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Sample records for adenomatosis polyposis coli

  1. [Oral and maxillofacial manifestations of familial adenomatosis polyposis. Gardner's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wijn, M A; Keller, J J; Brand, H S

    2005-09-01

    Patients suffering from familial adenomatosis polyposis develop multiple pre-malignant gastrointestinal polyps and are at high risk of developing colon cancer. In addition extra-intestinal manifestations are observed frequently. The combination of extra-intestinal manifestations and familial adenomatosis polyposis is named Gardner's syndrome. An early diagnosis of this disease is important because it could mean a better prognosis for the patient. This review describes the oral and maxillofacial symptoms of FAP, and its potential implications for dental treatment. PMID:16184913

  2. Familial polyposis coli and its extracolonic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S B

    1982-06-01

    A detailed clinical study of 30 families with familial polyposis coli is presented. Seven 'isolated' cases are also described. It was found that some families did not exhibit any extracolonic manifestations, but the majority of families showed various numbers of members who had these manifestations of differing types and degrees. In view of the great variability within the members of a family, polyposis coli and the Gardner syndrome are probably both produced by one pleiotropic gene. The occurrence of other neoplastic phenomena in association with polyposis coli has been considered. Many types of malignancy can occur in these patients and their families and the majority are probably fortuitous. The consistent finding of an association with medulloblastoma is such as to make this association of significance, but no reason is known for this. It is suggested that the term 'Turcot syndrome' should be used in a more restrictive manner than at present. PMID:7108915

  3. Dental and bone abnormalities in patients with familial polyposis coli.

    PubMed

    Carl, W; Herrera, L

    1987-01-01

    Dental and bone abnormalities of the maxilla and mandible are present in approximately 80% of patients with familial polyposis coli. The dental abnormalities include impacted teeth (other than third molars), supernumerary teeth, congenitally missing teeth, fused roots of first and second molars, and unusually long and tapered roots of posterior teeth. The bone lesions consist mostly of osteomas, either isolated or in clusters, in the maxilla and mandible or of exostoses with lateral and/or lingual extensions. Since dental and bone abnormalities are already present early in life there is a strong suggestion that they may be used as diagnostic features in the recognition of familial polyposis coli.

  4. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Mutation Leads to Myopia Development in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Qiu, Fangfang; Li, Jing; Zhu, Zhenzhen; Yang, Wenzhao; Zhou, Xiangtian; An, Jianhong; Huang, Furong; Wang, Qiongsi; Reinach, Peter S; Li, Wei; Chen, Wensheng; Liu, Zuguo

    2015-01-01

    Myopia incidence in China is rapidly becoming a very serious sight compromising problem in a large segment of the general population. Therefore, delineating the underlying mechanisms leading to myopia will markedly lessen the likelihood of other sight compromising complications. In this regard, there is some evidence that patients afflicted with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), havean adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutation and a higher incidence of myopia. To clarify this possible association, we determined whether the changes in pertinent biometric and biochemical parameters underlying postnatal refractive error development in APCMin mice are relevant for gaining insight into the pathogenesis of this disease in humans. The refraction and biometrics in APCMin mice and age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates between postnatal days P28 and P84 were examined with eccentric infrared photorefraction (EIR) and customized optical coherence tomography (OCT). Compared with WT littermates, the APCMin mutated mice developed myopia (average -4.64 D) on P84 which was associated with increased vitreous chamber depth (VCD). Furthermore, retinal and scleral changes appear in these mice along with: 1) axial length shortening; 2) increased retinal cell proliferation; 3) and decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, the rate-limiting enzyme of DA synthesis. Scleral collagen fibril diameters became heterogeneous and irregularly organized in the APCMin mice. Western blot analysis showed that scleral alpha-1 type I collagen (col1α1) expression also decreased whereas MMP2 and MMP9 mRNA expression was invariant. These results indicate that defective APC gene function promotes refractive error development. By characterizing in APCMin mice ocular developmental changes, this approach provides novel insight into underlying pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to human myopia development.

  5. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Mutation Leads to Myopia Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zhu, Zhenzhen; Yang, Wenzhao; Zhou, Xiangtian; An, Jianhong; Huang, Furong; Wang, Qiongsi; Reinach, Peter S.; Li, Wei; Chen, Wensheng; Liu, Zuguo

    2015-01-01

    Myopia incidence in China is rapidly becoming a very serious sight compromising problem in a large segment of the general population. Therefore, delineating the underlying mechanisms leading to myopia will markedly lessen the likelihood of other sight compromising complications. In this regard, there is some evidence that patients afflicted with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), havean adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutation and a higher incidence of myopia. To clarify this possible association, we determined whether the changes in pertinent biometric and biochemical parameters underlying postnatal refractive error development in APCMin mice are relevant for gaining insight into the pathogenesis of this disease in humans. The refraction and biometrics in APCMin mice and age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates between postnatal days P28 and P84 were examined with eccentric infrared photorefraction (EIR) and customized optical coherence tomography (OCT). Compared with WT littermates, the APCMin mutated mice developed myopia (average -4.64 D) on P84 which was associated with increased vitreous chamber depth (VCD). Furthermore, retinal and scleral changes appear in these mice along with: 1) axial length shortening; 2) increased retinal cell proliferation; 3) and decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, the rate-limiting enzyme of DA synthesis. Scleral collagen fibril diameters became heterogeneous and irregularly organized in the APCMin mice. Western blot analysis showed that scleral alpha-1 type I collagen (col1α1) expression also decreased whereas MMP2 and MMP9 mRNA expression was invariant. These results indicate that defective APC gene function promotes refractive error development. By characterizing in APCMin mice ocular developmental changes, this approach provides novel insight into underlying pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to human myopia development. PMID:26495845

  6. Genotype-phenotype correlations in attenuated adenomatous polyposis coli.

    PubMed Central

    Soravia, C; Berk, T; Madlensky, L; Mitri, A; Cheng, H; Gallinger, S; Cohen, Z; Bapat, B

    1998-01-01

    Germ-line mutations of the tumor suppressor APC are implicated in attenuated adenomatous polyposis coli (AAPC), a variant of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). AAPC is recognized by the occurrence of <100 colonic adenomas and a later onset of colorectal cancer (age >40 years). The aim of this study was to assess genotype-phenotype correlations in AAPC families. By protein-truncation test (PTT) assay, the entire coding region of the APC gene was screened in affected individuals from 11 AAPC kindreds, and their phenotypic differences were examined. Five novel germ-line APC mutations were identified in seven kindreds. Mutations were located in three different regions of the APC gene: (1) at the 5' end spanning exons 4 and 5, (2) within exon 9, and (3) at the 3' distal end of the gene. Variability in the number of colorectal adenomas was most apparent in individuals with mutations in region 1, and upper-gastrointestinal manifestations were more severe in them. In individuals with mutations in either region 2 or region 3, the average number of adenomas tended to be lower than those in individuals with mutations in region 1, although age at diagnosis was similar. In all AAPC kindreds, a predominance of right-sided colorectal adenomas and rectal polyp sparing was observed. No desmoid tumors were found in these kindreds. Our data suggest that, in AAPC families, the location of the APC mutation may partially predict specific phenotypic expression. This should help in the design of tailored clinical-management protocols in this subset of FAP patients. PMID:9585611

  7. Genotype-phenotype correlations in attenuated adenomatous polyposis coli.

    PubMed

    Soravia, C; Berk, T; Madlensky, L; Mitri, A; Cheng, H; Gallinger, S; Cohen, Z; Bapat, B

    1998-06-01

    Germ-line mutations of the tumor suppressor APC are implicated in attenuated adenomatous polyposis coli (AAPC), a variant of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). AAPC is recognized by the occurrence of <100 colonic adenomas and a later onset of colorectal cancer (age >40 years). The aim of this study was to assess genotype-phenotype correlations in AAPC families. By protein-truncation test (PTT) assay, the entire coding region of the APC gene was screened in affected individuals from 11 AAPC kindreds, and their phenotypic differences were examined. Five novel germ-line APC mutations were identified in seven kindreds. Mutations were located in three different regions of the APC gene: (1) at the 5' end spanning exons 4 and 5, (2) within exon 9, and (3) at the 3' distal end of the gene. Variability in the number of colorectal adenomas was most apparent in individuals with mutations in region 1, and upper-gastrointestinal manifestations were more severe in them. In individuals with mutations in either region 2 or region 3, the average number of adenomas tended to be lower than those in individuals with mutations in region 1, although age at diagnosis was similar. In all AAPC kindreds, a predominance of right-sided colorectal adenomas and rectal polyp sparing was observed. No desmoid tumors were found in these kindreds. Our data suggest that, in AAPC families, the location of the APC mutation may partially predict specific phenotypic expression. This should help in the design of tailored clinical-management protocols in this subset of FAP patients. PMID:9585611

  8. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile polyposis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... In the third type, known as juvenile polyposis coli, affected individuals develop polyps only in their colon. People with generalized juvenile polyposis and juvenile polyposis coli typically develop polyps during childhood. Most juvenile polyps ...

  9. Assay for Detecting the I1307K Susceptibility Allele within the Adenomatous Polyposis ColiGene.

    PubMed

    Gruber, S B

    2001-01-01

    Most germline mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene result in a classic inherited cancer syndrome called familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). FAP is characterized by thousands of colonic polyps, well-defined extracolonic manifestations that may include pigmented lesions of the ocular fundus, supernumerary teeth, osteomas, odontomas, desmoid tumors and epidermoid cysts, and a 100% lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer. Shortly after the APC gene was cloned in 1991 (1,2) the molecular basis of an attenuated form of FAP was recognized to be related to germline mutations within APC that were most likely to be found in the 5' and 3' ends of the gene (3,4). The truncating mutations leading to classic FAP and attenuated FAP are quite rare, but recently a polymorphism of the APC gene was found among 6 to 7% of Ashkenazi Jews that approximately doubles the risk of colorectal cancer (5). PMID:21370146

  10. Deep vein thrombosis in a patient of adenomatous polyposis coli treated successfully with aspirin: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Neha; Santra, Tuhin; Kar, Arnab; Guha, Pradipta; Bar, Mita; Adhikary, Apu; Datta, Sumana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep vein thrombosis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. However, its association with adenomatous polyposis coli is extremely rare. Here we present an interesting case of deep vein thrombosis associated with adenomatous polyposis coli. Case Presentation: A 15 year old female who was having fever and diarrhea for 5 months developed bilateral asymmetric painful swelling of lower limbs for 1 month. Doppler ultrasound of lower limbs revealed presence of thrombosis from inferior vena cava up to popliteal vein. Colonoscopy and biopsy were suggestive of adenomatous polyposis coli. However, she could not tolerate anticoagulant therapy and was put on aspirin therapy for 6 months to which she responded well with the resolution of thrombus. Conclusion: Role of aspirin therapy may be considered whenever a patient of venous thrombosis cannot tolerate anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27386068

  11. Missense Polymorphisms in the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Gene and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Croitoru, Marina E.; Redston, Mark; Knight, Julia A.; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE Whereas truncating germline mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene give rise to familial adenomatous polyposis, missense polymorphisms of APC may confer a weaker risk for colorectal cancer. METHODS We sequenced the entire open reading frame of the APC gene and tested for two common MYH mutations in a population-based series of patients with colorectal cancer and 5 to 99 adenomas. Missense adenomatous polyposis coli alterations identified in this colorectal cancer multiple-polyp population were analyzed in a population-based series of patients with colorectal cancer and healthy control subjects. RESULTS Germline APC or mutY human homologue (MYH) alterations were identified in 16 of 39 colorectal cancer-multiple polyp patients. Four missense APC gene alterations (S130G, E1317Q, Dl822V, G2502S) were observed in 13 individuals and 3 additional patients carried presumed pathogenic (APC Y94X, biallelic MYH Y165C and heterozygous MYH G382D) mutations. When independently assessed in 971 patients with colorectal cancer and 954 healthy control subjects, none of the identified missense APC alterations conferred a significantly increased risk for colorectal cancer, odds ratio (95 percent confidence intervals): S130G=3.1 (0.29–32.25), E1317Q= 1.08 (0.59–2.74), G2502S= 1 (0.65–1.63), D1822V (heterozygous)=0.79 (0.64–0.98), D1822V (homozygous) =0.82 (0.63–1.27). CONCLUSIONS Germline missense APC alterations observed in 33 percent of patients with multiple colorectal neoplasms seemed to play a limited role in colorectal cancer risk when independently assessed by a population-based, case-control analysis. PMID:18612690

  12. Rapid detection of translation-terminating mutations at the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene by direct protein truncation test

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Luut, R.; Khan, P.M.; Van Leeuwen, C.; Tops, C.; Roest, P.; Den Dunnen, J. )

    1994-03-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is usually associated with protein truncating mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. The APC mutations are known to play a major role in colorectal carcinogensis. For the identification of protein truncating mutations of the APC gene, the authors developed a rapid, sensitive, and direct screening procedure. The technique is based on the in vitro transcription and translation of the genomic PCR products and is called the protein truncation test. Samples of DNA from individual FAP patients, members of a FAP family, colorectal tumors, and colorectal tumor-derived cell lines were used to show the effectiveness of this method. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Tumour Suppressor Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) localisation is regulated by both Kinesin-1 and Kinesin-2

    PubMed Central

    Ruane, Peter T.; Gumy, Laura F.; Bola, Becky; Anderson, Beverley; Wozniak, Marcin J.; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; Allan, Victoria J.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules and their associated proteins (MAPs) underpin the polarity of specialised cells. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is one such MAP with a multifunctional agenda that requires precise intracellular localisations. Although APC has been found to associate with kinesin-2 subfamily members, the exact mechanism for the peripheral localization of APC remains unclear. Here we show that the heavy chain of kinesin-1 directly interacts with the APC C-terminus, contributing to the peripheral localisation of APC in fibroblasts. In rat hippocampal neurons the kinesin-1 binding domain of APC is required for its axon tip enrichment. Moreover, we demonstrate that APC requires interactions with both kinesin-2 and kinesin-1 for this localisation. Underlining the importance of the kinesin-1 association, neurons expressing APC lacking kinesin-1-binding domain have shorter axons. The identification of this novel kinesin-1-APC interaction highlights the complexity and significance of APC localisation in neurons. PMID:27272132

  14. Association and regulation of casein kinase 2 activity by adenomatous polyposis coli protein

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Miwako Kato; Li, Dongxia; Krebs, Edwin G.; Yuasa, Yasuhito; Homma, Yoshimi

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis coli and also sporadic colorectal cancer development. By using antibodies raised against the N-terminal region of APC protein, we have detected the variable masses of endogenous APC proteins in individual cell lines established from human colorectal carcinomas caused by nonsense mutations of the gene. Phosphorylation of immunoprecipitates of full-length and truncated APC were observed in in vitro kinase reaction, indicating association of APC with protein kinase activity. The kinase activity complexed with APC was sensitive to heparin and used GTP as phosphoryl donor, suggesting an involvement of casein kinase 2 (CK2). Both CK2α- and β-subunits were found to associate with APC in immunoprecipitates as well as in pull-down assays, with preferential interaction of APC with tetrameric CK2 holoenzyme. In synchronized cell populations, the association of APC with CK2 was cell cycle dependent, with the highest association in G2/M. Unexpectedly, APC immunoprecipitates containing full-length APC protein inhibited CK2 in vitro, whereas immunoprecipitates of truncated APC had little effect. This was confirmed by using recombinant APC, and the inhibitory region was localized to the C terminus of APC between residues 2086 and 2394. Overexpression of this fragment in SW480 cells suppressed cell proliferation rates as well as tumorigenesis. These results demonstrate a previously uncharacterized functional interaction between the tumor suppressor protein APC and CK2 and suggest that growth-inhibitory effects of APC may be regulated by inhibition of CK2. PMID:11972058

  15. Aspirin augments the expression of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli protein by suppression of IKKβ

    SciTech Connect

    Ashida, Noboru; Kishihata, Masako; Tien, Dat Nguyen; Kamei, Kaeko; Kimura, Takeshi; Yokode, Masayuki

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Clinical studies revealed aspirin inhibits cancer, but the mechanism is not known. • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a well-known tumor-suppressing gene. • We found aspirin up-regulates the protein of APC. • Aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, an essential kinase in NFκB activation. • The deletion of IKKβ significantly increases the expression of APC protein. - Abstract: Aspirin has been widely used as analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory medicine for long. In addition to these traditional effects, clinical studies suggest that aspirin can protect against cancer, but its mechanism has not been explored. To unveil it, we identified the proteins up- or down-regulated after incubation with aspirin by using proteomics analysis with Nano-flow LC/MALDI-TOF system. Interestingly, the analysis identified the protein of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) as one of the most up-regulated protein. APC regulates cell proliferation or angiogenesis, and is widely known as a tumor-suppressing gene which can cause colorectal cancer when it is mutated. Western blots confirmed this result, and real-time PCR indicated it is transcriptionally regulated. We further tried to elucidate the molecular mechanism with focusing on IKKβ. IKKβ is the essential kinase in activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), major transcriptional factors that regulate genes responsible for inflammation or immune response. Previous reports indicated that aspirin specifically inhibits IKKβ activity, and constitutively active form of IKKβ accelerates APC loss. We found that aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, and the deletion of IKKβ by siRNA increases the expression of APC in HEK294 cells. Finally, we observed similar effects of aspirin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these results reveal that aspirin up-regulates the expression of APC via the suppression of IKKβ. This can be a mechanism how aspirin prevents cancer at

  16. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Interacts with Flap Endonuclease 1 to Block Its Nuclear Entry and Function1

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Aruna S; Armas, Melissa L; Izumi, Tadahide; Strauss, Phyllis R; Narayan, Satya

    2012-01-01

    In previous studies, we found that adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) blocks the base excision repair (BER) pathway by interacting with 5′-flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1). In this study, we identify the molecular features that contribute to the formation and/or stabilization of the APC/Fen1 complex that determines the extent of BER inhibition, and the subsequent accumulation of DNA damage creates mutagenic lesions leading to transformation susceptibility. We show here that APC binds to the nuclear localization sequence of Fen1 (Lys365Lys366Lys367), which prevents entry of Fen1 into the nucleus and participation in Pol-β-directed long-patch BER. We also show that levels of the APC/Fen1 complex are higher in breast tumors than in the surrounding normal tissues. These studies demonstrate a novel role for APC in the suppression of Fen1 activity in the BER pathway and a new biomarker profile to be explored to identify individuals who may be susceptible to the development of mammary and other tumors. PMID:22787431

  17. Characterization of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Dynamics and Localization at the Centrosome.

    PubMed

    Lui, Christina; Mok, Myth T S; Henderson, Beric R

    2016-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is a multifunctional regulator of Wnt signaling and acts as a mobile scaffold at different cellular sites. APC was recently found to stimulate microtubule (MT) growth at the interphase centrosome; however, little is known about its dynamics and localization at this site. To address this, we analysed APC dynamics in fixed and live cells by fluorescence microscopy. In detergent-extracted cells, we discovered that APC was only weakly retained at the centrosome during interphase suggesting a rapid rate of exchange. This was confirmed in living cells by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which identified two pools of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-APC: a major rapidly exchanging pool (~86%) and minor retained pool (~14%). The dynamic exchange rate of APC was unaffected by C-terminal truncations implicating a targeting role for the N-terminus. Indeed, we mapped centrosome localization to N-terminal armadillo repeat (ARM) domain amino acids 334-625. Interestingly, the rate of APC movement to the centrosome was stimulated by intact MTs, and APC dynamics slowed when MTs were disrupted by nocodazole treatment or knockdown of γ-tubulin. Thus, the rate of APC recycling at the centrosome is enhanced by MT growth, suggesting a positive feedback to stimulate its role in MT growth. PMID:27144584

  18. Adenomatous polyposis coli heterozygous knockout mice display hypoactivity and age-dependent working memory deficits

    PubMed Central

    Koshimizu, Hisatsugu; Fukui, Yasuyuki; Takao, Keizo; Ohira, Koji; Tanda, Koichi; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Toyama, Keiko; Oshima, Masanobu; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    A tumor suppressor gene, Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc), is expressed in the nervous system from embryonic to adulthood stages, and transmits the Wnt signaling pathway in which schizophrenia susceptibility genes, including T-cell factor 4 (TCF4) and calcineurin (CN), are involved. However, the functions of Apc in the nervous system are largely unknown. In this study, as the first evaluation of Apc function in the nervous system, we have investigated the behavioral significance of the Apc gene, applying a battery of behavioral tests to Apc heterozygous knockout (Apc+/−) mice. Apc+/− mice showed no significant impairment in neurological reflexes or sensory and motor abilities. In various tests, including light/dark transition, open-field, social interaction, eight-arm radial maze, and fear conditioning tests, Apc+/− mice exhibited hypoactivity. In the eight-arm radial maze, Apc+/− mice 6–7 weeks of age displayed almost normal performance, whereas those 11–12 weeks of age showed a severe performance deficit in working memory, suggesting that Apc is involved in working memory performance in an age-dependent manner. The possibility that anemia, which Apc+/− mice develop by 17 weeks of age, impairs working memory performance, however, cannot be excluded. Our results suggest that Apc plays a role in the regulation of locomotor activity and presumably working memory performance. PMID:22347851

  19. Adenomatous polyposis coli regulates radial axonal sorting and myelination in the PNS.

    PubMed

    Elbaz, Benayahu; Traka, Maria; Kunjamma, Rejani B; Dukala, Danuta; Brosius Lutz, Amanda; Anton, E S; Barres, Ben A; Soliven, Betty; Popko, Brian

    2016-07-01

    The tumor suppressor protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is multifunctional - it participates in the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction pathway as well as modulating cytoskeleton function. Although APC is expressed by Schwann cells, the role that it plays in these cells and in the myelination of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) is unknown. Therefore, we used the Cre-lox approach to generate a mouse model in which APC expression is specifically eliminated from Schwann cells. These mice display hindlimb weakness and impaired axonal conduction in sciatic nerves. Detailed morphological analyses revealed that APC loss delays radial axonal sorting and PNS myelination. Furthermore, APC loss delays Schwann cell differentiation in vivo, which correlates with persistent activation of the Wnt signaling pathway and results in perturbed extension of Schwann cell processes and disrupted lamellipodia formation. In addition, APC-deficient Schwann cells display a transient diminution of proliferative capacity. Our data indicate that APC is required by Schwann cells for their timely differentiation to mature, myelinating cells and plays a crucial role in radial axonal sorting and PNS myelination.

  20. Adenomatous polyposis coli protein deletion leads to cognitive and autism-like disabilities.

    PubMed

    Mohn, J L; Alexander, J; Pirone, A; Palka, C D; Lee, S-Y; Mebane, L; Haydon, P G; Jacob, M H

    2014-10-01

    Intellectual disabilities (IDs) and autism spectrum disorders link to human APC inactivating gene mutations. However, little is known about adenomatous polyposis coli's (APC's) role in the mammalian brain. This study is the first direct test of the impact of APC loss on central synapses, cognition and behavior. Using our newly generated APC conditional knock-out (cKO) mouse, we show that deletion of this single gene in forebrain neurons leads to a multisyndromic neurodevelopmental disorder. APC cKO mice, compared with wild-type littermates, exhibit learning and memory impairments, and autistic-like behaviors (increased repetitive behaviors, reduced social interest). To begin to elucidate neuronal changes caused by APC loss, we focused on the hippocampus, a key brain region for cognitive function. APC cKO mice display increased synaptic spine density, and altered synaptic function (increased frequency of miniature excitatory synaptic currents, modestly enhanced long-term potentiation). In addition, we found excessive β-catenin levels and associated changes in canonical Wnt target gene expression and N-cadherin synaptic adhesion complexes, including reduced levels of presenilin1. Our findings identify some novel functional and molecular changes not observed previously in other genetic mutant mouse models of co-morbid cognitive and autistic-like disabilities. This work thereby has important implications for potential therapeutic targets and the impact of their modulation. We provide new insights into molecular perturbations and cell types that are relevant to human ID and autism. In addition, our data elucidate a novel role for APC in the mammalian brain as a hub that links to and regulates synaptic adhesion and signal transduction pathways critical for normal cognition and behavior.

  1. Linkage disequilibrium predicts physical distance in the adenomatous polyposis coli region

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Watkins, W.S.; Carlson, M.; Albertsen, H.; Thliveris, A.; Leppert, M. )

    1994-05-01

    To test the reliability of linkage-disequilibrium analysis for gene mapping, the authors compared physical distance and linkage disequilibrium among seven polymorphisms in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) region on chromosome 5. Three of them lie within the APC gene, and two lie within the nearby MCC (mutated in colon cancer) gene. One polymorphism lies between the two genes, and one is likely to be 5' of MCC. Five of these polymorphisms are newly reported. All polymorphisms were typed in the CEPH kindreds, yielding 179-205 unrelated two-locus haplotypes. Linkage disequilibrium between each pair of polymorphisms is highly correlated with physical distance in this 550-kb region (correlation coefficient [minus].80, P < .006). This result is replicated in both the Utah and non-Utah CEPH kindreds. There is a tendency for greater disequilibrium among pairs of polymorphisms located within the same gene than among other pairs of polymorphisms. Trigenic, quadrigenic, three-locus, and four-locus disequilibrium measures were also estimated, but these measures revealed much less disequilibrium than did the two-locus disequilibrium measures. A review of 19 published disequilibrium studies, including this one, shows that linkage disequilibrium nearly always correlates significantly with physical distance in genomic regions >50-60 kb but that it does not do so in smaller genomic regions. The authors show that this agrees with theoretical predictions. This finding helps to resolve controversies regarding the use of disequilibrium for inferring gene order. Disequilibrium mapping is unlikely to predict gene order correctly in regions <50-60 kb in size but can often be applied successfully in regions of 50-500 kb or so in size. It is convenient that this is the range in which other mapping techniques, including chromosome walking and linkage mapping, become difficult. 81 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. New approach to surgical treatment of ulcerative colitis and polyposis coli without pelvic pouch. Experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Chaimoff, C; Kyzer, S; Karib, N; Kessler, H; Bayer, I

    1989-07-01

    A new method for the surgical treatment of ulcerative colitis and polyposis coli is described. Instead of preparing a pelvic pouch, the natural rectal pouch stripped of the diseased mucosa was used experimentally in dogs. The undisturbed muscular cuff of the rectum (12 cm from the anal verge) was covered by healthy vascularized mucosa of small bowel in such a manner that the dog could use its rectum as usual before surgery. The results are encouraging. The rectal reservoir is spared, with its sensitivity, continence and motor activity covered by healthy mucosa. The dogs thrived. PMID:2544382

  3. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis.

    PubMed

    Waller, Alexia; Findeis, Sarah; Lee, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), caused by a germline mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene on chromosome 5q21, is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hundreds to thousands of adenomas throughout the gastrointestinal tract. A variety of extraintestinal manifestations, including thyroid, soft tissue, and brain tumors, may also be present. These patients inevitably develop colorectal carcinoma by the fourth decade of life. In this review, the pathology, epidemiology, and genetic features of FAP are discussed. PMID:27617147

  4. Topoisomerase IIα Binding Domains of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Influence Cell Cycle Progression and Aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Coffey, Robert J.; Osheroff, Neil; Neufeld, Kristi L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Truncating mutations in the tumor suppressor gene APC (Adenomatous Polyposis Coli) are thought to initiate the majority of colorectal cancers. The 15- and 20-amino acid repeat regions of APC bind β-catenin and have been widely studied for their role in the negative regulation of canonical Wnt signaling. However, functions of APC in other important cellular processes, such as cell cycle control or aneuploidy, are only beginning to be studied. Our previous investigation implicated the 15-amino acid repeat region of APC (M2-APC) in the regulation of the G2/M cell cycle transition through interaction with topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα). Methodology/Principal Findings We now demonstrate that the 20-amino acid repeat region of APC (M3-APC) also interacts with topo IIα in colonic epithelial cells. Expression of M3-APC in cells with full-length endogenous APC causes cell accumulation in G2. However, cells with a mutated topo IIα isoform and lacking topo IIβ did not arrest, suggesting that the cellular consequence of M2- or M3-APC expression depends on functional topoisomerase II. Both purified recombinant M2- and M3-APC significantly enhanced the activity of topo IIα. Of note, although M3-APC can bind β-catenin, the G2 arrest did not correlate with β-catenin expression or activity, similar to what was seen with M2-APC. More importantly, expression of either M2- or M3-APC also led to increased aneuploidy in cells with full-length endogenous APC but not in cells with truncated endogenous APC that includes the M2-APC region. Conclusions/Significance Together, our data establish that the 20-amino acid repeat region of APC interacts with topo IIα to enhance its activity in vitro, and leads to G2 cell cycle accumulation and aneuploidy when expressed in cells containing full-length APC. These findings provide an additional explanation for the aneuploidy associated with many colon cancers that possess truncated APC. PMID:20368985

  5. The Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Is Required for the Formation of Robust Spindles Formed in CSF Xenopus ExtractsD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Dikovskaya, Dina; Newton, Ian P.; Näthke, Inke S.

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein occur early in colon cancer and correlate with chromosomal instability. Here, we show that depletion of APC from cystostatic factor (CSF) Xenopus extracts leads to a decrease in microtubule density and changes in tubulin distribution in spindles and asters formed in such extracts. Addition of full-length APC protein or a large, N-terminally truncated APC fragment to APC-depleted extracts restored normal spindle morphology and the intact microtubule-binding site of APC was necessary for this rescue. These data indicate that the APC protein plays a role in the formation of spindles that is dependent on its effect on microtubules. Spindles formed in cycled extracts were not sensitive to APC depletion. In CSF extracts, spindles predominantly formed from aster-like intermediates, whereas in cycled extracts chromatin was the major site of initial microtubule polymerization. These data suggest that APC is important for centrosomally driven spindle formation, which was confirmed by our finding that APC depletion reduced the size of asters nucleated from isolated centrosomes. We propose that lack of microtubule binding in cancer-associated mutations of APC may contribute to defects in the assembly of mitotic spindles and lead to missegregation of chromosomes. PMID:15075372

  6. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Deletion in Efferent Olivocochlear Neurons Perturbs Afferent Synaptic Maturation and Reduces the Dynamic Range of Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Tyler T.; Liberman, M. Charles

    2015-01-01

    Normal hearing requires proper differentiation of afferent ribbon synapses between inner hair cells (IHCs) and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) that carry acoustic information to the brain. Within individual IHCs, presynaptic ribbons show a size gradient with larger ribbons on the modiolar face and smaller ribbons on the pillar face. This structural gradient is associated with a gradient of spontaneous rates and threshold sensitivity, which is essential for a wide dynamic range of hearing. Despite their importance for hearing, mechanisms that direct ribbon differentiation are poorly defined. We recently identified adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC) as a key regulator of interneuronal synapse maturation. Here, we show that APC is required for ribbon size heterogeneity and normal cochlear function. Compared with wild-type littermates, APC conditional knock-out (cKO) mice exhibit decreased auditory brainstem responses. The IHC ribbon size gradient is also perturbed. Whereas the normal-developing IHCs display ribbon size gradients before hearing onset, ribbon sizes are aberrant in APC cKOs from neonatal ages on. Reporter expression studies show that the CaMKII-Cre used to delete the floxed APC gene is present in efferent olivocochlear (OC) neurons, not IHCs or SGNs. APC loss led to increased volumes and numbers of OC inhibitory dopaminergic boutons on neonatal SGN fibers. Our findings identify APC in efferent OC neurons as essential for regulating ribbon heterogeneity, dopaminergic terminal differentiation, and cochlear sensitivity. This APC effect on auditory epithelial cell synapses resembles interneuronal and nerve–muscle synapses, thereby defining a global role for APC in synaptic maturation in diverse cell types. Significance Statement This study identifies novel molecules and cellular interactions that are essential for the proper maturation of afferent ribbon synapses in sensory cells of the inner ear, and for normal hearing. PMID:26085645

  7. Enhanced suicidal erythrocyte death in mice carrying a loss-of-function mutation of the adenomatous polyposis coli gene.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Syed M; Mahmud, Hasan; Lang, Elisabeth; Gu, Shuchen; Bobbala, Diwakar; Zelenak, Christine; Jilani, Kashif; Siegfried, Alexandra; Föller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2012-05-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in human adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) lead to multiple colonic adenomatous polyps eventually resulting in colonic carcinoma. Similarly, heterozygous mice carrying defective APC (apc(Min/+)) suffer from intestinal tumours. The animals further suffer from anaemia, which in theory could result from accelerated eryptosis, a suicidal erythrocyte death triggered by enhanced cytosolic Ca(2+) activity and characterized by cell membrane scrambling and cell shrinkage. To explore, whether APC-deficiency enhances eryptosis, we estimated cell membrane scrambling from annexin V binding, cell size from forward scatter and cytosolic ATP utilizing luciferin-luciferase in isolated erythrocytes from apc(Min/+) mice and wild-type mice (apc(+/+)). Clearance of circulating erythrocytes was estimated by carboxyfluorescein-diacetate-succinimidyl-ester labelling. As a result, apc(Min/+) mice were anaemic despite reticulocytosis. Cytosolic ATP was significantly lower and annexin V binding significantly higher in apc(Min/+) erythrocytes than in apc(+/+) erythrocytes. Glucose depletion enhanced annexin V binding, an effect significantly more pronounced in apc(Min/+) erythrocytes than in apc(+/+) erythrocytes. Extracellular Ca(2+) removal or inhibition of Ca(2+) entry with amiloride (1 mM) blunted the increase but did not abrogate the genotype differences of annexin V binding following glucose depletion. Stimulation of Ca(2+) -entry by treatment with Ca(2+) -ionophore ionomycin (10 μM) increased annexin V binding, an effect again significantly more pronounced in apc(Min/+) erythrocytes than in apc(+/+) erythrocytes. Following retrieval and injection into the circulation of the same mice, apc(Min/+) erythrocytes were more rapidly cleared from circulating blood than apc(+/+) erythrocytes. Most labelled erythrocytes were trapped in the spleen, which was significantly enlarged in apc(Min/+) mice. The observations point to accelerated eryptosis and subsequent

  8. Destruction Complex Function in the Wnt Signaling Pathway of Drosophila Requires Multiple Interactions Between Adenomatous Polyposis Coli 2 and Armadillo

    PubMed Central

    Kunttas-Tatli, Ezgi; Zhou, Meng-Ning; Zimmerman, Sandra; Molinar, Olivia; Zhouzheng, Fangyuan; Carter, Krista; Kapur, Megha; Cheatle, Alys; Decal, Richard; McCartney, Brooke M.

    2012-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) negatively regulates Wnt signaling through its activity in the destruction complex. APC binds directly to the main effector of the pathway, β-catenin (βcat, Drosophila Armadillo), and helps to target it for degradation. In vitro studies demonstrated that a nonphosphorylated 20-amino-acid repeat (20R) of APC binds to βcat through the N-terminal extended region of a 20R. When phosphorylated, the phospho-region of an APC 20R also binds βcat and the affinity is significantly increased. These distinct APC–βcat interactions suggest different models for the sequential steps of destruction complex activity. However, the in vivo role of 20R phosphorylation and extended region interactions has not been rigorously tested. Here we investigated the functional role of these molecular interactions by making targeted mutations in Drosophila melanogaster APC2 that disrupt phosphorylation and extended region interactions and deletion mutants missing the Armadillo binding repeats. We tested the ability of these mutants to regulate Wnt signaling in APC2 null and in APC2 APC1 double-null embryos. Overall, our in vivo data support the role of phosphorylation and extended region interactions in APC2’s destruction complex function, but suggest that the extended region plays a more significant functional role. Furthermore, we show that the Drosophila 20Rs with homology to the vertebrate APC repeats that have the highest affinity for βcat are functionally dispensable, contrary to biochemical predictions. Finally, for some mutants, destruction complex function was dependent on APC1, suggesting that APC2 and APC1 may act cooperatively in the destruction complex. PMID:22174073

  9. Duodenal adenoma surveillance in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Sulbaran, Marianny; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a hereditary disorder caused by Adenomatous Polyposis Gene mutations that lead to the development of colorectal polyps with great malignant risk throughout life. Moreover, numerous extracolonic manifestations incorporate different clinical features to produce varied individual phenotypes. Among them, the occurrence of duodenal adenomatous polyps is considered an almost inevitable event, and their incidence rates increase as a patient’s age advances. Although the majority of patients exhibit different grades of duodenal adenomatosis as they age, only a small proportion (1%-5%) of patients will ultimately develop duodenal carcinoma. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to review the data regarding the epidemiology, classification, genetic features, endoscopic features, carcinogenesis, surveillance and management of duodenal polyps in patients with FAP. PMID:26265988

  10. Tissue-Specific Effects of Reduced β-catenin Expression on Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Mutation-Instigated Tumorigenesis in Mouse Colon and Ovarian Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ying; Sakamoto, Naoya; Wu, Rong; Liu, Jie-yu; Wiese, Alexandra; Green, Maranne E.; Green, Megan; Akyol, Aytekin; Roy, Badal C.; Zhai, Yali; Cho, Kathleen R.; Fearon, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) inactivating mutations are present in most human colorectal cancers and some other cancers. The APC protein regulates the β-catenin protein pool that functions as a co-activator of T cell factor (TCF)-regulated transcription in Wnt pathway signaling. We studied effects of reduced dosage of the Ctnnb1 gene encoding β-catenin in Apc-mutation-induced colon and ovarian mouse tumorigenesis and cell culture models. Concurrent somatic inactivation of one Ctnnb1 allele, dramatically inhibited Apc mutation-induced colon polyposis and greatly extended Apc-mutant mouse survival. Ctnnb1 hemizygous dose markedly inhibited increases in β-catenin levels in the cytoplasm and nucleus following Apc inactivation in colon epithelium, with attenuated expression of key β-catenin/TCF-regulated target genes, including those encoding the EphB2/B3 receptors, the stem cell marker Lgr5, and Myc, leading to maintenance of crypt compartmentalization and restriction of stem and proliferating cells to the crypt base. A critical threshold for β-catenin levels in TCF-regulated transcription was uncovered for Apc mutation-induced effects in colon epithelium, along with evidence of a feed-forward role for β-catenin in Ctnnb1 gene expression and CTNNB1 transcription. The active β-catenin protein pool was highly sensitive to CTNNB1 transcript levels in colon cancer cells. In mouse ovarian endometrioid adenocarcinomas (OEAs) arising from Apc- and Pten-inactivation, while Ctnnb1 hemizygous dose affected β-catenin levels and some β-catenin/TCF target genes, Myc induction was retained and OEAs arose in a fashion akin to that seen with intact Ctnnb1 gene dose. Our findings indicate Ctnnb1 gene dose exerts tissue-specific differences in Apc mutation-instigated tumorigenesis. Differential expression of selected β-catenin/TCF-regulated genes, such as Myc, likely underlies context-dependent effects of Ctnnb1 gene dosage in tumorigenesis. PMID:26528816

  11. ABT-888 and quinacrine induced apoptosis in metastatic breast cancer stem cells by inhibiting base excision repair via adenomatous polyposis coli.

    PubMed

    Siddharth, Sumit; Nayak, Deepika; Nayak, Anmada; Das, Sarita; Kundu, Chanakya Nath

    2016-09-01

    PARP inhibitors in combination with other agents are in clinical trial against cancer, but its effect on cancer stem cells (CSCs) is limited. CSCs are responsible for drug resistance, metastasis and cancer relapse due to high DNA repair capacity. Here, we present preclinical effects of Quinacrine (QC) with ABT-888, a PARP inhibitor, on highly metastatic breast cancer stem cells (mBCSCs). An increased level of Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) was noted after treatment with ABT-888 in QC pre-treated mBCSCs cells. Increased APC physically interacts with PARP-1 and inhibits PARylation causing the non assembly of base excision repair (BER) multiprotein complex, resulting in an irreparable DNA damage and subsequent apoptosis. Knockdown of APC in mBCSCs inhibited DNA damage, increased BER and PARylation, reduces apoptosis while the over-expression of APC in BT20 (APC low expressing) cells reversed the effect. Thus, combination of QC and ABT-888 decreased mBCSCs growth by activating APC and inhibiting BER within the cells. PMID:27334689

  12. The two SAMP repeats and their phosphorylation state in Drosophila Adenomatous polyposis coli-2 play mechanistically distinct roles in negatively regulating Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kunttas-Tatli, Ezgi; Von Kleeck, Ryan A.; Greaves, Bradford D.; Vinson, David; Roberts, David M.; McCartney, Brooke M.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) plays a key role in regulating the canonical Wnt signaling pathway as an essential component of the β-catenin destruction complex. C-terminal truncations of APC are strongly implicated in both sporadic and familial forms of colorectal cancer. However, many questions remain as to how these mutations interfere with APC’s tumor suppressor activity. One set of motifs frequently lost in these cancer-associated truncations is the SAMP repeats that mediate interactions between APC and Axin. APC proteins in both vertebrates and Drosophila contain multiple SAMP repeats that lack high sequence conservation outside of the Axin-binding motif. In this study, we tested the functional redundancy between different SAMPs and how these domains are regulated, using Drosophila APC2 and its two SAMP repeats as our model. Consistent with sequence conservation–based predictions, we show that SAMP2 has stronger binding activity to Axin in vitro, but SAMP1 also plays an essential role in the Wnt destruction complex in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that the phosphorylation of SAMP repeats is a potential mechanism to regulate their activity. Overall our findings support a model in which each SAMP repeat plays a mechanistically distinct role but they cooperate for maximal destruction complex function. PMID:26446838

  13. Regulation of Wnt signaling by the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli does not require the ability to enter the nucleus or a particular cytoplasmic localization.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David M; Pronobis, Mira I; Poulton, John S; Kane, Eric G; Peifer, Mark

    2012-06-01

    Wnt signaling plays key roles in development and disease. The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is an essential negative regulator of Wnt signaling. Its best-characterized role is as part of the destruction complex, targeting the Wnt effector β-catenin (βcat) for phosphorylation and ultimate destruction, but several studies suggested APC also may act in the nucleus at promoters of Wnt-responsive genes or to shuttle βcat out for destruction. Even in its role in the destruction complex, APC's mechanism of action remains mysterious. We have suggested APC positions the destruction complex at the appropriate subcellular location, facilitating βcat destruction. In this study, we directly tested APC's proposed roles in the nucleus or in precisely localizing the destruction complex by generating a series of APC2 variants to which we added tags relocalizing otherwise wild-type APC to different cytoplasmic locations. We tested these for function in human colon cancer cells and Drosophila embryos. Strikingly, all rescue Wnt regulation and down-regulate Wnt target genes in colon cancer cells, and most restore Wnt regulation in Drosophila embryos null for both fly APCs. These data suggest that APC2 does not have to shuttle into the nucleus or localize to a particular subcellular location to regulate Wnt signaling.

  14. The two SAMP repeats and their phosphorylation state in Drosophila Adenomatous polyposis coli-2 play mechanistically distinct roles in negatively regulating Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Kunttas-Tatli, Ezgi; Von Kleeck, Ryan A; Greaves, Bradford D; Vinson, David; Roberts, David M; McCartney, Brooke M

    2015-12-01

    The tumor suppressor Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) plays a key role in regulating the canonical Wnt signaling pathway as an essential component of the β-catenin destruction complex. C-terminal truncations of APC are strongly implicated in both sporadic and familial forms of colorectal cancer. However, many questions remain as to how these mutations interfere with APC's tumor suppressor activity. One set of motifs frequently lost in these cancer-associated truncations is the SAMP repeats that mediate interactions between APC and Axin. APC proteins in both vertebrates and Drosophila contain multiple SAMP repeats that lack high sequence conservation outside of the Axin-binding motif. In this study, we tested the functional redundancy between different SAMPs and how these domains are regulated, using Drosophila APC2 and its two SAMP repeats as our model. Consistent with sequence conservation-based predictions, we show that SAMP2 has stronger binding activity to Axin in vitro, but SAMP1 also plays an essential role in the Wnt destruction complex in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that the phosphorylation of SAMP repeats is a potential mechanism to regulate their activity. Overall our findings support a model in which each SAMP repeat plays a mechanistically distinct role but they cooperate for maximal destruction complex function.

  15. Drosophila Homologues of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) and the Formin Diaphanous Collaborate by a Conserved Mechanism to Stimulate Actin Filament Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Richa; Stepanik, Vince; Rankova, Aneliya; Molinar, Olivia; Goode, Bruce L.; McCartney, Brooke M.

    2013-01-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a large multidomain protein that regulates the cytoskeleton. Recently, it was shown that vertebrate APC through its Basic domain directly collaborates with the formin mDia1 to stimulate actin filament assembly in the presence of nucleation barriers. However, it has been unclear whether these activities extend to homologues of APC and Dia in other organisms. Drosophila APC and Dia are each required to promote actin furrow formation in the syncytial embryo, suggesting a potential collaboration in actin assembly, but low sequence homology between the Basic domains of Drosophila and vertebrate APC has left their functional and mechanistic parallels uncertain. To address this question, we purified Drosophila APC1 and Dia and determined their individual and combined effects on actin assembly using both bulk fluorescence assays and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Our data show that APC1, similar to its vertebrate homologue, bound to actin monomers and nucleated and bundled filaments. Further, Drosophila Dia nucleated actin assembly and protected growing filament barbed ends from capping protein. Drosophila APC1 and Dia directly interacted and collaborated to promote actin assembly in the combined presence of profilin and capping protein. Thus, despite limited sequence homology, Drosophila and vertebrate APCs exhibit highly related activities and mechanisms and directly collaborate with formins. These results suggest that APC-Dia interactions in actin assembly are conserved and may underlie important in vivo functions in a broad range of animal phyla. PMID:23558679

  16. Targeted deletion of the C-terminus of the mouse adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor results in neurologic phenotypes related to schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Loss of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene function results in constitutive activation of the canonical Wnt pathway and represents the main initiating and rate-limiting event in colorectal tumorigenesis. APC is likely to participate in a wide spectrum of biological functions via its different functional domains and is abundantly expressed in the brain as well as in peripheral tissues. However, the neuronal function of APC is poorly understood. To investigate the functional role of Apc in the central nervous system, we analyzed the neurological phenotypes of Apc1638T/1638T mice, which carry a targeted deletion of the 3′ terminal third of Apc that does not affect Wnt signaling. Results A series of behavioral tests revealed a working memory deficit, increased locomotor activity, reduced anxiety-related behavior, and mildly decreased social interaction in Apc1638T/1638T mice. Apc1638T/1638T mice showed abnormal morphology of the dendritic spines and impaired long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission in the hippocampal CA1 region. Moreover, Apc1638T/1638T mice showed abnormal dopamine and serotonin distribution in the brain. Some of these behavioral and neuronal phenotypes are related to symptoms and endophenotypes of schizophrenia. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the C-terminus of the Apc tumor suppressor plays a critical role in cognitive and neuropsychiatric functioning. This finding suggests a potential functional link between the C-terminus of APC and pathologies of the central nervous system. PMID:24678719

  17. Regulation of Wnt signaling by the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli does not require the ability to enter the nucleus or a particular cytoplasmic localization

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, David M.; Pronobis, Mira I.; Poulton, John S.; Kane, Eric G.; Peifer, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays key roles in development and disease. The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is an essential negative regulator of Wnt signaling. Its best-characterized role is as part of the destruction complex, targeting the Wnt effector β-catenin (βcat) for phosphorylation and ultimate destruction, but several studies suggested APC also may act in the nucleus at promoters of Wnt-responsive genes or to shuttle βcat out for destruction. Even in its role in the destruction complex, APC's mechanism of action remains mysterious. We have suggested APC positions the destruction complex at the appropriate subcellular location, facilitating βcat destruction. In this study, we directly tested APC's proposed roles in the nucleus or in precisely localizing the destruction complex by generating a series of APC2 variants to which we added tags relocalizing otherwise wild-type APC to different cytoplasmic locations. We tested these for function in human colon cancer cells and Drosophila embryos. Strikingly, all rescue Wnt regulation and down-regulate Wnt target genes in colon cancer cells, and most restore Wnt regulation in Drosophila embryos null for both fly APCs. These data suggest that APC2 does not have to shuttle into the nucleus or localize to a particular subcellular location to regulate Wnt signaling. PMID:22513088

  18. The postsynaptic adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) multiprotein complex is required for localizing neuroligin and neurexin to neuronal nicotinic synapses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Madelaine M; Yang, Fang; Mohn, Jesse L; Storer, Elizabeth K; Jacob, Michele H

    2010-08-18

    Synaptic efficacy requires that presynaptic and postsynaptic specializations align precisely and mature coordinately. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood, however. We propose that adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC) is a key coordinator of presynaptic and postsynaptic maturation. APC organizes a multiprotein complex that directs nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) localization at postsynaptic sites in avian ciliary ganglion neurons in vivo. We hypothesize that the APC complex also provides retrograde signals that direct presynaptic active zones to develop in register with postsynaptic nAChR clusters. In our model, the APC complex provides retrograde signals via postsynaptic neuroligin that interacts extracellularly with presynaptic neurexin. S-SCAM (synaptic cell adhesion molecule) and PSD-93 (postsynaptic density-93) are scaffold proteins that bind to neuroligin. We identify S-SCAM as a novel component of neuronal nicotinic synapses. We show that S-SCAM, PSD-93, neuroligin and neurexin are enriched at alpha3*-nAChR synapses. PSD-93 and S-SCAM bind to APC and its binding partner beta-catenin, respectively. Blockade of selected APC and beta-catenin interactions, in vivo, leads to decreased postsynaptic accumulation of S-SCAM, but not PSD-93. Importantly, neuroligin synaptic clusters are also decreased. On the presynaptic side, there are decreases in neurexin and active zone proteins. Further, presynaptic terminals are less mature structurally and functionally. We define a novel neural role for APC by showing that the postsynaptic APC multiprotein complex is required for anchoring neuroligin and neurexin at neuronal synapses in vivo. APC human gene mutations correlate with autism spectrum disorders, providing strong support for the importance of the association, demonstrated here, between APC, neuroligin and neurexin.

  19. Downregulation of adenomatous polyposis coli by microRNA-663 promotes odontogenic differentiation through activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Park, Min-Gyeong; Lee, Seul Ah; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Heung-Joong; Yu, Sun-Kyoung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob; Chun, Hong Sung; Park, Joo-Cheol; Kim, Do Kyung

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • miR-663 is significantly up-regulated during MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell differentiation. • miR-663 accelerates mineralization in MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells without cell proliferation. • miR-663 promotes odontoblastic cell differentiation by targeting APC and activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MDPC-23 cells. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation by inhibiting mRNA translation or by inducing its degradation. However, the role of miRNAs in odontogenic differentiation is largely unknown. In this present study, we observed that the expression of miR-663 increased significantly during differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts. Furthermore, up-regulation of miR-663 expression promoted odontogenic differentiation and accelerated mineralization without proliferation in MDPC-23 cells. In addition, target gene prediction for miR-663 revealed that the mRNA of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, which is associated with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has a miR-663 binding site in its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Furthermore, APC expressional was suppressed significantly by miR-663, and this down-regulation of APC expression triggered activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-663 promotes differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts by targeting APC-mediated activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Therefore, miR-663 can be considered a critical regulator of odontoblast differentiation and can be utilized for developing miRNA-based therapeutic agents.

  20. Intestinal trefoil factor controls the expression of the adenomatous polyposis coli-catenin and the E-cadherin-catenin complexes in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Efstathiou, J A; Noda, M; Rowan, A; Dixon, C; Chinery, R; Jawhari, A; Hattori, T; Wright, N A; Bodmer, W F; Pignatelli, M

    1998-03-17

    Intestinal trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is a member of the trefoil family of peptides, small molecules constitutively expressed in epithelial tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract. TFF3 has been shown to promote migration of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and to enhance mucosal healing and epithelial restitution in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the effect of recombinant TFF3 (rTFF3) stimulation on the expression and cellular localization of the epithelial (E)-cadherin-catenin complex, a prime mediator of Ca2+ dependent cell-cell adhesion, and the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)-catenin complex in HT29, HCT116, and SW480 colorectal carcinoma cell lines. Stimulation by rTFF3 (10(-9) M and 10(-8) M) for 20-24 hr led to cell detachment and to a reduction in intercellular adhesion in HT29 and HCT116 cells. In both cell lines, E-cadherin expression was down-regulated. The expression of APC, alpha-catenin and beta-catenin also was decreased in HT29 cells, with a translocation of APC into the nucleus. No change in either cell adhesion or in the expression of E-cadherin, the catenins, and APC was detected in SW480 cells. In addition, TFF3 induced DNA fragmentation and morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis in HT29. Tyrphostin, a competitive inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases, inhibited the effects of TFF3. Our results indicate that by perturbing the complexes between E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and associated proteins, TFF3 may modulate epithelial cell adhesion, migration, and survival.

  1. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and familial adenomatous polyposis: an association?

    PubMed

    Ferouz, A S; Mohr, R M; Paul, P

    1995-10-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a benign neoplasm affecting the nasopharynx of male adolescents. Two patients treated at Temple University Hospital for this condition were also diagnosed with familial adenomatous polyposis. Familial adenomatous polyposis results from the inheritance of a mutated adenomatous polyposis coli gene in an autosomal dominant pattern. The development of colorectal carcinoma in middle age is seen almost invariably in familial adenomatous polyposis, if a prophylactic colectomy is not performed. To identify a possible association between juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and familial adenomatous polyposis, chart reviews and patient interviews were carried out for all patients treated for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma at Temple University Hospital between 1985 and 1993. Single-strand conformational polymorphism was performed to detect the presence of certain adenomatous polyposis coli gene mutations within the germline DNA of those juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma patients not previously found to have familial adenomatous polyposis. Although no more patients with both juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and familial adenomatous polyposis were found by these methods, the two patients with both disorders previously identified constitute 22% of our juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma series. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  2. Treatment of Multiple Hepatic Adenomatosis Using Transarterial Chemoembolization: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Hahn, Seong Tai

    2004-09-15

    Liver adenomatosis is a rare entity in which multiple liver cell adenomas (more than 10) occur in patients with no prior history of steroid use or glycogen storage disease. This report describes angiographic findings and treatment strategies of a case of liver adenomatosis.

  3. A case of multiple endocrine adenomatosis with primary amenorrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Vandeweghe, M.; Braxel, K.; Schutyser, J.; Vermeulen, A.

    1978-01-01

    A well documented sporadic case of multiple endocrine adenomatosis (MEA) type I, with the pituitary tumour presenting as a prolactinoma, is described in a 28-year-old female. Primary amenorrhoea, resulting from hyperprolactinaemia, was the first symptom of the polyglandular neoplasia. A gastrinoma was removed from the head of the pancreas and latent hyperparathyroidism appeared to be present. Treatment with bromocriptine was poorly tolerated; neurosurgical intervention was refused by the patient. The possibility that a serum prolactin determination may be useful in detecting pituitary involvement in MEA deserves consideration. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:31610

  4. Western diet enhances benzo(a)pyrene-induced colon tumorigenesis in a polyposis in rat coli (PIRC) rat model of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kelly L.; Pulliam, Stephanie R.; Okoro, Emmanuel; Guo, Zhongmao; Washington, Mary K.; Adunyah, Samuel E.; Amos-Landgraf, James M.; Ramesh, Aramandla

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of Western diet (WD), contaminated with environmental toxicants, has been implicated as one of the risk factors for sporadic colon cancer. Our earlier studies using a mouse model revealed that compared to unsaturated dietary fat, the saturated dietary fat exacerbated the development of colon tumors caused by B(a)P. The objective of this study was to study how WD potentiates B(a)P-induced colon carcinogenesis in the adult male rats that carry a mutation in the Apc locus - the polyposis in the rat colon (PIRC) rats. Groups of PIRC rats were fed with AIN-76A standard diet (RD) or Western diet (WD) and received 25, 50, or 100 μg B(a)P/kg body weight (wt) via oral gavage for 60 days. Subsequent to exposure, rats were euthanized; colons were retrieved and preserved in 10% formalin for counting the polyp numbers, measuring the polyp size, and histological analyses. Blood samples were collected and concentrations of cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, insulin and leptin were measured. Rats that received WD + B(a)P showed increased levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and leptin in comparison to RD + B(a)P groups or controls. The colon tumor numbers showed a B(a)P dose-response relationship. Adenomas with high grade dysplasia were prominent in B(a)P + WD rats compared to B(a)P + RD rats and controls (p < 0.05). The larger rat model system used in this study allows for studying more advanced tumor phenotypes over a longer duration and delineating the role of diet - toxicant interactions in sporadic colon tumor development. PMID:26959117

  5. Adenomatosis of accessory salivary glands of the lip. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ahrén, C; Lindström, J

    1977-01-01

    Two cases of an unusual tumour of accessory salivary glands are presented. The histological examination revealed that this tumour was benign and not malignant as has been suggested by others. Clinical follow-up for 8 years showed no signs of recurrence or metastases. We suggested to call it 'adenomatosis'. No extensive surgery is indicated.

  6. Familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Half, Elizabeth; Bercovich, Dani; Rozen, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is characterized by the development of many tens to thousands of adenomas in the rectum and colon during the second decade of life. FAP has an incidence at birth of about 1/8,300, it manifests equally in both sexes, and accounts for less than 1% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. In the European Union, prevalence has been estimated at 1/11,300-37,600. Most patients are asymptomatic for years until the adenomas are large and numerous, and cause rectal bleeding or even anemia, or cancer develops. Generally, cancers start to develop a decade after the appearance of the polyps. Nonspecific symptoms may include constipation or diarrhea, abdominal pain, palpable abdominal masses and weight loss. FAP may present with some extraintestinal manifestations such as osteomas, dental abnormalities (unerupted teeth, congenital absence of one or more teeth, supernumerary teeth, dentigerous cysts and odontomas), congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE), desmoid tumors, and extracolonic cancers (thyroid, liver, bile ducts and central nervous system). A less aggressive variant of FAP, attenuated FAP (AFAP), is characterized by fewer colorectal adenomatous polyps (usually 10 to 100), later age of adenoma appearance and a lower cancer risk. Some lesions (skull and mandible osteomas, dental abnormalities, and fibromas on the scalp, shoulders, arms and back) are indicative of the Gardner variant of FAP. Classic FAP is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and results from a germline mutation in the adenomatous polyposis (APC) gene. Most patients (~70%) have a family history of colorectal polyps and cancer. In a subset of individuals, a MUTYH mutation causes a recessively inherited polyposis condition, MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), which is characterized by a slightly increased risk of developing CRC and polyps/adenomas in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Diagnosis is based on a suggestive family history

  7. Familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Half, Elizabeth; Bercovich, Dani; Rozen, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is characterized by the development of many tens to thousands of adenomas in the rectum and colon during the second decade of life. FAP has an incidence at birth of about 1/8,300, it manifests equally in both sexes, and accounts for less than 1% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. In the European Union, prevalence has been estimated at 1/11,300-37,600. Most patients are asymptomatic for years until the adenomas are large and numerous, and cause rectal bleeding or even anemia, or cancer develops. Generally, cancers start to develop a decade after the appearance of the polyps. Nonspecific symptoms may include constipation or diarrhea, abdominal pain, palpable abdominal masses and weight loss. FAP may present with some extraintestinal manifestations such as osteomas, dental abnormalities (unerupted teeth, congenital absence of one or more teeth, supernumerary teeth, dentigerous cysts and odontomas), congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE), desmoid tumors, and extracolonic cancers (thyroid, liver, bile ducts and central nervous system). A less aggressive variant of FAP, attenuated FAP (AFAP), is characterized by fewer colorectal adenomatous polyps (usually 10 to 100), later age of adenoma appearance and a lower cancer risk. Some lesions (skull and mandible osteomas, dental abnormalities, and fibromas on the scalp, shoulders, arms and back) are indicative of the Gardner variant of FAP. Classic FAP is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and results from a germline mutation in the adenomatous polyposis (APC) gene. Most patients (~70%) have a family history of colorectal polyps and cancer. In a subset of individuals, a MUTYH mutation causes a recessively inherited polyposis condition, MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), which is characterized by a slightly increased risk of developing CRC and polyps/adenomas in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Diagnosis is based on a suggestive family history

  8. Tumor-associated NH2-terminal fragments are the most stable part of the adenomatous polyposis coli protein and can be regulated by interactions with COOH-terminal domains.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoyu; Näthke, Inke S

    2005-06-15

    Truncation mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are responsible for familial and sporadic colorectal cancer. APC is a large, multifunctional protein involved in cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Dominant effects that have been attributed to the NH2-terminal fragments of APC expressed in tumors may result from loss of functions due to lack of COOH-terminal regions or gain of functions due to fewer regulatory interactions. Resolving this issue and determining how structural changes contribute to the multiple functions of the APC protein requires knowledge about the structural organization of the APC molecule. To this end, we used limited proteolysis to distinguish regions of the molecule with limited structure from those that form well-folded domains. We discovered that the NH2-terminal region of APC was most resistant to proteolytic degradation, whereas middle and COOH-terminal regions were significantly more sensitive. Binding of APC to microtubules protected COOH-terminal regions of APC against proteolysis, consistent with the idea that this region of the molecule becomes ordered when bound to microtubules. Furthermore, interactions between the NH2- and COOH-terminal domains of APC were identified in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that NH2-terminal fragments of APC may be regulated by interactions with COOH-terminal domains. Indeed, expressing COOH-terminal APC fragments in tumor cells resulted in changes in the protein interactions of endogenous NH2-terminal fragments in these cells. Thus, the dominant function of NH2-terminal APC fragments found in tumor cells could be explained by loss of this regulation in tumors where COOH-terminal domains are missing.

  9. Hepatocellular adenomatosis is a rare entity that may mimic other hepatocellular lesions.

    PubMed

    Skarupa, David J; Ellison, E Christopher; Vitellas, Kenneth M; Frankel, Wendy L

    2004-02-01

    A 14-year-old girl presented to her pediatrician with right lower quadrant pain that progressed to right upper quadrant pain with radiation to her back. Her past medical history included mitral valve prolapse, and she had no history of oral contraceptive use. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a liver mass and multiple smaller areas of low attenuation, too small to characterize. The clinical and radiographic features were suggestive of hepatocellular adenoma, and she underwent a left hepatic lobectomy. The liver contained one 4.2 cm nodule and multiple (10 to 20) smaller nodules that were well-demarcated from the adjacent liver parenchyma. All lesions were histologically hepatocellular adenomas and, therefore, she was diagnosed with hepatocellular adenomatosis. This case is unique because of the small number of cases of hepatocellular adenomatosis diagnosed in teenagers, and little long-term follow-up.

  10. Giant Adrenal Cavernous Hemangioma in a Patient with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Bacha, Dhouha; Chaabane, Abir; Khanche, Fatma; Néchi, Saloua; Touinsi, Hassen; Chelbi, Emna

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal hemangioma is an uncommon benign vascular tumor that is often discovered incidentally. It has never been reported in association with familial adenomatous polyposis. We report a case of a 60-year old man with a history of familial adenomatous polyposis, in whom a huge retroperitoneal cyst of 18x17 cm was discovered during routine radiologic evaluation. Because of the impossibility of ruling out the presence of malignancy, surgical cystectomy was performed, associated to a scheduled total colectomy. Pathological examination revealed that the cyst corresponded to an adrenal cavernous hemangioma. Colonic adenomas did not show signs of degeneration. Screening for adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene mutation was not carried out. As familial adenomatous polyposis is known to involve a variety of extracolonic manifestations, this finding raises the suspicion of a possible variant of this syndrome including adrenal hemangioma. An extensive study based on a larger patient series with genetic exploration is necessary. PMID:27777714

  11. Molecular genetic analysis of exons 1 to 6 of the APC gene in non-polyposis familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Joyce, J A; Froggatt, N J; Davies, R; Evans, D G; Trembath, R; Barton, D E; Maher, E R

    1995-12-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis coli is caused by constitutional mutations in the APC gene. The hallmark of familial adenomatous polyposis coli is the presence of numerous (> 100) colorectal polyps, but mutations in the 5' end of the APC gene have been associated with familial colorectal cancer without florid polyposis. Although familial adenomatous polyposis coli accounts for only a minority of familial colorectal cancer cases, we hypothesised that APC mutations which were not associated with florid polyposis might make a significant contribution to nonpolyposis familial colorectal cancer. To investigate this possibility, we analysed 40 unrelated patients with familial colorectal cancer without classical familial adenomatous polyposis coli for mutations in exons 1 to 6 (codons 1 to 243) of the APC gene. No mutations were detected, but a C-->T polymorphism at nucleotide 333 (Arg-->Trp at codon 99) was identified. No 5' APC mutations were detected in two patients with desmoid tumours and a family history of colorectal cancer and polyps. We conclude that mutations in exons 1 to 6 of the APC gene are infrequent in patients with familial colorectal cancer who do not have many colorectal polyps. PMID:8835324

  12. [A new case of hepatic adenomatosis treated with orthotopic liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Yunta, P J; Moya, A; San-Juan, F; López-Andújar, R; De Juan, M; Orbis, F; Mir, J

    2001-09-01

    Hepatic adenomatosis is a rare disease with multiple hepatic adenomas (10 or more), not associated with an history of oral contraceptive use or anabolic steroids use or with glycogen storage disease. A new case is reported in a 23 year-old woman who consulted for an abdominal mass and who had more than 50 adenomas of the liver. The suspicion of malignant transformation by the elevation of the alpha-foetoprotein, and the diffuse affectation of the liver, with minimum free parenchyma, suggested to carry out an orthotopic liver transplantation. The definitive histological examination of the surgical specimen confirmed the existence of local areas of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  13. Genetic aspects of multiple polyposis coli.

    PubMed

    Murphy, E A

    1983-07-01

    Questions on this topic that concern the clinician are addressed: whether it is inherited and, if so, whether Mendelian; what the segregation ratios will be; whether it is heterogeneous; how its high frequency can be accounted for; and what preventive measures are available. In several cases the question has to be reworded in order to make it sufficiently precise for it to be used in practice without misleading the patient. Framed in this fashion applicable answers are relatively easily available although many genetic puzzles remain. To date, no antenatal diagnosis is available. PMID:6861579

  14. Diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment strategies for familial adenomatous polyposis: rationale and update

    PubMed Central

    Aihara, Hiroyuki; Kumar, Nitin; Thompson, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis is characterized by the development of multiple (>100) colorectal adenomas throughout the colorectum. This disorder can be caused by a germline mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene and can be diagnosed either clinically or genetically. After diagnosis with the condition, patients should undergo prophylactic proctocolectomy with a neoreservoir, usually an ileoanal pouch, at an appropriate time. Individuals with a family history of this disease who have not been diagnosed should be advised to attend genetic counseling and to enroll in appropriate clinical and genetic surveillance programs. Recent progress in endoscopic technology, including high-resolution endoscopy, capsule endoscopy, and double-balloon endoscopy, has made possible more detailed and wide-ranging investigation of the gastrointestinal tract. Although there has been limited evidence, further studies on these new endoscopic technologies might alter the surveillance strategies for familial adenomatous polyposis. PMID:24161962

  15. Current status of familial gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ioan; Gurzu, Simona; Turdean, Gligore Sabin

    2015-01-01

    Because of the rarity of familial gastrointestinal cancer-predisposing syndromes, their exploration in literature is not extensive. In this review, an update of the clinicopathological and molecular criteria of gastrointestinal familial polyposis syndromes with potential malignant transformation is performed. In addition, a guide for screening and surveillance was synthesized and a distribution of gene mutations according to the specific syndromes and geographic distribution was included. The following inherited polyposes syndromes were analyzed: familial adenomatous polyposis, the hamartomatous familial polyposes (Juvenile polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Cowden syndrome, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, neurofibromatosis type I and multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome 2B), Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and MUTYH-associated adenomatous polyposis. For proper medical care, subspecialization of gastroenterologists, pathologists, and genticists in the field of familial diseases should be introduced in the medical curriculum. PMID:26600934

  16. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as “hamartomatous polyposis syndromes”, “Peutz-Jeghers syndrome”, “juvenile polyposis syndrome”, “juvenile polyp”, and “PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome” (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented. PMID:25848489

  17. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-03-27

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as "hamartomatous polyposis syndromes", "Peutz-Jeghers syndrome", "juvenile polyposis syndrome", "juvenile polyp", and "PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome" (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented.

  18. [A Case of Serrated Polyposis Syndrome with Early Colon Cancer].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Okihide; Chika, Noriyasu; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Aoyagi, Nobuhiko; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Mochiki, Erito; Miura, Ichiro; Yao, Takashi; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2015-11-01

    The patient was a 65-year-old man without any noteworthy medical history. A colonoscopy conducted after a positive fecal occult blood test revealed approximately 100 polyps in the large intestine. A biopsy of some these polyps revealed serrated and hyperplastic polyps, which were histologically determined to be well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of serrated polyposis syndrome (SPS) was made, and the patient underwent laparoscopic pancolectomy/ileoproctostomy. Histopathological analysis revealed a total of 91 lesions, out of which 15 were ≥10 mm. A 30 mm lesion in the ascending colon was a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, stage Ⅰ colon cancer (T1a [sm], ly0, v0, N0, and M0). No germline mutations were found on genetic testing of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), mutY homolog (MUTYH), mutL homolog 1 (MLH1), mutS homolog 2 (MSH2), mutS homolog 6 (MSH6), and postmeiotic segregation increased 2 (PMS2) genes. No loss of MLH1 protein expression or expression of mutated B-Raf (BRAF) V600E protein was observed in the cancer regions after immunostaining. This case is important because not only is the condition rare but also because it showed that the serrated pathway may not necessarily be the mechanism by which serrated lesions become cancerous in patients with SPS.

  19. Familial adenomatous polyposis in an adolescent with coexisting schizophrenia: treatment strategies and implications

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Luisa; Alvarez, Jose; Weinstein, Erica; Korenis, Panagiota

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with high mortality and morbidity. The etiology of schizophrenia remains unclear, studies implicate a multifactorial origin with genetic and environmental factors. The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene has been associated with FAP (familial adenomatous polyposis), and studies have linked it to schizophrenia. However, there are few studies which examine the association between FAP and schizophrenia. Limited data exist regarding recommendations for genetic counseling of adolescents with comorbid psychiatric illness. A case of an adolescent with FAP who developed psychotic symptoms is presented. This case hopes to add to the literature about mental illness in those with FAP. A review of literature about the role of APC in schizophrenia as well as implications of genetic counseling on those who suffer with mental illness will be discussed. PMID:26436104

  20. Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Unresectable Liver Adenomatosis Associated with Congenital Absence of Portal Vein: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Brasoveanu, Vladislav; Ionescu, Mihnea Ioan; Grigorie, Razvan; Mihaila, Mariana; Bacalbasa, Nicolae; Dumitru, Radu; Herlea, Vlad; Iorgescu, Andreea; Tomescu, Dana; Popescu, Irinel

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 21 Final Diagnosis: Unresectable liver adenomatosis associated with congenital absence of portal vein Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Living donor liver transplantation Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Rare disease Background: Abernethy malformation (AM), or congenital absence of portal vein (CAPV), is a very rare disease which tends to be associated with the development of benign or malignant tumors, usually in children or young adults. Case Report: We report the case of a 21-year-old woman diagnosed with type Ib AM (portal vein draining directly into the inferior vena cava) and unresectable liver adenomatosis. The patient presented mild liver dysfunction and was largely asymptomatic. Living donor liver transplantation was performed using a left hemiliver graft from her mother. Postoperatively, the patient attained optimal liver function and at 9-month follow-up has returned to normal life. Conclusions: We consider that living donor liver transplantation is the best therapeutic solution for AM associated with unresectable liver adenomatosis, especially because compared to receiving a whole liver graft, the waiting time on the liver transplantation list is much shorter. PMID:26386552

  1. Hyperplastic polyposis: association with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Leggett, B A; Devereaux, B; Biden, K; Searle, J; Young, J; Jass, J

    2001-02-01

    Hyperplastic polyposis is a loosely defined syndrome initially thought not to confer a clinically important predisposition to colorectal cancer. The aim of the current study was to examine the clinical, histologic, and molecular features of a prospective series of cases meeting a strict definition of the condition. Twelve patients were identified, seven of whom had developed colorectal cancer. Most polyps were hyperplastic, but 11 patients also had polyps containing dysplasia as either serrated adenomas. mixed polyps, or traditional adenomas. The mean percentage of dysplastic polyps in patients with cancer was 35%, and in patients without cancer, 11% (p < 0.05). Microsatellite instability (MSI) was present in 3 of 47 hyperplastic polyps and two of eight serrated adenomas. Kras was mutated in 8 of 47 hyperplastic polyps and two of eight serrated adenomas. No polyps showed loss of heterozygosity of chromosomes 5q, 1p, or 18q. Two of seven cancers showed a high level of MSI. It is concluded that hyperplastic polyposis is associated with a high risk of colorectal cancer. Hyperplastic polyps are the dominant type of polyp, but most cases have some dysplastic epithelium. A higher proportion of dysplastic polyps is associated with increased cancer risk. Clonal genetic changes are observed in some hyperplastic polyps and serrated adenomas.

  2. Frontal mucocoele secondary to nasal polyposis: an unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Chew, Y K; Noorizan, Y; Khir, A; Brito-Mutunayagam, S; Prepageran, N

    2009-11-01

    The incidence of mucocoeles associated with a non-surgically treated nasal polyposis is rare. We report a rare case of nasal polyposis with asymptomatic frontal mucocoeles in a 28-year-old Malay man who presented with bilateral nasal obstruction with anosmia. Physical examination revealed bilateral grade III nasal polyps causing obstruction. Computed tomography revealed paranasal polyposis with a large polyp extending and expanding the posterior table of the frontal sinus causing erosion and thinning of its wall. Marsupialisation of the mucocoele and nasal polypectomy were done. Endoscopic sinus surgery and marsupialisation should be the treatment of choice for asymptomatic frontal mucocoele.

  3. Extra-abdominal desmoid tumors associated with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Calvert, George T; Monument, Michael J; Burt, Randall W; Jones, Kevin B; Randall, R Lor

    2012-01-01

    Extra-abdominal desmoid tumors are a significant cause of morbidity in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome. Understanding of the basic biology and natural history of these tumors has increased substantially over the past decade. Accordingly, medical and surgical management of desmoid tumors has also evolved. This paper analyzes recent evidence pertaining to the epidemiology, molecular biology, histopathology, screening, and treatment of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors associated with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome.

  4. Duodenal polyposis secondary to portal hypertensive duodenopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Ananta; Jaffe, Philip E; Zhang, Xuchen

    2015-01-01

    Portal hypertensive duodenopathy (PHD) is a recognized, but uncommon finding of portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. Lesions associated with PHD include erythema, erosions, ulcers, telangiectasia, exaggerated villous pattern and duodenal varices. However, duodenal polyposis as a manifestation of PHD is rare. We report a case of a 52-year-old man who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and was found with multiple small duodenal polyps ranging in size from 1-8 mm. Biopsy of the representative polyps revealed polypoid fragments of duodenal mucosa with villiform hyperplasia lined by reactive duodenal/gastric foveolar epithelium and underlying lamina propria showed proliferating ectatic and congested capillaries. The features were diagnostic of polyps arising in the setting of PHD. PMID:26634042

  5. Gastric polyposis caused by multifocal histiocytosis X.

    PubMed Central

    Wada, R; Yagihashi, S; Konta, R; Ueda, T; Izumiyama, T

    1992-01-01

    A rare case of gastric polyposis caused by infiltration of Langerhans' cells is reported. A 53 year old Japanese woman complaining of vague abdominal discomfort, was found at endoscopy to have numerous polyps all over the gastric wall. An endoscopic biopsy specimen showed characteristic infiltration of Langerhans' cells in the lamina propria of the mucosa. Functional abnormalities such as impaired gastric acid secretion or malabsorption were not associated with this lesion and the patient was treated conservatively. During follow up over two years, she had a cutaneous eruption with infiltration of histiocytes and osteolytic lesions in the skull. However, no progressive changes occurred in the stomach. This probably benign self-limiting lesion of gastric histiocytosis X may be one of the manifestations of multifocal histiocytosis X, but its aetiology and appropriate treatment have not yet been determined. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1644344

  6. [Serrated polyps and serrated polyposis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Carballal, Sabela; Moreira, Leticia; Balaguer, Francesc

    2013-03-01

    Serrated polyps of the colorectum are a heterogeneous group of lesions with potential malignant transformation through the «serrated pathway» of carcinogenesis. The discovery of these lesions has been a paradigm shift in the concept of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, so that up to 30% of tumors develop through this pathway. The main factors associated with an increased risk of malignancy in serrated polyps are size≥10mm, multiplicity, sessile serrated adenoma histology, presence of associated dysplasia and proximal location. Current evidence indicates that these lesions should be resected completely, and the patient requires an endoscopic surveillance program. Serrated polyposis syndrome is a clinicopathological entity characterized by multiple and/or large serrated polyps with an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. These patients and their families, require multidisciplinary assessment in specialized high risk colorectal cancer units.

  7. Altered Interactions between the Gut Microbiome and Colonic Mucosa Precede Polyposis in APCMin/+ Mice.

    PubMed

    Son, Joshua S; Khair, Shanawaj; Pettet, Donald W; Ouyang, Nengtai; Tian, Xinyu; Zhang, Yuanhao; Zhu, Wei; Mackenzie, Gerardo G; Robertson, Charles E; Ir, Diana; Frank, Daniel N; Rigas, Basil; Li, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Mutation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene), an early event in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, is present in 70-80% of sporadic human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. To test the hypothesis that mutation of the APC gene alters microbial interactions with host intestinal mucosa prior to the development of polyposis, culture-independent methods (targeted qPCR assays and Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V1V2 hypervariable region) were used to compare the intestinal microbial composition of 30 six-week old C57BL/6 APCMin/+ and 30 congenic wild type (WT) mice. The results demonstrate that similar to 12-14 week old APCMin/+ mice with intestinal neoplasia, 6 week old APCMin/+ mice with no detectable neoplasia, exhibit an increased relative abundance of Bacteroidetes spp in the colon. Parallel mouse RNA sequence analysis, conducted on a subset of proximal colonic RNA samples (6 APCMin/+, 6 WT) revealed 130 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, fold change ≥ 2, FDR <0.05). Hierarchical clustering of the DEGs was carried out by using 1-r dissimilarity measurement, where r stands for the Pearson correlation, and Ward minimum variance linkage, in order to reduce the number of input variables. When the cluster centroids (medians) were included along with APC genotype as input variables in a negative binomial (NB) regression model, four of seven mouse gene clusters, in addition to APC genotype, were significantly associated with the increased relative abundance of Bacteroidetes spp. Three of the four clusters include several downregulated genes encoding immunoglobulin variable regions and non-protein coding RNAs. These results support the concept that mutation of the APC gene alters colonic-microbial interactions prior to polyposis. It remains to be determined whether interventions directed at ameliorating dysbiosis in APCMin/+mice, such as through probiotics, prebiotics or antibiotics, could reduce tumor formation. PMID:26121046

  8. Celecoxib and tauro-ursodeoxycholic acid co-treatment inhibits cell growth in familial adenomatous polyposis derived LT97 colon adenoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Heumen, Bjorn W.H. van; Roelofs, Hennie M.J.; Morsche, Rene H.M. te; Marian, Brigitte; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Peters, Wilbert H.M.

    2012-04-15

    Chemoprevention would be a desirable strategy to avoid duodenectomy in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) suffering from duodenal adenomatosis. We investigated the in vitro effects on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and COX-2 expression of the potential chemopreventives celecoxib and tauro-ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). HT-29 colon cancer cells and LT97 colorectal micro-adenoma cells derived from a patient with FAP, were exposed to low dose celecoxib and UDCA alone or in combination with tauro-cholic acid (CA) and tauro-chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), mimicking bile of FAP patients treated with UDCA. In HT-29 cells, co-treatment with low dose celecoxib and UDCA resulted in a decreased cell growth (14-17%, p < 0.01). A more pronounced decrease (23-27%, p < 0.01) was observed in LT97 cells. Cell growth of HT-29 cells exposed to 'artificial bile' enriched with UDCA, was decreased (p < 0.001), either in the absence or presence of celecoxib. In LT97 cells incubated with 'artificial bile' enriched with UDCA, cell growth was decreased only in the presence of celecoxib (p < 0.05). No clear evidence was found for involvement of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, caspase-3, or COX-2 in the cellular processes leading to the observed changes in cell growth. In conclusion, co-treatment with low dose celecoxib and UDCA has growth inhibitory effects on colorectal adenoma cells derived from a patient with FAP, and further research on this combination as promising chemopreventive strategy is desired. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Celecoxib and UDCA acid co-treatment decreases cell growth in colon tumor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UDCA enriched 'artificial bile' decreases LT-97 cell growth only in presence of celecoxib. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCNA, caspase-3, nor COX-2 seem to be involved in the observed changes in cell growth.

  9. Recurrent Obstructive Giant Inflammatory Polyposis of the Colon

    PubMed Central

    Budhraja, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory polyps are relatively common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The term giant inflammatory polyposis is used to describe inflammatory polyps greater than 1.5 cm in any dimension. Their clinical presentation can be varied, ranging from asymptomatic, with incidental detection on radiological or endoscopic testing, to symptomatic, with rectal bleeding and colonic obstruction. Although giant inflammatory polyposis is a rare finding, it is of clinical importance, since it is easily mistaken for colon cancer, with patients sometimes undergoing radical surgeries. We describe an unusual case of giant inflammatory polyposis causing recurrent symptomatic obstruction despite multiple segmental colectomies in a patient with indeterminate colitis. This is the first such reported case in English literature to the best of our knowledge.

  10. Filiform polyposis in the sigmoid colon: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Geun; Lim, Yun Jeong; Choi, Jong Sun; Lee, Jin Ho

    2010-01-01

    Filiform polyposis is a rare condition of uncertain pathogenesis that is usually found in association with Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, intestinal tuberculosis or histiocytosis X. We report seven interesting cases of polyposis with various pathologic components, mainly located in the left side of the colon with no associated inflammatory bowel disease, intestinal tuberculosis or histiocytosis X. Multiple finger-like polypoid lesions with the appearance of stalactites were noted on the left side of the colon, especially in the sigmoid area, at the time of colonoscopy. The polyps had a variety of sizes and shapes and were shown to have various histopathologic components among the different patients. Although filiform polyposis localized in the sigmoid colon appears not to have high oncogenic potential, periodic follow-up seems to be needed. PMID:20480534

  11. Filiform polyposis in the sigmoid colon: a case series.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Geun; Lim, Yun-Jeong; Choi, Jong-Sun; Lee, Jin-Ho

    2010-05-21

    Filiform polyposis is a rare condition of uncertain pathogenesis that is usually found in association with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, intestinal tuberculosis or histiocytosis X. We report seven interesting cases of polyposis with various pathologic components, mainly located in the left side of the colon with no associated inflammatory bowel disease, intestinal tuberculosis or histiocytosis X. Multiple finger-like polypoid lesions with the appearance of stalactites were noted on the left side of the colon, especially in the sigmoid area, at the time of colonoscopy. The polyps had a variety of sizes and shapes and were shown to have various histopathologic components among the different patients. Although filiform polyposis localized in the sigmoid colon appears not to have high oncogenic potential, periodic follow-up seems to be needed.

  12. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  13. Filiform polyposis in a patient without inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Tsung, Swei H

    2013-01-01

    Filiform polyposis is a rare condition of uncertain pathogenesis that is usually found in patients with a history of inflammatory bowel disease. Here I report a case of filiform polyposis with no associated inflammatory bowel disease. Numerous finger-like polypoid lesions with the appearance of stalactites were noted in the transverse colon at the time of colonoscopy. Filiform polyps may be misinterpreted on colonoscopy as unusual villous adenomas or small carcinomas. Endoscopists should be familiar with the varied morphology of filifform polypsis in order to arrive at a correct diagnosis, and to ensure proper management.

  14. Serrated polyposis: the last (or only the latest?) frontier of familial polyposis?

    PubMed

    Lanspa, Stephen J; Ahnen, Dennis J; Lynch, Henry T

    2012-05-01

    Serrated polyps are thought to be precursors of ~15% of colorectal cancers and clinical criteria for a serrated polyposis (SP) syndrome have been proposed. In this issue of American Journal of Gastroenterology, Win et al. report that family members of individuals who meet the clinical criteria for SP are at increased risk for colorectal and possibly pancreatic cancer. The important data presented by Win et al. strongly support the concept that familial SP exists and help define the patterns of risk in this syndrome. The paper also illustrates the difficulties of trying to define a genetic syndrome on the basis of largely retrospective clinical data and highlights the importance of efforts to define the genetic basis of familial SP and to study these families in a systematic, prospective manner.

  15. Strabismus secondary to frontal sinus mucocele associated with nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Koktekir, Bengu Ekinci; Karalezli, Aylin; Topal, Ozgul; Erbek, Selim

    2012-07-01

    Paranasal mucoceles are regarded as slow-growing and benign lesions. They are usually recognized by otorhinolaryngologists, but a clinically relevant mucocele with orbital complications may present to an ophthalmologist. We report a 15-year-old's case with unilateral reduced ocular motility due to bilateral frontal mucocele associated with grade II nasal polyposis.

  16. A survey of phenotypic features in juvenile polyposis.

    PubMed Central

    Desai, D C; Murday, V; Phillips, R K; Neale, K F; Milla, P; Hodgson, S V

    1998-01-01

    Solitary juvenile polyps are quite frequent in children, but juvenile polyposis (JP) is a rare autosomal dominant trait characterised by the occurrence of numerous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract. Extracolonic phenotypic abnormalities are well documented in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and can allow a clinical diagnosis to be made before the bowel pathology becomes available. Though described, characteristic extracolonic abnormalities have not been clearly defined in juvenile polyposis. We sought to determine whether there are consistent extracolonic phenotypic abnormalities in JP patients and how frequently this would allow diagnosis of one of the genetic syndromes known to be associated with juvenile polyposis. Twenty-two JP patients underwent clinical examination and data from one patient were obtained from case notes. Those consenting to further investigations had x rays of the skull, chest, and hands and an echocardiogram if clinically indicated. Significant extracolonic phenotypic abnormalities were present in 18 patients (14 male and four female), and included dermatological (13), skeletal (16), neurological (5), cardiopulmonary (4), gastrointestinal (3), genitourinary (4), and ocular (1) features. In five patients the diagnosis of a genetic syndrome was possible: two had Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, two had Gorlin syndrome, and one had hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, also known as Osler-Rendu-Weber syndrome). Other patients had some features of these conditions and of Cowden and Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndromes, but these were not sufficient to allow a definitive diagnosis. Images PMID:9643289

  17. Map syndrome (MYH Associated Polyposis) colorectal cancer, etiopathological connections

    PubMed Central

    Ion, D; Stoian, RV; Serban, MB

    2011-01-01

    The case presented raised our scientific curiosity and it is worthy of being brought in front of the medical audience because of several reasons presented below. Presently, there are 3 hereditary syndromes that have a demonstrated etiological relationship with the colorectal cancer: Familiar Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP syndrome), HNPCC syndrome (Hereditary Nonpoliposis Colorectal Cancer) and MAP syndrome. Discovered only in 2002, the MAP syndrome (MYH associated polyposis) is the first hereditary syndrome that has autosomal recessive transmission. The APC gene can be mutated in several ways during the colonic oncogenesis: congenital in the FAP syndrome, somatic in sporadic colorectal cancers and secondary to the MYH gene inactivation in MAP syndrome. MAP phenotype is similar to the FAP phenotype because of the somatic mutations to the APC gene. Colonic polyposis is lower than FAP syndrome and appeared later, in the 40's and 50's. Colorectal cancers are frequent and discovered in the same moment as the colonic polyposis. Patients are diagnosed mostly in cancer stages. Colonoscopy shows polyps disseminated around the entire colic frame. Treatment in these cases is total rectocolectomy with ileoanal anastomosis. When working in a general emergency surgery clinic, physicians are often faced with colorectal cancers in different evolutive stages, and mostly they are faced with their complications. PMID:21505584

  18. The growing complexity of the intestinal polyposis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lucci-Cordisco, Emanuela; Risio, Mauro; Venesio, Tiziana; Genuardi, Maurizio

    2013-11-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis has been the first form of inherited intestinal polyposis to be recognized. For a long time it has been considered the main polyposis syndrome, associated with an easily recognizable phenotype, with a marginal role attributed to a few very rare hamartomatous conditions. More recently, it has been gradually demonstrated that the intestinal polyposes encompass a range of conditions within a wide spectrum of disease severity, polyp histology, and extraintestinal manifestations. A growing number of genes and phenotypes has been identified, and heterogeneity of somatic molecular pathways underlying epithelial transformation in different syndromes and associated tumors has been documented. Increasing knowledge on the molecular bases and more widespread use of genetic tests has shown phenotypic overlaps between conditions that were previously considered distinct, highlighting diagnostic difficulties. With the advent of next generation sequencing, the diagnosis and the classification of these syndromes will be progressively based more on genetic testing results. However, the phenotypic variability documented among patients with mutations in the same genes cannot be fully explained by different expressivity, indicating a role for as yet unknown modifying factors. Until the latter will be identified, the management of patients with polyposis syndromes should be guided by both clinical and genetic findings.

  19. Chemoprevention of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis by Bromo-noscapine (EM011) in the ApcMin/+ Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiwang; Ghaleb, Amr M.; He, Jing; Bughani, Usha; Bialkowska, Agnieszka B.; Yang, Vincent W.; Joshi, Harish C.

    2011-01-01

    Germline mutation of the tumor suppressor gene, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), is responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) with nearly 100% risk for colon cancer at an early age. Although FAP is involved in only 1% of all colon cancer cases, over 80% of sporadic cancers harbor somatic mutations of APC. We show here that bromo-onoscapine (EM011), a rationally-designed synthetic derivative of a natural non-toxic tubulin-binding alkaloid-noscapine, that reduces the dynamics of microtubules, causes a reversible G2/M arrest in wild type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), but an aberrant exit from a brief mitotic block, followed by apoptosis in MEFs after APC deletion with siRNA. Furthermore, both β-catenin levels and activity fell to half the original levels with a concomitant reduction of cell proliferation-inducing cyclin D1, c-Myc, and induction of cytostatic protein p21 prior to caspase-3 activation. Additionally, we show a statistically significant reduction in the number of newly emerging intestinal polyps (to 35% compared with untreated mice) as well as the mean size of polyps (to 42% compared with untreated mice) in EM011-treated ApcMin/+ mice as compared to their sham-treated control littermates. The remaining polyps in the EM011 treated group of ApcMin/+ mice showed evidence of elevated apoptosis as revealed by immunohistochemistry. We failed to detect any evidence of histopathological and hematological toxicities following EM011 treatment. Taken together, our data are persuasive that a clinical trial of EM011 is possible for the prevention/amelioration of polyposis in FAP patients. PMID:22052467

  20. Slow progression of periampullary neoplasia in familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Moozar, Kouros L; Madlensky, Lisa; Berk, Terri; Gallinger, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Variable endoscopic surveillance protocols and treatment strategies have been proposed for periampullary neoplasia in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), primarily because of the lack of long-term, prospective natural history data. A total of 115 patients with FAP were followed prospectively for 10 years with periodic side-viewing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy by a single surgeon. The appearance of the duodenum was classified as stages 1 to 5. Statistical analysis included one-way analysis of variance for age comparisons between stage groupings and Kaplan-Meier analysis for the lifetime risks of having a particular stage of duodenal polyposis. Eighty-seven patients had multiple endoscopies over an average of 6.6 years. Thirty-three subjects had a change in stage, within an average time of 3.9 years at an average age of 41 years. The risk of having stage 3 or 4 duodenal neoplasia increased exponentially after the age of 40. The degree of dysplasia did not correlate with stage at initial classification. Progression of neoplasia in the duodenum of patients with FAP is slow. The severity of duodenal polyposis increases with age and is not influenced by the initial stage. The average time for progression of adenoma to carcinoma is likely long. PMID:12504221

  1. Remission of Cap Polyposis Maintained for More Than Three Years after Infliximab Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Chun, Hoon Jai; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Ryu, Ho Sang

    2009-01-01

    Cap polyposis is a rare disorder with characteristic endoscopic and histological features; its etiology is still unknown, and no specific treatment has been established. We report a case of cap polyposis that improved remarkably after infliximab infusion and had no recurrence for 3 years. PMID:20431770

  2. Hereditary colorectal cancer: MYH-associated polyposis and other newly identified disorders.

    PubMed

    Lindor, Noralane M

    2009-01-01

    Historically, discussions of familial adenomatous polyposis and hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer have dominated lectures and writings on hereditary predisposition to colorectal cancer. In the last decade, the subject has grown well beyond the two entities. In this paper, five topics relevant to genetic risk assessment for colorectal cancer are reviewed. These include the autosomal recessive MYH-associated polyposis, hyperplastic polyposis and serrated pathway syndrome, the association of autosomal dominant juvenile polyposis with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, familial colorectal cancer type X, and the syndrome of biallelic DNA mismatch repair gene mutations. Knowledge of these entities may assist clinicians to recognize and manage cases that do not fit into the more common syndromes of colorectal cancer predisposition.

  3. IL-33 activates tumor stroma to promote intestinal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Maywald, Rebecca L.; Doerner, Stephanie K.; Pastorelli, Luca; De Salvo, Carlo; Benton, Susan M.; Dawson, Emily P.; Lanza, Denise G.; Berger, Nathan A.; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Nadeau, Joseph H.; Pizarro, Theresa T.; Heaney, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor epithelial cells develop within a microenvironment consisting of extracellular matrix, growth factors, and cytokines produced by nonepithelial stromal cells. In response to paracrine signals from tumor epithelia, stromal cells modify the microenvironment to promote tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we identify interleukin 33 (IL-33) as a regulator of tumor stromal cell activation and mediator of intestinal polyposis. In human colorectal cancer, IL-33 expression was induced in the tumor epithelium of adenomas and carcinomas, and expression of the IL-33 receptor, IL1RL1 (also referred to as IL1-R4 or ST2), localized predominantly to the stroma of adenoma and both the stroma and epithelium of carcinoma. Genetic and antibody abrogation of responsiveness to IL-33 in the ApcMin/+ mouse model of intestinal tumorigenesis inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, and suppressed angiogenesis in adenomatous polyps, which reduced both tumor number and size. Similar to human adenomas, IL-33 expression localized to tumor epithelial cells and expression of IL1RL1 associated with two stromal cell types, subepithelial myofibroblasts and mast cells, in ApcMin/+ polyps. In vitro, IL-33 stimulation of human subepithelial myofibroblasts induced the expression of extracellular matrix components and growth factors associated with intestinal tumor progression. IL-33 deficiency reduced mast cell accumulation in ApcMin/+ polyps and suppressed the expression of mast cell-derived proteases and cytokines known to promote polyposis. Based on these findings, we propose that IL-33 derived from the tumor epithelium promotes polyposis through the coordinated activation of stromal cells and the formation of a protumorigenic microenvironment. PMID:25918379

  4. Distinctive Molecular Genetic Alterations in Sporadic and Familial Adenomatous Polyposis-Associated Pancreatoblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Susan C.; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Klimstra, David S.; Finn, Laura S.; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Yeo, Charles J.; Cameron, John L.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2001-01-01

    Pancreatoblastomas are unusual malignant neoplasms of the pediatric pancreas that may also rarely affect adults. The molecular pathogenesis of pancreatoblastomas is unknown. They are clinicopathologically distinct from adult pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, but their occasional occurrence in patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and the case presented here of a pancreatoblastoma in an adult patient with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) suggests that they might bear a genetic similarity to other infantile embryonal tumors such as hepatoblastomas. We analyzed a series of nine pancreatoblastomas for mutations common to other embryonal malignancies including somatic alterations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/β-catenin pathway and chromosome 11p, using immunohistochemistry for β-catenin, 5q and 11p allelic loss assays, and direct DNA sequencing of exon 3 of the β-catenin gene and the mutation cluster region of the APC gene. In addition, we analyzed the pancreatoblastomas for alterations found in adult-type pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas including mutations in the K-ras oncogene and the p53 and DPC4 tumor suppressor genes, using direct DNA sequencing of exon 1 of K-ras and immunohistochemistry for p53 and Dpc4. Allelic loss on chromosome 11p was the most common genetic alteration in pancreatoblastomas, present in 86% (six of seven informative cases). Molecular alterations in the APC/β-catenin pathway were detected in 67% (six of nine), including five neoplasms with activating mutations of the β-catenin oncogene and the one FAP-associated tumor with biallelic APC inactivation (germline truncating mutation combined with loss of the wild-type allele); seven neoplasms showed abnormal nuclear accumulation of β-catenin protein. In contrast, loss of Dpc4 protein expression was present in only two cases (one diffuse and one focal), and no alterations in the K-ras gene or p53 expression were detected. Our findings indicate that pancreatoblastomas are

  5. Ulcerative colitis with inflammatory polyposis in a teenage boy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jin-Shan; Ye, Ying; Guo, Can-Can; Luo, Bo-Tao; Zheng, Xue-Bao

    2015-01-21

    Ulcerative colitis in addition to inflammatory polyposis is common. The benign sequel of ulcerative colitis can sometimes mimic colorectal carcinoma. This report describes a rare case of inflammatory polyposis with hundreds of inflammatory polyps in ulcerative colitis which was not easy to distinguish from other polyposis syndromes. A 16-year-old Chinese male suffering from ulcerative colitis for 6 mo underwent colonoscopy, and hundreds of polyps were observed in the sigmoid, causing colonic stenosis. The polyps were restricted to the sigmoid. Although rectal inflammation was detected, no polyps were found in the rectum. A diagnosis of inflammatory polyposis and ulcerative colitis was made. The patient underwent total colectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis. The patient recovered well and was discharged on postoperative day 8. Endoscopic surveillance after surgery is crucial as ulcerative colitis with polyposis is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. Recognition of polyposis requires clinical, endoscopic and histopathologic correlation, and helps with chemoprophylaxis of colorectal cancer, as the drugs used postoperatively for colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis and polyposis are different. PMID:25624746

  6. Serrated polyposis syndrome: molecular, pathological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Guarinos, Carla; Sánchez-Fortún, Cristina; Rodríguez-Soler, María; Alenda, Cristina; Payá, Artemio; Jover, Rodrigo

    2012-05-28

    Hyperplastic polyps have traditionally been considered not to have malignant potential. New pathological classification of serrated polyps and recent discoveries about the serrated pathway of carcinogenesis have revolutionized the concepts and revitalized the research in this area. Until recently, it has been thought that most colorectal cancers arise from conventional adenomas via the traditional tumor suppressor pathway initiated by a mutation of the APC gene, but it has been found that this pathway accounts for only approximately 70%-80% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. The majority of the remaining colorectal cancer cases follow an alternative pathway leading to CpG island methylator phenotype carcinoma with BRAF mutation and with or without microsatellite instability. The mechanism of carcinomas arising from this alternative pathway seems to begin with an activating mutation of the BRAF oncogene. Serrated polyposis syndrome is a relatively rare condition characterized by multiple and/or large serrated polyps of the colon. Clinical characteristics, etiology and relationship of serrated polyposis syndrome to CRC have not been clarified yet. Patients with this syndrome show a high risk of CRC and both sporadic and hereditary cases have been described. Clinical criteria have been used for diagnosis and frequent colonoscopy surveillance should be performed in order to prevent colorectal cancer. In this review, we try to gather new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of serrated polyps in order to understand their possible clinical implications and to make an approach to the management of this syndrome.

  7. Chemotherapy for desmoid tumours in association with familial adenomatous polyposis: a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Lisa; Blackstein, Martin; Berk, Terri; McLeod, Robin S.; Gallinger, Steven; Madlensky, Lisa; Cohen, Zane

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of chemotherapy for inoperable desmoid tumours associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. Design A review of three cases of unresectable desmoid tumours and of the literature on the subject. Setting The Steven Atanas Stavro Polyposis Registry at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto. Patients Three patients with symptomatic, unresectable desmoid tumours associated with familial adenomatous polyposis and unresponsive to conventional hormone therapy. Intervention A chemotherapy regimen of seven cycles of doxorubicin (dose ranging from 60 to 90 mg/m2) and dacarbazine (1000 mg/m2), followed by carboplatin (400 mg/m2) and dacarbazine. Outcome Measures Clinical improvement and tumour regression demonstrated by computed tomography. Results In each of the three cases significant tumour regression was seen clinically and radiologically. Conclusions Cytotoxic chemotherapy is an effective treatment for desmoid tumours associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. The chemotherapy should be started early in cases of symptomatic desmoid tumour unresponsive to conventional medical therapy. PMID:8640627

  8. Association of juvenile and adenomatous polyposis with pulmonary arteriovenous malformation and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Prieto, G; Polanco, I; Sarria, J; Larrauri, J; Lassaletta, L

    1990-07-01

    The juvenile form is the usual type of colonic polyp seen during childhood. However, mixed forms associating juvenile and adenomatous polyps have been reported. A syndrome including the association of generalized juvenile polyposis, pulmonary arteriovenous malformation, and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy has been described in three cases; however, this is the first report of the association of mixed juvenile and adenomatous polyposis, pulmonary arteriovenous malformation, and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

  9. Extracolonic cancer risk in patients with serrated polyposis syndrome and their first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Hazewinkel, Yark; Reitsma, Johannes B; Nagengast, Fokko M; Vasen, Hans F; van Os, Theo A M; van Leerdam, Monique E; Koornstra, Jan-Jacob; Dekker, Evelien

    2013-12-01

    Serrated polyposis syndrome is associated with an increased colorectal cancer risk. Although the underlying genetic cause of the condition is unknown, first-degree relatives of patients with serrated polyposis have an increased risk for colorectal cancer compared with the general population. This suggests an inheritable component. Since other hereditary polyposis syndromes are often associated with an expanded extracolonic tumour spectrum, our aim was to determine the extra colonic cancer risks for patients with serrated polyposis and their first-degree relatives and compare these risks with the general population. Serrated polyposis index patients from 5 medical centres were included. Demographic data concerning age, sex and reported malignancies were ascertained by reviewing medical charts and histopathology reports. Family history was obtained by examining pedigree records from the department of Clinical Genetics. Incidence rates of extracolonic malignancies were compared with the general population through a person-year analysis, adjusted for age and sex. Population-based incidence data were derived from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry. A total of 105 patients with serrated polyposis and 341 first-degree relatives were included. Among the patients with serrated polyposis, 9 extracolonic cancers were observed, compared to 13 expected malignancies in the general population (RR 0.69 95% CI 0.36-1.33; p = 0.27). Among the first-degree relatives, 44 extracolonic malignancies were observed, compared to 48 expected malignancies (RR 0.92 95% CI 0.69-1.24; p = 0.60). In this study, the overall incidence of extracolonic malignancies in patients with serrated polyposis and their first-degree relatives was not increased. Large international studies are required to confirm these results.

  10. Allergic and non-allergic rhinitis: relationship with nasal polyposis, asthma and family history.

    PubMed

    Gelardi, M; Iannuzzi, L; Tafuri, S; Passalacqua, G; Quaranta, N

    2014-02-01

    Rhinitis and rhinosinusitis (with/without polyposis), either allergic or non-allergic, represent a major medical problem. Their associated comorbidities and relationship with family history have so far been poorly investigated. We assessed these aspects in a large population of patients suffering from rhinosinusal diseases. Clinical history, nasal cytology, allergy testing and direct nasal examination were performed in all patients referred for rhinitis/rhinosinusitis. Fibre optic nasal endoscopy, CT scan and nasal challenge were used for diagnosis, when indicated. A total of 455 patients (60.7% male, age range 4-84 years) were studied; 108 (23.7%) had allergic rhinitis, 128 (28.1%) rhinosinusitis with polyposis, 107 (23.5%) non-allergic rhinitis (negative skin test); 112 patients had associated allergic and non-allergic rhinitis, the majority with eosinophilia. There was a significant association between non-allergic rhinitis and family history of nasal polyposis (OR = 4.45; 95%CI = 1.70-11.61; p = 0.0019), whereas this association was no longer present when allergic rhinitis was also included. Asthma was equally frequent in non-allergic and allergic rhinitis, but more frequent in patients with polyposis. Aspirin sensitivity was more frequent in nasal polyposis, independent of the allergic (p = 0.03) or non-allergic (p = 0.01) nature of rhinitis. Nasal polyposis is significantly associated with asthma and positive family history of asthma, partially independent of the allergic aetiology of rhinitis.

  11. Berberine potently attenuates intestinal polyps growth in ApcMin mice and familial adenomatous polyposis patients through inhibition of Wnt signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junfang; Cao, Hailong; Zhang, Bing; Cao, Hanwei; Xu, Xiuqin; Ruan, Hang; Yi, Tingting; Tan, Li; Qu, Rui; Song, Gang; Wang, Bangmao; Hu, Tianhui

    2013-01-01

    As a traditional anti-inflammatory Chinese herbal medicine, Alkaloid berberine has been recently reported to exhibit anti-tumour effects against a wide spectrum of cancer. However, the mechanism was largely unknown. Gene chip array reveals that with berberine treatment, c-Myc, the target gene of Wnt pathway, was down-regulated 5.3-folds, indicating that berberine might inhibit Wnt signalling. TOPflash analysis revealed that Wnt activity was significantly reduced after berberine treatment, and the mechanism of which might be that berberine disrupted β-catenin transfer to nucleus through up-regulating the expression of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene and stabilized APC-β-catenin complex. Berberine administration in ApcMin/+ mice exhibited fewer and smaller polyps in intestine, along with reduction in cyclin D1 and c-Myc expression. In clinical practice, oral administration of berberine also significantly reduced the familial adenomatous polyposis patients' polyp size along with the inhibition of cyclin D1 expression in polyp samples. These observations indicate that berberine inhibits colon tumour formation through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signalling and berberine might be a promising drug for the prevention of colon cancer. PMID:24015932

  12. Diagnostic value of fundus examination in familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Tiret, A.; Taiel-Sartral, M.; Tiret, E.; Laroche, L.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Multiple, bilateral lesions of congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE) have been described in patients suffering from familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) since 1980. This study aimed to determine a reliable diagnostic criterion, based on the size and number of retinal CHRPE lesions, allowing the screening of patient carriers of the gene responsible for FAP.
METHODS—32 control subjects and 144 patients belonging to 85 FAP families were studied, divided into 124 carriers of the genetic alteration and 20 non-carriers.
RESULTS—In carriers of the deleted gene, multiple, bilateral retinal lesions were consistently observed. Lesion situation, size, shape, and degree of pigmentation were variable however. A positive criterion for FAP was defined as the presence of at least four lesions whatever their size, or at least two lesions one of which is large. This criterion showed a high sensitivity (0.68) and a maximal specificity (1). Within each family, the retinal phenotypic expression was homogeneous. CHRPE lesions were observed in two thirds of the FAP families and absent from the remaining third.
CONCLUSION—By using this new positive diagnostic criterion, fundus examination allows early detection of those children carrying the gene responsible for FAP in families positive at ocular examination.

 PMID:9422927

  13. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in the hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brazowski, Eli; Misonzhnick-Bedny, Faina; Rozen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome (HMPS), characterized by hyperplastic, juvenile, admixed, serrated adenomas and eventually colorectal cancer, is managed by repeated polypectomy and surgery. We determined if HMPS polyps express cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Nineteen recent HMPS polyps, from five family members, were stained for COX-2. Polyps' epithelium and stroma and comparison tissues (normal colonic mucosa [9], sporadic juvenile polyps [18], colorectal cancers [3]) were quantified for COX-2 by: area of staining (0-3) x intensity (0-3). Epithelial, stromal, and total scores were evaluated in relationship to histology and dysplasia. HMPS polyps COX-2 mean epithelial (5.0+/-3.0), stromal (6.9+/-1.9), and total (11.8+/-4.6) scores were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than sporadic juvenile polyps (0.6+/-0.7, 3.1+/-2.2, and 3.6+/- 2.2 respectively), while colorectal cancer scored 9, 9, and 18. There was a positive association (P < 0.01) among histology, degree of dysplasia, and COX-2 expression. COX-2 expression in HMPS polyps and its association with dysplasia suggest that chemoprevention might be a useful adjunct therapy.

  14. Metachronous multifocal desmoid-type fibromatoses along the neuraxis with adenomatous polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chung, K H Carlos; Charlton, Amanda; Arbuckle, Susan; Chaseling, Raymond; Owler, Brian K

    2010-10-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis, aggressive fibromatosis, or desmoid tumor is an uncommon benign but locally aggressive fibroblastic lesion. Although intraabdominal desmoid-type fibromatoses are well described in association with adenomatous polyposis syndrome, their occurrence along the neuraxis is extremely rare. The authors report the case of a 14-year-old boy with metachronous intracranial and spinal desmoid-type fibromatoses with preceding medulloblastoma. He was ultimately diagnosed with adenomatous polyposis syndrome. This is the first reported case of spinal desmoid-type fibromatosis in association with adenomatous polyposis syndrome. The identification of an underlying genetic instability allows for screening to detect lesions and institute measures to avoid preventable mortality from nonneurological tumors.

  15. Development of invasive colon cancer with microsatellite instability in a patient with hyperplastic polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Horii, Joichiro; Kato, Jun; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Hiraoka, Sakiko; Sun, Dong-Sheng; Watanabe, Kazuo; Fujita, Isao; Toyokawa, Tatsuya; Tomoda, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2012-05-01

    The serrated pathway has recently been proposed as a route for the development of colorectal cancer with microsatellite instability. Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome is a rare syndrome defined by the presence of numerous serrated polyps, with a high risk of developing into colorectal cancer. We present here a case of hyperplastic polyposis syndrome developing into colorectal cancer with microsatellite instability from a serrated polyp. BRAF mutation and the loss of MLH1 protein were observed in the colorectal cancer, but not in the other serrated polyps around the colorectal cancer, suggesting that colorectal cancer with microsatellite instability develops rapidly from a specific serrated polyp with distinct molecular properties.

  16. Clinicopathological features of familial adenomatous polyposis in Korean patients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Min; Yoon, Yong Sik; Lim, Seok-Byeong; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify prognostic factors and to correlate APC mutations with clinical features, including extracolic manifestations. METHODS: One hundred thirty-five patients who underwent surgical procedures for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) were included. FAP was diagnosed when the number of adenomatous polyps was > 100. Data related to patient, extracoloic manifestations, cancer characteristics, operative procedure, follow up and surveillance were collected. APC mutation testing was performed in the 30 most recent patients. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and polymerase chain reaction products using 31 primer pairs on APC gene were sequenced. A retrospective study was performed to investigate a causal relationship between prognosis and feature of patient. RESULTS: The mean age of the 51 patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) was older than that of those without CRC (30.5 vs 36.9, P = 0.002). Older individuals were more likely to have colon cancer at the time of FAP diagnosis [odds ratio, 4.75 (95%CI: 1.71-13.89) and 5.91(1.76-22.12) for 40-49 years and age > 50 vs age < 30). The number of confirmed deaths was 13 and the median age at death was 40 years (range, 27 to 85 years). Ten of the deaths (76.9%) were from CRC. Another cause of two cases of death were desmoid tumors (15.4%). Development of cancer on remnant rectal or ileal mucosa after surgery was not observed. The APC mutation testing revealed 23 pathogenic mutations and one likely pathogenic mutation, among which were four novel mutations. The correlation between mutational status and clinical manifestations was investigated. Mutations that could prodict poor prognosis were at codon 1309 which located on mutation cluster region, codon 1465 and codon 1507. CONCLUSION: Identification of APC mutations should aid in the diagnosis and counseling of family members in terms of early diagnosis and management of FAP. PMID:27158207

  17. Molecular classification and genetic pathways in hyperplastic polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Carmona, L G; Howarth, K M; Lockett, M; Polanco-Echeverry, G M; Volikos, E; Gorman, M; Barclay, E; Martin, L; Jones, A M; Saunders, B; Guenther, T; Donaldson, A; Paterson, J; Frayling, I; Novelli, M R; Phillips, R; Thomas, H J W; Silver, A; Atkin, W; Tomlinson, I P M

    2007-08-01

    Hyperplastic Polyposis (HPPS) is a poorly characterized syndrome that increases colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. We aimed to provide a molecular classification of HPPS. We obtained 282 tumours from 32 putative HPPS patients with >or= 10 hyperplastic polyps (HPs); some patients also had adenomas and CRCs. We found no good evidence of microsatellite instability (MSI) in our samples. The epithelium of HPs was monoclonal. Somatic BRAF mutations occurred in two-thirds of our patients' HPs, and KRAS2 mutations in 10%; both mutations were more common in younger cases. The respective mutation frequencies in a set of 'sporadic' HPs were 18% and 10%. Importantly, the putative HPPS patients generally fell into two readily defined groups, one set whose polyps had BRAF mutations, and another set whose polyps had KRAS2 mutations. The most plausible explanation for this observation is that there exist different forms of inherited predisposition to HPPS, and that these determine whether polyps follow a BRAF or KRAS2 pathway. Most adenomas and CRCs from our putative HPPS patients had 'classical' morphology and few of these lesions had BRAF or KRAS2 mutations. These findings suggest that tumourigenesis in HPPS does not necessarily follow the 'serrated' pathway. Although current definitions of HPPS are sub-optimal, we suggest that diagnosis could benefit from molecular analysis. Specifically, testing BRAF and KRAS2 mutations, and perhaps MSI, in multiple polyps could help to distinguish HPPS from sporadic HPs. We propose a specific model which would have diagnosed five more of our cases as HPPS compared with the WHO clinical criteria.

  18. Diffuse nasal polyposis: postoperative long-term results after endoscopic sinus surgery and frontal irrigation.

    PubMed

    Klossek, J M; Peloquin, L; Friedman, W H; Ferrier, J C; Fontanel, J P

    1997-10-01

    Diffuse nasal polyposis remains a challenge despite recent improvements in endonasal surgery. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results after a radical complete sphenoethmoidectomy with peroperative and postoperative frontal irrigation in cases of diffuse nasal polyposis. In this prospective study, we include 50 consecutive patients with diffuse nasal polyposis suffering from nasal obstruction, anosmia, and other symptoms of chronic sinusitis. All patients were refractory to medical therapy. In each patient an endoscopic complete sphenoethmoidectomy including total excision of all diseased ethmoid mucosa was performed. Preoperative and postoperative frontal irrigation was performed systematically. The patients were followed closely with serial endoscopic examination, and CT scanning was performed between 2 and 3 years after surgery. There were no complications. Thirty-nine of the 50 patients regained satisfactory olfaction. Partial nasal obstruction persisted in four of the 50 patients. Endoscopically, polyp recurrence was noted in 3% of posterior ethmoids, 23% of anterior ethmoids, and 50% of frontal recesses. We conclude that in cases of refractory and extensive nasal polyposis, a total sphenoethmoidectomy with perioperative frontal irrigation followed by long-term postoperative topical steroid therapy provides excellent improvement or cure with safety and reliability.

  19. A deleterious RNF43 germline mutation in a severely affected serrated polyposis kindred.

    PubMed

    Taupin, Douglas; Lam, Wesley; Rangiah, David; McCallum, Larissa; Whittle, Belinda; Zhang, Yafei; Andrews, Daniel; Field, Matthew; Goodnow, Christopher C; Cook, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    We report a germline nonsense mutation within the extracellular domain of the RING finger ubiquitin ligase RNF43, segregating with a severe form of serrated polyposis within a kindred. The finding provides evidence that inherited RNF43 mutations define a familial cancer syndrome.

  20. Colorectal cancer: serrated polyposis--should we screen first-degree relatives?

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc; Pellise, Maria

    2014-06-01

    Serrated polyposis syndrome (SPS) is a condition characterized by multiple and/or proximal serrated polyps in the colorectum. Several features of SPS suggest there is an underlying genetic disorder that is yet to be identified. A new study provides insights on the diagnostic yield of screening colonoscopy in first-degree relatives of patients with SPS.

  1. The spectrum of APC mutations in children with hepatoblastoma from familial adenomatous polyposis kindreds.

    PubMed

    Hirschman, Barbara A; Pollock, Brad H; Tomlinson, Gail E

    2005-08-01

    Hepatoblastoma is associated with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). In a series of 93 patients with hepatoblastoma,8 (8.6%) reported family histories suggestive of FAP. These and a review of reported FAP kindreds with hepatoblastoma may provide information helpful in counseling families with FAP.

  2. Smell Decline as a good Predictor of Sinonasal Polyposis Recurrence after Endoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshaee, Mahdi; Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Ghazizadeh, Amir Hossain; Nahid, Kianoosh; Jalaeian Samani, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: To evaluate the most sensitive symptom to predict early recurrence of nasal polyposis. Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Tertiary university referral center with accredited otorhinolaryngology residency programs. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, we evaluated 62 patients with diffuse nasal polyposis. All patients underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery. The author-devised questionnaire relating to the four major symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis were answered by patients at the pre-operative visit and at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Patients were followed up with serial endoscopic examinations, and a computed tomography (CT) scan was performed if indicated.  Results: All 62 patients (37 male, 25 female) completed the study. The mean age was 41.24 ± 12.47 years. All major symptoms showed significant improvement after surgery (P=0.000); however, the severity of symptoms gradually increased in patients with a recurrence of polyposis, but at different points in time (P= 0.008). Sense of smell was the first symptom to deteriorate in patients with relapse (mean, 6 months) followed by nasal secretion (12 months), obstruction and pain(24 months). Patients with asthma, Samter’s triad, allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS) and allergic rhinitis showed symptoms of recurrence sooner than other patients (P<0.05).  Conclusion: The most sensitive symptom for the early detection of recurrence of nasal polyposis is a decrease in the sense of smell. Nasal obstruction and facial pain were observed in the late stage of relapse when frank polyposis formation was established. PMID:27280099

  3. Exome sequencing identifies potential novel candidate genes in patients with unexplained colorectal adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Spier, Isabel; Kerick, Martin; Drichel, Dmitriy; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Altmüller, Janine; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Adam, Ronja; Zhao, Bixiao; Becker, Tim; Lifton, Richard P; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Perner, Sven; Thiele, Holger; Nöthen, Markus M; Hoffmann, Per; Timmermann, Bernd; Schweiger, Michal R; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In up to 30% of patients with colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutation in the known genes APC, causing familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH, causing MUTYH-associated polyposis, and POLE or POLD1, causing Polymerase-Proofreading-associated polyposis can be identified, although a hereditary etiology is likely. To uncover new causative genes, exome sequencing was performed using DNA from leukocytes and a total of 12 colorectal adenomas from seven unrelated patients with unexplained sporadic adenomatous polyposis. For data analysis and variant filtering, an established bioinformatics pipeline including in-house tools was applied. Variants were filtered for rare truncating point mutations and copy-number variants assuming a dominant, recessive, or tumor suppressor model of inheritance. Subsequently, targeted sequence analysis of the most promising candidate genes was performed in a validation cohort of 191 unrelated patients. All relevant variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. The analysis of exome sequencing data resulted in the identification of rare loss-of-function germline mutations in three promising candidate genes (DSC2, PIEZO1, ZSWIM7). In the validation cohort, further variants predicted to be pathogenic were identified in DSC2 and PIEZO1. According to the somatic mutation spectra, the adenomas in this patient cohort follow the classical pathways of colorectal tumorigenesis. The present study identified three candidate genes which might represent rare causes for a predisposition to colorectal adenoma formation. Especially PIEZO1 (FAM38A) and ZSWIM7 (SWS1) warrant further exploration. To evaluate the clinical relevance of these genes, investigation of larger patient cohorts and functional studies are required. PMID:26780541

  4. The molecular characteristics of colonic neoplasms in serrated polyposis: a systematic review and meta‐analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Emily Y.; Wyld, Lucy; Sloane, Mathew A.; Canfell, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Serrated polyposis is a rare disorder characterised by the presence of multiple serrated polyps in the large intestine, and an increased personal and familial risk of colorectal cancer. Knowledge of the molecular characteristics of colonic lesions which develop in this syndrome is fragmented, making it difficult to understand the underlying genetic basis of this condition. We conducted a systematic review and meta‐analysis of all studies which evaluated the molecular characteristics of colorectal neoplasms found in individuals with serrated polyposis. We identified 4561 potentially relevant studies, but due to a lack of consensus in the reporting of findings, only fourteen studies were able to be included in the meta‐analysis. BRAF mutation was found in 73% (95% CI 65–80%) of serrated polyps, 0% (95% CI 0–3%) of conventional adenomas and 49% (95%CI 33–64%) of colorectal cancers. In contrast, KRAS mutation was present in 8% (95% CI 5–11%) of serrated polyps, 3% (95% CI 0–13%) of conventional adenomas and 6% (95% CI 0–13%) of colorectal cancers. Absence of MLH1 immunostaining was found in 3% (95% CI 0–10%) of serrated polyps and 53% (95% CI 36–71%) of colorectal cancers. Overall, microsatellite instability was found in 40% (95% CI 18–64%) of colorectal cancers arising in the setting of serrated polyposis. Our results indicate that diverse molecular pathways are likely to contribute to the increased predisposition for colorectal cancer in individuals with serrated polyposis. We also propose a set of minimum standards for the reporting of future research in serrated polyposis as this is a rare syndrome and collation of research findings from different centres will be essential to identify the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this condition. PMID:27499922

  5. The molecular characteristics of colonic neoplasms in serrated polyposis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Emily Y; Wyld, Lucy; Sloane, Mathew A; Canfell, Karen; Ward, Robyn L

    2016-07-01

    Serrated polyposis is a rare disorder characterised by the presence of multiple serrated polyps in the large intestine, and an increased personal and familial risk of colorectal cancer. Knowledge of the molecular characteristics of colonic lesions which develop in this syndrome is fragmented, making it difficult to understand the underlying genetic basis of this condition. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of all studies which evaluated the molecular characteristics of colorectal neoplasms found in individuals with serrated polyposis. We identified 4561 potentially relevant studies, but due to a lack of consensus in the reporting of findings, only fourteen studies were able to be included in the meta-analysis. BRAF mutation was found in 73% (95% CI 65-80%) of serrated polyps, 0% (95% CI 0-3%) of conventional adenomas and 49% (95%CI 33-64%) of colorectal cancers. In contrast, KRAS mutation was present in 8% (95% CI 5-11%) of serrated polyps, 3% (95% CI 0-13%) of conventional adenomas and 6% (95% CI 0-13%) of colorectal cancers. Absence of MLH1 immunostaining was found in 3% (95% CI 0-10%) of serrated polyps and 53% (95% CI 36-71%) of colorectal cancers. Overall, microsatellite instability was found in 40% (95% CI 18-64%) of colorectal cancers arising in the setting of serrated polyposis. Our results indicate that diverse molecular pathways are likely to contribute to the increased predisposition for colorectal cancer in individuals with serrated polyposis. We also propose a set of minimum standards for the reporting of future research in serrated polyposis as this is a rare syndrome and collation of research findings from different centres will be essential to identify the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  6. E. Coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... E. coli is short for the medical term Escherichia coli . The strange thing about these bacteria — and lots ... cause a very serious infection. Someone who has E. coli infection may have these symptoms: bad stomach cramps and ...

  7. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Simpson, Peter T; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R; Clouston, Andrew D; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C; Neklason, Deborah W; Davis, Sean R; Walker, Robert L; Calzone, Kathleen A; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N; Hulick, Peter J; Weissman, Scott M; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sampson, Jone E; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K; Huntsman, David G; Foulkes, William D; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M; Edwards, Stacey L; French, Juliet D; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S; Worthley, Daniel L; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-05-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present.

  8. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Simpson, Peter T; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R; Clouston, Andrew D; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C; Neklason, Deborah W; Davis, Sean R; Walker, Robert L; Calzone, Kathleen A; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N; Hulick, Peter J; Weissman, Scott M; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sampson, Jone E; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K; Huntsman, David G; Foulkes, William D; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M; Edwards, Stacey L; French, Juliet D; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S; Worthley, Daniel L; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-05-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present. PMID:27087319

  9. A nation-wide study comparing sporadic and familial adenomatous polyposis-related desmoid-type fibromatoses.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Marry H; Casparie, Mariel; Mathus-Vliegen, Lisbeth M H; Dekkers, Olaf M; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Vasen, Hans F A

    2011-07-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatoses are neoplasms of fibroblastic origin, occurring sporadically or associated with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) coli. By comparing sporadic and FAP-associated desmoid-type fibromatoses, we tried to identify clinical characteristics, which may indicate FAP. Histopathology data of all Dutch patients with desmoid-type fibromatoses diagnosed between 1999 and 2009 were retrieved from PALGA, the nation-wide network and registry of histopathology in the Netherlands. For calculation of incidence rates, person-years from the general matched population were used. Based on polyp counts in pathological records, the cohort was divided into a FAP group and a non-FAP group. Patient- and tumor characteristics were compared between the two groups. A total number of 519 patients older than 10 years with a confirmed diagnosis of desmoid-type fibromatoses were included. Thirty-nine (7.5%) desmoid patients were documented of having FAP. The incidences of sporadic and FAP-related desmoid-type fibromatoses were 3.42 and 2,784 per million person-years, respectively. The majority of FAP patients developed desmoid-type fibromatoses after the diagnosis of FAP. Having FAP was associated with male gender [odds ratio (OR) 2.0, p = 0.034], desmoid diagnosis at an earlier age (mean 36 vs. 42 years, p = 0.031), and desmoid localization intra-abdominally (OR 18.9, p ≤ 0.001) or in the abdominal wall (OR 4.8, p ≤ 0.001), compared to extra-abdominal desmoid localization. In conclusion, patients with desmoid-type fibromatoses are at risk of underlying FAP. Especially cases with desmoid localization intra-abdominal or in the abdominal wall, and all patients younger than 60 years, have a substantial increased risk and should be referred for colonoscopy.

  10. Giant Filiform Polyposis not Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Rossella; Mastracci, Luca; Di Domenico, Stefano; Ferretti, Carlotta; De Cian, Franco; Fiocca, Roberto; Grillo, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Filiform polyposis (FP) is an uncommon cause of non-neoplastic and non-syndromic polyposis. Several hypotheses concerning its pathogenesis have been published. FP is most frequently associated with a post-inflammatory reparative process; indeed, the most frequent association is with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). FP is characterized by one to hundreds of uniform, slender, arborizing, vermiform projections of the large bowel mucosa and submucosa lined by normal or inflamed colonic mucosa. The most common sites for these polyps are the transverse and descending colon. Case Report In this report we present a case of giant FP associated with locally invasive adenocarcinoma of the right colon in a 73-year-old man with no past medical history of IBD. Conclusion Few of these cases have been reported in the literature, and out of the approximately 20 of such case reports only one other was associated with colorectal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26288616

  11. A Unique Presentation of Primary Intestinal MALT Lymphoma as Multiple Lymphomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Biligi, Dayananda S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple lymphomatous polyposis is considered to be a rare condition, with most of the cases being extranodal counterpart of mantle cell lymphomas. We report a rare case of multiple lymphomatous polyposis of the gastrointestinal tract in which the patient presented with abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. Computer tomography of the abdomen showed circumferential wall thickening with intramural mass involving caecum & ascending colon with enlarged pericolonic lymph nodes. The patient underwent right hemicolectomy. Immunohistologic findings were characteristic of MALT lymphoma. Microscopic examination of polypoidal masses and mesenteric lymph nodes revealed infiltration by pleomorphic, atypical lymphoid cells which were CD20 positive and negative for CD3, CD10, Cyclin D1. Lymphoepithelial lesions were also noted. Careful endoscopic evaluation and histopathological review along with an immunohistochemical panel is extremely useful for accurately diagnosing such cases and avoiding unnecessary surgery and inappropriate therapy. PMID:27190819

  12. Iron loss and reabsorption in Ancylostoma duodenale infection and bilharzial colonic polyposis.

    PubMed

    Farid, Z; Bassily, S; Lehman, J S; Kent, D C; Haxton, J; Patwardhan, V N; Hassan, A

    1970-01-01

    Individuals infected with Ancylostoma duodenale may lose up to 6 mg of iron daily and those infected with bilharzial colonic polyposis may lose an average of 3 mg daily; patients suffering with both infections may lose up to 9 mg of iron daily. 1 study has shown that some iron loss to the upper gastrointestinal tract was reabsorbed. A study was undertaken to ascertain whether any iron lost in the lower gastrointestinal tract is reabsorbed and to measure the amount of iron reabsorbed in patients with A. duodenale. 7 Egyptian farmers with A. duodenale and 8 with bilharzial intestinal polyposis but without hookworm infection were given thorough physical and laboratory examinations. Hookworm and Schistosoma mansoni egg counts were performed. All patients were given oral ferrous sulfate before starting the experiment to raise their hemoglobin levels to over 10 gm %. The mean daily blood loss in the 7 patients with heavy hookworm infections was 64.8 ml and the mean iron loss was 18.7; but a mean of 7.7 of this iron was reabsorbed. In the 8 patients with bilharzial polyposis, blood loss averaged 13.1 ml and iron loss, 4.3 mg. In 4 patients, the amount of iron reabsorbed was not significant, in the remaining 4, it reached only 2 mg. The reabsorption of 40% of the iron initially lost in the upper gastrointestinal tract may explain the remarkable tolerance of Egyptian farmers to prolonged hookworm infections. The general iron deficiency anemia prevalent among patients with bilharzial polyposis is due in part to the loss of iron which is not reabsorbed.

  13. Using Genetics to Identify Hereditary Colorectal Polyposis and Cancer Syndromes in Your Patient.

    PubMed

    Macaron, Carole; Heald, Brandie; Burke, Carol A

    2015-10-01

    The majority of patients with colorectal polyps and cancer do not have a Mendelian cause of the disease. Age, lifestyle, and environmental factors interact with complex genetic traits to contribute to the etiology. However, approximately 5-10 % of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and more than 40 % of patients meeting specific clinical features of the hereditary polyposis syndromes have a discoverable, actionable genetic cause which will significantly alter their medical management. PMID:26292665

  14. Juvenile polyposis of infancy associated with paracentric inversion and deletion of chromosome 10 in a Hispanic patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vargas-González, Roberto; de la Torre-Mondragón, Luis; Aparicio-Rodríguez, Juan Manuel; Paniagua-Morgan, Froylan; López-Hernández, Gerardo; Garrido-Hernández, Miguel Angel; Nuñez-Barrera, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis of infancy is a rare genetic disorder, involving multiple hamartomatous polyps of the gastrointestinal tract, which usually has a very aggressive clinical course and is often fatal. It is characterized by early onset (during the 1st months of life) and by diffuse juvenile polyposis with anemia, recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, diarrhea, rectal prolapse, intussusception, protein-losing enteropathy, starvation, and malnutrition. There is a hypothesis that mutation of the tumor-suppressor genes BMPR1A and PTEN, located on the long arm of chromosome 10, is associated with the development of this disease. Medical treatment for this disorder is challenging and should be conservative whenever possible. We present the case of a 3-year-old girl with juvenile polyposis of infancy who eventually died from mesenteric artery thrombosis during surgical colectomy. Karyotype of the patient showed a paracentric inversion in 10q and a deletion in 10p. We will briefly comment on some genetic considerations of this disease.

  15. Resolution of Fundic Gland Polyposis following Laparoscopic Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation and Subsequent Cessation of Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Brockmeyer, Joel R.; Connolly, Erin E.; Wittchow, Richard J.; Kothari, Shanu N.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric polyps occur from a variety of sources and are found commonly on upper endoscopy. We present the case of a 49-year-old female who presented for evaluation for antireflux surgery with a history of fundic gland polyposis who required twice-daily proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for control of her gastric reflux. After verifying that she met criteria for surgery, she underwent an uncomplicated laparoscopic magnetic sphincter augmentation placement. With the cessation of PPIs following surgery, the fundic gland polyposis resolved. Fundic gland polyps may occur sporadically or within certain syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis. Multiple possible inciting factors exist, including the use of PPIs. This is the first reported case of the resolution of numerous fundic gland polyps following the completion of laparoscopic magnetic sphincter augmentation. PMID:26600954

  16. Does oral prednisolone increase the efficacy of subsequent nasal steroids in treating nasal polyposis?

    PubMed Central

    Wongsritrang, Krongthong; Ruttanaphol, Suwalee

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although combined oral and nasal steroid therapy is widely used in nasal polyposis, a subset of patients show an unfavorable therapeutic outcome. This study aimed to evaluate whether oral prednisolone produces any additive effects on subsequent nasal steroid therapy and to evaluate if any clinical variables can predict therapeutic outcome. Methods: Using a 3:2 randomization ratio, 67 patients with nasal polyposis received 50 mg of prednisolone and 47 patients received placebo daily for 2 weeks, followed by mometasone furoate nasal spray (MFNS) at 200 micrograms twice daily for 10 weeks. Clinical response was evaluated by nasal symptom score (NSS), peak expiratory flow index (PEFI), and total nasal polyps score (TNPS). Potential predictor variables were assessed by clinical history, nasal endoscopy, allergy skin test, and sinus radiography. Results: At the end of the 2-week oral steroid phase, the prednisolone group showed significantly greater improvements in all nasal symptoms, nasal airflow, and polyp size than the placebo group. In the nasal steroid phase, while the MFNS maintained the outcome improvements in the prednisolone group, all outcome variables in the placebo group showed continuing improvements. At the end of the nasal steroid phase, there were no significant differences of most outcome improvements between the two groups, except in hyposmia, PEFI, and TNPS (p = 0.049, p = 0.029, and p = 0.005, respectively). In the prednisolone group, patients with polyps grade 3 and endoscopic signs of meatal discharge showed significantly less improvement in total NSS, PEFI, and TNPS than patients with grade 1–2 size and negative metal discharge. Conclusion: In the 12-week treatment evaluation of nasal polyposis, pretreatment with oral steroids had no significant advantage for most nasal symptoms other than earlier relief; however, combined oral and nasal steroid therapy more effectively improved hyposmia, polyps size, and nasal airflow. Polyps size

  17. Exome Sequencing Identifies Biallelic MSH3 Germline Mutations as a Recessive Subtype of Colorectal Adenomatous Polyposis.

    PubMed

    Adam, Ronja; Spier, Isabel; Zhao, Bixiao; Kloth, Michael; Marquez, Jonathan; Hinrichsen, Inga; Kirfel, Jutta; Tafazzoli, Aylar; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Uhlhaas, Siegfried; Stienen, Dietlinde; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Altmüller, Janine; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Kayser, Katrin; Thiele, Holger; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Marra, Giancarlo; Kristiansen, Glen; Nöthen, Markus M; Büttner, Reinhard; Möslein, Gabriela; Betz, Regina C; Brieger, Angela; Lifton, Richard P; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    In ∼30% of families affected by colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutations have been identified in the previously implicated genes APC, MUTYH, POLE, POLD1, and NTHL1, although a hereditary etiology is likely. To uncover further genes with high-penetrance causative mutations, we performed exome sequencing of leukocyte DNA from 102 unrelated individuals with unexplained adenomatous polyposis. We identified two unrelated individuals with differing compound-heterozygous loss-of-function (LoF) germline mutations in the mismatch-repair gene MSH3. The impact of the MSH3 mutations (c.1148delA, c.2319-1G>A, c.2760delC, and c.3001-2A>C) was indicated at the RNA and protein levels. Analysis of the diseased individuals' tumor tissue demonstrated high microsatellite instability of di- and tetranucleotides (EMAST), and immunohistochemical staining illustrated a complete loss of nuclear MSH3 in normal and tumor tissue, confirming the LoF effect and causal relevance of the mutations. The pedigrees, genotypes, and frequency of MSH3 mutations in the general population are consistent with an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. Both index persons have an affected sibling carrying the same mutations. The tumor spectrum in these four persons comprised colorectal and duodenal adenomas, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, and an early-onset astrocytoma. Additionally, we detected one unrelated individual with biallelic PMS2 germline mutations, representing constitutional mismatch-repair deficiency. Potentially causative variants in 14 more candidate genes identified in 26 other individuals require further workup. In the present study, we identified biallelic germline MSH3 mutations in individuals with a suspected hereditary tumor syndrome. Our data suggest that MSH3 mutations represent an additional recessive subtype of colorectal adenomatous polyposis. PMID:27476653

  18. Microsatellite instability in tumor and nonneoplastic colorectal cells from hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer and sporadic high microsatellite-instable tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Dietmaier, W; Gänsbauer, S; Beyser, K; Renke, B; Hartmann, A; Rümmele, P; Jauch, K W; Hofstädter, F; Rüschoff, J

    2000-01-01

    Genetic alterations such as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI) have been frequently studied in various tumor types. Genetic heterogeneity of nonneoplastic cells has not yet been sufficiently investigated. However, genomic instability in normal cells could be a potentially important issue, in particular when these cells are used as reference in LOH and MSI analyses of tumor samples. In order to investigate possible genetic abnormalities in normal colorectal cells of tumor patients, MSI analyses of normal colonic mucosa were performed. Up to 15 different laser-microdissected normal regions containing 50-150 cells were investigated in each of 15 individual microsatellite-stable, sporadic high microsatellite-instable (MSI-H) and hereditary non-polyposis coli cancer (HNPCC) colorectal cancer patients. Frequent MSI and heterogeneity in the MSI pattern were found both in normal and tumor cells from 10 HNPCC and sporadic MSI-H tumor patients whose tumors had defect mismatch repair protein expressions. This observation shows that MSI can also occur in nonneoplastic cells which has to be considered in MSI analyses for molecular HNPCC screening. In addition, considerable genetic heterogeneity was detected in all MSI-H (sporadic and HNPCC) tumors when analyzing five different regions with less than 150 cells, respectively. These differences were not detectable in larger tumor regions containing about 10,000 cells. Thus, heterogeneity of the MSI pattern (e.g. intratumoral MSI) is an important feature of tumors with the MSI-H phenotype.

  19. Detection of familial adenomatous polyposis with orthogonal polarized spectroscopy of the oral mucosa vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Ali; Edelstein, Daniel L.; Graham, Jenna; Nabili, Afshin; Giardiello, Francis M.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2013-01-01

    Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by the development of multiple colonic polyps at younger age with a near 100% lifetime risk of colorectal cancer. The determination of FAP is made after extensive clinical evaluation and genetic testing of at risk individuals. We investigated a novel spectro-polarimetric imaging system capable of capturing high-resolution images of the oral mucosa at different wavelengths in an attempt to distinguish patients with FAP from controls. Results of a clinical trial show that the system is capable of separating FAP positive individuals from controls by measuring the individuals’ oral vascular density and complexity. PMID:21922674

  20. [The danger of serrated polyps in the colon: from sporadic polyp to polyposis syndrome].

    PubMed

    IJspeert, Joep E G; Bastiaansen, Barbara A J; Dekker, Evelien

    2015-01-01

    Up to 30% of colorectal cancers develop from sessile serrated polyps via the serrated neoplasia pathway. The clinical management of these lesions is challenging for both endoscopists and pathologists due to the difficulties in detection and recognition. As a result, more than half of all colonoscopy interval cancers, cancers detected after colonoscopy and before the next scheduled surveillance procedure, appear to develop from sessile serrated polyps. We describe the pitfalls in the clinical management of these lesions as well as potential solutions, illustrated by case reports of two patients, aged 28 and 65 years, with serrated polyposis syndrome and colorectal cancer.

  1. Dento-osseous anomalies associated to familial adenomatous polyposis mimicking florid cemento-osseous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Fabiana Tolentino; Leite, André Ferreira; de Souza Figueiredo, Paulo Tadeu; Melo, Nilce Santos; Sousa, João Batista; Almeida, Rômulo; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Silva Guerra, Eliete Neves

    2012-12-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a colorectal cancer syndrome characterized by the development of multiple polyps of the colon and rectum with high risk of malignant transformation. The extraintestinal manifestations such as dento-osseous changes are associated with FAP. This is a case report of a 36-year-old female patient who was referred for dental treatment with the initial diagnosis of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD). However, the association of the imaging dento-osseous findings with the medical history confirmed the diagnosis of FAP. The paper illustrates the clinical characteristics and imaging findings associated with FAP, and also discusses misdiagnosis based exclusively on imaging features.

  2. Colorectal carcinomas arising in the hyperplastic polyposis syndrome progress through the chromosomal instability pathway.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, N J; Gorman, P; Tomlinson, I P; Bullpitt, P; Ward, R L

    2000-08-01

    The hyperplastic polyposis syndrome is characterized by the presence within the colon of multiple large hyperplastic polyps. We describe a case of hyperplastic polyposis syndrome associated with two synchronous carcinomas, one of which arises within a pre-existing hyperplastic lesion. Comparative genomic hybridization was used to determine genetic changes in both carcinomas and several associated hyperplastic lesions. Microsatellite analysis at five loci was performed on carcinomas and representative hyperplastic polyps, and p53 status was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Both carcinomas showed multiple genetic aberrations, including high level gains of 8q and 13q, and loss of 5q. These changes were not seen in the hyperplastic polyps. Microsatellite instability was not seen in the carcinomas, four separate hyperplastic polyps, the hyperplastic polyp with mild adenomatous change associated with the carcinoma, or a separate serrated adenoma. Allelic imbalance in the cancers at D5S346 and D17S938 suggested allelic loss of both p53 and APC, as well as at the loci D13S263, D13S174, D13S159, and D18S49. An early invasive carcinoma in one hyperplastic polyp stained for p53 protein, but the associated hyperplastic polyp was negative. In this case, neoplastic progression followed the typical genetic pathway of common colorectal carcinoma and occurred synchronously with mutation of p53.

  3. Azithromycin for the treatment of eosinophilic nasal polyposis: Clinical and histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Borges Crosara, Paulo Fernando Tormin; Cassali, Geovanni Dantas; dos Reis, Diego Carlos; Rodrigues, Danilo Santana; Nunes, Flavio Barbosa; Guimarães, Roberto Eustáquio Santos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Macrolides used as immunomodulators are a promising tool for chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Eosinophilic nasal polyposis (ENP) is still considered a disease that is difficult to control with the currently standardized treatments. Objectives: To evaluate prolonged treatment with low-dose azithromycin for ENP based on clinical and histopathologic variables. Methods: The present investigation was a self-paired case study of 33 patients with ENP. A comparison was performed between patients before and after treatment with azithromycin for 8 weeks. The patients were subjected to clinical examinations, staging (three-dimensional imaging by endoscopy), application of the questionnaire, and biopsy of nasal polyps at the beginning and at the end of the treatment. Results: The treatment yielded a clinical improvement regarding the two variables studied: polyposis staging (69.7%) and questionnaire (57.6%). We did not find significant differences in the inflammatory pattern and in the percentage or absolute number of eosinophils per field between samples obtained before and after the treatment (p > 0.05). There was no difference between the answers obtained from groups with and without asthma and/or aspirin intolerance (p > 0.3). The patients with advanced initial staging exhibited lower subjective improvement index and staging reduction (p = 0.031 and p = 0.012, respectively). Conclusion: Based on this study, azithromycin may be considered as another therapeutic option for ENP. However, further studies are necessary to define the real mechanism of action involved. PMID:27465667

  4. High proportion of large genomic deletions and a genotype–phenotype update in 80 unrelated families with juvenile polyposis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aretz, S; Stienen, D; Uhlhaas, S; Stolte, M; Entius, M M; Loff, S; Back, W; Kaufmann, A; Keller, K‐M; Blaas, S H; Siebert, R; Vogt, S; Spranger, S; Holinski‐Feder, E; Sunde, L; Propping, P; Friedl, W

    2007-01-01

    Background In patients with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) the frequency of large genomic deletions in the SMAD4 and BMPR1A genes was unknown. Methods Mutation and phenotype analysis was used in 80 unrelated patients of whom 65 met the clinical criteria for JPS (typical JPS) and 15 were suspected to have JPS. Results By direct sequencing of the two genes, point mutations were identified in 30 patients (46% of typical JPS). Using MLPA, large genomic deletions were found in 14% of all patients with typical JPS (six deletions in SMAD4 and three deletions in BMPR1A). Mutation analysis of the PTEN gene in the remaining 41 mutation negative cases uncovered a point mutation in two patients (5%). SMAD4 mutation carriers had a significantly higher frequency of gastric polyposis (73%) than did patients with BMPR1A mutations (8%) (p<0.001); all seven cases of gastric cancer occurred in families with SMAD4 mutations. SMAD4 mutation carriers with gastric polyps were significantly older at gastroscopy than those without (p<0.001). In 22% of the 23 unrelated SMAD4 mutation carriers, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) was also diagnosed clinically. The documented histologic findings encompassed a wide distribution of different polyp types, comparable with that described in hereditary mixed polyposis syndromes (HMPS). Conclusions Screening for large deletions raised the mutation detection rate to 60% in the 65 patients with typical JPS. A strong genotype‐phenotype correlation for gastric polyposis, gastric cancer, and HHT was identified, which should have implications for counselling and surveillance. Histopathological results in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes must be critically interpreted. PMID:17873119

  5. Colorectal cancer risk variants on 11q23 and 15q13 are associated with unexplained adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Hes, Frederik J; Ruano, Dina; Nieuwenhuis, Marry; Tops, Carli M; Schrumpf, Melanie; Nielsen, Maartje; Huijts, Petra E A; Wijnen, Juul T; Wagner, Anja; Gómez García, Encarna B; Sijmons, Rolf H; Menko, Fred H; Letteboer, Tom G W; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Harryvan, Jan; Kampman, Ellen; Morreau, Hans; Vasen, Hans F A; van Wezel, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal adenomatous polyposis is associated with a high risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and is frequently caused by germline mutations in APC or MUTYH. However, in about 20–30% of patients no underlying gene defect can be identified. In this study, we tested if recently identified CRC risk variants play a role in patients with >10 adenomas. Methods We analysed a total of 16 SNPs with a reported association with CRC in a cohort of 252 genetically unexplained index patients with >10 colorectal adenomas and 745 controls. In addition, we collected detailed clinical information from index patients and their first-degree relatives (FDRs). Results We found a statistically significant association with two of the variants tested: rs3802842 (at chromosome 11q23, OR=1.60, 95% CI 1.3 to 2.0) and rs4779584 (at chromosome 15q13, OR=1.50, 95% CI 1.2 to 1.9). The majority of index patients (84%) had between 10 and 100 adenomas and 15% had >100 adenomas. Only two index patients (1%), both with >100 adenomas, had FDRs with polyposis. Forty-one per cent of the index patients had one or more FDRs with CRC. Conclusions These SNPs are the first common, low-penetrant variants reported to be associated with adenomatous polyposis not caused by a defect in the APC, MUTYH, POLD1 and POLE genes. Even though familial occurrence of polyposis was very rare, CRC was over-represented in FDRs of polyposis patients and, if confirmed, these relatives will therefore benefit from surveillance. PMID:24253443

  6. Phenotype and polyp landscape in serrated polyposis syndrome: a series of 100 patients from genetics clinics.

    PubMed

    Rosty, Christophe; Buchanan, Daniel D; Walsh, Michael D; Pearson, Sally-Ann; Pavluk, Erika; Walters, Rhiannon J; Clendenning, Mark; Spring, Kevin J; Jenkins, Mark A; Win, Aung K; Hopper, John L; Sweet, Kevin; Frankel, Wendy L; Aronson, Melyssa; Gallinger, Steve; Goldblatt, Jack; Woodall, Sonja; Arnold, Julie; Walker, Neal I; Jass, Jeremy R; Parry, Susan; Young, Joanne P

    2012-06-01

    Serrated polyposis syndrome (SPS), also known as hyperplastic polyposis, is a syndrome of unknown genetic basis defined by the occurrence of multiple serrated polyps in the large intestine and associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). There are a variety of SPS presentations, which may encompass a continuum of phenotypes modified by environmental and genetic factors. To explore the phenotype of SPS, we recorded the histologic and molecular characteristics of multiple colorectal polyps in patients with SPS recruited between 2000 and 2010 from genetics clinics in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States. Three specialist gastrointestinal pathologists reviewed the polyps, which they classified into conventional adenomas or serrated polyps, with various subtypes, according to the current World Health Organization criteria. Mutations in BRAF and KRAS and mismatch repair protein expression were determined in a subset of polyps. A total of 100 patients were selected for the study, of whom 58 were female and 42 were male. The total polyp count per patient ranged from 6 to 150 (median 30). The vast majority of patients (89%) had polyposis affecting the entire large intestine. From this cohort, 406 polyps were reviewed. Most of the polyps (83%) were serrated polyps: microvesicular hyperplastic polyps (HP) (n=156), goblet cell HP (n=25), sessile serrated adenoma/polyps (SSA/P) (n=110), SSA/P with cytologic dysplasia (n=28), and traditional serrated adenomas (n=18). A further 69 polyps were conventional adenomas. BRAF mutation was mainly detected in SSA/P with dysplasia (95%), SSA/P (85%), microvesicular HP (76%), and traditional serrated adenoma (54%), whereas KRAS mutation was present mainly in goblet cell HP (50%) and in tubulovillous adenoma (45%). Four of 6 SSA/Ps with high-grade dysplasia showed loss of MLH1/PMS2 expression. CRC was diagnosed in 39 patients who were more often found to have a conventional adenoma compared with patients

  7. Colonic epithelial cell proliferation in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Green, S; Chapman, P; Burn, J; Burt, A; Bennett, M; Appleton, D; Varma, J; Mathers, J

    1998-01-01

    Background—Despite the recent discovery of four genes responsible for up to 90% of all cases of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), there will still be families in whom predictive testing is not possible. A phenotypic biomarker would therefore be useful. An upwards shift of the proliferative compartment in colonic crypts is reported to be one of the earliest changes in premalignant mucosa. 
Aims—To assess the role of crypt cell proliferation as a phenotypic biomarker in HNPCC. 
Patients—Thirty five patients at 50% risk of carrying the HNPCC gene (21 of whom subsequently underwent predictive testing and hence gene carrier status was known) and 18controls. 
Methods—Crypt cell proliferation was measured at five sites in the colon using two different techniques. Labelling index was determined using the monoclonal antibody MIB1 and whole crypt mitotic index was measured using the microdissection and crypt squash technique. The distribution of proliferating cells within the crypts was also assessed. 
Results—There were no significant differences in the total labelling index or mean number of mitoses per crypt, nor in the distribution of proliferating cells within the crypt, between the study and control groups at any site. When the 21 patients in whom gene carrier status was known were analysed separately there were no significant differences in the measured indices of proliferation between the HNPCC gene carriers and non-gene carriers. 
Conclusion—Crypt cell proliferation is not a discriminative marker of gene carriage in HNPCC. 

 Keywords: cell proliferation; hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer PMID:9771410

  8. Copy number variants associated with 18p11.32, DCC and the promoter 1B region of APC in colorectal polyposis patients

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Amy L.; Talseth-Palmer, Bente A.; Evans, Tiffany-Jane; McElduff, Patrick; Spigelman, Allan D.; Hannan, Garry N.; Scott, Rodney J.

    2015-01-01

    Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) is the second most common inherited predisposition to colorectal cancer (CRC) associated with the development of hundreds to thousands of adenomas in the colon and rectum. Mutations in APC are found in ~ 80% polyposis patients with FAP. In the remaining 20% no genetic diagnosis can be provided suggesting other genes or mechanisms that render APC inactive may be responsible. Copy number variants (CNVs) remain to be investigated in FAP and may account for disease in a proportion of polyposis patients. A cohort of 56 polyposis patients and 40 controls were screened for CNVs using the 2.7M microarray (Affymetrix) with data analysed using ChAS (Affymetrix). A total of 142 CNVs were identified unique to the polyposis cohort suggesting their involvement in CRC risk. We specifically identified CNVs in four unrelated polyposis patients among CRC susceptibility genes APC, DCC, MLH1 and CTNNB1 which are likely to have contributed to disease development in these patients. A recurrent deletion was observed at position 18p11.32 in 9% of the patients screened that was of particular interest. Further investigation is necessary to fully understand the role of these variants in CRC risk given the high prevalence among the patients screened. PMID:26909336

  9. E. Coli and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... care provider. What is E. coli? E. coli (Escherichia coli) is a bacterium that lives in your colon ( ... 10):1411-1413. Jones B, et al. 2004. Escherichia coli: a growing problem in early onset neonatal sepsis. ...

  10. E. Coli Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is E. coli? E. coli is short for Escherichia coli -- bacteria (germs) that cause severe cramps and diarrhea. E. ... and especially in people who have another illness. E. coli infection is more common during the summer months and ...

  11. Somatic c.34G>T KRAS mutation: a new prescreening test for MUTYH-associated polyposis?

    PubMed

    Aimé, Adeline; Coulet, Florence; Lefevre, Jeremie H; Colas, Chrystelle; Cervera, Pascale; Flejou, Jean-François; Lascols, Olivier; Soubrier, Florent; Parc, Yann

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the somatic c.34G>T KRAS transversion as a marker suggestive of MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP). We compared 86 adenomas and 19 colorectal cancers (CRCs) of 30 MAP patients to 135 adenomas and five CRCs of 47 familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients. The c.34G>T mutation was investigated by DNA sequencing. Secondly, the germline MUTYH gene sequence was analyzed in patients carrying c.34G>T in CRCs diagnosed between 2008 and 2012. The c.34G>T was present in 39.7% of MAP adenomas versus 1.6% of FAP adenomas (P < 0.01). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting MAP were 39.7% and 98%, respectively. Sensitivity increased with the number of adenomas tested (P = 0.039). KRAS exon 2 analysis was performed on 2239 CRC and 2.2% harbored the c.34G>T transversion. Among 28 carriers of the c.34G>T mutation, biallelic MUTYH mutations were detected in seven patients (25%). One patient did not have any polyp or family history and did not fulfill criteria for MUTYH testing. With high specificity, the c.34G>T mutation seems to be a useful and promising test for MAP. For polyposis, it may guide genetic testing toward APC or MUTYH. If routinely performed in CRC patients, it could help to diagnose MUTYH-mutation carriers, even when they don't fulfill genetic testing criteria. PMID:26056087

  12. Upper tract juvenile polyps in juvenile polyposis patients: dysplasia and malignancy are associated with foveolar, intestinal, and pyloric differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changqing; Giardiello, Francis M; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2014-12-01

    Patients with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS), a hereditary autosomal dominant hamartomatous polyposis syndrome, are at increased risk for colorectal adenocarcinoma. The upper gastrointestinal tract is less often involved by JPS than the colorectum, and, consequently, upper tract juvenile polyps (JPs) are not well studied. We reviewed upper endoscopies and corresponding biopsies in JPS patients documented in our Polyposis Registry. A total of 199 upper gastrointestinal biopsies from 69 endoscopies were available in 22 of 41 (54%) JPS patients. Thirteen of the 22 patients (59%) had ≥1 gastric JP; 5 also had 6 small bowel JPs. Gastric JP was identified as early as age 7 in a patient with an SMAD4 gene mutation. Two patients (9%) had high-grade dysplasia in gastric JP. Invasive adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in the gastrectomy specimen of 1 patient. Five patients had a huge gastric polyp burden; 3 underwent total gastrectomy. Three patients died of complications associated with extensive upper JP. Histologically, 8 of the 56 (14%) gastric JPs identified had dysplasia. All of the 8 polyps demonstrated intestinalized and pyloric gland differentiation intermixed with foveolar epithelium. Dysplasia was seen arising in all 3 types of epithelium. The flat gastric mucosa in 11 patients was unremarkable without inflammation or intestinal metaplasia. The 6 small bowel JPs had no dysplasia. Our findings suggest that JPS patients are at increased risk for gastric adenocarcinoma. Detection of malignancy in syndromic gastric JP indicates that the current screening procedures are insufficient in removal of precursor lesions to prevent progression to carcinoma. PMID:25390638

  13. Scarce evidence of the causal role of germline mutations in UNC5C in hereditary colorectal cancer and polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Mur, Pilar; Elena, Sánchez-Cuartielles; Aussó, Susanna; Aiza, Gemma; Rafael, Valdés-Mas; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Brunet, Joan; Urioste, Miguel; Lázaro, Conxi; Moreno, Victor; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S.; Valle, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in UNC5C have been suggested to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, thus causing hereditary CRC. However, the evidence gathered thus far is insufficient to include the study of the UNC5C gene in the routine genetic testing of familial CRC. Here we aim at providing a more conclusive answer about the contribution of germline UNC5C mutations to genetically unexplained hereditary CRC and/or polyposis cases. To achieve this goal we sequenced the coding region and exon-intron boundaries of UNC5C in 544 familial CRC or polyposis patients (529 families), using a technique that combines pooled DNA amplification and massively parallel sequencing. A total of eight novel or rare variants, all missense, were identified in eight families. Co-segregation data in the families and association results in case-control series are not consistent with a causal effect for 7 of the 8 identified variants, including c.1882_1883delinsAA (p.A628K), previously described as a disease-causing mutation. One variant, c.2210G > A (p.S737N), remained unclassified. In conclusion, our results suggest that the contribution of germline mutations in UNC5C to hereditary colorectal cancer and to polyposis cases is negligible. PMID:26852919

  14. Escherichia Coli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  15. E. coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... sure that ground beef has reached a safe internal temperature of 160° F. Wash hands before preparing food, after diapering infants, and after contact with cows, sheep, or goats, their food or treats, or their living environment . General Information E. coli Infections (NIH MedlinePlus) Trusted ...

  16. Detection of familial adenomatous polyposis with polarized spectroscopic imaging and oral vascular density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiri, Ali; Edelstein, Daniel L.; Giardiello, Francis M.; Ramella-Roman, J. C.

    2011-03-01

    Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by the development of multiple colonic polyps at younger age with a near 100% lifetime risk of colorectal cancer in later years. The determination of FAP is made after extensive clinical evaluation and genetic testing of at risk individuals. Genetic testing is expensive and in some cases deleterious mutations are not found in all patients with a clinical diagnosis of FAP. As such, the early identification of affected individuals could substantially eliminate associated morbidity and mortality. We investigated a novel spectro-polarimetric imaging system to capture images of the oral mucosa at different wavelengths in an attempt to distinguish patients with FAP from controls. Total diffused oral mucosal reflectance (OMR) and oral mucosal vascular density (OMVD) were calculated from spectral data collected from 33 patients with gene positive FAP, 5 patients who tested negative for FAP, and 45 controls. A statistically significant difference in OMVD (p < 0.001) was observed between individuals with FAP and controls. Analysis of OMR showed no significant difference between the two subject groups.

  17. Screening and Health Behaviors among Persons Diagnosed with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis and Their Relatives

    PubMed Central

    James, Aimee S.; Chisholm, Phillip; Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Baxter, Melanie; Kaphingst, Kimberly; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2012-01-01

    Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited colorectal cancer syndrome. Individuals with FAP often undergo colectomy and are recommended to follow several surveillance protocols. Biological relatives of persons with FAP may also be at risk and thus should undergo genetic counseling. Screening adherence, genetic testing, and other health behaviors among individuals with FAP and their relatives are not well characterized. We conducted a cross-sectional self-report survey with individuals who have FAP (n = 35) and their biological relatives (n = 15). Respondents were recruited through a cancer center registry for inherited colon cancers. Most relatives had undergone colon cancer screening; 40% had undergone genetic testing. One fifth of respondents with FAP had not undergone an upper endoscopy, contrary to usual recommendations. Cigarette smoking rates were above average and were higher among FAP respondents. Use of vitamin supplements was fairly common, more so among those with FAP. Although most people had been screened, there are areas for improvement, notably for upper endoscopy among individuals with FAP and genetic testing among family members. Several other health-risk behaviors and health concerns other than FAP were identified. Further research into factors contributing to screening rates and other health behaviors in this high-risk population is warranted. PMID:22899922

  18. Prevalence of serrated polyposis syndrome and its association with synchronous advanced adenoma and lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Naoya; Sakamoto, Taku; Makazu, Makomo; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Kushima, Ryoji; Shimoda, Tadakazu; Fujii, Takahiro; Inoue, Haruhiro; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Saito, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with serrated polyposis syndrome (SPS) and the incidence of advanced adenoma/colorectal cancer (CRC). We prospectively enrolled 249 consecutive patients who underwent colonoscopy at the National Cancer Center Hospital over a 6-month period. All the polyps were diagnosed using magnification colonoscopy and resection/biopsy. The enrolled patients were divided into two groups, i) those with ≥5 histologically diagnosed hyperplastic polyps (HPs) proximal to the sigmoid colon, with at least 2 polyps >10 mm in diameter and ii) those with ≥20 HPs distributed throughout the colon. The clinical characteristics of the two groups were compared, including lifestyle, family history of CRC and colonoscopic findings. HPs were identified in 228 patients, of whom 21 (8.4%) had SPS. All 21 patients had ≥20 HPs distributed throughout the colon, with none having >2 HPs ≥1 cm in diameter in the right colon. Synchronous advanced adenoma/CRC was diagnosed in 76/249 (30.5%) patients. The prevalence of advanced adenoma/CRC was higher among patients with compared to those without SPS (P=0.075). SPS was also associated with older age and higher body mass index (BMI). Our results suggested that older age and higher BMI are independent risk factors for SPS. Advanced adenoma/CRC tended to occur more frequently among patients with compared to those without SPS, although the difference was not statistically significant.

  19. Multiplicity and molecular heterogeneity of colorectal carcinomas in individuals with serrated polyposis.

    PubMed

    Rosty, Christophe; Walsh, Michael D; Walters, Rhiannon J; Clendenning, Mark; Pearson, Sally-Ann; Jenkins, Mark A; Win, Aung Ko; Hopper, John L; Sweet, Kevin; Frankel, Wendy L; Aronson, Melyssa; Gallinger, Steve; Goldblatt, Jack; Tucker, Kathy; Greening, Sian; Gattas, Michael R; Woodall, Sonja; Arnold, Julie; Walker, Neal I; Parry, Susan; Young, Joanne P; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2013-03-01

    Serrated polyposis (SP) is a clinically defined syndrome characterized by the occurrence of multiple serrated polyps in the large intestine. Individuals with SP and their relatives are at increased risk of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). We aimed to determine the pathologic and molecular profiles of CRCs in individuals fulfilling World Health Organization criteria for SP. A total of 45 CRCs were obtained from 38 individuals with SP (27 female and 11 male patients; median age at CRC diagnosis, 58.5 y) attending genetics clinics. Tumor samples were pathologically reviewed, screened for somatic BRAF and KRAS mutations, and analyzed immunohistochemically for mismatch repair protein (MMR) expression. Tumors were spread throughout the large intestine, with 64% located in the proximal colon. Mutations in BRAF and KRAS and immunohistochemical evidence of MMR deficiency were found in 46%, 5%, and 38%, respectively. Nearly half of CRCs were BRAF/KRAS wild type, and these were associated with distal location (63%) and MMR proficiency (84%). Overexpression of p53 and/or evidence of β-catenin activation were identified in 13 CRCs. Ten patients (26%) had synchronous or metachronous CRCs. In conclusion, the majority of CRCs arising in individuals with SP do not harbor molecular hallmarks of serrated pathway CRCs but show a diverse range of molecular profiles. The high proportion of multiple CRCs suggests that individuals with SP would benefit from frequent colonoscopic surveillance and from a consideration of a more extensive colectomy at the time of CRC diagnosis.

  20. Clinicopathological Characteristics of Serrated Polyposis Syndrome in Korea: Single Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Keun; Seo, Kyung-Jin; Choi, Hyun Ho; Kim, Sung Soo; Chae, Hiun-Suk; Shin, Ok-Ran; Ahn, Chang Hyuck; Cho, Young-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim. Serrated polyposis syndrome (SPS) is a rare condition characterized by multiple serrated polyps throughout the colon and rectum. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinicopathological characteristics of SPS in Koreans. Methods. This retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was performed using information from the endoscopy, clinical records, and pathology database system of Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital. Consecutive patients satisfying the updated 2010 World Health Organization criteria for SPS between June 2011 and May 2014 were enrolled. Results. Of the 17,552 patients who underwent colonoscopies during the study period, 11 (0.06%) met the criteria for SPS. The mean age of these patients was 55.6 years. Ten patients (91%) were males. None had a family history of CRC or a first-degree relative with SPS. Seven patients (64%) had synchronous advanced adenoma. One patient had coexistence of SPS with CRC that was diagnosed at the initial colonoscopy. Five patients (45%) had more than 30 serrated polyps. One of the patients underwent surgery and 10 underwent endoscopic resection. Conclusion. The prevalence of SPS in this study cohort was comparable to that in Western populations. Considering the high risk of CRC, correct diagnosis and careful follow-up for SPS are necessary.

  1. Genetic Polymorphisms of Flavin Monooxygenase 3 in Sulindac-Induced Regression of Colorectal Adenomas in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Hisamuddin, Irfan M.; Wehbi, Mohammad A.; Schmotzer, Brian; Easley, Kirk A.; Hylind, Linda M.; Giardiello, Francis M.; Yang, Vincent W.

    2008-01-01

    Sulindac is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug with a chemopreventive effect in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). In vivo, the active form of sulindac is sulindac sulfide, which is inactivated by the hepatic microsomal enzyme, flavin monooxygenase 3 (FMO3). In humans, numerous polymorphisms exist in FMO3, which alter enzymatic activity and subsequent substrate metabolism. We recently showed that certain polymorphic forms of FMO3 with reduced activity were associated with a more favorable response to sulindac in preventing the formation of adenomas in patients with FAP without polyps at baseline. Here, we determined whether these FMO3 polymorphisms correlated with the ability of sulindac to regress polyposis in patients with FAP who had polyps prior to treatment. Nineteen patients were treated with 150 mg sulindac twice a day for 6 months. The size and number of polyps in each patient was assessed at baseline (prior to the administration of sulindac), and at 3 and 6 months. Genotyping was done on seven established FMO3 polymorphisms with functional significance—M66I, E158K, P153L, V257M, E305X, E308G, and R492W. Statistical analyses were done with Wilcoxon rank sum test. Of the loci examined, only E158K and E308G showed polymorphic changes. Six patients exhibited polymorphisms in both E158K and E308G loci and were designated as genotype combination 1. The remaining patients were designated as genotype combination 2. Over the course of treatment, patients with genotype combination 1 had a greater reduction in both the size and number of polyps than those with genotype combination 2. These results suggest that combined polymorphic changes in the E158K and E308G alleles may protect against polyposis in patients with FAP treated with sulindac. PMID:16214918

  2. Colonic polyposis in a 15 year-old boy: Challenges and lessons from a rural resource-poor area

    PubMed Central

    Kakembo, Nasser; Kisa, Phyllis; Fitzgerald, Tamara; Ozgediz, Doruk; Sekabira, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal polyps usually present with rectal bleeding and are associated with increased risk of colorectal carcinoma. Evaluation and management in resource-poor areas present unique challenges. Presentation of case This 15 year-old boy presented with 9 years of painless rectal bleeding and 2 years of a prolapsing rectal mass after passing stool. He had 3 nephews with similar symptoms. On clinical assessment and initial exam under anesthesia, an impression of a polyposis syndrome was made and a biopsy taken from the mass that revealed inflammatory polyps with no dysplasia. He was identified during a pediatric surgical outreach to a rural area with no endoscopy, limited surgical services, and no genetic testing available, even at a tertiary center. He subsequently had a three-stage proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis with good outcome after referral to a tertiary care center. The surgical specimen showed many polyps scattered through the colon. Discussion In the absence of endoscopic surveillance and diagnostic services including advanced pathology and genetic testing, colorectal polyposis syndromes are a significant challenge if encountered in these settings. Reports from similar settings have not included this surgical treatment, often opting for partial colectomy. Nonetheless, good outcomes can be achieved even given these constraints. The case also illustrates the complexity of untreated chronic pediatric surgical disease in rural resource-poor areas with limited health care access. Conclusion Polyposis syndromes in children present unique challenges in rural resource-poor settings. Good outcomes can be achieved with total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anastomosis. PMID:27144002

  3. Common colorectal cancer risk alleles contribute to the multiple colorectal adenoma phenotype, but do not influence colonic polyposis in FAP

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Timothy H T; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Barclay, Ella; Casey, Graham; Newcomb, Polly A; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V; Schumacher, Fred; Gallinger, Steve; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Hunter, David J; Kraft, Peter; Jacobs, Kevin B; Cox, David G; Yeager, Meredith; Hankinson, Susan E; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Welch, Robert; Hutchinson, Amy; Wang, Junwen; Yu, Kai; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Orr, Nick; Willett, Walter C; Colditz, Graham A; Ziegler, Regina G; Berg, Christine D; Buys, Saundra S; McCarty, Catherine A; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Calle, Eugenia E; Thun, Michael J; Hayes, Richard B; Tucker, Margaret; Gerhard, Daniela S; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Hoover, Robert N; Thomas, Gilles; Chanock, Stephen J; Yeager, Meredith; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Ciampa, Julia; Jacobs, Kevin B; Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus; Hayes, Richard B; Kraft, Peter; Wacholder, Sholom; Orr, Nick; Berndt, Sonja; Yu, Kai; Hutchinson, Amy; Wang, Zhaoming; Amundadottir, Laufey; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Thun, Michael J; Diver, W Ryan; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Cussenot, Olivier; Valeri, Antoine; Andriole, Gerald L; Crawford, E David; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian; Kolonel, Laurence; Marchand, Loic Le; Siddiq, Afshan; Riboli, Elio; Key, Timothy J; Kaaks, Rudolf; Isaacs, William; Isaacs, Sarah; Wiley, Kathleen E; Gronberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Stattin, Pär; Xu, Jianfeng; Zheng, S Lilly; Sun, Jielin; Vatten, Lars J; Hveem, Kristian; Kumle, Merethe; Tucker, Margaret; Gerhard, Daniela S; Hoover, Robert N; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Hunter, David J; Thomas, Gilles; Chanock, Stephen J; Purdue, Mark P; Johansson, Mattias; Zelenika, Diana; Toro, Jorge R; Scelo, Ghislaine; Moore, Lee E; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Wu, Xifeng; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Gaborieau, Valerie; Jacobs, Kevin B; Chow, Wong-Ho; Zaridze, David; Matveev, Vsevolod; Lubinski, Jan; Trubicka, Joanna; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Péter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Bucur, Alexandru; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Boffetta, Paolo; Colt, Joanne S; Davis, Faith G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Banks, Rosamonde E; Selby, Peter J; Harnden, Patricia; Berg, Christine D; Hsing, Ann W; Grubb III, Robert L; Boeing, Heiner; Vineis, Paolo; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Krogh, Vittorio; Panico, Salvatore; Duell, Eric J; Quirós, José Ramón; Sanchez, Maria-José; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Dorronsoro, Miren; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Allen, Naomi E; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H M; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Linseisen, Jakob; Ljungberg, Börje; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Romieu, Isabelle; Riboli, Elio; Mukeria, Anush; Shangina, Oxana; Stevens, Victoria L; Thun, Michael J; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Pharoah, Paul D; Easton, Douglas F; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vatten, Lars; Hveem, Kristian; Njølstad, Inger; Tell, Grethe S; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Kumar, Rajiv; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Cussenot, Olivier; Benhamou, Simone; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Vermeulen, Sita H; Aben, Katja K H; van der Marel, Saskia L; Ye, Yuanqing; Wood, Christopher G; Pu, Xia; Mazur, Alexander M; Boulygina, Eugenia S; Chekanov, Nikolai N; Foglio, Mario; Lechner, Doris; Gut, Ivo; Heath, Simon; Blanche, Hélène; Hutchinson, Amy; Thomas, Gilles; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Skryabin, Konstantin G; McKay, James D; Rothman, Nathaniel; Chanock, Stephen J; Lathrop, Mark; Brennan, Paul; Saunders, Brian; Thomas, Huw; Clark, Sue; Tomlinson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The presence of multiple (5–100) colorectal adenomas suggests an inherited predisposition, but the genetic aetiology of this phenotype is undetermined if patients test negative for Mendelian polyposis syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP). We investigated whether 18 common colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could help to explain some cases with multiple adenomas who phenocopied FAP or MAP, but had no pathogenic APC or MUTYH variant. No multiple adenoma case had an outlying number of CRC SNP risk alleles, but multiple adenoma patients did have a significantly higher number of risk alleles than population controls (P=5.7 × 10−7). The association was stronger in those with ≥10 adenomas. The CRC SNPs accounted for 4.3% of the variation in multiple adenoma risk, with three SNPs (rs6983267, rs10795668, rs3802842) explaining 3.0% of the variation. In FAP patients, the CRC risk score did not differ significantly from the controls, as we expected given the overwhelming effect of pathogenic germline APC variants on the phenotype of these cases. More unexpectedly, we found no evidence that the CRC SNPs act as modifier genes for the number of colorectal adenomas in FAP patients. In conclusion, common colorectal tumour risk alleles contribute to the development of multiple adenomas in patients without pathogenic germline APC or MUTYH variants. This phenotype may have ‘polygenic' or monogenic origins. The risk of CRC in relatives of multiple adenoma cases is probably much lower for cases with polygenic disease, and this should be taken into account when counselling such patients. PMID:24801760

  4. E. coli enteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Traveler's diarrhea - E. coli ; Food poisoning - E. coli ; E. coli diarrhea; Hamburger disease ... properly reheated Fish or oysters Raw fruits or vegetables that have not been washed well Raw vegetable ...

  5. Influence of asthma on quality of life and clinical characteristics of patients with nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Dudvarski, Zoran; Djukic, Vojko; Janosevic, Ljiljana; Tomanovic, Nada; Soldatovic, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have evidenced that nasal polyposis (NP) may lead to significant limitations in physical, emotional and social aspects of life of the affected patients. The study is aimed to investigate the influence of asthma on quality of life (QoL), intensity of symptoms, endoscopic and computerized tomography (CT) sinus findings in patients with NP. The cross-sectional study included 88 adult patients with NP out of whom 35 (39.8 %) were asthmatic while 53 (60.2 %) were non-asthmatic. QoL is assessed based on Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire, while symptom intensity was presented using visual analogue scale (VAS). The objective finding is presented as endoscopic and CT score. Comparison of individual symptom intensity, total score and major symptom score failed to evidence any statistically significant difference between the groups. Minor symptom score which include intensity of headache, fetor ex ore, fatigue/malaise, dental pain, cough, pressure/fullness in the ears and fever was higher in the group with asthma (p < 0.05). Comparison of scores according to SF-36 domains, as well as summary scores for physical and mental health did not reveal statistically significant difference between the observed groups. Mean value of the endoscopic score in the group with asthma was 8.57 ± 2.22, being 8.38 ± 1.93 in the group without asthma (p > 0.05). Mean value of the CT score in the groups with and without asthma was 20.37 ± 4.34 and 17.47 ± 4.75, respectively (p < 0.01). Asthma has no influence on QoL and endoscopic findings of patients with NP, however it influences minor symptom score and CT findings. PMID:23135235

  6. Risk of thyroid cancer among Caribbean Hispanic patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Casellas-Cabrera, Nicolás; Díaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Carlo-Chévere, Víctor J; González-Pons, María; Rodríguez-Mañón, Natalia; Pérez-Mayoral, Julyann; Bertrán-Rodríguez, Carlos; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Giardiello, Francis M; Rodríguez-Quilichini, Segundo; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2016-04-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited form of colorectal cancer characterized by hundreds of adenomatous polyps in the colon and rectum. FAP is also associated with thyroid cancer (TC), but the lifetime risk is still unclear. This study reports the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of TC in Hispanic FAP patients. TC incidence rates in patients with FAP between the periods of January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2013 were compared with the general population through direct database linkage from the Puerto Rico Central Cancer Registry (PRCCR) and the Puerto Rico Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry (PURIFICAR). The study population consisted of 51 Hispanic patients with FAP and 3239 with TC from the general population. The SIR was calculated using the Indirect Method, defined as observed TC incidence among patients with FAP in PURIFICAR's cohort (2006-2013) divided by the expected TC incidence based on the PR population rates (2006-2010). SIR values were estimated by sex (male, female, and overall). This study received IRB approval (protocol #A2210207). In Hispanic patients with FAP, the SIR (95% CI) for TC was 251.73 (51.91-735.65), with higher risk for females 461.18 (55.85-1665.94) than males 131.91 (3.34-734.95). Hispanic FAP patients are at a high risk for TC compared to the general population. Our incidence rates are higher than previous studies, suggesting that this community may be at a higher risk for TC than previously assumed. Implementation of clinical surveillance guidelines and regular ultrasound neck screening in Hispanic FAP patients is recommended. PMID:26690363

  7. Hyperplastic/serrated polyposis in inflammatory bowel disease: a case series of a previously undescribed entity.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Amitabh; Redston, Mark; Farraye, Francis A; Yantiss, Rhonda K; Odze, Robert D

    2008-02-01

    Herein, we describe the clinical, pathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular features of 3 unique patients with long standing inflammatory bowel disease, all of whom developed numerous discrete hyperplastic/serrated colonic polyps similar to those described in the hyperplastic/serrated polyposis syndrome. The 3 patients (2 with ulcerative colitis and 1 with Crohn ileo-colitis) were evaluated for a variety of clinical, histologic (including the type, location and number of polyps in the colon), and immunohistochemical features [MLH-1, MSH-2, MGMT (O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase), beta-catenin, and p53]. KRAS and BRAF mutation analysis was also performed on a subset of polyps from 2 patients. All patients had moderate-severe pancolitis of more than 10 years duration and had >20 colonic polyps. None had polyps in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Pathologically, a combination of conventional hyperplastic polyps and sessile serrated polyps (adenomas) were present in the 3 cases. In addition, serrated adenomas were present in 2 and conventional adenomas in 1. Two patients also had synchronous adenocarcinoma. All 3 cases showed retention of MLH-1 and MSH-2, and a membranous beta-catenin staining pattern. However, 2 cases showed loss of MGMT in several serrated polyps, and one also in adjacent colitic mucosa. KRAS mutations were detected in 5/11 serrated polyps. However, BRAF mutations were not present in any of the polyps tested. These findings suggest the possibility of a serrated pathway of carcinogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease characterized by silencing of MGMT, most likely by gene promoter methylation, KRAS mutations, and possibly other, as yet, uncharacterized molecular alterations, resulting eventually in progression to adenocarcinoma.

  8. A phase Ib study of the effects of black raspberries on rectal polyps in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Shu; Burke, Carol A; Hasson, Henrietta; Kuo, Chieh-Ti; Molmenti, Christine L Sardo; Seguin, Claire; Liu, Pengyuan; Huang, Tim H-M; Frankel, Wendy L; Stoner, Gary D

    2014-07-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is characterized by the early onset of colonic polyposis and a high risk for colorectal cancer. FAP is treated by colectomy followed by lifelong removal of rectal polyps. This study determined whether black raspberries (BRBs) might regress rectal polyps in patients with FAP. Fourteen patients with FAP were treated with BRBs daily for 9 months. Seven patients received BRB powder orally plus two BRB suppositories inserted into the rectum at bedtime. The other 7 received an oral placebo plus the suppositories. Rectal polyp counts and polyp sizes were obtained at time zero and after 9 months of BRB treatment. Polyps and adjacent normal tissue were collected at both time points. The burden (P = 0.036) but not number (P = 0.069) of rectal polyps was significantly decreased. No benefit was noted with the addition of oral BRBs. Three patients were nonresponders. BRBs significantly decreased cellular proliferation, DNA methylation methyl transferase 1 protein expression, and p16 promoter methylation, but not promoter methylation of the Wnt pathway antagonists, SFRP2 and WIF1, in rectal polyps (adenomas) from responders but not from nonresponders. The MBD-seq assay revealed more demethylated transcription start sites (TSS), including those for miRNAs, in BRB-treated adenomas from the responders. In conclusion, BRB suppositories seem sufficient for regressing rectal polyps in patients with FAP.

  9. Effect of Sulindac and Erlotinib vs Placebo on Duodenal Neoplasia in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Samadder, N. Jewel; Neklason, Deborah W.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Byrne, Kathryn R.; Kanth, Priyanka; Samowitz, Wade; Jones, David; Tavtigian, Sean V.; Done, Michelle W.; Berry, Therese; Jasperson, Kory; Pappas, Lisa; Smith, Laurel; Sample, Danielle; Davis, Rian; Topham, Matthew K.; Lynch, Patrick; Strait, Elena; McKinnon, Wendy; Burt, Randall W.; Kuwada, Scott K.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) are at markedly increased risk for duodenal polyps and cancer. Surgical and endoscopic management of duodenal neoplasia is difficult and chemoprevention has not been successful. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of a combination of sulindac and erlotinib on duodenal adenoma regression in patients with FAP. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, enrolling 92 participants with FAP, conducted from July 2010 through June 2014 at Huntsman Cancer Institute in Salt Lake City, Utah. INTERVENTIONS Participants with FAP were randomized to sulindac (150 mg) twice daily and erlotinib (75 mg) daily (n = 46) vs placebo (n = 46) for 6 months. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The total number and diameter of polyps in the proximal duodenum were mapped at baseline and 6 months. The primary outcome was change in total polyp burden at 6 months. Polyp burden was calculated as the sum of the diameters of polyps. The secondary outcomes were change in total duodenal polyp count, change in duodenal polyp burden or count stratified by genotype and initial polyp burden, and percentage of change from baseline in duodenal polyp burden. RESULTS Ninety-two participants (mean age, 41 years [range, 24–55]; women, 56 [61%]) were randomized when the trial was stopped by the external data and safety monitoring board because the second preplanned interim analysis met the prespecified stopping rule for superiority. Grade 1 and 2 adverse events were more common in the sulindac-erlotinib group, with an acne-like rash observed in 87% of participants receiving treatment and 20% of participants receiving placebo (P < .001). Only 2 participants experienced grade 3 adverse events. OutcomeBaseline6-moFollow-upMedianChangeBetween-GroupDifference (95% CI)PValueMedian Duodenal Polyp Burden, mmSulindac-erlotinib29.019.5−8.5−19.0 (−32.0 to −10.9)<.001Placebo23.031.08.0Median Duodenal Polyp Count, No

  10. Clinical outcomes and quality of life in patients with nasal polyposis after functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Vojko; Dudvarski, Zoran; Arsovic, Nenad; Dimitrijevic, Milovan; Janosevic, Ljiljana

    2015-01-01

    The majority of studies have shown that the use of functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) leads to symptomatic improvement in 73-98.4 % of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis (NP). The aim of the study is to evaluate clinical outcomes and quality of life (QoL) in patients with NP after FESS. The prospective study included 85 consecutive adult patients (≥18 years) with NP who were operated on using FESS after failure of the medicamentous treatment and in certain cases of surgical treatment. QoL was assessed by Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire, and the symptom intensity was presented using visual analogue scale (VAS). The objective finding was presented as endoscopic and computerized tomography (CT) score. The intensity of each symptom, the values of symptom scores (major, minor and total), the values of dimension scales and summary scales of the QoL, as well as the values of endoscopic score through three periods of time (pre-surgery, 6 and 12 months after the surgery) were analyzed. Following the FESS, mean intensity values of all individual symptoms and symptom scores were significantly lower and the values of all dimension scales and summary scales of QoL were significantly higher (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in symptom intensity and QoL after 6 and 12 months of surgical treatment (p > 0.05). Endoscopic score was on average significantly lower after 6 and 12 months of FESS (p < 0.05), but the mean score value after 12 months of operation was significantly higher in relation to that after 6 months of surgery (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, the recurrence of NP was observed in 28 patients (32.9 %) in the follow-up period. In conclusion, FESS in NP patients results in significant improvement of symptom intensity, QoL and endoscopic score. While the intensity of symptoms and QoL showed a tendency to maintain between 6 and 12 months after surgery, endoscopic score showed a tendency of exacerbation

  11. Effects of celecoxib on prostanoid biosynthesis and circulating angiogenesis proteins in familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Dovizio, Melania; Tacconelli, Stefania; Ricciotti, Emanuela; Bruno, Annalisa; Maier, Thorsten Jürgen; Anzellotti, Paola; Di Francesco, Luigia; Sala, Paola; Signoroni, Stefano; Bertario, Lucio; Dixon, Dan A; Lawson, John A; Steinhilber, Dieter; FitzGerald, Garret A; Patrignani, Paola

    2012-04-01

    Vascular cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-dependent prostacyclin (PGI(2)) may affect angiogenesis by preventing endothelial activation and platelet release of angiogenic factors present in platelet α-granules. Thus, a profound inhibition of COX-2-dependent PGI(2) might be associated with changes in circulating markers of angiogenesis. We aimed to address this issue by performing a clinical study with celecoxib in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). In nine patients with FAP and healthy controls, pair-matched for gender and age, we compared systemic biosynthesis of PGI(2), thromboxane (TX) A(2), and prostaglandin (PG) E(2), assessing their urinary enzymatic metabolites, 2,3-dinor-6-keto PGF(1α) (PGI-M), 11-dehydro-TXB(2) (TX-M), and 11-α-hydroxy-9,15-dioxo-2,3,4,5-tetranor-prostane-1,20-dioic acid (PGE-M), respectively. The impact of celecoxib (400 mg b.i.d. for 7 days) on prostanoid biosynthesis and 14 circulating biomarkers of angiogenesis was evaluated in FAP. Intestinal tumorigenesis was associated with enhanced urinary TX-M levels, but unaffected by celecoxib, suggesting the involvement of a COX-1-dependent pathway, presumably from platelets. This was supported by the finding that in cocultures of a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (HT-29) and platelets enhanced TXA(2) generation was almost completely inhibited by pretreatment of platelets with aspirin, a preferential inhibitor of COX-1. In FAP, celecoxib profoundly suppressed PGE(2) and PGI(2) biosynthesis that was associated with a significant increase in circulating levels of most proangiogenesis proteins but also the antiangiogenic tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2. Urinary PGI-M, but not PGE-M, was negatively correlated with circulating levels of fibroblast growth factor 2 and angiogenin. In conclusion, inhibition of tumor COX-2-dependent PGE(2) by celecoxib may reduce tumor progression. However, the coincident depression of vascular PGI(2), in a context of enhanced TXA(2) biosynthesis, may modulate

  12. Presence of c.3956delC mutation in familial adenomatous polyposis patients from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Nunes, Caroline Aquino; Alcântara, Diego di Felipe Ávila; Lima-Júnior, Sérgio Figueiredo; Cavalléro, Sandro Roberto de Araújo; Rey, Juan Antonio; Pinto, Giovanny Rebouças; de Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize APC gene mutations and correlate them with patient phenotypes in individuals diagnosed with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) in northern Brazil. METHODS: A total of 15 individuals diagnosed with FAP from 5 different families from the north of Brazil were analyzed in this study. In addition to patients with histopathological diagnosis of FAP, family members who had not developed the disease were also tested in order to identify mutations and for possible genetic counseling. All analyzed patients or their guardians signed a consent form approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the João de Barros Barreto University Hospital (Belem, Brazil). DNA extracted from the peripheral blood of a member of each of the affected families was subjected to direct sequencing. The proband of each family was sequenced to identify germline mutations using the Ion Torrent platform. To validate the detected mutations, Sanger sequencing was also performed. The samples from all patients were also tested for the identification of mutations by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction using the amplification refractory mutation system. RESULTS: Through interviews with relatives and a search of medical records, it was possible to construct genograms for three of the five families included in the study. All 15 patients from the five families with FAP exhibited mutations in the APC gene, and all mutations were detected in exon 15 of the APC gene. In addition to the patients with a histological diagnosis of FAP, family members without disease symptoms showed the mutation in the APC gene. In the present study, we detected two of the three most frequent germline mutations in the literature: the mutation at codon 1309 and the mutation at codon 1061. The presence of c.3956delC mutation was found in all families from this study, and suggests that this mutation was introduced in the population of the State of Pará through ancestor immigration (i.e., a de novo

  13. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nataro, James P.; Kaper, James B.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the predominant nonpathogenic facultative flora of the human intestine. Some E. coli strains, however, have developed the ability to cause disease of the gastrointestinal, urinary, or central nervous system in even the most robust human hosts. Diarrheagenic strains of E. coli can be divided into at least six different categories with corresponding distinct pathogenic schemes. Taken together, these organisms probably represent the most common cause of pediatric diarrhea worldwide. Several distinct clinical syndromes accompany infection with diarrheagenic E. coli categories, including traveler’s diarrhea (enterotoxigenic E. coli), hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (enterohemorrhagic E. coli), persistent diarrhea (enteroaggregative E. coli), and watery diarrhea of infants (enteropathogenic E. coli). This review discusses the current level of understanding of the pathogenesis of the diarrheagenic E. coli strains and describes how their pathogenic schemes underlie the clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and epidemiologic investigation of these important pathogens. PMID:9457432

  14. [HNPCC (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer) or Lynch syndrome: a syndrome related to a failure of DNA repair system].

    PubMed

    Manceau, Gilles; Karoui, Mehdi; Charachon, Antoine; Delchier, Jean-Charles; Sobhani, Iradj

    2011-03-01

    The HNPCC syndrome (hereditary non polyposis colon cancer) or Lynch syndrome stands for an autosomic dominant condition leading to the most prevalent hereditary colo-rectal cancers (CCR). MMR (mismatch repair)'s genes are involved in carcinogenesis as they play a role in ADNA mismatch repair. Microsatellite instability (MSI+ phenotype) induced by germline mutations is characteristic of such tumors and is necessary to assert the diagnosis. The HNPCC syndrome is associated with a significant increased risk of CCR altogether with endometrium, upper urinary tract and small bowel carcinomas as well as ovarian, biliary system and gastric cancers although of lesser extent. It is of importance to diagnose HNPCC syndrome prior to the treatment starts because it may influence patient's (as well as her/his relatives) disease management (type of surgery, surveillance and screening exams). New French recommendations, developed in 2009, about prophylactic colo-rectal and gynecologic surgeries and monitoring update latest ones published on 2004. PMID:21459714

  15. Prevalence of human papilloma virus and human herpes virus types 1-7 in human nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Zaravinos, Apostolos; Bizakis, John; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV), herpes simplex virus-1/-2 (HSV-1/-2), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpes virus-6/-7 (HHV-6/-7) in 23 human nasal polyps by applying PCR. Two types of control tissues were used: adjacent inferior/middle turbinates from the patients and inferior/middle turbinates from 13 patients undergoing nasal corrective surgery. EBV was the virus most frequently detected (35%), followed by HPV (13%), HSV-1 (9%), and CMV (4%). The CMV-positive polyp was simultaneously positive for HSV-1. HPV was also detected in the adjacent turbinates (4%) and the adjacent middle turbinate (4%) of one of the HPV-positive patients. EBV, HSV, and CMV were not detected in the adjacent turbinates of the EBV-, HSV- or CMV-positive patients. All mucosae were negative for the VZV, HHV-6, and HHV-7. This is the first study to deal with the involvement of a comparable group of viruses in human nasal polyposis. The findings support the theory that the presence of viral EBV markedly influences the pathogenesis of these benign nasal tumors. The low incidence of HPV detected confirms the hypothesis that HPV is correlated with infectious mucosal lesions to a lesser extent than it is with proliferative lesions, such as inverted papilloma. The low incidence of HSV-1 and CMV confirms that these two herpes viruses may play a minor role in the development of nasal polyposis. Double infection with HSV-1 and CMV may also play a minor, though causative, role in nasal polyp development. VZV and HHV-6/-7 do not appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of these mucosal lesions.

  16. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Cancer genetics has rapidly evolved in the last two decades. Understanding and exploring the several genetic pathways in the cancer cell is the foundation of targeted therapy. Several genomic aberrations have been identified and their role in carcinogenesis is being explored. In contrast to most cancers where these mutations are acquired, patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have inherited genomic aberrations. The understanding of the molecular pathobiology in hereditary cancer syndromes has advanced dramatically. In addition, many molecularly targeted therapies have been developed that could have potential roles in the treatment of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes. In this review, we outline the presentation, molecular biology, and possible targeted therapies for two of the most widely recognized hereditary cancer syndromes -- hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (Lynch syndrome). We will also discuss other syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (TP53). PMID:25549704

  17. Type 1 serrated polyposis represents a predominantly female disease with a high prevalence of dysplastic serrated adenomas, without germline mutation in MUTYH, APC, and PTEN genes

    PubMed Central

    Petronio, Marco; Pinson, Stephane; Walter, Thomas; Joly, Marie-Odile; Hervieu, Valerie; Forestier, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this article is to clarify the epidemiologic, clinical, endoscopic, biological and genetic characteristics of type 1 serrated polyposis patients. Patients and methods Consecutive patients responding to the WHO definition of type 1 serrated polyposis in one reference center for polyposis patients accepted genetic counseling. Detailed data on previous endoscopies, histology, and life habits were recorded, after informed consent, germline analysis of MUTYH, APC, and PTEN germline mutations. Molecular biology was tested on available fixed tissue from different lesion types. Results We included 29 patients (mean age 53.5 years, 21 women (72.4%)), four with a personal history of colorectal cancer (CRC), with a mean of 11.6 SSAs, with associated hyperplastic polyps in 93.1% and adenomas in 82.8%. SSAs showed no dysplasia in 46.9% of lesions (three of 29 patients), LGD in 51.9% (22/29 patients), and HGD in 1.2% (four of 29 patients). Dysplasia was more frequent in proximal SSAs and in women. Colectomy 15 patients (51.7%), upper digestive neoplasms: eight patients (27.5%); smokers: 24 patients (82.8%); family history of CRC: 16 patients (55.2%). Biology: MSI-H phenotype in one SSA, V600E BRAF mutation in 95% of SSAs; MGMT hypermethylation in three of 17 SSAs. No germline mutation was detected in MYH, APC or PTEN genes. Conclusion Type 1 serrated polyposis corresponds to a majority of women, with a high prevalence of smokers, a high prevalence of dysplastic serrated adenomas, particularly in females, without identified germline mutation in targeted predisposing genes. PMID:27087961

  18. POLE and POLD1 mutations in 529 kindred with familial colorectal cancer and/or polyposis: review of reported cases and recommendations for genetic testing and surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Bellido, Fernando; Pineda, Marta; Aiza, Gemma; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Navarro, Matilde; Puente, Diana A.; Pons, Tirso; González, Sara; Iglesias, Silvia; Darder, Esther; Piñol, Virginia; Soto, José Luís; Valencia, Alfonso; Blanco, Ignacio; Urioste, Miguel; Brunet, Joan; Lázaro, Conxi; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S.; Valle, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Germ-line mutations in the exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 have been recently associated with polyposis and colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition. Here, we aimed to gain a better understanding of the phenotypic characteristics of this syndrome to establish specific criteria for POLE and POLD1 mutation screening and to help define the clinical management of mutation carriers. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Methods: The exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 were studied in 529 kindred, 441 with familial nonpolyposis CRC and 88 with polyposis, by using pooled DNA amplification and massively parallel sequencing. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Results: Seven novel or rare genetic variants were identified. In addition to the POLE p.L424V recurrent mutation in a patient with polyposis, CRC and oligodendroglioma, six novel or rare POLD1 variants (four of them, p.D316H, p.D316G, p.R409W, and p.L474P, with strong evidence for pathogenicity) were identified in nonpolyposis CRC families. Phenotypic data from these and previously reported POLE/POLD1 carriers point to an associated phenotype characterized by attenuated or oligo-adenomatous colorectal polyposis, CRC, and probably brain tumors. In addition, POLD1 mutations predispose to endometrial and breast tumors. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Conclusion: Our results widen the phenotypic spectrum of the POLE/POLD1-associated syndrome and identify novel pathogenic variants. We propose guidelines for genetic testing and surveillance recommendations. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. PMID:26133394

  19. Overlap of Juvenile polyposis syndrome and Cowden syndrome due to de novo chromosome 10 deletion involving BMPR1A and PTEN: implications for treatment and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Alimi, Adebisi; Weeth-Feinstein, Lauren A; Stettner, Amy; Caldera, Freddy; Weiss, Jennifer M

    2015-06-01

    We describe a patient with a severe juvenile polyposis phenotype, due to a de novo deletion of chromosome 10q22.3-q24.1. He was initially diagnosed with Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) at age four after presenting with hematochezia due to multiple colonic juvenile polyps. He then re-presented at 23 years with recurrent hematochezia from juvenile polyps in his ileoanal pouch. He is one of the earliest reported cases of JPS associated with a large deletion of chromosome 10. Since his initial diagnosis of JPS further studies have confirmed an association between JPS and mutations in BMPR1A in chromosome band 10q23.2, which is in close proximity to PTEN. Mutations in PTEN cause Cowden syndrome (CS) and other PTEN hamartoma tumor syndromes. Due to the chromosome 10 deletion involving contiguous portions of BMPR1A and PTEN in our patient, he may be at risk for CS associated cancers and features, in addition to the polyps associated with JPS. This case presents new challenges in developing appropriate surveillance algorithms to account for the risks associated with each syndrome and highlights the importance of longitudinal follow-up and transitional care between pediatric and adult gastroenterology for patients with hereditary polyposis syndromes.

  20. Haploid loss of the tumor suppressor Smad4/Dpc4 initiates gastric polyposis and cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Brodie, S G; Yang, X; Im, Y H; Parks, W T; Chen, L; Zhou, Y X; Weinstein, M; Kim, S J; Deng, C X

    2000-04-01

    The tumor suppressor SMAD4, also known as DPC4, deleted in pancreatic cancer, is a central mediator of TGF-beta signaling. It was previously shown that mice homozygous for a null mutation of Smad4 (Smad4-/-) died prior to gastrulation displaying impaired extraembryonic membrane formation and endoderm differentiation. Here we show that Smad4+/- mice began to develop polyposis in the fundus and antrum when they were over 6 - 12 months old, and in the duodenum and cecum in older animals at a lower frequency. With increasing age, polyps in the antrum show sequential changes from hyperplasia, to dysplasia, in-situ carcinoma, and finally invasion. These alterations are initiated by a dramatic expansion of the gastric epithelium where Smad4 is expressed. However, loss of the remaining Smad4 wild-type allele was detected only in later stages of tumor progression, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of Smad4 is sufficient for tumor initiation. Our data also showed that overexpression of TGF-beta1 and Cyclin D1 was associated with increased proliferation of gastric polyps and tumors. These studies demonstrate that Smad4 functions as a tumor suppressor in the gastrointestinal tract and also provide a valuable model for screening factors that promote or prevent gastric tumorigenesis.

  1. One-hit effects in cancer: Altered proteome of morphologically normal colon crypts in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Anthony T.; Patel, Bhavinkumar B.; Li, Xin-Ming; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Coudry, Renata A.; Cooper, Harry S.; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Boman, Bruce M.; Zhang, Tao; Litwin, Samuel; Ross, Eric A.; Conrad, Peggy; Crowell, James A.; Kopelovich, Levy; Knudson, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    We studied patients with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), because they are virtually certain to develop colon cancer, and because much is known about the causative APC gene. We hypothesized that the inherited heterozygous mutation itself leads to changes in the proteome of morphologically normal crypts and the proteins that changed may represent targets for preventive and therapeutic agents. We determined the differential protein expression of morphologically normal colon crypts of FAP patients versus those of individuals without the mutation, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and validation by 2D gel Western blotting. Approximately 13% of 1,695 identified proteins were abnormally expressed in the morphologically normal crypts of APC mutation carriers, indicating that a colon crypt cell under the one-hit state is already abnormal. Many of the expression changes affect pathways consistent with the function of the APC protein, including apoptosis, cell adhesion, cell motility, cytoskeletal organization and biogenesis, mitosis, transcription and oxidative stress response. Thus, heterozygosity for a mutant APC tumor suppressor gene alters the proteome of normal-appearing crypt cells in a gene-specific manner, consistent with a detectable one-hit event. These changes may represent the earliest biomarkers of colorectal cancer development, potentially leading to the identification of molecular targets for cancer prevention. PMID:18794146

  2. A population-based study of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer: evidence of pathologic and genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Warden, G; Harnett, D; Green, J; Wish, T; Woods, M O; Green, R; Dicks, E; Rahman, P; Zhai, G; Parfrey, P

    2013-12-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) may be the result of Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, a syndrome of unknown etiology called familial colorectal cancer type-X (FCCTX), or familial serrated neoplasia associated with the colorectal cancer (CRC) somatic BRAF mutation. To determine the cause of HNPCC in the founder population of the island of Newfoundland, we studied 37 families with LS and 29 families without LS who fulfilled the Amsterdam I criteria. In non-LS, four index CRCs were BRAF mutation positive, one of which was microsatellite instable. Geographic clustering of LS families caused by three different founder mutations in MSH2 was observed. Nine unique MMR mutations in four MMR genes were identified in single families distributed in different geographic isolates. The geographic distribution of non-LS was similar to LS. The coefficient of relatedness using genotype data was significantly higher for non-LS than for all CRC. Extensive genealogic investigation failed to connect non-LS families and in some clusters pathologic CRC heterogeneity was observed. We conclude that non-LS HNPCC may be a heterogeneous disorder with different pathogenic pathways, and that the geographic distribution is consistent with multiple different mutations in unknown CRC susceptibility gene(s).

  3. A prospective study of the clinical, genetic, screening, and pathologic features of a family with hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rozen, P; Samuel, Z; Brazowski, E

    2003-10-01

    In 1997, hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome (HMPS) was described in an Ashkenazi pedigree having colorectal polyps with mixed histology and risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). The mutation is now localized to 15q13-14. Since 1980, compliant relatives of an HMPS family were seen annually, tested genetically, and had colonoscopy offered every 1 to 2 yr from age 20 yr. The Israeli pedigree has 37 members (17 clinically affected by CRC or polyps), and seven of 13 available relatives entered our screening program. The others, followed-up elsewhere, provided clinical information. Half of our screened group had rectal bleeding; others were asymptomatic. Colonoscopy, performed a mean of four times, identified polyps in all seven patients (mean age 28 yr). Polyps were removed and included juvenile adenomas, mixed juvenile adenomas, hyperplastic polyps, mixed hyperplastic adenomas, serrated adenomas, and tubular adenomas. None of our screened patients developed CRC or extracolonic neoplasia. Linkage analysis localized their mutation to 15q13-14. This high-penetrance founder mutation so far is described only in Ashkenazim. The CRC pathway seems to be through juvenile and hyperplastic polyps. Mutation identification will aid screening for and evaluation of HMPS prevalence in Jewish and non-Jewish populations. Meanwhile, a cancer pedigree and correct classification of polyps will identify HMPS families. They require early and frequent colonoscopy, polypectomy, and elective extensive colectomy when indicated.

  4. A serrated colorectal cancer pathway predominates over the classic WNT pathway in patients with hyperplastic polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boparai, Karam S; Dekker, Evelien; Polak, Mirjam M; Musler, Alex R; van Eeden, Susanne; van Noesel, Carel J M

    2011-06-01

    Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome (HPS) is characterized by the presence of multiple colorectal serrated polyps and is associated with an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. The mixture of distinct precursor lesion types and malignancies in HPS provides a unique model to study the canonical pathway and a proposed serrated CRC pathway in humans. To establish which CRC pathways play a role in HPS and to obtain new support for the serrated CRC pathway, we assessed the molecular characteristics of polyps (n = 84) and CRCs (n = 19) in 17 patients with HPS versus control groups of various sporadic polyps (n = 59) and sporadic microsatellite-stable CRCs (n = 16). In HPS and sporadic polyps, APC mutations were exclusively identified in adenomas, whereas BRAF mutations were confined to serrated polyps. Six of 19 HPS CRCs (32%) were identified in a serrated polyp. Mutation analysis performed in the CRC and the serrated component of these lesions showed identical BRAF mutations. One HPS CRC was located in an adenoma, both components harboring an identical APC mutation. Overall, 10 of 19 HPS CRCs (53%) carried a BRAF mutation versus none in control group CRCs (P = 0.001). Six BRAF-mutated HPS CRCs (60%) were microsatellite unstable owing to MLH1 methylation. These findings provide novel supporting evidence for the existence of a predominant serrated CRC pathway in HPS, generating microsatellite-stable and microsatellite-instable CRCs.

  5. Colorectal cancer survivors undergoing genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer: motivational factors and psychosocial functioning.

    PubMed

    Esplen, M J; Madlensky, L; Aronson, M; Rothenmund, H; Gallinger, S; Butler, K; Toner, B; Wong, J; Manno, M; McLaughlin, J

    2007-11-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) represents about 1-3% of all cases of colorectal cancer (CRC). The objectives of the study were to examine motivational factors, expectations and psychosocial functioning in a sample of CRC survivors undergoing genetic testing for HNPCC. A cross-sectional survey of 314 colorectal cancer patients recruited through a population-based colon cancer family registry was conducted. Motivations for genetic testing for hereditary cancer were similar to those of clinic-based samples of CRC patients and included learning of the increased risk to offspring and finding out if additional screening was needed. While age at diagnosis and sex were associated with psychological functioning, significant predictors of post-counseling distress were perceived lower satisfaction with social support, an escape-avoidant coping style and the anticipation of becoming depressed if a mutation was present. Most cancer survivors anticipated disclosing test results to relatives and physicians. Cancer survivors reported several motivations for genetic testing for HNPCC that varied by sex. A subgroup of survivors with lower satisfaction with social support and an escape-avoidant coping style were worried about the potential impact of genetic test results and demonstrated more distress following counseling. Findings have implications for future research and potential support needs during the genetic counseling and testing process. PMID:17892499

  6. Risk of colon cancer in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer patients as predicted by fuzzy modeling: Influence of smoking

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Rhonda M; Jones, David D; Lynch, Henry T; Brand, Randall E; Watson, Patrice; Ashwathnayaran, Ramesh; Roy, Hemant K

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether a fuzzy logic model could predict colorectal cancer (CRC) risk engendered by smoking in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients. METHODS: Three hundred and forty HNPCC mismatch repair (MMR) mutation carriers from the Creighton University Hereditary Cancer Institute Registry were selected for modeling. Age-dependent curves were generated to elucidate the joint effects between gene mutation (hMLH1 or hMSH2), gender, and smoking status on the probability of developing CRC. RESULTS: Smoking significantly increased CRC risk in male hMSH2 mutation carriers (P < 0.05). hMLH1 mutations augmented CRC risk relative to hMSH2 mutation carriers for males (P < 0.05). Males had a significantly higher risk of CRC than females for hMLH1 non smokers (P < 0.05), hMLH1 smokers (P < 0.1) and hMSH2 smokers (P < 0.1). Smoking promoted CRC in a dose-dependent manner in hMSH2 in males (P < 0.05). Females with hMSH2 mutations and both sexes with the hMLH1 groups only demonstrated a smoking effect after an extensive smoking history (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: CRC promotion by smoking in HNPCC patients is dependent on gene mutation, gender and age. These data demonstrate that fuzzy modeling may enable formulation of clinical risk scores, thereby allowing individualization of CRC prevention strategies. PMID:16874859

  7. PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species which inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of man and warm-blooded animals. Because of the ubiquity of this bacterium in the intestinal flora, it serves as an important indicator organism of fecal contamination. E. coli, aside from serving a...

  8. Evidence that the familial adenomatous polyposis gene is involved in a subset of colon cancers with a complementable defect in c-myc regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Erisman, M.D.; Scott, J.K.; Astrin, S.M. )

    1989-06-01

    Human colorectal carcinomas frequently express elevated levels of c-myc mRNA in the absence of a gross genetic change at the c-myc locus. To test the hypothesis that these tumors are defective in a gene function necessary for the regulation of c-myc expression, the authors fused an osteosarcoma cell line that exhibits normal c-myc regulation with two colon carcinoma cell lines that express deregulated levels of c-myc mRNA. Since rates of c-myc mRNA turnover in the colon carcinoma cells were found to be comparable to those in normal cells, increased message stability cannot account for the increased steady-state levels of transcripts. These finding suggest that loss of function of a trans-acting regulator is responsible for the deregulation of c-myc expression in a major fraction of colorectal carcinomas. Analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms in tumor/normal tissue pairs from patients with primary colorectal lesions indicated that deregulation of c-myc expression in the tumors is correlated with frequent loss of alleles of syntenic markers on chromosome 5q. Chromosome 5q is the region known to contain the gene for familial adenomatous polyposis, an inherited predisposition to colon cancer. These findings, together with the arlier finding that the colonic distribution of tumors exhibiting deregulated c-myc expression is similar to that reported for familial polyposis, provide evidence that loss of function of the familial adenomatous polyposis gene is involved in a subset of colorectal cancers in which c-myc expression is deregulated.

  9. [Proctocolectomy with ileoanal anastomoses and desmoid tumor treated with resection. One case of familial adenomatous polyposis].

    PubMed

    Villalón-López, José Sebastián; Souto-del Bosque, Rosalía; Méndez-Sashida, Pedro Gonzalo

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: la poliposis adenomatosa familiar (PAF) es una rara enfermedad causada por una mutación en el gen de la poliposis adenomatosa coli (APC). Caso clínico: mujer de 32 años, con dolor y aumento del perímetro abdominal además de evacuaciones melénicas y pérdida de peso. La paciente presentó un tumor de 12 cm de diámetro en la fosa iliaca derecha. Tras la administración de medio de contraste, en una tomografía se apreció el tumor abdominal con reforzamiento compatible con sarcoma frente a tumor desmoide. Se realizó colonoscopia, por medio de la que se encontraron pólipos en el recto y el colon. La biopsia reportó adenomas túbulo-vellosos. Una panendoscopía demostró pólipos en fondo y cuerpo gástrico; el duodeno se encontraba en estado normal. Se realizó resección del tumor en pared abdominal y reconstrucción con malla además de proctocolectomía restaurativa con un reservorio íleo-anal con una ileostomía temporal. Se reportó tumor desmoide en la pared abdominal y se identificaron 152 pólipos túbulo-vellosos que afectaban todas las porciones del colon y el recto. Conclusiones: la PAF es una enfermedad autosómica dominante causada por una mutación en el gen APC que da como resultado el desarrollo de múltiples pólipos tanto en el colon como en el recto. Descrito en 1991, el gen APC se localiza en el cromosoma 5q21. Sin cirugía profiláctica, todos los pacientes desarrollarán cáncer colorrectal en la tercera década de la vida. Los tumores desmoides y los pólipos duodenales son ahora la causa de muerte en los pacientes con PAF.

  10. Global Quantitative Assessment of Colorectal Polyp Burden in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Using a Web-based Tool

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Patrick M.; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Ross, William A.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Posadas, Juan; Khalaf, Rossa; Weber, Diane M.; Sepeda, Valerie O.; Levin, Bernard; Shureiqi, Imad

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate measures of total polyp burden in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) are lacking. Current assessment tools include polyp quantitation in limited-field photographs and qualitative total colorectal polyp burden by video. Objective To develop global quantitative tools of FAP colorectal adenoma burden. Design and Interventions A single-arm phase II trial in 27 FAP patients treated with celecoxib for 6 months, with pre- and post-treatment videos posted to intranet with interactive site for scoring. Main outcome measurements Global adenoma counts and sizes (grouped into categories: <2 mm, 2–4 mm, and >4 mm) were scored from videos using a novel web-based tool. Baseline and end-of-study adenoma burdens results were summarized using five models. Correlations between pairs of reviewers were analyzed for each model. RESULTS Interobserver agreement was high for all 5 measures of polyp burden. Measures employing both polyp count and polyp size had better interobserver agreement than measures based only on polyp count. The measure in which polyp counts were weighted according to diameter, calculated as (1) × (no. of polyps <2 mm) + (3) × (no. of polyps 2–4 mm) + (5) × (no. of polyps >4 mm) had the highest interobserver agreement. (Pearson r = 0.978 for two gastroenterologists, 0.786 and 0.846 for the surgeon vs each gastroenterologist). Treatment reduced polyp burden by these measurements in 70–89% subjects (p<0.001). Limitations Phase II study. Conclusions This novel web-based polyp scoring method provides a convenient and reproducible way to quantify global colorectal adenoma burden in FAP patients and a framework for developing a clinical staging system for FAP. PMID:23332604

  11. Serrated polyposis is an underdiagnosed and unclear syndrome: the surgical pathologist has a role in improving detection.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Clinton D; Sweet, Kevin; Lehman, Amy; Frankel, Wendy L

    2012-08-01

    Serrated polyposis syndrome (SPS) is poorly defined and patients have an increased but unspecified risk for colorectal carcinoma through the serrated pathway. Despite this association SPS remains relatively obscure and is therefore likely underrecognized. We determined the frequency of SPS among patients with any serrated polyps (SPs) over a 6-month "index" period, and in doing so we assessed the ability of surgical pathologists to improve SPS detection. Particular attention was given to the index procedure to assess the potential predictive value of the findings resulting from a single colonoscopy. A total of 929 patients with at least 1 SP were identified, 17 of whom (1.8%) were determined to meet World Health Organization criteria for SPS. Nine patients met the first criterion (≥ 5 proximal SPs, 2 of which are > 10 mm); 4 met the third criterion (> 20 SPs of any size distributed throughout the colon); and 4 met both criteria. Although no specific SP size or number at the index procedure was clearly superior in its ability to predict SPS, > 50% of cases would be detected if a cutoff of ≥ 3 SPs or a single SP ≥ 15 mm at the index procedure is used. In summary, SPS is rare but more likely underdiagnosed. Additional studies to address the underlying genetic basis for SPS are ongoing in order to shed further light on this syndrome. Surgical pathologists are in a unique position to assist in this endeavor by identifying those patients who either meet or seem to be at high risk of meeting World Health Organization criteria.

  12. Cribriform-morular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma at pediatric age - case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Brehar, Andreea Cristiana; Terzea, Dana Cristina; Ioachim, Dumitru Lucian; Procopiuc, Camelia; Brehar, Felix Mircea; Bulgăr, Alexandra Cătălina; Ghemigian, Mircea Vasile; Dumitrache, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Cribriform-morular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (CMV-PTC) is a rare tumor, which exceptionally occurs at pediatric age. CMV-PTC may develop in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or may be a sporadic tumor. The authors present a case of CMV-PTC in a 10-year-old girl patient without FAP history, who presented with a left neck mass. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy with central compartment neck dissection. Histopathological diagnosis was compatible with cribriform-morular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Immunostaining was positive for thyroglobulin, β-catenin, CD10 and p53. Molecular test showed the absence of BRAF, K-RAS mutations, deletions or duplications of APC (adenomatosis polyposis coli) gene and showed the presence of RET÷PTC (rearranged during transfection÷papillary thyroid carcinoma) rearrangements. At 32 months follow-up, the patient was without signs of recurrence. This particular form of thyroid carcinoma should raise suspicion of a possible familial cancer syndrome, therefore early diagnosis and thoroughly evaluation, which includes colonoscopy and genetic screening are mandatory. PMID:27516030

  13. E. Coli Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... You can also get the infection by swallowing water in a swimming pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 days. NIH: National Institute ...

  14. Sporadic colonic polyposis and adenocarcinoma associated with lymphoblastic and large B-cell lymphoma in a young male patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HASHEMI, SEYED MEHDI; FAZELI, SEYED AMIRHOSSEIN; ARABPOUR-DAHOUEI, FATEMEH; DAVARIAN, ALI; GOLABCHIFARD, REZA

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of colonic polyposis, colorectal carcinoma and large B-cell lymphoma in a 22-year-old male patient with a previous history of childhood lymphoblastic lymphoma. Eight years after lymphoblastic lymphoma, which presented as mediastinal mass and superior vena cava syndrome, the patient complained of abdominal pain, lower gastrointestinal bleeding and an abdominal mass. The surgical exploration revealed numerous mucosal polyps throughout the large intestine, and multifocal masses in the ascending and transverse colon and the rectosigmoid region. A retroperitoneal mass was also found. The pathological examination revealed >100 tubular adenomatous polyps and a multifocal, well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, with lymph node involvement and pericolic invasion. Interestingly, the immunohistochemical studies confirmed the malignant undifferentiated retroperitoneal mass as large B-cell lymphoma. Over a period of ~10 years, the patient had suffered from three different malignancies. To the best of our knowledge, such a combination of sporadic adenomatous colonic polyposis, colorectal carcinoma and two extra-intestinal non-Hodgkin lymphomas has not been reported to date. It should be considered that each malignancy increases the risk for other neoplastic diseases and a close follow-up is crucial for early detection of second malignancies and neoplastic syndromes. PMID:26998302

  15. Mismatch repair mRNA and protein expression in intestinal adenocarcinoma in sika deer (Cervus nippon) resembling heritable non-polyposis colorectal cancer in man.

    PubMed

    Jahns, H; Browne, J A

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal adenocarcinomas seen in an inbred herd of farmed sika deer (Cervus nippon) morphologically resembled human hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Features common to both included multiple de novo sites of tumourigenesis in the proximal colon, sessile and non-polyposis mucosal changes, the frequent finding of mucinous type adenocarcinoma, lymphocyte infiltration into the neoplastic tubules and Crohn's-like lymphoid follicles at the deep margin of the tumour. HNPCC is defined by a germline mutation of mismatch repair (MMR) genes resulting in their inactivation and loss of expression. To test the hypothesis that similar MMR gene inactivation occurs in the deer tumours, the expression of the four most important MMR genes, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6 and PMS2, was examined at the mRNA level by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (n = 12) and at the protein level by immunohistochemistry (n = 40) in tumour and control tissues. All four genes were expressed equally in normal and neoplastic tissues, so MMR gene inactivation could not be implicated in the carcinogenesis of this tumour in sika deer. PMID:25678423

  16. Adenomatosis of minor salivary glands. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Khullar, S M; Best, P V

    1992-12-01

    An account is given of a patient who had multiple canalicular adenomas in the upper lip and adjacent oral mucosa. A few months after these had been excised, several more tumors of the same type developed. Microscopic examination also revealed numerous tiny foci of adenomatous proliferation within otherwise normal salivary gland lobules. We suggest that this phenomenon represents a field neoplastic change although it appears to be benign.

  17. Genetic recombination. [Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, F.W.

    1987-02-01

    The molecular pathways of gene recombination are explored and compared in studies of the model organisms, Escherichia coli and phase lambda. In the discussion of data from these studies it seems that recombination varies with the genetic idiosyncrasies of the organism and may also vary within a single organism.

  18. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the ileal heterotopic pancreas in a patient with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hwa; Kim, Wook Youn; Hwang, Dae-Yong; Han, Hye Seung

    2015-07-01

    We report a case of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) originating from the ileal heterotopic pancreas in a patient with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). A 49-year-old woman had a past history of total colectomy and total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy due to colonic adenocarcinoma and endometrial adenocarcinoma 11 years ago. Her parents died from colonic adenocarcinoma and her sister died from colonic adenocarcinoma and endometrial adenocarcinoma. The clinician found an ileal mass with necrotic change and the mass increased in size from 1.7 cm to 2.2 cm during the past 2 years on computed tomography. It was surgically resected. Microscopically, the ileal mass showed heterotopic pancreas with IPMN high grade dysplasia. Immunohistochemical staining revealed positive reactivity for MLH1/PMS2 and negative reactivity for MSH2/MSH6. This is the first report of IPMN originating from the ileal heterotopic pancreas in a patient with HNPCC in the English literature.

  19. Conversion Therapy Using mFOLFOX6 With Panitumumab for Unresectable Liver Metastases From Multiple Colorectal Cancers With Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Kitajima, Takahito; Okigami, Masato; Kawamura, Mikio; Kawamoto, Aya; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Jyunichiro; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2014-01-01

    A 39-year-old man received a diagnosis of unresectable multiple liver metastases from multiple colorectal cancers with familial adenomatous polyposis. After construction of an ileostomy, modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6) with panitumumab was administrated because rectal cancer and sigmoid colon cancer are KRAS wild type. The 13 courses of chemotherapy resulted in a marked reduction in the size of liver metastases and sigmoid colon cancer. Consequently, curative resection with total colectomy, ileal pouch anal anastomosis, and liver metastasis resection with radiofrequency ablation was performed. Progression of KRAS wild-type rectal cancer after chemotherapy suggested that each clone from rectal and sigmoid colon cancer might have a different sensitivity to epidermal growth factor receptor antibody. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed loss of PTEN expression in rectal cancer compared with liver metastases from sigmoid colon cancer, showing that the difference of mFOLFOX6 with panitumumab might be related to activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway. PMID:25437589

  20. Attenuated Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    MedlinePlus

    ... have the same gene mutation. What are the estimated cancer risks associated with AFAP? The cancer risks ... high, but less than 100%, if not treated Estimated digestive tract cancer risks for classic FAP. It ...

  1. Hereditary Mixed Polyposis Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can help diagnose HMPS. What are the estimated cancer risks associated with HMPS? People with HMPS ... but the amount of risk has not been estimated. What are the screening options for HMPS? There ...

  2. Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... or symptoms that suggests JPS. What are the estimated cancer risks associated with JPS? People with JPS ... stomach, small intestine, and pancreatic cancers . The overall estimated cancer risk associated with JPS is 9% to ...

  3. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a medical procedure done in conjunction with in-vitro fertilization (IVF). It allows people who carry a specific known genetic mutation to have children who do not carry the mutation. A woman’s eggs are removed and fertilized in a laboratory. When the embryos reach a certain ...

  4. Aging of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, C. E.

    1966-01-01

    Clifton, C. E. (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.). Aging of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 92:905–912. 1966.—The rates of endogenous and exogenous (glucose) respiration decreased much more rapidly than did the viable count during the first 24 hr of aging of washed, C14-labeled cells of Escherichia coli K-12 suspended in a basal salt medium devoid of ammonium salts. The rates of decrease of respiration and of death approached each other as the age of the cells increased, but death was not the only factor involved in decreased respiratory activity of the suspensions. The greatest decrease in cellular contents with aging was noted in the ribonucleic acid fraction, of which the ribose appeared to be oxidized, while uracil accumulated in the suspension medium. The viable count and respiratory activities remained higher in glucose-fed than in nonfed suspensions. Proline-labeled cells fed glucose tended to lose more of their proline and to convert more proline into C14O2 than in unfed controls. On the other hand, uracil-labeled cells fed glucose retained more of the uracil than did nonfed cells, but glucose elicited some oxidation of uracil. An exogenous energy source such as glucose aided in the maintenance of a population, but it was not the only factor needed for such maintenance. PMID:5332874

  5. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the ileal heterotopic pancreas in a patient with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hwa; Kim, Wook Youn; Hwang, Dae-Yong; Han, Hye Seung

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) originating from the ileal heterotopic pancreas in a patient with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). A 49-year-old woman had a past history of total colectomy and total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy due to colonic adenocarcinoma and endometrial adenocarcinoma 11 years ago. Her parents died from colonic adenocarcinoma and her sister died from colonic adenocarcinoma and endometrial adenocarcinoma. The clinician found an ileal mass with necrotic change and the mass increased in size from 1.7 cm to 2.2 cm during the past 2 years on computed tomography. It was surgically resected. Microscopically, the ileal mass showed heterotopic pancreas with IPMN high grade dysplasia. Immunohistochemical staining revealed positive reactivity for MLH1/PMS2 and negative reactivity for MSH2/MSH6. This is the first report of IPMN originating from the ileal heterotopic pancreas in a patient with HNPCC in the English literature. PMID:26167093

  6. Germline MLH1 and MSH2 mutational spectrum including frequent large genomic aberrations in Hungarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer families: Implications for genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Janos; Kovacs, Marietta E; Olah, Edith

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the prevalence of germline MLH1 and MSH2 gene mutations and evaluate the clinical characteristics of Hungarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families. METHODS: Thirty-six kindreds were tested for mutations using conformation sensitive gel electrophoreses, direct sequencing and also screening for genomic rearrangements applying multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). RESULTS: Eighteen germline mutations (50%) were identified, 9 in MLH1 and 9 in MSH2. Sixteen of these sequence alterations were considered pathogenic, the remaining two were non-conservative missense alterations occurring at highly conserved functional motifs. The majority of the definite pathogenic mutations (81%, 13/16) were found in families fulfilling the stringent Amsterdam I/II criteria, including three rearrangements revealed by MLPA (two in MSH2 and one in MLH1). However, in three out of sixteen HNPCC-suspected families (19%), a disease-causing alteration could be revealed. Furthermore, nine mutations described here are novel, and none of the sequence changes were found in more than one family. CONCLUSION: Our study describes for the first time the prevalence and spectrum of germline mismatch repair gene mutations in Hungarian HNPCC and suspected-HNPCC families. The results presented here suggest that clinical selection criteria should be relaxed and detection of genomic rearrangements should be included in genetic screening in this population. PMID:17569143

  7. Novel germline mutation (300-305delAGTTGA) in the human MSH2 gene in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC).

    PubMed

    Glasl, S; Papatheodorou, L; Baretton, G; Jung, C; Gross, M

    2000-07-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a common hereditary syndrome characterized by the high incidence and early onset of colorectal cancer. The majority of the HNPCC families carry germline mutations in either the MSH2 or the MLH1 mismatch repair gene. A 46 year-old female patient whose family history fulfilled the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC was diagnosed with undifferentiated adenocarcinoma of the transverse colon. Recognizing the Lynch 2 syndrome (the existance of multiple HNPCC related cancers in a pedigree), we used polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing to screen the coding regions of both the MSH2 and the MLH1 genes for germline mutations in DNA from the patient. We detected a novel germline mutation (300-305delAGTTGA) in exon 2 of human MSH2. We noted microsatellite instability in four microsatellite loci. Immunohistochemistry showed a lack of expression of the MSH2 gene product in the tumor, suggesting that the mutation is a disease-causing mutation.

  8. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Manifesting as Lactococcus Endocarditis: A Case Report and Review of the Association of Lactococcus with Underlying Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bazemore, Taylor C.; Maskarinec, Stacey A.; Zietlow, Kahli; Hendershot, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    A 45-year-old male with a prosthetic aortic valve presented to the hospital with several months of generalized malaise. On admission, he was noted to have anemia of unclear etiology and subsequently became febrile with multiple blood cultures growing Lactococcus garvieae. Inpatient workup was concerning for infectious endocarditis (IE) secondary to Lactococcus. The patient was discharged home with appropriate antimicrobial therapy; however, he was readmitted for persistent, symptomatic anemia and underwent colonoscopy, which revealed innumerable colonic polyps consistent with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) that was later confirmed with genetic testing. Surveillance computed tomography (CT) imaging of the aortic repair later demonstrated valve dehiscence with surrounding fluid collection; he underwent redo surgery and was found to have destruction of the aortic annulus and a large pseudoaneurysm. Histopathology of the valve prosthesis confirmed IE. It is suspected that the patient developed Lactococcus IE from enteric translocation. Review of the literature provides several reports of Lactococcus infections in association with underlying gastrointestinal disease, including colorectal cancer. Given this association, we raise the question of whether the diagnosis of Lactococcus IE should evoke suspicion and encourage evaluation for gastrointestinal pathology, as occurs with Streptococcus bovis.

  9. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur containing heterocyclic molecules such as those found in coal, by mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which were selected for improved oxidation of furan and thiophene derivatives. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research as it appears to be of central importance in thiophene oxidation. We hope that analysis of the thd genes of E. coli will lead to improvement of our thiophene metabolizing bacterial strains. 1 tab.

  10. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur containing heterocyclic molecules by mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which were selected for improved oxidation of furan and thiophene derivatives. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research as it appears to be of central importance in thiophene oxidation. We hope that analysis of the thd gene of E. coli will lead to improvement of our thiophene metabolizing bacterial strains.

  11. Toward Network Biology in E. coli Cell.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirotada; Takeuchi, Rikiya; Otsuka, Yuta; Bowden, Steven; Yokoyama, Katsushi; Muto, Ai; Libourel, Igor; Wanner, Barry L

    2015-01-01

    E. coli has been a critically important model research organism for more than 50 years, particularly in molecular biology. In 1997, the E. coli draft genome sequence was published. Post-genomic techniques and resources were then developed that allowed E. coli to become a model organism for systems biology. Progress made since publication of the E. coli genome sequence will be summarized.

  12. Endogenous conversion of ω-6 to ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fat-1 mice attenuated intestinal polyposis by either inhibiting COX-2/β-catenin signaling or activating 15-PGDH/IL-18.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Min; Park, Jong-Min; Cha, Ji-Young; Jeong, Migyeong; Go, Eun-Jin; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-05-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3PUFAs) have inhibitory effects in various preclinical cancer models, but their effects in intestinal polyposis have never been examined. As attempts have been made to use nutritional intervention to counteract colon cancer development, in this study we evaluated the effects of ω-3 PUFAs on intestinal polyposis in the Apc(Min/+) mouse model. The experimental groups included wild-type C56BL/6 mice, Apc(Min/+) mice, fat-1 transgenic mice expressing an n-3 desaturase to enable ω-3 PUFA synthesis, and Apc(Min/+) × fat-1 double-transgenic mice; all mice were 20 weeks of age. Small intestines were collected for gross and pathologic evaluation, including assessment of polyp number and size, followed by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. After administration of various concentrations of ω-3 PUFAs, PUFA levels were measured in small intestine tissue by GC/MS/MS analysis to compare with PUFA synthesis of between C57BL6 and fat-1mice. As a result, ω-3 PUFAs significantly attenuated Apc mutation-induced intestinal polyposis accompanied with significant inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, COX-2 and PGE2, but induced significant levels of 15-PGDH. In addition, significant induction of the inflammasome-related substrates as IL-1β and IL-18 and activation of caspase-1 was observed in Apc(Min/+) × fat-1 mice. Administration of at least 3 g/60 kg ω-3 PUFAs was equivalent to ω-3 PUFAs produced in fat-1 mice and resulted in significant increase in the expression of IL-1β, caspase-3 and IL-18, as seen in Apc(Min/+) × fat-1 mice. We conclude that ω-3PUFAs can prevent intestinal polyp formation by inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, but increased levels of 15-PGDH and IL-18.

  13. Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Smith, James L; Fratamico, Pina M; Gunther, Nereus W

    2007-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) possesses virulence traits that allow it to invade, colonize, and induce disease in bodily sites outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Human diseases caused by ExPEC include urinary tract infections, neonatal meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, surgical site infections, as well as infections in other extraintestinal locations. ExPEC-induced diseases represent a large burden in terms of medical costs and productivity losses. In addition to human illnesses, ExPEC strains also cause extraintestinal infections in domestic animals and pets. A commonality of virulence factors has been demonstrated between human and animal ExPEC, suggesting that the organisms are zoonotic pathogens. ExPEC strains have been isolated from food products, in particular from raw meats and poultry, indicating that these organisms potentially represent a new class of foodborne pathogens. This review discusses various aspects of ExPEC, including its presence in food products, in animals used for food or as companion pets; the diseases ExPEC can cause; and the virulence factors and virulence mechanisms that cause disease.

  14. Predictive genetic testing of first degree relatives of mutation carriers is a cost-effective strategy in preventing hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Wang, Vivian Wei; Koh, Poh Koon; Chow, Wai Leng; Lim, Jeremy Fung Yen

    2012-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common cancer in Singapore. We sought to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of targeted genetic testing and surveillance programs in individuals at high risk of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), as compared to an unselective clinical surveillance program alone in Singapore. A Markov model analysis from the healthcare service provider's perspective was developed to follow over a lifetime a cohort of cancer-free 21-year-old individuals, who were first-degree relatives of HNPCC patients with a known mutation. Genetic testing strategy provided a lifetime saving of Singapore dollars (SGD) 13,588 per person and gained additional life years of 0.01, as compared to clinical surveillance alone, by sparing non-mutation carriers from unnecessary and invasive intensive clinical surveillance (assuming 100% compliance with recommended surveillance programs in both strategies). Sensitivity analyses showed that as long as the compliance rate in mutation carriers was not lower than that for individuals without genetic testing, pursuing a genetic testing strategy would either be a more favorable option with discounted incremental cost-effectiveness ratios ranging from SGD 6,961 to 17,289 per life year gained or a dominant status achieved (more life year gained and less costly). Genetic testing for individuals at high risk of HNPCC allows targeted clinical surveillance to be directed at mutation carriers, ensuring efficient use of healthcare resources and reduces CRC-related mortality. It can be regarded as a cost-effective strategy in Singapore, if an improved compliance with recommended surveillance protocol is achieved in proven mutation carriers.

  15. The prevalence of MADH4 and BMPR1A mutations in juvenile polyposis and absence of BMPR2, BMPR1B, and ACVR1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Howe, J; Sayed, M; Ahmed, A; Ringold, J; Larsen-Haidle, J; Merg, A; Mitros, F; Vaccaro, C; Petersen, G; Giardiello, F; Tinley, S; Aaltonen, L; Lynch, H

    2004-01-01

    Background: Juvenile polyposis (JP) is an autosomal dominant syndrome predisposing to colorectal and gastric cancer. We have identified mutations in two genes causing JP, MADH4 and bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1A (BMPR1A): both are involved in bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) mediated signalling and are members of the TGF-ß superfamily. This study determined the prevalence of mutations in MADH4 and BMPR1A, as well as three other BMP/activin pathway candidate genes in a large number of JP patients. Methods: DNA was extracted from the blood of JP patients and used for PCR amplification of each exon of these five genes, using primers flanking each intron–exon boundary. Mutations were determined by comparison to wild type sequences using sequence analysis software. A total of 77 JP cases were sequenced for mutations in the MADH4, BMPR1A, BMPR1B, BMPR2, and/or ACVR1 (activin A receptor) genes. The latter three genes were analysed when MADH4 and BMPR1A sequencing found no mutations. Results: Germline MADH4 mutations were found in 14 cases (18.2%) and BMPR1A mutations in 16 cases (20.8%). No mutations were found in BMPR1B, BMPR2, or ACVR1 in 32 MADH4 and BMPR1A mutation negative cases. Discussion: In the largest series of JP patients reported to date, the prevalence of germline MADH4 and BMPR1A mutations is approximately 20% for each gene. Since mutations were not found in more than half the JP patients, either additional genes predisposing to JP remain to be discovered, or alternate means of inactivation of the two known genes are responsible for these JP cases. PMID:15235019

  16. Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Allen; Youngster, Ilan; McAdam, Alexander J

    2015-06-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is among the common causes of foodborne gastroenteritis. STEC is defined by the production of specific toxins, but within this pathotype there is a diverse group of organisms. This diversity has important consequences for understanding the pathogenesis of the organism, as well as for selecting the optimum strategy for diagnostic testing in the clinical laboratory. This review includes discussions of the mechanisms of pathogenesis, the range of manifestations of infection, and the several different methods of laboratory detection of Shiga toxin-producing E coli.

  17. Experimental evolution of E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mengshi

    The evolution from unicellular to multicellular behavior is an essential step in the history of life. Our aim is to investigate the emergence of collective behavior in the model organism Escherichia coli (E. coli) and its selection advantages, such as better utilization of public goods. Our preliminary results suggest that the evolution of collective behavior may be a natural response to stressed conditions. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: mengshi0928@gmail.com.

  18. Serrated polyposis associated with a family history of colorectal cancer and/or polyps: The preferential location of polyps in the colon and rectum defines two molecular entities.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patrícia; Albuquerque, Cristina; Lage, Pedro; Fontes, Vanessa; Fonseca, Ricardo; Vitoriano, Inês; Filipe, Bruno; Rodrigues, Paula; Moita, Susana; Ferreira, Sara; Sousa, Rita; Claro, Isabel; Nobre Leitão, Carlos; Chaves, Paula; Dias Pereira, António

    2016-09-01

    Serrated polyposis (SPP) is characterized by the development of multiple serrated polyps and an increased predisposition to colorectal cancer (CRC). In the present study, we aimed to characterize, at a clinical and molecular level, a cohort of SPP patients with or without a family history of SPP and/or polyps/CRC (SPP-FHP/CRC). Sixty-two lesions from 12 patients with SPP-FHP/CRC and 6 patients with sporadic SPP were included. The patients with SPP-FHP/CRC presented with an older mean age at diagnosis (p=0.027) and a more heterogeneous histological pattern of lesions (p=0.032) than the patients with sporadic SPP. We identified two molecular forms of SPP-FHP/CRC, according to the preferential location of the lesions: proximal/whole-colon or distal colon. Mismatch repair (MMR) gene methylation [mutS homolog 6 (MSH6)/mutS homolog 3 (MSH3)] or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of D2S123 (flanking MSH6) were detected exclusively in the former (p=3.0x10-7), in most early lesions. Proximal/whole‑colon SPP-FHP/CRC presented a higher frequency of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation/LOH, microsatellite instability (MSI) and Wnt mutations (19/29 vs. 7/17; 16/23 vs. 1/14, p=2.2x10-4; 15/26 vs. 2/15, p=0.006; 14/26 vs. 4/20, p=0.02) but a lower frequency of B-raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) mutations (7/30 vs. 12/20, p=0.0089) than the distal form. CRC was more frequent in cases of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS)-associated proximal/whole-colon SPP-FHP/CRC than in the remaining cases (4/4 vs. 1/8, p=0.01). Thus, SPP-FHP/CRC appears to be a specific entity, presenting two forms, proximal/whole-colon and distal, which differ in the underlying tumor initiation pathways. Early MGMT and MMR gene deficiency in the former may underlie an inherited susceptibility to genotoxic stress.

  19. Serrated polyposis associated with a family history of colorectal cancer and/or polyps: The preferential location of polyps in the colon and rectum defines two molecular entities.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patrícia; Albuquerque, Cristina; Lage, Pedro; Fontes, Vanessa; Fonseca, Ricardo; Vitoriano, Inês; Filipe, Bruno; Rodrigues, Paula; Moita, Susana; Ferreira, Sara; Sousa, Rita; Claro, Isabel; Nobre Leitão, Carlos; Chaves, Paula; Dias Pereira, António

    2016-09-01

    Serrated polyposis (SPP) is characterized by the development of multiple serrated polyps and an increased predisposition to colorectal cancer (CRC). In the present study, we aimed to characterize, at a clinical and molecular level, a cohort of SPP patients with or without a family history of SPP and/or polyps/CRC (SPP-FHP/CRC). Sixty-two lesions from 12 patients with SPP-FHP/CRC and 6 patients with sporadic SPP were included. The patients with SPP-FHP/CRC presented with an older mean age at diagnosis (p=0.027) and a more heterogeneous histological pattern of lesions (p=0.032) than the patients with sporadic SPP. We identified two molecular forms of SPP-FHP/CRC, according to the preferential location of the lesions: proximal/whole-colon or distal colon. Mismatch repair (MMR) gene methylation [mutS homolog 6 (MSH6)/mutS homolog 3 (MSH3)] or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of D2S123 (flanking MSH6) were detected exclusively in the former (p=3.0x10-7), in most early lesions. Proximal/whole‑colon SPP-FHP/CRC presented a higher frequency of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation/LOH, microsatellite instability (MSI) and Wnt mutations (19/29 vs. 7/17; 16/23 vs. 1/14, p=2.2x10-4; 15/26 vs. 2/15, p=0.006; 14/26 vs. 4/20, p=0.02) but a lower frequency of B-raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) mutations (7/30 vs. 12/20, p=0.0089) than the distal form. CRC was more frequent in cases of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS)-associated proximal/whole-colon SPP-FHP/CRC than in the remaining cases (4/4 vs. 1/8, p=0.01). Thus, SPP-FHP/CRC appears to be a specific entity, presenting two forms, proximal/whole-colon and distal, which differ in the underlying tumor initiation pathways. Early MGMT and MMR gene deficiency in the former may underlie an inherited susceptibility to genotoxic stress. PMID:27430658

  20. Serrated polyposis associated with a family history of colorectal cancer and/or polyps: The preferential location of polyps in the colon and rectum defines two molecular entities

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patrícia; Albuquerque, Cristina; Lage, Pedro; Fontes, Vanessa; Fonseca, Ricardo; Vitoriano, Inês; Filipe, Bruno; Rodrigues, Paula; Moita, Susana; Ferreira, Sara; Sousa, Rita; Claro, Isabel; Leitão, Carlos Nobre; Chaves, Paula; Pereira, António Dias

    2016-01-01

    Serrated polyposis (SPP) is characterized by the development of multiple serrated polyps and an increased predisposition to colorectal cancer (CRC). In the present study, we aimed to characterize, at a clinical and molecular level, a cohort of SPP patients with or without a family history of SPP and/or polyps/CRC (SPP-FHP/CRC). Sixty-two lesions from 12 patients with SPP-FHP/CRC and 6 patients with sporadic SPP were included. The patients with SPP-FHP/CRC presented with an older mean age at diagnosis (p=0.027) and a more heterogeneous histological pattern of lesions (p=0.032) than the patients with sporadic SPP. We identified two molecular forms of SPP-FHP/CRC, according to the preferential location of the lesions: proximal/whole-colon or distal colon. Mismatch repair (MMR) gene methylation [mutS homolog 6 (MSH6)/mutS homolog 3 (MSH3)] or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of D2S123 (flanking MSH6) were detected exclusively in the former (p=3.0×10−7), in most early lesions. Proximal/whole-colon SPP-FHP/CRC presented a higher frequency of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation/LOH, microsatel-lite instability (MSI) and Wnt mutations (19/29 vs. 7/17; 16/23 vs. 1/14, p=2.2×10−4; 15/26 vs. 2/15, p=0.006; 14/26 vs. 4/20, p=0.02) but a lower frequency of B-raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) mutations (7/30 vs. 12/20, p=0.0089) than the distal form. CRC was more frequent in cases of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS)-associated proximal/whole-colon SPP-FHP/CRC than in the remaining cases (4/4 vs. 1/8, p=0.01). Thus, SPP-FHP/CRC appears to be a specific entity, presenting two forms, proximal/whole-colon and distal, which differ in the underlying tumor initiation pathways. Early MGMT and MMR gene deficiency in the former may underlie an inherited susceptibility to genotoxic stress. PMID:27430658

  1. EXTRAINTESTINAL PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI (EXPEC)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) possess virulence traits that allow them to invade, colonize, and induce disease in bodily sites outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Human diseases caused by ExPEC include urinary tract infections, neonatal meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, surgic...

  2. Clinical Implications of Enteroadherent Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M.P.; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli enteropathogenic E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including non-intimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called “enteroadherent E. coli ” categories subsequently produced toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  3. Infection strategies of enteric pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Abigail; Young, Joanna C.; Constantinou, Nicholas; Frankel, Gad

    2012-01-01

    Enteric Escherichia coli (E. coli) are both natural flora of humans and important pathogens causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Traditionally enteric E. coli have been divided into 6 pathotypes, with further pathotypes often proposed. In this review we suggest expansion of the enteric E. coli into 8 pathotypes to include the emerging pathotypes of adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) and Shiga-toxin producing enteroaggregative E. coli (STEAEC). The molecular mechanisms that allow enteric E. coli to colonize and cause disease in the human host are examined and for two of the pathotypes that express a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) we discuss the complex interplay between translocated effectors and manipulation of host cell signaling pathways that occurs during infection. PMID:22555463

  4. Clinical implications of enteroadherent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M P; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G

    2012-10-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including nonintimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called "enteroadherent E. coli" categories subsequently produce toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  5. Human mismatch-repair protein MutL homologue 1 (MLH1) interacts with Escherichia coli MutL and MutS in vivo and in vitro: a simple genetic system to assay MLH1 function.

    PubMed Central

    Quaresima, Barbara; Alifano, Pietro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Avvedimento, Enrico V; Costanzo, Francesco S; Venuta, Salvatore

    2003-01-01

    A simple genetic system has been developed to test the effect of over-expression of wild-type or mutated human MutL homologue 1 (hMLH1) proteins on methyl-directed mismatch repair (MMR) in Escherichia coli. The system relies on detection of Lac(+) revertants using MMR-proficient or MMR-deficient E. coli strains carrying a lac +1 frameshift mutation expressing hMLH1 proteins. We report that expression of wild-type hMLH1 protein causes an approx. 19-fold increase in mutation rates. The mutator phenotype was due to the ability of hMLH1 protein to interact with bacterial MutL and MutS proteins, thereby interfering with the formation of complexes between MMR proteins and mismatched DNA. Conversely, expression of proteins encoded by alleles deriving from hereditary-non-polyposis-colon-cancer (HNPCC) families decreases mutation rates, depending on the specific amino acid substitutions. These effects parallel the MutL-and MutS-binding and ATP-binding/hydrolysis activities of the mutated proteins. PMID:12513688

  6. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur-containing heterocyclic molecules by mutant strains of Escherichia coli K-12. We have previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which had gained the capacity to oxidize thiophene compounds and their furan analogs. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research, as this appears to be in a regulatory gene central to the thiophene/furan oxidation system. The thdF gene appears to be more directly involved in the oxidation reactions, whereas thdC and thdD are apparently required for increased protection against the toxic effects of thiophene and furan compounds. 4 tabs.

  7. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC): new germline mutation (190-191 del AA) in the human MLH1 gene and review of clinical guidelines for surveillance of affected families.

    PubMed

    Schiemann, U; Papatheodorou, L; Glasl, S; Gross, M

    2001-03-26

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is one of the most common genetic diseases comprising at least 5-6% of all colorectal cancers. It is characterized by early onset and mostly right-sided tumors (proximal to the splenic flexure). Molecular analyses are useful methods for diagnosis in index patients and for the detection of risk persons in affected families. A 37-year-old female patient whose family history fulfilled the criteria for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was studied using PCR and DNA sequencing for the detection of mutations in the mismatch repair genes hMSH2 and hMLH1. Additionally, literature was reviewed (MEDLINE research until 2000) concerning clinical guidelines for surveillance in HNPCC families. A new deletion of two adenosine nucleotides (190-191 del AA) at codon 64 in exon 2 of the hMLH1 gene was found. The frameshift led to a stop codon at amino acid position 75. This mutation is considered to be disease causing in the development of the colorectal cancer of this family. Six publications with detailed recommendations for the surveillance of risk persons were found in the literature. Following their guidelines, colonoscopy is recommended from 20-30 years on for members of a family who fulfills either the Amsterdam criteria or the Bethesda criteria in combination with a detection of microsatellite instability. Female risk persons should be investigated gynecologically, including a transvaginal ultrasound examination, from 25-35 years on for the early detection of endometrial or ovarian cancer. Recommendations for gastroscopy, abdominal ultrasound examination and urine analysis are not given in all publications. Genetic counseling is recommended from 18 years on for all members of affected families.

  8. Escherichia coli in Europe: an overview.

    PubMed

    Allocati, Nerino; Masulli, Michele; Alexeyev, Mikhail F; Di Ilio, Carmine

    2013-11-25

    Escherichia coli remains one of the most frequent causes of several common bacterial infections in humans and animals. E. coli is the prominent cause of enteritis, urinary tract infection, septicaemia and other clinical infections, such as neonatal meningitis. E. coli is also prominently associated with diarrhoea in pet and farm animals. The therapeutic treatment of E. coli infections is threatened by the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant E. coli strains is increasing worldwide principally due to the spread of mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids. The rise of multidrug-resistant strains of E. coli also occurs in Europe. Therefore, the spread of resistance in E. coli is an increasing public health concern in European countries. This paper summarizes the current status of E. coli strains clinically relevant in European countries. Furthermore, therapeutic interventions and strategies to prevent and control infections are presented and discussed. The article also provides an overview of the current knowledge concerning promising alternative therapies against E. coli diseases.

  9. Peptidoglycan Hydrolases of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    van Heijenoort, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The review summarizes the abundant information on the 35 identified peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases of Escherichia coli classified into 12 distinct families, including mainly glycosidases, peptidases, and amidases. An attempt is also made to critically assess their functions in PG maturation, turnover, elongation, septation, and recycling as well as in cell autolysis. There is at least one hydrolytic activity for each bond linking PG components, and most hydrolase genes were identified. Few hydrolases appear to be individually essential. The crystal structures and reaction mechanisms of certain hydrolases having defined functions were investigated. However, our knowledge of the biochemical properties of most hydrolases still remains fragmentary, and that of their cellular functions remains elusive. Owing to redundancy, PG hydrolases far outnumber the enzymes of PG biosynthesis. The presence of the two sets of enzymes acting on the PG bonds raises the question of their functional correlations. It is difficult to understand why E. coli keeps such a large set of PG hydrolases. The subtle differences in substrate specificities between the isoenzymes of each family certainly reflect a variety of as-yet-unidentified physiological functions. Their study will be a far more difficult challenge than that of the steps of the PG biosynthesis pathway. PMID:22126997

  10. Third International E. coli genome meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Proceedings of the Third E. Coli Genome Meeting are provided. Presentations were divided into sessions entitled (1) Large Scale Sequencing, Sequence Analysis; (2) Databases; (3) Sequence Analysis; (4) Sequence Divergence in E. coli Strains; (5) Repeated Sequences and Regulatory Motifs; (6) Mutations, Rearrangements and Stress Responses; and (7) Origins of New Genes. The document provides a collection of abstracts of oral and poster presentations.

  11. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  12. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  13. Survival of Escherichia coli in stormwater biofilters.

    PubMed

    Chandrasena, G I; Deletic, A; McCarthy, D T

    2014-04-01

    Biofilters are widely adopted in Australia for stormwater treatment, but the reported removal of common faecal indicators (such as Escherichia coli (E. coli)) varies from net removal to net leaching. Currently, the underlying mechanisms that govern the faecal microbial removal in the biofilters are poorly understood. Therefore, it is important to study retention and subsequent survival of faecal microorganisms in the biofilters under different biofilter designs and operational characteristics. The current study investigates how E. coli survival is influenced by temperature, moisture content, sunlight exposure and presence of other microorganisms in filter media and top surface sediment. Soil samples were taken from two different biofilters to investigate E. coli survival under controlled laboratory conditions. Results revealed that the presence of other microorganisms and temperature are vital stressors which govern the survival of E. coli captured either in the top surface sediment or filter media, while sunlight exposure and moisture content are important for the survival of E. coli captured in the top surface sediment compared to that of the filter media. Moreover, increased survival was found in the filter media compared to the top sediment, and sand filter media was found be more hostile than loamy sand filter media towards E. coli survival. Results also suggest that the contribution from the tested environmental stressors on E. coli survival in biofilters will be greatly affected by the seasonality and may vary from one site to another.

  14. Fosfomycin Resistance in Escherichia coli, Pennsylvania, USA.

    PubMed

    Alrowais, Hind; McElheny, Christi L; Spychala, Caressa N; Sastry, Sangeeta; Guo, Qinglan; Butt, Adeel A; Doi, Yohei

    2015-11-01

    Fosfomycin resistance in Escherichia coli is rare in the United States. An extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli clinical strain identified in Pennsylvania, USA, showed high-level fosfomycin resistance caused by the fosA3 gene. The IncFII plasmid carrying this gene had a structure similar to those found in China, where fosfomycin resistance is commonly described.

  15. The unexhausted potential of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Blount, Zachary D

    2015-03-25

    E. coli's hardiness, versatility, broad palate and ease of handling have made it the most intensively studied and best understood organism on the planet. However, research on E.coli has primarily examined it as a model organism, one that is abstracted from any natural history. But E. coli is far more than just a microbial lab rat. Rather, it is a highly diverse organism with a complex, multi-faceted niche in the wild. Recent studies of 'wild' E. coli have, for example, revealed a great deal about its presence in the environment, its diversity and genomic evolution, as well as its role in the human microbiome and disease. These findings have shed light on aspects of its biology and ecology that pose far-reaching questions and illustrate how an appreciation of E. coli's natural history can expand its value as a model organism.

  16. Ileoanal anastomosis with reservoirs: complications and long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Belliveau, Paul; Trudel, Judith; Vasilevsky, Carol-Ann; Stein, Barry; Gordon, Philip H.

    Objective To determine the rate of complications of ileoanal pouch anastomosis, their treatment and their influence on a successful outcome. Design A computerized database and chart review. Setting Three academic tertiary care health centres. Patients All 239 patients admitted for surgery between 1981 and 1994 with a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatosis coli. Interventions Sphincter-saving total proctocolectomy and construction of either S-type or J-type ileoanal reservoir. Outcome measures Indications, early and late complications, incidence of pouch excision. Results Of the 239 patients, 228 (95.4%) were operated on for ulcerative colitis and 11 (4.6%) for familial polyposis coli. One patient in each group was found to have a carcinoma not previously diagnosed. Twenty-eight patients had poor results: in 17 (7.1%) the ileostomy was never closed or was re-established because of pelvic sepsis or complex fistulas, sclerosing cholangitis or severe diarrhea; 11 (4.6%) patients required excision of the pouch because of anal stenosis, perirectal abscess-fistula or rectovaginal fistula. Three patients died — of suicide, and complications of liver transplantation and HIV infection. Thus, 208 patients maintained a functioning pouch. The early complication rate (within 30 days of operation) was 57.7% (138 patients) and the late complication rate was 52.3% (125 patients). Pouchitis alone did not lead to failure or pouch excision. Emptying difficulties in 25 patients with anal stenosis were helped in 2 by resorting to intermittent catheterization. Patients with indeterminate colitis had a higher rate of anorectal septic complications, and all patients having Crohn’s disease after pouch construction had complicated courses. Conclusions The complication rate associated with ileoanal pouch anastomosis continues to be relatively high despite increasing experience with this technique. Overall, however, a satisfactory outcome was obtained in 87% of patients

  17. Nonchemotactic Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John B.; Adler, Julius; Dahl, Margaret M.

    1967-01-01

    We have isolated 40 mutants of Escherichia coli which are nonchemotactic as judged by their failure to swarm on semisolid tryptone plates or to make bands in capillary tubes containing tryptone broth. All the mutants have normal flagella, a fact shown by their shape and reaction with antiflagella serum. All are fully motile under the microscope and all are sensitive to the phage chi. Unlike its parent, one of the mutants, studied in greater detail, failed to show chemotaxis toward oxygen, glucose, serine, threonine, or aspartic acid. The failure to exhibit chemotaxis does not result from a failure to use the chemicals. The swimming of this mutant was shown to be random. The growth rate was normal under several conditions, and the growth requirements were unchanged. Images PMID:5335897

  18. Structure of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Ku, Shao Yang; Yip, Patrick; Howell, P Lynne

    2006-07-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent tryptophanase has been isolated from Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined. The structure shares the same fold with and has similar quaternary structure to Proteus vulgaris tryptophanase and tyrosine-phenol lyase, but is found in a closed conformation when compared with these two enzymes. The tryptophanase structure, solved in its apo form, does not have covalent PLP bound in the active site, but two sulfate ions. The sulfate ions occupy the phosphoryl-binding site of PLP and the binding site of the alpha-carboxyl of the natural substrate tryptophan. One of the sulfate ions makes extensive interactions with both the transferase and PLP-binding domains of the protein and appears to be responsible for holding the enzyme in its closed conformation. Based on the sulfate density and the structure of the P. vulgaris enzyme, PLP and the substrate tryptophan were modeled into the active site. The resulting model is consistent with the roles of Arg419 in orienting the substrate to PLP and acidifying the alpha-proton of the substrate for beta-elimination, Lys269 in the formation and decomposition of the PLP quinonoid intermediate, Arg230 in orienting the substrate-PLP intermediates in the optimal conformation for catalysis, and His463 and Tyr74 in determining substrate specificity and suggests that the closed conformation observed in the structure could be induced by substrate binding and that significant conformational changes occur during catalysis. A catalytic mechanism for tryptophanase is proposed. Since E. coli tryptophanase has resisted forming diffraction-quality crystals for many years, the molecular surface of tryptophanase has been analyzed in various crystal forms and it was rationalized that strong crystal contacts occur on the flat surface of the protein and that the size of crystal contact surface seems to correlate with the diffraction quality of the crystal.

  19. Characteristics of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli from pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, V P; Gyles, C L; Friendship, R W

    1988-01-01

    Porcine verotoxigenic Escherichia coli were characterized with respect to frequency of occurrence, serogroup, and association with disease, weaning, and selected properties of the bacterium. Of 668 strains of E. coli from southern Ontario pigs with enteric disease, 32 (4.8%) produced verotoxin at 10(3)-10(7) cytotoxic doses per mL of culture supernatant. Of 22 isolates which belonged to O serogroups 138, 139 and 141, 15 produced verotoxin. Among other enterotoxigenic types of E. coli, two of 57 isolates of O157:K"V17" and two of 96 isolates of O149:K91 were verotoxigenic. The remaining 13 verotoxigenic E. coli belonged to O groups 2, 107, 120, 121 and 130. An additional 21 verotoxigenic E. coli belonging to O groups 138, 139 and 141 and three to O157:K"V17" were identified in a collection of 47 E. coli recovered from weaned pigs with enteric disease. Verotoxigenic E. coli were associated with postweaning diarrhea, bloody stools, sudden death and edema disease. They were isolated at similar frequencies (14%) from healthy weaned pigs, and from weaned pigs with enteric disease. Isolation rates from neonates were low and significantly different from rates in weaned pigs. Neutralizing antibody to verotoxin was not detected in the sera of 45 pigs, which included pigs from herds with a history of edema disease. Verotoxin was not associated with production of colicin, hemolysin, or enterotoxins or with any of 23 biochemical properties of the organisms. The serological data indicate that porcine verotoxigenic E. coli are not a common source of verotoxigenic E. coli for humans. Porcine verotoxin may play a role in postweaning diarrhea and absence of detectable neutralizing antibody in serum may be an important aspect of pathogenesis. PMID:3048621

  20. Survival of pathogenic Escherichia coli on basil, lettuce, and spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contamination of lettuce, spinach and basil with pathogenic E. coli has caused numerous illnesses over the past decade. E. coli O157:H7, E. coli O104:H4 and avian pathogenic E. coli (APECstx- and APECstx+) were inoculated on basil plants and in promix soiless substrate using drip and overhead ir...

  1. Advances in genoserotyping and subtyping of Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E. coli plays an important role as a member of the gut microbiota; however, pathogenic strains also exist, including various diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli that cause illness outside of the GI-tract. E. coli have traditionally been serotyped using antisera a...

  2. Biofuels from E. Coli: Engineering E. coli as an Electrofuels Chassis for Isooctane Production

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-16

    Electrofuels Project: Ginkgo Bioworks is bypassing photosynthesis and engineering E. coli to directly use carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce biofuels. E. coli doesn’t naturally metabolize CO2, but Ginkgo Bioworks is manipulating and incorporating the genes responsible for CO2 metabolism into the microorganism. By genetically modifying E. coli, Ginkgo Bioworks will enhance its rate of CO2 consumption and liquid fuel production. Ginkgo Bioworks is delivering CO2 to E. coli as formic acid, a simple industrial chemical that provides energy and CO2 to the bacterial system.

  3. First international E. coli genome meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This volume is a collection of abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of studies reported at the First International E. Coli Genome Meeting, held September 10-14, 1992 at the University of Wisconsin.

  4. First international E. coli genome meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This volume is a collection of abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of studies reported at the First International E. Coli Genome Meeting, held September 10-14, 1992 at the University of Wisconsin.

  5. Escherichia coli in retail processed food.

    PubMed

    Pinegar, J A; Cooke, E M

    1985-08-01

    Four thousand two hundred and forty six samples of retail processed food were examined for the presence of Escherichia coli. Overall 12% of samples contained this organism, cakes and confectionery being more frequently contaminated (28%) than meat and meat based products (9%). Contamination was more frequent in the summer months than in the colder weather and 27% of the contaminated foods contained greater than 10(3) E. coli/g. E. coli from meat and meat based products were more commonly resistant to one or more antibiotics (14%) than were confectionery strains (1%). The significance of these findings in relation to the E. coli population of the human bowel is discussed. PMID:3894508

  6. [Acute appendicitis caused by Balantidium coli].

    PubMed

    González Sánchez, O

    1978-01-01

    A patient who was surgically treated for acute appendicitis is presented. In the sections of cecal appendix many Balantidium coli trophozoites were found. The history, characteristics, habitat, location, biological aspects and reproduction of this parasite are commented. PMID:358326

  7. Methane production from kitchen waste using Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmi, S; Joseph, Kurian; Sukumaran, V

    2007-04-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain isolated from biogas plant sludge was examined for its ability to enhance biogas from kitchen waste during solid phase anaerobic digestion. The laboratory experiments were conducted for total solid concentrations of 20% and 22%. Kitchen waste was characterized for physico-chemical parameters and laboratory experiments were conducted with and without E. coli strain. It was found that the reactor with E. coli produced 17% more biogas than the reactors that are operated without E. coli strain.

  8. Native valve Escherichia coli endocarditis following urosepsis

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, D.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Patro, K. C.; Devaraj, S.; Krishnamurthy, V.; Kothari, Y.; Satyaki, N.

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative organisms are a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Escherichia coli, the most common cause of urinary tract infection and gram-negative septicemia involves endocardium rarely. In this case report, we describe infection of native mitral valve by E. coli following septicemia of urinary tract origin in a diabetic male; subsequently, he required prosthetic tissue valve replacement indicated by persistent sepsis and congestive cardiac failure. PMID:23814428

  9. Biodegradation of Aromatic Compounds by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Eduardo; Ferrández, Abel; Prieto, María A.; García, José L.

    2001-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli has long been recognized as the best-understood living organism, little was known about its abilities to use aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. This review gives an extensive overview of the current knowledge of the catabolism of aromatic compounds by E. coli. After giving a general overview of the aromatic compounds that E. coli strains encounter and mineralize in the different habitats that they colonize, we provide an up-to-date status report on the genes and proteins involved in the catabolism of such compounds, namely, several aromatic acids (phenylacetic acid, 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, phenylpropionic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, and 3-hydroxycinnamic acid) and amines (phenylethylamine, tyramine, and dopamine). Other enzymatic activities acting on aromatic compounds in E. coli are also reviewed and evaluated. The review also reflects the present impact of genomic research and how the analysis of the whole E. coli genome reveals novel aromatic catabolic functions. Moreover, evolutionary considerations derived from sequence comparisons between the aromatic catabolic clusters of E. coli and homologous clusters from an increasing number of bacteria are also discussed. The recent progress in the understanding of the fundamentals that govern the degradation of aromatic compounds in E. coli makes this bacterium a very useful model system to decipher biochemical, genetic, evolutionary, and ecological aspects of the catabolism of such compounds. In the last part of the review, we discuss strategies and concepts to metabolically engineer E. coli to suit specific needs for biodegradation and biotransformation of aromatics and we provide several examples based on selected studies. Finally, conclusions derived from this review may serve as a lead for future research and applications. PMID:11729263

  10. Fosfomycin Resistance in Escherichia coli, Pennsylvania, USA

    PubMed Central

    Alrowais, Hind; McElheny, Christi L.; Spychala, Caressa N.; Sastry, Sangeeta; Guo, Qinglan; Butt, Adeel A.

    2015-01-01

    Fosfomycin resistance in Escherichia coli is rare in the United States. An extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing E. coli clinical strain identified in Pennsylvania, USA, showed high-level fosfomycin resistance caused by the fosA3 gene. The IncFII plasmid carrying this gene had a structure similar to those found in China, where fosfomycin resistance is commonly described. PMID:26488485

  11. Systems Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyeong Rok; Shin, Jae Ho; Cho, Jae Sung; Yang, Dongsoo; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-05-01

    Systems metabolic engineering, which recently emerged as metabolic engineering integrated with systems biology, synthetic biology, and evolutionary engineering, allows engineering of microorganisms on a systemic level for the production of valuable chemicals far beyond its native capabilities. Here, we review the strategies for systems metabolic engineering and particularly its applications in Escherichia coli. First, we cover the various tools developed for genetic manipulation in E. coli to increase the production titers of desired chemicals. Next, we detail the strategies for systems metabolic engineering in E. coli, covering the engineering of the native metabolism, the expansion of metabolism with synthetic pathways, and the process engineering aspects undertaken to achieve higher production titers of desired chemicals. Finally, we examine a couple of notable products as case studies produced in E. coli strains developed by systems metabolic engineering. The large portfolio of chemical products successfully produced by engineered E. coli listed here demonstrates the sheer capacity of what can be envisioned and achieved with respect to microbial production of chemicals. Systems metabolic engineering is no longer in its infancy; it is now widely employed and is also positioned to further embrace next-generation interdisciplinary principles and innovation for its upgrade. Systems metabolic engineering will play increasingly important roles in developing industrial strains including E. coli that are capable of efficiently producing natural and nonnatural chemicals and materials from renewable nonfood biomass. PMID:27223822

  12. Succinate production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Thakker, Chandresh; Martínez, Irene; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N.

    2012-01-01

    Succinate has been recognized as an important platform chemical that can be produced from biomass. While a number of organisms are capable of succinate production naturally, this review focuses on the engineering of Escherichia coli for production of the four-carbon dicarboxylic acid. Important features of a succinate production system are to achieve optimal balance of reducing equivalents generated by consumption of the feedstock, while maximizing the amount of carbon that is channeled to the product. Aerobic and anaerobic production strains have been developed and applied to production from glucose as well as other abundant carbon sources. Metabolic engineering methods and strain evolution have been used and supplemented by the recent application of systems biology and in silico modeling tools to construct optimal production strains. The metabolic capacity of the production strain, as well as the requirement for efficient recovery of succinate and the reliability of the performance under scale-up are important in the overall process. The costs of the overall biorefinery compatible process will determine the economical commercialization of succinate and its impact in larger chemical markets. PMID:21932253

  13. E. coli on the move

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calne, S.

    2012-04-01

    Lynn Grove High School in Great Yarmouth, UK has been awarded a Royal Society partnership grant. Lynn Grove pupils aged between 11 and 16 years will carry out an investigation collaborating with scientists at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, UK to investigate the distribution of E.coli and other coliform bacteria within a school. The information will be used as an evidence base to educate pupils about the transmission of microbes and about methods of control. Through this work pupils will gain an appreciation of the diversity of microbial biochemistry and the chemistry behind chromogenic detection methodologies for specific bacterial enzymes. Inferences from the use of diagnostic selective media will be confirmed by carrying out DNA isolation and PCR to identify the genes responsible for the biochemical reactions. PCR will also be used to identify species of coliforms by reference to genomic sequence databases. These techniques will allow pupils to look into an unseen world in a way which has direct relevance to their everyday lives. Furthermore this partnership study will demonstrate to pupils that solving scientific questions requires the integration of a variety of scientific disciplines. The project will run from January 2012 until June 2012. We will present our preliminary results from the investigation and outline our future plans.

  14. Murein segregation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    de Pedro, M A; Quintela, J C; Höltje, J V; Schwarz, H

    1997-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (murein) segregation has been studied by means of a new labeling method. The method relies on the ability of Escherichia coli cells to incorporate D-Cys into macromolecular murein. The incorporation depends on a periplasmic amino acid exchange reaction. At low concentrations, D-Cys is innocuous to the cell. The distribution of modified murein in purified sacculi can be traced and visualized by immunodetection of the -SH groups by fluorescence and electron microscopy techniques. Analysis of murein segregation in wild-type and cell division mutant strains revealed that murein in polar caps is metabolically inert and is segregated in a conservative fashion. Elongation of the sacculus apparently occurs by diffuse insertion of precursors over the cylindrical part of the cell surface. At the initiation of cell division, there is a FtsZ-dependent localized activation of murein synthesis at the potential division sites. Penicillin-binding protein 3 and the products of the division genes ftsA and ftsQ are dispensable for the activation of division sites. As a consequence, under restrictive conditions ftsA,ftsI,or ftsQ mutants generate filamentous sacculi with rings of all-new murein at the positions where septa would otherwise develop. PMID:9139895

  15. Growth rate of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Marr, A G

    1991-01-01

    It should be possible to predict the rate of growth of Escherichia coli of a given genotype in a specified environment. The idea that the rate of synthesis of ATP determines the rate of growth and that the yield of ATP determines the yield of growth is entrenched in bacterial physiology, yet this idea is inconsistent with experimental results. In minimal media the growth rate and yield vary with the carbon source in a manner independent of the rate of formation and yield of ATP. With acetate as the carbon source, anapleurotic reactions, not ATP synthesis, limit the growth rate. For acetate and other gluconeogenic substrates the limiting step appears to be the formation of triose phosphate. I conclude that the rate of growth is controlled by the rate of formation of a precursor metabolite and, thus, of monomers such as amino acids derived from it. The protein-synthesizing system is regulated according to demand for protein synthesis. I examine the conjecture that the signal for this regulation is the ratio of uncharged tRNA to aminoacyl-tRNA, that this signal controls the concentration of guanosine tetraphosphate, and that the concentration of guanosine tetraphosphate controls transcription of rrn genes. Differential equations describing this system were solved numerically for steady states of growth; the computed values of ribosomes and guanosine tetraphosphate and the maximal growth rate agree with experimental values obtained from the literature of the past 35 years. These equations were also solved for dynamical states corresponding to nutritional shifts up and down. PMID:1886524

  16. Lytic bacteriophages reduce Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Sean; Roberts, Cheryl; Handy, Eric; Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield™) or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either; (1) immersion of lettuce in 500 ml of EcoShield™ 8.3 log PFU/ml or 9.8 log PFU/ml for up to 2 min before inoculation with E. coli O157:H7; (2) spray-application of EcoShield™ (9.3 log PFU/ml) to lettuce after inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 (4.10 CFU/cm2) following exposure to 50 μg/ml chlorine for 30 sec. After immersion studies, lettuce was spot-inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (2.38 CFU/cm2). Phage-treated, inoculated lettuce pieces were stored at 4°C for and analyzed for E. coli O157:H7 populations for up to 7 d. Immersion of lettuce in 9.8 log PFU/ml EcoShield™ for 2 min significantly (p < 0.05) reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations after 24 h when stored at 4°C compared with controls. Immersion of lettuce in suspensions containing high concentrations of EcoShield™ (9.8 log PFU/ml) resulted in the deposition of high concentrations (7.8 log log PFU/cm2) of bacteriophages on the surface of fresh cut lettuce, potentially contributing to the efficacy of the lytic phages on lettuce. Spraying phages on to inoculated fresh cut lettuce after being washed in hypochlorite solution was significantly more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations (2.22 log CFU/cm2) on day 0 compared with control treatments (4.10 log CFU/cm2). Both immersion and spray treatments provided protection from E. coli O157:H7 contamination on lettuce, but spray application of lytic bacteriophages to lettuce was more effective in immediately reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations fresh cut lettuce. PMID:23819106

  17. Logarithmic Sensing in Escherichia coli Bacterial Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Yevgeniy V.; Jiang, Lili; Tu, Yuhai; Wu, Mingming

    2009-01-01

    We studied the response of swimming Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria in a comprehensive set of well-controlled chemical concentration gradients using a newly developed microfluidic device and cell tracking imaging technique. In parallel, we carried out a multi-scale theoretical modeling of bacterial chemotaxis taking into account the relevant internal signaling pathway dynamics, and predicted bacterial chemotactic responses at the cellular level. By measuring the E. coli cell density profiles across the microfluidic channel at various spatial gradients of ligand concentration grad[L] and the average ligand concentration [L]¯near the peak chemotactic response region, we demonstrated unambiguously in both experiments and model simulation that the mean chemotactic drift velocity of E. coli cells increased monotonically with grad [L]/[L]¯ or ∼grad(log[L])—that is E. coli cells sense the spatial gradient of the logarithmic ligand concentration. The exact range of the log-sensing regime was determined. The agreements between the experiments and the multi-scale model simulation verify the validity of the theoretical model, and revealed that the key microscopic mechanism for logarithmic sensing in bacterial chemotaxis is the adaptation kinetics, in contrast to explanations based directly on ligand occupancy. PMID:19289068

  18. Profiling of Escherichia coli Chromosome database.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yukiko; Niki, Hironori; Kato, Jun-ichi

    2008-01-01

    The Profiling of Escherichia coli Chromosome (PEC) database (http://www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/pec/) is designed to allow E. coli researchers to efficiently access information from functional genomics studies. The database contains two principal types of data: gene essentiality and a large collection of E. coli genetic research resources. The essentiality data are based on data compilation from published single-gene essentiality studies and on cell growth studies of large-deletion mutants. Using the circular and linear viewers for both whole genomes and the minimal genome, users can not only gain an overview of the genome structure but also retrieve information on contigs, gene products, mutants, deletions, and so forth. In particular, genome-wide exhaustive mutants are an essential resource for studying E. coli gene functions. Although the genomic database was constructed independently from the genetic resources database, users may seamlessly access both types of data. In addition to these data, the PEC database also provides a summary of homologous genes of other bacterial genomes and of protein structure information, with a comprehensive interface. The PEC is thus a convenient and useful platform for contemporary E. coli researchers. PMID:18392982

  19. The unexhausted potential of E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Blount, Zachary D

    2015-01-01

    E. coli's hardiness, versatility, broad palate and ease of handling have made it the most intensively studied and best understood organism on the planet. However, research on E.coli has primarily examined it as a model organism, one that is abstracted from any natural history. But E. coli is far more than just a microbial lab rat. Rather, it is a highly diverse organism with a complex, multi-faceted niche in the wild. Recent studies of ‘wild’ E. coli have, for example, revealed a great deal about its presence in the environment, its diversity and genomic evolution, as well as its role in the human microbiome and disease. These findings have shed light on aspects of its biology and ecology that pose far-reaching questions and illustrate how an appreciation of E. coli's natural history can expand its value as a model organism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05826.001 PMID:25807083

  20. Generation of a transgenic mouse for colorectal cancer research with intestinal cre expression limited to the large intestine.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yingben; Johnson, Robert; Desmet, Marsha; Snyder, Paul W; Fleet, James C

    2010-08-01

    Genetically modified mice have been used for colon cancer research, but findings from these models are confounded by expression of cancer in multiple organs. We sought to create a transgenic mouse with Cre recombinase (Cre) expression limited to the epithelial cells of the large intestine and used this model to study colon cancer driven by adenomatosis polyposis coli (APC) gene inactivation. A promoter/enhancer from the mouse carbonic anhydrase I gene was used to generate a Cre-expressing transgenic mouse (CAC). After characterizing transgene expression and distribution, CAC mice were crossed to APC(580S) mice to generate mice with APC inactivation at one (CAC;APC(580S/+)) or both alleles (CAC;APC(580S/580S)). Transgene expression was limited to the epithelial cells of the cecum and colon, extended from the crypt base to the luminal surface, and was expressed in approximately 15% of the crypts. No abnormal gross phenotype was seen in 3- or 6-week-old CAC;APC(580S/+) mice, but CAC;APC(580S/580S) mice had significant mucosal hyperplasia in the colon at 3 weeks, which developed into tumors by 6 weeks. By 10 weeks, 20% of CAC;APC(580S/+) mice developed adenomatous lesions in the distal colon (3.0 +/- 0.4 mm; 1.1 per mouse). Dextran sulfate sodium treatment increased the incidence and number of tumors, and this occurred predominantly in distal colon. Our new model has improved features for colon cancer research, that is, transgene expression is limited to the epithelium of the large bowel with normal cells found next to genetically modified cells.

  1. Tea polyphenols epigallocatechin gallete and theaflavin restrict mouse liver carcinogenesis through modulation of self-renewal Wnt and hedgehog pathways.

    PubMed

    Sur, Subhayan; Pal, Debolina; Mandal, Syamsundar; Roy, Anup; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate chemopreventive and therapeutic efficacy of tea polyphenols epigallocatechin gallete (EGCG) and theaflavin (TF) on self-renewal Wnt and Hedgehog (Hh) pathways during CCl4/N-nitosodiethylamine-induced mouse liver carcinogenesis. For this purpose, the effect of EGCG/TF was investigated in liver lesions of different groups at pre-, continuous and post initiation stages of carcinogenesis. Comparatively increased body weights were evident due to EGCG/TF treatment than carcinogen control mice. Both EGCG and TF could restrict the development of hepatocellular carcinoma at 30th week of carcinogen application showing potential chemoprevention in continuous treated group (mild dysplasia) followed by pretreated (moderate dysplasia) and therapeutic efficacy in posttreated group (mild dysplasia). This restriction was associated with significantly reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis, decreased prevalence of hepatocyte progenitor cell (AFP) and stem cell population (CD44) irrespective of EGCG/TF treatments. The EGCG/TF could modulate the Wnt pathway by reducing β-catenin and phospho-β-catenin-Y-654 expressions along with up-regulation of sFRP1 (secreted frizzled-related protein 1) and adenomatosis polyposis coli during the restriction. In case of the Hh pathway, EGCG/TF could also reduce expressions of glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (Gli1) and SMO (smoothened homolog) along with up-regulation of PTCH1 (patched homolog 1). As a result, in Wnt/Hh regulatory pathways decreased expressions of β-catenin/Gli1 target genes like CyclinD1, cMyc and EGFR/phospho-EGFR-Y-1173 and up-regulation of E-cadherin were seen during the restriction. Thus, the restriction of liver carcinogenesis by EGCG/TF was due to reduction in hepatocyte progenitor cell/stem cell population along with modulation of Wnt/Hh and other regulatory pathways. PMID:26386739

  2. Expression of signaling components in embryonic eyelid epithelium.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinghang; Jin, Chang; Chen, Yinglei; Chen, Jing; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Closure of an epithelium opening is a critical morphogenetic event for development. An excellent example for this process is the transient closure of embryonic eyelid. Eyelid closure requires shape change and migration of epithelial cells at the tip of the developing eyelids, and is dictated by numerous signaling pathways. Here we evaluated gene expression in epithelial cells isolated from the tip (leading edge, LE) and inner surface epithelium (IE) of the eyelid from E15.5 mouse fetuses by laser capture microdissection (LCM). We showed that the LE and IE cells are different at E15.5, such that IE had higher expression of muscle specific genes, while LE acquired epithelium identities. Despite their distinct destinies, these cells were overall similar in expression of signaling components for the "eyelid closure pathways". However, while the LE cells had more abundant expression of Fgfr2, Erbb2, Shh, Ptch1 and 2, Smo and Gli2, and Jag1 and Notch1, the IE cells had more abundant expression of Bmp5 and Bmpr1a. In addition, the LE cells had more abundant expression of adenomatosis polyposis coli down-regulated 1 (Apcdd1), but the IE cells had high expression of Dkk2. Our results suggest that the functionally distinct LE and IE cells have also differential expression of signaling molecules that may contribute to the cell-specific responses to morphogenetic signals. The expression pattern suggests that the EGF, Shh and NOTCH pathways are preferentially active in LE cells, the BMP pathways are effective in IE cells, and the Wnt pathway may be repressed in LE and IE cells via different mechanisms.

  3. Expression of Signaling Components in Embryonic Eyelid Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qinghang; Jin, Chang; Chen, Yinglei; Chen, Jing; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Closure of an epithelium opening is a critical morphogenetic event for development. An excellent example for this process is the transient closure of embryonic eyelid. Eyelid closure requires shape change and migration of epithelial cells at the tip of the developing eyelids, and is dictated by numerous signaling pathways. Here we evaluated gene expression in epithelial cells isolated from the tip (leading edge, LE) and inner surface epithelium (IE) of the eyelid from E15.5 mouse fetuses by laser capture microdissection (LCM). We showed that the LE and IE cells are different at E15.5, such that IE had higher expression of muscle specific genes, while LE acquired epithelium identities. Despite their distinct destinies, these cells were overall similar in expression of signaling components for the “eyelid closure pathways”. However, while the LE cells had more abundant expression of Fgfr2, Erbb2, Shh, Ptch1 and 2, Smo and Gli2, and Jag1 and Notch1, the IE cells had more abundant expression of Bmp5 and Bmpr1a. In addition, the LE cells had more abundant expression of adenomatosis polyposis coli down-regulated 1 (Apcdd1), but the IE cells had high expression of Dkk2. Our results suggest that the functionally distinct LE and IE cells have also differential expression of signaling molecules that may contribute to the cell-specific responses to morphogenetic signals. The expression pattern suggests that the EGF, Shh and NOTCH pathways are preferentially active in LE cells, the BMP pathways are effective in IE cells, and the Wnt pathway may be repressed in LE and IE cells via different mechanisms. PMID:24498290

  4. Control of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation by the heterochronic genes and the cellular asymmetry machinery in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Harandi, Omid F; Ambros, Victor R

    2015-01-20

    Transitions between asymmetric (self-renewing) and symmetric (proliferative) cell divisions are robustly regulated in the context of normal development and tissue homeostasis. To genetically assess the regulation of these transitions, we used the postembryonic epithelial stem (seam) cell lineages of Caenorhabditis elegans. In these lineages, the timing of these transitions is regulated by the evolutionarily conserved heterochronic pathway, whereas cell division asymmetry is conferred by a pathway consisting of Wnt (Wingless) pathway components, including posterior pharynx defect (POP-1)/TCF, APC related/adenomatosis polyposis coli (APR-1)/APC, and LIT-1/NLK (loss of intestine/Nemo-like kinase). Here we explore the genetic regulatory mechanisms underlying stage-specific transitions between self-renewing and proliferative behavior in the seam cell lineages. We show that mutations of genes in the heterochronic developmental timing pathway, including lin-14 (lineage defect), lin-28, lin-46, and the lin-4 and let-7 (lethal defects)-family microRNAs, affect the activity of LIT-1/POP-1 cellular asymmetry machinery and APR-1 polarity during larval development. Surprisingly, heterochronic mutations that enhance LIT-1 activity in seam cells can simultaneously also enhance the opposing, POP-1 activity, suggesting a role in modulating the potency of the cellular polarizing activity of the LIT-1/POP-1 system as development proceeds. These findings illuminate how the evolutionarily conserved cellular asymmetry machinery can be coupled to microRNA-regulated developmental pathways for robust regulation of stem cell maintenance and proliferation during the course of development. Such genetic interactions between developmental timing regulators and cell polarity regulators could underlie transitions between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell fates in other systems and could be deregulated in the context of developmental disorders and cancer. PMID:25561544

  5. Control of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation by the heterochronic genes and the cellular asymmetry machinery in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Harandi, Omid F.; Ambros, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Transitions between asymmetric (self-renewing) and symmetric (proliferative) cell divisions are robustly regulated in the context of normal development and tissue homeostasis. To genetically assess the regulation of these transitions, we used the postembryonic epithelial stem (seam) cell lineages of Caenorhabditis elegans. In these lineages, the timing of these transitions is regulated by the evolutionarily conserved heterochronic pathway, whereas cell division asymmetry is conferred by a pathway consisting of Wnt (Wingless) pathway components, including posterior pharynx defect (POP-1)/TCF, APC related/adenomatosis polyposis coli (APR-1)/APC, and LIT-1/NLK (loss of intestine/Nemo-like kinase). Here we explore the genetic regulatory mechanisms underlying stage-specific transitions between self-renewing and proliferative behavior in the seam cell lineages. We show that mutations of genes in the heterochronic developmental timing pathway, including lin-14 (lineage defect), lin-28, lin-46, and the lin-4 and let-7 (lethal defects)-family microRNAs, affect the activity of LIT-1/POP-1 cellular asymmetry machinery and APR-1 polarity during larval development. Surprisingly, heterochronic mutations that enhance LIT-1 activity in seam cells can simultaneously also enhance the opposing, POP-1 activity, suggesting a role in modulating the potency of the cellular polarizing activity of the LIT-1/POP-1 system as development proceeds. These findings illuminate how the evolutionarily conserved cellular asymmetry machinery can be coupled to microRNA-regulated developmental pathways for robust regulation of stem cell maintenance and proliferation during the course of development. Such genetic interactions between developmental timing regulators and cell polarity regulators could underlie transitions between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell fates in other systems and could be deregulated in the context of developmental disorders and cancer. PMID:25561544

  6. Interaction between Escherichia coli and lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    A sample of mature lunar fines (10084.151) was solubilized to a high degree (about 17 percent) by the chelating agent salicylic acid (0.01. M). The neutralized (pH adjusted to 7.0) leachate was found to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli (ATCC 259922) in a minimial mineral salts glucose medium; however, the inhibition was somewhat less than that caused by neutralized salicylic acid alone. The presence of lunar fines in the minimal medium was highly stimulatory to growth of E. coli following an early inhibitory response. The bacterium survived less well in the lunar leachate than in distilled water, no doubt because of the salicylate. It was concluded that the sample of lunar soil tested has nutritional value to E. coli and that certain products of fermentation helped to solubilize the lunar soil.

  7. Prodigiosin - A Multifaceted Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Zorec, Maša; Stopar, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite a considerable interest in prodigiosin, the mechanism of its antibacterial activity is still poorly understood. In this work, Escherichia coli cells were treated with prodigiosin to determine its antimicrobial effect on bacterial physiology. The effect of prodigiosin was concentration dependent. In prodigiosin treated cells above MIC value no significant DNA damage or cytoplasmic membrane disintegration was observed. The outer membrane, however, becomes leaky. Cells had severely decreased respiration activity. In prodigiosin treated cells protein and RNA synthesis were inhibited, cells were elongated but could not divide. Pre-treatment with prodigiosin improved E. coli survival rate in media containing ampicillin, kanamycin and erythromycin but not phleomycin. The results suggest that prodigiosin acts as a bacteriostatic agent in E. coli cells. If prodigiosin was diluted, cells resumed growth. The results indicate that prodigiosin has distinct mode of antibacterial action in different bacteria. PMID:27612193

  8. Thymineless Death in Escherichia coli: Strain Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Mondale, Lee

    1967-01-01

    Thymineless death of various ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive strains of Escherichia coli B and K-12 was investigated. It was found that E. coli B, Bs−12, K-12 rec-21, and possibly K-12 Lon−, all sensitive to UV, were also sensitive to thymine starvation. However, other UV-sensitive strains of E. coli were found to display the typical resistant-type kinetics of thymineless death. The correlation of these results with various other cellular processes suggested that the filament-forming ability of the bacteria might be involved in the mechanism of thymineless death. It was apparent from the present results that capacity for host-cell reactivation, recombination ability, thymine dimer excision, and probably induction of a defective prophage had little to do with determining sensitivity to thymine deprivation. Images PMID:5337772

  9. Prodigiosin - A Multifaceted Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Agent.

    PubMed

    Danevčič, Tjaša; Borić Vezjak, Maja; Zorec, Maša; Stopar, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite a considerable interest in prodigiosin, the mechanism of its antibacterial activity is still poorly understood. In this work, Escherichia coli cells were treated with prodigiosin to determine its antimicrobial effect on bacterial physiology. The effect of prodigiosin was concentration dependent. In prodigiosin treated cells above MIC value no significant DNA damage or cytoplasmic membrane disintegration was observed. The outer membrane, however, becomes leaky. Cells had severely decreased respiration activity. In prodigiosin treated cells protein and RNA synthesis were inhibited, cells were elongated but could not divide. Pre-treatment with prodigiosin improved E. coli survival rate in media containing ampicillin, kanamycin and erythromycin but not phleomycin. The results suggest that prodigiosin acts as a bacteriostatic agent in E. coli cells. If prodigiosin was diluted, cells resumed growth. The results indicate that prodigiosin has distinct mode of antibacterial action in different bacteria. PMID:27612193

  10. Prodigiosin - A Multifaceted Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Agent.

    PubMed

    Danevčič, Tjaša; Borić Vezjak, Maja; Zorec, Maša; Stopar, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite a considerable interest in prodigiosin, the mechanism of its antibacterial activity is still poorly understood. In this work, Escherichia coli cells were treated with prodigiosin to determine its antimicrobial effect on bacterial physiology. The effect of prodigiosin was concentration dependent. In prodigiosin treated cells above MIC value no significant DNA damage or cytoplasmic membrane disintegration was observed. The outer membrane, however, becomes leaky. Cells had severely decreased respiration activity. In prodigiosin treated cells protein and RNA synthesis were inhibited, cells were elongated but could not divide. Pre-treatment with prodigiosin improved E. coli survival rate in media containing ampicillin, kanamycin and erythromycin but not phleomycin. The results suggest that prodigiosin acts as a bacteriostatic agent in E. coli cells. If prodigiosin was diluted, cells resumed growth. The results indicate that prodigiosin has distinct mode of antibacterial action in different bacteria.

  11. coliBASE: an online database for Escherichia coli, Shigella and Salmonella comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Roy R; Khan, Arshad M; Pallen, Mark J

    2004-01-01

    We have constructed coliBASE, a database for Escherichia coli, Shigella and Salmonella comparative genomics available online at http://colibase. bham.ac.uk. Unlike other E.coli databases, which focus on the laboratory model strain K12, coliBASE is intended to reflect the full diversity of E.coli and its relatives. The database contains comparative data including whole genome alignments and lists of putative orthologous genes, together with numerous analytical tools and links to existing online resources. The data are stored in a relational database, accessible by a number of user-friendly search methods and graphical browsers. The database schema is generic and can easily be applied to other bacterial genomes. Two such databases, CampyDB (for the analysis of Campylobacter spp.) and ClostriDB (for Clostridium spp.) are also available at http://campy.bham.ac.uk and http://clostri. bham.ac.uk, respectively. An example of the power of E.coli comparative analyses such as those available through coliBASE is presented. PMID:14681417

  12. Hydrogen production by recombinant Escherichia coli strains

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Toshinari; Sanchez‐Torres, Viviana; Wood, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The production of hydrogen via microbial biotechnology is an active field of research. Given its ease of manipulation, the best‐studied bacterium Escherichia coli has become a workhorse for enhanced hydrogen production through metabolic engineering, heterologous gene expression, adaptive evolution, and protein engineering. Herein, the utility of E. coli strains to produce hydrogen, via native hydrogenases or heterologous ones, is reviewed. In addition, potential strategies for increasing hydrogen production are outlined and whole‐cell systems and cell‐free systems are compared. PMID:21895995

  13. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli-Associated Exotoxins.

    PubMed

    Welch, Rodney A

    2016-06-01

    Escherichia coli are a common cause of infectious disease outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Several independently evolved E. coli clades are common causes of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. There is ample epidemiological and in vitro evidence that several different protein toxins common to many, but not all, of these strains are likely to aid the colonization and immune-evasion ability of these bacteria. This review discusses our current knowledge and areas of ignorance concerning the contribution of the hemolysin; cytotoxic-necrotizing factor-1; and the autotransporters, Sat, Pic, and Vat, to extraintestinal human disease. PMID:27337488

  14. Studies of Escherichia coli Infection in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, R. B.; Lopez-Alvarez, J.; Pettit, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The pathogenesis of infection with Escherichia coli was studied in chickens using live O78:K80 cells and a heat-labile chick lethal toxin. The results obtained were compared with those observed in field outbreaks. The common histological findings of subepicardial edema and congestion, focal necrosis in the spleen and focal necrosis, congestion, edema and accumulation of fibrin in the liver support an active role for chick lethal toxin in the pathogenesis of E. coli disease. ImagesFig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7. PMID:4274822

  15. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli-associated exotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Rodney A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli are a common cause of infectious disease outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Several independently evolved E. coli clades are common causes of urinary tract and blood stream infections. There is ample epidemiological and in vitro evidence that several different protein toxins common to many but not all of these strains are likely to aid the colonization and immune evasion ability of these bacteria. This review discusses our current knowledge and areas of ignorance concerning the contribution of the hemolysin, cytotoxic necrotizing factor-1 and the autotransporters, Sat, Pic and Vat to extraintestinal human disease. PMID:27337488

  16. WGS accurately predicts antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in identifying resistance genotypes of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) and whether these correlate with observed phenotypes. Methods: Seventy-six E. coli strains were isolated from farm cattle and measured f...

  17. The Biology of the Escherichia coli Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Hufnagel, David A.; DePas, William H.; Chapman, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter Summary Escherichia coli (E. coli) is one of the world’s best-characterized organisms, as it has been extensively studied for over a century. However, most of this work has focused on E. coli grown under laboratory conditions that do not faithfully simulate its natural environments. Therefore, the historical perspectives on E. coli physiology and life cycle are somewhat skewed toward experimental systems that feature E. coli growing logarithmically in a test tube. Typically a commensal bacterium, E. coli resides in the lower intestines of a slew of animals. Outside of the lower intestine, E. coli can adapt and survive in a very different set of environmental conditions. Biofilm formation allows E. coli to survive, and even thrive, in environments that do not support the growth of planktonic populations. E. coli can form biofilms virtually everywhere; in the bladder during a urinary tract infection, on in-dwelling medical devices, and outside of the host on plants and in the soil. The E. coli extracellular matrix, primarily composed of the protein polymer named curli and the polysaccharide cellulose, promotes adherence to organic and inorganic surfaces, and resistance to desiccation, the host immune system and other antimicrobials. The pathways that govern E. coli biofilm formation, cellulose production, and curli biogenesis will be discussed in this book chapter, which concludes with insights into the future of E. coli biofilm research and potential therapies. PMID:26185090

  18. Escherichia coli mediated urinary tract infections: are there distinct uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) pathotypes?

    PubMed

    Marrs, Carl F; Zhang, Lixin; Foxman, Betsy

    2005-11-15

    A variety of virulence genes are associated with Escherichia coli mediated urinary tract infections. Particular sets of virulence factors shared by bacterial strains directing them through a particular pathogenesis process are called a "pathotype." Comparison of co-occurrence of potential urinary tract infection (UTI) virulence genes among different E. coli isolates from fecal and UTI collections provides evidence for multiple pathotypes of uropathogenic E. coli, but current understanding of critical genetic differences defining the pathotypes is limited. Discovery of additional E. coli genes involved in uropathogenesis and determination of their distribution and co-occurrences will further define UPEC pathotypes and allow for a more detailed analysis of how these pathotypes might differ in how they cause disease.

  19. Escherichia coli as a bioreporter in ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Robbens, Johan; Dardenne, Freddy; Devriese, Lisa; De Coen, Wim; Blust, Ronny

    2010-11-01

    Ecotoxicological assessment relies to a large extent on the information gathered with surrogate species and the extrapolation of test results across species and different levels of biological organisation. Bacteria have long been used as a bioreporter for genotoxic testing and general toxicity. Today, it is clear that bacteria have the potential for screening of other toxicological endpoints. Escherichia coli has been studied for years; in-depth knowledge of its biochemistry and genetics makes it the most proficient prokaryote for the development of new toxicological assays. Several assays have been designed with E. coli as a bioreporter, and the recent trend to develop novel, better advanced reporters makes bioreporter development one of the most dynamic in ecotoxicology. Based on in-depth knowledge of E. coli, new assays are being developed or existing ones redesigned, thanks to the availability of new reporter genes and new or improved substrates. The technological evolution towards easier and more sensitive detection of different gene products is another important aspect. Often, this requires the redesign of the bacterium to make it compatible with the novel measuring tests. Recent advances in surface chemistry and nanoelectronics open the perspective for advanced reporter based on novel measuring platforms and with an online potential. In this article, we will discuss the use of E. coli-based bioreporters in ecotoxicological applications as well as some innovative sensors awaited for the future.

  20. E. Coli: Preventing Outbreaks at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Mary D.

    1996-01-01

    One strain of E. coli is not usually found in foods, but has been related to consumption of undercooked ground beef. Symptoms are stomach cramps and diarrhea, and 2-7% of infections lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome, which is life threatening. Camps can prevent outbreaks by avoiding uncooked meat on overnight campouts and requiring appropriate…

  1. Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Mead, P S; Griffin, P M

    1998-10-10

    Escherichia coli O157 was first identified as a human pathogen in 1982. One of several Shiga toxin-producing serotypes known to cause human illness, the organism probably evolved through horizontal acquisition of genes for Shiga toxins and other virulence factors. E. coli O157 is found regularly in the faeces of healthy cattle, and is transmitted to humans through contaminated food, water, and direct contact with infected people or animals. Human infection is associated with a wide range of clinical illness, including asymptomatic shedding, non-bloody diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis, haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and death. Since laboratory practices vary, physicians need to know whether laboratories in their area routinely test for E. coli O157 in stool specimens. Treatment with antimicrobial agents remains controversial: some studies suggest that treatment may precipitate haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and other studies suggest no effect or even a protective effect. Physicians can help to prevent E. coli O157 infections by counselling patients about the hazards of consuming undercooked ground meat or unpasteurised milk products and juices, and about the importance of handwashing to prevent the spread of diarrhoeal illness, and by informing public-health authorities when they see unusual numbers of cases of bloody diarrhoea or haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

  2. Engineering Escherichia coli for methanol conversion.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jonas E N; Meyer, Fabian; Litsanov, Boris; Kiefer, Patrick; Potthoff, Eva; Heux, Stéphanie; Quax, Wim J; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria utilize methanol and other reduced one-carbon compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. For this purpose, these bacteria evolved a number of specialized enzymes and pathways. Here, we used a synthetic biology approach to select and introduce a set of "methylotrophy genes" into Escherichia coli based on in silico considerations and flux balance analysis to enable methanol dissimilation and assimilation. We determined that the most promising approach allowing the utilization of methanol was the implementation of NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase and the establishment of the ribulose monophosphate cycle by expressing the genes for hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase (Phi). To test for the best-performing enzymes in the heterologous host, a number of enzyme candidates from different donor organisms were selected and systematically analyzed for their in vitro and in vivo activities in E. coli. Among these, Mdh2, Hps and Phi originating from Bacillus methanolicus were found to be the most effective. Labeling experiments using (13)C methanol with E. coli producing these enzymes showed up to 40% incorporation of methanol into central metabolites. The presence of the endogenous glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation pathway of E. coli did not adversely affect the methanol conversion rate. Taken together, the results of this study represent a major advancement towards establishing synthetic methylotrophs by gene transfer.

  3. Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Clark, David P.

    1991-01-01

    The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

  4. ECMDB: the E. coli Metabolome Database.

    PubMed

    Guo, An Chi; Jewison, Timothy; Wilson, Michael; Liu, Yifeng; Knox, Craig; Djoumbou, Yannick; Lo, Patrick; Mandal, Rupasri; Krishnamurthy, Ram; Wishart, David S

    2013-01-01

    The Escherichia coli Metabolome Database (ECMDB, http://www.ecmdb.ca) is a comprehensively annotated metabolomic database containing detailed information about the metabolome of E. coli (K-12). Modelled closely on the Human and Yeast Metabolome Databases, the ECMDB contains >2600 metabolites with links to ∼1500 different genes and proteins, including enzymes and transporters. The information in the ECMDB has been collected from dozens of textbooks, journal articles and electronic databases. Each metabolite entry in the ECMDB contains an average of 75 separate data fields, including comprehensive compound descriptions, names and synonyms, chemical taxonomy, compound structural and physicochemical data, bacterial growth conditions and substrates, reactions, pathway information, enzyme data, gene/protein sequence data and numerous hyperlinks to images, references and other public databases. The ECMDB also includes an extensive collection of intracellular metabolite concentration data compiled from our own work as well as other published metabolomic studies. This information is further supplemented with thousands of fully assigned reference nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry spectra obtained from pure E. coli metabolites that we (and others) have collected. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided that support text, chemical structure, spectral, molecular weight and gene/protein sequence queries. Because of E. coli's importance as a model organism for biologists and as a biofactory for industry, we believe this kind of database could have considerable appeal not only to metabolomics researchers but also to molecular biologists, systems biologists and individuals in the biotechnology industry.

  5. Gentamicin: effect on E. coli in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacena, M. A.; Todd, P.

    1999-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that liquid bacterial cultures grown in space flight were not killed as effectively by antibiotic treatments as were cultures grown on Earth. However, the cause for the decreased antibiotic effectiveness remains unknown. Possible explanations include modified cell proliferation and modified antibiotic transport in the culture medium. Escherichia coli cultures were grown in space flight (STS-69 and STS-73), with and without gentamicin, on a solid agar substrate thus eliminating fluid effects and reducing the unknowns associated with space-flight bacterial cultures in suspension. This research showed that E. coli cultures grown in flight on agar for 24 to 27 hours experienced a heightened growth compared to simultaneous controls. However, addition of gentamicin to the agar killed the bacteria such that both flight and ground control E. coli samples had similar final cell concentrations. Therefore, while the reported existence of a decrease in antibiotic effectiveness in liquid cultures remains unexplained, these data suggest that gentamicin in space flight was at least as effective as, if not more effective than, on Earth, when E. coli cells were grown on agar.

  6. Escherichia Coli--Key to Modern Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bregegere, Francois

    1982-01-01

    Mid-nineteenth century work by Mendel on plant hybrids and by Pasteur on fermentation gave birth by way of bacterial genetics to modern-day molecular biology. The bacterium Escherichia Coli has occupied a key position in genetic studies leading from early gene identification with DNA to current genetic engineering using recombinant DNA technology.…

  7. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  8. Balantidium coli pneumonia in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Vasilakopoulou, Alexandra; Dimarongona, Kyriaki; Samakovli, Anastasia; Papadimitris, Konstantinos; Avlami, Athina

    2003-01-01

    A fatal case is reported of Balantidium coli pneumonia in a 71-y-old woman suffering from anal cancer. The diagnosis was made by the discovery of motile trophozoites in a wet mount from bronchial secretions. The usual habitat of the parasite is the colon; lung balantidiasis is very rare. PMID:12693570

  9. Diarrhea, bacteremia and multiorgan dysfunction due to an extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli strain with enteropathogenic E. coli genes

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Robert; Nisa, Shahista; Hazen, Tracy H.; Horneman, Amy; Amoroso, Anthony; Rasko, David A.; Donnenberg, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old man with well-controlled HIV had severe diarrhea for 3 weeks and developed multiorgan dysfunction and bacteremia due to Escherichia coli. The genome of the patient's isolate had features characteristic of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli and genes distantly related to those defining enteropathogenic E. coli. PMID:26410828

  10. Risk Factors for Infection with Escherichia coli in Nursing Home Residents Colonized with Fluoroquinolone-Resistant E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Sara; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Tolomeo, Pam; Han, Jennifer H.

    2015-01-01

    A case-control study to determine risk factors for clinical infection with Escherichia coli was conducted among nursing home residents colonized with fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. Among 94 subjects, 11 (12%) developed infections with E. coli. Risk factors included the presence of a urinary catheter or tracheostomy, diabetes mellitus, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole exposure. PMID:25880678

  11. Production of glycoprotein vaccines in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Conjugate vaccines in which polysaccharide antigens are covalently linked to carrier proteins belong to the most effective and safest vaccines against bacterial pathogens. State-of-the art production of conjugate vaccines using chemical methods is a laborious, multi-step process. In vivo enzymatic coupling using the general glycosylation pathway of Campylobacter jejuni in recombinant Escherichia coli has been suggested as a simpler method for producing conjugate vaccines. In this study we describe the in vivo biosynthesis of two novel conjugate vaccine candidates against Shigella dysenteriae type 1, an important bacterial pathogen causing severe gastro-intestinal disease states mainly in developing countries. Results Two different periplasmic carrier proteins, AcrA from C. jejuni and a toxoid form of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin were glycosylated with Shigella O antigens in E. coli. Starting from shake flask cultivation in standard complex medium a lab-scale fed-batch process was developed for glycoconjugate production. It was found that efficiency of glycosylation but not carrier protein expression was highly susceptible to the physiological state at induction. After induction glycoconjugates generally appeared later than unglycosylated carrier protein, suggesting that glycosylation was the rate-limiting step for synthesis of conjugate vaccines in E. coli. Glycoconjugate synthesis, in particular expression of oligosaccharyltransferase PglB, strongly inhibited growth of E. coli cells after induction, making it necessary to separate biomass growth and recombinant protein expression phases. With a simple pulse and linear feed strategy and the use of semi-defined glycerol medium, volumetric glycoconjugate yield was increased 30 to 50-fold. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that glycosylated proteins can be produced in recombinant E. coli at a larger scale. The described methodologies constitute an important step towards cost-effective in vivo

  12. The Biology of the Escherichia coli Extracellular Matrix.

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, David A; Depas, William H; Chapman, Matthew R

    2015-06-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the world's best-characterized organisms, because it has been extensively studied for over a century. However, most of this work has focused on E. coli grown under laboratory conditions that do not faithfully simulate its natural environments. Therefore, the historical perspectives on E. coli physiology and life cycle are somewhat skewed toward experimental systems that feature E. coli growing logarithmically in a test tube. Typically a commensal bacterium, E. coli resides in the lower intestines of a slew of animals. Outside of the lower intestine, E. coli can adapt and survive in a very different set of environmental conditions. Biofilm formation allows E. coli to survive, and even thrive, in environments that do not support the growth of planktonic populations. E. coli can form biofilms virtually everywhere: in the bladder during a urinary tract infection, on in-dwelling medical devices, and outside of the host on plants and in the soil. The E. coli extracellular matrix (ECM), primarily composed of the protein polymer named curli and the polysaccharide cellulose, promotes adherence to organic and inorganic surfaces and resistance to desiccation, the host immune system, and other antimicrobials. The pathways that govern E. coli biofilm formation, cellulose production, and curli biogenesis will be discussed in this article, which concludes with insights into the future of E. coli biofilm research and potential therapies. PMID:26185090

  13. Drinking water and diarrhoeal disease due to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Paul R

    2003-06-01

    Escherichia coli has had a central place in water microbiology for decades as an indicator of faecal pollution. It is only relatively recently that the role of E. coli as pathogen, rather than indicator, in drinking water has begun to be stressed. Interest in the role of E. coli as a cause of diarrhoeal disease has increased because of the emergence of E. coli O157:H7 and other enterohaemorrhagic E. coli, due to the severity of the related disease. There are enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic, enterohaemorrhagic, enteroinvasive, enteroaggregative and diffusely adherent strains of E. coli. Each type of E. coli causes diarrhoeal disease through different mechanisms and each causes a different clinical presentation. Several of the types cause diarrhoea by the elaboration of one or more toxins, others by some other form of direct damage to epithelial cells. This paper discusses each of these types in turn and also describes their epidemiology, with particular reference to whether they are waterborne or not.

  14. Multiple oral radiopaque masses leading to Gardner's syndrome diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Aline Garcia Figueiredo; Costa, Rayana Ondina Biagioni; de Oliveira, Lucinei Roberto; Grossmann, Soraya de Mattos Camargo

    2013-07-01

    Gardner's syndrome, an autosomal dominant syndrome, is linked to familial adenomatosis polyposis (FAP), which is known mainly as a colorectal disease. FAP also presents extracolonically as intestinal polyposis, multiple osteomas, cutaneous cysts, or fibromas. This article reports the case of a 66-year-old white woman who was referred to the Oral Medicine Clinic, School of Dentistry, Universidade Vale do Rio Verde, Brazil, for evaluation of multiple sclerotic, asymptomatic masses in the jaws that were observed in a routine periapical radiographic exam by a dentist. The patient presented with intestinal poliposis, periosteal osteoma in the face, and fibromas and multiple endosteal osteomas in the maxilla, which are indications of Gardner's syndrome. The clinical differential diagnosis included multiple buccal exostoses, idiopathic osteosclerosis, cemento-osseous dysplasias, multiple odontomas, osteomas, and Gardner's syndrome. Patients with a suspected diagnosis of Gardner's syndrome should be referred to a dermatologist, have a colonoscopy performed, and be followed up by a dentist.

  15. Multiple oral radiopaque masses leading to Gardner's syndrome diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Aline Garcia Figueiredo; Costa, Rayana Ondina Biagioni; de Oliveira, Lucinei Roberto; Grossmann, Soraya de Mattos Camargo

    2013-07-01

    Gardner's syndrome, an autosomal dominant syndrome, is linked to familial adenomatosis polyposis (FAP), which is known mainly as a colorectal disease. FAP also presents extracolonically as intestinal polyposis, multiple osteomas, cutaneous cysts, or fibromas. This article reports the case of a 66-year-old white woman who was referred to the Oral Medicine Clinic, School of Dentistry, Universidade Vale do Rio Verde, Brazil, for evaluation of multiple sclerotic, asymptomatic masses in the jaws that were observed in a routine periapical radiographic exam by a dentist. The patient presented with intestinal poliposis, periosteal osteoma in the face, and fibromas and multiple endosteal osteomas in the maxilla, which are indications of Gardner's syndrome. The clinical differential diagnosis included multiple buccal exostoses, idiopathic osteosclerosis, cemento-osseous dysplasias, multiple odontomas, osteomas, and Gardner's syndrome. Patients with a suspected diagnosis of Gardner's syndrome should be referred to a dermatologist, have a colonoscopy performed, and be followed up by a dentist. PMID:23823353

  16. Efficient production of indigoidine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuchao; Gage, David; Zhan, Jixun

    2015-08-01

    Indigoidine is a bacterial natural product with antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Its bright blue color resembles the industrial dye indigo, thus representing a new natural blue dye that may find uses in industry. In our previous study, an indigoidine synthetase Sc-IndC and an associated helper protein Sc-IndB were identified from Streptomyces chromofuscus ATCC 49982 and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BAP1 to produce the blue pigment at 3.93 g/l. To further improve the production of indigoidine, in this work, the direct biosynthetic precursor L-glutamine was fed into the fermentation broth of the engineered E. coli strain harboring Sc-IndC and Sc-IndB. The highest titer of indigoidine reached 8.81 ± 0.21 g/l at 1.46 g/l L-glutamine. Given the relatively high price of L-glutamine, a metabolic engineering technique was used to directly enhance the in situ supply of this precursor. A glutamine synthetase gene (glnA) was amplified from E. coli and co-expressed with Sc-indC and Sc-indB in E. coli BAP1, leading to the production of indigoidine at 5.75 ± 0.09 g/l. Because a nitrogen source is required for amino acid biosynthesis, we then tested the effect of different nitrogen-containing salts on the supply of L-glutamine and subsequent indigoidine production. Among the four tested salts including (NH4)2SO4, NH4Cl, (NH4)2HPO4 and KNO3, (NH4)2HPO4 showed the best effect on improving the titer of indigoidine. Different concentrations of (NH4)2HPO4 were added to the fermentation broths of E. coli BAP1/Sc-IndC+Sc-IndB+GlnA, and the titer reached the highest (7.08 ± 0.11 g/l) at 2.5 mM (NH4)2HPO4. This work provides two efficient methods for the production of this promising blue pigment in E. coli.

  17. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF PLASMOLYSIS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    PubMed

    COTA-ROBLES, E H

    1963-03-01

    Cota-Robles, Eugene H. (University of California, Riverside). Electron microscopy of plasmolysis in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 85:499-503. 1963.-Escherichia coli cells plasmolyzed in 0.35 m sucrose reveal plasmolysis at one tip of a cell or in the center of dividing cells in which protoplast partition has been complete. Central plasmolysis reveals that protoplast separation can be completed before the invagination of the cell wall is complete. These studies support the concept that these cells divide by constriction. The strength of the union between cell wall and cytoplasm is not uniform around the entire cell. It is strongest along the sides of these rod-shaped cells and weakest at one tip of the single cell. Thus, a single cell generally forms one cup-shaped vacuole in which the cytoplasm has collapsed away from one tip of the cell.

  18. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: Orchestrated host engagement.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, James M; Munson, George M; Rasko, David A

    2013-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are a pervasive cause of serious diarrheal illness in developing countries. Presently, there is no vaccine to prevent these infections, and many features of the basic pathogenesis of these organisms remain poorly understood. Until very recently most pathogenesis studies had focused almost exclusively on a small subset of known "classical" virulence genes, namely fimbrial colonization factors and the heat-labile (LT) and heat stable (ST) enterotoxins. However, recent investigations of pathogen-host interactions reveal a surprisingly complex and intricately orchestrated engagement involving the interplay of classical and "novel" virulence genes, as well as participation of genes highly conserved in the E. coli species. These studies may inform further rational approaches to vaccine development for these important pathogens. PMID:23892244

  19. Escherichia coli growth under modeled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul W.; Meyer, Michelle L.; Leff, Laura G.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit varying responses to modeled reduced gravity that can be simulated by clino-rotation. When Escherichia coli was subjected to different rotation speeds during clino-rotation, significant differences between modeled reduced gravity and normal gravity controls were observed only at higher speeds (30-50 rpm). There was no apparent affect of removing samples on the results obtained. When E. coli was grown in minimal medium (at 40 rpm), cell size was not affected by modeled reduced gravity and there were few differences in cell numbers. However, in higher nutrient conditions (i.e., dilute nutrient broth), total cell numbers were higher and cells were smaller under reduced gravity compared to normal gravity controls. Overall, the responses to modeled reduced gravity varied with nutrient conditions; larger surface to volume ratios may help compensate for the zone of nutrient depletion around the cells under modeled reduced gravity.

  20. Compilation of DNA sequences of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Manfred

    1989-01-01

    We have compiled the DNA sequence data for E.coli K12 available from the GENBANK and EMBO databases and over a period of several years independently from the literature. We have introduced all available genetic map data and have arranged the sequences accordingly. As far as possible the overlaps are deleted and a total of 940,449 individual bp is found to be determined till the beginning of 1989. This corresponds to a total of 19.92% of the entire E.coli chromosome consisting of about 4,720 kbp. This number may actually be higher by some extra 2% derived from the sequence of lysogenic bacteriophage lambda and the various insertion sequences. This compilation may be available in machine readable form from one of the international databanks in some future. PMID:2654890

  1. Engineering the Escherichia coli Fermentative Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orencio-Trejo, M.; Utrilla, J.; Fernández-Sandoval, M. T.; Huerta-Beristain, G.; Gosset, G.; Martinez, A.

    Fermentative metabolism constitutes a fundamental cellular capacity for industrial biocatalysis. Escherichia coli is an important microorganism in the field of metabolic engineering for its well-known molecular characteristics and its rapid growth. It can adapt to different growth conditions and is able to grow in the presence or absence of oxygen. Through the use of metabolic pathway engineering and bioprocessing techniques, it is possible to explore the fundamental cellular properties and to exploit its capacity to be applied as industrial biocatalysts to produce a wide array of chemicals. The objective of this chapter is to review the metabolic engineering efforts carried out with E. coli by manipulating the central carbon metabolism and fermentative pathways to obtain strains that produce metabolites with high titers, such as ethanol, alanine, lactate and succinate.

  2. Verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC).

    PubMed

    Karmali, Mohamed A; Gannon, Victor; Sargeant, Jan M

    2010-01-27

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other Verocytotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC) are zoonotic pathogens associated with food and waterborne illness around the world. E. coli O157:H7 has been implicated in large outbreaks as well as in sporadic cases of haemorrhagic colitis and the sometimes fatal haemolytic uremic syndrome. VTs produced by these bacteria are thought to damage host endothelial cells in small vessels of the intestine, kidney and brain resulting in thrombotic microangiopathy. All VTs have the same subunit structure, glycolipid cell receptor and inhibit protein synthesis. During VTEC infection, it is thought one or more bacterial adhesins initiates colonization and establishes intimate attachment and is responsible for the translocation of a variety of effectors which alter the structure and function of host cells. VTEC are widespread in animals but ruminants are thought to be their natural reservoir. E. coli O157:H7 colonizes the terminal colon of cattle and can be shed in very large numbers by specific herdmates known as "supershedders". Faeces containing these organisms act as a source of contamination for a variety of foods and the environment. Many VTEC control efforts have been investigated along the "farm to fork" continuum including, vaccination of cattle with colonization factors, and the use of novel antimicrobials, such as bacteriocins, chloral hydrate, bacteriophage and substances which disrupt quorum sensing. In addition, many barriers have been developed for use in the slaughter and food processing industry such as steam pasteurization and irradiation. Despite these efforts many scientific, technical and regulatory challenges remain in the control and prevention of VTEC-associated human illness.

  3. Regulation of alcohol fermentation by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the way in which the synthesis of ethanol and related fermentation products are regulated in the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli. We are also investigating the control of other genes required for anaerobic growth. We have isolated both structural and regulatory mutations affecting the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase, the enzyme responsible for the final step in alcohol synthesis. Some of these regulatory mutations also affect other anaerobically induced genes. The adh gene has been cloned and sequenced. The ADH protein is one of the largest highly expressed proteins in E. coli and requires approximately 2700bp of DNA for its coding sequence. We have also isolated mutations affecting the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase and have recently cloned the ldh gene. In consequence it is now possible to construct E. coli strains defective in the production of any one or more of their normal fermentation products (i.e. formate, acetate, lactate, ethanol and succinate). The factors affecting ratio of fermentation products are being investigated by in vivo NMR spectroscopy.

  4. Characterization of molybdenum cofactor from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Amy, N K; Rajagopalan, K V

    1979-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor activity was found in the soluble fraction of cell-free extracts of Escherichia coli grown aerobically in media supplemented with molybdate. Cofactor was detected by its ability to complement the nitrate reductase-deficient mutant of Neurospora crossa, nit-1, resulting in the vitro formation of nitrate reductase activity. Acid treatment of E. coli extracts was not required for release of cofactor activity. Cofactor was able to diffuse through a membrane of nominal 2,000-molecular-weight cutoff and was insensitive to trypsin. The cofactor was associated with a carrier molecule (approximately 40,000 daltons) during gel filtration and sucrose gradient centrifugation, but was easily removed from the carrier by dialysis. The carrier molecule protected the cofactor from inactivation by heat or oxygen. E. coli grown in molybdenum-free media, without and with tungsten, synthesized a metal-free "empty" cofactor and its tungsten analog, respectively, both of which were subsequently activated by the addition of molybdate. Empty and tungsten-containing cofactor complemented the nitrate reductase subunits in the nit-1 extract, forming inactive, but intact, 7.9S nitrate reductase. Addition of molybdate to the enzyme complemented in this manner restored nitrate reductase activity. PMID:387715

  5. Secretion of clostridium cellulase by E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Ida Kuo

    1998-01-01

    A gene, encoding an endocellulase from a newly isolated mesophilic Clostridium strain IY-2 which can digest bamboo fibers, cellulose, rice straw, and sawdust, was isolated by shotgun cloning in an E. coli expression plasmid pLC2833. E. coli positive clones were selected based on their ability to hydrolyze milled bamboo fibers and cellulose present in agar plates. One clone contained a 2.8 kb DNA fragment that was responsible for cellulase activity. Western blot analyses indicated that the positive clone produced a secreted cellulase with a mass of about 58,000 daltons that was identical in size to the subunit of one of the three major Clostridium cellulases. The products of cellulose digestion by this cloned cellulase were cellotetraose and soluble higher polymers. The cloned DNA contained signal sequences capable of directing the secretion of heterologous proteins from an E. coli host. The invention describes a bioprocess for the treatment of cellulosic plant materials to produce cellular growth substrates and fermentation end products suitable for production of liquid fuels, solvents, and acids.

  6. Role of Escherichia coli in Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Koppolu, Veerendra; Vasigala, Veneela KR

    2016-01-01

    Increased energy consumption coupled with depleting petroleum reserves and increased greenhouse gas emissions have renewed our interest in generating fuels from renewable energy sources via microbial fermentation. Central to this problem is the choice of microorganism that catalyzes the production of fuels at high volumetric productivity and yield from cheap and abundantly available renewable energy sources. Microorganisms that are metabolically engineered to redirect renewable carbon sources into desired fuel products are contemplated as best choices to obtain high volumetric productivity and yield. Considering the availability of vast knowledge in genomic and metabolic fronts, Escherichia coli is regarded as a primary choice for the production of biofuels. Here, we reviewed the microbial production of liquid biofuels that have the potential to be used either alone or in combination with the present-day fuels. We specifically highlighted the metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches used to improve the production of biofuels from E. coli over the past few years. We also discussed the challenges that still exist for the biofuel production from E. coli and their possible solutions. PMID:27441002

  7. Role of Escherichia coli in Biofuel Production.

    PubMed

    Koppolu, Veerendra; Vasigala, Veneela Kr

    2016-01-01

    Increased energy consumption coupled with depleting petroleum reserves and increased greenhouse gas emissions have renewed our interest in generating fuels from renewable energy sources via microbial fermentation. Central to this problem is the choice of microorganism that catalyzes the production of fuels at high volumetric productivity and yield from cheap and abundantly available renewable energy sources. Microorganisms that are metabolically engineered to redirect renewable carbon sources into desired fuel products are contemplated as best choices to obtain high volumetric productivity and yield. Considering the availability of vast knowledge in genomic and metabolic fronts, Escherichia coli is regarded as a primary choice for the production of biofuels. Here, we reviewed the microbial production of liquid biofuels that have the potential to be used either alone or in combination with the present-day fuels. We specifically highlighted the metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches used to improve the production of biofuels from E. coli over the past few years. We also discussed the challenges that still exist for the biofuel production from E. coli and their possible solutions. PMID:27441002

  8. Cadaverine induces closing of E. coli porins.

    PubMed

    delaVega, A L; Delcour, A H

    1995-12-01

    We have used the electrophysiological technique of patch-clamp to study the modulation of Escherichia coli porins by cadaverine. Porin channels typically have a very high probability to be open, and were not known to be inhibited by specific compounds until the present study. Experiments performed on patches of outer membrane reconstituted in liposomes reveal that cadaverine applied to the periplasmic side increases the frequency of channel closures in a concentration-dependent fashion, and thereby decreases the total amount of ion flux through a porin-containing membrane. The positive charge on cadaverine is important for inhibition, because the effect is relieved at higher pH where fewer polyamine molecules are charged. Modulation is observed only at negative pipet voltages, and therefore confers voltage dependence to porin activity. Cadaverine increases the number and duration of cooperative closures of more than one channel, suggesting that it does not merely block the pore but exerts its kinetic effect allosterically. As a biological assay of porin inhibition, E. coli behavior in chemotaxis swarm plates was tested and found to be impaired in the presence of cadaverine. Polyamines are naturally found associated with the outer membrane of E.coli, but are lost upon fractionation. We postulate that cadaverine might be a natural regulator of porin activity.

  9. [Therapeutic aspects of coli mastitis in ruminants].

    PubMed

    Verheijden, J H; van Miert, A S

    1985-01-01

    Cows with coliform mastitis showed, in addition to fever, tachycardia and ruminal stasis and a concatenation of nonspecific responses, such as neutrophylic leukopenia followed by leukocytosis, lymphopenia, hypocalcaemia, hypoferraemia, hypozincaemia, and hypercupremia, and changes in the concentration of certain serum proteins. Similar responses occurred in cows and goats when mastitis was induced by an E. coli endotoxin or following the i/v injection of such endotoxin. Research suggested that in cows with clinical mastitis the symptoms of a generalized disease were predominantly the result of the release of phagocyte endogenous proteins at the site of inflammation in the mammary gland. Another inflammatory protein was the leukocytic endothelial mediator which changed the plasma concentrations of trace elements. Local treatment with the rather toxic antibiotic, polymyxin B, blocked the effect of the endotoxin administered via the udder on plasma Zn and Fe values. Therefore, local treatment with this drug seemed to be indicated with cows having E. coli mastitis. Based on pharmacokinetic behaviour parenteral treatment of such cows with trimethoprim or chloramphenicol appeared to be interest. Furthermore fluboprofen, a nonsteroid antiinflammatory agent was shown to possess a beneficial effect in cows with experimental E. coli mastitis.

  10. Role of Escherichia coli in Biofuel Production.

    PubMed

    Koppolu, Veerendra; Vasigala, Veneela Kr

    2016-01-01

    Increased energy consumption coupled with depleting petroleum reserves and increased greenhouse gas emissions have renewed our interest in generating fuels from renewable energy sources via microbial fermentation. Central to this problem is the choice of microorganism that catalyzes the production of fuels at high volumetric productivity and yield from cheap and abundantly available renewable energy sources. Microorganisms that are metabolically engineered to redirect renewable carbon sources into desired fuel products are contemplated as best choices to obtain high volumetric productivity and yield. Considering the availability of vast knowledge in genomic and metabolic fronts, Escherichia coli is regarded as a primary choice for the production of biofuels. Here, we reviewed the microbial production of liquid biofuels that have the potential to be used either alone or in combination with the present-day fuels. We specifically highlighted the metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches used to improve the production of biofuels from E. coli over the past few years. We also discussed the challenges that still exist for the biofuel production from E. coli and their possible solutions.

  11. Fate of E. coli across mechanical dewatering processes.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, M C; Furness, D; Jefferson, B; Cartmell, E

    2004-07-01

    Five UK sludge treatment plants have been monitored for Escherichia coli (E.coli) variation after mechanical belt press and centrifuge dewatering processes. A complementary laboratory trial was also completed to examine the effects of varying centrifugal force on raw sludge E.coli content. An E.coli balance between the numbers contained in the flows entering and exiting four full scale centrifuge dewatering systems indicated a minimum 63 % increase in E.coli numbers between the input feed and sludge cake for a digested sludge input to the centrifuge. For two of the centrifuge sites this increase was statistically significant and corresponded to an increase in E.coli concentration ranging up to 1.4 Log after centrifugation. However, E.coli variation was found to be dependent on the type of sludge, as centrifuge dewatering of raw sludge at full scale resulted in a 40 % decrease in E.coli numbers. The complementary laboratory centrifuge work confirmed that E.coli numbers decreased in raw sludge after centrifugation. E.coli numbers were not observed to increase in digested sludge which had been dewatered using a belt press. A decrease of 44 % was observed. PMID:15346864

  12. The fate of Escherichia coli and E. coli O157 in cattle slurry after application to land.

    PubMed

    Fenlon, D R; Ogden, I D; Vinten, A; Svoboda, I

    2000-01-01

    The fate of both faecal Escherichia coli and E. coli O157 in slurry following application to arable and grass plots on a clay loam soil was studied. Slurry (5% dry matter) containing 5.3 x 10(4) ml(-1) E. coli and 30 E. coli O157 100 ml(-1) was spread in early March. Initially, almost all E. coli were retained in the upper layers of the soil. Escherichia coli numbers steadily declined to less than 1% of those applied by day 29, and E. coli O157 were only detected in the soil and on the grass for the first week after application. There was some transport of bacteria to deeper layers of the soil, but this was approximately 2% of the total; transport to drains over the same period was mainly associated with rainfall events and amounted to approximately 7% of applied E. coli. However, there were indications that periods of heavy rainfall could cause significant losses of E. coli by both leaching and run-off. Experimental studies showed that E. coli O157 on grass, which was subsequently ensiled in conditions allowing aerobic spoilage, could multiply to numbers exceeding 10(6) g(-1) in the silage.

  13. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Njoroge, Samuel M.; Boinett, Christine J.; Madé, Laure F.; Ouko, Tom T.; Fèvre, Eric M.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described. PMID:26187892

  14. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel M; Boinett, Christine J; Madé, Laure F; Ouko, Tom T; Fèvre, Eric M; Thomson, Nicholas R; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described. PMID:26187892

  15. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel M; Boinett, Christine J; Madé, Laure F; Ouko, Tom T; Fèvre, Eric M; Thomson, Nicholas R; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described.

  16. Recent advances in adherence and invasion of pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kalita, Anjana; Hu, Jia; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Colonization of the host epithelia by pathogenic Escherichia coli is influenced by the ability of the bacteria to interact with host surfaces. Because the initial step of an E. coli infection is to adhere, invade, and persist within host cells, some strategies used by intestinal and extra-intestinal E. coli to infect host cell are presented. Recent findings This review highlights recent progress understanding how extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli strains express specific adhesins/invasins that allow colonization of the urinary tract or the meninges, while intestinal E. coli strains are able to colonize different regions of the intestinal tract using other specialized adhesins/invasins. Finally, evaluation of, different diets and environmental conditions regulating the colonization of these pathogens is discussed. Summary Discovery of new interactions between pathogenic E. coli and the host epithelial cells unravels the need of more mechanistic studies that can provide new clues in how to combat these infections. PMID:25023740

  17. Replication and transcription of eukaryotic DNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Morrow, J F; Cohen, S N; Chang, A C; Boyer, H W; Goodman, H M; Helling, R B

    1974-05-01

    Fragments of amplified Xenopus laevis DNA, coding for 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA and generated by EcoRI restriction endonuclease, have been linked in vitro to the bacterial plasmid pSC101; and the recombinant molecular species have been introduced into E. coli by transformation. These recombinant plasmids, containing both eukaryotic and prokaryotic DNA, replicate stably in E. coli. RNA isolated from E. coli minicells harboring the plasmids hybridizes to amplified X. laevis rDNA.

  18. Comparative genomics of unintrogressed Campylobacter coli clades 2 and 3

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli share a multitude of risk factors associated with human gastrointestinal disease, yet their phylogeny differs significantly. C. jejuni is scattered into several lineages, with no apparent linkage, whereas C. coli clusters into three distinct phylogenetic groups (clades) of which clade 1 has shown extensive genome-wide introgression with C. jejuni, yet the other two clades (2 and 3) have less than 2% of C. jejuni ancestry. We characterized a C. coli strain (76339) with four novel multilocus sequence type alleles (ST-5088) and having the capability to express gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT); an accessory feature in C. jejuni. Our aim was to further characterize unintrogressed C. coli clades 2 and 3, using comparative genomics and with additional genome sequences available, to investigate the impact of horizontal gene transfer in shaping the accessory and core gene pools in unintrogressed C. coli. Results Here, we present the first fully closed C. coli clade 3 genome (76339). The phylogenomic analysis of strain 76339, revealed that it belonged to clade 3 of unintrogressed C. coli. A more extensive respiratory metabolism among unintrogressed C. coli strains was found compared to introgressed C. coli (clade 1). We also identified other genes, such as serine proteases and an active sialyltransferase in the lipooligosaccharide locus, not present in C. coli clade 1 and we further propose a unique scenario for the evolution of Campylobacter ggt. Conclusions We propose new insights into the evolution of the accessory genome of C. coli clade 3 and C. jejuni. Also, in silico analysis of the gene content revealed that C. coli clades 2 and 3 have genes associated with infection, suggesting they are a potent human pathogen, and may currently be underreported in human infections due to niche separation. PMID:24524824

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain NB8

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Zu-huang; Wang, Chun-xin; Zhu, Jian-ming

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli NB8 is a clinical pyelonephritis isolate. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of uropathogenic E. coli NB8, which contains drug resistance genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones, macrolides, colistin, sulfonamide-trimethoprim, and tetracycline. NB8 infects the kidney and bladder, making it an important tool for studying E. coli pathogenesis. PMID:27609920

  20. Survival of pathogenic Escherichia coli on basil, lettuce, and spinach.

    PubMed

    Markland, S M; Shortlidge, K L; Hoover, D G; Yaron, S; Patel, J; Singh, A; Sharma, M; Kniel, K E

    2013-12-01

    The contamination of lettuce, spinach and basil with pathogenic E. coli has caused numerous illnesses over the past decade. E. coli O157:H7, E. coli O104:H4 and avian pathogenic E. coli (APECstx- and APECstx+) were inoculated on basil plants and in promix substrate using drip and overhead irrigation. When overhead inoculated with 7 log CFU/ml of each strain, E. coli populations were significantly (P = 0.03) higher on overhead-irrigated plants than on drip-irrigated plants. APECstx-, E. coli O104:H4 and APECstx+ populations were recovered on plants at 3.6, 2.3 and 3.1 log CFU/g at 10 dpi (days post-inoculation), respectively. E. coli O157:H7 was not detected on basil after 4 dpi. The persistence of E. coli O157:H7 and APECstx- were similar when co-inoculated on lettuce and spinach plants. On spinach and lettuce, E. coli O157:H7 and APEC populations declined from 5.7 to 6.1 log CFU/g and 4.5 log CFU/g, to undetectable at 3 dpi and 0.6-1.6 log CFU/g at 7 dpi, respectively. The detection of low populations of APEC and E. coli O104:H4 strains 10 dpi indicates these strains may be more adapted to environmental conditions than E. coli O157:H7. This is the first reported study of E. coli O104:H4 on a produce commodity.

  1. Survival of pathogenic Escherichia coli on basil, lettuce, and spinach.

    PubMed

    Markland, S M; Shortlidge, K L; Hoover, D G; Yaron, S; Patel, J; Singh, A; Sharma, M; Kniel, K E

    2013-12-01

    The contamination of lettuce, spinach and basil with pathogenic E. coli has caused numerous illnesses over the past decade. E. coli O157:H7, E. coli O104:H4 and avian pathogenic E. coli (APECstx- and APECstx+) were inoculated on basil plants and in promix substrate using drip and overhead irrigation. When overhead inoculated with 7 log CFU/ml of each strain, E. coli populations were significantly (P = 0.03) higher on overhead-irrigated plants than on drip-irrigated plants. APECstx-, E. coli O104:H4 and APECstx+ populations were recovered on plants at 3.6, 2.3 and 3.1 log CFU/g at 10 dpi (days post-inoculation), respectively. E. coli O157:H7 was not detected on basil after 4 dpi. The persistence of E. coli O157:H7 and APECstx- were similar when co-inoculated on lettuce and spinach plants. On spinach and lettuce, E. coli O157:H7 and APEC populations declined from 5.7 to 6.1 log CFU/g and 4.5 log CFU/g, to undetectable at 3 dpi and 0.6-1.6 log CFU/g at 7 dpi, respectively. The detection of low populations of APEC and E. coli O104:H4 strains 10 dpi indicates these strains may be more adapted to environmental conditions than E. coli O157:H7. This is the first reported study of E. coli O104:H4 on a produce commodity. PMID:23280331

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain NB8.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xing-Bei; Mi, Zu-Huang; Wang, Chun-Xin; Zhu, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli NB8 is a clinical pyelonephritis isolate. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of uropathogenic E. coli NB8, which contains drug resistance genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones, macrolides, colistin, sulfonamide-trimethoprim, and tetracycline. NB8 infects the kidney and bladder, making it an important tool for studying E. coli pathogenesis. PMID:27609920

  3. Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan Balantidium coli

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sat; Harding, Godfrey

    2003-01-01

    Balantidium coli, a ciliated protozoan, is well known to cause intestinal infection in humans. Extraintestinal spread to the peritoneal cavity and genitourinary tract has rarely been reported. There have also been a few cases of lung involvement from this parasite. A case of B coli causing a thick-walled right upper lobe cavity in an organic farmer who had contact with aerosolized pig manure is reported. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid examined for ova and parasite revealed trophozoites of B coli in large numbers. Treatment with doxycycline hyclate led to marked improvement. Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan B coli should be considered in individuals who report contact with pigs. PMID:18159451

  4. Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan Balantidium coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sat; Harding, Godfrey

    2003-05-01

    Balantidium coli, a ciliated protozoan, is well known to cause intestinal infection in humans. Extraintestinal spread to the peritoneal cavity and genitourinary tract has rarely been reported. There have also been a few cases of lung involvement from this parasite. A case of B coli causing a thick-walled right upper lobe cavity in an organic farmer who had contact with aerosolized pig manure is reported. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid examined for ova and parasite revealed trophozoites of B coli in large numbers. Treatment with doxycycline hyclate led to marked improvement. Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan B coli should be considered in individuals who report contact with pigs. PMID:18159451

  5. Rapid Sterilization of Escherichia coli by Solution Plasma Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Nina; Ishizaki, Takahiro; Baroch, Pavel; Saito, Nagahiro

    2012-12-01

    Solution plasma (SP), which is a discharge in the liquid phase, has the potential for rapid sterilization of water without chemical agents. The discharge showed a strong sterilization performance against Escherichia coli bacteria. The decimal value (D value) of the reduction time for E. coli by this system with an electrode distance of 1.0 mm was estimated to be approximately 1.0 min. Our discharge system in the liquid phase caused no physical damage to the E. coli and only a small increase in the temperature of the aqueous solution. The UV light generated by the discharge was an important factor in the sterilization of E. coli.

  6. Using zebra mussels to monitor Escherichia coli in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Selegean, J P; Kusserow, R; Patel, R; Heidtke, T M; Ram, J L

    2001-01-01

    Use of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) as an indicator of previously elevated bacteria concentrations in a watershed was examined. The ability of the zebra mussel to accumulate and purge Escherichia coli over several days was investigated in both laboratory and field experiments. In laboratory experiments, periodic enumeration of E. coli in mussels that had been exposed to a dilute solution of raw sewage demonstrated that (i) maximum concentrations of E. coli are reached within a few hours of exposure to sewage, (ii) the tissue concentration attained is higher than the concentration in the ambient water, and (iii) the E. coli concentrations take several days to return to preexposure concentrations when mussels are subsequently placed in sterile water. In field experiments conducted in southeast Michigan in the Clinton River watershed, brief increases in E. coli concentrations in the water were accompanied by increases in mussel concentrations of E. coli that lasted 2 or 3 d. The ability of mussels to retain and to concentrate E. coli made it possible to detect E. coli in the environment under conditions that conventional monitoring may often miss. Sampling caged mussels in a river and its tributaries may enable watershed managers to reduce the sampling frequency normally required to identify critical E. coli sources, thereby providing a more cost-effective river monitoring strategy for bacterial contamination.

  7. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. PMID:25611733

  8. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  9. The Synthesis of Ribosomes in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Mccarthy, B. J.; Britten, R. J.

    1962-01-01

    C14-uracil is rapidly incorporated by E. coli at low concentrations. Approximately half the radioactivity passes directly into RNA with very little delay. The remaining half enters a large metabolic pool and later is incorporated into RNA. The total rate of uptake (growing cells) is not greater than the requirement for uracil and cytosine for RNA synthesis. The size of the metabolic pool is not influenced measurably by the external uracil concentration. No evidence is found for the existence of a fraction of RNA which is rapidly synthesized and degraded. PMID:19431314

  10. [Recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Nuc, Przemysław; Nuc, Katarzyna

    2006-01-01

    Growing needs for efficient recombinant production pose new challenges; starting from cell growth optimization under overexpression conditions, improving vectors, gene and protein sequence to suit them to protein biosynthesis machinery of the host, through extending the knowledge of protein folding, fusion protein construction, and coexpression systems, to improvements in protein purification and renaturation technologies. Hitherto Escherichia coli is the most defined and the cheapest protein biosynthesis system. With its wealth of available mutants tested is the best suited to economically test new gene constructs and to scale up the recombinant protein production.

  11. Escherichia coli survival in waters: temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, R A; Pachepsky, Y; Hill, R L; Shelton, D R; Whelan, G

    2013-02-01

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q₁₀ model. This suggestion was made 34 years ago based on 20 survival curves taken from published literature, but has not been revisited since then. The objective of this study was to re-evaluate the accuracy of the Q₁₀ equation, utilizing data accumulated since 1978. We assembled a database of 450 E. coli survival datasets from 70 peer-reviewed papers. We then focused on the 170 curves taken from experiments that were performed in the laboratory under dark conditions to exclude the effects of sunlight and other field factors that could cause additional variability in results. All datasets were tabulated dependencies "log concentration vs. time." There were three major patterns of inactivation: about half of the datasets had a section of fast log-linear inactivation followed by a section of slow log-linear inactivation; about a quarter of the datasets had a lag period followed by log-linear inactivation; and the remaining quarter were approximately linear throughout. First-order inactivation rate constants were calculated from the linear sections of all survival curves and the data grouped by water sources, including waters of agricultural origin, pristine water sources, groundwater and wells, lakes and reservoirs, rivers and streams, estuaries and seawater, and wastewater. Dependency of E. coli inactivation rates on temperature varied among the water sources. There was a significant difference in inactivation rate values at the reference temperature between rivers and agricultural waters, wastewaters and agricultural waters, rivers and lakes, and wastewater and lakes. At specific sites, the Q₁₀ equation was more accurate in rivers and coastal waters than in lakes making the value of

  12. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli: foe or innocent bystander?

    PubMed

    Hu, J; Torres, A G

    2015-08-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) remain one the most important pathogens infecting children and they are one of the main causes of persistent diarrhoea worldwide. Historically, typical EPEC (tEPEC), defined as those isolates with the attaching and effacement (A/E) genotype (eae(+)), which possess bfpA(+) and lack the stx(-) genes are found strongly associated with diarrhoeal cases. However, occurrence of atypical EPEC (aEPEC; eae(+)bfpA(-)stx(-)) in diarrhoeal and asymptomatic hosts has made investigators question the role of these pathogens in human disease. Current epidemiological data are helping to answer the question of whether EPEC is mainly a foe or an innocent bystander during infection.

  13. GLYCOLATE METABOLISM IN ESCHERICHIA COLI1

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Robert W.; Hayashi, James A.

    1962-01-01

    Hansen, Robert W. (University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago) and James A. Hayashi. Glycolate metabolism in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 83:679–687. 1962.—This study of glycolate-adapted Escherichia coli indicates that the most probable route for utilization of the substrate includes glyceric acid, 3-phosphoglyceric acid, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. A glyceric acid dehydrogenase, which reduces tartronic semialdehyde to glycerate in the presence of reduced diphosphopyridine nucleotide, and a kinase, which catalyzes the formation of 3-phosphoglycerate from glyceric acid and adenosine triphosphate, were shown to be present. Carbon recoveries in growing cultures and manometric data obtained with resting cells showed the complete oxidation of glycolate to carbon dioxide. Measurements of the oxidation of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates indicated that these compounds are oxidized without lag and at a rate commensurate with the rate of glycolate oxidation. Assays of the enzymes characteristic of known pathways of terminal oxidation, such as isocitratase, malate synthetase, isocitric dehydrogenase, and condensing enzyme, provided further evidence for an operating tricarboxylic acid cycle. A postulated pathway for the utilization of glycolic acid is as follows: glycolate → glycerate → 3-phosphoglycerate → pyruvate → tricarboxylic acid cycle. PMID:13904441

  14. The crystal structure Escherichia coli Spy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eunju; Kim, Dong Young; Gross, Carol A; Gross, John D; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2010-11-01

    Escherichia coli spheroplast protein y (EcSpy) is a small periplasmic protein that is homologous with CpxP, an inhibitor of the extracytoplasmic stress response. Stress conditions such as spheroplast formation induce the expression of Spy via the Cpx or the Bae two-component systems in E. coli, though the function of Spy is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of EcSpy, which reveals a long kinked hairpin-like structure of four α-helices that form an antiparallel dimer. The dimer contains a curved oval shape with a highly positively charged concave surface that may function as a ligand binding site. Sequence analysis reveals that Spy is highly conserved over the Enterobacteriaceae family. Notably, three conserved regions that contain identical residues and two LTxxQ motifs are placed at the horizontal end of the dimer structure, stabilizing the overall fold. CpxP also contains the conserved sequence motifs and has a predicted secondary structure similar to Spy, suggesting that Spy and CpxP likely share the same fold.

  15. Shear alters motility of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Jalali, Maryam; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Understanding of locomotion of microorganisms in shear flows drew a wide range of interests in microbial related topics such as biological process including pathogenic infection and biophysical interactions like biofilm formation on engineering surfaces. We employed microfluidics and digital holography microscopy to study motility of E. coli in shear flows. We controlled the shear flow in three different shear rates: 0.28 s-1, 2.8 s-1, and 28 s-1 in a straight channel with the depth of 200 μm. Magnified holograms, recorded at 15 fps with a CCD camera over more than 20 minutes, are analyzed to obtain 3D swimming trajectories and subsequently used to extract shear responses of E.coli. Thousands of 3-D bacterial trajectories are tracked. The change of bacteria swimming characteristics including swimming velocity, reorientation, and dispersion coefficient are computed directly for individual trajectory and ensemble averaged over thousands of realizations. The results show that shear suppresses the bacterial dispersions in bulk but promote dispersions near the surface contrary to those in quiescent flow condition. Ongoing analyses are focusing to quantify effect of shear rates on tumbling frequency and reorientation of cell body, and its implication in locating the hydrodynamic mechanisms for shear enhanced angular scattering. NIH, NSF, GoMRI.

  16. gltBDF operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, I; Bastarrachea, F; Covarrubias, A A

    1988-01-01

    A 2.0-kilobase DNA fragment carrying antibiotic resistance markers was inserted into the gltB gene of Escherichia coli previously cloned in a multicopy plasmid. Replacement of the chromosomal gltB+ gene by the gltB225::omega mutation led to cells unable to synthesize glutamate synthase, utilize growth rate-limiting nitrogen sources, or derepress their glutamine synthetase. The existence of a gltBDF operon encoding the large (gltB) and small (gltD) subunits of glutamate synthase and a regulatory peptide (gltF) at 69 min of the E. coli linkage map was deduced from complementation analysis. A plasmid carrying the entire gltB+D+F+ operon complemented cells for all three of the mutant phenotypes associated with the polar gltB225::omega mutation in the chromosome. By contrast, plasmids carrying gltB+ only complemented cells for glutamate synthase activity. A major tricistronic mRNA molecule was detected from Northern (RNA blot) DNA-RNA hybridization experiments with DNA probes containing single genes of the operon. A 30,200-dalton polypeptide was identified as the gltF product, the lack of which was responsible for the inability of cells to use nitrogen-limiting sources associated with gltB225::omega. Images PMID:2448295

  17. Independence of replisomes in Escherichia coli chromosomalreplication

    SciTech Connect

    Breier, Adam M.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R.

    2005-03-13

    In Escherichia coli DNA replication is carried out by the coordinated action of the proteins within a replisome. After replication initiation, the two bidirectionally oriented replisomes from a single origin are colocalized into higher-order structures termed replication factories. The factory model postulated that the two replisomes are also functionally coupled. We tested this hypothesis by using DNA combing and whole-genome microarrays. Nascent DNA surrounding oriC in single, combed chromosomes showed instead that one replisome, usually the leftward one, was significantly ahead of the other 70% of the time. We next used microarrays to follow replication throughout the genome by measuring DNA copy number. We found in multiple E. coli strains that the replisomes are independent, with the leftward replisome ahead of the rightward one. The size of the bias was strain-specific, varying from 50 to 130 kb in the array results. When we artificially blocked one replisome, the other continued unabated, again demonstrating independence. We suggest an improved version of the factory model that retains the advantages of threading DNA through colocalized replisomes at about equal rates, but allows the cell flexibility to overcome obstacles encountered during elongation.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: familial adenomatous polyposis

    MedlinePlus

    ... R215-6. Review. Citation on PubMed Cheadle JP, Sampson JR. Exposing the MYtH about base excision repair ... 21(20):2525-38. Review. Citation on PubMed Sampson JR, Dolwani S, Jones S, Eccles D, Ellis A, Evans ...

  19. Oral Therapeutics for Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyposis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew J; Alt, Jeremiah A

    2016-01-01

    Oral therapeutics for chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) include oral corticosteroids (OCS), antibiotics, antifungals and anti-leukotrienes. Of these treatments, the strongest evidence exists to support the use of a short course of OCS for treatment of CRSwNP, and OCS are the most consistently recommended oral therapy in practice guidelines. Antibiotics have demonstrated some utility, which appears more likely related to an anti-inflammatory rather than antimicrobial effect. The non-macrolide antibiotics lack sufficient evidence to support their use, though among this class doxycycline has some limited evidence of benefit in CRSwNP. Greater evidence exists for the use of macrolide antibiotics which have shown reduction of subjective and objective measures of CRSwNP severity. A short course of a macrolide should be considered as an option. Oral antifungals are not recommended in the treatment of CRSwNP given disappointing results and known potential adverse effects, except in allergic fungal rhinosinusitis where they may play a role. Leukotriene antagonists have demonstrated some promise in the treatment of CRSwNP, though studies are limited, but should be considered a potentially useful oral therapeutic. The current level of evidence for these oral therapeutic options for CRSwNP is reviewed in this chapter. PMID:27466856

  20. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes.

  1. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli multilocus sequence types in Guatemala and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Nicklasson, Matilda; Klena, John; Rodas, Claudia; Bourgeois, August Louis; Torres, Olga; Svennerholm, Ann Mari; Sjoling, Asa

    2010-01-01

    The genetic backgrounds of 24 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains from Mexico and Guatemala expressing heat-stable toxin (ST) and coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) were analyzed. US travelers to these countries and resident children in Guatemala were infected by ETEC strains of sequence type 398, expressing STp and carrying genetically identical CS6 sequences.

  2. Complete Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli JF733

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Gabriele R. M.; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Wertz, John E.; Friehs, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli JF733 is a strain with a long history in research on membrane proteins and processes. However, tracing back the strain development raises some questions concerning the correct genotype of JF733. Here, we present the complete draft genome of E. coli JF733 in order to resolve any remaining uncertainties. PMID:27103723

  3. Nisin stimulates oxygen consumption by Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro de Melo, A M; Cook, G M; Miles, R J; Poole, R K

    1996-01-01

    Nisin stimulated oxygen consumption by nongrowing, glucose-metabolizing Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli cells, indicating a protonophore mode of action. A similar stimulation in E. coli cells osmotically stressed to disrupt the outer cell membrane confirmed the cytoplasmic membrane as the site of nisin action and showed that nisin uptake was not prevented by the outer membrane. PMID:8633884

  4. Characterization of enterohemorrhagic E. coli on veal hides and carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) associated with the most severe forms of foodborne illnesses. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) has identified a higher percentage of non-O157 EHEC compared to E....

  5. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E.; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes. PMID:26809117

  6. [Acute diarrheal disease caused by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal Escherichia coli pathogens are leading causes of acute diarrheal disease in children less than 5 years in Latin America, Africa and Asia and a leading cause of death in children living in poorest communities in Africa and South East Asia. Studies on the role of E. coli pathogens in childhood diarrhea in Colombia and other countries in Latin America are limited due to the lack of detection assays in clinical laboratories at the main urban medical centers. Recent studies report that enterotoxigenic E. coli is the most common E. coli pathogens associated with diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age. Other E. coli pathotypes have been detected in children with diarrhea including enteropathogenic, enteroaggregative, shiga-toxin producing and diffusely adherent E. coli. It was also found that meat and vegetables at retail stores are contaminated with Shiga-toxin producing E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli, suggesting that food products are involved in transmission and infection of the susceptible host. More studies are necessary to evaluate the mechanisms of transmission, the impact on the epidemiology of diarrheal disease, and management strategies and prevention of these pathogens affecting the pediatric population in Colombia.

  7. Molecular serotyping of Escherichia coli: A verification and reclassification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Serotyping of E. coli, based on the O- (polysaccharide side chain) and H- (flagellar) antigens using antisera is a common practice for diagnostics, outbreak investigations, and epidemiological surveillance. The full set of E. coli serogroups comprises O-groups O1 to O181, with several O...

  8. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples.

    PubMed

    Coura, Fernanda Morcatti; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  9. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    PubMed Central

    Morcatti Coura, Fernanda; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  10. EcoCyc: Encyclopedia of Escherichia coli genes and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karp, P D; Riley, M; Paley, S M; Pellegrini-Toole, A; Krummenacker, M

    1998-01-01

    The encyclopedia of Escherichia coli genes and metabolism (EcoCyc) is a database that combines information about the genome and the intermediary metabolism of E.coli. The database describes 3030 genes of E.coli , 695 enzymes encoded by a subset of these genes, 595 metabolic reactions that occur in E.coli, and the organization of these reactions into 123 metabolic pathways. The EcoCyc graphical user interface allows scientists to query and explore the EcoCyc database using visualization tools such as genomic-map browsers and automatic layouts of metabolic pathways. EcoCyc can be thought of as an electronic review article because of its copious references to the primary literature, and as a (qualitative) computational model of E.coli metabolism. EcoCyc is available at URL http://ecocyc.PangeaSystems.com/ecocyc/

  11. Human platelets efficiently kill IgG-opsonized E. coli.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Anum H; Tasma, Brian E; Woodman, Michael E; Wooten, R Mark; Worth, Randall G

    2012-06-01

    Platelets are known contributors of hemostasis but have recently been shown to be important in inflammation and infectious diseases. Moreover, thrombocytopenia is often observed in patients with sepsis. We previously reported that platelets actively phagocytosed IgG-coated latex beads. In this study, the capacity of human platelets to participate in host defense against bacterial infections was determined by assessing their ability to kill Escherichia coli. Washed human platelets were incubated with unopsonized or IgG-opsonized E. coli and evaluated for binding and killing of E. coli. We found that although both unopsonized and IgG-opsonized E. coli were associated with platelets, only IgG-opsonized E. coli were efficiently killed unless platelets were activated by a potent agonist. The bactericidal activity was dependent on FcγRIIA, was sensitive to cytochalasin D, but was not due to reactive oxygen metabolites. These data suggest that platelets may play an important role in protection against infection.

  12. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples.

    PubMed

    Coura, Fernanda Morcatti; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals.

  13. A chimeric Anabaena/ Escherichia coli KdpD protein (Anacoli KdpD) functionally interacts with E. coli KdpE and activates kdp expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Anand; Heermann, Ralf; Jung, Kirsten; Gassel, Michael; Apte, Kumar; Altendorf, Karlheinz

    2002-08-01

    The kdpFABC operon, coding for a high-affinity K(+)-translocating P-type ATPase, is expressed in Escherichia coli as a backup system during K(+) starvation or an increase in medium osmolality. Expression of the operon is regulated by the membrane-bound sensor kinase KdpD and the cytosolic response regulator KdpE. From a nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain L-31, a kdpDgene was cloned (GenBank accession no. AF213466) which codes for a KdpD protein (365 amino acids) that lacks both the transmembrane segments and C-terminal transmitter domain and thus is shorter than E. coli KdpD. A chimeric kdpD gene was constructed and expressed in E. coli coding for a protein (Anacoli KdpD), in which the first 365 amino acids of E. coli KdpD were replaced by those from Anabaena KdpD. In everted membrane vesicles, this chimeric Anacoli KdpD protein exhibited activities, such as autophosphorylation, transphosphorylation and ATP-dependent dephosphorylation of E. coli KdpE, which closely resemble those of the E. coli wild-type KdpD. Cells of E. coli synthesizing Anacoli KdpD expressed kdpFABC in response to K(+) limitation and osmotic upshock. The data demonstrate that Anabaena KdpD can interact with the E. coliKdpD C-terminal domain resulting in a protein that is functional in vitro as well as in vivo.

  14. A DNA structural atlas for Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, A G; Jensen, L J; Brunak, S; Staerfeldt, H H; Ussery, D W

    2000-06-16

    We have performed a computational analysis of DNA structural features in 18 fully sequenced prokaryotic genomes using models for DNA curvature, DNA flexibility, and DNA stability. The structural values that are computed for the Escherichia coli chromosome are significantly different from (and generally more extreme than) that expected from the nucleotide composition. To aid this analysis, we have constructed tools that plot structural measures for all positions in a long DNA sequence (e.g. an entire chromosome) in the form of color-coded wheels (http://www.cbs.dtu. dk/services/GenomeAtlas/). We find that these "structural atlases" are useful for the discovery of interesting features that may then be investigated in more depth using statistical methods. From investigation of the E. coli structural atlas, we discovered a genome-wide trend, where an extended region encompassing the terminus displays a high of level curvature, a low level of flexibility, and a low degree of helix stability. The same situation is found in the distantly related Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, suggesting that the phenomenon is biologically relevant. Based on a search for long DNA segments where all the independent structural measures agree, we have found a set of 20 regions with identical and very extreme structural properties. Due to their strong inherent curvature, we suggest that these may function as topological domain boundaries by efficiently organizing plectonemically supercoiled DNA. Interestingly, we find that in practically all the investigated eubacterial and archaeal genomes, there is a trend for promoter DNA being more curved, less flexible, and less stable than DNA in coding regions and in intergenic DNA without promoters. This trend is present regardless of the absolute levels of the structural parameters, and we suggest that this may be related to the requirement for helix unwinding during initiation of transcription, or perhaps to the previously observed

  15. Arrestin Expression in E. coli and Purification

    PubMed Central

    Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Zhan, Xuanzhi; Chen, Qiuyan; Iverson, Tina M.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2014-01-01

    Purified arrestin proteins are necessary for biochemical, biophysical, and crystallographic studies of these versatile regulators of cell signaling. Here we describe a basic protocol for expression in E. coli and purification of tag-free wild type and mutant arrestins. The method includes ammonium sulfate precipitation of arrestins from cell lysates, followed by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. Depending on the arrestin type and/or mutations, this step is followed by Q-Sepharose or SP-Sepharose chromatography. In many cases the non-binding column is used as a pre-filter to bind contaminants without retaining arrestin. In some cases both chromatographic steps need to be performed sequentially to achieve high purity. Purified arrestins can be concentrated up to 10 mg/ml, remain fully functional, and can withstand several cycles of freezing and thawing, provided that overall salt concentration is kept at or above physiological levels. PMID:25446290

  16. Preparation of Soluble Proteins from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Purification of human IL-1β is used in this unit as an example of the preparation of soluble proteins from E. coli. Bacteria containing IL-1β are lysed, and IL-1 β in the resulting supernatant is purified by anion-exchange chromatography, salt precipitation and cation-exchange chromatography, and then concentrated. Finally, the IL-1 β protein is applied to a gel-filtration column to separate it from remaining higher- and lower-molecular-weight contaminants, the purified protein is stored frozen or is lyophilized. The purification protocol described is typical for a protein that is expressed in fairly high abundance (i.e., >5% total protein) and accumulates in a soluble state. Also, the purification procedure serves as an example of how use classical protein purifications methods which may also be used in conjunction with the affinity-based methods now more commonly used. PMID:25367009

  17. The eclipse period of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    von Freiesleben, U; Krekling, M A; Hansen, F G; Løbner-Olesen, A

    2000-11-15

    The minimal time between successive initiations on the same origin (the eclipse) in Escherichia coli was determined to be approximately 25-30 min. An inverse relationship was found between the length of the eclipse and the amount of Dam methyltransferase in the cell, indicating that the eclipse corresponds to the period of origin hemimethylation. The SeqA protein was absolutely required for the eclipse, and DnaA titration studies suggested that the SeqA protein prevented the binding of multiple DnaA molecules on oriC (initial complex formation). No correlation between the amount of SeqA and eclipse length was revealed, but increased SeqA levels affected chromosome partitioning and/or cell division. This was corroborated further by an aberrant nucleoid distribution in SeqA-deficient cells. We suggest that the SeqA protein's role in maintaining the eclipse is tied to a function in chromosome organization.

  18. Animal models of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli infection

    PubMed Central

    Philipson, Casandra W.; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Hontecillas, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) has been acknowledged as an emerging cause of gastroenteritis worldwide for over two decades. Epidemiologists are revealing the role of EAEC in diarrheal outbreaks as a more common occurrence than ever suggested before. EAEC induced diarrhea is most commonly associated with travelers, children and immunocompromised individuals however its afflictions are not limited to any particular demographic. Many attributes have been discovered and characterized surrounding the capability of EAEC to provoke a potent pro-inflammatory immune response, however cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying initiation, progression and outcomes are largely unknown. This limited understanding can be attributed to heterogeneity in strains and the lack of adequate animal models. This review aims to summarize current knowledge about EAEC etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestation. Additionally, current animal models and their limitations will be discussed along with the value of applying systems-wide approaches such as computational modeling to study host-EAEC interactions. PMID:23680797

  19. Novel antigens for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, James; Sheikh, Alaullah; Qadri, Firdausi

    2014-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common bacterial pathogens causing diarrhea in developing countries where they lead to hundreds of thousands of deaths, mostly in children. These organisms are a leading cause of diarrheal illness in travelers to endemic countries. ETEC pathogenesis, and consequently vaccine approaches, have largely focused on plasmid-encoded enterotoxins or fimbrial colonization factors. To date these approaches have not yielded a broadly protective vaccine. However, recent studies suggest that ETEC pathogenesis is more complex than previously appreciated and involves additional plasmid and chromosomally encoded virulence molecules that can be targeted in vaccines. Here, we review recent novel antigen discovery efforts, potential contribution of these proteins to the molecular pathogenesis of ETEC and protective immunity, and the potential implications for development of next generation vaccines for important pathogens. These proteins may help to improve the effectiveness of future vaccines by making them simpler and possibly broadly protective because of their conserved nature. PMID:24702311

  20. Mechanism of Escherichia coli Resistance to Pyrrhocoricin

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Shalini; Modak, Joyanta K.; Ryan, Catherine S.; Garcia-Bustos, Jose; Davies, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their lack of toxicity to mammalian cells and good serum stability, proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PR-AMPs) have been proposed as promising candidates for the treatment of infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant bacterial pathogens. It has been hypothesized that these peptides act on multiple targets within bacterial cells, and therefore the likelihood of the emergence of resistance was considered to be low. Here, we show that spontaneous Escherichia coli mutants resistant to pyrrhocoricin arise at a frequency of approximately 6 × 10−7. Multiple independently derived mutants all contained a deletion in a nonessential gene that encodes the putative peptide uptake permease SbmA. Sensitivity could be restored to the mutants by complementation with an intact copy of the sbmA gene. These findings question the viability of the development of insect PR-AMPs as antimicrobials. PMID:24590485

  1. Preparation of Soluble Proteins from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    Purification of human IL-1β is used in this unit as an example of the preparation of a soluble protein from E. coli. Bacteria containing IL-1β are lysed, and IL-1 β in the resulting supernatant is purified by anion-exchange chromatography, salt precipitation, and cation-exchange chromatography, and then concentrated. Finally, the IL-1 β protein is applied to a gel-filtration column to separate it from remaining higher- and lower-molecular-weight contaminants, the purified protein is stored frozen or is lyophilized. The purification protocol described is typical for a protein that is expressed in fairly high abundance (i.e., >5% total protein) and accumulates in a soluble state. In addition, the purification procedure serves as an example of how to use classical protein purifications methods, which may also be used in conjunction with the affinity-based methods now more commonly used. PMID:25367009

  2. Direct Upstream Motility in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Tolga; Koser, Hur

    2012-01-01

    We provide an experimental demonstration of positive rheotaxis (rapid and continuous upstream motility) in wild-type Escherichia coli freely swimming over a surface. This hydrodynamic phenomenon is dominant below a critical shear rate and robust against Brownian motion and cell tumbling. We deduce that individual bacteria entering a flow system can rapidly migrate upstream (>20 μm/s) much faster than a gradually advancing biofilm. Given a bacterial population with a distribution of sizes and swim speeds, local shear rate near the surface determines the dominant hydrodynamic mode for motility, i.e., circular or random trajectories for low shear rates, positive rheotaxis for moderate flow, and sideways swimming at higher shear rates. Faster swimmers can move upstream more rapidly and at higher shear rates, as expected. Interestingly, we also find on average that both swim speed and upstream motility are independent of cell aspect ratio. PMID:22500751

  3. Identification of Coli Surface Antigen 23, a Novel Adhesin of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Del Canto, Felipe; Botkin, Douglas J.; Valenzuela, Patricio; Popov, Vsevolod; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P.; Levine, Myron M.; Stine, O. Colin; Pop, Mihai

    2012-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea, mainly in developing countries. Although there are 25 different ETEC adhesins described in strains affecting humans, between 15% and 50% of the clinical isolates from different geographical regions are negative for these adhesins, suggesting that additional unidentified adhesion determinants might be present. Here, we report the discovery of Coli Surface Antigen 23 (CS23), a novel adhesin expressed by an ETEC serogroup O4 strain (ETEC 1766a), which was negative for the previously known ETEC adhesins, albeit it has the ability to adhere to Caco-2 cells. CS23 is encoded by an 8.8-kb locus which contains 9 open reading frames (ORFs), 7 of them sharing significant identity with genes required for assembly of K88-related fimbriae. This gene locus, named aal (adhesion-associated locus), is required for the adhesion ability of ETEC 1766a and was able to confer this adhesive phenotype to a nonadherent E. coli HB101 strain. The CS23 major structural subunit, AalE, shares limited identity with known pilin proteins, and it is more closely related to the CS13 pilin protein CshE, carried by human ETEC strains. Our data indicate that CS23 is a new member of the diverse adhesin repertoire used by ETEC strains. PMID:22645287

  4. Identification of Coli Surface Antigen 23, a novel adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Del Canto, Felipe; Botkin, Douglas J; Valenzuela, Patricio; Popov, Vsevolod; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P; Levine, Myron M; Stine, O Colin; Pop, Mihai; Torres, Alfredo G; Vidal, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea, mainly in developing countries. Although there are 25 different ETEC adhesins described in strains affecting humans, between 15% and 50% of the clinical isolates from different geographical regions are negative for these adhesins, suggesting that additional unidentified adhesion determinants might be present. Here, we report the discovery of Coli Surface Antigen 23 (CS23), a novel adhesin expressed by an ETEC serogroup O4 strain (ETEC 1766a), which was negative for the previously known ETEC adhesins, albeit it has the ability to adhere to Caco-2 cells. CS23 is encoded by an 8.8-kb locus which contains 9 open reading frames (ORFs), 7 of them sharing significant identity with genes required for assembly of K88-related fimbriae. This gene locus, named aal (adhesion-associated locus), is required for the adhesion ability of ETEC 1766a and was able to confer this adhesive phenotype to a nonadherent E. coli HB101 strain. The CS23 major structural subunit, AalE, shares limited identity with known pilin proteins, and it is more closely related to the CS13 pilin protein CshE, carried by human ETEC strains. Our data indicate that CS23 is a new member of the diverse adhesin repertoire used by ETEC strains. PMID:22645287

  5. [Sensitivity to drugs of Escherichia coli strains isolated from poultry with coli septicemia].

    PubMed

    Giurov, B

    1985-01-01

    Investigations were carried out into the susceptibility of a total of 223 strains of Escherichia coli to therapeutic agents with the employment of the disk diffusion method. The organisms were isolated from internal organs and bone marrow of birds died of coli septicaemia. The serologic classification of the strains was defined with the use of 88 anti-group OK-agglutinating sera obtained through hyperimmunization of rabbits with the following Escherichia coli serotypes: 01-063, 068, 071, 073, 075, 078, 086, 0101, 0103, 0111-0114, 0119, 0124, 0129, 0135-0141, 0146, 0147, and 0149. It was found that serologically the strains referred as follows: 01-41 strains, 02-70 strains, 04-2 strains, 08-3 strains, 026-1 strain, 078-70 strains, 0111-2 strains, 0103-1 strain, 0141-1 strain. The number of untypable strains amounted to 32. Highest number of strains proved sensitive to colistin--96.06%, the remaining drugs following in a descending order: flumequine--95.65%, apramycin - 95.5%, gentamycin--93.72%, amoxicillin--93,8%, amikacin--88.57%, carbenicillin--86.88%, furazolidone--83,13%, and kanamycin--79.36%. High was the percent of strains resistant to tetracycline--66.17%, spectinomycin--61.67%, ampicillin--51.12%, chloramphenicol--50.23%, and streptomycin--44.84%.

  6. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains may carry virulence properties of diarrhoeagenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Abe, Cecilia M; Salvador, Fábia A; Falsetti, Ivan N; Vieira, Mônica A M; Blanco, Jorge; Blanco, Jesús E; Blanco, Miguel; Machado, Antônia M O; Elias, Waldir P; Hernandes, Rodrigo T; Gomes, Tânia A T

    2008-04-01

    To analyze whether Escherichia coli strains that cause urinary tract infections (UPEC) share virulence characteristics with the diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) pathotypes and to recognize their genetic diversity, 225 UPEC strains were examined for the presence of various properties of DEC and UPEC (type of interaction with HeLa cells, serogroups and presence of 30 virulence genes). No correlation between adherence patterns and serogroups was observed. Forty-five serogroups were found, but 64% of the strains belonged to one of the 12 serogroups (O1, O2, O4, O6, O7, O14, O15, O18, O21, O25, O75, and O175) and carried UPEC virulence genes (pap, hly, aer, sfa, cnf). The DEC genes found were: aap, aatA, aggC, agg3C, aggR, astA, eae, ehly, iha, irp2, lpfA(O113), pet, pic, pilS, and shf. Sixteen strains presented aggregative adherence and/or the aatA sequence, which are characteristics of enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), one of the DEC pathotypes. In summary, certain UPEC strains may carry DEC virulence properties, mostly associated to the EAEC pathotype. This finding raises the possibility that at least some faecal EAEC strains might represent potential uropathogens. Alternatively, certain UPEC strains may have acquired EAEC properties, becoming a potential cause of diarrhoea.

  7. Identification of Coli Surface Antigen 23, a novel adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Del Canto, Felipe; Botkin, Douglas J; Valenzuela, Patricio; Popov, Vsevolod; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P; Levine, Myron M; Stine, O Colin; Pop, Mihai; Torres, Alfredo G; Vidal, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea, mainly in developing countries. Although there are 25 different ETEC adhesins described in strains affecting humans, between 15% and 50% of the clinical isolates from different geographical regions are negative for these adhesins, suggesting that additional unidentified adhesion determinants might be present. Here, we report the discovery of Coli Surface Antigen 23 (CS23), a novel adhesin expressed by an ETEC serogroup O4 strain (ETEC 1766a), which was negative for the previously known ETEC adhesins, albeit it has the ability to adhere to Caco-2 cells. CS23 is encoded by an 8.8-kb locus which contains 9 open reading frames (ORFs), 7 of them sharing significant identity with genes required for assembly of K88-related fimbriae. This gene locus, named aal (adhesion-associated locus), is required for the adhesion ability of ETEC 1766a and was able to confer this adhesive phenotype to a nonadherent E. coli HB101 strain. The CS23 major structural subunit, AalE, shares limited identity with known pilin proteins, and it is more closely related to the CS13 pilin protein CshE, carried by human ETEC strains. Our data indicate that CS23 is a new member of the diverse adhesin repertoire used by ETEC strains.

  8. REPRESSION OF TRYPTOPHANASE SYNTHESIS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    PubMed

    BEGGS, W H; LICHSTEIN, H C

    1965-04-01

    Beggs, William H. (University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio), and Herman C. Lichstein. Repression of tryptophanase synthesis in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 89:996-1004. 1965.-The nature of the glucose effect on tryptophanase in Escherichia coli (Crookes) was investigated to test the catabolite-repression hypothesis. Under static conditions of growth in the presence of 0.005 m glucose, tryptophanase was repressed and remained so upon continued static incubation subsequent to glucose exhaustion. Aeration following glucose exhaustion under static cultural conditions resulted in rapid enzyme synthesis. In the absence of glucose, certain amino acids repressed tryptophanase synthesis early in the growth cycle under aerated conditions. An inverse relationship was observed between the concentration of acid-hydrolyzed casein and the level of tryptophanase. At 3 hr, enzyme activity in cells grown in media containing 0.05% acid-hydrolyzed casein was at least five times that of cells grown in the presence of 1% casein. Addition of 0.005 m d- or l-serine to a 0.05% acid-hydrolyzed casein medium rendered the medium capable of strongly repressing tryptophanase. Glucose-expended medium was prepared by allowing cells to grow and exhaust glucose in static culture. When this expended medium was recovered and inoculated with fresh cells not previously exposed to glucose, tryptophanase synthesis was repressed for a short period in shake culture, but in static culture enzyme synthesis was only slightly affected. When the expended medium was prepared from shake cultures, fresh cells were not repressed strongly when subsequent incubation was carried out aerobically. The tryptophan pool in glucose-repressed cells grown in shake culture was appreciably less than in cells grown in the absence of glucose or in cells undergoing synthesis of tryptophanase after exhaustion of the sugar.

  9. The Escherichia coli Peripheral Inner Membrane Proteome*

    PubMed Central

    Papanastasiou, Malvina; Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Koukaki, Marina; Kountourakis, Nikos; Sardis, Marios Frantzeskos; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Economou, Anastassios

    2013-01-01

    Biological membranes are essential for cell viability. Their functional characteristics strongly depend on their protein content, which consists of transmembrane (integral) and peripherally associated membrane proteins. Both integral and peripheral inner membrane proteins mediate a plethora of biological processes. Whereas transmembrane proteins have characteristic hydrophobic stretches and can be predicted using bioinformatics approaches, peripheral inner membrane proteins are hydrophilic, exist in equilibria with soluble pools, and carry no discernible membrane targeting signals. We experimentally determined the cytoplasmic peripheral inner membrane proteome of the model organism Escherichia coli using a multidisciplinary approach. Initially, we extensively re-annotated the theoretical proteome regarding subcellular localization using literature searches, manual curation, and multi-combinatorial bioinformatics searches of the available databases. Next we used sequential biochemical fractionations coupled to direct identification of individual proteins and protein complexes using high resolution mass spectrometry. We determined that the proposed cytoplasmic peripheral inner membrane proteome occupies a previously unsuspected ∼19% of the basic E. coli BL21(DE3) proteome, and the detected peripheral inner membrane proteome occupies ∼25% of the estimated expressed proteome of this cell grown in LB medium to mid-log phase. This value might increase when fleeting interactions, not studied here, are taken into account. Several proteins previously regarded as exclusively cytoplasmic bind membranes avidly. Many of these proteins are organized in functional or/and structural oligomeric complexes that bind to the membrane with multiple interactions. Identified proteins cover the full spectrum of biological activities, and more than half of them are essential. Our data suggest that the cytoplasmic proteome displays remarkably dynamic and extensive communication with

  10. The evolution of metabolic networks of E. coli

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of numerous complete genome sequences from E. coli strains, published genome-scale metabolic models exist only for two commensal E. coli strains. These models have proven useful for many applications, such as engineering strains for desired product formation, and we sought to explore how constructing and evaluating additional metabolic models for E. coli strains could enhance these efforts. Results We used the genomic information from 16 E. coli strains to generate an E. coli pangenome metabolic network by evaluating their collective 76,990 ORFs. Each of these ORFs was assigned to one of 17,647 ortholog groups including ORFs associated with reactions in the most recent metabolic model for E. coli K-12. For orthologous groups that contain an ORF already represented in the MG1655 model, the gene to protein to reaction associations represented in this model could then be easily propagated to other E. coli strain models. All remaining orthologous groups were evaluated to see if new metabolic reactions could be added to generate a pangenome-scale metabolic model (iEco1712_pan). The pangenome model included reactions from a metabolic model update for E. coli K-12 MG1655 (iEco1339_MG1655) and enabled development of five additional strain-specific genome-scale metabolic models. These additional models include a second K-12 strain (iEco1335_W3110) and four pathogenic strains (two enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 and two uropathogens). When compared to the E. coli K-12 models, the metabolic models for the enterohemorrhagic (iEco1344_EDL933 and iEco1345_Sakai) and uropathogenic strains (iEco1288_CFT073 and iEco1301_UTI89) contained numerous lineage-specific gene and reaction differences. All six E. coli models were evaluated by comparing model predictions to carbon source utilization measurements under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and to batch growth profiles in minimal media with 0.2% (w/v) glucose. An ancestral genome

  11. Advances in Molecular Serotyping and Subtyping of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fratamico, Pina M; DebRoy, Chitrita; Liu, Yanhong; Needleman, David S; Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Feng, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli plays an important role as a member of the gut microbiota; however, pathogenic strains also exist, including various diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli that cause illness outside of the GI-tract. E. coli have traditionally been serotyped using antisera against the ca. 186 O-antigens and 53 H-flagellar antigens. Phenotypic methods, including bacteriophage typing and O- and H- serotyping for differentiating and characterizing E. coli have been used for many years; however, these methods are generally time consuming and not always accurate. Advances in next generation sequencing technologies have made it possible to develop genetic-based subtyping and molecular serotyping methods for E. coli, which are more discriminatory compared to phenotypic typing methods. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing (WGS) of E. coli is replacing established subtyping methods such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, providing a major advancement in the ability to investigate food-borne disease outbreaks and for trace-back to sources. A variety of sequence analysis tools and bioinformatic pipelines are being developed to analyze the vast amount of data generated by WGS and to obtain specific information such as O- and H-group determination and the presence of virulence genes and other genetic markers.

  12. Molecular characterization of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli from Libya.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mostafa Mohamed M; Mohamed, Zienat Kamel; Klena, John D; Ahmed, Salwa Fouad; Moussa, Tarek A A; Ghenghesh, Khalifa Sifaw

    2012-05-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) are important enteric pathogens that cause a wide variety of gastrointestinal diseases, particularly in children. Escherichia coli isolates cultured from 243 diarrheal stool samples obtained from Libyan children and 50 water samples were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for genes characteristic of enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC). The DEC were detected in 21 (8.6%) children with diarrhea; 10 (4.1%) cases were identified as EAEC, 3 (1.2%) as EPEC, and 8 (3.3%) were ETEC; EHEC, and EIEC were not detected. All DEC were grouped phylogenetically by PCR with the majority (> 70%) identified as phylogenetic groups A and B1. The EAEC isolates were also tested for eight genes associated with virulence using PCR. Multi-virulence (≥ 3 virulence factors) was found in 50% of EAEC isolates. Isolated EAEC possessed different virulence traits and belonged to different phylogenetic groups indicating their heterogeneity.

  13. Advances in molecular serotyping and subtyping of Escherichia coli

    DOE PAGES

    Fratamico, Pina M.; DebRoy, Chitrita; Liu, Yanhong; Needleman, David S.; Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Feng, Peter

    2016-05-03

    Escherichia coli plays an important role as a member of the gut microbiota; however, pathogenic strains also exist, including various diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli that cause illness outside of the GI-tract. E. coli have traditionally been serotyped using antisera against the ca. 186 O-antigens and 53 H-flagellar antigens. Phenotypic methods, including bacteriophage typing and O- and H- serotyping for differentiating and characterizing E. coli have been used for many years; however, these methods are generally time consuming and not always accurate. Advances in next generation sequencing technologies have made it possible to develop genetic-based subtypingmore » and molecular serotyping methods for E. coli, which are more discriminatory compared to phenotypic typing methods. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing (WGS) of E. coli is replacing established subtyping methods such as pulsedfield gel electrophoresis, providing a major advancement in the ability to investigate food-borne disease outbreaks and for trace-back to sources. Furthermore, a variety of sequence analysis tools and bioinformatic pipelines are being developed to analyze the vast amount of data generated by WGS and to obtain specific information such as O- and H-group determination and the presence of virulence genes and other genetic markers.« less

  14. Gentamicin resistance among Escherichia coli strains isolated in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hasvold, J; Bradford, L; Nelson, C; Harrison, C; Attar, M; Stillwell, T

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among term and preterm infants. Ampicillin and gentamicin are standard empiric therapy for early onset sepsis. Four cases of neonatal sepsis secondary to Escherichia coli (E. coli) found to be gentamicin resistant occurred within a five week period in one neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). To determine whether these cases could be tied to a single vector of transmission, and to more broadly evaluate the incidence of gentamicin resistant strains of E. coli in the neonatal population at our institution compared to other centers, we reviewed the charts of the four neonates (Infants A through D) and their mothers. The E. coli isolates were sent for Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) to evaluate for genetic similarity between strains. We also reviewed all positive E. coli cultures from one NICU over a two year period. Infants A and B had genetically indistinguishable strains which matched that of urine and placental cultures of Infant B's mother. Infant C had a genetically distinct organism. Infant D, the identical twin of Infant C, did not have typing performed. Review of all cultures positive for E. coli at our institution showed a 12.9 percent incidence of gentamicin-resistance. A review of other studies showed that rates of resistance vary considerably by institution. We conclude that gentamicin-resistant E. coli is a relatively uncommon cause of neonatal sepsis, but should remain a consideration in patients who deteriorate despite initiation of empiric antibiotics. PMID:24246520

  15. Inactivation of Escherichia coli using atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahata, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Ohyama, Ryu-ichiro; Ito, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure argon (Ar) plasma jet was applied to the inactivation of Escherichia coli. The Ar plasma jet was generated at a frequency of 10 kHz, an applied voltage of 10 kV, and an Ar gas flow rate of 10 L/min at atmospheric pressure. E. coli cells seeded on an agar medium in a Petri dish were inactivated by Ar plasma jet irradiation for 1 s. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that E. coli cells were killed because their cell wall and membrane were disrupted. To determine the causes of the disruption of the cell wall and membrane of E. coli, we performed the following experiments: the measurement of the surface temperature of an agar medium using a thermograph, the analysis of an emission spectrum of a plasma jet obtained using a multichannel spectrometer, and the determination of the distribution of the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated on an agar medium by plasma jet irradiation using semiquantitative test strips. Moreover, H2O2 solutions of different concentrations were dropped onto an agar medium seeded with E. coli cells to examine the contribution of H2O2 to the death of E. coli. The results of these experiments showed that the cell wall and membrane of E. coli were disrupted by electrons in the plasma jet, as well as by electroneutral excited nitrogen molecules (N2) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the periphery of the plasma jet.

  16. Hemolytic E. coli Promotes Colonic Tumorigenesis in Females.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ye; Tang, Senwei; Li, Weilin; Ng, Siew Chien; Chan, Michael W Y; Sung, Joseph J Y; Yu, Jun

    2016-05-15

    Bacterial infection is linked to colorectal carcinogenesis, but the species that contribute to a protumorigenic ecology are ill-defined. Here we report evidence that α-hemolysin-positive (hly(+)) type I Escherichia coli (E. coli) drives adenomagenesis and colorectal cancer in human females but not males. We classified E. coli into four types using a novel typing method to monitor fimH mutation patterns of fecal isolates from adenoma patients (n= 59), colorectal cancer patients (n= 83), and healthy subjects (n= 85). hly(+) type I E. coli was found to be relatively more prevalent in stools from females with adenoma and colorectal cancer, correlating with poor survival in colorectal cancer patients. In mechanistic studies in female mice, we found that hly(+) type 1 E. coli activated expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1 and repressed expression of the tumor suppressor BIM. hly-encoded alpha hemolysin partially accounted for these effects by elevating the levels of HIF1α. Notably, colon tumorigenesis in mice could be promoted by feeding hly(+) type I E. coli to female but not male subjects. Collectively, our findings point to hemolytic type I E. coli as a candidate causative factor of colorectal cancer in human females, with additional potential as a biomarker of disease susceptibility. Cancer Res; 76(10); 2891-900. ©2016 AACR.

  17. Evaluation of Sanita-kun E. coli & coliform sheet medium for the enumeration of total coliforms and E. coli.

    PubMed

    Ushiyama, Masashi; Iwasaki, Mihoko

    2010-01-01

    The Sanita-kun E. coli & Coliform sheet medium consists of a transparent cover film, an adhesive sheet, a layer of nonwoven fabric, and a water-soluble compound film, including a culture medium formula for the enumeration of total coliforms and differentiation of Escherichia coli. The Sanita-kun E. coli & Coliform sheet is a chromogenic medium and contains X-Gal, which is hydrolyzed by beta-galactosidase from coliforms to produce a visible blue dye and Salmon-glucuronic acid, which is hydrolyzed by beta-glucuronidase from E. coli to produce a red-purple dye. It is easy to distinguish the difference between E. coli and coliform (other than E. coli) colonies. Total coliforms and E. coli can be enumerated by incubating the sheet medium at 35 + 1 degrees C for 21-24 h without further confirmation. The Sanita-kun E. coli & Coliform sheets were validated as a medium for the enumeration of E. coli and total coliform in meats and meat products using processed meat and two types of raw and frozen meats using stomacher and blender homogenization. In the stomacher homogenization, all 100 samples showed no significant difference between Sanita-kun sheet and AOAC Method 966.24. The linear correlation coefficients (r2) were calculated as 0.90 (coliform) and 0.79 (E. coli). In the blender homogenization, out of 100 samples tested, 99 showed no significant difference between Sanita-kun sheet and AOAC Method 966.24, but the count of total coliforms of Sanita-kun in one sample of uninoculated raw beef was significantly higher than that obtained by AOAC Method 966.24. The linear r2 values were calculated as 0.84 (coliform) and 0.86 (E. coli). The inclusivity and exclusivity study indicated an inclusivity rate of 100% and an exclusivity rate of 95.4%. The sensitivity study showed positive results when the homogenate or dilution contained 3 CFU/mL of coliform or E. coli. The performance of four different lots of the sheets was equivalent, and suggested no change of the performance at

  18. Survival of Escherichia coli on strawberries grown under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Angela Laury; Svoboda, Amanda; Jie, Beatrice; Nonnecke, Gail; Mendonca, Aubrey

    2015-04-01

    Strawberries are soft fruit that are not recommended to have a post-harvest wash due to quality concerns. Escherichia coli O157:H7 has been linked to outbreaks with strawberries but little is known about the survival of E. coli during the growth cycle of strawberries. The survival of E. coli on strawberry plants during growing under greenhouses conditions was evaluated. Soil, leaves, and strawberries (if present) were artificially contaminated with an E. coli surrogate either at the time of planting, first runner removal (4 wk), second runner removal (8 wk), or one week prior to harvest. At harvest E. coli was recovered from the leaves, soil, and strawberries regardless of the contamination time. Time of contamination influenced (P < 0.05) numbers of viable E. coli on the plant. The highest survival of E. coli (P < 0.0001) was detected in soil that was contaminated at planting (4.27 log10 CFU g soil(-1)), whereas, the survival of E. coli was maximal at later contamination times (8 wk and 1 wk prior to harvest) for the leaves (4.40 and 4.68 log10 CFU g leaves(-1)) and strawberries (3.37 and 3.53 log10 CFU strawberry(-1)). Cross contamination from leaves to fruit was observed during this study, with the presence of E. coli on strawberries which had not been present at the time of contamination. These results indicate that good agricultural best practices to avoid contamination are necessary to minimize the risk of contamination of these popular fruit with enteric pathogens. Practices should include soil testing prior to harvest and avoiding contamination of the leaves.

  19. Fluorogenic assays for immediate confirmation of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Feng, P C; Hartman, P A

    1982-06-01

    Rapid assays for Escherichia coli were developed by using the compound 4-methylumbelliferone glucuronide (MUG), which is hydrolyzed by glucuronidase to yield a fluorogenic product. The production of glucuronidase was limited to strains of E. coli and some Salmonella and Shigella strains in the family Enterobacteriaceae. For immediate confirmation of the presence of E. coli in most-probable-number tubes, MUG was incorporated into lauryl tryptose broth at a final concentration of 100 micrograms/ml. Results of both the presumptive test (gas production) and the confirmed test (fluorescence) for E. coli were obtained from a variety of food, water, and milk samples after incubation for only 24 h at 35 degrees C. Approximately 90% of the tubes showing both gas production and fluorescence contained fecal coliforms (they were positive in EC broth incubated at 45 degrees C). Few false-positive reactions were observed. The lauryl tryptose broth-MUG-most-probable-number assay was superior to violet red bile agar for the detection of heat- and chlorine-injured E. coli cells. Anaerogenic strains produced positive reactions, and small numbers of E. coli could be detected in the presence of large numbers of competing bacteria. The fluorogenic assay was sensitive and rapid; the presence of one viable cell was detected within 20 h. E. coli colonies could be distinguished from other coliforms on membrane filters and plates of violet red bile agar if MUG was incorporated into the culture media. A rapid confirmatory test for E. coli that is amenable to automation was developed by using microtitration plates filled with a nonselective medium containing MUG. Pure or mixed cultures containing E. coli produced fluorescence within 4 h (most strains) to 24 h (a few weakly positive strains).

  20. Survival of Escherichia coli on strawberries grown under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Angela Laury; Svoboda, Amanda; Jie, Beatrice; Nonnecke, Gail; Mendonca, Aubrey

    2015-04-01

    Strawberries are soft fruit that are not recommended to have a post-harvest wash due to quality concerns. Escherichia coli O157:H7 has been linked to outbreaks with strawberries but little is known about the survival of E. coli during the growth cycle of strawberries. The survival of E. coli on strawberry plants during growing under greenhouses conditions was evaluated. Soil, leaves, and strawberries (if present) were artificially contaminated with an E. coli surrogate either at the time of planting, first runner removal (4 wk), second runner removal (8 wk), or one week prior to harvest. At harvest E. coli was recovered from the leaves, soil, and strawberries regardless of the contamination time. Time of contamination influenced (P < 0.05) numbers of viable E. coli on the plant. The highest survival of E. coli (P < 0.0001) was detected in soil that was contaminated at planting (4.27 log10 CFU g soil(-1)), whereas, the survival of E. coli was maximal at later contamination times (8 wk and 1 wk prior to harvest) for the leaves (4.40 and 4.68 log10 CFU g leaves(-1)) and strawberries (3.37 and 3.53 log10 CFU strawberry(-1)). Cross contamination from leaves to fruit was observed during this study, with the presence of E. coli on strawberries which had not been present at the time of contamination. These results indicate that good agricultural best practices to avoid contamination are necessary to minimize the risk of contamination of these popular fruit with enteric pathogens. Practices should include soil testing prior to harvest and avoiding contamination of the leaves. PMID:25475285

  1. YeeO from Escherichia coli exports flavins

    PubMed Central

    McAnulty, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins help maintain cellular homeostasis by secreting metabolic wastes. Flavins may occur as cellular waste products, with their production and secretion providing potential benefit for industrial applications related to biofuel cells. Here we find that MATE protein YeeO from Escherichia coli exports both flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Significant amounts of flavins were trapped intracellularly when YeeO was produced indicating transport limits secretion of flavins. Wild-type E. coli secreted 3 flavins (riboflavin, FMN, and FAD), so E. coli likely produces additional flavin transporters. PMID:25482085

  2. An integrated database to support research on Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Baehr, A.; Dunham, G.; Matsuda, Hideo; Michaels, G.; Taylor, R.; Overbeek, R.; Rudd, K.E. ); Ginsburg, A.; Joerg, D.; Kazic, T. . Dept. of Genetics); Hagstrom, R.; Zawada, D. ); Smith, C.; Yoshida, Kaoru )

    1992-01-01

    We have used logic programming to design and implement a prototype database of genomic information for the model bacterial organism Escherichia coli. This report presents the fundamental database primitives that can be used to access and manipulate data relating to the E. coli genome. The present system, combined with a tutorial manual, provides immediate access to the integrated knowledge base for E. coli chromosome data. It also serves as the foundation for development of more user-friendly interfaces that have the same retrieval power and high-level tools to analyze complex chromosome organization.

  3. YeeO from Escherichia coli exports flavins.

    PubMed

    McAnulty, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins help maintain cellular homeostasis by secreting metabolic wastes. Flavins may occur as cellular waste products, with their production and secretion providing potential benefit for industrial applications related to biofuel cells. Here we find that MATE protein YeeO from Escherichia coli exports both flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Significant amounts of flavins were trapped intracellularly when YeeO was produced indicating transport limits secretion of flavins. Wild-type E. coli secreted 3 flavins (riboflavin, FMN, and FAD), so E. coli likely produces additional flavin transporters. PMID:25482085

  4. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Serotypes and Endemic Diarrhea in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, M. Regina F.; Alvariza, M. do Carmo B.; Murahovschi, Jayme; Ramos, Sonia R. T. S.; Trabulsi, Luiz R.

    1983-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli serotypes were searched for in feces of 550 children with endemic diarrhea and in 129 controls, in São Paulo, in 1978 and 1979; serotypes O111ab:H−, O111ab:H2, and O119:H6 were significantly associated with diarrhea in children 0 to 5 months old and were the most frequent agents of diarrhea in this age group as compared with enterotoxigenic and enteroinvasive E. coli, Salmonella sp., Shigella sp., and Yersinia enterocolitica. It is concluded that various enteropathogenic E. coli serotypes may be agents of endemic infantile diarrhea. PMID:6339384

  5. [Cytophotometric analysis of trophozoites and cysts of Balantidium coli].

    PubMed

    Skotarczak, B

    1996-01-01

    In trophozoites and cysts of Balantidium coli the contents of nucleic acids were compared, with the use of cytochemical methods. There is more RNA (nuclear and cytoplasmatic) in trophozoites, but the content of DNA is the same in both trophozoites and cysts. Some morphometric parameters, allowing to compare trophozoites and cysts of B. coli, were obtained on the basis of cytophotometric determination of the cytochemical reactions' intensity and its computer analysis. These studies showed greater compactness of nuclear chromatin, higher homogeneity of chromatin's structures in cysts in comparison with trophozoites, and finally, decrease in the circumference and area of cysts of B. coli. PMID:8967075

  6. Ultrastructural and cytochemical identification of peroxisomes in Balantidium coli, Ciliophora.

    PubMed

    Skotarczak, B

    1997-01-01

    Peroxisomes of the trophozoites of Balantidium coli isolated from pig intestine content were investigated, using ultrastructural and cytochemical techniques. The peroxisomes of B. coli trophozoites from pigs with subclinical balantidiasis are less then 0.8 mm in diameter whereas those from pigs with acute balantidiasis are greater than 0.8 micron in diameter. In all the trophozoites peroxisomes are round, oval or dumb-bell shaped. Catalase as an indicative enzyme was detected by cytochemical techniques in B. coli peroxisomes. PMID:9643167

  7. Balantidium coli-infection in a Finnish horse.

    PubMed

    Headley, Selwyn Arlington; Kummala, Elina; Sukura, Antti

    2008-11-25

    Balantidium coli is a ciliated protozoan that inhabits the large intestine of swine, man, rodents, and nonhuman primates. Frequently this organism is associated with enteric diseases in man and nonhuman primates, with rare manifestations of disease in swine and other mammalian species. This report describes a case of B. coli-induced enteric disease in a 15-yr-old, mare, Finnish Horse after an acute onset of colic. Severe hemorrhagic and eosinophilic colitis with intense infiltration of intralesional B. coli-like ciliated protozoan were found histologically. PMID:18922641

  8. Prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli on coriander.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Segovia-Cruz, Jesús A; Cerna-Cortes, Jorge F; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Salas-Rangel, Laura P; Gutiérrez-Alcántara, Eduardo J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes on coriander was determined. One hundred coriander samples were collected from markets. Generic E. coli were determined using the most probable number procedure. Diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEPs) were identified using two multiplex polymerase chain reaction procedures. Susceptibility to sixteen antibiotics was tested for the isolated DEPs strains by standard test. The behavior of multidrug-resistant DEPs isolated from coriander was determined on coriander leaves and chopped coriander at 25°± 2 °C and 3°± 2 °C. Generic E. coli and DEPs were identified, respectively, in 43 and 7% of samples. Nine DEPs strains were isolated from positive coriander samples. The identified DEPs included Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC, 4%) enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC, 2%) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, 1%). All isolated DEPs strains exhibited multi-resistance to antibiotics. On inoculated coriander leaves stored at 25°± 2 °C or 3°± 2 °C, no growth was observed for multidrug-resistant DEPs strains. However, multidrug-resistant DEPs strains grew in chopped coriander: after 24 h at 25° ± 2 °C, DEPs strains had grown to approximately 3 log CFU/g. However, at 3°± 2 °C the bacterial growth was inhibited. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence and behavior of multidrug-resistant STEC, ETEC and EPEC on coriander and chopped coriander.

  9. Prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli on coriander.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Segovia-Cruz, Jesús A; Cerna-Cortes, Jorge F; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Salas-Rangel, Laura P; Gutiérrez-Alcántara, Eduardo J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes on coriander was determined. One hundred coriander samples were collected from markets. Generic E. coli were determined using the most probable number procedure. Diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEPs) were identified using two multiplex polymerase chain reaction procedures. Susceptibility to sixteen antibiotics was tested for the isolated DEPs strains by standard test. The behavior of multidrug-resistant DEPs isolated from coriander was determined on coriander leaves and chopped coriander at 25°± 2 °C and 3°± 2 °C. Generic E. coli and DEPs were identified, respectively, in 43 and 7% of samples. Nine DEPs strains were isolated from positive coriander samples. The identified DEPs included Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC, 4%) enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC, 2%) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, 1%). All isolated DEPs strains exhibited multi-resistance to antibiotics. On inoculated coriander leaves stored at 25°± 2 °C or 3°± 2 °C, no growth was observed for multidrug-resistant DEPs strains. However, multidrug-resistant DEPs strains grew in chopped coriander: after 24 h at 25° ± 2 °C, DEPs strains had grown to approximately 3 log CFU/g. However, at 3°± 2 °C the bacterial growth was inhibited. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence and behavior of multidrug-resistant STEC, ETEC and EPEC on coriander and chopped coriander. PMID:27375249

  10. Genome Sequence of the Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Bacteriophage UFV-AREG1

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Laís Silva; Albino, Luiz Augusto A.; Boggione, Delaine Meireles Gouveia; Gontijo, Marco Tulio Pardini; Bazzolli, Denise M. Soares; Mendonca, Regina C. Santos

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the genome sequence of the Escherichia coli bacteriophage UFV-AREG1. This phage was isolated from cowshed wastewater and showed specificity for enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43895), E. coli 0111 (CDC O11ab) and E. coli (ATCC 23229). PMID:27738021

  11. Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli: detection and characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli strains that produce Shiga toxins, referred to as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) or verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) are important food-borne pathogens that cause hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). E. coli O157:H7 is a common cause of STEC infection; ho...

  12. Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli Associated with Muscle Foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli strains that produce Shiga toxins, referred to as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) or verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC), cause hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). E. coli O157:H7 is the most common cause of STEC infection; however, numerous non-O157 STECs b...

  13. 75 FR 14607 - Small Entity Compliance Guide: Bottled Water: Total Coliform and E. coli

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... are Escherichia coli (E. coli), an indicator of fecal contamination. FDA also amended its bottled... and E. coli; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food... ``Bottled Water: Total Coliform and E. coli--Small Entity Compliance Guide'' for a final rule published...

  14. 40 CFR 141.858 - Repeat monitoring and E. coli requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... exceeded. (b) Escherichia coli (E. coli) testing. (1) If any routine or repeat sample is total coliform... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Repeat monitoring and E. coli....858 Repeat monitoring and E. coli requirements. (a) Repeat monitoring. (1) If a sample taken...

  15. 40 CFR 141.858 - Repeat monitoring and E. coli requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... exceeded. (b) Escherichia coli (E. coli) testing. (1) If any routine or repeat sample is total coliform... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Repeat monitoring and E. coli....858 Repeat monitoring and E. coli requirements. (a) Repeat monitoring. (1) If a sample taken...

  16. Diarrhea, Urosepsis and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Caused by the Same Heteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain.

    PubMed

    Ang, C Wim; Bouts, Antonia H M; Rossen, John W A; Van der Kuip, Martijn; Van Heerde, Marc; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2016-09-01

    We describe an 8-month-old girl with diarrhea, urosepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Escherichia coli. Typing of cultured E. coli strains from urine and blood revealed the presence of virulence factors from multiple pathotypes of E. coli. This case exemplifies the genome plasticity of E. coli and the resulting heteropathogenic strains.

  17. Typical Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli Is the Most Prevalent Pathotype among E. coli Strains Causing Diarrhea in Mongolian Children

    PubMed Central

    Sarantuya, Jav; Nishi, Junichiro; Wakimoto, Naoko; Erdene, Shirchin; Nataro, James P.; Sheikh, Jalaluddin; Iwashita, Mayumi; Manago, Kunihiro; Tokuda, Koichi; Yoshinaga, Masao; Miyata, Koichiro; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2004-01-01

    Diarrhea remains one of the main sources of morbidity and mortality in the world, and a large proportion is caused by diarrheagenic Escherichia coli. In Mongolia, the epidemiology of diarrheagenic E. coli has not been well studied. A total of 238 E. coli strains from children with sporadic diarrhea and 278 E. coli strains from healthy children were examined by PCR for 10 virulence genes: enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) eae, tir, and bfpA; enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) lt and st; enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) ipaH; enterohemorragic E. coli stx1 and stx2; and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) aggR and astA. EAEC strains without AggR were identified by the HEp-2 cell adherence test. The detection of EAEC, ETEC, EPEC, and EIEC was significantly associated with diarrhea. The incidence of EAEC (15.1%), defined by either a molecular or a phenotypic assay, was higher in the diarrheal group than any other category (0 to 6.0%). The incidence of AggR-positive EAEC in the diarrheal group was significantly higher than in the control group (8.0 versus 1.4%; P = 0.0004), while that of AggR-negative EAEC was not (7.1 versus 4.3%). Nineteen AggR-positive EAEC strains harbored other EAEC virulence genes—aggA, 2 (5.5%); aafA, 4 (11.1%); agg-3a, 5 (13.8%); aap, 8 (22.2%); aatA, 11 (30.5%); capU, 9 (25.0%); pet, 6 (16.6%); and set, 3 (8.3%)—and showed 15 genotypes. EAEC may be an important pathogen of sporadic diarrhea in Mongolian children. Genetic analysis showed the heterogeneity of EAEC but illustrated the importance of the AggR regulon (denoting typical EAEC) as a marker for virulent EAEC strains. PMID:14715743

  18. Café au lait macules and juvénile polyps.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Theresa R; Scatena, Lisa S; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Gralla, Jane; Lee, Lela A

    2007-01-01

    Several hereditary and nonhereditary gastrointestinal tract polyposis syndromes exhibit extra-intestinal manifestations, including cutaneous findings. However, a lack of information exists regarding cutaneous features of juvenile polyposis. Our objective was to document the prevalence of cutaneous hyperpigmented lesions in children with juvenile polyposis coli or juvenile polyposis coli and their first degree relatives.Children seen in the gastroenterology practice at The Children's Hospital in Denver, Colorado with polyps (juvenile polyposis coli, sporadic juvenile polyps, and familial adenomatous polyposis coli) and their first degree relatives were invited to participate in the study. A comprehensive skin examination was performed on those who consented to participate. We found that 8 of 14 patients (eight with juvenile polyposis coli, four with juvenile polyposis, and two with familial adenomatous polyposis coli) had at least one café-au-lait macule, compared with three of 27 relatives (p=0.003).The prevalence of at least one café-au-lait macule in our patients (8/14 or 57.1%, CI: 28.9–82.3%) was significantly higher than the general population prevalence of 28.5% (p=0.023). However, if the two patients with familial adenomatous polyposis coli were excluded, the comparison with the general population prevalence did not reach statistical significance (p=0.095). The prevalence of multiple cafe´-au-lait macules in our patients (4/14 or 28.6%; CI:8.4–58.1%) was significantly higher than the general population prevalence of 5.2% (p ¼ 0.005). A notable finding was the presence of multiple café -au-lait macules in 4 of 12 juvenile polyposis coli/juvenile polyposis patients.Two patients with juvenile polyposis coli also had lentigines. In this selected case series, we observed single or multiple café-au-lait macules in a high proportion of children with the three types of polyps. Further studies are needed to assess a possible common pathway for hamartomatous

  19. TRIMETHOPRIM-SULFAMETHOXAZOLE RESISTANCE IN SEWAGE ISOLATES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sewage samples from seven locations in the United States were analyzed for Escherichia coli isolates which were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT). The prevalence rate of SXT resistant organisms varied between the different geographical locales. The majority of th...

  20. A comprehensive library of fluorescent transcriptional reporters for Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zaslaver, Alon; Bren, Anat; Ronen, Michal; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Kikoin, Ilya; Shavit, Seagull; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Surette, Michael G; Alon, Uri

    2006-08-01

    E. coli is widely used for systems biology research; there exists a need, however, for tools that can be used to accurately and comprehensively measure expression dynamics in individual living cells. To address this we present a library of transcriptional fusions of gfp to each of about 2,000 different promoters in E. coli K12, covering the great majority of the promoters in the organism. Each promoter fusion is expressed from a low-copy plasmid. We demonstrate that this library can be used to obtain highly accurate dynamic measurements of promoter activity on a genomic scale, in a glucose-lactose diauxic shift experiment. The library allowed detection of about 80 previously uncharacterized transcription units in E. coli, including putative internal promoters within previously known operons, such as the lac operon. This library can serve as a tool for accurate, high-resolution analysis of transcription networks in living E. coli cells.

  1. A comprehensive library of fluorescent transcriptional reporters for Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zaslaver, Alon; Bren, Anat; Ronen, Michal; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Kikoin, Ilya; Shavit, Seagull; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Surette, Michael G; Alon, Uri

    2006-08-01

    E. coli is widely used for systems biology research; there exists a need, however, for tools that can be used to accurately and comprehensively measure expression dynamics in individual living cells. To address this we present a library of transcriptional fusions of gfp to each of about 2,000 different promoters in E. coli K12, covering the great majority of the promoters in the organism. Each promoter fusion is expressed from a low-copy plasmid. We demonstrate that this library can be used to obtain highly accurate dynamic measurements of promoter activity on a genomic scale, in a glucose-lactose diauxic shift experiment. The library allowed detection of about 80 previously uncharacterized transcription units in E. coli, including putative internal promoters within previously known operons, such as the lac operon. This library can serve as a tool for accurate, high-resolution analysis of transcription networks in living E. coli cells. PMID:16862137

  2. Purification of penicillin-binding protein 2 of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, S J; Strominger, J L

    1981-01-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP-2) of Escherichia coli K-12 was purified by covalent affinity chromatography using 6-aminopenicillanic acid covalently coupled to carboxymethyl-Sepharose (6-APA-CM-Sepharose). Purification of PBP-2 was accomplished by prebinding the methoxy cephalosporin, cefoxitin, to the Triton X-100-solubilized PBPs of E. coli and then incubating the PBPs with 6-APA-CM-Sepharose. Cefoxitin readily binds to all the E. coli PBPs except PBP-2 and, thus, in the presence of cefoxitin, only PBP-2 could bind to the 6-APA-CM-Sepharose. The purification of a mixture of all of the PBPs of E. coli by affinity chromatography is also described. Images PMID:7007320

  3. EcoCyc: Enyclopedia of Escherichia coli Genes and Metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Karp, P D; Riley, M; Paley, S M; Pellegrini-Toole, A; Krummenacker, M

    1997-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Genes and Metabolism (EcoCyc) is a database that combines information about the genome and the intermediary metabolism of Escherichia coli. It describes 2970 genes of E.coli, 547 enzymes encoded by these genes, 702 metabolic reactions that occur in E.coli and the organization of these reactions into 107 metabolic pathways. The EcoCyc graphical user interface allows scientists to query and explore the EcoCyc database using visualization tools such as genomic-map browsers and automatic layouts of metabolic pathways. EcoCyc spans the space from sequence to function to allow scientists to investigate an unusually broad range of questions. EcoCyc can be thought of as both an electronic review article because of its copious references to the primary literature, and as an in silicio model of E.coli metabolism that can be probed and analyzed through computational means. PMID:9016502

  4. EcoCyc: Enyclopedia of Escherichia coli Genes and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karp, P D; Riley, M; Paley, S M; Pellegrini-Toole, A; Krummenacker, M

    1997-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Genes and Metabolism (EcoCyc) is a database that combines information about the genome and the intermediary metabolism of Escherichia coli. It describes 2970 genes of E.coli, 547 enzymes encoded by these genes, 702 metabolic reactions that occur in E.coli and the organization of these reactions into 107 metabolic pathways. The EcoCyc graphical user interface allows scientists to query and explore the EcoCyc database using visualization tools such as genomic-map browsers and automatic layouts of metabolic pathways. EcoCyc spans the space from sequence to function to allow scientists to investigate an unusually broad range of questions. EcoCyc can be thought of as both an electronic review article because of its copious references to the primary literature, and as an in silicio model of E.coli metabolism that can be probed and analyzed through computational means.

  5. The different ecological niches of enterotoxigenic E scherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales‐Siles, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Enterotoxigenic E scherichia coli (ETEC) is a water and food‐borne pathogen that infects the small intestine of the human gut and causes diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli adheres to the epithelium by means of colonization factors and secretes two enterotoxins, the heat labile toxin and/or the heat stable toxin that both deregulate ion channels and cause secretory diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli as all E. coli, is a versatile organism able to survive and grow in different environments. During transmission and infection, ETEC is exposed to various environmental cues that have an impact on survivability and virulence. The ability to cope with exposure to different stressful habitats is probably shaping the pool of virulent ETEC strains that cause both endemic and epidemic infections. This review will focus on the ecology of ETEC in its different habitats and interactions with other organisms as well as abiotic factors. PMID:26522129

  6. The different ecological niches of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Siles, Lucia; Sjöling, Åsa

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a water and food-borne pathogen that infects the small intestine of the human gut and causes diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli adheres to the epithelium by means of colonization factors and secretes two enterotoxins, the heat labile toxin and/or the heat stable toxin that both deregulate ion channels and cause secretory diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli as all E. coli, is a versatile organism able to survive and grow in different environments. During transmission and infection, ETEC is exposed to various environmental cues that have an impact on survivability and virulence. The ability to cope with exposure to different stressful habitats is probably shaping the pool of virulent ETEC strains that cause both endemic and epidemic infections. This review will focus on the ecology of ETEC in its different habitats and interactions with other organisms as well as abiotic factors. PMID:26522129

  7. Evolution in the Lab: Biocide Resistance in E.coli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welden, Charles W.; Hossler, Rex A.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment on resistance to teach about evolution and issues of misuse of antimicrobial compounds. Investigates Escherichia coli's response to treatment of triclosan, a biocide used in consumer products. (Contains 12 references.) (YDS)

  8. Eco Cyc: encyclopedia of Escherichia coli genes and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karp, P D; Riley, M; Paley, S M; Pellegrini-Toole, A; Krummenacker, M

    1999-01-01

    The EcoCyc database describes the genome and gene products of Escherichia coli, its metabolic and signal-transduction pathways, and its tRNAs. The database describes 4391 genes of E.coli, 695 enzymes encoded by a subset of these genes, 904 metabolic reactions that occur in E.coli, and the organization of these reactions into 129 metabolic pathways. The EcoCyc graphical user interface allows scientists to query and explore the EcoCyc database using visualization tools such as genomic-map browsers and automatic layouts of metabolic pathways. EcoCyc has many references to the primary literature, and is a (qualitative) computational model of E. coli metabolism. EcoCyc is available at URL http://ecocyc. PangeaSystems.com/ecocyc/

  9. The different ecological niches of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Siles, Lucia; Sjöling, Åsa

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a water and food-borne pathogen that infects the small intestine of the human gut and causes diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli adheres to the epithelium by means of colonization factors and secretes two enterotoxins, the heat labile toxin and/or the heat stable toxin that both deregulate ion channels and cause secretory diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli as all E. coli, is a versatile organism able to survive and grow in different environments. During transmission and infection, ETEC is exposed to various environmental cues that have an impact on survivability and virulence. The ability to cope with exposure to different stressful habitats is probably shaping the pool of virulent ETEC strains that cause both endemic and epidemic infections. This review will focus on the ecology of ETEC in its different habitats and interactions with other organisms as well as abiotic factors.

  10. The function of ubiquinone in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cox, G. B.; Newton, N. A.; Gibson, F.; Snoswell, A. M.; Hamilton, J. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. The function of ubiquinone in Escherichia coli was studied by using whole cells and membrane preparations of normal E. coli and of a mutant lacking ubiquinone. 2. The mutant lacking ubiquinone, strain AN59 (Ubi−), when grown under aerobic conditions, gave an anaerobic type of growth yield and produced large quantities of lactic acid, indicating that ubiquinone plays a vital role in electron transport. 3. NADH and lactate oxidase activities in membranes from strain AN59 (Ubi−) were greatly impaired and activity was restored by the addition of ubiquinone (Q-1). 4. Comparison of the percentage reduction of flavin, cytochrome b1 and cytochrome a2 in the aerobic steady state in membranes from the normal strain (AN62) and strain AN59 (Ubi−) and the effect of respiratory inhibitors on these percentages in membranes from strain AN62 suggest that ubiquinone functions at more than one site in the electron-transport chain. 5. Membranes from strain AN62, in the absence of substrate, showed an electron-spin-resonance signal attributed to ubisemiquinone. The amount of reduced ubiquinone (50%) found after rapid solvent extraction is consistent with the existence of ubiquinone in membranes as a stabilized ubisemiquinone. 6. The effects of piericidin A on membranes from strain AN62 suggest that this inhibitor acts at the ubiquinone sites: thus inhibition of electron transport is reversed by ubiquinone (Q-1); the aerobic steady-state oxidation–reduction levels of flavins and cytochrome b1 in the presence of the inhibitor are raised to values approximating those found in the membranes of strain AN59 (Ubi−); the inhibitor rapidly eliminates the electron-spin-resonance signal attributed to ubisemiquinone and allows slow oxidation of endogenous ubiquinol in the absence of substrate and prevents reduction of ubiquinone in the presence of substrate. It is concluded that piericidin A separates ubiquinone from the remainder of the electron-transport chain. 7. A scheme is

  11. Global dissemination of a multidrug resistant Escherichia coli clone

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Nicola K.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Stanton-Cook, Mitchell; Skippington, Elizabeth; Totsika, Makrina; Forde, Brian M.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Gomes Moriel, Danilo; Peters, Kate M.; Davies, Mark; Rogers, Benjamin A.; Dougan, Gordon; Rodriguez-Baño, Jesús; Pascual, Alvaro; Pitout, Johann D. D.; Upton, Mathew; Paterson, David L.; Walsh, Timothy R.; Schembri, Mark A.; Beatson, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) is a globally disseminated, multidrug resistant (MDR) clone responsible for a high proportion of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. The rapid emergence and successful spread of E. coli ST131 is strongly associated with several factors, including resistance to fluoroquinolones, high virulence gene content, the possession of the type 1 fimbriae FimH30 allele, and the production of the CTX-M-15 extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL). Here, we used genome sequencing to examine the molecular epidemiology of a collection of E. coli ST131 strains isolated from six distinct geographical locations across the world spanning 2000–2011. The global phylogeny of E. coli ST131, determined from whole-genome sequence data, revealed a single lineage of E. coli ST131 distinct from other extraintestinal E. coli strains within the B2 phylogroup. Three closely related E. coli ST131 sublineages were identified, with little association to geographic origin. The majority of single-nucleotide variants associated with each of the sublineages were due to recombination in regions adjacent to mobile genetic elements (MGEs). The most prevalent sublineage of ST131 strains was characterized by fluoroquinolone resistance, and a distinct virulence factor and MGE profile. Four different variants of the CTX-M ESBL–resistance gene were identified in our ST131 strains, with acquisition of CTX-M-15 representing a defining feature of a discrete but geographically dispersed ST131 sublineage. This study confirms the global dispersal of a single E. coli ST131 clone and demonstrates the role of MGEs and recombination in the evolution of this important MDR pathogen. PMID:24706808

  12. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Riley, M

    1998-01-01

    GenProtEC is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins, representing groups of paralogous genes, with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. GenProtEC can be accessed at the URL http://www.mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html PMID:9399799

  13. Typhlitis due to Balantidium coli in captive lowland gorillas.

    PubMed

    Lee, R V; Prowten, A W; Anthone, S; Satchidanand, S K; Fisher, J E; Anthone, R

    1990-01-01

    Typhlitis caused by Balantidium coli and requiring surgical resection occurred in three captive lowland gorillas over a 30-month period. Not one of the other gorillas in the colony or their keepers was ill. B. coli is distributed widely geographically and widely among mammals. Asymptomatic commensalism predominates, but invasion of the colonic mucosa can produce diarrhea and dysentery and set the stage for local or systemic spread. PMID:2267484

  14. Summer E. coli patterns and responses along 23 Chicago beaches.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Richard L; Nevers, Meredith B

    2008-12-15

    Concentrations of E. coli in recreational beach water are highly variable both locally and temporally, but a broader understanding of these fluctuations may be explained through coastal observations. Currently, beach contamination study approaches tend to be site-specific under the belief that politically delineated beaches are unique and management of beaches cannot be regionally oriented. E. coli data collected over five years from 23 Chicago beaches clearly identified ambient linked patterns at the regional scale. Temporal fluctuations were similar, with all beaches having simultaneous peaks and troughs of E. coli concentrations. Spatially, E. coli concentrations for beaches more closely situated were more closely correlated, indicating spatial autocorrelation. Julian day, wave height, and barometric pressure explained up to 40% of the variation, a value comparable to individual, less parsimonious site-specific models. Day of sampling could explain the majority of the variation in E. coli concentrations, more so than beach, depth, or time of day. Comparing beaches along a targeted coastline allows a better understanding of inherent background regional fluctuations and, ultimately, better predictions of E. coli concentrations in coastal recreational water.

  15. Summer E. coli patterns and responses along 23 Chicago beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, R.L.; Nevers, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Concentrations of E. coli in recreational beach water are highly variable both locally and temporally, but a broader understanding of these fluctuations may be explained through coastal observations. Currently, beach contamination study approaches tend to be site-specific underthe belief that politically delineated beaches are unique and management of beaches cannot be regionally oriented. E. coli data collected over five years from 23 Chicago beaches clearly identified ambient linked patterns at the regional scale. Temporal fluctuations were similar, with all beaches having simultaneous peaks and troughs of E. coli concentrations. Spatially, E. coli concentrations for beaches more closely situated were more closely correlated, indicating spatial autocorrelation. Julian day, wave height, and barometric pressure explained up to 40% of the variation, a value comparable to individual, less parsimonious site-specific models. Day of sampling could explain the majority of the variation in E. coli concentrations, more so than beach, depth, or time of day. Comparing beaches along a targeted coastline allows a better understanding of inherent background regional fluctuations and, ultimately, better predictions of E. coli concentrations in coastal recreational water.

  16. EcoCyc: A comprehensive view of Escherichia coli biology

    PubMed Central

    Keseler, Ingrid M.; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Collado-Vides, Julio; Gama-Castro, Socorro; Gunsalus, Robert P.; Johnson, D. Aaron; Krummenacker, Markus; Nolan, Laura M.; Paley, Suzanne; Paulsen, Ian T.; Peralta-Gil, Martin; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Shearer, Alexander Glennon; Karp, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    EcoCyc (http://EcoCyc.org) provides a comprehensive encyclopedia of Escherichia coli biology. EcoCyc integrates information about the genome, genes and gene products; the metabolic network; and the regulatory network of E. coli. Recent EcoCyc developments include a new initiative to represent and curate all types of E. coli regulatory processes such as attenuation and regulation by small RNAs. EcoCyc has started to curate Gene Ontology (GO) terms for E. coli and has made a dataset of E. coli GO terms available through the GO Web site. The curation and visualization of electron transfer processes has been significantly improved. Other software and Web site enhancements include the addition of tracks to the EcoCyc genome browser, in particular a type of track designed for the display of ChIP-chip datasets, and the development of a comparative genome browser. A new Genome Omics Viewer enables users to paint omics datasets onto the full E. coli genome for analysis. A new advanced query page guides users in interactively constructing complex database queries against EcoCyc. A Macintosh version of EcoCyc is now available. A series of Webinars is available to instruct users in the use of EcoCyc. PMID:18974181

  17. Measuring Escherichia coli Gene Expression during Human Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Escherichia coli (E. coli) evolved by acquisition of pathogenicity islands, phage, plasmids, and DNA segments by horizontal gene transfer. Strains are heterogeneous but virulent uropathogenic isolates more often have specific fimbriae, toxins, and iron receptors than commensal strains. One may ask whether it is the virulence factors alone that are required to establish infection. While these virulence factors clearly contribute strongly to pathogenesis, bacteria must survive by metabolizing nutrients available to them. By constructing mutants in all major metabolic pathways and co-challenging mice transurethrally with each mutant and the wild type strain, we identified which major metabolic pathways are required to infect the urinary tract. We must also ask what else is E. coli doing in vivo? To answer this question, we examined the transcriptome of E. coli CFT073 in the murine model of urinary tract infection (UTI) as well as for E. coli strains collected and analyzed directly from the urine of patients attending either a urology clinic or a university health clinic for symptoms of UTI. Using microarrays and RNA-seq, we measured in vivo gene expression for these uropathogenic E. coli strains, identifying genes upregulated during murine and human UTI. Our findings allow us to propose a new definition of bacterial virulence. PMID:26784237

  18. Transformation of Escherichia coli and protein expression using lipoplex mimicry.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chul-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Ahn, Taeho

    2016-11-01

    We investigated a "one-step" method for transformation of and protein expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) using a complex of n-stearylamine, a cationic lipid, and plasmid DNA, which mimics lipoplex-based approaches. When E. coli cells were treated with the cationic lipid-plasmid complex, the transformation efficiencies were in the range of approximately 2-3 × 10(6) colony-forming units. Further increase in the efficiency was obtained by co-treatment with calcium chloride (or rubidium chloride) and the complexes. Moreover, after DNA transfer, E. coli cells successfully expressed plasmid-encoded proteins such as cytochrome P450s and glutathione-S-transferase without overnight incubation of the cells to form colonies, an indispensable step in other bacterial transformation methods. In this study, we provide a simple method for E. coli transformation, which does not require the preparation of competent cells. The present method also shortens the overall procedures for transformation and gene expression in E. coli by omitting the colony-forming step. PMID:27416742

  19. Biochemical characteristic of biofilm of uropathogenic Escherichia coli Dr(+) strains.

    PubMed

    Zalewska-Piątek, Beata; Wilkanowicz, Sabina; Bruździak, Piotr; Piątek, Rafał; Kur, Józef

    2013-07-19

    Urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli are very common health problem in the developed countries. The virulence of the uropathogenic E. coli Dr(+) IH11128 is determined by Dr fimbriae, which are homopolymeric structures composed of DraE subunits with the DraD protein capping the fiber. In this study, we have analyzed the structural and biochemical properties of biofilms developed by E. coli strains expressing Dr fimbriae with or without the DraD tip subunit and the surface-exposed DraD protein. We have also demonstrated that these E. coli strains form biofilms on an abiotic surface in a nutrient-dependent fashion. We present evidence that Dr fimbriae are necessary during the first stage of bacterial interaction with the abiotic surface. In addition, we reveal that the DraD alone is also sufficient for the initial surface attachment at an even higher level than Dr fimbriae and that chloramphenicol is able to reduce the normal attachment of the analyzed E. coli. The action of chloramphenicol also shows that protein synthesis is required for the early events of biofilm formation. Additionally, we have identified reduced exopolysaccharide coverage in E. coli that express only Dr fimbrial polyadhesins at the cell surface with or without the DraD capping subunit.

  20. An Escherichia coli Mutant That Makes Exceptionally Long Cells

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Elaine B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although Escherichia coli is a very small (1- to 2-μm) rod-shaped cell, here we describe an E. coli mutant that forms enormously long cells in rich media such as Luria broth, as long indeed as 750 μm. These extremely elongated (eel) cells are as long as the longest bacteria known and have no internal subdivisions. They are metabolically competent, elongate rapidly, synthesize DNA, and distribute cell contents along this length. They lack only the ability to divide. The concentration of the essential cell division protein FtsZ is reduced in these eel cells, and increasing this concentration restores division. IMPORTANCE Escherichia coli is usually a very small bacterium, 1 to 2 μm long. We have isolated a mutant that forms enormously long cells, 700 times longer than the usual E. coli cell. E. coli filaments that form under other conditions usually die within a few hours, whereas our mutant is fully viable even when it reaches such lengths. This mutant provides a useful tool for the study of aspects of E. coli physiology that are difficult to investigate with small cells. PMID:25691528

  1. Bacterial chemotaxis differences in Escherichia coli isolated from different hosts.

    PubMed

    Dzinic, Sijana H; Luercio, Marcella; Ram, Jeffrey L

    2008-12-01

    The mechanisms mediating the association between Escherichia coli and specific hosts are unknown. This study investigates the hypothesis that the host-specific associations of E. coli strains are mediated in part by differences in chemotaxis. To test this hypothesis, chemotactic responses of E. coli strains isolated from different host groups (carnivores, herbivores, and omnivores) were tested with various attractants. In low-density agar chemotaxis assays, the average motility of E. coli in response to aspartate, serine, and ribose among the different groups was not significantly different; however, strains from carnivores responded significantly more to aspartate, relative to their responses to serine, in comparison with strains from herbivores, which responded equally or better to serine than to aspartate. The relatively greater chemotactic response of strains from carnivores to aspartate than to serine was confirmed in a subset of strains by capillary chemotaxis assay. Differences in responses to serine and aspartate were not due to growth differences, as determined by comparison of 24 h growth curves with glycerol, aspartate, and serine carbon sources. The differences in chemotactic behavior of E. coli strains isolated from herbivores and carnivores support the hypothesis that host-specific associations of E. coli strains are mediated in part by differences in chemotactic behavior.

  2. Transformation of Escherichia coli and protein expression using lipoplex mimicry.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chul-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Ahn, Taeho

    2016-11-01

    We investigated a "one-step" method for transformation of and protein expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) using a complex of n-stearylamine, a cationic lipid, and plasmid DNA, which mimics lipoplex-based approaches. When E. coli cells were treated with the cationic lipid-plasmid complex, the transformation efficiencies were in the range of approximately 2-3 × 10(6) colony-forming units. Further increase in the efficiency was obtained by co-treatment with calcium chloride (or rubidium chloride) and the complexes. Moreover, after DNA transfer, E. coli cells successfully expressed plasmid-encoded proteins such as cytochrome P450s and glutathione-S-transferase without overnight incubation of the cells to form colonies, an indispensable step in other bacterial transformation methods. In this study, we provide a simple method for E. coli transformation, which does not require the preparation of competent cells. The present method also shortens the overall procedures for transformation and gene expression in E. coli by omitting the colony-forming step.

  3. [Avian Escherichia coli virulence factors associated with coli septicemia in broiler chickens].

    PubMed

    Ramirez Santoyo, R M; Moreno Sala, A; Almanza Marquez, Y

    2001-01-01

    In order to detect phenotypic characteristics associated with pathogenicity, 25 strains of Escherichia coli, isolated from clinical cases of colisepticemia in broiler chickens, were examined to determine the following properties: colicinogenicity, colicin V production, type 1 fimbriae, hemolysin expression and motility. Colicinogenicity occurred in 72% of the strains, 56% of all strains produced colicin V, 84% were positive for type 1 fimbriae and 80% were positive for motility. None of the strains had hemolytic activity; however, all of them, expressed at least one of the other characteristics studied. These results suggest that the diversity of phenotypes detected partially explain the multifactorial nature of avian colisepticemia.

  4. Regulation of alcohol fermentation by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the way in which the fermentative synthesis of ethanol is regulated in the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli. Focus is on the two final steps in alcohol synthesis, which are catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde CoA dehydrogenase. We have isolated a series of mutations affecting the expression of these enzymes. Some of these mutations are in the structural genes for these enzymes; others affect the regulation of the adh operon. We have recently cloned the genes coding for these enzymes and are now studying the effect of multiple copies of the adh gene on fermentative growth and its regulation. A recently invented technique, proton suicide has allowed the selection of a variety of novel mutants affecting fermentation which are presently being characterized. We have isolated a comprehensive collection of operon fusions in which the lacZ structural gene is fused to promoters that are inactive aerobically but active anaerobically. Although these genes (like adh) are only expressed under anaerobic conditions, the level of induction varies from two-fold to nearly 100-fold. The nitrogen source, medium pH, nature of the buffer, presence of alternative electron acceptors (e.g., nitrate), and other factors exert a great effect on the expression of many of these genes. In the near future we will investigate control mechanisms common to the adh operon and other anaerobically regulated genes.

  5. Genotoxicity of Graphene in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ananya

    Rapid advances in nanotechnology necessitate assessment of the safety of nanomaterials in the resulting products and applications. One key nanomaterial attracting much interest in many areas of science and technology is graphene. Graphene is a one atom thick carbon allotrope arranged in a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. In addition to being extremely thin, graphene has several extraordinary physical properties such as its exceptional mechanical strength, thermal stability, and high electrical conductivity. Graphene itself is relatively chemically inert and therefore pristine graphene must undergo a process called functionalization, which is combination of chemical and physical treatments that change the properties of graphene, to make it chemically active. Functionalization of graphene is of crucial importance as the end application of graphene depends on proper functionalization. In the field of medicine, graphene is currently a nanomaterial of high interest for building biosensors, DNA transistors, and probes for cancer detection. Despite the promising applications of graphene in several areas of biomedicine, there have been only few studies in recent years that focus on evaluating cytotoxicity of graphene on cells, and almost no studies that investigate how graphene exposure affects cellular genetic material. Therefore, in this study we used a novel approach to evaluate the genotoxicity, i.e., the effects of graphene on DNA, using Escherichia coli as a prokaryotic model organism.

  6. Starvation-induced dormancy in E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simsek, Emrah; Kim, Minsu

    Isogenic bacterial populations can exhibit phenotypic heterogeneity. Phenotypic heterogeneity is often viewed as a bet-hedging strategy to cope with environmental fluctuations, and believed to be under genetic control. The experimental evidence of this view, however, is limited. Here, we report experimental evidence that prompts reconsideration of this view. Observing how starved E. coli cells resume growth upon nutrient upshift at the single-cell level in real time, we revealed that physiological and metabolic state of starved cells, as well as growth resumption kinetics, vary from cell to cell. Upon nutrient upshift, a majority of cells resume growth instantly, but a small fraction maintain a non-growth state for several hours or days (i.e., long lag time). Hence they are dormant cells. The fraction strongly depends on the duration of starvation. The dormancy does not confer resistance to starvation. Oxidative damage accumulated during starvation leads to the appearance of dormant cells. Taken together, our data suggests that a dormant subpopulation appears as an inevitable consequence of starvation, rather than cellular decision to cope with starvation. Hence, the existence of a genetic program and adaptive value as a bet-hedging strategy to cope with starvation stress may not be needed to explain the emergence of bacterial dormancy.

  7. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Etcheverría, Analía Inés; Padola, Nora Lía

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. Outbreaks are linked to bovine food sources. STEC O157:H7 has been responsible for the most severe outbreaks worldwide. However, non-O157 serotypes have emerged as important enteric pathogens in several countries. The main virulence factor of STEC is the production of Shiga toxins 1 and 2. Additional virulence markers are a plasmid-encoded enterohemolysin (ehxA), an autoagglutinating adhesin (Saa), a catalase-peroxidase (katP), an extracellular serine protease (espP), a zinc metalloprotease (stcE), a subtilase cytotoxin (subAB), among others. Other virulence factors are intimin and adhesins that had a roll in the adherence of STEC to bovine colon. This review focuses on the virulence traits of STEC and especially on those related to the adhesion to bovine colon. The known of the interaction between STEC and the bovine host is crucial to develop strategies to control cattle colonization. PMID:23624795

  8. A surprising sweetener from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Infections with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) are remarkably devoid of gut inflammation and necrotic damage compared to infections caused by invasive pathogens such as Salmonella and Shigella. Recently, we observed that EPEC blocks cell death using the type III secretion system (T3SS) effector NleB. NleB mediated post-translational modification of death domain containing adaptor proteins by the covalent attachment of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to a conserved arginine in the death domain.  N-linked glycosylation of arginine has not previously been reported in mammalian cell biology and the precise biochemistry of this modification is not yet defined. Although the addition of a single GlcNAc to arginine is a seemingly slight alteration, the impact of NleB is considerable as arginine in this location is critical for death domain interactions and death receptor induced apoptosis. Hence, by blocking cell death, NleB promotes enterocyte survival and thereby prolongs EPEC attachment to the gut epithelium. PMID:25536377

  9. A surprising sweetener from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Infections with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) are remarkably devoid of gut inflammation and necrotic damage compared to infections caused by invasive pathogens such as Salmonella and Shigella. Recently, we observed that EPEC blocks cell death using the type III secretion system (T3SS) effector NleB. NleB mediated post-translational modification of death domain containing adaptor proteins by the covalent attachment of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to a conserved arginine in the death domain.  N-linked glycosylation of arginine has not previously been reported in mammalian cell biology and the precise biochemistry of this modification is not yet defined. Although the addition of a single GlcNAc to arginine is a seemingly slight alteration, the impact of NleB is considerable as arginine in this location is critical for death domain interactions and death receptor induced apoptosis. Hence, by blocking cell death, NleB promotes enterocyte survival and thereby prolongs EPEC attachment to the gut epithelium.

  10. Optimal search in E. coli chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Dev, Subrata; Chatterjee, Sakuntala

    2015-04-01

    We study chemotaxis of a single E. coli bacterium in a medium where the nutrient chemical is also undergoing diffusion and its concentration has the form of a Gaussian whose width increases with time. We measure the average first passage time of the bacterium at a region of high nutrient concentration. In the limit of very slow nutrient diffusion, the bacterium effectively experiences a Gaussian concentration profile with a fixed width. In this case we find that there exists an optimum width of the Gaussian when the average first passage time is minimum, i.e., the search process is most efficient. We verify the existence of the optimum width for the deterministic initial position of the bacterium and also for the stochastic initial position, drawn from uniform and steady state distributions. Our numerical simulation in a model of a non-Markovian random walker agrees well with our analytical calculations in a related coarse-grained model. We also present our simulation results for the case when the nutrient diffusion and bacterial motion occur over comparable time scales and the bacterium senses a time-varying concentration field.

  11. Colonization factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, T P Vipin; Sakellaris, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of life-threatening diarrheal disease around the world. The major aspects of ETEC virulence are colonization of the small intestine and the secretion of enterotoxins which elicit diarrhea. Intestinal colonization is mediated, in part, by adhesins displayed on the bacterial cell surface. As colonization of the intestine is the critical first step in the establishment of an infection, it represents a potential point of intervention for the prevention of infections. Therefore, colonization factors (CFs) have been important subjects of research in the field of ETEC virulence. Research in this field has revealed that ETEC possesses a large array of serologically distinct CFs that differ in composition, structure, and function. Most ETEC CFs are pili (fimbriae) or related fibrous structures, while other adhesins are simple outer membrane proteins lacking any macromolecular structure. This chapter reviews the genetics, structure, function, and regulation of ETEC CFs and how such studies have contributed to our understanding of ETEC virulence and opened up potential opportunities for the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. PMID:25596032

  12. Eclipse period without sequestration in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Jan; Dasgupta, Santanu; Berg, Otto G; Nordström, Kurt

    2002-06-01

    The classical Meselson-Stahl density shift experiment was used to determine the length of the eclipse period in Escherichia coli, the minimum time period during which no new initiation is allowed from a newly replicated origin of chromosome replication, oriC. Populations of bacteria growing exponentially in heavy ((15)NH(4)+ and (13)C(6)-glucose) medium were shifted to light ((14)NH(4)+ and (12)C(6)-glucose) medium. The HH-, HL- and LL-DNA were separated by CsCl density gradient centrifugation, and their relative amounts were determined using radioactive gene-specific probes. The eclipse period, estimated from the kinetics of conversion of HH-DNA to HL- and LL-DNA, turned out to be 0.60 generation times for the wild-type strain. This was invariable for widely varying doubling times (35, 68 and 112 min) and was independent of the chromosome locus at which the eclipse period was measured. For strains with seqA, dam and damseqA mutants, the length of the eclipse period was 0.16, 0.40 and 0.32 generation times respectively. Thus, initiations from oriC were repressed for a considerable proportion of the generation time even when the sequestration function seemed to be severely compromised. The causal relationship between the length of the eclipse period and the synchrony of initiations from oriC is discussed.

  13. Biochemistry of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczykowski, S C; Dixon, D A; Eggleston, A K; Lauder, S D; Rehrauer, W M

    1994-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental biological process. Biochemical understanding of this process is most advanced for Escherichia coli. At least 25 gene products are involved in promoting genetic exchange. At present, this includes the RecA, RecBCD (exonuclease V), RecE (exonuclease VIII), RecF, RecG, RecJ, RecN, RecOR, RecQ, RecT, RuvAB, RuvC, SbcCD, and SSB proteins, as well as DNA polymerase I, DNA gyrase, DNA topoisomerase I, DNA ligase, and DNA helicases. The activities displayed by these enzymes include homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange, helicase, branch migration, Holliday junction binding and cleavage, nuclease, ATPase, topoisomerase, DNA binding, ATP binding, polymerase, and ligase, and, collectively, they define biochemical events that are essential for efficient recombination. In addition to these needed proteins, a cis-acting recombination hot spot known as Chi (chi: 5'-GCTGGTGG-3') plays a crucial regulatory function. The biochemical steps that comprise homologous recombination can be formally divided into four parts: (i) processing of DNA molecules into suitable recombination substrates, (ii) homologous pairing of the DNA partners and the exchange of DNA strands, (iii) extension of the nascent DNA heteroduplex; and (iv) resolution of the resulting crossover structure. This review focuses on the biochemical mechanisms underlying these steps, with particular emphases on the activities of the proteins involved and on the integration of these activities into likely biochemical pathways for recombination. Images PMID:7968921

  14. Analysis of E. coli promoter sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Harley, C B; Reynolds, R P

    1987-01-01

    We have compiled and analyzed 263 promoters with known transcriptional start points for E. coli genes. Promoter elements (-35 hexamer, -10 hexamer, and spacing between these regions) were aligned by a program which selects the arrangement consistent with the start point and statistically most homologous to a reference list of promoters. The initial reference list was that of Hawley and McClure (Nucl. Acids Res. 11, 2237-2255, 1983). Alignment of the complete list was used for reference until successive analyses did not alter the structure of the list. In the final compilation, all bases in the -35 (TTGACA) and -10 (TATAAT) hexamers were highly conserved, 92% of promoters had inter-region spacing of 17 +/- 1 bp, and 75% of the uniquely defined start points initiated 7 +/- 1 bases downstream of the -10 region. The consensus sequence of promoters with inter-region spacing of 16, 17 or 18 bp did not differ. This compilation and analysis should be useful for studies of promoter structure and function and for programs which identify potential promoter sequences. PMID:3550697

  15. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of the enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.

  16. Regulation of Glutamine Transport in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Willis, R C; Iwata, K K; Furlong, C E

    1975-01-01

    The formation of the high-affinity (Km equal to 0.2 muM) L-glutamine transport system of Escherichia coli strain 7 (Lin) appears to be subject to the same major control as the glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) of this gram-negative organism. Culture of cells under nitrogen-limited conditions provides maximum derepression of both the glutamine synthetase and the glutamine transport system. Nutritional conditions providing a rich supply of ammonium salts or available sources of nitrogen, i.e., conditions which repress the formation of glutamine synthetase, provide three- and 20-fold repression, respectively, of the glutamine transport system. Culture of cells with glutamine supplements of 2 mM does not increase the repression of high-affinity glutamine transport system beyond the level observed in the absence of glutamine. A second kinetically distinct low-affinity component of glutamine. A second kinetically distinct low-affinity component of glutamine uptake is observed in cells cultured with a glutamine-depleted nutrient broth. This second component is associated with the appearance of glutaminase A (EC 3.5.1.2) and asparaginase I (EC 3.5.1.1), a periplasmic enzyme. Parallel changes were observed in the levels of the high-affinity glutamine transport system and the glutamine synthetase when cells were cultured with the carbon sources: glucose, glycerol, or succinate. PMID:238938

  17. The E. coli DNA Replication Fork.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J S; Jergic, S; Dixon, N E

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication in Escherichia coli initiates at oriC, the origin of replication and proceeds bidirectionally, resulting in two replication forks that travel in opposite directions from the origin. Here, we focus on events at the replication fork. The replication machinery (or replisome), first assembled on both forks at oriC, contains the DnaB helicase for strand separation, and the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (Pol III HE) for DNA synthesis. DnaB interacts transiently with the DnaG primase for RNA priming on both strands. The Pol III HE is made up of three subassemblies: (i) the αɛθ core polymerase complex that is present in two (or three) copies to simultaneously copy both DNA strands, (ii) the β2 sliding clamp that interacts with the core polymerase to ensure its processivity, and (iii) the seven-subunit clamp loader complex that loads β2 onto primer-template junctions and interacts with the α polymerase subunit of the core and the DnaB helicase to organize the two (or three) core polymerases. Here, we review the structures of the enzymatic components of replisomes, and the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that ensure they remain intact while undergoing substantial dynamic changes as they function to copy both the leading and lagging strands simultaneously during coordinated replication.

  18. Curli expression of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Szabó, E; Skedsmo, A; Sonnevend, A; Al-Dhaheri, K; Emody, L; Usmani, A; Pál, T

    2005-01-01

    One hundred and four enterotoxin producing Escherichia coli strains of wide geographical origin were tested for the expression of curli fimbriae by transmission electronmicroscopy and by ELISA using curli-specific antibodies, as well as for the presence of curli-specific gene sequences by PCR. All isolates, irrespective of the production of the fimbriae, carried sequences specific for the structure (csgA) and for one of the regulator genes (crl) of curli expression, respectively. Curli fimbriae were detected in 56 strains (53.8 %). Thirty-six strains expressed curli only when growing at 30 degrees C, 4 isolates were weakly curliated at 37 degrees C only, while on 16 strains curli was observed at both temperatures. On isolates carrying curli at both temperatures the expression of the fimbria was significantly stronger at 30 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. Curli proficiency significantly, but not completely, correlated with the binding of the Congo Red dye. The expression of curli did not confer epithelial cell invasiveness to ETEC strains but, once expressed at 30 degrees C, it facilitated the adherence of the bacteria to plastic surfaces. Curli present in more than half of the ETEC strains and expressed preferentially at low temperatures could be a factor facilitating the environmental survival of this food- and water-borne pathogen.

  19. Escherichia coli EDL933 requires gluconeogenic nutrients to successfully colonize the intestines of streptomycin-treated mice precolonized with E. coli Nissle 1917.

    PubMed

    Schinner, Silvia A C; Mokszycki, Matthew E; Adediran, Jimmy; Leatham-Jensen, Mary; Conway, Tyrrell; Cohen, Paul S

    2015-05-01

    Escherichia coli MG1655, a K-12 strain, uses glycolytic nutrients exclusively to colonize the intestines of streptomycin-treated mice when it is the only E. coli strain present or when it is confronted with E. coli EDL933, an O157:H7 strain. In contrast, E. coli EDL933 uses glycolytic nutrients exclusively when it is the only E. coli strain in the intestine but switches in part to gluconeogenic nutrients when it colonizes mice precolonized with E. coli MG1655 (R. L. Miranda et al., Infect Immun 72:1666-1676, 2004, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.72.3.1666-1676.2004). Recently, J. W. Njoroge et al. (mBio 3:e00280-12, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00280-12) reported that E. coli 86-24, an O157:H7 strain, activates the expression of virulence genes under gluconeogenic conditions, suggesting that colonization of the intestine with a probiotic E. coli strain that outcompetes O157:H7 strains for gluconeogenic nutrients could render them nonpathogenic. Here we report that E. coli Nissle 1917, a probiotic strain, uses both glycolytic and gluconeogenic nutrients to colonize the mouse intestine between 1 and 5 days postfeeding, appears to stop using gluconeogenic nutrients thereafter in a large, long-term colonization niche, but continues to use them in a smaller niche to compete with invading E. coli EDL933. Evidence is also presented suggesting that invading E. coli EDL933 uses both glycolytic and gluconeogenic nutrients and needs the ability to perform gluconeogenesis in order to colonize mice precolonized with E. coli Nissle 1917. The data presented here therefore rule out the possibility that E. coli Nissle 1917 can starve the O157:H7 E. coli strain EDL933 of gluconeogenic nutrients, even though E. coli Nissle 1917 uses such nutrients to compete with E. coli EDL933 in the mouse intestine. PMID:25733524

  20. Escherichia coli EDL933 requires gluconeogenic nutrients to successfully colonize the intestines of streptomycin-treated mice precolonized with E. coli Nissle 1917.

    PubMed

    Schinner, Silvia A C; Mokszycki, Matthew E; Adediran, Jimmy; Leatham-Jensen, Mary; Conway, Tyrrell; Cohen, Paul S

    2015-05-01

    Escherichia coli MG1655, a K-12 strain, uses glycolytic nutrients exclusively to colonize the intestines of streptomycin-treated mice when it is the only E. coli strain present or when it is confronted with E. coli EDL933, an O157:H7 strain. In contrast, E. coli EDL933 uses glycolytic nutrients exclusively when it is the only E. coli strain in the intestine but switches in part to gluconeogenic nutrients when it colonizes mice precolonized with E. coli MG1655 (R. L. Miranda et al., Infect Immun 72:1666-1676, 2004, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.72.3.1666-1676.2004). Recently, J. W. Njoroge et al. (mBio 3:e00280-12, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00280-12) reported that E. coli 86-24, an O157:H7 strain, activates the expression of virulence genes under gluconeogenic conditions, suggesting that colonization of the intestine with a probiotic E. coli strain that outcompetes O157:H7 strains for gluconeogenic nutrients could render them nonpathogenic. Here we report that E. coli Nissle 1917, a probiotic strain, uses both glycolytic and gluconeogenic nutrients to colonize the mouse intestine between 1 and 5 days postfeeding, appears to stop using gluconeogenic nutrients thereafter in a large, long-term colonization niche, but continues to use them in a smaller niche to compete with invading E. coli EDL933. Evidence is also presented suggesting that invading E. coli EDL933 uses both glycolytic and gluconeogenic nutrients and needs the ability to perform gluconeogenesis in order to colonize mice precolonized with E. coli Nissle 1917. The data presented here therefore rule out the possibility that E. coli Nissle 1917 can starve the O157:H7 E. coli strain EDL933 of gluconeogenic nutrients, even though E. coli Nissle 1917 uses such nutrients to compete with E. coli EDL933 in the mouse intestine.

  1. Fungal β-1,3-glucan increases ofloxacin tolerance of Escherichia coli in a polymicrobial E. coli/Candida albicans biofilm.

    PubMed

    De Brucker, Katrijn; Tan, Yulong; Vints, Katlijn; De Cremer, Kaat; Braem, Annabel; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan; Vleugels, Jef; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2015-01-01

    In the past, biofilm-related research has focused mainly on axenic biofilms. However, in nature, biofilms are often composed of multiple species, and the resulting polymicrobial interactions influence industrially and clinically relevant outcomes such as performance and drug resistance. In this study, we show that Escherichia coli does not affect Candida albicans tolerance to amphotericin or caspofungin in an E. coli/C. albicans biofilm. In contrast, ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli is significantly increased in a polymicrobial E. coli/C. albicans biofilm compared to its tolerance in an axenic E. coli biofilm. The increased ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli is mainly biofilm specific, as ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli is less pronounced in polymicrobial E. coli/C. albicans planktonic cultures. Moreover, we found that ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli decreased significantly when E. coli/C. albicans biofilms were treated with matrix-degrading enzymes such as the β-1,3-glucan-degrading enzyme lyticase. In line with a role for β-1,3-glucan in mediating ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli in a biofilm, we found that ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli increased even more in E. coli/C. albicans biofilms consisting of a high-β-1,3-glucan-producing C. albicans mutant. In addition, exogenous addition of laminarin, a polysaccharide composed mainly of poly-β-1,3-glucan, to an E. coli biofilm also resulted in increased ofloxacin tolerance. All these data indicate that β-1,3-glucan from C. albicans increases ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli in an E. coli/C. albicans biofilm.

  2. Prevalence of Avian-Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strain O1 Genomic Islands among Extraintestinal and Commensal E. coli Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Wannemuehler, Yvonne; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie; Johnson, James R.; Logue, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains that cause disease outside the intestine are known as extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and include pathogens of humans and animals. Previously, the genome of avian-pathogenic E. coli (APEC) O1:K1:H7 strain O1, from ST95, was sequenced and compared to those of several other E. coli strains, identifying 43 genomic islands. Here, the genomic islands of APEC O1 were compared to those of other sequenced E. coli strains, and the distribution of 81 genes belonging to 12 APEC O1 genomic islands among 828 human and avian ExPEC and commensal E. coli isolates was determined. Multiple islands were highly prevalent among isolates belonging to the O1 and O18 serogroups within phylogenetic group B2, which are implicated in human neonatal meningitis. Because of the extensive genomic similarities between APEC O1 and other human ExPEC strains belonging to the ST95 phylogenetic lineage, its ability to cause disease in a rat model of sepsis and meningitis was assessed. Unlike other ST95 lineage strains, APEC O1 was unable to cause bacteremia or meningitis in the neonatal rat model and was significantly less virulent than uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) CFT073 in a mouse sepsis model, despite carrying multiple neonatal meningitis E. coli (NMEC) virulence factors and belonging to the ST95 phylogenetic lineage. These results suggest that host adaptation or genome modifications have occurred either in APEC O1 or in highly virulent ExPEC isolates, resulting in differences in pathogenicity. Overall, the genomic islands examined provide targets for further discrimination of the different ExPEC subpathotypes, serogroups, phylogenetic types, and sequence types. PMID:22467781

  3. Modeling the inactivatin of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and uropathogenic E. coli in ground beef by high pressure processing and citral

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease causing Escherichia coli commonly found in meat and poultry include intestinal pathogenic E. coli (iPEC) as well as extraintestinal types such as the Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). In this study we compared the resistance of iPEC (O157:H7) to UPEC in ground beef using High Pressure Processing...

  4. Modeling the inactivation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and uropathogenic E.coli in ground chicken by high pressure processing and thymol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease causing Escherichia coli commonly found in meat and poultry include intestinal pathogenic E. coli (iPEC) as well as extraintestinal types such as the Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). In this study we compare the resistance of iPEC (O157:H7) to UPEC in chicken meat using High Pressure Processing...

  5. Difference between Escherichia coli O157:H7 and non-pathogenic E. coli: survival and growth in seasonings.

    PubMed

    Yokoigawa, K; Takikawa, A; Kawai, H

    1999-01-01

    We examined the survival and growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells incubated with several seasonings, in comparison with those of non-pathogenic E. coli. The cells were incubated at 25 degrees C for 24 h with several concentrations of NaCl, sucrose, soy sauce, worcester sauce and tomato ketchup, and their survival ratios were determined. The E. coli O157:H7 strains showed relatively higher survival ratios in 0.5-1.0 M sucrose, 25% soy sauce and 12.5-50% worcester sauce than the non-pathogenic strains, but slightly lower survival ratios in 0.5-2.0 M NaCl. A noteworthy difference between E. coli O157:H7 and the non-pathogenic strains was that incubation in the presence of 12.5% soy sauce allowed the growth of E. coli O157:H7 strains but reduced the viable cell numbers of non-pathogenic E. coli strains. PMID:16232665

  6. Binding and cleavage of E. coli HUbeta by the E. coli Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Lin, Yu-Ching; Hsu, Jowey; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Chen, Tse-An; Hsu, Chun-Hua; Chir, Jiun-Ly; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Wu, Tzu-Hua; Hong, Li-Jenn; Yen, Pei-Wen; Chiou, Arthur; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    The Escherichia coli Lon protease degrades the E. coli DNA-binding protein HUbeta, but not the related protein HUalpha. Here we show that the Lon protease binds to both HUbeta and HUalpha, but selectively degrades only HUbeta in the presence of ATP. Mass spectrometry of HUbeta peptide fragments revealed that region K18-G22 is the preferred cleavage site, followed in preference by L36-K37. The preferred cleavage site was further refined to A20-A21 by constructing and testing mutant proteins; Lon degraded HUbeta-A20Q and HUbeta-A20D more slowly than HUbeta. We used optical tweezers to measure the rupture force between HU proteins and Lon; HUalpha, HUbeta, and HUbeta-A20D can bind to Lon, and in the presence of ATP, the rupture force between each of these proteins and Lon became weaker. Our results support a mechanism of Lon protease cleavage of HU proteins in at least three stages: binding of Lon with the HU protein (HUbeta, HUalpha, or HUbeta-A20D); hydrolysis of ATP by Lon to provide energy to loosen the binding to the HU protein and to allow an induced-fit conformational change; and specific cleavage of only HUbeta.

  7. Persistence of Escherichia coli in batch and continuous vermicomposting systems.

    PubMed

    Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Martin, Vincent J J; Gélinas, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Vermicomposting is a biooxidation process in which epigeicearthworms act in synergy with microbial populations to degrade organic matter. Vermicomposting does not go through a thermophilic stage as required by North American legislations for pathogen eradication. We examined the survival of a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) labeled Escherichia coli MG1655 as a model for the survival of pathogenic bacteria in both small-scale batch and medium-scale continuously-operated systems to discern the influence of the earthworm Eisenia fetida, nutrient content and the indigenous vermicompost microbial community on pathogen abundance. In batch systems, the microbial community had the greatest influence on the rapid decline of E. coli populations, and the effect of earthworms was only visible in microbially-impoverishedvermicomposts. No significant earthworm density-dependent relationship was observed on E. coli survival under continuous operation. E. coli numbers decreased below the US EPA compost sanitation guidelines of 10(3)Colony Forming Units (CFU)/g (dry weight) within 18-21days for both the small-scale batch and medium-scale continuous systems, but it took up to 51days without earthworms and with an impoverished microbial community to reach the legal limit. Nutrient replenishment (i.e. organic carbon) provided by continuous feed input did not appear to extend E. coli survival. In fact, longer survival of E. coli was noticed in treatments where less total and labile sugars were available, suggesting that sugars may support potentially antagonist bacteria in the vermicompost. Total N, pH and humidity did not appear to affect E. coli survival. Several opportunistic human pathogens may be found in vermicompost, and their populations are likely kept in check by antagonists.

  8. Elucidating the Aetiology of Human Campylobacter coli Infections

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Francois; Sproston, Emma; Rotariu, Ovidiu; MacRae, Marion; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Bessell, Paul; Smith-Palmer, Alison; Cowden, John; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Forbes, Ken J.; Strachan, Norval J. C.

    2013-01-01

    There has been little research on the determinants of Campylobacter coli infection, despite its contributing up to 10% of human Campylobacter infections. A case-control and two case-case study methods explored the aetiology of C. coli over a one year period across Scotland. The case-control multivariate model found an increased risk of C. coli infection in people older than 19 years (O.R. = 3.352), and during the summer months (O.R. = 2.596), while residing in an urban area decreased the risk (O.R. = 0.546). The first case-case study compared C. coli and C. jejuni cases and also showed a higher risk of C. coli during the summer (O.R. = 1.313) and in people older than 19 years (O.R. = 0.791). Living in an urban area was associated with a reduced risk of infection (O.R. = 0.769). Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) indicated that sheep and chicken C. coli sequence types (STs) were most frequently found in humans whilst those from cattle and pigs were rarer. MLST diversity was high in isolates from pigs and chicken, intermediate in human isolates, and low in ruminant isolates. The second case-case study used MLST data to ascribe putative sources of infection to the cases. The putative source for 40% of cases was chicken, with 60% acquired from other sources (ruminants 54% and pigs 6%). The case-case analysis also showed that female gender was a risk factor (O.R. = 1.940), which may be explained by females being more likely to prepare poultry in the home. These findings indicate differences between the aetiology of C. coli and C. jejuni infections: this should be taken into account by public health professionals when developing strategies to reduce the burden of human campylobacteriosis. PMID:23734204

  9. Contamination of beef chucks with Escherichia coli during carcass breaking.

    PubMed

    Gill, C O; McGinnis, J C; Bryant, J

    2001-11-01

    Samples were obtained by swabbing the whole of the chuck portion on each of the first 500 sides that entered a beef carcass breaking process and the whole of the outer surface of each of the chuck primal cuts that were prepared from those portions. Swabs obtained from groups of 10 sides or cuts that entered or emerged from the process consecutively were combined, and the coliforms and Escherichia coli recovered from each group were enumerated. Coliforms and E. coli were recovered only sporadically from groups of sides at log total numbers of 4.0 and 3.5 log CFU/500 sides, respectively. Coliforms were recovered from three and E. coli from none of the first six groups of cuts. Coliforms and E. coli were recovered from all subsequent groups of cuts, initially at log numbers mostly <3 log CFU/10 cuts, but ultimately at log numbers mostly >3 log CFU/10 cuts. The log total numbers of coliforms and E. coli recovered from cuts were >6.0 and 5.5 log CFU/500 cuts, respectively. After the breaking of about 600 sides, samples were obtained by swabbing a table onto which the part of the side that included the chuck portion was deposited after it was cut from the hanging side, and the belt that was used for conveying chucks. The numbers of coliforms and E. coli recovered from the table and conveyor belt were comparable with the numbers recovered from sides and cuts, respectively. Those findings show that most of the coliforms and E. coli recovered from the cuts were not present on carcass sides but that they originated largely from the cut conveying equipment. PMID:11726167

  10. Persistence of Escherichia coli in batch and continuous vermicomposting systems.

    PubMed

    Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Martin, Vincent J J; Gélinas, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Vermicomposting is a biooxidation process in which epigeicearthworms act in synergy with microbial populations to degrade organic matter. Vermicomposting does not go through a thermophilic stage as required by North American legislations for pathogen eradication. We examined the survival of a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) labeled Escherichia coli MG1655 as a model for the survival of pathogenic bacteria in both small-scale batch and medium-scale continuously-operated systems to discern the influence of the earthworm Eisenia fetida, nutrient content and the indigenous vermicompost microbial community on pathogen abundance. In batch systems, the microbial community had the greatest influence on the rapid decline of E. coli populations, and the effect of earthworms was only visible in microbially-impoverishedvermicomposts. No significant earthworm density-dependent relationship was observed on E. coli survival under continuous operation. E. coli numbers decreased below the US EPA compost sanitation guidelines of 10(3)Colony Forming Units (CFU)/g (dry weight) within 18-21days for both the small-scale batch and medium-scale continuous systems, but it took up to 51days without earthworms and with an impoverished microbial community to reach the legal limit. Nutrient replenishment (i.e. organic carbon) provided by continuous feed input did not appear to extend E. coli survival. In fact, longer survival of E. coli was noticed in treatments where less total and labile sugars were available, suggesting that sugars may support potentially antagonist bacteria in the vermicompost. Total N, pH and humidity did not appear to affect E. coli survival. Several opportunistic human pathogens may be found in vermicompost, and their populations are likely kept in check by antagonists. PMID:27499290

  11. Lysis of Escherichia coli mutants by lactose.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J K

    1979-11-01

    Growth of Escherichia coli strain MM6-13 (ptsI suc lacI sup), which as a suppressor of the succinate-negative phenotype, was inhibited by lactose. Cells growing in yeast extract-tryptone-sodium chloride medium (LB broth) were lysed upon the addition of lactose. In Casamino Acids-salts medium, lactose inhibited growth, but due to the high K+ content no lysis occurred. Lysis required high levels of beta-galctosidase and lactose transport activity. MM6, the parental strain of MM6-13, has lower levels of both of these activities and was resistant to lysis under these conditions. When MM6 was grown in LB broth with exogenous cyclic adenosine monophosphate, however, beta-galactosidase and lactose transport activities were greatly increased, and lysis occurred upon the addition of lactose. Resting cells of both MM6 and MM6-13 were lysed by lactose in buffers containing suitable ions. In the presence of MG2+, lysis was enhanced by 5 mM KCl and 100 mM NaCl. Higher slat concentrations (50 mM KCl or 200 mM NaCl) provided partial protection from lysis. In the absence of Mg2+, lysis occurred without KCl. Lactose-dependent lysis occurred in buffers containing anions such as sulafte, chloride, phosphate, or citrate; however, thiocyanate or acetate protected the cells from lysis. These data indicate that both cations and anions, as well as the levels of lactose transport and beta-galactosidase activity, are important in lysis.

  12. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Smith, James L; Fratamico, Pina M; Gunther, Nereus W

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, it is estimated that non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause more illnesses than STEC O157:H7, and the majority of cases of non-O157 STEC infections are due to serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145, referred to as the top six non-O157 STEC. The diseases caused by non-O157 STEC are generally milder than those induced by O157 STEC; nonetheless, non-O157 STEC strains have also been associated with serious illnesses such as hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome, as well as death. Ruminants, particularly cattle, are reservoirs for both O157 and non-O157 STEC, which are transmitted to humans by person-to-person or animal contact and by ingestion of food or water contaminated with animal feces. Improved strategies to control STEC colonization and shedding in cattle and contamination of meat and produce are needed. In general, non-O157 STEC respond to stresses such as acid, heat, and other stresses induced during food preparation similar to O157 STEC. Similar to O157:H7, the top six non-O157 STEC are classified as adulterants in beef by the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service, and regulatory testing for these pathogens began in June 2012. Due to the genetic and phenotypic variability of non-O157 STEC strains, the development of accurate and reliable methods for detection and isolation of these pathogens has been challenging. Since the non-O157 STEC are responsible for a large portion of STEC-related illnesses, more extensive studies on their physiology, genetics, pathogenicity, and evolution are needed in order to develop more effective control strategies.

  13. Current world status of Balantidium coli.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Frederick L; Ramirez-Avila, Lynn

    2008-10-01

    Balantidium coli is a cosmopolitan parasitic-opportunistic pathogen that can be found throughout the world. Pigs are its reservoir hosts, and humans become infected through direct or indirect contact with pigs. In rural areas and in some developing countries where pig and human fecal matter contaminates the water supply, there is a greater likelihood that balantidiosis may develop in humans. The infection may be subclinical in humans, as it mostly is in pigs, or may develop as a fulminant infection with bloody and mucus-containing diarrhea; this can lead to perforation of the colon. The disease responds to treatment with tetracycline or metronidazole. Balantidiosis is a disease that need never exist given access to clean water and a public health infrastructure that monitors the water supply and tracks infections. Its spread can be limited by sanitary measures and personal hygiene, but it is a disease that will be around as long as there are pigs. Immunocompromised individuals have developed balantidiosis without any direct contact with pigs, perhaps with rats or contaminated produce as a possible source of infection. For the clinician, balanatidiosis should be included in the differential diagnosis for persistent diarrhea in travelers to or from Southeast Asia, the Western Pacific islands, rural South America, or communities where close contact with domestic swine occurs. Warming of the earth's surface may provide a more favorable environment, even in the now-temperate areas of the world, for survival of trophic and cystic stages of Balantidium, and its prevalence may increase. Effective sanitation and uncontaminated water are the most useful weapons against infection. Fortunately, balantidiosis responds to antimicrobial therapy, and there have been no reports of resistance to the drugs of choice.

  14. Systematic Mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli Genome†

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yisheng; Durfee, Tim; Glasner, Jeremy D.; Qiu, Yu; Frisch, David; Winterberg, Kelly M.; Blattner, Frederick R.

    2004-01-01

    A high-throughput method has been developed for the systematic mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli genome. The system is based on in vitro transposition of a modified Tn5 element, the Sce-poson, into linear fragments of each open reading frame. The transposon introduces both positive (kanamycin resistance) and negative (I-SceI recognition site) selectable markers for isolation of mutants and subsequent allele replacement, respectively. Reaction products are then introduced into the genome by homologous recombination via the λRed proteins. The method has yielded insertion alleles for 1976 genes during a first pass through the genome including, unexpectedly, a number of known and putative essential genes. Sce-poson insertions can be easily replaced by markerless mutations by using the I-SceI homing endonuclease to select against retention of the transposon as demonstrated by the substitution of amber and/or in-frame deletions in six different genes. This allows a Sce-poson-containing gene to be specifically targeted for either designed or random modifications, as well as permitting the stepwise engineering of strains with multiple mutations. The promiscuous nature of Tn5 transposition also enables a targeted gene to be dissected by using randomly inserted Sce-posons as shown by a lacZ allelic series. Finally, assessment of the insertion sites by an iterative weighted matrix algorithm reveals that these hyperactive Tn5 complexes generally recognize a highly degenerate asymmetric motif on one end of the target site helping to explain the randomness of Tn5 transposition. PMID:15262929

  15. Very slow growth of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Chesbro, W; Evans, T; Eifert, R

    1979-01-01

    A recycling fermentor (a chemostat with 100% biomass feedback) was used to study glucose-limited behavior of Escherichia coli B. The expectation from mass transfer analysis that growth would asymptotically approach a limit mass determined by the glucose provision rate (GPR) and the culture's maintenance requirement was not met. Instead, growth proceeded at progressively lower rates through three distinct phases. After the fermentor was seeded, but before glucose became limiting, growth followed the usual, exponential path (phase 1). About 12 h postseeding, residual glucose in the fermentor fell below 1 microgram . ml-1 and the growth rate (dx/dt) became constant and a linear function of GPR (phase 2). The specific growth rate, mu, therefore fell continuously throughout the phase. Biomass yield and glucose assimilation (13%) were near the level for exponential growth, however, and independent of GPR over a broad range. At a critical specific growth rate (0.04 h-1 for this strain), phase 2 ended abruptly and phase 3 commenced. In phase 3, the growth rate was again constant, although lower than in phase 2, so that mu continued to fall, but growth rates and yields were praboloid functions of GPR. They were never zero, however, at any positive value of GPR. By inference, the fraction of metabolic energy used for maintenance functions is constant for a given GPR, although different for phases 2 and 3, and independent of biomass. In both phases 2 and 3, orcinol, diphenylamine, and Lowry reactive materials were secreted at near-constant rates such that over 50% as much biosynthetic mass was secreted as was retained by the cells. Images PMID:378981

  16. The Melibiose Transporter of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, Oliver; Lin, Yibin; Granell, Meritxell; Leblanc, Gérard; Padrós, Esteve; Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A.; Cladera, Josep

    2015-01-01

    We examine the role of Lys-377, the only charged residue in helix XI, on the functional mechanism of the Na+-sugar melibiose symporter from Escherichia coli. Intrinsic fluorescence, FRET, and Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy reveal that replacement of Lys-377 with either Cys, Val, Arg, or Asp disables both Na+ and melibiose binding. On the other hand, molecular dynamics simulations extending up to 200–330 ns reveal that Lys-377 (helix XI) interacts with the anionic side chains of two of the three putative ligands for cation binding (Asp-55 and Asp-59 in helix II). When Asp-59 is protonated during the simulations, Lys-377 preferentially interacts with Asp-55. Interestingly, when a Na+ ion is positioned in the Asp-55-Asp-59 environment, Asp-124 in helix IV (a residue essential for melibiose binding) reorients and approximates the Asp-55-Asp-59 pair, and all three acidic side chains act as Na+ ligands. Under these conditions, the side chain of Lys-377 interacts with the carboxylic moiety of these three Asp residues. These data highlight the crucial role of the Lys-377 residue in the spatial organization of the Na+ binding site. Finally, the analysis of the second-site revertants of K377C reveals that mutation of Ile-22 (in helix I) preserves Na+ binding, whereas that of melibiose is largely abolished according to spectroscopic measurements. This amino acid is located in the border of the sugar-binding site and might participate in sugar binding through apolar interactions. PMID:25971963

  17. Current World Status of Balantidium coli

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Frederick L.; Ramirez-Avila, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Balantidium coli is a cosmopolitan parasitic-opportunistic pathogen that can be found throughout the world. Pigs are its reservoir hosts, and humans become infected through direct or indirect contact with pigs. In rural areas and in some developing countries where pig and human fecal matter contaminates the water supply, there is a greater likelihood that balantidiosis may develop in humans. The infection may be subclinical in humans, as it mostly is in pigs, or may develop as a fulminant infection with bloody and mucus-containing diarrhea; this can lead to perforation of the colon. The disease responds to treatment with tetracycline or metronidazole. Balantidiosis is a disease that need never exist given access to clean water and a public health infrastructure that monitors the water supply and tracks infections. Its spread can be limited by sanitary measures and personal hygiene, but it is a disease that will be around as long as there are pigs. Immunocompromised individuals have developed balantidiosis without any direct contact with pigs, perhaps with rats or contaminated produce as a possible source of infection. For the clinician, balanatidiosis should be included in the differential diagnosis for persistent diarrhea in travelers to or from Southeast Asia, the Western Pacific islands, rural South America, or communities where close contact with domestic swine occurs. Warming of the earth's surface may provide a more favorable environment, even in the now-temperate areas of the world, for survival of trophic and cystic stages of Balantidium, and its prevalence may increase. Effective sanitation and uncontaminated water are the most useful weapons against infection. Fortunately, balantidiosis responds to antimicrobial therapy, and there have been no reports of resistance to the drugs of choice. PMID:18854484

  18. Current world status of Balantidium coli.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Frederick L; Ramirez-Avila, Lynn

    2008-10-01

    Balantidium coli is a cosmopolitan parasitic-opportunistic pathogen that can be found throughout the world. Pigs are its reservoir hosts, and humans become infected through direct or indirect contact with pigs. In rural areas and in some developing countries where pig and human fecal matter contaminates the water supply, there is a greater likelihood that balantidiosis may develop in humans. The infection may be subclinical in humans, as it mostly is in pigs, or may develop as a fulminant infection with bloody and mucus-containing diarrhea; this can lead to perforation of the colon. The disease responds to treatment with tetracycline or metronidazole. Balantidiosis is a disease that need never exist given access to clean water and a public health infrastructure that monitors the water supply and tracks infections. Its spread can be limited by sanitary measures and personal hygiene, but it is a disease that will be around as long as there are pigs. Immunocompromised individuals have developed balantidiosis without any direct contact with pigs, perhaps with rats or contaminated produce as a possible source of infection. For the clinician, balanatidiosis should be included in the differential diagnosis for persistent diarrhea in travelers to or from Southeast Asia, the Western Pacific islands, rural South America, or communities where close contact with domestic swine occurs. Warming of the earth's surface may provide a more favorable environment, even in the now-temperate areas of the world, for survival of trophic and cystic stages of Balantidium, and its prevalence may increase. Effective sanitation and uncontaminated water are the most useful weapons against infection. Fortunately, balantidiosis responds to antimicrobial therapy, and there have been no reports of resistance to the drugs of choice. PMID:18854484

  19. An adhesive protein capsule of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Orskov, I; Birch-Andersen, A; Duguid, J P; Stenderup, J; Orskov, F

    1985-01-01

    The nature of the adhesive capacity of three hemagglutinating Escherichia coli strains that had earlier been described as nonfimbriated was studied. The strains that were isolated from human disease adhered to human buccal and urinary tract epithelial cells, an adhesion that was not inhibited by D-mannose. By crossed immunoelectrophoresis it was shown that the three strains produced a common antigen, Z1, developed after growth at 37 degrees C but not 18 degrees C. One of the strains produced an additional antigen, Z2, of almost the same electrophoretic mobility in crossed immunoelectrophoresis. A mutant of this strain deficient of its polysaccharide K antigen had maintained the adhesive capacity, indicating that the K antigen was not responsible for adhesion. A further mutant of the acapsular mutant produced a strongly reduced amount of the Z antigens and had lost the ability to adhere. The Z1 (and Z2?) antigens were therefore deemed to be responsible for adhesion. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of extracts of cells of the three strains, a heavy Coomassie-blue stained line was seen, indicating the presence of a protein subunit of molecular weight slightly above 14,400. By immunoblotting with absorbed antiserum, it was shown that this protein was the same as that detected by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Protease from Streptomyces griseus, but not trypsin, digested the protein. Heating to 100 degrees C did not affect it. By immunoelectron microscopy of embedded and sectioned bacteria that had first been treated with specific antisera and ferritin-labeled antirabbit immunoglobulin, the protein adhesin-antibody complex was found to surround the bacteria as a heavy capsule. After negative staining with uranylacetate (pH approximately 4), the capsule appeared as a mesh of very fine filaments. The possible role of this capsule in the pathogenesis of disease is discussed. Images PMID:2856913

  20. Validation of the Soleris E. coli method for detection and semi-quantitative determination of Escherichia coli in foods.

    PubMed

    Foti, Debra; Romano, Leah; Alles, Susan; Mozola, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    The performance of the Soleris E. coli method was compared with that of the ISO 7251 most probable number (MPN) and detection reference methods for Escherichia coli. The Soleris E. coli method is a growth-based, rapid, automated system composed of temperature-controlled incubation chambers and photodiode-based optical detection devices for measurement of color changes in a prepared medium vial. A dilution of the test sample homogenate is inoculated directly into the vial. Products of E. coli metabolism alter the color of the medium over time, and this change is monitored by the Soleris instrument. The test is used in a dilute-to-specification or specification monitoring manner in which the result is positive or negative around a desired cutoff (in CFU/g) determined by the dilution and volume of sample homogenate added to the vial. Alternatively, the test is used for zero tolerance determinations (e.g., absence in 25 g) by performing an off-line pre-enrichment step followed by transfer of a portion of the pre-enrichment culture to the Soleris vial. Six E. coli strains originating from food sources were inoculated individually into six food commodities: frozen green beans, Echinacea powder, cocoa powder, sweetened condensed milk, pasteurized liquid egg, and shredded mozzarella cheese. Uninoculated samples were included in each trial. The results obtained by the ISO 7251 detection method and the Soleris E. coli method were shown to be in agreement by Chi-square analysis when the presence of E. coli was determined in 25 g of sample. Results from the Soleris E. coli dilute-to-specification method and the ISO 7251 MPN method were found to be in agreement by probability of detection statistical analysis. In inclusivity testing, 52 of 53 E. coli strains were detected within 24 h. Only a non-thermoduric strain of serotype O157:H43 was not detected. In exclusivity testing, all 31 strains tested produced negative results. Results of ruggedness experiments show that accurate

  1. Development of a Multiplex PCR Assay for Detection of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli, Enterohemorrhagic E. coli, and Enteropathogenic E. coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Botkin, Douglas J.; Galli, Lucía; Sankarapani, Vinoth; Soler, Michael; Rivas, Marta; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other pathogenic E. coli strains are enteric pathogens associated with food safety threats and which remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the current study, we investigated whether enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) strains can be rapidly and specifically differentiated with multiplex PCR (mPCR) utilizing selected biomarkers associated with each strain’s respective virulence genotype. Primers were designed to amplify multiple intimin (eae) and long polar fimbriae (lpfA) variants, the bundle-forming pilus gene bfpA, and the Shiga toxin-encoding genes stx1 and stx2. We demonstrated consistent amplification of genes specific to the prototype EHEC O157:H7 EDL933 (lpfA1-3, lpfA2-2, stx1, stx2, and eae-γ) and EPEC O127:H6 E2348/69 (eae-α, lpfA1-1, and bfpA) strains using the optimized mPCR protocol with purified genomic DNA (gDNA). A screen of gDNA from isolates in a diarrheagenic E. coli collection revealed that the mPCR assay was successful in predicting the correct pathotype of EPEC and EHEC clones grouped in the distinctive phylogenetic disease clusters EPEC1 and EHEC1, and was able to differentiate EHEC1 from EHEC2 clusters. The assay detection threshold was 2 × 104 CFU per PCR reaction for EHEC and EPEC. mPCR was also used to screen Argentinean clinical samples from hemolytic uremic syndrome and diarrheal patients, resulting in 91% sensitivity and 84% specificity when compared to established molecular diagnostic procedures. In conclusion, our mPCR methodology permitted differentiation of EPEC, STEC and EHEC strains from other pathogenic E. coli; therefore, the assay becomes an additional tool for rapid diagnosis of these organisms. PMID:22919600

  2. Production of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Malla, Sailesh; Simkhada, Dinesh; Kim, Byung-Gee; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2013-03-01

    Quercetin, a flavonol aglycone, is one of the most abundant flavonoids with high medicinal value. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetic properties of quercetin are influenced by the type of sugars attached to the molecule. To efficiently diversify the therapeutic uses of quercetin, Escherichia coli was harnessed as a production factory by the installation of various plant and bacterial UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes. The genes encoding for the UDP-xylose pathway enzymes phosphoglucomutase (nfa44530), glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (galU), UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (calS8), and UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase (calS9) were overexpressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) along with a glycosyltransferase (arGt-3) from Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆zwf, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf, and E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf∆ushA mutants carrying the aforementioned UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes and glycosyltransferase and the galU-integrated E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi host harboring only calS8, calS9, and arGt-3 were constructed to enhance whole-cell bioconversion of exogeneously supplied quercetin into 3-O-xylosyl quercetin. Here, we report the highest production of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin with E. coli BL21 (DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf∆ushA carrying UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes and glycosyltransferase. The maximum concentration of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin achieved was 23.78 mg/L (54.75 μM), representing 54.75 % bioconversion, which was an ~4.8-fold higher bioconversion than that shown by E. coli BL21 (DE3) with the same set of genes when the reaction was carried out in 5-mL culture tubes with 100 μM quercetin under optimized conditions. Bioconversion was further improved by 98 % when the reaction was scaled up in a 3-L fermentor at 36 h. PMID:23053089

  3. Escherichia coli β-Lactamases: What Really Matters

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Priyanka; Singh, Nambram S.; Virdi, Jugsharan S.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains belonging to diverse pathotypes have increasingly been recognized as a major public health concern. The β-lactam antibiotics have been used successfully to treat infections caused by pathogenic E. coli. However, currently, the utility of β-lactams is being challenged severely by a large number of hydrolytic enzymes – the β-lactamases expressed by bacteria. The menace is further compounded by the highly flexible genome of E. coli, and propensity of resistance dissemination through horizontal gene transfer and clonal spread. Successful management of infections caused by such resistant strains requires an understanding of the diversity of β-lactamases, their unambiguous detection, and molecular mechanisms underlying their expression and spread with regard to the most relevant information about individual bacterial species. Thus, this review comprises first such effort in this direction for E. coli, a bacterial species known to be associated with production of diverse classes of β-lactamases. The review also highlights the role of commensal E. coli as a potential but under-estimated reservoir of β-lactamases-encoding genes. PMID:27065978

  4. Escherichia coli ST131, an Intriguing Clonal Group

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Xavier; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2008, a previously unknown Escherichia coli clonal group, sequence type 131 (ST131), was identified on three continents. Today, ST131 is the predominant E. coli lineage among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) isolates worldwide. Retrospective studies have suggested that it may originally have risen to prominence as early as 2003. Unlike other classical group B2 ExPEC isolates, ST131 isolates are commonly reported to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases, such as CTX-M-15, and almost all are resistant to fluoroquinolones. Moreover, ST131 E. coli isolates are considered to be truly pathogenic, due to the spectrum of infections they cause in both community and hospital settings and the large number of virulence-associated genes they contain. ST131 isolates therefore seem to contradict the widely held view that high levels of antimicrobial resistance are necessarily associated with a fitness cost leading to a decrease in pathogenesis. Six years after the first description of E. coli ST131, this review outlines the principal traits of ST131 clonal group isolates, based on the growing body of published data, and highlights what is currently known and what we need to find out to provide public health authorities with better information to help combat ST131. PMID:24982321

  5. Paper-based ELISA to rapidly detect Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cheng-Min; Chang, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Min-Yen; Lin, Jyun-Yu; Kuan, Chen-Meng; Wang, Hsi-Kai; Huang, Chun-Te; Chung, Mu-Chi; Huang, Kui-Chou; Hsu, Cheng-En; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Shen, Ying-Cheng; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2015-12-01

    Escherichia coli is a generic indicator of fecal contamination, and certain serotypes cause food- and water-borne illness such as O157:H7. In the clinic, detection of bacteriuria, which is often due to E. coli, is critical before certain surgical procedures or in cases of nosocomial infection to prevent further adverse events such as postoperative infection or sepsis. In low- and middle-income countries, where insufficient equipment and facilities preclude modern methods of detection, a simple, low-cost diagnostic device to detect E. coli in water and in the clinic will have significant impact. We have developed a simple paper-based colorimetric platform to detect E. coli contamination in 5h. On this platform, the mean color intensity for samples with 10(5)cells/mL is 0.118±0.002 (n=4), and 0.0145±0.003 (P<0.01⁎⁎) for uncontaminated samples. This technique is less time-consuming, easier to perform, and less expensive than conventional methods. Thus, paper-based ELISA is an innovative point-of-care diagnostic tool to rapidly detect E. coli, and possibly other pathogens when customized as appropriate, especially in areas that lack advanced clinical equipment.

  6. Commensal and Pathogenic Escherichia coli Metabolism in the Gut.

    PubMed

    Conway, Tyrrell; Cohen, Paul S

    2015-06-01

    E. coli is a ubiquitous member of the intestinal microbiome. This organism resides in a biofilm comprised of a complex microbial community within the mucus layer where it must compete for the limiting nutrients that it needs to grow fast enough to stably colonize. In this article we discuss the nutritional basis of intestinal colonization. Beginning with basic ecological principles we describe what is known about the metabolism that makes E. coli such a remarkably successful member of the intestinal microbiota. To obtain the simple sugars and amino acids that it requires, E. coli depends on degradation of complex glycoproteins by strict anaerobes. Despite having essentially the same core genome and hence the same metabolism when grown in the laboratory, different E. coli strains display considerable catabolic diversity when colonized in mice. To explain why some E. coli mutants do not grow as well on mucus in vitro as their wild type parents yet are better colonizers, we postulate that each one resides in a distinct "Restaurant" where it is served different nutrients because it interacts physically and metabolically with different species of anaerobes. Since enteric pathogens that fail to compete successfully for nutrients cannot colonize, a basic understanding of the nutritional basis of intestinal colonization will inform efforts to develop prebiotics and probiotics to combat infection. PMID:26185077

  7. Heterologous production of ribostamycin derivatives in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kurumbang, Nagendra Prasad; Park, Je Won; Yoon, Yeo Joon; Liou, Kwangkyoung; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2010-09-01

    Aminoglycosides are a class of important antibiotic compounds used for various therapeutic indications. In recent times, their efficacy has been curtailed due to the rapid development of bacterial resistance. There is a need to develop novel derivatives with an improved spectrum of activity and higher sensitivity against pathogenic bacteria. Although efforts have been focused on the development of newer therapeutic agents by chemical synthesis, to our knowledge, there has been no attempt to harness the potential of microorganisms for this purpose. Escherichia coli affords a widely studied cellular system that could be utilized not only for understanding but also for attempting to engineer the biosynthetic pathway of secondary metabolites. The primary metabolic pathway of E. coli can be engineered to divert the precursor pool required for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Utilizing this approach previously, we engineered E. coli host and generated E. coli M1. Here, we produced a ribostamycin derivative in the engineered host by heterologous expression of the recombinants constructed from the genes encoding the biosynthetic pathway in aminoglycoside-producing strains. The products obtained from the transformants were isolated, analyzed and verified to be ribostamycin derivatives. The study further demonstrated the importance of E. coli as surrogate antibiotic producer and also offered future possibility for the production of other aminoglycoside derivatives through genetic engineering and expression in a heterologous background.

  8. Recent Advances in Understanding Enteric Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Croxen, Matthew A.; Law, Robyn J.; Scholz, Roland; Keeney, Kristie M.; Wlodarska, Marta

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Although Escherichia coli can be an innocuous resident of the gastrointestinal tract, it also has the pathogenic capacity to cause significant diarrheal and extraintestinal diseases. Pathogenic variants of E. coli (pathovars or pathotypes) cause much morbidity and mortality worldwide. Consequently, pathogenic E. coli is widely studied in humans, animals, food, and the environment. While there are many common features that these pathotypes employ to colonize the intestinal mucosa and cause disease, the course, onset, and complications vary significantly. Outbreaks are common in developed and developing countries, and they sometimes have fatal consequences. Many of these pathotypes are a major public health concern as they have low infectious doses and are transmitted through ubiquitous mediums, including food and water. The seriousness of pathogenic E. coli is exemplified by dedicated national and international surveillance programs that monitor and track outbreaks; unfortunately, this surveillance is often lacking in developing countries. While not all pathotypes carry the same public health profile, they all carry an enormous potential to cause disease and continue to present challenges to human health. This comprehensive review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the intestinal pathotypes of E. coli. PMID:24092857

  9. Hierarchically imprinted polymer substrates for enhanced attachment of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengxiang; Li, Hongzhe; Wang, Xin; Low, Hong Yee; Li, Xu

    2010-03-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) detection is important for ensuring human health and public security. One critical step in most detection methods is to have the E. coli cells attach to the substrate or transducer of a biosensor before they can be detected and/or identified. In this context, a chemical or physical enhancement effect arising from the substrate will help to achieve a high sensitivity of bacterial detection. This work makes use of hierarchically imprinted surface structures to demonstrate such effect using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Specifically, hierarchical structures are imprinted on polystyrene coated resonance crystals of QCM; such crystals, after incubation in an E. coli suspension of reduced concentration (1x10(4) colony forming units/mL), exhibit improved resonance frequency shifts, which are 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than those without the hierarchical structures. The enhancement effect is attributed to the enlarged surface area of the substrate and the way it immobilizes the bacteria. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy, the hierarchical substrates immobilize the E. coli cells by both trapping them in the micro-trenches and having them adhere to the nano-protrusions, while the single-level imprinted structures accommodate the cells mainly in the trenches or over the protrusions, instead of both.

  10. Pulsed-Plasma Disinfection of Water Containing Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Kohki; MacGregor, Scott J.; Anderson, John G.; Woolsey, Gerry A.; Fouracre, R. Anthony

    2007-03-01

    The disinfection of water containing the microorganism, Escherichia coli (E. coli) by exposure to a pulsed-discharge plasma generated above the water using a multineedle electrode (plasma-exposure treatment), and by sparging the off-gas of the pulsed plasma into the water (off-gas-sparging treatment), is performed in the ambient gases of air, oxygen, and nitrogen. For the off-gas-sparging treatment, bactericidal action is observed only when oxygen is used as the ambient gas, and ozone is found to generate the bactericidal action. For the plasma-exposure treatment, the density of E. coli bacteria decreases exponentially with plasma-exposure time for all the ambient gases. It may be concluded that the main contributors to E. coli inactivation are particle species produced by the pulsed plasma. For the ambient gases of air and nitrogen, the influence of acidification of the water in the system, as a result of pulsed-plasma exposure, may also contribute to the decay of E. coli density.

  11. Fumarate-Mediated Persistence of Escherichia coli against Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Seob; Cho, Da-Hyeong; Heo, Paul; Jung, Suk-Chae; Park, Myungseo; Oh, Eun-Joong; Sung, Jaeyun; Kim, Pan-Jun; Lee, Suk-Chan; Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Sarah; Lee, Choong Hwan; Shin, Dongwoo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial persisters are a small fraction of quiescent cells that survive in the presence of lethal concentrations of antibiotics. They can regrow to give rise to a new population that has the same vulnerability to the antibiotics as did the parental population. Although formation of bacterial persisters in the presence of various antibiotics has been documented, the molecular mechanisms by which these persisters tolerate the antibiotics are still controversial. We found that amplification of the fumarate reductase operon (FRD) in Escherichia coli led to a higher frequency of persister formation. The persister frequency of E. coli was increased when the cells contained elevated levels of intracellular fumarate. Genetic perturbations of the electron transport chain (ETC), a metabolite supplementation assay, and even the toxin-antitoxin-related hipA7 mutation indicated that surplus fumarate markedly elevated the E. coli persister frequency. An E. coli strain lacking succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), thereby showing a lower intracellular fumarate concentration, was killed ∼1,000-fold more effectively than the wild-type strain in the stationary phase. It appears that SDH and FRD represent a paired system that gives rise to and maintains E. coli persisters by producing and utilizing fumarate, respectively. PMID:26810657

  12. Isolation of an Aptamer that Binds Specifically to E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Cleto, Fernanda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio; Cardoso, Josiane

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species found ubiquitously in the intestinal flora of animals, although pathogenic variants cause major public health problems. Aptamers are short oligonucleotides that bind to targets with high affinity and specificity, and have great potential for use in diagnostics and therapy. We used cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (cell-SELEX) to isolate four single stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers that bind strongly to E. coli cells (ATCC generic strain 25922), with Kd values in the nanomolar range. Fluorescently labeled aptamers label the surface of E. coli cells, as viewed by fluorescent microscopy. Specificity tests with twelve different bacterial species showed that one of the aptamers–called P12-31—is highly specific for E. coli. Importantly, this aptamer binds to Meningitis/sepsis associated E. coli (MNEC) clinical isolates, and is the first aptamer described with potential for use in the diagnosis of MNEC-borne pathologies. PMID:27104834

  13. The Escherichia coli Proteome: Past, Present, and Future Prospects†

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mee-Jung; Lee, Sang Yup

    2006-01-01

    Proteomics has emerged as an indispensable methodology for large-scale protein analysis in functional genomics. The Escherichia coli proteome has been extensively studied and is well defined in terms of biochemical, biological, and biotechnological data. Even before the entire E. coli proteome was fully elucidated, the largest available data set had been integrated to decipher regulatory circuits and metabolic pathways, providing valuable insights into global cellular physiology and the development of metabolic and cellular engineering strategies. With the recent advent of advanced proteomic technologies, the E. coli proteome has been used for the validation of new technologies and methodologies such as sample prefractionation, protein enrichment, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, protein detection, mass spectrometry (MS), combinatorial assays with n-dimensional chromatographies and MS, and image analysis software. These important technologies will not only provide a great amount of additional information on the E. coli proteome but also synergistically contribute to other proteomic studies. Here, we review the past development and current status of E. coli proteome research in terms of its biological, biotechnological, and methodological significance and suggest future prospects. PMID:16760308

  14. Nonthermal atmospheric argon plasma jet effects on Escherichia coli biomacromolecules.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh Colagar, Abasalt; Memariani, Hamed; Sohbatzadeh, Farshad; Valinataj Omran, Azadeh

    2013-12-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric plasma jet, a promising technology based on ionized gas at low temperatures, can be applied for disinfection of contaminated surfaces. In this study, Escherichia coli cells and their macromolecules were exposed to the nonthermal atmospheric argon plasma jet for different time durations. Total protein, genomic DNA, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels of E. coli were assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining; agarose gel electrophoresis; and measurement of absorbance at 534 nm, respectively. After exposure, the spectroscopic results of liquid samples indicated that the survival reduction of E. coli can reach to 100 % in an exposure time of 600 s. Moreover, inactivation zones of E. coli, DNA degradation, and MDA levels were significantly increased. Additionally, banding patterns of total protein were changed and amino acid concentrations increased following ninhydrin test. The experimental results suggest that the nonthermal plasma could serve as an effective instrument for both sterilizing E. coli and degrading macromolecules from the surface of the objects being sterilized.

  15. Balantidium coli: an unrecognized cause of vertebral osteomyelitis and myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Shashi; Jain, Deepali; Mehta, Veer Singh

    2013-03-01

    Balantidium coli is a ciliated protozoan parasite that primarily infects primates and pigs. It is the largest protozoan to infect humans and is a well-known cause of diarrhea and dysentery. Extraintestinal disease is uncommon, and extraintestinal spread to the peritoneal cavity, appendix, genitourinary tract, and lung has rarely been reported. The authors describe a case of vertebral osteomyelitis with secondary cervical cord compression caused by B. coli. The patient was a 60-year-old immunocompetent man presenting with quadriplegia of short duration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed extradural and prevertebral abscess at the C3-4 level. Drainage of the abscess, C3-4 discectomy, and iliac bone grafting were performed. Histologically B. coli was confirmed in an abscess sample. To the best of the authors' knowledge, involvement of bone by B. coli has never been reported, and this case is the first documented instance of cervical cord compression due to B. coli osteomyelitis of the spine in the literature. PMID:23259539

  16. Insights from 100 Years of Research with Probiotic E. Coli

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A century ago, Alfred Nissle discovered that intentional intake of particular strains of Escherichia coli could treat patients suffering from infectious diseases. Since then, one of these strains became the most frequently used probiotic E. coli in research and was applied to a variety of human conditions. Here, properties of that E. coli Nissle 1917 strain are compared with other commercially available E. coli probiotic strains, with emphasis on their human applications. A literature search formed the basis of a summary of research findings reported for the probiotics Mutaflor, Symbioflor 2, and Colinfant. The closest relatives of the strains in these products are presented, and their genetic content, including the presence of virulence, genes is discussed. A similarity to pathogenic strains causing urinary tract infections is noticeable. Historic trends in research of probiotics treatment for particular human conditions are identified. The future of probiotic E. coli may lay in what Alfred Nissle originally discovered: to treat gastrointestinal infections, which nowadays are often caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. PMID:27766164

  17. Commensal and Pathogenic Escherichia coli Metabolism in the Gut.

    PubMed

    Conway, Tyrrell; Cohen, Paul S

    2015-06-01

    E. coli is a ubiquitous member of the intestinal microbiome. This organism resides in a biofilm comprised of a complex microbial community within the mucus layer where it must compete for the limiting nutrients that it needs to grow fast enough to stably colonize. In this article we discuss the nutritional basis of intestinal colonization. Beginning with basic ecological principles we describe what is known about the metabolism that makes E. coli such a remarkably successful member of the intestinal microbiota. To obtain the simple sugars and amino acids that it requires, E. coli depends on degradation of complex glycoproteins by strict anaerobes. Despite having essentially the same core genome and hence the same metabolism when grown in the laboratory, different E. coli strains display considerable catabolic diversity when colonized in mice. To explain why some E. coli mutants do not grow as well on mucus in vitro as their wild type parents yet are better colonizers, we postulate that each one resides in a distinct "Restaurant" where it is served different nutrients because it interacts physically and metabolically with different species of anaerobes. Since enteric pathogens that fail to compete successfully for nutrients cannot colonize, a basic understanding of the nutritional basis of intestinal colonization will inform efforts to develop prebiotics and probiotics to combat infection.

  18. Selective detection of Escherichia coli DNA using fluorescent carbon spindles.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anurag; Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Pramanik, Srikrishna; Devi, Parukuttyamma Sujatha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-04-28

    We investigate the interaction of hydrophilic blue emitting carbon spindles with various deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) having different base pair compositions, such as Herring testes (HT), calf thymus (CT), Escherichia coli (EC) and Micrococcus lysodeikticus (ML) DNA, to understand the mode of interaction. Interestingly, the fluorescent carbon spindles selectively interacted with E. coli DNA resulting in enhanced fluorescence of the former. Interaction of the same carbon with other DNAs exhibited insignificant changes in fluorescence. In addition, in the presence of EC DNA, the D band in the Raman spectrum attributed to the defect state completely disappeared, resulting in enhanced crystallinity. Microscopy images confirmed the wrapping of DNA on the carbon spindles leading to the assembly of spindles in the form of flowers. Dissociation of double-stranded DNA occurred upon interaction with carbon spindles, resulting in selective E. coli DNA interaction. The carbon spindles also exhibited a similar fluorescence enhancement upon treating with E. coli bacteria. These results confirm the possibility of E. coli detection in water and other liquid foods using such fluorescent carbon. PMID:27081680

  19. Biosafety of E. coli beta-glucuronidase (GUS) in plants.

    PubMed

    Gilissen, L J; Metz, P L; Stiekema, W J; Nap, J P

    1998-05-01

    The beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene is to date the most frequently used reporter gene in plants. Marketing of crops containing this gene requires prior evaluation of their biosafety. To aid such evaluations of the GUS gene, irrespective of the plant into which the gene has been introduced, the ecological and toxicological aspects of the gene and gene product have been examined. GUS activity is found in many bacterial species, is common in all tissues of vertebrates and is also present in organisms of various invertebrate taxa. The transgenic GUS originates from the enterobacterial species Escherichia coli that is widespread in the vertebrate intestine, and in soil and water ecosystems. Any GUS activity added to the ecosystem through genetically modified plants will be of no or minor influence. Selective advantages to genetically modified plants that posses and express the E. coli GUS transgene are unlikely. No increase of weediness of E. coli GUS expressing crop plants, or wild relatives that might have received the transgene through outcrossing, is expected. Since E. coli GUS naturally occurs ubiquitously in the digestive tract of consumers, its presence in food and feed from genetically modified plants is unlikely to cause any harm. E. coli GUS in genetically modified plants and their products can be regarded as safe for the environment and consumers.

  20. Catabolism and nitrogen control in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Berberich, M A

    1985-01-01

    It would appear from these studies that nitrogen control reflects the catabolic capacity of the cell and that utilizable nitrogen sources and some carbon sources are, to some extent, in competition for this capacity. The series of catabolic events initiated by addition of D-amino acids or by growth on aldol sugars, in the presence of ammonia nitrogen in the growth medium, provide an opportunity for study of the positive aspect of nitrogen control under conditions where negative control predominates. This approach may eventually clarify the apparent interactions between the modification cascade components, PII and UT/UR, with the nitrogen regulatory gene, glnG. The utilization of nutrients by E. coli seems less a matter of energy than of expeditious use of whatever is offered in the diet. A comparison of the rate of increase of GS on cultural downshift with the rate of increase following D-glutamate addition would suggest that control by nitrogen limitation is about eight times more effective than positive activation by D-glutamate in the presence of ammonia nitrogen. This observation is consistent with the finding of an additive effect for the D-amino acids which can function as positive activators in GS regulation. It has been demonstrated for the wild-type organism that the increase in GS level generated by a mixture of D-glutamate, D-lysine, D-threonine, and glycine approximates the increase in GS level observed during step-down of the culture from an ammonia-sufficient to an ammonia-limited condition. This observation further supports the physiologic relevance of the effect of D-amino acids in nitrogen control and suggests that the apparent derepression of GS observed upon exhaustion of the ammonia nitrogen supply represents a composite of positive activation generated as alternative catabolic functions assume a greater importance. As might be expected, addition of D-glutamate to cells at the point of ammonia exhaustion had no additional positive effect

  1. Infection by verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, M A

    1989-01-01

    Verocytotoxin (VT)-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) are a newly recognized group of enteric pathogens which are increasingly being recognized as common causes of diarrhea in some geographic settings. Outbreak studies indicate that most patients with VTEC infection develop mild uncomplicated diarrhea. However, a significant risk of two serious and potentially life-threatening complications, hemorrhagic colitis and the hemolytic uremic syndrome, makes VTEC infection a public health problem of serious concern. The main reservoirs of VTEC appear to be the intestinal tracts of animals, and foods of animal (especially bovine) origin are probably the principal sources for human infection. The term VT refers to a family of subunit exotoxins with high biological activity. Individual VTEC strains elaborate one or both of at least two serologically distinct, bacteriophage-mediated VTs (VT1 and VT2) which are closely related to Shiga toxin and are thus also referred to as Shiga-like toxins. The holotoxins bind to cells, via their B subunits, to a specific receptor which is probably the glycolipid, globotriosyl ceramide (Gb3). Binding is followed by internalization of the A subunit, which, after it is proteolytically nicked and reduced to the A1 fragment, inhibits protein synthesis in mammalian cells by inactivating 60S ribosomal subunits through selective structural modification of 28S ribosomal ribonucleic acid. The mechanism of VTEC diarrhea is still controversial, and the relative roles of locally acting VT and "attaching and effacing adherence" of VTEC to the mucosa have yet to be resolved. There is increasing evidence that hemolytic uremic syndrome and possibly hemorrhagic colitis result from the systemic action of VT on vascular endothelial cells. The role of antitoxic immunity in preventing the systemic complications of VTEC infection is being explored. Antibiotics appear to be contraindicated in the treatment of VTEC infection. The most common VTEC serotype associated

  2. Genetic Relatedness Among Escherichia coli Pathotypes Isolated from Food Products for Human Consumption in Cartagena, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Amézquita-Montes, Zorangel; Tamborski, Maria; Kopsombut, Usa G; Zhang, Chengxian; Arzuza, Octavio S; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2015-05-01

    Foodborne pathogens are a leading cause of mild-to-severe gastrointestinal illnesses worldwide. Escherichia coli pathotypes have been known to cause gastrointestinal illnesses in children less than 5 years old in Colombia. However, insufficient information is available on the prevalence of E. coli contamination of food products and the kind of E. coli food product reservoirs. The two objectives of this study were designed to address this issue. The first objective was to ascertain coliform, E. coli, and pathogenic E. coli contamination of food products readily available for human consumption in Cartagena, Colombia. The second objective was to evaluate the relationship between pathogenic E. coli isolated from food products and those isolated from cases of diarrhea in children. Food product samples consisting of pasteurized milk, unpasteurized fruit juice, ground beef, cheese, and vegetables were obtained at four retail stores. The food samples were cultured in liquid media and tested for the presence of coliforms and E. coli. E. coli isolates were tested by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of pathogenic E. coli. Coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathotypes contamination were detected in 88.4%, 53%, and 2.1% of food product samples, respectively. Ground beef and cheese were the only food samples contaminated with E. coli intestinal pathotypes including enteropathogenic (EPEC), Shiga toxin-producing (STEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). Closed multilocus sequencing typing relationships between diarrheagenic E. coli isolates from food products and from individuals with diarrhea suggest that food products readily available at public markets in Cartagena can transmit ETEC and possibly EPEC and STEC. We demonstrated that a high proportion of food products for human consumption available at public markets in Cartagena are contaminated with coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathogens. Furthermore, food products containing E. coli intestinal

  3. Genetic Relatedness Among Escherichia coli Pathotypes Isolated from Food Products for Human Consumption in Cartagena, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Amézquita-Montes, Zorangel; Tamborski, Maria; Kopsombut, Usa G.; Zhang, Chengxian; Arzuza, Octavio S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Foodborne pathogens are a leading cause of mild-to-severe gastrointestinal illnesses worldwide. Escherichia coli pathotypes have been known to cause gastrointestinal illnesses in children less than 5 years old in Colombia. However, insufficient information is available on the prevalence of E. coli contamination of food products and the kind of E. coli food product reservoirs. The two objectives of this study were designed to address this issue. The first objective was to ascertain coliform, E. coli, and pathogenic E. coli contamination of food products readily available for human consumption in Cartagena, Colombia. The second objective was to evaluate the relationship between pathogenic E. coli isolated from food products and those isolated from cases of diarrhea in children. Food product samples consisting of pasteurized milk, unpasteurized fruit juice, ground beef, cheese, and vegetables were obtained at four retail stores. The food samples were cultured in liquid media and tested for the presence of coliforms and E. coli. E. coli isolates were tested by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of pathogenic E. coli. Coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathotypes contamination were detected in 88.4%, 53%, and 2.1% of food product samples, respectively. Ground beef and cheese were the only food samples contaminated with E. coli intestinal pathotypes including enteropathogenic (EPEC), Shiga toxin–producing (STEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). Closed multilocus sequencing typing relationships between diarrheagenic E. coli isolates from food products and from individuals with diarrhea suggest that food products readily available at public markets in Cartagena can transmit ETEC and possibly EPEC and STEC. We demonstrated that a high proportion of food products for human consumption available at public markets in Cartagena are contaminated with coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathogens. Furthermore, food products containing E. coli

  4. Genetic Relatedness Among Escherichia coli Pathotypes Isolated from Food Products for Human Consumption in Cartagena, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Amézquita-Montes, Zorangel; Tamborski, Maria; Kopsombut, Usa G; Zhang, Chengxian; Arzuza, Octavio S; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2015-05-01

    Foodborne pathogens are a leading cause of mild-to-severe gastrointestinal illnesses worldwide. Escherichia coli pathotypes have been known to cause gastrointestinal illnesses in children less than 5 years old in Colombia. However, insufficient information is available on the prevalence of E. coli contamination of food products and the kind of E. coli food product reservoirs. The two objectives of this study were designed to address this issue. The first objective was to ascertain coliform, E. coli, and pathogenic E. coli contamination of food products readily available for human consumption in Cartagena, Colombia. The second objective was to evaluate the relationship between pathogenic E. coli isolated from food products and those isolated from cases of diarrhea in children. Food product samples consisting of pasteurized milk, unpasteurized fruit juice, ground beef, cheese, and vegetables were obtained at four retail stores. The food samples were cultured in liquid media and tested for the presence of coliforms and E. coli. E. coli isolates were tested by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of pathogenic E. coli. Coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathotypes contamination were detected in 88.4%, 53%, and 2.1% of food product samples, respectively. Ground beef and cheese were the only food samples contaminated with E. coli intestinal pathotypes including enteropathogenic (EPEC), Shiga toxin-producing (STEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). Closed multilocus sequencing typing relationships between diarrheagenic E. coli isolates from food products and from individuals with diarrhea suggest that food products readily available at public markets in Cartagena can transmit ETEC and possibly EPEC and STEC. We demonstrated that a high proportion of food products for human consumption available at public markets in Cartagena are contaminated with coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathogens. Furthermore, food products containing E. coli intestinal

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis of Enteroaggregative and Diffusely Adherent Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Czeczulin, John R.; Whittam, Thomas S.; Henderson, Ian R.; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Nataro, James P.

    1999-01-01

    The phylogenetics of the various pathotypes of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli are not completely understood. In this study, we identified several plasmid and chromosomal genes in the pathogenic enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) prototype strain 042 and determined the prevalence of these loci among EAEC and diffusely adherent E. coli strains. The distribution of these genes is analyzed within an evolutionary framework provided by the characterization of allelic variation in housekeeping genes via multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. Our data reveal that EAEC strains are heterogeneous with respect to chromosomal and plasmid-borne genes but that the majority harbor a member of a conserved family of virulence plasmids. Comparison of plasmid and chromosomal relatedness of strains suggests clonality of chromosomal markers and a limited transfer model of plasmid distribution. PMID:10338471

  6. Biofilm modifies expression of ribonucleotide reductase genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cendra, Maria del Mar; Juárez, Antonio; Torrents, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is an essential enzyme for all living organisms since is the responsible for the last step in the synthesis of the four deoxyribonucleotides (dNTPs) necessary for DNA replication and repair. In this work, we have investigated the expression of the three-RNR classes (Ia, Ib and III) during Escherichia coli biofilm formation. We show the temporal and spatial importance of class Ib and III RNRs during this process in two different E. coli wild-type strains, the commensal MG1655 and the enteropathogenic and virulent E2348/69, the prototype for the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). We have established that class Ib RNR, so far considered cryptic, play and important role during biofilm formation. The implication of this RNR class under the specific growth conditions of biofilm formation is discussed. PMID:23050019

  7. Incidence of Escherichia coli in black walnut meats.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M T; Vaughn, R H

    1969-11-01

    Examination of commercially shelled black walnut meats showed inconsistent numbers of total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and Escherichia coli; variation occurred among different meat sizes and within each meat size. The incidence of E. coli on meats of commercially hulled black walnuts depended on the physical condition of the nuts. Apparently tightly sealed ones contained only a few or none, whereas those with visibly separated sutures and spoiled meats yielded the most. This contamination was in part correlated to a hulling operation. Large numbers of E. coli on the husk of the walnuts contaminated the hulling water, subsequently also contaminating the meats by way of separated sutures. Chlorination of the hulling wash water was ineffective. Attempts were made to decontaminate the walnut meats without subsequent deleterious changes in flavor or texture. A treatment in coconut oil at 100 C followed by removal of excess surface oil by centrifugation was best.

  8. Reconstruction of a chromatic response system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Yoshimi; Hori, Mayuko; Oka, Shunsuke; Ohtsuka, Hokuto; Aiba, Hirofumi

    2016-07-14

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS) are involved in widespread cellular responses to diverse signals from bacteria to plants. Cyanobacteria have evolved photoperception systems for efficient photosynthesis, and some histidine kinases are known to function as photosensors. In this study, we attempt to reconstruct the photoperception system in Escherichia coli to make an easily controllable ON/OFF switch for gene expressions. For this purpose, a CcaS-CcaR two-component system from Nostoc punctiforme was expressed with phycocyanobilin (PCB) producing enzymes in E. coli which carries a G-box-controlled reporter gene. We succeeded to endow E. coli with a gene activation switch that is regulated in a light-color dependent manner. The possibility of such a switch for the development of synthetic biology is pointed out. PMID:27246537

  9. Binding studies of antimicrobial peptides to Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Concetta; D'Andrea, Luca D; Saviano, Michele; Olivieri, Michele; Cimmino, Amelia; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is pivotal to the design of new and more active peptides. In the last few years it has become clear that the behavior of antimicrobial peptides on membrane model systems does not always translate to cells; therefore the need to develop methods aimed at capturing details of the interactions of peptides with bacterial cells is compelling. In this work we analyzed binding of two peptides, namely temporin B and TB_KKG6A, to Escherichia coli cells and to Escherichia coli LPS. Temporin B is a natural peptide active against Gram positive bacteria but inactive against Gram negative bacteria, TB_KKG6A is an analogue of temporin B showing activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. We found that binding to cells occurs only for the active peptide TB_KKG6A; stoichiometry and affinity constant of this peptide toward Escherichia coli cells were determined.

  10. Binding studies of antimicrobial peptides to Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Concetta; D'Andrea, Luca D; Saviano, Michele; Olivieri, Michele; Cimmino, Amelia; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is pivotal to the design of new and more active peptides. In the last few years it has become clear that the behavior of antimicrobial peptides on membrane model systems does not always translate to cells; therefore the need to develop methods aimed at capturing details of the interactions of peptides with bacterial cells is compelling. In this work we analyzed binding of two peptides, namely temporin B and TB_KKG6A, to Escherichia coli cells and to Escherichia coli LPS. Temporin B is a natural peptide active against Gram positive bacteria but inactive against Gram negative bacteria, TB_KKG6A is an analogue of temporin B showing activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. We found that binding to cells occurs only for the active peptide TB_KKG6A; stoichiometry and affinity constant of this peptide toward Escherichia coli cells were determined. PMID:27450805

  11. Evolution of E. coli tRNA(Trp)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staves, Mark P.; Lacey, James C., Jr.; Bloch, David P.

    1988-01-01

    It has been shown by Lacey et al. (1985) that, in general, the hydrophobicity ranking of an amino acid correlates with that of its anticodonic nucleotide, with tryptophan being one of the four amino acids for which this rule does not apply. It was proposed that this failure to correlate was due to the fact that the anticodon assignments for the four amino acids were made late, after the mutation of existing tRNAs. In this paper, the evolution of E. coli tRNA(Trp) is examined by comparing its homology with other E. coli tRNAs. The results demonstrate the presence of an evolutionary relationship between E. coli tRNA(Trp) and tRNA(Gly) or tRNA(Arg) molecules, and support the idea of the late assignment of anticodon to Trp.

  12. Chemotaxis towards autoinducer 2 mediates autoaggregation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Laganenka, Leanid; Colin, Remy; Sourjik, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria communicate by producing and sensing extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. Such intercellular signalling, known as quorum sensing, allows bacteria to coordinate and synchronize behavioural responses at high cell densities. Autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is the only known quorum-sensing molecule produced by Escherichia coli but its physiological role remains elusive, although it is known to regulate biofilm formation and virulence in other bacterial species. Here we show that chemotaxis towards self-produced AI-2 can mediate collective behaviour—autoaggregation—of E. coli. Autoaggregation requires motility and is strongly enhanced by chemotaxis to AI-2 at physiological cell densities. These effects are observed regardless whether cell–cell interactions under particular growth conditions are mediated by the major E. coli adhesin (antigen 43) or by curli fibres. Furthermore, AI-2-dependent autoaggregation enhances bacterial stress resistance and promotes biofilm formation. PMID:27687245

  13. Functions of the gene products of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M

    1993-01-01

    A list of currently identified gene products of Escherichia coli is given, together with a bibliography that provides pointers to the literature on each gene product. A scheme to categorize cellular functions is used to classify the gene products of E. coli so far identified. A count shows that the numbers of genes concerned with small-molecule metabolism are on the same order as the numbers concerned with macromolecule biosynthesis and degradation. One large category is the category of tRNAs and their synthetases. Another is the category of transport elements. The categories of cell structure and cellular processes other than metabolism are smaller. Other subjects discussed are the occurrence in the E. coli genome of redundant pairs and groups of genes of identical or closely similar function, as well as variation in the degree of density of genetic information in different parts of the genome. PMID:7508076

  14. Dysenteric syndrome due to Balantidium coli: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Scherer, Emeline; Cazorla, Arnault; Grenouillet, Frederic

    2013-04-01

    A 28-year-old man was hospitalized for a dysenteric syndrome that had developed during the previous days. Physical examination revealed abdominal pains, fever, vomiting and more than ten liquid stools per day. Fresh stool examination showed numerous mobile ciliated trophozoites of Balantidium coli. The patient reported having been on a hike the previous weekend during which he had drunk water through a hydration pouch bladder. Complete resolution was observed after intravenous rehydration and ten days of oral treatment with metronidazole (Flagyl®). Balantidium coli is the largest ciliate protozoan able to infect humans. This parasite is common in pigs and has a worldwide distribution. Human infections, a rare event in industrialised countries, are usually acquired by ingestion of food or water contaminated by mammal faeces. Human B. coli infections are easily treated but may be severe and even fatal if neglected. PMID:23686128

  15. Engineering Escherichia coli K12 MG1655 to use starch

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To attain a sustainable bioeconomy, fuel, or valuable product, production must use biomass as substrate. Starch is one of the most abundant biomass resources and is present as waste or as a food and agroindustry by-product. Unfortunately, Escherichia coli, one of the most widely used microorganisms in biotechnological processes, cannot use starch as a carbon source. Results We engineered an E. coli strain capable of using starch as a substrate. The genetic design employed the native capability of the bacterium to use maltodextrins as a carbon source plus expression and secretion of its endogenous α-amylase, AmyA, in an adapted background. Biomass production improved using 35% dissolved oxygen and pH 7.2 in a controlled bioreactor. Conclusion The engineered E. coli strain can use starch from the milieu and open the possibility of optimize the process to use agroindustrial wastes to produce biofuels and other valuable chemicals. PMID:24886307

  16. Escherichia coli kgtP encodes an. alpha. -ketoglutarate transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Wongi; Shatkin, A.J. )

    1991-05-01

    The witA gene located between pss and rrnG on the Escherichia coli chromosome encodes a 432-amino acid protein. It is homologous to a human hepatoma glucose transporter and to E. coli membrane proteins that transport citrate (CitA), arabinose (AraE), and xylose (XylE), and, like these carrier proteins, WitA also contains 12 highly hydrophobic putative membrane-spanning regions. Gene disruption mutants constructed in two E. coli strains grew slowly or not at all, depending on genetic background, in M9 minimal medium containing {alpha}-ketoglutarate and uptake of {alpha}-({sup 14}C)ketoglutarate were restored by transformation with plasmids containing witA. These complementation studies indicate that WitA is an {alpha}-ketoglutarate transporter and should be renamed kgtP({alpha}-ketoglutarate permease).

  17. Engineering of Escherichia coli for Lycopene Production Through Promoter Engineering.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Jie; Hu, Jin-Jing; Li, Xi-Ran; Liu, Jian-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The control of gene expression is critical for metabolic engineering. The multi-copy plasmids has been widely used for high-level expression of genes. However, plasmid-based expression systems are liable to genetic instability and require a selective pressure to assure plasmid stability. In this study, we first constructed a lycopene producer Escherichia coli through promoter engineering. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mevalonate (MEV) pathway was also optimized to balance expression of the top and bottom MEV pathway by using the different strength promoters. The chromosomal heterologous expression of the optimized S. cerevisiae MEV pathway can further improved lycopene production. The final engineered strain, E. coli LYCOP 20, produced lycopene of 529.45 mg/L and 20.25 mg per gram of dry cell weight in the fed-batch culture. The engineered strain does not have a plasmid or antibiotic marker. This strategy used in this study can be applied in pathway engineering of E. coli and other bacteria.

  18. Occurrence of Escherichia coli, Campylobcter, Salmonella and Shiga-Toxin Producing E. coli in Norwegian Primary Strawberry Production.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Gro S; Eckner, Karl F; Heiberg, Nina; Monshaugen, Marte; Begum, Mumtaz; Økland, Marianne; Høgåsen, Helga R

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bacteriological quality of strawberries at harvest and to study risk factors such as irrigation water, soil and picker's hand cleanliness. Four farms were visited during the harvest season in 2012. Samples of strawberries, irrigation water, soil and hand swabs were collected and analyzed for E. coli, Campylobacter, Salmonella and STEC Although fecal indicators and pathogens were found in environmental samples, only one of 80 samples of strawberries was positive for E. coli (1.0 log10 cfu/g) and pathogens were not detected in any of the strawberry samples. The water samples from all irrigation sources were contaminated with E. coli in numbers ranging from 0 to 3.3 log10 cfu/g. Campylobacter (8/16 samples) and Salmonella (1/16 samples) were isolated from samples with high numbers of E. coli. The water samples collected from a lake had lower numbers of E. coli than the samples from rivers and a stream. The present study indicated continuous background contamination in the primary production environment. Although the background contamination was not reflected on the strawberries tested here, the results must be interpreted with caution due to the limited number of samples. PMID:26090606

  19. A hydrogel based rapid test method for detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in contaminated water samples.

    PubMed

    Gunda, Naga Siva Kumar; Chavali, Ravi; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2016-05-10

    We have formulated a new chemical composition for rapid detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) with currently available enzymatic substrates. We have evaluated the performance of the new chemical composition with different kinds of bacteria, and metallic and ionic interferences and optimized the chemical composition for rapid and specific detection of E. coli. We used a novel hydrogel based porous matrix to encapsulate the optimized chemical compounds and incorporated it within a readily available plunger-tube assembly. This overall system allows efficient, field deployable, rapid testing of water samples by simultaneously pre-concentrating and detecting E. coli within one integrated unit. We were able to detect E. coli concentrations of 4 × 10(6) CFU mL(-1) to 4 × 10(5) CFU mL(-1) within 5 min and 4 × 10(4) CFU mL(-1) to 400 CFU mL(-1) within 60 min using the integrated plunger-tube assembly containing the hydrogel matrix. PMID:27137782

  20. Occurrence of Escherichia coli, Campylobcter, Salmonella and Shiga-Toxin Producing E. coli in Norwegian Primary Strawberry Production

    PubMed Central

    Johannessen, Gro S.; Eckner, Karl F.; Heiberg, Nina; Monshaugen, Marte; Begum, Mumtaz; Økland, Marianne; Høgåsen, Helga R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bacteriological quality of strawberries at harvest and to study risk factors such as irrigation water, soil and picker’s hand cleanliness. Four farms were visited during the harvest season in 2012. Samples of strawberries, irrigation water, soil and hand swabs were collected and analyzed for E. coli, Campylobacter, Salmonella and STEC Although fecal indicators and pathogens were found in environmental samples, only one of 80 samples of strawberries was positive for E. coli (1.0 log10 cfu/g) and pathogens were not detected in any of the strawberry samples. The water samples from all irrigation sources were contaminated with E. coli in numbers ranging from 0 to 3.3 log10 cfu/g. Campylobacter (8/16 samples) and Salmonella (1/16 samples) were isolated from samples with high numbers of E. coli. The water samples collected from a lake had lower numbers of E. coli than the samples from rivers and a stream. The present study indicated continuous background contamination in the primary production environment. Although the background contamination was not reflected on the strawberries tested here, the results must be interpreted with caution due to the limited number of samples. PMID:26090606

  1. Occurrence of Escherichia coli, Campylobcter, Salmonella and Shiga-Toxin Producing E. coli in Norwegian Primary Strawberry Production.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Gro S; Eckner, Karl F; Heiberg, Nina; Monshaugen, Marte; Begum, Mumtaz; Økland, Marianne; Høgåsen, Helga R

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bacteriological quality of strawberries at harvest and to study risk factors such as irrigation water, soil and picker's hand cleanliness. Four farms were visited during the harvest season in 2012. Samples of strawberries, irrigation water, soil and hand swabs were collected and analyzed for E. coli, Campylobacter, Salmonella and STEC Although fecal indicators and pathogens were found in environmental samples, only one of 80 samples of strawberries was positive for E. coli (1.0 log10 cfu/g) and pathogens were not detected in any of the strawberry samples. The water samples from all irrigation sources were contaminated with E. coli in numbers ranging from 0 to 3.3 log10 cfu/g. Campylobacter (8/16 samples) and Salmonella (1/16 samples) were isolated from samples with high numbers of E. coli. The water samples collected from a lake had lower numbers of E. coli than the samples from rivers and a stream. The present study indicated continuous background contamination in the primary production environment. Although the background contamination was not reflected on the strawberries tested here, the results must be interpreted with caution due to the limited number of samples.

  2. Genomic anatomy of Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Eppinger, Mark; Mammel, Mark K; Leclerc, Joseph E; Ravel, Jacques; Cebula, Thomas A

    2011-12-13

    The rapid emergence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from an unknown strain in 1982 to the dominant hemorrhagic E. coli serotype in the United States and the cause of widespread outbreaks of human food-borne illness highlights a need to evaluate critically the extent to which genomic plasticity of this important enteric pathogen contributes to its pathogenic potential and its evolution as well as its adaptation in different ecological niches. Aimed at a better understanding of the evolution of the E. coli O157:H7 pathogenome, the present study presents the high-quality sequencing and comparative phylogenomic analysis of a comprehensive panel of 25 E. coli O157:H7 strains associated with three nearly simultaneous food-borne outbreaks of human disease in the United States. Here we present a population genetic analysis of more than 200 related strains recovered from patients, contaminated produce, and zoonotic sources. High-resolution phylogenomic approaches allow the dynamics of pathogenome evolution to be followed at a high level of phylogenetic accuracy and resolution. SNP discovery and study of genome architecture and prophage content identified numerous biomarkers to assess the extent of genetic diversity within a set of clinical and environmental strains. A total of 1,225 SNPs were identified in the present study and are now available for typing of the E. coli O157:H7 lineage. These data should prove useful for the development of a refined phylogenomic framework for forensic, diagnostic, and epidemiological studies to define better risk in response to novel and emerging E. coli O157:H7 resistance and virulence phenotypes. PMID:22135463

  3. Behavior of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains on whole and sliced jalapeño and serrano peppers.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Gordillo-Martínez, Alberto J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2014-06-01

    The behavior of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and non-O157 shiga toxin-producing E. coli (non-O157-STEC) on whole and slices of jalapeño and serrano peppers as well as in blended sauce at 25 ± 2 °C and 3 ± 2 °C was investigated. Chili peppers were collected from markets of Pachuca city, Hidalgo, Mexico. On whole serrano and jalapeño stored at 25 ± 2 °C or 3 ± 2 °C, no growth was observed for EPEC, ETEC, EIEC and non-O157-STEC rifampicin resistant strains. After twelve days at 25 ± 2 °C, on serrano peppers all diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEP) strains had decreased by a total of approximately 3.7 log, whereas on jalapeño peppers the strains had decreased by approximately 2.8 log, and at 3 ± 2 °C they decreased to approximately 2.5 and 2.2 log respectively, on serrano and jalapeño. All E. coli pathotypes grew onto sliced chili peppers and in blended sauce: after 24 h at 25 ± 2 °C, all pathotypes had grown to approximately 3 and 4 log CFU on pepper slices and sauce, respectively. At 3 ± 2 °C the bacterial growth was inhibited. PMID:24549200

  4. Escherichia coli Mutants that Synthesize Dephosphorylated Lipid A Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Brian O.; Masoudi, Ali; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2010-01-01

    The lipid A moiety of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide is a hexa-acylated disaccharide of glucosamine that is phosphorylated at the 1 and 4′ positions. Expression of the Francisella novicida lipid A 1-phosphatase FnLpxE in E. coli results in dephosphorylation of the lipid A proximal unit. Co-expression of FnLpxE and the Rhizobium leguminosarum lipid A oxidase RlLpxQ in E. coli converts much of the proximal glucosamine to 2-amino-2-deoxy-gluconate. Expression of the F. novicida lipid A 4′-phosphatase FnLpxF in wild-type E. coli has no effect because FnLpxF cannot dephosphorylate hexa-acylated lipid A. However, expression of FnLpxF in E. coli lpxM mutants, which synthesize penta-acylated lipid A lacking the secondary 3′-myristate chain, causes extensive 4′-dephosphorylation. Co-expression of FnLpxE and FnLpxF in lpxM mutants results in massive accumulation of lipid A species lacking both phosphate groups, and introduction of RlLpxQ generates phosphate-free lipid A variants containing 2-amino-2-deoxy-gluconate. The proposed lipid A structures were confirmed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Strains with 4′-dephosphorylated lipid A display increased polymyxin resistance. Heptose-deficient mutants of E. coli lacking both the 1- and 4′-phosphate moieties are viable on plates but sensitive to CaCl2. Our methods for re-engineering lipid A structure may be useful for generating novel vaccines and adjuvants. PMID:20795687

  5. A structural view of the dissociation of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Green, Keren; Qasim, Nasrin; Gdaelvsky, Garik; Kogan, Anna; Goldgur, Yehuda; Parola, Abraham H; Lotan, Ofra; Almog, Orna

    2015-12-01

    Tryptophanase (Trpase) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent homotetrameric enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of L-tryptophan. Trpase is also known for its cold lability, which is a reversible loss of activity at low temperature (2°C) that is associated with the dissociation of the tetramer. Escherichia coli Trpase dissociates into dimers, while Proteus vulgaris Trpase dissociates into monomers. As such, this enzyme is an appropriate model to study the protein-protein interactions and quaternary structure of proteins. The aim of the present study was to understand the differences in the mode of dissociation between the E. coli and P. vulgaris Trpases. In particular, the effect of mutations along the molecular axes of homotetrameric Trpase on its dissociation was studied. To answer this question, two groups of mutants of the E. coli enzyme were created to resemble the amino-acid sequence of P. vulgaris Trpase. In one group, residues 15 and 59 that are located along the molecular axis R (also termed the noncatalytic axis) were mutated. The second group included a mutation at position 298, located along the molecular axis Q (also termed the catalytic axis). Replacing amino-acid residues along the R axis resulted in dissociation of the tetramers into monomers, similar to the P. vulgaris Trpase, while replacing amino-acid residues along the Q axis resulted in dissociation into dimers only. The crystal structure of the V59M mutant of E. coli Trpase was also determined in its apo form and was found to be similar to that of the wild type. This study suggests that in E. coli Trpase hydrophobic interactions along the R axis hold the two monomers together more strongly, preventing the dissociation of the dimers into monomers. Mutation of position 298 along the Q axis to a charged residue resulted in tetramers that are less susceptible to dissociation. Thus, the results indicate that dissociation of E. coli Trpase into dimers occurs along the molecular Q axis.

  6. Behavior of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains on whole and sliced jalapeño and serrano peppers.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Gordillo-Martínez, Alberto J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2014-06-01

    The behavior of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and non-O157 shiga toxin-producing E. coli (non-O157-STEC) on whole and slices of jalapeño and serrano peppers as well as in blended sauce at 25 ± 2 °C and 3 ± 2 °C was investigated. Chili peppers were collected from markets of Pachuca city, Hidalgo, Mexico. On whole serrano and jalapeño stored at 25 ± 2 °C or 3 ± 2 °C, no growth was observed for EPEC, ETEC, EIEC and non-O157-STEC rifampicin resistant strains. After twelve days at 25 ± 2 °C, on serrano peppers all diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEP) strains had decreased by a total of approximately 3.7 log, whereas on jalapeño peppers the strains had decreased by approximately 2.8 log, and at 3 ± 2 °C they decreased to approximately 2.5 and 2.2 log respectively, on serrano and jalapeño. All E. coli pathotypes grew onto sliced chili peppers and in blended sauce: after 24 h at 25 ± 2 °C, all pathotypes had grown to approximately 3 and 4 log CFU on pepper slices and sauce, respectively. At 3 ± 2 °C the bacterial growth was inhibited.

  7. The reduction of nitrous oxide to dinitrogen by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kaldorf, M; Linne von Berg, K H; Meier, U; Servos, U; Bothe, H

    1993-01-01

    Escherichia coli K12 reduces nitrous oxide stoichiometrically to molecular nitrogen with rates of 1.9 mumol/h x mg protein. The activity is induced by anaerobiosis and nitrate. N2-formation from N2O is inhibited by C2H2 (Ki approximately 0.03 mM in the medium) and nitrite (Ki = 0.3 mM) but not by azide. A mutant defective in FNR synthesis is unable to reduce N2O to N2. The reaction in the wild type could routinely be followed by gas chromatography and alternatively by mass spectrometry measuring the formation of 15N2 from 15N2O. The enzyme catalyzing N2O-reduction in E. coli could not be identified; it is probably neither nitrate reductase nor nitrogenase. E. coli does not grow with N2O as sole respiratory electron acceptor. N2O-reduction might not have a physiological role in E. coli, and the enzyme involved might catalyze something else in nature, as it has a low affinity for the substrate N2O (apparent Km approximately 3.0 mM). The capability for N2O-reduction to N2 is not restricted to E. coli but is also demonstrable in Yersinia kristensenii and Buttiauxella agrestis of the Enterobacteriaceae. E. coli is able to produce NO and N2O from nitrite by nitrate reductase, depending on the assay conditions. In such experiments NO2- is not reduced to N2 because of the high demand for N2O of N2O-reduction and the inhibitory effect of NO2- on this reaction.

  8. Genomic Comparison of Translocating and Non-Translocating Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Nathan L.; Katouli, Mohammad; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of E. coli across the gut epithelium can result in fatal sepsis in post-surgical patients. In vitro and in vivo experiments have identified the existence of a novel pathotype of translocating E. coli (TEC) that employs an unknown mechanism for translocating across epithelial cells to the mesenteric lymph nodes and the blood stream in both humans and animal models. In this study the genomes of four TEC strains isolated from the mesenteric lymph nodes of a fatal case of hospitalised patient (HMLN-1), blood of pigs after experimental shock (PC-1) and after non-lethal haemorrhage in rats (KIC-1 and KIC-2) were sequenced in order to identify the genes associated with their adhesion and/or translocation. To facilitate the comparison, the genomes of a non-adhering, non-translocating E. coli (46–4) and adhering but non-translocating E. coli (73–89) were also sequenced and compared. Whole genome comparison revealed that three (HMLN-1, PC-1 and KIC-2) of the four TEC strains carried a genomic island that encodes a Type 6 Secretion System that may contribute to adhesion of the bacteria to gut epithelial cells. The human TEC strain HMLN-1 also carried the invasion ibeA gene, which was absent in the animal TEC strains and is likely to be associated with host-specific translocation. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the four TEC strains were distributed amongst three distinct E. coli phylogroups, which was supported by the presence of phylogroup specific fimbriae gene clusters. The genomic comparison has identified potential genes that can be targeted with knock-out experiments to further characterise the mechanisms of E. coli translocation. PMID:26317913

  9. Genomic anatomy of Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Eppinger, Mark; Mammel, Mark K.; Leclerc, Joseph E.; Ravel, Jacques; Cebula, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid emergence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from an unknown strain in 1982 to the dominant hemorrhagic E. coli serotype in the United States and the cause of widespread outbreaks of human food-borne illness highlights a need to evaluate critically the extent to which genomic plasticity of this important enteric pathogen contributes to its pathogenic potential and its evolution as well as its adaptation in different ecological niches. Aimed at a better understanding of the evolution of the E. coli O157:H7 pathogenome, the present study presents the high-quality sequencing and comparative phylogenomic analysis of a comprehensive panel of 25 E. coli O157:H7 strains associated with three nearly simultaneous food-borne outbreaks of human disease in the United States. Here we present a population genetic analysis of more than 200 related strains recovered from patients, contaminated produce, and zoonotic sources. High-resolution phylogenomic approaches allow the dynamics of pathogenome evolution to be followed at a high level of phylogenetic accuracy and resolution. SNP discovery and study of genome architecture and prophage content identified numerous biomarkers to assess the extent of genetic diversity within a set of clinical and environmental strains. A total of 1,225 SNPs were identified in the present study and are now available for typing of the E. coli O157:H7 lineage. These data should prove useful for the development of a refined phylogenomic framework for forensic, diagnostic, and epidemiological studies to define better risk in response to novel and emerging E. coli O157:H7 resistance and virulence phenotypes. PMID:22135463

  10. Recombinant production of mecasermin in E. coli expression system

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, S.; Babaeipour, V.; Seyedi, H.A. Eslampanah; Rahaie, M.; Mofid, M.R.; Haddad, L.; Namvaran, M.M.; Fallah, J.

    2014-01-01

    Human Insulin-like growth factor 1 (hIGF-1) consists of 70 amino acids in a single chain with three intermolecular disulfide bridges possessing valuable therapeutic effects. To date, numerous variants of specifically engineered hIGF-1 have been produced so as to improve hIGF-1 biological activity, stability and stronger binding to IGF-1 receptor. Mecasermin is one of the modified variants with one amino acid substitution near the N-terminal (T4I) approved for the treatment of growth failure diabetes, wound healing, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and severe primary IGF-1 deficiency. No scientific report for recombinant production of mecasermin in Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system has been sofar reported. In the present study, we therefore investigated the overexpression of mecasermin in two different E. coli strains in order to obtain higher yield of recombinant protein. To achieve this goal, mecasermin DNA encoding sequence was designed based on polypeptide sequence, optimized according to E. coli codon preference, and cloned in pET15b. Recombinant vector, pET15-mecasermin, transferred into two E. coli strains rigami B (DE3) and BL21 (DE3) and induced for expression in a small scale. Results revealed the E. coli Origami B (DE3) expression system was a preferable host for mecasermin production due to its high expression level being around twice as much as BL21 (DE3). Large scale mecasermin production was performed in batch culture and produced recombinant protein specifically confirmed by western blotting and mass spectroscopy. Since major part of recombinant mecasermin was expressed as inclusion body, isolation and refolding was accomplished through developed purification procedure, and finally recombinant protein was successfully purified by gel filtration chromatography. PMID:26339260

  11. Unidirecetional motility of excherichia coli in restrictive capillaries

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Papadopoulos, K.D.

    1995-10-01

    In a 6-{mu}m capillary filled with buffer and in the absence of any chemotactic stimuli, Escherichia coli K-12 cells swim persistently in only one direction. This behavior of E. coli can be simply explained by means of the length and relative rigidity of their flagella. Single-cell motility parameters-swimming speed, turn angle, and run length time-were measured. Compared with the motility parameters measured in bulk phase, turn angle was influenced because of the effect of the geometrical restriction. 30 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Antioxidant assay using genetically engineered bioluminescent Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolome, Amelita; Macalino, Bernadette; Pastoral, Ian Lemuel; Sevilla, Fortunato, III

    2006-02-01

    A new antioxidant activity assay based on the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-inducible bacterial strain (E. coli DPD2511) is described. The strain harbors the plasmid pKatG::luxCDABE and responds to hydrogen peroxide treatment by increasing light emission at 490 nm. Antioxidant capacity is evaluated through the ability of an agent to inhibit the hydrogen peroxide-induced bioluminescence of E. coli DPD2511. Applicability of the developed assay in detecting levels of antioxidants in various aqueous plant extracts is demonstrated. The assay was validated against 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, a known antioxidant assay.

  13. Escherichia coli as a model active colloid: A practical introduction.

    PubMed

    Schwarz-Linek, Jana; Arlt, Jochen; Jepson, Alys; Dawson, Angela; Vissers, Teun; Miroli, Dario; Pilizota, Teuta; Martinez, Vincent A; Poon, Wilson C K

    2016-01-01

    The flagellated bacterium Escherichia coli is increasingly used experimentally as a self-propelled swimmer. To obtain meaningful, quantitative results that are comparable between different laboratories, reproducible protocols are needed to control, 'tune' and monitor the swimming behaviour of these motile cells. We critically review the knowledge needed to do so, explain methods for characterising the colloidal and motile properties of E. coli cells, and propose a protocol for keeping them swimming at constant speed at finite bulk concentrations. In the process of establishing this protocol, we use motility as a high-throughput probe of aspects of cellular physiology via the coupling between swimming speed and the proton motive force. PMID:26310235

  14. Cloning of a Thiobacillus ferrooxidans plasmid in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, D.S.; Lobos, J.H.; Bopp, L.H.; Welch, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Three separate plasmids of 6, 7, 16, and >23 kilobases were purified from a single clone of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 33020 grown in the presence of uranium. The 6.7-kilobase plasmid (pTfl) was cloned separately into the HindIII or BamHI site of Escherichia coli plasmid pBR322. Restriction maps of the recombinant plasmids, termed pTf100 and pTf110, respectively, were constructed, creating potential cloning vehicles for exchanging genetic information between E. coli and T. ferrooxidans. Evidence from restriction enzyme analysis and Southern blot DNA-DNA hybridization indicates that the three native plasmids share little sequence homology.

  15. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli (GenProtEc).

    PubMed

    Riley, M; Space, D B

    1996-01-01

    GenProtEc is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. The database is available as a PKZip file by ftp from mbl.edu/pub/ecoli.exe. The program runs under MS-DOS on IMB-compatible machines. GenProtEc can also be accessed through the World Wide Web at URL http://mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html. PMID:8594596

  16. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, Germán L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the organisms of choice for the production of recombinant proteins. Its use as a cell factory is well-established and it has become the most popular expression platform. For this reason, there are many molecular tools and protocols at hand for the high-level production of heterologous proteins, such as a vast catalog of expression plasmids, a great number of engineered strains and many cultivation strategies. We review the different approaches for the synthesis of recombinant proteins in E. coli and discuss recent progress in this ever-growing field. PMID:24860555

  17. Balantidium Coli liver abscess: first case report from India.

    PubMed

    Kapur, P; Das, A K; Kapur, P R; Dudeja, M

    2016-03-01

    Protozoal infections are common in the tropics. Amoebic colitis is the commonest of these infections and can lead to liver abscess as a complication. Balantidium coli is a rare free moving protozoal parasite which is known to infest human large intestine causing a type of colitis very similar to that caused by Entamoeba histolytica. However this pathogen is not known to cause liver invasion in humans. We report here a case of liver abscess caused by B. coli, which is probably the first such case reported in Indian literature. PMID:27065613

  18. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical. Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  19. Escherichia coli as a model active colloid: A practical introduction.

    PubMed

    Schwarz-Linek, Jana; Arlt, Jochen; Jepson, Alys; Dawson, Angela; Vissers, Teun; Miroli, Dario; Pilizota, Teuta; Martinez, Vincent A; Poon, Wilson C K

    2016-01-01

    The flagellated bacterium Escherichia coli is increasingly used experimentally as a self-propelled swimmer. To obtain meaningful, quantitative results that are comparable between different laboratories, reproducible protocols are needed to control, 'tune' and monitor the swimming behaviour of these motile cells. We critically review the knowledge needed to do so, explain methods for characterising the colloidal and motile properties of E. coli cells, and propose a protocol for keeping them swimming at constant speed at finite bulk concentrations. In the process of establishing this protocol, we use motility as a high-throughput probe of aspects of cellular physiology via the coupling between swimming speed and the proton motive force.

  20. Isolation of a Citrobacter freundii strain which carries the Escherichia coli O157 antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Bettelheim, K A; Evangelidis, H; Pearce, J L; Sowers, E; Strockbine, N A

    1993-01-01

    A biochemically typical strain of Citrobacter freundii which carries the Escherichia coli O157 antigen is described. The significance of differentiating such strains from typical E. coli O157 strains is stressed. PMID:7681442