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Sample records for adenomatoid odontogenic tumors

  1. Cystic Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sonal; Rahim, Ahmed Mujib Bangalore; Parakkat, Nithin Kavassery; Kapoor, Shekhar; Mittal, Kumud; Sharma, Bhushan; Shivappa, Anil Bangalore

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor (AOT) is a well-established benign epithelial lesion of odontogenic origin. Rightfully called “the master of disguise,” this lesion has been known for its varied clinical and histoarchitectural patterns. Not only does AOT predominantly present radiologically as a unilocular cystic lesion enclosing the unerupted tooth (which is commonly mistaken as a dentigerous cyst) but the lesion also presents rarely with a cystic component histopathologically. We present one such unusual case of cystic AOT associated with an impacted canine, mimicking a dentigerous cyst. The present case aims to highlight the difference between cystic AOT and dentigerous cyst radiographically. The exact histogenesis of AOT and its variants still remains obscure. An attempt has been made to hypothesize the new school of thought regarding the origin of AOT. PMID:26579317

  2. Follicular adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Vera Sempere, Francisco José; Artes Martínez, María Jose; Vera Sirera, Beatriz; Bonet Marco, Jaime

    2006-07-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is an uncommon benign odontogenic lesion that affects young patients, with female predominance, mainly in second decade, showing a radiolucent unilocular image associated with an unerupted tooth, usually a canine. In spite of previous and confusing denominations, such as adenoameloblastoma or adenomatoid ameloblastic tumor, AOT is a benign tumor with a very low rate of recurrence, that show a peculiar morphological picture (basaloid appearance with glandular-like structures, calcifying areas, and amiloid-like material) that allow its histopathological recognition. We present a clinicopathological analysis of a case of follicular AOT affecting the mandible in a 9 years-old female patient associated with unerupted lower left canine. Immunohistochemical study showed some data previously unrecognised. All cellular types that composed AOT showed nuclear positivity for p63 indicating a basal characterization in the different cellular components. According to its benign character and low potential for recurrence, AOT revealed a scant proliferative activity (2-3% nuclei showed Ki-67 positivity) limited to some epithelial nodules (AE1-3 +) of fusiform appearance. Absence of reactivity for hormonal receptors (RE and RPg) excluded a possible hormonodependence in AOT that could explain the observed female predominance.

  3. Extrafollicular Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor: An Unusual Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Reddy Kundoor, Vinay Kumar; Maloth, Kotya Naik; Guguloth, Nagu Naik; Kesidi, Sunitha

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is an uncommon tumor of odontogenic origin and often misdiagnosed as an odontogenic cyst. It is predominantly found in young female patients, located more often in maxilla, and in most cases associated with an unerupted permanent tooth. There are three variants of AOT namely follicular, extra follicular, and peripheral. We report an unusual case of extrafollicular AOT in maxilla of a 50-year old male patient. PMID:27942555

  4. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: As an unusual mandibular manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neeraj; Passi, Sidhi; Kumar, Vinay V.

    2012-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare odontogenic tumor which is often misdiagnosed as odontogenic cyst and accounts for about 1% until 9% of all odontogenic tumors. It is predominantly found in young and female patients, located more often in the maxilla in most cases associated with an unerupted permanent tooth. It is a benign (hamartomatous), noninvasive lesion with slow but progressive growth. There are three variants of AOT: follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral. We report a rare case of follicular-type AOT in the mandible of a 14-year-old male patient who presented with right -sided jaw swelling. PMID:22629062

  5. Follicular Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor in Mandible: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Belgaumi, UI; Parkar, MI; Malik, NA; Suresh, KV; Havewala, AM; Bhalinge, PM

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a relatively rare, benign, hamartomatous, and cystic odontogenic neoplasm that was first described more than a century ago. The lesion still continues to intrigue experts with its varied histomorphology and controversies regarding its development. The present article describes a case of cystic AOT with an unusual histomorphology associated with an impacted 44 in a 21-year-old male. PMID:27057389

  6. Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: I. Ameloblastoma and Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Sook

    2013-01-01

    Ameloblastomas and adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs) are common epithelial tumors of odontogenic origin. Ameloblastomas are clinico-pathologically classified into solid/multicystic, unicystic, desmoplastic, and peripheral types, and also divided into follicular, plexiform, acanthomatous, granular types, etc., based on their histological features. Craniopharyngiomas, derived from the remnants of Rathke's pouch or a misplaced enamel organ, are also comparable to the odontogenic tumors. The malignant transformation of ameloblastomas results in the formation of ameloblastic carcinomas and malignant ameloblastomas depending on cytological dysplasia and metastasis, respectively. AOTs are classified into follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral types. Ameloblastomas are common, have an aggressive behavior and recurrent course, and are rarely metastatic, while AOTs are hamartomatous benign lesions derived from the complex system of the dental lamina or its remnants. With advances in the elucidation of molecular signaling mechanisms in cells, the cytodifferentiation of epithelial tumor cells in ameloblastomas and AOTs can be identified using different biomarkers. Therefore, it is suggested that comprehensive pathological observation including molecular genetic information can provide a more reliable differential diagnosis for the propagation and prognosis of ameloblastomas and AOTs. This study aimed to review the current concepts of ameloblastomas and AOTs and to discuss their clinico-pathological features relevant to tumorigenesis and prognosis. PMID:23837011

  7. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma: a case report and critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Castro, Wagner Henriques; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Loyola, Adriano Mota

    2013-08-09

    We describe a case of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) associated with odontoma occurring in the posterior mandible of a 32-year-old man. Although calcifications are commonly found in the AOT, the presence of rudimentary dental structures is a very rare phenomenon. Cases with similar aspects have been described as ameloblastic dentinoma, ameloblastic odontoma, adenoameloblastic odontoma and AOT associated with odontoma. After a careful analysis of the literature we describe the clinical aspects of this tumor. Further case reports and surveys of odontogenic tumors are necessary to define whether AOT associated with odontoma is a variant of AOT or a distinct clinicopathologic condition.

  8. Dentigerous Cyst or Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor: Clinical Radiological and Histopathological Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Shivesh; Goyal, Ashima; Rattan, Vidya; Vaiphei, Kim; Kaur Bhatia, Sarabjot

    2014-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a well-recognised slow growing benign tumor derived from complex system of dental lamina or its remnants. This lesion is categorised into three variants of which the more common variant is follicular type which is often mistaken for dentigerous cyst. We present a case of AOT in a 14-year-old male who was misdiagnosed as dentigerous cyst. Clinical radiological and therapeutic characteristics of the case are commented on in detail. PMID:25097553

  9. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with an unerupted mandibular lateral incisor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare, benign odontogenic tumor that predominantly appears in the second decade of life in female patients. Most AOTs occur in the anterior part of the maxilla and are usually associated with impacted anterior teeth. There are three types of AOT, follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral, which are classified based on the location of the lesion and its association with the impacted tooth. We report a rare case of AOT associated with an impacted right mandibular lateral incisor in an 11-year-old female patient. PMID:26734563

  10. An unusually large aggressive adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of maxilla involving the third molar: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Dhupar, Vikas; Akkara, Francis; Khandelwal, Pulkit

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare tumor comprising only 3% of all odontogenic tumors. It is a benign, encapsulated, noninvasive, nonaggressive, slowly growing odontogenic lesion associated with an impacted tooth. These lesions may go unnoticed for years. The usual treatment is enucleation and curettage, and the lesion does not recur. Here, we present a rare case of an unusually large aggressive AOT of maxilla associated with impacted third molar. The authors also discuss clinical, radiographic, histopathologic, and therapeutic features of the case. Subtotal maxillectomy with simultaneous reconstruction of the surgical defect with temporalis myofascial flap was planned and carried out. PMID:27095910

  11. Surgical management of peripheral variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: A rare case report with review

    PubMed Central

    Jindwani, Karuna; Paharia, Y. K.; Kushwah, Atul Pratap Singh

    2015-01-01

    The adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT) is a relatively uncommon lesion constituting around 3% of all odontogenic tumours and often misdiagnosed as an odontogenic cyst. It manifests as a beningn growth which affects young individuals, with a female predeliction usually in the second decade of life, exhibiting more often in the anterior region of maxilla. The current article enumerates the clinical, radiographic and histopathological features of a rare case of extraosseous AOT with its therapeutic consideration PMID:25684929

  12. Expression of CK14 and vimentin in adenomatoid odontogenic tumor and dentigerous cyst

    PubMed Central

    Sudhakara, Muniswamappa; Rudrayya, S Puranik; Vanaki, Srineevas S; Bhullar, RamanPreet Kaur; Shivakumar, MS; Hosur, Mahadevi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Origin of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) has long been a controversy, and the issue of it being a neoplasm or hamartoma was a subject of debate for a long time. Earlier it was grouped under a mixed group of odontogenic tumors considering the varying degrees of inductive changes. Recently, the WHO classification states that the presence of hard tissue within AOT was not due to induction but was rather a metaplastically produced mineralization and hence the tumor was reclassified under a group of tumors arising from odontogenic epithelium. This study is an attempt to identify if both epithelial (cytokeratin 14 [CK14]) and mesenchymal (vimentin) markers are expressed in the follicular and extrafollicular variants of AOT and to compare the expression with dentigerous cyst (DC) as this cyst is known to arise from reduced enamel epithelium which expressed CK14. This is done to possibly relate the origin of AOT with reduced enamel epithelium. Aims and Objectives: To study, analyze and correlate the expression of CK14 and vimentin in AOT and DC. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study on paraffin embedded tissues. Sixteen cases of AOT and 15 cases of DC were retrieved from the departmental archives and subjected to CK14 and vimentin immunostaining. Statistical Methods: Measures of central tendency was used to analyze the results. Results and Observations: Ninety percent of cases of follicular AOT (FAOT) and 100% cases of extra-follicular AOTs (EAOTs) showed positivity for CK14 and all cases of DC showed positivity for CK14. Vimentin was positive in 44% and negative in 56% cases of both FAOT and EAOT taken together. Conclusion: The CK14 expression profile in AOT and DC supports its odontogenic epithelial specific nature. The possible role of reduced enamel epithelium and dental lamina in histogenesis of AOT and DC is strongly evident by their CK14 expression pattern. PMID:27721599

  13. Repair of a defect following the removal of a maxillary adenomatoid odontogenic tumor using guided tissue regeneration. A case report.

    PubMed

    Vitkus, R; Meltzer, J A

    1996-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOT) make up 3% of odontogenic tumors. This tumor, most commonly found in the maxillary arch, mimics a follicular cyst associated with an impacted tooth. This is a case report of an AOT found in a 14-year-old female undergoing active orthodontic therapy. The surgical removal of the lesion resulted in the exposure of a large bony cavity surrounding the maxillary left canine. Placement of freeze-dried bone and coverage with an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane resulted in rapid and complete healing of the lesion and restoration of osseous support.

  14. Extensive Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor of the Maxilla: A Case Report of Conservative Surgical Excision and Orthodontic Alignment of Impacted Canine.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jee-Won

    2014-07-01

    The present report describe the surgical therapy, clinical course, orthodontic treatment and morphological characteristics of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in the maxilla of an 11-year-old patient. The cystic tumor filled the maxillary sinus and involved a tooth. Marsupialization was accompanied by partial enucleation and applied traction to the affected tooth by a fixed orthodontic appliance. Healing was uneventful and no local recurrence was observed during a 1-year period of follow-up control.

  15. Hybrid ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: report of a case and review of hybrid variations in the literature.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Manabu; Maruyama, Satoshi; Abé, Tatsuya; Babkair, Hamzah; Fujita, Hajime; Takagi, Ritsuo; Koyama, Jun-Ichi; Hayashi, Takafumi; Cheng, Jun; Saku, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Hybrid odontogenic tumors including 2 or more different histologic types have been documented, but their occurrences are not very common. We present a case of hybrid odontogenic tumor composed of ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) arising in the mandibular molar region of a 31-year-old Japanese woman who had a history of familial adenomatous polyposis. The tumor, measuring 10 mm in diameter, was surgically removed from the alveolar bone. Histopathologically, the tumor consisted of both follicular and plexiform types of ameloblastoma in which multiple and smaller foci of AOT were intermingled. There have been 3 reported cases of hybrid ameloblastoma and AOT, all of which presented unicystic types as ameloblastoma components. This, however, is the first report of a hybrid tumor containing an authentic solid-type ameloblastoma compartment and an AOT compartment in a patient with a background of familial adenomatous polyposis.

  16. A comparative immunohistochemical study of Ki-67 and Bcl-2 expression in solid ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Tabatabaie, Sayed Hosein; Hoseini, Ali Tavakoli; Hoseini, Ehsan Tavakoli; Khabazian, Arezu

    2012-01-01

    Background: Solid ameloblastoma (SAB) is an invasive tumor which infiltrates adjacent normal tissues. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor is a noninvasive tumor and never infiltrates surrounding normal tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine the biological behavior of these two epithelial odontogenic neoplasm by detecting Ki-67 and Bcl-2, which are mitotic and anti apoptotic markers respectively. Materials and Methods: In this analytical retrospective study, 16 samples of SAB and 16 samples of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor were selected. The samples were deparafinized and antigens were retrieved. Immunohistochemistry technique was applied for evaluation of these two markers. Monoclonal antibodies MIB1 and Bcl-2 were used to detect Ki-67 and Bcl-2 protein respectively, then the labeling index (LI) was calculated for both markers according to cellular staining. Data were analyzed by “t” test, (P<0.05). Results: The mean values of LI for Ki-67 in SAB and Adenomatiod odontogenic tumor (AOT) were 4 and 1% respectively and for Bcl-2 in SAB and AOT were 63 and 26% respectively. The indices of both markers were higher in SAB compared to AOT (P <0.05). Conclusions: Higher percentage of these two markers in SAB compared to AOT confirms the aggressive behavior of SAB and the hamartomatosis behavior of AOT. PMID:22623937

  17. A Rare Case of Extrafollicular Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour in the Posterior Region of the Mandible: Misdiagnosed as Residual Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Shivali, Vaid; Pandey, Anil; Khanna, Vidhi D; Khanna, Prateek; Singh, Ashish; Ahuja, Tarun

    2013-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor is a relatively uncommon distinct odontogenic neoplasm. It is an uncommon tumor of odontogenic origin with varying number of ductlike structures and inductive changes in the stroma. It is a benign and slow growing epithelial tumor and represents 3% of all odontogenic tumors. Its occurrence is more common in anterior region of the maxilla than mandible. Most of the adenomatoid odontogenic tumors occur intra-osseously but few peripheral variant have been reported which are attached to the gingival structures. The intra-osseous Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor may be related to unerrupted tooth (follicular varient) or may not (extrafollicular varient) be related to unerrupted tooth. This paper is to present a rare case of an extrafollicular Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor occurring in the body of the mandible in a male patient which is distinct and secondly it was clinically and radiographically diagnosed as residual cyst. The diagnosis of Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor was confirmed by Histopathological investigation. How to cite this article: Shivali V, Khanna VD, Khanna P, Singh A, Pandey A, Ahuja T. A Rare Case of Extrafollicular Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour in the Posterior Region of the Mandible: Misdiagnosed as Residual Cyst. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):124-8. PMID:24324316

  18. A case report and short review on changing trends in the site of occurrence of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: Unravelling the past 15 years

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sneha; Kumar, Manish; Aggarwal, Pratul; Indra Kumar, H. S.; Sugandhi, Chetan D.; Singh, Silvie

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is an uncommon benign odontogenic lesion, with debatable histogenesis and variable histopathology. A systematic and diverse insight into the evolution, clinical presentation, histology, and immunohistochemical findings of this lesion is reviewed and presented. We reviewed the data published from 2000 to 2014 of approximately 255 cases that revealed a significant change in the incidence of predominant site involved, in contrast to the findings published by Reichart. We have also included the chronological order of events leading to the coining of the term AOT, which shows the curiosity that has been dedicated to understanding the lesion. Immunohistochemistry is considered to be a hallmark in pathology for learning the molecular pathogenesis and giving a correct final diagnosis. Several markers have been used to investigate and understand this lesion, and a compilation of the findings has been tabulated. PMID:27857774

  19. Simultaneous adenomatoid odontogenic and keratocystic odontogenic tumours in a patient with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shephard, M; Shepard, M; Coleman, H

    2014-03-01

    Gorlin and Goltz described a syndrome in which multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts and bifid ribs occurred in combination. The jaw keratocysts are a consistent feature of 'Gorlin-Goltz' or naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Central nervous system and ocular involvement occurred together with the fairly typical facial features of frontal bossing and hypertelorism. This case report documents the pathology associated with an impacted maxillary canine tooth in a boy with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. The patient presented for investigation of the failure of eruption of the right permanent maxillary canine tooth. Radiographic investigation showed the presence of a well circumscribed radiolucency located around the crown of an impacted right maxillary canine tooth. The patient's medical history revealed a medulloblastoma that was treated 13 years ago. The right maxillary canine tooth and associated peri-coronal tissue were removed under general anaesthetic. A diagnosis of a keratocystic odontogenic tumour with an associated adenomatoid odontogenic tumour was made. The common differential diagnoses for a peri-coronal radiolucency in the maxilla that need to be considered by dentists include a dentigerous cyst, follicular keratocystic odontogenic tumour and adenomatoid odontogenic tumour. A rare case of both keratocystic odontogenic tumour and associated follicular adenomatoid odontogenic tumour is described in a patient with naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

  20. Mural Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour as Anterior Mandibular Swelling: A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Reena Bhola; Grewal, Jessica; Grewal, Ripin; Bansal, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour is an uncommon, benign, hamartomatous lesion that commonly affects the anterior maxilla and has two radiographic variants, follicular and extrafollicular where the former is more common than the latter. Here, we report a case of 15-year-old female with midline swelling of the mandible. Radiographically, impacted right permanent mandibular canine was associated with the radiolucent lesion. Dentigerous cyst was given as provisional diagnosis. However, histologically the lesion represented the features of cystic variant of Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour. PMID:25121073

  1. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblast density in odontogenic cysts and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Jabbari, Golchin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate myofibroblast (MF) density in a broad spectrum of odontogenic cysts and tumors and the relation between the density of MFs and the clinical behavior of these lesions. Methods. A total of 105 cases of odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), solid ameloblastoma (SA), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), radicular cyst (RC) (15 for each category), and odontogenic myxoma (OM), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) (10 for each category), were immunohistochemically stained with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The mean percentage of positive cells in 10 high-power fields was considered as MF density for each case. Results. A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean scores between the study groups (P < 0.001). The intensity of MFs was significantly higher in odontogenic tumors compared to odontogenic cysts (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between odontogenic tumors, except between UAM and OM (P = 0.041). The difference between OKC and odontogenic tumors was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The number of MFs was significantly higher in OKC and lower in COC compared to other odontogenic cysts (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045, respectively). Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest a role for MFs in the aggressive behavior of odontogenic lesions. MFs may represent an important target of therapy, especially for aggressive odontogenic lesions. Our findings support the classification of OKC in the category of odontogenic tumors. PMID:27092213

  2. Epididymal Adenomatoid Tumor: A Very Rare Paratesticular Tumor of Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Kaselas, Christos; Theocharides, Constantine; Kalogirou, Maria; Farmakis, Konstantinos; Feidantsis, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid tumor is an uncommon benign mesothelial neoplasm, usually localized in the epididymis. It is the most common paratesticular tumor of middle-aged patients (average age of clinical presentation: 36 years). However, these tumors in pediatric and pubertal patients are extremely rare. Due to their rarity, we present a case of adenomatoid tumor of the tail of the epididymis in a 16-year-old patient. After systematic research of the current literature, we did not find another case report of epididymal adenomatoid tumor in a male patient aged 16 years old or less. This notice and our concern, as well, about the patient's surveillance protocol during the postoperative period were the motive for this case study. PMID:28003830

  3. Eruption of an impacted canine in an adenomatid odontogenic tumor treated with combined orthodontic and surgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Erdur, Emire Aybuke; Ileri, Zehra; Ugurluoglu, Ceyhan; Cakir, Mustafa; Dolanmaz, Dogan

    2016-06-01

    An adenomatoid odontogenic tumor is an uncommon asymptomatic lesion that is often misdiagnosed as a dentigerous cyst. It originates from the odontogenic epithelium. Enucleation and curettage is the usual treatment of choice. Marsupialization may be attempted instead of extraction of the impacted tooth, since it provides an opportunity for tooth eruption. This case report is the first to report on the eruption of an impacted canine in an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor treated with combined orthodontics and marsupialization. The impacted canine erupted uneventfully, with no evidence of recurrence 3 years after the treatment.

  4. [Adenomatoid tumor of the uterus--2 case reports].

    PubMed

    Dietterle, S; Hantschick, M; Stosiek, P

    1997-01-01

    We report two cases of the so-called adenomatoid tumor of the uterus, which have been detected in patients who underwent surgery for leiomyomas. The clinical signs, origin and immunohistochemical characteristics of the adenomatoid tumor are described. Adenomatoid tumors are slow growing epithelioid neoplasias with a co-expression of vimentin and cytokeratins. The characteristic cytokeratins are numbered 7, 8, 18, 19 and 5. The mesothelial histogenesis of the tumor can be confirmed. Our results rule out origins from Müllerian or mesonephrogenous ducts and angioma or adenoma. Considering our experiences, adenomatoid and leiomyoma cannot be distinguished macroscopically. The hysterectomy or salpingo-oophorectomy, primarily performed under other diagnoses, are the therapies of choice.

  5. A retrospective review of 61 cases of adenomatoid odontogenic tumour seen in five tertiary health facilities in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adisa, Akinyele Olumuyiwa; Lawal, Ahmed Oluwatoyin; Effiom, Olajumoke Ajibola; Soyele, Olujide Oladele; Omitola, Olufemi Gbenga; Olawuyi, Adetokunbo; Fomete, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a benign lesion originating from the dental lamina or its remnants. It is a relatively uncommon neoplasm representing about 3% of all odontogenic tumors. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical and radiological characteristics of AOTs in five major tertiary centres in Nigeria. Methods Archival hospital-based data stores of five tertiary health facilities in Nigeria were accessed. Case files and biopsy records were retrieved to obtain relevant information. Data was collected according to a proforma for standardization and entered into and analysed using SPSS for Windows (version 20.0; SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL). Results 61 (4.5%) cases of AOT were documented. The age range was 8-46 years with a mean age of 20.4±9.9 years. Male: Female ratio was 1:1.3. The anterior maxilla had 34 (55.8%) cases and the anterior mandible had 20 (32.8%) cases. 40 (65.6%) follicular cases, 20 (32.8%) extra-follicular cases and 1(1.6%) extra-osseous case were found. 31 cases (61.1%) were associated with impacted teeth and the upper canine was involved in 19 (57.6%) cases. Conclusion This study showed AOT to be more common in the maxilla, more in females, most often associated with impacted canines, however, the suggestion of AOT being a “Two third tumour” was not observed in this study. PMID:27642441

  6. Kallikrein 4 and matrix metalloproteinase-20 immunoexpression in malignant, benign and infiltrative odontogenic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crivelini, Marcelo Macedo; Oliveira, Denise Tostes; de Mesquita, Ricardo Alves; de Sousa, Suzana Cantanhede Orsini Machado; Loyola, Adriano Motta

    2016-01-01

    Context: Matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP20) (enamelysin) and kallikrein 4 (KLK4) are enzymes secreted by ameloblasts that play an important role in enamel matrix degradation during amelogenesis. However, studies have shown that neoplastic cells can produce such enzymes, which may affect the tumor infiltrative and metastatic behaviors. Aims: The aim of this study is to assess the biological role of MMP20 and KLK4 in odontogenic tumors. Materials and Methods: The enzymes were analyzed immunohistochemically in ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, keratocystic odontogenic tumor with or without recurrence and odontogenic carcinoma. Statistical Analysis Used: Clinicopathological parameters were statistically correlated with protein expression using the Fisher's exact test. Kruskal–Wallis and Wilcoxon-independent methods were used to evaluate the differences in median values. Results: Positive Immunoexpression was detected in all benign lesions, with a prevalence of 75–100% immunolabeled cells. Patients were predominantly young, Caucasian, female, with slow-growing tumors located in the mandible causing asymptomatic swelling. No KLK4 expression was seen in carcinomas, and the amount of MMP20-positive cells varied between 20% and 80%. Rapid evolution, recurrence and age >60 years characterized the malignant nature of these lesions. Conclusions: Data showed that KLK4 and MMP20 enzymes may not be crucial to tumoral infiltrative capacity, especially in malignant tumors, considering the diversity and peculiarity of these lesions. The significant immunoexpression in benign lesions, remarkably in AOT, is likely associated with differentiated tumor cells that can produce and degrade enamel matrix-like substances. This would be expected since the histogenesis of odontogenic tumors commonly comes from epithelium that recently performed a secretory activity in tooth formation. PMID:27601817

  7. Giant keratocystic odontogenic tumor: a challenging diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Rachna; Punyani, Silky Rajesh; Raj, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    The keratocystic odontogenic tumor, although a benign lesion, is peculiarly aggressive with a high recurrence rate. Its involvement with the maxillary antrum is atypical. We report the unusual case of a 20-year-old male patient with an extensive antral tumor associated with an impacted third molar, which was initially misdiagnosed as a dentigerous cyst. Clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic aspects were analyzed to provide useful information for the correct diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis within a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27818958

  8. Immunolocalization of PTCH protein in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    PubMed

    Barreto, D C; Bale, A E; De Marco, L; Gomez, R S

    2002-11-01

    The human patched gene (PTCH) functions in both embryologic development and tumor suppression. PTCH mutations have been found in odontogenic keratocysts. However, the expression and localization of the protein product of the gene have not been determined in odontogenic tumors and cysts. We investigated 68 odontogenic lesions by immunohistochemistry, and compared their PTCH expression with that in basal cell carcinomas. All odontogenic lesions, including two keratocysts with truncating mutations, were positive for PTCH. Different types of lesions had different amounts of staining. Lack of staining was noted in the majority of basal cell carcinomas. Taken together, these data suggest that odontogenic keratocysts arise with heterozygous mutations of the PTCH gene.

  9. Pigmented odontogenic tumors: Adding color to diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Bhanu, Udhay; Kulkarni, Rasika; Boaz, Karen; Srikant, N

    2014-01-01

    Melanocytes are neural crest derivatives that exhibit a ubiquitous presence in the epidermis. They determine the complexion of an individual and most importantly, provide a barrier against ultraviolet radiations from the sun. Their presence in the oral cavity is a consistent finding, especially in the gingiva and buccal mucosa of the dark complexioned. Melanocytes occasionally form a part of the histology of a variety of odontogenic cysts and tumors. How these cells make their way into the lesional tissue and the diagnostic relevance of their presence remains elusive. This write up attempts to trace the path melanocytes take to find themselves within odontogenic tumors and also offer possible explanations for the same. PMID:25948995

  10. Maxillary peripheral keratocystic odontogenic tumor. A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Romero, María del Carmen; Serrera-Figallo, María de los Angeles; Alberdi-Navarro, Javier; Cabezas-Talavero, Javier; Romero-Ruiz, Manuel-María; Aguirre-Urizar, Jose-Manuel; Gutiérrez-Pérez, Jose-Luis

    2017-01-01

    The keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a benign odontogenic cystic neoplasia characterized by its thin, squamous epithelium with superficial parakeratosis. It has the potential for infiltration and local aggressiveness and has a high rate of recurrence. This neoplasia is predominantly found in males and people of white origin. The mandible is the most frequently involved site, in particular the third molar region, mandibular angle, and ramus. It has a mandible-maxilla ratio of 2:1. Only about twenty cases of peripheral keratocystic odontogenic tumors (PKCOT) have been reported in the international literature. This study presents a case of PKCOT localized in the anterior region of the maxilla, on the vestibular side of the upper left lateral incisor and the upper left canine. The diagnosis and treatment procedures, as based on the literature, are also discussed. Key words:Odontogenic cysts, odontogenic tumors, keratocyst, keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PMID:28149484

  11. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with ameloblastic fibro-odontoma of the anterior mandible.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun; Song, Young-Gook; Moon, Seong-Yong; Choi, Boyoung; Kim, Bong Chul; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2014-05-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, which was formerly named calcifying odontogenic cyst, is a benign odontogenic tumor containing clusters of ghost cells within ameloblastic epithelium. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors have been associated with other odontogenic tumors, a finding that is a rare event in other types of odontogenic cysts or tumors. This report describes a case of hybrid odontogenic tumor composed of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastic fibroma-odontoma of the anterior mandible that occurred in a 4-year-old Korean girl.

  12. Odontogenic tumors in Port Harcourt: South–South geopolitical zone of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Iyogun, CA; Omitola, OG; Ukegheson, GE

    2016-01-01

    Aim: A retrospective study of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in Port Harcourt was undertaken to establish its prevalence and compare with known data in the literature from Nigeria and elsewhere. Materials and Methods: All pathologically diagnosed OTs between 2008 and 2013 at the archives of the Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Biology of the University of Port Harcourt/University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital were retrospectively studied and classified according to the 2005 WHO classification of OTs and allied diseases. These were recorded into a computer and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 21.0, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: A total of sixty-three cases of OTs were recorded for the period under review. Fifty-two of these were cases of ameloblastoma (82.54%). This was followed by adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT) 4 (6.35%) and odontogenic myxoma 3 (4.76%). Most lesions were seen within the second to fourth decades of life and mandible was most frequently affected. Conclusion: It is concluded that the pattern of occurrence of OTs in Port Harcourt followed a general pattern in Nigeria and other African countries but slightly differs from findings from other parts of the world. PMID:27601807

  13. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Kavita; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Fareed, Wamiq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/conttrollers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors. PMID:26221475

  14. Adenomatoid Tumor of the Adrenal Gland in Young Woman: From Clinical and Radiological to Pathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Mishevska, Sasha Jovanovska; Jovanovic, Rubens

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid tumors are neoplasms of mesothelial origin, usually occurring in the male and female genital tracts. Extragenital localization sites such as adrenal glands are rare but have been reported. When found in the adrenals, they represent great clinical, radiological and pathological diagnostic challenge, with wide range of differential diagnoses to be considered. We present a case of a 30 years old female, with incidental ultrasound finding of unilateral tumor in the right adrenal gland. Multi slices CT scan was of value in localizing this tumor, but not in the precise diagnosis. The tumor ranged from 5.6 cm to 6.4 cm in greatest diameter. Clinical and hormonal examinations excluded Sy. Cushing, M. Conn and pheochromocytoma. The patient underwent laparoscopic right adrenalectomy. A large tumor (d: 8 × 7 × 3 cm) was removed showing no infiltration of the adrenal cortex or medulla, or extra-adrenal extension into the periadrenal adipose tissue. Histological examination showed numerous cystic spaces lined by flattened cubical epithelial cells. The small cystic spaces were separated by edematous fibrovascular stroma with rare epithelial cells with vacuolated cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical staining was positive with vimentin (+), S100 (+), MCA mesothelial Ag (+), CD 68 (+) and negative with acitin (-), CK7 (-), CD3 (-). Adenomatoid tumor is a rare benign neoplasm that should be added in the differential diagnosis of any adrenal tumor occurring in adrenal gland. The histological and immunohistochemical profiles of this adrenal adenomatoid tumor are very supportive in reaching the diagnosis of this benign tumor of a mesothelial cell origin, helping to avoid invasive treatment. PMID:28058099

  15. [A case of the calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg's tumor). Reported and literature review].

    PubMed

    Peña-Torres, Leandro Miguel; Monterrubio-Guerrero, Alejandro; Díaz de León-Sandoval, Laura Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor known as Pindborg's tumor, is a rare odontogenic neoplasm of the jaws. One of their characteristics is the cortical expansion and the relationship with a non erupted tooth. Since the original description in 1955, only 200 cases approximately have been described in the world literature. This article reviews the literature and describes a case of patient who presented calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor in the jaw undergoing surgical excision treatment with an evolution without complications.

  16. Odontogenic calcificant cystic tumor: a report of two clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Daniel; Villanueva, Julio; Espinosa, Sebastián; Cornejo, Marco

    2007-03-01

    Odontogenic Calcificant Cystic Tumor (OCCT) is an infrequent injury. It arises from odontogenic epithelial rests present in the maxilla, jaw or gum. Gorlin and col. described the OCCT for first time as an own pathological entity in 1962. Clinically, the OCCT represents 1% of the odontogenic injuries. It is possible to be found from the first decade to the eighth decade. It affects in same proportion the maxilla and the jaw, being the most common in the dented zones, with greater incidence in the first molar area. Two case reports of OCCT in two different ages, both in female individuals, one at 5 years old and the other at 35 years old are presented. Enucleation of the tumor was the treatment chosen. The purpose of this article is to present a review of the literature related to these two cases of OCCT and its treatment, putting an emphasis on its aetiology, biological behaviour and treatment.

  17. Classification of odontogenic cysts and tumors – Antecedents

    PubMed Central

    Imran, Aesha; Jayanthi, P; Tanveer, Shahela; Gobu, Sreeja C

    2016-01-01

    Pierre Paul Broca produced a monograph on tumor classification which also included the classification of odontogenic tumors (OTs). The terminology used to describe malignant epithelial OTs has varied since the World Health Organization published the initial consensus on the taxonomy of OTs. Minor changes were introduced in the second edition. It is only in the very recent years that additional knowledge has accumulated and refined the classification. This review emphasizes on reasons for modification by each author and the recent acceptance. PMID:27601821

  18. Targeting the Sonic Hedgehog Pathway in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor*

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Changchun; Amm, Hope M.; DeVilliers, Patricia; Wu, Yixin; Deatherage, Joseph R.; Liu, Zhongyu; MacDougall, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) may occur sporadically or associated with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is a benign aggressive tumor of odontogenic epithelial origin with a high rate of recurrence. A primary human keratocystic odontogenic tumor cell population, KCOT-1, has been established from a tumor explant culture. The KCOT-1 cells were characterized by growth rate, gene expression profiles of major tooth enamel matrix proteins (EMPs), amelogenin (AMELX), enamelin (ENAM), ameloblastin (AMBN), amelotin (AMTN), tumor-related proteins enamelysin (MMP-20), kallikrein-4 (KLK-4), and odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Cytokeratin 14 (CK14) was examined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, expression of the members of the sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway, SHH, patched (PTCH-1), smoothened (SMO), GLI-1, and GLI-2 and of the NOTCH signaling pathway, NOTCH-1, NOTCH-2, NOTCH-3, JAG-2 (Jagged-2), and Delta-like-1 (DLL-1) were evaluated. KCOT-1 cells were treated with SMO antagonist cyclopamine. We found that cyclopamine significantly arrested the growth of KCOT-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner and that the effects of cyclopamine were abolished by adding SHH protein. The protein expression of the SHH pathway was down-regulated by cyclopamine, further confirming that cyclopamine inhibits the SHH signaling pathway; SHH down-regulation correlated with the down-regulation of the NOTCH signaling pathway as well. In conclusion, using an established KCOT-1 cell population, we characterized the gene expression profiles related to the EMPs, SHH, and NOTCH signaling pathway and confirmed that cyclopamine significantly arrested the growth of KCOT-1 cells and may be a viable agent as a novel therapeutic. PMID:22679015

  19. Immunolocalisation of laminin-1 in keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Silva Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo; Gonçalves Ramos, Eduardo Antônio; Araújo Melo, Leonardo; Brandi Schlaepfer, Caroline; de Souza, Renata Oliveira; Campos Oliveira, Márcio; dos Santos, Jean Nunes

    2010-11-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOTs) are distinct odontogenic lesions frequently affecting the jawbones. They may be associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), and may exhibit disorders involving the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunolocalisation of laminin-1 in 20 cases of KOTs in order to contribute to the characterization of this protein, which is little studied in odontogenic tumors. Our results showed laminin-1 in all 20 KOTs studied; its labelling intensity was weak in three cases (15%), moderate in five (25%) and strong in 12 cases (60%). Laminin-1 immunolocalisation was predominantly continuous in 18 (90%) KOTs, including areas of acanthosis, subepithelial split and epithelial buds. Weak immunolabelling was observed in regions exhibiting an inflammatory process, especially in the case of intense inflammation. These findings suggest that laminin-1 does not participate in biological processes such as cystic epithelium-cystic wall separation or the formation of epithelial islands in KOTs. Furthermore, the discontinuous and weak labelling of this protein in the basement membrane of these tumors is probably a consequence of the inflammatory process in the tumor stroma.

  20. Odontogenic Tumors: A Review of 675 Cases in Eastern Libya

    PubMed Central

    Goteti, Saravana HL

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in an Eastern Libyan population based on the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO) classification, and also to compare the actual data with previous studies. Materials and Methods: We retrieved and analyzed 85 OTs from a total of 675 tumors and tumor-like lesions of the oral and perioral structures, for gender, age, tumor site, and frequency. The diagnosis was based on the most recent WHO (2005) classification of OTs. Results: OTs constituted 12.6% of all oral/jaw tumors and tumor-like lesions. Ameloblastoma (28.2%) was the most common type, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (25.2%) and odontoma (19.9%). The male: female ratio was 1.2:1, and maxilla: mandible ratio 1:2. The mean age of occurrence of tumors was 29 years with a peak incidence between 10 and 40 years. Conclusions: OTs are relatively common lesion in this Libyan Population, but the incidence of tumors is neither similar to Caucasians nor Sub-Saharan population. PMID:27013857

  1. Ghost cell odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma--report of two rare cases.

    PubMed

    Hogge, Maritzabel; Velez, Ines; Kaltman, Steven; Movahed, Reza; Yeh, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The ghost cell odontogenic tumor (GCOT) is a neoplastic/cystic lesion with a diverse histopathological and clinical behavior It was formerly known as calcified odontogenic cyst, but in 2005 the World Health Organization categorized this lesion as an odontogenic, benign tumor rather than a cyst; nominating this neoplasm as calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor. A later comprehensive classification named it ghost cell odontogenic tumor because the most remarkable histopathologic characteristic is the presence of a mass of ghost cells embedded in the epithelium. We report two cases of a rare variant of a ghost cell odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma; to our knowledge, one is the youngest patient (four month old) reported in the English literature.

  2. Squamous Odontogenic Tumor: Literature Review Focusing on the Radiographic Features and Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Nilson do Rosário; Gamba, Thiago de Oliveira; Flores, Isadora Luana; de Almeida, Solange Maria; Lopes, Sérgio Lúcio Pereira de Castro

    2015-01-01

    Since its first publication in 1975, the squamous odontogenic tumor remains the rarest odontogenic lesion, with around 50 cases in the English-language literature in which the microscopic characteristics are frequently very well demonstrated. However, articles which discuss the radiographic aspects are scarce, especially with emphasis on the differential diagnosis. The present treatise proposes an assessment of jaw lesions with the same radiographic characteristics of the squamous odontogenic tumor to clarify the main findings for dental clinicians during routine diagnosis. PMID:26140060

  3. In vitro studies on odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Catón, Javier; Mitsiadis, Thimios A; Morgan, Peter R

    2012-01-01

    Ameloblastomas are uncommon benign neoplasms of the jaws. They originate from dental epithelial cells, but they are not capable of mineralizing or forming enamel. The study of these tumors is limited to live tissue collected from patients during scheduled surgery. Ameloblastomas grow slowly in vivo and this property is translated to their behavior in vitro. Here, we describe the methods to culture ameloblastomas in organotypic cultures, as well as to isolate stem/progenitor cells from these tumors.

  4. Retrospective study of 289 odontogenic tumors in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    Serpa, Marianna-Sampaio; Tenório, Jefferson-da-Rocha; do Nascimento, George-João-Ferreira; de Souza-Andrade, Emanuel-Sávio; Veras-Sobral, Ana-Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background Odontogenic tumors (OTs) are considered important among oral lesions because of their clinicopathological heterogeneity, and variable biological behavior. This paper aims to determine the frequency and distribution of OTs, over a period of 10 years, at a public university in Northeastern Brazil and compare this data with previous reports. Material and Methods We reviewed all cases of OTs from oral pathology laboratory of University of Pernambuco (UPE), from 2004 to 2014. Diagnoses were re-evaluated and the tumors were classified according to the latest (2005) World Health Organization Classification of Tumors. In addition, we searched in the English-language literature retrospective studies on OTs that used the same classification. Results Data was obtained allowing the analysis of the tissue hemodynamics. We were able to map the vascularization of the face and it was possible to access three arteries of small diameter (0,60mm angular artery; 0,55mm greater palatine artery; 0,45mm infraorbital artery). Conclusions OTs are uncommon neoplasms with geographic variation. Our clinicopathological features are according to literature. In the present study, KCOT was the most frequent one, showing that the new classification of OTs altered the distribution of these lesions and possibly made KCOT the most common OT observed in diagnostic services worldwide. Key words:Odontogenic tumors, jaw neoplasms, epidemiology, oral pathology. PMID:26827068

  5. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor: a clinico-radio-pathological dilemma.

    PubMed

    Hada, M S; Sable, M; Kane, S V; Pai, Prathamesh S; Juvekar, S L

    2014-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare benign neoplasm of mandible in adults. The presentation of this entity is varied and often confused with a variety of mucosal and jaw lesions and clinical, radiological, and pathological feature of CEOT often-mimic malignancy. The objective of this report is to highlight the clinical features and radiological findings which should arouse suspicion of a benign lesion and importance of providing adequate clinical information to the pathologist to attain accurate diagnosis.We discussed two cases with tumors located in the maxilla. Both presented as expansile lesions with one biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma. Both were pursued with clinico-radiological suspicion of benign lesions and confirmed with pathological correlation of histology and immunohistochemistry as CEOT. Therefore a High index of suspicion and clinico-radiological information are the key feature for diagnosis of this rare tumor.

  6. Cyst or tumor in the buccomaxillary region: Review of literature and a case report

    PubMed Central

    Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Kujan, Omar Bashar; Dwedary, Hisham Mohammed Najeeb; Sikander, Mohammed Hilal; Mankar, Sunil; Amrin, M. Nidha

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors (OTs) include entities of a hamartomatous nature, such as odontoma, benign neoplasms like an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), some benign neoplasms are aggressive as in the case of ameloblastoma. The AOT is a rare odontogenic tumor constituting only 3% of all the OT and very often misdiagnosed as an odontogenic cyst. We report a case of an intra-osseous type of AOT occurred in a young 16-year-old female located in the anterior maxilla along with the clinical, radiological, histological features, and literature review related to the tumor affecting the patient. PMID:26538960

  7. Role of carnoy’s solution in the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Belenguer, Álvaro; Sánchez-Torres, Alba

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Objective The keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a benign but aggressive neoplasm. As enucleation alone obtains high recurrence rates, some adjuvant treatments such as Carnoy’s solution have been proposed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the reduction of recurrences with the use of Carnoy’s solution as adjuvant in the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors. Material and Methods An electronic search in Pubmed (MEDLINE), ScienceDirect and Cochrane databases was conducted with the key words “odontogenic keratocyst”, “keratocystic odontogenic tumor”, “carnoy’s solution”, “treatment” and “enucleation”. The inclusion criteria were clinical studies using Carnoy’s solution as adjuvant for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, published in English, including at least 10 patients. Articles with an unclear reporting of the treatment applied, nonhuman studies, case reports and lesions associated to Gorlin-Goltz syndrome were excluded. Results All the studies included were case series. The recurrence rate of enucleation ranged from 0% to 58.8%. With the only use of Carnoy’s solution as adjuvant treatment to the enucleation, recurrences varied from 0% to 100%. The use of ≥ 2 adjuvant treatments reduced the range between 0% and 7.9%. Conclusions The use of Carnoy’s solution as adjuvant therapy for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumor has a grade C recommendation. Key words:Carnoy’s solution, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, treatment, recurrence. PMID:27475699

  8. The relative frequency of odontogenic tumors: A study of 376 cases in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Verde-Osterne, Rafael; Turatti, Eveline; Cordeiro-Teixeira, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Background Odontogenic tumors (OTs) are rare lesions, exclusive of the jaws, that are derived from epithelial and/or ectomesenchymal elements of the tooth-forming apparatus. Their biological behavior is heterogeneous, including hamartomatous tissue proliferation, benign nonaggressive and aggressive neoplasms, and malignant tumors with metastatic capacity. The aim of this study was to describe the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors in a Brazilian population. In addition, a review of the literature identified studies on odontogenic tumors that follow the 2005 World Health Organization. Material and Methods A total of 376 cases of odontogenic tumors from an oral pathology service were reviewed about age, gender, anatomic site and histologic diagnosis. Results Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (31.6%) were the most common, followed by ameloblastoma (28.5%), and odontoma (22.6%). The mean age was 32.2 years, and more than half the patients (52.1%) were in the second and third decades of life. The male to female ratio was 1:1.37, with a maxilla to mandible ratio of 1:2.08. Conclusions The variation in relative frequency of tumors observed among the several series, including the present study, is probably due in part to cultural differences between geographic areas but also to the study design. Key words:Pathology, epidemiology, odontogenic tumors. PMID:28160576

  9. Peripheral Odontogenic Fibroma: A Rare Tumor mimicking a Gingival Reactive Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Khot, Komal; Bagri-Manjrekar, Kriti; Khot, Paresh

    2017-01-01

    Gingival growths are one of the most frequently encountered lesions in the oral cavity. A plethora of lesions can be seen having similar clinical presentation, making diagnosis a dilemma. Peripheral odontogenic tumors are rare neoplasms to occur on gingiva, the most common among them being the peripheral odontogenic fibroma (POdF). The POdF is a benign, slow-growing, exophytic lesion. Although considered to have a recurrence potential after excision, the actual recurrence rate is not known due to paucity of reported cases. Presented here is a case of a rare neoplasm mimicking an inflammatory gingival lesion with review of the available literature. How to cite this article Khot K, Deshmane S, Bagri-Manjrekar K, Khot P. Peripheral Odontogenic Fibroma: A Rare Tumor mimicking a Gingival Reactive Lesion. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(1):103-106. PMID:28377665

  10. Expression of cell cycle and apoptosis-related proteins in ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Metgud, Rashmi; Gupta, Kanupriya

    2013-12-01

    Tumors arising from epithelium of the odontogenic apparatus or from its derivatives or remnants exhibit considerable histologic variation and are classified into several benign and malignant entities. A high proliferative activity of the odontogenic epithelium in ameloblastoma (AM) and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) has been demonstrated in some studies individually. However, very few previous studies have simultaneously evaluated cell proliferation and apoptotic indexes in AM and KCOT, comparing both lesions. The aim of this study was to assess and compare cell proliferation and apoptotic rates between these two tumors. Specimens of 15 solid AM and 15 KCOT were evaluated. The proliferation index (PI) was assessed by immunohistochemical detection of Ki-67 and the apoptotic index (AI) by methyl green-pyronin stain. KCOT presented a higher PI than AM (P < .05). No statistically significant difference was found in the AI between AM and KCOT. PI and AI were higher in the peripheral cells of AM and respectively in the suprabasal and superficial layers of KCOT. In conclusion, KCOT showed a higher cell proliferation than AM and the AI was similar between these tumors. These findings reinforce the classification of KCOT as an odontogenic tumor and should contribute to its aggressive clinical behavior.

  11. Central Granular Cell Odontogenic Tumor: Report of a Case with CBCT Features

    PubMed Central

    Anbiaee, Najmeh; Saghafi, Shadi; Mohammadzadeh Rezaei, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Central granular cell odontogenic tumor) CGCOT) of the jaw is an exceedingly rare benign odontogenic neoplasm with 35 reported cases in the literature. Among these, very few studies have focused on the cone-beam CT features of CGCOT. Here, we report a case of an asymptomatic CGCOT in a 16-year-old girl and focus on the cone-beam CT features. Only 36 cases of this lesion, including this one, have been reported so far. The case presented is of special importance due to the young age of the patient, the posterior location of the lesion and the multilocular pattern in the cone beam CT images PMID:25628673

  12. CD166 expression in dentigerous cyst, keratocystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Gorgizadeh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background CD166 is a glycoprotein of an immunoglobulin super family of adhesion molecules that has been associated with aggressive characteristics and high recurrence rate of tumors. Different odontogenic lesions exhibit considerable histological variation and different clinical behavior. In an attempt to clarify the mechanisms underlying this different behavior, the present study investigates the immunohistochemical expression of CD166 in these lesions. Material and Methods In this study 69 formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissue blocks of odontogenic lesion consist of 15 unicystic ameloblastoma (UA), 17 solid ameloblastoma (SA), 18 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT), and 19 dentigerous cysts (DC) were reviewed by immunohistochemistry for CD166 staining. Results In this study, CD166 immune staining was evident in all specimen groups except dentigerous cyst. In positive cases, protein localization was cytoplasmic and/or membranous. CD166 expression was seen in76.5% (13) of SA, 73.5% (11) of UA, and 66.7% (12) of KCOTs. Statistical analysis showed that CD166 expression levels were significantly higher in ameloblastoma (SA and UA) and KCOTs than dentigerous cyst (P <0.001), but there was no statistically significant difference between CD166 expression in the other groups (P>0.05). Conclusions This data demonstrates that overexpression of CD166 may have a role in the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma and KCOT. Key words:CD166, ameloblastoma, dentigerous cyst, odontogenic keratocyst. PMID:27398171

  13. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A biopsy service’s experience with 104 solitary, multiple and recurrent lesions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a clinically significant cystic lesion of odontogenic origin. This study aimed to retrospectively review and describe the clinicopathologic features of KCOT and to objectively compare the clinical and histological features of solitary, multiple and recurrent KCOT in a Saudi Arabian population. Material and Methods Biopsy request forms, pathology records and archival materials (all histological slides) of 104 cases of KCOT from 75 patients were retrieved. Demographic and clinical details as well as histological evaluation were analyzed and compared between the 3 groups using chi-squared or Mann-Whitney tests of association as appropriate. Results Significant differences were noted in the age of presentation, location and association with impaction between multiple and solitary cases. Histologically, there was a difference in the mitotic count, presence of satellite cysts and proliferating odontogenic epithelium between solitary and multiple lesions. There was no difference between the KCOT that later recurred and solitary lesion which did not recur even when matched clinically for age, sex and location. There were differences when solitary KCOT that later recurred or recurrent KCOT were compared with multiple lesions. Multiple lesions still had more significant proliferative activity parameters than solitary recurrence-related KCOT. Conclusions KCOTs in Saudi Arabians are not different from those reported from other parts of the world. Clinical and histological analyses showed multiple KCOT is different from its solitary recurrent or non-recurrent counterparts and has a higher proliferative activity than both. Clinicohistologic features alone cannot wholly explain the behavior of KCOT. Key words:Descriptive study, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontogenic keratocyst, solitary, multiple, recurrent. PMID:27475695

  14. Amyloid-Producing Odontogenic Tumors of the Facial Skin in Three Cats.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, K; Endoh, C; Kagawa, Y; Ohmachi, T; Yamagami, T; Nomura, K; Matsuda, K; Okamoto, M; Taniyama, H

    2017-03-01

    Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumors (APOTs) of the facial skin were diagnosed in 3 domestic cats. The neoplasms had the histopathological characteristics of the odontogenic tumor. The neoplastic cells were present in irregular islands, strands, and sheets. The peripheral neoplastic cells of the islands and strands were arranged in a palisading fashion, while the central cells were polyhedral to stellate and randomly arranged. Multiple spherules of homogeneous eosinophilic material were closely apposed to the neoplastic epithelial cells. The spherules stained with Congo red and produced an apple green birefringence under polarization microscopy, indicative of amyloid. Immunohistochemically, amyloid materials of the neoplasms reacted with polyclonal antibodies for ameloblastin, amelogenin, and sheathlin antibodies. Neoplastic epithelial cells also reacted with antiameloblastin, amelogenin, and sheathlin antibodies, with varied intensity. The histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of dermal neoplasms of the 3 cats were analogous to those of APOTs reported in the dog and the cat.

  15. p53, p63 and p73 expression and angiogenesis in keratocystic odontogenic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chandrangsu, Soranun

    2016-01-01

    Background Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTSs) are odontogenic tumors previously referred to as odontogenic keratocysts. Several studies have reported that KCOT behavior is more like that of a benign neoplasm than a cyst. KCOTs are locally destructive and exhibit a high recurrence rate. The objective of this study is to characterize the expression of p53, p63 and p73 in KCOTs together with the relationship between their expression and KCOT angiogenesis and recurrence. Material and Methods Standard indirect immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies specific to human p53, p63, p73 and CD105 was performed in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 39 KCOT samples. Grading of p53, p63 and p73 immunohistochemical staining was divided into three groups, whereas microvessel density (MVD) was presented as the mean +/- standard deviation. Associations between p53, p63 and p73 expression and clinical-pathological parameters were analyzed by Fisher’s exact test, whereas associations among MVD levels, clinical and pathological parameters and p53, p63 and p73 expression were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U test. Correlations among p53, p63, p73 and MVD levels were analyzed using Spearman’s correlation coefficients. For all analyses, p< 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. Results p53, p63 and p73 expression was noted in 23, 32 and 26 of 39 KCOT cases, respectively. The mean MVD was 26.7 ± 15.8 per high-power field. In addition, correlations between the expression levels of p53, p63, p73 and MVD in KCOT were examined. Statistically significant positive relationships were noted for all proteins (p<0.001). Conclusions Three members of the p53 protein family are expressed in KCOTs, and their expression relates to angiogenesis in these tumors. Key words:p53, p63, p73, angiogenesis, keratocystic odontogenic tumors. PMID:27957261

  16. Multicentric Squamous Odontogenic Tumor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Elmuradi, Sophia; Mair, Yasmin; Suresh, Lakshmanan; DeSantis, James; Neiders, Mirdza; Aguirre, Alfredo

    2016-09-08

    Squamous odontogenic tumor (SOT) is a rare benign epithelial odontogenic neoplasm of the jaws. Both intraosseous and peripheral SOTs have been described in the English language literature. While most intraosseous SOTs occur as solitary lesions, a multicentric variant has also been previously described. Although the radiographic and microscopic features are identical for both solitary and multicentric clinical presentations, there are three significant differences between them. More specifically, multicentric SOT presents at an earlier age (third decade of life), has a slightly higher male to female ratio than the solitary type and has a marked predilection for African-Americans. Here we document the eighth reported case of multicentric SOT, which was diagnosed in a 43-year-old African-American male. In addition, we feature focal sebaceous metaplasia, a heretofore unknown microscopic feature of SOT. Clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings are discussed. The differential diagnosis, biological behavior and management modalities for SOT are also addressed.

  17. Conservative approach to recurrent calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor occupying the maxillary sinus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) is an uncommon benign cystic neoplasm of the jaw that develops from the odontogenic epithelium. Invasion into the maxillary sinus by a CCOT is not a typical, and the recurrence of the cystic variant of CCOT in the posterior maxilla is rare. This report describes a recurrent CCOT occupying most of the maxillary sinus of a 24-year-old male patient. As a treatment, marsupialization was carried out as a means of decompression, and the involved teeth were all endodontically treated. Afterward, surgical enucleation was performed. The size of the lesion continued to shrink after marsupialization, and the maxillary sinus restored its volume. This patient has been followed-up for 3 years after the surgery, and there have not been any signs of recurrence. PMID:27847742

  18. Oral pulse granuloma associated with keratocystic odontogenic tumor: Report of a case and review on etiopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S.; Angadi, Punnya V.; Mane, Deepa R.; Hallikerimath, Seema R.

    2011-01-01

    Pulse granuloma is a distinct oral entity characterized as a foreign body reaction occurring either centrally or peripherally. It is usually seen in the periapical or in the sulcus area. Occasionally the lesions occur in the wall of the cyst, commonest being the inflammatory odontogenic cyst. Histologically, they present as eosinophilic hyaline mass with giant cell inclusions and inflammatory cells. They may show different histological characteristics, possibly related to the length of time in the tissue. Adequate recognition is important to avoid misdiagnosis. Many authors suggest that pulse granuloma results due to implantation of food particles of plant or vegetable origin into the tissue following tooth extraction. This paper aims to report a case of pulse granuloma associated with keratocystic odontogenic tumor with its histochemical and polarizing microscopic features and discuss on etiopathogenesis of pulse granuloma. PMID:23482677

  19. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Findings in Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumor Associated with Odontome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Phulambrikar, Tushar; Vilas Kant, Sanchita; Kode, Manasi; Magar, Shaliputra

    2015-01-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) is a rare cystic odontogenic neoplasm frequently found in association with odontome. This report documents a case of CCOT associated with an odontome arising in the anterior maxilla in a 28-year-old man. Conventional radiographs showed internal calcification within the lesion but were unable to visualize its relation with the adjacent structures and its accurate extent. In this case cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could accurately reveal the extent and the internal structure of the lesion which aided the presumptive diagnosis of the lesion as CCOT. This advanced imaging technique proved to be extremely useful in the radiographic assessment and management of this neoplasm of the maxilla. PMID:26636128

  20. Odontogenic tumors in children and adolescents. A 15-year retrospective study in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Guerrisi, Marcela; Piloni, María Julia; Keszler, Alicia

    2007-05-01

    There are few studies on bucco-maxillary lesions in children and adolescents, and reports on odontogenic tumors (OT) are scanty. Comparison among the available data is difficult due to differences in the criteria used in each study. The aim of the present work was to perform a retrospective study of OT in patients aged up to 20 years diagnosed at a center specialized in histopathologic diagnosis of oral diseases. All cases diagnosed with OT between 1990 and 2004 were retrieved from the Service archives. The 153 retrieved cases accounted for 7% of total biopsies performed during that period, and to 78.4% of tumors of the jaws. Mean age of the whole population was 12.7 years and the male to female ratio was 2:1. The most frequent tumor types were Odontoma, (50.9%), Ameloblastoma (18.3%) and Myxoma (8.5%), and the most infrequent was Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor (1.3%). According to our results, OT cannot be considered infrequent. They are the prevalent tumors of the jaws in the age group studied herein.

  1. Comparison of immunohistochemical expression of CD10 in keratocystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Hormozi, Elham; Fard, Vahid Nourollahi; Naseri, Mohammad Ali; Jahromi, Nima Haghighat; Keshani, Forooz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), also called keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), is a developmental lesion which should be carefully monitored and it exhibits development mechanisms and biologic behaviors different from those of other more common lesions such as dentigerous and radicular cysts. CD10 antigen is a cell surface metalloendopeptidase, which inactivates various peptides that are physiologically active. Studies have shown that increase in the expression of CD10 in the stromal cells helps the progression of the tumor. Ameloblastoma (AB) is a local invasive tumor and given the role of supporting connective tissue stroma in the aggression and progression. The aim of the present study was to comparatively evaluate the expression of CD10 in the connective tissue stroma of AB and OKC as a KCOT. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective, cross-sectional study, 14 paraffin blocks of KCOT and 9 of AB (7 multicystic and 2 unicystic) were evaluated with CD10 immunohistochemical expression in the connective tissue stroma of AB and the connective tissue wall of KCOT. The data were analyzed with Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Results: In 8 samples of 9 AB and in 13 samples of 14 KOT lesions, expression of CD10 was shown. Fisher's exact test did not reveal any significant differences between these two lesions in the expression of CD10 (P = 0.64). Conclusion: The results of this study propose that high expression rate of CD10 might be one of the reasons for the aggressive behavior of AB and high recurrence rate of OKC and reinforce the classification of OKC as an odontogenic tumor. PMID:27076824

  2. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Genes Involved in the Pathogenesis of Ameloblastoma and Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Eliane Macedo Sobrinho; Santos, Hércules Otacílio; dos Santos Dias, Ivoneth; Santos, Sérgio Henrique; Batista de Paula, Alfredo Maurício; Feltenberger, John David; Sena Guimarães, André Luiz; Farias, Lucyana Conceição

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of odontogenic tumors is not well known. It is important to identify genetic deregulations and molecular alterations. This study aimed to investigate, through bioinformatic analysis, the possible genes involved in the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma (AM) and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Genes involved in the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT were identified in GeneCards. Gene list was expanded, and the gene interactions network was mapped using the STRING software. “Weighted number of links” (WNL) was calculated to identify “leader genes” (highest WNL). Genes were ranked by K-means method and Kruskal-Wallis test was used (P<0.001). Total interactions score (TIS) was also calculated using all interaction data generated by the STRING database, in order to achieve global connectivity for each gene. The topological and ontological analyses were performed using Cytoscape software and BinGO plugin. Literature review data was used to corroborate the bioinformatics data. CDK1 was identified as leader gene for AM. In KCOT group, results show PCNA and TP53. Both tumors exhibit a power law behavior. Our topological analysis suggested leader genes possibly important in the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT, by clustering coefficient calculated for both odontogenic tumors (0.028 for AM, zero for KCOT). The results obtained in the scatter diagram suggest an important relationship of these genes with the molecular processes involved in AM and KCOT. Ontological analysis for both AM and KCOT demonstrated different mechanisms. Bioinformatics analyzes were confirmed through literature review. These results may suggest the involvement of promising genes for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT. PMID:28357197

  3. Immunoexpression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway proteins in ameloblastoma and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Sabrina-Nogueira; Pires, Fábio-Ramôa; Armada, Luciana

    2017-01-01

    Background Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is essential for the beginning of odontogenesis and may be involved in the development and progression of some odontogenic tumors. Thus, the aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway proteins in a series of AME and CCOT. Material and Methods Immunohistochemical reactions were performed using antibodies against Wnt1, Wnt5a and β-catenin in 17 cases of solid AME and 6 cases of CCOT. Results In the AME group, Wnt1 and Wnt5a were identified in the epithelium in most of the cases, and β-catenin was mainly identified in the cytoplasm of the tumoral cells. In the CCOT group, Wnt1 and Wnt5a were identified in the epithelium and in the ghost cells in almost all the cases, and β-catenin was mainly identified in the cytoplasm and in the nuclei of the tumoral cells. Conclusions These results contribute to support the importance of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway proteins in AME and CCOT tumorigenesis. The abnormal expression of cytoplasmic and/or nuclear β-catenin appears to contribute to the development of both AME and CCOT. In addition, it is possible that Wnt1 and Wnt5a expression in ghost cells can contribute to its histogenesis in CCOT. Key words:Ameloblastoma, β-catenin, calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, immunohistochemistry, Wnt. PMID:28149478

  4. Presentation of a keratocystic odontogenic tumor with agenesis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We analyzed the etiopathogenetic, clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic aspects of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, particularly in association with dental anomalies of number, with the aim of providing useful information for their correct diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis within a multidisciplinary approach. Case presentation A 14-year-old Caucasian girl presented for observation of bilateral agenesis of the upper incisors, which was diagnosed by orthopantomography. Approximately one year after starting orthodontic treatment, the patient went to the emergency department because of a phlegmonous tumefaction of the lateroposterior upper left maxillary region. Diagnostic orthopantomography and axial computed tomography scan results of the facial skeleton revealed a large lesion occupying the left maxillary sinus, rhizolysis of dental elements 26 and 27, and dislocation of dental element 28. The lesion and infected sinus mucosa were removed through surgical antral-cystectomy with the Caldwell-Luc approach. Histological examination of the lesion confirmed the suspected diagnosis of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. The 12-month follow-up orthopantomography and computed tomography scan results showed good trabecular bone formation in the lesion area. The 24-month follow-up results showed optimal healing in the area of the lesion, positive pulp vitality tests for teeth 26 and 27, and good periodontal tissue healing, as verified through periodontal probing. Conclusions Combined with our observations from a careful review of the literature, the results of the case study suggest that keratocystic odontogenic tumor and dental agenesis probably do not develop through a common genetic cause. More likely, they are caused by related environmental factors. Management of this case required the multidisciplinary collaboration of different specializations and careful planning to devise a correct therapeutic protocol and reach a favorable prognosis. PMID:24716509

  5. Exploring the concept of “inflammatory angiogenesis” in keratocystic odontogenic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Alaeddini, Mojgan; Mostafaloo, Esmat; Mirmohammadkhani, Omid; Eshghyar, Nosratollah

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of inflammation in angiogenesis of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Study Design: Twenty inflamed and 20 non-inflamed KCOTs were selected based on quantitative scoring of inflammation which was also applied on 20 radicular cysts. Microvessel density was assessed in all samples using CD34 antibody and angiogenesis was compared between the three groups. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance followed by post-hoc Scheffe test and P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. Results: A statistically significant difference in angiogenesis was found between radicular cysts and both inflamed and non-inflamed KCOTs (P < 0.001), but not between inflamed and non-inflamed KCOTs (P =0.347). Conclusion: Based on the results obtained in the present study, it seems that the effect of inflammation on angiogenesis in KCOT is minimal. However further investigation using other methods of evaluation is suggested to fully clarify the role of “inflammatory angiogenesis” in this neoplasm. Key words:Keratocystic odontogenic tumor, radicular cyst, angiogenesis, inflammation. PMID:23385504

  6. Vismodegib hedgehog-signaling inhibition and treatment of basal cell carcinomas as well as keratocystic odontogenic tumors in Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Booms, Patrick; Harth, Marc; Sader, Robert; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Vismodegib hedgehog signaling inhibition treatment has potential for reducing the burden of multiple skin basal cell carcinomas and jaw keratocystic odontogenic tumors. They are major criteria for the diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome, also called nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Clinical features of Gorlin syndrome are reported, and the relevance of hedgehog signaling pathway inhibition by oral vismodegib for maxillofacial surgeons is highlighted. In summary, progressed basal cell carcinoma lesions are virtually inoperable. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors have an aggressive behavior including rapid growth and extension into adjacent tissues. Interestingly, nearly complete regression of multiple Gorlin syndrome-associated keratocystic odontogenic tumors following treatment with vismodegib. Due to radio-hypersensitivity in Gorlin syndrome, avoidance of treatment by radiotherapy is strongly recommended for all affected individuals. Vismodegib can help in those instances where radiation is contra-indicated, or the lesions are inoperable. The effect of vismodegib on basal cell carcinomas was associated with a significant decrease in hedgehog-signaling and tumor proliferation. Vismodegib, a new and approved drug for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma, is a specific oncogene inhibitor. It also seems to be effective for treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors and basal cell carcinomas in Gorlin syndrome, rendering the surgical resections less challenging.

  7. Squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferation in a radicular cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Molina, Vicente; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2013-01-01

    The squamous odontogenic tumour is a rare benign neoplasm whose aetiology remains unknown. It usually appears in the jaw and its origin could be related to the ephitelial remnants of Malassez. Histologically comprises numerous islets of squamous, non-keratinized, well-differentiated and rounded epithelial cells a fibrous stroma without signs of atypical cells. There is a non-neoplastic lesion with the same histological pattern than the squamous odontogenic tumour. This entity is characterized by squamous odontogenic tumour proliferations isolated into the cyst wall of an odontogenic cyst. It is rare and has a benign behavior. It has been suggested that these epithelial proliferations could be the former expression of the neoplastic form. It is very important to carry out clinical and radiological controls periodically. So far it has not been documented any change towards a squamous odontogenic tumour nor toward malignancy in a squamous odontogenic tumour like proliferation. Key words:Radicular cyst, squamous odontogenic tumour. PMID:24455099

  8. Squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferation in a radicular cyst: A case report.

    PubMed

    Sala-Pérez, Sergi; Marco-Molina, Vicente; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2013-12-01

    The squamous odontogenic tumour is a rare benign neoplasm whose aetiology remains unknown. It usually appears in the jaw and its origin could be related to the ephitelial remnants of Malassez. Histologically comprises numerous islets of squamous, non-keratinized, well-differentiated and rounded epithelial cells a fibrous stroma without signs of atypical cells. There is a non-neoplastic lesion with the same histological pattern than the squamous odontogenic tumour. This entity is characterized by squamous odontogenic tumour proliferations isolated into the cyst wall of an odontogenic cyst. It is rare and has a benign behavior. It has been suggested that these epithelial proliferations could be the former expression of the neoplastic form. It is very important to carry out clinical and radiological controls periodically. So far it has not been documented any change towards a squamous odontogenic tumour nor toward malignancy in a squamous odontogenic tumour like proliferation. Key words:Radicular cyst, squamous odontogenic tumour.

  9. Recurrent squamous odontogenic tumor: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    MOHR, BARBARA; WINTER, JOCHEN; WAHL, GERHARD; JANSKA, EMILIA

    2015-01-01

    Squamous odontogenic tumors (SOTs) are benign, locally infiltrative neoplasms that localize to the periodontium. In total, <50 cases have been reported since the first description of SOTs in 1975. Although the exact etiology of SOTs is unknown, the tumors are considered to derive from the epithelial cell rests of Malassez. SOTs are characterized by radiological and clinical signs and symptoms, including pain with increased sensitivity in the affected area, bone expansion and increased tooth mobility. The present study describes the case of a patient that experienced numerous SOT recurrences and also discusses recommendations for treatment. A locally invasive mandibular SOT was identified in a Caucasian 41-year-old female patient. The treatment involved recommended conservative surgery, including local curettage. In addition, 49 cases published in the literature were reviewed to assess the treatment strategies. The present patient experienced two recurrences of the tumor during the 6-year follow-up period. Ultimately, the vitality of the adjacent teeth was compromised. An apicoectomy with a small amount of resection of the marginal bone was necessary. In >50% of the reported cases of SOT in the literature the adjacent teeth were extracted. The present case of SOT and the associated literature were also discussed. It was concluded that the treatment of choice appears to be a conservative surgical removal, but the successful management of SOTs often requires the removal of the adjacent teeth. PMID:26722231

  10. Early dental epithelial transcription factors distinguish ameloblastoma from keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Heikinheimo, K; Kurppa, K J; Laiho, A; Peltonen, S; Berdal, A; Bouattour, A; Ruhin, B; Catón, J; Thesleff, I; Leivo, I; Morgan, P R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the molecular relationship between ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) by means of a genome-wide expression analysis. Total RNA from 27 fresh tumor samples of 15 solid/multicystic intraosseous ameloblastomas and 12 sporadic KCOTs was hybridized on Affymetrix whole genome arrays. Hierarchical clustering separated ameloblastomas and KCOTs into 2 distinct groups. The gene set enrichment analysis based on 303 dental genes showed a similar separation of ameloblastomas and KCOTs. Early dental epithelial markers PITX2, MSX2, DLX2, RUNX1, and ISL1 were differentially overexpressed in ameloblastoma, indicating its dental identity. Also, PTHLH, a hormone involved in tooth eruption and invasive growth, was one of the most differentially upregulated genes in ameloblastoma. The most differentially overexpressed genes in KCOT were squamous epithelial differentiation markers SPRR1A, KRTDAP, and KRT4, as well as DSG1, a component of desmosomal cell-cell junctions. Additonally, the epithelial stem cell marker SOX2 was significantly upregulated in KCOT when compared with ameloblastoma. Taken together, the gene expression profile of ameloblastoma reflects differentiation from dental lamina toward the cap/bell stage of tooth development, as indicated by dental epithelium-specific transcription factors. In contrast, gene expression of KCOT indicates differentiation toward keratinocytes.

  11. Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumor in Radiologically Normal Dental Follicular Space of Mandibular Third Molars: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Sarode, Gargi S.; Sarode, Sachin C.; Prajapati, Ghevaram; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Patil, Shankargouda

    2017-01-01

    Two cases of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) of the dental follicle in an impacted third molar without clinical and radiological evidence are reported during routine histopathological examination. In both the cases left mandibular third molar was mesioangularly impacted with pericoronal radiolucency of less than 2.5 mm, which was not indicative of any pathology. As a routine protocol (which is not practiced widely) of our institution, dental follicles associated with extracted molars were sent for histopathological examination. Histopathological features were consistent with CCOT with pathognomonic ghost cell transformation of odontogenic epithelium. The patients were followed for one year with no recurrence. This paper emphasizes the importance of routine histopathological examination of dental follicles associated with asymptomatic impacted teeth without any clinical or radiographic evidence of follicular lesion. PMID:28286639

  12. The use of vismodegib to shrink keratocystic odontogenic tumors in basal cell nevus syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Ally, Mina S.; Tang, Jean Y.; Joseph, Timmy; Thompson, Bobbye; Lindgren, Joselyn; Raphael, Maria Acosta; Ulerio, Grace; Chanana, Anita M.; Mackay-Wiggan, Julian M.; Bickers, David R.; Epstein, Ervin H

    2014-01-01

    Importance Keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaw (KCOTs) affect more than 65% of patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS). Surgery frequently causes facial disfigurement and is not always curative. Most BCNS-related and some sporadic KCOTs have malignant activation of the Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway. Observations We examined the effect of vismodegib (an oral HH-pathway inhibitor) on KCOT size in BCNS patients enrolled in a clinical trial testing vismodegib for BCC prevention (NCT00957229), using pre and post-treatment MRIs. Four men and 2 women had pretreatment KCOTs, mean longest diameter 2.0cm (range: 0.7–3.3cm), occurring primarily in the mandible. Subjects were treated with vismodegib (150mg/day) for a mean 18 months (SD: 4.8, range: 11–24). Four subjects experienced a size reduction and 2 had no change. Vismodegib reduced the mean longest diameter of KCOTs in all subjects by 1.0cm (95% CI: 0.03, 1.94, p= 0.02) or 50% from baseline. We observed no enlargement of existing KCOTs or new KCOT development. Conclusions and relevance Vismodegib shrinks some KCOTs in BCNS patients and may offer an alternative to surgical therapy. These effects were maintained for at least 9 months after drug cessation in 1 patient. Further studies assessing long-term efficacy and optimal maintenance regimens should be performed. PMID:24623282

  13. Immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in keratocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst, and radicular cyst: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Khajuria, Nidhi; Metgud, Rashmi; Naik, Smitha; Lerra, Sahul; Tiwari, Priya; Mamta; Katakwar, Payal; Tak, Anirudh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cyst and tumors arise from tissue remains of odontogenesis, these interactions have been considered to play an important role in the tumorigenesis of odontogenic lesions. The connective tissue stroma has an essential role in the preservation of epithelial tissues and minor alterations in the epithelium are followed by corresponding changes in the stroma, such as angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered the first factor which maintains its position as the most critical driver of vascular formation and is required to initiate the formation of immature vessels, with this aim, present study was executed to evaluate VEGF expression in kertocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst and radicular cyst (RC). Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out comprising a total of 31 cases; 13 cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), nine cases of dentigerous cyst (DC) and nine cases of RC. The sections were stained immunohistochemically with VEGF antibody and were evaluated for the presence and intensity of the immuno reactive cells. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square test to inter-compare the VEGF expression between KCOT, DC, and RC. Results: VEGF expression in the epithelium and connective tissue was significantly higher in KCOT compared to dentigerous and RC. One case of KCOT with carcinomatous change also revealed positive results for the VEGF expression in the dysplastic epithelium, tumor islands, and connective tissue. The significant difference was observed on inter-comparison of the VEGF expression in the connective tissue of KCOT and DC, whereas no significant difference was observed in the VEGF expression in the connective tissue of KCOT and DC. Conclusion: The present study data supports the literature finding that angiogenesis can be important in the progression and enlargement of odontogenic cysts similarly to what occurs in neoplastic conditions and further it can be concluded that

  14. The beginning of oral pathology. Part I: First dental journal reports of odontogenic tumors and cysts, 1839-1860.

    PubMed

    Bouquot, J E; Lense, E C

    1994-09-01

    Literature reviews of oral lesions frequently lack an appropriate historic perspective, presuming that the mid- to late-twentieth century reports are the first valid reports available. The mid-nineteenth century dental journals, however, are replete with clinical, surgical, and microscopic descriptions of oral tumors and cysts. Most of these have never been referenced during the present century. The purpose of this article is to report the earliest dental journal references for a variety of odontogenic tumors and cysts. These references are derived from a canvass of all dental journals published from the first journal (American Journal of Dental Science) in 1839 to the appearance of Dental Cosmos and the organization of the American Dental Association in 1860.

  15. Update from the 4th Edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Head and Neck Tumours: Odontogenic and Maxillofacial Bone Tumors.

    PubMed

    Wright, John M; Vered, Marilena

    2017-03-01

    The 4th edition of the World Health Organization's Classification of Head and Neck Tumours was published in January of 2017. This article provides a summary of the changes to Chapter 4 Tumours of the oral cavity and mobile tongue and Chapter 8 Odontogenic and maxillofacial bone tumours. Odontogenic cysts which were eliminated from the 3rd 2005 edition were included in the 4th edition as well as other unique allied conditons of the jaws. Many new tumors published since 2005 have been included in the 2017 classification.

  16. The effect of ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor on the displacement pattern of inferior alveolar canal in CBCT examinations.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Isa; Taheri Talesh, Kourosh; Yazdani, Javad; Keshavarz Meshkin Fam, Sareh; Ghavimi, Mohammad Ali; Arta, Seyed Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background. The inferior alveolar canal should be examined as a significant anatomical landmark, particularly in the posterior body and ramus of the mandible, for dental and surgical procedures. In the present study, the effects of two pathological lesions, ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor, on canal displacement were investigated. Methods. This study had a single-blinded design. Twenty-six patients with lesions in the mandible referred to Imam Reza Hospital, Tabriz, Iran, were studied in two equal groups (13 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of ameloblastoma and 13 with a histopathological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst). After confirming the initial incisional biopsy and pathological report, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) of lesions larger than 3 cm mesiodistaly and those involving the mandibular posterior body and ramus were included in the study. Two maxillofacial surgeons in association with an oral and maxillofacial radiologist examined three points on CBCT images to determine the mandibular canal position relative to the lesions from the lingual and buccal aspects. Results. The results of statistical analyses showed that in ameloblastoma, the inferior alveolar canal had been displaced more buccally in the ramus area (point A) (84.6%) but in the distal region (point C), the displacement was less buccal (41.6%). The canal was displaced buccally in 53.8% of cases at point A and in 46.2% of cases at point C in KOT lesions. Finally chi-squared test did not show any statistically significant differences between these two lesions. Conclusion. The results of this study showed no relationship between these lesions and the displacement of the mandibular canal.

  17. The effect of ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor on the displacement pattern of inferior alveolar canal in CBCT examinations

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Isa; Taheri Talesh, Kourosh; Yazdani, Javad; Keshavarz Meshkin Fam, Sareh; Ghavimi, Mohammad Ali; Arta, Seyed Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background. The inferior alveolar canal should be examined as a significant anatomical landmark, particularly in the posterior body and ramus of the mandible, for dental and surgical procedures. In the present study, the effects of two pathological lesions, ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor, on canal displacement were investigated. Methods. This study had a single-blinded design. Twenty-six patients with lesions in the mandible referred to Imam Reza Hospital, Tabriz, Iran, were studied in two equal groups (13 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of ameloblastoma and 13 with a histopathological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst). After confirming the initial incisional biopsy and pathological report, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) of lesions larger than 3 cm mesiodistaly and those involving the mandibular posterior body and ramus were included in the study. Two maxillofacial surgeons in association with an oral and maxillofacial radiologist examined three points on CBCT images to determine the mandibular canal position relative to the lesions from the lingual and buccal aspects. Results. The results of statistical analyses showed that in ameloblastoma, the inferior alveolar canal had been displaced more buccally in the ramus area (point A) (84.6%) but in the distal region (point C), the displacement was less buccal (41.6%). The canal was displaced buccally in 53.8% of cases at point A and in 46.2% of cases at point C in KOT lesions. Finally chi-squared test did not show any statistically significant differences between these two lesions. Conclusion. The results of this study showed no relationship between these lesions and the displacement of the mandibular canal. PMID:27651881

  18. Central mucoepidermoid carcinoma radiographically mimicking an odontogenic tumor: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Leorik Pereira; Serpa, Marianna Sampaio; da Silva, Luiz Arthur Barbosa; Sobral, Ana Paula Veras

    2016-01-01

    Central mucoepidermoid carcinoma (CMC) of the jaw bones is a rare malignant salivary gland tumor of unknown pathogenesis, comprising about 4% of all mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MECs). Most cases are histologically classified as a low-grade tumor and radiographically appear as a well-defined unilocular or multilocular radiolucent lesion. Block resection or wide local excisions are the treatment of choice and patients usually show a good overall prognosis although a long-term follow-up is necessary. This report describes a case of a 28-year-old male with MEC in the posterior region of the mandible and discusses its clinical, radiographic and histopathological findings. Although rare, CMC may be considered a differential diagnosis in cases of proliferative and osteolytic lesions in the oral cavity even when its clinical and/or radiographic findings do not suggest malignancy. PMID:27721620

  19. Adenomatoid mesothelioma with intranuclear inclusion bodies: a case report with cytological and histological findings.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Toshiaki; Kawashima, Katsuhiko; Serizawa, Hiromi; Miura, Hiroyuki; Kyeongil, Kim

    2014-05-01

    We report a very unusual cytologic feature, intranuclear inclusion bodies, in mesothelioma of a predominantly adenomatoid type. The patient, a 57-year-old woman, was presented with dyspnea and right pleural effusion. Pleural aspiration cytology revealed many cohesive ball-like clusters, with a tubular pattern, composed of small atypical cells displaying a high-nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio. They had a nuclear groove and irregular intranuclear inclusion bodies. Right lung partial resection with thoracoscopy revealed that a white tumor had proliferated along the pleural surface at S(8) . Histology revealed nodular tumor cells forming dilated structures mixed with small tubular or glandular structures similar to those seen in benign adenomatoid tumors. These tumor cells had invaded peripheral lung tissues. Such inclusion bodies have not been reported earlier in mesothelioma. On the basis of this observation, we propose that the adenomatoid type of malignant mesothelioma be added to the differential diagnosis of malignant effusions when tumor cells with nuclear grooves and intranuclear inclusions are found in pleural aspiration cytology.

  20. Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst masquerading as dentigerous cyst

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Devi Charan; Rathore, Ajit Singh; Jain, Anshi; Thokchom, Natasha; Khurana, Neha

    2016-01-01

    The orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is a rare developmental odontogenic cyst that has been considered as a variant of the keratocystic odontogenic tumor until Wright (1981) defined it as a different entity. Recognition of OOC as a unique entity has long been due, yet its inexplicable clinical, radiographic presentation resembling dentigerous cyst due to its association to an impacted tooth, and its histological features makes it rather perplexing. This is the report of a case of OOC in relation to an impacted maxillary canine and its immunohistochemical analysis with Ki-67. PMID:27857903

  1. A study of 1177 odontogenic lesions in a South Kerala population

    PubMed Central

    Deepthi, PV; Beena, VT; Padmakumar, SK; Rajeev, R; Sivakumar, R

    2016-01-01

    Context: A study on odontogenic cysts and tumors. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of odontogenic cysts and tumors and their distribution according to age, gender, site and histopathologic types of those reported over a period of 1998–2012 in a Tertiary Health Care Center at South Kerala. Settings and Design: The archives of Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects and Methods: Archival records were reviewed and all the cases of odontogenic cysts and tumors were retrieved from 1998 to 2012. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistical analysis was performed using the computer software, Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) IBM SPSS Software version 16. Results: Of 7117 oral biopsies, 4.29% were odontogenic tumors. Ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumor comprising 50.2% of cases, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (24.3%). These tumors showed a male predilection (1.19: 1). Odontogenic tumors occurred in a mean age of 33.7 ± 16.8 years. Mandible was the most common jaw affected (76.07%). Odontogenic cysts constituted 12.25% of all oral biopsies. Radicular cyst comprised 75.11% of odontogenic cysts followed by dentigerous cyst (17.2%). Conclusions: This study showed similar as well as contradictory results compared to other studies, probably due to geographical and ethnic variations which is yet to be corroborated. PMID:27601809

  2. Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst of the mandible: A rare case report with a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sarvaiya, Bhumi; Vadera, Hitesh; Sharma, Vimal; Bhad, Kaustubh; Patel, Zinal; Thakkar, Mimansa

    2014-01-01

    Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is an odontogenic cyst was initially termed as the uncommon orthokeratinized type of odontogenic keratocyst by the World Health Organization. It usually occurs in mandible. Various studies have shown that OOC has typical characteristic clinicopathologic features when compared to other developmental odontogenic lesions such as dentigerous cyst and the keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Rare recurrence was noted after surgical removal of the lesion. The purpose of this article is to present a case of OOC arising in the posterior mandible and emphasize on differentiating it from the KCOT and dentigerous cyst. PMID:24818100

  3. Clinical and radiological profile of ameloblastic fibro-odontoma: an update on an uncommon odontogenic tumor based on a critical analysis of 114 cases.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Amos; Kaffe, Israel; Vered, Marilena

    2013-03-01

    Ameloblastic fibro-odontoma is an uncommon benign tumor of the jaws that belongs to the group of mixed odontogenic tumors. The descriptions of its clinical and radiological features in the literature are not always accurate and sometimes even contradictory. The aim of the present study was to critically evaluate their clinical and radiological features as reported in the English-language literature. A total of 114 well-documented cases of ameloblastic fibro-odontomas (103 from publications and 11 of our own new cases) were analyzed. The patients' age ranged from 8 months to 26 years (mean 9.6). There were 74 (65 %) males, with a male-to-female ratio of 1.85:1 (P = 0.001). The mandible was involved in 74 (65 %) cases, and the mandible-to-maxilla ratio was 1.85:1 (P < 0.001). Nearly 80 % of the lesions were located in the posterior region of the jaws, and most (58 %) were in the posterior mandible. Radiographically, most of the lesions were unilocular and only a few (~10 %) were multilocular. Most lesions were mixed radiolucent-radiopaque, and only a few (~5 %) were radiolucent. Almost all lesions (~92 %) were associated with the crown of an unerupted tooth/teeth. This comprehensive analysis of a large number of patients with an uncommon lesion revealed that ameloblastic fibro-odontomas are significantly more common in males and in the mandible, and that multilocular lesions are uncommon. It also revealed that, based on their clinical and radiological features, some of them are probably true neoplasms while others appear to be developing odontomas (hamartomas).

  4. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma in odontogenic keratocyst: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Chitrapriya; Aggarwal, Pooja; Wadhwan, Vijay; Bansal, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising from the wall of an odontogenic cyst (also known as primary intraosseous carcinoma) is a rare tumor which occurs only in jaw bones. This tumor was first described by Loos in 1913 as a central epidermoid carcinoma of the jaw. Primary intraosseous carcinomas (PIOC) may theoretically arise from the lining of an odontogenic cyst or de novo from presumed odontogenic cell rests. According to the new histological classification of tumors of the World Health Organization, odontogenic keratocyst is nowadays considered a specific odontogenic tumor and the PIOC derived from it is considered as a specific entity which is different from other PIOCs derived from the odontogenic cysts. The following report describes a case of such extremely rare entity that is primary intraosseous SCC of the mandible derived from an OKC in a 60-year-old male patient with brief review of literature.

  5. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma in odontogenic keratocyst: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Chitrapriya; Aggarwal, Pooja; Wadhwan, Vijay; Bansal, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising from the wall of an odontogenic cyst (also known as primary intraosseous carcinoma) is a rare tumor which occurs only in jaw bones. This tumor was first described by Loos in 1913 as a central epidermoid carcinoma of the jaw. Primary intraosseous carcinomas (PIOC) may theoretically arise from the lining of an odontogenic cyst or de novo from presumed odontogenic cell rests. According to the new histological classification of tumors of the World Health Organization, odontogenic keratocyst is nowadays considered a specific odontogenic tumor and the PIOC derived from it is considered as a specific entity which is different from other PIOCs derived from the odontogenic cysts. The following report describes a case of such extremely rare entity that is primary intraosseous SCC of the mandible derived from an OKC in a 60-year-old male patient with brief review of literature. PMID:26980976

  6. Comparision of Immunohistochemical Expression of CD10 in Odontogenic Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Munisekhar, M.S.; Suri, Charu; Rajalbandi, Santosh Kumar; M.R., Pradeep; Gothe, Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Expression of CD10 has been documented in various tumors like nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, odontogenic tumors. Aim: To evaluate and compare CD10 expression in odontogenic cysts like radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst (OKC). Materials and Methods: Total 60 cases were included in the study, comprising 20 cases each of radicular, dentigerous and odontogenic keratocyst. Each case was evaluated and compared for immunohistochemical expression of CD10. Results obtained were statistically analysed using ANOVA test followed by post hoc test Tukey-Kramer Multiple Comparisons Test for continuous variable and Chi-square test for discrete variable. Results: More number of cases showing sub-epithelial stromal CD10 expression were found in OKC among the cysts. Conclusion: CD10 expression was more in OKC compared to radicular and dentigerous cysts. PMID:25584313

  7. Squamous cell carcinoma in a maxillary odontogenic keratocyst: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Maria, Anisha; Sharma, Yogesh; Chhabria, Amit

    2011-07-01

    Odontogenic cysts in the maxilla are common but a malignant change in an odontogenic cyst is a comparatively a rare occurrence; however, these entities present with clinical and radiographic features similar to benign, expansible, central, odontogenic tumor, or cyst of the jaws. A patient reporting with squamous cell carcinoma arising from an odontogenic keratocyst of right maxilla has been worked up clinically, radiographically, and pathologically. The case was surgically managed and followed up. A 54-year-old male patient with a compressible, rapidly growing swelling of right maxilla was clinically diagnosed to be a case of odontogenic cyst. On radiologic examination it appeared similar to a cystic lesion. An incisional biopsy obtained from the cyst wall showed it to be odontogenic keratocyst with histologic evidence of malignant transformation. The pathogenesis of the tumor, the biologic progression, and prognosis and overall clinical and histopathogical features of this rare malignancy is reported and discussed.

  8. Advances in assessing the volume of odontogenic cysts and tumors in the mandible: a retrospective clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare two methods of creating three-dimensional representations of mandibular cysts and tumors on the basis of computed tomography (CT) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data. Methods A total of 71 patients with acquired jaw cysts took part in this retrospective clinical study. CT and CBCT scans were obtained from all patients and saved in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) format. Data were analyzed twice with iPlan software. Analysis was performed manually and using an interpolarization algorithm. The accuracy of the two methods in assessing cyst volume was compared. Results Manual delineation did not provide more accurate results than the interpolarization algorithm. Conclusion There are no major differences between manual analysis and analysis using the interpolarization algorithm. The use of the algorithm, however, has the advantage of rapidity. PMID:23601144

  9. Non-odontogenic toothache.

    PubMed

    Okeson, J P

    2000-01-01

    Toothache is a common complaint in the dental office. Most toothaches have their origin in the pulpal tissues of periodontal structures. These odontogenic pains are managed well and predictably by dental therapies. Non-odontogenic toothaches are often difficult to identify and can challenge the diagnostic ability of the clinician. The most important step toward proper management of toothache is to be suspicious that the pain may not be of dental origin. The cardinal warning symptoms of non-odontogenic toothache are as follow: A. Spontaneous multiple toothaches. B. Inadequate local dental cause for the pain. C. Stimulating, burning, non-pulsatile toothaches. D. Constant, unremitting, non-variable toothaches. E. Persistent, recurrent toothaches. F. Local anesthetic blocking of the offending tooth does not eliminate the pain. G. Failure of the toothache to respond to reasonable dental therapy.

  10. Pindborg tumor

    PubMed Central

    Caliaperoumal, Santhosh Kumar; Gowri, S.; Dinakar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references. PMID:27041911

  11. [Cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung. Importance of prenatal diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Beatriz; Oñoro, Gonzalo; Cantarín Extremera, Verónica; Sanz Santiago, Verónica; Sequeiros, Adolfo

    2011-04-01

    Cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung is a rare malformation of the lung airway which often performed diagnosed in the prenatal period by ultrasound. Ultrasound monitoring should be performed during pregnancy to assess lung development. We report the case of a 4-year-old patient with prenatal diagnosis of cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung, not confirmed by chest radiograph at birth. The patient underwent surgery at 4 years of age after diagnosis was made for presenting recurrent pneumonia. A normal chest radiograph at birth does not exclude this malformation and a computerized tomography at 4 weeks of birth must be done to confirm or rule out this anomaly. Once the diagnosis is made, surgical treatment should be prompted to avoid complications.

  12. A prospective epidemiological study on odontogenic tumours in a black African population, with emphasis on the relative frequency of ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Oginni, F O; Stoelinga, P J W; Ajike, S A; Obuekwe, O N; Olokun, B Aluko; Adebola, R A; Adeyemo, W L; Fasola, O; Adesina, O A; Akinbami, B O; Iwegbu, I O; Ogunmuyiwa, S A; Obimakinde, O S; Uguru, C C

    2015-09-01

    The persistent view in the literature is that the relative frequency of ameloblastomas is higher in the black population than in Caucasians. The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of all odontogenic tumours (OT) in a 100% black population and to compare our findings with those of previous studies. A prospective study was undertaken of all patients presenting with OT to all 16 Nigerian departments of oral and maxillofacial surgery over a 4-year period. The following data were obtained: patient demographics, delay to presentation, extent of the lesion, and histological diagnosis. Six hundred and twenty-two cases were studied. A slight male preponderance was observed (male to female ratio 1.17:1). Patients ranged in age from 5 to 89 years, with a peak incidence in the third decade. The relative frequency of OT was 0.99 per million and that of ameloblastoma was 0.76 per million. Ameloblastoma was the most prevalent OT (76.5%), followed by adenomatoid odontogenic tumours (5.6%), odontogenic myxoma (4.5%), and keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOT) (3.1%). The relative frequency of ameloblastoma among Nigerians was not different from frequencies reported previously among Caucasian and Tanzanian black populations. KCOTs were, however, rarely diagnosed in Nigerians as compared to the white population in the Western world.

  13. PTCH gene mutations in odontogenic keratocysts.

    PubMed

    Barreto, D C; Gomez, R S; Bale, A E; Boson, W L; De Marco, L

    2000-06-01

    An odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a benign cystic lesion of the jaws that occurs sporadically or in association with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). Recently, the gene for NBCCS was cloned and shown to be the human homologue of the Drosophila segment polarity gene Patched (PTCH), a tumor suppressor gene. The PTCH gene encodes a transmembrane protein that acts in opposition to the Hedgehog signaling protein, controlling cell fates, patterning, and growth in numerous tissues, including tooth. We investigated three cases of sporadic odontogenic keratocysts and three other cases associated with NBCCS, looking for mutations of the PTCH gene. Non-radioactive single-strand conformational polymorphism and direct sequencing of PCR products revealed a deletion of 5 base pairs (bp) in exon 3 (518delAAGCG) in one sporadic cyst as well as mutations in two cysts associated with NBCCS, a nonsense (C2760A) and a missense (G3499A) alteration. This report is the first to describe a somatic mutation of PTCH in sporadic odontogenic keratocysts as well as two novel mutations in cysts associated with NBCCS, indicating a similar pathogenesis in a subset of sporadic keratocysts.

  14. Fetal MRI as Complementary Study of Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation During Pregnancy: A Single Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Paanakker, Alberto; Gomez-Leal, Paloma; Navarro-Sanchez, Patricia; Bueno-Crespo, Andres; Martinez-Cendan, Juan Pedro; Remezal-Solano, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Fetal lung masses are rare findings in prenatal ultrasound scanning in general population, of which congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation is the most commonly diagnosed type. This paper reports a single case of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation detected at our hospital and the subsequent clinical follow-up using ultrasound scanning and fetal magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27186452

  15. Computed tomographic characteristics of odontogenic neoplasms in dogs.

    PubMed

    Amory, Joseph T; Reetz, Jennifer A; Sánchez, Melissa D; Bradley, Charles W; Lewis, John R; Reiter, Alexander M; Mai, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic neoplasms are locally invasive oral tumors in dogs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe CT characteristics for varying histopathologic types of canine odontogenic neoplasms. A board-certified veterinary radiologist who was unaware of histologic findings reviewed and scored imaging studies. A total of 29 dogs were included in the study. Twenty-three of these dogs had concurrent dental radiographs. The most common CT characteristics for all tumor types were a direct association with or in the region of multiple teeth in 96.4% (27/28), contrast enhancement in 96.3% (26/27), alveolar bone lysis in 93.1% (27/29), and mass-associated tooth displacement in 85.2% (23/27). Mass-associated cyst-like structures were identified in 53.6% (15/28) and were only present in tumors containing odontogenic epithelium. Canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas (n = 15) appeared as extra-osseous (10/15) or intra-osseous (5/15) masses. Intra-osseous canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas were more likely to have mass-associated cyst-like structures and were subjectively more aggressive when compared with extra-osseous canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas. Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumors (n = 3) had subjectively uniform CT imaging characteristics and consisted of round soft tissue and mineral attenuating masses with multiple associated cyst-like structures. Fibromatous epulides of periodontal ligament origin (n = 4) were contrast enhancing extra-osseous masses that were rarely referred for CT examinations and 25% (1/4) were not visible with CT. Other odontogenic tumors were less represented or had more variable CT imaging characteristics. Mass-associated tooth destruction was appreciated more often with dental radiographs and extra-oral tumor extension was identified more often with CT.

  16. Orthokeratinizing odontogenic cyst of maxilla with complex odontoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Meena; Kheur, Supriya; Agrawal, Tripti; Ingle, Yashwant

    2013-01-01

    The orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) and odontoma are the odontogenic cyst and tumor respectively that are minimally invasive neoplasms of head and neck region. OOC is a rare variant of odontogenic cyst characterized by the presence of excessive orthokeratin covering the cystic lining. Odontoma is a benign neoplasm/hamartoma often discovered accidently on panoramic radiographs. We came across a case of a 26-year-old male with swelling on his face along with difficulty in breathing. On the basis of radiographic and histopathological findings the final diagnosis of OOC associated with odontoma was given. However, there is no report in the English literature of the simultaneous occurrence of these two lesions and hence this case is very rare. It is unclear whether the two lesions were just coincidental or were actually related to each other. PMID:24574683

  17. Rare and massive odontogenic parakeratotic cyst treated by endoscopic sinus surgery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Keratocystic odontogenic tumors are benign neoplasms of odontogenic origin with a potential for aggressive and infiltrative behavior. Many different treatments for this type of lesion have been reported. However, no common consensus has emerged to date regarding the most effective therapeutic approach. Cases of maxillary sinus giant keratocystic odontogenic tumors completely excised by enucleation or marsupialization via endoscopic sinus surgery are extremely rare, and, to the best of our knowledge, only one case has been described in the literature since 2005. Case presentation We report a case of a 24-year-old Italian man who came to our department with maxillary sinus region swelling, pain and left nasal obstruction. A massive keratocystic odontogenic tumor involving the right maxillary sinus and causing focal erosions of the bony walls was diagnosed. The keratocystic odontogenic tumor was removed as much as possible by a transnasal approach using endoscopic sinus surgery, which produced optimal surgical and prognostic outcomes. Follow-up is reported for an 8-year period. Conclusion Conservative management in this case demonstrated good therapeutic efficacy with a low risk of recurrence. For injuries involving the maxillary sinus, the possibility of decompression or marsupialization by endoscopic sinus surgery should always be considered because it demonstrated the potential to lead to excellent results even after 8 years of follow-up in our patient. To our knowledge, no case report has described follow-up longer than 8 years for a maxillary sinus keratocystic odontogenic tumor treated with endoscopic sinus surgery. PMID:25193270

  18. Late presentation of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Hulnick, D.H.; Naidich, D.P.; McCauley, D.I.; Feiner, H.D.; Avitabile, A.M.; Greco, M.A.; Genieser, N.B.

    1984-06-01

    Although most often recognized in neonates and young children, congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung (CCAM) occasionally appears in later years. Three patients, aged 35, 24, and 7 years, are reported. Chest radiographs in each case suggested a localized patchy density, a cystic mass, or a multicystic mass, but computed tomography (CT) best demonstrated the cystic and solid components while ruling out bronchiectasis or major bronchial obstruction. Bronchography contributed no further diagnostic information compared with CT. Each patient underwent lobectomy. Histologically, the characteristic overgrowth of bronchiolar elements replacing normal parenchymal architecture was accompanied by some superimposed inflammatory change.

  19. Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma: A rare case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Alberola-Ferranti, Margarita; Hueto-Madrid, Juan Antonio; Bescós-Atín, Coro

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma is a rare condition characterized by ameloblastic-like islands of epithelial cells with aberrant keratinitation in the form of Ghost cell with varying amounts of dysplastic dentina. Material and Methods: We report a case of a 70 year-old woman with a rapid onset of painful swelling right maxillary tumor. Magnetic resonance showed a huge tumor dependent on the right half of the right hard palate with invasion of the pterygoid process and focally to the second branch of the trigeminal. Radiological stage was T4N0. The patient underwent a right subtotal maxillectomy with clear margins. Adjuvant radiotherapy was given. The patient was free of residual or recurrent disease 12 months after surgery. Results: The tumor was 3,9cm in diameter. It was spongy and whitish gray. Microscopically the tumor was arranged in nets and trabeculae, occasionally forming palisade. Tumoral cells had clear cytoplasm with vesicular nuclei. There was atipia and mitosi with vascular and perineural invasion. The excised tumor was diagnosed as a GCOC. Conclusions: Ghost cell carcinoma is a rare odontogenic carcinoma. Its course is unpredictable, ranging from locally invasive tumors of slow growth to highly aggressive and infiltrative ones. Wide surgical excision with clean margins is the treatment of choice although its combination with postoperative radiation therapy, with or without chemotherapy, remains controversial. Key words:Ameloblastic carcinoma, calcifying odontogenic cyst, Ghost cell carcinoma, keratinizing epithelial odontogenic cyst, maxillary tumor, odontogenic carcinoma. PMID:25674335

  20. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis of odontogenic origin is a well-known condition in both the dental and otolaryngology communities. It occurs when the Schneiderian membrane is violated by conditions arising from dentoalveolar unit. This type of sinusitis differs in its pathophysiology, microbiology, diagnostics and management from sinusitis of other causes, therefore, failure to accurately identify a dental cause in these patients usually lead to persistent symptomatology and failure of medical and surgical therapies directed toward sinusitis. Unilateral recalcitrant disease associated with foul smelling drainage is a most common feature of odontogenic sinusitis. Also, high-resolution CT scans and cone-beam volumetric computed tomography can assist in identifying dental disease. Sometimes dental treatment alone is adequate to resolve the odontogenic sinusitis and sometimes concomitant or subsequent functional endoscopic sinus surgery or Caldwell-Luc operation is required. The aim of this article is to give a review of the most common causes, symptoms, diagnostic and treatment methods of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Search on Cochrane Library, PubMed and Science Direct data bases by key words resulted in 35 articles which met our criteria. It can be concluded that the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis is likely underreported in the available literature.

  1. Odontogenic Orofacial Infections.

    PubMed

    Bertossi, Dario; Barone, Antonio; Iurlaro, Antonio; Marconcini, Simone; De Santis, Daniele; Finotti, Marco; Procacci, Pasquale

    2017-01-01

    Acute dental abscess is a frequent and sometimes underestimated disease of the oral cavity. The acute dental abscess usually occurs secondary to caries, trauma, or failed endodontic treatment. After the intact pulp chamber is opened, colonization of the root canals takes place with a variable set of anaerobic bacteria, which colonize the walls of the necrotic root canals forming a specialized mixed anaerobic biofilm. Asymptomatic necrosis is common. However, abscess formation occurs when these bacteria and their toxic products breach into the periapical tissues through the apical foramen and induce acute inflammation and pus formation. The main signs and symptoms of the acute dental abscess (often referred to as a periapical abscess or infection) are pain, swelling, erythema, and suppuration usually localized to the affected tooth, even if the abscess can eventually spread causing a severe odontogenic infection which is characterized by local and systemic involvement culminating in sepsis syndrome. The vast majority of dental abscesses respond to antibiotic treatment, however, in some patients surgical management of the infection may be indicated. In the present work, a retrospective analysis of the patients with dental orofacial infections referred to the Unit of Dentistry and Maxillofacial Surgery of the University of Verona from 1991 to 2011 has been performed.

  2. Ameloblastic carcinoma with features of ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma in a patient with suspected Gardner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, S G; Hirsch, S A; Listinsky, C M; Lyu, D J-H; Baur, D A

    2015-04-01

    Ameloblastic carcinoma and ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma are rare malignancies arising in odontogenic epithelium within the jaws. Gardner syndrome is a multifaceted autosomal dominant condition, which results in multiple dentofacial anomalies along with premalignant colon polyp formation and tumor formation in the skin and other organs. We report a case of ameloblastic carcinoma with features of ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma and extensive clear cell change and melanin pigmentation in a patient with clinical features of Gardner syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, odontogenic carcinoma arising in a patient with features of Gardner syndrome has not been reported previously. The clinical, radiographic, and histologic features of the case are discussed along with a review of the relevant literature.

  3. The central odontogenic fibroma: How difficult can be making a preliminary diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pippi, Roberto; Santoro, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign odontogenic tumor derived from the dental ectomesenchymal tissues. A 16-year-old Caucasian female patient was referred by her dentist for a radiolucent asymptomatic area associated with the crown of the impacted lower right third molar. A preliminary diagnosis of a follicular cyst was supposed. The lesion was surgically removed under general anesthesia together with the impacted tooth. The microscopic diagnosis of the excised tissue revealed an odontogenic fibroma. No clinical or radiographic signs of recurrence were found five years after surgical excision. Despite the various differential diagnoses of homogeneous unilocular and well delimited radiolucencies of the jaws, enucleation with peripheral curettage, without any other pre-operative imaging exams or biopsies, can be considered as the treatment of choice. Key words:Differential diagnosis, impacted third molar, radiographic imaging, microscopic diagnosis, odontogenic fibroma. PMID:27034766

  4. Differential expression of Cyclin D1 in keratin-producing odontogenic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01

    Objetives: The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression levels of Cyclin D1 (CCD1), a nuclear protein that plays a crucial role in cell cycle progression, in a series of keratin-producing odontogenic cysts. Study Design: A total of 58 keratin-producing odontogenic cysts, diagnosed over ten years and classified according to the WHO 2005 criteria, were immunohistochemically analyzed in terms of CCD1 expression, which was quantified in the basal, suprabasal and intermediate/superficial epithelial compartments. The extent of immunostaining was measured as a proportion of total epithelial thickness. Quantified immunohistochemical data were correlated with clinicopathological features and clinical recurrence. Results: Keratin-producing odontogenic cysts were classified as 6 syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors (S-KCOT), 40 sporadic or non-syndromic KCOT (NS-KCOT) and 12 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOC). Immunohistochemically, CCD1 staining was evident predominantly in the parabasal region of all cystic lesions, but among-lesion differences were apparent, showing a clear expansion of parabasal compartment especially in the S-KCOT, followed to a lesser extent in the NS-KCOT, and being much more reduced in the OOC, which had the greatest average epithelial thickness. Conclusions: The differential expression of CCD1 noted in the present study suggests that dysregulation of cell cycle progression from G1 to the S phase contributes to the different aggressiveness of these lesions. However, CCD1 expression levels did not predict NS-KCOT recurrence, which is likely influenced by factors unrelated to lesion biology. Key words:Keratin-producing odontogenic cyst, keratocyst, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst, cyclin D1, immunohistochemistry. PMID:25475773

  5. Nasolabial Cyst Associated with Odontogenic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Eveline Claudia; Coppla, Fabiana Madalozzo; Campagnoli, Eduardo Bauml; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The nasolabial cyst or Klestadt cyst is a relatively uncommon nonodontogenic cyst that develops in the nasal alar region; it has uncertain pathogenesis. This lesion has slow growth and variable dimensions and is characterized clinically by a floating tumefaction in the nasolabial fold area around the bridge of the nose, causing an elevation of the upper lip and relative facial asymmetry. Diagnosis is primarily made clinically; if necessary, this is complemented by imaging. This paper reports the case of a 39-year-old male patient who complained of pain in the right upper premolar region and poor aesthetics due to a firm tumor in the right wing of the nose. Initially, this was thought to be due to an odontogenic abscess; however, the differential diagnosis was that a nasolabial cyst was communicating with the apex of teeth 14 and 15. Surgical treatment was carried out, followed by histopathological examination and concomitant endodontic treatment of the teeth involved. PMID:26904312

  6. Recurrent odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma (OGCC) at a reconstructed fibular flap: a case report with immunohistochemical findings.

    PubMed

    Li, B-H; Cho, Y-A; Kim, S-M; Kim, M-J; Hong, S-P; Lee, J-H

    2011-08-01

    Odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma (OGCC), a malignant counterpart of the odontogenic ghost cell tumor (OGCT), with aggressive growth characteristics, is exceedingly rare. A painful swelling in the jaw with local paresthesia is the most common symptom. We described a case of 47-year Korean woman who had a rare central epithelial odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma which recurred at reconstructed fibular flap. Immunohistochemical differences between OGCT and OGCC analyzed using primary and recurred surgical specimen. On the basis of this case, the tumor started as an OGCT and transformed into OGCC with highly aggressive, rapidly growing, infiltrative tumors. Our findings suggest that some of the cytokines produced by ghost cells may play important roles in causing extensive bone resorption in the odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma. Wide local excision with histologically clean margins is the treatment mode of selection. Also, we recommend close long-term surveillance of OGCT because of high recurrence and potential for malignancy transformation.

  7. Carnoy's solution in the mangement of odontogenic keratocyst

    PubMed Central

    Sivanmalai, Sivaraj; Kandhasamy, Kohila; Prabu, Neetika; Prince, Christo Naveen; Prabu, Chandrakala Shekarappa Annapurna Pannaikadu Somasundaram

    2012-01-01

    Carnoy's solution is a substance used as a complementary treatment after the conservative excision of odontogenic keratocyst. The application of Carnoy's solution promotes a superficial chemical necrosis and is intended to reduce recurrence rates. However, the inferior alveolar vascular–nervous plexus can occasionally be exposed after the removal of a lesion. The safety of the application of Carnoy's solution over this plexus has been reported, but to date, no clinical report has been made. The authors present a case that was given Carnoy's solution over the inferior alveolar vascular–nervous plexus as a complementary treatment for the keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Effective control of recurrence with low and transient neural morbidity was suggested with this technique. PMID:23066248

  8. Brain abscess of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Antonio Azoubel; de Santana Santos, Thiago; de Carvalho, Ricardo Wathson Feitosa; Avelar, Rafael Linard; Pereira, Carlos Umberto; Pereira, José Carlos

    2011-11-01

    Brain abscess is a rare and threatening infection, which is in a suppuration area, caused either by trauma, neurosurgical complication, or by a secondary infection of dental origin complication. The infectious process spread from the start focus can occur in 2 ways: hematogenous or by contiguity. The treatment should ideally be based on the etiological factor excision, combined with drainage and antibiotics as adjuvant; this philosophy is not observed in the reports described in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. This study's goal was to report a case of brain abscess consequent of an odontogenic outbreak, where an adequate treatment was set up, but it was already in advanced stages and had as a result the lethal outcome. Complications from the odontogenic infections have a low incidence, but should never be disregarded, because they can lead to death, as described in this manuscript.

  9. [Odontogenic myxoma of nasosinusal localization in a pediatric patient].

    PubMed

    Arjona Amo, M; Belmonte Caro, R; Valdivieso del Pueblo, C; Batista Cruzado, A; Torres Lagares, D; Gutiérrez Pérez, J L

    2011-04-01

    In the present study we report and discuss a case of odontogenic myxoma in a 13-month-old patient. Only two other reports have been published in the literature describing the occurrence of this type of tumor at an earlier age. Odontogenic myxoma is a benign mesenchymal neoplasm of the maxilla more common between the third and fourth decades of life. The case here reported is exceptional as it presents in an infant and, although some cases have been reported in the literature, this type of tumor is rare in early childhood. The most common locations include the ascending ramus and the angle of the jaw, although these tumors may also affect the upper maxilla, in which case they may involve the maxillary sinus. According to the review of the literature, these tumors show a recurrence rate of about 25%. Consequently, after the intraoperative clinical examination of the lesion and the assessment of the initial suspected diagnosis by means of intraoperative biopsy under general anesthesia, we carried out the resection of the tumor with wide margins at some points of the tumor location.

  10. Video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy for congenital cystic adenomatoid malformations.

    PubMed

    Selimović, Amina; Hasanbegović, Edo; Mujičić, Ermina; Milišić, Selma; Haxhija, Emir; Karavdić, Kenan; Pilav, Alen

    2017-02-01

    Aim The aim was to show rare cases of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and the manner of its surgical treatment with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Methods Two male and one female child, 7, 4 and 3 years of age were treated for symptoms of cough and high temperature in district hospitals. In all three children laboratory blood tests and chest radiography were done. Auscultatory findings showed the presence of pneumonia. Children were treated with appropriate doses of antibiotics. After the rehabilitation of inflammation, they were sent to the University Clinical Center Sarajevo, where video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (VATS) was indicated after computerized tomography (CT). Results Chest CT scan pointed to the CCAM and pulmonary sequestration (PS) changes to the lungs. This has required surgery lobectomy of an affected part of the lungs. In two children with PS, the aberrant systemic artery came from the most proximal part of aorta abdominals, the third patient did not have an anomalous artery. Conclusion VATS lobectomy is an alternative to the traditional thoracotomy for the treatment of CCAM and PS, however, it should be investigated in the future for its safety and effectiveness.

  11. Successfully treated congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation by open fetal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Dazhi; Wu, Shuzhen; Wang, Rui; Huang, Yi; Fu, Yao; Ai, Wen; Zeng, Meng; Guo, Xiaoling; Liu, Zhengping

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is a rare hamartomatous cystic lesion. Open fetal surgery currently provides a potential therapeutic option for management of a fetus with CCAM diagnosis. Case Summary: A 22-year-old G2P0 woman presented at   weeks’ gestation for evaluation of a fetus with a left lung lesion and diagnosed as CCAM at   weeks’ gestation. Open fetal surgery was performed to resection the lesion at   weeks’ gestation under deep maternal general anesthesia. The mother presented at   weeks after open fetal surgery with preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) and underwent cesarean delivery at   weeks’ gestation. A vigorous woman infant of 1955 g, with good Apgar score, was delivered. At 1 month, 4 years, and present, 5 years after birth, she has continued to do well without any obvious deficit and both respiration and circulation were well maintained. Conclusion: We present one case of CCAM which was cured by open fetal surgery and continued to do well at follow-up of 5 years. The success of treatment provided preliminary experience for further carrying out such interventions in China. PMID:28079822

  12. Decompression Device Using a Stainless Steel Tube and Wire for Treatment of Odontogenic Cystic Lesions: A Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eun-Joo; Baek, Jin-A; Leem, Dae-Ho

    2014-11-01

    Decompression is considered an effective treatment for odontogenic cystic lesions in the jaw. A variety of decompression devices are successfully used for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts, and ameloblastoma. The purpose of these devices is to keep an opening between the cystic lesion and the oral environment during treatment. The aim of this report is to describe an effective decompression tube using a stainless steel tube and wire for treatment of jaw cystic lesions.

  13. Rare appearance of an odontogenic myxoma in cone-beam computed tomography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Dabbaghi, Arash; Nikkerdar, Nafiseh; Bayati, Soheyla; Golshah, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an infiltrative benign bone tumor that occurs almost exclusively in the facial skeleton. The radiographic characteristics of odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns, making diagnosis difficult. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may prove extremely useful in clarifying the intraosseous extent of the tumor and its effects on surrounding structures. Here, we report a case of odontogenic myxoma of the mandible in a 27-year-old female. The patient exhibited a slight swelling in the left mandible. Surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted. In the CBCT sections, we observed perforation of the cortical plate and radiopaque line that extended from the periosteum, resembling "sunray" appearance—a rare feature of OM—which could not be assessed by panoramic radiography. PMID:27092217

  14. Odontogenic myxofibroma: A concise review of the literature with emphasis on the surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    Giovannacci, Ilaria; Corradi, Domenico; Manfredi, Maddalena; Merigo, Elisabetta; Bonanini, Mauro; Vescovi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to report a review of the literature concerning epidemiology, clinical and radiographic features as well as treatment of odontogenic myxofibroma (MF). Methods: The PubMed database was searched using the following keywords: “odontogenic myxofibroma”, “odontogenic fibromyxoma”, “myxofibroma of the jaw” and “fibromyxoma of the jaw”. Results: Fifteen articles reporting the experience with 24 patients were identified. Male/female ratio was 1:1.4 and the average age was 29.5 years. The most frequent location was the mandible. In 66.7% of the cases the radiographic appearance was a multilocular radiolucency. Swelling was observed in 13 patients (92.86%), varying degrees of pain in 5 (35.71%) and paresthesia in only one patient (7.14%). Six out of 24 patients (26.09%) were treated with radical surgery and 17 (73.91%) with a conservative approach. In two out of 21 cases (9.52%) a recurrence was reported. Conclusions: MF is an extremely rare tumor and no agreement exists on the causes of its development. According to the present review, the choice of treatment should depend on variables such as localization, presence of a primary or of a recurrent lesion, age, general medical conditions and aesthetic needs of the patient. Key words:Odontogenic myxofibroma, myxofibroma of the jaw, odontogenic tumors, oral surgery, oral pathology. PMID:25129249

  15. Calcifying odontogenic cyst associated with complex odontoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gallana-Alvarez, Silvia; Mayorga-Jimenez, Francisco; Torres-Gómez, Francisco Javier; Avellá-Vecino, Francisco Javier; Salazar-Fernandez, Clara

    2005-01-01

    We report a calcifying odontogenic cyst associated with odontoma (COCaO) and an included permanent canine in the superior maxilla, in a 19 year-old-man. The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) was first described as a distinct entity by Gorlin et al in 1962. The lesion is a mixed odontogenic benign tumor, and although most of the cases present cystic characteristics, a few are of the solid type (15%), and its rare malignant transformation is well documented. The COC may occur in association with other odontogenic tumors, the most common is the odontoma, occurring in about 24% of the cases. For this association the term Odontocalcifying odontogenic cyst has been suggested. Radiographically is a well defined mixed lesion and histologically consists of a large cyst. In the central area of the cyst enamel and dentin deposits can be found, irregularly distributed in areas and in other parts it takes on a well defined organoid aspect. A thorough review of literature takes place and the pathogenesis is discussed.

  16. Bilateral respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartomas originating from the anterior olfactory clefts

    PubMed Central

    Falco, Jeffrey J.; Peine, Brandon S.

    2017-01-01

    A respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma (REAH) is an uncommon benign lesion often found in the sinonasal tract. We present a case of bilateral REAH originating from the anterior olfactory cleft treated with endoscopic surgical resection without recurrence. We highlight the characteristics of REAH and necessary steps to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Management of Recurrent Odontogenic Myxoma of Mandible: A Clinical Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Ankita; Varghese, K George; Dwivedi, Shailendra; Goyal, Vidhi

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic Myxoma (OM) is a slow growing painless locally aggressive tumor seen in gnathic bones and is generally asymptomatic. OM is characterized by spindle, wedge or stellate shaped cells loosely arranged in an abundant mucoid stroma. It is found incidentally on radiographs and may vary from a unilocular radiolucency to a multilocular lesion with well-defined or diffuse margins. Treatment includes surgical management that may range from simple enucleation and curettage to surgical excision including peripheral osteotomy, segmental resection, hemimandibulectomy and maxillectomy. Here we are presenting a case report on odontogenic myxoma with recurrence after conservative treatment. PMID:27891488

  18. Odontogenic infections: Microbiology and management

    PubMed Central

    Bahl, Rashi; Sandhu, Sumeet; Singh, Kanwardeep; Sahai, Nilanchal; Gupta, Mohita

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the involvement of fascial spaces, their bacteriology, sensitivity to antibiotics and management of odontogenic infection in 100 patients of age less than 60 years. Resuls: The mandibular 3rd molar was found to be the most commonly offending tooth, followed by the mandibular 2nd molar. The submandibular space was the most frequently involved fascial space both in single fascial space infections and multiple fascial space infections. Mixed growth (aerobic and anaerobic) was seen in culture smears of 60 patients, only aerobic bacterial growth was seen in 25 patients and anaerobic bacterial growth was seen in culture smears of 15 patients. Streptococcus viridans was the most frequently isolated bacteria among the aerobes, whereas Bacteroides and Prevotella were the most common bacterial species among anaerobes. Empirical antibiotic therapy in the form of Co amoxiclav and Metronidazole was given. Incision and drainage followed by extraction of the offending tooth/teeth was carried out. Conclusion: It was concluded that odontogenic infections were mixed aerobic–anaerobic infections. Anaerobic as well as aerobic cultures were necessary to isolate all pathogens. Successful management of these infections depends on changing the environment through decompression, removal of the etiologic factor and by choosing the proper antibiotic. PMID:25191064

  19. Odontogenic epithelial proliferation is correlated with COX-2 expression in dentigerous cyst and ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Alsaegh, Mohammed Amjed; Miyashita, Hitoshi; Taniguchi, Takahiro; Zhu, Sheng Rong

    2017-01-01

    Investigation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in dentigerous cyst and ameloblastoma may help to improve understanding of the nature and behavior of odontogenic cysts and tumors, and in addition may eventually represent a definitive target for a pharmacological approach in the management of these lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate COX-2 expression and its correlation with the proliferation of odontogenic epithelium in these lesions. Dentigerous cysts (n=16) and ameloblastomas (n=17) were evaluated. Detection of Ki-67 and COX-2 protein expression was conducted by immunohistochemistry. Data were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. No significant differences were found in the expression of Ki-67 and COX-2 between dentigerous cysts and ameloblastomas (P>0.05). A significant positive correlation (P=0.018) and highly significant positive correlation (P=0.004) were found between Ki-67 and COX-2 expression in the odontogenic epithelium of dentigerous cyst and ameloblastoma, respectively. COX-2 was expressed in the odontogenic epithelium of dentigerous cyst and ameloblastoma. It may contribute to local extension of these lesions by increasing the proliferation of their odontogenic epithelial cells. PMID:28123497

  20. Evaluation of osteopontin and CD44v6 expression in odontogenic cystic lesions by immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Salehinejad, Jahanshah; Saghafi, Shadi; Sharifi, Nourieh; Zare-Mahmoodabadi, Reza; Saghravanian, Nasrollah; Ghazi, Narges; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-07-15

    Odontogenic cysts are common lesions with different biological behavior. Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) and calcifying odontogenic cysts (COCs) with ameloblastoma-like epithelium are more aggressive than dentigerous cysts (DCs) and radicular cysts (RCs). Therefore, they were included in the list of odontogenic tumors by WHO. Osteopontin (OPN) is a calcium-binding glycoprotein present in many normal tissues. It plays a role in the migration and invasion of transformed epithelial cells. Binding of OPN to its receptor CD44v6 can enhance cell motility and migration. The purpose of this study was to compare the expression of these markers between odontogenic cysts of varying biological behavior. We examined OPN and CD44v6 expression in tissue sections of 14OKCs, 14COCs, 14RCs and 14DCs by immunohistochemistry. OPN and CD44v6 immunostaining was observed in all lining epithelial cells of the studied lesions with different degrees. The highest level of OPN and CD44v6 expression was found in OKCs, followed by COCs, RCs and DCs. Comparison of both markers among four groups revealed significant differences (P<0.001). Our findings suggest that higher level of OPN and CD44v6 expression in epithelial cells of some lesions such as OKC and COC can explain the local aggressive behavior of them.

  1. Mandibular intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma lesion associated with odontogenic keratocyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Han-Kyul; Kim, Tae-Seop; Geum, Dong-Ho; Yoon, Sang-Yong; Song, Jae-Min; Hwang, Dae-Seok; Cho, Yeong-Cheol; Kim, Uk-Kyu

    2015-04-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common malignant tumor in the oral cavity, and it accounts for about 90% of all oral cancers. Several risk factors for oral SCC have been identified; however, SCC associated with odontogenic keratocysts have rarely been reported. The present study describes the case of a 36-year-old man with SCC of the right ramus of the mandible, which was initially diagnosed as a benign odontogenic cyst. He underwent enucleation at another hospital followed by segmental mandibulectomy and fibular free flap reconstruction at our institution. In this case, we introduce a patient with oral cancer associated with odontogenic cyst on the mandible and report a satisfactory outcome with wide resection and immediate free flap reconstruction.

  2. Mandibular intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma lesion associated with odontogenic keratocyst: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Seop; Geum, Dong-Ho; Yoon, Sang-Yong; Song, Jae-Min; Hwang, Dae-Seok; Cho, Yeong-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common malignant tumor in the oral cavity, and it accounts for about 90% of all oral cancers. Several risk factors for oral SCC have been identified; however, SCC associated with odontogenic keratocysts have rarely been reported. The present study describes the case of a 36-year-old man with SCC of the right ramus of the mandible, which was initially diagnosed as a benign odontogenic cyst. He underwent enucleation at another hospital followed by segmental mandibulectomy and fibular free flap reconstruction at our institution. In this case, we introduce a patient with oral cancer associated with odontogenic cyst on the mandible and report a satisfactory outcome with wide resection and immediate free flap reconstruction. PMID:25922819

  3. A Large Extragnathic Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M.; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Narasimhamurthy, Srinath

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are developmental cysts which occur typically in the jawbones. They present more commonly in the posterior mandible of young adults than the maxilla. OKCs have been reclassified under odontogenic tumours in 2005 by the WHO and have since been termed as keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs). Here we report a case of a recurrent buccal lesion in a 62-year-old man which was provisionally diagnosed as a space infection (buccal abscess) but surprisingly turned out to be a soft tissue KCOT in an unusual location on histopathologic examination. PMID:26770859

  4. The odontogenic keratocyst: a potential endodontic misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Garlock, J A; Pringle, G A; Hicks, M L

    1998-04-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts manifest themselves as radiolucencies that can appear anywhere in the maxilla or mandible, including periradicular areas; they may thus masquerade as lesions of endodontic origin. This retrospective study examined 239 odontogenic keratocysts received by the Oral Pathology Laboratory at Temple University School of Medicine over a 3-year period. Twenty-one (9%) of the cysts received were located periradicularly; of these 21, 12 (57%) were associated with nonvital or endodontically treated teeth and thus mimicked lesions of endodontic origin. Because of its aggressive nature and tendency to recur, the periradicular odontogenic keratocyst should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions that are refractory to endodontic treatment.

  5. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung: hazards of delayed diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Anne M; Ridgway, Paul F; Killeen, Ronan P; Dodd, Jonathan D; Tolan, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation is a rare pulmonary developmental anomaly, which typically manifests in neonates and infants. Presentation in adulthood is uncommon, with <60 cases reported in the literature. The majority of cases involve one lobe only. We report a case of type 1 congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in an adult presenting with a respiratory tract infection and haemoptysis. At thoracotomy, complex cystic masses were noted in the right upper and lower lobes. Lung-sparing surgery, in the form of two segmentectomies and a non-anatomical resection, was performed in order to avoid pneumonectomy. Such presentations may be problematic as potentially incomplete resections may increase the risk of complications and malignant transformation. This suggests the importance of appropriate clinical and radiological follow up.

  6. TGF-β in jaw tumor fluids induces RANKL expression in stromal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Chiaki; Aikawa, Tomonao; Okuno, Emi; Miyagawa, Kazuaki; Amano, Katsuhiko; Takahata, Sosuke; Kimata, Masaaki; Okura, Masaya; Iida, Seiji; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors and cysts, arising in the jawbones, grow by resorption and destruction of the jawbones. However, mechanisms underlying bone resorption by odontogenic tumors/cysts remain unclear. Odontogenic tumors/cysts comprise odontogenic epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts, which originate from the developing tooth germ. It has been demonstrated that odontogenic epithelial cells of the developing tooth germ induce osteoclastogenesis to prevent the tooth germ from invading the developing bone to maintain its structure in developing bones. Thus, we hypothesized that odontogenic epithelial cells of odontogenic tumors/cysts induce osteoclast formation, which plays potential roles in tumor/cyst outgrowth into the jawbone. The purpose of this study was to examine osteoclastogenesis by cytokines, focusing on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), produced by odontogenic epithelial cells. We observed two pathways for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) induction by keratocystic odontogenic tumor fluid: the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) pathway through interleukin-1α (IL-1α) signaling and non-COX-2/PGE2 pathway through TGF-β receptor signaling. TGF-β1 and IL-1α produced by odontogenic tumors/cysts induced osteoclastogenesis directly in the osteoclast precursor cells and indirectly via increased RANKL induction in the stroma. PMID:27279422

  7. Keratocystic odontogenic tumour: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald-Jankowski, D S

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this review is to evaluate the principal clinical and conventional radiographic features of non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) by systematic review (SR), and to compare the frequencies between four global groups. Methods The databases searched were the PubMed interface of Medline and LILACS. Only those reports of KCOTs that occurred in a series of consecutive cases, in the reporting authors' caseload, were considered. Results 51 reports, of 49 series of cases, were included in the SR. 11 SR-included series were in languages other than English. KCOTs affected males more frequently and were three times more prevalent in the mandible. Although the mean age at first presentation was 37 years, the largest proportion of cases first presented in the third decade. The main symptom was swelling. Over a third were found incidentally. Nearly two-thirds displayed buccolingual expansion. Over a quarter of cases recurred. Only a quarter of all SR-included reported series of cases included details of at least one radiological feature. The East Asian global group presented significantly as well-defined, even corticated, multilocular radiolucencies with buccolingual expansion. The KCOTs affecting the Western global group significantly displayed an association with unerupted teeth. Conclusions Long-term follow-up of large series that would have revealed detailed radiographic description and long-term outcomes of non-syndromic KCOT was lacking. PMID:21159911

  8. Odontogenic infections. Complications. Systemic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Yolanda; Bagán, José Vicente; Murillo, Judith; Poveda, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    The term, odontogenic infection refers to an infection that originates in the tooth proper or in the tissues that closely surround it; said infection then progresses along the periodontia down to the apex, involving periapical bone and from this area, it then spreads through the bone and periosteum towards near-by or more distant structures. The relevance of this type of infection lies in that it can cause infections that compromise more distant structures (via direct spread and distant spread), for example, intracraneal, retropharyngeal and pulmonary pleural infections. Dissemination by means of the bloodstream can lead to rheumatic problems and deposits on the valves of the heart (endocarditis), etc. The conditions or factors that influence the spread of infection are dependent on the balance between patient-related conditions and microorganism-related conditions. The virulence of the affecting germs is dependent upon their quality and quantity and is one of the microbiological conditions that influences the infection. It is this virulence that promotes infectious invasion and the deleterious effects the microbe will have on the host. Patient-related conditions include certain systemic factors that determine host resistance, which may be impaired in situations such as immunodeficiency syndrome or in brittle diabetes, as well as local factors that will also exert their impact on the spread of the infection.

  9. A review of complications of odontogenic infections

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these “space infections” has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms “odontogenic infections,” “complications,” and “risk factors.” PMID:27390486

  10. Odontogenic epithelial stem cells: hidden sources.

    PubMed

    Padma Priya, Sivan; Higuchi, Akon; Abu Fanas, Salem; Pooi Ling, Mok; Kumari Neela, Vasantha; Sunil, P M; Saraswathi, T R; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Kumar, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    The ultimate goal of dental stem cell research is to construct a bioengineered tooth. Tooth formation occurs based on the well-organized reciprocal interaction of epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The dental mesenchymal stem cells are the best explored, but because the human odontogenic epithelium is lost after the completion of enamel formation, studies on these cells are scarce. The successful creation of a bioengineered tooth is achievable only when the odontogenic epithelium is reconstructed to produce a replica of natural enamel. This article discusses the untapped sources of odontogenic epithelial stem cells in humans, such as those present in the active dental lamina in postnatal life, in remnants of dental lamina (the gubernaculum cord), in the epithelial cell rests of Malassez, and in reduced enamel epithelium. The possible uses of these stem cells in regenerative medicine, not just for enamel formation, are discussed.

  11. Systemic and Odontogenic Etiologies in Chronic Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Edward C; Suh, Jeffrey D

    2017-02-01

    Systemic and odontogenic etiologies of chronic rhinosinusitis, although rare, are an integral consideration in the comprehensive management of patients with sinonasal disease. Proper knowledge and timely recognition of each disease process, with referrals to appropriate consultants, will facilitate treatment, because many of these conditions require both local and systemic therapy. In some instances, medical therapy plays a pivotal role, with surgery being a supplemental treatment technique. We review the most commonly encountered systemic etiologies of chronic rhinosinusitis and odontogenic sinusitis, including clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and treatment outcomes.

  12. EGFR mutation of adenocarcinoma in congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Mizue; Sakai, Fumikazu; Arimura, Ken; Katsura, Hideki; Koh, Eitetsu; Sekine, Yasuo; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-03-01

    An 80-year-old man underwent right upper lobectomy for the resection of multiple cysts accompanied by a nodule. The pathological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma with surrounding atypical epithelial cell proliferation in a Type 1 congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation. There was epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in the adenocarcinoma and surrounding atypical epithelial cells that had proliferated. Malignant transformation of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation may be related to the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in this case, with atypical epithelial cell proliferation as a precursor. We emphasize the importance of complete resection of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation and the possibility of treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated cases.

  13. Primordial Odontogenic Cyst with Induction Phenomenon (Zonal Fibroblastic Hypercellularity) and Dentinoid Material Versus Archegonous Cystic Odontoma: You Choose!

    PubMed

    Argyris, Prokopios P; Wetzel, Stephanie L; Pambuccian, Stefan E; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Koutlas, Ioannis G

    2016-06-01

    The most recent A.F.I.P. fascicle defines primordial odontogenic cyst (POC) as a distinct, nonkeratinized, odontogenic cyst of "undetermined origin" forming in the place of a developing normal or supernumerary tooth. However, the majority of examples reported in the literature under this term represent odontogenic keratocysts (keratocystic odontogenic tumors). In addition, there are rare reported cases of cystic odontomas. An 18-year-old Caucasian male presented with a unilocular mandibular radiolucent lesion in the place of a congenitally missing molar. Histologically, it featured nonkeratinizing, thin stratified squamous epithelial lining with areas of spongiosis and foci of vacuolization of individual basal cells without significant nuclear palisading. Focally, budding of the basal cell layer was identified. A zone of increased cellularity featuring induction-type fibroblasts was present subepithelially as well as dentinoid deposits with odontogenic epithelial nests. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial lining was negative for calretinin and the induction-like zone negative for S100 protein, smooth muscle actin, and CD34. The case was externally reviewed by five oral pathologists who provided various diagnostic interpretations including primordial cyst, odontogenic cyst not otherwise specified (NOS), cyst with ameloblastic changes, and unicystic ameloblastoma. At that time, a final diagnosis of odontogenic cyst NOS was rendered with a comment that it may represent a true example of POC or a cystic odontoma. The lesion has not recurred within a 13 year follow-up period after initial excision. An unusual cystic lesion is presented that may represent a true example of POC with dentinoid formation or an archegonous cystic odontoma.

  14. Glandular odontogenic cyst: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald-Jankowski, D S

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the principal features of “glandular odontogenic cyst” (GOC), by systematic review (SR), and to compare their frequencies among four global groups. Methods The databases searched were the PubMed interface of MEDLINE and LILACS. Only those reports of GOCs that occurred in a series in the reporting authors' caseload were considered. All cases were confirmed histopathologically. Results 18 reports on 17 series of consecutive cases were included in the SR. GOC affected males twice as frequently and the mandible almost three times as frequently. The mean age at first presentation was 44 years, coincident with that of the Western global group, in which the largest proportion of reports and cases first presented in the second half of the fifth decade. However, age at presentation of GOCs in the East Asian and sub-Saharan African global groups was nearly a decade younger, this was significant. Six reports included details of at least one clinical presentation. Eight reports included at least one conventional radiological feature. There were some significant differences between global groups. The Western global group had a particular predilection for the anterior sextants of both jaws. The sub-Saharan African group displayed buccolingual expansion (as did the Latin American group) and tooth displacement in every case. 18% of GOCs recurred overall, except in the sub-Saharan African global group. Conclusions GOCs have a marked propensity to recur in most global groups. GOCs presented in older patients and with swellings, affected the anterior sextants of both jaws, and radiologically were more likely to present as a well-defined unilocular radiolucency with buccolingual expansion. Tooth displacement, root resorption and an association with unerupted teeth occurred in 50%, 30% and 11% of cases, respectively. PMID:20203274

  15. Biochemical and Cytological Comparison of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumours to Nonkeratinising Odontogenic Cysts Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Pushparaj; Patidar, Nitesh; Mittal, Sugandh; Singh, Hanspal; Chethna

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the levels of albumin, prealbumin, total protein, inorganic phosphate and presence of keratinocytes in the cystic fluid for the diagnosis and appropriate treatment planning of keratocystic odontogenic tumours and other non keratinizing odontogenic cysts. Materials and Methods Fifteen keratocystic odontogenic tumour and 15 controls were studied. The cystic fluid was aspirated and analysed to determine the levels of albumin, prealbumin, total protein, inorganic phosphate and the presence of keratinocytes. The data collected was statistically evaluated using Mann Whitney U-Test and Student’s t-test. Results A highly significant difference (p<0.0001) was seen when a comparison of Prealbumin, total protein, inorganic phosphate and presence of keratinocytes was made between keratocystic odontogenic tumour and non keratinizing odontogenic cysts. The presence of albumin also showed a significant difference (p<0.01). Conclusion A combined analysis of total protein, albumin, prealbumin, inorganic phosphorous and detection of epithelial squames may be used as a diagnostic adjunct in the preoperative diagnosis of keratocystic odontogenic tumour in a minimally invasive and highly accurate fashion. PMID:26393202

  16. Malignant transformation in odontogenic keratocysts. Case report.

    PubMed

    Keszler, A; Piloni, M J

    2002-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma arising in the epithelial lining of an odontogenic keratocyst is a rare finding. Up to now, only 12 cases have been reported in the literature. The present work reports a new case diagnosed in a 70 year old man. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathological findings and the treatment are described.

  17. [Rare case of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation associated with polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Jabłoński, Janusz; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Sitkiewicz, Anna; Lewandowska, Małgorzata; Andrzejewska, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is a rare pulmonary abnormality that results from aberrant fetal lung development. It about 4-26% of cases it can be associated with other congenital abnormalities. We describe a case of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation 2 associated with polycystic kidney disease. The association of these two congenital malformations is exceptional. Only four similar cases have been reported in the literature. A 2-year-old girl was referred to the Department of Paediatric Surgery and Oncology Medical University of Lodz with pneumonia and left pneumothorax. For three weeks prior to referral the patient was treated with antibiotics. Chest x-ray revealed hyperinflation of left upper lobe with mediastinal shift to right. Computer tomographic scan of the lung revealed multiple cyst in the left upper lobe, left-site pneumothorax and mediastinal shift to the right. The patient underwent thoracotomy. Intraoperatively, multiple cysts in the left upper lobe were found and left upper lobectomy was performed. Histologic study was compatible with type 2 congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation. Ultrasound examination showed multilocular cysts in both kidneys. The dimensions of the cysts were: MWR4. 54x45x45 mm and 25x21x24 mm on the left and right sides, respectively. Significant increase in cyst size on the left side was observed. Ten months after first hospitalization resection of the cystic lower pole of the left kidney was performed. The presence of even a single renal cyst in a child with CCAM is an indication for further follow up examinations.

  18. The early history of odontogenic ghost cell lesions: from Thoma to Gorlin.

    PubMed

    Ide, Fumio; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Yuji; Kusama, Kaoru; Saito, Ichiro; Muramatsu, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    To reappraise the early history of odontogenic ghost cell lesions (OGCL), the extensive world literature published from 1838 to 1962 was reviewed. In light of the long history of OGCL, the term "calcifying epithelioma of Malherbe" first appeared in a 1931 French report, and the term "ghost cells" had its origin in two American seminal articles by Thoma and Goldman in 1946. Although Gorlin et al. coined the term "calcifying odontogenic cyst" (COC) in 1962, this type of cyst was initially reported three decades earlier by Rywkind in Russia, and almost concurrently by Blood good in the United States and Sato in Japan. In 1948, Willis provided the initial histological evidence of a peripheral COC in his British pathology textbook. Credit for the earliest clinical presentation of odontoma associated calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor belongs to the American radiology textbook by Thoma in 1917. A Scandinavian journal report published in 1953 by Husted and Pindborg was the first to address a dentinogenic ghost cell tumor, and its peripheral counterpart was originally reported in the Swiss literature 7 years later. The current concept of COC was undoubtedly established by Gorlin et al. but the history of OGCL really started with Thoma's pioneering work about a century ago.

  19. Evidence of loss of heterozygosity of the PTCH gene in orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; Galvão, Clarice Ferreira; Macedo, Paula Serelle; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2011-03-01

    The orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is an odontogenic cyst of unknown etiology. Clinical, histological, and biological differences are reported between keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KOT) and OOC. PTCH is a tumor suppressor gene related to sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway important in embryological development. Considering that alterations in this pathway have been described in sporadic and nevoid basal cell syndrome-associated KOT, we tested the hypothesis that OOC is also associated with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the PTCH gene. Seven samples of OOC and seven of KOT were included in the study. D9S287, D9S196, and D9S127 microsatellite markers located in the region of PTCH gene, at chromosome 9q, were investigated for LOH. There was loss in at least one locus in 5/7 KOT and in 4/7 OOC samples. The present finding demonstrates that, despite the existence of clinical, morphological, immunohistochemical, and biological behavior differences between OOC and KOT, both harbor similar genetic alterations at 9q.

  20. Odontogenic keratocyst: a clinical experience in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chow, H T

    1998-11-01

    The odontogenic keratocyst has been well documented and extensively studied. It is of particular interest because of its high recurrence rate and aggressive nature. The material for this study consisted of 70 cases of odontogenic keratocysts in predominantly ethnic Chinese patients who were treated from 1981 to 1996. The cases were retrospectively studied to compare characteristics of the lesion in this population with those in previous reports. Most of the patients in this series were 21 to 30 years of age. Association with an impacted mandibular third molar was found in more than 50% of the cases. The recurrence rate was 20% for 35 patients with a follow-up period of at least 5 years. The follow-up period for the whole series ranged from 1 to 16 years. Treatment was surgical enucleation with peripheral ostectomy. There were no significant differences in characteristics with respect to presentation and prognosis between this series and those described in previous publications.

  1. Severe odontogenic infection: An emergency. Case report

    PubMed Central

    Crisosto-Jara, Claudia; Diaz-Ricouz, Camilo; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David

    2017-01-01

    Odontogenic infections (OI) are a major reason for consultation in dental practice. They affect people of all ages, and most of them respond well to current medical and surgical treatments. However, some OI can spread to vital and deep structures, overcome the host immune system - especially in diabetic, immunocompromised or weakened patients - and even prove fatal. Ludwig’s angina is a severe form of diffuse cellulitis that can have an acute onset and spread very rapidly, bilaterally affecting areas of the head and neck, and may prove life threatening. A case of severe dental infection is presented in which emphasis is placed on the importance of airway maintenance, followed by surgical decompression under adequate antibiotic coverage. Key words:Ludwig’s angina, severe odontogenic infection, surgical decompression, dental infection. PMID:28210456

  2. Odontogenic Keratocyst in Children: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kamil, Ahmed H.; Tarakji, Bassel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Is to highlight the characteristics and management of odontogenic keratocyst in children only Material and Method: Computerized search in pubmed between (2005-2015) using specific words such as odontogenic keratocyst in children, odontogenic keratocyst association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with abstract written in English only. Result: During computerized literature search 77 articles in the years (2005-2015) were found. All these publications were miscellaneous studies including case series and case reports. Only 35 papers were selected which conform to our criteria. Most of the papers indicate that the histological type of keratocyst prevalent in children was parakeratinized variant, and most of the cases occurred in maxilla rather than mandible. Conclusion: We recommend that the surgeons who treat keratocysts in children take into consideration the late presentation in addition to the destructive nature and high recurrence rate. General practitioners face difficulty in early detection and referral of children with keratocysts or Gorlin syndrome. Treatment by multidiscplinary team is important if associated with Gorlin's syndrome Postoperative follow up is advised every 6 months. PMID:27335612

  3. Classification of odontogenic tumours. A historical review.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, Hans Peter; Reichart, Peter A

    2006-10-01

    Using the term odontome for any tumour arising from the dental formative tissues, Broca suggested a classification of odontogenic tumours (OTs) in 1869. From 1888 to 1914, Bland-Sutton and Gabell, James and Payne modified tumour terminology, while maintaining Broca's odontome concept. Thoma and Goldman's classification (1946) divided the OTs into tumours of ectodermal, mesodermal and mixed origin and abolished the general term odontome. The Pindborg and Clausen classification (1958) based on the idea that the reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal tissue interactions were also operating in the pathogenesis of OTs. In 1966, WHO established a Collaborating Centre for the Histological Classification of Odontogenic Tumours and Allied Lesions (including jaw cysts) headed by Dr Jens Pindborg. In 1971, the first authoritative WHO guide to the classification of OTs and cysts appeared followed in 1992 by a second edition. In 2002, Philipsen and Reichart produced a revision of the 1992-edition and in 2003, the editors of the WHO Blue Book series: 'WHO Classification of Tumours' decided to produce a volume on the Head and Neck Tumours including a chapter on Odontogenic Tumours and Bone Related Lesions. In July of 2005 this volume was published by IARC, Lyon.

  4. Multiple non-syndromic odontogenic keratocysts in three siblings

    PubMed Central

    Nirwan, Amit; Wanjari, Sangeeta Panjab; Saikhedkar, Rashmi; Karun, Vinayak

    2013-01-01

    Occurrence of multiple cysts (MC) involving the jaw is rare. When multiple, it is usually associated with a syndrome. Occurrence of MC without syndromic association is extremely rare. Multiple odontogenic cysts mostly could be odontogenic keratocysts or dentigerous cysts. Odontogenic keratocyst shows involvement of mandible over maxilla, with peak incidence in second and third decade and it is exceedingly rare before 10 years of age. However multiple odontogenic keratocysts found in children are often reflective of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Here is a case report which documents multiple jaw cysts involving both the jaws, in three siblings of ages 10, 13 and 17 years with negative parental history. All three reported cases were free of any systemic involvement. As odontogenic keratocyst spreads through bone marrow, destruction is more before any clinical manifestation. Therefore, early detection and intervention are essential in preventing extensive destruction. PMID:23505078

  5. Multiple non-syndromic odontogenic keratocysts in three siblings.

    PubMed

    Nirwan, Amit; Wanjari, Sangeeta Panjab; Saikhedkar, Rashmi; Karun, Vinayak

    2013-03-14

    Occurrence of multiple cysts (MC) involving the jaw is rare. When multiple, it is usually associated with a syndrome. Occurrence of MC without syndromic association is extremely rare. Multiple odontogenic cysts mostly could be odontogenic keratocysts or dentigerous cysts. Odontogenic keratocyst shows involvement of mandible over maxilla, with peak incidence in second and third decade and it is exceedingly rare before 10 years of age. However multiple odontogenic keratocysts found in children are often reflective of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Here is a case report which documents multiple jaw cysts involving both the jaws, in three siblings of ages 10, 13 and 17 years with negative parental history. All three reported cases were free of any systemic involvement. As odontogenic keratocyst spreads through bone marrow, destruction is more before any clinical manifestation. Therefore, early detection and intervention are essential in preventing extensive destruction.

  6. Central odontogenic fibroma: Retrospective study of 8 clinical cases

    PubMed Central

    Hrichi, Radia; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: The central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a benign odontogenic tumour derived from the dental mesenchymal tissues. It is a rare tumour and only 70 cases of it have been published. Bearing in mind the rareness of the tumour, 8 new cases of central odontogenic fibroma have been found by analyzing the clinical, radiological and histopathological characteristics of COF. Patients and Method: A retrospective study was carried out on 3011 biopsies in the Service of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Dental Clinic of Barcelona University between January 1995 and March 2008. 85 odontogenic tumours were diagnosed of which 8 were central odontogenic fibroma. The radiological study was based on orthopantomographs, periapical and occlusal radiographies and computerised tomographics. The variables collected were: sex, age, clinical characteristics of the lesion, treatment received and possible reappearances of the tumour. Results: The central odontogenic fibroma represents 9.4% of all odontogenic tumours. Of the 8 cases, 5 were diagnosed in men and 3 in women. The average age was 19.9 years with an age range of 11 to 38 years. The most common location of the tumour was in the mandible. All cases were associated with unerupted teeth. Of the 8 tumours, 3 provoked rhizolysis of the adjacent teeth and 4 cases caused cortical bone expansion. 50% of the patients complained of pain associated to the lesion. No case of recurrence was recorded up to 2 years after the treatment. Conclusions: Central odontogenic fibromas usually evolve asymptomatically although they can manifest very aggressively provoking dental displacement and rhizolysis. Radiologically, COF manifest as a uni or multilocular radiotransparent image although they can be indistinguishable from other radiotransparent lesions making diagnosis more difficult. COF treatment involves conservative surgery as well as follow-up patient checks. Key words: Odontogenic tumour, central odontogenic

  7. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis obscured by midfacial trauma.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Ryškienė, Silvija; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis whose sinonasal symptomatology was thought to be the consequence of a previous midfacial trauma. The patient was admitted to the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery after more than 10 years of exacerbations of sinonasal symptoms, which began to plague soon after a facial contusion. We decided to perform CT of paranasal sinuses, and despite the absence dental symptomatology, the dental origin of sinusitis was discovered. The majority of sinonasal symptoms resolved after appropriate dental treatment, and there was no need for nasal or sinus surgery.

  8. Orbital abscess from an odontogenic infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Kyu; Kim, Ju-Rok; Jang, Keum-Soo; Moon, Yeon-Sung; Park, Sun-Won

    2007-01-01

    An orbital abscess is a rare but serious complication of an odontogenic infection, which can lead to loss of vision or worse. This paper presents a case of orbital abscess secondary to an infection from the upper molar teeth, which extended to the retobulbar and posterosuperior region of the orbit, close to the superior orbital fissure. The infection spreaded to the pterygopalatine and infratemporal fossa and then to the orbit via the inferior orbital fissure. This paper reviews the clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, route of spread, value of serial CT scanning, treatment and possible complications.

  9. Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma of the maxilla: a case report with a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Elneel Ahmed Mohamed; karrar, Musadak Ali; El-Siddig, Abeer Abdalla; Gafer, Nahla; satir, Ali Abdel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this report is to present a rare case of a Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC) of a 21-year-old man with review of the literature. The patient was treated surgically, and one of the surgical margins was involved, the patient received adjuvant radiotherapy for local control. Five months later, patient presented with infraorbital lesion which was proven histological to be GCOC. Radiological images, histological sections and clinical photographs are also presented. One year after the second surgery, the patient was tumor free. The only effective treatment modality was surgical removal. PMID:26523195

  10. Odontogenic Cyst with Verrucous Proliferation Exhibiting Melanin Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Krupa Mehta; Ahmed, Junaid; Bhat, Keshava; Kottieth Pallam, Nandita; Lewis, Amitha Juanita

    2017-01-01

    Verrucous proliferation arising from odontogenic cysts is a rare entity. We report an unusual case of an infected odontogenic cyst with verrucous proliferation and melanin pigmentation in a 13-year-old male patient who presented with an intraoral swelling in relation to impacted teeth 26 and 27. The enucleated lesion was diagnosed as an odontogenic keratocyst and the patient died within two years of presentation due to multiple recurrences. The clinical, radiological, and microscopic features of the lesion are presented with an attempt to discuss the etiopathogenesis. The case hereby reported is uncommon with only eight cases reported in the literature.

  11. Bilateral orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst: A rare case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalkar, Rahul Devidas; Barpande, Suresh R; Bhavthankar, Jyoti D; Mandale, Mandakini S

    2014-01-01

    Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is a developmental cyst of jaw and was initially considered by the World Health Organization (1992) as the uncommon orthokeratinized variant of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC). However, studies have shown that OOC has peculiar clinicopathologic aspects when compared with other developmental odontogenic cysts, especially OKC. So orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst now stands out to be a distinct entity. Clinically, it occurs as a single cyst, shows a predilection for males and is most often found in the second to the fifth decade. Its bilateral occurrence is extremely rare. The purpose of the article is to present a rare case of bilateral OOC arising in the mandible and review the literature on bilateral occurrence of this lesion. PMID:25328309

  12. Odontogenic Myxoma of the Maxilla- A Rare case Report

    PubMed Central

    Subramaiam, Ramkumar; Narasimhan, Malathi; Giri, Veda; Kumar, Santhosh

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an uncommon, benign, locally invasive, non-metastasizing neoplasm arising from the odontogenic ectomesenchyme that usually occurs in the tooth bearing areas of the jaws. These lesions arouse special interest as they pose high diagnostic challenge. Here, we present a rare case of OM of the maxilla in an 18-year-old male. The clinical, radiographic and histopathological features of the lesion are discussed in this paper. PMID:26155585

  13. [Relationship between odontogenic infections and infective endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bascones-Ilundain, Jaime

    2012-03-24

    Revised guidelines for the prevention of infective endocarditis published by national and international associations in the last years do not support the indiscriminate use of antibiotic prophylaxis for dental procedures. However, some of them still recommend its use in high-risk patients before dental treatments likely to cause bleeding. Given the high prevalence of bacteremia of dental origin due to tooth-brushing, mastication or other daily activities, it appears unlikely that infective endocarditis from oral microorganisms can be completely prevented. A good oral health status and satisfactory level of oral hygiene are sufficient to control the consequences of the systemic spread of oral microorganisms in healthy individuals. However, caution is still needed and prophylactic antibiotics must be administered to susceptible or medically compromised patients. This review briefly outlines the current concepts of odontogenic bacteremia and antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing dental treatment.

  14. A case of odontogenic brain abscess arising from covert dental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Clifton, T C; Kalamchi, S

    2012-01-01

    Odontogenic infections can spread to any organ of the body and in some cases cause life threatening infections. We report a case of multiple odontogenic brain abscesses resulting from undetected tooth decay. Whereas most odontogenic brain abscesses occur following dental treatment, this report documents brain abscesses prior to dental treatment, signifying the dangers of covert dental infections. This case report updates the literature on the topic of odontogenic brain abscesses.

  15. Malignant changes developing from odontogenic cysts: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Borrás-Ferreres, Jordi; Sánchez-Torres, Alba

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review scientific literature in orderto describe the characteristics and prognosis of malignant entities developing from odontogenic cysts. A search in Pubmed (MEDLINE) and Cochrane databases was conducted. The inclusion criteria were articles published in English related to the malignisation of odontogenic cysts in humans. The exclusion criteria were articles that do not specify the type of odontogenic cyst, malignisation of parakeratinised keratocysts, the presence of an ameloblastic carcinoma and metastasis from distant primary tumours. The selected articles were classified according to Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy criteria. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out using statistical package software SPSS version 22.0. From the 1,237 articles initially obtained, the authors included 3 case series and 45 case reports in the end. Descriptive analysis showed that men have a disposition for malignisation from odontogenic cysts and they frequently appear at the posterior mandible, with pain and swelling being the most frequent signs and symptoms. Follicular cysts were the entities that underwent the most malignant changes with well differentiated squamous cell carcinomas being the most prevalent type of malignancy. The real prognosis of this malignancy is not known because of the heterogeneity of available studies. Key words:Odontogenic cysts, squamous cell carcinoma, neoplastic cell transformation, oral cancer. PMID:27957281

  16. Malignant changes developing from odontogenic cysts: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Borrás-Ferreres, Jordi; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review scientific literature in orderto describe the characteristics and prognosis of malignant entities developing from odontogenic cysts. A search in Pubmed (MEDLINE) and Cochrane databases was conducted. The inclusion criteria were articles published in English related to the malignisation of odontogenic cysts in humans. The exclusion criteria were articles that do not specify the type of odontogenic cyst, malignisation of parakeratinised keratocysts, the presence of an ameloblastic carcinoma and metastasis from distant primary tumours. The selected articles were classified according to Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy criteria. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out using statistical package software SPSS version 22.0. From the 1,237 articles initially obtained, the authors included 3 case series and 45 case reports in the end. Descriptive analysis showed that men have a disposition for malignisation from odontogenic cysts and they frequently appear at the posterior mandible, with pain and swelling being the most frequent signs and symptoms. Follicular cysts were the entities that underwent the most malignant changes with well differentiated squamous cell carcinomas being the most prevalent type of malignancy. The real prognosis of this malignancy is not known because of the heterogeneity of available studies. Key words:Odontogenic cysts, squamous cell carcinoma, neoplastic cell transformation, oral cancer.

  17. Suspect Odontogenic Infection Etiology for Canine Lymphoplasmacytic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Stepaniuk, Kevin S; Gingerich, Wade

    2015-01-01

    The role of odontogenic infection as an etiology for lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis in dogs was evaluated. An association between odontogenic infection and inflammatory rhinitis was identified in 55% of cases evaluated. Odontogenic infection was unlikely or undetermined in 10% and 35% of the cases, respectively. Cases of lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis had roentgen signs associated with endodontic disease, periodontal disease, or retained tooth roots in 60%, 45%, and 25% of the cases, respectively. A collaborative team based approach assessing inflammatory nasal disease is recommended. Based on the history and signalment of the individual patient, diagnostic modalities should be chosen wisely. In some cases, oral examination and intraoral radiographs may be a more direct and cost effective approach for diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory rhinitis.

  18. Glandular odontogenic cyst: absence of PTCH gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Barreto, D C; De Marco, L; Castro, W H; Gomez, R S

    2001-02-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare jawbone cyst of odontogenic origin. Human patched (PTCH) is a tumour suppressor gene that has been recently associated with signalling pathways during odontogenesis. Recently alterations of this gene were found on sporadic odontogenic keratocysts. This evidence, together with the biological behaviour similarities of both lesions, and the absence of reports on molecular analysis of GOC, led us to hypothesize that PTCH gene mutations may underlie the tumorigenesis of GOC. Therefore the aim of this study was to report one additional case of GOC and investigate the PTCH gene of the cyst. No mutations were found in the splicing and coding regions of the PTCH gene. In conclusion, the PTCH gene does not seem to be involved in GOC pathogenesis.

  19. Fate of pulpectomized deciduous teeth: Bilateral odontogenic cyst?

    PubMed Central

    Sandhyarani, B.; Noorani, Hina; Shivaprakash, P. K.; Dayanand, A. Huddar

    2016-01-01

    Pulpectomy is preferably more conservative treatment option than the extraction of deciduous teeth despite few undesirable consequences of obturating materials of which odontogenic cysts are one. This article aims to report a case of an 11-year-old female child having bilateral odontogenic cysts, i.e., radicular and infected dentigerous cyst followed by pulpectomy of deciduous molars using zinc oxide eugenol which was surgically enucleated and followed up to 6 months until satisfactory healing of bone was observed. The article also emphasizes on the importance of regular follow-up of the pulpectomized tooth which can be harmful otherwise. PMID:27307677

  20. Pigmented Pindborg tumor of the maxilla: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Priya, Subashchandrabose; Madanagopaal, Lakshmikanth Ramiah; Sarada, Venkaterwaran

    2016-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as the Pindborg tumor, is a benign locally invasive neoplasm. Common variants of CEOT include noncalcifying, Langerhans cell, bone and cementum forming and clear cell, which have a prognostic significance. Pigmented variants are known to occur in other odontogenic tumors. However, a definitive pigmented variant of CEOT has not been reported in literature so far. Here, we report the first case of pigmented Pindborg tumor arising from the maxilla in a young female. The pigment was demonstrated as melanin by staining and confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The pigmented variant of CEOT did not recur within 18 months postsurgery. Our report indicates that it is essential to recognize the pigmented variant. We discuss the common variants of CEOT and potential histogenesis of the pigmented variant. Further studies are required to reveal the histogenesis of melanocytes and their pathological significance in the odontogenic tumors. PMID:27721633

  1. Orthokeratinized Odontogenic Cyst: A Report of Three Clinical Cases

    PubMed Central

    González Galván, María del Carmen; García-García, Abel; Anitua-Aldecoa, Eduardo; Martinez-Conde Llamosas, Rafael; Aguirre-Urizar, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is a rare developmental odontogenic cyst that has been considered as a variant of the keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) until Wright (1981) defined it as a different entity. Surgery is the usual treatment, and recurrence or association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome has rarely been described. In this report, we presented three cases of this pathology, and we review the principal clinical, histological, radiological, and therapeutic aspects. Case 1. A 73-year-old female presents with a slight swelling on the right mandible, associated with an unilocular well-defined radiolucent lesion. Case 2. A 27-year-old female presents with a painful mandibular swelling associated with an unilocular radiolucent lesion posterior to the 4.8. Case 3. A 61-year-old male was casually detected presents with an unilocular radiolucent lesion distal to the 4.8. Conclusion. The OOC is a specific odontogenic clinicopathological entity that should be differentiated from the KCOT as it presents a completely different biological behaviour. PMID:24191203

  2. Occlusive vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome accompanying a congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sa, Young Jo; Kim, Young Du; Moon, Seok-Whan; Kim, Chi-Kyung; Ki, Chang Seok

    2013-12-01

    An 8-year-old male presented with a cystic lung lesion in the left lower lobe, which was initially detected during surgery for a spontaneous rupture of the sigmoid colon at the age of 6 years. Tissue fragility and a tendency to bleed easily were noted during the surgery, which strongly suggested vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Although there was no abnormality in the hemostasis screening test, or any suspicious hereditary problem in his pedigree, genetic gene testing for vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was recommended, and showed a de novo mutation in the COL3A1 gene. This report presents the case of patient with occlusive vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome accompanying a congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of lung, in addition to a duplicated infrarenal vena cava.

  3. Unilateral right pulmonary artery agenesis and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the right lung with Ortner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    David, Jane Jackie; Mohanlal, Smilu; Sankhe, Punam; Ghildiyal, Radha

    2016-01-01

    We report a 2.5-year-old girl who presented with hoarseness of voice since 3 months of age and failure to thrive. Chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with a deviation of the trachea and mediastinum to the right side. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed decreased flow across the right pulmonary artery, a small atrial septal defect (ASD) with a right-to-left shunt, and a dilated right atrium and right ventricle with severe tricuspid regurgitation suggestive of severe pulmonary hypertension. A silent large patent ductus arteriosus was also seen. Multiple detector computerized tomography aortogram confirmed the findings of absent right pulmonary artery and hypoplastic right lung with small cystic lesions suggestive of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in the right lower lobe. Hoarseness of voice was due to the left vocal cord palsy probably secondary to severe pulmonary hypertension (Ortner's syndrome).

  4. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by or linked with viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Most anal cancers (human papillomavirus) Some throat ...

  5. Glandular odontogenic cyst of the maxilla: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Nigel Roque; Dinkar, Ajit Dattatray; Khorate, Manisha Maruti

    2016-01-01

    Glandular Odontogenic Cyst is a relatively rare cyst of odontogenic origin, which shows glandular or salivary features that are thought to indicate the pluripotentiality of odontogenic epithelium. It is seen in middle-aged adults, and commonly involves the anterior region of the jaws, especially the mandible. It shows non-specific clinico-radiographic findings which may resemble other lesions, but has characteristic histopathologic features which help in its diagnosis. This paper reports an unusual presentation of a glandular odontogenic cyst which was diagnosed in a 64-year old female in the posterior maxilla, along with a literature review of this cyst, especially the cases reported in India in the past.

  6. Glandular Odontogenic Cyst: The Value of Intraepithelial Hemosiderin.

    PubMed

    AbdullGaffar, Badr; Koilelat, Mohamed

    2017-05-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a relatively rare but well-described clinicopathologic entity. Its rarity and unpredictable clinical behavior are challenging to managing clinicians. Its variable and overlapping histomorphologic features are also diagnostically challenging for pathologists. Other odontogenic cysts and oral cystic neoplasms can simulate GOC. There are specific histologic criteria that help distinguish GOC from other mimickers. To our knowledge, the phenomenon of hemosiderin pigments deposition within the lining glandular epithelium of GOC has not been covered in detail or specifically reported so far in the literature. We report a case of nontraumatized anterior mandibular GOC in a middle-aged male, which histologically showed hemosiderin pigments within the lining epithelium without stromal siderophages. This finding might reflect a nonspecific spontaneous intraluminal hemorrhage. However, intraepithelial hemosiderin in GOC may be an additional helpful diagnostic clue of GOC in challenging cases since this phenomenon has not been reported in other mimicker cystic lesions.

  7. Glandular odontogenic cyst: report of an unusual bilateral occurrence.

    PubMed

    Amberkar, Vikram S; Jahagirdar, Abhishek; Ahmed Mujib, B R

    2011-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a recently recognized rare developmental odontogenic cyst having an aggressive behavior and accounting for 0.012% to 1.3% of all jaw cysts. GOC usually presents as a painless, slow-growing swelling that tends to affect the anterior part of the jaws. It chiefly occurs in the fourth and fifth decades of life and presents as an expansion of jaws with or without pain or paresthesia. Aggressive nature of the lesion has been reported, as supported by the fact that 25 to 55% of cases recur following curettage. So far only just over 113 cases of GOC have been reported in the literature. Here, we report a case of bilateral GOC in the posterior region of the maxilla, in a 29-year-old male patient, which is unique, being the first case of bilateral GOC to be reported in the literature.

  8. Minor trauma triggering cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis from odontogenic abscess.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shraddha; Nagpure, Prakash S; Singh, Roohie; Garg, Deepika

    2008-07-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the face and neck is a very rare complication of dental infection. Otolaryngologists and dentists should be familiar with this condition because of its similarity to odontogenic deep neck space infection in the initial stages, its rapid spread, and its life-threatening potential. Trauma has been reported to be an important predisposing factor for NF of the face. In this paper, we describe the presentation and treatment of a 62-year-old man who developed NF of the face and neck following bilateral odontogenic deep neck space abscesses. The disease progressed rapidly, with necrosis of the skin, after the patient inflicted minor trauma in the form of application of heated medicinal leaves. The organism isolated in culture from pus was Acinetobacter sp. The comorbid conditions in our patient were anemia and chronic alcoholism. The patient was managed by immediate and repeated extensive debridements and split-skin grafting.

  9. Minor trauma triggering cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis from odontogenic abscess

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shraddha; Nagpure, Prakash S; Singh, Roohie; Garg, Deepika

    2008-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the face and neck is a very rare complication of dental infection. Otolaryngologists and dentists should be familiar with this condition because of its similarity to odontogenic deep neck space infection in the initial stages, its rapid spread, and its life-threatening potential. Trauma has been reported to be an important predisposing factor for NF of the face. In this paper, we describe the presentation and treatment of a 62-year-old man who developed NF of the face and neck following bilateral odontogenic deep neck space abscesses. The disease progressed rapidly, with necrosis of the skin, after the patient inflicted minor trauma in the form of application of heated medicinal leaves. The organism isolated in culture from pus was Acinetobacter sp. The comorbid conditions in our patient were anemia and chronic alcoholism. The patient was managed by immediate and repeated extensive debridements and split-skin grafting. PMID:19561990

  10. Brain abscess due to odontogenic infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Yong; Suh, Dong Won; Park, Chul Min; Oh, Min Seok

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we describe a case of brain abscess due to odontogenic infection. A 53-year-old female who had been suffering from headache and trismus for two weeks visited the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the Sun Dental Hospital (Daejeon, Korea). Even after several routine tests, we still could not make a diagnosis. However, after the combined multidisciplinary efforts of oral surgeons and neurosurgeons, the patient was treated for odontogenic infection and made an uneventful recovery. Therefore, patients with infections in the head and neck region showing symptoms such as headache, changes in mental state, nausea, vomiting, seizures, hemiplegia, speech disturbance, and visual disturbance, a brain abscess should be included in the list of differential diagnoses. PMID:25045643

  11. [Oropharyngeal tumors of dogs--a clinical study of 79 cases].

    PubMed

    Hörsting, N; von Reiswitz, A; Wohlsein, P; Bullerdiek, J; Reimann, N; Nolte, I

    1998-01-01

    This study presents the data on incidence, TNM-classification and therapy outcome of 79 dogs with oropharyngeal tumors, which were admitted to the Clinic of Small Animals, Hannover School of Veterinary Medicine. 52 neoplasms were examined histologically. The most common tumors were malignant melanoma (n = 17), fibrosarcoma (n = 5), squamous cell carcinoma and peripheral odontogenic fibroma (n = 4). It could be determined that dogs treated by surgery, regardless of tumor type and type of surgery, had longer survival times than untreated dogs. With regard to survival time and the rate of local tumor recurrence, radical surgery (partial mandibulectomy/maxillectomy) led to good results in squamous cell carcinomas and invasive odontogenic tumors, but, keeping in mind the small number of cases, showed no advantage over conservative surgery in malignant melanomas, fibrosarcomas, neurofibrosarcomas and non invasive odontogenic tumors. It could be shown that the clinical staging of the patients was of prognostic relevance.

  12. Severe odontogenic infection in pregnancy - A timely reminder.

    PubMed

    Tocaciu, Shreya; Robinson, Bruce W; Sambrook, Paul J

    2016-09-07

    Dental practitioners often treat patients who are pregnant. Understanding the altered physiology in the pregnant patient, especially changes in immune function, is vital in effective management of orofacial infections. We present a case of rapidly spreading odontogenic infection in a pregnant patient requiring surgical management. We also discuss the physiological changes of pregnancy relevant to dentistry, and the principles of managing such infections in the gravid patient. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. A case of tetanus secondary to an odontogenic infection.

    PubMed

    Darraj, Majid; Stone, James; Keynan, Yoav; Thompson, Kristjan; Snider, Carolyn

    2016-12-08

    Tetanus is a life-threatening clinical syndrome that commonly presents with muscular spasms, rigidity, and autonomic instability. It is considered rare in industrialized countries, and tetanus occurring secondary to dental abscesses, procedures, or infections has been infrequently reported. We describe the case of a patient inadequately immunized for tetanus, who presented to the emergency department with muscular spasms, rigidity, and autonomic instability in the setting of an odontogenic infection. A clinical diagnosis of tetanus was made and subsequently managed successfully.

  14. Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumour (calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour) in the mandible of a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Kang, M-S; Park, M-S; Kwon, S-W; Ma, S-A; Cho, D-Y; Kim, D-Y; Kim, Y

    2006-01-01

    A 13-year-old male tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) had a marked mandibular swelling noticed 12 months earlier and associated with progressive anorexia and weight loss. Radiological and post-mortem examination revealed a mass (13x15 cm) which was firm and poorly defined, with destruction of the adjacent bone tissue. Histologically, the mass was poorly demarcated, with infiltrative growth, and composed of nests, cords and islands of epithelial cells with characteristic basal cell features. Also observed were extensive squamous metaplasia, ghost cells, stellate reticulum, and fibroblastic connective tissue stroma containing inflammatory cells. A prominent feature of this tumour consisted of abundant nodular deposits of congophilic amyloid-like material with partial mineralization (Liesegang rings). Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells and the amyloid-like material were positive for pancytokeratin and negative for vimentin. The findings supported the diagnosis of an amyloid-producing odontogenic tumour (APOT), also known as calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour in man and animals.

  15. Microbial flora of odontogenic abscesses in pet guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Minarikova, A; Hauptman, K; Knotek, Z; Jekl, V

    2016-10-01

    Abscesses of odontogenic origin in guinea pigs pose a serious health problem and need to be treated with a combination of surgical and medical therapy. The aim of this prospective study was to describe the microbial flora of odontogenic abscesses associated with osteomyelitis in 24 pet guinea pigs, to perform antibiotic sensitivity testing, and to make recommendations for practitioners on the antibiotics of first choice. Inclusion criteria for the study included the animal being diagnosed with an odontogenic abscess which underwent surgery and was not pre-treated with an antibiotic. Inclusion criteria matched for 24 guinea pigs. Samples (pus, capsule and affected tooth/bone) for bacteriological examination were collected under sterile conditions during the surgical procedure. The most commonly isolated bacteria from abscesses of odontogenic origin were Bacteroides fragilis in 12.8 per cent (6/47) of cases, Pasteurella multocida in 10.6 per cent (5/47) and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius in 8.5 per cent (4/47). Aerobic bacterial species only were isolated in 29.2 per cent (7/24) of cases, anaerobic bacteria only were isolated in 33.3 per cent (8/24), and mixed infection with anaerobic and aerobic bacterial species was seen in 37.5 per cent (9/24). Aerobes (n=20) were sensitive to enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin in 100 per cent of samples, benzylpenicillin potassium (penicillin G, PNCG) in 90 per cent, cephalotin in 85 per cent, amoxicillin-clavulanate in 75 per cent, doxycycline in 70 per cent, gentamicin in 65 per cent and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in 55 per cent. Anaerobes (n=27) were sensitive to amoxicillin-clavulanate in 100 per cent of cases, clindamycin in 96.3 per cent, metronidazole in 92.6 per cent, PNCG in 92.6 per cent and cephalotin in 74.1 per cent. As guinea pigs are strictly herbivorous animals, based on the results of this study the recommended antibiotic treatment for odontogenic abscesses is a combination of fluoroquinolones and metronidazole.

  16. Odontogenic tumours in children and adolescents: a collaborative study of 431 cases.

    PubMed

    Servato, J P S; de Souza, P E A; Horta, M C R; Ribeiro, D C; de Aguiar, M C F; de Faria, P R; Cardoso, S V; Loyola, Adriano Mota

    2012-06-01

    This study describes the oral and maxillofacial pathological characteristics of a series of odontogenic tumours in children and adolescents from three Brazilian reference centres. The records were reviewed for all odontogenic tumours in patients up to 18 years old based on criteria proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2005. Data concerning sex, age, skin colour and tumour location were collected and plotted. Four hundred and thirty one odontogenic tumours in children and adolescents were found, accounting for 37.5% of the total number of odontogenic tumours diagnosed. Benign tumours were predominant (99.8% of the cases), and odontoma was the most frequent type (41.4%), followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumours (25.5%) and ameloblastoma (14.6%). Odontogenic tumours were rarely detected in early childhood, and their prevalence increased with age. An almost equal distribution was observed with respect to sex and the site of the lesions. This study is the largest reported retrospective analysis describing odontogenic tumours in children and adolescents to date. The authors detected some variation in the relative frequency of odontogenic tumours compared with similar reports. Additional studies should be conducted based on the new WHO classification and predetermined age parameters to enable comparative analysis among different worldwide populations.

  17. Er:YAG Laser Assisted Treatment of Central Odontogenic Fibroma of the Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Luis Silva; Martins, Marco; Pacheco, José Júlio; Salazar, Filomena; Magalhães, João; Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma is a very rare benign odontogenic tumour characterized by a fibrous mature stroma with variable strands or islands of inactive-looking odontogenic epithelium. Our aim is to report a case of a central odontogenic fibroma and describe the clinical usefulness of Er:YAG laser for the surgical treatment of this tumour. A 74-year-old woman presented with an expansive lesion located in a mandible with multilocular and mixed radiographic appearance. A conservative excision using Er:YAG laser was performed. Complete removal was obtained. There were no postoperative complications. The histopatologic features were consistent with the diagnosis of central odontogenic fibroma of rich-epithelium type. No recurrence was observed during follow-up. PMID:26457211

  18. Ameloblastomatous calcifying odontogenic cyst: a rare histological variant

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Soumi; V, Sreelatha S; S, Venkatesh; Nair, Preeti P

    2013-01-01

    The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) occurs mainly as an intraosseous lesion in mandible or maxilla, but the peripheral variation of COC has also been reported. The confusion regarding its nature as cyst or tumour has not been resolved and a vast diversity has been noted in clinicopathological aspects of COC. We report a case of COCs with minimal mural ameloblastomatous proliferation in a 13-year-old girl, who presented with a painless swelling in the left jaw causing mild facial asymmetry. PMID:23696143

  19. Odontogenic myxoma in a 52-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Hari; Mehta, Gagan; Kumar, Manoj; Lone, Parveen

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare benign but locally aggressive tumour of the jaws. It is usually seen in the second to third decade of life. Women are more frequently affected than men and it has more predilections for the mandible rather than the maxilla. OM presents as an asymptomatic swelling in most of the cases. Owing to the non-capsulated and aggressive nature of OM, a high rate of recurrence has been reported. Here we present a case of OM in a 52-year-old woman managed by segmental mandibulectomy. Sign of recurrence was seen after 18 months of follow-up. PMID:24859552

  20. Cholesterol Granuloma in Odontogenic Cyst: An Enigmatic Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Anju; Gupta, Shruti

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol granuloma (CG) is the outcome of the foreign body type of response to the accumulation of cholesterol crystals and is frequently present in conjunction with chronic middle ear diseases. Recently, cases of CG in jaws have been reported, but still, very few cases have been found of CG in dental literature. This article presents three rare cases of CG in the wall of odontogenic cysts emphasizing on its possible role in expansion of the associated lesion and bone erosion. It also lays stress on the fact that more cases of CG should be reported so that its nature and pathogenesis in the oral cavity become more perceivable. PMID:28070428

  1. Ghost Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Jason; Cohen, Molly D; Ramer, Naomi; Payami, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Ghost cell tumors are a family of lesions that range in presentation from cyst to solid neoplasm and in behavior from benign to locally aggressive or metastatic. All are characterized by the presence of ameloblastic epithelium, ghost cells, and calcifications. This report presents the cases of a 14-year-old girl with a calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) and a 65-year-old woman with a peripheral dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT) with dysplastic changes, a rare locally invasive tumor of odontogenic epithelium. The first patient presented with a 1-year history of slowly progressing pain and swelling at the left body of the mandible. Initial panoramic radiograph displayed a mixed radiolucent and radiopaque lesion. An incisional biopsy yielded a diagnosis of CCOT. Decompression of the mass was completed; after 3 months, it was enucleated and immediately grafted with bone harvested from the anterior iliac crest. The second patient presented with a 3-month history of slowly progressing pain and swelling at the left body of the mandible. Initial panoramic radiograph depicted a mixed radiolucent and radiopaque lesion with saucerization of the buccal mandibular cortex. An incisional biopsy examination suggested a diagnosis of DGCT because of the presence of ghost cells, dentinoid, and islands of ameloblastic epithelium. Excision of the mass with peripheral ostectomy was completed. At 6 and 12 months of follow-up, no evidence of recurrence was noted.

  2. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis: an unusual sequel of odontogenic infection.

    PubMed

    Subhashraj, Krishnaraj; Jayakumar, Naveen; Ravindran, Chinnasamy

    2008-12-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection of the fascial planes, which is less common in head and neck, because of the rarity and higher vascularity in the region. We reviewed five patients with cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic infection managed at a teaching hospital at Chennai, India. There were four men and one woman, of whom four patients were diabetic and hypertensive, with a mean age of 53 years. Mandibular molars (periapical or pericoronal abscess) were found to be the source of infection in all of the cases. The treatment involved incision and drainage and debridement. Anti-microbial drugs were given for all the patients, which included cephalosporins, metronidazole and gentamycin. In four patients the wound healed by contracture and one patient required split skin grafting. Due to the smaller extent of the necrosis, better control of the systemic disease and small size of the sample, there was neither a major complication nor death. This paper reminds us that cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) remains one of the potential complications of long standing odontogenic infections in patients with immune-compromised status, particularly in lower dentition.

  3. Disseminated necrotic mediastinitis spread from odontogenic abscess: our experience

    PubMed Central

    Filiaci, Fabio; Riccardi, Emiliano; Mitro, Valeria; Piombino, Pasquale; Rinna, Claudio; Agrillo, Alessandro; Ungari, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aims Deep neck infections are rare but potentially fatal complication of pulpal abscess of the teeth. If an infection can progress rapidly from a toothache to a life threatening infection, then it is critical that dentists be able to recognize the danger signs and identify the patients who are at risk. Mediastinitis is a severe inflammatory process involving the connective tissues that fills the intracellular spaces and surrounds the organs in the middle of the chest. This pathology has both an acute and a chronic form and, in most cases, it has an infectious etiology. This study want to expose the experience acquired in the Oral and Maxillo-facial Sciences Department, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, regarding two clinical cases of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis starting from an odontogenic abscess. Methods We report two clinical cases of disseminated necrotic mediastinitis with two different medical and surgical approaches. The radiographic and photographic documentation of the patients was collected in the pre-and post-operatively. All patients underwent a CT scan and MRI. Results Mediastinitis can result from a serious odontogenic abscess, and the extent of its inflammation process must be never underestimated. Dental surgeons play a key role as a correct diagnosis can prevent further increasing of the inflammation process. Conclusions A late diagnosis and an inadequate draining represent the major causes of the elevated mortality rate of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis. PMID:26330907

  4. Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumour of the Mandible: An Unusually Aggressive Presentation of an Indolent Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Dev, DP Arul; Michael, Manoj Joseph; Akhilesh, AV; Das, Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumour (CEOT) or Pindborg tumour is a rare odontogenic tumour of epithelial origin. They constitute less than 1% of odontogenic tumours. Intra-ossseous variant of CEOT are more common compared to extra-osseous variant. Although benign, these can exhibit deceptively aggressive presentation. Here we report a rare case of CEOT in a 36-year-old female patient who presented with aggressive intra-osseous lesion with cortical breach and exuberant soft tissue proliferation. The lesion was treated with resection and reconstructed with titanium reconstruction plate. PMID:27790590

  5. Evaluation of microbial flora in orofacial space infections of odontogenic origin

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Amod; Dugal, Arun; Kshirsagar, Rajesh; Hariram; Singh, Vikram; Mishra, Akshay

    2014-01-01

    Background: The microbiology of acute dental infections has been in the midst of many researches. Various bacteriological studies show variations in their conclusion. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the microbial flora in orofacial space infections of odontogenic origin, which is essential for appropriate antibiotic selection. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with odontogenic infection causing fascial space involvement were included. Aspirated specimen was transported in nutrient broth and thyoglycollate media within an hour for further culture and sensitivity testing. Result and Conclusion: This study indicates that orofacial odontogenic infections are usually polymicrobial, consisting of a complex mixture of both anaerobes and aerobes. PMID:25937727

  6. Valuable Radiographic Tool for Odontogenic Jaw Keratocyst Diagnosis and Surgical Planning

    PubMed Central

    Lai, R-F; Li, Z-J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical use of cone beam computed tomography in the diagnosis of patients with odontogenic jaw keratocyst and to guide computer-aided surgical treatment planning. Methods: Imaging, image processing, and visualization technologies were used to produce clear diagnosis, provide proper treatment, and formulate favourable prognosis. Cone beam computed tomography was used to collect medical information including site, extent, shape, and other characteristic features of a patient with large odontogenic jaw keratocyst. Results: The imaging technique produced excellent results in imaging, image processing and threedimensional (3D) visualization. Conclusion: The 3D digital reconstruction model of the odontogenic jaw keratocyst was shown intuitively. PMID:25429483

  7. Glandular odontogenic cyst of the maxilla: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Nigel Roque; Dinkar, Ajit Dattatray; Khorate, Manisha Maruti

    2016-01-01

    Glandular Odontogenic Cyst is a relatively rare cyst of odontogenic origin, which shows glandular or salivary features that are thought to indicate the pluripotentiality of odontogenic epithelium. It is seen in middle-aged adults, and commonly involves the anterior region of the jaws, especially the mandible. It shows non-specific clinico-radiographic findings which may resemble other lesions, but has characteristic histopathologic features which help in its diagnosis. This paper reports an unusual presentation of a glandular odontogenic cyst which was diagnosed in a 64-year old female in the posterior maxilla, along with a literature review of this cyst, especially the cases reported in India in the past. PMID:28292079

  8. A Rare Simultaneous Occurrence of Odontogenic Keratocyst and Unicystic Ameloblastoma in Mandible: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dugal, Arun Govind; Pawar, Sudhir Ramlal; Khandelwal, Saurabh Girish; Iyengar, Apoorva

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic Keratocyst (OKC) and Ameloblastomas are slow growing benign odontogenic lesions that primarily occur in the molar region of the mandible. Clinically and radiographically both ameloblastoma, especially the Unicystic ameloblastoma and OKC are indistinguishable due to the similar location of occurrence and the age of patients. It is very rare for these lesions to arise simultaneously in a patient’s jaw. The co-occurrence of Ameloblastomas with odontogenic cysts or other odontogenic lesions (histologically in a single lesion)have already been described as combined or hybrid lesions. There are very few reported cases in the English literature for simultaneous occurrence of Unicystic Ameloblastoma and OKC as completely distinct lesions. Here we present such a rare case of the simultaneous occurrence of OKC and ameloblastoma in the posterior region of the mandible of a 22-year-old male in close relation. PMID:27656574

  9. Nasal Sinus Tract of Odontogenic Origin: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Sagar; Pathak, Anjani Kumar; Purwar, Parth; Dixit, Jaya; Singhal, Divya; Sajjanhar, Isha; Goel, Kopal; Gupta, Vaibhav Sheel

    2015-01-01

    Extraoral sinus tract often poses a diagnostic challenge to the clinician owing to its rare occurrence and absence of symptoms. The accurate diagnosis and comprehensive management are inevitable as the aetiology of such lesions is often masked and requires holistic approach. The present case report encompasses the management of an extraoral discharging sinus tract at the base of the right nostril in a chronic smoker. The lesion which was earlier diagnosed to be of nonodontogenic origin persisted even after erratic treatment modalities. Our investigations showed the aetiology of sinus tract to be odontogenic. Initially, a five-step program as recommended by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality was used for smoking cessation followed by root canal therapy (RCT) and surgical management of the sinus tract. The patient has been under stringent follow-up and no reoccurrence has been noted. PMID:26649208

  10. Carcinoma of Maxillary Sinus Masquerading as Odontogenic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ramachamparambathu, Ashir Kolikkal; Vengal, Manoj; Siyo, Nizaro; Ahmed, Anis

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumours of maxillary sinus are rare. They are usually diagnosed in the late stages when they perforate the sinus walls. The presence of large air space in the maxillary sinus facilitates asymptomatic growth of the sinus malignancy. The clinical presentation of these tumours depends on the sinus wall involved by the disease. The medial wall is usually the first to become eroded, leading to nasal obstruction, epistaxis or discharge. Rarely, symptoms of maxillary sinus carcinoma can resemble dental infection and the affected patients may visit dental clinic seeking treatment. This report presents a case of carcinoma of maxillary sinus mimicking odontogenic infection. Computed tomographic findings explained the reason for the present lesion to masquerade as an inflammatory condition. The importance of advanced imaging modalities for prompt identification of such lesions is discussed. PMID:27790593

  11. Sclerosing odontogenic carcinoma presenting on the hard palate of a 43-year-old female: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wood, Andrew; Young, Fiona; Morrison, James; Conn, Brendon I

    2016-12-01

    We present a case of sclerosing odontogenic carcinoma (SOC) occurring on the hard palate of a 43-year-old female. The tumor presented as an asymptomatic firm swelling and histopathologically was characterized by widely dispersed nests and cords of bland cells infiltrating between hyalinized collagen fibers. Prominent perineural and intraneural invasion and erosion of bone was noted. The tumor cells showed staining with antibodies to pan-cytokeratin (PanCK), cytokeratin 19 (CK19), cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6), cytokeratin 14 (CK14), p63 and E-cadherin, but no staining with antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 7 (CK7), cytokeratin 20 (CK20), estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) or S100. Staining for mucin with alcian blue/periodic acid-Schiff with diastase was equivocal, with no definite evidence of mucin or muciphages. An initial diagnosis of adenocarcinoma NOS was made upon incisional biopsy, with the prominent filing pattern and cytoplasmic vacuolization prompting consideration of metastatic breast cancer in the first instance. The true nature of the tumor became clear after staging investigations and surgical resection. The patient was treated by surgery alone and is disease-free after 17 months.

  12. Fetal case of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung: fetal therapy and a review of the published reports in Japan.

    PubMed

    Asabe, Koushi; Oka, Yoichiro; Shirakusa, Takayuki

    2005-09-01

    We herein report a case of type I congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung (CCAML) with non-immune hydrops fetalis (NIHF), a mediastinal shift and polyhydramnios diagnosed at 24 weeks' gestation by ultrasonography. The fetus was treated with a cyst-amniotic shunt at 29 weeks' gestation. Following a postnatal whole resection of the right lung, postpneumonectomy syndrome appeared and, as a result, the infant died 13 months after delivery due to respiratory failure. Only 19 cases demonstrating CCAML associated with NIHF have been reported previously in Japan. Four cases showed a spontaneous resolution of NIHF, while 5 cases with type I CCAML, which all underwent fetal intervention, demonstrated an excellent outcome.

  13. The role of PIN1 on odontogenic and adipogenic differentiation in human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Man; Shin, Seung-Yun; Jue, Seong-Suk; Kwon, Il-Keun; Cho, Eun-Hee; Cho, Eui-Sic; Park, Sang-Hyuk; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2014-03-15

    Recently, the involvement of PIN1, a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase, has been reported in age-related bone homeostasis and adipogenesis. However, the role of PIN1 during odontogenic and adipogenic differentiation remains to be fully understood, particularly regarding human dental pulp stem cells (HDPSCs). Thus, in the present study, we have investigated the role of PIN1 in odontogenic and adipogenic differentiation of HDPSCs and signaling pathways possibly involved. PIN1 mRNA and protein level were upregulated in a time-dependent manner during adipogenic differentiation, increasing until 1 day of odontogenic induction and then steadily declined during odontogenic differentiation. Treatment of a known PIN1 inhibitor, juglone, significantly increased odontogenic differentiation as confirmed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium deposition, and mRNAs induction of odontogenic markers [ALP, osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OCN), dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1)]. On the contrary, adipogenic differentiation was dramatically reduced upon juglone treatment, with concomitant downregulation of lipid droplet accumulation and adipogenic marker genes [peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (AP2)]. In contrast to PIN1 inhibition, the overexpression of PIN1 via adenoviral infection (Ad-PIN1) in HDPSCs inhibited odontogenic differentiation but increased adipogenic differentiation, in which stem cell property markers such as stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4) and STRO-1 were upregulated during odontogenic differentiation but downregulated in adiopogenic differentiation. Consistently, juglone-mediated inhibition of PIN1 augmented the osteogenic medium (OM)-induced activation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Wnt/β-catenin, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF

  14. A case of odontogenic orbital cellulitis causing blindness by severe tension orbit.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Hyun; Jee, Dong Hyun; La, Tae Yoon

    2013-02-01

    We report a very rare case of odontogenic orbital cellulitis causing blindness by severe tension orbit. A 41-yr old male patient had visited the hospital due to severe periorbital swelling and nasal stuffiness while he was treated for a periodontal abscess. He was diagnosed with odontogenic sinusitis and orbital cellulitis, and treated with antibiotics. The symptoms were aggravated and emergency sinus drainage was performed. On the next day, a sudden decrease in vision occurred with findings of ischemic optic neuropathy and central retinal artery occlusion. Deformation of the eyeball posterior pole into a cone shape was found from the orbital CT. A high-dose steroid was administered immediately resulting in improvements of periorbital swelling, but the patient's vision had not recovered. Odontogenic orbital cellulitis is relatively rare, but can cause blindness via rapidly progressing tension orbit. Therefore even the simplest of dental problems requires careful attention.

  15. Bilateral Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour of Mandible: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Pragun; Mhapuskar, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a relatively rare lesion of oral and maxillofacial region and forms only 2% of all odontogenic tumours. It was previously known as Calcifying odontogenic cyst and only recently has been classified as a tumour by WHO. The controversy regarding its origin can be owed to its diverse clinical and histopathological presentation and variation in reported malignant potential. It was first reported by Gorlin in 1962 and since then conundrum regarding its true nature has persisted. It is seen in association with other lesions like odontoma, ameloblastoma and ameloblastic fibroma. Both intra-osseous and extra-osseous forms of CCOT have been reported. It commnoly occurs in anterior region with equal preponderance in maxilla and mandible. Here we present a rare case of bilateral CCOT in the posterior mandible of a 16-year-old male patient which was discovered incidentally during a radiographic examination. PMID:26673837

  16. Immunohistochemical features of proliferative marker and basement membrane components of two feline inductive odontogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroki; Mori, Takashi; Iida, Tsuneyoshi; Tokuma, Yanai; Maruo, Kouji; Masegi, Toshiaki

    2008-07-01

    Feline inductive odontogenic tumour (FIOT) is a rare and interesting odontogenic neoplasm in which the odontogenic epithelium has inductive potential to form aggregated foci of dental pulp-like mesenchymal cells. Two male cats aged 11 and 10 months presented with nasal swelling and a left maxillary mass. Histopathologically, the masses consisted of non-encapsulated invasive neoplasms exhibiting proliferation of epithelial and mesenchymal components with local infiltration into the maxillary bone in both cases. The epithelial component formed islands, anastomosing strands, and solid sheets of polygonal epithelial cells. Occasionally, these cells formed circular aggregates, resembling the cap stage of odontogenesis. Type IV collagen and laminin were constantly positive around the foci of epithelial cells, and Ki-67 positive indices were extremely low; therefore, these findings consistent with the benign clinical presentation of FIOT.

  17. Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a slow-growing odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Miranda Rius, Jaume; Nadal, Alfons; Lahor, Eduard; Mtui, Beatus; Brunet, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a subjacent tumoural pathology is reported. The patient was a 55-year-old black male, whose chief complaint was a progressive gingival overgrowth for more than ten years, in the buccal area of the anterior left mandible. According to the clinical features and the radiological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst, a conservative surgery with enucleation and curettage was performed. Tissue submitted for histopathological analysis rendered the diagnosis of odontogenic myxoma. After 12-month of follow-up, no evidence of recurrence was found. Clinicians should be cautious when facing any gingival enlargement to avoid diagnostic pitfalls and to indicate the appropriate treatment. PMID:23722914

  18. Peripheral odontogenic fibroma: a rare gingival neoplasm with clinico-pathological differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jaiswal, Shradha; Sharma, Aanchal; Andhare, Vinod; Sabir, Husain

    2015-01-01

    The peripheral odontogenic fibroma (POdF) is a rare gingival neoplasm, characterised by relatively mature collagenous fibrous tissue and varying amounts of odontogenic epithelium. It can be described as a slow growing, firmly attached, solid and smooth gingival mass which may be present asymptomatically for years, which may cause displacement of adjacent teeth. The purpose of this article is to discuss a case of POdF, occurring in the maxillary anterior region, with detailed clinico-pathological differential diagnosis to clarify characteristic features of various gingival overgrowths to enhance easy identification.

  19. Immunohistochemical expression of Type IV Collagen and Autocrine Motility Factor Receptor in Odontogenic Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sneha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Autocrine motility factor receptor (AMFR) is a tumour motility stimulating protein secreted by tumour cells. The protein encoded by this gene is a glycosylated transmembrane protein and a receptor for autocrine motility factor. It has been known to play a role in progression of neoplastic lesions. Basement membranes are specialized extracellular matrices that serve as structural barriers as well as substrates for cellular interactions. The network of type IV collagen is thought to define the scaffold integrating other components such as laminins and perlecan into highly organized supramolecular architecture. The aim of this study was to determine and evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of Type IV Collagen and Autocrine motility factor receptor in odontogenic lesions. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of Type IV Collagen and Autocrine motility factor receptor was evaluated in 31 odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma, multicystic ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumour and ameloblastic carcinoma. Normal follicular tissue formed the control. Results: Maximum expression for Type IV Collagen was seen in multicystic ameloblastoma and minimum expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumour. The maximum expression of AMFR was seen in ameloblastic carcinoma and minimum expression in multicystic ameloblastoma. Conclusion: The results of this study suggested an association of loss of expression of type IV Collagen with progression of lesion. AMFR expression was found to be associated with the aggressive potential of tumours. PMID:25478440

  20. Zygomycosis originating from an odontogenic infection in a pediatric oncology patient

    PubMed Central

    Adderson, Elisabeth E.; Rowland, Christopher; McGregor, Lisa M.; Santana, Victor M.

    2011-01-01

    The Zygomyces are an increasingly frequent cause of invasive mould infection in immunocompromised patients. Here we describe the first well-documented case of Rhizopus infection of odontogenic origin, which presented as a rapidly progressive soft tissue infection in a neutropenic child. The infection resolved with limited surgical debridement and antifungal therapy. PMID:20227220

  1. The orosomucoid 1 protein (α1 acid glycoprotein) is overexpressed in odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a benign, but locally invasive, neoplasm occurring in the jaws. However, the molecules implicated in its development are unknown. OM as well as Dental Follicle (DF), an odontogenic tissue surrounding the enamel organ, is derived from ectomesenchymal/mesencyhmal elements. To identify some protein that could participate in the development of this neoplasm, total proteins from OM were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the profiles were compared with those obtained from DF, used as a control. Results We identified eight proteins with differential expression; two of them were downregulated and six upregulated in OM. A spot consistently overexpressed in odontogenic myxoma, with a molecular weight of 44-kDa and a pI of 3.5 was identified as the orosomucoid 1 protein. Western blot experiments confirmed the overexpression of this protein in odontogenic myxoma and immunohistochemical assays showed that this protein was mainly located in the cytoplasm of stellate and spindle-shaped cells of this neoplasm. Conclusion Orosomucoid 1, which belongs to a group of acute-phase proteins, may play a role in the modulation of the immune system and possibly it influences the development of OM. PMID:22888844

  2. Insight into the maintenance of odontogenic potential in mouse dental mesenchymal cells based on transcriptomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Yang, Dandan; Hu, Waner; Chen, Shubin; Zhao, Yuming; Cai, Jinglei; Pei, Duanqing

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mouse dental mesenchymal cells (mDMCs) from tooth germs of cap or later stages are frequently used in the context of developmental biology or whole-tooth regeneration due to their odontogenic potential. In vitro-expanded mDMCs serve as an alternative cell source considering the difficulty in obtaining primary mDMCs; however, cultured mDMCs fail to support tooth development as a result of functional failures of specific genes or pathways. The goal of this study was to identify the genes that maintain the odontogenic potential of mDMCs in culture. Methods. We examined the odontogenic potential of freshly isolated versus cultured mDMCs from the lower first molars of embryonic day 14.5 mice. The transcriptome of mDMCs was detected using RNA sequencing and the data were validated by qRT-PCR. Differential expression analysis and pathway analysis were conducted to identify the genes that contribute to the loss of odontogenic potential. Results. Cultured mDMCs failed to develop into well-structured tooth when they were recombined with dental epithelium. Compared with freshly isolated mDMCs, we found that 1,004 genes were upregulated and 948 were downregulated in cultured mDMCs. The differentially expressed genes were clustered in the biological processes and signaling pathways associated with tooth development. Following in vitro culture, genes encoding a wide array of components of MAPK, TGF-β/BMP, and Wnt pathways were significantly downregulated. Moreover, the activities of Bdnf, Vegfα, Bmp2, and Bmp7 were significantly inhibited in cultured mDMCs. Supplementation of VEGFα, BMP2, and BMP7 restored the expression of a subset of downregulated genes and induced mDMCs to form dentin-like structures in vivo. Conclusions. Vegfα, Bmp2, and Bmp7 play a role in the maintenance of odontogenic potential in mDMCs. PMID:26925321

  3. Odontogenic keratocyst in a 5-year-old child: a rare cause of maxillary swelling in children.

    PubMed

    Smith, I M; Harvey, N; Logan, R M; David, D J; Anderson, P J

    2008-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts in children are uncommon. They are cysts of the jaws that have a tendency for recurrence and are usually seen in adults. We report an exceptionally rare case in a young child and discuss its management.

  4. Solitary Plasmacytoma in the Mandible Resembling an Odontogenic Cyst/Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Izadi, Babak

    2016-01-01

    A 46-year-old male patient referred to Department of Oral Medicine, with the primary chief complaint of a painless swelling in the right side of mandibular. A panoramic radiograph revealed a well-defined, multilocular radiolucent bony lesion with thin and straight septa in the right side of mandible extending from distal of canine to mesial of third molar. Histological examination showed a solid proliferation of atypical plasmacytoid cells, which was indicative of plasmacytoma. A systemic workup for the final diagnosis was performed to rule out multiple myeloma. PMID:28078146

  5. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth.

    PubMed

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-05-02

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period.

  6. Obstruction of the eruption pathway by peripheral odontogenic fibroma: report of a patient.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Giulio Alessandri; Marini, Ida; Zucchelli, Giovanni; Checchi, Luigi

    2008-02-01

    The diagnostic process and interdisciplinary treatment of a healthy 12-year-old boy with impactions due to a localized peripheral odontogenic fibroma are presented. The treatment consisted of the surgical excision of the peripheral odontogenic fibroma and interceptive orthodontic treatment with an activator appliance to allow the passive eruption of the impacted teeth. Complete orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances was used later to level and coordinate the arches. This report illustrates the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of tooth impactions associated with diffuse gingival enlargement. The cooperation of various specialists in making a differential diagnosis, developing a comprehensive plan for conservative treatment, and delivering excellent care led to a successful result for this patient.

  7. Expression of cytokeratin in the epithelium of dentigerous cysts and odontogenic keratocysts: an aid to diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, A W; Fletcher, A

    1989-01-01

    Sections of tissue embedded in paraffin wax from 18 selected odontogenic cysts were studied both histologically and immunohistochemically with antibodies to cytokeratins using the indirect peroxidase technique. The cysts were divided on a clinical and histological basis into two equal groups comprising dentigerous cysts and odontogenic keratocysts. It was possible to differentiate the two cyst types in every case by the pattern of staining using the monoclonal antibody LP34 for cytokeratins of intermediate molecular weight. The monoclonal antibody CAM 5.2 for cytokeratins of low molecular weight was not discriminatory. Such a clear distinction may prove useful diagnostically in distinguishing between two cysts of similar appearance but very different behaviour. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:2474580

  8. [Isolation of Pseudomonas stutzeri from an odontogenic inflammatory cyst: Diagnostic relevance].

    PubMed

    Molgatini, Susana; Rey, Eduardo; Basilaki, Jorge; Mosca, Christian; Galante, Rafael; Gliosca, Laura

    Pseudomonas stutzeri is distributed widely in the environment, and occupies different ecological niches. However, it is found in clinically relevant infections as an opportunistic pathogen. Isolation of P. stutzeri from an odontogenic inflammatory cyst is an uncommon microbiological finding that has not been reported to date. In the case presented here, the bacterium was isolated from surgical material obtained from excision of an inflammatory odontogenic cyst located in the tooth 1.2, and presenting with concomitant pulp necrosis. Complementary techniques such as radiographs, CAT scans, and histopathological and microbiological studies were used to establish definitive diagnosis. The obtained results allowed classifying the process as an inflammatory cyst infected by P. stutzeri. Biotyping and characterization of the susceptibility profile of the isolated strain allowed adjusting the antibiotic therapy more specifically. The microbiological studies allowed establishing the etiology of the infectious process, adjusting the treatment plan, and re-establishing tissue integrity.

  9. Advanced diagnostic imaging and surgical treatment of an odontogenic retromasseteric abscess in a guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Capello, V; Lennox, A

    2015-02-01

    A two-year-old guinea pig presented for difficulty chewing. Examination and diagnostic imaging, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance, revealed an odontogenic retromasseteric abscess associated with a mandibular cheek tooth. Treatment included removal of the abscess and marsupialisation of the surgical site for repeated debridement and healing by second intention. Unique features of this case included the use of advanced diagnostic imaging and utilisation of marsupialisation for surgical correction.

  10. Central odontogenic fibroma: a case report with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Brazão-Silva, Marco T; Fernandes, Alexandre V; Durighetto-Júnior, Antônio F; Cardoso, Sérgio V; Loyola, Adriano M

    2010-08-13

    An osteolytic tumour of the mandible with prominent expansive growth on the alveolar ridge and displacement of the involved teeth is described in a 28-year-old man. The lesion was diagnosed as a central odontogenic fibroma, an uncommon benign neoplasm derived from dental apparatus, and was removed by curettage. The patient remains asymptomatic after thirteen years of follow-up, which supports the claimed indolent behavior of this poorly documented disease and the adequacy of a conservative surgical treatment.

  11. Porcine tooth germ cell conditioned medium can induce odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-Xiong; Ma, Zhao-Feng; Huo, Na; Tang, Liang; Han, Chun; Duan, Yin-Zhong; Jin, Yan

    2011-05-01

    It is suggested that the differentiation of tooth-derived stem cells is modulated by the local microenvironment in which they reside. Previous studies have indicated that tooth germ cell-conditioned medium (TGC-CM) holds the potential to induce dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to differentiate into the odontogenic lineage. Nevertheless, human TGC-CM (hTGC-CM) is not feasible in practical application, so we conjectured that xenogenic TGC-CM might exert a similar influence on human dental stem cells. In this study, we chose swine as the xenogenic origin and compared the effect of porcine tooth germ cell-conditioned medium (pTGC-CM) with its human counterpart on human DPSCs. Morphological appearance, colony-forming assay, in vitro multipotential ability, protein and gene expression of the odontogenic phenotype and the in vivo differentiation capacity of DPSCs were evaluated. The results showed that pTGC-CM exerted a similar effect to hTGC-CM in inducing human DPSCs to present odontogenic changes, which were indicated by remarkable morphological changes, higher multipotential capability and the expression of some odontogenic markers in gene and protein levels. Besides, the in vivo results showed that pTGC-CM-treated DPSCs, similar to hTGC-CM-treated DPSCs, could form a more regular dentine-pulp complex. Our data provided the first evidence that pTGC-CM is able to exert almost the same effect on DPSCs with hTGC-CM. The observations suggest that the application of xenogenic TGC-CM may facilitate generating bioengineered teeth from tooth-derived stem cells in future.

  12. Antibiotic prescription in the treatment of odontogenic infection by health professionals: A factor to consensus

    PubMed Central

    González-Martínez, Raquel; Cortell-Ballester, Isidoro; Herráez-Vilas, José M.; Arnau-de Bolós, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To observe the attitude of dentists and family doctors in prescribing antibiotics for the treatment of dental infections. Study Design: A poll was performed to determine the differences in the prescription of antibiotics for the treatment of odontogenic infection by dentists and family doctors of the primary care department of the Catalan Health Care Service. Results: A hundred polls were distributed among family doctors, and another 100 ones among primary care dentists assigned to the Catalan Health Care Service of the Generalitat de Catalunya. Of the total of questionnaires distributed, 63 were retuned and answered from dentists and 71 from family doctors. Eighty-one percent of dentists included in the opinion poll considered amoxicillin as the first antibiotic choice for the treatment of odontogenic infections, while 73.2% of family doctors preferred the combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. With regard to antibiotics of choice in patients allergic to penicillin, 67.7% of family doctors preferred macrolides (25.4% opted for clarithromycin, 25.4% for erythromycin and 16.9% for spiramycin). However, clindamycin was the antibiotic most frequently prescribed by dentists (66.7%), followed by erythromycin (28.6%). Conclusions: The results of this study show a large discrepancy in the criteria for the treatment of odontogenic infections on the part of leading professionals involved in the management of this condition. Although the most common prescription involved beta-lactam antibiotics in both groups, several significant differences have been detected with regard to the second antibiotic choice. Key words:Odontogenic infections, antibiotics, antimicrobials. PMID:22143715

  13. Lemierre's syndrome from odontogenic infection: Review of the literature and case description

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Dani; Rachmiel, Adi; Levy-Faber, Dan; Emodi, Omri

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome (LS) is a rare potentially fatal sequel of head and neck infection, classically described as thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein (IJV) with cervical space infection extending into the thorax. Our objective was to answer the clinical question: “Does Lemierre syndrome (LS) from odontogenic infection differ from nonodontogenic LS in regard to clinical sequence, treatment, and survival.” We reviewed the literature on the management of LS over the last two decades, with a focus on LS from odontogenic infection. Such a case is presented in order to portray the clinical sequence. Only 10 cases met the inclusion criteria (including the case presented). The recorded data were analyzed in comparison to large case series reviewing LS. Our data reflect the moderate differences in regard to IJV thrombosis and bacteriogram. There is an overall rise in published LS cases in the last 20 years. Odontogenic infection leading to LS is scarce, yet with survival rates similar to nonodontogenic LS. Repeated surgical interventions and aggressive wide spectrum antibiotic therapy remain the treatment of choice. PMID:26981474

  14. Reconstruction of defects of maxillary sinus wall after removal of a huge odontogenic lesion using prebended 3D titanium-mesh and CAD/CAM technique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A 63 year-old male with a huge odontogenic lesion of sinus maxillaris was treated with computer-assisted surgery. After resection of the odontogenic lesion, the sinus wall was reconstructed with a prebended 3D titanium-mesh using CAD/CAM technique. This work provides a new treatment device for maxillary reconstruction via rapid prototyping procedures. PMID:22070833

  15. Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor of the Mandible (Pindborg Tumor) . RPC (Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation) from the AFIP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    radiolucent to chiefly radiopaque. The size of the slowly-growing lesion corresponds to its duration. The differential diagnosis should include adenoameloblastoma, odontoma , ossifying fibroma, and osteomyelitis.

  16. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma of the mandible arising from an infected odontogenic cyst: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Grisar, Koenraad; Schol, Matthias; Hauben, Esther; Schoenaers, Joseph; Politis, Constantinus

    2016-01-01

    Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma (PIOSCC) derived from a odontogenic cyst is a rare form of odontogenic carcinoma. The incidence of carcinomas arising from odontogenic cysts is particularly uncommon and is reported to occur in 1–2 individuals for every 1,000 cases. The present case describes a 25-year-old man who was initially diagnosed with a chronically infected odontogenic cyst of the mandible. Biopsy and subsequent histology revealed the presence of squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, neck dissection and hemimandibulectomy were performed. Ultimately, the situation in the mouth healed, though with a severe amount of scarring. Although the development of PIOSCC from an odontogenic cyst is rare, it should be included in the differential diagnosis for jaw bone radiolucency. PMID:28105241

  17. Juxtaoral Organ of Chievitz, an Obscure Anatomical Structure Masquerading as Perineural Invasion of Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Sancheti, Sankalp Mahendra; Sawaimoon, Satyakam; Zameer, Mohammed Abdul Lateef

    2015-09-01

    The juxtaoral organ was first described by Chievitz in 1885. This is typically located deep to the medial pterygoid muscle (unilaterally or bilaterally) in the pterygomandibular space. Juxtaoral organ of Chievitz (JOOC) is usually incidentally detected in biopsies or resection specimen of other tumors but exceptionally, it can present as mass lesions. Awareness of this normal anatomic structure is important, because the epithelial islands in this area could be misinterpreted as an invasive carcinoma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma, an odontogenic tumor such as ameloblastoma or adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, or a perineural invasion by carcinoma. When a portion of the juxtaoral organ of Chievitz is accidentally exposed by frozen biopsy, there is an even higher risk of mistaking these cells for an invasive cancer or a perineural invasion of carcinoma. We report this to create awareness about this obscure structure and to draw attention to its differential diagnosis.

  18. A rare case of recurring calcifying epithelial odontogenic cyst in the maxillary sinus: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Karun, Vinayak; Mishra, Amit Kumar; Saikhedkar, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic cyst (CEOC) is an odontogenic cyst with epithelial lining. CEOC is a rare entity that occurs in a wide age range, does not show any gender predilection, and accounts for only 1% of all jaw cysts. The lesion generally occurs in the region anterior to maxillary and mandibular molars and either intraosseously or extraosseusly. This entity might present as a cystic or solid lesion. Enucleation is the recommended treatment for a simple, unicystic CEOC. A case of recurring CEOC in the right maxilla antrum is presented here. The patient presented to the authors after postsurgical recurrence. The case was evaluated thoroughly, and the cyst was resolved.

  19. [Lymphatic system of the tongue and its role in glositis of odontogenic origin].

    PubMed

    Chkhikvishvili, M Dzh

    2005-02-01

    In aged persons reduction of diameter of tongue lymphatic capillaries precedes thinning of the Kaarl net. In the process of tongue inflammation, lymphogenic way of inclusion in 6|6 and 8|8 teeth lower area should be stuck out with existence of alleged "Integration Centers". Lymphatic knots and lymphatic ducts are in prevailed placed in corresponding tissues of lower-chin and lower teeth. Lymphatic-muscular system and its anatomical links and age-related changeability raise the special interest during odontogenic infections with tongue inflammation.

  20. Non-Candida albicans Candida mediastinitis of odontogenic origin in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Kofteridis, Diamantis P; Mantadakis, Elpis; Karatzanis, Alexander D; Bourolias, Constantinos A; Papazoglou, Georgios; Velegrakis, George A; Samonis, George

    2008-06-01

    Descending mediastinitis occurs as a complication of oropharyngeal or cervical infections and its delayed diagnosis and treatment are associated with high mortality. A rare case of an odontogenic infection in a diabetic patient, complicated by Candida parapsilosis and Candida krusei parapharyngeal space infection, descending mediastinitis and aspiration pneumonia is described. Isolate identification was based on colonial and microscopic morphological characteristics and carbohydrate assimilation test results. The patient was successfully treated with surgical drainage and debridement, broad spectrum antibacterials and liposomal amphotericin B followed by prolonged oral voriconazole therapy.

  1. Desmosomes: A light microscopic and ultrastructural analysis of desmosomes in odontogenic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Pratima; Wadhwan, Vijay; Chaudhary, Minal S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Desmosomes together with adherens junctions represent the major adhesive cell–cell junctions of epithelial cells. Any damage to these junctions leads to loss of structural balance. Aim: The present study was designed to analyze the desmosomal junctions in different odontogenic cysts and compare them with their corresponding hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)   stained sections. Materials and Methods: Ten cases each of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cysts (DCs), radicular cysts (RCs) and normal mucosa were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the sections was then carried out of all the sections. The area of interest on H and E stained section was marked and this marking was later superimposed onto the corresponding unstained sections and were subjected to SEM analysis. Results and Observations: OKC at ×1000 magnification showed many prominent desmosomes. However, an increase in the intercellular space was also noted. SEM analysis demonstrated similar findings with the presence of many desmosomes, though they were seen to be damaged and fragile. H and E stained DC under oil immersion did not show any prominent desmosomes. SEM analysis of the same confirmed the observation and very minimal number were seen with a very condense arrangement of the epithelial cells. RC at ×1000 magnification revealed plenty of desmosomes, which were again confirmed by SEM. Conclusion: The number and quality of desmosomal junctions in all the cysts has a role in the clinical behavior of the cyst. PMID:25948985

  2. Odontogenic keratocysts: a clinical and histological study with special reference to enzyme histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, B C

    1978-02-01

    Of a total of 1,420 odontogenic cysts, 52 (3.3%) were diagnosed as odontogenic keratocysts. Clinical and histological findings in these 52 cysts are reported. Frozen sections of 26 of the keratocysts were incubated to show the following enzyme activities: NADH2- and NADPH2-diaphorase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase, leucine aminopeptidase and ATPase. Furthermore, keratinization was studied with the rhodamine B method and lipids with the oil red O, the OTAN and the acid hematein methods. Sections from epidermis, oral mucosa, radicular cysts, residual cysts and follicular cysts served as reference material. The oxidative enzymes showed strong activity in the keratocyst epithelium which contrasted with weak activity in the reference cysts. Acid phosphatase activity was weak in all epithelia except that in keratocysts, which displayed a marked activity. In the fibrous capsule of the keratocyst a high activity of leucine aminopeptidase was recorded. This high activity contrasted with a weak activity in the reference material. The significance of the histochemical results in relation to the aggressive behavior of the keratocyst is discussed.

  3. Metallothionein immunoexpression in non-syndromic and syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumour

    PubMed Central

    Johann, Aline-Cristina-Batista-Rodrigues; Caliari, Marcelo-Vidigal; Gomez, Ricardo-Santiago; Aguiar, Maria-Cássia-Ferreira; Mesquita, Ricardo-Alves

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare the metallothionein (MT) immunoexpression in non-syndromic and syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KOT), to correlate MT with cellular proliferation, and to evaluate the influence of inflammation in MT. Material and Methods Fourteen cases of KOT were submitted to immunohistochemistry for MT and Ki-67 analysis. The lesions were grouped according to their grade of inflammation, and statistical analysis was performed. Results MT was higher in non-syndromic KOT than in syndromic KOT (p<0.05). No statistical difference in Ki-67 could be identified; however, an inverse correlation was observed between MT and Ki-67 in both lesions. When analysing inflammation, non-syndromic KOT showed no differences in either MT or Ki-67. Conclusions The MT immunophenotype of syndromic KOT was different from non-syndromic KOT. MT might not be involved in the proliferation control of both KOT. MT and Ki-67 immunoexpressions proved to be unaffected by inflammation in non-syndromic KOT. Key words: Odontogenic tumours, basal cell nevus syndrome, metallothionein, Ki-67 Antigen, immunohistoche-mistry. PMID:25858080

  4. Non-Syndromic Familial Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour: A Rare Case Report in Japanese Identical Twins

    PubMed Central

    Maruoka, Yutaka; Yamaji, Iena; Kawai, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour (KCOT) is unicystic or multicystic intraosseous benign tumour of odontogenic origin that recurs due to locally destructive behaviour. KCOTs are usually the first manifestation of Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS), an autosomal dominant disorder also known as Gorlin’s syndrome and they are most frequently observed familial symptom regardless of patients’ nationality. In addition, the recurrence rate and multiplicity of KCOTs is relatively high as compared to that of other sporadic carcinomas. KCOT has been considered as a non-hereditary lesion and its familial onset is an extremely rare event in non-NBCCS cases. Here, we describe previously unreported non-syndromic multiple KCOT cases in identical twins in a Japanese family. The subjects were female Japanese identical twins who were 26 and 27 years old, respectively, at the time of diagnosis for KCOT. They had no major or minor features of NBCCS other than KCOT. Although there were lesions that were likely to be dentigerous cysts based on radiographic findings, one of them was KCOT. This case report highlights the importance of precise diagnosis, choice of surgical method and careful observation for multiplicity or familial onset in sporadic KCOT cases without NBCCS. PMID:27656582

  5. PTCH mutations in sporadic and Gorlin-syndrome-related odontogenic keratocysts.

    PubMed

    Gu, X-M; Zhao, H-S; Sun, L-S; Li, T-J

    2006-09-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts are relatively common lesions that may occur in isolation or in association with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (or Gorlin syndrome). The PTCH gene has been reported to be associated with Gorlin syndrome. We investigated 10 cases of non-syndromic keratocysts and two other cases associated with Gorlin syndrome, looking for PTCH mutations. Four novel and 1 known PTCH mutations were identified in five individual patients. Of the 5 mutations identified, 2 were germ-line mutations (2619C>A; 1338_1339insGCG) in 2 cysts associated with Gorlin syndrome, and 3 were somatic mutations (3124_3129dupGTGTGC; 1361_1364delGTCT; 3913G>T) in 3 non-syndromic cysts. This report describes PTCH mutations in both non-syndromic and Gorlin-syndrome-related odontogenic keratocysts in Chinese patients, and suggests that defects of PTCH are associated with the pathogenesis of syndromic as well as a subset of non-syndromic keratocysts.

  6. Mandibular odontogenic myxoma. Reconstructive considerations by means of the vascularized fibular free flap.

    PubMed

    González García, Raúl; Rodríguez Campo, Francisco J; Naval Gías, Luis; Muñoz Guerra, Mario F; Sastre Pérez, Jesús; Díaz González, Francisco J

    2006-11-01

    The odontogenic myxoma is a rare entity located in mandible and upper maxilla. Due to its local aggressiveness, wide surgical excision is mandatory. Several surgical techniques have been described for the reconstruction of segmental mandibular defects. In comparison with other free flaps, the vascularized free fibular flap (VFFF) supports the longest amount of bone and, due to the nature of the vascular supply a complete freedom in location of the osteotomy is present. A precise mandibular arc can be performed following bone resection. We suggest the performance of the in situ VFFF technique in order to recreate mandibular contour by means of several osteotomies, while the pedicle is still attached to the leg. Substantial decrease in surgical time is obtained. With the double-barrel technique and subsequent osseointegrated implants, good results are obtained in the reconstruction of dentate patients without maxillary atrophy. We present two new cases of large odontogenic mandibular myxoma. Wide surgical excision by means of hemimandibulectomies and subsequent reconstruction with VFFF were performed.

  7. Odontogenic effects of a fast-setting calcium-silicate cement containing zirconium oxide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-A; Yang, Yeon-Mi; Kwon, Young-Sun; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Yu, Mi-Kyung; Min, Kyung-San

    2015-01-01

    A fast-setting calcium-silicate cement (Endocem) was introduced in the field of dentistry for use in vital pulp therapy. Similar to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), it contains bismuth oxide to provide radiopacity. Recently, another product, EndocemZr, which contains zirconium oxide (ZrO2) as a radiopacifier, was developed by the same company. In this study, the biological/odontogenic effects of EndocemZr were investigated in human primary dental pulp cells (hpDPCs) in vitro and on capped rat teeth in vivo. The biocompatibility of EndocemZr was similar to that of ProRoot and Endocem on the basis of cell viability tests and cell morphological analysis. The mineralization nodule formation, expression of odontogenic-related markers, and reparative dentin formation of EndocemZr group was similar to those of other material groups. Our results suggest that EndocemZr has the potential to be used as an effective material for vital pulp therapy, similar to ProRoot and Endocem.

  8. Ventral rhinotomy in a pet rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) with an odontogenic abscess and sub-obstructive rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tamara; Beaufrère, Hugues; Brisson, Brigitte; Laniesse, Delphine; Zur Linden, Alex

    2016-08-01

    A rabbit was presented for severe dyspnea and was diagnosed with an odontogenic abscess obstructing the rostral nasopharynx using CT scan and oral endoscopy. The offending tooth was extracted intraorally, but due to persistent dyspnea, an endoscopic-guided ventral rhinotomy was performed. The dyspnea subsequently resolved, but the rabbit died 5 weeks later from a seemingly unrelated cause.

  9. Moxifloxacin versus Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone in the management of odontogenic maxillofacial infectious processes: A preliminary, intrahospital, controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Arámbula, Hansel; Hidalgo-Hurtado, Antonio; Rodríguez-Flores, Rosaura; González-Amaro, Ana-María; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the days of hospitalization length between patients treated with Moxifloxacin with that of patients treated with a Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone combination and additionally, to isolate and identify the oral pathogens involved in orofacial odontogenic infections. Material and Methods A pilot-controlled-clinical-trial was carried out on hospitalized patients with cervicofacial odontogenic abscesses or cellulitis, who were randomly asigned to two study groups: 1) patients who received Moxifloxacin, and 2) patients receiving Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone combination. Infiltrate samples were collected through transdermic or transmucosal punction and later cultured on a media specific for aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Mean hospitalization duration in days until hospital discharge and susceptibility assessment in rates were established. Results Mean hospitalization time in days of patients treated with Moxifloxacin was 7.0 ± 1.6 days, while in the Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone group, this was 8.4 ± 1.8 days, although significant difference could not be demonstrated (p=0.074). A total of 43 strains were isolated, all of these Gram-positive. These strains appeared to be highly sensitive to Moxifloxacin (97.5%) and Ceftriaxone (92.5%). Conclusions Moxifloxacin and Ceftriaxone appear to be potential convenient and rational alternatives to traditional antibiotics, for treating severe odontogenic infections, in conjunction with surgical extraoral incision, debridement, and drainage. Key words:Orofacial odontogenic infections, antimicrobial susceptibility, antimicrobial resistance. PMID:26644841

  10. Changes in admission rates for spreading odontogenic infection resulting from changes in government policy about the dental schedule and remunerations.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Richard; Bhandari, Rishi; Bridle, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The government changed the system of payment to general dental practitioners on 1 April 2005 from a fee/item to a banding system. The figures collected have shown that there has been a 62% increase in the number of patients who require admission for surgical treatment of spreading odontogenic infections compared with the 3-year period before this date.

  11. Ventral rhinotomy in a pet rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) with an odontogenic abscess and sub-obstructive rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tamara; Beaufrère, Hugues; Brisson, Brigitte; Laniesse, Delphine; zur Linden, Alex

    2016-01-01

    A rabbit was presented for severe dyspnea and was diagnosed with an odontogenic abscess obstructing the rostral nasopharynx using CT scan and oral endoscopy. The offending tooth was extracted intraorally, but due to persistent dyspnea, an endoscopic-guided ventral rhinotomy was performed. The dyspnea subsequently resolved, but the rabbit died 5 weeks later from a seemingly unrelated cause. PMID:27493289

  12. Growth factor-enriched autologous plasma improves wound healing after surgical debridement in odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis of the neck is a fulminant infection of odontogenic origin that quickly spreads along the fascial planes and results in necrosis of the affected tissues. It is usually polymicrobial, occurs frequently in immunocompromised patients, and has a high mortality rate. Case presentation A 69-year old Mexican male had a pain in the maxillar right-canine region and a swelling of the submental and submandibular regions. Our examination revealed local pain, tachycardia, hyperthermia (39°C), and the swelling of bilateral submental and submandibular regions, which also were erythematous, hyperthermic, crepitant, and with a positive Godet sign. Mobility and third-degree caries were seen in the right mandibular canine. Bacteriological cultures isolated streptococcus pyogenes and staphylococcus aureus. The histopathological diagnosis was odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis of the submental and submandibular regions. The initial treatment was surgical debridement and the administration of antibiotics. After cultures were negative, the surgical wound was treated with a growth factor-enriched autologous plasma eight times every third day until complete healing occurred. Conclusions The treatment with a growth factor-enriched autologous plasma caused a rapid healing of an extensive surgical wound in a patient with odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis. The benefits were rapid tissue regeneration, an aesthetic and a functional scar, and the avoidance of further surgery and possible complications. PMID:21396085

  13. Clinical appearance of orofacial infections of odontogenic origin in relation to microbiological findings.

    PubMed Central

    Heimdahl, A; von Konow, L; Satoh, T; Nord, C E

    1985-01-01

    Fifty-eight patients with acute orofacial infections of odontogenic origin were classified into two groups with respect to the severity of infection. A total of 174 anaerobic and 22 aerobic bacterial strains were isolated. Anaerobic gram-negative rods were isolated more frequently from the patients with severe infections than from the patients with infections judged as mild (P less than 0.05). The occurrence of Fusobacterium nucleatum especially appeared to be associated with the severity of the infections (P less than 0.05). Penicillin resistance among the anaerobes was rarely found, while resistance to erythromycin was a common finding. All aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were susceptible to clindamycin, and all obligate anaerobic bacteria were susceptible to nitroimidazoles. PMID:4031041

  14. A brain abscess of probable odontogenic origin in a child with cyanotic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Moti; Birenboim, Ravit; Katz-Sagi, Hadas; Perles, Zeev; Averbuch, Diana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present report was to present a rare case of a brain abscess in a child with heterotaxy syndrome, severe cardiac anomalies, and extensive dental caries. The pathogen was Streptococcus intermedius isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid. The source of the pathogen was probably an infection of a primary molar with a dentoalveolar abscess involving the bud of the permanent successor. After a long course of antibiotic regimens followed by a craniotomy with abscess drainage, a shunt, and comprehensive dental treatment, the patient was discharged from the hospital without any neurological sequel. At home, she completed an additional 3 months of oral antibiotics. This is the only known documented case of a toddler with a brain abscess of probable odontogenic origin without previous dental intervention. It emphasizes the importance of collaboration between cardiologists and pediatric dentists, especially in referring children with congenital heart defects for early dental checkups.

  15. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis and acute mediastinitis of odontogenic origin: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Monsalve-Iglesias, Fernando; Cabello-Serrano, Almudena; Valencia-Laseca, Alfredo; Garcia-Medina, Blas

    2017-01-01

    Necrotising fasciitis (NF) is an uncommon infection. Early signs and symptoms include fever, severe pain and swelling, and redness at the wound site. Moreover, fulminant evolution and high mortality rate are typical of this pathology. In the present report we describes three cases of cervical necrotizing fasciitis complicated by acute mediastinitis. All patients were apparently immunocompetent adults. The main aim of the present report is to show the serious consequences that a dental infection might trigger. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in these cases. The constant interaction between different medical specialties is essential for ensuring a proper management of each case. Key words:Cervical necrotizing fasciitis, acute mediastinitis, odontogenic origin , multidisciplinary approach. PMID:28149480

  16. Odontogenic myxofibroma of gingiva in a pediatric patient with tuberous sclerosis: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Bhoyar, Nidhi; Gupta, Sunita; Ghosh, Sujoy

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare multisystem genetic disease, with an estimated incidence of 1 in 6000–1 in 10,000. TSC is an autosomal dominant syndrome involving heart, kidneys, lungs, and skin. The classic triad of TSC is seizures, mental retardation, and angiofibromas; this triad occurs in only 29% of patients. The clinical diagnostic guidelines on TSC are prepared based on clinical features, radiographic findings. The most common oral manifestations of TSC are fibroma, gingival hyperplasia, and enamel hypoplasia. Odontogenic myxofibroma represents a rare slow-growing benign neoplasm found rarely in children below 10 years or adults over 50 years of age. The prevalence of myxoma is between 0.04% and 3.7%. Here, we are reporting a rare case of myxofibroma of gingiva in an 8-year-old female TSC patient. PMID:27994429

  17. Calcifying odontogenic cyst with luminal and mural component (Type 1c)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bhushan; Koshy, George; Kapoor, Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) was first described and classified by Gorlin et al. It is defined as a cystic lesion in which the epithelial lining shows a well defined basal layer of columnar cells, an overlying layer that often resemble stellate reticulum and masses of ghost cells that may be in the epithelial cystic lining or in the fibrous capsule. The lesion generally occurs in the region anterior to maxillary and mandibular molars and either intraosseous or extraosseus. This entity might present as a cystic or solid lesion. Praetorius et al. classified COC into 2 main entities namely a cyst (Type 1) and a neoplasm (Type 2). The present case report exhibit a cystic lesion with both luminal and mural component. PMID:27433053

  18. Aerobic microbiology and culture sensitivity of head and neck space infection of odontogenic origin

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amit; Ramola, Vikas; Nautiyal, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Context: Head and neck space infections source, age, gender, tooth involved, fascial spaces involved, microbiological study of aerobic flora, and antibiotic susceptibilities. Aims: The aim of the present study is to identify causative aerobic microorganisms responsible for deep fascial spaces of head and neck infections and evaluate the resistance of antibiotics used in the treatment of such. Settings and Design: Prospective study in 100 patients. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 100 patients who reported in the outpatient department and fulfilled the inclusion criteria to study aerobic microbiology and antibiotic sensitivity in head and neck space infection of odontogenic origin. Pus sample was obtained either by aspiration or by swab stick from the involved spaces, and culture and sensitivity tests were performed. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square test and level of significance. Results: Result showed aerobic Gram-positive isolates were 73% and aerobic Gram-negative isolates were 18%. Nine percent cases showed no growth. Streptococcus viridans was the highest isolate in 47% cases among Gram-positive bacteria, and in Gram-negative, Klebsiella pneumoniae was the highest isolate of total cases 11%. Amoxicillin showed resistance (48.4%) as compared to other antibiotics such as ceftriaxone, carbenicillin, amikacin, and imipenem had significantly higher sensitivity. Conclusions: Amoxicillin with clavulanic acid showed (64.8%) efficacy for all organisms isolated, whereas ceftriaxone showed (82.4%) efficacy and could be used in odontogenic infections for both Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms. Substitution of third generation cephalosporin for amoxicillin in the empirical management of deep fascial space infections can also be used. Carbenicillin, amikacin, and imipenem showed (93.4%) sensitivity against all microorganisms and should be reserved for more severe infection. Newer and broad-spectrum antibiotics are more

  19. Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Odontogenic Cysts: Is There Any Impression on Clinical Outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Sadri, Donia; Farhadi, Sareh; Shahabi, Zahra; Sarshar, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The recent scientific reports have shown that angiogenesis can affect biological behavior of pathologic lesions. Objective: Regarding unique clinical outcome of Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), the present study was aimed to compare angiogenesis in Odontogenic keratocyst and Dentigerous cyst (DC). Method: In this experimental study, tissue sections of 46 samples of OKC and DC were stained through immunohistochemical method using Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) antibody. VEGF expression was evaluated in epithelial cells, fibroblasts and endothelial cells. The average percentage of stained cells in any samples was categorized to 3 groups as follows: SCORE 0: 10% of cells or less are positive. SCORE 1: 10 to 50% of cells are positive. SCORE 2: more than 50% of cells are positive. Mann-U-Whitney, T-test and chi-square was used for statistical analysis. Result: The average of VEGF expression in 24 samples of DC was 20.2% and in 22 samples of OKC was 52.6%, respectively. The average of VEGF expression in these two cysts had statistical significant differences. (PV= 0.045). There was significant statistical differences between two cysts in the terms of VEGF SCORE (PV= 0.000). OKC samples had significantly higher SCORE for the purpose of VEGF incidence than DC. Also, there were no differences between VEGF expression in epithelial cells of two cysts (PV= 0.268) there were significant statistical differences between two cysts in terms of endothelial cell staining. The endothelial cell staining was significantly higher in OKC than DC (PV= 0.037%). Conclusion: Regarding higher expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth factor in OKC than DC, it seems that angiogenesis may have great impression on clinical outcome of OKC. PMID:28217191

  20. Odontogenic stimulation of human dental pulp cells with bioactive nanocomposite fiber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga-Hyun; Park, Yong-Duk; Lee, So-Youn; El-Fiqi, Ahmed; Kim, Jung-Ju; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a composite nanofibrous matrix made of biopolymer blend polycaprolactone-gelatin (BP) and mesoporous bioactive glass nanoparticles (BGNs) on the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). BGN-BP nanomatrices, with BGN content of up to 20 wt%, were produced via electrospinning. The differentiation of the HDPCs was evaluated by using an ALP activity assay, calcified nodule formation, and mRNA expression for markers. Integrin and its underlying signal pathways were assessed via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Although cell growth and attachment on the BGN-BP nanomatrix was similar to that on BP, ALP activity, mineralized nodule formation, and mRNA, expressions involving ALP, osteocalcin, osteopontin, dentin sialophosphoprotein, and dentin matrix protein-1 were greater on BGN-BP. BGN-BP upregulated the key adhesion receptors (integrin components α1, α2, α5, and β1) and activated integrin downstream pathways, such as phosphorylated-focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK), and p-paxillin. In addition, BGN-BP activated BMP receptors, BMP-2 mRNA, and p-Smad 1/5/8, and such activation was blocked by the BMP antagonist, noggin. Furthermore, BGN-BP induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, protein kinase 38, and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinases and activated expression of the transcription factors Runx2 and Osterix in HDPCs. Collectively, the results indicated for the first time that a BGN-BP composite nanomatrix promoted odontogenic differentiation of HDPCs through the integrin, BMP, and mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling pathway. Moreover, the nanomatrix is considered to be promising scaffolds for the culture of HDPCs and dental tissue engineering.

  1. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  2. Jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth: A radiographic diagnostic guide

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    This review article aimed to introduce a category of jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth. General search engines and specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, MedLine Plus, Science Direct, Scopus, and well-recognized textbooks were used to find relevant studies using keywords such as "jaw lesion", "jaw disease", "impacted tooth", and "unerupted tooth". More than 250 articles were found, of which approximately 80 were broadly relevant to the topic. We ultimately included 47 articles that were closely related to the topic of interest. When the relevant data were compiled, the following 10 lesions were identified as having a relationship with impacted tooth: dentigerous cysts, calcifying odontogenic cysts, unicystic (mural) ameloblastomas, ameloblastomas, ameloblastic fibromas, adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, keratocystic odontogenic tumors, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors, ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, and odontomas. When clinicians encounter a lesion associated with an impacted tooth, they should first consider these entities in the differential diagnosis. This will help dental practitioners make more accurate diagnoses and develop better treatment plans based on patients' radiographs. PMID:27672610

  3. Odontogenic Sinusitis Caused by an Inflammation of a Dentigerous Cyst and Subsequent Finding of a Fibrous Dysplasia. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    López-Carriches, Carmen; López-Carriches, Inmaculada; Bryan, Rafael Baca-Perez

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 38-year old male patient with sinusitis caused by an infected follicular cyst due to an ectopic impacted third molar in the right maxillary sinus. A 10-day antibiotherapy regimen was administered; subsequently, the cyst and the third molar were removed achieving complete recovery. Fibrous dysplasia was diagnosed at follow-up examination (occupation of the maxillary sinus by bone tissue was observed in a radiographic examination) and confirmed by biopsy. In cases of odontogenic sinusitis, thorough examination is crucial, as evidenced by the case reported in this study. A Literature review was performed in order to identify the diagnostic methods currently available and the clinical features, complications and treatment for both, odontogenic maxillary sinusitis and fibrous dysplasia. PMID:28077969

  4. In vitro osteogenic and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells seeded on carboxymethyl cellulose-hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Teti, Gabriella; Salvatore, Viviana; Focaroli, Stefano; Durante, Sandra; Mazzotti, Antonio; Dicarlo, Manuela; Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica; Orsini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells from human dental pulp have been considered as an alternative source of adult stem cells in tissue engineering because of their potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages. Recently, polysaccharide based hydrogels have become especially attractive as matrices for the repair and regeneration of a wide variety of tissues and organs. The incorporation of inorganic minerals as hydroxyapatite nanoparticles can modulate the performance of the scaffolds with potential applications in tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to verify the osteogenic and odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) cultured on a carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. Human DPSCs were seeded on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel and on carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogel for 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, and 21 days. Cell viability assay and ultramorphological analysis were carried out to evaluate biocompatibility and cell adhesion. Real Time PCR was carried out to demonstrate the expression of osteogenic and odontogenic markers. Results showed a good adhesion and viability in cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel, while a low adhesion and viability was observed in cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogel. Real Time PCR data demonstrated a temporal up-regulation of osteogenic and odontogenic markers in dental pulp stem cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. In conclusion, our in vitro data confirms the ability of DPSCs to differentiate toward osteogenic and odontogenic lineages in presence of a carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. Taken together, our results provide evidence that DPSCs and carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel could be considered promising candidates for dental pulp complex and periodontal tissue engineering. PMID:26578970

  5. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling plays an essential role in activation of odontogenic mesenchyme during early tooth development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianquan; Lan, Yu; Baek, Jin-A; Gao, Yang; Jiang, Rulang

    2009-10-01

    Classical tissue recombination studies demonstrated that initiation of tooth development depends on activation of odontogenic potential in the mesenchyme by signals from the presumptive dental epithelium. Although several members of the Wnt family of signaling molecules are expressed in the presumptive dental epithelium at the beginning of tooth initiation, whether Wnt signaling is directly involved in the activation of the odontogenic mesenchyme has not been characterized. In this report, we show that tissue-specific inactivation of beta-catenin, a central component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, in the developing tooth mesenchyme caused tooth developmental arrest at the bud stage in mice. We show that mesenchymal beta-catenin function is required for expression of Lef1 and Fgf3 in the developing tooth mesenchyme and for induction of primary enamel knot in the developing tooth epithelium. Expression of Msx1 and Pax9, two essential tooth mesenchyme transcription factors downstream of Bmp and Fgf signaling, respectively, were not altered in the absence of beta-catenin in the tooth mesenchyme. Moreover, we found that constitutive stabilization of beta-catenin in the developing palatal mesenchyme induced aberrant palatal epithelial invaginations that resembled early tooth buds both morphologically and in epithelial molecular marker expression, but without activating expression of Msx1 and Pax9 in the mesenchyme. Together, these results indicate that activation of the mesenchymal odontogenic program during early tooth development requires concerted actions of Bmp, Fgf and Wnt signaling from the presumptive dental epithelium to the mesenchyme.

  6. Osteo-/odontogenic differentiation of BMP2 and VEGF gene-co-transfected human stem cells from apical papilla

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, WEN; ZHANG, XIAOLEI; LING, JUNQI; WEI, XI; JIAN, YUTAO

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP) possess clear osteo-/odontogenic differentiation capabilities, and are regarded as the major cellular source for root dentin development. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) serve pivotal roles in the modulation of tooth development and dentin formation. However, the synergistic effects of BMP2 and VEGF on osteo-/odontogenic differentiation of SCAP remain unclear. The current study aimed to investigate the proliferative and osteo-/odontogenic differentiating capabilities of BMP2 and VEGF gene-co-transfected SCAP (SCAP-BMP2-VEGF) in vitro. The basic characteristics of the isolated SCAP were identified by the induction of multipotent differentiation and by flow cytometry. Lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfection was conducted with SCAP in order to construct blank vector-transfected SCAP (SCAP-green fluorescent protein), BMP2 gene-transfected SCAP (SCAP-BMP2), VEGF gene-transfected SCAP (SCAP-VEGF) and SCAP-BMP2-VEGF. The Cell Counting Kit 8 assay was used to analyze the proliferative capacities of the four groups of cells. The expression of osteo-/odontogenic genes and proteins in the cells were evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The mineralized nodules formed by the four group cells were visualized by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining. Among the four groups of cells, SCAP-VEGF was demonstrated to exhibit increased proliferation, and SCAP-BMP2-VEGF exhibited reduced proliferation during eight days observation. SCAP-BMP2-VEGF exhibited significantly increased expression levels of ALP, osteocalcin, dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein gene 1 and dentin sialoprotein than the other three groups at the majority of the time points. Furthermore, the SCAP-BMP2-VEGF group exhibited a significantly greater number of ALP-positive mineralized nodules than the other groups following 16 days culture in

  7. Osteo-/odontogenic differentiation of BMP2 and VEGF gene-co-transfected human stem cells from apical papilla.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaolei; Ling, Junqi; Wei, Xi; Jian, Yutao

    2016-05-01

    Stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP) possess clear osteo‑/odontogenic differentiation capabilities, and are regarded as the major cellular source for root dentin development. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) serve pivotal roles in the modulation of tooth development and dentin formation. However, the synergistic effects of BMP2 and VEGF on osteo‑/odontogenic differentiation of SCAP remain unclear. The current study aimed to investigate the proliferative and osteo‑/odontogenic differentiating capabilities of BMP2 and VEGF gene-co-transfected SCAP (SCAP-BMP2-VEGF) in vitro. The basic characteristics of the isolated SCAP were identified by the induction of multipotent differentiation and by flow cytometry. Lentiviral vector‑mediated gene transfection was conducted with SCAP in order to construct blank vector‑transfected SCAP (SCAP-green fluorescent protein), BMP2 gene-transfected SCAP (SCAP-BMP2), VEGF gene‑transfected SCAP (SCAP‑VEGF) and SCAP-BMP2-VEGF. The Cell Counting Kit 8 assay was used to analyze the proliferative capacities of the four groups of cells. The expression of osteo-/odontogenic genes and proteins in the cells were evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The mineralized nodules formed by the four group cells were visualized by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining. Among the four groups of cells, SCAP‑VEGF was demonstrated to exhibit increased proliferation, and SCAP‑BMP2‑VEGF exhibited reduced proliferation during eight days observation. SCAP‑BMP2‑VEGF exhibited significantly increased expression levels of ALP, osteocalcin, dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein gene 1 and dentin sialoprotein than the other three groups at the majority of the time points. Furthermore, the SCAP‑BMP2‑VEGF group exhibited a significantly greater number of ALP‑positive mineralized nodules than the other

  8. Multiple tumor types including leiomyoma and Wilms tumor in a patient with Gorlin syndrome due to 9q22.3 microdeletion encompassing the PTCH1 and FANC-C loci.

    PubMed

    Garavelli, Livia; Piemontese, Maria Rosaria; Cavazza, Alberto; Rosato, Simonetta; Wischmeijer, Anita; Gelmini, Chiara; Albertini, Enrico; Albertini, Giuseppe; Forzano, Francesca; Franchi, Fabrizia; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    Gorlin syndrome or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant condition mainly characterized by the development of mandibular keratocysts which often have their onset during the second decade of life and/or multiple basal cell carcinoma (BCC) normally arising during the third decade. Cardiac and ovarian fibromas can be found. Patients with NBCCS develop the childhood brain malignancy medulloblastoma (now often called primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor [PNET]) in 5% of cases. The risk of other malignant neoplasms is not clearly increased, although lymphoma and meningioma can occur in this condition. Wilms tumor has been mentioned in the literature four times. We describe a patient with a 10.9 Mb 9q22.3 deletion spanning 9q22.2 through 9q31.1 that includes the entire codifying sequence of the gene PTCH1, with Wilms tumor, multiple neoplasms (lung, liver, mesenteric, gastric and renal leiomyomas, lung typical carcinoid tumor, adenomatoid tumor of the pleura) and a severe clinical presentation. We propose including leiomyomas among minor criteria of the NBCCS.

  9. Vitamin D Promotes Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells via ERK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Su-Mi; Lim, Hae-Soon; Jeong, Kyung-Yi; Kim, Seon-Mi; Kim, Won-Jae; Jung, Ji-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin D such as 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) is a well-known key regulatory factor in bone metabolism. However, little is known about the potential of vitamin D as an odontogenic inducer in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) in vitro. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of vitamin D3 metabolite, 1α,25(OH)2D3, on odontoblastic differentiation in HDPCs. HDPCs extracted from maxillary supernumerary incisors and third molars were directly cultured with 1α,25(OH)2D3 in the absence of differentiation-inducing factors. Treatment of HDPCs with 1α,25(OH)2D3 at a concentration of 10 nM or 100 nM significantly upregulated the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein1 (DMP1), the odontogenesis-related genes. Also, 1α,25(OH)2D3 enhanced the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization in HDPCs. In addition, 1α,25(OH)2D3 induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), whereas the ERK inhibitor U0126 ameliorated the upregulation of DSPP and DMP1 and reduced the mineralization enhanced by 1α,25(OH)2D3. These results demonstrated that 1α,25(OH)2D3 promoted odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs via modulating ERK activation. PMID:26062551

  10. Odontogenic sinusitis, oro-antral fistula and surgical repair by Bichat's fat pad: Literature review.

    PubMed

    Bravo Cordero, Gustavo; Minzer Ferrer, Simona; Fernández, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic sinusitis accounts for 10-12% of maxillary sinusitis. It occurs due to an interruption of the mucoperiosteum in response to a series of conditions, most frequently the extraction of a superior tooth. Its treatment has two bases: treating the infection and managing the oroantral fistula that perpetuates the infection. Communications smaller than 5mm can resolve spontaneously; bigger ones must be closed by a flap. Bichat's fat pad flap was first used in 1977 to close an oroantral fistula. It is a pedicled flap that has been shown to be successful, with advantages that make it the best option in oroantral fistula treatment. Its location allows easy access, minimum dissection, great versatility, good mobility, good blood supply, low rate of complications, no morbidity in the donor site, low risk of infection, shortened surgical time and fast cover by epithelium, and it leaves no visible scar, amongst other benefits. That is why we encourage the use of this technique and choose it as the best option for management of our patients.

  11. Conservative surgical approach to aggressive benign odontogenic neoplasm: a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive benign odontogenic neoplasms have substantial potential to grow to an enormous size with resulting bone deformities, and they often invade adjacent tissues and spread beyond their normal clinical and radiographic margins; as such, they have a high rate of recurrence. Historically, management (conservative versus aggressive) on the basis of clinical, radiographic and/or histopathologic characteristics has been controversial. However, recent advances in the understanding of the biological features of these lesions may provide greater evidence of the benefits of conservative management. Three patients with different complaints and final histopathologic diagnoses were enrolled in the study. All three cases were treated by a single operator with similar conservative surgical procedures. During follow-up, the patients had uneventful secondary healing and bone regeneration, less packing time than previously reported, no clinical or radiographic evidence of recurrence and no apparent deformity. The aggressive behavior of these lesions requires long clinical and radiographic follow-up. Conservative surgical management may be an option to reduce recurrence and morbidity and increase the probability of uneventful secondary healing and bone regeneration. PMID:25741467

  12. Glandular odontogenic cyst: review of literature and report of a new case with cytokeratin-19 expression.

    PubMed

    Mascitti, Marco; Santarelli, Andrea; Sabatucci, Antonio; Procaccini, Maurizio; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Zizzi, Antonio; Rubini, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    The glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) was a rare jawbone cyst described in 1988 as a distinct entity. This lesion can involve either jaw, and the anterior region of the mandible was the most commonly affected area. Clinical and radiographic findings were not specific, and the diagnosis of GOC can be extremely difficult due to the rarity of this lesion. The cyst presented a wall constituted by fibrous connective tissue and was lined by a non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium of variable thickness. Large areas of the lining epithelium presented cylinder cells, sometimes ciliated. A variable amount of mucina was occasionally noted. Due to the strong similarities, this cyst can be easily misdiag-nosed as a central mucoepidermoid carcinoma (CMEC). Immunohistochemistry may be an aid in diagnosis; in fact has been demonstrated that there were differences in the expression of cytokeratins (CK) in GOC and CMEC. In this study, we reported a new case of GOC in a 38 year female patient. In addition, we carried out a review of 110 previous cases reported in literature.

  13. FGF signaling sustains the odontogenic fate of dental mesenchyme by suppressing β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Gu, Shuping; Sun, Cheng; Ye, Wenduo; Song, Zhongchen; Zhang, Yanding; Chen, YiPing

    2013-11-01

    Odontoblasts and osteoblasts develop from multipotent craniofacial neural crest cells during tooth and jawbone development, but the mechanisms that specify and sustain their respective fates remain largely unknown. In this study we used early mouse molar and incisor tooth germs that possess distinct tooth-forming capability after dissociation and reaggregation in vitro to investigate the mechanism that sustains odontogenic fate of dental mesenchyme during tooth development. We found that after dissociation and reaggregation, incisor, but not molar, mesenchyme exhibits a strong osteogenic potency associated with robustly elevated β-catenin signaling activity in a cell-autonomous manner, leading to failed tooth formation in the reaggregates. Application of FGF3 to incisor reaggregates inhibits β-catenin signaling activity and rescues tooth formation. The lack of FGF retention on the cell surface of incisor mesenchyme appears to account for the differential osteogenic potency between incisor and molar, which can be further attributed to the differential expression of syndecan 1 and NDST genes. We further demonstrate that FGF signaling inhibits intracellular β-catenin signaling by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway to regulate the subcellular localization of active GSK3β in dental mesenchymal cells. Our results reveal a novel function for FGF signaling in ensuring the proper fate of dental mesenchyme by regulating β-catenin signaling activity during tooth development.

  14. Aperture width of the osteomeatal complex as a predictor of successful treatment of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Tomomatsu, N; Uzawa, N; Aragaki, T; Harada, K

    2014-11-01

    Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis (OMS) is an inflammatory disease caused by the spread of dental inflammation into the sinus. The long-term administration of antibiotic medicine and/or treatment of the causative tooth are the usual initial treatments. These initial treatments are not always effective, and the reason is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to identify factors of significance that may contribute to the results of the initial treatment of OMS. Thirty-nine patients were studied, divided into two groups according to the results of initial treatment: effective or non-effective. The effective group comprised 20 patients who were cured by initial treatment. The non-effective group comprised 19 patients who required an additional operation. The duration of symptoms, spread into the other sinuses, aperture width of the osteomeatal complex (OMC) on the side of the maxillary sinus, and anatomical variations in the sinuses were compared between the groups. The only significant difference found was in the aperture width of the OMC, which was significantly narrower in the non-effective group than in the effective group. The aperture width of the OMC may be a significant predictor of the effectiveness of initial treatment of OMS.

  15. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin in a diabetic patient complicated by substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Camino Junior, Rubens; Naclerio-Homem, Maria G; Cabral, Lecy Marcondes; Luz, João Gualberto C

    2014-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) is an uncommon, potentially fatal soft tissue infection with rapid progression characterized by necrosis in the subcutaneous tissue and fascia. A case of CNF of odontogenic origin in a diabetic patient, complicated by alcohol dependence and tobacco abuse, is presented with a literature review. The emergency procedure comprised hydration, colloid administration, glycemic control and broad spectrum antibiotic therapy, followed by aggressive surgical debridement. Necrosis in the platysma muscle was verified by histopathologic analysis. Reconstructive surgery was performed after suppressing the infection, and the wound was closed with an autologous skin graft. The patient had a long hospital stay, in part because the substance abuse led to a difficult recovery. The principles of early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement, broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and intensive supportive care in the treatment of CNF were confirmed in the present case. It was concluded that given the occurrence of CNF in the presence of diabetes mellitus and abuse of substances such as alcohol and tobacco, the health care professional should consider a stronger response to treatment and longer hospitalization.

  16. Tooth replacement and putative odontogenic stem cell niches in pharyngeal dentition of medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Abduweli, Dawud; Baba, Otto; Tabata, Makoto J; Higuchi, Kazunori; Mitani, Hiroshi; Takano, Yoshiro

    2014-04-01

    The small-sized teleost fish medaka, Oryzias latipes, has as many as 1000 pharyngeal teeth undergoing continuous replacement. In this study, we sought to identify the tooth-forming units and determine its replacement cycles, and further localize odontogenic stem cell niches in the pharyngeal dentition of medaka to gain insights into the mechanisms whereby continuous tooth replacement is maintained. Three-dimensional reconstruction of pharyngeal epithelium and sequential fluorochrome labeling of pharyngeal bones and teeth indicated that the individual functional teeth and their successional teeth were organized in families, each comprising up to five generations of teeth and successional tooth germs, and that the replacement cycle of functional teeth was approximately 4 weeks. BrdU label/chase experiments confirmed the existence of clusters of label-retaining epithelial cells at the posterior end of each tooth family where the expression of pluripotency marker Sox2 was confirmed by in situ hybridization. Label-retaining cells were also identified in the mesoderm immediately adjacent to the posterior end of each tooth family. These data suggest the importance of existence of slow-cycling dental epithelial cells and Sox2 expressions at the posterior end of each tooth family to maintain continuous tooth formation and replacement in the pharyngeal dentition of medaka.

  17. Myxofibroma of the maxilla. Reconstruction with iliac crest graft and dental implants after tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Infante-Cossío, Pedro; Martínez-de-Fuentes, Rafael; García-Perla-García, Alberto; Jiménez-Castellanos, Emilio; Gómez-Izquierdo, Lourdes

    2011-07-01

    Odontogenic fibromyxomas are benign odontogenic tumors of mesenchymal origin of rare presentation in the oral cavity, which exhibit locally aggressive behavior and are prone to local recurrence. The controversy has mainly been on therapeutic management with recommendations varying, depending on the clinical cases, from simple curettage of lesion to segmental bone resection. We present a case report describing the reconstruction of an osseous defect in the maxilla and the restoration with dental implants in a 32 year old female patient after radical surgical excision due to an odontogenic fibromyxoma with locally aggressive behavior. The primary reconstruction of maxillary discontinuity defect was carried out by an immediate non-vascularized cortico-cancellous iliac crest graft. Using a computer-guided system for the implant treatment-planning, three dental implants were secondary placed in the bone graft by means of flapless implant surgery. The patient was subsequently restored with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis that has remained in continuous function for a period of three years. The surgical, reconstructive and restorative treatment sequence and techniques are discussed.

  18. Proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of BMP2 gene‑transfected stem cells from human tooth apical papilla: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaolei; Ling, Junqi; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xinchun; Ma, Jinglei; Zheng, Jianmao

    2014-10-01

    Stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAP) have odontogenic potential, which plays a pivotal role in the root dentin development of permanent teeth. Human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) is a well-known gene that participates in regulating the odontogenic differentiation of dental tissue‑derived stem cells. However, little is known regarding the effects of the BMP2 gene on the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of SCAP. This study aimed to evaluate the odontogenic differentiation potential of lentiviral‑mediated BMP2 gene‑transfected human SCAP (SCAP/BMP2) in vitro. SCAP were isolated by enzymatic dissociation of human teeth apical papillae. The multipotential of SCAP was verified by their osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation characteristics. The phenotype of SCAP was evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM). The proliferation status of the blank vector‑transfected SCAP (SCAP/Vector) and SCAP/BMP2 was analyzed by a cell counting kit-8 (CCK‑8). Odontogenic genes, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OCN), dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) of the two groups of cells were evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). ALP staining and alizarin red (AR) staining of the cells was performed on the 16th day after transfection. In vitro results of CCK-8, qPCR, ALP and AR staining demonstrated that: ⅰ) SCAP/BMP2 had a comparable proliferation rate to SCAP/Vector; ⅱ) SCAP/BMP2 presented significantly better potential to differentiate into odontoblasts compared to SCAP/Vector by upregulating ALP, OCN, DSPP and DMP1 genes; ⅲ) more ALP granules and mineralized deposits were formed by SCAP/BMP2 as compared to SCAP/Vector. The results suggested that lentiviral-mediated BMP2 gene transfection enhances the odontogenic differentiation capacity of human SCAP in vitro.

  19. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells on Hydrogel Scaffolds Derived from Decellularized Bone Extracellular Matrix and Collagen Type I

    PubMed Central

    White, Lisa J.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on hydrogel scaffolds derived from bone extracellular matrix (bECM) in comparison to those seeded on collagen I (Col-I), one of the main components of dental pulp ECM. Methods DPSCs isolated from human third molars were characterized for surface marker expression and odontogenic potential prior to seeding into bECM or Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. The cells were then seeded onto bECM and Col-I hydrogel scaffolds and cultured under basal conditions or with odontogenic and growth factor (GF) supplements. DPSCs cultivated on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) with and without supplements were used as controls. Gene expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1) and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and mineral deposition was observed by Von Kossa staining. Results When DPSCs were cultured on bECM hydrogels, the mRNA expression levels of DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE genes were significantly upregulated with respect to those cultured on Col-I scaffolds or TCPS in the absence of extra odontogenic inducers. In addition, more mineral deposition was observed on bECM hydrogel scaffolds as demonstrated by Von Kossa staining. Moreover, DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE mRNA expressions of DPSCs cultured on bECM hydrogels were further upregulated by the addition of GFs or osteo/odontogenic medium compared to Col-I treated cells in the same culture conditions. Significance These results demonstrate the potential of the bECM hydrogel scaffolds to stimulate odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs. PMID:26882351

  20. Microbiological Analysis of a Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Trial Comparing Moxifloxacin and Clindamycin in the Treatment of Odontogenic Infiltrates and Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Sobottka, Ingo; Wegscheider, Karl; Balzer, Ludwig; Böger, Rainer H.; Hallier, Olaf; Giersdorf, Ina; Streichert, Thomas; Haddad, Munif; Platzer, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the oral pathogens found in odontogenic infections, to determine their susceptibilities to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMC), clindamycin (CLI), doxycycline (DOX), levofloxacin (LVX), moxifloxacin (MXF), and penicillin (PEN), and to search for associations between specific pathogens and types of infection. Swabs from patients enrolled in a randomized, double-blind phase II trial comparing MXF with CLI for the treatment of odontogenic abscesses or inflammatory infiltrates were cultured on media for aerobes and anaerobes. All bacterial isolates were identified at the species level. Overall, 205 isolates were cultured from 71 patients: 77 viridans group streptococci, 56 Prevotella spp., 19 Neisseria spp., 17 Streptococcus anginosus group isolates and hemolytic streptococci, 15 other anaerobes, and 21 other bacteria. Ninety-eight percent of pathogens were susceptible to MXF, 96% to AMC, 85% to LVX, 67% to PEN, 60% to CLI, and 50% to DOX. S. anginosus group and hemolytic streptococci were found significantly more frequently (P = 0.04) in patients with abscesses (12/95) than in patients with infiltrates (5/110). In four patients with infiltrates who failed to respond to CLI therapy, three isolates of the Streptococcus mitis group and four Neisseria spp. resistant to CLI were found. In this study, S. anginosus group and hemolytic streptococci were clearly associated with odontogenic abscesses. Our analysis suggests that viridans group streptococci and Neisseria spp. play a decisive role in the etiology of odontogenic infiltrates. The high in vitro activity of MXF against odontogenic bacteria corresponds well to its clinical results in the treatment of odontogenic abscesses and infiltrates. PMID:22354306

  1. Importance of cone beam computed tomography for diagnosis of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour associated to odontoma. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Marques, Yonara-Maria-Freire-Soares; Botelho, Tessa-de Lucena; Xavier, Flávia-Caló-de Aquino; Rangel, Andrea-Leão; Rege, Inara-Carneiro-Costa; Mantesso, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a rare benign cystic neoplasm not infrequently associated with odontoma. This report documents a case of CCOT associated with compound odontoma arising in the anterior maxilla in a 25-year-old woman. Conventional radiographs showed a large calcified mass with poorly visualized radiolucent margins. The extent and condition of the internal structure of the CCOT associated with odontoma was able to be determined based on radiographic findings from cone beam computed tomography. This advanced image technique proved to be extremely useful in the radiographic assessment of this particular neoplasm of the jawbones.

  2. Bilateral septic cavernous sinus thrombosis following the masticator and parapharyngeal space infection from the odontogenic origin: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kiddee, Weerawat; Preechawai, Passorn; Hirunpat, Siriporn

    2010-09-01

    Neglect of odontogenic infections can have serious consequences. If they spread through fascial planes and intracranially they can cause an abscess, orbital cellulitis, and eventually cavernous sinus thrombosis. The authors report a case of rapid progressive bilateral orbital cellulitis and cavernous sinus thrombosis that originated from dental caries. Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is a medical emergency. Early recognition and prompt treatments direct to the underlying sources of infection are crucial. Broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment to reduce morbidity and mortality from this lethal condition. Management should be based on early diagnosis and prompt management with intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics and surgical intervention.

  3. Digital panoramic radiography versus cone beam computed tomography in the delineation of maxillomandibular tumors.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Barros, Renata Quirino de; Abilio, Vanessa Maria Freire; Yamamoto, Angela Toshie Araki; Melo, Daniela Pita de; Godoy, Gustavo Pina; Bento, Patricia Meira

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to compare the efficacy of digital panoramic radiography (DPR) with that of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for delineation of odontogenic and nonodontogenic tumors. From November 2009 through March 2011, 23 tumors in the maxillomandibular complex were diagnosed by histopathological examination. All DPRs and CBCTs were obtained and analyzed by a single previously calibrated radiologist, who considered the following radiographic aspects: clarity of the lesion edges, relation with dental elements, involvement of adjacent anatomical structures, cortical bone expansion and disruption, and, if present, type of involved anatomical structures and site of bone expansion and disruption. Of 23 patients, 15 (65.2%) were male and 8 (34.8%) were female. The tumor was classified as odontogenic in 73.9% of patients and nonodontogenic in 26.1% of patients. Analysis revealed that 56.5% of the tumors were located in the mandible, 34.8% in the maxilla, and 8.7% in both arches. For all analyzed variables, CBCTs offered more accurate details than did DPRs. Panoramic radiography should not be the examination of choice to visualize lesions in the maxillomandibular complex.

  4. A comparative examination of odontogenic gene expression in both toothed and toothless amniotes

    PubMed Central

    Lainoff, Alexis J.; Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline E.; Hu, Diane; Kallonen, Aki; Marcucio, Ralph S.; Hlusko, Leslea J.

    2015-01-01

    A well-known tenet of murine tooth development is that BMP4 and FGF8 antagonistically initiate odontogenesis, but whether this tenet is conserved across amniotes is largely unexplored. Moreover, changes in BMP4-signaling have previously been implicated in evolutionary tooth loss in Aves. Here we demonstrate that Bmp4, Msx1, and Msx2 expression is limited proximally in the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta) mandible at stages equivalent to those at which odontogenesis is initiated in mice, a similar finding to previously reported results in chicks. To address whether the limited domains in the turtle and the chicken indicate an evolutionary molecular parallelism, or whether the domains simply constitute an ancestral phenotype, we assessed gene expression in a toothed reptile (the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis) and a toothed non-placental mammal (the gray short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica). We demonstrate that the Bmp4 domain is limited proximally in M. domestica and that the Fgf8 domain is limited distally in A. mississippiensis just preceding odontogenesis. Additionally, we show that Msx1 and Msx2 expression patterns in these species differ from those found in mice. Our data suggest that a limited Bmp4 domain does not necessarily correlate with edentulism, and reveal that the initiation of odontogenesis in non-murine amniotes is more complex than previously imagined. Our data also suggest a partially conserved odontogenic program in T. scripta, as indicated by conserved Pitx2, Pax9, and Barx1 expression patterns and by the presence of a Shh-expressing palatal epithelium, which we hypothesize may represent potential dental rudiments based on the Testudinata fossil record. PMID:25678399

  5. The Role of Thymosin Beta 4 on Odontogenic Differentiation in Human Dental Pulp Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwa-Jeong; Cha, Hee-Jae; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that overexpression of thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) in transgenic mice promotes abnormal hair growth and tooth development, but the role of Tβ4 in dental pulp regeneration was not completely understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Tβ4 on odontoblastic differentiation and the underlying mechanism regulating pulp regeneration in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). Our results demonstrate that mRNA and protein expression of Tβ4 is upregulated during odontogenic differentiation in HDPCs. Transfection with Tβ4 siRNA decreases OM-induced odontoblastic differentiation by decreasing alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mRNA expression of differentiation markers, and calcium nodule formation. In contrast, Tβ4 activation with a Tβ4 peptide promotes these processes by enhancing the phosphorylation of p38, JNK, and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2, BMP4, phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 and Smad2/3, and expression of transcriptional factors such as Runx2 and Osterix, which were blocked by the BMP inhibitor noggin. The expression of integrin receptors α1, α2, α3, and β1 and downstream signaling molecules including phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK), p-paxillin, and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) were increased by Tβ4 peptide in HDPCs. ILK siRNA blocked Tβ4-induced odontoblastic differentiation and activation of the BMP and MAPK transcription factor pathways in HDPCs. In conclusion, this study demonstrates for the first time that Tβ4 plays a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs and activation of Tβ4 could provide a novel mechanism for regenerative endodontics. PMID:23613983

  6. Ear Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Outer Ear Ear Blockages Ear Tumors External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear) Malignant External Otitis Perichondritis Tumors of the ... Outer Ear Ear Blockages Ear Tumors External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear) Malignant External Otitis Perichondritis NOTE: This is ...

  7. Peripheral dentinogenic ghost cell tumor: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Candido, Germano Angarani; Viana, Karolline Alves; Watanabe, Satiro; Vencio, Eneida Franco

    2009-09-01

    Dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT) is a rare neoplasm, representing 1.9% to 2.1% of all odontogenic tumors. Few cases of DGCT have been reported and only 11 show no bone involvement. A rare case of peripheral DGCT is reported, located in the anterior mandible of a 45-year-old man. The patient presented a slow painless growth in the canine region of an edentulous mandible. Radiographically, no bone involvement was registered. The lesion was enucleated and microscopically characterized by islands of epithelial cells showing ameloblastomalike features in fibrous tissue. Dysplasic dentin and ghost cells were frequently observed. Areas showing a connection between tumor cells and the overlying mucosa were also identified. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated positivity for pan-cytokeratin, cytokeratin-14, and 2 neural markers. Denditric cells (Langerhans cells and melanocytes) were identified inside tumoral islands. A rare case of peripheral DGCT is reported, with immunohistochemical analysis and a review of the English literature.

  8. Detection of arenavirus in a peripheral odontogenic fibromyxoma in a red tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor) with inclusion body disease.

    PubMed

    Hellebuyck, Tom; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Saey, Veronique; Martel, An

    2015-03-01

    A captive bred red tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor) was presented with a large intraoral mass originating from the buccal gingiva, attached to the right dentary teeth row. Based on the clinical features and histological examination, the diagnosis of a peripheral odontogenic fibromyxoma was made. Sections of liver biopsies and circulating lymphocytes contained relatively few eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, indistinguishable from those observed in inclusion body disease-affected snakes. Inclusion bodies were not observed in cells comprising the neoplastic mass. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), arenavirus was detected in the neoplastic tissue. Two years after surgical removal of the mass, recurrence of the neoplastic lesion was observed. Numerous large inclusion body disease inclusions were abundantly present in the neoplastic cells of the recurrent fibromyxoma. Sections of liver biopsies and circulating lymphocytes contained relatively few intracytoplasmic inclusions. The RT-PCR revealed the presence of arenavirus in blood, a liver biopsy, and neoplastic tissue. The present case describes the co-occurrence of an arenavirus infection and an odontogenic fibromyxoma in a red tail boa.

  9. Orthodontic treatment of a patient with an impacted maxillary second premolar and odontogenic keratocyst in the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Yuko; Miyawaki, Shouichi; Imai, Mikako; Takeda, Ryoko; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2005-11-01

    An eight-year-, four-month-old girl was brought to the orthodontic clinic of Okayama University Medical and Dental Hospital. The patient had an impacted upper left second premolar because of an odontogenic keratocyst and showed a skeletal Class II jaw base relationship. At the age of six years four months, marsupialization of a cyst was performed at the Okayama University Medical and Dental Hospital because the patient had shown a swelling of the left cheek because of the cyst. The upper left second premolar was located in the roof of the maxillary sinus. The cyst was histopathologically diagnosed as an odontogenic keratocyst. At the age of nine years 10 months and after regaining the space for eruption of the premolar, the impacted premolar erupted without traction. At the age of 12 years five months, edgewise treatment was initiated, which continued for three years. After removing the edgewise appliance, an optimum occlusion was achieved. The occlusion was maintained without recurrence of the keratocyst after a retention period of five years.

  10. Odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells by calcium silicate materials stimulating via FGFR/ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao-Hsin; Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Lin, Chi-Chang; Kao, Chia-Tze; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-10-01

    Bone healing needs a complex interaction of growth factors that establishes an environment for efficient bone formation. We examine how calcium silicate (CS) and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) cements influence the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) through fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and active MAPK pathways, in particular ERK. The hDPCs are cultured with β-TCP and CS, after which the cells' viability and odontogenic differentiation markers are determined by using PrestoBlue® assay and western blot, respectively. The effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection targeting FGFR was also evaluated. The results showed that CS promoted cell proliferation and enhances FGFR expression. It was also found that CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs, and furthermore, raises the expression and secretion of DSP, and DMP-1. Additionally, statistically significant differences (p<0.05) have been found in the calcium deposition in si-FGFR transfection and ERK inhibitor between CS and β-TCP; these variations indicated that ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the silicon-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. The current study shows that CS substrates play a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs through FGFR and modulate ERK/MAPK activation.

  11. Use of metronidazole as part of an empirical antibiotic regimen after incision and drainage of infections of the odontogenic spaces.

    PubMed

    Bali, Rishi; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani

    2015-01-01

    The combination of amoxicillin/clavulanate and metronidazole is a widely-accepted empirical regimen for infections of the odontogenic spaces. Once adequate drainage has been established micro-organisms are less likely to grow and multiply, particularly anaerobes. This may obviate the need for anaerobic coverage after drainage in healthy hosts. We studied 60 patients in this randomised prospective study, the objective of which was to evaluate metronidazole as part of an empirical antibiotic regimen after drainage of infections of the odontogenic spaces. Samples of pus were sent for culture and testing for sensitivity. Amoxicillin/clavulanate and metronidazole were given to all patients. After incision and drainage the patients were randomly allocated to two groups. In the first group both antibiotics were continued, and in the second metronidazole was withdrawn. The groups were compared both clinically and microbiologically. There were no significant differences between the groups in the resolution of infection. Thirteen patients (n=6 in the 2-antimicrobial group, and n=7 in the amoxicillin/clavulanate group) showed no improvement during the 48 h postoperatively. Overall there was need to substitute another antibiotic for amoxicillin/clavulanate in only 6 cases. Six patients in the amoxicillin/clavulanate group required the addition of metronidazole after drainage. We conclude that in healthy subjects metronidazole is not necessary in the period after drainage, but its prescription should be based on assessment of clinical and laboratory markers of infection.

  12. Immunohistochemical Comparison of the Expression of CD34 and CD105 in Odontogenic Keratocyst and Dentigerous Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Shokoofeh; Zargaran, Massoumeh; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah; Hadadi, Fatemeh; Dehghani| Nazhvani, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a developmental odontogenic cyst with specific histopathological features, high recurrence rate, and aggressive clinical behavior. Angiogenesis might be considered as an important factor for the growth, expansion, and distribution of this lesion. Purpose: The aim of the present study was to determine the mean vascular densities (MVD) of OKCs and dentigerous cysts to evaluate their relationship with the biologic behavior of these lesions. Materials and Method: In this cross-sectional analytical study, angiogenesis was assessed in OKC and dentigerous cyst by measuring the MVD. Immunohistochemistry was carried out using CD34 and CD105. The results were analyzed with independent samples t-test. The data were analyzed, setting p value at 0.05. Results: The MVDs with the use of CD34 and CD105 markers were significantly higher in OKC compared to dentigerous cyst (p< 0.05). In addition, MVDs obtained by CD105 in dentigerous cysts and OKC were significantly less than those based on CD34 (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, it can be suggested that angiogenesis might be one of the possible mechanisms involved in higher aggressive biologic behavior and greater recurrence rate of OKC compared to dentigerous cysts. PMID:28280759

  13. Sclerosing odontogenic carcinoma with benign fibro-osseous lesion of the mandible: an extremely rare case report.

    PubMed

    Irié, Tarou; Ogawa, Ikuko; Takata, Takashi; Toyosawa, Satoru; Saito, Noriko; Akiba, Masakazu; Isobe, Tomohide; Hokazono, Chie; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2010-10-01

    A case of sclerosing odontogenic carcinoma (SOC) admixed with a benign fibro-osseous lesion (BFOL) is reported herein. A 67-year-old male had paresthesia in the mental region. Computed tomography detected an intragnathic mass that was focally expansile with disappearance of cortical bone, and contained admixed radiolucency and radio-opacity. Under the pathological diagnosis as benign fibro-osseous lesion, it was surgically removed by curettage. Microscopic analysis showed that a few parts of the resected materials contained dispersed thin cords and small nests of epithelial cells accompanied by fibrous stroma. Cellular atypia and mitotic figures were not evident. The diagnosis of BFOL with hyperplastic and metaplastic odontogenic epithelia was ultimately made. Eight months after the operation, the lesion recurred and segmental mandibulectomy was carried out. Histologically, the lesion was predominantly occupied by the fibro-osseous component with irregular-shaped foci of epithelial component. The epithelial component exhibited mostly thin cord or small nest patterns and showed definite perineural infiltration. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial cells were positive for p63, cytokeratin (CK) 6 and CK19, and focally positive for CK7 but negative for vimentin. MIB-1 positive nuclei were inconspicuous. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first case of SOC with BFOL.

  14. Clinicopathological evaluation of 164 dental follicles and dentigerous cysts with emphasis on the presence of odontogenic epithelium in the connective tissue. The hypothesis of “focal ameloblastoma”

    PubMed Central

    Meleti, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Some ameloblastomas presumably originate from odontogenic epithelium within the connective tissue of dental follicles and dentigerous cysts. Therefore, it would seem reasonable to discuss as whether odontogenic epithelium proliferations, frankly displaying ameloblastomatous features (“focal ameloblastoma”), should be considered as an “early” ameloblastoma. Study Design: Histopathological reports from 164 dental follicles and dentigerous cysts from the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Oral Pathology of the VU Free University medical center in Amsterdam, The Ne-therlands, were reviewed. Histopathological slides from 39 cases reporting the presence of odontogenic epithelium within the connective tissue were re-evaluated in order to assess the possible presence of focal ameloblastomas. Results: Focal ameloblastomas were detected in one dental follicle and in two dentigerous cysts. During a follow-up period of 6, 8 and 22 years, respectively, no clinical signs of (recurrent) ameloblastoma have occurred in these patients. Conclusions: Focal ameloblastoma possibly represents the early stage of ameloblastoma development. Key words:Ameloblastoma, odontogenic epithelium, dentigerous cyst, dental follicle. PMID:23085710

  15. A Comparative Analysis of Cytokeratin 18 and 19 Expressions in Odontogenic Keratocyst, Dentigerous Cyst and Radicular Cyst with a Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vandana Sandip; Ghanchi, Mohsin Jiva; Gosavi, Sandesh Sachchidanand; Srivastava, Himanshu Mahesh; Pachore, Nivedita Javahir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Odontogenic cysts viz Odontogenic Keratocyst (OKC), Dentigerous Cyst (DC) and Radicular Cyst (RC) occur commonly in the oral and maxillofacial region. Cytokeratin (CK) expression studies have been done to evaluate diagnostic accuracy, role in pathogenesis, elucidate behaviour and role in treatment protocols. However, variations have been reported in the expression of CK patterns in these odontogenic cysts, which could be due to the lack of standardization of laboratory techniques. The present study has tried to shed light on CK 18 and 19 expression in odontogenic cysts and offer the brief review of previous studies on these CK. Aim The aim of the present study was to evaluate the intensity and expression patterns of CK 18 and 19 in OKCs, DCs and RCs. Materials and Methods A total of 60 cases, 20 each of OKC, DC and RC were confirmed histologically and evaluated for immunohistochemical expression pattern and intensity of CK 18 and 19. Results A focal and variable expression of CK 18 was observed in 25% of OKCs, 15% of DCs and 10% of RCs. CK 19 was expressed in 75% of OKCs and 100% in DCs as well as RCs. Conclusion The intensity and expression of Cytokeratin 19 was more in all three cysts compared to Cytokeratin 18. PMID:27630961

  16. Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Tools & Publications Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors World Health Organization (WHO) Updates Official Classification of Tumors ... Central Nervous System On May 9, 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) published an official reclassification of ...

  17. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis and Mandibular Osteomyelitis Arising From an Odontogenic Infection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Gams, Kevin; Freeman, Phillip

    2016-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been infrequently reported in the literature. Some investigators believe that this condition is under-reported because it is underdiagnosed. Misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of this condition can lead to serious morbidity, including fistula formation, intracranial abscess, fibrous or bony ankylosis, temporal bone or condylar osteomyelitis, growth alteration, and several others. This report describes a case of septic TMJ arthritis arising from direct spread of an odontogenic infection with subsequent development of mandibular osteomyelitis. The purpose of this case report is to 1) increase awareness of an underdiagnosed condition, 2) establish the seriousness of this infection, 3) for the first time report on a case of TMJ septic arthritis caused by Bacteroides infection, and 4) provide a review of the relevant literature.

  18. One germline mutation of PTCH gene in a Chinese family with non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lu, Y; Shen, G; Chen, W

    2011-08-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KOCTs) are common benign cystic tumours that arise sporadically or associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). PTCH mutation can be found in sporadically or NBCCS associated KOCTs. Few PTCH mutations in families with non-syndromic KOCTs have been reported. Through PCR and gene sequence analysis, the authors discovered one missense mutation c.3277G>C in exon 19 of PTCH gene in a Chinese family with non-syndromic KOCTs. This mutation causes one highly conserved glycine residue transit to arginine on the 10th transmembrane region of PTCH protein. This work revealed that the missense mutation of PTCH is the causative and dominant gene of KOCTs in this family.

  19. Odontogenic myxoma involving the orbit in a 3-year-old boy: removal, reconstruction and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Teis Schjals; Danielsson, Lina Isabella; Fast, Søren; Thygesen, Torben H

    2016-02-17

    We present a rare case of a 3-year-old boy with an odontogenic myxoma (OM) involving the orbita. Including our case, only nine cases of OM have been reported to involve the eye in children.There is no gold standard for treatment of OM in children with orbital involvement. The recurrence rate of OM in children seems low, which advocates for less invasive surgery. A gentle resection of the OM was carried out. The floor and medial wall of the orbit was reconstructed immediately using a non-resorbable Medpor implant with passive adaptation. Reconstruction with a Medpor implant in children has rarely been reported in the literature. No clinical or radiological recurrence was observed 24 months after surgical removal, and the patient presented with symmetric appearance and normal vision.

  20. Insight from Frogs: Sonic Hedgehog Gene Expression and a Re-evaluation of the Vertebrate Odontogenic Band.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Theresa M; Hlusko, Leslea J

    2016-08-01

    While the identification of conserved processes across multiple taxa leads to an understanding of fundamental developmental mechanisms, the ways in which different animals fail to conform to common developmental processes can elucidate how evolution modifies development to result in the vast array of morphologies seen today-the developmental mechanisms that lead to anatomical variation. Odontogenesis-how teeth are initiated and formed-is well suited to the examination of both developmental conservation and phenotypic diversity. We suggest here that the study of early tooth development, the period of odontogenic band development, reveals departures from conserved mechanisms that question the role of players in the developmental process. In the earliest stages of odontogenesis, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) gene expression is interpreted as critical evidence of tooth initiation prior to any histological indication. However, a detailed examination of studies of tooth development across a wide range of taxa reveals that several vertebrate species fail to conform to the expectations of the Shh Consensus Model, calling for a reconsideration of the assumed causality of epithelial Shh in tooth initiation. We present new Shh gene expression data for an amphibian, the frog Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis. In these animals, craniofacial and odontogenic developmental processes are more disjunct, and thereby provide a natural test of the hypothesis that Shh is immediately required for subsequent tooth development. Our results suggest that Shh expression may actually be related to the formation of the mouth rather than a required precursor to subsequent tooth formation. Anat Rec, 299:1099-1109, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Mammary neoplasia is one of the more common malignancies affecting domestic species. Despite their importance, they are often over- diagnosed, undertreated and subject to several misconceptions propagated by veterinarians and pet owners alike. Mammary neoplasia is the most frequent tumor type encountered in the female accounting for almost half of all malignancies reported. The canine has the highest incidence of mammary tumors of all domestic species. In the dog, about 65 percent of mammary tumors are benign mixed tumors, and 25 percent are carcinomas. The rest are adenomas, myoepitheliomas, and malignant mixed tumors. The age distribution of mammary tumors closely follows the age distribution of most tumors in the dog. Mammary tumors are rare in dogs 2 years old, but incidence begins to increase sharply at approximately 6 years of age. Median age at diagnosis is about 10 years. No breed predilection has been consistently reported.

  2. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  3. Urogenital tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Wilms Tumor KidsHealth > For Parents > Wilms Tumor Print A A A What's in this article? ... their child has cancer. Fortunately, most kids with Wilms tumor, a rare kidney cancer, survive and go on ...

  5. Tracheobronchial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Milenkovic, Branislava

    2016-01-01

    Tumors of trachea and bronchi are uncommon and can occur in the form of benign or low- and high-grade malignant tumors. Although tracheobronchial tumors (TBTs) represent only 0.6% of all pulmonary tumors, they are clinically significant. Delays in diagnosis of these tumors commonly occur because the signs and symptoms caused by these tumors are nonspecific and chest radiographs are often considered unremarkable. Therefore, novel radiological techniques and better access to flexible bronchoscopy enable detection of larger number of TBT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of tracheal and bronchial tumors and discuss significant aspects of the different TBT with focus on clinical manifestations and diagnostic procedures. PMID:28066620

  6. A case of central carcinoma of the mandible arising from a recurrent odontogenic keratocyst: delineation of surgical margins and reconstruction with bilateral rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flaps.

    PubMed

    Ota, Y; Karakida, K; Watanabe, D; Miyasaka, M; Tsukinoki, K

    1998-10-01

    A case of central carcinoma of the mandible arising from a recurrent odontogenic keratocyst is reported. A 38-year-old man was admitted to the Tokai University Hospital due to postoperative infection of a recurrent odontogenic keratocyst of the left mandible. He had had a cystectomy for an odontogenic keratocyst 4 years ago. The lesion revealed bony destruction of the mandible with worm-eating shaped margins with extension to the facial skin. A biopsy specimen revealed squamous cell carcinoma. The mandible was resected with facial skin and the sublingual space was dissected to preserve the lingual nerve. The oral and the facial resections were reconstructed with a titanium plate and bilateral rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flaps. The plate was removed due to infection around the margins and readjustment of the flaps was conducted 5 months after the surgery. He has not had a local relapse, metastasis, or incisional hernia for 8 months following surgery. Good occlusion has been attained by the residual mandible, and he is able to eat without any problems.

  7. Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Rare Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Anal Canal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Anal Canal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Appendix Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Cholangiocarcinoma; Chordoma; Colorectal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Dermoid Cyst; Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Esophageal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Esophageal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Fallopian Tube Adenocarcinoma; Fibromyxoid Tumor; Gastric Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Gastric Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Giant Cell Carcinoma; Intestinal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Sarcomatoid Carcinoma; Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Malignant Odontogenic Neoplasm; Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Malignant Testicular Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm of Unknown Primary Origin; Mixed Mesodermal (Mullerian) Tumor; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Nasal Cavity Adenocarcinoma; Nasal Cavity Carcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Oral Cavity Carcinoma; Oropharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Ovarian Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Paraganglioma; Paranasal Sinus Adenocarcinoma; Paranasal Sinus Carcinoma; Parathyroid Gland Carcinoma; Pituitary Gland Carcinoma; Placental Choriocarcinoma; Placental-Site Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Primary Peritoneal High Grade Serous Adenocarcinoma; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Scrotal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Seminal Vesicle Adenocarcinoma; Seminoma; Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Small Intestinal Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestinal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Spindle Cell Neoplasm

  8. Odontogenic Fibromyxoma of the Maxilla: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Eva-Maria; Papaemmanouil, Styliani; Koloutsos, Giorgos; Antoniades, Hlias; Antoniades, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    Fibromyxoma represents a rare benign neoplasm that mostly affects the posterior region of the mandible. Here, we report the case of a 46-year-old male with a swelling of the right maxilla. After proper diagnosis, he was treated with enucleation and curettage of the tumor. The defect was filled with a pedicled buccal fat pad flap. The mesenchymal origin from the dental follicle of the fibromyxoma is the most plausible explanation. Radiological examination with MRI, CT, and conventional radiography contributes to the differential diagnosis from other benign tumors, such as the ameloblastoma. Its management is surgical and comprises enucleation and curettage or en bloc resection. Patients must be monitored for at least two years postoperatively in order to diagnose possible recurrence. According to the literature, the maxilla is a rare location of a fibromyxoma and, to our knowledge, our case is the 30th presented case of a fibromyxoma of the maxilla. PMID:21629853

  9. Hypothalamic tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur at any age. They are often more aggressive in adults than in children. In adults, tumors ... The treatment depends on how aggressive the tumor is, and whether it is a glioma or another type of cancer. Treatment may involve combinations of surgery, radiation , ...

  10. Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing cancers. They usually start in the lining of the digestive tract or in the lungs. They grow ... trouble breathing. Surgery is the main treatment for carcinoid tumors. If they haven't spread to other parts of the body, surgery can cure the cancer.

  11. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... pituitary is the "master control gland" - it makes hormones that affect growth and the functions of other glands in the body. Pituitary tumors are common, but often they don't cause health ... tumor produces hormones and disrupts the balance of hormones in your ...

  12. One Odontogenic Cell-Population Contributes to the Development of the Mouse Incisors and of the Oral Vestibule

    PubMed Central

    Hovorakova, Maria; Lochovska, Katerina; Zahradnicek, Oldrich; Domonkosova Tibenska, Kristina; Dornhoferova, Michaela; Horakova-Smrckova, Lucie; Bodorikova, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The area of the oral vestibule is often a place where pathologies appear (e.g., peripheral odontomas). The origin of these pathologies is not fully understood. In the present study, we traced a cell population expressing Sonic hedgehog (Shh) from the beginning of tooth development using Cre-LoxP system in the lower jaw of wild-type (WT) mice. We focused on Shh expression in the area of the early appearing rudimentary incisor germs located anteriorly to the prospective incisors. The localization of the labelled cells in the incisor germs and also in the inner epithelial layer of the vestibular anlage showed that the first very early developmental events in the lower incisor area are common to the vestibulum oris and the prospective incisor primordia in mice. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of human historical tooth-like structures found in the vestibular area of jaws confirmed their relation to teeth and thus the capability of the vestibular tissue to form teeth. The location of labelled cells descendant of the early appearing Shh expression domain related to the rudimentary incisor anlage not only in the rudimentary and functional incisor germs but also in the externally located anlage of the oral vestibule documented the odontogenic potential of the vestibular epithelium. This potential can be awakened under pathological conditions and become a source of pathologies in the vestibular area. PMID:27611193

  13. The influence of inflammation on the polarization colors of collagen fibers in the wall of odontogenic keratocyst.

    PubMed

    Hirshberg, Abraham; Lib, Meytal; Kozlovsky, Avital; Kaplan, Ilana

    2007-03-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions have been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC). In the present study we investigated the effect of inflammation in the OKC wall on the polarization colors of Picrosirius red-stained collagen fibers. 50 cases of OKC were selected and separated into two groups according to the inflammatory intensity: those with mild-to-moderate inflammation (Group A), and those with intense inflammation (Group B). The polarization colors of the collagen fibers were recorded separately for thick and thin fibers. Polarization colors of the thin fibers were in the green- to yellow spectrum, without significant differences between the groups. However, polarization colors of the thick fibers significantly differ between the groups. In Group B, the frequency of thick fibers with green birefringence decreased significantly, whereas fibers with red polarization colors increased in frequency (4.6% and 44%, respectively) compared with Group A (12.3% and 23.6%, respectively). It can than be concluded that inflammation has an impact on the packing of collagen fibers in the connective tissue wall of OKC as reflected by their birefringence colors under polarized light. In the presence of dense inflammation, the percentage of thick fibers with green birefringence decreases, with an increase in thick fibers with red birefringence which appeared more packed.

  14. Tumor Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... types: Germ cell tumors, lymphoma, leukemia, melanoma, and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To assess stage, ... NSE) Cancer types: Small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To help in ...

  15. Wilms' Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... team and have training in child development, recreation, psychology or social work. If your child must remain ... conditions/wilms-tumor/basics/definition/CON-20043492 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms Any use of ...

  16. Tumor Grade

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... much of the tumor tissue has normal breast (milk) duct structures Nuclear grade : an evaluation of the ...

  17. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 49. Read More Brain tumor - children Hodgkin lymphoma Metastasis Spinal cord trauma Review Date 8/15/2016 Updated by: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review ...

  18. Wilms tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... a type of kidney cancer that occurs in children. Causes WT is the most common form of childhood kidney cancer. The exact cause of this tumor in most children is unknown. A missing iris of the eye ( ...

  19. Pituitary tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough of its hormones. This condition is called hypopituitarism . The causes of pituitary tumors are unknown. Some ... Cyst Endocrine glands Gigantism Growth hormone test Hyperthyroidism Hypopituitarism Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I Prolactin blood test ...

  20. Physical properties and biological/odontogenic effects of an experimentally developed fast-setting α-tricalcium phosphate-based pulp capping material

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, fast-setting α-tricalcium-phosphate (TCP) cement was developed for use in the pulp capping process. The aim of this study was to investigate the physical properties and biological effects of α-TCP cement in comparison with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Methods We measured the setting time, pH values, compressive strength, and solubility of the two materials. We evaluated biocompatibility on the basis of cell morphology and a viability test using human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). Chemical composition of each material was analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic (EDS) analysis. The expression of odontogenic-related genes was evaluated by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. The calcified nodule formation was measured by Alizarin red staining. We performed the pulp capping procedure on rat teeth for histological investigation. The data were analyzed by an independent t-test for physical properties, one-way ANOVA for biological effects, and the Mann-Whitney U test for tertiary dentin formation. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant for all tests. Results The setting time, pH values, and compressive strength of α-TCP was lower than that of MTA (P < 0.05); however, the solubility of α-TCP was higher than that of MTA (P < 0.05). The resultant cell viability observed with the two materials was similar (P > 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that cells attached to both materials were flat and had cytoplasmic extensions. The expression of odontogenic-related markers and mineralized nodule formation were higher in the two experimental groups compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Continuous tertiary dentin was formed underneath the capping materials in all samples of the tested groups. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that the α-TCP exhibited biocompatibility and odontogenicity comparable to MTA, whereas it had a quicker setting time. PMID:25015173

  1. Odontogenic differentiation and biomineralization potential of dental pulp stem cells inside Mg-based bioceramic scaffolds under low-level laser treatment.

    PubMed

    Theocharidou, Anna; Bakopoulou, Athina; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Papachristou, Eleni; Hadjichristou, Christina; Bousnaki, Maria; Theodorou, George; Papadopoulou, Lambrini; Kantiranis, Nikolaos; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos; Koidis, Petros

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) to promote odontogenic differentiation and biomineralization by dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) seeded inside bioceramic scaffolds. Mg-based, Zn-doped bioceramic scaffolds, synthesized by the sol-gel technique, were spotted with DPSCs and exposed to LLLI at 660 nm with maximum output power of 140 mw at fluencies (a) 2 and 4 J/cm(2) to evaluate cell viability/proliferation by the MTT assay and (b) 4 J/cm(2) to evaluate cell differentiation, using real-time PCR (expression of odontogenic markers) and a p-nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP)-based assay for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity measurement. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis were used for structural/chemical characterization of the regenerated tissues. Exposure of the DPSCs/scaffold complexes to the proposed LLLI scheme was associated with statistically significant increase of odontogenesis-related markers (bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2): 22.4-fold, dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP): 28.4-fold, Osterix: 18.5-fold, and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2): 3.4-fold). ALP activity was significantly increased at 3 and 7 days inside the irradiated compared to that in the non-irradiated SC/DPSC complexes, but gradually decreased until 14 days. Newly formed Ca-P tissue was formed on the SC/DPSC complexes after 28 days of culture that attained the characteristics of bioapatite. Overall, LLLI treatment proved to be beneficial for odontogenic differentiation and biomineralization of DPSCs inside the bioceramic scaffolds, making this therapeutic modality promising for targeted dentin engineering.

  2. Spinal Cord Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal cord tumor Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A spinal tumor is a growth that develops within your ... as vertebral tumors. Tumors that begin within the spinal cord itself are called spinal cord tumors. There are ...

  3. What Is Wilms Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor What Is Wilms Tumor? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... live normal, healthy lives with just one kidney. Wilms tumors Wilms tumors are the most common cancers in ...

  4. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors)

    PubMed Central

    Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner’s syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach. PMID:27429965

  5. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... almost always benign (not cancerous), but can cause hormonal imbalances and interfere with the normal function of the pituitary gland. Because the pituitary affects so many functions of the body, ... the tumor mass or hormonal changes (either too much or too little hormone). ...

  6. Laparoscopic Treatment of Sclerosing Stromal Tumor of the Ovary in a Woman With Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Grechi, Gianluca; Clemente, Nicolò; Tozzi, Alessandra; Ciavattini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare hereditary multisystemic disease. Multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, and skeletal abnormalities are the main clinical manifestations of the syndrome, but several organs can be involved. Moreover, this condition is associated with the development of various benign and malignant tumors, even in the genital tract. This report describes a rare association between Gorlin-Goltz syndrome and the sclerosing stromal tumor of the ovary. Because the ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging patterns of this tumor can be similar to those of a malignant neoplasm, prompt surgical intervention and histological confirmation of diagnosis is mandatory; however, this is a benign lesion and thus can be approached with a laparoscopic fertility-sparing surgery. Gynecologists should be aware of this possible association to provide appropriate counseling for these women, and to take a fertility-sparing laparoscopic approach whenever possible.

  7. "Cancer tumor".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronshtehn, V. A.

    The title is a phrase borrowed from a speech by a Leningrad pressman, V. E. Lvov, who called upon those attending a theoretical conference on ideological issues in astronomy held by the Leningrad Branch of the All-Union Astronomic and Geodetic Society (13 - 4 December 1948), "to make a more radical emphasis on the negative role of relativistic cosmology which is a cancer tumor disintegrating the contemporary astronomy theory, and a major ideological enemy of a materialist astronomy".

  8. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  9. Understanding Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  10. Brain tumor - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  11. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  12. Brain Tumor Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ...

  13. Downregulation of adenomatous polyposis coli by microRNA-663 promotes odontogenic differentiation through activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Park, Min-Gyeong; Lee, Seul Ah; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Heung-Joong; Yu, Sun-Kyoung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob; Chun, Hong Sung; Park, Joo-Cheol; Kim, Do Kyung

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • miR-663 is significantly up-regulated during MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell differentiation. • miR-663 accelerates mineralization in MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells without cell proliferation. • miR-663 promotes odontoblastic cell differentiation by targeting APC and activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MDPC-23 cells. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation by inhibiting mRNA translation or by inducing its degradation. However, the role of miRNAs in odontogenic differentiation is largely unknown. In this present study, we observed that the expression of miR-663 increased significantly during differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts. Furthermore, up-regulation of miR-663 expression promoted odontogenic differentiation and accelerated mineralization without proliferation in MDPC-23 cells. In addition, target gene prediction for miR-663 revealed that the mRNA of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, which is associated with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has a miR-663 binding site in its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Furthermore, APC expressional was suppressed significantly by miR-663, and this down-regulation of APC expression triggered activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-663 promotes differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts by targeting APC-mediated activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Therefore, miR-663 can be considered a critical regulator of odontoblast differentiation and can be utilized for developing miRNA-based therapeutic agents.

  14. MEPE-Derived ASARM Peptide Inhibits Odontogenic Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells and Impairs Mineralization in Tooth Models of X-Linked Hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Khaddam, Mayssam; Naji, Jiar; Coyac, Benjamin R.; Baroukh, Brigitte; Letourneur, Franck; Lesieur, Julie; Decup, Franck; Le Denmat, Dominique; Nicoletti, Antonino; Poliard, Anne; Rowe, Peter S.; Huet, Eric; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Linglart, Agnès; McKee, Marc D.; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome) cause X-linked familial hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), a disorder having severe bone and tooth dentin mineralization defects. The absence of functional PHEX leads to abnormal accumulation of ASARM (acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif) peptide − a substrate for PHEX and a strong inhibitor of mineralization − derived from MEPE (matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein) and other matrix proteins. MEPE-derived ASARM peptide accumulates in tooth dentin of XLH patients where it may impair dentinogenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of ASARM peptides in vitro and in vivo on odontoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization. Dental pulp stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) were seeded into a 3D collagen scaffold, and induced towards odontogenic differentiation. Cultures were treated with synthetic ASARM peptides (phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated) derived from the human MEPE sequence. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide inhibited SHED differentiation in vitro, with no mineralized nodule formation, decreased odontoblast marker expression, and upregulated MEPE expression. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide implanted in a rat molar pulp injury model impaired reparative dentin formation and mineralization, with increased MEPE immunohistochemical staining. In conclusion, using complementary models to study tooth dentin defects observed in XLH, we demonstrate that the MEPE-derived ASARM peptide inhibits both odontogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization, while increasing MEPE expression. These results contribute to a partial mechanistic explanation of XLH pathogenesis: direct inhibition of mineralization by ASARM peptide leads to the mineralization defects in XLH teeth. This process appears to be positively reinforced by the increased MEPE expression induced by ASARM. The MEPE-ASARM system can therefore be considered as a potential therapeutic

  15. Chronic odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ugincius, Paulius; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gervickas, Albinas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate average age of the patients in both sexes treated for MS, distribution by sex, amount of dexter and sinister MS with and without the fistulas into the maxillary sinus, with and without the foreign-bodies, length of stay in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine during the period from 1999 till 2004. The retrospective data analysis of the patients' treated from chronic MS was made. 346 patients (213 females and 133 males) were treated for chronic MS. 55 cases of chronic dexter MS with a fistula into maxillary sinus, 98 cases of chronic dexter MS without a fistula, 45 cases of chronic sinister MS with a fistula, 112 cases chronic sinister MS without a fistula, 16 cases of foreign-bodies in dexter maxillary sinus, 20 cases of foreign-bodies in sinister maxillary sinus have been detected. The main age of the female was 46.6+/-15.0, the main age of the men was 42.1+/-14.4. Statictically significant difference in the age difference of the women and the men was found (p=0.0024). It was determined, that females diagnosed and treated with chronic MS were 1.6 times more than males during the period from 1999 till 2004 in Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine. Females treated for chronic MS were 4.5 years older than males.

  16. How Are Wilms Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Are Wilms Tumors Diagnosed? Wilms tumors are usually found when a ... Your Child’s Doctor About Wilms Tumor? More In Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  17. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  18. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation Board Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  19. Childhood Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  20. Tumors and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  1. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on how many people survive this type of ...

  2. Pathology of eyelid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pe’er, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The eyelids are composed of four layers: skin and subcutaneous tissue including its adnexa, striated muscle, tarsus with the meibomian glands, and the palpebral conjunctiva. Benign and malignant tumors can arise from each of the eyelid layers. Most eyelid tumors are of cutaneous origin, mostly epidermal, which can be divided into epithelial and melanocytic tumors. Benign epithelial lesions, cystic lesions, and benign melanocytic lesions are very common. The most common malignant eyelid tumors are basal cell carcinoma in Caucasians and sebaceous gland carcinoma in Asians. Adnexal and stromal tumors are less frequent. The present review describes the more important eyelid tumors according to the following groups: Benign and malignant epithelial tumors, benign and malignant melanocytic tumors, benign and malignant adnexal tumors, stromal eyelid tumors, lymphoproliferative and metastatic tumors, other rare eyelid tumors, and inflammatory and infections lesions that simulate neoplasms. PMID:27146927

  3. Overview of Heart Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. Most heart tumors are metastatic cancer. Did You Know... Noncancerous tumors can be as deadly ... slow the tumor's growth. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Table 2 ...

  4. Hand and Wrist Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guide Journal of Hand Surgery (JHS) Home Anatomy Hand Tumors and Wrist Tumors Email to a friend * ... are seen commonly. CAUSES Common Types of Wrist Hand Tumors Ganglion Cysts (Figure 1): This is the ...

  5. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors A A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  6. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Treating Lung Carcinoid Tumors Surgery to Treat Lung Carcinoid Tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  7. Epidemiology of Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Katharine A

    2016-11-01

    Brain tumors are the commonest solid tumor in children, leading to significant cancer-related mortality. Several hereditary syndromes associated with brain tumors are nonfamilial. Ionizing radiation is a well-recognized risk factor for brain tumors. Several industrial exposures have been evaluated for a causal association with brain tumor formation but the results are inconclusive. A casual association between the common mutagens of tobacco, alcohol, or dietary factors has not yet been established. There is no clear evidence that the incidence of brain tumors has changed over time. This article presents the descriptive epidemiology of the commonest brain tumors of children and adults.

  8. Hypoxia in Microscopic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; O’Donoghue, Joseph A

    2008-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been commonly observed in a broad spectrum of primary solid malignancies. Hypoxia is associated with tumor progression, increased aggressiveness, enhanced metastatic potential and poor prognosis. Hypoxic tumor cells are resistant to radiotherapy and some forms of chemotherapy. Using an animal model, we recently showed that microscopic tumors less than 1 mm diameter were severely hypoxic. In this review, models and techniques for the study of hypoxia in microscopic tumors are discussed. PMID:18384940

  9. Odontogenic ameloblasts-associated protein (ODAM), via phosphorylation by bone morphogenetic protein receptor type IB (BMPR-IB), is implicated in ameloblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Park, Jong-Tae; Cho, Young-Sik; Bae, Hyun-Sook; Cho, Moon-Il; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2012-05-01

    To elucidate the function of the odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) in ameloblasts, we identified more than 74 proteins that interact with ODAM using protoarray. Of the identified proteins, bone morphogenetic protein receptor type-IB (BMPR-IB) was physiologically relevant in differentiating ameloblasts. ODAM and BMPR-IB exhibited similar patterns of expression in vitro, during ameloblast differentiation. ODAM and BMPR-IB interacted through the C-terminus of ODAM, which resulted in increased ODAM phosphorylation in the presence of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). Immunoprecipitation assays using Ser-Xaa-Glu (SXE) mutants of ODAM demonstrated that the phosphorylation of ODAM by BMPR-IB occurs at this motif, and this phosphorylation is required for the activation of MAPKs. ODAM phosphorylation was detected in ameloblasts during ameloblast differentiation and enamel mineralization in vitro and involved in the activation of downstream factors of MAPKs. Therefore, the BMP-2-BMPR-IB-ODAM-MAPK signaling cascade has important roles in ameloblast differentiation and enamel mineralization. Our data suggest that ODAM facilitates the progression of tooth development in cooperation with BMPR-IB through distinct domains of ODAM.

  10. Tumor macroenvironment and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Al-Zoughbi, Wael; Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organs. Amino acids, and distinct lipid and lipoprotein species can be essential for further tumor growth. The role of glucose in tumor metabolism has been studied extensively. Cancer-associated cachexia is the most important tumor-associated systemic syndrome and not only affects the quality of life of patients with various malignancies but is estimated to be the cause of death in 15%-20% of all cancer patients. On the other hand, systemic metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes are known to influence tumor development. Furthermore, the clinical implications of the tumor macroenvironment are explored in the context of the patient's outcome with special consideration for pediatric tumors. Finally, ways to target the tumor macroenvironment that will provide new approaches for therapeutic concepts are described.

  11. Posterior Fossa Tumors.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Lara A; Young Poussaint, Tina

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric brain tumors are the leading cause of death from solid tumors in childhood. The most common posterior fossa tumors in children are medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor, cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymoma, and brainstem glioma. Location, and imaging findings on computed tomography (CT) and conventional MR (cMR) imaging may provide important clues to the most likely diagnosis. Moreover, information obtained from advanced MR imaging techniques increase diagnostic confidence and help distinguish between different histologic tumor types. Here we discuss the most common posterior fossa tumors in children, including typical imaging findings on CT, cMR imaging, and advanced MR imaging studies.

  12. Krukenberg tumor with yolk sac tumor differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zamecnik, Michal; Voltr, Lubomir; Stuk, Jan; Chlumska, Alena

    2008-04-01

    An unusual case of bilateral Krukenberg tumor with foci of yolk sac tumor (YST) differentiation occurring in a 50-year-old patient is reported. The primary tumor was in the gastric antrum, and it showed morphology of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with diffuse and solid growth pattern. A component of typical YST was not found in the gastric primary and lymph node metastases, although some cells in these locations were positive for alpha-fetoprotein. In the ovarian metastases, YST element showed microcystic/reticular and solid patterns, whereas the adenocarcinoma component was of diffuse type with signet ring cells and with some undifferentiated areas. The case represents further example of the somatic cell-derived tumor with focal germ cell-type differentiation and the first report of YST differentiation in Krukenberg tumor.

  13. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... CBTF Justin's Hope Fund Grant Recipients Grants Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

  14. Lacrimal gland tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... B. Lacrimal gland tumors. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology . 16th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott ... JA. Secondary orbital tumors. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology . 16th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott ...

  15. Gastric stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Ovali, Gülgün Yilmaz; Tarhan, Serdar; Serter, Selim; Pabuşçu, Yüksel

    2005-06-01

    Gastric stromal tumors are rare neoplasms of the stomach. In this report we present a gastric stromal tumor with an exophytic growth pattern, and describe magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography findings.

  16. Tumor suppressor ARF

    PubMed Central

    Través, Paqui G.; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    ARF (alternative reading frame) is one of the most important tumor regulator playing critical roles in controlling tumor initiation and progression. Recently, we have demonstrated a novel and unexpected role for ARF as modulator of inflammatory responses. PMID:23162766

  17. Stages of Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  18. American Brain Tumor Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Molecule Read More ABTA News April 6, 2017 Chicago-Based American Brain Tumor Association’s Breakthrough for Brain ... Association 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave. Ste 550 Chicago, IL 60631 © 2014 American Brain Tumor Association Phone: ...

  19. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... functions. These include blood sugar level and the production of stomach acid. Tumors that arise from islet ... try and shrink the tumors. If the abnormal production of hormones is causing symptoms, you may receive ...

  20. Renal primitive neuroectodermal tumors.

    PubMed

    Bartholow, Tanner; Parwani, Anil

    2012-06-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors exist as a part of the Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor family. These tumors most commonly arise in the chest wall and paraspinal regions; cases with a renal origin are rare entities, but have become increasingly reported in recent years. Although such cases occur across a wide age distribution, the average age for a patient with a renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor is the mid- to late 20s, with both males and females susceptible. Histologically, these tumors are characterized by pseudorosettes. Immunohistochemically, CD99 is an important diagnostic marker. Clinically, these are aggressive tumors, with an average 5-year disease-free survival rate of only 45% to 55%. Given that renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor bears many similarities to other renal tumors, it is important to review the histologic features, immunostaining profile, and genetic abnormalities that can be used for its correct diagnosis.

  1. Posterior fossa tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the tumor can easily press on delicate structures if it grows. Depending on the type and size of the tumor, radiation treatment may also be used after surgery. Support Groups You can ease the stress of illness ...

  2. Malignant tumors of childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 34 papers about malignant tumors. some of the titles are: Invasive Cogenital Mesoblastic Nephroma, Leukemia Update, Unusual Perinatal Neoplasms, Lymphoma Update, Gonadal Germ Cell Tumors in Children, Nutritional Status and Cancer of Childhood, and Chemotherapy of Brain tumors in Children.

  3. Tracing the Tumor Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Navin, Nicholas E.; Hicks, James

    2010-01-01

    Defining the pathways through which tumors progress is critical to our understanding and treatment of cancer. We do not routinely sample patients at multiple time points during the progression of their disease, and thus our research is limited to inferring progression a posteriori from the examination of a single tumor sample. Despite this limitation, inferring progression is possible because the tumor genome contains a natural history of the mutations that occur during the formation of the tumor mass. There are two approaches to reconstructing a lineage of progression: (1) inter-tumor comparisons, and (2) intra-tumor comparisons. The inter-tumor approach consists of taking single samples from large collections of tumors and comparing the complexity of the genomes to identify early and late mutations. The intra-tumor approach involves taking multiple samples from individual heterogeneous tumors to compare divergent clones and reconstruct a phylogenetic lineage. Here we discuss how these approaches can be used to interpret the current models for tumor progression. We also compare data from primary and metastatic copy number profiles to shed light on the final steps of breast cancer progression. Finally, we discuss how recent technical advances in single cell genomics will herald a new era in understanding the fundamental basis of tumor heterogeneity and progression. PMID:20537601

  4. Liver Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Liver Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Liver Tumors Print A A A What's in this ... Malignant (Cancerous) Tumors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping The liver is the body's largest solid organ. Lying next ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors / Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the tumor and a special camera that detects radioactivity is used to show where the tumors are ... the tumor and a special camera that detects radioactivity is used to show where the tumors are ...

  6. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Bournazou, Eirini; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Persistent JAK-STAT3 signaling is implicated in many aspects of tumorigenesis. Apart from its tumor-intrinsic effects, STAT3 also exerts tumor-extrinsic effects, supporting tumor survival and metastasis. These involve the regulation of paracrine cytokine signaling, alterations in metastatic sites rendering these permissive for the growth of cancer cells and subversion of host immune responses to create an immunosuppressive environment. Targeting this signaling pathway is considered a novel promising therapeutic approach, especially in the context of tumor immunity. In this article, we will review to what extent JAK-STAT3-targeted therapies affect the tumor microenvironment and whether the observed effects underlie responsiveness to therapy. PMID:24058812

  7. Tumor Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is a dynamic cellular “organ” that controls passage of nutrients into tissues, maintains the flow of blood, and regulates the trafficking of leukocytes. In tumors, factors such as hypoxia and chronic growth factor stimulation result in endothelial dysfunction. For example, tumor blood vessels have irregular diameters; they are fragile, leaky, and blood flow is abnormal. There is now good evidence that these abnormalities in the tumor endothelium contribute to tumor growth and metastasis. Thus, determining the biological basis underlying these abnormalities is critical for understanding the pathophysiology of tumor progression and facilitating the design and delivery of effective antiangiogenic therapies. PMID:22393533

  8. Immunology of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Roth, Patrick; Eisele, Günter; Weller, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Brain tumors of different origin, but notably malignant gliomas, are characterized by their immunosuppressive properties which allow them to escape the host's immune surveillance. The activating immune cell ligands that are expressed by tumor cells, together with potentially immunogenic antigens, are overridden by numerous immune inhibitory signals, with TGF-3 as the master immunosuppressive molecule (Figure 4.1).The ongoing investigation of mechanisms of tumor-derived immunosuppression allows for an increasing understanding of brain tumor immunology. Targeting different mechanisms of tumor-derived immunosuppression, such as inhibition of TGF-[, may represent a promising strategy for future immunotherapeutic approaches.

  9. Imagery of pineal tumors.

    PubMed

    Deiana, G; Mottolese, C; Hermier, M; Louis-Tisserand, G; Berthezene, Y

    2015-01-01

    Pineal tumors are rare and include a large variety of entities. Germ cell tumors are relatively frequent and often secreting lesions. Pineal parenchymal tumors include pineocytomas, pineal parenchymal tumor of intermediate differentiation, pineoblastomas and papillary tumors of the pineal region. Other lesions including astrocytomas and meningiomas as well as congenital malformations i.e. benign cysts, lipomas, epidermoid and dermoid cysts, which can also arise from the pineal region. Imagery is often non-specific but detailed analysis of the images compared with the hormone profile can narrow the spectrum of possible diagnosis.

  10. Ocular surface tumors

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Ihab Saad

    2009-01-01

    Tumors of the conjunctiva and cornea comprise a large and varied spectrum of conditions. These tumors are grouped into two major categories of congenital and acquired lesions. The acquired lesions are further subdivided based on origin of the mass into surface epithelial, mucoepidermoid, melanocytic, vascular, fibrous, neural, histiocytic, myxoid, myogenic, lipomatous, lymphoid, leukemic, metastatic and secondary tumors. Ocular surface tumors include a variety of neoplasms originating from squamous epithelium, melanocytic tumors and lymphocytic resident cells of the conjunctival stroma. In this review, we highlight clinical features of these lesions, important diagnostic and investigative tools and standard care of management. PMID:21234217

  11. Localization and expression pattern of amelotin, odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein and follicular dendritic cell-secreted protein in the junctional epithelium of inflamed gingiva.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yohei; Kobayashi, Ryoki; Matsui, Sari; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Iwai, Yasunobu; Noda, Keisuke; Yamazaki, Mizuho; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Yoshimura, Atsutoshi; Shinomura, Tamayuki; Ganss, Bernhard; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2016-11-02

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the localization of amelotin (AMTN), odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) and follicular dendritic cell-secreted protein (FDC-SP) at the junctional epithelium (JE) in Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans infected mice and inflamed and non-inflamed human gingiva. We performed immunostaining to determine the localization and expression pattern of AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP. AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP in A. actinomycetemcomitans infected mice did not change dramatically compared with non-infected mice. AMTN and FDC-SP expressions were observed stronger in P. gingivalis infected mice at early stage. However, at the following stage, the coronal part of the AMTN expression disappeared from the JE, and FDC-SP expression decreased due to severe inflammation by P. gingivalis. ODAM expressed internal and external basal lamina, and the expression increased not only at early stage but also at the following stage in the inflammatory JE induced by P. gingivalis. In the human gingival tissues, AMTN was detected at the surface of the sulcular epithelium and JE in the non-inflamed and inflamed gingiva, and the localization did not change the process of inflammation. ODAM and FDC-SP were more widely detected at the sulcular epithelium and JE in the non-inflamed gingiva. In the inflamed gingiva, localization of ODAM and FDC-SP was spread into the gingival epithelium, compared to AMTN. These studies demonstrated that the expression pattern of AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP at the JE were changed during inflammation process and these three proteins might play an important role in the resistance to inflammation.

  12. Nano-Structured Gelatin/Bioactive Glass Hybrid Scaffolds for the Enhancement of Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Tiejun; Liu, Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    Tooth decay is one of the most common chronic disorders throughout the world. Regenerating decayed dentin/pulp structure requires the design of novel scaffolding materials that mimic the architecture of natural dental extracellular matrix (ECM) and provide suitable environments for the attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and biomineralization of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). In this work, we developed an approach to prepare three-dimensional (3D) nano-fibrous gelatin/silica bioactive glass (NF-gelatin/SBG) hybrid scaffolds that mimic the nano-structured architecture and chemical composition of natural dental ECM. This approach involved the combination of a thermally induced phase separation, sol-gel, and porogen leaching process, and synthesized hybrid scaffolds possessing natural ECM-like architecture, high porosity, well-defined pore size and interconnectivity, and improved mechanical strength. An in vitro cell culture study showed that human DPSCs had a significantly higher proliferation rate on NF-gelatin/SBG scaffolds compared to NF-gelatin scaffolds under the same conditions. Furthermore, the integration of SBG into the hybrid scaffold significantly promoted the differentiation and biomineralization of the human DPSCs. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and expressions of marker genes for odontogenic differentiation (Col I, ALP, OCN, DSPP and DMP-1) were all significantly higher in the NF-gelatin/SBG than in the NF-gelatin group. Those results were further confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and von Kossa staining, as evidenced by greater ECM secretion and mineral deposition in the hybrid scaffold. In summary, the biomimetic NF-gelatin/SBG hybrid scaffolds provide an excellent environment for the growth and differentiation of human DPSCs and are promising candidates for dentin/pulp tissue regeneration. PMID:24098854

  13. Tumors of the spine

    PubMed Central

    Ciftdemir, Mert; Kaya, Murat; Selcuk, Esref; Yalniz, Erol

    2016-01-01

    Spine tumors comprise a small percentage of reasons for back pain and other symptoms originating in the spine. The majority of the tumors involving the spinal column are metastases of visceral organ cancers which are mostly seen in older patients. Primary musculoskeletal system sarcomas involving the spinal column are rare. Benign tumors and tumor-like lesions of the musculoskeletal system are mostly seen in young patients and often cause instability and canal compromise. Optimal diagnosis and treatment of spine tumors require a multidisciplinary approach and thorough knowledge of both spine surgery and musculoskeletal tumor surgery. Either primary or metastatic tumors involving the spine are demanding problems in terms of diagnosis and treatment. Spinal instability and neurological compromise are the main and critical problems in patients with tumors of the spinal column. In the past, only a few treatment options aiming short-term control were available for treatment of primary and metastatic spine tumors. Spine surgeons adapted their approach for spine tumors according to orthopaedic oncologic principles in the last 20 years. Advances in imaging, surgical techniques and implant technology resulted in better diagnosis and surgical treatment options, especially for primary tumors. Also, modern chemotherapy drugs and regimens with new radiotherapy and radiosurgery options caused moderate to long-term local and systemic control for even primary sarcomas involving the spinal column. PMID:26925382

  14. Nonfunctioning Juxtaglomerular Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Ryoko; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Yanagisawa, Masahiro; Murakami, Takayuki; Makiyama, Kazuhide; Nakaigawa, Noboru; Inayama, Yoshiaki; Ohashi, Kenichi; Nagashima, Yoji; Yao, Masahiro; Kubota, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    The juxtaglomerular cell tumor (JGCT) is a rare renal tumor characterized by excessive renin secretion causing intractable hypertension and hypokalemia. However, asymptomatic nonfunctioning JGCT is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of nonfunctioning JGCT in a 31-year-old woman. The patient presented with a left renal tumor without hypertension or hypokalemia. Under a clinical diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma, radical nephrectomy was performed. The tumor was located in the middle portion adjacent to the renal pelvis, measuring 2 cm in size. Pathologically, the tumor was composed of cuboidal cells forming a solid arrangement, immunohistochemically positive for renin. Based on these findings, the tumor was diagnosed as JGCT. In cases with hyperreninism, preoperative diagnosis of JGCT is straightforward but difficult in nonfunctioning case. Generally, JGCT presents a benign biological behavior. Therefore, we should take nonfunctioning JGCT into the differential diagnoses for renal tumors, especially in younger patients to avoid excessive surgery. PMID:23607027

  15. Galectins in tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Griffioen, Arjan W.

    2014-01-01

    The expansion of solid tumors depends on the continuous ingrowth of new blood vessels out of pre-existing capillaries. Consequently, tumor neovascularization or tumor angiogenesis is considered a hallmark of cancer and an attractive target for cancer therapy. Tumor angiogenesis is mainly carried out by endothelial cells (EC), i.e., the cells lining the luminal vessel wall. These cells have to take on different functional activities in order to successfully make new tumor blood vessels. In the last decade it has become apparent that galectins are important regulators of tumor angiogenesis. In the present review we summarize the current knowledge regarding the role galectins in tumor angiogenesis focussing on the endothelial galectins, i.e., gal-1/-3/-8/-9. PMID:25405165

  16. [Immune system and tumors].

    PubMed

    Terme, Magali; Tanchot, Corinne

    2017-02-01

    Despite having been much debated, it is now well established that the immune system plays an essential role in the fight against cancer. In this article, we will highlight the implication of the immune system in the control of tumor growth and describe the major components of the immune system involved in the antitumoral immune response. The immune system, while exerting pressure on tumor cells, also will play a pro-tumoral role by sculpting the immunogenicity of tumors cells as they develop. Finally, we will illustrate the numerous mechanisms of immune suppression that take place within the tumoral microenvironment which allow tumor cells to escape control from the immune system. The increasingly precise knowledge of the brakes to an effective antitumor immune response allows the development of immunotherapy strategies more and more innovating and promising of hope.

  17. Uterine primitive neuroectodermal tumor.

    PubMed

    Aminimoghaddam, Soheila; Seifirad, Soroush; Abbasi Dezfouli, Golbahar; Abbasi, Neda; Zare Mehrjardi, Ali; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Mahmoudzadeh, Fatemeh

    2015-04-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors are fairly rare in uterus. A case of uterine body primitive neuroectodermal tumor in a 32-year-old Iranian woman is presented. The patient was admitted with abdominal pain and fever and underwent emergency exploratory surgery with total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and pelvic lymph node dissection. Posterior wall of the uterus was necrotic and ruptured and a huge tumor disrupted the uterine body. The tumor was strongly positive for CD99, NSE, and chromogranin; No reaction was seen for CD10, CD45 and myogenin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an uterine body primitive neuroectodermal tumor and the second report of uterine primitive neuroectodermal tumor from Iran.

  18. [Retroperitoneal germ cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Borrell Palanca, A; García Garzón, J; Villamón Fort, R; Domenech Pérez, C; Martínez Lorente, A; Gunthner, S; García Sisamón, F

    1999-03-01

    We report a case of retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor in an 17 years old patient who presented with aedema and pain in left inferior extremity asociated with hemopthysis caused by pulmonar metastasis, who was treated with chemotherapy and resection of residual mass and pulmonary nodes. Dyagnosis was stableshed by fine neadle aspiration biopsy of the wass. We comment on the difficult of stableshing differential dyagnosis between retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor and metastasis of a testicular tumor. Dyagnosis is stableshed by the finding of a histologically malignant germ-cell tumor with normal testis. We considered physical examination and ecographyc exploration enough for a correct dyagnosis.

  19. Canine mammary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Sorenmo, Karin

    2003-05-01

    The National Consensus Group recommends that all women with tumors larger than 1 cm be offered chemotherapy regardless of tumor histology of lymph node status. This recommendation is to ensure that everyone at risk for failing, even though the risk may be low in women with relatively small tumors and favorable histology, has a choice and receives the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. This type of treatment recommendation may also be made in dogs based on recognized, well-accepted prognostic factors such as tumor size, stage, type, and histologic differentiation. Based on the limited clinical information available in veterinary medicine, the drugs that are effective in human breast cancer, such as cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin, may also have a role in the treatment of malignant mammary gland tumors in dogs. Randomized prospective studies are needed, however, to evaluate the efficacy of chemotherapy in dogs with high-risk mammary gland tumors and to determine which drugs and protocols are the most efficacious. Until such studies are performed, the treatment of canine mammary gland tumors will be based on the individual oncologist's understanding of tumor biology, experience, interpretation of the available studies, and a little bit of gut-feeling. Table 2 is a proposal for treatment guidelines for malignant canine mammary gland tumors according to established prognostic factors, results from published veterinary studies, and current recommendations for breast cancer treatment in women.

  20. Radioresistance of Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Kevin; Knisely, Jonathan; Symons, Marc; Ruggieri, Rosamaria

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as part of the standard of care treatment of the majority of brain tumors. The efficacy of RT is limited by radioresistance and by normal tissue radiation tolerance. This is highlighted in pediatric brain tumors where the use of radiation is limited by the excessive toxicity to the developing brain. For these reasons, radiosensitization of tumor cells would be beneficial. In this review, we focus on radioresistance mechanisms intrinsic to tumor cells. We also evaluate existing approaches to induce radiosensitization and explore future avenues of investigation. PMID:27043632

  1. CNS and spinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Andre D; Panigrahy, Ashok; Fitz, Charles R

    2016-01-01

    Primary CNS tumors consist of a diverse group of neoplasms originating from various cell types in the CNS. Brain tumors are the most common solid malignancy in children under the age of 15 years and the second leading cause of cancer death after leukemia. The most common brain neoplasms in children differ consistently from those in older age groups. Pediatric brain tumors demonstrate distinct patterns of occurrence and biologic behavior according to sex, age, and race. This chapter highlights the imaging features of the most common tumors that affect the child's CNS (brain and spinal cord).

  2. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  3. Tumor cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  4. Tumor-Targeted Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    ElBayoumi, Tamer A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of drug delivery systems can be enhanced by making them target-specific via the attachment of various ligands. We attempted to enhance tumor accumulation and therapeutic effect of doxorubicin-loaded long-circulating PEGylated liposomes (Doxil®, ALZA Corp.) by coupling to their surface the anti-cancer monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5) with nuclesome (NS)-restricted activity, that can recognize the surface of various tumor but not normal cells and specifically targets pharmaceutical carriers to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Following earlier in vitro results with various cancer cell lines, the mAb 2C5-liposomes were studied in vivo vs. plain and non-specific IgG-liposomes. Experimental design Antibody coupling to Doxil® was performed via the “post-insertion” technique. Using 111In-labeled liposomes, the tissue biodistribution and pharmacokinetic profile were studied, as well as their accumulation in tumors in mice was followed by the whole-body γ-scintigraphic imaging. Therapeutic efficacy of mAb 2C5-targeted Doxil® vs. non-specific IgG-modified and original Doxil® controls was followed by registering live tumor growth and determining tumor weights upon mice sacrifice. Results mAb2C5 antibody-targeted liposomes demonstrate enhanced accumulation in tumors, and the in vivo therapeutic activity of the mAb 2C5-Doxil® treatment was found to be significantly superior, resulting in final tumor weights of only 25-40% compared to all Doxil® control treatments, when tested against the subcutaneous primary murine tumors of 4T1 and C26 and human PC3 tumor in nude mice. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the remarkable capability of 2C5-targeted Doxil® to specifically deliver its cargo into various tumors significantly increasing the efficacy of therapy. PMID:19276264

  5. Vanishing tumor in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Vimal, M. V.; Budyal, Sweta; Kasliwal, Rajeev; Jagtap, Varsha S.; Lila, Anurag R.; Bandgar, Tushar; Menon, Padmavathy; Shah, Nalini S.

    2012-01-01

    A patient with microprolactinoma, who had two successful pregnancies, is described for management issues. First pregnancy was uneventful. During the second pregnancy, the tumor enlarged to macroprolactinoma with headache and blurring of vision which was managed successfully with bromocriptine. Post delivery, complete disappearance of the tumor was documented. PMID:23226664

  6. Leydig cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cells in the testicles that release the male hormone, testosterone . ... seem to be linked to undescended testes . Leydig cell tumors make up a very small number of all testicular tumors. They are most often found in men between 30 and 60 years of age. This ...

  7. Skull Base Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    In skull base tumors associated with a low radiosensitivity for conventional radiotherapy (RT), irradiation with proton or carbon ion beams facilitates a safe and accurate application of high tumor doses due to the favorable beam localization properties of these particle beams. Cranial nerves, the brain stem and normal brain tissue can at the same time be optimally spared.

  8. Can Wilms Tumor Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wilms Tumor Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Wilms Tumor Be Found Early? Wilms tumors are usually found ... Your Child’s Doctor About Wilms Tumor? More In Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  9. What Happens After Treatment for Wilms Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Wilms Tumor? During and after treatment for Wilms tumors, the ... Wilms Tumor Survivors and Their Families More In Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  10. Merkel cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, M; Watanabe, H; Kobayashi, H; Ohnishi, Y; Shitara, A; Nitto, H

    1987-06-01

    A Merkel cell tumor appeared on the left cheek of an 83-year-old female was reported. The tumor was located mainly in the dermis and infiltrated to the subcutaneous adipose tissue with an involvement of the blood vessels and lymphatics at the periphery. Electron-microscopically, few of the dense-cored granules and the single globular aggregates of intermediate filaments at the nuclear indentations were observed. Electron-microscopic uranaffin reaction proved positive reaction on the dense-cored granules. Half of the cytoplasmic border was smooth, while the rest had short projections. Desmosomes or junctional complexes were not detected among the tumor cells. Immunohistochemically, the cytoplasm of tumor cell showed positive reaction to both neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and keratin. The single globular positive spots of the latter were localized in accordance with the aggregates of intermediate filaments. These findings suggested a neurogenic origin with double differentiation, epithelial and neuroendocrine, of the Merkel cell tumor.

  11. Method of treating tumors

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally J.; Burke, Patricia A.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Goodman, Simon; Matzku, legal representative, Kerstin; Matzku, Siegfried

    2006-04-18

    A method of treating tumors, such as prostate tumors, breast tumors, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and the like, includes the sequential steps of administering to the patient at least one dose of an antiangiogenic cyclo-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-containing pentapeptide (cRGD pentapeptide); administering to the patient an anti-tumor effective amount of a radioimmunotherapeutic agent (RIT); and then administering to the patient at least one additional dose of cRGD pentapeptide. The cRGD pentapeptide is preferably cyclo-(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-[N-Me]-Val), and the RIT is preferably a radionuclide-labeled chelating agent-ligand complex in which chelating agent is chemically bonded to a tumor-targeting molecule, such as a monoclonal antibody.

  12. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Liver Tumors Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a treatment that ... of Liver Tumors? What is Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, sometimes referred to as RFA, ...

  13. Radiology of the spine: Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanmart, L.

    1986-01-01

    This book deals with tumors of the spinal cord and various aspects of primary and secondary osseous tumors of the spine. Included in discussion are tumors, chordoma hemangioma, vascular malformation and the terms angioma and hemangiomas.

  14. Intramural esophageal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Katarzyna; Rębowski, Marek; Kozak, Józef

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intramural esophageal tumors (IET) are located between unchanged mucous membrane and muscularis mucosae. They can be both benign and malignant. Aim To evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties of IET. Material and methods During the years 2010–2015, 11 patients with IET were treated in our clinic. Diagnostics included gastroscopy, computed tomography of the chest, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine needle biopsy, and positron emission tomography (PET) of the esophagus in cases with no histopathological confirmation. Results Based on the conducted analysis we diagnosed 1 case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), 1 case of adenocarcinoma, and 2 cases of esophageal cysts. In another 7 cases radiological images resembled leiomyoma but with no histopathological confirmation. Esophagectomy was performed in 2 cases of malignant tumors and 1 case of a large benign tumor. In other cases surgical enucleation of tumors was performed. Postoperatively we diagnosed 6 cases of leiomyoma, 1 case of schwannoma, 2 esophageal cysts, 1 case of GIST and 1 of esophageal cancer. Conclusions Intramural esophageal tumors is a very diverse group of tumors, both malignant and benign. In every case of IET we should seek histopathological conformation. Treatment of IET depends on localization, size and histopathological type of lesion. PMID:28096828

  15. Benign follicular tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Tellechea, Oscar; Cardoso, José Carlos; Reis, José Pedro; Ramos, Leonor; Gameiro, Ana Rita; Coutinho, Inês; Baptista, António Poiares

    2015-01-01

    Benign follicular tumors comprise a large and heterogeneous group of neoplasms that share a common histogenesis and display morphological features resembling one or several portions of the normal hair follicle, or recapitulate part of its embryological development. Most cases present it as clinically nondescript single lesions and essentially of dermatological relevance. Occasionally, however, these lesions be multiple and represent a cutaneous marker of complex syndromes associated with an increased risk of visceral neoplasms. In this article, the authors present the microscopic structure of the normal hair follicle as a basis to understand the type and level of differentiation of the various follicular tumors. The main clinicopathological features and differential diagnosis of benign follicular tumors are then discussed, including dilated pore of Winer, pilar sheath acanthoma, trichoadenoma, trichilemmoma, infundibuloma, proliferating trichilemmal cyst/tumor, trichoblastoma and its variants, pilomatricoma, trichodiscoma/fibrofolliculoma, neurofollicular hamartoma and trichofolliculoma. In addition, the main syndromes presenting with multiple follicular tumors are also discussed, namely Cowden, Birt-Hogg-Dubé, Rombo and Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndromes, as well as multiple tumors of follicular infundibulum (infundibulomatosis) and multiple trichoepitheliomas. Although the diagnosis of follicular tumors relies on histological examination, we highlight the importance of their knowledge for the clinician, especially when in presence of patients with multiple lesions that may be the cutaneous marker of a cancer-prone syndrome. The dermatologist is therefore in a privileged position to recognize these lesions, which is extremely important to provide further propedeutic, appropriate referral and genetic counseling for these patients. PMID:26734858

  16. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  17. [Ovarian fibrothecal tumor: case report].

    PubMed

    González Gleason, Alejandro; De la Cruz, Sebastián Iris; Torres Salas, María Esther; Guzmán Patraca, Carlos; Chavarría Olarte, María Eugenia; Reyes Fuentes, Alejandro

    2002-05-01

    Tumors with stromal or sex-cords origin are scarce, and comprise only 5% or less of all ovarian tumors. Nevertheless functional tumor types are the most striking ones, only few of them produce hormonal symptoms. Fibrothecal tumors belong to the stromal cells tumor class, with differentiation towards both fibroblastic-type cells of thecal cell. We present a case report of a 68 years old woman with an ovarian tumor sized 14 x 9 x 7 cm. The treatment was the extirpation of the tumor. Microscopic evaluation of the surgical piece reported an ovarian fibrothecal tumor.

  18. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaehong; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors. PMID:26966341

  19. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Progressive Carcinoid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-28

    Atypical Carcinoid Tumor; Foregut Carcinoid Tumor; Hindgut Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Midgut Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1

  20. Intraperitoneal Solitary Fibrous Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Benabdejlil, Youssef; Kouach, Jaouad; Babahabib, Abdellah; Elhassani, Moulay Elmehdi; Rharassi, Issam; Boudhas, Adil; Bakkali, Hicham; Elmarjany, Mohammed; Moussaoui, Driss; Dehayni, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors of the pelvis are rare. We report the case of a 32-years-old patient who presented with abdominopelvic mass. The imaging studies showed a right adnexal mass of more than 10 cm. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a 20 cm mass at the Douglas pouch which was adhered to the posterior wall of the uterus. Complete resection of the mass was performed. Histological analysis showed a spindle cell undifferentiated tumor whose morphological and immunohistochemical profile are consistent with solitary fibrous tumor. It is important to know that although these tumors are rare, their evolution can be pejorative. Therefore, long-term followup should be recommended. PMID:25276449

  1. Metastatic brain tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... them create an advance directive and power of attorney for health care. Support Groups You can ease ... surgery Brain tumor - children Breast cancer Increased intracranial pressure Lung cancer - small cell Melanoma Renal cell carcinoma ...

  2. Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinbo; Hu, Zhijian; Wu, Junwei; Bai, Lishan; Chai, Xinqun

    2011-11-19

    Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor is rare and poses a challenge for diagnosis and management. We presented a case of primary hepatic carcinoid tumor in a 53-year-old female with a complaint of right upper abdominal pain. Computer tomography scans revealed a hypervascular mass in segment 4 of the liver. An ultrasonography-guided biopsy showed a carcinoid tumor. No other lesions were found by the radiological investigations. Surgery resection was performed and histopathological examination revealed a primary hepatic carcinoid tumor. Three years later, recurrence was found and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization was performed. After transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, the patient has been free of symptom and had no radiological disease progression for over 6 months. Surgical resection combination with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization is effective to offer excellent palliation.

  3. Primary renal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, K V; Vanikar, A V; Patel, R D; Suthar, K S; Kute, V B; Modi, P R; Trivedi, H L

    2013-09-01

    Primary renal carcinoid tumor is extremely rare and, therefore, its pathogenesis and prognosis is not well known. We report a primary renal carcinoid in a 26-year-old man treated by radical nephrectomy.

  4. Optic pathway tumors.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M E; Duffner, P K

    1991-05-01

    Overall, the majority of patients with optic pathway tumors will have stable disease regardless if they are radiated or receive chemotherapy. This is a very indolent tumor system and, for the most part, not a threat to life. Because of this, issues regarding appropriate therapeutic approaches have yet to be resolved. Most agree that in patients with progressive visual loss and tumor limited to the orbit, surgery can be associated with a cure. The downside is the loss of vision associated with surgical extirpation. Radiation rather than surgery has been the mainstay of treatment for intracranial tumors of the optic pathway. To eliminate side effects associated with radiotherapy in the young child, chemotherapy may be the more considered choice. However, on escape of control, i.e., conversion of stable disease to progressive disease, radiotherapy should be considered.

  5. Salivary gland tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers Salivary duct stones Salivary gland infections Dehydration Sarcoidosis Sjögren syndrome The most common type of salivary ... Cancer Cirrhosis Salivary duct stones Salivary gland infections Sarcoidosis Tumor Review Date 10/30/2015 Updated by: ...

  6. Skin tumors on squirrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Reilly, J.R.

    1955-01-01

    Skin tumors having the gross appearance of previously reported fibromas are reported on gray squirrels from N. Y., Md., Va., N. C., and W. Va. and from a fox squirrel from W. Va. and a porcupine from Pa.

  7. Brain Tumor Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Press Releases Headlines Newsletter ... About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain Tumor Information ...

  8. Posterior pole tumor update.

    PubMed

    Ou, Judy I; Wheeler, Sharon M; O'Brien, Joan M

    2002-12-01

    This chapter focuses on the diagnosis and management of choroidal melanoma in light of recent findings from the COMS. Retinoblastoma is emphasized to describe recent trends in primary treatment away from EBRT and toward chemoreduction with local therapy. In addition, vascular and glial tumors of the retina and tumors of the retinal pigment epithelium are described because of the association between these lesions and systemic disease. Recent advances in treatment and genetic testing for these diseases are discussed. Finally, ocular metastasis, intraocular lymphoid tumors, and intraocular leukemia are included because of their importance in determining systemic treatment and prognosis. The chapter gives an overview of important posterior pole tumors and highlights recent developments in the management of each intraocular disease process.

  9. [Immunological tumor therapy].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, K; Theobald, M

    2015-08-01

    Tumor cells could fundamentally be recognized and eliminated by the immune system but malignant cells are able to escape the immune surveillance system. The idea of immunotherapy of cancer is to activate, modulate and amplify the host immune response or to genetically equip the immune repertoire of patients with anti-tumor specificities and effectors. In recent years, a variety of promising immunotherapy strategies have been developed, such as bispecific, multispecific and immunoregulatory antibodies, gene-modified T lymphocytes and tumor vaccines. Some drugs have already been approved and others are available for patients in clinical trials. This article presents the current anti-tumor immune strategies and their molecular basis. Even though further research is needed in some areas, such as the establishment of biomarkers for targeted therapy, duration of therapeutic activity and compatibility of combined strategies, cancer immunotherapy is likely to be a key component in oncological treatment concepts in the very near future.

  10. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... be associated with the type, size, and/or location of the tumor, as well as the treatments used to manage it. Surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, and other treatments all have the potential to ... American ...

  11. [Metastatic bronchial carcinoid tumors].

    PubMed

    Bouledrak, K; Walter, T; Souquet, P J; Lombard-Bohas, C

    2016-02-01

    Bronchial carcinoids are uncommon pulmonary neoplasms and represent 1 to 2 % of all lung tumors. In early stage of disease, the mainstay and only curative treatment is surgery. Bronchial carcinoids are generally regarded as low-grade carcinomas and metastatic dissemination is unusual. The management of the metastatic stage is not currently standardized due to a lack of relevant studies. As bronchial carcinoids and in particular their metastatic forms are rare, we apply treatment strategies that have been evaluated in gastrointestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, bronchial carcinoids have their own characteristic. A specific therapeutic feature of these metastatic tumors is that they require a dual approach: both anti-secretory for the carcinoid syndrome, and anti-tumoral.

  12. Antibody tumor penetration

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  13. Tracheal and bronchial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pio, Luca; Brandigi, Elisa; Paraboschi, Irene; Khen-Dunlop, Nazhia; Hervieux, Erik; Muller, Cecile; Mattioli, Girolamo; Sarnacki, Sabine; Torre, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Although primary tracheobronchial tumors are extremely rare in children, recurrent respiratory symptoms resistant to conventional therapy require further investigations to exclude possible malignant obstructive causes. As the matter of fact, early diagnosis may allow minimally invasive surgeries, improving the standard of living and the globally survival rate. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of diagnosis and management of tracheobronchial tumors in the early age, since only few reports are reported in the worldwide literature. PMID:28149577

  14. Familiality in brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Familiality in brain tumors is not definitively substantiated. Methods: We used the Utah Population Data Base (UPDB), a genealogy representing the Utah pioneers and their descendants, record-linked to statewide cancer records, to describe the familial nature of primary brain cancer. We examined the familial clustering of primary brain tumors, including subgroups defined by histologic type and age at diagnosis. The UPDB includes 1,401 primary brain tumor cases defined as astrocytoma or glioblastoma, all with at least three generations of genealogy data. We tested the hypothesis of excess relatedness of brain tumor cases using the Genealogical Index of Familiality method. We estimated relative risks for brain tumors in relatives using rates of brain tumors estimated internally. Results: Significant excess relatedness was observed for astrocytomas and glioblastomas considered as a group (n = 1,401), for astrocytomas considered separately (n = 744), but not for glioblastomas considered separately (n = 658). Significantly increased risks to first- and second-degree relatives for astrocytomas were identified for relatives of astrocytomas considered separately. Significantly increased risks to first-degree relatives, but not second degree, were observed for astrocytoma and glioblastoma cases considered together, and for glioblastoma cases considered separately. Conclusions: This study provides strong evidence for a familial contribution to primary brain cancer risk. There is evidence that this familial aspect includes not only shared environment, but also a heritable component. Extended high-risk brain tumor pedigrees identified in the UPDB may provide the opportunity to identify predisposition genes responsible for familial brain tumors. GLOSSARY GBM = glioblastoma; GIF = Genealogical Index of Familiality; HGG = high-grade gliomas; ICD-O = International Classification of Disease–Oncology; LGG = low-grade gliomas; RR = relative risks; SEER = Surveillance

  15. Endolymphatic sac tumors.

    PubMed

    Wick, Cameron C; Manzoor, Nauman F; Semaan, Maroun T; Megerian, Cliff A

    2015-04-01

    Endolymphatic sac tumors (ELST) are slow-growing, locally aggressive, low-grade malignancies that originate from the epithelium of the endolymphatic duct and sac. ELST often present with sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo, which may mimic Meniere disease. Large tumors may present with additional cranial neuropathies. Management is primarily via microsurgical excision. Radiation therapy has a limited role for residual or unresectable disease. Early detection may enable hearing preservation techniques. ELST have an association with von Hippel-Lindau disease.

  16. Radiology of juxtaglomerular tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnick, N.R.; Hartman, D.S.; Ford, K.K.; Davis, C.J. Jr.; Amis, E.S. Jr.

    1983-05-01

    Nine cases of proven juxtaglomerular tumor of the kidney are reviewed. Each patient presented with hypertension; elevated peripheral renin levels were found in four patients. As in past studies, this tumor occurred more frequently in women (7/9 cases). Although the patients tended to be younger (mean age, 31 years) than those with essential hypertension, all but two patients were more than 20 years of age. In all cases, the tumor was solitary, well-defined, and curable by surgery. The tumor was identified by excretory urography in 5/8 patients who underwent this procedure. A solid renal mass was detected in each of the seven patients examined by ultrasound. Since the tumor tends to be isodense with normal renal parenchyma, it is sometimes not seen on computed tomography without intravenouse contrast material. Arteriography revealed a hypovascular mass in each of the nine patients. The combination of a hypovascular solid renal mass in a patient with elevated renin but no renal artery lesions should suggest the diagnosis of a juxtaglomerular cell tumor.

  17. [Testicular germ cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Dourthe, L M; Ouachet, M; Fizazi, K; Droz, J P

    1998-09-01

    Testicle germ cells tumors are the most common young men neoplasm. The incidence is maximal in Scandinavian countries. Cryptorchidism is a predisposing factor. Diagnosis is clinic, first treatment is radical orchidectomy by inguinal incision, after study of tumor markers. Histology shows seminoma or non seminomatous tumor. Carcinoma in situ is the precursor of invasive germ cell tumors. Germ cell tumors have no p53 mutation, and have isochrome of the short arm of chromosome 12 as a specific marker. With the results of histological, biochemical and radiographic evaluation, patient are classified as follows: good, intermediate and poor risk prognosis. Standard treatment of stage I seminoma is prophylactic irradiation. Stage II with less than 3 cm lymph node too. Other situations need a cisplatin based chemotherapy. In case of metastatic residuals masses more than 3 cm, surgery need to be discussed. Stage I non seminomatous germ cell tumors are treated by retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy, by surveillance or by two cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin, etoposide and bleomycin (BEP). Standard treatment of good prognosis stage II and III is three cycles of BEP, four for poor prognosis. Residual mass need surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary in presence of viable germ cell. Standard treatment for relapses is chemotherapy with cisplatin, ifosfamide and vinblastine with a 30% remission rate. The place of high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation is not yet standardised. New drugs, as paclitaxel, are under studies.

  18. Towards tumor immunodiagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kotoula, Vassiliki

    2016-01-01

    Immunodiagnostic markers applicable on tissue or cytologic material may be prognostic or predictive of response to immunomodulatory drugs and may also be classified according to whether they are cell-specific or tumor-tissue-specific. Cell-specific markers are evaluated under the microscope as (I) morphological, corresponding to the assessment of tumor infiltrating immune cells on routine hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) sections; and (II) immunophenotypic, including the immunohistochemical (IHC) assessment of markers characteristic for tumor infiltrating immune cells. Tumor-tissue-specific markers are assessed in tissue extracts that may be enriched in neoplastic cells but almost inevitably also contain stromal and immune cells infiltrating the tumor. Such markers include (I) immune-response-related gene expression profiles, and (II) tumor genotype characteristics, as recently assessed with large-scale genotyping methods, usually next generation sequencing (NGS) applications. Herein, we discuss the biological nature of immunodiagnostic markers, their potential clinical relevance and the shortcomings that have, as yet, prevented their clinical application. PMID:27563650

  19. Giant Intradiverticular Bladder Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Mohamad Syafeeq Faeez Md; Aziz, Ahmad Fuad Abdul; Ghani, Khairul Asri Mohd; Siang, Christopher Lee Kheng; Yunus, Rosna; Yusof, Mubarak Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Giant intradiverticular bladder tumor with metastasis Symptoms: Hematuria Medication:— Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Urology Objective: Rare disease Background: Intradiverticular bladder tumors are rare. This renders diagnosis of an intradiverticular bladder tumor difficult. Imaging plays a vital role in achieving the diagnosis, and subsequently staging of the disease. Case Report: A 74-year-old male presented to our center with a few months history of constitutional symptoms. Upon further history, he reported hematuria two months prior to presentation, which stopped temporarily, only to recur a few days prior to coming to the hospital. The patient admitted to having lower urinary tract symptoms. However, there was no dysuria, no sandy urine, and no fever. Palpation of his abdomen revealed a vague mass at the suprapubic region, which was non tender. In view of his history and the clinical examination findings, an ultrasound of the abdomen and computed tomography (CT) was arranged. These investigations revealed a giant tumor that seemed to be arising from a bladder diverticulum, with a mass effect and hydronephrosis. He later underwent operative intervention. Conclusions: Intradiverticular bladder tumors may present a challenge to the treating physician in an atypical presentation; thus requiring a high index of suspicion and knowledge of tumor pathophysiology. As illustrated in our case, CT with its wide availability and multiplanar imaging capabilities offers a useful means for diagnosis, disease staging, operative planning, and follow-up. PMID:28246375

  20. [Primary orbital tumors in children].

    PubMed

    Składzień, J; Olszewski, E; Reroń, E; Modrzejewski, M; Tomik, J; Paziewski, E

    1996-01-01

    We present the incidence, diagnosis and clinical picture of the primary orbital tumors in children. They were treated in ENT Clinic CM UJ in Kraków between 1981-1990 years. Discovered was preponderance of primary non malignant tumors. The most frequently encountered tumors were dermatomas, angiomas and among the malignant tumors-rhabdomyosarcoma.

  1. [Enophthalmos in an orbital tumor].

    PubMed

    Szabo, Bianca; Szabo, I; Nicula, Cristina; Popescu, Livia Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Enophtalmus is an unusual sign of the orbital tumors often represented by proptosis. One patient with enophtalmus and intraorbital tumor and aplasy is presented. The treatment of choice of orbital tumor is complete surgical excision and careful follow-up. Considering the more aggressive course followed by recurrent tumor, correct diagnosis and management is essential.

  2. Brain tumors in infants

    PubMed Central

    Ghodsi, Seyyed Mohammad; Habibi, Zohreh; Hanaei, Sara; Moradi, Ehsan; Nejat, Farideh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain tumors in infants have different clinical presentations, anatomical distribution, histopathological diagnosis, and clinical prognosis compared with older children. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was done in patients <12 months old who were operated on for primary brain tumor in Children's Hospital Medical Center since 2008 to 2014. Results: Thirty-one infants, 20 males and 11 females, with the mean age of 7.13 months (0.5–12) were enrolled. There were 16 supratentorial and 15 infratentorial tumors. The presenting symptoms included increased head circumference (16); bulge fontanel (15); vomiting (15); developmental regression (11); sunset eye (7); seizure (4); loss of consciousness (4); irritability (3); nystagmus (2); visual loss (2); hemiparesis (2); torticollis (2); VI palsy (3); VII, IX, X nerve palsy (each 2); and ptosis (1). Gross total and subtotal resection were performed in 19 and 11 cases, respectively. Fourteen patients needed external ventricular drainage in the perioperative period, from whom four infants required a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. One patient underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunting without tumor resection. The most common histological diagnoses were primitive neuroectodermal tumor (7), followed by anaplastic ependymoma (6) and grade II ependymoma. The rate of 30-day mortality was 19.3%. Eighteen patients are now well-controlled with or without adjuvant therapy (overall survival; 58%), from whom 13 cases are tumor free (disease free survival; 41.9%), 3 cases have residual masses with fixed or decreased size (progression-free survival; 9.6%), and 2 cases are still on chemotherapy. Conclusion: Brain tumors in infants should be treated with surgical resection, followed by chemotherapy when necessary. PMID:26962338

  3. Odontogenic myxoma of the maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Kaymakci, Mustafa; Yazici, Selçuk

    2011-01-01

    Myxomas are mostly seen in the 2th and 3rd decades. They rarely occur in childhood and maxillofacial region is rarely involved. The recurrence incidence is high. We report this unusual case occurring in a 9-year-old girl in the maxillofacial region and recurrence four months after initial treatment. PMID:24765377

  4. Necrotising fasciitis of odontogenic origin

    PubMed Central

    Chunduri, Nagendra Srinivas; Madasu, Krishnaveni; Tammannavar, Praveen Shrimant; C, Pushpalatha

    2013-01-01

    Necrotising fasciitis (NF) is a rare infection of the fascial planes, which is less common in head and neck, because of the rarity and higher vascularity in the region. We report a case of necrotising fasciitis in a 43-year-old man, arising from a dental infection treated successfully by early diagnosis, prompt surgical management, antibiotic therapy and adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy. The diagnosis of descending NF must always be considered in a patient who presents with a history of oropharyngeal infection with evidence of neck swelling, chest pain, and dyspnea or respiratory distress. Aggressive surgical debridement of all involved tissue along with intravenous antibiotic therapy should be initiated before aerobic and anaerobic cultures are obtained. HBO may also be of some benefit in the treatment of this potentially fatal infection. PMID:23821623

  5. Pediatric brain tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingying; Margol, Ashley; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric brain tumors as a group, including medulloblastomas, gliomas, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT) are the most common solid tumors in children and the leading cause of death from childhood cancer. Brain tumor-derived cell lines are critical for studying the biology of pediatric brain tumors and can be useful for initial screening of new therapies. Use of appropriate brain tumor cell lines for experiments is important, as results may differ depending on tumor properties, and can thus affect the conclusions and applicability of the model. Despite reports in the literature of over 60 pediatric brain tumor cell lines, the majority of published papers utilize only a small number of these cell lines. Here we list the approximately 60 currently-published pediatric brain tumor cell lines and summarize some of their central features as a resource for scientists seeking pediatric brain tumor cell lines for their research.

  6. Signs and Symptoms of Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Signs and Symptoms of Wilms Tumor Wilms tumors can be hard to find early ... Your Child’s Doctor About Wilms Tumor? More In Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  7. Tumor-associated macrophages: effectors of angiogenesis and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Hughes, Russell; Lewis, Claire E

    2009-08-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a prominent inflammatory cell population in many tumor types residing in both perivascular and avascular, hypoxic regions of these tissues. Analysis of TAMs in human tumor biopsies has shown that they express a variety of tumor-promoting factors and evidence from transgenic murine tumor models has provided unequivocal evidence for the importance of these cells in driving angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, immunosuppression, and metastasis. This review will summarize the mechanisms by which monocytes are recruited into tumors, their myriad, tumor-promoting functions within tumors, and the influence of the tumor microenvironment in driving these activities. We also discuss recent attempts to both target/destroy TAMs and exploit them as delivery vehicles for anti-cancer gene therapy.

  8. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT.

  9. Decay Dynamics of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fractional cell kill is a mathematical expression describing the rate at which a certain population of cells is reduced to a fraction of itself. We investigate the mathematical function that governs the rate at which a solid tumor is lysed by a cell population of cytotoxic lymphocytes. We do it in the context of enzyme kinetics, using geometrical and analytical arguments. We derive the equations governing the decay of a tumor in the limit in which it is plainly surrounded by immune cells. A cellular automaton is used to test such decay, confirming its validity. Finally, we introduce a modification in the fractional cell kill so that the expected dynamics is attained in the mentioned limit. We also discuss the potential of this new function for non-solid and solid tumors which are infiltrated with lymphocytes. PMID:27310010

  10. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Summary Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors including well differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) and neuroendocrine carcinomas (pNECs). The incidence of pNENs has increased over the past few decades. Although, the understanding and interest for this tumor have also increased significantly, the debate about classification and diagnosis continues. Although the primary treatment for pNENs is surgical resection, there is still a lack of effective therapeutic options for patients with advanced unresectable pNENs. Although many therapeutic methods have proven effective, the choice of treatment and specific programs are still unclear. Our article presents an overview of pNENs, with a focus on their diagnostic work-up, clinical presentation and treatment options. PMID:28357177

  11. Devil Facial Tumor Disease.

    PubMed

    Pye, R J; Woods, G M; Kreiss, A

    2016-07-01

    Devil facial tumor disease (DFTD) is an emergent transmissible cancer exclusive to Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) and threatening the species with extinction in the wild. Research on DFTD began 10 years ago, when nothing was known about the tumor and little about the devils. The depth of knowledge gained since then is impressive, with research having addressed significant aspects of the disease and the devils' responses to it. These include the cause and pathogenesis of DFTD, the immune response of the devils and the immune evasion mechanisms of the tumor, the transmission patterns of DFTD, and the impacts of DFTD on the ecosystem. This review aims to collate this information and put it into the context of conservation strategies designed to mitigate the impacts of DFTD on the devil and the Tasmanian ecosystem.

  12. Bilateral Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm, A.W.; Jaffe, N.; Folkman, M.J.; Cassady, J.R.

    1980-02-01

    Twenty children with bilateral Wilms' tumor were presented to the Children's Hospital Medical Center and Children's Cancer Research Foundation, Sidney Farber Cancer Institute, and Joint Center for Radiation Therapy (CHMC-CCRF, SFCI, JCRT) from January 1, 1956 to December 31, 1976. Of these 20, 16 had simultaneous and 4 had metachronous disease on presentation. All patients were treated with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Of the 16 patients with simultaneous disease, 10 (63%) are alive and free of disease 12+ to 175+ months post diagnosis and treatment, with median follow-up of 121 months. There were no long-term survivors in the metachronous group; all were dead of disease within 21 months from initial presentation of original tumor. With these data we relate prognosis to extent of disease and discuss a general approach to the management of bilateral Wilms' tumor.

  13. Papillary glioneuronal tumor--a new tumor entity.

    PubMed

    Broholm, H; Madsen, F F; Wagner, A A; Laursen, H

    2002-01-01

    Glioneuronal neoplasms of the CNS comprises a heterogeneous group of generally low-grade tumors expressing glial and neuronal cells of varying differentiation. Recently, a new variant of the glioneuronal tumors has been identified. We present a case of a glioneuronal tumor located in the left frontal lobe of a 16-year-old boy who developed seizures 6 months after brain concussion. MR scan demonstrated an irregular, but well circumscribed, mixed cystic and solid tumor with contrast enhancement in the solid part. Histology showed a papillary glioneuronal tumor. The tumor is indolent with no sign of recurrence after gross total resection.

  14. Tumor-induced hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Mulani, M.; Somani, K.; Bichu, S.; Billa, V.

    2017-01-01

    Significant hypophosphatemia is commonly due to Vitamin D deficiency. Any sporadic onset of hypophosphatemia in adults warrants workup to identify alternate causes. Hypophosphatemia may also be the only manifestation of an occult malignancy. A high index of clinical suspicion can help diagnose such conditions in early stages. Prompt treatment of the cause can correct this biochemical abnormality. We describe a case report of a woman presenting with severe hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia, leading eventually to the diagnosis of a phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor of the temporo-occipital bone. Surgical resection of tumor led to normalization of the biochemical parameters as well as a complete clinical recovery. PMID:28182049

  15. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchigami, Takao; Kibe, Toshiro; Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio; Nishizawa, Yoshiaki; Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi; Ueda, Masahiro; Nakamura, Norifumi; Kiyono, Tohru; Kishida, Michiko

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • We studied the interaction between tumor cells and fibroblasts in ameloblastoma. • AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted significantly high IL-1α levels. • IL-1α derived from AM-3 cells promoted IL-6 and IL-8 secretion of fibroblasts. • IL-6 and IL-8 activated the cellular motility and proliferation of AM-3 cells. - Abstract: Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave

  16. Hhip regulates tumor-stroma-mediated upregulation of tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vijayendra; Kim, Dong Young; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2017-01-01

    Tumor growth is governed by the coordinated action of various types of cells that are present in the tumor environment. Fibroblasts, which constitute a major fraction of the stroma, participate actively in various signaling events and regulate tumor development and metastasis. The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway plays an important role in promoting tumor malignancy via fibroblasts; however, the role of hedgehog interacting protein (hhip; inhibitor of Hh pathway) in tumor growth is poorly understood. Here we implanted B16F10 tumors in hhip+/− mice to study the tumor growth characteristics and the vascular phenotype. Furthermore, the mechanism involved in the observed phenomena was explored to reveal the role of hhip in tumor growth. The tumors that were implanted in hhip+/− mice exhibited accelerated growth and increased tumor angiogenesis. Although we observed a decrease in hypoxia, blood vessels still had abnormal phenotype. We found that increased Hh signaling in tumor fibroblasts induced a high expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which subsequently resulted in an increased proliferation of endothelial cells. Thus, the heterozygous knockdown of hhip in mice could affect Hh signaling in tumor fibroblasts, which could cause the increased production of the growth factor VEGF. This signaling, via a paracrine effect on endothelial cells, increased tumor vascular density. PMID:28127049

  17. Serodiagnosis for Tumor Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Brian J.; Labo, Nazzarena; Miley, Wendell J.; Whitby, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The known human tumor viruses include the DNA viruses Epstein-Barr virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus, human papillomavirus, and hepatitis B virus. RNA tumor viruses include Human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type-1 and hepatitis C virus. The serological identification of antigens/antibodies in plasma serum is a rapidly progressing field with utility for both scientists and clinicians. Serology is useful for conducting seroepidemiology studies and to inform on the pathogenesis and host immune response to a particular viral agent. Clinically, serology is useful for diagnosing current or past infection and for aiding in clinical management decisions. Serology is useful for screening blood donations for infectious agents and for monitoring the outcome of vaccination against these viruses. Serodiagnosis of human tumor viruses has improved in recent years with increased specificity and sensitivity of the assays, as well as reductions in cost and the ability to assess multiple antibody/antigens in single assays. Serodiagnosis of tumor viruses plays an important role in our understanding of the prevalence and transmission of these viruses and ultimately in the ability to develop treatments/preventions for these globally important diseases. PMID:25843726

  18. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure

  19. Circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Gradilone, Angela; Giannini, Giuseppe; De Falco, Elena; Chimenti, Isotta; Varriale, Elisa; Hauch, Siegfried; Plappert, Linda; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis of the “liquid biopsy” using circulating tumor cells (CTCs) emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to traditional tissue biopsy to determine cancer therapy. Discordance for biomarkers expression between primary tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been widely reported, thus rendering the biological characterization of CTCs an attractive tool for biomarkers assessment and treatment selection. Studies performed in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients using CellSearch, the only FDA-cleared test for CTCs assessment, demonstrated a much lower yield of CTCs in this tumor type compared with breast and prostate cancer, both at baseline and during the course of treatment. Thus, although attractive, the possibility to use CTCs as therapy-related biomarker for colorectal cancer patients is still limited by a number of technical issues mainly due to the low sensitivity of the CellSearch method. In the present study we found a significant discordance between CellSearch and AdnaTest in the detection of CTCs from mCRC patients. We then investigated KRAS pathway activating mutations in CTCs and determined the degree of heterogeneity for KRAS oncogenic mutations between CTCs and tumor tissues. Whether KRAS gene amplification may represent an alternative pathway responsible for KRAS activation was further explored. KRAS gene amplification emerged as a functionally equivalent and mutually exclusive mechanism of KRAS pathway activation in CTCs, possibly related to transcriptional activation. The serial assessment of CTCs may represent an early biomarker of treatment response, able to overcome the intrinsic limit of current molecular biomarkers represented by intratumor heterogeneity. PMID:24521660

  20. Stages of Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  1. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors This page lists cancer drugs approved by ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors Afinitor (Everolimus) Afinitor Disperz (Everolimus) Avastin (Bevacizumab) ...

  2. Juxtaglomerular cell tumor: MR findings.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, R; Jafri, S Z; Gibson, D P; Bis, K G; Ali-Reza

    1995-01-01

    Juxtaglomerular (JG) cell tumor is a rare benign neoplasm of the kidney that typically presents with hypertension, secondary hyperaldosteronism, hypocalcemia, and hyperreninism. We describe a case of JG cell tumor diagnosed with MRI.

  3. General Information about Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Pituitary Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  5. Treatment Options for Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  6. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Sertoli-stromal cell tumor; Arrhenoblastoma; Androblastoma; Ovarian cancer - Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor ... The Sertoli cells are normally located in the male reproductive glands (the testes). They feed sperm cells. The Leydig cells, also ...

  7. Bednar Tumor: An Uncommon Entity.

    PubMed

    Amonkar, Gayathri P; Rupani, Asha; Shah, Ajay; Deshpande, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Bednar tumor is an uncommon variant of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Also known as pigmented dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, this tumor is of intermediate grade. It is seen in adults and has a predisposition to affect the shoulder region. We report a rare case of Bednar tumor in a 40-year-old female patient. The diagnosis of Bednar tumor must be considered while reporting pigmented subcutaneous spindle cell lesions.

  8. Abdominal tumors in children

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chaeyoun; Youn, Joong Kee; Han, Ji-Won; Kim, Hyun-Young; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in pediatric patients has been steadily increasing in recent years. However, its use for diagnosing and treating abdominal tumors in children is still limited compared with adults, especially when malignancy is a matter of debate. Here, we describe the experience at our center with pediatric abdominal tumors to show the safety and feasibility of MIS. Based on a retrospective review of patient records, we selected for study those pediatric patients who had undergone diagnostic exploration or curative resection for abdominal tumors at a single center from January 2010 through August 2015. Diagnostic exploration for abdominal tumors was performed in 32 cases and curative resection in 173 cases (205 operations). MIS was performed in 11 cases of diagnostic exploration (34.4%) and 38 cases of curative resection (21.9%). The mean age of the children who underwent MIS was 6.09 ± 5.2 years. With regard to diagnostic exploration, patient characteristics and surgical outcomes were found to be similar for MIS and open surgery. With regard to curative resection, however, the mean age was significantly lower among the patients who underwent open surgery (4.21 ± 4.20 vs 6.02 ± 4.99 for MIS, P = 0.047), and the proportion of malignancies was significantly higher (80% vs 39.4% for MIS, P < 0.001). MIS compared favorably with open surgery with respect to the rate of recurrence (6.7% vs 35.1%, P = 0.035), the rate of intraoperative transfusions (34.2% vs 58.5%, P = 0.01), the median amount of blood transfused (14 vs 22 mL/kg, P = 0.001), and the mean number of hospital days (4.66 ± 2.36 vs 7.21 ± 5.09, P < 0.001). Complication rates did not differ significantly between the MIS and open surgery groups. The operation was converted to open surgery in 3 cases (27.2%) of diagnostic MIS and in 5 cases (13.1%) of curative MIS. MIS was found to be both feasible and effective for the

  9. Phyllodes tumor showing intraductal growth.

    PubMed

    Makidono, Akari; Tsunoda, Hiroko; Mori, Miki; Yagata, Hiroshi; Onoda, Yui; Kikuchi, Mari; Nozaki, Taiki; Saida, Yukihisa; Nakamura, Seigo; Suzuki, Koyu

    2013-07-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare fibroepithelial lesion and particularly uncommon in adolescent girls. It is thought to arise from the periductal rather than intralobular stroma. Usually, it is seen as a well-defined mass. Phyllodes tumor showing intraductal growth is extremely rare. Here we report a girl who has a phyllodes tumor with intraductal growth.

  10. Tumor uptake of radioruthenium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S C; Richards, P; Meinken, G E; Larson, S M; Grunbaum, Z

    1980-01-01

    The use of ruthenium-97 as a scintigraphic agent, particularly for tumor localization, is investigated. The tumor uptake of ruthenium chloride and ruthenium-labelled transferrin is evaluated and their application as tumor-imagine agents is compared to gallium-67 citrate. (ACR)

  11. Granular cell tumor of trachea.

    PubMed

    Bekteshi, Edgar; Toth, Jennifer W; Benninghoff, Michael G; Kang, Jason; Betancourt, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Granular cell tumors of the tracheobronchial tree are rare benign lesions of neurogenic origin. These benign tumors mostly involve the skin, oral cavity, or esophagus. There is no consensus regarding treatment of granular cell tumors. Treatment varies from simple observation to different bronchoscopic interventions, such as laser therapy or fulguration to surgical resection.

  12. Tumor-Induced Hyperlipidemia Contributes to Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianfeng; Li, Lena; Lian, Jihong; Schauer, Silvia; Vesely, Paul W.; Kratky, Dagmar; Hoefler, Gerald; Lehner, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Summary The known link between obesity and cancer suggests an important interaction between the host lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis. Here, we used a syngeneic tumor graft model to demonstrate that tumor development influences the host lipid metabolism. BCR-Abl-transformed precursor B cell tumors induced hyperlipidemia by stimulating very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) production and blunting VLDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turnover. To assess whether tumor progression was dependent on tumor-induced hyperlipidemia, we utilized the VLDL production-deficient mouse model, carboxylesterase3/triacylglycerol hydrolase (Ces3/TGH) knockout mice. In Ces3/Tgh–/– tumor-bearing mice, plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels were attenuated. Importantly tumor weight was reduced in Ces3/Tgh–/– mice. Mechanistically, reduced tumor growth in Ces3/Tgh–/– mice was attributed to reversal of tumor-induced PCSK9-mediated degradation of hepatic LDLR and decrease of LDL turnover. Our data demonstrate that tumor-induced hyperlipidemia encompasses a feed-forward loop that reprograms hepatic lipoprotein homeostasis in part by providing LDL cholesterol to support tumor growth. PMID:27050512

  13. Pediatric Suprasellar Tumors.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Heather J; George, Emilie; Settler, Allison; Schwartz, Theodore H; Greenfield, Jeffrey P

    2016-10-01

    The various childhood suprasellar tumors, while pathologically distinct, present similar clinical and surgical challenges as a result of their common anatomic location. These lesions are in close proximity to or may invade the optic nerve and chiasm, pituitary gland and infundibulum, hypothalamus, and third ventricle, leading to presenting features including visual field loss, impairment in visual acuity, endocrine dysfunction, and hydrocephalus. Though many suprasellar lesions are relatively benign in pathology, treatment may be complicated by high surgical morbidity resulting from damage to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Here we review the most frequent pediatric lesions occurring in the suprasellar region: craniopharyngioma, chiasmatic glioma, germ cell tumor, Rathke cleft and arachnoid cysts, pituitary adenoma, and histiocytosis. This review outlines both common presenting features and differentiating aspects of these lesions. It also includes classic radiographic presentations and treatment considerations for each lesion.

  14. [Retroperitoneal Tumor: Neurofibroma.

    PubMed

    Lada, Paul Eduardo; Marriot, Daniela; Sanchez Tasonne, Carlos; Sanchez, Martin; Caballero, Fabian; Massa, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The neurofibroma is a benign tumor that grows from the sheath of the peripheral nerves, which is often localized on superficial tissues, especially in isolated forms. The neurofibromas can be of two types, localized or diffuse, the last one closely related to Von Recklinghausen disease or NF-1. We described a 37 years old male e patient, 37 years without symptoms, and the computed tomography scan (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging showed a tumor in proximity to the right kidney, the psoas muscle, the spine and compressing the cava vein, but cannot be accurately determinate the invasion of these structures. We review the differential diagnosis, therapeutic and the management of this disease in this clinical case.

  15. Retroperitoneal calcifying fibrous tumor mimicking an adrenal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Prochaska, Erica C.; Sciallis, Andrew P.; Miller, Barbra S.

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the etiology of a retroperitoneal tumor may be difficult due to close proximity of multiple organs. Evaluation of retroperitoneal tumors often leads to surgery, many times to obtain a definitive diagnosis and rule out malignancy. Calcifying fibrous tumors (CFT) are very rare soft tissue tumors occurring most often in young patients. They are most often found arising in the thoracic cavity, mediastinum, abdominal cavity and extremities and usually have a benign clinical course. Macrocscopically, the tumors are well circumscribed and firm with a white-tan appearance. Histologically, CFT comprised a hypocellular proliferation of bland spindle cells, densely hyalinized collagen, chronic lymphoplasmacytic inflammation and dystrophic calcifications. Other considerations in the pathologic differential diagnosis include solitary fibrous tumor and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. PMID:27252518

  16. Retroperitoneal calcifying fibrous tumor mimicking an adrenal tumor.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, Erica C; Sciallis, Andrew P; Miller, Barbra S

    2016-06-01

    Establishing the etiology of a retroperitoneal tumor may be difficult due to close proximity of multiple organs. Evaluation of retroperitoneal tumors often leads to surgery, many times to obtain a definitive diagnosis and rule out malignancy. Calcifying fibrous tumors (CFT) are very rare soft tissue tumors occurring most often in young patients. They are most often found arising in the thoracic cavity, mediastinum, abdominal cavity and extremities and usually have a benign clinical course. Macrocscopically, the tumors are well circumscribed and firm with a white-tan appearance. Histologically, CFT comprised a hypocellular proliferation of bland spindle cells, densely hyalinized collagen, chronic lymphoplasmacytic inflammation and dystrophic calcifications. Other considerations in the pathologic differential diagnosis include solitary fibrous tumor and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor.

  17. Myeloid Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment: Modulation of Tumor Angiogenesis and Tumor Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Michael C.; Varner, Judith A.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid cells are a heterogeneous population of bone marrow-derived cells that play a critical role during growth and metastasis of malignant tumors. Tumors exhibit significant myeloid cell infiltrates, which are actively recruited to the tumor microenvironment. Myeloid cells promote tumor growth by stimulating tumor angiogenesis, suppressing tumor immunity, and promoting metastasis to distinct sites. In this review, we discuss the role of myeloid cells in promoting tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, we describe a subset of myeloid cells with immunosuppressive activity (known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells). Finally, we will comment on the mechanisms regulating myeloid cell recruitment to the tumor microenvironment and on the potential of myeloid cells as new targets for cancer therapy. PMID:20490273

  18. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment.

    PubMed

    Mankad, Rekha; Herrmann, Joerg

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001-0.03% in most autopsy series). They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1) thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2) cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3) primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses.

  19. Serum tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Greg L; Slater, Evan D; Sanders, Georganne K; Prichard, John G

    2003-09-15

    Monoclonal antibodies are used to detect serum antigens associated with specific malignancies. These tumor markers are most useful for monitoring response to therapy and detecting early relapse. With the exception of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), tumor markers do not have sufficient sensitivity or specificity for use in screening. Cancer antigen (CA) 27.29 most frequently is used to follow response to therapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Carcinoembryonic antigen is used to detect relapse of colorectal cancer, and CA 19-9 may be helpful in establishing the nature of pancreatic masses. CA 125 is useful for evaluating pelvic masses in postmenopausal women, monitoring response to therapy in women with ovarian cancer, and detecting recurrence of this malignancy. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a marker for hepatocellular carcinoma, sometimes is used to screen highly selected populations and to assess hepatic masses in patients at particular risk for developing hepatic malignancy. Testing for the beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) is an integral part of the diagnosis and management of gestational trophoblastic disease. Combined AFP and beta-hCG testing is an essential adjunct in the evaluation and treatment of nonseminomatous germ cell tumors, and in monitoring the response to therapy. AFP and beta-hCG also may be useful in evaluating potential origins of poorly differentiated metastatic cancer. PSA is used to screen for prostate cancer, detect recurrence of the malignancy, and evaluate specific syndromes of adenocarcinoma of unknown primary.

  20. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mankad, Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001–0.03% in most autopsy series). They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1) thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2) cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3) primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses. PMID:27600455

  1. Testis tumor associated to microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Lisieux Eyer; Maciel, Felipe; Monnerat, Andrea Lima C.; Fernandes, Marcia Antunes; Dekermache, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss the relationship between testicular microlithiasis and testis tumors in children and to consider the chances of testis preserving surgery in specific cases. CASE DESCRIPTION: Pre-adolescent presenting testicular microlithiasis and a larger left testis, corresponding to a cystic testicular tumor. The tumor was excised, with ipsilateral testis preservation. Histology diagnosed a testis dermoid tumor. COMMENTS: The relationship between testis tumors and testicular microlithiasis is ill defined in children. Pediatric urologists need to develop specific follow-up protocols for pre-pubertal children. PMID:24473964

  2. Management of Frontal Sinus Tumors.

    PubMed

    Selleck, Anne Morgan; Desai, Dipan; Thorp, Brian D; Ebert, Charles S; Zanation, Adam M

    2016-08-01

    The most common primary tumors of the frontal sinus are osteomas and inverted papillomas, although a variety of other tumors involving this space have been reported. With the advent of new surgical techniques and instrumentation, an endoscopic approach to this region has become feasible. The preoperative assessment and decision making must take into account the complexity of frontal sinus anatomy, tumor type, tumor location, and associated attachments. These procedures allow adequate visualization, tumor removal, and postoperative monitoring, and preserve fairly normal sinus function. Open techniques may also be required and should be in the surgeon's armamentarium.

  3. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Takao; Kibe, Toshiro; Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio; Nishizawa, Yoshiaki; Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi; Ueda, Masahiro; Nakamura, Norifumi; Kiyono, Tohru; Kishida, Michiko

    2014-09-05

    Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave interactively via these cytokines to create a microenvironment that leads to the extension of ameloblastomas.

  4. Wilms' Tumor: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Kidney Tumors (National Cancer Institute) Also in Spanish What Is Wilms Tumor? (American Cancer Society) Wilms Tumor (Nemours Foundation) Also in Spanish Wilms' Tumor (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ...

  5. Laser therapy in intraocular tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstocea, Benone D.; Gafencu, Otilia L.; Apostol, Silvia

    1995-01-01

    Intraocular tumors present special problems of diagnosis and treatment. Diagnostic methods include, in addition to systemic and ophthalmological examinations, ancillary examinations such as transillumination, fluorescein angiography, ultrasonography, radioactive phosphorus uptake test, radiology, computerized tomography, and fine-needle aspiration biopsy with cytological analyses. Previously, enucleation of the involved eye was generally accepted as management of malignant tumors. Improved therapeutic methods such as photocoagulation and better surgical techniques now provide a variety of therapeutical alternatives. This study consists of 21 cases of intraocular tumors that were managed by Argon laser photocoagulation. Four cases were intraocular metastasis and 17 cases were primitive intraocular tumors. Argon laser therapy proved to be totally ineffective for the intraocular metastasis and a very adequate therapy for the primitive tumors. Tumor extirpations (choroidal, cillary body, or iris tumors) using laser lancet proved to be more suitable than classic surgery.

  6. Collecting Tumor Samples From Patients With Gynecological Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Borderline Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Borderline Ovarian Serous Tumor; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Childhood Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Endometrioid Stromal Sarcoma; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Malignant Mesothelioma; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Melanoma; Neoplasm of Uncertain Malignant Potential; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Vulva; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Recurrent Vaginal Carcinoma; Recurrent Vulvar Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-Stromal Tumor; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell

  7. What Are the Key Statistics about Pituitary Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors About Pituitary Tumors What Are the Key Statistics About Pituitary Tumors? About 10,000 pituitary tumors ... What Are Pituitary Tumors? What Are the Key Statistics About Pituitary Tumors? What’s New in Pituitary Tumor ...

  8. A case of carotid body tumor concomitant with carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Mun, Mi Jin; Lee, Jin Choon; Lee, Byung Joo

    2015-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors typically fall into two broad categories: those of epithelial origin and those of neural derivation. The former group includes carcinoid tumors and the latter includes paraganglioma. Although paraganglioma and carcinoid tumor have different biologic behaviors, their overlapping histological appearance can pose diagnostic challenges. Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing neuroendocrine tumors arising from the enterochromaffin cells disseminated throughout the gastrointestinal and bronchopulmonary systems. Carotid body tumor is the most common type of extra-adrenal paraganglioma. Paraganglioma tends to grow slowly but can compress adjacent vessel and nerve. A 63-year-old woman showed huge mass extending from carotid body to skull base, encircling internal and external carotid arteries on magnetic resonance image. Surgical removal of carotid body tumor was done after embolization procedure. Postoperative histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical analysis were consistent with paraganglioma concomitant with carcinoid tumor in carotid body. Primary cervical carcinoid tumor is extremely rare, and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of concomitant existence of paraganglioma and carcinoid tumor in carotid body.

  9. Study of Kidney Tumors in Younger Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-18

    Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Congenital Mesoblastic Nephroma; Diffuse Hyperplastic Perilobar Nephroblastomatosis; Rhabdoid Tumor of the Kidney; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage I Wilms Tumor; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Wilms Tumor; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Wilms Tumor; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Wilms Tumor; Stage V Wilms Tumor

  10. Cerebral malignant nerve sheath tumor, triton tumor variant: case report.

    PubMed

    Bornstein-Quevedo, Leticia; Peralta-Olvera, Fabiola; Marhx-Bracho, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Jurado, Rodolfo; De Leon-Bojorge, Beatriz

    2003-01-01

    A case of a cerebral malignant triton tumor in a 3-year-old boy with a 2-month history of frontal headache and no clinical evidence of neurofibromatosis is reported. The computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large, irregular tumor in the right parietooccipital lobe. A partial surgical resection was performed. Histologically, the tumor was highly cellular and consisted of spindle cells with hyperchromatic and pleomorphic nuclei. Focally, neoplastic cells with rhabdomyoblastic features were found. The immunohistochemical study showed that tumor cells were positive for S-100 protein and CD57, and the rhabdomyoblasts expressed desmin, Myo-D1, and myoglobin. During the postoperative period, a massive intraparenchymal hemorrhage was identified and surgical drainage was performed. The patient worsened and died 10 days after the first surgery. Postmortem study was not authorized. Six cases of cerebral malignant nerve sheath tumor have been described; however, primary intraparenchymal malignant triton tumor has not been previously described.

  11. Pott puffy tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pranav; Sharma, Salil; Gupta, Nishant; Kochar, Puneet

    2017-01-01

    Pott puffy tumor is osteomyelitis of the frontal bone with associated subperiosteal abscess causing swelling and edema over the forehead and scalp. It is a complication of frontal sinusitis or trauma. We present the case of an 8-year-old girl with frontal swelling. Imaging evaluation showed frontal osteomyelitis as a complication of frontal sinusitis with associated epidural and subperiosteal abscess. The patient was treated surgically and recovered well. This case highlights the need for high clinical suspicion and early diagnosis and management to prevent life-threatening complications. Unfortunately, in our case the patient had to undergo surgery for this complication, which could have been prevented by earlier diagnosis.

  12. Role of tumor associated macrophages in tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Riabov, Vladimir; Gudima, Alexandru; Wang, Nan; Mickley, Amanda; Orekhov, Alexander; Kzhyshkowska, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is an essential process for supplying rapidly growing malignant tissues with essential nutrients and oxygen. An angiogenic switch allows tumor cells to survive and grow, and provides them access to vasculature resulting in metastatic disease. Monocyte-derived macrophages recruited and reprogrammed by tumor cells serve as a major source of angiogenic factors boosting the angiogenic switch. Tumor endothelium releases angiopoietin-2 and further facilitates recruitment of TIE2 receptor expressing monocytes (TEM) into tumor sites. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) sense hypoxia in avascular areas of tumors, and react by production of angiogenic factors such as VEGFA. VEGFA stimulates chemotaxis of endothelial cells (EC) and macrophages. In some tumors, TAM appeared to be a major source of MMP9. Elevated expression of MMP9 by TAM mediates extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and the release of bioactive VEGFA. Other angiogenic factors released by TAM include basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), thymidine phosphorylase (TP), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), and adrenomedullin (ADM). The same factors used by macrophages for the induction of angiogenesis [like vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) and MMP9] support lymphangiogenesis. TAM can express LYVE-1, one of the established markers of lymphatic endothelium. TAM support tumor lymphangiogenesis not only by secretion of pro-lymphangiogenic factors but also by trans-differentiation into lymphatic EC. New pro-angiogenic factor YKL-40 belongs to a family of mammalian chitinase-like proteins (CLP) that act as cytokines or growth factors. Human CLP family comprises YKL-40, YKL-39, and SI-CLP. Production of all three CLP in macrophages is antagonistically regulated by cytokines. It was recently established that YKL-40 induces angiogenesis in vitro and in animal tumor models. YKL-40-neutralizing monoclonal antibody blocks tumor angiogenesis and progression. The role of YKL-39 and SI

  13. Endobronchial solitary fibrous tumor

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Marcelo Padovani Toledo; Colby, Thomas; Oliveira, Gilmar Felisberto; Hasimoto, Erica Nishida; Cataneo, Daniele Cristina; Cataneo, Antônio José Maria; De Faveri, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a mesenchymal neoplasm that appears primarily in the pleura and rarely in intrapulmonary or endobronchial topography. The authors report the case of a 47-year-old woman who presented obstructive respiratory symptoms for 4 years. The chest computed tomography and bronchoscopy showed an obstructive polypoid lesion located between the trachea and the left main bronchus associated with distal atelectasis of the left lung. A resection of the lesion was performed and, macroscopically, the mass was oval, encapsulated, and firm, measuring 2.3 × 1.7 × 1.5 cm. Histology revealed low-grade mesenchymal spindle cell neoplasm, with alternating cellularity, myxoid areas, and mature adipose tissue outbreaks, as well as blood vessels with irregular walls. The immunohistochemical study was positive for CD34, CD99, and BCL2. The diagnosis was SFT in an unusual topography. The patient’s symptoms remitted after tumor excision, and no systemic problems were evident. SFTs primarily affect adults and often follow a benign course; however, their behavior is unpredictable. The presence of necrosis and mitotic activity may portend a poor prognosis. Endobronchial SFTs are rare but should be evaluated and monitored similar to SFTs at other sites, with a long-term follow-up. PMID:28210572

  14. Aquaporins and Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Maugeri, Rosario; Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Fricano, Anna; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Di Liegro, Italia

    2016-01-01

    Brain primary tumors are among the most diverse and complex human cancers, and they are normally classified on the basis of the cell-type and/or the grade of malignancy (the most malignant being glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), grade IV). Glioma cells are able to migrate throughout the brain and to stimulate angiogenesis, by inducing brain capillary endothelial cell proliferation. This in turn causes loss of tight junctions and fragility of the blood–brain barrier, which becomes leaky. As a consequence, the most serious clinical complication of glioblastoma is the vasogenic brain edema. Both glioma cell migration and edema have been correlated with modification of the expression/localization of different isoforms of aquaporins (AQPs), a family of water channels, some of which are also involved in the transport of other small molecules, such as glycerol and urea. In this review, we discuss relationships among expression/localization of AQPs and brain tumors/edema, also focusing on the possible role of these molecules as both diagnostic biomarkers of cancer progression, and therapeutic targets. Finally, we will discuss the possibility that AQPs, together with other cancer promoting factors, can be exchanged among brain cells via extracellular vesicles (EVs). PMID:27367682

  15. Perlecan and Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xinnong; Couchman, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Perlecan is a major heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) of basement membranes (BMs) and connective tissues. The core protein of perlecan is divided into five domains based on sequence homology to other known proteins. Commonly, the N-terminal domain I of mammalian perlecan is substituted with three HS chains that can bind a number of matrix molecules, cytokines, and growth factors. Perlecan is essential for metazoan life, as shown by genetic manipulations of nematodes, insects, and mice. There are also known human mutations that can be lethal. In vertebrates, new functions of perlecan emerged with the acquisition of a closed vascular system and skeletal connective tissues. Many of perlecan's functions may be related to the binding and presentation of growth factors to high-affinity tyrosine kinase (TK) receptors. Data are accumulating, as discussed here, that similar growth factor-mediated processes may have unwanted promoting effects on tumor cell proliferation and tumor angiogenesis. Understanding of these attributes at the molecular level may offer opportunities for therapeutic intervention. PMID:14566013

  16. Primary renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor.

    PubMed

    Goel, V; Talwar, V; Dodagoudar, C; Singh, S; Sharma, A; Patnaik, N

    2015-01-01

    Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the kidney is a rare entity. Very few cases of primary renal PNET have been reported to date. Most literature about rPNET is isolated case reports. We report a case of rPNET in a 39-year-old male with a pre-operative diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma with renal vein thrombosis. The patient underwent radical nephrectomy with thrombolectomy, and histopathological examination revealed a highly aggressive tumor composed of monotonous sheets of round cells. Tumor cells were positive for CD 99 and FLI-1, hence confirming the diagnosis of Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor. Post-surgery, patient was given VAC/IE-based adjuvant chemotherapy. In view of highly aggressive nature of this tumor, prompt diagnosis and imparting effective chemotherapy regimen to the patient is required, and it is important to differentiate PNET from other small round-cell tumors because of different therapeutic approach.

  17. Differentiated thyroid tumors: surgical indications.

    PubMed

    Lucchini, R; Monacelli, M; Santoprete, S; Triola, R; Conti, C; Pecoriello, R; Favoriti, P; Di Patrizi, M S; Barillaro, I; Boccolini, A; Avenia, S; D'Ajello, M; Sanguinetti, A; Avenia, N

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid gland tumors represent 1% of malignant tumors. In Italy their incidence is in constant growth. The aggressiveness depends on the histological type. The relative non-aggressive grade of different forms of tumors is the basis for discussing the treatment of choice: total thyroidectomy vs lobectomy with or without lymphadenectomy of the sixth level in the absence of metastasis. Authors report about their experience, and they advocate, given the high percentage of multicentric forms, total thyroidectomy as treatment of choice.

  18. Glutathione Levels in Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gamcsik, Michael P.; Kasibhatla, Mohit S.; Teeter, Stephanie D.; Colvin, O. Michael

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes clinical studies in which glutathione was measured in tumor tissue from patients with brain, breast, gastrointestinal, gynecological, head and neck and lung cancer. Glutathione tends to be elevated in breast, ovarian, head and neck and lung cancer and lower in brain and liver tumors compared to disease-free tissue. Cervical, colorectal, gastric and esophageal cancers show both higher and lower levels of tumor glutathione. Some studies show an inverse relationship between patient survival and tumor glutathione. Based on this survey, we recommend approaches that may improve the clinical value of glutathione as a biomarker. PMID:22900535

  19. Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas has created an accompanying need for methods to determine if the tumor will be responsive to the intended therapy and to monitor its effectiveness. Ideally, these methods would be noninvasive and provide quantitative real-time analysis of tumor activity in a variety of carcinomas. Assessment of circulating tumor cells shed into the blood during metastasis may satisfy this need. Here we review the CellSearch technology used for the detection of circulating tumor cells and discuss potential future directions for improvements. PMID:25133014

  20. Therapeutic Trial for Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumor and Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone or Soft Tissue; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  1. Current standards of care and future directions for "high-risk" pediatric renal tumors: Anaplastic Wilms tumor and Rhabdoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Geller, James I

    2016-01-01

    'High risk' renal tumors of childhood generally includes anaplastic Wilms tumor, rhabdoid tumor, and metastatic renal sarcomas and carcinomas. In this review, the epidemiology, biology, treatment and prognosis of anaplastic Wilms tumor and rhabdoid tumor are presented. Future directions related to management of such cancers are discussed, with insights provided into possible clinical trials in development that consider integration of novel targeted therapies.

  2. Childhood Brain Tumor Epidemiology: A Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium Review

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kimberly J.; Cullen, Jennifer; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Langer, Chelsea E.; Turner, Michelle C.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Fisher, James L.; Lupo, Philip J.; Partap, Sonia; Schwartzbaum, Judith A.; Scheurer, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood brain tumors are the most common pediatric solid tumor and include several histological subtypes. Although progress has been made in improving survival rates for some subtypes, understanding of risk factors for childhood brain tumors remains limited to a few genetic syndromes and ionizing radiation to the head and neck. In this report, we review descriptive and analytical epidemiology childhood brain tumor studies from the past decade and highlight priority areas for future epidemiology investigations and methodological work that is needed to advance our understanding of childhood brain tumor causes. Specifically, we summarize the results of a review of studies published since 2004 that have analyzed incidence and survival in different international regions and that have examined potential genetic, immune system, developmental and birth characteristics, and environmental risk factors. PMID:25192704

  3. Intradural jugular foramen tumors.

    PubMed

    Mattos, João Paulo; Ramina, Ricardo; Borges, Wilson; Ghizoni, Enrico; Fernandes, Yvens B; Paschoal, Jorge R; Honorato, Donizeti C; Borges, Guilherme

    2004-12-01

    Eleven patients with jugular foramen lesions with or without extradural extension were operated at University Hospital of Campinas (UNICAMP), in Campinas, Brazil, between 1998 and 2001. Neck dissection, mastoidectomy without transposition of the facial nerve and myofascial flap reconstruction of the cranial base with an especially developed technique were carried out in 7 patients. Four patients were operated using retrosigmoid craniectomy. Total excision was accomplished in 9 cases. All patients did not show evidence of disease progression at least after 2 years follow-up. There was no mortality. New lower cranial nerve deficits occurred in 5 patients. Nine maintain or improved their preoperative status based on Karnofsky and Glasgow Outcome Scale. A complex anatomy of this region demand wide exposures for treat those tumors. For this reason, an adequate approach for curative resection of most lesions and an efficient skull base reconstruction decreasing postoperative morbidity are essential.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Ming

    2013-01-28

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a critical cytokine, which contributes to both physiological and pathological processes. This mini-review will briefly touch the history of TNF discovery, its family members and its biological and pathological functions. Then, it will focus on new findings on the molecular mechanisms of how TNF triggers activation of the NF-κB and AP-1 pathways, which are critical for expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as the MLKL cascade, which is critical for the generation of ROS in response to TNF. Finally, this review will briefly summarize recent advances in understanding TNF-induced cell survival, apoptosis and necrosis (also called necroptosis). Understanding new findings and emerging concepts will impact future research on the molecular mechanisms of TNF signaling in immune disorders and cancer-related inflammation.

  5. Update on desmoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Escobar, C; Munker, R; Thomas, J O; Li, B D; Burton, G V

    2012-03-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are histologically benign proliferations of stromal cells but may grow locally aggressive. Overall, DTs are rare (0.03% of all neoplasms). A minority of DTs is associated with Gardner syndrome and mutations of the familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) gene. Most spontaneous DTs are associated with mutations of the beta-catenin gene. This mutation results in the activation of Wnt/catenin signaling. Due to their variable clinical presentation and behavior, no standard approach for DTs can be recommended. In most cases of DTs of the extremities surgical extirpation is indicated, whereas in many other cases, a multimodal and multidisciplinary concept should be followed. In this review article, we discuss the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and treatment options for DTs, including targeted therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  6. Imaging probe for tumor malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hiraoka, Hasahiro

    2009-02-01

    Solid tumors possess unique microenvironments that are exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions ("tumor hypoxia"). Although more than half a century has passed since it was suggested that tumor hypoxia correlated with poor treatment outcomes and contributed to cancer recurrence, a fundamental solution to this problem has yet to be found. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor that regulates the cellular response to hypoxia. It induces various genes whose functions are strongly associated with malignant alteration of the entire tumor. The cellular changes induced by HIF-1 are extremely important targets of cancer therapy, particularly in therapy against refractory cancers. Imaging of the HIF-1-active microenvironment is therefore important for cancer therapy. To image HIF-1activity in vivo, we developed a PTD-ODD fusion protein, POHA, which was uniquely labeled with near-infrared fluorescent dye at the C-terminal. POHA has two functional domains: protein transduction domain (PTD) and VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of the alpha subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1α). It can therefore be delivered to the entire body and remain stabilized in the HIF-1-active cells. When it was intravenously injected into tumor-bearing mice, a tumor-specific fluorescence signal was detected in the tumor 6 h after the injection. These results suggest that POHA can be used an imaging probe for tumor malignancy.

  7. Adolescent and Pediatric Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child you love is diagnosed with a brain tumor, it is difficult to think about anything else. There are often more questions than answers. Your life can feel as though it has been turned upside ... Brain Tumor Association for information, insight and support. Our ...

  8. Gene Therapy for Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Seilicovich, Adriana; Pisera, Daniel; Sciascia, Sandra A.; Candolfi, Marianela; Puntel, Mariana; Xiong, Weidong; Jaita, Gabriela; Castro, Maria G.

    2009-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms. Although most pituitary tumors are considered typically benign, others can cause severe and progressive disease. The principal aims of pituitary tumor treatment are the elimination or reduction of the tumor mass, normalization of hormone secretion and preservation of remaining pituitary function. In spite of major advances in the therapy of pituitary tumors, for some of the most difficult tumors, current therapies that include medical, surgical and radiotherapeutic methods are often unsatisfactory and there is a need to develop new treatment strategies. Gene therapy, which uses nucleic acids as drugs, has emerged as an attractive therapeutic option for the treatment of pituitary tumors that do not respond to classical treatment strategies if the patients become intolerant to the therapy. The development of animal models for pituitary tumors and hormone hypersecretion has proven to be critical for the implementation of novel treatment strategies and gene therapy approaches. Preclinical trials using several gene therapy approaches for the treatment of anterior pituitary diseases have been successfully implemented. Several issues need to be addressed before clinical implementation becomes a reality, including the development of more effective and safer viral vectors, uncovering novel therapeutic targets and development of targeted expression of therapeutic transgenes. With the development of efficient gene delivery vectors allowing long-term transgene expression with minimal toxicity, gene therapy will become one of the most promising approaches for treating pituitary adenomas. PMID:16457646

  9. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Cancer.gov

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  10. Feminizing adrenocortical tumors: Literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chentli, Farida; Bekkaye, Ilyes; Azzoug, Said

    2015-01-01

    Feminizing adrenal tumors (FAT) are extremely rare tumors prevailing in males. Clinical manifestations are gynecomastia and/or other hypogonadism features in adults. They are rarer in pediatric population and their main manifestation is peripheral sexual precocity. In women genital bleeding, uterus hypertrophy, high blood pressure and/or abdomen mass may be the only manifestations. On the biological point, estrogen overproduction with or without increase in other adrenal hormones are the main abnormalities. Radiological examination usually shows the tumor, describes its limits and its eventual metastases. Adrenal and endocrine origins are confirmed by biochemical assessments and histology, but that one is unable to distinguish between benign and malignant tumors, except if metastases are already present. Immunostaining using anti-aromatase antibodies is the only tool that distinguishes FAT from other adrenocortical tumors. Abdominal surgery is the best and the first line treatment. For large tumors (≥10 cm), an open access is preferred to coeliosurgery, but for the small ones, or when the surgeon is experienced, endoscopic surgery seems to give excellent results. Surgery can be preceded by adrenolytic agents such as ortho paraprime dichloro diphenyl dichloroethane (Mitotane), ketoconazole or by aromatase inhibitors, but till now there is not any controlled study to compare the benefit of different drugs. New anti-estrogens can be used too, but their results need to be confirmed in malignant tumors resistant to classical chemotherapy and to conventional radiotherapy. Targeted therapy can be used too, as in other adrenocortical tumors, but the results need to be confirmed. PMID:25932386

  11. Benign ear cyst or tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bony tumor of the ear canal Images Ear anatomy References Nicolai P, Castelnuovo P. Benign tumors of the sinonasal tract. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  12. Tumors STING adaptive antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo

    2014-11-20

    Immunotherapy is revolutionizing the treatment of cancer patients, but the molecular basis for tumor immunogenicity is unclear. In this issue of Immunity, Deng et al. (2014) and Woo et al. (2014) provide evidence suggesting that dendritic cells detect DNA from tumor cells via the STING-mediated, cytosolic DNA sensing pathway.

  13. What Are the Risk Factors for Pituitary Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Factors for Pituitary Tumors? Do We Know What Causes Pituitary Tumors? Can Pituitary Tumors Be Prevented? Pituitary Tumors Causes, ... from a parent. (See Do We Know What Causes Pituitary Tumors? ) Most often, though, the cause of pituitary tumors ...

  14. What Happens after Treatment for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Lung Carcinoid Tumors? For many people with carcinoid tumors, ... Lung Carcinoid Tumor Treatment Stops Working More In Lung Carcinoid Tumors About Lung Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk ...

  15. [Adrenocortical tumors--new perspectives].

    PubMed

    Latronico, Ana Claudia; Mendonça, Berenice B de

    2004-10-01

    A high frequency of adrenocortical tumors has been observed in Brazilian children and adults from South and Southwestern regions. The valuable national experience in the management of these tumors have resulted in several and relevant basic and clinical reports. However, the creation of an adrenocortical tumor national registry, the uniformity of approaches and collaborative studies are target to pursue. In this review article, we briefly described the fundamental points which were discussed in two scientific events on adrenocortical tumors: "International Consensus Conference on Treatment of Adrenal Cancer" and "I Simposio de Diagnóstico e Tratamento dos Tumores Adrenocorticais". The task force involving several Brazilian centers will increase the progress in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of this devastating disorder.

  16. Computed tomography of Krukenberg tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, K.C.; Gold, B.M.

    1985-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of three patients with Kurkenberg tumor was reviewed retrospectively. CT showed large, lobulated, multicystic masses with soft-tissue components, indistinguishable from primary ovarian carcinoma. Much has been written about metastatic ovarian tumor, but this is the first report in the radiologic literature about their CT features. The authors emphasize the importance of recognizing the ovary as a frequent site of metastases and the proper approach to this problem. In patients with a history of colon or gastric carcinoma, the mixed cystic and solid ovarian mass on CT should be regarded as metastatic tumor until proven otherwise. A careful search for gastrointestinal tract signs or symptoms should be done in any patient with a pelvic tumor. When CT is done for evaluation of ovarian tumor, the stomach and colon should be carefully evaluated, and the ovaries routinely examined in the preoperative CT staging of gastric or colon carcinoma.

  17. [Radiotherapy of benign intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Delannes, M; Latorzeff, I; Chand, M E; Huchet, A; Dupin, C; Colin, P

    2016-09-01

    Most of the benign intracranial tumors are meningiomas, vestibular schwannomas, pituitary adenomas, craniopharyngiomas, and glomus tumors. Some of them grow very slowly, and can be observed without specific treatment, especially if they are asymptomatic. Symptomatic or growing tumors are treated by surgery, which is the reference treatment. When surgery is not possible, due to the location of the lesion, or general conditions, radiotherapy can be applied, as it is if there is a postoperative growing residual tumor, or a local relapse. Indications have to be discussed in polydisciplinary meetings, with precise evaluation of the benefit and risks of the treatments. The techniques to be used are the most modern ones, as multimodal imaging and image-guided radiation therapy. Stereotactic treatments, using fractionated or single doses depending on the size or the location of the tumors, are commonly realized, to avoid as much a possible the occurrence of late side effects.

  18. [Radiological evaluation of congenital tumors].

    PubMed

    Aguado del Hoyo, A; Ruiz Martín, Y; Lancharro Zapata, Á; Marín Rodríguez, C; Gordillo Gutiérrez, I

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we consider tumors that are diagnosed during pregnancy or in the first three months of life. This is a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with special biological and epidemiological characteristics that differentiate them from tumors arising in children or adults. In the last two decades, the prenatal detection of congenital tumors has increased due to the generalized use of prenatal sonographic screening. Advances in imaging techniques, especially in fetal magnetic resonance imaging, have enabled improvements in the diagnosis, follow-up, clinical management, and perinatal treatment of these tumors. This image-based review of the most common congenital tumors describes their histologic types, locations, and characteristics on the different imaging techniques used.

  19. The History of Tumor Virology

    PubMed Central

    Javier, Ronald T.; Butel, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    In the century since its inception, the field of tumor virology has provided groundbreaking insights into the causes of human cancer. Peyton Rous founded this scientific field in 1911 by discovering an avian virus that induced tumors in chickens; however, it took 40 years for the scientific community to comprehend the effect of this seminal finding. Later identification of mammalian tumor viruses in the 1930s by Richard Shope and John Bittner, and in the 1950s by Ludwik Gross, sparked the first intense interest in tumor virology by suggesting the possibility of a similar causal role for viruses in human cancers. This change in attitude opened the door in the 1960s and 1970s for the discovery of the first human tumor viruses—EBV, hepatitis B virus, and the papillomaviruses. Such knowledge proved instrumental to the development of the first cancer vaccines against cancers having an infectious etiology. Tumor virologists additionally recognized that viruses could serve as powerful discovery tools, leading to revolutionary breakthroughs in the 1970s and 1980s that included the concept of the oncogene, the identification of the p53 tumor suppressor, and the function of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor. The subsequent availability of more advanced molecular technologies paved the way in the 1980s and 1990s for the identification of additional human tumor viruses—human T-cell leukemia virus type 1, hepatitis C virus, and Kaposi’s sarcoma virus. In fact, current estimates suggest that viruses are involved in 15% to 20% of human cancers worldwide. Thus, viruses not only have been shown to represent etiologic agents for many human cancers but have also served as tools to reveal mechanisms that are involved in all human malignancies. This rich history promises that tumor virology will continue to contribute to our understanding of cancer and to the development of new therapeutic and preventive measures for this disease in the 21st century. PMID:18829521

  20. The history of tumor virology.

    PubMed

    Javier, Ronald T; Butel, Janet S

    2008-10-01

    In the century since its inception, the field of tumor virology has provided groundbreaking insights into the causes of human cancer. Peyton Rous founded this scientific field in 1911 by discovering an avian virus that induced tumors in chickens; however, it took 40 years for the scientific community to comprehend the effect of this seminal finding. Later identification of mammalian tumor viruses in the 1930s by Richard Shope and John Bittner, and in the 1950s by Ludwik Gross, sparked the first intense interest in tumor virology by suggesting the possibility of a similar causal role for viruses in human cancers. This change in attitude opened the door in the 1960s and 1970s for the discovery of the first human tumor viruses--EBV, hepatitis B virus, and the papillomaviruses. Such knowledge proved instrumental to the development of the first cancer vaccines against cancers having an infectious etiology. Tumor virologists additionally recognized that viruses could serve as powerful discovery tools, leading to revolutionary breakthroughs in the 1970s and 1980s that included the concept of the oncogene, the identification of the p53 tumor suppressor, and the function of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor. The subsequent availability of more advanced molecular technologies paved the way in the 1980s and 1990s for the identification of additional human tumor viruses--human T-cell leukemia virus type 1, hepatitis C virus, and Kaposi's sarcoma virus. In fact, current estimates suggest that viruses are involved in 15% to 20% of human cancers worldwide. Thus, viruses not only have been shown to represent etiologic agents for many human cancers but have also served as tools to reveal mechanisms that are involved in all human malignancies. This rich history promises that tumor virology will continue to contribute to our understanding of cancer and to the development of new therapeutic and preventive measures for this disease in the 21st century.

  1. Precision radiotherapy for brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ying; Guo, Zhanwen; Zhang, Haibo; Wang, Ning; Xu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Precision radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of brain tumors. This study aimed to identify global research trends in precision radiotherapy for brain tumors using a bibliometric analysis of the Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of data retrievals for precision radiotherapy for brain tumors containing the key words cerebral tumor, brain tumor, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, imaging-guided radiotherapy, dose-guided radiotherapy, stereotactic brachytherapy, and stereotactic radiotherapy using the Web of Science. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: (a) peer-reviewed articles on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors which were published and indexed in the Web of Science; (b) type of articles: original research articles and reviews; (c) year of publication: 2002-2011. Exclusion criteria: (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) Corrected papers or book chapters. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to country; (3) distribution according to institution; (4) top cited publications; (5) distribution according to journals; and (6) comparison of study results on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. RESULTS: The stereotactic radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and imaging-guided radiotherapy are three major methods of precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. There were 260 research articles addressing precision radiotherapy for brain tumors found within the Web of Science. The USA published the most papers on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors, followed by Germany and France. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, German Cancer Research Center and Heidelberg University were the most prolific research institutes for publications on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. Among the top 13 research institutes publishing in this field, seven

  2. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  3. ABT-751 in Treating Young Patients With Refractory Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-03-14

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Liver Cancer; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  4. Tumor-associated macrophages (not tumor cells) are the determinants of photosensitizer tumor localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-03-01

    The distribution of Photofrin and several other photosensitizers among major cellular populations contained in solid mouse tumors was examined using flow cytometry. Seven tumor models were included in the analysis: sarcomas EMT6, KHT, RIF, FsaR and FsaN, Lewis lung carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII. In all these tumors, the highest photosensitizer levels were found in a subpopulation of tumor associated macrophages consisting of activated cells (as suggested by their increased size, granularity, and the number of interleukin 2 receptors). There was no evidence of selective photosensitizer accumulation in malignant tumor cells. Results consistent with these observations were also obtained with the carcinogen induced squamous cell carcinoma growing in hamster cheek pouch.

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Treatment Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  6. Tumor Targeting via Integrin Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Rechenmacher, Florian; Sobahi, Tariq Rashad Ali; Mas-Moruno, Carlos; Kessler, Horst

    2013-01-01

    Selective and targeted delivery of drugs to tumors is a major challenge for an effective cancer therapy and also to overcome the side-effects associated with current treatments. Overexpression of various receptors on tumor cells is a characteristic structural and biochemical aspect of tumors and distinguishes them from physiologically normal cells. This abnormal feature is therefore suitable for selectively directing anticancer molecules to tumors by using ligands that can preferentially recognize such receptors. Several subtypes of integrin receptors that are crucial for cell adhesion, cell signaling, cell viability, and motility have been shown to have an upregulated expression on cancer cells. Thus, ligands that recognize specific integrin subtypes represent excellent candidates to be conjugated to drugs or drug carrier systems and be targeted to tumors. In this regard, integrins recognizing the RGD cell adhesive sequence have been extensively targeted for tumor-specific drug delivery. Here we review key recent examples on the presentation of RGD-based integrin ligands by means of distinct drug-delivery systems, and discuss the prospects of such therapies to specifically target tumor cells. PMID:24010121

  7. Platelets effects on tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Goubran, Hadi A; Stakiw, Julie; Radosevic, Mirjana; Burnouf, Thierry

    2014-06-01

    Unlike other blood cells, platelets are small anucleate structures derived from marrow megakaryocytes. Thought for almost a century to possess solely hemostatic potentials, platelets, however, play a much wider role in tissue regeneration and repair and interact intimately with tumor cells. On one hand, tumor cells induce platelet aggregation (TCIPA), known to act as the trigger of cancer-associated thrombosis. On the other hand, platelets recruited to the tumor microenvironment interact, directly, with tumor cells, favoring their proliferation, and, indirectly, through the release of a wide palette of growth factors, including angiogenic and mitogenic proteins. In addition, the role of platelets is not solely confined to the primary tumor site. Indeed, they escort tumor cells, helping their intravasation, vascular migration, arrest, and extravasation to the tissues to form distant metastasis. As expected, nonspecific or specific inhibition of platelets and their content represents an attractive novel approach in the fight against cancer. This review illustrates the role played by platelets at primary tumor sites and in the various stages of the metastatic process.

  8. Laser therapy in ocular tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstocea, Benone D.; Gafencu, Otilia L.; Apostol, Silvia; Ionita, Marcel A.; Moroseanu, A.; Dascalu, Traian; Lupei, Voicu; Ionita-Manzatu, V.

    1998-07-01

    The medical laser equipments made at NILPRP have been exploited intensively for more than 10 years at CMH. The availability and reliability of the first like-on equipment have increased, following improvements in optical delivery system and cooling circuit. This paper shows the impact of technical advances on the development of ophthalmologic laser therapy. Intraocular tumors pose special problems of diagnosis and treatment. Diagnostic methods include addition to systemic and ophthalmologic examinations, ancillary examinations, such as transillumination, fluorescence angiography, ultrasonography, radioactive phosphorus uptake tests, radiology, computerized tomography and fine-needle aspiration biopsy with cytological analyses. The enucleation of the involved eye used to be a generally accepted management of malignant tumors. Improved therapeutic methods such as photocoagulation and better surgical techniques now provide a variety of therapeutic alternatives. This study covers 31 cases of intraocular tumors that were managed either by Argon Laser photocoagulation and/or by Nd:YAG laser surgical treatment. Four cases were intraocular metastasse and 17 cases were primitive intraocular tumors. Argon laser therapy proved to be totally ineffective for intraocular metastasse but very adequate therapy for primitive tumors. Tumor extirpations (choroidal, cillary body or iris tumors) using Nd:YAG laser lancet proved to be more suitable than classic surgery.

  9. Spectroscopic-guided brain tumor resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Chiang; Toms, Steven A.; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2000-05-01

    A pilot in vivo study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using optical spectroscopy for brain tumor margin detection. Fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra were acquired using a portable clinical spectroscopic system from normal brain tissues, tumors, and tumor margins in 21 brain tumor patients undergoing craniotomy. Results form this study show the potential of optical spectroscopy in detecting infiltrating tumor margins of primary brain tumors.

  10. Phyllodes tumor of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Herazo, Fernando; Gil, Monica; Echeverri, Carolina; Ángel, Gonzalo; Borrero, Mauricio; Madrid, Jorge; Jaramillo, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Breast Phyllodes tumors are rare breast tumors present in less than 1% of new cases of breast cancer, usually occurring among middle-aged women (40-50 yrs). Objective: This study shows diagnostic experience, surgical management and follows up of patients with this disease during a period of ten years in a oncology referral center. Methods: Retrospectively, breast cancer registries at the institution were reviewed, identifying 77 patients with Phyllodes tumors between 2002 and 2012, who had been operated on at the Instituto de Cancerología - Clínica Las Américas, in Medellín (Colombia). Clinical and histopathological data belonging to these cases was captured and analyzed and descriptive statistics were used. Results: The follow up median was 22.5 months (IQR: 10.5-60.0), average age was 47.2 yrs (SD: 12.4), mean tumor size was 3.6 cm (SD: 4.6), 88.3% of the patients (68 cases) presented negative margins and none of them received adjuvant chemotherapy. Of the patients with Phyllodes tumors; 33.8% had benign, 31.2% had borderline and 35.0% had malignant tumor. Disease-free survival was 85.8% and overall survival was 94.5%. Discussion: Reported data in this article is in accordance with what has been reported in worldwide literature. In our cohort even the high mean size of the tumors, the risk of local relapse and metastatic disease is low than previously reported in literature. Trials with longer follow up and molecular trials in Phyllodes tumors are necessary to understand the behavior of these tumors in Hispanics population. PMID:26600624

  11. Therapeutic modalities for Pancoast tumors.

    PubMed

    Nikolaos, Panagopoulos; Vasilios, Livaditis; Efstratios, Koletsis; Panagiotis, Alexopoulos; Christos, Prokakis; Nikolaos, Baltayiannis; Antonios, Hatzimichalis; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Madesis, Athanasios; Vretzakis, Georgios; Kolettas, Alexandros; Dimitrios, Dougenis

    2014-03-01

    A Pancoast tumor, also called a pulmonary sulcus tumor or superior sulcus tumor, is a tumor of the pulmonary apex. It is a type of lung cancer defined primarily by its location situated at the top end of either the right or left lung. It typically spreads to nearby tissues such as the ribs and vertebrae. Most Pancoast tumors are non-small cell cancers. The growing tumor can cause compression of a brachiocephalic vein, subclavian artery, phrenic nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve, vagus nerve, or, characteristically, compression of a sympathetic ganglion resulting in a range of symptoms known as Horner's syndrome. Pancoast tumors are named for Henry Pancoast, a US radiologist, who described them in 1924 and 1932.The treatment of a Pancoast lung cancer may differ from that of other types of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Its position and close proximity to vital structures may make surgery difficult. As a result, and depending on the stage of the cancer, treatment may involve radiation and chemotherapy given prior to surgery. Surgery may consist of the removal of the upper lobe of a lung together with its associated structures as well as mediastinal lymphadenectomy. Surgical access may be via thoracotomy from the back or the front of the chest and modification. Careful patient selection, improvements in imaging such as the role of PET-CT in restaging of tumors, radiotherapy and surgical advances, the management of previously inoperable lesions by a combined experienced thoracic-neurosurgical team and prompt recognition and therapy of postoperative complications has greatly increased local control and overall survival for patients with these tumors.

  12. Treatment for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) Based on Tumor Spread

    MedlinePlus

    ... These treatments may include radiofrequency ablation (RFA; using electric currents to heat the tumor), or ethanol ablation ( ... Life Events College Relay For Life Donate a Car Ways to Give Memorial Giving Planned Giving Leadership ...

  13. [Phyllodes tumor: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Uribe, A; Bravo, G; Uribe, A; Viada, R; Capetillo, M; Villarroel, T

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed 1.178 benign tumors treated between 1981/93 among which 39 appeared with a Phylodes Tumors diagnosis, disregarding 5 of them because they did not have a precise description and histologic classification, studying 34 proved cases which represented 2.89% of all benign tumors; if we add 89% cancers in these years, we have 2.074 and the relation becomes 1.64% of the total. We found 22 benign phylodes (64.7%) 7 border line (20.5%) and 5 malignant (14.8%) whose clinic, histologic and evolutive characteristics are presented in this paper.

  14. Differentiated thyroid tumors: surgical indications

    PubMed Central

    LUCCHINI, R.; MONACELLI, M.; SANTOPRETE, S.; TRIOLA, R.; CONTI, C.; PECORIELLO, R.; FAVORITI, P.; DI PATRIZI, M.S.; BARILLARO, I.; BOCCOLINI, A.; AVENIA, S.; D’AJELLO, M.; SANGUINETTI, A.; AVENIA, N.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Thyroid gland tumors represent 1% of malignant tumors. In Italy their incidence is in constant growth. The aggressiveness depends on the histological type. The relative non-aggressive grade of different forms of tumors is the basis for discussing the treatment of choice: total thyroidectomy vs lobectomy with or without lymphadenectomy of the sixth level in the absence of metastasis. Authors report about their experience, and they advocate, given the high percentage of multicentric forms, total thyroidectomy as treatment of choice. PMID:23837952

  15. A collision tumor of esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bin; Guan, Shanghui; Huang, Xiaochen; Su, Peng; Song, Qingxu; Cheng, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    The collision tumor is defined by Meyer as that arisen from the accidental meeting and eventual intermingling of two independent neoplasms, which is quite rare. Most of them occur in the junction of different epithelial types of tissue such as oral cavity, esophagogastric junction, anorectaljunction and cervix, while collision tumors occurring in the liver, gallbladder, pancreatic, urinary bladder also have been reported. Here we present a case of 55-year-old Chinese man diagnosed as a collision tumor composed of leiomyosarcoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) in the lower third part of esophagus with 6 years survival after surgery and radiotherapy.

  16. Brain tumors in irradiated monkeys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haymaker, W.; Miquel, J.; Rubinstein, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of 32 monkeys which survived one to seven years after total body exposure to protons or to high-energy X rays. Among these 32 monkeys there were 21 which survived two years or longer after exposure to 200 to 800 rad. Glioblastoma multiforme developed in 3 of the 10 monkeys surviving three to five years after receiving 600 or 800 rad 55-MeV protons. Thus, the incidence of tumor development in the present series was far higher than the incidence of spontaneously developing brain tumors in monkeys cited in the literature. This suggests that the tumors in the present series may have been radiation-induced.

  17. [Unclassified sex cord testis tumor].

    PubMed

    Grenha, Vânia; Serra, Paula; Coelho, Hugo; Retroz, Edson; Temido, Paulo; Mota, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Unclassified sex cord testis tumor is an extremely rare tumor, especially in the adult. It is characterized histologically for a nonspecific combination of testis stromal and epithelial elements, with varying degree of differentiation. Treatment usually consists of radical orchiectomy followed by clinical and imaging surveillance. The available literature about this pathology relies almost exclusively on clinical cases. It's our aim to describe the case of a 37 years old man with an unclassified sex cord testis tumor, the first case described in Portugal, and to review the literature about this issue.

  18. Modification of tumor response by manipulation of tumor oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Beckers, Jill; Hetzel, Fred W.

    1999-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) requires tissue oxygenation during light irradiation. Tumor hypoxia, either pre-existing or induced by PDT during light irradiation, can severely hamper the effectiveness of a PDT treatment. Lowering the light irradiation does rate or fractionating a light dose may improve cell kill of PDT induced hypoxic cells, but will have no effects on pre-existing hypoxic cells. In the current study, we used hyper-oxygenation during PDT to overcome cell hypoxia in PDT. C3H mice with transplanted mammary carcinoma tumor were injected with 12.5 mg/kg Photofrin and irradiated with 630 nm laser light 24 hours later. Tumor oxygenation was manipulated by subjecting the animals to 3 a.t.p. hyperbaric oxygen or normobaric oxygen during PDT light irradiation. The results show a significant improvement in tumor response when PDT was delivered during hyper-oxygenation. With hyper-oxygenation, up to 80% of treated tumors showed no re-growth after 60 days. In comparison, only 20% of tumors treated while animals breathed normal room air, did not re-grow. To quantitatively evaluate the effects of manipulating tumor oxygenation, tumor p02 was measured with microelectrodes positioned in pre-existing hypoxic regions before and during the PDT light irradiation. The results show that hyper-oxygenation may oxygenate pre-existing hypoxic cells and compensate oxygen depletion induced by PDT light irradiation. In conclusion, hyper-oxygenation may provide effective ways to improve PDT treatment efficiency by oxygenating both pre-existing and treatment induced cell hypoxia.

  19. Macrophages in Tumor Microenvironments and the Progression of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ning-Bo; Lü, Mu-Han; Fan, Ya-Han; Cao, Ya-Ling; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are widely distributed innate immune cells that play indispensable roles in the innate and adaptive immune response to pathogens and in-tissue homeostasis. Macrophages can be activated by a variety of stimuli and polarized to functionally different phenotypes. Two distinct subsets of macrophages have been proposed, including classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages express a series of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and effector molecules, such as IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α, iNOS and MHCI/II. In contrast, M2 macrophages express a wide array of anti-inflammatory molecules, such as IL-10, TGF-β, and arginase1. In most tumors, the infiltrated macrophages are considered to be of the M2 phenotype, which provides an immunosuppressive microenvironment for tumor growth. Furthermore, tumor-associated macrophages secrete many cytokines, chemokines, and proteases, which promote tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and immunosuppression. Recently, it was also found that tumor-associated macrophages interact with cancer stem cells. This interaction leads to tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance. So mediating macrophage to resist tumors is considered to be potential therapy. PMID:22778768

  20. Peri-tumoral leakage during intra-tumoral convection-enhanced delivery has implications for efficacy of peri-tumoral infusion before removal of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoliang; Saito, Ryuta; Nakamura, Taigen; Zhang, Rong; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    In cases of malignant brain tumors, infiltrating tumor cells that exist at the tumor-surrounding brain tissue always escape from cytoreductive surgery and, protected by blood-brain barrier (BBB), survive the adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, eventually leading to tumor recurrence. Local interstitial delivery of chemotherapeutic agents is a promising strategy to target these cells. During our effort to develop effective drug delivery methods by intra-tumoral infusion of chemotherapeutic agents, we found consistent pattern of leakage from the tumor. Here we describe our findings and propose promising strategy to cover the brain tissue surrounding the tumor with therapeutic agents by means of convection-enhanced delivery. First, the intracranial tumor isograft model was used to define patterns of leakage from tumor mass after intra-tumoral infusion of the chemotherapeutic agents. Liposomal doxorubicin, although first distributed inside the tumor, distributed diffusely into the surrounding normal brain once the leakage happen. Trypan blue dye was used to evaluate the distribution pattern of peri-tumoral infusions. When infused intra- or peri-tumorally, infusates distributed robustly into the tumor border. Subsequently, volume of distributions with different infusion scheduling; including intra-tumoral infusion, peri-tumoral infusion after tumor resection, peri-tumoral infusion without tumor removal with or without systemic infusion of steroids, were compared with Evans-blue dye. Peri-tumoral infusion without tumor removal resulted in maximum volume of distribution. Prior use of steroids further increased the volume of distribution. Local interstitial drug delivery targeting tumor surrounding brain tissue before tumor removal should be more effective when targeting the invading cells.