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Sample records for adenomatosis polyposis coli

  1. Tumor suppressor gene adenomatous polyposis coli downregulates intestinal transport.

    PubMed

    Rexhepaj, Rexhep; Rotte, Anand; Gu, Shuchen; Michael, Diana; Pasham, Venkanna; Wang, Kan; Kempe, Daniela S; Ackermann, Teresa F; Brücher, Björn; Fend, Falko; Föller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2011-05-01

    Loss of function mutations of the tumor suppressor gene adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) underly the familial adenomatous polyposis. Mice carrying an inactivating mutation in the apc gene (apc (Min/+)) similarly develop intestinal polyposis. APC is effective at least in part by degrading β-catenin and lack of APC leads to markedly enhanced cellular β-catenin levels. β-Catenin has most recently been shown to upregulate the Na+/K+ ATPase. The present study, thus, explored the possibility that APC could influence intestinal transport. The abundance and localization of β-catenin were determined utilizing Western blotting and confocal microscopy, the activity of the electrogenic glucose carrier (SGLT1) was estimated from the glucose-induced current in jejunal segments utilizing Ussing chamber experiments and the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE3) activity from Na+ -dependent re-alkalinization of cytosolic pH (ΔpH(i)) following an ammonium pulse employing BCECF fluorescence. As a result, β-catenin abundance in intestinal tissue was significantly higher in apc (Min/+) mice than in wild-type mice (apc (+/+)). The β-catenin protein was localized in the basolateral membrane. Both, the glucose-induced current and ΔpH(i) were significantly higher in apc (Min/+) mice than in apc (+/+) mice. In conclusion, intestinal electrogenic transport of glucose and intestinal Na+/H+ exchanger activity are both significantly enhanced in apc (Min/+) mice, pointing to a role of APC in the regulation of epithelial transport.

  2. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Mutation Leads to Myopia Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zhu, Zhenzhen; Yang, Wenzhao; Zhou, Xiangtian; An, Jianhong; Huang, Furong; Wang, Qiongsi; Reinach, Peter S.; Li, Wei; Chen, Wensheng; Liu, Zuguo

    2015-01-01

    Myopia incidence in China is rapidly becoming a very serious sight compromising problem in a large segment of the general population. Therefore, delineating the underlying mechanisms leading to myopia will markedly lessen the likelihood of other sight compromising complications. In this regard, there is some evidence that patients afflicted with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), havean adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutation and a higher incidence of myopia. To clarify this possible association, we determined whether the changes in pertinent biometric and biochemical parameters underlying postnatal refractive error development in APCMin mice are relevant for gaining insight into the pathogenesis of this disease in humans. The refraction and biometrics in APCMin mice and age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates between postnatal days P28 and P84 were examined with eccentric infrared photorefraction (EIR) and customized optical coherence tomography (OCT). Compared with WT littermates, the APCMin mutated mice developed myopia (average -4.64 D) on P84 which was associated with increased vitreous chamber depth (VCD). Furthermore, retinal and scleral changes appear in these mice along with: 1) axial length shortening; 2) increased retinal cell proliferation; 3) and decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, the rate-limiting enzyme of DA synthesis. Scleral collagen fibril diameters became heterogeneous and irregularly organized in the APCMin mice. Western blot analysis showed that scleral alpha-1 type I collagen (col1α1) expression also decreased whereas MMP2 and MMP9 mRNA expression was invariant. These results indicate that defective APC gene function promotes refractive error development. By characterizing in APCMin mice ocular developmental changes, this approach provides novel insight into underlying pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to human myopia development. PMID:26495845

  3. Nonfamilial juvenile polyposis coli in a child: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tadao; Sasaki, Fumiaki; Ueki, Shinya; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Kato, Mototsugu; Itoh, Tomoo; Ota, Satoshi; Todo, Satoru

    2004-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis coli (JPC) is an uncommon condition, manifesting as hamartomatous gastrointestinal polyposis with potential malignancy. This report describes a 15-month-old girl who was diagnosed to have nonfamilial JPC accompanied by macrocephaly, clubbed fingers, and mental retardation. Radiography of the colon by a barium enema and total colonoscopy demonstrated numerous colonic polyps. A barium meal study did not show any abnormality in the stomach, duodenum, or small intestine. She died at 6 years of age from hemorrhagic shock due to massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding associated with a rectal prolapse. The related literature is reviewed, and the treatments and complications of JPC in children are also discussed. We emphasize that family members of patients diagnosed with juvenile polyposis should be questioned and undergo appropriate examinations of the entire intestine from the stomach to the rectum.

  4. Fibroadenoma of the breast in a man associated with adenocarcinoma of the rectum and polyposis coli.

    PubMed

    Adibelli, Z H; Yildirim, M; Ozan, E; Oztekin, O; Kucukzeybek, B

    2010-01-01

    Fibroadenoma of the breast is an uncommon cause of breast lumps in men. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature, the majority of which were prescribed estrogen. We present herein the first case of a fibroadenoma of the breast in a 68-year-old man with adenocarcinoma of the rectum and polyposis coli. In this case, there was neither estrogen treatment nor any other medications which have been discussed in the literature as inducing fibroadenomas. Fibroadenomas in men without hormone treatment and with normal hormone levels are extremely rare and the developmental mechanism of the breast fibroadenoma in this man is under question.

  5. Polymorphisms in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene and advanced colorectal adenoma risk.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hui-Lee; Peters, Ulrike; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Wen-Yi; Schatzkin, Arthur; Bresalier, Robert S; Velie, Ellen M; Brody, Lawrence C

    2010-09-01

    While germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene cause the hereditary colon cancer syndrome (familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP)), the role of common germline APC variants in sporadic adenomatous polyposis remains unclear. We studied the association of eight APC single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), possibly associated with functional consequences, and previously identified gene-environment (dietary fat intake and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use) interactions, in relation to advanced colorectal adenoma in 758 cases and 767 sex- and race-matched controls, randomly selected from the screening arm of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Cases had at least one verified advanced adenoma of the distal colon; controls, a negative sigmoidoscopy. We did not observe an association between genotypes for any of the eight APC SNPs and advanced distal adenoma risk (P(global gene-based)=0.92). Frequencies of identified common haplotypes did not differ between cases and controls (P(global haplotype test)=0.97). However, the risk for advanced distal adenoma was threefold higher for one rare haplotype (cases: 2.7%; controls: 1.6%) (odds ratio (OR)=3.27; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.08-9.88). The genetic association between D1822V and advanced distal adenoma was confined to persons consuming a high-fat diet (P(interaction)=0.03). Similar interactions were not observed with HRT use. In our large, nested case-control study of advanced distal adenoma and clinically verified adenoma-free controls, we observed no association between specific APC SNPs and advanced adenoma. Fat intake modified the APC D1822V-adenoma association, but further studies are warranted.

  6. Adenomatous polyposis coli-deficient zebrafish are susceptible to digestive tract neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Haramis, Anna-Pavlina G; Hurlstone, Adam; van der Velden, Yme; Begthel, Harry; van den Born, Maaike; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Clevers, Hans C

    2006-04-01

    Truncation of the tumour suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) constitutively activates the Wnt/beta-catenin signalling pathway. This event constitutes the primary transforming event in sporadic colorectal cancer in humans. Moreover, humans or mice carrying germline truncating mutations in APC develop large numbers of intestinal adenomas. Here, we report that zebrafish that are heterozygous for a truncating APC mutation spontaneously develop intestinal, hepatic and pancreatic neoplasias that are highly proliferative, accumulate beta-catenin and express Wnt target genes. Treatment with the chemical carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene accelerates the induction of these lesions. These observations establish apc-mutant zebrafish as a bona fide model for the study of digestive tract cancer.

  7. Selective targeting of mutant adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Theodoropoulos, Panayotis C; Eskiocak, Ugur; Wang, Wentian; Moon, Young-Ah; Posner, Bruce; Williams, Noelle S; Wright, Woodring E; Kim, Sang Bum; Nijhawan, Deepak; De Brabander, Jef K; Shay, Jerry W

    2016-10-19

    Mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are common in colorectal cancer (CRC), and more than 90% of those mutations generate stable truncated gene products. We describe a chemical screen using normal human colonic epithelial cells (HCECs) and a series of oncogenically progressed HCECs containing a truncated APC protein. With this screen, we identified a small molecule, TASIN-1 (truncated APC selective inhibitor-1), that specifically kills cells with APC truncations but spares normal and cancer cells with wild-type APC. TASIN-1 exerts its cytotoxic effects through inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis. In vivo administration of TASIN-1 inhibits tumor growth of CRC cells with truncated APC but not APC wild-type CRC cells in xenograft models and in a genetically engineered CRC mouse model with minimal toxicity. TASIN-1 represents a potential therapeutic strategy for prevention and intervention in CRC with mutant APC.

  8. Aspirin augments the expression of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli protein by suppression of IKKβ

    SciTech Connect

    Ashida, Noboru; Kishihata, Masako; Tien, Dat Nguyen; Kamei, Kaeko; Kimura, Takeshi; Yokode, Masayuki

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Clinical studies revealed aspirin inhibits cancer, but the mechanism is not known. • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a well-known tumor-suppressing gene. • We found aspirin up-regulates the protein of APC. • Aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, an essential kinase in NFκB activation. • The deletion of IKKβ significantly increases the expression of APC protein. - Abstract: Aspirin has been widely used as analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory medicine for long. In addition to these traditional effects, clinical studies suggest that aspirin can protect against cancer, but its mechanism has not been explored. To unveil it, we identified the proteins up- or down-regulated after incubation with aspirin by using proteomics analysis with Nano-flow LC/MALDI-TOF system. Interestingly, the analysis identified the protein of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) as one of the most up-regulated protein. APC regulates cell proliferation or angiogenesis, and is widely known as a tumor-suppressing gene which can cause colorectal cancer when it is mutated. Western blots confirmed this result, and real-time PCR indicated it is transcriptionally regulated. We further tried to elucidate the molecular mechanism with focusing on IKKβ. IKKβ is the essential kinase in activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), major transcriptional factors that regulate genes responsible for inflammation or immune response. Previous reports indicated that aspirin specifically inhibits IKKβ activity, and constitutively active form of IKKβ accelerates APC loss. We found that aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, and the deletion of IKKβ by siRNA increases the expression of APC in HEK294 cells. Finally, we observed similar effects of aspirin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these results reveal that aspirin up-regulates the expression of APC via the suppression of IKKβ. This can be a mechanism how aspirin prevents cancer at

  9. Hepatocellular adenomatosis associated with hereditary haemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Radhi, J; Loewy, J

    2000-01-01

    A young healthy man presented with abdominal pain following an accidental fall. Imaging studies and laparoscopy revealed multiple yellowish well-defined hepatic lesions. Liver biopsies showed hepatic adenomas and iron overload. Laboratory investigation confirmed a diagnosis of hereditary haemochromatosis. To our knowledge this represents the first report of an association of hepatic adenomatosis and primary haemochromatosis.


Keywords: liver; adenomatosis; haemochromatosis PMID:10644389

  10. Adenomatous polyposis coli associates with the microtubule-destabilizing protein XMCAK.

    PubMed

    Banks, Jennifer D; Heald, Rebecca

    2004-11-23

    During cell division, the proper formation of a bipolar spindle and its function to segregate chromosomes requires precise coordination of microtubule-stabilizing and destabilizing activities. Globally destabilized, dynamic microtubules radiating from duplicated centrosomes are locally regulated by chromosomes. Proteins at the kinetochore of each sister chromatid mediate a dynamic attachment, allowing chromosome movement coupled to microtubule polymerization/depolymerization and error-correction mechanisms for improperly attached chromosomes. The tumor suppressor protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) stabilizes microtubules both in vitro and in vivo and is implicated in mitosis, although its mechanisms of action are not well characterized. Here, we show that in mitotic Xenopus egg extracts, the carboxyl-terminus of APC can associate with the amino terminus of the microtubule-destabilizing KinI, Xenopus mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (XMCAK), in a cytoplasmic complex. We find that like XMCAK, APC can localize to the centromere as well as the kinetochore region of mitotic chromosomes and does not require microtubules for chromosomal targeting in Xenopus egg extracts. We propose that the presence of these proteins in a complex brings together both positive and negative microtubule effectors, whose opposing activities may be regulated by additional factors, thereby providing precise control of both global and local microtubule dynamics.

  11. Functional definition of the mutation cluster region of adenomatous polyposis coli in colorectal tumours.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Eva Maria; Derungs, Adrian; Daum, Gabriele; Behrens, Jürgen; Schneikert, Jean

    2008-07-01

    The mutation cluster region (MCR) of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is located within the central part of the open reading frame, overlapping with the region encoding the 20 amino acid repeats (20R) that are beta-catenin-binding sites. Each mutation in the MCR leads to the synthesis of a truncated APC product expressed in a colorectal tumour. The MCR extends from the 3' border of the first 20R coding region to approximately the middle of the third 20R coding region, reflecting both positive and negative selections of the N- and C-terminal halves of the APC protein in colon cancer cells, respectively. In contrast, the second 20R escapes selection and can be either included or excluded from the truncated APC products found in colon cancer cells. To specify the functional outcome of the selection of the mutations, we investigated the beta-catenin binding capacity of the first three 20R in N-terminal APC fragments. We found in co-immunoprecipitation and intracellular co-localization experiments that the second 20R is lacking any beta-catenin binding activity. Similarly, we also show that the tumour-associated truncations abolish the interaction of beta-catenin with the third 20R. Thus, our data provide a functional definition of the MCR: the APC fragments typical of colon cancer are selected for the presence of a single functional 20R, the first one, and are therefore equivalent relative to beta-catenin binding.

  12. Insulin signaling regulates a functional interaction between adenomatous polyposis coli and cytoplasmic dynein.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng J; Shi, Liang; Hines, Timothy; Hebbar, Sachin; Neufeld, Kristi L; Smith, Deanna S

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes is linked to an increased risk for colorectal cancer, but the mechanistic underpinnings of this clinically important effect are unclear. Here we describe an interaction between the microtubule motor cytoplasmic dynein, the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor protein (APC), and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), which could shed light on this issue. GSK-3β is perhaps best known for glycogen regulation, being inhibited downstream in an insulin-signaling pathway. However, the kinase is also important in many other processes. Mutations in APC that disrupt the regulation of β-catenin by GSK-3β cause colorectal cancer in humans. Of interest, both APC and GSK-3β interact with microtubules and cellular membranes. We recently demonstrated that dynein is a GSK-3β substrate and that inhibition of GSK-3β promotes dynein-dependent transport. We now report that dynein stimulation in intestinal cells in response to acute insulin exposure (or GSK-3β inhibition) is blocked by tumor-promoting isoforms of APC that reduce an interaction between wild-type APC and dynein. We propose that under normal conditions, insulin decreases dynein binding to APC to stimulate minus end-directed transport, which could modulate endocytic and secretory systems in intestinal cells. Mutations in APC likely impair the ability to respond appropriately to insulin signaling. This is exciting because it has the potential to be a contributing factor in the development of colorectal cancer in patients with diabetes.

  13. Linkage disequilibrium predicts physical distance in the adenomatous polyposis coli region.

    PubMed Central

    Jorde, L. B.; Watkins, W. S.; Carlson, M.; Groden, J.; Albertsen, H.; Thliveris, A.; Leppert, M.

    1994-01-01

    To test the reliability of linkage-disequilibrium analysis for gene mapping, we compared physical distance and linkage disequilibrium among seven polymorphisms in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) region on chromosome 5. Three of them lie within the APC gene, and two lie within the nearby MCC (mutated in colon cancer) gene. One polymorphism lies between the two genes, and one is likely to be 5' of MCC. Five of these polymorphisms are newly reported. All polymorphisms were typed in the CEPH kindreds, yielding 179-205 unrelated two-locus haplotypes. Linkage disequilibrium between each pair of polymorphisms is highly correlated with physical distance in this 550-kb region (correlation coefficient -.80, P < .006). This result is replicated in both the Utah and non-Utah CEPH kindreds. There is a tendency for greater disequilibrium among pairs of polymorphisms located within the same gene than among other pairs of polymorphisms. Trigenic, quadrigenic, three-locus, and four-locus disequilibrium measures were also estimated, but these measures revealed much less disequilibrium than did the two-locus disequilibrium measures. A review of 19 published disequilibrium studies, including this one, shows that linkage disequilibrium nearly always correlates significantly with physical distance in genomic regions > 50-60 kb but that it does not do so in smaller genomic regions. We show that this agrees with theoretical predictions. This finding helps to resolve controversies regarding the use of disequilibrium for inferring gene order. Disequilibrium mapping is unlikely to predict gene order correctly in regions < 50-60 kb in size but can often be applied successfully in regions of 50-500 kb or so in size. It is convenient that this is the range in which other mapping techniques, including chromosome walking and linkage mapping, become difficult. PMID:8178829

  14. Herpesvirus saimiri-mediated delivery of the adenomatous polyposis coli tumour suppressor gene reduces proliferation of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Macnab, Stuart A; Turrell, Susan J; Carr, Ian M; Markham, Alex F; Coletta, P Louise; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2011-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer-related mortality. A contributing factor to the progression of this disease is sporadic or hereditary mutation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, a negative regulator of the Wnt signalling pathway. Inherited mutations in APC cause the disorder familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), which leads to CRC development in early adulthood. However, the gene is also disrupted in some 60% of sporadic cancers. Restoration of functional APC may slow the growth of CRC by negatively regulating proliferation-associated genes such as c-myc. Therefore, we have cloned the cDNA of the APC tumour suppressor gene into a replication competent Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS)-based vector to assess APC gene delivery in SW480 and SW620 CRC cell lines. Our results demonstrate that full length APC protein was efficiently expressed from the HVS vector and that transgene expression inhibited proliferation of both the SW480 and the metastatic SW620 cancer cell lines. Moreover, a sustained effect could be observed for at least 8 weeks after initial infection in SW480 cells. In addition, monolayer wounding assays showed a marked reduction in proliferation and migration in HVS-GFP-APC infected cells. We believe that this is the first instance of infectious delivery and APC cDNA expression from a virus-based vector.

  15. Liver cell adenoma and liver cell adenomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Barthelmes, Ludger

    2005-01-01

    During the last three decades liver cell adenoma and liver cell adenomatosis have emerged as new clinical entities in hepato-logical practice due to the widespread use of oral contraceptives and increased imaging of the liver. On review of published series there is evidence that 10% of liver cell adenomas progress to hepatocellular carcinoma, diagnosis is best made by open or laparoscopic excision biopsy, and the preferred treatment modality is resection of the liver cell adenoma to prevent bleeding and malignant transformation. In liver cell adenomatosis, the association with oral contraceptive use is not as high as in solitary liver cell adenomas. The risk of malignant transformation is not increased compared with solitary liver cell adenomas. Treatment consists of close monitoring and imaging, resection of superficially located, large (>4 cm) or growing liver cell adenomas. Liver transplantation is the last resort in case of substantive concern about malignant transformation or for large, painful adenomas in liver cell adenomatosis after treatment attempts by liver resection. PMID:18333188

  16. Evidence for a novel exon in the coding region of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ling; St. Denis, K.A.; Bapat, B.

    1995-08-10

    Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene APC cause familial adenomatous polyposis. Somatic APC alterations are involved in several sporadic neoplasma, including colorectal, duodenal, gastric, and esophageal carcinoma. The APC mRNA is encoded by 15 exons. Additional transcripts have been reported, due to alternative splicing of coding as well as noncoding regions. Two mRNA isoforms occur due to a deletion of exon 7 or a partial deletion of exon 9. We have identified a novel exon, flanked by APC exons 10 and 11, which is expressed as an alternatively transcribed product of the gene. Further, we have shown that the novel exon consists of a heptad repeat motif and is conserved across species. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) regulates miR17-92 cluster through β-catenin pathway in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Lauriola, M; Kim, D; Francesconi, M; D'Uva, G; Shibata, D; Malafa, M P; Yeatman, T J; Coppola, D; Solmi, R; Cheng, J Q

    2016-09-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutation is the most common genetic change in sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). Although deregulations of miRNAs have been frequently reported in this malignancy, APC-regulated miRNAs have not been extensively documented. Here, by using an APC-inducible cell line and array analysis, we identified a total of 26 deregulated miRNAs. Among them, members of miR-17-92 cluster were dramatically inhibited by APC and induced by enforced expression of β-catenin. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated β-catenin resulted from APC loss binds to and activates the miR-17-92 promoter. Notably, enforced expression of miR-19a overrides APC tumor suppressor activity, and knockdown of miR-19a in cancer cells with compromised APC function reduced their aggressive features in vitro. Finally, we observed that expression of miR-19a significantly correlates with β-catenin levels in colorectal cancer specimens, and it is associated to the aggressive stage of tumor progression. Thus, our study reveals that miR-17-92 cluster is directly regulated by APC/β-catenin pathway and could be a potential therapeutic target in colon cancers with aberrant APC/β-catenin signaling.

  18. Molecular analysis of mutations for the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene in Romanian patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Toma, M; Cimponeriu, D; Pompilia, A; Stavarachi, M; Beluşică, L; Radu, I; Gavrilă, L

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene have not been previously characterized among Romanian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). We initiate this study to detect the mutations in APC gene in blood and tumor samples collected from 16 patients (10 men and 6 women) and blood samples from 21 first and second degree relatives of the patients. For this the presence of mutations in exons 6, 7, 12, 13, 14 as well as in regions B, L and W of exon 15 was investigated using PCR multiplex. In the same time, we have searched for 5 bp deletions at codon 1061 of APC gene by PAGE and SSCP methods. These methods allowed us to evidence identification of the presence of mutations in samples from 7 individuals. In one patient, was detected a deletion of exon 13th of APC gene both in DNA extracted from blood and tumor samples. Multiple deletions (e.g. in exon 6, 12, and in 15L and 15W regions) in DNA extracted from the tumor sample were detected, but not in DNA probe obtained from blood cells. We can speculate that these mutations are an example of genomic instability accompanying the malignancy. Till now, no mutation affecting 1061 codon of APC gene was identified in the patients investigated in our study.

  19. A CA-repeat polymorphism close to the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene offers improved diagnostic testing for familial APC

    SciTech Connect

    Spirio, L.; Nelson, L.; Ward, K.; Burt, R.; White, R.; Leppert, M. )

    1993-02-01

    Presymptomatic genetic testing for the presence of a mutant allele causing familial adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) has been difficult to perform effectively in the past because DNA markers surrounding the APC gene on chromosome 5q have not been very informative. The authors report results of genetic linkage studies on both research families and clinical families by using D5S346, a highly polymorphic dinucleotide (CA)-repeat locus 30-70 kb from the APC gene. Linkage analysis with this marker in a large APC pedigree showed an increase of at least 9.0 LOD units, in likelihood of linkage of the disease-causing allele to the APC locus, when compared with the highest LOD score attained with any other closely linked marker. When the first 14 APC families that requested genotypic analysis by the DNA Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of Utah were tested with D5S346, 20 of the 31 at-risk individuals were identified as either carriers or noncarriers of an APC-predisposing allele. The authors see this marker as an important tool for research studies and for the presymptomatic diagnosis of APC. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Wnt-7a induces presynaptic colocalization of alpha 7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and adenomatous polyposis coli in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Farías, Ginny G; Vallés, Ana S; Colombres, Marcela; Godoy, Juan A; Toledo, Enrique M; Lukas, Ronald J; Barrantes, Francisco J; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2007-05-16

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) contribute significantly to hippocampal function. Alpha7-nAChRs are present in presynaptic sites in hippocampal neurons and may influence transmitter release, but the factors that determine their presynaptic localization are unknown. We report here that Wnt-7a, a ligand active in the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, induces dissociation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein from the beta-catenin cytoplasmic complex and the interaction of APC with alpha7-nAChRs in hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, Wnt-7a induces the relocalization of APC to membranes, clustering of APC in neurites, and coclustering of APC with different, presynaptic protein markers. Wnt-7a also increases the number and size of coclusters of alpha7-nAChRs and APC in presynaptic terminals. These short-term changes in alpha7-nAChRs occur in the few minutes after ligand exposure and involve translocation to the plasma membrane without affecting total receptor levels. Longer-term exposure to Wnt-7a increases nAChR alpha7 subunit levels in an APC-independent manner and increases clusters of alpha7-nAChRs in neurites via an APC-dependent process. Together, these results demonstrate that stimulation through the canonical Wnt pathway regulates the presynaptic localization of APC and alpha7-nAChRs with APC serving as an intermediary in the alpha7-nAChR relocalization process. Modulation by Wnt signaling may be essential for alpha7-nAChR expression and function in synapses.

  1. Programmed ribosomal frameshifting in the expression of the regulator of intestinal stem cell proliferation, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)

    PubMed Central

    Barriscale, Kathy A; Firth, Andrew E; Jud, Molly C; Letsou, Anthea; Manning, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    A programmed ribosomal frameshift (PRF) in the decoding of APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) mRNA has been identified and characterized in caenorhabditis worms, Drosophila and mosquitoes. The frameshift product lacks the C-terminal approximately one-third of the product of standard decoding and instead has a short sequence encoded by the -1 frame which is just 13 residues in C. elegans, but is 125 in D. melanogaster. The frameshift site is A AAA AAC in Caenorhabditids, fruit flies and the mosquitoes studied while a variant A AAA AAA is found in some other nematodes. The predicted secondary RNA structure of the downstream stimulators varies considerably in the species studied. In the twelve sequenced Drosophila genomes, it is a long stem with a four-way junction in its loop. In the five sequenced Caenorhabditis species, it is a short RNA pseudoknot with an additional stem in loop 1. The efficiency of frameshifting varies significantly, depending on the particular stimulator within the frameshift cassette, when tested with reporter constructs in rabbit reticulocyte lysates. Phylogenetic analysis of the distribution of APC programmed ribosomal frameshifting cassettes suggests it has an ancient origin and raises questions about the possibility of synthesis of alternative protein products during expression of APC in other organisms such as humans. The origin of APC as a PRF candidate emerged from a prior study of evolutionary signatures derived from comparative analysis of the 12 fly genomes. Three other proposed PRF candidates (Xbp1, CG32736, CG14047) with switches in conservation of reading frames are likely explained by mechanisms other than PRF. PMID:21593603

  2. Association between Hepatitis C Virus Infection, p53 Phenotypes, and Gene Variants of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli in Hepatocellular Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Council, Leona N; Shanmugam, Chandrakumar; Suswam, Esther A; Katkoori, Venkat R; Heslin, Martine J; Hanna, Alex; Jhala, Nirag C; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Manne, Upender

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical value of p53 codon 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and variants of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Methods DNA and RNA from 51 HCCs and their matching, uninvolved liver tissues were analyzed for p53 mutations, and the methylation and expression of APC variants were determined. Proliferation of each HCC was assessed by Ki67 immunohistochemistry. The results were correlated with the demographic and clinicopathologic features and patient survival. Results Of 51 HCCs, 12% exhibited missense p53 mutations. SNP analysis of p53 codon 72 demonstrated the highest prevalence of the Arg/Arg (56%) phenotype, followed by Arg/Pro (33%) and Pro/Pro (11%). Four of five cases with the Pro/Pro phenotype were African Americans (AAs). All five cases with the Pro/Pro phenotype had hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, a high Ki67 index, and lower median survival (15.5 months) compared to those with Arg/Arg or Arg/Pro phenotypes (32 months). The overall frequency of APC methylation was 31%, which was found predominantly in Caucasians. There was lower mRNA expression of APC variants-2 and -3 in both HCCs and corresponding adjacent, uninvolved liver tissues as compared to APC variant-1. The expression of APC variant-3, but not variants-1 and -2, was lower in HCCs relative to uninvolved tissues. Expression of all APC variants was lower in HCCs with APC methylation relative to HCCs without APC methylation, and low expression of APC variant-2 was associated with the Pro/Pro phenotype. Conclusions These findings suggest that, for AA patients with HCCs, the p53 Pro/Pro phenotype and low expression of APC variant-2 are associated with aggressive tumor behavior, HCV infection, and poor clinical outcome. PMID:28203651

  3. Nasal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gerald A.

    1969-01-01

    A review of 313 cases of nasal polyposis indicates that there is a high incidence of recurrence in this disease. Other nasal pathology affects a significant number of these patients. Simple surgical removal of the polypi by a transnasal route is the common mode of treatment. PMID:4187956

  4. Analysis of adenomatous polyposis coli gene expression, APC locus-microsatellite instability and APC promoter methylation in the progression of melanocytic tumours.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Schlott, Thilo; Siems, Nils; Müller, Anegret; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Fischer, Gösta; Brinck, Ulrich

    2004-12-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC) defects have been demonstrated for the first time in familial adenomatous polyposis. Recent reports indicate that the APC gene is an intermediary between cell adhesion molecules and the cytoskeleton and that it may function as a gatekeeper of colonic epithelial proliferation. The objective of this study was to analyse APC's presence in lentigos, primary melanomas and melanoma metastases. By immunohistochemistry, APC was demonstrated in all lentigos, in 75 out of 88 primary melanomas and in 16 out of 28 melanoma lymphatic metastases. The percentage of immunolabelled tumour cells (APC index) in lentigos ranged between 5 and 69%, in primary melanomas between 0 and 98% and in melanoma metastases between 0 and 52%. Statistically significant differences between lentigos and primary melanomas and between lentigos and metastases in APC expression were found. In a multivariate analysis, APC showed an independent prognostic impact. Analysis of microsatellite instability in the APC locus was performed on 29 melanomas. Microsatellite instability was found in 5/29 melanomas and loss of heterozygosity in 1/29 melanomas. Promoter methylation of APC was found in 6/10 APC-negative primary melanomas and in 9/10 APC-negative melanoma lymphatic metastases investigated. We conclude about important role of APC alterations for melanoma progression.

  5. Therapy-associated polyposis – a novel form of acquired gastrointestinal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Yurgelun, Matthew B.; Hornick, Jason L.; Curry, Victoriana K.; Ukaegbu, Chinedu I.; Brown, Emily K.; Hiller, Elaine; Chittenden, Anu; Goldberg, Joel E.; Syngal, Sapna

    2014-01-01

    Survivors of childhood cancers are at increased risk of developing secondary gastrointestinal cancers, including colorectal cancer later in life, possibly due to abdominopelvic radiotherapy and/or alkylating chemotherapy exposure. Profuse gastrointestinal polyposis is associated with rare, inherited colorectal cancer predisposition syndromes, most commonly caused by mutations in the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) and MutY Homolog (MYH) genes. We report five patients with gastrointestinal polyposis developing many years after radiotherapy and chemotherapy for a childhood cancer. All had normal genetic testing of the APC and MYH genes. Childhood chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy exposure may be an unrecognized cause of acquired gastrointestinal polyposis. PMID:24362051

  6. Crystal structures of the armadillo repeat domain of adenomatous polyposis coli and its complex with the tyrosine-rich domain of Sam68.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Ella Czarina; Murayama, Kazutaka; Kato-Murayama, Miyuki; Ishizuka-Katsura, Yoshiko; Tomabechi, Yuri; Hayashi, Tomoatsu; Terada, Takaho; Handa, Noriko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Akiyama, Tetsu; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2011-10-12

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a tumor suppressor protein commonly mutated in colorectal tumors. APC plays important roles in Wnt signaling and other cellular processes. Here, we present the crystal structure of the armadillo repeat (Arm) domain of APC, which facilitates the binding of APC to various proteins. APC-Arm forms a superhelix with a positively charged groove. We also determined the structure of the complex of APC-Arm with the tyrosine-rich (YY) domain of the Src-associated in mitosis, 68 kDa protein (Sam68), which regulates TCF-1 alternative splicing. Sam68-YY forms numerous interactions with the residues on the groove and is thereby fixed in a bent conformation. We assessed the effects of mutations and phosphorylation on complex formation between APC-Arm and Sam68-YY. Structural comparisons revealed different modes of ligand recognition between the Arm domains of APC and other Arm-containing proteins.

  7. [Juvenile polyposis. A report on two cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ferran, J L; Allien, E; Broche, M; Senac, J P; Blum, M

    1979-01-01

    The discovery of multiple polypi in a small child does not necessarily indicate that this is a case of familial adenomatosis. Two cases of juvenile polyposis were confirmed by histological examinations, and their clinical and, more particularly, their radiological characteristics were studied. The only way to explore the full extent of the lesions in a satisfactory manner is by double-contrast examination of the whole colon. The authors stress the value of radiological examinations, though the frequency with which they should be carried out is open to discussion. Review of the published literature reveals that the association of true familial polyposis or adenocarcinomatosis exists in the same family or even in the same patient. Diagnostic difficulties are usually due to the fortuitons co-existence of a lymphoid hyperplasia, the significance of which is still not known.

  8. Regulation of Wnt signaling by the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli does not require the ability to enter the nucleus or a particular cytoplasmic localization.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David M; Pronobis, Mira I; Poulton, John S; Kane, Eric G; Peifer, Mark

    2012-06-01

    Wnt signaling plays key roles in development and disease. The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is an essential negative regulator of Wnt signaling. Its best-characterized role is as part of the destruction complex, targeting the Wnt effector β-catenin (βcat) for phosphorylation and ultimate destruction, but several studies suggested APC also may act in the nucleus at promoters of Wnt-responsive genes or to shuttle βcat out for destruction. Even in its role in the destruction complex, APC's mechanism of action remains mysterious. We have suggested APC positions the destruction complex at the appropriate subcellular location, facilitating βcat destruction. In this study, we directly tested APC's proposed roles in the nucleus or in precisely localizing the destruction complex by generating a series of APC2 variants to which we added tags relocalizing otherwise wild-type APC to different cytoplasmic locations. We tested these for function in human colon cancer cells and Drosophila embryos. Strikingly, all rescue Wnt regulation and down-regulate Wnt target genes in colon cancer cells, and most restore Wnt regulation in Drosophila embryos null for both fly APCs. These data suggest that APC2 does not have to shuttle into the nucleus or localize to a particular subcellular location to regulate Wnt signaling.

  9. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Tumor Suppressor Protein Has Signaling Activity in Xenopus laevis Embryos Resulting in the Induction of an Ectopic Dorsoanterior Axis

    PubMed Central

    Vleminckx, Kris; Wong, Ellen; Guger, Kathy; Rubinfeld, Bonnee; Polakis, Paul; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    1997-01-01

    Mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene are linked to both familial and sporadic human colon cancer. So far, a clear biological function for the APC gene product has not been determined. We assayed the activity of APC in the early Xenopus embryo, which has been established as a good model for the analysis of the signaling activity of the APC-associated protein β-catenin. When expressed in the future ventral side of a four-cell embryo, full-length APC induced a secondary dorsoanterior axis and the induction of the homeobox gene Siamois. This is similar to the phenotype previously observed for ectopic β-catenin expression. In fact, axis induction by APC required the availability of cytosolic β-catenin. These results indicate that APC has signaling activity in the early Xenopus embryo. Signaling activity resides in the central domain of the protein, a part of the molecule that is missing in most of the truncating APC mutations in colon cancer. Signaling by APC in Xenopus embryos is not accompanied by detectable changes in expression levels of β-catenin, indicating that it has direct positive signaling activity in addition to its role in β-catenin turnover. From these results we propose a model in which APC acts as part of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, either upstream of, or in conjunction with, β-catenin. PMID:9015311

  10. Drosophila Homologues of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) and the Formin Diaphanous Collaborate by a Conserved Mechanism to Stimulate Actin Filament Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Richa; Stepanik, Vince; Rankova, Aneliya; Molinar, Olivia; Goode, Bruce L.; McCartney, Brooke M.

    2013-01-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a large multidomain protein that regulates the cytoskeleton. Recently, it was shown that vertebrate APC through its Basic domain directly collaborates with the formin mDia1 to stimulate actin filament assembly in the presence of nucleation barriers. However, it has been unclear whether these activities extend to homologues of APC and Dia in other organisms. Drosophila APC and Dia are each required to promote actin furrow formation in the syncytial embryo, suggesting a potential collaboration in actin assembly, but low sequence homology between the Basic domains of Drosophila and vertebrate APC has left their functional and mechanistic parallels uncertain. To address this question, we purified Drosophila APC1 and Dia and determined their individual and combined effects on actin assembly using both bulk fluorescence assays and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Our data show that APC1, similar to its vertebrate homologue, bound to actin monomers and nucleated and bundled filaments. Further, Drosophila Dia nucleated actin assembly and protected growing filament barbed ends from capping protein. Drosophila APC1 and Dia directly interacted and collaborated to promote actin assembly in the combined presence of profilin and capping protein. Thus, despite limited sequence homology, Drosophila and vertebrate APCs exhibit highly related activities and mechanisms and directly collaborate with formins. These results suggest that APC-Dia interactions in actin assembly are conserved and may underlie important in vivo functions in a broad range of animal phyla. PMID:23558679

  11. LKB1-mediated spatial control of GSK3beta and adenomatous polyposis coli contributes to centrosomal forward movement and neuronal migration in the developing neocortex.

    PubMed

    Asada, Naoyuki; Sanada, Kamon

    2010-06-30

    Neuronal migration is an essential process for the development of the cerebral cortex. We have previously shown that LKB1, an evolutionally conserved polarity kinase, plays a critical role in neuronal migration in the developing neocortex. Here we show that LKB1 mediates Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK3beta to inactivate the kinase at the leading process tip of migrating neurons in the developing neocortex. This enables the microtubule plus-end binding protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) to localize at the distal ends of microtubules in the tip, thereby stabilizing microtubules near the leading edge. We also show that LKB1 activity, Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK3beta, and APC binding to the distal ends of microtubules are required for the microtubule stabilization in the leading process tip, centrosomal forward movement, and neuronal migration. These findings suggest that LKB1-induced spatial control of GSK3beta and APC at the leading process tip mediates the stabilization of microtubules within the tip and is critical for centrosomal forward movement and neuronal migration in the developing neocortex.

  12. Regulation of Wnt signaling by the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli does not require the ability to enter the nucleus or a particular cytoplasmic localization

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, David M.; Pronobis, Mira I.; Poulton, John S.; Kane, Eric G.; Peifer, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays key roles in development and disease. The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is an essential negative regulator of Wnt signaling. Its best-characterized role is as part of the destruction complex, targeting the Wnt effector β-catenin (βcat) for phosphorylation and ultimate destruction, but several studies suggested APC also may act in the nucleus at promoters of Wnt-responsive genes or to shuttle βcat out for destruction. Even in its role in the destruction complex, APC's mechanism of action remains mysterious. We have suggested APC positions the destruction complex at the appropriate subcellular location, facilitating βcat destruction. In this study, we directly tested APC's proposed roles in the nucleus or in precisely localizing the destruction complex by generating a series of APC2 variants to which we added tags relocalizing otherwise wild-type APC to different cytoplasmic locations. We tested these for function in human colon cancer cells and Drosophila embryos. Strikingly, all rescue Wnt regulation and down-regulate Wnt target genes in colon cancer cells, and most restore Wnt regulation in Drosophila embryos null for both fly APCs. These data suggest that APC2 does not have to shuttle into the nucleus or localize to a particular subcellular location to regulate Wnt signaling. PMID:22513088

  13. The two SAMP repeats and their phosphorylation state in Drosophila Adenomatous polyposis coli-2 play mechanistically distinct roles in negatively regulating Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kunttas-Tatli, Ezgi; Von Kleeck, Ryan A.; Greaves, Bradford D.; Vinson, David; Roberts, David M.; McCartney, Brooke M.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) plays a key role in regulating the canonical Wnt signaling pathway as an essential component of the β-catenin destruction complex. C-terminal truncations of APC are strongly implicated in both sporadic and familial forms of colorectal cancer. However, many questions remain as to how these mutations interfere with APC’s tumor suppressor activity. One set of motifs frequently lost in these cancer-associated truncations is the SAMP repeats that mediate interactions between APC and Axin. APC proteins in both vertebrates and Drosophila contain multiple SAMP repeats that lack high sequence conservation outside of the Axin-binding motif. In this study, we tested the functional redundancy between different SAMPs and how these domains are regulated, using Drosophila APC2 and its two SAMP repeats as our model. Consistent with sequence conservation–based predictions, we show that SAMP2 has stronger binding activity to Axin in vitro, but SAMP1 also plays an essential role in the Wnt destruction complex in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that the phosphorylation of SAMP repeats is a potential mechanism to regulate their activity. Overall our findings support a model in which each SAMP repeat plays a mechanistically distinct role but they cooperate for maximal destruction complex function. PMID:26446838

  14. Downregulation of adenomatous polyposis coli by microRNA-663 promotes odontogenic differentiation through activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Park, Min-Gyeong; Lee, Seul Ah; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Heung-Joong; Yu, Sun-Kyoung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob; Chun, Hong Sung; Park, Joo-Cheol; Kim, Do Kyung

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • miR-663 is significantly up-regulated during MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell differentiation. • miR-663 accelerates mineralization in MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells without cell proliferation. • miR-663 promotes odontoblastic cell differentiation by targeting APC and activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MDPC-23 cells. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation by inhibiting mRNA translation or by inducing its degradation. However, the role of miRNAs in odontogenic differentiation is largely unknown. In this present study, we observed that the expression of miR-663 increased significantly during differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts. Furthermore, up-regulation of miR-663 expression promoted odontogenic differentiation and accelerated mineralization without proliferation in MDPC-23 cells. In addition, target gene prediction for miR-663 revealed that the mRNA of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, which is associated with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has a miR-663 binding site in its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Furthermore, APC expressional was suppressed significantly by miR-663, and this down-regulation of APC expression triggered activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-663 promotes differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts by targeting APC-mediated activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Therefore, miR-663 can be considered a critical regulator of odontoblast differentiation and can be utilized for developing miRNA-based therapeutic agents.

  15. Identification of a novel putative gastrointestinal stem cell and adenoma stem cell marker, doublecortin and CaM kinase-like-1, following radiation injury and in adenomatous polyposis coli/multiple intestinal neoplasia mice.

    PubMed

    May, Randal; Riehl, Terrence E; Hunt, Clayton; Sureban, Sripathi M; Anant, Shrikant; Houchen, Courtney W

    2008-03-01

    In the gut, tumorigenesis arises from intestinal or colonic crypt stem cells. Currently, no definitive markers exist that reliably identify gut stem cells. Here, we used the putative stem cell marker doublecortin and CaM kinase-like-1 (DCAMKL-1) to examine radiation-induced stem cell apoptosis and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/multiple intestinal neoplasia (min) mice to determine the effects of APC mutation on DCAMKL-1 expression. Immunoreactive DCAMKL-1 staining was demonstrated in the intestinal stem cell zone. Furthermore, we observed apoptosis of the cells negative for DCAMKL-1 at 6 hours. We found DNA damage in all the cells in the crypt region, including the DCAMKL-1-positive cells. We also observed stem cell apoptosis and mitotic DCAMKL-1-expressing cells 24 hours after irradiation. Moreover, in APC/min mice, DCAMKL-1-expressing cells were negative for proliferating cell nuclear antigen and nuclear beta-catenin in normal-appearing intestine. However, beta-catenin was nuclear in DCAMKL-1-positive cells in adenomas. Thus, nuclear translocation of beta-catenin distinguishes normal and adenoma stem cells. Targeting DCAMKL-1 may represent a strategy for developing novel chemotherapeutic agents.

  16. Galangin suppresses the proliferation of β-catenin response transcription-positive cancer cells by promoting adenomatous polyposis coli/Axin/glycogen synthase kinase-3β-independent β-catenin degradation.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Jungsug; Oh, Jingyo; Cho, Munju; Bae, Soo Kyung; Song, Im-Sook; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Jeong, Yongsu; Kim, Dong-Eun; Chung, Young-Hwa; Oh, Sangtaek

    2011-06-01

    Galangin is a naturally occurring bioflavonoid with anticancer activity against certain human cancers, yet little is known about its mechanism of action. Here, we used a chemical biology approach to reveal that galangin suppresses β-catenin response transcription (CRT), which is aberrantly up-regulated in colorectal and liver cancers, by promoting the degradation of intracellular β-catenin. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activity or mutation of the GSK-3β-targeted sequence from β-catenin was unable to abrogate the galangin-mediated degradation of β-catenin. In addition, galangin down-regulated the intracellular β-catenin levels in cancer cells with inactivating mutations of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin, which are components of the β-catenin destruction complex. Galangin repressed the expression of β-catenin/T-cell factor-dependent genes, such as cyclin D1 and c-myc, and thus inhibited the proliferation of CRT-positive cancer cells. Structure-activity data indicated that the major structural requirements for galangin-mediated β-catenin degradation are hydroxyl groups at positions 3, 5, and 7. Our findings suggest that galangin exerts its anticancer activity by promoting APC/Axin/GSK-3β-independent proteasomal degradation of β-catenin.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile polyposis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of the disorder. Juvenile polyposis of infancy is characterized by polyps that occur throughout the gastrointestinal tract during infancy. Juvenile polyposis of infancy is the most severe ...

  18. An unusual case of familial adenomatous polyposis with very early symptom occurrence.

    PubMed

    Ponz de Leon, Maurizio; Bianchini, Maria Anastasia; Reggiani-Bonetti, Luca; Pedroni, Monica; Di Gregorio, Carmela; Merighi, Alberto; Rossi, Giuseppina; Magnani, Giulia; Domati, Federica; Cacciari, Alfredo

    2014-09-01

    We report the clinical case of a patient who showed an "accelerated" form of polyposis, with development of major lesions within the first decade of life. The patient belongs to a familial adenomatous polyposis family-already described in 2001-featured by profuse polyposis at an early age of onset and desmoid tumors in the majority of affected individuals (of both sexes). The family was characterized by an uncommon mutation of the APC gene (c.4391_4700del310insCACCTACTGCTGAAA, previously defined as c.4394ins15del310) consisting in a large deletion of 310 bp at codon 1,464 with duplication of the breakpoint leading to a stop codon at position 1,575. The proband was affected by desmoids tumors at the age of 3 years. In the same year (2004) numerous polyps in the large bowel and a hepatoblastoma developed. After several months new desmoids appeared in the surgical scar. In 2010, at age 9, the patient was operated of total colectomy and endorectal pull-through of the small intestine owing to profuse colorectal adenomatosis. New desmoids developed in 2011 and 2012, and required chemotherapy. Further analysis of the APC gene in the proband revealed several polymorphisms. One of these (c.398A>G) had not been previously reported, nor was present in two other affected members of the family. The clinical case, and the practical implications for therapy, are discussed according to the most recent theories of colorectal cancer development. Long-term treatment with Cox-2 inhibitors might represent a good option for this patient.

  19. Abnormal sensitivity of skin fibroblasts from familial polyposis patients to DNA alkylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Barfknecht, T.R.; Little, J.B.

    1982-04-01

    Fibroblast cell strains derived from different patients all afflicted with genetic predisposing to the development of intestinal polyposis and cancer were tested for their sensitivity to the lethal effects of the DNA alkylating agents methylmethanesulfonate (MMS), ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, and 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide. The genetic syndromes studied were: (a) adenomatosis of the colon and rectum only, an autosomal dominant trait; (b) Turcot's syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive polyposis syndrome also characterized by central nervous system tumors; and (c) Gardner's syndrome, an autosomal dominant syndrome which, in addition to intestinal polyposis, is also clinically characterized by osteomas and soft tissue tumors. Fibroblasts from a patient with Turcot's syndrome were hypersensitive to MMS, having a D0 value of 0.24 mM (p less than 0.01) versus the normal average D0 of 0.36 mM and a D10 value of 0.95 mM (p less than 0.01) compared with the normal average value of 1.3 mM. Fibroblasts from the Gardner's syndrome proband were moderately sensitive to MMS, ethyl methanesulfonate, and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine due to significant differences of D10 values of 0.60 mM (p less than 0.01), 15 mM (p less than 0.01), and 4.8 microM (p less than 0.025), respectively, versus the normal average values of 1.3 mM, 28 mM, and 9.4 microM. Fibroblasts from the clinically affected Gardner's syndrome daughter of the proband were significantly more sensitive to MMS treatment, D0 of 0.22 mM (p less than 0.01) versus the normal average D0 of 0.36 mM and a D10 of 0.97 mM (p less than 0.01) versus the normal average. This differential sensitivity to the several DNA alkylating agents suggests that different mechanisms of hypersensitivity to these chemicals may be associated with fibroblasts from the various forms of familial polyposis.

  20. Chemoprevention in familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Brian; Giardiello, Francis M

    2011-08-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) predictably leads to adenomas and eventual adenocarcinomas in the lower gastrointestinal tract and less frequently, the upper gastrointestinal tract. Chemopreventive strategies have been studied in FAP patients to delay the development of adenomas in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract, as well as to prevent recurrence of adenomas in the retained rectum of patients after prophylactic surgery with colectomy and ileorectal anastamosis (IRA). The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) sulindac and selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor celecoxib reduce polyposis of the retained rectum after colectomy with IRA. Reports of cardiovascular risks of some NSAIDs and selective COX-2 inhibitors have led to promising studies of lower doses in combination with ursodeoxycholic acid, statin, and difluoromethylornithine. Curcumin and eicosapentaenoic acid show efficacy in small clinical trials of FAP chemoprevention. This article will review the concept of chemoprevention and the current clinical literature in FAP chemoprevention.

  1. Attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis with desmoids caused by an APC mutation

    PubMed Central

    Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Komura, Mitsuhiro; Imoto, Seiya; Yamaguchi, Rui; Shimizu, Eigo; Kasuya, Shinichi; Shibuya, Tetsuo; Hatakeyama, Seira; Miyano, Satoru; Furukawa, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    We present here a case of attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis (AFAP) with a family history of desmoids and thyroid tumors. This patient had no colonic polyps but did have multiple desmoids. Genetic analysis identified a 4-bp deletion in codon 2644 (c.7932_7935delTTAT: p.Tyr2645LysfsX14) of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. In cases with limited numbers of colonic polyps and desmoids, AFAP may be caused by a mutation in the 3′ region of APC. PMID:27081525

  2. Multiple neoplasia in a 15-year-old girl with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Brasseur, Benoit; Dahan, Karin; Beauloye, Véronique; Blétard, Noella; Chantrain, Christophe; Dupont, Sophie; Guarin, Jean-Luc; Vermylen, Christiane; Brichard, Bénédicte

    2009-07-01

    A 15-year-old girl with adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC) mutation and brain tumor-polyposis syndrome developed an unusual succession of cervicocephalic tumors (medulloblastoma, meningeal low-grade myxoid tumor, and papillary thyroid carcinoma), at the age of 5, 9, and 15 years, respectively. We discuss the genetic profile of the thyroid tumor in which a large somatic deletion of APC gene was found and the physiopathology of thyroid carcinoma in patients with germline APC mutation. We also point out the uncommon phenotype in this young girl with early multiple neoplasias and the difficulties of management of such familial adenomatous polyposis patients with occurrence of extracolonic cancers that require the use of potential trigger agents as radiotherapy or chemotherapy.

  3. Current status of familial gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ioan; Gurzu, Simona; Turdean, Gligore Sabin

    2015-01-01

    Because of the rarity of familial gastrointestinal cancer-predisposing syndromes, their exploration in literature is not extensive. In this review, an update of the clinicopathological and molecular criteria of gastrointestinal familial polyposis syndromes with potential malignant transformation is performed. In addition, a guide for screening and surveillance was synthesized and a distribution of gene mutations according to the specific syndromes and geographic distribution was included. The following inherited polyposes syndromes were analyzed: familial adenomatous polyposis, the hamartomatous familial polyposes (Juvenile polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Cowden syndrome, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, neurofibromatosis type I and multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome 2B), Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and MUTYH-associated adenomatous polyposis. For proper medical care, subspecialization of gastroenterologists, pathologists, and genticists in the field of familial diseases should be introduced in the medical curriculum. PMID:26600934

  4. Pseudoexons provide a mechanism for allele-specific expression of APC in familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Taina T; Pavicic, Walter; Porkka, Noora; Kankainen, Matti; Järvinen, Heikki J; Lepistö, Anna; Peltomäki, Päivi

    2016-10-25

    Allele-specific expression (ASE) of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) gene occurs in up to one-third of families with adenomatous polyposis (FAP) that have screened mutation-negative by conventional techniques. To advance our understanding of the genomic basis of this phenomenon, 54 APC mutation-negative families (21 with classical FAP and 33 with attenuated FAP, AFAP) were investigated. We focused on four families with validated ASE and scrutinized these families by sequencing of the blood transcriptomes (RNA-seq) and genomes (WGS). Three families, two with classical FAP and one with AFAP, revealed deep intronic mutations associated with pseudoexons. In all three families, intronic mutations (c.646-1806T>G in intron 6, c.1408+729A>G in intron 11, and c.1408+731C>T in intron 11) created new splice donor sites resulting in the insertion of intronic sequences (of 127 bp, 83 bp, and 83 bp, respectively) in the APC transcript. The respective intronic mutations were absent in the remaining polyposis families and the general population. Premature stop of translation as the predicted consequence as well as co-segregation with polyposis supported the pathogenicity of the pseudoexons. We conclude that next generation sequencing on RNA and genomic DNA is an effective strategy to reveal and validate pseudoexons that are regularly missed by traditional screening methods and is worth considering in apparent mutation-negative polyposis families.

  5. Microsurgery in nasal polyposis transnasal ethmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Bagatella, F; Mazzoni, A

    1986-01-01

    Transnasal ethmoidectomy is a current treatment in selected cases of nasal polyposis, and with its complicated anatomy offers a proper opportunity for microsurgery. Ten years' experience of microsurgical ethmoidectomy in 155 patients with nasal polyposis is reported. The surgical anatomy of the ethmoid sinus is reviewed with attention to the requirements of the microsurgical approach, and the operative procedure is described. The microsurgical approach is discussed both as a part of the treatment of nasal polyposis and as a new development in rhinologic surgery. Advantages of the technique are the objective safety against risks of the ethmoid area and enhanced sense of security for the surgeon.

  6. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as “hamartomatous polyposis syndromes”, “Peutz-Jeghers syndrome”, “juvenile polyposis syndrome”, “juvenile polyp”, and “PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome” (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented. PMID:25848489

  7. APC germline mutations in families with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    De Queiroz Rossanese, Lillian Barbosa; De Lima Marson, Fernando Augusto; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Coy, Claudio Saddy Rodrigues; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia

    2013-11-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) germline mutations are responsible for the occurrence of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Somatic mutations lead to malignant transformation of adenomas. In this context, considering the significance of APC germline mutations in FAP, we aimed to identify APC germline mutations. In the present study, 20 FAP patients were enrolled. The determination of APC germline mutations was performed using sequencing, and the mutations were compared with clinical markers (gender, age at diagnosis, smoking habits, TNM stage, Astler‑Coller stage, degree of differentiation of adenocarcinoma). The data were compared using the SPSS program, with the Fisher's exact test and χ2 test, considering α=0.05. According to the main results in our sample, 16 alleles with deleterious mutations (80% of the patients) were identified while 7 (35%) patients had no deleterious mutations. There was a predominance of nonsense (45% of the patients) and frameshift (20% of the patients) mutations. There was no statistical significance between the APC germline mutations identified and the clinical variables considered in our study. Only TNM stage was associated with the presence of deleterious mutations. Patients with deleterious mutations had an OR, 0.086 (IC=0.001-0.984); TNM stage I+II in comparison with III+IV, when compared with the patients with no deleterious mutations identified. In this context, as a conclusion, we demonstrated the molecular heterogeneity of APC germline mutations in FAP and the difficulty to perform molecular diagnostics in a Brazilian population, considering the admixed population analyzed.

  8. Familial adenomatous polyposis in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Liu, Qing Wei; Li, Liang Wen; Wang, Qiang Zhi; Hong, Min; Dong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant disease with a poor prognosis, and has been studied by clinicians and geneticists in China for the past three decades. It is estimated that FAP has an incidence of between 1 in 8,000 and 1 in 10,000 individuals, and accounts for 0.94% of colorectal cancer cases in China. Recent advances in the understanding of FAP suggest that the genotype of the patient may allow for early diagnosis and surveillance, and guide surgical and chemopreventive management. However, the genetic mechanisms of FAP vary between different countries. FAP in China has its own characteristics, and this may be due to ethnic and geographical genetic variation. In the present review the clinical manifestations and genetics of FAP in China are discussed, as well as the surgical strategies, chemotherapeutics and traditional Chinese medicines used in its treatment. Increased insight into the genetic and clinical features of FAP in the Chinese population may aid in the prevention and management of the disorder. PMID:28105195

  9. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Two Lawsonia intracellularis Isolates Associated with Proliferative Hemorrhagic Enteropathy and Porcine Intestinal Adenomatosis in South Korea▿

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jung-Yong; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Aeran; Lee, Ji Youn; Hwang, Jeong-Min; Kang, Bo-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Man; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Joong-Bok

    2011-01-01

    This study represents the first published data on antimicrobial susceptibility of Asian isolates of Lawsonia intracellularis. We assessed MICs of 16 antimicrobials for two isolates of L. intracellularis recovered from diseased pigs in South Korea, one from a finisher pig with acute proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy in 2002 and the other from a grower pig with porcine intestinal adenomatosis in 2010. Tylosin and tilmicosin were found to be the most active against L. intracellularis both intracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 0.125 μg/ml, respectively) and extracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 1 μg/ml, respectively). PMID:21690283

  10. Three novel mutations of APC gene in Chinese patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Li, Xiaoxia; Li, Sen; Qu, Shengqiang; Wang, Yu; Tang, Qingzhu; Ma, Hongwei; Luo, Yang

    2016-08-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of hundreds to thousands of colonic adenomas and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), encoding a large multidomain protein involved in antagonizing the Wnt signaling pathway, has been identified as the main causative gene responsible for FAP. In this study, we identified three novel mutations as well as two recurrent mutations in the APC in five Chinese FAP families by sequencing. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that among these mutations, a nonsense mutation (c.2510C>G) and two small deletions (c.2016_2047del, c.3180_3184del) led to the truncation of the APC protein and the cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in the colorectal samples from affected individuals, respectively. Our study expands the database on mutations of APC and provides evidence to understand the function of APC in FAP.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: familial adenomatous polyposis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Järvinen HJ, Peltomäki P. The complex genotype-phenotype relationship in familial adenomatous polyposis. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. ... healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright ...

  12. Transnasal microsurgical ethmoidectomy in nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Bagatella, F; Mazzoni, A

    1980-03-01

    A technique of microsurgical ethmoidectomy by a nasal route was devised for and applied to the treatment of nasal polyposis. A description of the operative procedure and the results in 30 cases with a 3-5 years of follow-up are reported.

  13. Repurposing the FDA-Approved Pinworm Drug Pyrvinium as a Novel Chemotherapeutic Agent for Intestinal Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Giambelli, Camilla; Fei, Dennis Liang; Han, Lu; Hang, Brian I.; Bai, Feng; Pei, Xin-Hai; Nose, Vania; Burlingame, Oname; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Orton, Darren; Lee, Ethan; Robbins, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the WNT-pathway regulator ADENOMATOUS POLYPOSIS COLI (APC) promote aberrant activation of the WNT pathway that is responsible for APC-associated diseases such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and 85% of spontaneous colorectal cancers (CRC). FAP is characterized by multiple intestinal adenomas, which inexorably result in CRC. Surprisingly, given their common occurrence, there are few effective chemotherapeutic drugs for FAP. Here we show that the FDA-approved, anti-helminthic drug Pyrvinium attenuates the growth of WNT-dependent CRC cells and does so via activation of CK1α. Furthermore, we show that Pyrvinium can function as an in vivo inhibitor of WNT-signaling and polyposis in a mouse model of FAP: APCmin mice. Oral administration of Pyrvinium, a CK1α agonist, attenuated the levels of WNT-driven biomarkers and inhibited adenoma formation in APCmin mice. Considering its well-documented safe use for treating enterobiasis in humans, our findings suggest that Pyrvinium could be repurposed for the clinical treatment of APC-associated polyposes. PMID:25003333

  14. Phenotypic markers in human skin fibroblasts as possible diagnostic indices of hereditary adenomatosis of the colon and rectum.

    PubMed

    Kopelovich, L

    1977-11-01

    Hereditary adenomatosis of the colon and rectum (ACR) and its Gardner's syndrome variant, an autosomal dominant trait, indicate a propensity for neoplasia. The present study describes the growth abnormalities of cultured human skin fibroblasts derived from normal-appearing cutaneous biopsies of ACR genotypes and a portion of the clinically asymptomatic ACR progeny, first filial generation, and their differential susceptibility to transformation by Kirsten murine sarcoma virus. These skin fibroblasts, but not cells derived from unaffected individuals, showed lack of contact inhibition, decreased serum requirement for growth, elevated levels of plasminogen activator, and alterations in the intracellular distribution of actin cables; they did not, however, grow in the absence of anchorage, nor did they form palpable tumors in congenitally athymic BALB/c nu/nu mice, and they were normal with regard to cholesterol feedback regulation. Skin fibroblasts from ACR subjects were 100- to 1000-fold more susceptible to transformation by the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus than were normal cells. The virally transformed skin fibroblasts were anchorage-independent and formed tumors in athymic mice. These growth abnormalities represent steps in the changing phenotypic expression of cells undergoing neoplastic transformation. Identification of abnormal expressions associated with oncogenesis may facilitate their use as diagnostic indices for the detection of latent forms of colon cancer in man.

  15. Multiple endocrine adenomatosis with Cushing's disease and the amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome responsive to proton beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Veseley, D.L.; Fass, F.H.

    1981-09-01

    Multiple endocrine adenomatosis (MEA) or neoplasia is a hereditary disorder consisting of tumors of hyperplasia of several endocrine glands. In MEA-1 the pituitary, parathyroids, and pancreatic islets are most frequently involved, while in MEA-2 the thyroid (medullary carcinoma of the thyroid), parathyroids,and adrenals (pheochromocytomas) are the endocrine glands most likely to be involved. Cushings's syndrome may occur in MEA-1 and has also been found in patients with MEA-2, where the cause of Cushing's syndrome is usually ectopic ACTH production from medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. Recently, there have been reports of amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome in patients with MEA-1, and confirmation that hyperprolactinemia is associated with this syndrom has been found in patients with MEA-1. The present report details a patient who has been followed up for 20 years since she first presented with amenorrhea and galactorrhea. Ten years after first being seen she was noted to have Cushing's syndrom and hyperparathyroidism due to parathyroid hyperplasia. Both the amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome and Cushing's sydrome disappeared with proton beam irradiation to the pituitary.

  16. Dispelling misconceptions in the management of familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Chittleborough, Timothy J; Warrier, Satish K; Heriot, Alexander G; Kalady, Matthew; Church, James

    2017-03-07

    Patients with familial adenomatous polyposis require surgical intervention at some point in their lives. The diagnosis is often apparent from their phenotype and family history, however, this is not always the case. Many factors can influence the surgical strategy although the polyposis burden and distribution remain the main consideration. While prophylactic removal of the rectum and colon is often required, sparing the rectum at the index surgery is safe in select patients. This article aims to dispel misconceptions in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

  17. [Intraabdominal desmoid tumors in familial adenomatous polyposis].

    PubMed

    Galletto, Paula; Leoz, Maria Liz; Castells, Antoni; Balaguer, Francesc

    2013-11-01

    Desmoid tumors are currently the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. More than 10% of these patients will develop these tumors during their lifetime and more than a third will suffer their consequences. The main risk factors for their development are female sex and abdominal surgery. The most frequent localization is intraabdominal. The therapeutic approach to these tumors has changed, and the surgical treatment of choice is currently the subject of debate. If a watch and wait approach is adopted, more than 50% of tumors will prove to be indolent. Therefore, the therapeutic strategy should be based on clinical presentation and should be decided by a multidisciplinary team working in a center with experience of these tumors. The present article proposes a prognostic classification to guide the therapeutic approach.

  18. Familial adenomatous polyposis and extracolonic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lynch, H T; Thorson, A G; McComb, R D; Franklin, B A; Tinley, S T; Lynch, J F

    2001-11-01

    Our purpose is to focus attention on the cancer family history, coupled with an understanding of the natural history and extracolonic tumor spectrum of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), through a family study. This family report provides an example of how colorectal cancer (CRC) can be prevented by knowledgeable gastroenterologists and colorectal surgeons who educate and compassionately counsel members of high-risk families so that their compliance with diagnostic screening and, ultimately, with protection through prophylactic colectomy, is achieved. A working pedigree of this extended family was constructed through interviews with the proband, followed by questionnaires sent to all primary and secondary relatives. Appropriately signed permission forms enabled us to secure pertinent medical and pathology records in order to ensure accuracy of historical information. Integral extracolonic tumors included medulloblastoma, papillary thyroid carcinoma, hepatoblastoma, and desmoid tumors. We conclude that, due in part to improved longevity as a result of being spared CRC, several family members have developed certain FAP integral extracolonic cancers.

  19. Clinical outcomes of gastric polyps and neoplasms in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Keiko; Nonaka, Satoru; Nakajima, Takeshi; Yachida, Tatsuo; Abe, Seiichiro; Sakamoto, Taku; Suzuki, Haruhisa; Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Oda, Ichiro; Matsuda, Takahisa; Sekine, Shigeki; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Katai, Hitoshi; Saito, Yutaka; Hirota, Seiichi

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant syndrome caused by a germline mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, characterized by the presence of more than 100 adenomatous polyps in the colorectum. The upper gastrointestinal tract is an extracolonic site for malignancy in patients with FAP. The frequency of death in Japanese patients with FAP because of gastric cancer is 2.8 % and that because of colon cancer is 60.6 %. Few studies have reported upper gastrointestinal diseases in patients with FAP. In the present study, we investigated the clinical outcomes of patients with FAP diagnosed with gastric neoplasms. Patients and methods We enrolled 80 patients with FAP who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy from October 1997 to December 2011. We investigated patient characteristics, endoscopic findings of gastric lesions, treatment outcomes, and long-term courses. Results Fundic gland polyposis was observed in 51 patients (64 %) and gastric neoplasms in 22 patients (28 %), including 20 with non-invasive and 2 with invasive neoplasm. Of the 26 neoplasms, 11 were treated by endoscopic resection (ER) and 4 by surgical resection. Metachronous gastric neoplasms were observed in 7 patients (15 lesions) and treated by ER, except for in 1 patient. No patients died of gastric lesions during a median follow-up period of 6.5 years (range, 0 – 14). Conclusion Because gastric lesions including gastric cancers in patients with FAP did not cause any deaths, they can be considered to have favorable prognoses. Early detection of gastric neoplasms through an appropriate follow-up interval may have contributed to these good outcomes. PMID:28271094

  20. Clinical outcomes of gastric polyps and neoplasms in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keiko; Nonaka, Satoru; Nakajima, Takeshi; Yachida, Tatsuo; Abe, Seiichiro; Sakamoto, Taku; Suzuki, Haruhisa; Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Oda, Ichiro; Matsuda, Takahisa; Sekine, Shigeki; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Katai, Hitoshi; Saito, Yutaka; Hirota, Seiichi

    2017-03-01

    Background and study aims Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant syndrome caused by a germline mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, characterized by the presence of more than 100 adenomatous polyps in the colorectum. The upper gastrointestinal tract is an extracolonic site for malignancy in patients with FAP. The frequency of death in Japanese patients with FAP because of gastric cancer is 2.8 % and that because of colon cancer is 60.6 %. Few studies have reported upper gastrointestinal diseases in patients with FAP. In the present study, we investigated the clinical outcomes of patients with FAP diagnosed with gastric neoplasms. Patients and methods We enrolled 80 patients with FAP who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy from October 1997 to December 2011. We investigated patient characteristics, endoscopic findings of gastric lesions, treatment outcomes, and long-term courses. Results Fundic gland polyposis was observed in 51 patients (64 %) and gastric neoplasms in 22 patients (28 %), including 20 with non-invasive and 2 with invasive neoplasm. Of the 26 neoplasms, 11 were treated by endoscopic resection (ER) and 4 by surgical resection. Metachronous gastric neoplasms were observed in 7 patients (15 lesions) and treated by ER, except for in 1 patient. No patients died of gastric lesions during a median follow-up period of 6.5 years (range, 0 - 14). Conclusion Because gastric lesions including gastric cancers in patients with FAP did not cause any deaths, they can be considered to have favorable prognoses. Early detection of gastric neoplasms through an appropriate follow-up interval may have contributed to these good outcomes.

  1. Localization of the genetic defect in familial adenomatous polyposis within a small region of chromosome 5

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yusuke; Lathrop, Mark; Leppert, Mark; Dobbs, Marc; Wasmuth, John; Wolff, Erica; Carlson, Mary; Fujimoto, Esther; Krapcho, Karen; Sears, Tena; Woodward, Scott; Hughes, J.; Burt, Randy; Gardner, Eldon; Lalouel, Jean-Marc; White, Ray

    1988-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), a Mendelian disorder that includes familial polyposis coli (FPC) and Gardner syndrome (GS), has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. It is characterized by hundreds to thousands of adenomatous polyps that can progress to carcinoma of the colon, suggesting that the gene that harbors the FAP germ-line mutation may play an important role in the somatic genetic pathway to colon cancer. The defect responsible for FAP was recently mapped to the long arm of chromosome 5 by linkage between the FPC phenotype and a locus defined by DNA probe pC11p11 (D5S71), located at 5q21–22. Because an important next step in the paradigm for identification of a disease gene is to obtain a more precise localization, we isolated and mapped by linkage six additional polymorphic DNA markers in the FAP region. Subsequent linkage analysis in six pedigrees, three having the FPC phenotype and three segregating GS, placed the FAP locus very close to a new marker, YN5.48 (D5S81), that is approximately 17 centimorgans distal to C11p11 on the genetic map. The analysis revealed no evidence of genetic heterogeneity between the two phenotypes, a question that had not been clearly resolved by the earlier studies. The new set of markers in the near vicinity of the FAP locus represents a further step toward isolation of the genetic defect and provides the opportunity for preclinical diagnosis of risk status for colon cancer among individuals in families that are segregating adenomatous polyposis. PMID:2903664

  2. Cribriform variant papillary thyroid cancer: a characteristic of familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Fenton, P A; Clarke, S E; Owen, W; Hibbert, J; Hodgson, S V

    2001-02-01

    Inherited cancer syndromes may predispose to more than one type of cancer, and these characteristically develop at an earlier age than their sporadic counterparts. The occurrence in a single individual of multiple, early onset primary cancers may indicate an inherited cancer susceptibility. Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), an autosomal, dominantly inherited susceptibility to colorectal adenomas and cancer also predisposes to childhood medulloblastomas and to a specific rare histologic type (cribriform variant) of papillary thyroid cancer. We describe a patient who developed a childhood medulloblastoma of the cerebellum, and subsequently a cribriform papillary thyroid cancer. These cancers predated the diagnosis of FAP in this patient, who was later found to have several relatives with FAP. The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutation delineated in this family was in the region associated with those causing an increased risk of thyroid cancer. We submit that the diagnosis of the cribriform variant of papillary thyroid cancer in a young individual, especially after a previous cancer diagnosis, should alert the physician to the possibility of a diagnosis of FAP.

  3. Celecoxib and tauro-ursodeoxycholic acid co-treatment inhibits cell growth in familial adenomatous polyposis derived LT97 colon adenoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Heumen, Bjorn W.H. van; Roelofs, Hennie M.J.; Morsche, Rene H.M. te; Marian, Brigitte; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Peters, Wilbert H.M.

    2012-04-15

    Chemoprevention would be a desirable strategy to avoid duodenectomy in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) suffering from duodenal adenomatosis. We investigated the in vitro effects on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and COX-2 expression of the potential chemopreventives celecoxib and tauro-ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). HT-29 colon cancer cells and LT97 colorectal micro-adenoma cells derived from a patient with FAP, were exposed to low dose celecoxib and UDCA alone or in combination with tauro-cholic acid (CA) and tauro-chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), mimicking bile of FAP patients treated with UDCA. In HT-29 cells, co-treatment with low dose celecoxib and UDCA resulted in a decreased cell growth (14-17%, p < 0.01). A more pronounced decrease (23-27%, p < 0.01) was observed in LT97 cells. Cell growth of HT-29 cells exposed to 'artificial bile' enriched with UDCA, was decreased (p < 0.001), either in the absence or presence of celecoxib. In LT97 cells incubated with 'artificial bile' enriched with UDCA, cell growth was decreased only in the presence of celecoxib (p < 0.05). No clear evidence was found for involvement of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, caspase-3, or COX-2 in the cellular processes leading to the observed changes in cell growth. In conclusion, co-treatment with low dose celecoxib and UDCA has growth inhibitory effects on colorectal adenoma cells derived from a patient with FAP, and further research on this combination as promising chemopreventive strategy is desired. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Celecoxib and UDCA acid co-treatment decreases cell growth in colon tumor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UDCA enriched 'artificial bile' decreases LT-97 cell growth only in presence of celecoxib. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCNA, caspase-3, nor COX-2 seem to be involved in the observed changes in cell growth.

  4. Tumor suppressor genes in familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Eshghifar, Nahal; Farrokhi, Naser; Naji, Tahereh; Zali, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is mostly due to a series of genetic alterations that are being greatly under the influence of the environmental factors. These changes, mutational or epigenetic modifications at transcriptional forefront and/or post-transcriptional effects via miRNAs, include inactivation and the conversion of proto-oncogene to oncogenes, and/or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSG). Here, a thorough review was carried out on the role of TSGs with the focus on the APC as the master regulator, mutated genes and mal-/dysfunctional pathways that lead to one type of hereditary form of the CRC; namely familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). This review provides a venue towards defining candidate genes that can be used as new PCR-based markers for early diagnosis of FAP. In addition to diagnosis, defining the modes of genetic alterations will open door towards genome editing to either suppress the disease or reduce its progression during the course of action. PMID:28331559

  5. Association of hyperplastic polyposis syndrome, colorectal cancer and meningioma.

    PubMed

    Muzaffar, Mahvish; Irlam, John; Mohamed, Iman

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has provided compelling evidence that a subset of hyperplastic polyps may be associated with a risk of colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer with extracolonic manifestation is usually seen in a hereditary syndrome setting, but some association with meningioma has been reported. The association of colorectal cancer with hyperplastic polyposis and meningioma is extremely rare. This report in a 57-year-old female with no family history of colon cancer or polyps, could be the first case of hyperplastic polyposis syndrome, colorectal cancer and meningioma. Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome was diagnosed as per WHO criteria at the time of colon cancer diagnosis. Within 4 months of colon cancer diagnosis she developed seizures. Imaging of the brain revealed meningioma of the left cerebellopontine angle. The patient underwent surgery followed by chemotherapy.

  6. Isolated diffuse hyperplastic gastric polyposis presenting with severe anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardena, Suriya; Anandacoomaraswamy, Dharshan; Burzyantseva, Olga; Abdullah, Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Gastric polyps exist in a wide variety of types, most of which are small and often benign. Discovery of gastric polyps during Endoscopy necessitates biopsies. Case presentation We present a case report of an isolated diffuse hyperplastic gastric polyposis in a 26 years old Hispanic female when she was investigated for profound anemia. The Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed numerous gastric polyps filling the entire stomach. She was treated with near-total gastrectomy and her anemia resolved Conclusion Isolated diffuse hyperplasic gastric polyposis with normal gastrin level is a rare entity and can present with severe anemia. PMID:18755016

  7. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  8. Map syndrome (MYH Associated Polyposis) colorectal cancer, etiopathological connections

    PubMed Central

    Ion, D; Stoian, RV; Serban, MB

    2011-01-01

    The case presented raised our scientific curiosity and it is worthy of being brought in front of the medical audience because of several reasons presented below. Presently, there are 3 hereditary syndromes that have a demonstrated etiological relationship with the colorectal cancer: Familiar Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP syndrome), HNPCC syndrome (Hereditary Nonpoliposis Colorectal Cancer) and MAP syndrome. Discovered only in 2002, the MAP syndrome (MYH associated polyposis) is the first hereditary syndrome that has autosomal recessive transmission. The APC gene can be mutated in several ways during the colonic oncogenesis: congenital in the FAP syndrome, somatic in sporadic colorectal cancers and secondary to the MYH gene inactivation in MAP syndrome. MAP phenotype is similar to the FAP phenotype because of the somatic mutations to the APC gene. Colonic polyposis is lower than FAP syndrome and appeared later, in the 40's and 50's. Colorectal cancers are frequent and discovered in the same moment as the colonic polyposis. Patients are diagnosed mostly in cancer stages. Colonoscopy shows polyps disseminated around the entire colic frame. Treatment in these cases is total rectocolectomy with ileoanal anastomosis. When working in a general emergency surgery clinic, physicians are often faced with colorectal cancers in different evolutive stages, and mostly they are faced with their complications. PMID:21505584

  9. A survey of phenotypic features in juvenile polyposis.

    PubMed Central

    Desai, D C; Murday, V; Phillips, R K; Neale, K F; Milla, P; Hodgson, S V

    1998-01-01

    Solitary juvenile polyps are quite frequent in children, but juvenile polyposis (JP) is a rare autosomal dominant trait characterised by the occurrence of numerous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract. Extracolonic phenotypic abnormalities are well documented in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and can allow a clinical diagnosis to be made before the bowel pathology becomes available. Though described, characteristic extracolonic abnormalities have not been clearly defined in juvenile polyposis. We sought to determine whether there are consistent extracolonic phenotypic abnormalities in JP patients and how frequently this would allow diagnosis of one of the genetic syndromes known to be associated with juvenile polyposis. Twenty-two JP patients underwent clinical examination and data from one patient were obtained from case notes. Those consenting to further investigations had x rays of the skull, chest, and hands and an echocardiogram if clinically indicated. Significant extracolonic phenotypic abnormalities were present in 18 patients (14 male and four female), and included dermatological (13), skeletal (16), neurological (5), cardiopulmonary (4), gastrointestinal (3), genitourinary (4), and ocular (1) features. In five patients the diagnosis of a genetic syndrome was possible: two had Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, two had Gorlin syndrome, and one had hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, also known as Osler-Rendu-Weber syndrome). Other patients had some features of these conditions and of Cowden and Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndromes, but these were not sufficient to allow a definitive diagnosis. Images PMID:9643289

  10. Adenomatous Polyposis in a Young Jamaican Male of African Descent

    PubMed Central

    Alfred, R; Mills, M

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of adenomatous polyposis in a 20-year old African Jamaican male. This is to highlight the importance of aggressively investigating unexplained recurrent anaemia in the young and the impact of psychosocial issues that arise in managing such a patient. PMID:25303258

  11. Rhinosinusal Polyposis and Inverted Papilloma: A Morphometric Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Gabriel Costa; Fujise, Luciana Harumi; Fernandes, Atílio Maximino; Azoubel, Reinaldo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Nasal obstruction is one of the main rhinologic complaints, and two diseases must be investigated as differential diagnosis: rhinosinusal polyposis and inverted papilloma. Using traditional methods, the differential diagnosis between these diseases may be difficult. The morphometric study may be a useful tool for differential diagnosis and to define prognosis. Objective Calculate the morphometric values of rhinosinusal polyposis and inverted papilloma and compare the average of variables obtained between the groups. Methods The nasal mucus of 10 patients who had surgery in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Surgery of Head and Neck was studied; 5 had rhinosinusal polyposis and 5 had inverted papilloma. After the capture and print of corresponding data of each slide, the largest and smallest diameters of the nuclei were measured and the morphometric variables were calculated: average diameter, perimeter, ratio between largest and smallest diameter, volume, area, ratio of volume to area, form coefficient, contour index, and eccentricity. Results We found a significant difference (p < 0.05) between the two groups in the following morphometric variables: largest diameter, smallest diameter, average diameter, volume, area, perimeter, and ratio of volume to area, indicating that these parameters can be useful in diagnostic differentiation between these diseases. Conclusion We founded morphometric variables higher in patients with inverted papilloma, which can be related to the neoplastic origin of the inverted papilloma. The analysis of nuclear parameters is an instrument of great value in the differential diagnosis between rhinosinusal polyposis and inverted papilloma. PMID:26157491

  12. [Endonasal ethmoidectomy in the treatment of nasal sinus polyposis].

    PubMed

    Chevalier, D; Darras, J A; Sarini, J; Piquet, J J

    1995-01-01

    Endonasal surgery of paranasal polyposis. Two hundred and fifty one microscopical sphenoethmoidectomies with a major complication rate of 2.6% are reported. Long term results are analysed. Nasal obstruction disappears in 96% and persists in 70% of the cases 5 years later. Through topical steroid therapy and surgical experience polyp recurrence rate is reduced to 30%.

  13. [Nasosinusal polyposis and aspirin intolerance. Fernand Widal-Lermoyez syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wayoff, M; Moneret-Vautrin, D; Gazel, P

    1979-01-01

    The authors describe the clinical picture of the aspirin idiosyncrasy and propose to call this peculiar entity: syndrom of Widal and Lermoyez. They compare 25 cases of aspirin nasal polyposis with 26 other cases of various etiologies. Other substances than aspirin seem to be charged. The complications are regular with severe asthma and infection. The pathogenesis is discussed, excluding an allergic mechanism; it remain not quite clear. Essentially prophylactic, the treatment is poor and difficult.

  14. [Spheno-ethmoidectomy in recurrent nasal polyposis. Technic, indications, results].

    PubMed

    Goubert, J L; Thomassin, J M; Zanaret, M; Triglia, J M; Besson, J; Banis, C; Cannoni, M; Pech, A

    1987-01-01

    Spheno-ethmoidectomy can be legitimately included within the therapeutic schema for nasosinusal polyposis causing incapacity and resistant to medical treatment. Benefiting from recent technical progress, a very precise medical therapeutic framework and improved knowledge of ethmoid surgical anatomy, a marked reduction in complications of this operation has been observed. Results of a series of 175 ethmoidectomies performed in 90 patients confirm the good results reported in the literature, even though follow up is still insufficient.

  15. Familial adenomatous polyposis in pediatrics: natural history, emerging surveillance and management protocols, chemopreventive strategies, and areas of ongoing debate.

    PubMed

    Septer, Seth; Lawson, Caitlin E; Anant, Shrikant; Attard, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a hereditary condition with a near 100 % lifetime risk of colorectal cancer without prophylactic colectomy. Most patients with FAP have a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene on chromosome 5q22. This condition frequently presents in children with polyps developing most frequently in the second decade of life and surveillance colonoscopy is required starting at age ten. Polyps are found not only in the colon, but in the stomach and duodenum. Knowledge of the natural history of FAP is important as there are several extra-colonic sequelae which also require surveillance. In infants and toddlers, there is an increased risk of hepatoblastoma, while in teenagers and adults duodenal carcinomas, desmoid tumors, thyroid cancer and medulloblastoma are more common in FAP than in the general population. Current chemopreventive strategies include several medications and natural products, although to this point there is no consensus on the most efficacious and safe agent. Genetic counseling is an important part of the diagnostic process for FAP. Appropriate use and interpretation of genetic testing is best accomplished with genetic counselor involvement as many families also have concerns regarding future insurability or discrimination when faced with genetic testing.

  16. Intranasal ethmoidectomy in nasal polyposis in children. Indications and results.

    PubMed

    Triglia, J M; Dessi, P; Cannoni, M; Pech, A

    1992-03-01

    Nasal polyposis in children is a rare pathology that is difficult to treat, with results that are often disappointing. The aim of this paper is focused on the surgical possibilities of ethmoidectomy by endonasal approach. Thirty-nine ethmoidectomies were performed in 24 children with a mean age of 12 years (cystic fibrosis, n = 7; Woakes' syndrome, n = 2; isolated polyposis, n = 15). The decision for surgical treatment was based upon the severity of initial symptoms, principally nasal obstruction, lack of improvement after medical treatment, and the assurance of good surgical follow-up. Twenty-three children were followed up for a mean of 3 years. Complete recurrence was noted in 13% of the cases (n = 3). In all the other cases, including those with partial recurrence, the lives of the children were transformed. Ethmoidectomy by endonasal approach is reliable if the appropriate surgical techniques are strictly followed. It has proven its efficacy in children with nasal polyposis with results that are very encouraging compared to previously proposed therapies.

  17. IL-33 activates tumor stroma to promote intestinal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Maywald, Rebecca L.; Doerner, Stephanie K.; Pastorelli, Luca; De Salvo, Carlo; Benton, Susan M.; Dawson, Emily P.; Lanza, Denise G.; Berger, Nathan A.; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Nadeau, Joseph H.; Pizarro, Theresa T.; Heaney, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor epithelial cells develop within a microenvironment consisting of extracellular matrix, growth factors, and cytokines produced by nonepithelial stromal cells. In response to paracrine signals from tumor epithelia, stromal cells modify the microenvironment to promote tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we identify interleukin 33 (IL-33) as a regulator of tumor stromal cell activation and mediator of intestinal polyposis. In human colorectal cancer, IL-33 expression was induced in the tumor epithelium of adenomas and carcinomas, and expression of the IL-33 receptor, IL1RL1 (also referred to as IL1-R4 or ST2), localized predominantly to the stroma of adenoma and both the stroma and epithelium of carcinoma. Genetic and antibody abrogation of responsiveness to IL-33 in the ApcMin/+ mouse model of intestinal tumorigenesis inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, and suppressed angiogenesis in adenomatous polyps, which reduced both tumor number and size. Similar to human adenomas, IL-33 expression localized to tumor epithelial cells and expression of IL1RL1 associated with two stromal cell types, subepithelial myofibroblasts and mast cells, in ApcMin/+ polyps. In vitro, IL-33 stimulation of human subepithelial myofibroblasts induced the expression of extracellular matrix components and growth factors associated with intestinal tumor progression. IL-33 deficiency reduced mast cell accumulation in ApcMin/+ polyps and suppressed the expression of mast cell-derived proteases and cytokines known to promote polyposis. Based on these findings, we propose that IL-33 derived from the tumor epithelium promotes polyposis through the coordinated activation of stromal cells and the formation of a protumorigenic microenvironment. PMID:25918379

  18. Adenomas of the common bile duct in familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mao-Lin; Pan, Jun-Yong; Bai, Yan-Nan; Lai, Zhi-De; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Yao-Dong

    2015-03-14

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or Gardner's syndrome is often accompanied by adenomas of the stomach and duodenum. We experienced a case of adenomas of the common bile duct in a 40-year-old woman with FAP presenting with acute cholangitis. Only 8 cases of adenomas or adenocarcinoma of the common bile duct have been reported in the literature in patients with FAP or Gardner's syndrome. Those patients presented with acute cholangitis or pancreatitis. Local excision or Whipple procedure may be the reasonable surgical option.

  19. Oxidative DNA damage drives carcinogenesis in MUTYH-associated-polyposis by specific mutations of mitochondrial and MAPK genes.

    PubMed

    Venesio, Tiziana; Balsamo, Antonella; Errichiello, Edoardo; Ranzani, Guglielmina N; Risio, Mauro

    2013-10-01

    MUTYH is a DNA-base-excision-repair gene implicated in the activation of nuclear and mitochondrial cell-death pathways. MUTYH germline mutations cause an inherited polyposis, MUTYH-associated-polyposis, characterized by multiple adenomas and increased susceptibility to colorectal cancer. Since this carcinogenesis remains partially unknown, we searched for nuclear and mitochondrial gene alterations that may drive the tumorigenic process. Ninety-six adenomas and 7 carcinomas from 12 MUTYH-associated-polyposis and 13 classical/attenuated adenomatous polyposis patients were investigated by sequencing and pyrosequencing for the presence of mutations in KRAS, BRAF, MT-CO1/MT-CO2 and MT-TD genes. KRAS mutations were identified in 24% MUTYH-associated-polyposis vs 15% classical/attenuated familial polyposis adenomas; mutated MUTYH-associated-polyposis adenomas exhibited only c.34G>T transversions in codon 12, an alteration typically associated with oxidative DNA damage, or mutations in codon 13; neither of these mutations was found in classical/attenuated familial polyposis adenomas (P<0.001). Mutated MUTYH-associated-polyposis carcinomas showed KRAS c.34G>T transversions, prevalently occurring with BRAFV600E; none of the classical/attenuated familial polyposis carcinomas displayed these alterations. Comparing mitochondrial DNA from lymphocytes and adenomas of the same individuals, we detected variants in 82% MUTYH-associated-polyposis vs 38% classical/attenuated familial polyposis patients (P=0.040). MT-CO1/MT-CO2 missense mutations, which cause aminoacid changes, were only found in MUTYH-associated-polyposis lesions and were significantly associated with KRAS mutations (P=0.0085). We provide evidence that MUTYH-associated-polyposis carcinogenesis is characterized by the occurrence of specific mutations in both KRAS and phylogenetically conserved genes of mitochondrial DNA which are involved in controlling oxidative phosphorylation; this implies the existence of a

  20. Cribiform variant of papillary thyroid cancer and familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Perea del Pozo, E.; Ramirez Plaza, C.; Padillo Ruiz, J.; Martos Martínez, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome characterised by the progressive development of multiple colorectal adenomatous polyps and an increased incidence of colorectal carcinoma. It is often accompanied by other benign or malignant extracolonic manifestations, including gastric and duodenal tumours, osteomas, desmoid tumours, retinal pigmentation, and thyroid and adrenocortical tumours Methods and results We report the case of a 42-year-old white female with FAP who was referred to our Endocrine Surgery Unit for surgery because of a palpable mass in the left side of the neck. An ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy showed a cribriform-morular variant (CMV) of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The incidence, clinical presentation, histology and treatment options for this rare histological subtype are discussed. Conclusions The diagnosis of CMV of PTC is very strongly related to the FAP syndrome and must be suspected when a thyroid node appears in FAP patients. Likewise, any patient without known FAP who presents this histology in a surgically biopsied or resected thyroid node should undergo total colonoscopy for screening of colonic polyposis and genetic study of the APC gene sequence. PMID:26521198

  1. Multiple intestinal lymphomatous polyposis in a Jindo dog

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Da-Hee; Do, Sun-Hee; Hong, Il-Hwa; Yang, Hai-Jie; Yuan, Dong-Wei; Choi, Dong-Hag

    2006-01-01

    A male, 5-year-old Jindo dog underwent enterectomy and enteroanastomosis due to ileus of the intestine at a local veterinary hospital. Grossly, the excised intestine showed markedly thickened multinodular masses in the serosal layer of the upper part, and soft-to-firm, cream-colored neoplastic masses that displayed extensive nodular mucosal protuberances into the lumen. The neoplastic masses were filled with large round cells that were ovoid in shape and they had pale and/or hyperchromatic nuclei. The neoplastic cells had mainly infiltrated into the mucosal and submucosal layers, and they had diffusely invaded the muscular and serosal layers. Therefore, the diagnosis of canine multiple intestinal malignant lymphomatous polyposis was made based on the gross and histopathological findings. The origin of these tumor cells was determined to be B-cells since they were positive for anti-CD20. PMID:17106235

  2. Effects of Preoperative Clarithromycin Administration in Patients with Nasal Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Perić, A; Baletić, N; Milojević, M; Sotirović, J; Živić, L; Perić, AV; Vojvodić, D

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: In recent years, various investigators have shown considerable interest in the use of macrolide antibiotics for treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effects of preoperative long-term, low-dose clarithromycin administration in patients with nasal polyposis. Methods: Eighty nasal polyp patients (42 non-atopic and 38 atopic) were included in this prospective, non-placebo controlled investigation and randomized equally to either the combined clarithromycin-surgical or surgical group. Forty patients received 500 mg of clarithromycin daily for eight weeks, and, after evaluation, they were treated by functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). The other 40 patients were treated only surgically. The nasal symptom scores and endoscopic scores after macrolide treatment/surgical treatment, and after six and 12 months of follow-up were evaluated. Results: After clarithromycin therapy, we found improvement in symptom scores in 25/40, and improvement in endoscopic scores in 19/40 patients. We found no significant difference in nasal symptom score between allergic and non-allergic patients regarding the outcome to macrolide (p = 0.352) or surgical treatment (p = 0.396). When we compared differences between endoscopic scores at the time points of 12 months and six months postoperatively (ESt12 minus ESt6), we found statistically lower differences in the clarithromycin-surgery group than in the surgery group (p = 0.006). Conclusion: Preoperative clarithromycin administration postponed nasal polyp relapse after FESS. Allergies have no influence on the clinical efficacy of clarithromycin therapy and on the efficacy of FESS. PMID:25867579

  3. Allergic and non-allergic rhinitis: relationship with nasal polyposis, asthma and family history.

    PubMed

    Gelardi, M; Iannuzzi, L; Tafuri, S; Passalacqua, G; Quaranta, N

    2014-02-01

    Rhinitis and rhinosinusitis (with/without polyposis), either allergic or non-allergic, represent a major medical problem. Their associated comorbidities and relationship with family history have so far been poorly investigated. We assessed these aspects in a large population of patients suffering from rhinosinusal diseases. Clinical history, nasal cytology, allergy testing and direct nasal examination were performed in all patients referred for rhinitis/rhinosinusitis. Fibre optic nasal endoscopy, CT scan and nasal challenge were used for diagnosis, when indicated. A total of 455 patients (60.7% male, age range 4-84 years) were studied; 108 (23.7%) had allergic rhinitis, 128 (28.1%) rhinosinusitis with polyposis, 107 (23.5%) non-allergic rhinitis (negative skin test); 112 patients had associated allergic and non-allergic rhinitis, the majority with eosinophilia. There was a significant association between non-allergic rhinitis and family history of nasal polyposis (OR = 4.45; 95%CI = 1.70-11.61; p = 0.0019), whereas this association was no longer present when allergic rhinitis was also included. Asthma was equally frequent in non-allergic and allergic rhinitis, but more frequent in patients with polyposis. Aspirin sensitivity was more frequent in nasal polyposis, independent of the allergic (p = 0.03) or non-allergic (p = 0.01) nature of rhinitis. Nasal polyposis is significantly associated with asthma and positive family history of asthma, partially independent of the allergic aetiology of rhinitis.

  4. E. Coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC E.coli (Escherichia coli) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Brand SoyNut Butter Read the Latest E. coli (Escherichia coli) General Information Protect Yourself Learn about E. coli ...

  5. Attenuated polyposis of the large bowel: a morphologic and molecular approach.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Maurizio Ponz; Pedroni, Monica; Roncucci, Luca; Domati, Federica; Rossi, Giuseppina; Magnani, Giulia; Pezzi, Annalisa; Fante, Rossella; Bonetti, Luca Reggiani

    2016-10-25

    Attenuated polyposis could be defined as a variant of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) in which synchronous polyps of the large bowel range between 10 and 99. We analysed all cases of attenuated polyposis observed over the last 30 years with the objectives: (A) to classify the disease according to different type and proportion of polyps; (B) To ascertain the contribution of APC and MutYH genes; (C) to discover features which could arise the suspicion of mutations; (D) To obtain indications for management and follow-up. 84 individuals in 82 families were studied. Polyps were classified into four groups as adenoma, hyperplastic, other serrated lesions or others; APC and MutYH mutations were assessed. Mean age at diagnosis was 54 ± 14 years in men and 48 ± 13 in women (P = 0.005). Polyps were more numerous in women (37 ± 26 vs 29 ± 22). Sixty % of patients underwent bowel resection, mainly for cancer; the remaining were managed through endoscopy. A total of 2586 polyps were detected at diagnostic endoscopy: 2026 (80 %) were removed and analysed. Adenomas were diagnosed in 1445 (70 %), hyperplastic polyps in 541 (26 %), other serrated lesions in 61 (2.9 %). Adenomas and hyperplastic lesions were detected in the majority of patients. In 68 patients (81 %) in whom studies were executed, APC mutations were found in 8 and MutYH mutations in 10. Genetic variants were more frequent in women (12 vs 6, P = 0.039). Taking into consideration the prevalent (>50 %) histology and presence of mutations, patients could be subdivided into four groups: (1) APC mutated polyposis (AFAP), when adenomas were >50 % and APC mutations detected (no. 8, 10 %); (2) MutYH mutated polyposis (MAP), adenomas >50 % and biallelic MutYH mutations (no. 10, 12 %); (1) attenuated polyposis without detectable mutations, prevalence of adenomas, 48 cases (57 %); (1) hyperplastic-serrated polyposis, with prevalence (>50 %) of hyperplastic/other serrated lesions and no

  6. Germline deletions in the tumour suppressor gene FOCAD are associated with polyposis and colorectal cancer development.

    PubMed

    Weren, Robbert D A; Venkatachalam, Ramprasath; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Farin, Henner F; Kets, C Marleen; de Voer, Richarda M; Vreede, Lilian; Verwiel, Eugène T P; van Asseldonk, Monique; Kamping, Eveline J; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Neveling, Kornelia; Aben, Katja K H; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Schackert, Hans K; Clevers, Hans; van de Wetering, Marc; Tomlinson, Ian P; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Geurts van Kessel, Ad; Kuiper, Roland P

    2015-06-01

    Heritable genetic variants can significantly affect the lifetime risk of developing cancer, including polyposis and colorectal cancer (CRC). Variants in genes currently known to be associated with a high risk for polyposis or CRC, however, explain only a limited number of hereditary cases. The identification of additional genetic causes is, therefore, crucial to improve CRC prevention, detection and treatment. We have performed genome-wide and targeted DNA copy number profiling and resequencing in early-onset and familial polyposis/CRC patients, and show that deletions affecting the open reading frame of the tumour suppressor gene FOCAD are recurrent and significantly enriched in CRC patients compared with unaffected controls. All patients carrying FOCAD deletions exhibited a personal or family history of polyposis. RNA in situ hybridization revealed FOCAD expression in epithelial cells in the colonic crypt, the site of tumour initiation, as well as in colonic tumours and organoids. Our data suggest that monoallelic germline deletions in the tumour suppressor gene FOCAD underlie moderate genetic predisposition to the development of polyposis and CRC.

  7. Surgical treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis: dilemmas and current recommendations.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme

    2014-11-28

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant inherited syndrome characterized by multiple adenomatous polyps (predisposing to colorectal cancer development) and numerous extracolonic manifestations. The underlying genetic burden generates variable clinical features that may influence operative management. As a precancerous hereditary condition, the rationale of performing a prophylactic surgery is a mainstay of FAP management. The purpose of the present paper is to bring up many controversial aspects regarding surgical treatment for FAP, and to discuss the results and perspectives of the operative choices and approaches. Preferably, the decision-making process should not be limited to the conventional confrontation of pros and cons of ileorectal anastomosis or restorative proctocolectomy. A wide discussion with the patient may evaluate issues such as age, genotype, family history, sphincter function, the presence or risk of desmoid disease, potential complications of each procedure and chances of postoperative surveillance. Therefore, the definition of the best moment and the choice of appropriate procedure constitute an individual decision that must take into consideration patient's preferences and full information about the complex nature of the disease. All these facts reinforce the idea that FAP patients should be managed by experienced surgeons working in specialized centers to achieve the best immediate and long-term results.

  8. [Familial adenomatous polyposis: review of the literature and report of 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Bronzino, P; Rassu, P C; Cassinelli, G; Stanizzi, T; Casaccia, M

    2003-01-01

    The Authors describe three cases of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, (FAP), in patients of the same family, mother and two daughters, with different stages of the disease. Familial adenomatous polyposis is a mendelian dominant inherited syndrome with an incidence of 1:11,000, caused by an alteration of APC gene, which causes multiple disorders of the development ecto-, endo- and mesoderma. The syndrome is characterized by the presence of adenomatous polyps in the gastroenteric tract, mostly in colon-rectum and duodenum with demonstrated adenoma-carcinoma sequence. In the family here reported a case of familial adenomatous polyposis at the adenomatous stage and two of cancer of colon-rectum are registered. In the first case surgery had a preventive aim, and ileo-rectal anastomosis was performed; in the other two cases the treatment was Miles operation with radical intention.

  9. The genetic basis of familial adenomatous polyposis and its implications for clinical practice and risk management

    PubMed Central

    Leoz, Maria Liz; Carballal, Sabela; Moreira, Leticia; Ocaña, Teresa; Balaguer, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited disorder that represents the most common gastrointestinal polyposis syndrome. Germline mutations in the APC gene were initially identified as responsible for FAP, and later, several studies have also implicated the MUTYH gene as responsible for this disease, usually referred to as MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP). FAP and MAP are characterized by the early onset of multiple adenomatous colorectal polyps, a high lifetime risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), and in some patients the development of extracolonic manifestations. The goal of colorectal management in these patients is to prevent CRC mortality through endoscopic and surgical approaches. Individuals with FAP and their relatives should receive appropriate genetic counseling and join surveillance programs when indicated. This review is focused on the description of the main clinical and genetic aspects of FAP associated with germline APC mutations and MAP. PMID:25931827

  10. The role of pediatricians in families with a history of familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Augustyn, Ann Marie; Wallerstein, Robert

    2009-07-01

    Colon cancer is not an entity that pediatricians routinely confront; however, a family history of colon cancer can have pediatric implications when it is part of familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome. Colonic (multiple intestinal polyps) and extracolonic manifestations (such as hepatoblastoma or brain tumors) can be the presenting features in children. The authors present 2 patients from different families with familial adenomatous polyposis who presented with the extracolonic manifestation of this syndrome and a family history of colon cancer. Identification of these families and education of their primary care givers can lead to improved screening and management of these high-risk individuals.

  11. Peutz-Jeghers' syndrome--juvenile intestinal polyposis--review of five cases.

    PubMed

    Bumbić, S; Stepanović, R; Nestorović, B

    1986-06-01

    During the past 30 years, authors observed and followed 5 patients with Peutz-Jeghers' syndrome. Four of them had diffuse polyposis of stomach, small bowel and colon. They also had severe clinical presentation of the disease, with recurring colicky pain, haemorrhage, anaemia and intussusception, all of which necessitated frequent surgical treatment. Excised polyps presented as benign hamartomas, without malignant alteration. Mucocutaneous pigmentations were present in 4 patients. Family history was revealing in only 2 cases. One patient, a girl aged 2 years, died due to the complications of the surgical intervention (intestinal obstruction). She has had the most severe form of the disease with diffuse polyposis.

  12. Clinicopathological features of familial adenomatous polyposis in Korean patients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Min; Yoon, Yong Sik; Lim, Seok-Byeong; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify prognostic factors and to correlate APC mutations with clinical features, including extracolic manifestations. METHODS: One hundred thirty-five patients who underwent surgical procedures for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) were included. FAP was diagnosed when the number of adenomatous polyps was > 100. Data related to patient, extracoloic manifestations, cancer characteristics, operative procedure, follow up and surveillance were collected. APC mutation testing was performed in the 30 most recent patients. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and polymerase chain reaction products using 31 primer pairs on APC gene were sequenced. A retrospective study was performed to investigate a causal relationship between prognosis and feature of patient. RESULTS: The mean age of the 51 patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) was older than that of those without CRC (30.5 vs 36.9, P = 0.002). Older individuals were more likely to have colon cancer at the time of FAP diagnosis [odds ratio, 4.75 (95%CI: 1.71-13.89) and 5.91(1.76-22.12) for 40-49 years and age > 50 vs age < 30). The number of confirmed deaths was 13 and the median age at death was 40 years (range, 27 to 85 years). Ten of the deaths (76.9%) were from CRC. Another cause of two cases of death were desmoid tumors (15.4%). Development of cancer on remnant rectal or ileal mucosa after surgery was not observed. The APC mutation testing revealed 23 pathogenic mutations and one likely pathogenic mutation, among which were four novel mutations. The correlation between mutational status and clinical manifestations was investigated. Mutations that could prodict poor prognosis were at codon 1309 which located on mutation cluster region, codon 1465 and codon 1507. CONCLUSION: Identification of APC mutations should aid in the diagnosis and counseling of family members in terms of early diagnosis and management of FAP. PMID:27158207

  13. Gastric Polyposis: A Rare Cause of Iron Deficiency Anemia in a Patient With Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Macaron, Carole; Pai, Rish K.; Alkhouri, Naim

    2015-01-01

    Portal hypertension leading to gastric polyposis has rarely been reported. More common gastric manifestations of portal hypertension are portal hypertensive gastropathy and gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE). We report a case of a patient in whom portal hypertension manifested as bleeding gastric polyps leading to transfusion-dependent iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26157923

  14. Colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes: Genetic determinism, clinical presentation and recommendations for care.

    PubMed

    Buecher, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal adenomatous polyposis constitutes a diverse group of disorders with different modes of inheritance. Molecular diagnosis of this condition has become more complex. In fact, somatic mosaicism for APC mutations now appears to be more frequent than previously thought and rare germline alterations of this gene may be implicated in patients tested negative for "classical" APC mutations (point mutations and large genomic rearrangements). Moreover, the knowledge concerning several aspects of the MUTYH-associated polyposis has improved since its first description in 2002 and germline mutations in new genes have recently been implicated in some cases of unexplained adenomatous polyposis. Genetic testing in probands and their relatives should be conducted in the context of pre- and post-test genetic counseling. The recent advent of New Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques affords the opportunity to rapidly screen patients for a comprehensive panel of colorectal cancer susceptibility genes in a cost-effective fashion. This type of approach will probably replace the classical sequential approach based on clinical presumptive diagnoses in the near future. The risk of colorectal cancer is very high in affected patients in the absence of appropriate care. Clinical management is complex and should be provided in centers with special expertise in these diseases. This review focuses on the various colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes with special attention to more innovative and important aspects.

  15. Barrett's esophagus in the patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Gatalica, Zoran; Chen, Mingkui; Snyder, Carrie; Mittal, Sumeet; Lynch, Henry T

    2014-06-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is caused by germ line mutations in the APC gene. Barrett's esophagus (BE) and Barrett's adenocarcinoma are intestinal type lesions of the esophagus characterized by an early loss of heterozygosity at the APC locus. We hypothesized that patients with FAP are at risk for the early development of BE due to the inherited mutations in the APC gene (haploinsufficiency). Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) tract biopsies from 36 patients with FAP were reviewed to determine the incidence and characteristics of BE in these patients. Twenty-four patients were confirmed carriers of a deleterious germline APC mutation. The other 12 patients were from FAP families with known APC gene mutations and had clinical manifestations of FAP. The control group consisted of patients who did not have a personal or family history of FAP undergoing UGI endoscopic examination in our institution over a 30 month period of time. The difference in expression of Wnt pathway proteins (APC, β-catenin, E-cadherin and cyclin D1) in BE between BE(+)/FAP(+), BE(-)/FAP(+) and age-matched BE(+)/FAP(-) groups was studied using immunohistochemistry. BE was found in 6 of 36 (6/36 or 16%) patients with FAP and in 266 of 1662 patients (16%) in the control group of symptomatic patients. The average age at the first diagnosis of BE in FAP patients was 37.8 versus 57.5 years in the control group (sporadic BE). When compared to age matched BE(+)/FAP- group (7/334), patients with FAP had a significantly (p = 0.005843, odds ratio 9.2; Fisher exact test) higher incidence of BE. Both classic FAP and attenuated FAP phenotypes were associated with BE .Two types of germ line mutations in APC gene were identified in BE(+)/FAP(+) patients: Five patients had 2-base deletion in exon 4 (426delAT) and one patient had 4-base deletion in exon 15 (3202del4). No difference in Wnt signaling pathway proteins expression was detected between BE(+)/FAP(+) and the age matched group of patients with

  16. Smell Decline as a good Predictor of Sinonasal Polyposis Recurrence after Endoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshaee, Mahdi; Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Ghazizadeh, Amir Hossain; Nahid, Kianoosh; Jalaeian Samani, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: To evaluate the most sensitive symptom to predict early recurrence of nasal polyposis. Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Tertiary university referral center with accredited otorhinolaryngology residency programs. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, we evaluated 62 patients with diffuse nasal polyposis. All patients underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery. The author-devised questionnaire relating to the four major symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis were answered by patients at the pre-operative visit and at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Patients were followed up with serial endoscopic examinations, and a computed tomography (CT) scan was performed if indicated.  Results: All 62 patients (37 male, 25 female) completed the study. The mean age was 41.24 ± 12.47 years. All major symptoms showed significant improvement after surgery (P=0.000); however, the severity of symptoms gradually increased in patients with a recurrence of polyposis, but at different points in time (P= 0.008). Sense of smell was the first symptom to deteriorate in patients with relapse (mean, 6 months) followed by nasal secretion (12 months), obstruction and pain(24 months). Patients with asthma, Samter’s triad, allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS) and allergic rhinitis showed symptoms of recurrence sooner than other patients (P<0.05).  Conclusion: The most sensitive symptom for the early detection of recurrence of nasal polyposis is a decrease in the sense of smell. Nasal obstruction and facial pain were observed in the late stage of relapse when frank polyposis formation was established. PMID:27280099

  17. E. Coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? E. Coli KidsHealth > For Kids > E. Coli A A A What's in this article? What ... Doctor Do? What Can Kids Do? en español E. coli What Is It? E. coli is a common ...

  18. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Simpson, Peter T; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R; Clouston, Andrew D; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C; Neklason, Deborah W; Davis, Sean R; Walker, Robert L; Calzone, Kathleen A; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N; Hulick, Peter J; Weissman, Scott M; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sampson, Jone E; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K; Huntsman, David G; Foulkes, William D; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M; Edwards, Stacey L; French, Juliet D; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S; Worthley, Daniel L; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-05-05

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present.

  19. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L.; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S.; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J.; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R.M.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Simpson, Peter T.; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Clouston, Andrew D.; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A.; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F.; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C.; Neklason, Deborah W.; Davis, Sean R.; Walker, Robert L.; Calzone, Kathleen A.; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N.; Hulick, Peter J.; Weissman, Scott M.; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Sampson, Jone E.; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K.; Huntsman, David G.; Foulkes, William D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M.; Edwards, Stacey L.; French, Juliet D.; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S.; Worthley, Daniel L.; Schrader, Kasmintan A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present. PMID:27087319

  20. Inflammatory Duodenal Polyposis Associated with Primary Immunodeficiency Disease: A Novel Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shera, Irfan Ali; Khurshid, Sheikh Mudassir

    2017-01-01

    Agammaglobulinemia is a rare form of B-cell primary immunodeficiency disease characterized by reduced levels of IgG, IgA, or IgM and recurrent bacterial infections. Agammaglobulinemia is most commonly associated with diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia. Duodenal polyps are a rare entity; however, due to wide use of esophagogastroduodenoscopy, incidental diagnosis of duodenal polyps appears to be increasing. Although inflammatory duodenal polyposis has been reported in the literature, its association with common variable immunodeficiency has not been reported till date to the best of our knowledge. We report a case of a 59-year-old male with chronic symptoms of agammaglobulinemia associated with inflammatory duodenal polyposis. PMID:28163721

  1. Gardner syndrome associated with multiple osteomas, intestinal polyposis, and epidermoid cysts.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kwang-Joon; Park, Ha-Na; Kim, Kyoung-A

    2016-12-01

    Gardner syndrome is known as a variant of familial adenomatous polyposis. This syndrome is characterized by multiple intestinal polyposes, osteomas, and epidermoid cysts. In addition, dental abnormalities include an increased frequency of multiple odontomas, as well as supernumerary and impacted teeth. The authors report the case of a 7-year-old male patient with Gardner syndrome. Radiographic findings revealed multiple osteomas in both sides of the maxilla, multiple diffuse enostoses in both jaws, and a complex odontoma in the left mandibular body. Two years later, multiple epidermoid cysts on the scalp were found. Since this patient was suspected to have Gardner syndrome, the authors recommended gastrointestinal endoscopy to check for intestinal polyposis. Gastrointestinal endoscopic examination revealed multiple polyposes in the upper gastrointestinal tract and fundus of the stomach. As a result, the final diagnosis was Gardner syndrome.

  2. Gardner syndrome associated with multiple osteomas, intestinal polyposis, and epidermoid cysts

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ha-Na; Kim, Kyoung-A

    2016-01-01

    Gardner syndrome is known as a variant of familial adenomatous polyposis. This syndrome is characterized by multiple intestinal polyposes, osteomas, and epidermoid cysts. In addition, dental abnormalities include an increased frequency of multiple odontomas, as well as supernumerary and impacted teeth. The authors report the case of a 7-year-old male patient with Gardner syndrome. Radiographic findings revealed multiple osteomas in both sides of the maxilla, multiple diffuse enostoses in both jaws, and a complex odontoma in the left mandibular body. Two years later, multiple epidermoid cysts on the scalp were found. Since this patient was suspected to have Gardner syndrome, the authors recommended gastrointestinal endoscopy to check for intestinal polyposis. Gastrointestinal endoscopic examination revealed multiple polyposes in the upper gastrointestinal tract and fundus of the stomach. As a result, the final diagnosis was Gardner syndrome. PMID:28035305

  3. Celecoxib in a 12-year-old boy with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Segura, P; Bodas, A; Sereno, M; Martínez-Amores, B; Olivera, H; Díaz, S; López-Asenjo, J A; Puente, J; Maluenda, C; Díaz-Rubio, E

    2010-03-01

    Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by colonic polyps in early adult life. Children with this disease are at risk for colonic cancer, so prophylactic colectomy is the standard treatment to prevent this complication. Chemoprevention experience with NSAIDs in children is exceptional. This case report describes our experience with Celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, in a 12-year-old boy.

  4. Acceleration of intestinal polyposis through prostaglandin receptor EP2 in Apc(Delta 716) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sonoshita, M; Takaku, K; Sasaki, N; Sugimoto, Y; Ushikubi, F; Narumiya, S; Oshima, M; Taketo, M M

    2001-09-01

    Arachidonic acid is metabolized to prostaglandin H(2) (PGH(2)) by cyclooxygenase (COX). COX-2, the inducible COX isozyme, has a key role in intestinal polyposis. Among the metabolites of PGH(2), PGE(2) is implicated in tumorigenesis because its level is markedly elevated in tissues of intestinal adenoma and colon cancer. Here we show that homozygous deletion of the gene encoding a cell-surface receptor of PGE(2), EP2, causes decreases in number and size of intestinal polyps in Apc(Delta 716) mice (a mouse model for human familial adenomatous polyposis). This effect is similar to that of COX-2 gene disruption. We also show that COX-2 expression is boosted by PGE(2) through the EP2 receptor via a positive feedback loop. Homozygous gene knockout for other PGE(2) receptors, EP1 or EP3, did not affect intestinal polyp formation in Apc(Delta 716) mice. We conclude that EP2 is the major receptor mediating the PGE2 signal generated by COX-2 upregulation in intestinal polyposis, and that increased cellular cAMP stimulates expression of more COX-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor in the polyp stroma.

  5. Benign colonic metaplasia at a previous stoma site in a patient without adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Prouty, Megan; Patrawala, Samit; Vogt, Adam; Kelleher, Michael; Lee, Michael; Parker, Douglas C

    2016-03-01

    There are few reported cases of cutaneous intestinal metaplasia or primary adenocarcinoma arising at the ileostomy site following panproctocolectomy. These complications have been seen almost exclusively in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, benign intraepidermal colonic mucosa at a reversed ileostomy site in a patient without familial adenomatous polyposis or IBD has not been documented. We report a case of a 51-year-old female with a history of colonic adenocarcinoma who presented with pruritic, erythematous, scaly plaques on the right lower abdomen, present since reversal of her ileostomy in 2007. Skin biopsy revealed benign foci of colonic epithelium with no evidence of adenomatous change. Benign intraepidermal colonic mucosa was diagnosed based on histopathologic findings and immunohistochemistry. To our knowledge, this is the first case of intraepidermal benign colonic metaplasia forming in a patient following ostomy reversal. The case emphasizes the importance of patient education and physical examination of the stoma or stoma remnants for detection of unusual or changing lesions due to the risk for malignant transformation. It also demonstrates that benign colonic mucosa should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating lesions near ileostomy sites, regardless of whether the patient has a history of familial adenomatous polyposis or IBD.

  6. Clinical characterization and mutation spectrum in Hispanic families with adenomatous polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Mendez, Vanessa; Vazquez, Pedro Juan; Lozada, Maria Eugenia; Freyre, Katerina; Lathroum, Liselle; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria; Hernandez-Marrero, Jessica; Giardiello, Francis; Rodriguez-Quilichini, Segundo

    2013-01-01

    Background Several genetically defined hereditary CRC syndromes are associated with colonic polyposis including familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and MUTYH adenomatous polyposis (MAP). Limited data exists on the clinical characterization and genotypic spectrum of polyposis syndromes among Hispanics. Purpose To describe the phenotype and genotype of Puerto Rican Hispanic patients with FAP and MUTYH and compare with other ethnic and racial groups. Methods Probands were identified from the Puerto Rico Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry (PURIFICAR). Recruited individuals completed risk factors, medical, and family history questionnaires and underwent genetic testing for genotype analysis. Frequency analysis, chi-square, Fisher’s exact test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test were used for statistical analysis methods. Results A total of 31 FAP (from 19 families) and 13 MAP (from 13 families) Hispanic patients recruited from the Puerto Rico Familiar Colorectal Cancer Registry were evaluated. Among the FAP cases, mean age at diagnosis was 27.6 (range 9–71 years); 67.7% cases had more than 100 polyps and 41.9% had upper gastrointestinal polyps. Among the 19 FAP families, there were 77 affected FAP individuals and 26 colorectal cancer cases. Genetic mutations were available for 42.2% of FAP families; all mutations identified were unique. Surgeries were reported in 31 cases; 14 (45.2%) prophylactic surgeries and 6 (19.4%) therapeutic surgeries for management of CRC. Among MAP cases, mean age at diagnosis was 53 (range 34–76 years) and genetic analysis revealed homozygous biallelic mutations (G382D) in 53.8%, compound heterozygous mutations (G382/Y165C) in 23%, and non-G382/Y165C monoallelic mutations in 23%. Conclusions Familial cancer registries should be promoted as vehicles for detection, education and follow up of families at-risk of acquiring familial cancers. PURIFICAR is the first and only familial cancer registry in Puerto Rico providing these services to families

  7. Nasal polyposis: microsurgical ethmoidectomy and interruption of autonomic innervation vs conventional surgery.

    PubMed

    Rucci, L; Bocciolini, C; Casucci, A

    2003-02-01

    Nasal polyposis is an invalidating disease which develops through chronic inflammation which leads to tissue oedema and eventually polyps. Treatment is aimed at eliminating polyps, resolving rhinitis symptoms, re-establishing nasal breathing and olfaction and preventing recurrence. The pathogenesis can be explained, in part, by degranulation of mast cells and release of mediators attracting eosinophils which, in turn, can cause tissue damage and oedema. Neurovascular reflexes and factors related to the complex anatomy of ethmoidal labyrinth may be responsible for the onset and persistence of oedema. This would offer a rationale to treatments modifying ethmoid anatomy and blocking neurovascular reflexes in the management of nasal polyposis. The advent of microsurgery and of diagnostic and operative endoscopy has led, over the last twenty years, to earlier detection and to less traumatic and more precise surgical treatment of nasal polyps. With these techniques resection of parasympathetic innervation is also possible, which is in keeping with the proposed rationale and cannot be easily achieved by conventional surgery. To evaluate the impact of this resection on the management of nasal polyposis a review of data has been made in a series of patients with diagnosis of nasal polyposis established by clinical examination, resistant to pharmacological therapy and treated between 1983 and 1998 at the Oto-Neuro-Ophthalmology Department of Florence University (Italy). Patients were treated by conventional surgery (386 cases), by microsurgery without resection of the parasympathetic component of the vidian nerve (97 cases), or by microsurgery with resection of this latter component (94 cases). The rate of recurrence and of major post-operative complications, respectively, were: 39.9% and 4.4% for patients treated by conventional surgery; 37.1% and 6.2% with microsurgery without resection of parasympathetic innervation; and 25.5% and 2.1% with resection of this innervation

  8. Thoracic Aortic Disease in Two Patients with Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome and SMAD4 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Teekakirikul, Polakit; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Miller, David T.; Lacro, Ronald V.; Regalado, Ellen S.; Rosales, Ana Maria; Ryan, Daniel P.; Toler, Tomi L.; Lin, Angela E.

    2012-01-01

    Dilation or aneurysm of the ascending aorta can progress to acute aortic dissection (Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Dissections, TAAD). Mutations in genes encoding TGF-β related proteins (TGFBR1, TGFBR2, FBN1, and SMAD3) cause syndromic and inherited TAAD. SMAD4 mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis (JPS) and a combined JPS-hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) known as JPS-HHT. A family with JPS-HHT was reported to have aortic root dilation and mitral valve abnormalities. We report on two patients with JPS-HHT with SMAD4 mutations associated with thoracic aortic disease. The first patient, an 11-year-old boy without Marfan syndrome features, had JPS and an apparently de novo SMAD4 mutation (c.1340_1367dup28). Echocardiography showed mild dilation of the aortic annulus and aortic root, and mild dilation of the sinotubular junction and ascending aorta. Computed tomography confirmed aortic dilation and showed small pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM). The second patient, a 34-year-old woman with colonic polyposis, HHT, and Marfan syndrome, had a SMAD4 mutation (c.1245_1248delCAGA). Echocardiography showed mild aortic root dilation. She also had PAVM and hepatic focal nodular hyperplasia. Her family history was significant for polyposis, HHT, thoracic aortic aneurysm, and dissection and skeletal features of Marfan syndrome in her father. These two cases confirm the association of thoracic aortic disease with JPS-HHT resulting from SMAD4 mutations. We propose that the thoracic aorta should be screened in patients with SMAD4 mutations to prevent untimely death from dissection. This report also confirms that SMAD4 mutations predispose to TAAD. PMID:23239472

  9. E. Coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Your Teeth El cuidado de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray E. Coli KidsHealth > For Kids > E. Coli Print A A A What's in ... recalls affecting contaminated vegetables or other products. But kids can ... inside. Don't swallow lake, ocean, or pool water. If the water contains ...

  10. Efficacy of ESS in chronic rhinosinusitis with and without nasal polyposis: a Danish cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lind, Henrik; Joergensen, G; Lange, B; Svendstrup, F; Kjeldsen, A D

    2016-04-01

    Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) for patients with severe chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has become a well-established treatment in cases where medical therapy fails. Even though CRS patients are divided into two subgroups, CRS with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP) and CRS without nasal polyposis (CRSsNP), most studies present only results for the total cohort. This prospective cohort study evaluated the efficacy of ESS on both quality of life and olfactory function measures, in a cohort of Danish CRS patients diagnosed according to the EPOS criteria, with results analysed separately for the CRSwNP and CRSsNP subgroups. All 97 CRS patients who underwent ESS over an 18-month trial period were evaluated preoperative by SNOT-22 score, Sniffin' Sticks score, modified Lund-Kennedy endoscopic score and Lund-Mackay CT score. Patient outcomes were reevaluated at clinical follow-up 1 and 6 months postoperative. ESS efficiently and immediately improved quality of life for both CRSwNP and CRSsNP patients, with over 50 % reduction in SNOT-22 score 1 month after surgery, which sustained 6 months postoperative. Olfactory function measured by Sniffin' Sticks score showed overall improvement in both groups. ESS efficiently improved quality of life in both CRSwNP and CRSsNP patients, and surgery lead to an overall improvement in olfactory function. However, a minor proportion of patients experienced deterioration in olfactory function after ESS.

  11. Azithromycin for the treatment of eosinophilic nasal polyposis: Clinical and histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Borges Crosara, Paulo Fernando Tormin; Cassali, Geovanni Dantas; dos Reis, Diego Carlos; Rodrigues, Danilo Santana; Nunes, Flavio Barbosa; Guimarães, Roberto Eustáquio Santos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Macrolides used as immunomodulators are a promising tool for chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Eosinophilic nasal polyposis (ENP) is still considered a disease that is difficult to control with the currently standardized treatments. Objectives: To evaluate prolonged treatment with low-dose azithromycin for ENP based on clinical and histopathologic variables. Methods: The present investigation was a self-paired case study of 33 patients with ENP. A comparison was performed between patients before and after treatment with azithromycin for 8 weeks. The patients were subjected to clinical examinations, staging (three-dimensional imaging by endoscopy), application of the questionnaire, and biopsy of nasal polyps at the beginning and at the end of the treatment. Results: The treatment yielded a clinical improvement regarding the two variables studied: polyposis staging (69.7%) and questionnaire (57.6%). We did not find significant differences in the inflammatory pattern and in the percentage or absolute number of eosinophils per field between samples obtained before and after the treatment (p > 0.05). There was no difference between the answers obtained from groups with and without asthma and/or aspirin intolerance (p > 0.3). The patients with advanced initial staging exhibited lower subjective improvement index and staging reduction (p = 0.031 and p = 0.012, respectively). Conclusion: Based on this study, azithromycin may be considered as another therapeutic option for ENP. However, further studies are necessary to define the real mechanism of action involved. PMID:27465667

  12. Culture-independent analysis of the gut microbiota in colorectal cancer and polyposis.

    PubMed

    Scanlan, Pauline D; Shanahan, Fergus; Clune, Yvonne; Collins, John K; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; O'Riordan, Micheal; Holmes, Elaine; Wang, Yulan; Marchesi, Julian R

    2008-03-01

    A role for the intestinal microbiota is routinely cited as a potential aetiological factor in colorectal cancer initiation and progression. As the majority of bacteria in the gut are refractory to culture we investigated this ecosystem in subjects with colorectal cancer and with adenomatous polyposis who are at high risk of developing colorectal cancer, using culture-independent methods. Twenty colorectal cancer and 20 polypectomized volunteers were chosen for this analysis. An exploration of the diversity and temporal stability of the dominant bacteria and several bacterial subgroups was undertaken using 16S rRNA gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA). Metabonomic analysis of the distal gut microbiota's environment was also undertaken. A significantly reduced temporal stability and increased diversity for the microbiota of subjects with colorectal cancer and polyposis was evident. A significantly increased diversity of the Clostridium leptum and C. coccoides subgroups was also noted for both disease groups. A clear division in the metabonome was observed for the colorectal cancer and polypectomized subjects compared with control volunteers. The intestinal microbiota and their metabolites are significantly altered in both colorectal cancer and polypectomized subjects compared with controls.

  13. Association between blood arsenic levels and nasal polyposis disease risk in the Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Khlifi, Rim; Olmedo, Pablo; Gil, Fernando; Chakroun, Amine; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel

    2015-09-01

    Although the pathophysiology underlying nasal polyposis (NP) formation is not fully understood, systemic, local, and environmental factors appear to contribute to NP disease development. This study aimed to explore the relationship between metal blood levels and NP risk. To the best of our knowledge, the current research represents the first scientific contribution reporting levels of Cr and As in blood of NP patients. In this context, 90 NP patients and 171 controls were recruited and blood samples were analyzed to determine the concentrations of As and Cr. Metal blood levels of As in patients (2.1 μg/L) were significantly higher than those of controls (1.2 μg/L). However, no significant difference in blood Cr levels was found between cases and controls. Arsenic blood levels of cigarette smokers were significantly higher than those of non-smokers. Environmental exposure and shisha consumption presented the most significant association with NP disease (OR = 10.1 and 14.1, respectively). High levels of blood As were significantly associated with NP disease (OR = 2.1). Cr blood levels were found to be associated with the four stages of polyps in both nasal cavities. This study found a strong association between nasal polyposis disease and As blood levels. These findings merit further investigation.

  14. [Endonasal ethmoidectomy in naso-sinusal polyposis. Results in 110 surgically treated patients].

    PubMed

    Simon, D; Fombeur, J P; Ebbo, D; Lecomte, F; Koubbi, G; Barrault, S

    1995-01-01

    We assessed retrospectively functional and endoscopic results obtained in 110 patients who underwent endonasal ethmoidectomy (n = 218). The patients were divided into 3 groups according to associated pathology (polyposis alone, asthma without intolerance to aspirin, Widal's disease) and outcome was evaluated after a mean 19.5 month follow-up. Function was improved in 88% of the patients. Endoscopic recurrence was seen in 40% of the patients including 10% with major polyposis. Oedema of the mucose remained in 20% of the patients and the mucosa was normal in 40%. Improvement in patients with Widal's disease was the least favourable among the three groups and was best in those with asthma and no intolerance to aspirin. Post-operative complications occurred in 12.6% of the patients and were severe in 0.9%. These satisfactory results, both in terms of function and the low rate of complications, suggest that the current medicosurgical management should be continued with particular attention to the rate of endoscopic recurrence.

  15. Primary adenocarcinoma in the ileostomy of a woman with familial adenomatous polyposis: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Ileal adenomas associated with familial adenomatous polyposis are a common finding. Many recent studies following panproctocolectomy for familial adenomatous polyposis have confirmed the presence of multiple ileal adenomas and an increase in ileal mucosal proliferation. In this study, we present a case of invasive adenocarcinoma arising in a severely dysplastic tubulovillous adenoma in the ileostomy of a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis; also, we present a literature review. To the best of our knowledge, only very few cases have been reported in the literature. Case presentation A 59-year-old Caucasian woman developed a primary adenocarcinoma in her ileostomy, complicating the stoma 31 years after its formation. Conclusions Primary adenocarcinoma following panproctocolectomy for familial adenomatous polyposis is a very rare clinical entity. The risk of developing adenocarcinoma in those patients increases with time. Patient education and medical examination of the stoma are of paramount importance and should be implemented early with the need of designing a surveillance protocol for early detection and management of ileal adenomas, especially in longstanding stomas. PMID:22129430

  16. [Recurrence of nasosinusal polyposis after ethmoidectomy by endonasal approach. Functional, endoscopic, x-ray tomographic aspects and surgical implications].

    PubMed

    Batteur, B; Strunski, V; Caprio, D; Berthet, V; Goin, M

    1994-01-01

    Recurrent polyposis after 116 endonasal ethmoidectomies performed in 61 patients were investigated on the basis of functional, endoscopic and tomodensitometric data. The results of the endoscopic examinations revealed that the anterior ethmoid was involved most often (41%) with either a single localization or in combination with other sites in the sinuses. Functional rhinosinus symptomatology was satisfactory in most cases after a mean follow-up of 22 months, especially for nasal obstruction which was initially predominant (91%). Headaches, especially fronto-orbial localizations, clearly decreased after the operation but there was no correlation between the presence of headache after the operation and the recurrence of the polyposis. Computed tomography gave results similar to those obtained by endoscopy. However, a distinction could not be made between radio-opaque images of polyposis and certain cicatricial or inflammatory reactions. Unlike the functional outcome, ethmoidectomy had little effect on these images. Recurrent polyps appeared most often on the anterior ethmoid and the role of the initial infundibulotomy can be debated. It would appear that the prognosis of polyposis is not modified by extended anterior ethmoidectomy, suggesting that a more conservative surgical approach may be appropriate for frontal ethomoidal polyps.

  17. Identification of coding exon 3 duplication in the BMPR1A gene in a patient with juvenile polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Junya; Nagayama, Satoshi; Chino, Akiko; Sakata, Ai; Yamamoto, Noriko; Sato, Yuri; Ashihara, Yuumi; Kita, Mizuho; Nomura, Sachio; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Igarashi, Masahiro; Ueno, Masashi; Arai, Masami

    2014-10-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by multiple juvenile polyps arising in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers, specifically colon cancer. BMPR1A and SMAD4 germline mutations have been found in patients with juvenile polyposis syndrome. We identified a BMPR1A mutation, which involves a duplication of coding exon 3 (c.230+452_333+441dup1995), on multiple ligation dependent probe amplification in a patient with juvenile polyposis syndrome. The mutation causes a frameshift, producing a truncated protein (p.D112NfsX2). Therefore, the mutation is believed to be pathogenic. We also identified a duplication breakpoint in which Alu sequences are located. These results suggest that the duplication event resulted from recombination between Alu sequences. To our knowledge, partial duplication in the BMPR1A gene has not been reported previously. This is the first case report to document coding exon 3 duplication in the BMPR1A gene in a patient with juvenile polyposis syndrome.

  18. E. Coli Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is E. coli?E. coli is short for Escherichia coli -- bacteria (germs) that cause severe cramps and diarrhea. ... staff Tags: bacterial endotoxin, bloody diarrhea, enterohemorrhagic infection, Escherichia coli, food-borne illness, gastroenteritis, hemorrhagic colitis, HUS, thrombotic ...

  19. Duodeno-gastric reflux and gastric adenomas: a scintigraphic study in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed Central

    Spigelman, A D; Granowska, M; Phillips, R K

    1991-01-01

    To test whether the presence of gastric adenomas (dysplasia) was associated with gastric reflux of duodenal contents, six patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) who had gastric adenomas and nine matched FAP patients without gastric adenomas underwent scintigraphic duodeno-gastric reflux scanning. Reflux was graded 0-6, where 0 = no reflux, 1 = intermittent reflux into antrum only, 2 = prolonged reflux into antrum only, 3 = intermittent reflux into body, 4 = prolonged reflux into body, 5 = intermittent reflux into body and fundus, and 6 = prolonged reflux into body and fundus. FAP patients with gastric adenomas had more severe reflux (median 6, range 4-6) than did controls (median 3, range 0-6; P = 0.009, Mann-Whitney U test). These results are consistent with a role for bile in the development of gastric adenomatous polyps and suggest that bile is involved in the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. PMID:1653358

  20. [Asthma and polyposis. Efficacy and adverse effect of endonasal ethmoidectomy. Results apropos of 70 patients].

    PubMed

    Korchia, D; Thomassin, J M; Doris, J M; Badier, M

    1992-01-01

    The authors report the efficacy and adverse effects of intranasal ethmoidectomy in 70 patients with asthma and persistent severe symptoms from nasosinal polyposis despite repeated prior treatment. The efficacy was defined according to the evolution of symptoms and endoscopic findings. Adverse effects were evaluated according to subjective clinical and therapeutic data in all 70 patients. In addition, 25 patients had complete pre and post-operative pulmonary function tests. The results confirm that intranasal micro-surgery does not increase the severity of asthma. On the other hand, no significant improvement in bronchial function was noted after ethmoidectomy. Finally, the authors emphasize the poorer results obtained in Widal's disease and the importance, after the failure of medical treatment, of using of sufficiently extensive surgical procedure in order to decrease the incidence of recurrences.

  1. Malignant familial adenomatous polyposis treated by laparoscopic colectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zaharie, Florin; Ciorogar, George; Zaharie, Roxana; Tantau, Marcel; Iancu, Cornel; Mocan, Lucian

    2014-12-01

    The mean age of colorectal cancer in untreated familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is 39 years. We present the case of a 21-year-old patient with FAP and colorectal cancer. The patient was detected with significant family history: her mother died at age 45 with colon cancer; two uncles were diagnosed with colon cancer at the age of 40 and 43 and one aunt at the age of 45 with colon cancer and gastric cancer. The treatment was laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with total excision of the mesorectum and ileal pouch anal anastomosis completed with endoanal excision of inferior rectal polyps. The histopathological report described a well differentiated rectal adenocarcinoma T1N1aMx developed on a tubulo-villous adenoma located on the rectosigmoid jonction, the rest of the polyps with benign histology.

  2. Cadmium and nickel in blood of Tunisian population and risk of nasosinusal polyposis disease.

    PubMed

    Khlifi, Rim; Olmedo, Pablo; Gil, Fernando; Hammami, Bouthaina; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel

    2015-03-01

    Nasosinusal polyposis (NSP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the nasal mucosa. Although the pathophysiology underlying NSP formation is not fully understood, environmental factors appear to be contributed the development of this disease. A case-control study of Tunisian patients was examined to assess the levels of cadmium (Cd) and nickel (Ni) in blood and reparse the association between the exposure to these metals and the risk of nasosinusal polyposis disease. Mean blood levels of Cd in patients (2.2 ± 12.8 μg/L) were significantly higher than those of controls (0.5 ± 0.7 μg/L). Levels of blood Cd were positively correlated with tobacco smoking and chewing among controls. The Cd and Ni concentrations among control (p = 0.001) and patient (p = 0.018) tobacco consumers (smoking, chewing, and shisha) were significantly higher than those nonconsumers. Additionally, Ni blood levels of patient and control smokers were significantly higher than those of nonsmokers. Cd levels in blood samples of NSP patients occupationally exposed for more than 14 years were eight times higher than that of nonexposed. Drinking water was also found to be incriminated as exposure sources. Among risk factors, shisha consumption, environmental exposure, and occupational exposure presented the most significant association with NSP disease (odds ratio (OR) = 14.1, 10.1, and 1.7, respectively). High levels of blood Cd (OR = 3.5) were strongly associated with NSP disease (p = 0.027). Ni blood levels were shown to be associated with the four stages of polyps in both nasal cavities (right and left) (p < 0.05). This investigation suggested a potential role of toxic metals in the mechanism of NSP disease development. Exposure assessment investigations encompassing a wider population are needed.

  3. Comparison of functional results after ethmoidectomy and nasalization for diffuse and severe nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, R; Pigret, D; Decroocq, F

    1997-07-01

    Taking advantage of a natural experimental situation, we compared, retrospectively, functional results after nasalization and ethmoidectomy for diffuse nasal polyposis. Nasalization was a radical ethmoidectomy systematically removing all the bony lamellae and mucosa within the labyrinth, with large antrostomy, sphenoidotomy, frontotomy, and middle turbinectomy (Surgeon 1, 39 consecutive patients operated on between March and September 1991). Ethmoidectomy was a less systematic procedure, that was adapted to the extent of the pathology (Surgeon 2, 37 consecutive patients, operated on between October 1991 and November 1994). In May 1994, a third physician mailed a questionnaire simultaneously to all patients including 10-point visual analog scales 34/39 patients in the nasalization group (age: 28-71 years: 20 asthmatics; follow-up: 32-36 months), and 29/37 patients in the ethmoidectomy group (age: 26-65 years: 9 asthmatics: follow-up: 18-31 months) participated in the study. The overall nasal improvement was 8.8 +/- 0.2 (mean +/- SEM) after nasalization and 5.9 +/- 0.6 after ethmoidectomy (p = 0.0001). Olfaction improvement was similar in both groups 6 months after surgery, remained at the same level 36 months after nasalization (6.9 +/- 0.7), but decreased to 4.2 +/- 1 points 24 months after ethmoidectomy (p = 0.02). Asthma improvement remained significantly better after nasalization (p = 0.05), and the need for systemic steroids was also lower (p = 0.03). Results of this study suggest that when dealing with nasal polyposis, the more radical the surgery, the better the functional results.

  4. Interaction of the MUC1 Tumor Antigen and the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Tumor Suppressor in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    molecule. J Mammary Gland Biol Neoplasia 2001, 6(3):339-353. 3. Braun DP, Crist KA, Shaheen F, Staren ED, Andrews S, Parker J: Aromatase inhibitors... resveratrol : NF- kappaB and AP-1 as potential targets. Mutat Res, 555: 65-80, 2004. 18. DeSouza, M. M., Surveyor, G. A., Price, R. E., Julian, J

  5. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) regulates miR17-92 cluster through β-catenin pathway in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Francesconi, Mirko; D'Uva, Gabriele; Shibata, Dave; Malafa, Mokenge P.; Yeatman, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    APC mutation is the most common genetic changes in sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). Despite deregulations of miRNAs have been frequently reported in this malignancy, APC regulated miRNAs have not been extensively documented. Here, by employing an APC inducible cell line and array analysis, we identified a total of 26 deregulated miRNAs. Among them members of miR-17-92 cluster were dramatically inhibited by APC and induced by enforced expression of β-catenin. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated β-catenin resulted from APC loss binds to and activates the miR-17-92 promoter. Notably, enforced expression of miR-19a overrides APC tumour suppressor activity and knockdown of miR-19a in cancer cells with compromised APC function reduced their aggressive features in vitro. Finally, we observed that expression of miR-19a significantly correlates with β-catenin levels in colorectal cancer specimens, and it is associated to the aggressive stage of tumour progression. Thus our study reveals that miR-17-92 cluster is directly regulated by APC/β-catenin pathway and could be a potential therapeutic target in colon cancers with aberrant APC/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26804172

  6. Interaction of the MUC1 Tumor Antigen and the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Tumor Suppressor in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Christine L. Hattrup CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ 85259 REPORT DATE: March 2005 TYPE OF REPORT...FRET, and siRNA as complementary assays in examining the role of the MUCl -APC interaction in human breast cancer. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES...significance for breast cancer and metastasis, as Mucl (note that the mouse protein is designated Mucl and the human MUC1), P-catenin, and the erbB

  7. Maintenance of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)-mutant colorectal cancer is dependent on Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Scholer-Dahirel, Alix; Schlabach, Michael R; Loo, Alice; Bagdasarian, Linda; Meyer, Ronald; Guo, Ribo; Woolfenden, Steve; Yu, Kristine K; Markovits, Judit; Killary, Karen; Sonkin, Dmitry; Yao, Yung-Mae; Warmuth, Markus; Sellers, William R; Schlegel, Robert; Stegmeier, Frank; Mosher, Rebecca E; McLaughlin, Margaret E

    2011-10-11

    Persistent expression of certain oncogenes is required for tumor maintenance. This phenotype is referred to as oncogene addiction and has been clinically validated by anticancer therapies that specifically inhibit oncoproteins such as BCR-ABL, c-Kit, HER2, PDGFR, and EGFR. Identifying additional genes that are required for tumor maintenance may lead to new targets for anticancer drugs. Although the role of aberrant Wnt pathway activation in the initiation of colorectal cancer has been clearly established, it remains unclear whether sustained Wnt pathway activation is required for colorectal tumor maintenance. To address this question, we used inducible β-catenin shRNAs to temporally control Wnt pathway activation in vivo. Here, we show that active Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for maintenance of colorectal tumor xenografts harboring APC mutations. Reduced tumor growth upon β-catenin inhibition was due to cell cycle arrest and differentiation. Upon reactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway colorectal cancer cells resumed proliferation and reacquired a crypt progenitor phenotype. In human colonic adenocarcinomas, high levels of nuclear β-catenin correlated with crypt progenitor but not differentiation markers, suggesting that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway may also control colorectal tumor cell fate during the maintenance phase of tumors in patients. These results support efforts to treat human colorectal cancer by pharmacological inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  8. Regulation of intracellular beta-catenin levels by the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor-suppressor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Munemitsu, S; Albert, I; Souza, B; Rubinfeld, B; Polakis, P

    1995-01-01

    The APC tumor-suppressor protein associates with beta-catenin, a cell adhesion protein that is upregulated by the WNT1 oncogene. We examined the effects of exogenous APC expression on the distribution and amount of beta-catenin in a colorectal cancer cell containing only mutant APC. Expression of wild-type APC caused a pronounced reduction in total beta-catenin levels by eliminating an excessive supply of cytoplasmic beta-catenin indigenous to the SW480 colorectal cancer cell line. This reduction was due to an enhanced rate of beta-catenin protein degradation. Truncated mutant APC proteins, characteristic of those associated with cancer, lacked this activity. Mutational analysis revealed that the central region of the APC protein, which is typically deleted or severely truncated in tumors, was responsible for the down-regulation of beta-catenin. These results suggest that the tumor-suppressor activity of mutant APC may be compromised due to a defect in its ability to regulate beta-catenin. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7708772

  9. E. Coli and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... care provider. What is E. coli? E. coli (Escherichia coli) is a bacterium that lives in your colon ( ... 10):1411-1413. Jones B, et al. 2004. Escherichia coli: a growing problem in early onset neonatal sepsis. ...

  10. Restorative proctocolectomy or rectum-preserving surgery in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis: results of a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, F; Valanzano, R; Monaci, I; Mazzoni, P; Anastasi, A; Ficari, F

    1997-01-01

    Surgical treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is still controversial. From 1984 we carried out a prospective evaluation of total colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) and restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) to determine differences in postoperative complications, functional results, occurrence of desmoids, and recurrence of polyps in the rectal stump. IRA was performed below the peritoneal reflection and was indicated in the absence of rectal cancer and in the presence of fewer than 10 polyps or minute polyposis in the last 10 cm of the rectal mucosa. IRA patients underwent a regular endoscopic follow-up and prolonged sulindac administration (100 mg twice daily). When criteria for IRA were absent, IPAA was performed adopting a manual anastomosis at the pectinate line. Fourteen patients were operated with IRA and 24 with IPAA. There was no difference in sex and age between the two groups of patients. The number of rectal polyps was significantly different in the two groups. Immediate postoperative complications were observed in only five IPAA patients, three of whom (12%) required reoperation. Late postoperative complications occurred more frequently in IRA patients (14%) than in IPAA patients (4%). Desmoids developed in both groups (five in the IRA group and four in IPAA group). The number of bowel movements was similar in both groups, but 25% of IPAA patients complained of nocturnal fecal soiling. Fulguration or polypectomy for recurrent polyps was necessary in all but two IRA patients at follow-up. The rectal stump was easily eradicated by polyps in all but four patients with minute polyps at surgery. In the latter patients a diffuse or carpeting rectal polyposis occurred. IPAA can give optimum control of colorectal polyposis in FAP patients with an acceptable incidence of postoperative complications and satisfactory functional results. This type of surgical procedure is indicated in most FAP patients, and IRA

  11. Scarce evidence of the causal role of germline mutations in UNC5C in hereditary colorectal cancer and polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Mur, Pilar; Elena, Sánchez-Cuartielles; Aussó, Susanna; Aiza, Gemma; Rafael, Valdés-Mas; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Brunet, Joan; Urioste, Miguel; Lázaro, Conxi; Moreno, Victor; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S.; Valle, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in UNC5C have been suggested to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, thus causing hereditary CRC. However, the evidence gathered thus far is insufficient to include the study of the UNC5C gene in the routine genetic testing of familial CRC. Here we aim at providing a more conclusive answer about the contribution of germline UNC5C mutations to genetically unexplained hereditary CRC and/or polyposis cases. To achieve this goal we sequenced the coding region and exon-intron boundaries of UNC5C in 544 familial CRC or polyposis patients (529 families), using a technique that combines pooled DNA amplification and massively parallel sequencing. A total of eight novel or rare variants, all missense, were identified in eight families. Co-segregation data in the families and association results in case-control series are not consistent with a causal effect for 7 of the 8 identified variants, including c.1882_1883delinsAA (p.A628K), previously described as a disease-causing mutation. One variant, c.2210G > A (p.S737N), remained unclassified. In conclusion, our results suggest that the contribution of germline mutations in UNC5C to hereditary colorectal cancer and to polyposis cases is negligible. PMID:26852919

  12. Scarce evidence of the causal role of germline mutations in UNC5C in hereditary colorectal cancer and polyposis.

    PubMed

    Mur, Pilar; Sánchez-Cuartielles, Elena; Aussó, Susanna; Aiza, Gemma; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Brunet, Joan; Urioste, Miguel; Lázaro, Conxi; Moreno, Victor; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S; Valle, Laura

    2016-02-08

    Germline mutations in UNC5C have been suggested to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, thus causing hereditary CRC. However, the evidence gathered thus far is insufficient to include the study of the UNC5C gene in the routine genetic testing of familial CRC. Here we aim at providing a more conclusive answer about the contribution of germline UNC5C mutations to genetically unexplained hereditary CRC and/or polyposis cases. To achieve this goal we sequenced the coding region and exon-intron boundaries of UNC5C in 544 familial CRC or polyposis patients (529 families), using a technique that combines pooled DNA amplification and massively parallel sequencing. A total of eight novel or rare variants, all missense, were identified in eight families. Co-segregation data in the families and association results in case-control series are not consistent with a causal effect for 7 of the 8 identified variants, including c.1882_1883delinsAA (p.A628K), previously described as a disease-causing mutation. One variant, c.2210G > A (p.S737N), remained unclassified. In conclusion, our results suggest that the contribution of germline mutations in UNC5C to hereditary colorectal cancer and to polyposis cases is negligible.

  13. Escherichia Coli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  14. Fibrotic Tissue and Middle Turbinate Exhibit Similar Mechanical Properties. Is Fibrosis a Solution in Nasal Polyposis?

    PubMed Central

    Gregório, Luciano; Pezato, Rogério; Felici, Rafael Souza; Kosugi, Eduardo Macoto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nasal polyposis (NP) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the upper airway characterized by overgrowth of nasal mucosa. Recent studies have shown a mechanical dysfunction in the nasal polyp tissue. Objective This study aims to evaluate the mechanical properties of nasal fibrotic tissue. Method This study was an institutional review board approved translational study in 20 participants (8 patients with NP, 7 patients with nasal synechiae, and 5 subjects without sinus disease (control group). We used Controlled Disc Stimulation equipment to compare the curve Pressure/Volume created during the saline solution infusion. Results The increase of pressure in response to solution injection was lower in the nasal polyp group when compared with control middle turbinate group and fibrotic group. No significant difference was found in the pressure response during solution injection between fibrotic group and control middle turbinate group. Inferior turbinate group showed significant difference when compared with control middle turbinate group. Conclusion The mechanical dysfunction found in the nasal mucosa of patients with NP provides new insight into this condition. These data allow the belief that the fibrosis has a potential role in increasing interstitial hydrostatic pressure and, consequently, mitigating edema formation in NP.

  15. [Detection of a founder mutation in an Argentine family with hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Gómez, Laura; Adi, José; Ibarra, Jorge; Roqué, María

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) has been related to mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2 y MSH6). Mutation detection analysis requires the complete sequencing of these genes, given the high frequency of family-specific alterations. A point mutation (2269-2270insT) in the last codon of the MLH1 gene has been detected in families from a northern region of Italy (Reggio Emilia).Given that this alteration was registered only in people from this region, it has been considered a founder mutation. In this work, we present an Argentine HNPCC family whose ancestors were natives from the Reggio Emilia, Italy, and who were carriers for this mutation. In order to detect the genetic alteration, a PCR was developed followed by a restriction enzyme incubation assay. The mutation was detected in 3 family members, two of them without clinical symptoms. The PCR/restriction enzyme methodology has been sensitive and specific for the detection of this mutation. It has allowed the performance of a pre-symptomatic genetic diagnosis in the Argentine HNPCC family, avoiding sending samples abroad. It is worth mentioning that pre-symptomatic diagnosis of hereditary cancers allows enhanced surveillance and support for the affected families when it is performed by a multidisciplinary group.

  16. [Long-term results of ileo-rectal anastomosis in familial polyposis].

    PubMed

    Sváb, J; Pesková, M; Jirásek, V; Fried, M; Krska, Z

    1999-04-01

    The authors present their experience with 93 patients operated at the First Surgical Clinic of the General Faculty Hospital and First Medical Faculty, Charles University Prague on account of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) assembled during 36 year starting in 1962. They analyze 91 patients followed up in collaboration with the First Medical Clinic of the General Faculty Hospital and First Medical Clinic Charles University Prague. Seventy-two of the patients were operated and in 55 of them an ileorectoanastomosis was made following subtotal colectomy. Two important findings were made. From the group of 91 patients incl. primary patients who suffered already from advanced malignant disease of the large bowel a total of 38.5% died. In the rectal stump after ileorectoanastomosis on average within 16 years after operation in 16.4% of the patients a malignant tumour was found. This leads to the belief that patients should be recommended colectomy with ileoanoanastomosis with an ileal reservoir. This operation was performed during the last five years in nine patients with this condition, using a one-stage or two-stage procedure with temporary ileostomy.

  17. Desmoid tumors: clinical features and outcome of an unpredictable and challenging manifestation of familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real; Novaes, Marleny; Nahas, Sérgio Carlos; Cecconello, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    Background/Aims Desmoid tumors (DTs) are rare, locally invasive neoplasms that may affect 10-25% of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients. Our aim was to evaluate incidence and clinical presentation among our patients, the potential impact on FAP outcome and to discuss treatment. Materials and methods Charts from 133 FAP (1977-2013) were reviewed. Patients with DTs were separated to retrieve demographic, clinical and management data. Follow-up was focused on disease evolution causing complications or death. Results 19 (14.3%) DTs were diagnosed, either after previous trauma (16) or during FAP surgery (3). This group comprised 8 men (42.1%) and 11 women (57.9%) with an average age of 32.9 years. Intervals from surgical trauma to DTs ranged from 7 to 60 months. ECMs were detected in 12 (63.1%) patients. DTs were located in the abdominal wall (8), abdominal cavity (8), abdominal wall and cavity (2) and left arm (1). Five patients (26.3%) referred family history of DTs. Patients presented severe complications such as small bowel obstruction (4) and hydronephrosis (2), being directly responsible for death in three patients. Conclusions (1) DTs developed in 14.3% of FAP, mostly after surgical trauma; (2) 30% caused severe morbidity; (3) identification of clinical risk factors may help surgeons to develop screening and therapeutic decisions.

  18. The challenge of developmentally appropriate care: predictive genetic testing in young people for familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Rony E; Gillam, Lynn; Savulescu, Julian; Williamson, Robert; Rogers, John G; Delatycki, Martin B

    2010-03-01

    Predictive genetic tests for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) are routinely offered to young people during early adolescence. While this is not controversial, due to the medical benefit conferred by the test, it is nonetheless challenging as a consequence of the stage of life of the young people, and the simultaneous involvement of multiple family members. Despite these challenges, it is possible to ensure that the test is offered in such a way that it actively acknowledges and facilitates young people's developing autonomy and psychosocial well-being. In this paper we present findings from ten in-depth interviews with young people who have undergone predictive genetic testing for FAP (four male, six female; five gene-positive, five gene-negative; aged 10-17 years at the time of their predictive test; aged 12-25 years at the time of their research interview). We present five themes that emerged from the interviews which highlight key ethical challenges associated with such testing. These are: (1) the significance of the test; (2) young people's lack of involvement in the decision to be tested; (3) young people's limited understanding; (4) provision of the blood test at the first visit; and (5) group testing of family members. We draw on these themes to make eight recommendations for future practice. Together, these recommendations highlight the importance of providing developmentally appropriate care to young people undergoing predictive genetic testing for FAP.

  19. Epidemiological and clinical aspects of nasal polyposis in France; the ORLI group experience.

    PubMed

    Rugina, M; Serrano, E; Klossek, J M; Crampette, L; Stoll, D; Bebear, J P; Perrahia, M; Rouvier, P; Peynegre, R

    2002-06-01

    Nasal polyposis (NP) is a common condition in patients consulting ENT practitioners in France. A multicenter prospective study was performed to evaluate symptoms, demography, environmental factors, personal and family history and associated conditions like asthma, and food or drugs sensitivity (FDS) in patients suffering from NP. In each investigation center assessments were performed at the moment of the initial consultation by the same investigator, then updated with complementary exploration results required by the protocol. The chi 2 test and the Fisher test were used for statistical analysis. In this study 224 patients were included. Males were predominant at 63%. Asthma was found in 45% of cases without relevant sex difference. However, FDS, positive in 31% of the patients, was statistically higher in females than in males (42.9% vs. 24.4%). Severe and major symptoms were more frequently found in the female population. Environment and habitat factors did not appear to be relevant. High rates of NP (52.66%) and asthma (43.58%) were found in the family history. Hereditary factors were suggested and lead us to further study the genetic factors potentially involved in this pathology.

  20. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Drives Autocrine Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Survival in Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Sil; Myers, Allen; Kim, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: The pathogenesis of nasal polyps in chronic rhinosinusitis is poorly understood. Objectives: These studies seek to implicate a functional role for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in perpetuating primary nasal epithelial cell overgrowth, a key feature of hyperplastic polyps. Methods: Comparison of VEGF and receptor expression was assessed by ELISA of nasal lavage, immunohistochemistry of sinus tissue, flow cytometry of nasal epithelial cells, and ELISA of supernatants. VEGF-dependent cell growth and apoptosis were assessed with blocking antibodies to VEGF, their receptors, or small interfering RNA knockdown of neuropilin-1 by cell proliferation assays and flow cytometric binding of annexin V. Measurements and Main Results: VEGF protein was sevenfold higher in nasal lavage from patients with polyposis compared with control subjects (P < 0.001). We also report elevated expression of VEGF (P < 0.012), receptors VEGFR2 and phospho-VEGFR2 (both P < 0.04), and identification of VEGF coreceptor neuropilin-1 in these tissues. Nasal epithelial cells from patients with polyps demonstrated faster growth rates (P < 0.005). Exposure of cells to blocking antibodies against VEGF resulted in inhibition of cell growth (P < 0.05). VEGF receptor blockade required blockade of neuropilin-1 (P < 0.05) and resulted in increased apoptosis (P < 0.001) and inhibition of autocrine epithelial VEGF production (P < 0.05). Conclusions: These data demonstrate that VEGF is a novel biomarker for chronic rhinosinusitis with hyperplastic sinonasal polyposis that functions in an autocrine feed-forward manner to promote nasal epithelial cell growth and to inhibit apoptosis. These findings implicate a previously unrecognized and novel role of VEGF functioning through neuropilin-1 on nonneoplastic primary human airway epithelial cells, to amplify cell growth, contributing to exuberant hyperplastic polyposis. PMID:19762561

  1. Gastrin promotes intestinal polyposis through cholecystokinin-B receptor-mediated proliferative signaling and fostering tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Han, Y-M; Park, J-M; Park, S-H; Hahm, K B; Hong, S P; Kim, E-H

    2013-08-01

    Increased serum gastrin concentrations in patients with colorectal cancer suggested the tumorigenic trophic effect of gastrin. Detailed and global molecular mechanisms explaining trophic effect of gastrin had not been revealed. In the current study, intestinal polyposis of APC(Min/⁺) mice was compared between phosphate buffered saline (PBS) injected and gastrin (10 μg/kg, thrice per week) injected group. Total number of intestinal polyposis was counted and immunohistochemical staining with F4/80 and CD3 was done. MTT assay, cell cycle analysis, and Western blot for cyclin D1, CDK4, and β-catenin were performed in Raw 264.7 and HCT116 cells before and after gastrin administration. Experiments were repeated with YM022 or transfection with si-cholecystokinin-B receptor (CCK-B-R). Intraperitoneal gastrin significantly increased intestinal polyposis in APC(Min/⁺) mice (P<0.005), in which significant increases in macrophage were noted on F4/80 immunohistochemical staining (Plt;0.05) as well as Ki-67 staining (Plt;0.05) after gastrin. On comparative cytokine array, gastrin increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin 3Rβ (IL-3Rβ), stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), and thymus-derived chemotactic agent 3 (TCA-3) in macrophage cells, which was further confirmed with real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis (P<0.05). In addition to increased inflammatory cytokines, gastrin increased macrophage proliferation accompanied with increased cyclin D1 and CDK4. Targeted for HCT116 cells, gastrin significantly increased proliferation as well as increases in synthetic phase of cell cycle. YM022 as gastrin antagonist significantly abolished the trophic actions of gastrin (P<0.05). HCT116 cells transfected with siCCK-B-R, gastrin did not increase either cell cycle or β-catenin in spite of gastrin administration. Conclusively, gastrin promoted intestinal polyposis through either direct gastrin receptor

  2. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms on the RYD5 Gene in Nasal Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    İzbirak, Afife; Özdaş, Talih; Özcan, Kürşat Murat; Erbek, Selim S.; Köseoğlu, Sabri; Dere, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    Nasal polyposis (NP) is a chronic inflammatory disease. Several genes play major roles in the pathophysiology of the disease. We analyzed RYD5 gene polymorphisms to determine the effect of these variants or their genetic combinations on NP. We genotyped the RYD5 gene in 434 participants (196 patients with NP and 238 controls). Data were analyzed with SPSS, SNPStats, and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) software. We genotyped 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the RYD5 gene. RYD5 (+152G>T) (p.Gly51Va) has not been reported previously. The PolyPhen and PROVEAN predicted the missense mutation as deleterious, but sorting intolerant from tolerant (SIFT) did not. In the genotype analysis, we found that four SNPs (RYD5 [−264A>G], [−103G>A], [+57-14C>T], and [+66A>G]) were significantly associated with NP. The individuals with combined genotypes of six risk alleles (RYD5−264G, −103A, +13C, +57-14T, +66G, and +279T) had significantly higher risks for NP compared with the ones with one or four risk alleles. Haplotype analysis revealed that the two haplotypes were associated with risk of NP. As indicated by MDR analysis, RYD5 (−264A>G and −103G>A) and RYD5 (−264A>G, −177C>A, and −103G>A) were the best predictive combinations and they had the highest synergistic interaction on NP. In addition, RYD5 (+13C>T) was significantly associated with increased risk of both NP with asthma and NP with allergy and asthma. Some SNPs and their combinations in the RYD5 gene are associated with increased probability for developing NP. We emphasize the importance of genetic factors on NP and NP-related clinical phenotypes. PMID:26204469

  3. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis-Associated Desmoids Display Significantly More Genetic Changes than Sporadic Desmoids

    PubMed Central

    Robanus-Maandag, Els; Bosch, Cathy; Amini-Nik, Saeid; Knijnenburg, Jeroen; Szuhai, Karoly; Cervera, Pascale; Poon, Raymond; Eccles, Diana; Radice, Paolo; Giovannini, Marco; Alman, Benjamin A.; Tejpar, Sabine; Devilee, Peter; Fodde, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Desmoid tumours (also called deep or aggressive fibromatoses) are potentially life-threatening fibromatous lesions. Hereditary desmoid tumours arise in individuals affected by either familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or hereditary desmoid disease (HDD) carrying germline mutations in APC. Most sporadic desmoids carry somatic mutations in CTNNB1. Previous studies identified losses on 5q and 6q, and gains on 8q and 20q as recurrent genetic changes in desmoids. However, virtually all genetic changes were derived from sporadic tumours. To investigate the somatic alterations in FAP-associated desmoids and to compare them with changes occurring in sporadic tumours, we analysed 17 FAP-associated and 38 sporadic desmoids by array comparative genomic hybridisation and multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification. Overall, the desmoids displayed only a limited number of genetic changes, occurring in 44% of cases. Recurrent gains at 8q (7%) and 20q (5%) were almost exclusively found in sporadic tumours. Recurrent losses were observed for a 700 kb region at 5q22.2, comprising the APC gene (11%), a 2 Mb region at 6p21.2-p21.1 (15%), and a relatively large region at 6q15-q23.3 (20%). The FAP-associated desmoids displayed a significantly higher frequency of copy number abnormalities (59%) than the sporadic tumours (37%). As predicted by the APC germline mutations among these patients, a high percentage (29%) of FAP-associated desmoids showed loss of the APC region at 5q22.2, which was infrequently (3%) seen among sporadic tumours. Our data suggest that loss of region 6q15-q16.2 is an important event in FAP-associated as well as sporadic desmoids, most likely of relevance for desmoid tumour progression. PMID:21931686

  4. Is Nasal Polyposis Related to Levels of Serum Vitamin D and Vitamin D Receptor Gene Expression?

    PubMed Central

    Erdag, Omer; Turan, Mahfuz; Ucler, Rıfkı; Berkoz, Mehmet; Garca, Mehmet Fatih; Bozan, Nazım; Kıroglu, Ahmet Faruk; Cankaya, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Nasal polyposis (NP) is the most frequent cause of nasal masses. Despite considerable research on the subject, its etiology has not been fully elucidated, and effective treatment methods have not been developed. Some etiological factors causing low or high expression of genes in genetically predisposed individuals may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. The purpose of this study was to assess the relation between levels of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene expression and serum vitamin D with NP. Material/Methods The study included 46 subjects with NP (NP group) and 40 volunteers (control group). Nasal polyp tissue samples were taken from the NP group and nasal mucosa samples were taken from the control group. Levels of VDR gene expression in the tissue samples were assessed using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Results Mean serum 25(OH)D levels were 13.38±14.08 ng/ml in the NP group and 10.57±6.44 ng/ml in the control group (p=0.249). VDR gene expression was present in 17.5% of the NP group and 3.3% of the control group, and the difference between the 2 groups was statistically significant (likelihood ratio χ2=3.887; p=0.049). Conclusions This is the first study to assess levels of VDR gene expression in subjects with NP. Our results suggest that VDR gene expression may be associated with the pathogenesis or progression of NP. PMID:27895321

  5. Management strategies in Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis: a national healthcare survey in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Tomoki; Hamanaka, Michiko; Babaya, Akihito; Kimura, Kei; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Fukumoto, Miki; Tsukamoto, Kiyoshi; Noda, Masafumi; Matsubara, Nagahide; Tomita, Naohiro; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2017-02-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) are major sources of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) and are associated with other malignancies. There is some heterogeneity in management strategies in Japan. We undertook a survey of management of hereditary CRC in hospitals that are members of the Japan Society of Colorectal Cancer Research. One hundred and ninety departments responded, of which 127 were from designated cancer care hospitals (DCCHs) according to the Japanese government. There were 25 488 operations for CRC in these departments in 2015. The DCCHs performed better with regard to usage of Japan Society of Colorectal Cancer Research guidelines, referring new CRC patients for LS screening, and having in-house genetic counselors and knowledge of treatment for LS. There were 174 patients diagnosed with LS and 602 undergoing follow-up in 2011-2015, which is fewer than the number expected from CRC operations in 2015. These numbers were not affected by whether the institution was a DCCH. Universal screening for LS was carried out in 8% of the departments. In contrast, 541 patients were diagnosed with FAP and 273 received preventive proctocolectomy/colectomy in 2011-2015. The DCCH departments undertook more surgery than non-DCCH departments, although most of the management, including surgical procedures and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, was similar. Management of desmoid tumor in the abdominal cavity differed according to the number of patients treated. In conclusion, there was heterogeneity in management of LS but not FAP. Most patients with LS may be overlooked and universal screening for LS is not common in Japan.

  6. Desmoid Tumours in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis: Review of 17 Patients from a Portuguese Tertiary Center

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Anabela; Martins, Vilma; Santos, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Desmoid Tumours (DT) are benign tumours with an estimated incidence of 2-4 per million per year. Between 7-16% of them are associated with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and are mostly parietal or intra-abdominal. They are a challenge in relation to their unpredictable natural course, associated complications and difficult treatment. Aim The aim of the present study was to review the occurrence, management and follow-up of DT on FAP patients treated consecutively at a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of clinical data from patients treated consecutively between 1993 and 2014. Patients’ data was gathered from clinical records. Data collection included the following variables: demographic data, genotype, FAP phenotype, data on FAP related surgery, DT diagnosis, location, size and number, DT treatment, patients’ status and follow-up data. Results The study population consisted of 17 patients from 9 families; with a mean age of 41 years, mostly women (59%) and most with a mutation either on codon 232 or 554. Most tumours had an intra-abdominal component (59%) with a mean size of 5cm. Fifteen patients were first treated with pharmacotherapy (Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) and Tamoxifen). Five patients (29%) underwent surgery, 4 of them for complications of intra-abdominal tumours and 1 patient for abdominal wall tumours. Two patients underwent chemotherapy in relation to aggressive intra-abdominal disease. The mean follow-up time since diagnosis of DT was 123 months. Overall, 2 patients had remission, 11 patients had regression or stabilized disease, and 2 patients had progression. One patient died due to surgical complications. Conclusion Diagnosis of DT is based on clinical symptoms, without the need for screening, although imaging plays an important role once diagnosis is suspected. The treatment approach is conservative on most patients, leaving surgery for DT related complications. The follow

  7. Change in nasal congestion index after treatment in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Sahin-Onder, Serap; Oysu, Cagatay; Deveci, Ildem; Sahin, Samil; Aktas, Betul

    2016-01-01

    Background: The management of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP) involves both surgical and medical approaches, and remains a controversial subject. Objective: The objective of this prospective, randomized, controlled trial was to compare the medical and surgical treatments of CRSwNP in terms of their effect on the nasal congestion index (NCI). Methods: Forty-eight patients with CRSwNP were randomized either to medical or surgical therapy. Pretreatment and 3- and 6-month posttreatment assessments of the visual analog scale score, the 20-Item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test, saccharine clearance time, nasal endoscopy, and NCI measurement with acoustic rhinometry were performed. Forty-one subjects were included in the analysis. Results: Both the medical and surgical interventions for CRSwNP resulted in significant improvement in the visual analog scale score, 20-Item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test, saccharine clearance time, and nasal endoscopic examination scores. There was no difference between the two groups in terms of the percentage change from baseline for any of the parameters at the 6-month posttreatment assessment. NCI showed no significant difference from baseline. Similarly, no significant difference was found between the medical and surgical groups in terms of their effect on the NCI (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Because NCI does not correlate with standard subjective measures in outcomes for this group of patients, it cannot be used as an outcome measurement of treatment of subjects with CRSwNP. Results of this prospective randomized study did not find any additional benefit of surgical therapy over medical therapy in subjects with CRSwNP.

  8. Longer telomeres are associated with cancer risk in MMR-proficient hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Seguí, Nuria; Guinó, Elisabet; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Bellido, Fernando; Lázaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Moreno, Victor; Capellá, Gabriel; Valle, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant telomere length measured in blood has been associated with increased risk of several cancer types. In the field of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (CRC), and more particularly in Lynch syndrome, caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, we recently found that cancer-affected MMR gene mutation carriers had shorter telomeres and more pronounced shortening of telomere length with age than controls and unaffected MMR gene mutation carriers. Here we evaluate blood telomere length in MMR-proficient hereditary non-polyposis CRC, i.e. familial CRC type X (fCRC-X). A total of 57 cancer-affected and 57 cancer-free individuals from 34 Amsterdam-positive fCRC-X families were analyzed and compared to the data previously published on 144 cancer-affected and 100 cancer-free MMR gene mutation carriers, and 234 controls. Relative telomere length was measured using a monochrome multiplex quantitative PCR method, following strict measures to avoid sources of bias and adjusting by age. Despite the retrospective nature of our study, the results show that longer telomeres associate with cancer risk in fCRC-X, thus identifying different patterns of telomere length according to the status of the MMR system.

  9. A phase Ib study of the effects of black raspberries on rectal polyps in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Shu; Burke, Carol A; Hasson, Henrietta; Kuo, Chieh-Ti; Molmenti, Christine L Sardo; Seguin, Claire; Liu, Pengyuan; Huang, Tim H-M; Frankel, Wendy L; Stoner, Gary D

    2014-07-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is characterized by the early onset of colonic polyposis and a high risk for colorectal cancer. FAP is treated by colectomy followed by lifelong removal of rectal polyps. This study determined whether black raspberries (BRBs) might regress rectal polyps in patients with FAP. Fourteen patients with FAP were treated with BRBs daily for 9 months. Seven patients received BRB powder orally plus two BRB suppositories inserted into the rectum at bedtime. The other 7 received an oral placebo plus the suppositories. Rectal polyp counts and polyp sizes were obtained at time zero and after 9 months of BRB treatment. Polyps and adjacent normal tissue were collected at both time points. The burden (P = 0.036) but not number (P = 0.069) of rectal polyps was significantly decreased. No benefit was noted with the addition of oral BRBs. Three patients were nonresponders. BRBs significantly decreased cellular proliferation, DNA methylation methyl transferase 1 protein expression, and p16 promoter methylation, but not promoter methylation of the Wnt pathway antagonists, SFRP2 and WIF1, in rectal polyps (adenomas) from responders but not from nonresponders. The MBD-seq assay revealed more demethylated transcription start sites (TSS), including those for miRNAs, in BRB-treated adenomas from the responders. In conclusion, BRB suppositories seem sufficient for regressing rectal polyps in patients with FAP.

  10. A Case with Serrated Polyposis Syndrome Controlled by Multiple Applications of Endoscopic Mucosal Resection and Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Satohiro; Mashima, Hirosato

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 66 Final Diagnosis: Serrated polyposis syndrome Symptoms: Positive fecal occult blood test Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Unusual setting of medical care Background: Serrated polyposis syndrome (SPS) is characterized by numerous hyperplastic polyps and sessile serrated adenoma/polyp (SSA/P) in the large intestine. SSA/P is known to transform into malignant lesions through the serrated pathway instead of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Early diagnosis with lower gastrointestinal endoscopy and early treatment are now considered to be essential. Case Report: We had an experience with a case of SPS to which endoscopic treatment was applied in multiple sessions. Endoscopic treatment was performed for 16 lesions in total, and the pathological findings were SSA/P for 15 and adenoma for the other lesion. We intend to continue performing endoscopic surveillance for any newly developing lesions. Conclusions: SPS has a potential for malignant transformation, and issues, such as long-term prognosis and optimal therapeutic strategies, await resolution. However, multiple endoscopic treatments are useful for cases with lesions that are controllable employing this modality. PMID:28341823

  11. Effect of Sulindac and Erlotinib vs Placebo on Duodenal Neoplasia in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Samadder, N. Jewel; Neklason, Deborah W.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Byrne, Kathryn R.; Kanth, Priyanka; Samowitz, Wade; Jones, David; Tavtigian, Sean V.; Done, Michelle W.; Berry, Therese; Jasperson, Kory; Pappas, Lisa; Smith, Laurel; Sample, Danielle; Davis, Rian; Topham, Matthew K.; Lynch, Patrick; Strait, Elena; McKinnon, Wendy; Burt, Randall W.; Kuwada, Scott K.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) are at markedly increased risk for duodenal polyps and cancer. Surgical and endoscopic management of duodenal neoplasia is difficult and chemoprevention has not been successful. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of a combination of sulindac and erlotinib on duodenal adenoma regression in patients with FAP. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, enrolling 92 participants with FAP, conducted from July 2010 through June 2014 at Huntsman Cancer Institute in Salt Lake City, Utah. INTERVENTIONS Participants with FAP were randomized to sulindac (150 mg) twice daily and erlotinib (75 mg) daily (n = 46) vs placebo (n = 46) for 6 months. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The total number and diameter of polyps in the proximal duodenum were mapped at baseline and 6 months. The primary outcome was change in total polyp burden at 6 months. Polyp burden was calculated as the sum of the diameters of polyps. The secondary outcomes were change in total duodenal polyp count, change in duodenal polyp burden or count stratified by genotype and initial polyp burden, and percentage of change from baseline in duodenal polyp burden. RESULTS Ninety-two participants (mean age, 41 years [range, 24–55]; women, 56 [61%]) were randomized when the trial was stopped by the external data and safety monitoring board because the second preplanned interim analysis met the prespecified stopping rule for superiority. Grade 1 and 2 adverse events were more common in the sulindac-erlotinib group, with an acne-like rash observed in 87% of participants receiving treatment and 20% of participants receiving placebo (P < .001). Only 2 participants experienced grade 3 adverse events. OutcomeBaseline6-moFollow-upMedianChangeBetween-GroupDifference (95% CI)PValueMedian Duodenal Polyp Burden, mmSulindac-erlotinib29.019.5−8.5−19.0 (−32.0 to −10.9)<.001Placebo23.031.08.0Median Duodenal Polyp Count, No

  12. Colonic and duodenal flat adenomas in children with classical familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Marta; Thomson, Mike; Taylor, Chris; Donatone, Jorge; Quijano, Graciela; Drut, Ricardo

    2006-04-01

    Flat adenomas of the colon and duodenum have been described as associating with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), its attenuated variant, and the so-called hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. There seem to be no report on the occurrence of flat adenomas in pediatric patients with family history of FAP. We are reporting 4 children from 2 cancer-prone families in whom colonic and duodenal moderately dysplastic flat adenomas were found. Gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsies were performed in 3 female siblings (7, 9, and 11 years old) and 1 male (9 years old) when referred for screening owing to familial history of bowel cancer (family 1) or evidence of bilateral congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE), which is known to be associated with FAP (family 2). Endoscopic visualization of the mucosa was improved by use of 0.2% indigo carmine solution spray. Biopsies were routinely processed for H&E and immunohistochemistry staining. Present patients were asymptomatic, with the exception of 2 weeks rectal bleeding in 1 of them. The colonic videoendoscopy showed in 2/3 siblings hundreds of flat or slightly raised plaques less than 1 cm in diameter as well as some classic polyps throughout the colon. The other sibling showed 40 flat-topped lesions with minimal elevation and central umbilication in the cecum. Upper endoscopy demonstrated a few flat lesions in the nonperiampullary area of the duodenum in 2/4 patients. The colonic videoendoscopy performed on the 9-year-old boy revealed multiple small sessile polyps. Microscopic study demonstrated tubular adenomas with a few neoplastic crypts, slight disarray of the overall architecture, and moderate (low-grade) dysplasia of the epithelium. These features were more obvious at the center and superficial areas of the adenomas. The 4 children had multiple flat adenomas of the colon and duodenum (2/4) matching with those described in adult patients. Flat adenomas in the context of FAP probably

  13. Presence of c.3956delC mutation in familial adenomatous polyposis patients from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Nunes, Caroline Aquino; Alcântara, Diego di Felipe Ávila; Lima-Júnior, Sérgio Figueiredo; Cavalléro, Sandro Roberto de Araújo; Rey, Juan Antonio; Pinto, Giovanny Rebouças; de Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize APC gene mutations and correlate them with patient phenotypes in individuals diagnosed with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) in northern Brazil. METHODS: A total of 15 individuals diagnosed with FAP from 5 different families from the north of Brazil were analyzed in this study. In addition to patients with histopathological diagnosis of FAP, family members who had not developed the disease were also tested in order to identify mutations and for possible genetic counseling. All analyzed patients or their guardians signed a consent form approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the João de Barros Barreto University Hospital (Belem, Brazil). DNA extracted from the peripheral blood of a member of each of the affected families was subjected to direct sequencing. The proband of each family was sequenced to identify germline mutations using the Ion Torrent platform. To validate the detected mutations, Sanger sequencing was also performed. The samples from all patients were also tested for the identification of mutations by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction using the amplification refractory mutation system. RESULTS: Through interviews with relatives and a search of medical records, it was possible to construct genograms for three of the five families included in the study. All 15 patients from the five families with FAP exhibited mutations in the APC gene, and all mutations were detected in exon 15 of the APC gene. In addition to the patients with a histological diagnosis of FAP, family members without disease symptoms showed the mutation in the APC gene. In the present study, we detected two of the three most frequent germline mutations in the literature: the mutation at codon 1309 and the mutation at codon 1061. The presence of c.3956delC mutation was found in all families from this study, and suggests that this mutation was introduced in the population of the State of Pará through ancestor immigration (i.e., a de novo

  14. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nataro, James P.; Kaper, James B.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the predominant nonpathogenic facultative flora of the human intestine. Some E. coli strains, however, have developed the ability to cause disease of the gastrointestinal, urinary, or central nervous system in even the most robust human hosts. Diarrheagenic strains of E. coli can be divided into at least six different categories with corresponding distinct pathogenic schemes. Taken together, these organisms probably represent the most common cause of pediatric diarrhea worldwide. Several distinct clinical syndromes accompany infection with diarrheagenic E. coli categories, including traveler’s diarrhea (enterotoxigenic E. coli), hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (enterohemorrhagic E. coli), persistent diarrhea (enteroaggregative E. coli), and watery diarrhea of infants (enteropathogenic E. coli). This review discusses the current level of understanding of the pathogenesis of the diarrheagenic E. coli strains and describes how their pathogenic schemes underlie the clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and epidemiologic investigation of these important pathogens. PMID:9457432

  15. E. Coli Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults with weak immune systems. You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. Symptoms of ... pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 ...

  16. POLE and POLD1 mutations in 529 kindred with familial colorectal cancer and/or polyposis: review of reported cases and recommendations for genetic testing and surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Bellido, Fernando; Pineda, Marta; Aiza, Gemma; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Navarro, Matilde; Puente, Diana A.; Pons, Tirso; González, Sara; Iglesias, Silvia; Darder, Esther; Piñol, Virginia; Soto, José Luís; Valencia, Alfonso; Blanco, Ignacio; Urioste, Miguel; Brunet, Joan; Lázaro, Conxi; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S.; Valle, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Germ-line mutations in the exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 have been recently associated with polyposis and colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition. Here, we aimed to gain a better understanding of the phenotypic characteristics of this syndrome to establish specific criteria for POLE and POLD1 mutation screening and to help define the clinical management of mutation carriers. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Methods: The exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 were studied in 529 kindred, 441 with familial nonpolyposis CRC and 88 with polyposis, by using pooled DNA amplification and massively parallel sequencing. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Results: Seven novel or rare genetic variants were identified. In addition to the POLE p.L424V recurrent mutation in a patient with polyposis, CRC and oligodendroglioma, six novel or rare POLD1 variants (four of them, p.D316H, p.D316G, p.R409W, and p.L474P, with strong evidence for pathogenicity) were identified in nonpolyposis CRC families. Phenotypic data from these and previously reported POLE/POLD1 carriers point to an associated phenotype characterized by attenuated or oligo-adenomatous colorectal polyposis, CRC, and probably brain tumors. In addition, POLD1 mutations predispose to endometrial and breast tumors. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Conclusion: Our results widen the phenotypic spectrum of the POLE/POLD1-associated syndrome and identify novel pathogenic variants. We propose guidelines for genetic testing and surveillance recommendations. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. PMID:26133394

  17. The role of High Mobility Group Box 1 chromosomal protein in the pathogenesis of chronic sinusitis and nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Bellussi, L M; Chen, L; Chen, D; Passali, F M; Passali, D

    2012-12-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis is considered to be a multifactorial disease where different stimuli (mechanical, viral, bacterial, fungal infection, immunological disorders or dysreactivity, environmental pollution), acting on the mucosa of nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses, lead to epithelial damage and mucosal inflammation. Inflammatory cell infiltration (predominantly eosinophils, but also neutrophils, mast cells, macrophages and lymphocytes), cytokine release and sub-epithelial oedema are the histological pictures that are associated, from the clinical point of view, with nasal congestion, secretion and/or post-nasal drip and facial pain/headache. Recently, the importance of the HMG B-1 protein in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases has been demonstrated. This protein is released from necrotic/damaged cells or immune-activated cells, and by acting on specific membrane receptors causes the release of pro-inflammatory mediators, endothelial activation and the survival of inflammatory cells. The objective of the present study was: i) to determine whether HMG B1 is augmented in chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps; ii) if its expression is associated with eosinophils, TNF-α, IL 5 and IL 8 cytokines typically present in chronic inflammation of the nose and paranasal sinuses; iii) to investigate a hypothetical role of this protein in the pathogenesis of nasal polyposis. Nasal polyps tissue from 21 patients affected by CRSwNP and nasal mucosa from 8 controls was collected at the ENT Department of the Chinese PLA General Hospital and underwent immunohistological staining for detection of HMG B1 protein and IL -5, IL -8 and TNF-α inflammatory cytokines. The degree of HMG B1 protein expression was evaluated by dividing the stained sections in 4 portions: 1) nucleus of epithelial cells, 2) cytoplasm of epithelial cells, 3) focal extracellular infiltration, 4) inflammatory cells. HMG B1 was more expressed in the nucleus of epithelial

  18. Escherichia coli biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Beloin, Christophe; Roux, Agnès; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a predominant species among facultative anaerobic bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract. Both its frequent community lifestyle and the availability of a wide array of genetic tools contributed to establish E. coli as a relevant model organism for the study of surface colonization. Several key factors, including different extracellular appendages, are implicated in E. coli surface colonization and their expression and activity are finely regulated, both in space and time, to ensure productive events leading to mature biofilm formation. This chapter will present known molecular mechanisms underlying biofilm development in both commensal and pathogenic E. coli. PMID:18453280

  19. A Novel SMAD4 Mutation Causing Severe Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome with Protein Losing Enteropathy, Immunodeficiency, and Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Joel; Sahin, Christofer; Pestoff, Rebecka; Ignatova, Simone; Forsberg, Pia; Edsjö, Anders; Ekstedt, Mattias; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by juvenile polyps of the gastrointestinal tract. We present a new pathogenic mutation of the SMAD4 gene and illustrate the need for a multidisciplinary health care approach to facilitate the correct diagnosis. The patient, a 47-year-old Caucasian woman, was diagnosed with anaemia at the age of 12. During the following 30 years, she developed numerous gastrointestinal polyps. The patient underwent several operations, and suffered chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition, and multiple infections. Screening of the SMAD4 gene revealed a novel, disease-causing mutation. In 2012, the patient suffered hypoalbuminemia and a large polyp in the small bowel was found. Gamma globulin was given but the patient responded with fever and influenza-like symptoms and refused more treatment. The patient underwent surgery in 2014 and made an uneventful recovery. At follow-up two months later albumin was 38 g/L and IgG was 6.9 g/L. Accurate diagnosis is essential for medical care. For patients with complex symptomatology, often with rare diseases, this is best provided by multidisciplinary teams including representatives from clinical genetics. Patients with a SMAD4 mutation should be followed up both for JPS and haemorrhagic hereditary telangiectasia and may develop protein loosing enteropathy and immunodeficiency. PMID:25705527

  20. One-hit effects in cancer: Altered proteome of morphologically normal colon crypts in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Anthony T.; Patel, Bhavinkumar B.; Li, Xin-Ming; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Coudry, Renata A.; Cooper, Harry S.; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Boman, Bruce M.; Zhang, Tao; Litwin, Samuel; Ross, Eric A.; Conrad, Peggy; Crowell, James A.; Kopelovich, Levy; Knudson, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    We studied patients with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), because they are virtually certain to develop colon cancer, and because much is known about the causative APC gene. We hypothesized that the inherited heterozygous mutation itself leads to changes in the proteome of morphologically normal crypts and the proteins that changed may represent targets for preventive and therapeutic agents. We determined the differential protein expression of morphologically normal colon crypts of FAP patients versus those of individuals without the mutation, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and validation by 2D gel Western blotting. Approximately 13% of 1,695 identified proteins were abnormally expressed in the morphologically normal crypts of APC mutation carriers, indicating that a colon crypt cell under the one-hit state is already abnormal. Many of the expression changes affect pathways consistent with the function of the APC protein, including apoptosis, cell adhesion, cell motility, cytoskeletal organization and biogenesis, mitosis, transcription and oxidative stress response. Thus, heterozygosity for a mutant APC tumor suppressor gene alters the proteome of normal-appearing crypt cells in a gene-specific manner, consistent with a detectable one-hit event. These changes may represent the earliest biomarkers of colorectal cancer development, potentially leading to the identification of molecular targets for cancer prevention. PMID:18794146

  1. A distinct mutation on the alternative splice site of APC exon 9 results in attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis phenotype.

    PubMed

    Fostira, Florentia; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis

    2010-09-01

    A subset of APC mutation carriers shows a milder familial adenomatous polyposis phenotype (attenuated FAP) developing smaller number of polyps and colorectal cancer at an older age. It seems that a different mechanism to carcinogenesis is initiated according to the initial site of the germline mutation. The APC gene of a female patient with AFAP phenotypic features was analysed. A novel mutation located on the alternatively splice site of exon 9 was identified. This is the first reported mutation in the specific site. Transcripts characterization revealed disruption of splicing occurring within exon 9, resulting in the expression of a shorter mRNA transcript, which surprisingly does not affect the ratio between the two wild type transcripts, as well as the production of wild type short isoform by the mutant allele. The short wild type isoform, produced by the mutant allele, needs to be inactivated, on top of the wild type allele, for colorectal cancer to develop. These observations enhance the 'three hit hypothesis' and indicate that a distinct mechanism for the adenoma to carcinoma sequence should be followed, for truncated mutations taking place on the borderline of the alternatively spliced exon 9 of the APC gene, as well.

  2. Cytoreductive strategy for multiple intra-abdominal and abdominal wall desmoid tumors in familial adenomatous polyposis: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koji; Toiyama, Yuji; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Junichiro; Kawamoto, Aya; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Araki, Toshimitsu; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2012-10-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are benign myofibroblastic neoplasms originating from the fascia or muscle aponeurosis, which occur in one-third of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Most FAP-associated DTs occur in the intra-abdominal or abdominal wall region, thus, their infiltrative or expansive growth causes life-threatening organ damage, such as intestinal obstruction, urethral obstruction, and mesenteric infiltration with the involvement of mesenteric vessels. Treatments including surgical resection, cytotoxic chemotherapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and anti-estrogen therapy have all been tried with variable success. Here, we report on three patients with FAP who developed multiple intra-abdominal and abdominal wall DTs after total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. Two cases underwent surgical resection of uncontrolled abdominal wall DTs after successful control of intra-abdominal DTs by systemic chemotherapy. The remaining case underwent repeated surgical resections of multiple intra-abdominal and abdominal wall DTs, and consequently had recurrent intra-abdominal DTs, with involvement of the small bowel and ureter. Surgical intervention as tumor volume reduction (cytoreduction) may be useful for cases with medical treatment-refractory or symptomatic FAP-associated abdominal DTs.

  3. PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species which inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of man and warm-blooded animals. Because of the ubiquity of this bacterium in the intestinal flora, it serves as an important indicator organism of fecal contamination. E. coli, aside from serving a...

  4. Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli, a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is a part of the normal flora of the intestinal tract of humans and a variety of animals. E. coli strains are classified on the basis of antigenic differences in two surface components (serotyping), the somatic antigen (O) of the lipopoly...

  5. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Tânia A T; Elias, Waldir P; Scaletsky, Isabel C A; Guth, Beatriz E C; Rodrigues, Juliana F; Piazza, Roxane M F; Ferreira, Luís C S; Martinez, Marina B

    2016-12-01

    Most Escherichia coli strains live harmlessly in the intestines and rarely cause disease in healthy individuals. Nonetheless, a number of pathogenic strains can cause diarrhea or extraintestinal diseases both in healthy and immunocompromised individuals. Diarrheal illnesses are a severe public health problem and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and young children, especially in developing countries. E. coli strains that cause diarrhea have evolved by acquiring, through horizontal gene transfer, a particular set of characteristics that have successfully persisted in the host. According to the group of virulence determinants acquired, specific combinations were formed determining the currently known E. coli pathotypes, which are collectively known as diarrheagenic E. coli. In this review, we have gathered information on current definitions, serotypes, lineages, virulence mechanisms, epidemiology, and diagnosis of the major diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes.

  6. Somatic APC inactivation mechanisms in sporadic colorectal cancer cases in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Kámory, Eniko; Olasz, Judit; Csuka, Orsolya

    2008-03-01

    The role of germline inactivation of the adenomatosis polyposis coli (APC) gene in hereditary colorectal cancer is well known, being the most important cause of familial adenomatosus polyposis (FAP) syndrome. Hereditary cases with germline mutations, however, account only for 5-10% of colorectal cancers. The somatic inactivation of this gene has also been observed in sporadic cases. In order to examine the inactivation mechanisms of the APC gene we screened 70 sporadic colorectal cancer cases (27 rectal, 43 intestinal) of different stages for promoter hypermethylation, allelic imbalance (AI) and somatic mutations. The presence of promoter hypermethylation was observed in 21 cases (30%). Fifteen of the examined tumors (21%) showed AI, and also 15 tumors (21%) carried at least one somatic mutation. Thirteen of the detected alterations were novel variations: seven frameshifts, four missense mutations and two polymorphisms. Biallelic inactivation was found in 15 patients (21%). These results suggest that the inactivation of the APC gene is very common in sporadic colorectal cancer, and the main inactivation mechanism of the APC gene is promoter hypermethylation. Allelic imbalance has the same frequency as mutations, and mutations in the APC gene are more common in the early stages and in tumors located in the rectum.

  7. [Proctocolectomy with ileoanal anastomoses and desmoid tumor treated with resection. One case of familial adenomatous polyposis].

    PubMed

    Villalón-López, José Sebastián; Souto-del Bosque, Rosalía; Méndez-Sashida, Pedro Gonzalo

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: la poliposis adenomatosa familiar (PAF) es una rara enfermedad causada por una mutación en el gen de la poliposis adenomatosa coli (APC). Caso clínico: mujer de 32 años, con dolor y aumento del perímetro abdominal además de evacuaciones melénicas y pérdida de peso. La paciente presentó un tumor de 12 cm de diámetro en la fosa iliaca derecha. Tras la administración de medio de contraste, en una tomografía se apreció el tumor abdominal con reforzamiento compatible con sarcoma frente a tumor desmoide. Se realizó colonoscopia, por medio de la que se encontraron pólipos en el recto y el colon. La biopsia reportó adenomas túbulo-vellosos. Una panendoscopía demostró pólipos en fondo y cuerpo gástrico; el duodeno se encontraba en estado normal. Se realizó resección del tumor en pared abdominal y reconstrucción con malla además de proctocolectomía restaurativa con un reservorio íleo-anal con una ileostomía temporal. Se reportó tumor desmoide en la pared abdominal y se identificaron 152 pólipos túbulo-vellosos que afectaban todas las porciones del colon y el recto. Conclusiones: la PAF es una enfermedad autosómica dominante causada por una mutación en el gen APC que da como resultado el desarrollo de múltiples pólipos tanto en el colon como en el recto. Descrito en 1991, el gen APC se localiza en el cromosoma 5q21. Sin cirugía profiláctica, todos los pacientes desarrollarán cáncer colorrectal en la tercera década de la vida. Los tumores desmoides y los pólipos duodenales son ahora la causa de muerte en los pacientes con PAF.

  8. Assessment of quality-of-life outcomes after surgery for nasal polyposis with the DyNaChron questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Trung; Guillemin, Francis; Arous, Fabien; Jankowski, Roger

    2015-02-01

    This prospective study assesses outcomes at 6 weeks and 7 months after radical ethmoid surgery in 65 patients with nasal polyposis using a new and detailed instrument, the DyNaChron questionnaire, which was filled in the day prior to surgery and at 6 weeks and 7 months after surgery at follow-up visits. Before surgery, the leading bothersome symptoms were olfactory disturbances (7.74 ± 2.81) and nasal obstruction (6.66 ± 2.28). After surgery (6th week and 7th month), there was a clear improvement of all symptoms including nasal obstruction, olfactory disturbances, anterior rhinorrhea, postnasal discharge, facial pain/headache and cough in comparison to baseline (p < 0.0001). Nasal obstruction was the most improved symptom (effect size of 2.24). At 7th post-operative month, the sense of smell continued to improve slightly. By contrast, the postnasal discharge score that was significantly improved at 6th post-operative week tended to worsen at 7 months (p = 0.0045). Before surgery, strong psychosocial impacts were observed in association with nasal obstruction and anterior rhinorrhea. The physical impacts of each symptom were proportionally correlated to the symptom score before and after surgery. The quality of life (QOL) related to each symptom was clearly better at 6 weeks and remained steady at 7 months after surgery. In conclusion, olfactory disorders and postnasal rhinorrhea were the main remaining symptoms after sinus surgery despite a global improvement of symptoms and quality of life. The earlier time point to stabilize QOL outcomes of endoscopic sinus surgery could be suggested at 6 weeks after surgery.

  9. Gene-environment interactions between ERCC2, ERCC3, XRCC1 and cadmium exposure in nasal polyposis disease.

    PubMed

    Khlifi, Rim; Olmedo, Pablo; Gil, Fernando; Hammami, Boutheina; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel; Rebai, Ahmed

    2016-11-12

    Gene-environment interactions have long been known to play an important role in complex disease aetiology, such as nasal polyposis (NP). The present study supports the concept that DNA repair gene polymorphisms play critical roles in modifying individual susceptibility to environmental diseases. In fact, we investigated the role of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and cadmium as risk factors for Tunisian patients with NP. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the impact of combined effects of cadmium and ERCC3 7122 A>G (rs4150407), ERCC2 Lys751Gln (rs13181) and XRCC1 Arg399Gln (rs25487) genes in the susceptibility to NP disease. Significant associations between the risk of developing NP disease and ERCC2 [odds ratio (OR) = 2.0, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-3.7, p = 0.023] and ERCC3 (OR = 2.2, 95 % CI = 1.2-4.1, p = 0.013) genotypes polymorphisms were observed. Blood concentrations of Cd in NP patients (2.2 μg/L) were significantly higher than those of controls (0.5 μg/L). A significant interaction between ERCC3 (7122 A>G) polymorphism and blood-Cd levels (for the median of blood-Cd levels: OR = 3.8, 95 % CI = 1.3-10.8, p = 0.014 and for the 75th percentiles of blood-Cd levels: OR = 2.7, 95 % CI = 1.1-7.2, p = 0.041) was found in association with the risk of NP disease. In addition, when we stratified ERCC2, ERCC3 and XRCC1 polymorphism genotypes by the median and 75th percentiles of blood-Cd levels, we found also significant interactions between ERCC2 (Lys751Gln) and ERCC3 (7122 A>G) genotypes polymorphism and this metal in association with NP disease. However, no interaction was found between XRCC1 (Arg399Gln) polymorphism genotypes and Cd in association with NP disease.

  10. [A Case of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis with a Desmoid Tumor Probably Communicating to the Intestinal Lumen That Was Successfully Treated with Non-Surgical Therapy].

    PubMed

    Ito, Tetsuya; Chika, Noriyasu; Yamamoto, Azusa; Ogura, Toshiro; Amano, Kunihiko; Ishiguro, Toru; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kumagai, Youichi; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Okazaki, Yasushi; Mochiki, Erito; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2016-11-01

    A 44-year-old man with familial adenomatous polyposis underwent laparoscopic-assistedtotal proctocolectomy with ilealpouch anal anastomosis(IPAA). Computed tomography conducted 21 months after IPAA demonstrated bilateral hydronephrosis andan intra-abdominal mass with a maximal diameter of 22 cm, leading to a diagnosis of stage IV desmoid disease, according to the classification by Church and associates. Six courses of combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin plus dacarbazine were administered. Computed tomography after chemotherapy demonstrated marked shrinkage of the desmoidtumor with intraabdominal air andfluidcollection extending just below the skin of the ileostomy closure site. Stoollike fluidoverflowedspontaneously through the site of the ileostomy closure andthe abscess cavity was successfully drained. The patient was discharged 30 days after the start of drainage. The patient is doing well 10 months after the drainage without regrowth of the desmoid tumor, even though a cavity-like lesion encapsulatedby a thick wall remains.

  11. Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed and fertilized in a laboratory. When the embryos reach a certain size, one cell is removed ... question. The parents can then choose to transfer embryos that do not have the mutation. PGD has ...

  12. Attenuated Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed and fertilized in a laboratory. When the embryos reach a certain size, one cell is removed ... question. The parents can then choose to transfer embryos which do not have the mutation. PGD has ...

  13. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed and fertilized in a laboratory. When the embryos reach a certain size, one cell is removed ... question. The parents can then choose to transfer embryos that do not have the mutation. PGD has ...

  14. Hereditary Mixed Polyposis Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... removed and fertilized in a laboratory. When the embryos reach a certain size, 1 cell is removed ... question. The parents can then choose to transfer embryos which do not have the mutation. PGD has ...

  15. MYH-Associated Polyposis

    MedlinePlus

    ... may carry a single mutation in the MYH gene. How is MAP diagnosed? MAP is considered as a possible diagnosis ... found to have 2 mutations in the MYH gene. Although most individuals with MAP carry at least 1 of the 2 most ...

  16. Investigation of E. coli Enterotoxins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    It has been determined that representative culture filtrates from two different strains (H197 and 74-114) of enterotoxigenic E . coli contain at least...for E . coli entorotoxin (soluble) and that trypsin-activated insol ECT is more antigenic than unactivated insol ECT. In contrast, it was determined...that cholera (ga) toxoid, with or without adjuvant, stimulates antitoxin capable of neutralizing both cholera and E . coli enterotoxins. It has been

  17. ANIMAL ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    PubMed Central

    Dubreuil, J. Daniel; Isaacson, Richard E.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common cause of E. coli diarrhea in farm animals. ETEC are characterized by the ability to produce two types of virulence factors; adhesins that promote binding to specific enterocyte receptors for intestinal colonization and enterotoxins responsible for fluid secretion. The best-characterized adhesins are expressed in the context of fimbriae, such as the F4 (also designated K88), F5 (K99), F6 (987P), F17 and F18 fimbriae. Once established in the animal small intestine, ETEC produces enterotoxin(s) that lead to diarrhea. The enterotoxins belong to two major classes; heat-labile toxin that consist of one active and five binding subunits (LT), and heat-stable toxins that are small polypeptides (STa, STb, and EAST1). This chapter describes the disease and pathogenesis of animal ETEC, the corresponding virulence genes and protein products of these bacteria, their regulation and targets in animal hosts, as well as mechanisms of action. Furthermore, vaccines, inhibitors, probiotics and the identification of potential new targets identified by genomics are presented in the context of animal ETEC. PMID:27735786

  18. Investigating polymorphisms by bioinformatics is a potential cost-effective method to screen for germline mutations in Chinese familial adenomatous polyposis patients

    PubMed Central

    YANG, JUN; LIU, WEI QING; LI, WEN LIANG; CHEN, CHENG; ZHU, ZHU; HONG, MIN; WANG, ZHI QIANG; DONG, JIAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate germline mutations of the APC, MUTYH and AXIN2 genes in Chinese patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), and further assess the value of bioinformatics in screening the pathogenic changes predisposing to FAP. APC genes from 11 unrelated FAP patients in Yunnan province in China were firstly examined by exon-specific DNA sequencing. For samples without already known pathogenic changes predisposing to FAP in the APC gene, whole-gene sequencing of MUTYH and AXIN2 was performed. Mutational analysis of each gene was performed by bioinformatics. Eleven different types of APC polymorphisms were observed in the cohort of families analyzed. Of these polymorphisms, four were missense substitutions (V1822D, V1173G, P1760H and K2057), one was a nonsense substitution (S1196X), and six were silent substitutions (Y486Y, T449T, T1493T, G1678G, S1756S and P1960P). One missense mutation (Q335H) and two intronic substitutions (c.264+11G>A and c.420+35A>G) were detected in the MUTYH gene, and four synonymous mutations (I144I, P455P, P462P and L688L) and three intonic mutations (c.1060–77G>T, c.1060–287A>G and c.1060–282 A>G) of the AXIN2 gene were observed. In addition to the already reported pathogenic mutations, by using function assessment tools and databases, the synonymous substitutions observed in the APC gene of our samples were predicted to affect splicing regulation in the translation of mRNA, while the missense mutations observed in the APC gene and MUTYH gene were predicted to be disease-related polymorphisms; however, no functional effect of the mutations was observed in the AXIN2 gene. Comprehensive screening for germline mutations in APC, MUTYH and AXIN2 genes followed by prediction of pathogenicity using bioinformatic tools contributes to a cost-effective way of screening germline mutations in Chinese familial adenomatous polyposis patients. PMID:27347161

  19. Investigation of E. coli Enterotoxins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In the course of investigating E . coli enterotoxins, it was discovered that trypsin treatment of partially purified enterotoxin from strain H197 (078...loops) did exhibit elevated PF titers compared with uninoculated controls. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that E . coli enterotoxins

  20. Quality of life, social impact and functional outcome following ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Raviram, S; Rajan, Ramesh; Sindhu, R S; Bonny, N; Kuruvilla, A P; Subhalal, N

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to assess quality of life (QoL), functional outcome, and social impact following ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA) for ulcerative colitis (UC) and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) since Indian data is limited. Data was collected prospectively from patients who underwent IPAA for UC or FAP from 2004 to 2013. QoL and functional outcome at 1, 3, and 5 years after surgery, return to work, and change of job (social impact) were documented. QoL was assessed using the validated Cleveland Global Quality of Life (CGQL) score, the normal score being 1.0. Twenty-five patients were analyzed. Mean CGQL scores before surgery and at 1, 3, and 5 years were 0.5, 0.63, 0.73, and 0.8, respectively. FAP patients had better scores at 3 and 5 years. Only 40 % returned to same job. Sixty-four percent returned to work within a year. The median number of bowel movements per 24 h was less for FAP patients at 3 and 5 years. UC patients on long-term steroids had poorer function at 3 years. Long-term QoL and functional outcomes following IPAA are acceptable. Initial deterioration in QoL, mainly in FAP and long-term adverse social impact in both groups should not be underestimated. UC patients on long-term steroids showed delayed improvement in pouch function.

  1. Comparative effectiveness of next generation genomic sequencing for disease diagnosis: Design of a randomized controlled trial in patients with colorectal cancer/polyposis syndromes✩

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Carlos J.; Bennette, Caroline S.; Heagerty, Patrick; Comstock, Bryan; Horike-Pyne, Martha; Hisama, Fuki; Amendola, Laura M.; Bennett, Robin L.; Dorschner, Michael O.; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Grady, William M.; Fullerton, S. Malia; Trinidad, Susan B.; Regier, Dean A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Burke, Wylie; Patrick, Donald L.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Veenstra, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Whole exome and whole genome sequencing are applications of next generation sequencing transforming clinical care, but there is little evidence whether these tests improve patient outcomes or if they are cost effective compared to current standard of care. These gaps in knowledge can be addressed by comparative effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes research. We designed a randomized controlled trial that incorporates these research methods to evaluate whole exome sequencing compared to usual care in patients being evaluated for hereditary colorectal cancer and polyposis syndromes. Approximately 220 patients will be randomized and followed for 12 months after return of genomic findings. Patients will receive findings associated with colorectal cancer in a first return of result visit, and findings not associated with colorectal cancer (incidental findings) during a second return of result visit. The primary outcome is efficacy to detect mutations associated with these syndromes; secondary outcomes include psychosocial impact, cost-effectiveness and comparative costs. The secondary outcomes will be obtained via surveys before and after each return visit. The expected challenges in conducting this randomized controlled trial include the relatively low prevalence of genetic disease, difficult interpretation of some genetic variants, and uncertainty about which incidental findings should be returned to patients. The approaches utilized in this study may help guide other investigators in clinical genomics to identify useful outcome measures and strategies to address comparative effectiveness questions about the clinical implementation of genomic sequencing in clinical care. PMID:24997220

  2. Cap-assisted forward-viewing endoscopy to visualize the ampulla of Vater and the duodenum in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Kallenberg, Frank G J; Bastiaansen, Barbara A J; Dekker, Evelien

    2017-02-01

    Background and study aims Guidelines recommend surveillance endoscopy with both forward- and side-viewing endoscopes to identify duodenal and ampullary adenomas in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). We hypothesized that both the duodenum and the ampulla of Vater can be completely visualized during cap-assisted forward-viewing endoscopy. Patients and methods A total of 40 patients with FAP underwent forward-viewing endoscopy with a short cap attached to the tip of the gastroscope, with the aim of visualizing both the duodenum and the ampulla of Vater. If unsuccessful, the procedure was followed by a side-viewing endoscopy. Adverse events were reported. Results The duodenum, including the ampulla of Vater, was completely visualized using the cap in 38/40 patients (95.0 %). The ampulla could not be visualized using the cap in two patients, both of whom underwent additional side-viewing endoscopy, which was successful. No adverse events occurred. Conclusions This study showed that cap-assisted endoscopy can be used effectively and safely to visualize both the duodenum and the ampulla of Vater in patients with FAP. This practice might reduce burden, time, and costs of an additional side-viewing endoscopy.

  3. Restorative proctocolectomy with a three-loop ileal reservoir for ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis. Clinical results in 66 patients followed for up to 6 years.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, J; Pescatori, M; Motson, R W; Pezim, M E

    1984-01-01

    The results of restorative proctocolectomy with a three-loop ileal reservoir were reviewed. Of 66 patients treated between 1976 and 1982, 52 had ulcerative colitis and 14 had familial adenomatous polyposis. The temporary ileostomy was closed between 2 and 78 months previously in 63 cases. Of these, three patients had had the reservoir removed and two were lost to follow-up. One other patient was subsequently found to have Crohn's disease. Function was assessed in 55 patients who had undergone closure of the ileostomy more than 8 weeks previously. Mean frequency of defecation was 3.7 per 24 hours (range 1-9.5) and 11 patients (20%) were taking antidiarrheal medication. Spontaneous defecation occurred in 22 patients (40%) while 29 (52.7%) had to use a catheter passed per anum. Four patients defecated spontaneously but sometimes used a catheter. Continence was normal in 36 (65.4%) and minor leakage once every 2 to 3 days occurred at night in 16 (29.1%). Three patients (5.4%) had some soiling during day and night. Troublesome perianal soreness (five patients, 9.1%) necessitated a defunctioning ileostomy in one. Fifty-four of the 55 patients assessed preferred their quality of life to that with an ileostomy. PMID:6712311

  4. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Manifesting as Lactococcus Endocarditis: A Case Report and Review of the Association of Lactococcus with Underlying Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bazemore, Taylor C.; Maskarinec, Stacey A.; Zietlow, Kahli; Hendershot, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    A 45-year-old male with a prosthetic aortic valve presented to the hospital with several months of generalized malaise. On admission, he was noted to have anemia of unclear etiology and subsequently became febrile with multiple blood cultures growing Lactococcus garvieae. Inpatient workup was concerning for infectious endocarditis (IE) secondary to Lactococcus. The patient was discharged home with appropriate antimicrobial therapy; however, he was readmitted for persistent, symptomatic anemia and underwent colonoscopy, which revealed innumerable colonic polyps consistent with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) that was later confirmed with genetic testing. Surveillance computed tomography (CT) imaging of the aortic repair later demonstrated valve dehiscence with surrounding fluid collection; he underwent redo surgery and was found to have destruction of the aortic annulus and a large pseudoaneurysm. Histopathology of the valve prosthesis confirmed IE. It is suspected that the patient developed Lactococcus IE from enteric translocation. Review of the literature provides several reports of Lactococcus infections in association with underlying gastrointestinal disease, including colorectal cancer. Given this association, we raise the question of whether the diagnosis of Lactococcus IE should evoke suspicion and encourage evaluation for gastrointestinal pathology, as occurs with Streptococcus bovis. PMID:27818810

  5. Reduced expression of APC-1B but not APC-1A by the deletion of promoter 1B is responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Nagayama, Satoshi; Shimizu, Eigo; Komura, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Rui; Shibuya, Tetsuo; Arai, Masami; Hatakeyama, Seira; Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Ueno, Masashi; Miyano, Satoru; Imoto, Seiya; Furukawa, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene APC are associated with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Here we applied whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to the DNA of a sporadic FAP patient in which we did not find any pathological APC mutations by direct sequencing. WGS identified a promoter deletion of approximately 10 kb encompassing promoter 1B and exon1B of APC. Additional allele-specific expression analysis by deep cDNA sequencing revealed that the deletion reduced the expression of the mutated APC allele to as low as 11.2% in the total APC transcripts, suggesting that the residual mutant transcripts were driven by other promoter(s). Furthermore, cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) demonstrated that the deleted promoter 1B region is responsible for the great majority of APC transcription in many tissues except the brain. The deletion decreased the transcripts of APC-1B to 39–45% in the patient compared to the healthy controls, but it did not decrease those of APC-1A. Different deletions including promoter 1B have been reported in FAP patients. Taken together, our results strengthen the evidence that analysis of structural variations in promoter 1B should be considered for the FAP patients whose pathological mutations are not identified by conventional direct sequencing. PMID:27217144

  6. Multiple hepatic adenomas caused by long-term administration of androgenic steroids for aplastic anemia in association with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Nakao, A; Sakagami, K; Nakata, Y; Komazawa, K; Amimoto, T; Nakashima, K; Isozaki, H; Takakura, N; Tanaka, N

    2000-01-01

    We report a rare case of hepatic adenomas (HA), in a 20-year-old Japanese girl treated for 6 years with anabolic androgens for aplastic anemia. In a review of the world literature using computer MEDLINE search, we found only 17 cases of androgen-induced HA published between 1975 and 1998 in the English-language literature. The patient was referred to us because of liver lesions detected during a follow-up examination for familial adenomatous polyposis. After being diagnosed with aplastic anemia at 14 years of age, she had been treated with oxymetholone (30 mg/day) for 6 years. Laboratory evaluation revealed normal liver function. Ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) demonstrated multiple liver lesions. Histopathological examinations of biopsied specimens from the liver tumor showed HA. After the patient was diagnosed with HA, oxymetholone was tapered off. Patients taking androgenic-anabolic steroids should be carefully monitored with US and CT and tumor markers should be measured. This report may be helpful in identifying the population who is at risk of developing hepatic sex hormone-related tumors.

  7. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur containing heterocyclic molecules by mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which were selected for improved oxidation of furan and thiophene derivatives. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research as it appears to be of central importance in thiophene oxidation. We hope that analysis of the thd gene of E. coli will lead to improvement of our thiophene metabolizing bacterial strains.

  8. Endogenous conversion of ω-6 to ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fat-1 mice attenuated intestinal polyposis by either inhibiting COX-2/β-catenin signaling or activating 15-PGDH/IL-18.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Min; Park, Jong-Min; Cha, Ji-Young; Jeong, Migyeong; Go, Eun-Jin; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-05-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3PUFAs) have inhibitory effects in various preclinical cancer models, but their effects in intestinal polyposis have never been examined. As attempts have been made to use nutritional intervention to counteract colon cancer development, in this study we evaluated the effects of ω-3 PUFAs on intestinal polyposis in the Apc(Min/+) mouse model. The experimental groups included wild-type C56BL/6 mice, Apc(Min/+) mice, fat-1 transgenic mice expressing an n-3 desaturase to enable ω-3 PUFA synthesis, and Apc(Min/+) × fat-1 double-transgenic mice; all mice were 20 weeks of age. Small intestines were collected for gross and pathologic evaluation, including assessment of polyp number and size, followed by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. After administration of various concentrations of ω-3 PUFAs, PUFA levels were measured in small intestine tissue by GC/MS/MS analysis to compare with PUFA synthesis of between C57BL6 and fat-1mice. As a result, ω-3 PUFAs significantly attenuated Apc mutation-induced intestinal polyposis accompanied with significant inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, COX-2 and PGE2, but induced significant levels of 15-PGDH. In addition, significant induction of the inflammasome-related substrates as IL-1β and IL-18 and activation of caspase-1 was observed in Apc(Min/+) × fat-1 mice. Administration of at least 3 g/60 kg ω-3 PUFAs was equivalent to ω-3 PUFAs produced in fat-1 mice and resulted in significant increase in the expression of IL-1β, caspase-3 and IL-18, as seen in Apc(Min/+) × fat-1 mice. We conclude that ω-3PUFAs can prevent intestinal polyp formation by inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, but increased levels of 15-PGDH and IL-18.

  9. An Individual with Both MUTYH-Associated Polyposis and Lynch Syndrome Identified by Multi-Gene Hereditary Cancer Panel Testing: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Stephanie A.; Tan, Christopher A.; Bisson, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of next-generation sequencing technology to interrogate multiple genes simultaneously is being utilized more frequently in hereditary cancer testing. While this has benefits of reducing cost and allowing clinicians to cast a wide net in the elucidation of their patient's cancer, panel testing has the potential to reveal unexpected information. We report on a proband with pathogenic variants resulting in two different hereditary colon cancer syndromes. A 39-year-old male with a history of colon cancer, more than 20 colon polyps and a family history of colon cancer presented for genetic counseling. Testing with a 7-gene high-risk hereditary colon cancer panel identified a homozygous pathogenic variant, c.1187G>A (p.Gly396Asp) in MUTYH, and a likely pathogenic duplication of exon 7 in MSH2. Since this test result, the proband's mother was diagnosed with colon cancer; subsequent genetic testing confirmed she also carries the likely pathogenic duplication in the MSH2 gene. Although the cancer risk in individuals who carry multiple pathogenic variants has not been established for combined biallelic MUTYH-associated polyposis and Lynch syndrome, the identification of multiple pathogenic variants does allow for screening for cancers associated with both syndromes and has implications for cancer risk for family members. In particular, this has significant impact on those who test negative for a known familial pathogenic variant, yet could be still be at risk for cancer due to a second pathogenic variant in a family. More information is needed on the frequency of occurrence of multiple pathogenic variants, as well as the phenotypic spectrum when multiple pathogenic variants are present. PMID:27014339

  10. "You're one of us now": young people describe their experiences of predictive genetic testing for Huntington disease (HD) and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP).

    PubMed

    Duncan, Rony E; Gillam, Lynn; Savulescu, Julian; Williamson, Robert; Rogers, John G; Delatycki, Martin B

    2008-02-15

    There has been much debate about the psychosocial effects of predictive genetic testing in minors. The majority of this debate has been theoretical, with little empirical evidence published. We conducted in-depth interviews with 18 young people who had undergone testing, to explore the range of harms and benefits that they perceived were associated with their tests. Participants were eight individuals who were tested for Huntington disease (two gene-positive, six gene-negative) and ten who were tested for familial adenomatous polyposis (five gene-positive, five gene-negative). At the time of their test they ranged from 10 to 25 years of age. When interviewed they ranged from 14 to 26 years of age. Harms described included knowledge of future illness, witnessing distress in parents, negative effects on family relationships and friendships, effects upon employment and school, experiencing regret, feeling guilty and having to confront difficult issues. Benefits included knowledge of gene-negative status, relief from uncertainty, witnessing relief in parents, feeling able to plan for the future, positive effects on family relationships and friendships, feeling empowered and experiencing a sense of clarity about what is important in life. Harms were described in relation to gene-negative test results, as were benefits in relation to gene-positive test results. The testing process itself had several positive and negative effects for young people, distinct from the actual test result. Future research concerning the effects of predictive genetic testing in young people must remain broad and should aim to measure the beneficial as well as the harmful effects that resonate for young people themselves.

  11. The prevalence of MADH4 and BMPR1A mutations in juvenile polyposis and absence of BMPR2, BMPR1B, and ACVR1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Howe, J; Sayed, M; Ahmed, A; Ringold, J; Larsen-Haidle, J; Merg, A; Mitros, F; Vaccaro, C; Petersen, G; Giardiello, F; Tinley, S; Aaltonen, L; Lynch, H

    2004-01-01

    Background: Juvenile polyposis (JP) is an autosomal dominant syndrome predisposing to colorectal and gastric cancer. We have identified mutations in two genes causing JP, MADH4 and bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1A (BMPR1A): both are involved in bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) mediated signalling and are members of the TGF-ß superfamily. This study determined the prevalence of mutations in MADH4 and BMPR1A, as well as three other BMP/activin pathway candidate genes in a large number of JP patients. Methods: DNA was extracted from the blood of JP patients and used for PCR amplification of each exon of these five genes, using primers flanking each intron–exon boundary. Mutations were determined by comparison to wild type sequences using sequence analysis software. A total of 77 JP cases were sequenced for mutations in the MADH4, BMPR1A, BMPR1B, BMPR2, and/or ACVR1 (activin A receptor) genes. The latter three genes were analysed when MADH4 and BMPR1A sequencing found no mutations. Results: Germline MADH4 mutations were found in 14 cases (18.2%) and BMPR1A mutations in 16 cases (20.8%). No mutations were found in BMPR1B, BMPR2, or ACVR1 in 32 MADH4 and BMPR1A mutation negative cases. Discussion: In the largest series of JP patients reported to date, the prevalence of germline MADH4 and BMPR1A mutations is approximately 20% for each gene. Since mutations were not found in more than half the JP patients, either additional genes predisposing to JP remain to be discovered, or alternate means of inactivation of the two known genes are responsible for these JP cases. PMID:15235019

  12. Experimental evolution of E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mengshi

    The evolution from unicellular to multicellular behavior is an essential step in the history of life. Our aim is to investigate the emergence of collective behavior in the model organism Escherichia coli (E. coli) and its selection advantages, such as better utilization of public goods. Our preliminary results suggest that the evolution of collective behavior may be a natural response to stressed conditions. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: mengshi0928@gmail.com.

  13. Serogroups of Escherichia coli from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ramteke, P W; Tewari, Suman

    2007-07-01

    Fifty seven isolates of thermotolerant E. coli were recovered from 188 drinking water sources, 45 (78.9%) were typable of which 15 (26.3%) were pathogenic serotypes. Pathogenic serogroup obtained were 04 (Uropathogenic E. coli, UPEC), 025 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC), 086 (Enteropathogenic E. coli, EPEC), 0103 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 0157 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 08 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC) and 0113 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC). All the pathogenic serotypes showed resistance to bacitracin and multiple heavy metal ions. Resistance to streptomycin and cotrimazole was detected in two strains whereas resistance to cephaloridine, polymixin-B and ampicillin was detected in one strain each. Transfer of resistances to drugs and metallic ions was observed in 9 out of 12 strains studied. Resistances to bacitracin were transferred in all nine strains. Among heavy metals resistance to As(3+) followed by Cr(6+) were transferred more frequently.

  14. In-stream Escherichia coli Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, P.; Soupir, M.

    2013-12-01

    Elevated levels of pathogenic bacteria indicators such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) in streams are a serious concern. Controlling E. coli levels in streams requires improving our existing understanding of fate and transport of E. coli at watershed scale. In-stream E. coli concentrations are potentially linked to non-point pollution sources (i.e., agricultural land). Water of a natural stream can receive E. coli by either through overland flow (via runoff from cropland) or resuspension from the streambed to the water column. Calculating in-stream total E. coli loads requires estimation of particle attached bacteria as well free floating E. coli transport. Currently water quality models commonly used for predicting E. coli levels in stream water have limited capability for predicting E. coli levels in the water column as well as in the streambed sediment. The challenges in calculating in-stream E. coli levels include difficulties in modeling the complex interactions between sediment particles and E. coli. Here we have developed a watershed scale model (integrated with Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)), which involves calculation of particle attached E. coli, to predict in-stream E. coli concentrations. The proposed model predicts E. coli levels in streambed bed sediment as well as in the water column. An extensive in-stream E. coli monitoring was carried out to verify the model predictions, and results indicate that the model performed well. The study proposed here will improve understanding on in-stream bacterial contamination, and help improving existing water quality models for predicting pathogenic bacteria levels in ambient water bodies.

  15. Investigation of ’Escherichia coli’ Enterotoxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    E . coli diarrheal disease in man and domestic animals. Fundamentally, the design of the vaccine is based on the well- documented ability of cholera antitoxin to neutralize both cholera and heat- labile E . coli enterotoxins and on the ability of certain E . coli antigens to enhance the immune response to cholera toxoid and possibly whole-cell Cholera Vaccine, as

  16. Exonuclease IX of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Shafritz, K M; Sandigursky, M; Franklin, W A

    1998-01-01

    The bacteria Escherichia coli contains several exonucleases acting on both double- and single-stranded DNA and in both a 5'-->3' and 3'-->5' direction. These enzymes are involved in replicative, repair and recombination functions. We have identified a new exonuclease found in E.coli, termed exonuclease IX, that acts preferentially on single-stranded DNA as a 3'-->5' exonuclease and also functions as a 3'-phosphodiesterase on DNA containing 3'-incised apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites to remove the product trans -4-hydroxy-2-pentenal 5-phosphate. The enzyme showed essentially no activity as a deoxyribophosphodiesterase acting on 5'-incised AP sites. The activity was isolated as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein from a sequence of the E.coli genome that was 60% identical to a 260 bp region of the small fragment of the DNA polymerase I gene. The protein has a molecular weight of 28 kDa and is free of AP endonuclease and phosphatase activities. Exonuclease IX is expressed in E.coli , as demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR, and it may function in the DNA base excision repair and other pathways. PMID:9592142

  17. Clinical Implications of Enteroadherent Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M.P.; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli enteropathogenic E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including non-intimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called “enteroadherent E. coli ” categories subsequently produced toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  18. Intestinal Colonization by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    E . coli is mediated by specific types of pili. These pili are antigenic and can be used in diagnosing enterotoxigenic E . coli infections. They are also good protective antigens. When pregnant dams are vaccinated parenterally or orally with pili on live piliated bacteria, they secrete antibodies against the pili in their milk. Neonates suckling dams so vaccinated are passively protected against fatal challenge by enterotoxigenic E . coli . Pili are also good candidate protective antigens for the development of vaccines to protect by

  19. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO LIVE E. COLI ORGANISMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    shock and shock produced by injection of live E . coli organisms in dogs. A primary purpose of our research has been to determine the effects of...intravenous injections of living E . coli organisms in dogs and monkeys and compare them with responses produced by endotoxin. Hemodynamic changes...pathologic alterations, and metabolic abnormalities have been evaluated in animals receiving lethal and sublethal injections of live E . coli organisms and comparable dosages of purified endotoxin.

  20. Transcription of foreign DNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Warren, René L; Freeman, John D; Levesque, Roger C; Smailus, Duane E; Flibotte, Stephane; Holt, Robert A

    2008-11-01

    Propagation of heterologous DNA in E. coli host cells is central to molecular biology. DNA constructs are often engineered for expression of recombinant protein in E. coli, but the extent of incidental transcription arising from natural regulatory sequences in cloned DNA remains underexplored. Here, we have used programmable microarrays and RT-PCR to measure, comprehensively, the transcription of H. influenzae, P. aeruginosa, and human DNA propagating in E. coli as bacterial artificial chromosomes. We find evidence that at least half of all H. influenzae genes are transcribed in E. coli. Highly transcribed genes are principally involved in energy metabolism, and their proximal promoter regions are significantly enriched with E. coli sigma(70) (also known as RpoD) binding sites. H. influenzae genes acquired from an ancient bacteriophage Mu insertion are also highly transcribed. Compared with H. influenzae, a smaller proportion of P. aeruginosa genes are transcribed in E. coli, and in E. coli there is punctuated transcription of human DNA. The presence of foreign DNA in E. coli disturbs the host transcriptional profile, with expression of the E. coli phage shock protein operon and the flagellar gene cluster being particularly strongly up-regulated. While cross-species transcriptional activation is expected to be enabling for horizontal gene transfer in bacteria, incidental expression of toxic genes can be problematic for DNA cloning. Ongoing characterization of cross-expression will help inform the design of biosynthetic gene clusters and synthetic microbial genomes.

  1. Presence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, Enteroinvasive E. coli, Enteropathogenic E. coli, and Enterotoxigenic E. coli on tomatoes from public markets in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Torres-Vitela, M Del Refugio; Acevedo-Sandoval, Otilio A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Villarruel-López, Angélica; Castro-Rosas, Andjavier

    2013-09-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes (DEP) are important foodborne pathogens in various countries, including Mexico. However, no data exist on the presence of DEP on fresh tomatoes (Solanum lycopericum) from Mexico. The frequency of fecal coliforms (FC), E. coli, and DEP were determined for two tomato varieties. One hundred samples of a saladette tomato variety and 100 samples of a red round tomato variety were collected from public markets in Pachuca, Mexico. Each tomato sample consisted of four whole tomatoes. For the 100 saladette samples, coliform bacterial, FC, E. coli, and DEP were identified in 100, 70, 60, and 10% of samples, respectively. For the 100 red round samples, coliform bacterial, FC, E. coli, and DEP were identified in 100, 75, 65, and 11% of samples, respectively. Identified DEP included Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). STEC were isolated from 6% of saladette samples and 5% of red round samples. ETEC were isolated from 3% of saladette samples and 4% of red round samples. EPEC were isolated from 2% of saladette samples and 3% of red round samples, and EIEC were isolated from 1% of saladette samples. Both STEC and ETEC were identified in two saladette samples and 1 red round sample. E. coli O157:H7 was not detected in any STEC-positive samples.

  2. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  3. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  4. Third International E. coli genome meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Proceedings of the Third E. Coli Genome Meeting are provided. Presentations were divided into sessions entitled (1) Large Scale Sequencing, Sequence Analysis; (2) Databases; (3) Sequence Analysis; (4) Sequence Divergence in E. coli Strains; (5) Repeated Sequences and Regulatory Motifs; (6) Mutations, Rearrangements and Stress Responses; and (7) Origins of New Genes. The document provides a collection of abstracts of oral and poster presentations.

  5. E. coli survival in waters: temperature dependence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important for evaluating microbial contamination and in making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature; this dependency is routinely expressed using an analog of the Q10 model. This suggestion...

  6. Escherichia coli and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bettelheim, Karl A.; Goldwater, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the association of strains of Escherichia coli with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and the possible role these bacteria play in this enigmatic condition. The review addresses evidence for E. coli in SIDS infants, potential sources of E. coli in the environment, colonization by commensal and pathogenic strains, the variety of currently accepted pathotypes, and how these pathotypes could compromise intestinal integrity and induce inflammation. Both intestinal and extraintestinal pathotypes are compared in relation to the apparent liability in which virulence traits can be gained or lost by strains of E. coli. The way in which E. coli infections fit with current views on infant sleeping position and other SIDS risk factors is highlighted. PMID:26191064

  7. Structure of Escherichia Coli Tryptophanase

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Yip, P.; Howell, P.

    2006-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent tryptophanase has been isolated from Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined. The structure shares the same fold with and has similar quaternary structure to Proteus vulgaris tryptophanase and tyrosine-phenol lyase, but is found in a closed conformation when compared with these two enzymes. The tryptophanase structure, solved in its apo form, does not have covalent PLP bound in the active site, but two sulfate ions. The sulfate ions occupy the phosphoryl-binding site of PLP and the binding site of the {alpha}-carboxyl of the natural substrate tryptophan. One of the sulfate ions makes extensive interactions with both the transferase and PLP-binding domains of the protein and appears to be responsible for holding the enzyme in its closed conformation. Based on the sulfate density and the structure of the P. vulgaris enzyme, PLP and the substrate tryptophan were modeled into the active site. The resulting model is consistent with the roles of Arg419 in orienting the substrate to PLP and acidifying the {alpha}-proton of the substrate for {beta}-elimination, Lys269 in the formation and decomposition of the PLP quinonoid intermediate, Arg230 in orienting the substrate-PLP intermediates in the optimal conformation for catalysis, and His463 and Tyr74 in determining substrate specificity and suggests that the closed conformation observed in the structure could be induced by substrate binding and that significant conformational changes occur during catalysis. A catalytic mechanism for tryptophanase is proposed. Since E. coli tryptophanase has resisted forming diffraction-quality crystals for many years, the molecular surface of tryptophanase has been analyzed in various crystal forms and it was rationalized that strong crystal contacts occur on the flat surface of the protein and that the size of crystal contact surface seems to correlate with the diffraction quality of the crystal.

  8. Structure of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Ku, Shao Yang; Yip, Patrick; Howell, P Lynne

    2006-07-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent tryptophanase has been isolated from Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined. The structure shares the same fold with and has similar quaternary structure to Proteus vulgaris tryptophanase and tyrosine-phenol lyase, but is found in a closed conformation when compared with these two enzymes. The tryptophanase structure, solved in its apo form, does not have covalent PLP bound in the active site, but two sulfate ions. The sulfate ions occupy the phosphoryl-binding site of PLP and the binding site of the alpha-carboxyl of the natural substrate tryptophan. One of the sulfate ions makes extensive interactions with both the transferase and PLP-binding domains of the protein and appears to be responsible for holding the enzyme in its closed conformation. Based on the sulfate density and the structure of the P. vulgaris enzyme, PLP and the substrate tryptophan were modeled into the active site. The resulting model is consistent with the roles of Arg419 in orienting the substrate to PLP and acidifying the alpha-proton of the substrate for beta-elimination, Lys269 in the formation and decomposition of the PLP quinonoid intermediate, Arg230 in orienting the substrate-PLP intermediates in the optimal conformation for catalysis, and His463 and Tyr74 in determining substrate specificity and suggests that the closed conformation observed in the structure could be induced by substrate binding and that significant conformational changes occur during catalysis. A catalytic mechanism for tryptophanase is proposed. Since E. coli tryptophanase has resisted forming diffraction-quality crystals for many years, the molecular surface of tryptophanase has been analyzed in various crystal forms and it was rationalized that strong crystal contacts occur on the flat surface of the protein and that the size of crystal contact surface seems to correlate with the diffraction quality of the crystal.

  9. The evolution of the Escherichia coli phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Roy R; Henderson, Ian R

    2012-03-01

    Escherichia coli is familiar to biologists as a classical model system, ubiquitous in molecular biology laboratories around the world. Outside of the laboratory, E. coli strains exist as an almost universal component of the lower-gut flora of humans and animals. Although usually a commensal, E. coli has an alter ego as a pathogen, and is associated with diarrhoeal disease and extra-intestinal infections. The study of E. coli diversity predates the availability of molecular data, with strains initially distinguished by serotyping and metabolic profiling, and genomic diversity illustrated by DNA hybridisation. The quantitative study of E. coli diversity began with the application of multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), and has progressed with the accumulation of nucleotide sequence data, from single genes through multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to whole genome sequencing. Phylogenetic methods have shed light on the processes of genomic evolution in this extraordinarily diverse species, and revealed the origins of pathogenic E. coli strains, including members of the phylogenetically indistinguishable "genus"Shigella. In May and June 2011, an outbreak of haemorrhagic uraemic syndrome in Germany was linked to a strain of enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O104:H4. Application of high-throughput sequencing technologies allowed the genome and origins of the outbreak strain to be characterised in real time as the outbreak was in progress.

  10. Effect of bile on growth, peritoneal absorption, and blood clearance of Escherichia coli in E coli peritonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, R.; Schalen, C.; Tranberg, K.G. )

    1991-06-01

    The effect of intraperitoneal bile on growth, peritoneal absorption, and clearance of Escherichia coli was determined in E coli peritonitis in the rat. In E coli peritonitis, intraperitoneal bacterial counts gradually decreased, whereas they increased (after 2 hours) with subsequent development of bacteremia in E coli plus bile peritonitis. After an intraperitoneal injection of labeled bacteria, blood radioactivity was only initially lower in E coli plus bile peritonitis compared with E coli peritonitis. Clearance from blood was lower in E coli plus bile peritonitis than in E coli peritonitis. Organ localization was similar in E coli peritonitis and E coli plus bile peritonitis with decreased splenic, increased pulmonary, and unchanged hepatic uptakes compared with controls. Impaired peritoneal absorption of bacteria, together with impaired local host defense, is likely to enhance the noxious effect of bile in E coli peritonitis.

  11. Low level of cross-resistance between triclosan and antibiotics in Escherichia coli K-12 and E. coli O55 compared to E. coli O157.

    PubMed

    Braoudaki, Maria; Hilton, Anthony Craig

    2004-06-15

    Misuse of biocides has encouraged the emergence of resistance and cross-resistance in certain strains. This study investigated resistance of triclosan-adapted Escherichia coli K-12 and E. coli O55 to antimicrobial agents and compared these to E. coli O157:H7. Cross-resistance in E. coli K-12 and E. coli O55 was observed however to a lesser extent than in E. coli O157:H7. Triclosan-adapted E. coli K-12 demonstrated cross-resistance to chloramphenicol, whereas triclosan-adapted E. coli O55 exhibited resistance to trimethoprim. In comparison, E. coli O157:H7 was resistant to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, trimethoprim, benzalkonium chloride and chlorohexidine suggesting strain specific rather than general resistance mechanisms.

  12. Advances in genoserotyping and subtyping of Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E. coli plays an important role as a member of the gut microbiota; however, pathogenic strains also exist, including various diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli that cause illness outside of the GI-tract. E. coli have traditionally been serotyped using antisera a...

  13. Survival of pathogenic Escherichia coli on basil, lettuce, and spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contamination of lettuce, spinach and basil with pathogenic E. coli has caused numerous illnesses over the past decade. E. coli O157:H7, E. coli O104:H4 and avian pathogenic E. coli (APECstx- and APECstx+) were inoculated on basil plants and in promix soiless substrate using drip and overhead ir...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  19. Electrophoretic Mobilities of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Wild-Type Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Darren A.; Rice, Eugene W.; Johnson, Clifford H.; Fox, Kim R.

    1999-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of a number of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and wild-type E. coli strains were measured. The effects of pH and ionic strength on the EPMs were investigated. The EPMs of E. coli O157:H7 strains differed from those of wild-type strains. As the suspension pH decreased, the EPMs of both types of strains increased. PMID:10388724

  20. Biofuels from E. Coli: Engineering E. coli as an Electrofuels Chassis for Isooctane Production

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-16

    Electrofuels Project: Ginkgo Bioworks is bypassing photosynthesis and engineering E. coli to directly use carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce biofuels. E. coli doesn’t naturally metabolize CO2, but Ginkgo Bioworks is manipulating and incorporating the genes responsible for CO2 metabolism into the microorganism. By genetically modifying E. coli, Ginkgo Bioworks will enhance its rate of CO2 consumption and liquid fuel production. Ginkgo Bioworks is delivering CO2 to E. coli as formic acid, a simple industrial chemical that provides energy and CO2 to the bacterial system.

  1. First international E. coli genome meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This volume is a collection of abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of studies reported at the First International E. Coli Genome Meeting, held September 10-14, 1992 at the University of Wisconsin.

  2. First international E. coli genome meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This volume is a collection of abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of studies reported at the First International E. Coli Genome Meeting, held September 10-14, 1992 at the University of Wisconsin.

  3. Structure of Water in Escherichia Coli B

    DTIC Science & Technology

    structure broadening of the NMR water spectrum. Using bacteria grown in the special chemically defined medium, we showed that the water in E. coli B was highly ordered and was very different from ’free’ water and from polywater .

  4. Native valve Escherichia coli endocarditis following urosepsis.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, D; Ramakrishnan, S; Patro, K C; Devaraj, S; Krishnamurthy, V; Kothari, Y; Satyaki, N

    2013-05-01

    Gram-negative organisms are a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Escherichia coli, the most common cause of urinary tract infection and gram-negative septicemia involves endocardium rarely. In this case report, we describe infection of native mitral valve by E. coli following septicemia of urinary tract origin in a diabetic male; subsequently, he required prosthetic tissue valve replacement indicated by persistent sepsis and congestive cardiac failure.

  5. Biodegradation of Aromatic Compounds by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Eduardo; Ferrández, Abel; Prieto, María A.; García, José L.

    2001-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli has long been recognized as the best-understood living organism, little was known about its abilities to use aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. This review gives an extensive overview of the current knowledge of the catabolism of aromatic compounds by E. coli. After giving a general overview of the aromatic compounds that E. coli strains encounter and mineralize in the different habitats that they colonize, we provide an up-to-date status report on the genes and proteins involved in the catabolism of such compounds, namely, several aromatic acids (phenylacetic acid, 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, phenylpropionic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, and 3-hydroxycinnamic acid) and amines (phenylethylamine, tyramine, and dopamine). Other enzymatic activities acting on aromatic compounds in E. coli are also reviewed and evaluated. The review also reflects the present impact of genomic research and how the analysis of the whole E. coli genome reveals novel aromatic catabolic functions. Moreover, evolutionary considerations derived from sequence comparisons between the aromatic catabolic clusters of E. coli and homologous clusters from an increasing number of bacteria are also discussed. The recent progress in the understanding of the fundamentals that govern the degradation of aromatic compounds in E. coli makes this bacterium a very useful model system to decipher biochemical, genetic, evolutionary, and ecological aspects of the catabolism of such compounds. In the last part of the review, we discuss strategies and concepts to metabolically engineer E. coli to suit specific needs for biodegradation and biotransformation of aromatics and we provide several examples based on selected studies. Finally, conclusions derived from this review may serve as a lead for future research and applications. PMID:11729263

  6. Biodegradation of aromatic compounds by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Díaz, E; Ferrández, A; Prieto, M A; García, J L

    2001-12-01

    Although Escherichia coli has long been recognized as the best-understood living organism, little was known about its abilities to use aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. This review gives an extensive overview of the current knowledge of the catabolism of aromatic compounds by E. coli. After giving a general overview of the aromatic compounds that E. coli strains encounter and mineralize in the different habitats that they colonize, we provide an up-to-date status report on the genes and proteins involved in the catabolism of such compounds, namely, several aromatic acids (phenylacetic acid, 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, phenylpropionic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, and 3-hydroxycinnamic acid) and amines (phenylethylamine, tyramine, and dopamine). Other enzymatic activities acting on aromatic compounds in E. coli are also reviewed and evaluated. The review also reflects the present impact of genomic research and how the analysis of the whole E. coli genome reveals novel aromatic catabolic functions. Moreover, evolutionary considerations derived from sequence comparisons between the aromatic catabolic clusters of E. coli and homologous clusters from an increasing number of bacteria are also discussed. The recent progress in the understanding of the fundamentals that govern the degradation of aromatic compounds in E. coli makes this bacterium a very useful model system to decipher biochemical, genetic, evolutionary, and ecological aspects of the catabolism of such compounds. In the last part of the review, we discuss strategies and concepts to metabolically engineer E. coli to suit specific needs for biodegradation and biotransformation of aromatics and we provide several examples based on selected studies. Finally, conclusions derived from this review may serve as a lead for future research and applications.

  7. Systems Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyeong Rok; Shin, Jae Ho; Cho, Jae Sung; Yang, Dongsoo; Lee, Sang Yup

    2017-03-01

    Systems metabolic engineering, which recently emerged as metabolic engineering integrated with systems biology, synthetic biology, and evolutionary engineering, allows engineering of microorganisms on a systemic level for the production of valuable chemicals far beyond its native capabilities. Here, we review the strategies for systems metabolic engineering and particularly its applications in Escherichia coli. First, we cover the various tools developed for genetic manipulation in E. coli to increase the production titers of desired chemicals. Next, we detail the strategies for systems metabolic engineering in E. coli, covering the engineering of the native metabolism, the expansion of metabolism with synthetic pathways, and the process engineering aspects undertaken to achieve higher production titers of desired chemicals. Finally, we examine a couple of notable products as case studies produced in E. coli strains developed by systems metabolic engineering. The large portfolio of chemical products successfully produced by engineered E. coli listed here demonstrates the sheer capacity of what can be envisioned and achieved with respect to microbial production of chemicals. Systems metabolic engineering is no longer in its infancy; it is now widely employed and is also positioned to further embrace next-generation interdisciplinary principles and innovation for its upgrade. Systems metabolic engineering will play increasingly important roles in developing industrial strains including E. coli that are capable of efficiently producing natural and nonnatural chemicals and materials from renewable nonfood biomass.

  8. Succinate production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Thakker, Chandresh; Martínez, Irene; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N.

    2012-01-01

    Succinate has been recognized as an important platform chemical that can be produced from biomass. While a number of organisms are capable of succinate production naturally, this review focuses on the engineering of Escherichia coli for production of the four-carbon dicarboxylic acid. Important features of a succinate production system are to achieve optimal balance of reducing equivalents generated by consumption of the feedstock, while maximizing the amount of carbon that is channeled to the product. Aerobic and anaerobic production strains have been developed and applied to production from glucose as well as other abundant carbon sources. Metabolic engineering methods and strain evolution have been used and supplemented by the recent application of systems biology and in silico modeling tools to construct optimal production strains. The metabolic capacity of the production strain, as well as the requirement for efficient recovery of succinate and the reliability of the performance under scale-up are important in the overall process. The costs of the overall biorefinery compatible process will determine the economical commercialization of succinate and its impact in larger chemical markets. PMID:21932253

  9. E. coli on the move

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calne, S.

    2012-04-01

    Lynn Grove High School in Great Yarmouth, UK has been awarded a Royal Society partnership grant. Lynn Grove pupils aged between 11 and 16 years will carry out an investigation collaborating with scientists at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, UK to investigate the distribution of E.coli and other coliform bacteria within a school. The information will be used as an evidence base to educate pupils about the transmission of microbes and about methods of control. Through this work pupils will gain an appreciation of the diversity of microbial biochemistry and the chemistry behind chromogenic detection methodologies for specific bacterial enzymes. Inferences from the use of diagnostic selective media will be confirmed by carrying out DNA isolation and PCR to identify the genes responsible for the biochemical reactions. PCR will also be used to identify species of coliforms by reference to genomic sequence databases. These techniques will allow pupils to look into an unseen world in a way which has direct relevance to their everyday lives. Furthermore this partnership study will demonstrate to pupils that solving scientific questions requires the integration of a variety of scientific disciplines. The project will run from January 2012 until June 2012. We will present our preliminary results from the investigation and outline our future plans.

  10. Generation of a Transgenic Mouse for Colorectal Cancer Research with Intestinal Cre-Expression Limited to the Large Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yingben; Johnson, Robert; DeSmet, Marsha; Snyder, Paul W.; Fleet, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Genetically modified mice have been used for colon cancer research but findings from these models are confounded by expression of cancer in multiple organs. We sought to create a transgenic mouse with Cre recombinase (Cre) expression limited to the epithelial cells of the large intestine and use this model to study colon cancer driven by adenomatosis polyposis coli (APC) gene inactivation. A promoter/enhancer from the mouse carbonic anhydrase I gene was used to generate a Cre expressing transgenic mouse (CAC). After characterizing transgene expression and distribution, CAC mice were crossed to APC580S mice to generate mice with APC inactivation at one (CAC; APC580S/+) or both alleles (CAC; APC580S/580S). Transgene expression was limited to the epithelial cells of the cecum and colon, extended from the crypt base to the luminal surface, and was expressed in approximately 15% of the crypts. No abnormal gross phenotype was seen in 3 or 6 wk CAC; APC580S/+ mice but CAC; APC580S/580S mice had significant mucosal hyperplasia in the colon at 3 wk that developed into tumors by 6 wk. By 10 wk, 20% of CAC; APC580S/+ mice developed adenomatous lesions in the distal colon (3.0±0.4 mm, 1.1 per mouse). Dextran sulfate sodium treatment increased the incidence and number of tumors and this occurred predominantly in distal colon. Our new model has improved features for colon cancer research i.e. transgene expression is limited to the epithelium of the large bowel with normal cells found next to genetically modified cells. PMID:20663863

  11. Alterations in K-ras, APC and p53-multiple genetic pathway in colorectal cancer among Indians.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Pooja; Anwar, Mumtaz; Nanda, Neha; Kochhar, Rakesh; Wig, Jai Dev; Vaiphei, Kim; Mahmood, Safrun

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing rapidly in Asian countries during the past few decades, but no comprehensive analysis has been done to find out the exact cause of this disease. In this study, we investigated the frequencies of mutations and expression pattern of K-ras, APC (adenomatosis polyposis coli) and p53 in tumor, adjoining and distant normal mucosa and to correlate these alterations with patients clinicopathological parameters as well as with the survival. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction digestion was used to detect mutations in K-ras and PCR-SSCP (Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism) followed by DNA sequencing was used to detect mutations in APC and p53 genes. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression pattern of K-ras, APC and p53 proteins. The frequencies of mutations of K-ras, APC and p53 in 30 tumor tissues samples were 26.7 %, 46.7 % and 20 %, respectively. Only 3.3 % of tumors contained mutations in all the three genes. The most common combination of mutation was APC and p53 whereas mutation in both p53 and K-ras were extremely rare. There was no association between the mutations and expression pattern of K-ras, APC and p53 (p>0.05). In Indians, the frequency of alterations of K-ras and APC is similar as in Westerns, whereas the frequency of p53 mutation is slightly lower. The lack of multiple mutations in tumor specimens suggests that these genetic alterations might have independent influences on CRC development and there could be multiple alternative genetic pathways to CRC in our present study cohort.

  12. [Esophageal, gastric and colorectal tumors].

    PubMed

    Stolte, M

    2001-01-01

    The new WHO-classification of the tumours of the digestive System replaces the "blue books", and are now dealt with completely in a single book. In addition to the histological features of the lesions, the new classification also contains information on epidemiology, aetiology, endoscopy, genetic susceptibility, molecular genetics, prognosis and predictive factors. The erstwhile mostly black-and-white histological photographs have at last again been replaced by numerous colour photographs and supplemented by endoscopic and macroscopic pictures. The changes to the individual tumour classifications are only few. The former classification of the malignant lymphomas of the gastrointestinal tract has now been replaced by the classification of these lesions that has long been in use. New additions are the gastrointestinal tract has long been in use. New additions are the gastrointestinal stroma tumours (GIST) and the gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumour (GANT). To the epithelial tumours of the oesophagus have now been added the basaloid squamous cell tumours of the vermiform appendix and the colorectum have now been added the serrated adenoma and the small-cell carcinoma. The following new chapter have been included: adenocarcinoma of the oesophagogastric junction, secondary carcinomas of the stomach, secondary tumours of the small bowel and colon, the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenile polyposis, familial adenomatosis coli, and HNPCC. For the first time the intra-epithelial neoplasias in chronic inflammatory bowel disease have been differentiated, i.e. adenomas distinguished from the dysplasias, while the latter term has now been replaced by the term "intra-epithelial neoplasias". In comparison with the former "blue books", the new WHO-classification, prepared by presentatives of numerous disciplines--for the first time including clinicians--has taken on the character of a text book.

  13. Lytic bacteriophages reduce Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Sean; Roberts, Cheryl; Handy, Eric; Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield™) or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either; (1) immersion of lettuce in 500 ml of EcoShield™ 8.3 log PFU/ml or 9.8 log PFU/ml for up to 2 min before inoculation with E. coli O157:H7; (2) spray-application of EcoShield™ (9.3 log PFU/ml) to lettuce after inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 (4.10 CFU/cm2) following exposure to 50 μg/ml chlorine for 30 sec. After immersion studies, lettuce was spot-inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (2.38 CFU/cm2). Phage-treated, inoculated lettuce pieces were stored at 4°C for and analyzed for E. coli O157:H7 populations for up to 7 d. Immersion of lettuce in 9.8 log PFU/ml EcoShield™ for 2 min significantly (p < 0.05) reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations after 24 h when stored at 4°C compared with controls. Immersion of lettuce in suspensions containing high concentrations of EcoShield™ (9.8 log PFU/ml) resulted in the deposition of high concentrations (7.8 log log PFU/cm2) of bacteriophages on the surface of fresh cut lettuce, potentially contributing to the efficacy of the lytic phages on lettuce. Spraying phages on to inoculated fresh cut lettuce after being washed in hypochlorite solution was significantly more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations (2.22 log CFU/cm2) on day 0 compared with control treatments (4.10 log CFU/cm2). Both immersion and spray treatments provided protection from E. coli O157:H7 contamination on lettuce, but spray application of lytic bacteriophages to lettuce was more effective in immediately reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations fresh cut lettuce. PMID:23819106

  14. Transmission OF Campylobacter coli in chicken embryos

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Daise Aparecida; Fonseca, Belchiolina Beatriz; de Melo, Roberta Torres; Felipe, Gutembergue da Silva; da Silva, Paulo Lourenço; Mendonça, Eliane Pereira; Filgueiras, Ana Luzia Lauria; Beletti, Marcelo Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter coli is an important species involved in human cases of enteritis, and chickens are carriers of the pathogen mainly in developing country. The current study aimed to evaluate the transmission of C. coli and its pathogenic effects in chicken embryos. Breeder hens were inoculated intra-esophageally with C. coli isolated from chickens, and their eggs and embryos were analyzed for the presence of bacteria using real-time PCR and plate culture. The viability of embryos was verified. In parallel, SPF eggs were inoculated with C. coli in the air sac; after incubation, the embryos were submitted to the same analysis as the embryos from breeder hens. In embryos and fertile eggs from breeder hens, the bacterium was only identified by molecular methods; in the SPF eggs, however, the bacterium was detected by both techniques. The results showed no relationship between embryo mortality and positivity for C. coli in the embryos from breeder hens. However, the presence of bacteria is a cause of precocious mortality for SPF embryos. This study revealed that although the vertical transmission is a possible event, the bacteria can not grow in embryonic field samples. PMID:24031861

  15. Behavior of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains on alfalfa sprouts.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Torres-Vitela, M Del Refugio; Villarruel-López, Angélica; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2013-08-01

    Data about the behavior of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (non-O157 STEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) on seeds and alfalfa sprouts are not available. The behavior of STEC, EIEC, ETEC, and EPEC was determined during germination and sprouting of alfalfa seeds at 20 ± 2°C and 30 ± 2°C and on alfalfa sprouts at 3 ± 2°C. When alfalfa seeds were inoculated with STEC, EIEC, ETEC, or EPEC strains, all these diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEPs) grew during germination and sprouting of seeds, reaching counts of approximately 5 and 6 log CFU/g after 1 day at 20 ± 2°C and 30 ± 2°C, respectively. However, when the sprouts were inoculated after 1 day of seed germination and stored at 20 ± 2°C or 30 ± 2°C, no growth was observed for any DEP during sprouting at 20 ± 2°C or 30 ± 2°C for 9 days. Refrigeration reduced significantly (P < 0.0.5) the number of viable DEPs on sprouts after 20 days in storage; nevertheless, these decreases have no practical significance for the safety of the sprouts.

  16. The 503nm pigment of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kamitakahara, Joyce R.; Polglase, W. J.

    1970-01-01

    The yield of cell protein was one-third less for streptomycin-dependent Escherichia coli B than for the wild-type parent strain when both were grown aerobically on a medium with limiting glucose, but anaerobically the yield of protein was similar for both strains. The transient pigment absorbing at 503nm that is known to be present in E. coli and other organisms was not detectable in streptomycin-dependent mutants nor in a non-dependent (energy-deficient) revertant. When wild-type E. coli B was grown on limiting glucose–salts medium containing 2,4 dinitrophenol, the yield of cell protein was decreased and formation of the 503nm pigment was inhibited. Fumarase, aconitase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were de-repressed in E. coli B cells grown with excess of glucose in a medium containing 2,4-dinitrophenol. In air-oxidized, wild-type E. coli B cells, the 503nm pigment appeared before reduced cytochromes when gluconate was the substrate but failed to appear when succinate was the substrate. The results provide evidence for a role of the 503nm pigment in aerobic energy metabolism, possibly as an electron acceptor from NADPH. PMID:4395501

  17. Interaction between Escherichia coli and lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    A sample of mature lunar fines (10084.151) was solubilized to a high degree (about 17 percent) by the chelating agent salicylic acid (0.01. M). The neutralized (pH adjusted to 7.0) leachate was found to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli (ATCC 259922) in a minimial mineral salts glucose medium; however, the inhibition was somewhat less than that caused by neutralized salicylic acid alone. The presence of lunar fines in the minimal medium was highly stimulatory to growth of E. coli following an early inhibitory response. The bacterium survived less well in the lunar leachate than in distilled water, no doubt because of the salicylate. It was concluded that the sample of lunar soil tested has nutritional value to E. coli and that certain products of fermentation helped to solubilize the lunar soil.

  18. Production of curcuminoids in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ji; Cha, Mi Na; Kim, Bog-Gyu; Ahn, Joong-Hoon

    2017-03-09

    Curcumin, a hydrophobic polyphenol derived from the rhizome of the herb Curcuma longa, possesses diverse pharmacological properties including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activity. Two curcuminoids (dicinnamoylmethane and bisdemethoxycurcumin) were synthesized from glucose in Escherichia coli. PAL (phenylalanine ammonia lyase) or TAL (tyrosine ammonia lyase), along with Os4CL (p-coumaroyl-CoA ligase) and CUS (curcumin synthase), were introduced in to E. coli, and each strain produced dicinnamoylmethane or bisdemethoxycurcumin, respectively. In order to increase the production of curcuminoids in E. coli, the shikimic acid biosynthesis pathway which increases the substrates for curcuminoid biosynthesis, was engineered. Using engineered strains, the production of bisdemethoxycurcumin increased from 0.32 to 4.63 mg/L, and that of dicinnamoylmethane from 1.24 mg/L and 6.95 mg/L.

  19. Frequency-Dependent Escherichia coli Chemotaxis Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuejun; Si, Guangwei; Deng, Nianpei; Ouyang, Qi; Wu, Tailin; He, Zhuoran; Jiang, Lili; Luo, Chunxiong; Tu, Yuhai

    2012-03-01

    We study Escherichia coli chemotaxis behavior in environments with spatially and temporally varying attractant sources by developing a unique microfluidic system. Our measurements reveal a frequency-dependent chemotaxis behavior. At low frequency, the E. coli population oscillates in synchrony with the attractant. In contrast, in fast-changing environments, the population response becomes smaller and out of phase with the attractant waveform. These observations are inconsistent with the well-known Keller-Segel chemotaxis equation. A new continuum model is proposed to describe the population level behavior of E. coli chemotaxis based on the underlying pathway dynamics. With the inclusion of a finite adaptation time and an attractant consumption rate, our model successfully explains the microfluidic experiments at different stimulus frequencies.

  20. Thymineless death in Escherichia coli: strain specificity.

    PubMed

    Cummings, D J; Mondale, L

    1967-06-01

    Thymineless death of various ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive strains of Escherichia coli B and K-12 was investigated. It was found that E. coli B, B(s-12), K-12 rec-21, and possibly K-12 Lon(-), all sensitive to UV, were also sensitive to thymine starvation. However, other UV-sensitive strains of E. coli were found to display the typical resistant-type kinetics of thymineless death. The correlation of these results with various other cellular processes suggested that the filament-forming ability of the bacteria might be involved in the mechanism of thymineless death. It was apparent from the present results that capacity for host-cell reactivation, recombination ability, thymine dimer excision, and probably induction of a defective prophage had little to do with determining sensitivity to thymine deprivation.

  1. Thymineless Death in Escherichia coli: Strain Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Mondale, Lee

    1967-01-01

    Thymineless death of various ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive strains of Escherichia coli B and K-12 was investigated. It was found that E. coli B, Bs−12, K-12 rec-21, and possibly K-12 Lon−, all sensitive to UV, were also sensitive to thymine starvation. However, other UV-sensitive strains of E. coli were found to display the typical resistant-type kinetics of thymineless death. The correlation of these results with various other cellular processes suggested that the filament-forming ability of the bacteria might be involved in the mechanism of thymineless death. It was apparent from the present results that capacity for host-cell reactivation, recombination ability, thymine dimer excision, and probably induction of a defective prophage had little to do with determining sensitivity to thymine deprivation. Images PMID:5337772

  2. Diversity of CRISPR loci in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Díez-Villaseñor, C; Almendros, C; García-Martínez, J; Mojica, F J M

    2010-05-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) and CAS (CRISPR-associated sequence) proteins are constituents of a novel genetic barrier that limits horizontal gene transfer in prokaryotes by means of an uncharacterized mechanism. The fundamental discovery of small RNAs as the guides of the defence apparatus arose as a result of Escherichia coli studies. However, a survey of the system diversity in this species in order to further contribute to the understanding of the CRISPR mode of action has not yet been performed. Here we describe two CRISPR/CAS systems found in E. coli, following the analysis of 100 strains representative of the species' diversity. Our results substantiate different levels of activity between loci of both CRISPR types, as well as different target preferences and CRISPR relevances for particular groups of strains. Interestingly, the data suggest that the degeneration of one CRISPR/CAS system in E. coli ancestors could have been brought about by self-interference.

  3. Prodigiosin - A Multifaceted Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Zorec, Maša; Stopar, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite a considerable interest in prodigiosin, the mechanism of its antibacterial activity is still poorly understood. In this work, Escherichia coli cells were treated with prodigiosin to determine its antimicrobial effect on bacterial physiology. The effect of prodigiosin was concentration dependent. In prodigiosin treated cells above MIC value no significant DNA damage or cytoplasmic membrane disintegration was observed. The outer membrane, however, becomes leaky. Cells had severely decreased respiration activity. In prodigiosin treated cells protein and RNA synthesis were inhibited, cells were elongated but could not divide. Pre-treatment with prodigiosin improved E. coli survival rate in media containing ampicillin, kanamycin and erythromycin but not phleomycin. The results suggest that prodigiosin acts as a bacteriostatic agent in E. coli cells. If prodigiosin was diluted, cells resumed growth. The results indicate that prodigiosin has distinct mode of antibacterial action in different bacteria. PMID:27612193

  4. Persistent colonization of sheep by Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other E. coli pathotypes.

    PubMed

    Cornick, N A; Booher, S L; Casey, T A; Moon, H W

    2000-11-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is an important cause of food-borne illness in humans. Ruminants appear to be more frequently colonized by STEC than are other animals, but the reason(s) for this is unknown. We compared the frequency, magnitude, duration, and transmissibility of colonization of sheep by E. coli O157:H7 to that by other pathotypes of E. coli. Young adult sheep were simultaneously inoculated with a cocktail consisting of two strains of E. coli O157:H7, two strains of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), and one strain of enteropathogenic E. coli. Both STEC strains and ETEC 2041 were given at either 10(7) or 10(10) CFU/strain/animal. The other strains were given only at 10(10) CFU/strain. We found no consistent differences among pathotypes in the frequency, magnitude, and transmissibility of colonization. However, the STEC strains tended to persist to 2 weeks and 2 months postinoculation more frequently than did the other pathotypes. The tendency for persistence of the STEC strains was apparent following an inoculation dose of either 10(7) or 10(10) CFU. One of the ETEC strains also persisted when inoculated at 10(10) CFU. However, in contrast to the STEC strains, it did not persist when inoculated at 10(7) CFU. These results support the hypothesis that STEC is better adapted to persist in the alimentary tracts of sheep than are other pathotypes of E. coli.

  5. Melanosis coli in patients with colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Biernacka-Wawrzonek, Dorota; Stępka, Michał; Tomaszewska, Alicja; Ehrmann-Jóśko, Agnieszka; Chojnowska, Natalia; Muszyński, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Melanosis coli is a benign lesion affecting the mucosa of the large intestine. There is a relationship between the presence of melanosis and anthraquinone laxative use. Melanosis coli is also observed in patients with colon cancer, but there is doubt whether these two conditions are related. Aim To analyze the correlation between melanosis and colon cancer. Material and methods We analyzed retrospectively 436 patients undergoing colon cancer surgery. There were 246 women and 190 men. Patients were divided into three age groups: under 50 years, between 51 and 65 years, and over 66 years. We analyzed sections of the cancer and intestinal mucosa from the tumor’s proximal (2–5 cm) and distal (8–10 cm) zone. Results Melanosis coli was present in 52 patients, which represents 11.9% of patients with colon cancer. More often it was present in women. The most common location of melanosis and colon cancer was the terminal part of the large intestine. In patients below 50 years of age in both sexes melanosis coli did not occur. In men, melanosis was more common in the age group over 66 years. Intensity of pigmentation was higher in the tumor’s distal zone. Conclusions The incidence of melanosis coli increases with age, similar to that of colon cancer. Melanosis was not present inside tumors, in almost half of the cases it was not present in the proximal zone, and the degree of pigmentation increased in distal zone. The cause-effect relationship between melanosis coli and colon cancer remains uncertain. PMID:28337232

  6. Hydrogen production by recombinant Escherichia coli strains

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Toshinari; Sanchez‐Torres, Viviana; Wood, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The production of hydrogen via microbial biotechnology is an active field of research. Given its ease of manipulation, the best‐studied bacterium Escherichia coli has become a workhorse for enhanced hydrogen production through metabolic engineering, heterologous gene expression, adaptive evolution, and protein engineering. Herein, the utility of E. coli strains to produce hydrogen, via native hydrogenases or heterologous ones, is reviewed. In addition, potential strategies for increasing hydrogen production are outlined and whole‐cell systems and cell‐free systems are compared. PMID:21895995

  7. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli-Associated Exotoxins.

    PubMed

    Welch, Rodney A

    2016-06-01

    Escherichia coli are a common cause of infectious disease outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Several independently evolved E. coli clades are common causes of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. There is ample epidemiological and in vitro evidence that several different protein toxins common to many, but not all, of these strains are likely to aid the colonization and immune-evasion ability of these bacteria. This review discusses our current knowledge and areas of ignorance concerning the contribution of the hemolysin; cytotoxic-necrotizing factor-1; and the autotransporters, Sat, Pic, and Vat, to extraintestinal human disease.

  8. WGS accurately predicts antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in identifying resistance genotypes of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) and whether these correlate with observed phenotypes. Methods: Seventy-six E. coli strains were isolated from farm cattle and measured f...

  9. Intestinal Colonization by Enterotoxigenic ’Escherichia Coli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    Growth of enterotoxigenic E . coli in porcine small intestine selects for piliated forms which adhere to the intestinal epithelium. Surface antigen...K99 on enterotoxigenic E . coli is a pilus. Antigen K99 occurs on porcine enterotoxigenic E . coli strains and is produced in pig small intestine.

  10. 77 FR 9888 - Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products... manufacturing trimmings for six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45..., non-intact product, that are contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26,...

  11. Gentamicin: effect on E. coli in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacena, M. A.; Todd, P.

    1999-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that liquid bacterial cultures grown in space flight were not killed as effectively by antibiotic treatments as were cultures grown on Earth. However, the cause for the decreased antibiotic effectiveness remains unknown. Possible explanations include modified cell proliferation and modified antibiotic transport in the culture medium. Escherichia coli cultures were grown in space flight (STS-69 and STS-73), with and without gentamicin, on a solid agar substrate thus eliminating fluid effects and reducing the unknowns associated with space-flight bacterial cultures in suspension. This research showed that E. coli cultures grown in flight on agar for 24 to 27 hours experienced a heightened growth compared to simultaneous controls. However, addition of gentamicin to the agar killed the bacteria such that both flight and ground control E. coli samples had similar final cell concentrations. Therefore, while the reported existence of a decrease in antibiotic effectiveness in liquid cultures remains unexplained, these data suggest that gentamicin in space flight was at least as effective as, if not more effective than, on Earth, when E. coli cells were grown on agar.

  12. Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Mead, P S; Griffin, P M

    1998-10-10

    Escherichia coli O157 was first identified as a human pathogen in 1982. One of several Shiga toxin-producing serotypes known to cause human illness, the organism probably evolved through horizontal acquisition of genes for Shiga toxins and other virulence factors. E. coli O157 is found regularly in the faeces of healthy cattle, and is transmitted to humans through contaminated food, water, and direct contact with infected people or animals. Human infection is associated with a wide range of clinical illness, including asymptomatic shedding, non-bloody diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis, haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and death. Since laboratory practices vary, physicians need to know whether laboratories in their area routinely test for E. coli O157 in stool specimens. Treatment with antimicrobial agents remains controversial: some studies suggest that treatment may precipitate haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and other studies suggest no effect or even a protective effect. Physicians can help to prevent E. coli O157 infections by counselling patients about the hazards of consuming undercooked ground meat or unpasteurised milk products and juices, and about the importance of handwashing to prevent the spread of diarrhoeal illness, and by informing public-health authorities when they see unusual numbers of cases of bloody diarrhoea or haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

  13. Travelers' diarrhea and toxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, S L; Kean, B H; Evans, D G; Evans, D J; Bessudo, D

    1975-05-01

    In a group of 133 United States students studied for 18 days after arriving in Mexico, diarrhea developed in 38 (29 per cent). Diarrhea rarely began before the fourth day, and the mean onset was 13 days after arrival. Symptoms lasted an average of 3.4 days but persisted in 21 per cent of sick students. Heat-labile enterotoxin-producing Escheria coli was found in the stools of 72 per cent of sick and 15 per cent of healthy students. None had heat-labile Esch. coli when they entered Mexico. The incubation period was short, generally 24 to 48 hours, and the carrier state was five days or less in 82 per cent of students surveyed. Entamoeba histolytica was found in 6 per cent of cases of diarrhea, but not salmonella, shigella or penetrating Esch. coli. These studies suggest that approximately 70 per cent of travelers' diarrhea in Mexico is associated with heat-labile toxigenic strains of Esch. coli.

  14. E. Coli: Preventing Outbreaks at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Mary D.

    1996-01-01

    One strain of E. coli is not usually found in foods, but has been related to consumption of undercooked ground beef. Symptoms are stomach cramps and diarrhea, and 2-7% of infections lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome, which is life threatening. Camps can prevent outbreaks by avoiding uncooked meat on overnight campouts and requiring appropriate…

  15. Hybrid speciation in agricultural Campylobacter coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Hybridization between distantly related organisms can facilitate rapid adaptation but is constrained by epistatic fitness interactions. The zoonotic pathogens Campylobacter coli and C. jejuni differ from each other at an average of nearly 40 amino acids per gene. Nevertheless, they have...

  16. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies.

  17. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  18. Extracellular recombinant protein production from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ye; Chen, Rachel

    2009-11-01

    Escherichia coli is the most commonly used host for recombinant protein production and metabolic engineering. Extracellular production of enzymes and proteins is advantageous as it could greatly reduce the complexity of a bioprocess and improve product quality. Extracellular production of proteins is necessary for metabolic engineering applications in which substrates are polymers such as lignocelluloses or xenobiotics since adequate uptake of these substrates is often an issue. The dogma that E. coli secretes no protein has been challenged by the recognition of both its natural ability to secrete protein in common laboratory strains and increased ability to secrete proteins in engineered cells. The very existence of this review dedicated to extracellular production is a testimony for outstanding achievements made collectively by the community in this regard. Four strategies have emerged to engineer E. coli cells to secrete recombinant proteins. In some cases, impressive secretion levels, several grams per liter, were reached. This secretion level is on par with other eukaryotic expression systems. Amid the optimism, it is important to recognize that significant challenges remain, especially when considering the success cannot be predicted a priori and involves much trials and errors. This review provides an overview of recent developments in engineering E. coli for extracellular production of recombinant proteins and an analysis of pros and cons of each strategy.

  19. Engineering Escherichia coli for methanol conversion.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jonas E N; Meyer, Fabian; Litsanov, Boris; Kiefer, Patrick; Potthoff, Eva; Heux, Stéphanie; Quax, Wim J; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria utilize methanol and other reduced one-carbon compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. For this purpose, these bacteria evolved a number of specialized enzymes and pathways. Here, we used a synthetic biology approach to select and introduce a set of "methylotrophy genes" into Escherichia coli based on in silico considerations and flux balance analysis to enable methanol dissimilation and assimilation. We determined that the most promising approach allowing the utilization of methanol was the implementation of NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase and the establishment of the ribulose monophosphate cycle by expressing the genes for hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase (Phi). To test for the best-performing enzymes in the heterologous host, a number of enzyme candidates from different donor organisms were selected and systematically analyzed for their in vitro and in vivo activities in E. coli. Among these, Mdh2, Hps and Phi originating from Bacillus methanolicus were found to be the most effective. Labeling experiments using (13)C methanol with E. coli producing these enzymes showed up to 40% incorporation of methanol into central metabolites. The presence of the endogenous glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation pathway of E. coli did not adversely affect the methanol conversion rate. Taken together, the results of this study represent a major advancement towards establishing synthetic methylotrophs by gene transfer.

  20. Escherichia Coli--Key to Modern Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bregegere, Francois

    1982-01-01

    Mid-nineteenth century work by Mendel on plant hybrids and by Pasteur on fermentation gave birth by way of bacterial genetics to modern-day molecular biology. The bacterium Escherichia Coli has occupied a key position in genetic studies leading from early gene identification with DNA to current genetic engineering using recombinant DNA technology.…

  1. Quantitative Proteomics of the E. coli Membranome.

    PubMed

    Tsolis, K C; Economou, A

    2017-01-01

    Due to their physicochemical properties, membrane protein proteomics analyses often require extensive sample preparation protocols resulting in sample loss and introducing technical variation. Several methods for membrane proteomics have been described, designed to meet the needs of specific sample types and experimental designs. Here, we present a complete membrane proteomics pipeline starting from the membrane sample preparation to the protein identification/quantification and also discuss about annotation of proteomics data. The protocol has been developed using Escherichia coli samples but is directly adaptable to other bacteria including pathogens. We describe a method for the preparation of E. coli inner membrane vesicles (IMVs) central to our pipeline. IMVs are functional membrane vesicles that can also be used for biochemical studies. Next, we propose methods for membrane protein digestion and describe alternative experimental approaches that have been previously tested in our lab. We highlight a surface proteolysis protocol for the identification of inner membrane and membrane-bound proteins. This is a simple, fast, and reproducible method for the membrane sample characterization that has been previously used for the E. coli inner membrane proteome characterization (Papanastasiou et al., 2013) and the experimental validation of E. coli membrane proteome (Orfanoudaki & Economou, 2014). It provides a reduced load on MS-time and allows for multiple repeats. Then we discuss membrane protein quantification approaches and tools that can be used for the functional annotation of identified proteins. Overall, membrane proteome quantification can be fast, simplified, and reproducible; however, optimization steps should be performed for a given sample type.

  2. Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Clark, David P.

    1991-01-01

    The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

  3. Engineering Escherichia coli to bind to cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijian; Meng, Liuyi; Ni, Congjian; Yao, Lanqiu; Zhang, Fengyu; Jin, Yuji; Mu, Xuelang; Zhu, Shiyu; Lu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Shiyu; Yu, Congyu; Wang, Chenggong; Zheng, Pu; Wu, Jie; Kang, Li; Zhang, Haoqian M; Ouyang, Qi

    2017-03-01

    We engineered Escherichia coli cells to bind to cyanobacteria by heterologously producing and displaying lectins of the target cyanobacteria on their surface. To prove the efficacy of our approach, we tested this design on Microcystis aeruginosa with microvirin (Mvn), the lectin endogenously produced by this cyanobacterium. The coding sequence of Mvn was C-terminally fused to the ice nucleation protein NC (INPNC) gene and expressed in E. coli. Results showed that E. coli cells expressing the INPNC::Mvn fusion protein were able to bind to M. aeruginosa and the average number of E. coli cells bound to each cyanobacterial cell was enhanced 8-fold. Finally, a computational model was developed to simulate the binding reaction and help reconstruct the binding parameters. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on the binding of two organisms in liquid culture mediated by the surface display of lectins and it may serve as a novel approach to mediate microbial adhesion.

  4. Impact of dry chilling on the genetic diversity of Escherichia coli on beef carcasses and on the survival of E. coli and E. coli O157.

    PubMed

    Visvalingam, Jeyachchandran; Liu, Yang; Yang, Xianqin

    2017-03-06

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of dry chilling on the genetic diversity of naturally occurring Escherichia coli on beef carcasses, and to examine whether two populations of E. coli recovered from carcasses during chilling and E. coli O157 differed in their response to desiccation. Isolates of E. coli were obtained from beef carcasses during a 67h dry chilling process and were genotyped using multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA). Ten E. coli genotypes found only at 0h (group A) and found more than once (group B), as well as five strains of E. coli O157 (group C) were inoculated on stainless steel coupons and their survival was examined after exposure to 75 and 100% relative humidity (RH) at 0 or 35°C for 67h. A total of 450 E. coli isolates were obtained, with 254, 49, 49, 51, 23, 20, and 4 from 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 24h of chilling, respectively. No E. coli were recovered at 67h. MLVA of the isolates revealed 173 distinct genotypes. Genetic diversity of E. coli isolates, defined as ratio of the number of isolates to the number of genotypes, remained between 2.3 and 1.3 during the 24h of chilling. All strains inoculated on stainless steel coupons and exposed to 75% RH at 35°C were completely inactivated, irrespective of their groups. Inactivation of E. coli of the three groups was not significantly (P>0.05) different by exposure to 75% RH at 0°C. The findings indicate that the genetic diversity of E. coli on beef carcasses was not affected by dry chilling. In addition, inactivation of E. coli genotypes and E. coli O157 by desiccation on stainless steel simulating dry chilling conditions did not differ significantly (P>0.05). Thus, dry chilling may be used as an effective antimicrobial intervention for beef carcasses.

  5. Genotypic Characterization of Egypt Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Isolates Expressing Coli Surface Antigen 6

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    USA Abstract Introduction: One approach to control enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections has been to develop vaccines focused on...results show a lack of clonality among Egypt CS6 E. coli isolates and supports the use and the further research on vaccines targeting this cell surface...has received considerable attention as a target for vaccine development [11-14]. CS6 is immunogenic in humans both after natural infection and

  6. CRISPRi engineering E. coli for morphology diversification.

    PubMed

    Elhadi, Dina; Lv, Li; Jiang, Xiao-Ran; Wu, Hong; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2016-11-01

    Microbial morphology engineering has recently become interesting for biotechnology. Genes ftsZ and mreB encoding proteins of bacterial fission ring and skeletons, respectively, are essential for cell growth, they both are the most important genes keeping the bacterial shapes including the cell length and width, respectively. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference, abbreviated as CRISPRi, was for the first time used in this study to regulate expression intensities of ftsZ or/and mreB in E. coli. Five sgRNAs associated with CRISPRi were designed and synthesized, respectively, to target five various locations on genes ftsZ or mreB encoded in the E. coli chromosome, resulting in various reduced expression levels of ftsZ or/and mreB, respectively, forming elongated or/and fatter cells. Repressions on gene expressions of ftsZ or/and mreB could be further intensified by combining various sgRNAs together. It was found that the stronger the repression on genes ftsZ or/and mreB, the longer the E. coli fibers, and the larger the E. coli cells. Combined repressions on expressions of ftsZ and mreB generated long and larger E. coli with diverse morphologies including various sizes of gourds, bars, coccus, spindles, multi-angles and ellipsoids. In all cases, accumulations of intracellular biopolyester polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) were in direct proportional to the intracellular volumes, ranging from 40% to 80% PHB in bacterial cell dry weights, depending on the cell volumes increases by the above CRISPRi applications.

  7. Diarrhea, bacteremia and multiorgan dysfunction due to an extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli strain with enteropathogenic E. coli genes.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Robert; Nisa, Shahista; Hazen, Tracy H; Horneman, Amy; Amoroso, Anthony; Rasko, David A; Donnenberg, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    A 55-year-old man with well-controlled HIV had severe diarrhea for 3 weeks and developed multiorgan dysfunction and bacteremia due to Escherichia coli. The genome of the patient's isolate had features characteristic of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli and genes distantly related to those defining enteropathogenic E. coli.

  8. Sources of Escherichia coli in a Coastal Subtropical Environment

    PubMed Central

    Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Wolfert, Melinda A.; Desmarais, Timothy R.; Palmer, Carol J.

    2000-01-01

    Sources of Escherichia coli in a coastal waterway located in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., were evaluated. The study consisted of an extensive program of field measurements designed to capture spatial and temporal variations in E. coli concentrations as well as experiments conducted under laboratory-controlled conditions. E. coli from environmental samples was enumerated by using a defined substrate technology (Colilert-18). Field sampling tasks included sampling the length of the North Fork to identify the river reach contributing high E. coli levels, autosampler experiments at two locations, and spatially intense sampling efforts at hot spots. Laboratory experiments were designed to simulate tidal conditions within the riverbank soils. The results showed that E. coli entered the river in a large pulse during storm conditions. After the storm, E. coli levels returned to baseline levels and varied in a cyclical pattern which correlated with tidal cycles. The highest concentrations were observed during high tide, whereas the lowest were observed at low tide. This peculiar pattern of E. coli concentrations between storm events was caused by the growth of E. coli within riverbank soils which were subsequently washed in during high tide. Laboratory analysis of soil collected from the riverbanks showed increases of several orders of magnitude in soil E. coli concentrations. The ability of E. coli to multiply in the soil was found to be a function of soil moisture content, presumably due to the ability of E. coli to outcompete predators in relatively dry soil. The importance of soil moisture in regulating the multiplication of E. coli was found to be critical in tidally influenced areas due to periodic wetting and drying of soils in contact with water bodies. Given the potential for growth in such systems, E. coli concentrations can be artificially elevated above that expected from fecal impacts alone. Such results challenge the use of E. coli as a suitable indicator of water

  9. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli are less likely than paired fecal E. coli to have CRISPR loci.

    PubMed

    Dang, Trang Nguyen Doan; Zhang, Lixin; Zöllner, Sebastian; Srinivasan, Usha; Abbas, Khadija; Marrs, Carl F; Foxman, Betsy

    2013-10-01

    CRISPRs (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) are short fragments of DNA that act as an adaptive immune system protecting bacteria against invasion by phages, plasmids or other forms of foreign DNA. Bacteria without a CRISPR locus may more readily adapt to environmental changes by acquiring foreign genetic material. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) live in a number of environments suggesting an ability to rapidly adapt to new environments. If UPEC are more adaptive than commensal E. coli we would expect that UPEC would have fewer CRISPR loci, and--if loci are present--that they would harbor fewer spacers than CRISPR loci in fecal E. coli. We tested this in vivo by comparing the number of CRISPR loci and spacers, and sensitivity to antibiotics (resistance is often obtained via plasmids) among 81 pairs of UPEC and fecal E. coli isolated from women with urinary tract infection. Each pair included one uropathogen and one commensal (fecal) sample from the same female patient. Fecal isolates had more repeats (p=0.009) and more unique spacers (p<0.0001) at four CRISPR loci than uropathogens. By contrast, uropathogens were more likely than fecal E. coli to be resistant to ampicillin, cefazolin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. However, no consistent association between CRISPRs and antibiotic resistance was identified. To our knowledge, this is the first study to compare fecal E. coli and pathogenic E. coli from the same individuals, and to test the association of CRISPR loci with antibiotic resistance. Our results suggest that the absence of CRISPR loci may make UPEC more susceptible to infection by phages or plasmids and allow them to adapt more quickly to various environments.

  10. Leukemia and risk of recurrent Escherichia coli bacteremia: genotyping implicates E. coli translocation from the colon to the bloodstream.

    PubMed

    Samet, A; Sledzińska, A; Krawczyk, B; Hellmann, A; Nowicki, S; Kur, J; Nowicki, B

    2013-11-01

    In patients with leukemia, the portal(s) and reasons for the persistence of an Escherichia coli recurrent bacteremia remain unclear. Adult Hematology Clinic (AHC) databases at the State Clinical Hospital in Gdańsk were reviewed to evaluate the frequency of E. coli bacteremia between 2002 and 2005. Blood and bowel E. coli strains were obtained and the genetic relatedness of the strains was analyzed. The rate of E. coli bacteremia per 1,000 admissions at the AHC was higher (85.0) than in the other clinics of the hospital (2.9), p < 0.001. A higher mortality was observed in patients with a history of E. coli versus non-E. coli bacteremia [30/95 (31 %) vs. 53/430 (12 %), p < 0.001]; 72.8 % of patients with leukemia had an unknown source of bacteremia. In 2005, 6 out of 25 (24 %) patients with leukemia had ≥2 episodes of E. coli-positive blood cultures. These gastrointestinal E. coli isolates were replaced within 3-8 weeks with a new E. coli H genotype. A recurrent episode of bacteremia was usually caused by an infection with a transient E. coli H genotype identical to that found in the subject's bowel. Consistent with the definition of bowel/blood translocation, the bowel appeared to be a portal for E. coli in these subjects and, hence, a clear source for their recurring bacteremia.

  11. [Escherichia coli R live vaccine Suicolplex "Dessau"].

    PubMed

    Michael-Meese, M; Klie, H; Schöll, W

    1980-01-01

    Immunisation of pregnant sows prior to parturition has long proved to be a good method to forestall coli dysentery in piglets before weaning. Inactivated vaccines of the pathogenetically important E. coli serogroups with and without adjuvant so far were primarily used at international level. A vaccine of that kind has become available in the GDR more than eight years ago. Its name is Coliporc "Dessau". A live vaccine has been developed from two R-mutants at the authors' institute. The effectiveness of that live vaccine on laboratory animals and in field experiments is reported in this paper together with possibilities of differential diagnosis to distinguish wild strains from the mutants. The live vaccine was commercially registered under the name of Suicolpex "Dessau", in spring 1976.

  12. Designed phosphoprotein recognition in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Nicholas; Gassaway, Brandon M; Haimovich, Adrian D; Isaacs, Farren J; Rinehart, Jesse; Regan, Lynne

    2014-11-21

    Protein phosphorylation is a central biological mechanism for cellular adaptation to environmental changes. Dysregulation of phosphorylation signaling is implicated in a wide variety of diseases. Thus, the ability to detect and quantify protein phosphorylation is highly desirable for both diagnostic and research applications. Here we present a general strategy for detecting phosphopeptide-protein interactions in Escherichia coli. We first redesign a model tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein to recognize phosphoserine in a sequence-specific fashion and characterize the interaction with its target phosphopeptide in vitro. We then combine in vivo site-specific incorporation of phosphoserine with split mCherry assembly to observe the designed phosphopeptide-protein interaction specificity in E. coli. This in vivo strategy for detecting and characterizing phosphopeptide-protein interactions has numerous potential applications for the study of natural interactions and the design of novel ones.

  13. Automatic tracking of Escherichia coli bacteria.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Khan, Shahid; Shah, Mubarak

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method for estimating the trajectories of Escherichia coli bacteria from in vivo phase-contrast microscopy videos. To address the low-contrast boundaries in cellular images, an adaptive kernel-based technique is applied to detect cells in sequence of frames. Then a novel matching gain measure is introduced to cope with the challenges such as dramatic changes of cells' appearance and serious overlapping and occlusion. For multiple cell tracking, an optimal matching strategy is proposed to improve the handling of cell collision and broken trajectories. The results of successful tracking of Escherichia coli from various phase-contrast sequences are reported and compared with manually-determined trajectories, as well as those obtained from existing tracking methods. The stability of the algorithm with different parameter values is also analyzed and discussed.

  14. Escherichia coli growth under modeled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul W.; Meyer, Michelle L.; Leff, Laura G.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit varying responses to modeled reduced gravity that can be simulated by clino-rotation. When Escherichia coli was subjected to different rotation speeds during clino-rotation, significant differences between modeled reduced gravity and normal gravity controls were observed only at higher speeds (30-50 rpm). There was no apparent affect of removing samples on the results obtained. When E. coli was grown in minimal medium (at 40 rpm), cell size was not affected by modeled reduced gravity and there were few differences in cell numbers. However, in higher nutrient conditions (i.e., dilute nutrient broth), total cell numbers were higher and cells were smaller under reduced gravity compared to normal gravity controls. Overall, the responses to modeled reduced gravity varied with nutrient conditions; larger surface to volume ratios may help compensate for the zone of nutrient depletion around the cells under modeled reduced gravity.

  15. Detection of Escherichia coli enterotoxins in stools.

    PubMed Central

    Merson, M H; Yolken, R H; Sack, R B; Froehlich, J L; Greenberg, H B; Huq, I; Black, R W

    1980-01-01

    We determined whether enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli diarrhea could be diagnosed by direct examination of stools for heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. The Y-1 adrenal cell and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detected LT in 85 and 93%, respectively, of stool specimens obtained from adults with acute diarrhea from whom an LT- and ST-producing organism had been isolated. Furthermore, the ELISA assay detected LT in 8 of 35 stool specimens from which no LT-producing E. coli had been isolated. The infant mouse assay was utilized to detect ST in these stool specimens and was found to be an insensitive method, showing positive results in only 36% of the specimens from which an ST-producing organism was isolated. Further studies are warranted to determine the diagnostic value of direct detection of LT in stools, especially by the ELISA method. PMID:6995331

  16. Compilation of DNA sequences of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Manfred

    1989-01-01

    We have compiled the DNA sequence data for E.coli K12 available from the GENBANK and EMBO databases and over a period of several years independently from the literature. We have introduced all available genetic map data and have arranged the sequences accordingly. As far as possible the overlaps are deleted and a total of 940,449 individual bp is found to be determined till the beginning of 1989. This corresponds to a total of 19.92% of the entire E.coli chromosome consisting of about 4,720 kbp. This number may actually be higher by some extra 2% derived from the sequence of lysogenic bacteriophage lambda and the various insertion sequences. This compilation may be available in machine readable form from one of the international databanks in some future. PMID:2654890

  17. Silver nanoparticle-E. coli colloidal interaction in water and effect on E. coli survival.

    PubMed

    Dror-Ehre, A; Mamane, H; Belenkova, T; Markovich, G; Adin, A

    2009-11-15

    Silver nanoparticles exhibit antibacterial properties via bacterial inactivation and growth inhibition. The mechanism is not yet completely understood. This work was aimed at elucidating the effect of silver nanoparticles on inactivation of Escherichia coli, by studying particle-particle interactions in aqueous suspensions. Stable, molecularly capped, positively or negatively charged silver nanoparticles were mixed at 1 to 60microgmL(-1) with suspended E. coli cells to examine their effect on inactivation of the bacteria. Gold nanoparticles with the same surfactant were used as a control, being of similar size but made up of a presumably inert metal. Log reduction of 5log(10) and complete inactivation were obtained with the silver nanoparticles while the gold nanoparticles did not show any inactivation ability. The effect of molecularly capped nanoparticles on E. coli survival was dependent on particle number. Log reduction of E. coli was associated with the ratio between the number of nanoparticles and the initial bacterial cell count. Electrostatic attraction or repulsion mechanisms in silver nanoparticle-E. coli cell interactions did not contribute to the inactivation process.

  18. Secretion of clostridium cellulase by E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Ida Kuo

    1998-01-01

    A gene, encoding an endocellulase from a newly isolated mesophilic Clostridium strain IY-2 which can digest bamboo fibers, cellulose, rice straw, and sawdust, was isolated by shotgun cloning in an E. coli expression plasmid pLC2833. E. coli positive clones were selected based on their ability to hydrolyze milled bamboo fibers and cellulose present in agar plates. One clone contained a 2.8 kb DNA fragment that was responsible for cellulase activity. Western blot analyses indicated that the positive clone produced a secreted cellulase with a mass of about 58,000 daltons that was identical in size to the subunit of one of the three major Clostridium cellulases. The products of cellulose digestion by this cloned cellulase were cellotetraose and soluble higher polymers. The cloned DNA contained signal sequences capable of directing the secretion of heterologous proteins from an E. coli host. The invention describes a bioprocess for the treatment of cellulosic plant materials to produce cellular growth substrates and fermentation end products suitable for production of liquid fuels, solvents, and acids.

  19. Arabidopsis alternative oxidase sustains Escherichia coli respiration.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A M; Söll, D

    1992-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA reductase, encoded by the hemA gene, is the first enzyme in porphyrin biosynthesis in many organisms. Hemes, important porphyrin derivatives, are essential components of redox enzymes, such as cytochromes. Thus a hemA Escherichia coli strain (SASX41B) is deficient in cytochrome-mediated aerobic respiration. Upon complementation of this strain with an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library, we isolated a clone which permitted the SASX41B strain to grow aerobically. The clone encodes the gene for Arabidopsis alternative oxidase, whose deduced amino acid sequence was found to have 71% identity with that of the enzyme from the voodoo lily, Sauromatum guttatum. The Arabidopsis protein is expressed as a 31-kDa protein in E. coli and confers on this organism cyanide-resistant growth, which in turn is sensitive to salicylhydroxamate. This implies that a single polypeptide is sufficient for alternative oxidase activity. Based on these observations we propose that a cyanide-insensitive respiratory pathway operates in the transformed E. coli hemA strain. Introduction of this pathway now opens the way to genetic/molecular biological investigations of alternative oxidase and its cofactor. Images PMID:1438286

  20. Role of Escherichia coli in Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Koppolu, Veerendra; Vasigala, Veneela KR

    2016-01-01

    Increased energy consumption coupled with depleting petroleum reserves and increased greenhouse gas emissions have renewed our interest in generating fuels from renewable energy sources via microbial fermentation. Central to this problem is the choice of microorganism that catalyzes the production of fuels at high volumetric productivity and yield from cheap and abundantly available renewable energy sources. Microorganisms that are metabolically engineered to redirect renewable carbon sources into desired fuel products are contemplated as best choices to obtain high volumetric productivity and yield. Considering the availability of vast knowledge in genomic and metabolic fronts, Escherichia coli is regarded as a primary choice for the production of biofuels. Here, we reviewed the microbial production of liquid biofuels that have the potential to be used either alone or in combination with the present-day fuels. We specifically highlighted the metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches used to improve the production of biofuels from E. coli over the past few years. We also discussed the challenges that still exist for the biofuel production from E. coli and their possible solutions. PMID:27441002

  1. Regulation of alcohol fermentation by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the way in which the fermentative synthesis of ethanol is regulated in the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli. We are also investigating the control of other genes required for fermentation and anaerobic growth. We have isolated both structural and regulatory mutations affecting the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase, the enzyme responsible for the final step in alcohol synthesis. Some of these regulatory mutations also affect other anaerobically induced genes. The adh gene has been cloned and sequenced. The ADH protein is one of the largest highly expressed proteins in E. coli and requires approximately 2700bp of DNA for its cloning sequence. We have also isolated mutations affecting the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase. In consequence it is now possible to construct E. coli strains defective in the production of any one or more of their normal fermentation products (i.e. formate, acetate, lactate, ethanol and succinate). The factors affecting the ratio of fermentation products are being investigated by in vivo NMR spectroscopy.

  2. Regulation of alcohol fermentation by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the way in which the synthesis of ethanol and related fermentation products are regulated in the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli. We are also investigating the control of other genes required for anaerobic growth. We have isolated both structural and regulatory mutations affecting the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase, the enzyme responsible for the final step in alcohol synthesis. Some of these regulatory mutations also affect other anaerobically induced genes. The adh gene has been cloned and sequenced. The ADH protein is one of the largest highly expressed proteins in E. coli and requires approximately 2700bp of DNA for its coding sequence. We have also isolated mutations affecting the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase and have recently cloned the ldh gene. In consequence it is now possible to construct E. coli strains defective in the production of any one or more of their normal fermentation products (i.e. formate, acetate, lactate, ethanol and succinate). The factors affecting ratio of fermentation products are being investigated by in vivo NMR spectroscopy.

  3. Long term effects of Escherichia coli mastitis.

    PubMed

    Blum, Shlomo E; Heller, Elimelech D; Leitner, Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most frequently diagnosed causes of bovine mastitis, and is typically associated with acute, clinical mastitis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the long term effects of intramammary infections by E. coli on milk yield and quality, especially milk coagulation. Twenty-four Israeli Holstein cows diagnosed with clinical mastitis due to intramammary infection by E. coli were used in this study. Mean lactation number, days in milk (DIM) and daily milk yield (DMY) at the time of infection was 3.3 ± 1.3, 131.7 days ± 78.6 and 45.7 L ± 8.4, respectively. DMY, milk constituents, somatic cells count (SCC), differential leukocytes count and coagulation parameters were subsequently assessed. Two patterns of inflammation were identified: 'short inflammation', characterized by <15% decrease in DMY and <30 days until return to normal (n = 5), and 'long inflammation', characterized by >15% decrease in DMY and >30 days to reach a new maximum DMY (n = 19). The estimated mean loss of marketable milk during the study was 200 L/cow for 'short inflammation' cases, and 1,500 L/cow for 'long inflammation' ones. Significant differences between 'short' and 'long inflammation' effects were found in almost all parameters studied. Long-term detrimental effects on milk quality were found regardless of clinical or bacteriological cure of affected glands.

  4. Environmental Escherichia coli: Ecology and public health implications - A review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jang, Jeonghwan; Hur, Hor-Gil; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Yan, Tao; Ishii, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is classified as a rod-shaped, Gram-negative bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae. The bacterium mainly inhabits the lower intestinal tract of warm-blooded animals, including humans, and is often discharged into the environment through feces or wastewater effluent. The presence of E. coli in environmental waters has long been considered as an indicator of recent fecal pollution. However, numerous recent studies have reported that some specific strains of E. coli can survive for long periods of time, and potentially reproduce, in extra-intestinal environments. This indicates that E. coli can be integrated into indigenous microbial communities in the environment. This naturalization phenomenon calls into question the reliability of E. coli as a fecal indicator bacterium (FIB). Recently, many studies reported that E. coli populations in the environment are affected by ambient environmental conditions affecting their long-term survival. Large-scale studies of population genetics provide the diversity and complexity of E. coli strains in various environments, affected by multiple environmental factors. This review examines the current knowledge on the ecology of E. coli strains in various environments in regards to its role as a FIB and as a naturalized member of indigenous microbial communities. Special emphasis is given on the growth of pathogenic E. coli in the environment, and the population genetics of environmental members of the genus Escherichia. The impact of environmental E. coli on water quality and public health is also discussed.

  5. Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli in Asia: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    Sidjabat, Hanna E; Paterson, David L

    2015-05-01

    Escherichia coli has become multiresistant by way of production of a variety of β-lactamases. The prevalence of CTX-M-producing E. coli has reached 60-79% in certain parts of Asia. The acquisition of CTX-M plasmids by E. coli sequence type 131, a successful clone of E. coli, has caused further dissemination of CTX-M-producing E. coli. The prevalence of carbapenemase-producing E. coli, especially Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase, and New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM)-producing E. coli has been increasing in Asia. K. pneumoniae carbapenemase and NDM have now been found in E. coli sequence type 131. The occurrence of NDM-producing E. coli is a major concern particularly in the Indian subcontinent, but now elsewhere in Asia as well. There are multiple reasons why antibiotic resistance in E. coli in Asia has reached such extreme levels. Approaches beyond antibiotic therapy, such as prevention of antibiotic resistance by antibiotic stewardship and protecting natural microbiome, are strategies to avoid further spread of antibiotic resistance.

  6. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli in Children from Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Cristian; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G.; Arias, María L.

    2010-01-01

    More than 5,000 diarrheal cases per year receive medical care at the National Children's Hospital of Costa Rica, and nearly 5% of them require hospitalization. A total of 173 Escherichia coli strains isolated from children with diarrhea were characterized at the molecular, serologic, and phenotypic level. Multiplex and duplex polymerase chain reactions were used to detect the six categories of diarrheagenic E. coli. Thirty percent (n = 52) of the strains were positive, indicating a high prevalence among the pediatric population. Enteropathogenic E. coli and enteroinvasive E. coli pathotypes were the most prevalent (21% and 19%, respectively). Pathogenic strains were distributed among the four E. coli phylogenetic groups A, B1, B2, and D, with groups A and B1 the most commonly found. This study used molecular typing to evaluate the prevalence of diarrheagenic E. coli reported in Costa Rica and demonstrated the importance of these pathotypes in the pediatric population. PMID:20682870

  7. Experimental Escherichia coli O157:H7 carriage in calves.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C A; Harmon, B G; Zhao, T; Doyle, M P

    1997-01-01

    Nine weaned calves (6 to 8 weeks of age) were given 10(10) CFU of a five-strain mixture of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 by oral-gastric intubation. After an initial brief period of pyrexia in three calves and transient mild diarrhea in five calves, calves were clinically normal throughout the 13- to 27-day study. The population of E. coli O157:H7 in the faces decreased dramatically in all calves during the first 2 weeks after inoculation. Thereafter, small populations of E. coli O157:H7 persisted in all calves, where they were detected intermittently in the feces and rumen contents. While withholding food increased fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7 by 1 to 2 log10/g in three of four calves previously shedding small populations of E. coli O157:H7, the effect of fasting on fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7 was variable in calves shedding larger populations. At necropsy, E. coli O157:H7 was not isolated from sites outside the alimentary tract. E. coli O157:H7 was isolated from the forestomach or colon of all calves at necropsy. Greater numbers of E. coli O157:H7 were present in the gastrointestinal contents than in the corresponding mucosal sections, and there was no histologic or immunohistochemical evidence of E. coli O157:H7 adhering to the mucosa. In conclusion, under these experimental conditions, E. coli O157:H7 is not pathogenic in weaned calves, and while it does not appear to colonize mucosal surfaces for extended periods, E. coli O157:H7 persists in the contents of the rumen and colon as a source for fecal shedding. PMID:8979335

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain NB8

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Zu-huang; Wang, Chun-xin; Zhu, Jian-ming

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli NB8 is a clinical pyelonephritis isolate. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of uropathogenic E. coli NB8, which contains drug resistance genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones, macrolides, colistin, sulfonamide-trimethoprim, and tetracycline. NB8 infects the kidney and bladder, making it an important tool for studying E. coli pathogenesis. PMID:27609920

  9. Development of an E. coli 0157:H7 Specific Probe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    E . coli strain O157:H7 is an organism causing severe bloody diarrhea in humans. It’s often contracted by ingestion of contaminated food. Present...problems of present methods and provide better health care. The 60 megadalton plasmid of E coli strain 0157:H7 was isolated by a modification of the Magic...molecule was used to transform competent DH5 E . coli cells. Approximately 35 clones were obtained from the 0157H7 plasmid library. This report ends

  10. E. COLI VARIABILITY IN WATER UNDER THE EFFECT OF OZONE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    As a result of the effect of ozone, E . coli underwent significant morphological, cultural and biochemical changes. Ozonized bacteria lost the...gas formation was absent in the majority of E . coli variants which developed during incubation of the secondary fermentation sample at 43 C. As a...result of the ozonization of water a depression was established in the dehydrogenase of E . coli in respect to carbohydrates (except saccharose), alcohols

  11. Cytotoxic Escherichia coli strains encoding colibactin colonize laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    García, Alexis; Mannion, Anthony; Feng, Yan; Madden, Carolyn M; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Shen, Zeli; Ge, Zhongming; Fox, James G

    2016-12-01

    Escherichia coli strains have not been fully characterized in laboratory mice and are not currently excluded from mouse colonies. Colibactin (Clb), a cytotoxin, has been associated with inflammation and cancer in humans and animals. We performed bacterial cultures utilizing rectal swab, fecal, and extra intestinal samples from clinically unaffected or affected laboratory mice. Fifty-one E. coli were isolated from 45 laboratory mice, identified biochemically, and selected isolates were serotyped. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced for specific isolates, PCR used for clbA and clbQ gene amplification, and phylogenetic group identification was performed on all 51 E. coli strains. Clb genes were sequenced and selected E. coli isolates were characterized using a HeLa cell cytotoxicity assay. Forty-five of the 51 E. coli isolates (88%) encoded clbA and clbQ and belonged to phylogenetic group B2. Mouse E. coli serotypes included: O2:H6, O-:H-, OM:H+, and O22:H-. Clb-encoding O2: H6 mouse E. coli isolates were cytotoxic in vitro. A Clb-encoding E. coli was isolated from a clinically affected genetically modified mouse with cystic endometrial hyperplasia. Our findings suggest that Clb-encoding E. coli colonize laboratory mice and may induce clinical and subclinical diseases that may impact experimental mouse models.

  12. Using zebra mussels to monitor Escherichia coli in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Selegean, J P; Kusserow, R; Patel, R; Heidtke, T M; Ram, J L

    2001-01-01

    Use of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) as an indicator of previously elevated bacteria concentrations in a watershed was examined. The ability of the zebra mussel to accumulate and purge Escherichia coli over several days was investigated in both laboratory and field experiments. In laboratory experiments, periodic enumeration of E. coli in mussels that had been exposed to a dilute solution of raw sewage demonstrated that (i) maximum concentrations of E. coli are reached within a few hours of exposure to sewage, (ii) the tissue concentration attained is higher than the concentration in the ambient water, and (iii) the E. coli concentrations take several days to return to preexposure concentrations when mussels are subsequently placed in sterile water. In field experiments conducted in southeast Michigan in the Clinton River watershed, brief increases in E. coli concentrations in the water were accompanied by increases in mussel concentrations of E. coli that lasted 2 or 3 d. The ability of mussels to retain and to concentrate E. coli made it possible to detect E. coli in the environment under conditions that conventional monitoring may often miss. Sampling caged mussels in a river and its tributaries may enable watershed managers to reduce the sampling frequency normally required to identify critical E. coli sources, thereby providing a more cost-effective river monitoring strategy for bacterial contamination.

  13. Rapid Sterilization of Escherichia coli by Solution Plasma Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Nina; Ishizaki, Takahiro; Baroch, Pavel; Saito, Nagahiro

    2012-12-01

    Solution plasma (SP), which is a discharge in the liquid phase, has the potential for rapid sterilization of water without chemical agents. The discharge showed a strong sterilization performance against Escherichia coli bacteria. The decimal value (D value) of the reduction time for E. coli by this system with an electrode distance of 1.0 mm was estimated to be approximately 1.0 min. Our discharge system in the liquid phase caused no physical damage to the E. coli and only a small increase in the temperature of the aqueous solution. The UV light generated by the discharge was an important factor in the sterilization of E. coli.

  14. Behavior of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli, non-O157-shiga toxin-producing E. coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains on mung bean seeds and sprout.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Bautista-De León, Haydee; Vázquez-Barrios, Ma Estela; Gordillo-Martínez, Alberto J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2013-09-16

    The behavior of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), non-O157 shiga toxin-producing E. coli (non-O157-STEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) on mung bean seeds at 25±2 °C and during germination and sprouting of mung bean seeds at 20±2 ° and 30±2 °C and on mung bean sprouts at 3±2 °C was determined. When mung bean seeds were inoculated with EAEC, non-O157 STEC, EIEC, EPEC or ETEC strains, all these diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEPs) survived at least 90 days on mung bean seeds at 25±2 °C. All DEPs grew during germination and sprouting of seeds, reaching counts of approximately 5 Log and 7 Log CFU/g after 2 days at 20±2 ° and 30±2 °C, respectively. However, when the sprouts were inoculated after 1 day of seeds germination and stored at 20±2 ° or 30±2 °C, no growth was observed for any DEPs during sprouting at 20±2 °C per 9 d; however, a significant increase in the concentration of DEPs of approximately 0.7 log CFU/g was observed during sprouting at 30±2 °C after 1 day of sprout contamination. Refrigeration reduced the number of viable DEPs strains on sprouts after 10 days in storage; nevertheless, these decreases have no practical significance in the safety of the sprouts.

  15. Cyclomodulins in urosepsis strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Damien; Delmas, Julien; Cady, Anne; Robin, Frédéric; Sivignon, Adeline; Oswald, Eric; Bonnet, Richard

    2010-06-01

    Determinants of urosepsis in Escherichia coli remain incompletely defined. Cyclomodulins (CMs) are a growing functional family of toxins that hijack the eukaryotic cell cycle. Four cyclomodulin types are actually known in E. coli: cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs), cycle-inhibiting factor (Cif), cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs), and the pks-encoded toxin. In the present study, the distribution of CM-encoding genes and the functionality of these toxins were investigated in 197 E. coli strains isolated from patients with community-acquired urosepsis (n = 146) and from uninfected subjects (n = 51). This distribution was analyzed in relation to the phylogenetic background, clinical origin, and antibiotic resistance of the strains. It emerged from this study that strains harboring the pks island and the cnf1 gene (i) were strongly associated with the B2 phylogroup (P, <0.001), (ii) frequently harbored both toxin-encoded genes in phylogroup B2 (33%), and (iii) were predictive of a urosepsis origin (P, <0.001 to 0.005). However, the prevalences of the pks island among phylogroup B2 strains, in contrast to those of the cnf1 gene, were not significantly different between fecal and urosepsis groups, suggesting that the pks island is more important for the colonization process and the cnf1 gene for virulence. pks- or cnf1-harboring strains were significantly associated with susceptibility to antibiotics (amoxicillin, cotrimoxazole, and quinolones [P, <0.001 to 0.043]). Otherwise, only 6% and 1% of all strains harbored the cdtB and cif genes, respectively, with no particular distribution by phylogenetic background, antimicrobial susceptibility, or clinical origin.

  16. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. PMID:25611733

  17. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  18. Escherichia coli survival in waters: temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, R A; Pachepsky, Y; Hill, R L; Shelton, D R; Whelan, G

    2013-02-01

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q₁₀ model. This suggestion was made 34 years ago based on 20 survival curves taken from published literature, but has not been revisited since then. The objective of this study was to re-evaluate the accuracy of the Q₁₀ equation, utilizing data accumulated since 1978. We assembled a database of 450 E. coli survival datasets from 70 peer-reviewed papers. We then focused on the 170 curves taken from experiments that were performed in the laboratory under dark conditions to exclude the effects of sunlight and other field factors that could cause additional variability in results. All datasets were tabulated dependencies "log concentration vs. time." There were three major patterns of inactivation: about half of the datasets had a section of fast log-linear inactivation followed by a section of slow log-linear inactivation; about a quarter of the datasets had a lag period followed by log-linear inactivation; and the remaining quarter were approximately linear throughout. First-order inactivation rate constants were calculated from the linear sections of all survival curves and the data grouped by water sources, including waters of agricultural origin, pristine water sources, groundwater and wells, lakes and reservoirs, rivers and streams, estuaries and seawater, and wastewater. Dependency of E. coli inactivation rates on temperature varied among the water sources. There was a significant difference in inactivation rate values at the reference temperature between rivers and agricultural waters, wastewaters and agricultural waters, rivers and lakes, and wastewater and lakes. At specific sites, the Q₁₀ equation was more accurate in rivers and coastal waters than in lakes making the value of

  19. Biosynthesis of phosphatidyl glycerophosphate in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y Y; Kennedy, E P

    1967-09-01

    An enzyme (L-glycerol 3-phosphate: CMP phosphatidyltransferase) catalyzing the synthesis of phosphatidyl glycerophosphate from CDP-diglyceride and L-glycerol 3-phosphate has been rendered soluble by treatment of the particulate, membrane-containing fraction of E. coli with Triton X-100 and has been partially purified. The enzyme, devoid of phosphatidyl glycerophosphatase activity, is specific for L-glycerol 3-phosphate and is completely dependent upon added Mg(++) or Mn(++) for activity. It has high affinity for CDP-diglyceride and can be used for the assay of this nucleotide. Other properties of the enzyme are also described.

  20. Genetic and Physical Structure of Salmonella-coli Phage Hybrids and Development of New Generalized Transducing Hybrid Phages for E. Coli.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    Walter Reed Army Institute of Research began searching for E . coli -S. typhimurium recombinants in 1971. After isolating E . coli -S. typhimurium hybrids...which are common hosts for the various coli and Salmonella phages, we developed efficient selective methods of hybrids between Salmonella and E . coli phages

  1. Expanding ester biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Tashiro, Yohei; Atsumi, Shota

    2014-04-01

    To expand the capabilities of whole-cell biocatalysis, we have engineered Escherichia coli to produce various esters. The alcohol O-acyltransferase (ATF) class of enzyme uses acyl-CoA units for ester formation. The release of free CoA upon esterification with an alcohol provides the free energy to facilitate ester formation. The diversity of CoA molecules found in nature in combination with various alcohol biosynthetic pathways allows for the biosynthesis of a multitude of esters. Small to medium volatile esters have extensive applications in the flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, solvent, paint and coating industries. The present work enables the production of these compounds by designing several ester pathways in E. coli. The engineered pathways generated acetate esters of ethyl, propyl, isobutyl, 2-methyl-1-butyl, 3-methyl-1-butyl and 2-phenylethyl alcohols. In particular, we achieved high-level production of isobutyl acetate from glucose (17.2 g l(-1)). This strategy was expanded to realize pathways for tetradecyl acetate and several isobutyrate esters.

  2. [Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli. Pathogenesis and epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Prats, G; Llovet, T

    1995-03-01

    Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) is an intestinal pathogen causing enteritis, with a similar pathogenic mechanism to that of Shigella, which causes an epithelial invasion of the large bowel leading to inflammation and ulceration of the mucosa. The patients often develop the symptoms of bacillary dysentery. The EIEC strains are atypical in their biochemical reactions and may ferment lactose late or not at all, are lysine decarboxilase negative, and non motile. In addition, most EIEC strains express somatic antigens which are either strongly related or identical to Shigella antigens. EIEC invasion is mediated by a large plasmid (140 MDa) coding for the production of several outer membrane proteins involved in invasiveness. These strains have been isolated with some regularity in South America, the Extreme Orient, and Eastern Europe. In Spain the incidence of enteroinvasive E. coli is extraordinarily low (0.2%), the serogroup O124 being the most frequently isolated. EIEC enteritis has been associated to sporadic cases occurring in travellers. Occasional outbreaks related to ingestion of contaminated water or food and person to person have been reported.

  3. Independence of replisomes in Escherichia coli chromosomalreplication

    SciTech Connect

    Breier, Adam M.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R.

    2005-03-13

    In Escherichia coli DNA replication is carried out by the coordinated action of the proteins within a replisome. After replication initiation, the two bidirectionally oriented replisomes from a single origin are colocalized into higher-order structures termed replication factories. The factory model postulated that the two replisomes are also functionally coupled. We tested this hypothesis by using DNA combing and whole-genome microarrays. Nascent DNA surrounding oriC in single, combed chromosomes showed instead that one replisome, usually the leftward one, was significantly ahead of the other 70% of the time. We next used microarrays to follow replication throughout the genome by measuring DNA copy number. We found in multiple E. coli strains that the replisomes are independent, with the leftward replisome ahead of the rightward one. The size of the bias was strain-specific, varying from 50 to 130 kb in the array results. When we artificially blocked one replisome, the other continued unabated, again demonstrating independence. We suggest an improved version of the factory model that retains the advantages of threading DNA through colocalized replisomes at about equal rates, but allows the cell flexibility to overcome obstacles encountered during elongation.

  4. Nucleotide excision repair in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Van Houten, B

    1990-01-01

    One of the best-studied DNA repair pathways is nucleotide excision repair, a process consisting of DNA damage recognition, incision, excision, repair resynthesis, and DNA ligation. Escherichia coli has served as a model organism for the study of this process. Recently, many of the proteins that mediate E. coli nucleotide excision have been purified to homogeneity; this had led to a molecular description of this repair pathway. One of the key repair enzymes of this pathway is the UvrABC nuclease complex. The individual subunits of this enzyme cooperate in a complex series of partial reactions to bind to and incise the DNA near a damaged nucleotide. The UvrABC complex displays a remarkable substrate diversity. Defining the structural features of DNA lesions that provide the specificity for damage recognition by the UvrABC complex is of great importance, since it represents a unique form of protein-DNA interaction. Using a number of in vitro assays, researchers have been able to elucidate the action mechanism of the UvrABC nuclease complex. Current research is devoted to understanding how these complex events are mediated within the living cell. PMID:2181258

  5. Shear alters motility of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Jalali, Maryam; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Understanding of locomotion of microorganisms in shear flows drew a wide range of interests in microbial related topics such as biological process including pathogenic infection and biophysical interactions like biofilm formation on engineering surfaces. We employed microfluidics and digital holography microscopy to study motility of E. coli in shear flows. We controlled the shear flow in three different shear rates: 0.28 s-1, 2.8 s-1, and 28 s-1 in a straight channel with the depth of 200 μm. Magnified holograms, recorded at 15 fps with a CCD camera over more than 20 minutes, are analyzed to obtain 3D swimming trajectories and subsequently used to extract shear responses of E.coli. Thousands of 3-D bacterial trajectories are tracked. The change of bacteria swimming characteristics including swimming velocity, reorientation, and dispersion coefficient are computed directly for individual trajectory and ensemble averaged over thousands of realizations. The results show that shear suppresses the bacterial dispersions in bulk but promote dispersions near the surface contrary to those in quiescent flow condition. Ongoing analyses are focusing to quantify effect of shear rates on tumbling frequency and reorientation of cell body, and its implication in locating the hydrodynamic mechanisms for shear enhanced angular scattering. NIH, NSF, GoMRI.

  6. Chemotaxis Toward Sugars in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Julius; Hazelbauer, Gerald L.; Dahl, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    Using a quantitative assay for measuring chemotaxis, we tested a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives for their ability to attract Escherichia coli bacteria. The most effective attractants, i.e., those that have thresholds near 10−5 M or below, are N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, 6-deoxy-d-glucose, d-fructose, d-fucose, 1-d-glycerol-β-d-galactoside, galactitol, d-galactose, d-glucosamine, d-glucose, α-d-glucose-1-phosphate, lactose, maltose, d-mannitol, d-mannose, methyl-β-d-galactoside, methyl-β-d-glucoside, d-ribose, d-sorbitol, and trehalose. Lactose, and probably d-glucose-1-phosphate, are attractive only after conversion to the free monosaccharide, while the other attractants do not require breakdown for taxis. Nine different chemoreceptors are involved in detecting these various attractants. They are called the N-acetyl-glucosamine, fructose, galactose, glucose, maltose, mannitol, ribose, sorbitol, and trehalose chemoreceptors; the specificity of each was studied. The chemoreceptors, with the exception of the one for d-glucose, are inducible. The galactose-binding protein serves as the recognition component of the galactose chemoreceptor. E. coli also has osmotically shockable binding activities for maltose and d-ribose, and these appear to serve as the recognition components for the corresponding chemoreceptors. PMID:4580570

  7. Expanding ester biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Tashiro, Yohei; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-01-01

    To expand the capabilities of whole-cell biocatalysis, we have engineered Escherichia coli to produce various esters. The alcohol O-acyltransferase (ATF) class of enzyme uses acyl-CoA units for ester formation. The release of free CoA upon esterification with an alcohol provides the free energy to facilitate ester formation. The diversity of CoA molecules found in nature in combination with various alcohol biosynthetic pathways allows for the biosynthesis of a multitude of esters. Small to medium volatile esters have extensive applications in the flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, solvent, paint and coating industries. The present work enables the production of these compounds by designing several ester pathways in E. coli. The engineered pathways generated acetate esters of ethyl, propyl, isobutyl, 2-methyl-1-butyl, 3-methyl-1-butyl and 2-phenylethyl alcohols. In particular, we achieved high-level production of isobutyl acetate from glucose (17.2 g l−1). This strategy was expanded to realize pathways for tetradecyl acetate and several isobutyrate esters. PMID:24609358

  8. The thermal impulse response of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Paster, Eli; Ryu, William S.

    2008-01-01

    Swimming Escherichia coli responds to changes in temperature by modifying its motor behavior. Previous studies using populations of cells have shown that E. coli accumulate in spatial thermal gradients, but these experiments did not cleanly separate thermal responses from chemotactic responses. Here we have isolated the thermal response by studying the behavior of single, tethered cells. The motor output of cells grown at 33°C was measured at constant temperature, from 10° to 40°C, and in response to small, impulsive increases in temperature, from 23° to 43°C. The thermal impulse response at temperatures < 31°C is similar to the chemotactic impulse response: Both follow a similar time course, share the same directionality, and show biphasic characteristics. At temperatures > 31°C, some cells show an inverted response, switching from warm- to cold-seeking behavior. The fraction of inverted responses increases nonlinearly with temperature, switching steeply at the preferred temperature of 37°C. PMID:18385380

  9. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E.; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes. PMID:26809117

  10. [Verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli--epidemiology, pathogenicity and antimicrobial resistance].

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Verocytotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) are one of the most common foodborne pathogen in human worldwide. High pathogenic potential of these organisms makes it often the cause of international outbreaks with numerous fatalities. This study presents the current knowledge on verocytotoxigenic E. coli: pathogenicity, drug resistance as well as the epidemiology of infections.

  11. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Multilocus Sequence Types in Guatemala and Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Klena, John; Rodas, Claudia; Bourgeois, August Louis; Torres, Olga; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Sjöling, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    The genetic backgrounds of 24 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains from Mexico and Guatemala expressing heat-stable toxin (ST) and coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) were analyzed. US travelers to these countries and resident children in Guatemala were infected by ETEC strains of sequence type 398, expressing STp and carrying genetically identical CS6 sequences. PMID:20031063

  12. Molecular serotyping of Escherichia coli: A verification and reclassification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Serotyping of E. coli, based on the O- (polysaccharide side chain) and H- (flagellar) antigens using antisera is a common practice for diagnostics, outbreak investigations, and epidemiological surveillance. The full set of E. coli serogroups comprises O-groups O1 to O181, with several O...

  13. [Acute diarrheal disease caused by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal Escherichia coli pathogens are leading causes of acute diarrheal disease in children less than 5 years in Latin America, Africa and Asia and a leading cause of death in children living in poorest communities in Africa and South East Asia. Studies on the role of E. coli pathogens in childhood diarrhea in Colombia and other countries in Latin America are limited due to the lack of detection assays in clinical laboratories at the main urban medical centers. Recent studies report that enterotoxigenic E. coli is the most common E. coli pathogens associated with diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age. Other E. coli pathotypes have been detected in children with diarrhea including enteropathogenic, enteroaggregative, shiga-toxin producing and diffusely adherent E. coli. It was also found that meat and vegetables at retail stores are contaminated with Shiga-toxin producing E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli, suggesting that food products are involved in transmission and infection of the susceptible host. More studies are necessary to evaluate the mechanisms of transmission, the impact on the epidemiology of diarrheal disease, and management strategies and prevention of these pathogens affecting the pediatric population in Colombia.

  14. Characterization of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli on veal hides and carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) associated with the most severe forms of foodborne illnesses. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) has identified a higher percentage of non-O157 EHEC compared to E....

  15. Weak Electromagnetic Field Effects on Gene Expression in E. coli.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and/or translation were altered by MFs. A cell-free E . coli system was used to determine whether or not MFs directly affect the translational or...inability to distinguish differences in transcription and translation in E . coli may be related to the coupled nature of these processes in the bacterial system.

  16. STUDY OF THE ACTION OF SODIUM LAURYLSULFATE ON E. COLI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Sodium laurylsulfate (L.S.) lyses E . coli cells when their metabolism is halted or inhibited by any of a number of antimetabolites. Actively growing...L.S. has an extremely rapid lytic action on globular forms of E . coli . The probable mechanism of the cytolysis of nonmetabolizing whole cells is discussed.

  17. ACCELERATED METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF E. COLI,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A method was developed for preparing indicator paper slips for the determination of E . coli by the ’Bactostrip’ method (Foerg) when appraising the...quality of milk. The essence of the method is the exposure of E . coli on a strip of paper, impregnated with nutrient medium containing an indicator (triphenyltetrazolium chloride or other). (Author)

  18. Molecular Cloning of Actinomyces Bacteriophage DNA in E. Coli.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    recombinant clones revealed the presence of the expected phi63 DNA fragments that were used in the subcloning and they were stably maintained in E . coli . Further...feasibility of cloning of Actinomyces phage DNA fragments onto an E . coli expression vector.

  19. Use of bacteriophages in controlling E. coli in leafy vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophages are viruses that can infect and lys (kill) bacteria. These viruses are not harmful to humans and are present in the environment and many foods. Enterohemmorhagic E. coli (EHEC), like E. coli O157:H7, have been associated with contaminated bagged leafy green commodities. Outbreaks o...

  20. Escherichia coli and fecal coliforms in freshwater and estuarine sediments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been known for some time that substantial populations of fecal coliforms and E. coli are harbored in freshwater bottom sediments, bank soils, and beach sands. However, the relative importance of sediments as bacterial habitats and as a source of water-borne fecal coliforms and E. coli has not...

  1. EcoCyc: Encyclopedia of Escherichia coli genes and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karp, P D; Riley, M; Paley, S M; Pellegrini-Toole, A; Krummenacker, M

    1998-01-01

    The encyclopedia of Escherichia coli genes and metabolism (EcoCyc) is a database that combines information about the genome and the intermediary metabolism of E.coli. The database describes 3030 genes of E.coli , 695 enzymes encoded by a subset of these genes, 595 metabolic reactions that occur in E.coli, and the organization of these reactions into 123 metabolic pathways. The EcoCyc graphical user interface allows scientists to query and explore the EcoCyc database using visualization tools such as genomic-map browsers and automatic layouts of metabolic pathways. EcoCyc can be thought of as an electronic review article because of its copious references to the primary literature, and as a (qualitative) computational model of E.coli metabolism. EcoCyc is available at URL http://ecocyc.PangeaSystems.com/ecocyc/

  2. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    PubMed Central

    Morcatti Coura, Fernanda; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  3. Glycerol elicits energy taxis of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Zhulin, I B; Rowsell, E H; Johnson, M S; Taylor, B L

    1997-05-01

    Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium show positive chemotaxis to glycerol, a chemical previously reported to be a repellent for E. coli. The threshold of the attractant response in both species was 10(-6) M glycerol. Glycerol chemotaxis was energy dependent and coincident with an increase in membrane potential. Metabolism of glycerol was required for chemotaxis, and when lactate was present to maintain energy production in the absence of glycerol, the increases in membrane potential and chemotactic response upon addition of glycerol were abolished. Methylation of a chemotaxis receptor was not required for positive glycerol chemotaxis in E. coli or S. typhimurium but is involved in the negative chemotaxis of E. coli to high concentrations of glycerol. We propose that positive chemotaxis to glycerol in E. coli and S. typhimurium is an example of energy taxis mediated via a signal transduction pathway that responds to changes in the cellular energy level.

  4. Molecular typing of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli colonies originating from outbreaks of E. coli peritonitis syndrome in chicken flocks.

    PubMed

    Landman, W J M; Buter, G J; Dijkman, R; van Eck, J H H

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli colonies isolated from the bone marrow of fresh dead hens of laying flocks with the E. coli peritonitis syndrome (EPS) were genotyped using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Typing is important from an epidemiological point of view and also if the use of autogenous (auto)vaccines is considered. Birds with EPS originated from one house of each of three layer farms and one broiler breeder farm. Farms were considered as separate epidemiological units. In total, six flocks were examined including two successive flocks of one layer farm and the broiler breeder farm. E. coli colonies (one per bird) from nine to 16 hens of each flock were genotyped. The clonality of E. coli within birds was studied using five colonies of each of nine to 14 birds per flock. E. coli genotypes, which totalled 15, differed between farms and flocks except for two successive layer flocks that shared three genotypes. One to five genotypes were found per flock with one or two genotypes dominating each outbreak. Within hens, E. coli bacteria were always clonal. Colonies of the same PFGE type always had the same multilocus sequence type. However, four PFGE types shared sequence type 95. Neither PFGE types nor multilocus sequence types were unambiguously related to avian pathogenic E. coli from EPS. In cases where persistence of E. coli strains associated with EPS is found to occur frequently, routine genotyping to select strains for autovaccines should be considered.

  5. Effects of intravenous Escherichia coli (E. coli) dose on the pathophysiological response of colostrum-fed Jersey calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine the effects of E. coli dose on the pathophysiological response of dairy calves following an intravenous challenge. Eighteen 3-week old colostrum-fed Jersey calves were completely randomized to 1 of 6 doses of E. coli. The challenge doses included 0, 105, 106, 107, 108,...

  6. Soil solarization reduces Escherichia coli O157:H7 and total Escherichia coli on cattle feedlot pen surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feedlot pen soils are a source for transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and therefore a target for preharvest strategies to reduce this pathogen in cattle. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of soil solarization to reduce E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot surface material (FSM)....

  7. Preparation of Soluble Proteins from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Purification of human IL-1β is used in this unit as an example of the preparation of soluble proteins from E. coli. Bacteria containing IL-1β are lysed, and IL-1 β in the resulting supernatant is purified by anion-exchange chromatography, salt precipitation and cation-exchange chromatography, and then concentrated. Finally, the IL-1 β protein is applied to a gel-filtration column to separate it from remaining higher- and lower-molecular-weight contaminants, the purified protein is stored frozen or is lyophilized. The purification protocol described is typical for a protein that is expressed in fairly high abundance (i.e., >5% total protein) and accumulates in a soluble state. Also, the purification procedure serves as an example of how use classical protein purifications methods which may also be used in conjunction with the affinity-based methods now more commonly used. PMID:25367009

  8. Mechanism of Escherichia coli Resistance to Pyrrhocoricin

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Shalini; Modak, Joyanta K.; Ryan, Catherine S.; Garcia-Bustos, Jose; Davies, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their lack of toxicity to mammalian cells and good serum stability, proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PR-AMPs) have been proposed as promising candidates for the treatment of infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant bacterial pathogens. It has been hypothesized that these peptides act on multiple targets within bacterial cells, and therefore the likelihood of the emergence of resistance was considered to be low. Here, we show that spontaneous Escherichia coli mutants resistant to pyrrhocoricin arise at a frequency of approximately 6 × 10−7. Multiple independently derived mutants all contained a deletion in a nonessential gene that encodes the putative peptide uptake permease SbmA. Sensitivity could be restored to the mutants by complementation with an intact copy of the sbmA gene. These findings question the viability of the development of insect PR-AMPs as antimicrobials. PMID:24590485

  9. Animal models of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli infection

    PubMed Central

    Philipson, Casandra W.; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Hontecillas, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) has been acknowledged as an emerging cause of gastroenteritis worldwide for over two decades. Epidemiologists are revealing the role of EAEC in diarrheal outbreaks as a more common occurrence than ever suggested before. EAEC induced diarrhea is most commonly associated with travelers, children and immunocompromised individuals however its afflictions are not limited to any particular demographic. Many attributes have been discovered and characterized surrounding the capability of EAEC to provoke a potent pro-inflammatory immune response, however cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying initiation, progression and outcomes are largely unknown. This limited understanding can be attributed to heterogeneity in strains and the lack of adequate animal models. This review aims to summarize current knowledge about EAEC etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestation. Additionally, current animal models and their limitations will be discussed along with the value of applying systems-wide approaches such as computational modeling to study host-EAEC interactions. PMID:23680797

  10. An overview of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hernandes, Rodrigo T; Elias, Waldir P; Vieira, Mônica A M; Gomes, Tânia A T

    2009-08-01

    The enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) pathotype is currently divided into two groups, typical EPEC (tEPEC) and atypical EPEC (aEPEC). The property that distinguishes these two groups is the presence of the EPEC adherence factor plasmid, which is only found in tEPEC. aEPEC strains are emerging enteropathogens that have been detected worldwide. Herein, we review the serotypes, virulence properties, genetic relationships, epidemiology, reservoir and diagnosis of aEPEC, including those strains not belonging to the classical EPEC serogroups (nonclassical EPEC serogroups). The large variety of serotypes and genetic virulence properties of aEPEC strains from nonclassical EPEC serogroups makes it difficult to determine which strains are truly pathogenic.

  11. Escherichia coli fliAZY operon.

    PubMed Central

    Mytelka, D S; Chamberlin, M J

    1996-01-01

    We have cloned the Escherichia coli fliAZY operon, which contains the fliA gene (the alternative sigma factor sigma F) and two novel genes, fliZ and fliY. Transcriptional mapping of this operon shows two start sites, one of which is preceded by a canonical E sigma F-dependent consensus and is dependent on sigma F for expression in vivo and in vitro. We have overexpressed and purified sigma F and demonstrated that it can direct core polymerase to E sigma F-dependent promoters. FliZ and FliY are not required for motility but may regulate sigma F activity, perhaps in response to a putative cell density signal that may be detected by FliY, a member of the bacterial extracellular solute-binding protein family 3. PMID:8550423

  12. [Sensitivity to drugs of Escherichia coli strains isolated from poultry with coli septicemia].

    PubMed

    Giurov, B

    1985-01-01

    Investigations were carried out into the susceptibility of a total of 223 strains of Escherichia coli to therapeutic agents with the employment of the disk diffusion method. The organisms were isolated from internal organs and bone marrow of birds died of coli septicaemia. The serologic classification of the strains was defined with the use of 88 anti-group OK-agglutinating sera obtained through hyperimmunization of rabbits with the following Escherichia coli serotypes: 01-063, 068, 071, 073, 075, 078, 086, 0101, 0103, 0111-0114, 0119, 0124, 0129, 0135-0141, 0146, 0147, and 0149. It was found that serologically the strains referred as follows: 01-41 strains, 02-70 strains, 04-2 strains, 08-3 strains, 026-1 strain, 078-70 strains, 0111-2 strains, 0103-1 strain, 0141-1 strain. The number of untypable strains amounted to 32. Highest number of strains proved sensitive to colistin--96.06%, the remaining drugs following in a descending order: flumequine--95.65%, apramycin - 95.5%, gentamycin--93.72%, amoxicillin--93,8%, amikacin--88.57%, carbenicillin--86.88%, furazolidone--83,13%, and kanamycin--79.36%. High was the percent of strains resistant to tetracycline--66.17%, spectinomycin--61.67%, ampicillin--51.12%, chloramphenicol--50.23%, and streptomycin--44.84%.

  13. Escherichia coli Unsaturated Fatty Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Cronan, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Although the unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) synthetic pathway of Escherichia coli is the prototype of such pathways, several unresolved issues have accumulated over the years. The key players are the fabA and fabB genes. Earlier studies of fabA transcription showed that the gene was transcribed from two promoters, with one being positively regulated by the FadR protein. The other weaker promoter (which could not be mapped with the technology then available) was considered constitutive because its function was independent of FadR. However, the FabR negative regulator was recently shown to represses fabA transcription. We report that the weak promoter overlaps the FadR-dependent promoter and is regulated by FabR. This promoter is strictly conserved in all E. coli and Salmonella enterica genomes sequenced to date and is thought to provide insurance against inappropriate regulation of fabA transcription by exogenous saturated fatty acids. Also, the fabAup promoter, a mutant promoter previously isolated by selection for increased FabA activity, was shown to be a promoter created de novo by a four-base deletion within the gene located immediately upstream of fabA. Demonstration of the key UFA synthetic reaction catalyzed by FabB has been elusive, although it was known to catalyze an elongation reaction. Strains lacking FabB are UFA auxotrophs indicating that the enzyme catalyzes an essential step in UFA synthesis. Using thioesterases specific for hydrolysis of short chain acyl-ACPs, the intermediates of the UFA synthetic pathway have been followed in vivo for the first time. These experiments showed that a fabB mutant strain accumulated less cis-5-dodecenoic acid than the parental wild-type strain. These data indicate that the key reaction in UFA synthesis catalyzed by FabB is elongation of the cis-3-decenoyl-ACP produced by FabA. PMID:19679654

  14. Mono and diterpene production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reiling, K Kinkead; Yoshikuni, Yasuo; Martin, Vincent J J; Newman, Jack; Bohlmann, Jörg; Keasling, Jay D

    2004-07-20

    Mono- and diterpenoids are of great industrial and medical value as specialty chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Production of these compounds in microbial hosts, such as Escherichia coli, can be limited by intracellular levels of the polyprenyl diphosphate precursors, geranyl diphosphate (GPP), and geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP). To alleviate this limitation, we constructed synthetic operons that express three key enzymes for biosynthesis of these precursors: (1). DXS,1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase; (2). IPPHp, IPP isomerase from Haematococcus pluvialis; and (3). one of two variants of IspA, FPP synthase that produces either GPP or GGPP. The reporter plasmids pAC-LYC and pACYC-IB, which encode enzymes that convert either FPP or GGPP, respectively, to the pigment lycopene, were used to demonstrate that at full induction, the operon encoding the wild-type FPP synthase and mutant GGPP synthase produced similar levels of lycopene. To synthesize di- or monoterpenes in E. coli using the GGPP and GPP encoding operons either a diterpene cyclase [casbene cyclase (Ricinus communis L) and ent-kaurene cyclase (Phaeosphaeria sp. L487)] or a monoterpene cyclase [3-carene cyclase (Picea abies)] was coexpressed with their respective precursor production operon. Analysis of culture extracts or headspace by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed the in vivo production of the diterpenes casbene, kaur-15-ene, and kaur-16-ene and the monoterpenes alpha-pinene, myrcene, sabinene, 3-carene, alpha-terpinene, limonene, beta-phellandrene, alpha-terpinene, and terpinolene. Construction and functional expression of GGPP and GPP operons provides an in vivo precursor platform host for the future engineering of di- and monoterpene cyclases and the overproduction of terpenes in bacteria.

  15. Microdiesel: Escherichia coli engineered for fuel production.

    PubMed

    Kalscheuer, Rainer; Stölting, Torsten; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2006-09-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative energy source and a substitute for petroleum-based diesel fuel. It is produced from renewable biomass by transesterification of triacylglycerols from plant oils, yielding monoalkyl esters of long-chain fatty acids with short-chain alcohols such as fatty acid methyl esters and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs). Despite numerous environmental benefits, a broader use of biodiesel is hampered by the extensive acreage required for sufficient production of oilseed crops. Therefore, processes are urgently needed to enable biodiesel production from more readily available bulk plant materials like sugars or cellulose. Toward this goal, the authors established biosynthesis of biodiesel-adequate FAEEs, referred to as Microdiesel, in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli. This was achieved by heterologous expression in E. coli of the Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase and the unspecific acyltransferase from Acinetobacter baylyi strain ADP1. By this approach, ethanol formation was combined with subsequent esterification of the ethanol with the acyl moieties of coenzyme A thioesters of fatty acids if the cells were cultivated under aerobic conditions in the presence of glucose and oleic acid. Ethyl oleate was the major constituent of these FAEEs, with minor amounts of ethyl palmitate and ethyl palmitoleate. FAEE concentrations of 1.28 g l(-1) and a FAEE content of the cells of 26 % of the cellular dry mass were achieved by fed-batch fermentation using renewable carbon sources. This novel approach might pave the way for industrial production of biodiesel equivalents from renewable resources by employing engineered micro-organisms, enabling a broader use of biodiesel-like fuels in the future.

  16. The Escherichia coli Peripheral Inner Membrane Proteome*

    PubMed Central

    Papanastasiou, Malvina; Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Koukaki, Marina; Kountourakis, Nikos; Sardis, Marios Frantzeskos; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Economou, Anastassios

    2013-01-01

    Biological membranes are essential for cell viability. Their functional characteristics strongly depend on their protein content, which consists of transmembrane (integral) and peripherally associated membrane proteins. Both integral and peripheral inner membrane proteins mediate a plethora of biological processes. Whereas transmembrane proteins have characteristic hydrophobic stretches and can be predicted using bioinformatics approaches, peripheral inner membrane proteins are hydrophilic, exist in equilibria with soluble pools, and carry no discernible membrane targeting signals. We experimentally determined the cytoplasmic peripheral inner membrane proteome of the model organism Escherichia coli using a multidisciplinary approach. Initially, we extensively re-annotated the theoretical proteome regarding subcellular localization using literature searches, manual curation, and multi-combinatorial bioinformatics searches of the available databases. Next we used sequential biochemical fractionations coupled to direct identification of individual proteins and protein complexes using high resolution mass spectrometry. We determined that the proposed cytoplasmic peripheral inner membrane proteome occupies a previously unsuspected ∼19% of the basic E. coli BL21(DE3) proteome, and the detected peripheral inner membrane proteome occupies ∼25% of the estimated expressed proteome of this cell grown in LB medium to mid-log phase. This value might increase when fleeting interactions, not studied here, are taken into account. Several proteins previously regarded as exclusively cytoplasmic bind membranes avidly. Many of these proteins are organized in functional or/and structural oligomeric complexes that bind to the membrane with multiple interactions. Identified proteins cover the full spectrum of biological activities, and more than half of them are essential. Our data suggest that the cytoplasmic proteome displays remarkably dynamic and extensive communication with

  17. Slugs: Potential Novel Vectors of Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Sproston, Emma L.; Macrae, M.; Ogden, Iain D.; Wilson, Michael J.; Strachan, Norval J. C.

    2006-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were performed to determine whether slugs could act as novel vectors for pathogen (e.g., Escherichia coli O157) transfer from animal feces to salad vegetables. Escherichia coli O157 was isolated from 0.21% of field slugs from an Aberdeenshire sheep farm. These isolates carried the verocytotoxin genes (vt1 and vt2) and the attaching and effacing gene (eae), suggesting that they are potentially pathogenic to humans. Strain typing using multilocus variable number tandem repeats analysis showed that slug and sheep isolates were indistinguishable. Laboratory experiments using an E. coli mutant resistant to nalidixic acid showed that the ubiquitous slug species Deroceras reticulatum could carry viable E. coli on its external surface for up to 14 days. Slugs that had been fed E. coli shed viable bacteria in their feces with numbers showing a short but statistically significant linear log decline. Further, it was found that E. coli persisted for up to 3 weeks in excreted slug feces, and hence, we conclude that slugs have the potential to act as novel vectors of E. coli O157. PMID:16391036

  18. Advances in molecular serotyping and subtyping of Escherichia coli

    DOE PAGES

    Fratamico, Pina M.; DebRoy, Chitrita; Liu, Yanhong; ...

    2016-05-03

    Escherichia coli plays an important role as a member of the gut microbiota; however, pathogenic strains also exist, including various diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli that cause illness outside of the GI-tract. E. coli have traditionally been serotyped using antisera against the ca. 186 O-antigens and 53 H-flagellar antigens. Phenotypic methods, including bacteriophage typing and O- and H- serotyping for differentiating and characterizing E. coli have been used for many years; however, these methods are generally time consuming and not always accurate. Advances in next generation sequencing technologies have made it possible to develop genetic-based subtypingmore » and molecular serotyping methods for E. coli, which are more discriminatory compared to phenotypic typing methods. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing (WGS) of E. coli is replacing established subtyping methods such as pulsedfield gel electrophoresis, providing a major advancement in the ability to investigate food-borne disease outbreaks and for trace-back to sources. Furthermore, a variety of sequence analysis tools and bioinformatic pipelines are being developed to analyze the vast amount of data generated by WGS and to obtain specific information such as O- and H-group determination and the presence of virulence genes and other genetic markers.« less

  19. Gentamicin resistance among Escherichia coli strains isolated in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hasvold, J; Bradford, L; Nelson, C; Harrison, C; Attar, M; Stillwell, T

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among term and preterm infants. Ampicillin and gentamicin are standard empiric therapy for early onset sepsis. Four cases of neonatal sepsis secondary to Escherichia coli (E. coli) found to be gentamicin resistant occurred within a five week period in one neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). To determine whether these cases could be tied to a single vector of transmission, and to more broadly evaluate the incidence of gentamicin resistant strains of E. coli in the neonatal population at our institution compared to other centers, we reviewed the charts of the four neonates (Infants A through D) and their mothers. The E. coli isolates were sent for Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) to evaluate for genetic similarity between strains. We also reviewed all positive E. coli cultures from one NICU over a two year period. Infants A and B had genetically indistinguishable strains which matched that of urine and placental cultures of Infant B's mother. Infant C had a genetically distinct organism. Infant D, the identical twin of Infant C, did not have typing performed. Review of all cultures positive for E. coli at our institution showed a 12.9 percent incidence of gentamicin-resistance. A review of other studies showed that rates of resistance vary considerably by institution. We conclude that gentamicin-resistant E. coli is a relatively uncommon cause of neonatal sepsis, but should remain a consideration in patients who deteriorate despite initiation of empiric antibiotics.

  20. Inactivation of Escherichia coli using atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahata, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Ohyama, Ryu-ichiro; Ito, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure argon (Ar) plasma jet was applied to the inactivation of Escherichia coli. The Ar plasma jet was generated at a frequency of 10 kHz, an applied voltage of 10 kV, and an Ar gas flow rate of 10 L/min at atmospheric pressure. E. coli cells seeded on an agar medium in a Petri dish were inactivated by Ar plasma jet irradiation for 1 s. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that E. coli cells were killed because their cell wall and membrane were disrupted. To determine the causes of the disruption of the cell wall and membrane of E. coli, we performed the following experiments: the measurement of the surface temperature of an agar medium using a thermograph, the analysis of an emission spectrum of a plasma jet obtained using a multichannel spectrometer, and the determination of the distribution of the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated on an agar medium by plasma jet irradiation using semiquantitative test strips. Moreover, H2O2 solutions of different concentrations were dropped onto an agar medium seeded with E. coli cells to examine the contribution of H2O2 to the death of E. coli. The results of these experiments showed that the cell wall and membrane of E. coli were disrupted by electrons in the plasma jet, as well as by electroneutral excited nitrogen molecules (N2) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the periphery of the plasma jet.

  1. ESBL-producing E. coli in Austrian sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Reinthaler, Franz Ferdinand; Feierl, Gebhard; Galler, Herbert; Haas, Doris; Leitner, Eva; Mascher, Franz; Melkes, Angelika; Posch, Josefa; Winter, Ingrid; Zarfel, Gernot; Marth, Egon

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the degree of contamination of sewage sludge with ESBL-producing Escherichia coli strains and the effectiveness of different sewage sludge treatment methods. Monthly sewage sludge samples were collected between January and September 2009 in 5 different sewage treatment plants and tested for the presence of ESBL E. coli. In addition, the number of colony forming units (CFU) of E. coli and coliform bacteria before and after the different sludge treatment methods (aerobic/anaerobic digestion, lime stabilization, and thermal treatment) was investigated. Of the 72 sewage sludge samples investigated, ESBL-positive E. coli were found in 44 (61.1%) sewage sludge samples. The classification of beta-lactamase groups was carried out in 15 strains resulting in the detection of 2 different groups (CTX-M and TEM) of bla genes. All 15 of them had a CTX-M gene and 4 of these strains furthermore carried a TEM gene. With regard to the CFU of E. coli and coliform bacteria, thermal treatment and lime stabilization following dehydration sufficiently reduced pathogen concentrations. The plants using merely stabilization and dehydration showed an increase of E. coli and coliform bacteria and thus also an increase in ESBL-producing E. coli.

  2. Soil solarization reduces Escherichia coli O157:H7 and total Escherichia coli on cattle feedlot pen surfaces.

    PubMed

    Berry, Elaine D; Wells, James E

    2012-01-01

    Feedlot pen soil is a source for transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and therefore a target for preharvest strategies to reduce this pathogen in cattle. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of soil solarization to reduce E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot surface material (FSM). A feedlot pen was identified in which naturally occurring E. coli O157:H7 was prevalent and evenly distributed in the FSM. Forty plots 3 by 3 m were randomly assigned such that five plots of each of the solarization times of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks were examined. Temperature loggers were placed 7.5 cm below the surface of each plot, and plots to be solarized were covered with clear 6-mil polyethylene. At each sampling time, five FSM samples were collected from each of five solarized and five unsolarized plots. E. coli concentrations and E. coli O157:H7 presence by immunomagnetic separation and plating were determined for each FSM sample. Initial percentages of E. coli O157:H7-positive samples in control and solarized FSM were 84 and 80%, respectively, and did not differ (P > 0.05). E. coli O157:H7 was no longer detectable by 8 weeks of solarization, but was still detected in unsolarized FSM at 10 weeks. The average initial concentration of E. coli in FSM was 5.56 log CFU/g and did not differ between treatments (P > 0.05). There was a 2.0-log decrease of E. coli after 1 week of solarization, and a >3.0-log reduction of E. coli by week 6 of solarization (P, 0.05). E. coli levels remained unchanged in unsolarized FSM (P > 0.05). Daily peak FSM temperatures were on average 8.7°C higher for solarized FSM compared with unsolarized FSM, and reached temperatures as high as 57°C. Because soil solarization reduces E. coli O157:H7, this technique may be useful for reduction of persistence and transmission of this pathogen in cattle production, in addition to remediation of E. coli O157:H7-contaminated soil used to grow food crops.

  3. Fluorogenic assays for immediate confirmation of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Feng, P C; Hartman, P A

    1982-01-01

    Rapid assays for Escherichia coli were developed by using the compound 4-methylumbelliferone glucuronide (MUG), which is hydrolyzed by glucuronidase to yield a fluorogenic product. The production of glucuronidase was limited to strains of E. coli and some Salmonella and Shigella strains in the family Enterobacteriaceae. For immediate confirmation of the presence of E. coli in most-probable-number tubes, MUG was incorporated into lauryl tryptose broth at a final concentration of 100 micrograms/ml. Results of both the presumptive test (gas production) and the confirmed test (fluorescence) for E. coli were obtained from a variety of food, water, and milk samples after incubation for only 24 h at 35 degrees C. Approximately 90% of the tubes showing both gas production and fluorescence contained fecal coliforms (they were positive in EC broth incubated at 45 degrees C). Few false-positive reactions were observed. The lauryl tryptose broth-MUG-most-probable-number assay was superior to violet red bile agar for the detection of heat- and chlorine-injured E. coli cells. Anaerogenic strains produced positive reactions, and small numbers of E. coli could be detected in the presence of large numbers of competing bacteria. The fluorogenic assay was sensitive and rapid; the presence of one viable cell was detected within 20 h. E. coli colonies could be distinguished from other coliforms on membrane filters and plates of violet red bile agar if MUG was incorporated into the culture media. A rapid confirmatory test for E. coli that is amenable to automation was developed by using microtitration plates filled with a nonselective medium containing MUG. Pure or mixed cultures containing E. coli produced fluorescence within 4 h (most strains) to 24 h (a few weakly positive strains). Images PMID:7049088

  4. Prevalence of Escherichia coli in apple cider manufactured in Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Dingman, D W

    1999-06-01

    Cider samples obtained from 11 cider mills operating in Connecticut during the 1997 to 1998 production season were tested for the presence of Escherichia coli. Cider production began in mid August and continued through March, with peak production in September and October. Of 314 cider samples tested, 11 (4%) were found to contain E. coli. Of the 11 mills, 6 (55%) tested positive for E. coli in the cider at least once during the production year. E. coli was first observed in cider samples produced in mid to late October and was not detected in samples made after January. A trend was observed for cider to decrease in acidity and increase in Brix (soluble sugars) throughout the production season. No correlation between pH and soluble sugars of cider and the presence of E. coli was detected. Eight mills used both dropped apples and tree-picked apples, whereas three mills used tree-picked apples only. The use of dropped apples in cider production began 5 weeks before the first detection of E. coli in cider. E. coli was isolated from cider samples produced using dropped apples and from samples produced using only tree-picked apples. No direct correlation between the use of dropped apples or tree-picked apples and the presence of E. coli in the cider was observed. An association between the time of apple harvest and the appearance of E. coli in cider was noted. For mills providing adequate records, all contaminated cider was produced from apples harvested between mid October and mid November.

  5. Thymineless Death in Escherichia coli: Inactivation and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Kusy, Alvin R.

    1969-01-01

    The effects of chloramphenicol (CAP) on the progress of thymineless death (TLD), nalidixic acid (NA) inactivation, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and mitomycin C (MC) inactivation were studied in Escherichia coli B, Bs−1, Bs−3, Bs−12, and B/r. This was done before, during, and after inactivation. During the progress of inactivation, it was found that at 10 to 20 μg of CAP per ml, up to 50% of the UV-sensitive bacteria survived TLD and about 10% survived NA. In E. coli B/r, at these concentrations of CAP, about 10 to 15% of the cells survived TLD and about 20 to 25% survived NA. Concentrations of CAP greater than 25 μg/ml actually increased the sensitivity of E. coli B, Bs−1, Bs−3, and Bs−12 to inactivation by either TLD or NA; at 150 μg of CAP per ml, the sensitivity of E. coli B/r to inactivation also increased. When E. coli B cells were incubated in CAP prior to inactivation, the longer the preincubation the longer onset of TLD was delayed; NA inactivation was also affected in that the rate of inactivation after CAP incubation was greatly decreased. Preincubation of E. coli B/r with CAP had much less effect on the progress of inactivation. After thymineless death, incubation in CAP plus thymine led to a rapid and almost complete recovery of E. coli B and Bs−12. Lesser recoveries were observed after inactivation due to UV, NA, or MC inactivation. E. coli Bs−1 and B/r did not recover viability after any mode of inactivation, and E. coli Bs−3 and Bs−12 recovered from UV to about 20% of the initial titer. It was suggested that protein synthesis, in particular proteins involved in deoxyribonucleic synthesis, was a determining factor in these inactivating and recovery events. PMID:4897115

  6. Triglyceride kinetics in fasted and fed E. coli septic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza-Jacoby, S.; Tabares, A. )

    1990-02-26

    The mechanism for the development of hypertriglyceridemia during gram-negative sepsis was studies by examining the liver production and clearance of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) triglyceride (TG). To assess the liver output and peripheral clearance the kinetics of VLDL-TG were determined by a constant intravenous infusion of (2-{sup 3}H) glycerol-labeled VLDL in fasted control, fasted E. coli-treated, fed control, and fed E.coli-treated rats. Lewis inbred rats, 275-300 g, were made septic with 8 {times} 10{sup 7} live E.coli colonies per 100 g body weight. Twenty-four hours following E.coli injection serum TG of fasted E.coli-treated rats was elevated by 170% which was attributed to a 67% decrease in the clearance rate of VLDL-TG in fasted E.coli-treated rats compared with their fasted controls. The secretion of VLDL-TG declined by 31% in the livers of the fasted E.coli-treated rats which was accompanied by a 2-fold increase in the composition of liver TG. In a second series of experiments control and E.coli-treated rats were fed intragastrically (IG) a balanced solution containing glucose plus fat as the sources of nonprotein calories. Serum TG were 26% lower in the fed E.coli-treated rats because the clearance rate increased by 86%. The secretion of TG in the fed septic rats increased by 40% but this difference was not significant. In the septic rat the ability to clear triglycerides from the plasma depends upon the nutritional state.

  7. The quantitative and condition-dependent Escherichia coli proteome

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Alexander; Kochanowski, Karl; Vedelaar, Silke; Ahrné, Erik; Volkmer, Benjamin; Callipo, Luciano; Knoops, Kèvin; Bauer, Manuel; Aebersold, Ruedi; Heinemann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Measuring precise concentrations of proteins can provide insights into biological processes. Here, we use efficient protein extraction and sample fractionation and state-of-the-art quantitative mass spectrometry techniques to generate a comprehensive, condition-dependent protein abundance map of Escherichia coli. We measure cellular protein concentrations for 55% of predicted E. coli genes (>2300 proteins) under 22 different experimental conditions and identify methylation and N-terminal protein acetylations previously not known to be prevalent in bacteria. We uncover system-wide proteome allocation, expression regulation, and post-translational adaptations. These data provide a valuable resource for the systems biology and broader E. coli research communities. PMID:26641532

  8. An integrated database to support research on Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Baehr, A.; Dunham, G.; Matsuda, Hideo; Michaels, G.; Taylor, R.; Overbeek, R.; Rudd, K.E.; Ginsburg, A.; Joerg, D.; Kazic, T.; Hagstrom, R.; Zawada, D.; Smith, C.; Yoshida, Kaoru

    1992-01-01

    We have used logic programming to design and implement a prototype database of genomic information for the model bacterial organism Escherichia coli. This report presents the fundamental database primitives that can be used to access and manipulate data relating to the E. coli genome. The present system, combined with a tutorial manual, provides immediate access to the integrated knowledge base for E. coli chromosome data. It also serves as the foundation for development of more user-friendly interfaces that have the same retrieval power and high-level tools to analyze complex chromosome organization.

  9. YeeO from Escherichia coli exports flavins.

    PubMed

    McAnulty, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins help maintain cellular homeostasis by secreting metabolic wastes. Flavins may occur as cellular waste products, with their production and secretion providing potential benefit for industrial applications related to biofuel cells. Here we find that MATE protein YeeO from Escherichia coli exports both flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Significant amounts of flavins were trapped intracellularly when YeeO was produced indicating transport limits secretion of flavins. Wild-type E. coli secreted 3 flavins (riboflavin, FMN, and FAD), so E. coli likely produces additional flavin transporters.

  10. Production of Enzymatically Active Human Acetylcholinesterase in E. Coli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    AD-A282 703 lE1l1lm11I AD( CONTRACT NO: DAMD17-90-C-0107 TITLE: PRODUCTION OF ENZYMATICALLY ACTIVE HUMAN ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE IN E . COLI PRINCIPAL...FUNDING NUMBERS Production of Enzymatically Active Human Contract No. Acetylcholinesterase in E . coli DAMD17-90-C-0107 6. AUTHOR(S) M. Gorecki, Ph.D. and M...S493pMFL-52Ser - Run #1 37 Table 8: Summary of reconstitution and purification of rhAChE derived from E . coli S493pMFL-52Ser - Run #2 38 Table 9

  11. Heat-stable Escherichia coli enterotoxin production in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Whipp, S C; Moon, H W; Lyon, N C

    1975-01-01

    Hysterectomy-derived, colostrum-deprived piglets were infected with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli on day 4 of life. Samples of feces and intestinal contents were collected and tested in infant mice for enterotoxic activity. Positive enterotoxic responses were observed in mice given filtrates of feces and intestinal contents from piglets infected withe enterotoxigenic E. coli known to produce heat-stable enterotoxin but not heat-liabile enterotoxin in vitro. It is concluded that heat-stable enterotoxigenic E. coli induce diarrhea by production of heat-stable enterotoxin in vivo. PMID:1097335

  12. Reassessing Escherichia coli as a cell factory for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chonglong; Pfleger, Brian F; Kim, Seon-Won

    2017-03-11

    Via metabolic engineering, industrial microorganisms have the potential to convert renewable substrates into a wide range of biofuels that can address energy security and environmental challenges associated with current fossil fuels. The user-friendly bacterium, Escherichia coli, remains one of the most frequently used hosts for demonstrating production of biofuel candidates including alcohol-, fatty acid- and terpenoid-based biofuels. In this review, we summarize the metabolic pathways for synthesis of these biofuels and assess enabling technologies that assist in regulating biofuel synthesis pathways and rapidly assembling novel E. coli strains. These advances maintain E. coli's position as a prominent host for developing cell factories for biofuel production.

  13. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Serotypes and Endemic Diarrhea in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, M. Regina F.; Alvariza, M. do Carmo B.; Murahovschi, Jayme; Ramos, Sonia R. T. S.; Trabulsi, Luiz R.

    1983-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli serotypes were searched for in feces of 550 children with endemic diarrhea and in 129 controls, in São Paulo, in 1978 and 1979; serotypes O111ab:H−, O111ab:H2, and O119:H6 were significantly associated with diarrhea in children 0 to 5 months old and were the most frequent agents of diarrhea in this age group as compared with enterotoxigenic and enteroinvasive E. coli, Salmonella sp., Shigella sp., and Yersinia enterocolitica. It is concluded that various enteropathogenic E. coli serotypes may be agents of endemic infantile diarrhea. PMID:6339384

  14. Prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli on coriander.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Segovia-Cruz, Jesús A; Cerna-Cortes, Jorge F; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Salas-Rangel, Laura P; Gutiérrez-Alcántara, Eduardo J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes on coriander was determined. One hundred coriander samples were collected from markets. Generic E. coli were determined using the most probable number procedure. Diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEPs) were identified using two multiplex polymerase chain reaction procedures. Susceptibility to sixteen antibiotics was tested for the isolated DEPs strains by standard test. The behavior of multidrug-resistant DEPs isolated from coriander was determined on coriander leaves and chopped coriander at 25°± 2 °C and 3°± 2 °C. Generic E. coli and DEPs were identified, respectively, in 43 and 7% of samples. Nine DEPs strains were isolated from positive coriander samples. The identified DEPs included Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC, 4%) enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC, 2%) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, 1%). All isolated DEPs strains exhibited multi-resistance to antibiotics. On inoculated coriander leaves stored at 25°± 2 °C or 3°± 2 °C, no growth was observed for multidrug-resistant DEPs strains. However, multidrug-resistant DEPs strains grew in chopped coriander: after 24 h at 25° ± 2 °C, DEPs strains had grown to approximately 3 log CFU/g. However, at 3°± 2 °C the bacterial growth was inhibited. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence and behavior of multidrug-resistant STEC, ETEC and EPEC on coriander and chopped coriander.

  15. Diarrhea, Urosepsis and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Caused by the Same Heteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain.

    PubMed

    Ang, C Wim; Bouts, Antonia H M; Rossen, John W A; Van der Kuip, Martijn; Van Heerde, Marc; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2016-09-01

    We describe an 8-month-old girl with diarrhea, urosepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Escherichia coli. Typing of cultured E. coli strains from urine and blood revealed the presence of virulence factors from multiple pathotypes of E. coli. This case exemplifies the genome plasticity of E. coli and the resulting heteropathogenic strains.

  16. Genome Sequence of the Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Bacteriophage UFV-AREG1.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Maryoris E Soto; Batalha, Laís Silva; Vidigal, Pedro Marcus Pereira; Albino, Luiz Augusto A; Boggione, Delaine Meireles Gouveia; Gontijo, Marco Tulio Pardini; Bazzolli, Denise M Soares; Mendonca, Regina C Santos

    2016-10-13

    Here, we present the genome sequence of the Escherichia coli bacteriophage UFV-AREG1. This phage was isolated from cowshed wastewater and showed specificity for enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43895), E. coli 0111 (CDC O11ab) and E. coli (ATCC 23229).

  17. Genome Sequence of the Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Bacteriophage UFV-AREG1

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Laís Silva; Albino, Luiz Augusto A.; Boggione, Delaine Meireles Gouveia; Gontijo, Marco Tulio Pardini; Bazzolli, Denise M. Soares; Mendonca, Regina C. Santos

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the genome sequence of the Escherichia coli bacteriophage UFV-AREG1. This phage was isolated from cowshed wastewater and showed specificity for enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43895), E. coli 0111 (CDC O11ab) and E. coli (ATCC 23229). PMID:27738021

  18. Molecular characterization of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains from stools samples and food products in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Rúgeles, Laura Cristina; Bai, Jing; Martínez, Aída Juliana; Vanegas, María Consuelo; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of diarrheagenic E. coli in childhood diarrhea and the role of contaminated food products in disease transmission in Colombia are largely unknown. The aim of this study is to identify E. coli pathotypes, including E. coli O157:H7, from 108 stool samples from children with acute diarrhea, 38 meat samples and 38 vegetable samples. Multiplex PCR and Bax Dupont systems were used for E. coli pathotype detection. Eighteen (9.8%) E. coli diarrheagenic pathotypes were detected among all clinical and food product samples tested. Four different pathotypes were identified from clinical samples, including enteroaggregative E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, shiga-toxin producing E. coli, and enteropathogenic E. coli. Food product samples were positive for enteroaggregative and shiga-toxin producing E. coli, suggesting that meat and vegetables may be involved in transmission of these E. coli pathotypes in the community. Most E. coli strains identified belong to the phylogenetic groups A and B1, known to be associated with intestinal rather than extraintestinal E. coli clones. Our data is the first molecular E. coli report that confirms the presence of E. coli pathotypes circulating in Colombia among children with diarrhea and food products for human consumption. Implementation of multiplex PCR technology in Latin America and other countries with limited resources may provide an important epidemiological tool for the surveillance of E. coli pathotypes from clinical isolates as well as from water and food product samples. PMID:20153069

  19. Molecular characterization of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains from stools samples and food products in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Rúgeles, Laura Cristina; Bai, Jing; Martínez, Aída Juliana; Vanegas, María Consuelo; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar Gilberto

    2010-04-15

    The prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli in childhood diarrhea and the role of contaminated food products in disease transmission in Colombia are largely unknown. The aim of this study is to identify E. coli pathotypes, including E. coli O157:H7, from 108 stool samples from children with acute diarrhea, 38 meat samples and 38 vegetable samples. Multiplex PCR and Bax Dupont systems were used for E. coli pathotype detection. Eighteen (9.8%) E. coli diarrheagenic pathotypes were detected among all clinical and food product samples tested. Four different pathotypes were identified from clinical samples, including enteroaggregative E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, shiga-toxin producing E. coli, and enteropathogenic E. coli. Food product samples were positive for enteroaggregative and shiga-toxin producing E. coli, suggesting that meat and vegetables may be involved in transmission of these E. coli pathotypes in the community. Most E. coli strains identified belong to the phylogenetic groups A and B1, known to be associated with intestinal rather than extraintestinal E. coli clones. Our data is the first molecular E. coli report that confirms the presence of E. coli pathotypes circulating in Colombia among children with diarrhea and food products for human consumption. Implementation of multiplex PCR technology in Latin America and other countries with limited resources may provide an important epidemiological tool for the surveillance of E. coli pathotypes from clinical isolates as well as from water and food product samples.

  20. 75 FR 14607 - Small Entity Compliance Guide: Bottled Water: Total Coliform and E. coli

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... are Escherichia coli (E. coli), an indicator of fecal contamination. FDA also amended its bottled... and E. coli; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food... ``Bottled Water: Total Coliform and E. coli--Small Entity Compliance Guide'' for a final rule published...

  1. 40 CFR 141.858 - Repeat monitoring and E. coli requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... exceeded. (b) Escherichia coli (E. coli) testing. (1) If any routine or repeat sample is total coliform... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Repeat monitoring and E. coli....858 Repeat monitoring and E. coli requirements. (a) Repeat monitoring. (1) If a sample taken...

  2. 40 CFR 141.858 - Repeat monitoring and E. coli requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... exceeded. (b) Escherichia coli (E. coli) testing. (1) If any routine or repeat sample is total coliform... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Repeat monitoring and E. coli....858 Repeat monitoring and E. coli requirements. (a) Repeat monitoring. (1) If a sample taken...

  3. Multiplex PCR for Diagnosis of Enteric Infections Associated with Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Roberto; Vidal, Maricel; Lagos, Rossana; Levine, Myron; Prado, Valeria

    2004-01-01

    A multiplex PCR for detection of three categories of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. With this method, enterohemorrhagic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli were identified in fecal samples from patients with hemorrhagic colitis, watery diarrhea, or hemolytic-uremic syndrome and from food-borne outbreaks. PMID:15071051

  4. Characterization of a novel hemagglutinin of diarrhea-associated Escherichia coli that has characteristics of diffusely adhering E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T; Wakisaka, N; Nakae, T; Kamano, T; Serichantalergs, O; Echeverria, P

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli 73-1 (serotype O73:H33) and 5-2 (serotype O89:H-) isolated from patients with diarrhea adhered to tissue culture cells (HeLa and HEp-2) as well as coverslips (plastic and glass) in a diffuse pattern. Adherence of strain 73-1 was mediated by a 110-kbp plasmid designated pEDA1 and correlated with D-mannose-resistant hemagglutinin (MRHA) detected with bovine, sheep, or human erythrocytes. The MRHA region was duplicated on pEDA1 and mediated the production of the 57-kDa outer membrane protein whose N-terminal amino acid sequence was hydrophobic. In accordance with MRHA and adherence, the 57-kDa outer membrane protein was observed best at 37 degrees C and to a lesser extent at 25 degrees C. In human intestine, adherence to mucus and colonic epithelium was obvious. No detectable pili were observed. The enteroaggregative E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin 1 (EAST1) gene, whose nucleotide sequence was 99.1% homologous to that of enteroaggregative E. coli, was present adjacent to the MRHA region on pEDA1. Strain 5-2 also exhibited MRHA activities and adherence and had sequences corresponding to those of the MRHA region and EAST1 gene. The data suggest that strain 73-1 (and strain 5-2), which has characteristics of both diffusely adhering E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli, possesses a novel hemagglutinin associated with diffuse adherence. PMID:8751919

  5. Free RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Michael; Dennis, Patrick P; Ehrenberg, Mans; Bremer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    The frequencies of transcription initiation of regulated and constitutive genes depend on the concentration of free RNA polymerase holoenzyme [Rf] near their promoters. Although RNA polymerase is largely confined to the nucleoid, it is difficult to determine absolute concentrations of [Rf] at particular locations within the nucleoid structure. However, relative concentrations of free RNA polymerase at different growth rates, [Rf]rel, can be estimated from the activities of constitutive promoters. Previous studies indicated that the rrnB P2 promoter is constitutive and that [Rf]rel in the vicinity of rrnB P2 increases with increasing growth rate. Recently it has become possible to directly visualize Rf in growing Escherichia coli cells. Here we examine some of the important issues relating to gene expression based on these new observations. We conclude that: (i) At a growth rate of 2 doublings/h, there are about 1000 free and 2350 non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules per average cell (12 and 28%, respectively, of 8400 total) which are in rapid equilibrium. (ii) The reversibility of the non-specific binding generates more than 1000 free RNA polymerase molecules every second in the immediate vicinity of the DNA. Of these, most rebind non-specifically to the DNA within a few ms; the frequency of non-specific binding is at least two orders of magnitude greater than specific binding and transcript initiation. (iii) At a given amount of RNA polymerase per cell, [Rf] and the density of non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules along the DNA both vary reciprocally with the amount of DNA in the cell. (iv) At 2 doublings/h an E. coli cell contains, on the average, about 1 non-specifically bound RNA polymerase per 9 kbp of DNA and 1 free RNA polymerase per 20 kbp of DNA. However some DNA regions (i.e. near active rRNA operons) may have significantly higher than average [Rf].

  6. TRIMETHOPRIM-SULFAMETHOXAZOLE RESISTANCE IN SEWAGE ISOLATES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sewage samples from seven locations in the United States were analyzed for Escherichia coli isolates which were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT). The prevalence rate of SXT resistant organisms varied between the different geographical locales. The majority of th...

  7. The different ecological niches of enterotoxigenic E scherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales‐Siles, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Enterotoxigenic E scherichia coli (ETEC) is a water and food‐borne pathogen that infects the small intestine of the human gut and causes diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli adheres to the epithelium by means of colonization factors and secretes two enterotoxins, the heat labile toxin and/or the heat stable toxin that both deregulate ion channels and cause secretory diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli as all E. coli, is a versatile organism able to survive and grow in different environments. During transmission and infection, ETEC is exposed to various environmental cues that have an impact on survivability and virulence. The ability to cope with exposure to different stressful habitats is probably shaping the pool of virulent ETEC strains that cause both endemic and epidemic infections. This review will focus on the ecology of ETEC in its different habitats and interactions with other organisms as well as abiotic factors. PMID:26522129

  8. Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli Tailed Phage Utah

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, Justin C.; Heitkamp, Alexandra J.; Bhattacharjee, Ananda S.; Gilcrease, Eddie B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli bacteriophage Utah is a member of the chi-like tailed phage cluster in the Siphoviridae family. We report here the complete 59,024-bp sequence of the genome of phage Utah. PMID:28360173

  9. Proton-linked D-xylose transport in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, V M; Daruwalla, K R; Henderson, P J; Jones-Mortimer, M C

    1980-01-01

    The addition of xylose to energy-depleted cells of Escherichia coli elicited an alkaline pH change which failed to appear in the presence of uncoupling agents. Accumulation of [14C]xylose by energy-replete cells was also inhibited by uncoupling agents, but not by fluoride or arsenate. Subcellular vesicles of E. coli accumulated [14C]xylose provided that ascorbate plus phenazine methosulfate were present for respiration, and this accumulation was inhibited by uncoupling agents or valinomycin. Therefore, the transport of xylose into E. coli appears to be energized by a proton-motive force, rather than by a phosphotransferase or directly energized mechanism. Its specificity for xylose as inducer and substrate and the genetic location of a xylose-H+ transport-negative mutation near mtl showed that the xylose-H+ system is distinct from other proton-linked sugar transport systems of E. coli. PMID:6995439

  10. Evolution in the Lab: Biocide Resistance in E.coli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welden, Charles W.; Hossler, Rex A.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment on resistance to teach about evolution and issues of misuse of antimicrobial compounds. Investigates Escherichia coli's response to treatment of triclosan, a biocide used in consumer products. (Contains 12 references.) (YDS)

  11. A comprehensive library of fluorescent transcriptional reporters for Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zaslaver, Alon; Bren, Anat; Ronen, Michal; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Kikoin, Ilya; Shavit, Seagull; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Surette, Michael G; Alon, Uri

    2006-08-01

    E. coli is widely used for systems biology research; there exists a need, however, for tools that can be used to accurately and comprehensively measure expression dynamics in individual living cells. To address this we present a library of transcriptional fusions of gfp to each of about 2,000 different promoters in E. coli K12, covering the great majority of the promoters in the organism. Each promoter fusion is expressed from a low-copy plasmid. We demonstrate that this library can be used to obtain highly accurate dynamic measurements of promoter activity on a genomic scale, in a glucose-lactose diauxic shift experiment. The library allowed detection of about 80 previously uncharacterized transcription units in E. coli, including putative internal promoters within previously known operons, such as the lac operon. This library can serve as a tool for accurate, high-resolution analysis of transcription networks in living E. coli cells.

  12. Biosynthesis of Two Flavones, Apigenin and Genkwanin, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyejin; Kim, Bong Gyu; Kim, Mihyang; Ahn, Joong-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    The flavonoid apigenin and its O-methyl derivative, genkwanin, have various biological activities and can be sourced from some vegetables and fruits. Microorganisms are an alternative for the synthesis of flavonoids. Here, to synthesize genkwanin from tyrosine, we first synthesized apigenin from p-coumaric acid using four genes (4CL, CHS, CHI, and FNS) in Escherichia coli. After optimization of different combinations of constructs, the yield of apigenin was increased from 13 mg/l to 30 mg/l. By introducing two additional genes (TAL and POMT7) into an apigenin-producing E. coli strain, we were able to synthesize 7-O-methyl apigenin (genkwanin) from tyrosine. In addition, the tyrosine content in E. coli was modulated by overexpressing aroG and tyrA. The engineered E. coli strain synthesized approximately 41 mg/l genkwanin.

  13. Large Surface Blebs on Escherichia coli Heated to Inactivating Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Scheie, Paul; Ehrenspeck, Susan

    1973-01-01

    Large surface blebs were observed with phase-contrast optics on Escherichia coli B/r and Bs-1 heated to temperatures at which colony-forming ability was lost. Characterization of such blebs was consistent with the view that they were formed by a physical process and were bounded by the outer membrane of the cell. A hypothesis for thermal inactivation of E. coli is presented that places membrane damage near the primary lethal event. Images PMID:4196258

  14. ENERGY REQUIREMENT FOR THYMINELESS DEATH IN CELLS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    PubMed

    FREIFELDER, D; MAALOE, O

    1964-10-01

    Freifelder, David (University of California, Berkeley), and Ole Maaløe. Energy requirement for thymineless death in cells of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 88:987-990. 1964.-Thymineless death in thymine-requiring Escherichia coli is arrested immediately and reversibly by nitrogenation if the bacterial population is growing in a medium containing a carbon source that can only be metabolized aerobically. The mechanism of death, therefore, involves a metabolic process.

  15. ENERGY REQUIREMENT FOR THYMINELESS DEATH IN CELLS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    PubMed Central

    Freifelder, David; Maaløe, Ole

    1964-01-01

    Freifelder, David (University of California, Berkeley), and Ole Maaløe. Energy requirement for thymineless death in cells of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 88:987–990. 1964.—Thymineless death in thymine-requiring Escherichia coli is arrested immediately and reversibly by nitrogenation if the bacterial population is growing in a medium containing a carbon source that can only be metabolized aerobically. The mechanism of death, therefore, involves a metabolic process. PMID:14219063

  16. Expression of staphylococcal enterotoxin C1 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bohach, G A; Schlievert, P M

    1987-01-01

    The structural gene encoding staphylococcal enterotoxin C1 was cloned into Escherichia coli and localized on a 1.5-kilobase HindIII-ClaI DNA fragment by subcloning. The toxin was partially purified from E. coli clones and shown to be immunologically identical to enterotoxin C1 from Staphylococcus aureus. The cloned toxin also had the same molecular weight (26,000) and charge heterogeneity as staphylococcus-derived enterotoxin. Toxins from both sources were equally biologically active. Images PMID:3542834

  17. Café au lait macules and juvénile polyps.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Theresa R; Scatena, Lisa S; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Gralla, Jane; Lee, Lela A

    2007-01-01

    Several hereditary and nonhereditary gastrointestinal tract polyposis syndromes exhibit extra-intestinal manifestations, including cutaneous findings. However, a lack of information exists regarding cutaneous features of juvenile polyposis. Our objective was to document the prevalence of cutaneous hyperpigmented lesions in children with juvenile polyposis coli or juvenile polyposis coli and their first degree relatives.Children seen in the gastroenterology practice at The Children's Hospital in Denver, Colorado with polyps (juvenile polyposis coli, sporadic juvenile polyps, and familial adenomatous polyposis coli) and their first degree relatives were invited to participate in the study. A comprehensive skin examination was performed on those who consented to participate. We found that 8 of 14 patients (eight with juvenile polyposis coli, four with juvenile polyposis, and two with familial adenomatous polyposis coli) had at least one café-au-lait macule, compared with three of 27 relatives (p=0.003).The prevalence of at least one café-au-lait macule in our patients (8/14 or 57.1%, CI: 28.9–82.3%) was significantly higher than the general population prevalence of 28.5% (p=0.023). However, if the two patients with familial adenomatous polyposis coli were excluded, the comparison with the general population prevalence did not reach statistical significance (p=0.095). The prevalence of multiple cafe´-au-lait macules in our patients (4/14 or 28.6%; CI:8.4–58.1%) was significantly higher than the general population prevalence of 5.2% (p ¼ 0.005). A notable finding was the presence of multiple café -au-lait macules in 4 of 12 juvenile polyposis coli/juvenile polyposis patients.Two patients with juvenile polyposis coli also had lentigines. In this selected case series, we observed single or multiple café-au-lait macules in a high proportion of children with the three types of polyps. Further studies are needed to assess a possible common pathway for hamartomatous

  18. Summer E. coli patterns and responses along 23 Chicago beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, R.L.; Nevers, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Concentrations of E. coli in recreational beach water are highly variable both locally and temporally, but a broader understanding of these fluctuations may be explained through coastal observations. Currently, beach contamination study approaches tend to be site-specific underthe belief that politically delineated beaches are unique and management of beaches cannot be regionally oriented. E. coli data collected over five years from 23 Chicago beaches clearly identified ambient linked patterns at the regional scale. Temporal fluctuations were similar, with all beaches having simultaneous peaks and troughs of E. coli concentrations. Spatially, E. coli concentrations for beaches more closely situated were more closely correlated, indicating spatial autocorrelation. Julian day, wave height, and barometric pressure explained up to 40% of the variation, a value comparable to individual, less parsimonious site-specific models. Day of sampling could explain the majority of the variation in E. coli concentrations, more so than beach, depth, or time of day. Comparing beaches along a targeted coastline allows a better understanding of inherent background regional fluctuations and, ultimately, better predictions of E. coli concentrations in coastal recreational water.

  19. A novel toolbox for E. coli lysis monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rajamanickam, Vignesh; Wurm, David; Slouka, Christoph; Herwig, Christoph; Spadiut, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    The bacterium Escherichia coli is a well-studied recombinant host organism with a plethora of applications in biotechnology. Highly valuable biopharmaceuticals, such as antibody fragments and growth factors, are currently being produced in E. coli. However, the high metabolic burden during recombinant protein production can lead to cell death, consequent lysis, and undesired product loss. Thus, fast and precise analyzers to monitor E. coli bioprocesses and to retrieve key process information, such as the optimal time point of harvest, are needed. However, such reliable monitoring tools are still scarce to date. In this study, we cultivated an E. coli strain producing a recombinant single-chain antibody fragment in the cytoplasm. In bioreactor cultivations, we purposely triggered cell lysis by pH ramps. We developed a novel toolbox using UV chromatograms as fingerprints and chemometric techniques to monitor these lysis events and used flow cytometry (FCM) as reference method to quantify viability offline. Summarizing, we were able to show that a novel toolbox comprising HPLC chromatogram fingerprinting and data science tools allowed the identification of E. coli lysis in a fast and reliable manner. We are convinced that this toolbox will not only facilitate E. coli bioprocess monitoring but will also allow enhanced process control in the future.

  20. Summer E. coli patterns and responses along 23 Chicago beaches.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Richard L; Nevers, Meredith B

    2008-12-15

    Concentrations of E. coli in recreational beach water are highly variable both locally and temporally, but a broader understanding of these fluctuations may be explained through coastal observations. Currently, beach contamination study approaches tend to be site-specific under the belief that politically delineated beaches are unique and management of beaches cannot be regionally oriented. E. coli data collected over five years from 23 Chicago beaches clearly identified ambient linked patterns at the regional scale. Temporal fluctuations were similar, with all beaches having simultaneous peaks and troughs of E. coli concentrations. Spatially, E. coli concentrations for beaches more closely situated were more closely correlated, indicating spatial autocorrelation. Julian day, wave height, and barometric pressure explained up to 40% of the variation, a value comparable to individual, less parsimonious site-specific models. Day of sampling could explain the majority of the variation in E. coli concentrations, more so than beach, depth, or time of day. Comparing beaches along a targeted coastline allows a better understanding of inherent background regional fluctuations and, ultimately, better predictions of E. coli concentrations in coastal recreational water.

  1. Interaction of Escherichia coli and Soil Particles in Runoff

    PubMed Central

    Muirhead, Richard William; Collins, Robert Peter; Bremer, Philip James

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory-scale model system was developed to investigate the transport mechanisms involved in the horizontal movement of bacteria in overland flow across saturated soils. A suspension of Escherichia coli and bromide tracer was added to the model system, and the bromide concentration and number of attached and unattached E. coli cells in the overland flow were measured over time. Analysis of the breakthrough curves indicated that the E. coli and bromide were transported together, presumably by the same mechanism. This implied that the E. coli was transported by advection with the flowing water. Overland-flow transport of E. coli could be significantly reduced if the cells were preattached to large soil particles (>45 μm). However, when unattached cells were inoculated into the system, the E. coli appeared to attach predominantly to small particles (<2 μm) and hence remained unattenuated during transport. These results imply that in runoff generated by saturation-excess conditions, bacteria are rapidly transported across the surface and have little opportunity to interact with the soil matrix. PMID:16672484

  2. Measuring Escherichia coli Gene Expression during Human Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Escherichia coli (E. coli) evolved by acquisition of pathogenicity islands, phage, plasmids, and DNA segments by horizontal gene transfer. Strains are heterogeneous but virulent uropathogenic isolates more often have specific fimbriae, toxins, and iron receptors than commensal strains. One may ask whether it is the virulence factors alone that are required to establish infection. While these virulence factors clearly contribute strongly to pathogenesis, bacteria must survive by metabolizing nutrients available to them. By constructing mutants in all major metabolic pathways and co-challenging mice transurethrally with each mutant and the wild type strain, we identified which major metabolic pathways are required to infect the urinary tract. We must also ask what else is E. coli doing in vivo? To answer this question, we examined the transcriptome of E. coli CFT073 in the murine model of urinary tract infection (UTI) as well as for E. coli strains collected and analyzed directly from the urine of patients attending either a urology clinic or a university health clinic for symptoms of UTI. Using microarrays and RNA-seq, we measured in vivo gene expression for these uropathogenic E. coli strains, identifying genes upregulated during murine and human UTI. Our findings allow us to propose a new definition of bacterial virulence. PMID:26784237

  3. Regulation of arabinose and xylose metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Desai, Tasha A; Rao, Christopher V

    2010-03-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli will often consume one sugar at a time when fed multiple sugars, in a process known as carbon catabolite repression. The classic example involves glucose and lactose, where E. coli will first consume glucose, and only when it has consumed all of the glucose will it begin to consume lactose. In addition to that of lactose, glucose also represses the consumption of many other sugars, including arabinose and xylose. In this work, we characterized a second hierarchy in E. coli, that between arabinose and xylose. We show that, when grown in a mixture of the two pentoses, E. coli will consume arabinose before it consumes xylose. Consistent with a mechanism involving catabolite repression, the expression of the xylose metabolic genes is repressed in the presence of arabinose. We found that this repression is AraC dependent and involves a mechanism where arabinose-bound AraC binds to the xylose promoters and represses gene expression. Collectively, these results demonstrate that sugar utilization in E. coli involves multiple layers of regulation, where cells will consume first glucose, then arabinose, and finally xylose. These results may be pertinent in the metabolic engineering of E. coli strains capable of producing chemical and biofuels from mixtures of hexose and pentose sugars derived from plant biomass.

  4. Escherichia coli sequence type 131: epidemiology and challenges in treatment.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Zubair A; Doi, Yohei

    2014-05-01

    Escherichia coli ST131 has emerged as a global epidemic, multidrug-resistant clone of E. coli causing extra-intestinal infections. It is now highly prevalent among fluoroquinolone-resistant and CTX-M ESBL-producing E. coli isolates worldwide. Humans are likely the primary reservoir of ST131. Factors associated with its acquisition include residence in long-term care facilities and recent receipt of antimicrobial agents. E. coli ST131 causes a wide array of infections ranging from cystitis to life-threatening sepsis. Fluoroquinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are no longer adequate options for empiric therapy when E. coli ST131 is suspected from risk factors and local epidemiology. Expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, piperacillin-tazobactam and carbapenems are options to treat serious non-ESBL-producing E. coli ST131 infections, while carbapenems are indicated for ESBL-producing infections. There is a growing interest in reevaluating oral agents including fosfomycin and pivmecillinam for less serious infections such as uncomplicated cystitis.

  5. Characterization of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from foods.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Aida Juliana; Bossio, Carolina Paba; Durango, Adriana Coral; Vanegas, Maria Consuelo

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) by PCR using strains isolated from ham, beef, and cattle in Colombia. A total of 189 E. coli strains were tested for the presence of the uidA, stx1, and stx2 genes, and identification was confirmed by the automated PCR BAX system for E. coli O157:H7. Genes encoding Shiga-like toxins (stx) were found in eight (6.06%) of 132 strains previously isolated from minced beef; four (50%) of these strains yielded amplification products for both toxin genes (stx1 and stx2), and four (50%) yielded products only for the stx2 toxin. None of the strains analyzed were positive by PCR for the presence of the single base-pair mutation in the uidA gene from E. coli O157:H7; these results were confirmed by the BAX system analysis. A multiplex PCR assay was standardized for the three genes. Results from this study confirmed previous data about the low prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 and Shiga-like toxins in Colombia and is the first known report of the prevalence of non-O157 enterohemorrhagic E. coli in this country.

  6. [Avian Escherichia coli virulence factors associated with coli septicemia in broiler chickens].

    PubMed

    Ramirez Santoyo, R M; Moreno Sala, A; Almanza Marquez, Y

    2001-01-01

    In order to detect phenotypic characteristics associated with pathogenicity, 25 strains of Escherichia coli, isolated from clinical cases of colisepticemia in broiler chickens, were examined to determine the following properties: colicinogenicity, colicin V production, type 1 fimbriae, hemolysin expression and motility. Colicinogenicity occurred in 72% of the strains, 56% of all strains produced colicin V, 84% were positive for type 1 fimbriae and 80% were positive for motility. None of the strains had hemolytic activity; however, all of them, expressed at least one of the other characteristics studied. These results suggest that the diversity of phenotypes detected partially explain the multifactorial nature of avian colisepticemia.

  7. Regulation of Glutamine Transport in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Willis, R C; Iwata, K K; Furlong, C E

    1975-01-01

    The formation of the high-affinity (Km equal to 0.2 muM) L-glutamine transport system of Escherichia coli strain 7 (Lin) appears to be subject to the same major control as the glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) of this gram-negative organism. Culture of cells under nitrogen-limited conditions provides maximum derepression of both the glutamine synthetase and the glutamine transport system. Nutritional conditions providing a rich supply of ammonium salts or available sources of nitrogen, i.e., conditions which repress the formation of glutamine synthetase, provide three- and 20-fold repression, respectively, of the glutamine transport system. Culture of cells with glutamine supplements of 2 mM does not increase the repression of high-affinity glutamine transport system beyond the level observed in the absence of glutamine. A second kinetically distinct low-affinity component of glutamine. A second kinetically distinct low-affinity component of glutamine uptake is observed in cells cultured with a glutamine-depleted nutrient broth. This second component is associated with the appearance of glutaminase A (EC 3.5.1.2) and asparaginase I (EC 3.5.1.1), a periplasmic enzyme. Parallel changes were observed in the levels of the high-affinity glutamine transport system and the glutamine synthetase when cells were cultured with the carbon sources: glucose, glycerol, or succinate. PMID:238938

  8. ESCHERICHIA COLI Gene Induction by Alkylation Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Volkert, Michael R.; Nguyen, Dinh C.; Beard, K. Christopher

    1986-01-01

    Searches for alkylation-inducible (aid) genes of Escherichia coli have been conducted by screening random fusions of the Mu-dl(ApR lac) phage for fusions showing increased β-galactosidase activity after treatment with methylating agents, but not after treatments with UV-irradiation. In this report we describe gene fusions that are specifically induced by alkylation treatments. Nine new mutants are described, and their properties are compared with the five mutants described previously. The total of 14 fusion mutants map at five distinct genetic loci. They can be further subdivided on the basis of their induction by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). alkA, aidB and aidD are induced by both agents and appear to be regulated by ada. Neither aidC nor aidI is regulated by ada. Moreover, since aidC is induced only by MNNG and aidI is induced only by MMS, these two genes are likely to be individually regulated. Thus, there appear to be at least three different regulatory mechanisms controlling aid genes. PMID:3080354

  9. Escherichia coli gene induction by alkylation treatment.

    PubMed

    Volkert, M R; Nguyen, D C; Beard, K C

    1986-01-01

    Searches for alkylation-inducible (aid) genes of Escherichia coli have been conducted by screening random fusions of the Mu-dl(ApR lac) phage for fusions showing increased beta-galactosidase activity after treatment with methylating agents, but not after treatments with UV-irradiation. In this report we describe gene fusions that are specifically induced by alkylation treatments. Nine new mutants are described, and their properties are compared with the five mutants described previously. The total of 14 fusion mutants map at five distinct genetic loci. They can be further subdivided on the basis of their induction by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N' -nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). alkA, aidB and aidD are induced by both agents and appear to be regulated by ada. Neither aidC nor aidI is regulated by ada. Moreover, since aidC is induced only by MNNG and aidI is induced only by MMS, these two genes are likely to be individually regulated. Thus, there appear to be at least three different regulatory mechanisms controlling aid genes.

  10. Regulation of alcohol fermentation by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the way in which the fermentative synthesis of ethanol is regulated in the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli. Focus is on the two final steps in alcohol synthesis, which are catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde CoA dehydrogenase. We have isolated a series of mutations affecting the expression of these enzymes. Some of these mutations are in the structural genes for these enzymes; others affect the regulation of the adh operon. We have recently cloned the genes coding for these enzymes and are now studying the effect of multiple copies of the adh gene on fermentative growth and its regulation. A recently invented technique, proton suicide has allowed the selection of a variety of novel mutants affecting fermentation which are presently being characterized. We have isolated a comprehensive collection of operon fusions in which the lacZ structural gene is fused to promoters that are inactive aerobically but active anaerobically. Although these genes (like adh) are only expressed under anaerobic conditions, the level of induction varies from two-fold to nearly 100-fold. The nitrogen source, medium pH, nature of the buffer, presence of alternative electron acceptors (e.g., nitrate), and other factors exert a great effect on the expression of many of these genes. In the near future we will investigate control mechanisms common to the adh operon and other anaerobically regulated genes.

  11. Antimicrobial-resistant Invasive Escherichia coli, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Oteo, Jesús; Lázaro, Edurne; de Abajo, Francisco J.; Baquero, Fernando; Campos, José

    2005-01-01

    To address the public health problem of antimicrobial resistance, the European Union founded the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System. A network of 32 Spanish hospitals, serving ≈9.6 million persons, submitted antimicrobial-susceptibility data on 7,098 invasive Escherichia coli species (2001–2003). Resistance to ampicillin, cotrimoxazole, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin was found at rates of 59.9%, 32.6%, 19.3%, 6.8%, and 5.3%, respectively. Resistance to multiple drugs increased from 13.8% in 2001 to 20.6% in 2003 (p <0.0001). Antimicrobial consumption data were obtained from the Spanish National Health System. In spite of decreased cephalosporin and β-lactam use, overall extended-spectrum β-lactamase production increased from 1.6% (2001) to 4.1% (2003) (p <0.0001), mainly due to the rising prevalence of cefotaximases. Resistance to ciprofloxacin significantly increased, mostly in community-onset infections, which coincided with a rise in community quinolone use. Cotrimoxazole resistance remained stable at ≈30%, even though its use was dramatically reduced. PMID:15829192

  12. Starvation-induced dormancy in E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simsek, Emrah; Kim, Minsu

    Isogenic bacterial populations can exhibit phenotypic heterogeneity. Phenotypic heterogeneity is often viewed as a bet-hedging strategy to cope with environmental fluctuations, and believed to be under genetic control. The experimental evidence of this view, however, is limited. Here, we report experimental evidence that prompts reconsideration of this view. Observing how starved E. coli cells resume growth upon nutrient upshift at the single-cell level in real time, we revealed that physiological and metabolic state of starved cells, as well as growth resumption kinetics, vary from cell to cell. Upon nutrient upshift, a majority of cells resume growth instantly, but a small fraction maintain a non-growth state for several hours or days (i.e., long lag time). Hence they are dormant cells. The fraction strongly depends on the duration of starvation. The dormancy does not confer resistance to starvation. Oxidative damage accumulated during starvation leads to the appearance of dormant cells. Taken together, our data suggests that a dormant subpopulation appears as an inevitable consequence of starvation, rather than cellular decision to cope with starvation. Hence, the existence of a genetic program and adaptive value as a bet-hedging strategy to cope with starvation stress may not be needed to explain the emergence of bacterial dormancy.

  13. Optimal search in E. coli chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, Subrata; Chatterjee, Sakuntala

    2015-04-01

    We study chemotaxis of a single E. coli bacterium in a medium where the nutrient chemical is also undergoing diffusion and its concentration has the form of a Gaussian whose width increases with time. We measure the average first passage time of the bacterium at a region of high nutrient concentration. In the limit of very slow nutrient diffusion, the bacterium effectively experiences a Gaussian concentration profile with a fixed width. In this case we find that there exists an optimum width of the Gaussian when the average first passage time is minimum, i.e., the search process is most efficient. We verify the existence of the optimum width for the deterministic initial position of the bacterium and also for the stochastic initial position, drawn from uniform and steady state distributions. Our numerical simulation in a model of a non-Markovian random walker agrees well with our analytical calculations in a related coarse-grained model. We also present our simulation results for the case when the nutrient diffusion and bacterial motion occur over comparable time scales and the bacterium senses a time-varying concentration field.

  14. Genotoxicity of Graphene in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ananya

    Rapid advances in nanotechnology necessitate assessment of the safety of nanomaterials in the resulting products and applications. One key nanomaterial attracting much interest in many areas of science and technology is graphene. Graphene is a one atom thick carbon allotrope arranged in a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. In addition to being extremely thin, graphene has several extraordinary physical properties such as its exceptional mechanical strength, thermal stability, and high electrical conductivity. Graphene itself is relatively chemically inert and therefore pristine graphene must undergo a process called functionalization, which is combination of chemical and physical treatments that change the properties of graphene, to make it chemically active. Functionalization of graphene is of crucial importance as the end application of graphene depends on proper functionalization. In the field of medicine, graphene is currently a nanomaterial of high interest for building biosensors, DNA transistors, and probes for cancer detection. Despite the promising applications of graphene in several areas of biomedicine, there have been only few studies in recent years that focus on evaluating cytotoxicity of graphene on cells, and almost no studies that investigate how graphene exposure affects cellular genetic material. Therefore, in this study we used a novel approach to evaluate the genotoxicity, i.e., the effects of graphene on DNA, using Escherichia coli as a prokaryotic model organism.

  15. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of the enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.

  16. Biochemistry of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczykowski, S C; Dixon, D A; Eggleston, A K; Lauder, S D; Rehrauer, W M

    1994-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental biological process. Biochemical understanding of this process is most advanced for Escherichia coli. At least 25 gene products are involved in promoting genetic exchange. At present, this includes the RecA, RecBCD (exonuclease V), RecE (exonuclease VIII), RecF, RecG, RecJ, RecN, RecOR, RecQ, RecT, RuvAB, RuvC, SbcCD, and SSB proteins, as well as DNA polymerase I, DNA gyrase, DNA topoisomerase I, DNA ligase, and DNA helicases. The activities displayed by these enzymes include homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange, helicase, branch migration, Holliday junction binding and cleavage, nuclease, ATPase, topoisomerase, DNA binding, ATP binding, polymerase, and ligase, and, collectively, they define biochemical events that are essential for efficient recombination. In addition to these needed proteins, a cis-acting recombination hot spot known as Chi (chi: 5'-GCTGGTGG-3') plays a crucial regulatory function. The biochemical steps that comprise homologous recombination can be formally divided into four parts: (i) processing of DNA molecules into suitable recombination substrates, (ii) homologous pairing of the DNA partners and the exchange of DNA strands, (iii) extension of the nascent DNA heteroduplex; and (iv) resolution of the resulting crossover structure. This review focuses on the biochemical mechanisms underlying these steps, with particular emphases on the activities of the proteins involved and on the integration of these activities into likely biochemical pathways for recombination. Images PMID:7968921

  17. Endonuclease IV (nfo) mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, R P; Saporito, S M; Spitzer, S G; Weiss, B

    1986-01-01

    A cloned gene, designated nfo, caused overproduction of an EDTA-resistant endonuclease specific for apurinic-apyrimidinic sites in DNA. The sedimentation coefficient of the enzyme was similar to that of endonuclease IV. An insertion mutation was constructed in vitro and transferred from a plasmid to the Escherichia coli chromosome. nfo mutants had an increased sensitivity to the alkylating agents methyl methanesulfonate and mitomycin C and to the oxidants tert-butyl hydroperoxide and bleomycin. The nfo mutation enhanced the killing of xth (exonuclease III) mutants by methyl methanesulfonate, H2O2, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, and gamma rays, and it enhanced their mutability by methyl methanesulfonate. It also increased the temperature sensitivity of an xth dut (dUTPase) mutant that is defective in the repair of uracil-containing DNA. These results are consistent with earlier findings that endonuclease IV and exonuclease III both cleave DNA 5' to an apurinic-apyrimidinic site and that exonuclease III is more active. However, nfo mutants were more sensitive to tert-butyl hydroperoxide and to bleomycin than were xth mutants, suggesting that endonuclease IV might recognize some lesions that exonuclease III does not. The mutants displayed no marked increase in sensitivity to 254-nm UV radiation, and the addition of an nth (endonuclease III) mutation to nfo or nfo xth mutants did not significantly increase their sensitivity to any of the agents tested. Images PMID:2430946

  18. Ribonuclease Sensitivity of Escherichia coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Santer, Melvin; Smith, Josephine R.

    1966-01-01

    Santer, Melvin (Haverford College, Haverford, Pa.), and Josephine R. Smith. Ribonuclease sensitivity of Escherichia coli ribosomes. J. Bacteriol. 92:1099–1110. 1966.—The ribonucleic acid (RNA) contained in 70S ribosomes and in 50S and 30S subunits was hydrolyzed by pancreatic ribonuclease. A 7% amount of the RNA was removed from the 70S particle; at 10−4m magnesium concentration, a maximum of 24 and 30% of the RNA in the 50S and the 30S fractions, respectively, was removed by ribonuclease. At the two lower magnesium ion concentrations, 50S ribosomes did not lose any protein, whereas 30S ribosomes lost protein as a result of ribonuclease treatment. A number of proteins were removed from the 30S particles by ribonuclease, and these proteins were antigenically related to proteins present in 50S ribosomes. The differential effect of ribonuclease on 50S and 30S ribosomes suggested that they have structural dissimilarities. Images PMID:5332866

  19. Prevalence of Escherichia coli sequence type 131 and its H30 subclone among E. coli isolates in a French hospital.

    PubMed

    Lafolie, Jeremy; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Hocquet, Didier; Bertrand, Xavier

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) and its subclone H30 was assessed among a collection of 490 E. coli isolated in 2013 in a French university hospital. The prevalence of ST131 was 4% among bloodstream isolates (regardless of antimicrobial resistance) and 17.2% among extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates. Although a much lower prevalence of ST131 was found among bloodstream E. coli isolates compared with other countries, a large predominance of H30 subclone within ST131 was confirmed. It was also confirmed that, among ESBL-producing E. coli, ST131 isolates were more frequently resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftazidime, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides than non-ST131 isolates.

  20. Phenotypic microarrays suggest Escherichia coli ST131 is not a metabolically distinct lineage of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Alqasim, Abdulaziz; Emes, Richard; Clark, Gemma; Newcombe, Jane; La Ragione, Roberto; McNally, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) are the major aetiological agent of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in humans. The emergence of the CTX-M producing clone E. coli ST131 represents a major challenge to public health worldwide. A recent study on the metabolic potential of E. coli isolates demonstrated an association between the E. coli ST131 clone and enhanced utilisation of a panel of metabolic substrates. The studies presented here investigated the metabolic potential of ST131 and other major ExPEC ST isolates using 120 API test reagents and found that ST131 isolates demonstrated a lower metabolic activity for 5 of 120 biochemical tests in comparison to non-ST131 ExPEC isolates. Furthermore, comparative phenotypic microarray analysis showed a lack of specific metabolic profile for ST131 isolates countering the suggestion that these bacteria are metabolically fitter and therefore more successful human pathogens.

  1. Escherichia coli EDL933 requires gluconeogenic nutrients to successfully colonize the intestines of streptomycin-treated mice precolonized with E. coli Nissle 1917.

    PubMed

    Schinner, Silvia A C; Mokszycki, Matthew E; Adediran, Jimmy; Leatham-Jensen, Mary; Conway, Tyrrell; Cohen, Paul S

    2015-05-01

    Escherichia coli MG1655, a K-12 strain, uses glycolytic nutrients exclusively to colonize the intestines of streptomycin-treated mice when it is the only E. coli strain present or when it is confronted with E. coli EDL933, an O157:H7 strain. In contrast, E. coli EDL933 uses glycolytic nutrients exclusively when it is the only E. coli strain in the intestine but switches in part to gluconeogenic nutrients when it colonizes mice precolonized with E. coli MG1655 (R. L. Miranda et al., Infect Immun 72:1666-1676, 2004, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.72.3.1666-1676.2004). Recently, J. W. Njoroge et al. (mBio 3:e00280-12, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00280-12) reported that E. coli 86-24, an O157:H7 strain, activates the expression of virulence genes under gluconeogenic conditions, suggesting that colonization of the intestine with a probiotic E. coli strain that outcompetes O157:H7 strains for gluconeogenic nutrients could render them nonpathogenic. Here we report that E. coli Nissle 1917, a probiotic strain, uses both glycolytic and gluconeogenic nutrients to colonize the mouse intestine between 1 and 5 days postfeeding, appears to stop using gluconeogenic nutrients thereafter in a large, long-term colonization niche, but continues to use them in a smaller niche to compete with invading E. coli EDL933. Evidence is also presented suggesting that invading E. coli EDL933 uses both glycolytic and gluconeogenic nutrients and needs the ability to perform gluconeogenesis in order to colonize mice precolonized with E. coli Nissle 1917. The data presented here therefore rule out the possibility that E. coli Nissle 1917 can starve the O157:H7 E. coli strain EDL933 of gluconeogenic nutrients, even though E. coli Nissle 1917 uses such nutrients to compete with E. coli EDL933 in the mouse intestine.

  2. Fungal β-1,3-glucan increases ofloxacin tolerance of Escherichia coli in a polymicrobial E. coli/Candida albicans biofilm.

    PubMed

    De Brucker, Katrijn; Tan, Yulong; Vints, Katlijn; De Cremer, Kaat; Braem, Annabel; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan; Vleugels, Jef; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2015-01-01

    In the past, biofilm-related research has focused mainly on axenic biofilms. However, in nature, biofilms are often composed of multiple species, and the resulting polymicrobial interactions influence industrially and clinically relevant outcomes such as performance and drug resistance. In this study, we show that Escherichia coli does not affect Candida albicans tolerance to amphotericin or caspofungin in an E. coli/C. albicans biofilm. In contrast, ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli is significantly increased in a polymicrobial E. coli/C. albicans biofilm compared to its tolerance in an axenic E. coli biofilm. The increased ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli is mainly biofilm specific, as ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli is less pronounced in polymicrobial E. coli/C. albicans planktonic cultures. Moreover, we found that ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli decreased significantly when E. coli/C. albicans biofilms were treated with matrix-degrading enzymes such as the β-1,3-glucan-degrading enzyme lyticase. In line with a role for β-1,3-glucan in mediating ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli in a biofilm, we found that ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli increased even more in E. coli/C. albicans biofilms consisting of a high-β-1,3-glucan-producing C. albicans mutant. In addition, exogenous addition of laminarin, a polysaccharide composed mainly of poly-β-1,3-glucan, to an E. coli biofilm also resulted in increased ofloxacin tolerance. All these data indicate that β-1,3-glucan from C. albicans increases ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli in an E. coli/C. albicans biofilm.

  3. Prevalence of avian-pathogenic Escherichia coli strain O1 genomic islands among extraintestinal and commensal E. coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy J; Wannemuehler, Yvonne; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie; Johnson, James R; Logue, Catherine M; Nolan, Lisa K

    2012-06-01

    Escherichia coli strains that cause disease outside the intestine are known as extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and include pathogens of humans and animals. Previously, the genome of avian-pathogenic E. coli (APEC) O1:K1:H7 strain O1, from ST95, was sequenced and compared to those of several other E. coli strains, identifying 43 genomic islands. Here, the genomic islands of APEC O1 were compared to those of other sequenced E. coli strains, and the distribution of 81 genes belonging to 12 APEC O1 genomic islands among 828 human and avian ExPEC and commensal E. coli isolates was determined. Multiple islands were highly prevalent among isolates belonging to the O1 and O18 serogroups within phylogenetic group B2, which are implicated in human neonatal meningitis. Because of the extensive genomic similarities between APEC O1 and other human ExPEC strains belonging to the ST95 phylogenetic lineage, its ability to cause disease in a rat model of sepsis and meningitis was assessed. Unlike other ST95 lineage strains, APEC O1 was unable to cause bacteremia or meningitis in the neonatal rat model and was significantly less virulent than uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) CFT073 in a mouse sepsis model, despite carrying multiple neonatal meningitis E. coli (NMEC) virulence factors and belonging to the ST95 phylogenetic lineage. These results suggest that host adaptation or genome modifications have occurred either in APEC O1 or in highly virulent ExPEC isolates, resulting in differences in pathogenicity. Overall, the genomic islands examined provide targets for further discrimination of the different ExPEC subpathotypes, serogroups, phylogenetic types, and sequence types.

  4. Effect of tannins on the in viro growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and in vivo growth of generic Escherichia coli excreted from steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of commercially available chestnut and mimosa tannins in vitro (experiment 1) or in vivo (experiment 2) on the growth or recovery of Escherichia coli O157:H7 or generic fecal E. coli was evaluated. In experiment 1, the mean growth rate of E. coli O157:H7, determined via the measurement o...

  5. Modeling the inactivation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and uropathogenic E.coli in ground chicken by high pressure processing and thymol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease causing Escherichia coli commonly found in meat and poultry include intestinal pathogenic E. coli (iPEC) as well as extraintestinal types such as the Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). In this study we compare the resistance of iPEC (O157:H7) to UPEC in chicken meat using High Pressure Processing...

  6. Genetic and Physical Structure of Salmonella-coli Phage Hybrids and Development of New Generalized Transducing Hybrid Phages for E. Coli.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    coli chromosome although the parental phage Mu80, is a specialized transducing phage for the E . coli trp operon. Phage P22 can recombine with coli...mutator phage Mu. Genetic analysis of Mu80immP22 hybrid genomes led us to isolate high specialized transducing phages for argF and proAB genes of the E

  7. Modeling the inactivatin of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and uropathogenic E. coli in ground beef by high pressure processing and citral

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease causing Escherichia coli commonly found in meat and poultry include intestinal pathogenic E. coli (iPEC) as well as extraintestinal types such as the Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). In this study we compared the resistance of iPEC (O157:H7) to UPEC in ground beef using High Pressure Processing...

  8. 77 FR 58091 - Risk-Based Sampling of Beef Manufacturing Trimmings for Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service Risk-Based Sampling of Beef Manufacturing Trimmings for Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 and Plans for Beef Baseline AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), U... announcing its intention to redesign its E. coli O157:H7 verification testing program for beef...

  9. Binding and Cleavage of E. coli HUβ by the E. coli Lon Protease

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Lin, Yu-Ching; Hsu, Jowey; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Chen, Tse-An; Hsu, Chun-Hua; Chir, Jiun-Ly; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Wu, Tzu-Hua; Hong, Li-Jenn; Yen, Pei-Wen; Chiou, Arthur; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The Escherichia coli Lon protease degrades the E. coli DNA-binding protein HUβ, but not the related protein HUα. Here we show that the Lon protease binds to both HUβ and HUα, but selectively degrades only HUβ in the presence of ATP. Mass spectrometry of HUβ peptide fragments revealed that region K18-G22 is the preferred cleavage site, followed in preference by L36-K37. The preferred cleavage site was further refined to A20-A21 by constructing and testing mutant proteins; Lon degraded HUβ-A20Q and HUβ-A20D more slowly than HUβ. We used optical tweezers to measure the rupture force between HU proteins and Lon; HUα, HUβ, and HUβ-A20D can bind to Lon, and in the presence of ATP, the rupture force between each of these proteins and Lon became weaker. Our results support a mechanism of Lon protease cleavage of HU proteins in at least three stages: binding of Lon with the HU protein (HUβ, HUα, or HUβ-A20D); hydrolysis of ATP by Lon to provide energy to loosen the binding to the HU protein and to allow an induced-fit conformational change; and specific cleavage of only HUβ. PMID:20085725

  10. The Melibiose Transporter of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, Oliver; Lin, Yibin; Granell, Meritxell; Leblanc, Gérard; Padrós, Esteve; Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A.; Cladera, Josep

    2015-01-01

    We examine the role of Lys-377, the only charged residue in helix XI, on the functional mechanism of the Na+-sugar melibiose symporter from Escherichia coli. Intrinsic fluorescence, FRET, and Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy reveal that replacement of Lys-377 with either Cys, Val, Arg, or Asp disables both Na+ and melibiose binding. On the other hand, molecular dynamics simulations extending up to 200–330 ns reveal that Lys-377 (helix XI) interacts with the anionic side chains of two of the three putative ligands for cation binding (Asp-55 and Asp-59 in helix II). When Asp-59 is protonated during the simulations, Lys-377 preferentially interacts with Asp-55. Interestingly, when a Na+ ion is positioned in the Asp-55-Asp-59 environment, Asp-124 in helix IV (a residue essential for melibiose binding) reorients and approximates the Asp-55-Asp-59 pair, and all three acidic side chains act as Na+ ligands. Under these conditions, the side chain of Lys-377 interacts with the carboxylic moiety of these three Asp residues. These data highlight the crucial role of the Lys-377 residue in the spatial organization of the Na+ binding site. Finally, the analysis of the second-site revertants of K377C reveals that mutation of Ile-22 (in helix I) preserves Na+ binding, whereas that of melibiose is largely abolished according to spectroscopic measurements. This amino acid is located in the border of the sugar-binding site and might participate in sugar binding through apolar interactions. PMID:25971963

  11. Novel Mechanism of Escherichia coli Porin Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Keller, Maria; Vuong, Phu; Misra, Rajeev

    2006-01-01

    A novel mechanism of Escherichia coli porin regulation was discovered from multicopy suppressors that permitted growth of cells expressing a mutant OmpC protein in the absence of DegP. Analyses of two suppressors showed that both substantially lowered OmpC expression. Suppression activities were confined to a short DNA sequence, which we designated ipeX for inhibition of porin expression, and to DNA containing a 3′-truncated ompR gene. The major effect of ipeX on ompC expression was exerted posttranscriptionally, whereas the truncated OmpR protein reduced ompC transcription. ipeX was localized within an untranslated region of 247 base pairs between the stop codon of nmpC—a remnant porin gene from the cryptic phage qsr′ (DLP12) genome—and its predicted Rho-independent transcriptional terminator. Interestingly, another prophage, PA-2, which encodes a porin similar to NmpC, known as Lc, has sequences downstream from lc identical to that of ipeX. PA-2 lysogenization leads to Lc expression and OmpC inhibition. Our data show that the synthesis of the lc transcript, whose 3′ end contains the corresponding ipeX sequence, inhibits OmpC expression. Overexpression of ipeX RNA inhibited both OmpC and OmpF expression but not that of OmpA. ompC-phoA chimeric gene constructs revealed a 248-bp untranslated region of ompC required for ipeX-mediated inhibition. However, no sequence complementarity was found between ipeX and this region of ompC, indicating that inhibition may not involve simple base pairing between the two RNA molecules. The effect of ipeX on ompC, but not on ompF, was independent of the RNA chaperone Hfq. PMID:16385048

  12. Current World Status of Balantidium coli

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Frederick L.; Ramirez-Avila, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Balantidium coli is a cosmopolitan parasitic-opportunistic pathogen that can be found throughout the world. Pigs are its reservoir hosts, and humans become infected through direct or indirect contact with pigs. In rural areas and in some developing countries where pig and human fecal matter contaminates the water supply, there is a greater likelihood that balantidiosis may develop in humans. The infection may be subclinical in humans, as it mostly is in pigs, or may develop as a fulminant infection with bloody and mucus-containing diarrhea; this can lead to perforation of the colon. The disease responds to treatment with tetracycline or metronidazole. Balantidiosis is a disease that need never exist given access to clean water and a public health infrastructure that monitors the water supply and tracks infections. Its spread can be limited by sanitary measures and personal hygiene, but it is a disease that will be around as long as there are pigs. Immunocompromised individuals have developed balantidiosis without any direct contact with pigs, perhaps with rats or contaminated produce as a possible source of infection. For the clinician, balanatidiosis should be included in the differential diagnosis for persistent diarrhea in travelers to or from Southeast Asia, the Western Pacific islands, rural South America, or communities where close contact with domestic swine occurs. Warming of the earth's surface may provide a more favorable environment, even in the now-temperate areas of the world, for survival of trophic and cystic stages of Balantidium, and its prevalence may increase. Effective sanitation and uncontaminated water are the most useful weapons against infection. Fortunately, balantidiosis responds to antimicrobial therapy, and there have been no reports of resistance to the drugs of choice. PMID:18854484

  13. Effect of Ampicillin on E. Coli of Swine Origin

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, S. L.; Dale, D. G.; Blackwood, A. G.

    1963-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of 103 cultures of E. coli isolated from scouring and nonscouring pigs, and four cultures of Salmonella isolated from a case of necrotic enteritis was tested against Ampicillin contained in nutrient broth at concentrations of 0, 0.1, 1.0 and 5.0 uG per ml. of the medium. All but three cultures of E. coli were found to be susceptible to 5.0 uG/ml., all Salmonella isolates were also susceptible to this concentration of the antibiotic. Susceptibility of E. coli was also tested by plating dilutions of fecal samples obtained from either a scouring or a nonscouring pig, with E.M.B. agar containing 0, 0.1, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 uG Ampicillin per ml. of the medium. No difference in the growth of E. coli was observed at 0, 0.1 and 1.0 uG concentrations. The three higher concentrations of the antibiotic inhibited the growth of E. coli proportional to the amount of Ampicillin in each concentration. Ampicillin proved very effective in alleviating the symptoms of hemorrhagic enteritis in a 11-week old pig. The disappearance of scours was associated with the replacement of the previously existing sero-biotypes of fecal E. coliwith another aberrant type of E.coli which produced H2S. No Ampicillin resistant strains of E. coli emerged following treatment of the animal with this antibiotic. ImagesFig. IIp227-a PMID:17649462

  14. Genotyping and virulence factors assessment of bovine mastitis Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blum, Shlomo E; Leitner, Gabriel

    2013-05-03

    Escherichia coli is a major agent of bovine mastitis worldwide. However, specific E. coli virulence factors associated to pathogenicity during intra-mammary infections are yet unknown and this pathotype remains uncharacterized. The objectives of the present work were to assess the presence of a wide range of known virulence factors in a large set of E. coli strains isolated from bovine mastitis (mastitis set) and to study the genotypic distribution of strains in the mastitis set in comparison to a set of strains isolated from cows' environment in dairy farms (environmental set). Virulence factors were assessed by DNA hybridization microarray. The three most prevalent virulence factors found in the mastitis set were lpfA (long polar fimbriae), iss (increased serum resistance) and astA (enteroaggregative E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin 1). None, however, characterized the majority of these strains. Genotyping was assessed by ECOR phylogenetic grouping, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Strains in the mastitis and environmental sets were differentially distributed into ECOR phylogenetic groups; groups A and B1 being the most prevalent ones. Multiple MLST strain types were found in the two sets of strains, but only a few were common to both, and diversity was higher in the environmental set. A variety of PFGE patterns were found in the mastitis and environmental sets. Two clusters comprising mostly highly similar mastitis strains were identified. The results confirm that mastitis E. coli strains mostly lack known E. coli virulence factors. In addition, it is shown that the genotypic diversity of mastitis strains does not reflect the diversity found in the environmental E. coli population.

  15. Distribution of core oligosaccharide types in lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Amor, K; Heinrichs, D E; Frirdich, E; Ziebell, K; Johnson, R P; Whitfield, C

    2000-03-01

    In the lipopolysaccharides of Escherichia coli there are five distinct core oligosaccharide (core OS) structures, designated K-12 and R1 to R4. The objective of this work was to determine the prevalences of these core OS types within the species. Unique sequences in the waa (core OS biosynthesis) gene operon were used to develop a PCR-based system that facilitated unequivocal determination of the core OS types in isolates of E. coli. This system was applied to the 72 isolates in the E. coli ECOR collection, a compilation of isolates that is considered to be broadly representative of the genetic diversity of the species. Fifty (69. 4%) of the ECOR isolates contained the R1 core OS, 8 (11.1%) were representatives of R2, 8 (11.1%) were R3, 2 (2.8%) were R4, and only 4 (5.6%) were K-12. R1 is the only core OS type found in all four major phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2, and D) in the ECOR collection. Virulent extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates tend to be closely related to group B2 and, to a lesser extent, group D isolates. All of the ECOR representatives from the B2 and D groups had the R1 core OS. In contrast, commensal E. coli isolates are more closely related to group A, which contains isolates representing each of the five core OS structures. R3 was the only core OS type found in 38 verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) isolates from humans and cattle belonging to the common enterohemorrhagic E. coli serogroups O157, O111, and O26. Although isolates from other VTEC serogroups showed more core OS diversity, the R3 type (83.1% of all VTEC isolates) was still predominant. When non-VTEC commensal isolates from cattle were analyzed, it was found that most possessed the R1 core OS type.

  16. Reduction of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli in production of fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Holck, Askild L; Axelsson, Lars; Rode, Tone Mari; Høy, Martin; Måge, Ingrid; Alvseike, Ole; L'abée-Lund, Trine M; Omer, Mohamed K; Granum, Per Einar; Heir, Even

    2011-11-01

    After a number of foodborne outbreaks of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli involving fermented sausages, some countries have imposed regulations on sausage production. For example, the US Food Safety and Inspection Service requires a 5 log(10) reduction of E. coli in fermented products. Such regulations have led to a number of studies on the inactivation of E. coli in fermented sausages by changing processing and post-processing conditions. Several factors influence the survival of E. coli such as pre-treatment of the meat, amount of NaCl, nitrite and lactic acid, water activity, pH, choice of starter cultures and addition of antimicrobial compounds. Also process variables like fermentation temperature and storage time play important roles. Though a large variety of different production processes of sausages exist, generally the reduction of E. coli caused by production is in the range 1-2 log(10). In many cases this may not be enough to ensure microbial food safety. By optimising ingredients and process parameters it is possible to increase E. coli reduction to some extent, but in some cases still other post process treatments may be required. Such treatments may be storage at ambient temperatures, specific heat treatments, high pressure processing or irradiation. HACCP analyses have identified the quality of the raw materials, low temperature in the batter when preparing the sausages and a rapid pH drop during fermentation as critical control points in sausage production. This review summarises the literature on the reduction verotoxigenic E. coli in production of fermented sausages.

  17. Persistence of Escherichia coli in batch and continuous vermicomposting systems.

    PubMed

    Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Martin, Vincent J J; Gélinas, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Vermicomposting is a biooxidation process in which epigeicearthworms act in synergy with microbial populations to degrade organic matter. Vermicomposting does not go through a thermophilic stage as required by North American legislations for pathogen eradication. We examined the survival of a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) labeled Escherichia coli MG1655 as a model for the survival of pathogenic bacteria in both small-scale batch and medium-scale continuously-operated systems to discern the influence of the earthworm Eisenia fetida, nutrient content and the indigenous vermicompost microbial community on pathogen abundance. In batch systems, the microbial community had the greatest influence on the rapid decline of E. coli populations, and the effect of earthworms was only visible in microbially-impoverishedvermicomposts. No significant earthworm density-dependent relationship was observed on E. coli survival under continuous operation. E. coli numbers decreased below the US EPA compost sanitation guidelines of 10(3)Colony Forming Units (CFU)/g (dry weight) within 18-21days for both the small-scale batch and medium-scale continuous systems, but it took up to 51days without earthworms and with an impoverished microbial community to reach the legal limit. Nutrient replenishment (i.e. organic carbon) provided by continuous feed input did not appear to extend E. coli survival. In fact, longer survival of E. coli was noticed in treatments where less total and labile sugars were available, suggesting that sugars may support potentially antagonist bacteria in the vermicompost. Total N, pH and humidity did not appear to affect E. coli survival. Several opportunistic human pathogens may be found in vermicompost, and their populations are likely kept in check by antagonists.

  18. Development of a Multiplex PCR Assay for Detection of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli, Enterohemorrhagic E. coli, and Enteropathogenic E. coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Botkin, Douglas J.; Galli, Lucía; Sankarapani, Vinoth; Soler, Michael; Rivas, Marta; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other pathogenic E. coli strains are enteric pathogens associated with food safety threats and which remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the current study, we investigated whether enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) strains can be rapidly and specifically differentiated with multiplex PCR (mPCR) utilizing selected biomarkers associated with each strain’s respective virulence genotype. Primers were designed to amplify multiple intimin (eae) and long polar fimbriae (lpfA) variants, the bundle-forming pilus gene bfpA, and the Shiga toxin-encoding genes stx1 and stx2. We demonstrated consistent amplification of genes specific to the prototype EHEC O157:H7 EDL933 (lpfA1-3, lpfA2-2, stx1, stx2, and eae-γ) and EPEC O127:H6 E2348/69 (eae-α, lpfA1-1, and bfpA) strains using the optimized mPCR protocol with purified genomic DNA (gDNA). A screen of gDNA from isolates in a diarrheagenic E. coli collection revealed that the mPCR assay was successful in predicting the correct pathotype of EPEC and EHEC clones grouped in the distinctive phylogenetic disease clusters EPEC1 and EHEC1, and was able to differentiate EHEC1 from EHEC2 clusters. The assay detection threshold was 2 × 104 CFU per PCR reaction for EHEC and EPEC. mPCR was also used to screen Argentinean clinical samples from hemolytic uremic syndrome and diarrheal patients, resulting in 91% sensitivity and 84% specificity when compared to established molecular diagnostic procedures. In conclusion, our mPCR methodology permitted differentiation of EPEC, STEC and EHEC strains from other pathogenic E. coli; therefore, the assay becomes an additional tool for rapid diagnosis of these organisms. PMID:22919600

  19. Production of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Malla, Sailesh; Simkhada, Dinesh; Kim, Byung-Gee; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2013-03-01

    Quercetin, a flavonol aglycone, is one of the most abundant flavonoids with high medicinal value. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetic properties of quercetin are influenced by the type of sugars attached to the molecule. To efficiently diversify the therapeutic uses of quercetin, Escherichia coli was harnessed as a production factory by the installation of various plant and bacterial UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes. The genes encoding for the UDP-xylose pathway enzymes phosphoglucomutase (nfa44530), glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (galU), UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (calS8), and UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase (calS9) were overexpressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) along with a glycosyltransferase (arGt-3) from Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆zwf, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf, and E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf∆ushA mutants carrying the aforementioned UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes and glycosyltransferase and the galU-integrated E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi host harboring only calS8, calS9, and arGt-3 were constructed to enhance whole-cell bioconversion of exogeneously supplied quercetin into 3-O-xylosyl quercetin. Here, we report the highest production of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin with E. coli BL21 (DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf∆ushA carrying UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes and glycosyltransferase. The maximum concentration of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin achieved was 23.78 mg/L (54.75 μM), representing 54.75 % bioconversion, which was an ~4.8-fold higher bioconversion than that shown by E. coli BL21 (DE3) with the same set of genes when the reaction was carried out in 5-mL culture tubes with 100 μM quercetin under optimized conditions. Bioconversion was further improved by 98 % when the reaction was scaled up in a 3-L fermentor at 36 h.

  20. Extraintestinal Escherichia coli carrying virulence genes in coastal marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Luna, G M; Vignaroli, C; Rinaldi, C; Pusceddu, A; Nicoletti, L; Gabellini, M; Danovaro, R; Biavasco, F

    2010-09-01

    Despite the recognized potential of long-term survival or even growth of fecal indicators bacteria (FIB) in marine sediments, this compartment is largely ignored by health protection authorities. We conducted a large-scale study over approximately 50 km of the Marche coasts (Adriatic Sea) at depths ranging from 2 to 5 m. Total and fecal coliforms (FC) were counted by culture-based methods. Escherichia coli was also quantified using fluorescence in situ hybridization targeting specific 16S rRNA sequences, which yielded significantly higher abundances than culture-based methods, suggesting the potential importance of viable but nonculturable E. coli cells. Fecal coliforms displayed high abundances at most sites and showed a prevalence of E. coli. FC isolates (n = 113) were identified by API 20E, additional biochemical tests, and internal transcribed spacer-PCR. E. coli strains, representing 96% of isolates, were then characterized for genomic relatedness and phylogenetic group (A, B1, B2, and D) of origin by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and multiplex-PCR. The results indicated that E. coli displayed a wide genotypic diversity, also among isolates from the same station, and that 44 of the 109 E. coli isolates belonged to groups B2 and D. Further characterization of B2 and D isolates for the presence of 11 virulence factor genes (pap, sfa/foc, afa, eaeA, ibeA, traT, hlyA, stx(1), stx(2), aer, and fyuA) showed that 90% of B2 and 65% of D isolates were positive for at least one of these. Most of the variance of both E. coli abundance and assemblage composition (>62%) was explained by a combination of physical-chemical and trophic variables. These findings indicate that coastal sediments could represent a potential reservoir for commensal and pathogenic E. coli and that E. coli distribution in marine coastal sediments largely depends upon the physical and trophic status of the sediment. We conclude that future sampling designs aimed at monitoring the microbiological

  1. Antibiotic Resistance in Urinary Isolates of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Abduzaimovic, Amila; Aljicevic, Mufida; Rebic, Velma; Vranic, Sabina Mahmutovic; Abduzaimovic, Kadrija; Sestic, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the presence of antimicrobial resistance / susceptibility strains of Escherichia coli in inpatients and outpatients. Materials and methods: It is a retrospective study carried out at the Department of Microbiology, Parasitology and Virology Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo. In cooperation with the Microbiological laboratory of the Cantonal Hospital Zenica and the Microbiological laboratory of the General Hospital Tesanj, 3863 urine samples were processed in the period from March 1st to March 31st 2016. Results: Our study showed that E. coli had the highest antimicrobial resistance to trimethoprim / sulfamethoxazole (38.61%), followed by amoxicillin / clavulanic acid (19.62%), ciprofloxacin (9.49%), gentamicin (8.86%), cephalexin (8.23%), nitrofurantoin (8.23%), cefuroxime (7.52%), ceftazidime (6.33%), cefuroxime (89.87%), amikacin (4.43%). Conclusions: The isolated strains of E. coli showed the highest resistance to trimethoprim / sulfamethoxazole and amoxicillin / clavulanic acid. The isolated strains of E. coli showed the greatest susceptibility to amikacin and ceftazidime. Gender distribution of positive E. coli isolates showed statistically significant differences in favor of females. PMID:28144190

  2. Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli Serotypes from Cochin Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Divya P.; Durairaj, Srinivasan; Abdulla, Mohamed Hatha

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at detecting the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant serotypes of Escherichia coli in Cochin estuary, India. E. coli strains were isolated during the period January 2010–December 2011 from five different stations set at Cochin estuary. Water samples from five different stations in Cochin estuary were collected on a monthly basis for a period of two years. Isolates were serotyped, antibiogram-phenotyped for twelve antimicrobial agents, and genotyped by polymerase chain reaction for uid gene that codes for β-D-glucuronidase. These E. coli strains from Cochin estuary were tested against twelve antibiotics to determine the prevalence of multiple antibiotic resistance among them. The results revealed that more than 53.33% of the isolates were multiple antibiotic resistant. Thirteen isolates showed resistance to sulphonamides and two of them contained the sul 1 gene. Class 1 integrons were detected in two E. coli strains which were resistant to more than seven antibiotics. In the present study, O serotyping, antibiotic sensitivity, and polymerase chain reaction were employed with the purpose of establishing the present distribution of multiple antibiotic-resistant serotypes, associated with E. coli isolated from different parts of Cochin estuary. PMID:23008708

  3. Escherichia coli ST131, an Intriguing Clonal Group

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Xavier; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2008, a previously unknown Escherichia coli clonal group, sequence type 131 (ST131), was identified on three continents. Today, ST131 is the predominant E. coli lineage among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) isolates worldwide. Retrospective studies have suggested that it may originally have risen to prominence as early as 2003. Unlike other classical group B2 ExPEC isolates, ST131 isolates are commonly reported to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases, such as CTX-M-15, and almost all are resistant to fluoroquinolones. Moreover, ST131 E. coli isolates are considered to be truly pathogenic, due to the spectrum of infections they cause in both community and hospital settings and the large number of virulence-associated genes they contain. ST131 isolates therefore seem to contradict the widely held view that high levels of antimicrobial resistance are necessarily associated with a fitness cost leading to a decrease in pathogenesis. Six years after the first description of E. coli ST131, this review outlines the principal traits of ST131 clonal group isolates, based on the growing body of published data, and highlights what is currently known and what we need to find out to provide public health authorities with better information to help combat ST131. PMID:24982321

  4. Recent Advances in Understanding Enteric Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Croxen, Matthew A.; Law, Robyn J.; Scholz, Roland; Keeney, Kristie M.; Wlodarska, Marta

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Although Escherichia coli can be an innocuous resident of the gastrointestinal tract, it also has the pathogenic capacity to cause significant diarrheal and extraintestinal diseases. Pathogenic variants of E. coli (pathovars or pathotypes) cause much morbidity and mortality worldwide. Consequently, pathogenic E. coli is widely studied in humans, animals, food, and the environment. While there are many common features that these pathotypes employ to colonize the intestinal mucosa and cause disease, the course, onset, and complications vary significantly. Outbreaks are common in developed and developing countries, and they sometimes have fatal consequences. Many of these pathotypes are a major public health concern as they have low infectious doses and are transmitted through ubiquitous mediums, including food and water. The seriousness of pathogenic E. coli is exemplified by dedicated national and international surveillance programs that monitor and track outbreaks; unfortunately, this surveillance is often lacking in developing countries. While not all pathotypes carry the same public health profile, they all carry an enormous potential to cause disease and continue to present challenges to human health. This comprehensive review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the intestinal pathotypes of E. coli. PMID:24092857

  5. The Escherichia coli Proteome: Past, Present, and Future Prospects†

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mee-Jung; Lee, Sang Yup

    2006-01-01

    Proteomics has emerged as an indispensable methodology for large-scale protein analysis in functional genomics. The Escherichia coli proteome has been extensively studied and is well defined in terms of biochemical, biological, and biotechnological data. Even before the entire E. coli proteome was fully elucidated, the largest available data set had been integrated to decipher regulatory circuits and metabolic pathways, providing valuable insights into global cellular physiology and the development of metabolic and cellular engineering strategies. With the recent advent of advanced proteomic technologies, the E. coli proteome has been used for the validation of new technologies and methodologies such as sample prefractionation, protein enrichment, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, protein detection, mass spectrometry (MS), combinatorial assays with n-dimensional chromatographies and MS, and image analysis software. These important technologies will not only provide a great amount of additional information on the E. coli proteome but also synergistically contribute to other proteomic studies. Here, we review the past development and current status of E. coli proteome research in terms of its biological, biotechnological, and methodological significance and suggest future prospects. PMID:16760308

  6. Isolation of an Aptamer that Binds Specifically to E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Cleto, Fernanda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio; Cardoso, Josiane

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species found ubiquitously in the intestinal flora of animals, although pathogenic variants cause major public health problems. Aptamers are short oligonucleotides that bind to targets with high affinity and specificity, and have great potential for use in diagnostics and therapy. We used cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (cell-SELEX) to isolate four single stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers that bind strongly to E. coli cells (ATCC generic strain 25922), with Kd values in the nanomolar range. Fluorescently labeled aptamers label the surface of E. coli cells, as viewed by fluorescent microscopy. Specificity tests with twelve different bacterial species showed that one of the aptamers–called P12-31—is highly specific for E. coli. Importantly, this aptamer binds to Meningitis/sepsis associated E. coli (MNEC) clinical isolates, and is the first aptamer described with potential for use in the diagnosis of MNEC-borne pathologies. PMID:27104834

  7. Fumarate-Mediated Persistence of Escherichia coli against Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Seob; Cho, Da-Hyeong; Heo, Paul; Jung, Suk-Chae; Park, Myungseo; Oh, Eun-Joong; Sung, Jaeyun; Kim, Pan-Jun; Lee, Suk-Chan; Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Sarah; Lee, Choong Hwan; Shin, Dongwoo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial persisters are a small fraction of quiescent cells that survive in the presence of lethal concentrations of antibiotics. They can regrow to give rise to a new population that has the same vulnerability to the antibiotics as did the parental population. Although formation of bacterial persisters in the presence of various antibiotics has been documented, the molecular mechanisms by which these persisters tolerate the antibiotics are still controversial. We found that amplification of the fumarate reductase operon (FRD) in Escherichia coli led to a higher frequency of persister formation. The persister frequency of E. coli was increased when the cells contained elevated levels of intracellular fumarate. Genetic perturbations of the electron transport chain (ETC), a metabolite supplementation assay, and even the toxin-antitoxin-related hipA7 mutation indicated that surplus fumarate markedly elevated the E. coli persister frequency. An E. coli strain lacking succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), thereby showing a lower intracellular fumarate concentration, was killed ∼1,000-fold more effectively than the wild-type strain in the stationary phase. It appears that SDH and FRD represent a paired system that gives rise to and maintains E. coli persisters by producing and utilizing fumarate, respectively. PMID:26810657

  8. Escherichia coli β-Lactamases: What Really Matters

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Priyanka; Singh, Nambram S.; Virdi, Jugsharan S.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains belonging to diverse pathotypes have increasingly been recognized as a major public health concern. The β-lactam antibiotics have been used successfully to treat infections caused by pathogenic E. coli. However, currently, the utility of β-lactams is being challenged severely by a large number of hydrolytic enzymes – the β-lactamases expressed by bacteria. The menace is further compounded by the highly flexible genome of E. coli, and propensity of resistance dissemination through horizontal gene transfer and clonal spread. Successful management of infections caused by such resistant strains requires an understanding of the diversity of β-lactamases, their unambiguous detection, and molecular mechanisms underlying their expression and spread with regard to the most relevant information about individual bacterial species. Thus, this review comprises first such effort in this direction for E. coli, a bacterial species known to be associated with production of diverse classes of β-lactamases. The review also highlights the role of commensal E. coli as a potential but under-estimated reservoir of β-lactamases-encoding genes. PMID:27065978

  9. Effects of Escherichia coli hemolysin on endothelial cell function.

    PubMed Central

    Suttorp, N; Flöer, B; Schnittler, H; Seeger, W; Bhakdi, S

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli hemolysin is considered an important virulence factor in extraintestinal E. coli infections. The present study demonstrates that cultured pulmonary artery endothelial cells are susceptible to attack by low concentrations of E. coli hemolysin (greater than or equal to 0.05 hemolytic units/ml; greater than or equal to 5 ng/ml). Sublytic amounts of hemolysin increased the permeability of endothelial cell monolayers in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The hydraulic conductivity increased approximately 30-fold and the reflection coefficient for large molecules dropped from 0.71 to less than 0.05, indicating a toxin-induced loss of endothelial barrier function. The alterations of endothelial monolayer permeability were accompanied by cell retraction and interendothelial gap formation. In addition, E. coli hemolysin stimulated prostacyclin synthesis in endothelial cells. This effect was strictly dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ but not of Mg2+. An enhanced passive influx of 45Ca2+ and 3H-sucrose but not of tritiated inulin and dextran was noted in toxin-treated cells, indicating that small transmembrane pores comparable to those detected in rabbit erythrocytes had been generated in endothelial cell membranes. These pores may act as nonphysiologic Ca2+ gates, thereby initiating different Ca2+-dependent cellular processes. We conclude that endothelial cells are highly susceptible to E. coli hemolysin and that two major endothelial cell functions are altered by very low concentrations of hemolysin. Images PMID:2121650

  10. Insights from 100 Years of Research with Probiotic E. Coli.

    PubMed

    Wassenaar, Trudy M

    2016-09-29

    A century ago, Alfred Nissle discovered that intentional intake of particular strains of Escherichia coli could treat patients suffering from infectious diseases. Since then, one of these strains became the most frequently used probiotic E. coli in research and was applied to a variety of human conditions. Here, properties of that E. coli Nissle 1917 strain are compared with other commercially available E. coli probiotic strains, with emphasis on their human applications. A literature search formed the basis of a summary of research findings reported for the probiotics Mutaflor, Symbioflor 2, and Colinfant. The closest relatives of the strains in these products are presented, and their genetic content, including the presence of virulence, genes is discussed. A similarity to pathogenic strains causing urinary tract infections is noticeable. Historic trends in research of probiotics treatment for particular human conditions are identified. The future of probiotic E. coli may lay in what Alfred Nissle originally discovered: to treat gastrointestinal infections, which nowadays are often caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  11. The Genetic Basis of Escherichia coli Pathoadaptation to Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Miskinyte, Migla; Sousa, Ana; Ramiro, Ricardo S.; de Sousa, Jorge A. Moura; Kotlinowski, Jerzy; Caramalho, Iris; Magalhães, Sara; Soares, Miguel P.; Gordo, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Antagonistic interactions are likely important driving forces of the evolutionary process underlying bacterial genome complexity and diversity. We hypothesized that the ability of evolved bacteria to escape specific components of host innate immunity, such as phagocytosis and killing by macrophages (MΦ), is a critical trait relevant in the acquisition of bacterial virulence. Here, we used a combination of experimental evolution, phenotypic characterization, genome sequencing and mathematical modeling to address how fast, and through how many adaptive steps, a commensal Escherichia coli (E. coli) acquire this virulence trait. We show that when maintained in vitro under the selective pressure of host MΦ commensal E. coli can evolve, in less than 500 generations, virulent clones that escape phagocytosis and MΦ killing in vitro, while increasing their pathogenicity in vivo, as assessed in mice. This pathoadaptive process is driven by a mechanism involving the insertion of a single transposable element into the promoter region of the E. coli yrfF gene. Moreover, transposition of the IS186 element into the promoter of Lon gene, encoding an ATP-dependent serine protease, is likely to accelerate this pathoadaptive process. Competition between clones carrying distinct beneficial mutations dominates the dynamics of the pathoadaptive process, as suggested from a mathematical model, which reproduces the observed experimental dynamics of E. coli evolution towards virulence. In conclusion, we reveal a molecular mechanism explaining how a specific component of host innate immunity can modulate microbial evolution towards pathogenicity. PMID:24348252

  12. Unusual "flesh-eating" strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Hila; Samra, Zmira; Paul, Michal; Madar-Shapiro, Liora; Cohen, Jonathan; Pitlik, Silvio; Bishara, Jihad

    2012-12-01

    Monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis (type II) is typically caused by group A streptococcus alone or in combination with Staphylococcus aureus. Escherichia coli has been isolated from polymicrobial or Fournier's gangrene but has rarely been reported in monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis. We describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of seven cases of monomicrobial E. coli necrotizing fasciitis and/or severe soft tissue infection diagnosed at a single institution during an 18-month period. Four isolates from three patients and two isolates from two patients with type I polymicrobial severe soft tissue infection (controls) were assayed by the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis for fingerprinting and PCR amplification of primers in order to detect cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 and 2 (cnf1 and cnf2) genes. All patients had some type of immune suppression. The limb was the most commonly involved organ. In all cases, E. coli was isolated as a monomicrobial pathogen from blood, fascia, or both. All patients died during hospitalization, three within the first 48 h. The RAPD amplification assay showed a high degree of genetic diversity among the "flesh-eating" strains and controls. The cnf1 toxin gene was identified in two out of three cases, but not in the controls. cnf2 was not detected in any of the patients. E. coli may be responsible for life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis. Further research is needed to reveal relevant risk factors, reservoirs, and modes of transmission of cnf1 E. coli.

  13. Escherichia coli exports cyclic AMP via TolC.

    PubMed

    Hantke, Klaus; Winkler, Karin; Schultz, Joachim E

    2011-03-01

    In Escherichia coli more than 180 genes are regulated by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex. However, more than 90% of cAMP that is made by intracellular adenylyl cyclases is found in the culture medium. How is cAMP exported from E. coli? In a tolC mutant, 0.03 mM IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) was sufficient to induce β-galactosidase compared to 0.1 mM IPTG in the parent strain. In a cya mutant unable to produce cAMP about 1 mM extracellular cAMP was required to induce β-galactosidase, whereas in a cya tolC mutant 0.1 mM cAMP was sufficient. When cAMP in E. coli cya was generated intracellularly by a recombinant, weakly active adenylyl cyclase from Corynebacterium glutamicum, the critical level of cAMP necessary for induction of maltose degradation was only achieved in a tolC mutant and not in the parent strain. Deletion of a putative cAMP phosphodiesterase of E. coli, CpdA, resulted in a slightly similar, yet more diffuse phenotype. The data demonstrate that export of cAMP via TolC is a most efficient way of E. coli to lower high concentrations of cAMP in the cell and maintain its sensitivity in changing metabolic environments.

  14. Selective detection of Escherichia coli DNA using fluorescent carbon spindles.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anurag; Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Pramanik, Srikrishna; Devi, Parukuttyamma Sujatha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-04-28

    We investigate the interaction of hydrophilic blue emitting carbon spindles with various deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) having different base pair compositions, such as Herring testes (HT), calf thymus (CT), Escherichia coli (EC) and Micrococcus lysodeikticus (ML) DNA, to understand the mode of interaction. Interestingly, the fluorescent carbon spindles selectively interacted with E. coli DNA resulting in enhanced fluorescence of the former. Interaction of the same carbon with other DNAs exhibited insignificant changes in fluorescence. In addition, in the presence of EC DNA, the D band in the Raman spectrum attributed to the defect state completely disappeared, resulting in enhanced crystallinity. Microscopy images confirmed the wrapping of DNA on the carbon spindles leading to the assembly of spindles in the form of flowers. Dissociation of double-stranded DNA occurred upon interaction with carbon spindles, resulting in selective E. coli DNA interaction. The carbon spindles also exhibited a similar fluorescence enhancement upon treating with E. coli bacteria. These results confirm the possibility of E. coli detection in water and other liquid foods using such fluorescent carbon.

  15. Salmonella typhimurium intercepts Escherichia coli signaling to enhance antibiotic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Nicole M.; Allison, Kyle R.; Samuels, Amanda N.; Klempner, Mark S.; Collins, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial communication plays an important role in many population-based phenotypes and interspecies interactions, including those in host environments. These interspecies interactions may prove critical to some infectious diseases, and it follows that communication between pathogenic bacteria and commensal bacteria is a subject of growing interest. Recent studies have shown that Escherichia coli uses the signaling molecule indole to increase antibiotic tolerance throughout its population. Here, we show that the intestinal pathogen Salmonella typhimurium increases its antibiotic tolerance in response to indole, even though S. typhimurium does not natively produce indole. Increased antibiotic tolerance can be induced in S. typhimurium by both exogenous indole added to clonal S. typhimurium populations and indole produced by E. coli in mixed-microbial communities. Our data show that indole-induced tolerance in S. typhimurium is mediated primarily by the oxidative stress response and, to a lesser extent, by the phage shock response, which were previously shown to mediate indole-induced tolerance in E. coli. Further, we find that indole signaling by E. coli induces S. typhimurium antibiotic tolerance in a Caenorhabditis elegans model for gastrointestinal infection. These results suggest that the intestinal pathogen S. typhimurium can intercept indole signaling from the commensal bacterium E. coli to enhance its antibiotic tolerance in the host intestine. PMID:23946425

  16. Nonthermal atmospheric argon plasma jet effects on Escherichia coli biomacromolecules.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh Colagar, Abasalt; Memariani, Hamed; Sohbatzadeh, Farshad; Valinataj Omran, Azadeh

    2013-12-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric plasma jet, a promising technology based on ionized gas at low temperatures, can be applied for disinfection of contaminated surfaces. In this study, Escherichia coli cells and their macromolecules were exposed to the nonthermal atmospheric argon plasma jet for different time durations. Total protein, genomic DNA, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels of E. coli were assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining; agarose gel electrophoresis; and measurement of absorbance at 534 nm, respectively. After exposure, the spectroscopic results of liquid samples indicated that the survival reduction of E. coli can reach to 100 % in an exposure time of 600 s. Moreover, inactivation zones of E. coli, DNA degradation, and MDA levels were significantly increased. Additionally, banding patterns of total protein were changed and amino acid concentrations increased following ninhydrin test. The experimental results suggest that the nonthermal plasma could serve as an effective instrument for both sterilizing E. coli and degrading macromolecules from the surface of the objects being sterilized.

  17. Paper-based ELISA to rapidly detect Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cheng-Min; Chang, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Min-Yen; Lin, Jyun-Yu; Kuan, Chen-Meng; Wang, Hsi-Kai; Huang, Chun-Te; Chung, Mu-Chi; Huang, Kui-Chou; Hsu, Cheng-En; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Shen, Ying-Cheng; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2015-12-01

    Escherichia coli is a generic indicator of fecal contamination, and certain serotypes cause food- and water-borne illness such as O157:H7. In the clinic, detection of bacteriuria, which is often due to E. coli, is critical before certain surgical procedures or in cases of nosocomial infection to prevent further adverse events such as postoperative infection or sepsis. In low- and middle-income countries, where insufficient equipment and facilities preclude modern methods of detection, a simple, low-cost diagnostic device to detect E. coli in water and in the clinic will have significant impact. We have developed a simple paper-based colorimetric platform to detect E. coli contamination in 5h. On this platform, the mean color intensity for samples with 10(5)cells/mL is 0.118±0.002 (n=4), and 0.0145±0.003 (P<0.01⁎⁎) for uncontaminated samples. This technique is less time-consuming, easier to perform, and less expensive than conventional methods. Thus, paper-based ELISA is an innovative point-of-care diagnostic tool to rapidly detect E. coli, and possibly other pathogens when customized as appropriate, especially in areas that lack advanced clinical equipment.

  18. Pulsed-Plasma Disinfection of Water Containing Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Kohki; MacGregor, Scott J.; Anderson, John G.; Woolsey, Gerry A.; Fouracre, R. Anthony

    2007-03-01

    The disinfection of water containing the microorganism, Escherichia coli (E. coli) by exposure to a pulsed-discharge plasma generated above the water using a multineedle electrode (plasma-exposure treatment), and by sparging the off-gas of the pulsed plasma into the water (off-gas-sparging treatment), is performed in the ambient gases of air, oxygen, and nitrogen. For the off-gas-sparging treatment, bactericidal action is observed only when oxygen is used as the ambient gas, and ozone is found to generate the bactericidal action. For the plasma-exposure treatment, the density of E. coli bacteria decreases exponentially with plasma-exposure time for all the ambient gases. It may be concluded that the main contributors to E. coli inactivation are particle species produced by the pulsed plasma. For the ambient gases of air and nitrogen, the influence of acidification of the water in the system, as a result of pulsed-plasma exposure, may also contribute to the decay of E. coli density.

  19. Insights from 100 Years of Research with Probiotic E. Coli

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A century ago, Alfred Nissle discovered that intentional intake of particular strains of Escherichia coli could treat patients suffering from infectious diseases. Since then, one of these strains became the most frequently used probiotic E. coli in research and was applied to a variety of human conditions. Here, properties of that E. coli Nissle 1917 strain are compared with other commercially available E. coli probiotic strains, with emphasis on their human applications. A literature search formed the basis of a summary of research findings reported for the probiotics Mutaflor, Symbioflor 2, and Colinfant. The closest relatives of the strains in these products are presented, and their genetic content, including the presence of virulence, genes is discussed. A similarity to pathogenic strains causing urinary tract infections is noticeable. Historic trends in research of probiotics treatment for particular human conditions are identified. The future of probiotic E. coli may lay in what Alfred Nissle originally discovered: to treat gastrointestinal infections, which nowadays are often caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. PMID:27766164

  20. Escherichia coli isolated from feces of brown bears (Ursus arctos) have a lower prevalence of human extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli virulence-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Vadnov, Maruša; Barbič, Damjana; Žgur-Bertok, Darja; Erjavec, Marjanca Starčič

    2017-01-01

    Eighty-six Escherichia coli strains from feces of either wild brown bears or those living in a zoo were screened for phylogenetic groups using the revisited Clermont phylotyping method and the prevalence of 24 virulence-associated genes (VAGs) of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Our results showed that most strains of E. coli in bears belonged to phylogenetic groups III/IV/V (29%) and B1 (26%). Only half of the tested VAGs were found in the E. coli bear strains, with fimH present in 72%, ompT in 63%, and kpsMT in 43% of the strains. When the data obtained on the fecal E. coli strains from brown bears were compared with the data obtained on 90 fecal E. coli strains from healthy humans, there were significant differences in E. coli population structures between both hosts.

  1. Infection by verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, M A

    1989-01-01

    Verocytotoxin (VT)-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) are a newly recognized group of enteric pathogens which are increasingly being recognized as common causes of diarrhea in some geographic settings. Outbreak studies indicate that most patients with VTEC infection develop mild uncomplicated diarrhea. However, a significant risk of two serious and potentially life-threatening complications, hemorrhagic colitis and the hemolytic uremic syndrome, makes VTEC infection a public health problem of serious concern. The main reservoirs of VTEC appear to be the intestinal tracts of animals, and foods of animal (especially bovine) origin are probably the principal sources for human infection. The term VT refers to a family of subunit exotoxins with high biological activity. Individual VTEC strains elaborate one or both of at least two serologically distinct, bacteriophage-mediated VTs (VT1 and VT2) which are closely related to Shiga toxin and are thus also referred to as Shiga-like toxins. The holotoxins bind to cells, via their B subunits, to a specific receptor which is probably the glycolipid, globotriosyl ceramide (Gb3). Binding is followed by internalization of the A subunit, which, after it is proteolytically nicked and reduced to the A1 fragment, inhibits protein synthesis in mammalian cells by inactivating 60S ribosomal subunits through selective structural modification of 28S ribosomal ribonucleic acid. The mechanism of VTEC diarrhea is still controversial, and the relative roles of locally acting VT and "attaching and effacing adherence" of VTEC to the mucosa have yet to be resolved. There is increasing evidence that hemolytic uremic syndrome and possibly hemorrhagic colitis result from the systemic action of VT on vascular endothelial cells. The role of antitoxic immunity in preventing the systemic complications of VTEC infection is being explored. Antibiotics appear to be contraindicated in the treatment of VTEC infection. The most common VTEC serotype associated

  2. Characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other Shiga toxin-producing E. coli serotypes isolated from sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Kudva, I T; Hatfield, P G; Hovde, C J

    1997-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains from sheep are described. One flock was investigated for E. coli O157:H7 over a 16-month period that spanned two summer and two autumn seasons. Variation in the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7-positive sheep was observed, with animals being culture positive only in the summer months but not in the spring, autumn, or winter. E. coli O157:H7 isolates were distinguished by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of chromosomal DNA and toxin gene restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Ten PFGE patterns and five RFLP patterns, identified among the isolates, showed that multiple E. coli O157:H7 strains were isolated from one flock, that a single animal simultaneously shed multiple E. coli O157:H7 strains, and that the strains shed by individuals changed over time. E. coli O157:H7 was isolated only by selective enrichment culture off 10 g of ovine feces. In contrast, strains of eight STEC serotypes other than O157:H7 were cultured from feces of sheep from a separate flock without enrichment. The predominant non-O157 STEC serotype found was O91:NM (NM indicates nonmotile), and others included O128:NM, O88:NM, O6:H49, and O5:NM. Irrespective of serotype, 98% of the ovine STEC isolates possessed various combinations of the virulence-associated genes for Shiga toxin(s) and the attaching-and-effacing lesion (stx1, stx2, and eae), suggesting their potential for human pathogenicity. The most common toxin-eae genotype was positive for stx1, stx2, and eae. A Vero cell cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that 90% of the representative STEC isolates tested expressed the toxin gene. The report demonstrates that sheep transiently shed a variety of STEC strains, including E. coli O157:H7, that have potential as human pathogens. PMID:9157149

  3. Genetic Relatedness Among Escherichia coli Pathotypes Isolated from Food Products for Human Consumption in Cartagena, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Amézquita-Montes, Zorangel; Tamborski, Maria; Kopsombut, Usa G; Zhang, Chengxian; Arzuza, Octavio S; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2015-05-01

    Foodborne pathogens are a leading cause of mild-to-severe gastrointestinal illnesses worldwide. Escherichia coli pathotypes have been known to cause gastrointestinal illnesses in children less than 5 years old in Colombia. However, insufficient information is available on the prevalence of E. coli contamination of food products and the kind of E. coli food product reservoirs. The two objectives of this study were designed to address this issue. The first objective was to ascertain coliform, E. coli, and pathogenic E. coli contamination of food products readily available for human consumption in Cartagena, Colombia. The second objective was to evaluate the relationship between pathogenic E. coli isolated from food products and those isolated from cases of diarrhea in children. Food product samples consisting of pasteurized milk, unpasteurized fruit juice, ground beef, cheese, and vegetables were obtained at four retail stores. The food samples were cultured in liquid media and tested for the presence of coliforms and E. coli. E. coli isolates were tested by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of pathogenic E. coli. Coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathotypes contamination were detected in 88.4%, 53%, and 2.1% of food product samples, respectively. Ground beef and cheese were the only food samples contaminated with E. coli intestinal pathotypes including enteropathogenic (EPEC), Shiga toxin-producing (STEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). Closed multilocus sequencing typing relationships between diarrheagenic E. coli isolates from food products and from individuals with diarrhea suggest that food products readily available at public markets in Cartagena can transmit ETEC and possibly EPEC and STEC. We demonstrated that a high proportion of food products for human consumption available at public markets in Cartagena are contaminated with coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathogens. Furthermore, food products containing E. coli intestinal

  4. Genetic Relatedness Among Escherichia coli Pathotypes Isolated from Food Products for Human Consumption in Cartagena, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Amézquita-Montes, Zorangel; Tamborski, Maria; Kopsombut, Usa G.; Zhang, Chengxian; Arzuza, Octavio S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Foodborne pathogens are a leading cause of mild-to-severe gastrointestinal illnesses worldwide. Escherichia coli pathotypes have been known to cause gastrointestinal illnesses in children less than 5 years old in Colombia. However, insufficient information is available on the prevalence of E. coli contamination of food products and the kind of E. coli food product reservoirs. The two objectives of this study were designed to address this issue. The first objective was to ascertain coliform, E. coli, and pathogenic E. coli contamination of food products readily available for human consumption in Cartagena, Colombia. The second objective was to evaluate the relationship between pathogenic E. coli isolated from food products and those isolated from cases of diarrhea in children. Food product samples consisting of pasteurized milk, unpasteurized fruit juice, ground beef, cheese, and vegetables were obtained at four retail stores. The food samples were cultured in liquid media and tested for the presence of coliforms and E. coli. E. coli isolates were tested by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of pathogenic E. coli. Coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathotypes contamination were detected in 88.4%, 53%, and 2.1% of food product samples, respectively. Ground beef and cheese were the only food samples contaminated with E. coli intestinal pathotypes including enteropathogenic (EPEC), Shiga toxin–producing (STEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). Closed multilocus sequencing typing relationships between diarrheagenic E. coli isolates from food products and from individuals with diarrhea suggest that food products readily available at public markets in Cartagena can transmit ETEC and possibly EPEC and STEC. We demonstrated that a high proportion of food products for human consumption available at public markets in Cartagena are contaminated with coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathogens. Furthermore, food products containing E. coli

  5. [Escherichia coli, a pathogen under fire from the news].

    PubMed

    Cohen, R; Raymond, J; Gendrel, D; Bingen, E

    2012-11-01

    Escherichia coli is both a gastrointestinal tract commensal and a major pathogen. In recent years, E. coli is under fire from the news due to a better understanding of pathogenic factors, outbreaks of infections caused by enterohaemorrhagic strains, and last but not least, the worrying development of antibiotic resistance. Due to the absence of new compounds active against these strains, producing extended-spectrum ß-lactamases (ESBL) and frequently multiresistant to other antibiotics, their emergence will pose therapeutic problems for practitioners of all pediatric specialties. The gold standard treatment for severe infections due to ESBL-E. coli family is the penem class. The frequent use of penems promotes the emergence of strains resistant to carbapenems. Sparing carbapenems should be a clear objective for non life-threatening infections.

  6. Campylobacter coli infection in pet birds in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Dipineto, Ludovico; Borrelli, Luca; Pace, Antonino; Romano, Violante; D'Orazio, Stefano; Varriale, Lorena; Russo, Tamara Pasqualina; Fioretti, Alessandro

    2017-01-06

    Avian species are considered as the main reservoir of Campylobacter spp. However, few data are available on the presence of this microorganism in pet birds. This study was therefore performed to determine the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in pet birds bred in southern Italy. Faecal samples were collected from 88 cages housing different species of pet birds and examined by bacteriological culture and polymerase chain reaction. A total of 13.6% of the cage samples were positive for Campylobacter coli. Other Campylobacter spp. were not found. The study shows that C. coli can be isolated from the cages of apparently healthy pet birds, which should therefore be considered as potential carriers of C. coli and a possible source of infection for humans and companion animals.

  7. Polyerositis and Arthritis Due to Escherichia coli in Gnotobiotic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Waxler, G. L.; Britt, A. L.

    1972-01-01

    Forty gnotobiotic pigs from six litters were exposed orally to Escherichia coli 083:K·:NM at 69 to 148 hours of age, while 17 pigs from the same litters served as unexposed controls. Clinical signs of infection included fever, anorexia, diarrhea, lameness, and reluctance to move. Eighty-four percent of the exposed pigs in four litters died, while only 13% in two litters died. Gross and microscopic lesions included serofibrinous to fibrinopurulent polyserositis in 96% of the exposed pigs in four litters and 33% of the exposed pigs in two litters. A few pigs had gross and/or microscopic lesions of arthritis. Escherichia coli was routinely isolated from the serous and synovial cavities of infected pigs. Anti-hog cholera serum administered orally as a colostrum substitute gave partial protection against E. coli infection. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 8. PMID:4261837

  8. Functions of the gene products of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M

    1993-01-01

    A list of currently identified gene products of Escherichia coli is given, together with a bibliography that provides pointers to the literature on each gene product. A scheme to categorize cellular functions is used to classify the gene products of E. coli so far identified. A count shows that the numbers of genes concerned with small-molecule metabolism are on the same order as the numbers concerned with macromolecule biosynthesis and degradation. One large category is the category of tRNAs and their synthetases. Another is the category of transport elements. The categories of cell structure and cellular processes other than metabolism are smaller. Other subjects discussed are the occurrence in the E. coli genome of redundant pairs and groups of genes of identical or closely similar function, as well as variation in the degree of density of genetic information in different parts of the genome. PMID:7508076

  9. Incidence of Escherichia coli in Black Walnut Meats

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Melvin T.; Vaughn, Reese H.

    1969-01-01

    Examination of commercially shelled black walnut meats showed inconsistent numbers of total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and Escherichia coli; variation occurred among different meat sizes and within each meat size. The incidence of E. coli on meats of commercially hulled black walnuts depended on the physical condition of the nuts. Apparently tightly sealed ones contained only a few or none, whereas those with visibly separated sutures and spoiled meats yielded the most. This contamination was in part correlated to a hulling operation. Large numbers of E. coli on the husk of the walnuts contaminated the hulling water, subsequently also contaminating the meats by way of separated sutures. Chlorination of the hulling wash water was ineffective. Attempts were made to decontaminate the walnut meats without subsequent deleterious changes in flavor or texture. A treatment in coconut oil at 100 C followed by removal of excess surface oil by centrifugation was best. PMID:4905608

  10. Evolution of E. coli tRNA(Trp)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staves, Mark P.; Lacey, James C., Jr.; Bloch, David P.

    1988-01-01

    It has been shown by Lacey et al. (1985) that, in general, the hydrophobicity ranking of an amino acid correlates with that of its anticodonic nucleotide, with tryptophan being one of the four amino acids for which this rule does not apply. It was proposed that this failure to correlate was due to the fact that the anticodon assignments for the four amino acids were made late, after the mutation of existing tRNAs. In this paper, the evolution of E. coli tRNA(Trp) is examined by comparing its homology with other E. coli tRNAs. The results demonstrate the presence of an evolutionary relationship between E. coli tRNA(Trp) and tRNA(Gly) or tRNA(Arg) molecules, and support the idea of the late assignment of anticodon to Trp.

  11. Quantitative method for enumeration of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, R L; Levin, M A

    1981-01-01

    A rapid method was developed to quantify toxigenic Escherichia coli, using a membrane filter procedure. After filtration of samples, the membrane filter was first incubated on a medium selective for E. coli (24 h, 44 degrees C) and then transferred to tryptic soy agar (3%; 6 h, 37 degrees C). To assay for labile toxin-producing colonies, the filter was then transferred to a monolayer of Y-1 cells, the E. coli colonies were marked on the bottom of the petri dish, and the filter was removed after 15 min. The monolayer was observed for a positive rounding effect after a 15- to 24-h incubation. The method has an upper limit of detecting 30 toxigenic colonies per plate and can detect as few as one toxigenic colony per plate. A preliminary screening for these enterotoxigenic strains in polluted waters and known positive fecal samples was performed, and positive results were obtained with fecal samples only. PMID:7007415

  12. Mechanisms of the radioprotective effect of cysteamine in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Korystov, Yu.N.; Vexler, F.B.

    1988-06-01

    The values of the oxygen effect (m) and the maximal protective effect of cysteamine (DMF*) were estimated for four Escherichia coli strains: AB1157 (wild type), AB1886 (uvrA), AB2463 (recA), and p3478 (polA). A correlation made between DMF* and m as well as the kinetics of the increase of DMF with oxygen depletion showed that the protective effect of cysteamine is realized by three mechanisms: (i) anoxia achieved by oxygen reduction, with the DMF varying from 2.2 to 4.2 for different E. coli strains (this protection is the major contribution to the entire mechanism); (ii) lowering of the indirect radiation effect; i.e., for 50 mM cysteamine DMF does not exceed 1.1; and (iii) increase of the efficiency of enzymatic repair. The latter effect of cysteamine is registered only with the wild-type E. coli, the DMF being not less than 1.4.

  13. Chemotaxis towards autoinducer 2 mediates autoaggregation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Laganenka, Leanid; Colin, Remy; Sourjik, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria communicate by producing and sensing extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. Such intercellular signalling, known as quorum sensing, allows bacteria to coordinate and synchronize behavioural responses at high cell densities. Autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is the only known quorum-sensing molecule produced by Escherichia coli but its physiological role remains elusive, although it is known to regulate biofilm formation and virulence in other bacterial species. Here we show that chemotaxis towards self-produced AI-2 can mediate collective behaviour—autoaggregation—of E. coli. Autoaggregation requires motility and is strongly enhanced by chemotaxis to AI-2 at physiological cell densities. These effects are observed regardless whether cell–cell interactions under particular growth conditions are mediated by the major E. coli adhesin (antigen 43) or by curli fibres. Furthermore, AI-2-dependent autoaggregation enhances bacterial stress resistance and promotes biofilm formation. PMID:27687245

  14. Engineering Escherichia coli K12 MG1655 to use starch

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To attain a sustainable bioeconomy, fuel, or valuable product, production must use biomass as substrate. Starch is one of the most abundant biomass resources and is present as waste or as a food and agroindustry by-product. Unfortunately, Escherichia coli, one of the most widely used microorganisms in biotechnological processes, cannot use starch as a carbon source. Results We engineered an E. coli strain capable of using starch as a substrate. The genetic design employed the native capability of the bacterium to use maltodextrins as a carbon source plus expression and secretion of its endogenous α-amylase, AmyA, in an adapted background. Biomass production improved using 35% dissolved oxygen and pH 7.2 in a controlled bioreactor. Conclusion The engineered E. coli strain can use starch from the milieu and open the possibility of optimize the process to use agroindustrial wastes to produce biofuels and other valuable chemicals. PMID:24886307

  15. Persistence of Escherichia coli O157 and non-O157 strains in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jincai; Mark Ibekwe, A; Crowley, David E; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2014-08-15

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli O157 and non-O157 serogroups are known to cause serious diseases in human. However, research on the persistence of E. coli non-O157 serogroups in preharvest environment is limited. In the current study, we compared the survival behavior of E. coli O157 to that of non-O157 E. coli strains in agricultural soils collected from three major fresh produce growing areas of California (CA) and Arizona (AZ). Results showed that the nonpathogenic E. coli O157:H7 4554 survived longer than the pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 EDL933 in Imperial Valley CA and Yuma AZ, but not in soils from the Salinas area. However, E. coli O157:NM was found to persist significantly longer than E. coli O157:H7 EDL933 in all soil tested from the three regions. Furthermore, two non-O157 (E. coli O26:H21 and E. coli O103:H2) survived significantly longer than E. coli O157:H7 EDL933 in all soils tested. Pearson correlation analysis showed that survival of the E. coli strains was affected by different environmental factors. Our data suggest that survival of E. coli O157 and non-O157 may be strain and soil specific, and therefore, care must be taken in data interpretation with respect to survival of this pathogen in different soils.

  16. [Development of chromogenic agar medium for isolation of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O26].

    PubMed

    Ikedo, M; Komatsu, O; Hara-Kudo, Y; Yamamoto, S; Kumagai, S

    2001-04-01

    Agar media for isolation of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) have been developed primarily for E. coli O157, because this bacterium has most frequently caused EHEC infection. However, there have been few studies for isolation of other serotypes of EHEC, and media appropriate for isolation of such organisms, especially from food samples, are not yet available. Among such serotypes, E. coli O26 has often been isolated from clinical specimens from patients and animals, but not from food samples in outbreaks, because of lack of an appropriate method for isolation. In this study, we tried to develop a new chromogenic agar medium for selective isolation of E. coli O26 using the characteristics of E. coli O26. Fifteen strains of E. coli O26, 11 strains of E. coli O157 and 36 strains of other sero-types E. coli were tested for fermentation of rhamnose, cellobiose, dulcitol, salicin, raffinose, sorbitol, sucrose, lactose, mannitol, arabinose, maltose, xylose and glucose. Rhamnose was fermented by all E. coli strains except for E. coli O26. The other substrates were not effective for differentiating E. coli O26 from the other strains of E. coli. Thus the medium containing rhamnose and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, which is a substrate of beta-galactosidase specific to coliforms, produced a color of E. coli O26 colonies different from colors of the other bacteria. Furthermore, cefixime and sodium tellulite were added to the composition of the medium for gaining higher selectivity.

  17. Occurrence of Escherichia coli, Campylobcter, Salmonella and Shiga-Toxin Producing E. coli in Norwegian Primary Strawberry Production.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Gro S; Eckner, Karl F; Heiberg, Nina; Monshaugen, Marte; Begum, Mumtaz; Økland, Marianne; Høgåsen, Helga R

    2015-06-17

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bacteriological quality of strawberries at harvest and to study risk factors such as irrigation water, soil and picker's hand cleanliness. Four farms were visited during the harvest season in 2012. Samples of strawberries, irrigation water, soil and hand swabs were collected and analyzed for E. coli, Campylobacter, Salmonella and STEC Although fecal indicators and pathogens were found in environmental samples, only one of 80 samples of strawberries was positive for E. coli (1.0 log10 cfu/g) and pathogens were not detected in any of the strawberry samples. The water samples from all irrigation sources were contaminated with E. coli in numbers ranging from 0 to 3.3 log10 cfu/g. Campylobacter (8/16 samples) and Salmonella (1/16 samples) were isolated from samples with high numbers of E. coli. The water samples collected from a lake had lower numbers of E. coli than the samples from rivers and a stream. The present study indicated continuous background contamination in the primary production environment. Although the background contamination was not reflected on the strawberries tested here, the results must be interpreted with caution due to the limited number of samples.

  18. Occurrence of Escherichia coli, Campylobcter, Salmonella and Shiga-Toxin Producing E. coli in Norwegian Primary Strawberry Production

    PubMed Central

    Johannessen, Gro S.; Eckner, Karl F.; Heiberg, Nina; Monshaugen, Marte; Begum, Mumtaz; Økland, Marianne; Høgåsen, Helga R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bacteriological quality of strawberries at harvest and to study risk factors such as irrigation water, soil and picker’s hand cleanliness. Four farms were visited during the harvest season in 2012. Samples of strawberries, irrigation water, soil and hand swabs were collected and analyzed for E. coli, Campylobacter, Salmonella and STEC Although fecal indicators and pathogens were found in environmental samples, only one of 80 samples of strawberries was positive for E. coli (1.0 log10 cfu/g) and pathogens were not detected in any of the strawberry samples. The water samples from all irrigation sources were contaminated with E. coli in numbers ranging from 0 to 3.3 log10 cfu/g. Campylobacter (8/16 samples) and Salmonella (1/16 samples) were isolated from samples with high numbers of E. coli. The water samples collected from a lake had lower numbers of E. coli than the samples from rivers and a stream. The present study indicated continuous background contamination in the primary production environment. Although the background contamination was not reflected on the strawberries tested here, the results must be interpreted with caution due to the limited number of samples. PMID:26090606

  19. Adhesive Escherichia coli in inflammatory bowel disease and infective diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, D. A.; Axon, A. T.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical features of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are similar to those of infections of the bowel, although their cause is uncertain. Many bacteria that cause intestinal diseases adhere to the gut mucosa, and adhesion of pathogenic Escherichia coli is resistant to D-mannose. The adhesive properties of isolates of E coli were assessed by assay of adhesion to buccal epithelial cells with mannose added. The isolates were obtained from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (50 with a relapse of ulcerative colitis, nine with ulcerative colitis in remission, 13 with Crohn's disease, and 11 with infectious diarrhoea not due to E coli) and 22 controls. The median index of adhesion to buccal epithelial cells (the proportion of cells with more than 50 adherent bacteria) for E coli from patients with ulcerative colitis in relapse was significantly higher (43%) than that for controls (5%) and patients with infectious diarrhoea (14%). The index was not significantly different among isolates from patients with ulcerative colitis in relapse, Crohn's disease (53%), and ulcerative colitis in remission (30%). If an index of adhesion of greater than 25% is taken as indicating an adhesive strain 86% of isolates of E coli from patients with inflammatory bowel disease were adhesive compared with 27% from patients with infective diarrhoea and none from controls. The adhesive properties of the isolates from patients with inflammatory bowel disease were similar to those of pathogenic intestinal E coli, raising the possibility that they may have a role in the pathogenesis of the condition; the smaller proportion of adhesive isolates in patients with infective diarrhoea due to other bacteria suggests that the organism may be of primary importance rather than arising secondarily. Images a PMID:3044496

  20. Behavior of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains on whole and sliced jalapeño and serrano peppers.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Gordillo-Martínez, Alberto J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2014-06-01

    The behavior of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and non-O157 shiga toxin-producing E. coli (non-O157-STEC) on whole and slices of jalapeño and serrano peppers as well as in blended sauce at 25 ± 2 °C and 3 ± 2 °C was investigated. Chili peppers were collected from markets of Pachuca city, Hidalgo, Mexico. On whole serrano and jalapeño stored at 25 ± 2 °C or 3 ± 2 °C, no growth was observed for EPEC, ETEC, EIEC and non-O157-STEC rifampicin resistant strains. After twelve days at 25 ± 2 °C, on serrano peppers all diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEP) strains had decreased by a total of approximately 3.7 log, whereas on jalapeño peppers the strains had decreased by approximately 2.8 log, and at 3 ± 2 °C they decreased to approximately 2.5 and 2.2 log respectively, on serrano and jalapeño. All E. coli pathotypes grew onto sliced chili peppers and in blended sauce: after 24 h at 25 ± 2 °C, all pathotypes had grown to approximately 3 and 4 log CFU on pepper slices and sauce, respectively. At 3 ± 2 °C the bacterial growth was inhibited.

  1. Pathogenic Escherichia coli in rural household container waters.

    PubMed

    Jagals, P; Barnard, T G; Mokoena, M M; Ashbolt, N; Roser, D J

    2013-01-01

    Plastic containers in the range of 5-20 L are widely used - especially in rural African settings - to collect, transport and store water for domestic use, including drinking, bathing and hygiene. The pathogen content of the waters in these containers has not been adequately characterized as yet. This paper presents the primary findings of a synoptic survey of drinking water quality samples from these containers and involved collection of bacterial indicator and pathogenicity gene data. In total, 571 samples of a variety of waters were taken in rural communities in South Africa and the Escherichia coli numbers measured. Of the E. coli positive samples, 46% (n = 148) were screened for the presence of E. coli pathogen gene markers. Though synoptic, the survey provided many insights into the issues that drove the study. Container use markedly degraded water quality as judged by indicator counts, even where improved water supply services were in place. Household container use also appeared to promote regrowth or contamination of containers with pathogenic E. coli strains. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis also showed that the diversity of potential pathogenic E. coli carrying virulence genes was great. All seven genes screened for (Ial, Stx1, Stx2, EaeA, Eagg, ST, LT) were found in the waters, alone or as mixtures (number of different combinations = 31) including those characteristic of the more dangerous invasive and haemorrhagic E. coli strains. Given the central role of containers in the management of water supply to rural communities, it is clear the microbiology of these waters requires much further characterization.

  2. Dynamic regulation of extracellular ATP in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Cora Lilia; Corradi, Gerardo; Lauri, Natalia; Marginedas-Freixa, Irene; Leal Denis, María Florencia; Enrique, Nicolás; Mate, Sabina María; Milesi, Verónica; Ostuni, Mariano Anibal; Herlax, Vanesa; Schwarzbaum, Pablo Julio

    2017-04-04

    We studied the kinetics of extracellular ATP (ATPe) in Escherichia coli and their outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) stimulated with amphipatic peptides melittin (MEL) and mastoparan 7 (MST7). Real-time luminometry was used to measure ATPe kinetics, ATP release, and ATPase activity. The latter was also determined by following [(32)P]Pi released from [γ-(32)P]ATP. E. coli was studied alone, co-incubated with Caco-2 cells, or in rat jejunum segments. In E. coli, the addition of [γ-(32)P]ATP led to the uptake and subsequent hydrolysis of ATPe. Exposure to peptides caused an acute 3-fold (MST7) and 7-fold (MEL) increase in [ATPe]. In OMVs, ATPase activity increased linearly with [ATPe] (0.1-1 µM). Exposure to MST7 and MEL enhanced ATP release by 3-7 fold, with similar kinetics to that of bacteria. In Caco-2 cells, the addition of ATP to the apical domain led to a steep [ATPe] increase to a maximum, with subsequent ATPase activity. The addition of bacterial suspensions led to a 6-7 fold increase in [ATPe], followed by an acute decrease. In perfused jejunum segments, exposure to E. coli increased luminal ATP 2 fold. ATPe regulation of E. coli depends on the balance between ATPase activity and ATP release. This balance can be altered by OMVs, which display their own capacity to regulate ATPe. E. coli can activate ATP release from Caco-2 cells and intestinal segments, a response which in vivo might lead to intestinal release of ATP from the gut lumen.

  3. Expression of a synthetic pertussis toxin operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pozza, T D; Yan, H; Walker, M J

    1997-06-01

    Bordetella pertussis is the causative agent of whooping cough, a severe disease of infants characterised by repeated of paroxysmal coughing. Pertussis toxin (PT) is a major virulence factor of B. pertussis and is a typical A/B bacterial toxin consisting of five subunits S1-S5 in a ratio of 1:1:1:2:1. The PT subunit genes are organized into an operon which is not expressed in Escherichia coli, thus hampering the use of this organism for vaccine production. We have expressed the five PT subunits individually in E. coli by replacing the wild-type transcriptional and translational signals, and in the case of the S4 subunit the leader peptide has been exchanged with a modified E. coli beta-lactamase leader sequence. We have developed a stepwise cloning method to construct a synthetic PT operon which simultaneously expresses the five PT subunits in E. coli. Western blot analysis indicated that in E. coli KS476 containing the synthetic PT operon, S4 and S5 were completely processed, S1 was partially processed, whilst the majority of S2 and S3 remained unprocessed. Periplasmic extracts contained soluble S1 and S3; however, the processed form of S2, S4 and S5 were not detected, suggesting that these subunits may be membrane associated or in an insoluble form. This work should allow an investigation of the potential of E. coli to produce detoxified PT in a background free of other pertussis virulence factors that may contribute to the side-effects of some vaccine preparations currently in use.

  4. A structural view of the dissociation of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Green, Keren; Qasim, Nasrin; Gdaelvsky, Garik; Kogan, Anna; Goldgur, Yehuda; Parola, Abraham H; Lotan, Ofra; Almog, Orna

    2015-12-01

    Tryptophanase (Trpase) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent homotetrameric enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of L-tryptophan. Trpase is also known for its cold lability, which is a reversible loss of activity at low temperature (2°C) that is associated with the dissociation of the tetramer. Escherichia coli Trpase dissociates into dimers, while Proteus vulgaris Trpase dissociates into monomers. As such, this enzyme is an appropriate model to study the protein-protein interactions and quaternary structure of proteins. The aim of the present study was to understand the differences in the mode of dissociation between the E. coli and P. vulgaris Trpases. In particular, the effect of mutations along the molecular axes of homotetrameric Trpase on its dissociation was studied. To answer this question, two groups of mutants of the E. coli enzyme were created to resemble the amino-acid sequence of P. vulgaris Trpase. In one group, residues 15 and 59 that are located along the molecular axis R (also termed the noncatalytic axis) were mutated. The second group included a mutation at position 298, located along the molecular axis Q (also termed the catalytic axis). Replacing amino-acid residues along the R axis resulted in dissociation of the tetramers into monomers, similar to the P. vulgaris Trpase, while replacing amino-acid residues along the Q axis resulted in dissociation into dimers only. The crystal structure of the V59M mutant of E. coli Trpase was also determined in its apo form and was found to be similar to that of the wild type. This study suggests that in E. coli Trpase hydrophobic interactions along the R axis hold the two monomers together more strongly, preventing the dissociation of the dimers into monomers. Mutation of position 298 along the Q axis to a charged residue resulted in tetramers that are less susceptible to dissociation. Thus, the results indicate that dissociation of E. coli Trpase into dimers occurs along the molecular Q axis.

  5. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical. Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  6. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for 1-butanol production.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Shota; Cann, Anthony F; Connor, Michael R; Shen, Claire R; Smith, Kevin M; Brynildsen, Mark P; Chou, Katherine J Y; Hanai, Taizo; Liao, James C

    2008-11-01

    Compared to ethanol, butanol offers many advantages as a substitute for gasoline because of higher energy content and higher hydrophobicity. Typically, 1-butanol is produced by Clostridium in a mixed-product fermentation. To facilitate strain improvement for specificity and productivity, we engineered a synthetic pathway in Escherichia coli and demonstrated the production of 1-butanol from this non-native user-friendly host. Alternative genes and competing pathway deletions were evaluated for 1-butanol production. Results show promise for using E. coli for 1-butanol production.

  7. Functional role of bdm during flagella biogenesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Sun; Kim, Yu Jin; Seo, Sojin; Seong, Maeng-Je; Lee, Kangseok

    2015-03-01

    The biofilm-dependent modulation gene (bdm) has recently been shown to play a role in osmotic-induced formation of biofilm in Escherichia coli. In this study, we demonstrated that deletion of bdm results in down-regulation of flagella biosynthesis genes and, consequently, a defect in E. coli motility. In addition, we employed atomic force microscopy to confirm the absence of flagella-like structures on the surface of bdm-null cells. These findings indicate that bdm plays a key role in regulatory pathway for the formation of flagella.

  8. Unidirecetional motility of excherichia coli in restrictive capillaries

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Papadopoulos, K.D.

    1995-10-01

    In a 6-{mu}m capillary filled with buffer and in the absence of any chemotactic stimuli, Escherichia coli K-12 cells swim persistently in only one direction. This behavior of E. coli can be simply explained by means of the length and relative rigidity of their flagella. Single-cell motility parameters-swimming speed, turn angle, and run length time-were measured. Compared with the motility parameters measured in bulk phase, turn angle was influenced because of the effect of the geometrical restriction. 30 refs., 6 figs.

  9. PROPERTIES OF A BACTERIOPHAGE DERIVED FROM ESCHERICHIA COLI K235

    PubMed Central

    Jesaitis, Margeris A.; Hutton, John J.

    1963-01-01

    A temperate bacteriophage was isolated from the colicinogenic strain of Escherichia coli K235 and characterized. This phage, termed PK, is related to P2 virus morphologically, serologically, and, possibly, genetically and it bears no relationship to the T-even phages. It was also demonstrated that PK virus and colicine K differ both in their host range and in their immunological specificity, and that PK prophage does not induce the colicinogenesis in its host bacterium. It was concluded that the formation of colicine K. and PK phage in E. coli K235 are controlled by different genetic determinants. PMID:14029160

  10. [Expression of Photobacterium leiognathi bioluminescence system genes in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Ptitsyn, L R; Fatova, M A; Stepanov, A I

    1990-02-01

    Expression of Photobacterium leiognathi bioluminescence genes under the control of lac, tac, tet promoters in Escherichia coli cells has been studied. The position of the genes for aliphatic aldehyde biosynthesis and for the synthesis of luciferase subunits was identified. The plasmid pBRPL1 has been constructed containing the system of bioluminescence genes devoid of promoter following the polylinker DNA fragment. The plasmid can be used for selection of promoter containing DNA sequences as well as for studying the promoters regulation in process of Escherichia coli cells growth.

  11. Nitric oxide donor-mediated killing of bioluminescent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Virta, M; Karp, M; Vuorinen, P

    1994-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of two nitric oxide-releasing compounds against Escherichia coli were investigated by using recombinant E. coli cloned with a luciferase gene from Pyrophorus plagiophthalamus. Since luciferase uses intracellular ATP to generate visible light which can be measured from living cells in real time, we wanted to compare the extent to which cell viability parallels light emission. Results from luminescence measurements and CFU counts were in good agreement, and the decrease in light emission was shown to provide a rapid and more sensitive indication of cytotoxicity. PMID:7695261

  12. Antioxidant assay using genetically engineered bioluminescent Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolome, Amelita; Macalino, Bernadette; Pastoral, Ian Lemuel; Sevilla, Fortunato, III

    2006-02-01

    A new antioxidant activity assay based on the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-inducible bacterial strain (E. coli DPD2511) is described. The strain harbors the plasmid pKatG::luxCDABE and responds to hydrogen peroxide treatment by increasing light emission at 490 nm. Antioxidant capacity is evaluated through the ability of an agent to inhibit the hydrogen peroxide-induced bioluminescence of E. coli DPD2511. Applicability of the developed assay in detecting levels of antioxidants in various aqueous plant extracts is demonstrated. The assay was validated against 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, a known antioxidant assay.

  13. Accelerated glycerol fermentation in Escherichia coli using methanogenic formate consumption.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Gescher, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Escherichia coli can ferment glycerol anaerobically only under very defined restrictive conditions. Hence, it was the aim of this study to overcome this limitation via a co-cultivation approach. Anaerobic glycerol fermentation by a pure E. coli culture was compared to a co-culture that also contained the formate-oxidizing methanogen Methanobacterium formicicum. Co-cultivation of the two strains led to a more than 11-fold increased glycerol consumption. Furthermore, it supported a constantly neutral pH and a shift from ethanol to succinate production. Moreover, M. formicicum was analyzed for its ability to grow on different standard media and a surprising versatility could be demonstrated.

  14. Bacterial self-defence: how Escherichia coli evades serum killing.

    PubMed

    Miajlovic, Helen; Smith, Stephen G

    2014-05-01

    The ability to survive the bactericidal action of serum is advantageous to extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli that gain access to the bloodstream. Evasion of the innate defences present in serum, including complement and antimicrobial peptides, involves multiple factors. Serum resistance mechanisms utilized by E. coli include the production of protective extracellular polysaccharide capsules and expression of factors that inhibit or interfere with the complement cascade. Recent studies have also highlighted the importance of structural integrity of the cell envelope in serum survival. These survival strategies are outlined in this review with particular attention to novel findings and recent insights into well-established resistance mechanisms.

  15. Escherichia coli as a model active colloid: A practical introduction.

    PubMed

    Schwarz-Linek, Jana; Arlt, Jochen; Jepson, Alys; Dawson, Angela; Vissers, Teun; Miroli, Dario; Pilizota, Teuta; Martinez, Vincent A; Poon, Wilson C K

    2016-01-01

    The flagellated bacterium Escherichia coli is increasingly used experimentally as a self-propelled swimmer. To obtain meaningful, quantitative results that are comparable between different laboratories, reproducible protocols are needed to control, 'tune' and monitor the swimming behaviour of these motile cells. We critically review the knowledge needed to do so, explain methods for characterising the colloidal and motile properties of E. coli cells, and propose a protocol for keeping them swimming at constant speed at finite bulk concentrations. In the process of establishing this protocol, we use motility as a high-throughput probe of aspects of cellular physiology via the coupling between swimming speed and the proton motive force.

  16. Inducible repair of oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Demple, B; Halbrook, J

    Hydrogen peroxide is lethal to many cell types, including the bacterium Escherichia coli. Peroxides yield transient radical species that can damage DNA and cause mutations. Such partially reduced oxygen species are occasionally released during cellular respiration and are generated by lethal and mutagenic ionizing radiation. Because cells live in an environment where the threat of oxidative DNA damage is continual, cellular mechanisms may have evolved to avoid and repair this damage. Enzymes are known which evidently perform these functions. We report here that resistance to hydrogen peroxide toxicity can be induced in E. coli, that this novel induction is specific and occurs, in part, at the level of DNA repair.

  17. Sedimentation and gravitational instability of Escherichia coli Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douarche, Carine; Salin, Dominique; Collaboration between Laboratory FAST; LPS Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The successive run and tumble of Escherichia coli bacteria provides an active matter suspension of rod-like particles with a large swimming diffusion. As opposed to inactive elongated particles, this diffusion prevents clustering and instability in the gravity field. We measure the time dependent E . coli concentration profile during their sedimentation. After some hours, due to the dioxygen consumption, a motile / non-motile front forms leading to a Rayleigh-Taylor type gravitational instability. Analyzing both sedimentation and instability in the framework of active particle suspensions, we can measure the relevant bacteria hydrodynamic characteristics such as its single particle sedimentation velocity and its hindrance volume.

  18. Susceptibility of Gnotobiotic Swine to Escherichia coli Isolated from Nonenteric Human Infections

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, R. C.; Rhoades, H. E.; Simon, J.

    1972-01-01

    Newborn, germfree piglets were susceptible to Escherichia coli associated with human, nonenteric infections and should provide a useful model in the study of generalized E. coli infections. PMID:4557565

  19. Flagella from F18+Escherichia coli play a role in adhesion to pig epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Duan, Qiangde; Zhou, Mingxu; Zhu, Xiaofang; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Jun; Bao, Wenbin; Wu, Shenglong; Ruan, Xiaosai; Zhang, Weiping; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2013-02-01

    F18 fimbriae and toxins produced by F18 fimbriae-carrying Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains are known virulence factors responsible for post-weaning diarrhea (PWD) and edema disease (ED). In this study, we showed that fliC isogenic mutants constructed in two reference wild-type F18 fimbriae (F18+) E. coli were markedly impaired in adherence in vitro cell models (p < 0.05). Flagella purified from F18+E. coli could directly bind to cultured piglet epithelial cells and block adherence of F18+E. coli to cells when pre-incubated. In addition, the F18+E. coli fliC deletion mutants up-regulated the expression of type I fimbriae produced by F18+E. coli strains. These results demonstrated that expression of flagella is essential for the adherence of F18+E. coli in vitro.

  20. Virulence Factors and Stability of Coliphages Specific to Escherichia coli O157:H7 and to Various E. coli Infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Jin; Chang, Hyun-Joo; Kwak, Soojin; Park, Jong-Hyun

    2016-12-28

    Characteristics of E. coli O157:H7-specific infection bacteriophages (O157 coliphages) and broad-host-range bacteriophages for other E. coli serotypes (broad-host coliphages) were compared. The burst sizes of the two groups ranged from 40 to 176 PFU/infected cell. Distributions of the virulence factors stx1, stx2, ehxA, and saa between the two groups were not differentiated. Broad-host-range coliphages showed lower stability at 70°C, in relation to O157 coliphages. However, O157 coliphages showed high acid and ethanol tolerance by reduction of only 22% and 11% phages, respectively, under pH 3 and 70% ethanol for 1 h exposure. Therefore, these results revealed that the O157 coliphages might be more stable under harsh environments, which might explain their effective infection of the acid-tolerant E. coli O157:H7.

  1. Escherichia coli Probiotic Strain ED1a in Pigs Has a Limited Impact on the Gut Carriage of Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing E. coli.

    PubMed

    Mourand, G; Paboeuf, F; Fleury, M A; Jouy, E; Bougeard, S; Denamur, E; Kempf, I

    2017-01-01

    Four trials were conducted to evaluate the impact of Escherichia coli probiotic strain ED1a administration to pigs on the gut carriage or survival in manure of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing E. coli Groups of pigs were orally inoculated with strain E. coli M63 carrying the blaCTX-M-1 gene (n = 84) or used as a control (n = 26). In the first two trials, 24 of 40 E. coli M63-inoculated pigs were given E. coli ED1a orally for 6 days starting 8 days after oral inoculation. In the third trial, 10 E. coli M63-inoculated pigs were given either E. coli ED1a or probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 for 5 days. In the fourth trial, E. coli ED1a was given to a sow and its 12 piglets, and these 12 piglets plus 12 piglets that had not received E. coli ED1a were then inoculated with E. coli M63. Fecal shedding of cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CTX-RE) was studied by culture, and blaCTX-M-1 genes were quantified by PCR. The persistence of CTX-RE in manure samples from inoculated pigs or manure samples inoculated in vitro with E. coli M63 with or without probiotics was studied. The results showed that E. coli M63 and ED1a were good gut colonizers. The reduction in the level of fecal excretion of CTX-RE in E. coli ED1a-treated pigs compared to that in nontreated pigs was usually less than 1 log10 CFU and was mainly observed during the probiotic administration period. The results obtained with E. coli Nissle 1917 did not differ significantly from those obtained with E. coli ED1a. CTX-RE survival did not differ significantly in manure samples with or without probiotic treatment. In conclusion, under our experimental conditions, E. coli ED1a and E. coli Nissle 1917 could not durably prevent CTX-RE colonization of the pig gut.

  2. EcoR phylogenetic analysis and virulence genotyping of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strains and Escherichia coli isolates from commercial chicken carcasses in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Renata K T; Aquino, Ivani; Ferreira, Ana Lívia da S; Vidotto, Marilda C

    2011-05-01

    Escherichia coli strains designated as avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) are responsible for avian colibacillosis, an acute and largely systemic disease that promotes significant economic losses in poultry industry worldwide because of mortality increase, medication costs, and condemnation of carcasses. APEC is a subgroup of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli pathotype, which includes uropathogenic E. coli, neonatal meningitis E. coli, and septicemic E. coli. We isolated E. coli from commercial chicken carcasses in a Brazilian community and compared by polymerase chain reaction-defined phylogenetic group (A, B1, B2, or D) with APEC strains isolated from sick chickens from different poultry farms. A substantial number of strains assigned to phylogenetic E. coli reference collection group B2, which is known to harbor potent extraintestinal human and animal E. coli pathogens, were identified as APEC (26.0%) in both commercial chicken carcasses and retail poultry meat (retail poultry E. coli [RPEC]) (21.25%). The majority of RPEC were classified as group A (35%), whereas the majority of APEC were groups B1 (30.8) and A (27.6%). APEC and RPEC presented the genes pentaplex, iutA, hly, iron, ompT, and iss, but with different virulence profiles. The similarity between APEC and RPEC indicates RPEC as potentially pathogenic strains and supports a possible zoonotic risk for humans.

  3. Prevalence of genes encoding virulence factors among Escherichia coli with K1 antigen and non-K1 E. coli strains.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Budzynska, Anna; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2012-10-01

    Multiplex PCR was used to detect genes encoding selected virulence determinants associated with strains of Escherichia coli with K1 antigen (K1(+)) and non-K1 E. coli (K1(-)). The prevalence of the fimA, fimH, sfa/foc, ibeA, iutA and hlyF genes was studied for 134 (67 K1(+) and 67 K1(-)) E. coli strains isolated from pregnant women and neonates. The fimA gene was present in 83.6 % of E. coli K1(+) and in 86.6 % of E. coli K1(-) strains. The fimH gene was present in all tested E. coli K1(+) strains and in 97.0 % of non-K1 strains. E. coli K1(+) strains were significantly more likely to possess the following genes than E. coli K1(-) strains: sfa/foc (37.3 vs 16.4 %, P = 0.006), ibeA (35.8 vs 4.5 %, P<0.001), iutA (82.1 vs 35.8 %, P<0.001) and hlyF (28.4 vs 6.0 %, P<0.001). In conclusion, E. coli K1(+) seems to be more virulent than E. coli K1(-) strains in developing severe infections, thereby increasing possible sepsis or neonatal bacterial meningitis.

  4. The udhA Gene of Escherichia coli Encodes a Soluble Pyridine Nucleotide Transhydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Birgitte; French, Christopher E.; Wainwright, Ian; Bruce, Neil C.

    1999-01-01

    The udhA gene of Escherichia coli was cloned and expressed in E. coli and found to encode an enzyme with soluble pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase activity. The N-terminal end of the enzyme contains the fingerprint motif of a dinucleotide binding domain, not present in published E. coli genome sequences due to a sequencing error. E. coli is hereby the first organism reported to possess both a soluble and a membrane-bound pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase. PMID:9922271

  5. CARDIORESPIRATORY AND METABOLIC RESPONSES TO LIVE E. COLI AND ENDOTOXIN IN THE MONKEY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    of live organisms (Escherichia coli) were compared with endotoxin and saline in rhesus monkeys. Six animals were given E . coli , six endotoxin, and...five served as controls. Studies were conducted for 2-4 hours. The mean cardiac output decreased 62% within 60-90 minutes in the E . coli group and 41...Pco2 decreased to 24 mm Hg in the E . coli group and 26 mm Hg in the endotoxin group. Arterial hypoxemia developed in four animals and high

  6. Escherichia coli O104:H4 Pathogenesis: an Enteroaggregative E. coli/Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli Explosive Cocktail of High Virulence.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    A major outbreak caused by Escherichia coli of serotype O104:H4 spread throughout Europe in 2011. This large outbreak was caused by an unusual strain that is most similar to enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) of serotype O104:H4. A significant difference, however, is the presence of a prophage encoding the Shiga toxin, which is characteristic of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) strains. This combination of genomic features, associating characteristics from both EAEC and EHEC, represents a new pathotype. The 2011 E. coli O104:H4 outbreak of hemorrhagic diarrhea in Germany is an example of the explosive cocktail of high virulence and resistance that can emerge in this species. A total of 46 deaths, 782 cases of hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and 3,128 cases of acute gastroenteritis were attributed to this new clone of EAEC/EHEC. In addition, recent identification in France of similar O104:H4 clones exhibiting the same virulence factors suggests that the EHEC O104:H4 pathogen has become endemically established in Europe after the end of the outbreak. EAEC strains of serotype O104:H4 contain a large set of virulence-associated genes regulated by the AggR transcription factor. They include, among other factors, the pAA plasmid genes encoding the aggregative adherence fimbriae, which anchor the bacterium to the intestinal mucosa (stacked-brick adherence pattern on epithelial cells). Furthermore, sequencing studies showed that horizontal genetic exchange allowed for the emergence of the highly virulent Shiga toxin-producing EAEC O104:H4 strain that caused the German outbreak. This article discusses the role these virulence factors could have in EAEC/EHEC O104:H4 pathogenesis.

  7. Colonization with extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli among nursing home residents and its relationship to fluoroquinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Joel N; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Glaze, Thomas; Bilker, Warren; Johnson, James R

    2004-09-01

    In a cross-sectional fecal prevalence survey involving 49 residents of a Veterans Affairs nursing home, 59% of subjects were colonized with extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC), 22% were colonized with adhesin-positive E. coli, and 51% were colonized with fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. Among 80 unique isolates, adhesins correlated negatively and aerobactin correlated positively with fluoroquinolone resistance.

  8. Editorial: Emerging approaches for typing, detection, characterization, and traceback of Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commensal E. coli inhabit the large intestines of humans and animals and are important in maintaining normal intestinal homeostasis. There are also many groups of disease-causing E. coli, including diarrheagenic and extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). There are approximately O188 somatic O...

  9. A glimpse of Escherichia coli O157:H7 survival in soils from eastern China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7) is an important food-borne pathogen, which continues to be a major public health concern worldwide. It is known that E. coli O157:H7 survive in soil environment might result in the contamination of fresh produce or water source. To investigate how the soils...

  10. Escherichia coli strain diversity: Selecting isolates for use as pathogen surrogates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Escherichia coli (E. coli) is commonly used as a surrogate for pathogens in research to identify sources of agricultural contamination and to characterize how pathogens persist on plant surfaces. However, E. coli strains are highly diverse, exhibiting differences in physical, chemical and...

  11. Mouse in vivo neutralization of Escherichia coli Shiga toxin 2 with monoclonal antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) food contaminations pose serious health and food safety concerns, and have been the subject of massive food recalls. Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2)-producing E. coli has been identified as the major cause of hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the most severe di...

  12. Detection of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in Fecal Samples in Meat Goats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobley, Ray; Madden, Uford; Brooks-Walter, Alexis

    2004-01-01

    Studies have reported the isolation of Escherichia coli (E. coli)O157:H7 from pork, lamb and poultry products, and from other animals including deer, horses, dogs, birds and humans. There is limited or no information on the presence of the organism in goats. The objectives of this study were to determine if E. coli O157:H7 was naturally occurring…

  13. Resistance of various shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli to electrolyzed oxidizing water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The resistance of thirty two strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and six major serotypes of non-O157 Shiga toxin- producing E. coli (STEC) plus E. coli O104 was tested against Electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water using two different methods; modified AOAC 955.16 sequential inoculation method and minim...

  14. Ubiquity and Persistence of Escherichia coli in a Midwestern Coastal Stream†

    PubMed Central

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Fowler, Melanie; Shively, Dawn; Whitman, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Dunes Creek, a small Lake Michigan coastal stream that drains sandy aquifers and wetlands of Indiana Dunes, has chronically elevated Escherichia coli levels along the bathing beach near its outfall. This study sought to understand the sources of E. coli in Dunes Creek's central branch. A systematic survey of random and fixed sampling points of water and sediment was conducted over 3 years. E. coli concentrations in Dunes Creek and beach water were significantly correlated. Weekly monitoring at 14 stations during 1999 and 2000 indicated chronic loading of E. coli throughout the stream. Significant correlations between E. coli numbers in stream water and stream sediment, submerged sediment and margin, and margin and 1 m from shore were found. Median E. coli counts were highest in stream sediments, followed by bank sediments, sediments along spring margins, stream water, and isolated pools; in forest soils, E. coli counts were more variable and relatively lower. Sediment moisture was significantly correlated with E. coli counts. Direct fecal input inadequately explains the widespread and consistent occurrence of E. coli in the Dunes Creek watershed; long-term survival or multiplication or both seem likely. The authors conclude that (i) E. coli is ubiquitous and persistent throughout the Dunes Creek basin, (ii) E. coli occurrence and distribution in riparian sediments help account for the continuous loading of the bacteria in Dunes Creek, and (iii) ditching of the stream, increased drainage, and subsequent loss of wetlands may account for the chronically high E. coli levels observed. PMID:12902241

  15. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance to enrofloxacin in uropathogenic Escherichia coli in dog

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) urinary tract infections (UTIs) are becoming a serious problem both for pets and humans (zoonosis) due to the close contact and to the increasing resistance to antibiotics. Canine E. coli represents a good experimental model useful to study this pathology. Moreover, as des...

  16. 76 FR 72331 - Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection Service... methods for controlling non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in raw, intact and non-intact beef... Escherichia coli in raw, intact and non-intact beef products and product components on or before December...

  17. A homolog of an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, C. M.; White, F. F.; Heaton, L. A.; Guikema, J. A.; Leach, J. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae gene with sequence similarity to an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene (phoS) produces a periplasmic protein of apparent M(r) 35,000 when expressed in E. coli. Amino terminal sequencing revealed that a signal peptide is removed during transport to the periplasm in E. coli.

  18. Comparison of whole genome sequences from human and non-human Escherichia coli O26 strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26 is the second leading E. coli serogroup responsible for human illness outbreaks behind E. coli O157:H7. Recent outbreaks have been linked to emerging pathogenic O26:H11 strains harboring stx2 only. Cattle have been recognized as an important reserv...

  19. SURVIVAL OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 IN DAIRY CATTLE FEED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cattle feed waters from two dairy farms were used in a study to determine the survival characteristics of the bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli )157:H7 and wild-type E. coli. The E. coli 0157:H7 inoculum consisted of a consortium of isolates obtained from dairy cattle. Fresh ma...

  20. Proteomic differences between Escherichia coli strains that cause transient versus persistent intramammary infections [abstract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli is a leading cause of bacterial mastitis in dairy cattle. Typically this infection is transient in nature and lasts 2-3 days. However, in a minority of cases, E. coli can cause a persistent intramammary infection. The mechanisms that enable certain strains of E. coli to cause a p...