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Sample records for adenocarcinoma mouse prostate

  1. Extra-prostatic transgene-associated neoplastic lesions in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice.

    PubMed

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Bolon, Brad; Oglesbee, Michael J; Clinton, Steven K; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih; La Perle, Krista M D

    2015-02-01

    Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice are frequently used in prostate cancer research because their prostates consistently develop a series of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Disease progression in TRAMP mouse prostates culminates in metastatic, poorly differentiated carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. The androgen dependence of the rat probasin promoter largely limits transgene expression to the prostatic epithelium. However, extra-prostatic transgene-positive lesions have been described in TRAMP mice, including renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urethra, and phyllodes-like tumors of the seminal vesicle. Here, we describe the histologic and immunohistochemical features of 2 novel extra-prostatic lesions in TRAMP mice: primary anaplastic tumors of uncertain cell origin in the midbrain and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the submandibular salivary gland. These newly characterized tumors apparently result from transgene expression in extra-prostatic locations rather than representing metastatic prostate neoplasms because lesions were identified in both male and female mice and in male TRAMP mice without histologically apparent prostate tumors. In this article, we also calculate the incidences of the urethral carcinomas and renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, further elucidate the biological behavior of the urethral carcinomas, and demonstrate the critical importance of complete necropsies even when evaluating presumably well characterized phenotypes in genetically engineered mice.

  2. A novel sulindac derivative lacking cyclooxygenase-inhibitory activities suppresses carcinogenesis in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jinhui; Wang, Lei; Quealy, Emily; Gary, Bernard D; Reynolds, Robert C; Piazza, Gary A; Lü, Junxuan

    2010-07-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including sulindac are well documented to be highly effective for cancer chemoprevention. However, their cyclooxygenase (COX)-inhibitory activities cause severe gastrointestinal, renal, and cardiovascular toxicities, limiting their chronic use. Recent studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms may be responsible for the chemopreventive benefits of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and support the potential for the development of a novel generation of sulindac derivatives lacking COX inhibition for cancer chemoprevention. A prototypic sulindac derivative with a N,N-dimethylammonium substitution called sulindac sulfide amide (SSA) was recently identified to be devoid of COX-inhibitory activity yet displays much more potent tumor cell growth-inhibitory activity in vitro compared with sulindac sulfide. In this study, we investigated the androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathway as a potential target for its COX-independent antineoplastic mechanism and evaluated its chemopreventive efficacy against prostate carcinogenesis using the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate model. The results showed that SSA significantly suppressed the growth of human and mouse prostate cancer cells expressing AR in strong association with G(1) arrest, and decreased AR level and AR-dependent transactivation. Dietary SSA consumption dramatically attenuated prostatic growth and suppressed AR-dependent glandular epithelial lesion progression through repressing cell proliferation in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate mice, whereas it did not significantly affect neuroendocrine carcinoma growth. Overall, the results suggest that SSA may be a chemopreventive candidate against prostate glandular epithelial carcinogenesis.

  3. Prostate Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ali

    2017-03-30

    Prostate ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a rare subtype of prostate adenocarcinoma that shows more aggressive behavior than conventional prostatic acinar adenocarcinoma. PDA demonstrates similar clinical and paraclinical features such as prostatic acinar adenocarcinoma; therefore, clinical distinction of the 2 entities is very difficult (if not impossible) and histopathology plays an important role in the diagnosis of the disease. This review discusses all the necessary information needed for the diagnosis and prognosis of PDA including the morphologic features of PDA, an introduction about the known variants of PDA with helpful hints in grading of each variant, tips on differential diagnosis of PDA from the common morphologic mimickers, a detailed discussion on the value of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of PDA, and pathologic features that are helpful in determining the outcome.

  4. Decreased expression of Toll-like receptor 4 and 5 during progression of prostate transformation in transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Ju-Hee; Park, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Chang, Seo-Na; Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Park, Jae-Hak; Kim, Dong-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been considered an important risk factor for development of prostate cancer. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize microbial moieties or endogenous molecules and play an important role in the triggering and promotion of inflammation. In this study, we examined whether expression of TLR4 and TLR5 was associated with progression of prostate transformation in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. The expression of TLR4 and TLR5 was evaluated by immunohistochemisty in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded prostate tissue from wild-type (WT) and TRAMP mice. Normal prostate tissue from WT mice showed strong expression of TLR4 and TLR5. However, TLR4 expression in the prostate tissue from TRAMP mice gradually decreased as pathologic grade became more aggressive. TLR5 expression in the prostate tissue from TRAMP mice also decreased in low-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), high-grade PIN and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Overall, our results suggest that decreased expression of TLR4 and TLR5 may contribute to prostate tumorigenesis.

  5. Chemopreventive Effects of Korean Angelica versus Its Major Pyranocoumarins on Two Lineages of Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Su-Ni; Zhang, Jinhui; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Peixin; Puppala, Manohar; Zhang, Yong; Xing, Chengguo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2015-09-01

    We showed previously that daily gavage of Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root ethanolic extract starting 8 weeks of age inhibited growth of prostate epithelium and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NE-Ca) in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Because decursin (D) and its isomer decursinol angelate (DA) are major pyranocoumarins in AGN extract, we tested the hypothesis that D/DA represented active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP carcinogenesis. Three groups of male C57BL/6 TRAMP mice were gavage treated daily with excipient vehicle, AGN (5 mg per mouse), or equimolar D/DA (3 mg per mouse) from 8 weeks to 16 or 28 weeks of age. Measurement of plasma and NE-Ca D, DA, and their common metabolite decursinol indicated similar retention from AGN versus D/DA dosing. The growth of TRAMP dorsolateral prostate (DLP) in AGN- and D/DA-treated mice was inhibited by 66% and 61% at 16 weeks and by 67% and 72% at 28 weeks, respectively. Survival of mice bearing NE-Ca to 28 weeks was improved by AGN, but not by D/DA. Nevertheless, AGN- and D/DA-treated mice had lower NE-Ca burden. Immunohistochemical and mRNA analyses of DLP showed that AGN and D/DA exerted similar inhibition of TRAMP epithelial lesion progression and key cell-cycle genes. Profiling of NE-Ca mRNA showed a greater scope of modulating angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion-metastasis, and inflammation genes by AGN than D/DA. The data therefore support D/DA as probable active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP epithelial lesions, and they cooperate with non-pyranocoumarin compounds to fully express AGN efficacy against NE-Ca.

  6. Chemopreventive effects of Korean Angelica vs. its major pyranocoumarins on two lineages of transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Su-Ni; Zhang, Jinhui; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Peixin; Puppala, Manohar; Zhang, Yong; Xing, Chengguo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2015-01-01

    We showed previously that daily gavage of Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root ethanolic extract starting 8 weeks of age inhibited growth of prostate epithelium and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NE-Ca) in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Since decursin (D) and its isomer decursinol angelate (DA) are major pyranocoumarins in AGN extract, we tested the hypothesis that D/DA represented active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP carcinogenesis. Three groups of male C57BL/6 TRAMP mice were gavage-treated daily with excipient vehicle, AGN (5 mg per mouse) or equimolar D/DA (3 mg per mouse) from 8 weeks to 16 or 28 weeks of age. Measurement of plasma and NE-Ca D, DA and their common metabolite decursinol indicated similar retention from AGN vs. D/DA dosing. The growth of TRAMP dorsolateral prostate (DLP) in AGN-and D/DA-treated mice was inhibited by 66% and 61% at 16 weeks and by 67% and 72% at 28 weeks, respectively. Survival of mice bearing NE-Ca to 28 weeks was improved by AGN, but not by D/DA. Nevertheless, AGN-and D/DA-treated mice had lower NE-Ca burden. Immunohistochemical and mRNA analyses of DLP showed AGN and D/DA exerted similar inhibition of TRAMP epithelial lesion progression and key cell cycle genes. Profiling of NE-Ca mRNA showed a greater scope of modulating angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal-transition, invasion-metastasis and inflammation genes by AGN than D/DA. The data therefore support D/DA as probable active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP epithelial lesions, and they cooperate with non-pyranocoumarin compounds to fully express AGN efficacy against NE-Ca. PMID:26116406

  7. Examination of the Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Prostate Cancer using the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    and lymph node tissues. I next measured Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and Dnmt3b mRNA expression, B1 repetitive element methylation, and global (5mdC) levels...tumor progression, we were unsure of how they may change in the TRAMP Dnmt1 Hypomorphic mice (1-3). Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and Dnmt3b mRNA expression are...significantly decreased in R/+ and N/R mice compared to WT TRAMP mouse prostate tissue (Fig. 8d-f). Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b mRNA expression shows some

  8. A high-fat diet containing whole walnuts (Juglans regia) reduces tumour size and growth along with plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary fat is linked to prostate cancer (PCa), the most commonly diagnosed male cancer, but the nature and strength of the relationships between total fat, n-6 and n-3 fatty acids and PCa remain incompletely understood. Transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice (N=10-12 per grou...

  9. A null-mutation in the Znt7 gene accelerates prostate tumor formation in a transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decrease of cellular zinc in the epithelium of the prostate has been implicated in the development of prostate cancer. To investigate whether ZnT7, a zinc transporter involved in intracellular zinc accumulation, plays a role in prostate cancer development, we have generated and characterized a trans...

  10. Examination of the Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Prostate Cancer using the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    genotypes of Dnmt1 hypomorphic mice as expected (Figure 6A). In contrast, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b displayed variable expression patterns, with no clear change in...for molecular analyses. To confirm specific knockdown of Dnmt1, I measured Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and Dnmt3b mRNA and protein expressions in the prostates...points (Figure 9A). In contrast, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b mRNA expression shows variability amongst the four genotypes, with the only significant change

  11. Metastasis of Prostate Adenocarcinoma to the Testis

    PubMed Central

    Campara, Zoran; Simic, Dejan; Aleksic, Predrag; Spasic, Aleksandar; Milicevic, Snjezana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prostate carcinoma is the most frequently diagnosed carcinoma in the male population. The most typical places of the metastases are pelvic lymphatic glands, bones and lungs, and very rarely it metastasizes into a testis. The prognostic importance of testicular metastasis of prostate cancer is not yet well-known, due to a very few published cases. According to the known facts, it is certain that a metastasis of the prostate carcinoma into a testis is a sign of an advanced disease. Case report: This work presents a 48-year-old patient, to whom an adenocarcinoma of the prostate has been proven by the pathohistological finding of transrectal biopsy, performed due to the elevated level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Nine years after the initial diagnosis, due to a gradual rise of PSA and tumorous enlargement of the left testis, left inguinal orchectomy and right orchectomy were performed. Metastatic dissemination of prostate adenocarcinoma into a testis was determined by a pathohistological analysis of the left testis. Conclusion: The metastasis of the prostate carcinoma into a testis, as a rare localization of the metastatic dissemination, after additionally performed orchectomy along with further oncological therapy, can provide a continuation of a good life quality as well as a control of the disease in a longer time period. PMID:27703299

  12. Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yutaro; Kawahara, Takashi; Iwashita, Hiromichi; Shimokihara, Kota; Tsutsumi, Sohgo; Takamoto, Daiji; Mochizuki, Taku; Hattori, Yusuke; Teranishi, Jun-ichi; Miyoshi, Yasuhide; Yumura, Yasushi; Yao, Masahiro; Inayama, Yoshiaki; Uemura, Hiroji

    2016-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is an unusual variant of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. A 73-year-old male was referred to our hospital for the further examination of an elevated prostate-specific antigen level of 23.4 ng/mL. Radical prostatectomy (RP) was performed based on the diagnosis obtained by a prostate needle biopsy. The RP specimen revealed ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate with positive capsular penetration. We herein report a rare case of ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate. PMID:28101029

  13. Abiraterone Acetate and Castration Resistant Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Linden-Castro, Edgar; Pelayo-Nieto, Marcela; Alias-Melgar, Alejandro; Espinosa-Perezgrovas, Daniel; Ramirez-Galindo, Ivan; Catalan-Quinto, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate is a rare histological variant that only represents <1% of prostate tumors. This histological variant has several important clinical implications with respect to their evolution, clinical prognosis, and treatment. We report the case of a 64-year-old patient with ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate, which progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer, that was treated with abiraterone acetate with good clinical response, to our knowledge, the first case of ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate in treatment with abiraterone acetate. PMID:24891969

  14. A small molecule polyamine oxidase inhibitor blocks androgen-induced oxidative stress and delays prostate cancer progression in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate model.

    PubMed

    Basu, Hirak S; Thompson, Todd A; Church, Dawn R; Clower, Cynthia C; Mehraein-Ghomi, Farideh; Amlong, Corey A; Martin, Christopher T; Woster, Patrick M; Lindstrom, Mary J; Wilding, George

    2009-10-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) present in human prostate epithelia are an important etiologic factor in prostate cancer (CaP) occurrence, recurrence, and progression. Androgen induces ROS production in the prostate by a yet unknown mechanism. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time that androgen induces an overexpression of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the polyamine oxidation pathway. As prostatic epithelia produce a large excess of polyamines, the androgen-induced polyamine oxidation that produces H2O2 could be a major reason for the high ROS levels in the prostate epithelia. A small molecule polyamine oxidase inhibitor N,N'-butanedienyl butanediamine (MDL 72,527 or CPC-200) effectively blocks androgen-induced ROS production in human CaP cells, as well as significantly delays CaP progression and death in animals developing spontaneous CaP. These data show that polyamine oxidation is not only a major pathway for ROS production in prostate, but inhibiting this pathway also successfully delays CaP progression.

  15. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia-like ductal prostatic adenocarcinoma: A case suitable for active surveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Dillard, Melissa R.; Zhu, Grace G.; Gordetsky, Jennifer B.

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to typical prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN)-like ductal adenocarcinoma is a rare variant of prostate cancer with low-grade clinical behavior. We report a case of a 66-year-old African-American male with an elevated serum prostate-specific antigen who underwent multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRI/ultrasound fusion-guided biopsies. Pathology demonstrated low-volume Gleason score 3 + 3 = 6 (Grade Group 1), acinar adenocarcinoma involving one core and PIN-like ductal adenocarcinoma on a separate core. Herein, we discuss the potential role of active surveillance for patients with this rare variant of prostate cancer found in the era of advanced imaging with multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer. PMID:28216939

  16. Role of ProstaScint for brachytherapy in localized prostate adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Rodney J; Kim, Edward; Foor, Ryan

    2004-07-01

    ProstaScint (CYT-356 or capromab pendetide, Cytogen) is an 111In-labeled monoclonal mouse antibody specific for prostate-specific membrane antigen, a prostate transmembrane glycoprotein that is upregulated in prostate adenocarcinoma. ProstaScint scans are US Food and Drug Administration approved for pretreatment evaluation of metastatic disease in high-risk patients. They are also approved for post-prostatectomy assessment of recurrent disease in patients with a rising prostate-specific antigen level. This review explores the literature on ProstaScint and its use in guiding the treatment of prostate cancer. A novel technique for identifying areas of cancer within the prostate using ProstaScint images fused with pelvic computed tomography scans is also described. The identification of areas of high antibody signal provides targets for radiotherapeutic dose escalation, with the overall goals of improving treatment outcome while preserving adjacent tissue structures and decreasing treatment morbidity.

  17. Stratified epithelium in prostatic adenocarcinoma: a mimic of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Omar; Humphrey, Peter A

    2006-07-01

    Typically glands of prostatic adenocarcinoma have a single cell lining, although stratification can be seen in invasive carcinomas with a cribriform architecture, including ductal carcinoma. The presence and diagnostic significance of stratified cells within non-cribriform carcinomatous prostatic glands has not been well addressed. The histomorphological features and immunohistochemical profile of cases of non-cribriform prostatic adenocarcinoma with stratified malignant glandular epithelium were analyzed. These cases were identified from needle biopsy cases from the consultation files of one of the authors and from a review of 150 consecutive in-house needle biopsy cases of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry was performed utilizing antibodies reactive against high molecular weight cytokeratin (34betaE12), p63 and alpha-methylacyl-coenzyme-A racemase (AMACR). A total of 8 cases were identified, including 2 from the 150 consecutive in-house cases (1.3%). In 4 cases, the focus with glands having stratified epithelium was the sole carcinomatous component in the biopsy, while such a component represented 5-30% of the invasive carcinoma seen elsewhere in the remaining cases. The main attribute in all these foci was the presence of glandular profiles lined by several layers of epithelial cells with cytological and architectural features resembling flat or tufted high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, but lacking basal cells as confirmed by negative 34betaE12 and/or p63 immunostains in all cases. The AMACR staining profile of the stratified foci was variable, with 4 foci showing positivity, and 3 foci being negative, including two cases that displayed AMACR positivity in adjacent non-stratified prostatic adenocarcinoma. Prostatic adenocarcinoma with stratified malignant glandular epithelium can be identified in prostate needle biopsy samples harboring non-cribriform prostatic adenocarcinoma and resembles glands with high-grade prostatic

  18. Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Metastatic Prostate Adenocarcinoma to the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Koop, Andree; Brauhmbhatt, Bhaumik; Lewis, Jason

    2017-01-01

    We present a rare case of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding associated with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma to the stomach. Prostate cancer, which is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among men, rarely spreads to the stomach, with only 7 cases reported in the English literature. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and GI bleeding. Our patient was treated with epinephrine injection and bipolar cautery, but GI bleeding recurred 7 months later when he had worsening of his thrombocytopenia while using ibuprofen. PMID:28377935

  19. Radiologic presentation of chronic granulomatous prostatitis mimicking locally advanced prostate adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Min; Joshi, Jay; Wolfe, Konrad; Acher, Peter; Liyanage, Sidath H

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of nonspecific granulomatous prostatitis (GP), a clinical mimic of prostate adenocarcinoma. A 54-year-old man presented with lower urinary tract symptoms and raised prostate-specific antigen. Magnetic resonance imaging showed features consistent with prostate cancer, including low T2-signal intensity in the peripheral and transition zones with signs of extracapsular extension. Diffusion-weighted imaging showed high-signal intensity, with low apparent diffusion coefficient values, whereas dynamic contrast enhancement demonstrated a type 3 washout curve, similar to that found in prostate cancer. Transperineal sector-guided prostate biopsy confirmed nonspecific GP, and the patient was treated conservatively. We discuss and compare nonspecific, chronic GP as a radiologic mimic of prostate adenocarcinoma patient.

  20. Characterization of Notch Signalling Pathway Members in Normal Prostate, Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia (PIN) and Prostatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Soylu, Hakan; Acar, Nuray; Ozbey, Ozlem; Unal, Betul; Koksal, Ismail Turker; Bassorgun, Ibrahim; Ciftcioglu, Akif; Ustunel, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Prostate Cancer (PCa) holds the second place in terms of cancer-related mortality rate among men. The Notch signalling pathway regulates the proliferation and differentiation in embryonic and adult tissues and determines the cell fate. The body of knowledge in the present literature is currently controversial about the effect of the Notch pathway on prostatic cancer. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the immunolocalization and expression levels of Notch1-4, Jagged1-2, Delta, HES1 and HES5 from among the members of the Notch signalling pathway in tissues of normal, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and malignant prostate. The current study included a sample of 20 patients with localised prostatic adenocarcinoma, 18 patients with high grade PIN (H-PIN) and 18 normal prostatic tissue. Immunolocalisations of Notch1, 2, 3, 4, Jagged1, 2, Delta, HES1 and HES5 were identified through the immunohistochemical method. The findings of the present study showed that all in-scope members of the Notch signalling pathway were localised in PIN structures to a greater extent than in other tissues and from amongst these members, specifically Notch1, Notch4, Jagged1 and HES1 were at more significant levels. Consequently, the findings of the present study may indicate that the Notch signalling pathway can play a role especially in the formation of PIN structures.

  1. Inflammation and focal atrophy in prostate needle biopsy cores and association to prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Ines; Bettin, Alfonso; Reyes, Niradiz

    2016-10-01

    The possible origin of proliferative inflammatory atrophy in the regenerative proliferation of prostate epithelial cells in response to injury caused by inflammation, and their relation to prostate adenocarcinoma have not been defined. Inflammation and focal atrophy are common pathological findings in prostate biopsies, currently not routinely included in surgical pathology reports. The objective of the study was to determine the correlation between inflammation and focal atrophy with prostate adenocarcinoma. Prostate needle biopsies from 203 patients with clinical parameters suspicious for malignancy were evaluated for the presence and extent of chronic inflammation, type and grade of focal atrophy, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and adenocarcinoma. Relations among them and with age were also analyzed. χ(2) tests and binary logistic regression were used to estimate associations. Chronic inflammation was observed in 77.3% of the biopsies, significantly associated to adenocarcinoma (P = .031). Moderate/severe inflammation in at least 1 biopsy core increased the risk of prostate adenocarcinoma (odds ratio, 2.94; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-6.8), whereas glandular localization of inflammation decreased the risk. Focal atrophy was present in 72.9% of the biopsies, proliferative inflammatory atrophy was the most common type, and its grade was significantly associated to inflammation (P < .0001) and inflammation intensity (P = .003). An association between prostate adenocarcinoma and inflammation was found, with higher odds in presence of moderate/severe inflammation in at least 1 biopsy core. Increasing grades of proliferative inflammatory atrophy were associated to high levels of inflammation, supporting its previously proposed inflammatory nature.

  2. Raman Spectroscopy Study of Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Bulk Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devpura, S.; Dai, H.; Thakur, J. S.; Naik, R.; Cao, A.; Pandya, A.; Auner, G. W.; Sarkar, F.; Sakr, W.; Naik, V.

    2009-03-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer among men. The mortality rate for this disease can be dramatically reduced if it can be diagnosed in its early stages. Raman spectroscopy is one of the optical techniques which can provide fingerprints of a disease in terms of its molecular composition which changes due to the onset of disease. The aim of this project is to investigate the differences in the Raman spectra to identify benign epithelium (BE), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and adenocarcinoma of various Gleason grades in archived bulk tissues embedded in paraffin wax. For each tissue, two adjacent tissue sections were cut and dewaxed, where one of the sections was stained using haematoxylin and eosin for histological examination and the other unstained adjacent section was used for Raman spectroscopic studies. We have collected Raman spectra from 10 prostatic adenocarcinoma dewaxed tissue sections using Raman microscope (785 nm excitation laser). The data were analyzed using statistical methods of principal component analysis and discriminant function analysis to classify the tissue regions. The results indicate that Raman Spectroscopy can differentiate between BE, PIN and Cancer regions.

  3. Synchronous Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor and Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Bouropoulos, Konstantinos; Farmakis, Antonios

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors (MPNSTs) of the prostate are extremely rare. A very unusual case of simultaneous adenocarcinoma and MPNST of the prostate is reported. A 60-year-old Caucasian male presented for annual urologic examination. Digital rectal examination revealed a painless, toughish, and asymmetrically enlarged prostate. Serum prostate-specific antigen was 1 ng/mL. Radiologic examinations demonstrated a large mass, which was arising from the left peripheral lobe of the prostate. The patient underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate which revealed a smooth muscle tumor of uncertain malignant potential. Radical retropubic prostatectomy with en bloc removal of the mass and the seminal vesicles was performed and histology demonstrated low-grade MPNST and adenocarcinoma of the prostate. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous prostatic adenocarcinoma and MPNST in the English literature. PMID:27872787

  4. Effects of verbenalin on prostatitis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Mingsan; Guo, Lin; Yan, Xiaoli; Wang, Tan; Li, Zuming

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the treatment characteristics of verbenalin on a prostatitis mouse model. Give Xiaozhiling injection in the prostate locally to make a prostatitis mouse model. High, medium and low doses of verbenalin were each given to different mouse groups. The amount of water was determined in 14th, 28th. The number of white cells and lecithin corpuscle density in prostatic fluid were determined. Morphological changes in the prostate, testis, epididymis and kidney were detected. Compared with the model control group, the mice treated with high, medium and low doses of verbenalin had significantly increased amounts of water, and prostate white blood cell count and prostate volume density (Vv) were decreased significantly, the density of lecithin corpuscle score increased, and pathologic prostatitis changes were significantly reduced. Pathological change in the testis was significantly reduced and the change in the epididymis was obviously reduced. The thymic cortex thickness and the number of lymphocytes increased significantly and could reduce the renal pathological changes in potential. Verbenalin has a good therapeutic effect on the prostatitis mouse model. PMID:26858560

  5. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the prostate: ductal adenocarcinoma and stromal sarcoma-like appearance: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Parada, David; Peña, Karla B; Riu, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma (SC) of prostate gland is a rare biphasic tumour. In about half of cases, initial diagnosis is acinar adenocarcinoma, followed by nonsurgical therapy, with a subsequent diagnosis of SC. The survival rate is lower. We report a case of an 59-years-old man with unusual histopathologic finding of prostate sarcomatoid carcinoma, showing characteristics of ductal prostatic adenocarcinoma and prostatic stromal sarcoma-like appearance. Ductal adenocarcinoma was characterized by tall columnar cells with abundant amphophilic to eosinophil cytoplasm. Pleomorphic sarcoma was characterized to have overall glandular growth pattern, simulating a malignant phyllodes tumour. Estrogen and progesterone receptors showed nuclear immunostaining in mesenchymal multinucleated giant cells. In conclusion, SC of the prostate is an exceedingly rare tumour. Retrospective analyses render prostate SC as one of the most aggressive prostate malignancies. The prognosis is dismal regardless of other histologic or clinical findings.

  6. Genetic deletion of osteopontin in TRAMP mice skews prostate carcinogenesis from adenocarcinoma to aggressive human-like neuroendocrine cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Giorgio; Jachetti, Elena; Comuzzi, Barbara; Dugo, Matteo; Arioli, Ivano; Miotti, Silvia; Sangaletti, Sabina; Di Carlo, Emma; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario P.

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted glycoprotein, that belongs to the non-structural extracellular matrix (ECM), and its over expression in human prostate cancer has been associated with disease progression, androgen independence and metastatic ability. Nevertheless, the pathophysiology of OPN in prostate tumorigenesis has never been studied. We crossed TRansgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mice with OPN deficient (OPN−/−) mice and followed tumor onset and progression in these double mutants. Ultrasound examination detected the early onset of a rapidly growing, homogeneous and spherical tumor in about 60% of OPN−/− TRAMP mice. Such neoplasms seldom occurred in parental TRAMP mice otherwise prone to adenocarcinomas and were characterized for being androgen receptor negative, highly proliferative and endowed with neuroendocrine (NE) features. Gene expression profiling showed up-regulation of genes involved in tumor progression, cell cycle and neuronal differentiation in OPN-deficient versus wild type TRAMP tumors. Down-regulated genes included key genes of TGFa pathway, including SMAD3 and Filamin, which were confirmed at the protein level. Furthermore, NE genes and particularly those characterizing early prostatic lesions of OPN-deficient mice were found to correlate with those of human prostate NE tumours. These data underscore a novel role of OPN in the early stages of prostate cancer growth, protecting against the development of aggressive NE tumors. PMID:26700622

  7. An unusual variant of prostatic adenocarcinoma with metastasis to testis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Anila, K R; Somanathan, T; Mathews, A; Jayasree, K

    2012-07-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate is considered to be a rare variant of prostatic adenocarcinoma when compared to the more common acinar adenocarcinoma. We report here a case of ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate in a 68-year old man who presented with complaints of abdominal pain, retention of urine and hematuria of one month duration. Clinical examination showed prostatomegaly. The serum Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) value was raised to 79ng/mL. Histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation of resected specimen of prostate revealed ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The patient was lost to follow up and presented four years after the initial diagnosis with metastasis to the bone and testis. Though prostatic cancers have the ability for wide spread dissemination, metastasis to testis is rare. Immunohistochemical staining with PSA and Prostatic Acid Phosphatase (PAP) can help in establishing prostatic nature of the neoplasm. We are reporting this case because of the rarity of metastasis of prostatic carcinoma to testis and for stressing the need for keeping in mind the possibility of metastatic carcinoma also while dealing with testicular tumors.

  8. Immunohistochemical profile of ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Seipel, Amanda H; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Delahunt, Brett; Wiklund, Fredrik; Wiklund, Peter; Lindberg, Johan; Grönberg, Henrik; Egevad, Lars

    2014-11-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate (DAC) is considered to be an aggressive subtype of prostate cancer with greater risk of progression than acinar adenocarcinoma (AC). It has been debated whether DAC is a distinct subtype or a morphological variant of AC. Our aim was to examine the protein expression of DAC and to compare the results with AC. A tissue microarray was constructed from 60 DAC and 46 AC matched by Gleason score. The slides were stained for 28 immunomarkers (estrogen, progesterone and androgen receptor, prolactin, PSA, prostein, PSMA, PSAP, CDX2, lysozyme, villin, monoclonal CEA, CK7, CK20, HMWCK, p63, p504s, c-myc, EGFR, Ki-67, p16, p21, p27, p53, PTEN, ERG, PAX-2, and PAX-8). HMWCK was positive in 8.5 % of DAC, but negative in all cases of AC (p = 0.045). p16 was positive in 53.3 % of DAC and in 26.1 % of AC (p = 0.005). p53 was positive in 42.4 % of DAC and 26.7 % of AC (p = 0.031). A distinct patchy positivity of CK20 was seen in 23.7 % of DAC, and this pattern was also seen in 9.1 % of AC (p = 0.047). Villin was positive in 3.4 % of DAC while expression was negative in AC. Ki-67 labeling index was significantly higher in DAC than in AC (mean 9.2 % [95 % CI 6.4-12.0] and 2.6 % [1.9-3.4], p < 0.001). While there is some overlap in the immunohistochemical expression of DAC and AC, the differences between these two morphotypes of prostatic carcinoma are consistent with DAC having a more aggressive phenotype than AC.

  9. Visualization of early prostatic adenocarcinoma as a stem cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Maggie Y.; Lee, Tammy L.; Hao, Su-Shin; Mahooti, Sepi; Baird, Stephen M.; Donoghue, Daniel J.; Haas, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Prostate Cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States, and the third leading cause of cancer death among men in Europe. We have previously shown that cells possessing Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) characteristics can be grown from human PrCa tissue harvested at the time of prostatectomy. However, the cellular origin of these CSCs was not previously known. In most cases, simple hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections are sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma (PrCa) in needle biopsy samples. We utilized six different antibodies specific for stem cell antigens to examine paraffin sections of PrCa taken at the time of needle-biopsy diagnosis. These antisera were specific for CD44, CD133, ALDH7A1, LGR-5, Oct-4 and NANOG. We demonstrate specific staining of tumor cells with all six antisera specific for stem cell antigens. Some of these antibodies also react with cells of hyperplastic glands, but the patterns of reactivity differ from those of malignant glands. These findings demonstrate that at the time of diagnosis, PrCa consists of cells exhibiting properties of CSCs and consistent with the possibility that PrCa is a stem cell disease. PMID:27764770

  10. Malignant priapism: Penile metastasis originating on a primary prostate adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Gaspar, Sandro Roberto; Nunes, Alvaro; Dias, Jose Santos; Lopes, Tome

    2015-01-01

    Malignant priapism is a definition invented in 1938 by Peacock, defined as a persistent erection, not related with sexual activity, caused by cavernous sinus and associated venous systems invasion with malignant cells. Penile secondary lesions are rare entities. Primary locations are usually the pelvic cavity organs, namely the prostate and the bladder as the most common ones. Priapism as a first manifestation of these kinds of lesions is even rarer. The aim was to present a 52-year-old patient harboring a penile metastasis that originated in the primary prostate adenocarcinoma, manifesting itself as a “common” priapism. The patient referred to the emergency room presenting with a priapism and nodules at the coronal sulcus, without previous similar episodes. His evolution until properly diagnosed was catastrophic with multiple lymph nodes, bone and organ involvement, and with his demise soon after from serious bleeding and congestive heart failure, almost 2 months after he first came to the emergency room. We review the literature concerning malignant priapism, diagnosis, and current treatment and survival perspectives. PMID:26229335

  11. Visualization of early prostatic adenocarcinoma as a stem cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Maggie Y; Lee, Tammy L; Hao, Su-Shin; Mahooti, Sepi; Baird, Stephen M; Donoghue, Daniel J; Haas, Martin

    2016-11-15

    Prostate Cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States, and the third leading cause of cancer death among men in Europe. We have previously shown that cells possessing Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) characteristics can be grown from human PrCa tissue harvested at the time of prostatectomy. However, the cellular origin of these CSCs was not previously known. In most cases, simple hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections are sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma (PrCa) in needle biopsy samples. We utilized six different antibodies specific for stem cell antigens to examine paraffin sections of PrCa taken at the time of needle-biopsy diagnosis. These antisera were specific for CD44, CD133, ALDH7A1, LGR-5, Oct-4 and NANOG. We demonstrate specific staining of tumor cells with all six antisera specific for stem cell antigens. Some of these antibodies also react with cells of hyperplastic glands, but the patterns of reactivity differ from those of malignant glands. These findings demonstrate that at the time of diagnosis, PrCa consists of cells exhibiting properties of CSCs and consistent with the possibility that PrCa is a stem cell disease.

  12. Iodine uptake and prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse model.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Caltzontzin, Paloma; Delgado, Guadalupe; Aceves, Carmen; Anguiano, Brenda

    2013-11-08

    Iodine supplementation exerts antitumor effects in several types of cancer. Iodide (I⁻) and iodine (I₂) reduce cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP and DU-145). Both chemical species decrease tumor growth in athymic mice xenografted with DU-145 cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the uptake and effects of iodine in a preclinical model of prostate cancer (transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate [TRAMP] mice/SV40-TAG antigens), which develops cancer by 12 wks of age. ¹²⁵I⁻ and ¹²⁵I₂ uptake was analyzed in prostates from wild-type and TRAMP mice of 12 and 24 wks in the presence of perchlorate (inhibitor of the Na⁺/I⁻ symporter [NIS]). NIS expression was quantified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Mice (6 wks old) were supplemented with 0.125 mg I⁻ plus 0.062 mg I₂/mouse/day for 12 or 24 wks. The weight of the genitourinary tract (GUT), the number of acini with lesions, cell proliferation (levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA] by immunohistochemistry), p53 and p21 expression (by qPCR) and apoptosis (relative amount of nucleosomes by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) were evaluated. In both age-groups, normal and tumoral prostates take up both forms of iodine, but only I⁻ uptake was blocked by perchlorate. Iodine supplementation prevented the overexpression of NIS in the TRAMP mice, but had no effect on the GUT weight, cell phenotype, proliferation or apoptosis. In TRAMP mice, iodine increased p53 expression but had no effect on p21 (a p53-dependent gene). Our data corroborate NIS involvement in I⁻ uptake and support the notion that another transporter mediates I₂ uptake. Iodine did not prevent cancer progression. This result could be explained by a strong inactivation of the p53 pathway by TAG antigens.

  13. Malakoplakia associated with prostatic adenocarcinoma: Report of 4 cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Medlicott, Shaun; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Jimenez, Rafael E; Trpkov, Kiril

    2016-06-01

    Malakoplakia is an inflammatory process that has been rarely reported in the prostate. Malakoplakia in association with prostatic carcinoma is exceedingly rare with only 4 previously reported cases. We describe the clinical features and the associated pathology in 4 patients who demonstrated malakoplakia of the prostate in association with prostatic adenocarcinoma. Prostatic malakoplakia presenting in association with prostatic adenocarcinoma was identified in 4 patients through a search from the records of 3 institutional databases with large in-house and consult uropathology practices. In 2 of the patients the diagnostic needle biopsy contained only prostatic carcinoma; malakoplakia in association with prostatic carcinoma was documented on prostatectomy, performed 15 and 8weeks after the biopsy, respectively. Both patients experienced urinary infections during the interval between the biopsy and the prostatectomy. The third and fourth patient had a long-standing history of "prostatitis", and acute urinary tract infection with urinary retention, respectively. The needle biopsy in both patients showed concomitant malakoplakia and prostatic carcinoma. One of them also had malakoplakia on the initial biopsy containing only atypical glands and on the subsequent one demonstrating carcinoma. One patient was treated conservatively and one with prostatectomy. Although coexistent prostatic carcinoma and malakoplakia are exceedingly rare, malakoplakia can likely occur as an exceptionally rare complication of a prostate needle biopsy, particularly in individuals with long-term or acute urinary tract infections at the time of the biopsy.

  14. Choroidal metastasis secondary to prostatic adenocarcinoma: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Albadainah, Faisal; Khader, Jamal; Salah, Samer; Salem, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    Choroidal metastasis from prostate adenocarcinoma is exceedingly rare. Furthermore, data addressing the optimal therapeutic strategy is limited. A 62-year-old male patient with metastatic prostate cancer was found to have a choroidal metastasis after complaining of decreased vision in his left eye. Following treatment with external beam radiotherapy, complete response in the choroidal metastasis was demonstrated. A literature search was undertaken to highlight the therapeutic options for this rare presentation. Choroidal metastasis secondary to adenocarcinoma of the prostate is exceedingly rare, as only eight cases have been reported so far. External beam radiotherapy is an effective therapeutic modality.

  15. Lymphatic vessel densities of lymph node-negative prostate adenocarcinoma in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Sung, Wooseok; Lee, Sun; Chang, Sung-Goo; Park, Yong-Koo

    2009-01-01

    Although lymphatic vessel density (LVD) is associated with regional lymph node (LN) metastasis in prostate adenocarcinoma, no study is available that examines whether the LVD is correlated with prognostic factors other than LN metastasis in LN-negative prostate adenocarcinoma. The aim of our study was to analyze intratumoral (IT), peritumoral (PT), and nontumoral (NT) LVDs, and to determine if there is a correlation between the LVD and the clinicopathological parameters in the Korean LN-negative prostate adenocarcinoma patients. Lymphatics were detected by immunohistochemical staining using D2-40 antibody on 39 radical prostatectomy specimens. Mean LVDs of IT, PT, and NT compartments were 5.39+/-4.22, 10.71+/-4.61, and 2.04+/-1.34 per 200 x field, respectively. The difference in LVD among the compartments was significant (P<0.001). The IT-LVD was significantly lower in patients with larger tumor volume (P=0.029) and higher preoperative prostate-specific antigen level (P=0.008). The PT-LVD showed no significant correlation with the clinicopathological parameters. Our results suggest that IT- and PT-LVDs may increase in LN-negative prostate adenocarcinoma as a result of lymphangiogenesis, but IT lymphatics may decrease due to mechanical compression and destruction caused by proliferating tumor cells. In addition, IT-LVD may be used as a prognostic factor in LN-negative prostate adenocarcinoma.

  16. Effect of gyromagnetic fields on human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hongen; Xu, Yongde; Guan, Ruili; Li, Meng; Hui, Yu; Gao, Zhezhu; Yang, Bicheng; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the biological effect of gyromagnetic fields (GMFs) on cell proliferation and apoptosis of human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods PC-3 cells were grouped into normal control (NC) and GMF treatment groups. Cell proliferation was analyzed with kit-8 and Ki67 immunofluorescence staining, while cell apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry double staining of Annexin V-PE/7-AAD. The Akt and p38 MAPK/Caspase signaling pathways were analyzed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining, and cell polarization was analyzed with PARD3. Results Cell proliferation and activity of the Akt pathway were significantly decreased by the GMF, while cell apoptosis, activity of p38 MAPK, and PARD3-positive cell number were significantly increased in the GMF group compared to the NC group. Conclusion GMFs inhibit cell proliferation, induce apoptosis, and regulate tumor cell polarity conditions, potentially through down-regulating Akt, activating the p38 MAPK/Caspase pathway, and promoting PARD3 expression in PC-3 cells. PMID:26648740

  17. Prostatic adenocarcinoma with mandibular metastatic lesion: case report.

    PubMed

    Reyes Court, Daniel; Encina, Susana; Levy, Irene

    2007-10-01

    Metastatic lesions of primary tumors, which originate in different parts of the body, comprise almost 1 % of different types of oral cancers. These lesions can affect either bones or soft tissues in the maxillofacial region. Whenever the maxillofacial area is affected, the most common location is in the molar region of the mandible. The clinical presentation of mandibular metastasis follows a clinical pattern characterized by irradiated dental pain in the third molar region. The most frequent sign is parethesia of the area innervated by the mandibular alveolar dental nerve. Differential diagnosis and treatment of these patients can be extremely difficult because there a number of pathologic conditions with similar symptoms and because diagnostic examination can be highly confusing. The aim of this article is to present a case of prostatic adenocarcinoma where the only metastasis was found in the jaw. A literature review will be presented, hoping to contribute to the scarce information regarding this lesion, due to its low frequency and atypical expression of this type of metastasis in terms of etiology, biological behavior and treatment.

  18. Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) expression and metastatic potential in prostatic adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Dinjens, W N; Ten Kate, J; Kirch, J A; Tanke, H J; Van der Linden, E P; Van den Ingh, H F; Van Steenbrugge, G J; Meera Khan, P; Bosman, F T

    1990-03-01

    The expression of the adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) was investigated by immunohistochemistry in the normal and hyperplastic human prostate, in 30 prostatic adenocarcinomas, and in seven human prostatic adenocarcinoma cell lines grown as xenografts in athymic nude mice. In the normal and hyperplastic prostate, ADCP was localized exclusively in the apical membrane and the apical cytoplasm of the glandular epithelial cells. In prostatic adenocarcinomas, four distinct ADCP expression patterns were observed: diffuse cytoplasmic, membranous, both cytoplasmic and membranous, and no ADCP expression. The expression patterns were compared with the presence of metastases. We found an inverse correlation between membranous ADCP immunoreactivity and metastatic propensity. Exclusively membranous ADCP immunoreactivity occurred only in non-metastatic tumours. In contrast, the metastatic tumours showed no or diffuse cytoplasmic ADCP immunoreactivity. This suggests that immunohistochemical detection of ADCP might predict the biological behaviour of prostatic cancer. However, the occurrence of membranous ADCP immunoreactivity in the xenograft of a cell line (PC-EW), derived from a prostatic carcinoma metastasis, indicates that not only the tendency to metastasize modulates ADCP expression.

  19. Prostatic adenocarcinoma presenting with metastases to the testis and epididymis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIN; DONG, MEI; HU, XIAOLEI; LIU, LIN; LI, SHEN; LI, CHAO; YANG, LIJUN; XIAO, YONGQIANG; PANG, SHUJIAN; WANG, CHUAN

    2016-01-01

    Few cases of testicular metastases from prostate carcinoma have been reported, and asymptomatic metastases of prostate carcinoma to both the testis and epididymis are extremely rare. The current study presents the case of a 69-year-old male with testicular and epididymal metastases from prostate carcinoma. The patient was admitted to The First Hospital of Shijiazhuang with a 2-year history of lower urinary tract symptoms. Digital rectal examination revealed an enlarged multinodular prostate, and the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was >100 ng/ml. Magnetic resonance imaging showed prostate carcinoma with seminal vesicle involvement. A prostate biopsy showed prostate gland adenocarcinoma. The Gleason score was 3+3. The immunohistochemistry results were as follows: Prostatic acid phosphatase (+++), PSA (+++), P504s (+++), p63 (−) and cytokeratin 34βE12 (−), with a Ki-67 of ~5%. The patient was treated with a bilateral orchiectomy. The testicular pathology showed that the right testis and epididymis were invaded with metastatic adenocarcinoma. The left testis and epididymis were normal. The patient was treated with conventional flutamide endocrine therapy. At present the patient remains in a stable condition after 24 months of follow-up. PMID:26870285

  20. Prostate adenocarcinoma presenting with supraclavicular node enlargement: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Platania, Marco; Bajetta, Emilio; Guadalupi, Valentina; Buzzoni, Roberto; Colecchia, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    This report describes a case of prostate adenocarcinoma presenting with supraclavicular adenopathy and deep venous thrombosis in the ipsilateral arm. Biopsy revealed the enlarged node to be an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma of unknown origin, while CT scan evidenced widespread adenopathies. Because of the increase in serum PSA, the immunohistochemical staining of the biopsy specimen was reviewed and strong positivity for PSA suggested a prostatic origin. We emphasize the importance of PSA immunohistochemistry and serum PSA level monitoring in men presenting with carcinoma of undetermined origin and generalized lymphadenopathies.

  1. Should the involvement of skeletal muscle by prostatic adenocarcinoma be reported on biopsies?

    PubMed

    Sadimin, Evita T; Ye, Huihui; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscle is seen at the distal part of the prostate apex, where benign glands may reside as part of normal anatomy and histology, and extends more proximally anteriorly. At times, prostatic adenocarcinoma can be seen admixed with skeletal muscle, raising the question of extraprostatic extension. Although there has been increased attention regarding biopsy sampling of the distal apex to guide the performing of the apical dissection on radical prostatectomy, the finding of skeletal muscle involvement by prostatic adenocarcinoma has not been consistently reported by pathologists on biopsies. We searched our database spanning 12 years from 2000 to 2012 for all patients who had prostatic adenocarcinoma Gleason score 3 + 3 = 6 involving skeletal muscle on biopsy. We identified 220 patients who met the criteria. Of the 220 patients, 101 underwent prostatectomy, which comprised the "study group." Prostatectomy reports from these patients were compared with those of a "control group," which consisted of 201 contemporaneous patients with Gleason score 3 + 3 = 6 prostatic adenocarcinoma on biopsy without skeletal muscle involvement. The results showed a significantly higher percentage of positive margins in the study group compared with the control group (P = .006). The study group also had a higher percentage of positive margins at the apex admixed with skeletal muscle (P = .008). In summary, the findings in this study support that pathologists should report the involvement of skeletal muscle by tumor, and recommend that urologists performing radical prostatectomies on these patients try to ensure adequate excision in the apical area to avoid positive apical margin.

  2. Quantitative GSTP1 methylation and the detection of prostate adenocarcinoma in sextant biopsies.

    PubMed

    Harden, Susan V; Sanderson, Harriette; Goodman, Steven N; Partin, Alan A W; Walsh, Patrick C; Epstein, Jonathan I; Sidransky, David

    2003-11-05

    Hypermethylation of the 5' promoter region of the glutathione S-transferase pi gene (GSTP1) occurs at a very high frequency in prostate adenocarcinoma. We compared the results of blinded histologic review of sextant biopsy samples from 72 excised prostates with those obtained using a quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction assay (QMSP) for GSTP1. Formal surgical pathologic review of the resected prostates was used to determine the number of patients with (n = 61) and without (n = 11) prostate cancer. Histology alone detected prostate carcinoma with 64% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI] = 51% to 76%) and 100% specificity (95% CI = 72% to 100%), whereas the combination of histology and GSTP1 QMSP at an assay threshold greater than 10 detected prostate carcinoma with 75% sensitivity (95% CI = 63% to 86%) and 100% specificity (95% CI = 72% to 100%), an 11% improvement (95% CI = 5% to 22%) in sensitivity over histology alone. The combination of histology and GSTP1 QMSP at an assay threshold greater than 5 detected prostate adenocarcinoma with 79% sensitivity (95% CI = 68% to 89%), a 15% improvement (95% CI = 7% to 26%) over histology alone. Thus, GSTP1 QMSP improved the sensitivity of histologic review of random needle biopsies for prostate cancer diagnosis. Further studies should determine whether detection of GSTP1 hypermethylation in a biopsy sample with normal histology indicates the need for an early repeat biopsy at the same site.

  3. Prostate adenocarcinoma mandibular metastasis associated with numb chin syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report a rare case of mandibular adenocarcinoma that was diagnosed due to metastasis from the prostate. Numb chin syndrome (NCS), which was associated with this case, is also discussed. Computed tomography (CT) and an intraoral incisional biopsy of the left mandibular area were performed. Urology consultation, hormone therapy, chemotherapy and follow-up radiographic images were administered. Histological examination of the incised specimen revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. The Gleason score was 8 (primary 4/secondary 4). Immunohistochemical features and radiographic results confirmed the diagnosis of metastasis from prostate adenocarcinoma, moderately differentiated. The patient's prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was very high. After hormone treatment, the patient's PSA levels dropped gradually. Seventeen months later, in May 2015, the PSA level was elevated. The 18-month follow-up CT image indicated that the patient's condition was aggravated. Docetaxel chemotherapy was started in June 2015 (18 months later), and the sixth cycle of the therapy is in progress. Oral metastases that originate from prostate adenocarcinoma are rare and can induce various periosteal reactions. Hormone therapy, chemotherapy and close follow-up could be additional, appropriate treatment, and were applied in this case. Finally, NCS is a valuable indicator of metastatic disease in the mandible. PMID:27847740

  4. FGFR1-WNT-TGF-β signaling in prostate cancer mouse models recapitulates human reactive stroma

    PubMed Central

    Carstens, Julienne L.; Shahi, Payam; Van Tsang, Susan; Smith, Billie; Creighton, Chad J.; Zhang, Yiqun; Seamans, Amber; Seethammagari, Mamatha; Vedula, Indira; Levitt, Jonathan M.; Ittmann, Michael M.; Rowley, David R.; Spencer, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The reactive stroma surrounding tumor lesions performs critical roles ranging from supporting tumor cell proliferation to inducing tumorigenesis and metastasis. Therefore, it is critical to understand the cellular components and signaling control mechanisms that underlay the etiology of reactive stroma. Previous studies have individually implicated fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and canonical WNT/β-catenin signaling in prostate cancer progression and the initiation and maintenance of a reactive stroma; however, both pathways are frequently found co-activated in cancer tissue. Using autochthonous transgenic mouse models for inducible FGFR1 (JOCK1) and prostate-specific and ubiquitously expressed inducible β-catenin (Pro-Cat and Ubi-Cat, respectively) and bigenic crosses between these lines (Pro-Cat × JOCK1 and Ubi-Cat × JOCK1), we describe WNT-induced synergistic acceleration of FGFR1-driven adenocarcinoma, associated with a pronounced fibroblastic reactive stroma activation surrounding prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN) lesions found both in situ and reconstitution assays. Both mouse and human reactive stroma exhibited increased transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling adjacent to pathologic lesions likely contributing to invasion. Furthermore, elevated stromal TGF-β signaling was associated with higher Gleason scores in archived human biopsies, mirroring murine patterns. Our findings establish the importance of the FGFR1-WNT-TGF-β signaling axes as driving forces behind reactive stroma in aggressive prostate adenocarcinomas, deepening their relevance as therapeutic targets. PMID:24305876

  5. Differential expression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) messenger RNAs and proteins in normal human prostate and prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Langat, Daudi K; Sue Platt, J; Tawfik, Ossama; Fazleabas, Asgerally T; Hunt, Joan S

    2006-08-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a major histocompatibility complex class Ib gene expressed in normal organs and in some tumors. The glycoproteins encoded by this gene are best known for their immunosuppressive properties. Because isoform-specific expression of HLA-G in male reproductive organs has not been reported, we investigated HLA-G1, -G2, -G5, -G6 mRNAs and proteins in four-to-five samples of normal prostate glands, prostates with benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate adenocarcinomas using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. All tissues contained HLA-G1, -G2, -G5 and -G6 specific mRNAs, but only HLA-G5 protein was detectable. In normal prostate glands, HLA-G5 protein was prominent in the cytoplasm of tubuloglandular epithelia and in glandular secretions. Staining was reduced in samples of benign prostatic hyperplasia but remained localized to the cytoplasm of glandular epithelia and secretions. In prostatic adenocarcinomas, HLA-G5 protein was detectable mainly in the secretions. Thus, HLA-G5 but not HLA-G1, -G2 or -G6 is produced in the normal prostate and is present in prostatic secretions. In addition, normal cellular localization is disturbed in benign and malignant prostatic adenocarcinomas. The results are consistent with this molecule may influencing female immune receptivity to sperm and suggest that such immunosuppression could be disturbed in men with prostatic adenocarcinomas.

  6. Metastasis of prostate adenocarcinoma to the frontal and ethmoid sinus

    PubMed Central

    Akdemir, Fatih; Aldemir, Mustafa; Çakar, Hasan; Güler, Gülnur

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial metastasis of prostate cancer is rarely seen, and there are few studies in this regard in the literature. Most of these studies in the literature comprise the metastasis of prostate cancer to the sphenoid sinus, and metastasis to the frontal and ethmoid sinus is a much rare entity. Association of visual symptoms, epistaxis, headache, and hematuria may indicate a urologic malignancy in terms of the origin of the primary tumor. This study was aimed to present the prostate cancer case of a 73-year-old patient whose paranasal sinus tomograms revealed the presence of frontal and ethmoid sinus metastasis. PMID:27909626

  7. Late recurrence of a prostatic adenocarcinoma as a solitary splenic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Compérat, Eva; Azzouzi, Abdel-Rahmène; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Ménégaux, Fabrice; Capron, Frédérique; Richard, François; Charlotte, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    Splenic metastases of solid tumors are exceptional. We report the first case of an isolated splenic metastasis from prostate carcinoma, 5 years after radical prostatectomy. The splenic tumor was revealed by a pain and progressive increase in the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Histology of the spleen showed an adenocarcinoma immunostained with cytokeratin and PSA markers. The patient remained asymptomatic and his serum PSA level was within normal limits 17 months after the splenectomy. This case suggests that splenic metastasis might be the result of the growth of an early blood-borne micrometastasis within the spleen after a period of clinical latency.

  8. Management and therapeutic response of a prostate ductal adenocarcinoma: a still unknown tumour?

    PubMed

    Martorana, Eugenio; Micali, Salvatore; Pirola, Giacomo Maria; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Clò, Vera; Ghaith, Ahmed; Bianchi, Giampaolo

    2016-09-26

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is a rare subtype of prostate cancer with a worse prognosis.Histologically, it is characterized by the presence of tall, pseudostratified columnar epithelium with abundant cytoplasm organized in a papillary or cribriform-papillary pattern. Several clinical differences distinguish this subtype of prostate cancer by the conventional acinar adenocarcinoma: exophytic growth into the prostatic urethra, different clinical presentation, different sites of metastasis and more aggressiveness. The rarity of this tumour forced to base our knowledge on small case series or on individual case reports, and does not help to establish appropriate guidelines. Therefore, the diagnosis of this tumour masks clinical implications that are still not well-understood.We report the case of a 69-year-old Caucasian man with a diagnosis of pure prostate ductal adenocarcinoma that early developed multiple metastases after radical prostatectomy. The patient started hormonal therapy with a fast biochemical and radiologic (positron emission tomography-computed tomography, PET-CT) hormonal escape. Therefore, we took the decision to perform chemotherapy with Taxotere along with prednisolone with a relative stability of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, but a new PET-CT scan showed a further progression of the disease. Finally, the patient underwent therapy with Abiraterone acetate that did not stop the cancer progression.No therapeutic options available showed a good control of disease progression. PSA proved to be a poor marker while, on the contrary, PET-CT scan has proved to be particularly useful in the management of the disease progression. More efforts are required to add new knowledge about this tumour and assess what is known until now.

  9. Prostate pathology of genetically engineered mice: definitions and classification. The consensus report from the Bar Harbor meeting of the Mouse Models of Human Cancer Consortium Prostate Pathology Committee.

    PubMed

    Shappell, Scott B; Thomas, George V; Roberts, Richard L; Herbert, Ron; Ittmann, Michael M; Rubin, Mark A; Humphrey, Peter A; Sundberg, John P; Rozengurt, Nora; Barrios, Roberto; Ward, Jerrold M; Cardiff, Robert D

    2004-03-15

    The Pathological Classification of Prostate Lesions in Genetically Engineered Mice (GEM) is the result of a directive from the National Cancer Institute Mouse Models of Human Cancer Consortium Prostate Steering Committee to provide a hierarchical taxonomy of disorders of the mouse prostate to facilitate classification of existing and newly created mouse models and the translation to human prostate pathology. The proposed Bar Harbor Classification system is the culmination of three meetings and workshops attended by various members of the Prostate Pathology Committee of the Mouse Models of Human Cancer Consortium. A 2-day Pathology Workshop was held at The Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, in October 2001, in which study sets of 93 slides from 22 GEM models were provided to individual panel members. The comparison of mouse and human prostate anatomy and disease demonstrates significant differences and considerable similarities that bear on the interpretation of the origin and natural history of their diseases. The recommended classification of mouse prostate pathology is hierarchical, and includes developmental, inflammatory, benign proliferative, and neoplastic disorders. Among the neoplastic disorders, preinvasive, microinvasive, and poorly differentiated neoplasms received the most attention. Specific criteria were recommended and will be discussed. Transitions between neoplastic states were of particular concern. Preinvasive neoplasias of the mouse prostate were recognized as focal, atypical, and progressive lesions. These lesions were designated as mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN). Some atypical lesions were identified in mouse models without evidence of progression to malignancy. The panel recommended that mPIN lesions not be given histological grades, but that mPIN be further classified as to the absence or presence of documented associated progression to invasive carcinoma. Criteria for recognizing microinvasion, for classification of

  10. Metastatic Prostate Adenocarcinoma to the Brain: Case Reports and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Alexander; Gan, Peter Y. C.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral metastasis secondary to prostatic adenocarcinoma is rare and it is usually a late complication in patients with widespread distant metastases. Here, we report two unusual cases of such a rare condition. Our first case presented with a large frontal contrast-enhancing lesion-associated calcification and a large tumor cyst as shown on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. This is the fifth reported case of prostatic metastasis manifesting as a cystic intraparenchymal tumor in the literature. The second case presented with a large soft tissue mass in the scalp and this lesion appeared to invade through the skull and into the middle cranial fossa. He was not known to have prostate cancer before his initial presentation and it was only diagnosed following histology results of the scalp lesion.

  11. Sialomucins are characteristically O-acylated in poorly differentiated and colloid prostatic adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Sáez, C; Japón, M A; Conde, A F; Poveda, M A; Luna-Moré, S; Segura, D I

    1998-12-01

    Mucinous glycoproteins are secreted by prostatic adenocarcinomas and might play important roles in tumor invasion and metastasis. Their histochemical properties on routine biopsy specimens have not been fully characterized. We present a histochemical study of mucin in 21 prostatic adenocarcinomas, with particular focus on the demonstration of different types of sialomucins. We applied the following histochemical techniques to routinely processed, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections: Alcian blue (pH 2.5) and periodic acid-Schiff to reveal both acidic and neutral mucins; high iron diamine and Alcian blue (pH 2.5) to show sulfated and acidic nonsulfated mucosubstances simultaneously; periodic acid borohydride, potassium hydroxide, and periodic acid-Schiff to demonstrate O-acylated sialic acids; periodic acid thionine-Schiff, potassium hydroxide, and periodic acid-Schiff to differentiate pre-existing glycols from those revealed after saponification procedures; and periodic acid borohydride and periodic acid-Schiff to show C9-O-acylated sialic acid. These techniques are useful tools for demonstrating neutral and acidic (sialo- and sulfo-) mucins and di(C8,C9- or C7,C9-)-O-acylated, tri(C7,C8,C9-)-O-acylated and mono(C9)-O-acylated sialomucins. Most prostatic adenocarcinomas showed acidic mucins, with sialomucins predominating over sulfomucins. Well-differentiated and moderately differentiated noncolloid tumors had non-O-acylated sialomucins. Poorly differentiated tumors contained mono-O-acylated (C9) sialomucins, and colloid-type tumors secreted mono-, di-, and tri-O-acylated sialoglycoproteins. Acidic mucins, mainly sialomucins, constitute the major secretory component in prostatic adenocarcinomas, and our results show that the O-acylation of these sialoglycoproteins inversely correlates with tumor differentiation. Well-differentiated and moderately differentiated tumors are not O-acylated, whereas the poorly differentiated ones characteristically have O

  12. Architectural heterogeneity and cribriform pattern predict adverse clinical outcome for Gleason grade 4 prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fei; Yang, Ping; Wang, Chaofu; Wu, Shulin; Xiao, Yu; McDougal, W Scott; Young, Robert H; Wu, Chin-Lee

    2013-12-01

    Gleason grade 4 defines a group of prostatic adenocarcinomas with a variety of architectural patterns, including poorly formed glands, fused glands, and cribriform pattern. To address the relative contribution to clinical prognosis by these distinct patterns, the histology of 241 consecutive radical prostatectomy specimens with the highest Gleason grade of 4 was reviewed. The presence of poorly formed glands, fused glands, and cribriform pattern was recorded for each case, and the types of architectural patterns present were associated with patient outcome. In this population, prostatic adenocarcinomas demonstrated architectural heterogeneity, with 17% of cases exhibiting a single Gleason grade 4 pattern, and 41% of cases exhibiting all 3 morphologic patterns. Patients exhibiting all 3 architectural patterns had lower rates of biochemical disease-free survival (66% vs. 76% at 5 y; log rank P=0.006). Twenty-two of 165 patients (13.3%) with cribriform pattern adenocarcinoma developed metastasis, whereas 2 of 76 patients (2.6%) without cribriform pattern developed metastasis at a median postoperative follow-up of 10.0 years. The presence of a cribriform pattern was an independent predictor for biochemical recurrence (hazard ratio 2.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-4.32; P=0.003) as well as metastasis after radical prostatectomy (hazard ratio 5.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-24.5; P=0.02). These results suggest that the morphologic subclassification of distinct Gleason grade 4 architectural patterns provides prognostic information beyond the current Gleason classification system.

  13. Incremental learning with SVM for multimodal classification of prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    García Molina, José Fernando; Zheng, Lei; Sertdemir, Metin; Dinter, Dietmar J; Schönberg, Stefan; Rädle, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Robust detection of prostatic cancer is a challenge due to the multitude of variants and their representation in MR images. We propose a pattern recognition system with an incremental learning ensemble algorithm using support vector machines (SVM) tackling this problem employing multimodal MR images and a texture-based information strategy. The proposed system integrates anatomic, texture, and functional features. The data set was preprocessed using B-Spline interpolation, bias field correction and intensity standardization. First- and second-order angular independent statistical approaches and rotation invariant local phase quantization (RI-LPQ) were utilized to quantify texture information. An incremental learning ensemble SVM was implemented to suit working conditions in medical applications and to improve effectiveness and robustness of the system. The probability estimation of cancer structures was calculated using SVM and the corresponding optimization was carried out with a heuristic method together with a 3-fold cross-validation methodology. We achieved an average sensitivity of 0.844 ± 0.068 and a specificity of 0.780 ± 0.038, which yielded superior or similar performance to current state of the art using a total database of only 41 slices from twelve patients with histological confirmed information, including cancerous, unhealthy non-cancerous and healthy prostate tissue. Our results show the feasibility of an ensemble SVM being able to learn additional information from new data while preserving previously acquired knowledge and preventing unlearning. The use of texture descriptors provides more salient discriminative patterns than the functional information used. Furthermore, the system improves selection of information, efficiency and robustness of the classification. The generated probability map enables radiologists to have a lower variability in diagnosis, decrease false negative rates and reduce the time to recognize and delineate structures in

  14. 68Ga PSMA PET/CT in a Rare Case of Metastatic Adenocarcinoma Prostate Presenting as Numb Chin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, M R A; Gopal, Renuka; Thomas, Boben

    2017-03-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with right-side facial numbness. MRI showed an extra-axial mass infiltrating the right temporal bone. It was debulked surgically, and histopathology revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma. Ga PSMA PET/CT done in view of increased PSA levels and clinically suspicious hard lesion in prostate showed primary lesion in left side of prostate with metastases to the right temporal bone. Primary carcinoma of the prostate and metastases to the right temporal bone were proven histopathologically. Our case highlights the usefulness of Ga PSMA PET/CT in identifying the primary site in suspected prostate cancer and mapping the metastatic sites.

  15. Interactions in the aetiology, presentation and management of synchronous and metachronous adenocarcinoma of the prostate and rectum.

    PubMed

    Nash, G F; Turner, K J; Hickish, T; Smith, J; Chand, M; Moran, B J

    2012-10-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the prostate and rectum are common male pelvic cancers and may present synchronously or metachronously due to their anatomic proximity. The treatment of rectal or prostate cancer (in particular surgery and/or radiotherapy) may alter the presentation, incidence and management should a metachronous tumour develop. This review focuses on the interaction between prostatic and rectal cancer diagnosis and management. We have restricted the scope of this large topic to general considerations, management of rectal cancer after prostate cancer treatment and vice versa, management of synchronous disease and cancer follow-up issues.

  16. Mouse models for studying prostate cancer bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jinlu; Hensel, Janine; Wang, Ning; Kruithof-de Julio, Marianna; Shiozawa, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Once tumor cells metastasize to the bone, the prognosis for prostate cancer patients is generally very poor. The mechanisms involved in bone metastasis, however, remain elusive, because of lack of relevant animal models. In this manuscript, we describe step-by-step protocols for the xenograft mouse models that are currently used for studying prostate cancer bone metastasis. The different routes of tumor inoculation (intraosseous, intracardiac, intravenous and orthotopic) presented are useful for exploring the biology of bone metastasis. PMID:26916039

  17. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Gamat, Melissa; Malinowski, Rita L.; Parkhurst, Linnea J.; Steinke, Laura M.; Marker, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO) to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effect in mediating

  18. Histopathological features of ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate in 1,051 radical prostatectomy specimens.

    PubMed

    Seipel, Amanda H; Wiklund, Fredrik; Wiklund, N Peter; Egevad, Lars

    2013-04-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma (DAC) of the prostate is thought to have worse prognosis than prostatic acinar carcinoma (PAC). We aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of histopathological patterns of DAC. A series of 1,051 radical prostatectomy specimens from Karolinska University Hospital 1998-2005 was reviewed. A ductal component was classified as classical DAC (DACC) if it had columnar, pseudostratified epithelium, elongated nuclei, and papillary, glandular, or cribriform architecture; borderline DAC (DACB) if it lacked elongated nuclei or classical architecture; and prostatic adenocarcinoma with ductal features (PCDF) if stratified high-grade nuclei were found. DACC, DACB, and PCDF were seen in 2.6, 4.0, and 1.6 % of the cases. DAC was usually mixed with PAC and constituted 10-100 % (mean 40 %) of the main tumor. Location was periurethral, peripheral, or both in 69.8, 3.5, and 26.7 %. Necrosis was seen in 31.3 %, stromal invasion of DAC in 52.3 %, and intraductal spread in 91.9 %. In DACC/DACB and PAC, extraprostatic extension was seen in 66.7 and 42.4 % (p < 0.001) and seminal vesicle invasion in 13.0 and 5.0 % (p = 0.0045). DACC, DACB, and PCDF had a hazard ratio for biochemical recurrence of 1.5 (0.7-2.8), 1.4 (0.8-2.6) and 1.2 (0.5-2.7). When PCDF was excluded from DAC, hazard ratio was 1.4 (95 % CI 0.9-2.3, p = 0.12). Location, % DAC, necrosis, stromal invasion, or Gleason score were not predictive of recurrence. This suggests that DACC and DACB are more aggressive than average PAC, while cancers with acinar architecture and pseudostratified high-grade nuclei should not be included in DAC.

  19. Identification of FISH biomarkers to detect chromosome abnormalities associated with prostate adenocarcinoma in tumour and field effect environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To reduce sampling error associated with cancer detection in prostate needle biopsies, we explored the possibility of using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) to detect chromosomal abnormalities in the histologically benign prostate tissue from patients with adenocarcinoma of prostate. Methods Tumour specimens from 33 radical prostatectomy (RP) cases, histologically benign tissue from 17 of the 33 RP cases, and 26 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) control cases were evaluated with Locus Specific Identifier (LSI) probes MYC (8q24), LPL (8p21.22), and PTEN (10q23), as well as with centromere enumerator probes CEP8, CEP10, and CEP7. A distribution of FISH signals in the tumour and histologically benign adjacent tissue was compared to that in BPH specimens using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results The combination of MYC gain, CEP8 Abnormal, PTEN loss or chromosome 7 aneusomy was positive in the tumour area of all of the 33 specimens from patients with adenocarcinomas, and in 88% of adjacent histologically benign regions (15 out of 17) but in only 15% (4 out of 26) of the benign prostatic hyperplasia control specimens. Conclusions A panel of FISH markers may allow detection of genomic abnormalities that associate with adenocarcinoma in the field adjacent to and surrounding the tumour, and thus could potentially indicate the presence of cancer in the specimen even if the cancer focus itself was missed by biopsy and histology review. PMID:24568597

  20. Proapoptotic effects of new pentabromobenzylisothiouronium salts in a human prostate adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Koronkiewicz, Mirosława; Kazimierczuk, Zygmunt; Szarpak, Kinga; Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in elderly men worldwide and its incidence rate is rising continuously. Agents capable of inducing apoptosis in prostate cancer cells seem a promising approach to treat this malignancy. In this study we describe the synthesis of a number of novel N- and N,N'-substituted S-2,3,4,5,6-pentabromobenzylisothiouronium bromides and their activity against the human prostate adenocarcinoma PC3 cell line. All the compounds produced changes in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cell cycle progression, showed a cytostatic effect and induced apoptosis in the tested cancer line in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The most effective compounds ZKK-3, ZKK-9 and ZKK-13 produced, at 20 microM concentration, apoptosis in 42, 46, and 66% of the cells, respectively, after 48 h incubation. Two selected S-2,3,4,5,6-pentabromobenzylisothiouronium bromides (ZKK-3, ZKK-9) showed also a synergic proapoptotic effect with the new casein kinase II inhibitor 2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (TBIPIP) in the PC3 cell line.

  1. Deep RNA sequencing analysis of readthrough gene fusions in human prostate adenocarcinoma and reference samples

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Readthrough fusions across adjacent genes in the genome, or transcription-induced chimeras (TICs), have been estimated using expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries to involve 4-6% of all genes. Deep transcriptional sequencing (RNA-Seq) now makes it possible to study the occurrence and expression levels of TICs in individual samples across the genome. Methods We performed single-end RNA-Seq on three human prostate adenocarcinoma samples and their corresponding normal tissues, as well as brain and universal reference samples. We developed two bioinformatics methods to specifically identify TIC events: a targeted alignment method using artificial exon-exon junctions within 200,000 bp from adjacent genes, and genomic alignment allowing splicing within individual reads. We performed further experimental verification and characterization of selected TIC and fusion events using quantitative RT-PCR and comparative genomic hybridization microarrays. Results Targeted alignment against artificial exon-exon junctions yielded 339 distinct TIC events, including 32 gene pairs with multiple isoforms. The false discovery rate was estimated to be 1.5%. Spliced alignment to the genome was less sensitive, finding only 18% of those found by targeted alignment in 33-nt reads and 59% of those in 50-nt reads. However, spliced alignment revealed 30 cases of TICs with intervening exons, in addition to distant inversions, scrambled genes, and translocations. Our findings increase the catalog of observed TIC gene pairs by 66%. We verified 6 of 6 predicted TICs in all prostate samples, and 2 of 5 predicted novel distant gene fusions, both private events among 54 prostate tumor samples tested. Expression of TICs correlates with that of the upstream gene, which can explain the prostate-specific pattern of some TIC events and the restriction of the SLC45A3-ELK4 e4-e2 TIC to ERG-negative prostate samples, as confirmed in 20 matched prostate tumor and normal samples and 9 lung cancer

  2. Cell Lineage Analysis of Mouse Prostate Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    epithelial stem cells are efficient targets for prostate cancer initiation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of...America 2010, 107(6):2610-2615. 4. Dor Y, Brown J, Martinez OI, Melton DA: Adult pancreatic beta- cells are formed by self- duplication rather than stem ...Shen C, Shen MM: A luminal epithelial stem cell that is a cell of origin for prostate cancer. Nature 2009, 461(7263):495-500. 6. Liu J, Pascal LE

  3. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2-ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for

  4. Impact of Prostate Inflammation on Lesion Development in the POET3+Pten+/− Mouse Model of Prostate Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Burcham, Grant N.; Cresswell, Gregory M.; Snyder, Paul W.; Chen, Long; Liu, Xiaoqi; Crist, Scott A.; Henry, Michael D.; Ratliff, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence linking prostatitis and prostate cancer development is contradictory. To study this link, the POET3 mouse, an inducible model of prostatitis, was crossed with a Pten-loss model of prostate cancer (Pten+/−) containing the ROSA26 luciferase allele to monitor prostate size. Prostatitis was induced, and prostate bioluminescence was tracked over 12 months, with lesion development, inflammation, and cytokine expression analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 months and compared with mice without induction of prostatitis. Acute prostatitis led to more proliferative epithelium and enhanced bioluminescence. However, 4 months after initiation of prostatitis, mice with induced inflammation had lower grade pre-neoplastic lesions. A trend existed toward greater development of carcinoma 12 months after induction of inflammation, including one of two mice with carcinoma developing perineural invasion. Two of 18 mice at the later time points developed lesions with similarities to proliferative inflammatory atrophy, including one mouse with associated carcinoma. Pten+/− mice developed spontaneous inflammation, and prostatitis was similar among groups of mice at 8 and 12 months. Analyzed as one cohort, lesion number and grade were positively correlated with prostatitis. Specifically, amounts of CD11b+Gr1+ cells were correlated with lesion development. These results support the hypothesis that myeloid-based inflammation is associated with lesion development in the murine prostate, and previous bouts of CD8-driven prostatitis may promote invasion in the Pten+/− model of cancer. PMID:25455686

  5. Selective expression of myosin IC Isoform A in mouse and human cell lines and mouse prostate cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Sielski, Neil L; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2014-01-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily. We recently identified a novel isoform and showed that the MYOIC gene in mammalian cells encodes three isoforms (isoforms A, B, and C). Furthermore, we demonstrated that myosin IC isoform A but not isoform B exhibits a tissue specific expression pattern. In this study, we extended our analysis of myosin IC isoform expression patterns by analyzing the protein and mRNA expression in various mammalian cell lines and in various prostate specimens and tumor tissues from the transgenic mouse prostate (TRAMP) model by immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and by indirect immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded prostate specimen. Analysis of a panel of mammalian cell lines showed an increased mRNA and protein expression of specifically myosin IC isoform A in a panel of human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines but not in non-cancer prostate or other (non-prostate-) cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myosin IC isoform A expression is significantly increased in TRAMP mouse prostate samples with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) lesions and in distant site metastases in lung and liver when compared to matched normal tissues. Our observations demonstrate specific changes in the expression of myosin IC isoform A that are concurrent with the occurrence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse prostate cancer model that closely mimics clinical prostate cancer. These data suggest that elevated levels of myosin IC isoform A may be a potential marker for the detection of prostate cancer.

  6. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer What Is Prostate Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  7. Zinc-sensitive MRI contrast agent detects differential release of Zn(II) ions from the healthy vs. malignant mouse prostate

    PubMed Central

    Clavijo Jordan, M. Veronica; Lo, Su-Tang; Chen, Shiuhwei; Preihs, Christian; Chirayil, Sara; Zhang, Shanrong; Kapur, Payal; Li, Wen-Hong; De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M.; Lubag, Angelo J. M.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Sherry, A. Dean

    2016-01-01

    Many secretory tissues release Zn(II) ions along with other molecules in response to external stimuli. Here we demonstrate that secretion of Zn(II) ions from normal, healthy prostate tissue is stimulated by glucose in fasted mice and that release of Zn(II) can be monitored by MRI. An ∼50% increase in water proton signal enhancement is observed in T1-weighted images of the healthy mouse prostate after infusion of a Gd-based Zn(II) sensor and an i.p. bolus of glucose. Release of Zn(II) from intracellular stores was validated in human epithelial prostate cells in vitro and in surgically exposed prostate tissue in vivo using a Zn(II)-sensitive fluorescent probe known to bind to the extracellular surface of cells. Given the known differences in intracellular Zn(II) stores in healthy versus malignant prostate tissues, the Zn(II) sensor was then evaluated in a transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model in vivo. The agent proved successful in detecting small malignant lesions as early as 11 wk of age, making this noninvasive MR imaging method potentially useful for identifying prostate cancer in situations where it may be difficult to detect using current multiparametric MRI protocols. PMID:27562169

  8. Zinc-sensitive MRI contrast agent detects differential release of Zn(II) ions from the healthy vs. malignant mouse prostate.

    PubMed

    Clavijo Jordan, M Veronica; Lo, Su-Tang; Chen, Shiuhwei; Preihs, Christian; Chirayil, Sara; Zhang, Shanrong; Kapur, Payal; Li, Wen-Hong; De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M; Lubag, Angelo J M; Rofsky, Neil M; Sherry, A Dean

    2016-09-13

    Many secretory tissues release Zn(II) ions along with other molecules in response to external stimuli. Here we demonstrate that secretion of Zn(II) ions from normal, healthy prostate tissue is stimulated by glucose in fasted mice and that release of Zn(II) can be monitored by MRI. An ∼50% increase in water proton signal enhancement is observed in T1-weighted images of the healthy mouse prostate after infusion of a Gd-based Zn(II) sensor and an i.p. bolus of glucose. Release of Zn(II) from intracellular stores was validated in human epithelial prostate cells in vitro and in surgically exposed prostate tissue in vivo using a Zn(II)-sensitive fluorescent probe known to bind to the extracellular surface of cells. Given the known differences in intracellular Zn(II) stores in healthy versus malignant prostate tissues, the Zn(II) sensor was then evaluated in a transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model in vivo. The agent proved successful in detecting small malignant lesions as early as 11 wk of age, making this noninvasive MR imaging method potentially useful for identifying prostate cancer in situations where it may be difficult to detect using current multiparametric MRI protocols.

  9. Gray level entropy matrix is a superior predictor than multiplex ELISA in the detection of reactive stroma and metastatic potential of high-grade prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaopeng; Sun, Yanan; Wang, Baozhi

    2014-12-01

    Recent reports have indicated that not only the primary glandular tissue but also the surrounding stromal tissue plays an active role in the progression of carcinoma. Such is true for cancer tissues arising in the prostate. However, the precise role of stromal tissue in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate adenocarcinoma is not well described. We undertook this current investigation to examine the changes in orientation of the extracellular matrix and correlate with prostatic cancer progression. We used a novel form of image analysis called gray level entropy matrix (GLEM) texture analysis to evaluate morphometric changes in stromal tissues. We used normal prostatic tissue obtained from cadaveric specimen and compared with BPH, prostatic intraepithelium neoplastic, hormone responsive prostatic adenocarcinoma and castration-resistant prostatic adenocarcinoma tissues. GLEM showed higher entropy in disease-resistant prostatic tissues, compared with benign forms of all spectra of pathologically diagnosed prostatic tissues (P < 0.05, ANOVA, between groups). Higher entropy is reflective of the disorganized morphological organization of the stroma, possibly reflecting the reactive matrix. In contrast, ELISA revealed that although individually correlated with the progressive stages of benign and carcinomatous prostatic tissues and trend correlation between groups, intergroup comparisons failed to arrive at statistical significance of comparisons between markers of neovasculogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (beta1-integrin, E-cadherin, MMP3) and osteogenic metastasis (RANKL and osteoprotegerin). The results of our study demonstrate the potential of GLEM entropy of gray level pixel in providing quasiquantitative estimate of a reactive stroma in advance stages of prostatic adenocarcinoma and thus can be routinely used in clinical decision making.

  10. Olaparib With or Without Cediranib in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Castration-Resistant Prostate Carcinoma; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma With Focal Neuroendocrine Differentiation; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Prostate Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Adenocarcinoma

  11. Mutational landscape of EGFR-, MYC-, and Kras-driven genetically engineered mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, David G.; Politi, Katerina; Bhutkar, Arjun; Chen, Frances K.; Song, Xiaoling; Pirun, Mono; Santiago, Philip M.; Kim-Kiselak, Caroline; Platt, James T.; Lee, Emily; Hodges, Emily; Rosebrock, Adam P.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Jacks, Tyler; Varmus, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of cancer are increasingly being used to assess putative driver mutations identified by large-scale sequencing of human cancer genomes. To accurately interpret experiments that introduce additional mutations, an understanding of the somatic genetic profile and evolution of GEMM tumors is necessary. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing of tumors from three GEMMs of lung adenocarcinoma driven by mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras), or overexpression of MYC proto-oncogene. Tumors from EGFR- and Kras-driven models exhibited, respectively, 0.02 and 0.07 nonsynonymous mutations per megabase, a dramatically lower average mutational frequency than observed in human lung adenocarcinomas. Tumors from models driven by strong cancer drivers (mutant EGFR and Kras) harbored few mutations in known cancer genes, whereas tumors driven by MYC, a weaker initiating oncogene in the murine lung, acquired recurrent clonal oncogenic Kras mutations. In addition, although EGFR- and Kras-driven models both exhibited recurrent whole-chromosome DNA copy number alterations, the specific chromosomes altered by gain or loss were different in each model. These data demonstrate that GEMM tumors exhibit relatively simple somatic genotypes compared with human cancers of a similar type, making these autochthonous model systems useful for additive engineering approaches to assess the potential of novel mutations on tumorigenesis, cancer progression, and drug sensitivity. PMID:27702896

  12. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-05-01

    From 1971--1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF{sub 1} mice irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. Absence of any of these fragments on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. Tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southern blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, 1 of 6 tumors from {gamma}-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice showed a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5{prime} region of the mRb gene.

  13. Immunostimulatory early phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages does not predict tumor growth outcome in an HLA-DR mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Riabov, Vladimir; Kim, David; Chhina, Surmeet; Alexander, Richard B; Klyushnenkova, Elena N

    2015-07-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) were shown to support the progression of many solid tumors. However, anti-tumor properties of TAM were also reported in several types of cancer. Here, we investigated the phenotype and functions of TAM in two transgenic mouse models of prostate cancer that display striking differences in tumor growth outcome. Mice expressing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a self-antigen specifically in prostate (PSAtg mice) rejected PSA-expressing transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) tumors. However, the introduction of HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2b) transgene presenting PSA-derived peptides in a MHC class II-restricted manner exacerbated the growth of TRAMP-PSA tumors in DR2bxPSA F 1 mice. Despite the difference in tumor growth outcome, tumors in both strains were equally and intensively infiltrated by macrophages on the first week after tumor challenge. TAM exhibited mixed M1/M2 polarization and simultaneously produced pro-inflammatory (TNFα, IL1β) and anti-inflammatory (IL10) cytokines. TAM from both mouse strains demonstrated antigen-presenting potential and pronounced immunostimulatory activity. Moreover, they equally induced apoptosis of tumor cells. In vivo depletion of macrophages in DR2bxPSA F 1 but not PSAtg mice aggravated tumor growth suggesting that macrophages more strongly contribute to anti-tumor immunity when specific presentation of PSA to CD4+ T cells is possible. In summary, we conclude that in the early stages of tumor progression, the phenotype and functional properties of TAM did not predict tumor growth outcome in two transgenic prostate cancer models. Furthermore, we demonstrated that during the initial stage of prostate cancer development, TAM have the potential to activate T cell immunity and mediate anti-tumor effects.

  14. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1993-04-01

    From 1971 to 1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF{sub 1} mice irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons; normal and tumor tissues from mice in these studies were preserved in paraffin blocks. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been developed to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene in the paraffin-embedded tissues. Microtomed sections were used as the DNA source in PCR reaction mixtures. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. The absence of any of these fragments (relative to control PCR products) on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. The tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice (569 cGy of {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays or 60 cGy of JANUS neutrons, doses that have been found to have approximately equal biological effectiveness in the BCF, mouse) were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies, all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southem blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, I of 6 tumors from {gamma}-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice had a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5{prime} region of the mRb gene.

  15. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    From 1971 to 1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF[sub 1] mice irradiated with [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons; normal and tumor tissues from mice in these studies were preserved in paraffin blocks. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been developed to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene in the paraffin-embedded tissues. Microtomed sections were used as the DNA source in PCR reaction mixtures. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. The absence of any of these fragments (relative to control PCR products) on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. The tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice (569 cGy of [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays or 60 cGy of JANUS neutrons, doses that have been found to have approximately equal biological effectiveness in the BCF, mouse) were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies, all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southem blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, I of 6 tumors from [gamma]-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice had a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5[prime] region of the mRb gene.

  16. 1.5T MRI-guided trans-perineal laser ablation of locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, E. Frederick; Mynderse, Lance A.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; McNichols, Roger J.; Atwell, Thomas D.; Gettman, Matthew T.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Kawashima, Akira; Woodrum, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after definitive therapy with radical prostatectomy (RP) is known to occur between 25-30%. We present the first known case of 1.5T MRI guided ablation using laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer following RP. Methods: The patient elected to undergo MRI-guided LITT of the biopsy proven cancer recurrence using an FDAapproved MRI compatible, 980nm, 15-watt laser system with MR thermometry. Under T2-weighted MR(1.5T Siemens) imaging, guidance and targeting of the lesions with trans-perineal placement of laser applicators. Multiple cycles of laser energy were used to ablate the tumor. A MRI-compatible urethral cooling catheter was placed to prevent urethral thermal damage. Results: Intra-procedural temperature mapping allowed continuous monitoring of the ablation zone and permitted ablation control until tumor coverage was achieved. Additionally, the protective cooling effects of the urethral cooling catheter could also be seen with the temperature mapping. Post-ablation gadolinium and T2 weighted MR imaging demonstrated an ablation defect encompassing the recurrent tumor with no residual hyper-enhancing nodules. Three month follow-up shows no residual or recurrent tumor seen on MR imaging. Conclusion: This represents the first known, successful, MRI-guided, LITT procedures at 1.5T for locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following RP.

  17. mTOR pathway activation is a favorable prognostic factor in human prostate adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stelloo, Suzan; Sanders, Joyce; Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; de Jong, Jeroen; Peters, Dennis; van Leenders, Geert J.L.H.; Jenster, Guido; Bergman, Andries M.; Zwart, Wilbert

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer patients with localized disease are treated with curative intent. However, the disease will recur in approximately 30% of patients with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. Prognostic biomarkers are needed to identify patients with high risk of relapse. mTOR pathway activation is reported in prostate cancer, but clinical trials testing efficacy of mTOR inhibitors were unsuccessful. To explain this clinical observation, we studied the expression and prognostic impact of mTOR-S2448 phosphorylation in localized prostate carcinomas. mTOR-S2448 phosphorylation is indicative for an activated mTOR pathway in prostate cancer. Surprisingly, the mTOR signaling pathway is activated specifically in prostate cancer patients with a favorable outcome. Since tumors from poor-outcome patients have low levels of mTOR-S2448 phosphorylation, this may explain why mTOR inhibitors proved unsuccessful in prostate cancer trials. PMID:27096957

  18. Nociceptive and Inflammatory Mediator Upregulation in a Mouse Model of Chronic Prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Erica S.; Xie, Amy; La, Jun-Ho; Gebhart, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis, characterized by genitourinary pain in the pelvic region in the absence of an identifiable cause, is common in adult males. Surprisingly, the sensory innervation of the prostate and mediators that sensitize its innervation have received little attention. We thus characterized a mouse model of chronic prostatitis, focusing on the prostate innervation and how organ inflammation affects gene expression of putative nociceptive markers in prostate afferent somata in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and mediators in the prostate. Retrograde tracing (fast blue, FB) from the prostate revealed that thoracolumbar (TL) and lumbosacral (LS) DRG are the principal sources of somata of prostate afferents. Nociceptive markers (e.g., TRP, TREK and P2X channels) were upregulated in FB-labeled TL and LS somata for up to four weeks after inflaming the prostate (intra-prostate injection of zymosan). Prostatic inflammation was evident histologically, by monocyte infiltration and a significant increase in mast cell tryptase activity 14, 21 and 28 days after zymosan injection. Interleukin-10 and NGF were also significantly upregulated in the prostate throughout the four weeks of inflammation. Open field pain-related behaviors (e.g., rearing) were unchanged in prostate-inflamed mice, suggesting the absence of ongoing nociception, but withdrawal thresholds to lower abdominal pressure were significantly reduced. The increases in IL-10, mast cell tryptase and NGF in the inflamed prostate were cotemporaneous with reduced thresholds to probing of the abdomen and upregulation of nociceptive markers in DRG somata innervating the prostate. The results provide insight and direction for study of mechanisms underlying pain in chronic prostatitis. PMID:25915147

  19. ROCK signalling induced gene expression changes in mouse pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Nicola; Kalna, Gabriela; Clark, William; Olson, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The RhoA and RhoC GTPases act via the ROCK1 and ROCK2 kinases to promote actomyosin contraction, resulting in directly induced changes in cytoskeleton structures and altered gene transcription via several possible indirect routes. Elevated activation of the Rho/ROCK pathway has been reported in several diseases and pathological conditions, including disorders of the central nervous system, cardiovascular dysfunctions and cancer. To determine how increased ROCK signalling affected gene expression in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, we transduced mouse PDAC cell lines with retroviral constructs encoding fusion proteins that enable conditional activation of ROCK1 or ROCK2, and subsequently performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) using the Illumina NextSeq 500 platform. We describe how gene expression datasets were generated and validated by comparing data obtained by RNA-Seq with RT-qPCR results. Activation of ROCK1 or ROCK2 signalling induced significant changes in gene expression that could be used to determine how actomyosin contractility influences gene transcription in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27824338

  20. Dysfunctional Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor II Accelerates Prostate Tumorigenesis in the TRAMP Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Hong; Collazo, Joanne; Jones, Elisabeth; Gayheart, Dustin; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Vogt, Adam; Mitchell, Bonnie; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of a dysfunctional TGF-β type II receptor (TGFβRII) to prostate cancer initiation and progression was investigated in an in vivo mouse model. Transgenic mice harboring the dominant-negative mutant TGF-β type II receptor (DNTGFβRII) in mouse epithelial cell were crossed with the TRAMP prostate cancer transgenic mouse to characterize the in vivo consequences of inactivated TGF-β signaling on prostate tumor initiation and progression. Histopathological diagnosis of prostate specimens from the TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII double transgenic mice, revealed the appearance of early malignant changes and subsequently highly aggressive prostate tumors at a younger age, compared to littermates TRAMP+/Wt TGFβRII mice. Immunohistochemical and western blotting analysis revealed significantly increased proliferative and apoptotic activities, as well as vascularity and macrophage infiltration that correlated with an elevated VEGF and MCP-1 protein levels in prostates from TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII+ mice. An epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-effect was also detected in prostates of TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII mice, as documented by the loss of epithelial markers (E-cadherin and β-catenin) and upregulation of mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin) and EMT-transcription factor Snail. A significant increase in the androgen receptor (AR) mRNA and protein levels was associated with the early onset of prostate tumorigenesis in TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII mice. Our results indicate that in vivo disruption of TGF-β signaling accelerates the pathological malignant changes in the prostate by altering the kinetics of prostate growth and inducing EMT. The study also suggests that a dysfunctional TGFβRII augments AR expression and promotes inflammation in early stage tumor growth thus conferring a significant contribution by TGF-β to prostate cancer progression. PMID:19738062

  1. A novel intraperitoneal metastatic xenograft mouse model for survival outcome assessment of esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Niranjan; Li, Jun; Schwarz, Margaret A.; Schwarz, Roderich E.; von Holzen, Urs

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has become the dominant type of esophageal cancer in United States. The 5-year survival rate of EAC is below 20% and most patients present with locally advanced or widespread metastatic disease, where current treatment is largely ineffective. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches are urgently needed. Improvement of EAC patient outcome requires well-characterized animal models in which to evaluate novel therapeutics. In this study we aimed to establish a peritoneal dissemination xenograft mouse model of EAC that would support survival outcome analyses. To find the best candidate cell line from 7 human EAC cell lines of different origin named ESO26, OE33, ESO51, SK-GT-2, OE19, OACM5.1C and Flo-1 were injected intraperitoneally/subcutaneously into SCID mice. The peritoneal/xenograft tumor formation and mouse survival were compared among different groups. All cell lines injected subcutaneously formed tumors within 3 months at variable rates. All cell lines except OACM5.1C formed intraperitoneal tumors within 3 months at variable rates. Median animal survival with peritoneal dissemination was 108 days for ESO26 cells (5X106), 65 days for OE33 cells (5X106), 88 days for ESO51 cells (5X106), 76 days for SK-GT-2 cells (5X106), 55 days for OE19 cells (5X106), 45 days for OE19 cells (10X106) and 82 days for Flo-1 cells (5X106). Interestingly, only in the OE19 model all mice (7/7 for 5X106 and 5/5 for10X106) developed bloody ascites with liver metastasis after intraperitoneal injection. The median survival time of these animals was the shortest (45 days for 10X106 cells). In addition, median survival was significantly increased after paclitaxel treatment compared with the control group (57 days versus 45 days, p = 0.0034) along with a significant decrease of the relative subcutaneous tumor volume (p = 0.00011). Thus peritoneal dissemination mouse xenograft model for survival outcome assessment after intraperitoneal injection of OE19 cells will

  2. Differences in toxicity and outcome associated with circadian variations between patients undergoing daytime and evening radiotherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Feng-Ming; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Wang, Chia-Chun; Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Tsai, Yu-Chieh; Yu, Hong-Jeng; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study tested the hypothesis that disease control and treatment-related toxicity in patients undergoing high-dose radiotherapy (HDRT) for prostate cancer varies in a circadian manner. Patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma receiving HDRT (median 78 Gy) to the prostate and involved seminal vesicle(s) without elective pelvic irradiation were divided into a daytime treatment (before 5 PM) group (n = 267) and evening treatment (after 5 PM) group (n = 142). Biochemical failure (Phoenix definition), acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary toxicities (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4), biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) and freedom from late toxicity were assessed. Analyses were performed by binary logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard regression. The median follow-up was 68 months, and 75% of patients were ≥70 years old. Evening HDRT was significantly associated with worse freedom from ≥grade 2 late GI complications (hazard ratio = 2.96; p < 0.001). The detrimental effect of evening HDRT was significant in patients older than 70 years old (p < 0.001) but not in younger patients (p = 0.63). In a subgroup of propensity score-matched cohort with T2b-T3 disease (n = 154), the 5-year BFFS was worse in the evening group than the daytime group (72% vs. 85%, hazard ratio = 1.95, p = 0.05). Our study indicates that evening HDRT may lead to more GI complications, especially in older patients, and worse BFFS in patients with T2b-T3 disease.

  3. Usual and unusual histologic patterns of high Gleason score 8 to 10 adenocarcinoma of the prostate in needle biopsy tissue.

    PubMed

    Gottipati, Srinivas; Warncke, Jason; Vollmer, Robin; Humphrey, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    High Gleason score 8 to 10 adenocarcinoma is the most aggressive and potentially lethal form of prostate cancer. The 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP)-modified Gleason grading scheme defines several gland arrangements of high Gleason grade patterns 4 and 5. The aim of this investigation was to quantitate the frequency of the ISUP-defined high Gleason grade patterns in needle biopsy tissue, to determine the common admixtures and to characterize patterns not presented in the 2005 ISUP report. For patients who underwent radical prostatectomy, we analyzed for association of specific high-grade patterns in needle biopsy with extraprostatic extension in radical prostatectomy tissues. A total of 268 prostate needle biopsy cases with Gleason score of 8 to 10 were examined. A mean of 3.6 patterns (range, 1 to 8) were identified per case and only 12% of cases had a pure single pattern. Ill-defined glands with poorly formed lumina (at 57%) and fused microacinar glands (at 53%) comprised the predominant and most frequently admixed patterns. Single cells and single signet ring cells were present in 53% and 31% of cases, respectively. Additional patterns in order of frequency included cords (35%), cribriform glands (25%), sheets of cells (19%), chains (4%), glomeruloid (3%), comedonecrosis (2%), and hypernephromatoid (1 case=0.3%). Gleason score 8 to 10 carcinomas are typically extensive in needle core tissue, with a mean of 4.4 positive cores (range, 1 to 15 cores) per case. Only 14 cases (5%) had high-grade minimal carcinoma measuring <1 mm in needle core tissue. Gleason grade patterns not described in the 2005 ISUP report include single file growth, solid cylinders, and nested patterns. The single file pattern was present in 40% of cases, and the small solid nested pattern was detected in 24% of cases. One case displayed solid cylinders. Only the single file pattern was associated with extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy (P=0.005). These

  4. Induction of apoptosis in the LNCaP human prostate carcinoma cell line and prostate adenocarcinomas of SV40T antigen transgenic rats by the Bowman-Birk inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tang, MingXi; Asamoto, Makoto; Ogawa, Kumiko; Naiki-Ito, Aya; Sato, Shinya; Takahashi, Satoru; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2009-11-01

    The soybean-derived serine protease inhibitor, Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), has been reported as a potent chemoprevention agent against several types of tumors. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of BBI on androgen-sensitive/dependent prostate cancers using a human prostate cancer cell (LNCaP) and the transgenic rats developing adenocarcinoma of the prostate (TRAP) model. Treatment of LNCaP prostate cancer cells with 500 microg/mL BBI resulted in inhibition of viability measured on WST-1 assays, with induction of connexin 43 (Cx43) and cleaved caspase-3 protein expression. Feeding of 3% roughly prepared BBI (BBIC) to TRAP from the age 3 weeks to 13 weeks resulted in significant reduction of the relative epithelial areas within the acinus and multiplicity of the adenocarcinomas in the lateral prostate lobes. Cx43- and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP-biotin end labeling of fragmented DNA (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic cancer cells were more frequently observed in the lateral prostates treated with BBIC than in the controls. These in vivo and in vitro results suggest that BBI possesses chemopreventive activity associated with induction of Cx43 expression and apoptosis.

  5. Anti-tumor effect of the alphavirus-based virus-like particle vector expressing prostate-specific antigen in a HLA-DR transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Riabov, V; Tretyakova, I; Alexander, R B; Pushko, P; Klyushnenkova, E N

    2015-10-05

    The goal of this study was to determine if an alphavirus-based vaccine encoding human Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) could generate an effective anti-tumor immune response in a stringent mouse model of prostate cancer. DR2bxPSA F1 male mice expressing human PSA and HLA-DRB1(*)1501 transgenes were vaccinated with virus-like particle vector encoding PSA (VLPV-PSA) followed by the challenge with Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate cells engineered to express PSA (TRAMP-PSA). PSA-specific cellular and humoral immune responses were measured before and after tumor challenge. PSA and CD8 reactivity in the tumors was detected by immunohistochemistry. Tumor growth was compared in vaccinated and control groups. We found that VLPV-PSA could infect mouse dendritic cells in vitro and induce a robust PSA-specific immune response in vivo. A substantial proportion of splenic CD8 T cells (19.6 ± 7.4%) produced IFNγ in response to the immunodominant peptide PSA(65-73). In the blood of vaccinated mice, 18.4 ± 4.1% of CD8 T cells were PSA-specific as determined by the staining with H-2D(b)/PSA(65-73) dextramers. VLPV-PSA vaccination also strongly stimulated production of IgG2a/b anti-PSA antibodies. Tumors in vaccinated mice showed low levels of PSA expression and significant CD8+ T cell infiltration. Tumor growth in VLPV-PSA vaccinated mice was significantly delayed at early time points (p=0.002, Gehan-Breslow test). Our data suggest that TC-83-based VLPV-PSA vaccine can efficiently overcome immune tolerance to PSA, mediate rapid clearance of PSA-expressing tumor cells and delay tumor growth. The VLPV-PSA vaccine will undergo further testing for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  6. Long-Term Results of a Phase II Trial of Ultrasound-Guided Radioactive Implantation of the Prostate for Definitive Management of Localized Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate (RTOG 98-05)

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Hunt, Daniel; Lee, W. Robert; Gomella, Leonard; Grignon, David; Gillin, Michael; Morton, Gerard; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Sandler, Howard

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term effectiveness of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive I{sup 125} implantation of the prostate for organ confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate compared with historical data of prostatectomy and external beam radiotherapy within a cooperative group setting. Methods and Materials: Patients accrued to this study had histologically confirmed, locally confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate clinical stage T1b, T1c, or T2a; no nodal or metastatic disease; prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}10 ng/ml; and a Gleason score of {<=}6. All patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided radioactive I{sup 125} seed implantation into the prostate. The prescribed dose was 145 Gy to the prostate planning target volume. Results: A total of 101 patients from 27 institutions were accrued to this protocol; by design, no single institution accrued more than 8 patients. There were 94 eligible patients. The median follow up was 8.1 years (range, 0.1-9.2 years). After 8 years, 8 patients had protocol-defined biochemical (prostate-specific antigen) failure (cumulative incidence, 8.0%); 5 patients had local failure (cumulative incidence, 5.5%); and 1 patient had distant failure (cumulative incidence, 1.1%; this patient also had biochemical failure and died of causes not related to prostate cancer). The 8-year overall survival rate was 88%. At last follow-up, no patient had died of prostate cancer or related toxicities. Three patients had maximum late toxicities of Grade 3, all of which were genitourinary. No Grade 4 or 5 toxicities were observed. Conclusions: The long-term results of this clinical trial have demonstrated that this kind of trial can be successfully completed through the RTOG and that results in terms of biochemical failure and toxicity compare very favorably with other brachytherapy published series as well as surgical and external beam radiotherapy series. In addition, the prospective, multicenter design highlights the

  7. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Markers β-catenin, Snail, and E-Cadherin do not Predict Disease Free Survival in Prostate Adenocarcinoma: a Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Ipekci, Tumay; Ozden, Ferhat; Unal, Betul; Saygin, Caner; Uzunaslan, Didem; Ates, Erhan

    2015-09-01

    Current methods for diagnosis and staging of prostate adenocarcinoma are not sensitive enough to distinguish between patients with indolent disease and those that should receive radical treatment. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a well-characterized process involved in tumor invasion and metastasis. The aim of this study is to analyze the expression of β-catenin, Snail, and E-cadherin in prostate cancer patients with prospective evaluation of their value in predicting disease-free survival (DFS). One-hundred-and-three consecutive prostate carcinoma patients who underwent radical prostatectomy and 35 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) were enrolled. Age, initial PSA level, tumor size and clinical stage were documented for adenocarcinoma patients and they were enrolled in active surveillance with serum PSA levels. Recurrence was defined as PSA level of ≥ 0.2 ng/ml on at least 2 occasions over a 2-month period. Immunohistochemical staining intensity was scored as negative, weakly positive, moderately positive, and strongly positive. For Snail and β-catenin immunoreaction, the tumors were considered nuclear positive when more than 5 % of the nuclei of tumor cells were positively stained. Patients with prostate cancer had weaker β-catenin (p < 0.0001), Snail (p = 0.006), and E-cadherin (p = 0.02) staining when compared to BPH patients and the frequency of nuclear positivity for β-catenin and Snail were higher in adenocarcinoma group (p < 0.0001). Increased expression and nuclear positivity of β-catenin were associated with advanced stage (p = 0.012 and p = 0.003) and higher tumor volume (p = 0.013 and p = 0.002). Additionally, patients with increased Snail expression had higher Gleason scores and tumor volume at presentation (p = 0.008 and p = 0.004). However, there were no significant DFS differences in adenocarcinoma patients who did and did not have β-catenin, Snail, and E-cadherin expression as assessed with log-rank test. Expressions

  8. Dynamics of notch expression during murine prostate development and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Shou, J; Ross, S; Koeppen, H; de Sauvage, F J; Gao, W Q

    2001-10-01

    Notch signaling has been widely demonstrated to be responsible for cell fate determination during normal development and implicated in human T-cell leukemia and mouse mammary carcinomas. Here we show that Notch signaling may be involved in prostatic development and cancer cell growth. In situ hybridization and reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that Notch1 was expressed in prostate epithelial cells during normal development and in prostate cancer cells. Characterization of Notch1-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice, in which the expression of reporter green fluorescent protein is under the control of the Notch1 promoter, indicated that Notch1-expressing cells were associated with the basal epithelial cell population in the prostate. Examination of the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate showed that expression of Notch1 was elevated in malignant prostatic epithelial cells of primary and metastatic tumors. Expression of Notch ligands, however, was low or undetectable in cultured prostate cancer cells or in malignant prostatic epithelial cells in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate. Furthermore, overexpression of a constitutively active form of Notch1 inhibited the proliferation of various prostate cancer cells, including DU145, LNCaP, and PC3 cells. Taken together, our data indicate for the first time that Notch signaling may play a role in murine prostatic development and tumorigenesis.

  9. Aurora kinase-A overexpression in mouse mammary epithelium induces mammary adenocarcinomas harboring genetic alterations shared with human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Treekitkarnmongkol, Warapen; Katayama, Hiroshi; Kai, Kazuharu; Sasai, Kaori; Jones, Jennifer Carter; Wang, Jing; Shen, Li; Sahin, Aysegul A; Gagea, Mihai; Ueno, Naoto T; Creighton, Chad J; Sen, Subrata

    2016-12-01

    Recent data from The Cancer Genome Atlas analysis have revealed that Aurora kinase A (AURKA) amplification and overexpression characterize a distinct subset of human tumors across multiple cancer types. Although elevated expression of AURKA has been shown to induce oncogenic phenotypes in cells in vitro, findings from transgenic mouse models of Aurora-A overexpression in mammary glands have been distinct depending on the models generated. In the present study, we report that prolonged overexpression of AURKA transgene in mammary epithelium driven by ovine β-lactoglobulin promoter, activated through multiple pregnancy and lactation cycles, results in the development of mammary adenocarcinomas with alterations in cancer-relevant genes and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The tumor incidence was 38.9% (7/18) in Aurora-A transgenic mice at 16 months of age following 4-5 pregnancy cycles. Aurora-A overexpression in the tumor tissues accompanied activation of Akt, elevation of Cyclin D1, Tpx2 and Plk1 along with downregulation of ERα and p53 proteins, albeit at varying levels. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses of transgenic mouse mammary adenocarcinomas revealed copy gain of Glp1r and losses of Ercc5, Pten and Tcf7l2 loci. Review of human breast tumor transcriptomic data sets showed association of these genes at varying levels with Aurora-A gain of function alterations. Whole exome sequencing of the mouse tumors also identified gene mutations detected in Aurora-A overexpressing human breast cancers. Our findings demonstrate that prolonged overexpression of Aurora-A can be a driver somatic genetic event in mammary adenocarcinomas associated with deregulated tumor-relevant pathways in the Aurora-A subset of human breast cancer.

  10. Interaction of the androgen receptor, ETV1 and PTEN pathways in mouse prostate varies with pathological stage and predicts cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Jake; Brogley, Michele; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Mehra, Rohit; Ittmann, Michael M.; Li, Jun Z.; Tomlins, Scott A.; Robins, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    To examine the impact of common somatic mutations in prostate cancer (PCa) on androgen receptor (AR) signaling, mouse models were designed to perturb sequentially the AR, ETV1 and PTEN pathways. Mice with "humanized" AR (hAR) alleles that modified AR transcriptional strength by varying polyglutamine tract (Q-tract) length were crossed with mice expressing a prostate-specific, AR-responsive ETV1 transgene (ETV1Tg). While hAR allele did not grossly affect ETV1-induced neoplasia, ETV1 strongly antagonized global AR regulation and repressed critical androgen-induced differentiation and tumor suppressor genes, such as Nkx3-1 and Hoxb13. When Pten was varied to determine its impact on disease progression, mice lacking one Pten allele (Pten+/−) developed more frequent prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN). Yet only those with the ETV1 transgene progressed to invasive adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, progression was more frequent with the short Q-tract (stronger) AR, suggesting that the AR, ETV1 and PTEN pathways cooperate in aggressive disease. On the Pten+/− background, ETV1 had markedly less effect on AR target genes. However, a strong inflammatory gene expression signature, notably upregulation of Cxcl16, was induced by ETV1. Comparison of mouse and human patient data stratified by presence of ETS fusion genes highlighted additional factors, some not previously associated with prostate cancer but for which targeted therapies are in development for other diseases. In sum, concerted use of these mouse models illuminates the complex interplay of AR, ETV1 and PTEN pathways in pre-cancerous neoplasia and early tumorigenesis, disease stages difficult to analyze in man. PMID:25631336

  11. PD-1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 expression in mouse prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shijie; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Wang, Alun R; You, Zongbing

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and its ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2 play critical roles in maintaining an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. The purpose of the present study was to assess expression of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 in mouse prostate tumors. A total of 33 mouse prostate tumors derived from Pten-null mice were examined using immunohistochemical staining for PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2. The animals were either with interleukin-17 receptor c (Il-17rc) wild-type or knockout genotype, or fed with regular diet or high-fat diet to 30 weeks of age. We found that Il-17rc wild-type mouse prostate tumors had significantly higher levels of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 than Il-17rc knockout mouse prostate tumors. High-fat diet-induced obese mice had significantly higher levels of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 in their prostate tumors than lean mice fed with regular diet. Increased expression of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 was associated with increased number of invasive prostate tumors formed in the Il-17rc wild-type and obese mice compared to the Il-17rc knockout and lean mice, respectively. Our findings suggest that expression of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 may enhance development of mouse prostate cancer through creating an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

  12. Mouse Models of Prostate Cancer: Picking the Best Model for the Question

    PubMed Central

    Grabowska, Magdalena M.; DeGraff, David J.; Yu, Xiuping; Jin, Ren Jie; Chen, Zhenbang; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Matusik, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    When the NIH Mouse Models of Human Cancer Consortium (MMCC) initiated the Prostate Steering Committee 15 years ago, there were no genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models of prostate cancer (PCa). Today, a PubMed search for “prostate cancer mouse model” yields 3,200 publications and this list continues to grow. The first generation of GEM utilized the newly discovered and characterized probasin (PB) promoter driving viral oncogenes such as SV40 large T antigen to yield the LADY and TRAMP models. As the PCa research field has matured, the second generation of models has incorporated the single and multiple molecular changes observed in human disease, such as loss of PTEN and over-expression of Myc. Application of these models has revealed that mice are particularly resistant to developing invasive PCa, and once they achieve invasive disease, the PCa rarely resembles human disease. Nevertheless, these models and their application have provided vital information on human PCa progression. The aim of this review is to provide a brief primer on mouse and human prostate histology and pathology, provide descriptions of mouse models, as well as attempt to answer the age old question: Which GEM model of PCa is the best for my research question? PMID:24452759

  13. Efficacy of targeted AKT inhibition in genetically engineered mouse models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    De Velasco, Marco A; Kura, Yurie; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Kazuto; Davies, Barry R; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2016-03-29

    The PI3K/AKT pathway is frequently altered in advanced human prostate cancer mainly through the loss of functional PTEN, and presents as potential target for personalized therapy. Our aim was to determine the therapeutic potential of the pan-AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. Here we used a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer to evaluate the in vivo pharmacodynamic and antitumor activity of AZD5363 in castration-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer. An additional GEM model, based on the concomitant inactivation of PTEN and Trp53 (P53), was established as an aggressive model of advanced prostate cancer and was used to further evaluate clinically relevant endpoints after treatment with AZD5363. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated that AZD5363 effectively inhibited downstream targets of AKT. AZD5363 monotherapy significantly reduced growth of tumors in castration-naïve and castration-resistant models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. More importantly, AZD5363 significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival and progression-free survival in PTEN/P53 double knockout mice. Our findings demonstrate that AZD5363 is effective against GEM models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer and provide lines of evidence to support further investigation into the development of treatment strategies targeting AKT for the treatment of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

  14. MUC1 enhances tumor progression and contributes towards immunosuppression in a mouse model of spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tinder, Teresa L.; Subramani, Durai B.; Basu, Gargi D.; Bradley, Judy M.; Schettini, Jorge; Million, Arefayene; Skaar, Todd

    2008-01-01

    MUC1, a membrane tethered mucin glycoprotein, is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in >80% of human ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, the role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has been elusive, partly due to the lack of an appropriate model. We report the characterization of a novel mouse model that expresses human MUC1 as a self molecule (PDA.MUC1 mice). Pancreatic tumors arise in an appropriate MUC1-tolerant background within an immune competent host. Significant enhancement in the development of pancreatic intraepithelial pre-neoplastic lesions (PanINs) and progression to adenocarcinoma is observed in PDA.MUC1 mice, possibly due to increased proliferation. Tumors from PDA.MUC1 mice express higher levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and indoleamine 2,3, dioxygenase compared to PDA mice lacking MUC1, especially during early stages of tumor development. The increased pro-inflammatory milieu correlates with an increased percentage of regulatory T cells and myeloid suppressor cells in the pancreatic tumor and tumor draining lymph nodes. Data shows that during pancreatic cancer progression, MUC1-mediated mechanisms enhance the onset and progression of the disease which in turn regulate the immune responses. Thus, the mouse model is ideally-suited for testing novel chemopreventive and therapeutic strategies against pancreatic cancer. PMID:18713982

  15. A Rare Case of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Biliary Duct in a Patient with Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Ravish; Krol, Gregory; Piraka, Cyrus; Batra, Surinder

    2016-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are mucin-producing papillary neoplasms of the pancreatic or biliary ductal system that exhibit variable cellular atypia and cause ductal dilation. There are few reported cases of IPMN arising from the biliary tree in the literature. It has a higher propensity to undergo malignant transformation compared to IPMN arising from the pancreatic duct. An 80-year-old male underwent cross-sectional tomography (CT) imaging of the abdomen for evaluation of prostate adenocarcinoma, which revealed an incidental 2.3 × 2.7 cm soft tissue mass centered at the porta hepatis with diffuse dilatation of the left intrahepatic biliary ductal system and mild prominence of the right intrahepatic ductal system. Endoscopic ultrasound showed 2 adjacent hilar masses involving the common hepatic duct and the left hepatic duct with protrusion of the tissue into the lumen of the duct and upstream ductal dilatation. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed a large filling defect in the common hepatic duct extending into the left hepatic duct. A large amount of clot and soft tissue with a fish-egg appearance was retrieved. The patient underwent left hepatic lobectomy, radical resection of the common hepatic duct with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy to the right hepatic duct. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen revealed intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with diffuse high-grade dysplasia. Follow-up CT scan of the abdomen 2 months after the surgery was negative for any masses. PMID:28100995

  16. Synchrotron FTIR shows evidence of DNA damage and lipid accumulation in prostate adenocarcinoma PC-3 cells following proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipiec, Ewelina; Bambery, Keith R.; Heraud, Phil; Hirschmugl, Carol; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Tobin, Mark J.; Vogel, Christian; Whelan, Donna; Wood, Bayden R.

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron Radiation Fourier Transform Infrared (SR-FTIR) spectra of single human prostate adenocarcinoma PC-3 cells, irradiated with a defined number of 2 MeV protons generated by a proton microbeam along with non-irradiated control cells, were analysed using multivariate methods. A number of different Principal Component Analysis (PCA) models were tested and the spectral ranges associated with nucleic acids, proteins and lipids were analysed separately. The results show a dose dependent shift of the Osbnd Psbnd O asymmetric stretching mode from 1234 cm-1 to 1237 cm-1, consistent with local disorder in the B-DNA conformation along with a change in intensity of the Osbnd Psbnd O symmetric stretching band at 1083 cm-1 indicative of chromatin fragmentation - the natural consequence of a high number of DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSBs). 2D mapping of characteristic functional groups at the diffraction limit shows evidence of lipid deposition and chromatin condensation in cells exposed to protons indicative of cell apoptosis following irradiation. These studies lay the foundation for understanding the macromolecular changes that occur to cells in response to radiation therapy, which has important implications in the treatment of tumours.

  17. The effect of magnetic targeting on the uptake of magnetic-fluid-loaded liposomes by human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Martina, Marie-Sophie; Wilhelm, Claire; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2008-10-01

    Interactions of magnetic-fluid-loaded liposomes (MFL) with human adenocarcinoma prostatic cell line PC3 were investigated in vitro. MFL consisted of unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles (mean hydrodynamic diameter close to 180 nm) encapsulating 8-nm nanocrystals of maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)) and sterically stabilized by introducing 5 mol.% of distearylphosphatidylcholine poly(ethylene glycol)(2000) (DSPE-PEG(2000)) in the vesicle bilayer. The association processes with living cells, including binding and effective internalization, were followed versus time at two levels. On one hand, the lipid vesicles labeled by 1 mol.% of rhodamine-marked phosphatidylethanolamine were imaged by confocal fluorescence microscopy. On the other hand, the iron oxide particles associated with cells were independently quantified by magnetophoresis. This allowed modeling of MFL uptake kinetics as a two-step process involving first binding adsorption onto the outer cell membrane followed by subsequent internalization. Capture efficiency was significantly improved by guiding MFL in the near vicinity of the cells by means of a 0.29-T external magnet developing a magnetic field gradient close to 30 mT/mm. Double detection of lipids by fluorescence tracking and of iron oxide by magnetophoresis showed excellent correlation. This demonstrated that MFL associate with tumor cells as intact vesicle structures which conserve their internal content.

  18. Conformal Postoperative Radiotherapy in Patients With Positive Resection Margins and/or pT3-4 Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bellavita, Rita; Massetti, Michela; Abraha, Iosief; Lupattelli, Marco; Mearini, Luigi; Falcinelli, Lorenzo; Farneti, Alessia; Palumbo, Isabella; Porena, Massimo; Aristei, Cynthia

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcome and toxicity of high-dose conformal radiotherapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Between August 1998 and December 2007, 182 consecutive patients with positive resection margins and/or pT3-4, node-negative prostate adenocarcinoma underwent postoperative conformal RT. The prescribed median dose to the prostate/seminal vesicle bed was 66.6 Gy (range 50-70). Hormone therapy (a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue and/or antiandrogen) was administered to 110/182 (60.5%) patients with high-risk features. Biochemical relapse was defined as an increase of more than 0.2 ng/mL over the lowest postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value measured on 3 occasions, each at least 2 weeks apart. Results: Median follow-up was 55.6 months (range 7.6-141.9 months). The 3- and 5-year probability of biochemical relapse-free survival were 87% and 81%, respectively. In univariate analysis, more advanced T stages, preoperative PSA values {>=}10 ng/mL, and RT doses <70 Gy were significant factors for biochemical relapse. Pre-RT PSA values >0.2 ng/mL were significant for distant metastases. In multivariate analysis, risk factors for biochemical relapse were higher preoperative and pre-RT PSA values, hormone therapy for under 402 days and RT doses of <70 Gy. Higher pre-RT PSA values were the only independent predictor of distant metastases. Acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities occurred in 72 (39.6%) and 91 (50%) patients, respectively. There were 2 cases of Grade III GI toxicity but no cases of Grade IV. Late GU and GI toxicities occurred in 28 (15.4%) and 14 (7.7%) patients, respectively: 11 cases of Grade III toxicity: 1 GI (anal stenosis) and 10 GU, all urethral strictures requiring endoscopic urethrotomy. Conclusions: Postoperative high-dose conformal RT in patients with high-risk features was associated with a low risk of biochemical relapse as well as minimal morbidity.

  19. Predicting Drug Response in Human Prostate Cancer from Preclinical Analysis of In Vivo Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Mitrofanova, Antonina; Aytes, Alvaro; Zou, Min; Shen, Michael M; Abate-Shen, Cory; Califano, Andrea

    2015-09-29

    Although genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models are often used to evaluate cancer therapies, extrapolation of such preclinical data to human cancer can be challenging. Here, we introduce an approach that uses drug perturbation data from GEM models to predict drug efficacy in human cancer. Network-based analysis of expression profiles from in vivo treatment of GEM models identified drugs and drug combinations that inhibit the activity of FOXM1 and CENPF, which are master regulators of prostate cancer malignancy. Validation of mouse and human prostate cancer models confirmed the specificity and synergy of a predicted drug combination to abrogate FOXM1/CENPF activity and inhibit tumorigenicity. Network-based analysis of treatment signatures from GEM models identified treatment-responsive genes in human prostate cancer that are potential biomarkers of patient response. More generally, this approach allows systematic identification of drugs that inhibit tumor dependencies, thereby improving the utility of GEM models for prioritizing drugs for clinical evaluation.

  20. Tracer-cocktail injections for combined pre- and intraoperative multimodal imaging of lymph nodes in a spontaneous mouse prostate tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Anne C.; Buckle, Tessa; Bendle, Gavin; Vermeeren, Lenka; Valdés Olmos, Renato; van de Poel, Henk G.; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.

    2011-01-01

    To improve surgical guidance toward prostate draining lymph nodes, we investigate the potential of intraoperative fluorescence imaging and combined pre- and intraoperative multimodality imaging approaches. Transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate mice with spontaneous prostate tumors are injected intratumorally with: 1. a cocktail of patent blue (Pb) and indocyanine green (ICG); 2. a cocktail of albumin radiocolloids (99mTc-NanoColl), Pb, and ICG; or 3. a cocktail of radiolabeled albumin (99mTc-Vasculosis), Pb, and ICG. The distribution of these imaging agents over the lymph nodes (LNs) are studied at different time points after injection. We find that at 60-min postinjection, ICG significantly improves the detection of the LNs compared to Pb, 53 versus 7%, respectively. Moreover, a cocktail of ICG and 99mTc-NanoColl improves the fluorescent detection rate to 86%, equalling that of the clinically applied 99mTc-NanoColl. A similar overlap is observed in our initial clinical pilot data. Fluorescent detection of the LNs using a ICG with 99mTc-Vasculosis gives similar results as ``free'' ICG (58% 60 min). A 99mTc-NanoColl, Pb, and cocktail ICG enriches the standard 99mTc-NanoColl approach by adding optical detection of the sentinel lymph nodes. Furthermore, this approach improves fluorescent-based guidance and enables both accurate surgical planning and intraoperative detection, based on a single injection.

  1. Prostatic Inflammation Induces Fibrosis in a Mouse Model of Chronic Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Letitia; Hutson, Paul R.; Bushman, Wade

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the prostate is strongly correlated with development of lower urinary tract symptoms and several studies have implicated prostatic fibrosis in the pathogenesis of bladder outlet obstruction. It has been postulated that inflammation induces prostatic fibrosis but this relationship has never been tested. Here, we characterized the fibrotic response to inflammation in a mouse model of chronic bacterial-induced prostatic inflammation. Transurethral instillation of the uropathogenic E. coli into C3H/HeOuJ male mice induced persistent prostatic inflammation followed by a significant increase in collagen deposition and hydroxyproline content. This fibrotic response to inflammation was accompanied with an increase in collagen synthesis determined by the incorporation of 3H-hydroxyproline and mRNA expression of several collagen remodeling-associated genes, including Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Mmp2, Mmp9, and Lox. Correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation of inflammation severity with collagen deposition and immunohistochemical staining revealed that CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes were abundant in inflamed prostates at the time point coinciding with increased collagen synthesis. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an increased percentage of these CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes among collagen type I expressing cells. These data show–for the first time–that chronic prostatic inflammation induces collagen deposition and implicates fibrocytes in the fibrotic process. PMID:24950301

  2. Salmonella Bacterial Monotherapy Reduces Autochthonous Prostate Tumor Burden in the TRAMP Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kazmierczak, Robert A.; Gentry, Bettina; Mumm, Tyler; Schatten, Heide; Eisenstark, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium injected in the circulatory system of mammals selectively targets tumors. Using weekly intraperitoneal injections of attenuated Salmonella strain CRC2631, we tested for regression and/or inhibition of tumor development in the TRAMP prostate tumor mouse model, which utilizes SV40 early region expression for autochthonous formation of prostate tumors that progress into metastatic, poorly differentiated prostatic carcinomas in an immunocompetent murine model. Thirteen weekly intraperitoneal administrations of 105–107 CFU CRC2631 into 10 week old mice were well tolerated by the TRAMP model. Sacrifice and histological analysis of TRAMP prostates at 22 weeks indicated that Salmonella monotherapy at administrated levels decrease visible tumor size (>29%) but did not significantly inhibit previously described SV40 expression-driven TRAMP tumor progression to undifferentiated carcinomas when histologically examined. In conclusion, this work demonstrates baseline results for CRC2631 Salmonella monotherapy using the immunocompetent TRAMP prostate tumor model in preparation for study of combination therapies that resolve autochthonously generated TRAMP prostate tumors, further reduce tumor size, or inhibit prostate tumor progression. PMID:27504973

  3. Whole-body irradiation increases the magnitude and persistence of adoptively transferred T cells associated with tumor regression in a mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ward-Kavanagh, Lindsay K; Zhu, Junjia; Cooper, Timothy K; Schell, Todd D

    2014-08-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in a subset of clinical and preclinical studies, but the T cells used for therapy often are rendered rapidly nonfunctional in tumor-bearing hosts. Recent evidence indicates that prostate cancer can be susceptible to immunotherapy, but most studies using autochthonous tumor models demonstrate only short-lived T-cell responses in the tolerogenic prostate microenvironment. Here, we assessed the efficacy of sublethal whole-body irradiation (WBI) to enhance the magnitude and duration of adoptively transferred CD8(+) T cells in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. We demonstrate that WBI promoted high-level accumulation of granzyme B (GzB, Gzmb)-expressing donor T cells both in lymphoid organs and in the prostate of TRAMP mice. Donor T cells remained responsive to vaccination in irradiated recipients, but a single round of WBI-enhanced adoptive immunotherapy failed to affect significantly the existing disease. Addition of a second round of immunotherapy promoted regression of established disease in half of the treated mice, with no progression observed. Regression was associated with long-term persistence of effector/memory phenotype CD8(+) donor cells. Administration of the second round of adoptive immunotherapy led to reacquisition of GzB expression by persistent T cells from the first transfer. These results indicate that WBI conditioning amplifies tumor-specific T cells in the TRAMP prostate and lymphoid tissue, and suggest that the initial treatment alters the tolerogenic microenvironment to increase antitumor activity by a second wave of donor cells.

  4. Elderly-onset neuromyelitis optica which developed after the diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma and relapsed after a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Yu; Warabi, Yoko; Bandoh, Mitsuaki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Matsubara, Shiro

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of elderly-onset neuromyelitis optica (NMO) positive for the anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP-4) antibody; symptoms developed after the diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma and relapsed after a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination. We suggest that activation of CD4-positive T cells and secretion of interferon-gamma induced by adenocarcinoma and complement activation induced by vaccination are responsible for the onset and relapse of NMO, even if a patient is positive for the anti-AQP-4 antibody. This case supports the previous experimental finding that the anti-AQP-4 antibody does not cause NMO-like lesions when injected alone, but does so after the induction of T cell-mediated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis or when co-injected with human complement.

  5. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jarad M.; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To assess in a prospective trial the feasibility and late toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinical stage T1c-2cNXM0 disease. They received 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with intensity-modulated radiotherapy including daily on-line image guidance with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results: Between June 2001 and March 2004, 92 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The cohort had a median prostate-specific antigen value of 7.06 ng/mL. The majority had Gleason grade 5-6 (38%) or 7 (59%) disease, and 82 patients had T1c-T2a clinical staging. Overall, 29 patients had low-risk, 56 intermediate-risk, and 7 high-risk disease. Severe acute toxicity (Grade 3-4) was rare, occurring in only 1 patient. Median follow-up was 38 months. According to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the rate of biochemical control at 14 months was 97%. According to the previous American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, biochemical control at 3 years was 76%. The incidence of late toxicity was low, with no severe (Grade {>=}3) toxicity at the most recent assessment. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with image guidance is feasible and is associated with low rates of late bladder and rectal toxicity. At early follow-up, biochemical outcome is comparable to that reported for conventionally fractionated controls. The findings are being tested in an ongoing, multicenter, Phase III trial.

  6. The association of the cribriform pattern with outcome for prostatic adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kir, G; Sarbay, B C; Gümüş, E; Topal, C S

    2014-10-01

    With the revision of the Gleason system at the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference, there was consensus that most cribriform glands should be classified as pattern 4. There is now increased understanding that invasive cribriform carcinoma is a relatively aggressive disease. This study was based on 233 radical prostatectomy (RP) specimens collected at the Department of Pathology, Umraniye Education and Research Hospital, from 2006 to 2013. We assessed the cribriform foci associated with the more definitive patterns 3, 4, and 5 elsewhere on the RP specimens and evaluated the association of the presence of cribriform pattern (CP) with biochemical prostate-specific antigen recurrence (BPR). In Cox regression model, taking into account the Gleason score (GS), pathologic stage, surgical margin (SM) status, presence of a CP, and preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a positive SM, and the presence of a CP were independent predictors of BPR after RP. We observed BPR more frequently in GS 3+3 cases with a CP than in those without a CP (p=0.008). There was no significant difference in BPR status for cases with GS 3+4, 4+3, 4+5, and 5+4 when the patients were stratified by the presence of a CP. On the basis of these data, we suggest that the classification of CP into Gleason pattern 4 has value in predicting BPR status after RP. However, as many of these modifications are empirical and supported by only a few studies, long-term follow-up studies with clinical endpoints are necessary to validate these recommendations.

  7. A Signaling Network Controlling Androgenic Repression of c-Fos Protein in Prostate Adenocarcinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Eswar; Song, Kyung; Corum, Sarah L.; Bane, Kara L.; Wang, Hui; Kao, Hung-Ying; Danielpour, David

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor c-Fos controls many important cellular processes, including cell growth and apoptosis. c-Fos expression is rapidly elevated in the prostate upon castration-mediated androgen withdrawal through an undefined mechanism. Here we show that androgens (5α-dihydrotestosterone and R1881) suppress c-Fos protein and mRNA expression induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or EGF in human prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines. Such suppression transpires through a transcriptional mechanism, predominantly at the proximal serum response element of the c-fos promoter. We show that androgen signaling suppresses TPA-induced c-Fos expression through repressing a PKC/MEK/ERK/ELK-1 signaling pathway. Moreover, our results support the hypothesis that p38MAPK, PI3K, and PKCδ are involved in the androgenic regulation of c-Fos through controlling MEK/ERK. Stable silencing of c-Fos and PKCδ with shRNAs suggests that R1881 promotes cell death induced by low-dose TPA through a mechanism that is dependent on both PKCδ and loss of c-Fos expression. Reciprocally, loss of either PKCδ or c-Fos activates p38MAPK while suppressing the activation of ERK1/2. We also provide the first demonstration that R1881 permits cell death induced by low-dose TPA in the LNCaP androgen-dependent PCa cell line and that TPA-induced cell death is independent of exogenous androgen in the castration-resistant variants of LNCaP, C4-2 and C4-2B. Acquisition of androgen-independent killing by TPA correlates with activation of p38MAPK, suppression of ERK1/2, and loss of c-Fos. These results provide new insights into androgenic control of c-Fos and use of PKC inhibitors in PCa therapy. PMID:26786102

  8. Stabilin-1 is expressed in human breast cancer and supports tumor growth in mammary adenocarcinoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Riabov, Vladimir; Yin, Shuiping; Song, Bin; Avdic, Aida; Schledzewski, Kai; Ovsiy, Ilja; Gratchev, Alexei; Verdiell, Maria Llopis; Sticht, Carsten; Schmuttermaier, Christina; Schönhaber, Hiltrud; Weiss, Christel; Fields, Alan P.; Simon-Keller, Katja; Pfister, Frederick; Berlit, Sebastian; Marx, Alexander; Arnold, Bernd; Goerdt, Sergij; Kzhyshkowska, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Stabilin-1 is a multifunctional scavenger receptor expressed on alternatively-activated macrophages. Stabilin-1 mediates phagocytosis of “unwanted-self” components, intracellular sorting, and endocytic clearance of extracellular ligands including SPARC that modulates breast cancer growth. The expression of stabilin-1 was found on tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) in mouse and human cancers including melanoma, lymphoma, glioblastoma, and pancreatic insulinoma. Despite its tumor-promoting role in mouse models of melanoma and lymphoma the expression and functional role of stabilin-1 in breast cancer was unknown. Here, we demonstrate that stabilin-1 is expressed on TAM in human breast cancer, and its expression is most pronounced on stage I disease. Using stabilin-1 knockout (ko) mice we show that stabilin-1 facilitates growth of mouse TS/A mammary adenocarcinoma. Endocytosis assay on stabilin-1 ko TAM demonstrated impaired clearance of stabilin-1 ligands including SPARC that was capable of inducing cell death in TS/A cells. Affymetrix microarray analysis on purified TAM and reporter assays in stabilin-1 expressing cell lines demonstrated no influence of stabilin-1 expression on intracellular signalling. Our results suggest stabilin-1 mediated silent clearance of extracellular tumor growth-inhibiting factors (e.g. SPARC) as a mechanism of stabilin-1 induced tumor growth. Silent clearance function of stabilin-1 makes it an attractive candidate for delivery of immunomodulatory anti-cancer therapeutic drugs to TAM. PMID:27105498

  9. Xanthogranulomatous Prostatitis, a Rare Prostatic Entity.

    PubMed

    Noyola, Alejandro; Gil, José Fernando; Lujano, Heriberto; Piñon, Omar; Muñoz, Gabriel; Michel, José Manuel; Garcia, Jorge; Valdez, Jorge; Morales, Omar

    2017-01-01

    There are several benign prostatic pathologies that can clinically mimic a prostate adenocarcinoma. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is a benign inflammatory condition of the prostate and a rare entity. A 47-year old male, with 3 years of lower urinary tract symptoms, with a palpable hypogastric tumor, digital rectal examination: solid prostate, of approximately 60 g. Initial PSA was 0.90 ng/mL. He underwent surgical excision of the lower abdominal nodule and prostatectomy. Histopathology showed xanthogranulomatous prostatitis, without malignancy. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is an extremely rare entity that can simulate prostate adenocarcinoma, therefore having a correct histopathological diagnosis is essential.

  10. Mouse Orthotopic Xenographs of Human Prostate Primary Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 4 from cancer) were isolated from multiple samples of 4 radical prostatectomy surgical specimens, two of which belonged...pellet (12.5 mg, 90 day- release) was implanted subcutaneously in all mice. 5 PI: Loda, Massimo b) Eight primary cell cultures (4 from benign

  11. Multi-Parametric MRI-Directed Focal Salvage Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy for Locally Recurrent Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: A Novel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, T.; Avital, I.; Stojadinovic, A.; Brücher, B.L.D.M.; Cote, E.; Yu, J.

    2013-01-01

    Even with the technological advances of dose-escalated IMRT with the addition of the latest image guidance technologies, local failures still occur. The combination of MRI-based imaging techniques can yield quantitative information that reflects on the biological properties of prostatic tissues. These techniques provide unique information that can be used for tumor detection in the treated gland. With the advent of these improved imaging modalities, it has become possible to more effectively image local recurrences within the prostate gland. With better imaging, these focal recurrences can be differentially targeted with salvage brachytherapy minimizing rectal and bladder toxicity. Here we report a novel use of MRI-directed focal brachytherapy after local recurrence. This technique offers a unique opportunity to safely and successfully treat recurrent prostate cancer, previously treated with definitive radiation therapy. The use of multi-parametric MRI-directed focal salvage permanent interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent adenocarcinoma of the prostate is a promising strategy to avoid more aggressive and expensive treatments that are associated with increased morbidity, potentially improving survival at potentially lower costs. PMID:23412660

  12. MYC and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Cheryl M.; Bieberich, Charles J.; Dang, Chi V.; Nelson, William G.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer, the majority of which is adenocarcinoma, is the most common epithelial cancer affecting a majority of elderly men in Western nations. Its manifestation, however, varies from clinically asymptomatic insidious neoplasms that progress slowly and do not threaten life to one that is highly aggressive with a propensity for metastatic spread and lethality if not treated in time. A number of somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations occur in prostate cancer cells. Some of these changes, such as loss of the tumor suppressors PTEN and p53, are linked to disease progression. Others, such as ETS gene fusions, appear to be linked more with early phases of the disease, such as invasion. Alterations in chromosome 8q24 in the region of MYC have also been linked to disease aggressiveness for many years. However, a number of recent studies in human tissues have indicated that MYC appears to be activated at the earliest phases of prostate cancer (e.g., in tumor-initiating cells) in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, a key precursor lesion to invasive prostatic adenocarcinoma. The initiation and early progression of prostate cancer can be recapitulated in genetically engineered mouse models, permitting a richer understanding of the cause and effects of loss of tumor suppressors and activation of MYC. The combination of studies using human tissues and mouse models paints an emerging molecular picture of prostate cancer development and early progression. This picture reveals that MYC contributes to disease initiation and progression by stimulating an embryonic stem cell–like signature characterized by an enrichment of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and by repressing differentiation. These insights pave the way to potential novel therapeutic concepts based on MYC biology. PMID:21779461

  13. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma.

  14. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26309895

  15. Cytoprotective Mitochondrial Chaperone TRAP-1 As a Novel Molecular Target in Localized and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leav, Irwin; Plescia, Janet; Goel, Hira Lal; Li, Jing; Jiang, Zhong; Cohen, Ronald J.; Languino, Lucia R.; Altieri, Dario C.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular chaperones of the heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) family promote cell survival, but the molecular requirements of this pathway in tumor progression are not understood. Here, we show that a mitochondria-localized Hsp90 chaperone, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein-1 (TRAP-1), is abundantly and ubiquitously expressed in human high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, Gleason grades 3 through 5 prostatic adenocarcinomas, and metastatic prostate cancer, but largely undetectable in normal prostate or benign prostatic hyperplasia in vivo. Prostate lesions formed in genetic models of the disease, including the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate and mice carrying prostate-specific deletion of the phosphatase tensin homolog tumor suppressor (Ptenpc−/−), also exhibit high levels of TRAP-1. Expression of TRAP-1 in nontransformed prostatic epithelial BPH-1 cells inhibited cell death, whereas silencing of TRAP-1 in androgen-independent PC3 or DU145 prostate cancer cells by small interfering RNA enhanced apoptosis. Targeting TRAP-1 with a novel class of mitochondria-directed Hsp90 inhibitors, ie, Gamitrinibs, caused rapid and complete killing of androgen-dependent or -independent prostate cancer, but not BPH-1 cells, whereas reintroduction of TRAP-1 in BPH-1 cells conferred sensitivity to Gamitrinib-induced cell death. These data identify TRAP-1 as a novel mitochondrial survival factor differentially expressed in localized and metastatic prostate cancer compared with normal prostate. Targeting this pathway with Gamitrinibs could be explored as novel molecular therapy in patients with advanced prostate cancer. PMID:19948822

  16. Androgen regulated expression of a spermine binding protein gene in mouse ventral prostate.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, J S; Needham, M; Parker, M G

    1987-01-01

    A full length cDNA (MP25) encoding the major mouse prostatic secretory glycoprotein (p25), whose expression is androgen dependent, has been cloned and characterised. Steady-state levels of mRNA are decreased approximately 100-fold after 3 days castration but are restored progressively over 4 days with testosterone treatment. The secreted glycoprotein appears to be a spermine binding protein since the nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence of MP25 shares extensive homology with a spermine binding protein (SBP) found in rat ventral prostate. Genomic clones indicate that there is a single gene for SBP which consists of 4 exons, the first of which is only 11bp in length. The second exon encodes the signal peptide, the third contains a portion of the spermine binding protein unique to the mouse and the largest exon encodes the bulk of the secreted protein. Images PMID:3502715

  17. Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer Initiation in a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model by Targeting 15-Lipoxygenase-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    either omega (n)-3 or n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ) directly impact PCa tumor growth. Furthermore, the FLiMP mice, which overexpress human 15...effects of excessive n-6 LA diet consumption in the progression of PCa. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Linoleic acid ; LO or LOX, lipoxygenase; PUFA , Polyunsaturated... fatty acid ; PCa, Prostate Cancer, MMHCC, Mouse Models of Human Cancer Consortium; IHC, immunohistochemistry; H & E, Hematoxylin and Eosin; FLiMP

  18. Epididymal metastasis from prostate adenocarcinoma: An unusual and challenging diagnosis suspected in gallium-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen-positron emission tomography/computed tomography and histologically confirmed

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Lopes, Sofia; Lobo, João; Henrique, Rui; Oliveira, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    A few cases of prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa) metastases to the epididymis have been documented in literature. We report a case of a 69-year-old man with a left epididymal metastasis, 6 years after radical prostatectomy and adjuvant radiation therapy for PCa. Although he developed biochemical recurrence, only gallium-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen-positron emission tomography/computed tomography revealed high uptake in the left testis and retrovesical space. An unrecognized painless firm nodule was palpable on the left epididymis. Radical orchiectomy was performed, and histopathological examination confirmed PCa metastasis located in the epididymis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the 27th reported case of epididymal metastasis from PCa. PMID:28216940

  19. Alternatively activated RAW264.7 macrophages enhance tumor lymphangiogenesis in mouse lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bicheng; Wang, Jun; Gao, Juan; Guo, Yan; Chen, Xi; Wang, Baocheng; Gao, Jianfei; Rao, Zhiguo; Chen, Zhengtang

    2009-05-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been implicated in promoting tumor progression and invasion. The onset and maintenance of tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis also seem to be partly driven by a group of polarized alternatively activated macrophages (aaMphi) in lung adenocarcinoma. Here, the aaMphi and classically activated macrophages (caMphi) were obtained using RAW264.7 cells via IL-4 and IFN-gamma + LPS treatment, respectively. Co-inoculation of aaMphi with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells promoted tumor growth, increased lymph node metastasis, and reduced the survival in C57BL/6 mice bearing LLC. Furthermore, the effects of the activated macrophages on the lymphangiogenesis-related properties of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) were investigated in vitro. When LECs were cultured in macrophages conditioned medium or in a co-culture system of macrophages and LECs, aaMphi significantly promoted proliferation, migration, and tube-like formation of LECs. We identified high VEGF-C expression in aaMphi and low expression in caMphi as well as unactivated macrophages by ELISA and Western blotting. In LECs, co-culture with aaMphi resulted in a significant increase of mRNA levels of specific lymphatic marker VEGF receptor-3 and the homeobox gene Prox-1, as well as lymphangiogenic factor VEGF-C rather than VEGF-D by quantitative RT-PCR. Furthermore, enhanced LECs migration and capillary formation by co-culture with aaMphi were significantly inhibited by rVEGF receptor-3/Fc chimera. In conclusion, these data show that aaMphi play a critical role in tumor-induced lymphangiogenesis through up-regulating VEGF-C and increasing lymphangiogenesis-related behavior of LECs, which may contribute to lymphatic invasion in lung adenocarcinoma.

  20. Kinase domain activation of FGFR2 yields high-grade lung adenocarcinoma sensitive to a Pan-FGFR inhibitor in a mouse model of NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Tchaicha, Jeremy H; Akbay, Esra A; Altabef, Abigail; Mikse, Oliver R; Kikuchi, Eiki; Rhee, Kevin; Liao, Rachel G; Bronson, Roderick T; Sholl, Lynette M; Meyerson, Matthew; Hammerman, Peter S; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2014-09-01

    Somatic mutations in FGFR2 are present in 4% to 5% of patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Amplification and mutations in FGFR genes have been identified in patients with NSCLCs, and clinical trials are testing the efficacy of anti-FGFR therapies. FGFR2 and other FGFR kinase family gene alterations have been found in both lung squamous cell carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma, although mouse models of FGFR-driven lung cancers have not been reported. Here, we generated a genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) of NSCLC driven by a kinase domain mutation in FGFR2. Combined with p53 ablation, primary grade 3/4 adenocarcinoma was induced in the lung epithelial compartment exhibiting locally invasive and pleiotropic tendencies largely made up of multinucleated cells. Tumors were acutely sensitive to pan-FGFR inhibition. This is the first FGFR2-driven lung cancer GEMM, which can be applied across different cancer indications in a preclinical setting.

  1. A novel method for somatic transgenesis of the mouse prostate using the Sleeping Beauty transposon system

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Kimberly D.P.; Alsop, Jim; Buresh-Stiemke, Rita A.; Frantskevich, Katsiaryna; Malinowski, Rita; Roethe, Laura; Powers, Ginny L; Marker, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In vivo ectopic gene expression is a common approach for prostate research through the use of transgenes in germline transgenic mice. For some other organs, somatic transgenesis with the Sleeping Beauty transposon system has allowed in vivo ectopic gene expression with higher throughput and lower cost than germline transgenic approaches. METHODS Mouse e16 urogenital sinuses (UGSs) were co-injected with plasmids expressing the Sleeping Beauty transposase and plasmids with control or activated BRAF expressing transposons. Following electroporation, the transduced UGSs were grown as allografts in mouse hosts for 8 weeks, and the resulting allografts were evaluated for several endpoints. RESULTS Transposon-transduced UGS allografts developed into prostatic tissue with normal tissue structure and cellular differentiation. Integration of transposon vectors into the genomes of transduced allografts was confirmed using linker-mediated PCR, sequencing, and in situ PCR. Transduction of UGS allografts with transposons expressing activated BRAF resulted in ectopic BRAF expression that was detectable at both the mRNA and protein levels. Prostatic ducts over-expressing activated BRAF also had ectopic activation of the ERK1/2 mitogen activated kinases and increased epithelial cell proliferation. CONCLUSIONS The Sleeping Beauty transposon system can be used to achieve somatic transgenesis of prostatic allografts. This new method for achieving ectopic gene expression in the prostate will complement other existing approaches such as ectopic gene expression in cell lines and in germline transgenic mice. Advantages of this new approach include preservation of stromal-epithelial interactions not possible with cell lines, and higher throughput and lower cost than traditional germline transgenic approaches. PMID:24647932

  2. Estrogenic chemicals in plastic and oral contraceptives disrupt development of the fetal mouse prostate and urethra

    PubMed Central

    Timms, Barry G.; Howdeshell, Kembra L.; Barton, Lesley; Bradley, Sarahann; Richter, Catherine A.; vom Saal, Frederick S.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure of human fetuses to man-made estrogenic chemicals can occur through several sources. For example, fetal exposure to ethinylestradiol occurs because each year ≈3% of women taking oral contraceptives become pregnant. Exposure to the estrogenic chemical bisphenol A occurs through food and beverages because of significant leaching from polycarbonate plastic products and the lining of cans. We fed pregnant CD-1 mice ethinylestradiol (0.1 μg/kg per day) and bisphenol A (10 μg/kg per day), which are doses below the range of exposure by pregnant women. In male mouse fetuses, both ethinylestradiol and bisphenol A produced an increase in the number and size of dorsolateral prostate ducts and an overall increase in prostate duct volume. Histochemical staining of sections with antibodies to proliferating cell nuclear antigen and mouse keratin 5 indicated that these increases were due to a marked increase in proliferation of basal epithelial cells located in the primary ducts. The urethra was malformed in the colliculus region and was significantly constricted where it enters the bladder, which could contribute to urine flow disorders. These effects were identical to those caused by a similar dose (0.1 μg/kg per day) of the estrogenic drug diethylstilbestrol (DES), a known human developmental teratogen and carcinogen. In contrast, a 2,000-fold higher DES dose completely inhibited dorsolateral prostate duct formation, revealing opposite effects of high and low doses of estrogen. Acceleration in the rate of proliferation of prostate epithelium during fetal life by small amounts of estrogenic chemicals could permanently disrupt cellular control systems and predispose the prostate to disease in adulthood. PMID:15867144

  3. A pilot study on the expression of microRNAs resident on chromosome 21 in laser microdissected FFPE prostate adenocarcinoma samples.

    PubMed

    Mihala, Adrian; Alexa, Andreea Anda; Samoilă, Corina; Dema, Alis; Vizitiu, Anda Cornelia; Anghel, Andrei; Tămaş, Liviu; Marian, Cătălin Valer; Sîrbu, Ioan Ovidiu

    2015-01-01

    The tremendous research effort of the last decades added a new, epigenetic layer of complexity to the already complex image of prostate cancer pathogenesis. Here we use quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to investigate the expression of the microRNAs resident on chromosome 21 (miR-ch21) in laser capture microdissected (LCM) tissues from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archived, prostate adenocarcinoma samples. We show a strong, specific down-regulation of miR-ch21 in tumoral epithelia and stromae as compared to normal counterparts, results at odd with the current paradigm on the involvement of these microRNAs in prostate oncogenesis. By comparing this result with the expression of two well-known pluripotency associated microRNA, hsa-miR-372 and miR-373, we suggest that miR-ch21 down-regulation might be the result of specific silencing of miR genes mapped to chromosome 21. Further studies, of larger sample size are needed to confirm our preliminary data.

  4. Validation of International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading for prostatic adenocarcinoma in thin core biopsies using TROG 03.04 'RADAR' trial clinical data.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, B; Egevad, L; Srigley, J R; Steigler, A; Murray, J D; Atkinson, C; Matthews, J; Duchesne, G; Spry, N A; Christie, D; Joseph, D; Attia, J; Denham, J W

    2015-10-01

    In 2014 a consensus conference convened by the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) adopted amendments to the criteria for Gleason grading and scoring (GS) for prostatic adenocarcinoma. The meeting defined a modified grading system based on 5 grading categories (grade 1, GS 3+3; grade 2, GS 3+4; grade 3, GS 4+3; grade 4, GS 8; grade 5, GS 9-10). In this study we have evaluated the prognostic significance of ISUP grading in 496 patients enrolled in the TROG 03.04 RADAR Trial. There were 19 grade 1, 118 grade 2, 193 grade 3, 88 grade 4 and 79 grade 5 tumours in the series, with follow-up for a minimum of 6.5 years. On follow-up 76 patients experienced distant progression of disease, 171 prostate specific antigen (PSA) progression and 39 prostate cancer deaths. In contrast to the 2005 modified Gleason system (MGS), the hazards of the distant and PSA progression endpoints, relative to grade 2, were significantly greater for grades 3, 4 and 5 of the 2014 ISUP grading scheme. Comparison of predictive ability utilising Harrell's concordance index, showed 2014 ISUP grading to significantly out-perform 2005 MGS grading for each of the three clinical endpoints.

  5. Feature-based analysis of mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in histological tissue sections

    PubMed Central

    Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Valkonen, Mira; Nykter, Matti; Visakorpi, Tapio; Latonen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes work presented at the Nordic Symposium on Digital Pathology 2015, in Linköping, Sweden. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) represents premalignant tissue involving epithelial growth confined in the lumen of prostatic acini. In the attempts to understand oncogenesis in the human prostate, early neoplastic changes can be modeled in the mouse with genetic manipulation of certain tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. As with many early pathological changes, the PIN lesions in the mouse prostate are macroscopically small, but microscopically spanning areas often larger than single high magnification focus fields in microscopy. This poses a challenge to utilize full potential of the data acquired in histological specimens. We use whole prostates fixed in molecular fixative PAXgene™, embedded in paraffin, sectioned through and stained with H&E. To visualize and analyze the microscopic information spanning whole mouse PIN (mPIN) lesions, we utilize automated whole slide scanning and stacked sections through the tissue. The region of interests is masked, and the masked areas are processed using a cascade of automated image analysis steps. The images are normalized in color space, after which exclusion of secretion areas and feature extraction is performed. Machine learning is utilized to build a model of early PIN lesions for determining the probability for histological changes based on the calculated features. We performed a feature-based analysis to mPIN lesions. First, a quantitative representation of over 100 features was built, including several features representing pathological changes in PIN, especially describing the spatial growth pattern of lesions in the prostate tissue. Furthermore, we built a classification model, which is able to align PIN lesions corresponding to grading by visual inspection to more advanced and mild lesions. The classifier allowed both determining the probability of early histological changes for uncategorized

  6. Effect of intermittent fasting on prostate cancer tumor growth in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J A; Antonelli, J A; Lloyd, J C; Masko, E M; Poulton, S H; Phillips, T E; Pollak, M; Freedland, S J

    2010-12-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to have anti-cancer properties. However, CR may be difficult to apply in humans secondary to compliance and potentially deleterious effects. An alternative is intermittent CR, or in the extreme case intermittent fasting (IF). In a previous small pilot study, we found 2 days per week of IF with ad libitum feeding on the other days resulted in trends toward prolonged survival of mice bearing prostate cancer xenografts. We sought to confirm these findings in a larger study. A total of 100 (7- to 8-week-old) male severe combined immunodeficiency mice were injected subcutaneously with 1 × 10(5) LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells. Mice were randomized to either ad libitum Western Diet (44% carbohydrates, 40% fat and 16% protein) or ad libitum Western Diet with twice-weekly 24 h fasts (IF). Tumor volumes and mouse bodyweights were measured twice weekly. Mice were killed when tumor volumes reached 1000 mm(3). Serum and tumor were collected for analysis of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) hormonal axis. Overall, there was no difference in mouse survival (P=0.37) or tumor volumes (P ≥ 0.10) between groups. Mouse body weights were similar between arms (P=0.84). IF mice had significantly higher serum IGF-1 levels and IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratios at killing (P<0.001). However, no difference was observed in serum insulin, IGFBP-3 or tumor phospho-Akt levels (P ≥ 0.39). IF did not improve mouse survival nor did it delay prostate tumor growth. This may be secondary to metabolic adaptations to the 24 h fasting periods. Future studies are required to optimize CR for application in humans.

  7. Analysis of spatial heterogeneity in normal epithelium and preneoplastic alterations in mouse prostate tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Valkonen, Mira; Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Kartasalo, Kimmo; Nykter, Matti; Visakorpi, Tapio; Latonen, Leena

    2017-01-01

    Cancer involves histological changes in tissue, which is of primary importance in pathological diagnosis and research. Automated histological analysis requires ability to computationally separate pathological alterations from normal tissue with all its variables. On the other hand, understanding connections between genetic alterations and histological attributes requires development of enhanced analysis methods suitable also for small sample sizes. Here, we set out to develop computational methods for early detection and distinction of prostate cancer-related pathological alterations. We use analysis of features from HE stained histological images of normal mouse prostate epithelium, distinguishing the descriptors for variability between ventral, lateral, and dorsal lobes. In addition, we use two common prostate cancer models, Hi-Myc and Pten+/− mice, to build a feature-based machine learning model separating the early pathological lesions provoked by these genetic alterations. This work offers a set of computational methods for separation of early neoplastic lesions in the prostates of model mice, and provides proof-of-principle for linking specific tumor genotypes to quantitative histological characteristics. The results obtained show that separation between different spatial locations within the organ, as well as classification between histologies linked to different genetic backgrounds, can be performed with very high specificity and sensitivity. PMID:28317907

  8. Cryptosporidium parvum-induced ileo-caecal adenocarcinoma and Wnt signaling in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Benamrouz, Sadia; Conseil, Valerie; Chabé, Magali; Praet, Marleen; Audebert, Christophe; Blervaque, Renaud; Guyot, Karine; Gazzola, Sophie; Mouray, Anthony; Chassat, Thierry; Delaire, Baptiste; Goetinck, Nathalie; Gantois, Nausicaa; Osman, Marwan; Slomianny, Christian; Dehennaut, Vanessa; Lefebvre, Tony; Viscogliosi, Eric; Cuvelier, Claude; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Creusy, Colette; Certad, Gabriela

    2014-06-01

    Cryptosporidium species are apicomplexan protozoans that are found worldwide. These parasites constitute a large risk to human and animal health. They cause self-limited diarrhea in immunocompetent hosts and a life-threatening disease in immunocompromised hosts. Interestingly, Cryptosporidium parvum has been related to digestive carcinogenesis in humans. Consistent with a potential tumorigenic role of this parasite, in an original reproducible animal model of chronic cryptosporidiosis based on dexamethasone-treated or untreated adult SCID mice, we formerly reported that C. parvum (strains of animal and human origin) is able to induce digestive adenocarcinoma even in infections induced with very low inoculum. The aim of this study was to further characterize this animal model and to explore metabolic pathways potentially involved in the development of C. parvum-induced ileo-caecal oncogenesis. We searched for alterations in genes or proteins commonly involved in cell cycle, differentiation or cell migration, such as β-catenin, Apc, E-cadherin, Kras and p53. After infection of animals with C. parvum we demonstrated immunohistochemical abnormal localization of Wnt signaling pathway components and p53. Mutations in the selected loci of studied genes were not found after high-throughput sequencing. Furthermore, alterations in the ultrastructure of adherens junctions of the ileo-caecal neoplastic epithelia of C. parvum-infected mice were recorded using transmission electron microscopy. In conclusion, we found for the first time that the Wnt signaling pathway, and particularly the cytoskeleton network, seems to be pivotal for the development of the C. parvum-induced neoplastic process and cell migration of transformed cells. Furthermore, this model is a valuable tool in understanding the host-pathogen interactions associated with the intricate infection process of this parasite, which is able to modulate host cytoskeleton activities and several host-cell biological

  9. Invasive mouse gastric adenocarcinomas arising from Lgr5+ stem cells are dependent on crosstalk between the Hedgehog/GLI2 and mTOR pathways

    PubMed Central

    Syu, Li-Jyun; Zhao, Xinyi; Zhang, Yaqing; Grachtchouk, Marina; Demitrack, Elise; Ermilov, Alexandre; Wilbert, Dawn M.; Zheng, Xinlei; Kaatz, Ashley; Greenson, Joel K.; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Merchant, Juanita L.; di Magliano, Marina Pasca; Samuelson, Linda C.; Dlugosz, Andrzej A.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is the third most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Here we report a novel, highly-penetrant mouse model of invasive gastric cancer arising from deregulated Hedgehog/Gli2 signaling targeted to Lgr5-expressing stem cells in adult stomach. Tumor development progressed rapidly: three weeks after inducing the Hh pathway oncogene GLI2A, 65% of mice harbored in situ gastric cancer, and an additional 23% of mice had locally invasive tumors. Advanced mouse gastric tumors had multiple features in common with human gastric adenocarcinomas, including characteristic histological changes, expression of RNA and protein markers, and the presence of major inflammatory and stromal cell populations. A subset of tumor cells underwent epithelial-mesenchymal transition, likely mediated by focal activation of canonical Wnt signaling and Snail1 induction. Strikingly, mTOR pathway activation, based on pS6 expression, was robustly activated in mouse gastric adenocarcinomas from the earliest stages of tumor development, and treatment with rapamycin impaired tumor growth. GLI2A-expressing epithelial cells were detected transiently in intestine, which also contains Lgr5+ stem cells, but they did not give rise to epithelial tumors in this organ. These findings establish that deregulated activation of Hedgehog/Gli2 signaling in Lgr5-expressing stem cells is sufficient to drive gastric adenocarcinoma development in mice, identify a critical requirement for mTOR signaling in the pathogenesis of these tumors, and underscore the importance of tissue context in defining stem cell responsiveness to oncogenic stimuli. PMID:26859571

  10. Examination of the Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Prostate Cancer Using the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    S141-144, 2001. 54. Nelson, E. C., Cambio , A. J., Yang, J. C., Ok, J. H., Lara, P. N., Jr., and Evans, C. P. Clinical implications of...2001;12 Suppl 2:S141-4. 46. Nelson EC, Cambio AJ, Yang JC, Ok JH, Lara PN, Jr., Evans CP. Clinical implications of neuroendocrine differentiation in

  11. Simultaneous haploinsufficiency of Pten and Trp53 tumor suppressor genes accelerates tumorigenesis in a mouse model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Suzana S.; Cao, Mei; Duarte, Paulo C.; Banach-Petrosky, Whitney; Wang, Shunyou; Romanienko, Peter; Wu, Hong; Cardiff, Robert D.; Abate-Shen, Cory; Cunha, Gerald R.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene PTEN is important in the initiation and progression of human prostate carcinoma, whereas the role of TP53 remains controversial. Since Pten/Trp53 double conditional knockout mice show earlier onset and fast progression of prostate cancer when compared to Pten knockout mice, we asked whether heterozygosity of these two tumor suppressor genes was sufficient to accelerate prostatic tumorigenesis. To answer this question we examined prostatic lesion progression of Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice and a series of controls such as Pten heterozygous, Pten conditional knockout, Trp53 heterozygous and Trp53 knockout mice. Tissue recombination of adult prostatic epithelium coupled with embryonic rat seminal vesicle mesenchyme was used as a tool to stimulate prostatic epithelial proliferation. In our study, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) was found with high frequency at 8 weeks post-tissue recombination transplantation. PIN lesions in Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice were more severe than those seen in Pten heterozygous alone. Furthermore, morphologic features attributable to Pten or Trp53 loss appeared to be enhanced in double heterozygous tissues. LOH analysis of Pten and Trp53 in genomic DNA collected from high-grade PIN lesions in Pten heterozygous and Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice showed an intact wild-type allele for both genes in all samples examined. In conclusion, simultaneous heterozygosity of Pten and Trp53 accelerates prostatic tumorigenesis in this mouse model of prostate cancer independently of loss of heterozygosity of either gene. PMID:19281769

  12. Early Detection of Bilateral Testicular Metastases From Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Using 68Ga-PSMA Ligand PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Weiberg, Desiree; Radner, Herbert; Derlin, Thorsten; Thon, Walter F

    2017-03-31

    We present the case of a 76-year-old man with biochemical relapse after primary therapy for prostate cancer. Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand PET/CT performed for localization of recurrent disease revealed bilateral metastases to the testes. Histopathologic evaluation after bilateral orchiectomy revealed testicular metastases. Metastases to the testes are rare and usually seen in advanced stages. Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT is a highly sensitive and specific imaging method for the detection of primary and metastatic prostate cancer and has refined diagnostic approaches. This case highlights the potential of PSMA-targeted PET/CT for detection of prostate cancer metastases, even in very unusual localizations.

  13. Dying for love: Perimenopausal degeneration of vaginal microbiome drives the chronic inflammation-malignant transformation of benign prostatic hyperplasia to prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2017-04-01

    Prostatic carcinoma is the second commonest cancer in males and is so common as to become almost holoendemic with advancing age. The recent demonstration that far from being benign, "benign" prostatic hypertrophy is a likely a reaction of the prostate to chronic untreated lower genital tract infection, and that this chronic inflammation is likely the usual precursor to the frequent occurrence of prostatic carcinoma has far reaching implications. The obvious source for the chronic inflammatory stimulus in the prostate is the documented dramatically altered lower female genital microbiota associated with the menopause. Hence the major hypothesis is that prostatic cancer may arise due to chronic infection and inflammation in the prostate gland consequent upon the altered microbiome of the menopausal female genital tract. This has implications for testing and diagnosis, treatment, population health and personal hygiene practices. It suggests that male dyspareunia, although almost never encountered in clinical practice may in fact be relatively common in older males, and in particular if diagnosed, represents a critical opportunity for therapeutic intervention to interrupt the chronic inflammation - cancer transformation and progression which has been well documented in other tissues. It implies that the coordinated application of next generation sequencing to the microbiome of the lower genital tracts of male and female couples, including seminal fluid, will have both research applications to further explore this sequence, as well as finding application as a potential population level screening procedure as is presently done for the "Thin Prep" cervical screening for human papillomavirus in females. Moreover this insight opens up new opportunities for chemointervention and chemoprevention for this important clinicopathological progression. These considerations give rise to the exciting possibility that prostatic malignancy may be preventable by various methods of local

  14. Predicting Gleason score using the initial serum total prostate-specific antigen in Black men with symptomatic prostate adenocarcinoma in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nnabugwu, Ikenna I; Udeh, Emeka I; Ugwumba, Fredrick O; Ozoemena, Francis O

    2016-01-01

    Background Men of Black African descent are known to have the highest incidence of prostate cancer. The disease is also more aggressive in this group possibly due to biologically more aggressive tumor or late presentation. Currently, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assay plays a significant role in making the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, the obtained value of serum PSA may not directly relate with the Gleason score (GS), a measure of tumor aggression in prostate cancer. This study explores the relationship between serum total PSA at presentation (iPSA) and GS. Patients and methods The iPSA of patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer was compared with the obtained GS of the prostate biopsy specimens. The age of the patients at presentation and the prostate volumes were also analyzed with respect to the iPSA and GS. The data were analyzed retrospectively using IBM SPSS Version 20. Pearson correlation was used for numeric variables, whereas Fisher’s exact test was used for categorical variables. Significance was set at P≤0.05. Results There were 205 patients from January 2010 to November 2013 who satisfied the inclusion criteria. iPSA as well as age at presentation and prostate volume were not found to significantly correlate with the primary Gleason grade, the secondary Gleason grade, or the GS. However, the presence of distant metastasis was identified to significantly correlate positively with GS. Conclusion GS may not be confidently predicted by the iPSA. Higher iPSA does not correlate with higher GS and vice versa. PMID:27486316

  15. Prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Domingue, Gerald J.; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    1998-01-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of acute bacterial prostatitis is straightforward and easily accomplished in clinical laboratories. Chronic bacterial prostatitis, and especially chronic idiopathic prostatitis (most often referred to as abacterial prostatitis), presents a real challenge to the clinician and clinical microbiologist. Clinically, the diagnosis of chronic idiopathic prostatitis is differentiated from that of acute prostatitis by a lack of prostatic inflammation and no “significant” (controversial) leukocytes or bacteria in the expressed prostatic secretions. Despite these diagnostic criteria, the etiology of chronic idiopathic prostatitis is unknown. While this review covers the entire spectrum of microbially caused acute prostatitis (including common and uncommon bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites) and microbially associated chronic prostatitis, a special focus has been given to chronic idiopathic prostatitis. The idiopathic syndrome is commonly diagnosed in men but is poorly treated. Recent data convincingly suggests a possible bacterial etiology for the condition. Provocative molecular studies have been published reporting the presence of 16S rRNA bacterial sequences in prostate biopsy tissue that is negative for ordinary bacteria by routine culture in men with chronic idiopathic prostatitis. Additionally, special culture methods have indicated that difficult-to-culture coryneforms and coagulase-negative staphylococci are present in expressed prostatic secretions found to be negative by routine culture techniques. Treatment failures are not uncommon in chronic prostatitis. Literature reports suggest that antimicrobial treatment failures in chronic idiopathic prostatitis caused by organisms producing extracellular slime might result from the virulent properties of coagulase-negative staphylococci or other bacteria. While it is difficult to definitively extrapolate from animal models, antibiotic pharmokinetic studies with a murine model have

  16. Circulating Tumor Cells as a Biomarker of Response to Treatment in Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Torphy, Robert J.; Tignanelli, Christopher J.; Kamande, Joyce W.; Moffitt, Richard A.; Herrera Loeza, Silvia G.; Soper, Steven A.; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells shed from solid tumors into circulation and have been shown to be prognostic in the setting of metastatic disease. These cells are obtained through a routine blood draw and may serve as an easily accessible marker for monitoring treatment effectiveness. Because of the rapid progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), early insight into treatment effectiveness may allow for necessary and timely changes in treatment regimens. The objective of this study was to evaluate CTC burden as a biomarker of response to treatment with a oral phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor, BKM120, in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models of PDAC. PDX mice were randomized to receive vehicle or BKM120 treatment for 28 days and CTCs were enumerated from whole blood before and after treatment using a microfluidic chip that selected for EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule) positive cells. This microfluidic device allowed for the release of captured CTCs and enumeration of these cells via their electrical impedance signatures. Median CTC counts significantly decreased in the BKM120 group from pre- to post-treatment (26.61 to 2.21 CTCs/250 µL, p = 0.0207) while no significant change was observed in the vehicle group (23.26 to 11.89 CTCs/250 µL, p = 0.8081). This reduction in CTC burden in the treatment group correlated with tumor growth inhibition indicating CTC burden is a promising biomarker of response to treatment in preclinical models. Mutant enriched sequencing of isolated CTCs confirmed that they harbored KRAS G12V mutations, identical to the matched tumors. In the long-term, PDX mice are a useful preclinical model for furthering our understanding of CTCs. Clinically, mutational analysis of CTCs and serial monitoring of CTC burden may be used as a minimally invasive approach to predict and monitor treatment response to guide therapeutic regimens. PMID:24586805

  17. Therapeutic efficacy evaluation of 111in-VNB-liposome on human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wan-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Chang, Ya-Fang; Lu, Yi-Ching; Ting, Gann; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the liposome encaged with vinorelbine (VNB) and 111In-oxine on human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) using HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts. HT-29 cells stably transfected with plasmid vectors containing luciferase gene ( luc) were transplanted subcutaneously into the male NOD/SCID mice. Biodistribution of the drug was performed when tumor size reached 500-600 mm 3. The uptakes of 111In-VNB-liposome in tumor and normal tissues/organs at various time points postinjection were assayed. Multimodalities, including gamma scintigraphy, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and whole-body autoradiography (WBAR), were applied for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy when tumor size was about 100 mm 3. The tumor/blood ratios of 111In-VNB-liposome were 0.044, 0.058, 2.690, 20.628 and 24.327, respectively, at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h postinjection. Gamma scinitigraphy showed that the tumor/muscle ratios were 2.04, 2.25 and 4.39, respectively, at 0, 5 and 10 mg/kg VNB. BLI showed that significant tumor control was achieved in the group of 10 mg/kg VNB ( 111In-VNB-liposome). WBAR also confirmed this result. In this study, we have demonstrated a non-invasive imaging technique with a luciferase reporter gene and BLI for evaluation of tumor treatment efficacy in vivo. The SCID mice bearing HT-29/ luc xenografts treated with 111In-VNB-liposome were shown with tumor reduction by this technique.

  18. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  19. Copper as a target for prostate cancer therapeutics: copper-ionophore pharmacology and altering systemic copper distribution

    PubMed Central

    Denoyer, Delphine; Pearson, Helen B.; Clatworthy, Sharnel A.S.; Smith, Zoe M.; Francis, Paul S.; Llanos, Roxana M.; Volitakis, Irene; Phillips, Wayne A.; Meggyesy, Peter M.; Masaldan, Shashank; Cater, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Copper-ionophores that elevate intracellular bioavailable copper display significant therapeutic utility against prostate cancer cells in vitro and in TRAMP (Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate) mice. However, the pharmacological basis for their anticancer activity remains unclear, despite impending clinical trails. Herein we show that intracellular copper levels in prostate cancer, evaluated in vitro and across disease progression in TRAMP mice, were not correlative with copper-ionophore activity and mirrored the normal levels observed in patient prostatectomy tissues (Gleason Score 7 & 9). TRAMP adenocarcinoma cells harbored markedly elevated oxidative stress and diminished glutathione (GSH)-mediated antioxidant capacity, which together conferred selective sensitivity to prooxidant ionophoric copper. Copper-ionophore treatments [CuII(gtsm), disulfiram & clioquinol] generated toxic levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TRAMP adenocarcinoma cells, but not in normal mouse prostate epithelial cells (PrECs). Our results provide a basis for the pharmacological activity of copper-ionophores and suggest they are amendable for treatment of patients with prostate cancer. Additionally, recent in vitro and mouse xenograft studies have suggested an increased copper requirement by prostate cancer cells. We demonstrated that prostate adenocarcinoma development in TRAMP mice requires a functional supply of copper and is significantly impeded by altered systemic copper distribution. The presence of a mutant copper-transporting Atp7b protein (tx mutation: A4066G/Met1356Val) in TRAMP mice changed copper-integration into serum and caused a remarkable reduction in prostate cancer burden (64% reduction) and disease severity (grade), abrogating adenocarcinoma development. Implications for current clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27175597

  20. p53 gene mutational rate, Gleason score, and BK virus infection in prostate adenocarcinoma: Is there a correlation?

    PubMed

    Russo, Giuseppe; Anzivino, Elena; Fioriti, Daniela; Mischitelli, Monica; Bellizzi, Anna; Giordano, Antonio; Autran-Gomez, Anamaria; Di Monaco, Franco; Di Silverio, Franco; Sale, Patrizio; Di Prospero, Laura; Pietropaolo, Valeria

    2008-12-01

    Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer deaths in Western countries. Viral infections could play a role in prostate carcinogenesis. Human polyomavirus BK (BKV) is a possible candidate because of its transforming properties. In this study, BKV sequences in urine, blood, fresh, and paraffin-embedded prostate cancer samples from 26 patients were searched using Q-PCR analysis. T antigen (TAg) and p53 localization in neoplastic cells were evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis. Also, the presence of mutations in 5-9 exons of p53 gene was analyzed. Results showed that BKV-DNA was found in urine (54%), plasma (31%), and in fresh prostate cancer specimens (85%). The analysis of p53 gene evidenced several mutations in high Gleason patients, according to tumor advanced stage. Immunohistochemical analysis results evidenced the localization of p53 and TAg into cytoplasm, whereas in TAg-negative tumors, p53 was nuclear. This study suggests that BKV acts as cofactor in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. These observations emphasize previous studies regarding the cellular pathways that may be deregulated by BKV.

  1. Race and Survival Following Brachytherapy-Based Treatment for Men With Localized or Locally Advanced Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Winkfield, Karen M.; Chen Minghui; Dosoretz, Daniel E.; Salenius, Sharon A.; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We investigated whether race was associated with risk of death following brachytherapy-based treatment for localized prostate cancer, adjusting for age, cardiovascular comorbidity, treatment, and established prostate cancer prognostic factors. Methods: The study cohort was composed of 5,360 men with clinical stage T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer who underwent brachytherapy-based treatment at 20 centers within the 21st Century Oncology consortium. Cox regression multivariable analysis was used to evaluate the risk of death in African-American and Hispanic men compared to that in Caucasian men, adjusting for age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, clinical T stage, year and type of treatment, median income, and cardiovascular comorbidities. Results: After a median follow-up of 3 years, there were 673 deaths. African-American and Hispanic races were significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.77 and 1.79; 95% confidence intervals, 1.3-2.5 and 1.2-2.7; p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). Other factors significantly associated with an increased risk of death included age (p < 0.001), Gleason score of 8 to 10 (p = 0.04), year of brachytherapy (p < 0.001), and history of myocardial infarction treated with stent or coronary artery bypass graft (p < 0.001). Conclusions: After adjustment for prostate cancer prognostic factors, age, income level, and revascularized cardiovascular comorbidities, African-American and Hispanic races were associated with higher ACM in men with prostate cancer. Additional causative factors need to be identified.

  2. The S100A4 Oncoprotein Promotes Prostate Tumorigenesis in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Hifzur R.; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Parray, Aijaz; Johnson, Jeremy J.; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Shekhani, Mohammad T.; Murtaza, Imtiyaz; Ambartsumian, Noona; Konety, Badrinath R.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    S100A4, a calcium-binding protein, is known for its role in the metastatic spread of tumor cells, a late event of cancer disease. This is the first report showing that S100A4 is not merely a metastatic protein but also an oncoprotein that plays a critical role in the development of tumors. We earlier showed that S100A4 expression progressively increases in prostatic tissues with the advancement of prostate cancer (CaP) in TRAMP, an autochthonous mouse model. To study the functional significance of S100A4 in CaP, we generated a heterozygously deleted S100A4 (TRAMP/S100A4+/−) genotype by crossing TRAMP with S100A4−/− mice. TRAMP/S100A4+/− did not show a lethal phenotype, and transgenes were functional. As compared to age-matched TRAMP littermates, TRAMP/S100A4+/− mice exhibited 1) an increased tumor latency period (P < 0.001), 2) a 0% incidence of metastasis, and 3) reduced prostatic weights (P < 0.001). We generated S100A4-positive clones from S100A4-negative CaP cells and tested their potential. S100A4-positive tumors grew at a faster rate than S100A4-negative tumors in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. The S100A4 protein exhibited growth factor–like properties in multimode (intracellular and extracellular) forms. We observed that 1) the growth-promoting effect of S100A4 is due to its activation of NFκB, 2) S100A4-deficient tumors exhibit reduced NFκB activity, 3) S100A4 regulates NFκB through the RAGE receptor, and 4) S100A4 and RAGE co-localize in prostatic tissues of mice. Keeping in view its growth-promoting role, we suggest that S100A4 qualifies as an excellent candidate to be exploited for therapeutic agents to treat CaP in humans. PMID:24069509

  3. Characterization of the cell of origin and propagation potential of the fibroblast growth factor 9-induced mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Arai, Daisuke; Hegab, Ahmed E; Soejima, Kenzo; Kuroda, Aoi; Ishioka, Kota; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Naoki, Katsuhiko; Kagawa, Shizuko; Hamamoto, Junko; Yin, Yongjun; Ornitz, David M; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2015-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) is essential for lung development and is highly expressed in a subset of human lung adenocarcinomas. We recently described a mouse model in which FGF9 expression in the lung epithelium caused proliferation of the airway epithelium at the terminal bronchioles and led to rapid development of adenocarcinoma. Here, we used this model to characterize the effects of prolonged FGF9 induction on the proximal and distal lung epithelia, and examined the propagation potential of FGF9-induced lung tumours. We showed that prolonged FGF9 over-expression in the lung resulted in the development of adenocarcinomas arising from both alveolar type II and airway secretory cells in the lung parenchyma and airways, respectively. We found that tumour cells harboured tumour-propagating cells that were able to form secondary tumours in recipient mice, regardless of FGF9 expression. However, the highest degree of tumour propagation was observed when unfractionated tumour cells were co-administered with autologous, tumour-associated mesenchymal cells. Although the initiation of lung adenocarcinomas was dependent on activation of the FGF9-FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) signalling axis, maintenance and propagation of the tumour was independent of this signalling. Activation of an alternative FGF-FGFR axis and the interaction with tumour stromal cells is likely to be responsible for the development of this independence. This study demonstrates the complex role of FGF-FGFR signalling in the initiation, growth and propagation of lung cancer. Our findings suggest that analysing the expressions of FGF-FGFRs in human lung cancer will be a useful tool for guiding customized therapy.

  4. Interleukin-17 promotes prostate cancer via MMP7-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Q; Liu, S; Parajuli, KR; Zhang, W; Zhang, K; Mo, Z; Liu, J; Chen, Z; Yang, S; Wang, AR; Myers, L; You, Z

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been associated with a variety of human cancers including prostate cancer. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a critical pro-inflammatory cytokine, which has been demonstrated to promote development of prostate cancer, colon cancer, skin cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, and pancreas cancer. IL-17 promotes prostate adenocarcinoma with a concurrent increase of matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7) expression in mouse prostate. Whether MMP7 mediates IL-17’s action and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We generated Mmp7 and Pten double knockout (Mmp7−/− in abbreviation) mouse model and demonstrated that MMP7 promotes prostate adenocarcinoma through induction of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in Pten-null mice. MMP7 disrupted E-cadherin/β-catenin complex to up-regulate EMT transcription factors in mouse prostate tumors. IL-17 receptor C and Pten double knockout mice recapitulated the weak EMT characteristics observed in Mmp7−/− mice. IL-17 induced MMP7 and EMT in human prostate cancer LNCaP, C4-2B, and PC-3 cell lines, while siRNA knockdown of MMP7 inhibited IL-17-induced EMT. Compound III, a selective MMP7 inhibitor, decreased development of invasive prostate cancer in Pten single knockout mice. In human normal prostates and prostate tumors, IL-17 mRNA levels were positively correlated with MMP7 mRNA levels. These findings demonstrate that MMP7 mediates IL-17’s function in promoting prostate carcinogenesis through induction of EMT, indicating IL-17-MMP7-EMT axis as potential targets for developing new strategies in the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:27375020

  5. Toxicity report of once weekly radiation therapy for low-risk prostate adenocarcinoma: preliminary results of a phase I/II trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Increasing clinical data supports a low α/β ratio for prostate adenocarcinoma, potentially lower than that of surrounding normal tissues. A hypofractionated, weekly radiation therapy (RT) schedule should result in improved tumour control, reduced acute toxicity, and similar or decreased late effects. We report the toxicity profile of such treatment. Materials and Methods We conducted a multi-institution phase I/II trial of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for favourable-risk prostate cancer (T1a-T2a, Gleason ≤ 6 and PSA < 10 ng/ml). RT consisted of 45 Gy in nine 5 Gy fractions, once weekly. Primary end-points were feasibility and late gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity (RTOG scale), while secondary end-points included acute GI toxicity, acute and late genitourinary (GU) toxicity, biochemical control, and survival. Results Between 2006 and 2008, 80 patients were treated. No treatment interruptions occurred. The median follow-up is 33 months (range: 20-51). Maximal grade 1, 2, and 3 acute (< 3 months) GU toxicity was 29%, 31% and 5% respectively (no grade 4). Acute GI grade 1 toxicity was reported in 30% while grade 2 occurred in 14% (no grade 3 or 4). Crude late grade ≥ 3 toxicity rates at 31 months were 2% for both GU and GI toxicity. Cumulative late grade ≥ 3 GI toxicity at 3 years was 11%. Two patients had PSA failure according to the Phoenix definition. The three-year actuarial biochemical control rate is 97%. Conclusions Weekly RT with 45 Gy in 9 fractions is feasible and results in comparable toxicity. Long term tumour control and survival remain to be assessed. PMID:21906281

  6. IV Administered Gadodiamide Enters the Lumen of the Prostatic Glands: X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy Examination of a Mouse Model

    DOE PAGES

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Ward, Jesse; ...

    2015-09-01

    In our objective, we descibe how dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has become a standard component of multiparametric protocols for MRI examination of the prostate, and its use is incorporated into current guidelines for prostate MRI examination. Analysis of DCE-MRI data for the prostate is usually based on the distribution of gadolinium-based agents, such as gadodiamide, into two well-mixed compartments, and it assumes that gadodiamide does not enter into the glandular lumen. However, this assumption has not been directly tested. The purpose of this study was to use x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) imaging in situ to measure the concentration of gadodiamidemore » in the epithelia and lumens of the prostate of healthy mice after IV injection of the contrast agent. For our materials and methods, six C57Bl6 male mice (age, 28 weeks) were sacrificed 10 minutes after IV injection of gadodiamide (0.13 mmol/kg), and three mice were sacrificed after saline injection. Prostate tissue samples obtained from each mouse were harvested and frozen; 7-μm-thick slices were sectioned for XFM imaging, and adjacent 5-μm-thick slices were sectioned for H and E staining. Elemental concentrations were determined from XFM images. Our results show mean (± SD) baseline concentration of gadolinium of 0.01 ± 0.01 mM was determined from XFM measurements of prostatic tissue samples when no gadodiamide was administered, and it was used to determine the measurement error. When gadodiamide was added, the mean concentrations of gadolinium in the epithelia and lumens in 32 prostatic glands from six mice were 1.00 ± 0.13 and 0.36 ± 0.09 mM, respectively. In conclusion, our data suggest that IV administration of gadodiamide results in uptake of contrast agent by the glandular lumens of the mouse prostate. We were able to quantitatively determine gadodiamide distributions in mouse prostatic epithelia and lumens.« less

  7. IV Administered Gadodiamide Enters the Lumen of the Prostatic Glands: X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy Examination of a Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Ward, Jesse; Dougherty, Urszula; Zamora, Marta; Markiewicz, Erica; Binder, David C.; Antic, Tatjana; Vogt, Stefan; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Oto, Aytekin

    2015-09-01

    In our objective, we descibe how dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has become a standard component of multiparametric protocols for MRI examination of the prostate, and its use is incorporated into current guidelines for prostate MRI examination. Analysis of DCE-MRI data for the prostate is usually based on the distribution of gadolinium-based agents, such as gadodiamide, into two well-mixed compartments, and it assumes that gadodiamide does not enter into the glandular lumen. However, this assumption has not been directly tested. The purpose of this study was to use x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) imaging in situ to measure the concentration of gadodiamide in the epithelia and lumens of the prostate of healthy mice after IV injection of the contrast agent. For our materials and methods, six C57Bl6 male mice (age, 28 weeks) were sacrificed 10 minutes after IV injection of gadodiamide (0.13 mmol/kg), and three mice were sacrificed after saline injection. Prostate tissue samples obtained from each mouse were harvested and frozen; 7-μm-thick slices were sectioned for XFM imaging, and adjacent 5-μm-thick slices were sectioned for H and E staining. Elemental concentrations were determined from XFM images. Our results show mean (± SD) baseline concentration of gadolinium of 0.01 ± 0.01 mM was determined from XFM measurements of prostatic tissue samples when no gadodiamide was administered, and it was used to determine the measurement error. When gadodiamide was added, the mean concentrations of gadolinium in the epithelia and lumens in 32 prostatic glands from six mice were 1.00 ± 0.13 and 0.36 ± 0.09 mM, respectively. In conclusion, our data suggest that IV administration of gadodiamide results in uptake of contrast agent by the glandular lumens of the mouse prostate. We were able to quantitatively determine gadodiamide distributions in mouse prostatic epithelia and lumens.

  8. LACK OF EXPRESSION OF EGF AND TGF-ALPHA IN THE FETAL MOUSE ALTERS FORMATION OF PROSTATIC EPITHELIAL BUDS AND INFLUENCES THE RESPONSE TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lack of Expression of EGF and TGF in the Fetal Mouse Alters Formation of Prostatic Epithelial Buds and Responsiveness to TCDD-Induced Impairment of Prostatic Bud Formation.

    Barbara D. Abbott, Tien-Min Lin, Nathan T. Rasmussen, Robert W. Moore,
    Ralph M. Albrecht, Judi...

  9. Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer 3 Annual Progress Report W81XWH-13-1-0162 Using a Novel...Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer Feng Yang, Ph.D. Department of...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0162 TITLE: Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and

  10. Responsiveness of human prostate carcinoma bone tumors to interleukin-2 therapy in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    PubMed

    Kocheril, S V; Grignon, D J; Wang, C Y; Maughan, R L; Montecillo, E J; Talati, B; Tekyi-Mensah, S; Pontes, J e; Hillman, G G

    1999-01-01

    We have tested an immunotherapy approach for the treatment of metastatic prostate carcinoma using a bone tumor model. Human PC-3 prostate carcinoma tumor cells were heterotransplanted into the femur cavity of athymic Balb/c nude mice. Tumor cells replaced marrow cells in the bone cavity, invaded adjacent bone and muscle tissues, and formed a palpable tumor at the hip joint. PC-3/IF cell lines, generated from bone tumors by serial in vivo passages, grew with faster kinetics in the femur and metastasized to inguinal lymph nodes. Established tumors were treated with systemic interleukin-2 (IL-2) injections. IL-2 significantly inhibited the formation of palpable tumors and prolonged mouse survival at nontoxic low doses. Histologically IL-2 caused vascular damage and infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes in the tumor as well as necrotic areas with apoptotic cells. These findings suggest destruction of tumor cells by systemic IL-2 therapy and IL-2 responsiveness of prostate carcinoma bone tumors.

  11. A Critical Role of the PTEN/PDGF Signaling Network for the Regulation of Radiosensitivity in Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Michael; Najy, Abdo J.; Snyder, Michael; Movilla, Lisa S.; Kim, Hyeong-Reh Choi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Loss or mutation of the phosphate and tensin homologue (PTEN) is a common genetic abnormality in prostate cancer (PCa) and induces platelet-derived growth factor D (PDGF D) signaling. We examined the role of the PTEN/PDGF axis on radioresponse using a murine PTEN null prostate epithelial cell model. Methods and Materials: PTEN wild-type (PTEN{sup +/+}) and PTEN knockout (PTEN{sup −/−}) murine prostate epithelial cell lines were used to examine the relationship between the PTEN status and radiosensitivity and also to modulate the PDGF D expression levels. PTEN{sup −/−} cells were transduced with a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentiviral vector containing either scrambled nucleotides (SCRM) or sequences targeted to PDGF D (shPDGF D). Tumorigenesis and morphogenesis of these cell lines were evaluated in vivo via subcutaneous injection of male nude mice and in vitro using Matrigel 3-dimensional (3D) culture. Effects of irradiation on clonogenic survival, cell migration, and invasion were measured with respect to the PTEN status and the PDGF D expression level. In addition, apoptosis and cell cycle redistribution were examined as potential mechanisms for differences seen. Results: PTEN{sup −/−} cells were highly tumorigenic in animals and effectively formed foci in 3D culture. Importantly, loss of PDGF D in these cell lines drastically diminished these phenotypes. Furthermore, PTEN{sup −/−} cells demonstrated increased clonogenic survival in vitro compared to PTEN{sup +/+}, and attenuation of PDGF D significantly reversed this radioresistant phenotype. PTEN{sup −/−} cells displayed greater migratory and invasive potential at baseline as well as after irradiation. Both the basal and radiation-induced migratory and invasive phenotypes in PTEN{sup −/−} cells required PDGF D expression. Interestingly, these differences were independent of apoptosis and cell cycle redistribution, as they showed no significant difference. Conclusions: We propose

  12. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2015-10-13

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting.

  13. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides induce apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells and inhibits prostate cancer growth in a xenograft mouse model of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qiong; Li, Zhuoneng; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Fan; Xu, Ruo-Jun; Cai, Yi-Zhong

    2009-08-01

    Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBPs) are important functional constituents in red-colored fruits of L. barbarum (Guo Qi Zi, a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal plant commonly known as Goji berry or wolfberry). The influence of LBP on human prostate cancer cells was systematically investigated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro effects of LBP on two cell lines (PC-3 and DU-145) were examined by using trypan blue exclusion staining, single-cell gel electrophoresis, flow cytometry, terminal dUTP nick-end labeling assay, and immunohistochemical assay (assessment of Bcl-2 and Bax expression). The in vivo effect of LBP on PC-3 cells was assessed in the nude mouse xenograft tumor model. The in vitro results showed that LBP can dose- and time-dependently inhibit the growth of both PC-3 and DU-145 cells. LBP caused the breakage of DNA strands of PC-3 and DU-145 cells; the tail frequency and tail length were significantly higher than that of control cells. LBP also markedly induced PC-3 and DU-145 cell apoptosis, with the highest apoptosis rates at 41.5% and 35.5%, respectively. The ratio of Bcl-2/Bax protein expression following LBP treatments decreased significantly with a dose-effect relationship, which suggested that LBP can regulate the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax to induce apoptosis of PC-3 and DU-145 cells. The in vivo experimental results indicate that LBP might significantly inhibit PC-3 tumor growth in nude mice. Both the tumor volume and weight of the LBP treatment group were significantly lower than those of the control group.

  14. A Novel Imaging Approach for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer Based on Endogenous Zinc Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Subrata K.; Kim, Pilhan; Zhang, Xiao-an; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Moore, Anna; Lippard, Stephen J.; Medarova, Zdravka

    2010-01-01

    The early detection of prostate cancer is a life-saving event in patients harboring potentially aggressive disease. With the development of malignancy there is a dramatic reduction in the zinc content of prostate tissue associated with the inability of cancer cells to accumulate the ion. In the current study, we utilized endogenous zinc as an imaging biomarker for prostate cancer detection and progression monitoring. We employed a novel fluorescent sensor for mobile zinc (ZPP1) to detect and monitor the development of prostate cancer in a transgenic mouse model of prostate adenocarcinoma, using in vivo optical imaging correlated with biological fluid-based methods. We demonstrated that the progression of prostate cancer could be monitored in vivo judging by decreasing zinc content in the prostates of tumor-bearing mice in an age-dependent manner. In a novel quantitative assay, we determine the concentration of mobile zinc in both prostate cell lysates and mouse prostate extracts through simple titration of the ZPP1 sensor. Our findings fulfill the promise of zinc-based prostate cancer diagnostics with the prospect for immediate clinical translation. PMID:20610630

  15. Do adenocarcinomas of the prostate with Gleason score (GS) ≤6 have the potential to metastasize to lymph nodes?

    PubMed

    Ross, Hillary M; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N; Cowan, Janet E; Simko, Jeffry P; Wheeler, Thomas M; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2012-09-01

    Although rare, there are cases within reported series of men with Gleason score (GS) ≤6 on radical prostatectomies that show pelvic lymph node (LN) metastases. However, there are no studies on whether pelvic LN metastases occur in tumors with GS ≤6 using the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) updated GS system. We performed a search of the radical prostatectomy databases at 4 large academic centers for cases of GS ≤6. Only prostatectomies submitted and embedded in entirety with pelvic LN dissections were included. A combined total of 14,123 cases were identified, of which 22 cases had a positive LN. Histopathologic review of 19 cases (3 cases unavailable for review) showed higher grade than originally reported by the pathologists in all cases. Of the 17 pre-ISUP reviewed cases, 2 were upgraded to 4+3=7 with both cribriform and poorly formed glands. One case was upgraded to 4+3=7 with tertiary pattern 5 displaying cribriform glands, poorly formed glands, and cords of single cells. Eleven cases were upgraded to 3+4=7 with glomeruloid structures and small to large cribriform glands (1 of these also had features of ductal adenocarcinoma). Two cases had tertiary pattern 4 with small cribriform glands. One case had a prominent colloid component that would currently be graded as 4+5=9 because of large cribriform glands and solid sheets of cells within the mucin. Of the 2 post-ISUP cases, 1 demonstrated tertiary pattern 4, and the other showed GS 3+4=7 with irregular cribriform glands. Undergrading is the primary reason for LN positivity with GS ≤6, which has decreased significantly since the adoption of the ISUP grading system in 2005. Of over 14,000 totally embedded radical prostatectomies from multiple institutions, there was not a single case of a GS ≤6 tumor with LN metastases. In contrast to prevailing assumptions, GS ≤6 tumors do not appear to metastasize to LNs. Rather, Gleason pattern 4 or 5, as better defined by the current ISUP

  16. An Assessment of Early Response to Targeted Therapy via Molecular Imaging: A Pilot Study of 3'-deoxy-3'[(18)F]-Fluorothymidine Positron Emission Tomography (18)F-FLT PET/CT in Prostate Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kairemo, Kalevi; Ravizzini, Gregory C; Macapinlac, Homer A; Subbiah, Vivek

    2017-04-04

    Fluorothymidine is a thymidine analog labeled with fluorine-18 fluorothymidine for positron emission tomography ((18)F-FLT-PET) imaging. Thymidine is a nucleic acid that is used to build DNA. Fluorine-18 fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) utilizes the same metabolic pathway as does thymidine but has a very low incidence of being incorporated into the DNA (<1%). (18)F-FLT-PET could have a role in the evaluation of response to targeted therapy. We present here a pilot study where we investigated cellular metabolism and proliferation in patients with prostate cancer before and after targeted therapy. Seven patients with Stage IV prostate adenocarcinoma, candidates for targeted therapy inhibiting the hepatocyte growth factor/tyrosine-protein kinase Met (HGF/C-MET) pathway, were included in this study. The HGF/C-MET pathway is implicated in prostate cancer progression, and an evaluation of the inhibition of this pathway could be valuable. (18)F-FLT was performed at baseline and within four weeks post-therapy. Tumor response was assessed semi-quantitatively and using visual response criteria. The range of SUVmax for (18)F-FLT at baseline in the prostate varied from 2.5 to 4.2. This study demonstrated that (18)F-FLT with positron emission tomography/computerized tomography ((18)F-FLT PET/CT) had only limited applications in the early response evaluation of prostate cancer. (18)F-FLT PET/CT may have some utility in the assessment of response in lymph node disease. However, (18)F-FLT PET/CT was not found to be useful in the evaluation of the prostate bed, metastatic skeletal disease, and liver disease.

  17. Deletion of Interstitial Genes between TMPRSS2 and ERG Promotes Prostate Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Linn, Douglas E; Penney, Kathryn L; Bronson, Roderick T; Mucci, Lorelei A; Li, Zhe

    2016-04-01

    TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions that occur frequently in human prostate cancers can be generated either through insertional chromosomal rearrangement or by intrachromosomal deletion. Genetically, a key difference between these two mechanisms is that the latter results in deletion of a ∼3-Mb interstitial region containing genes with unexplored roles in prostate cancer. In this study, we characterized two mouse models recapitulating TMPRSS2-ERG insertion or deletion events in the background of prostate-specific PTEN deficiency. We found that only the mice that lacked the interstitial region developed prostate adenocarcinomas marked by poor differentiation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Mechanistic investigations identified several interstitial genes, including Ets2 and Bace2, whose reduced expression correlated in the gene homologs in human prostate cancer with biochemical relapse and lethal disease. Accordingly, PTEN-deficient mice with prostate-specific knockout of Ets2 exhibited marked progression of prostate adenocarcinomas that was partly attributed to activation of MAPK signaling. Collectively, our findings established that Ets2 is a tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer, and its loss along with other genes within the TMPRSS2-ERG interstitial region contributes to disease progression. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1869-81. ©2016 AACR.

  18. TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in small cell carcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Guo, Charles C; Dancer, Jane Y; Wang, Yan; Aparicio, Ana; Navone, Nora M; Troncoso, Patricia; Czerniak, Bogdan A

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that most prostate cancers carry the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. Here we evaluated the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in small cell carcinoma of the prostate (n = 12) in comparison with small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (n = 12) and lung (n = 11). Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated rearrangement of the ERG gene in 8 cases of prostatic small cell carcinoma (67%), and the rearrangement was associated with deletion of the 5' ERG gene in 7 cases, but rearrangement of the ERG gene was not present in any small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder or lung. Next we evaluated the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in nude mouse xenografts that were derived from 2 prostatic small cell carcinomas carrying the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. Two transcripts encoded by the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing demonstrated that the 2 transcripts were composed of fusions of exon 1 of the TMPRSS2 gene to exon 4 or 5 of the ERG gene. Our study demonstrates the specific presence of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in prostatic small cell carcinoma, which may be helpful in distinguishing small cell carcinoma of prostatic origin from nonprostatic origins. The high prevalence of the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in prostatic small cell carcinoma as well as adenocarcinoma implies that small cell carcinoma may share a common pathogenic pathway with adenocarcinoma in the prostate.

  19. Mapping Complex Traits in a Diversity Outbred F1 Mouse Population Identifies Germline Modifiers of Metastasis in Human Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jean M; Gildea, Derek E; Andreas, Jonathan P; Gatti, Daniel M; Williams, Kendra A; Lee, Minnkyong; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Suiyuan; Mullikin, James C; Wolfsberg, Tyra G; McDonnell, Shannon K; Fogarty, Zachary C; Larson, Melissa C; French, Amy J; Schaid, Daniel J; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Churchill, Gary A; Crawford, Nigel P S

    2017-01-25

    It is unclear how standing genetic variation affects the prognosis of prostate cancer patients. To provide one controlled answer to this problem, we crossed a dominant, penetrant mouse model of prostate cancer to Diversity Outbred mice, a collection of animals that carries over 40 million SNPs. Integration of disease phenotype and SNP variation data in 493 F1 males identified a metastasis modifier locus on Chromosome 8 (LOD = 8.42); further analysis identified the genes Rwdd4, Cenpu, and Casp3 as functional effectors of this locus. Accordingly, analysis of over 5,300 prostate cancer patient samples revealed correlations between the presence of genetic variants at these loci, their expression levels, cancer aggressiveness, and patient survival. We also observed that ectopic overexpression of RWDD4 and CENPU increased the aggressiveness of two human prostate cancer cell lines. In aggregate, our approach demonstrates how well-characterized genetic variation in mice can be harnessed in conjunction with systems genetics approaches to identify and characterize germline modifiers of human disease processes.

  20. Xanthohumol impairs human prostate cancer cell growth and invasion and diminishes the incidence and progression of advanced tumors in TRAMP mice.

    PubMed

    Venè, Roberta; Benelli, Roberto; Minghelli, Simona; Astigiano, Simonetta; Tosetti, Francesca; Ferrari, Nicoletta

    2012-12-06

    Despite recent advances in understanding the biological basis of prostate cancer, management of the disease, especially in the phase resistant to androgen ablation, remains a significant challenge. The long latency and high incidence of prostate carcinogenesis provides the opportunity to intervene with chemoprevention to prevent or eradicate prostate malignancies. In this study, we have used human hormone-resistant prostate cancer cells, DU145 and PC3, as an in vitro model to assess the efficacy of xanthohumol (XN) against cell growth, motility and invasion. We observed that treatment of prostate cancer cells with low micromolar doses of XN inhibits proliferation and modulates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and AKT phosphorylation leading to reduced cell migration and invasion. Oxidative stress by increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was associated with these effects. Transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) transgenic mice were used as an in vivo model of prostate adenocarcinoma. Oral gavage of XN, three times per week, beginning at 4 wks of age, induced a decrease in the average weight of the urogenital (UG) tract, delayed advanced tumor progression and inhibited the growth of poorly differentiated prostate carcinoma. The ability of XN to inhibit prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo suggests that XN may be a novel agent for the management of prostate cancer.

  1. Metastatic adenocarcinoma of unknown primary origin.

    PubMed

    Hammar, S P

    1998-12-01

    Adenocarcinomas account for up to 60% of all metastatic neoplasms of unknown primary origin. In general, adenocarcinomas are the most difficult metastatic tumor to accurately identify the primary site. Some metastatic adenocarcinomas have distinctive histological features that allow for their site determination (eg, colonic adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma), although the majority of metastatic adenocarcinomas have histological features that are not distinctive enough to allow for a specific diagnosis of their origin. For this reason, electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry have been used to help identify the exact type (origin) of metastatic adenocarcinomas. Relatively specific ultrastructural features used to diagnose metastatic adenocarcinomas of unknown primary origin include tubular myelin, intranuclear surfactant apoprotein tubular inclusions, Clara cell granules, uniform short microvilli with filamentous cores and core rootlets, Langerhans cells associated with neoplastic cells, cytoplasmic hyaline globules, lipid droplets, glycogen, and cytoplasmic crystals. Only a few of these ultrastructural features are absolutely specific. Relatively specific immunohistochemical tests used to diagnose metastatic adenocarcinomas of unknown primary origin include prostate-specific antigen, thyroglobulin, estrogen and progesterone receptor proteins, thyroid transcription factor-I, and surfactant apoproteins. Of these, prostate-specific antigen and thyroglobulin are the most specific. The purpose of this article is to discuss the use of electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry in the site-specific diagnosis of metastatic adenocarcinomas of unknown primary origin.

  2. Systemic interleukin 2 therapy for human prostate tumors in a nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Triest, J A; Grignon, D J; Cher, M L; Kocheril, S V; Montecillo, E J; Talati, B; Tekyi-Mensah, S; Pontes, J E; Hillman, G G

    1998-08-01

    Once the regional lymph nodes become involved in prostate carcinoma, 85% of patients develop distant metastases within 5 years, and metastatic disease is difficult to treat. We have investigated the effect of systemic interleukin 2 (IL-2) treatment on metastatic prostate carcinoma using a xenograft tumor model. Cells from a PC-3/IF cell line, produced by intrafemoral injection of human PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells, were injected in the prostate of Balb/c nude mice. Prostate tumors and para-aortic lymph nodes were resected, and tumor cells were recultured and passaged in the prostate in vivo to produce new cell lines. On day 6 following prostatic injection of these cell lines, mice were treated with i.p. injections of IL-2 at 25,000-50,000 units/ day for 5 consecutive days. The effect of IL-2 on tumor progression was assessed, and histological studies were performed on prostate tumor and lymph node sections. The tumor cell lines generated by serial prostate injection were tumorigenic and metastasized to regional para-aortic lymph nodes. Tumors of 0.4 cm were obtained by day 16 and grew to 1-1.5 cm by day 40 with metastasis to para-aortic lymph nodes. Following two to three weekly courses of 5 days of 25,000-40,000 units/day of IL-2, the growth of prostate tumors was inhibited by 94%. Higher doses of 50,000 units/ day were toxic. Histologically, prostate sections showed vascular damage manifested by multifocal hemorrhages and an influx of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear cells into disintegrating tumors and areas of necrosis containing numerous apoptotic cells. In contrast to control mice, para-aortic lymph nodes were not enlarged in responding mice. These findings suggest that systemic IL-2 therapy can induce an antitumor response in prostate tumors and control their growth and metastasis.

  3. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-03-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  4. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26840261

  5. The therapeutic efficacy of I131-PSCA-mAb in orthotopic mouse models of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is upregulated in prostate cancer tissues. Here we aimed to study the therapeutic efficacy of a monoclonal antibody of PSCA-labeled I131 (I131-PSCA-mAb) in orthotopic mouse models of prostate cancer. Methods The proliferation, apoptosis and invasion abilities of PC-3 and LNCaP cells treated with I131-PSCA-mAb were measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay, flow cytometry and transwell culture, respectively. The human prostate cancer models were established by orthotopic implantation of PC-3 and LNCaP cells in nude mice. I131-PSCA-mAb distribution and tumor cell apoptosis in the tumor-bearing nude mice were measured. Results The inhibitory and apoptosis rates of PC-3 and LNCaP cells treated with I131-PSCA-mAb reached a maximum of 84%, 80% and 50%, 46%, respectively, which were obviously higher than in the cells treated with I131-IgG or PSCA-mAb. The invaded number of PC-3 and LNCaP cells treated with I131-PSCA-mAbe was significantly reduced (P < 0.01) compared with the control group. The ratios of I131-PSCA-mAb in tumor to intramuscular I131-PSCA-mAb (T/NT) in tumor-bearing nude mice were increased with time and reached the highest level after 8 h. T/NT stayed above 3.0 after 12 h, and the tumor could still be developed after 24 h. The number of apoptotic cells in tumor tissue of nude mice treated with I131-PSCA-mAb was larger than that in the control group. Conclusion I131-PSCA-mAb has the potential to become a new targeted therapy drug for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:24330823

  6. The G gamma / T-15 transgenic mouse model of androgen-independent prostate cancer: target cells of carcinogenesis and the effect of the vitamin D analogue EB 1089.

    PubMed

    Perez-Stable, Carlos M; Schwartz, Gary G; Farinas, Adan; Finegold, Milton; Binderup, Lise; Howard, Guy A; Roos, Bernard A

    2002-06-01

    Transgenic mouse models of prostate cancer provide unique opportunities to understand the molecular events in prostate carcinogenesis and for the preclinical testing of new therapies. We studied the G gamma T-15 transgenic mouse line, which contains the human fetal globin promoter linked to SV40 T antigen (Tag) and which develops androgen-independent prostate cancer. Using the immunohistochemistry of normal mouse prostates before tumor formation, we showed that the target cells of carcinogenesis in G gamma T-15 mice are located in the basal epithelial layer. We tested the efficacy of the 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) analogue, EB 1089, to chemoprevent prostate cancer in these transgenic mice. Compared with treatment with placebo, treatment with EB 1089 at three different time points before the onset of prostate tumors in mice did not prevent or delay tumor onset. However, EB 1089 significantly inhibited prostate tumor growth. At the highest dose, EB 1089 inhibited prostate tumor growth by 60% (P = 0.0003) and the growth in the number of metastases, although this dose also caused significant hypercalcemia and weight loss. We conducted several in vitro experiments to explore why EB 1089 did not prevent the occurrence of the primary tumors. EB 1089 significantly inhibited the growth of a Tag-expressing human prostate epithelial cell line, BPH-1, and an androgen-insensitive subline of LNCaP cells [which was not inhibited by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)]. Thus, neither Tag expression nor androgen insensitivity explain the absence of chemopreventive effect. Conversely, neither 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) nor EB 1089 inhibited the growth of the normal rat prostate basal epithelial cell line NRP-152. It is likely that EB 1089 was not effective in delaying the growth of the primary tumor in G gamma T-15 transgenic mice because the target cells of carcinogenesis in these mice are located in the basal epithelial layer. We conclude that G gamma T-15 transgenic mice are a useful model for testing vitamin D

  7. c-Myc targeted regulators of cell metabolism in a transgenic mouse model of papillary lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ciribilli, Yari; Singh, Prashant; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    c-Myc's role in pulmonary cancer metabolism is uncertain. We therefore investigated c-Myc activity in papillary lung adenocarcinomas (PLAC). Genomics revealed 90 significantly regulated genes (> 3-fold) coding for cell growth, DNA metabolism, RNA processing and ribosomal biogenesis and bioinformatics defined c-Myc binding sites (TFBS) at > 95% of up-regulated genes. EMSA assays at 33 novel TFBS evidenced DNA binding activity and ChIP-seq data retrieved from public repositories confirmed these to be c-Myc bound. Dual-luciferase gene reporter assays developed for RNA-Terminal-Phosphate-Cyclase-Like-1(RCL1), Ribosomal-Protein-SA(RPSA), Nucleophosmin/Nucleoplasmin-3(NPM3) and Hexokinase-1(HK1) confirmed c-Myc functional relevance and ChIP assays with HEK293T cells over-expressing ectopic c-Myc demonstrated enriched c-Myc occupancy at predicted TFBS for RCL1, NPM3, HK1 and RPSA. Note, c-Myc recruitment on chromatin was comparable to the positive controls CCND2 and CDK4. Computational analyses defined master regulators (MR), i.e. heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1, nucleolin, the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1, triosephosphate-isomerase 1, folate transporter (SLC19A1) and nucleophosmin to influence activity of up to 90% of PLAC-regulated genes. Their expression was induced by 3-, 3-, 6-, 3-, 11- and 7-fold, respectively. STRING analysis confirmed protein-protein-interactions of regulated genes and Western immunoblotting of fatty acid synthase, serine hydroxyl-methyltransferase 1, arginine 1 and hexokinase 2 showed tumor specific induction. Published knock down studies confirmed these proteins to induce apoptosis by disrupting neoplastic lipogenesis, by endorsing uracil accumulation and by suppressing arginine metabolism and glucose-derived ribonucleotide biosynthesis. Finally, translational research demonstrated high expression of MR and of 47 PLAC up-regulated genes to be associated with poor survival in lung adenocarcinoma patients (HR 3.2 p < 0.001) thus

  8. PPARγ isoforms differentially regulate metabolic networks to mediate mouse prostatic epithelial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Strand, D W; Jiang, M; Murphy, T A; Yi, Y; Konvinse, K C; Franco, O E; Wang, Y; Young, J D; Hayward, S W

    2012-08-09

    Recent observations indicate prostatic diseases are comorbidities of systemic metabolic dysfunction. These discoveries revealed fundamental questions regarding the nature of prostate metabolism. We previously showed that prostate-specific ablation of PPARγ in mice resulted in tumorigenesis and active autophagy. Here, we demonstrate control of overlapping and distinct aspects of prostate epithelial metabolism by ectopic expression of individual PPARγ isoforms in PPARγ knockout prostate epithelial cells. Expression and activation of either PPARγ 1 or 2 reduced de novo lipogenesis and oxidative stress and mediated a switch from glucose to fatty acid oxidation through regulation of genes including Pdk4, Fabp4, Lpl, Acot1 and Cd36. Differential effects of PPARγ isoforms included decreased basal cell differentiation, Scd1 expression and triglyceride fatty acid desaturation and increased tumorigenicity by PPARγ1. In contrast, PPARγ2 expression significantly increased basal cell differentiation, Scd1 expression and AR expression and responsiveness. Finally, in confirmation of in vitro data, a PPARγ agonist versus high-fat diet (HFD) regimen in vivo confirmed that PPARγ agonization increased prostatic differentiation markers, whereas HFD downregulated PPARγ-regulated genes and decreased prostate differentiation. These data provide a rationale for pursuing a fundamental metabolic understanding of changes to glucose and fatty acid metabolism in benign and malignant prostatic diseases associated with systemic metabolic stress.

  9. Mechanisms of Abnormal Growth Regulation in Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Using Abi1/Hssh3bp1 Conditional Knockout Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    2008). Hence library containing SH2 domains was used in the screening. These experiments were done in collaboration with Dr. Bruce Mayer and Dr...Machida (University of Connecticut Health Science Center, Farmington, CT) using the overlay method developed by Dr. Mayer laboratory (Machida et al...Shin, and B.J. Mayer . 2007. High-throughput phosphotyrosine profiling using SH2 domains. Mol Cell. 26:899-915. Macoska, J.A., J. Xu, D. Ziemnicka, T.S

  10. Lurbinectedin induces depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, an essential component of its in vivo synergism with gemcitabine, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma mouse models.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Guillén, María José; López-Casas, Pedro Pablo; Sarno, Francesca; Gallardo, Alberto; Álamo, Patricia; Cuevas, Carmen; Hidalgo, Manuel; Galmarini, Carlos María; Allavena, Paola; Avilés, Pablo; Mangues, Ramón

    2016-12-01

    We explored whether the combination of lurbinectedin (PM01183) with the antimetabolite gemcitabine could result in a synergistic antitumor effect in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) mouse models. We also studied the contribution of lurbinectedin to this synergism. This drug presents a dual pharmacological effect that contributes to its in vivo antitumor activity: (i) specific binding to DNA minor grooves, inhibiting active transcription and DNA repair; and (ii) specific depletion of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). We evaluated the in vivo antitumor activity of lurbinectedin and gemcitabine as single agents and in combination in SW-1990 and MIA PaCa-2 cell-line xenografts and in patient-derived PDA models (AVATAR). Lurbinectedin-gemcitabine combination induced a synergistic effect on both MIA PaCa-2 [combination index (CI)=0.66] and SW-1990 (CI=0.80) tumor xenografts. It also induced complete tumor remissions in four out of six patient-derived PDA xenografts. This synergism was associated with enhanced DNA damage (anti-γ-H2AX), cell cycle blockage, caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. In addition to the enhanced DNA damage, which is a consequence of the interaction of the two drugs with the DNA, lurbinectedin induced TAM depletion leading to cytidine deaminase (CDA) downregulation in PDA tumors. This effect could, in turn, induce an increase of gemcitabine-mediated DNA damage that was especially relevant in high-density TAM tumors. These results show that lurbinectedin can be used to develop 'molecularly targeted' combination strategies.

  11. Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0162 TITLE: Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc...CONTRACT NUMBER Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer...Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We previously generated a PB-Cre4/CAG-SMIL transgenic model allowing Cre

  12. Frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas-1 demonstrates oncogenic properties in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Xiong, Hua; Zou, Yanmei; Xu, Sanpeng; Quan, Lanping; Yuan, Xianglin; Xu, Ningzhi; Wang, Yihua

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer-associated mortality for males worldwide. Although dysregulation of the β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) pathway has been previously reported in prostate cancer, the mechanisms underlying this process remain unknown. Frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas-1 (FRAT1) functions as a positive regulator of the β-catenin/TCF signaling pathway. However, to the best of our knowledge, the molecular association between FRAT1 and the β-catenin/TCF pathway in prostate cancer has not been investigated. In the present study, FRAT1 expression was analyzed in normal prostate tissues and prostate adenocarcinoma samples using publicly available databases, a commercial tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry techniques. In addition, FRAT1 expression levels were altered by overexpression or RNA interference-mediated depletion in prostate cancer cells. The effects of FRAT1 expression on tumor growth were determined using cell growth curves in vitro and xenografts in nude mice in vivo. The effects of FRAT1 on β-catenin/TCF activity were measured using the TOPFLASH reporter assay. FRAT1 was expressed exclusively in the nuclei of normal prostate basal cells, and nuclear FRAT1 was detected in 68% (40/59) of prostate adenocarcinoma samples. In addition, FRAT1 activated the TCF luciferase reporter gene promoter in prostate cancer cells, and was observed to promote the growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro. Furthermore, FRAT1 expression was sufficient to transform NIH3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and lead to tumor formation in vivo. These results suggest that FRAT1 demonstrates oncogenic properties in prostate cancer, potentially by suppressing the inhibitory effect of nuclear glycogen synthase 3β against β-catenin/TCF activity, thus activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and promoting cell growth. PMID:27599661

  13. Prostate Stem Cell Antigen DNA Vaccination Breaks Tolerance to Self-antigen and Inhibits Prostate Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sarfraz; Casey, Garrett; Sweeney, Paul; Tangney, Mark; O'Sullivan, Gerald C

    2009-01-01

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a cell surface antigen expressed in normal human prostate and over expressed in prostate cancer. Elevated levels of PSCA protein in prostate cancer correlate with increased tumor stage/grade, with androgen independence and have higher expression in bone metastases. In this study, the PSCA gene was isolated from the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate cell line (TRAMPC1), and a vaccine plasmid construct was generated. This plasmid PSCA (pmPSCA) was delivered by intramuscular electroporation (EP) and induced effective antitumor immune responses against subcutaneous TRAMPC1 tumors in male C57 BL/6 mice. The pmPSCA vaccination inhibited tumor growth, resulting in cure or prolongation in survival. Similarly, the vaccine inhibited metastases in PSCA expressing B16 F10 tumors. There was activation of Th-1 type immunity against PSCA, indicating the breaking of tolerance to a self-antigen. This immunity was tumor specific and was transferable by adoptive transfer of splenocytes. The mice remained healthy and there was no evidence of collateral autoimmune responses in normal tissues. EP-assisted delivery of the pmPSCA evoked strong specific responses and could, in neoadjuvant or adjuvant settings, provide a safe and effective immune control of prostate cancer, given that there is significant homology between human and mouse PSCA. PMID:19337234

  14. ALTERED SENSITIVITY OF THE MOUSE FETUS TO IMPAIRED PROSTATIC BUD FORMATION BY DIOXIN: INFLUENCE OF GENETIC BACKGROUND AND NULL EXPRESSION OF TGF-ALFA AND EGF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Altered sensitivity of the mouse fetus to impaired prostatic bud formation by dioxin: Influence of genetic background and null expression of TGF and EGF.
    Rasmussen, N.T., Lin T-M., Fenton, S.E., Abbott, B.D. and R.E. Peterson.
    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)...

  15. Dicarbonyl/L-xylulose reductase: a potential biomarker identified by laser-capture microdissection-micro serial analysis of gene expression of human prostate adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cho-Vega, Jeong Hee; Tsavachidis, Spiridon; Do, Kim-Anh; Nakagawa, Junichi; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; McDonnell, Timothy J

    2007-12-01

    To identify genes involved in prostate carcinogenesis, we used laser-capture microdissection-micro serial analysis of gene expression to construct libraries of paired cancer and normal cells from human tissue samples. After computational comparison of the two libraries, we identified dicarbonyl/l-xylulose reductase (DCXR), an enzyme that catalyzes alpha-dicarbonyl and l-xylulose, as being significantly up-regulated in prostate cancer cells. The specificity of DCXR up-regulation for prostate cancer tissues was confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR, virtual Northern blot, and Western blot analyses. Furthermore, DCXR expression at the protein level was assessed using fresh-frozen tissues and a tissue microarray consisting of 46 cases of organ-confined early-stage prostate cancer and 29 cases of chemohormonally treated prostate cancer. In most normal prostate epithelial cells, DCXR was expressed at low levels and was localized predominantly in the cytoplasmic membrane. In contrast, in virtually all grades of early-stage prostate cancer and in all chemohormonally treated cases, DCXR was strikingly overexpressed and was localized predominantly in the cytoplasm and nucleus. In all samples, the stromal cells were completely devoid of DCXR expression. Based on these findings, we suggest that DCXR overexpression has the potential to be an additional useful biomarker for prostate cancer.

  16. Preclinical Studies of Signaling Pathways in a Mutant Mouse Model of Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    PD0325901 effectively inhibited their target pathways when used individually or in com- bination, upregulation of Bim expression was most marked when the...that PTEN expression was mark - edly reduced with high frequency (59% cases) during prostate can- cer progression, as determined by comparing BPH, PIN...al. 2002. Immunohistochemical dem- onstration of phospho-Akt in high Gleason grade prostate cancer. Clin. Cancer Res. 8:1168–1171. 9. McMenamin , M.E

  17. Humanizing the Mouse Androgen Receptor to Study Polymorphisms and Mutations in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    process. AR molecular genetics underlie two crucial problems in PCa: 1) Do polymorphisms in AR lead to differential risk of disease? 2) Do...Nkx3.1, which is critical in prostate growth and differentiation , was higher for short compared to long Q tract alleles (see Fig. 6 in ms.), likely...This link between Q tract length and prostate cancer establishment, likely due to the differential transcriptional strength of these AR alleles

  18. Preclinical Studies of Signaling Pathways in a Mutant Mouse Model of Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    Palanisamy N, Chinnaiyan AM. 2009. Induced chromosomal proximity and gene fusions in prostate cancer. Science 326: 1230. Marker PC, Donjacour AA, Dahiya R...Identification of a new prostate cancer susceptibility locus on chromosome 8q24. Nat Genet 41: 1055–1057. Yu X, Wang Y , Jiang M, Bierie B, Roy-Burman...poorly differentiated cancer phenotype in each of the tumor-prone (tamoxifen-induced) mice. These tumors express CK8, a luminal cell marker , in the

  19. The human (PEDB) and mouse (mPEDB) Prostate Expression Databases.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Peter S; Pritchard, Colin; Abbott, Denise; Clegg, Nigel

    2002-01-01

    The Prostate Expression Databases (PEDB and mPEDB) are online resources designed to allow researchers to access and analyze gene expression information derived from the human and murine prostate, respectively. Human PEDB archives more than 84 000 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) from 38 prostate cDNA libraries in a curated relational database that provides detailed library information including tissue source, library construction methods, sequence diversity and sequence abundance. The differential expression of each EST species can be viewed across all libraries using a Virtual Expression Analysis Tool (VEAT), a graphical user interface written in Java for intra- and inter-library sequence comparisons. Recent enhancements to PEDB include (i) the development of a murine prostate expression database, mPEDB, that complements the human gene expression information in PEDB, (ii) the assembly of a non-redundant sequence set or 'prostate unigene' that represents the diversity of gene expression in the prostate, and (iii) an expanded search tool that supports both text-based and BLAST queries. PEDB and mPEDB are accessible via the World Wide Web at http://www.pedb.org and http://www.mpedb.org.

  20. Delay of Postnatal Maturation Sensitizes the Mouse Prostate to Testosterone-Induced Pronounced Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Savolainen, Saija; Pakarainen, Tomi; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Poutanen, Matti; Mäkelä, Sari

    2007-01-01

    The role of estrogens in the etiology of prostate cancer is controversial. To demonstrate the specific effects of estrogens and androgens on the development of the prostatic epithelial hyperplasia, we used luteinizing hormone receptor knockout mice (LuRKO), which are resistant to pituitary regulation mediated by luteinizing hormone, lack postnatal androgen production, and have rudimentary accessory sex glands, the growth of which can be induced with exogenous androgen replacement. This model is thus ideal for the investigation of direct hormonal effects on the prostate. Testosterone, but not 5α-dihydrotestosterone, replacement from 21 days of life for 8 weeks induced pronounced hyperplasia and inflammation in the prostates of LuRKO mice. Interestingly, 5α-dihydrotestosterone combined with 17β-estradiol did not induce hyperplasia or inflammation, and treatments with inhibitors of estrogen action, aromatase inhibitor, and ICI 182780 further exacerbated testosterone-induced hyperplastic growth. However, the activation of estrogen receptor (ER)-β with a specific agonist, DPN [2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenol)-propionitrile], prevented the development of prostatic hyperplasia and inflammation in testosterone-treated LuRKO mice. Thus, it seems that in the presence of sufficient androgenic stimulation, it is the balance between ER-α- and ER-β-mediated signaling that determines whether estrogens promote hyperplasia or protect the prostate against hyperplastic changes. PMID:17640960

  1. Boosting antitumor responses of T lymphocytes infiltrating human prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Kasic, Tihana; Gri, Giorgia; Gallana, Keti; Borsellino, Giovanna; Marigo, Ilaria; Battistini, Luca; Iafrate, Massimo; Prayer-Galetti, Tommaso; Pagano, Francesco; Viola, Antonella

    2005-04-18

    Immunotherapy may provide valid alternative therapy for patients with hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer. However, if the tumor environment exerts a suppressive action on antigen-specific tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), immunotherapy will achieve little, if any, success. In this study, we analyzed the modulation of TIL responses by the tumor environment using collagen gel matrix-supported organ cultures of human prostate carcinomas. Our results indicate that human prostatic adenocarcinomas are infiltrated by terminally differentiated cytotoxic T lymphocytes that are, however, in an unresponsive status. We demonstrate the presence of high levels of nitrotyrosines in prostatic TIL, suggesting a local production of peroxynitrites. By inhibiting the activity of arginase and nitric oxide synthase, key enzymes of L-arginine metabolism that are highly expressed in malignant but not in normal prostates, reduced tyrosine nitration and restoration of TIL responsiveness to tumor were achieved. The metabolic control exerted by the tumor on TIL function was confirmed in a transgenic mouse prostate model, which exhibits similarities with human prostate cancer. These results identify a novel and dominant mechanism by which cancers induce immunosuppression in situ and suggest novel strategies for tumor immunotherapy.

  2. Notch signaling is required for normal prostatic epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-De; Leow, Ching Ching; Zha, Jiping; Tang, Zhijun; Modrusan, Zora; Radtke, Freddy; Aguet, Michel; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2006-02-01

    Notch pathway is crucial for stem/progenitor cell maintenance, growth and differentiation in a variety of tissues. Using a transgenic cell ablation approach, we found in our previous study that cells expressing Notch1 are crucial for prostate early development and re-growth. Here, we further define the role of Notch signaling in regulating prostatic epithelial cell growth and differentiation using biochemical and genetic approaches in ex vivo or in vivo systems. Treatment of developing prostate grown in culture with inhibitors of gamma-secretase/presenilin, which is required for Notch cleavage and activation, caused a robust increase in proliferation of epithelial cells co-expressing cytokeratin 8 and 14, lack of luminal/basal layer segregation and dramatically reduced branching morphogenesis. Using conditional Notch1 gene deletion mouse models, we found that inactivation of Notch1 signaling resulted in profound prostatic alterations, including increased tufting, bridging and enhanced epithelial proliferation. Cells within these lesions co-expressed both luminal and basal cell markers, a feature of prostatic epithelial cells in predifferentiation developmental stages. Microarray analysis revealed that the gene expression in a number of genetic networks was altered following Notch1 gene deletion in prostate. Furthermore, expression of Notch1 and its effector Hey-1 gene in human prostate adenocarcinomas were found significantly down-regulated compared to normal control tissues. Taken together, these data suggest that Notch signaling is critical for normal cell proliferation and differentiation in the prostate, and deregulation of this pathway may facilitate prostatic tumorigenesis.

  3. Lurbinectedin induces depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, an essential component of its in vivo synergism with gemcitabine, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Guillén, María José; López-Casas, Pedro Pablo; Sarno, Francesca; Gallardo, Alberto; Álamo, Patricia; Cuevas, Carmen; Hidalgo, Manuel; Galmarini, Carlos María; Allavena, Paola; Avilés, Pablo; Mangues, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We explored whether the combination of lurbinectedin (PM01183) with the antimetabolite gemcitabine could result in a synergistic antitumor effect in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) mouse models. We also studied the contribution of lurbinectedin to this synergism. This drug presents a dual pharmacological effect that contributes to its in vivo antitumor activity: (i) specific binding to DNA minor grooves, inhibiting active transcription and DNA repair; and (ii) specific depletion of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). We evaluated the in vivo antitumor activity of lurbinectedin and gemcitabine as single agents and in combination in SW-1990 and MIA PaCa-2 cell-line xenografts and in patient-derived PDA models (AVATAR). Lurbinectedin-gemcitabine combination induced a synergistic effect on both MIA PaCa-2 [combination index (CI)=0.66] and SW-1990 (CI=0.80) tumor xenografts. It also induced complete tumor remissions in four out of six patient-derived PDA xenografts. This synergism was associated with enhanced DNA damage (anti-γ-H2AX), cell cycle blockage, caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. In addition to the enhanced DNA damage, which is a consequence of the interaction of the two drugs with the DNA, lurbinectedin induced TAM depletion leading to cytidine deaminase (CDA) downregulation in PDA tumors. This effect could, in turn, induce an increase of gemcitabine-mediated DNA damage that was especially relevant in high-density TAM tumors. These results show that lurbinectedin can be used to develop ‘molecularly targeted’ combination strategies. PMID:27780828

  4. Akt-mediated phosphorylation of Bmi1 modulates its oncogenic potential, E3 ligase activity, and DNA damage repair activity in mouse prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nacerddine, Karim; Beaudry, Jean-Bernard; Ginjala, Vasudeva; Westerman, Bart; Mattiroli, Francesca; Song, Ji-Ying; van der Poel, Henk; Ponz, Olga Balagué; Pritchard, Colin; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien; Zevenhoven, John; Tanger, Ellen; Sixma, Titia K.; Ganesan, Shridar; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major lethal malignancy in men, but the molecular events and their interplay underlying prostate carcinogenesis remain poorly understood. Epigenetic events and the upregulation of polycomb group silencing proteins including Bmi1 have been described to occur during PCa progression. Here, we found that conditional overexpression of Bmi1 in mice induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and elicited invasive adenocarcinoma when combined with PTEN haploinsufficiency. In addition, Bmi1 and the PI3K/Akt pathway were coactivated in a substantial fraction of human high-grade tumors. We found that Akt mediated Bmi1 phosphorylation, enhancing its oncogenic potential in an Ink4a/Arf-independent manner. This process also modulated the DNA damage response and affected genomic stability. Together, our findings demonstrate the etiological role of Bmi1 in PCa, unravel an oncogenic collaboration between Bmi1 and the PI3K/Akt pathway, and provide mechanistic insights into the modulation of Bmi1 function by phosphorylation during prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:22505453

  5. Reversal of methylcholanthrene-induced changes in mouse prostates in vitro by retinoic acid and its analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Lasnitzki, I.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of vitamin A-related compounds on hyperplasia and metaplasia induced by methylcholanthrene was studied in mouse prostate glands in organ culture. Methylcholanthrene was found to cause extensive hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia of the prostatic epithelium which persisted after withdrawal of the carcinogen. The retinoids included retinoic acid and 6 of its structural analogues synthesized in an attempt to enhance the anticarcinogenic action and reduce the toxicity of the parent compound. These where the cyclopentenyl analogus 7699, A2-retinoic acid, 13-cis-alpha-retinoic acid and 3 aromatic analogues. Administration of the compounds following the carcinogen reduced the extent and incidence of hyperplasia significantly and with the exception of one compound reversed the squamous metaplasia. Two of the aromatic analogues, one with a terminal ethylamide group (1430), and the other with a terminal ethylester group (9369), proved to be the most potent inhibitors, followed by compound 7699 and (9369), proved to be the most potent inhibitors, followed by compound 7699 and retinoic acid. A2-retinoic acid and 13-cis-alpha-retinoic acid showed the lowest activity. The inhibition of hyperplasia appeared to be mediated via a reduction of DNA synthesis. It seemed unrelated to either the biological growth-promoting activity of the compounds or their surface-active properties. It is tentatively suggested that vitamin A and its analogues may act as hormones. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:987794

  6. Producing a Mouse Model to Explore the Linkages Between Tocopherol Biology and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Edwards, Prostate cancer and supplementation with alpha-tocopherol and beta -carotene: incidence and mortality in a controlled trial. J Natl Cancer...cholecystokinin responses in men fed barley pasta enriched with ß- glucan . American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 69:55-63. 21. 1999 Tinker LF, Parks EJ, Behr

  7. Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer Initiation in a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model by Targeting 15-Lipoxygenase-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    omega (ω)-3 or ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ) directly impact PCa...development. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Diet, polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ), 15-lipoxygenase-1, cyclooxygenase, prostate cancer, Array, Genes. 16...competing with ω-6 fatty acids for 15-LO-1, and COX-2 activities. REPORTABLE OUTCOMES: None. CONCLUSION: Omega (ω)-3 fatty acids can

  8. Inflammation Oxidative Stress and Preneoplasia in a Mouse Model of Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    2003;361:955-64. 31. Hopkins WJ, Gendron-Fitzpatrick A, Balish E, Uehling DT. Escherichia coli urinary tract infection in genetically distinct mouse...strains: Time-course and host responses to infection. Infect Immun. 1998;66:2798-2802. 32. Hopkins WJ. Mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection . Chapter

  9. A Contemporary Analysis of Outcomes of Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate With Seminal Vesicle Invasion (pT3b) After Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Pierorazio, Phillip M.; Ross, Ashley E.; Schaeffer, Edward M.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Han, Misop; Walsh, Patrick C.; Partin, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite earlier detection and stage migration, seminal vesicle invasion is still reported in the prostate specific antigen era and remains a poor prognostic indicator. We investigated outcomes in men with pT3b disease in the contemporary era. Materials and Methods The institutional radical prostatectomy database (1982 to 2010) of 18,505 men was queried and 989 with pT3b tumors were identified. The cohort was split into pre-prostate specific antigen (1982 to 1992), and early (1993 to 2000) and contemporary (2001 to present) prostate specific antigen eras. Of the 732 men identified in the prostate specific antigen era 140 had lymph node involvement and were excluded from study. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine biochemical recurrence-free, metastasis-free and prostate cancer specific survival. Proportional hazard models were used to determine predictors of biochemical recurrence-free, metastasis-free and cancer specific survival. Results In the pre-prostate specific antigen, and early and contemporary prostate specific antigen eras, 7.7%, 4.3% and 3.3% of patients, respectively, had pT3bN0 disease (p >0.001). In pT3bN0 cases, the 10-year biochemical recurrence-free survival rate was 25.8%, 28.6% and 19.6% (p = 0.8), and the cancer specific survival rate was 79.9%, 79.6% and 83.8% (p = 0.6) among the eras, respectively. In pT3bN0 cases in the prostate specific antigen era, prostate specific antigen, clinical stage T2b or greater, pathological Gleason sum 7 and 8–10, and positive surgical margins were significant predictors of biochemical recurrence-free survival on multivariate analysis while clinical stage T2c or greater and Gleason 8–10 were predictors of metastasis-free and cancer specific survival. Conclusions Despite a decreased frequency of pT3b disease, and lower rates of positive surgical margins and lymph nodes, patients with seminal vesicle invasion continue to have low biochemical recurrence-free survival. Advanced clinical stage

  10. Role of the ARF Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    currently understudied . Our preliminary data using human samples from Washington University indicates that prostate adenocarcinomas typically...In addition, we have used several media formulations for epithelial and prostate cell culture. These have not helped to promote the specific growth

  11. Proteomic identification of the lactate dehydrogenase A in a radioresistant prostate cancer xenograft mouse model for improving radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jingli; Graham, Peter; Chang, Lei; Ni, Jie; Wasinger, Valerie; Beretov, Julia; Deng, Junli; Duan, Wei; Bucci, Joseph; Malouf, David; Gillatt, David; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Radioresistance is a major challenge for prostate cancer (CaP) metastasis and recurrence after radiotherapy. This study aimed to identify potential protein markers and signaling pathways associated with radioresistance using a PC-3 radioresistant (RR) subcutaneous xenograft mouse model and verify the radiosensitization effect from a selected potential candidate. PC-3RR and PC-3 xenograft tumors were established and differential protein expression profiles from two groups of xenografts were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry. One selected glycolysis marker, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) was validated, and further investigated for its role in CaP radioresistance. We found that 378 proteins and 51 pathways were significantly differentially expressed between PC-3RR and PC-3 xenograft tumors, and that the glycolysis pathway is closely linked with CaP radioresistance. In addition, we also demonstrated that knock down of LDHA with siRNA or inhibition of LDHA activity with a LDHA specific inhibitor (FX-11), could sensitize PC-3RR cells to radiotherapy with reduced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, hypoxia, DNA repair ability and autophagy, as well as increased DNA double strand breaks and apoptosis. In summary, we identified a list of potential RR protein markers and important signaling pathways from a PC-3RR xenograft mouse model, and demonstrate that targeting LDHA combined with radiotherapy could increase radiosensitivity in RR CaP cells, suggesting that LDHA is an ideal therapeutic target to develop combination therapy for overcoming CaP radioresistance. PMID:27708237

  12. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Male Breast Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  13. Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer Initiation in a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model by Targeting 15-Lipoxygenase-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    in either omega (ω)-3 or ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) directly impact PCa tumor growth. Furthermore, the FLiMP mice, which overexpress ...monounsaturated fatty acid pathway enzyme, Δ-9-desaturase which is a member in the fatty acid synthase (FASN) pathway, increased in tumors from SDA... Overexpression of 15-lipoxygenase-1 in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells increases tumorigenesis. Carcinogenesis, 22, 1765-73. 6. Ziboh A and VangK

  14. Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer Initiation in a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model By Targeting 15-Lipoxygenase-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    chemoprevention studies. Diets rich in either omega (ω)-3 or ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ) directly impact PCa tumor growth. Furthermore, the FLiMP...polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ), 15-lipoxygenase-1, cyclooxygenase, prostate cancer, Array, Genes. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...observed) and, (3) Our study in year 2 provided mechanistic roles of omega (ω)-3 fatty acids in slowing PCa growth by altering ω-6/ ω-3 ratios via diet

  15. Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer Initiation in a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model by Targeting 15-Lipoxygenase-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    provide a valuable pre-clinical model for chemoprevention studies. Diets rich in either omega (ω)-3 or ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ) directly...polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ), 15-lipoxygenase-1, cyclooxygenase, prostate cancer, Array, Genes. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...FLiMP+/+ mice fed a normal diet (PIN observed) and, (3) Our study in year 2 provided mechanistic roles of omega (ω)-3 fatty acids in slowing PCa growth

  16. Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer Initiation in a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model by Targeting 15-Lipoxygenase-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    chemoprevention studies. Diets rich in either omega (ω)-3 or ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ) directly impact PCa tumor growth. Furthermore... acids effects on PIN development. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Diet, polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ), 15-lipoxygenase-1, cyclooxygenase, prostate cancer...compared to FLiMP+/+ mice fed a normal diet (PIN observed) and, (3) Our study in year 2 provided mechanistic roles of omega (ω)-3 fatty acids in slowing

  17. Microvesicles released from hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells facilitate mouse pre-osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Tomohiro; Ito, Yuko; Ohtsuki, Yoshinori; Ando, Masashi; Tsukamasa, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Nami; Naoe, Tomoki; Akao, Yukihiro

    2012-10-01

    Bone metastasis is often occurs in patients with prostate cancer. There is a vicious cycle for bone metastases involving prostate cancer cells, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts. Acting among those cells during the process of metastasis are several molecules such as bone morphogenetic proteins, platelet-derived growth factor, endothelin-1, matrix metalloproteases, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-β, and insulin-like growth factors. Cell-derived microvesicles are endogenous carriers transporting proteins, mRNAs and miRNAs between cells, which is a candidate for participation in the bone metastasis of these cells. Here, we demonstrated that prostate cancer cells in vitro released microvesicles into the culture medium (PCa-MVs), which was shown by electron microscopic study and nanoparticle tracking analysis. In this study, we found for the first time that these PCa-MVs enhanced osteoblast differentiation mainly through the delivery of PCa cell-derived v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1, which is an osteoblast differentiation related-transcriptional factor.

  18. High-grade Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Present in a Single Biopsy Core is Associated With Increased Extraprostatic Extension, Seminal Vesicle Invasion, and Positive Surgical Margins at Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chaux, Alcides; Fajardo, Daniel A.; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Partin, Alan W.; Eisenberger, Mario; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Netto, George J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the pathologic outcome of prostate-specific antigen-screened patients with high-grade (Gleason score ≥ 8) prostate cancer limited to 1 biopsy core, without clinical evidence of disease. METHODS Ninety-two patients with only 1 biopsy core with cancer and treated by radical prostatectomy were divided into 4 groups according to the biopsy Gleason score: 3 + 3 = 6 (23 cases), 3 + 4 = 7 (25 cases), 4 + 3 = 7 (20 cases), and ≥8 (24 cases). RESULTS Cases with Gleason score ≥8 showed a significantly higher proportion of extraprostatic extension (50%), positive surgical margins (21%), and seminal vesicle invasion (12%) when compared with the other groups. Patients with Gleason score ≥8 in the biopsy had a 25-fold increased in the odds ratio for extraprostatic extension in the prostatectomy. The incidence of extraprostatic extension was higher in those with prostatic cancer involving ≥50% of one core (88%) compared with cases involving <50% (32%). CONCLUSION In patients with prostate cancer limited to 1 biopsy core, the presence of Gleason score ≥8 significantly increased the incidence of extraprostatic extension, positive surgical margins, and seminal vesicle invasion. The odds ratio was substantially higher in patients with ≥50% of Gleason ≥8 in the biopsy core. These data might be taken into account for proper clinical management of this set of patients. PMID:22173174

  19. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  20. Urinary Bladder Adenocarcinoma Metastatic to the Abdominal Wall: Report of a Case with Cytohistologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, Mithra

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of adenocarcinoma metastatic to the abdominal wall in a 71-year-old man with a history of primary bladder adenocarcinoma. CT-guided core biopsy was performed; imprints and histologic sections showed malignant glands lined by tumor cells with hyperchromatic nuclei and prominent nucleoli, infiltrating through skeletal muscle. Immunohistochemistry revealed positivity for CK7, membranous/cytoplasmic β-catenin, caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2), and α-methylacyl coenzyme A racemase and negativity for CK20, p63, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP). These findings were interpreted as metastatic adenocarcinoma, consistent with bladder primary. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma is a rare malignancy arising within glandular metaplasia and is associated with cystitis cystica and cystitis glandularis. Predisposing factors include bladder exstrophy, schistosomiasis, and other causes of chronic bladder irritation. This tumor is divided into intestinal, clear cell, and signet ring cell subtypes. Treatment involves radical cystectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection, and prognosis is unfavorable. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma should be differentiated from urachal adenocarcinoma, which arises from urachal remnants near the bladder dome, and secondary adenocarcinoma, or vesical involvement by adenocarcinoma from a different primary. CK7, CK20, CDX2, thrombomodulin, and β-catenin can help distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma from colonic adenocarcinoma; PSA and PSAP can help distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma from prostate adenocarcinoma. PMID:27006847

  1. Monotherapy with a tumor-targeting mutant of Salmonella typhimurium cures orthotopic metastatic mouse models of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Geller, Jack; Ma, Huaiyu; Yang, Meng; Penman, Sheldon; Hoffman, Robert M

    2007-06-12

    Bacterial infection occasionally has a marked therapeutic effect on malignancies, as noted as early as the 19th century. Recently, there have been attempts to develop cancer treatment by using tumor-targeting bacteria. These treatments were developed to deliver therapeutic molecules specifically to tumors. Researchers used anaerobic microorganisms that preferentially grew in necrotic tumor areas. However, the resulting tumor killing was, at best, limited. We have developed a far more effective bacterial cancer therapy by targeting viable tumor tissue by using Salmonella typhimurium leu-arg auxotrophs. Although these bacteria grow in viable as well as necrotic areas of tumors, the nutritional auxo trophy severely restricts growth in normal tissue. In the current study, we measured the antitumor efficacy of the S. typhimurium A1-R mutant, which is auxotrophic for leu-arg and has increased antitumor virulence selected by tumor passage. A1-R was used to treat metastatic PC-3 human prostate tumors that had been orthotopically implanted in nude mice. GFP was used to image tumor and metastatic growth. Of the 10 mice with the PC-3 tumors that were injected weekly with S. typhimurium A1-R, 7 were alive and well at the time the last untreated mouse died. Four A1-R-treated mice remain alive and well 6 months after implantation. Ten additional nontumor-bearing mice were injected weekly to determine the toxicity of S. typhimurium A1-R. No toxic effects were observed. The approach described here, where bacterial monotherapy effectively treats metastatic prostate tumors, is a significant improvement over previous bacterial tumor-therapy strategies that require combination with toxic chemotherapy.

  2. Therapeutic efficacy and molecular mechanisms of snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom-loaded silica nanoparticles in the treatment of breast cancer- and prostate cancer-bearing experimental mouse models.

    PubMed

    Badr, Gamal; Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K; Rabah, Danny M

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of drug-resistant cancer is a clinical challenge, and thus screening for novel anticancer drugs is critically important. We recently demonstrated a strong enhancement of the antitumor activity of snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom (WEV) in vitro in breast carcinoma, prostate cancer, and multiple myeloma cell lines but not in normal cells when the venom was combined with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NP). In the present study, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of WEV+NP in breast cancer- and prostate cancer-bearing experimental mouse models. Xenograft breast and prostate tumor mice models were randomized into 4 groups for each cancer model (10 mice per group) and were treated with vehicle (control), NP, WEV, or WEV+NP daily for 28 days post tumor inoculation. The tumor volumes were monitored throughout the experiment. On Day 28 post tumor inoculation, breast and prostate tumor cells were collected and either directly cultured for flow cytometry analysis or lysed for Western blot and ELISA analysis. Treatment with WEV+NP or WEV alone significantly reduced both breast and prostate tumor volumes compared to treatment with NP or vehicle alone. Compared to treatment with WEV alone, treatment of breast and prostate cancer cells with WEV+NP induced marked elevations in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydroperoxides, and nitric oxide; robust reductions in the levels of the chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL12, CXCL13, and CXCL16 and decreased surface expression of their cognate chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR4, CXCR5, and CXCR6; and subsequent reductions in the chemokine-dependent migration of both breast and prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that WEV+NP strongly inhibited insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated proliferation of breast and prostate cancer cells, respectively, and enhanced the induction of apoptosis by increasing the activity of caspase-3,-8, and -9 in both breast and

  3. Long-Term Treatment Sequelae After External Beam Irradiation With or Without Hormonal Manipulation for Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Studies 85-31, 86-10, and 92-02

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A. Bae, Kyoungwha; Pilepich, Miljenko; Hanks, Gerald; Shipley, William

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: Late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) morbidity from external beam irradiation used to treat adenocarcinoma of the prostate continue to be a concern of physicians and patients alike. In addition, for locally advanced/high-risk cancer, the appropriate use of hormonal manipulation in addition to radiation therapy (RT) may increase toxicity. We analyzed three large Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) studies (85-31, 86-10, and 92-02) to try to address these issues. Methods and Materials: A total of 2,922 patients were accrued with a median follow-up of 10.3 years for surviving patients. The RTOG scoring scheme was used to assess GI, GU, and other toxicities. Toxicity reported was Grade 3 or higher late toxicity. Patient toxicity level was assessed by study and by treatment type combining RT only vs. RT + short-course hormone therapy (STH) vs. RT + long-term hormone therapy (LTH). Results: Multivariate analysis reveals that age >70 was statistically significantly associated with a decrease in late any Grade 3+ toxicity (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78, p = 0.0476) adjusted for treatment type. Comparing treatment type, patients treated with RT+STH had a statistically significant lower probability of Grade 3+ GI, GU, and other toxicity compared with RT alone (p = .00006; p = 0.0037; p = 0.0127, respectively). Patients treated with RT+LTH had a statistically significant lower probability of Grade 3+ GU toxicity compared with RT alone (p = 0.023). Conclusions: These data show that external beam radiation therapy remains a safe option for locally advanced/high-risk prostate cancer, and the use of hormonal manipulation does appear to be protective for GU and GI toxicity depending upon length of treatment.

  4. Sonic Hedgehog pathway activity in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    BRAGINA, OLGA; NJUNKOVA, NATALJA; SERGEJEVA, SVETLANA; JÄRVEKÜLG, LILIAN; KOGERMAN, PRIIT

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal activation of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway has been demonstrated in a number of human tumors, including prostate cancer. The study aimed to assess the activity of Shh pathway components (Shh, Gli1, Gli2 and Gli3), as well as the proliferation markers FoxA1 and Notch1 during cancer progression in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP). We evaluated changes in respective proteins by immunohistochemistry at three time points (12, 17 and 21 weeks of age) in the tissue of TRAMP and C57Bl/6 mice. Moreover, the expression of mRNA of these proteins was assessed. The present study shows a significant age-dependent increase in the number of Shh, Gli1, Gli3 and FoxA1-positive prostate cells and a decrease in Gli2-positive cells in TRAMP. The study also supports the hypothesis that the development of prostate cancer and its metastasis is associated with activation of the Shh signaling pathway. PMID:22966302

  5. Phase II Trial of Combined High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and External Beam Radiotherapy for Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: Preliminary Results of RTOG 0321

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, I-Chow; Bae, Kyounghwa; Shinohara, Katsuto; Pouliot, Jean; Purdy, James; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Speight, Joycelyn; Vigneault, Eric; Ivker, Robert M.D.; Sandler, Howard M.D.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To estimate the rate of late Grade 3 or greater genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events (AEs) after treatment with external beam radiotherapy and prostate high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Each participating institution submitted computed tomography-based HDR brachytherapy dosimetry data electronically for credentialing and for each study patient. Patients with locally confined Stage T1c-T3b prostate cancer were eligible for the present study. All patients were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions using external beam radiotherapy and one HDR implant delivering 19 Gy in two fractions. All AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Late GU/GI AEs were defined as those occurring >9 months from the start of the protocol treatment, in patients with {>=}18 months of potential follow-up. Results: A total of 129 patients from 14 institutions were enrolled in the present study. Of the 129 patients, 125 were eligible, and AE data were available for 112 patients at analysis. The pretreatment characteristics of the patients were as follows: Stage T1c-T2c, 91%; Stage T3a-T3b, 9%; prostate-specific antigen level {<=}10 ng/mL, 70%; prostate-specific antigen level >10 but {<=}20 ng/mL, 30%; and Gleason score 2-6, 10%; Gleason score 7, 72%; and Gleason score 8-10, 18%. At a median follow-up of 29.6 months, three acute and four late Grade 3 GU/GI AEs were reported. The estimated rate of late Grade 3-5 GU and GI AEs at 18 months was 2.56%. Conclusion: This is the first prospective, multi-institutional trial of computed tomography-based HDR brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. The technique and doses used in the present study resulted in acceptable levels of AEs.

  6. Boron supplementation inhibits the growth and local expression of IGF-1 in human prostate adenocarcinoma (LNCaP) tumors in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Williams, Maria T; Chapin, Robert E; King, Paula E; Moser, Glenda J; Goldsworthy, Thomas L; Morrison, James P; Maronpot, Robert R

    2004-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a serine protease and one of the most abundant proteins secreted by the human prostate epithelium. PSA is used as a well-established marker of prostate cancer. The involvement of PSA in several early events leading to the development of malignant prostate tumors has made it a target for prevention and intervention. It is thought that PSA cleaves insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), providing increased local levels of IGF-1, leading to tumor growth. Separately, there are data that suggest an enzymatic regulatory role for dietary boron, which is a serine protease inhibitor. In this study we have addressed the use of boric acid as a PSA inhibitor in an animal study. We have previously reported that low concentrations (6 ug/mL) of boric acid can partially inhibit the proteolytic activity of purified PSA towards a synthetic fluorogenic substrate. Also, by Western blot we have followed the degradation of fibronectin by enzymatically active PSA and have found significant inhibition in the presence of boric acid. We proposed that dietary supplementation with boric acid would inhibit PSA and reduce the development and proliferation of prostate carcinomas in an animal model. We tested this hypothesis using nude mice implanted subcutaneously with LNCaP cells in Matrigel. Two groups (10 animals/group) were dosed with boric acid solutions (1.7, 9.0 mgB/kg/day) by gavage. Control group received only water. Tumor sizes were measured weekly for 8 weeks. Serum PSA and IGF-1 levels were determined at terminal sacrifice. The size of tumors was decreased in mice exposed to the low and high dose of boric acid by 38% and 25%, respectively. Serum PSA levels decreased by 88.6% and 86.4%, respectively, as compared to the control group. There were morphological differences between the tumors in control and boron-dosed animals, including a significantly lower incidence of mitotic figures in the boron-supplemented groups. Circulating IGF-1

  7. Genistein chemoprevention: timing and mechanisms of action in murine mammary and prostate.

    PubMed

    Lamartiniere, Coral A; Cotroneo, Michelle S; Fritz, Wayne A; Wang, Jun; Mentor-Marcel, Roycelynn; Elgavish, Ada

    2002-03-01

    We investigated the potential of genistein, the primary isoflavone of soy, to protect against breast and prostate cancers in animal models. For mammary cancer studies, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed AIN-76A diet plus minus 250 mg genistein/kg diet. Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene was administered by gavage at d 50 postpartum to induce mammary tumors. Mammary cancer chemoprevention was demonstrated after prepubertal and combined prepubertal and adult genistein treatments but not after prenatal- or adult-only treatments, demonstrating that the timing of exposure to genistein is important for mammary cancer chemoprevention. The cellular mechanism of action was found to be mammary gland and cell differentiation, as shown by whole-mount analysis and beta-casein expression. An imprinting effect was shown for epidermal growth factor receptor expression in mammary terminal end buds. For prostate cancer studies, we used two models. The first was a chemically (N-methylnitrosourea) induced prostate cancer rat model. Genistein in the diet inhibited the development of invasive adenocarcinomas in a dose-dependent manner. The second model was a transgenic mouse model that resulted in spontaneously developing adenocarcinoma tumor of the prostate. Genistein in the diet reduced the incidence of poorly differentiated prostatic adenocarcinomas in a dose-dependent manner and down-regulated androgen receptor, estrogen receptor-alpha, progesterone receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, insulin-like growth factor-I, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 but not estrogen receptor-beta and transforming growth factor-alpha mRNA expressions. We conclude that dietary genistein protects against mammary and prostate cancers by regulating specific sex steroid receptors and growth factor signaling pathways.

  8. Dendritic cells serve as a “Trojan horse” for oncolytic adenovirus delivery in the treatment of mouse prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao-lun; Liang, Xuan; Li, He-cheng; Wang, Zi-ming; Chong, Tie

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer, in which replication of the virus itself is the anticancer method. However, the success of this novel therapy is limited due to inefficient delivery of the virus to the target sites. In this study, we used dendritic cells (DCs) as carriers for conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) in targeting prostate carcinoma (PCa). Methods: Four types of CRAds, including Ad-PC (without PCa-specific promoter and a recombinant human tumor necrosis factor, rmhTNF, sequence), Ad-PC-rmhTNF (without PCa-specific promoter), Ad-PPC-NCS (without an rmhTNF sequence) and Ad-PPC-rmhTNF, were constructed. The androgen-insensitive mouse PCa RM-1 cells were co-cultured with CRAd-loading DCs, and the viability of RM-1 cells was examined using MTT assay. The in vivo effects of CRAd-loading DCs on PCa were evaluated in RM-1 xenograft mouse model. Results: Two PCa-specific CRAds (Ad-PPC-NCS, Ad-PPC-rmhTNF) exhibited more potent suppression on the viability of RM-1 cells in vitro than the PCa-non-specific CRAds (Ad-PC, Ad-PC-rmhTNF). In PCa-bearing mice, intravenous injection of the PCa-specific CRAd-loading DCs significantly inhibited the growth of xenografted tumors, extended the survival time, and induced T-cell activation. Additionally, the rmhTNF-containing CRAds exhibited greater tumor killing ability than CRAds without rmhTNF. Conclusion: DCs may be an effective vector for the delivery of CRAds in the treatment of PCa. PMID:27345628

  9. PARP-1 regulates epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in prostate tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Hong; Horbinski, Craig; Hensley, Patrick J.; Matuszak, Emily A.; Atkinson, Timothy; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is involved in key cellular processes such as DNA replication and repair, gene transcription, cell proliferation and apoptosis. The role of PARP-1 in prostate cancer development and progression is not fully understood. The present study investigated the function of PARP-1 in prostate growth and tumorigenesis in vivo. Functional inactivation of PARP-1 by gene-targeted deletion led to a significant reduction in the prostate gland size in young PARP-1−/− mice (6 weeks) compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. To determine the effect of PARP-1 functional loss on prostate cancer onset, PARP-1−/− mice were crossed with the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Pathological assessment of prostate tumors revealed that TRAMP+/−, PARP-1−/− mice exhibited higher grade prostate tumors compared with TRAMP+/− PARP-1+/+ (16–28 weeks) that was associated with a significantly increased proliferative index and decreased apoptosis among the epithelial cells in TRAMP+/− PARP-1−/− prostate tumors. Furthermore tumors harboring PARP-1 loss, exhibited a downregulation of nuclear androgen receptor. Impairing PARP-1 led to increased levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and Smads that correlated with induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), as established by loss of E-cadherin and β-catenin and upregulation of N-cadherin and ZEB-1. Our findings suggest that impaired PARP-1 function promotes prostate tumorigenesis in vivo via TGF-β-induced EMT. Defining the EMT control by PARP-1 during prostate cancer progression is of translational significance for optimizing PARP-1 therapeutic targeting and predicting response in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:25173886

  10. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia enhances radiation therapy: A study in mouse models of human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Attaluri, Anilchandra; Kandala, Sri Kamal; Wabler, Michele; Zhou, Haoming; Cornejo, Christine; Armour, Michael; Hedayati, Mohammad; Zhang, Yonggang; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Herman, Cila; Ivkov, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to characterise magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPH) with radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods Human prostate cancer subcutaneous tumours, PC3 and LAPC-4, were grown in nude male mice. When tumours measured 150 mm3 magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONPs) were injected into tumours to a target dose of 5.5 mg Fe/cm3 tumour, and treated 24 h later by exposure to alternating magnetic field (AMF). Mice were randomly assigned to one of four cohorts to characterise (1) intratumour MIONP distribution, (2) effects of variable thermal dose mNPH (fixed AMF peak amplitude 24 kA/m at 160±5 kHz) with/without RT (5 Gy), (3) effects of RT (RT5: 5 Gy; RT8: 8 Gy), and (4) fixed thermal dose mNPH (43 °C for 20min) with/without RT (5 Gy). MIONP concentration and distribution were assessed following sacrifice and tissue harvest using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Prussian blue staining, respectively. Tumour growth was monitored and compared among treated groups. Results LAPC-4 tumours retained higher MIONP concentration and more uniform distribution than did PC3 tumours. AMF power modulation provided similar thermal dose for mNPH and combination therapy groups (CEM43: LAPC-4: 33.6 ± 3.4 versus 25.9 ± 0.8, and PC3: 27.19 ± 0.7 versus 27.50 ± 0.6), thereby overcoming limitations of MIONP distribution and yielding statistically significant tumour growth delay. Conclusion PC3 and LAPC-4 tumours represent two biological models that demonstrate different patterns of nanoparticle retention and distribution, offering a model to make comparisons of these effects for mNPH. Modulating power for mNPH offers potential to overcome limitations of MIONP distribution to enhance mNPH. PMID:25811736

  11. Pim1 kinase synergizes with c-MYC to induce advanced prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Kim, Jongchan; Roh, Meejeon; Franco, Omar E.; Hayward, Simon W.; Wills, Marcia L.; Abdulkadir, Sarki A.

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic PIM1 kinase has been implicated as a cofactor for c-MYC in prostate carcinogenesis. Here we show that in human prostate tumors, coexpression of c-MYC and PIM1 is associated with higher Gleason grades. Using a tissue recombination model coupled with lentiviral-mediated gene transfer we find that Pim1 is weakly oncogenic in naïve adult mouse prostatic epithelium. However, it cooperates dramatically with c-MYC to induce prostate cancer within 6-weeks. Importantly, c-MYC/Pim1 synergy is critically dependent on Pim1 kinase activity. c-MYC/Pim1 tumors showed increased levels of the active serine-62 (S62) phosphorylated form of c-MYC. Grafts expressing a phosphomimetic c-MYCS62D mutant had higher rates of proliferation than grafts expressing wild type c-MYC but did not form tumors like c-MYC/Pim1 grafts, indicating that Pim1 cooperativity with c-MYC in vivo involves additional mechanisms other than enhancement of c-MYC activity by S62 phosphorylation. c-MYC/Pim1-induced prostate carcinomas demonstrate evidence of neuroendocrine (NE) differentiation. Additional studies, including the identification of tumor cells coexpressing androgen receptor and NE cell markers synaptophysin and Ascl1 suggested that NE tumors arose from adenocarcinoma cells through transdifferentiation. These results directly demonstrate functional cooperativity between c-MYC and PIM1 in prostate tumorigenesis in vivo and support efforts for targeting PIM1 in prostate cancer. PMID:20140016

  12. Increased gene copy number of ERG on chromosome 21 but not TMPRSS2–ERG fusion predicts outcome in prostatic adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Toubaji, Antoun; Albadine, Roula; Meeker, Alan K; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara; Haffner, Michael C; Chaux, Alcides; Epstein, Jonathan I; Han, Misop; Walsh, Patrick C; Partin, Alan W; De Marzo, Angelo M; Platz, Elizabeth A; Netto, George J

    2012-01-01

    The role of TMPRSS2–ERG gene fusion in prostate cancer prognostication remains controversial. We evaluated the prognostic role of TMPRSS2–ERG fusion using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis in a case–control study nested in The Johns Hopkins retropubic radical prostatectomy cohort. In all, 10 tissue microarrays containing paired tumors and normal tissues obtained from 172 cases (recurrence) and 172 controls (non-recurrence) matched on pathological grade, stage, race/ethnicity, and age at the time of surgery were analyzed. All radical prostatectomies were performed at our institution between 1993 and 2004. Recurrence was defined as biochemical recurrence, development of clinical evidence of metastasis, or death from prostate carcinoma. Each tissue microarray spot was scored for the presence of TMPRSS2–ERG gene fusion and for ERG gene copy number gains. The odds ratio of recurrence and 95% confidence intervals were estimated from conditional logistic regression. Although the percentage of cases with fusion was slightly lower in cases than in controls (50 vs 57%), the difference was not statistically significant (P=0.20). The presence of fusion due to either deletion or split event was not associated with recurrence. Similarly, the presence of duplicated ERG deletion, duplicated ERG split, or ERG gene copy number gain with a single ERG fusion was not associated with recurrence. ERG gene polysomy without fusion was significantly associated with recurrence (odds ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval 1.17–3.42). In summary, TMPRSS2–ERG fusion was not prognostic for recurrence after retropubic radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer, although men with ERG gene copy number gain without fusion were twice more likely to recur. PMID:21743434

  13. Novel prostate acid phosphatase-based peptide vaccination strategy induces antigen-specific T-cell responses and limits tumour growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Saif, Jaimy M S; Vadakekolathu, Jayakumar; Rane, Shraddha S; McDonald, Danielle; Ahmad, Murrium; Mathieu, Morgan; Pockley, A Graham; Durrant, Lindy; Metheringham, Rachael; Rees, Robert C; McArdle, Stephanie E B

    2014-04-01

    Treatment options for patients with advanced prostate cancer remain limited and rarely curative. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) is a prostate-specific protein overexpressed in 95% of prostate tumours. An FDA-approved vaccine for the treatment of advanced prostate disease, PROVENGE® (sipuleucel-T), has been shown to prolong survival, however the precise sequence of the PAP protein responsible for the outcome is unknown. As the PAP antigen is one of the very few prostate-specific antigens for which there is a rodent equivalent with high homology, preclinical studies using PAP have the potential to be directly relevant to clinical setting. Here, we show three PAP epitopes naturally processed and presented in the context of HHDII/DR1 (114-128, 299-313, and 230-244). The PAP-114-128 epitope elicits CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-specific responses in C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, when immunised in a DNA vector format (ImmunoBody®), PAP-114-128 prevents and reduces the growth of transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate-C1 prostate cancer cell-derived tumours in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings. This anti-tumour effect is associated with infiltration of CD8(+) tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes and the generation of high avidity T cells secreting elevated levels of IFN-γ. PAP-114-128 therefore appears to be a highly relevant peptide on which to base vaccines for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  14. Inositol hexaphosphate represses telomerase activity and translocates TERT from the nucleus in mouse and human prostate cancer cells via the deactivation of Akt and PKC{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesh, Shankar; Banerjee, Partha P. . E-mail: ppb@georgetown.edu

    2006-11-03

    Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) has anti-proliferative effects on a variety of cancer cells, including prostate cancer. However, the molecular mechanism of anti-proliferative effects of IP6 is not entirely understood. Since the activation of telomerase is crucial for cells to gain immortality and proliferation ability, we examined the role of IP6 in the regulation of telomerase activity in prostate cancer cells. Here, we show that IP6 represses telomerase activity in mouse and human prostate cancer cells dose-dependently. In addition, IP6 prevents the translocation of TERT to the nucleus. Since phosphorylation of TERT by Akt and/or PKC{alpha} is necessary for nuclear translocation, we examined phosphorylation of Akt and PKC{alpha} after IP6 treatments. Our results show that IP6 inhibits phosphorylation of Akt and PKC{alpha}. These results show for the first time that IP6 represses telomerase activity in prostate cancer cells by posttranslational modification of TERT via the deactivation of Akt and PKC{alpha}.

  15. An Evaluation of Hemi-Ablation Therapy Using High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound in the Treatment of Localized Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Hashim Uddin; Freeman, Alex; Allen, Clare; Kirkham, Alex; Illing, Rowland; Emberton, Mark

    2007-05-01

    The current choice for men with localised prostate cancer lies between active surveillance and radical therapy. The best evidence for the difference between these two extremes of care is 5% in terms of cancer-related absolute mortality at 8 years. It is generally accepted that this small difference will decrease for men diagnosed in the PSA-era. Therein lays a dilemma for men. If they choose active surveillance they accept anxiety of living with a cancer diagnosis and risk of under-treatment in the long term. On the other hand, radical therapy carries significant toxicity (incontinence, impotence, rectal problems) because it treats the whole gland and damages surrounding structures in up to half of men. With increasing PSA screening practices men are diagnosed younger with lower risk disease — early stage, lower Gleason grade and lower volume of cancer. Many have unifocal or unilateral disease. We propose a new concept whereby only the tumour focus and a margin of normal tissue is treated. With emerging techniques that can accurately localise tumour in the gland and technology that can treat to within millimetre accuracy, focal therapy of prostate cancer is now possible. By treating focally, the psychological burden of active surveillance is avoided. Equally, it is proposed that toxicity will decrease whilst at the same time retaining effective cancer control.

  16. 3-D photoacoustic and pulse echo imaging of prostate tumor progression in the mouse window chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Daniel R.; Olafsson, Ragnar; Montilla, Leonardo G.; Witte, Russell S.

    2011-02-01

    Understanding the tumor microenvironment is critical to characterizing how cancers operate and predicting their response to treatment. We describe a novel, high-resolution coregistered photoacoustic (PA) and pulse echo (PE) ultrasound system used to image the tumor microenvironment. Compared to traditional optical systems, the platform provides complementary contrast and important depth information. Three mice are implanted with a dorsal skin flap window chamber and injected with PC-3 prostate tumor cells transfected with green fluorescent protein. The ensuing tumor invasion is mapped during three weeks or more using simultaneous PA and PE imaging at 25 MHz, combined with optical and fluorescent techniques. Pulse echo imaging provides details of tumor structure and the surrounding environment with 100-μm3 resolution. Tumor size increases dramatically with an average volumetric growth rate of 5.35 mm3/day, correlating well with 2-D fluorescent imaging (R = 0.97, p < 0.01). Photoacoustic imaging is able to track the underlying vascular network and identify hemorrhaging, while PA spectroscopy helps classify blood vessels according to their optical absorption spectrum, suggesting variation in blood oxygen saturation. Photoacoustic and PE imaging are safe, translational modalities that provide enhanced depth resolution and complementary contrast to track the tumor microenvironment, evaluate new cancer therapies, and develop molecular contrast agents in vivo.

  17. ABCG2-mediated dyecycle violet efflux defined side population in benign and malignant prostate

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Grinu; Timm, Earl A.; Sotomayor, Paula; Godoy, Alejandro; Montecinos, Viviana P.; Smith, Gary J.; Huss, Wendy J.

    2010-01-01

    The efflux of Hoechst 33342 by ATP-binding cassette protein G2 (ABCG2) membrane pump allows reproducible identification of a subpopulation of cells by flow cytometric analysis termed the “side population” (SP). The SP identified by constitutive Hoechst efflux contains the stem/progenitor cell population from bone marrow and many solid organs, including prostate. DyeCycle Violet (DCV) is a cell membrane permeable, fluorescent vital dye that intercalates into DNA and is a substrate for ABCG2-mediated efflux. Therefore, DCV was evaluated in this study as a tool for identification of the SP from prostate cancer cell lines and from freshly harvested human prostate tissue. SPs that demonstrated ABCG2-mediated efflux of DCV were identified in the human prostate cancer cell lines CWR-R1, DU-145 and RWPE-1, but not in the BPH-1, LAPC-4 or PC-3 cell lines. Additionally, a SP was identified in enzymatically disaggregated prostate tumors from Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP), human benign prostate tissue and human prostate cancer tissue. The causal role of ABCG2-mediated efflux of DCV in the identification of the SP was confirmed by loss of the SP by incubation with the specific inhibitor of ABCG2, Fumitremorgin C. Expression of ABCG2 in the SP cells was confirmed by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Consequently, DCV represents an important new tool for isolation of viable candidate stem cells/cancer stem cells as a SP from cultured prostate cell lines, and prostate tissue specimens, without the requirement for instrumentation with ultra-violet excitation capability and minimizing the risk of damage to DNA in the sorted population. PMID:19270533

  18. Foxm1 expression in prostate epithelial cells is essential for prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuqi; Balli, David; Ustiyan, Vladimir; Fulford, Logan; Hiller, Andrea; Misetic, Vinko; Zhang, Yufang; Paluch, Andrew M; Waltz, Susan E; Kasper, Susan; Kalin, Tanya V

    2013-08-02

    The treatment of advanced prostate cancer (PCa) remains a challenge. Identification of new molecular mechanisms that regulate PCa initiation and progression would provide targets for the development of new cancer treatments. The Foxm1 transcription factor is highly up-regulated in tumor cells, inflammatory cells, and cells of tumor microenvironment. However, its functions in different cell populations of PCa lesions are unknown. To determine the role of Foxm1 in tumor cells during PCa development, we generated two novel transgenic mouse models, one exhibiting Foxm1 gain-of-function and one exhibiting Foxm1 loss-of-function under control of the prostate epithelial-specific Probasin promoter. In the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) model of PCa that uses SV40 large T antigen to induce PCa, loss of Foxm1 decreased tumor growth and metastasis. Decreased prostate tumorigenesis was associated with a decrease in tumor cell proliferation and the down-regulation of genes critical for cell proliferation and tumor metastasis, including Cdc25b, Cyclin B1, Plk-1, Lox, and Versican. In addition, tumor-associated angiogenesis was decreased, coinciding with reduced Vegf-A expression. The mRNA and protein levels of 11β-Hsd2, an enzyme playing an important role in tumor cell proliferation, were down-regulated in Foxm1-deficient PCa tumors in vivo and in Foxm1-depleted TRAMP C2 cells in vitro. Foxm1 bound to, and increased transcriptional activity of, the mouse 11β-Hsd2 promoter through the -892/-879 region, indicating that 11β-Hsd2 was a direct transcriptional target of Foxm1. Without TRAMP, overexpression of Foxm1 either alone or in combination with inhibition of a p19(ARF) tumor suppressor caused a robust epithelial hyperplasia, but was insufficient to induce progression from hyperplasia to PCa. Foxm1 expression in prostate epithelial cells is critical for prostate carcinogenesis, suggesting that inhibition of Foxm1 is a promising therapeutic approach for

  19. Alteration of cellular phenotype and responses to oxidative stress by manganese superoxide dismutase and a superoxide dismutase mimic in RWPE-2 human prostate adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weixiong; Yan, Tao; Webber, Mukta M; Oberley, Terry D

    2004-06-01

    To study biologic effects of increased manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) on cell behavior, we overexpressed MnSOD in a human prostate cancer cell line RWPE-2 by cDNA transfection. Stable transfectants of MnSOD showed a two- to threefold increase in MnSOD protein and enzymatic activity and a decrease in growth rate with prolonged cell population doubling times. Western blot analysis showed a 1.5- to twofold increase in the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Waf1) in MnSOD transfectants. Overexpression of MnSOD resulted in a seven- to eightfold increase in reduced glutathione (GSH), 18- to 26-fold increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and a two- to threefold decrease in the ratio of GSH to GSSG. MnSOD-overexpressing cells showed an increase in sensitivity to the cytotoxicity of buthionine sulfoximine, a glutathione-depleting agent, and vitamin C, but a decrease in sensitivity to sodium selenite. Treatment with a superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimic MnTMPyP resulted in similar effects of MnSOD overexpression on cell responses to vitamin C and selenium. These data demonstrate that overexpression of MnSOD or treatment with SOD mimics can result in antioxidant or prooxidant effects in cells, depending on the presence of other antioxidants and prooxidants. MnSOD also has redox regulatory effects on cell growth and gene expression. These findings suggest that MnSOD and SOD mimics have the potential for cancer prevention or treatment.

  20. Deregulation of MiR-34b/Sox2 Predicts Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Maria Veronica; Gazzano, Giacomo; Giangiobbe, Sara; Montanari, Emanuele; Del Nero, Alberto; Rocco, Bernardo; Albo, Giancarlo; Languino, Lucia R.; Altieri, Dario C.; Vaira, Valentina; Bosari, Silvano

    2015-01-01

    Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer will have an indolent and curable disease, whereas approximately 15% of these patients will rapidly progress to a castrate-resistant and metastatic stage with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, the identification of molecular signature(s) that detect men at risk of progressing disease remains a pressing and still unmet need for these patients. Here, we used an integrated discovery platform combining prostate cancer cell lines, a Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model and clinically-annotated human tissue samples to identify loss of expression of microRNA-34b as consistently associated with prostate cancer relapse. Mechanistically, this was associated with epigenetics silencing of the MIR34B/C locus and increased DNA copy number loss, selectively in androgen-dependent prostate cancer. In turn, loss of miR-34b resulted in downstream deregulation and overexpression of the “stemness” marker, Sox2. These findings identify loss of miR-34b as a robust biomarker for prostate cancer progression in androgen-sensitive tumors, and anticipate a potential role of progenitor/stem cell signaling in this stage of disease. PMID:26107383

  1. Histologic Grading of Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Can Be Further Optimized: Analysis of the Relative Prognostic Strength of Individual Architectural Patterns in 1275 Patients From the Canary Retrospective Cohort.

    PubMed

    McKenney, Jesse K; Wei, Wei; Hawley, Sarah; Auman, Heidi; Newcomb, Lisa F; Boyer, Hilary D; Fazli, Ladan; Simko, Jeff; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Troyer, Dean A; Tretiakova, Maria S; Vakar-Lopez, Funda; Carroll, Peter R; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Gleave, Martin E; Lance, Raymond S; Lin, Dan W; Nelson, Peter S; Thompson, Ian M; True, Lawrence D; Feng, Ziding; Brooks, James D

    2016-11-01

    Histologic grading remains the gold standard for prognosis in prostate cancer, and assessment of Gleason score plays a critical role in active surveillance management. We sought to optimize the prognostic stratification of grading and developed a method of recording and studying individual architectural patterns by light microscopic evaluation that is independent of standard Gleason grade. Some of the evaluated patterns are not assessed by current Gleason grading (eg, reactive stromal response). Individual histologic patterns were correlated with recurrence-free survival in a retrospective postradical prostatectomy cohort of 1275 patients represented by the highest-grade foci of carcinoma in tissue microarrays. In univariable analysis, fibromucinous rupture with varied epithelial complexity had a significantly lower relative risk of recurrence-free survival in cases graded as 3+4=7. Cases having focal "poorly formed glands," which could be designated as pattern 3+4=7, had lower risk than cribriform patterns with either small cribriform glands or expansile cribriform growth. In separate multivariable Cox proportional hazard analyses of both Gleason score 3+3=6 and 3+4=7 carcinomas, reactive stromal patterns were associated with worse recurrence-free survival. Decision tree models demonstrate potential regrouping of architectural patterns into categories with similar risk. In summary, we argue that Gleason score assignment by current consensus guidelines are not entirely optimized for clinical use, including active surveillance. Our data suggest that focal poorly formed gland and cribriform patterns, currently classified as Gleason pattern 4, should be in separate prognostic groups, as the latter is associated with worse outcome. Patterns with extravasated mucin are likely overgraded in a subset of cases with more complex epithelial bridges, whereas stromogenic cancers have a worse outcome than conveyed by Gleason grade alone. These findings serve as a foundation to

  2. FOXO3 programs tumor-associated DCs to become tolerogenic in human and murine prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Stephanie K.; Zhu, Ziqiang; Riboldi, Elena; Shafer-Weaver, Kim A.; Stagliano, Katherine E.R.; Sklavos, Martha M.; Ambs, Stefan; Yagita, Hideo; Hurwitz, Arthur A.

    2011-01-01

    The limited success of cancer immunotherapy is often attributed to the loss of antigen-specific T cell function in situ. However, the mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. In this study, we describe a population of tumor-associated DCs (TADCs) in both human and mouse prostate cancer that tolerizes and induces suppressive activity in tumor-specific T cells. In tumors from human prostate cancer patients and transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice, TADCs expressed elevated levels of FOXO3 and Foxo3, respectively, which correlated with expression of suppressive genes that negatively regulate T cell function. Silencing FOXO3 and Foxo3 with siRNAs abrogated the ability of human and mouse TADCs, respectively, to tolerize and induce suppressive activity by T cells. Silencing Foxo3 in mouse TADCs was also associated with diminished expression of tolerogenic mediators, such as indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase, arginase, and TGF-β, and upregulated expression of costimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokines. Importantly, transfer of tumor-specific CD4+ Th cells into TRAMP mice abrogated TADC tolerogenicity, which was associated with reduced Foxo3 expression. These findings demonstrate that FOXO3 may play a critical role in mediating TADC-induced immune suppression. Moreover, our results identify what we believe to be a novel target for preventing CTL tolerance and enhancing immune responses to cancer by modulating the immunosuppressive activity of TADCs found in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:21436588

  3. Zoledronic Acid Decreased Osteolysis But Not Bone Metastasis in a Nude Mouse Model of Canine Prostate Cancer With Mixed Bone Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Thudi, Nanda K.; Martin, Chelsea K.; Nadella, Murali V.P.; Fernandez, Soledad A.; Werbeck, Jillian L.; Pinzone, Joseph J.; Rosol, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bone metastasis is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced prostate cancer and is manifested primarily as mixed osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions. However, the mechanisms responsible for bone metastases in prostate cancer are not clearly understood, in part due to the lack of relevant in vivo models that mimic the clinical presentation of the disease in humans. We previously established a nude mouse model with mixed bone metastases using intracardiac injection of canine prostate cancer cells (Ace-1). In this study, we hypothesized that tumor-induced osteolysis promoted the incidence of bone metastases and osteoblastic activity. METHODS We studied the effect of inhibition of osteolysis with zoledronic acid (ZA) on the prevention and progression of Ace-1 bone metastases in nude mice using prophylactic and delayed treatment protocols. Bioluminescent imaging, radiography, and histopathological evaluation were performed to monitor the effect of ZA on the incidence, progression and nature of bone metastases. RESULTS Unexpectedly, there was no significant difference in tumor burden and the incidence of metastasis between control and treatment groups as detected by bioluminescent imaging and bone histomorphometry. However, radiographic and histopathological analysis showed a significant treatment-related decrease in osteolysis, but no effect on tumor-induced trabecular bone thickness in both treatment groups compared to controls. CONCLUSION Our results demonstrated that the incidence of prostate cancer bone metastases in vivo was not reduced by zoledronic acid even though zoledronic acid inhibited bone resorption and bone loss associated with the mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic bone metastases in the Ace-1 model. PMID:18461562

  4. Fatty Acid Synthesis Intermediates Represent Novel Noninvasive Biomarkers of Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention by Phenethyl Isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Singh, Krishna B; Singh, Shivendra V

    2017-03-14

    Increased de novo synthesis of fatty acids is a distinctive feature of prostate cancer, which continues to be a leading cause of cancer-related deaths among American men. Therefore, inhibition of de novo fatty acid synthesis represents an attractive strategy for chemoprevention of prostate cancer. We have shown previously that dietary feeding of phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a phytochemical derived from edible cruciferous vegetables such as watercress, inhibits incidence and burden of poorly-differentiated prostate cancer in Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis of whether fatty acid intermediate(s) can serve as noninvasive biomarker(s) of prostate cancer chemoprevention by PEITC using archived plasma and tumor specimens from the TRAMP study as well as cellular models of prostate cancer. Exposure of prostate cancer cells (LNCaP and 22Rv1) to pharmacological concentrations of PEITC resulted in downregulation of key fatty acid metabolism proteins, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1), fatty acid synthase (FASN), and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A). The mRNA expression of FASN and CPT1A as well as acetyl-CoA levels were decreased by PEITC treatment in both cell lines. PEITC administration to TRAMP mice also resulted in a significant decrease in tumor expression of FASN protein. Consistent with these findings, the levels of total free fatty acids, total phospholipids, triglyceride, and ATP were significantly lower in the plasma and/or prostate tumors of PEITC-treated TRAMP mice compared with controls. The present study is the first to implicate inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in prostate cancer chemoprevention by PEITC.

  5. The S100A4 Oncoprotein Promotes Prostate Tumorigenesis in a Transgenic Mouse Model: Regulating NFκB through the RAGE Receptor.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Hifzur R; Adhami, Vaqar M; Parray, Aijaz; Johnson, Jeremy J; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A; Shekhani, Mohammad T; Murtaza, Imtiyaz; Ambartsumian, Noona; Konety, Badrinath R; Mukhtar, Hasan; Saleem, Mohammad

    2013-05-01

    S100A4, a calcium-binding protein, is known for its role in the metastatic spread of tumor cells, a late event of cancer disease. This is the first report showing that S100A4 is not merely a metastatic protein but also an oncoprotein that plays a critical role in the development of tumors. We earlier showed that S100A4 expression progressively increases in prostatic tissues with the advancement of prostate cancer (CaP) in TRAMP, an autochthonous mouse model. To study the functional significance of S100A4 in CaP, we generated a heterozygously deleted S100A4 (TRAMP/S100A4(+/-)) genotype by crossing TRAMP with S100A4(-/-) mice. TRAMP/S100A4(+/-) did not show a lethal phenotype, and transgenes were functional. As compared to age-matched TRAMP littermates, TRAMP/S100A4(+/-) mice exhibited 1) an increased tumor latency period (P < 0.001), 2) a 0% incidence of metastasis, and 3) reduced prostatic weights (P < 0.001). We generated S100A4-positive clones from S100A4-negative CaP cells and tested their potential. S100A4-positive tumors grew at a faster rate than S100A4-negative tumors in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. The S100A4 protein exhibited growth factor-like properties in multimode (intracellular and extracellular) forms. We observed that 1) the growth-promoting effect of S100A4 is due to its activation of NFκB, 2) S100A4-deficient tumors exhibit reduced NFκB activity, 3) S100A4 regulates NFκB through the RAGE receptor, and 4) S100A4 and RAGE co-localize in prostatic tissues of mice. Keeping in view its growth-promoting role, we suggest that S100A4 qualifies as an excellent candidate to be exploited for therapeutic agents to treat CaP in humans.

  6. A Rare Case of Omentum Invasive Prostate Cancer: Staging With PSMA PET/CT Imaging and Response to Systemic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ladwa, Rahul; Gustafson, Sonja; McCaffrey, Elizabeth; Miles, Kenneth; O'Byrne, Kenneth

    2017-02-24

    The omentum is a rare metastatic site for prostatic adenocarcinoma. We present a case of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer, with progressive omentum invasive prostate cancer identified on prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT scan. Omental biopsy revealed metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma, and cabazitaxel chemotherapy was instituted with a prostate-specific antigen biochemical response. Repeat PSMA PET/CT imaging revealed increased avidity in omental metastasis. Despite prostate-specific antigen response, PSMA PET/CT did not correlate with a therapeutic response.

  7. GRK3 is a direct target of CREB activation and regulates neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haiping; Zheng, Dayong; Zhang, Yan; Li, Min; Xu, Jianming; Zhang, Songlin; Ittmann, Michael; Li, Wenliang

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC) is an aggressive subtype of prostate cancer that commonly arises through neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) of prostate adenocarcinoma (PAC) after therapy, such as radiation therapy and androgen deprivation treatment (ADT). No effective therapeutic is available for NEPC and its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have reported that G protein-coupled receptor kinase 3 (GRK3, also called ADRBK2) promotes prostate cancer progression. In this study, we demonstrate that the ADT-activated cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) directly targets and induces GRK3. We show GRK3 expression is higher in NEPC than in PAC cells and mouse models, and it positively correlates with the expression and activity of CREB in human prostate cancers. Notably, overexpression of GRK3 in PAC cells increased the expression of NE markers in a kinase activity dependent manner. Conversely, silencing GRK3 blocked CREB-induced NED in PAC cells, reversed NE phenotypes and inhibited proliferation of NEPC cells. Taken together, these results indicate that GRK3 is a new critical activator of NE phenotypes and mediator of CREB activation in promoting NED of prostate cancer cells. PMID:27191986

  8. Flavokawain A induces deNEDDylation and Skp2 degradation leading to inhibition of tumorigenesis and cancer progression in the TRAMP transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuesen; Yokoyama, Noriko N.; Zhang, Saiyang; Ding, Lina; Liu, Hong-min; Lilly, Michael B.; Mercola, Dan; Zi, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    S phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) has been shown to be required for spontaneous tumor development that occurs in the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) deficient mice. Here we have demonstrated that flavokawain A (FKA), a novel chalcone from the kava plant, selectively inhibited the growth of pRb deficient cell lines and resulted in a proteasome-dependent and ubiquitination-mediated Skp2 degradation. Degradation of Skp2 by FKA was found to be involved in a functional Cullin1, but independent of Cdh1 expression. Further studies have demonstrated that FKA docked into the ATP binding pocket of the precursor cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8)-activating enzyme (NAE) complex, inhibited NEDD8 conjugations to both Cullin1 and Ubc12 in PC3 cells and Ubc12 NEDDylation in an in vitro assay. Finally, dietary feeding of the autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice with FKA inhibited the formation of high-grade prostatic intra-epithelial neoplasia lesions (HG-PIN) and prostate adenocarcinomas, reduced the tumor burden and completely abolished distant organ metastasis. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed that dietary FKA feeding resulted in marked anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects via down-regulation of Skp2 and NEDD8 and up-regulation of p27/Kip1 in the prostate of TRAMP mice. Our findings therefore provide evidence that FKA is a promising NEDDylation inhibitor for targeting Skp2 degradation in prostate cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:26497688

  9. Flavokawain A induces deNEDDylation and Skp2 degradation leading to inhibition of tumorigenesis and cancer progression in the TRAMP transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuesen; Yokoyama, Noriko N; Zhang, Saiyang; Ding, Lina; Liu, Hong-min; Lilly, Michael B; Mercola, Dan; Zi, Xiaolin

    2015-12-08

    S phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) has been shown to be required for spontaneous tumor development that occurs in the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) deficient mice. Here we have demonstrated that flavokawain A (FKA), a novel chalcone from the kava plant, selectively inhibited the growth of pRb deficient cell lines and resulted in a proteasome-dependent and ubiquitination-mediated Skp2 degradation. Degradation of Skp2 by FKA was found to be involved in a functional Cullin1, but independent of Cdh1 expression. Further studies have demonstrated that FKA docked into the ATP binding pocket of the precursor cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8)-activating enzyme (NAE) complex, inhibited NEDD8 conjugations to both Cullin1 and Ubc12 in PC3 cells and Ubc12 NEDDylation in an in vitro assay. Finally, dietary feeding of the autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice with FKA inhibited the formation of high-grade prostatic intra-epithelial neoplasia lesions (HG-PIN) and prostate adenocarcinomas, reduced the tumor burden and completely abolished distant organ metastasis. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed that dietary FKA feeding resulted in marked anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects via down-regulation of Skp2 and NEDD8 and up-regulation of p27/Kip1 in the prostate of TRAMP mice. Our findings therefore provide evidence that FKA is a promising NEDDylation inhibitor for targeting Skp2 degradation in prostate cancer prevention and treatment.

  10. Inhibition of mouse breast adenocarcinoma growth by ablation with intratumoral alpha-irradiation combined with inhibitors of immunosuppression and CpG.

    PubMed

    Confino, Hila; Schmidt, Michael; Efrati, Margalit; Hochman, Ilan; Umansky, Viktor; Kelson, Itzhak; Keisari, Yona

    2016-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that aggressive in situ tumor destruction (ablation) could lead to the release of tumor antigens, which can stimulate anti-tumor immune responses. We developed an innovative method of tumor ablation based on intratumoral alpha-irradiation, diffusing alpha-emitters radiation therapy (DaRT), which efficiently ablates local tumors and enhances anti-tumor immunity. In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor potency of a treatment strategy, which combines DaRT tumor ablation with two approaches for the enhancement of anti-tumor reactivity: (1) neutralization of immunosuppressive cells such as regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and (2) boost the immune response by the immunoadjuvant CpG. Mice bearing DA3 mammary adenocarcinoma with metastases were treated with DaRT wires in combination with a MDSC inhibitor (sildenafil), Treg inhibitor (cyclophosphamide at low dose), and the immunostimulant, CpG. Combination of all four therapies led to a complete rejection of primary tumors (in 3 out of 20 tumor-bearing mice) and to the elimination of lung metastases. The treatment with DaRT and Treg or MDSC inhibitors (without CpG) also resulted in a significant reduction in tumor size, reduced the lung metastatic burden, and extended survival compared to the corresponding controls. We suggest that the therapy with DaRT combined with the inhibition of immunosuppressive cells and CpG reinforced both local and systemic anti-tumor immune responses and displayed a significant anti-tumor effect in tumor-bearing mice.

  11. Primary enteric-type mucinous adenocarcinoma of the urethra in a patient with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Patsouras, Dimitrios; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Charalampoudis, Petros; Anastasiou, Ioannis; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Primary carcinoma of the male urethra accounts for less than 1% of malignancies in men. Mucinous adenocarcinoma of the urethra is extremely rare, and its biologic behavior is poorly understood. We present herein a rare case of mucinous urethral adenocarcinoma in a male patient with longstanding ulcerative colitis and multiple sclerosis. The patient presented with a voluminous pelvic mass; core biopsy of the lesion demonstrated a mucus-producing adenocarcinoma. Given the patient's history of subtotal colectomy, preoperative diagnosis was oriented towards a rectal stump adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent a pelvic exenteration: surprisingly, histology marked the prostatic urethra as the primary lesion site.

  12. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-19

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic theMYCamplification andPTENloss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics.

  13. Oral administration of withaferin A inhibits carcinogenesis of prostate in TRAMP model

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Suman; Das, Trinath P.; Moselhy, Jim; Pal, Deeksha; Kolluru, Venkatesh; Alatassi, Houda; Ankem, Murali K.; Damodaran, Chendil

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that withaferin A (WA), a natural compound, deters prostate cancer by inhibiting AKT while inducing apoptosis. In the current study, we examined its chemopreventive efficacy against carcinogenesis in the prostate using the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Two distinct sets of experiments were conducted. To determine whether WA delays tumor progression, it was given before cancer onset, at week 6, and until week 44. To determine its effect after the onset of prostate cancer, it was given from weeks 12 to 35. In both strategies, oral administration of WA effectively suppressed tumor burden when compared to vehicle-treated animals. No toxicity was seen in treated animals at gross pathological examination. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry of tumor sections revealed that in TRAMP controls, AKT and pAKT were highly expressed while nuclear FOXO3a and Par-4 were downregulated. On the contrary, treated mice showed inhibition of AKT signaling and activation of FOX03a-Par-4-induced cell death. They also displayed inhibition of mesenchymal markers such as β-catenin, vimentin, and snail as well as upregulation of E-cadherin. Because expressions of the angiogenic markers factor VIII and retic were downregulated, an anti-angiogenic role of WA is suggested. Overall, our results suggest that WA could be a promising anti-cancer agent that effectively inhibits carcinogenesis of the prostate. PMID:27447565

  14. Aggressive Prostate Cancer Is Prevented in ERαKO Mice and Stimulated in ERβKO TRAMP Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ślusarz, Anna; Jackson, Glenn A.; Day, J. Kevin; Shenouda, Nader S.; Bogener, Jennifer L.; Browning, Jim D.; Fritsche, Kevin L.; MacDonald, Ruth S.; Besch-Williford, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Previous evidence suggests soy genistein may be protective against prostate cancer, but whether this protection involves an estrogen receptor (ER)-dependent mechanism is unknown. To test the hypothesis that phytoestrogens may act through ERα or ERβ to play a protective role against prostate cancer, we bred transgenic mice lacking functional ERα or ERβ with transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Dietary genistein reduced the incidence of cancer in ER wild-type (WT)/transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate mice but not in ERα knockout (KO) or ERβKO mice. Cancer incidence was 70% in ERWT mice fed the control diet compared with 47% in ERWT mice fed low-dose genistein (300 mg/kg) and 32% on the high-dose genistein (750 mg/kg). Surprisingly, genistein only affected the well differentiated carcinoma (WDC) incidence but had no effect on poorly differentiated carcinoma (PDC). No dietary effects have been observed in either of the ERKO animals. We observed a very strong genotypic influence on PDC incidence, a protective effect in ERαKO (only 5% developed PDC), compared with 19% in the ERWT, and an increase in the incidence of PDC in ERβKO mice to 41%. Interestingly, immunohistochemical analysis showed ERα expression changing from nonnuclear in WDC to nuclear in PDC, with little change in ERβ location or expression. In conclusion, genistein is able to inhibit WDC in the presence of both ERs, but the effect of estrogen signaling on PDC is dominant over any dietary treatment, suggesting that improved differential targeting of ERα vs. ERβ would result in prevention of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:22753646

  15. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Cleveland, Elyse; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Shevrin, Daniel; Kaul, Karen; Brendler, Charles; Iozzo, Renato V.; Seth, Prem

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle to establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.

  16. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; ...

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle tomore » establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.« less

  17. Sarcomatoid Carcinoma of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Açıkgöz, Onur; Gazel, Eymen; Zengin, Neslihan İnci; Kasap, Yusuf; Çamtosun, Ahmet; Yazıcıoğlu, Ahmet Hamdi

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the prostate is among the rarest malignant neoplasm types and has been well known for its aggressive clinical course. Patient was admitted with the symptoms of lower urinary tract. Transurethral resection of prostate (TUR-P) was carried out. Revealing Gleason 5 + 3 = 8 prostate adenocarcinoma in TUR-P material. Thereby, a Radical Prostatectomy procedure was planned. In operation, frozen examination revealed adenocarcinoma metastasis to the obturator lymph node. The operation was terminated. In the postoperative 3rd month, the patient was re-admitted with acute urinary system symptoms. A cystoscopy performed and complete resection of the mass was performed. The pathological examination reported that the tumor was compatible with undifferentiated adenocarcinoma owing to presence of poorly differentiated tumoral cells and detection of adenocarcinoma in a relatively small (<1%) focus. 4 month after the operation, the patient underwent another cyctoscopic examination which revealed the prostatic lounge and most of the bladder lumen to be filled with tumoral tissue. The tumoral tissues was resected incompletely. This material was diagnosed to be “Sarcomatoid Malignant Tumor” upon the new evidences of progressive dedifferentiation and predominant sarcomatoid appearance, compared with the former TUR-P materials. Subsequent PET-CT scan depicted multiple metastasis. The patient was referred to oncology department. In conclusion, sarcomatoid carcinoma is a malignant variant that brings along diagnostic and treatment difficulties. PMID:23691427

  18. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Açıkgöz, Onur; Gazel, Eymen; Zengin, Neslihan İnci; Kasap, Yusuf; Camtosun, Ahmet; Yazıcıoğlu, Ahmet Hamdi

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the prostate is among the rarest malignant neoplasm types and has been well known for its aggressive clinical course. Patient was admitted with the symptoms of lower urinary tract. Transurethral resection of prostate (TUR-P) was carried out. Revealing Gleason 5 + 3 = 8 prostate adenocarcinoma in TUR-P material. Thereby, a Radical Prostatectomy procedure was planned. In operation, frozen examination revealed adenocarcinoma metastasis to the obturator lymph node. The operation was terminated. In the postoperative 3rd month, the patient was re-admitted with acute urinary system symptoms. A cystoscopy performed and complete resection of the mass was performed. The pathological examination reported that the tumor was compatible with undifferentiated adenocarcinoma owing to presence of poorly differentiated tumoral cells and detection of adenocarcinoma in a relatively small (<1%) focus. 4 month after the operation, the patient underwent another cyctoscopic examination which revealed the prostatic lounge and most of the bladder lumen to be filled with tumoral tissue. The tumoral tissues was resected incompletely. This material was diagnosed to be "Sarcomatoid Malignant Tumor" upon the new evidences of progressive dedifferentiation and predominant sarcomatoid appearance, compared with the former TUR-P materials. Subsequent PET-CT scan depicted multiple metastasis. The patient was referred to oncology department. In conclusion, sarcomatoid carcinoma is a malignant variant that brings along diagnostic and treatment difficulties.

  19. [Markers of prostate cancer stem cells: research advances].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shun-Qi; Huang, Sheng-Song

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most seriously malignant diseases threatening men's health, and the mechanisms of its initiation and progression are not yet completely understood. Recent years have witnessed distinct advances in researches on prostate cancer stem cells in many aspects using different sources of materials, such as human prostate cancer tissues, human prostate cancer cell lines, and mouse models of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer stem cell study offers a new insight into the mechanisms of the initiation and progression of prostate cancer and contributes positively to its treatment. This article presents an overview on the prostate cancer stem cell markers utilized in the isolation and identification of prostate cancer stem cells.

  20. PKC Epsilon: A Novel Oncogenic Player in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    determine if COX-2 inhibition could also affect the signaling event in adenocarcinoma formed in the compound PKC;Pten mice. Our results showed that PKC...responsive probasin (PB) promoter[ 29 ]. Interestingly, only PB-PKC mice developed dysplastic changes characteristic of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia...alteration in human prostate cancer, resulted in a compound mutant mice (PB-PKC;Pten+/- mice) that developed fully invasive adenocarcinoma. We recently

  1. Perturbation of NK cell peripheral homeostasis accelerates prostate carcinoma metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Lu, Shengjun; Wang, Xuanjun; Page, Stephanie T.; Higano, Celestia S.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Greenberg, Norman M.; Sun, Shaoli; Li, Zihai; Wu, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    The activating receptor NK cell group 2 member D (NKG2D) mediates antitumor immunity in experimental animal models. However, whether NKG2D ligands contribute to tumor suppression or progression clinically remains controversial. Here, we have described 2 novel lines of “humanized” bi-transgenic (bi-Tg) mice in which native human NKG2D ligand MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence B (MICB) or the engineered membrane-restricted MICB (MICB.A2) was expressed in the prostate of the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model of spontaneous carcinogenesis. Bi-Tg TRAMP/MICB mice exhibited a markedly increased incidence of progressed carcinomas and metastasis, whereas TRAMP/MICB.A2 mice enjoyed long-term tumor-free survival conferred by sustained NKG2D-mediated antitumor immunity. Mechanistically, we found that cancer progression in TRAMP/MICB mice was associated with loss of the peripheral NK cell pool owing to high serum levels of tumor-derived soluble MICB (sMICB). Prostate cancer patients also displayed reduction of peripheral NK cells and high sMIC levels. Our study has not only provided direct evidence in “humanized” mouse models that soluble and membrane-restricted NKG2D ligands pose opposite impacts on cancer progression, but also uncovered a mechanism of sMIC-induced impairment of NK cell antitumor immunity. Our findings suggest that the impact of soluble NKG2D ligands should be considered in NK cell–based cancer immunotherapy and that our unique mouse models should be valuable for therapy optimization. PMID:24018560

  2. Association of Diet With Prostate Specific Antigen and Prostate Volume

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Mehdi; Ariafar, Ali; Zeyghami, Shahryar; Hosseini, Mohammad Mehdi; Khezri, Abdol Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prostate is an important male reproductive system gland and its disorders can affect men's quality of life and health. Prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate adenocarcinoma are major disorders that can be found in all men in different ages. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of diet with serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level as well as prostate volume. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 950 men older than 40 years of age who had attended our clinic for a screening program for prostate cancer were enrolled. Data was extracted from the program database. The eligible cases included all noncancerous subjects with available data concerning serum PSA level and prostate volume; the patients had completed a 50-item self-administered food frequency questionnaire about their diet during the preceding two year. Results: No overall association was found between the consumption of foods and prostate volume as well as serum PSA level. There was a significant correlations between age and serum PSA level (r = 0.24) as well as with prostate volume (r = 0.22) (P < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant correlation between serum PSA level and prostate volume (r = 0.41 and P < 0.001). Conclusions: The results of this study confirmed the previous reports regarding the serum PSA level correlation with prostate volume. There was no evidence that dietary patterns might have any important effect on prostate volume and serum PSA in this Iranian population. PMID:25695023

  3. Metastasis of prostate cancer and melanoma cells in a preclinical in vivo mouse model is enhanced by L-plastin expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor cell migration and metastasis require dynamic rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Interestingly, the F-actin cross-linking and stabilizing protein L-plastin, originally described as a leukocyte specific protein, is aberrantly expressed in several non-hematopoietic malignant tumors. Therefore, it has been discussed as a tumor marker. However, systematic in vivo analyses of the functional relevance of L-plastin for tumor cell metastasis were so far lacking. Methods We investigated the relevance of L-plastin expression and phosphorylation by ectopical expression of L-plastin in human melanoma cells (MV3) and knock-down of endogenous L-plastin in prostate cancer (PC3M). The growth and metastatic potential of tumor cells expressing no L-plastin, phosphorylatable or non-phosphorylatable L-plastin was analyzed in a preclinical mouse model after subcutaneous and intracardial injection of the tumor cells. Results Knock-down of endogenous L-plastin in human prostate carcinoma cells led to reduced tumor cell growth and metastasis. Vice versa, and in line with these findings, ectopic expression of L-plastin in L-plastin negative melanoma cells significantly increased the number of metastases. Strikingly, the metastasis promoting effect of L-plastin was not observed if a non-phosphorylatable L-plastin mutant was expressed. Conclusions Our data provide the first in vivo evidence that expression of L-plastin promotes tumor metastasis and, importantly, that this effect depends on an additionally required phosphorylation of L-plastin. In conclusion, these findings imply that for determining the importance of tumor-associated proteins like L-plastin a characterization of posttranslational modifications is indispensable. PMID:24438191

  4. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) inhibits vanadate-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in TRAMP prostates

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Wayne A.; Lin, Tien-Min; Peterson, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) are basic helix-loop-helix/per-arnt-sim (PAS) family transcription factors. During angiogenesis and tumor growth, HIF-1α dimerizes with ARNT, inducing expression of many genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). ARNT also dimerizes with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). AhR-null (Ahr−/−) transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice develop prostate tumors with greater frequency than AhR wild-type (Ahr+/+) TRAMP mice, even though prevalence of prostate epithelial hyperplasia is not inhibited. This suggests that Ahr inhibits prostate carcinogenesis. In TRAMP mice, prostatic epithelial hyperplasia results in stabilized HIF-1α, inducing expression of VEGF, a prerequisite for tumor growth and angiogenesis. Since ARNT is a common dimerization partner of AhR and HIF-1α, we hypothesized that the AhR inhibits prostate tumor formation by competing with HIF-1α for ARNT, thereby limiting VEGF production. Prostates from Ahr+/+, Ahr+/− and Ahr−/− C57BL/6J TRAMP mice were cultured in the presence of graded concentrations of vanadate, an inducer of VEGF through the HIF-1α–ARNT pathway. Vanadate induced VEGF protein in a dose-dependent fashion in Ahr+/− and Ahr−/− TRAMP cultures, but not in Ahr+/+ cultures. However, vanadate induced upstream proteins in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-signaling cascade to a similar extent in TRAMPs of each Ahr genotype, evidenced by v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (Akt) phosphorylation. These findings suggest that AhR sequesters ARNT, decreasing interaction with HIF-1α reducing VEGF production. Since VEGF is required for tumor vascularization and growth, these studies further suggest that reduction in VEGF correlates with inhibited prostate carcinogenesis in Ahr+/+ TRAMP mice. PMID:18359762

  5. Primary appendiceal mucinous adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Behera, Prativa Kumari; Rath, Pramod Kumar; Panda, Rabiratna; Satpathi, Sanghamitra; Behera, Rajan

    2011-04-01

    Primary Adenocarcinomas of the appendix are extremely rare tumor. We report a case of primary mucinous adenocarcinoma in a 40 year old lady misdiagnosed as having acute appendicitis. All the routine investigations were within normal limit. USG of abdomen showed dilated appendix with little fluid collection adjacent to it and no other abnormality was seen which suggested acute appendicitis. Appendicectomy was done and excised appendix was sent for histopathological examination. Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the appendix was confirmed after histopathological examination. Right hemicolectomy was done as a second stage procedure. As some cases are incidentally discovered, this case emphasizes that histological examination of all appendicectomy specimens is mandatory.

  6. Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Thomas; Zaanan, Aziz; Mary, Florence; Afchain, Pauline; Manfredi, Sylvain; Evans, Thomas Ronald Jeffry

    2016-09-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinomas (SBAs) are rare tumors, but their incidence is increasing. The most common primary location is the duodenum. Even though SBAs are more often sporadic, some diseases are risk factors. Early diagnosis of small bowel adenocarcinoma remains difficult, despite significant radiologic and endoscopic progress. After R0 surgical resection, the main prognostic factor is lymph node invasion. An international randomized trial (BALLAD [Benefit of Adjuvant Chemotherapy For Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma] study) will evaluate the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. For metastatic disease, retrospectives studies suggest that platinum-based chemotherapy is the most effective treatment. Phase II studies are ongoing to evaluate targeted therapy in metastatic SBA.

  7. N-Myc Drives Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Initiated from Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Smith, Bryan A; Park, Jung Wook; Stoyanova, Tanya; McCaffrey, Erin F; Baertsch, Robert; Sokolov, Artem; Meyerowitz, Justin G; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M; Shokat, Kevan M; Gustafson, W Clay; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-11

    MYCN amplification and overexpression are common in neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC). However, the impact of aberrant N-Myc expression in prostate tumorigenesis and the cellular origin of NEPC have not been established. We define N-Myc and activated AKT1 as oncogenic components sufficient to transform human prostate epithelial cells to prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC with phenotypic and molecular features of aggressive, late-stage human disease. We directly show that prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC can arise from a common epithelial clone. Further, N-Myc is required for tumor maintenance, and destabilization of N-Myc through Aurora A kinase inhibition reduces tumor burden. Our findings establish N-Myc as a driver of NEPC and a target for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Assessment of Perigenital Sensitivity and Prostatic Mast Cell Activation in a Mouse Model of Neonatal Maternal Separation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Isabella M.; Pierce, Angela N.; O'Neil, Pierce T.; Christianson, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) has a lifetime prevalence of 14% and is the most common urological diagnosis for men under the age of 50, yet it is the least understood and studied chronic pelvic pain disorder. A significant subset of patients with chronic pelvic pain report having experienced early life stress or abuse, which can markedly affect the functioning and regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Mast cell activation, which has been shown to be increased in both urine and expressed prostatic secretions of CP/CPPS patients, is partially regulated by downstream activation of the HPA axis. Neonatal maternal separation (NMS) has been used for over two decades to study the outcomes of early life stress in rodent models, including changes in the HPA axis and visceral sensitivity. Here we provide a detailed protocol for using NMS as a preclinical model of CP/CPPS in male C57BL/6 mice. We describe the methodology for performing NMS, assessing perigenital mechanical allodynia, and histological evidence of mast cell activation. We also provide evidence that early psychological stress can have long-lasting effects on the male urogenital system in mice. PMID:26327525

  9. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  10. Enhancement of broccoli indole glucosinolates by methyl jasmonate treatment and effects on prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ann G; Juvik, John A; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Clinton, Steven K; Erdman, John W

    2014-11-01

    Broccoli is rich in bioactive components, such as sulforaphane and indole-3-carbinol, which may impact cancer risk. The glucosinolate profile of broccoli can be manipulated through treatment with the plant stress hormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Our objective was to produce broccoli with enhanced levels of indole glucosinolates and determine its impact on prostate carcinogenesis. Brassica oleracea var. Green Magic was treated with a 250 μM MeJA solution 4 days prior to harvest. MeJA-treated broccoli had significantly increased levels of glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassicin, and gluconasturtiin (P < .05). Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice (n = 99) were randomized into three diet groups at 5-7 weeks of age: AIN-93G control, 10% standard broccoli powder, or 10% MeJA broccoli powder. Diets were fed throughout the study until termination at 20 weeks of age. Hepatic CYP1A was induced with MeJA broccoli powder feeding, indicating biological activity of the indole glucosinolates. Following ∼ 15 weeks on diets, neither of the broccoli treatments significantly altered genitourinary tract weight, pathologic score, or metastasis incidence, indicating that broccoli powder at 10% of the diet was ineffective at reducing prostate carcinogenesis in the TRAMP model. Whereas broccoli powder feeding had no effect in this model of prostate cancer, our work demonstrates the feasibility of employing plant stress hormones exogenously to stimulate changes in phytochemical profiles, an approach that may be useful for optimizing bioactive component patterns in foods for chronic-disease-prevention studies.

  11. Oncolytic vaccinia virus as a vector for therapeutic sodium iodide symporter gene therapy in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, D C; Kyula, J N; Rosenfelder, N; Chao-Chu, J; Kramer-Marek, G; Khan, A A; Roulstone, V; McLaughlin, M; Melcher, A A; Vile, R G; Pandha, H S; Khoo, V; Harrington, K J

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic strains of vaccinia virus are currently in clinical development with clear evidence of safety and promising signs of efficacy. Addition of therapeutic genes to the viral genome may increase the therapeutic efficacy of vaccinia. We evaluated the therapeutic potential of vaccinia virus expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in prostate cancer models, combining oncolysis, external beam radiotherapy and NIS-mediated radioiodide therapy. The NIS-expressing vaccinia virus (VV-NIS), GLV-1h153, was tested in in vitro analyzes of viral cell killing, combination with radiotherapy, NIS expression, cellular radioiodide uptake and apoptotic cell death in PC3, DU145, LNCaP and WPMY-1 human prostate cell lines. In vivo experiments were carried out in PC3 xenografts in CD1 nude mice to assess NIS expression and tumor radioiodide uptake. In addition, the therapeutic benefit of radioiodide treatment in combination with viral oncolysis and external beam radiotherapy was measured. In vitro viral cell killing of prostate cancers was dose- and time-dependent and was through apoptotic mechanisms. Importantly, combined virus therapy and iodizing radiation did not adversely affect oncolysis. NIS gene expression in infected cells was functional and mediated uptake of radioiodide both in vitro and in vivo. Therapy experiments with both xenograft and immunocompetent Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mouse models showed that the addition of radioiodide to VV-NIS-infected tumors was more effective than each single-agent therapy, restricting tumor growth and increasing survival. In conclusion, VV-NIS is effective in prostate cancer models. This treatment modality would be an attractive complement to existing clinical radiotherapy practice. PMID:26814609

  12. Oncolytic vaccinia virus as a vector for therapeutic sodium iodide symporter gene therapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, D C; Kyula, J N; Rosenfelder, N; Chao-Chu, J; Kramer-Marek, G; Khan, A A; Roulstone, V; McLaughlin, M; Melcher, A A; Vile, R G; Pandha, H S; Khoo, V; Harrington, K J

    2016-04-01

    Oncolytic strains of vaccinia virus are currently in clinical development with clear evidence of safety and promising signs of efficacy. Addition of therapeutic genes to the viral genome may increase the therapeutic efficacy of vaccinia. We evaluated the therapeutic potential of vaccinia virus expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in prostate cancer models, combining oncolysis, external beam radiotherapy and NIS-mediated radioiodide therapy. The NIS-expressing vaccinia virus (VV-NIS), GLV-1h153, was tested in in vitro analyzes of viral cell killing, combination with radiotherapy, NIS expression, cellular radioiodide uptake and apoptotic cell death in PC3, DU145, LNCaP and WPMY-1 human prostate cell lines. In vivo experiments were carried out in PC3 xenografts in CD1 nude mice to assess NIS expression and tumor radioiodide uptake. In addition, the therapeutic benefit of radioiodide treatment in combination with viral oncolysis and external beam radiotherapy was measured. In vitro viral cell killing of prostate cancers was dose- and time-dependent and was through apoptotic mechanisms. Importantly, combined virus therapy and iodizing radiation did not adversely affect oncolysis. NIS gene expression in infected cells was functional and mediated uptake of radioiodide both in vitro and in vivo. Therapy experiments with both xenograft and immunocompetent Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mouse models showed that the addition of radioiodide to VV-NIS-infected tumors was more effective than each single-agent therapy, restricting tumor growth and increasing survival. In conclusion, VV-NIS is effective in prostate cancer models. This treatment modality would be an attractive complement to existing clinical radiotherapy practice.

  13. Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids fail to reduce prostate tumorigenesis in the PB-ErbB-2 x Pten(+/-) preclinical mouse model.

    PubMed

    Vissapragada, Sarada; Ghosh, Anup; Ringer, Lymor; Salinas, Patricia; Brophy, Amanda; Peaceman, Daniel; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Banerjee, Partha P; Fricke, Stanley T; Helfrich, William; Lee, Yi Chien; Pestell, Richard; Scherer, Philipp; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Avantaggiati, Maria Laura; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Lisanti, Michael P; Rodriguez, Olga C; Albanese, Chris

    2010-05-01

    Diet and obesity, and their associated metabolic alterations, are some of the fastest-growing causes of disease and death in America. Findings from epidemiological studies correlating obesity, the sources of dietary fat and prostate cancer (PCa) are conflicting. We have previously shown that 15% of PB-ErbB-2 x pten(+/-) mice developed PCa and exhibited increased phosphorylated 4E-BP1, but not the key PI3-kinase intermediary phospho-protein, mTOR, when maintained on unrefined mouse chow. We report herein that 100% of animals fed refined, westernized AIN-93-based diets containing corn oil developed PCa by 12 months of age. Increases in visceral fat and mTO R activation in the tumors were also observed. Furthermore, nuclear cyclin E levels were significantly induced by the AIN-93-corn oil-based diets versus chow. Replacing 50% of the corn oil with menhaden oil, with 21% of its triglycerides being n-3 PUFA's, had no effect on tumorigenesis, fat deposition, cyclin E or mTOR. Phosphorylated BAD levels were similar in the tumors of mice in all three diets. Our data demonstrated that in the context of our preclinical model, components of crude chow, but not dietary n-3 PUFAs, protect against PCa progression. In addition, these data establish phosphorylated mTOR, nuclear cyclin E and visceral fat deposits as possible biomarkers of increased dietary risk for PCa.

  14. Hydronephrosis as a complication of adenocarcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Akio; Ueoka, Hiroshi; Gemba, Kenich; Kuyama, Syouich; Kishino, Daizo; Tabata, Masahiro; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Harada, Mine

    2003-01-01

    We describe a patient with adenocarcinoma of the lung who developed hydronephrosis secondary to compression by right common iliac lymph node metastases. The most common primary sites of cancers causing ureteral obstruction are the cervix, prostate, bladder and colo-rectum. To date, few reports of ureteral obstruction attributable to lung cancer have been published. Although rare, physicians should be aware that hydronephrosis can complicate the course of patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

  15. Chronic prostatitis, cystitis, pyelonephritis, and balanoposthitis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Pointer, Emmy; Murray, Louise

    2011-01-01

    An adult, intact male domestic shorthair presented for preputial swelling and urinary incontinence. A caudal abdominal mass was palpated. A transabdominal ultrasound examination showed severe prostatomegaly with abnormal tissue extending along the urethra. The cat was euthanized due to the owner's financial constraints and the veterinarians' suspicion of a poor long-term prognosis. Biopsies showed chronic active inflammation of the prostate, bladder, kidneys, ureters, penis, and prepuce most consistent with a chronic infectious process. Reports of feline prostatic disease of any kind are rare. Chronic prostatitis may have a more favorable prognosis than feline prostatic adenocarcinoma, currently the most commonly reported disease of the feline prostate.

  16. The Function of Neuroendocrine Cells in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    still many unanswered questions in prostate cancer. A fundamental and clinically important issue is why prostate cancer responds to hormonal therapy ...adenocarcinoma cells express low levels of CD49f. We then fractionated CD49fhi and CD49flo cells and transplanted both into recipient mice. Both phenotypic...Hsia E, Squires J, Li Z, Zhang Y, Li W, Chen X, Xu H, Huang J. Androgen-deprivation therapy -induced aggressive prostate cancer with neuroendocrine

  17. Infections and inflammation in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sfanos, Karen S; Isaacs, William B; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2013-12-25

    The frequent observation of both acute and chronic inflammation of unknown stimulus in the adult prostate has motivated a large body of research aimed at identifying potential infectious agents that may elicit prostatic inflammation. The overarching hypothesis is that infection-induced inflammation may be associated with prostate cancer development or progression, as inflammation is known to serve as an "enabling characteristic" of cancer. With recent advances in molecular techniques for microorganism identification, a panoply of microorganisms has been scrutinized in prostate tissues and in relation to prostate carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the evidence for infectious agents as a contributing factor to prostatic inflammation and prostate cancer, and to highlight recent literature suggesting an infectious etiology to the biogenesis of prostatic corpora amylacea and on the development of mouse models of prostatic infections.

  18. Infections and inflammation in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sfanos, Karen S; Isaacs, William B; Marzo, Angelo M De

    2013-01-01

    The frequent observation of both acute and chronic inflammation of unknown stimulus in the adult prostate has motivated a large body of research aimed at identifying potential infectious agents that may elicit prostatic inflammation. The overarching hypothesis is that infection-induced inflammation may be associated with prostate cancer development or progression, as inflammation is known to serve as an “enabling characteristic” of cancer. With recent advances in molecular techniques for microorganism identification, a panoply of microorganisms has been scrutinized in prostate tissues and in relation to prostate carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the evidence for infectious agents as a contributing factor to prostatic inflammation and prostate cancer, and to highlight recent literature suggesting an infectious etiology to the biogenesis of prostatic corpora amylacea and on the development of mouse models of prostatic infections. PMID:25110720

  19. LL-37 as a therapeutic target for late stage prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Jonathan A.; Chanda, Diptiman; Kumar, Sanjay; Sawant, Anandi; Grizzle, William E.; Siegal, Gene P.; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The antimicrobial peptide, LL-37 (leucine-leucine-37), stimulates proliferation, angiogenesis and cellular migration, inhibits apoptosis and is associated with inflammation. Since these functional processes are often exaggerated in cancer, the aim of the present study was to investigate the expression and role of LL-37 in prostate cancer (PCa) and establish its value as a therapeutic target. METHODS We evaluated the expression of LL-37 and the murine orthologue, Cathelicidin Related Anti-Microbial Peptide (CRAMP) in human and murine prostate tumors, respectively. Compared to normal/benign prostate tissue, both LL-37 and CRAMP were increasingly over-expressed with advancing grades of primary prostate cancer and its metastasis in human tissues and in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model, correspondingly. We subsequently knocked down CRAMP in the highly tumorigenic TRAMP-C1 cell line via a RNA interference (RNAi) strategy to examine the importance of CRAMP on cellular proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, apoptosis, activation of signaling pathways and tumor kinetics. RESULTS Abrogation of CRAMP expression led to decreased proliferation, invasion, type IV collagenase, and the amount of phosphorylated Erk1/2 and Akt signaling in vitro. These results were paralleled in vivo. Syngenic implantation of TRAMP-C1 cells subjected to CRAMP knock-down resulted in a decreased tumor incidence and size, and the down regulation of pro-tumorigenic mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS CRAMP knockdown in a murine prostate cancer model analogously demonstrated the tumorigenic contributions of LL-37 in PCa and its potential as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of PCa and potentially, other cancers over-expressing the peptide. PMID:20957672

  20. Systemic therapy of spontaneous prostate cancer in transgenic mice with oncolytic herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Susan; Rabkin, Samuel D; Nielsen, G Petur; MacGarvey, Usha; Liu, Renbin; Martuza, Robert L

    2007-10-01

    Oncolytic viruses are an innovative therapeutic strategy for cancer, wherein viral replication and cytotoxicity are selective for tumor cells. Here we show the efficacy of systemically administered oncolytic viruses for the treatment of spontaneously arising tumors, specifically the use of oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (HSV) administered i.v. to treat spontaneously developing primary and metastatic prostate cancer in the transgenic TRAMP mouse, which recapitulates human prostate cancer progression. Four administrations of systemically delivered NV1023 virus, an HSV-1/HSV-2 oncolytic recombinant, to TRAMP mice at 12 or 18 weeks of age (presence of prostate adenocarcinoma or metastatic disease, respectively) inhibited primary tumor growth and metastases to lymph nodes. Expression of interleukin 12 (IL-12) from NV1042 virus, a derivative of NV1023, was additionally effective, significantly reducing the frequency of development of prostate cancer and lung metastases, even when the mice were treated after the onset of metastasis at 18 weeks of age. NV1042-infected cells, as detected by 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-d-galactopyranoside staining for Lac Z expressed by the virus, were present in prostate tumors 1 week after the final virus injection and viral DNA was detected at 2 weeks after final virus injection by real-time PCR in primary and metastatic tumors but not in liver or blood. No toxicity was observed in any of the treated mice. The efficacy of the IL-12-expressing NV1042 virus in this aggressive prostate cancer model using a clinically relevant treatment paradigm merits its consideration for clinical studies.

  1. Caveolin-1 and prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Yang, Wei; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Caveolin-1 was identified in the 1990s as a marker of aggressive prostate cancer. The caveolin-1 protein localizes to vesicular structures called caveolae and has been shown to bind and regulate many signaling proteins involved in oncogenesis. Caveolin-1 also has lipid binding properties and mediates aspects of cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism and can elicit biological responses in a paracrine manner when secreted. Caveolin-1 is also present in the serum of prostate cancer patients and circulating levels correlate with extent of disease. Current evidence indicates that increased expression of caveolin-1 in prostate adenocarcinoma cells and commensurate downregulation of the protein in prostate stroma, mediate progression to the castration-resistant phase of prostate cancer through diverse pathways. This chapter summarizes the current state of our understanding of the cellular and physiologic mechanisms in which caveolin-1 participates in the evolution of prostate cancer cell phenotypes.

  2. Expression level and DNA methylation status of Glutathione-S-transferase genes in normal murine prostate and TRAMP tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mavis, Cory K.; Kinney, Shannon R. Morey; Foster, Barbara A.; Karpf, Adam R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glutathione-S-transferase (Gst) genes are down-regulated in human prostate cancer, and GSTP1 silencing is mediated by promoter DNA hypermethylation in this malignancy. We examined Gst gene expression and Gst promoter DNA methylation in normal murine prostates and Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) tumors. METHODS Primary and metastatic tumors were obtained from TRAMP mice, and normal prostates were obtained from strain-matched WT mice (n=15/group). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to measure GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1 mRNA expression, and Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining was used to measure GstM1 and GstP1 protein expression. MassARRAY Quantitative Methylation Analysis was used to measure DNA methylation of the 5’ CpG islands of GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1. TRAMP-C2 cells were treated with the epigenetic remodeling drugs decitabine and trichostatin A (TSA) alone and in combination, and Gst gene expression was measured. RESULTS Of the genes analyzed, GstM1 and GstP1 were expressed at highest levels in normal prostate. All five Gst genes showed greatly reduced expression in primary tumors compared to normal prostate, but not in tumor metastases. Gst promoter methylation was unchanged in TRAMP tumors compared to normal prostate. Combined decitabine + TSA treatment significantly enhanced the expression of 4/5 Gst genes in TRAMP-C2 cells. CONCLUSIONS Gst genes are extensively downregulated in primary but not metastatic TRAMP tumors. Promoter DNA hypermethylation does not appear to drive Gst gene repression in TRAMP primary tumors; however, pharmacological studies using TRAMP cells suggest the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in Gst gene repression. PMID:19444856

  3. Role of Foxm1 in the Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    LADY transgenic (TG) mouse models of prostate cancer . Ubiquitous over-expression of Foxm1 accelerates development of PCa, as well as significantly...types in Rosa26-Foxm1 mice, the direct role of Foxm1 in prostate epithelial cells, the cells from which prostate cancer arises, remains unknown...prostate cancer by regulating genes critical for proliferation of prostate epithelial cells and (2) that Foxm1 is negatively regulated by p19ARF tumor

  4. Posttranslational Regulation of Membrane Type 1-Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) in Mouse PTEN Null Prostate Cancer Cells: Enhanced Surface Expression and Differential O-Glycosylation of MT1-MMP1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seaho; Huang, Wei; Mottillo, Emilio P.; Sohail, Anjum; Ham, Yoon-Ah; Conley-LaComb, M. Katie; Kim, Chong Jai; Tzivion, Guri; Kim, Hyeong-Reh Choi; Wang, Shihua; Chen, Yong Q.; Fridman, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Membrane type 1 (MT1)-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-tethered MMP that has been shown to play a key role in promoting cancer cell invasion. MT1-MMP is highly expressed in bone metastasis of prostate cancer (PC) patients and promotes intraosseous tumor growth of PC cells in mice. The majority of metastatic prostate cancers harbor loss-of-function mutations or deletions of the tumor suppressor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten). However, the role of PTEN inactivation in MT1-MMP expression in PC cells has not been examined. In this study, prostate epithelial cell lines derived from mice that are either heterozygous (PTEN+/-) or homozygous (PTEN-/-) for PTEN deletion or harboring a wild type PTEN (PTEN+/+) were used to investigate the expression of MT1-MMP. We found that biallelic loss of PTEN is associated with posttranslational regulation of MT1-MMP protein in mouse PC cells. PTEN-/- PC cells display higher levels of MT1-MMP at the cell surface when compared to PTEN+/+ and PTEN+/- cells and consequently exhibited enhanced migratory and collagen-invasive activities. MT1-MMP displayed by PTEN-/- cells is differentially O-glycosylated and exhibits a slow rate of turnover. MT1-MMP expression in PTEN-/- cells is under control of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, as determined using pharmacological inhibitors. Interestingly, rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, up-regulates MT1-MMP expression in PTEN+/+ cells via PI3K activity. Collectively, these data in a mouse prostate cell system uncover for the first time a novel and complex relationship between PTEN loss-mediated PI3K/AKT activation and posttranslational regulation of MT1-MMP, which may play a role in PC progression. PMID:20620173

  5. Prostate Specific or Enriched Genes as Composite Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    research: To evaluate prostate specific genes such as WDR19, NDRG1 , TAGLN2 as diagnosis and prognosis markers for prostate cancers. Major findings: (1) We...have determined that WDR19, NDRG1 are not as good a marker as PSA for prostate cancer stratification. (2) We developed a mouse antibody for a...optimize sandwich ELISA assays for WDR19, NDRG1 , or other novel prostate-specific biomarker candidates. During the past two years, we have evaluated the

  6. c-MYC drives histone demethylase PHF8 during neuroendocrine differentiation and in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Fazli, Ladan; Tyler, Scott; Nasir, Moman; Dong, Xuesen; Qi, Hank Heng

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic factors play critical roles in prostate cancer (PCa) development. However, how they contribute to neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) and castration-resistant PCa (CRPC) is not fully understood. Using bioinformatics and biochemical approaches to analyze cell-based models of NED and CRPC, we found a cluster of epigenetic factors whose expression is downregulated during NED and upregulated in CRPC (i.e. follow a Down-Up pattern). Two histone demethylases within this cluster, PHF8 and KDM3A, are post-transcriptionally regulated by c-MYC through miR-22, which targets both PHF8 and KDM3A. We also found that the c-MYC/miR-22/PHF8 axis is downstream of androgen receptor (AR) signaling in CRPC cells. The co-expression of PHF8 with AR in clinical CRPC samples, normal mouse prostate, and adenocarcinomas of the prostate during PCa progression in a transgenic (TRAMP) mouse model supports the connection between PHF8 and AR. Knockdown of PHF8 impedes cell cycle progression in CRPC cells and has more profound effects on their growth than on the parental LNCaP cell line. Furthermore, PHF8 knockdown sensitizes LNCaP-Abl cells to the AR antagonist enzalutamide. Our data reveal novel mechanisms that underlie the regulation of PHF8 and KDM3A during NED and in CRPC, and support the candidacy of PHF8 as a therapeutic target in CRPC. PMID:27689328

  7. c-MYC drives histone demethylase PHF8 during neuroendocrine differentiation and in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Maina, Peterson Kariuki; Shao, Peng; Liu, Qi; Fazli, Ladan; Tyler, Scott; Nasir, Moman; Dong, Xuesen; Qi, Hank Heng

    2016-11-15

    Epigenetic factors play critical roles in prostate cancer (PCa) development. However, how they contribute to neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) and castration-resistant PCa (CRPC) is not fully understood. Using bioinformatics and biochemical approaches to analyze cell-based models of NED and CRPC, we found a cluster of epigenetic factors whose expression is downregulated during NED and upregulated in CRPC (i.e. follow a Down-Up pattern). Two histone demethylases within this cluster, PHF8 and KDM3A, are post-transcriptionally regulated by c-MYC through miR-22, which targets both PHF8 and KDM3A. We also found that the c-MYC/miR-22/PHF8 axis is downstream of androgen receptor (AR) signaling in CRPC cells. The co-expression of PHF8 with AR in clinical CRPC samples, normal mouse prostate, and adenocarcinomas of the prostate during PCa progression in a transgenic (TRAMP) mouse model supports the connection between PHF8 and AR. Knockdown of PHF8 impedes cell cycle progression in CRPC cells and has more profound effects on their growth than on the parental LNCaP cell line. Furthermore, PHF8 knockdown sensitizes LNCaP-Abl cells to the AR antagonist enzalutamide. Our data reveal novel mechanisms that underlie the regulation of PHF8 and KDM3A during NED and in CRPC, and support the candidacy of PHF8 as a therapeutic target in CRPC.

  8. The Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Prostate Cancer This booklet is about prostate cancer. Learning about medical care for your cancer ... ePub This booklet covers: The anatomy of the prostate and basics about prostate cancer Treatments for prostate ...

  9. Prostate cancer stem cells are targets of both innate and adaptive immunity and elicit tumor-specific immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Jachetti, Elena; Mazzoleni, Stefania; Grioni, Matteo; Ricupito, Alessia; Brambillasca, Chiara; Generoso, Luca; Calcinotto, Arianna; Freschi, Massimo; Mondino, Anna; Galli, Rossella; Bellone, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, therapies that do not target the CSC compartment have limited, if any, chances to eradicate established tumors. While cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) have the potential to recognize and kill single neoplastic cells within a tissue, whether CSCs can be targeted by the immune system during spontaneous or vaccination-elicited responses is poorly defined. Here, we provide experimental evidence showing that CSC lines established from the prostate of transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice expressed prostate cancer-associated antigens, MHC Class I and II molecules as well as ligands for natural killer (NK) cell receptors. Indeed, CSC were targets for both NK cell- and CTL-mediated cytotoxicity, both in vitro and in vivo. The administration of dendritic cells pulsed with irradiated CSCs induced a tumor-specific immune response that was more robust than that induced by dendritic cells pulsed with differentiated tumor cells, delayed tumor growth in mice challenged with prostate CSCs and caused tumor regression in TRAMP mice. Thus, CSC are targeted by both innate and adaptive immune responses and might be exploited for the design of novel immunotherapeutic approaches against cancer. PMID:23762811

  10. A New Concept for Androgen Receptor-Independent Growth of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    Mesothelioma Ewing’s sarcoma Endometrial Ovarian yolk sac Osteosarcoma Lung squamous Thyroid ...Lung adenocarcinoma Esophagus Gastric Ovarian Skin basal cell Synovial sarcoma Medulloblastoma ...Intestine Colon Prostate Cervix Ovary Thyroid Skin Lung Heart muscle Stomach

  11. Phase II Evaluation of Early Oral Estramustine, Oral Etoposide and Intravenous Paclitaxel in Combination with Hormone Therapy in Patients with High-Risk Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) S0032

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David C.; Tangen, Cathy M.; Hussain, Maha H.A.; Van Veldhuizen, Peter J.; Harrer, Grant W.; Stuart, Robert K.; Mills, Glenn M.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Thompson, Ian M.

    2012-01-01

    Background This multicenter cooperative group single arm trial assessed the efficacy of a multiagent taxane-based chemotherapy in combination with hormonal therapy in men with metastatic androgen-dependent prostate cancer. Methods Forty-one patients with newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer involving both the axial and appendicular skeletons or viscera were enrolled. Thirty-five were treated with combined androgen blockade and up to 4 cycles of oral estramustine (280 mg orally 3 times per day) and etoposide (50 mg/m2 daily) for 14 days of each 21 day cycle, with paclitaxel (135 mg/m2 IV over 1 hour) on day 2 of each cycle. Chemotherapy was started within 30 days of initiation of hormonal therapy. Patients were followed to determine progression-free survival. Results The median progression-free survival for the evaluable population was 13 months (95% CI 10–16 mo) with a median overall survival of 38 months (95% CI 28–49 mo). The main toxicities were myelosuppression with 9 patients with ≥ grade 3 neutropenia, and 1 with grade 4 thrombocytopenia. One patient died with neutropenic infection. Four episodes of thrombosis embolism occurred (3 grade 4, 1 grade 3) with one episode of grade 4 cardiac ischemia. Conclusions Administration of chemotherapy to this population is feasible with moderate toxicity. This is a high-risk population with poor prognosis and this study serves as a basis for ongoing phase III trials assessing this approach in metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:21334731

  12. Androgen deprivation and stem cell markers in prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yao; Hamburger, Anne W; Wang, Linbo; Khan, Mohammad Afnan; Hussain, Arif

    2010-01-01

    In our previous studies using human LNCaP xenografts and TRAMP (transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate) mice, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) resulted in a temporary cessation of prostate cancer (PCa) growth, but then tumors grew faster with more malignant behaviour. To understand whether cancer stem cells might play a role in PCa progression in these animal models, we investigated the expressions of stem cell-related markers in tumors at different time points after ADT. In both animal models, enhanced expressions of stem cell markers were observed in tumors of castrated mice, as compared to non-castrated controls. This increased cell population that expressed stem cell markers is designated as stem-like cells (SLC) in this article. We also observed that the SLC peaked at relatively early time points after ADT, before tumors resumed their growth. These results suggest that the SLC population may play a role in tumor re-growth and disease progression, and that targeting the SLC at their peak-expression time point may prevent tumor recurrence following ADT. PMID:20126580

  13. Enlarged prostate

    MedlinePlus

    BPH; Benign prostatic hyperplasia (hypertrophy); Prostate - enlarged ... The actual cause of prostate enlargement is unknown. Factors linked to aging and changes in the cells of the testicles may have a role in the growth ...

  14. Prostate Cancer Prevention by Sulforaphane, a Novel Dietary Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    prostate cells (PrEC), benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH-1), early stage LNCaP cells ( androgen -dependent prostate cancer cells) and late...stage PC3 ( androgen -independent carcinoma). Treatment with 15 μM SFN caused more that 50% of cell death in prostate cancerous cells, while only...mediates epigenetic alterations and suppresses prostate cancer development in a novel APC-mutant mouse model of prostate carcinogenesis. We noticed

  15. Prostatitis: Inflammation of the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... walnut-shaped gland that is part of the male reproductive system. The main function of the prostate is to ... walnut-shaped gland that is part of the male reproductive system. What causes prostatitis? The causes of prostatitis differ ...

  16. Trop-2 is up-regulated in invasive prostate cancer and displaces FAK from focal contacts

    PubMed Central

    Trerotola, Marco; Ganguly, Kirat K.; Fazli, Ladan; Fedele, Carmine; Lu, Huimin; Dutta, Anindita; Liu, Qin; De Angelis, Tiziana; Riddell, Luke W.; Riobo, Natalia A.; Gleave, Martin E.; Zoubeidi, Amina; Pestell, Richard G.; Altieri, Dario C.; Languino, Lucia R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we show that the transmembrane glycoprotein Trop-2 is up-regulated in human prostate cancer (PCa) with extracapsular extension (stages pT3/pT4) as compared to organ-confined (stage pT2) PCa. Consistent with this evidence, Trop-2 expression is found to be increased in metastatic prostate tumors of Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate mice and to strongly correlate with α5β1 integrin levels. Using PCa cells, we show that Trop-2 specifically associates with the α5 integrin subunit, as binding to α3 is not observed, and that Trop-2 displaces focal adhesion kinase from focal contacts. In support of the role of Trop-2 as a promoter of PCa metastatic phenotype, we observe high expression of this molecule in exosomes purified from Trop-2-positive PCa cells. These vesicles are then found to promote migration of Trop-2-negative PCa cells on fibronectin, an α5β1 integrin/focal adhesion kinase substrate, thus suggesting that the biological function of Trop-2 may be propagated to recipient cells. In summary, our findings show that Trop-2 promotes an α5β1 integrin-dependent pro-metastatic signaling pathway in PCa cells and that the altered expression of Trop-2 may be utilized for early identification of capsule-invading PCa. PMID:26015409

  17. Phenotype-Specific CpG Island Methylation Events in a Murine Model of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Camoriano, Marta; Morey Kinney, Shannon R.; Moser, Michael T.; Foster, Barbara A.; Mohler, James L.; Trump, Donald L.; Karpf, Adam R.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation plays a significant role in nearly all human cancers and may contribute to disease progression to advanced phenotypes. Study of advanced prostate cancer phenotypes in the human disease is hampered by limited availability of tissues. We therefore took advantage of the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model to study whether three different phenotypes of TRAMP tumors (PRIM, late-stage primary tumors; AIP, androgen-independent primary tumors; and MET, metastases) displayed specific patterns of CpG island hypermethylation using Restriction Landmark Genomic Scanning. Each tumor phenotype displayed numerous hypermethylation events, with the most homogeneous methylation pattern in AIP and the most heterogeneous pattern in MET. Several loci displayed a phenotype-specific methylation pattern; the most striking pattern being loci methylated at high frequency in PRIM and AIP but rarely in MET. Examination of the mRNA expression of three genes, BC058385, Goosecoid, and Neurexin 2, which exhibited nonpromoter methylation, revealed increased expression associated with downstream methylation. Only methylated samples showed mRNA expression, in which tumor phenotype was a key factor determining the level of expression. The CpG island in the human orthologue of BC058385 was methylated in human AIP but not in primary androgen-stimulated prostate cancer or benign prostate. The clinical data show a proof-of-principle that the TRAMP model can be used to identify targets of aberrant CpG island methylation relevant to human disease. In conclusion, phenotype-specific hypermethylation events were associated with the overexpression of different genes and may provide new markers of prostate tumorigenesis. PMID:18519676

  18. Inhibition of prostate carcinogenesis in TRAMP mice by oral infusion of green tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Hastak, K; Ahmad, N; Lewin, J S; Mukhtar, H

    2001-08-28

    Development of effective chemopreventive agents against prostate cancer (CaP) for humans requires conclusive evidence of their efficacy in animal models that closely emulates human disease. The autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model, which spontaneously develops metastatic CaP, is one such model that mimics progressive forms of human disease. Employing male TRAMP mice, we show that oral infusion of a polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea (GTP) at a human achievable dose (equivalent to six cups of green tea per day) significantly inhibits CaP development and increases survival in these mice. In two separate experiments, the cumulative incidence of palpable tumors at 32 weeks of age in 20 untreated mice was 100% (20 of 20). In these mice, 95% (19 of 20), 65% (13 of 20), 40% (8 of 20), and 25% (5 of 20) of the animals exhibited distant site metastases to lymph nodes, lungs, liver, and bone, respectively. However, 0.1% GTP (wt/vol) provided as the sole source of drinking fluid to TRAMP mice from 8 to 32 weeks of age resulted in (i) significant delay in primary tumor incidence and tumor burden as assessed sequentially by MRI, (ii) significant decrease in prostate (64%) and genitourinary (GU) (72%) weight, (iii) significant inhibition in serum insulin-like growth factor-I and restoration of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 levels, and (iv) marked reduction in the protein expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the prostate compared with water-fed TRAMP mice. The striking observation of this study was that GTP infusion resulted in almost complete inhibition of distant site metastases. Furthermore, GTP consumption caused significant apoptosis of CaP cells, which possibly resulted in reduced dissemination of cancer cells, thereby causing inhibition of prostate cancer development, progression, and metastasis of CaP to distant organ sites.

  19. Villoglandular papillary adenocarcinoma: case report

    PubMed Central

    Salek, Ghizlane; Lalya, Issam; Rahali, Driss Moussaoui; Dehayni, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Villoglandular papillary adenocarcinoma (VPA) is a very rare subtype of adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix, but a well-recognized variant of cervical adenocarcinoma with a favorable prognosis and generally occurring in women of child-bearing age. Herein, we report a case of VPA diagnosed and managed successfully with conservative measure. This management is particularly desirable in young women to preserve reproductive capability. PMID:28293348

  20. Discontinuous unilateral involvement of 12 part core biopsies by adenocarcinoma predicts bilateral involvement of subsequent radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Lowenthal, Brett Matthew; Liao, Xiaoyan; Wen, Fang; Bagherzadeh, Nader; Mahooti, Sepi

    2016-08-01

    At our institution, percent tumor burden in prostate core biopsies is quantified using variations of one of two methods. Measurement by the Aggregate method reports only adenocarcinoma and omits intervening stroma and benign prostatic glands while the Discontinuous method includes the intervening stroma and benign glands between distinct foci of adenocarcinoma. In this study, we selected cases with 12-part core biopsies that were followed by a radical prostatectomy within two years. Interestingly, we found that when adenocarcinoma involved prostate 12-part core biopsies and subsequent resection unilaterally, there is no significant difference in absolute percentage of tumor using either measuring method (P = 0.4). In contrast, when adenocarcinoma involved the biopsies unilaterally and subsequent prostatectomy bilaterally, the two measurement methods had a statistically significant difference in percentage scores (P = 0.002). In the study cohort, other factors including Gleason score (P = 0.88) and total number of adenocarcinoma-involved cores (P = 0.27) did not introduce any significant correlation with bilateral involvement. In this study, we found that biopsies that discontinuously and unilaterally involve half of a prostate are much more likely to involve both lobes than those that are unilateral and present in nodular aggregates.

  1. Delay of postnatal maturation sensitizes the mouse prostate to testosterone-induced pronounced hyperplasia: protective role of estrogen receptor-beta.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, Saija; Pakarainen, Tomi; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Poutanen, Matti; Mäkelä, Sari

    2007-09-01

    The role of estrogens in the etiology of prostate cancer is controversial. To demonstrate the specific effects of estrogens and androgens on the development of the prostatic epithelial hyperplasia, we used luteinizing hormone receptor knockout mice (LuRKO), which are resistant to pituitary regulation mediated by luteinizing hormone, lack postnatal androgen production, and have rudimentary accessory sex glands, the growth of which can be induced with exogenous androgen replacement. This model is thus ideal for the investigation of direct hormonal effects on the prostate. Testosterone, but not 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, replacement from 21 days of life for 8 weeks induced pronounced hyperplasia and inflammation in the prostates of LuRKO mice. Interestingly, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone combined with 17beta-estradiol did not induce hyperplasia or inflammation, and treatments with inhibitors of estrogen action, aromatase inhibitor, and ICI 182780 further exacerbated testosterone-induced hyperplastic growth. However, the activation of estrogen receptor (ER)-beta with a specific agonist, DPN [2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenol)-propionitrile], prevented the development of prostatic hyperplasia and inflammation in testosterone-treated LuRKO mice. Thus, it seems that in the presence of sufficient androgenic stimulation, it is the balance between ER-alpha- and ER-beta-mediated signaling that determines whether estrogens promote hyperplasia or protect the prostate against hyperplastic changes.

  2. Development of a Reactive Stroma Associated with Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia in EAF2 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Laura E.; Ai, Junkui; Masoodi, Khalid Z.; Wang, Yujuan; Wang, Dan; Eisermann, Kurtis; Rigatti, Lora H.; O’Malley, Katherine J.; Ma, Hei M.; Wang, Xinhui; Dar, Javid A.; Parwani, Anil V.; Simons, Brian W.; Ittman, Michael M.; Li, Luyuan; Davies, Benjamin J.; Wang, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    ELL-associated factor 2 (EAF2) is an androgen-responsive tumor suppressor frequently deleted in advanced prostate cancer that functions as a transcription elongation factor of RNA Pol II through interaction with the ELL family proteins. EAF2 knockout mice on a 129P2/OLA-C57BL/6J background developed late-onset lung adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, B-cell lymphoma and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. In order to further characterize the role of EAF2 in the development of prostatic defects, the effects of EAF2 loss were compared in different murine strains. In the current study, aged EAF2−/− mice on both the C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ backgrounds exhibited mPIN lesions as previously reported on a 129P2/OLA-C57BL/6J background. In contrast to the 129P2/OLA-C57BL/6J mixed genetic background, the mPIN lesions in C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ EAF2−/− mice were associated with stromal defects characteristic of a reactive stroma and a statistically significant increase in prostate microvessel density. Stromal inflammation and increased microvessel density was evident in EAF2-deficient mice on a pure C57BL/6J background at an early age and preceded the development of the histologic epithelial hyperplasia and neoplasia found in the prostates of older EAF2−/− animals. Mice deficient in EAF2 had an increased recovery rate and a decreased overall response to the effects of androgen deprivation. EAF2 expression in human cancer was significantly down-regulated and microvessel density was significantly increased compared to matched normal prostate tissue; furthermore EAF2 expression was negatively correlated with microvessel density. These results suggest that the EAF2 knockout mouse on the C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ genetic backgrounds provides a model of PIN lesions associated with an altered prostate microvasculature and reactive stromal compartment corresponding to that reported in human prostate tumors. PMID:24260246

  3. Prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  4. Expression of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin receptors claudin-3 and claudin-4 in prostate cancer epithelium.

    PubMed

    Long, H; Crean, C D; Lee, W H; Cummings, O W; Gabig, T G

    2001-11-01

    The mRNA for Rvp.1 (rat ventral prostate) increases in abundance before gland involution after androgen deprivation. Rvp.1 is homologous to CPE-R, the high-affinity intestinal epithelial receptor for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), and is sufficient to mediate CPE binding and trigger subsequent toxin-mediated cytolysis. Rvp.1 (claudin-3) and CPE-R (claudin-4) are members of a larger family of transmembrane tissue-specific claudin proteins that are essential components of intercellular tight junction structures regulating paracellular ion flux. However, claudin-3 and claudin-4 are the only family members capable of mediating CPE binding and cytolysis. The present study was designed to study the expression of claudin-3 and claudin-4 in human prostate tissue as potential targets for CPE toxin-mediated therapy for prostate cancer. On human multiple-tissue Northern blot analysis, mRNAs for both claudin-3 and claudin-4 were expressed at high levels in prostate tissue. In normal prostate tissue, expression of claudin-3 was localized exclusively within acinar epithelial cells by in situ mRNA hybridization. Compared with expression within prostate epithelial cells in surrounding normal glandular tissue, expression of claudin-3 mRNA remained high in the epithelium of prostate adenocarcinoma (10 of 10) and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (five of five). Prostate adenocarcinoma cells metastatic to bone were obtained from a patient with disease progression during antiandrogen therapy. These metastatic cells were prostate-specific antigen-positive by immunohistochemical staining and also expressed functional CPE receptors as measured by sensitivity to CPE-induced cell lysis. The persistent high level of claudin-3 expression in prostate adenocarcinoma and functional cytotoxicity of CPE in metastatic androgen-independent prostate adenocarcinoma suggests a new potential therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer.

  5. Role of Nonreceptor Protein Kinase Ack1 in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    initiation and progression of prostate cancer in vivo. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, transgenic mice , mouse model 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...These transgenic mice were generated in the laboratory of our collaborator Dr. Terry Van Dyke and are a mouse model of prostate cancer in which T121...reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching

  6. [High-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia: state-of-the-art].

    PubMed

    Allina, D O; Andreeva, Iu Iu; Zavalishina, L E; Kekeeva, T V; Frank, G A

    2015-01-01

    According to current views, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia is the most likely precursor of prostate adenocarcinoma. This review gives the latest data of genetic, proteomic, and morphological analyses of this neoplasia and touches upon the probems that might arise when searching for new markers for differential diagnosis and prognosis estimation.

  7. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and chemoprevention

  8. Gene expression signatures associated with suppression of TRAMP prostate carcinogenesis by a kavalactone-rich Kava fraction.

    PubMed

    Tang, Su-Ni; Zhang, Jinhui; Jiang, Peixin; Datta, Palika; Leitzman, Pablo; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Jiang, Cheng; Xing, Chengguo; Lü, Junxuan

    2016-12-01

    Kava (Piper methysticum Forster) extract and its major kavalactones have been shown to block chemically induced lung tumor initiation in mouse models. Here we evaluated the chemopreventive effect of a kavalactone-rich Kava fraction B (KFB), free of flavokavains, on carcinogenesis in a transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model and characterized the prostate gene expression signatures. Male C57BL/6 TRAMP mice were fed AIN93M diet with or without 0.4% KFB from 8 wk of age. Mice were euthanized at 16 or 28 wk. The growth of the dorsolateral prostate (DLP) lobes in KFB-treated TRAMP mice was inhibited by 66% and 58% at the respective endpoint. Anterior and ventral prostate lobes in KFB-treated TRAMP mice were suppressed by 40% and 49% at 28 wk, respectively. KFB consumption decreased cell proliferation biomarker Ki-67 and epithelial lesion severity in TRAMP DLP, without detectable apoptosis enhancement. Real time qRT-PCR detection of mRNA from DLP at 28 wk showed decreased expression of cell cycle regulatory genes congruent with Ki-67 suppression. Microarray profiling of DLP mRNA indicated that "oncogene-like" genes related to angiogenesis and cell proliferation were suppressed by KFB but tumor suppressor, immunity, muscle/neuro, and metabolism-related genes were upregulated by KFB in both TRAMP and WT DLP. TRAMP mice fed KFB diet developed lower incidence of neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECa) (2 out of 14 mice) than those fed the basal diet (8 out of 14 mice, χ(2)  = 5.6, P < 0.025). KFB may, therefore, inhibit not only TRAMP DLP epithelial lesions involving multiple molecular pathways, but also NECa. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Differential Requirement for Src-family Tyrosine Kinases in the Initiation, Progression and Metastasis of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Irwin H.; Peresie, Jennifer; Eng, Kevin H.; Foster, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) recurrence after androgen ablation therapy (ADT) remains a significant cause of mortality in aging men. Malignant progression and metastasis are typically driven by genetic and epigenetic changes controlled by the androgen receptor (AR). However, evidence suggests that activated non-receptor tyrosine kinases, including those of the Src family (SFK), directly phosphorylate AR, thereby activating its transcriptional activity in the absence of serum androgen levels. To ascertain whether CaP progression and metastasis require SFK members an autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma (AD) of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model was crossed into Src-, Lyn- or Fyn-null backgrounds. Primary-site CaP formation was dependent on Src, to a lesser extent, Lyn, but not Fyn. Only Src−/−;TRAMP prostate tumors were marked by reactive stroma. SFK deficiency did not affect progression to neuroendocrine (NE) disease, although there were fewer new cancer cases initiating after 34 weeks in the SFK−/−;TRAMP mice compared to TRAMP controls. Fifteen to 21% of older (>33 weeks) Lyn- or Fyn-null TRAMP mice lacking primary-site tumors suffered from aggressive metastatic AD growths, compared with 3% of TRAMP mice. Taken with the data that TRAMP mice lacking Src or Lyn exhibited fewer macroscopic metastases compared to Fyn−/−;TRAMP and TRAMP controls, this suggests that SFK can either promote or suppress specific parameters of metastatic growth, possibly depending on cross-talk with primary tumors. These data identify critical, yet potentially opposing roles played by various SFKs in the initiation and metastatic potential of CaP using the TRAMP model. Implications: Genetically defined mouse models indicate a critical role for Src tyrosine kinase in prostate cancer initiation and metastatic progression. PMID:25053806

  10. The different functions and clinical significances of caveolin-1 in human adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Pin; Chen, Fuchun; Pan, Qi; Zhao, Xianda; Zhao, Chen; Cho, William Chi-Shing; Chen, Honglei

    2017-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a major structural protein of caveolae, is an integral membrane protein which plays an important role in the progression of carcinoma. However, whether Cav-1 acts as a tumor promoter or a tumor suppressor still remains controversial. For example, the tumor-promoting function of Cav-1 has been found in renal cancer, prostate cancer, tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), lung SCC and bladder SCC. In contrast, Cav-1 also plays an inhibitory role in esophagus adenocarcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma and cutaneous SCC. The role of Cav-1 is still controversial in thyroid cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric adenocarcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, breast cancer, pancreas cancer, oral SCC, laryngeal SCC, head and neck SCC, esophageal SCC and cervical SCC. Besides, it has been reported that the loss of stromal Cav-1 might predict poor prognosis in breast cancer, gastric cancer, pancreas cancer, prostate cancer, oral SCC and esophageal SCC. However, the accumulation of stromal Cav-1 has been found to be promoted by the progression of tongue SCC. Taken together, Cav-1 seems playing a different role in different cancer subtypes even of the same organ, as well as acting differently in the same cancer subtype of different organs. Thus, we hereby explore the functions of Cav-1 in human adenocarcinoma and SCC from the perspective of clinical significances and pathogenesis. We envision that novel targets may come with the further investigation of Cav-1 in carcinogenesis. PMID:28243118

  11. The Function of Neuroendocrine Cells in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    common malignancy in men and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths (Cooperberg et al. 2004). Normal prostate epithelium contains luminal...www.endocrinology-journals.org including glandular formation and expression of androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA...adenocarcinoma, which usually shows glandular formation, SCNC has a solid, sheet-like growth pattern but no glandular formation. Tumor cells are small with

  12. The Aged Microenvironment Influences Prostate Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    of the ECM which could further affect tumor progression and spread. Our observation that the collagenous stroma in the aged prostate is highly...cancer. Effect of Ccl8 and ApoD on mouse prostate tumor cell growth To determine the effect of ApoD and Ccl8, (candidate factors identified in task 1...prostate epithelial cell growth, I used recombinant CCL8 and APOD. Mouse TRAMP C2 and MycCaP tumor cells were seeded in DMEM + 5% FBS containing

  13. Early Growth Inhibition Is Followed by Increased Metastatic Disease with Vitamin D (Calcitriol) Treatment in the TRAMP Model of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karasik, Ellen; Gillard, Bryan; Moser, Michael T.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.; Foster, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin D3, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) has antiproliferative effects in non-aggressive prostate cancer, however, its effects in more aggressive model systems are still unclear. In these studies, effects of calcitriol and a less-calcemic vitamin D analog, QW-1624F2-2 (QW), were tested in vivo, using the aggressive autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. To study prevention of androgen-stimulated prostate cancer, vehicle, calcitriol (20 µg/kg), or QW (50 µg/kg) were administered to 4 week-old TRAMP mice intraperitoneal (i.p.) 3×/week on a MWF schedule for 14 weeks. Calcitriol and QW slowed progression of prostate cancer as indicated by reduced urogenital tract (p = 0.0022, calcitriol; p = 0.0009, QW) and prostate weights (p = 0.0178, calcitriol; p = 0.0086, QW). However, only calcitriol increased expression of the pro-differentiation marker, cadherin 1 (p = 0.0086), and reduced tumor proliferation (p = 0.0467). By contrast, neither vitamin D analog had any effect on castration resistant prostate cancer in mice treated pre- or post-castration. Interestingly, although vitamin D showed inhibitory activity against primary tumors in hormone-intact mice, distant organ metastases seemed to be enhanced following treatment (p = 0.0823). Therefore, TRAMP mice were treated long-term with calcitriol to further examine effects on metastasis. Calcitriol significantly increased the number of distant organ metastases when mice were treated from 4 weeks-of-age until development of palpable tumors (20–25 weeks-of-age)(p = 0.0003). Overall, data suggest that early intervention with vitamin D in TRAMP slowed androgen-stimulated tumor progression, but prolonged treatment resulted in development of a resistant and more aggressive disease associated with increased distant organ metastasis. PMID:24586868

  14. Biochemical characterization of riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tanya; Ouhtit, Allal; Gaur, Rajiv; Fernando, Augusta; Schwarzenberger, Paul; Su, Joseph; Ismail, Mohamed F; El-Sayyad, Hassan I; Karande, Anjali; Elmageed, Zakaria Abd; Rao, Prakash; Raj, Madhwa

    2009-01-01

    Riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) is a growth- and development-specific protein. Here, we characterized the expression of this protein in prostate cancer by polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against chicken RCP. RCP was localized to both androgen-dependent and independent prostate cancer cell lines. Compared to controls, RCP was over-expressed in all 45 prostate adenocarcinomas, irrespective of the Gleason's score or the stage of the disease. The identified RCP had a molecular weight of 38 kDa, similar to RCP purified from chicken. Presence of this protein was also confirmed by siRNA inhibition analysis. Antibodies to chicken RCP inhibited incorporation of tritiated thymidine into DNA and prevented riboflavin uptake in PC3 prostate cancer cells, suggesting a critical function of this protein in prostate cancer cell growth. These data suggest that RCP can be used as a tumor biomarker in prostate cancer.

  15. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  16. Prostatitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... through sexual contact can cause prostatitis. These include chlamydia and gonorrhea . Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are more ... 2012:chap 11. Read More Bladder outlet obstruction Chlamydia Enlarged prostate Epididymitis Urethritis Urinary tract infection - adults ...

  17. Prostate brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... minutes or more, depending on the type of therapy you have. Before the procedure, you will be ...

  18. Pioglitazone, a Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Agonist, Suppresses Rat Prostate Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shugo; Mori, Yukiko; Nagano, Aya; Naiki-Ito, Aya; Kato, Hiroyuki; Nagayasu, Yuko; Kobayashi, Mizuho; Kuno, Toshiya; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Pioglitazone (PGZ), a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist, which is known as a type 2 diabetes drug, inhibits cell proliferation in various cancer cell lines, including prostate carcinomas. This study focused on the effect of PGZ on prostate carcinogenesis using a transgenic rat for an adenocarcinoma of prostate (TRAP) model. Adenocarcinoma lesions as a percentage of overall lesions in the ventral prostate were significantly reduced by PGZ treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The number of adenocarcinomas per given area in the ventral prostate was also significantly reduced by PGZ treatment. The Ki67 labeling index in the ventral prostate was also significantly reduced by PGZ. Decreased cyclin D1 expression in addition to the inactivation of both p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)κB were detected in PGZ-treated TRAP rat groups. In LNCaP, a human androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell line, PGZ also inhibited cyclin D1 expression and the activation of both p38 MAPK and NFκB. The suppression of cultured cell growth was mainly regulated by the NFκB pathway as detected using specific inhibitors in both LNCaP and PC3, a human androgen-independent prostate cancer cell line. These data suggest that PGZ possesses a chemopreventive potential for prostate cancer. PMID:27973395

  19. Long-Term Results of an RTOG Phase II Trial (00-19) of External-Beam Radiation Therapy Combined With Permanent Source Brachytherapy for Intermediate-Risk Clinically Localized Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Yan, Yan; Lee, W. Robert; Gillin, Michael; Firat, Selim; Baikadi, Madhava; Crook, Juanita; Kuettel, Michael; Morton, Gerald; Sandler, Howard

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: External-beam radiation therapy combined with low-doserate permanent brachytherapy are commonly used to treat men with localized prostate cancer. This Phase II trial was performed to document late gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity as well as biochemical control for this treatment in a multi-institutional cooperative group setting. This report defines the long-term results of this trial. Methods and Materials: All eligible patients received external-beam radiation (45 Gy in 25 fractions) followed 2-6 weeks later by a permanent iodine 125 implant of 108 Gy. Late toxicity was defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late radiation morbidity scoring scheme. Biochemical control was defined by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus definition and the ASTRO Phoenix definition. Results: One hundred thirty-eight patients were enrolled from 20 institutions, and 131 were eligible. Median follow-up (living patients) was 8.2 years (range, 2.7-9.3 years). The 8-year estimate of late grade >3 genitourinary and/or gastrointestinal toxicity was 15%. The most common grade >3 toxicities were urinary frequency, dysuria, and proctitis. There were two grade 4 toxicities, both bladder necrosis, and no grade 5 toxicities. In addition, 42% of patients complained of grade 3 impotence (no erections) at 8 years. The 8-year estimate of biochemical failure was 18% and 21% by the Phoenix and ASTRO consensus definitions, respectively. Conclusion: Biochemical control for this treatment seems durable with 8 years of follow-up and is similar to high-dose external beam radiation alone or brachytherapy alone. Late toxicity in this multi-institutional trial is higher than reports from similar cohorts of patients treated with high-dose external-beam radiation alone or permanent low-doserate brachytherapy alone, perhaps suggesting further attention to strategies that limit doses to

  20. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from ... and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It ...

  1. Targeting Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Acidic Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Roland, Christina L.; Deng, Defeng; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Moshnikova, Anna; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Logsdon, Craig D.

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the USA, accounting for ~40,000 deaths annually. The dismal prognosis for PDAC is largely due to its late diagnosis. Currently, the most sensitive diagnosis of PDAC requires invasive procedures, such as endoscopic ultrasonography, which has inherent risks and accuracy that is highly operator dependent. Here we took advantage of a general characteristic of solid tumors, the acidic microenvironment that is generated as a by-product of metabolism, to develop a novel approach of using pH (Low) Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs) for imaging of PDAC. We show that fluorescently labeled pHLIPs can localize and specifically detect PDAC in human xenografts as well as PDAC and PanIN lesions in genetically engineered mouse models. This novel approach may improve detection, differential diagnosis and staging of PDAC.

  2. Automated Analysis of PIN-4 Stained Prostate Needle Biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabata, Bikash; Babenko, Boris; Monroe, Robert; Srinivas, Chukka

    Prostate Needle biopsies are stained with the PIN-4 marker cocktail to help the pathologist distinguish between HGPIN and adenocarcinoma. The correct interpretation of multiple IHC markers can be challenging. Therefore we propose the use of computer aided diagnosis algorithms for the identification and classification of glands in a whole slide image of prostate needle biopsy. The paper presents the different issues related to the automated analysis of prostate needle biopsies and the approach taken by BioImagene in its first generation algorithms.

  3. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Bey, P; Beckendorf, V; Stinès, J

    2001-10-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extracapsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk.

  4. Deregulated Wnt Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    transgene. The entire transgene will be “knocked-in” to the ROSA locus via homologous recombination in mouse ES cells. The resulting “knock-in” mice ...at 25 mg/kg mouse body weight. Ten minutes after injection, mice were imaged with an IVIS Imaging System™ (Xenogen) with continuous isoflurane...promote prostate cancer in the mouse . Furthermore, an increase in the frequency or size of osteoblastic bone metastases in bigenic mice compared to age

  5. Cryptococcal prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Hinchey, W W; Someren, A

    1981-02-01

    A case of granulomatous prostatitis due to Cryptococcus neoformans is reported. The patient, who had a history of diabetes mellitus and chronic active hepatitis, had symptoms of prostatic hypertrophy. Tissue obtained from surgery showed granulomatous prostatitis, and a cryptococcal organism was identified by special stains. Postoperative cultures grew Cryptococcus neoformans, and the patient was treated successfully with surgery and a short course of amphotericin B. After nine months of follow-up, there is no evidence of systemic infection.

  6. Inactivation of the retinoblastoma gene yields a mouse model of malignant colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Parisi, T; Bronson, R T; Lees, J A

    2015-11-26

    The retinoblastoma gene (Rb) is mutated at significant frequency in various human epithelial tumors, including colorectal cancer, and is strongly associated with metastatic disease. However, sole inactivation of Rb in the mouse has so far failed to yield epithelial cancers. Here, we specifically inactivate Rb and/or p53 in the urogenital epithelium and the intestine. We find that the loss of both tumor suppressors is unable to yield tumors in the transitional epithelium lining the bladder, kidneys and ureters. Instead, these mice develop highly metastatic tumors of neuroendocrine, not epithelial, origin within the urogenital tract to give prostate cancer in the males and vaginal tumors in the females. Additionally, we discovered that the sole inactivation of Rb in the intestine was sufficient to induce formation of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas. These tumors closely mirror the human disease in regard to the age of onset, histological appearance, invasiveness and metastatic potential. Like most human colorectal carcinomas, our murine Rb-deficient tumors demonstrate genomic instability and they show activation of β-catenin. Deregulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is specific to the intestinal tumors, as genomic instability but not activation of β-catenin was observed in the neuroendocrine tumors. To date, attempts to generate genetically engineered mouse models of colorectal cancer tumors have yielded mostly cancer of the small intestine, which rarely occurs in humans. Our system provides the opportunity to accurately model and study colorectal cancer in the mouse via a single gene mutation.

  7. Testosterone Regulates Tight Junction Proteins and Influences Prostatic Autoimmune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jing; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Vakar-Lopez, Funda; Montgomery, Bruce; True, Larry; Nelson, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone and inflammation have been linked to the development of common age-associated diseases affecting the prostate gland including prostate cancer, prostatitis, and benign prostatic hypertrophy. We hypothesized that testosterone regulates components of prostate tight junctions which serve as a barrier to inflammation, thus providing a connection between age- and treatment-associated testosterone declines and prostatic pathology. We examined the expression and distribution of tight junction proteins in prostate biospecimens from mouse models and a clinical study of chemical castration, using transcript profiling, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. We determined that low serum testosterone is associated with reduced transcript and protein levels of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8, resulting in defective tight junction ultrastructure in benign prostate glands. Expression of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8 was negatively correlated with the mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate caused by testosterone deprivation. Testosterone suppression also induced an auto-immune humoral response directed toward prostatic proteins. Testosterone supplementation in castrate mice resulted in re-expression of tight junction components in prostate epithelium and significantly reduced prostate inflammatory cell numbers. These data demonstrate that tight junction architecture in the prostate is related to changes in serum testosterone levels, and identify an androgen-regulated mechanism that potentially contributes to the development of prostate inflammation and consequent pathology. PMID:21761342

  8. A Preliminary Analysis of Calcifying Particles in the Serum and Prostates of Patients with Prostatic Inflammation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Carlson, Grant; Kajander, E. Olavi; Warmflash, David; Taylor, Karen; Ayala, Gustavo; Shoskes, Daniel; Everett, Meg; Feedback, Dan; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    2006-01-01

    Chronic diseases of the prostate such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) & chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) have associated findings of chronic inflammation, despite a lack of causal relationship. Numerous attempts to define an infectious agent responsible for the clinical findings have been inconsistent. The possibility of an infectious agent, that has not been uncovered with routine culturing methods, forms the basis for this study. Serum from 940 healthy Finnish men were compared with serum from 40 Crohn's, 40 path dx prostatitis, & 40 with path dx carcinoma, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA), to detect antigens specific to Nanobacteria(NB) utilizing monoclonal antibodies (Ab) 5/3 and 8D10. This ELISA has not been validated for detecting NB-associated with clinical prostatic disease, yet cross-reactivity with other bacterial species is low. Immunohistochemistry was performed on de-paraffinized prostatic tissue slides, de-calcified with EDTA and stained with the DAKO Catalyzed Signal Amplification kit, employing 8D10 as the primary (target/antigen-detecting) Ab. The mean (plus or minus SD) & median concentrations of NB antigen (U/50 L) were 379.59 (plus or minus 219.28) & 640.00 for patients with prostatitis (BPH) vs 3.31 (plus or minus 3.55) & 2.94 for prostate adenocarcinoma, 1.88 (plus or minus 2.94) & 0.80 for Crohn's disease, & 7.43 (plus or minus 25.57) & 0.00 for patients with no clinical prostatic disease. Unpaired t-tests revealed statistically significant differences between the prostatitis (BPH) sera & each of the other groups with p less than 0.005, but no differences between the other groups themselves. Preliminary studies with immunohistochemistry & 3-D confocal microscopy reveal 16/24 tissue sections + for NB Ag in BPH vs. only 2/22 tissue sections with prostate cancer. The preliminary findings of this serum screening study suggest that NB antigen may be commonly found in the serum of patients with the pathological diagnosis

  9. Upgrading prostate cancer following proton beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Logan, Jennifer K; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Merino, Maria J; Pinto, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Pre- and post-radiation therapy (RT) effects on prostate histology have not been rigorously studied, but there appears to be a correlation between escalating radiation dosage and increasing post-RT histologic changes. Despite this dose-response relationship, radiation-induced changes may be heterogenous among different patients and even within a single tumor. When assessing residual tumor it is important to understand biopsy evaluation in the post-RT setting. We present the case of a poorly differentiated prostate adenocarcinoma following proton beam RT in a 45-year-old man with pre-RT Gleason 4 + 3 = 7 disease diagnosed in the setting of an elevated serum prostate-specific antigen level.

  10. Prostatic aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Abbas, F; Kamal, M K; Talati, J

    1995-03-01

    Prostatic aspergillosis is rare with only 3 cases reported previously. We report a case of localized invasive aspergillosis of the prostate in a nonimmunocompromised patient with chronic urinary retention and recurrent urinary tract infections. Transurethral resection followed by open prostatectomy was performed for massive prostatomegaly. No systemic antifungal therapy was required for cure. The literature is reviewed, and diagnostic and management options are discussed.

  11. SMAD-Mediated Signaling During Prostate Growth and Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    prostatic hyperplasia and in prostatic carcinoma. This transgenic mouse model is a unique approach to examine gain-of-function outcomes on the developing...cell proliferation then increased levels of Smad 2 should be linked to enlargement of the organ and replicate events that are observed in benign

  12. CTLA-4 Blockade-Based Immunotherapy in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    V, Bok R, Small EJ. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics as a measure of the biologic effect of granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor in...Kwon ED, Truong T, Choi EM, Greenberg NM, et al. Combination immunotherapy of primary prostate cancer in a transgenic mouse model using CTLA-4 blockade

  13. Notch signaling in prostate cancer: refining a therapeutic opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qingtai; Xin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Summary Notch is an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway that plays a critical role in specifying cell fate and regulating tissue homeostasis and carcinogenesis. Studies using organ cultures and genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that Notch signaling regulates prostate development and homeostasis. However, the role of the Notch signaling pathway in prostate cancer remains inconclusive. Many published studies have documented consistent deregulation of major Notch signaling components in human prostate cancer cell lines, mouse models for prostate cancers, and human prostate cancer specimens at both the mRNA and the protein levels. However, functional studies in human cancer cells by modulation of Notch pathway elements suggest both tumor suppressive and oncogenic roles of Notch. These controversies may originate from our inadequate understanding of the regulation of Notch signaling under versatile genetic contexts, and reflect the multifaceted and pleiotropic roles of Notch in regulating different aspects of prostate cancer cell biology, such as proliferation, metastasis, and chemo-resistance. Future comprehensive studies using various mouse models for prostate cancer may help clarify the role of Notch signaling in prostate cancer and provide a solid basis for determining whether and how Notch should be employed as a therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26521657

  14. Prostate cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate cancer screening - PSA; Prostate cancer screening - digital rectal exam; Prostate cancer screening - DRE ... level of PSA could mean you have prostate cancer. But other conditions can also cause a high ...

  15. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . The prostate is just below the bladder (the ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  16. [Endoscopic diagnosis of Barrett's adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Yoshio, H; Takashi, Y; Mitsuyo, H; Nobuhiko, Y; Tatsurou, T; Kazuhiko, S; Yoko, H; Shigemasa, I; Hisanaga, M; Osamu, H; Katsuyoshi, S; Seishi, U; Matsushita, H; Masahiko, T

    1999-03-01

    Biopsy specimens can reveal that esophageal cancer is an adenocarcinoma but they cannot show that its origin is Barrett's mucosa. Therefore we must show during endoscopy that the tumor exists in Barrett's mucosa. We reported that Barrett's esophagus could be clearly diagnosed at endoscopy as the columnar mucosa lying on the longitudinal vessels in the lower esophagus. We define Barrett's esophagus as "the columnar mucosa in the esophagus which exists continuously more than 2 cm in circumference from the stomach." Short-segment Barrett's esophagus (SSBE) is "the columnar mucosa which exists in the esophagus continuously from the stomach but its length has a part under 2 cm in length." Endoscopically Barrett's adenocarcinoma is visualized as a lesion with a reddish and uneven mucosal surface. Barrett's adenocarcinomas occur in the SSBE as well. Endoscopic observation at periodic intervals is necessary not only for cases with Barrett's esophagus but also with SSBE. A further examination is necessary to determine the application of EMR for superficial Barrett's adenocarcinoma.

  17. Isolation and analysis of discreet human prostate cellular populations

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Douglas W.; Aaron, LaTayia; Henry, Gervaise; Franco, Omar E.; Hayward, Simon W.

    2015-01-01

    The use of lineage tracing in transgenic mouse models has revealed an abundance of subcellular phenotypes responsible for maintaining prostate homeostasis. The ability to use fresh human tissues to examine the hypotheses generated by these mouse experiments has been greatly enhanced by technical advances in tissue processing, flow cytometry and cell culture. We describe in detail the optimization of protocols for each of these areas to facilitate research on solving human prostate diseases through the analysis of human tissue. PMID:26546040

  18. Activation of nuclear factor-κB in human prostate carcinogenesis and association to biochemical relapse

    PubMed Central

    Domingo-Domenech, J; Mellado, B; Ferrer, B; Truan, D; Codony-Servat, J; Sauleda, S; Alcover, J; Campo, E; Gascon, P; Rovira, A; Ross, J S; Fernández, P L; Albanell, J

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB/p65 regulates the transcription of a wide variety of genes involved in cell survival, invasion and metastasis. We characterised by immunohistochemistry the expression of NF-κB/p65 protein in six histologically normal prostate, 13 high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and 86 prostate adenocarcinoma specimens. Nuclear localisation of p65 was used as a measure of NF-κB active state. Nuclear localisation of NF-κB was only seen in scattered basal cells in normal prostate glands. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasias exhibited diffuse and strong cytoplasmic staining but no nuclear staining. In prostate adenocarcinomas, cytoplasmic NF-κB was detected in 57 (66.3%) specimens, and nuclear NF-κB (activated) in 47 (54.7%). Nuclear and cytoplasmic NF-κB staining was not correlated (P=0.19). By univariate analysis, nuclear localisation of NF-κB was associated with biochemical relapse (P=0.0009; log-rank test) while cytoplasmic expression did not. On multivariate analysis, serum preoperative prostate specific antigen (P=0.02), Gleason score (P=0.03) and nuclear NF-κB (P=0.002) were independent predictors of biochemical relapse. These results provide novel evidence for NF-κB/p65 nuclear translocation in the transition from PIN to prostate cancer. Our findings also indicate that nuclear localisation of NF-κB is an independent prognostic factor of biochemical relapse in prostate cancer. PMID:16278667

  19. Influence of Anti-Mouse Interferon Serum on the Growth and Metastasis of Tumor Cells Persistently Infected with Virus and of Human Prostatic Tumors in Athymic Nude Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Lola M.; Minato, Nagahiro; Gresser, Ion; Holland, John; Kadish, Anna; Bloom, Barry R.

    1981-02-01

    Baby hamster kidney or HeLa cells form tumors in 100% of athymic nude mice. When such cells are persistently infected (PI) with RNA viruses, such as mumps or measles virus, the tumor cells either fail to grow or form circumscribed benign nodules. Neither the parental nor the virus PI tumor cells form invasive or metastatic lesions in nude mice. Previous studies have indicated a correlation between the susceptibility of virus-PI tumor cells in vitro and the cytolytic activity of natural killer (NK) cells and their failure to grow in vivo. Because interferon (IF) is the principal regulatory molecule governing the differentiation of NK cells, it was possible to test the relevance of the IF--NK cell system in vivo to restriction of tumor growth by treatment of nude mice with anti-IF globulin. This treatment was shown to reduce both IF production and NK activity in spleen cells. Both parental and virus-PI tumor cells grew and formed larger tumors in nude mice treated with anti-IF globulin than in control nude mice. The viral-PI tumor cells and the uninfected parental cells formed tumors in treated mice that were highly invasive and often metastatic. Some human tumor types have been notoriously difficult to establish as tumor lines in nude mice (e.g., primary human prostatic carcinomas). When transplanted into nude mice treated either with anti-IF globulin or anti-lymphocyte serum, two prostatic carcinomas grew and produced neoplasms with local invasiveness and some metastases. The results are consistent with the view that interferon may be important in restricting the growth, invasiveness, and metastases of tumor cells by acting indirectly through components of the immune system, such as NK cells.

  20. SOX4 is essential for prostate tumorigenesis initiated by PTEN ablation | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Understanding remains incomplete of the mechanisms underlying initiation and progression of prostate cancer, the most commonly diagnosed cancer in American men. The transcription factor SOX4 is overexpressed in many human cancers, including prostate cancer, suggesting it may participate in prostate tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated this possibility by genetically deleting Sox4 in a mouse model of prostate cancer initiated by loss of the tumor suppressor Pten.

  1. Cooperativity Between Oncogenic PKC Epsilon and Pten Loss in Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    cooperate for the development of prostate cancer. We recapitulated these data using genetically engineered mouse models that were developed in our...one of the most common genetic alterations in human prostate cancer and PKCε overexpression is also found in most prostate tumors, we anticipate...from prostate epithelial cells isolated from Pten knock-out mice, and engineered to overexpress PKCε (CaP2-PKCε and CaP8-PKCε). Both cell lines behave

  2. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ): National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www. ...

  3. Targeting adhesion signaling in KRAS, LKB1 mutant lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-Ross, Melissa; Konen, Jessica; Koo, Junghui; Shupe, John; Robinson, Brian S; Wiles, Walter Guy; Huang, Chunzi; Martin, W David; Behera, Madhusmita; Smith, Geoffrey H; Hill, Charles E; Rossi, Michael R; Sica, Gabriel L; Rupji, Manali; Chen, Zhengjia; Kowalski, Jeanne; Kasinski, Andrea L; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Fu, Haian; Khuri, Fadlo R; Zhou, Wei; Marcus, Adam I

    2017-03-09

    Loss of LKB1 activity is prevalent in KRAS mutant lung adenocarcinoma and promotes aggressive and treatment-resistant tumors. Previous studies have shown that LKB1 is a negative regulator of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), but in vivo studies testing the efficacy of FAK inhibition in LKB1 mutant cancers are lacking. Here, we took a pharmacologic approach to show that FAK inhibition is an effective early-treatment strategy for this high-risk molecular subtype. We established a lenti-Cre-induced Kras and Lkb1 mutant genetically engineered mouse model (KLLenti) that develops 100% lung adenocarcinoma and showed that high spatiotemporal FAK activation occurs in collective invasive cells that are surrounded by high levels of collagen. Modeling invasion in 3D, loss of Lkb1, but not p53, was sufficient to drive collective invasion and collagen alignment that was highly sensitive to FAK inhibition. Treatment of early, stage-matched KLLenti tumors with FAK inhibitor monotherapy resulted in a striking effect on tumor progression, invasion, and tumor-associated collagen. Chronic treatment extended survival and impeded local lymph node spread. Lastly, we identified focally upregulated FAK and collagen-associated collective invasion in KRAS and LKB1 comutated human lung adenocarcinoma patients. Our results suggest that patients with LKB1 mutant tumors should be stratified for early treatment with FAK inhibitors.

  4. Targeting adhesion signaling in KRAS, LKB1 mutant lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Konen, Jessica; Koo, Junghui; Robinson, Brian S.; Wiles, Walter Guy; Huang, Chunzi; Martin, W. David; Behera, Madhusmita; Smith, Geoffrey H.; Hill, Charles E.; Rossi, Michael R.; Sica, Gabriel L.; Rupji, Manali; Chen, Zhengjia; Kowalski, Jeanne; Kasinski, Andrea L.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Marcus, Adam I.

    2017-01-01

    Loss of LKB1 activity is prevalent in KRAS mutant lung adenocarcinoma and promotes aggressive and treatment-resistant tumors. Previous studies have shown that LKB1 is a negative regulator of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), but in vivo studies testing the efficacy of FAK inhibition in LKB1 mutant cancers are lacking. Here, we took a pharmacologic approach to show that FAK inhibition is an effective early-treatment strategy for this high-risk molecular subtype. We established a lenti-Cre–induced Kras and Lkb1 mutant genetically engineered mouse model (KLLenti) that develops 100% lung adenocarcinoma and showed that high spatiotemporal FAK activation occurs in collective invasive cells that are surrounded by high levels of collagen. Modeling invasion in 3D, loss of Lkb1, but not p53, was sufficient to drive collective invasion and collagen alignment that was highly sensitive to FAK inhibition. Treatment of early, stage-matched KLLenti tumors with FAK inhibitor monotherapy resulted in a striking effect on tumor progression, invasion, and tumor-associated collagen. Chronic treatment extended survival and impeded local lymph node spread. Lastly, we identified focally upregulated FAK and collagen-associated collective invasion in KRAS and LKB1 comutated human lung adenocarcinoma patients. Our results suggest that patients with LKB1 mutant tumors should be stratified for early treatment with FAK inhibitors. PMID:28289710

  5. Bilateral sphenoid wing metastases of prostate cancer presenting with extensive brain edema.

    PubMed

    Lindsberg, P J; Tatlisumak, T; Tienari, J; Brander, A

    1999-05-01

    A 76-year-old man insidiously developed diffuse neurological symptoms: cognitive decline, dysphagia, dysphasia and mental disturbance. Computed tomography of the cranium revealed widespread bilateral brain edema and symmetrical bilateral sphenoid wing hyperostosis. Adjacent to the hyperostosis that resembled skull base meningiomas, two separate parenchymatous temporal lobe lesions enhancing with contrast medium were observed. The patient had earlier been diagnosed to have prostatic carcinoma. Dexamethasone therapy resulted in discontinuation of the neurological symptoms. The diagnosis of metastasized adenocarcinoma of the prostate was confirmed histologically on autopsy after a sudden death from pneumonia. Intracranial metastases of prostate cancer may have a predilection site at the sphenoid wing, and can mimic a skull base meningioma. Intracranial spread of prostatic adenocarcinoma should be considered in elderly men as a treatable cause of gradual neurological deterioration, especially if cranial malignancy or hyperostosis is found.

  6. Effects of Androgen Blockade on Cognitive Function and Quality of Life in Men with Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    lower. Post-menopausal women taking estrogen and women who are hypoestrogenic from taking GnRH agonists but taking “add-back” estrogen (Sherwin...program on the effects of GnRH analogues on prostate cancer in various model systems. He has two full days of clinic each week, seeing...trial. As these are quite detailed, they will only be summarized here. • Adenocarcinoma of the prostate, with or without metastases to bone , brain

  7. Chronic Chlorpyrifos Exposure Does Not Promote Prostate Cancer in Prostate Specific PTEN Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Robert U.; Bannick, Nadine L.; Marin, Maximo J.; Robertson, Larry W.; Lynch, Charles F.; Henry, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental factors are likely to interact with genetic determinants to influence prostate cancer progression. The Agricultural Health Study has identified an association between exposure to organophosphorous pesticides including chlorpyrifos, and increased prostate cancer risk in pesticide applicators with a first-degree family history of this disease. Exploration of this potential gene-environment interaction would benefit from the development of a suitable animal model. Utilizing a previously described mouse model that is genetically predisposed to prostate cancer through a prostate-specific heterozygous PTEN deletion, termed C57/Luc/Ptenp+/−, we used bioluminescence imaging and histopathological analyses to test whether chronic exposure to chlorpyrifos in a grain-based diet for 32 weeks was able to promote prostate cancer development. Chronic exposure to chlorpyrifos in the diet did not promote prostate cancer development in C57/Luc/Ptenp+/− mice despite achieving sufficient levels to inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity in plasma. We found no significant differences in numbers of murine prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions or disease progression in chlorpyrifos versus control treated animals up to 32 weeks. The mechanistic basis of pesticide-induced prostate cancer may be complex and may involve other genetic variants, multiple genes, or nongenetic factors that might alter prostate cancer risk during pesticide exposure in agricultural workers. PMID:23758150

  8. SPRY2 loss enhances ErbB trafficking and PI3K/AKT signalling to drive human and mouse prostate carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meiling; Patel, Rachana; Ahmad, Imran; Fleming, Janis; Edwards, Joanne; McCracken, Stuart; Sahadevan, Kanagasabai; Seywright, Morag; Norman, Jim; Sansom, Owen; Leung, Hing Y

    2012-01-01

    Loss of SPRY2 and activation of receptor tyrosine kinases are common events in prostate cancer (PC). However, the molecular basis of their interaction and clinical impact remains to be fully examined. SPRY2 loss may functionally synergize with aberrant cellular signalling to drive PC and to promote treatment-resistant disease. Here, we report evidence for a positive feedback regulation of the ErbB-PI3K/AKT cascade by SPRY2 loss in in vitro as well as pre-clinical in vivo models and clinical PC. Reduction in SPRY2 expression resulted in hyper-activation of PI3K/AKT signalling to drive proliferation and invasion by enhanced internalization of EGFR/HER2 and their sustained signalling at the early endosome in a PTEN-dependent manner. This involved p38 MAPK activation by PI3K to facilitate clathrin-mediated ErbB receptor endocytosis. Finally, in vitro and in vivo inhibition of PI3K suppressed proliferation and invasion, supporting PI3K/AKT as a target for therapy particularly in patients with PTEN-haploinsufficient-, low SPRY2- and ErbB-expressing tumours. In conclusion, SPRY2 is an important tumour suppressor in PC since its loss drives the PI3K/AKT pathway via functional interaction with the ErbB system. PMID:22649008

  9. Prostate Specific or Enriched Genes as Composite Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    plays important roles in endocytosis.7 DYF-2, the C . elegans orthologue of WDR19, is involved in intraciliary/intraflagellar transport. Loss of DYF-2...chemosensation in C . elegans (35). The mouse WDR19 was shown to localize to granule structures inside of the cell at the base of cilia in the ependymal...Prostate Specific or Enriched Genes as Composite Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Biaoyang Lin, Ph.D

  10. Hepatoid Adenocarcinoma of the Urachus

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Carlos Andrés; Carrascal, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the urachus is a rare condition. We present the case of a 51-year-old female who developed abdominal pain and hematuria. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reported an urachal mass with invasion to the bladder that was resected by partial cystectomy. On light microscopy the tumor resembled liver architecture, with polygonal atypical cells in nest formation and trabecular structures. Immunochemistry was positive for alfa-fetoprotein (AFP) and serum AFP was elevated. Hepatoid adenocarcinomas have been reported in multiple organs, being most commonly found in the stomach and the ovaries. Bladder compromise has been rarely described in the literature, and it has been associated with poor prognosis, low remission rates, and early metastasis. PMID:27803830

  11. Oncocytic Adenocarcinoma of the Orbit.

    PubMed

    Harris, Gerald J; Paul, Sean; Hunt, Bryan C

    Oncocytic adenocarcinoma of the orbit is a rare tumor, with 1 case of nonlacrimal sac, nonlacrimal gland origin, and a poor outcome previously reported. An 85-year-old man with a 2-month history of left-sided epiphora, enlarging eyelid nodules, and diplopia in left gaze was found on imaging to have a poorly circumscribed, nodular mass of uniform radiodensity in the inferomedial orbit. Incisional biopsy revealed morphologic and immunohistochemical features of oncocytic adenocarcinoma with origin in the caruncle suspected, and CT of the neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no metastases or remote primary tumor source. Based on multidisciplinary consensus, orbital exenteration with adjuvant radiation therapy was performed, and there was no evidence of residual or recurrent tumor 2 years after treatment.

  12. Chronic prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome [CP/CPPS]). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for chronic bacterial prostatitis? What are the effects of treatments for chronic abacterial prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors, allopurinol, alpha-blockers, biofeedback, local injections of antimicrobial drugs, mepartricin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), oral antimicrobial drugs, pentosan polysulfate, prostatic massage, quercetin, radical prostatectomy, sitz baths, transurethral microwave thermotherapy, and transurethral resection. PMID:21736764

  13. Optimal lymphadenectomy for esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oezcelik, A

    2013-08-01

    Recently published data have shown that an extended lymphadenectomy during the en bloc esophagectomy leads to a significant increased long-term survival for esophageal adenocarcinoma. On the other hand some studies indicate that the increased survival is based on stage migration and that the surgical complication rate is increased after extended lymphadenectomy. The aim of this review was to give an overview about all aspects of an extended lymphadenectomy in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. The review of the literature shows clearly that the number of involved lymph nodes is an independent prognostic factor in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, an extended lymphadenectomy leads to an increased long-term survival. Some studies describe that 23 lymph nodes should be removed to predict survival; other studies 18 lymph nodes or 15 lymph nodes. Opponents indicate that the survival benefit is based on stage migration. The studies with a large study population have performed a Cox regression analyzes and identified the number of lymph nodes removed as an independent factor for improved survival, which means it is significant independently from other parameters. Under these circumstances is stage migration not an option to explain the survival benefit. An important difficulty is, that there is no standardized definition of an extended lymphadenectomy, which means the localization and number of removed lymph nodes differ depending from the performing centre. The controversies regarding the survival benefit of the lymphadenectomy is based on the lack of standardisation of the lymphadenectomy. The main goal of further studies should be to generate a clear definition of an extended lymphadenectomy in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  14. [Second cancer after starting treatment for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Mikata, Noriharu; Imao, Sadao; Fukasawa, Ritu

    2002-08-01

    The subjects for the present study were 270 patients with prostate cancer who underwent initial treatment at our hospital over the 14 years from 1986 to 1999. They were investigated to assess the relationship between their treatment and metachronous tumors. Sixteen patients (5.9%) developed cancer of other organs after starting treatment for prostate cancer. These metachronous tumors included gastric cancer in six patients as well as lung cancer, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, liver cancer, renal cancer, bladder cancer, skin cancer, leukemia, and mediastinal adenocarcinoma. Treatment for prostate cancer other than surgery included radiotherapy in eight patients, administration of estramustine phosphate sodium in nine patients, and LH-RH analogues in six patients. The chi-square test showed no significant difference in the incidence of metachronous cancer in relation to the presence/absence of these three therapies. The present study therefore ruled out the possible induction of other tumors by treatment for prostate cancer.

  15. Human Papilloma Virus Detection by INNOLiPA HPV in Prostate Tissue from Men of Northeast Mexico

    PubMed

    Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Ignacio Morales, Cesar V; Aragón Tovar, Anel R; Olache Jimenez, Delia; Castelán Maldonado, Edmundo; Lara Miranda, Sandra; Cortés Gutiérrez, Elva I

    2016-11-01

    Background: Prostatic adenocarcinoma by Prosate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer and the second cause of cancer-related death among men in the Western world. Human papilloma virus (HPV) may be considered as a preventable risk factor. In this study, we assessed the frequencies of HPV infection in prostatic adenocarcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) cases in Northeast Mexico. Materials and Methods: A total of 87 paraffin-embedded blocks (from 25 and 62 patients with definite diagnoses of BPH and adenocarcinoma, respectively) were selected and subjected to INNOLiPA HPV Genotyping to detect 28 high- and low-risk HPV types. The rates of infection were compared in the two studied groups. Results: INNOLiPA HPV demonstrated great sensitivity for HPV detection on paraffin-embedded tissue. Global prevalence was 14.9% (13/87). HPV infection was positive in 19.4% (12/62) of patients with adenocarcinoma and 4.0% (1/25) of patients with BPH. HPV-11, which is considered to be low risk, was more prevalent. Interestingly, one patient with BPH and six with prostate cancer showed examples considered to be high risk (HPV-18, -51, -52, and -66). Conclusion: A higher rate of HPV infection among Mexican patients with prostatic carcinoma than among those with BPH was observed. HPV infections may thus contribute to the risk of prostate cancer. Further studies are required to elucidate any roles of HPV infection in prostate disease in Mexico and the effect of prevention and treatment of HPV infection on prostatic adenocarcinoma.

  16. The essential role of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Barbara A.; Karasik, Ellen; Gillard, Bryan; Morrison, Carl; Mohler, James; Phillips, James G.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic epithelial cells secrete high levels of acetylated polyamines into the prostatic lumen. This distinctive characteristic places added strain on the connected pathways, which are forced to increase metabolite production to maintain pools. The methionine salvage pathway recycles the one-carbon unit lost to polyamine biosynthesis back to the methionine cycle, allowing for replenishment of SAM pools providing a mechanism to help mitigate metabolic stress associated with high flux through these pathways. The rate-limiting enzyme involved in this process is methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), which, although commonly deleted in many cancers, is protected in prostate cancer. We report near universal retention of MTAP expression in a panel of human prostate cancer cell lines as well as patient samples. Upon metabolic perturbation, prostate cancer cell lines upregulate MTAP and this correlates with recovery of SAM levels. Furthermore, in a mouse model of prostate cancer we find that both normal prostate and diseased prostate maintain higher SAM levels than other tissues, even under increased metabolic stress. Finally, we show that knockdown of MTAP, both genetically and pharmacologically, blocks androgen sensitive prostate cancer growth in vivo. Our findings strongly suggest that the methionine salvage pathway is a major player in homeostatic regulation of metabolite pools in prostate cancer due to their high level of flux through the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. Therefore, this pathway, and specifically the MTAP enzyme, is an attractive therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26910893

  17. Understanding and Targeting Tumor Microenvironment in Prostate Cancer to Inhibit Tumor Progression and Castration Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC), Pten, Smad4, genetically engineered mouse model, Gr-1, peptide-Fc fusion protein...KEYWORDS Prostate cancer, myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC), Pten, Smad4, genetically engineered mouse model, Gr-1, peptide-Fc fusion protein 3...which should provide a genetic method for MDSC functional evaluation. Currently, the compound mouse Ptenpc-/- Smad4pc-/- CD11b-DTR+ are still in

  18. Whole-Body and Microenvironmental Localization of Radium-223 in Naïve and Mouse Models of Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Abou, Diane S.; Ulmert, David; Doucet, Michele; Hobbs, Robert F.; Riddle, Ryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bone-metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (bmCRPC) represents a lethal stage of the most common noncutaneous cancer in men. The recent introduction of Radium-223 dichloride, a bone-seeking alpha particle (α)–emitting radiopharmaceutical, demonstrates statistically significant survival benefit and palliative effect for bmCRPC patients. Clinical results have established safety and efficacy, yet questions remain regarding pharmacodynamics and dosing for optimized patient benefit. Methods: We elucidated the biodistribution of 223Ra as well as interaction with the bone and tumor compartments in skeletally mature mice (C57Bl/6 and CD-1, n = 3–6) and metastasis models (LNCaP and PC3, n = 4). Differences in uptake were evaluated by µCT and histological investigation. Novel techniques were leveraged on whole-mount undecalcified cryosections to determine microdistribution of Radium-223. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: 223Ra uptake in the bones (>30% injected activity per gram) at 24 hours was also accompanied by non-negligible remnant activity in the kidney (2.33% ± 0.36%), intestines (5.73% ± 2.04%), and spleen (10.5% ± 5.9%) Skeletal accumulation across strains did not correspond with bone volume or surface area but instead to local blood vessel density (P = .04). Microdistribution analysis by autoradiography and α camera revealed targeting of the ossifying surfaces adjacent to the epiphyseal growth plate. In models of PCa metastasis, radioactivity does not localize directly within tumors but instead at the apposite bone surface. Osteoblastic and lytic lesions display similar intensity, which is comparable with uptake at sites of normal bone remodeling. Conclusions: Profiling the macro- and microdistribution of 223Ra in healthy and diseased models has important implications to guide precision application of this emerging α-therapy approach for bmCRPC and other bone metastastic diseases. PMID:26683407

  19. Pten Regulates Epithelial Cytodifferentiation during Prostate Development

    PubMed Central

    Lokody, Isabel B.; Francis, Jeffrey C.; Gardiner, Jennifer R.; Erler, Janine T.; Swain, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression and functional studies have indicated that the molecular programmes involved in prostate development are also active in prostate cancer. PTEN has been implicated in human prostate cancer and is frequently mutated in this disease. Here, using the Nkx3.1:Cre mouse strain and a genetic deletion approach, we investigate the role of Pten specifically in the developing mouse prostate epithelia. In contrast to its role in other developing organs, this gene is dispensable for the initial developmental processes such as budding and branching. However, as cytodifferentiation progresses, abnormal luminal cells fill the ductal lumens together with augmented epithelial proliferation. This phenotype resembles the hyperplasia seen in postnatal Pten deletion models that develop neoplasia at later stages. Consistent with this, gene expression analysis showed a number of genes affected that are shared with Pten mutant prostate cancer models, including a decrease in androgen receptor regulated genes. In depth analysis of the phenotype of these mice during development revealed that loss of Pten leads to the precocious differentiation of epithelial cells towards a luminal cell fate. This study provides novel insight into the role of Pten in prostate development as part of the process of coordinating the differentiation and proliferation of cell types in time and space to form a functional organ. PMID:26076167

  20. Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy caused by prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, Keiko; Kinoshita, Tatsuya; Nagai, Keisuke; Hongyo, Hidenari; Kishimoto, Kentaro; Inoue, Atsuo; Takamura, Manabu; Choi, Soomi

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM) is a fatal malignancy-related condition that involves rapidly progressing hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension. We report a case of PTTM caused by prostate carcinoma, which was diagnosed before autopsy in an 81-year-old man. Computed tomography showed diffuse ground-glass opacities, consolidation, and small nodules in the peripheral regions of the lung. Autopsy showed adenocarcinoma cells embolizing small pulmonary arteries with fibrocellular intimal proliferation, which was consistent with PTTM caused by prostate carcinoma. PMID:27635254

  1. [Horseshoe kidney, stone disease and prostate cancer: a case presentation].

    PubMed

    Hermida Pérez, J A; Bermejo Hernández, A; Hernández Guerra, J S; Sobenes Gutierrez, R J

    2013-01-01

    The horseshoe kidney is the most common congenital renal fusion anomalies. It occurs in 0.25% of the population, or 1 in every 400 people. It is more frequent in males (ratio 2:1). The most observed complication of horseshoe kidney is stone disease, although there may be others such as, abdominal pain, urinary infections, haematuria, hydronephrosis, trauma and tumours (most commonly associated with hypernephroma and Wilms tumour). We describe a case of a male patient with horseshoe kidney, stone disease and adenocarcinoma of the prostate. One carrier of this condition who suffered a transitional cell carcinoma of the prostate was found in a review of the literature.

  2. Microsatellite instability in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, A.L.; Wick, M.J.; Persons, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellite instability (MIN) has been documented in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as well as in sporadic forms of human cancers. Two of the genes which appear to be responsible for this particular tumor phenotype, hMSH2 and hMLH1, have now been identified. To determine the potential role of these mutator genes in prostate cancer, we have examined 95 prostate adenocarcinomas (40 paraffin embedded and 55 fresh frozen) for the presence of genetic instability at four microsatellite markers. The markers are localized to chromosome arms 5q(APC-CA1), 8p(Mfd 210Z), 15q(635/636), and 17q(p53-CA). Patients from whom paraffin embedded material was obtained were divided into short term (<3 years, n=18), and long term (>3 years, n=22) survivors. Of the 95 tumors examined, only four tumors (4%) demonstrated MIN: two tumors demonstrated MIN at 3 loci (p53-CA, APC-CA1, 635/636), one tumor demonstrated MIN at 2 loci (APC-CA1 and 635/636), and one tumor demonstrated instability at 635/636 only. All tumors exhibiting MIN had Gleason scores of {ge} 4+4. A correlation between MIN and survival was not observed. Information on family history was limited. However, of the two patients demonstrating MIN at three loci, one patient was diagnosed with a second malignancy (TCC of the ureter), but otherwise had a negative family history, while the second patient had one first degree relative with esophageal cancer. The patient demonstrating MIN at two loci had a negative family history, while the remaining patient had two first degree relatives with cancer (prostate and stomach). These results suggest that hMSH2 and hMLH1 (as reflected by the small percentage of tumors displaying MIN) do not play a prominent role in the process of prostate tumorigenesis.

  3. Stem Cells in Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    disease upon aging, specifically prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . In order to study the cell differentiation lineage associated with...specifically prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . In order to study the cell differentiation lineage associated with normal and diseased prostate

  4. Rb and p53 gene deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from irradiated and control mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1997-08-01

    This study was conducted on mouse lung adenocarcinoma tissues that were formalin-treated and paraffin-embedded 25 years ago to investigate the large gene deletions of mRb and p53 in B6CF{sub 1} male mice. A total of 80 lung tissue samples from irradiated mice and 40 lung samples from nonirradiated controls were randomly selected and examined in the mRb portion of this study. The results showed a significant (P < 0.05) higher percentage of mRb deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to 60 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses than those from mice receiving 24 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses at low doses and low dose rates; however, the percentage was not significantly different (P > 0.05) from that for spontaneous lung adenocarcinomas or lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to single-dose {gamma} irradiation at a similar total dose. mRb fragments 3 (71%) and 5 (67%), the parts of the gene that encoded the pocket binding region of Rb protein to adenovirus E1A and SV40 T-antigen, were the most frequently deleted fragments. p53 gene deletion analysis was carried out on normal lungs and lung adenocarcinomas that were initially found to bear mRb deletions. Exons 1,4,5,6, and 9 were chosen to be analyzed.

  5. Prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, D; Waxman, J

    2002-01-01

    It is a paradigm in cancer treatment that early detection and treatment improves survival. However, although screening measures lead to a higher rate of detection, for small bulk localised prostate cancer it remains unclear whether early detection and early treatment will lead to an overall decrease in mortality. The management options include surveillance, radiotherapy, and radical prostatectomy but there is no evidence base to evaluate the benefits of each approach. Advanced prostate cancer is managed by hormonal therapy. There have been major changes in treatment over the last two decades with the use of more humane treatment and developments in both chemotherapy and radiation. In this article we review the natural history and management of prostate cancer. PMID:12415080

  6. Transcriptomic Microenvironment of Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bossé, Yohan; Sazonova, Olga; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Bastien, Nathalie; Conti, Massimo; Pagé, Sylvain; Trahan, Sylvain; Couture, Christian; Joubert, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    Background: Tissues surrounding tumors are increasingly studied to understand the biology of cancer development and identify biomarkers.Methods: A unique geographic tissue sampling collection was obtained from patients that underwent curative lobectomy for stage I pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Tumor and nontumor lung samples located at 0, 2, 4, and 6 cm away from the tumor were collected. Whole-genome gene expression profiling was performed on all samples (n = 5 specimens × 12 patients = 60). Analyses were carried out to identify genes differentially expressed in the tumor compared with adjacent nontumor lung tissues at different distances from the tumor as well as to identify stable and transient genes in nontumor tissues with respect to tumor proximity.Results: The magnitude of gene expression changes between tumor and nontumor sites was similar with increasing distance from the tumor. A total of 482 up- and 843 downregulated genes were found in tumors, including 312 and 566 that were consistently differentially expressed across nontumor sites. Twenty-nine genes induced and 34 knocked-down in tumors were also identified. Tumor proximity analyses revealed 15,700 stable genes in nontumor lung tissues. Gene expression changes across nontumor sites were subtle and not statistically significant.Conclusions: This study describes the transcriptomic microenvironment of lung adenocarcinoma and adjacent nontumor lung tissues collected at standardized distances relative to the tumor.Impact: This study provides further insights about the molecular transitions that occur from normal tissue to lung adenocarcinoma and is an important step to develop biomarkers in nonmalignant lung tissues. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 389-96. ©2016 AACR.

  7. Survival Signaling in Prostate Cancer: Role of Androgen Receptor and Integrins in Regulating Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Majumder, P. K., Zhao, J. J., Mukherjee, S., Signoretti, S., Campbell, K. T., Sellers, W. R., Roberts , T. M., Loda, M. et al. (2004). Androgen- induced...differentially expressed and mislocalized in prostate adenocarcinoma. J. Pathol. 215, 118- 125. Manohar, A., Shome, S. G., Lamar, J., Stirling , L., Iyer, V

  8. [Paget's disease mimicking metastatic prostate cancer on bone scan image : a case report].

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Ken; Koie, Takuya; Yamamoto, Hayato; Okamoto, Akiko; Imai, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ohyama, Chikara

    2013-04-01

    A 61-year-old man was referred to our hospital complaining of elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (5.1 ng/ml). Histopathologic diagnosis with trans-rectal prostate biopsy specimen was adenocarcinoma, Gleason score 4+5 = 9. Bone scintigraphy revealed an abnormal uptake on left coxal bone. The patient was diagnosed with prostate cancer with bone metastasis. He received androgen deprivation therapy for two years. Serum PSA decreased to an undetected level. However, the abnormal activity of left coxal bone lesion was not changed on bone scintigraphy. Coxal bone biopsy was performed. The bone lesion was histopathologically diagnosed as Paget's disease of bone.

  9. Computer-Aided Detection of Prostate Cancer on Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yahui; Jiang, Yulei; Chuang, Shang-Tian; Yang, Ximing J.

    2009-01-01

    We report an automated computer technique for detection of prostate cancer in prostate tissue sections processed with immunohistochemistry. Two sets of color optical images were acquired from prostate tissue sections stained with a double-chromogen triple-antibody cocktail combining alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR), p63, and high-molecular-weight cytokeratin (HMWCK). The first set of images consisted of 20 training images (10 malignant) used for developing the computer technique and 15 test images (7 malignant) used for testing and optimizing the technique. The second set of images consisted of 299 images (114 malignant) used for evaluation of the performance of the computer technique. The computer technique identified image segments of AMACR-labeled malignant epithelial cells (red), p63-and HMWCK-labeled benign basal cells (brown), and secretory and stromal cells (blue) for identifying prostate cancer automatically. The sensitivity and specificity of the computer technique were 94% (16/17) and 94% (17/18), respectively, on the first (training and test) set of images, and 88% (79/90) and 97% (136/140), respectively, on the second (validation) set of images. If high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), which is a precursor of cancer, and atypical cases were included, the sensitivity and specificity were 85% (97/114) and 89% (165/185), respectively. These results show that the novel automated computer technique can accurately identify prostatic adenocarcinoma in the triple-antibody cocktail-stained prostate sections. PMID:19417626

  10. Primary mucinous adenocarcinoma of the female urethra: a contemporary clinicopathologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Harari, Saul E; Cheng, Liang; Osunkoya, Adeboye O

    2016-01-01

    Primary mucinous adenocarcinoma of the female urethra is very rare and may lead to both diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Although primary mucinous adenocarcinoma of the prostate and prostatic urethra has been well characterized in men, this is the largest clinicopathologic study to date of primary mucinous adenocarcinoma of the female urethra. A search was made through the files of 2 major academic institutions for cases of confirmed primary mucinous adenocarcinoma arising from the female urethra. Tumors arising from adjacent organs were excluded both clinically and pathologically in all cases. Five cases were identified. The mean patient age was 67 years (range, 54-74 years). All patients presented with a polypoid/papillary mass arising from the urethra. Pathologic stages were as follows: pT4 3 (60%) of 5 cases; pT3 1 (20%) of 5 cases, and pT2 1 (20%) of 5 cases. Immunohistochemical stains for GATA3, p63, CK7, CK20, CDX2, ER, PAX8, and β-catenin were performed on all cases. Immunohistochemical stains were positive in the tumor cells for CDX2 in 4/5 (80%) cases; focally positive for CK20 in 4/5 (80%) cases; focally positive for CK7 in 4/5 cases (80%); and negative for p63, GATA3, ER, PAX8 and β-catenin in all cases. In the 4 patients with available follow-up data, mean follow-up was 25 months (range, 4-54 months). It is critical for pathologists to be aware of this entity in light of potential diagnostic pitfalls and therapeutic implications.

  11. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF? Featured Blue Jacket Fashion Show Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms The conversation about PSA screening really applies ... That’s why screening is such an important topic. Prostate Cancer Basics About the Prostate Risk Factors Prevention Symptoms ...

  12. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  13. About the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer growth or as a result of treatments. Prostate Cancer Basics About the Prostate Risk Factors Prevention Symptoms Early Detection & Screening Living with Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Treatment Options Side Effects Recurrence Advanced ...

  14. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  15. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  16. Uterine adenocarcinoma with feline leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Jin; Lee, Hyun-A; Hong, Sunhwa; Kim, Okjin

    2011-12-01

    Feline endometrial adenocarcinomas are uncommon malignant neoplasms that have been poorly characterized to date. In this study, we describe a uterine adenocarcinoma in a Persian cat with feline leukemia virus infection. At the time of presentation, the cat, a female Persian chinchilla, was 2 years old. The cat underwent surgical ovariohystectomy. A cross-section of the uterine wall revealed a thickened uterine horn. The cat tested positive for feline leukemia virus as detected by polymerase chain reaction. Histopathological examination revealed uterine adenocarcinoma that had metastasized to the omentum, resulting in thickening and the formation of inflammatory lesions. Based on the histopathological findings, this case was diagnosed as a uterine adenocarcinoma with abdominal metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a uterine adenocarcinoma with feline leukemia virus infection.

  17. A cytomegalovirus-based vaccine expressing a single tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell epitope delays tumor growth in a murine model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Kouiavskaia, Diana V; Parkins, Christopher J; Caposio, Patrizia; Botto, Sara; Alexander, Richard B; Jarvis, Michael A

    2012-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly immunogenic virus that results in a persistent, life-long infection in the host typically with no ill effects. Certain unique features of CMV, including its capacity to actively replicate in the presence of strong host CMV-specific immunity, may give CMV an advantage compared with other virus-based vaccine delivery platforms. In the present study, we tested the utility of mouse CMV (mCMV)-based vaccines expressing human prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for prostate cancer immunotherapy in double-transgenic mice expressing PSA and HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2bxPSA F1 mice). We assessed the capacity of 2 mCMV-based vectors to induce PSA-specific CD8 T-cell responses and affect the growth of PSA-expressing Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate tumors (TRAMP-PSA). In the absence of tumor challenge, immunization with mCMV vectors expressing either a H2-D(b)-restricted epitope PSA(65-73) (mCMV/PSA(65-73)) or the full-length gene for PSA (mCMV/PSA(FL)) induced comparable levels of CD8 T-cell responses that increased (inflated) with time. Upon challenge with TRAMP-PSA tumor cells, animals immunized with mCMV/PSA(65-73) had delay of tumor growth and increased PSA-specific CD8 T-cell responses, whereas animals immunized with mCMV/PSA(FL) showed progressive tumor growth and no increase in number of splenic PSA(65-73)-specific T cells. The data show that a prototype CMV-based prostate cancer vaccine can induce an effective antitumor immune response in a "humanized" double-transgenic mouse model. The observation that mCMV/PSA(FL) is not effective against TRAMP-PSA is consistent with our previous findings that HLA-DRB1*1501-restricted immune responses to PSA are associated with suppression of effective CD8 T-cell responses to TRAMP-PSA tumors.

  18. Increased Infiltrated Macrophages in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohai; Lin, Wen-Jye; Izumi, Kouji; Jiang, Qi; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Xu, Defeng; Fang, Lei-Ya; Lu, Tianjing; Li, Lei; Xia, Shujie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-01-01

    Infiltrated macrophages may play important roles in the development and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. We found increased macrophages infiltration in human and mouse BPH tissues. By establishing a co-culture transwell system, we found increased migration of macrophages and proliferation of prostate stromal cells during co-culture. Importantly, stromal androgen receptor (AR) could enhance the migration of macrophages and macrophage-mediated stromal cell proliferation. We identified CCL3 as an AR downstream player, and found CCL3 levels were notably increased in human and mouse BPH prostates. Ablation of prostate stromal AR in a mouse BPH model significantly reduced CCL3 expression levels in prostates. Consistently, targeting AR via an AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9§, or neutralization of CCL3 with an antibody, resulted in suppression of macrophage migration and prostate stromal cell growth. Our study provides mechanistic insights on the regulation of prostate stromal cells by macrophages via stromal AR/CCL3 signaling pathways, which could potentially allow the development of therapeutic approaches for battling BPH with persistent inflammation. PMID:22474290

  19. Modeling prostate cancer in mice: something old, something new, something premalignant, something metastatic.

    PubMed

    Irshad, Shazia; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2013-06-01

    More than 15 years ago, the first generation of genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models of prostate cancer was introduced. These transgenic models utilized prostate-specific promoters to express SV40 oncogenes specifically in prostate epithelium. Since the description of these initial models, there have been a plethora of GEM models of prostate cancer representing various perturbations of oncogenes or tumor suppressors, either alone or in combination. This review describes these GEM models, focusing on their relevance for human prostate cancer and highlighting their strengths and limitations, as well as opportunities for the future.

  20. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Prostate Diseases Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Tools & Tips ...

  1. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... If the cancer has not spread outside the prostate gland, common treatments include: Surgery ( radical prostatectomy ) Radiation therapy , including brachytherapy and proton therapy If you are older, your doctor may recommend simply monitoring the cancer with PSA tests and biopsies. Hormone therapy is ...

  2. Prostate Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor’s office or a medical facility. A health care professional tests your urine sample at your doctor’s office or ... your doctor’s office or a medical facility. A health care professional sends ... may want to test your blood sample for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). ...

  3. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge ... You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, depending ...

  4. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Participants With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-08

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  5. The Utility of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in Poorly Differentiated Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Demirkol, Mehmet Onur; Kiremit, Murat Can; Acar, Omer; Ucar, Burcu; Saglican, Yesim

    2017-03-17

    We aimed to emphasize how useful PSMA PET/CT findings can be while trying to restage prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy in the presence of low prostate-specific antigen values. A 64-year-old man with pT3b N1 M0 Gleason 7 adenocarcinoma of the prostate presented 5 years postoperatively with a palpable axillary mass, whereas his prostate-specific antigen was 0.08 ng/mL. Conventional imaging studies and histopathologic findings of the axillary mass biopsy revealed inconclusive results. Ga-PSMA PET/CT demonstrated PSMA-positive metastatic lesions, the largest one being located in the right axilla. This finding confirmed metastatic poorly differentiated prostate cancer, and androgen deprivation therapy was initiated.

  6. Prostate Expression Databases: Gene Expression Resources for Comparative Studies of Prostate Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    NKX3.1 (gift from Dr E. Gelmann, Georgetown University), AMACR (gift from Dr R.J. Wanders, Academic Medical Center, Amster- dam , Netherlands), mouse...independence and osseous metastasis, Prostate 44 (2000) 91–103 (101; 144(102)). [8] P. Liang, A.B. Pardee , Differential display of eukaryotic messenger

  7. Androgen regulated genes in human prostate xenografts in mice: relation to BPH and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Love, Harold D; Booton, S Erin; Boone, Braden E; Breyer, Joan P; Koyama, Tatsuki; Revelo, Monica P; Shappell, Scott B; Smith, Jeffrey R; Hayward, Simon W

    2009-12-21

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma (CaP) are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ) human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1) highly expressed in prostate, 2) had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3) encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues.

  8. Isolation, cultivation and identification of human lung adenocarcinoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, DE-GENG; JIANG, AI-GUI; LU, HUI-YU; ZHANG, LI-XIN; GAO, XIAO-YAN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that lung cancer is a stem cell disease. However, ideal cell surface markers for isolating stem cells in lung cancer are yet to be identified. In the present study, a cell population with a cluster of differentiation (CD)133+ phenotype was successfully isolated from a single cell suspension of lung adenocarcinoma tissue using magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) and enriched in a serum-free culture. In comparison to CD133− cells, the CD133+ cells exhibited an enhanced capacity for self-renewal and differentiation, and a greater potential for in vivo tumor formation, in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. Tumors could be induced in NOD/SCID mice by the transplantation of 102 stem-like cells per mouse. The results of the present study demonstrated that CD133 may serve as a specific cell surface marker for lung adenocarcinoma stem cells, and that MACS combined with serum-free culture is an effective method for isolating and enriching lung cancer stem cells. PMID:25435932

  9. Prostate Enlargement: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur as a result of alcohol consumption, cold temperatures, or a long period of inactivity. What are ... to heat selected portions of the prostate. The temperature becomes high enough inside the prostate to destroy ...

  10. [An unusual secondary localization of bronchial adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Mirallie, E; Courant, O; Sagan, C; Letessier, E; Paineau, J; Visset, J

    1993-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of metastatic carcinoma of the large bowel, secondary to a primary bronchogenic adenocarcinoma. Abdominal pain developed in a 44-year old man 5 months after lobectomy for lung adenocarcinoma. The diagnosis of a large caecal extraluminal mass was established by means of sonography, scanner and laparoscopy. Palliative resection (brain metastases) was performed. Postoperative histological examination revealed the resected tumor to be identical to the lung adenocarcinoma. The patient eventually died 4 months after resection (complication of intracranial hypertension). Diagnosis and therapeutic features of metastatic extra-thoracic lung carcinoma are discussed.

  11. [Mesocolic excision for colonic adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Debove, Clotilde; Lefèvre, Jérémie H; Parc, Yann

    2017-02-01

    On the same principle than total mesorectal excision in rectal cancer, the effect of complete mesocolic excision on short and long-term outcomes is actually evaluated for colonic adenocarcinoma. This method, usually performed for left colectomy, offers a surgical specimen of higher quality, with a larger number of lymph nodes harvested. For right colectomy, surgical specifications make it less common complete mesocolic excision and conventional surgery offer comparable outcomes, as regards to postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. No differences are identified between laparoscopic and open surgery. On oncologic outcomes, only two studies report a higher free-disease survival after complete mesocolic excision. Then, there is evidence that complete mesocolic excision offers a higher rate of specimen with extensive lymph node resection, without increased morbidity rate. However, there is limited evidence that it leads to improve long-term oncological outcomes.

  12. Pre-clinical Orthotopic Murine Model of Human Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shahryari, Varahram; Nip, Hannah; Saini, Sharanjot; Dar, Altaf A; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Colden, Melissa; Bucay, Nathan; Tabatabai, Laura Z; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Dahiya, Rajvir; Majid, Shahana

    2016-08-29

    To study the multifaceted biology of prostate cancer, pre-clinical in vivo models offer a range of options to uncover critical biological information about this disease. The human orthotopic prostate cancer xenograft mouse model provides a useful alternative approach for understanding the specific interactions between genetically and molecularly altered tumor cells, their organ microenvironment, and for evaluation of efficacy of therapeutic regimens. This is a well characterized model designed to study the molecular events of primary tumor development and it recapitulates the early events in the metastatic cascade prior to embolism and entry of tumor cells into the circulation. Thus it allows elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying the initial phase of metastatic disease. In addition, this model can annotate drug targets of clinical relevance and is a valuable tool to study prostate cancer progression. In this manuscript we describe a detailed procedure to establish a human orthotopic prostate cancer xenograft mouse model.

  13. Role of Obesity in Prostate Cancer Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    prostate cancer development in this model. A second experiment was conducted using a prostate cancer cell line developed from a TRAMP mouse tumor, TRAMP...antibodies used are shown along the left hand side. 11 Study using TRAMP-C2 Cells Because of the difficulties with GTG injections described above we...Lynch,C.F., Rubenstein,L.M., Lemke,J.H., Cohen,M.B., Lubaroff,D.M., and Wallace,R.B. (1997) Association of smoking , body mass, and physical activity

  14. Expression of the KAI1 protein in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, T.; Ichikawa, T.; Tamaru, J.; Mikata, A.; Akakura, K.; Akimoto, S.; Imai, T.; Yoshie, O.; Shiraishi, T.; Yatani, R.; Ito, H.; Shimazaki, J.

    1996-01-01

    The KAI1 gene, recently identified as a metastatic suppressor gene for prostate cancer, was cloned and was revealed to be identical to the C33/IA4/ R2/4R9 gene. The expression of KAI1 protein was examined immunohistochemically in the tissues from 14 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia and 46 cases of prostate cancer using mouse monoclonal anti-human C33 antibody. In benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues, KAI1 protein was uniformly expressed in the glandular cell membrane at cell-to-cell borders. The KAI1 protein in the tissues of untreated prostate cancer was also located at similar sites to those of benign prostatic hyperplasia, but the percentage of strongly positive cancer cells was correlated inversely to the Gleason pattern (P < 0.0001, one-way analysis of variance). There was also a statistically inverse correlation between the percentage of KAI1-positive cancer cells and the clinical stage (chi 2 = 9.6; P = 0.0081). In 4 cancer death cases relapsed from endocrine therapy, KAI1 protein was not stained in either primary or metastatic foci. These results indicate that the expression of KAI1 protein correlates to tumor characteristics in prostate cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:8909232

  15. Unusual Presentation of Prostate Carcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Anuradha; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in elderly men and it frequently metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and sometimes to bone. Very rarely in some of the cases it also shows involvement of non-regional lymph nodes like supra-diaphragmatic lymph nodes. In our report, we present a 60-year-old male, initially misdiagnosed as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) with cervical lymph node involvement may be due to infective region or inflammatory pathology, which was later found to have prostatic adenocarcinoma metastatic to supraclavicular lymph nodes. Very less case reports are present which have shown similar presentations. So we would like to highlight that prostatic carcinoma can be present in an atypical form also.

  16. The Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype Promotes Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Vital, Paz; Castro, Patricia; Tsang, Susan; Ittmann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is characterized by increased tissue mass in the transition zone of the prostate, which leads to obstruction of urine outflow and considerable morbidity in a majority of older men. Senescent cells accumulate in human tissues, including the prostate, with increasing age. Expression of proinflammatory cytokines is increased in these senescent cells, a manifestation of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Multiplex analysis revealed that multiple cytokines are increased in BPH, including GM-CSF, IL-1α, and IL-4, and that these are also increased in senescent prostatic epithelial cells in vitro. Tissue levels of these cytokines were correlated with a marker of senescence (cathepsin D), which was also strongly correlated with prostate weight. IHC analysis revealed the multifocal epithelial expression of cathepsin D and coexpression with IL-1α in BPH tissues. In tissue recombination studies in nude mice with immortalized prostatic epithelial cells expressing IL-1α and prostatic stromal cells, both epithelial and stromal cells exhibited increased growth. Expression of IL-1α in prostatic epithelial cells in a transgenic mouse model resulted in increased prostate size and bladder obstruction. In summary, both correlative and functional evidence support the hypothesis that the senescence-associated secretory phenotype can promote the development of BPH, which is the single most common age-related pathology in older men. PMID:24434012

  17. Knockout AR in Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    enlarged ventral prostates, we evaluated fertility. We found that there were no significant differences in litter-size when either WT or pes-ARKO males...prostate (DLP), ventral prostate (VP) all lobes of prostate (Pr), testes (T), glans penis (Pe); *Pɘ.05, ***Pɘ.001. PI: Chang, Chawnshang 7

  18. 2-Methoxyestradiol as a Chemotherapeutic for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    significantly increase bioavailability and is now being tested in clinical trials. Primary prostate tumors and visible lymph node metastases were removed and...T-15 transgenic mice. Gy/T- 15 mice with palpable prostate tumors were randomly divided into experimental and control groups and injected i.p. every... horse - of control from three independent experiments done radish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody in triplicate. (anti-mouse IgGl/2a or anti

  19. Concurrent chemoradiation for high-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Benjamin T; Sanfilippo, Nicholas J

    2015-08-10

    There are estimated to be 220800 cases of prostate cancer diagnosed in 2015, making up 26% of all cancer diagnoses. Fortunately, adenocarcinoma of the prostate is often a highly treatable malignancy. Even though the majority of prostate cancer patients present with localized disease, prostate cancer still accounts for over 27000 deaths a year. There is a subset of patients that are likely to recur after locoregional treatment that is thought of as a "high-risk" population. This more aggressive subset includes patients with clinical stage greater than T2b, Gleason score greater than 7, and prostate specific antigen greater than 20 ng/dL. The rate of biochemical relapse in this high risk group is 32%-70% within five years of definitive focal therapy. Given these discouraging outcomes, attempts have been made to improve cure rates by radiation dose escalation, addition of androgen depravation therapy, and addition of chemotherapy either sequentially or concurrently with radiation. One method that has been shown to improve clinical outcomes is the addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy for definitive treatment. Concurrent chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil, estramustine phosphate, vincristine, docetaxel, and paclitaxel has been studied in the phase I and/or II setting. These trials have identified the maximum tolerated dose of chemotherapy and radiation that can be safely delivered concurrently and established the safety and feasibility of this technique. This review will focus on the addition of concurrent chemotherapy to radiotherapy in the definitive management of high-risk prostate cancer.

  20. The role of human papillomavirus infection in prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aghakhani, Arezoo; Hamkar, Rasool; Parvin, Mahmoud; Ghavami, Nastaran; Nadri, Mahsa; Pakfetrat, Attesa; Banifazl, Mohammad; Eslamifar, Ali; Izadi, Nabiollah; Jam, Sara; Ramezani, Amitis

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are associated with benign and malignant lesions of the female and male anogenital tract. Currently the possible role of HPV infections in prostate carcinogenesis is a subject of great controversy. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of HPV infection in prostate carcinoma (PCa). The study included formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 104 primary prostate adenocarcinoma cases and 104 control tissues of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). HPV-DNA was purified and amplified through MY09/MY11 and GP5(+)/GP6(+) primers and subsequently subjected to sequencing. HPV-DNA was found in 13 of 104 (12.5%) PCa and 8 of 104 (7.7%) BPH samples. High-risk HPVs were detected in 10 of 13 (76.9%) PCa and 5 of 8 (62.5%) BPH samples with positive HPV-DNA. Low-risk HPVs were detected in 3 of 13 (23.1%) PCa and 3 of 8 (37.5%) BPH specimens with positive HPV-DNA. There was no significant difference between PCa and BPH specimens regarding HPV-DNA presence or the detection of high-risk and low-risk types of HPV. Our data do not support the role of HPV infection in prostate carcinoma. Further studies are required to elucidate the role of HPV infection in human prostate carcinogenesis.

  1. Exosomes as Novel microRNA-Delivery Vehicles to Modulate Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    specifically packaged in these 40-100 nm microvesicles and secreted from prostate cancer cells are important in the progression to aggressive disease...behavior of aggressive human prostate cancer cell lines in vitro as well as in vivo using mouse xenograft models. 15. SUBJECT TERMS microRNAs, exosomes...microvesicles and secreted from prostate cancer cells are important in the progression to aggressive disease. In this exploratory award, we are

  2. Colonic adenocarcinoma with metastasis to the gingiva.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Alvarez, Carlos; Iglesias-Rodríguez, Begoña; Pazo-Irazu, Susana; Delgado-Sánchez-Gracián, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic tumors involve the oral cavity, and the most common primary sites are the breast and lung. Most cases affect the mandible and maxilla in that order, although some of them can be located in the soft perioral tissues. We report the case of a 62-year-old male who had been diagnosed with sigmoid adenocarcinoma with nodal and liver metastasis, who presented 6 months later with a gingival polypoid tumor, at first considered as a primary neoplasm of gingiva, that was diagnosed in a biopsy as metastatic intestinal adenocarcinoma. The histological evaluation is essential to separate adenocarcinoma from the commoner in this site squamous cell carcinoma, and the immunohistochemical techniques are useful to distinguish metastatic tumor versus primary adenocarcinoma from the minor salivary glands of the area. The intraoral spread of a disseminated neoplasm is generally a sign of bad prognosis, although a longer survival can be expected if a radical surgical treatment of a solitary metastasis is carried out.

  3. Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) Analysis in Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Treatments for Prostate Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil

    2009-05-01

    Studies have shown that as many as 8 out of 10 men had prostate cancer by age 80.Prostate cancer begins with small changes (prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia(PIN)) in size and shape of prostate gland cells,known as prostate adenocarcinoma.With advent in technology, prostate cancer has been the most widely used application of IMRT with the longest follow-up periods.Prostate cancer fits the ideal target criteria for IMRT of adjacent sensitive dose-limiting tissue (rectal, bladder).A retrospective study was performed on 10 prostate cancer patients treated with radiation to a limited pelvic field with a standard 4 field arrangements at dose 45 Gy, and an IMRT boost field to a total isocenter dose of 75 Gy.Plans were simulated for 4 field and the supplementary IMRT treatments with proposed dose delivery at 1.5 Gy/fraction in BID basis.An automated DVH analysis software, HART (S. Jang et al., 2008,Med Phys 35,p.2812)was used to perform DVH assessments in IMRT plans.A statistical analysis of dose coverage at targets in prostate gland and neighboring critical organs,and the plan indices(homogeneity, conformality etc) evaluations were also performed using HART extracted DVH statistics.Analyzed results showed a better correlation with the proposed outcomes (TCP, NTCP) of the treatments.

  4. Are Histological Findings of Thulium Laser Vapo-Enucleation Versus Transurethral Resection of the Prostate Comparable?

    PubMed

    Carmignani, Luca; Macchi, Alberto; Ratti, Dario; Finkelberg, Elisabetta; Casellato, Stefano; Bozzini, Giorgio; Maruccia, Serena; Marenghi, Carlo; Picozzi, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    We investigated if an adequate histological diagnosis can be made from tissue after Thulium laser vapo-enucleation of the prostate (ThuVEP) and whether it is comparable to transurethral prostate resection (TURP) tissue findings in patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. We analyzed 350 ThuLEP and 100 matched TURP tissue specimens from patients who underwent one of the two procedures between January 2009 and June 2014. Thulium Laser Enucleation of Prostate (ThuVEP) was combined with mechanical morcellation of the resected lobe. Each histological specimen was reviewed by two pathologists. Preoperative prostate ultrasound volume, total serum prostatic specific antigen and postoperative tissue weight were evaluated. Microscopic histological diagnosis was assessed by standard histological techniques and immunohistochemical evaluation. Patients were comparable in terms of age and preoperative total serum prostate specific antigen. Incidental adenocarcinoma and high grade PIN of the prostate were diagnosed in a comparable percent of specimens in the 2 groups (2.5 % in the ThuVEP group versus 3 % in the TURP group). Tissue thermal artifacts induced by the Thulium laser are mostly due to coagulation as that of the conventional monopolar diathermy in TURP. Tissue quality was maintained in the ThuVEP histological specimens. Tissue maintain histological characteristics and proprieties without modification for successive immunoistochemical analysis. The pathologist ability to detect incidental prostate cancer and PIN was maintained even if there is a quoted of vaporized tissue.

  5. Pathologic classification of adenocarcinoma of lung.

    PubMed

    Van Schil, Paul E; Sihoe, Alan D L; Travis, William D

    2013-10-01

    Recently, the 1999/2004 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of adenocarcinoma became less useful from a clinical standpoint as most adenocarcinomas belonged to the mixed subtype and the term bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) gave rise to much confusion among clinicians. For these reasons a new adenocarcinoma classification was introduced in 2011 by a joint working group of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS). This represents an international, multidisciplinary effort joining pathologists, molecular biologists, pulmonary physicians, thoracic oncologists, radiologists, and thoracic surgeons. Currently, a distinction is made between pre-invasive lesions, minimally invasive and invasive lesions. The confusing term BAC is not used anymore and new subcategories include adenocarcinoma in situ and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma. Several aspects of this classification are discussed with main emphasis on its correlation with imaging techniques and its impact on diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. On chest computed tomography (CT) a distinction is made between solid and subsolid nodules, the latter comprising ground glass opacities (GGO), and partly solid lesions. Several studies incorporating CT and positron emission tomographic (PET) data show a good imaging-pathologic correlation. With the implementation of screening programs early lung cancer has become a hotly debated topic and sublobar resection is currently reconsidered for early lesions without lymph node involvement. This new classification will also have an impact on the TNM classification. Thoracic surgeons will continue to play a major role in the application, evaluation and further refinement of this new adenocarcinoma classification.

  6. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back After Treatment Prostate Cancer Treating Prostate Cancer Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  7. Medical Tests for Prostate Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... than age 50 is inflammation, called prostatitis. Prostate enlargement, or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is another common ... cannot distinguish between cancerous tumors and noncancerous prostate enlargement. Once a biopsy has confirmed cancer, these imaging ...

  8. Transurethral resection of the prostate

    MedlinePlus

    TURP; Prostate resection - transurethral ... used to remove the inside part of your prostate gland using electricity. ... if you have benign prostatic hyperplasia ( BPH ). The prostate gland often grows larger as men get older. ...

  9. Metastatic Colonic Adenocarcinoma in Breast: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kothadia, Jiten P.; Arju, Rezina; Kaminski, Monica; Ankireddypalli, Arvind; Duddempudi, Sushil; Chow, Jonathan; Giashuddin, Shah

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic adenocarcinoma to the breast from an extramammary site is extremely rare. In the literature, the most current estimate is that extramammary metastases account for only 0.43% of all breast malignancies and that, of these extramammary sites, colon cancer metastases form a very small subset. Most commonly seen metastasis in breast is from a contralateral breast carcinoma, followed by metastasis from hematopoietic neoplasms, malignant melanoma, sarcoma, lung, prostate, and ovary and gastric neoplasms. Here we present two rare cases, in which colonic adenocarcinomas were found to metastasize to the breast. In both cases, core biopsies were obtained from the suspicious areas identified on mammogram. Histopathology revealed neoplastic proliferation of atypical glandular components within benign breast parenchyma which were morphologically consistent with metastatic adenocarcinoma. By immunohistochemical staining, it was confirmed that the neoplastic components were immunoreactive to colonic markers and nonreactive to breast markers, thus further supporting the morphologic findings. It is extremely important to make this distinction between primary breast cancer and a metastatic process, in order to provide the most effective and appropriate treatment for the patient and to avoid any harmful or unnecessary surgical procedures. PMID:25883818

  10. Intense Uptake in Amyloidosis of the Seminal Vesicles on 68Ga-PSMA PET Mimicking Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Maximilian; Kim, David Insoo; Shepherd, Benjamin; Gustafson, Sonja; Thomas, Paul

    2017-02-01

    We report a case of benign senile seminal vesicle amyloidosis demonstrating intense Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) uptake on PET/CT. A 68-year-old man underwent staging PSMA PET/CT and MRI for biopsy-proven prostate adenocarcinoma. There was an intense focus of Ga-PSMA uptake in the primary malignancy, as well as symmetrical intense uptake in the seminal vesicles bilaterally that was reported as multifocal disease with local invasion. Final histology after radical prostatectomy showed amyloidosis of the seminal vesicles without any evidence of prostate cancer. Care should be taken in the interpretation of seminal vesicle PSMA uptake to avoid overstaging.

  11. FOXA1 deletion in luminal epithelium causes prostatic hyperplasia and alteration of differentiated phenotype.

    PubMed

    DeGraff, David J; Grabowska, Magdalena M; Case, Tom C; Yu, Xiuping; Herrick, Mary K; Hayward, William J; Strand, Douglas W; Cates, Justin M; Hayward, Simon W; Gao, Nan; Walter, Michael A; Buttyan, Ralph; Yi, Yajun; Kaestner, Klaus H; Matusik, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    The forkhead box (Fox) superfamily of transcription factors has essential roles in organogenesis and tissue differentiation. Foxa1 and Foxa2 are expressed during prostate budding and ductal morphogenesis, whereas Foxa1 expression is retained in adult prostate epithelium. Previous characterization of prostatic tissue rescued from embryonic Foxa1 knockout mice revealed Foxa1 to be essential for ductal morphogenesis and epithelial maturation. However, it is unknown whether Foxa1 is required to maintain the differentiated status in adult prostate epithelium. Here, we employed the PBCre4 transgenic system and determined the impact of prostate-specific Foxa1 deletion in adult murine epithelium. PBCre4/Foxa1(loxp/loxp) mouse prostates showed progressive florid hyperplasia with extensive cribriform patterning, with the anterior prostate being most affected. Immunohistochemistry studies show mosaic Foxa1 KO consistent with PBCre4 activity, with Foxa1 KO epithelial cells specifically exhibiting altered cell morphology, increased proliferation, and elevated expression of basal cell markers. Castration studies showed that, while PBCre4/Foxa1(loxp/loxp) prostates did not exhibit altered sensitivity in response to hormone ablation compared with control prostates, the number of Foxa1-positive cells in mosaic Foxa1 KO prostates was significantly reduced compared with Foxa1-negative cells following castration. Unexpectedly, gene expression profile analyses revealed that Foxa1 deletion caused abnormal expression of seminal vesicle-associated genes in KO prostates. In summary, these results indicate Foxa1 expression is required for the maintenance of prostatic cellular differentiation.

  12. Globally increased ultraconserved noncoding RNA expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Joo; Gusev, Yuriy; Allard, David; Sutaria, Dhruvitkumar S.; Badawi, Mohamed; Elgamal, Ola A.; Lerner, Megan R.; Brackett, Daniel J.; Calin, George A.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Transcribed ultraconserved regions (T-UCRs) are a class of non-coding RNAs with 100% sequence conservation among human, rat and mouse genomes. T-UCRs are differentially expressed in several cancers, however their expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has not been studied. We used a qPCR array to profile all 481 T-UCRs in pancreatic cancer specimens, pancreatic cancer cell lines, during experimental pancreatic desmoplasia and in the pancreases of P48Cre/wt; KrasLSL-G12D/wt mice. Fourteen, 57 and 29% of the detectable T-UCRs were differentially expressed in the cell lines, human tumors and transgenic mouse pancreases, respectively. The vast majority of the differentially expressed T-UCRs had increased expression in the cancer. T-UCRs were monitored using an in vitro model of the desmoplastic reaction. Twenty-five % of the expressed T-UCRs were increased in the HPDE cells cultured on PANC-1 cellular matrix. UC.190, UC.233 and UC.270 were increased in all three human data sets. siRNA knockdown of each of these three T-UCRs reduced the proliferation of MIA PaCa-2 cells up to 60%. The expression pattern among many T-UCRs in the human and mouse pancreases closely correlated with one another, suggesting that groups of T-UCRs are co-activated in PDAC. Successful knockout of the transcription factor EGR1 in PANC-1 cells caused a reduction in the expression of a subset of T-UCRs suggesting that EGR1 may control T-UCR expression in PDAC. We report a global increase in expression of T-UCRs in both human and mouse PDAC. Commonalties in their expression pattern suggest a similar mechanism of transcriptional upregulation for T-UCRs in PDAC. PMID:27363020

  13. Role of Nonreceptor Protein Kinase Ack 1 in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    cancer in vivo. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, transgenic mice , mouse model 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...1 In order to address task 1, prostates from PbAck1 mice and non-transgenic littermates were collected at multiple time points (12, 16, 24, 36, 48...our PbAck1;TgAPT121 bi-transgenic mice (Appendix Fig. 2). This result 8 validates the PbAck1;TgAPT121 bi-transgenic construct as a mouse model of

  14. Primary Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Urinary Bladder with Signet-Ring Cells: Description of an Uncommon Case and Critical Points in Its Management

    PubMed Central

    Amorim Aita, Giuliano; Amorim Aita, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    We present an uncommon case of mucinous adenocarcinoma of the bladder (MAB) with signet-ring cells extensively infiltrating prostate gland and pelvic/retroperitoneal lymph node stations and not responsive to usual systemic chemotherapy regimens. This case highlights the important features of MAB including the pattern of tumor spread, the tendency for initial misdiagnosis, and the importance of immunohistochemical study in order to define its primary origin from the bladder and choose the most appropriate treatment since the beginning. PMID:28078160

  15. Cell Lineage Analysis of Mouse Prostate Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    tamoxifen to induce genetic combination to mark luminal epithelial cells (month 24-30) Status: We are expecting the first experimental animals to be...born within the next 90 days. These animals will be ready for intraperitoneal injection of tamoxifen at 6 weeks of age. Expected revised timeline...clippings are taken for genotyping analyses at 21 days of age at weaning. C. Intraperitoneal injection of tamoxifen to induce genetic

  16. MRI-directed cognitive fusion-guided biopsy of the anterior prostate tumors

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Ian G.; NiMhurchu, Elaine; Gibney, Robert G.; McMahon, Colm J.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-directed cognitive fusion transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided anterior prostate biopsy for diagnosis of anterior prostate tumors and to illustrate this technique. METHODS A total of 39 patients with previous negative TRUS biopsy, but high clinical suspicion of occult prostate cancer, prospectively underwent prostate MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Patients with a suspicious anterior lesion on MRI underwent targeted anterior gland TRUS-guided biopsy with cognitive fusion technique using sagittal probe orientation. PIRADS version 1 scores (T2, DWI, and overall), lesion size, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), PSA density, and prostate gland volume were compared between positive and negative biopsy groups and between clinically significant cancer and remaining cases. Logistic regression analysis of imaging parameters and prostate cancer diagnosis was performed. RESULTS Anterior gland prostate adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in 18 patients (46.2%) on targeted anterior gland TRUS-guided biopsy. Clinically significant prostate cancer was diagnosed in 13 patients (33.3%). MRI lesion size, T2, DWI, and overall PIRADS scores were significantly higher in patients with positive targeted biopsies and those with clinically significant cancer (P < 0.05). Biopsies were positive in 90%, 33%, and 29% of patients with overall PIRADS scores of 5, 4, and 3 respectively. Overall PIRADS score was an independent predictor of all prostate cancer diagnosis and of clinically significant prostate cancer diagnosis. CONCLUSION Targeted anterior gland TRUS-guided biopsy with MRI-directed cognitive fusion enables accurate sampling and may improve tumor detection yield of anterior prostate cancer. PMID:28074780

  17. A study of molecular signals deregulating mismatch repair genes in prostate cancer compared to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanmitra; Majumder, Subhadipa; Bhowal, Ankur; Ghosh, Alip; Naskar, Sukla; Nandy, Sumit; Mukherjee, Subhabrata; Sinha, Rajan Kumar; Basu, Keya; Karmakar, Dilip; Banerjee, Soma; Sengupta, Sanghamitra

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality among aging males. There is an unmet requirement of clinically useful biomarkers for early detection of prostate cancer to reduce the liabilities of overtreatment and accompanying morbidity. The present population-based study investigates the factors disrupting expression of multiple functionally related genes of DNA mismatch repair pathway in prostate cancer patients to identify molecular attributes distinguishing adenocarcinoma from benign hyperplasia of prostate. Gene expression was compared between tissue samples from prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia using real-time-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Assessment of genotypes of seven single-nucleotide-polymorphisms of three MMR genes was conducted using PCR-coupled RFLP and sequencing. Promoter methylation was interrogated by methylation-specific-PCR and bisulfite-sequencing. Interaction between microRNAs and MMR genes was verified by 3'UTR-based dual luciferase assays. Concurrent reduction of three MMR genes namely hMLH1, hMSH6 and hMSH2 (34-85%, P<0.05) was observed in prostate cancer tissues. hMSH6 polymorphism rs1800932(Pro92Pro) conferred a borderline protection in cancer patients (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.15-0.75). Relative transcript level of hMLH1 was inversely related (r = -0.59, P<0.05) with methylation quotient of its promoter which showed a significantly higher methylation density (P = 0.008, Z = -2.649) in cancer patients. hsa-miR-155, hsa-miR-141 and hsa-miR-21 gene expressions were significantly elevated (66-85%, P<0.05) in tumor specimens and negatively correlated (r = -0.602 to -0.527, P<0.05) with that of MMR genes. hsa-miR-155 & hsa-miR-141 and hsa-miR-155 & hsa-miR-21 were demonstrated to bind to their putative seed sequences in hMLH1 and hMSH6 3'UTRs respectively. Relatively higher expression of DNA methyl-transferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) and HIF-1α genes (34-50%, P<0.05) were also detected in tumor tissues. This

  18. A Study of Molecular Signals Deregulating Mismatch Repair Genes in Prostate Cancer Compared to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sanmitra; Majumder, Subhadipa; Bhowal, Ankur; Ghosh, Alip; Naskar, Sukla; Nandy, Sumit; Mukherjee, Subhabrata; Sinha, Rajan Kumar; Basu, Keya; Karmakar, Dilip; Banerjee, Soma; Sengupta, Sanghamitra

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality among aging males. There is an unmet requirement of clinically useful biomarkers for early detection of prostate cancer to reduce the liabilities of overtreatment and accompanying morbidity. The present population-based study investigates the factors disrupting expression of multiple functionally related genes of DNA mismatch repair pathway in prostate cancer patients to identify molecular attributes distinguishing adenocarcinoma from benign hyperplasia of prostate. Gene expression was compared between tissue samples from prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia using real-time-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Assessment of genotypes of seven single-nucleotide-polymorphisms of three MMR genes was conducted using PCR-coupled RFLP and sequencing. Promoter methylation was interrogated by methylation-specific-PCR and bisulfite-sequencing. Interaction between microRNAs and MMR genes was verified by 3'UTR-based dual luciferase assays. Concurrent reduction of three MMR genes namely hMLH1, hMSH6 and hMSH2 (34-85%, P<0.05) was observed in prostate cancer tissues. hMSH6 polymorphism rs1800932(Pro92Pro) conferred a borderline protection in cancer patients (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.15-0.75). Relative transcript level of hMLH1 was inversely related (r = -0.59, P<0.05) with methylation quotient of its promoter which showed a significantly higher methylation density (P = 0.008, Z = -2.649) in cancer patients. hsa-miR-155, hsa-miR-141 and hsa-miR-21 gene expressions were significantly elevated (66-85%, P<0.05) in tumor specimens and negatively correlated (r = -0.602 to -0.527, P<0.05) with that of MMR genes. hsa-miR-155 & hsa-miR-141 and hsa-miR-155 & hsa-miR-21 were demonstrated to bind to their putative seed sequences in hMLH1 and hMSH6 3’UTRs respectively. Relatively higher expression of DNA methyl-transferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) and HIF-1α genes (34-50%, P<0.05) were also detected in tumor tissues

  19. FGF signalling in prostate development, tissue homoeostasis and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yongshun; Wang, Fen

    2010-04-09

    The FGFs (fibroblast growth factors) regulate a broad spectrum of biological activities by activating transmembrane FGFR (FGF receptor) tyrosine kinases and their coupled intracellular signalling pathways. In the prostate, the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions mediated by androgen signalling and paracrine factors are essential for gland organogenesis, homoeostasis and tumorigenesis. FGFs mediate these mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in the prostate by paracrinal crosstalk through a diverse set of ligands and receptors. Gain- and loss-of-function studies in mouse models have demonstrated the requirement for the FGF signalling axis in prostate development and homoeostasis. The aberrant induction of this axis in either compartment of the prostate results in developmental disorders, disrupts the homoeostatic balance and leads to prostate carcinogenesis. FGFs are also implicated in mediating androgen signalling in the prostate between mesenchymal and epithelial compartments. Therefore studying FGF signalling in the prostate will help us to better understand the underlying molecular mechanisms by which the gland develops, maintains homoeostasis and undergoes carcinogenesis; as well as yield clues on how androgens mediate these processes and how advanced-tumour prostate cells escape strict androgen regulations.

  20. RNA splicing and splicing regulator changes in prostate cancer pathology.

    PubMed

    Munkley, Jennifer; Livermore, Karen; Rajan, Prabhakar; Elliott, David J

    2017-04-05

    Changes in mRNA splice patterns have been associated with key pathological mechanisms in prostate cancer progression. The androgen receptor (abbreviated AR) transcription factor is a major driver of prostate cancer pathology and activated by androgen steroid hormones. Selection of alternative promoters by the activated AR can critically alter gene function by switching mRNA isoform production, including creating a pro-oncogenic isoform of the normally tumour suppressor gene TSC2. A number of androgen-regulated genes generate alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms, including a prostate-specific splice isoform of ST6GALNAC1 mRNA. ST6GALNAC1 encodes a sialyltransferase that catalyses the synthesis of the cancer-associated sTn antigen important for cell mobility. Genetic rearrangements occurring early in prostate cancer development place ERG oncogene expression under the control of the androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 promoter to hijack cell behaviour. This TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene shows different patterns of alternative splicing in invasive versus localised prostate cancer. Alternative AR mRNA isoforms play a key role in the generation of prostate cancer drug resistance, by providing a mechanism through which prostate cancer cells can grow in limited serum androgen concentrations. A number of splicing regulator proteins change expression patterns in prostate cancer and may help drive key stages of disease progression. Up-regulation of SRRM4 establishes neuronal splicing patterns in neuroendocrine prostate cancer. The splicing regulators Sam68 and Tra2β increase expression in prostate cancer. The SR protein kinase SRPK1 that modulates the activity of SR proteins is up-regulated in prostate cancer and has already given encouraging results as a potential therapeutic target in mouse models.

  1. CXCR2 expression in tumor cells is a poor prognostic factor and promotes invasion and metastasis in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Saintigny, Pierre; Massarelli, Erminia; Lin, Steven; Chen, Yulong; Goswami, Sangeeta; Erez, Baruch; O’Reilly, Michael S.; Liu, Diane; Lee, J. Jack; Zhang, Li; Ping, Yuan; Behrens, Carmen; Soto, Luisa M. Solis; Heymach, John V.; Kim, Edward S.; Herbst, Roy S.; Lippman, Scott M.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Hong, Waun Ki; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Koo, Ja Seok

    2012-01-01

    CXCR2 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been studied mainly in stromal cells and is known to increase tumor inflammation and angiogenesis. Here, we examined the prognostic importance of CXCR2 in NSCLC and the role of CXCR2 and its ligands in lung cancer cells. The effect of CXCR2 expression on tumor cells was studied using stable knockdown clones derived from a murine KRAS/p53-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell line with high metastatic potential and an orthotopic syngeneic mouse model and in vitro using a CXCR2 small molecule antagonist (SB225002). CXCR2 protein expression was analyzed in tumor cells from 262 NSCLC. Gene expression profiles for CXCR2 and its ligands (CXCR2 axis) were analyzed in 52 human NSCLC cell lines and 442 human lung adenocarcinomas. Methylation of CXCR2 axis promoters was determined in 70 human NSCLC cell lines. Invasion and metastasis were decreased in CXCR2 knockdown clones in vitro and in vivo. SB225002 decreased invasion in vitro. In lung adenocarcinomas, CXCR2 expression in tumor cells was associated with smoking and poor prognosis. CXCR2 axis gene expression profiles in human NSCLC cell lines and lung adenocarcinomas defined a cluster driven by CXCL5 and associated with smoking, poor prognosis and RAS pathway activation. Expression of CXCL5 was regulated by promoter methylation. The CXCR2 axis may be an important target in smoking-related lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:23204236

  2. An immunohistochemical assessment of hypoxia in prostate carcinoma using pimonidazole: Implications for radioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Carnell, Dawn M. . E-mail: peterhoskin@nhs.net; Smith, Rowena E.; Daley, Frances; Saunders, Michele I.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Hoskin, Peter J.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the presence of hypoxia in human prostate carcinoma by using pimonidazole immunohistochemical labeling in radical prostatectomy specimens. Methods and Materials: Forty-three patients (median age, 69 years; range, 49-83 years) with localized prostate adenocarcinoma received 0.5 gm/m{sup 2} i.v. pimonidazole 16-24 h before radical prostatectomy. Hypoxia was detected with a monoclonal antibody directed against pimonidazole and scored in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. Median and maximal vessel counts were measured with CD34. Results: Thirty-seven patients completed the study. Pimonidazole binding was present in prostate carcinomas in 34 of 37 patients (92%) and in benign prostatic hyperplasia in 35 of 37 patients (95%). A positive correlation of 3+ pimonidazole binding with Gleason score was demonstrated (Spearman's rank, p = 0.044). Vascularity scores did not correlate with hypoxic status or clinical prognostic parameters. Conclusion: Prostate carcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia have significant areas of hypoxia; greater hypoxia scores are seen with more aggressive prostate cancer. It is postulated that a hypoxic microenvironment within the prostate might be responsible for the promotion of secondary genetic alterations and angiogenic stimulation, leading to malignant progression, a more aggressive cell phenotype, and greater radioresistance. Modification of radiation regimens to specifically target hypoxia might improve local tumor control.

  3. Activation of Notch1 synergizes with multiple pathways in promoting castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanova, Tanya; Riedinger, Mireille; Lin, Shu; Faltermeier, Claire M.; Smith, Bryan A.; Zhang, Kelvin X.; Going, Catherine C.; Goldstein, Andrew S.; Lee, John K.; Drake, Justin M.; Rice, Meghan A.; Hsu, En-Chi; Nowroozizadeh, Behdokht; Castor, Brandon; Orellana, Sandra Y.; Blum, Steven M.; Cheng, Donghui; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Reiter, Robert E.; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the primary cause of prostate cancer-specific mortality. Defining new mechanisms that can predict recurrence and drive lethal CRPC is critical. Here, we demonstrate that localized high-risk prostate cancer and metastatic CRPC, but not benign prostate tissues or low/intermediate-risk prostate cancer, express high levels of nuclear Notch homolog 1, translocation-associated (Notch1) receptor intracellular domain. Chronic activation of Notch1 synergizes with multiple oncogenic pathways altered in early disease to promote the development of prostate adenocarcinoma. These tumors display features of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a cellular state associated with increased tumor aggressiveness. Consistent with its activation in clinical CRPC, tumors driven by Notch1 intracellular domain in combination with multiple pathways altered in prostate cancer are metastatic and resistant to androgen deprivation. Our study provides functional evidence that the Notch1 signaling axis synergizes with alternative pathways in promoting metastatic CRPC and may represent a new therapeutic target for advanced prostate cancer. PMID:27694579

  4. Osteoclast derived matrix metalloproteinase-9 directly impacts angiogenesis in the prostate tumor-bone microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Bruni-Cardoso, Alexandre; Johnson, Lindsay C.; Vessella, Robert L.; Peterson, Todd E.; Lynch, Conor C.

    2010-01-01

    In human prostate to bone metastases and in a novel rodent model that recapitulates prostate tumor induced-osteolytic and osteogenic responses, we found that osteoclasts are a major source of the proteinase, MMP-9. Since MMPs are important mediators of tumor-host communication, we tested the impact of host derived MMP-9 on prostate tumor progression in bone. To this end, immunocompromised mice that were wild type or null for MMP-9 received transplants of osteolytic/osteogenic inducing prostate adenocarcinoma tumor tissue to the calvaria. Surprisingly, we found that that host MMP-9 significantly contributed to prostate tumor growth without impacting prostate tumor induced osteolytic or osteogenic change as determined by μCT, μSPECT and histomorphometry. Subsequent studies aimed at delineating the mechanism of MMP-9 action on tumor growth focused on angiogenesis since MMP-9 and osteoclasts have been implicated in this process. We observed; 1) significantly fewer and smaller blood vessels in the MMP-9 null group by CD-31 immunohistochemistry; 2) MMP-9 null osteoclasts had significantly lower levels of bioavailable VEGF-A164 and; 3) using an aorta sprouting assay, conditioned media derived from wild type osteoclasts was significantly more angiogenic than conditioned media derived from MMP-9 null osteoclasts. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that osteoclast derived MMP-9 impacts prostate tumor growth in the bone microenvironment by contributing to angiogenesis without altering prostate tumor induced osteolytic or osteogenic changes. PMID:20332212

  5. Oncogenic herpesvirus HHV-8 promotes androgen-independent prostate cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Mygatt, Justin G; Singhal, Adit; Sukumar, Gauthaman; Dalgard, Clifton L; Kaleeba, Johnan A R

    2013-09-15

    Mechanisms underlying progression to androgen-independent prostate cancer following radical ablation therapy remain poorly defined. Although intraprostatic infections have been highlighted as potential cofactors, pathogen influences on pathways that support tumor regrowth are not known. To explore this provocative concept, we derived androgen-sensitive and -insensitive prostate epithelial cells persistently infected with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), an oncogenic herpesvirus that has been detected in normal prostate epithelium, prostate adenocarcinoma, and biologic fluids of patients with prostate cancer, to explore its effects on transition to hormone-refractory disease. Strikingly, we found that HHV-8 infection of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells conferred the capacity for androgen-independent growth. This effect was associated with altered expression and transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR). However, HHV-8 infection bypassed AR signaling by promoting enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2)-mediated epigenetic silencing of tumor-suppressor genes, including MSMB and DAB2IP that are often inactivated in advanced disease. Furthermore, we found that HHV-8 triggered epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Although HHV-8 has not been linked etiologically to prostate cancer, virologic outcomes revealed by our study provide mechanistic insight into how intraprostatic infections could constitute risk for progression to androgen-independent metastatic disease where EZH2 has been implicated. Taken together, our findings prompt further evaluations of the relationship between HHV-8 infections and risk of advanced prostate cancer.

  6. Applications of immunoPET: Using 124I-anti-PSCA A11 minibody for imaging disease progression and response to therapy in mouse xenograft models of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, Scott M.; Tavare, Richard; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Rochefort, Matthew M.; Salazar, Felix B.; Jiang, Ziyue Karen; Reiter, Robert E.; Wu, Anna M.

    2014-10-17

    Here, prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is highly expressed in local prostate cancers and prostate cancer bone metastases and its expression correlates with androgen receptor activation and a poor prognosis. Here in this study, we investigate the potential clinical applications of immunoPET with the anti-PSCA A11 minibody, an antibody fragment optimized for use as an imaging agent. We compare A11 minibody immunoPET to 18F-Fluoride PET bone scans for detecting prostate cancer bone tumors and evaluate the ability of the A11 minibody to image tumor response to androgen deprivation. Osteoblastic, PSCA expressing, LAPC-9 intratibial xenografts were imaged with serial 124I-anti-PSCA A11 minibody immunoPET and 18F-Fluoride bone scans. Mice bearing LAPC-9 subcutaneous xenografts were treated with either vehicle or MDV-3100 and imaged with A11 minibody immunoPET/CT scans pre- and post-treatment. Ex vivo flow cytometry measured the change in PSCA expression in response to androgen deprivation. A11 minibody demonstrated improved sensitivity and specificity over 18F-Fluoride bone scans for detecting LAPC-9 intratibial xenografts at all time points. Finally, LAPC-9 subcutaneous xenografts showed downregulation of PSCA when treated with MDV-3100 which A11 minibody immunoPET was able to detect in vivo.

  7. Applications of immunoPET: Using 124I-anti-PSCA A11 minibody for imaging disease progression and response to therapy in mouse xenograft models of prostate cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Knowles, Scott M.; Tavare, Richard; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; ...

    2014-10-17

    Here, prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is highly expressed in local prostate cancers and prostate cancer bone metastases and its expression correlates with androgen receptor activation and a poor prognosis. Here in this study, we investigate the potential clinical applications of immunoPET with the anti-PSCA A11 minibody, an antibody fragment optimized for use as an imaging agent. We compare A11 minibody immunoPET to 18F-Fluoride PET bone scans for detecting prostate cancer bone tumors and evaluate the ability of the A11 minibody to image tumor response to androgen deprivation. Osteoblastic, PSCA expressing, LAPC-9 intratibial xenografts were imaged with serial 124I-anti-PSCA A11more » minibody immunoPET and 18F-Fluoride bone scans. Mice bearing LAPC-9 subcutaneous xenografts were treated with either vehicle or MDV-3100 and imaged with A11 minibody immunoPET/CT scans pre- and post-treatment. Ex vivo flow cytometry measured the change in PSCA expression in response to androgen deprivation. A11 minibody demonstrated improved sensitivity and specificity over 18F-Fluoride bone scans for detecting LAPC-9 intratibial xenografts at all time points. Finally, LAPC-9 subcutaneous xenografts showed downregulation of PSCA when treated with MDV-3100 which A11 minibody immunoPET was able to detect in vivo.« less

  8. Extremely Early Diagnostic Test for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    James, Veronica Jean

    2011-11-17

    This article reports the results of a blinded fiber diffraction study of skin samples taken from TRAMP mice and age-matched controls to determine whether changes noted in fiber diffraction studies of human skin were present in these TRAMP mice studies. These mice are bred to progress to Gleeson Type 3 to Type 5 prostate cancer. Small strips, 1 mm x 5 mm, cut from the mouse skin samples were loaded into cells in the same way as human samples and slightly stretched to remove the crimp. They remained fully hydrated throughout exposure to the synchrotron beam. The added change that was reported for prostate cancer in 2009 was obtained for all TRAMP mice samples, indicating that this change can be read as High Grade Cancer in human diagnostic tests. These changes were evident for all 3 and 7 week old TRAMP mice samples but not for any of the control samples. This indicates that the changes in the fibre diffraction patterns appear much earlier than in any other available prostate cancer diagnostic test, as none of these can verify the presence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mice before 10 weeks of age. The fiber diffraction test is therefore the most accurate and earliest test for high grade prostate cancer.

  9. What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? For some people with small intestine cancer, ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Stops Working More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  10. What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? It’s important to have honest, open discussions ... Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  11. Extrapulmonary Small Cell Carcinoma of the Seminal Vesicles and Prostate Demonstrated on 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Tabrizipour, Amir Iravani; Shen, Lily; Mansberg, Robert; Chuong, Bui

    2016-02-05

    Extrapulmonary primary small cell carcinomas arising from the urogenital tract is infrequent. It can rarely arise from the prostate and even more rarely from the seminal vesicles. We present a 79-year-old male who was admitted due to acute renal failure with a history of radical radiotherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma 13 years ago. The prostate specific antigen level was not elevated. An abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan showed markedly enlarged seminal vesicles causing bilateral ureteral obstruction and a mildly enlarged prostate. Further evaluation with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/CT demonstrated extensive 18F-FDG uptake in the pelvis with diffuse involvement of both seminal vesicles and the prostate without pathologic uptake in the lungs or elsewhere in the body. Core biopsies of the prostate and both seminal vesicles revealed diffuse involvement by small cell carcinoma. Therapy could not be instituted due to a rapid deterioration in the patient's clinical condition.

  12. Detection by DNA fingerprinting of somatic changes during the establishment of a new prostate cell line.

    PubMed Central

    van Helden, P. D.; Wiid, I. J.; Hoal-van Helden, E. G.; Bey, E.; Cohen, R.

    1994-01-01

    The establishment of a new prostate cell line (BM1604) from a human prostatic adenocarcinoma is reported. The line was rapidly established by culture of tissue on an extracellular matrix, previously laid down by culture of non-related cells. The method has been shown to work well, and other prostate lines have recently been cultured in this way. The cells have a doubling time of 28 h. DNA fingerprinting comparison of the genome from the tumour, the germline and the cells shows that somatic mutations have occurred in the tumour and that clonal selection has clearly occurred in establishment of the line. Many somatic mutations are apparent in the selected cells, which are now stable in culture. This method and the cells may be a useful addition to the limited material available for the in vitro study of prostate cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8054265

  13. Nerve growth factor signaling in prostate health and disease.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Nicola; Bodei, Serena; Zani, Danilo; Simeone, Claudio; Cunico, Sergio Cosciani; Missale, Cristina; Spano, Pierfranco; Sigala, Sandra

    2010-06-01

    The prostate is one of the most abundant sources of nerve growth factor (NGF) in different species, including humans. NGF and its receptors are implicated in the control of prostate cell proliferation and apoptosis and it can either support or suppress cell growth. The co-expression of both NGF receptors, p75(NGFR) and tropomyosin-related kinase A (trkA), represents a crucial condition for the antiproliferative effect of NGF; indeed, p75(NGFR) is progressively lost during prostate tumorigenesis and its disappearance represents a malignancy marker of prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa). Interestingly, a dysregulation of NGF signal transduction was found in a number of human tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of NGF and its receptors in prostate and in PCa. Conclusions bring to the hypothesis that the NGF network could be a candidate for future pharmacological manipulation in the PCa therapy: in particular the re-expression of p75(NTR) and/or the negative modulation of trkA could represent a target to induce apoptosis and to reduce proliferation and invasiveness of PCa.

  14. Prostate cancer - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... well. Proton therapy is another kind of radiation therapy used to treat prostate cancer. Proton beams target the tumor precisely, so there is less damage to the surrounding tissue. This therapy is not widely accepted or used. Prostate Brachytherapy ...

  15. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  16. Enlarged prostate - after care

    MedlinePlus

    BPH - self-care; Benign prostatic hypertrophy - self-care; Benign prostatic hyperplasia - self-care ... Your health care provider may have you take a medicine called alpha-1- blocker. Most people find that these drugs help ...

  17. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000907.htm Cryotherapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features ... first treatment for prostate cancer. What Happens During Cryotherapy Before the procedure, you will be given medicine ...

  18. PROSTATE REGULATION: MODELING ENDOGENOUS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ALTERATIONS IN PROSTATE WEIGHT AND HISTOPATHOLOGY ARE OBSERVED FOLLOWING IN UTERO, PUBERTAL AND ADULT EXPOSURES TO ANTIANDROGENS. ALTERATIONS IN PROSTATE WEIGHT AND HISTOPATHOLOGY ARE OBSERVED FOLLOWING IN UTERO, PUBERTAL AND ADULT EXPOSURES TO ANTIANDROGENS.

  19. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  20. TU-F-12A-01: Quantitative Non-Linear Compartment Modeling of 89Zr- and 124I- Labeled J591 Monoclonal Antibody Kinetics Using Serial Non-Invasive Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in a Pre-Clinical Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, EK; Cheal, SM; Chalasani, S; Fareedy, SB; Punzalan, B; Humm, JL; Osborne, JR; Larson, SM; Zanzonico, PB; Otto, B; Bander, NH

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the binding kinetics of human IgG monoclonal antibody J591 which targets prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in a pre-clinical mouse cancer model using quantitative PET compartmental analysis of two radiolabeled variants. Methods: PSMA is expressed in normal human prostate, and becomes highly upregulated in prostate cancer, making it a promising therapeutic target. Two forms of J591, radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I, were prepared. {sup 89}Zr is a radiometal that becomes trapped in the cell upon internalization by the antigen-antibody complex, while radioiodine leaves the cell. Mice with prostate cancer xenografts underwent non-invasive serial imaging on a Focus 120 microPET up to 144 hours post-injection of J591. A non-linear compartmental model describing the binding and internalization of antibody in tumor xenograft was developed and applied to the PET-derived time-activity curves. The antibody-antigen association rate constant (ka), total amount of antigen per gram tumor (Ag-total), internalization rate of antibody-antigen complex, and efflux rate of radioisotope from tumor were fitted using the model. The surface-bound and the internalized activity were also estimated. Results: Values for ka, Ag-total, and internalization rate were found to be similar regardless of radiolabel payload used. The efflux rate, however, was ∼ 9-fold higher for {sup 124}I-J591 than for {sup 89}Zr-J591. Time-dependent surface-bound and internalized radiotracer activity were similar for both radiolabels at early times post-injection, but clearly differed beyond 24 hours. Conclusion: Binding and internalization of J591 to PSMA-expressing tumor xenografts were similar when radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I payload. The difference in efflux of radioactivity from tumor may be attributable to differential biological fate intracellularly of the radioisotopes. This has great significance for radioimmunotherapy and antibody

  1. Adenocarcinoma of Meckel's cave: case report.

    PubMed

    Tacconi, L; Arulampalam, T; Johnston, F; Symon, L

    1995-12-01

    A rare localization of adenocarcinoma in Meckel's cave is reported in a 58-year-old woman, who had a 5-month history of pain and altered sensation in the second division of the left trigeminal nerve. Removal of the lesion was achieved by a subtemporal route. Histology showed this to be an adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent investigations for a primary tumor; the investigations were all negative, and the patient was subsequently treated with a course of radiotherapy. At 4-month follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence, and she remains symptomatically well. The various mechanisms of secondary localization are discussed.

  2. Enlarged Prostate (BPH)

    MedlinePlus

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine out of the body. As men age, their prostate grows bigger. If it gets too large, it ...

  3. Bisphenol A Promotes Human Prostate Stem-Progenitor Cell Self-Renewal and Increases In Vivo Carcinogenesis in Human Prostate Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wen-Yang; Shi, Guang-Bin; Hu, Dan-Ping; Majumdar, Shyama; Li, Guannan; Huang, Ke; Nelles, Jason L.; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Walker, Cheryl Lyn; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in rodent models have shown that early-life exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) reprograms the prostate and enhances its susceptibility to hormonal carcinogenesis with aging. To determine whether the human prostate is similarly sensitive to BPA, the current study used human prostate epithelial stem-like cells cultured from prostates of young, disease-free donors. Similar to estradiol-17β (E2), BPA increased stem-progenitor cell self-renewal and expression of stem-related genes in a dose-dependent manner. Further, 10 nM BPA and E2 possessed equimolar membrane-initiated signaling with robust induction of p-Akt and p-Erk at 15 minutes. To assess in vivo carcinogenicity, human prostate stem-progenitor cells combined with rat mesenchyme were grown as renal grafts in nude mice, forming normal human prostate epithelium at 1 month. Developmental BPA exposure was achieved through oral administration of 100 or 250 μg BPA/kg body weight to hosts for 2 weeks after grafting, producing free BPA levels of 0.39 and 1.35 ng/mL serum, respectively. Carcinogenesis was driven by testosterone plus E2 treatment for 2 to 4 months to model rising E2 levels in aging men. The incidence of high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia and adenocarcinoma markedly increased from 13% in oil-fed controls to 33% to 36% in grafts exposed in vivo to BPA (P < .05). Continuous developmental BPA exposure through in vitro (200 nM) plus in vivo (250 μg/kg body weight) treatments increased high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia/cancer incidence to 45% (P < .01). Together, the present findings demonstrate that human prostate stem-progenitor cells are direct BPA targets and that developmental exposure to BPA at low doses increases hormone-dependent cancer risk in the human prostate epithelium. PMID:24424067

  4. Increased infiltrated macrophages in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH): role of stromal androgen receptor in macrophage-induced prostate stromal cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohai; Lin, Wen-Jye; Izumi, Kouji; Jiang, Qi; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Xu, Defeng; Fang, Lei-Ya; Lu, Tianjing; Li, Lei; Xia, Shujie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-05-25

    Infiltrated macrophages may play important roles in the development and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. We found increased macrophages infiltration in human and mouse BPH tissues. By establishing a co-culture transwell system, we found increased migration of macrophages and proliferation of prostate stromal cells during co-culture. Importantly, stromal androgen receptor (AR) could enhance the migration of macrophages and macrophage-mediated stromal cell proliferation. We identified CCL3 as an AR downstream player, and found CCL3 levels were notably increased in human and mouse BPH prostates. Ablation of prostate stromal AR in a mouse BPH model significantly reduced CCL3 expression levels in prostates. Consistently, targeting AR via an AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9®, or neutralization of CCL3 with an antibody, resulted in suppression of macrophage migration and prostate stromal cell growth. Our study provides mechanistic insights on the regulation of prostate stromal cells by macrophages via stromal AR/CCL3 signaling pathways, which could potentially allow the development of therapeutic approaches for battling BPH with persistent inflammation.

  5. Detection of circulating tumor cells in patients with esophagogastric or pancreatic adenocarcinoma using the CellSearch® system: An observational feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Piegeler, Tobias; Winder, Thomas; Kern, Sabine; Pestalozzi, Bernhard; Schneider, Paul Magnus; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood of cancer patients have been demonstrated to be of prognostic value regarding metastasis and survival. The CellSearch® system has been certified for the detection of CTCs and as a prognostic tool in patients with metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer. Few studies have evaluated the detection of CTCs originating from esophagogastric or pancreatic cancer with the CellSearch® system. In the present small pilot study, a total of 16 patients with either esophagogastric (n=8) or pancreatic (n=8) adenocarcinomas at various disease stages were randomly screened and included. A total of 7.5 ml of blood was drawn from each patient and analyzed for CTCs using the CellSearch® device. CTCs could be detected in 1 out of 8 patients (12.5%) with esophagogastric and in 7 out of 8 patients (87.5%) with pancreatic cancer. The preliminary data obtained from this observational feasibility study suggested that the CellSearch® system may become a valuable tool for the detection of CTCs in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, whereas the usefulness in patients with early-stage esophagogastric adenocarcinoma may be limited. This study clearly points towards a requirement for larger studies focusing on patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma at various disease stages and assessing CTCs, whereas patients with esophagogastric adenocarcinomas should be part of further pilot studies. PMID:27446462

  6. Detection of circulating tumor cells in patients with esophagogastric or pancreatic adenocarcinoma using the CellSearch(®) system: An observational feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Piegeler, Tobias; Winder, Thomas; Kern, Sabine; Pestalozzi, Bernhard; Schneider, Paul Magnus; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice

    2016-08-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood of cancer patients have been demonstrated to be of prognostic value regarding metastasis and survival. The CellSearch(®) system has been certified for the detection of CTCs and as a prognostic tool in patients with metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer. Few studies have evaluated the detection of CTCs originating from esophagogastric or pancreatic cancer with the CellSearch(®) system. In the present small pilot study, a total of 16 patients with either esophagogastric (n=8) or pancreatic (n=8) adenocarcinomas at various disease stages were randomly screened and included. A total of 7.5 ml of blood was drawn from each patient and analyzed for CTCs using the CellSearch(®) device. CTCs could be detected in 1 out of 8 patients (12.5%) with esophagogastric and in 7 out of 8 patients (87.5%) with pancreatic cancer. The preliminary data obtained from this observational feasibility study suggested that the CellSearch(®) system may become a valuable tool for the detection of CTCs in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, whereas the usefulness in patients with early-stage esophagogastric adenocarcinoma may be limited. This study clearly points towards a requirement for larger studies focusing on patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma at various disease stages and assessing CTCs, whereas patients with esophagogastric adenocarcinomas should be part of further pilot studies.

  7. Identificaton of Genes Required for the Survival of Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    luteinizing hormone- releasing hormone (LHRH) (also known as gonadotropin-releasing hormone – GnRH ). This is often done in combination with inhibitors...independent prostate cancer metastasis of the bone (30). It exhibits low 5α-reductase activity and is p53-, p16- , and pRb mutated (31). The MDA-PCa-2b...adenocarcinoma cell line was also derived from a bone metastasis of androgen-independent prostate cancer. These cells are p53+ and pRb+ (32) and

  8. Structure and Function of the Splice Variants of TMPRSS2-ERG, a Prevalent Genomic Alteration in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    the two main tumor foci in this section, one tumor focus was ERG positive. In ERG positive tumor focus, malignant epithelium or normal endotheials...ERG was not expressed in normal mouse prostate epithelium (Mohamed et al., 2010). Similar findings were noted for human prostate (Furusato et al...2010). These observations highlight the cancer-specific aberrant expression and function of ERG in the prostate epithelium . Figure 10

  9. The effect of finasteride on the prostate gland in men with elevated serum prostate-specific antigen levels.

    PubMed Central

    Cote, R. J.; Skinner, E. C.; Salem, C. E.; Mertes, S. J.; Stanczyk, F. Z.; Henderson, B. E.; Pike, M. C.; Ross, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a disease associated with androgens. It has been hypothesized that reducing the conversion of testosterone (T) to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the prostate by the use of the drug finasteride, a 5alpha-reductase inhibitor, will reduce the incidence of prostate cancer. We investigated the chemopreventive potential of finasteride by evaluating its effect on the prostate gland of men with elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Fifty-two men with elevated PSA and prostate sextant biopsies negative for cancer were randomized to receive finasteride 5 mg day(-1) (27 patients) or no medication (25 patients) for 12 months and were rebiopsied at 12 months. The biopsies were evaluated for the presence of cancer, the proportion of glandular and hyperplastic tissue, and the presence of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN). Epithelial proliferation was assessed in the prestudy and 12-month biopsies by immunohistochemistry using antibody to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Serum blood samples were drawn at baseline and after 1, 3, 6 and 12 months of study. In the control group, serum levels of PSA and T were unchanged throughout the 12 months. In the finasteride group, PSA decreased 48% (P < 0.001), DHT decreased 67% (P < 0.001) and T increased 21% (P < 0.001). Histological evaluation of prestudy and 12-month biopsy specimens revealed that the finasteride group had a 30% reduction in the percentage of hyperplastic epithelial tissue (P = 0.002), although this decrease was not statistically significantly different between the finasteride and control groups (P = 0.11). In patients with PIN on prestudy biopsy, no change occurred in the PIN lesions with finasteride treatment. Finasteride also had no effect on the proliferation index of prostatic epithelial cells. Of the 27 patients treated with finasteride, eight (30%) had adenocarcinoma of the prostate detected on the 12-month biopsy, compared with one (4%) of the control patients

  10. Linking Estrogens, Prostatitis and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    provide the first direct evidence linking phy siologic estr ogen up- regulation an d pr ostate ma lignancy via inflammation. Ellem, Stuart J...inflammation and malignancy in the prostate. The identification of estr ogen as a cause of prostatitis, as well as a fac tor in the development of

  11. Role of the ARF Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    literature. We asked Dr. Jeff Arbeit in the department of Surgery here at Washington University for his expertise in mouse prostate tumor development...18070929 6. Lu, Z.H., Wright, J.D., Belt, B., Cardiff, R.D. & Arbeit , J.M. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 facilitates cervical cancer progression in human

  12. NF-κB gene signature predicts prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Renjie; Yi, Yajun; Yull, Fiona E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Clark, Peter E.; Koyama, Tatsuki; Smith, Joseph A.; Matusik, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    In many prostate cancer (PCa) patients, the cancer will be recurrent and eventually progress to lethal metastatic disease after primary treatment, such as surgery or radiation therapy. Therefore, it would be beneficial to better predict which patients with early-stage PCa would progress or recur after primary definitive treatment. In addition, many studies indicate that activation of NF-κB signaling correlates with PCa progression; however, the precise underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Our studies show that activation of NF-κB signaling via deletion of one allele of its inhibitor, IκBα, did not induce prostatic tumorigenesis in our mouse model. However, activation of NF-κB signaling did increase the rate of tumor progression in the Hi-Myc mouse PCa model when compared to Hi-Myc alone. Using the non-malignant NF-κB activated androgen depleted mouse prostate, a NF-κB Activated Recurrence Predictor 21 (NARP21) gene signature was generated. The NARP21 signature successfully predicted disease-specific survival and distant metastases-free survival in patients with PCa. This transgenic mouse model derived gene signature provides a useful and unique molecular profile for human PCa prognosis, which could be used on a prostatic biopsy to predict indolent versus aggressive behavior of the cancer after surgery. PMID:24686169

  13. Aggressive digital papillary adenoma-adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Evangelos G; Miller, Gavin; Revelos, Kyriakos; Kitsanta, Panagiota; Page, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma and aggressive digital papillary adenoma are rare tumours of the sweat glands. They are most common in the most distal part of the fingers and are locally aggressive with a 50% local recurrence rate; 14% of tumours metastasize. We present two cases.

  14. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  15. Can Prostate Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Prostate Cancer Be Found Early? Screening is testing to find ... Health Care Team About Prostate Cancer? More In Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  16. Analysis of Morphogenic Effect of hDAB2IP on Prostate Cancer and its Disease Correlation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    polycomb-group gene Ezh2 is required for early mouse development. Mol. Cell . Biol. 21, 4330-4336 16. Plath, K. et al. (2003) Role of histone H3 lysine 27...of organs. By determining the promoter sequence from the 5’- flanking region of the mDab2ip gene in mouse prostatic epithelial cell lines provided...two PCR transcripts (300 bp and 600 bp) were detected from RNA isolated from mouse brain and three mouse prostatic epithelial cell lines (TRAMP-Cl, -C2

  17. Inflammation-associated regulation of the macrophage inhibitory cytokine (MIC-1) gene in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Seema; Vanveldhuizen, Peter; Holzbeierlein, Jeffrey; Tawfik, Ossama; Thrasher, J Brantley; Karan, Dev

    2012-05-01

    Macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1), also known as prostate-derived factor (PDF), is a molecule of the TGF-β superfamily and has been associated with the progression of various types of diseases including prostate cancer. Initially identified from activated macrophages, the MIC-1 gene may provide a potential link between inflammation and prostate cancer. In this context, we performed MIC-1 expression analysis using mouse prostate tissues to determine whether there was any correlation with age and inflammation. Reverse transcription PCR analysis on RNA samples isolated from prostate lobes from prostate-specific antigen transgenic mice of varying ages revealed that MIC-1 gene expression is extremely low to non-detectable in the prostate tissues obtained from young mice, while its expression increases in the prostate tissues harvested from elderly mice. Increased MIC-1 gene expression in the mouse prostate was found to be associated with an increased level of infiltrating lymphocytes. To confirm this observation, we showed that inflammation-associated cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α) significantly upregulate the secretion of the MIC-1 protein in a human prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP cells), while cytokines IL-6 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor were less effective. Taken together, these data indicated that inflammation-associated cytokines may play a critical role in the functional regulation of the MIC-1 gene in the early stages of prostate cancer development. More studies are required to understand the biological activity of MIC-1 gene regulation in the development and progression of prostate cancer.

  18. An MR Contrast Agent for Intra-Prostatic Imaging of Prostatic Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    nanoparticle MR contrast targeted to the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRP receptor) that will be used to image the intra-prostatic distribution of...develop a magnetic nanoparticle MR contrast targeted to the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRP receptor) that will be used to image the intra...the receptor in a convenient animal model, the normal mouse. The GRP receptor is expressed at high levels in the normal rodent pancreas. I. Synthesis

  19. Isolation and Growth of Prostate Stem Cells and Establishing Cancer Cell Lines from Human Prostate Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    RU, Cheng D, and Witte ON. Isolation and functional characterization of murine prostate stem cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2006; 29. Cunha GR...Hopkins School of Medicine Flow Sorting Facility) for their expert assistance and Jessica Hicks and Yuko Konishi (Johns Hopkins Department of...P. Mouse urogenital development: a practical approach. Differentiation 2003;71:402–13. 29. Xin L, Ide H, Kim Y, Dubey P, Witte ON. In vivo

  20. Dual tumor suppressing and promoting function of Notch1 signaling in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lefort, Karine; Ostano, Paola; Mello-Grand, Maurizia; Calpini, Valérie; Scatolini, Maria; Farsetti, Antonella; Dotto, G Paolo; Chiorino, Giovanna

    2016-07-26

    Adenocarcinomas of the prostate arise as multifocal heterogeneous lesions as the likely result of genetic and epigenetic alterations and deranged cell-cell communication. Notch signaling is an important form of intercellular communication with a role in growth/differentiation control and tumorigenesis. Contrasting reports exist in the literature on the role of this pathway in prostate cancer (PCa) development. We show here that i) compared to normal prostate tissue, Notch1 expression is significantly reduced in a substantial fraction of human PCas while it is unaffected or even increased in others; ii) acute Notch activation both inhibits and induces process networks associated with prostatic neoplasms; iii) down-modulation of Notch1 expression and activity in immortalized normal prostate epithelial cells increases their proliferation potential, while increased Notch1 activity in PCa cells suppresses growth and tumorigenicity through a Smad3-dependent mechanism involving p21WAF1/CIP1; iv) prostate cancer cells resistant to Notch growth inhibitory effects retain Notch1-induced upregulation of pro-oncogenic genes, like EPAS1 and CXCL6, also overexpressed in human PCas with high Notch1 levels. Taken together, these results reconcile conflicting data on the role of Notch1 in prostate cancer.

  1. Dual tumor suppressing and promoting function of Notch1 signaling in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lefort, Karine; Ostano, Gian Paola; Mello-Grand, Maurizia; Calpini, Valérie; Scatolini, Maria; Farsetti, Antonella; Dotto, Gian Paolo; Chiorino, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinomas of the prostate arise as multifocal heterogeneous lesions as the likely result of genetic and epigenetic alterations and deranged cell-cell communication. Notch signaling is an important form of intercellular communication with a role in growth/differentiation control and tumorigenesis. Contrasting reports exist in the literature on the role of this pathway in prostate cancer (PCa) development. We show here that i) compared to normal prostate tissue, Notch1 expression is significantly reduced in a substantial fraction of human PCas while it is unaffected or even increased in others; ii) acute Notch activation both inhibits and induces process networks associated with prostatic neoplasms; iii) down-modulation of Notch1 expression and activity in immortalized normal prostate epithelial cells increases their proliferation potential, while increased Notch1 activity in PCa cells suppresses growth and tumorigenicity through a Smad3-dependent mechanism involving p21WAF1/CIP1; iv) prostate cancer cells resistant to Notch growth inhibitory effects retain Notch1-induced upregulation of pro-oncogenic genes, like EPAS1 and CXCL6, also overexpressed in human PCas with high Notch1 levels. Taken together, these results reconcile conflicting data on the role of Notch1 in prostate cancer. PMID:27384993

  2. MicroRNA expression profiles associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and ampullary adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Nicolai A; Werner, Jens; Willenbrock, Hanni; Roslind, Anne; Giese, Nathalia; Horn, Thomas; Wøjdemann, Morten; Johansen, Julia S

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNAs have potential as diagnostic cancer biomarkers. The aim of this study was (1) to define microRNA expression patterns in formalin-fixed parafin-embedded tissue from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, ampullary adenocarcinoma, normal pancreas and chronic pancreatitis without using micro-dissection and (2) to discover new diagnostic microRNAs and combinations of microRNAs in cancer tissue. The expression of 664 microRNAs in tissue from 170 pancreatic adenocarcinomas and 107 ampullary adenocarcinomas were analyzed using a commercial microRNA assay. Results were compared with chronic pancreatitis, normal pancreas and duodenal adenocarcinoma. In all, 43 microRNAs had higher and 41 microRNAs reduced expression in pancreatic cancer compared with normal pancreas. In all, 32 microRNAs were differently expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared with chronic pancreatitis (17 higher; 15 reduced). Several of these microRNAs have not before been related to diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (eg, miR-492, miR-614, miR-622). MiR-614, miR-492, miR-622, miR-135b and miR-196 were most differently expressed. MicroRNA profiles of pancreatic and ampullary adenocarcinomas were correlated (0.990). MicroRNA expression profiles for pancreatic cancer described in the literature were consistent with our findings, and the microRNA profile for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (miR-196b-miR-217) was validated. We identified a more significant expression profile, the difference between miR-411 and miR-198 (P=2.06 × 10(-54)) and a diagnostic LASSO classifier using 19 microRNAs (sensitivity 98.5%; positive predictive value 97.8%; accuracy 97.0%). We also identified microRNA profiles to subclassify ampullary adenocarcinomas into pancreatobiliary or intestinal type. In conclusion, we found that combinations of two microRNAs could roughly separate neoplastic from non-neoplastic samples. A diagnostic 19 microRNA classifier was constructed which without micro-dissection could discriminate pancreatic

  3. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  4. Risks of Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Prostate Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  6. General Information about Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  7. A rare case of metachronous penile and urethral metastases from a rectal mucinous adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Christodoulidou, Michelle; Sahdev, Varun; Muneer, Asif; Nigam, Raj

    2015-11-05

    Metastatic lesions in the penis are uncommon in patients with prostate or bladder cancer but penile metastatic lesions from rectal tumours are rare with only 65 cases reported in the literature. We describe the case of a 70-year-old man who developed metastatic lesions within his corpus cavernosum 2 years after being diagnosed and treated for a mucinous adenocarcinoma of the rectum and a year after a wedge resection of an isolated lung metastasis. He proceeded with total penectomy and intraoperatively two skip lesions were also found within the wall of his urethra; histological analysis proved that these were also metastatic lesions. A perineal urethrostomy was formed with the remaining macroscopically healthy urethra. He made a good recovery from his operation and continued his treatment under the oncology team.

  8. CK2 abrogates the inhibitory effects of PRH/HHEX on prostate cancer cell migration and invasion and acts through PRH to control cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Y H; Kershaw, R M; Humphreys, E H; Assis Junior, E M; Chaudhri, S; Jayaraman, P-S; Gaston, K

    2017-01-01

    PRH/HHEX (proline-rich homeodomain protein/haematopoietically expressed homeobox protein) is a transcription factor that controls cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell migration. Our previous work has shown that in haematopoietic cells, Protein Kinase CK2-dependent phosphorylation of PRH results in the inhibition of PRH DNA-binding activity, increased cleavage of PRH by the proteasome and the misregulation of PRH target genes. Here we show that PRH and hyper-phosphorylated PRH are present in normal prostate epithelial cells, and that hyper-phosphorylated PRH levels are elevated in benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatic adenocarcinoma, and prostate cancer cell lines. A reduction in PRH protein levels increases the motility of normal prostate epithelial cells and conversely, PRH over-expression inhibits prostate cancer cell migration and blocks the ability of these cells to invade an extracellular matrix. We show that CK2 over-expression blocks the repression of prostate cancer cell migration and invasion by PRH. In addition, we show that PRH knockdown in normal immortalised prostate cells results in an increase in the population of cells capable of colony formation in Matrigel, as well as increased cell invasion and decreased E-cadherin expression. Inhibition of CK2 reduces PRH phosphorylation and reduces prostate cell proliferation but the effects of CK2 inhibition on cell proliferation are abrogated in PRH knockdown cells. These data suggest that the increased phosphorylation of PRH in prostate cancer cells increases both cell proliferation and tumour cell migration/invasion. PMID:28134934

  9. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic characteristics of the diseased canine prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Troisi, Alessandro; Orlandi, Riccardo; Bargellini, Paolo; Menchetti, Laura; Borges, Paulo; Zelli, Riccardo; Polisca, Angela

    2015-11-01

    The work was carried out on a total of 26 male dogs that on the basis of clinical examination, prostate ultrasound and prostate biopsy, were divided prospectively into four groups: (1) normal dogs (control group; n = 8); (2) dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia (group BPH; n = 8); (3) dogs suffering from prostatitis (group prostatitis; n = 4); (4) dogs with prostatic tumors (group tumors; n = 6). The examination of the prostate by means of contrast medium and dedicated ultrasound system allowed a detailed qualitative and quantitative analysis of prostatic vessels in normal and diseased conditions, enabling the detection and characterization of different disease states, and quantification of parameters such as peak intensity of perfusion (%), arrival time of the contrast medium to its maximum value of video intensity (time to peak [TTP; seconds]), regional blood volume, regional blood flow, and mean transit time (MTT [seconds]). The hemodynamic indices TTP (P < 0.01) and MTT (P < 0.001) of diseased prostate groups were significantly lower than those in the normal prostate group although there were no differences among diseases. Optimal cutoff values were 31 seconds (Sensitivity: 72%; Specificity: 88%) and 47 seconds (Sensitivity: 100%; Specificity: 88%) while area under receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.86 (P < 0.01) and 0.97 (P < 0.01) for TTP and MTT, respectively. The qualitative evaluation of vascular patterns showed differences between normal and diseased prostate glands. The latter were characterized by an alteration of the normal vascular appearance consisting of loss of the subcapsular arterioles and lack of a centripetal vascular pattern. The qualitative aspect of the study highlighted the different vascular architecture between BPH, prostatitis, adenocarcinoma, and lymphoma. This study shows how contrast-enhanced ultrasound represents a valid and noninvasive method for highlighting and characterizing prostatic vasculature

  10. FOLFOX-6 Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Esophagectomy and Post-operative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastric Cardia; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer

  11. T cells engineered with a T cell receptor against the prostate antigen TARP specifically kill HLA-A2+ prostate and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hillerdal, Victoria; Nilsson, Berith; Carlsson, Björn; Eriksson, Fredrik; Essand, Magnus

    2012-09-25

    To produce genetically engineered T cells directed against prostate and breast cancer cells, we have cloned the T-cell receptor recognizing the HLA-A2-restricted T-cell receptor γ-chain alternate reading-frame protein (TARP)(4-13) epitope. TARP is a protein exclusively expressed in normal prostate epithelium and in adenocarcinomas of the prostate and breast. Peripheral blood T cells transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding the TARP-TCR proliferated well when exposed to peptide-specific stimuli. These cells exerted peptide-specific IFN-γ production and cytotoxic activity. Importantly, HLA-A2(+) prostate and breast cancer cells expressing TARP were also killed, demonstrating that the TARP(4-13) epitope is a physiologically relevant target for T-cell therapy of prostate and breast cancer. In conclusion, we present the cloning of a T cell receptor (TCR) directed against a physiologically relevant HLA-A2 epitope of TARP. To our knowledge this report on engineering of T cells with a TCR directed against an antigen specifically expressed by prostate cells is unique.

  12. Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinomas exhibit gastric differentiation.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Emma; Liu, Xiuli; Xiao, Shu-Yuan

    2014-02-01

    Primary small bowel adenocarcinoma is rare. Although generally similar to colonic adenocarcinoma, some small bowel adenocarcinomas exhibit unique morphologic features, particularly those arising in association with Crohn disease. In this study, 15 sporadic small bowel adenocarcinomas and 11 Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinomas were examined for histology and immunohistochemical profile including cytokeratins (CK) 7 and 20, intestinal markers CDX2 and MUC2, and gastric epithelial markers MUC5AC and MUC6. We found that Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinomas frequently resemble gastric tubular adenocarcinoma histologically. In addition, when compared to sporadic small bowel adenocarcinoma, the former expressed MUC5AC and MUC6 with much higher frequency (82% vs. 7% and 73% vs. 0%, respectively). Ten of 11 Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinomas (91%) were positive for at least one gastric-type marker (MUC5AC or MUC6). Expression of CK7 was also more frequent in Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinoma (73% versus 27%) while expression of CK20 was less frequent (64% vs. 100%). There was no difference between sporadic and Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinoma in expression of CDX2 (100% vs. 91%) and MUC2 (93% vs. 73%). These observations suggest that there is a difference in the morphologic and immunohistochemical characteristics of sporadic versus Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinoma, particularly in their expression of gastric-type mucin. The findings also suggest that gastric differentiation in Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinoma is related to gastric metaplasia, a common phenomenon in Crohn disease.

  13. Tristetraprolin disables prostate cancer maintenance by impairing proliferation and metabolic function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weimin; Yang, Chunying; Fernandez, Mario R.; Schaub, Franz X.; Cleveland, John L.; Rounbehler, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is an RNA-binding protein that post-transcriptionally suppresses gene expression by delivering mRNA cargo to processing bodies (P-bodies) where the mRNA is degraded. TTP functions as a tumor suppressor in a mouse model of B cell lymphoma, and in some human malignancies low TTP expression correlates with reduced survival. Here we report important prognostic and functional roles for TTP in human prostate cancer. First, gene expression analysis of prostate tumors revealed low TTP expression correlates with patients having high-risk Gleason scores and increased biochemical recurrence. Second, in prostate cancer cells with low levels of endogenous TTP, inducible TTP expression inhibits their growth and proliferation, as well as their clonogenic growth. Third, TTP functions as a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer, as forced TTP expression markedly impairs the tumorigenic potential of prostate cancer cells in a mouse xenograft model. Finally, pathway analysis of gene expression data suggested metabolism is altered by TTP expression in prostate tumor cells, and metabolic analyses revealed that such processes are impaired by TTP, including mitochondrial respiration. Collectively, these findings suggest that TTP is an important prognostic indicator for prostate cancer, and augmenting TTP function would effectively disable the metabolism and proliferation of aggressive prostate tumors. PMID:27825143

  14. Small cell-like change in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductal carcinoma, and invasive prostatic carcinoma: a study of 7 cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephen; Han, Jeong S; Chang, Alex; Ross, Hillary M; Montironi, Rodolfo; Yorukoglu, Kutsal; Lane, Zhaoli; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2013-03-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the prostate is associated with poor prognosis and different treatment from conventional acinar adenocarcinoma. Given the important clinicopathologic implications of a diagnosis of small cell carcinoma, we report 7 cases showing unusual, extensive small cell-like change in intraductal carcinoma and invasive carcinoma. Prostatic biopsies from 3 patients and radical prostatectomy specimens from 4 patients showed variably extensive small cell-like high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and intraductal carcinoma. Five cases were associated with conventional acinar adenocarcinoma (2 cases with Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7; 3 cases with Gleason 3 + 4 = 7). No small cell carcinoma was seen. Small and large ducts with small cell-like change showed solid and cribriform proliferations of atypical cells with abrupt transition between centrally located populations of small cells and more typical large dysplastic cells at the duct periphery. Rosette-like formations were noted within some involved ducts. Small cell-like change was characterized by crowded cells with uniformly bland vesicular nuclei and minimal cytoplasm and no significant mitotic or apoptotic activity. In 3 cases, similar small cell-like morphology was noted focally in invasive carcinoma. The small cell-like areas were negative for synaptophysin and chromogranin, focally positive for TTF-1, and weakly positive for racemase. Ki-67 labeled less than 5% with predominant labeling of the larger atypical cells and minimal reactivity in the small cell-like population. In summary, small cell-like change in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductal carcinoma, and invasive carcinoma is not associated with small cell carcinoma; shows no immunohistochemical evidence of neuroendocrine differentiation; and likely is not an adverse prognostic feature.

  15. YBX1 regulates tumor growth via CDC25a pathway in human lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wendan; Li, Jinxiu; Tang, Zhipeng; Yu, Zhenlong; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Yixiang; Wang, Ziyi; Wang, Peng; Li, Yechi; Li, Fengzhou; Sun, Zhe; Xuan, Yang; Tang, Ranran; Deng, Wu-guo; Guo, Wei; Gu, Chundong

    2016-01-01

    Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX1) is involved in the multi-tumor occurrence and development. However, the regulation of YBX1 in lung tumorigenesis and the underlying mechanisms, especially its relationship with CDC25a, was remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the expression and clinical significance of YBX1 and CDC25a in lung adenocarcinoma and identified their roles in the regulation of lung cancer growth. The retrospective analysis of 116 patients with lung adenocarcinoma indicated that YBX1 was positively correlated with CDC25a expression. The Cox-regression analysis showed only high-ranking TNM stage and low CDC25a expression were an independent risk factor of prognosis in enrolled patients. High expression of YBX1 or CDC25a protein was also observed in lung adenocarcinoma cells compared with HLF cells. ChIP assay demonstrated the binding of endogenous YBX1 to the CDC25a promoter region. Overexpression of exogenous YBX1 up-regulated the expression of the CDC25a promoter-driven luciferase. By contrast, inhibition of YBX1 by siRNA markedly decreased the capability of YBX1 binding to CDC25a promoter in A549 and H322 cells. Inhibition of YBX1 expression also blocked cell cycle progression, suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis via the CDC25a pathway in vitro. Moreover, inhibition of YBX1 by siRNA suppressed tumorigenesis in a xenograft mouse model and down-regulated the expression of YBX1, CDC25a, Ki67 and cleaved caspase 3 in the tumor tissues of mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate inhibition of YBX1 suppressed lung cancer growth partly via the CDC25a pathway and high expression of YBX1/CDC25a predicts poor prognosis in human lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27384875

  16. Bone Matrix Osteonectin Limits Prostate Cancer Cell Growth and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kapinas, Kristina; Lowther, Katie M.; Kessler, Catherine B.; Tilbury, Karissa; Lieberman, Jay R.; Tirnauer, Jennifer S.; Campagnola, Paul; Delany, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding prostate cancer metastasis to bone and the interaction of these cells with the bone microenvironment. Osteonectin/SPARC/BM-40 is a collagen binding matricellular protein that is enriched in bone. Its expression is increased in prostate cancer metastases, and it stimulates the migration of prostate carcinoma cells. However, the presence of osteonectin in cancer cells and the stroma may limit prostate tumor development and progression. To determine how bone matrix osteonectin affects the behavior of prostate cancer cells, we modeled prostate cancer cell-bone interactions using the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3, and mineralized matrices synthesized by wild type and osteonectin-null osteoblasts in vitro. We developed this in vitro system because the structural complexity of collagen matrices in vivo is not mimicked by reconstituted collagen scaffolds or by more complex substrates, like basement membrane extracts. Second harmonic generation imaging demonstrated that the wild type matrices had thick collagen fibers organized into longitudinal bundles, whereas osteonectin-null matrices had thinner fibers in random networks. Importantly, a mouse model of prostate cancer metastases to bone showed a collagen fiber phenotype similar to the wild type matrix synthesized in vitro. When PC-3 cells were grown on the wild type matrices, they displayed decreased cell proliferation, increased cell spreading, and decreased resistance to radiation-induced cell death, compared to cells grown on osteonectin-null matrix. Our data support the idea that osteonectin can suppress prostate cancer pathogenesis, expanding this concept to the microenvironment of skeletal metastases. PMID:22525512

  17. Acid ceramidase in prostate cancer radiation therapy resistance and relapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Joseph C.

    Prostate tumor cell escape from ionizing radiation (IR)-induced killing can lead to disease progression and relapse. Sphingolipids such as ceramide and sphingosine 1-phosphate influence signal transduction pathways that regulate stress response in cancer cells. In particular, metabolism of apoptotic ceramide constitutes an important survival adaptation. Assessments of enzyme activity, mRNA, and protein demonstrated preferential upregulation of the ceramide deacylating enzyme acid ceramidase (AC) in irradiated cancer cells. Promoter-reporter and ChIP-qPCR assays revealed AC transcription by activator protein 1 (AP-1) is sensitive to pharmacological inhibition of de novo ceramide biosynthesis, identifying a protective feedback mechanism that mitigates the effects of IR-induced ceramide. Deregulation of c-Jun, in particular, induced marked radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo, which was rescued by ectopic AC over-expression. AC over-expression in prostate cancer clonogens surviving 80 Gray fractionated irradiation was associated with increased radioresistance and proliferation, suggesting a role in radiotherapy failure and relapse. Indeed, immunohistochemical analysis of human prostate cancer tissues revealed higher levels of AC after radiotherapy failure than therapy-naive adenocarcinoma, PIN, or benign tissues. By genetically downregulating AC with small interfering RNA (siRNA), we observed radiosensitization of cells using clonogenic and cytotoxicity assays. Finally, treatment with lysosomotropic small molecule inhibitors of AC, LCL385 or LCL521, induced prostate cancer xenograft radiosensitization and long-term suppression, suggesting AC is a tractable target for adjuvant radiotherapy.

  18. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, Version 2.2012

    PubMed Central

    Tempero, Margaret A.; Arnoletti, J. Pablo; Behrman, Stephen W.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Benson, Al B.; Casper, Ephraim S.; Cohen, Steven J.; Czito, Brian; Ellenhorn, Joshua D. I.; Hawkins, William G.; Herman, Joseph; Hoffman, John P.; Ko, Andrew; Komanduri, Srinadh; Koong, Albert; Ma, Wen Wee; Malafa, Mokenge P.; Merchant, Nipun B.; Mulvihill, Sean J.; Muscarella, Peter; Nakakura, Eric K.; Obando, Jorge; Pitman, Martha B.; Sasson, Aaron R.; Tally, Anitra; Thayer, Sarah P.; Whiting, Samuel; Wolff, Robert A.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A.; Shead, Dorothy A.

    2013-01-01

    The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma discuss the workup and management of tumors of the exocrine pancreas. These NCCN Guidelines Insights provide a summary and explanation of major changes to the 2012 NCCN Guidelines for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma. The panel made 3 significant updates to the guidelines: 1) more detail was added regarding multiphase CT techniques for diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer, and pancreas protocol MRI was added as an emerging alternative to CT; 2) the use of a fluoropyrimidine plus oxaliplatin (e.g., 5-FU/leucovorin/oxaliplatin or capecitabine/oxaliplatin) was added as an acceptable chemotherapy combination for patients with advanced or metastatic disease and good performance status as a category 2B recommendation; and 3) the panel developed new recommendations concerning surgical technique and pathologic analysis and reporting. PMID:22679115

  19. miR-200 Inhibits Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Invasion and Metastasis by Targeting Flt1/VEGFR1

    PubMed Central

    Roybal, Jonathon D.; Zang, Yi; Ahn, Young-Ho; Yang, Yanan; Gibbons, Don L.; Baird, Brandi N.; Alvarez, Cristina; Thilaganathan, Nishan; Liu, Diane D.; Saintigny, Pierre; Heymach, John V.; Creighton, Chad J.; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2011-01-01

    The microRNA-200 (miR-200) family is part of a gene expression signature that predicts poor prognosis in lung cancer patients. In a mouse model of K-ras/p53-mutant lung adenocarcinoma, miR-200 levels are suppressed in metastasis-prone tumor cells, and forced miR-200 expression inhibits tumor growth and metastasis, but the miR-200 target genes that drive lung tumorigenesis have not been fully elucidated. Here, we scanned the genome for putative miR-200 binding sites and found them in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of 35 genes that are amplified in human cancer. Mining of a database of resected human lung adenocarcinomas revealed that the levels of one of these genes, Flt1/VEGFR1, correlate inversely with duration of survival. Forced miR-200 expression suppressed Flt1 levels in metastasis-prone lung adenocarcinoma cells derived from K-ras/p53-mutant mice, and negatively regulated the Flt1 3′-UTR in reporter assays. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) isolated from murine lung adenocarcinomas secreted abundant VEGF and enhanced tumor cell invasion in coculture studies. CAF-induced tumor cell invasion was abrogated by VEGF neutralization or Flt1 knockdown in tumor cells. Flt1 knockdown decreased the growth and metastasis of tumor cells in syngeneic mice. We conclude that miR-200 suppresses lung tumorigenesis by targeting Flt1. PMID:21115742

  20. [Tuberculosis of the prostate].

    PubMed

    Streltsova, O S; Krupin, V N; Yunusova, K E; Mamonov, M V

    2016-12-01

    Genitourinary tract is the second most common site where extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) occurs. Genitourinary TB is notable for a latent clinical course and difficult diagnosis. The paper presents clinical observations of two patients treated in a urology department of a general public hospital. One of them was diagnosed with tuberculosis of the prostate, MTB+. In the other, TB of the prostate was suspected based on pathologic assessment of the surgical specimen after surgery for prostate cancer.

  1. [Atypical metastatic site of lung adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Sakhri, L; Mennecier, B; Jacqmin, D; Di Marco, A; Schumacher, C; Chenard, M-P; Bergmann, E; Quoix, E

    2011-12-01

    The case concerns a 40 years old smoker male, treated for an adenocarcinoma of the left upper lobe, metastatic in muscle extended to the right femur cortex. The patient had first a surgical excision of the mass of the thigh, an intramedullary femoral nailing, and six courses of chemotherapy (cisplatin-vinorelbine) with concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. This treatment led to disease stability. One year later, hematuria revealed a bladder tumor. Cystoscopy with biopsy concluded to an adenocarcinoma pulmonary origin. The PET-scanner showed an uptake of the bladder mass, a hypermetabolic right adrenal gland and subcutaneous left shoulder nodule. The patient had a partial cystectomy associated with enterocystoplasty and left ureteral reimplantation, plus excision of the subcutaneous nodule located in the left shoulder and a right adrenalectomy during the same time. All of the sites were metastasis from adenocarcinoma of pulmonary origin. A salvage chemotherapy was initiated. In the vast majority of cases, bladder metastasis as primary bladder tumours is revealed by hematuria, cystitis or sometimes vague pelvic pain. Our case is a very unusual bladder metastatic site from lung cancer. We will discuss the different procedures and the therapeutic strategies on the basis of the published data.

  2. Laparoscopy in the management of gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, E C; Karpeh, M S; Conlon, K C; Brennan, M F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors determined the accuracy of laparoscopy in detecting metastatic disease in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The majority of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma in the United States present with advanced disease. They are at high risk for intraabdominal metastatic spread. METHODS: One hundred eleven patients with gastric adenocarcinoma underwent laparoscopy at Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from December 1991 to December 1995. All were judged to be free of intra-abdominal metastatic disease on preoperative computed tomographic scan imaging. RESULTS: Laparoscopic exploration was successful in 110 of 111 patients and accurately staged 94% of the patients with respect to metastatic disease with a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 100%. The prevalence rate of metastatic disease was 37%. Twenty-four patients underwent laparoscopy only and were discharged in an average 1.4 days versus 6.5 days in patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy without resection (p < 0.05). No patients undergoing laparoscopy only have returned for palliative surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopy should be performed in nonobstructed, nonbleeding patients with advanced gastric cancer in the United States. More than one third of these patients have unsuspected metastatic disease at time of operation. Laparoscopy is highly accurate in detecting occult metastases and identifies a unique population of stage IV patients who may benefit from newer induction chemotherapeutic approaches while avoiding unnecessary laparotomy. Images Figure 4. PMID:9060581

  3. Carcinogenesis of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Precursor Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gnoni, Antonio; Licchetta, Antonella; Scarpa, Aldo; Azzariti, Amalia; Brunetti, Anna Elisabetta; Simone, Gianni; Nardulli, Patrizia; Santini, Daniele; Aieta, Michele; Delcuratolo, Sabina; Silvestris, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma displays a variety of molecular changes that evolve exponentially with time and lead cancer cells not only to survive, but also to invade the surrounding tissues and metastasise to distant sites. These changes include: genetic alterations in oncogenes and cancer suppressor genes; changes in the cell cycle and pathways leading to apoptosis; and also changes in epithelial to mesenchymal transition. The most common alterations involve the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, the HER2 gene, and the K-ras gene. In particular, the loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes has been documented in this tumor, especially in CDKN2a, p53, DPC4 and BRCA2 genes. However, other molecular events involved in pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathogenesis contribute to its development and maintenance, specifically epigenetic events. In fact, key tumor suppressors that are well established to play a role in pancreatic adenocarcinoma may be altered through hypermethylation, and oncogenes can be upregulated secondary to permissive histone modifications. Indeed, factors involved in tumor invasiveness can be aberrantly expressed through dysregulated microRNAs. This review summarizes current knowledge of pancreatic carcinogenesis from its initiation within a normal cell until the time that it has disseminated to distant organs. In this scenario, highlighting these molecular alterations could provide new clinical tools for early diagnosis and new effective therapies for this malignancy. PMID:24084722

  4. Intraoperative molecular imaging to identify lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Andrew D.; Kennedy, Gregory T.; Predina, Jarrod D.; Low, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative molecular imaging is a promising new technology with numerous applications in lung cancer surgery. Accurate identification of small nodules and assessment of tumor margins are two challenges in pulmonary resections for cancer, particularly with increasing use of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). One potential solution to these problems is intraoperative use of a fluorescent contrast agent to improve detection of cancer cells. This technology requires both a targeted fluorescent dye that will selectively accumulate in cancer cells and a specialized imaging system to detect the cells. In several studies, we have shown that intraoperative imaging with indocyanine green (ICG) can be used to accurately identify indeterminate pulmonary nodules. The use of a folate-tagged fluorescent molecule targeted to the folate receptor-α (FRα) further improves the sensitivity and specificity of detecting lung adenocarcinomas. We have demonstrated this technology can be used as an “optical biopsy” to differentiate adenocarcinoma versus other histological subtypes of pulmonary nodules. This strategy has potential applications in assessing bronchial stump margins, identifying synchronous or metachronous lesions, and rapidly assessing lymph nodes for lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:28066672

  5. Comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the lung is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Here we report molecular profiling of 230 resected lung adenocarcinomas using messenger RNA, microRNA and DNA sequencing integrated with copy number, methylation and proteomic analyses. High rates of somatic mutation were seen (mean 8.9 mutations per megabase). Eighteen genes were statistically significantly mutated, including RIT1 activating mutations and newly described loss-of-function MGA mutations which are mutually exclusive with focal MYC amplification. EGFR mutations were more frequent in female patients, whereas mutations in RBM10 were more common in males. Aberrations in NF1, MET, ERBB2 and RIT1 occurred in 13% of cases and were enriched in samples otherwise lacking an activated oncogene, suggesting a driver role for these events in certain tumours. DNA and mRNA sequence from the same tumour highlighted splicing alterations driven by somatic genomic changes, including exon 14 skipping in MET mRNA in 4% of cases. MAPK and PI(3)K pathway activity, when measured at the protein level, was explained by known mutations in only a fraction of cases, suggesting additional, unexplained mechanisms of pathway activation. These data establish a foundation for classification and further investigations of lung adenocarcinoma molecular pathogenesis. PMID:25079552

  6. Comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    2014-07-31

    Adenocarcinoma of the lung is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Here we report molecular profiling of 230 resected lung adenocarcinomas using messenger RNA, microRNA and DNA sequencing integrated with copy number, methylation and proteomic analyses. High rates of somatic mutation were seen (mean 8.9 mutations per megabase). Eighteen genes were statistically significantly mutated, including RIT1 activating mutations and newly described loss-of-function MGA mutations which are mutually exclusive with focal MYC amplification. EGFR mutations were more frequent in female patients, whereas mutations in RBM10 were more common in males. Aberrations in NF1, MET, ERBB2 and RIT1 occurred in 13% of cases and were enriched in samples otherwise lacking an activated oncogene, suggesting a driver role for these events in certain tumours. DNA and mRNA sequence from the same tumour highlighted splicing alterations driven by somatic genomic changes, including exon 14 skipping in MET mRNA in 4% of cases. MAPK and PI(3)K pathway activity, when measured at the protein level, was explained by known mutations in only a fraction of cases, suggesting additional, unexplained mechanisms of pathway activation. These data establish a foundation for classification and further investigations of lung adenocarcinoma molecular pathogenesis.

  7. Epithelial defect in prostates of Stat5a-null mice.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, M T; Ahonen, T J; Yamashita, H; Chandrashekar, V; Bartke, A; Grimley, P M; Robinson, G W; Hennighausen, L; Rui, H

    2000-07-01

    The transcription factor Stat5a critically mediates prolactin (PRL)-induced mammary gland development and lactogenesis. PRL also stimulates growth and differentiation of prostate tissue. Specifically, hyperprolactinemia gives rise to prostate hyperplasia, and prostate size is reduced in PRL-deficient mice. We therefore investigated the importance of Stat5a for prostate development and function by examining Stat5a-null mice. The absence of Stat5a in mice was associated with a distinct prostate morphology characterized by an increased prevalence of local disorganization within acinar epithelium of ventral prostates. Affected acini were typically filled with desquamated, granular epithelial cells that had become embedded in dense, coagulated secretory material. These features were reminiscent of acinar cyst formation and degeneration frequently observed in human benign prostate hyperplasia, however, cystic changes in prostate acini of Stat5a-deficient mice were not associated with increased prostate size or morphologic hallmarks of epithelial hyperplasia. Instead, immunohistochemistry of the prostate-specific secretory marker, probasin, suggested that hypersecretory function of the epithelium could underlie local congestion and cyst formation in prostates of Stat5a-null mice. Serum testosterone and PRL levels were normal in Stat5a knockout mice, but prostate PRL receptor expression was reduced as determined by immunohistochemistry. Expression levels or activation states of other PRL signal transduction proteins, including Stat5b, Stat3, Stat1, ERK1, and ERK2 were not altered. The present study offers the first evidence for a direct role of Stat5a in the maintenance of normal tissue architecture and function of the mouse prostate.

  8. Activated Kras and Ink4a/Arf deficiency cooperate to produce metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Andrew J.; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Sinha, Manisha; Lopez, Lyle; Tuveson, David A.; Horner, James; Redston, Mark S.; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2003-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma ranks among the most lethal of human malignancies. Here, we assess the cooperative interactions of two signature mutations in mice engineered to sustain pancreas-specific Cre-mediated activation of a mutant Kras allele (KrasG12D) and deletion of a conditional Ink4a/Arf tumor suppressor allele. The phenotypic impact of KrasG12D alone was limited primarily to the development of focal premalignant ductal lesions, termed pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs), whereas the sole inactivation of Ink4a/Arf failed to produce any neoplastic lesions in the pancreas. In combination, KrasG12D expression and Ink4a/Arf deficiency resulted in an earlier appearance of PanIN lesions and these neoplasms progressed rapidly to highly invasive and metastatic cancers, resulting in death in all cases by 11 weeks. The evolution of these tumors bears striking resemblance to the human disease, possessing a proliferative stromal component and ductal lesions with a propensity to advance to a poorly differentiated state. These findings in the mouse provide experimental support for the widely accepted model of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma in which activated KRAS serves to initiate PanIN lesions, and the INK4A/ARF tumor suppressors function to constrain the malignant conversion of these PanIN lesions into lethal ductal adenocarcinoma. This faithful mouse model may permit the systematic analysis of genetic lesions implicated in the human disease and serve as a platform for the identification of early disease markers and for the efficient testing of novel therapies. PMID:14681207

  9. A mammary adenocarcinoma murine model suitable for the study of cancer immunoediting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer immunoediting is a dynamic process composed of three phases: elimination (EL), equilibrium (EQ) and escape (ES) that encompasses the potential host-protective and tumor-sculpting functions of the immune system throughout tumor development. Animal models are useful tools for studying diseases such as cancer. The present study was designed to characterize the interaction between mammary adenocarcinoma M-406 and CBi, CBi− and CBi/L inbred mice lines. Results The mammary adenocarcinoma M-406 developed spontaneously in a CBi mouse. CBi/L and CBi− mice were artificially selected for body conformation from CBi. When CBi mice are s.c. challenged with M-406, tumor growths exponentially in 100% of animals, while in CBi− the tumor growths briefly and then begins a rejection process in 100% of the animals. In CBi/L the growth of the tumor shows the three phases: 51.6% in ES, 18.5% in EQ and 29.8% in EL. Conclusions The results obtained support the conclusion that the system M-406 plus the inbred mouse lines CBi, CBi− and CBi/L, is a good murine model to study the process of tumor immunoediting. PMID:24885995

  10. Solitary Psoas Muscle Metastasis of Gastroesphageal Junction Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Azadeh, Payam; Yaghobi Joybari, Ali; Sarbaz, Samaneh; Ghiasi, Hosein Ali; Farasatinasab, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis of gastroesphageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma in skeletal muscle is rare and primary sites for skeletal muscle metastases are usually lung, renal and colorectal cancer. We have encountered with the first case report of solitary psoas muscle metastasis of GEJ adenocarcinoma. Here we describe a 65 years old man was diagnosed with GEJ adenocarcinoma in Gastroenterology Department, Imam Hussein Hospital, Tehran, Iran in February 2014. We were not able to use PET techniques due to lack of access. Staging CT scans demonstrated a small mass lateral to right psoas muscle. A CT-guided core needle biopsy of right psoas muscle was performed that supported a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma consistent with primary adenocarcinoma of the GEJ. Distant metastasis to skeletal muscle rarely occurs in patients with GEJ adenocarcinoma, but heightened awareness to these soft tissue lesions is warranted. CT or MR imaging could show findings suggestive of metastatic disease, although PET is preferable modality. PMID:26870148

  11. Screening for prostate cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite recent advances in both the survival and cure rates for many forms of cancer, unfortunately the same has not been true for prostate cancer. In fact, the age-adjusted death rate from prostate cancer has not significantly improved since 1949, and prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in American men, causing the second highest cancer mortality rate. Topics discussed include the following: serum testosterone levels; diagnosis; mortality statistics; prostate-sppecific antigen (PSA) tests; and the Occupational Medicine Services policy at LeRC.

  12. Living with Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer treatment and can improve many aspects of health, including muscle strength, balance, fatigue, cardiovascular fitness, and depression. Physical activity after a prostate cancer diagnosis is linked to ...

  13. Loss of Mig6 accelerates initiation and progression of mutant epidermal growth factor receptor-driven lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Tapan K.; Venugopalan, Abhilash; Linnoila, Ilona; Cultraro, Constance M.; Giannakou, Andreas; Nemati, Roxanne; Zhang, Xu; Webster, Joshua D.; Ritt, Daniel; Ghosal, Sarani; Hoschuetzky, Heinz; Simpson, R. Mark; Biswas, Romi; Politi, Katerina; Morrison, Deborah K.; Varmus, Harold E.; Guha, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain drive lung adenocarcinoma. We have previously identified MIG6, an inhibitor of ERBB signaling and a potential tumor suppressor, as a target for phosphorylation by mutant EGFRs. Here we demonstrate that Mig6 is a tumor suppressor for the initiation and progression of mutant EGFR-driven lung adenocarcinoma in mouse models. Mutant EGFR-induced lung tumor formation was accelerated in Mig6-deficient mice, even with Mig6 haploinsufficiency. We demonstrate that constitutive phosphorylation of MIG6 at Y394/395 in EGFR-mutant human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines is associated with an increased interaction of MIG6 with mutant EGFR, which may stabilize EGFR protein. MIG6 also fails to promote mutant EGFR degradation. We propose a model whereby increased tyrosine phosphorylation of MIG6 decreases its capacity to inhibit mutant EGFR. Nonetheless, the residual inhibition is sufficient for Mig6 to delay mutant EGFR-driven tumor initiation and progression in mouse models. PMID:25735773

  14. Small cell carcinoma of the prostate presenting with Cushing Syndrome. A narrative review of an uncommon condition.

    PubMed

    Rueda-Camino, José Antonio; Losada-Vila, Beatriz; De Ancos-Aracil, Cristina Lucía; Rodríguez-Lajusticia, Laura; Tardío, Juan Carlos; Zapatero-Gaviria, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the prostate is an uncommon condition; there are very few cases in which presenting symptoms are consistent with Cushing Syndrome (CS). We report a new case in which CS triggers the suspicion of an SCC of the prostate and a review of the published cases of SCC of the prostate presenting with CS. The origin of these neoplasms is still unclear. It may be suspected when laboratory features appear in patients diagnosed with prostatic adenocarcinoma which becomes resistant to specific therapy. SCC usually occurs after the 6th decade. Patients suffering SCC of the prostate presenting with CS usually present symptoms such as hypertension, hyperglycemia, alkalosis or hypokalemia; cushingoid phenotype is less frequent. Cortisol and ACTH levels are often high. Prostatic-specific antigen levels are usually normal. CT scan is the preferred imaging test to localize the lesion, but its performance may be improved by adding other tests, such as FDG-PET scan. All patients have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Lymph nodes, liver and bone are the most frequent metastases sites. Surgery and Ketokonazole are the preferred treatments for CS. The prognosis is very poor: 2- and 5-year survival rates are 27.5 and 14.3%, respectively. Key messages When a patient presents with ectopic Cushing Syndrome but lungs are normal, an atypical localization should be suspected. We should suspect a prostatic origin if Cushing Syndrome is accompanied by obstructive inferior urinary tract symptoms or in the setting of a prostatic adenocarcinoma with rapid clinical and radiological progression with relatively low PSA levels. Although no imaging test is preferred to localize these tumors, FDG-PET-TC can be very useful. Hormone marker scintigraphy (e.g. somatostatin) could be used too. As Cushing Syndrome is a paraneoplastic phenomenon, treatment of the underlying disease may help control hypercortisolism manifestations. These tumors are usually metastatic by the

  15. Androgens and prostate disease

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lori A; Page, Stephanie T

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of literature has established the anabolic benefits of testosterone (T) therapy in hypogonadal men. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding the risks of exogenous androgen use in older men and the potential for adverse effects on the prostate gland. Whether T therapy in older, hypogonadal men might worsen lower urinary tract symptoms or exacerbate, unmask, or even incite prostate cancer development has tempered enthusiasm for T therapy, while known prostatic disease has served as a relative contraindication to T therapy. Androgens are necessary for the development and maintenance of the prostate gland. However, epidemiologic studies do not consistently find a positive relationship between endogenous serum androgen concentrations and the risk of prostate disease. Recent data demonstrate that 5α-reductase inhibitors decrease the risk of low-grade prostate cancer, suggesting that modifying androgen metabolism may have beneficial effects on prostate health, yet similar reductions in high-grade disease have not been observed, thereby questioning the true clinical benefits of these agents for chemoprevention. Knowing how to best investigate the relationship between androgens and the development of prostate disease given the lack of large, randomized trials is difficult. Accumulating data challenges the assumption that alterations in serum androgens have parallel effects within the prostate hormonal environment or change androgen-regulated processes within the gland. Long-term intervention studies are needed to truly ascertain the effects of androgen manipulation on prostate tissue and disease risk. However, available data do not support the notion that restoring serum androgens to normal physiologic ranges drives prostate disease. PMID:24407178

  16. In Silico Functional Pathway Annotation of 86 Established Prostate Cancer Risk Variants

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Lenora W. M.; Fong, Aaron Y. W.; Cheng, Iona; Le Marchand, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    Heritability is one of the strongest risk factors of prostate cancer, emphasizing the importance of the genetic contribution towards prostate cancer risk. To date, 86 established prostate cancer risk variants have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To determine if these risk variants are located near genes that interact together in biological networks or pathways contributing to prostate cancer initiation or progression, we generated gene sets based on proximity to the 86 prostate cancer risk variants. We took two approaches to generate gene lists. The first strategy included all immediate flanking genes, up- and downstream of the risk variant, regardless of distance from the index variant, and the second strategy included genes closest to the index GWAS marker and to variants in high LD (r2 ≥0.8 in Europeans) with the index variant, within a 100 kb window up- and downstream. Pathway mapping of the two gene sets supported the importance of the androgen receptor-mediated signaling in prostate cancer biology. In addition, the hedgehog and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways were identified in pathway mapping for the flanking gene set. We also used the HaploReg resource to examine the 86 risk loci and variants high LD (r2 ≥0.8) for functional elements. We found that there was a 12.8 fold (p = 2.9 x 10-4) enrichment for enhancer motifs in a stem cell line and a 4.4 fold (p = 1.1 x 10-3) enrichment of DNase hypersensitivity in a prostate adenocarcinoma cell line, indicating that the risk and correlated variants are enriched for transcriptional regulatory motifs. Our pathway-based functional annotation of the prostate cancer risk variants highlights the potential regulatory function that GWAS risk markers, and their highly correlated variants, exert on genes. Our study also shows that these genes may function cooperatively in key signaling pathways in prostate cancer biology. PMID:25658610

  17. Identification of an NKX3.1-G9a-UTY transcriptional regulatory network that controls prostate differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Aditya; Le Magnen, Clémentine; Mitrofanova, Antonina; Ouyang, Xuesong; Califano, Andrea; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2016-06-24

    The NKX3.1 homeobox gene plays essential roles in prostate differentiation and prostate cancer. We show that loss of function of Nkx3.1 in mouse prostate results in down-regulation of genes that are essential for prostate differentiation, as well as up-regulation of genes that are not normally expressed in prostate. Conversely, gain of function of Nkx3.1 in an otherwise fully differentiated nonprostatic mouse epithelium (seminal vesicle) is sufficient for respecification to prostate in renal grafts in vivo. In human prostate cells, these activities require the interaction of NKX3.1 with the G9a histone methyltransferase via the homeodomain and are mediated by activation of target genes such as UTY (KDM6c), the male-specific paralog of UTX (KDM6a) We propose that an NKX3.1-G9a-UTY transcriptional regulatory network is essential for prostate differentiation, and we speculate that disruption of such a network predisposes to prostate cancer.

  18. Massive Bleeding as the First Clinical Manifestation of Metastatic Prostate Cancer due to Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation with Enhanced Fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, João Madeira; Victorino, Rui M. M.; Meneses Santos, João

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is the most frequent coagulation disorder associated with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. However, DIC with enhanced fibrinolysis as an initial presentation of prostate cancer is extremely rare. The appropriate treatment to control bleeding in these situations is challenging, controversial, and based on isolated case reports in the literature. A 66-year-old male presented at the emergency department with acute severe spontaneous ecchymoses localized to the limbs, laterocervical hematoma, and hemothorax. Prostate specific antigen level was 385 μg/L, bone scintigraphy revealed multiple bone metastases, and prostate biopsy confirmed adenocarcinoma (Gleason 9; 4 + 5). Laboratory investigation showed a pattern of enhanced fibrinolysis rather than the more common intravascular coagulation mechanism. Epsilon aminocaproic acid in monotherapy was initiated with a clear and rapid control of bleeding manifestations. This rare case of massive bleeding due to DIC with enhanced fibrinolysis as the first manifestation of prostate cancer suggests that in selected cases where the acute bleeding dyscrasia is clearly associated with a dominant fibrinolysis mechanism it is possible to use an approach of monotherapy with antifibrinolytics. PMID:27803823

  19. Aberrant Transforming Growth Factor-β Activation Recruits Mesenchymal Stem Cells During Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long; Xie, Liang; Tintani, Francis; Xie, Hui; Li, Changjun; Cui, Zhuang; Wan, Mei; Zu, Xiongbing; Qi, Lin; Cao, Xu

    2017-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the overgrowth of prostate tissues with high prevalence in older men. BPH pathogenesis is not completely understood, but it is believed to be a result of de novo overgrowth of prostatic stroma. In this study, we show that aberrant activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) mobilizes mesenchymal/stromal stem cells (MSCs) in circulating blood, which are recruited for the prostatic stromal hyperplasia. Elevated levels of active TGF-β were observed in both a phenylephrine-induced prostatic hyperplasia mouse model and human BPH tissues. Nestin lineage tracing revealed that 39.6% ± 6.3% of fibroblasts and 73.3% ± 4.2% smooth muscle cells were derived from nestin(+) cells in Nestin-Cre, Rosa26-YFP(flox/+) mice. Nestin(+) MSCs were increased in the prostatic hyperplasia mice. Our parabiosis experiment demonstrate that nestin(+) MSCs were mobilized and recruited to the prostatic stroma of wild-type mice and gave rise to the fibroblasts. Moreover, injection of a TGF-β neutralizing antibody (1D11) inhibits mobilization of MSCs, their recruitment to the prostatic stroma and hyperplasia. Importantly, knockout of TβRII in nestin(+) cell lineage ameliorated stromal hyperplasia. Thus, elevated levels of TGF-β-induced mobilization and recruitment of MSCs to the reactive stroma resulting in overgrowth of prostate tissues in BPH and, thus, inhibition of TGF-β activity could be a potential therapy for BPH. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:394-404.

  20. Primary malignant melanoma of prostate.

    PubMed

    Doublali, M; Chouaib, A; Khallouk, A; Tazi, M F; El Fassi, M J; Farih, My H; Elfatmi, H; Bendahou, M; Benlemlih, A; Lamarti, O

    2010-05-01

    Primary genitourinary melanoma accounts for less than one per cent of all cases of melanoma. Most cases attributed to the prostate actually originate from the prostatic urethra. Due to its infrequency, primary malignant melanoma of the genitourinary tract presents a difficult diagnostic and management challenge. We report a case of primary malignant melanoma of the prostate found during transurethral resection of the prostate.

  1. [IDENTIFICATION OF A NEW DIAGNOSTIC MARKERS OF PROSTATIC CANCER, USING NOTI-MICROCHIPS].

    PubMed

    Vozianov, S O; Kashuba, V I; Grygorenko, V M; Gordiyuk, V V; Danylets, R O; Bondarenko, Yu M; Vikarchuk, M V

    2016-04-01

    The biopsy material specimens were investigated in 33 patients, examined for the prostatic cancer suspicion. In accordance to the morphological investigation data, in 15 patients a benign prostatic hyperplasia was verified, and in 18--pancreatic adenocarcinoma. NotI-Microchips of 180 clones of the third chromosome were used for determination of epigenetic changes. In 50 genes of the third chromosome a high rate of the methylation state changes (from 33 to 82%) was noted. Some changed genes take part in cancerogenesis (HMGB1L5, LRRC58, GPR149, DZIP1L, C3orf77, NUDT16) and in the prostatic gland cancer occurrence (BCL6, ITGA9, FBLN2, SOX2, LRRC3B etc.). Dependence of the genes methylation state from the clinic-morphological indices in patients with the prostatic gland cancer, including, the prostate-specific antigen level, the tumor differentiation degree in accordance to Gleason, was not established. Panel, consisting of 16 new potential markers for early and differentiated diagnosis of prostatic gland cancer, was identified: BHLHE40, FOXP1, LOC285205, ITGA9, CTDSPL, FGF12, LOC440944/SETD5, VHL, CLCN2, OSBPL10/ZNF860, LMCD1, FAM19A4, CAND2, MAP4, KY and LRRC58.

  2. Linneg Sca-1high CD49fhigh prostate cancer cells derived from the Hi-Myc mouse model are tumor-initiating cells with basal-epithelial characteristics and differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saha, Achinto; Blando, Jorge; Fernandez, Irina; Kiguchi, Kaoru; DiGiovanni, John

    2016-05-03

    A cell line was established from ventral prostate (VP) tumors of one-year-old Hi-Myc mice. These cells, called HMVP2 cells, are LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh with high CD44 and CD29 expression and express CK14, Sca-1 and CD49f (but not CK8), suggesting basal-epithelial characteristics. Furthermore, HMVP2 cells form spheroids and both the cells and spheroids produce tumors in syngeneic mice. After four days of culture, HMVP2 spheroids underwent a gradual transition from LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression to LinnegSca-1lowCD49flow while a subpopulation of the cells retained the original LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression pattern. Additional cell subpopulations expressing Lin positive markers were also present suggesting further differentiation of HMVP2 spheroids. Two additional highly tumorigenic cell lines (HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2) were isolated from HMVP2 cells after subsequent tumor formation in FVB/N mice. Concurrently, we also established cell lines from the VP of 6 months old Hi-Myc mice (named as HMVP1) and FVB/N mice (called NMVP) having less aggressive growth properties compared to the other three cell lines. AR expression was reduced in HMVP2 cells compared to NMVP and HMVP1 cells and almost absent in HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2 cells. These cell lines will provide valuable tools for further mechanistic studies as well as preclinical studies to evaluate preventive and/or therapeutic agents for prostate cancer.

  3. Linneg Sca-1high CD49fhigh prostate cancer cells derived from the Hi-Myc mouse model are tumor-initiating cells with basal-epithelial characteristics and differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Irina; Kiguchi, Kaoru; DiGiovanni, John

    2016-01-01

    A cell line was established from ventral prostate (VP) tumors of one-year-old Hi-Myc mice. These cells, called HMVP2 cells, are LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh with high CD44 and CD29 expression and express CK14, Sca-1 and CD49f (but not CK8), suggesting basal-epithelial characteristics. Furthermore, HMVP2 cells form spheroids and both the cells and spheroids produce tumors in syngeneic mice. After four days of culture, HMVP2 spheroids underwent a gradual transition from LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression to LinnegSca-1lowCD49flow while a subpopulation of the cells retained the original LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression pattern. Additional cell subpopulations expressing Lin positive markers were also present suggesting further differentiation of HMVP2 spheroids. Two additional highly tumorigenic cell lines (HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2) were isolated from HMVP2 cells after subsequent tumor formation in FVB/N mice. Concurrently, we also established cell lines from the VP of 6 months old Hi-Myc mice (named as HMVP1) and FVB/N mice (called NMVP) having less aggressive growth properties compared to the other three cell lines. AR expression was reduced in HMVP2 cells compared to NMVP and HMVP1 cells and almost absent in HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2 cells. These cell lines will provide valuable tools for further mechanistic studies as well as preclinical studies to evaluate preventive and/or therapeutic agents for prostate cancer. PMID:26910370

  4. Bone Metastasis of Prostate Cancer Can Be Therapeutically Targeted at the TBX2-WNT Signaling Axis.

    PubMed

    Nandana, Srinivas; Tripathi, Manisha; Duan, Peng; Chu, Chia-Yi; Mishra, Rajeev; Liu, Chunyan; Jin, Renjie; Yamashita, Hironobu; Zayzafoon, Majd; Bhowmick, Neil A; Zhau, Haiyen E; Matusik, Robert J; Chung, Leland W K

    2017-03-15

    Identification of factors that mediate visceral and bone metastatic spread and subsequent bone remodeling events is highly relevant to successful therapeutic intervention in advanced human