral proptosis as an initial manifestation of metastatic prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Fortson, J. K.; Bezmalinovic, Z. L.; Moseley, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    This article presents a case of bilateral ethmoid sinusitis with unilateral proptosis as a presenting sign of an unsuspected prostate carcinoma. A 59-year-old Hispanic male presented to his primary care physician with nasal congestion and rhinitis. He was treated with antibiotics and antihistamine decongestants for 3 weeks without improvement. A trial of steroids resulted in brief improvement followed by a rapid onset of nasal obstruction with proptosis. A computed tomography scan revealed opacification of the ethmoid sinus with right proptosis. The presumptive diagnosis was orbital cellulitis secondary to chronic ethmoid sinusitis. Endoscopic sinusotomy and bilateral ethmoidectomies were performed. Biopsy results returned as metastatic adenocarcinoma, probably of prostate origin. Urological work-up and evaluation with biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of prostatic carcinoma. The patient was treated with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. He died 7 months later with disseminated disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4A Figure 4B PMID:7861473

  16. Intramedullary conus medullaris metastasis from prostate carcinoma: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zengbao; Xu, Siyi; Zhong, Chunlong; Gao, Yang; Liu, Qiang; Zheng, Yan; Guo, Yang; Wang, Yong; Luo, Qizhong; Jiang, Jiyao

    2014-03-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord metastases (ISCMs) are rare and account for 4-8.5% of central nervous system metastases. Only one case of biopsy-proven ISCM due to prostate cancer has previously been reported. The current study presents an additional unique case of a 74-year-old male who developed symptoms from an intramedullary conus medullaris metastasis as the first manifestation of prostate adenocarcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, this scenario is even more rare and has not previously been reported. The tumor was radically resected, followed by androgen blockade treatment. The patient's neurological deficit significantly improved, with no tumor recurrence during the follow-up period. In addition, the present study provides an overview of the previous literature concerning ISCMs from prostate cancer, and discusses the treatment options.

  17. Alcohol-responsive Action Myoclonus of the Leg in Prostate Cancer: A Novel Paraneoplastic Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Frucht, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Paraneoplastic movement disorders in prostate cancer are rare, and to our knowledge paraneoplastic myoclonus has not previously been reported. Case Report We report two men with adenocarcinoma of the prostate who developed isolated alcohol-responsive action myoclonus of one leg. Myoclonus was absent at rest but triggered by movement, standing, or walking. Evaluations excluded malignant invasion of the nervous system, and testing for commercial paraneoplastic antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were unrevealing. Both patients experienced significant improvement with alcohol, and sodium oxybate was used in one patient with good initial benefit. Discussion Alcohol-responsive leg myoclonus might be a novel paraneoplastic syndrome associated with prostate cancer. The nature of the syndrome and the source of the myoclonus are currently unknown. PMID:26759739

  18. Optimization of prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Weir, James; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Connelly, Roger R.; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    1999-05-01

    Urologists routinely use the systematic sextant needle biopsy technique to detect prostate cancer. However, recent evidence suggests that this technique has a significant sampling error. We have developed a novel 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator based upon 201 whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various prostate needle biopsy protocols. Computerized prostate models have been developed to accurately depict the anatomy of the prostate and all individual tumor foci. We obtained 18-biopsies of each prostate model to determine the detection rates of various biopsy protocols. As a result, the 10- and 12- pattern biopsy protocols had a 99.0 percent detection rate, while the traditional sextant biopsy protocol rate was only 72.6 percent. The 5-region biopsy protocol had a 90.5 percent detection rate. the lateral sextant pattern revealed a detection rate of 95.5 percent, whereas the 4-pattern lateral biopsy protocol had a 93.5 percent detection rate. Our results suggest that all the biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon the five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern. Lateral biopsies in the mid and apical zones of the gland are the most important.

  19. Immunotherapy of prostate cancer in the Dunning rat model: use of cytokine gene modified tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vieweg, J; Rosenthal, F M; Bannerji, R; Heston, W D; Fair, W R; Gansbacher, B; Gilboa, E

    1994-04-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the prostate is the most common cancer in men. The majority of cancers are discovered once they have already metastasized, and there is no effective therapy for prostatic cancer at this stage. The use of cytokine-secreting tumor cell preparations as therapeutic vaccines for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer was investigated in the Dunning rat R3327-MatLyLu prostatic tumor model. IL-2 secreting, irradiated, tumor cell preparations were capable of curing animals with s.c. established tumors, and induced immunological memory that protected animals from subsequent tumor challenge. Immunotherapy was less effective when tumors were induced orthotopically, but nevertheless led to improved outcome, significantly delaying, and occasionally preventing, recurrence of tumors after resection of the cancerous prostate. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor secreting tumor cell preparations were less effective, and interferon-gamma secreting cells had only a marginal effect. Induction of a potent immune response in tumor bearing animals against the nonimmunogenic MatLyLu tumor supports the view that active immunotherapy warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic approach to prostate cancer. PMID:8137291

  20. [IDENTIFICATION OF A NEW DIAGNOSTIC MARKERS OF PROSTATIC CANCER, USING NOTI-MICROCHIPS].

    PubMed

    Vozianov, S O; Kashuba, V I; Grygorenko, V M; Gordiyuk, V V; Danylets, R O; Bondarenko, Yu M; Vikarchuk, M V

    2016-04-01

    The biopsy material specimens were investigated in 33 patients, examined for the prostatic cancer suspicion. In accordance to the morphological investigation data, in 15 patients a benign prostatic hyperplasia was verified, and in 18--pancreatic adenocarcinoma. NotI-Microchips of 180 clones of the third chromosome were used for determination of epigenetic changes. In 50 genes of the third chromosome a high rate of the methylation state changes (from 33 to 82%) was noted. Some changed genes take part in cancerogenesis (HMGB1L5, LRRC58, GPR149, DZIP1L, C3orf77, NUDT16) and in the prostatic gland cancer occurrence (BCL6, ITGA9, FBLN2, SOX2, LRRC3B etc.). Dependence of the genes methylation state from the clinic-morphological indices in patients with the prostatic gland cancer, including, the prostate-specific antigen level, the tumor differentiation degree in accordance to Gleason, was not established. Panel, consisting of 16 new potential markers for early and differentiated diagnosis of prostatic gland cancer, was identified: BHLHE40, FOXP1, LOC285205, ITGA9, CTDSPL, FGF12, LOC440944/SETD5, VHL, CLCN2, OSBPL10/ZNF860, LMCD1, FAM19A4, CAND2, MAP4, KY and LRRC58. PMID:27434957

  1. Myeloid sarcoma of the periprostatic tissue and prostate: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Koppisetty, Shalini; Edelman, Brain L.; Rajpurkar, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma (MS) is a rare extramedullary tumor composed of immature cells of myeloid lineage that destroy the original tissue architecture in which it is found. It is most commonly identified in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia, and less often in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and other myeloproliferative disorders. It is most commonly reported in the periosteum, bone, skin, and lymph nodes but has been reported in many other sites of the body. Herein, we describe a case of MS involving the periprostatic tissue and review of literature of MS of the prostate. Our patient was initially diagnosed with MDS and was in remission following successful treatment. Six months later, the patient was diagnosed with prostate adenocarcinoma, and MS of the periprostatic tissue was incidentally discovered in the postprostatectomy pathology specimen. An extensive review of literature from 1997 to 2014 revealed a total of eight cases of MS involving the prostate. Of the eight cases of MS of the prostate, four were primary MS (absence of a history of leukemia) and four were secondary MS. Three received local radiation to the prostate with relief of obstructive symptoms, and one of them had a repeat prostate biopsy negative for leukemic cells. Despite being a rare entity, MS should be considered as a differential diagnosis of soft tissue masses, especially in patients with a history of hematological malignancies. PMID:27453659

  2. Heterogeneity in intratumor distribution of p53 mutations in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Mirchandani, D.; Zheng, J.; Miller, G. J.; Ghosh, A. K.; Shibata, D. K.; Cote, R. J.; Roy-Burman, P.

    1995-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma from 65 patients have been examined for the occurrence of point mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene locus within the region of exons 5 to 8. Overall, only a small fraction of tumors (12.3%) was found to contain p53 mutations. No significant correlation was detected between the presence of the mutant gene and either tumor volume or histopathological grade. However, metastatic prostatic tumors are found to display a higher percentage (21.4%) of p53 mutations compared with primary adenocarcinomas (9.8%). Analysis of the topographical distribution of the p53 mutant genotype revealed two remarkable findings. First, multifocal tumors within a prostate appear to differ in harboring the mutant gene, and second, evidence is obtained for intratumor heterogeneity in the distribution of the mutant p53 allele. Together these findings appear to explain, at least in part, why there has been a wide discrepancy in the reported detection frequency of p53 mutations in prostate cancer specimens. It appears that the outcome of mutation analysis would depend not only on which tumors but also which regions of the tumors are included in the study. Furthermore, the observed heterogeneous topographical distribution of the mutation, if confirmed to be unique to prostate cancer, may have important implications in the understanding of the biology of prostate carcinogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7604888

  3. [IDENTIFICATION OF A NEW DIAGNOSTIC MARKERS OF PROSTATIC CANCER, USING NOTI-MICROCHIPS].

    PubMed

    Vozianov, S O; Kashuba, V I; Grygorenko, V M; Gordiyuk, V V; Danylets, R O; Bondarenko, Yu M; Vikarchuk, M V

    2016-04-01

    The biopsy material specimens were investigated in 33 patients, examined for the prostatic cancer suspicion. In accordance to the morphological investigation data, in 15 patients a benign prostatic hyperplasia was verified, and in 18--pancreatic adenocarcinoma. NotI-Microchips of 180 clones of the third chromosome were used for determination of epigenetic changes. In 50 genes of the third chromosome a high rate of the methylation state changes (from 33 to 82%) was noted. Some changed genes take part in cancerogenesis (HMGB1L5, LRRC58, GPR149, DZIP1L, C3orf77, NUDT16) and in the prostatic gland cancer occurrence (BCL6, ITGA9, FBLN2, SOX2, LRRC3B etc.). Dependence of the genes methylation state from the clinic-morphological indices in patients with the prostatic gland cancer, including, the prostate-specific antigen level, the tumor differentiation degree in accordance to Gleason, was not established. Panel, consisting of 16 new potential markers for early and differentiated diagnosis of prostatic gland cancer, was identified: BHLHE40, FOXP1, LOC285205, ITGA9, CTDSPL, FGF12, LOC440944/SETD5, VHL, CLCN2, OSBPL10/ZNF860, LMCD1, FAM19A4, CAND2, MAP4, KY and LRRC58.

  4. MicroRNA expression profiles associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and ampullary adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Nicolai A; Werner, Jens; Willenbrock, Hanni; Roslind, Anne; Giese, Nathalia; Horn, Thomas; Wøjdemann, Morten; Johansen, Julia S

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNAs have potential as diagnostic cancer biomarkers. The aim of this study was (1) to define microRNA expression patterns in formalin-fixed parafin-embedded tissue from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, ampullary adenocarcinoma, normal pancreas and chronic pancreatitis without using micro-dissection and (2) to discover new diagnostic microRNAs and combinations of microRNAs in cancer tissue. The expression of 664 microRNAs in tissue from 170 pancreatic adenocarcinomas and 107 ampullary adenocarcinomas were analyzed using a commercial microRNA assay. Results were compared with chronic pancreatitis, normal pancreas and duodenal adenocarcinoma. In all, 43 microRNAs had higher and 41 microRNAs reduced expression in pancreatic cancer compared with normal pancreas. In all, 32 microRNAs were differently expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared with chronic pancreatitis (17 higher; 15 reduced). Several of these microRNAs have not before been related to diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (eg, miR-492, miR-614, miR-622). MiR-614, miR-492, miR-622, miR-135b and miR-196 were most differently expressed. MicroRNA profiles of pancreatic and ampullary adenocarcinomas were correlated (0.990). MicroRNA expression profiles for pancreatic cancer described in the literature were consistent with our findings, and the microRNA profile for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (miR-196b-miR-217) was validated. We identified a more significant expression profile, the difference between miR-411 and miR-198 (P=2.06 × 10(-54)) and a diagnostic LASSO classifier using 19 microRNAs (sensitivity 98.5%; positive predictive value 97.8%; accuracy 97.0%). We also identified microRNA profiles to subclassify ampullary adenocarcinomas into pancreatobiliary or intestinal type. In conclusion, we found that combinations of two microRNAs could roughly separate neoplastic from non-neoplastic samples. A diagnostic 19 microRNA classifier was constructed which without micro-dissection could discriminate pancreatic

  5. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β is dispensable for development of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi; Hirata, Ayako; Nakayama, Sohei; VanderLaan, Paul A; Levantini, Elena; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Hirai, Hideyo; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Costa, Daniel B; Watanabe, Hideo; Kobayashi, Susumu S

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Although disruption of normal proliferation and differentiation is a vital component of tumorigenesis, the mechanisms of this process in lung cancer are still unclear. A transcription factor, C/EBPβ is a critical regulator of proliferation and/or differentiation in multiple tissues. In lung, C/EBPβ is expressed in alveolar pneumocytes and bronchial epithelial cells; however, its roles on normal lung homeostasis and lung cancer development have not been well described. Here we investigated whether C/EBPβ is required for normal lung development and whether its aberrant expression and/or activity contribute to lung tumorigenesis. We showed that C/EBPβ was expressed in both human normal pneumocytes and lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. We found that overall lung architecture was maintained in Cebpb knockout mice. Neither overexpression of nuclear C/EBPβ nor suppression of CEBPB expression had significant effects on cell proliferation. C/EBPβ expression and activity remained unchanged upon EGF stimulation. Furthermore, deletion of Cebpb had no impact on lung tumor burden in a lung specific, conditional mutant EGFR lung cancer mouse model. Analyses of data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) revealed that expression, promoter methylation, or copy number of CEBPB was not significantly altered in human lung adenocarcinoma. Taken together, our data suggest that C/EBPβ is dispensable for development of lung adenocarcinoma.

  6. Human and murine prostate basal/stem cells are not direct targets of prolactin.

    PubMed

    Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Angelergues, Antoine; Boutillon, Florence; d'Acremont, Bruno; Maidenberg, Marc; Oudard, Stéphane; Goffin, Vincent

    2015-09-01

    Local overexpression of prolactin (PRL) in the prostate of Pb-PRL transgenic mice induces benign prostate tumors exhibiting marked amplification of the epithelial basal/stem cell compartment. However, PRL-activated intracellular signaling seems to be restricted to luminal cells, suggesting that basal/stem cells may not be direct targets of PRL. Given their described role as prostate cancer-initiating cells, it is important to understand the mechanisms that regulate basal/stem cells. In this study, we evaluated whether PRL can act directly on these cells, by growing them as prostaspheres. For this, primary 3D prostasphere cultures were prepared from unfractionated cells isolated from freshly harvested human and mouse benign prostate tissues and subjected to PRL stimulation in vitro. None of the various concentrations of PRL tested showed any effects on the sizes or numbers of the prostaspheres generated. In addition, neither activation of canonical PRL-induced signaling pathways (Stat5, Stat3 or Erk1/2) nor increased expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 were detected by immunostaining in PRL-stimulated prostaspheres. Consistent with the absence of response, PRL receptor mRNA levels were generally undetectable in mouse sphere cells. We conclude that human and mouse prostate basal/stem cells are not direct targets of PRL action. The observed amplification of basal/stem cells in Pb-PRL prostates might be due to paracrine mechanisms originating from PRL action on other cell compartments. Our current efforts are aimed at unraveling these mechanisms.

  7. Massive Bleeding as the First Clinical Manifestation of Metastatic Prostate Cancer due to Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation with Enhanced Fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, João Madeira; Victorino, Rui M. M.; Meneses Santos, João

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is the most frequent coagulation disorder associated with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. However, DIC with enhanced fibrinolysis as an initial presentation of prostate cancer is extremely rare. The appropriate treatment to control bleeding in these situations is challenging, controversial, and based on isolated case reports in the literature. A 66-year-old male presented at the emergency department with acute severe spontaneous ecchymoses localized to the limbs, laterocervical hematoma, and hemothorax. Prostate specific antigen level was 385 μg/L, bone scintigraphy revealed multiple bone metastases, and prostate biopsy confirmed adenocarcinoma (Gleason 9; 4 + 5). Laboratory investigation showed a pattern of enhanced fibrinolysis rather than the more common intravascular coagulation mechanism. Epsilon aminocaproic acid in monotherapy was initiated with a clear and rapid control of bleeding manifestations. This rare case of massive bleeding due to DIC with enhanced fibrinolysis as the first manifestation of prostate cancer suggests that in selected cases where the acute bleeding dyscrasia is clearly associated with a dominant fibrinolysis mechanism it is possible to use an approach of monotherapy with antifibrinolytics. PMID:27803823

  8. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vemana, Goutham; Hamilton, Robert J; Andriole, Gerald L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Large prospective randomized trials, such as the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) trial, and Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), have provided practitioners with considerable data regarding methods of treatment and prevention of prostate cancer. The best-studied medications for prevention are 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Their efficacy and side effects are well characterized. Other medications, dietary nutrients, and supplements have not been as well studied and generally do not demonstrate efficacy for disease prevention with an acceptable level of evidence. PMID:24188663

  9. Assessment of Prostatism

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Peter H.

    1978-01-01

    Prostatism is a syndrome associated with outlet obstruction at the bladder neck and the commonest cause is benign prostatic hypertrophy. The main indications for investigation and treatment are these symptoms (especially nocturia). The diagnosis should then be confirmed by the physical signs such as an enlarged gland or palpable bladder. If other causes of these symptoms are eliminated, the patient should be referred to a urologist to confirm, through cystoscopy, signs of an obstructing prostate and bladder trabeculation. The surgery (TUR or open) for benign disease leaves the capsules behind and the patient should still be followed with routine rectal examinations for early detection of malignancy. PMID:21301523

  10. FOLFOX-6 Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Esophagectomy and Post-operative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastric Cardia; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer

  11. Comparison of biochemical failure definitions for permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuban, Deborah A. . E-mail: dakuban@mdanderson.org; Levy, Larry B.; Potters, Louis; Beyer, David C.; Blasko, John C.; Moran, Brian J.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Elshaikh, Mohamed; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To assess prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure definitions for patients with Stage T1-T2 prostate cancer treated by permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 2,693 patients treated with radioisotopic implant as solitary treatment for T1-T2 prostatic adenocarcinoma were studied. All patients had a pretreatment PSA, were treated at least 5 years before analysis, 1988 to 1998, and did not receive hormonal therapy before recurrence. Multiple PSA failure definitions were tested for their ability to predict clinical failure. Results: Definitions which determined failure by a certain increment of PSA rise above the lowest PSA level to date (nadir + x ng/mL) were more sensitive and specific than failure definitions based on PSA doubling time or a certain number of PSA rises. The sensitivity and specificity for the nadir + 2 definition were 72% and 83%, vs. 51% and 81% for 3 PSA rises. The surgical type definitions (PSA exceeding an absolute value) could match this sensitivity and specificity but only when failure was defined as exceeding a PSA level in the 1-3 ng/mL range and only when patients were allowed adequate time to nadir. When failure definitions were compared by time varying covariate regression analysis, nadir + 2 ng/mL retained the best fit. Conclusions: For patients treated by permanent radioisotopic implant for prostate cancer, the definition nadir + 2 ng/mL provides the best surrogate for failure throughout the entire follow-up period, similar to patients treated by external beam radiotherapy. Therefore, the same PSA failure definition could be used for both modalities. For brachytherapy patients with long-term follow-up, at least 6 years, defining failure as exceeding an absolute PSA level in the 0.5 ng/mL range may be reasonable.

  12. MRI of the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. The prostate gland is part of the male reproductive system. It is located in front of the rectum ...

  13. Prostate Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close About Us Our Story A Legacy of Leadership About the Prostate Cancer Foundation CEO Message Why ... Cancer Board of Directors Annual Report & Financials Our Leadership Leadership Team A Legacy of Leadership Featured Take ...

  14. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rittmaster, Roger S

    2011-06-01

    Over the past two decades, many more men are diagnosed with prostate cancer then die of the disease. This increase in diagnosis has led to aggressive treatment of indolent disease in many individuals and has been the impetus for finding a means of reducing the risk of prostate cancer. In the past decade, there have been eight large trials of prostate cancer risk reduction using dietary supplements, 5α-reductase inhibitors, or anti-estrogens. The only two trials which have demonstrated efficacy are those involving 5α-reductase inhibitors: the PCPT (finasteride) and REDUCE (dutasteride). This review examines prostate cancer risk reduction, with emphasis on conclusions that can be drawn from these two landmark studies. PMID:21604953

  15. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Andrew J; Abouassaly, Robert; Klein, Eric A

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is an appropriate target for primary chemoprevention because of its ubiquity, disease-related mortality, treatment-related morbidity, and long latency period. The PCPT and REDUCE trials demonstrate that this cancer can be prevented by a relatively nontoxic oral pharmacologic agent (5alpha-reductase inhibitors). Evidence from the SELECT trial argues against the recommendation of the use of vitamins and micronutrients as chemoprevention of prostate cancer. Dietary modification may substantially alter a man's risk of prostate cancer, but the specific dietary manipulations that are necessary are poorly defined and these may need to be instituted in early adulthood to be successful. 5alpha-reductase inhibitors represent an effective primary prevention strategy, and these agents should be used more liberally for the prevention of prostate cancer, particularly in high-risk patients. PMID:20152515

  16. Chronic prostatitis: management strategies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adam B; Macejko, Amanda; Taylor, Aisha; Nadler, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has redefined prostatitis into four distinct entities. Category I is acute bacterial prostatitis. It is an acute prostatic infection with a uropathogen, often with systemic symptoms of fever, chills and hypotension. The treatment hinges on antimicrobials and drainage of the bladder because the inflamed prostate may block urinary flow. Category II prostatitis is called chronic bacterial prostatitis. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of documented urinary tract infections with the same uropathogen and causes pelvic pain, urinary symptoms and ejaculatory pain. It is diagnosed by means of localization cultures that are 90% accurate in localizing the source of recurrent infections within the lower urinary tract. Asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis comprises NIH category IV. This entity is, by definition, asymptomatic and is often diagnosed incidentally during the evaluation of infertility or prostate cancer. The clinical significance of category IV prostatitis is unknown and it is often left untreated. Category III prostatitis is called chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). It is characterized by pelvic pain for more than 3 of the previous 6 months, urinary symptoms and painful ejaculation, without documented urinary tract infections from uropathogens. The syndrome can be devastating, affecting 10-15% of the male population, and results in nearly 2 million outpatient visits each year. The aetiology of CP/CPPS is poorly understood, but may be the result of an infectious or inflammatory initiator that results in neurological injury and eventually results in pelvic floor dysfunction in the form of increased pelvic muscle tone. The diagnosis relies on separating this entity from chronic bacterial prostatitis. If there is no history of documented urinary tract infections with a urinary tract pathogen, then cultures should be taken when patients are symptomatic. Prostatic localization cultures, called the

  17. Prostate cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment of prostate cancer varies depending on the stage of the cancer (i.e., spread) and may include surgical removal, radiation, chemotherapy, hormonal manipulation or a combination of these treatments.

  18. Prostate cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... test. A faster increase could show a more aggressive tumor. A prostate biopsy is done in your ... suggest the cancer is slow growing and not aggressive. Higher numbers indicate a faster growing cancer that ...

  19. What Is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the more likely he is to develop the disease. Physician: Come on back, first room. Narrator: Most ... cancer. Prostate cancer is really a spectrum of diseases where on one end of the spectrum there ...

  20. Enlarged prostate gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... enlarges in size in a process called benign hypertrophy, which means that the gland got larger without ... in several of the symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy, or BPH. Symptoms may include a slowed or ...

  1. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... abnormal and raises the index of suspicion that cancer may be present. Narrator: While the use of ... examination does not mean that they have prostate cancer. It means that we're concerned about it ...

  2. Prostate cancer. Foreword.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hiten R H

    2014-11-01

    Professor Hiten Patel is an expert in Laparoscopic and Robotic Surgery for treating prostate disease. He is also a leading researcher in basic science and `clinical research. His basic science research is focused on studying the pathways for improving prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis through biomarker application, and his clinical research includes new technology applications for training surgeons and improving patient care outcome. Prof Patel is also Chairman of the Urology group for the Enhanced Recovery after Surgery Society.

  3. Gall bladder Adenocarcinoma in a Young Girl.

    PubMed

    Date, Shivprasad V; Rizvi, S J

    2015-04-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with abdominal discomfort, weakness, and jaundice. General examination revealed deep icterus with hard lymph nodes in left supraclavicular region. On gastrointestinal examination, we appreciated a hard intra-abdominal lump in the right hypochondrium. Biochemical evaluation showed features of obstructive jaundice. Imaging confirmed the presence of gall bladder lump with multiple intra-abdominal lymph nodes. Fine needle aspiration cytology of neck nodes demonstrated metastatic adenocarcinoma. Fine needle aspiration cytology of the gall bladder lump (done under sonographic guidance) confirmed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, malignancy of the gall bladder has not been reported in individuals less than 18 years in India, and only three cases have been reported worldwide in English literature. PMID:26139973

  4. Gall bladder Adenocarcinoma in a Young Girl.

    PubMed

    Date, Shivprasad V; Rizvi, S J

    2015-04-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with abdominal discomfort, weakness, and jaundice. General examination revealed deep icterus with hard lymph nodes in left supraclavicular region. On gastrointestinal examination, we appreciated a hard intra-abdominal lump in the right hypochondrium. Biochemical evaluation showed features of obstructive jaundice. Imaging confirmed the presence of gall bladder lump with multiple intra-abdominal lymph nodes. Fine needle aspiration cytology of neck nodes demonstrated metastatic adenocarcinoma. Fine needle aspiration cytology of the gall bladder lump (done under sonographic guidance) confirmed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, malignancy of the gall bladder has not been reported in individuals less than 18 years in India, and only three cases have been reported worldwide in English literature.

  5. Treatment of primary adenocarcinoma of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Weiner, S; Wizenberg, M J

    1975-06-01

    Between 1956 and 1971, a total of 74 cases of adenocarcinoma of the cervix was treatedin the Division of Radiation Therapy of the University of Maryland Hospital. Radical radiation therapy was followed by routine surgery early in the study;after 1967, surgery was used only for radiation failure. The likelihood of local control and 5-year survival was not improved by the routine addition of surgery to radical radiation, although the incidence of serious complications was markedly elevated. The results of treatment of adenocarcinoma of the cervix by radiation therapy alone are not significantly different from those achieved with squamous cell carcinoma. Surgery should be used as a salvage procedure in case of failure, rather than on a routine basis. PMID:1148986

  6. Genetics and Biology of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Richard F; Hezel, Aram F

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains a clinical challenge. Thus far, enlightenment on the downstream activities of Kras, the tumor's unique metabolic needs, and how the stroma and immune system affect it have remained untranslated to the clinical practice. Given the numbers of diverse therapies in development and a growing knowledge about how to evaluate these systems preclinically and clinically, this is expected to change significantly and for the better over the next 5 years. PMID:26226899

  7. A mammary adenocarcinoma murine model suitable for the study of cancer immunoediting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer immunoediting is a dynamic process composed of three phases: elimination (EL), equilibrium (EQ) and escape (ES) that encompasses the potential host-protective and tumor-sculpting functions of the immune system throughout tumor development. Animal models are useful tools for studying diseases such as cancer. The present study was designed to characterize the interaction between mammary adenocarcinoma M-406 and CBi, CBi− and CBi/L inbred mice lines. Results The mammary adenocarcinoma M-406 developed spontaneously in a CBi mouse. CBi/L and CBi− mice were artificially selected for body conformation from CBi. When CBi mice are s.c. challenged with M-406, tumor growths exponentially in 100% of animals, while in CBi− the tumor growths briefly and then begins a rejection process in 100% of the animals. In CBi/L the growth of the tumor shows the three phases: 51.6% in ES, 18.5% in EQ and 29.8% in EL. Conclusions The results obtained support the conclusion that the system M-406 plus the inbred mouse lines CBi, CBi− and CBi/L, is a good murine model to study the process of tumor immunoediting. PMID:24885995

  8. Predictors of Survival in Sinonasal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michelle M.; Roman, Sanziana A.; Sosa, Julie A.; Judson, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify factors associated with disease-specific survival (DSS) in intestinal and nonintestinal sinonasal adenocarcinoma. Design Retrospective review. Setting Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database. Participants Adult patients with sinonasal adenocarcinoma. Main Outcome Measures DSS. Results We identified 325 patients; of these, 300 had the nonintestinal type and 25 had intestinal type histologies. The 5-year DSS rates for patients who had no treatment, radiation (RT), surgery, and surgery and postoperative RT were 42.5, 46.1, 85.6, and 72.6%, respectively (log-rank test; p < 0.001). Black race, age ≥ 75 years, paranasal sinus involvement, and high grade were independently associated with decreased DSS. Compared with RT, surgery (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.15–0.77), and adjuvant RT (HR: 0.47; 95% CI, 0.26–0.86) were associated with improved DSS. Conclusions There is no difference in prognosis between intestinal and nonintestinal subtypes of sinonasal adenocarcinoma. Treatment with surgery alone or adjuvant RT is associated with a more favorable prognosis. PMID:26225303

  9. Comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the lung is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Here we report molecular profiling of 230 resected lung adenocarcinomas using messenger RNA, microRNA and DNA sequencing integrated with copy number, methylation and proteomic analyses. High rates of somatic mutation were seen (mean 8.9 mutations per megabase). Eighteen genes were statistically significantly mutated, including RIT1 activating mutations and newly described loss-of-function MGA mutations which are mutually exclusive with focal MYC amplification. EGFR mutations were more frequent in female patients, whereas mutations in RBM10 were more common in males. Aberrations in NF1, MET, ERBB2 and RIT1 occurred in 13% of cases and were enriched in samples otherwise lacking an activated oncogene, suggesting a driver role for these events in certain tumours. DNA and mRNA sequence from the same tumour highlighted splicing alterations driven by somatic genomic changes, including exon 14 skipping in MET mRNA in 4% of cases. MAPK and PI(3)K pathway activity, when measured at the protein level, was explained by known mutations in only a fraction of cases, suggesting additional, unexplained mechanisms of pathway activation. These data establish a foundation for classification and further investigations of lung adenocarcinoma molecular pathogenesis. PMID:25079552

  10. Predictors of Survival in Sinonasal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Michelle M; Roman, Sanziana A; Sosa, Julie A; Judson, Benjamin L

    2015-06-01

    Objectives To identify factors associated with disease-specific survival (DSS) in intestinal and nonintestinal sinonasal adenocarcinoma. Design Retrospective review. Setting Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database. Participants Adult patients with sinonasal adenocarcinoma. Main Outcome Measures DSS. Results We identified 325 patients; of these, 300 had the nonintestinal type and 25 had intestinal type histologies. The 5-year DSS rates for patients who had no treatment, radiation (RT), surgery, and surgery and postoperative RT were 42.5, 46.1, 85.6, and 72.6%, respectively (log-rank test; p < 0.001). Black race, age ≥ 75 years, paranasal sinus involvement, and high grade were independently associated with decreased DSS. Compared with RT, surgery (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.15-0.77), and adjuvant RT (HR: 0.47; 95% CI, 0.26-0.86) were associated with improved DSS. Conclusions There is no difference in prognosis between intestinal and nonintestinal subtypes of sinonasal adenocarcinoma. Treatment with surgery alone or adjuvant RT is associated with a more favorable prognosis. PMID:26225303

  11. A vaccine strategy with multiple prostatic acid phosphatase-fused cytokines for prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    FUJIO, KEI; WATANABE, MASAMI; UEKI, HIDEO; LI, SHUN-AI; KINOSHITA, RIE; OCHIAI, KAZUHIKO; FUTAMI, JUNICHIRO; WATANABE, TOYOHIKO; NASU, YASUTOMO; KUMON, HIROMI

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the attractive treatment strategies for advanced prostate cancer. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) previously approved the therapeutic vaccine, sipuleucel-T, which is composed of autologous antigen-presenting cells cultured with a fusion protein [prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF)]. Although sipuleucel-T has been shown to prolong the median survival of patients for 4.1 months, more robust therapeutic effects may be expected by modifying the vaccination protocol. In the present study, we aimed to develop and validate a novel vaccination strategy using multiple PAP-fused cytokines for prostate cancer treatment. Using a super gene expression (SGE) system that we previously established to amplify the production of a recombinant protein, significant amounts of PAP-fused cytokines [human GMCSF, interleukin-2 (IL2), IL4, IL7 and mouse GMCSF and IL4] were obtained. We examined the activity of the fusion proteins in vitro to validate their cytokine functions. A significant upregulation of dendritic cell differentiation from monocytes was achieved by PAP-GMCSF when used with the other PAP-fused cytokines. The PAP-fused human IL2 significantly increased the proliferation of lymphocytes, as determined by flow cytometry. We also investigated the in vivo therapeutic effects of multiple PAP-fused cytokines in a mouse prostate cancer model bearing prostate-specific antigen (PSA)- and PAP-expressing tumors. The simultaneous intraperitoneal administration of PAP-GMCSF, -IL2, -IL4 and -IL7 significantly prevented tumor induction and inhibited the tumor growth in the PAP-expressing tumors, yet not in the PSA-expressing tumors. The in vivo therapeutic effects with the multiple PAP-fused cytokines were superior to the effects of PAP-GMCSF alone. We thus demonstrated the advantages of the combined use of multiple PAP-fused cytokines including PAP-GMCSF, and propose a promising prostatic antigen

  12. Metastatic lung adenocarcinoma to the bladder: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YE, HAI-JUN; MA, JIAN; LIU, YING-JIE; YE, XIAO-FEI; ZHANG, LI-WANG; LI, JIN-GE

    2015-01-01

    Urothelial cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of malignant tumor in the bladder, of which primary adenocarcinoma accounts for a small percentage. Secondary malignancies, in particular metastatic adenocarcinoma from the lung, are exceedingly rare, with only six cases previously reported in the literature. The present study describes the case of a 71-year-old Chinese male patient with known lung cancer for >2 years, who was diagnosed with metastatic adenocarcinoma to the bladder. The histopathological characteristics and immunohistochemical features of the patient are reported. It was proposed that pathologists should consider the possibility of metastatic adenocarcinoma from the lung, rather than assume a diagnosis of primary adenocarcinoma of the bladder or direct invasion of adenocarcinoma from the surrounding organs. Furthermore, it is essential to determine the medical history of each patient and observe the immunohistochemical features of all tumors prior to diagnosis. PMID:26622730

  13. Combined inhibition of DDR1 and Notch signaling is a therapeutic strategy for KRAS-driven lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ambrogio, Chiara; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Falcone, Mattia; Vidal, August; Nadal, Ernest; Crosetto, Nicola; Blasco, Rafael B; Fernández-Marcos, Pablo J; Sánchez-Céspedes, Montserrat; Ren, Xiaomei; Wang, Zhen; Ding, Ke; Hidalgo, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel; Villanueva, Alberto; Santamaría, David; Barbacid, Mariano

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS)-mutant lung adenocarcinoma are currently treated with standard chemotherapy because of a lack of efficacious targeted therapies. We reasoned that the identification of mediators of Kras signaling in early mouse lung hyperplasias might bypass the difficulties that are imposed by intratumor heterogeneity in advanced tumors, and that it might unveil relevant therapeutic targets. Transcriptional profiling of Kras(G12V)-driven mouse hyperplasias revealed intertumor diversity with a subset that exhibited an aggressive transcriptional profile analogous to that of advanced human adenocarcinomas. The top-scoring gene in this profile encodes the tyrosine kinase receptor DDR1. The genetic and pharmacological inhibition of DDR1 blocked tumor initiation and tumor progression, respectively. The concomitant inhibition of both DDR1 and Notch signaling induced the regression of KRAS;TP53-mutant patient-derived lung xenografts (PDX) with a therapeutic efficacy that was at least comparable to that of standard chemotherapy. Our data indicate that the combined inhibition of DDR1 and Notch signaling could be an effective targeted therapy for patients with KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma.

  14. Vesical clear cell adenocarcinoma arising from endometriosis: A mullerian tumor, indistinguishable from ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eirwen M; Sun, Ying; Richardson, Ingride; Frimer, Marina

    2016-11-01

    Endometriosis is associated with increased rates of ovarian, particularly clear cell, adenocarcinomas. Malignant transformation of ovarian endometriosis is most common but rare cases have been reported in the bladder, abdominal wall, diaphragm, and rectum. We present the case of a 44-year-old female with vesical clear cell adenocarcinoma arising in a background of endometriosis in the absence of other pelvic endometriosis. The malignancy was diagnosed on transurethral resection of bladder tumor and managed with radical surgery. Histology and immunohistochemical findings were consistent mullerian origin and indistinguishable from similar tumors arising in the female genital tract. Extrapolating from the gynecologic literature, the recommendation was made for adjuvant chemotherapy. Further studies are needed to clarify the optimal treatment paradigm for ovarian and bladder clear cell adenocarcinomas. PMID:27660815

  15. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer Abiraterone Acetate Bicalutamide Cabazitaxel Casodex (Bicalutamide) Degarelix Docetaxel ...

  16. Understanding Prostate Cancer: Newly Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wellness PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Understanding Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Newly Diagnosed Staging the Disease Issues ... you care about has recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer, this section will help guide you through the ...

  17. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  18. Targeting stromal androgen receptor suppresses prolactin-driven benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    PubMed

    Lai, Kuo-Pao; Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Fang, Lei-Ya; Izumi, Kouji; Lo, Chi-Wen; Wood, Ronald; Kindblom, Jon; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-10-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction plays a pivotal role to mediate the normal prostate growth, the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer development. Until now, the stromal androgen receptor (AR) functions in the BPH development, and the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we used a genetic knockout approach to ablate stromal fibromuscular (fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells) AR in a probasin promoter-driven prolactin transgenic mouse model (Pb-PRL tg mice) that could spontaneously develop prostate hyperplasia to partially mimic human BPH development. We found Pb-PRL tg mice lacking stromal fibromuscular AR developed smaller prostates, with more marked changes in the dorsolateral prostate lobes with less proliferation index. Mechanistically, prolactin mediated hyperplastic prostate growth involved epithelial-stromal interaction through epithelial prolactin/prolactin receptor signals to regulate granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor expression to facilitate stromal cell growth via sustaining signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 activity. Importantly, the stromal fibromuscular AR could modulate such epithelial-stromal interacting signals. Targeting stromal fibromuscular AR with the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9(®), led to the reduction of prostate size, which could be used in future therapy.

  19. HER2 amplification, overexpression and score criteria in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yingchuan; Bandla, Santhoshi; Godfrey, Tony E.; Tan, Dongfeng; Luketich, James D.; Pennathur, Arjun; Qiu, Xing; Hicks, David G.; Peters, Jeffrey; Zhou, Zhongren

    2011-01-01

    The HER2 oncogene was recently reported to be amplified and overexpressed in esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the relationship of HER2 amplification in esophageal adenocarcinoma with prognosis has not been well defined. The scoring systems for clinically evaluating HER2 in esophageal adenocarcinoma are not established. The aims of the study were to establish a HER2 scoring system and comprehensively investigate HER2 amplification and overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesion. Using a tissue microarray, containing 116 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, 34 cases of BE, 18 cases of low grade dysplasia and 15 cases of high grade dysplasia, HER2 amplification and overexpression were analyzed by HercepTest and CISH methods. The amplification frequency in an independent series of 116 esophageal adenocarcinoma samples was also analyzed using Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarrays. In our studies, we have found that HER2 amplification does not associate with poor prognosis in total 232 esophageal adenocarcinoma patients by CISH and high density microarrays. We further confirm the similar frequency of HER2 amplification by CISH (18.10%; 21/116) and SNP 6.0 microarrays (16.4%, 19/116) in esophageal adenocarcinoma. HER2 protein overexpression was observed in 12.1 % (14/116) of esophageal adenocarcinoma and 6.67% (1/15) of HGD. No HER2 amplification or overexpression was identified in BE or LGD. All HER2 protein overexpression cases showed HER2 gene amplification. Gene amplification was found to be more frequent by CISH than protein overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma (18.10% vs 12.9%). A modified two-step model for esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 testing is recommend for clinical esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 trial. PMID:21460800

  20. Primary Adenocarcinoma of an Ileostomy in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Meena A.; Lo, Amy; Bellaguarda, Emanuelle; Strong, Scott; Hanauer, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Although Crohn's disease has been associated with an increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma, primary adenocarcinoma arising from an ileostomy is a complication that has been rarely documented in Crohn's disease. Chronic small bowel inflammation may lead to development of malignancy through the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. We report a case of a 61-year-old woman with Crohn's ileocolitis diagnosed with a primary adenocarcinoma at the ileostomy with metastases to the liver 47 years after proctocolectomy, and review the literature.

  1. Computed tomography of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Van Engelshoven, J M; Kreel, L

    1979-02-01

    The conventional anatomy of the prostate is reviewed and the computed tomography (CT) anatomy described and illustrated. The results of 55 "normal" cases were analyzed for size and relationship to the symphysis pubis, retropubic space, and bladder, as shown on CT sections correlating the features with age and possible urinary symptoms. Attention is also drawn to the differences between phleboliths and prostatic calcification. Computed tomography is an effective method of demonstrating the prostate and surrounding structures and of assessing prostatic enlargement.

  2. ALK positivity on pleuroscopic pleural biopsy in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Preyas J; Kate, Arvind H; Mehta, Deval; Dhabar, Boman N; Chhajed, Prashant N

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and around 75% to 80% of lung cancers are detected in advanced stage. Multiple genetic mutations are identified and reported in adenocarcinoma of the lung. Various pulmonary samples can be tested for molecular mutations in lung cancer. However, feasibility of molecular profiling of pleuroscopic pleural biopsies in lung adenocarcinoma is not reported. We describe a case of advanced adenocarcinoma of lung with positive anaplastic lymphoma tyrosine kinase mutation on pleuroscopic pleural biopsy and improved with oral crizotinib. The current case highlights the feasibility of pleuroscopy.-guided pleural biopsies in molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27461706

  3. Prostatic adenoma of ductal origin.

    PubMed

    Min, K W; Gyorkey, F

    1980-07-01

    A case of prostatic adenoma believed to originate from the prostatic duct is described. There were morphologic similarities to basal cell adenomas of salivary glands, and it was concluded that the tumor is a benign counterpart of "salivary gland" carcinomas, rarely observed in the prostate.

  4. Antiproliferative Evaluation of Isofuranodiene on Breast and Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Lambertucci, Catia; Maggi, Filippo; Papa, Fabrizio; Santinelli, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The anticancer activity of isofuranodiene, extracted from Smyrnium olusatrum, was evaluated in human breast adenocarcinomas MDA-MB 231 and BT 474, and Caucasian prostate adenocarcinoma PC 3 cell lines by MTS assay. MTS assay showed a dose-dependent growth inhibition in the tumor cell lines after isofuranodiene treatment. The best antiproliferative activity of the isofuranodiene was found on PC 3 cells with an IC50 value of 29 μM, which was slightly less than the inhibition against the two breast adenocarcinoma cell lines with IC50 values of 59 and 55 μM on MDA-MB 231 and BT 474, respectively. Hoechst 33258 assay was performed in order to study the growth inhibition mechanism in prostate cancer cell line; the results indicate that isofuranodiene induces apoptosis. Overall, the understudy compound has a good anticancer activity especially towards the PC 3. On the contrary, it is less active on Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) and human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) appearing as a good candidate as a potential natural anticancer drug with low side effects. PMID:24967427

  5. Human kallikrein 3 (prostate specific antigen) and human kallikrein 5 expression in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Darling, M R; Tsai, S; Jackson-Boeters, L; Daley, T D; Diamandis, E P

    2006-01-01

    The human kallikrein 5 protein (hK5) is expressed in many normal tissues, most notably in skin, breast, salivary gland and esophagus. It has also been shown to be a potential biomarker for breast, ovarian and testicular cancer. Human kallikrein 3 (hK3; prostate-specific antigen) is the most useful marker for adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. The aim of this study was to determine whether hK3 and hK5 are expressed in salivary gland tissues and salivary gland tumors (both benign and malignant), in order to compare normal with tumor tissues. Pleomorphic adenomas, adenoid cystic carcinomas, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas, acinic cell carcinomas, mucoepidermoid carcinomas and adenocarcinomas not otherwise specified of both minor and major salivary glands were examined. The results of this study indicate that most salivary gland tumors do not show high levels of expression of hK5. Staining was most prominent in keratinizing epithelia in pleomorphic adenomas. hK3 is not expressed in salivary gland tumors.

  6. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells participate in prostate carcinogenesis and promote growth of prostate cancer by cell fusion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianan; Li, Jian; Ma, Pengde; Ding, Hao; Feng, Guowei; Lin, Dong; Xu, Yong; Yang, Kuo

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is comprised of diverse stromal cells that contribute towards tumor progression. As a result, there has been a growing interest in the role of bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) in cancer progression. However, the role of BMDCs in prostate cancer (PCa) progression still remains unclear. In this study, we established GFP bone marrow transplanted TRAMP and MUN-induced prostate cancer models, in order to investigate the role of BMDCs in prostate cancer progression. By tracing GFP positive cells, we observed that BMDCS were recruited into mouse prostate tissues during tumorigenesis. GFP+/Sca-1+/CD45− BMDCs were significantly increased in the MNU-induced PCa group, as compared to the citrated-treated control group (2.67 ± 0.25% vs 0.67 ± 0.31%, p = 0.006). However, there were no significant differences found in GFP+/Sca-1+/CD45+ cell populations between the two groups (0.27 ± 0.15% vs 0.10 ± 0.10%, p = 0.334). Moreover, co-grafting of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and RM1 cells were found to promote RM1 tumor growth in vivo, and cell fusion was observed in RM-1+BMMSCs xenografts. Therefore, the data suggests that BMDCs can be recruited to the prostate during carcinogenesis, and that BMMSCs may promote the growth of PCa. PMID:27129157

  7. Steroid hormone receptors in prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Khalid, B A; Nurshireen, A; Rashidah, M; Zainal, B Y; Roslan, B A; Mahamooth, Z

    1990-06-01

    One hundred and six prostatic tissue samples obtained from transurethral resection were analysed for androgen and estrogen receptors. In 62 of these, progesterone and glucocorticoid receptors were also assayed. Steroid receptors were assayed using single saturation dose 3H-labelled ligand assays. Ninety percent of the 97 prostatic hyperplasia tissues and six of the nine prostatic carcinoma tissues were positive for androgen receptors. Estrogen receptors were only present in 19% and 33% respectively. Progesterone receptors were present in 70% of the tissues, but glucocorticoid receptors were present in only 16% of prostatic hyperplasia and none in prostatic carcinoma. PMID:1725553

  8. Experience with prostate-specific antigen in prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Romics, I; Bach, D

    1991-01-01

    A total of 71 prostatic tumour patients and 45 prostatic adenoma patients were tested for prostate-specific antigen (PSA), immunological prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) concentration as well as serum prostatic phosphatase (SPP) and enzymic serum phosphatase. It was found among untreated patients that PSA showed the highest percentage of pathologic affection in each stage. PSA, on the evidence of clearance test in the initial days of therapy and after a follow-up period of several months, gave a good picture of the course that the disease had taken.

  9. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3-dependent lung adenocarcinoma with a human monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yongjun; Ren, Xiaodi; Smith, Craig; Guo, Qianxu; Malabunga, Maria; Guernah, Ilhem; Zhang, Yiwei; Shen, Juqun; Sun, Haijun; Chehab, Nabil; Loizos, Nick; Ludwig, Dale L.; Ornitz, David M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Activating mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) have been identified in multiple types of human cancer and in congenital birth defects. In human lung cancer, fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9), a high-affinity ligand for FGFR3, is overexpressed in 10% of primary resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens. Furthermore, in a mouse model where FGF9 can be induced in lung epithelial cells, epithelial proliferation and ensuing tumorigenesis is dependent on FGFR3. To develop new customized therapies for cancers that are dependent on FGFR3 activation, we have used this mouse model to evaluate a human monoclonal antibody (D11) with specificity for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of FGFR3, that recognizes both human and mouse forms of the receptor. Here, we show that D11 effectively inhibits signaling through FGFR3 in vitro, inhibits the growth of FGFR3-dependent FGF9-induced lung adenocarcinoma in mice, and reduces tumor-associated morbidity. Given the potency of FGF9 in this mouse model and the absolute requirement for signaling through FGFR3, this study validates the D11 antibody as a potentially useful and effective reagent for treating human cancers or other pathologies that are dependent on activation of FGFR3. PMID:27056048

  10. Prostate Cancer Support Groups

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Suzanne; Garrett, Bernie; Bottorff, Joan L.; McKenzie, Michael; Han, Christina S.; Ogrodniczuk, John S.

    2015-01-01

    To understand prostate cancer (PCa) specialists’ views about prostate cancer support groups (PCSGs), a volunteer sample of Canada-based PCa specialists (n = 150), including urologists (n = 100), radiation oncologists (n = 40), and medical oncologists (n = 10) were surveyed. The 56-item questionnaire used in this study included six sets of attitudinal items to measure prostate cancer specialists’ beliefs about positive and negative influences of PCSGs, reasons for attending PCSGs, the attributes of effective PCSGs, and the value of face-to-face and web-based PCSGs. In addition, an open-ended question was included to invite additional input from participants. Results showed that PCSGs were positively valued, particularly for information sharing, education and psychosocial support. Inclusivity, privacy, and accessibility were identified as potential barriers, and recommendations were made for better marketing PCSGs to increase engagement. Findings suggest prostate cancer specialists highly valued the role and potential benefits of face-to-face PCSGs. Information provision and an educational role were perceived as key benefits. Some concerns were expressed about the ability of web-based PCSGs to effectively engage and educate men who experience prostate cancer. PMID:25061087

  11. Alendronate decreases orthotopic PC-3 prostate tumor growth and metastasis to prostate-draining lymph nodes in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Tuomela, Johanna M; Valta, Maija P; Väänänen, Kalervo; Härkönen, Pirkko L

    2008-01-01

    Background Metastatic prostate cancer is associated with a high morbidity and mortality but the spreading mechanisms are still poorly understood. The aminobisphosphonate alendronate, used to reduce bone loss, has also been shown to inhibit the invasion and migration of prostate cancer cells in vitro. We used a modified orthotopic PC-3 nude mouse tumor model of human prostate cancer to study whether alendronate affects prostate tumor growth and metastasis. Methods PC-3 cells (5 × 105) were implanted in the prostates of nude mice and the mice were treated with alendronate (0.5 mg/kg/day in PBS, s.c.) or vehicle for 4 weeks. After sacrifice, the sizes of tumor-bearing prostates were measured and the tumors and prostate-draining regional iliac and sacral lymph nodes were excised for studies on markers of proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, using histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry. Results Tumor occurrence in the prostate was 73% in the alendronate-treated group and 81% in the control group. Mean tumor size (218 mm3, range: 96–485 mm3, n = 11) in the alendronate-treated mice was 41% of that in the control mice (513 mm3, range: 209–1350 mm3, n = 13) (p < 0.05). In the iliac and sacral lymph nodes of alendronate-treated mice, the proportion of metastatic area was only about 10% of that in control mice (p < 0.001). Immunohistochemical staining of tumor sections showed that alendronate treatment caused a marked decrease in the number of CD34-positive endothelial cells in tumors (p < 0.001) and an increase in that of ISEL positive apoptotic cells in tumors as well as in lymph node metastases (p < 0.05) compared with those in the vehicle-treated mice. The density of m-LYVE-1-stained lymphatic capillaries was not changed. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that alendronate treatment opposes growth of orthotopic PC-3 tumors and decreases tumor metastasis to prostate-draining lymph nodes. This effect could be at least partly explained by

  12. Evaluation of Trastuzumab Anti-Tumor Efficacy and its Correlation with HER-2 Status in Patient-Derived Gastric Adenocarcinoma Xenograft Models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Ye, Qingqing; Lv, Jing; Ye, Peng; Sun, Yun; Fan, Shuqiong; Su, Xinying; Gavine, Paul; Yin, Xiaolu

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate trastuzumab anti-tumor efficacy and its correlation with HER-2 status in primary xenograft models derived from Chinese patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. Patient-derived gastric adenocarcinoma xenograft (PDGAX) mouse models were firstly generated by implanting gastric adenocarcinoma tissues from patients into immune deficient mice. A high degree of histological and molecular similarity between the PDGAX mouse models and their corresponding patients' gastric adenocarcinoma tissues was shown by pathological observation, HER-2 expression, HER-2 gene copy number, and mutation detection. Based on Hoffmann's criteria in gastric cancer, three models (PDGAX001, PDGAX003 and PDGAX005) were defined as HER-2 positive with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) amplification or immunohistochemistry (IHC) 2+/ 3+, while two models (PDGAX002, PDGAX004) were defined as HER-2 negative. Upon trastuzumab treatment, significant tumor regression (105 % TGI) was observed in model PDGAX005 (TP53 wt), while moderate sensitivity (26 % TGI) was observed in PDGAX003, and resistance was observed in PDGAX001, 002 and 004. A significant increase in HER-2 gene copy number was only observed in PDGAX005 (TP53 wt). Interestingly, trastuzumab showed no efficacy in PDGAX001 (HER2 IHC 3+ and FISH amplification, but with mutant TP53). Consistent with this finding, phosphor-HER2 modulation by trastuzumab was observed in model PDGAX005, but not in PDGAX001.

  13. Effects of nobiletin on PhIP-induced prostate and colon carcinogenesis in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming Xi; Ogawa, Kumiko; Asamoto, Makoto; Chewonarin, Teera; Suzuki, Shugo; Tanaka, Takuji; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the effects of nobiletin (5,6,7,8,3',4'-hexamethoxy flavone) on 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP)-induced prostate and colon carcinogenesis. PhIP was administered to 6-wk-old F344 male rats intragastrically (100 mg/kg) twice a wk for 10 wk. The animals were given 0.05% nobiletin or the basal diet for 50 wk. At the end of the experiment, serum testosterone, estrogen, and leptin did not differ between the 2 groups. The body weights of nobiletin-treated rats were significantly higher than controls (P<0.05), and feeding of nobiletin significantly reduced the relative prostate (P<0.05) and testes (P<0.05) weights as well as the Ki67 labeling index in the normal epithelium in the ventral prostate (P<0.01). The incidence and multiplicity of adenocarcinomas in nobiletin-treated ventral prostate were 50% and 36%, respectively, of controls, but the differences were not statistically significant. However, nobiletin did significantly reduce the total number of colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) compared to the control value (P<0.05). Nobiletin, therefore, may have potential for chemoprevention of early changes associated with carcinogenesis in both the prostate and colon.

  14. A Review of the Literature on Primary Leiomyosarcoma of the Prostate Gland

    PubMed Central

    Venyo, Anthony Kodzo-Grey

    2015-01-01

    Primary leiomyosarcoma of the prostate (PLSOP) is rare, with less than 200 cases reported so far. PLSOPs present with lower urinary tract symptoms, haematuria, and perineal pain; may or may not be associated with a history of previous treatment for adenocarcinoma of prostate by means of radiotherapy and or hormonal treatment; may afflict children and adult male. Examination may reveal benign enlarged prostate and hard enlarged mass. PLSOPs may be diagnosed by histological examination findings of spindle-shaped carcinoma cells in prostate specimens. Immunohistochemical staining tends to be positive for vimentin, CD44, smooth muscle actin, and calponin, focally positive for desmin, and at times positive for keratin. They stain negatively for PSA, S-100, CD34, CD117, and cytokeratin. Cytogenetic study on primary leiomyosarcoma of the prostate gland may show clonal chromosomal rearrangement involving Chromosomes 2, 3, 9, 11, and 19. On the whole the prognosis is poor. Surgery with or without chemotherapy would appear to be the mainstay of treatment for PLSOPs that are operable, but generally there is no consensus opinion on the best therapeutic approach. Most cases of PLSOPs are diagnosed in an advanced stage of the disease. A global multicenter trial is required to find therapies that would improve the prognosis. PMID:26640482

  15. Strategies to Circumvent Testosterone Surge and Disease Flare in Advanced Prostate Cancer: Emerging Treatment Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Pokuri, Venkata K; Nourkeyhani, Houman; Betsy, Bodie; Herbst, Laurie; Sikorski, Marcus; Spangenthal, Edward; Fabiano, Andrew; George, Saby

    2015-07-01

    The testosterone surge and disease flare is a feared complication from initiation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist treatment in advanced prostate adenocarcinoma. It is a common practice to start an average 7-day pretreatment regimen with an antiandrogen agent before initiating GnRH agonist therapy, to circumvent disease flare from testosterone surge. However, this might not be the best strategy and can be harmful, especially in patients at high risk of imminent organ damage from minimal testosterone surge. Surgical castration is a simple and cost-effective method that should be considered in these scenarios. But most patients refuse this procedure because of the permanent and psychologic impact of surgery. Novel GnRH antagonists, such as degarelix, and cytochrome P450 17 (CYP17) enzyme inhibitors, such as ketoconazole, achieve castrate-equivalent serum testosterone levels much faster than traditional GnRH agonists without the need for coadministration of antiandrogens. This article reports on 3 cases of impending oncologic emergencies in advanced prostate adenocarcinoma treated promptly with degarelix and ketoconazole without any disease flare related to testosterone surge. In the setting of symptomatic hormone-naïve metastatic prostate cancer, the authors suggest clinical trials using abiraterone, orteronel, and other newer agents that target the CYP17 axis (eg, ketoconazole) for fine-tuning the emergent medical castration methods and avoiding the dangers from the flare phenomenon.

  16. Benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, R J

    1997-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of benign prostatic hyperplasia reflects a complex interplay between benign prostatic enlargement, which will affect almost all men by the age of 80, and the resulting outlet obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms. The disease is now known to adversely affect the quality of life of around one man in three over the age of 50. New medical treatments and new surgical interventions are challenging the previous standard treatment of transurethral resection of prostate, which continues to have a morbidity of 17% and some mortality. Primary care will be increasingly involved in shared care with particular emphasis on monitoring of patients on watchful waiting medical therapy- and following operative intervention. PMID:9196969

  17. Polymorphisms of homologous recombination RAD51, RAD51B, XRCC2, and XRCC3 genes and the risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nowacka-Zawisza, Maria; Wiśnik, Ewelina; Wasilewski, Andrzej; Skowrońska, Milena; Forma, Ewa; Bryś, Magdalena; Różański, Waldemar; Krajewska, Wanda M

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may induce individual variations in DNA repair capacity, which may in turn contribute to the risk of cancer developing. Homologous recombination repair (HRR) plays a critical role in maintaining chromosomal integrity and protecting against carcinogenic factors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between prostate cancer risk and the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes involved in HRR, that is, RAD51 (rs1801320 and rs1801321), RAD51B (rs10483813 and rs3784099), XRCC2 (rs3218536), and XRCC3 (rs861539). Polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP and Real-Time PCR in 101 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and 216 age- and sex-matched controls. A significant relationship was detected between the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism and increased prostate cancer risk. Our results indicate that the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism may contribute to prostate cancer susceptibility in Poland. PMID:26339569

  18. Mesonephric adenocarcinoma of the uterine corpus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haixia; Zhang, Lin; Cao, Wenfeng; Hu, Yuanjing; Liu, Yixin

    2014-01-01

    Mesonephric carcinomas are rare in the female genital tract and usually are found in sites where embryonic remnants of wolffian ducts are usually detected, such as the uterine cervix, broad ligament, mesosalpinx and exceptionally rarely in the uterine corpus. To date, only four cases of mesonephric carcinomas arising in the uterine corpus have been described in literature. Here we report two cases of mesonephric carcinomas arising in a deep intramural location of the uterine corpus in a 55-year-old woman and a 62-year-old woman in Chinese populations. It is believed to be the first report in China. Both cases presented with a little postmenopausal bleeding. Before hospitalized, uterine curettages were programmed for both cases. The pathology reports were mesonephric adenocarcinoma. A total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were performed. On gross examination, the tumors of both cases were confined to the myometrium. Microscopic examination found both tumors of these two cases were adenocarcinomas mixed with spindle cell component. The most primary histologic patterns of the mesonephric adenocarcinomas were tubular glands that varied in size and were lined by one to several layers of columnar cells. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells expressed positive with CD10, calretinin, vimentin, cytokeratin (AE1/AE3) and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA); but expressions of ER and PR were completely negative. The peculiar location of mesonephric carcinoma of the uterine corpus may be misinterpreted as other histological type neoplasms. Awareness of this rare phenomenon and immunostaining for markers of mesonephric carcinoma can prevent from making a false diagnosis. PMID:25400789

  19. Pharmacotherapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, P; Indudhara, R

    1994-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a benign neoplasm of the prostate seen in men of advancing age. Microscopic evidence of the disorder is seen in about 70% of men by 70 years of age, whereas symptoms requiring some form of surgical intervention occur in 30% of men during their lifetime. Although the exact cause of benign prostatic hyperplasia is not clear, it is well recognized that high levels of intraprostatic androgens are required for the maintenance of prostatic growth. In recent years, extensive surveys of patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate reveal an 18% incidence of morbidity that has essentially not changed in the past 30 years. This procedure is also the second highest reimbursed surgical therapy under Medicare. These findings have resulted in an intensive search for alternative therapies for prostatic hyperplasia. An alternative that has now been well defined is the use of alpha-adrenergic blockers to relax the prostatic urethra. This is based on findings that a major component of benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms is spasm of the prostatic urethra and bladder neck, which is mediated by the alpha-adrenergic nerves. A second approach is to block androgens involved in maintaining prostate growth. Several such drugs are now available for clinical use, and we discuss their side effects and use. We also include the newer recommendations on evaluating benign prostatic hyperplasia that are cost-effective yet comprehensive. Images PMID:7528957

  20. Staging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Bostwick, David G; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Berney, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma (PCa) is a significant cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. Accurate staging is critical for prognosis assessment and treatment planning for PCa. Despite the large volume of clinical activity and research, the challenge to define the most appropriate and clinically relevant staging system remains. The pathologically complex and uncertain clinical course of prostate cancer further complicates the design of staging classification and a substaging system suitable for individualized care. This review will focus on recent progress and controversial issues related to prostate cancer staging. The 2010 revision of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (AJCC/UICC) tumour, node and metastasis (TNM) system is the most widely used staging system at this time. Despite general acceptance of the system as a whole, there is controversy and uncertainty about its application, particularly for T2 subclassification. The three-tiered T2 classification system for organ-confined prostate cancer is superfluous, considering the biology and anatomy of PCa. A tumour size-based substaging system may be considered in the future TNM subclassification of pT2 cancer. Lymph node status is one of the most important prognostic factors for prostate cancer. Nevertheless, clinical outcomes in patients with positive lymph nodes are variable. Identification of patients at the greatest risk of systemic progression helps in the selection of appropriate therapy. The data suggest that the inherent aggressiveness of metastatic prostate cancer is closely linked to the tumour volume of lymph node metastasis. We recommend that a future TNM staging system should consider subclassification of node-positive cancer on the basis of nodal cancer volume, using the diameter of the largest nodal metastasis and/or the number of positive nodes.

  1. Staging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Bostwick, David G; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Berney, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma (PCa) is a significant cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. Accurate staging is critical for prognosis assessment and treatment planning for PCa. Despite the large volume of clinical activity and research, the challenge to define the most appropriate and clinically relevant staging system remains. The pathologically complex and uncertain clinical course of prostate cancer further complicates the design of staging classification and a substaging system suitable for individualized care. This review will focus on recent progress and controversial issues related to prostate cancer staging. The 2010 revision of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (AJCC/UICC) tumour, node and metastasis (TNM) system is the most widely used staging system at this time. Despite general acceptance of the system as a whole, there is controversy and uncertainty about its application, particularly for T2 subclassification. The three-tiered T2 classification system for organ-confined prostate cancer is superfluous, considering the biology and anatomy of PCa. A tumour size-based substaging system may be considered in the future TNM subclassification of pT2 cancer. Lymph node status is one of the most important prognostic factors for prostate cancer. Nevertheless, clinical outcomes in patients with positive lymph nodes are variable. Identification of patients at the greatest risk of systemic progression helps in the selection of appropriate therapy. The data suggest that the inherent aggressiveness of metastatic prostate cancer is closely linked to the tumour volume of lymph node metastasis. We recommend that a future TNM staging system should consider subclassification of node-positive cancer on the basis of nodal cancer volume, using the diameter of the largest nodal metastasis and/or the number of positive nodes. PMID:22212080

  2. Parathyroid adenocarcinoma in a nephropathic Persian cat.

    PubMed

    Cavana, Paola; Vittone, Valentina; Capucchio, Maria T; Farca, Anna M

    2006-10-01

    This report describes an uncommon clinical case of cystic parathyroid adenocarcinoma. A 17-year-old male Persian cat was presented for evaluation of a ventral cervical mass. The cat was inappetent and showed weight loss, polydipsia and vomiting. Serum biochemistry and urinalysis revealed moderate hypercalcaemia, a mild increase of creatinine, isosthenuria and proteinuria. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-agarose gel electrophoresis showed a mixed tubular proteinuric pattern, in accordance with histological examination that revealed interstitial nephritis and glomerulonephritis. Diagnosis of parathyroid carcinoma was based on histopathological findings. PMID:16651017

  3. Endometrial Adenocarcinoma Presenting in a Premenopausal Patient with Tuberous Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, J. S.; Chambers, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Endometrial adenocarcinoma is very uncommon in women under 40 years of age. Case: A 39-year-old woman with tuberous sclerosis and severe intellectual disability presented with irregular bleeding unresponsive to oral contraceptive therapy. She was subsequently found to have a deeply invasive endometrial adenocarcinoma. Conclusion:…

  4. Laparoscopic treatment of mucinous urachal adenocarcinoma with mucocele.

    PubMed

    Oberndoerfer, Marine; Bucher, Pascal; Caviezel, Alessandro; Platon, Alexandra; Ott, Vincent; Egger, Jean-François; Morel, Philippe

    2009-02-01

    We present a case of an asymptomatic 76-year-old woman treated laparoscopically for an urachal mucocele owing to a nonmetastatic urachal mucinous adenocarcinoma. Since laparoscopic en bloc resection of the urachus and partial cystectomy, the patient has been healthy and disease-free for 12 months. Modern surgical treatment of urachal adenocarcinoma is discussed in the light of this case.

  5. Passive smoking and risk of oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Duan, L; Wu, A H; Sullivan-Halley, J; Bernstein, L

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have examined the association between passive smoking and the risk of oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas. In a population-based case–control study with 2474 participants in Los Angeles County, there was no evidence that passive smoking had any appreciable effect on oesophageal or gastric adenocarcinomas. PMID:19352383

  6. Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1) is regulated by androgens and enhances androgen-dependent prostate development.

    PubMed

    Keil, Kimberly P; Mehta, Vatsal; Branam, Amanda M; Abler, Lisa L; Buresh-Stiemke, Rita A; Joshi, Pinak S; Schmitz, Christopher T; Marker, Paul C; Vezina, Chad M

    2012-12-01

    Fetal prostate development from urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium requires androgen receptor (AR) activation in UGS mesenchyme (UGM). Despite growing awareness of sexually dimorphic gene expression in the UGS, we are still limited in our knowledge of androgen-responsive genes in UGM that initiate prostate ductal development. We found that WNT inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1) mRNA is more abundant in male vs. female mouse UGM in which its expression temporally and spatially overlaps androgen-responsive steroid 5α-reductase 2 (Srd5a2). Wif1 mRNA is also present in prostatic buds during their elongation and branching morphogenesis. Androgens are necessary and sufficient for Wif1 expression in mouse UGS explant mesenchyme, and testicular androgens remain necessary for normal Wif1 expression in adult mouse prostate stroma. WIF1 contributes functionally to prostatic bud formation. In the presence of androgens, exogenous WIF1 protein increases prostatic bud number and UGS basal epithelial cell proliferation without noticeably altering the pattern of WNT/β-catenin-responsive Axin2 or lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (Lef1) mRNA. Wif1 mutant male UGSs exhibit increased (Sfrp)2 and (Sfrp)3 expression and form the same number of prostatic buds as the wild-type control males. Collectively our results reveal Wif1 as one of the few known androgen-responsive genes in the fetal mouse UGM and support the hypothesis that androgen-dependent Wif1 expression is linked to the mechanism of androgen-induced prostatic bud formation.

  7. Trans-rectal interventional MRI: initial prostate biopsy experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Bernadette M.; Behluli, Meliha R.; Feller, John F.; May, Stuart T.; Princenthal, Robert; Winkel, Alex; Kaminsky, David B.

    2010-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate gland when evaluated along with T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and their corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps can yield valuable information in patients with rising or elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels1. In some cases, patients present with multiple negative trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsies, often placing the patient into a cycle of active surveillance. Recently, more patients are undergoing TRIM for targeted biopsy of suspicious findings with a cancer yield of ~59% compared to 15% for second TRUS biopsy2 to solve this diagnostic dilemma and plan treatment. Patients were imaged in two separate sessions on a 1.5T magnet using a cardiac phased array parallel imaging coil. Automated CAD software was used to identify areas of wash-out. If a suspicious finding was identified on all sequences it was followed by a second imaging session. Under MRI-guidance, cores were acquired from each target region3. In one case the microscopic diagnosis was prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), in the other it was invasive adenocarcinoma. Patient 1 had two negative TRUS biopsies and a PSA level of 9ng/mL. Patient 2 had a PSA of 7.2ng/mL. He underwent TRUS biopsy which was negative for malignancy. He was able to go on to treatment for his prostate carcinoma (PCa)4. MRI may have an important role in a subset of patients with multiple negative TRUS biopsies and elevated or rising PSA.

  8. Evaluation of glycophenotype in prostatic neoplasm by chemiluminescent assay

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Lúcia Patrícia Bezerra Gomes; de Almeida, Sinara Mônica Vitalino; de Lima, Luiza Rayanna Amorim; Cavalcanti, Carmelita de Lima Bezerra; Lira, Mariana Montenegro de Melo; da Silva, Maria da Paz Carvalho; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; Júnior, Luiz Bezerra de Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the glycophenotype in normal prostate, bening prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostatic adenocarcinoma (PCa) tissues by a chemiluminescent method. Concanavalin A (Con A), Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-I) and Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectins were conjugated to acridinium ester (lectins-AE). These conjugates remained capable to recognize their specific carbohydrates. Tissue samples were incubated with lectins-AE. The chemiluminescence of the tissue-lectin-AE complex was expressed in relative light units (RLU). Transformed tissues (0.25 cm2 by 8 µm of thickness) showed statistical significant lower α-D-glucose/mannose (BPH: 226,931 ± 17,436; PCa: 239,520 ± 12,398) and Gal-β(1-3)-GalNAc (BPH: 28,754 ± 2,157; PCa: 16,728 ± 1,204) expression than normal tissues (367,566 ± 48,550 and 409,289 ± 22,336, respectively). However, higher α-L-fucose expression was observed in PCa (251,118 ± 14,193) in relation to normal (200,979 ± 21,318) and BHP (169,758 ± 10,264) tissues. It was observed an expressive decreasing of the values of RLU by inhibition of the interaction between tissues and lectins-AE using their specific carbohydrates. The relationship between RLU and tissue area showed a linear correlation for all lectin-AE in both transformed tissues. These results indicated that the used method is an efficient tool for specific, sensitive and quantitative analyses of prostatic glycophenotype. PMID:25120756

  9. Near‑infrared fluorescence imaging of prostate cancer using heptamethine carbocyanine dyes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jianlin; Yi, Xiaomin; Yan, Fei; Wang, Fuli; Qin, Weijun; Wu, Guojun; Yang, Xiaojian; Shao, Chen; Chung, Leland W K

    2015-02-01

    Near‑infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an attractive novel modality for the detection of cancer. A previous study defined two organic polymethine cyanine dyes as ideal NIRF probes, IR‑783 and its derivative MHI‑148, which have excellent optical characteristics, superior biocompatibility and cancer targeting abilities. To investigate the feasibility of NIRF dye‑mediated prostate cancer imaging, dye uptake and subcellular co‑localization were investigated in PC‑3, DU‑145 and LNCaP human prostate cancer cells and RWPE‑1 normal prostate epithelial cells. Different organic anion transporting peptide (OATP) inhibitors were utilized to explore the potential role of the OATP subtype, including the nonspecific OATP inhibitor bromosulfophthalein, the OATP1 inhibitor 17β‑estradiol, the selective OATP1B1 inhibitor rifampicin and the selective OATP1B3 inhibitor cholecystokinin octapeptide. NIRF dyes were also used for the simulated detection of circulating tumor cells and the rapid detection of prostate cancer in human prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer xenografts in mouse models. The results revealed that the cancer‑specific uptake of these organic dyes in prostate cancer cells occurred primarily via OATP1B3. A strong NIRF signal was detected in prostate cancer tissues, but not in normal tissues that were stained with IR‑783. Prostate cancer cells were recognized with particular NIR fluorescence in isolated mononuclear cell mixtures. The results of the present study demonstrated that NIRF dye‑mediated imaging is a feasible and practicable method for prostate cancer detection, although further investigative studies are required before clinical translation.

  10. Prophylactic tamsulosin (Flomax) in patients undergoing prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy for prostate carcinoma: Final report of a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Ulchaker, James C.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Angermeier, Kenneth W.; Klein, Eric A.; Chehade, Nabil; Altman, Andrew; Ciezki, Jay P. . E-mail: ciezkj@ccf.org

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of prophylactic tamsulosin (Flomax) in reducing the urinary symptoms in patients undergoing {sup 125}I prostate implantation (PI) for prostate adenocarcinoma. Methods and materials: This is a single-institution, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial for patients undergoing PI for prostate adenocarcinoma comparing prophylactic tamsulosin versus placebo. Eligibility criteria included patients not taking tamsulosin or other {alpha}-blockers treated with PI. The patients were randomly assigned to either tamsulosin (0.8 mg, orally once a day) or matched placebo. All patients started the medication 4 days before PI and continued for 60 days. The American Urologic Association (AUA) symptom index questionnaire was used to assess urinary symptoms. The AUA questionnaire was administered before PI for a baseline score and weekly for 8 weeks after PI. Patients were taken off the study if they developed urinary retention, had intolerable urinary symptoms, or wished to discontinue with the trial. Results: One hundred twenty-six patients were enrolled in this study from November 2001 to January 2003 (118 were evaluable: 58 in the tamsulosin arm and 60 in the placebo group). Pretreatment and treatment characteristics were comparably matched between the two groups. The urinary retention rate was 17% (10 patients) in the placebo group compared with 10% (6 patients) in the tamsulosin group (p = 0.3161). Eighty-eight percent (14 patients) of those who developed urinary retention experienced it within 2 weeks after the PI. Intolerable urinary symptoms were reported equally (10 patients in each group) with 70% occurring in the first 2 weeks after PI. There was a significant difference in mean AUA score in favor of tamsulosin at Week 5 after PI (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Prophylactic tamsulosin (0.8 mg/day) before prostate brachytherapy did not significantly affect urinary retention rates, but had a positive effect on urinary morbidity at

  11. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder, mesonephroid type: a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Mahmoud; Kramer, Mario W.; Wolters, Mathias; Herrman, Thomas R.W.; Becker, Jan U.; Kreipe, Hans-Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    Primary adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare disease. It occurs in 0.5–2% of all bladder cancers and is discussed as the malignant counterpart of nephrogenic adenomas. We report a 46-year-old white female presented with gross hematuria for clinical examination. Histopathology revealed pT2, Pn1, L1, G2 adenocarcinoma of the bladder and carcinoma in situ according to the TNM classification. Computed tomography scan diagnostic was unremarkable. Patients with adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder should be treated vigorously and without time delay. Only 7 cases of adenocarcinoma in the urinary bladder (mesonephroid) have been described until now. We present a case of clear cell adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder, mesonephroid type that early diagnosed and till now 3 months after the cystectomy without symptoms and without complications. PMID:23772302

  12. Highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational control for MRI-guided prostatic thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Anthony B.; Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Gill, Harcharan; Bouley, Donna M.; Daniel, Bruce; Rieke, Viola; Butts, R. Kim; Sommer, Graham

    2004-01-01

    Transurethral ultrasound applicators with highly directional energy deposition and rotational control were investigated for precise treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and adenocarcinoma of the prostate (CaP). Two types of catheter-based applicators were fabricated, using either 90° sectored tubular (3.5 mm OD × 10 mm) or planar transducers (3.5 mm × 10 mm). They were constructed to be MRI compatible, minimally invasive and allow for manual rotation of the transducer array within a 10 mm cooling balloon. In vivo evaluations of the applicators were performed in canine prostates (n = 3) using MRI guidance (0.5 T interventional magnet). MR temperature imaging (MRTI) utilizing the proton resonance frequency shift method was used to acquire multiple-slice temperature overlays in real time for monitoring and guiding the thermal treatments. Post-treatment T1-weighted contrast-enhanced imaging and triphenyl tetrazolium chloride stained tissue sections were used to define regions of tissue coagulation. Single sonications with the 90° tubular applicator (9-15 W, 12 min, 8 MHz) produced coagulated zones covering an 80° wedge of the prostate extending from 1-2 mm outside the urethra to the outer boundary of the gland (16 mm radial coagulation). Single sonications with the planar applicator (15-20 W, 10 min, ~8 MHz) generated thermal lesions of ~30° extending to the prostate boundary. Multiple sequential sonications (sweeping) of a planar applicator (12 W with eight rotations of 30° each) demonstrated controllable coagulation of a 270° contiguous section of the prostate extending to the capsule boundary. The feasibility of using highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational capabilities to selectively coagulate regions of the prostate while monitoring and controlling the treatments with MRTI was demonstrated in this study.

  13. Association and regulation of protein factors of field effect in prostate tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Kristin N.; Jones, Anna C.; Nguyen, Julie P.T.; Antillon, Kresta S.; Janos, Sara N.; Overton, Heidi N.; Jenkins, Shannon M.; Frisch, Emily H.; Trujillo, Kristina A.; Bisoffi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Field effect or field cancerization denotes the presence of molecular aberrations in structurally intact cells residing in histologically normal tissues adjacent to solid tumors. Currently, the etiology of prostate field-effect formation is unknown and there is a prominent lack of knowledge of the underlying cellular and molecular pathways. We have previously identified an upregulated expression of several protein factors representative of prostate field effect, i.e., early growth response-1 (EGR-1), platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF-A), macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1), and fatty acid synthase (FASN) in tissues at a distance of 1 cm from the visible margin of intracapsule prostate adenocarcinomas. We have hypothesized that the transcription factor EGR-1 could be a key regulator of prostate field-effect formation by controlling the expression of PDGF-A, MIC-1, and FASN. Taking advantage of our extensive quantitative immunofluorescence data specific for EGR-1, PDGF-A, MIC-1, and FASN generated in disease-free, tumor-adjacent, and cancerous human prostate tissues, we chose comprehensive correlation as our major approach to test this hypothesis. Despite the static nature and sample heterogeneity of association studies, we show here that sophisticated data generation, such as by spectral image acquisition, linear unmixing, and digital quantitative imaging, can provide meaningful indications of molecular regulations in a physiologically relevant in situ environment. Our data suggest that EGR-1 acts as a key regulator of prostate field effect through induction of pro-proliferative (PDGF-A and FASN), and suppression of pro-apoptotic (MIC-1) factors. These findings were corroborated by computational promoter analyses and cell transfection experiments in non-cancerous prostate epithelial cells with ectopically induced and suppressed EGR-1 expression. Among several clinical applications, a detailed knowledge of pathways of field effect may lead to the

  14. Pseudohyperplastic prostatic carcinoma in simple prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Arista-Nasr, Julián; Martinez-Benitez, Braulio; Fernandez-Amador, Jose Antonio; Bornstein-Quevedo, Leticia; Arceo-Olaiz, Ricardo; Albores-Saavedra, Jorge

    2011-06-01

    Pseudohyperplastic carcinoma (PHPC) is a prostatic neoplasm that can be easily mistaken for nodular hyperplasia or atypical adenomatous hyperplasia. To determine the frequency and clinicopathologic characteristics of PHPC, we reviewed 200 simple prostatectomy specimens. We found 3 cases (1.5%) of PHPC. The tumors were small and ranged in size from 4 to 6 mm. Two of them were erroneously diagnosed as benign glandular proliferations in the original interpretation. Their histologic aspect at low magnification showed nodules of well-differentiated medium-sized glands with cystic dilation in a tight arrangement that imparted a benign appearance. Corpora amylacea were found in 2 cases. However, the lining cells showed nucleomegaly and prominent nuclei in most of the neoplastic glands, and the high-molecular-weight keratin (34BE12) immunostain revealed absence of basal cells. α-Methylacyl-CoA-racemase was positive in 2 cases. In one case, a small focus of moderated acinar adenocarcinoma was found adjacent to the pseudohyperplastic glands facilitating the diagnosis. The 3 patients are disease-free 3 and 4 years after surgery probably because of the small size of the tumors; however, it must be emphasized that most PHPC are considered moderately differentiated and potentially aggressive neoplasms.

  15. Aggressive papillary adenocarcinoma on atypical localization

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Mecdi Gurhan; Tayfur, Mahir; Deger, Ayse Nur; Cimen, Orhan; Eken, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma (ADPA) is a rare sweat gland tumor that is found on the fingers, toes, and the digits. To date, <100 cases have been reported in the literature. Apart from 1 case reported in the thigh, all of them were on digital or nondigital acral skin. Case presentation: A 67-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to the hospital due to a mass on the scalp. This lesion was present for almost a year. It was a semimobile cyctic mass that elevated the scalp. There was no change in the skin color. Its dimensions were 1.5 × 1 × 0.6 cm. The laboratory, clinic, and radiologic findings (head x-ray) of the patient were normal. It was evaluated as a benign lesion such as lipoma or epidermal cyst by a surgeon due to a small semimobile mass and no erosion of the skull. It was excised by a local surgery excision. The result of the pathologic examination was aggressive papillary adenocarcinoma. This diagnosis is synonymous with ADPA. Conclusion: In our case, localization was scalp. This localization is the first for this tumor in the literature. In addition, another atypical localization of this tumor (ADPA) is thigh in the literature. This case was presented due to both the rare and atypical localizations. That is why, in our opinion, revision of “digital” term in ADPA is necessary due to seem in atypical localizations like thigh and scalp. PMID:27428196

  16. Neoadjuvant treatment for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, John; Solomon, Naveenraj L; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States in both men and women, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Surgical resection remains the only curative treatment, but most patients develop systemic recurrence within 2 years of surgery. Adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival, but the delivery of treatment remains problematic with up to 50% of patients not receiving postoperative treatment. Neoadjuvant therapy can provide benefits of eradication of micrometastasis and improved delivery of intended treatment. We have reviewed the findings from completed neoadjuvant clinical trials, and discussed the ongoing studies. Combinational cytotoxic chemotherapy such as fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab)-paclitaxel, active in the metastatic setting, are being studied in the neoadjuvant setting. In addition, novel targeted agents such as inhibitor of immune checkpoint are incorporated with cytotoxic chemotherapy in early-phase clinical trial. Furthermore we have explored the utility of biomarkers which can personalize treatment and select patients for target-driven therapy to improve treatment outcome. The treatment of resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma requires multidisciplinary approach and novel strategies including innovative trials to make progress. PMID:26862486

  17. s-SHIP expression identifies a subset of murine basal prostate cells as neonatal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Brocqueville, Guillaume; Chmelar, Renee S.; Bauderlique-Le Roy, Hélène; Deruy, Emeric; Tian, Lu; Vessella, Robert L.; Greenberg, Norman M.; Bourette, Roland P.

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of prostate stem cells (PSCs) is crucial for understanding their biology during normal development and tumorigenesis. In this aim, we used a transgenic mouse model expressing GFP from the stem cell-specific s-SHIP promoter to mark putative stem cells during postnatal prostate development. Here we show that cells identified by GFP expression are present transiently during early prostate development and localize to the basal cell layer of the epithelium. These prostate GFP+ cells are a subpopulation of the Lin− CD24+ Sca-1+ CD49f+ cells and are capable of self-renewal together with enhanced growth potential in sphere-forming assay in vitro, a phenotype consistent with that of a PSC population. Transplantation assays of prostate GFP+ cells demonstrate reconstitution of prostate ducts containing both basal and luminal cells in renal grafts. Altogether, these results demonstrate that s-SHIP promoter expression is a new marker for neonatal basal prostate cells exhibiting stem cell properties that enables PSCs in situ identification and isolation via a single consistent parameter. Transcriptional profiling of these GFP+ neonatal stem cells showed an increased expression of several components of the Wnt signaling pathway. It also identified stem cell regulators with potential applications for further analyses of normal and cancer stem cells. PMID:27081082

  18. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Prostate Epithelial Homeostasis by Androgen Receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Boyu; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Henry, Gervaise; Malewska, Alicia; Wei, Xing; Zhang, Li; Brinkley, William; Zhang, Yiqun; Castro, Patricia D; Titus, Mark; Chen, Rui; Sayeeduddin, Mohammad; Raj, Ganesh V; Mauck, Ryan; Roehrborn, Claus; Creighton, Chad J; Strand, Douglas W; Ittmann, Michael M; Xin, Li

    2016-09-15

    Prostate inflammation has been suggested as an etiology for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We show that decreased expression of the androgen receptor (AR) in luminal cells of human BPH specimens correlates with a higher degree of regional prostatic inflammation. However, the cause-and-effect relationship between the two events remains unclear. We investigated specifically whether attenuating AR activity in prostate luminal cells induces inflammation. Disrupting luminal cell AR signaling in mouse models promotes cytokine production cell-autonomously, impairs epithelial barrier function, and induces immune cell infiltration, which further augments local production of cytokines and chemokines including Il-1 and Ccl2. This inflammatory microenvironment promotes AR-independent prostatic epithelial proliferation, which can be abolished by ablating IL-1 signaling or depleting its major cellular source, the macrophages. This study demonstrates that disrupting luminal AR signaling promotes prostate inflammation, which may serve as a mechanism for resistance to androgen-targeted therapy for prostate-related diseases. PMID:27594448

  19. What Tests Can Detect Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate cancer early detection What tests can detect prostate cancer early? The tests discussed below are used to ... also found in the blood. Most men without prostate cancer have PSA levels under 4 nanograms per milliliter ( ...

  20. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Cancer.gov

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  1. Giant prostatic fossa with misleading radiographic features.

    PubMed

    Stenzl, A; Fuchs, G J

    1989-01-01

    The long-term complication of a perforation of the prostatic capsule during transurethral resection of the prostate is described. Calcifications in a giant prostatic fossa led to initially misleading radiologic findings.

  2. Cancer of the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 180,890 % of All New Cancer Cases 10.7% Estimated Deaths in 2016 26,120 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 2,850,139 men living with prostate cancer ...

  3. [Grading of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, G; Roth, W; Helpap, B

    2016-07-01

    The current grading of prostate cancer is based on the classification system of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) following a consensus conference in Chicago in 2014. The foundations are based on the frequently modified grading system of Gleason. This article presents a brief description of the development to the current ISUP grading system. PMID:27393141

  4. [Chemotherapy for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Rauchenwald, Michael; De Santis, Maria; Fink, Eleonore; Höltl, Wolfgang; Kramer, Gero; Marei, Isabella-Carolina; Neumann, Hans-Jörg; Reissigl, Andreas; Schmeller, Nikolaus; Stackl, Walter; Hobisch, Alfred; Krainer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    For many years the benefit of chemotherapy in patients with prostate cancer was thought to be limited to palliation of late-stage disease, and thus this treatment option only became involved in patient care towards the end of the disease process, if at all. However, two landmark phase-III trials with docetaxel-based therapy (TAX 327 and Southwest Oncology Group, SWOG, 9916) have shown a survival benefit for patients with hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) thus prompting a change in patterns of care. With raising interest for chemotherapeutic options and clinical trials for new drugs and new indications (neoadjuvant therapy, adjuvant therapy, increasing PSA levels after local treatment, and hormone sensitive cancer) under way our goal was to review within the context of a multidisciplinary team the available evidence and explore the standard for the medical treatment of prostate cancer outside of clinical trials. We are carefully evaluating the current treatment recommendations based on the available evidence and highlight potential future treatment options but also discuss important clinical topics (treatment until progression versus the advantage of chemo holidays, definition of particular patient subgroups and potential second line options) for which there are no clear cut answers to date. The role and importance of radiotherapy, biphosphonate treatment and the medical management of pain and side effects is also discussed. The multitude of treatment options for patients with advanced prostate cancer clearly asks for a close collaboration between urologists, medical oncologists and radiation therapists. PMID:18726672

  5. Detection of brain metastasis with 68Ga-labeled PSMA ligand PET/CT: a novel radiotracer for imaging of prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Partha Sarathi; Kumar, Rajiv; Tripathi, Madhavi; Das, Chandan Jyoti; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2015-04-01

    Brain metastasis in prostate cancer is rare and not expected at initial presentation especially when the patient is asymptomatic for the same. A 45-year-old male patient undergoing initial evaluation for newly diagnosed prostatic adenocarcinoma was referred to our department for 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy. As part of the study protocol, he also underwent Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys-(Ahx)-[Ga-68(HBED-CC)] (68Ga-PSMA) PET/CT, which revealed tracer accumulation in brain lesions, apart from localization in the primary, lymph node, and bone metastases. A subsequent MR evaluation confirmed brain metastases.

  6. Variability in diagnostic opinion among pathologists for single small atypical foci in prostate biopsies.

    PubMed

    Van der Kwast, Theodorus H; Evans, Andrew; Lockwood, Gina; Tkachuk, Doug; Bostwick, David G; Epstein, Jonathan I; Humphrey, Peter A; Montironi, Rodolfo; Van Leenders, Geert J L H; Pihl, Carl-Gustaf; Neetens, Ingrid; Kujala, Paula M; Laurila, Marita; Mazerolles, Catharine; Bubendorf, Lukas; Finelli, Antonio; Watson, Kemp; Srigley, John

    2010-02-01

    Pathologists are increasingly exposed to prostate biopsies with small atypical foci, requiring differentiation between adenocarcinoma, atypical small acinar proliferation suspicious for malignancy, and a benign diagnosis. We studied the level of agreement for such atypical foci among experts in urologic pathology and all-round reference pathologists of the European Randomized Screening study of Prostate Cancer (ERSPC). For this purpose, we retrieved 20 prostate biopsies with small (most <1 mm) atypical foci. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides, including 10 immunostained slides were digitalized for virtual microscopy. The lesional area was not marked. Five experts and 7 ERSPC pathologists examined the cases. Multirater kappa statistics was applied to determine agreement and significant differences between experts and ERSPC pathologists. The kappa value of experts (0.39; confidence interval, 0.29-0.49) was significantly higher than that of ERSPC pathologists (0.21; confidence interval, 0.14-0.27). Full (100%) agreement was reached by the 5 experts for 7 of 20 biopsies. Experts and ERSPC pathologists rendered diagnoses ranging from benign to adenocarcinoma on the same biopsy in 5 and 9 biopsies, respectively. Most of these lesions comprised between 2 and 5 atypical glands. The experts diagnosed adenocarcinoma (49%) more often than the ERSPC pathologists (32%) (P<0.001). As agreement was particularly poor for foci comprising <6 glands, we would encourage pathologists to obtain intercollegial consultation of a specialized pathologist for these lesions before a carcinoma diagnosis, whereas clinicians may consider to perform staging biopsies before engaging on deferred or definite therapy. PMID:20061936

  7. Cabazitaxel Plus Prednisone With Octreotide For Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) Previously Treated With Docetaxel

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-21

    Diarrhea; Hormone-resistant Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  8. Preliminary studies of fluorescence image-guided photothermal therapy of human oesophageal adenocarcinoma in vivo using multifunctional gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabavi, Elham; Singh, Mohan; Zhou, Yu; Gallina, Maria Elena; Zhao, Hailin; Ma, Daqing; Cass, Anthony; Hanna, George; Elson, Daniel S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a preliminary in vivo study of fluorescence imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) of human oesophageal adenocarcinoma using multi-functionalised gold nanorods (GNRs). After establishing tumour xenograft in mouse functionalised GNRs were administrated intravenously (IV). Fluorescence imaging was performed to detect the tumour area. The intensity of the fluorescence signal varied significantly across the tumour site and surrounding tissues. PTT was then performed using a 808 nm continuous wave diode laser to irradiate the tumour for 3 minutes, inducing a temperature rise of ~44°C, which photothermally ablated the tumour.

  9. Mouse DNA contamination in human tissue tested for XMRV

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We used a PCR-based approach to study the prevalence of genetic sequences related to a gammaretrovirus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus, XMRV, in human prostate cancer. This virus has been identified in the US in prostate cancer patients and in those with chronic fatigue syndrome. However, with the exception of two patients in Germany, XMRV has not been identified in prostate cancer tissue in Europe. Most putative associations of new or old human retroviruses with diseases have turned out to be due to contamination. We have looked for XMRV sequences in DNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin- embedded prostate tissues. To control for contamination, PCR assays to detect either mouse mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or intracisternal A particle (IAP) long terminal repeat DNA were run on all samples, owing to their very high copy number in mouse cells. Results In general agreement with the US prevalence, XMRV-like sequences were found in 4.8% of prostate cancers. However, these were also positive, as were 21.5% of XMRV-negative cases, for IAP sequences, and many, but not all were positive for mtDNA sequences. Conclusions These results show that contamination with mouse DNA is widespread and detectable by the highly sensitive IAP assay, but not always with less sensitive assays, such as murine mtDNA PCR. This study highlights the ubiquitous presence of mouse DNA in laboratory specimens and offers a means of rigorous validation for future studies of murine retroviruses in human disease. PMID:21171966

  10. Ghrelin relieves cancer cachexia associated with the development of lung adenocarcinoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Tsubouchi, Hironobu; Yanagi, Shigehisa; Miura, Ayako; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2014-11-15

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial, critical illness syndrome characterized by an ongoing loss of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The reductions in body weight and skeletal muscle mass are important prognostic indicators for cancer patients that are refractory to current therapies. Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor, is produced in the stomach, stimulates food intake and growth hormone secretion, suppresses inflammation, and prevents muscle catabolism. We investigated the pharmacological potential of ghrelin in the treatment of cancer cachexia by using urethane-treated, bronchioalveolar epithelium-specific Pten-deficient mice that developed lung adenocarcinomas. Ghrelin or phosphate-buffered saline was given to mice daily for four weeks beginning at five months after urethane injection, which corresponded to the time point of lung adenocarcinoma formation. Ghrelin inhibited the inductions of C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6, mitigated the reduction of food intake and fat mass, and consequently ameliorated body weight loss in the mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma. We also demonstrated that skeletal muscle mass and muscle contraction force in both fast-twitch muscle and slow-twitch muscle were retained in ghrelin-treated mice in conjunction with an upregulation of local insulin-like growth factor 1/Akt signaling. In addition, ghrelin administration reduced the expressions of phosphorylated-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphorylated-nuclear factor-kappa B, Forkhead box protein O1, muscle RING-finger protein-1, and F-Box protein 32 in the lysates of skeletal muscle in the tumor-bearing state. Our results indicate that ghrelin administration exerts a protective effect against cancer cachexia by ameliorating skeletal muscle wasting and regulating systemic inflammation.

  11. Complications associated with preoperative radiation therapy and Iodine-125 brachytherapy for localized prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Flanigan, R.C.; Patterson, J.; Mendiondo, O.A.; Gee, W.F.; Lucas, B.A.; McRoberts, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-five consecutive patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with 1,050 rad preoperative radiation therapy and Iodine-125 seed brachytherapy are reviewed. Significant long-term postoperative complications included radiation cystitis (12%), radiation proctitis (4%), genital and leg edema (12%), stress incontinence (8%), total incontinence (4%), and impotence (26%). Complications occurred in 75 per cent of patients who received additional postoperative radiation. Improved staging with CT scan, lymphangiography, and Chiba needle biopsy of any possibly abnormal lymph nodes provided excellent preoperative staging with only 1 patient (6%) upstaged at surgery to Stage D1.

  12. Sensorimotor polyneuropathy and foot-drop as result of a prostate cancer paraneoplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bodkin, John J; Duff, Michael; Seereiter, Phillip J; Chevli, K Kent

    2013-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) vary in incidence and manifestation based on tumor histology. PNS secondary to urologic malignancies have an extremely low incidence. Most reported cases of PNS from urologic malignancies are associated with adenocarcinoma. Peripheral neuropathy-associated PNS from urologic malignancy are exceedingly rare. An 80-year-old male developed a paraneoplastic sensorimotor polyneuropathy and foot-drop after a diagnosis of clinical stage T2cN0M0, Gleason grade 5+4 prostate cancer. A thorough workup is needed in order to adequately assess and treat PNS. Careful analysis must be used to determine the root cause of a patient’s symptoms. PMID:24400247

  13. Botanical derivatives for the prostate.

    PubMed

    Cristoni, A; Di Pierro, F; Bombardelli, E

    2000-08-01

    The prostate, after the age of 45 years, may undergo benign hyperplasia (BPH). Its etiology has not yet been completely explained, but different factors play a major role in its occurrence, among them, the sexual hormones (with a fundamental role of 5 alpha reductase). The 5-alpha reductase activity and inflammatory aspects in the prostate tissue can be effectively controlled with the use of highly standardized plant extracts (Pygeum africanum, Serenoa repens, etc.), which yield excellent results in the prophylaxis and treatment of the symptoms linked to prostate hypertrophy. The prostate tissue is not affected only by benign diseases but may also be subject to neoplastic transformation. From an epidemiological point of view, a vegetable derivative, lycopene, was linked with a lower occurrence of prostate carcinoma. A recent clinical study demonstrated that lycopene might not only prevent prostate cancer but also have therapeutic effects.

  14. Prostate cancer markers: An update

    PubMed Central

    PENTYALA, SRINIVAS; WHYARD, TERRY; PENTYALA, SAHANA; MULLER, JOHN; PFAIL, JOHN; PARMAR, SUNJIT; HELGUERO, CARLOS G.; KHAN, SARDAR

    2016-01-01

    As the most common noncutaneous malignancy in American men, prostate cancer currently accounts for 29% of all diagnosed cancers, and ranks second as the cause of cancer fatality in American men. Prostatic cancer is rarely symptomatic early in its course and therefore disease presentation often implies local extension or even metastatic disease. Thus, it is extremely critical to detect and diagnose prostate cancer in its earliest stages, often prior to the presentation of symptoms. Three of the most common techniques used to detect prostate cancer are the digital rectal exam, the transrectal ultrasound, and the use of biomarkers. This review presents an update regarding the field of prostate cancer biomarkers and comments on future biomarkers. Although there is not a lack of research in the field of prostate cancer biomarkers, the discovery of a novel biomarker that may have the advantage of being more specific and effective warrants future scientific inquiry. PMID:26998261

  15. Prostate cancer stem cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunyan; Yao, Zhi; Jiang, Yuan; Keller, Evan. T.

    2012-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model provides insights into pathophysiology of cancers and their therapeutic response. The CSC model has been both controversial, yet provides a foundation to explore cancer biology. In this review, we provide an overview of CSC concepts, biology and potential therapeutic avenues. We then focus on prostate CSC including (1) their purported origin as either basal-derived or luminal-derived cells; (2) markers used for prostate CSC identification; (3) alterations of signaling pathways in prostate CSCs (4) involvement of prostate CSCs in metastasis of PCa and (5) microRNA-mediated regulation of prostate CSCs. Although definitive evidence for the identification and characterization of prostate CSCs still remains unclear, future directions pursuing therapeutic targets of CSCs may provide novel insights for the treatment of PCa. PMID:22402315

  16. Vaccine immunotherapy for prostate cancer: from mice to men.

    PubMed

    Lubaroff, David M; Vaena, Daniel; Brown, James A; Zehr, Pamela; Griffith, Karen C; Brown, Erica; Eastman, Julie; Nepple, Kenneth; Kattula, Ambika; Williams, Richard D

    2014-08-01

    Preclinical studies demonstrated the ability of an adenovirus/PSA (Ad/PSA) vaccine to induce strong anti-PSA immune responses, and these responses were capable of destroying prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-secreting mouse prostate tumors. A series of preclinical studies have demonstrated the superiority of the Ad/PSA vaccine to other PSA vaccines for the induction of anti-PSA immune responses, the ability of Ad/PSA vaccination combined with cytokine gene therapy and the TLR9 agonist CpG to enhance the anti-prostate tumor immunotherapy, and the reduction of negative regulatory elements when the vaccine was combined with 5-fluoruracil administration. A phase I clinical trial of the Ad/PSA vaccine in men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer demonstrated the safety of the vaccine even at the highest single dose permitted by the FDA. Currently, a phase II trial of the Ad/PSA vaccine is underway treating patients in two protocols. Thus far 81 patients have been enrolled and vaccinated. Early results from the patients evaluated to date demonstrated the induction of anti-PSA T cell responses, and the majority of patients evaluated at this time had demonstrated an increase in PSA doubling times. PMID:24847764

  17. Prolactin-induced prostate tumorigenesis links sustained Stat5 signaling with the amplification of basal/stem cells and emergence of putative luminal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Chiche, Aurélie; Mosquera-Garrote, Nerea; Boutillon, Florence; Cordier, Corinne; Pourmir, Ivan; Pascual-Mathey, Luz; Kessal, Karima; Pigat, Natascha; Camparo, Philippe; Goffin, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Current androgen ablation therapies for prostate cancer are initially successful, but the frequent development of castration resistance urges the generation of alternative therapies and represents an important health concern. Prolactin/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) signaling is emerging as a putative target for alternative treatment for prostate cancer. However, mechanistic data for its role in development or progression of prostate tumors are scarce. In vivo mouse studies found that local prolactin induced the amplification of prostate epithelial basal/stem cells. Because these cells are proposed cells of origin for prostate cancer and disease recurrence, we looked further into this amplification. Our results indicated that sustained Stat5 activation was associated with the occurrence of abnormal basal/stem cell clusters in prostate epithelium of prostate-specific prolactin-transgenic mice. Analysis of epithelial areas containing these clusters found high proliferation, Stat5 activation, and expression of stem cell antigen 1. Furthermore, enhanced prolactin signaling also led to amplification of a luminal cell population that was positive for stem cell antigen 1. These cells may originate from amplified basal/stem cells and might represent important progenitors for tumor development in prostate epithelium. These data provide a deeper understanding of the initial stages of prostate tumorigenesis induced by prolactin to help determine whether this hormone or its downstream messengers could be useful targets for prostate cancer treatment in the future.

  18. Prostatic Stromal Hyperplasia with Atypia

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Ryan C.; Wu, Kevin J.; Cheville, John C.; Thiel, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Prostatic stromal hyperplasia with atypia (PSHA) is a rare histologic finding diagnosed incidentally on prostate biopsies, transurethral resection specimens, and radical prostatectomy specimens. PSHA has a bizarre histologic appearance and these lesions often raise concern for sarcoma; however, their clinical course is indolent and does not include extraprostatic progression. We discuss a case of PHSA discovered on prostate biopsy performed for an abnormal digital rectal examination and review the literature on this rare pathologic finding. PMID:23781384

  19. Prostatic stromal hyperplasia with atypia.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Ryan C; Wu, Kevin J; Cheville, John C; Thiel, David D

    2013-01-01

    Prostatic stromal hyperplasia with atypia (PSHA) is a rare histologic finding diagnosed incidentally on prostate biopsies, transurethral resection specimens, and radical prostatectomy specimens. PSHA has a bizarre histologic appearance and these lesions often raise concern for sarcoma; however, their clinical course is indolent and does not include extraprostatic progression. We discuss a case of PHSA discovered on prostate biopsy performed for an abnormal digital rectal examination and review the literature on this rare pathologic finding. PMID:23781384

  20. VEGF neutralizing aerosol therapy in primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Virginie; Rabbe, Nathalie; Guilleminault, Laurent; Paul, Flora; Schlick, Laurène; Azzopardi, Nicolas; Duruisseaux, Michael; Fouquenet, Delphine; Montharu, Jérôme; Redini, Françoise; Paintaud, Gilles; Lemarié, Etienne; Cadranel, Jacques; Wislez, Marie; Heuzé-Vourc'h, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    K-ras mutations promote angiogenesis in lung cancer and contribute to the drug resistance of cancer cells. It is not clear whether K-ras mutated adenocarcinomas are sensitive to anti-angiogenic therapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Anti-angiogenic mAbs are usually delivered systemically, but only a small proportion reaches the lung after intravenous injection. We investigated the relevance of a non-invasive pulmonary route for the delivery of anti-VEGF mAbs in the mouse K-ras(LA1) model. We found that pulmonary delivery of these mAbs significantly reduced the number of tumor lesions and inhibited malignant progression. The antitumor effect involves the VEGFR2-dependent inhibition of blood vessel growth, which impairs tumor proliferation. Pharmacokinetic analysis of aerosolized anti-VEGF showed its low rate of passage into the bloodstream, suggesting that this delivery route is associated with reduced systemic side effects. Our findings highlight the value of the aerosol route for administration of anti-angiogenic mAbs in pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations. PMID:25484066

  1. Secondhand Tobacco Smoke Exposure and Lung Adenocarcinoma In Situ/Minimally Invasive Adenocarcinoma (AIS/MIA).

    PubMed

    Kim, Claire H; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Hung, Rayjean J; Boffetta, Paolo; Xie, Dong; Wampfler, Jason A; Cote, Michele L; Chang, Shen-Chih; Ugolini, Donatella; Neri, Monica; Le Marchand, Loic; Schwartz, Ann G; Morgenstern, Hal; Christiani, David C; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke on the incidence of lung adenocarcinoma in situ/minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (AIS/MIA). Data from seven case-control studies participating in the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO) were pooled, resulting in 625 cases of AIS/MIA and 7,403 controls, of whom 170 cases and 3,035 controls were never smokers. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted ORs (ORadj) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), controlling for age, sex, race, smoking status (ever/never), and pack-years of smoking. Study center was included in the models as a random-effects intercept term. Ever versus never exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke was positively associated with AIS/MIA incidence in all subjects (ORadj = 1.48; 95% CI, 1.14-1.93) and in never smokers (ORadj = 1.45; 95% CI, 1.00-2.12). There was, however, appreciable heterogeneity of ORadj across studies (P = 0.01), and the pooled estimates were largely influenced by one large study (40% of all cases and 30% of all controls). These findings provide weak evidence for an effect of secondhand tobacco smoke exposure on AIS/MIA incidence. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of secondhand tobacco smoke exposure using the newly recommended classification of subtypes of lung adenocarcinoma.

  2. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Abusamra, Ashraf; Murshid, Esam; Kushi, Hussain; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Al-Mansour, Mubarak; Saadeddin, Ahmad; Rabah, Danny; Bazarbashi, Shouki; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Alghamdi, Abdullah; Alghamdi, Khalid; Alsharm, Abdullah; Ahmad, Imran

    2016-01-01

    This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7(th) edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors) who were selected by the Saudi oncology society and Saudi urological association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health care policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate to. PMID:27141178

  3. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abusamra, Ashraf; Murshid, Esam; Kushi, Hussain; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Al-Mansour, Mubarak; Saadeddin, Ahmad; Rabah, Danny; Bazarbashi, Shouki; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Alghamdi, Abdullah; Alghamdi, Khalid; Alsharm, Abdullah; Ahmad, Imran

    2016-01-01

    This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors) who were selected by the Saudi oncology society and Saudi urological association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health care policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate to. PMID:27141178

  4. Targeting cancer cell metabolism in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Romain; Neuzillet, Cindy; Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï; Faivre, Sandrine; de Gramont, Armand; Raymond, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer death by 2030. Current therapeutic options are limited, warranting an urgent need to explore innovative treatment strategies. Due to specific microenvironment constraints including an extensive desmoplastic stroma reaction, PDAC faces major metabolic challenges, principally hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Their connection with oncogenic alterations such as KRAS mutations has brought metabolic reprogramming to the forefront of PDAC therapeutic research. The Warburg effect, glutamine addiction, and autophagy stand as the most important adaptive metabolic mechanisms of cancer cells themselves, however metabolic reprogramming is also an important feature of the tumor microenvironment, having a major impact on epigenetic reprogramming and tumor cell interactions with its complex stroma. We present a comprehensive overview of the main metabolic adaptations contributing to PDAC development and progression. A review of current and future therapies targeting this range of metabolic pathways is provided. PMID:26164081

  5. Oncocytic adenocarcinoma arising in Warthin's tumor.

    PubMed

    Bengoechea, O; Sánchez, F; Larrínaga, B; Martínez-Peñuela, J M

    1989-12-01

    Warthin's tumor (adenolymphoma) is a monomorphous adenoma of the salivary glands well characterized histologically. Its clinical evolution is almost invariably benign, the malignant change being extremely unusual. We present the case of a 67 year-old man with a right retromandibular tumor which has evolved over a two year period, with peripheral involvement of V, VI and VII cranial nerves on the same side, and direct invasion of intracranial structures. The biopsy revealed a classic adenolymphoma which shows foci of well differentiated adenocarcinoma. Transitional areas between benign and malignant epithelium were evident. In addition, histological findings support the hypothesis of the origin of adenolymphoma from epithelial ducts trapped in the regional lymphatic tissue.

  6. Prostatic Leiomyoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mellas, Soufiane; Bouchikhi, Ahmed Amine; Tazi, Mohammed-Fadl; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Elammari, Jalal-Eddin; El Fassi, Mohammed-Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic enlargement due to benign adenomatous hyperplasia is very common in elderly males. However, benign mesenchymal tumors especially true leiomyoma of the prostate are rare. We describe a 68-year-old male presenting a urinary obstruction lasting more than two years. The patient was referred for an acute urinary retention. The clinical examination was normal. The perrectal examination revealed an enlarged prostate without abnormalities. An endoscopic resection was performed. The histopathological examination revealed a benign smooth muscle tumor with absence of glandular hyperplasia; the result was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Accordingly, the diagnosis of true leiomyoma of the prostate was made. PMID:23198266

  7. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wibmer, Andreas G; Burger, Irene A; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig; Weber, Wolfgang A; Vargas, Hebert Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among men in the Western world. The natural history and clinical course of prostate cancer are markedly diverse, ranging from small indolent intraprostatic lesions to highly aggressive disseminated disease. An understanding of this biologic heterogeneity is considered a necessary requisite in the quest for the adoption of precise and personalized management strategies. Molecular imaging offers the potential for noninvasive assessment of the biologic interactions underpinning prostate carcinogenesis. Currently, numerous molecular imaging probes are in clinical use or undergoing preclinical or clinical evaluation. These probes can be divided into those that image increased cell metabolism, those that target prostate cancer-specific membrane proteins and receptor molecules, and those that bind to the bone matrix adjacent to metastases to bone. The increased metabolism and vascular changes in prostate cancer cells can be evaluated with radiolabeled analogs of choline, acetate, glucose, amino acids, and nucleotides. The androgen receptor, prostate-specific membrane antigen, and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (ie, bombesin) are overexpressed in prostate cancer and can be targeted by specific radiolabeled imaging probes. Because metastatic prostate cancer cells induce osteoblastic signaling pathways of adjacent bone tissue, bone-seeking radiotracers are sensitive tools for the detection of metastases to bone. Knowledge about the underlying biologic processes responsible for the phenotypes associated with the different stages of prostate cancer allows an appropriate choice of methods and helps avoid pitfalls. PMID:26587888

  8. Prostate resection - minimally invasive - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Laser prostatectomy - discharge; Transurethral needle ablation - discharge; TUNA - discharge; Transurethral incision - discharge; TUIP - discharge; Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate - discharge; HoLep - discharge; Interstitial laser ...

  9. Duodenal adenocarcinoma presenting as a mass with aneurismal dilatation.

    PubMed

    Mama, Nadia; Ben Slama, Aïda; Arifa, Nadia; Kadri, Khaled; Sriha, Badreddine; Ksiaa, Mehdi; Jemni, Hela; Tlili-Graiess, Kalthoum

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal adenocarcinoma is frequent. Aneurysmal dilatation of the small bowel is reported to be a lymphoma characteristic imaging finding. A 57-year-old male was found to have a duodenal adenocarcinoma with aneurismal dilatation on imaging which is an exceptional feature. On laparotomy, the wall thickening of the dilated duodenum extended to the first jejunal loop, with multiple mesenteric lymph nodes and ascites. Segmental palliative resection with gastro-entero-anastomosis was done. Histopathology revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma with neuro-endocrine differentiation foci. Wide areas of necrosis and vascular emboli were responsible for the radiological feature of the dilated duodenum with wall thickening.

  10. Primary Adenocarcinoma of an Ileostomy in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Meena A.; Lo, Amy; Bellaguarda, Emanuelle; Strong, Scott; Hanauer, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Although Crohn's disease has been associated with an increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma, primary adenocarcinoma arising from an ileostomy is a complication that has been rarely documented in Crohn's disease. Chronic small bowel inflammation may lead to development of malignancy through the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. We report a case of a 61-year-old woman with Crohn's ileocolitis diagnosed with a primary adenocarcinoma at the ileostomy with metastases to the liver 47 years after proctocolectomy, and review the literature. PMID:27622191

  11. New trends in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and carcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Petrovich, Z; Ameye, F; Baert, L; Bichler, K H; Boyd, S D; Brady, L W; Bruskewitz, R C; Dixon, C; Perrin, P; Watson, G M

    1993-06-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a very common condition affecting over 800,000 American males each year. A standard, effective, and well-proven therapy is prostatectomy. This surgical procedure is used to treat, in the United States, approximately 400,000 BPH patients annually. Major treatment benefit is expected in 70% to 80% of patients. Complications are seen in 20% of the surgically treated patients. Due to the advanced age of BPH patients and the presence of other serious coexisting medical problems, surgical therapy may be difficult to utilize. These patients, who present a high risk for surgery, are in need of alternative treatments. Alternative therapy in BPH patients with clinically important symptoms and signs of urinary outflow obstruction include treatment with pharmacological agents, balloon dilatation, laser beam therapy, transurethral thermal therapy, transrectal microwave hyperthermia, and transurethral microwave hyperthermia. These alternative treatment modalities are currently under intensive study. These new treatment modalities ultimately must be compared with the standard treatment, which is prostatectomy. Due to the unpredictable natural history of BPH, it is desirable that each Phase III study should contain a no-treatment observation-only arm. Adenocarcinoma of the prostate (CaP) has become a tumor, which first in frequency, and second in importance in cancer mortality statistics of American males. Local tumor control rates and long-term survivals, with radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy, have been excellent. There was, however, recent concern regarding a high incidence of microscopic local tumor recurrence following a definitive course of irradiation. Deep regional or intracavitary hyperthermia (HT) with phase steering may be of value as an adjuvant treatment to radiotherapy. This HT may increase the incidence of local tumor control obtained with radiotherapy. Phase I-II clinical studies are currently underway.

  12. T1 Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum

    PubMed Central

    Bentrem, David J.; Okabe, Satoshi; Wong, W Douglas; Guillem, Jose G.; Weiser, Martin R.; Temple, Larissa K.; Ben-Porat, Leah S.; Minsky, Bruce D.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Paty, Philip B.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Recent studies suggest local excision may be acceptable treatment of T1 adenocarcinoma of the rectum, but there is little comparative data with radical surgery to assess outcomes and quantify risk. We performed a retrospective evaluation of patients with T1 rectal cancers treated by either transanal excision or radical resection at our institution to assess patient selection, cancer recurrence, and survival. Methods: All patients who underwent surgery for T1 adenocarcinomas of the rectum (0–15 cm from anal verge) by either transanal excision (TAE) or radical resection (RAD) between January 1987 and January 2004 were identified from a prospective database. Data were analyzed using Fisher exact test, Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank test. Results: Three hundred nineteen consecutive patients with T1 lesions were treated by transanal excision (n = 151) or radical surgery (n = 168) over the 17-year period. RAD surgery was associated with higher tumor location in the rectum, slightly larger tumor size, a similar rate of adverse histology, and a lymph node metastasis rate of 18%. Despite these features, patients who underwent RAD surgery had fewer local recurrences, fewer distant recurrences, and significantly better recurrence-fre