Science.gov

Sample records for adenomatoid odontogenic tumors

  1. Cystic Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sonal; Rahim, Ahmed Mujib Bangalore; Parakkat, Nithin Kavassery; Kapoor, Shekhar; Mittal, Kumud; Sharma, Bhushan; Shivappa, Anil Bangalore

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor (AOT) is a well-established benign epithelial lesion of odontogenic origin. Rightfully called “the master of disguise,” this lesion has been known for its varied clinical and histoarchitectural patterns. Not only does AOT predominantly present radiologically as a unilocular cystic lesion enclosing the unerupted tooth (which is commonly mistaken as a dentigerous cyst) but the lesion also presents rarely with a cystic component histopathologically. We present one such unusual case of cystic AOT associated with an impacted canine, mimicking a dentigerous cyst. The present case aims to highlight the difference between cystic AOT and dentigerous cyst radiographically. The exact histogenesis of AOT and its variants still remains obscure. An attempt has been made to hypothesize the new school of thought regarding the origin of AOT. PMID:26579317

  2. An adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in disguise.

    PubMed

    Dhirawani, Rajesh B; Pathak, Sanyog; Mallikaarjuna, K; Sharma, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a slowly growing benign tumor of the oral cavity. It accounts of 3-7% of all odontogenic tumors. It is seen to occur commonly in the anterior maxilla. The tumor is usually associated with an impacted tooth with maxillary canine being the most common tooth. AOT is seen in a younger group, especially below 20 years with a female preponderance. AOT occurs in two main variants: Central or intraosseous which is more common and second is peripheral which is rare. Radiologically, it represents as a radiolucent lesion with radiopaque foci usually an impacted or a supernumerary tooth. With a close clinical and radiographic resemblance to dentigerous cyst correct diagnosis and treatment is necessary. AOT being benign in nature requires a conservative management with enucleation. This is a case report of a 13-year-old girl with an AOT occurring in the anterior maxillary region. PMID:27461816

  3. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: A unique report with histological diversity

    PubMed Central

    Mutalik, Vimi S; Shreshtha, Ashish; Mutalik, Sunil S; Radhakrishnan, Raghu

    2012-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors are a group of heterogeneous lesions, features of which have been catalogued for several decades. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a relatively rare and distinct odontogenic tumor that is exclusively odontogenic epithelium in origin. Although considerable number of reports is available with regard to the clinical and histological spectrum of AOT, very few have highlighted its varied histological presentations. Therefore, this article focuses on the assorted histoarchitectural patterns of AOT. PMID:22438651

  4. Follicular Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor in Mandible: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Belgaumi, UI; Parkar, MI; Malik, NA; Suresh, KV; Havewala, AM; Bhalinge, PM

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a relatively rare, benign, hamartomatous, and cystic odontogenic neoplasm that was first described more than a century ago. The lesion still continues to intrigue experts with its varied histomorphology and controversies regarding its development. The present article describes a case of cystic AOT with an unusual histomorphology associated with an impacted 44 in a 21-year-old male. PMID:27057389

  5. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor with peripheral cemento-osseous reactive proliferation: report of 2 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Aparna; Slater, Lee J; Hamao-Sakamoto, Aya; Waters, Patrick; Kessler, Harvey P; Wright, John M

    2016-09-01

    Two cases of a rare variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor encompassed by a prominent reactive cemento-osseous proliferation are reported. This unique variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor has only been seen twice in the authors' collective experience. Literature documenting the histopathologic patterns of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor and the occurrence of other combined lesions other is reviewed and discussed. PMID:26899293

  6. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor with peripheral cemento-osseous reactive proliferation: report of 2 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Aparna; Slater, Lee J; Hamao-Sakamoto, Aya; Waters, Patrick; Kessler, Harvey P; Wright, John M

    2016-09-01

    Two cases of a rare variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor encompassed by a prominent reactive cemento-osseous proliferation are reported. This unique variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor has only been seen twice in the authors' collective experience. Literature documenting the histopathologic patterns of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor and the occurrence of other combined lesions other is reviewed and discussed.

  7. Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: I. Ameloblastoma and Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Sook

    2013-01-01

    Ameloblastomas and adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs) are common epithelial tumors of odontogenic origin. Ameloblastomas are clinico-pathologically classified into solid/multicystic, unicystic, desmoplastic, and peripheral types, and also divided into follicular, plexiform, acanthomatous, granular types, etc., based on their histological features. Craniopharyngiomas, derived from the remnants of Rathke's pouch or a misplaced enamel organ, are also comparable to the odontogenic tumors. The malignant transformation of ameloblastomas results in the formation of ameloblastic carcinomas and malignant ameloblastomas depending on cytological dysplasia and metastasis, respectively. AOTs are classified into follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral types. Ameloblastomas are common, have an aggressive behavior and recurrent course, and are rarely metastatic, while AOTs are hamartomatous benign lesions derived from the complex system of the dental lamina or its remnants. With advances in the elucidation of molecular signaling mechanisms in cells, the cytodifferentiation of epithelial tumor cells in ameloblastomas and AOTs can be identified using different biomarkers. Therefore, it is suggested that comprehensive pathological observation including molecular genetic information can provide a more reliable differential diagnosis for the propagation and prognosis of ameloblastomas and AOTs. This study aimed to review the current concepts of ameloblastomas and AOTs and to discuss their clinico-pathological features relevant to tumorigenesis and prognosis. PMID:23837011

  8. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma: a case report and critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Castro, Wagner Henriques; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Loyola, Adriano Mota

    2013-08-09

    We describe a case of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) associated with odontoma occurring in the posterior mandible of a 32-year-old man. Although calcifications are commonly found in the AOT, the presence of rudimentary dental structures is a very rare phenomenon. Cases with similar aspects have been described as ameloblastic dentinoma, ameloblastic odontoma, adenoameloblastic odontoma and AOT associated with odontoma. After a careful analysis of the literature we describe the clinical aspects of this tumor. Further case reports and surveys of odontogenic tumors are necessary to define whether AOT associated with odontoma is a variant of AOT or a distinct clinicopathologic condition.

  9. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with an unerupted mandibular lateral incisor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare, benign odontogenic tumor that predominantly appears in the second decade of life in female patients. Most AOTs occur in the anterior part of the maxilla and are usually associated with impacted anterior teeth. There are three types of AOT, follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral, which are classified based on the location of the lesion and its association with the impacted tooth. We report a rare case of AOT associated with an impacted right mandibular lateral incisor in an 11-year-old female patient. PMID:26734563

  10. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with dentigerous cyst of the maxillary antrum: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Simarpreet V; Narang, Ramandeep S; Jawanda, Manveen; Rai, Sachin

    2010-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is an uncommon tumor of odontogenic origin composed of odontogenic epithelium in a variety of histoarchitectural patterns. Most cases are in females and have a striking tendency to occur in the anterior maxilla. However, AOT of the maxillary antrum is extremely rare. A 25-year-old female presented with a large radiolucent lesion associated with the crown of an unerupted canine located in the maxillary antrum, which was clinically diagnosed as dentigerous cyst. The microscopic examination revealed the presence of AOT in the fibrous capsule of a dentigerous cyst. Very few cases of AOT associated with dentigerous cyst have been reported till date. A case of gigantic AOT that occupied the maxillary sinus and associated with dentigerous cyst is described. Also, an attempt has been made to determine whether the AOT derived from the dentigerous cyst could represent a distinct hybrid variety. PMID:21180455

  11. Case Presentation of Concomitant and Contiguous Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor and Focal Cemento-Ossifying Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Gita; Donoghue, Mandana; Reichart, Peter A; Pazuhi, Neda

    2015-01-01

    A 24 year-old male was presented for the diagnosis of an asymptomatic bony expansion in relation to the right maxillary canine and first premolar. The unilocular radiolucent lesion with central foci of calcification had caused divergence of canine and first premolar roots without any resorption. This case report details a diagnosis of two distinct disease processes of different cellular origin namely, focal cemento-ossifying dysplasia and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in a previously unreported concomitant and contiguous relationship. The diagnosis was determined by a combination of clinical, radiographic, histopathological and surgical evidence. This case highlights two points, first the need to examine all mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesions with advanced imaging techniques to assess the number and extent of the lesions prior to treatment planning. Second a likely role of periodontal ligament as the tissue source for odontogenic epithelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells required for the development of odontogenic tumors and cemento-osseous dysplasias. PMID:26464605

  12. Case Presentation of Concomitant and Contiguous Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor and Focal Cemento-Ossifying Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Gita; Donoghue, Mandana; Reichart, Peter A; Pazuhi, Neda

    2015-01-01

    A 24 year-old male was presented for the diagnosis of an asymptomatic bony expansion in relation to the right maxillary canine and first premolar. The unilocular radiolucent lesion with central foci of calcification had caused divergence of canine and first premolar roots without any resorption. This case report details a diagnosis of two distinct disease processes of different cellular origin namely, focal cemento-ossifying dysplasia and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in a previously unreported concomitant and contiguous relationship. The diagnosis was determined by a combination of clinical, radiographic, histopathological and surgical evidence. This case highlights two points, first the need to examine all mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesions with advanced imaging techniques to assess the number and extent of the lesions prior to treatment planning. Second a likely role of periodontal ligament as the tissue source for odontogenic epithelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells required for the development of odontogenic tumors and cemento-osseous dysplasias.

  13. Concomitant occurrence of cemento-ossifying fibroma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor with bilateral impacted permanent canines in the mandible.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A Ravi; Reddy, P Sreenivas; Bavle, Radhika M

    2012-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is an uncommon, benign and slow growing odontogenic tumor, which is usually located in an anterior region of the maxilla without pain. Cemento-ossifying fibroma (COF) is a relatively rare benign tumor of the jaw. Here we present 2 lesions presenting in unusual forms, follicular variant of AOT in the mandible and COF associated with impacted canine in the mandible, occurring concomitantly in the same patient. Both lesions presented classic histopathologic features.

  14. The role of stroma in the expansion of odontogenic cysts and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: A polarized microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Aarti M.; Mahajan, Mahendra C.; Ganvir, S. M.; Hazarey, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the polarization colors of collagen fibers of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst, and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) with reference to their biological behavior. Study Design: Twenty cases each of OKC, radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst, and AOT were stained with picrosirius red stain and studied under polarized light. Results: A predominance of green to greenish yellow thick fibers was noted in OKC and AOT as compared to dentigerous cyst and radicular cyst. There was no significant difference between the polarization colors of the thin fibers in all the three groups. Conclusion: The stroma of OKC and AOT consists of poorly packed or pathologic collagen and plays a role in its neoplastic behavior. PMID:24082724

  15. An unusually large aggressive adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of maxilla involving the third molar: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Dhupar, Vikas; Akkara, Francis; Khandelwal, Pulkit

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare tumor comprising only 3% of all odontogenic tumors. It is a benign, encapsulated, noninvasive, nonaggressive, slowly growing odontogenic lesion associated with an impacted tooth. These lesions may go unnoticed for years. The usual treatment is enucleation and curettage, and the lesion does not recur. Here, we present a rare case of an unusually large aggressive AOT of maxilla associated with impacted third molar. The authors also discuss clinical, radiographic, histopathologic, and therapeutic features of the case. Subtotal maxillectomy with simultaneous reconstruction of the surgical defect with temporalis myofascial flap was planned and carried out. PMID:27095910

  16. Expression of CK14 and vimentin in adenomatoid odontogenic tumor and dentigerous cyst

    PubMed Central

    Sudhakara, Muniswamappa; Rudrayya, S Puranik; Vanaki, Srineevas S; Bhullar, RamanPreet Kaur; Shivakumar, MS; Hosur, Mahadevi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Origin of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) has long been a controversy, and the issue of it being a neoplasm or hamartoma was a subject of debate for a long time. Earlier it was grouped under a mixed group of odontogenic tumors considering the varying degrees of inductive changes. Recently, the WHO classification states that the presence of hard tissue within AOT was not due to induction but was rather a metaplastically produced mineralization and hence the tumor was reclassified under a group of tumors arising from odontogenic epithelium. This study is an attempt to identify if both epithelial (cytokeratin 14 [CK14]) and mesenchymal (vimentin) markers are expressed in the follicular and extrafollicular variants of AOT and to compare the expression with dentigerous cyst (DC) as this cyst is known to arise from reduced enamel epithelium which expressed CK14. This is done to possibly relate the origin of AOT with reduced enamel epithelium. Aims and Objectives: To study, analyze and correlate the expression of CK14 and vimentin in AOT and DC. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study on paraffin embedded tissues. Sixteen cases of AOT and 15 cases of DC were retrieved from the departmental archives and subjected to CK14 and vimentin immunostaining. Statistical Methods: Measures of central tendency was used to analyze the results. Results and Observations: Ninety percent of cases of follicular AOT (FAOT) and 100% cases of extra-follicular AOTs (EAOTs) showed positivity for CK14 and all cases of DC showed positivity for CK14. Vimentin was positive in 44% and negative in 56% cases of both FAOT and EAOT taken together. Conclusion: The CK14 expression profile in AOT and DC supports its odontogenic epithelial specific nature. The possible role of reduced enamel epithelium and dental lamina in histogenesis of AOT and DC is strongly evident by their CK14 expression pattern. PMID:27721599

  17. Extensive Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor of the Maxilla: A Case Report of Conservative Surgical Excision and Orthodontic Alignment of Impacted Canine

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jee-Won

    2014-01-01

    The present report describe the surgical therapy, clinical course, orthodontic treatment and morphological characteristics of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in the maxilla of an 11-year-old patient. The cystic tumor filled the maxillary sinus and involved a tooth. Marsupialization was accompanied by partial enucleation and applied traction to the affected tooth by a fixed orthodontic appliance. Healing was uneventful and no local recurrence was observed during a 1-year period of follow-up control. PMID:27489830

  18. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour in a 20-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Virupakshappa, Deepti; Rajashekhara, Bhari Sharanesha; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha; Das, Nagarajappa

    2014-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour is a relatively rare and distinct odontogenic tumour that is exclusively odontogenic epithelium in origin. It comprises 3% of all odontogenic tumours. This report describes the surgical therapy, clinical course and morphological characteristics of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumour that developed in the left maxilla of a 20-year-old patient. PMID:24810436

  19. Dentigerous Cyst Associated with Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Uppala, Divya; Talasila, Sunil; Babu, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT), a tumour composed of odontogenic epithelium, is an uncommon tumour of odontogenic origin that accounts for only 2.2- 7.1% of all odontogenic tumours. Very few cases of AOT associated with Dentigerous cyst (DC) have been reported till date, most cases are in females and have a striking tendency to occur in the anterior maxilla. The present case is that of a 14-year-old female who revealed a large radiolucent lesion associated with the crown of an unerupted canine located in the left maxillary anterior region. The microscopic examination revealed the presence of AOT in the fibrous capsule of a DC. In this paper, we describe the importance of grossing, sectioning and complete examination of the slide to diagnose such hybrid lesions. PMID:26155575

  20. The adenomatoid odontogenic tumour: an update of selected issues.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, Hans Peter; Khongkhunthiang, Pathawee; Reichart, Peter A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this update was to present the recent notable progress within remaining questions relating to the adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT). Selected issues that were studied included the following: (i) AOT history and terminology, (ii) the so-called peripheral AOT, (iii) AOT and the gubernaculum dentis and (iv) the so-called adenomatoid odontogenic cyst (AOC). The earliest irrefutable European case of AOT was described in 1915 by Harbitz as 'cystic adamantoma'. Recently, Ide et al. have traced two Japanese cases with irrefutable proof described by Nakayama in 1903. The so-called peripheral (gingival) variant of AOT seems to cover a dual pathogenesis, both an 'erupted intraosseous' and an 'extraosseous' (gingival) one. In 1992, we theorized that the generally unnoticed gubernaculum dentis (cord and canal) seems to be involved in the development of AOT. Ide et al. have concluded that the dental lamina in the gubernacular cord seems to be an embryonic source of the vast majority of AOTs. The suggestion by Marx and Stern to change the nomenclature of AOT to adenomatoid odontogenic cyst (AOC) is critically discussed. The present authors agree on the background of the work of several groups of researchers and WHO/IARC classifications that the biology of the follicular variant of AOT is already fully explained and does not make room for any change in diagnostic terms. Further, there is no reason to change terminology in this case where improvements or conditions to better clinical management are not an issue. PMID:26865435

  1. Pediatric Odontogenic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Joshua M; McClure, Shawn A

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric odontogenic tumors are rare, and are often associated with impacted teeth. Although they can develop anywhere in the jaws, odontogenic tumors mainly occur in the posterior mandible. This article discusses the diagnosis and treatment of the most common pediatric odontogenic tumors, such as ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontoma, and cementoblastoma.

  2. Adenomatoid tumor of the pleura.

    PubMed

    Minato, Hiroshi; Nojima, Takayuki; Kurose, Nozomu; Kinoshita, Eriko

    2009-08-01

    A case of adenomatoid tumor of the pleura is reported, and its differential diagnosis from benign and malignant pleural lesions is discussed. A small pleural nodule was incidentally found during a thoracic operation in a 54-year-old woman with esophageal cancer. The patient had no history of exposure to asbestos, and was well with no sign of recurrence 14 months after the operation. A 7 mm, circumscribed tumor had characteristic features of adenomatoid tumor. The tumor was composed of an aggregation of irregularly shaped tubulocystic spaces with fibrous stoma. The spaces were lined by flattened and occasional cuboidal epithelioid cells with cytoplasmic vacuolization, and several spaces contained pale blue mucinous fluid. On immunohistochemistry the tumor cells were positive for AE1/AE3, CAM5.2, vimentin, cytokeratin 5/6, D2-40, calretinin, thrombomodulin, and WT-1, but negative for CEA, Leu M1 (CD15), thyroid transcription factor-1, epithelial membrane antigen, desmin, glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), CD31, and CD34. The MIB-1 (Ki-67) labeling index was 1-2%, indicating low proliferative activity. Adenomatoid tumor of the pleura is rare, and the pathogenesis has not been elucidated. Recognition of these benign mesothelial lesions in the pleura is important to avoid misdiagnosis. The immunohistochemistry in the present case supports its mesothelial origin.

  3. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour: tumour or a cyst, a histopathological support for the controversy.

    PubMed

    Gadewar, Dilip R; Srikant, N

    2010-04-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT) is a well-established odontogenic tumour with various clinicopathological variants. AOT quite frequently mimics an odontogenic cyst commonly a dentigerous cyst. Histologically a cystic component of AOT has been described in the literature. In the present paper we review the literature for the AOTs arising in an odontogenic cyst and add to the literature a case of cystic AOT. The present review is aimed to provide an insight to the varied demographic profile, clinical behavior and prognosis of cystic variant of AOT.

  4. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblast density in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    PubMed

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Jabbari, Golchin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate myofibroblast (MF) density in a broad spectrum of odontogenic cysts and tumors and the relation between the density of MFs and the clinical behavior of these lesions. Methods. A total of 105 cases of odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), solid ameloblastoma (SA), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), radicular cyst (RC) (15 for each category), and odontogenic myxoma (OM), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) (10 for each category), were immunohistochemically stained with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The mean percentage of positive cells in 10 high-power fields was considered as MF density for each case. Results. A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean scores between the study groups (P < 0.001). The intensity of MFs was significantly higher in odontogenic tumors compared to odontogenic cysts (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between odontogenic tumors, except between UAM and OM (P = 0.041). The difference between OKC and odontogenic tumors was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The number of MFs was significantly higher in OKC and lower in COC compared to other odontogenic cysts (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045, respectively). Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest a role for MFs in the aggressive behavior of odontogenic lesions. MFs may represent an important target of therapy, especially for aggressive odontogenic lesions. Our findings support the classification of OKC in the category of odontogenic tumors. PMID:27092213

  5. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblast density in odontogenic cysts and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Jabbari, Golchin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate myofibroblast (MF) density in a broad spectrum of odontogenic cysts and tumors and the relation between the density of MFs and the clinical behavior of these lesions. Methods. A total of 105 cases of odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), solid ameloblastoma (SA), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), radicular cyst (RC) (15 for each category), and odontogenic myxoma (OM), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) (10 for each category), were immunohistochemically stained with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The mean percentage of positive cells in 10 high-power fields was considered as MF density for each case. Results. A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean scores between the study groups (P < 0.001). The intensity of MFs was significantly higher in odontogenic tumors compared to odontogenic cysts (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between odontogenic tumors, except between UAM and OM (P = 0.041). The difference between OKC and odontogenic tumors was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The number of MFs was significantly higher in OKC and lower in COC compared to other odontogenic cysts (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045, respectively). Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest a role for MFs in the aggressive behavior of odontogenic lesions. MFs may represent an important target of therapy, especially for aggressive odontogenic lesions. Our findings support the classification of OKC in the category of odontogenic tumors. PMID:27092213

  6. A retrospective review of 61 cases of adenomatoid odontogenic tumour seen in five tertiary health facilities in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adisa, Akinyele Olumuyiwa; Lawal, Ahmed Oluwatoyin; Effiom, Olajumoke Ajibola; Soyele, Olujide Oladele; Omitola, Olufemi Gbenga; Olawuyi, Adetokunbo; Fomete, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a benign lesion originating from the dental lamina or its remnants. It is a relatively uncommon neoplasm representing about 3% of all odontogenic tumors. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical and radiological characteristics of AOTs in five major tertiary centres in Nigeria. Methods Archival hospital-based data stores of five tertiary health facilities in Nigeria were accessed. Case files and biopsy records were retrieved to obtain relevant information. Data was collected according to a proforma for standardization and entered into and analysed using SPSS for Windows (version 20.0; SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL). Results 61 (4.5%) cases of AOT were documented. The age range was 8-46 years with a mean age of 20.4±9.9 years. Male: Female ratio was 1:1.3. The anterior maxilla had 34 (55.8%) cases and the anterior mandible had 20 (32.8%) cases. 40 (65.6%) follicular cases, 20 (32.8%) extra-follicular cases and 1(1.6%) extra-osseous case were found. 31 cases (61.1%) were associated with impacted teeth and the upper canine was involved in 19 (57.6%) cases. Conclusion This study showed AOT to be more common in the maxilla, more in females, most often associated with impacted canines, however, the suggestion of AOT being a “Two third tumour” was not observed in this study. PMID:27642441

  7. Adenomatoid tumor of testis: A rare cytological diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Makkar, M; Dayal, P; Gupta, C; Mahajan, NC

    2013-01-01

    Adenomatoid tumor is a benign neoplasm of the male and female genital tracts arising from mesothelial cells. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) plays a pivotal role in its preoperative diagnosis. Therefore, it is imperative that pathologists should be well aware of its cytological features so as to avoid erroneous diagnosis and hence prevent unnecessary surgical interventions. We hereby, present a case of adenomatoid tumor of testis in a 41 year male diagnosed by FNAC and later confirmed by histopathological examination. PMID:23661947

  8. Characteristic features of the adenomatoid odontogenic tumour on cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, M; Wang, H; Xu, L

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To illustrate characteristic features of adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT) on CBCT. Methods: The archived CBCT and panoramic radiographs of eight patients histopathologically diagnosed as AOT were analysed. The radiographic features displayed on both radiographic images were carefully described and compared. Results: All eight AOT cases presented as unilocular and well-demarcated lesions on both CBCT and panoramic images. CBCT images displayed three-dimensional interpretation of AOT lesions, especially the detailed intralesional radiopacities. Numerous discrete radiopaque foci scattered in the lesion with evident contrast to the radiolucent background could be considered as one of the characteristic features of AOT on CBCT. Conclusions: Compared with panoramic radiography, CBCT seems to possess better potential in diagnosing AOT. PMID:24940808

  9. Clonality assessment of adenomatoid tumor supports its neoplastic nature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Huiting; Wang, Jigang; Wang, Shuyang; Wang, Diyi; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhu, Hongguang

    2016-02-01

    Adenomatoid tumor is a relatively rare disease that predominantly involves male and female internal genital tracts. Although its clinical and pathologic features are well characterized, there is still controversy regarding its nature as a true neoplasm or a variant of mesothelial hyperplasia of a reactive nature. We sought to resolve this debate by investigating the clonality of uterine adenomatoid tumor from 13 female cases. The mesothelial cells and surrounding normal myometrium were precisely harvested using laser capture microdissection, and genomic DNA was extracted for clonal analysis by assessing the patterns of X-chromosome inactivation. Fluorescent polymerase chain reaction amplification of a highly polymorphic short tandem repeat of the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) gene with and without methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease HpaII digestion was performed on DNA extracted from mesothelial cells, using normal myometrium and male blood sample as controls. Of the 13 cases successfully amplified, all 10 informative cases showed concordant nonrandom X-chromosome inactivation pattern consistent with monoclonality. In comparison, surrounding normal myometrium showed a polyclonal pattern of X-chromosome inactivation, and male blood sample failed to be amplified after HpaII treatment. Our results demonstrate that adenomatoid tumor is a monoclonal disease favoring a neoplastic process. This neoplastic rather than reactive nature probably accounts for its frequently observed infiltrative growth pattern and the occurrence of diffuse adenomatoid tumor, especially when host immunity is compromised. Additional studies with larger sample sizes will be needed to conclusively prove our conclusion. PMID:26772404

  10. Kallikrein 4 and matrix metalloproteinase-20 immunoexpression in malignant, benign and infiltrative odontogenic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crivelini, Marcelo Macedo; Oliveira, Denise Tostes; de Mesquita, Ricardo Alves; de Sousa, Suzana Cantanhede Orsini Machado; Loyola, Adriano Motta

    2016-01-01

    Context: Matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP20) (enamelysin) and kallikrein 4 (KLK4) are enzymes secreted by ameloblasts that play an important role in enamel matrix degradation during amelogenesis. However, studies have shown that neoplastic cells can produce such enzymes, which may affect the tumor infiltrative and metastatic behaviors. Aims: The aim of this study is to assess the biological role of MMP20 and KLK4 in odontogenic tumors. Materials and Methods: The enzymes were analyzed immunohistochemically in ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, keratocystic odontogenic tumor with or without recurrence and odontogenic carcinoma. Statistical Analysis Used: Clinicopathological parameters were statistically correlated with protein expression using the Fisher's exact test. Kruskal–Wallis and Wilcoxon-independent methods were used to evaluate the differences in median values. Results: Positive Immunoexpression was detected in all benign lesions, with a prevalence of 75–100% immunolabeled cells. Patients were predominantly young, Caucasian, female, with slow-growing tumors located in the mandible causing asymptomatic swelling. No KLK4 expression was seen in carcinomas, and the amount of MMP20-positive cells varied between 20% and 80%. Rapid evolution, recurrence and age >60 years characterized the malignant nature of these lesions. Conclusions: Data showed that KLK4 and MMP20 enzymes may not be crucial to tumoral infiltrative capacity, especially in malignant tumors, considering the diversity and peculiarity of these lesions. The significant immunoexpression in benign lesions, remarkably in AOT, is likely associated with differentiated tumor cells that can produce and degrade enamel matrix-like substances. This would be expected since the histogenesis of odontogenic tumors commonly comes from epithelium that recently performed a secretory activity in tooth formation. PMID:27601817

  11. Pigmented odontogenic tumors: Adding color to diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Bhanu, Udhay; Kulkarni, Rasika; Boaz, Karen; Srikant, N

    2014-01-01

    Melanocytes are neural crest derivatives that exhibit a ubiquitous presence in the epidermis. They determine the complexion of an individual and most importantly, provide a barrier against ultraviolet radiations from the sun. Their presence in the oral cavity is a consistent finding, especially in the gingiva and buccal mucosa of the dark complexioned. Melanocytes occasionally form a part of the histology of a variety of odontogenic cysts and tumors. How these cells make their way into the lesional tissue and the diagnostic relevance of their presence remains elusive. This write up attempts to trace the path melanocytes take to find themselves within odontogenic tumors and also offer possible explanations for the same.

  12. c-Myc oncogene expression in selected odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Moosvi, Zama; Rekha, K

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of c-Myc oncogene in selected odontogenic cysts and tumors. Materials and Methods: Ten cases each of ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst, and radicular cyst were selected and primary monoclonal mouse anti-human c-Myc antibody was used in a dilution of 1: 50. Statistical Analysis was performed using Mann Whitney U test. Results: 80% positivity was observed in ameloblastoma, AOT and OKC; 50% positivity in radicular cyst and 20% positivity in dentigerous cyst. Comparison of c-Myc expression between ameloblastoma and AOT did not reveal significant results. Similarly, no statistical significance was observed when results of OKC were compared with ameloblastoma and AOT. In contrast, significant differences were seen on comparison of dentigerous cyst with ameloblastoma and AOT and radicular cyst with AOT. Conclusion: From the above data we conclude that (1) Ameloblastoma and AOT have similar proliferative potential and their biologic behavior cannot possibly be attributed to it. (2) OKC has an intrinsic growth potential which is absent in other cysts and reinforces its classification as keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PMID:23798830

  13. Classification of odontogenic cysts and tumors - Antecedents.

    PubMed

    Imran, Aesha; Jayanthi, P; Tanveer, Shahela; Gobu, Sreeja C

    2016-01-01

    Pierre Paul Broca produced a monograph on tumor classification which also included the classification of odontogenic tumors (OTs). The terminology used to describe malignant epithelial OTs has varied since the World Health Organization published the initial consensus on the taxonomy of OTs. Minor changes were introduced in the second edition. It is only in the very recent years that additional knowledge has accumulated and refined the classification. This review emphasizes on reasons for modification by each author and the recent acceptance.

  14. Classification of odontogenic cysts and tumors - Antecedents.

    PubMed

    Imran, Aesha; Jayanthi, P; Tanveer, Shahela; Gobu, Sreeja C

    2016-01-01

    Pierre Paul Broca produced a monograph on tumor classification which also included the classification of odontogenic tumors (OTs). The terminology used to describe malignant epithelial OTs has varied since the World Health Organization published the initial consensus on the taxonomy of OTs. Minor changes were introduced in the second edition. It is only in the very recent years that additional knowledge has accumulated and refined the classification. This review emphasizes on reasons for modification by each author and the recent acceptance. PMID:27601821

  15. Comprehensive keratin profiling reveals different histopathogenesis of keratocystic odontogenic tumor and orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst.

    PubMed

    Aragaki, Tadanobu; Michi, Yasuyuki; Katsube, Ken-ichi; Uzawa, Narikazu; Okada, Norihiko; Akashi, Takumi; Amagasa, Teruo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Sakamoto, Kei

    2010-12-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor is a cystic lesion that behaves more aggressively than other jaw cysts. One of its characteristic histologic features is a parakeratinized uniform layer of lining epithelium. A jaw cyst lined with orthokeratinized epithelium is called an orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst. These keratinized jaw cysts are thought to be separate entities, although their histopathogenesis has not been fully assessed. To better understand these lesions, we performed comprehensive immunohistochemical profiling of the keratin expression of each. Orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts expressed keratin 1, keratin 2, keratin 10, and loricrin, suggesting differentiation toward normal epidermis. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors expressed keratin 4, keratin 13, keratin 17, and keratin 19, which is a unique expression pattern reminiscent of a mucosal squamous epithelium and an epithelial appendage. In neonatal rat tooth germ, cells strongly positive for keratin 17 and keratin 19 were observed, specifically in the dental lamina, implying the origin of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. GLI2, a downstream effector of hedgehog signaling, was significantly expressed in keratocystic odontogenic tumor and basal cell carcinoma, accompanied with robust expression of keratin 17, mammalian target of rapamycin, and BCL2. The expression of these GLI2- or keratin 17-related factors was not significantly observed in orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts. These findings provide evidence to support the viewpoint that keratocystic odontogenic tumor and orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst are separate entities, and furthermore suggest their characteristic histology, pathogenesis, and biological behaviors.

  16. Pigmented odontogenic tumors: Adding color to diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Bhanu, Udhay; Kulkarni, Rasika; Boaz, Karen; Srikant, N

    2014-01-01

    Melanocytes are neural crest derivatives that exhibit a ubiquitous presence in the epidermis. They determine the complexion of an individual and most importantly, provide a barrier against ultraviolet radiations from the sun. Their presence in the oral cavity is a consistent finding, especially in the gingiva and buccal mucosa of the dark complexioned. Melanocytes occasionally form a part of the histology of a variety of odontogenic cysts and tumors. How these cells make their way into the lesional tissue and the diagnostic relevance of their presence remains elusive. This write up attempts to trace the path melanocytes take to find themselves within odontogenic tumors and also offer possible explanations for the same. PMID:25948995

  17. Different manifestations of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Utumi, Estevam Rubens; Pedron, Irineu Gregnanin; da Silva, Leopoldo Penteado Nucci; Machado, Gustavo Grothe; Rocha, André Caroli

    2012-01-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor normally presents as a painless, slow-growing mass, involving both maxilla and mandible, primarily the anterior segment (incisor/canine area). It generally affects young adults in the third to fourth decades, with no gender predilection. Computerized tomography images revealed important characteristics that were not detected by panoramic radiography, such as fenestration, calcification and tooth-like structures. The typical microscopic feature of this lesion is the presence of variable amounts of aberrant epithelial cells, without nuclei, which are named "ghost cells". In addition, dysplastic dentine can be found and occasionally the cyst can be associated with an area of dental hard tissue formation resembling an odontoma. The treatment for calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor involves simple enucleation and curettage. The purpose of this article is to present two different manifestation of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor in which computerized tomography, associated to clinical features, served as an important tool for diagnosis, adequate surgical planning and follow-up of patients.

  18. [Benign odontogenic tumor in the lower jaw: A case report].

    PubMed

    Bassetti, Renzo; Tomasetti, Patrick; Crameri, Manuel; Kuttenberger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Odontomas are classified within the group of odontogenic epithelial tumors with odontogenic ectomesenchyme with or without hard tissue formation. Together with ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors they are counted among the most common odontogenic tumors. Their growth is self-limiting and mostly, they are discovered accidentally as part of a x-ray examination. A common finding is that odontomas are associated with an unerupted permanent tooth. The aim of the present case report is to present the step-by-step procedure of a surgical odontoma removal in the lingual premolar/canine area of the lower jaw. PMID:27142310

  19. [Benign odontogenic tumor in the lower jaw: A case report].

    PubMed

    Bassetti, Renzo; Tomasetti, Patrick; Crameri, Manuel; Kuttenberger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Odontomas are classified within the group of odontogenic epithelial tumors with odontogenic ectomesenchyme with or without hard tissue formation. Together with ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors they are counted among the most common odontogenic tumors. Their growth is self-limiting and mostly, they are discovered accidentally as part of a x-ray examination. A common finding is that odontomas are associated with an unerupted permanent tooth. The aim of the present case report is to present the step-by-step procedure of a surgical odontoma removal in the lingual premolar/canine area of the lower jaw.

  20. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with ameloblastic fibro-odontoma of the anterior mandible.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun; Song, Young-Gook; Moon, Seong-Yong; Choi, Boyoung; Kim, Bong Chul; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2014-05-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, which was formerly named calcifying odontogenic cyst, is a benign odontogenic tumor containing clusters of ghost cells within ameloblastic epithelium. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors have been associated with other odontogenic tumors, a finding that is a rare event in other types of odontogenic cysts or tumors. This report describes a case of hybrid odontogenic tumor composed of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastic fibroma-odontoma of the anterior mandible that occurred in a 4-year-old Korean girl.

  1. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Kavita; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Fareed, Wamiq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/conttrollers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors. PMID:26221475

  2. Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor with an Ectopic Tooth in Maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Bhagawati, Basavaraj T.; Gupta, Manish; Narang, Gaurav; Bhagawati, Sharanamma

    2013-01-01

    The term odontogenic keratocyst was first used by Philipsen in the year 1956. The lesion was renamed by him as keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and reclassified as odontogenic neoplasm in the World Health Organization's 2005 edition that occurs commonly in the jaws having a predilection for the angle and ascending ramus of mandible. In contrast, KCOTs arising in the maxillary premolar region are relatively rare. Here, we discuss a rare case of keratocystic odontogenic tumor occurring in the maxilla with an ectopic tooth position. PMID:24396609

  3. Odontogenic tumors in Port Harcourt: South–South geopolitical zone of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Iyogun, CA; Omitola, OG; Ukegheson, GE

    2016-01-01

    Aim: A retrospective study of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in Port Harcourt was undertaken to establish its prevalence and compare with known data in the literature from Nigeria and elsewhere. Materials and Methods: All pathologically diagnosed OTs between 2008 and 2013 at the archives of the Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Biology of the University of Port Harcourt/University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital were retrospectively studied and classified according to the 2005 WHO classification of OTs and allied diseases. These were recorded into a computer and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 21.0, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: A total of sixty-three cases of OTs were recorded for the period under review. Fifty-two of these were cases of ameloblastoma (82.54%). This was followed by adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT) 4 (6.35%) and odontogenic myxoma 3 (4.76%). Most lesions were seen within the second to fourth decades of life and mandible was most frequently affected. Conclusion: It is concluded that the pattern of occurrence of OTs in Port Harcourt followed a general pattern in Nigeria and other African countries but slightly differs from findings from other parts of the world.

  4. Odontogenic tumors in Port Harcourt: South–South geopolitical zone of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Iyogun, CA; Omitola, OG; Ukegheson, GE

    2016-01-01

    Aim: A retrospective study of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in Port Harcourt was undertaken to establish its prevalence and compare with known data in the literature from Nigeria and elsewhere. Materials and Methods: All pathologically diagnosed OTs between 2008 and 2013 at the archives of the Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Biology of the University of Port Harcourt/University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital were retrospectively studied and classified according to the 2005 WHO classification of OTs and allied diseases. These were recorded into a computer and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 21.0, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: A total of sixty-three cases of OTs were recorded for the period under review. Fifty-two of these were cases of ameloblastoma (82.54%). This was followed by adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT) 4 (6.35%) and odontogenic myxoma 3 (4.76%). Most lesions were seen within the second to fourth decades of life and mandible was most frequently affected. Conclusion: It is concluded that the pattern of occurrence of OTs in Port Harcourt followed a general pattern in Nigeria and other African countries but slightly differs from findings from other parts of the world. PMID:27601807

  5. p53 and PCNA Expression in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors Compared with Selected Odontogenic Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Seyedmajidi, Maryam; Nafarzadeh, Shima; Siadati, Sepideh; Shafaee, Shahryar; Bijani, Ali; Keshmiri, Nazanin

    2013-01-01

    p53 and PCNA expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumors compared with selected odontogenic cysts Summary: The aim of this study was to evaluate p53 and PCNA expression in different odontogenic lesions regarding their different clinical behaviors. Slices prepared from 94 paraffin-embedded tissue blocks (25 radicular cysts (RC), 23 dentigerous cysts (DC), 23 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) and 23 calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors (CCOT)) were stained with p53 and PCNA antibodies using immunohistochemistry procedure. The highest level of p53 expression was in the basal layer of RC, and the highest level of PCNA expression was in the suprabasal layer of KCOT. The differences of p53 expression in basal and suprabasal layers as well as PCNA expression in the suprabasal layer were significant but there was no significant difference in PCNA expression in the basal layer of these lesions. The expression of p53 in the basal layer of RC was higher than in other cysts. This may be due to intensive inflammatory infiltration. Also, the high level of PCNA expression in the suprabasal layer of KCOT may justify its neoplastic nature and tendency to recurrence. KCOT and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors did not show similar expression of studied biomarkers. PMID:24551811

  6. Primordial Odontogenic Tumor: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Slater, Lee J; Eftimie, Liviu F; Herford, Alan S

    2016-03-01

    Primordial odontogenic tumor (POT) was first described in 2014. It typically presents in the posterior mandible of a child or adolescent as a "dentigerous cyst-like" well-circumscribed radiolucency associated with an unerupted molar. POT consists of an ellipsoidal mass of dental papilla-like myxoid connective tissue entirely enveloped in a delicate membrane of ameloblastic epithelium. It shows features of a developing tooth with a huge dental papilla, and because it is devoid of dental hard tissue, it could be regarded a soft tissue odontoma. The lesion histologically mimics early (primordial) stages of tooth development. This report describes a case of POT and POT-like proliferations in an unrelated complex odontoma.

  7. Aspiration cytology of adenomatoid tumor of epididymis: An important diagnostic tool

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S; Garg, S; Agarwal, R; Sen, R

    2012-01-01

    Adenomatoid tumor is a benign mesothelial neoplasm of the paratesticular region in males but can also occur in female genital tracts. The epididymis is the most common site of involvement and constitutes 32% of paratesticular neoplasms. We diagnosed a case of adenomatoid tumor on cytopathology in 24 years old male, who presented with mass lesion right epididymis since 2 months. The diagnosis was confirmed on histopathology and immunohistochemistry after surgical excision of the nodule. FNAC is a rapid, reliable and cost effective diagnostic tool for preoperative diagnosis to take appropriate surgical decisions. Pathologists should be aware of the cytological features of such lesions so as to differentiate it from other paratesticular lesions. PMID:24960828

  8. Adenomatoid tumors of the female and male genital tracts: a clinicopathological and immunohistochemical study of 44 cases.

    PubMed

    Sangoi, Ankur R; McKenney, Jesse K; Schwartz, Erich J; Rouse, Robert V; Longacre, Teri A

    2009-09-01

    Adenomatoid tumors of the female and male genital tracts are well characterized as mesothelial in origin, but a detailed histological and immunohistochemical analysis comparing both traditional and newer mesothelial markers across gender and site has not been formally conducted. A variety of morphologic features previously described as characteristic of adenomatoid tumors were evaluated in 44 adenomatoid tumors from the male and female genital tracts. Immunohistochemical analysis with pankeratin (AE1/CAM5.2), WT-1, calretinin, CK5/6, D2-40, and caldesmon was also performed. The extent and intensity of staining were scored semiquantitatively on one representative section per case and mean value for each parameter was calculated. All (n=44) the adenomatoid tumors from both the female and male genital tracts demonstrated a distinctive thread-like bridging strand pattern. Lymphoid aggregates were seen in all 12 adenomatoid tumors of male patients, but in only 4 of 32 (13%) tumors in female patients (P<0.0001). The remaining morphologic features were variably present with no clear sex predilection. Pankeratin, calretinin, and D2-40 reactivity were identified in all female (n=32) and male (n=12) genital tract adenomatoid tumors. Adenomatoid tumors expressed WT-1 in 11/12 (92%) male patients and in 31/32 (97%) female patients. In male patients, reactivity for CK5/6 and caldesmon was found in 1/12 (8%) and 0/12 (0%) adenomatoid tumors (respectively), whereas reactivity in female patients was found in 5/32 (16%) and 1/32 (3%); respectively. Female tumors differ from their male counterparts by the frequent absence of lymphoid aggregates and the presence of a circumscribed margin when occurring in the fallopian tube. Of the putative mesothelial markers evaluated, calretinin, D2-40, and WT-1 show a similar immunoprofile and have a higher sensitivity than CK5/6 and caldesmon in genital tract adenomatoid tumors. However, the presence of additional, often strong expression of WT

  9. Bilateral keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Srivatsan, K. S.; Kumar, Vikas; Mahendra, Ashish; Singh, Preeti

    2014-01-01

    The designation “keratocyst” was used to describe any jaw cyst in which keratin was formed to a large extent. A rare incidence of bilateral mandibular cysts (odontogenic keratocysts) was related to third molar teeth. Herein, we report two cases of bilateral keratocystic odontogenic tumor in a 22-year-old male and 15-year-old female, which was diagnosed by a series of investigations and treated appropriately. PMID:25298727

  10. Bilateral keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Srivatsan, K S; Kumar, Vikas; Mahendra, Ashish; Singh, Preeti

    2014-01-01

    The designation "keratocyst" was used to describe any jaw cyst in which keratin was formed to a large extent. A rare incidence of bilateral mandibular cysts (odontogenic keratocysts) was related to third molar teeth. Herein, we report two cases of bilateral keratocystic odontogenic tumor in a 22-year-old male and 15-year-old female, which was diagnosed by a series of investigations and treated appropriately.

  11. Midkine expression correlating with growth activity and tooth morphogenesis in odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Shuichi; Seki, Sachiko; Fujiwara, Mutsunori; Ikeda, Tohru

    2008-05-01

    Midkine (MK; a low molecular weight heparin-binding growth factor) is a multifunctional cytokine. MK plays a role in morphogenesis of many organs including teeth through epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. We immunohistochemically examined MK expression in various human odontogenic tumors. There was no difference in positive rate and intensity of MK between benign odontogenic tumors and their malignant counterparts. Ameloblastoma showed MK localization in the peripheral columnar cells in budding processes from the parenchyma, which frequently expressed proliferating cell nuclear antigen. MK was also preferentially expressed in keratinized cells in acanthomatous ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor. In odontogenic mixed tumors except for odontoma, intense immunoreactivity to MK was found in epithelial follicles, the surrounding odontogenic ectomesenchymal tissue, and the basement membrane between them. Intensity in the odontogenic ectomesenchyme decreased in relation to distance from the epithelial follicles. No expression was found in tumor cells associated with production of dental hard tissues in odontogenic mixed tumors including odontoma. These findings suggested that MK is involved in the reciprocal interaction between odontogenic epithelium and odontogenic ectomesenchymal tissue in areas without dental hard tissue formation in odontogenic mixed tumors. Coexpression of MK and proliferating cell nuclear antigen was also observed in epithelial follicles and highly cellular nodules in the ectomesenchyme of odontogenic mixed tumors. MK is considered to mediate growth activity of odontogenic tumors and cell differentiation of odontogenic mixed tumors through molecular mechanisms similar to those involved in morphogenesis of the tooth.

  12. Intraosseous calcifying epithelial odontogenic (Pindborg) tumor: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    More, Chandramani B; Vijayvargiya, Ritika

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a locally aggressive, rare benign odontogenic neoplasm that accounts for <1% of all odontogenic tumors. It was first described by a Dutch pathologist Jens Jorgen Pindborg in 1955. It is most often located in the posterior mandible. The tumor usually appears between the second and sixth decade of life and has no gender predilection. It is slow-growing neoplasm with a recurrence rate of 10–15% and with rare malignant transformation. Early diagnosis is essential to avoid oro-maxillofacial deformation and destruction. CEOT is rarely reported in India. We, herewith present a rare case of CEOT with unusual features associated with an impacted right third molar in the posterior mandible of 35 years male, with an emphasis on clinical, radiographic, histopathology and immunohistochemical features. PMID:26604515

  13. Deep Neck Space Infection Caused by Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji-Su; Kim, Su-Gwan; You, Jae-Seek; Min, Hong-Gi; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Eun-Sik; Kim, Cheol-Man; Lim, Kyung-Seop

    2014-03-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a benign cystic intraosseous tumor of odontogenic origin. An infection of a KCOT is not common because KCOT is a benign developmental neoplasm. Moreover, a severe deep neck space infection with compromised airway caused by infected KCOT is rare. This report presents a 60-year-old male patient with a severe deep neck space infection related to an infected KCOT due to cortical bone perforation and rupture of the exudate. Treatment of the deep neck space infection and KCOT are reported.

  14. Odontogenic calcificant cystic tumor: a report of two clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Daniel; Villanueva, Julio; Espinosa, Sebastián; Cornejo, Marco

    2007-03-01

    Odontogenic Calcificant Cystic Tumor (OCCT) is an infrequent injury. It arises from odontogenic epithelial rests present in the maxilla, jaw or gum. Gorlin and col. described the OCCT for first time as an own pathological entity in 1962. Clinically, the OCCT represents 1% of the odontogenic injuries. It is possible to be found from the first decade to the eighth decade. It affects in same proportion the maxilla and the jaw, being the most common in the dented zones, with greater incidence in the first molar area. Two case reports of OCCT in two different ages, both in female individuals, one at 5 years old and the other at 35 years old are presented. Enucleation of the tumor was the treatment chosen. The purpose of this article is to present a review of the literature related to these two cases of OCCT and its treatment, putting an emphasis on its aetiology, biological behaviour and treatment.

  15. Calcifying odontogenic cyst with atypical features.

    PubMed

    Balaji, S M; Rooban, Thavarajah

    2012-01-01

    The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) was first delineated in 1962. It is a rare developmental odontogenic cyst with notable presence of histopathological features which include a cystic lining demonstrating characteristic "Ghost" epithelial cells with a propensity to calcify. In addition, the COC may be associated with other recognized odontogenic tumors. This gives rise to a spectrum of variants of COC according to clinical, histopathological, and radiological characteristics. Very few reports have actually captured the actual transformation while most reported cases are documents of co-existing lesions. This article presents one such entity, where the asymptomatic presentation misled the diagnosis and on histopathological examination revealed the COC with areas suggestive of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor.

  16. Classification of odontogenic cysts and tumors – Antecedents

    PubMed Central

    Imran, Aesha; Jayanthi, P; Tanveer, Shahela; Gobu, Sreeja C

    2016-01-01

    Pierre Paul Broca produced a monograph on tumor classification which also included the classification of odontogenic tumors (OTs). The terminology used to describe malignant epithelial OTs has varied since the World Health Organization published the initial consensus on the taxonomy of OTs. Minor changes were introduced in the second edition. It is only in the very recent years that additional knowledge has accumulated and refined the classification. This review emphasizes on reasons for modification by each author and the recent acceptance.

  17. Classification of odontogenic cysts and tumors – Antecedents

    PubMed Central

    Imran, Aesha; Jayanthi, P; Tanveer, Shahela; Gobu, Sreeja C

    2016-01-01

    Pierre Paul Broca produced a monograph on tumor classification which also included the classification of odontogenic tumors (OTs). The terminology used to describe malignant epithelial OTs has varied since the World Health Organization published the initial consensus on the taxonomy of OTs. Minor changes were introduced in the second edition. It is only in the very recent years that additional knowledge has accumulated and refined the classification. This review emphasizes on reasons for modification by each author and the recent acceptance. PMID:27601821

  18. Msx and Dlx Homeogene Expression in Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ruhin-Poncet, Blandine; Ghoul-Mazgar, Sonia; Hotton, Dominique; Capron, Frédérique; Jaafoura, Mohamed Habib; Goubin, Gérard; Berdal, Ariane

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial odontogenic tumors are rare jaw pathologies that raise clinical diagnosis and prognosis dilemmas notably between ameloblastomas and clear cell odontogenic carcinomas (CCOCs). In line with previous studies, the molecular determinants of tooth development—amelogenin, Msx1, Msx2, Dlx2, Dlx3, Bmp2, and Bmp4—were analyzed by RT-PCR, ISH, and immunolabeling in 12 recurrent ameloblastomas and in one case of CCOC. Although Msx1 expression imitates normal cell differentiation in these tumors, other genes showed a distinct pattern depending on the type of tumor and the tissue involved. In benign ameloblastomas, ISH localized Dlx3 transcripts and inconstantly detected Msx2 transcripts in epithelial cells. In the CCOC, ISH established a lack of both Dlx3 and Msx2 transcripts but allowed identification of the antisense transcript of Msx1, which imitates the same scheme of distribution between mesenchyme and epithelium as in the cup stage of tooth development. Furthermore, while exploring the expression pattern of signal molecules by RT-PCR, Bmp2 was shown to be completely inactivated in the CCOC and irregularly noticeable in ameloblastomas. Bmp4 was always expressed in all the tumors. Based on the established roles of Msx and Dlx transcription factors in dental cell fates, these data suggest that their altered expression is a proposed trail to explain the genesis and/or the progression of odontogenic tumors. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:69–78, 2009) PMID:18854600

  19. Clear cell variant of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hicks, M J; Flaitz, C M; Wong, M E; McDaniel, R K; Cagle, P T

    1994-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm which was first described by Pindborg in 1955 and accounts for less than 1% of all odontogenic lesions. Recently, a clear cell variant of CEOT has been identified with only eight well-documented cases in the literature. We present an additional case of clear cell CEOT of the mandible and review the salient clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic features of this entity and CEOTs in general. The differential diagnosis of clear cell tumors in the mandible includes: clear cell odontogenic tumor, clear cell ameloblastoma (odontogenic carcinoma), metastatic clear cell adenocarcinoma, primary intraosseous mucoepidermoid carcinoma, acinic cell carcinoma, epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma, clear cell salivary gland tumors, and clear cell variant of squamous cell carcinoma. Because of the belief that clear cell odontogenic tumors are locally aggressive neoplasms, definitive resection of the entire mass with tumor-free surgical margins and long-term follow-up are recommended.

  20. Odontogenic Tumors: A Review of 675 Cases in Eastern Libya

    PubMed Central

    Goteti, Saravana HL

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in an Eastern Libyan population based on the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO) classification, and also to compare the actual data with previous studies. Materials and Methods: We retrieved and analyzed 85 OTs from a total of 675 tumors and tumor-like lesions of the oral and perioral structures, for gender, age, tumor site, and frequency. The diagnosis was based on the most recent WHO (2005) classification of OTs. Results: OTs constituted 12.6% of all oral/jaw tumors and tumor-like lesions. Ameloblastoma (28.2%) was the most common type, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (25.2%) and odontoma (19.9%). The male: female ratio was 1.2:1, and maxilla: mandible ratio 1:2. The mean age of occurrence of tumors was 29 years with a peak incidence between 10 and 40 years. Conclusions: OTs are relatively common lesion in this Libyan Population, but the incidence of tumors is neither similar to Caucasians nor Sub-Saharan population. PMID:27013857

  1. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) without calcification: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Seema; Mathur, Sandeep R; Vijay, Maneesh; Rustagi, Ankur

    2012-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor is a rare benign odontogenic tumor that was first described by Pindborg in 1955. It accounts for less than 1% of all odontogenic neoplasms. The tumor is characterized histologically by the presence of polygonal epithelial cells, calcification, and eosinophilic deposits resembling amyloid. Noncalcifying Pindborg tumor is very rare and only three cases have been documented in the English language literature so far. We present an additional case of noncalcifying Pindborg tumor and review the previously reported cases. Because noncalcifying Pindborg tumor is believed to be an aggressive variant, a definitive resection of the tumor with tumor-free surgical margins and long-term follow-up is recommended. PMID:22434947

  2. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) without calcification: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Seema; Mathur, Sandeep R; Vijay, Maneesh; Rustagi, Ankur

    2012-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor is a rare benign odontogenic tumor that was first described by Pindborg in 1955. It accounts for less than 1% of all odontogenic neoplasms. The tumor is characterized histologically by the presence of polygonal epithelial cells, calcification, and eosinophilic deposits resembling amyloid. Noncalcifying Pindborg tumor is very rare and only three cases have been documented in the English language literature so far. We present an additional case of noncalcifying Pindborg tumor and review the previously reported cases. Because noncalcifying Pindborg tumor is believed to be an aggressive variant, a definitive resection of the tumor with tumor-free surgical margins and long-term follow-up is recommended.

  3. Ghost cell odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma--report of two rare cases.

    PubMed

    Hogge, Maritzabel; Velez, Ines; Kaltman, Steven; Movahed, Reza; Yeh, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The ghost cell odontogenic tumor (GCOT) is a neoplastic/cystic lesion with a diverse histopathological and clinical behavior It was formerly known as calcified odontogenic cyst, but in 2005 the World Health Organization categorized this lesion as an odontogenic, benign tumor rather than a cyst; nominating this neoplasm as calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor. A later comprehensive classification named it ghost cell odontogenic tumor because the most remarkable histopathologic characteristic is the presence of a mass of ghost cells embedded in the epithelium. We report two cases of a rare variant of a ghost cell odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma; to our knowledge, one is the youngest patient (four month old) reported in the English literature.

  4. Are All Odontogenic Keratocysts Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors? Correlation between Imaging Features and Epithelial Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harkanwal Preet; Nayar, Amit; Raj, Asha; Kumar, Prince

    2013-01-01

    This study was to correlate and analyze the imaging features and epithelial cell proliferation pattern in different cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) and study the role of inflammation using proliferative markers and different radiographic patterns of KCOT to determine its biological behavior. One hundred and eighty-six cases of KCOT were taken together and grouped based on radiographic patterns. Forty cases were randomly selected and stained using a proliferating cellular nuclear antigen marker. The correlation between imaging and epithelial proliferation with and without inflammation was determined. Unilocular variety is the most common type of KCOT, showing least epithelial proliferation of all the patterns. More than 50% of the multilocular KCOTs were associated with inflammation, showing an enhanced rate of epithelial proliferation. Results were subjected to statistical analysis. Different rates of epithelial proliferation of the different patterns suggested that all odontogenic keratocysts do not behave like tumors and that aggressive treatment should be reserved for selective cases only depending on radiographic and other histopathological parameters such as inflammation. PMID:23607070

  5. Transcriptome Variability in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor Suggests Distinct Molecular Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shijia; Divaris, Kimon; Parker, Joel; Padilla, Ricardo; Murrah, Valerie; Wright, John Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KCOT) is a locally aggressive developmental cystic neoplasm thought to arise from the odontogenic epithelium. A high recurrence rate of up to 30% has been found following conservative treatment. Aggressive tumor resection can lead to the need for extensive reconstructive surgery, resulting in significant morbidity and impacting quality of life. Most research has focused on candidate-genes with a handful of studies employing whole transcriptome approaches. There is also the question of which reference tissue is most biologically-relevant. This study characterizes the transcriptome of KCOT using whole genome microarray and compare it with gene expression of different odontogenic tissues ("dentome"). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the neoplastic epithelial tissue in 20 cases. KCOT gene expression was compared with the "dentome" and relevant pathways were examined. Cluster analysis revealed 2 distinct molecular subtypes of KCOT. Several inflammatory pathways were activated in both subtypes. The AKT pathway was activated in one subtype while MAP kinase pathway was activated in the other. Additionally, PTCH1 expression was downregulated in both clusters suggesting involvement in KCOT tumorigenesis. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into the transcriptome of KCOT and highlights pathways that could be of diagnostic and prognostic value. PMID:27066764

  6. The incidence of satellite cysts in keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Pavelić, Boiidar; Katunarić, Marina; Segović, Sanja; Karadole, Maja Cimas; Katanec, Davor; Saban, Aida; Puhar, Ivan

    2014-03-01

    Renaming of the Odontogenic Keratocyst as the Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor by the World Health Organization (WHO) is based on the aggressive nature of this lesion. Satellite cysts founded in the walls of the original cysts may give rise to a new lesion formation. The aim of this retrospecitve study was to identify the existence of specific features according incidence of satellite cysts and the pallisading of the basal layer of the epithelium and to establish their mutual correlation. The histopathologic data of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor on the basis of new WHO's classification (2005) were analized. Prominent palisade basal cell layer was found in 415 (94.75%) and partially absent palisade basal cell layer in 23 (5.25%) cases. Satellite cysts were presented in prominent palisade basal cell layer in 85 specimens (20.5%) and in cases with partial absent of the palisade basal layer in 3 spicemens (13%). The higher the frequency of pallisading was the higher the frequency of satellite cysts was (p > 0.05).

  7. Transcriptome Variability in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor Suggests Distinct Molecular Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shijia; Divaris, Kimon; Parker, Joel; Padilla, Ricardo; Murrah, Valerie; Wright, John Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KCOT) is a locally aggressive developmental cystic neoplasm thought to arise from the odontogenic epithelium. A high recurrence rate of up to 30% has been found following conservative treatment. Aggressive tumor resection can lead to the need for extensive reconstructive surgery, resulting in significant morbidity and impacting quality of life. Most research has focused on candidate-genes with a handful of studies employing whole transcriptome approaches. There is also the question of which reference tissue is most biologically-relevant. This study characterizes the transcriptome of KCOT using whole genome microarray and compare it with gene expression of different odontogenic tissues (“dentome”). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the neoplastic epithelial tissue in 20 cases. KCOT gene expression was compared with the “dentome” and relevant pathways were examined. Cluster analysis revealed 2 distinct molecular subtypes of KCOT. Several inflammatory pathways were activated in both subtypes. The AKT pathway was activated in one subtype while MAP kinase pathway was activated in the other. Additionally, PTCH1 expression was downregulated in both clusters suggesting involvement in KCOT tumorigenesis. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into the transcriptome of KCOT and highlights pathways that could be of diagnostic and prognostic value. PMID:27066764

  8. Squamous Odontogenic Tumor: Literature Review Focusing on the Radiographic Features and Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Nilson do Rosário; Gamba, Thiago de Oliveira; Flores, Isadora Luana; de Almeida, Solange Maria; Lopes, Sérgio Lúcio Pereira de Castro

    2015-01-01

    Since its first publication in 1975, the squamous odontogenic tumor remains the rarest odontogenic lesion, with around 50 cases in the English-language literature in which the microscopic characteristics are frequently very well demonstrated. However, articles which discuss the radiographic aspects are scarce, especially with emphasis on the differential diagnosis. The present treatise proposes an assessment of jaw lesions with the same radiographic characteristics of the squamous odontogenic tumor to clarify the main findings for dental clinicians during routine diagnosis. PMID:26140060

  9. In vitro studies on odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Catón, Javier; Mitsiadis, Thimios A; Morgan, Peter R

    2012-01-01

    Ameloblastomas are uncommon benign neoplasms of the jaws. They originate from dental epithelial cells, but they are not capable of mineralizing or forming enamel. The study of these tumors is limited to live tissue collected from patients during scheduled surgery. Ameloblastomas grow slowly in vivo and this property is translated to their behavior in vitro. Here, we describe the methods to culture ameloblastomas in organotypic cultures, as well as to isolate stem/progenitor cells from these tumors.

  10. Retrospective study of 289 odontogenic tumors in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    Serpa, Marianna-Sampaio; Tenório, Jefferson-da-Rocha; do Nascimento, George-João-Ferreira; de Souza-Andrade, Emanuel-Sávio; Veras-Sobral, Ana-Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background Odontogenic tumors (OTs) are considered important among oral lesions because of their clinicopathological heterogeneity, and variable biological behavior. This paper aims to determine the frequency and distribution of OTs, over a period of 10 years, at a public university in Northeastern Brazil and compare this data with previous reports. Material and Methods We reviewed all cases of OTs from oral pathology laboratory of University of Pernambuco (UPE), from 2004 to 2014. Diagnoses were re-evaluated and the tumors were classified according to the latest (2005) World Health Organization Classification of Tumors. In addition, we searched in the English-language literature retrospective studies on OTs that used the same classification. Results Data was obtained allowing the analysis of the tissue hemodynamics. We were able to map the vascularization of the face and it was possible to access three arteries of small diameter (0,60mm angular artery; 0,55mm greater palatine artery; 0,45mm infraorbital artery). Conclusions OTs are uncommon neoplasms with geographic variation. Our clinicopathological features are according to literature. In the present study, KCOT was the most frequent one, showing that the new classification of OTs altered the distribution of these lesions and possibly made KCOT the most common OT observed in diagnostic services worldwide. Key words:Odontogenic tumors, jaw neoplasms, epidemiology, oral pathology. PMID:26827068

  11. Defects of the Carney complex gene (PRKAR1A) in odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Sílvia F; Gomez, Ricardo S; Diniz, Marina G; Bernardes, Vanessa F; Soares, Flávia F C; Brito, João Artur R; Liu, Sophie; Pontes, Hélder Antônio R; Stratakis, Constantine A; Gomes, Carolina C

    2015-06-01

    The surgical treatment of some odontogenic tumors often leads to tooth and maxillary bone loss as well as to facial deformity. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in the pathogenesis of odontogenic tumors may result in alternative molecular therapies. The PRKAR1A gene displays a loss of protein expression as well as somatic mutations in odontogenic myxomas, an odontogenic ectomesenchymal neoplasm. We used a combination of quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis, and direct sequencing of all PRKAR1A exons to assess if this gene is altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. Thirteen tumors were included in the study: six ameloblastic fibromas, four ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, one ameloblastic fibrodentinoma, and two ameloblastic fibrosarcomas. The epithelial components of the tumors were separated from the mesenchymal by laser microdissection in most of the cases. We also searched for odontogenic pathology in Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice. PRKAR1A mRNA/protein expression was decreased in the benign mixed odontogenic tumors in association with LOH at markers around the PRKAR1A gene. We also detected a missense and two synonymous mutations along with two 5'-UTR and four intronic mutations in mixed odontogenic tumors. Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice did not show evidence of odontogenic tumor formation, which indicates that additional genes may be involved in the pathogenesis of such tumors, at least in rodents. We conclude that the PRKAR1A gene and its locus are altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. PRKAR1A expression is decreased in a subset of tumors but not in all, and Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice do not show abnormalities, which indicates that additional genes play a role in this tumor's pathogenesis. PMID:25870248

  12. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor in a 5-year-old boy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rajiv S; Sabnis, Rajesh; Bhuta, Bansari A; Yadav, Archana

    2015-03-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT), formerly known as calcifying odontogenic cyst, is a rare developmental neoplasm/cyst of odontogenic epithelial origin with considerable histopathologic diversity and variable clinical behaviour. The occurrence of CCOT in the first decade of life is very uncommon. We report an interestingly rare variant of CCOT with ameloblastomatous proliferation affecting the mandibular left posterior region associated with an impacted permanent tooth in a 5-year-old boy.

  13. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with an odontome – a diverse lesion encountered

    PubMed Central

    Radheshyam, Chourasia; Alokenath, Bandyopadhyay; Kumar, Harish; Abikshyeet, Panda

    2015-01-01

    The human jaw is an exclusive habitat for odontogenic lesions. Ghost cells associated odontogenic lesions are a diverse group with a variety of presentations in the jaws. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor is a benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin which demonstrates ghost cells in the epithelial component. This tumor sometimes mimics the features of a cyst clinically and radiographically, but histopathologically as well as behavior-wise shows the features of a tumor. Many classification systems have been proposed and revised from time to time. Presently a dualistic concept is highlighted to classify this group of lesions. The present case highlights a case of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with a complex composite odontome, which appeared like a cyst clinically and radiographically. PMID:26345145

  14. Odontogenic tumor with prominent clear cell component misdiagnosed as pleomorphic adenoma by fine-needle aspiration. A case report.

    PubMed

    Tamiolakis, D; Thomaidis, V; Tsamis, J; Lambropoulou, M; Alexiadis, G; Venizelos, J; Papadopoulos, N

    2003-10-01

    Clear cell tumors in the maxillofacial region, are usually originated in salivary or odontogenic tissues, or may be metastatic. They include calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors, ameloblastoma and odontogenic carcinoma. Clear cell odontogenic tumor has been classified in the last WHO classification as a benign tumor, but current opinion is that it should be designated as a carcinoma. We report a case of clear cell odontogenic tumor documented by histology, in a 82 year-old female, misinterpreted as pleomorphic adenoma by fine-needle aspiration cytology.

  15. Oxyphilic adenomatoid tumor of the ovary: a case report with discussion of the differential diagnosis of ovarian tumors with vacuoles and related spaces.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Victoria; McCluggage, W Glenn; Young, Robert H

    2007-01-01

    We describe an unusual example of ovarian adenomatoid tumor that was an incidental finding in the ovary of a 52-year-old woman and was characterized by cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm, an occasional feature of the adenomatoid tumor but one that, in an ovarian example, may cause added diagnostic confusion to that already engendered by the rarity of this neoplasm in the ovary. The typical numerous small vacuoles of the neoplasm sometimes had the appearance of signet ring cells. These 2 features (oxyphil and signet ring cells) caused a broad differential. Tumor cells were positive with broad-spectrum cytokeratins as well as mesothelial markers CK5/6, WT1, and calretinin. In reporting this case, we focus on the differential diagnosis of ovarian neoplasms and tumorlike conditions with vacuoles and related spaces, a topic that embraces many diverse entities.

  16. Defects of the Carney complex's gene (PRKAR1A) in odontogenic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Sílvia F; Gomez, Ricardo S; Diniz, Marina G; Bernardes, Vanessa F; Soares, Flávia FC; Brito, João Artur R; Liu, Sophie; Pontes, Hélder Antônio R; Stratakis, Constantine A; Gomes, Carolina C

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of some odontogenic tumors often leads to tooth and maxillary bone loss as well as facial deformity. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in their pathogenesis may result in alternative molecular therapies. The PRKAR1A gene shows loss of protein expression, as well as somatic mutations in odontogenic myxomas, an odontogenic ectomesenchymal neoplasm. We used a combination of qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, LOH analysis and direct sequencing of all PRKAR1A exons to assess if this gene is altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. Thirteen tumors were included, being six ameloblastic fibromas, four ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, one ameloblastic fibrodentinoma and two ameloblastic fibrosarcomas. The epithelial component of the tumors was separated from the mesenchymal by laser microdissection in most of the cases. We also searched for odontogenic pathology in Prkar1a+/− mice. PRKAR1A mRNA/protein expression was decreased in the benign mixed odontogenic tumors in association with LOH at markers around PRKAR1A gene. We also detected a missense and two synonymous mutations, besides two 5’-UTR and four intronic mutations in the mixed odontogenic tumors. Prkar1a+/− mice did not show evidence of odontogenic tumor formation, suggesting that additional genes may be involved in their pathogenesis, at least in rodents. We conclude that the PRKAR1A gene and its locus are altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. PRKAR1A's expression is decreased in a subset of tumors but not in all, and Prkar1a+/− mice do not show abnormalities, suggesting that additional genes play a role in this tumor's pathogenesis. PMID:25870248

  17. Peripheral Tumor with Osteodentin and Cementum-like Material in an Infant: Odontogenic Hamartoma or Odontoma?

    PubMed

    Sfakianou, Aikaterini; Emmanouil, Dimitris E; Tosios, Konstantinos I; Sklavounou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe a peripheral tumor on the mandibular alveolar ridge of a seven-month-old Caucasian boy, consisting of ectomesencymal odontogenic tissues, in particular osteodentin and cementum-like material, in a cellular or loose vascular connective tissue stroma. This case may be considered either a peripheral odontogenic hamartoma or a peripheral odontoma.

  18. Cyst or tumor in the buccomaxillary region: Review of literature and a case report

    PubMed Central

    Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Kujan, Omar Bashar; Dwedary, Hisham Mohammed Najeeb; Sikander, Mohammed Hilal; Mankar, Sunil; Amrin, M. Nidha

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors (OTs) include entities of a hamartomatous nature, such as odontoma, benign neoplasms like an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), some benign neoplasms are aggressive as in the case of ameloblastoma. The AOT is a rare odontogenic tumor constituting only 3% of all the OT and very often misdiagnosed as an odontogenic cyst. We report a case of an intra-osseous type of AOT occurred in a young 16-year-old female located in the anterior maxilla along with the clinical, radiological, histological features, and literature review related to the tumor affecting the patient. PMID:26538960

  19. Cyst or tumor in the buccomaxillary region: Review of literature and a case report.

    PubMed

    Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Kujan, Omar Bashar; Dwedary, Hisham Mohammed Najeeb; Sikander, Mohammed Hilal; Mankar, Sunil; Amrin, M Nidha

    2015-08-01

    Odontogenic tumors (OTs) include entities of a hamartomatous nature, such as odontoma, benign neoplasms like an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), some benign neoplasms are aggressive as in the case of ameloblastoma. The AOT is a rare odontogenic tumor constituting only 3% of all the OT and very often misdiagnosed as an odontogenic cyst. We report a case of an intra-osseous type of AOT occurred in a young 16-year-old female located in the anterior maxilla along with the clinical, radiological, histological features, and literature review related to the tumor affecting the patient.

  20. Multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Treville; Tamgadge, Avinash; Sapdhare, Swati; Pujar, Ashwini

    2015-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is of particular interest because its recurrence rate is high and its behavior is aggressive. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), which is also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and with a predisposition to neoplasms. These multiple KCOTs have warranted an aggressive treatment at the earliest because of the damage and possible complications. Recurrence of these lesions is a characteristic feature that has to be considered while explaining the prognosis to the patient. Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old boy with clinical features of basal cell nevus syndrome and multiple KCOTs. In addition to the other common features, congenitally missing third molars in all the four quadrants is a feature which has not been previously reported in association with NBCCS in Indian patients. PMID:26981489

  1. Endoscope-Assisted Enucleation of Mandibular Odontogenic Keratocyst Tumors.

    PubMed

    Romano, Antonio; Orabona, Giovanni D A; Abbate, Vincenzo; Maglitto, Fabio; Solari, Domenico; Iaconetta, Giorgio; Califano, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    The keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KCOT) represents a rare and benign but locally aggressive developmental cystic lesion usually affecting the posterior aspect of the mandible bone, the treatment of which has always been raising debate, since Philipsen first described it as a distinct pathological entity in 1956.Recent studies have proposed the use of endoscope-assisted surgical technique, due to the possibility given by the endoscope of improving the effectiveness of the treatment of these lesions thanks to a better visualization of operative field and though a better understanding of the pathology. In this article, we would like to present our experience with the endoscope-assisted treatment of KCOT of the posterior region of the mandible.From April 2000 to April 2012, 32 patients treated for KCOT were enrolled in our retrospective study: patients were divided in 2 groups according to the type of treatment, that is, 18 were treated with traditional enucleation surgery (TES), and 14 patients underwent endoscopic assisted enucleation surgery (EES).Fischer exact test and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to compare the outcomes between the 2 focusing on the recurrence and complication rates. In the TES group, patients we found a higher recurrence rate (39%) and higher postoperative complication rate at 5-year follow-up.Our data suggested, though, that EES seems to be a feasible alternative for the treatment of posterior mandibular KCOT. Further studies and larger series are needed to confirm these results. PMID:27607111

  2. Cystic lymphangioma-like adenomatoid tumor of the adrenal gland: report of a rare case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Changshui; Zheng, Jiangjiang; Yan, Minghui; Sun, Ke; Wang, Zhaoming

    2013-01-01

    Adenomatoid tumors (AT) are uncommon, benign tumors of mesothelial origination most frequently encountered in the genital tracts of both sexes. Their occurrences in the extragenital sites are much rarer and could elicit a variety of differential diagnosis both clinically and morphologically. With regard to the adrenal gland, to the best knowledge of us, only 31 cases of AT have been reported in the English literature. Several histologic growth patterns have been documented in AT, among which cystic type is the least common one. We herein present a further case of AT arising in the adrenal of a 62-year-old Chinese man with a medical history for systemic hypertensive disease. The tumor was incidentally identified during routine medical examination. An abdomen computed tomography scan revealed a solitary mass in the right adrenal. Grossly, the poorly-circumscribed mass measured 3.0 x 3.0 x 2.0 cm with a cut surface showing a gelatinous texture with numerous tiny cystic structures. Microscopic examination showed an infiltrated lesion with honeycomb appearance mimicking a lymphangioma, which composed predominantly of variably sized and shaped anastomosing small cystic spaces lined by flattened endothelial-like cells, without any epithelioid or signet-ring like components present. Foci of extraadrenal tumor extension, lymphoid aggregates with occasional germinal centre formation, intralesional fat tissue, stromal myoid proliferation and ossification were also observed. Immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the mesothelial differentiation of this tumor and indicated a diagnosis of cystic lymphangiomatoid AT of the adrenal. PMID:23638228

  3. Evaluation and Comparison of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression between Ameloblastoma and Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Dineshkumar, Thayalan; Priyadharsini, Nataraj; Gnanaselvi, U Punitha; Sathishkumar, Srinivasan; Srikanth, R P; Nagarathinam, A E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a developmental odontogenic cyst with an aggressive clinical behavior suggesting a change in its terminology from a cyst to a tumor and has now been renamed as keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). The purpose of this study was to assess and compare angiogenesis in ameloblastoma and OKC. Materials and Methods: Angiogenesis was assessed by studying the immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The study samples included 15 ameloblastomas and 15 KCOTs. The immunoreactivity was statistically evaluated using Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: VEGF expression was higher in ameloblastoma than KCOTs. However, a non-significant difference of VEGF expression was noted between ameloblastoma and KCOTs (P = 0.345). Conclusion: The results suggest that tumor angiogenesis may play a significant role in aggressive biologic behavior of KCOT. Thus, angiogenesis could be a potent target for developing anatiangiogenic therapeutic strategies. PMID:25709368

  4. Giant Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor of the Mandible – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kornafel, Olga; Jaźwiec, Przemysław; Pakulski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a relatively rare, benign neoplasm which develops in the maxilla or mandible, arising from the dental lamina or basal cells of the oral epithelium. It is often found incidentally and brings about late symptoms as it does not cause bone distension for a long time. Case Report The presented case is of a young woman with a giant keratocystic odontogenic tumor of the mandible. Conclusions Despite its rare occurrence, it must be taken into consideration in radiological and clinical diagnostics. Due to the frequent recurrence of KCOT, patients are recommended to be kept under long-term and close radiological supervision. PMID:25566331

  5. Clear cell variant of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of maxilla: Report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Badrashetty, Dinesh; Rangaswamy, Shruthi; Belgode, Niranjan

    2013-09-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare benign tumor of the jaws. Pindborg's tumor having clear cells is extremely rare. Twelve central lesions have been reported of which only three cases have occurred in maxilla. Clear cell variant is a distinct entity, has more aggressive biological behavior and higher chances of recurrence. Hence it is important that presence of clear cells be included in histopathological diagnosis. Here we present a rare case of clear cell CEOT having aggressive behavior.

  6. Clear cell variant of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of maxilla: Report of a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Badrashetty, Dinesh; Rangaswamy, Shruthi; Belgode, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare benign tumor of the jaws. Pindborg's tumor having clear cells is extremely rare. Twelve central lesions have been reported of which only three cases have occurred in maxilla. Clear cell variant is a distinct entity, has more aggressive biological behavior and higher chances of recurrence. Hence it is important that presence of clear cells be included in histopathological diagnosis. Here we present a rare case of clear cell CEOT having aggressive behavior. PMID:24574681

  7. CD166 expression in dentigerous cyst, keratocystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Gorgizadeh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background CD166 is a glycoprotein of an immunoglobulin super family of adhesion molecules that has been associated with aggressive characteristics and high recurrence rate of tumors. Different odontogenic lesions exhibit considerable histological variation and different clinical behavior. In an attempt to clarify the mechanisms underlying this different behavior, the present study investigates the immunohistochemical expression of CD166 in these lesions. Material and Methods In this study 69 formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissue blocks of odontogenic lesion consist of 15 unicystic ameloblastoma (UA), 17 solid ameloblastoma (SA), 18 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT), and 19 dentigerous cysts (DC) were reviewed by immunohistochemistry for CD166 staining. Results In this study, CD166 immune staining was evident in all specimen groups except dentigerous cyst. In positive cases, protein localization was cytoplasmic and/or membranous. CD166 expression was seen in76.5% (13) of SA, 73.5% (11) of UA, and 66.7% (12) of KCOTs. Statistical analysis showed that CD166 expression levels were significantly higher in ameloblastoma (SA and UA) and KCOTs than dentigerous cyst (P <0.001), but there was no statistically significant difference between CD166 expression in the other groups (P>0.05). Conclusions This data demonstrates that overexpression of CD166 may have a role in the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma and KCOT. Key words:CD166, ameloblastoma, dentigerous cyst, odontogenic keratocyst. PMID:27398171

  8. Aggressive Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor of the Maxillary Sinus with Extraosseous Oral Mucosal Involvement: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Vidya; Masthan, Mahaboob Kadar; Aravindha, Babu; Leena, Sankari

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors are benign odontogenic neoplasms whose occurrence in the maxillary sinus is rare. Maxillary tumors tend to be locally aggressive and may rapidly involve the surrounding vital structures. We report a case of a large calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of the maxilla, involving the maxillary sinus in a 48-year-old woman. The tumor was largely intraosseous. In the canine and first premolar regions, the loss of bone could be palpated but the oral mucosa appeared normal. Histologically, the tumor tissue could be seen in the connective tissue below the oral epithelium. The most significant finding was the presence of an intraosseous tumor with an extraosseous involvement in a single tumor, indicating aggressive behavior and warranting aggressive treatment. In this article, we discuss the rare presentation of the tumor and its radiological appearance and histological features. We also highlight the importance of a detailed histopathological examination of the excised specimen. PMID:26989286

  9. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A biopsy service’s experience with 104 solitary, multiple and recurrent lesions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a clinically significant cystic lesion of odontogenic origin. This study aimed to retrospectively review and describe the clinicopathologic features of KCOT and to objectively compare the clinical and histological features of solitary, multiple and recurrent KCOT in a Saudi Arabian population. Material and Methods Biopsy request forms, pathology records and archival materials (all histological slides) of 104 cases of KCOT from 75 patients were retrieved. Demographic and clinical details as well as histological evaluation were analyzed and compared between the 3 groups using chi-squared or Mann-Whitney tests of association as appropriate. Results Significant differences were noted in the age of presentation, location and association with impaction between multiple and solitary cases. Histologically, there was a difference in the mitotic count, presence of satellite cysts and proliferating odontogenic epithelium between solitary and multiple lesions. There was no difference between the KCOT that later recurred and solitary lesion which did not recur even when matched clinically for age, sex and location. There were differences when solitary KCOT that later recurred or recurrent KCOT were compared with multiple lesions. Multiple lesions still had more significant proliferative activity parameters than solitary recurrence-related KCOT. Conclusions KCOTs in Saudi Arabians are not different from those reported from other parts of the world. Clinical and histological analyses showed multiple KCOT is different from its solitary recurrent or non-recurrent counterparts and has a higher proliferative activity than both. Clinicohistologic features alone cannot wholly explain the behavior of KCOT. Key words:Descriptive study, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontogenic keratocyst, solitary, multiple, recurrent. PMID:27475695

  10. Intramuscular keratocyst as a soft tissue counterpart of keratocystic odontogenic tumor: differential diagnosis by immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Abé, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Essa, Ahmed; Babkair, Hamzah; Mikami, Toshihiko; Shingaki, Susumu; Kobayashi, Tadaharu; Hayashi, Takafumi; Cheng, Jun; Saku, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), a developmental jaw cyst previously referred to as odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), typically arises in the jawbone. In this article, however, we report a case of KCOT located within the temporalis muscle. We compared its immunohistochemical profiles with those of authentic jaw KCOT, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst, and epidermoid cyst in order to consider whether a soft tissue counterpart of KCOT could be a separate disease entity. The patient was a 46-year-old man with a well-defined cystic lesion within the left temporalis muscle. On computed tomographic images, the lesion was recognized as a cystic lesion, although KCOT was not included in the clinical differential diagnoses. The location of the lesion was not within bone but, rather, within the temporalis muscle that was attached to the jawbones. Our review of the literature has disclosed more than 20 peripheral KCOT cases of the oral mucosa and more than 10 cases of the skin, but only 1 case arising in muscle. Immunohistochemical investigation of the present intramuscular case reveals KCOT-characteristic profiles distinct from the other 3 types of cysts investigated. The results indicate that KCOT-like lesions can arise within soft tissues, although use of the term odontogenic might seem inappropriate in those cases.

  11. M2-polarized macrophages in keratocystic odontogenic tumor: relation to tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wen-Qun; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Wei; Xiong, Xue-Peng; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Bing; Zhao, Yi-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence of M2-polarized macrophages and their relationships to angiogenesis in keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). M2-polarized macrophages were detected in KCOT samples by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Meanwhile, microvessel density measured with antibody against CD31 was closely correlated with the presence of M2-polarized macrophages. In addition, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) significantly contributed to the activation of M2-polarized macrophages. Moreover, the results of in vitro wound healing, cell migration and tube formation assays further revealed the pro-angiogenic function of M2-polarized macrophage-like cells. This function might be associated with secretion of angiogenic cytokines, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and matrix metalloprotein-9 (MMP-9). This study demonstrates for the first time that M2-polarized macrophages are prevalent in KCOT, and their presence is dependent on M-CSF expression. More importantly, these tumor-supportive cells can also promote tumor angiogenesis by secreting angiogenic cytokines. PMID:26508096

  12. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Findings in Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumor Associated with Odontome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Phulambrikar, Tushar; Vilas Kant, Sanchita; Kode, Manasi; Magar, Shaliputra

    2015-01-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) is a rare cystic odontogenic neoplasm frequently found in association with odontome. This report documents a case of CCOT associated with an odontome arising in the anterior maxilla in a 28-year-old man. Conventional radiographs showed internal calcification within the lesion but were unable to visualize its relation with the adjacent structures and its accurate extent. In this case cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could accurately reveal the extent and the internal structure of the lesion which aided the presumptive diagnosis of the lesion as CCOT. This advanced imaging technique proved to be extremely useful in the radiographic assessment and management of this neoplasm of the maxilla. PMID:26636128

  13. Comparison of immunohistochemical expression of CD10 in keratocystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Hormozi, Elham; Fard, Vahid Nourollahi; Naseri, Mohammad Ali; Jahromi, Nima Haghighat; Keshani, Forooz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), also called keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), is a developmental lesion which should be carefully monitored and it exhibits development mechanisms and biologic behaviors different from those of other more common lesions such as dentigerous and radicular cysts. CD10 antigen is a cell surface metalloendopeptidase, which inactivates various peptides that are physiologically active. Studies have shown that increase in the expression of CD10 in the stromal cells helps the progression of the tumor. Ameloblastoma (AB) is a local invasive tumor and given the role of supporting connective tissue stroma in the aggression and progression. The aim of the present study was to comparatively evaluate the expression of CD10 in the connective tissue stroma of AB and OKC as a KCOT. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective, cross-sectional study, 14 paraffin blocks of KCOT and 9 of AB (7 multicystic and 2 unicystic) were evaluated with CD10 immunohistochemical expression in the connective tissue stroma of AB and the connective tissue wall of KCOT. The data were analyzed with Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Results: In 8 samples of 9 AB and in 13 samples of 14 KOT lesions, expression of CD10 was shown. Fisher's exact test did not reveal any significant differences between these two lesions in the expression of CD10 (P = 0.64). Conclusion: The results of this study propose that high expression rate of CD10 might be one of the reasons for the aggressive behavior of AB and high recurrence rate of OKC and reinforce the classification of OKC as an odontogenic tumor. PMID:27076824

  14. Novel PTCH1 Mutations in Patients with Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors Screened for Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma (NBCC) Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, Lorenza; Pollio, Annamaria; Pellacani, Giovanni; Guarneri, Carmelo; Ghiorzo, Paola; Longo, Caterina; Bruno, William; Giusti, Francesca; Bassoli, Sara; Bianchi-Scarrà, Giovanna; Ruini, Cristel; Seidenari, Stefania; Tomasi, Aldo; Ponti, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are cystic tumors that arise sporadically or associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). NBCCS is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disease mainly characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, KCOTs of the jaws and a variety of other tumors. PTCH1 mutation can be found both in sporadic or NBCCS associated KCOTs. The aim of the current study was to assess whether a combined clinical and bio-molecular approach could be suitable for the detection of NBCCS among patients with a diagnosis of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs). The authors collected keratocystic odontogenic tumors recorded in the database of the Pathology Department of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia during the period 1991–2011. Through interviews and examinations, family pedigrees were drawn for all patients affected by these odontogenic lesions. We found out that 18 of the 70 patients with KCOTs and/or multiple basal cell carcinomas actually met the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of NBCCS. A wide inter- and intra-familial phenotypic variability was evident in the families. Ameloblastomas (AMLs) were reported in two probands that are also carriers of the PCTH1 germline mutations. Nine germline mutations in the PTCH1 gene, 5 of them novel, were evident in 14 tested probands. The clinical evaluation of the keratocystic odontogenic tumors can be used as screening for the detection of families at risk of NBCCS. Keratocystic odontogenic lesions are uncommon, and their discovery deserves the search for associated cutaneous basal cell carcinomas and other benign and malignant tumors related to NBCCS. PMID:22952776

  15. Adenomatoid hyperplasia of oral minor salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Barrett, A W; Speight, P M

    1995-04-01

    Adenomatoid hyperplasia is a rare cause of swelling of the oral minor salivary glands, but is of significance because of its clinical resemblance to salivary gland tumors. The histologic appearance is one of benign hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the minor mucous glands. The clinical and histologic features of 20 new cases are reported, 19 of which occurred in the hard or soft palate. The cause of adenomatoid hyperplasia has hitherto been unclear, but the observation that 14 subjects were tobacco smokers or denture wearers, or both, suggests chronic, local trauma may be an important factor in the development of the condition.

  16. The combined epithelial odontogenic tumour in Malaysians.

    PubMed

    Siar, C H; Ng, K H

    1991-04-01

    The combined epithelial odontogenic tumour represents a hybrid lesion comprising primarily areas of adenomatoid odontogenic tumour intermixed with foci of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour. Five such cases retrieved from the files of the Division of Stomatology, Institute for Medical Research, Kuala Lumpur, and four others from the existing literature were analysed. A mean age of 18.8 years, a female preponderance (66.7%) with a male to female ratio of 1:2 and predilection for the mandible (55.6%) were observed. All cases were treated by conservative surgery and the lack of recurrence confirmed the innocuous nature of this lesion.

  17. Exploring the concept of “inflammatory angiogenesis” in keratocystic odontogenic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Alaeddini, Mojgan; Mostafaloo, Esmat; Mirmohammadkhani, Omid; Eshghyar, Nosratollah

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of inflammation in angiogenesis of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Study Design: Twenty inflamed and 20 non-inflamed KCOTs were selected based on quantitative scoring of inflammation which was also applied on 20 radicular cysts. Microvessel density was assessed in all samples using CD34 antibody and angiogenesis was compared between the three groups. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance followed by post-hoc Scheffe test and P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. Results: A statistically significant difference in angiogenesis was found between radicular cysts and both inflamed and non-inflamed KCOTs (P < 0.001), but not between inflamed and non-inflamed KCOTs (P =0.347). Conclusion: Based on the results obtained in the present study, it seems that the effect of inflammation on angiogenesis in KCOT is minimal. However further investigation using other methods of evaluation is suggested to fully clarify the role of “inflammatory angiogenesis” in this neoplasm. Key words:Keratocystic odontogenic tumor, radicular cyst, angiogenesis, inflammation. PMID:23385504

  18. Adenomatoid hyperplasia of lower lip.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaganjot Kaur; Sharma, Manish; Vanaki, Srinivas S

    2011-10-01

    Adenomatoid hyperplasia (AH) is an uncommon, non-neoplastic swelling on the palate caused due to hyperplasia of the mucinous acini. The lesion clinically presents as a sessile tumor-like nodule resembling pleomorphic adenoma. Histopathologic findings include lobules of enlarged mucinous acini which are filled with secretory granules. The nuclei are squeezed to the basal portions, associated with focal inflammation and ductal dilatation, and a history of trauma is often elicited. Here, we report a rare case of AH of the lower lip in a 20-year-old male patient, which mimics a mucous retention cyst or mucocele. PMID:22135695

  19. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors related to Gorlin–Goltz syndrome: A clinicopathological study

    PubMed Central

    Khaliq, Mohammed Israr Ul; Shah, Ajaz A.; Ahmad, Irshad; Hasan, Shahid; Jangam, Sagar S.; Farah; Anwar

    2015-01-01

    Background Assess clinicopathological features of patients with keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) associated with Gorlin–Goltz syndrome in our institution from 2004 to 2015. Method After histopathological analyses of KCOT related to Gorlin–Goltz syndrome, 7 patients were assessed. These patients presented a total of 15 primary and 2 recurrent KCOT. Results All patients presented a multiple KCOT, and 13 lesions were located in mandible (77%) and 4 (23%) in maxilla. Most of the tumors presented a unilocular pattern (71%) and had tooth association (88%). Four patients (57%) were in the age group of 10–19 years and three patients (43%) were in the age group of 20–29 years. There were four male and three female patients. Conclusion KCOT is a frequent manifestation of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome and can be its first sign, mainly in young patients. The four patients presented with two lesions (57%) and three lesions in three patients (43%). PMID:27195205

  20. [Mixed odontogenic tumors. Studies on the significance of correlations between ameloblastic fibroma, ameloblastic fibro-odontoma and odontoma].

    PubMed

    Fabris, G A; Ferretti, S; Balderi, A; Trombelli, L; Calura, G

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interrelationship between the mixed odontogenic tumors. A population of 292 cases--9 cases from our own files, 283 cases taken from the literature--was considered. Data concerning age, sex distribution and site of occurrence of the different lesions were statistically analyzed. The results showed a significant prevalence of odontomas in the anterior region and a highly significant correlation for age and site distribution in relation to the various lesions. It is supposed that ameloblastic fibroma, ameloblastic fibro-odontoma and odontoma represent different maturational stages of the same lesion whose histogenesis is linked to the odontogenic process.

  1. Squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferation in a radicular cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Molina, Vicente; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2013-01-01

    The squamous odontogenic tumour is a rare benign neoplasm whose aetiology remains unknown. It usually appears in the jaw and its origin could be related to the ephitelial remnants of Malassez. Histologically comprises numerous islets of squamous, non-keratinized, well-differentiated and rounded epithelial cells a fibrous stroma without signs of atypical cells. There is a non-neoplastic lesion with the same histological pattern than the squamous odontogenic tumour. This entity is characterized by squamous odontogenic tumour proliferations isolated into the cyst wall of an odontogenic cyst. It is rare and has a benign behavior. It has been suggested that these epithelial proliferations could be the former expression of the neoplastic form. It is very important to carry out clinical and radiological controls periodically. So far it has not been documented any change towards a squamous odontogenic tumour nor toward malignancy in a squamous odontogenic tumour like proliferation. Key words:Radicular cyst, squamous odontogenic tumour. PMID:24455099

  2. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor in proliferation of odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bhavana; Chandra, Shaleen; Singh, Anil; Sah, Kunal; Raj, Vineet; Gupta, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is capable of initiating angiogenesis in blood vessels and may act as mitogenic agent for epithelium of odontogenic cysts and tumors. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of epithelial VEGF expression in odontogenic cysts and ameloblastoma and its correlation with argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region counts to assess its role in their biological behavior. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, 45 histologically confirmed cases, 15 cases of each of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs), dentigerous cysts, and ameloblastomas were examined for immunohistochemical expression for epithelial VEGF, and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) (used as secondary marker in this study) staining was done for comparing the proliferative capacity with VEGF. Results: KCOT shows mild expression within the basal layers and strong expression in the suprabasal layer whereas, in dentigerous cysts, a majority showed no VEGF expression whereas ameloblastomas showed strong expression in all cases by stellate reticulum-like cells at the center of the follicles and suprabasal layers of epithelium. The results of AgNOR counts were higher in KCOTs as compared to ameloblastoma and least in dentigerous cysts. Conclusion: VEGF expression by the epithelium of odontogenic cysts and tumors may play a role in epithelial proliferation via autocrine mechanism as reflected by increased AgNOR counts. The angiogenic activity via paracrine pathway may be responsible for the difference in growth rate and neoplastic behavior of the lesions. PMID:27274347

  3. Fibroblasts Regulate Variable Aggressiveness of Syndromic Keratocystic and Non-syndromic Odontogenic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Y.-Y.; Yu, F.-Y.; Qu, J.-F.; Chen, F.; Li, T.-J.

    2014-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are jaw lesions that can be either sporadic or associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, which typically occurs as multiple, aggressive lesions that can lead to large areas of bone destruction and resorption and cause major impairment and even jaw fracture. To clarify the role of fibroblasts in the aggressivness of syndromic (S-) as compared with non-syndromic (NS-) KCOTs, we assessed fibroblasts derived from 16 S- and NS-KCOTs for differences in cell proliferation, multilineage differentiation potential, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteoclastogenic potential. S-KCOT fibroblasts had proliferative and osteoclastogenic capacity higher than those from NS-KCOTs, as evidenced by higher numbers of tartrate-resistant acid-phosphatase-positive multinuclear cells, expression of cyclooxygenase 2, and ratio of receptor activator of nuclear factor–kappa B ligand to osteoprotegerin. The osteogenic potential was higher for S- than for NS-KCOT fibroblasts and was associated with lower mRNA expression of runt-related transcription factor 2, collagen type I α1, osteocalcin, and osteopontin as well as reduced alkaline phosphatase activity. These results suggest that the distinct characteristics of fibroblasts in KCOTs are responsible for the greater aggressiveness observed in the syndromic subtype. Abbreviations: AP, alkaline phosphatase; CK, cytokeratin; COL1A1, collagen type I α1; COX-2, cyclooxygenase-2; GM-CSF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor; IL-1α, interleukin 1α; KCOT, keratocystic odontogenic tumor; NBCCS, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome; NS-KCOT, non-syndrome-associated KCOT; OCN, osteocalcin; OPG, osteoprotegerin; OPN, osteopontin; RANKL, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand; Runx2, runt-related transcription factor 2; S-KCOT, syndrome-associated KCOT; TAF, tumor-associated fibroblast; and TRAP, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. PMID:24972872

  4. Recurrent squamous odontogenic tumor: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    MOHR, BARBARA; WINTER, JOCHEN; WAHL, GERHARD; JANSKA, EMILIA

    2015-01-01

    Squamous odontogenic tumors (SOTs) are benign, locally infiltrative neoplasms that localize to the periodontium. In total, <50 cases have been reported since the first description of SOTs in 1975. Although the exact etiology of SOTs is unknown, the tumors are considered to derive from the epithelial cell rests of Malassez. SOTs are characterized by radiological and clinical signs and symptoms, including pain with increased sensitivity in the affected area, bone expansion and increased tooth mobility. The present study describes the case of a patient that experienced numerous SOT recurrences and also discusses recommendations for treatment. A locally invasive mandibular SOT was identified in a Caucasian 41-year-old female patient. The treatment involved recommended conservative surgery, including local curettage. In addition, 49 cases published in the literature were reviewed to assess the treatment strategies. The present patient experienced two recurrences of the tumor during the 6-year follow-up period. Ultimately, the vitality of the adjacent teeth was compromised. An apicoectomy with a small amount of resection of the marginal bone was necessary. In >50% of the reported cases of SOT in the literature the adjacent teeth were extracted. The present case of SOT and the associated literature were also discussed. It was concluded that the treatment of choice appears to be a conservative surgical removal, but the successful management of SOTs often requires the removal of the adjacent teeth. PMID:26722231

  5. Management of a rare case of peripheral squamous odontogenic tumor of the gingiva.

    PubMed

    Anjana, Ramamurti; Murali, Nirupama; Malathi, Narasimhan; Suresh, Ranga Rao

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors (OTs) arising from the periodontium are quite rare. Squamous OT (SOT) is one such neoplasm which has an exceedingly rare occurrence. According to the literature, there have been very few reported cases of SOT with a very small percentage involving the gingiva. Most of the times, these tumors are located within the bone, only a very few peripheral cases been noted so far. Although predominantly benign, the possibility of a malignant transformation prevails. Our case describes a rare presentation of a peripheral SOT involving the upper anterior gingiva in a 59-year-old patient, which presented clinically as a firm and fibrotic swelling. An excisional biopsy was performed as a part of surgical management and for microscopic evaluation to confirm the clinical diagnosis. A soft tissue graft was harvested from an edentulous area to cover the deficit at the surgical site. The patient was evaluated at periodic intervals to assess the healing outcome and for any recurrence of the lesion. PMID:27563210

  6. Management of a rare case of peripheral squamous odontogenic tumor of the gingiva

    PubMed Central

    Anjana, Ramamurti; Murali, Nirupama; Malathi, Narasimhan; Suresh, Ranga Rao

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors (OTs) arising from the periodontium are quite rare. Squamous OT (SOT) is one such neoplasm which has an exceedingly rare occurrence. According to the literature, there have been very few reported cases of SOT with a very small percentage involving the gingiva. Most of the times, these tumors are located within the bone, only a very few peripheral cases been noted so far. Although predominantly benign, the possibility of a malignant transformation prevails. Our case describes a rare presentation of a peripheral SOT involving the upper anterior gingiva in a 59-year-old patient, which presented clinically as a firm and fibrotic swelling. An excisional biopsy was performed as a part of surgical management and for microscopic evaluation to confirm the clinical diagnosis. A soft tissue graft was harvested from an edentulous area to cover the deficit at the surgical site. The patient was evaluated at periodic intervals to assess the healing outcome and for any recurrence of the lesion. PMID:27563210

  7. Differential expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in keratocystic odontogenic tumors prior and subsequent to decompression

    PubMed Central

    XU, WEI; SONG, XIAOMENG; ZHANG, XIAOMIN; WANG, ZHAO; DING, XU; YUAN, YE; WU, YUNONG; WU, HEMING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) prior and subsequent to decompression and to explore the association between iNOS expression and changes in clinical features. Sixteen pairs of specimens obtained at the time of decompression and subsequent curettages were collected and immunohistochemically examined using an antibody against iNOS. The intensity of iNOS staining was evaluated semi-quantitatively for statistical analysis. Prior to decompression, 87.5% of KCOT samples showed no immunohistochemical reactivity for iNOS. Only 12.5% of samples exhibited slight staining for iNOS in the cytoplasm of cells in the epithelial layer. Subsequent to decompression, all the samples exhibited moderate to intense staining for iNOS in the cytoplasm and membrane of cells in the epithelial and fibrous layers. This increased expression of iNOS following decompression was statistically significant (P<0.01). The results demonstrated distinct expression of iNOS in KCOT samples prior and subsequent to decompression, indicating that iNOS may have a role in mediating changes in clinical features. PMID:27073658

  8. The use of vismodegib to shrink keratocystic odontogenic tumors in basal cell nevus syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Ally, Mina S.; Tang, Jean Y.; Joseph, Timmy; Thompson, Bobbye; Lindgren, Joselyn; Raphael, Maria Acosta; Ulerio, Grace; Chanana, Anita M.; Mackay-Wiggan, Julian M.; Bickers, David R.; Epstein, Ervin H

    2014-01-01

    Importance Keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaw (KCOTs) affect more than 65% of patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS). Surgery frequently causes facial disfigurement and is not always curative. Most BCNS-related and some sporadic KCOTs have malignant activation of the Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway. Observations We examined the effect of vismodegib (an oral HH-pathway inhibitor) on KCOT size in BCNS patients enrolled in a clinical trial testing vismodegib for BCC prevention (NCT00957229), using pre and post-treatment MRIs. Four men and 2 women had pretreatment KCOTs, mean longest diameter 2.0cm (range: 0.7–3.3cm), occurring primarily in the mandible. Subjects were treated with vismodegib (150mg/day) for a mean 18 months (SD: 4.8, range: 11–24). Four subjects experienced a size reduction and 2 had no change. Vismodegib reduced the mean longest diameter of KCOTs in all subjects by 1.0cm (95% CI: 0.03, 1.94, p= 0.02) or 50% from baseline. We observed no enlargement of existing KCOTs or new KCOT development. Conclusions and relevance Vismodegib shrinks some KCOTs in BCNS patients and may offer an alternative to surgical therapy. These effects were maintained for at least 9 months after drug cessation in 1 patient. Further studies assessing long-term efficacy and optimal maintenance regimens should be performed. PMID:24623282

  9. [Adenomatoid hyperplasia of minor salivary glands].

    PubMed

    Guallart Doménech, F; Molina Mira, A; González Martínez, M A; Pons Rocher, F; Mompó Romero, L; Serrano Badía, E

    1994-01-01

    Adenomatoid hyperplasia of minor salivary glands in an uncommon clinicopathologic entity, first reported, in 1971, by Giansanti and cols. The condition mimics a neoplasm because of its swelling, but the histologic picture agrees with that of normal appearing salivary gland tissue. The interest of this entity is that although benign pseudotumoral lesion, it can be clinically confused with benign or malignant tumors and even, through fine needle aspiration cytology, with low grade mucoepidermoid tumors. We present one case of this condition arising in the soft palate in a patient with unilateral serous otitis media. A review of the published literature on the subject is done.

  10. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblasts in odontogenic cysts and tumors: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Syamala, Deepa; Suresh, Rakesh; Janardhanan, Mahija; Savithri, Vindhya; Anand, Prem P; Jose, Amrutha

    2016-01-01

    Context: Myofibroblasts are fibroblasts with smooth muscle-like features characterized by the presence of a contractile apparatus and found in the connective tissue stroma of normal tissues such as blood vessels and lymph nodes. They are now thought to play a role in the synthesis and reorganization of extracellular matrix, which could contribute to the aggressive biologic behavior of the lesions. Aims: To compare the mean number of stromal myofibroblasts in dentigerous cysts (DCs), keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and ameloblastoma; and to derive a correlation between the stromal myofibroblasts and the known biologic behavior of the lesions. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional immunohistochemical analysis of cases of DC, KCOT and ameloblastoma. Materials and Methods: Twenty paraffin-embedded tissue blocks each of DC, KCOT and multicystic ameloblastoma were selected for the study and diagnosis confirmed through hematoxylin and eosin staining. Tissue sections were analyzed for the number of myofibroblasts using alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) immunostaining. Statistical Analysis: Differences in the mean number of α-SMA positive cells in each group were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test. Intergroup comparisons of mean values of α-SMA positive cells were performed using Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: Ameloblastoma showed the highest number of myofibroblasts, whereas DC showed the lowest. Among the groups, there were significant differences between the myofibroblast counts among DC and KCOT and between DC and ameloblastoma, whereas the difference in counts was not statistically significant between KCOT and ameloblastoma. A positive correlation was observed between the myofibroblast count and the known biologic behavior of the lesions. Conclusion: Myofibroblasts may act in close association with the epithelial cells to bring about changes in stromal microenvironment, favorable to the growth and progression of the lesion. They may be of great value in

  11. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblasts in odontogenic cysts and tumors: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Syamala, Deepa; Suresh, Rakesh; Janardhanan, Mahija; Savithri, Vindhya; Anand, Prem P; Jose, Amrutha

    2016-01-01

    Context: Myofibroblasts are fibroblasts with smooth muscle-like features characterized by the presence of a contractile apparatus and found in the connective tissue stroma of normal tissues such as blood vessels and lymph nodes. They are now thought to play a role in the synthesis and reorganization of extracellular matrix, which could contribute to the aggressive biologic behavior of the lesions. Aims: To compare the mean number of stromal myofibroblasts in dentigerous cysts (DCs), keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and ameloblastoma; and to derive a correlation between the stromal myofibroblasts and the known biologic behavior of the lesions. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional immunohistochemical analysis of cases of DC, KCOT and ameloblastoma. Materials and Methods: Twenty paraffin-embedded tissue blocks each of DC, KCOT and multicystic ameloblastoma were selected for the study and diagnosis confirmed through hematoxylin and eosin staining. Tissue sections were analyzed for the number of myofibroblasts using alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) immunostaining. Statistical Analysis: Differences in the mean number of α-SMA positive cells in each group were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test. Intergroup comparisons of mean values of α-SMA positive cells were performed using Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: Ameloblastoma showed the highest number of myofibroblasts, whereas DC showed the lowest. Among the groups, there were significant differences between the myofibroblast counts among DC and KCOT and between DC and ameloblastoma, whereas the difference in counts was not statistically significant between KCOT and ameloblastoma. A positive correlation was observed between the myofibroblast count and the known biologic behavior of the lesions. Conclusion: Myofibroblasts may act in close association with the epithelial cells to bring about changes in stromal microenvironment, favorable to the growth and progression of the lesion. They may be of great value in

  12. Immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in keratocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst, and radicular cyst: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Khajuria, Nidhi; Metgud, Rashmi; Naik, Smitha; Lerra, Sahul; Tiwari, Priya; Mamta; Katakwar, Payal; Tak, Anirudh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cyst and tumors arise from tissue remains of odontogenesis, these interactions have been considered to play an important role in the tumorigenesis of odontogenic lesions. The connective tissue stroma has an essential role in the preservation of epithelial tissues and minor alterations in the epithelium are followed by corresponding changes in the stroma, such as angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered the first factor which maintains its position as the most critical driver of vascular formation and is required to initiate the formation of immature vessels, with this aim, present study was executed to evaluate VEGF expression in kertocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst and radicular cyst (RC). Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out comprising a total of 31 cases; 13 cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), nine cases of dentigerous cyst (DC) and nine cases of RC. The sections were stained immunohistochemically with VEGF antibody and were evaluated for the presence and intensity of the immuno reactive cells. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square test to inter-compare the VEGF expression between KCOT, DC, and RC. Results: VEGF expression in the epithelium and connective tissue was significantly higher in KCOT compared to dentigerous and RC. One case of KCOT with carcinomatous change also revealed positive results for the VEGF expression in the dysplastic epithelium, tumor islands, and connective tissue. The significant difference was observed on inter-comparison of the VEGF expression in the connective tissue of KCOT and DC, whereas no significant difference was observed in the VEGF expression in the connective tissue of KCOT and DC. Conclusion: The present study data supports the literature finding that angiogenesis can be important in the progression and enlargement of odontogenic cysts similarly to what occurs in neoplastic conditions and further it can be concluded that

  13. Tumor of the maxilla-odontogenic or glandular? A diagnostic challenge and the role of immunohistochemical markers.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Jaya; Manjunatha, B S; Kumar, Harish; Kumar, Pratiksha

    2015-01-01

    Today's practice in medicine has reached remarkable change mainly due to the advances in the field. Odontogenic tumors represent a spectrum of lesions ranging from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms. Rarely, odontogenic tumors pose a challenge due to varied histological features. But appropriate and accurate diagnosis is crucial for further treatment and follow-up as these have an influence on the prognosis. In such situations, immunohistochemical. (IHC) markers play a significant role in the differentiating various lesions. Within its palette of histology, there are multiple histopathological presentations, many a times these features come in an intermixed pattern simulating different origin. We here, report such a case presented in a 70-year-old female came with a complaint of swelling in the posterior maxilla. The microscopic findings were indicative of a benign neoplasm. To know the nature of the lesion and arrive at a diagnosis, many IHC markers were used. Based on all these findings, a final diagnosis of unicystic ameloblastoma was arrived. PMID:26881616

  14. Enucleation of large keratocystic odontogenic tumor at mandible via unilateral sagittal split osteotomy: a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong-Geun; Rhee, Seung-Hyun; Noh, Chung-Ah

    2015-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a common benign tumor of osseous lesions in dental and maxillofacial practice. We describe three cases of large KCOT located in the posterior part of the mandible extending to the angle and ramus region, which were enucleated via sagittal split osteotomy (SSO) of the mandible. There are cases in which a conventional enucleation procedure does not ensure complete excision of the entire lesion without damage to vital structures like the inferior alveolar nerve. In such cases, a SSO approach could be a better choice than conventional methods. The purpose of this article is to describe our experience using unilateral mandibular SSO for removal of a KCOT from the mandible. PMID:26339581

  15. Benign odontogenic tumors versus histochemically related tissues: preliminary results from mid-infrared and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kolmas, Joanna; Prządka, Rafał

    2014-01-01

    Three types of human odontogenic tumors histologically classified as compound composite odontoma, ossifying fibroma, and Pindborg tumor were characterized using mid-infrared spectroscopy (mid-IR) and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR). For comparison, human jawbone and dental mineralized tissues such as dentin, enamel, and dental cement were also characterized. The studies focused on the structural properties and chemical composition of pathological tissues versus histochemically related tissues. All analyzed tumors were composed of organic and mineral parts and water. Apatite was found to be the main constituent of the mineral part. Various components (water, structural hydroxyl groups, carbonate ions (CO(3)(2-)), and hydrogen phosphate ions (HPO(4)(2-))) and physicochemical parameters (index of apatite maturity and crystallinity) were examined. The highest organic/mineral ratio was observed in fibrocementoma, a finding that can be explained by the fibrous character of the tumor. The lowest relative HPO(4)(2-) content was found in odontoma. This tumor is characterized by the highest mineral crystallinity index and content of structural hydroxyl groups. The Pindborg tumor mineral portion was found to be poorly crystalline and rich in HPO(4)(2-). The relative CO(3)(2-) content was similar in all samples studied. The results of spectroscopic studies of odontogenic tumors were consistent with the standard histochemical analysis. It was shown that the various techniques of ssNMR and elaborate analysis of the mid-IR spectra, applied together, provide valuable information about calcified benign odontogenic tumors.

  16. Adenomatoid hyperplasia of mucous salivary glands. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Brown, F H; Houston, G D; Lubow, R M; Sagan, M A

    1987-02-01

    Adenomatoid hyperplasia of the mucous salivary glands is an uncommon benign tumor of the oral cavity. Two cases of palatal involvement are presented. Since clinical differentiation between benign and malignant growth of the palate cannot be established, microscopic examination is necessary. The palate is the most common location of this lesion, and as such it is useful for the periodontist to be aware of this tumor.

  17. The effect of ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor on the displacement pattern of inferior alveolar canal in CBCT examinations

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Isa; Taheri Talesh, Kourosh; Yazdani, Javad; Keshavarz Meshkin Fam, Sareh; Ghavimi, Mohammad Ali; Arta, Seyed Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background. The inferior alveolar canal should be examined as a significant anatomical landmark, particularly in the posterior body and ramus of the mandible, for dental and surgical procedures. In the present study, the effects of two pathological lesions, ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor, on canal displacement were investigated. Methods. This study had a single-blinded design. Twenty-six patients with lesions in the mandible referred to Imam Reza Hospital, Tabriz, Iran, were studied in two equal groups (13 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of ameloblastoma and 13 with a histopathological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst). After confirming the initial incisional biopsy and pathological report, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) of lesions larger than 3 cm mesiodistaly and those involving the mandibular posterior body and ramus were included in the study. Two maxillofacial surgeons in association with an oral and maxillofacial radiologist examined three points on CBCT images to determine the mandibular canal position relative to the lesions from the lingual and buccal aspects. Results. The results of statistical analyses showed that in ameloblastoma, the inferior alveolar canal had been displaced more buccally in the ramus area (point A) (84.6%) but in the distal region (point C), the displacement was less buccal (41.6%). The canal was displaced buccally in 53.8% of cases at point A and in 46.2% of cases at point C in KOT lesions. Finally chi-squared test did not show any statistically significant differences between these two lesions. Conclusion. The results of this study showed no relationship between these lesions and the displacement of the mandibular canal. PMID:27651881

  18. The effect of ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor on the displacement pattern of inferior alveolar canal in CBCT examinations.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Isa; Taheri Talesh, Kourosh; Yazdani, Javad; Keshavarz Meshkin Fam, Sareh; Ghavimi, Mohammad Ali; Arta, Seyed Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background. The inferior alveolar canal should be examined as a significant anatomical landmark, particularly in the posterior body and ramus of the mandible, for dental and surgical procedures. In the present study, the effects of two pathological lesions, ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor, on canal displacement were investigated. Methods. This study had a single-blinded design. Twenty-six patients with lesions in the mandible referred to Imam Reza Hospital, Tabriz, Iran, were studied in two equal groups (13 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of ameloblastoma and 13 with a histopathological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst). After confirming the initial incisional biopsy and pathological report, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) of lesions larger than 3 cm mesiodistaly and those involving the mandibular posterior body and ramus were included in the study. Two maxillofacial surgeons in association with an oral and maxillofacial radiologist examined three points on CBCT images to determine the mandibular canal position relative to the lesions from the lingual and buccal aspects. Results. The results of statistical analyses showed that in ameloblastoma, the inferior alveolar canal had been displaced more buccally in the ramus area (point A) (84.6%) but in the distal region (point C), the displacement was less buccal (41.6%). The canal was displaced buccally in 53.8% of cases at point A and in 46.2% of cases at point C in KOT lesions. Finally chi-squared test did not show any statistically significant differences between these two lesions. Conclusion. The results of this study showed no relationship between these lesions and the displacement of the mandibular canal. PMID:27651881

  19. The effect of ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor on the displacement pattern of inferior alveolar canal in CBCT examinations

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Isa; Taheri Talesh, Kourosh; Yazdani, Javad; Keshavarz Meshkin Fam, Sareh; Ghavimi, Mohammad Ali; Arta, Seyed Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background. The inferior alveolar canal should be examined as a significant anatomical landmark, particularly in the posterior body and ramus of the mandible, for dental and surgical procedures. In the present study, the effects of two pathological lesions, ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor, on canal displacement were investigated. Methods. This study had a single-blinded design. Twenty-six patients with lesions in the mandible referred to Imam Reza Hospital, Tabriz, Iran, were studied in two equal groups (13 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of ameloblastoma and 13 with a histopathological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst). After confirming the initial incisional biopsy and pathological report, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) of lesions larger than 3 cm mesiodistaly and those involving the mandibular posterior body and ramus were included in the study. Two maxillofacial surgeons in association with an oral and maxillofacial radiologist examined three points on CBCT images to determine the mandibular canal position relative to the lesions from the lingual and buccal aspects. Results. The results of statistical analyses showed that in ameloblastoma, the inferior alveolar canal had been displaced more buccally in the ramus area (point A) (84.6%) but in the distal region (point C), the displacement was less buccal (41.6%). The canal was displaced buccally in 53.8% of cases at point A and in 46.2% of cases at point C in KOT lesions. Finally chi-squared test did not show any statistically significant differences between these two lesions. Conclusion. The results of this study showed no relationship between these lesions and the displacement of the mandibular canal.

  20. Genetic profile of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Carinci, Francesco; Volinia, Stefano; Rubini, Corrado; Fioroni, Massimiliano; Francioso, Francesca; Arcelli, Diego; Pezzetti, Furio; Piattelli, Adriano

    2003-05-01

    In the head and neck region, clear cell tumors are usually derived from salivary glands, odontogenic tissues, and metastasis. The World Health Organization has classified clear cell odontogenic tumor among benign tumors, but it is now recognized as a more sinister lesion, and current opinion is that it should be designated as a carcinoma. It is characterized by aggressive growth, recurrences, and metastasis. By using complementary DNA microarrays, several genes in clear cell odontogenic tumor were identified that are differentially regulated when compared with non-tumor tissue. In conclusion, the first genetic profiling of clear odontogenic carcinoma is reported. DNA microarrays can potentially help in identifying some genes whose products could be disease-specific targets for cancer therapy as well as a tool for better classifying odontogenic tumor.

  1. PTCH1 Gene Mutations in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors: A Study of 43 Chinese Patients and a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Jian-Yun; Li, Xue-Fen; Luo, Hai-Yan; Chen, Feng; Li, Tie-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background The keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a locally aggressive cystic jaw lesion that occurs sporadically or in association with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). PTCH1, the gene responsible for NBCCS, may play an important role in sporadic KCOTs. In this study, we analyzed and compared the distribution pattern of PTCH1 mutations in patients with sporadic and NBCCS-associated KCOTs. Methods We detected PTCH1 mutations in 14 patients with NBCCS-associated KCOTs and 29 patients with sporadic KCOTs by direct sequencing. In addition, five electronic databases were searched for studies detecting PTCH1 mutations in individuals with NBCCS-associated or sporadic KCOTs, published between January 1996 and June 2013 in English language. Results We identified 15 mutations in 11 cases with NBCCS-associated KCOTs and 19 mutations in 13 cases with sporadic KCOTs. In addition, a total of 204 PTCH1 mutations (187 mutations from 210 cases with NBCCS-associated and 17 mutations from 57 cases with sporadic KCOTs) were compiled from 78 published papers. Conclusions Our study indicates that mutations in transmembrane 2 (TM2) are closely related to the development of sporadic KCOTs. Moreover, for the early diagnosis of NBCCS, a genetic analysis of the PTCH1 gene should be included in the new diagnostic criteria. PMID:24204797

  2. Integrated Genotypic Analysis of Hedgehog-Related Genes Identifies Subgroups of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor with Distinct Clinicopathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yasuyuki; Katsube, Ken-ichi; Kabasawa, Yuji; Morita, Kei-ichi; Omura, Ken; Yamaguchi, Akira; Sakamoto, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) arises as part of Gorlin syndrome (GS) or as a sporadic lesion. Gene mutations and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the hedgehog receptor PTCH1 plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of KCOT. However, some KCOT cases lack evidence for gene alteration of PTCH1, suggesting that other genes in the hedgehog pathway may be affected. PTCH2 and SUFU participate in the occurrence of GS-associated tumors, but their roles in KCOT development are unknown. To elucidate the roles of these genes, we enrolled 36 KCOT patients in a study to sequence their entire coding regions of PTCH1, PTCH2 and SUFU. LOH and immunohistochemical expression of these genes, as well as the downstream targets of hedgehog signaling, were examined using surgically-excised KCOT tissues. PTCH1 mutations, including four novel ones, were found in 9 hereditary KCOT patients, but not in sporadic KCOT patients. A pathogenic mutation of PTCH2 or SUFU was not found in any patients. LOH at PTCH1 and SUFU loci correlated with the presence of epithelial budding. KCOT harboring a germline mutation (Type 1) showed nuclear localization of GLI2 and frequent histological findings such as budding and epithelial islands, as well as the highest recurrence rate. KCOT with LOH but without a germline mutation (Type 2) less frequently showed these histological features, and the recurrence rate was lower. KCOT with neither germline mutation nor LOH (Type 3) consisted of two subgroups, Type 3A and 3B, which were characterized by nuclear and cytoplasmic GLI2 localization, respectively. Type 3B rarely exhibited budding and recurrence, behaving as the most amicable entity. The expression patterns of CCND1 and BCL2 tended to correlate with these subgroups. Our data indicates a significant role of PTCH1 and SUFU in the pathogenesis of KCOT, and the genotype-oriented subgroups constitute entities with different potential aggressiveness. PMID:23951062

  3. Central mucoepidermoid carcinoma radiographically mimicking an odontogenic tumor: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Leorik Pereira; Serpa, Marianna Sampaio; da Silva, Luiz Arthur Barbosa; Sobral, Ana Paula Veras

    2016-01-01

    Central mucoepidermoid carcinoma (CMC) of the jaw bones is a rare malignant salivary gland tumor of unknown pathogenesis, comprising about 4% of all mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MECs). Most cases are histologically classified as a low-grade tumor and radiographically appear as a well-defined unilocular or multilocular radiolucent lesion. Block resection or wide local excisions are the treatment of choice and patients usually show a good overall prognosis although a long-term follow-up is necessary. This report describes a case of a 28-year-old male with MEC in the posterior region of the mandible and discusses its clinical, radiographic and histopathological findings. Although rare, CMC may be considered a differential diagnosis in cases of proliferative and osteolytic lesions in the oral cavity even when its clinical and/or radiographic findings do not suggest malignancy. PMID:27721620

  4. [Adenomatoid tumour of the adrenal gland].

    PubMed

    Bandier, Philippe Claus; Hansen, Alastair; Thorelius, Lars

    2009-01-26

    An adenomatoid tumour in the right suprarenal gland was discovered during clinical cancer staging of a 73-year-old woman. Adenomatoid tumours in the suprarenal glands are rare and are most often found incidentally. A definitive diagnosis is made on the basis of histology since imaging methods are non-specific. Differential diagnoses comprise malignant vascular neoplasm or adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry or electron microscopy allows uncomplicated distinction between these tumours. In general, it is recommended to obtain biopsies from suprarenal processes.

  5. Surgical and prosthetic management of maxillary odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Haroon; Bashir, Atif

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic myxomas are uncommon tumors of comprising of 3% of all the tumors of odontogenic origin. They usually occur during the second and third decades of life and are more commonly seen in females. The current case report sheds light upon the surgical treatment of a myxoma of odontogenic origin in posterior maxilla of a young female patient. Prosthodontic rehabilitation stages are also briefly described following complete healing of the lesion after surgery. PMID:26038664

  6. Odontogenic carcinoma with dentinoid: a new odontogenic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Neville, Brad W; Tatemoto, Yukihiro; Ogawa, Ikuko; Takata, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Dentinoid is an integral part of some odontogenic tumors. This article describes the clinico-pathological features of three cases of odontogenic carcinomas with dentinoid (OCD). A comparison of these with previously reported cases of dentinoid-producing epithelial odontogenic tumors allowed us to identify another six cases that may be considered as examples of OCD. Six cases occurred in the mandible and three in the maxilla, all developing behind the canines. There was no sex predilection (five men and four women; age range 14-61 years, mean 38.1). Pain or discomfort was mentioned in five cases, four of which showed tooth resorption. All cases appeared initially as well-defined radiolucencies, five of which showed variable amounts of calcified material. Recurrences were recorded in three instances, but no evidence of metastasis has been found. Seven cases were composed predominantly or entirely of clear cells, usually with minimal cellular atypia and variable mitotic activity; however, in all cases there was evidence of tumor infiltration into adjacent tissues, including the presence of perineural invasion in two tumors. Those cases in which no reference was made to the presence of clear cells exhibited evident mitotic activity and cellular pleomorphism. The epithelium in OCD does not produce buds or enamel organ-like structures such as those found in ameloblastic fibro-dentinoma and this tumor does not contain a mesenchyme-like connective tissue resembling dental papilla as observed in several mixed odontogenic tumors. Based on the existing data and the present series of cases, OCD appears to represent a distinct entity. PMID:25409850

  7. Complete resolution of a calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor with physiological eruption of a dislocated permanent tooth after marsupialization in a child with a mixed dentition: a case report.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Keiji; Kawano, Shintaro; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Sakamoto, Taiki; Kiyoshima, Tamotsu; Nakamura, Seiji; Nonaka, Kazuaki

    2015-09-17

    Here, we report the complete resolution of a calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) in the right mandible after marsupialization in an 8-year-old girl with a mixed dentition. Clinical, radiographic, and histopathological findings showed a simple cystic variant of CCOT in the region of the deciduous second molar, with dislocation of the permanent second premolar tooth germ. Initial treatment involved marsupialization, including extraction of the involved deciduous tooth, incision of pathological tissue, and creation of a window in the extraction socket. The crown of the dislocated second premolar was exposed at the base of the cystic cavity after marsupialization. One year and nine months later, complete bone healing and spontaneous eruption of the second premolar were observed, providing evidence of the bone regeneration capacity and tooth germ eruption potential in children. No recurrence was observed after 7 years. The findings from this case suggest that marsupialization can be successfully applied for the treatment of CCOT in children with a mixed dentition.

  8. Adenomatoid mesothelioma with intranuclear inclusion bodies: a case report with cytological and histological findings.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Toshiaki; Kawashima, Katsuhiko; Serizawa, Hiromi; Miura, Hiroyuki; Kyeongil, Kim

    2014-05-01

    We report a very unusual cytologic feature, intranuclear inclusion bodies, in mesothelioma of a predominantly adenomatoid type. The patient, a 57-year-old woman, was presented with dyspnea and right pleural effusion. Pleural aspiration cytology revealed many cohesive ball-like clusters, with a tubular pattern, composed of small atypical cells displaying a high-nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio. They had a nuclear groove and irregular intranuclear inclusion bodies. Right lung partial resection with thoracoscopy revealed that a white tumor had proliferated along the pleural surface at S(8) . Histology revealed nodular tumor cells forming dilated structures mixed with small tubular or glandular structures similar to those seen in benign adenomatoid tumors. These tumor cells had invaded peripheral lung tissues. Such inclusion bodies have not been reported earlier in mesothelioma. On the basis of this observation, we propose that the adenomatoid type of malignant mesothelioma be added to the differential diagnosis of malignant effusions when tumor cells with nuclear grooves and intranuclear inclusions are found in pleural aspiration cytology.

  9. Expression of Bcl-2 and epithelial growth factor receptor proteins in keratocystic odontogenic tumor in comparison with dentigerous cyst and ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed Mohammad; Torabinia, Nakisa; Mohajeri, Mohammad Reza; Shahriyary, Shahriyar; Ghalegolab, Shirin; Nouri, Samin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a developmental odontogenic cyst on which various investigations have been focused due to its biological activities, high tendency to recur and different growth mechanisms in comparison with other cystic lesions. Previous studies have shown different biological and proliferative activities for the lining epithelium of KCOT. The aim of this study was immunohistochemical evaluation of Bcl-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in KCOT compared with dentigerous cyst and ameloblastoma. Materials and Methods: Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 16 cases of KCOT, 16 cases of dentigerous cyst and 16 cases of ameloblastoma were immunohistochemically analyzed to determine Bcl-2 and EGFR proteins’ expression. Biotin-Stereotavidin method was used. It was observed by two oral pathologists separately, and the data were analyzed by Mann–Whitney and Kruskul–Wallis. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Regardless of staining intensity, all cases of ameloblastoma and KCOT except dentigerous cases were positively stained for Bcl-2. Expression of Bcl-2 was higher in the peripheral layer of ameloblastoma and basal layer of KCOT. Furthermore, all cases of ameloblastoma and dentigerous cysts except KCOT samples were positively stained for EGFR. Expression of EGFR was higher in the peripheral layer of ameloblastoma and basal layer of dentigerous cysts. Conclusion: According to the expression of — Bcl-2 in ameloblastoma and KCOT, and no expression of EGFR in KCOT, it can be concluded that the biological activity and growth mechanisms of KCOT are different compared with other cystic lesions. However, the aggressive potential of KCOT is not as severe as that of a neoplasm such as ameloblastoma. PMID:26288624

  10. Adenomatoid hyperplasia of palatal minor salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Bryant, C; Manisali, M; Barrett, A W

    1996-02-01

    Adenomatoid hyperplasia of palatal minor mucous glands is rare but significant because the clinical appearance mimics malignant disease. The typical history of a painless, indolent palatal swelling, together with the histological picture of benign glandular hyperplasia and hypertrophy, are illustrated in this report.

  11. Central Odontogenic Fibroma of the Mandible.

    PubMed

    Puppala, Niharika; Madala, Jaya Kiran; Mareddy, Ajay Reddy; Dumpala, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a benign odontogenic tumor of mesenchymal tissue such as the periodontal ligament, dental papilla or dental follicle. It is an extremely rare tumor, accounting less than five percent of all odontogenic tumors. In this report, we describe the case of an eight year old girl who presented with a painless swelling of the left mandible. Radiographic evaluation revealed a well-defined unilocular radiolucency extending from the distal aspect of the displaced mandibular left premolar to the ascending ramus of the mandible. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of COF of the simple type. Surgical excision of the lesion was done and no recurrence was noted thereafter. PMID:27620521

  12. A study of 1177 odontogenic lesions in a South Kerala population

    PubMed Central

    Deepthi, PV; Beena, VT; Padmakumar, SK; Rajeev, R; Sivakumar, R

    2016-01-01

    Context: A study on odontogenic cysts and tumors. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of odontogenic cysts and tumors and their distribution according to age, gender, site and histopathologic types of those reported over a period of 1998–2012 in a Tertiary Health Care Center at South Kerala. Settings and Design: The archives of Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects and Methods: Archival records were reviewed and all the cases of odontogenic cysts and tumors were retrieved from 1998 to 2012. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistical analysis was performed using the computer software, Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) IBM SPSS Software version 16. Results: Of 7117 oral biopsies, 4.29% were odontogenic tumors. Ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumor comprising 50.2% of cases, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (24.3%). These tumors showed a male predilection (1.19: 1). Odontogenic tumors occurred in a mean age of 33.7 ± 16.8 years. Mandible was the most common jaw affected (76.07%). Odontogenic cysts constituted 12.25% of all oral biopsies. Radicular cyst comprised 75.11% of odontogenic cysts followed by dentigerous cyst (17.2%). Conclusions: This study showed similar as well as contradictory results compared to other studies, probably due to geographical and ethnic variations which is yet to be corroborated.

  13. A study of 1177 odontogenic lesions in a South Kerala population

    PubMed Central

    Deepthi, PV; Beena, VT; Padmakumar, SK; Rajeev, R; Sivakumar, R

    2016-01-01

    Context: A study on odontogenic cysts and tumors. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of odontogenic cysts and tumors and their distribution according to age, gender, site and histopathologic types of those reported over a period of 1998–2012 in a Tertiary Health Care Center at South Kerala. Settings and Design: The archives of Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects and Methods: Archival records were reviewed and all the cases of odontogenic cysts and tumors were retrieved from 1998 to 2012. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistical analysis was performed using the computer software, Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) IBM SPSS Software version 16. Results: Of 7117 oral biopsies, 4.29% were odontogenic tumors. Ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumor comprising 50.2% of cases, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (24.3%). These tumors showed a male predilection (1.19: 1). Odontogenic tumors occurred in a mean age of 33.7 ± 16.8 years. Mandible was the most common jaw affected (76.07%). Odontogenic cysts constituted 12.25% of all oral biopsies. Radicular cyst comprised 75.11% of odontogenic cysts followed by dentigerous cyst (17.2%). Conclusions: This study showed similar as well as contradictory results compared to other studies, probably due to geographical and ethnic variations which is yet to be corroborated. PMID:27601809

  14. Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst of the mandible: A rare case report with a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sarvaiya, Bhumi; Vadera, Hitesh; Sharma, Vimal; Bhad, Kaustubh; Patel, Zinal; Thakkar, Mimansa

    2014-01-01

    Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is an odontogenic cyst was initially termed as the uncommon orthokeratinized type of odontogenic keratocyst by the World Health Organization. It usually occurs in mandible. Various studies have shown that OOC has typical characteristic clinicopathologic features when compared to other developmental odontogenic lesions such as dentigerous cyst and the keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Rare recurrence was noted after surgical removal of the lesion. The purpose of this article is to present a case of OOC arising in the posterior mandible and emphasize on differentiating it from the KCOT and dentigerous cyst. PMID:24818100

  15. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma in odontogenic keratocyst: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Chitrapriya; Aggarwal, Pooja; Wadhwan, Vijay; Bansal, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising from the wall of an odontogenic cyst (also known as primary intraosseous carcinoma) is a rare tumor which occurs only in jaw bones. This tumor was first described by Loos in 1913 as a central epidermoid carcinoma of the jaw. Primary intraosseous carcinomas (PIOC) may theoretically arise from the lining of an odontogenic cyst or de novo from presumed odontogenic cell rests. According to the new histological classification of tumors of the World Health Organization, odontogenic keratocyst is nowadays considered a specific odontogenic tumor and the PIOC derived from it is considered as a specific entity which is different from other PIOCs derived from the odontogenic cysts. The following report describes a case of such extremely rare entity that is primary intraosseous SCC of the mandible derived from an OKC in a 60-year-old male patient with brief review of literature. PMID:26980976

  16. Clinical and radiological profile of ameloblastic fibro-odontoma: an update on an uncommon odontogenic tumor based on a critical analysis of 114 cases.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Amos; Kaffe, Israel; Vered, Marilena

    2013-03-01

    Ameloblastic fibro-odontoma is an uncommon benign tumor of the jaws that belongs to the group of mixed odontogenic tumors. The descriptions of its clinical and radiological features in the literature are not always accurate and sometimes even contradictory. The aim of the present study was to critically evaluate their clinical and radiological features as reported in the English-language literature. A total of 114 well-documented cases of ameloblastic fibro-odontomas (103 from publications and 11 of our own new cases) were analyzed. The patients' age ranged from 8 months to 26 years (mean 9.6). There were 74 (65 %) males, with a male-to-female ratio of 1.85:1 (P = 0.001). The mandible was involved in 74 (65 %) cases, and the mandible-to-maxilla ratio was 1.85:1 (P < 0.001). Nearly 80 % of the lesions were located in the posterior region of the jaws, and most (58 %) were in the posterior mandible. Radiographically, most of the lesions were unilocular and only a few (~10 %) were multilocular. Most lesions were mixed radiolucent-radiopaque, and only a few (~5 %) were radiolucent. Almost all lesions (~92 %) were associated with the crown of an unerupted tooth/teeth. This comprehensive analysis of a large number of patients with an uncommon lesion revealed that ameloblastic fibro-odontomas are significantly more common in males and in the mandible, and that multilocular lesions are uncommon. It also revealed that, based on their clinical and radiological features, some of them are probably true neoplasms while others appear to be developing odontomas (hamartomas).

  17. Central odontogenic fibroma of the mandible: A case report with diagnostic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Angela; Pannone, Giuseppe; Ramaglia, Luca; Bufo, Pantaleo; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Saviano, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Odontogenic fibroma (OF), a rare odontogenic tumor of mesodermal origin, has been thought to originate from either dental follicle, periodontal ligament, or dental papilla [1]. Different studies reported high variability in the incidence rate as being between 3 and 23% of all odontogenic tumors [2,3]. OF manifests a dual character at the histopathological examination showing odontogenic epithelial structures mimicking those observed in biopsy of ameloblastoma and, in addition, peculiar fragments of cellular stroma. The clinical and radiological features of OF are similar to other odontogenic and/or non-odontogenic tumours and the differential diagnosis may first occur at fine-needle aspiration biopsy. Presentation of case In the case reported, a young patient showed a localized gingival enlargement involving radiologically the superior margin of the right angle of the mandible and associated with an un-erupted tooth. The morphological characteristics together with clinical and radiologic findings confirmed the tumor to be a central odontogenic fibroma (COF) with secondary gingival involvement. Discussion and conclusion Benign odontogenic tumors may be distinguished from other odontogenic/non-odontogenic neoplasias and from malignant tumours through a cytologic differential diagnosis as treatment differs accordingly. PMID:26793312

  18. Central odontogenic fibroma of the maxilla.

    PubMed

    Veeravarmal, V; Madhavan, R Nirmal; Nassar, M Mohamed; Amsaveni, R

    2013-05-01

    The central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign odontogenic mesenchymal tumor of jaw bones. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes two variants of COF namely: 1) Epithelial-rich type (WHO) and 2) epithelial-poor type (simple type). Rare variants like ossifying COF, COF associated with giant cell lesions, and amyloid have been documented. This article presents a case of an epithelial-rich variant of COF in a 24-year-old female. It presented as a bony swelling of the maxilla and appeared as a mixed lesion in radiographs. Histopathology showed a highly cellular fibrous connective tissue stroma with plump fibroblasts and long strands of odontogenic epithelium exhibiting mild eosinophilic to clear cytoplasm. Numerous cementum-like hematoxyphilic calcifications of various sizes akin to dentin or acellular cementum were observed. We believe that clinical and radiographic features of this case may add valuable knowledge to the already existing literature. PMID:24250106

  19. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation type I

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Frederico Becker; Schultz, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is an hamartomatous congenital pulmonary airway malformation with incidence ranging between 1:10,000 and 1:35,000 newborns. Currently CCAM is classified into five groups according to clinical and pathological features. The clinical outcome varies depending on the subtype and the extent of involvement. The authors report the case of a premature male newborn with the prenatal diagnosis of CCAM Type 1 associated with cardiac right axis deviation, who died 67 hours after birth due to respiratory failure. In addition to the autopsy report of this rare entity, the authors present its classification and prognosis. PMID:26558243

  20. Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Iezzi, G; Rubini, C; Fioroni, M; Piattelli, A

    2002-02-01

    Clear cell tumours, in the head and neck region, are usually derived from salivary or odontogenic tissues, or may be metastatic. A few clear cells may be present in odontogenic cysts, while, odontogenic neoplasms composed predominantly of clear cells are quite rare. They include calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumours (CEOT), ameloblastoma and odontogenic carcinoma. Clear cell odontogenic tumour (CCOT) has been classified in the last WHO classification as a benign tumour, but it is now recognized as a more sinister lesion and current opinion is that CCOT should be designated as a carcinoma. These tumours are characterized by aggressive growth, recurrences, and metastatic disease. A recent review of the literature has yielded 30 cases of tumours with similar characteristics. These tumours have a peak incidence in the 5th-7th decades, with a female predilection. The anterior portions of the jaws, especially the mandible, are most frequently affected. The aggressive potential of these neoplasms is well documented by the extensive invasion of adjacent tissues, multiple recurrences and regional or distant metastases.

  1. Odontogenic Myxoma in Children: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Dalbo Contrera Toro, Mariana; Siqueira Barreto, Icléia; Amstalden, Eliane Maria Ingrid; Takahiro Chone, Carlos; Nizam Pfeilsticker, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Benign odontogenic lesions are rare entities but are very important due to their locally aggressive nature. Odontogenic myxoma is even rarer in children than in adults. There is no evidence in the literature in regard to the best treatment approach, in terms of conservative or aggressive surgery, for this type of tumor. This paper reports a case of odontogenic myxoma in a child treated with a compromised approach through bone osteotomies and a review of the literature about this disease, especially in pediatric patients. PMID:27064694

  2. Odontogenic Myxoma in Children: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Dalbo Contrera Toro, Mariana; Siqueira Barreto, Icléia; Amstalden, Eliane Maria Ingrid; Takahiro Chone, Carlos; Nizam Pfeilsticker, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Benign odontogenic lesions are rare entities but are very important due to their locally aggressive nature. Odontogenic myxoma is even rarer in children than in adults. There is no evidence in the literature in regard to the best treatment approach, in terms of conservative or aggressive surgery, for this type of tumor. This paper reports a case of odontogenic myxoma in a child treated with a compromised approach through bone osteotomies and a review of the literature about this disease, especially in pediatric patients. PMID:27064694

  3. Ameloblastomatous Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour: A Rare Variant

    PubMed Central

    Devaraju, Rama Raju; Duggi, Lakshmi Srujana; Sanjeevareddygari, Shylaja; Potturi, Abhinand

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumor (CCOT) was previously described by Gorlin et al., in 1962 as Calcifying odontogenic cyst. CCOT is a rare lesion which accounts for 2% of all odontogenic pathological changes in the jaws. One of the variants, Ameloblastomatous proliferating type of CCOT is even more rare and very few cases have been reported in the light of literature review. This case report is an effort to bring forth a case of ameloblastomatous proliferating type of CCOT in a 65 year male, who presented with a painful swelling in the right jaw crossing midline causing facial asymmetry and confirmed by histopathological evaluation. PMID:25954714

  4. Diagnostic dilemma: solitary fibrous tumor or hemangiopericytoma of the submandibular region in a patient with multiple odontogenic keratocysts.

    PubMed

    Garg, Deepti; Palaskar, Sangeeta; Shetty, Vishwa Prakash; Bhushan, Anju; Bhatia, Prateek; Sarin, Jyoti

    2009-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare spindle cell neoplasms that originate from mesothelial-lined surfaces, mainly the pleura and peritoneum. SFT is a distinctive mesenchymal neoplasm of the pleura but can be found in extrapleural sites. The treatment of SFT is simple excision or wide local resection. This is the case study of a 14-year-old girl who presented with a large diffuse swelling in the left submandibular region, ultimately diagnosed with SFT and surgically excised.

  5. Adenomatoid hyperplasia in the palate: another sheep in wolf's clothing.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Eveson, J W; Richards, A

    1992-09-01

    Adenomatoid hyperplasia is a rare idiopathic non-inflammatory, non-neoplastic and benign lesion of minor salivary glands, that typically presents with a tumour-like mass in the palate. A 77-year-old patient is described.

  6. Advances in assessing the volume of odontogenic cysts and tumors in the mandible: a retrospective clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare two methods of creating three-dimensional representations of mandibular cysts and tumors on the basis of computed tomography (CT) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data. Methods A total of 71 patients with acquired jaw cysts took part in this retrospective clinical study. CT and CBCT scans were obtained from all patients and saved in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) format. Data were analyzed twice with iPlan software. Analysis was performed manually and using an interpolarization algorithm. The accuracy of the two methods in assessing cyst volume was compared. Results Manual delineation did not provide more accurate results than the interpolarization algorithm. Conclusion There are no major differences between manual analysis and analysis using the interpolarization algorithm. The use of the algorithm, however, has the advantage of rapidity. PMID:23601144

  7. Pindborg tumor

    PubMed Central

    Caliaperoumal, Santhosh Kumar; Gowri, S.; Dinakar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references. PMID:27041911

  8. A novel PTCH1 gene mutation in a pediatric patient associated multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaws and Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Gozde; Balta, Burhan; Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Etoz, Osman A; Martinuzzi, Claudia; Kara, Ozlem; Pastorino, Lorenza; Kocoglu, Fatma; Ulker, Omer; Erdogan, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) is an uncommon autosomal dominant inherited disorder which comprises the triad of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts, and musculoskeletal malformations. Besides this triad, neurological, ophthalmic, endocrine, and genital manifestations are known to be variable. It is occasionally associated with aggressive BCC and internal malignancies. This report documents a case of GGS with a novel mutation in the PTCH1 gene in an 11-year-old child. The clinical, radiographic, histopathologic and molecular findings of this condition, and treatment are described, and a review of GGS was carried out. PMID:27510672

  9. Chromosomal aberrations in adenomatoid hyperplasia of palatal minor salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Manor, Esther; Sinelnikov, Igor; Brennan, Peter A; Bodner, Lipa

    2013-03-01

    Adenomatoid hyperplasia of minor salivary glands is rare, idiopathic, and benign, and typically presents as a tumour-like mass in the hard or soft palate. Its exact nature is not clear and histological examination usually shows an excess of normal-appearing minor salivary glands. To our knowledge, cytogenetic analysis of it in a minor salivary gland of the palate has not previously been reported. We present the cytogenetic analysis of adenomatoid hyperplasia in the hard palate of a 52-year-old woman.

  10. Odontogenic infection mimicking antral polyps.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, G J

    1997-01-01

    Odontogenic infections can extend into the maxillary sinus and produce sinusitis that mimics other pathoses. Infection of odontogenic origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of maxillary sinusitis. Sinusitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of maxillary posterior teeth with acute or chronic symptoms.

  11. Orthokeratinizing odontogenic cyst of maxilla with complex odontoma.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Meena; Kheur, Supriya; Agrawal, Tripti; Ingle, Yashwant

    2013-09-01

    The orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) and odontoma are the odontogenic cyst and tumor respectively that are minimally invasive neoplasms of head and neck region. OOC is a rare variant of odontogenic cyst characterized by the presence of excessive orthokeratin covering the cystic lining. Odontoma is a benign neoplasm/hamartoma often discovered accidently on panoramic radiographs. We came across a case of a 26-year-old male with swelling on his face along with difficulty in breathing. On the basis of radiographic and histopathological findings the final diagnosis of OOC associated with odontoma was given. However, there is no report in the English literature of the simultaneous occurrence of these two lesions and hence this case is very rare. It is unclear whether the two lesions were just coincidental or were actually related to each other.

  12. Odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma with pulmonary metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Renu; Somanathan, Thara; Kattoor, Jayasree

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma (OGCC) is an exceptionally rare malignant odontogenic epithelial tumor. It is characterized by ameloblastic-like islands of epithelial cells with aberrant keratinization in the form of ghost cells with varying amounts of dysplastic dentin. Malignant histological characteristics include infiltration, cellular pleomorphism, numerous mitosis and necrosis. Its biological behavior varies from slow-growing locally invasive lesions to rapidly growing highly aggressive tumors. OGCC metastasizing to distant sites is extremely rare. Only three cases of metastasis have been reported in literature. We are reporting the case of a 54-year-old male patient who presented with tender swelling in the malar region. Histopathological examination revealed OGCC and he received postoperative radiotherapy. Two years later, he presented with a lung mass. Biopsy from the lung lesion showed the same morphology as that of maxillary tumor with scattered ghost cells. This case points to the aggressive behavior of OGCC and its metastatic potential. It also highlights the need for long-term follow-up of these patients. PMID:26980967

  13. Odontogenic myxoma of maxilla: A rare presentation in an elderly female

    PubMed Central

    Vijayabanu, B.; Sreeja, C.; Bharath, N.; Aesha, I.; Kannan, V. Sadesh; Devi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic myxomas are rare benign neoplasm of mesenchymal origin, comprising 3–6% of all odontogenic tumors. They are slow growing, non-metastasizing, often asymptomatic with local aggressiveness due to its infiltrative nature and hence high recurrence rate, with a high incidence of occurrence in the mandible. Most frequently occurs in second to third decade of life, seldom occurs beyond these age groups. Hereby, we present a case of odontogenic myxoma occurring in the maxilla in a 65-year-old female managed by partial maxillectomy. PMID:26538962

  14. Odontogenic myxoma of maxilla: A rare presentation in an elderly female.

    PubMed

    Vijayabanu, B; Sreeja, C; Bharath, N; Aesha, I; Kannan, V Sadesh; Devi, M

    2015-08-01

    Odontogenic myxomas are rare benign neoplasm of mesenchymal origin, comprising 3-6% of all odontogenic tumors. They are slow growing, non-metastasizing, often asymptomatic with local aggressiveness due to its infiltrative nature and hence high recurrence rate, with a high incidence of occurrence in the mandible. Most frequently occurs in second to third decade of life, seldom occurs beyond these age groups. Hereby, we present a case of odontogenic myxoma occurring in the maxilla in a 65-year-old female managed by partial maxillectomy. PMID:26538962

  15. Calcifying odontogenic cyst associated with odontoma: a possible separate entity (odontocalcifying odontogenic cyst).

    PubMed

    Hirshberg, A; Kaplan, I; Buchner, A

    1994-06-01

    The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) has been reported to be associated with odontoma in about 24% of cases. Separation of the cases of COC associated with odontoma (COCaO) may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this lesion. A screen of the literature revealed 52 cases of COCaO. The male to female ratio was 1:1.9, with a mean age of 16 years. The most common location was the maxilla (61.5%). The radiographic appearance of most cases (80.5%) was of a well-defined, mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesion. Histologically, the lesions usually consisted of a single large cyst (which is similar to simple COC) with tooth-like structures that appear to be an integral part of the lesion, giving the impression of a single lesion. In addition to the unique histologic features, differences in gender and in distribution were found between the cases of COCaO and those of simple COC. COCaO may be regarded as a separate entity and classified as a benign, mixed odontogenic tumor. The term odontocalcifying odontogenic cyst is suggested.

  16. Calcifying odontogenic cyst in infancy: report of case associated with compound odontoma.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, J A; da Silva, C J; Costa, I M; Loyola, A M

    1995-01-01

    A case of calcifying odontogenic cyst associated with compound odontoma in an unerupted primary tooth in a three-year-old patient is reported. Some considerations regarding the age of the patient, differential diagnosis and treatment are discussed. Although the cyst can occur at any age, the majority of cases appear before the fourth decade of life. This malady represents less than 2 percent of all odontogenic tumors and cysts.

  17. Fetal MRI as Complementary Study of Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation During Pregnancy: A Single Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Paanakker, Alberto; Gomez-Leal, Paloma; Navarro-Sanchez, Patricia; Bueno-Crespo, Andres; Martinez-Cendan, Juan Pedro; Remezal-Solano, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Fetal lung masses are rare findings in prenatal ultrasound scanning in general population, of which congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation is the most commonly diagnosed type. This paper reports a single case of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation detected at our hospital and the subsequent clinical follow-up using ultrasound scanning and fetal magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27186452

  18. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis of odontogenic origin is a well-known condition in both the dental and otolaryngology communities. It occurs when the Schneiderian membrane is violated by conditions arising from dentoalveolar unit. This type of sinusitis differs in its pathophysiology, microbiology, diagnostics and management from sinusitis of other causes, therefore, failure to accurately identify a dental cause in these patients usually lead to persistent symptomatology and failure of medical and surgical therapies directed toward sinusitis. Unilateral recalcitrant disease associated with foul smelling drainage is a most common feature of odontogenic sinusitis. Also, high-resolution CT scans and cone-beam volumetric computed tomography can assist in identifying dental disease. Sometimes dental treatment alone is adequate to resolve the odontogenic sinusitis and sometimes concomitant or subsequent functional endoscopic sinus surgery or Caldwell-Luc operation is required. The aim of this article is to give a review of the most common causes, symptoms, diagnostic and treatment methods of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Search on Cochrane Library, PubMed and Science Direct data bases by key words resulted in 35 articles which met our criteria. It can be concluded that the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis is likely underreported in the available literature.

  19. The central odontogenic fibroma: How difficult can be making a preliminary diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pippi, Roberto; Santoro, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign odontogenic tumor derived from the dental ectomesenchymal tissues. A 16-year-old Caucasian female patient was referred by her dentist for a radiolucent asymptomatic area associated with the crown of the impacted lower right third molar. A preliminary diagnosis of a follicular cyst was supposed. The lesion was surgically removed under general anesthesia together with the impacted tooth. The microscopic diagnosis of the excised tissue revealed an odontogenic fibroma. No clinical or radiographic signs of recurrence were found five years after surgical excision. Despite the various differential diagnoses of homogeneous unilocular and well delimited radiolucencies of the jaws, enucleation with peripheral curettage, without any other pre-operative imaging exams or biopsies, can be considered as the treatment of choice. Key words:Differential diagnosis, impacted third molar, radiographic imaging, microscopic diagnosis, odontogenic fibroma. PMID:27034766

  20. Late presentation of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Hulnick, D.H.; Naidich, D.P.; McCauley, D.I.; Feiner, H.D.; Avitabile, A.M.; Greco, M.A.; Genieser, N.B.

    1984-06-01

    Although most often recognized in neonates and young children, congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung (CCAM) occasionally appears in later years. Three patients, aged 35, 24, and 7 years, are reported. Chest radiographs in each case suggested a localized patchy density, a cystic mass, or a multicystic mass, but computed tomography (CT) best demonstrated the cystic and solid components while ruling out bronchiectasis or major bronchial obstruction. Bronchography contributed no further diagnostic information compared with CT. Each patient underwent lobectomy. Histologically, the characteristic overgrowth of bronchiolar elements replacing normal parenchymal architecture was accompanied by some superimposed inflammatory change.

  1. Nasolabial Cyst Associated with Odontogenic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Eveline Claudia; Coppla, Fabiana Madalozzo; Campagnoli, Eduardo Bauml; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The nasolabial cyst or Klestadt cyst is a relatively uncommon nonodontogenic cyst that develops in the nasal alar region; it has uncertain pathogenesis. This lesion has slow growth and variable dimensions and is characterized clinically by a floating tumefaction in the nasolabial fold area around the bridge of the nose, causing an elevation of the upper lip and relative facial asymmetry. Diagnosis is primarily made clinically; if necessary, this is complemented by imaging. This paper reports the case of a 39-year-old male patient who complained of pain in the right upper premolar region and poor aesthetics due to a firm tumor in the right wing of the nose. Initially, this was thought to be due to an odontogenic abscess; however, the differential diagnosis was that a nasolabial cyst was communicating with the apex of teeth 14 and 15. Surgical treatment was carried out, followed by histopathological examination and concomitant endodontic treatment of the teeth involved. PMID:26904312

  2. Nasolabial Cyst Associated with Odontogenic Infection.

    PubMed

    Martini, Eveline Claudia; Coppla, Fabiana Madalozzo; Campagnoli, Eduardo Bauml; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The nasolabial cyst or Klestadt cyst is a relatively uncommon nonodontogenic cyst that develops in the nasal alar region; it has uncertain pathogenesis. This lesion has slow growth and variable dimensions and is characterized clinically by a floating tumefaction in the nasolabial fold area around the bridge of the nose, causing an elevation of the upper lip and relative facial asymmetry. Diagnosis is primarily made clinically; if necessary, this is complemented by imaging. This paper reports the case of a 39-year-old male patient who complained of pain in the right upper premolar region and poor aesthetics due to a firm tumor in the right wing of the nose. Initially, this was thought to be due to an odontogenic abscess; however, the differential diagnosis was that a nasolabial cyst was communicating with the apex of teeth 14 and 15. Surgical treatment was carried out, followed by histopathological examination and concomitant endodontic treatment of the teeth involved. PMID:26904312

  3. Bilateral respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma of the olfactory cleft penetrating into the endocranium.

    PubMed

    Mladina, Ranko; Skitarelić, Neven; Poje, Gorazd; Vuković, Katarina

    2011-09-01

    Respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartomas (REAHs) of the nose and paranasal sinuses are relatively rare. These tumors usually do not extend over the boundaries of the nose and sinuses. The authors presented a 65-year-old man experiencing progressive hyposmia, followed by intermittent stubborn headache. The symptoms lasted for almost 2 years and were getting worse very slowly. Fiberendoscopy showed relatively discrete polypoid tissue occupying the olfactory cleft bilaterally. The computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging suggested the possible lack of the cribriform plate and the unity and uniformity of the tissues located both in the endocranium and high in the nasal cavity. The clinical picture resembled very much a esthesineuroblastoma.The patient underwent endoscopic sinus surgery under the general hypotensive anesthesia. Frozen sections during the surgery showed REAH. The entire tumor was removed in a piece meal way, including both olfactory bulbs because they were involved within the pathologic tissue as well.This case showed that REAH could also be a locally aggressive process, penetrating even into the endocranium. PMID:21959462

  4. [Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by dental restoration].

    PubMed

    Sato, Kiminori

    2014-06-01

    We report herein on 5 patients with odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by a dental restoration (caries cutting, cavity preparation, inlay restoration). Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis was noted following dental restoration. Even though the pulp cavity and dental pulp were intact, the odontogenic maxillary sinusitis occurred caused by an apical lesion. Infection by way of the dentinal tubules was suggested to be a cause of the pathophysiology. Endoscopic sinus surgery was indicated in patients with intractable odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by the dental restoration. Cone-beam x-ray CT was useful for the accurate diagnosis of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by a dental restoration. Physicians should thus be aware of the possibility that a tooth, which has undergone dental restoration, may cause odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

  5. Central Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma: Primary Odontogenic or Osseous Neoplasm?

    PubMed

    Woo, Sook-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Currently, central cemento-ossifying fibroma is classified by the World Health Organization as a primary bone-forming tumor of the jaws. However, histopathologically, it is often indistinguishable from cemento-osseous dysplasias in that it forms osteoid and cementicles (cementum droplets) in varying proportions. It is believed that pluripotent cells within the periodontal membrane can be stimulated to produce either osteoid or woven bone and cementicles when stimulated. If this is true, cemento-ossifying fibroma would be better classified as a primary odontogenic neoplasm arising from the periodontal ligament. Cemento-ossifying fibromas also do not occur in the long bones. The present report compares several entities that fall within the diagnostic realm of benign fibro-osseous lesions and reviews the evidence for reclassifying central cemento-ossifying fibroma as a primary odontogenic neoplasm. PMID:26608158

  6. Condyloma acuminatum associated with odontogenic myxoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rajasekhar, G; Mushtaq, Mohammed; Vura, Nanda Gopal; Shekar, Ravi; Kumar, Sravan

    2009-12-01

    Condylomata acuminatum is a sexually transmitted infectious disease caused by human papiloma virus on the skin. The transmission is mainly by close contact with infected person and autoinoculation. In oral cavity the condition manifests as soft pink nodules which proliferate and coalesce rapidly to form diffuse papillomatous clusters of varying size. Odontogenic myxoma is a rare tumor of jaws which occurs in the tooth-bearing areas of the mandible and maxilla. It is an uncommon, benign, but locally aggressive neoplasm. This case report highlights a 17-year-old girl with two lesions in oral cavity with soft tissue growth on the palate which has been diagnosed as Condyloma Acuminatum, treated by surgical excision and a large swelling on the right side of the mandible in the same patient diagnosed as odontogenic myxoma where marginal resection was performed.

  7. Calcifying odontogenic cyst with ameloblastic fibroma: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Chung-Ho; Lin, Li-Min; Chen, Yuk-Kwan; Wright, John M; Kessler, Harvey P; Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa; Ellis, Edward

    2004-10-01

    Although it is a rare event, odontogenic tumors such as ameloblastoma, ameloblastic fibroma (AF), ameloblastic fibro-odontoma, and odontoma have been reported associated with calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC). There are only four cases of COC with AF cited in the English literature. However, three of these four cases were either included in a review of a series of cases or reported as an abstract, and limited clinical and histological information was provided. We present three additional cases of COC with AF and discuss the management for this combined lesion. Because COC is known for its histologic diversity and variable clinical behavior, and the clinical significance of an association of COC with AF is still unknown, we think it is valuable to report COC with AF with detailed clinical and pathological documentation.

  8. Central Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma: Primary Odontogenic or Osseous Neoplasm?

    PubMed

    Woo, Sook-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Currently, central cemento-ossifying fibroma is classified by the World Health Organization as a primary bone-forming tumor of the jaws. However, histopathologically, it is often indistinguishable from cemento-osseous dysplasias in that it forms osteoid and cementicles (cementum droplets) in varying proportions. It is believed that pluripotent cells within the periodontal membrane can be stimulated to produce either osteoid or woven bone and cementicles when stimulated. If this is true, cemento-ossifying fibroma would be better classified as a primary odontogenic neoplasm arising from the periodontal ligament. Cemento-ossifying fibromas also do not occur in the long bones. The present report compares several entities that fall within the diagnostic realm of benign fibro-osseous lesions and reviews the evidence for reclassifying central cemento-ossifying fibroma as a primary odontogenic neoplasm.

  9. [Odontogenic myxoma of nasosinusal localization in a pediatric patient].

    PubMed

    Arjona Amo, M; Belmonte Caro, R; Valdivieso del Pueblo, C; Batista Cruzado, A; Torres Lagares, D; Gutiérrez Pérez, J L

    2011-04-01

    In the present study we report and discuss a case of odontogenic myxoma in a 13-month-old patient. Only two other reports have been published in the literature describing the occurrence of this type of tumor at an earlier age. Odontogenic myxoma is a benign mesenchymal neoplasm of the maxilla more common between the third and fourth decades of life. The case here reported is exceptional as it presents in an infant and, although some cases have been reported in the literature, this type of tumor is rare in early childhood. The most common locations include the ascending ramus and the angle of the jaw, although these tumors may also affect the upper maxilla, in which case they may involve the maxillary sinus. According to the review of the literature, these tumors show a recurrence rate of about 25%. Consequently, after the intraoperative clinical examination of the lesion and the assessment of the initial suspected diagnosis by means of intraoperative biopsy under general anesthesia, we carried out the resection of the tumor with wide margins at some points of the tumor location.

  10. A pigmented calcifying odontogenic cyst.

    PubMed

    Soames, J V

    1982-04-01

    A case of the pigmented variant of the calcifying odontogenic cyst occurring in a 15-year-old West Indian girl is reported. Melanin pigment was widely distributed and appeared in greatest amount in cells exhibiting the appearance of stellate reticulum. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated large numbers of melanosomes in these cells but relatively few in epithelial ghost cells. The latter contained thick bundles of tonofilaments. Melanocytes were identified and two forms were distinguished, depending on their content of premelanosomes and fully melanized melanosomes.

  11. Rare appearance of an odontogenic myxoma in cone-beam computed tomography: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dabbaghi, Arash; Nikkerdar, Nafiseh; Bayati, Soheyla; Golshah, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an infiltrative benign bone tumor that occurs almost exclusively in the facial skeleton. The radiographic characteristics of odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns, making diagnosis difficult. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may prove extremely useful in clarifying the intraosseous extent of the tumor and its effects on surrounding structures. Here, we report a case of odontogenic myxoma of the mandible in a 27-year-old female. The patient exhibited a slight swelling in the left mandible. Surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted. In the CBCT sections, we observed perforation of the cortical plate and radiopaque line that extended from the periosteum, resembling "sunray" appearance-a rare feature of OM-which could not be assessed by panoramic radiography. PMID:27092217

  12. Rare appearance of an odontogenic myxoma in cone-beam computed tomography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Dabbaghi, Arash; Nikkerdar, Nafiseh; Bayati, Soheyla; Golshah, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an infiltrative benign bone tumor that occurs almost exclusively in the facial skeleton. The radiographic characteristics of odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns, making diagnosis difficult. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may prove extremely useful in clarifying the intraosseous extent of the tumor and its effects on surrounding structures. Here, we report a case of odontogenic myxoma of the mandible in a 27-year-old female. The patient exhibited a slight swelling in the left mandible. Surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted. In the CBCT sections, we observed perforation of the cortical plate and radiopaque line that extended from the periosteum, resembling "sunray" appearance—a rare feature of OM—which could not be assessed by panoramic radiography. PMID:27092217

  13. Rare appearance of an odontogenic myxoma in cone-beam computed tomography: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dabbaghi, Arash; Nikkerdar, Nafiseh; Bayati, Soheyla; Golshah, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an infiltrative benign bone tumor that occurs almost exclusively in the facial skeleton. The radiographic characteristics of odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns, making diagnosis difficult. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may prove extremely useful in clarifying the intraosseous extent of the tumor and its effects on surrounding structures. Here, we report a case of odontogenic myxoma of the mandible in a 27-year-old female. The patient exhibited a slight swelling in the left mandible. Surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted. In the CBCT sections, we observed perforation of the cortical plate and radiopaque line that extended from the periosteum, resembling "sunray" appearance-a rare feature of OM-which could not be assessed by panoramic radiography.

  14. Calcifying odontogenic cyst associated with complex odontoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gallana-Alvarez, Silvia; Mayorga-Jimenez, Francisco; Torres-Gómez, Francisco Javier; Avellá-Vecino, Francisco Javier; Salazar-Fernandez, Clara

    2005-01-01

    We report a calcifying odontogenic cyst associated with odontoma (COCaO) and an included permanent canine in the superior maxilla, in a 19 year-old-man. The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) was first described as a distinct entity by Gorlin et al in 1962. The lesion is a mixed odontogenic benign tumor, and although most of the cases present cystic characteristics, a few are of the solid type (15%), and its rare malignant transformation is well documented. The COC may occur in association with other odontogenic tumors, the most common is the odontoma, occurring in about 24% of the cases. For this association the term Odontocalcifying odontogenic cyst has been suggested. Radiographically is a well defined mixed lesion and histologically consists of a large cyst. In the central area of the cyst enamel and dentin deposits can be found, irregularly distributed in areas and in other parts it takes on a well defined organoid aspect. A thorough review of literature takes place and the pathogenesis is discussed.

  15. Odontogenic myxofibroma: A concise review of the literature with emphasis on the surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    Giovannacci, Ilaria; Corradi, Domenico; Manfredi, Maddalena; Merigo, Elisabetta; Bonanini, Mauro; Vescovi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to report a review of the literature concerning epidemiology, clinical and radiographic features as well as treatment of odontogenic myxofibroma (MF). Methods: The PubMed database was searched using the following keywords: “odontogenic myxofibroma”, “odontogenic fibromyxoma”, “myxofibroma of the jaw” and “fibromyxoma of the jaw”. Results: Fifteen articles reporting the experience with 24 patients were identified. Male/female ratio was 1:1.4 and the average age was 29.5 years. The most frequent location was the mandible. In 66.7% of the cases the radiographic appearance was a multilocular radiolucency. Swelling was observed in 13 patients (92.86%), varying degrees of pain in 5 (35.71%) and paresthesia in only one patient (7.14%). Six out of 24 patients (26.09%) were treated with radical surgery and 17 (73.91%) with a conservative approach. In two out of 21 cases (9.52%) a recurrence was reported. Conclusions: MF is an extremely rare tumor and no agreement exists on the causes of its development. According to the present review, the choice of treatment should depend on variables such as localization, presence of a primary or of a recurrent lesion, age, general medical conditions and aesthetic needs of the patient. Key words:Odontogenic myxofibroma, myxofibroma of the jaw, odontogenic tumors, oral surgery, oral pathology. PMID:25129249

  16. Odontogenic squamous cell carcinoma with osseous metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J H; Jones, J; Speight, P M

    1993-07-01

    Intra-osseous carcinomas of the jaw are rare tumours, thought to arise from residual elements of the odontogenic epithelium. We report an additional case which, unusually, was characterised by marked osseous metaplasia. We propose that the new bone formed around the tumour is the result of an epithelial-mesenchymal interaction between malignant odontogenic epithelium and osteogenic precursor cells in the surrounding stroma.

  17. A Large Extragnathic Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M.; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Narasimhamurthy, Srinath

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are developmental cysts which occur typically in the jawbones. They present more commonly in the posterior mandible of young adults than the maxilla. OKCs have been reclassified under odontogenic tumours in 2005 by the WHO and have since been termed as keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs). Here we report a case of a recurrent buccal lesion in a 62-year-old man which was provisionally diagnosed as a space infection (buccal abscess) but surprisingly turned out to be a soft tissue KCOT in an unusual location on histopathologic examination. PMID:26770859

  18. TGF-β in jaw tumor fluids induces RANKL expression in stromal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Chiaki; Aikawa, Tomonao; Okuno, Emi; Miyagawa, Kazuaki; Amano, Katsuhiko; Takahata, Sosuke; Kimata, Masaaki; Okura, Masaya; Iida, Seiji; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors and cysts, arising in the jawbones, grow by resorption and destruction of the jawbones. However, mechanisms underlying bone resorption by odontogenic tumors/cysts remain unclear. Odontogenic tumors/cysts comprise odontogenic epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts, which originate from the developing tooth germ. It has been demonstrated that odontogenic epithelial cells of the developing tooth germ induce osteoclastogenesis to prevent the tooth germ from invading the developing bone to maintain its structure in developing bones. Thus, we hypothesized that odontogenic epithelial cells of odontogenic tumors/cysts induce osteoclast formation, which plays potential roles in tumor/cyst outgrowth into the jawbone. The purpose of this study was to examine osteoclastogenesis by cytokines, focusing on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), produced by odontogenic epithelial cells. We observed two pathways for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) induction by keratocystic odontogenic tumor fluid: the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) pathway through interleukin-1α (IL-1α) signaling and non-COX-2/PGE2 pathway through TGF-β receptor signaling. TGF-β1 and IL-1α produced by odontogenic tumors/cysts induced osteoclastogenesis directly in the osteoclast precursor cells and indirectly via increased RANKL induction in the stroma. PMID:27279422

  19. Odontogenic myxoma: Report of three cases and retrospective review of literature in Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Zainab; Sharma, Pankaj; Gupta, Shalini; Mohanty, Sujata; Naithani, Manish; Jain, Anshul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To review the clinical pattern and treatment modalities meted out to patients of odontogenic myxoma (OM) in Indian population in last 30 years and also to report 3 cases of OM. Method: A retrospective review of radiograph and histopathology of three cases of odontogenic myxoma treated between 2005 and 2011 was done. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to examine the pattern of vimentin and NSE. Also a computerized literature search using Medline and Google scholar was conducted for published articles on OM in Indian population in last 30 years. Result: A total of 32 OM cases reviewed from 25 articles retrieved. Out of them 24 myxomas were present in maxilla, only 8 were in mandible and a single case was present in supraglottic region (larynx). Surgical procedure carried out was excision and curettage in 16 patients and resection with safe margin followed by reconstruction 13 patients. All the three reported cases were successfully treated by tumor enucleation and peripheral ostectomy with no recurrence after 3 to 7 years. Conclusion: Odontogenic myxoma is a rare odontogenic tumor with inconclusive clinical and radiographic features, hence histopathological examination is mandatory to confirm its diagnosis. Although the immunohistochemical analysis may help in diagnosis but plays no role in guiding treatment planning or predicting the rate of recurrence. Currently we lack data on number of reported OM cases in Indian population as author feels more patients must have been treated then reported. PMID:26681859

  20. A review of complications of odontogenic infections.

    PubMed

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these "space infections" has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms "odontogenic infections," "complications," and "risk factors." PMID:27390486

  1. Glandular odontogenic cyst: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Monali; Kale, Hemant; Ranginwala, Amena; Patel, Govind

    2014-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is an uncommon developmental odontogenic cyst of jaws with a relative frequency between 0.012 and 1.3%. GOC is very rare and only 111 cases have been documented in the English literature so far. Generally, this cyst is encountered in the anterior areas of the mandible and is more common with a wide age range, the mean age being 49.5 years and has a tendency to recur. GOC is often misdiagnosed because of its overlapping histopathological features with that of other odontogenic cysts such as lateral periodontal cyst (LPC) or botryoid cyst and central low-grade Mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Histopathological diagnosis and differential diagnosis of GOC is challenging for pathologist. Here, we present a case of GOC in a 40 year old male patient in left mandibular region that crossed the midline. PMID:24959044

  2. A review of complications of odontogenic infections

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these “space infections” has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms “odontogenic infections,” “complications,” and “risk factors.” PMID:27390486

  3. Clinical Characteristics of Odontogenic Cutaneous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Young; Kang, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Kyung-Won; Choi, Ki Hwa; Yoon, Tae Young

    2016-01-01

    Background Odontogenic cutaneous fistula appears as dimpling or a nodule with purulent discharge, usually in the chin or jaw. Affected patients usually seek help from dermatologists or surgeons rather than from dentists. However, clinical symptoms of facial skin fistula without dental problems can lead to misdiagnosis. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with odontogenic cutaneous fistulas. Methods This retrospective observational study was performed at Chungbuk National University Hospital by analyzing patients who visited from April 1994 to September 2014. Following clinical and radiographic examinations, the paths and origins of sinus fistulas were determined. Investigated factors were gender, age, morphology, location, originating tooth, time to evolution, recurrence, and treatment method. Results Thirty-three patients (22 males, 11 females; average age 49.2 years) were examined during the investigation period. Thirty-four fistulas were diagnosed as odontogenic cutaneous fistulas. The most common morphology was dimpling (n=14, 41.2%). The various locations observed were related to the originating tooth. The most common site was the mandibular body related to mandibular molars. The referral clinical diagnosis was of odontogenic origin in 6 cases (18.2%). The majority of patients had experienced recurrence after treatment in previous clinics that had failed to diagnose odontogenic cutaneous fistula. Surgical fistulectomy and/or tooth treatment were performed in all cases. All patients were followed-up for 1 year. None showed signs of recurrence. Conclusion Extraoral and dental examinations are required to make a diagnosis of odontogenic cutaneous fistula. Thus, cooperation between dermatologists and dentists is essential. PMID:27489421

  4. Primordial Odontogenic Cyst with Induction Phenomenon (Zonal Fibroblastic Hypercellularity) and Dentinoid Material Versus Archegonous Cystic Odontoma: You Choose!

    PubMed

    Argyris, Prokopios P; Wetzel, Stephanie L; Pambuccian, Stefan E; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Koutlas, Ioannis G

    2016-06-01

    The most recent A.F.I.P. fascicle defines primordial odontogenic cyst (POC) as a distinct, nonkeratinized, odontogenic cyst of "undetermined origin" forming in the place of a developing normal or supernumerary tooth. However, the majority of examples reported in the literature under this term represent odontogenic keratocysts (keratocystic odontogenic tumors). In addition, there are rare reported cases of cystic odontomas. An 18-year-old Caucasian male presented with a unilocular mandibular radiolucent lesion in the place of a congenitally missing molar. Histologically, it featured nonkeratinizing, thin stratified squamous epithelial lining with areas of spongiosis and foci of vacuolization of individual basal cells without significant nuclear palisading. Focally, budding of the basal cell layer was identified. A zone of increased cellularity featuring induction-type fibroblasts was present subepithelially as well as dentinoid deposits with odontogenic epithelial nests. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial lining was negative for calretinin and the induction-like zone negative for S100 protein, smooth muscle actin, and CD34. The case was externally reviewed by five oral pathologists who provided various diagnostic interpretations including primordial cyst, odontogenic cyst not otherwise specified (NOS), cyst with ameloblastic changes, and unicystic ameloblastoma. At that time, a final diagnosis of odontogenic cyst NOS was rendered with a comment that it may represent a true example of POC or a cystic odontoma. The lesion has not recurred within a 13 year follow-up period after initial excision. An unusual cystic lesion is presented that may represent a true example of POC with dentinoid formation or an archegonous cystic odontoma.

  5. Odontogenic keratocyst: What is in the name?

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Meghanand T.; Singh, Anjali; Singhvi, Abhishek; Sharma, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    The classification of odontogenic cysts is complicated and can create confusion for both clinicians and pathologists. The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is an enigmatic developmental cyst that deserves special attention. It has characteristic histopathological and clinical features; but, what makes this cyst special is its aggressive behavior and high recurrence rate. Despite of many classifications and nomenclature, unfortunately the clinicians still have to face difficulties in the management of this commonly found jaw lesion. This article is an effort to provide an overview of various aspects of OKC with emphasis on nomenclature, recurrence, molecular aspects, and management of OKC. PMID:24082717

  6. Pyopneumothorax with Stocker type III congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in a 5-month-old infant

    PubMed Central

    Chilkar, Sujeet M; Leelakumar, Venkat; Ranjani, Chakravarthy P; Musthyala, Bharati; Narayana, Kotte VS

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is a rare, developmental, hamartomatous abnormality of the lung characterized by a cessation of normal bronchiolar maturation, resulting in cystic overgrowth of the terminal bronchioles. We report one such case of CCAM in a 5-month-old female infant who was in perfect health until she suffered from spontaneous pyopneumothorax with type III CCAM of the lung and recovered after lobectomy. PMID:27051113

  7. The early history of odontogenic ghost cell lesions: from Thoma to Gorlin.

    PubMed

    Ide, Fumio; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Yuji; Kusama, Kaoru; Saito, Ichiro; Muramatsu, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    To reappraise the early history of odontogenic ghost cell lesions (OGCL), the extensive world literature published from 1838 to 1962 was reviewed. In light of the long history of OGCL, the term "calcifying epithelioma of Malherbe" first appeared in a 1931 French report, and the term "ghost cells" had its origin in two American seminal articles by Thoma and Goldman in 1946. Although Gorlin et al. coined the term "calcifying odontogenic cyst" (COC) in 1962, this type of cyst was initially reported three decades earlier by Rywkind in Russia, and almost concurrently by Blood good in the United States and Sato in Japan. In 1948, Willis provided the initial histological evidence of a peripheral COC in his British pathology textbook. Credit for the earliest clinical presentation of odontoma associated calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor belongs to the American radiology textbook by Thoma in 1917. A Scandinavian journal report published in 1953 by Husted and Pindborg was the first to address a dentinogenic ghost cell tumor, and its peripheral counterpart was originally reported in the Swiss literature 7 years later. The current concept of COC was undoubtedly established by Gorlin et al. but the history of OGCL really started with Thoma's pioneering work about a century ago.

  8. The glandular odontogenic jaw cyst: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Savage, N W; Joseph, B K; Monsour, P A; Young, W G

    1996-11-01

    A case of a rare odontogenic cyst arising in the lateral periodontal membrane in the mandible in a 14 year old girl is reported. This lesion appeared to be a new entity and has been named glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) or sialo-odontogenic cyst. Histologically the lesion was lined by mucous producing cuboidal epithelium containing several areas of thickening and numerous duct-like structures. The cyst recurred with the same histology two years postoperatively.

  9. Microbiology of Odontogenic Bacteremia: beyond Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Parahitiyawa, N. B.; Jin, L. J.; Leung, W. K.; Yam, W. C.; Samaranayake, L. P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The human gingival niche is a unique microbial habitat. In this habitat, biofilm organisms exist in harmony, attached to either enamel or cemental surfaces of the tooth as well as to the crevicular epithelium, subjacent to a rich vascular plexus underneath. Due to this extraordinary anatomical juxtaposition, plaque biofilm bacteria have a ready portal of ingress into the systemic circulation in both health and disease. Yet the frequency, magnitude, and etiology of bacteremias due to oral origin and the consequent end organ infections are not clear and have not recently been evaluated. In this comprehensive review, we address the available literature on triggering events, incidence, and diversity of odontogenic bacteremias. The nature of the infective agents and end organ infections (other than endocarditis) is also described, with an emphasis on the challenge of establishing the link between odontogenic infections and related systemic, focal infections. PMID:19136433

  10. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-01-01

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. This case emphases on including OOC in the differential diagnosis of radiolucencies occurring in the periapical region of non-vital tooth. PMID:24099763

  11. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst

    PubMed Central

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-01-01

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. This case emphases on including OOC in the differential diagnosis of radiolucencies occurring in the periapical region of non-vital tooth. PMID:24099763

  12. Bacteriological findings and antimicrobial resistance in odontogenic and non-odontogenic chronic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Salvatore; Privitera, Salvatore; Maiolino, Luigi; Serra, Agostino; Garotta, Matteo; Blandino, Giovanna; Speciale, Annamaria

    2011-09-01

    The main objectives of this study were to estimate the frequency of chronic maxillary sinusitis of dental origin, and to evaluate the microbiology of odontogenic and non-odontogenic chronic maxillary sinusitis. Aspirates from 59 patients with chronic maxillary sinusitis (47 non-odontogenic, 12 odontogenic), collected during a 3-year period, were microbiologically processed for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Moreover, antimicrobial susceptibility was evaluated in the isolated bacteria. In this study, 20 % of chronic maxillary sinusitis cases were associated with a dental origin, and sinus lift procedures were the main aetiological factor. Our microbiological findings showed that all specimens from chronic maxillary sinusitis were polymicrobial. Sixty aerobes and 75 anaerobes were recovered from the 47 cases of non-odontogenic sinusitis (2.9 bacteria per specimen); 15 aerobes and 25 anaerobes were isolated from the 12 patients with odontogenic sinusitis (3.3 bacteria per specimen). The predominant aerobes were Staphylococcus aureus (27) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (16), while the more frequent anaerobes were Peptostreptococcus species (31) and Prevotella species (30). Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis were absent in sinusitis associated with a dental origin. Overall, 22 % of Staphylococcus aureus isolates were oxacillin-resistant, and 75 % of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were penicillin-resistant and/or erythromycin-resistant; 21 % of anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria were penicillin-resistant, and 44 % of anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria were β-lactamase-positive. Vancomycin and quinopristin-dalfopristin had the highest in vitro activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus species, respectively; amoxicillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime showed the highest in vitro activity against aerobic Gram-negative bacteria; and moxifloxacin, metronidazole and clindamycin were the most active against anaerobic bacteria.

  13. Odontogenic Keratocyst in Children: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kamil, Ahmed H.; Tarakji, Bassel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Is to highlight the characteristics and management of odontogenic keratocyst in children only Material and Method: Computerized search in pubmed between (2005-2015) using specific words such as odontogenic keratocyst in children, odontogenic keratocyst association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with abstract written in English only. Result: During computerized literature search 77 articles in the years (2005-2015) were found. All these publications were miscellaneous studies including case series and case reports. Only 35 papers were selected which conform to our criteria. Most of the papers indicate that the histological type of keratocyst prevalent in children was parakeratinized variant, and most of the cases occurred in maxilla rather than mandible. Conclusion: We recommend that the surgeons who treat keratocysts in children take into consideration the late presentation in addition to the destructive nature and high recurrence rate. General practitioners face difficulty in early detection and referral of children with keratocysts or Gorlin syndrome. Treatment by multidiscplinary team is important if associated with Gorlin's syndrome Postoperative follow up is advised every 6 months. PMID:27335612

  14. [Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis in elderly and old age].

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, V V; Iordanishvili, A K; Ryzhak, G A

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of a detailed analysis of the clinical picture of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis the peculiarities of its flow in elderly and senile patients are demonstrated. The causes of odontogenic inflammation of the maxillary sinuses, the clinical features of inflammation of the maxillary sinus in older age groups, including those with oroantral communication are shown.

  15. [Age associated clinical features of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Iordanishvili, A K; Nikitenko, V V; Balin, D V

    2013-01-01

    Detailed analysis of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis clinical course allowed identifying clinical features of the disease specific for elderly and senile patients. The paper describes the peculiarities of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis in elderly and senile patients including those having oroantral sinus tract.

  16. Glandular Odontogenic Cyst of Mandible: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Ankur; Kaur, Gursheen; Sood, Neena

    2015-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare developmental odontogenic cyst. It is a slow growing and asymptomatic swelling, usually affecting middle aged men and has tendency to reoccur. Here, we report a case of GOC in the anterior portion of mandible diagnosed by histopathology. PMID:26813085

  17. Central odontogenic fibroma: Retrospective study of 8 clinical cases

    PubMed Central

    Hrichi, Radia; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: The central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a benign odontogenic tumour derived from the dental mesenchymal tissues. It is a rare tumour and only 70 cases of it have been published. Bearing in mind the rareness of the tumour, 8 new cases of central odontogenic fibroma have been found by analyzing the clinical, radiological and histopathological characteristics of COF. Patients and Method: A retrospective study was carried out on 3011 biopsies in the Service of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Dental Clinic of Barcelona University between January 1995 and March 2008. 85 odontogenic tumours were diagnosed of which 8 were central odontogenic fibroma. The radiological study was based on orthopantomographs, periapical and occlusal radiographies and computerised tomographics. The variables collected were: sex, age, clinical characteristics of the lesion, treatment received and possible reappearances of the tumour. Results: The central odontogenic fibroma represents 9.4% of all odontogenic tumours. Of the 8 cases, 5 were diagnosed in men and 3 in women. The average age was 19.9 years with an age range of 11 to 38 years. The most common location of the tumour was in the mandible. All cases were associated with unerupted teeth. Of the 8 tumours, 3 provoked rhizolysis of the adjacent teeth and 4 cases caused cortical bone expansion. 50% of the patients complained of pain associated to the lesion. No case of recurrence was recorded up to 2 years after the treatment. Conclusions: Central odontogenic fibromas usually evolve asymptomatically although they can manifest very aggressively provoking dental displacement and rhizolysis. Radiologically, COF manifest as a uni or multilocular radiotransparent image although they can be indistinguishable from other radiotransparent lesions making diagnosis more difficult. COF treatment involves conservative surgery as well as follow-up patient checks. Key words: Odontogenic tumour, central odontogenic

  18. In-flight spontaneous pneumothorax: congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung.

    PubMed

    Madan, Karan; Vishwanath, Gella; Singh, Navneet

    2012-01-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is a rare congenital abnormality. Symptomatic presentation in adult life is extremely uncommon. The usual radiological appearance of CCAM is a cystic space-occupying lesion. Patients with underlying cystic lung disease can develop in-flight complications because of pressure-volume changes during ascent. We report the first ever case in which spontaneous pneumothorax during flight was the presenting manifestation of CCAM of the lung in a previously healthy and asymptomatic young adult. We also discuss the physiological changes during air travel which contribute to the pathogenesis of respiratory complications during air travel.

  19. Treatment of orofacial infections of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Heimdahl, A; Nord, C E

    1985-01-01

    Acute purulent orofacial infections are often of odontogenic origin. The microorganisms and the anatomical site involved, largely determine the clinical manifestations. The infections are usually self-limiting but serious complications may ensue. Direct invasion of different anatomical spaces may cause mediastinitis, airway obstruction and also intracranial spread. Anaerobic bacteria belonging to the normal oropharyngeal flora (anaerobic cocci, bacteroides and fusobacteria) are usually isolated from orofacial abscesses. Surgical treatment including incision and drainage is essential. The drug of choice for antimicrobial therapy is penicillin. Penicillin resistant anaerobic bacteria may however make penicillin ineffective and antimicrobial agents such as metronidazole or clindamycin are then recommended to be used.

  20. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis obscured by midfacial trauma.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Ryškienė, Silvija; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis whose sinonasal symptomatology was thought to be the consequence of a previous midfacial trauma. The patient was admitted to the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery after more than 10 years of exacerbations of sinonasal symptoms, which began to plague soon after a facial contusion. We decided to perform CT of paranasal sinuses, and despite the absence dental symptomatology, the dental origin of sinusitis was discovered. The majority of sinonasal symptoms resolved after appropriate dental treatment, and there was no need for nasal or sinus surgery.

  1. Treatment of orofacial infections of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Heimdahl, A; Nord, C E

    1985-01-01

    Acute purulent orofacial infections are often of odontogenic origin. The microorganisms and the anatomical site involved, largely determine the clinical manifestations. The infections are usually self-limiting but serious complications may ensue. Direct invasion of different anatomical spaces may cause mediastinitis, airway obstruction and also intracranial spread. Anaerobic bacteria belonging to the normal oropharyngeal flora (anaerobic cocci, bacteroides and fusobacteria) are usually isolated from orofacial abscesses. Surgical treatment including incision and drainage is essential. The drug of choice for antimicrobial therapy is penicillin. Penicillin resistant anaerobic bacteria may however make penicillin ineffective and antimicrobial agents such as metronidazole or clindamycin are then recommended to be used. PMID:3865348

  2. Immunocytochemical expression of growth factors by odontogenic jaw cysts.

    PubMed Central

    Li, T.; Browne, R. M.; Matthews, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To determine the immunocytochemical pattern of expression of transforming growth factor (TGF) alpha, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and TGF beta in the three most common types of odontogenic jaw cyst. METHODS: Growth factor expression was detected in paraffin wax sections of odontogenic cysts (27 odontogenic keratocysts, 10 dentigerous cysts, and 10 radicular cysts) using a streptavidin-biotin peroxidase technique with monoclonal antibodies directed against TGF alpha (clone 213-4.4) and TGF beta (clone TB21) and a polyclonal antibody directed against EGF (Z-12). RESULTS: The epithelial linings of all cysts showed reactivity for TGF alpha which was mainly localised to basal and suprabasal layers. Odontogenic keratocyst linings expressed higher levels of TGF alpha than those of dentigerous and radicular cysts, with 89% (24/27) of odontogenic keratocysts exhibiting a strong positive reaction compared with 50% (five of 10) of dentigerous and radicular cysts, respectively. EGF reactivity was similar in all cyst groups, weaker than that for TGF alpha and predominantly suprabasal. TGF alpha and EGF were also detected in endothelial cells, fibroblasts and inflammatory cells within the cyst walls. The most intense TGF beta staining in odontogenic cysts was extracellular within the fibrous tissue capsules, irrespective of cyst type. CONCLUSIONS: These results, together with previous studies of EGF receptor, indicate differential expression of TGF alpha, EGF and their common receptor between the different types of odontogenic cyst, suggesting that these growth factors (via autocrine or paracrine, or both, pathways) may be involved in their pathogenesis. Images PMID:9208810

  3. Nucleolar organiser regions in odontogenic cysts and ameloblastomas.

    PubMed

    Allison, R T; Spencer, S

    1993-12-01

    Silver nucleolar organiser region (AgNOR) counts were performed on apical periodontal cysts, dentigerous cysts, odontogenic keratocysts, ameloblastomas and basal cell carcinomas. Significant differences, but with excessive overlap, were shown between dentigerous cysts and apical periodontal cysts and between odontogenic keratocysts and apical cysts. The mean AgNOR counts for all odontogenic cysts ranged between 2.02 and 2.65, and for ameloblastomas were 2.24, indicating that the method has neither a diagnostic nor a prognostic value in these lesions. Control oral squamous cell carcinoma tissues had significantly higher AgNOR counts than any other lesion tested.

  4. Bilateral orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst: A rare case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalkar, Rahul Devidas; Barpande, Suresh R; Bhavthankar, Jyoti D; Mandale, Mandakini S

    2014-01-01

    Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is a developmental cyst of jaw and was initially considered by the World Health Organization (1992) as the uncommon orthokeratinized variant of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC). However, studies have shown that OOC has peculiar clinicopathologic aspects when compared with other developmental odontogenic cysts, especially OKC. So orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst now stands out to be a distinct entity. Clinically, it occurs as a single cyst, shows a predilection for males and is most often found in the second to the fifth decade. Its bilateral occurrence is extremely rare. The purpose of the article is to present a rare case of bilateral OOC arising in the mandible and review the literature on bilateral occurrence of this lesion. PMID:25328309

  5. [Relationship between odontogenic infections and infective endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bascones-Ilundain, Jaime

    2012-03-24

    Revised guidelines for the prevention of infective endocarditis published by national and international associations in the last years do not support the indiscriminate use of antibiotic prophylaxis for dental procedures. However, some of them still recommend its use in high-risk patients before dental treatments likely to cause bleeding. Given the high prevalence of bacteremia of dental origin due to tooth-brushing, mastication or other daily activities, it appears unlikely that infective endocarditis from oral microorganisms can be completely prevented. A good oral health status and satisfactory level of oral hygiene are sufficient to control the consequences of the systemic spread of oral microorganisms in healthy individuals. However, caution is still needed and prophylactic antibiotics must be administered to susceptible or medically compromised patients. This review briefly outlines the current concepts of odontogenic bacteremia and antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing dental treatment.

  6. Intraosseous verrucous carcinoma arising from an orthokeratinized odontogenic keratocyst: A report of a rarest entity

    PubMed Central

    Kamarthi, Nagaraju; Palakshappa, Suhasini Gotur; Wadhwan, Vijay; Mohan, Raviprakash Sasankoti

    2016-01-01

    Intraosseous verrucous carcinomas (VCs) arising from odontogenic cysts are a rare entity. An unusual case of a VC arising from the orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst is described for the first time. The microscopic features of the lesion are presented. PMID:27630514

  7. Intraosseous verrucous carcinoma arising from an orthokeratinized odontogenic keratocyst: A report of a rarest entity.

    PubMed

    Kamarthi, Nagaraju; Palakshappa, Suhasini Gotur; Wadhwan, Vijay; Mohan, Raviprakash Sasankoti

    2016-01-01

    Intraosseous verrucous carcinomas (VCs) arising from odontogenic cysts are a rare entity. An unusual case of a VC arising from the orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst is described for the first time. The microscopic features of the lesion are presented. PMID:27630514

  8. Clinicopathologic spectrum of the so-called calcifying odontogenic cysts: a study of 21 intraosseous cases with reconsideration of the terminology and classification.

    PubMed

    Li, Tie-Jun; Yu, Shi-Feng

    2003-03-01

    The so-called calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) represents a heterogeneous group of lesions that exhibit a variety of clinicopathologic and behavioral features. Because of this diversity, there has been confusion and disagreement on the terminology and classification of these lesions. We reviewed the clinicopathologic features of 21 intraosseous cases that were previously diagnosed as COC or under related diagnostic terms. Based on the biologic behavior, the lesions of the present series were divided into three subgroups: cyst, benign tumor, and malignant tumor. Sixteen cases (nine men and seven women) proved to be unicystic lesions with (five cases) or without associated odontoma. The lining epithelium of the cystic lesions fulfilled the histologic criteria for COC proposed by the World Health Organization, and their overall clinicopathologic features were consistent with that of developmental odontogenic cysts. The age of patients from the cyst group peaked at the second decade. The maxilla was affected more often (69%) than the mandible, with a predilection for the canine-premolar region (62.5%). Thirteen patients with follow-up information revealed no recurrence following enucleation. The four cases in the benign tumor group had variable clinicopathologic features. Two cases were solid tumors consisting of ameloblastoma-like sheets of odontogenic epithelium that contained ghost cells/calcification foci and juxtaepithelial dentinoid. Both patients experienced multiple recurrences following conservative surgeries. The other two lesions contained typical areas of COC and other types of odontogenic tumors (one ameloblastoma and one odontogenic myxofibroma). All four lesions occurred in the mandible and were relatively large. In the present series one case identified as malignant tumor arose from a previously benign COC. The tumor shared some features of COC (ghost cell foci and dystrophic calcification) but also had prominent mitotic activity, nuclear and

  9. Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald-Jankowski, D S

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aims of the review were to evaluate the principal clinical and conventional radiographic features of orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) by systematic review (SR), and to compare the frequency of OOC between four global groups. Methods The databases searched were the PubMed interface of MEDLINE and LILACS. Only those reports of OOCs that occurred in a consecutive series of OOCs in the reporting authors' caseload were considered. Results 37 reports on 36 case series were included in the SR. OOC affected males twice as frequently and the mandible almost 2.5 times as frequently. Although the mean age at first presentation was 35 years, the largest proportion of cases first presented in the third decade for the Western, East Asian and Latin American global groups. Seven reports included details of at least one clinical finding. 11 reported case series included at least 1 radiological feature. All OOCs were radiolucent, 93% were unilocular and 68% were associated with unerupted teeth. 28% of the reported case series included follow up. 4% of OCC recurred and all of these were in the Western global group. Conclusions Although one feature of OOCs is that they are unlikely to recur, some do. Not only is there a lack of long-term follow up of large series with long-term outcomes of OOC, but there is a paucity of clinical and radiological details of OOC at initial presentation. PMID:21062939

  10. 'Triplication' defect in deciduous teeth: an unusual odontogenic anomaly.

    PubMed

    Shanthraj, Srinivas L; Mallikarjun, Shanthala B; Kiran, Shital; Wilson, Bobby

    2015-01-01

    Developmental odontogenic anomalies can occur in primary as well as in permanent dentition leading to morphological variations in shape, size and structure and numerical variations such as hypodontia. The most commonly reported odontogenic anomaly in primary dentition is conjoined teeth. Conjoined teeth can be due to fusion or gemination. Relevant clinical and radiographic evaluation is a must to differentiate between the two. Occurrence of double fusion as an anomaly may not be infrequent, but triple fusion is a rare odontogenic anomaly. We report a case of a 7.5-year-old girl who clinically had a large crown due to triple fusion in her dentition, between two normal primary teeth and a supernumerary tooth. This paper gives a brief insight into the incidence, associated quandaries and diagnosis and treatment modalities of a triple fusion. PMID:25743857

  11. Recurrent peripheral odontogenic fibroma associated with basal cell budding.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, C; Vezhavendan, N; Shabana, F; Vijayalakshmi, D; Devi, M; Arunakiry, N

    2014-07-01

    Peripheral odontogenic fibroma (POdF) is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm. It represents the soft tissue counterpart of central odontogenic fibroma. The embryonic source of POdF has been suggested by many as arising from the rest of dental lamina that has persisted in the gingiva following its disintegration. It presents clinically as a firm, slow growing and sessile gingival mass, which is difficult to distinguish with more common inflammatory lesions. Very few cases of recurrence have been documented. It has been stated that histological budding of basal cell layer of the surface squamous epithelium is associated with higher recurrence and the presence of calcification in direct apposition to the epithelial rest is associated with lower recurrence. Hereby, we present a case which histologically exhibited budding of the basal cell layer, which could have been the reason for its recurrence. PMID:25210375

  12. Recurrent peripheral odontogenic fibroma associated with basal cell budding

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Vezhavendan, N.; Shabana, F.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Arunakiry, N.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral odontogenic fibroma (POdF) is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm. It represents the soft tissue counterpart of central odontogenic fibroma. The embryonic source of POdF has been suggested by many as arising from the rest of dental lamina that has persisted in the gingiva following its disintegration. It presents clinically as a firm, slow growing and sessile gingival mass, which is difficult to distinguish with more common inflammatory lesions. Very few cases of recurrence have been documented. It has been stated that histological budding of basal cell layer of the surface squamous epithelium is associated with higher recurrence and the presence of calcification in direct apposition to the epithelial rest is associated with lower recurrence. Hereby, we present a case which histologically exhibited budding of the basal cell layer, which could have been the reason for its recurrence. PMID:25210375

  13. Suspect Odontogenic Infection Etiology for Canine Lymphoplasmacytic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Stepaniuk, Kevin S; Gingerich, Wade

    2015-01-01

    The role of odontogenic infection as an etiology for lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis in dogs was evaluated. An association between odontogenic infection and inflammatory rhinitis was identified in 55% of cases evaluated. Odontogenic infection was unlikely or undetermined in 10% and 35% of the cases, respectively. Cases of lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis had roentgen signs associated with endodontic disease, periodontal disease, or retained tooth roots in 60%, 45%, and 25% of the cases, respectively. A collaborative team based approach assessing inflammatory nasal disease is recommended. Based on the history and signalment of the individual patient, diagnostic modalities should be chosen wisely. In some cases, oral examination and intraoral radiographs may be a more direct and cost effective approach for diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory rhinitis. PMID:26197687

  14. Etiologies and Treatments of Odontogenic Maxillary Sinusitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Fahimeh; Esmaeelinejad, Mohammad; Safai, Pooria

    2015-01-01

    Context: Maxillary sinusitis is an important issue in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. This study aims to present a systematic review of etiologies and treatments of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Evidence Acquisition: An electronic database search was performed based on related MeSH keywords. Articles published between January 2001 and December 2014 was selected according to the inclusion criteria. The information extracted from various studies was categorized in various tables. Results: The study selected 19 studies. In most studies, oroantral fistula (OAF) was the most common etiology of odontogenic sinusitis. Alpha-hemolytic streptococcus was the most common flora in sinusitis with dental origin. The literature shows that the Caldwell-Luc approach may be the best method for treating sinusitis in cases of displaced teeth. Conclusions: OAF is a common cause of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis and may easily be treated by endoscopy and fistula closure. Maxillofacial surgeons and dentists should consider this problem to avoid misdiagnosis and prevent complications. PMID:26756016

  15. Fate of pulpectomized deciduous teeth: Bilateral odontogenic cyst?

    PubMed Central

    Sandhyarani, B.; Noorani, Hina; Shivaprakash, P. K.; Dayanand, A. Huddar

    2016-01-01

    Pulpectomy is preferably more conservative treatment option than the extraction of deciduous teeth despite few undesirable consequences of obturating materials of which odontogenic cysts are one. This article aims to report a case of an 11-year-old female child having bilateral odontogenic cysts, i.e., radicular and infected dentigerous cyst followed by pulpectomy of deciduous molars using zinc oxide eugenol which was surgically enucleated and followed up to 6 months until satisfactory healing of bone was observed. The article also emphasizes on the importance of regular follow-up of the pulpectomized tooth which can be harmful otherwise. PMID:27307677

  16. Pigmented Pindborg tumor of the maxilla: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Priya, Subashchandrabose; Madanagopaal, Lakshmikanth Ramiah; Sarada, Venkaterwaran

    2016-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as the Pindborg tumor, is a benign locally invasive neoplasm. Common variants of CEOT include noncalcifying, Langerhans cell, bone and cementum forming and clear cell, which have a prognostic significance. Pigmented variants are known to occur in other odontogenic tumors. However, a definitive pigmented variant of CEOT has not been reported in literature so far. Here, we report the first case of pigmented Pindborg tumor arising from the maxilla in a young female. The pigment was demonstrated as melanin by staining and confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The pigmented variant of CEOT did not recur within 18 months postsurgery. Our report indicates that it is essential to recognize the pigmented variant. We discuss the common variants of CEOT and potential histogenesis of the pigmented variant. Further studies are required to reveal the histogenesis of melanocytes and their pathological significance in the odontogenic tumors. PMID:27721633

  17. Orthokeratinized Odontogenic Cyst: A Report of Three Clinical Cases

    PubMed Central

    González Galván, María del Carmen; García-García, Abel; Anitua-Aldecoa, Eduardo; Martinez-Conde Llamosas, Rafael; Aguirre-Urizar, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is a rare developmental odontogenic cyst that has been considered as a variant of the keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) until Wright (1981) defined it as a different entity. Surgery is the usual treatment, and recurrence or association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome has rarely been described. In this report, we presented three cases of this pathology, and we review the principal clinical, histological, radiological, and therapeutic aspects. Case 1. A 73-year-old female presents with a slight swelling on the right mandible, associated with an unilocular well-defined radiolucent lesion. Case 2. A 27-year-old female presents with a painful mandibular swelling associated with an unilocular radiolucent lesion posterior to the 4.8. Case 3. A 61-year-old male was casually detected presents with an unilocular radiolucent lesion distal to the 4.8. Conclusion. The OOC is a specific odontogenic clinicopathological entity that should be differentiated from the KCOT as it presents a completely different biological behaviour. PMID:24191203

  18. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Hepatocellular carcinoma (hepatitis B and hepatitis C ...

  19. Orthokeratinized Odontogenic Cyst (OOC) of Condylar Head: A Rare Entity.

    PubMed

    Managutti, Anil; Managutti, Sunita; Patel, Harsh; Menat, Shailesh

    2016-07-01

    Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is a rare developmental jaw cyst, considered as distinct entity from odontogenic keratocysts as it exhibits a less aggressive behaviour and a very low rate of recurrence. Most commonly occurs in mandibular molar and ramus region, rarely seen in maxilla and mandibular premolar area. But till now never reported in condyle, this article describes a case of OOC involving the mandibular condylar head in a 41-year-old male. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as TMD based on the clinical features, but radiographic evaluation revealed osteolytic lesion in right side condylar head. Condylotomy was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. We report a rare entity in this article with its management.

  20. Orthokeratinized Odontogenic Cyst (OOC) of Condylar Head: A Rare Entity.

    PubMed

    Managutti, Anil; Managutti, Sunita; Patel, Harsh; Menat, Shailesh

    2016-07-01

    Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is a rare developmental jaw cyst, considered as distinct entity from odontogenic keratocysts as it exhibits a less aggressive behaviour and a very low rate of recurrence. Most commonly occurs in mandibular molar and ramus region, rarely seen in maxilla and mandibular premolar area. But till now never reported in condyle, this article describes a case of OOC involving the mandibular condylar head in a 41-year-old male. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as TMD based on the clinical features, but radiographic evaluation revealed osteolytic lesion in right side condylar head. Condylotomy was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. We report a rare entity in this article with its management. PMID:27408460

  1. [Differential radiodiagnosis of odontogenic mandibular osteomyelitis accompanied by trigeminal neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Solonskaia, N S; Zorina, I S

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the results of radiation examination in 43 patients with clinical manifestations of mandibular osteomyelitis. In 13 of them, the disease was accompanied by trigeminal neuropathy. The radiation semiotics of the changes occurring in the mandibular bone and its adjacent soft tissues in different phases of osteomyelitis is described. Comparative analysis of orthopantomograms and the images obtained by multislice spiral computed tomography has revealed the advantage of the latter in identifying insignificant changes in bone tissue and damages to the mandibular canal. Ultrasound study is of more informative value in detecting soft tissue changes in this area. High-technology radiodiagnostic techniques play a leading role in the differentiation of odontogenic and non-odontogenic trigeminal neuropathies.

  2. Quantification of PCNA+ cells within odontogenic jaw cyst epithelium.

    PubMed

    Li, T J; Browne, R M; Matthews, J B

    1994-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reactivity of the epithelial linings of the three major types of odontogenic cyst with a monoclonal antibody to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA; clone PC10). PCNA expression was studied in odontogenic cysts (n = 31) and normal oral epithelium (n = 10) using a biotin-streptavidin method on routinely processed paraffin sections. PCNA+ cells were counted manually and related to the length of basement membrane (mm) and the epithelial area (mm2) as determined by TV image analysis. The epithelial linings of odontogenic keratocysts (OKC; n = 11) contained the highest number of PCNA+ cells, most of which were located in the suprabasal layers. The mean value of PCNA+ cells in OKC linings (94.4 +/- 22.7 cells/mm) was similar to that of oral epithelia (80.8 +/- 20.6 cells/mm), but both were significantly higher than that of dentigerous (n = 10, 5.1 +/- 3.0 cells/mm) and radicular (n = 10, 11.0 +/- 4.1 cells/mm) cyst linings (P < 0.005). The epithelial distribution of PCNA+ cells differed between groups with the basal/suprabasal PCNA+ cell ratio in OKC linings (0.05 +/- 0.02) being significantly lower than that of normal oral epithelium (0.5 +/- 0.14), dentigerous (1.6 +/- 1.23) and radicular (1.9 +/- 1.09) cyst linings respectively (P < 0.005). These results demonstrate differences in PCNA expression between the epithelial linings of the major odontogenic cyst types, indicating differences in proliferative and differentiation processes within these lesions.

  3. [Modern clinical and radiological approach to diagnostics of odontogenic sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Khomutova, E Yu; Ignat'ev, Yu T; Demyanchuk, A N; Demyanchuk, A B

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the maxillary sinuses affect up to 70% of the adult population. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis represents 13-86% of the inflammatory processes of maxillofacial area, with the incidence range being explained rather by varying diagnosis criteria than the true incidence difference of odontogenic lesions. The aim of the study was to summarize the clinical and radiological characteristics of odontogenic sinusitis according to patients records in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery of Omsk Clinical Hospital No11 and the oral surgery department of BUZ GKSP No1 in 2009-2014. A total of 948 records of patient (aged 17 to 68 years) with maxillary sinusitis were identified. X-ray examinations were performed by CT PISASSO TRIO ("KoYo", South Korea) and MSCT Brillians 6 and Brillians 64 ((Philips HealthCare), Netherlands). Images were obtained in axial projection with slice thickness of 0.2-0.6 mm with multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) in a variety of direct and oblique projections. Altogether 664 patients were diagnosed with foreign bodies in the maxillary sinuses (filling material in 569 cases, roots or root fragments? implants, rubber drains, fragments of endodontic instruments in 95 cases). In 284 persons odontogenic cysts were found. Almost every fifth case was complicated by mycotic infection. Analysis of the results showed that only a multidisciplinary approach including dentists, maxillofacial surgeons, otolaryngologists and radiologists, as well as dental volumetric tomography or multislice CT can ensure the correct clinical and radiological approaches to determine the tactics of treatment in patients with sinusitis, reduce the incidence of relapses and chronic inflammatory processes in the maxillary sinuses.

  4. The syndromic multiple odontogenic keratocyst in siblings: A familial study

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Vimal; Kaushal, Nitin; Kalra, Geeta

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Our aim is to demonstrate the importance of postoperative assessment and highlight the need for a lifetime follow-up of the patient and the siblings in cases of Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS). Materials and Methods: Three siblings out of which two were of syndromic multiple odontogenic keratocysts, with multiple basal cell nevae were followed-up for manifestations of NBCCS from year 2001 till date. Two of the patients were treated for multiple bilateral odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). Familial occurrence of the syndromic multiple odontogenic keratocysts was studied. Result: Although NBCCS is associated with multiple OKCs, it does not imply that a patient should have more than one cyst at a given point in time, rather it refers to the lifetime history of the patient. Early diagnosis will often make it possible to use conservative therapies rather than complex treatments. Conclusion: Recognition of the syndrome permits early treatment in other but possibly asymptomatic relatives. Close attention of the family and past medical history and physical examination will alert the clinician to its presence, allowing for appropriate genetic counseling and serial screening for the development of malignancies and other complications besides OKCs. PMID:23483828

  5. Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumour (calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour) in the mandible of a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Kang, M-S; Park, M-S; Kwon, S-W; Ma, S-A; Cho, D-Y; Kim, D-Y; Kim, Y

    2006-01-01

    A 13-year-old male tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) had a marked mandibular swelling noticed 12 months earlier and associated with progressive anorexia and weight loss. Radiological and post-mortem examination revealed a mass (13x15 cm) which was firm and poorly defined, with destruction of the adjacent bone tissue. Histologically, the mass was poorly demarcated, with infiltrative growth, and composed of nests, cords and islands of epithelial cells with characteristic basal cell features. Also observed were extensive squamous metaplasia, ghost cells, stellate reticulum, and fibroblastic connective tissue stroma containing inflammatory cells. A prominent feature of this tumour consisted of abundant nodular deposits of congophilic amyloid-like material with partial mineralization (Liesegang rings). Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells and the amyloid-like material were positive for pancytokeratin and negative for vimentin. The findings supported the diagnosis of an amyloid-producing odontogenic tumour (APOT), also known as calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour in man and animals.

  6. Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumour (calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour) in the mandible of a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Kang, M-S; Park, M-S; Kwon, S-W; Ma, S-A; Cho, D-Y; Kim, D-Y; Kim, Y

    2006-01-01

    A 13-year-old male tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) had a marked mandibular swelling noticed 12 months earlier and associated with progressive anorexia and weight loss. Radiological and post-mortem examination revealed a mass (13x15 cm) which was firm and poorly defined, with destruction of the adjacent bone tissue. Histologically, the mass was poorly demarcated, with infiltrative growth, and composed of nests, cords and islands of epithelial cells with characteristic basal cell features. Also observed were extensive squamous metaplasia, ghost cells, stellate reticulum, and fibroblastic connective tissue stroma containing inflammatory cells. A prominent feature of this tumour consisted of abundant nodular deposits of congophilic amyloid-like material with partial mineralization (Liesegang rings). Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells and the amyloid-like material were positive for pancytokeratin and negative for vimentin. The findings supported the diagnosis of an amyloid-producing odontogenic tumour (APOT), also known as calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour in man and animals. PMID:16540113

  7. Glandular odontogenic cyst. A rare entity with aggressive biological behaviour. A case report.

    PubMed

    Jose, M; Rao, N N; Solomon, M C

    2000-01-01

    Glandular Odontogenic cyst is an apparently rare jaw cyst characterised by typical histopathological features, propensity to reach large size and high rate of local recurrence, if not adequately treated. Identification of this cyst as a separate entity is important because of the difference in biological behaviour. We report a case of Glandular Odontogenic cyst occurring in maxilla.

  8. Er:YAG Laser Assisted Treatment of Central Odontogenic Fibroma of the Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Luis Silva; Martins, Marco; Pacheco, José Júlio; Salazar, Filomena; Magalhães, João; Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma is a very rare benign odontogenic tumour characterized by a fibrous mature stroma with variable strands or islands of inactive-looking odontogenic epithelium. Our aim is to report a case of a central odontogenic fibroma and describe the clinical usefulness of Er:YAG laser for the surgical treatment of this tumour. A 74-year-old woman presented with an expansive lesion located in a mandible with multilocular and mixed radiographic appearance. A conservative excision using Er:YAG laser was performed. Complete removal was obtained. There were no postoperative complications. The histopatologic features were consistent with the diagnosis of central odontogenic fibroma of rich-epithelium type. No recurrence was observed during follow-up. PMID:26457211

  9. Familial odontogenic keratocysts. Report of 3 cases and review of Japanese dental literature.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Y; Narita, H; Yamamoto, T; Kameyama, Y; Maeda, H; Nakane, S

    1985-02-01

    Familial odontogenic keratocysts are described in this report. The Case 1 patient, who has 3 sisters, developed odontogenic keratocysts. The 2 younger sisters (Cases 2 and 3) also had odontogenic keratocysts, although the elder sister did not have any odontogenic cysts. The father of the patients had a history of removal of a jaw cyst, and the mother was found later to have malignant ameloblastoma. Besides the odontogenic keratocysts, the Case 1 patient had basal cell nevus, prominent frontal process, and ocular hypertelorism; the Case 2 patient had prominent frontal process; the Case 3 patient had prominent frontal process, ocular hypertelorism, and squint. All 3 sisters are suspected of being patients with the basal cell nevus syndrome. The Japanese dental literature concerning the basal cell nevus syndrome is reviewed.

  10. Unilateral right pulmonary artery agenesis and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the right lung with Ortner's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    David, Jane Jackie; Mohanlal, Smilu; Sankhe, Punam; Ghildiyal, Radha

    2016-01-01

    We report a 2.5-year-old girl who presented with hoarseness of voice since 3 months of age and failure to thrive. Chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with a deviation of the trachea and mediastinum to the right side. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed decreased flow across the right pulmonary artery, a small atrial septal defect (ASD) with a right-to-left shunt, and a dilated right atrium and right ventricle with severe tricuspid regurgitation suggestive of severe pulmonary hypertension. A silent large patent ductus arteriosus was also seen. Multiple detector computerized tomography aortogram confirmed the findings of absent right pulmonary artery and hypoplastic right lung with small cystic lesions suggestive of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in the right lower lobe. Hoarseness of voice was due to the left vocal cord palsy probably secondary to severe pulmonary hypertension (Ortner's syndrome). PMID:27625455

  11. Occlusive vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome accompanying a congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sa, Young Jo; Kim, Young Du; Moon, Seok-Whan; Kim, Chi-Kyung; Ki, Chang Seok

    2013-12-01

    An 8-year-old male presented with a cystic lung lesion in the left lower lobe, which was initially detected during surgery for a spontaneous rupture of the sigmoid colon at the age of 6 years. Tissue fragility and a tendency to bleed easily were noted during the surgery, which strongly suggested vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Although there was no abnormality in the hemostasis screening test, or any suspicious hereditary problem in his pedigree, genetic gene testing for vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was recommended, and showed a de novo mutation in the COL3A1 gene. This report presents the case of patient with occlusive vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome accompanying a congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of lung, in addition to a duplicated infrarenal vena cava.

  12. Unilateral right pulmonary artery agenesis and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the right lung with Ortner's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    David, Jane Jackie; Mohanlal, Smilu; Sankhe, Punam; Ghildiyal, Radha

    2016-01-01

    We report a 2.5-year-old girl who presented with hoarseness of voice since 3 months of age and failure to thrive. Chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with a deviation of the trachea and mediastinum to the right side. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed decreased flow across the right pulmonary artery, a small atrial septal defect (ASD) with a right-to-left shunt, and a dilated right atrium and right ventricle with severe tricuspid regurgitation suggestive of severe pulmonary hypertension. A silent large patent ductus arteriosus was also seen. Multiple detector computerized tomography aortogram confirmed the findings of absent right pulmonary artery and hypoplastic right lung with small cystic lesions suggestive of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in the right lower lobe. Hoarseness of voice was due to the left vocal cord palsy probably secondary to severe pulmonary hypertension (Ortner's syndrome).

  13. Unilateral right pulmonary artery agenesis and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the right lung with Ortner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    David, Jane Jackie; Mohanlal, Smilu; Sankhe, Punam; Ghildiyal, Radha

    2016-01-01

    We report a 2.5-year-old girl who presented with hoarseness of voice since 3 months of age and failure to thrive. Chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with a deviation of the trachea and mediastinum to the right side. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed decreased flow across the right pulmonary artery, a small atrial septal defect (ASD) with a right-to-left shunt, and a dilated right atrium and right ventricle with severe tricuspid regurgitation suggestive of severe pulmonary hypertension. A silent large patent ductus arteriosus was also seen. Multiple detector computerized tomography aortogram confirmed the findings of absent right pulmonary artery and hypoplastic right lung with small cystic lesions suggestive of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in the right lower lobe. Hoarseness of voice was due to the left vocal cord palsy probably secondary to severe pulmonary hypertension (Ortner's syndrome). PMID:27625455

  14. Diagnostic value of 2D and 3D imaging in odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Shahbazian, M; Jacobs, R

    2012-04-01

    This review aims to explore whether 3D imaging offers an added value in diagnosis of odontogenic sinusitis. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis accounts for approximately 10-12% of maxillary sinusitis cases. Proper diagnosis of odontogenic sinusitis is based on a thorough dental and medical examination and crucial to ensure therapeutic efficacy. To establish the odontogenic cause of maxillary sinusitis, 2D and 3D imaging modalities may be considered, each presenting distinct advantages and drawbacks. The available research indicates that 2D imaging modalities may often mask the origin of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. This limitation is particularly evident in the maxillary molar region, stressing the need for 3D cross-sectional imaging. The advent of low-dose cone beam computed tomography in dentistry may be particularly useful when odontogenic maxillary sinusitis is not responsive to therapy. Yet, it seems that more research is needed to validate its use in odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

  15. [Odontogenic induction and ameloblastoma. Histoenzymological and ultrastructural studies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Chomette, G; Auriol, M; Vaillant, J M

    1981-01-01

    The ameloblastoma is usually thought to be devoid of any odontogenic capacity. However, the histological, ultrastructural and histoenzymological study of 5 cases demonstrates the fairly high level of differentiation of some ameloblastic cells in such neoplasms. Furthermore, it suggests very early stage of epithelio-conjunctive interaction. The tumours consist, in addition to stellate, squamous, clear and dark epithelial cells, of densely packed peripheral columnar cells similar to the differentiated ameloblasts of the inner epithelium of enamel organ (median nucleus, well-developed rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and lysosomal-vacuolar system located in the distal end of the cells). Besides, the cytoplasmic membrane shows some pocket-like apical invaginations similar to early Tomes processes. On the other hand, similarly to physiological odontogenesis, an abundant amount of granulo-filamentous material is found along the lateral cellular membranes, and the basement membrane. This substance, sometimes, is intermingled with vertical collagenous fibers. In some areas, it is disrupted and cytoplasmic invaginations of epithelial cells, passing through these gaps, are connected with neighbouring mesenchymatous cells. In other respects, despite the lack of any odontoblastic differentiation, the high level of alkaline phosphatase activity found in these cells by means of histo and cytoenzymological technics, looks like that of odontogenic mesenchymal cells. These findings seem to demonstrate the histogenetic unicity of odontogenic tumours. These neoplasms, like the embryonary dental organ, are provided with two types of cells (epithelial and stromal cells). Thus, they are able to induce odontogenesis. But, in ameloblastoma, this power of induction is restricted to a very early stage of odontogenesis.

  16. Craniocervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin with mediastinal extension.

    PubMed

    Edwards, John D; Sadeghi, Nader; Najam, Farzad; Margolis, Mark

    2004-08-01

    We review an interesting case of craniocervical necrotizing fasciitis with thoracic extension in an immunocompetent 44-year-old man. The patient underwent aggressive medical and surgical management during a long hospitalization. Multiple surgical debridements, including transcervical mediastinal debridement, and eventually a thoracotomy for mediastinal abscess were required. The patient eventually recovered, and 3 months later he showed no sign of complications or recurrence. Craniocervical necrotizing fasciitis is a fulminant soft-tissue infection, usually of odontogenic origin, that requires prompt identification and treatment to ensure survival. Broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics, aggressive surgical debridement and wound care, hyperbaric oxygen, and good intensive care are the mainstays of treatment.

  17. [Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: peculiarities of diagnostics and treatment].

    PubMed

    Davydov, D V; Gvozdovich, V A; Stebunov, V E; Manakina, A Iu

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to improve the quality of diagnostics and the choice of optimal therapy for the management of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis associated with the localization of foreign bodies in the lateral parts of the maxillary sinuses. To this effect, multispiral computed tomography was used to enable the exact location of the foreign body inside the sinus and to choose the optimal approach for the surgical intervention. The modified Coldwell-Luc procedure was employed as the most adequate technique in the given clinical condition.

  18. [Lymphotropic therapy for acute purulent odontogenic jaw periostitis].

    PubMed

    Maĭborodin, I V; Lĭubarskiĭ, M S; Loĭko, E R; Sheplev, B V

    2003-01-01

    The structure of the gingival mucosa was studied by optic microscopy in patients with acute purulent odontogenic maxillary periostitis treated traditionally and receiving lymphotropic therapy. Lymphotropic administration of the antibiotic during 2 days resulted in less pronounced dilatation of the interstitial spaces and lymph vessels adjacent to the molars and higher counts of lymphocytes, monocytes, and macrophages. This indicated high efficiency of lymphotropic therapy of acute purulent maxillary periostitis for molars. Microcirculation parameters and tissue leukocyte cytogram in gingival mucosal tissue adjacent to the canines and premolars differed negligibly in patients treated by different methods.

  19. Remission for Loss of Odontogenic Potential in a New Micromilieu In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yunfei; Cai, Jinglei; Hutchins, Andrew Paul; Jia, Lingfei; Liu, Pengfei; Yang, Dandan; Chen, Shubin; Ge, Lihong; Pei, Duanqing; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic organogenesis, the odontogenic potential resides in dental mesenchyme from the bud stage until birth. Mouse dental mesenchymal cells (mDMCs) isolated from the inductive dental mesenchyme of developing molars are frequently used in the context of tooth development and regeneration. We wondered if and how the odontogenic potential could be retained when mDMCs were cultured in vitro. In the present study, we undertook to test the odontogenic potential of cultured mDMCs and attempted to maintain the potential during culturing. We found that cultured mDMCs could retain the odontogenic potential for 24 h with a ratio of 60% for tooth formation, but mDMCs were incapable of supporting tooth formation after more than 24 h in culture. This loss of odontogenic potential was accompanied by widespread transcriptomic alteration and, specifically, the downregulation of some dental mesenchyme-specific genes, such as Pax9, Msx1, and Pdgfrα. To prolong the odontogenic potential of mDMCs in vitro, we then cultured mDMCs in a serum-free medium with Knockout Serum Replacement (KSR) and growth factors (fibroblastic growth factor 2 and epidermal growth factor). In this new micromilieu, mDMCs could maintain the odontogenic potential for 48 h with tooth formation ratio of 50%. Moreover, mDMCs cultured in KSR-supplemented medium gave rise to tooth-like structures when recombined with non-dental second-arch epithelium. Among the supplements, KSR is essential for the survival and adhesion of mDMCs, and both Egf and Fgf2 induced the expression of certain dental mesenchyme-related genes. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the transcriptomic changes responded to the alteration of odontogenic potential in cultured mDMCs and a new micromilieu partly retained this potential in vitro, providing insight into the long-term maintenance of odontogenic potential in mDMCs. PMID:27050091

  20. Disseminated necrotic mediastinitis spread from odontogenic abscess: our experience

    PubMed Central

    Filiaci, Fabio; Riccardi, Emiliano; Mitro, Valeria; Piombino, Pasquale; Rinna, Claudio; Agrillo, Alessandro; Ungari, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aims Deep neck infections are rare but potentially fatal complication of pulpal abscess of the teeth. If an infection can progress rapidly from a toothache to a life threatening infection, then it is critical that dentists be able to recognize the danger signs and identify the patients who are at risk. Mediastinitis is a severe inflammatory process involving the connective tissues that fills the intracellular spaces and surrounds the organs in the middle of the chest. This pathology has both an acute and a chronic form and, in most cases, it has an infectious etiology. This study want to expose the experience acquired in the Oral and Maxillo-facial Sciences Department, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, regarding two clinical cases of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis starting from an odontogenic abscess. Methods We report two clinical cases of disseminated necrotic mediastinitis with two different medical and surgical approaches. The radiographic and photographic documentation of the patients was collected in the pre-and post-operatively. All patients underwent a CT scan and MRI. Results Mediastinitis can result from a serious odontogenic abscess, and the extent of its inflammation process must be never underestimated. Dental surgeons play a key role as a correct diagnosis can prevent further increasing of the inflammation process. Conclusions A late diagnosis and an inadequate draining represent the major causes of the elevated mortality rate of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis. PMID:26330907

  1. The odontogenic keratocyst: a 20-year clinicopathologic review.

    PubMed

    Meara, J G; Shah, S; Li, K K; Cunningham, M J

    1998-02-01

    The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a jaw cyst with a proclivity for local invasion and recurrence. This 20-year retrospective study was conducted to evaluate methods of treatment and recurrence rates. Forty-nine patients were identified with an average age at presentation of 39.5 years. The molar region of either the mandible or maxilla was the principal primary location; the maxillary antrum was also a common site. The majority of cysts were unilocular and associated with adjacent dentition. Initial therapy was typically enucleation with or without extraction of associated teeth; seven cases of recurrent or second primary odontogenic keratocysts required more extensive surgery. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 15 years with an average duration of 4.3 years. The overall recurrence rate was 35%, and the average time to recurrence 4 years. A recurrence rate of 60% was documented for patients with basal cell nevus syndrome or a family history thereof. Long-term follow-up is necessary following initial OKC treatment. The high rate of recurrence in patients with documented or suspected basal cell nevus syndrome suggests the need for more aggressive initial surgical management in this selected patient population.

  2. Evaluation of microbial flora in orofacial space infections of odontogenic origin

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Amod; Dugal, Arun; Kshirsagar, Rajesh; Hariram; Singh, Vikram; Mishra, Akshay

    2014-01-01

    Background: The microbiology of acute dental infections has been in the midst of many researches. Various bacteriological studies show variations in their conclusion. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the microbial flora in orofacial space infections of odontogenic origin, which is essential for appropriate antibiotic selection. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with odontogenic infection causing fascial space involvement were included. Aspirated specimen was transported in nutrient broth and thyoglycollate media within an hour for further culture and sensitivity testing. Result and Conclusion: This study indicates that orofacial odontogenic infections are usually polymicrobial, consisting of a complex mixture of both anaerobes and aerobes. PMID:25937727

  3. Multiple tumor types appear in a transgenic mouse with the ras oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Cardiff, R. D.; Leder, A.; Kuo, A.; Pattengale, P. K.; Leder, P.

    1993-01-01

    A transgenic mouse strain with the zeta-globin promoter and the vHa-ras oncogene develops an array of mesenchymal and epithelial neoplasms described here. The predominate mesenchymal tumors were dermal spindle cell tumors, which resembled malignant fibrous histiocytomas found in humans. They were associated with hepatosplenomegaly and developed beneath squamous papillomas. The hepatosplenomegaly was associated with infiltrates of cells that tended toward myelocytic or monocytic differentiation. Other epithelial tumors included keratoacanthomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Squamous cysts, some with squamous cell carcinomas, of the salivary glands and mammary carcinomas were also found. Odontogenic tumors, which sometimes differentiated into ameloblastomas, were one of the more unusual tumor types observed. Other, less frequent tumors were also noted. The tumors described here are a potentially valuable experimental resource that may lead to an understanding of malignant fibrous histiocytoma-like lesions, odontogenic tumors, and tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8475993

  4. Odontogenic deep neck space infection as life-threatening condition in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dalla Torre, D; Burtscher, D; Höfer, D; Kloss, F R

    2014-09-01

    Odontogenic deep neck space infections represent a severe disease with possible life-threatening complications. Despite knowledge of these infectious diseases, treatment remains a challenge for every maxillofacial surgeon. Therapy of severe neck infections is even more crucial during pregnancy because of the possible life-threatening situation for both the mother and the foetus. The possible compromise of oral health during pregnancy is well known, however severe odontogenic infections are rarely considered in the literature. The following case report describes the dramatic course of a deep neck space infection in a pregnant patient, commencing with typical symptoms of localized odontogenic infection and ending in a critical, life-threatening condition for the patient and a lethal condition for the foetus. The case represents the first description of intrauterine, foetal death caused by a deep neck space infection. Implications for dental and medical treatment during pregnancy, especially regarding odontogenic infections, are presented and discussed with findings in the international literature.

  5. A Rare Simultaneous Occurrence of Odontogenic Keratocyst and Unicystic Ameloblastoma in Mandible: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dugal, Arun Govind; Pawar, Sudhir Ramlal; Khandelwal, Saurabh Girish; Iyengar, Apoorva

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic Keratocyst (OKC) and Ameloblastomas are slow growing benign odontogenic lesions that primarily occur in the molar region of the mandible. Clinically and radiographically both ameloblastoma, especially the Unicystic ameloblastoma and OKC are indistinguishable due to the similar location of occurrence and the age of patients. It is very rare for these lesions to arise simultaneously in a patient’s jaw. The co-occurrence of Ameloblastomas with odontogenic cysts or other odontogenic lesions (histologically in a single lesion)have already been described as combined or hybrid lesions. There are very few reported cases in the English literature for simultaneous occurrence of Unicystic Ameloblastoma and OKC as completely distinct lesions. Here we present such a rare case of the simultaneous occurrence of OKC and ameloblastoma in the posterior region of the mandible of a 22-year-old male in close relation. PMID:27656574

  6. Evaluation of Calretinin expression in Ameloblastoma and Non-Neoplastic Odontogenic Cysts – An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    D’Silva, Shaloom; Sumathi, M K; Balaji, N; Shetty, Nisha K N; Pramod, K M; Cheeramelil, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Background: Calretinin a 29-kDa calcium binding protein is expressed widely in normal human tissue and tumours including amelobastoma. The objective of this study was to determine calretinin expression in heamatoxylin and eosin diagnosed cases of ameloblastoma and non-neoplastic odontogenic cysts. Materials & Methods: The lining epithelium in 3 cases of radicular cysts, 5 cases of odontogenic keratocysts, 5 cases of dentigerous cysts and 11 cases of ameloblastomas were examined for expression of calretinin. Results: No positive epithelial staining was observed in radicular and dentigerous cysts. In comparison, however 100% of cases of ameloblastomas and 40% of cases of odontogenic karatocysts showed positive calretinin expression. Conclusion: Calretinin may be a specific immunohistochemical marker for ameloblastoma. If there is any possible relation between calretinin expression and neural origin of the odontogenic epithelium and its neoplastic transformation and if calretinin could be used as an early marker to predict the tendency of neoplastic change of odontogenic epithelium could be answered through further researches. How to cite this article: D’Silva S, Sumathi MK, Balaji N, Shetty NK, Pramod KM, Cheeramelil J. Evaluation of Calretinin expression in Ameloblastoma and Non-Neoplastic Odontogenic Cysts – An immunohistochemical study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):42-8 . PMID:24453443

  7. An epidemiologic and anatomic survey of odontogenic infections.

    PubMed

    Haug, R H; Hoffman, M J; Indresano, A T

    1991-09-01

    An 81-month review of patients with infections of odontogenic origin admitted to the oral and maxillofacial surgery service at a county hospital and teaching facility in northeast Ohio is presented. Age, sex, race, etiology, pathogens isolated, admission temperature, and admission white blood cell count were identified and related to the anatomic space(s) encountered. Multispace and single-space infections occurred with equal distribution. In both the multispace and single-space infections, the submandibular and buccal spaces were most frequently involved. Males were affected with single-space infections twice as often as females. An equal distribution among sexes was found in multispace infections. The most common age range for all infections was 25 to 30 years. alpha-Hemolytic streptococci, Bacteroides melaninogenicus, and beta-hemolytic streptococci were the most frequently isolated pathogens. Third molars were the prevalent cause in both multispace and single-space infections that required hospital admission.

  8. Ossifying cystic odontogenic and Schneiderian choristoma of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Mudhar, Hardeep Singh; Nurrudin, Murtuza

    2014-02-01

    A 12-year-old girl presented with a left infraorbital lesion, causing upward globe displacement. Imaging confirmed a mass between the globe and the orbital floor. The lesion was removed via a sub-ciliary approach and histology revealed a a mature tooth along with a periodontal ligament, oral-type mucinous glands and bone. Six years later a mass recurred at exactly the same site and on this occasion, revealed cysts containing mucin and lined by Schneiderian type epithelium. A rather complex combination of a tooth, lamellar bone, mucinous oral type glands and Schneiderian cystic epithelium is highly unusual and we have called the lesion "ossifying cystic odontogenic and Schneiderian choristoma of the orbit."

  9. Nasal Sinus Tract of Odontogenic Origin: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Sagar; Pathak, Anjani Kumar; Purwar, Parth; Dixit, Jaya; Singhal, Divya; Sajjanhar, Isha; Goel, Kopal; Gupta, Vaibhav Sheel

    2015-01-01

    Extraoral sinus tract often poses a diagnostic challenge to the clinician owing to its rare occurrence and absence of symptoms. The accurate diagnosis and comprehensive management are inevitable as the aetiology of such lesions is often masked and requires holistic approach. The present case report encompasses the management of an extraoral discharging sinus tract at the base of the right nostril in a chronic smoker. The lesion which was earlier diagnosed to be of nonodontogenic origin persisted even after erratic treatment modalities. Our investigations showed the aetiology of sinus tract to be odontogenic. Initially, a five-step program as recommended by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality was used for smoking cessation followed by root canal therapy (RCT) and surgical management of the sinus tract. The patient has been under stringent follow-up and no reoccurrence has been noted. PMID:26649208

  10. Syndromic odontogenic keratocyst: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Fazil

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) may occur in two different forms, either as solitary (nonsyndromic OKCs) or as multiple OKCs (syndromic OKCs). Multiple OKCs usually occur as one of the findings in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with other features such as skin carcinomas and rib, eye, and neurologic abnormalities. We report a rare case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with a slow growing swelling on lower right and left back teeth region since 2 months. Apart from these, other findings were frontal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, ocular hypertelorism, prominent supra orbital ridge, and mild mandibular prognathism. Excision was done and microscopic study revealed OKC and the follow-up could not be carried out for the complete management. We also presented a review of its pathogenesis, criterion, and differences between syndromic and nonsyndromic OKCs and suggest to thoroughly examine any patient who presents with multiple OKCs to rule out syndromic variety. PMID:27011939

  11. Syndromic odontogenic keratocyst: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Fazil

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) may occur in two different forms, either as solitary (nonsyndromic OKCs) or as multiple OKCs (syndromic OKCs). Multiple OKCs usually occur as one of the findings in Gorlin–Goltz syndrome with other features such as skin carcinomas and rib, eye, and neurologic abnormalities. We report a rare case of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with a slow growing swelling on lower right and left back teeth region since 2 months. Apart from these, other findings were frontal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, ocular hypertelorism, prominent supra orbital ridge, and mild mandibular prognathism. Excision was done and microscopic study revealed OKC and the follow-up could not be carried out for the complete management. We also presented a review of its pathogenesis, criterion, and differences between syndromic and nonsyndromic OKCs and suggest to thoroughly examine any patient who presents with multiple OKCs to rule out syndromic variety. PMID:27011939

  12. A three-year-old boy with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and congenital pulmonary adenomatoid malformation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy leads to demyelination of the nervous system, adrenal insufficiency, and accumulation of long-chain fatty acids. Most young patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy develop seizures and progressive neurologic deficits, and die within the first two decades of life. Congenital or acquired disorders of the respiratory system have not been previously described in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Case presentation A 3-year-old Arabic boy from Yemen presented with discoloration of the mucous membranes and nail beds, which were considered cyanoses due to methemoglobinemia. He also had shortness of breath, fatigue, emesis and dehydration episodes for which he was admitted to our hospital. Chest radiograph and chest computed tomography scans showed congenital pulmonary adenomatoid malformation. A few weeks before the removal of the malformation, he had a significant episode of hypotension and hypoglycemia. This development required further in-hospital evaluation that led to the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency and the initiation of treatment with corticosteroids. One year later, he developed seizures and loss of consciousness. Magnetic resonance imaging of his head showed diffuse demyelination secondary to X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. He was treated with anti-seizure and anti-oxidants, and was referred for bone marrow transplant evaluation. Conclusion The presence of adrenal insufficiency, neurologic deficits and seizures are common manifestations of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. The association of congenital lung disease with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy or Addison's disease has not been described previously. PMID:20090870

  13. Clear cell tumors of the salivary glands, jaws, and oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Maiorano, E; Altini, M; Favia, G

    1997-08-01

    Clear cell tumors of the oral mucosa, jaws, and salivary glands constitute a heterogeneous group of lesions which may be either odontogenic, salivary gland, or metastatic in origin. Clear cells in these proliferations most frequently result from fixation artifact but may also be the result of cytoplasmic accumulation of water, glycogen, intermediate filaments, or immature zymogen granules, or a paucity of cellular organelles. Odontogenic neoplasms that may be characterized by a predominantly clear cell component include odontogenic carcinoma, ameloblastoma, and calcifying epithelial odontogenic (Pindborg) tumor. Clear cell tumors of salivary gland origin are almost invariably malignant in nature but they do include two benign lesions; namely, oncocytoma and myoepithelioma. Clear cells in acinic cell carcinoma seldom comprise a significant portion of the tumor whereas clear cell mucoepidermoid carcinomas can readily be identified by an admixture of clear-squamoid, mucous and intermediate cells. Lesions previously reported as "clear cell adenoma" "clear cell carcinoma, or glycogen-rich carcinoma" can be divided into the distinctive biphasic epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma and monophasic lesions which have been shown to be either myoepithelial or ductal in origin. The latter are primarily represented by the recently described "hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma." The most common metastatic clear cell tumor in the oral mucosa and the jaws is the renal cell carcinoma. However, metastases of melanoma and malignant clear cell tumors of the prostate, bowel, thyroid, and liver must also be considered.

  14. The effect of scaffold architecture on odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Ma, Haiyun; Jin, Xiaobing; Hu, Jiang; Liu, Xiaohua; Ni, Longxing; Ma, Peter X

    2011-11-01

    Previous studies have shown the superiority of nanofibrous (NF) poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffolds in supporting the osteogenic differentiation of a few cell types and bone regeneration. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether NF-PLLA scaffolds are advantageous for the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) over solid-walled (SW) PLLA scaffolds. The in vitro studies demonstrated that, compared with SW scaffolds, NF scaffolds enhanced attachment and proliferation as well as odontogenic differentiation of human DPSCs. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the expression of odontogenic genes of human DPSCs were increased on NF scaffolds compared with that on SW scaffolds. In addition, more mineral deposition was observed on the NF scaffolds, as demonstrated by von Kossa staining, calcium content measurement and scanning electron microscopy. Consistent with the in vitro studies, NF scaffolds promoted odontogenic differentiation and hard tissue formation compared with SW scaffolds after 8 weeks of ectopic transplantation in nude mice, as confirmed by von Kossa staining, Masson's trichrome staining and immunohistochemical staining for dentin sialoprotein. In conclusion, NF-PLLA scaffolds enhanced the odontogenic differentiation of human DPSCs and mineralization both in vitro and in vivo, and are promising scaffolds for dentin regeneration.

  15. [Diagnostics and treatment of acute odontogenic osteomyelitis of the mandible considering functional state of inferior alveolar nerve].

    PubMed

    Malanchuk, V A; Pavlovskiĭ, L L

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of functional impairment of inferior alveolar nerve in acute odontogenic inflammatory processes was carried out in this clinical study by means of stimulation electroneurography. Possibility of early diagnosis of acute odontogenic osteomyelitis by this method and effectiveness of decompression osteoperforation for its treatment was shown.

  16. [Bacteriological findings in materials from patients with nonspecific odontogenic infections].

    PubMed

    Oehring, V H; Schumann, D; Karl, P; Knappe, U; Gruhn, I

    1976-01-01

    The results of bacteriological studies made between 1964 and 1971 by workers at the Varia Laboratory, Institute of Medical Microbiology on 767 patients treated at the Clinic of Gnathofacial Surgery, Department of Medicine, Friedrich Schiller University at Jena, are evaluated. The testees (x=275) were included in groups with specific diagnoses, and a breakdown was made according to the detection of aerobic pus-forming germs. Gram-positive cocci were detected in 92% of the cases and their pathogenetic representatives, 76,5% of the cases. Rodshaped germs (Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas) were observed only in 37,9% of the cases. Staphylococcus aureus, which accounted for 62,5%, was the most frequently observed species. It was followed, in order of frequency of detection, by greening streptococci and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Monoinfection was far more frequently observed than multi-infection. Also, the problems associated with the differentiation of streptococci are pointed out since other investigators found streptococci to be the most frequent agents producing odontogenic infections. PMID:7062

  17. Novel Association of Odontogenic Myxoma with Constitutional Chromosomal 1q21 Microduplication: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Best-Rocha, Alejandro; Patel, Kalyani; Hicks, John; Edmonds, Joseph L; Paldino, Michael J; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare, benign, and locally aggressive tumor. It tends to occur in the posterior maxilla and mandible and is often associated with root resorption and perforation of cortex. Histopathologically, there is a proliferation of spindle, bipolar, and stellate cells, with bland nuclei within a myxoid to infrequently fibromyxoid extracellular matrix. Long, thin residual bony trabeculae are often seen floating within the spindle cell proliferation because of the infiltrating nature of this tumor, and these trabeculae impart a "soap bubble" or "tennis-racket" radiologic appearance. No syndromic association of OM has been reported. Although similar histopathologic features are shared with cardiac myxoma and soft tissue myxoma, mutations in the GNAS gene have not been identified in OM to date, and only 2 of 17 OMs showed mutations in the PRKAR1A gene. In this report, we describe a case of OM in a patient with constitutional 1q21 microduplication, a locus that harbors genes encoding certain proteins in the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway, including G-protein-coupled receptors and 1 phosphodiesterase interacting protein. Review of the literature describes the key clinical features and molecular pathogenesis of 1q21 microduplication, as well as highlighting the role of PKA signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of myxomas in general. PMID:26230961

  18. A case of glandular odontogenic cyst in the mandible treated with the dredging method.

    PubMed

    Motooka, Naomi; Ohba, Seigo; Uehara, Masataka; Fujita, Syuichi; Asahina, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare odontogenic cyst derived from the odontogenic epithelium. GOC shows unpredictable and potentially aggressive behavior. Although enucleation and curettage are applied in most cases, the recurrence rate remains relatively high. Because a standard care procedure for GOC has not been established, we propose a new treatment procedure for GOC. In this case report, we describe a 62-year-old Japanese woman who suffered from GOC arising at the anterior region of her mandible and who was treated using the dredging method. She underwent enucleation and curettage twice using the dredging method with preservation of the teeth, which were involved with the lesion, but the lesion recurred 2 years later. In addition to enucleation and curettage, apicoectomy of the teeth was performed with a third dredging method procedure, and prognosis has been good with no recurrence for 18 months since the last treatment. PMID:24374982

  19. Glandular odontogenic cyst: a rare entity revealed and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Anchlia, Sonal; Bahl, Sumit; Shah, Vandana; Vyas, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    A glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a developmental cyst that is a clinically rare and histopathologically unusual type of odontogenic cyst. GOCs are now relatively well-known entities; their importance relates to the fact that they exhibit a propensity for recurrence rates from 21% to 55%, similar to odontogenic keratocysts, and may be confused microscopically with central mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Furthermore, some microscopic features of GOCs may also be found in dentigerous, botryoid, radicular and surgical ciliated cysts. The present case report aims to describe a typical case of GOC, throwing light on its epidemiology and origin, as well as on its clinical, radiographic and microscopic features, which may be helpful for diagnosis in problematic cases, long-term follow-up and to determine the most appropriate treatment. PMID:26297768

  20. A case of odontogenic orbital cellulitis causing blindness by severe tension orbit.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Hyun; Jee, Dong Hyun; La, Tae Yoon

    2013-02-01

    We report a very rare case of odontogenic orbital cellulitis causing blindness by severe tension orbit. A 41-yr old male patient had visited the hospital due to severe periorbital swelling and nasal stuffiness while he was treated for a periodontal abscess. He was diagnosed with odontogenic sinusitis and orbital cellulitis, and treated with antibiotics. The symptoms were aggravated and emergency sinus drainage was performed. On the next day, a sudden decrease in vision occurred with findings of ischemic optic neuropathy and central retinal artery occlusion. Deformation of the eyeball posterior pole into a cone shape was found from the orbital CT. A high-dose steroid was administered immediately resulting in improvements of periorbital swelling, but the patient's vision had not recovered. Odontogenic orbital cellulitis is relatively rare, but can cause blindness via rapidly progressing tension orbit. Therefore even the simplest of dental problems requires careful attention.

  1. Bilateral Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour of Mandible: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Pragun; Mhapuskar, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a relatively rare lesion of oral and maxillofacial region and forms only 2% of all odontogenic tumours. It was previously known as Calcifying odontogenic cyst and only recently has been classified as a tumour by WHO. The controversy regarding its origin can be owed to its diverse clinical and histopathological presentation and variation in reported malignant potential. It was first reported by Gorlin in 1962 and since then conundrum regarding its true nature has persisted. It is seen in association with other lesions like odontoma, ameloblastoma and ameloblastic fibroma. Both intra-osseous and extra-osseous forms of CCOT have been reported. It commnoly occurs in anterior region with equal preponderance in maxilla and mandible. Here we present a rare case of bilateral CCOT in the posterior mandible of a 16-year-old male patient which was discovered incidentally during a radiographic examination. PMID:26673837

  2. Bilateral Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour of Mandible: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Pragun; Aditya, Amita; Mhapuskar, Amit

    2015-11-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a relatively rare lesion of oral and maxillofacial region and forms only 2% of all odontogenic tumours. It was previously known as Calcifying odontogenic cyst and only recently has been classified as a tumour by WHO. The controversy regarding its origin can be owed to its diverse clinical and histopathological presentation and variation in reported malignant potential. It was first reported by Gorlin in 1962 and since then conundrum regarding its true nature has persisted. It is seen in association with other lesions like odontoma, ameloblastoma and ameloblastic fibroma. Both intra-osseous and extra-osseous forms of CCOT have been reported. It commnoly occurs in anterior region with equal preponderance in maxilla and mandible. Here we present a rare case of bilateral CCOT in the posterior mandible of a 16-year-old male patient which was discovered incidentally during a radiographic examination.

  3. Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a slow-growing odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Miranda Rius, Jaume; Nadal, Alfons; Lahor, Eduard; Mtui, Beatus; Brunet, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a subjacent tumoural pathology is reported. The patient was a 55-year-old black male, whose chief complaint was a progressive gingival overgrowth for more than ten years, in the buccal area of the anterior left mandible. According to the clinical features and the radiological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst, a conservative surgery with enucleation and curettage was performed. Tissue submitted for histopathological analysis rendered the diagnosis of odontogenic myxoma. After 12-month of follow-up, no evidence of recurrence was found. Clinicians should be cautious when facing any gingival enlargement to avoid diagnostic pitfalls and to indicate the appropriate treatment. PMID:23722914

  4. Peripheral Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumour Mimicking a Gingival Inflammation: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Danielle Lima Corrêa; do Canto, Alan Motta; Eduardo, Fernanda de Paula; Bezinelli, Letícia Mello

    2016-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour (CEOT) is an extremely rare benign neoplasia, accounting for approximately 1% of all odontogenic tumours. CEOT can have two clinical manifestations: central or intraosseous (94% of the cases) and peripheral or extraosseous (6% of the cases). Although the latter is less common, the peripheral variant has been described as an insidious lesion, since it is usually asymptomatic and may be erroneously mistaken with gingival hyperplasia, hamartomas, or even metastasis of malignant neoplasia. We report a case of a young male patient presenting with a peripheral CEOT in the mandibular posterior region, mimicking a located gingival inflammation. PMID:27807486

  5. [Sinus lift and dental implantation after endosurgical treatment of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Sysoliatin, S P; Sysoliatin, P G; Palkina, M O; Solop, M V

    2013-01-01

    The long-term results of dental implant placement in patients with the history of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis are assessed in retrospective study. Maxillary sinusotomy and endoscopic surgery procedures are compared in regard to complications risks after subsequent sinus lift and dental implantation, the latter proving to be method of choice in such cases.

  6. [The improvement of complex treatment of odontogenous periostitis in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Okovityĭ, S V; Muzykin, M I; Iordanishvili, A K

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of clinical examination of 114 patients aged 60-88 years with acute odontogenous periostitis receiving treatment in in-patient maxillofacial surgery unit. The dynamic of clinical symptoms is used to carry out the comparative effectiveness study of several peroral antibiotics in elderly patients.

  7. The orosomucoid 1 protein (α1 acid glycoprotein) is overexpressed in odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a benign, but locally invasive, neoplasm occurring in the jaws. However, the molecules implicated in its development are unknown. OM as well as Dental Follicle (DF), an odontogenic tissue surrounding the enamel organ, is derived from ectomesenchymal/mesencyhmal elements. To identify some protein that could participate in the development of this neoplasm, total proteins from OM were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the profiles were compared with those obtained from DF, used as a control. Results We identified eight proteins with differential expression; two of them were downregulated and six upregulated in OM. A spot consistently overexpressed in odontogenic myxoma, with a molecular weight of 44-kDa and a pI of 3.5 was identified as the orosomucoid 1 protein. Western blot experiments confirmed the overexpression of this protein in odontogenic myxoma and immunohistochemical assays showed that this protein was mainly located in the cytoplasm of stellate and spindle-shaped cells of this neoplasm. Conclusion Orosomucoid 1, which belongs to a group of acute-phase proteins, may play a role in the modulation of the immune system and possibly it influences the development of OM. PMID:22888844

  8. Insight into the maintenance of odontogenic potential in mouse dental mesenchymal cells based on transcriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yunfei; Jia, Lingfei; Liu, Pengfei; Yang, Dandan; Hu, Waner; Chen, Shubin; Zhao, Yuming; Cai, Jinglei; Pei, Duanqing; Ge, Lihong; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mouse dental mesenchymal cells (mDMCs) from tooth germs of cap or later stages are frequently used in the context of developmental biology or whole-tooth regeneration due to their odontogenic potential. In vitro-expanded mDMCs serve as an alternative cell source considering the difficulty in obtaining primary mDMCs; however, cultured mDMCs fail to support tooth development as a result of functional failures of specific genes or pathways. The goal of this study was to identify the genes that maintain the odontogenic potential of mDMCs in culture. Methods. We examined the odontogenic potential of freshly isolated versus cultured mDMCs from the lower first molars of embryonic day 14.5 mice. The transcriptome of mDMCs was detected using RNA sequencing and the data were validated by qRT-PCR. Differential expression analysis and pathway analysis were conducted to identify the genes that contribute to the loss of odontogenic potential. Results. Cultured mDMCs failed to develop into well-structured tooth when they were recombined with dental epithelium. Compared with freshly isolated mDMCs, we found that 1,004 genes were upregulated and 948 were downregulated in cultured mDMCs. The differentially expressed genes were clustered in the biological processes and signaling pathways associated with tooth development. Following in vitro culture, genes encoding a wide array of components of MAPK, TGF-β/BMP, and Wnt pathways were significantly downregulated. Moreover, the activities of Bdnf, Vegfα, Bmp2, and Bmp7 were significantly inhibited in cultured mDMCs. Supplementation of VEGFα, BMP2, and BMP7 restored the expression of a subset of downregulated genes and induced mDMCs to form dentin-like structures in vivo. Conclusions. Vegfα, Bmp2, and Bmp7 play a role in the maintenance of odontogenic potential in mDMCs. PMID:26925321

  9. Medium modification with bone morphogenetic protein 2 addition for odontogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Atalayin, Cigdem; Tezel, Huseyin; Dagci, Taner; Yavasoglu, Nefise Ulku Karabay; Oktem, Gulperi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether medium modification improves the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) in vitro and in vivo. DPSC isolated from human impacted third molar teeth were analysed for clusters of differentiation with flow cytometry. Odontogenic differentiation was stimulated by medium modification with the addition of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2). The expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein 1, enamelysin/matrix metalloproteinase 20 and the phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome of the cells were analysed with RT-PCR at 7, 14 and 21 days. Then, DPSC were transplanted on the back of immunocompromised mice via a hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate scaffold, and the structure of the formed tissue was investigated. The cells were identified as mesenchymal stem cells with a 98.3% CD73 and CD90 double-positive cell rate. The increase in mineralization capacity and expression of human enamel-dentin specific transcripts proportional to the culture period were determined after differentiation. Six weeks after transplantation, an osteo-dentin matrix was formed in the group in which odontogenic differentiation was stimulated, and the odontogenic characteristics of the matrix were confirmed by histological examination and RT-PCR analysis. Odontogenic differentiation of the isolated and characterized human DPSC was improved with medium modification by the addition of BMP2 in vitro and in vivo. The defined medium and applied technique have a potential use for forming reparative dentin in the future, but the effects of the method should be investigated in long-term studies. PMID:26981753

  10. Diffusion-weighted imaging in the evaluation of odontogenic cysts and tumours

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, K; Seith Bhalla, A; Sharma, R; Kumar, A; Roychoudhury, A; Bhutia, O

    2012-01-01

    Objective The differentiation between keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) and other cystic/predominantly cystic odontogenic tumours is difficult on conventional CT and MR sequences as there is overlap in the imaging characteristics of these lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and to assess the performance of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) in the differential diagnosis of odontogenic cysts and tumours. Methods 20 patients with odontogenic cysts and tumours of the maxillomandibular region were examined with DWI. Diffusion-weighted images were obtained with a single-shot echoplanar technique with b-values of 0, 500 and 1000 s mm−2. An ADC map was obtained at each slice position. Results The cystic areas of ameloblastoma (n=10) showed free diffusion with a mean ADC value of 2.192±0.33×10−3 mm2 s−1, whereas the solid areas showed restricted diffusion with a mean ADC value of 1.041±0.41×10−3 mm2 s−1. KCOT (n=5) showed restricted diffusion with a mean ADC value of 1.019±0.07×10−3 mm2 s−1. There was a significant difference between the ADC values of KCOT and cystic ameloblastoma (p<0.01, Mann–Whitney U-test). The cut-off with which KCOT and predominantly cystic ameloblastomas were optimally differentiated was 2.013×10−3 mm2 s−1, which yielded 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Conclusion DWI can be used to differentiate KCOT from cystic (or predominantly cystic) odontogenic tumours. PMID:22553294

  11. Insight into the maintenance of odontogenic potential in mouse dental mesenchymal cells based on transcriptomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Yang, Dandan; Hu, Waner; Chen, Shubin; Zhao, Yuming; Cai, Jinglei; Pei, Duanqing

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mouse dental mesenchymal cells (mDMCs) from tooth germs of cap or later stages are frequently used in the context of developmental biology or whole-tooth regeneration due to their odontogenic potential. In vitro-expanded mDMCs serve as an alternative cell source considering the difficulty in obtaining primary mDMCs; however, cultured mDMCs fail to support tooth development as a result of functional failures of specific genes or pathways. The goal of this study was to identify the genes that maintain the odontogenic potential of mDMCs in culture. Methods. We examined the odontogenic potential of freshly isolated versus cultured mDMCs from the lower first molars of embryonic day 14.5 mice. The transcriptome of mDMCs was detected using RNA sequencing and the data were validated by qRT-PCR. Differential expression analysis and pathway analysis were conducted to identify the genes that contribute to the loss of odontogenic potential. Results. Cultured mDMCs failed to develop into well-structured tooth when they were recombined with dental epithelium. Compared with freshly isolated mDMCs, we found that 1,004 genes were upregulated and 948 were downregulated in cultured mDMCs. The differentially expressed genes were clustered in the biological processes and signaling pathways associated with tooth development. Following in vitro culture, genes encoding a wide array of components of MAPK, TGF-β/BMP, and Wnt pathways were significantly downregulated. Moreover, the activities of Bdnf, Vegfα, Bmp2, and Bmp7 were significantly inhibited in cultured mDMCs. Supplementation of VEGFα, BMP2, and BMP7 restored the expression of a subset of downregulated genes and induced mDMCs to form dentin-like structures in vivo. Conclusions. Vegfα, Bmp2, and Bmp7 play a role in the maintenance of odontogenic potential in mDMCs. PMID:26925321

  12. Ameloblastic fibromas and related tumors in cattle.

    PubMed

    Gardner, D G

    1996-03-01

    This article concerns rare odontogenic tumors that occur predominantly in the mandibular incisor region of young cattle and which have often in the past been referred to as ameloblastomas, or as the outdated synonym, adamantinoma. Twenty-two examples from the literature and two new ones were studied. Six consisted of epithelial islands which resembled those of ameloblastoma but which were located within a cellular fibrous connective tissue that was the second component of the tumor; these mixed odontogenic tumors therefore represented ameloblastic fibromas, not ameloblastomas. Eight consisted of a combination of ameloblastic fibroma and odontoma and therefore were ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, and one was apparently malignant (ameloblastic fibro-odontosarcoma). Excluding this last lesion, these tumors should respond well to enucleation, like their human counterparts but, to confirm this hypothesis, the margins of future examples should be carefully examined to determine that they are well-demarcated, not invasive. The microscopic features of the remaining 9 tumours could not be evaluated adequately, while another 17 tumors in cattle and water buffalo reported briefly could not be studied to any extent because of insufficient information.

  13. Conservative Management of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour with Enucleation, Excision of the Overlying Mucosa and Electrocauterization – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gambhir, A; Rani, G

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Odontogenic keratocyst remains an enigma for clinicians and researchers, although gains in knowledge in recent years have improved the understanding of this interesting lesion. The diagnostic problems are mainly related to the relative lack of specific clinical and radiographic features that unequivocally point to a proper diagnosis. Of particular interest to clinicians is the biologic behaviour of keratocysts which includes high rates of recurrence and potential existence as a benign odontogenic neoplasm, keratocystic odontogenic tumour. Various surgical modalities have evolved in an attempt to reduce the recurrence rate, including curettage, peripheral ostectomy, removal of overlying mucosa in cases of cortical perforation and osseous resection in the form of marginal or segmental osteotomies. The present case report describes the conservative surgical management of a large keratocystic odontogenic tumour in a young patient with no evidence of recurrence at two years follow-up. PMID:25867564

  14. From the radiologic pathology archives: Adrenal tumors and tumor-like conditions in the adult: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Lattin, Grant E; Sturgill, Eric D; Tujo, Charles A; Marko, Jamie; Sanchez-Maldonado, Katherine W; Craig, William D; Lack, Ernest E

    2014-01-01

    Advanced imaging often reveals adrenal tumors and tumor-like conditions in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. When adrenal disease is clinically suspected, cross-sectional imaging can be helpful in evaluating the etiology of the patient's symptoms. When adrenal disease is incidentally identified, what the clinician and patient really want to know is whether the findings are benign or malignant, as this ultimately will affect their next step in management. Using radiologic-pathologic correlation, we broadly classify common, uncommon, and rare tumors and tumor-like conditions that can occur in the adrenal as benign or malignant. This classification follows predominant trends in observed biologic behavior while acknowledging those tumors that may behave in the minority in an unpredictable manner. We review the clinical background and presentation of functional adrenal tumors including Conn syndrome, Cushing syndrome, and catecholamine-secreting tumors, as well as their relationship with adrenal anatomy. We discuss a variety of benign tumors, including adrenal cortical adenoma (including oncocytoma) and pheochromocytoma, as well as uncommonly and rarely encountered tumors such as myelolipoma, hemangioma, lymphangioma, schwannoma, ganglioneuroma, and adenomatoid tumor. A variety of tumefactive but nonneoplastic lesions are addressed, including adrenal cortical hyperplasia, adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal cysts, and infections. Malignant tumors discussed include adrenal cortical carcinoma, the rare malignant pheochromocytoma, lymphoma, metastases, and sarcomas. For each tumor and tumor-like lesion, the clinical presentation, epidemiology, key imaging findings, diagnostic differential considerations, and management options are briefly addressed. Finally, an approach to the workup of suspected or incidentally discovered tumors is presented based on a selected literature survey and our clinical experience. Radiologists play an important role in identification and

  15. From the radiologic pathology archives: Adrenal tumors and tumor-like conditions in the adult: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Lattin, Grant E; Sturgill, Eric D; Tujo, Charles A; Marko, Jamie; Sanchez-Maldonado, Katherine W; Craig, William D; Lack, Ernest E

    2014-01-01

    Advanced imaging often reveals adrenal tumors and tumor-like conditions in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. When adrenal disease is clinically suspected, cross-sectional imaging can be helpful in evaluating the etiology of the patient's symptoms. When adrenal disease is incidentally identified, what the clinician and patient really want to know is whether the findings are benign or malignant, as this ultimately will affect their next step in management. Using radiologic-pathologic correlation, we broadly classify common, uncommon, and rare tumors and tumor-like conditions that can occur in the adrenal as benign or malignant. This classification follows predominant trends in observed biologic behavior while acknowledging those tumors that may behave in the minority in an unpredictable manner. We review the clinical background and presentation of functional adrenal tumors including Conn syndrome, Cushing syndrome, and catecholamine-secreting tumors, as well as their relationship with adrenal anatomy. We discuss a variety of benign tumors, including adrenal cortical adenoma (including oncocytoma) and pheochromocytoma, as well as uncommonly and rarely encountered tumors such as myelolipoma, hemangioma, lymphangioma, schwannoma, ganglioneuroma, and adenomatoid tumor. A variety of tumefactive but nonneoplastic lesions are addressed, including adrenal cortical hyperplasia, adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal cysts, and infections. Malignant tumors discussed include adrenal cortical carcinoma, the rare malignant pheochromocytoma, lymphoma, metastases, and sarcomas. For each tumor and tumor-like lesion, the clinical presentation, epidemiology, key imaging findings, diagnostic differential considerations, and management options are briefly addressed. Finally, an approach to the workup of suspected or incidentally discovered tumors is presented based on a selected literature survey and our clinical experience. Radiologists play an important role in identification and

  16. Immunohistochemical Assessment of Mast Cells and Small Blood Vessels in Dentigerous Cyst, Odontogenic Keratocyst, and Periapical Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Moradzadeh Khiavi, Monir; Jamali, Golshan; Farnia, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to verify the density of mast cells (MCs) and microvessels in odontogenic cysts. Furthermore, the correlation between MCs and microvessels was evaluated to assess the contribution of MCs to angiogenesis and growth of odontogenic cysts. This approach may be a basis for the development of future pharmaceuticals addressed to MCs performance to manage odontogenic cysts. To our knowledge, no study investigating the correlation between MCs and microvessels has been performed to date. Methods: 60 cases of odontogenic cysts consisting of 20 radicular cysts (RCs), 20 odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) and 20 dentigerous cysts (DCs) were included in this study. Five high power fields in superficial connective tissue and five high power fields in deep connective tissue were counted for each sample. Moreover, a total mean of ten fields was calculated. Results: RC showed the highest mean numbers of MCs and microvessels (p<0.05). The subepithelial zones of all cysts contained more MCs and microvessels compared to the deeper zones. A statistically significant correlation between the numbers of MCs and microvessels was not observed (r=0.00, p=0.49). Conclusion: Although the number of MCs was not significantly associated with microvessels, these cells may be related to the growth of odontogenic lesions, particularly RCs. Further studies on the in vivo functions of MCs will make the concept more clear. PMID:26793609

  17. Maxillary odontogenic myxoma: a diagnostic pitfall on aspiration cytology.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeta; Jain, Shyama; Gupta, Sunita

    2002-08-01

    A painless, slow-growing cheek swelling in a young male clinically considered a salivary gland mass was aspirated. Cytology smears were hypocellular. The striking feature was abundant myxoid material with a few monomorphic oval cells, interpreted as myxoid variant of pleomorphic adenoma. Subsequent CT scan was suggestive of a malignant tumor but biopsy confirmed it as myxoma. Myxoma of the jaw is a rare benign tumor that has a tendency for bone destruction, invasion into surrounding structures, and a relatively high recurrence rate. Maxillary myxoma is less frequent but behaves more aggressively than in the mandible, as it spreads through the maxillary sinus. Cytologically, it should be differentiated from other tumors showing predominant myxoid change. Awareness of potential diagnostic pitfalls and careful evaluation of clinical and radiological data is necessary to narrow the differential diagnosis.

  18. Recurrent Maxillary Odontogenic Myxoma Following Partial Maxillary Resection and Consecutive Osseous Reconstruction Including Tooth Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Reinhard E; Scheuer, Hanna A; Höltje, Wolf

    2016-06-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare tumour arising in the jaws. The tumour is purported to be odontogenic in origin due to the frequent localisation of the tumour inside the jaws in close relation to teeth. The aim of this report was to detail the course of a patient who developed OM of the maxilla, underwent adequate ablative surgery and reconstruction, including tooth transplantation to the original tumour site, and subsequently developed a local recurrence in close proximity to the teeth transplanted to the reconstructed maxilla 6 years after the first diagnosis. Once again, a partial maxillary resection was performed, with no reconstruction. The patient has been free from tumour recurrence for over 20 years. We discuss the current hypothesis on OM pathogenesis and the possible impact of actively dividing cells on tumour re-growth. PMID:27272841

  19. A case of orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst suspected to be a radicular cyst.

    PubMed

    Onuki, Mizuho; Saito, Atsushi; Hosokawa, Sohei; Ohnuki, Tomohiro; Hayakawa, Hiroki; Seta, Shuichi; Muramatsu, Takashi; Furusawa, Masahiro

    2009-02-01

    This report describes a case of orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst arising in the mandibular molar region of a 39-year-old man. Under the initial clinical diagnosis of radicular cyst, root canal treatment was performed on the mandibular right second molar. The treatment that continued for six months did not achieve healing. Subsequently surgical intervention was selected since the tooth fracture was found, and the prognosis was judged to be poor. After atraumatic tooth extraction, the apical cystic lesion was enucleated, and the tooth was replanted. A definite diagnosis of orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. The radiograph taken seven months after the operation showed an improvement in the radiolucent lesion. No clinical signs of tooth mobility, pain, and swelling were present. The tooth was then successfully retained with the final restoration. Careful follow-up is needed in order to detect any signs of recurrence.

  20. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth.

    PubMed

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-05-02

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period.

  1. Aggressive osseous commitment result by keratocyst odontogenic tumour: case report, radiographic and clinical standpoints

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Gerusa O.M.; Matta-Neto, Edgard; El Achkar, Vivian N. R.; Niccoli-Filho, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) previously known as odontogenic keratocyst was recently classified as a benign lesion characterized by an infiltrating pattern, local aggressiveness with the propensity to recurrence. It is thought to arise from the dental lamina. Pain is usually not associated with KCOT until swelling occurs, and it commonly affects the posterior mandible. Multiple KCOT are associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. This study reports an aggressive case of KCOT with destruction of the osseous tissue of the mandible, accentuated face asymmetry, dysphagia and dysphonia. It was managed with a defined protocol which entailed diagnosis, treatment with enucleation along with peripheral ostectomy and rehabilitation. A long-term follow-up schedule was provided to the patient to observe the recurrence behaviour of this cyst. In postoperative phase, no complication was noticed regarding wound healing and recurrence. PMID:24964453

  2. Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour with Extraosseal Spread: Evaluation of the Effect Carnoy's Solution.

    PubMed

    Levorová, Jitka; Machoň, Vladimír; Grill, Pavel; Hirjak, Dušan; Foltán, René

    2015-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumour is relatively rare benign tumour. It is characterized by its fast aggressive growth and high risk of recurrence. Treatment is always surgical: conservative (enucleation, marsupialization) or aggressive (enucleation followed by application of Carnoy's solution, cryotherapy; peripheral ostectomy or en block resection of the jaw). Authors analysed retrospectively 22 patients who fulfilled inclusion criteria, i.e. had odontogenic keratocystic tumour of mandible, wherein antero-posterior dimension was at least 30 mm, and the tumour penetrated into the surrounding soft tissues. All patients underwent tumour enucleation, in 11 patients Carnoy's solution was given into the bone cavity after enucleation. The recurrence rate in the evaluation at least 36 months after surgery was both patient groups the same: 45.4%. PMID:26654803

  3. Very Large Inflammatory Odontogenic Cyst with Origin on a Single Long Time Traumatized Lower Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Filipe; Andre, Saudade; Moreira, Andre; Carames, Joao

    2015-01-01

    One of the consequences of traumatic injuries is the chance of aseptic pulp necrosis to occur which in time may became infected and give origin to periapical pathosis. Although the apical granulomas and cysts are a common condition, there appearance as an extremely large radiolucent image is a rare finding. Differential diagnosis with other radiographic-like pathologies, such as keratocystic odontogenic tumour or unicystic ameloblastoma, is mandatory. The purpose of this paper is to report a very large radicular cyst caused by a single mandibular incisor traumatized long back, in a 60-year-old male. Medical and clinical histories were obtained, radiographic and cone beam CT examinations performed and an initial incisional biopsy was done. The final decision was to perform a surgical enucleation of a lesion, 51.4 mm in length. The enucleated tissue biopsy analysis was able to render the diagnosis as an inflammatory odontogenic cyst. A 2 year follow-up showed complete bone recovery. PMID:26393219

  4. A fatal case of descending necrotizing mediastinitis as a complication of odontogenic infection. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Bogumił; Wołek, Wojciech; Jednakiewicz, Mariusz; Nicpoń, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the case of a 26-year-old female patient in whom descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) developed as a complication of an odontogenic purulent infection of the mouth. Despite the efforts of a multidisciplinary treatment team, the patient died with symptoms of septic shock and multiple organ failure. According to the literature, and as confirmed by our own observations, successful treatment requires early tomographic diagnosis, radical surgery, combination antibiotic therapy, and intensive care. PMID:26336443

  5. Antibiotic prescription in the treatment of odontogenic infection by health professionals: A factor to consensus

    PubMed Central

    González-Martínez, Raquel; Cortell-Ballester, Isidoro; Herráez-Vilas, José M.; Arnau-de Bolós, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To observe the attitude of dentists and family doctors in prescribing antibiotics for the treatment of dental infections. Study Design: A poll was performed to determine the differences in the prescription of antibiotics for the treatment of odontogenic infection by dentists and family doctors of the primary care department of the Catalan Health Care Service. Results: A hundred polls were distributed among family doctors, and another 100 ones among primary care dentists assigned to the Catalan Health Care Service of the Generalitat de Catalunya. Of the total of questionnaires distributed, 63 were retuned and answered from dentists and 71 from family doctors. Eighty-one percent of dentists included in the opinion poll considered amoxicillin as the first antibiotic choice for the treatment of odontogenic infections, while 73.2% of family doctors preferred the combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. With regard to antibiotics of choice in patients allergic to penicillin, 67.7% of family doctors preferred macrolides (25.4% opted for clarithromycin, 25.4% for erythromycin and 16.9% for spiramycin). However, clindamycin was the antibiotic most frequently prescribed by dentists (66.7%), followed by erythromycin (28.6%). Conclusions: The results of this study show a large discrepancy in the criteria for the treatment of odontogenic infections on the part of leading professionals involved in the management of this condition. Although the most common prescription involved beta-lactam antibiotics in both groups, several significant differences have been detected with regard to the second antibiotic choice. Key words:Odontogenic infections, antibiotics, antimicrobials. PMID:22143715

  6. Odontogenic Pain as the Principal Presentation of Vertebral Artery Pseudoaneurysm; a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zenteno, Marco; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Lee, Angel; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Dissection of the vertebral artery is an important but rare cause of cerebrovascular accidents. Here we report a 48-year-old man with toothache since 4 days before who presented to the emergency department with neck pain and final diagnosis of dissecting right vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm. To our knowledge, this maybe the first report of odontogenic pain as the first manifestation of vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm in the literatures. PMID:26495399

  7. Waking-up the sleeping beauty: recovery of the ancestral bird odontogenic program.

    PubMed

    Mitsiadis, Thimios A; Caton, Javier; Cobourne, Martyn

    2006-05-15

    Recent advances in molecular and developmental genetics have provided tools for understanding evolutionary changes in the nature of the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions regulating the patterned outgrowth of the tooth primordia. Tissue recombination experiments in mice have identified the oral epithelium as providing the instructive information for the initiation of tooth development. Teeth were lost in birds for more than 80 million years ago, but despite their disappearance, a number of gene products and the requisite tissue interactions needed for tooth formation are found in the avian oral region. It is believed that the avian ectomesenchyme has lost the odontogenic capacity, whilst the oral epithelium retains the molecular signaling required to induce odontogenesis. In order to investigate the odontogenic capacity of the neural crest-derived mesenchyme and its potential activation of the avian oral epithelium, we have realized mouse neural tube transplantations to chick embryos to replace the neural crest cells of chick with those of mouse. Teeth are formed in the mouse/chick chimeras, indicating that timing is critical for the acquisition of the odontogenic potential by the epithelium and, furthermore, suggesting that odontogenesis is initially directed by species-specific mesenchymal signals interplaying with common epithelial signals.

  8. Nanofibrous spongy microspheres enhance odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Rong; Zhang, Zhanpeng; Jin, Xiaobing; Hu, Jiang; Gupte, Melanie J; Ni, Longxing; Ma, Peter X

    2015-09-16

    Dentin regeneration is challenging due to its complicated anatomical structure and the shortage of odontoblasts. In this study, a novel injectable cell carrier, nanofibrous spongy microspheres (NF-SMS), is developed for dentin regeneration. Biodegradable and biocompatible poly(l-lactic acid)-block-poly(l-lysine) are synthesized and fabricated into NF-SMS using self-assembly and thermally induced phase separation techniques. It is hypothesized that NF-SMS with interconnected pores and nanofibers can enhance the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs), compared to nanofibrous microspheres (NF-MS) without pore structure and conventional solid microspheres (S-MS) with neither nanofibers nor pore structure. During the first 9 d in culture, hDPSCs proliferate significantly faster on NF-SMS than on NF-MS or S-MS (p < 0.05). Following in vitro odontogenic induction, all the examined odontogenic genes (alkaline phosphatase content, osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, collagen 1, dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP)), calcium content, and DSPP protein content are found significantly higher in the NF-SMS group than in the control groups. Furthermore, 6 weeks after subcutaneous injection of hDPSCs and microspheres into nude mice, histological analysis shows that NF-SMS support superior dentin-like tissue formation compared to NF-MS or S-MS. Taken together, NF-SMS have great potential as an injectable cell carrier for dentin regeneration.

  9. Differences in collagen fibres in the capsule walls of parakeratinized and orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J-Y; Dong, Q; Li, T-J

    2011-11-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of odontogenic lesions. Keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) is a benign cystic neoplasm with a characteristic parakeratinized epithelial lining, which differs histologically and behaviourally from the so-called orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC). The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in collagen fibres within the fibrous tissue walls of KCOT and OOC. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 15 cases of KCOT and 15 cases of OOC were collected. Paraffin sections were stained with picrosirius red and observed under a standard light microscope using optical polarization. Unicystic ameloblastoma (UA, 15 cases) and subcutaneous epidermoid cysts (EC, 15 cases) were included in the study for comparative purposes. Significant difference was detected between the polarization colours in the fibrous tissue walls of KCOT and OOC (P<0.05), whilst no significant differences were found between KCOT and UA and between OOC and EC (P>0.05). The stromal collagen fibres of KCOT were different from those of OOC, but similar to those of UA, which suggests that the stroma of KOCT may play an important role in determining the neoplastic behaviour of the lesion through epithelial-mesenchymal interaction.

  10. Nanofibrous spongy microspheres enhance odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Rong; Zhang, Zhanpeng; Jin, Xiaobing; Hu, Jiang; Gupte, Melanie J; Ni, Longxing; Ma, Peter X

    2015-09-16

    Dentin regeneration is challenging due to its complicated anatomical structure and the shortage of odontoblasts. In this study, a novel injectable cell carrier, nanofibrous spongy microspheres (NF-SMS), is developed for dentin regeneration. Biodegradable and biocompatible poly(l-lactic acid)-block-poly(l-lysine) are synthesized and fabricated into NF-SMS using self-assembly and thermally induced phase separation techniques. It is hypothesized that NF-SMS with interconnected pores and nanofibers can enhance the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs), compared to nanofibrous microspheres (NF-MS) without pore structure and conventional solid microspheres (S-MS) with neither nanofibers nor pore structure. During the first 9 d in culture, hDPSCs proliferate significantly faster on NF-SMS than on NF-MS or S-MS (p < 0.05). Following in vitro odontogenic induction, all the examined odontogenic genes (alkaline phosphatase content, osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, collagen 1, dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP)), calcium content, and DSPP protein content are found significantly higher in the NF-SMS group than in the control groups. Furthermore, 6 weeks after subcutaneous injection of hDPSCs and microspheres into nude mice, histological analysis shows that NF-SMS support superior dentin-like tissue formation compared to NF-MS or S-MS. Taken together, NF-SMS have great potential as an injectable cell carrier for dentin regeneration. PMID:26138254

  11. TET1 knockdown inhibits the odontogenic differentiation potential of human dental pulp cells

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Li-Jia; Yi, Bai-Cheng; Li, Qi-Meng; Xu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) possess the capacity to differentiate into odontoblast-like cells and generate reparative dentin in response to exogenous stimuli or injury. Ten–eleven translocation 1 (TET1) is a novel DNA methyldioxygenase that plays an important role in the promotion of DNA demethylation and transcriptional regulation in several cell lines. However, the role of TET1 in the biological functions of hDPCs is unknown. To investigate the effect of TET1 on the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation potential of hDPCs, a recombinant shRNA lentiviral vector was used to knock down TET1 expression in hDPCs. Following TET1 knockdown, TET1 was significantly downregulated at both the mRNA and protein levels. Proliferation of the hDPCs was suppressed in the TET1 knockdown groups. Alkaline phosphatase activity, the formation of mineralized nodules, and the expression levels of DSPP and DMP1 were all reduced in the TET1-knockdown hDPCs undergoing odontogenic differentiation. Based on these results, we concluded that TET1 knockdown can prevent the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs, which suggests that TET1 may play an important role in dental pulp repair and regeneration. PMID:27357322

  12. TET1 knockdown inhibits the odontogenic differentiation potential of human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Rao, Li-Jia; Yi, Bai-Cheng; Li, Qi-Meng; Xu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) possess the capacity to differentiate into odontoblast-like cells and generate reparative dentin in response to exogenous stimuli or injury. Ten-eleven translocation 1 (TET1) is a novel DNA methyldioxygenase that plays an important role in the promotion of DNA demethylation and transcriptional regulation in several cell lines. However, the role of TET1 in the biological functions of hDPCs is unknown. To investigate the effect of TET1 on the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation potential of hDPCs, a recombinant shRNA lentiviral vector was used to knock down TET1 expression in hDPCs. Following TET1 knockdown, TET1 was significantly downregulated at both the mRNA and protein levels. Proliferation of the hDPCs was suppressed in the TET1 knockdown groups. Alkaline phosphatase activity, the formation of mineralized nodules, and the expression levels of DSPP and DMP1 were all reduced in the TET1-knockdown hDPCs undergoing odontogenic differentiation. Based on these results, we concluded that TET1 knockdown can prevent the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs, which suggests that TET1 may play an important role in dental pulp repair and regeneration. PMID:27357322

  13. Waking-up the sleeping beauty: recovery of the ancestral bird odontogenic program.

    PubMed

    Mitsiadis, Thimios A; Caton, Javier; Cobourne, Martyn

    2006-05-15

    Recent advances in molecular and developmental genetics have provided tools for understanding evolutionary changes in the nature of the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions regulating the patterned outgrowth of the tooth primordia. Tissue recombination experiments in mice have identified the oral epithelium as providing the instructive information for the initiation of tooth development. Teeth were lost in birds for more than 80 million years ago, but despite their disappearance, a number of gene products and the requisite tissue interactions needed for tooth formation are found in the avian oral region. It is believed that the avian ectomesenchyme has lost the odontogenic capacity, whilst the oral epithelium retains the molecular signaling required to induce odontogenesis. In order to investigate the odontogenic capacity of the neural crest-derived mesenchyme and its potential activation of the avian oral epithelium, we have realized mouse neural tube transplantations to chick embryos to replace the neural crest cells of chick with those of mouse. Teeth are formed in the mouse/chick chimeras, indicating that timing is critical for the acquisition of the odontogenic potential by the epithelium and, furthermore, suggesting that odontogenesis is initially directed by species-specific mesenchymal signals interplaying with common epithelial signals. PMID:16463377

  14. Boron enhances odontogenic and osteogenic differentiation of human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Taşlı, Pakize Neslihan; Doğan, Ayşegül; Demirci, Selami; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2013-06-01

    Stem cell technology has been a great hope for the treatment of many common problems such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, cancer, and tissue regeneration. Therefore, the main challenge in hard tissue engineering is to make a successful combination of stem cells and efficient inductors in the concept of stem cell differentiation into odontogenic and osteogenic cell types. Although some boron derivatives have been reported to promote bone and teeth growth in vivo, the molecular mechanism of bone formation has not been elucidated yet. Different concentrations of sodium pentaborate pentahydrate (NaB) were prepared for the analysis of cell toxicity and differentiation evaluations. The odontogenic, osteogenic differentiation and biomineralization of human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs) were evaluated by analyzing the mRNA expression levels, odontogenic and osteogenic protein expressions, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralization, and calcium deposits. The NaB-treated group displayed the highest ALP activity and expression of osteo- and odontogenic-related genes and proteins compared to the other groups and baseline. In the current study, increased in vitro odontogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacity of hTGSCs by NaB application has been shown for the first time. The study offers considerable promise for the development of new scaffold systems combined with NaB in both functional bone and tooth tissue engineering.

  15. Effect of lactoferrin on odontogenic differentiation of stem cells derived from human 3rd molar tooth germ.

    PubMed

    Taşlı, Pakize Neslihan; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2014-11-01

    Stem cell technology has been a great hope for the treatment of many common tissue regeneration-related diseases. Therefore, the main challenge in hard tissue engineering is to make a successful combination of stem cells and efficient inductors such as biomaterials or growth factors, in the concept of stem cell conversion into odontogenic cell. Even though lactoferrin has been reported to promote bone growth in vivo, the molecular mechanism of teeth formation has not been elucidated yet. Different concentrations of lactoferrin were prepared for the analysis of cell toxicity and differentiation evaluations. The odontogenic differentiation of human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs) was assessed by gene expression analysis, determination of protein levels in odontogenic differentiation-related protein, measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralization, and calcium deposit levels. Lactoferrin-treated group showed the highest ALP activity as opposed to the other groups which were untreated. In addition, the gene expression levels as well as the protein levels of odontogenic factors were found to be high in compared to the control groups. In the current study, it is shown for the first time that there is a significant increase in odontogenic differentiation capacity in hTGSCs when lactoferrin is applied in vitro. The study offers a considerable promise for the development of pulp regeneration by using stem cell technology combined with lactoferrin in functional tooth tissue engineering.

  16. Immunohistochemical study of p53 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in odontogenic keratocyst and periapical cyst

    PubMed Central

    Sajeevan, Thara Purath; Saraswathi, Tillai Rajasekaran; Ranganathan, Kannan; Joshua, Elizabeth; Rao, Uma Devi K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: p53 protein is a product of p53 gene, which is now classified as a tumor suppressor gene. The gene is a frequent target for mutation, being seen as a common step in the pathogenesis of many human cancers. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an auxiliary protein of DNA polymerase delta and plays a critical role in initiation of cell proliferation. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess and compare the expression of p53 and PCNA in lining epithelium of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) and periapical cyst (PA). Materials and Methods: A total of 20 cases comprising 10 OKC and 10 PA were included in retrospective study. Three paraffin section of 4 μm were cut, one was used for routine hematoxylin and eosin stain, while the other two were used for immunohistochemistry. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square test. Results: The level of staining and intensity were assessed in all these cases. OKC showed PCNA expression in all cases (100%), whereas in perapical cyst only 60% of cases exhibited PCNA staining. (1) OKC showed p53 expression in 6 cases (60%) whereas in PA only 10% of the cases exhibited p53 staining. Chi-square test showed PCNA staining intensity was more significant than p53 in OKC. (2) The staining intensity of PA using p53, PCNA revealed that PCNA stating intensity was more significant than p53. Conclusion: OKC shows significant proliferative activity than PA using PCNA and p53. PCNA staining was more intense when compared with p53 in both OKC and PA. PMID:25210385

  17. Occurrence of odontogenic infections in patients treated in a postgraduation program on maxillofacial surgery and traumatology.

    PubMed

    Saito, Celia Tomiko Matida Hamata; Gulinelli, Jessica Lemos; Marão, Heloisa Fonseca; Garcia, Idelmo Rangel; Filho, Osvaldo Magro; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Poi, Wilson Roberto; Panzarini, Sônia Regina

    2011-09-01

    This study assessed the occurrence and characteristics of oral and maxillofacial infections in patients treated at a Brazilian oral and maxillofacial emergency service during a 7-year period. The clinical files of all patients treated at the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Traumatology Service of the Araçatuba Dental School, São Paulo State University, Brazil, between 2002 and 2008 were reviewed. From a population of 3645 patients treated in this period, the study sample consisted of 93 subjects who presented odontogenic infections. Data referring to the patients' sex, age, medical history, and the etiology, diagnosis, complications, drug therapy/treatment, and evolution of the pathologic diseases were collected and analyzed using the Epi Info 2000 software. Of these patients, 54 were men (58.1%) and 39 were women (41.9%). Most patients were in the 31- to 40-year-old (20.7%) and 21- to 30-year-old (19.6%) age groups. The most frequent etiology was pulp necrosis due to caries (80.6%). Regarding the treatment, antibiotics were administered to all patients, surgical drainage was done in 75 patients (82.4%), and 44 patients (47.3%) needed hospital admission. First-generation cephalosporin alone or combined with other drugs was the most prescribed antibiotic (n = 26) followed by penicillin G (n = 25). Most patients (n = 85, 91.4%) responded well to the treatment. Five cases had complications: 3 patients needed hospital readmission, 1 case progressed to descending mediastinitis, and 1 patient died. Odontogenic infections can be life-threatening and require hospital admission for adequate patient care. Complications from odontogenic infections, although rare, may be fatal if not properly managed.

  18. Odontogenic Myxoma of the Maxilla: A Report of Unusual Pediatric Case

    PubMed Central

    Mohan Das, Usha; Manjunath, V; Manoj Bavle, Radhika; Sudhakar, M; Kumar, Nanda; Srinath, Srinath

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare and locally benign neoplasm of high aggressive behavior found exclusively in the jaws. OM commonly occurs in the second and third decade, its quite rare to find in maxilla that to invading the maxillary sinus completely. The lesion often grows without symptoms and presents as a painless swelling. The radiographic features are variable, and the diagnosis is therefore not easy. This article presents a case of OM of maxilla in a 13-year-old boy, which was previously diagnosed as fibrosseous lesion with the help of CT.

  19. [Koletex-M absorbent paper use in acute festering odontogenic periostitis treatment].

    PubMed

    Fedotov, S N; Sukhanov, A E; Krylov, I A

    2009-01-01

    150 patients with acute festering odontogenic periostitis were under observation. In 75 of them Koletex-M absorbent paper was used as draining material containing as active components metronidazole, dimexide and sodium alginate. In the control group of patients traditional schemes of treatment were used. Treatment process efficacy was estimated by microbiological and cytological studies. It was found that Koletex-M absorbent paper use reduced postoperative wound microbe semination. In 3 days the cells of regenerative series were found that led to speedy wound healing and reduction of temporary disability terms.

  20. [Peculiarities of face regional hemodynamics in treatment of acute purulent jaw odontogenic periostitis].

    PubMed

    Fedotov, S N; Sukhanov, A E; Konkina, M A; Iakovlev, V E

    2010-01-01

    53 patients were under observation with acute purulent jaw odontogenic periostitis. In 27 out of them after operation as drainage material strips of napkin were used, containing as the active components metronidazol, dimexide and sodium alginate. Curative process efficacy evaluation was done according to the data of hemodynamic study (determination of the artery's diameter, maximal systolic speed and index of circulatory resistance) of the magistral face arteries. It was established that in the group of patients with rational treatment blood circulation in face arterial vessels was restored most actively than in the control group with the use of traditional treatment scheme.

  1. Report of a Rare Case of an Odontogenic Myxoma of the Maxilla and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, SM; Gupta, AA; Swetha, P; Moon, NJ; Singh, S; Singh, A

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a mesenchymal tissue benign neoplasia, being relatively rare which is almost exclusively seen in tooth-bearing areas. OM commonly occurs in the 2nd and 3rd decade and the mandible is involved more commonly than the maxilla. The lesion often grows without symptoms and presents as a painless swelling. Radiographically, the myxoma appears as a unilocular or multilocular radiolucency. This article presents a rare case of OM occurring in the maxilla of a 28-year-old female patient with a brief review of the literature. PMID:25031907

  2. Desmosomes: A light microscopic and ultrastructural analysis of desmosomes in odontogenic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Pratima; Wadhwan, Vijay; Chaudhary, Minal S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Desmosomes together with adherens junctions represent the major adhesive cell–cell junctions of epithelial cells. Any damage to these junctions leads to loss of structural balance. Aim: The present study was designed to analyze the desmosomal junctions in different odontogenic cysts and compare them with their corresponding hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)   stained sections. Materials and Methods: Ten cases each of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cysts (DCs), radicular cysts (RCs) and normal mucosa were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the sections was then carried out of all the sections. The area of interest on H and E stained section was marked and this marking was later superimposed onto the corresponding unstained sections and were subjected to SEM analysis. Results and Observations: OKC at ×1000 magnification showed many prominent desmosomes. However, an increase in the intercellular space was also noted. SEM analysis demonstrated similar findings with the presence of many desmosomes, though they were seen to be damaged and fragile. H and E stained DC under oil immersion did not show any prominent desmosomes. SEM analysis of the same confirmed the observation and very minimal number were seen with a very condense arrangement of the epithelial cells. RC at ×1000 magnification revealed plenty of desmosomes, which were again confirmed by SEM. Conclusion: The number and quality of desmosomal junctions in all the cysts has a role in the clinical behavior of the cyst. PMID:25948985

  3. Odontogenic effects of a fast-setting calcium-silicate cement containing zirconium oxide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-A; Yang, Yeon-Mi; Kwon, Young-Sun; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Yu, Mi-Kyung; Min, Kyung-San

    2015-01-01

    A fast-setting calcium-silicate cement (Endocem) was introduced in the field of dentistry for use in vital pulp therapy. Similar to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), it contains bismuth oxide to provide radiopacity. Recently, another product, EndocemZr, which contains zirconium oxide (ZrO2) as a radiopacifier, was developed by the same company. In this study, the biological/odontogenic effects of EndocemZr were investigated in human primary dental pulp cells (hpDPCs) in vitro and on capped rat teeth in vivo. The biocompatibility of EndocemZr was similar to that of ProRoot and Endocem on the basis of cell viability tests and cell morphological analysis. The mineralization nodule formation, expression of odontogenic-related markers, and reparative dentin formation of EndocemZr group was similar to those of other material groups. Our results suggest that EndocemZr has the potential to be used as an effective material for vital pulp therapy, similar to ProRoot and Endocem.

  4. Diagnosis and Treatment of Odontogenic Cutaneous Sinus Tracts in an 11-Year-Old Boy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Liang, Yun; Xiong, Huacui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tracts (OCSTs) are generally primarily misdiagnosed and inappropriately treated by virtue of their rarity and the absence of dental symptoms. Accurate diagnosis and treatment and the elimination of the source of infection can reduce the incidence of complications and relieve the pain of the patient. In this case report, we present the case of an 11-year-old patient with an apparent abscess but an unobvious draining sinus tract in his left cheek. Intraorally, a glass-ionomer-cement filling on the occlusal surface of the left mandibular first molar (tooth 36) was noted. Radiographic examination revealed a radiopaque mass inside the crown and pulp chamber and an irregular, radiolucent periapical lesion surrounding the distal root apex. He was diagnosed with an OCTS secondary to a periapical abscess of tooth 36. Precise root canal therapy (RCT) and chronic granuloma debridement was performed; 6 months later, the abscess and sinus had healed completely, and the periapical lesion had resolved. Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tracts are uncommon in the clinic. This case report reminds us of the significance of OCSTs and provides some implications for their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27196471

  5. Metallothionein immunoexpression in non-syndromic and syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumour

    PubMed Central

    Johann, Aline-Cristina-Batista-Rodrigues; Caliari, Marcelo-Vidigal; Gomez, Ricardo-Santiago; Aguiar, Maria-Cássia-Ferreira; Mesquita, Ricardo-Alves

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare the metallothionein (MT) immunoexpression in non-syndromic and syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KOT), to correlate MT with cellular proliferation, and to evaluate the influence of inflammation in MT. Material and Methods Fourteen cases of KOT were submitted to immunohistochemistry for MT and Ki-67 analysis. The lesions were grouped according to their grade of inflammation, and statistical analysis was performed. Results MT was higher in non-syndromic KOT than in syndromic KOT (p<0.05). No statistical difference in Ki-67 could be identified; however, an inverse correlation was observed between MT and Ki-67 in both lesions. When analysing inflammation, non-syndromic KOT showed no differences in either MT or Ki-67. Conclusions The MT immunophenotype of syndromic KOT was different from non-syndromic KOT. MT might not be involved in the proliferation control of both KOT. MT and Ki-67 immunoexpressions proved to be unaffected by inflammation in non-syndromic KOT. Key words: Odontogenic tumours, basal cell nevus syndrome, metallothionein, Ki-67 Antigen, immunohistoche-mistry. PMID:25858080

  6. Non-Syndromic Familial Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour: A Rare Case Report in Japanese Identical Twins.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yasuyuki; Maruoka, Yutaka; Yamaji, Iena; Kawai, Shigeo

    2016-08-01

    Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour (KCOT) is unicystic or multicystic intraosseous benign tumour of odontogenic origin that recurs due to locally destructive behaviour. KCOTs are usually the first manifestation of Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS), an autosomal dominant disorder also known as Gorlin's syndrome and they are most frequently observed familial symptom regardless of patients' nationality. In addition, the recurrence rate and multiplicity of KCOTs is relatively high as compared to that of other sporadic carcinomas. KCOT has been considered as a non-hereditary lesion and its familial onset is an extremely rare event in non-NBCCS cases. Here, we describe previously unreported non-syndromic multiple KCOT cases in identical twins in a Japanese family. The subjects were female Japanese identical twins who were 26 and 27 years old, respectively, at the time of diagnosis for KCOT. They had no major or minor features of NBCCS other than KCOT. Although there were lesions that were likely to be dentigerous cysts based on radiographic findings, one of them was KCOT. This case report highlights the importance of precise diagnosis, choice of surgical method and careful observation for multiplicity or familial onset in sporadic KCOT cases without NBCCS. PMID:27656582

  7. Human odontogenic epithelial cells derived from epithelial rests of Malassez possess stem cell properties.

    PubMed

    Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Yoshida, Maki; Takayama, Yukihiro; Kujiraoka, Satoko; Qi, Guangying; Kitagawa, Masae; Kondo, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Akiko; Arakaki, Rieko; Miyauchi, Mutsumi; Ogawa, Ikuko; Abiko, Yoshihiro; Nikawa, Hiroki; Murakami, Shinya; Takata, Takashi; Ishimaru, Naozumi; Kudo, Yasusei

    2016-10-01

    Epithelial cell rests of Malassez (ERM) are quiescent epithelial remnants of the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) that are involved in the formation of tooth roots. ERM cells are unique epithelial cells that remain in periodontal tissues throughout adult life. They have a functional role in the repair/regeneration of cement or enamel. Here, we isolated odontogenic epithelial cells from ERM in the periodontal ligament, and the cells were spontaneously immortalized. Immortalized odontogenic epithelial (iOdE) cells had the ability to form spheroids and expressed stem cell-related genes. Interestingly, iOdE cells underwent osteogenic differentiation, as demonstrated by the mineralization activity in vitro in mineralization-inducing media and formation of calcification foci in iOdE cells transplanted into immunocompromised mice. These findings suggest that a cell population with features similar to stem cells exists in ERM and that this cell population has a differentiation capacity for producing calcifications in a particular microenvironment. In summary, iOdE cells will provide a convenient cell source for tissue engineering and experimental models to investigate tooth growth, differentiation, and tumorigenesis. PMID:27479086

  8. Ventral rhinotomy in a pet rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) with an odontogenic abscess and sub-obstructive rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tamara; Beaufrère, Hugues; Brisson, Brigitte; Laniesse, Delphine; Zur Linden, Alex

    2016-08-01

    A rabbit was presented for severe dyspnea and was diagnosed with an odontogenic abscess obstructing the rostral nasopharynx using CT scan and oral endoscopy. The offending tooth was extracted intraorally, but due to persistent dyspnea, an endoscopic-guided ventral rhinotomy was performed. The dyspnea subsequently resolved, but the rabbit died 5 weeks later from a seemingly unrelated cause. PMID:27493289

  9. Cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis (sans thrombosis) secondary to odontogenic fascial space infection: an uncommon complication with unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Sundararaman; Jain, Sachin Kumar; Dal Singh, Vankudoth

    2015-03-01

    We discuss an unusual presentation of non-thrombotic cavernous sinus involvement in a patient who was treated for odontogenic fascial space infection arising from a maxillary molar. The highlights were ipsilateral abducens sparing, contralateral abducens involvement and lack of significant orbital congestion. The patient recovered with conservative treatment. PMID:25838693

  10. Changes in admission rates for spreading odontogenic infection resulting from changes in government policy about the dental schedule and remunerations.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Richard; Bhandari, Rishi; Bridle, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The government changed the system of payment to general dental practitioners on 1 April 2005 from a fee/item to a banding system. The figures collected have shown that there has been a 62% increase in the number of patients who require admission for surgical treatment of spreading odontogenic infections compared with the 3-year period before this date.

  11. Moxifloxacin versus Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone in the management of odontogenic maxillofacial infectious processes: A preliminary, intrahospital, controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Arámbula, Hansel; Hidalgo-Hurtado, Antonio; Rodríguez-Flores, Rosaura; González-Amaro, Ana-María; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the days of hospitalization length between patients treated with Moxifloxacin with that of patients treated with a Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone combination and additionally, to isolate and identify the oral pathogens involved in orofacial odontogenic infections. Material and Methods A pilot-controlled-clinical-trial was carried out on hospitalized patients with cervicofacial odontogenic abscesses or cellulitis, who were randomly asigned to two study groups: 1) patients who received Moxifloxacin, and 2) patients receiving Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone combination. Infiltrate samples were collected through transdermic or transmucosal punction and later cultured on a media specific for aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Mean hospitalization duration in days until hospital discharge and susceptibility assessment in rates were established. Results Mean hospitalization time in days of patients treated with Moxifloxacin was 7.0 ± 1.6 days, while in the Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone group, this was 8.4 ± 1.8 days, although significant difference could not be demonstrated (p=0.074). A total of 43 strains were isolated, all of these Gram-positive. These strains appeared to be highly sensitive to Moxifloxacin (97.5%) and Ceftriaxone (92.5%). Conclusions Moxifloxacin and Ceftriaxone appear to be potential convenient and rational alternatives to traditional antibiotics, for treating severe odontogenic infections, in conjunction with surgical extraoral incision, debridement, and drainage. Key words:Orofacial odontogenic infections, antimicrobial susceptibility, antimicrobial resistance. PMID:26644841

  12. Pathological changes in the maxillary sinus mucosae of patients with recurrent odontogenic maxillary sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Li, Hua; E, Ling-Ling; Li, Chuan-Jie; Ding, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the structural and functional changes of maxillary sinus mucosae of patients with odontogenic maxillary sinusitis, and to improve the therapeutic effects. Methods: Ten mucosal biopsy samples collected during the surgeries of patients with recurrent odontogenic maxillary sinusitis were selected as Group A. Another ten mucosal biopsy sample were collected during retention cyst-removing surgeries and referred to as Group B. The mucosae were put in 10% neutral formalin solution for 1 day and prepared into 5-7 µm thick paraffin sections which were subjected to hematoxylin-eosin staining. The reactions included: (1) Reaction with T-lymphocyte (CD-3); (2) reaction with T-helper cell (CD-4); (3) reaction with T-suppressing cell (CD-8); (4) reaction with B-lymphocyte (CD-20). Polymeric horseradish peroxidase visualized detection system was used. The contents of CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD20 in the stained cells of the maxillary sinus mucosal layer were calculated. The responses of receptors to muramidase were classified as mild, moderate and strong. All data were analyzed by Statistica 6.0 package for Windows based on Mann-Whitney non-parametric standards. Results: The epithelial tissues in the maxillary sinus mucosa of Group B were covered with multiple rows of cilia. The epithelial cells of Group A suffered from degeneration, shrinkage and desquamation. Different cells were distributed in the autologous mucosal layer, of which macrophages, fibroblasts, lymphocytes and neutrophils were dominant. The average contents of macrophages and lymphocytes accounted for 42.8%. Lymphocyte subset analysis showed that the number of CD3 cells exceeded that of CD20 ones and there were more CD4+ cells than CD8+ ones. T-helper and T-suppressing cells were distributed remarkably differently. CD8+ cells were mainly located inside and under the epithelium, while CD4+ cells were scattered in the autologous matrix. Conclusion: For patients with recurrent odontogenic maxillary

  13. [Cellular and tissue reactions of the mucous membrane of the maxillary sinus in the patients presenting with odontogenic aspergillous maxillary sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Baĭdik, O D; Sysoliatin, P G; Logvinov, S V

    2012-01-01

    The results of this morphological study of the mucous membrane of the maxillary sinuses in the patients presenting with the non-invasive fungal form of odontogenic sinusitis revealed the signs of granulematous inflammation. Epithelium underwent metaplasia into the single-row cubic or prismatic layer. The invasive form of fungal odontogenic sinusitis was characterized by allergic inflammation with intensive infiltration of maxillary sinus mucosa by antigen-representing and effector cells.

  14. Clinical appearance of orofacial infections of odontogenic origin in relation to microbiological findings.

    PubMed Central

    Heimdahl, A; von Konow, L; Satoh, T; Nord, C E

    1985-01-01

    Fifty-eight patients with acute orofacial infections of odontogenic origin were classified into two groups with respect to the severity of infection. A total of 174 anaerobic and 22 aerobic bacterial strains were isolated. Anaerobic gram-negative rods were isolated more frequently from the patients with severe infections than from the patients with infections judged as mild (P less than 0.05). The occurrence of Fusobacterium nucleatum especially appeared to be associated with the severity of the infections (P less than 0.05). Penicillin resistance among the anaerobes was rarely found, while resistance to erythromycin was a common finding. All aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were susceptible to clindamycin, and all obligate anaerobic bacteria were susceptible to nitroimidazoles. PMID:4031041

  15. Calcifying odontogenic cyst with luminal and mural component (Type 1c)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bhushan; Koshy, George; Kapoor, Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) was first described and classified by Gorlin et al. It is defined as a cystic lesion in which the epithelial lining shows a well defined basal layer of columnar cells, an overlying layer that often resemble stellate reticulum and masses of ghost cells that may be in the epithelial cystic lining or in the fibrous capsule. The lesion generally occurs in the region anterior to maxillary and mandibular molars and either intraosseous or extraosseus. This entity might present as a cystic or solid lesion. Praetorius et al. classified COC into 2 main entities namely a cyst (Type 1) and a neoplasm (Type 2). The present case report exhibit a cystic lesion with both luminal and mural component. PMID:27433053

  16. Calcifying odontogenic cyst associated with compound odontoma: a study on undemineralized material.

    PubMed

    Piattelli, A; Scarano, A; Piattelli, M

    1995-01-01

    In a minority of cases of calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) it is possible to observe the formation of dental hard tissues in the cyst wall. The use of undemineralized sections has allowed an evaluation of the mineralized tissues normally lost with the use of demineralizing agents. All the dental hard tissues presented a high degree of morpho- and histodifferentiation. The histochemical staining for calcium salts (von Kossa) showed the presence of areas of low mineralization in the portion of the lesion, where the tissue maturation was not complete. In conclusion the appearance of the dental hard tissues in this case of compound odontoma arising in the cyst wall of a COC is similar to that already described in compound odontoma not associated with COC.

  17. Calcifying odontogenic cyst with luminal and mural component (Type 1c).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhushan; Koshy, George; Kapoor, Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) was first described and classified by Gorlin et al. It is defined as a cystic lesion in which the epithelial lining shows a well defined basal layer of columnar cells, an overlying layer that often resemble stellate reticulum and masses of ghost cells that may be in the epithelial cystic lining or in the fibrous capsule. The lesion generally occurs in the region anterior to maxillary and mandibular molars and either intraosseous or extraosseus. This entity might present as a cystic or solid lesion. Praetorius et al. classified COC into 2 main entities namely a cyst (Type 1) and a neoplasm (Type 2). The present case report exhibit a cystic lesion with both luminal and mural component.

  18. Odontogenic stimulation of human dental pulp cells with bioactive nanocomposite fiber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga-Hyun; Park, Yong-Duk; Lee, So-Youn; El-Fiqi, Ahmed; Kim, Jung-Ju; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a composite nanofibrous matrix made of biopolymer blend polycaprolactone-gelatin (BP) and mesoporous bioactive glass nanoparticles (BGNs) on the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). BGN-BP nanomatrices, with BGN content of up to 20 wt%, were produced via electrospinning. The differentiation of the HDPCs was evaluated by using an ALP activity assay, calcified nodule formation, and mRNA expression for markers. Integrin and its underlying signal pathways were assessed via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Although cell growth and attachment on the BGN-BP nanomatrix was similar to that on BP, ALP activity, mineralized nodule formation, and mRNA, expressions involving ALP, osteocalcin, osteopontin, dentin sialophosphoprotein, and dentin matrix protein-1 were greater on BGN-BP. BGN-BP upregulated the key adhesion receptors (integrin components α1, α2, α5, and β1) and activated integrin downstream pathways, such as phosphorylated-focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK), and p-paxillin. In addition, BGN-BP activated BMP receptors, BMP-2 mRNA, and p-Smad 1/5/8, and such activation was blocked by the BMP antagonist, noggin. Furthermore, BGN-BP induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, protein kinase 38, and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinases and activated expression of the transcription factors Runx2 and Osterix in HDPCs. Collectively, the results indicated for the first time that a BGN-BP composite nanomatrix promoted odontogenic differentiation of HDPCs through the integrin, BMP, and mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling pathway. Moreover, the nanomatrix is considered to be promising scaffolds for the culture of HDPCs and dental tissue engineering.

  19. In vitro osteogenic and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells seeded on carboxymethyl cellulose-hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Teti, Gabriella; Salvatore, Viviana; Focaroli, Stefano; Durante, Sandra; Mazzotti, Antonio; Dicarlo, Manuela; Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica; Orsini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells from human dental pulp have been considered as an alternative source of adult stem cells in tissue engineering because of their potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages. Recently, polysaccharide based hydrogels have become especially attractive as matrices for the repair and regeneration of a wide variety of tissues and organs. The incorporation of inorganic minerals as hydroxyapatite nanoparticles can modulate the performance of the scaffolds with potential applications in tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to verify the osteogenic and odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) cultured on a carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. Human DPSCs were seeded on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel and on carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogel for 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, and 21 days. Cell viability assay and ultramorphological analysis were carried out to evaluate biocompatibility and cell adhesion. Real Time PCR was carried out to demonstrate the expression of osteogenic and odontogenic markers. Results showed a good adhesion and viability in cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel, while a low adhesion and viability was observed in cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogel. Real Time PCR data demonstrated a temporal up-regulation of osteogenic and odontogenic markers in dental pulp stem cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. In conclusion, our in vitro data confirms the ability of DPSCs to differentiate toward osteogenic and odontogenic lineages in presence of a carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. Taken together, our results provide evidence that DPSCs and carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel could be considered promising candidates for dental pulp complex and periodontal tissue engineering. PMID:26578970

  20. Jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth: A radiographic diagnostic guide.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Baharvand, Maryam

    2016-09-01

    This review article aimed to introduce a category of jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth. General search engines and specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, MedLine Plus, Science Direct, Scopus, and well-recognized textbooks were used to find relevant studies using keywords such as "jaw lesion", "jaw disease", "impacted tooth", and "unerupted tooth". More than 250 articles were found, of which approximately 80 were broadly relevant to the topic. We ultimately included 47 articles that were closely related to the topic of interest. When the relevant data were compiled, the following 10 lesions were identified as having a relationship with impacted tooth: dentigerous cysts, calcifying odontogenic cysts, unicystic (mural) ameloblastomas, ameloblastomas, ameloblastic fibromas, adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, keratocystic odontogenic tumors, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors, ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, and odontomas. When clinicians encounter a lesion associated with an impacted tooth, they should first consider these entities in the differential diagnosis. This will help dental practitioners make more accurate diagnoses and develop better treatment plans based on patients' radiographs. PMID:27672610

  1. Jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth: A radiographic diagnostic guide

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    This review article aimed to introduce a category of jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth. General search engines and specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, MedLine Plus, Science Direct, Scopus, and well-recognized textbooks were used to find relevant studies using keywords such as "jaw lesion", "jaw disease", "impacted tooth", and "unerupted tooth". More than 250 articles were found, of which approximately 80 were broadly relevant to the topic. We ultimately included 47 articles that were closely related to the topic of interest. When the relevant data were compiled, the following 10 lesions were identified as having a relationship with impacted tooth: dentigerous cysts, calcifying odontogenic cysts, unicystic (mural) ameloblastomas, ameloblastomas, ameloblastic fibromas, adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, keratocystic odontogenic tumors, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors, ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, and odontomas. When clinicians encounter a lesion associated with an impacted tooth, they should first consider these entities in the differential diagnosis. This will help dental practitioners make more accurate diagnoses and develop better treatment plans based on patients' radiographs.

  2. Jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth: A radiographic diagnostic guide

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    This review article aimed to introduce a category of jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth. General search engines and specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, MedLine Plus, Science Direct, Scopus, and well-recognized textbooks were used to find relevant studies using keywords such as "jaw lesion", "jaw disease", "impacted tooth", and "unerupted tooth". More than 250 articles were found, of which approximately 80 were broadly relevant to the topic. We ultimately included 47 articles that were closely related to the topic of interest. When the relevant data were compiled, the following 10 lesions were identified as having a relationship with impacted tooth: dentigerous cysts, calcifying odontogenic cysts, unicystic (mural) ameloblastomas, ameloblastomas, ameloblastic fibromas, adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, keratocystic odontogenic tumors, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors, ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, and odontomas. When clinicians encounter a lesion associated with an impacted tooth, they should first consider these entities in the differential diagnosis. This will help dental practitioners make more accurate diagnoses and develop better treatment plans based on patients' radiographs. PMID:27672610

  3. Amoxicillin/Clavulanic Acid for the Treatment of Odontogenic Infections: A Randomised Study Comparing Efficacy and Tolerability versus Clindamycin.

    PubMed

    Tancawan, Archiel Launch; Pato, Maria Noemi; Abidin, Khamiza Zainol; Asari, A S Mohd; Thong, Tran Xuan; Kochhar, Puja; Muganurmath, Chandra; Twynholm, Monique; Barker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Background. Treatment of odontogenic infections includes surgical drainage and adjunctive antibiotics. This study was designed to generate efficacy and safety data to support twice daily dosing of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid compared to clindamycin in odontogenic infections. Methods. This was a phase IV, randomised, observer blind study; 472 subjects were randomised to receive amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (875 mg/125 mg BID, n = 235) or clindamycin (150 mg QID, n = 237) for 5 or 7 days based on clinical response. The primary endpoint was percentage of subjects achieving clinical success (composite measure of pain, swelling, fever, and additional antimicrobial therapy required) at the end of treatment. Results. The upper limit of two-sided 95% confidence interval for the treatment difference between the study arms (7.7%) was within protocol specified noninferiority margin of 10%, thus demonstrating noninferiority of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid to clindamycin. Secondary efficacy results showed a higher clinical success rate at Day 5 in the amoxicillin/clavulanic acid arm. Most adverse events (raised liver enzymes, diarrhoea, and headache) were similar across both arms and were of mild to moderate intensity. Conclusion. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was comparable to clindamycin in achieving clinical success (88.2% versus 89.7%) in acute odontogenic infections and the safety profile was consistent with the known side effects of both drugs. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02141217.

  4. Amoxicillin/Clavulanic Acid for the Treatment of Odontogenic Infections: A Randomised Study Comparing Efficacy and Tolerability versus Clindamycin.

    PubMed

    Tancawan, Archiel Launch; Pato, Maria Noemi; Abidin, Khamiza Zainol; Asari, A S Mohd; Thong, Tran Xuan; Kochhar, Puja; Muganurmath, Chandra; Twynholm, Monique; Barker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Background. Treatment of odontogenic infections includes surgical drainage and adjunctive antibiotics. This study was designed to generate efficacy and safety data to support twice daily dosing of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid compared to clindamycin in odontogenic infections. Methods. This was a phase IV, randomised, observer blind study; 472 subjects were randomised to receive amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (875 mg/125 mg BID, n = 235) or clindamycin (150 mg QID, n = 237) for 5 or 7 days based on clinical response. The primary endpoint was percentage of subjects achieving clinical success (composite measure of pain, swelling, fever, and additional antimicrobial therapy required) at the end of treatment. Results. The upper limit of two-sided 95% confidence interval for the treatment difference between the study arms (7.7%) was within protocol specified noninferiority margin of 10%, thus demonstrating noninferiority of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid to clindamycin. Secondary efficacy results showed a higher clinical success rate at Day 5 in the amoxicillin/clavulanic acid arm. Most adverse events (raised liver enzymes, diarrhoea, and headache) were similar across both arms and were of mild to moderate intensity. Conclusion. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was comparable to clindamycin in achieving clinical success (88.2% versus 89.7%) in acute odontogenic infections and the safety profile was consistent with the known side effects of both drugs. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02141217. PMID:26300919

  5. Amoxicillin/Clavulanic Acid for the Treatment of Odontogenic Infections: A Randomised Study Comparing Efficacy and Tolerability versus Clindamycin

    PubMed Central

    Tancawan, Archiel Launch; Pato, Maria Noemi; Abidin, Khamiza Zainol; Asari, A. S. Mohd; Thong, Tran Xuan; Kochhar, Puja; Muganurmath, Chandra; Twynholm, Monique; Barker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Background. Treatment of odontogenic infections includes surgical drainage and adjunctive antibiotics. This study was designed to generate efficacy and safety data to support twice daily dosing of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid compared to clindamycin in odontogenic infections. Methods. This was a phase IV, randomised, observer blind study; 472 subjects were randomised to receive amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (875 mg/125 mg BID, n = 235) or clindamycin (150 mg QID, n = 237) for 5 or 7 days based on clinical response. The primary endpoint was percentage of subjects achieving clinical success (composite measure of pain, swelling, fever, and additional antimicrobial therapy required) at the end of treatment. Results. The upper limit of two-sided 95% confidence interval for the treatment difference between the study arms (7.7%) was within protocol specified noninferiority margin of 10%, thus demonstrating noninferiority of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid to clindamycin. Secondary efficacy results showed a higher clinical success rate at Day 5 in the amoxicillin/clavulanic acid arm. Most adverse events (raised liver enzymes, diarrhoea, and headache) were similar across both arms and were of mild to moderate intensity. Conclusion. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was comparable to clindamycin in achieving clinical success (88.2% versus 89.7%) in acute odontogenic infections and the safety profile was consistent with the known side effects of both drugs. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02141217. PMID:26300919

  6. Osteo-/odontogenic differentiation of BMP2 and VEGF gene-co-transfected human stem cells from apical papilla

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, WEN; ZHANG, XIAOLEI; LING, JUNQI; WEI, XI; JIAN, YUTAO

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP) possess clear osteo-/odontogenic differentiation capabilities, and are regarded as the major cellular source for root dentin development. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) serve pivotal roles in the modulation of tooth development and dentin formation. However, the synergistic effects of BMP2 and VEGF on osteo-/odontogenic differentiation of SCAP remain unclear. The current study aimed to investigate the proliferative and osteo-/odontogenic differentiating capabilities of BMP2 and VEGF gene-co-transfected SCAP (SCAP-BMP2-VEGF) in vitro. The basic characteristics of the isolated SCAP were identified by the induction of multipotent differentiation and by flow cytometry. Lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfection was conducted with SCAP in order to construct blank vector-transfected SCAP (SCAP-green fluorescent protein), BMP2 gene-transfected SCAP (SCAP-BMP2), VEGF gene-transfected SCAP (SCAP-VEGF) and SCAP-BMP2-VEGF. The Cell Counting Kit 8 assay was used to analyze the proliferative capacities of the four groups of cells. The expression of osteo-/odontogenic genes and proteins in the cells were evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The mineralized nodules formed by the four group cells were visualized by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining. Among the four groups of cells, SCAP-VEGF was demonstrated to exhibit increased proliferation, and SCAP-BMP2-VEGF exhibited reduced proliferation during eight days observation. SCAP-BMP2-VEGF exhibited significantly increased expression levels of ALP, osteocalcin, dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein gene 1 and dentin sialoprotein than the other three groups at the majority of the time points. Furthermore, the SCAP-BMP2-VEGF group exhibited a significantly greater number of ALP-positive mineralized nodules than the other groups following 16 days culture in

  7. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors Nasal Deformities Choanal Atresia Epiphora (Excessive Tearing) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Sinus Tumors Abtin Tabaee, MD Introduction Tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses are rare, accounting for fewer than 1% of all tumors. These ...

  8. Myxofibroma of the maxilla. Reconstruction with iliac crest graft and dental implants after tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Infante-Cossío, Pedro; Martínez-de-Fuentes, Rafael; García-Perla-García, Alberto; Jiménez-Castellanos, Emilio; Gómez-Izquierdo, Lourdes

    2011-07-01

    Odontogenic fibromyxomas are benign odontogenic tumors of mesenchymal origin of rare presentation in the oral cavity, which exhibit locally aggressive behavior and are prone to local recurrence. The controversy has mainly been on therapeutic management with recommendations varying, depending on the clinical cases, from simple curettage of lesion to segmental bone resection. We present a case report describing the reconstruction of an osseous defect in the maxilla and the restoration with dental implants in a 32 year old female patient after radical surgical excision due to an odontogenic fibromyxoma with locally aggressive behavior. The primary reconstruction of maxillary discontinuity defect was carried out by an immediate non-vascularized cortico-cancellous iliac crest graft. Using a computer-guided system for the implant treatment-planning, three dental implants were secondary placed in the bone graft by means of flapless implant surgery. The patient was subsequently restored with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis that has remained in continuous function for a period of three years. The surgical, reconstructive and restorative treatment sequence and techniques are discussed.

  9. Odontogenic sinusitis, oro-antral fistula and surgical repair by Bichat's fat pad: Literature review.

    PubMed

    Bravo Cordero, Gustavo; Minzer Ferrer, Simona; Fernández, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic sinusitis accounts for 10-12% of maxillary sinusitis. It occurs due to an interruption of the mucoperiosteum in response to a series of conditions, most frequently the extraction of a superior tooth. Its treatment has two bases: treating the infection and managing the oroantral fistula that perpetuates the infection. Communications smaller than 5mm can resolve spontaneously; bigger ones must be closed by a flap. Bichat's fat pad flap was first used in 1977 to close an oroantral fistula. It is a pedicled flap that has been shown to be successful, with advantages that make it the best option in oroantral fistula treatment. Its location allows easy access, minimum dissection, great versatility, good mobility, good blood supply, low rate of complications, no morbidity in the donor site, low risk of infection, shortened surgical time and fast cover by epithelium, and it leaves no visible scar, amongst other benefits. That is why we encourage the use of this technique and choose it as the best option for management of our patients.

  10. Odontogenic Induction of Dental Stem Cells by Extracellular Matrix-Inspired Three-Dimensional Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Sriram; Zhang, Youbin; Huang, Chun-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Currently, root canal therapy is the only clinical treatment available to treat damaged or necrotic dental pulp tissue arising from caries. This treatment results in the loss of tooth vitality. Somatic dental stem cell-based tissue engineering approaches can alleviate this problem by preserving tooth vitality. Dental stem cells are multipotent and under appropriate conditions could be used for dental pulp tissue engineering. Successful use of these cells in pulp repair requires a combination of growth factors and appropriate scaffolds to induce cell differentiation. In this study, we demonstrate the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and the human periodontal ligament stem cells when cultured on a decellularized 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold without the need for exogenous addition of growth factors. Subcutaneous implantation of the ECM scaffolds containing DPSCs showed the formation of dental pulp-like tissue with cells expressing dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphophoryn (DPP). Additionally, we also show that the ECM scaffold can be exploited as a tool to study the extracellular function of multifunctional proteins. These promising results demonstrate the feasibility of developing these biomimetic scaffolds for treatment of dental caries. PMID:23859633

  11. Aperture width of the osteomeatal complex as a predictor of successful treatment of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Tomomatsu, N; Uzawa, N; Aragaki, T; Harada, K

    2014-11-01

    Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis (OMS) is an inflammatory disease caused by the spread of dental inflammation into the sinus. The long-term administration of antibiotic medicine and/or treatment of the causative tooth are the usual initial treatments. These initial treatments are not always effective, and the reason is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to identify factors of significance that may contribute to the results of the initial treatment of OMS. Thirty-nine patients were studied, divided into two groups according to the results of initial treatment: effective or non-effective. The effective group comprised 20 patients who were cured by initial treatment. The non-effective group comprised 19 patients who required an additional operation. The duration of symptoms, spread into the other sinuses, aperture width of the osteomeatal complex (OMC) on the side of the maxillary sinus, and anatomical variations in the sinuses were compared between the groups. The only significant difference found was in the aperture width of the OMC, which was significantly narrower in the non-effective group than in the effective group. The aperture width of the OMC may be a significant predictor of the effectiveness of initial treatment of OMS.

  12. Vitamin D Promotes Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells via ERK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Su-Mi; Lim, Hae-Soon; Jeong, Kyung-Yi; Kim, Seon-Mi; Kim, Won-Jae; Jung, Ji-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin D such as 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) is a well-known key regulatory factor in bone metabolism. However, little is known about the potential of vitamin D as an odontogenic inducer in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) in vitro. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of vitamin D3 metabolite, 1α,25(OH)2D3, on odontoblastic differentiation in HDPCs. HDPCs extracted from maxillary supernumerary incisors and third molars were directly cultured with 1α,25(OH)2D3 in the absence of differentiation-inducing factors. Treatment of HDPCs with 1α,25(OH)2D3 at a concentration of 10 nM or 100 nM significantly upregulated the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein1 (DMP1), the odontogenesis-related genes. Also, 1α,25(OH)2D3 enhanced the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization in HDPCs. In addition, 1α,25(OH)2D3 induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), whereas the ERK inhibitor U0126 ameliorated the upregulation of DSPP and DMP1 and reduced the mineralization enhanced by 1α,25(OH)2D3. These results demonstrated that 1α,25(OH)2D3 promoted odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs via modulating ERK activation. PMID:26062551

  13. Parietal subdural empyema as complication of acute odontogenic sinusitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To date intracranial complication caused by tooth extractions are extremely rare. In particular parietal subdural empyema of odontogenic origin has not been described. A literature review is presented here to emphasize the extreme rarity of this clinical entity. Case presentation An 18-year-old Caucasian man with a history of dental extraction developed dysarthria, lethargy, purulent rhinorrhea, and fever. A computed tomography scan demonstrated extensive sinusitis involving maxillary sinus, anterior ethmoid and frontal sinus on the left side and a subdural fluid collection in the temporal-parietal site on the same side. He underwent vancomycin, metronidazole and meropenem therapy, and subsequently left maxillary antrostomy, and frontal and maxillary sinuses toilette by an open approach. The last clinical control done after 3 months showed a regression of all symptoms. Conclusions The occurrence of subdural empyema is an uncommon but possible sequela of a complicated tooth extraction. A multidisciplinary approach involving otolaryngologist, neurosurgeons, clinical microbiologist, and neuroradiologist is essential. Antibiotic therapy with surgical approach is the gold standard treatment. PMID:25146384

  14. Tooth replacement and putative odontogenic stem cell niches in pharyngeal dentition of medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Abduweli, Dawud; Baba, Otto; Tabata, Makoto J; Higuchi, Kazunori; Mitani, Hiroshi; Takano, Yoshiro

    2014-04-01

    The small-sized teleost fish medaka, Oryzias latipes, has as many as 1000 pharyngeal teeth undergoing continuous replacement. In this study, we sought to identify the tooth-forming units and determine its replacement cycles, and further localize odontogenic stem cell niches in the pharyngeal dentition of medaka to gain insights into the mechanisms whereby continuous tooth replacement is maintained. Three-dimensional reconstruction of pharyngeal epithelium and sequential fluorochrome labeling of pharyngeal bones and teeth indicated that the individual functional teeth and their successional teeth were organized in families, each comprising up to five generations of teeth and successional tooth germs, and that the replacement cycle of functional teeth was approximately 4 weeks. BrdU label/chase experiments confirmed the existence of clusters of label-retaining epithelial cells at the posterior end of each tooth family where the expression of pluripotency marker Sox2 was confirmed by in situ hybridization. Label-retaining cells were also identified in the mesoderm immediately adjacent to the posterior end of each tooth family. These data suggest the importance of existence of slow-cycling dental epithelial cells and Sox2 expressions at the posterior end of each tooth family to maintain continuous tooth formation and replacement in the pharyngeal dentition of medaka.

  15. The odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells on nanofibrous poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Xiaohua; Jin, Xiaobing; Ma, Haiyun; Hu, Jiang; Ni, Longxing; Ma, Peter X

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on nanofibrous (NF)-poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. Highly porous NF-PLLA scaffolds which mimic the architecture of collagen type I fibers were fabricated by the combination of a phase-separation technique and a porogen-leaching method. The human DPSCs were then seeded onto the scaffolds and cultured in different media for odontogenic differentiation: "Control" medium without supplements; "DXM" medium containing 10(-8)M dexamethasone (DXM), 50 microgml(-1) ascorbic acid and 5mM beta-glycerophosphate; "BMP-7+DXM" medium containing 10(-8)M DXM, 50 microgml(-1) ascorbic acid, 5mM beta-glycerophosphate plus 50 ngml(-1) bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7). For odontogenic differentiation study in vitro, alkaline phosphatase activity quantification, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, scanning electron microscopy, von Kossa staining and calcium content quantification were carried out. While both "DXM" medium and "BMP-7+DXM" medium induced the DPSCs to odontoblast-like cells, the "BMP-7+DXM" medium had greater inducing capacity than the "DXM" medium. Consistent with the in vitro studies, the "BMP-7+DXM" group presented more extracellular matrix and hard tissue formation than the "DXM" group after 8 weeks of ectopic implantation in nude mice. Differentiation of DPSCs into odontoblast-like cells was identified by the positive immunohistochemical staining for dentin sialoprotein. In conclusion, odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs can be achieved on NF-PLLA scaffolds both in vitro and in vivo; the combination of BMP-7 and DXM induced the odontogenic differentiation more effectively than DXM alone. The NF-PLLA scaffold and the combined odontogenic inductive factors provide excellent environment for DPSCs to regenerate dental pulp and dentin. PMID:20406702

  16. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells on Hydrogel Scaffolds Derived from Decellularized Bone Extracellular Matrix and Collagen Type I

    PubMed Central

    White, Lisa J.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on hydrogel scaffolds derived from bone extracellular matrix (bECM) in comparison to those seeded on collagen I (Col-I), one of the main components of dental pulp ECM. Methods DPSCs isolated from human third molars were characterized for surface marker expression and odontogenic potential prior to seeding into bECM or Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. The cells were then seeded onto bECM and Col-I hydrogel scaffolds and cultured under basal conditions or with odontogenic and growth factor (GF) supplements. DPSCs cultivated on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) with and without supplements were used as controls. Gene expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1) and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and mineral deposition was observed by Von Kossa staining. Results When DPSCs were cultured on bECM hydrogels, the mRNA expression levels of DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE genes were significantly upregulated with respect to those cultured on Col-I scaffolds or TCPS in the absence of extra odontogenic inducers. In addition, more mineral deposition was observed on bECM hydrogel scaffolds as demonstrated by Von Kossa staining. Moreover, DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE mRNA expressions of DPSCs cultured on bECM hydrogels were further upregulated by the addition of GFs or osteo/odontogenic medium compared to Col-I treated cells in the same culture conditions. Significance These results demonstrate the potential of the bECM hydrogel scaffolds to stimulate odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs. PMID:26882351

  17. Epigenetic Marks Define the Lineage and Differentiation Potential of Two Distinct Neural Crest-Derived Intermediate Odontogenic Progenitor Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gopinathan, Gokul; Kolokythas, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone modifications, play an active role in the differentiation and lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells. In the present study, epigenetic states and differentiation profiles of two odontogenic neural crest-derived intermediate progenitor populations were compared: dental pulp (DP) and dental follicle (DF). ChIP on chip assays revealed substantial H3K27me3-mediated repression of odontoblast lineage genes DSPP and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) in DF cells, but not in DP cells. Mineralization inductive conditions caused steep increases of mineralization and patterning gene expression levels in DP cells when compared to DF cells. In contrast, mineralization induction resulted in a highly dynamic histone modification response in DF cells, while there was only a subdued effect in DP cells. Both DF and DP progenitors featured H3K4me3-active marks on the promoters of early mineralization genes RUNX2, MSX2, and DLX5, while OSX, IBSP, and BGLAP promoters were enriched for H3K9me3 or H3K27me3. Compared to DF cells, DP cells expressed higher levels of three pluripotency-associated genes, OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2. Finally, gene ontology comparison of bivalent marks unique for DP and DF cells highlighted cell–cell attachment genes in DP cells and neurogenesis genes in DF cells. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the DF intermediate odontogenic neural crest lineage is distinguished from its DP counterpart by epigenetic repression of DSPP and DMP1 genes and through dynamic histone enrichment responses to mineralization induction. Findings presented here highlight the crucial role of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in the terminal differentiation of odontogenic neural crest lineages. PMID:23379639

  18. Glandular odontogenic cyst – Literature review and report of a paediatric case

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Mohammad; Ahmad, Syed Ansar; Ansari, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is an extremely rare lesion occurring in the jawbones. The present paper is a review of 181 cases of GOCs reported in English literature, since it was first reported by Padayache and Van Wyk in 1987. Mandible was involved in 130 cases and maxilla in 51 cases. Anterior mandible was the most common area of involvement. Radiographic appearance was that of a unilocular radiolucency in 98 of 176 reported cases. Rest presented as multilocular radiolucency. Cortical expansion was observed in 136 of the 180 reported cases while cortex breach or perforation was seen in 81 cases. The treatment of choice was that of minor procedures that included enucleation with or without curettage, peripheral ostectomy, cryotherapy, etc. in 157 of the total 177 reported cases. Marginal jaw resection, segmental mandibulectomy etc. was reported in 20 cases. Although minor surgical procedures were the treatment of choice in most studies, two major studies of Kaplan et al. and Fowler et al. involving 111 and 46 cases, recorded a recurrence rate of 35.9 and 19.6%, respectively. The age range was between 11 and 82 years. The respective mean age of patients in the above mentioned studies was 45.7 for Kaplan's and 51 years for Fowler's whereas in our study, the mean age was 45.9 years. Very rarely does GOC presents itself in a paediatric patient. The paper also reports a case of an 11-year-old child whose histopathogy came out to be a case of a GOC. PMID:26587384

  19. Glandular odontogenic cyst - Literature review and report of a paediatric case.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Mohammad; Ahmad, Syed Ansar; Ansari, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is an extremely rare lesion occurring in the jawbones. The present paper is a review of 181 cases of GOCs reported in English literature, since it was first reported by Padayache and Van Wyk in 1987. Mandible was involved in 130 cases and maxilla in 51 cases. Anterior mandible was the most common area of involvement. Radiographic appearance was that of a unilocular radiolucency in 98 of 176 reported cases. Rest presented as multilocular radiolucency. Cortical expansion was observed in 136 of the 180 reported cases while cortex breach or perforation was seen in 81 cases. The treatment of choice was that of minor procedures that included enucleation with or without curettage, peripheral ostectomy, cryotherapy, etc. in 157 of the total 177 reported cases. Marginal jaw resection, segmental mandibulectomy etc. was reported in 20 cases. Although minor surgical procedures were the treatment of choice in most studies, two major studies of Kaplan et al. and Fowler et al. involving 111 and 46 cases, recorded a recurrence rate of 35.9 and 19.6%, respectively. The age range was between 11 and 82 years. The respective mean age of patients in the above mentioned studies was 45.7 for Kaplan's and 51 years for Fowler's whereas in our study, the mean age was 45.9 years. Very rarely does GOC presents itself in a paediatric patient. The paper also reports a case of an 11-year-old child whose histopathogy came out to be a case of a GOC.

  20. A comparative examination of odontogenic gene expression in both toothed and toothless amniotes.

    PubMed

    Lainoff, Alexis J; Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline E; Hu, Diane; Kallonen, Aki; Marcucio, Ralph S; Hlusko, Leslea J

    2015-05-01

    A well-known tenet of murine tooth development is that BMP4 and FGF8 antagonistically initiate odontogenesis, but whether this tenet is conserved across amniotes is largely unexplored. Moreover, changes in BMP4-signaling have previously been implicated in evolutionary tooth loss in Aves. Here we demonstrate that Bmp4, Msx1, and Msx2 expression is limited proximally in the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta) mandible at stages equivalent to those at which odontogenesis is initiated in mice, a similar finding to previously reported results in chicks. To address whether the limited domains in the turtle and the chicken indicate an evolutionary molecular parallelism, or whether the domains simply constitute an ancestral phenotype, we assessed gene expression in a toothed reptile (the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis) and a toothed non-placental mammal (the gray short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica). We demonstrate that the Bmp4 domain is limited proximally in M. domestica and that the Fgf8 domain is limited distally in A. mississippiensis just preceding odontogenesis. Additionally, we show that Msx1 and Msx2 expression patterns in these species differ from those found in mice. Our data suggest that a limited Bmp4 domain does not necessarily correlate with edentulism, and reveal that the initiation of odontogenesis in non-murine amniotes is more complex than previously imagined. Our data also suggest a partially conserved odontogenic program in T. scripta, as indicated by conserved Pitx2, Pax9, and Barx1 expression patterns and by the presence of a Shh-expressing palatal epithelium, which we hypothesize may represent potential dental rudiments based on the Testudinata fossil record.

  1. Management of Odontogenic Fibromyxoma in Pediatric Nigerian Patients: A Review of 8 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Omeje, KU; Amole, IO; Osunde, OD; Efunkoya, AA

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic fibromyxoma (OFM) is a benign, locally invasive and aggressive nonmetastasizing neoplasm of jaw bones. They are considered relatively rare and known to be derived from embryonic mesenchymal elements of dental origin. Treatment of OFM depends on the size of the lesion and on its nature and behavior. Varying treatment modalities ranging from curettage to radical excision have been documented. Aim; This paper is a review of management of 8 pediatric patients with histologically diagnosed OFM at a Nigerian tertiary health care facility. This was a retrospective study of all patients aged 15 years and below who presented to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic of Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, over a 5-year period (January 2008 to December 2012), with a histologic diagnosis of OFM. The information obtained included patients' demographics, as well as their clinical characteristics such as the anatomical site and side of lesions. Other information collated included presenting features, the onset of symptoms, type of treatment carried out, as well as treatment outcome. The data were analyzed and the results presented as frequencies and percentages. Among the 8 patients with OFM, more males (n = 5/8; 62.5%) were affected than females (n = 3/8; 37.5%). The mandible (n = 5/8; 62.5%) was the most frequent site of occurrence, and the anterior mandible was the most favored location (n = 4/8; 50%). Seven patients had excision of the lesion with peripheral ostectomy of the underlying bone while only one patient had a bone resection. These patients have been followed up for at least 1 year, and no recurrence was observed throughout the follow-up period. OFM causes gross facial disfigurement and may result in the destruction of the entire jaw bone; the impact of which may be grave for a growing child. Prompt surgical intervention and follow-up have proven to be adequate management protocol. PMID:27057387

  2. A comparative examination of odontogenic gene expression in both toothed and toothless amniotes

    PubMed Central

    Lainoff, Alexis J.; Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline E.; Hu, Diane; Kallonen, Aki; Marcucio, Ralph S.; Hlusko, Leslea J.

    2015-01-01

    A well-known tenet of murine tooth development is that BMP4 and FGF8 antagonistically initiate odontogenesis, but whether this tenet is conserved across amniotes is largely unexplored. Moreover, changes in BMP4-signaling have previously been implicated in evolutionary tooth loss in Aves. Here we demonstrate that Bmp4, Msx1, and Msx2 expression is limited proximally in the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta) mandible at stages equivalent to those at which odontogenesis is initiated in mice, a similar finding to previously reported results in chicks. To address whether the limited domains in the turtle and the chicken indicate an evolutionary molecular parallelism, or whether the domains simply constitute an ancestral phenotype, we assessed gene expression in a toothed reptile (the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis) and a toothed non-placental mammal (the gray short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica). We demonstrate that the Bmp4 domain is limited proximally in M. domestica and that the Fgf8 domain is limited distally in A. mississippiensis just preceding odontogenesis. Additionally, we show that Msx1 and Msx2 expression patterns in these species differ from those found in mice. Our data suggest that a limited Bmp4 domain does not necessarily correlate with edentulism, and reveal that the initiation of odontogenesis in non-murine amniotes is more complex than previously imagined. Our data also suggest a partially conserved odontogenic program in T. scripta, as indicated by conserved Pitx2, Pax9, and Barx1 expression patterns and by the presence of a Shh-expressing palatal epithelium, which we hypothesize may represent potential dental rudiments based on the Testudinata fossil record. PMID:25678399

  3. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - spinal cord ... spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Most often these are ependymomas and other ... gene mutations. Spinal tumors can occur: Inside the spinal cord (intramedullary) In the membranes (meninges) covering the spinal ...

  4. Detection of arenavirus in a peripheral odontogenic fibromyxoma in a red tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor) with inclusion body disease.

    PubMed

    Hellebuyck, Tom; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Saey, Veronique; Martel, An

    2015-03-01

    A captive bred red tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor) was presented with a large intraoral mass originating from the buccal gingiva, attached to the right dentary teeth row. Based on the clinical features and histological examination, the diagnosis of a peripheral odontogenic fibromyxoma was made. Sections of liver biopsies and circulating lymphocytes contained relatively few eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, indistinguishable from those observed in inclusion body disease-affected snakes. Inclusion bodies were not observed in cells comprising the neoplastic mass. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), arenavirus was detected in the neoplastic tissue. Two years after surgical removal of the mass, recurrence of the neoplastic lesion was observed. Numerous large inclusion body disease inclusions were abundantly present in the neoplastic cells of the recurrent fibromyxoma. Sections of liver biopsies and circulating lymphocytes contained relatively few intracytoplasmic inclusions. The RT-PCR revealed the presence of arenavirus in blood, a liver biopsy, and neoplastic tissue. The present case describes the co-occurrence of an arenavirus infection and an odontogenic fibromyxoma in a red tail boa.

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Odontogenic Cutaneous Sinus Tracts in an 11-Year-Old Boy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Liang, Yun; Xiong, Huacui

    2016-05-01

    Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tracts (OCSTs) are generally primarily misdiagnosed and inappropriately treated by virtue of their rarity and the absence of dental symptoms. Accurate diagnosis and treatment and the elimination of the source of infection can reduce the incidence of complications and relieve the pain of the patient.In this case report, we present the case of an 11-year-old patient with an apparent abscess but an unobvious draining sinus tract in his left cheek. Intraorally, a glass-ionomer-cement filling on the occlusal surface of the left mandibular first molar (tooth 36) was noted. Radiographic examination revealed a radiopaque mass inside the crown and pulp chamber and an irregular, radiolucent periapical lesion surrounding the distal root apex. He was diagnosed with an OCTS secondary to a periapical abscess of tooth 36. Precise root canal therapy (RCT) and chronic granuloma debridement was performed; 6 months later, the abscess and sinus had healed completely, and the periapical lesion had resolved.Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tracts are uncommon in the clinic. This case report reminds us of the significance of OCSTs and provides some implications for their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27196471

  6. The role of lysyl oxidase-like 2 in the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Hyun; Lee, Eun-Hyang; Park, Hye-Jeong; Park, Eui-Kyun; Kwon, Tae-Geon; Shin, Hong-In; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2013-06-01

    Adult human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) are a unique population of precursor cells those are isolated from postnatal dental pulp and have the ability to differentiate into a variety of cell types utilized for the formation of a reparative dentin-like complex. Using LC-MS/MS proteomics approaches, we identified the proteins secreted from the differentiating hDPSCs in mineralization media. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) was identified as a protein that was down-regulated in the hDPSCs that differentiate into odontoblast-like cells. The role of LOXL2 has not been studied in dental pulp stem cells. LOXL2 mRNA levels were reduced in differentiating hDPSCs, whereas the levels of other LOX family members including LOX, LOXL1, LOXL3, and LOXL4, are increased. The protein expression and secretion levels of LOXL2 were also decreased during odontogenic differentiation. Recombinant LOXL2 protein treatment to hDPSCs resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the early differentiation and the mineralization accompanying with the lower levels of odontogenic markers such as DSPP, DMP-1 and ALP. These results suggest that LOXL2 has a negative effect on the differentiation of hDPSCs and blocking LOXL2 can promote the hDPSC differentiation to odontoblasts.

  7. Mixed odontogenic tumours and odontomas. Considerations on interrelationship. Review of the literature and presentation of 134 new cases of odontomas.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, H P; Reichart, P A; Praetorius, F

    1997-03-01

    Based on a world-wide literature survey of published cases of "mixed odontogenic tumours" (ameloblastic fibroma, fibrodentinoma and fibro-odontoma) and complex/compound odontomas (including 134 own cases of odontomas) the authors present data showing the complex nature of these lesions. The authors suggest the following work hypothesis regarding the pathogenesis and relationship between the "mixed odontogenic tumours" and the odontomas. The tumours develop along two separate lines: (I) the neoplastic line comprising only one tumour, the ameloblastic fibroma (AF) and the closely related ameloblastic fibrodentinoma (AFD). (II) The hamartomatous (or the developing complex odontoma (DCO) line comprising: (1) The AF (and AFD). Differences in age and biological behaviour indicate that some AF are true benign neoplasms, whereas others are hamartomas presenting the first stage in the DCO-line. (2) The AF-O represents the second stage of the DCO-line developing into (3) the fully mineralized complex odontoma. Lastly, the authors suggest that the compound odontoma should be considered not as an alternative final stage to the complex odontoma but rather as a malformation (with a high degree of histomorphological differentiation) pathogenetically closely related to the process producing hyperodontia, "multiple schizodontia" or locally conditioned hyperactivity of the dental lamina.

  8. Is maspin immunolocalization a tool to differentiate central low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma from glandular odontogenic cyst?

    PubMed

    Vered, Marilena; Allon, Irit; Buchner, Amos; Dayan, Dan

    2010-03-01

    Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) of the salivary glands has a low-grade variant (LGMEC), which may be found within the jawbones. LGMEC shares a number of histopathological similarities with glandular odontogenic cysts (GOC) of the jawbones. Maspin has been identified in several benign and malignant salivary gland neoplasms. We investigated the immunolocalization of maspin in LGMEC and GOC and evaluated its potential to distinguish between these two entities. Cases of LGMEC (n=6), GOC (n=8) and various odontogenic cysts with marked mucous metaplasia (OCMM, n=7), which served as controls, were immunohistochemically labeled for the binding of an antibody directed against maspin. Immunomorphometry was performed separately for maspin-immunopositive epithelial cells and epithelial-mucous cells in either their nuclear or cytoplasmic compartments. Results were presented as the volume fraction (Vv) of each element. The Vv of the maspin-immunopositive epithelial-mucous cytoplasm and nuclei was significantly higher in LGMEC than in GOC and OCMM (p<0.001 and p=0.026, respectively). In the epithelial cells, no significant differences were observed among the lesions (p>0.05). It is suggested that the high levels of maspin in the epithelial-mucous cells (in both cytoplasm and nuclei) in LGMEC may serve as a tool to distinguish it from GOC. This may be useful especially in equivocal cases and in small incisional biopsy samples.

  9. A Comparative Analysis of Cytokeratin 18 and 19 Expressions in Odontogenic Keratocyst, Dentigerous Cyst and Radicular Cyst with a Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vandana Sandip; Ghanchi, Mohsin Jiva; Gosavi, Sandesh Sachchidanand; Srivastava, Himanshu Mahesh; Pachore, Nivedita Javahir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Odontogenic cysts viz Odontogenic Keratocyst (OKC), Dentigerous Cyst (DC) and Radicular Cyst (RC) occur commonly in the oral and maxillofacial region. Cytokeratin (CK) expression studies have been done to evaluate diagnostic accuracy, role in pathogenesis, elucidate behaviour and role in treatment protocols. However, variations have been reported in the expression of CK patterns in these odontogenic cysts, which could be due to the lack of standardization of laboratory techniques. The present study has tried to shed light on CK 18 and 19 expression in odontogenic cysts and offer the brief review of previous studies on these CK. Aim The aim of the present study was to evaluate the intensity and expression patterns of CK 18 and 19 in OKCs, DCs and RCs. Materials and Methods A total of 60 cases, 20 each of OKC, DC and RC were confirmed histologically and evaluated for immunohistochemical expression pattern and intensity of CK 18 and 19. Results A focal and variable expression of CK 18 was observed in 25% of OKCs, 15% of DCs and 10% of RCs. CK 19 was expressed in 75% of OKCs and 100% in DCs as well as RCs. Conclusion The intensity and expression of Cytokeratin 19 was more in all three cysts compared to Cytokeratin 18.

  10. A Comparative Analysis of Cytokeratin 18 and 19 Expressions in Odontogenic Keratocyst, Dentigerous Cyst and Radicular Cyst with a Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vandana Sandip; Ghanchi, Mohsin Jiva; Gosavi, Sandesh Sachchidanand; Srivastava, Himanshu Mahesh; Pachore, Nivedita Javahir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Odontogenic cysts viz Odontogenic Keratocyst (OKC), Dentigerous Cyst (DC) and Radicular Cyst (RC) occur commonly in the oral and maxillofacial region. Cytokeratin (CK) expression studies have been done to evaluate diagnostic accuracy, role in pathogenesis, elucidate behaviour and role in treatment protocols. However, variations have been reported in the expression of CK patterns in these odontogenic cysts, which could be due to the lack of standardization of laboratory techniques. The present study has tried to shed light on CK 18 and 19 expression in odontogenic cysts and offer the brief review of previous studies on these CK. Aim The aim of the present study was to evaluate the intensity and expression patterns of CK 18 and 19 in OKCs, DCs and RCs. Materials and Methods A total of 60 cases, 20 each of OKC, DC and RC were confirmed histologically and evaluated for immunohistochemical expression pattern and intensity of CK 18 and 19. Results A focal and variable expression of CK 18 was observed in 25% of OKCs, 15% of DCs and 10% of RCs. CK 19 was expressed in 75% of OKCs and 100% in DCs as well as RCs. Conclusion The intensity and expression of Cytokeratin 19 was more in all three cysts compared to Cytokeratin 18. PMID:27630961

  11. Brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Black, K. L.; Mazziotta, J. C.; Becker, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental tumor biology are being applied to critical clinical problems of primary brain tumors. The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, which are sparse in normal brain, is increased as much as 20-fold in brain tumors. Experimental studies show promise in using labeled ligands to these receptors to identify the outer margins of malignant brain tumors. Whereas positron emission tomography has improved the dynamic understanding of tumors, the labeled selective tumor receptors with positron emitters will enhance the ability to specifically diagnose and greatly aid in the pretreatment planning for tumors. Modulation of these receptors will also affect tumor growth and metabolism. Novel methods to deliver antitumor agents to the brain and new approaches using biologic response modifiers also hold promise to further improve the management of brain tumors. Images PMID:1848735

  12. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis and Mandibular Osteomyelitis Arising From an Odontogenic Infection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Gams, Kevin; Freeman, Phillip

    2016-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been infrequently reported in the literature. Some investigators believe that this condition is under-reported because it is underdiagnosed. Misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of this condition can lead to serious morbidity, including fistula formation, intracranial abscess, fibrous or bony ankylosis, temporal bone or condylar osteomyelitis, growth alteration, and several others. This report describes a case of septic TMJ arthritis arising from direct spread of an odontogenic infection with subsequent development of mandibular osteomyelitis. The purpose of this case report is to 1) increase awareness of an underdiagnosed condition, 2) establish the seriousness of this infection, 3) for the first time report on a case of TMJ septic arthritis caused by Bacteroides infection, and 4) provide a review of the relevant literature.

  13. Tumor Types

    MedlinePlus

    ... acoustic neuroma is also known as a schwannoma, vestibular schwannoma, or neurilemmoma. Characteristics Arises from cells that ... multiple CNS tumors, including neurofibromas, multiple meningiomas, bilateral vestibular schwannomas, optic nerve gliomas, and spinal cord tumors. ...

  14. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  15. Urogenital tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Rare Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Anal Canal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Anal Canal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Appendix Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Cholangiocarcinoma; Chordoma; Colorectal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Esophageal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Esophageal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Fallopian Tube Adenocarcinoma; Fibromyxoid Tumor; Gastric Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Gastric Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Giant Cell Carcinoma; Intestinal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Sarcomatoid Carcinoma; Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Malignant Odontogenic Neoplasm; Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Malignant Skin Neoplasm; Malignant Testicular Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm of Unknown Primary Origin; Mixed Mesodermal (Mullerian) Tumor; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Nasal Cavity Adenocarcinoma; Nasal Cavity Carcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Oral Cavity Carcinoma; Oropharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Ovarian Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Paraganglioma; Paranasal Sinus Adenocarcinoma; Paranasal Sinus Carcinoma; Parathyroid Gland Carcinoma; Pituitary Gland Carcinoma; Placental Choriocarcinoma; Placental-Site Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Primary Peritoneal High Grade Serous Adenocarcinoma; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Scrotal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Seminal Vesicle Adenocarcinoma; Seminoma; Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Small Intestinal Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestinal Squamous

  17. STRO-1 selected rat dental pulp stem cells transfected with adenoviral-mediated human bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene show enhanced odontogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuechao; van der Kraan, Peter M; van den Dolder, Juliette; Walboomers, X Frank; Bian, Zhuan; Fan, Mingwen; Jansen, John A

    2007-11-01

    Dental pulp stem cells harbor great potential for tissue-engineering purposes. However, previous studies have shown variable results, and some have reported only limited osteogenic and odontogenic potential.Because bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-established agents to induce bone and dentin formation,in this study STRO-1-selected rat dental pulp-derived stem cells were transfected with the adenoviral mediated human BMP-2 gene. Subsequently, the cells were evaluated for their odontogenic differentiation ability in medium not containing dexamethasone or other stimuli. Cultures were investigated using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and evaluated for cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase(ALP) activity, and calcium content. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed for gene expression of Alp, osteocalcin, collagen type I, bone sialoprotein, dentin sialophosphoprotein, and dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein 1. Finally, an oligo-microarray was used to profile the expression of odontogenesis-related genes. Results of ALP activity, calcium content, and real-time PCR showed that only BMP2-transfected cells had the ability to differentiate into the odontoblast phenotype and to produce a calcified extracellular matrix. SEM and oligo-microarray confirmed these results. In contrast, the non-transfected cells represented a less differentiated cell phenotype. Based on our results, we concluded that the adenovirus can transfect STRO-1 selected cells with high efficacy. After BMP2 gene transfection, these cells had the ability to differentiate into odontoblast phenotype, even without the addition of odontogenic supplements to the medium. PMID:17824831

  18. Hypothalamic tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur at any age. They are often more aggressive in adults than in children. In adults, tumors ... The treatment depends on how aggressive the tumor is, and whether it is a glioma or another type of cancer. Treatment may involve combinations of surgery, radiation , ...

  19. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... pituitary is the "master control gland" - it makes hormones that affect growth and the functions of other glands in the body. Pituitary tumors are common, but often they don't cause health ... tumor produces hormones and disrupts the balance of hormones in your ...

  20. One Odontogenic Cell-Population Contributes to the Development of the Mouse Incisors and of the Oral Vestibule.

    PubMed

    Hovorakova, Maria; Lochovska, Katerina; Zahradnicek, Oldrich; Domonkosova Tibenska, Kristina; Dornhoferova, Michaela; Horakova-Smrckova, Lucie; Bodorikova, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The area of the oral vestibule is often a place where pathologies appear (e.g., peripheral odontomas). The origin of these pathologies is not fully understood. In the present study, we traced a cell population expressing Sonic hedgehog (Shh) from the beginning of tooth development using Cre-LoxP system in the lower jaw of wild-type (WT) mice. We focused on Shh expression in the area of the early appearing rudimentary incisor germs located anteriorly to the prospective incisors. The localization of the labelled cells in the incisor germs and also in the inner epithelial layer of the vestibular anlage showed that the first very early developmental events in the lower incisor area are common to the vestibulum oris and the prospective incisor primordia in mice. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of human historical tooth-like structures found in the vestibular area of jaws confirmed their relation to teeth and thus the capability of the vestibular tissue to form teeth. The location of labelled cells descendant of the early appearing Shh expression domain related to the rudimentary incisor anlage not only in the rudimentary and functional incisor germs but also in the externally located anlage of the oral vestibule documented the odontogenic potential of the vestibular epithelium. This potential can be awakened under pathological conditions and become a source of pathologies in the vestibular area. PMID:27611193

  1. Immunohistochemical analysis of factors related to apoptosis and cellular proliferation in relation to inflammation in dentigerous and odontogenic keratocyst

    PubMed Central

    Sreedhar, Gadiputi; Raju, M. Vijaya; Metta, Kiran Kumar; Manjunath, SM; Shetty, Sujan; Agarwal, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The effect of inflammation on pathogenesis and biological behavior of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) and dentigerous cyst (DC) is not completely understood. Hence, we aimed to analyze the effect of inflammation on biological behavior of OKC and DC using a proliferative and anti-apoptotic marker, i.e., proliferative cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Bcl-2, respectively. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical staining was performed using anti-PCNA and Bcl-2 antibody in 10 cases each of classical OKC, inflamed OKC and classical DC and inflamed DC. Results: Inflamed OKC and DC showed a significant increase in PCNA expression and decrease in Bcl-2 expression when compared with non-inflamed cyst. Correlation between inflammation and proliferative and anti-apoptotic activity was found to be statistically non-significant. Conclusion: Inflammation is responsible for change in behavior of neoplastic epithelium of OKC and hence should be treated meticulously, whereas in DC it is responsible for changes in the epithelial lining. PMID:24678208

  2. Odontogenic Keratocysts Arise from Quiescent Epithelial Rests and Are Associated with Deregulated Hedgehog Signaling in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Grachtchouk, Marina; Liu, Jianhong; Wang, Aiqin; Wei, Lebing; Bichakjian, Christopher K.; Garlick, Jonathan; Paulino, Augusto F.; Giordano, Thomas; Dlugosz, Andrzej A.

    2006-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts in humans are aggressive, noninflammatory jaw cysts that may harbor PTCH1 mutations, leading to constitutive activity of the embryonic Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. We show here that epithelial expression of the Hh transcriptional effector Gli2 is sufficient for highly penetrant keratocyst development in transgenic mice. Mouse and human keratocysts expressed similar markers, leading to tooth misalignment, bone remodeling, and craniofacial abnormalities. We detected Hh target gene expression in epithelial cells lining keratocysts from both species, implicating deregulated Hh signaling in their development. Most mouse keratocysts arose from rests of Malassez—quiescent, residual embryonic epithelial cells that remain embedded in the periodontal ligament surrounding mature teeth. In Gli2-expressing mice, these rests were stimulated to proliferate, stratify, and form a differentiated squamous epithelium. The frequent development of keratocysts in Gli2-expressing mice supports the idea that GLI transcription factor activity mediates pathological responses to deregulated Hh signaling in humans. Moreover, Gli2-mediated reactivation of quiescent epithelial rests to form keratocysts indicates that these cells retain the capacity to function as progenitor cells on activation by an appropriate developmental signal. PMID:16936257

  3. [The complex treatment of odontogenic periostitis and the opportunity to estimate the speed of regression of inflammatory process in gerontostomatology].

    PubMed

    Ar'eva, G T; Solov'ev, M M; Ar'ev, A L

    2008-01-01

    68 patients in the age of 32-83 years (middle age 61.83 +/- 14.73 year) with the diagnosis acute odontogenic periostitis of jaw before treatment (at height of acuteness) and on a background of the complex treatment which include Xefocam were examined. It is shown, that treatment with addition of Xefocam accelerates regress of an inflammation and a stage of recovery. High analgetic activity of Xefocam at this pathology was revealed. The greatest efficiency of this drug is marked in group of patients of elderly and senile age. The opportunity of definition the Melatonin concentration in a saliva as marker of speed of inflammatory process regress is shown. The high level of Melatonin concentration in a saliva at peak of an inflammation is significant prognostic criterion of outcome of disease. The high level of Melatonin in saliva at the patients of advanced age who has survived in the childhood the siege of Leningrad in comparison with patients of similar age, who was not exposed in the childhood by multifactor stress impact influence, is revealed more.

  4. One Odontogenic Cell-Population Contributes to the Development of the Mouse Incisors and of the Oral Vestibule

    PubMed Central

    Hovorakova, Maria; Lochovska, Katerina; Zahradnicek, Oldrich; Domonkosova Tibenska, Kristina; Dornhoferova, Michaela; Horakova-Smrckova, Lucie; Bodorikova, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The area of the oral vestibule is often a place where pathologies appear (e.g., peripheral odontomas). The origin of these pathologies is not fully understood. In the present study, we traced a cell population expressing Sonic hedgehog (Shh) from the beginning of tooth development using Cre-LoxP system in the lower jaw of wild-type (WT) mice. We focused on Shh expression in the area of the early appearing rudimentary incisor germs located anteriorly to the prospective incisors. The localization of the labelled cells in the incisor germs and also in the inner epithelial layer of the vestibular anlage showed that the first very early developmental events in the lower incisor area are common to the vestibulum oris and the prospective incisor primordia in mice. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of human historical tooth-like structures found in the vestibular area of jaws confirmed their relation to teeth and thus the capability of the vestibular tissue to form teeth. The location of labelled cells descendant of the early appearing Shh expression domain related to the rudimentary incisor anlage not only in the rudimentary and functional incisor germs but also in the externally located anlage of the oral vestibule documented the odontogenic potential of the vestibular epithelium. This potential can be awakened under pathological conditions and become a source of pathologies in the vestibular area. PMID:27611193

  5. [Adipocytic tumors].

    PubMed

    Stock, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Adipocytic tumors are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms, liposarcoma accounting for approximately 20% of soft tissue sarcomas. The differential diagnosis between benign and malignant tumors is often problematic and represents a significant proportion of consultation cases. The goal of this article is to review liposarcoma subtypes, the main benign adipocytic neoplasms: lipoblastoma, hibernoma, spindle/pleomorphic cell lipoma, chondroid lipoma, as well as non adipocytic neoplasms with a lipomatous component such as lipomatous solitary fibrous tumor, emphasizing on practical differential diagnosis issues, and immunohistochemical and molecular tools allowing their resolution.

  6. Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis, and the condition, or histology , of the cancer cells when observed under a microscope. "Favorable" histology is associated with a good chance of a cure; tumors with "unfavorable" histology are more aggressive and ...

  7. Tumor Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... types: Germ cell tumors, lymphoma, leukemia, melanoma, and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To assess stage, ... NSE) Cancer types: Small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To help in ...

  8. Retrorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Bullard Dunn, Kelli

    2010-02-01

    Retrorectal or presacral tumors are rare and can be challenging to diagnose and treat. Because the retrorectal space contains multiple embryologic remnants derived from various tissues, the tumors that develop in this space are heterogeneous. Most lesions are benign, but malignant neoplasms are not uncommon. Lesions are classified as congenital, neurogenic, osseous, inflammatory, or miscellaneous. Although treatment depends on diagnosis and anatomic location, most retrorectal lesions will require surgical resection.

  9. Physical properties and biological/odontogenic effects of an experimentally developed fast-setting α-tricalcium phosphate-based pulp capping material

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, fast-setting α-tricalcium-phosphate (TCP) cement was developed for use in the pulp capping process. The aim of this study was to investigate the physical properties and biological effects of α-TCP cement in comparison with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Methods We measured the setting time, pH values, compressive strength, and solubility of the two materials. We evaluated biocompatibility on the basis of cell morphology and a viability test using human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). Chemical composition of each material was analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic (EDS) analysis. The expression of odontogenic-related genes was evaluated by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. The calcified nodule formation was measured by Alizarin red staining. We performed the pulp capping procedure on rat teeth for histological investigation. The data were analyzed by an independent t-test for physical properties, one-way ANOVA for biological effects, and the Mann-Whitney U test for tertiary dentin formation. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant for all tests. Results The setting time, pH values, and compressive strength of α-TCP was lower than that of MTA (P < 0.05); however, the solubility of α-TCP was higher than that of MTA (P < 0.05). The resultant cell viability observed with the two materials was similar (P > 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that cells attached to both materials were flat and had cytoplasmic extensions. The expression of odontogenic-related markers and mineralized nodule formation were higher in the two experimental groups compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Continuous tertiary dentin was formed underneath the capping materials in all samples of the tested groups. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that the α-TCP exhibited biocompatibility and odontogenicity comparable to MTA, whereas it had a quicker setting time. PMID:25015173

  10. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors).

    PubMed

    Marulli, Giuseppe; Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner's syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach.

  11. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors).

    PubMed

    Marulli, Giuseppe; Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner's syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach. PMID:27429965

  12. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors)

    PubMed Central

    Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner’s syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach. PMID:27429965

  13. Immunolocalization and activity of the MMP-9 and MMP-2 in odontogenic region of the rat incisor tooth after post shortening procedure.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Jose Rosa; Omar, Nádia Fayez; dos Santos Neves, Juliana; Narvaes, Eliene Aparecida Orsini; Novaes, Pedro Duarte

    2011-04-01

    MMP-9 and MMP-2 are metalloproteinases which degrade the denatured collagen fibers. However, there is no report about roles of these MMPs in the odontogenic region of the adult rat incisor tooth under different eruption conditions. Male Wistar rats were divided in a normofunctional group (NF) in which their lower teeth remained in a normal eruption. In a hypofunctional group (HP) rats underwent shortening of their lower left incisor tooth every 2 days during 12 days. The eruption rate as well as the expression and activities of MMP-9 and MMP-2 were evaluated using imunohistochemistry and zymography. Although the shortening increased the eruption rate, no changes in the MMP-9 and MMP-2 were observed. We conclude that in adult rats, in opposite to development of tooth, the MMP-9 and MMP-2 present in the odontogenic region does not seem to play a direct role in the remodeling matrix, even after post-shortening procedures which to lead an acceleration of the eruption process in the incisor.

  14. Brain tumor (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumors are classified depending on the exact site of the tumor, the type of tissue involved, benign ... tendencies of the tumor, and other factors. Primary brain tumors can arise from the brain cells, the meninges ( ...

  15. Understanding Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  16. Brain Tumor Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ...

  17. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff ... Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning Donate to the ABTA Help advance the understanding ...

  18. [Tumor surgery].

    PubMed

    Hausamen, J E

    2000-05-01

    Surgery is still the primary therapeutic approach in treatment of tumors in the head and neck area, dating back to the early nineteenth century. More than 150 years ago, hemimaxillectomies and mandibular resections as well as hemiglossectomies were already performed by leading surgeons. The block principle we are now following dates back to Crile, who also established the principle of cervical lymph node dissection. Ablative oncologic surgery has always been closely linked with plastic and reconstructive surgery, rendering radical surgical interventions possible without disfiguring patients. The development of facial reconstructive surgery proceeded in stages, in the first instance as secondary reconstruction using tube pedicled flaps. The change to the concept of primary reconstruction occurred via arterialized skin flaps and myocutaneous flaps to the widely accepted and performed free tissue transfer. Free bone grafting, inaugurated earlier and still representing the majority of bone grafting, has been supplemented for certain reconstructive purposes by free vascularized bone transfer from various donor sites. Although the five-year-survival rate of carcinoma of the oral cavity has remained unchanged in the past 30 years, distinctive improvements in tumor surgery can be recorded. This is primarily based on improved diagnostics such as modern imaging techniques and the refinement of surgical techniques. The DOSAK has worked out distinctive guidelines for effective ablative oncologic surgery. Surgical approaches offering wide exposure and carrying low morbidity play a decisive role in radical resections. For this reason, midfacial degloving offers an essential improvement for the resection of midface tumors, especially from an aesthetic point of view. Tumors situated deep behind the viscerocranium at the skull base can be clearly exposed either through a lateral approach following a temporary osteotomy of the mandibular ramus or a transmandibular, transmaxillar, or

  19. [Incidence of odontogenic phlegmon associated with polymorphic variant 896A/G of gene TLR4, but not with 2258G/A of gene TLR2].

    PubMed

    Kuong, Vu V'et; Avetikov, D S; Shlykova, O A; Izmaĭlova, O V; Kaĭdashev, I P

    2014-10-01

    The problem actuality is caused by significant enhancement of the incidence rate for inflammatory diseases of the head and neck tissues, first of all of the oral cavity floor abscesses and phlegmons, which causes severe forms of mediastinitis while inadequate treatment. The authors have had established, that Toll-like receptors (TLR) initiate a cascade of anti-inflammatory reactions of the inborn immunity, followed by synthesis of a certain cytokines, and their genetic polymorphism changes the immune reactivity of the organism. Trustworthy correlation of the gene TLR4 (rs4986790) polymorphism 896A/G was proved with high risk of the odontogenic phlegmon of the oral cavity floor occurrence, what would permit to prognosticate the disease course in early terms, to optimize the schemes of its prophylaxis and treatment. PMID:25675790

  20. Downregulation of adenomatous polyposis coli by microRNA-663 promotes odontogenic differentiation through activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Park, Min-Gyeong; Lee, Seul Ah; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Heung-Joong; Yu, Sun-Kyoung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob; Chun, Hong Sung; Park, Joo-Cheol; Kim, Do Kyung

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • miR-663 is significantly up-regulated during MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell differentiation. • miR-663 accelerates mineralization in MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells without cell proliferation. • miR-663 promotes odontoblastic cell differentiation by targeting APC and activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MDPC-23 cells. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation by inhibiting mRNA translation or by inducing its degradation. However, the role of miRNAs in odontogenic differentiation is largely unknown. In this present study, we observed that the expression of miR-663 increased significantly during differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts. Furthermore, up-regulation of miR-663 expression promoted odontogenic differentiation and accelerated mineralization without proliferation in MDPC-23 cells. In addition, target gene prediction for miR-663 revealed that the mRNA of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, which is associated with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has a miR-663 binding site in its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Furthermore, APC expressional was suppressed significantly by miR-663, and this down-regulation of APC expression triggered activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-663 promotes differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts by targeting APC-mediated activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Therefore, miR-663 can be considered a critical regulator of odontoblast differentiation and can be utilized for developing miRNA-based therapeutic agents.

  1. Secondary optic nerve tumors.

    PubMed

    Christmas, N J; Mead, M D; Richardson, E P; Albert, D M

    1991-01-01

    Secondary tumors of the optic nerve are more common than primary optic nerve tumors. The involvement of the optic nerve may arise from direct invasion from intraocular malignancies, from hematopoietic malignancy, from meningeal carcinomatosis, or from distant primary tumors. Orbital tumors rarely invade the optic nerve, and brain tumors involve it only in their late stages.

  2. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  3. Tumors and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  4. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Complications of these tumors include: Diabetes Hormone crises (if the tumor releases certain types of hormones) Severe low blood sugar (from insulinomas) Severe ulcers in the stomach and small intestine (from gastrinomas) Spread of the tumor to the liver

  5. Childhood Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  6. Pathology of eyelid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pe’er, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The eyelids are composed of four layers: skin and subcutaneous tissue including its adnexa, striated muscle, tarsus with the meibomian glands, and the palpebral conjunctiva. Benign and malignant tumors can arise from each of the eyelid layers. Most eyelid tumors are of cutaneous origin, mostly epidermal, which can be divided into epithelial and melanocytic tumors. Benign epithelial lesions, cystic lesions, and benign melanocytic lesions are very common. The most common malignant eyelid tumors are basal cell carcinoma in Caucasians and sebaceous gland carcinoma in Asians. Adnexal and stromal tumors are less frequent. The present review describes the more important eyelid tumors according to the following groups: Benign and malignant epithelial tumors, benign and malignant melanocytic tumors, benign and malignant adnexal tumors, stromal eyelid tumors, lymphoproliferative and metastatic tumors, other rare eyelid tumors, and inflammatory and infections lesions that simulate neoplasms. PMID:27146927

  7. [Tumor formation in plants].

    PubMed

    Matveeva, T V; Lutova, L A; Nester, Iu

    2001-09-01

    The data on genetic tumors in plant species and interspecific hybrids, as well as the problems of Agrobacterium-induced tumors are reviewed. The role of the horizontal gene transfer in the induction of genetic tumors is discussed. PMID:11642121

  8. Pathology of eyelid tumors.

    PubMed

    Pe'er, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    The eyelids are composed of four layers: skin and subcutaneous tissue including its adnexa, striated muscle, tarsus with the meibomian glands, and the palpebral conjunctiva. Benign and malignant tumors can arise from each of the eyelid layers. Most eyelid tumors are of cutaneous origin, mostly epidermal, which can be divided into epithelial and melanocytic tumors. Benign epithelial lesions, cystic lesions, and benign melanocytic lesions are very common. The most common malignant eyelid tumors are basal cell carcinoma in Caucasians and sebaceous gland carcinoma in Asians. Adnexal and stromal tumors are less frequent. The present review describes the more important eyelid tumors according to the following groups: Benign and malignant epithelial tumors, benign and malignant melanocytic tumors, benign and malignant adnexal tumors, stromal eyelid tumors, lymphoproliferative and metastatic tumors, other rare eyelid tumors, and inflammatory and infections lesions that simulate neoplasms. PMID:27146927

  9. Overview of Heart Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. Most heart tumors are metastatic cancer. Did You Know... Noncancerous tumors can be as deadly ... slow the tumor's growth. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Table 2 ...

  10. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  11. Tumor heterogeneity and circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chufeng; Guan, Yan; Sun, Yulan; Ai, Dan; Guo, Qisen

    2016-05-01

    In patients with cancer, individualized treatment strategies are generally guided by an analysis of molecular biomarkers. However, genetic instability allows tumor cells to lose monoclonality and acquire genetic heterogeneity, an important characteristic of tumors, during disease progression. Researchers have found that there is tumor heterogeneity between the primary tumor and metastatic lesions, between different metastatic lesions, and even within a single tumor (either primary or metastatic). Tumor heterogeneity is associated with heterogeneous protein functions, which lowers diagnostic precision and consequently becomes an obstacle to determining the appropriate therapeutic strategies for individual cancer patients. With the development of novel testing technologies, an increasing number of studies have attempted to explore tumor heterogeneity by examining circulating tumor cells (CTCs), with the expectation that CTCs may comprehensively represent the full spectrum of mutations and/or protein expression alterations present in the cancer. In addition, this strategy represents a minimally invasive approach compared to traditional tissue biopsies that can be used to dynamically monitor tumor evolution. The present article reviews the potential efficacy of using CTCs to identify both spatial and temporal tumor heterogeneity. This review also highlights current issues in this field and provides an outlook toward future applications of CTCs.

  12. Pathogenesis of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Run; Melmed, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are common and mostly benign neoplasia which cause excess or deficiency of pituitary hormones and compressive damage to adjacent organs. Oncogene activation [e.g. PTTG (pituitary tumor-transforming gene) and HMGA2], tumor suppressor gene inactivation (e.g. MEN1 and PRKAR1A), epigenetic changes (e.g. methylation) and humoral factors (e.g. ectopic production of stimulating hormones) are all possible pituitary tumor initiators; the micro-environment of pituitary tumors including steroid milieu, angiogenesis and abnormal cell adhesion further promote tumor growth. Senescence, a cellular defence mechanism against malignant transformation, may explain the benign nature of at least some pituitary tumors. We suggest that future research on pituitary tumor pathogenesis should incorporate systems approaches, and address regulatory mechanisms for pituitary cell proliferation, development of new animal models of pituitary tumor and isolation of functional human pituitary tumor cell lines. PMID:20541667

  13. Increase of MT1-MMP, TIMP-2 and Ki-67 proteins in the odontogenic region of the rat incisor post-shortening procedure.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Jose Rosa; Omar, Nádia Fayez; Dos Santos Neves, Juliana; Narvaes, Eliene Aparecida Orsini; Novaes, Pedro Duarte

    2010-12-01

    MT1-MMP and TIMP-2 are well known for their roles in remodelling of extracellular matrix components. However, reports are emerging on the involvement of these molecules in cell kinetics. In the rat incisor tooth, a shortening treatment increases the eruption and cell proliferation rates. However, the role of MT1-MMP and TIMP-2 proteins in these processes is still to be evaluated. Male Wistar rats were divided in two groups. In the normofunctional group (NF) the lower teeth of the rats remained in a normal eruption process. In the hypofunctional group (HP) rats their lower left incisor tooth was shortened every 2 days during 12 days. The eruption rate was estimated during the shortening period and MT1-MMP, TIMP-2 and Ki-67 protein expression from the odontogenic region was measured after the treatment. In HP groups an increase in eruption rate, and in MT1-MMP/TIMP-2 and Ki-67 expression were observed. We conclude that there is a relationship between the increase in eruption rate, and in levels of MT1-MMP, TIMP-2 and Ki-67 in the HP group. This suggests that MT1-MMP and TIMP-2 may have some role in cell proliferation during the eruption of the rat incisor tooth.

  14. [Tumor-induced immunosuppression].

    PubMed

    Paul, S; Calmels, B; Régulier, E

    2002-01-01

    Tumor immunology is based on two essential concepts: immune surveillance, which implicate the host immune reactions against tumor cells, and tumor immune escape, which refers to the tumor-cell evasion process against the host immune system. The notion that a deficit in immune cell functions permits tumor growth has received experimental support with the discovery of several different biochemical defects in T lymphocytes that infiltrate cancers. Furthermore, expression of self-antigens on the tumor surface impose potential barriers to the development of effective immune response. Tumors are able to overcome immune surveillance by changing the polarity of effectors cells, thus down-regulating the proliferation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells, or altering the effector compositions of immune cells within the tumor milieu, or both. Understanding the interaction between cancer cells and host immune cells is of importance for clinical applications or immunotherapy in cancer treatment. PMID:11937439

  15. Salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, P J; Black, K M

    1985-10-01

    A retrospective review of 643 patients with salivary gland tumors seen between 1958-72 is reported. There were 328 malignant and 375 benign tumors. All patients with malignant tumors were assessed in a multidisciplinary head and neck clinic. The median age for developing malignant tumors was 58 and there was a male to female ratio of 1.2:1. For benign tumors the median age was 46 years and the male to female ratio 0.8:1. Overall the primary tumor was controlled by the first planned treatment in 145 (44%) malignant tumors and in 253 (80%) benign tumors. The five and 10 year actuarial survival for malignant tumors was 59.4% and 45.6% respectively.

  16. Pediatric jaw tumors: Our experience

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Susmita; Kumar, Sanjeev; Pundir, Siddharth

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reports of series of central jaw tumours in children are rare hence predicting their biological behaviour as well as treatment, prognosis have not been documented from this part of the world. Aim: To study retrospectively, the paediatric central jaw tumours, reported to our institute with relation to site of occurrence, presentation and biological behaviour. Materials and Methods: All consecutive patients (<18 years), between 2004-2010, histologically diagnosed as having an intraosseous tumour or tumour-like lesions formed the study population. Patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were only considered for further study. The entire study material was analyzed and grouped into various categories for logical conclusions. The data accumulated were grouped, entered and analyzed. Results: Sixty-one cases fulfilled the criteria. Gender distribution was equal, with mandible predominance (2.2:1) and a predominance of non-odontogenic lesions (2:1). There were 4 malignant and 57 benign conditions. Anterior jaw lesions were 23 while 38 were present in the posterior region of jaws (1:1:6). Conclusions: The pattern of central jaw tumours presentation in children from this part of India has been documented. In this study, paediatric jaw tumours are less common compared to those in adults with non-odontogenic tumours being common. The finding of the present study indicates that an impacted tooth, beyond the eruption time deserves more attention for the reason of associated pathologies in children. PMID:22438639

  17. Stages of Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  18. Brain Tumor Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... facts and statistics here include brain and central nervous system tumors (including spinal cord, pituitary and pineal gland ... U.S. living with a primary brain and central nervous system tumor. This year, nearly 17,000 people will ...

  19. Pituitary Tumors: Condition Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... stress. Growth hormone helps control body growth and metabolism. Thyroid-stimulating hormone is involved in growth, body temperature, and heart rate. Nonfunctioning pituitary tumors (also called nonsecretory tumors) do ...

  20. Tumor suppressor ARF

    PubMed Central

    Través, Paqui G.; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    ARF (alternative reading frame) is one of the most important tumor regulator playing critical roles in controlling tumor initiation and progression. Recently, we have demonstrated a novel and unexpected role for ARF as modulator of inflammatory responses. PMID:23162766

  1. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... CBTF Justin's Hope Fund Grant Recipients Grants Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

  2. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Cancer Foundation joins the PBTF Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  3. American Brain Tumor Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the Ear Canals Read More ABTA News October 5, 2016 Largest American Brain Tumor Association Team Running in Bank of America Chicago Marathon Sunday, October 9 September 21, 2016 American Brain Tumor Association Awards 16 Grants to Support ...

  4. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... for lung carcinoid tumor symptoms Surgery to treat lung carcinoid tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  5. Labial salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Neville, B W; Damm, D D; Weir, J C; Fantasia, J E

    1988-05-15

    A study was conducted on labial salivary gland tumors from four oral pathology laboratories. Of the 103 identified tumors, 87 (84.5%) were from the upper lip, whereas 16 (15.5%) were from the lower lip. Of the 87 upper lip tumors, 80 (92.0%) were benign. Forty-three of these were monomorphic adenomas and 37 were pleomorphic adenomas. Seven malignant tumors of the upper lip were as follows: four adenoid cystic carcinomas, two acinic cell carcinomas, and one adenocarcinoma. Of the 16 lower lip tumors, 15 (93.8%) were malignant. Thirteen of these were mucoepidermoid carcinomas and two were acinic cell carcinomas. The only benign lower lip tumor was an intraductal papilloma. These results confirm the findings of previous investigations, showing that minor salivary gland tumors are much more common in the upper lip than the lower lip, but that lower lip tumors are more likely to be malignant.

  6. [Intrapulmonary Solitary Fibrous Tumor].

    PubMed

    Komori, Kazuyuki; Tabata, Toshiharu; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Minowa, Muneo; Fujimura, Shigefumi

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of intrapulmonary solitary fibrous tumor( SFT). A 34-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to an abnormal shadow on a chest roentgenogram without symptom. Computed tomography showed a circumscribed intrapulmonary tumor with mild uptake on fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography( PET) in the left lower lobe( S6). Frozen examination revealed a mesenchymal tumor. Based on the pathological and immunohistochemical findings, the tumor was diagnosed as intrapulmonary SFT.

  7. [Intrapulmonary Solitary Fibrous Tumor].

    PubMed

    Komori, Kazuyuki; Tabata, Toshiharu; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Minowa, Muneo; Fujimura, Shigefumi

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of intrapulmonary solitary fibrous tumor( SFT). A 34-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to an abnormal shadow on a chest roentgenogram without symptom. Computed tomography showed a circumscribed intrapulmonary tumor with mild uptake on fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography( PET) in the left lower lobe( S6). Frozen examination revealed a mesenchymal tumor. Based on the pathological and immunohistochemical findings, the tumor was diagnosed as intrapulmonary SFT. PMID:26329708

  8. What Is Wilms Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor): In these tumors, the look of the cancer cells varies widely, and the cells’ nuclei (the central parts that contain the DNA) tend to be very large and distorted. This is called anaplasia . The more anaplasia a tumor has, the harder it is to cure. Other types of kidney cancers in children Most ...

  9. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brain and Spinal Tumors Information Page Synonym(s): Spinal Cord ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Brain and Spinal Tumors? Tumors of the brain and ...

  10. Recurrent mixed tumor.

    PubMed

    Batsakis, J G

    1986-01-01

    Recurrence of benign neoplasms can usually be attributed to incomplete excision. Such is the case with benign mixed tumors of salivary glands. Certain histopathologic features of mixed tumors, however, appear to facilitate recurrences. These are: a predominantly myxoid composition, and transcapsular extension by the tumor. Multicentric origin is possible, but it must be regarded as a much lower order of probability.

  11. Tumor-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC), contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor-homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR) motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies, and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is present in the

  12. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Bournazou, Eirini; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Persistent JAK-STAT3 signaling is implicated in many aspects of tumorigenesis. Apart from its tumor-intrinsic effects, STAT3 also exerts tumor-extrinsic effects, supporting tumor survival and metastasis. These involve the regulation of paracrine cytokine signaling, alterations in metastatic sites rendering these permissive for the growth of cancer cells and subversion of host immune responses to create an immunosuppressive environment. Targeting this signaling pathway is considered a novel promising therapeutic approach, especially in the context of tumor immunity. In this article, we will review to what extent JAK-STAT3-targeted therapies affect the tumor microenvironment and whether the observed effects underlie responsiveness to therapy. PMID:24058812

  13. Neuroimaging of Spinal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Merhemic, Zulejha; Stosic-Opincal, Tatjana; Thurnher, Majda M

    2016-08-01

    Intradural tumors are relatively rare neoplasms; however, when unrecognized in a timely manner, they can result in serious deficits and disability. These tumors lack obvious clinical symptoms until compression of the cord or neurologic deficits occur. The most common intramedullary lesions are ependymomas, astrocytomas, and hemangioblastomas. Meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors (schwannomas and neurofibromas) comprise most intradural-extramedullary tumors. Less common tumors are hemangiopericytoma, paraganglioma, melanocytoma, melanoma, metastases, and lymphoma. MR imaging is the imaging method of choice, helpful for localization and characterization of these lesions before treatment and for follow-up after treatment. PMID:27417401

  14. Benign ear cyst or tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Osteomas; Exostoses; Tumor - ear; Cysts - ear; Ear cysts; Ear tumors; Bony tumor of the ear canal ... bony tumors of the ear canal (exostoses and osteomas) are caused by excess growth of bone. Repeated ...

  15. Tumors of the spine

    PubMed Central

    Ciftdemir, Mert; Kaya, Murat; Selcuk, Esref; Yalniz, Erol

    2016-01-01

    Spine tumors comprise a small percentage of reasons for back pain and other symptoms originating in the spine. The majority of the tumors involving the spinal column are metastases of visceral organ cancers which are mostly seen in older patients. Primary musculoskeletal system sarcomas involving the spinal column are rare. Benign tumors and tumor-like lesions of the musculoskeletal system are mostly seen in young patients and often cause instability and canal compromise. Optimal diagnosis and treatment of spine tumors require a multidisciplinary approach and thorough knowledge of both spine surgery and musculoskeletal tumor surgery. Either primary or metastatic tumors involving the spine are demanding problems in terms of diagnosis and treatment. Spinal instability and neurological compromise are the main and critical problems in patients with tumors of the spinal column. In the past, only a few treatment options aiming short-term control were available for treatment of primary and metastatic spine tumors. Spine surgeons adapted their approach for spine tumors according to orthopaedic oncologic principles in the last 20 years. Advances in imaging, surgical techniques and implant technology resulted in better diagnosis and surgical treatment options, especially for primary tumors. Also, modern chemotherapy drugs and regimens with new radiotherapy and radiosurgery options caused moderate to long-term local and systemic control for even primary sarcomas involving the spinal column. PMID:26925382

  16. [Pediatric retroperitoneal tumors].

    PubMed

    Benicio dos Santos, I; Benicio dos Santos, M

    1980-01-01

    The author has based his work "Retroperitoneals tumors in infancy and childhood" in 65 cases observed at "Hospital Martagao Gesteira", Salvador, Bahia, Brasil. 32 of the retroperitoneals tumors, either intrarenals or extrarenals, observed in infancy and childhood were Wilm's tumor, 22 neuroblastoma, 5 hydronephrosis, 2 multicystic kidney, 1 policystic kidney, 2 pancreatic cyst and 1 biliar cyst. Wilm's tumor had the highest incidence - 32 cases (49,2%); neuroblastoma was in the second place in incidence - 22 (33,8%) of the 65 cases of retroperitoneals tumors studied, were neuroblastoma. As registered by the author in previous paper, the neuroblastoma, on contrary of what is established in the specialized literature, not was: the most frequent abdominal tumors, in infancy and childhood, neither it was also the abdominal pediatric tumor which could match Wilm's tumor in incidence. The plain X ray film of the abdomen, the Excretory Urography, the Cavography and Arteriography, the Radiological Examination of the Stomach and Duodenum, of the Small Intestine and the Colons, contribute in a very important way to establish the topography (retro or intraperitoneal) of the pediatric abdominal tumors. The author emphasizes that the plain X ray film of the abdomen supply important elements for the conclusion concerning the localization of abdominal tumors, from the observation of a simple criterion - the retroperitoneals tumors obliterate the border of kidney, because they are placed in the same plan of the kidney, data which is not pointed out sufficiently by the authors who have studied the subject.

  17. Cartilage-forming tumors.

    PubMed

    Qasem, Shadi A; DeYoung, Barry R

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage-forming tumors as a group are the most common primary bone tumors; this is largely due to the common occurrence of asymptomatic benign lesions such as osteochondroma and enchondroma. The common feature of these tumors is the presence of chondrocytic cells and the formation of cartilaginous tumor matrix. Some of these tumors are true neoplasms while others are hamartomas or developmental abnormalities. The morphologic heterogeneity of these tumors may be explained by a common multipotent mesenchymal cell differentiating along the lines of fetal-adult cartilage maturation. Recently mutations in IDH1 and IDH2 have been detected in a variety of benign and malignant cartilaginous tumors.(1-4.) PMID:24680178

  18. Genital soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Schoolmeester, John K; Fritchie, Karen J

    2015-07-01

    Mesenchymal neoplasms of the vulvovaginal and inguinoscrotal regions are among the most diagnostically challenging specimens in the pathology laboratory owing largely to their unique intersection between general soft tissue tumors and relatively genital-specific mesenchymal tumors. Genital stromal tumors are a unique subset of soft tissue tumors encountered at this location, and this group includes fibroepithelial stromal polyp, superficial (cervicovaginal) myofibroblastoma, cellular angiofibroma, mammary-type myofibroblastoma, angiomyofibroblastoma and aggressive angiomyxoma. Aside from the striking morphologic and immunophenotypic similarity that is seen with these entities, there is evidence that a subset of genital stromal tumors may be linked genetically. This review will focus on simplifying this group of tumors and provide the pathologist or dermatopathologist with practical management information. Smooth muscle tumors of the external genitalia will also be discussed.

  19. Odontogenic Ameloblast-associated Protein (ODAM) Mediates Junctional Epithelium Attachment to Teeth via Integrin-ODAM-Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor 5 (ARHGEF5)-RhoA Signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Ji, Suk; Park, Su-Jin; Choung, Han-Wool; Choi, Youngnim; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Park, Shin-Young; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2015-06-01

    Adhesion of the junctional epithelium (JE) to the tooth surface is crucial for maintaining periodontal health. Although odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) is expressed in the JE, its molecular functions remain unknown. We investigated ODAM function during JE development and regeneration and its functional significance in the initiation and progression of periodontitis and peri-implantitis. ODAM was expressed in the normal JE of healthy teeth but absent in the pathologic pocket epithelium of diseased periodontium. In periodontitis and peri-implantitis, ODAM was extruded from the JE following onset with JE attachment loss and detected in gingival crevicular fluid. ODAM induced RhoA activity and the expression of downstream factors, including ROCK (Rho-associated kinase), by interacting with Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 5 (ARHGEF5). ODAM-mediated RhoA signaling resulted in actin filament rearrangement. Reduced ODAM and RhoA expression in integrin β3- and β6-knockout mice revealed that cytoskeleton reorganization in the JE occurred via integrin-ODAM-ARHGEF5-RhoA signaling. Fibronectin and laminin activated RhoA signaling via the integrin-ODAM pathway. Finally, ODAM was re-expressed with RhoA in regenerating JE after gingivectomy in vivo. These results suggest that ODAM expression in the JE reflects a healthy periodontium and that JE adhesion to the tooth surface is regulated via fibronectin/laminin-integrin-ODAM-ARHGEF5-RhoA signaling. We also propose that ODAM could be used as a biomarker of periodontitis and peri-implantitis.

  20. Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Costanza; Hayes, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) are shed from primary or secondary tumors. Prior studies have demonstrated that enumeration of CTC is a robust independent prognostic factor of progression free and overall survival in patients with early and metastatic breast cancer. CTC, as well as other circulating tumor markers, have the appealing advantages over tissue biopsy of (1) ease of collection, (2) serial evaluation, and (3) interrogation of the entire tumor burden instead of just a limited part of the tumor. Advances have been recently made in phenotyping and genotyping of CTC, which should provide insights into the predictive role of CTC for sensitivity or resistance to therapies. In addition, CTC phenotypic marker changes during the course of treatment may serve as pharmacodynamic monitoring tools. Therefore, CTC may be considered "liquid biopsies," providing prognostic and predictive clinical information as well as additional understanding of tumor heterogeneity.

  1. Tumor cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  2. [Retroperitoneal germ cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Borrell Palanca, A; García Garzón, J; Villamón Fort, R; Domenech Pérez, C; Martínez Lorente, A; Gunthner, S; García Sisamón, F

    1999-03-01

    We report a case of retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor in an 17 years old patient who presented with aedema and pain in left inferior extremity asociated with hemopthysis caused by pulmonar metastasis, who was treated with chemotherapy and resection of residual mass and pulmonary nodes. Dyagnosis was stableshed by fine neadle aspiration biopsy of the wass. We comment on the difficult of stableshing differential dyagnosis between retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor and metastasis of a testicular tumor. Dyagnosis is stableshed by the finding of a histologically malignant germ-cell tumor with normal testis. We considered physical examination and ecographyc exploration enough for a correct dyagnosis.

  3. Radioresistance of Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Kevin; Knisely, Jonathan; Symons, Marc; Ruggieri, Rosamaria

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as part of the standard of care treatment of the majority of brain tumors. The efficacy of RT is limited by radioresistance and by normal tissue radiation tolerance. This is highlighted in pediatric brain tumors where the use of radiation is limited by the excessive toxicity to the developing brain. For these reasons, radiosensitization of tumor cells would be beneficial. In this review, we focus on radioresistance mechanisms intrinsic to tumor cells. We also evaluate existing approaches to induce radiosensitization and explore future avenues of investigation. PMID:27043632

  4. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  5. Tumor-Targeted Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    ElBayoumi, Tamer A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of drug delivery systems can be enhanced by making them target-specific via the attachment of various ligands. We attempted to enhance tumor accumulation and therapeutic effect of doxorubicin-loaded long-circulating PEGylated liposomes (Doxil®, ALZA Corp.) by coupling to their surface the anti-cancer monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5) with nuclesome (NS)-restricted activity, that can recognize the surface of various tumor but not normal cells and specifically targets pharmaceutical carriers to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Following earlier in vitro results with various cancer cell lines, the mAb 2C5-liposomes were studied in vivo vs. plain and non-specific IgG-liposomes. Experimental design Antibody coupling to Doxil® was performed via the “post-insertion” technique. Using 111In-labeled liposomes, the tissue biodistribution and pharmacokinetic profile were studied, as well as their accumulation in tumors in mice was followed by the whole-body γ-scintigraphic imaging. Therapeutic efficacy of mAb 2C5-targeted Doxil® vs. non-specific IgG-modified and original Doxil® controls was followed by registering live tumor growth and determining tumor weights upon mice sacrifice. Results mAb2C5 antibody-targeted liposomes demonstrate enhanced accumulation in tumors, and the in vivo therapeutic activity of the mAb 2C5-Doxil® treatment was found to be significantly superior, resulting in final tumor weights of only 25-40% compared to all Doxil® control treatments, when tested against the subcutaneous primary murine tumors of 4T1 and C26 and human PC3 tumor in nude mice. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the remarkable capability of 2C5-targeted Doxil® to specifically deliver its cargo into various tumors significantly increasing the efficacy of therapy. PMID:19276264

  6. Benign bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Steffner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Benign bone lesions are a broad category that demonstrates a spectrum of activities from latent to aggressive. Differentiating the various tumors is important in order to properly determine necessary intervention. This chapter focuses on the presentation, imaging, diagnostic features, and treatment of the most common benign bone tumors in order to help guide diagnosis and management. PMID:25070230

  7. Metastatic pleural tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... persons. Alternative Names Tumor - metastatic pleural Images Pleural space References Arenberg D, Pickens A. Metastatic malignant tumors. In: Mason RJ, Murray JF, Broaddus VC, et al., eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap ...

  8. Skull Base Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    In skull base tumors associated with a low radiosensitivity for conventional radiotherapy (RT), irradiation with proton or carbon ion beams facilitates a safe and accurate application of high tumor doses due to the favorable beam localization properties of these particle beams. Cranial nerves, the brain stem and normal brain tissue can at the same time be optimally spared.

  9. [Metachronous bilateral Wilms' tumor].

    PubMed

    Mambié Meléndez, M; Guibelalde Del Castillo, M; Nieto Del Rincón, N; Rodrigo Jiménez, D; Femenia Reus, A; Román Piñana, J M

    2002-03-01

    Wilms' tumor occurs in 5-10 % of all cases of nephroblastoma. The metachronous form represents 2-3 % of cases. Most (96.2 %) metachronous tumors appear within the first 5 years of the primary tumor. Associated malformations are more common in bilateral cases. Metachronous tumors are a therapeutic challenge. We describe the case of an 11-year-old girl with left hemihypertrophy. The diagnosis was metachronous relapse of Wilms' tumor 7 years after the first diagnosis. The patient received five courses of preoperative chemotherapy and tumorectomy was performed. Because of post-surgical complications, nephrectomy was performed on her only kidney. Since she is anephric, the patient is in chronic renal failure and is dependent on dialysis. Treatment with carboplatin and etoposide was continued after surgery and the patient is currently in complete remission. The appearance of a metachronous Wilms' tumor 5 years after that of the primary tumor is rare. When a contralateral tumour develops, chemotherapy must be given until the size of the tumor is reduced in order to preserve renal function and avoid dialysis. In patients with chronic renal failure caused by bilateral nephrectomy, ongoing treatment with dialysis support can be achieved through the choice of effective drugs and knowledge of their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

  10. [Circulating "tumor markers" in gastrointestinal tumors].

    PubMed

    Borlinghaus, P; Lamerz, R

    1991-09-01

    Tumor markers (TM) of the neoplastic cell can be divided into non-shedded substances and antigens shedded in blood, urine or other body fluids. For clinicians circulating TM are more important. All relevant circulating TM are not useful in screening of asymptomatic patients because of insufficient sensitivity and specificity. With caution they are useful in the observation of risk groups. Circulating TM have their main significance as additional parameters in monitoring symptomatic patients with malignancies. Several follow up determinations are more important than one single measurement. During follow up of tumor patients TM should not be checked automatically if there are no diagnostic or therapeutical consequences. The clinically most important circulating TM in non-hormone secreting tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are the oncofetal antigens CEA and AFP and antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies e. g. CA 19-9 and CA 72-4. AFP is the primary TM in hepatocellular carcinoma, often elevated in hepatoblastoma and always normal in cholangiocellular carcinoma. CEA is the TM of first choice in patients with colorectal carcinomas and liver metastasis. CA 19-9 is TM of first choice in pancreatic carcinoma and additionally of diagnostic value in cholangiocellular carcinoma and tumors of the bile ducts. In cancer of the stomach CA 19-9 and CEA are secondary TM in combination with CA 72-4 as primary TM. Care should be taken that slight and moderate elevations of TM can be observed in benign diseases of liver, pancreas and bowel.

  11. General Information about Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Go ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  12. Modern Brain Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Ramon F.; Cha, Soonmee

    2015-01-01

    The imaging and clinical management of patients with brain tumor continue to evolve over time and now heavily rely on physiologic imaging in addition to high-resolution structural imaging. Imaging remains a powerful noninvasive tool to positively impact the management of patients with brain tumor. This article provides an overview of the current state-of-the art clinical brain tumor imaging. In this review, we discuss general magnetic resonance (MR) imaging methods and their application to the diagnosis of, treatment planning and navigation, and disease monitoring in patients with brain tumor. We review the strengths, limitations, and pitfalls of structural imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging techniques, MR spectroscopy, perfusion imaging, positron emission tomography/MR, and functional imaging. Overall this review provides a basis for understudying the role of modern imaging in the care of brain tumor patients. PMID:25977902

  13. Pediatric genetic ocular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Behnaz; Ramasubramanian, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric genetic ocular tumors include malignancies like retinoblastoma and phakomatosis like neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is important to screen for ocular tumors both for visual prognosis and also for systemic implications. The phakomatosis comprise of multitude of benign tumors that are aysmptomatic but their detection can aid in the diagnosis of the syndrome. Retinoblastoma is the most common malignant intraocular tumor in childhood and with current treatment modalities, the survival is more than 95%. It is transmitted as an autosomal dominant fashion and hence the offsprings of all patients with the germline retinoblastoma need to be screened from birth. This review discusses the various pediatric genetic ocular tumors discussing the clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment.

  14. Nanotechnology and tumor microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Kano, Mitsunobu R

    2014-07-01

    Though much progress has been made in the development of anti-tumor chemotherapeutic agents, refractoriness is still a major clinical difficulty because little is known about the non-autonomous mechanisms involved. Abnormal capillary structures in tumors, for example, are well documented, but a thorough characterization of microcirculation, including functional consequences with particular regard to drug delivery and intratumor accumulation, is still required for many kinds of tumor. In this review, we highlight how use of synthesized nanoparticles, themselves a product of emerging nanotechnology, are beginning to open up new perspectives in understanding the functional and therapeutic consequences of capillary structure within tumors. Furthermore, nanoparticles promise exciting new clinical applications. I also stress the urgent necessity of developing clinically relevant tumor models, both in vivo and in vitro.

  15. Zebrafish Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Angelica; Amatruda, James F

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are malignant cancers that arise from embryonic precursors known as Primordial Germ Cells. GCTs occur in neonates, children, adolescents and young adults and can occur in the testis, the ovary or extragonadal sites. Because GCTs arise from pluripotent cells, the tumors can exhibit a wide range of different histologies. Current cisplatin-based combination therapies cures most patients, however at the cost of significant toxicity to normal tissues. While GWAS studies and genomic analysis of human GCTs have uncovered somatic mutations and loci that might confer tumor susceptibility, little is still known about the exact mechanisms that drive tumor development, and animal models that faithfully recapitulate all the different GCT subtypes are lacking. Here, we summarize current understanding of germline development in humans and zebrafish, describe the biology of human germ cell tumors, and discuss progress and prospects for zebrafish GCT models that may contribute to better understanding of human GCTs. PMID:27165367

  16. Method of treating tumors

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally J.; Burke, Patricia A.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Goodman, Simon; Matzku, legal representative, Kerstin; Matzku, Siegfried

    2006-04-18

    A method of treating tumors, such as prostate tumors, breast tumors, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and the like, includes the sequential steps of administering to the patient at least one dose of an antiangiogenic cyclo-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-containing pentapeptide (cRGD pentapeptide); administering to the patient an anti-tumor effective amount of a radioimmunotherapeutic agent (RIT); and then administering to the patient at least one additional dose of cRGD pentapeptide. The cRGD pentapeptide is preferably cyclo-(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-[N-Me]-Val), and the RIT is preferably a radionuclide-labeled chelating agent-ligand complex in which chelating agent is chemically bonded to a tumor-targeting molecule, such as a monoclonal antibody.

  17. Pediatric genetic ocular tumors.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Behnaz; Ramasubramanian, Aparna

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric genetic ocular tumors include malignancies like retinoblastoma and phakomatosis like neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is important to screen for ocular tumors both for visual prognosis and also for systemic implications. The phakomatosis comprise of multitude of benign tumors that are aysmptomatic but their detection can aid in the diagnosis of the syndrome. Retinoblastoma is the most common malignant intraocular tumor in childhood and with current treatment modalities, the survival is more than 95%. It is transmitted as an autosomal dominant fashion and hence the offsprings of all patients with the germline retinoblastoma need to be screened from birth. This review discusses the various pediatric genetic ocular tumors discussing the clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27625882

  18. Acetate dependence of tumors.

    PubMed

    Comerford, Sarah A; Huang, Zhiguang; Du, Xinlin; Wang, Yun; Cai, Ling; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Walters, Holly; Tantawy, Mohammed N; Fu, Allie; Manning, H Charles; Horton, Jay D; Hammer, Robert E; McKnight, Steven L; Tu, Benjamin P

    2014-12-18

    Acetyl-CoA represents a central node of carbon metabolism that plays a key role in bioenergetics, cell proliferation, and the regulation of gene expression. Highly glycolytic or hypoxic tumors must produce sufficient quantities of this metabolite to support cell growth and survival under nutrient-limiting conditions. Here, we show that the nucleocytosolic acetyl-CoA synthetase enzyme, ACSS2, supplies a key source of acetyl-CoA for tumors by capturing acetate as a carbon source. Despite exhibiting no gross deficits in growth or development, adult mice lacking ACSS2 exhibit a significant reduction in tumor burden in two different models of hepatocellular carcinoma. ACSS2 is expressed in a large proportion of human tumors, and its activity is responsible for the majority of cellular acetate uptake into both lipids and histones. These observations may qualify ACSS2 as a targetable metabolic vulnerability of a wide spectrum of tumors.

  19. Parotid tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Jaques, D A; Krolls, S O; Chambers, R G

    1976-10-01

    Most salivary gland tumors, both benign and malignant, develop within the parotid glands. Although an overwhelming majority of tumors are reported in the adult population, the parotid glands are also the most frequently involved salivary glands in the pediatric age group. This study represents a combination of case material from the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and our personal experiences. Of approximately 10,000 salivary gland lesions accessioned in all ages, only 124 tumors occurred in the parotid gland in children less than fifteen years old. There were ninety benign and thirty-four malignant lesions. The two most common benign masses were mixed tumors and vascular lesions. The most common malignancies were the mucoepidermoid and acinic cell carcinomas. We recommended that all solid tumors be removed by parotidectomy.

  20. THE TUMOR MACROENVIRONMENT: CANCER-PROMOTING NETWORKS BEYOND TUMOR BEDS

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Puchalt, Alfredo Perales; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    During tumor progression, alterations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion to distal organs, and eventual metastatic disease. Distally produced hormones, commensal microbiota residing within mucosal surfaces, and myeloid cells and even the bone marrow impact the systemic immune system, tumor growth, and metastatic spread. Understanding the reciprocal interactions between the cells and soluble factors within the macroenvironment and the primary tumor will enable the design of specific therapies that have the potential to prevent dissemination and metastatic spread. This chapter will summarize recent findings detailing how the primary tumor and systemic tumor macroenvironment coordinate malignant progression. PMID:26216635

  1. Radiology of the spine: Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanmart, L.

    1986-01-01

    This book deals with tumors of the spinal cord and various aspects of primary and secondary osseous tumors of the spine. Included in discussion are tumors, chordoma hemangioma, vascular malformation and the terms angioma and hemangiomas.

  2. Benign follicular tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Tellechea, Oscar; Cardoso, José Carlos; Reis, José Pedro; Ramos, Leonor; Gameiro, Ana Rita; Coutinho, Inês; Baptista, António Poiares

    2015-01-01

    Benign follicular tumors comprise a large and heterogeneous group of neoplasms that share a common histogenesis and display morphological features resembling one or several portions of the normal hair follicle, or recapitulate part of its embryological development. Most cases present it as clinically nondescript single lesions and essentially of dermatological relevance. Occasionally, however, these lesions be multiple and represent a cutaneous marker of complex syndromes associated with an increased risk of visceral neoplasms. In this article, the authors present the microscopic structure of the normal hair follicle as a basis to understand the type and level of differentiation of the various follicular tumors. The main clinicopathological features and differential diagnosis of benign follicular tumors are then discussed, including dilated pore of Winer, pilar sheath acanthoma, trichoadenoma, trichilemmoma, infundibuloma, proliferating trichilemmal cyst/tumor, trichoblastoma and its variants, pilomatricoma, trichodiscoma/fibrofolliculoma, neurofollicular hamartoma and trichofolliculoma. In addition, the main syndromes presenting with multiple follicular tumors are also discussed, namely Cowden, Birt-Hogg-Dubé, Rombo and Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndromes, as well as multiple tumors of follicular infundibulum (infundibulomatosis) and multiple trichoepitheliomas. Although the diagnosis of follicular tumors relies on histological examination, we highlight the importance of their knowledge for the clinician, especially when in presence of patients with multiple lesions that may be the cutaneous marker of a cancer-prone syndrome. The dermatologist is therefore in a privileged position to recognize these lesions, which is extremely important to provide further propedeutic, appropriate referral and genetic counseling for these patients. PMID:26734858

  3. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  4. Multiple granular cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Jones, J K; Kuo, T T; Griffiths, C M; Itharat, S

    1980-10-01

    Eleven cases of granular cell tumor were reviewed. In two of the cases multiple sites of involvement were seen. The tumor occurred in the oral cavity in both of these cases and each was initially wrongly diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. The most common site was the subcutaneous tissue (nine patients) and the tongue was involved in three cases. In one patient the parotid gland was involved. Eight of the patients were females and three were males; seven were black and four were white. The importance of differentiating between squamous cell carcinoma and granular cell tumor is stressed, as is the need for a simple wide surgical excision. PMID:7421377

  5. Myoepithelial Tumors: An Update.

    PubMed

    Jo, Vickie Y

    2015-09-01

    Primary myoepithelial neoplasms of soft tissue are uncommon, and have been increasingly characterized by clinicopathologic and genetic means. Tumors are classified as mixed tumor/chondroid syringoma, myoepithelioma, and myoepithelial carcinoma, and they share morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features with their salivary gland counterparts. However, soft tissue myoepithelial tumors are classified as malignant based on the presence of cytologic atypia, in contrast to the criterion of invasive growth in salivary gland sites. This review discusses the clinicopathologic and morphologic characteristics, distinct variants, and currently known genetic alterations of myoepithelial neoplasms of soft tissue, skin, and bone.

  6. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Progressive Carcinoid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-04

    Atypical Carcinoid Tumor; Foregut Carcinoid Tumor; Hindgut Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Midgut Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1

  7. Children's Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Children’s Tumor Foundation and Vice President Biden’s National Cancer Moonshot Initiative Oct 26, 2016, Posted in Collaborations , Latest News , Press Release , Science Foundation President Annette Bakker Participates in Key Meetings Dedicated ...

  8. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor, relieve symptoms, and improve brain function or comfort. Surgery is often needed for most primary brain ... and pressure Anticonvulsants to reduce seizures Pain medicines Comfort measures, safety measures, physical therapy, and occupational therapy ...

  9. Brain tumor - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms, and improve brain function or the child's comfort. Surgery is needed for most primary brain tumors. ... Anticonvulsants to reduce or prevent seizures Pain medicines Comfort measures, safety measures, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and ...

  10. Solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cem; Kabatas, Serdar; Ozen, Ozlem Isiksacan; Gulsen, Salih; Caner, Hakan; Altinors, Nur

    2009-12-01

    Intracranial solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) are typically dural based, CD34-positive neoplasms of mesenchymal origin. Since they were first described in 1996 at the meninges, fewer than 100 SFT had been reported in both cranial and spinal compartments of the central nervous system. SFT can resemble other spindle cell tumors both radiologically and histopathologically, and differentiation can be best achieved through viewing their ultrastructure and using immunohistochemical techniques. In this report, we present four patients with SFT. Upon diagnosing two patients with SFT located in the cerebellopontine angle and parasagittal areas, we reviewed our pathological files and found two more patients; one having a parasagittal tumor and the other having a convexity tumor, that had been diagnosed with hemangiopericytoma. These tumours proved to be SFT after an immunohistochemical re-examination.

  11. Skin tumors on squirrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Reilly, J.R.

    1955-01-01

    Skin tumors having the gross appearance of previously reported fibromas are reported on gray squirrels from N. Y., Md., Va., N. C., and W. Va. and from a fox squirrel from W. Va. and a porcupine from Pa.

  12. Dinosaurs Got Tumors, Too

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Tumors, Too Benign facial growth discovered in fossil dating back about 69 million years To use ... discovery is the first ever described in the fossil record and the first to be thoroughly documented ...

  13. Genetics of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Opocher, G; Schiavi, F; Cicala, M V; Patalano, A; Mariniello, B; Boaretto, F; Zovato, S; Pignataro, V; Macino, B; Negro, I; Mantero, F

    2009-06-01

    The impact of genetics and genomics on clinical medicine is becoming more and more important. Endocrinology pioneered the development of molecular medicine, but also the study of adrenal tumors had a great impact in this field. Particularly important was the detection of genetics of tumors derived from the adrenal medulla, as well as that of those derived from the sympathetic and parasympathetic paraganglia. The identification of mutations in one of the several pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma susceptibility genes may indicate a specific clinical management drive. Less well understood is the genetics of adrenal cortex tumors, in particular adrenocortical carcinoma, a rare and particularly aggressive disease. There are only a few examples of hereditary transmission of adrenocortical carcinoma, but the analysis of low penetrance genes by genome wide association study may enable us to discover new genetic mechanisms responsible for adrenocortical-derived tumors. PMID:19471236

  14. [Regression grading in gastrointestinal tumors].

    PubMed

    Tischoff, I; Tannapfel, A

    2012-02-01

    Preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy is a well-established and essential part of the interdisciplinary treatment of gastrointestinal tumors. Neoadjuvant treatment leads to regressive changes in tumors. To evaluate the histological tumor response different scoring systems describing regressive changes are used and known as tumor regression grading. Tumor regression grading is usually based on the presence of residual vital tumor cells in proportion to the total tumor size. Currently, no nationally or internationally accepted grading systems exist. In general, common guidelines should be used in the pathohistological diagnostics of tumors after neoadjuvant therapy. In particularly, the standard tumor grading will be replaced by tumor regression grading. Furthermore, tumors after neoadjuvant treatment are marked with the prefix "y" in the TNM classification. PMID:22293790

  15. Waking up dormant tumors.

    PubMed

    Tse, Joyce C; Kalluri, Raghu

    2011-06-10

    As appreciation grows for the contribution of the tumor microenvironment to the progression of cancer, new evidence accumulates to support that the participation of stromal cells can extend beyond the local environment. Recently, Elkabets and colleagues demonstrated a systemic interaction between cancer cells and distant bone marrow cells to support the growth of otherwise indolent tumor cells at a secondary site, raising thought-provoking questions regarding the involvement of stromal cells in maintaining metastatic dormancy.

  16. Antibody tumor penetration

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  17. Towards tumor immunodiagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kotoula, Vassiliki

    2016-01-01

    Immunodiagnostic markers applicable on tissue or cytologic material may be prognostic or predictive of response to immunomodulatory drugs and may also be classified according to whether they are cell-specific or tumor-tissue-specific. Cell-specific markers are evaluated under the microscope as (I) morphological, corresponding to the assessment of tumor infiltrating immune cells on routine hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) sections; and (II) immunophenotypic, including the immunohistochemical (IHC) assessment of markers characteristic for tumor infiltrating immune cells. Tumor-tissue-specific markers are assessed in tissue extracts that may be enriched in neoplastic cells but almost inevitably also contain stromal and immune cells infiltrating the tumor. Such markers include (I) immune-response-related gene expression profiles, and (II) tumor genotype characteristics, as recently assessed with large-scale genotyping methods, usually next generation sequencing (NGS) applications. Herein, we discuss the biological nature of immunodiagnostic markers, their potential clinical relevance and the shortcomings that have, as yet, prevented their clinical application. PMID:27563650

  18. Towards tumor immunodiagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kourea, Helen; Kotoula, Vassiliki

    2016-07-01

    Immunodiagnostic markers applicable on tissue or cytologic material may be prognostic or predictive of response to immunomodulatory drugs and may also be classified according to whether they are cell-specific or tumor-tissue-specific. Cell-specific markers are evaluated under the microscope as (I) morphological, corresponding to the assessment of tumor infiltrating immune cells on routine hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) sections; and (II) immunophenotypic, including the immunohistochemical (IHC) assessment of markers characteristic for tumor infiltrating immune cells. Tumor-tissue-specific markers are assessed in tissue extracts that may be enriched in neoplastic cells but almost inevitably also contain stromal and immune cells infiltrating the tumor. Such markers include (I) immune-response-related gene expression profiles, and (II) tumor genotype characteristics, as recently assessed with large-scale genotyping methods, usually next generation sequencing (NGS) applications. Herein, we discuss the biological nature of immunodiagnostic markers, their potential clinical relevance and the shortcomings that have, as yet, prevented their clinical application. PMID:27563650

  19. Accessory parotid gland tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramachar, Sreevathsa M.; Huliyappa, Harsha A.

    2012-01-01

    Tumors of accessory parotid gland are considered in the differential diagnosis of a mid cheek mass. Parotidectomy is the procedure of choice. All pathological types of parotid main gland tumors occur in the accessory parotid gland also. Presenting as a mid cheek or infrazygomatic mass, the tumors of this accessory parotid gland are notorious for recurrences, if adequate margins are not achieved. We describe two such cases of such a tumor. 40-year-old male with a slowly progressive mid cheek mass was operated by a mid cheek incision. Histopathology of the tumor was pleomorphic adenoma. Facial nerve paresis recovered complelety in 6 months. A 52-year-old female with progressive mid cheek mass who underwent parotidectomy and neck dissection by a modified Blair's incision was diagnosed with extranodal marginal zone lymphoma with focal transformation to a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Chemotherapy with CHOP regime was initiated. There was no recurrence at 6 months of follow-up. Lymphoma of accessory parotid gland is a very rare tumor. Standard parotidectomy incision is advocated to prevent damage to facial nerve branches. PMID:23483721

  20. [Endosonography of stomach tumors].

    PubMed

    Nattermann, C; Dancygier, H

    1992-11-01

    Based on own experience and on the published literature we report about indications and efficiency of endosonography (EUS) in gastric tumors. The following conclusions can be drawn at the present time. Submucous tumors can be clearly differentiated from extragastric compressions. Although the endosonographic aspect does not allow to formulate an etiologic diagnosis, EUS findings can give hints regarding the nature of the submucous tumor (e.g. leiomyoma, lipoma, cyst). In 75% of cases malignant submucous tumors can be visualized and a correct preoperative staging can be performed. EUS is of special importance in the description of gastric carcinoma. The pT stage can be correctly determined preoperatively in about 80% (69-92%) of cases. Accompanying inflammation in early gastric cancer can lead to overstaging. The sensitivity for local lymph node metastases reaches about 77% (50-88%). Gastric non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be excellently visualized with EUS. The sensitivity amounts to 90-100% and in about 90% of cases the extent of the tumor can be correctly determined preoperatively. The response to radio-chemotherapy of gastric non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be monitored easily with the method. At the present time EUS is the most sensitive imaging tool in visualizing and staging of gastric tumors. Its main advantage is the exact demonstration of intramural and paragastric alterations. However, despite the use of high ultrasonic frequencies and the excellent demonstration of even tiny details with EUS, biopsies for histologic evaluation are still mandatory, especially when dealing with gastric ulcer.

  1. [Grading of neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W; Schnabel, P A; Komminoth, P

    2016-07-01

    The current WHO classification of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) differentiates between typical carcinoids (low grade NET), atypical carcinoids (intermediate grade NET) and small cell and large cell carcinomas (high grade NET) according to the prognosis. Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas are graded in an identical way. Together with the TNM system this enables a preoperative estimation of the prognosis in biopsies and fine needle aspirates. Well-differentiated tumors are graded into G1 tumors by the number of mitoses, <2 per 10 high-power fields (HPF) and the Ki-67 (index <3 %) and G2 tumors (2-20 mitoses/10 HPF, Ki-67 3-20 %). Discrepancies between the number of mitoses and the Ki-67 index are not uncommon and in these cases the higher value of the two should be applied. The more differentiated tumors of the G3 type have to be differentiated from undifferentiated carcinomas of the small cell type and large cell type with a much poorer prognosis. Prognosis relevant grading of thyroid cancers is achieved by special subtyping so that the G1-G3 system is not applicable. The rare cancers of the parathyroid gland and of the pituitary gland are not graded. Adrenal tumors also have no grading system. The prognosis is dependent on the Ki-67 index and with some reservations on the established scoring systems. PMID:27379621

  2. [Enophthalmos in an orbital tumor].

    PubMed

    Szabo, Bianca; Szabo, I; Nicula, Cristina; Popescu, Livia Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Enophtalmus is an unusual sign of the orbital tumors often represented by proptosis. One patient with enophtalmus and intraorbital tumor and aplasy is presented. The treatment of choice of orbital tumor is complete surgical excision and careful follow-up. Considering the more aggressive course followed by recurrent tumor, correct diagnosis and management is essential.

  3. Brain tumors in infants

    PubMed Central

    Ghodsi, Seyyed Mohammad; Habibi, Zohreh; Hanaei, Sara; Moradi, Ehsan; Nejat, Farideh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain tumors in infants have different clinical presentations, anatomical distribution, histopathological diagnosis, and clinical prognosis compared with older children. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was done in patients <12 months old who were operated on for primary brain tumor in Children's Hospital Medical Center since 2008 to 2014. Results: Thirty-one infants, 20 males and 11 females, with the mean age of 7.13 months (0.5–12) were enrolled. There were 16 supratentorial and 15 infratentorial tumors. The presenting symptoms included increased head circumference (16); bulge fontanel (15); vomiting (15); developmental regression (11); sunset eye (7); seizure (4); loss of consciousness (4); irritability (3); nystagmus (2); visual loss (2); hemiparesis (2); torticollis (2); VI palsy (3); VII, IX, X nerve palsy (each 2); and ptosis (1). Gross total and subtotal resection were performed in 19 and 11 cases, respectively. Fourteen patients needed external ventricular drainage in the perioperative period, from whom four infants required a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. One patient underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunting without tumor resection. The most common histological diagnoses were primitive neuroectodermal tumor (7), followed by anaplastic ependymoma (6) and grade II ependymoma. The rate of 30-day mortality was 19.3%. Eighteen patients are now well-controlled with or without adjuvant therapy (overall survival; 58%), from whom 13 cases are tumor free (disease free survival; 41.9%), 3 cases have residual masses with fixed or decreased size (progression-free survival; 9.6%), and 2 cases are still on chemotherapy. Conclusion: Brain tumors in infants should be treated with surgical resection, followed by chemotherapy when necessary. PMID:26962338

  4. Neurologic complications of cardiac tumors.

    PubMed

    Roeltgen, David; Kidwell, Chelsea S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are an uncommon cause for neurologic disease, but if undiagnosed can be associated with devastating neurologic consequences. Primary cardiac tumors, both benign and neoplastic, and metastatic tumors occur. Primary cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with neurologic embolic complications. Metastatic cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with valvular distraction, arrhythmia, diminished cardiac output and indirect neurological dysfunction. Primary and metastatic cardiac tumors may result in cerebral metastatic disease. Atrial myxoma, a benign primary cardiac tumor, is the most common cardiac tumor associated with neurologic disease, and most commonly causes cerebral embolization and stroke. The use of thrombolytic therapy for these strokes is controversial. Additionally, delayed manifestations, including aneurysm formation and intracranial hemorrhage, are possible. Aneurysm formation has been described as occurring after removal of the primary tumor. The availability of noninvasive cardiac imaging has significantly helped decrease the neurologic morbidity of cardiac tumors and has led to frequent successful intervention. PMID:24365298

  5. Chemoimmunotherapy: reengineering tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Emens, Leisha A

    2013-02-01

    Cancer chemotherapy drugs have long been considered immune suppressive. However, more recent data indicate that some cytotoxic drugs effectively treat cancer in part by facilitating an immune response to the tumor when given at the standard dose and schedule. These drugs induce a form of tumor cell death that is immunologically active, thereby inducing an adaptive immune response specific for the tumor. In addition, cancer chemotherapy drugs can promote tumor immunity through ancillary and largely unappreciated immunologic effects on both the malignant and normal host cells present within the tumor microenvironment. These more subtle immunomodulatory effects are dependent on the drug itself, its dose, and its schedule in relation to an immune-based intervention. The recent approvals of two new immune-based therapies for prostate cancer and melanoma herald a new era in cancer treatment and have led to heightened interest in immunotherapy as a valid approach to cancer treatment. A detailed understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of interactions between chemotherapy drugs and the immune system is essential for devising the optimal strategy for integrating new immune-based therapies into the standard of care for various cancers, resulting in the greatest long-term clinical benefit for cancer patients. PMID:23389507

  6. Neuroimaging of spine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Nandor K; Pfiffner, Thomas J; Mechtler, Laszlo L

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary, intradural/extramedullary, and extradural spine tumors comprise a wide range of neoplasms with an even wider range of clinical symptoms and prognostic features. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), commonly used to evaluate the spine in patients presenting with pain, can further characterize lesions that may be encountered on other imaging studies, such as bone scintigraphy or computed tomography (CT). The advantage of the MRI is its multiplane capabilities, superior contrast agent resolution, and flexible protocols that play an important role in assessing tumor location, extent in directing biopsy, in planning proper therapy, and in evaluating therapeutic results. A multimodality approach can be used to fully characterize the lesion and the combination of information obtained from the different modalities usually narrows the diagnostic possibilities significantly. The diagnosis of spinal tumors is based on patient age, topographic features of the tumor, and lesion pattern, as seen at CT and MRI. The shift to high-end imaging incorporating diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, whole-body short tau inversion recovery, positron emission tomography, intraoperative and high-field MRI as part of the mainstream clinical imaging protocol has provided neurologists, neuro-oncologists, and neurosurgeons a window of opportunity to assess the biologic behavior of spine neoplasms. This chapter reviews neuroimaging of spine tumors, primary and secondary, discussing routine and newer modalities that can reduce the significant morbidity associated with these neoplasms. PMID:27430436

  7. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchigami, Takao; Kibe, Toshiro; Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio; Nishizawa, Yoshiaki; Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi; Ueda, Masahiro; Nakamura, Norifumi; Kiyono, Tohru; Kishida, Michiko

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • We studied the interaction between tumor cells and fibroblasts in ameloblastoma. • AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted significantly high IL-1α levels. • IL-1α derived from AM-3 cells promoted IL-6 and IL-8 secretion of fibroblasts. • IL-6 and IL-8 activated the cellular motility and proliferation of AM-3 cells. - Abstract: Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave

  8. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT. PMID:27521035

  9. Subcutaneous solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuichi; Kubota, Yumiko; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2004-12-01

    We describe a unique case of subcutaneous solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) in a 56-year-old female patient. The patient had been aware of a painless soft mass in her back for ten years. The lesion was surgically excised. Histological examination revealed that the well-defined mass was composed of a proliferation of spindle-shaped fibroblastic cells and polygonal cells embedded in a fibrous matrix corresponding to the so-called "patternless pattern". A prominent pericytomatous pattern (hemangiopericytoma-like structures), focal myxoid changes, and thick hyalinized collagen fibers were also observed. Immunohistochemical stainings for CD34 and bcl-2 were positive in the tumor cells. These features are compatible with SFT. We suggest that SFT should be included in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous spindle cell tumors.

  10. Decay Dynamics of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fractional cell kill is a mathematical expression describing the rate at which a certain population of cells is reduced to a fraction of itself. We investigate the mathematical function that governs the rate at which a solid tumor is lysed by a cell population of cytotoxic lymphocytes. We do it in the context of enzyme kinetics, using geometrical and analytical arguments. We derive the equations governing the decay of a tumor in the limit in which it is plainly surrounded by immune cells. A cellular automaton is used to test such decay, confirming its validity. Finally, we introduce a modification in the fractional cell kill so that the expected dynamics is attained in the mentioned limit. We also discuss the potential of this new function for non-solid and solid tumors which are infiltrated with lymphocytes. PMID:27310010

  11. [Familial pituitary tumors].

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, K; Saito, S

    1995-11-01

    Familial pituitary tumors are relatively rare. Most commonly, they occur as a part of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1). However, familial pituitary adenomas unrelated MEN 1 (familial pituitary adenomas) are extremely rare. In review of MEN 1 in Japan, 60% of the patients with MEN 1 had pituitary tumors. Only 45 cases of familial pituitary adenomas have been reported from 20 families. In our review of familial pituitary adenomas, 30 (67%) of 45 reported cases are acromegaly or gigantism. This incidence is much higher than 28% in MEN 1 patients with pituitary tumors. Allelic deletions at 11q13 were identified in MEN 1 associated pituitary adenomas and familial pituitary adenomas in two gigantism brothers. PMID:8538028

  12. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Changjun

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor has received a lot of attention over the last 10 years due to its unique biologic behavior, clinicopathological features, molecular mechanisms, and treatment implications. GIST is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm in the gastrointestinal tract and has emerged from a poorly understood and treatment resistant neoplasm to a well-defined tumor entity since the discovery of particular molecular abnormalities, KIT and PDGFRA gene mutations. The understanding of GIST biology at the molecular level promised the development of novel treatment modalities. Diagnosis of GIST depends on the integrity of histology, immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis. The risk assessment of the tumor behavior relies heavily on pathological evaluation and significantly impacts clinical management. In this review, historic review, epidemiology, pathogenesis and genetics, diagnosis, role of molecular analysis, prognostic factor and treatment strategies have been discussed. PMID:22943011

  13. Calcifying Fibrous Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chorti, Angeliki; Papavramidis, Theodossis S.; Michalopoulos, Antonios

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Calcifying fibrous tumor (CFT) is a benign lesion characterized by its specific histological findings and is found as solitary or multiple lesions in several locations of the human body. The aim of the present systematic review is to give a detailed account of all reported cases of CFT in the literature and to analyze the available data, to completely characterize the entity from epidemiological, medical, and surgical aspects. A bibliographic research was performed from 1988 until 2015. A database with the patients’ characteristics was made, including sex, age, location of the tumor, symptoms, symptoms duration, size of the tumor, diagnostic methods, treatment, metastasis, and follow-up. A total of 104 articles were identified, reporting 157 cases of CFT. Mean age of patients was 33.58 years and the ratio between men and women was 1:1.27. The most common locations of CFT were stomach (18%), small intestine (8.7%), pleura (9.9%), mesentery (5%), and peritoneum (6.8%). Mean diameter of the tumor was estimated 4.6 cm. The correlations proceeded showed that as age increases, size decreases (P = 0.001) and that the tumor is larger in females (P = 0.027). Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the larger tumors appear in the neck and adrenal gland (P = 0.001). The percentage of asymptomatic patients was 30.57%. Computed tomography and biopsy were the most common tests for the diagnosis of CFT. Open surgical procedure was performed in the majority of cases. The median hospitalization was 6.06 days and the mean follow-up period was 29.97 months. Recurrences were mentioned in 10 of 96 patients with available data. No deaths owing to CFT were mentioned in the literature. CFT should be included in the differential diagnosis of enlarging mass revealed by clinical or imaging examination either incidentally or after specific acute or chronic symptomatology. PMID:27196478

  14. Intramasseteric solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Ersoy; Erdag, Taner Kemal; Ikiz, Ahmet Omer; Guneri, Ataman; Sarioglu, Sulen

    2013-03-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare spindle cell neoplasm that usually arises from the pleura. SFTs occurring within the head and neck region are uncommon. Recently, it has been described in various head and neck sites such as oral cavity, nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, salivary glands, thyroid, buccal space, and larynx. Here, we report a case of SFT originating in the masseter muscle of a 27-year-old woman. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a SFT of the head and neck region, arising within the masseter muscle. We present the clinical history, radiologic and histopathologic findings as well as immunoreactivity of this tumor.

  15. Extradigital Glomus Tumor of Thigh

    PubMed Central

    Beksaç, Kemal; Dogan, Lutfi; Bozdogan, Nazan; Dilek, Gulay; Akgul, Gokhan Giray; Ozaslan, Cihangir

    2015-01-01

    Glomus tumors are benign neoplasms that arise from neuromyoarterial glomus bodies. They represent around 1–5% of all soft-tissue tumors. High temperature, sensitivity, and pain and localized tenderness are the classical triad of symptoms. Most glomus tumors represent in the subungual area of digits. Extradigital glomus tumors are a very rare entity. There are rare cases of these tumors reported to be in shoulder, elbow, knee, wrist, even stomach, colon, and larynx. We are reporting a case of a glomus tumor on thigh and discuss the histological and immunohistochemical features. PMID:26236537

  16. [Benign bone forming tumors].

    PubMed

    Caufourier, C; Leprovost, N; Guillou-Jamard, M-R; Compère, J-F; Bénateau, H

    2009-09-01

    Benign bone forming tumors typically produce dense bone (osteoma, enostosis) or osteoid tissue (osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma). Even though these four lesions have distinct characteristics, it is sometimes difficult to tell them apart and to rule out malignant bone forming lesions such as osteosarcoma. The first line treatment is surgical exeresis.

  17. Tumor Treated by Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young; Kwak, Jae Man; Chung, So Hak; Jung, Gu Hee

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to examine the clinical usefulness and efficacy of endoscopic curettage on benign bone tumor. Methods Thirty-two patients (20 men and 12 women) with benign bone tumor were included in the study. The patients were aged between five and 76 years; the mean follow-up period was 27.05 months (range, 9.6 to 39.9 months). The primary sites include simple bone cyst (9 cases), fibrous dysplasia (6 cases), enchondroma (5 cases), non-ossifying fibroma (4 cases), bone infarct (3 cases), aneurysmal bone cyst (1 case), chondroblastoma (1 case), osteoblastoma (1 case), intraosseous lipoma (1 case), and Brodie abscess (1 case). A plain radiography was performed to assess the radiological recovery. Radiological outcomes, including local recurrence and bone union, were evaluated as excellent, good, poor, and recurred. Results In our series, there were 27 cases (84.4%) of good or better outcomes, six cases (18.8%) of complications (4 local recurrence, 1 wound infection, and 1 pathologic fracture). Conclusions Our results showed that endoscopic curettage and bone graft had a lower rate of recurrence and a higher cure rate in cases of benign bone tumor. It can, therefore, be concluded that endoscopic curettage and bone graft might be good treatment modalities for benign bone tumors. PMID:24605192

  18. Benign small bowel tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J M; Melvin, D B; Gray, G; Thorbjarnarson, B

    1975-01-01

    The clinical record and histologic sections of 84 cases of benign small bowel tumor are reviewed. Manifestations of systemic diseases, congenital anomalies, and lesions of either the ileocecal valve or periampullary region were excluded. In the same time span there were 96 small bowel malignancies. Clinical presentation, pathologic findings, management and result are compared to the collected published experience of about 2000 cases. There were 36 leiomyomas, 22 lipomas, 9 angiomas, 6 neurofibromas and 4 fibromas. Thirty-six men and 48 women were affected; the majority in their fifth and sixth decade. Seventy-eight were operative and 6 autopsy diagnoses. The most common symptom was obstruction (42%) followed by hemorrhage (34%) and pain (22%), relative frequency differing for the various specific tumors. There were rarely significant physical findings. A diagnosis of small bowel tumor was made radiologically in 30 patients. Because of the nonspecificity of other signs and symptoms, an acute awareness of the possibility of small bowel tumor is mandatory for preoperative anticipation of the diagnosis. Local resection was performed in all with no deaths or significant postoperative complications. PMID:1078626

  19. [Mediastinal germ cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Bremmer, F; Ströbel, P

    2016-09-01

    The mediastinum is among the most frequent anatomic region in which germ cell tumors (GCT) arise, second only to the gonads. Mediastinal GCT (mGCT) account for 16 % of all mediastinal neoplasms. Although the morphology and (according to all available data) the molecular genetics of mediastinal and gonadal GCT are identical, a number of unique aspects exist. There is a highly relevant bi-modal age distribution. In pre-pubertal children of both sexes, mGCT consist exclusively of teratomas and yolk sac tumors. The prognosis is generally favorable with modern treatment. In post-pubertal adults, virtually all patients with malignant mGCT are males; the prognosis is more guarded and depends (among other factors) on the histological GCT components and is similar to GCT in other organs. So-called somatic type malignancies (i. e. clonally related, non-germ cell neoplasias arising in a GCT) are much more frequent in mGCT than in other organs, and the association between mediastinal yolk sac tumors and hematological malignancies, such as myelodysplasias and leukemias, is unique to mediastinal tumors. The prognosis of GCT with somatic type malignancies is generally dismal. PMID:27491549

  20. Testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Looijenga, Leendert H J

    2014-02-01

    Human germ cell tumors are of interest because of their epidemiology, clinical behavior and pathobiology. Histologically, they are subdivided into various elements, with similarities to embryogenesis. Recent insights resulted in a division of five types of human germ cell tumors. In the context of male germ cells, three are relevant; Type I: teratomas and yolk sac tumors of neonates and infants; Type II: seminomas and nonseminomas of (predominantly) adolescents and adults; and Type III: spermatocytic seminomas of the elderly. Recent studies led to significant increases in understanding of the parameters involved in the earliest pathogenetic steps of human germ cells tumors, in particularly the seminomas and nonseminomas (Type II). In case of a disturbed gonadal physiology, either due to the germ cell itself, or the micro-environment, embryonic germ cells during a specific window of sensitization can be blocked in their maturation, resulting in carcinoma in situ or gonadoblastoma, the precursors of seminomas and nonseminomas. The level of testicularization of the gonad determines the histological composition of the precursor. These insights will allow better definition of individuals at risk to develop a germ cell malignancy, with putative preventive measurements, and allow better selection of scientific approaches to elucidate the pathogenesis. PMID:24683949

  1. Tumor-induced osteomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Chong, William H; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Chen, Clara C; Collins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare and fascinating paraneoplastic syndrome in which patients present with bone pain, fractures, and muscle weakness. The cause is high blood levels of the recently identified phosphate and vitamin D-regulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). In TIO, FGF23 is secreted by mesenchymal tumors that are usually benign, but are typically very small and difficult to locate. FGF23 acts primarily at the renal tubule and impairs phosphate reabsorption and 1α-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, leading to hypophosphatemia and low levels of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D. A step-wise approach utilizing functional imaging (F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and octreotide scintigraphy) followed by anatomical imaging (computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging), and, if needed, selective venous sampling with measurement of FGF23 is usually successful in locating the tumors. For tumors that cannot be located, medical treatment with phosphate supplements and active vitamin D (calcitriol or alphacalcidiol) is usually successful; however, the medical regimen can be cumbersome and associated with complications. This review summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and provides guidance in evaluating and treating these patients. Novel imaging modalities and medical treatments, which hold promise for the future, are also reviewed. PMID:21490240

  2. Benign tumors

    Cancer.gov

    In human pulmonary pathology, benign tumors are rare and almost never progress to malignancy. The situation is quite different in mouse pathology, where a significant number of adenomas, especially after some chemical induction schemes and genetic modifications, may progress to carcinomas.

  3. SALIVARY GLAND TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, George S.; Helsper, James T.

    1960-01-01

    In a review of a series of 248 salivary gland tumors, seen over a 28-year period, all pathologic material was brought up to date by reclassification according to more recent criteria and nomenclature. In parotid tumors, a probable lowered recurrence rate and a definite decrease in incidence of permanent facial nerve paralysis was found in the more recent cases in which the “Y” incision was used, with identification of the seventh nerve as it leaves the stylomastoid foramen. The five-year recurrence rate for primary mixed tumor was 8.3 per cent, and in recurrent cases it was found to be 18.1 per cent. Of 44 patients with malignant salivary gland tumors in all sites who were observed for five years or more, 32 or 72.7 per cent survived five years. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12. PMID:18732337

  4. Serodiagnosis for Tumor Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Brian J.; Labo, Nazzarena; Miley, Wendell J.; Whitby, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The known human tumor viruses include the DNA viruses Epstein-Barr virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus, human papillomavirus, and hepatitis B virus. RNA tumor viruses include Human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type-1 and hepatitis C virus. The serological identification of antigens/antibodies in plasma serum is a rapidly progressing field with utility for both scientists and clinicians. Serology is useful for conducting seroepidemiology studies and to inform on the pathogenesis and host immune response to a particular viral agent. Clinically, serology is useful for diagnosing current or past infection and for aiding in clinical management decisions. Serology is useful for screening blood donations for infectious agents and for monitoring the outcome of vaccination against these viruses. Serodiagnosis of human tumor viruses has improved in recent years with increased specificity and sensitivity of the assays, as well as reductions in cost and the ability to assess multiple antibody/antigens in single assays. Serodiagnosis of tumor viruses plays an important role in our understanding of the prevalence and transmission of these viruses and ultimately in the ability to develop treatments/preventions for these globally important diseases. PMID:25843726

  5. Brain tumor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies.

  6. Imaging hypoxia in tumors.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, J R

    2001-10-01

    For many years, it has been known that hypoxia affects the response to radiotherapy in human cancers. Hypoxic regions can develop as a tumor grows beyond the ability of its blood supply to deliver oxygen to the full extent of the tumor, exacerbated by vascular spasm or compression caused by increased interstitial fluid pressure. However, hypoxia is heterogeneous, and tumors that appear identical by clinical and radiographic criteria can vary greatly in their extent of hypoxia. Several invasive procedures to measure hypoxia in tumors have been developed and are predictive of response to therapy, but none of these is in routine clinical use because of technical complexity, inconvenience, and inability to obtain repeated measures. Noninvasive imaging with a hypoxia-directed radiopharmaceutical could be of great clinical utility. Most such radiopharmaceuticals under development use 2-nitroimidazole as the targeting moiety. 2-Nitroimidazole, which is selectively reduced and bound in hypoxic tissues, has been labeled with F-18, Cu-64/67, I-123, and Tc-99m. Of these, F-18-fluoromisonidazole and I-123-iodoazomycin arabinoside (IAZA) have been most widely studied clinically. Non-nitro-containing bioreductive complexes, such as the Cu-60/62/64 thiosemicarbazone ATSM and Tc-99m butylene amineoxime (BnAO or HL91), have also been evaluated. In particular, 1-123-IAZA and Cu-60-ATSM have shown correlation with response to radiotherapy in preliminary clinical studies. However, more preclinical studies comparing imaging with validated invasive methods and clinical studies with outcome measures are required. Nuclear medicine is poised to play an important role in optimizing the therapy of patients with hypoxic tumors.

  7. General Information about Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Pituitary Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  9. Stages of Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ... Treatment of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ...

  10. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors This page lists cancer drugs approved by ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors Afinitor (Everolimus) Afinitor Disperz (Everolimus) Avastin (Bevacizumab) ...

  11. Pituitary: Non-Secretory Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... categories—tumor mass effects and hyposecretion effects. Tumor mass effects Visual field disturbances, most commonly loss of ... surgery. The goal is to completely remove the mass or cyst and preserve normal pituitary, brain, and ...

  12. [Osseous tumors of the jaw].

    PubMed

    Reychler, H

    1988-01-01

    The osseous tumors of the jaw bones are relatively rare but very oft malignant. This work analyses the different epidemiological, clinical, radiological, histological and therapeutic features of the benign and malignant osseous tumors of the jaw bones, with regard to the most recent literature. The described benign tumors are the osteoma and osteomatosis, the osteoblastoma and osteoid osteoma, the desmo-osteoblastoma and the exostosis. The osteosarcoma is the unique malignant osseous tumor encountered.

  13. [Tumors of the salivary glands].

    PubMed

    Halimi, P; Gardner, M; Petit, F

    2005-06-01

    Tumors of salivary glands arise mainly from the parotid gland. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is mandatory not only to localize precisely the tumor within the gland but also to differentiate between benign and malignant neoplasms, in competition with cytology in fine-needle aspiration biopsy. Tumors without risk of transformation, such as adenolymphoma, are not systematically operated on. Indications of roentgenotherapy and irradiation volumes depend on histologic type, localisation and size of the tumor.

  14. [Tumor of the Parotid Gland].

    PubMed

    Pötzl, Teresa; Iselin, Sabine; Husner, Alexander

    2016-05-11

    Salivary gland tumors are a rare, histologically heterogeneous group of tumors which constitute approximately 4–6 % of all head and neck neoplasms. In 2/3 of cases they are benign, especially in the parotid gland. We report about a rare tumor of the parotid gland presenting as an extraskeletal chondroma. Histologically there were multiple S 100 protein-positive nests of chondrocytes. The externally completed cytology suspected a pleomorphic adenoma, nevertheless, the final histopathological findings showed another tumor entity.

  15. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors.

  16. Nonodontogenic Tumors of the Jaws.

    PubMed

    Dyalram, Donita; Aslam-Pervez, Nawaf; Lubek, Joshua E

    2016-02-01

    Nonodontogenic tumors of the jaws are common in the pediatric population, accounting for approximately 70% of pediatric jaw tumors. This article focuses on the clinical characteristics and management of the benign nonodontogenic tumors (nonaggressive and aggressive) of the jaws most commonly encountered in children.

  17. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors. PMID:1886987

  18. The controversy of Warthin's tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Chapnik, J.S.

    1983-06-01

    Warthin's tumor is controversial. This controversy is multifaceted and relates to all aspects of the tumor from its historical beginnings to its pathogenesis, investigations, and treatments. In this paper, an in depth study of Warthin's tumor has been made to help clarify these controversies.

  19. Tumors of the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Madani, Gitta; Beale, Timothy

    2006-12-01

    This article reviews the role of imaging in the management of tumors of the salivary glands, discussing tumor localization, extent, and, where possible, characterization. The relative benefits of the different modalities and the typical features of benign and malignant lesions are discussed for each modality. Characteristic appearances of specific tumors are highlighted.

  20. Hyperdiploid tumor cells increase phenotypic heterogeneity within Glioblastoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Prudence; Cato, Kathleen; Legaie, Roxane; Jayalath, Rumal; Olsson, Gemma; Hall, Bruce; Olson, Sarah; Boros, Samuel; Reynolds, Brent A; Harding, Angus

    2014-04-01

    Here we report the identification of a proliferative, viable, and hyperdiploid tumor cell subpopulation present within Glioblastoma (GB) patient tumors. Using xenograft tumor models, we demonstrate that hyperdiploid cell populations are maintained in xenograft tumors and that clonally expanded hyperdiploid cells support tumor formation and progression in vivo. In some patient tumorsphere lines, hyperdiploidy is maintained during long-term culture and in vivo within xenograft tumor models, suggesting that hyperdiploidy can be a stable cell state. In other patient lines hyperdiploid cells display genetic drift in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that in these patients hyperdiploidy is a transient cell state that generates novel phenotypes, potentially facilitating rapid tumor evolution. We show that the hyperdiploid cells are resistant to conventional therapy, in part due to infrequent cell division due to a delay in the G₀/G₁ phase of the cell cycle. Hyperdiploid tumor cells are significantly larger and more metabolically active than euploid cancer cells, and this correlates to an increased sensitivity to the effects of glycolysis inhibition. Together these data identify GB hyperdiploid tumor cells as a potentially important subpopulation of cells that are well positioned to contribute to tumor evolution and disease recurrence in adult brain cancer patients, and suggest tumor metabolism as a promising point of therapeutic intervention against this subpopulation. PMID:24448662