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Sample records for adenosine amp adp

  1. [Influence of ADP-ribose, AMP and adenosine on bioelectric activity of hibernating ground squirrel atrium and papillary muscle].

    PubMed

    Kuz'min, V S; Abramochkin, D V; Sukhova, G S; Rozenshtraukh, L V

    2008-01-01

    The aim of work was to investigate effects of adenosine, AMP and ADP-ribose (1x10(-5)) on bioelectric activity of atrium and papillary muscle of nonhibernating (rat) and hibernating (Yakutian ground squirrel) animals. Action potential (AP) was registered with use of standard microelectrode technique. AP duration (APD) at level of 90% repolarisation in rat atrium in control experiments was 30+/-5 ms, APD at level of 50% repolarisation was 12+/-2 ms. APD at level of 90% repolarisation in rat papillary muscle was 56+/-7 ms, at level of 50% repolarisation was 18+/-2 ms. APD at level of 90% repolarisation in ground squirrel atrium was 77+/-6, APD at level of 50% repolarisation was 38+/-6 ms. APD at level of 90% repolarisation in ground squirrel papillary muscle was 105+/-9 ms, APD at level of 50% repolarisation was 42+/-8 ms. Purine nucleotides and nucleoside, that were tested in work, except ADP-ribose, act as inhibitory factors and decrease APD both in rat and hibernating ground squirrel heart. ADP-ribose decreases APD in papillary muscle of hibernator but did not in its atrium. In ground squirrel atrium AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 50% repolarisation by 10+/-3% and 18+/-3% respectively. AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 90% repolarisation by 9+/-2% and 11+/-2% respectively. In ground squirrel papillary muscle ADP-ribose, AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 50% repolarisation by 26+/-8%, 23+/-8% and 26+/-7%. ADP-ribose, AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 90% repolarisation by 12+/-3%, 10+/-3%, 13+/-3%. Thus, decrease of APD in ground squirrel papillary muscle at level of 90% repolarisation during nucleotides and adenosine action was 2-2.5 fold less, than the rat.

  2. Adenosine Monophosphate (AMP)-Activated Protein Kinase: A New Target for Nutraceutical Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Aguilar, Fabiola; Pavillard, Luis E.; Giampieri, Francesca; Bullón, Pedro; Cordero, Mario D.

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important energy sensor which is activated by increases in adenosine monophosphate (AMP)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio and/or adenosine diphosphate (ADP)/ATP ratio, and increases different metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation, glucose transport and mitochondrial biogenesis. In this sense, AMPK maintains cellular energy homeostasis by induction of catabolism and inhibition of ATP-consuming biosynthetic pathways to preserve ATP levels. Several studies indicate a reduction of AMPK sensitivity to cellular stress during aging and this could impair the downstream signaling and the maintenance of the cellular energy balance and the stress resistance. However, several diseases have been related with an AMPK dysfunction. Alterations in AMPK signaling decrease mitochondrial biogenesis, increase cellular stress and induce inflammation, which are typical events of the aging process and have been associated to several pathological processes. In this sense, in the last few years AMPK has been identified as a very interesting target and different nutraceutical compounds are being studied for an interesting potential effect on AMPK induction. In this review, we will evaluate the interaction of the different nutraceutical compounds to induce the AMPK phosphorylation and the applications in diseases such as cancer, type II diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases or cardiovascular diseases. PMID:28146060

  3. Effect of adenosine and adenosine analogues on cyclic AMP accumulation in cultured mesangial cells and isolated glomeruli of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, A.; Lopez-Novoa, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    1. Changes in intracellular levels of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) were studied in rat isolated glomeruli and cultured glomerular mesangial cells exposed to adenosine and to the preferential A1 receptor agonist N6-R-1-methyl-2-phenylethyl adenosine (R-PIA), or the potent A2 adenosine receptor agonist 5-(N-ethylcarboxamide)adenosine (NECA). 2. Whereas NECA and adenosine triggered a dose-dependent increase in cyclic AMP values with EC50 values of approximately 10(-6) M and 3 x 10(-5) M respectively, R-PIA lowered cyclic AMP levels at concentrations of 10(-6) M or less and increased them at higher concentrations. 3. The time-course of the increase induced by 10(-6) M NECA was slower than that induced by 10(-4) M adenosine. Adenosine produced a maximal stimulation within the first minute, whereas the effect of NECA in both glomeruli and mesangial cells was noticeable only from the second minute of incubation. 4. The effects of the agonists R-PIA and NECA on the cyclic AMP system were blocked respectively by the A1 adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthihe (DPCPX) at 10(-6) M and the A2 antagonist N-(2-dimethylaminoethyl)-N-methyl-4-(2, 3, 6, 7-tetrahydro-2,b-dioxo-1, 3-dipropyl-1H-purin-8-yl) benzene sulphonamide (PD115,199) at 10(-6) M. Theophylline, a known antagonist of adenosine receptors, inhibited the action of adenosine on cyclic AMP in mesangial cells. Dipyridamole, an inhibitor of the uptake of adenosine by the cells, enhanced the response to adenosine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1330173

  4. Kindlin-2 regulates hemostasis by controlling endothelial cell–surface expression of ADP/AMP catabolic enzymes via a clathrin-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Pluskota, Elzbieta; Ma, Yi; Bledzka, Kamila M.; Bialkowska, Katarzyna; Soloviev, Dmitry A.; Szpak, Dorota; Podrez, Eugene A.; Fox, Paul L.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Dowling, James J.; Ma, Yan-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Kindlin-2, a widely distributed cytoskeletal protein, has been implicated in integrin activation, and its absence is embryonically lethal in mice. In the present study, we tested whether hemostasis might be perturbed in kindlin-2+/− mice. Bleeding time and carotid artery occlusion time were significantly prolonged in kindlin-2+/− mice. Whereas plasma concentrations/activities of key coagulation/fibrinolytic proteins and platelet counts and aggregation were similar in wild-type and kindlin-2+/− mice, kindlin-2+/− endothelial cells (ECs) showed enhanced inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP) or low concentrations of other agonists. Cell-surface expression of 2 enzymes involved in ADP/adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) degradation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) diphosphohydrolase (CD39) and ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) were increased twofold to threefold on kindlin-2+/− ECs, leading to enhanced ATP/ADP catabolism and production of adenosine, an inhibitor of platelet aggregation. Trafficking of CD39 and CD73 at the EC surface was altered in kindlin-2+/− mice. Mechanistically, this was attributed to direct interaction of kindlin-2 with clathrin heavy chain, thereby controlling endocytosis and recycling of CD39 and CD73. The interaction of kindlin-2 with clathrin was independent of its integrin binding site but still dependent on a site within its F3 subdomain. Thus, kindlin-2 regulates trafficking of EC surface enzymes that control platelet responses and hemostasis. PMID:23896409

  5. Cyclen-based bismacrocycles for biological anion recognition. A potentiometric and NMR study of AMP, ADP and ATP nucleotide complexation.

    PubMed

    Delépine, Anne-Sophie; Tripier, Raphaël; Handel, Henri

    2008-05-21

    The behaviour of two cyclen-based bismacrocycles linked by aromatic spacers as receptors of adenosine monophosphate (AMP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) anions is explored. The two bismacrocycles differ from one another by the nature of their spacers, which are respectively 1,3-dimethylbenzene (BMC), or 2,6-dimethylpyridine (BPyC). Potentiometric investigations supported by (1)H and (31)P NMR measurements were performed over a wide pH range to characterize and understand the driving forces implicated in the supramolecular assemblies. A comparison is also carried out with the results presented in this work and those obtained previously with these two ligands and inorganic phosphates. The comparison exhibits the importance of pi-stacking capability of the organic anions in the binding and hydrogen-bonding network. For BPyC, NMR studies highlight two coordination schemes depending on the protonation of the nitrogen atom of the pyridinyl spacer, which acts in acidic media as a supplementary anchoring point.

  6. Cardiac myocyte–secreted cAMP exerts paracrine action via adenosine receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Sassi, Yassine; Ahles, Andrea; Truong, Dong-Jiunn Jeffery; Baqi, Younis; Lee, Sang-Yong; Husse, Britta; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Foinquinos, Ariana; Thum, Thomas; Müller, Christa E.; Dendorfer, Andreas; Laggerbauer, Bernhard; Engelhardt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Acute stimulation of cardiac β-adrenoceptors is crucial to increasing cardiac function under stress; however, sustained β-adrenergic stimulation has been implicated in pathological myocardial remodeling and heart failure. Here, we have demonstrated that export of cAMP from cardiac myocytes is an intrinsic cardioprotective mechanism in response to cardiac stress. We report that infusion of cAMP into mice averted myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis in a disease model of cardiac pressure overload. The protective effect of exogenous cAMP required adenosine receptor signaling. This observation led to the identification of a potent paracrine mechanism that is dependent on secreted cAMP. Specifically, FRET-based imaging of cAMP formation in primary cells and in myocardial tissue from murine hearts revealed that cardiomyocytes depend on the transporter ABCC4 to export cAMP as an extracellular signal. Extracellular cAMP, through its metabolite adenosine, reduced cardiomyocyte cAMP formation and hypertrophy by activating A1 adenosine receptors while delivering an antifibrotic signal to cardiac fibroblasts by A2 adenosine receptor activation. Together, our data reveal a paracrine role for secreted cAMP in intercellular signaling in the myocardium, and we postulate that secreted cAMP may also constitute an important signal in other tissues. PMID:25401477

  7. Synthesis of adenosine-imprinted microspheres for the recognition of ADP-ribosylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xia; Tang, Biao; Liu, Jing Jing; You, Xiang Yu; Gu, Jing; Deng, Jiao Yu; Xie, Wei-Hong

    2017-01-15

    Core-shell structural adenosine-imprinted microspheres were prepared via a two-step procedure. Polystyrene core particles (CP) were firstly prepared via a reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization leaving the iniferter on the surface of the cores, then a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) shell was synthesized on the surface of the cores by using acrylamide (AAm) as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker. The formation and growth of the MIP layer were seen dependent on the initiator (AIBN), AAm and the polymerization time used within the polymerization. SEM/TEM images showed that the dimensions of the cores and shells were 2μM and 44nm, respectively. The MIP microspheres exhibited a fast rebinding rate within 2h and a maximum adsorption capacity of 177μg per gram for adenosine. The adsorption fitted a Langmuir-Freundlich (LF) isotherm model with a KLF value of 41mL/μg and a qm value of 177μg/g for the MIP microspheres. The values were larger than those for a non-molecularly imprinted polymer (NIP) particles (5mL/μg and 88μg/g) indicating a better adsorption ability towards adenosine. The MIP microspheres showed a good selectivity for adenosine with a higher adsorption (683nmol/g) for adenosine than that (91nmol/g, 24nmol/g and 54nmol/g) for guanosine, cytidine and uridine respectively. Further experiment proved that the adenosine-imprinted polymer microspheres also had a good selectivity for ADP-ribosylated proteins that the MIP could extract the ADP-ribosylated proteins from the cell extract samples.

  8. A Comparative Study of Vasorelaxant Effects of ATP, ADP, and Adenosine on the Superior Mesenteric Artery of SHR.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shun; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Ando, Makoto; Kobayashi, Shota; Iguchi, Maika; Taguchi, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated superior mesenteric arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) to determine the relaxation responses induced by ATP, ADP, and adenosine and the relationship between the relaxant effects of these compounds and nitric oxide (NO) or cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived prostanoids. In rat superior mesenteric artery, relaxation induced by ATP and ADP but not by adenosine was completely eliminated by endothelial denudation. In the superior mesenteric arteries isolated from SHR [vs. age-matched control Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY)], a) ATP- and ADP-induced relaxations were weaker, whereas adenosine-induced relaxation was similar in both groups, b) ATP- and ADP-induced relaxations were substantially and partly reduced by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine [a NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor], respectively, c) indomethacin, an inhibitor of COX, increased ATP- and ADP-induced relaxations, d) ADP-induced relaxation was weaker under combined inhibition by NOS and COX, and e) adenosine-induced relaxation was not altered by treatment with these inhibitors. These data indicate that levels of responsiveness to these nucleotides/adenosine vary in the superior mesenteric arteries from SHR and WKY and are differentially modulated by NO and COX-derived prostanoids.

  9. Altered extracellular ATP, ADP, and AMP hydrolysis in blood serum of sedentary individuals after an acute, aerobic, moderate exercise session.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Cesar Eduardo Jacintho; Teixeira, Bruno Costa; Rockenbach, Liliana; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro; Casali, Emerson André; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2017-02-01

    Nucleotidases participate in the regulation of physiological and pathological events, such as inflammation and coagulation. Exercise promotes distinct adaptations, and can influence purinergic signaling. In the present study, we investigated soluble nucleotidase activities in the blood serum of sedentary young male adults at pre- and post-acute moderate aerobic exercise. In addition, we evaluated how this kind of exercise could influence adenine nucleotide concentrations in the blood serum. Sedentary individuals were submitted to moderate aerobic exercise on a treadmill; blood samples were collected pre- and post-exercise, and serum was separated for analysis. Results showed increases in ATP, ADP, and AMP hydrolysis post-exercise, compared to pre-exercise values. The ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase was also evaluated, showing an increased activity post-exercise, compared to pre-exercise. Purine levels were analyzed by HPLC in the blood serum, pre- and post-exercise. Decreased levels of ATP and ADP were found post-exercise, in contrast with pre-exercise values. Conversely, post-exercise levels of adenosine and inosine increased compared to pre-exercise levels. Our results indicate an influence of acute exercise on ATP metabolism, modifying enzymatic behavior to promote a protective biological environment.

  10. Evidence for a substrate cycle between AMP and adenosine in isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bontemps, F; Van den Berghe, G; Hers, H G

    1983-01-01

    The effect of adenosine on the metabolism of prelabeled adenine nucleotides was investigated in isolated hepatocytes. Adenosine caused an approximately equal to 2-fold increase in the ATP content of the cells. This effect was in part counteracted by an increased rate of adenine nucleotide catabolism that could be explained by a stimulation of both AMP deaminase (AMP aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.6) and the cytoplasmic 5'-nucleotidase (5'-ribonucleotide phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.5) because of the increased concentration of ATP. The unexpected finding that labeled adenosine was formed immediately after the addition of the unlabeled nucleoside could be explained by the trapping effect of adenosine. An accumulation of labeled adenosine was observed also in the presence of 5-iodotubercidin, a potent inhibitor of adenosine kinase (ATP:adenosine 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.20). Under these conditions, there was a decrease in the concentration of ATP in the cell and a 2- to 3-fold increase in the rate of formation of allantoin. This formation of adenosine was only slightly decreased by inhibition of the membranous 5'-nucleotidase; it led to the accumulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine in the presence of coformycin and an excess of L-homocysteine. It was concluded that, under basal conditions, the cytoplasmic 5'-nucleotidase present in the liver cell continuously produces adenosine, which is immediately reconverted into AMP by adenosine kinase, without giving rise to allantoin. This futile cycle between AMP and adenosine amounts to at least 20 nmol/min per g of liver and, thus, exceeds the basic rate of allantoin formation. PMID:6304684

  11. Regulation of mitochondrial poly(ADP-Ribose) polymerase activation by the β-adrenoceptor/cAMP/protein kinase A axis during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Brunyanszki, Attila; Olah, Gabor; Coletta, Ciro; Szczesny, Bartosz; Szabo, Csaba

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the regulation of mitochondrial poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) system during oxidative stress in U937 monocytes. Oxidative stress induced an early (10 minutes) mitochondrial DNA damage, and concomitant activation of PARP1 in the mitochondria. These early events were followed by a progressive mitochondrial oxidant production and nuclear PARP1 activation (by 6 hours). These processes led to a functional impairment of mitochondria, culminating in cell death of mixed (necrotic/apoptotic) type. β-Adrenoceptor blockade with propranolol or inhibition of its downstream cAMP/PKA signaling attenuated, while β-adrenoceptor agonists and cAMP/PKA activators enhanced, the oxidant-mediated PARP1 activation. In the presence of cAMP, recombinant PKA directly phosphorylated recombinant PARP1 on serines 465 (in the automodification domain) and 782 and 785 (both in the catalytic domain). Inhibition of the β-adrenergic receptor/cAMP/PKA axis protected against the oxidant-mediated cell injury. Propranolol also suppressed PARP1 activation in peripheral blood leukocytes during bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammation in mice. We conclude that the activation of mitochondrial PARP1 is an early, active participant in oxidant-induced cell death, which is under the control of β-adrenoceptor/cAMP/PKA axis through the regulation of PARP1 activity by PARP1 phosphorylation.

  12. Dynamic coupling between the LID and NMP domain motions in the catalytic conversion of ATP and AMP to ADP by adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Jana, Biman; Adkar, Bharat V; Biswas, Rajib; Bagchi, Biman

    2011-01-21

    The catalytic conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by adenylate kinase (ADK) involves large amplitude, ligand induced domain motions, involving the opening and the closing of ATP binding domain (LID) and AMP binding domain (NMP) domains, during the repeated catalytic cycle. We discover and analyze an interesting dynamical coupling between the motion of the two domains during the opening, using large scale atomistic molecular dynamics trajectory analysis, covariance analysis, and multidimensional free energy calculations with explicit water. Initially, the LID domain must open by a certain amount before the NMP domain can begin to open. Dynamical correlation map shows interesting cross-peak between LID and NMP domain which suggests the presence of correlated motion between them. This is also reflected in our calculated two-dimensional free energy surface contour diagram which has an interesting elliptic shape, revealing a strong correlation between the opening of the LID domain and that of the NMP domain. Our free energy surface of the LID domain motion is rugged due to interaction with water and the signature of ruggedness is evident in the observed root mean square deviation variation and its fluctuation time correlation functions. We develop a correlated dynamical disorder-type theoretical model to explain the observed dynamic coupling between the motion of the two domains in ADK. Our model correctly reproduces several features of the cross-correlation observed in simulations.

  13. AMP metabolism in the marine bacterium Beneckea natriegens.

    PubMed

    Pickard, M A; Whelihan, J A; Knowles, C J

    1980-05-01

    The catabolism of AMP by preparations from Beneckea natriegens has been reexamined. In the absence of ATP, cell-free extracts catabolized AMP via adenosine to inosine. When ATP was present, adenylate kinase converted AMP to ADP, lowering the rate of AMP catabolism. Particle-free supernatants (225,000 x g) metabolized AMP alone slowly, but adenylate kinase was active when ATP was added. Washed particulate fractions contained AMP nucleotidase activity which converted AMP to adenosine; in the presence of ATP, adenosine formation was reduced by residual adenylate kinase associated with the particulate fraction. IMP was not detected as a metabolite in these experiments.

  14. Adenosine A2B-receptor-mediated cyclic AMP accumulation in primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Peakman, M. C.; Hill, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on the accumulation of cyclic AMP have been investigated in primary cultures of rat astrocytes. 2. Adenosine A2-receptor stimulation caused a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP in cells prelabelled with [3H]-adenine. The rank order of agonist potencies was 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA; EC50 = 1 microM) > adenosine (EC50 = 5 microM) > 2-chloroadenosine (EC50 = 20 microM) >> CGS 21680 (EC50 > 10 microM). The presence of 0.5 microM dipyridamole, an adenosine uptake blocker, had no effect on the potency of adenosine. 3. The response to 10 microM NECA was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonists, xanthine amine congener (apparent KD = 12 nM), PD 115,199 (apparent KD = 134 nM) and 8-phenyltheophylline (apparent KD = 126 nM). However, the A1-receptor-selective antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, had no significant effect on the responses to NECA or 2-chloroadenosine at concentrations up to 1 microM. 4. Stimulation of A1-receptors with the selective agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine, did not alter the basal accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP but inhibited a forskolin-mediated elevation of [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation by a maximal value of 42%. This inhibition was fully reversed in the presence of 0.1 microM, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine. 5. The time course for NECA-mediated [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation was investigated. The results suggest that there is a substantial efflux of cyclic AMP from the cells in addition to the rapid and sustained elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (5 fold over basal) which was also observed. 6. These data indicate that rat astrocytes in primary culture express an A2B-adenosine receptor coupled positively to adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, the presence of A1-receptors negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase appears to have no significant effect on the A2B

  15. Selective Phosphonylation of 5'-Adenosine Monophosphate (5'-AMP) via Pyrophosphite [PPi(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Karl; Bryant, David E.; Marriott, Katie E. R.; Ohara, Shohei; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Kee, Terence P.

    2016-11-01

    We describe here experiments which demonstrate the selective phospho-transfer from a plausibly prebiotic condensed phosphorus (P) salt, pyrophosphite [H2P2O5 2-; PPi(III)], to the phosphate group of 5'-adenosine mono phosphate (5'-AMP). We show further that this P-transfer process is accelerated both by divalent metal ions (M2+) and by organic co-factors such as acetate (AcO-). In this specific case of P-transfer from PPi(III) to 5'-AMP, we show a synergistic enhancement of transfer in the combined presence of M2+ & AcO-. Isotopic labelling studies demonstrate that hydrolysis of the phosphonylated 5'-AMP, [P(III)P(V)-5'-AMP], proceeds via nuceophilic attack of water at the Pi(III) terminus.

  16. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP are reduced in lymphocytes from alcoholic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, I.; Wrubel, B.; Estrin, W.; Gordon, A.

    1987-03-01

    Alcoholism causes serious neurologic disease that may be due, in part, to the ability of ethanol to interact with neural cell membranes and change neuronal function. Adenosine receptors are membrane-bound proteins that appear to mediate some of the effects of ethanol in the brain. Human lymphocytes also have adenosine receptors, and their activation causes increases in cAMP levels. To test the hypothesis that basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels in lymphocytes might be abnormal in alcoholism, the authors studied lymphocytes from 10 alcoholic subjects, 10 age- and sex-matched normal individuals, and 10 patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels were reduced 75% in lymphocytes from alcoholic subjects. Also, there was a 76% reduction in ethanol stimulation of cAMP accumulation in lymphocytes from alcoholics. Similar results were demonstrable in isolated T cells. Unlike other laboratory tests examined, these measurements appeared to distinguish alcoholics from normal subjects and from patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Reduced basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP in lymphocytes from alcoholics may reflect a change in cell membranes due either to chronic alcohol abuse or to a genetic predisposition unique to alcoholic subjects.

  17. Regulation of cyclic AMP formation in cultures of human foetal astrocytes by beta 2-adrenergic and adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Woods, M D; Freshney, R I; Ball, S G; Vaughan, P F

    1989-09-01

    Two cell cultures, NEP2 and NEM2, isolated from human foetal brain have been maintained through several passages and found to express some properties of astrocytes. Both cell cultures contain adenylate cyclase stimulated by catecholamines with a potency order of isoprenaline greater than adrenaline greater than salbutamol much greater than noradrenaline, which is consistent with the presence of beta 2-adrenergic receptors. This study reports that the beta 2-adrenergic-selective antagonist ICI 118,551 is approximately 1,000 times more potent at inhibiting isoprenaline stimulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) formation in both NEP2 and NEM2 than the beta 1-adrenergic-selective antagonist practolol. This observation confirms the presence of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in these cell cultures. The formation of cAMP in NEP2 is also stimulated by 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)adenosine (NECA) more potently than by either adenosine or N6-(L-phenylisopropyl)adenosine (L-PIA), which suggests that this foetal astrocyte expresses adenosine A2 receptors. Furthermore, L-PIA and NECA inhibit isoprenaline stimulation of cAMP formation, a result suggesting the presence of adenosine A1 receptors on NEP2. The presence of A1 receptors is confirmed by the observation that the A1-selective antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine reverses the inhibition of isoprenaline stimulation of cAMP formation by L-PIA and NECA. Additional evidence that NEP2 expresses adenosine receptors linked to the adenylate cyclase-inhibitory GTP-binding protein is provided by the finding that pretreatment of these cells with pertussis toxin reverses the adenosine inhibition of cAMP formation stimulated by either isoprenaline or forskolin.

  18. Adenosine A1 receptors mediate inhibition of cAMP formation in vitro in the pontine, REM sleep induction zone.

    PubMed

    Marks, Gerald A; Birabil, Christian G; Speciale, Samuel G

    2005-11-09

    Microinjection of adenosine A1 receptor agonist or an inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase into the caudal, oral pontine reticular formation (PnOc) of the rat induces a long-lasting increase in REM sleep. Here, we report significant inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP in dissected pontine tissue slices containing the PnOc incubated with the A1 receptor agonist, cyclohexaladenosine (10(-8) M). These data are consistent with adenosine A1 receptor agonist actions on REM sleep mediated through inhibition of cAMP.

  19. A1 adenosine receptors inhibit chloride transport in the shark rectal gland. Dissociation of inhibition and cyclic AMP.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, G G; Poeschla, E M; Barron, H V; Forrest, J N

    1990-01-01

    In the in vitro perfused rectal gland of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias), the adenosine analogue 2-chloroadenosine (2Clado) completely and reversibly inhibited forskolin-stimulated chloride secretion with an IC50 of 5 nM. Other A1 receptor agonists including cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine (NECA) and R-phenylisopropyl-adenosine (R-PIA) also completely inhibited forskolin stimulated chloride secretion. The "S" stereoisomer of PIA (S-PIA) was a less potent inhibitor of forskolin stimulated chloride secretion, consistent with the affinity profile of PIA stereoisomers for an A1 receptor. The adenosine receptor antagonists 8-phenyltheophylline and 8-cyclopentyltheophylline completely blocked the effect of 2Clado to inhibit forskolin-stimulated chloride secretion. When chloride secretion and tissue cyclic (c)AMP content were determined simultaneously in perfused glands, 2Clado completely inhibited secretion but only inhibited forskolin stimulated cAMP accumulation by 34-40%, indicating that the mechanism of inhibition of secretion by 2Clado is at least partially cAMP independent. Consistent with these results, A1 receptor agonists only modestly inhibited (9-15%) forskolin stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and 2Clado markedly inhibited chloride secretion stimulated by a permeant cAMP analogue, 8-chlorophenylthio cAMP (8CPT cAMP). These findings provide the first evidence for a high affinity A1 adenosine receptor that inhibits hormone stimulated ion transport in a model epithelia. A major portion of this inhibition occurs by a mechanism that is independent of the cAMP messenger system. PMID:1970583

  20. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ monophosphate (AMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, K.; Feki, H. El; Marsan, O.; Drouet, C.

    2015-10-01

    This work investigates the interaction between the nucleotide adenosine 5‧ monophosphate molecule (AMP) and a biomimetic nanocrystalline carbonated apatite as a model for bone mineral. The analogy of the apatite phase used in this work with biological apatite was first pointed out by complementary techniques. AMP adsorption isotherms were then investigated. Obtained data were fitted to a Sips isotherm with an exponent greater than one suggesting positive cooperativity among adsorbed molecules. The data were compared to a previous study relative to the adsorption of another nucleotide, cytidine monophosphate (CMP) onto a similar substrate, evidencing some effect of the chemical nature of the nucleic base. An enhanced adsorption was observed under acidic (pH 6) conditions as opposed to pH 7.4, which parallels the case of DNA adsorption on biomimetic apatite. An estimated standard Gibbs free energy associated to the adsorption process (ΔG°ads ≅ -22 kJ/mol) intermediate between "physisorption" and "chemisorption" was found. The analysis of the solids after adsorption pointed to the preservation of the main characteristics of the apatite substrate but shifts or enhancements of Raman bands attributed to AMP showed the existence of chemical interactions involving both the phosphate and adenine parts of AMP. This contribution adds to the works conducted in view of better understanding the interaction of DNA/RNA and their constitutive nucleotides and the surface of biomimetic apatites. It could prove helpful in disciplines such as bone diagenesis (DNA/apatite interface in aged bones) or nanomedicine (setup of DNA- or RNA-loaded apatite systems). Also, the adsorption of nucleic acids on minerals like apatites could have played a role in the preservation of such biomolecules in the varying conditions known to exist at the origin of life on Earth, underlining the importance of dedicated adsorption studies.

  1. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-induced histone hyperacetylation contributes to its antiproliferative and differentiation-inducing activities.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seungwan; Lee, Yong Gyu; Kim, Ji Hye; Byeon, Se Eun; Rho, Ho Sik; Cho, Jae Youl; Hong, Sungyoul

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetylation is linked to the control of chromatin remodeling, which is involved in cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. It is not fully understood whether cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a representative differentiation-inducing molecule, is able to modulate histone acetylation as part of its anticancer activity. In the present study, we aimed to address this issue using cell-permeable cAMP, i.e. dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) and C6 glioma cells. As reported previously, under the conditions of our studies, treatment with dbcAMP clearly arrested C6 cell proliferation and altered their morphology. Its antiproliferative and differentiation-inducing activity in C6 glioma cells involved upregulation of p219WAF/CIP), p27(kip1), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and Cx43, as well as downregulation of vimentin. Furthermore, dbcAMP modulated the phosphorylation of ERK and Akt in a time-dependent manner and altered the colocalization pattern of phospho-Src and the actin cytoskeleton. Interestingly, dbcAMP upregulated the enzyme activity of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and, in parallel, enhanced cellular acetyllysine levels. Finally, the hyperacetylation-inducing compound, sodium butyrate (NaB), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, displayed similar anticancer activity to dbcAMP. Therefore, our data suggest that antiproliferative and differentiation-inducing activities of dbcAMP may be generated by its enhanced hyperacetylation function.

  2. Raman spectroscopic measurement of base stacking in solutions of adenosine, AMP, ATP, and oligoadenylates.

    PubMed

    Weaver, J L; Williams, R W

    1988-12-13

    Measurements of the colligative properties of nucleosides and their derivatives have shown that bases form transient aggregates in solution [Ts'o (1967) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 89, 3612-3622]. Aggregation of nucleotides cannot be measured by osmometry due to the presence of counterions. Sedimentation measurements are difficult to obtain and have been complicated by differences in pH [Ferguson et al. (1974) Biophys. Chem. 1, 325-337]. Raman studies of oligonucleotides have shown that the intensities due to base vibrational modes depend on the extent of base stacking, but this dependence has not been quantitated. We have measured this dependence by relating changes in the Raman spectra of nucleotides and nucleosides with previous measurements of colligative properties. Visible Raman spectra of ATP, AMP, and adenosine, taken over a range of concentrations from 1 to 1000 mM, show that the peak intensity ratio (I1305 + I1380)/I1340 varies linearly with the log of the concentration for all three bases. This concentration-dependent change correlates with published molal osmotic coefficient data for functionally similar bases with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. In contrast, UV resonance Raman spectra of the same bases show changes that vary linearly with concentration.

  3. “cAMP Sponge”: A Buffer for Cyclic Adenosine 3′, 5′-Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Moyer, Mary Pat; Curci, Silvana; Hofer, Aldebaran M.

    2009-01-01

    Background While intracellular buffers are widely used to study calcium signaling, no such tool exists for the other major second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP). Methods/Principal Findings Here we describe a genetically encoded buffer for cAMP based on the high-affinity cAMP-binding carboxy-terminus of the regulatory subunit RIβ of protein kinase A (PKA). Addition of targeting sequences permitted localization of this fragment to the extra-nuclear compartment, while tagging with mCherry allowed quantification of its expression at the single cell level. This construct (named “cAMP sponge”) was shown to selectively bind cAMP in vitro. Its expression significantly suppressed agonist-induced cAMP signals and the downstream activation of PKA within the cytosol as measured by FRET-based sensors in single living cells. Point mutations in the cAMP-binding domains of the construct rendered the chimera unable to bind cAMP in vitro or in situ. Cyclic AMP sponge was fruitfully applied to examine feedback regulation of gap junction-mediated transfer of cAMP in epithelial cell couplets. Conclusions This newest member of the cAMP toolbox has the potential to reveal unique biological functions of cAMP, including insight into the functional significance of compartmentalized signaling events. PMID:19888343

  4. Direct and simultaneous quantification of ATP, ADP and AMP by (1)H and (31)P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yakun; Jiang, Hua; Feng, Jinzhou; Wang, Xiaoyan; Hou, Xiandeng; Deng, Pengchi

    2016-04-01

    ATP, ADP and AMP are energy substances with vital biological significance. Based on the structural differences, a simple, rapid and comprehensive method has been established by (1)H and (31)P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H-NMR and (31)P-NMR) spectroscopies. Sodium 3-(trimethylsilyl) propionate-2,2,3,3-d4 (TMSP) and anhydrous disodium hydrogen phosphate (Na2HPO4) were selected as internal standards for (1)H-NMR and (31)P-NMR, respectively. Those three compounds and corresponding internal standards can be easily distinguished both by (1)H-NMR and (31)P-NMR. In addition, they all have perfect linearity in a certain range: 0.1-100mM for (1)H-NMR and 1-75 mM for (31)P-NMR. To validate the precision of this method, mixed samples of different concentrations were measured. Recovery experiments were conducted in serum (91-113% by (1)H-NMR and 89-113% by (31)P-NMR).

  5. Effect of electromagnetic field on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in a human mu-opioid receptor cell model.

    PubMed

    Ross, Christina L; Teli, Thaleia; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2016-01-01

    During the cell communication process, endogenous and exogenous signaling affect normal as well as pathological developmental conditions. Exogenous influences such as extra-low-frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) have been shown to effect pain and inflammation by modulating G-protein receptors, down-regulating cyclooxygenase-2 activity, and affecting the calcium/calmodulin/nitric oxide pathway. Investigators have reported changes in opioid receptors and second messengers, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), in opiate tolerance and dependence by showing how repeated exposure to morphine decreases adenylate cyclase activity causing cAMP to return to control levels in the tolerant state, and increase above control levels during withdrawal. Resonance responses to biological systems using exogenous EMF signals suggest that frequency response characteristics of the target can determine the EMF biological response. In our past research we found significant down regulation of inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) using 5 Hz EMF frequency. In this study cAMP was stimulated in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells transfected with human mu-opioid receptors, then exposed to 5 Hz EMF, and outcomes were compared with morphine treatment. Results showed a 23% greater inhibition of cAMP-treating cells with EMF than with morphine. In order to test our results for frequency specific effects, we ran identical experiments using 13 Hz EMF, which produced results similar to controls. This study suggests the use of EMF as a complementary or alternative treatment to morphine that could both reduce pain and enhance patient quality of life without the side-effects of opiates.

  6. Mdivi-1 Protects Against Ischemic Brain Injury via Elevating Extracellular Adenosine in a cAMP/CREB-CD39-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mei; Ding, Hongyan; Chen, Fangzhe; Zhao, Yanxin; Yang, Qi; Dong, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine whether the neuroprotective effects of Mdivi-1 are attributable to extracellular ATP and adenosine. Mdivi-1 was administered prior to or post middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The extracellular adenosine was measured by in vivo microdialysis and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) in MCAO mouse model. Western blot was done to determine the influence of Mdivi-1 on the expression of CD39 and CREB phosphorylation both in vivo and in the cultured astrocytes. Intracellular cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA) activity were detected in primary astrocytes. Results showed that Mdivi-1 significantly reduced infarct volume and neurological scores when administered either prior to or post MCAO. Interestingly, pretreatment with Mdivi-1 resulted in marked increase of extracellular adenosine and concomitant decrease in ATP. The expression of CD39, but not CD73, was upregulated by Mdivi-1, which was associated with the elevated phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor potentially regulating CD39 expression. In primary astrocytes, Mdivi-1 treatment induced increases in intracellular cAMP, PKA activity and CREB phosphorylation, and PKA-specific inhibitor completely reversed Mdivi-1-induced CD39 expression. Our results demonstrate that Mdivi-1 protects against ischemic brain injury through increasing extracellular adenosine, a process involving elevated CD39 expression that is likely modulated by cAMP/PKA/CREB cascade. Figure Potential mechanisms by which Mdivi-1 mediates the neuroprotection on cerebral ischemic stroke. Results from the present study indicate that Mdivi-1 protects against ischemic brain injury through increasing extracellular adenosine, a process involving elevated CD39 expression that is likely modulated by the cAMP/PKA/CREB cascades.

  7. Purification and properties of adenylyl sulphate:ammonia adenylyltransferase from Chlorella catalysing the formation of adenosine 5' -phosphoramidate from adenosine 5' -phosphosulphate and ammonia.

    PubMed

    Fankhauser, H; Schiff, J A; Garber, L J

    1981-06-01

    Extracts of Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris, spinach, barley, Dictyostelium discoideum and Escherichia coli form an unknown compound enzymically from adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate in the presence of ammonia. This unknown compound shares the following properties with adenosine 5'-phosphoramidate: molar proportions of constituent parts (1 adenine:1 ribose:1 phosphate:1 ammonia released at low pH), co-electrophoresis in all buffers tested including borate, formation of AMP at low pH through release of ammonia, mass and i.r. spectra and conversion into 5'-AMP by phosphodiesterase. This unknown compound therefore appears to be identical with adenosine 5'-phosphoramidate. The enzyme that catalyses the formation of adenosine 5'-phosphoramidate from ammonia and adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate was purified 1800-fold (to homogeneity) from Chlorella by using (NH(4))(2)SO(4) precipitation and DEAE-cellulose, Sephadex and Reactive Blue 2-agarose chromatography. The purified enzyme shows one band of protein, coincident with activity, at a position corresponding to 60000-65000 molecular weight, on polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, and yields three subunits on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of 26000, 21000 and 17000 molecular weight, consistent with a molecular weight of 64000 for the native enzyme. Isoelectrofocusing yields one band of pI4.2. The pH optimum of the enzyme-catalysed reaction is 8.8. ATP, ADP or adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phosphosulphate will not replace adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate, and the apparent K(m) for the last-mentioned compound is 0.82mm. The apparent K(m) for ammonia (assuming NH(3) to be the active species) is about 10mm. A large variety of primary, secondary and tertiary amines or amides will not replace ammonia. One mol.prop. of adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate reacts with 1 mol.prop. of ammonia to yield 1 mol.prop. each of adenosine 5'-phosphoramidate and sulphate; no AMP is found. The highly purified enzyme

  8. Phosphorylation of Cytokinin by Adenosine Kinase from Wheat Germ 1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong-Maw; Eckert, Richard L.

    1977-01-01

    Adenosine kinase was partially purified from wheat germ. This enzyme preparation, which was devoid of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase and nearly free of adenosine deaminase but contained adenylate kinase, rapidly phosphorylated adenosine and a cytokinin, N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenosine. Electrophoretic analysis indicated that only N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenosine-monophosphate was formed from the cytokinin while about 55% AMP, 45% ADP, and a trace of ATP were formed from adenosine. The biosynthesized nucleoside monophosphates were quantitatively hydrolyzed to the corresponding nucleosides by 5′-nucleotidase and the isopentenyl side chain of the phosphorylated cytokinin was not cleaved. The enzyme did not catalyze phosphorylation of inosine. The phosphorylation of the cytokinin and adenosine required ATP and Mg2+. The pH optimum was from 6.8 to 7.2 for both the cytokinin and adenosine. At pH 7 and 37 C the Km and Vmax for the cytokinin were 31 μm and 8.3 nmoles per mg protein per minute, and the values for adenosine were 8.7 μm and 46 nmoles per mg protein per minute. Crude enzyme preparations from tobacco callus tissue and wheat germ phosphorylated N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenosine. These preparations also phosphorylated N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenine when 5-phosphorylribose-1-pyrophosphate was present. PMID:16659870

  9. Properties of enzyme fraction A from Chlorella and copurification of 3' (2'), 5'-biphosphonucleoside 3' (2')-phosphohydrolase, adenosine 5'phosphosulfate sulfohydrolase and adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate cyclase activities.

    PubMed

    Lik-Shing Tsang, M; Schiff, J A

    1976-05-17

    Enzyme fraction A from Chlorella which catalyzes the formation of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate from adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phosphosulfate is further characterized. Fraction A is found to contain an Mg2+ -activated and Ca2+ -inhibited 3' (2')-nucleotidase specific for 3' (2'), 5'-biphosphonucleosides. This activity has been named 3' (2), 5'-biphosphonucleoside 3' (2')-phosphohydrolase. The A fraction is also found to contain an activity which catalyzes the formation of adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) from adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate cyclase). Under the same conditions of assay, 5'-ATP and 5'-ADP are not substrated for cyclic AMP formation. Unlike the 3' (2'), 5'-biphosphonucleoside 3' (2')-phosphohydrolase activity, the adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate cyclase activity does not require Mg2+, requires NH+4 or Na+, and is not inhibited by Ca2+. The A fraction also contains an adenosine 5'-phospho sulfate sulfohydrolase activity which forms 5'-AMP and sulfate. The three activities remain together during purification and acrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified preparation yields a pattern where only one protein band has all three activities. The phosphohydrolase can be separated from the other two activities by affinity chromatography on agarose-hexyl-adenosine 3'n5'-bisphosphate yielding a phosphohydrolase preparation showing a single band on gel electrophoresis. The adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate cyclase may provide an alternate route of cyclic AMP formation from sulfate via ATP sulfurylase, but its regulatory significance in Chlorella, if any, remains to be demonstrated. In sulfate reduction, the phosphohydrolase may serve to provide a readily utilized pool of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate as needed by the adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase. The cyclase and sulfohydrolase activities would be regarded as side reactions incidental to this pathway, but may be of importance in other metabolic and regulatory reactions.

  10. Application and optimization of the tenderization of pig Longissimus dorsi muscle by adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) using the response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shaoying; Wang, Daoying; Zhang, Muhan; Geng, Zhiming; Sun, Chong; Bian, Huan; Xu, Weimin; Zhu, Yongzhi; Liu, Fang; Wu, Haihong

    2016-03-01

    Based on single factor experiments, NaCl concentration, adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) concentration and temperature were selected as independent variables for a three-level Box-Behnken experimental design, and the shear force and cooking loss were response values for regression analysis. According to the statistical models, it showed that all independent variables had significant effects on shear force and cooking loss, and optimal values were at the NaCl concentration of 4.15%, AMP concentration of 22.27 mmol/L and temperature of 16.70°C, which was determined with three-dimensional response surface diagrams and contour plots. Under this condition, the observed shear force and cooking loss were 0.625 kg and 8.07%, respectively, exhibiting a good agreement with their predicted values, showing the good applicability and feasibility of response surface methodology (RSM) for improving pork tenderness. Compared with control pig muscles, AMP combined with NaCl treatment demonstrated significant effects on improvement of meat tenderness and reduction of cooking loss. Therefore, AMP could be regarded as an effective tenderization agent for pork.

  11. A cell wall-bound adenosine nucleosidase is involved in the salvage of extracellular ATP in Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Riewe, David; Grosman, Lukasz; Fernie, Alisdair R; Zauber, Henrik; Wucke, Cornelia; Geigenberger, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) has recently been demonstrated to play a crucial role in plant development and growth. To investigate the fate of eATP within the apoplast, we used intact potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber slices as an experimental system enabling access to the apoplast without interference of cytosolic contamination. (i) Incubation of intact tuber slices with ATP led to the formation of ADP, AMP, adenosine, adenine and ribose, indicating operation of apyrase, 5'-nucleotidase and nucleosidase. (ii) Measurement of apyrase, 5'-nucleotidase and nucleosidase activities in fractionated tuber tissue confirmed the apoplastic localization for apyrase and phosphatase in potato and led to the identification of a novel cell wall-bound adenosine nucleosidase activity. (iii) When intact tuber slices were incubated with saturating concentrations of adenosine, the conversion of adenosine into adenine was much higher than adenosine import into the cell, suggesting a potential bypass of adenosine import. Consistent with this, import of radiolabeled adenine into tuber slices was inhibited when ATP, ADP or AMP were added to the slices. (iv) In wild-type plants, apyrase and adenosine nucleosidase activities were found to be co-regulated, indicating functional linkage of these enzymes in a shared pathway. (v) Moreover, adenosine nucleosidase activity was reduced in transgenic lines with strongly reduced apoplastic apyrase activity. When taken together, these results suggest that a complete ATP salvage pathway is present in the apoplast of plant cells.

  12. Cyclic adenosine 3'-5'-monophosphate (cAMP) exerts proliferative and anti-proliferative effects in pituitary cells of different types by activating both cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac).

    PubMed

    Vitali, E; Peverelli, E; Giardino, E; Locatelli, M; Lasio, G B; Beck-Peccoz, P; Spada, A; Lania, A G; Mantovani, G

    2014-03-05

    In the pituitary the activation of cyclic adenosine 3'-5'-monophosphate (cAMP) dependent pathways generates proliferative signals in somatotrophs, whereas in pituitary cells of other lineages its effect remains uncertain. Moreover, the specific role of the two main cAMP effectors, protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac), has not been defined. Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cAMP on pituitary adenomatous cells proliferation and to identify PKA and Epac differential involvement. We found that cAMP increased DNA synthesis and cyclin D1 expression in somatotropinomas, whereas it reduced both parameters in prolactinomas and nonfunctioning adenomas, these effects being replicated in corresponding cell lines. Moreover, the divergent cAMP effects were mimicked by Epac and PKA analogs, which activated Rap1 and CREB, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that cAMP exerted opposite effects on different pituitary cell types proliferation, these effects being mediated by both Epac and PKA.

  13. Herkinorin dilates cerebral vessels via kappa opioid receptor and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in a piglet model.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fang; Wang, Zhenhong; Ma, Nan; Riley, John; Armstead, William M; Liu, Renyu

    2013-01-15

    Since herkinorin is the first non-opioid mu agonist derived from salvinorin A that has the ability to induce cerebral vascular dilatation, we hypothesized that herkinorin could have similar vascular dilatation effect via the mu and kappa opioid receptors and the cAMP pathway. The binding affinities of herkinorin to kappa and mu opioid receptors were determined by in-vitro competition binding assays. The cerebral arteries were monitored in piglets equipped with a closed cranial window and the artery responses were recorded before and every 30s after injection of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the presence or absence of the investigated drugs: herkinorion, norbinaltorphimine (NTP), a kappa opioid receptor antagonist, β-funaltrexamine (β-FNA), a mu opioid receptor antagonist, or Rp-8-Br-cAMPS (Rp-cAMPS), an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA). CSF samples were collected before and 10 min after herkinorin and NTP administration for the measurement of cAMP levels. Data were analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Our results show that herkinorin binds to both kappa and mu opioid receptors. Its vasodilation effect is totally abolished by NTP, but is not affected by β-FNA. The levels of cAMP in the CSF elevate after herkinorin administration, but are abolished with NTP administration. The cerebral vasodilative effect of herkinorin is also blunted by Rp-cAMPS. In conclusion, as a non-opioid kappa and mu opioid receptor agonist, herkinorin exhibits cerebral vascular dilatation effect. The dilatation is mediated though the kappa opioid receptor rather than the mu opioid receptor. cAMP signaling also plays an important role in this process.

  14. Temporal variations of adenosine metabolism in human blood.

    PubMed

    Chagoya de Sánchez, V; Hernández-Muñoz, R; Suárez, J; Vidrio, S; Yáñez, L; Aguilar-Roblero, R; Oksenberg, A; Vega-González, A; Villalobos, L; Rosenthal, L; Fernández-Cancino, F; Drucker-Colín, R; Díaz-Muñoz, M

    1996-08-01

    Eight diurnally active (06:00-23:00 h) subjects were adapted for 2 days to the room conditions where the experiments were performed. Blood sampling for adenosine metabolites and metabolizing enzymes was done hourly during the activity span and every 30 min during sleep. The results showed that adenosine and its catabolites (inosine, hypoxanthine, and uric acid), adenosine synthesizing (S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and 5'-nucleotidase), degrading (adenosine deaminase) and nucleotide-forming (adenosine kinase) enzymes as well as adenine nucleotides (AMP, ADP, and ATP) undergo statistically significant fluctuations (ANOVA) during the 24 h. However, energy charge was invariable. Glucose and lactate chronograms were determined as metabolic indicators. The same data analyzed by the chi-square periodogram and Fourier series indicated ultradian oscillatory periods for all the metabolites and enzymatic activities determined, and 24-h oscillatory components for inosine, hypoxanthine, adenine nucleotides, glucose, and the activities of SAH-hydrolase, 5'-nucleotidase, and adenosine kinase. The single cosinor method showed significant oscillatory components exclusively for lactate. As a whole, these results suggest that adenosine metabolism may play a role as a biological oscillator coordinating and/or modulating the energy homeostasis and physiological status of erythrocytes in vivo and could be an important factor in the distribution of purine rings for the rest of the organism.

  15. Neurochemical Measurement of Adenosine in Discrete Brain Regions of Five Strains of Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Amar K.; Jiao, Yun; Sample, Kenneth J.; Smeyne, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine (ADO), a non-classical neurotransmitter and neuromodulator, and its metabolites adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), have been shown to play an important role in a number of biochemical processes. Although their signaling is well described, it has been difficult to directly, accurately and simultaneously quantitate these purines in tissue or fluids. Here, we describe a novel method for measuring adenosine (ADO) and its metabolites using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Using this chromatographic technique, we examined baseline levels of ADO and ATP, ADP and AMP in 6 different brain regions of the C57BL/6J mouse: stratum, cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, substantia nigra and cerebellum and compared ADO levels in 5 different strains of mice (C57BL/6J, Swiss-Webster, FVB/NJ, 129P/J, and BALB/c). These studies demonstrate that baseline levels of purines vary significantly among the brain regions as well as between different mouse strains. These dissimilarities in purine concentrations may explain the variable phenotypes among background strains described in neurological disease models. PMID:24642754

  16. Involvement of cAMP-PKA pathway in adenosine A1 and A2A receptor-mediated regulation of acetaldehyde-induced activation of HSCs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaru; Wang, He; Lv, Xiongwen; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Han; Yang, Feng; Yang, Yan; Li, Jun

    2015-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism by which adenosine receptors (ARs)-mediated the cAMP/PKA/CREB signal pathway regulates the activation of acetaldehyde-induced hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Primary HSCs were isolated from SD rats, cultured in vitro, and activated with different concentrations of acetaldehyde at different time points. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to quantify both protein and mRNA levels of the four AR (A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R) in rat HSCs. Selective inhibitors of PDEs and the Gi/o protein pathway, general AR agonists, and AR subtype specific agents were used to study the AR signaling. The level of cAMP was measured by radio-immunoassay, and the expression of α-SMA, collagen type I and III, PKA and p-CREB were also detected by Western blotting. Acetaldehyde could significantly promote HSC proliferation, with a maximum stimulatory effect observed at 48 h after exposure to 200 μM acetaldehyde. All four AR subtypes could be present in rat HSCs, and the mRNA and protein expression levels for A2AR and A1R in much greater abundance than those for A2BR and A3R. The expression of A2AR and A1R was significantly increased in acetaldehyde-induced HSCs as compared with that of control group, whereas the expression of A2BR and A3R remained unaffected by the addition of acetaldehyde. Curiously, there is coupling of A2AR to the Gs-AC signaling, as well as coupling of A1R to the Gi/o-AC signaling pathway in acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Both the A2AR and A1R antagonists could suppress the activation of HSC, although they have opposing effects on cAMP signal transduction. These results suggested that a combination of cAMP/PKA/CREB signals via A2AR and A1R likely mediate the activation of acetaldehyde-induced HSCs, and A1R coupled to the Gi/o-AC signaling pathway may be masked by the more predominant A2AR that coupled to the Gs-AC signaling pathway.

  17. Effects of adenosine metabolism in astrocytes on central nervous system oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-liang; Zhang, Ya-nan; Wang, Zhong-zhuang; Xu, Wei-gang; Li, Run-ping; Zhang, Jun-dong

    2016-03-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is widely used in military operations, especially underwater missions. However, prolonged and continuous inhalation of HBO can cause central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT), which greatly limits HBO's application. The regulation of astrocytes to the metabolism of adenosine is involved in epilepsy. In our study, we aimed to observe the effects of HBO exposure on the metabolism of adenosine in the brain. Furthermore, we aimed to confirm the possible mechanism underlying adenosine's mediation of the CNS-OT. Firstly, anesthetized rats exposed to 5 atm absolute HBO for 80 min. The concentrations of extracellular adenosine, ATP, ADP, and AMP were detected. Secondly, free-moving rats were exposed to HBO at the same pressure for 20 min, and the activities of 5'-nucleotidase and ADK in brain tissues were measured. For the mechanism studies, we observed the effects of a series of different doses of drugs related to adenosine metabolism on the latency of CNS-OT. Results showed HBO exposure could increase adenosine content by inhibiting ADK activity and improving 5'-nucleotidase activity. And adenosine metabolism during HBO exposure may be a protective response against HBO-induced CNS-OT. Moreover, the improvement of adenosine concentration, activation of adenosine A1R, or suppression of ADK and adenosine A2AR, which are involved in the prevention of HBO-induced CNS-OT. This is the first study to demonstrate HBO exposure regulated adenosine metabolism in the brain. Adenosine metabolism and adenosine receptors are related to HBO-induced CNS-OT development. These results will provide new potential targets for the termination or the attenuation of CNS-OT.

  18. Inhibition of Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation by Adenosine and Inosine: Studies on Their Relative Contribution and Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Pereira, Jaime; Mezzano, Diego; Alarcón, Marcelo; Caballero, Julio; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background The inhibitory effect of adenosine on platelet aggregation is abrogated after the addition of adenosine-deaminase. Inosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside degraded from adenosine. Objectives The mechanisms of antiplatelet action of adenosine and inosine in vitro and in vivo, and their differential biological effects by molecular modeling were investigated. Results Adenosine (0.5, 1 and 2 mmol/L) inhibited phosphatidylserine exposure from 52±4% in the control group to 44±4 (p<0.05), 29±2 (p<0.01) and 20±3% (p<0.001). P-selectin expression in the presence of adenosine 0.5, 1 and 2 mmol/L was inhibited from 32±4 to 27±2 (p<0.05), 14±3 (p<0.01) and 9±3% (p<0.001), respectively. At the concentrations tested, only inosine to 4 mmol/L had effect on platelet P-selectin expression (p<0.05). Adenosine and inosine inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release stimulated by ADP and collagen. Adenosine and inosine reduced collagen-induced platelet adhesion and aggregate formation under flow. At the same concentrations adenosine inhibited platelet aggregation, decreased the levels of sCD40L and increased intraplatelet cAMP. In addition, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent adenosine receptor A2A antagonist) attenuated the effect of adenosine on platelet aggregation induced by ADP and intraplatelet level of cAMP. Adenosine and inosine significantly inhibited thrombosis formation in vivo (62±2% occlusion at 60 min [n = 6, p<0.01] and 72±1.9% occlusion at 60 min, [n = 6, p<0.05], respectively) compared with the control (98±2% occlusion at 60 min, n = 6). A2A is the adenosine receptor present in platelets; it is known that inosine is not an A2A ligand. Docking of adenosine and inosine inside A2A showed that the main difference is the formation by adenosine of an additional hydrogen bond between the NH2 of the adenine group and the residues Asn253 in H6 and Glu169 in EL2 of the A2A receptor. Conclusion Therefore

  19. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. XVIII. Synthesis and preparation of peptides and peptide fragments of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase (adenylate kinase) and their nucleotide-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Hamada, M; Johnson, M S; Russell, G A; Manship, M; Palmieri, R H; Fleming, G; Bredt, D S; Mildvan, A S

    1989-08-01

    Two peptide fragments, derived from the head and tail of rabbit muscle myokinase, were found to possess remarkable and specific ligand-binding properties (Hamada et al., 1979). By initiating systematic syntheses and measurements of equilibrium substrate-binding properties of these two sets of peptides, or portions thereof, which encompass the binding sites for (a) the magnesium complexes of the nucleotide substrates (MgATP2- and MgADP-) and (b) the uncomplexed nucleotide substrates (ADP3- and AMP2-) of rabbit muscle myokinase, some of the requirements for binding of the substrates to ATP-AMP transphosphorylase are being deduced and chemically outlined. One requirement for tight nucleotide binding appears to be a minimum peptide length of 15-25 residues. In addition, Lys-172 and/or Lys-194 may be involved in the binding of epsilon AMP. The syntheses are described as a set of peptides corresponding to residues 31-45, 20-45, 5-45, and 1-45, and a set of peptides corresponding to residues 178-192, 178-194, and 172-194 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase. The ligand-binding properties of the first set of synthetic peptides to the fluorescent ligands: epsilon MgATP/epsilon ATP and epsilon MgADP/epsilon ADP are quantitatively presented in terms of their intrinsic dissociation constants (K'd) and values of N (maximal number of moles bound per mole of peptide); and compared with the peptide fragment MT-I (1-44) obtained from rabbit muscle myokinase (Kuby et al., 1984) and with the native enzyme (Hamada et al., 1979). In addition, the values of N and K'd are given for the second set of synthetic peptides to the fluorescent ligands epsilon AMP and epsilon ADP as well as for the peptide fragments MT-XII(172-194) and CB-VI(126-194) (Kuby et al., 1984) and, in turn, compared with the native enzyme. A few miscellaneous dissociation constants which had been derived kinetically are also given for comparison (e.g., the Ki for epsilon AMP and the value of KMg epsilon ATP obtained for

  20. Kinetic mechanism of Toxoplasma gondii adenosine kinase and the highly efficient utilization of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Naguib, Fardos N M; Rais, Reem H; Al Safarjalani, Omar N; el Kouni, Mahmoud H

    2015-10-01

    Initial velocity and product inhibition studies of Toxoplasma gondii adenosine kinase (TgAK, EC 2.7.1.20) demonstrated that the basic mechanism of this enzyme is a hybrid random bi-uni ping-pong uni-bi. Initial velocity studies showed an intersecting pattern, consistent with substrate-enzyme-co-substrate complex formation and a binding pattern indicating that binding of the substrate interferes with the binding of the co-substrate and vice versa. Estimated kinetic parameters were KAdo=0.002±0.0002 mM, KATP=0.05±0.008 mM, and Vmax=920±35 μmol/min/mg protein. Ado exhibited substrate inhibition suggesting the presence of more than one binding site for Ado on the enzyme. ATP relieved substrate inhibition by Ado. Thus, Ado also binds to the ATP binding site. AMP was competitive with ATP, inferring that AMP binds to the same site as ATP. AMP, ADP and ATP were non-competitive with Ado, therefore, none of these nucleotides binds to the Ado binding site. Combining ATP with ADP was additive. Therefore, the binding of either ATP or ADP does not interfere with the binding of the other. It is concluded that for every ATP consumed, TgAK generates three new AMPs. These findings along with the fact that a wide range of nucleoside 5'-mono, di, and triphosphates could substitute for ATP as phosphate donors in this reaction may explain the efficient and central role played by TgAK in the utilization of Ado as the major source from which all other purines can be synthesized in T. gondii.

  1. Role of adenosine deaminase, ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) and ecto-(non-specific phosphatase) in cyanide-induced adenosine monophosphate catabolism in rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Newby, A C

    1980-01-01

    1. The role of adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4), ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) (EC 3.1.3.5) and ecto-(non-specific phosphatase) in the CN-induced catabolism of adenine nucleotides in intact rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes was investigated by inhibiting the enzymes in situ. 2. KCN (10mM for 90 min) induced a 20-30% fall in ATP concentration accompanied by an approximately equimolar increase in hypoxanthine, ADP, AMP and adenosine concentrations were unchanged, and IMP and inosine remained undetectable ( less than 0.05 nmol/10(7) cells). 3. Cells remained 98% intact, as judged by loss of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27). 4. Pentostatin (30 microM), a specific inhibitor of adenosine deaminase, completely inhibited hypoxanthine production from exogenous adenosine (55 microM), but did not black CN-induced hypoxanthine production or cause adenosine accumulation in intact cells. This implied that IMP rather than adenosine was an intermediate in AMP breakdown in response to cyanide. 5. Antibodies raised against purified plasma-membrane 5'-nucleotidase inhibited the ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) by 95-98%. Non-specific phosphatases were blocked by 10 mM-sodium beta-glycerophosphate. 6. These two agents together blocked hypoxanthine production from exogenous AMP and IMP (200 microM) by more than 90%, but had no effect on production from endogenous substrates. 7. These data suggest that ectophosphatases do not participate in CN-induced catabolism of intracellular AMP in rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes. 8. A minor IMPase, not inhibited by antiserum, was detected in the soluble fraction of disrupted cells. PMID:6249264

  2. Identification and partial characterization of an adenosine(5')tetraphospho(5')adenosine hydrolase on intact bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, A; Lüthje, J; Pohl, U; Busse, R

    1989-01-01

    The biologically active dinucleotides adenosine(5')tetraphospho(5')adenosine (Ap4A) and adenosine(5')-triphospho(5')adenosine (Ap3A), which are both releasable into the circulation from storage pools in thrombocytes, are catabolized by intact bovine aortic endothelial cells. 1. Compared with extracellular ATP and ADP, which are very rapidly hydrolysed, the degradation of Ap4A and Ap3A by endothelial ectohydrolases is relatively slow, resulting in a much longer half-life on the endothelial surface of the blood vessel. The products of hydrolysis are further degraded and finally taken up as adenosine. 2. Ap4A hydrolase has high affinity for its substrate (Km 10 microM). 3. ATP as well as AMP transiently accumulates in the extracellular fluid, suggesting an asymmetric split of Ap4A by the ectoenzyme. 4. Mg2+ or Mn2+ at millimolar concentration are needed for maximal activity; Zn2+ and Ca2+ are inhibitory. 5. The hydrolysis of Ap4A is retarded by other nucleotides, such as ATP and Ap3A, which are released from platelets simultaneously with Ap4A. PMID:2541689

  3. The combined inhibitory effect of the adenosine A1 and cannabinoid CB1 receptors on cAMP accumulation in the hippocampus is additive and independent of A1 receptor desensitization.

    PubMed

    Serpa, André; Correia, Sara; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M; Cascalheira, José F

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine A1 and cannabinoid CB1 receptors are highly expressed in hippocampus where they trigger similar transduction pathways. We investigated how the combined acute activation of A1 and CB1 receptors modulates cAMP accumulation in rat hippocampal slices. The CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 (0.3-30 μM) decreased forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation with an EC50 of 6.6±2.7 μM and an Emax of 31%±2%, whereas for the A1 agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 10-150 nM), an EC50 of 35±19 nM, and an Emax of 29%±5 were obtained. The combined inhibitory effect of WIN55212-2 (30 μM) and CPA (100 nM) on cAMP accumulation was 41%±6% (n=4), which did not differ (P>0.7) from the sum of the individual effects of each agonist (43%±8%) but was different (P<0.05) from the effects of CPA or WIN55212-2 alone. Preincubation with CPA (100 nM) for 95 min caused desensitization of adenosine A1 activity, which did not modify the effect of WIN55212-2 (30 μM) on cAMP accumulation. In conclusion, the combined effect of CB1 and A1 receptors on cAMP formation is additive and CB1 receptor activity is not affected by short-term A1 receptor desensitization.

  4. The breakdown of adenosine triphosphate in the contraction cycle of the frog sartorius muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mommaerts, W. F. H. M.; Wallner, A.

    1967-01-01

    1. It is confirmed that a fluorodinitrobenzene (FDNB)-treated frog sartorius muscle does not split phosphorylcreatine in the course of its contraction cycle, but does use adenosine triphosphate (ATP). 2. Good stoicheiometric relations between the diminution of ATP and the formation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP), adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and phosphate are obtained, and in a 0·2 sec tetanus at 0° C the net break-down of ATP amounts to 0·27, the total equivalent break-down to 0·34 μmoles/g. 3. There is no difference in this quantity between muscles interrupted at the height of contraction and those that have also relaxed, and, in experiments specifically designed to determine relaxation metabolism separately, no such metabolism is found. Thus, all the ATP-break-down occurs in the contraction phase. PMID:6065882

  5. New Insights into the Cyclic Di-adenosine Monophosphate (c-di-AMP) Degradation Pathway and the Requirement of the Cyclic Dinucleotide for Acid Stress Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus*

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Lisa; Zeden, Merve S.; Kaever, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide signaling networks are key to facilitate alterations in gene expression, protein function, and enzyme activity in response to diverse stimuli. Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is an important secondary messenger molecule produced by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and is involved in regulating a number of physiological processes including potassium transport. S. aureus must ensure tight control over its cellular levels as both high levels of the dinucleotide and its absence result in a number of detrimental phenotypes. Here we show that in addition to the membrane-bound Asp-His-His and Asp-His-His-associated (DHH/DHHA1) domain-containing phosphodiesterase (PDE) GdpP, S. aureus produces a second cytoplasmic DHH/DHHA1 PDE Pde2. Although capable of hydrolyzing c-di-AMP, Pde2 preferentially converts linear 5′-phosphadenylyl-adenosine (pApA) to AMP. Using a pde2 mutant strain, pApA was detected for the first time in S. aureus, leading us to speculate that this dinucleotide may have a regulatory role under certain conditions. Moreover, pApA is involved in a feedback inhibition loop that limits GdpP-dependent c-di-AMP hydrolysis. Another protein linked to the regulation of c-di-AMP levels in bacteria is the predicted regulator protein YbbR. Here, it is shown that a ybbR mutant S. aureus strain has increased acid sensitivity that can be bypassed by the acquisition of mutations in a number of genes, including the gene coding for the diadenylate cyclase DacA. We further show that c-di-AMP levels are slightly elevated in the ybbR suppressor strains tested as compared with the wild-type strain. With this, we not only identified a new role for YbbR in acid stress resistance in S. aureus but also provide further insight into how c-di-AMP levels impact acid tolerance in this organism. PMID:27834680

  6. New Insights into the Cyclic Di-adenosine Monophosphate (c-di-AMP) Degradation Pathway and the Requirement of the Cyclic Dinucleotide for Acid Stress Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Lisa; Zeden, Merve S; Schuster, Christopher F; Kaever, Volkhard; Gründling, Angelika

    2016-12-30

    Nucleotide signaling networks are key to facilitate alterations in gene expression, protein function, and enzyme activity in response to diverse stimuli. Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is an important secondary messenger molecule produced by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and is involved in regulating a number of physiological processes including potassium transport. S. aureus must ensure tight control over its cellular levels as both high levels of the dinucleotide and its absence result in a number of detrimental phenotypes. Here we show that in addition to the membrane-bound Asp-His-His and Asp-His-His-associated (DHH/DHHA1) domain-containing phosphodiesterase (PDE) GdpP, S. aureus produces a second cytoplasmic DHH/DHHA1 PDE Pde2. Although capable of hydrolyzing c-di-AMP, Pde2 preferentially converts linear 5'-phosphadenylyl-adenosine (pApA) to AMP. Using a pde2 mutant strain, pApA was detected for the first time in S. aureus, leading us to speculate that this dinucleotide may have a regulatory role under certain conditions. Moreover, pApA is involved in a feedback inhibition loop that limits GdpP-dependent c-di-AMP hydrolysis. Another protein linked to the regulation of c-di-AMP levels in bacteria is the predicted regulator protein YbbR. Here, it is shown that a ybbR mutant S. aureus strain has increased acid sensitivity that can be bypassed by the acquisition of mutations in a number of genes, including the gene coding for the diadenylate cyclase DacA. We further show that c-di-AMP levels are slightly elevated in the ybbR suppressor strains tested as compared with the wild-type strain. With this, we not only identified a new role for YbbR in acid stress resistance in S. aureus but also provide further insight into how c-di-AMP levels impact acid tolerance in this organism.

  7. Adenosine deaminase from Streptomyces coelicolor: recombinant expression, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Pornbanlualap, Somchai; Chalopagorn, Pornchanok

    2011-08-01

    The sequencing of the genome of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) identified seven putative adenine/adenosine deaminases and adenosine deaminase-like proteins, none of which have been biochemically characterized. This report describes recombinant expression, purification and characterization of SCO4901 which had been annotated in data bases as a putative adenosine deaminase. The purified putative adenosine deaminase gives a subunit Mr=48,400 on denaturing gel electrophoresis and an oligomer molecular weight of approximately 182,000 by comparative gel filtration. These values are consistent with the active enzyme being composed of four subunits with identical molecular weights. The turnover rate of adenosine is 11.5 s⁻¹ at 30 °C. Since adenine is deaminated ∼10³ slower by the enzyme when compared to that of adenosine, these data strongly show that the purified enzyme is an adenosine deaminase (ADA) and not an adenine deaminase (ADE). Other adenine nucleosides/nucleotides, including 9-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-adenine (ara-A), 5'-AMP, 5'-ADP and 5'-ATP, are not substrates for the enzyme. Coformycin and 2'-deoxycoformycin are potent competitive inhibitors of the enzyme with inhibition constants of 0.25 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Amino acid sequence alignment of ScADA with ADAs from other organisms reveals that eight of the nine highly conserved catalytic site residues in other ADAs are also conserved in ScADA. The only non-conserved residue is Asn317, which replaces Asp296 in the murine enzyme. Based on these data, it is suggested here that ADA and ADE proteins are divergently related enzymes that have evolved from a common α/β barrel scaffold to catalyze the deamination of different substrates, using a similar catalytic mechanism.

  8. Conservation and divergence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathway in two plant-pathogenic fungi: Fusarium graminearum and F. verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Breakspear, Andrew; Zhao, Guoyi; Gao, Lixin; Kistler, H Corby; Xu, Jin-Rong; Ma, Li-Jun

    2016-02-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathway is a central signalling cascade that transmits extracellular stimuli and governs cell responses through the second messenger cAMP. The importance of cAMP signalling in fungal biology has been well documented and the key conserved components, adenylate cyclase (AC) and the catalytic subunit of PKA (CPKA), have been functionally characterized. However, other genes involved in this signalling pathway and their regulation are not well understood in filamentous fungi. Here, we performed a comparative transcriptomics analysis of AC and CPKA mutants in two closely related fungi: Fusarium graminearum (Fg) and F. verticillioides (Fv). Combining available Fg transcriptomics and phenomics data, we reconstructed the Fg cAMP signalling pathway. We developed a computational program that combines sequence conservation and patterns of orthologous gene expression to facilitate global transcriptomics comparisons between different organisms. We observed highly correlated expression patterns for most orthologues (80%) between Fg and Fv. We also identified a subset of 482 (6%) diverged orthologues, whose expression under all conditions was at least 50% higher in one genome than in the other. This enabled us to dissect the conserved and unique portions of the cAMP-PKA pathway. Although the conserved portions controlled essential functions, such as metabolism, the cell cycle, chromatin remodelling and the oxidative stress response, the diverged portions had species-specific roles, such as the production and detoxification of secondary metabolites unique to each species. The evolution of the cAMP-PKA signalling pathway seems to have contributed directly to fungal divergence and niche adaptation.

  9. Identification of a Specific Assembly of the G Protein Golf as a Critical and Regulated Module of Dopamine and Adenosine-Activated cAMP Pathways in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Hervé, Denis

    2011-01-01

    In the principal neurons of striatum (medium spiny neurons, MSNs), cAMP pathway is primarily activated through the stimulation of dopamine D1 and adenosine A2A receptors, these receptors being mainly expressed in striatonigral and striatopallidal MSNs, respectively. Since cAMP signaling pathway could be altered in various physiological and pathological circumstances, including drug addiction and Parkinson’s disease, it is of crucial importance to identify the molecular components involved in the activation of this pathway. In MSNs, cAMP pathway activation is not dependent on the classical Gs GTP-binding protein but requires a specific G protein subunit heterotrimer containing Gαolf/β2/γ7 in particular association with adenylyl cyclase type 5. This assembly forms an authentic functional signaling unit since loss of one of its members leads to defects of cAMP pathway activation in response to D1 or A2A receptor stimulation, inducing dramatic impairments of behavioral responses dependent on these receptors. Interestingly, D1 receptor (D1R)-dependent cAMP signaling is modulated by the neuronal levels of Gαolf, indicating that Gαolf represents the rate-limiting step in this signaling cascade and could constitute a critical element for regulation of D1R responses. In both Parkinsonian patients and several animal models of Parkinson’s disease, the lesion of dopamine neurons produces a prolonged elevation of Gαolf levels. This observation gives an explanation for the cAMP pathway hypersensitivity to D1R stimulation, occurring despite an unaltered D1R density. In conclusion, alterations in the highly specialized assembly of Gαolf/β2/γ7 subunits can happen in pathological conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease, and it could have important functional consequences in relation to changes in D1R signaling in the striatum. PMID:21886607

  10. ADP is a vasodilator component from Lasiodora sp. mygalomorph spider venom.

    PubMed

    Horta, C C; Rezende, B A; Oliveira-Mendes, B B R; Carmo, A O; Capettini, L S A; Silva, J F; Gomes, M T; Chávez-Olórtegui, C; Bravo, C E S; Lemos, V S; Kalapothakis, E

    2013-09-01

    Members of the spider genus Lasiodora are widely distributed in Brazil, where they are commonly known as caranguejeiras. Lasiodora spider venom is slightly harmful to humans. The bite of this spider causes local pain, edema and erythema. However, Lasiodora sp. spider venom may be a source of important pharmacological tools. Our research group has described previously that Lasiodora sp. venom produces bradycardia in the isolated rat heart. In the present work, we sought to evaluate the vascular effect of Lasiodora sp. venom and to isolate the vasoactive compounds from the venom. The results showed that Lasiodora spider venom induced a concentration-dependent vasodilation in rat aortic rings, which was dependent on the presence of a functional endothelium and abolished by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME. Western blot experiments revealed that the venom also increased endothelial NOS function by increasing phosphorylation of the Ser¹¹⁷⁷ residue. Assay-directed fractionation isolated a vasoactive fraction from Lasiodora sp. venom. Mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assays identified a mixture of two compounds: adenosine diphosphate (ADP, approximately 90%) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP, approximately 10%). The vasodilator effects of Lasiodora sp. whole venom, as well as ADP, were significantly inhibited by suramin, which is a purinergic P2-receptor antagonist. Therefore, the results of the present work indicate that ADP is a main vasodilator component of Lasiodora sp. spider venom.

  11. The effects of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and other adenine nucleotides on body temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Dascombe, M J; Milton, A S

    1975-01-01

    1. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), its dibutyryl derivative (Db-cAMP) and other adenine nucleotides have been micro-injected into the hypothalamic region of the unanaesthetized cat and the effects on body temperature, and on behavioural and autonomic thermoregulatory activities observed. 2. Db-cAMP and cAMP both produced hypothermia when applied to the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. With Db-cAMP the hypothermia was shown to be dose dependent between 50 and 500 mug (0-096-0-96 mumole). 3. AMP, ADP and ATP also produced hypothermia when injected into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. 4. The order of relative potencies of the adenine nucleotides with respect both to the hypothermia produced and to the autonomic thermoregulatory effects observed were similar. Db-cAMP was most potent and cAMP least. 5. Micro-injection into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus of many substances including saline produced in most cats a non-specific rise in body temperature apparently the result of tissue damage. Intraperitoneal injection of 4-acetamidophenol (paracetamol 50 mg/kg) reduced or abolished this febrile response. 6. The hypothermic effect of the adenine nucleotides has been compared with the effects produced in these same cats by micro-injections of noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine, a mixture of acetylcholine and physostigmine (1:1), EDTA and excess Ca2+ ions. 7. It is concluded that as Db-cAMP and cAMP both produce hypothermia, it is unlikely that endogenous cAMP in the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus mediates the hyperthermic responses to pyrogens and prostaglandins. PMID:170396

  12. Abnormal Mitochondrial cAMP/PKA Signaling Is Involved in Sepsis-Induced Mitochondrial and Myocardial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Neviere, Remi; Delguste, Florian; Durand, Arthur; Inamo, Jocelyn; Boulanger, Eric; Preau, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors couple to Gs-proteins leading to transmembrane adenylyl cyclase activation and cytosolic cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production. Cyclic AMP is also produced in the mitochondrial matrix, where it regulates respiration through protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of respiratory chain complexes. We hypothesized that a blunted mitochondrial cAMP-PKA pathway would participate in sepsis-induced heart dysfunction. Adult male mice were subjected to intra-abdominal sepsis. Mitochondrial respiration of cardiac fibers and myocardial contractile performance were evaluated in response to 8Br-cAMP, PKA inhibition (H89), soluble adenylyl cyclase inhibition (KH7), and phosphodiesterase inhibition (IBMX; BAY60-7550). Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-stimulated respiratory rates of cardiac fibers were reduced in septic mice. Compared with controls, stimulatory effects of 8Br-cAMP on respiration rates were enhanced in septic fibers, whereas inhibitory effects of H89 were reduced. Ser-58 phosphorylation of cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV-1 was reduced in septic hearts. In vitro, incubation of septic cardiac fibers with BAY60-7550 increased respiratory control ratio and improved cardiac MVO2 efficiency in isolated septic heart. In vivo, BAY60-7550 pre-treatment of septic mice have limited impact on myocardial function. Mitochondrial cAMP-PKA signaling is impaired in the septic myocardium. PDE2 phosphodiesterase inhibition by BAY60-7550 improves mitochondrial respiration and cardiac MVO2 efficiency in septic mice. PMID:27973394

  13. Enzymatic regeneration of adenosine triphosphate cofactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Regenerating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by enzymatic process which utilizes carbamyl phosphate as phosphoryl donor is technique used to regenerate expensive cofactors. Process allows complex enzymatic reactions to be considered as candidates for large-scale continuous processes.

  14. Dual recognition unit strategy improves the specificity of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer biosensor for cerebral ATP assay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ping; He, Xiulan; Zhang, Li; Mao, Lanqun

    2015-01-20

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer has been widely used as a recognition unit for biosensor development; however, its relatively poor specificity toward ATP against adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP) essentially limits the application of the biosensors in real systems, especially in the complex cerebral system. In this study, for the first time, we demonstrate a dual recognition unit strategy (DRUS) to construct a highly selective and sensitive ATP biosensor by combining the recognition ability of aptamer toward A nucleobase and of polyimidazolium toward phosphate. The biosensors are constructed by first confining the polyimidazolium onto a gold surface by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP), and then the aptamer onto electrode surface by electrostatic self-assembly to form dual-recognition-unit-functionalized electrodes. The constructed biosensor based on DRUS not only shows an ultrahigh sensitivity toward ATP with a detection limit down to the subattomole level but also an ultrahigh selectivity toward ATP without interference from ADP and AMP. The constructed biosensor is used for selective and sensitive sensing of the extracellular ATP in the cerebral system by combining in vivo microdialysis and can be used as a promising neurotechnology to probing cerebral ATP concentration.

  15. Fast determination of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and its catabolites in royal jelly using ultraperformance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ling; Xue, XiaoFeng; Zhou, JinHui; Li, Yi; Zhao, Jing; Wu, LiMing

    2012-09-12

    To obtain insight into the metabolic regulation of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) in royal jelly and to determine whether ATP and its catabolites can be used as objective parameters to evaluate the freshness and quality of royal jelly (RJ), a rapid ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method has been developed for feasible separation and quantitation of ATP and its catabolites in RJ, namely, adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), inosine monophosphate (IMP), inosine (HxR), and hypoxanthine (Hx). The analytes in the sample were extracted using 5% precooled perchloric acid. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Waters Acquity UPLC system with a Waters BEH Shield RP18 column and gradient elution based on a mixture of two solvents: solvent A, 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.5); and solvent B, acetonitrile. The recoveries were in the range of 86.0-102.3% with RSD of no more than 3.6%. The correlation coefficients of six analytes were high (r(2) ≥ 0.9988) and within the test ranges. The limits of detection and quantification for the investigated compounds were lower, at 0.36-0.68 and 1.22-2.30 mg/kg, respectively. The overall intra- and interday RSDs were no more than 1.8%. The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of the analytes in samples. The results showed that ATP in RJ sequentially degrades to ADP, AMP, IMP, HxR, and Hx during storage.

  16. Probing the cyclic nucleotide binding sites of cAMP-dependent protein kinases I and II with analogs of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic phosphorothioates.

    PubMed

    Dostmann, W R; Taylor, S S; Genieser, H G; Jastorff, B; Døskeland, S O; Ogreid, D

    1990-06-25

    A set of cAMP analogs were synthesized that combined exocyclic sulfur substitutions in the equatorial (Rp) or the axial (Sp) position of the cyclophosphate ring with modifications in the adenine base of cAMP. The potency of these compounds to inhibit the binding of [3H]cAMP to sites A and B from type I (rabbit skeletal muscle) and type II (bovine myocardium) cAMP-dependent protein kinase was determined quantitatively. On the average, the Sp isomers had a 5-fold lower affinity for site A and a 30-fold lower affinity for site B of isozyme I than their cyclophosphate homolog. The mean reduction in affinities for the equivalent sites of isozyme II were 20- and 4-fold, respectively. The Rp isomers showed a decrease in affinity of approximately 400-fold and 200-fold for site A and B, respectively, of isozyme I, against 200-fold and 45-fold for site A and B of isozyme II. The Sp substitutions therefore increased the relative preference for site A of isozyme I and site B of isozyme II. The Rp substitution, on the other hand, increased the relative preference for site B of both isozymes. These data show that the Rp and Sp substitutions are tolerated differently by the two intrachain sites of isozymes I and II. They also support the hypothesis that it is the axial, and not the previously proposed equatorial oxygen that contributes the negative charge for the ionic interaction with an invariant arginine in all four binding sites. In addition, they demonstrate that combined modifications in the adenine ring and the cyclic phosphate ring of cAMP can enhance the ability to discriminate between site A and B of one isozyme as well as to discriminate between isozyme I and II. Since Rp analogs of cAMP are known to inhibit activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinases, the findings of the present study have implications for the synthesis of analogs having a very high selectivity for isozyme I or II.

  17. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent phosphoregulation of mitochondrial complex I is inhibited by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Kaleb C. Wallace, Kendall B.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are known to directly inhibit mitochondrial complex I activity as well as various mitochondrial kinases. Recent observations that complex I activity and superoxide production are modulated through cAMP-dependent phosphorylation suggests a mechanism through which NRTIs may affect mitochondrial respiration via kinase-dependent protein phosphorylation. In the current study, we examine the potential for NRTIs to inhibit the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of complex I and the associated NADH:CoQ oxidoreductase activities and rates of superoxide production using HepG2 cells. Phosphoprotein staining of immunocaptured complex I revealed that 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT; 10 and 50 {mu}M), AZT monophosphate (150 {mu}M), and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC; 1 {mu}M) prevented the phosphorylation of the NDUFB11 subunit of complex I. This was associated with a decrease in complex I activity with AZT and AZT monophosphate only. In the presence of succinate, superoxide production was increased with 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI; 10 {mu}M) and ddC (1 {mu}M). In the presence of succinate + cAMP, AZT showed an inverse dose-dependent effect on superoxide production. None of the NRTIs examined inhibit PKA activity suggesting that the observed effects are due to a direct interaction with complex I. These data demonstrate a direct effect of NRTIs on cAMP-dependent regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics independent of DNA polymerase-{gamma} activity; in the case of AZT, these observations may provide a mechanism for the observed long-term toxicity with this drug.

  18. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nicholas D; Regan, John M

    2015-12-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD(+), respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP(+), respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190 mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  19. Sustained release carrier for adenosine triphosphate as signaling molecule.

    PubMed

    Wischke, Christian; Weigel, Judith; Bulavina, Larisa; Lendlein, Andreas

    2014-12-10

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a molecule with a fascinating variety of intracellular and extracellular biological functions that go far beyond energy metabolism. Due to its limited passive diffusion through biological membranes, controlled release systems may allow to interact with ATP-mediated extracellular processes. In this study, two release systems were explored to evaluate the capacity for either long-term or short-term release: (i) Poly[(rac-lactide)-co-glycolide] (PLGA) implant rods were capable of ATP release over days to weeks, depending on the PLGA molecular weight and end-group capping, but were also associated with partial hydrolytic degradation of ATP to ADP and AMP, but not adenosine. (ii) Thermosensitive methylcellulose hydrogels with a gelation occurring at body temperature allowed combining adjustable loading levels and the capacity for injection, with injection forces less than 50N even for small 27G needles. Finally, a first in vitro study illustrated purinergic-triggered response of primary murine microglia to ATP released from hydrogels, demonstrating the potential relevance for biomedical applications.

  20. Progress in the function and regulation of ADP-Ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Hottiger, Michael O; Boothby, Mark; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Lüscher, Bernhard; Martin, Niall M B; Plummer, Ruth; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Ziegler, Mathias

    2011-05-24

    Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation is a protein posttranslational modification that is catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs), using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) as a substrate. Mono-ribosylation can be extended into polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR). Poly(ADP-ribosyl)polymerase (PARP) 1, the best-characterized cellular enzyme catalyzing this process, is the prototypical member of a family of mono- and poly(ADP-ribosyl)transferases. The physiological consequences of ADP-ribosylation are inadequately understood. PARP2010, the 18th International Conference on ADP-Ribosylation, attracted scientists from all over the world to Zurich, Switzerland. Highlights from this meeting include promising clinical trials with PARP inhibitors and new insights into cell, structural, and developmental biology of ARTs and the (glyco)hydrolase proteins that catalyze de-ADP-ribosylation of mono- or poly-ADP-ribosylated proteins. Moreover, potential links to the NAD-dependent sirtuin family were explored on the basis of a shared dependence on cellular NAD(+) concentrations and the relationship of ADP-ribosylation with intermediary metabolism and cellular energetics.

  1. Diguanosinetetraphosphatase from rat liver: Acitivity on diadenosine tetraphosphate and inhibition by adenosine tetraphosphate.

    PubMed

    Lobatón, C D; Vallejo, C G; Sillero, A; Sillero, M A

    1975-01-15

    The hydrolysis of diadenosine tetraphosphate, a compound previously described by others to occur in liver at concentrations of around 0.1 mu M, is carried out by a specific enzyme. This enzyme has been partially purified from rat liver extracts, and the following properties have been found. The Km value for diadenosine tetraphosphate is 2 mu M; the products of hydrolysis are ATP and AMP; the Km value for diguanosine tetraphosphate is 2 mu M; none of the following substances were substrates of the enzyme: diadenosine triphosphate, diguanosine di and triphosphates, adenosine tetraphosphate, ATP, ADP, NAD+, NADP+ and bis-p-nitrophenylphosphate. Cyclic AMP was not an inhibitor of the reaction. The enzyme requires Mg2+ ions, is maximally active at a pH value of approximately 8, and has a molecular weight of 22000 as estimated by filtration on Sephadex G-100. The activation energy of the reaction was of 10250 cal times mol-1 (42886 J times mol-1). Particularly striking is the inhibition by adenosine tetraphosphate (Ki equals 48 nM) and guanosine tetraphosphate (Ki equals 14 nM). Other nucleotides tested were also competitive inhibitors with Ki values in the 10--100 mu M range.

  2. Small molecule adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulators and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sandeep; Blowers, Elizabeth C; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2015-01-08

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor of cellular energy status that plays a key role in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. AMPK is a serine/threonine kinase that is activated by upstream kinases LKB1, CaMKKβ, and Tak1, among others. AMPK exists as αβγ trimeric complexes that are allosterically regulated by AMP, ADP, and ATP. Dysregulation of AMPK has been implicated in a number of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Recent studies have associated roles of AMPK with the development of cancer and neurological disorders, making it a potential therapeutic target to treat human diseases. This review focuses on the structure and function of AMPK, its role in human diseases, and its direct substrates and provides a brief synopsis of key AMPK modulators and their relevance in human diseases.

  3. Separation of adenosine diphosphate--adenosine triphosphate-exchange activity from the cerebral microsomal sodium-plus-potassium ion-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Stahl, W L; Sattin, A; McIlwain, H

    1966-05-01

    1. A microsomal fraction from ox cerebral cortex catalysed [(14)C]ADP-ATP exchange at a speed similar to that at which it liberated P(i) from ATP in the presence of Na(+), K(+) and Mg(2+). 2. Repeated washing the fraction with MgATP solutions solubilized most of the exchange activity and left the adenosine triphosphatase insoluble and little changed in activity. The exchange activity was accompanied by negligible adenosine-triphosphatase activity and was enriched by precipitation at chosen pH and by DEAE-Sephadex. At no stage was its activity affected by Na(+), K(+) or ouabain. 3. The washed microsomal fraction was exposed to a variety of reagents; a sodium iodide-cysteine treatment increased both adenosine-triphosphatase and exchange activities, as also did a synthetic zeolite. Preparations were obtained with exchange activities less than 3% of their Na(+)-plus-K(+)-stimulated adenosine-triphosphatase activity. Some contribution to the residual exchange activity was made by an adenylate kinase. 4. Thus over 95% of the microsomal ADP-ATP-exchange activity does not take part in the Na(+)-plus-K(+)-stimulated adenosine-triphosphatase reaction. Participation of some of the residual 3% of the ADP-ATP-exchange activity has not been excluded, but there appears no firm evidence for its participation in the adenosine triphosphatase; the bearing of this conclusion on mechanisms proposed for the Na(+)-plus-K(+)-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase is indicated.

  4. Adenosine modulates cell growth in the human breast cancer cells via adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Panjehpour, Mojtaba; Karami-Tehrani, Fatemeh

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine modulates the proliferation, survival, and apoptosis of many different cell types. The present study was performed to investigate the role of adenosine receptors in the human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB468. The biological effects of adenosine on the cells were analyzed by adenylyl cyclase and cell viability assay as well as RT-PCR of adenosine receptors. RT-PCR results show the expression of the transcript of all adenosine receptors in both cell lines. By using adenosine and selective adenosine receptor agonists or antagonists, we found that A3 stimulation reduced cell viability, which was abolished by pretreatment with A3 receptor antagonist. Moreover, we demonstrated that adenosine (natural agonist) triggers a cytotoxic signal via A3 receptor activation that was not seen for other subclasses of adenosine receptors. Intracellular cAMP concentration was changed significantly only for A3 and A2B receptor-selective agonists, which indicates the functional form of these receptors on the cell surface. In conclusion, our findings revealed the role of adenosine receptors in breast cancer cell lines on growth modulation role of A3 and functional form of A2B, although its involvement in cell growth modulation was not seen. Theses findings as well as data by others may provide a possible application of adenosine receptor agonists/antagonists in breast malignancies.

  5. Dietary Supplementation of Ginger and Turmeric Rhizomes Modulates Platelets Ectonucleotidase and Adenosine Deaminase Activities in Normotensive and Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, Ayodele Jacob; Thomé, Gustavo Roberto; Morsch, Vera Maria; Bottari, Nathieli B; Baldissarelli, Jucimara; de Oliveira, Lizielle Souza; Goularte, Jeferson Ferraz; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Oboh, Ganiyu; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is associated with platelet alterations that could contribute to the development of cardiovascular complications. Several studies have reported antiplatelet aggregation properties of ginger (Zingiber officinale) and turmeric (Curcuma longa) with limited scientific basis. Hence, this study assessed the effect of dietary supplementation of these rhizomes on platelet ectonucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities in Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME) induced hypertensive rats. Animals were divided into seven groups (n = 10): normotensive control rats; induced (l-NAME hypertensive) rats; hypertensive rats treated with atenolol (10 mg/kg/day); normotensive and hypertensive rats treated with 4% supplementation of turmeric or ginger, respectively. After 14 days of pre-treatment, the animals were induced with hypertension by oral administration of l-NAME (40 mg/kg/day). The results revealed a significant (p < 0.05) increase in platelet ADA activity and ATP hydrolysis with a concomitant decrease in ADP and AMP hydrolysis of l-NAME hypertensive rats when compared with the control. However, dietary supplementation with turmeric or ginger efficiently prevented these alterations by modulating the hydrolysis of ATP, ADP and AMP with a concomitant decrease in ADA activity. Thus, these activities could suggest some possible mechanism of the rhizomes against hypertension-derived complications associated to platelet hyperactivity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Defect-Related Luminescent Hydroxyapatite-Enhanced Osteogenic Differentiation of Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cells Via an ATP-Induced cAMP/PKA Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Liu, Dandan; Zhang, Cuimiao; Sun, Jiadong; Feng, Weipei; Liang, Xing-Jie; Wang, Shuxiang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2016-05-11

    Novel defect-related hydroxyapatite (DHAP), which combines the advantages of HAP and defect-related luminescence, has the potential application in tissue engineering and biomedical area, because of its excellent capability of monitoring the osteogenic differentiation and material biodegradation. Although the extracellular mechanism of DHAP minerals and PO4(3-) functioning in osteogenic differentiation has been widely studied, the intracellular molecular mechanism through which PO4(3-) mediates osteogenesis of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) is not clear. We examined a previously unknown molecular mechanism through which PO4(3-) promoted osteogenesis of BMSCs with an emphasis on adenosine-triphosphate (ATP)-induced cAMP/PKA pathway. Our studies showed that DHAP could be uptaken into lysosome, in which PO4(3-) was released from DHAP, because of the acid environment of lysosome. The released PO4(3-) interacted with ADP to form ATP, and then degraded into adenosine, an ATP metabolite, which interacted with A2b adenosine receptor to activate the cAMP/PKA pathway, resulting in the high expression of osteogenesis-related genes, such as Runx2, BMP-2, and OCN. These findings first revealed the function of ATP-metabolism in bone physiological homeostasis, which may be developed to cure bone metabolic diseases.

  7. Anticancer effect of adenosine on gastric cancer via diverse signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Ayako; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2015-10-21

    Extracellular adenosine induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells via intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. In the former pathway, adenosine uptake into cells triggers apoptosis, and in the latter pathway, adenosine receptors mediate apoptosis. Extracellular adenosine also induces apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. Extracellular adenosine is transported into cells through an adenosine transporter and converted to AMP by adenosine kinase. In turn, AMP activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is the factor responsible for caspase-independent apoptosis of GT3-TKB gastric cancer cells. Extracellular adenosine, on the other hand, induces caspase-dependent apoptosis of MKN28 and MKN45 gastric cancer cells by two mechanisms. Firstly, AMP, converted from intracellularly transported adenosine, initiates apoptosis, regardless of AMPK. Secondly, the A3 adenosine receptor, linked to Gi/Gq proteins, mediates apoptosis by activating the Gq protein effector, phospholipase Cγ, to produce inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, which activate protein kinase C. Consequently, the mechanisms underlying adenosine-induced apoptosis vary, depending upon gastric cancer cell types. Understand the contribution of each downstream target molecule of adenosine to apoptosis induction may aid the establishment of tailor-made chemotherapy for gastric cancer.

  8. Adenosine dry powder inhalation for bronchial challenge testing, part 2: proof of concept in asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Lexmond, Anne J; van der Wiel, Erica; Hagedoorn, Paul; Bult, Wouter; Frijlink, Henderik W; ten Hacken, Nick H T; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-09-01

    Adenosine is an indirect stimulus to assess bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR(2)) in asthma. Bronchial challenge tests are usually performed with nebulised solutions of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP(3)). The nebulised AMP test has several disadvantages, like long administration times and a restrictive maximum concentration that does not result in BHR in all patients. In this study, we investigated the applicability of dry powder adenosine for assessment of BHR in comparison to nebulised AMP. Dry powder adenosine was prepared in doubling doses (0.01-80 mg) derived from the nebulised AMP test with addition of two higher doses. Five asthmatic subjects performed two bronchial challenge tests, one with nebulised AMP following the 2-min tidal breathing method; the second with dry powder adenosine administered with an investigational inhaler and single slow inhalations (inspiratory flow rate 30-40 L/min). All subjects reached a 20% fall in FEV₁(4) with the new adenosine test (PD20(5)) compared to four subjects with the AMP test (PC₂₀(6)). Dry powder adenosine was well tolerated by all subjects and better appreciated than nebulised AMP. In conclusion, this new bronchial challenge test appears to be a safe and convenient alternative to the nebulised AMP test to assess BHR in asthmatic subjects.

  9. Imaging changes in the cytosolic ATP-to-ADP ratio

    PubMed Central

    Tantama, Mathew; Yellen, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a central metabolite that plays fundamental roles as an energy transfer molecule, a phosphate donor, and a signaling molecule inside cells. The phosphoryl group transfer potential of ATP provides a thermodynamic driving force for many metabolic reactions, and phosphorylation of both small metabolites and large proteins can serve as a regulatory modification. In the process of phosphoryl transfer from ATP, the diphosphate ADP is produced, and as a result, the ATP-to-ADP ratio is an important physiological control parameter. The ATP-to-ADP ratio is directly proportional to cellular energy charge and phosphorylation potential. Furthermore, several ATP-dependent enzymes and signaling proteins are regulated by ADP, and their activation profiles are a function of the ATP-to-ADP ratio. Finally, regeneration of ATP from ADP can serve as an important readout of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. We therefore developed a genetically-encoded fluorescent biosensor tuned to sense ATP-to-ADP ratios in the physiological range of healthy mammalian cells. Here we present a protocol for using this biosensor to visualize energy status using live-cell fluorescence microscopy. PMID:25416365

  10. Enhanced cAMP accumulation by a phorbol ester in cerebral cortical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beeler, J.F.; Davis, C.W.

    1987-05-01

    Phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) was found to be selective in its ability to alter cAMP accumulations in cultured rat cerebral cortical cells. Basal levels of cAMP in cultured neuronal and nonneuronal cells preincubated in the absence or presence of PMA were 14 pmol/mg protein and 16 pmol/mg protein, respectively. Adenosine increased cAMP levels in a dose-dependent manner. cAMP accumulation in response to low concentrations of adenosine was not significantly altered by pretreatment with PMA but marked potentiation of adenosine elicited accumulations was observed at 10 and 100 ..mu..M adenosine. Longer preincubation with PMA resulted in a decreased ability of PMA to enhance adenosine elicited accumulations of cAMP. PMA did not significantly alter cAMP accumulation by forskolin (FOR) and enhanced norepinephrine stimulated cAMP by only 2-fold. For similarly potentiated adenosine/sub 2/ (A/sub 2/)- receptor elicited accumulation of cAMP which could be further enhanced by PMA. These results suggest that the effects of the phorbol ester are more specific for potentiating adenosine stimulated cAMP accumulation and may occur as a result of a more efficient coupling between the A/sub 2/-receptor, N-protein and adenylate cyclase.

  11. Regulation of adenosine transport by acute and chronic ethanol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, L.E.; Casso, D.; Diamond, I.; Gordon, A.S. )

    1989-02-09

    Chronic exposure to ethanol results in a desensitization of adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP production. Since adenosine is released by cells and is known to desensitize its own as well as other receptors, it may be involved in ethanol-induced desensitization of adenosine receptor function. Therefore, we have examine the acute and chronic effects of ethanol on the transport of adenosine via the nucleoside transport. Acute exposure to ethanol caused an inhibition of adenosine uptake in S49 lymphoma cells. This decrease in uptake resulted in accumulation of extracellular adenosine after ethanol exposure. The effect of ethanol was specific to nucleoside transport. Uptake of uridine, also transported by the nucleoside transporter, was inhibited by ethanol to the same degree as adenosine uptake, while neither isoleucine nor deoxyglucose uptake was altered by ethanol treatment. Inhibition of adenosine uptake by ethanol was non-competitive and dependent on the concentration of ethanol. After chronic exposure to ethanol, cells became tolerant to the acute effects of ethanol. There was no longer an acute inhibition of adenosine uptake, nor was these accumulation of extracellular adenosine. Chronic ethanol exposure also resulted in a decrease in the absolute rate of adenosine uptake. Binding studies using a high affinity lignad for the nucleoside transporter, nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR), indicate that this decreased uptake was due to a decrease in the maximal number of binding sites. These ethanol-induced changes in adenosine transport may be important for the acute and chronic effects of ethanol.

  12. Identification of the distribution of adenosine phosphates, nucleosides and nucleobases in royal jelly.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liming; Chen, Lanzhen; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Wei, Yue; Wang, Yong; Li, Yi; Zhao, Jing; Xue, Xiaofeng

    2015-04-15

    Nucleotides, nucleosides and nucleobases play a greater role in the physiological activity of organisms which are highly present in royal jelly (RJ). The objective of the present study is to develop a HPLC method to simultaneous determine nucleotides, nucleosides and nucleobases in RJ and access them in fresh and commercial RJ samples. The LOD and LOQ were 12.2-99.6 μg/L and 40.8-289.4 μg/L, respectively with nearly 100.9% recoveries. Except uric acid, all other compounds were found in RJ samples. Significant difference in the average content of compounds in fresh (2682.93 mg/kg) and commercial samples (3152.78 mg/kg) were observed. AMP, adenosine and adenine were found predominant in all the samples. Significant higher levels of ATP, ADP and AMP was seen in fresh RJ samples, and IMP, uridine, guanosine, and thymidine was seen in commercial RJ samples. The investigated compounds can be used as indexes for assessment RJ freshness and quality.

  13. The Role of Adenosine Signaling in Headache: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Nathan T.; Elliott, Melanie B.; Oshinsky, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is the third most prevalent disease on the planet, yet our understanding of its mechanisms and pathophysiology is surprisingly incomplete. Recent studies have built upon decades of evidence that adenosine, a purine nucleoside that can act as a neuromodulator, is involved in pain transmission and sensitization. Clinical evidence and rodent studies have suggested that adenosine signaling also plays a critical role in migraine headache. This is further supported by the widespread use of caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, in several headache treatments. In this review, we highlight evidence that supports the involvement of adenosine signaling in different forms of headache, headache triggers, and basic headache physiology. This evidence supports adenosine A2A receptors as a critical adenosine receptor subtype involved in headache pain. Adenosine A2A receptor signaling may contribute to headache via the modulation of intracellular Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production or 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in neurons and glia to affect glutamatergic synaptic transmission within the brainstem. This evidence supports the further study of adenosine signaling in headache and potentially illuminates it as a novel therapeutic target for migraine. PMID:28335379

  14. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 attenuates PDGF-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration via the cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anuran; Wu, Bian; Chen, Mian; Conte, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Resolvin D1 (RvD1) is a specialized pro-resolving lipid mediator that has been previously shown to attenuate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, a key process in the development of intimal hyperplasia. We sought to investigate the role of the cAMP/PKA pathway in mediating the effects of the aspirin-triggered epimer 17R-RvD1 (AT-RvD1) on VSMC migration. Methods VSMCs were harvested from human saphenous veins. VSMCs were analyzed for intracellular cAMP levels and PKA activity after exposure to AT-RvD1. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced migration and cytoskeletal changes in VSMCs were observed through scratch, Transwell, and cell shape assays in the presence or absence of a PKA inhibitor (Rp-8-Br-cAMP). Further investigation of the pathways involved in AT-RvD1 signaling was performed by measuring Rac1 activity, vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation and paxillin translocation. Finally, we examined the role of RvD1 receptors (GPR32 and ALX/FPR2) in AT-RvD1 induced effects on VSMC migration and PKA activity. Results Treatment with AT-RvD1 induced a significant increase in cAMP levels and PKA activity in VSMCs at 5 minutes and 30 minutes, respectively. AT-RvD1 attenuated PDGF-induced VSMC migration and cytoskeletal rearrangements. These effects were attenuated by the PKA inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMP, suggesting cAMP/PKA involvement. Treatment of VSMC with AT-RvD1 inhibited PDGF-stimulated Rac1 activity, increased VASP phosphorylation, and attenuated paxillin localization to focal adhesions; these effects were negated by the addition of Rp-8-Br-cAMP. The effects of AT-RvD1 on VSMC migration and PKA activity were attenuated by blocking ALX/FPR2, suggesting an important role of this G-protein coupled receptor. Conclusions Our results suggest that AT-RvD1 attenuates PDGF-induced VSMC migration via ALX/FPR2 and cAMP/PKA. Interference with Rac1, VASP and paxillin function appear to mediate the downstream effects

  15. The P2Y12 antagonists, 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate triethylammonium salt and cangrelor (ARC69931MX), can inhibit human platelet aggregation through a Gi-independent increase in cAMP levels.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Subhashini; Mir, Fozia; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Khasawneh, Fadi T; Lam, Stephen C-T; Le Breton, Guy C

    2009-06-12

    ADP plays an integral role in the process of hemostasis by signaling through two platelet G-protein-coupled receptors, P2Y1 and P2Y12. The recent use of antagonists against these two receptors has contributed a substantial body of data characterizing the ADP signaling pathways in human platelets. Specifically, the results have indicated that although P2Y1 receptors are involved in the initiation of platelet aggregation, P2Y12 receptor activation appears to account for the bulk of the ADP-mediated effects. Based on this consideration, emphasis has been placed on the development of a new class of P2Y12 antagonists (separate from clopidogrel and ticlopidine) as an approach to the treatment of thromboembolic disorders. The present work examined the molecular mechanisms by which two of these widely used adenosine-based P2Y12 antagonists (2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate triethylammonium salt (2MeSAMP) and ARC69931MX), inhibit human platelet activation. It was found that both of these compounds raise platelet cAMP to levels that substantially inhibit platelet aggregation. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that this elevation of cAMP did not require Gi signaling or functional P2Y12 receptors but was mediated through activation of a separate G protein-coupled pathway, presumably involving Gs. However, additional experiments revealed that neither 2MeSAMP nor ARC69931MX (cangrelor) increased cAMP through activation of A2a, IP, DP, or EP2 receptors, which are known to couple to Gs. Collectively, these findings indicate that 2MeSAMP and ARC69931MX interact with an unidentified platelet G protein-coupled receptor that stimulates cAMP-mediated inhibition of platelet function. This inhibition is in addition to that derived from antagonism of P2Y12 receptors.

  16. Intracellular Mono-ADP-Ribosylation in Signaling and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bütepage, Mareike; Eckei, Laura; Verheugd, Patricia; Lüscher, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    A key process in the regulation of protein activities and thus cellular signaling pathways is the modification of proteins by post-translational mechanisms. Knowledge about the enzymes (writers and erasers) that attach and remove post-translational modifications, the targets that are modified and the functional consequences elicited by specific modifications, is crucial for understanding cell biological processes. Moreover detailed knowledge about these mechanisms and pathways helps to elucidate the molecular causes of various diseases and in defining potential targets for therapeutic approaches. Intracellular adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation refers to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent modification of proteins with ADP-ribose and is catalyzed by enzymes of the ARTD (ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin like, also known as PARP) family as well as some members of the Sirtuin family. Poly-ADP-ribosylation is relatively well understood with inhibitors being used as anti-cancer agents. However, the majority of ARTD enzymes and the ADP-ribosylating Sirtuins are restricted to catalyzing mono-ADP-ribosylation. Although writers, readers and erasers of intracellular mono-ADP-ribosylation have been identified only recently, it is becoming more and more evident that this reversible post-translational modification is capable of modulating key intracellular processes and signaling pathways. These include signal transduction mechanisms, stress pathways associated with the endoplasmic reticulum and stress granules, and chromatin-associated processes such as transcription and DNA repair. We hypothesize that mono-ADP-ribosylation controls, through these different pathways, the development of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:26426055

  17. Halobacterial adenosine triphosphatases and the adenosine triphosphatase from Halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, Hordur; Sadler, Martha H.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared from various members of the genus Halobacterium contained a Triton X-l00 activated adenosine triphosphatase. The enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum was unstable in solutions of low ionic strength and maximally active in the presence of 3.5 M NaCl. A variety of nucleotide triphosphates was hydrolyzed. MgADP, the product of ATP hydrolysis, was not hydrolyzed and was a competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum was composed of at least 2 and possibly 4 subunits. The 83-kDa and 60-kDa subunits represented about 90 percent of total protein. The 60-kDa subunit reacted with dicyclohexyl-carbodiimide when inhibition was carried out in an acidic medium. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum, possesses properties of an F(1)F(0) as well as an E(1)E(2) ATPase.

  18. Measuring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate level in living cells induced by low-level laser irradiation using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Zheng, Liqin; Yang, Hongqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies demonstrated that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), an important second messenger, is involved in the mechanism of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) treatment. However, most of these studies obtained the cAMP level in cell culture extracts or supernatant. In this study, the cAMP level in living cells was measured with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The effect of LLLI on cAMP level in living cells with adenosine receptors blocked was explored to identify the role of adenosine receptors in LLLI. The results showed that LLLI increased the cAMP level. Moreover, the rise of cAMP level was light dose dependent but wavelength independent for 658-, 785-, and 830-nm laser light. The results also exhibited that the adenosine receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), modulated the increase of cAMP level induced by LLLI. The cAMP level increased more significantly when the A3 adenosine receptors (A3R) were blocked by A3R antagonist compared with A1 adenosine receptor or A2a adenosine receptor blocked in HEK293T cells after LLLI, which was in good agreement with the adenosine receptors' expressions. All these results suggested that measuring the cAMP level with BRET could be a useful technique to study the role of GPCRs in living cells under LLLI.

  19. ADP's ABCs of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    When a company's core competence is processing data, it is sometimes easy to lose sight of the obvious--the information right under its nose. In the case of Automatic Data Processing, Inc. (ADP), a business outsourcing company specializing in human resources, payroll, tax, and benefits administrations solutions, that is not a problem. Through…

  20. Phosphorylation of adenosine in renal brush-border membrane vesicles by an exchange reaction catalysed by adenosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Sayós, J; Solsona, C; Mallol, J; Lluis, C; Franco, R

    1994-01-01

    Uptake of [3H]adenosine in brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles from either rat or pig kidney leads to an accumulation of intravesicular [3H]AMP. The lack of significant levels of ATP and the presence of AMP in BBM indicated that a phosphotransfer between [3H]adenosine and AMP occurs. The phosphotransfer activity is inhibited by iodotubercidin, which suggests that it is performed by adenosine kinase acting in an ATP-independent manner. The existence of a similar phosphotransferase activity was demonstrated in membrane-free extracts from pig kidney. From the compounds tested it was shown that a variety of mononucleotides could act as phosphate donors. The results suggest that phosphotransfer reactions may be physiologically relevant in kidney. PMID:8110185

  1. Feed-Forward Inhibition of CD73 and Upregulation of Adenosine Deaminase Contribute to the Loss of Adenosine Neuromodulation in Postinflammatory Ileitis

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Dias, Ana Sofia; Pelletier, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Purinergic signalling is remarkably plastic during gastrointestinal inflammation. Thus, selective drugs targeting the “purinome” may be helpful for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. The myenteric neuromuscular transmission of healthy individuals is fine-tuned and controlled by adenosine acting on A2A excitatory receptors. Here, we investigated the neuromodulatory role of adenosine in TNBS-inflamed longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the rat ileum. Seven-day postinflammation ileitis lacks adenosine neuromodulation, which may contribute to acceleration of gastrointestinal transit. The loss of adenosine neuromodulation results from deficient accumulation of the nucleoside at the myenteric synapse despite the fact that the increases in ATP release were observed. Disparity between ATP outflow and adenosine deficit in postinflammatory ileitis is ascribed to feed-forward inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 by high extracellular ATP and/or ADP. Redistribution of NTPDase2, but not of NTPDase3, from ganglion cell bodies to myenteric nerve terminals leads to preferential ADP accumulation from released ATP, thus contributing to the prolonged inhibition of muscle-bound ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and to the delay of adenosine formation at the inflamed neuromuscular synapse. On the other hand, depression of endogenous adenosine accumulation may also occur due to enhancement of adenosine deaminase activity. Both membrane-bound and soluble forms of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and adenosine deaminase were detected in the inflamed myenteric plexus. These findings provide novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory gut motility disorders. PMID:25210228

  2. The role of microorganisms in the degradation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in chill-stored common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fillets.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Zhang, Longteng; Song, Sijia; Wang, Zhiying; Kong, Chunli; Luo, Yongkang

    2017-06-01

    Biochemical and microbial changes after harvest strongly affect the final quality and shelf life of fish and fish products. In this study, the role of microbes in the degradation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and the origin of adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) and acid phosphatase (ACP) in common carp fillets during different stages of chilled storage (at 4°C) were investigated. The content of ATP, ADP, AMP, IMP, HxR, and Hx, the activity of AMPD and ACP, and the total count of viable, Aeromonas, Pseudomonas, H2S-producing bacteria, and lactic acid bacteria were examined. Results indicated that the population of microbial communities in control samples increased with storage time, and Pseudomonas peaked on the 10th day of storage. Changes in AMPD activity were less related to the abundance of microbes during the entire storage period. However, ACP was derived from both fish muscle and microbial secretion during the middle and late stages of storage. Degradation of ATP to IMP was not affected by spoilage bacteria, but the hydrolysis of IMP, and the transformation of HxR to Hx was affected considerably by the spoilage bacteria.

  3. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity.

  4. The Janus face of adenosine: antiarrhythmic and proarrhythmic actions.

    PubMed

    Szentmiklosi, A József; Galajda, Zoltán; Cseppento, Ágnes; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Susán, Zsolt; Hegyi, Bence; Nánási, Péter P

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous, endogenous purine involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological regulatory mechanisms. Adenosine has been proposed as an endogenous antiarrhythmic substance to prevent hypoxia/ischemia-induced arrhythmias. Adenosine (and its precursor, ATP) has been used in the therapy of various cardiac arrhythmias over the past six decades. Its primary indication is treatment of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, but it can be effective in other forms of supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias, like sinus node reentry based tachycardia, triggered atrial tachycardia, atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia, or ventricular tachycardia based on a cAMP-mediated triggered activity. The main advantage is the rapid onset and the short half life (1- 10 sec). Adenosine exerts its antiarrhythmic actions by activation of A1 adenosine receptors located in the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes, as well as in activated ventricular myocardium. However, adenosine can also elicit A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptor-mediated global side reactions (flushing, dyspnea, chest discomfort), but it may display also proarrhythmic actions mediated by primarily A1 adenosine receptors (e.g. bradyarrhythmia or atrial fibrillation). To avoid the non-specific global adverse reactions, A1 adenosine receptor- selective full agonists (tecadenoson, selodenoson, trabodenoson) have been developed, which agents are currently under clinical trial. During long-term administration with orthosteric agonists, adenosine receptors can be internalized and desensitized. To avoid desensitization, proarrhythmic actions, or global adverse reactions, partial A1 adenosine receptor agonists, like CVT-2759, were developed. In addition, the pharmacologically "silent" site- and event specific adenosinergic drugs, such as adenosine regulating agents and allosteric modulators, might provide attractive opportunity to increase the effectiveness of beneficial actions of adenosine

  5. Defense ADP Acquisition Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-30

    management issues. It also provides broad insight into the nature and causes of problems in the ADP acquisition process and offers several strategies ... strategy planning fails to provide the appropriate mission perspective. Curfent top-down strategic planning does not pro- vide the necessary guidance for the...recommendations presented here are more appropriately labeled strategies for change, rather than specific actions for improvement. (1) There Must Be a

  6. Cardiac cAMP: production, hydrolysis, modulation and detection

    PubMed Central

    Boularan, Cédric; Gales, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) modulates a broad range of biological processes including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractile function where it constitutes the main second messenger for β-adrenergic receptors' signaling to fulfill positive chronotropic, inotropic and lusitropic effects. A growing number of studies pinpoint the role of spatial organization of the cAMP signaling as an essential mechanism to regulate cAMP outcomes in cardiac physiology. Here, we will briefly discuss the complexity of cAMP synthesis and degradation in the cardiac context, describe the way to detect it and review the main pharmacological arsenal to modulate its availability. PMID:26483685

  7. Phosphate and ADP Differently Inhibit Coordinated Smooth Muscle Myosin Groups

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, Lennart; Balassy, Zsombor; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Mackey, Michael C.; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Actin filaments propelled in vitro by groups of skeletal muscle myosin motors exhibit distinct phases of active sliding or arrest, whose occurrence depends on actin length (L) within a range of up to 1.0 μm. Smooth muscle myosin filaments are exponentially distributed with ≈150 nm average length in vivo—suggesting relevance of the L-dependence of myosin group kinetics. Here, we found L-dependent actin arrest and sliding in in vitro motility assays of smooth muscle myosin. We perturbed individual myosin kinetics with varying, physiological concentrations of phosphate (Pi, release associated with main power stroke) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP, release associated with minor mechanical step). Adenosine triphosphate was kept constant at physiological concentration. Increasing [Pi] lowered the fraction of time for which actin was actively sliding, reflected in reduced average sliding velocity (ν) and motile fraction (fmot, fraction of time that filaments are moving); increasing [ADP] increased the fraction of time actively sliding and reduced the velocity while sliding, reflected in reduced ν and increased fmot. We introduced specific Pi and ADP effects on individual myosin kinetics into our recently developed mathematical model of actin propulsion by myosin groups. Simulations matched our experimental observations and described the inhibition of myosin group kinetics. At low [Pi] and [ADP], actin arrest and sliding were reflected by two distinct chemical states of the myosin group. Upon [Pi] increase, the probability of the active state decreased; upon [ADP] increase, the probability of the active state increased, but the active state became increasingly similar to the arrested state. PMID:25650929

  8. Phosphate and ADP differently inhibit coordinated smooth muscle myosin groups.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Lennart; Balassy, Zsombor; Zitouni, Nedjma B; Mackey, Michael C; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2015-02-03

    Actin filaments propelled in vitro by groups of skeletal muscle myosin motors exhibit distinct phases of active sliding or arrest, whose occurrence depends on actin length (L) within a range of up to 1.0 μm. Smooth muscle myosin filaments are exponentially distributed with ≈150 nm average length in vivo--suggesting relevance of the L-dependence of myosin group kinetics. Here, we found L-dependent actin arrest and sliding in in vitro motility assays of smooth muscle myosin. We perturbed individual myosin kinetics with varying, physiological concentrations of phosphate (Pi, release associated with main power stroke) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP, release associated with minor mechanical step). Adenosine triphosphate was kept constant at physiological concentration. Increasing [Pi] lowered the fraction of time for which actin was actively sliding, reflected in reduced average sliding velocity (ν) and motile fraction (fmot, fraction of time that filaments are moving); increasing [ADP] increased the fraction of time actively sliding and reduced the velocity while sliding, reflected in reduced ν and increased fmot. We introduced specific Pi and ADP effects on individual myosin kinetics into our recently developed mathematical model of actin propulsion by myosin groups. Simulations matched our experimental observations and described the inhibition of myosin group kinetics. At low [Pi] and [ADP], actin arrest and sliding were reflected by two distinct chemical states of the myosin group. Upon [Pi] increase, the probability of the active state decreased; upon [ADP] increase, the probability of the active state increased, but the active state became increasingly similar to the arrested state.

  9. Crystal Structures of the Adenylate Sensor from Fission Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Townley,R.; Shapiro, L.

    2007-01-01

    The 5'-AMP (adenosine monophosphate)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) coordinates metabolic function with energy availability by responding to changes in intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and AMP levels. Here we report crystal structures at 2.6 and 2.9 Angstrom resolution for ATP- and AMP-bound forms of a core {alpha}{beta}{gamma} adenylate-binding domain from the fission yeast AMPK homologue. ATP and AMP bind competitively to a single site in the {gamma} subunit, with their respective phosphate groups positioned near function-impairing mutants. Surprisingly, ATP binds without counter ions, amplifying its electrostatic effects on a critical regulatory region where all three subunits converge.

  10. Is a decrease in cyclic AMP a necessary and sufficient signal for maturation of amphibian oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gelerstein, S.; Shapira, H.; Dascal, N.; Yekuel, R.; Oron, Y.

    1988-05-01

    Acetylcholine rapidly lowered the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP in stage 5 and 6 Xenopus laevis oocytes. Acetylcholine alone did not induce oocyte maturation, though it did accelerate maturation induced by progesterone. The effect of acetylcholine on oocyte maturation was independent of extracellular calcium concentration. Adenosine increased cyclic AMP and abolished the progesterone-induced decrease in cyclic AMP levels in follicles and in denuded oocytes. This effect of adenosine was blocked by the Ra purinergic receptor antagonist, theophylline. Despite those effects, adenosine alone induced maturation in stage 6 oocytes and accelerated progesterone-induced maturation in both stage 5 and 6 cells. Adenosine also induced a significant increase in the rate of /sup 45/Ca efflux from oocytes in the presence and the absence of external calcium. We suggest that the activation of cell surface receptors involved in the release of calcium from cellular stores may induce or accelerate oocyte maturation independently of small changes in intracellular cyclic AMP concentration.

  11. Structures of the human poly (ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase catalytic domain confirm catalytic mechanism and explain inhibition by ADP-HPD derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Julie A; Bennett, Neil; Brassington, Claire; Durant, Stephen T; Hassall, Giles; Holdgate, Geoff; McAlister, Mark; Nissink, J Willem M; Truman, Caroline; Watson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is the only enzyme known to catalyse hydrolysis of the O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers, thereby reversing the effects of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. PARG deficiency leads to cell death whilst PARG depletion causes sensitisation to certain DNA damaging agents, implicating PARG as a potential therapeutic target in several disease areas. Efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors of PARG activity have until recently been hampered by a lack of structural information on PARG. We have used a combination of bio-informatic and experimental approaches to engineer a crystallisable, catalytically active fragment of human PARG (hPARG). Here, we present high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain of hPARG in unliganded form and in complex with three inhibitors: ADP-ribose (ADPR), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (hydroxymethyl)pyrrolidinediol (ADP-HPD) and 8-n-octyl-amino-ADP-HPD. Our structures confirm conservation of overall fold amongst mammalian PARG glycohydrolase domains, whilst revealing additional flexible regions in the catalytic site. These new structures rationalise a body of published mutational data and the reported structure-activity relationship for ADP-HPD based PARG inhibitors. In addition, we have developed and used biochemical, isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance assays to characterise the binding of inhibitors to our PARG protein, thus providing a starting point for the design of new inhibitors.

  12. Sustained antagonism of acute ethanol-induced ataxia following microinfusion of cyclic AMP and cpt-cAMP in the mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Dar, M Saeed

    2011-05-01

    Ataxia is a conspicuous physical manifestation of alcohol consumption in humans and laboratory animals. Previously we reported possible involvement of cAMP in ethanol-induced ataxia. We now report a sustained antagonism of ataxia due to multiple ethanol injections following intracerebellar (ICB) cAMP or cpt-cAMP microinfusion. Adenylyl cyclase drugs cAMP, cpt-cAMP, Sp-cAMP, Rp-cAMP, adenosine A₁ agonist, N⁶-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) and GABA(A) agonist muscimol were directly microinfused into the cerebellum of CD-1 male mice to evaluate their effect on ethanol (2 g/kg; i.p.) ataxia. Drug microinfusions were made via stereotaxically implanted stainless steel guide cannulas. Rotorod was used to evaluate the ethanol's ataxic response. Intracerebellar cAMP (0.1, 1, 10 fmol) or cpt-cAMP (0.5, 1, 2 fmol) 60 min before ethanol treatment, dose-dependently attenuated ethanol-induced ataxia in general agreement with previous observations. Intracerebellar microinfusion of cAMP (100 fmol) or cpt-cAMP (2 fmol) produced a sustained attenuation of ataxia following ethanol administration at 1, 4, 7 and 25 h or 31 h post-cAMP/cpt-cAMP microinfusion. At 31 h post-cAMP, the ataxic response of ethanol reappeared. Additionally, marked antagonism to the accentuation of ethanol-induced ataxia by adenosine A₁ and GABA(A) agonists, CHA (34 pmol) and muscimol (88 pmol), respectively, was noted 24h after cAMP and cpt-cAMP treatment. This indicated possible participation of AC/cAMP/PKA signaling in the co-modulation of ethanol-induced ataxia by A₁ adenosinergic and GABAergic systems. No change in normal motor coordination was noted when cAMP or cpt-cAMP microinfusion was followed by saline. Finally, Rp-cAMP (PKA inhibitor, 22 pmol) accentuated ethanol-induced ataxia and antagonized its attenuation by cAMP whereas Sp-cAMP (PKA activator, 22 pmol) produced just the opposite effects, further indicating participation of cAMP-dependent PKA downstream. Overall, the results support a role of

  13. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate and adenosine in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stagg, J; Smyth, M J

    2010-09-30

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is actively released in the extracellular environment in response to tissue damage and cellular stress. Through the activation of P2X and P2Y receptors, extracellular ATP enhances tissue repair, promotes the recruitment of immune phagocytes and dendritic cells, and acts as a co-activator of NLR family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes. The conversion of extracellular ATP to adenosine, in contrast, essentially through the enzymatic activity of the ecto-nucleotidases CD39 and CD73, acts as a negative-feedback mechanism to prevent excessive immune responses. Here we review the effects of extracellular ATP and adenosine on tumorigenesis. First, we summarize the functions of extracellular ATP and adenosine in the context of tumor immunity. Second, we present an overview of the immunosuppressive and pro-angiogenic effects of extracellular adenosine. Third, we present experimental evidence that extracellular ATP and adenosine receptors are expressed by tumor cells and enhance tumor growth. Finally, we discuss recent studies, including our own work, which suggest that therapeutic approaches that promote ATP-mediated activation of inflammasomes, or inhibit the accumulation of tumor-derived extracellular adenosine, may constitute effective new means to induce anticancer activity.

  14. ADP-Ribose Pyrophosphatase Reaction in Crystalline State Conducted by Consecutive Binding of Two Manganese(II) Ions as Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Furuike, Yoshihiko; Akita, Yuka; Miyahara, Ikuko; Kamiya, Nobuo

    2016-03-29

    Adenosine diphosphate ribose pyrophosphatase (ADPRase), a member of the Nudix family proteins, catalyzes the metal-induced and concerted general acid-base hydrolysis of ADP ribose (ADPR) into AMP and ribose-5'-phosphate (R5P). The ADPR-hydrolysis reaction of ADPRase from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtADPRase) requires divalent metal cations such as Mn(2+), Zn(2+), or Mg(2+) as cofactors. Here, we report the reaction pathway observed in the catalytic center of TtADPRase, based on cryo-trapping X-ray crystallography at atomic resolutions around 1.0 Å using Mn(2+) as the reaction trigger, which was soaked into TtADPRase-ADPR binary complex crystals. Integrating 11 structures along the reaction timeline, five reaction states of TtADPRase were assigned, which were ADPRase alone (E), the ADPRase-ADPR binary complex (ES), two ADPRase-ADPR-Mn(2+) reaction intermediates (ESM, ESMM), and the postreaction state (E'). Two Mn(2+) ions were inserted consecutively into the catalytic center of the ES-state and ligated by Glu86 and Glu82, which are highly conserved among the Nudix family, in the ESM- and ESMM-states. The ADPR-hydrolysis reaction was characterized by electrostatic, proximity, and orientation effects, and by preferential binding for the transition state. A new reaction mechanism is proposed, which differs from previous ones suggested from structure analyses with nonhydrolyzable substrate analogues or point-mutated ADPRases.

  15. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor I transcription by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in fetal rat bone cells through an element within exon 1: protein kinase A-dependent control without a consensus AMP response element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Thomas, M. J.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.

    1995-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a locally synthesized anabolic growth factor for bone. IGF-I synthesis by primary fetal rat osteoblasts (Ob) is stimulated by agents that increase the intracellular cAMP concentration, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Previous studies with Ob cultures demonstrated that PGE2 enhanced IGF-I transcription through selective use of IGF-I promoter 1, with little effect on IGF-I messenger RNA half-life. Transient transfection of Ob cultures with an array of promoter 1-luciferase reporter fusion constructs has now allowed localization of a potential cis-acting promoter element(s) responsible for cAMP-stimulated gene expression to the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of IGF-I exon 1, within a segment lacking a consensus cAMP response element. Our evidence derives from three principal observations: 1) a transfection construct containing only 122 nucleotides (nt) of promoter 1 and 328 nt of the 5'-UTR retained full PGE2-stimulated reporter expression; 2) maximal PGE2-driven reporter expression required the presence of nt 196 to 328 of exon 1 when tested within the context of IGF-I promoter 1; 3) cotransfection of IGF-I promoter-luciferase-reporter constructs with a plasmid encoding the alpha-isoform of the catalytic subunit of murine cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) produced results comparable to those seen with PGE2 treatment, whereas cotransfection with a plasmid encoding a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA that cannot bind cAMP blocked PGE2-induced reporter expression. Deoxyribonuclease I footprinting of the 5'-UTR of exon 1 demonstrated protected sequences at HS3A, HS3B, and HS3D, three of six DNA-protein binding sites previously characterized with rat liver nuclear extracts. Of these three regions, only the HS3D binding site is located within the functionally identified hormonally responsive segment of IGF-I exon 1. These results directly implicate PKA in the control of IGF-I gene transcription by PGE2 and identify a segment of

  16. Adenosine signaling promotes hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell emergence.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lili; Tamplin, Owen J; Chen, Michael J; Deng, Qing; Patterson, Shenia; Kim, Peter G; Durand, Ellen M; McNeil, Ashley; Green, Julie M; Matsuura, Shinobu; Ablain, Julien; Brandt, Margot K; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Huttenlocher, Anna; Daley, George Q; Ravid, Katya; Zon, Leonard I

    2015-05-04

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge from aortic endothelium via the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT). The molecular mechanisms that initiate and regulate EHT remain poorly understood. Here, we show that adenosine signaling regulates hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) development in zebrafish embryos. The adenosine receptor A2b is expressed in the vascular endothelium before HSPC emergence. Elevated adenosine levels increased runx1(+)/cmyb(+) HSPCs in the dorsal aorta, whereas blocking the adenosine pathway decreased HSPCs. Knockdown of A2b adenosine receptor disrupted scl(+) hemogenic vascular endothelium and the subsequent EHT process. A2b adenosine receptor activation induced CXCL8 via cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) and mediated hematopoiesis. We further show that adenosine increased multipotent progenitors in a mouse embryonic stem cell colony-forming assay and in embryonic day 10.5 aorta-gonad-mesonephros explants. Our results demonstrate that adenosine signaling plays an evolutionary conserved role in the first steps of HSPC formation in vertebrates.

  17. Fluorometric Determination of Adenosine Nucleotide Derivatives as Measures of the Microfouling, Detrital, and Sedimentary Microbial Biomass and Physiological Status

    PubMed Central

    Davis, William M.; White, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Adenosine, adenine, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), AMP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were recovered quantitatively from aqueous portions of lipid extracts of microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial communities. These could be detected quantitatively in the picomolar range by forming their 1-N6-etheno derivatives and analyzing by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Lipid extraction and subsequent analysis allowed the simultaneous measurement of the microbial community structure, total microbial biomass with the quantitative recovery of the adenine-containing cellular components, which were protected from enzymatic destruction. This extraction and fluorescent derivatization method showed equivalency with the luciferin-luciferase method for bacterial ATP measurements. Quick-freezing samples in the field with dry ice-acetone preserved the ATP and energy charge (a ratio of adenosine nucleotides) for analysis at remote laboratories. The metabolic lability of ATP in estuarine detrital and microfouling communities, as well as bacterial monocultures of constant biomass, showed ATP to be a precarious measure of biomass under some conditions. Combinations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides gave better correlations with microbial biomass measured as extractable lipid phosphate in the detrital and microfouling microbial communities than did ATP alone. Stresses such as anoxia or filtration are reflected in the rapid accumulation of intracellular adenosine and the excretion of adenosine and AMP into the surrounding milieu. Increases in AMP and adenosine may prove to be more sensitive indicators of metabolic status than the energy charge. PMID:16345633

  18. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) confers drug resistance against DNA damaging agents via PKAIA in CML cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ling-Yi; Kan, Wai-Ming

    2017-01-05

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates many vital functions such as metabolism, proliferation, differentiation and death. Depending on cell types and stimulators, cAMP could either promote or attenuate cell death. cAMP signal can be transduced by protein kinase A (PKA) and/or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC). In CML cells, cAMP may suppress their proliferation and enhance their differentiation. However, the role of cAMP on DNA damaging agent toxicity and the mechanism involved has not been studied. In this study, we studied the effect of cAMP on the sensitivity of CML cells to DNA damaging agents. We observed that forskolin (FSK) and dibutyryl-cAMP (DBcAMP) decreased cisplatin and etoposide-induced cell death in K562 cells. Moreover, PKA activator prevented K562 cells from DNA damaging agent-induced cell death while EPAC activator had no effect. Furthermore, we found that the PKA subtype, PKAIA, was involved in cAMP-attenuated resistance in K562 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that increased cAMP level confers CML cells to acquire a novel mechanism against DNA damaging agent toxicity via PKAIA. Thus, PKAIA inhibitor may be helpful in overcoming the resistance to DNA damaging agents in CML cells.

  19. Adenosine Signaling Increases Proinflammatory and Profibrotic Mediators through Activation of a Functional Adenosine 2B Receptor in Renal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Patrick F; Farrell, Francis X; Morel, Diane; Law, William; Murphy, Suzanne

    2016-07-01

    Interstitial renal fibrosis is a major pathophysiological manifestation of patients diagnosed with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), Diabetic Nephropathy (DN) and other inflammatory diseases. Adenosine signaling is an innate autocrine and paracrine cellular signaling pathway involving several key mediators that are elevated in the blood and kidneys of patients with DN. In these studies, we hypothesized that extracellular adenosine signals through one or more functional adenosine GPCRs on renal fibroblasts which increases profibrotic and proinflammatory mediators by inducing an activated fibroblast phenotype. Utilizing the renal fibroblast cell line NRK-49F, the presence and relative abundance of adenosine receptors (AR) A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 were quantified by RT-PCR. Under normal homeostatic conditions, only AR1 and AR2B were detected. The functionality of each receptor was then assessed by receptor specific pharmacological agonism and antagonism and assessed for modulation of the GPCR associated secondary messenger molecule, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Agonism of the AR2B receptor resulted in increased intracellular cAMP while agonism of the AR1 receptor inhibited cAMP modulation. Upon direct agonism of the AR2B receptor, transcripts for profibrotic and inflammatory mediators including SMA-α, IL-6, TGF-β, CTGF, and fibronectin were elevated between 2-4 fold. These data indicate that renal fibroblasts express a functional AR1 receptor that inhibits cAMP upon stimulation, leading to a functional AR2B receptor that increases cAMP upon stimulation and also induces an activated fibroblast phenotype resulting in increased fibrotic and inflammatory mediators.

  20. Molecular Bases of Catalysis and ADP-Ribose Preference of Human Mn2+-Dependent ADP-Ribose/CDP-Alcohol Diphosphatase and Conversion by Mutagenesis to a Preferential Cyclic ADP-Ribose Phosphohydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Cabezas, Alicia; Ribeiro, João Meireles; Rodrigues, Joaquim Rui; López-Villamizar, Iralis; Fernández, Ascensión; Canales, José; Pinto, Rosa María; Costas, María Jesús; Cameselle, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Among metallo-dependent phosphatases, ADP-ribose/CDP-alcohol diphosphatases form a protein family (ADPRibase-Mn-like) mainly restricted, in eukaryotes, to vertebrates and plants, with preferential expression, at least in rodents, in immune cells. Rat and zebrafish ADPRibase-Mn, the only biochemically studied, are phosphohydrolases of ADP-ribose and, somewhat less efficiently, of CDP-alcohols and 2´,3´-cAMP. Furthermore, the rat but not the zebrafish enzyme displays a unique phosphohydrolytic activity on cyclic ADP-ribose. The molecular basis of such specificity is unknown. Human ADPRibase-Mn showed similar activities, including cyclic ADP-ribose phosphohydrolase, which seems thus common to mammalian ADPRibase-Mn. Substrate docking on a homology model of human ADPRibase-Mn suggested possible interactions of ADP-ribose with seven residues located, with one exception (Cys253), either within the metallo-dependent phosphatases signature (Gln27, Asn110, His111), or in unique structural regions of the ADPRibase-Mn family: s2s3 (Phe37 and Arg43) and h7h8 (Phe210), around the active site entrance. Mutants were constructed, and kinetic parameters for ADP-ribose, CDP-choline, 2´,3´-cAMP and cyclic ADP-ribose were determined. Phe37 was needed for ADP-ribose preference without catalytic effect, as indicated by the increased ADP-ribose Km and unchanged kcat of F37A-ADPRibase-Mn, while the Km values for the other substrates were little affected. Arg43 was essential for catalysis as indicated by the drastic efficiency loss shown by R43A-ADPRibase-Mn. Unexpectedly, Cys253 was hindering for cADPR phosphohydrolase, as indicated by the specific tenfold gain of efficiency of C253A-ADPRibase-Mn with cyclic ADP-ribose. This allowed the design of a triple mutant (F37A+L196F+C253A) for which cyclic ADP-ribose was the best substrate, with a catalytic efficiency of 3.5´104 M-1s-1 versus 4´103 M-1s-1 of the wild type. PMID:25692488

  1. Molecular bases of catalysis and ADP-ribose preference of human Mn2+-dependent ADP-ribose/CDP-alcohol diphosphatase and conversion by mutagenesis to a preferential cyclic ADP-ribose phosphohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Alicia; Ribeiro, João Meireles; Rodrigues, Joaquim Rui; López-Villamizar, Iralis; Fernández, Ascensión; Canales, José; Pinto, Rosa María; Costas, María Jesús; Cameselle, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Among metallo-dependent phosphatases, ADP-ribose/CDP-alcohol diphosphatases form a protein family (ADPRibase-Mn-like) mainly restricted, in eukaryotes, to vertebrates and plants, with preferential expression, at least in rodents, in immune cells. Rat and zebrafish ADPRibase-Mn, the only biochemically studied, are phosphohydrolases of ADP-ribose and, somewhat less efficiently, of CDP-alcohols and 2´,3´-cAMP. Furthermore, the rat but not the zebrafish enzyme displays a unique phosphohydrolytic activity on cyclic ADP-ribose. The molecular basis of such specificity is unknown. Human ADPRibase-Mn showed similar activities, including cyclic ADP-ribose phosphohydrolase, which seems thus common to mammalian ADPRibase-Mn. Substrate docking on a homology model of human ADPRibase-Mn suggested possible interactions of ADP-ribose with seven residues located, with one exception (Cys253), either within the metallo-dependent phosphatases signature (Gln27, Asn110, His111), or in unique structural regions of the ADPRibase-Mn family: s2s3 (Phe37 and Arg43) and h7h8 (Phe210), around the active site entrance. Mutants were constructed, and kinetic parameters for ADP-ribose, CDP-choline, 2´,3´-cAMP and cyclic ADP-ribose were determined. Phe37 was needed for ADP-ribose preference without catalytic effect, as indicated by the increased ADP-ribose Km and unchanged kcat of F37A-ADPRibase-Mn, while the Km values for the other substrates were little affected. Arg43 was essential for catalysis as indicated by the drastic efficiency loss shown by R43A-ADPRibase-Mn. Unexpectedly, Cys253 was hindering for cADPR phosphohydrolase, as indicated by the specific tenfold gain of efficiency of C253A-ADPRibase-Mn with cyclic ADP-ribose. This allowed the design of a triple mutant (F37A+L196F+C253A) for which cyclic ADP-ribose was the best substrate, with a catalytic efficiency of 3.5´104 M-1s-1 versus 4´103 M-1s-1 of the wild type.

  2. A Temporal-Specific and Transient cAMP Increase Characterizes Odorant Classical Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cui, Wen; Smith, Andrew; Darby-King, Andrea; Harley, Carolyn W.; McLean, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are proposed to initiate learning in a wide variety of species. Here, we measure changes in cAMP in the olfactory bulb prior to, during, and following a classically conditioned odor preference trial in rat pups. Measurements were taken up to the point of maximal CREB phosphorylation in olfactory…

  3. Deficiency of terminal ADP-ribose protein glycohydrolase TARG1/C6orf130 in neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Reza; Morra, Rosa; Denise Appel, C; Tallis, Michael; Chioza, Barry; Jankevicius, Gytis; Simpson, Michael A; Matic, Ivan; Ozkan, Ege; Golia, Barbara; Schellenberg, Matthew J; Weston, Ria; Williams, Jason G; Rossi, Marianna N; Galehdari, Hamid; Krahn, Juno; Wan, Alexander; Trembath, Richard C; Crosby, Andrew H; Ahel, Dragana; Hay, Ron; Ladurner, Andreas G; Timinszky, Gyula; Williams, R Scott; Ahel, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation is a post-translational protein modification implicated in the regulation of a range of cellular processes. A family of proteins that catalyse ADP-ribosylation reactions are the poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerases (PARPs). PARPs covalently attach an ADP-ribose nucleotide to target proteins and some PARP family members can subsequently add additional ADP-ribose units to generate a PAR chain. The hydrolysis of PAR chains is catalysed by PAR glycohydrolase (PARG). PARG is unable to cleave the mono(ADP-ribose) unit directly linked to the protein and although the enzymatic activity that catalyses this reaction has been detected in mammalian cell extracts, the protein(s) responsible remain unknown. Here, we report the homozygous mutation of the c6orf130 gene in patients with severe neurodegeneration, and identify C6orf130 as a PARP-interacting protein that removes mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation on glutamate amino acid residues in PARP-modified proteins. X-ray structures and biochemical analysis of C6orf130 suggest a mechanism of catalytic reversal involving a transient C6orf130 lysyl-(ADP-ribose) intermediate. Furthermore, depletion of C6orf130 protein in cells leads to proliferation and DNA repair defects. Collectively, our data suggest that C6orf130 enzymatic activity has a role in the turnover and recycling of protein ADP-ribosylation, and we have implicated the importance of this protein in supporting normal cellular function in humans. PMID:23481255

  4. A High-Affinity Adenosine Kinase from Anopheles Gambiae

    SciTech Connect

    M Cassera; M Ho; E Merino; E Burgos; A Rinaldo-Matthis; S Almo; V Schramm

    2011-12-31

    Genome analysis revealed a mosquito orthologue of adenosine kinase in Anopheles gambiae (AgAK; the most important vector for the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa). P. falciparum are purine auxotrophs and do not express an adenosine kinase but rely on their hosts for purines. AgAK was kinetically characterized and found to have the highest affinity for adenosine (K{sub m} = 8.1 nM) of any known adenosine kinase. AgAK is specific for adenosine at the nucleoside site, but several nucleotide triphosphate phosphoryl donors are tolerated. The AgAK crystal structure with a bound bisubstrate analogue Ap{sub 4}A (2.0 {angstrom} resolution) reveals interactions for adenosine and ATP and the geometry for phosphoryl transfer. The polyphosphate charge is partly neutralized by a bound Mg{sup 2+} ion and an ion pair to a catalytic site Arg. The AgAK structure consists of a large catalytic core in a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich, and a small cap domain in contact with adenosine. The specificity and tight binding for adenosine arise from hydrogen bond interactions of Asn14, Leu16, Leu40, Leu133, Leu168, Phe168, and Thr171 and the backbone of Ile39 and Phe168 with the adenine ring as well as through hydrogen bond interactions between Asp18, Gly64, and Asn68 and the ribosyl 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups. The structure is more similar to that of human adenosine kinase (48% identical) than to that of AK from Toxoplasma gondii (31% identical). With this extraordinary affinity for AgAK, adenosine is efficiently captured and converted to AMP at near the diffusion limit, suggesting an important role for this enzyme in the maintenance of the adenine nucleotide pool. mRNA analysis verifies that AgAK transcripts are produced in the adult insects.

  5. Selective adenosine-5'-monophosphate uptake by water-compatible molecularly imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Breton, Florent; Delépée, Raphaël; Jégourel, Damien; Deville-Bonne, Dominique; Agrofoglio, Luigi A

    2008-06-02

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were prepared for adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP), a substrate of AMP-activated protein kinase. The template molecule was formed by the vinylphenylboronate diester of adenosine on which 5'-free hydroxide was protected by tert-butyldimethylsilyl group in order to mimic the steric hindrance of the phosphate moiety of AMP. Molecular imprinting was performed by complexing acrylamide and the template in a highly cross-linked polymer. MIPs were tested in batch experiments with aqueous samples of nucleotides and a number of parameters were investigated. The use of tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) was necessary to obtain a rebinding of nucleotides on MIP. The adsorption of AMP was optimal in 5 mM ammonium acetate buffer solution pH 9.5 for 30 min, with 30 mM of TBAH. The imprinted polymer was selective for AMP towards others nucleotides or deoxi analogues.

  6. Biochemical and molecular characterization of barley plastidial ADP-glucose transporter (HvBT1).

    PubMed

    Soliman, Atta; Ayele, Belay T; Daayf, Fouad

    2014-01-01

    In cereals, ADP-glucose transporter protein plays an important role in starch biosynthesis. It acts as a main gate for the transport of ADP-glucose, the main precursor for starch biosynthesis during grain filling, from the cytosol into the amyloplasts of endospermic cells. In this study, we have shed some light on the molecular and biochemical characteristics of barley plastidial ADP-glucose transporter, HvBT1. Phylogenetic analysis of several BT1 homologues revealed that BT1 homologues are divided into two distinct groups. The HvBT1 is assigned to the group that represents BT homologues from monocotyledonous species. Some members of this group mainly work as nucleotide sugar transporters. Southern blot analysis showed the presence of a single copy of HvBT1 in barley genome. Gene expression analysis indicated that HvBT1 is mainly expressed in endospermic cells during grain filling; however, low level of its expression was detected in the autotrophic tissues, suggesting the possible role of HvBT1 in autotrophic tissues. The cellular and subcellular localization of HvBT1 provided additional evidence that HvBT1 targets the amyloplast membrane of the endospermic cells. Biochemical characterization of HvBT1 using E. coli system revealed that HvBT1 is able to transport ADP-glucose into E. coli cells with an affinity of 614.5 µM and in counter exchange of ADP with an affinity of 334.7 µM. The study also showed that AMP is another possible exchange substrate. The effect of non-labeled ADP-glucose and ADP on the uptake rate of [α-32P] ADP-glucose indicated the substrate specificity of HvBT1 for ADP-glucose and ADP.

  7. Ameliorative effect of adenosine on hypoxia-reoxygenation injury in LLC-PK1, a porcine kidney cell line.

    PubMed

    Yonehana, T; Gemba, M

    1999-06-01

    We studied the effects of adenosine on injury caused by hypoxia and reoxygenation in LLC-PK1 cells. Lactate dehydrogenase and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase were released from cells exposed to hypoxia for 6 hr and then reoxygenation for 1 hr. The addition of adenosine at 100 microM to the medium before hypoxia began significantly decreased enzyme leakage into medium during both hypoxia and reoxygenation. The adenosine A1-receptor agonist, R(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine (R-PIA), at the concentration of 100 microM, did not affect enzyme release, but the adenosine A2-receptor agonist 2-p-[2-car-boxyethyl]phenethyl-amino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido-adenosi ne hydrochloride (CGS 21680) at the concentration of 100 nM, suppressed the injury caused by hypoxia and reoxygenation. There were decreases in cAMP contents and ATP levels in LLC-PK1 cells injured by hypoxia and reoxygenation. Adenosine (100 microM) restored ATP levels in the cells during reoxygenation. With adenosine, the intracellular cAMP level was increased prominently during reoxygenation. These results suggest that adenosine protects LLC-PK1 cells from injury caused by hypoxia and reoxygenation by increasing the intracellular cAMP level via adenosine A2 receptor.

  8. Effect of ionizing irradiation on the physiological activity of cyclic adenosine monophosphate on smooth muscle preparations.

    PubMed

    Schachinger, L; Michailov, M; Owusa Daaku, S; Prechter, I; Klöter, H; Schippel, C

    1982-01-01

    The effect of ionizing irradiation on the physiological activity of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in smooth muscle preparations from frog lung was studied. cAMP, given as dibutyryl salt (dib-cAMP) inhibited the radiation induced contractions of the muscle in a manner similar to the action of theophylline. In vitro irradiation of dib-cAMP resulted in an alteration of the chemical structure of this substance, i.e., formation of monobutyryl-cAMP and further derivatives as well as a decomposition of the purine structure. There was also a loss of the relaxing activity of irradiated cAMP on the muscle tone of frog lung preparations. The physiologically measured inactivation of dib-cAMP was far more pronounced than the chemical alteration. An inhibitory effect of the reaction products is postulated.

  9. Inhibition of AMP deaminase as therapeutic target in cardiovascular pathology.

    PubMed

    Zabielska, Magdalena A; Borkowski, Tomasz; Slominska, Ewa M; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2015-08-01

    AMP deaminase (AMPD; EC 3.5.4.6) catalyzes hydrolysis of the amino group from the adenine ring of AMP resulting in production of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) and ammonia. This reaction helps to maintain healthy cellular energetics by removing excess AMP that accumulates in energy depleted cells. Furthermore, AMPD permits the synthesis of guanine nucleotides from the larger adenylate pool. This enzyme competes with cytosolic 5'-nucleotidases (c5NT) for AMP. Adenosine, a product of c5NT is a vasodilator, antagonizes inotropic effects of catecholamines and exerts anti-platelet, anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activities. The ratio of AMPD/c5NT defines the amount of adenosine produced in adenine nucleotide catabolic pathway. Inhibition of AMPD could alter this ratio resulting in increased adenosine production. Besides the potential effect on adenosine production, elevation of AMP due to inhibition of AMPD could also lead to activation of AMP regulated protein kinase (AMPK) with myriad of downstream events including enhanced energetic metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis and cytoprotection. While the benefits of these processes are well appreciated in cells such as skeletal or cardiac myocytes its role in protection of endothelium could be even more important. Therapeutic use of AMPD inhibition has been limited due to difficulties with obtaining compounds with adequate characteristics. However, endothelium seems to be the easiest target as effective inhibition of AMPD could be achieved at much lower concentration than in the other types of cells. New generation of AMPD inhibitors has recently been established and its testing in context of endothelial and organ protection could provide important basic knowledge and potential therapeutic tools.

  10. Arginine-specific mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity on the surface of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, L E; Rendell, N B; Murray, S; Allport, J R; Lo, G; Kefalas, P; Taylor, G W; MacDermot, J

    1996-01-01

    An Arg-specific mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity on the surface of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes (PMNs) was confirmed by the use of diethylamino-(benzylidineamino)guanidine (DEA-BAG) as an ADP-ribose acceptor. Two separate HPLC systems were used to separate ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG from reaction mixtures, and its presence was confirmed by electrospray mass spectrometry. ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG was produced in the presence of PMNs, but not in their absence. Incubation of DEA-BAG with ADP-ribose (0.1-10 mM) did not yield ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG, which indicates that ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG formed in the presence of PMNs was not simply a product of a reaction between DEA-BAG and free ADP-ribose, due possibly to the hydrolysis of NAD+ by an NAD+ glycohydrolase. The assay of mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase with agmatine as a substrate was modified for intact PMNs, and the activity was found to be approx. 50-fold lower than that in rabbit cardiac membranes. The Km of the enzyme for NAD+ was 100.1 30.4 microM and the Vmax 1.4 0.2 pmol of ADP-ribosylagmatine/h per 10(6) cells. The enzyme is likely to be linked to the cell surface via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor, since incubation of intact PMNs with phosphoinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) led to a 98% decrease in mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity in the cells. Cell surface proteins were labelled after exposure of intact PMNs to [32P]NAD+. Their molecular masses were 79, 67, 46, 36 and 26 kDa. The time course for labelling was non-linear under these conditions over a period of 4 h. The labelled products were identified as mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins by hydrolysis with snake venom phosphodiesterase to yield 5'-AMP. PMID:8615841

  11. Adenosine diphosphate receptors on blood platelets: potential new targets for antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Rozalski, Marcin; Nocun, Marek; Watala, Cezary

    2005-01-01

    Platelets play a key role not only in physiological haemostasis, but also under pathological conditions such as thrombosis. Platelet activation may be initiated by a variety of agonists including thrombin, collagen, thromboxane or adenosine diphosphate (ADP). Although ADP is regarded as a weak agonist of blood platelets, it remains an important mediator of platelet activation evoked by other agonists, which induce massive ADP release from dense granules, where it occurs in molar concentrations. Thus, ADP action underlies a positive feedback that facilitates further platelet aggregation and leads to platelet plug formation. Additionally, ADP acts synergistically to other, even weak, agonists such as serotonin, adrenaline or chemokines. Blood platelets express two types of P2Y ADP receptors: P2Y(1) and P2Y(12). ADP-dependent platelet aggregation is initiated by the P2Y1 receptor, whereas P2Y(12) receptor augments the activating signal and promotes platelet release reaction. Stimulation of P2Y(12) is also essential for ADP-mediated complete activation of GPIIb-IIIa and GPIa-IIa, and further stabilization of platelet aggregates. The crucial role in blood platelet biology makes P2(Y12) an ideal candidate for pharmacological approaches for anti-platelet therapy.

  12. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate affects the response of human macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dubois-Colas, Nicolas; Petit-Jentreau, Laetitia; Barreiro, Luis B; Durand, Sylvère; Soubigou, Guillaume; Lecointe, Cécile; Klibi, Jihène; Rezaï, Keyvan; Lokiec, François; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Gicquel, Brigitte; Tailleux, Ludovic

    2014-09-01

    Granulomas are the hallmark of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. As the host fails to control the bacteria, the center of the granuloma exhibits necrosis resulting from the dying of infected macrophages. The release of the intracellular pool of nucleotides into the surrounding medium may modulate the response of newly infected macrophages, although this has never been investigated. Here, we show that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) indirectly modulates the expression of 272 genes in human macrophages infected with M. tuberculosis and that it induces their alternative activation. ATP is rapidly hydrolyzed by the ecto-ATPase CD39 into adenosine monophosphate (AMP), and it is AMP that regulates the macrophage response through the adenosine A2A receptor. Our findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for the purinergic pathway in the host response to M. tuberculosis. Dampening inflammation through signaling via the adenosine A2A receptor may limit tissue damage but may also favor bacterial immune escape.

  13. [Conformation study of cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate and some of its derivatives by means of circular dichroism].

    PubMed

    Tunitskaia, V L; Guliaev, N N; Poletaev, A I; Severin, E S

    1977-04-01

    Circular dichroism spectra of adenosine and cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) and their derivatives, having different substituents in 8-position of heterocycle, are studied, cAMP is suggested to have preferable anti-conformation in the solution, while its derivatives with substituents in 8-position of purine base are preferable in sin-conformation. An exception is 8-(beta aminoethylamine-)cAMP, which has an anti-conformation within pH range from 4.5 to 9.5. This is probably due to the formation of intra-molecular ionic bond between cyclophosphate group and aliphatic amino group of 8-position substituent.

  14. Intracellular tortuosity underlies slow cAMP diffusion in adult ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Mark; Lomas, Oliver; Jalink, Kees; Ford, Kerrie L.; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D.; Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Aims 3′,5′-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signals in the heart are often confined to concentration microdomains shaped by cAMP diffusion and enzymatic degradation. While the importance of phosphodiesterases (degradative enzymes) in sculpting cAMP microdomains is well established in cardiomyocytes, less is known about cAMP diffusivity (DcAMP) and factors affecting it. Many earlier studies have reported fast diffusivity, which argues against sharply defined microdomains. Methods and results [cAMP] dynamics in the cytoplasm of adult rat ventricular myocytes were imaged using a fourth generation genetically encoded FRET-based sensor. The [cAMP]-response to the addition and removal of isoproterenol (β-adrenoceptor agonist) quantified the rates of cAMP synthesis and degradation. To obtain a read out of DcAMP, a stable [cAMP] gradient was generated using a microfluidic device which delivered agonist to one half of the myocyte only. After accounting for phosphodiesterase activity, DcAMP was calculated to be 32 µm2/s; an order of magnitude lower than in water. Diffusivity was independent of the amount of cAMP produced. Saturating cAMP-binding sites with the analogue 6-Bnz-cAMP did not accelerate DcAMP, arguing against a role of buffering in restricting cAMP mobility. cAMP diffused at a comparable rate to chemically unrelated but similar sized molecules, arguing for a common physical cause of restricted diffusivity. Lower mitochondrial density and order in neonatal cardiac myocytes allowed for faster diffusion, demonstrating the importance of mitochondria as physical barriers to cAMP mobility. Conclusion In adult cardiac myocytes, tortuosity due to physical barriers, notably mitochondria, restricts cAMP diffusion to levels that are more compatible with microdomain signalling. PMID:27089919

  15. Cyclic AMP in prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Botsford, J L; Harman, J G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is found in a variety of prokaryotes including both eubacteria and archaebacteria. cAMP plays a role in regulating gene expression, not only for the classic inducible catabolic operons, but also for other categories. In the enteric coliforms, the effects of cAMP on gene expression are mediated through its interaction with and allosteric modification of a cAMP-binding protein (CRP). The CRP-cAMP complex subsequently binds specific DNA sequences and either activates or inhibits transcription depending upon the positioning of the complex relative to the promoter. Enteric coliforms have provided a model to explore the mechanisms involved in controlling adenylate cyclase activity, in regulating adenylate cyclase synthesis, and in performing detailed examinations of CRP-cAMP complex-regulated gene expression. This review summarizes recent work focused on elucidating the molecular mechanisms of CRP-cAMP complex-mediated processes. For other bacteria, less detail is known. cAMP has been implicated in regulating antibiotic production, phototrophic growth, and pathogenesis. A role for cAMP has been suggested in nitrogen fixation. Often the only data that support cAMP involvement in these processes includes cAMP measurement, detection of the enzymes involved in cAMP metabolism, or observed effects of high concentrations of the nucleotide on cell growth. PMID:1315922

  16. The ability of denbufylline to inhibit cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and its affinity for adenosine receptors and the adenosine re-uptake site.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, C. D.; Jackman, S. A.; Wilke, R.

    1989-01-01

    1. Denbufylline has been examined for its ability to inhibit cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isoenzymes from rat cardiac ventricle and cerebrum, as well as for its affinity for adenosine A1 and A2 receptors and the re-uptake site. For comparison, SK&F 94120, theophylline and 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX) were examined as phosphodiesterase inhibitors whilst N6-cyclohexyladenosine, R(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamido-adenosine, 2-nitrobenzylthioinosine, theophylline and IBMX were examined for their affinity for adenosine binding sites. 2. This investigation confirmed the presence of four phosphodiesterase activities in rat cardiac ventricle; in rat cerebrum only three were present. 3. Denbufylline selective inhibited one form of Ca2+-independent, low Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. The form inhibited was one of two present in cardiac ventricle and the sole one in cerebrum. This form was not inhibited by cyclic GMP. The inotropic agent SK&F 94120 selectively inhibited the form of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase which was inhibited by cyclic GMP present in cardiac ventricle. Theophylline and IBMX were relatively non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors. 4. Denbufylline was a less potent inhibitor of ligand binding to adenosine receptors than of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. This contrasted with theophylline, which had a higher affinity for adenosine receptors, and IBMX which showed no marked selectivity. Denbufylline, theophylline and IBMX all had a low affinity for the adenosine re-uptake site. 5. Denbufylline is being developed as an agent for the therapy of multi-infarct dementia. The selective inhibition of a particular low Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase may account for the activity of this compound. PMID:2474352

  17. Adenosine phosphonoacetic acid is slowly metabolized by NDP kinase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Morera, S; Pasti, C; Angusti, A; Solaroli, N; Véron, M; Janin, J; Manfredini, S; Deville-Bonne, D

    2005-11-01

    NDP kinase catalyzes the last step in the phosphorylation of nucleotides. It is also involved in the activation by cellular kinases of nucleoside analogs used in antiviral therapies. Adenosine phosphonoacetic acid, a close analog of ADP already proposed as an inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, was found to be a poor substrate for human NDP kinase, as well as a weak inhibitor with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 0.6 mM to be compared to 0.025 mM for ADP. The X-ray structure of a complex of adenosine phosphonoacetic acid and the NDP kinase from Dictyostelium was determined to 2.0 A resolution showing that the analog adopts a binding mode similar to ADP, but that no magnesium ion is present at the active site. As ACP may also interfere with other cellular kinases, its potential as a drug targeting NDP kinase or ribonucleotide reductase is likely to be limited due to strong side effects. The design of new molecules with a narrower specificity and a stronger affinity will benefit from the detailed knowledge of the complex ACP-NDP kinase.

  18. Release of Adenosine and ATP During Ischemia and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Nicholas; Frenguelli, Bruno G

    2009-01-01

    Eighty years ago Drury & Szent-Györgyi described the actions of adenosine, AMP (adenylic acid) and ATP (pyrophosphoric or diphosphoric ester of adenylic acid) on the mammalian cardiovascular system, skeletal muscle, intestinal and urinary systems. Since then considerable insight has been gleaned on the means by which these compounds act, not least of which in the distinction between the two broad classes of their respective receptors, with their many subtypes, and the ensuing diversity in cellular consequences their activation invokes. These myriad actions are of course predicated on the release of the purines into the extracellular milieu, but, surprisingly, there is still considerable ambiguity as to how this occurs in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review we summarise the release of ATP and adenosine during seizures and cerebral ischemia and discuss mechanisms by which the purines adenosine and ATP may be released from cells in the CNS under these conditions. PMID:20190959

  19. Correlation between blood adenosine metabolism and sleep in humans.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Muñoz, M; Hernández-Muñoz, R; Suárez, J; Vidrio, S; Yááñez, L; Aguilar-Roblero, R; Rosenthal, L; Villalobos, L; Fernández-Cancino, F; Drucker-Colín, R; Chagoya De Sanchez, V

    1999-01-01

    Blood adenosine metabolism, including metabolites and metabolizing enzymes, was studied during the sleep period in human volunteers. Searching for significant correlations among biochemical parameters found: adenosine with state 1 of slow-wave sleep (SWS); activity of 5'-nucleotidase with state 2 of SWS; inosine and AMP with state 3-4 of SWS; and activity of 5'-nucleotidase and lactate with REM sleep. The correlations were detected in all of the subjects that presented normal hypnograms, but not in those who had fragmented sleep the night of the experiment. The data demonstrate that it is possible to obtain information of complex brain operations such as sleep by measuring biochemical parameters in blood. The results strengthen the notion of a role played by adenosine, its metabolites and metabolizing enzymes, during each of the stages that constitute the sleep process in humans.

  20. Inhibitory action of certain cyclophosphate derivatives of cAMP on cAMP-dependent protein kinases.

    PubMed

    de Wit, R J; Hekstra, D; Jastorff, B; Stec, W J; Baraniak, J; Van Driel, R; Van Haastert, P J

    1984-07-16

    A series cAMP derivatives with modifications in the adenine, ribose and cyclophosphate moiety were screened for their binding affinity for the two types of cAMP-binding sites in mammalian protein kinase type 1. In addition, the activation of the kinase by these analogs was monitored. The binding data indicate that cAMP is bound to both sites in a comparable manner: the adenine appears to have no hydrogen-bond interactions with the binding sites, whereas the ribose may be bound by three hydrogen bonds involving the 2', 3' and 5' positions of cAMP. The binding data are not conclusive about the nature of the interaction with the exocyclic oxygen atoms on phosphorus, though a charge interaction seems to be absent. The cAMP molecule seems to be bound in the syn conformation. The results of activation experiments show that modifications in the adenine and ribose moiety do not affect the maximal activation level, while alteration of the two exocyclic oxygen atoms may result in a reduced maximal activation level and in one case, (Rp)-adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphorothioate [Rp-cAMPS], in total absence of activation even at concentrations at which the analog saturates both binding sites. Since occupancy of the cAMP-binding sites by this derivative apparently did not lead to activation of the enzyme, we examined whether this compound could antagonize the activation by cAMP. Indeed (Rp)-cAMPS was found to inhibit cAMP stimulated kinase activity at concentrations compatible to its binding affinity. Also with mammalian protein kinase type II (Rp)-cAMPS showed antagonistic activity, while with a cAMP-dependent protein kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum partial agonistic activity was observed. Previously a mechanism for activation of protein kinase type I was proposed involving a charge interaction between the equatorial exocyclic oxygen atom and the binding site [De Wit et. al. (1982) Eur. J. Biochem 122, 95-99]. This was based on measurements with impure preparations of (Rp)-cAMPS

  1. Molecular imprinting of AMP by an ionic-noncovalent dual approach.

    PubMed

    Breton, Florent; Delépée, Raphaël; Agrofoglio, Luigi A

    2009-10-01

    In order to mimic recognition properties of adenylate kinase, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were prepared for adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), a substrate of the enzyme. Different functional monomers interacting with the phosphate moiety were tested, and the MIP giving the best specific binding of AMP was composed with one equivalent of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and ten equivalents of acrylamide compared to AMP. Packed into solid phase cartridge, this polymer showed similar characteristics than the enzyme, since it was specific for AMP toward other nucleotides.

  2. Disaster Planning for Navy ADP Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    including contingency planning . The National Bureau of Standards enhanced FIPS publication 31 in 1981 with its Guidelines for ADP Contingency Planning ... National Bureau of Standards, Federal Information Processing Standards Publication 87, Guidelines for ADP Contingency Planning , 27 March 1981. 62 14... Planning , Contingency , ADP, Department of the Navy, Risk Analysis 2. AGSTAC? ;= a i bsie -f tem. eseeem d Idmu~r Wy 68ek semle.) ADP systems have become

  3. Identification of ATP diphosphohydrolase activity in human term placenta using a novel assay for AMP.

    PubMed

    Papamarcaki, T; Tsolas, O

    1990-09-03

    Human term placenta contains an ATP diphosphohydrolase activity which hydrolyses ATP to ADP and inorganic phosphate and ADP to AMP and a second mole of inorganic phosphate. The activity has a pH optimum between 8.0 and 8.5. Magnesium or calcium ions are required for maximum activity. Other nucleoside phosphates, p-nitrophenyl phosphate or sodium pyrophosphate, are not hydrolysed. The activity is not due to ATPases, or to myokinase, as determined by the use of inhibitors. NaF and NaN3 were found to inhibit strongly the activity thus identifying it as an ATP diphosphohydrolase. A sensitive enzymatic assay for measurement of AMP, one of the products of the reaction, was established, based on the strong inhibition of muscle fructose 1,6-biphosphatase by AMP. The range of the assay was 0.05-0.8 microM AMP. ATP diphosphohydrolase was found to have a rate of AMP production from ADP twice the rate from ATP. Under the same conditions, the assay for Pi release, on the other hand, gave velocities similar to each other for the two substrates. The activity appears to be identical to the ADP-hydrolysing activity in placenta reported by others.

  4. Adenosine receptor neurobiology: overview.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Lee, Chien-fei; Chern, Yijuang

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside that is distributed ubiquitously throughout the body as a metabolic intermediary. In the brain, adenosine functions as an important upstream neuromodulator of a broad spectrum of neurotransmitters, receptors, and signaling pathways. By acting through four G-protein-coupled receptors, adenosine contributes critically to homeostasis and neuromodulatory control of a variety of normal and abnormal brain functions, ranging from synaptic plasticity, to cognition, to sleep, to motor activity to neuroinflammation, and cell death. This review begun with an overview of the gene and genome structure and the expression pattern of adenosine receptors (ARs). We feature several new developments over the past decade in our understanding of AR functions in the brain, with special focus on the identification and characterization of canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways of ARs. We provide an update on functional insights from complementary genetic-knockout and pharmacological studies on the AR control of various brain functions. We also highlight several novel and recent developments of AR neurobiology, including (i) recent breakthrough in high resolution of three-dimension structure of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) in several functional status, (ii) receptor-receptor heterodimerization, (iii) AR function in glial cells, and (iv) the druggability of AR. We concluded the review with the contention that these new developments extend and strengthen the support for A1 and A2ARs in brain as therapeutic targets for neurologic and psychiatric diseases.

  5. Alteration of sodium, potassium-adenosine triphosphatase activity in rabbit ciliary processes by cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Delamere, N.A.; Socci, R.R.; King, K.L. )

    1990-10-01

    The response of sodium, potassium-adenosine triphosphatase (Na,K-ATPase) to cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase was examined in membranes obtained from rabbit iris-ciliary body. In the presence of the protein kinase together with 10(-5) M cAMP, Na,K-ATPase activity was reduced. No change in Na,K-ATPase activity was detected in response to the protein kinase without added cAMP. Likewise cAMP alone did not alter Na,K-ATPase activity. Reduction of Na,K-ATPase activity was also observed in the presence of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit. The response of the enzyme to the kinase catalytic subunit was also examined in membranes obtained from rabbit ciliary processes. In the presence of 8 micrograms/ml of the catalytic subunit, ciliary process Na,K-ATPase activity was reduced by more than 50%. To examine whether other ATPases were suppressed by the protein kinase, calcium-stimulated ATPase activity was examined; its activity was stimulated by the catalytic subunit. To test whether the response of the ciliary process Na,K-ATPase is unique, experiments were also performed using membrane preparations from rabbit lens epithelium or rabbit kidney; the catalytic subunit significantly reduced the activity of Na,K-ATPase from the kidney but not the lens. These Na,K-ATPase studies suggest that in the iris-ciliary body, cAMP may alter sodium pump activity. In parallel 86Rb uptake studies, we observed that ouabain-inhibitable potassium uptake by intact pieces of iris-ciliary body was reduced by exogenous dibutryl cAMP or by forskolin.

  6. Cyclic 3′,5′-Adenosine Monophosphate Phosphodiesterase of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, L. D.; Monard, D.; Rickenberg, H. V.

    1973-01-01

    The cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP) phosphodiesterase from Escherichia coli has been partially purified. The enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 30,000, a Michaelis constant of 0.5 mM c-AMP, and a pH optimum of 7. The partially purified enzyme requires for activity the presence of a reducing compound and of either iron or a protein which seemingly acts as iron carrier. PMID:4355491

  7. Quantitative effect and regulatory function of cyclic adenosine 5'-phosphate in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Narang, Atul

    2009-09-01

    Cyclic adenosine 5'-phosphate (cAMP) is a global regulator of gene expression in Escherichia coli. Despite decades of intensive study, the quantitative effect and regulatory function of cAMP remain the subjects of considerable debate. Here, we analyse the data in the literature to show that: (a) In carbon-limited cultures (including cultures limited by glucose), cAMP is at near-saturation levels with respect to expression of several catabolic promoters (including lac, ara and gal). It follows that cAMP receptor protein (CRP) cAMP-mediated regulation cannot account for the strong repression of these operons in the presence of glucose. (b) The cAMP levels in carbon-excess cultures are substantially lower than those observed in carbon-limited cultures under these conditions, the expression of catabolic promoters is very sensitive to variation of cAMP levels. (c)=CRPcAMP invariably activates the expression of catabolic promoters, but it appears to inhibit the expression of anabolic promoters. (d) These results suggest that the physiological function of cAMP is to maintain homeostatic energy levels. In carbon-limited cultures, growth is limited by the supply of energy; the cAMP levels therefore increase to enhance energy accumulation by activating the catabolic promoters and inhibiting the anabolic promoters. Conversely, in carbonexcess cultures, characterized by the availability of excess energy, the cAMP levels decrease in order to depress energy accumulation by inhibiting the catabolic promoters and activating the anabolic promoters.

  8. Revisiting cAMP signaling in the carotid body

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Ana R.; Holmes, Andrew P.; Conde, Sílvia V.; Gauda, Estelle B.; Monteiro, Emília C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic carotid body (CB) activation is now recognized as being essential in the development of hypertension and promoting insulin resistance; thus, it is imperative to characterize the chemotransduction mechanisms of this organ in order to modulate its activity and improve patient outcomes. For several years, and although controversial, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was considered an important player in initiating the activation of the CB. However, its relevance was partially displaced in the 90s by the emerging role of the mitochondria and molecules such as AMP-activated protein kinase and O2-sensitive K+ channels. Neurotransmitters/neuromodulators binding to metabotropic receptors are essential to chemotransmission in the CB, and cAMP is central to this process. cAMP also contributes to raise intracellular Ca2+ levels, and is intimately related to the cellular energetic status (AMP/ATP ratio). Furthermore, cAMP signaling is a target of multiple current pharmacological agents used in clinical practice. This review (1) provides an outline on the classical view of the cAMP-signaling pathway in the CB that originally supported its role in the O2/CO2 sensing mechanism, (2) presents recent evidence on CB cAMP neuromodulation and (3) discusses how CB activity is affected by current clinical therapies that modify cAMP-signaling, namely dopaminergic drugs, caffeine (modulation of A2A/A2B receptors) and roflumilast (PDE4 inhibitors). cAMP is key to any process that involves metabotropic receptors and the intracellular pathways involved in CB disease states are likely to involve this classical second messenger. Research examining the potential modification of cAMP levels and/or interactions with molecules associated with CB hyperactivity is currently in its beginning and this review will open doors for future explorations. PMID:25389406

  9. Adenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine modified with boron cluster pharmacophores as new classes of human blood platelet function modulators.

    PubMed

    Bednarska, Katarzyna; Olejniczak, Agnieszka B; Wojtczak, Błazej A; Sułowska, Zofia; Leśnikowski, Zbigniew J

    2010-05-03

    Novel types of adenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine derivatives containing boron clusters at positions C2', N6, or C8 were synthesized. The effect of these modified compounds on platelet function was studied. Modification of adenosine at the C2' position with a para-carborane cluster (C(2)B(10)H(11)) results in efficient inhibition of platelet function, including aggregation, protein secretion, and P-selectin expression induced by thrombin or ADP. These preliminary findings and the new chemistry proposed form the basis for the development of a new class of adenosine analogues that modulate human blood platelet activities.

  10. A reassessment of the modulatory role of cyclic AMP in catecholamine secretion by chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Parramón, M; González, M P; Oset-Gasque, M J

    1995-01-01

    1. The role of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) in the regulation of catecholamine (CA) secretion in chromaffin cells remains equivocal from previous studies. 2. In the present study the effect of this cyclic nucleotide on basal CA secretion, as well as on intracellular calcium and membrane potential has been examined. 3. Forskolin and the permeable cyclic AMP analogue, 8-(4-chlorphenylthio)-adenosine-3'-5' monophosphate cyclic (pClpcAMP), increased basal CA secretion in a dose-dependent manner. The EC50s were 0.43 +/- 0.10 microM for forskolin and 39 +/- 9 microM for pClpcAMP. Other agonists with adenylate cyclase activity such as stimulants of adenosine receptors, beta-adrenoceptors, GABAB receptors and intestinal vasoactive peptide (VIP), also increased basal CA secretion in a highly significant manner. However, when they were added together with forskolin, CA secretion was not affected although an additive increase in cyclic AMP levels was produced. 4. Statistical analysis of the correlation between cyclic AMP levels and CA secretion evoked by these cyclic AMP increasing compounds showed that a significant direct correlation between both parameters existed only when low levels of cyclic AMP were produced by secretagogue stimulation. When the increase in intracellular cyclic AMP concentrations exceeded approximately 8 times the basal cyclic AMP levels the correlation was not significant. These results indicate a dual dose-dependent effect of cyclic AMP on basal CA secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7881750

  11. Adenosine stimulates anabolic metabolism in developing castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Flörchinger, Martin; Zimmermann, Marc; Traub, Michaela; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2006-01-01

    In previous experiments it was shown that Castor-bean (Ricinus communis) endosperm releases carbohydrates, amino acids and nucleoside derivatives, which are subsequently imported into the developing cotyledons (Kombrink and Beevers in Plant Physiol 73:370-376, 1983). To investigate the importance of the most prominent nucleoside adenosine for the metabolism of growing Ricinus seedlings, we supplied adenosine to cotyledons of 5-days-old seedlings after removal of the endosperm. This treatment led to a 16% increase in freshweight of intact seedlings within 16 h, compared to controls. Using detached cotyledons, we followed uptake of radiolabelled adenosine and identified 40% of label in solubles (mostly ATP and ADP), 46% incorporation in RNA and 2.5% in DNA, indicating a highly active salvage pathway. About 7% of freshly imported adenosine entered the phloem, which indicates a major function of adenosine for cotyledon metabolism. Import and conversion of adenosine improved the energy content of cotyledons as revealed by a substantially increased ATP/ADP ratio. This effect was accompanied by slight increases in respiratory activity, decreased levels of hexose phosphates and increased levels of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and triose phosphates. These alterations indicate a stimulation of glycolytic flux by activation of phosphofructokinase, and accordingly we determined a higher activity of this enzyme. Furthermore the rate of [(14)C]-sucrose driven starch biosynthesis in developing castor-bean is significantly increased by feeding of adenosine. In conclusion, our data indicate that adenosine imported from mobilizing endosperm into developing castor-bean cotyledons fulfils an important function as it promotes anabolic reactions in this rapidly developing tissue.

  12. Temporal quantitative phosphoproteomics of ADP stimulation reveals novel central nodes in platelet activation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Florian; Geiger, Jörg; Gambaryan, Stepan; Solari, Fiorella A.; Dell’Aica, Margherita; Loroch, Stefan; Mattheij, Nadine J.; Mindukshev, Igor; Pötz, Oliver; Jurk, Kerstin; Burkhart, Julia M.; Fufezan, Christian; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Walter, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) enhances platelet activation by virtually any other stimulant to complete aggregation. It binds specifically to the G-protein–coupled membrane receptors P2Y1 and P2Y12, stimulating intracellular signaling cascades, leading to integrin αIIbβ3 activation, a process antagonized by endothelial prostacyclin. P2Y12 inhibitors are among the most successful antiplatelet drugs, however, show remarkable variability in efficacy. We reasoned whether a more detailed molecular understanding of ADP-induced protein phosphorylation could identify (1) critical hubs in platelet signaling toward aggregation and (2) novel molecular targets for antiplatelet treatment strategies. We applied quantitative temporal phosphoproteomics to study ADP-mediated signaling at unprecedented molecular resolution. Furthermore, to mimic the antagonistic efficacy of endothelial-derived prostacyclin, we determined how Iloprost reverses ADP-mediated signaling events. We provide temporal profiles of 4797 phosphopeptides, 608 of which showed significant regulation. Regulated proteins are implicated in well-known activating functions such as degranulation and cytoskeletal reorganization, but also in less well-understood pathways, involving ubiquitin ligases and GTPase exchange factors/GTPase-activating proteins (GEF/GAP). Our data demonstrate that ADP-triggered phosphorylation occurs predominantly within the first 10 seconds, with many short rather than sustained changes. For a set of phosphorylation sites (eg, PDE3ASer312, CALDAG-GEFISer587, ENSASer109), we demonstrate an inverse regulation by ADP and Iloprost, suggesting that these are central modulators of platelet homeostasis. This study demonstrates an extensive spectrum of human platelet protein phosphorylation in response to ADP and Iloprost, which inversely overlap and represent major activating and inhibitory pathways. PMID:28060719

  13. Cyclic AMP and the regeneration of retinal ganglion cell axons.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Mats; Harvey, Alan R

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we present a brief review of studies that have reported therapeutic benefits of elevated cAMP on plasticity and regeneration after injury to the central nervous system (CNS). We also provide new data on the cellular mechanisms by which elevation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) promotes cytokine driven regeneration of adult CNS axons, using the visual system as the experimental model. cAMP is a second messenger for many intracellular signalling pathways. Elevation of cAMP in the eye by intravitreal injection of the cell permeant analogue (8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate; CPT-cAMP), when added to recombinant ciliary neurotrophic factor (rCNTF), significantly enhances rCNTF-induced regeneration of adult rat retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons into peripheral nerve (PN) grafted onto transected optic nerve. This effect is mediated to some extent by protein kinase A (PKA) signalling, but CPT-cAMP also acts via PI3K/Akt signalling to reduce suppressor of cytokine signalling protein 3 (SOCS3) activity in RGCs. Another target for cAMP is the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), which can also mediate cAMP-induced axonal growth. Here we describe some novel results and discuss to what extent the pro-regenerative effects of CPT-cAMP on adult RGCs are mediated via Epac as well as via PKA-dependent pathways. We used the established PN-optic nerve graft model and quantified the survival and regenerative growth of adult rat RGCs after intravitreal injection of rCNTF in combination with a selective activator of PKA and/or a specific activator of Epac. Viable RGCs were identified by βIII-tubulin immunohistochemistry and regenerating RGCs retrogradely labelled and quantified after an injection of fluorogold into the distal end of the PN grafts, 4 weeks post-transplantation. The specific agonists of either PKA or Epac were both effective in enhancing the effects of rCNTF on RGC axonal regeneration, but interestingly, injections

  14. Adenosine and sleep

    SciTech Connect

    Yanik, G.M. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Behavioral and biochemical approaches have been used to determine the relative contribution of endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors to the sleep-wake cycle in the rat. Adenosine concentrations in specific areas of the rat brain were not affected by 24 hours of total sleep deprivation, or by 24 or 48 hours of REM sleep deprivation. In order to assess the effect of REM sleep deprivation on adenosine A/sub 1/ receptors, /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding was measured. The Bmax values for /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding to membrane preparations of the cortices and corpus striata from 48 hour REM sleep-deprived animals were increased 14.8% and 23%, respectively. These increases were not maintained following the cessation of sleep deprivation and recovered within 2 hours. The results of a 96 hour REM deprivation experiment were similar to those of the 48 hour REM sleep deprivation experiment. However, these increases were not evident in similar structures taken from stress control animals, and conclusively demonstrated that the changes in /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding resulted from REM sleep deprivation and not from stress.

  15. Purification and properties of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase from Crithidia fasciculata. Automodification and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of DNA topoisomerase I.

    PubMed

    Podestá, Dolores; García-Herreros, María I; Cannata, Joaquín J B; Stoppani, Andrés O M; Fernández Villamil, Silvia H

    2004-06-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase has been purified more than 160000-fold from Crithidia fasciculata. This is the first PARP isolated to apparent homogeneity from trypanosomatids. The purified enzyme absolutely required DNA for catalytic activity and histones enhanced it 2.5-fold, when the DNA:histone ratio was 1:1.3. The enzyme required no magnesium or any other metal ion cofactor. The apparent molecular mass of 111 kDa, determined by gel filtration would correspond to a dimer of two identical 55-kDa subunits. Activity was inhibited by nicotinamide, 3-aminobenzamide, theophylline, thymidine, xanthine and hypoxanthine but not by adenosine. The enzyme was localized to the cell nucleus. Our findings suggest that covalent poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of PARP itself or DNA topoisomerase I resulted in the inhibition of their activities and provide an initial biochemical characterization of this covalent post-translational modification in trypanosomatids.

  16. Regulatory T-Cell-Mediated Suppression of Conventional T-Cells and Dendritic Cells by Different cAMP Intracellular Pathways.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Cesar M; Jackson, Courtney M; Chougnet, Claire A

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) mediate their suppressive action by acting directly on conventional T-cells (Tcons) or dendritic cells (DCs). One mechanism of Treg suppression is the increase of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) levels in target cells. Tregs utilize cAMP to control Tcon responses, such as proliferation and cytokine production. Tregs also exert their suppression on DCs, diminishing DC immunogenicity by downmodulating the expression of costimulatory molecules and actin polymerization at the immunological synapse. The Treg-mediated usage of cAMP occurs through two major mechanisms. The first involves the Treg-mediated influx of cAMP in target cells through gap junctions. The second is the conversion of adenosine triphosphate into adenosine by the ectonucleases CD39 and CD73 present on the surface of Tregs. Adenosine then binds to receptors on the surface of target cells, leading to increased intracellular cAMP levels in these targets. Downstream, cAMP can activate the canonical protein kinase A (PKA) pathway and the exchange protein activated by cyclic AMP (EPAC) non-canonical pathway. In this review, we discuss the most recent findings related to cAMP activation of PKA and EPAC, which are implicated in Treg homeostasis as well as the functional alterations induced by cAMP in cellular targets of Treg suppression.

  17. Measurement of cAMP in an undergraduate teaching laboratory, using ALPHAscreen technology.

    PubMed

    Bartho, Joseph D; Ly, Kien; Hay, Debbie L

    2012-02-14

    Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is a cellular second messenger with central relevance to pharmacology, cell biology, and biochemistry teaching programs. cAMP is produced from adenosine triphosphate by adenylate cyclase, and its production is reduced or enhanced upon activation of many G protein-coupled receptors. Therefore, the measurement of cAMP serves as an indicator of receptor activity. Although there are many assays available for measuring cAMP, few are suitable for large class teaching, and even fewer seem to have been adapted for this purpose. Here, we describe the use of bead-based ALPHAscreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogenous Assay) technology for teaching a class of more than 300 students the practical aspects of detecting signal transduction. This technology is applicable to the measurement of many different signaling pathways. This resource is designed to provide a practical guide for instructors and a useful model for developing other classes using similar technologies.

  18. Adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate and adenosine 5'-pentaphosphate are synthesized by yeast acetyl coenzyme A synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Guranowski, A; Günther Sillero, M A; Sillero, A

    1994-01-01

    Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase (EC 6.2.1.1) catalyzes the synthesis of adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate (P4A) and adenosine 5'-pentaphosphate (p5A) from ATP and tri- or tetrapolyphosphate (P3 or P4), with relative velocities of 7:1, respectively. Of 12 nucleotides tested as potential donors of nucleotidyl moiety, only ATP, adenosine-5'-O-[3-thiotriphosphate], and acetyl-AMP were substrates, with relative velocities of 100, 62, and 80, respectively. The Km values for ATP, P3, and acetyl-AMP were 0.16, 4.7, and 1.8 mM, respectively. The synthesis of p4A could proceed in the absence of exogenous acetate but was stimulated twofold by acetate, with an apparent Km value of 0.065 mM. CoA did not participate in the synthesis of p4A (p5A) and inhibited the reaction (50% inhibitory concentration of 0.015 mM). At pH 6.3, which was optimum for formation of p4A (p5A), the rate of acetyl-CoA synthesis (1.84 mumol mg-1 min-1) was 245 times faster than the rate of synthesis of p4A measured in the presence of acetate. The known formation of p4A (p5A) in yeast sporulation and the role of acetate may therefore be related to acetyl-CoA synthetase. Images PMID:7910605

  19. Cell-cell contact mediates cAMP secretion in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Fontana, D R; Price, P L; Phillips, J C

    1991-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3':5' monophosphate (cAMP) and cell-cell contact regulate developmental gene expression in Dictyostelium discoideum. Developing D. discoideum amoebae synthesize and secrete cAMP following the binding of cAMP to their surface cAMP receptor, a response called cAMP signaling. We have demonstrated two responses of developing D. discoideum amoebae to cell-cell contact. Cell-cell contact elicits cAMP secretion and alters the amount of cAMP secreted in a subsequent cAMP signaling response. Depending upon experimental conditions, bacterial-amoebal contact and amoebal-amoebal contact can enhance or diminish the amount of cAMP secreted during a subsequent cAMP signaling response. We have hypothesized that cell-cell contact regulates D. discoideum development by altering cellular and extracellular levels of cAMP. To begin testing this hypothesis, these responses were further characterized. The two responses to cell-cell contact are independent, i.e., they can each occur in the absence of the other. The responses to cell-cell contact also have unique temperature dependences when compared to each other, cAMP signaling, and phagocytosis. This suggests that these four responses have unique steps in their transduction mechanisms. The secretion of cAMP in response to cell-cell contact appears to be a non-specific response; contact between D. discoideum amoebae and Enterobacter aerogenes, latex beads, or other amoebae elicits cAMP secretion. Despite the apparent similarities of the effects of bacterial-amoebal and amoebal-amoebal contact on the cAMP signaling response, this contact-induced response appears to be specific. Latex beads addition does not alter the magnitude of a subsequent cAMP signaling response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Presence of free cyclic AMP receptor protein and regulation of its level by cyclic AMP in neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Walter, U; Costa, M R; Breakefield, X O; Greengard, P

    1979-01-01

    Neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells of line 108CC-5 were found to contain high levels of soluble adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase activity and high levels of two specific cAMP receptor proteins, RI and RII. Treatment of the hybrid cells with dibutyryl cAMP increased the level of RI but did not significantly affect the level either of RII or of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity. The effect of dibutyryl cAMP could be mimicked by prostaglandin E1 and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, both of which are known to raise cAMP levels in neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells. Both in control as well as in dibutyryl cAMP-treated cells, RII but not RI was associated with cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Several lines of evidence suggest that RI represents the free regulatory subunit of type I cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The presence of this regulatory subunit as free cAMP receptor protein in neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells may be of significance with respect to the regulation of growth and differentiation in tumor cells. Images PMID:226964

  1. Rp-cAMPS Prodrugs Reveal the cAMP Dependence of First-Phase Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Schwede, Frank; Chepurny, Oleg G; Kaufholz, Melanie; Bertinetti, Daniela; Leech, Colin A; Cabrera, Over; Zhu, Yingmin; Mei, Fang; Cheng, Xiaodong; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; MacDonald, Patrick E; Genieser, Hans-G; Herberg, Friedrich W; Holz, George G

    2015-07-01

    cAMP-elevating agents such as the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. However, a debate has existed since the 1970s concerning whether or not cAMP signaling is essential for glucose alone to stimulate insulin secretion. Here, we report that the first-phase kinetic component of GSIS is cAMP-dependent, as revealed through the use of a novel highly membrane permeable para-acetoxybenzyl (pAB) ester prodrug that is a bioactivatable derivative of the cAMP antagonist adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer (Rp-cAMPS). In dynamic perifusion assays of human or rat islets, a step-wise increase of glucose concentration leads to biphasic insulin secretion, and under these conditions, 8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer, 4-acetoxybenzyl ester (Rp-8-Br-cAMPS-pAB) inhibits first-phase GSIS by up to 80%. Surprisingly, second-phase GSIS is inhibited to a much smaller extent (≤20%). Using luciferase, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays performed in living cells, we validate that Rp-8-Br-cAMPS-pAB does in fact block cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation. Novel effects of Rp-8-Br-cAMPS-pAB to block the activation of cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factors (Epac1, Epac2) are also validated using genetically encoded Epac biosensors, and are independently confirmed in an in vitro Rap1 activation assay using Rp-cAMPS and Rp-8-Br-cAMPS. Thus, in addition to revealing the cAMP dependence of first-phase GSIS from human and rat islets, these findings establish a pAB-based chemistry for the synthesis of highly membrane permeable prodrug derivatives of Rp-cAMPS that act with micromolar or even nanomolar potency to inhibit cAMP signaling in living cells.

  2. Preferential activation of excitatory adenosine receptors at rat hippocampal and neuromuscular synapses by adenosine formed from released adenine nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, R. A.; Correia-de-Sá, P.; Sebastião, A. M.; Ribeiro, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. In the present work, we investigated the action of adenosine originating from extracellular catabolism of adenine nucleotides, in two preparations where synaptic transmission is modulated by both inhibitory A1 and excitatory A(2a)-adenosine receptors, the rat hippocampal Schaffer fibres/CA1 pyramid synapses and the rat innervated hemidiaphragm. 2. Endogenous adenosine tonically inhibited synaptic transmission, since 0.5-2 u ml-1 of adenosine deaminase increased both the population spike amplitude (30 +/- 4%) and field excitatory post-synaptic potential (f.e.p.s.p.) slope (27 +/- 4%) recorded from hippocampal slices and the evoked [3H]-acetylcholine ([3H]-ACh) release from the motor nerve terminals (25 +/- 2%). 3. alpha, beta-Methylene adenosine diphosphate (AOPCP) in concentrations (100-200 microM) that almost completely inhibited the formation of adenosine from the extracellular catabolism of AMP, decreased population spike amplitude by 39 +/- 5% and f.e.p.s.p. slope by 32 +/- 3% in hippocampal slices and [3H]-ACh release from motor nerve terminals by 27 +/- 3%. 4. Addition of exogenous 5'-nucleotidase (5 u ml-1) prevented the inhibitory effect of AOPCP on population spike amplitude and f.e.p.s.p. slope by 43-57%, whereas the P2 antagonist, suramin (100 microM), did not modify the effect of AOPCP. 5. In both preparations, the effect of AOPCP resulted from prevention of adenosine formation since it was no longer evident when accumulation of extracellular adenosine was hindered by adenosine deaminase (0.5-2 u ml-1). The inhibitory effect of AOPCP was still evident when A1 receptors were blocked by 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (2.5-5 nM), but was abolished by the A2 antagonist, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (10 microM). 6. These results suggest that adenosine originating from catabolism of released adenine nucleotides preferentially activates excitatory A2 receptors in hippocampal CAI pyramid synapses and in phrenic motor nerve endings. PMID:8886406

  3. Negative feedback of extracellular ADP on ATP release in goldfish hepatocytes: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Chara, Osvaldo; Pafundo, Diego E; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J

    2010-06-21

    A mathematical model was built to account for the kinetic of extracellular ATP (ATPe) and extracellular ADP (ADPe) concentrations from goldfish hepatocytes exposed to hypotonicity. The model was based on previous experimental results on the time course of ATPe accumulation, ectoATPase activity, and cell viability [Pafundo et al., 2008]. The kinetic of ATPe is controlled by a lytic ATP flux, a non-lytic ATP flux, and ecto-ATPase activity, whereas ADPe kinetic is governed by a lytic ADP flux and both ecto-ATPase and ecto-ADPase activities. Non-lytic ATPe efflux was included as a diffusion equation modulated by ATPe activation (positive feedback) and ADPe inhibition (negative feedback). The model yielded physically meaningful and stable steady-state solutions, was able to fit the experimental time evolution of ATPe and simulated the concomitant kinetic of ADPe. According to the model during the first minute of hypotonicity the concentration of ATPe is mainly governed by both lytic and non-lytic ATP efflux, with almost no contribution from ecto-ATPase activity. Later on, ecto-ATPase activity becomes important in defining the time dependent decay of ATPe levels. ADPe inhibition of the non-lytic ATP efflux was strong, whereas ATPe activation was minimal. Finally, the model was able to predict the consequences of partial inhibition of ecto-ATPase activity on the ATPe kinetic, thus emulating the exposure of goldfish cells to hypotonic medium in the presence of the ATP analog AMP-PCP. The model predicts this analog to both inhibit ectoATPase activity and increase non-lytic ATP release.

  4. New insight into the binding modes of TNP-AMP to human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xinya; Huang, Yunyuan; Zhang, Rui; Xiao, San; Zhu, Shuaihuan; Qin, Nian; Hong, Zongqin; Wei, Lin; Feng, Jiangtao; Ren, Yanliang; Feng, Lingling; Wan, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) contains two binding sites, a substrate fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) active site and an adenosine monophosphate (AMP) allosteric site. The FBP active site works by stabilizing the FBPase, and the allosteric site impairs the activity of FBPase through its binding of a nonsubstrate molecule. The fluorescent AMP analogue, 2‧,3‧-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5‧-monophosphate (TNP-AMP) has been used as a fluorescent probe as it is able to competitively inhibit AMP binding to the AMP allosteric site and, therefore, could be used for exploring the binding modes of inhibitors targeted on the allosteric site. In this study, we have re-examined the binding modes of TNP-AMP to FBPase. However, our present enzyme kinetic assays show that AMP and FBP both can reduce the fluorescence from the bound TNP-AMP through competition for FBPase, suggesting that TNP-AMP binds not only to the AMP allosteric site but also to the FBP active site. Mutagenesis assays of K274L (located in the FBP active site) show that the residue K274 is very important for TNP-AMP to bind to the active site of FBPase. The results further prove that TNP-AMP is able to bind individually to the both sites. Our present study provides a new insight into the binding mechanism of TNP-AMP to the FBPase. The TNP-AMP fluorescent probe can be used to exam the binding site of an inhibitor (the active site or the allosteric site) using FBPase saturated by AMP and FBP, respectively, or the K247L mutant FBPase.

  5. Differences in G-actin containing bound ATP or ADP: the Mg2+-induced conformational change requires ATP.

    PubMed

    Frieden, C; Patane, K

    1985-07-16

    The role of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) in the Mg2+-induced conformational change of rabbit skeletal muscle G-actin has been investigated by comparing actin containing bound ADP with actin containing bound ATP. As previously described [Frieden, C. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 2882-2886], N-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine-labeled G-actin containing ATP undergoes a time-dependent Mg2+-induced fluorescence change that reflects a conformational change in the actin. Addition of Mg2+ to labeled G-actin containing ADP gives no fluorescence change, suggesting that the conformational change does not occur. The fluorescence change can be restored on the addition of ATP. Examination of the time courses of these experiments suggests that ATP must replace ADP prior to the Mg2+-induced change. The Mg2+-induced polymerization of actin containing ADP is extraordinarily slow compared to that of actin containing ATP. The lack of the Mg2+-induced conformational change, which is an essential step in the Mg2+-induced polymerization, is probably the cause for the very slow polymerization of actin containing ADP. On the other hand, at 20 degrees C, at pH 8, and in 2 mM Mg2+, the elongation rate from the slow growing end of an actin filament, measured by using the protein brevin to block growth at the fast growing end, is only 4 times slower for actin containing ADP than for actin containing ATP.

  6. 45 CFR 95.621 - ADP reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ASSISTANCE, MEDICAL ASSISTANCE AND STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS) Automatic Data Processing... appropriate ADP security requirements based on recognized industry standards or standards governing...

  7. 45 CFR 95.621 - ADP reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Physical security of ADP resources; (B) Equipment security to protect equipment from theft and unauthorized use; (C) Software and data security; (D) Telecommunications security; (E) Personnel security;...

  8. Studies of the cAMP mediated aggregation in Dictyostelium discoideum: receptor mediated activation of the adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Theibert, W.E.A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum, a eukaryotic amoeba of the cellular slime mold family, provides an interesting paradigm in developmental biology. During development, hundreds of thousands of cells aggregate to form a multicellular aggregate. Aggregation is mediated by chemotaxis and chemical signaling. Waves of adenosine 3'-5' cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) propagate through the monolayer and provide transient gradients for chemotaxis. The author has used a reversible inhibitor of the cAMP signaling response to demonstrate that adaptation to cAMP is independent of the activation of the adenylate cyclase and therefore is not caused by the rise in intracellular cAMP. Next, it is shown that adenosine inhibits the cAMP signaling response. Inhibition is rapid, reversible, and depends on the cAMP stimulus concentration. Then the specificity of the cAMP receptors which mediates signaling is determined and compared with the receptors which mediate chemotaxis, the cGMP response, and cAMP binding antagonism. The cAMP surface receptor has been identified by photoaffinity labeling intact cells with (/sup 32/P)-8-N/sub 3/-cAMP using an ammonium sulfate binding stabilization technique. The photoactivated ligand specifically labels a polypeptide, localized to the membrane fraction, which migrates as a closely spaced doublet on SDS Page.

  9. Rat cardiac myocyte adenosine transport and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, D.A.; Rovetto, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Based on the importance of myocardial adenosine and adenine nucleotide metabolism, the adenosine salvage pathway in ventricular myocytes was studied. Accurate estimates of transport rates, separate from metabolic fllux, were determined. Adenosine influx was constant between 3 and 60 s. Adenosine metabolism maintained intracellular adenosine concentrations < 10% of the extracellular adenosine concentrations and thus unidirectional influx could be measured. Myocytes transported adenosine via saturable and nonsaturable processes. A minimum estimate of the V/sub max/ of myocytic adenosine kinase indicated the saturable component of adenosine influx was independent of adenosine kinase activity. Saturable transport was inhibited by nitrobenzylthioinosine and verapamil. Extracellular adenosine taken up myocytes was rapidly phosphorylated to adenine taken up by myocytes was rapidly phosphorylated to adenine nucleotides. Not all extracellular adenosine, though, was phosphorylated on entering myocytes, since free, as opposed to protein-bound, intracellular adenosine was detected after digitonin extraction of cells in the presence of 1 mM ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid.

  10. Central or peripheral delivery of an adenosine A1 receptor agonist improves mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Katz, N K; Ryals, J M; Wright, D E

    2015-01-29

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, and a significant proportion of individuals suffer debilitating pain that significantly affects their quality of life. Unfortunately, symptomatic treatment options have limited efficacy, and often carry significant risk of systemic adverse effects. Activation of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) by the analgesic small molecule adenosine has been shown to have antinociceptive benefits in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The current study used a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy to determine the effect of diabetes on endogenous adenosine production, and if central or peripheral delivery of adenosine receptor agonists could alleviate signs of mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced using streptozocin in male A/J mice. Mechanical withdrawal thresholds were measured weekly to characterize neuropathy phenotype. Hydrolysis of AMP into adenosine by ectonucleotidases was determined in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord at 8 weeks post-induction of diabetes. AMP, adenosine and the specific A1R agonist, N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), were administered both centrally (intrathecal) and peripherally (intraplantar) to determine the effect of activation of adenosine receptors on mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Eight weeks post-induction, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased hydrolysis of extracellular AMP in the DRG; at this same time, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased mechanical withdrawal thresholds compared to nondiabetic controls. Central delivery AMP, adenosine and CPA significantly improved mechanical withdrawal thresholds in diabetic mice. Surprisingly, peripheral delivery of CPA also improved mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. This study provides new evidence that diabetes significantly affects endogenous AMP hydrolysis, suggesting that altered adenosine production could contribute to the development of

  11. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent vascular responses to purinergic agonists adenosine triphosphate and uridine triphosphate in the anesthetized mouse.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mrugeshkumar K; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism by which purinergic agonist adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP) decrease systemic arterial pressure in the anesthetized mouse was investigated. Intravenous injections of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP) produced dose-dependent decreases in systemic blood pressure in the mouse. The order of potency was ATP > UTP. Vasodilator responses to ATP and UTP were altered by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram. The vascular responses to ATP and UTP were not altered by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, a cGMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor, or a particular P2 receptor antagonist. These data suggest that ATP and UTP cause a decrease in systemic arterial pressure in the mouse via a cAMP-dependent pathway via a novel P2 receptor linked to adenylate cyclase and that nitric oxide release, prostaglandin synthesis, cGMP, and P2X1, P2Y1, and P2Y4 receptors play little or no role in the vascular effects of these purinergic agonists in the mouse.

  12. Host Cell Poly(ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase Is Crucial for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C.; Schlesinger, Mariana; Kevorkian, María L.; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Alonso, Guillermo D.; Fernández Villamil, Silvia H.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, has a complex life cycle which involves the invasion of mammalian host cells, differentiation and intracellular replication. Here we report the first insights into the biological role of a poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase in a trypanosomatid (TcPARG). In silico analysis of the TcPARG gene pointed out the conservation of key residues involved in the catalytic process and, by Western blot, we demonstrated that it is expressed in a life stage-dependant manner. Indirect immunofluorescence assays and electron microscopy using an anti-TcPARG antibody showed that this enzyme is localized in the nucleus independently of the presence of DNA damage or cell cycle stage. The addition of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors ADP-HPD (adenosine diphosphate (hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidinediol) or DEA (6,9-diamino-2-ethoxyacridine lactate monohydrate) to the culture media, both at a 1 µM concentration, reduced in vitro epimastigote growth by 35% and 37% respectively, when compared to control cultures. We also showed that ADP-HPD 1 µM can lead to an alteration in the progression of the cell cycle in hydroxyurea synchronized cultures of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Outstandingly, here we demonstrate that the lack of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activity in Vero and A549 host cells, achieved by chemical inhibition or iRNA, produces the reduction of the percentage of infected cells as well as the number of amastigotes per cell and trypomastigotes released, leading to a nearly complete abrogation of the infection process. We conclude that both, T. cruzi and the host, poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activities are important players in the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, emerging as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of Chagas’ disease. PMID:23776710

  13. Host cell poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase is crucial for Trypanosoma cruzi infection cycle.

    PubMed

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C; Schlesinger, Mariana; Kevorkian, María L; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Alonso, Guillermo D; Fernández Villamil, Silvia H

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas' disease, has a complex life cycle which involves the invasion of mammalian host cells, differentiation and intracellular replication. Here we report the first insights into the biological role of a poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase in a trypanosomatid (TcPARG). In silico analysis of the TcPARG gene pointed out the conservation of key residues involved in the catalytic process and, by Western blot, we demonstrated that it is expressed in a life stage-dependant manner. Indirect immunofluorescence assays and electron microscopy using an anti-TcPARG antibody showed that this enzyme is localized in the nucleus independently of the presence of DNA damage or cell cycle stage. The addition of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors ADP-HPD (adenosine diphosphate (hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidinediol) or DEA (6,9-diamino-2-ethoxyacridine lactate monohydrate) to the culture media, both at a 1 µM concentration, reduced in vitro epimastigote growth by 35% and 37% respectively, when compared to control cultures. We also showed that ADP-HPD 1 µM can lead to an alteration in the progression of the cell cycle in hydroxyurea synchronized cultures of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Outstandingly, here we demonstrate that the lack of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activity in Vero and A549 host cells, achieved by chemical inhibition or iRNA, produces the reduction of the percentage of infected cells as well as the number of amastigotes per cell and trypomastigotes released, leading to a nearly complete abrogation of the infection process. We conclude that both, T. cruzi and the host, poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activities are important players in the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, emerging as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of Chagas' disease.

  14. Adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate levels in Thermomonospora curvata during cellulase biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fennington, G.; Neubauer, D.; Stutzenberger, F.

    1983-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of cellulose requires the synergistic activity of at least three enzymes: exo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.91), endo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.4), and beta-glucosidase (EC3.2.1.21). Despite extensive studies on a variety of cellulolytic bacteria and fungi, the mechanism(s) regulating the biosynthesis of this inducible catabolic enzyme complex remains unknown. The intracellular concentrations of cyclic nucleotides such as adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) have been shown to play a major role in mediating catabolite repression of enzyme biosynthesis. The cAMP acts through a cAMP receptor protein (termed CRP or CAP) which is a dimer having two identical subunits each capable of binding one molecule of cAMP. The N-terminal domain of the CRP binds the cAMP while the C-terminal domain binds to DNA at the promotor region of a cAMP-dependent operon and stimulates transcription by promoting the formation of a preinitiation complex between RNA polymerase and the DNA. Intracellular cAMP levels in E. coli (the prototype organism for such studies) are influenced by the type and availability of carbon source used for growth. High intracellular cAMP levels should lead to higher concentrations of cAMP-CRP complexes which should increase the transcription rates for cAMP-dependent operons (such as the lac operon of beta-galactosidase) and indeed the differential rate of beta-galactosidase biosynthesis correlates to intracellular cAMP levels. In the case of cellulase, catabolite repression by glucose or other readily metabolizable compounds closely controls production in an apparently similar manner and therefore a correlation may exist between enzyme biosynthesis and intracellular cAMP levels. This communication describes the fluctuation in cAMP levels during cellulase induction and repression in the thermophilic actinomycete, Thermomonospora curvata.

  15. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2011-06-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP). sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems that are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells.

  16. Cyclic AMP Signaling: A Molecular Determinant of Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Knott, Eric P.; Assi, Mazen; Pearse, Damien D.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of axonal integrity during injury to the peripheral nerve system (PNS) sets into motion a cascade of responses that includes inflammation, Schwann cell mobilization, and the degeneration of the nerve fibers distal to the injury site. Yet, the injured PNS differentiates itself from the injured central nervous system (CNS) in its remarkable capacity for self-recovery, which, depending upon the length and type of nerve injury, involves a series of molecular events in both the injured neuron and associated Schwann cells that leads to axon regeneration, remyelination repair, and functional restitution. Herein we discuss the essential function of the second messenger, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP), in the PNS repair process, highlighting the important role the conditioning lesion paradigm has played in understanding the mechanism(s) by which cyclic AMP exerts its proregenerative action. Furthermore, we review the studies that have therapeutically targeted cyclic AMP to enhance endogenous nerve repair. PMID:25177696

  17. Cyclic AMP system in muscle tissue during prolonged hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antipenko, Y. A.; Bubeyev, Y. A.; Korovkin, B. F.; Mikhaleva, N. P.

    1980-01-01

    Components of the cyclic Adenosine-cyclic-35-monophosphate (AMP) system in the muscle tissue of white rats were studied during 70-75 days of hypokinesia, created by placing the animals in small booths which restricted their movements, and during the readaptation period. In the initial period, cyclic AMP levels and the activities of phosphodiesterase and adenylate cyclase in muscle tissue were increased. The values for these indices were roughly equal for controls and experimental animals during the adaptation period, but on the 70th day of the experiment cAMP levels dropped, phosphodiesterase activity increased, and the stimulative effect of epinephrine on the activity of adenylate cyclase decreased. The indices under study normalized during the readaptation period.

  18. ADP ribosylation adapts an ER chaperone response to short-term fluctuations in unfolded protein load

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Kseniya; Tomba, Giulia; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression programs that regulate the abundance of the chaperone BiP adapt the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to unfolded protein load. However, such programs are slow compared with physiological fluctuations in secreted protein synthesis. While searching for mechanisms that fill this temporal gap in coping with ER stress, we found elevated levels of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)–ribosylated BiP in the inactive pancreas of fasted mice and a rapid decline in this modification in the active fed state. ADP ribosylation mapped to Arg470 and Arg492 in the substrate-binding domain of hamster BiP. Mutations that mimic the negative charge of ADP-ribose destabilized substrate binding and interfered with interdomain allosteric coupling, marking ADP ribosylation as a rapid posttranslational mechanism for reversible inactivation of BiP. A kinetic model showed that buffering fluctuations in unfolded protein load with a recruitable pool of inactive chaperone is an efficient strategy to minimize both aggregation and costly degradation of unfolded proteins. PMID:22869598

  19. Compartmentation of cAMP signalling in cardiomyocytes in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Perera, R K; Nikolaev, V O

    2013-04-01

    3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger critically involved in the regulation of heart function. It has been shown to act in discrete subcellular signalling compartments formed by differentially localized receptors, phosphodiesterases and protein kinases. Cardiac diseases such as hypertrophy or heart failure are associated with structural and functional remodelling of these microdomains which leads to changes in cAMP compartmentation. In this review, we will discuss recent key findings which provided new insights into cAMP compartmentation in cardiomyocytes with a particular focus on its alterations in heart disease.

  20. The cAMP Pathway as Therapeutic Target in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Raker, Verena Katharina; Becker, Christian; Steinbrink, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide signaling molecules contribute to the regulation of cellular pathways. In the immune system, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is well established as a potent regulator of innate and adaptive immune cell functions. Therapeutic strategies to interrupt or enhance cAMP generation or effects have immunoregulatory potential in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Here, we provide an overview of the cyclic AMP axis and its role as a regulator of immune functions and discuss the clinical and translational relevance of interventions with these processes. PMID:27065076

  1. AMPED Program Overview

    ScienceCinema

    Gur, Ilan

    2016-07-12

    An overview presentation about ARPA-E's AMPED program. AMPED projects seek to develop advanced sensing, control, and power management technologies that redefine the way we think about battery management. Energy storage can significantly improve U.S. energy independence, efficiency, and security by enabling a new generation of electric vehicles. While rapid progress is being made in new battery materials and storage technologies, few innovations have emerged in the management of advanced battery systems. AMPED aims to unlock enormous untapped potential in the performance, safety, and lifetime of today's commercial battery systems exclusively through system-level innovations, and is thus distinct from existing efforts to enhance underlying battery materials and architectures.

  2. AMPED Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, Ilan

    2014-03-04

    An overview presentation about ARPA-E's AMPED program. AMPED projects seek to develop advanced sensing, control, and power management technologies that redefine the way we think about battery management. Energy storage can significantly improve U.S. energy independence, efficiency, and security by enabling a new generation of electric vehicles. While rapid progress is being made in new battery materials and storage technologies, few innovations have emerged in the management of advanced battery systems. AMPED aims to unlock enormous untapped potential in the performance, safety, and lifetime of today's commercial battery systems exclusively through system-level innovations, and is thus distinct from existing efforts to enhance underlying battery materials and architectures.

  3. Uridine adenosine tetraphosphate is a novel neurogenic P2Y1 receptor activator in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Durnin, Leonie; Hwang, Sung Jin; Kurahashi, Masaaki; Drumm, Bernard T.; Ward, Sean M.; Sasse, Kent C.; Sanders, Kenton M.; Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta N.

    2014-01-01

    Enteric purinergic motor neurotransmission, acting through P2Y1 receptors (P2Y1R), mediates inhibitory neural control of the intestines. Recent studies have shown that NAD+ and ADP ribose better meet criteria for enteric inhibitory neurotransmitters in colon than ATP or ADP. Here we report that human and murine colon muscles also release uridine adenosine tetraphosphate (Up4A) spontaneously and upon stimulation of enteric neurons. Release of Up4A was reduced by tetrodotoxin, suggesting that at least a portion of Up4A is of neural origin. Up4A caused relaxation (human and murine colons) and hyperpolarization (murine colon) that was blocked by the P2Y1R antagonist, MRS 2500, and by apamin, an inhibitor of Ca2+-activated small-conductance K+ (SK) channels. Up4A responses were greatly reduced or absent in colons of P2ry1−/− mice. Up4A induced P2Y1R–SK-channel–mediated hyperpolarization in isolated PDGFRα+ cells, which are postjunctional targets for purinergic neurotransmission. Up4A caused MRS 2500-sensitive Ca2+ transients in human 1321N1 astrocytoma cells expressing human P2Y1R. Up4A was more potent than ATP, ADP, NAD+, or ADP ribose in colonic muscles. In murine distal colon Up4A elicited transient P2Y1R-mediated relaxation followed by a suramin-sensitive contraction. HPLC analysis of Up4A degradation suggests that exogenous Up4A first forms UMP and ATP in the human colon and UDP and ADP in the murine colon. Adenosine then is generated by extracellular catabolism of ATP and ADP. However, the relaxation and hyperpolarization responses to Up4A are not mediated by its metabolites. This study shows that Up4A is a potent native agonist for P2Y1R and SK-channel activation in human and mouse colon. PMID:25341729

  4. The A2B adenosine receptor promotes Th17 differentiation via stimulation of dendritic cell IL-6.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jeffrey M; Kurtz, Courtney C; Black, Steven G; Ross, William G; Alam, Mohammed S; Linden, Joel; Ernst, Peter B

    2011-06-15

    Adenosine is an endogenous metabolite produced during hypoxia or inflammation. Previously implicated as an anti-inflammatory mediator in CD4(+) T cell regulation, we report that adenosine acts via dendritic cell (DC) A(2B) adenosine receptor (A(2B)AR) to promote the development of Th17 cells. Mouse naive CD4(+) T cells cocultured with DCs in the presence of adenosine or the stable adenosine mimetic 5'-(N-ethylcarboximado) adenosine resulted in the differentiation of IL-17- and IL-22-secreting cells and elevation of mRNA that encode signature Th17-associated molecules, such as IL-23R and RORγt. The observed response was similar when DCs were generated from bone marrow or isolated from small intestine lamina propria. Experiments using adenosine receptor antagonists and cells from A(2B)AR(-/-) or A(2A)AR(-/-)/A(2B)AR(-/-) mice indicated that the DC A(2B)AR promoted the effect. IL-6, stimulated in a cAMP-independent manner, is an important mediator in this pathway. Hence, in addition to previously noted direct effects of adenosine receptors on regulatory T cell development and function, these data indicated that adenosine also acts indirectly to modulate CD4(+) T cell differentiation and suggested a mechanism for putative proinflammatory effects of A(2B)AR.

  5. AMP-Conjugated Quantum Dots: Low Immunotoxicity Both In Vitro and In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Tongcheng; Li, Na; Liu, Lu; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-11-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are engineered nanoparticles that possess special optical and electronic properties and have shown great promise for future biomedical applications. In this work, adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), a small biocompatible molecular, was conjugated to organic QDs to produce hydrophilic AMP-QDs. Using macrophage J774A.1 as the cell model, AMP-QDs exhibited both prior imaging property and low toxicity, and more importantly, triggered limited innate immune responses in macrophage, indicating low immunotoxicity in vitro. Using BALB/c mice as the animal model, AMP-QDs were found to be detained in immune organs but did not evoke robust inflammation responses or obvious histopathological abnormalities, which reveals low immunotoxicity in vivo. This work suggests that AMP is an excellent surface ligand with low immunotoxicity, and potentially used in surface modification for more extensive nanoparticles.

  6. Cyclic AMP Mimics the Anti-ageing Effects of Calorie Restriction by Up-Regulating Sirtuin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuoran; Zhang, Lu; Liang, Yaru; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Zhiyu; Zhang, Lang; Fuji, Ryosuke; Mu, Wei; Li, Liyuan; Jiang, Junjun; Ju, Yong; Wang, Zhao

    2015-07-08

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) plays an important role in many biological processes as a second messenger, and cAMP treatment has been reported to extend the lifespan of wild-type Drosophila melanogaster. Our study showed that exogenous cAMP improved ageing-related phenotypes by increasing the protein level of Sirtuins, which prevented metabolic disorders to mimic the effect of calorie restriction. Experiments in vitro showed that cAMP directly bound to SIRT1 and SIRT3 and consequently increased their activity. These findings suggest that cAMP slows the ageing process and is a good candidate to mimic calorie restriction. Our research provides a promising therapeutic strategy to target metabolic disorder-induced ageing-related diseases.

  7. AMP as a low-energy charge signal autonomously initiates assembly of AXIN-AMPK-LKB1 complex for AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Lin; Guo, Huiling; Zhang, Chen-Song; Lin, Shu-Yong; Yin, Zhenyu; Peng, Yongying; Luo, Hui; Shi, Yuzhe; Lian, Guili; Zhang, Cixiong; Li, Mengqi; Ye, Zhiyun; Ye, Jing; Han, Jiahuai; Li, Peng; Wu, Jia-Wei; Lin, Sheng-Cai

    2013-10-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of metabolic homeostasis by sensing cellular energy status. AMPK is mainly activated via phosphorylation by LKB1 when cellular AMP/ADP levels are increased. However, how AMP/ADP brings about AMPK phosphorylation remains unclear. Here, we show that it is AMP, but not ADP, that drives AXIN to directly tether LKB1 to phosphorylate AMPK. The complex formation of AXIN-AMPK-LKB1 is greatly enhanced in glucose-starved or AICAR-treated cells and in cell-free systems supplemented with exogenous AMP. Depletion of AXIN abrogated starvation-induced AMPK-LKB1 colocalization. Importantly, adenovirus-based knockdown of AXIN in the mouse liver impaired AMPK activation and caused exacerbated fatty liver after starvation, underscoring an essential role of AXIN in AMPK activation. These findings demonstrate an initiating role of AMP and demonstrate that AXIN directly transmits AMP binding of AMPK to its activation by LKB1, uncovering the mechanistic route for AMP to elicit AMPK activation by LKB1.

  8. cAMP analogs and their metabolites enhance TREK-1 mRNA and K+ current expression in adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Enyeart, Judith A; Liu, Haiyan; Enyeart, John J

    2010-03-01

    bTREK-1 K(+) channels set the resting membrane potential of bovine adrenal zona fasciculata (AZF) cells and function pivotally in the physiology of cortisol secretion. Adrenocorticotropic hormone controls the function and expression of bTREK-1 channels through signaling mechanisms that may involve cAMP and downstream effectors including protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein 2 directly activated by cAMP (Epac2). Using patch-clamp and Northern blot analysis, we explored the regulation of bTREK-1 mRNA and K(+) current expression by cAMP analogs and several of their putative metabolites in bovine AZF cells. At concentrations sufficient to activate both PKA and Epac2, 8-bromoadenosine-cAMP enhanced the expression of both bTREK-1 mRNA and K(+) current. N(6)-Benzoyladenosine-cAMP, which activates PKA but not Epac, also enhanced the expression of bTREK-1 mRNA and K(+) current measured at times from 24 to 96 h. An Epac-selective cAMP analog, 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyl-cAMP (8CPT-2'-OMe-cAMP), potently stimulated bTREK-1 mRNA and K(+) current expression, whereas the nonhydrolyzable Epac activator 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyl-cAMP, Sp-isomer was ineffective. Metabolites of 8CPT-2'-OMe-cAMP, including 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine-5'-O-monophosphate and 8CPT-2'-OMe-adenosine, promoted the expression of bTREK-1 transcripts and ion current with a temporal pattern, potency, and effectiveness resembling that of the parent compound. Likewise, at low concentrations, 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (8CPT-cAMP; 30 microM) but not its nonhydrolyzable analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP, Sp-isomer, enhanced the expression of bTREK-1 mRNA and current. 8CPT-cAMP metabolites, including 8CPT-adenosine and 8CPT-adenine, also increased bTREK-1 expression. These results indicate that cAMP increases the expression of bTREK-1 mRNA and K(+) current through a cAMP-dependent but Epac2-independent mechanism. They further demonstrate that one or more metabolites of 8

  9. Thyroid expression of an A2 adenosine receptor transgene induces thyroid hyperplasia and hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Ledent, C; Dumont, J E; Vassart, G; Parmentier, M

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is the major intracellular second messenger of thyrotropin (TSH) action on thyroid cells. It stimulates growth as well as the function and differentiation of cultured thyrocytes. The adenosine A2 receptor, which activates adenylyl cyclase via coupling to the stimulating G protein (Gs), has been shown to promote constitutive activation of the cAMP cascade when transfected into various cell types. In order to test whether the A2 receptor was able to function similarly in vivo and to investigate the possible consequences of permanent adenylyl cyclase activation in thyroid cells, lines of transgenic mice were generated expressing the canine A2 adenosine receptor under control of the bovine thyroglobulin gene promoter. Thyroid-specific expression of the A2 adenosine receptor transgene promoted gland hyperplasia and severe hyperthyroidism causing premature death of the animals. The resulting goitre represents a model of hyperfunctioning adenomas: it demonstrates that constitutive activation of the cAMP cascade in such differentiated epithelial cells is sufficient to stimulate autonomous and uncontrolled function and growth. Images PMID:1371462

  10. Cocaine exposure modulates dopamine and adenosine signaling in the fetal brain

    PubMed Central

    Kubrusly, Regina C. C.; Bhide, Pradeep G.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to cocaine during the fetal period can produce significant lasting changes in the structure and function of the brain. Cocaine exerts its effects on the developing brain by blocking monoamine transporters and impairing monoamine receptor signaling. Dopamine is a major central target of cocaine. In a mouse model, we show that cocaine exposure from embryonic day 8 (E8) to E14 produces significant reduction in dopamine transporter activity, attenuation of dopamine D1-receptor function and upregulation of dopamine D2-receptor function. Cocaine’s effects on the D1-receptor are at the level of protein expression as well as activity. The cocaine exposure also produces significant increases in basal cAMP levels in the striatum and cerebral cortex. The increase in the basal cAMP levels was independent of dopamine receptor activity. In contrast, blocking the adenosine A2a receptor downregulated of the basal cAMP levels in the cocaine-exposed brain to physiological levels, suggesting the involvement of adenosine receptors in mediating cocaine’s effects on the embryonic brain. In support of this suggestion, we found that the cocaine exposure downregulated adenosine transporter function. We also found that dopamine D2- and adenosine A2a-receptors antagonize each other’s function in the embryonic brain in a manner consistent with their interactions in the mature brain. Thus, our data show that prenatal cocaine exposure produces direct effects on both the dopamine and adenosine systems. Furthermore, the dopamine D2 and adenosine A2a receptor interactions in the embryonic brain discovered in this study unveil a novel substrate for cocaine’s effects on the developing brain. PMID:19765599

  11. The Structural and Functional Characterization of Mammalian ADP-dependent Glucokinase*

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Jan P.; Goroncy, Alexander K.; Ronimus, Ron S.; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme-catalyzed phosphorylation of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate is a reaction central to the metabolism of all life. ADP-dependent glucokinase (ADPGK) catalyzes glucose-6-phosphate production, utilizing ADP as a phosphoryl donor in contrast to the more well characterized ATP-requiring hexokinases. ADPGK is found in Archaea and metazoa; in Archaea, ADPGK participates in a glycolytic role, but a function in most eukaryotic cell types remains unknown. We have determined structures of the eukaryotic ADPGK revealing a ribokinase-like tertiary fold similar to archaeal orthologues but with significant differences in some secondary structural elements. Both the unliganded and the AMP-bound ADPGK structures are in the “open” conformation. The structures reveal the presence of a disulfide bond between conserved cysteines that is positioned at the nucleotide-binding loop of eukaryotic ADPGK. The AMP-bound ADPGK structure defines the nucleotide-binding site with one of the disulfide bond cysteines coordinating the AMP with its main chain atoms, a nucleotide-binding motif that appears unique to eukaryotic ADPGKs. Key amino acids at the active site are structurally conserved between mammalian and archaeal ADPGK, and site-directed mutagenesis has confirmed residues essential for enzymatic activity. ADPGK is substrate inhibited by high glucose concentration and shows high specificity for glucose, with no activity for other sugars, as determined by NMR spectroscopy, including 2-deoxyglucose, the glucose analogue used for tumor detection by positron emission tomography. PMID:26555263

  12. Cardiovascular selectivity of adenosine receptor agonists in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Gerencer, R. Z.; Finegan, B. A.; Clanachan, A. S.

    1992-01-01

    1. In order to determine the relevance of adenosine (Ado) receptor classification obtained from in vitro methods to the cardiovascular actions of Ado agonists in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA, 400 fold A1-selective), 5'-N-ethyl-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA, A1 approximately A2) and 2-phenylaminoadenosine (PAA, 5 fold A2-selective) were compared in open-chest, fentanyl-pentobarbitone anaesthetized dogs. 2. Graded doses of CHA (10 to 1000 micrograms kg-1), NECA (0.5 to 100 micrograms kg-1) or PAA (0.1 to 20 micrograms kg-1) were administered intravenously and changes in haemodynamics and myocardial contractility were assessed 10 min following each dose. The effects of graded infusions of AMP (200 to 1000 micrograms kg-1 min-1) were also evaluated. 3. AMP and each of the Ado analogues (NECA > PAA > CHA) increased the systemic vascular conductance index (SVCI) in a dose-dependent manner and reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP). At doses causing similar increases in SVCI, these agonists caused (i) similar reflex increases in heart rate (HR) and cardiac index (CI) and decreases in AV conduction interval (AVi) and (ii) similar increases in coronary vascular conductance (CVC). 4. After cardiac autonomic blockade with atropine (0.2 mg kg-1) and propranolol (1 mg kg-1), AMP, CHA and PAA still increased SVCI and CVC and decreased MAP. CHA and PAA had no marked effects on HR, CI or AVi. As in the absence of cardiac autonomic blockade, equieffective vasodilator doses of CHA and PAA had identical effects on CVC, CI and AVi.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1467827

  13. [Interaction of adenosin-3',5'-cyclosulfate with adenosine-3'5'-cyclophosphate dependent protein kinase and phosphodiesterase].

    PubMed

    Severin, E S; Tkachuk, V A; Guliaev, N N

    1976-02-01

    Interaction of adenosine-3',5'-cyclosulphate (cAMS) cAMP analogue, having sulphur atom instead of phosphorus in a six-term cyclic system with pig brain proteinkinase and rabbit skeletal muscle phosphodiesterase is studied. The affinity of proteinkinase to cAMS was found to be in 25000 times lower than the affinity of cAMP, the affinity of cAMS to the active site of phosphodiesterase being high enough. It is suggested that in the regulatory subunit of proteinkinase positive kationic group participates in nucleotide binding by interacting with negative oxygen atom of six-term cyclophosphate system. There is no such a group in the active site of phospodiesterase, because the absence of negative charge in case of cAMS only slightly affects the constant of cAMS binding by phosphodiesterase.

  14. Modeling regulation of cardiac KATP and L-type Ca2+ currents by ATP, ADP, and Mg2+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michailova, Anushka; Saucerman, Jeffrey; Belik, Mary Ellen; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2005-01-01

    Changes in cytosolic free Mg(2+) and adenosine nucleotide phosphates affect cardiac excitability and contractility. To investigate how modulation by Mg(2+), ATP, and ADP of K(ATP) and L-type Ca(2+) channels influences excitation-contraction coupling, we incorporated equations for intracellular ATP and MgADP regulation of the K(ATP) current and MgATP regulation of the L-type Ca(2+) current in an ionic-metabolic model of the canine ventricular myocyte. The new model: 1), quantitatively reproduces a dose-response relationship for the effects of changes in ATP on K(ATP) current, 2), simulates effects of ADP in modulating ATP sensitivity of K(ATP) channel, 3), predicts activation of Ca(2+) current during rapid increase in MgATP, and 4), demonstrates that decreased ATP/ADP ratio with normal total Mg(2+) or increased free Mg(2+) with normal ATP and ADP activate K(ATP) current, shorten action potential, and alter ionic currents and intracellular Ca(2+) signals. The model predictions are in agreement with experimental data measured under normal and a variety of pathological conditions.

  15. cAMP enhances BMP2-signaling through PKA and MKP1-dependent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Ghayor, Chafik; Ehrbar, Martin; Miguel, Blanca San; Graetz, Klaus W.; Weber, Franz E.

    2009-04-03

    Recent studies suggest that the elevation of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and the activation of the protein kinase A regulate BMP-induced osteogenesis. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the enhancing effect of cAMP on BMP2 signaling were not completely revealed. In this study we investigated the effect of elevated cAMP level and PKA activation on the BMP2-induced osteoblastic differentiation in pluripotent C2C12 cells. Alkaline phosphatase activity and its mRNA were consistently induced by BMP2 treatment. The pretreatment of C2C12 cells with Forskolin, a cAMP generating agent, dbcAMP, an analogue of cAMP, or IBMX (3-isobutyl 1-methyl xanthine), and a nonspecific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases elicited further activation of alkaline phosphatase. Furthermore, elevated intracellular cAMP level increased BMP2-induced MKP1. On the other hand, BMP2-induced Erk phosphorylation (p44/p42) and cell proliferation were suppressed in the presence of cAMP. Thus, cAMP might enhance BMP2-induced osteoblastic differentiation by a MKP1-Erk-dependent mechanism.

  16. Neuronal activity promotes myelination via a cAMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Malone, Misti; Gary, Devin; Yang, In Hong; Miglioretti, Anna; Houdayer, Thierry; Thakor, Nitish; McDonald, John

    2013-06-01

    Neuronal activity promotes myelination in vivo and in vitro. However, the molecular events that mediate activity-dependent myelination are not completely understood. Seven, daily 1 h sessions of patterned electrical stimulation (ESTIM) promoted myelin segment formation in mixed cultures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and oligodendrocytes (OLs); the increase in myelination was frequency-dependent. Myelin segment formation was also enhanced following exposure of DRGs to ESTIM prior to OL addition, suggesting that ESTIM promotes myelination in a manner involving neuron-specific signaling. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in DRGs were increased three-fold following ESTIM, and artificially increasing cAMP mimicked the ability of ESTIM to promote myelination. Alternatively, inhibiting the cAMP pathway suppressed ESTIM-induced myelination. We used compartmentalized, microfluidic platforms to isolate DRG soma from OLs and assessed cell-type specific effects of ESTIM on myelination. A selective increase or decrease in DRG cAMP levels resulted in enhanced or suppressed myelination, respectively. This work describes a novel role for the cAMP pathway in neurons that results in enhanced myelination.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Study of Hsp90 and ADP: Hydrogen Bond Analysis for ADP Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kazutomo; Saito, Hiroaki; Nagao, Hidemi

    The contacts between the N-terminal domain of heat shock protein 90 (N-Hsp90) and ADP involve both direct and water-mediated hydrogen bonds in X-ray crystallographic structure. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of N-Hsp90 and ADP to investigate the changes of the hydrogen bond lengths during ADP dissociation. We show the difference between the hydrogen bonds in the crystal structure and MD simulations. Moreover, the N6 group of ADP does not contact with the Cγ group of Asp93, and the hydrogen bonds between Asn51 side chain and ADP are stable in the early step of ADP dissociation.

  18. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-2 - ADP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false ADP test. 1.401(k)-2 Section 1.401(k)-2 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(k)-2 ADP test. (a) Actual deferral percentage (ADP) test—(1) In general—(i) ADP test formula. A cash or deferred...

  19. The switching mechanism of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier explored by free-energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Adriana; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Klingenberg, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) of mitochondria has been an early example for elucidating the transport mechanism alternating between the external (c-) and internal (m-) states (M. Klingenberg, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1778 (2008) 1978-2021). An atomic resolution crystal structure of AAC is available only for the c-state featuring a three repeat transmembrane domain structure. Modeling of transport mechanism remained hypothetical for want of an atomic structure of the m-state. Previous molecular dynamics studies simulated the binding of ADP or ATP to the AAC remaining in the c-state. Here, a full description of the AAC switching from the c- to the m-state is reported using well-tempered metadynamics simulations. Free-energy landscapes of the entire translocation from the c- to the m-state, based on the gyration radii of the c- and m-gates and of the center of mass, were generated. The simulations revealed three free-energy basins attributed to the c-, intermediate- and m-states separated by activation barriers. These simulations were performed with the empty and with the ADP- and ATP-loaded AAC as well as with the poorly transported AMP and guanine nucleotides, showing in the free energy landscapes that ADP and ATP lowered the activation free-energy barriers more than the other substrates. Upon binding AMP and guanine nucleotides a deeper free-energy level stabilized the intermediate-state of the AAC2 hampering the transition to the m-state. The structures of the substrate binding sites in the different states are described producing a full picture of the translocation events in the AAC.

  20. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Masutani, Mitsuko; Fujimori, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    Cancer develops through diverse genetic, epigenetic and other changes, so-called 'multi-step carcinogenesis', and each cancer harbors different alterations and properties. Here in this article we review how poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is involved in multi-step and diverse pathways of carcinogenesis. Involvement of poly- and mono-ADP-ribosylation in carcinogenesis has been studied at molecular and cellular levels, and further by animal models and human genetic approaches. PolyADP-ribosylation acts in DNA damage repair response and maintenance mechanisms of genomic stability. Several DNA repair pathways, including base-excision repair and double strand break repair pathways, involve PARP and PARG functions. These care-taker functions of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation suggest that polyADP-ribosyation may mainly act in a tumor suppressive manner because genomic instability caused by defective DNA repair response could serve as a driving force for tumor progression, leading to invasion, metastasis and relapse of cancer. On the other hand, the new concept of 'synthetic lethality by PARP inhibition' suggests the significance of PARP activities for survival of cancer cells that harbor defects in DNA repair. Accumulating evidence has revealed that some PARP family molecules are involved in various signaling cascades other than DNA repair, including epigenetic and transcriptional regulations, inflammation/immune response and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, suggesting that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation both promotes and suppresses carcinogenic processes depending on the conditions. Expanding understanding of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation suggests that strategies to achieve cancer prevention targeting poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation for genome protection against life-long exposure to environmental carcinogens and endogenous carcinogenic stimuli.

  1. Purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, G C; Schmalstieg, F C; Trimmer, K B; Goldman, A S; Goldblum, R M

    1976-01-01

    Purine and pyrimidine metabolites were measured in erythrocytes, plasma, and urine of a 5-month-old infant with adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) deficiency. Adenosine and adenine were measured using newly devised ion exchange separation techniques and a sensitive fluorescence assay. Plasma adenosine levels were increased, whereas adenosine was normal in erythrocytes and not detectable in urine. Increased amounts of adenine were found in erythrocytes and urine as well as in the plasma. Erythrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate concentrations were normal, but adenosine triphosphate content was greatly elevated. Because of the possibility of pyrimidine starvation, pyrimidine nucleotides (pyrimidine coenzymes) in erythrocytes and orotic acid in urine were measured. Pyrimidine nucleotide concentrations were normal, while orotic acid was not detected. These studies suggest that the immune deficiency associated with adenosine deaminase deficiency may be related to increased amounts of adenine, adenosine, or adenine nucleotides. PMID:1066699

  2. Unhydrolyzable analogues of adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate demonstrating growth inhibition and differentiation in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yokozaki, H; Tortora, G; Pepe, S; Maronde, E; Genieser, H G; Jastorff, B; Cho-Chung, Y S

    1992-05-01

    A set of adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) analogues that combine exocyclic sulfur substitutions in the equatorial (Rp) or the axial (Sp) position of the cyclophosphate ring with modifications in the adenine base of cAMP were tested for their effect on the growth of HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells and LS-174T human colon carcinoma cells. Both diasteromeres of the phosphorothioate derivatives were growth inhibitory, exhibiting a concentration inhibiting 50% of cell proliferation of 3-100 microM. Among the analogues tested, Rp-8-Cl-cAMPS and Sp-8-Br-cAMPS were the two most potent. Rp-8-Cl-cAMPS was 5- to 10-fold less potent than 8-Cl-cAMP while Sp-8-Br-cAMPS was approximately 6-fold more potent than 8-Br-cAMP. The growth inhibition was not due to a block in a specific phase of the cell cycle or due to cytotoxicity. Rp-8-Cl-cAMPS enhanced its growth-inhibitory effect when added together with 8-Cl-cAMP and increased differentiation in combination with N6-benzyl-cAMP. The binding kinetics data showed that these Sp and Rp modifications brought about a greater decrease in affinity for Site B than for Site A of RI (the regulatory subunit of type I cAMP-dependent protein kinase) and a substantial decrease of affinity for Site A of RII (the regulatory subunit of type II protein kinase) but only a small decrease in affinity for Site B of RII, indicating the importance of the Site B binding of RII in the growth-inhibitory effect. These results show that the phosphorothioate analogues of cAMP are useful tools to investigate the mechanism of action of cAMP in growth control and differentiation and may have practical implication in the suppression of malignancy.

  3. Kinesin ATPase: Rate-Limiting ADP Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, David D.

    1988-09-01

    The ATPase rate of kinesin isolated from bovine brain by the method of S. A. Kuznetsov and V. I. Gelfand [(1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 8530-8534)] is stimulated 1000-fold by interaction with tubulin (turnover rate per 120-kDa peptide increases from ≈ 0.009 sec-1 to 9 sec-1). The tubulin-stimulated reaction exhibits no extra incorporation of water-derived oxygens over a wide range of ATP and tubulin concentrations, indicating that Pi release is faster than the reversal of hydrolysis. ADP release, however, is slow for the basal reaction and its release is rate limiting as indicated by the very tight ADP binding (Ki < 5 nM), the retention of a stoichiometric level of bound ADP through ion-exchange chromatography and dialysis, and the reversible labeling of a bound ADP by [14C]ATP at the steady-state ATPase rate as shown by centrifuge gel filtration and inaccessibility to pyruvate kinase. Tubulin accelerates the release of the bound ADP consistent with its activation of the net ATPase reaction. The detailed kinetics of ADP release in the presence of tubulin are biphasic indicating apparent heterogeneity with a fraction of the kinesin active sites being unaffected by tubulin.

  4. Adenosine-Associated Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi; Ghanem, Amyl; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside in every cell. Many critical treatments such as modulating irregular heartbeat (arrhythmias), regulation of central nervous system (CNS) activity, and inhibiting seizural episodes can be carried out using adenosine. Despite the significant potential therapeutic impact of adenosine and its derivatives, the severe side effects caused by their systemic administration have significantly limited their clinical use. In addition, due to adenosine’s extremely short half-life in human blood (less than 10 s), there is an unmet need for sustained delivery systems to enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. In this paper, various adenosine delivery techniques, including encapsulation into biodegradable polymers, cell-based delivery, implantable biomaterials, and mechanical-based delivery systems, are critically reviewed and the existing challenges are highlighted. PMID:26453156

  5. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in relation to inhibition of cervical smooth muscle activity in early pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Norström, A; Bryman, I

    1991-08-01

    Contractile activity was registered in strips of cervical tissue obtained by needle biopsy from women in the first trimester of pregnancy. Dibutyryl cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (5 x 10(-6) mol/l), isobutyryl methylxanthine (10(-4) mol/l), and forskolin (10(-5)-10(-4) mol/l), the latter two drugs known to increase the levels of endogenous cAMP, inhibited spontaneous muscle activity. The levels of tissue cAMP were determined in strips during relaxation induced by prostaglandin E2 or purified porcine relaxin and compared with cAMP levels in strips from the same women during contractile activity. Exposure to prostaglandin E2 but not to relaxin was followed by increased levels of cAMP. It is suggested that cAMP has a role as a second messenger in the prostaglandin E2-mediated relaxation of cervical smooth muscle.

  6. Phosphorylation potential and adenosine release during norepinephrine infusion in guinea pig heart

    SciTech Connect

    He, Miao-Xiang; Wangler, R.D.; Dillon, P.F.; Romig, G.D.; Sparks, H.V. )

    1987-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that adenosine released from isolated guinea pig hearts in response to norepinephrine is related to the cellular phosphorylation potential (PP;(ATP)/(ADP)(P{sub i})), where P{sub i} is inorganic phosphate. {sup 31}P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to measure the relative concentrations of P{sub i}, phosphocreatine (PCr), and ATP. After a control period, norepinephrine was infused for 20 min during which {sup 31}P-NMR spectra and samples of venous effluent were collected every minute. With norepinephrine infusion, PCr decreased rapidly to 72% of control by 8 min and then recovered to 80% of control for the remaining 12 min. ATP fell slowly to 70% of control over 20 min. P{sub i} increased to a peak at 2 min, then declined slowly to a steady state from 8 to 20 min. Adenosine release increased at 7 min and then slowly fell to a steady state from 10 to 20 min. There is hyperbolic relationship between adenosine release and PP; when the PP declines, a level is reached below which there is a rapid increase in adenosine release. These data support the hypothesis that adenosine release is regulated by the cellular PP as a closely related variable.

  7. cAMP and Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Valsecchi, Federica; Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier S.; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins has emerged as a major regulatory mechanism for metabolic adaptation. cAMP signaling and PKA phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins have just started to be investigated, and the presence of cAMP-generating enzymes and PKA inside mitochondria is still controversial. Here, we discuss the role of cAMP in regulating mitochondrial bioenergetics through protein phosphorylation and the evidence for soluble adenylyl cyclase as the source of cAMP inside mitochondria. PMID:23636265

  8. Endogenous ADP-ribosylation of elongation factor 2 in polyoma virus-transformed baby hamster kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fendrick, J.L.; Iglewski, W.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Polyoma virus-transformed baby hamster kidney (pyBHK) cells were cultured in medium containing ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate and 105 (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum. A {sup 32}P-labeled protein with an apparent molecular mass of 97 kDa was immunoprecipitated from cell lysates with antiserum to ADP-ribosylated elongation factor 2 (EF-2). The {sup 32}P labeling of the protein was enhanced by culturing cells in medium containing 2% serum instead of 10% serum. The {sup 32}P label was completely removed from the protein by treatment with snake venom phosphodiesterase and the digestion product was identified as ({sup 32}P)AMP, indicating the protein was mono-ADP-ribosylated. HPLC analysis of tryptic peptides of the {sup 32}P-labeled 97-kDa protein and purified EF-2, which was ADP-ribosylated in vitro with diphtheria toxin fragment A and ({sup 32}P)NAD, demonstrated an identical labeled peptide in the two proteins. The data strongly suggest that EF-2 was endogenously ADP-ribosylated in pyBHK cells. Maximum incorporation of radioactivity in EF-2 occurred by 12 hr and remained constant over the subsequent 12 hr. It was estimated that 30-35% of the EF-2 was ADP-ribosylated in cells cultured in medium containing 2% serum. When {sup 32}P-labeled cultures were incubated in medium containing unlabeled phosphate, the {sup 32}P label was lost from the EF-2 within 30 min.

  9. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate levels and activities of adenylate cyclase and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase in Pseudomonas and Bacteroides.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, L S; Hylemon, P B; Phibbs, P V

    1977-01-01

    A modified Gilman assay was used to determine the concentrations of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in rapidly filtered cells and in the culture filtrates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli K-12, and Bacteroides fragilis. In P. aeruginosa cultures, levels of cAMP in the filtrate increased with the culture absorbance (3.5 to 19.8 X 10(-9) M) but did not vary significantly with the carbon source used to support growth. Intracellular concentrations (0.8 to 3.2 X 10(-5) M) were substantially higher and did not vary appreciably during growth or with carbon source. Sodium cAMP (5 mM) failed to reverse the catabolite repression of inducible glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) synthesis caused by the addition of 10 mM succinate. Exogenous cAMP also had no discernible effect on the catabolite repression control of inducible mannitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.67). P. aeruginosa was found to contain both soluble cAMP phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.17) and membrane-associated adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) activity, and these were compared to the activities detected in crude extracts of E. coli. B. fragilis crude cell extracts contain neither of these enzyme activities, and little or no cAMP was detected in cells or culture filtrates of this anaerobic bacterium. PMID:187575

  10. Adenosine promotes burst activity in guinea-pig geniculocortical neurones through two different ionic mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Pape, H C

    1992-01-01

    1. The mechanisms of action of adenosine were examined in relay neurones of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGND) using in vitro intracellular recording techniques in guinea-pig thalamic slices. 2. Adenosine hyperpolarized LGND relay neurones due to an increase in membrane potassium conductance. The K+ currents generated by near maximal stimulation of adenosine and GABAB receptors were non-additive. 3. Blockage of membrane K+ conductances by barium unmasked a second response to adenosine; an outward shift of the current versus voltage relationship negative to -65 mV associated with an increase in membrane input resistance. The beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline elicited an inward current in the same voltage range, which was inhibited and replaced by an outward current during activation of adenosine receptors. The effects of adenosine were due to a decrease in amplitude and rate of rise of the hyperpolarization-activated cation current, Ih. Maximal reduction by 66% of Ih amplitude occurred near the range of half-activation. 4. Both responses to adenosine were mimicked by the selective A1 receptor agonists N6-cyclopentyladenosine or N6-cyclohexyladenosine, and reversibly blocked by the selective A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX). 5. The decrease in Ih by adenosine may be mediated by an inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity and hence a decrease in the intracellular level of cyclic AMP, since local application of the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine imitated the decrease in Ih. Local application of the adenylyl cyclase stimulant forskolin or 8-bromo-cyclic AMP resulted in an enhancement in Ih, and forskolin inhibited the action on Ih evoked by N6-cyclopentyladenosine. 6. The adenosine-induced effects interacted with the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of LGND neurones in that (i) the hyperpolarization due to an increase in K+ conductance inhibited single spike firing and promoted calcium

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase—an energy sensor that regulates all aspects of cell function

    PubMed Central

    Hardie, D. Grahame

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of energy status that maintains cellular energy homeostasis. It arose very early during eukaryotic evolution, and its ancestral role may have been in the response to starvation. Recent work shows that the kinase is activated by increases not only in AMP, but also in ADP. Although best known for its effects on metabolism, AMPK has many other functions, including regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and disposal, autophagy, cell polarity, and cell growth and proliferation. Both tumor cells and viruses establish mechanisms to down-regulate AMPK, allowing them to escape its restraining influences on growth. PMID:21937710

  12. Nucleotide Binding Site Communication in Arabidopsis thaliana Adenosine 5;-Phosphosulfate Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-08-31

    Adenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of adenosine 3{prime}-phosphate 5{prime}-phosphosulfate (PAPS), which is an essential metabolite for sulfur assimilation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Using APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana, we examine the energetics of nucleotide binary and ternary complex formation and probe active site features that coordinate the order of ligand addition. Calorimetric analysis shows that binding can occur first at either nucleotide site, but that initial interaction at the ATP/ADP site was favored and enhanced affinity for APS in the second site by 50-fold. The thermodynamics of the two possible binding models (i.e. ATP first versus APS first) differs and implies that active site structural changes guide the order of nucleotide addition. The ligand binding analysis also supports an earlier suggestion of intermolecular interactions in the dimeric APSK structure. Crystallographic, site-directed mutagenesis, and energetic analyses of oxyanion recognition by the P-loop in the ATP/ADP binding site and the role of Asp136, which bridges the ATP/ADP and APS/PAPS binding sites, suggest how the ordered nucleotide binding sequence and structural changes are dynamically coordinated for catalysis.

  13. Novel adenosine 3 prime ,5 prime -cyclic monophosphate dependent protein kinases in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.P.C.; Volcani, B.E. )

    1989-08-08

    Two novel adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinases have been isolated from the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis. The kinases, designated I and II, are eluted from DEAE-Sephacel at 0.10 and 0.15 M NaCl. They have a high affinity for cAMP and are activated by micromolar cAMP. They exhibit maximal activity at 5 mM Mg{sup 2+} and pH 8 with the preferred phosphate donor ATP and phosphate acceptor histone H1. They phosphorylate sea urchin sperm histone H1 on a single serine site in the sequence Arg-Lys-Gly-Ser({sup 32}P)-Ser-Asn-Ala-Arg and have an apparent M{sub r} of 75,000 as determined by gel filtration and sucrose density sedimentation. In the kinase I preparation a single protein band with an apparent M{sub r} of about 78,000 is photolabeled with 8-azido({sup 32}P)cAMP and is also phosphorylated with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in a cAMP-dependent manner, after autoradiography following sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. The rate of phosphorylation of the 78,000-dalton band is independent of the enzyme concentration. The results indicate that (i) these diatom cAMP-dependent protein kinases are monomeric proteins, possessing both the cAMP-binding regulatory and catalytic domains on the same polypeptide chain, (ii) the enzymes do not dissociate into smaller species upon activation by binding cAMP, and (iii) self-phosphorylation of the enzymes by an intrapeptide reaction is cAMP dependent. The two diatom cAMP kinases are refractory to the heat-stable protein kinase modulator from rabbit muscle, but they respond differently to proteolytic degradation and to inhibition by arachidonic acid and several microbial alkaloids.

  14. Adenosine receptor targets for pain.

    PubMed

    Sawynok, J

    2016-12-03

    The main focus for the development of adenosine targets as analgesics to date has been A1Rs due to its antinociceptive profile in various preclinical pain models. The usefulness of systemic A1R agonists may be limited by other effects (cardiovascular, motor), but enhanced selectivity for pain might occur with partial agonists, potent and highly selective agonists, or allosteric modulators. A2AR agonists exhibit some peripheral pronociceptive effects, but also act on immune cells to suppress inflammation and on spinal glia to suppress pain signaling and may be useful for inflammatory and neuropathic pain. A2BR agonists exhibit peripheral proinflammatory effects on immune cells, but also spinal antinociceptive effects similar to A2AR agonists. A3Rs are now demonstrated to produce antinociception in several preclinical neuropathic pain models, with mechanistic actions on glial cells, and may be useful for neuropathic pain. Endogenous adenosine levels can be augmented by inhibition of metabolism (via adenosine kinase) or increased generation (via nucleotidases), and these approaches have implications for pain. Endogenous adenosine contributes to antinociception by several pharmacological agents, herbal remedies, acupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, exercise, joint mobilization, and water immersion via spinal and/or peripheral effects, such that this system appears to constitute a major pain regulatory system. Finally, caffeine inhibits A1-, A2A- and A3Rs with similar potency, and dietary caffeine intake will need attention in trials of: (a) agonists and/or modulators acting at these receptors, (b) some pharmacological and herbal analgesics, and (c) manipulations that enhance endogenous adenosine levels, all of which are inhibited by caffeine and/or A1R antagonists in preclinical studies. All adenosine receptors have effects on spinal glial cells in regulating nociception, and gender differences in the involvement of such cells in chronic

  15. Raman gains of ADP and KDP crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hai-Liang; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Wang, Bo; Xu, Xin-Guang; Wang, Zheng-Ping; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Li-Song; Liu, Bao-An; Chai, Xiang-Xu

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the Raman gain coefficients of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are measured. By using a pump source of a 30-ps, 532-nm laser, the gain coefficients of ADP and KDP are 1.22 cm/GW, and 0.91 cm/GW, respectively. While for a 20-ps, 355-nm pump laser, the gain coefficients of these two crystals are similar, which are 1.95 cm/GW for ADP and 1.86 for KDP. The present results indicate that for ultra-violet frequency conversion, the problem of stimulated Raman scattering for ADP crystal will not be more serious than that for KDP crystal. Considering other advantages such the larger nonlinear optical coefficient, higher laser damage threshold, and lower noncritical phase-matching temperature, it can be anticipated that ADP will be a powerful competitor to KDP in large aperture, high energy third-harmonic generation or fourth-harmonic generation applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51323002 and 51402173), the Independent Innovation Foundation of Shandong University, China (Grant Nos. IIFSDU and 2012JC016), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, China (Grant No. NCET-10-0552), the Fund from the Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. 2014BB07), and the Natural Science Foundation for Distinguished Young Scholar of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. JQ201218).

  16. Genetically-encoded tools for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems.

    PubMed

    Paramonov, Valeriy M; Mamaeva, Veronika; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is one of the principal second messengers downstream of a manifold of signal transduction pathways, including the ones triggered by G protein-coupled receptors. Not surprisingly, biochemical assays for cAMP have been instrumental for basic research and drug discovery for decades, providing insights into cellular physiology and guiding pharmaceutical industry. However, despite impressive track record, the majority of conventional biochemical tools for cAMP probing share the same fundamental shortcoming-all the measurements require sample disruption for cAMP liberation. This common bottleneck, together with inherently low spatial resolution of measurements (as cAMP is typically analyzed in lysates of thousands of cells), underpin the ensuing limitations of the conventional cAMP assays: (1) genuine kinetic measurements of cAMP levels over time in a single given sample are unfeasible; (2) inability to obtain precise information on cAMP spatial distribution and transfer at subcellular levels, let alone the attempts to pinpoint dynamic interactions of cAMP and its effectors. At the same time, tremendous progress in synthetic biology over the recent years culminated in drastic refinement of our toolbox, allowing us not only to bypass the limitations of conventional assays, but to put intracellular cAMP life-span under tight control-something, that seemed scarcely attainable before. In this review article we discuss the main classes of modern genetically-encoded tools tailored for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems. We examine the capabilities and weaknesses of these different tools in the context of their operational characteristics and applicability to various experimental set-ups involving living cells, providing the guidance for rational selection of the best tools for particular needs.

  17. SHC1 sensitizes cancer cells to the 8-Cl-cAMP treatment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ki Young; Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Jeong Seon; Ahn, Young-Ho; Hong, Seung Hwan

    2015-08-07

    8-Chloro-cyclic AMP (8-Cl-cAMP) is a cyclic AMP analog that induces growth inhibition and apoptosis in a broad spectrum of cancer cells. Previously, we found that 8-Cl-cAMP-induced growth inhibition is mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as well as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). To identify downstream mediators of the 8-Cl-cAMP signaling, we performed co-immunoprecipitation combined with mass spectrometry using the anti-AMPK or p38 MAPK antibodies. Through this approach, SHC1 was identified as one of the binding partners of p38 MAPK. SHC1 phosphorylation was suppressed by 8-Cl-cAMP in HeLa and MCF7 cancer cells, which was mediated by its metabolites, 8-Cl-adenosine and 8-Cl-ATP; however, 8-Cl-cAMP showed no effect on SHC1 phosphorylation in normal human fibroblasts. SHC1 siRNA induced AMPK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and growth inhibition in cancer cells, and SHC1 overexpression re-sensitized human foreskin fibroblasts to the 8-Cl-cAMP treatment. SHC1 phosphorylation was unaffected by Compound C (an AMPK inhibitor) and SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor), which suggests that SHC1 is upstream of AMPK and p38 MAPK in the 8-Cl-cAMP-stimulated signaling cascade. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that SHC1 functions as a sensor during the 8-Cl-cAMP-induced growth inhibition in SHC1-overexpressing cancer cells.

  18. Genetically-encoded tools for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems

    PubMed Central

    Paramonov, Valeriy M.; Mamaeva, Veronika; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is one of the principal second messengers downstream of a manifold of signal transduction pathways, including the ones triggered by G protein-coupled receptors. Not surprisingly, biochemical assays for cAMP have been instrumental for basic research and drug discovery for decades, providing insights into cellular physiology and guiding pharmaceutical industry. However, despite impressive track record, the majority of conventional biochemical tools for cAMP probing share the same fundamental shortcoming—all the measurements require sample disruption for cAMP liberation. This common bottleneck, together with inherently low spatial resolution of measurements (as cAMP is typically analyzed in lysates of thousands of cells), underpin the ensuing limitations of the conventional cAMP assays: (1) genuine kinetic measurements of cAMP levels over time in a single given sample are unfeasible; (2) inability to obtain precise information on cAMP spatial distribution and transfer at subcellular levels, let alone the attempts to pinpoint dynamic interactions of cAMP and its effectors. At the same time, tremendous progress in synthetic biology over the recent years culminated in drastic refinement of our toolbox, allowing us not only to bypass the limitations of conventional assays, but to put intracellular cAMP life-span under tight control—something, that seemed scarcely attainable before. In this review article we discuss the main classes of modern genetically-encoded tools tailored for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems. We examine the capabilities and weaknesses of these different tools in the context of their operational characteristics and applicability to various experimental set-ups involving living cells, providing the guidance for rational selection of the best tools for particular needs. PMID:26441653

  19. Double electron–electron resonance reveals cAMP-induced conformational change in HCN channels

    PubMed Central

    Zagotta, William N.; Stoll, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Binding of 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) to hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels regulates their gating. cAMP binds to a conserved intracellular cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) in the channel, increasing the rate and extent of activation of the channel and shifting activation to less hyperpolarized voltages. The structural mechanism underlying this regulation, however, is unknown. We used double electron–electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy to directly map the conformational ensembles of the CNBD in the absence and presence of cAMP. Site-directed, double-cysteine mutants in a soluble CNBD fragment were spin-labeled, and interspin label distance distributions were determined using DEER. We found motions of up to 10 Å induced by the binding of cAMP. In addition, the distributions were narrower in the presence of cAMP. Continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance studies revealed changes in mobility associated with cAMP binding, indicating less conformational heterogeneity in the cAMP-bound state. From the measured DEER distributions, we constructed a coarse-grained elastic-network structural model of the cAMP-induced conformational transition. We find that binding of cAMP triggers a reorientation of several helices within the CNBD, including the C-helix closest to the cAMP-binding site. These results provide a basis for understanding how the binding of cAMP is coupled to channel opening in HCN and related channels. PMID:24958877

  20. Transcriptomic analysis of cyclic AMP response in bovine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, D R; Guillemette, C; Sirard, M A; Richard, F J

    2015-09-01

    Acquisition of oocyte developmental competence needs to be understood to improve clinical outcomes of assisted reproduction. The stimulation of cumulus cell concentration of cyclic adenosine 3'5'-monophosphate (cAMP) by pharmacological agents during in vitro maturation (IVM) participates in improvement of oocyte quality. However, precise coordination and downstream targets of cAMP signaling in cumulus cells are largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated better embryo development after cAMP stimulation for first 6 h during IVM. Using this model, we investigated cAMP signaling in cumulus cells through in vitro culture of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in the presence of cAMP raising agents: forskolin, IBMX, and dipyridamole (here called FID treatment). Transcriptomic analysis of cumulus cells indicated that FID-induced differentially expressed transcripts were implicated in cumulus expansion, steroidogenesis, cell metabolism, and oocyte competence. Functional genomic analysis revealed that protein kinase-A (PKA), extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and calcium (Ca(2+)) pathways as key regulators of FID signaling. Inhibition of PKA (H89) in FID-supplemented COCs or substitution of FID with calcium ionophore (A23187) demonstrated that FID activated primarily the PKA pathway which inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and was upstream of calcium signaling. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by FID supported a regulation by dual specific phosphatase (DUSP1) via PKA. Our findings imply that cAMP (FID) regulates cell metabolism, steroidogenesis, intracellular signaling and cumulus expansion through PKA which modulates these functions through optimization of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and coordination of calcium signaling. These findings have implications for development of new strategies for improving oocyte in vitro maturation leading to better developmental competence.

  1. Isolation of novel ribozymes that ligate AMP-activated RNA substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, A. J.; Szostak, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The protein enzymes RNA ligase and DNA ligase catalyze the ligation of nucleic acids via an adenosine-5'-5'-pyrophosphate 'capped' RNA or DNA intermediate. The activation of nucleic acid substrates by adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) may be a vestige of 'RNA world' catalysis. AMP-activated ligation seems ideally suited for catalysis by ribozymes (RNA enzymes), because an RNA motif capable of tightly and specifically binding AMP has previously been isolated. RESULTS: We used in vitro selection and directed evolution to explore the ability of ribozymes to catalyze the template-directed ligation of AMP-activated RNAs. We subjected a pool of 10(15) RNA molecules, each consisting of long random sequences flanking a mutagenized adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer, to ten rounds of in vitro selection, including three rounds involving mutagenic polymerase chain reaction. Selection was for the ligation of an oligonucleotide to the 5'-capped active pool RNA species. Many different ligase ribozymes were isolated; these ribozymes had rates of reaction up to 0.4 ligations per hour, corresponding to rate accelerations of approximately 5 x10(5) over the templated, but otherwise uncatalyzed, background reaction rate. Three characterized ribozymes catalyzed the formation of 3'-5'-phosphodiester bonds and were highly specific for activation by AMP at the ligation site. CONCLUSIONS: The existence of a new class of ligase ribozymes is consistent with the hypothesis that the unusual mechanism of the biological ligases resulted from a conservation of mechanism during an evolutionary replacement of a primordial ribozyme ligase by a more modern protein enzyme. The newly isolated ligase ribozymes may also provide a starting point for the isolation of ribozymes that catalyze the polymerization of AMP-activated oligonucleotides or mononucleotides, which might have been the prebiotic analogs of nucleoside triphosphates.

  2. STUDIES ON THE MECHANISM OF ACTION OF CYCLIC 3’,5’-ADENOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE ON STEROID HYDROXYLATIONS IN ADRENAL HOMOGENATES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Cyclic 3’,5’-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic 3’,5’AMP) has recently been shown to stimulate selectively steroid C-11- beta hydroxylase activity in rat...to be mediated via stimulation of alpha- glucan phosphorylase, which in turn led to enhanced production of G-6-P from glycogen and a concomitant...increase in NADPH generation. However, if cyclic 3’,5’-AMP stimulated steroid 11- beta -hydroxylation in adrenal homogenates only by this mechanism, its

  3. Importance of measurement of platelet reactivity to ADP in patients with coronary artery disease: an historical account.

    PubMed

    Tantry, Udaya S; Mahla, Elisabeth; Gesheff, Martin G; Gurbel, Paul A

    2013-11-01

    The pivotal roles of platelets in physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis at the site of plaque rupture are well established. The latter roles provide the fundamental basis for the most widely implemented pharmacologic management of coronary artery disease--dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin to inhibit platelet thromboxane A2 generation, and a P2Y12 receptor inhibitor to prevent adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet activation. Although suboptimal pharmacodynamic efficacy, also described as high on-treatment platelet reactivity to ADP, has been associated with greater risk for post-stenting ischemic event occurrence, enhanced responsiveness is associated with higher risk for bleeding in selected patients. In this review article, we aim to provide an historical account of the one and a half century long journey starting with the first description of platelets through the first report of ex vivo measurement of ADP-induced platelet aggregation, the first demonstration of an association between ADP-induced platelet aggregation and post-stenting ischemic event occurrence, and finally to the most recent description of a 'therapeutic window' concept for P2Y12 receptor inhibitor therapy.

  4. Platelet activation by ADP is increased in selected patients with anterior ischemic optic neuropathy or retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kuhli-Hattenbach, Claudia; Hellstern, Peter; Kohnen, Thomas; Hattenbach, Lars-Olof

    2017-02-16

    To investigate whether adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet hyperaggregability is associated with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) or retinal vein occlusion (RVO). We retrospectively reviewed thrombophilia screening data of patients with NAION or RVO without a history of arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and cigarette abuse. Patients with a positive family history for thromboembolism were not excluded. Platelet aggregation (area under the curve, AUC) after induction of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 µmol of ADP was estimated in 25 NAION and RVO patients and compared with 25 healthy controls. We observed significantly greater platelet aggregation post 0.5 (P = 0.002) and 1.0 (P = 0.008) µmol of ADP among NAION and RVO patients compared with healthy controls. Platelet hyperaggregability was significantly more prevalent in patients than in controls (56% vs. 8%; P = 0.0006). Our results suggest that in NAION and RVO patients without a history of arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and cigarette abuse, platelets are significantly hyperreactive after induction of very low concentrations of ADP when compared with healthy individuals. This hyperreactivity is particularly evident in patients with a family history of thromboembolism.

  5. Drugs elevating extracellular adenosine promote regeneration of haematopoietic progenitor cells in severely myelosuppressed mice: their comparison and joint effects with the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Vacek, Antonín; Weiterova, Lenka; Holá, Jirina; Vácha, Jirí

    2002-01-01

    We tested capabilities of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine and of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) given alone or in combination to modulate regeneration from severe myelosuppression resulting from combined exposure of mice to ionizing radiation and carboplatin. Elevation of extracellular adenosine was induced by joint administration of dipyridamole (DP), a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), serving as an adenosine prodrug. DP+AMP, G-CSF or all these drugs in combination were administered in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on day 3 after induction of myelosuppression. Comparable enhancements of haematopoietic regeneration due to elevation of extracellular adenosine or to action of G-CSF were demonstrated as shown by elevated numbers of haematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes/macrophages (GM-CFC) and erythrocytes (BFU-E) in the bone marrow and spleen in early time intervals after termination of the drug treatment, i.e. on days 7 and 10 after induction of myelosuppression. Coadministration of all the drugs further potentiated the restoration of progenitor cell pools in the haematopoietic organs. The effects of the drug treatments on progenitor cells were reflected in the peripheral blood in later time intervals of days 15 and 20 after induction of myelosuppression, especially as significantly elevated numbers of granulocytes and less pronounced elevation of lymphocytes and erythrocytes. The results substantiate the potential of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine for clinical utilization in myelosuppressive states, e.g. those accompanying oncological radio- and chemotherapy.

  6. Nucleotide P2Y13-stimulated phosphorylation of CREB is required for ADP-induced proliferation of late developing retinal glial progenitors in culture.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Flavia Jesus; Silva, Thayane Martins; da Silva, Flavia Emenegilda; Ornelas, Isis Moraes; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques

    2017-03-24

    Nucleotides stimulate phosphorylation of CREB to induce cell proliferation and survival in diverse cell types. We report here that ADP induces the phosphorylation of CREB in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in chick embryo retinal progenitors in culture. ADP-induced increase in phospho-CREB is mediated by P2 receptors as it is blocked by PPADS but not by the adenosine antagonists DPCPX or ZM241385. Incubation of the cultures with the CREB inhibitor KG-501 prevents ADP-induced incorporation of [(3)H]-thymidine, indicating that CREB is involved in retinal cell proliferation. No effect of this compound is observed on the viability of retinal progenitors. While no significant increase in CREB phosphorylation is observed with the P2Y1 receptor agonist MRS2365, ADP-induced phosphorylation of CREB is blocked by the P2Y13 receptor selective antagonist MRS2211, but not by MRS2179 or PSB0739, two antagonists of the P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors, respectively, suggesting that ADP-induced CREB phosphorylation is mediated by P2Y13 receptors. ADP-induced increase in phospho-CREB is attenuated by the PI3K inhibitor LY241385 and completely prevented by the MEK inhibitor U0126, suggesting that at least ERK is involved in ADP-induced CREB phosphorylation. A pharmacological profile similar to the activation and inhibition of CREB phosphorylation is observed in the phosphorylation of ERK, suggesting that P2Y13 receptors mediate ADP induced ERK/CREB pathway in the cultures. While no increase in [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation is observed with the P2Y1 receptor agonist MRS2365, both MRS2179 and MRS2211 prevent ADP-mediated increase in [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation, but not progenitor's survival, suggesting that both P2Y1 and P2Y13 receptor subtypes are involved in ADP-induced cell proliferation. P2Y1 receptor-mediated increase in [Ca(2+)]i is observed in glial cells only when cultures maintained for 9days are used. In glia from cultures cultivated for only 2days, no increase in [Ca

  7. In vivo model with targeted cAMP biosensor reveals changes in receptor-microdomain communication in cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, Julia U; Perera, Ruwan K; Steinbrecher, Julia H; Lehnart, Stephan E; Maier, Lars S; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O

    2015-04-28

    3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an ubiquitous second messenger that regulates physiological functions by acting in distinct subcellular microdomains. Although several targeted cAMP biosensors are developed and used in single cells, it is unclear whether such biosensors can be successfully applied in vivo, especially in the context of disease. Here, we describe a transgenic mouse model expressing a targeted cAMP sensor and analyse microdomain-specific second messenger dynamics in the vicinity of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). We demonstrate the biocompatibility of this targeted sensor and its potential for real-time monitoring of compartmentalized cAMP signalling in adult cardiomyocytes isolated from a healthy mouse heart and from an in vivo cardiac disease model. In particular, we uncover the existence of a phosphodiesterase-dependent receptor-microdomain communication, which is affected in hypertrophy, resulting in reduced β-adrenergic receptor-cAMP signalling to SERCA.

  8. Dietary effects of adenosine monophosphate to enhance growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Sakhawat; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; Yokoyama, Saichiro; Sony, Nadia Mahjabin

    2016-09-01

    Our study explored the dietary effects of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to enhance growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream. A semi-purified basal diet supplemented with 0% (Control), 0.1% (AMP-0.1), 0.2% (AMP-0.2), 0.4% (AMP-0.4) and 0.8% (AMP-0.8) purified AMP to formulate five experimental diets. Each diet was randomly allocated to triplicate groups of fish (mean initial weight 3.4 g) for 56 days. The results indicated that dietary AMP supplements tended to improve growth performances. One of the best ones was found in diet group AMP-0.2, followed by diet groups AMP-0.1, AMP-0.4 and AMP-0.8. The Apparent digestibility coefficients (dry matter, protein and lipid) also improved by AMP supplementation and the significantly highest dry matter digestibility was observed in diet group AMP-0.2. Fish fed diet groups AMP-0.2 and AMP-0.4 had significantly higher peroxidase and bactericidal activities than fish fed the control diet. Nitro-blue-tetrazolium (NBT) activity was found to be significantly (P < 0.05) greater in fish fed diet groups AMP-0.4 and AMP-0.8. Total serum protein, lysozyme activity and agglutination antibody titer were also increased (P > 0.05) by dietary supplementation. In contrast, catalase activity decreased with AMP supplementation. Moreover, the fish fed AMP supplemented diets had better improvement (P < 0.05) in body lipid contents, condition factor, hematocrit content and glutamyl oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) level than the control group. Supplementation also improved both freshwater and oxidative stress resistances. Interestingly, the fish fed diet groups AMP-0.2 and AMP-0.4 showed the least oxidative stress condition. Finally it is concluded that, dietary AMP supplementation enhanced the growth, digestibility, immune response and stress resistance of red sea bream. The regression analysis revealed that a dietary AMP supplementation between 0.2 and 0.4% supported weight gain and

  9. Phosphodiesterase 2 negatively regulates adenosine-induced transcription of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Makuch, Edyta; Kuropatwa, Marianna; Kurowska, Ewa; Ciekot, Jaroslaw; Klopotowska, Dagmara; Matuszyk, Janusz

    2014-07-05

    Adenosine induces expression of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene in PC12 cells. However, it is suggested that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits expression of this gene. Using real-time PCR and luciferase reporter assays we found that ANP significantly decreases the adenosine-induced transcription of the TH gene. Results of measurements of cyclic nucleotide concentrations indicated that ANP-induced accumulation of cGMP inhibits the adenosine-induced increase in cAMP level. Using selective phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) inhibitors and a synthetic cGMP analog activating PDE2, we found that PDE2 is involved in coupling the ANP-triggered signal to the cAMP metabolism. We have established that ANP-induced elevated levels of cGMP as well as cGMP analog stimulate hydrolytic activity of PDE2, leading to inhibition of adenosine-induced transcription of the TH gene. We conclude that ANP mediates negative regulation of TH gene expression via stimulation of PDE2-dependent cAMP breakdown in PC12 cells.

  10. Metabolism of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and induction of tryptophanase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Botsford, J L

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) metabolism and the induction of tryptophanase and beta-galactosidase was studied in several strains of Escherichia coli grown with succinate, acetate, glycerol, or glucose as the carbon source. No consistent relationship between the intracellular concentration of cyclic AMP in the several strains cultured and the various carbon sources was discerned. In E. coli K-12-1 the induction of tryptophanase was found to vary in the order: succinate greater than acetate greater than glycerol greater than glucose, and that of beta-galactosidase was found in the order: glycerol greater than acetate greater than succinate greater than glucose. Rate of accumulation of cyclic AMP in the culture filtrate was in the order: succinate greater than acetate greater than glycerol greater than glucose. The addition of glycerol to E. coli K-12-1 grown in acetate caused inhibition of tryptophanase and slight inhibition of accumulation of extracellular cyclic AMP. These same conditions caused beta-galactosidase induction to be stimulated. The addition of exogenous cyclic AMP to cultures grown with four different carbon sources had an effect characteristic for each of the two enzymes studied as well as each individual carbon source. The results suggest that there are control elements distinct from cyclic AMP and its receptor protein which respond to the catabolic situation of the cell. PMID:170248

  11. Central role of soluble adenylyl cyclase and cAMP in sperm physiology

    PubMed Central

    Buffone, Mariano G.; Wertheimer, Eva V.; Visconti, Pablo E.; Krapf, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), the first second messenger to be described, plays a central role in cell signaling in a wide variety of cell types. Over the last decades, a wide body of literature addressed the different roles of cAMP in cell physiology, mainly in response to neurotransmitters and hormones. cAMP is synthesized by a wide variety of adenylyl cylases that can generally be grouped in two types: transmembrane adenylyl cyclase and soluble adenylyl cyclases. In particular, several aspects of sperm physiology are regulated by cAMP produced by a single atypical adenylyl cyclase (Adcy10, aka sAC, SACY). The signature that identifies sAC among other ACs, is their direct stimulation by bicarbonate. The essential nature of cAMP in sperm function has been demonstrated using gain of function as well as loss of function approaches. This review unifies state of the art knowledge of the role of cAMP and those enzymes involved in cAMP signaling pathways required for the acquisition of fertilizing capacity of mammalian sperm. PMID:25066614

  12. Evidence for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, G.A.; Baldwin, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to use sodium flufenamate, a compound that inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) production in the pituitary, to evaluate the potential role of cAMP as a mediator of GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries. Quartered male pituitaries were perifused at 37/sup 0/C and sequential effluent fractions collected every 10 min. Infusions of GnRH resulted in a twofold increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion. Cycloheximide, 5 ..mu..M, completely inhibited the GnRH-stimulated LH and FSH secretion. Infusions of 0.1 mM flufenamate had similar effects on gonadotropin secretion as cycloheximide, whereas the administration of 5 mM dibutyryl cAMP in combination with GnRH and flufenamate restored the secretory responses of both hormones. The flufenamate-inhibited GnRH stimulated LH and FSH release, which was restored by DBcAMP and appeared to be protein synthesis dependent and specific for cAMP.These results suggest an indirect role for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries. However, in contrast to female pituitaries, the secretion of these hormones form male pituitaries is completely dependent on cAMP and de novo protein synthesis.

  13. Spatiotemporal Coupling of cAMP Transporter to CFTR Chloride Channel Function in the Gut Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunying; Krishnamurthy, Partha C.; Penmatsa, Himabindu; Marrs, Kevin L.; Wang, Xue Qing; Zaccolo, Manuela; Jalink, Kees; Li, Min; Nelson, Deborah J.; Schuetz, John D.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel localized at apical cell membranes and exists in macromolecular complexes with a variety of signaling and transporter molecules. Here we report that the multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), a cAMP transporter, is functionally and physically associates with CFTR. Adenosine-stimulated CFTR-mediated chloride currents are potentiated by MRP4 inhibition, and this potentiation is directly coupled to attenuated cAMP efflux through the apical cAMP transporter. CFTR single-channel recordings and FRET-based intracellular cAMP dynamics suggest that a compartmentalized coupling of cAMP transporter and CFTR occurs via the PDZ scaffolding protein, PDZK1, forming a macromolecular complex at apical surfaces of gut epithelia. Disrupting this complex abrogates the functional coupling of cAMP transporter activity to CFTR function. MRP4 knockout mice are more prone to CFTR-mediated secretory diarrhea. Our findings have important implications for disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and secretory diarrhea. PMID:18045536

  14. Cyclic AMP Represents a Crucial Component of Treg Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network, and a plethora of manuscripts have described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate as to which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP), which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted, the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear, and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for, in principle, two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario, Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication directly to the effector T cells (Teff) leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine, which trigger the adenylate cyclases in Teff cells via A2A and A2B receptors, thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation. PMID:27621729

  15. Spatiotemporal coupling of cAMP transporter to CFTR chloride channel function in the gut epithelia.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunying; Krishnamurthy, Partha C; Penmatsa, Himabindu; Marrs, Kevin L; Wang, Xue Qing; Zaccolo, Manuela; Jalink, Kees; Li, Min; Nelson, Deborah J; Schuetz, John D; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2007-11-30

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel localized at apical cell membranes and exists in macromolecular complexes with a variety of signaling and transporter molecules. Here, we report that the multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), a cAMP transporter, functionally and physically associates with CFTR. Adenosine-stimulated CFTR-mediated chloride currents are potentiated by MRP4 inhibition, and this potentiation is directly coupled to attenuated cAMP efflux through the apical cAMP transporter. CFTR single-channel recordings and FRET-based intracellular cAMP dynamics suggest that a compartmentalized coupling of cAMP transporter and CFTR occurs via the PDZ scaffolding protein, PDZK1, forming a macromolecular complex at apical surfaces of gut epithelia. Disrupting this complex abrogates the functional coupling of cAMP transporter activity to CFTR function. Mrp4 knockout mice are more prone to CFTR-mediated secretory diarrhea. Our findings have important implications for disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and secretory diarrhea.

  16. Effects of selective phosphodiesterase inhibition on cyclic AMP hydrolysis in rat cerebral cortical slices.

    PubMed Central

    Challiss, R. A.; Nicholson, C. D.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of selective inhibition of phosphodiesterase activities on the concentration and rate of hydrolysis of adenosine 3':5' cyclic-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) in rat cerebral cortical slices has been studied. 2. Isoprenaline caused a rapid, concentration-dependent increase in cyclic AMP concentration to new steady-state levels (basal: 7.1 +/- 0.7; 10 microM isoprenaline: 14.3 +/- 1.4 pmol mg-1 protein). Addition of a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist to isoprenaline-stimulated cerebral cortical slices caused a rapid decrease in cyclic AMP concentration to basal levels (t1/2: 58 +/- 18 s). 3. Preincubation of slices for 30 min with the phosphodiesterase inhibitors 1-methyl-3-isobutylxanthine, denbufylline, rolipram or Ro20,1724 caused concentration-dependent increases in basal and isoprenaline-stimulated cyclic AMP concentrations and decreased the rate of cyclic AMP hydrolysis measured after addition of a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist. However, SKF 94120 and zaprinast had none of these effects. 4. The results are discussed with respect to previous studies of phosphodiesterase isozymic activities isolated from cerebrum and it is suggested that the Ca2+/calmodulin-independent, low Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase isozyme, which is selectively inhibited by denbufylline, rolipram and Ro20,1724, and is present in cerebrum is of critical importance to the regulation of cyclic AMP concentration in this tissue. PMID:2158837

  17. [Interaction of 8-substituted derivatives and adenosine-3',5'-cyclophosphate esters with protein kinase from pig brain].

    PubMed

    Guliaev, N N; Tunitskaia, V L; Nesterova, M V; Mazurova, L A; Murtuzaev, I M

    1977-11-01

    A synthesis of previously unknown 8-substituted derivatives and alkyl esters of cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate, containing reactive groups, was carried out. The interaction of the compounds obtained with a homogeneous preparation of protein kinase from pig brain was studied. It was found that all compounds, with the exception of neutral esters of 3',5'-AMP, activate the enzyme and competitively inhibit 3H-labelled 3',5'-cAMP binding by the regulatory subunit of protein kinase. The activating effect and affinity of 8-(beta-aminoethylamino)-3',5'-cAMP for protein kinase was 10 times lower than that for 3',5'-cAMP and other 8-substituted derivatives of the cyclic nucleotide. It was found that 8-(N-chloroacetylaminoethylamino)-3',5'-cAMP interaction with the enzyme is of irreversible type, which suggest covalent blocking of the nucleophilic group of the 3',5'-cAMP binding site of protein kinase. The data obtained indicate that the 3',5'-cAMP molecule is bound to the regulatory site of protein kinase in the syn-conformation. The previously made assumption on the crucial importance of the negative charge in the 3',5'-cyclophosphate system for the interaction of cyclic AMP with the regulatory subunit of protein kinase has been thus confirmed.

  18. Adenosine uptake is the major effector of extracellular ATP toxicity in human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Paola de Andrade; Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo Cremonese; Nascimento, Jéssica; Beckenkamp, Aline; Santana, Danielle Bertodo; Kipper, Franciele; Casali, Emerson André; Nejar Bruno, Alessandra; Paccez, Juliano Domiraci; Zerbini, Luiz Fernando; Wink, Marcia Rosângela; Lenz, Guido; Buffon, Andréia

    2014-01-01

    In cervical cancer, HPV infection and disruption of mechanisms involving cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis are strictly linked with tumor progression and invasion. Tumor microenvironment is ATP and adenosine rich, suggesting a role for purinergic signaling in cancer cell growth and death. Here we investigate the effect of extracellular ATP on human cervical cancer cells. We find that extracellular ATP itself has a small cytotoxic effect, whereas adenosine formed from ATP degradation by ectonucleotidases is the main factor responsible for apoptosis induction. The level of P2×7 receptor seemed to define the main cytotoxic mechanism triggered by ATP, since ATP itself eliminated a small subpopulation of cells that express high P2×7 levels, probably through its activation. Corroborating these data, blockage or knockdown of P2×7 only slightly reduced ATP cytotoxicity. On the other hand, cell viability was almost totally recovered with dipyridamole, an adenosine transporter inhibitor. Moreover, ATP-induced apoptosis and signaling—p53 increase, AMPK activation, and PARP cleavage—as well as autophagy induction were also inhibited by dipyridamole. In addition, inhibition of adenosine conversion into AMP also blocked cell death, indicating that metabolization of intracellular adenosine originating from extracellular ATP is responsible for the main effects of the latter in human cervical cancer cells. PMID:25103241

  19. 42 CFR 457.230 - FFP for State ADP expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FFP for State ADP expenditures. 457.230 Section 457...; Reduction of Federal Medical Payments § 457.230 FFP for State ADP expenditures. FFP is available for State ADP expenditures for the design, development, or installation of mechanized claims processing...

  20. Activation of cyclic amp/protein kinase: a signaling pathway enhances osteoblast cell adhesion on biomaterials for regenerative engineering.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kevin W-H; Ashe, Keshia M; Kan, Ho Man; Lee, Duron A; Laurencin, Cato T

    2011-04-01

    Osteoblast cell adhesion on biomaterials is an important goal for implants to be useful in bone regeneration technologies. The adhesion of osteoblastic cells to biomaterials has been investigated in the field of bone regenerative engineering. Previous work from our group demonstrated that osteoblastic cells adhering to biodegradable biomaterials require the expression of integrins on the cell surface. However, the underlying molecular signaling mechanism is still not fully clear. We report here that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a small signaling molecule, regulates osteoblast cell adhesion to biomaterial surfaces. We used an in vitro cell adhesion assay to demonstrate that at 0.1 mM, 8-Br-cAMP, a cell-permeable cAMP analog, significantly enhances osteoblast-like cells' (MC3T3-E1) adherence to biomaterials. Moreover, we demonstrate that a commonly used cAMP-elevating agent, forskolin, promotes cell adhesion similar to that of the cell permeable cAMP analog. By using different target-specific cAMP analogs: 8-CPT-2Me-cAMP which specifically activates exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), and 6-Bnz-cAMP which specifically activates protein kinase A (PKA), we observed that the PKA signaling pathway plays a dominant role in this process. Thus, this report suggests a new method to enhance osteoblast cell adhesion on biodegradable biomaterials for bone regenerative engineering applications.

  1. Effect of cholera toxin on cAMP levels and Na/sup +/ influx in isolated intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, C.S.; Kimmich, G.A.

    1982-09-01

    Freshly isolated chicken intestinal cells contain approximately 20 pmol adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)/mg cellular protein. Incubation with 3 ..mu..g/ml cholera toxin (CT) at 37/sup 0/C induces an elevation of cellular cAMP beginning 10-15 min after initial exposure. The response is linear with time for 40-50 min and causes a six- to eightfold increase over control levels at steady state. Dibutyryl cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Na/sup +/ influx into the isolated enterocytes. Chlorpromazine completely abolishes the toxin-induced elevation of cAMP in the isolated cells and also reverses the effect on Na/sup +/ entry. The data provide evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal cell Na/sup +/ uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT on Na/sup +/ during induction of intestinal secretory activity. Studies on the time-dependent effects of chlorpromazine on both intracellular cAMP concentration and Na/sup +/ influx suggest that the reactivation of the Na/sup +/ transport system after cAMP-induced inhibition is slow relative to the disappearance of cAMP.

  2. PKA and Epac activation mediates cAMP-induced vasorelaxation by increasing endothelial NO production.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Verónica; Cuíñas, Andrea; Elíes, Jacobo; Campos-Toimil, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Vascular relaxation induced by 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is both endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent, although the underlying signaling pathways are not fully understood. Aiming to uncover potential mechanisms, we performed contraction-relaxation experiments on endothelium-denuded and intact rat aorta rings and measured NO levels in isolated human endothelial cells using single cell fluorescence imaging. The vasorelaxant effect of forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, was decreased after selective inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), a cAMP-activated kinase, or L-NAME, an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor, only in intact aortic rings. Both selective activation of PKA with 6-Bnz-cAMP and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) with 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP significantly relaxed phenylephrine-induced contractions. The vasorelaxant effect of the Epac activator, but not that of the PKA activator, was reduced by endothelium removal. Forskolin, dibutyryl cAMP (a cAMP analogue), 6-Bnz-cAMP and 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP increased NO levels in endothelial cells and the forskolin effect was significantly inhibited by inactivation of both Epac and PKA, and eNOS inhibition. Our results indicate that the endothelium-dependent component of forskolin/cAMP-induced vasorelaxation is partially mediated by an increase in endothelial NO release due to an enhanced eNOS activity through PKA and Epac activation in endothelial cells.

  3. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of adenosine receptors in the human malignant melanoma A375 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Merighi, Stefania; Varani, Katia; Gessi, Stefania; Cattabriga, Elena; Iannotta, Valeria; Ulouglu, Canan; Leung, Edward; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2001-01-01

    The present work characterizes, from a pharmacological and biochemical point of view, adenosine receptors in the human malignant melanoma A375 cell line. Adenosine receptors were detected by RT – PCR experiments. A1 receptors were characterized using [3H]-DPCPX binding with a KD of 1.9±0.2 nM and Bmax of 23±7 fmol mg−1 of protein. A2A receptors were studied with [3H]-SCH 58261 binding and revealed a KD of 5.1±0.2 nM and a Bmax of 220±7 fmol mg−1 of protein. A3 receptors were studied with the new A3 adenosine receptor antagonist [3H]-MRE 3008F20, the only A3 selective radioligand currently available. Saturation experiments revealed a single high affinity binding site with KD of 3.3±0.7 nM and Bmax of 291±50 fmol mg−1 of protein. The pharmacological profile of radioligand binding on A375 cells was established using typical adenosine ligands which displayed a rank order of potency typical of the different adenosine receptor subtype. Thermodynamic data indicated that radioligand binding to adenosine receptor subtypes in A375 cells was entropy- and enthalpy-driven. In functional assays the high affinity A2A agonists HE-NECA, CGS 21680 and A2A – A2B agonist NECA were able to increase cyclic AMP accumulation in A375 cells whereas A3 agonists Cl-IB-MECA, IB-MECA and NECA were able to stimulate Ca2+ mobilization. In conclusion, all these data indicate, for the first time, that adenosine receptors with a pharmacological and biochemical profile typical of the A1, A2A, A2B and A3 receptor subtype are present on A375 melanoma cell line. PMID:11704641

  4. Host layer buckling in the compounds formed by exfoliation and restacking of cadmium phosphorus trisulphide with adenosine monophosphate included

    SciTech Connect

    Westreich, Philippe . E-mail: pwestreich@alumni.sfu.ca; Yang Datong; Frindt, Robert F.

    2006-03-09

    Exfoliated single layer cadmium phosphorus trisulphide has been combined with the biological molecule adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to form the novel restacked compound Li{sub x}Cd{sub 0.8}PS{sub 3}(AMP){sub z}(H{sub 2}O){sub y}. Composition was determined using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and the structure of these compounds was studied using X-ray diffraction on oriented films. In the 0-80% relative humidity range, for (AMP){sub 0.5}, a host plane spacing near 19.6 A was found. Electron density calculations based on the X-ray diffraction pattern suggest a model for the arrangement of guest AMP molecules between the host layers, with an accompanying water molecule. The calculations also suggest that there is a buckling in the host layer of about {+-}0.6 A.

  5. (S)-α-Chlorohydrin Inhibits Protein Tyrosine Phosphorylation through Blocking Cyclic AMP - Protein Kinase A Pathway in Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weiwei; Yang, Bei; Pi, Jingbo; He, Gengsheng; Qu, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    α-Chlorohydrin is a common contaminant in food. Its (S)-isomer, (S)-α-chlorohydrin (SACH), is known for causing infertility in animals by inhibiting glycolysis of spermatozoa. The aim of present work was to examine the relationship between SACH and protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PTP), which plays a critical role in regulating mammalian sperm capacitation. In vitro exposure of SACH 50 µM to isolated rat epididymal sperm inhibited PTP. Sperm-specific glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDS) activities, the intracellular adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) levels, 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA) substrates in rat sperm were diminished dramatically, indicating that both glycolysis and the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway were impaired by SACH. The inhibition of both PTP and phosphorylation of PKA substrates by SACH could be restored by addition of cAMP analog dibutyryl-cAMP (dbcAMP) and phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Moreover, addition of glycerol protected glycolysis, ATP levels, phosphorylation of PKA substrates and PTP against the influence of SACH. These results suggested SACH inhibited PTP through blocking cAMP/PKA pathway in sperm, and PTP inhibition may play a role in infertility associated with SACH. PMID:22916194

  6. Macro Domain from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) Is an Efficient ADP-ribose Binding Module: CRYSTAL STRUCTURE AND BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chao-Cheng; Lin, Meng-Hsuan; Chuang, Chien-Ying; Hsu, Chun-Hua

    2016-03-04

    The newly emerging Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) encodes the conserved macro domain within non-structural protein 3. However, the precise biochemical function and structure of the macro domain is unclear. Using differential scanning fluorimetry and isothermal titration calorimetry, we characterized the MERS-CoV macro domain as a more efficient adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose binding module than macro domains from other CoVs. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the MERS-CoV macro domain was determined at 1.43-Å resolution in complex with ADP-ribose. Comparison of macro domains from MERS-CoV and other human CoVs revealed structural differences in the α1 helix alters how the conserved Asp-20 interacts with ADP-ribose and may explain the efficient binding of the MERS-CoV macro domain to ADP-ribose. This study provides structural and biophysical bases to further evaluate the role of the MERS-CoV macro domain in the host response via ADP-ribose binding but also as a potential target for drug design.

  7. Adenosine Monophosphate-Based Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Chen, Fei; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Hattori, Nori; Suzuki, Shigeya

    2009-01-01

    A method of rapid detection of bacterial spores is based on the discovery that a heat shock consisting of exposure to a temperature of 100 C for 10 minutes causes the complete release of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) from the spores. This method could be an alternative to the method described in the immediately preceding article. Unlike that method and related prior methods, the present method does not involve germination and cultivation; this feature is an important advantage because in cases in which the spores are those of pathogens, delays involved in germination and cultivation could increase risks of infection. Also, in comparison with other prior methods that do not involve germination, the present method affords greater sensitivity. At present, the method is embodied in a laboratory procedure, though it would be desirable to implement the method by means of a miniaturized apparatus in order to make it convenient and economical enough to encourage widespread use.

  8. Structural basis of the inhibition of class C acid phosphatases by adenosine 5;#8242;-phosphorothioate

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harkewal; Reilly, Thomas J.; Tanner, John J.

    2012-01-20

    The inhibition of phosphatases by adenosine 5'-phosphorothioate (AMPS) was first reported in the late 1960s; however, the structural basis for the inhibition has remained unknown. Here, it is shown that AMPS is a submicromolar inhibitor of class C acid phosphatases, a group of bacterial outer membrane enzymes belonging to the haloacid dehalogenase structural superfamily. Furthermore, the 1.35-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the inhibited recombinant Haemophilus influenzae class C acid phosphatase was determined; this is the first structure of a phosphatase complexed with AMPS. The conformation of AMPS is identical to that of the substrate 5'-AMP, except that steric factors force a rotation of the thiophosphoryl out of the normal phosphoryl-binding pocket. This conformation is catalytically nonproductive, because the P atom is not positioned optimally for nucleophilic attack by Asp64, and the O atom of the scissile O-P bond is too far from the Asp (Asp66) that protonates the leaving group. The structure of 5'-AMP complexed with the Asp64 {yields} Asn mutant enzyme was also determined at 1.35-{angstrom} resolution. This mutation induces the substrate to adopt the same nonproductive binding mode that is observed in the AMPS complex. In this case, electrostatic considerations, rather than steric factors, underlie the movement of the phosphoryl. The structures not only provide an explanation for the inhibition by AMPS, but also highlight the precise steric and electrostatic requirements of phosphoryl recognition by class C acid phosphatases. Moreover, the structure of the Asp64 {yields} Asn mutant illustrates how a seemingly innocuous mutation can cause an unexpected structural change.

  9. Evidence of platelet sensitization to ADP following discontinuation of clopidogrel therapy in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Diodati, Jean G; Schampaert, Erick; Palisaitis, Donald A; Pharand, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have linked clopidogrel discontinuation with an increased incidence of ischemic events. This has led to the hypothesis that clopidogrel discontinuation may result in a pharmacological rebound. We evaluated the impact of clopidogrel discontinuation on platelet function. Platelet aggregation was measured by light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2.5, 5 and 10 µM and by VerifyNow® P2Y12, in 37 clinically stable coronary artery disease (CAD) patients scheduled to discontinue clopidogrel treatment, and 37 clinically stable CAD patients not taking clopidogrel. Platelet function was assessed the day before clopidogrel cessation and 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after. Clopidogrel had been initiated a median of 555 days (ranging from 200 to 2280 days) before the treating cardiologist recommended its discontinuation. All participants were taking aspirin, most commonly 80 mg daily although a minority was prescribed 325 mg daily. Following clopidogrel discontinuation, VerifyNow® P2Y12 did not detect any rebound platelet activity, but ADP-induced LTA showed platelet sensitization to ADP, particularly at low ADP levels. Increased platelet activity was detectable seven days after clopidogrel cessation and remained higher than in controls 28 days after discontinuation. No clinical event occurred in any of the participants during the 28 days following clopidogrel cessation. In conclusion, platelet sensitization to ADP as a consequence of chronic clopidogrel administration may partially explain the recrudescence of ischemic events following clopidogrel discontinuation in otherwise stable coronary artery patients.

  10. Quantitative Measurement of cAMP Concentration Using an Exchange Protein Directly Activated by a cAMP-Based FRET-Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Salonikidis, Petrus S.; Zeug, André; Kobe, Fritz; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Richter, Diethelm W.

    2008-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors for the quantitative analysis of intracellular signaling, including sensors for monitoring cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), are of increasing interest. The measurement of the donor/acceptor emission ratio in tandem biosensors excited at the donor excitation wavelength is a commonly used technique. A general problem, however, is that this ratio varies not only with the changes in cAMP concentration but also with the changes of the ionic environment or other factors affecting the folding probability of the fluorophores. Here, we use a spectral FRET analysis on the basis of two excitation wavelengths to obtain a reliable measure of the absolute cAMP concentrations with high temporal and spatial resolution by using an “exchange protein directly activated by cAMP”. In this approach, FRET analysis is simplified and does not require additional calibration routines. The change in FRET efficiency (E) of the biosensor caused by [cAMP] changes was determined as ΔE = 15%, whereas E varies between 35% at low and 20% at high [cAMP], allowing quantitative measurement of cAMP concentration in the range from 150 nM to 15 μM. The method described is also suitable for other FRET-based biosensors with a 1:1 donor/acceptor stoichiometry. As a proof of principle, we measured the specially resolved cAMP concentration within living cells and determined the dynamic changes of cAMP levels after stimulation of the Gs-coupled serotonin receptor subtype 7 (5-HT7). PMID:18708470

  11. cAMP Promotes Cell Migration Through Cell Junctional Complex Dynamics and Actin Cytoskeleton Remodeling: Implications in Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Ok; Ryu, Jung Min; Suh, Han Na; Park, Soo Hyun; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang Hun; Han, Ho Jae

    2015-11-01

    Stem cells have attracted great interest for their therapeutic capacity in tissue regeneration. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), existing in high concentration at wound sites, mediated various signaling pathways such as cytoskeleton dynamics, cell adhesion, and cell migration in stem cells, which suggest the critical roles of cAMP in the wound healing process through functional regulation of stem cells. However, the mechanisms behind the effect of cAMP on mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) motility and its roles on skin wound healing remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, 8-Bromo cAMP-treated mESCs showed significant wound closure and improved neovascularization. Moreover, 8-Bromo cAMP stimulated mESC migration into the wound bed. 8-Bromo cAMP also increased ESC motility in in vitro migration assay. 8-Bromo cAMP induced myosin light chain phosphorylation through Rac1 and Cdc42 signaling, which were involved in 8-Bromo cAMP-induced decrease in expression of junction proteins (connexin 43, E-cadherin, and occludin) at the plasma membrane. Subsequently, 8-Bromo cAMP induced the disruption of cell junctions (including gap junctions, adherens junctions, and tight junctions), which reduced the function of the gap junctions and cell adhesion. In addition, 8-Bromo cAMP-induced Rac1 and Cdc42 activation increased Arp3, TOCA, PAK, and N-WASP expression, but decreased cofilin phosphorylation level, which elicited actin cytoskeleton remodeling. In contrast to the control, 8-Bromo cAMP evoked a substantial migration of cells into the denuded area, which was blocked by the small interfering RNAs of the signaling pathway-related molecules or by inhibitors. In conclusion, cAMP enhanced the migration of mESCs through effective coordination of junctional disruption and actin cytoskeleton remodeling, which increased the wound healing capacity of ESCs.

  12. Effect of Repeated Injections of Adenosine Diphosphate-Encapsulated Liposomes Coated with a Fibrinogen γ-Chain Dodecapeptide Developed as a Synthetic Platelet Substitute on Accelerated Blood Clearance in a Healthy and an Anticancer Drug-Induced Thrombocytopenia Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kazuaki; Hashimoto, Mai; Ogaki, Shigeru; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Takeoka, Shinji; Ikeda, Yasuo; Handa, Makoto; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2015-09-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-encapsulated liposomes coated with a fibrinogen γ-chain dodecapeptide [H12 (dodecapeptide ((400) HHLGGAKQAGDV(411) ))-(ADP)-liposome] is a synthetic platelet substitute, in which the surface is covered with polyethylene glycol (PEG). It has been reported that repeated injections of PEGylated liposomes induce an accelerated blood clearance (ABC) phenomenon, which involves a loss in the long-circulation half-life of the material when administered repeatedly to the same animals. The objective of this study was to determine whether the ABC phenomenon was induced by repeated injections of H12-(ADP)-liposome in healthy and anticancer drug-induced thrombocytopenia model rats. The findings show that the ABC phenomenon was induced by healthy rats that were repeatedly injected with H12-(ADP)-liposomes at the interval of 5 days at a dose of 10 mg lipids/kg. The ABC phenomenon involves the production of anti-H12-(ADP)-liposome immunoglobulin M (IgM) and complement activation. On the other hand, when thrombocytopenia model rats were repeatedly injected with H12-(ADP)-liposomes under the same conditions, no ABC phenomenon, nor was any suppression of anti-H12-(ADP)-liposome IgM-mediated complement activation observed. We thus conclude that the repeated injection of H12-(ADP)-liposome treatment in rat model with anticancer drug-induced thrombocytopenia did not induce the ABC phenomenon.

  13. Antigenicity of UV radiation-induced murine tumors correlates positively with the level of adenosine deaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, S L; Fidler, I J

    1987-01-01

    The specific activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA) in 16 murine tumor cell lines derived from seven UV light-induced neoplasms (melanoma and fibrosarcoma) were determined. In each case, the specific activity of ADA correlated positively with the antigenicity of the tumor cells. Highly antigenic cell lines that regress upon introduction into syngeneic hosts had on average 4- to 6-fold higher ADA specific activities than cell lines of low antigenicity that grow progressively in syngeneic hosts. The antigenic differences are probably not related to intracellular cAMP levels, as the level of cAMP differed only 2-fold between the two groups of cell lines.

  14. A cardiac mitochondrial cAMP signaling pathway regulates calcium accumulation, permeability transition and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Liu, D; Varin, A; Nicolas, V; Courilleau, D; Mateo, P; Caubere, C; Rouet, P; Gomez, A-M; Vandecasteele, G; Fischmeister, R; Brenner, C

    2016-01-01

    Although cardiac cytosolic cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates multiple processes, such as beating, contractility, metabolism and apoptosis, little is known yet on the role of this second messenger within cardiac mitochondria. Using cellular and subcellular approaches, we demonstrate here the local expression of several actors of cAMP signaling within cardiac mitochondria, namely a truncated form of soluble AC (sACt) and the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (Epac1), and show a protective role for sACt against cell death, apoptosis as well as necrosis in primary cardiomyocytes. Upon stimulation with bicarbonate (HCO3−) and Ca2+, sACt produces cAMP, which in turn stimulates oxygen consumption, increases the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and ATP production. cAMP is rate limiting for matrix Ca2+ entry via Epac1 and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter and, as a consequence, prevents mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). The mitochondrial cAMP effects involve neither protein kinase A, Epac2 nor the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. In addition, in mitochondria isolated from failing rat hearts, stimulation of the mitochondrial cAMP pathway by HCO3− rescued the sensitization of mitochondria to Ca2+-induced MPT. Thus, our study identifies a link between mitochondrial cAMP, mitochondrial metabolism and cell death in the heart, which is independent of cytosolic cAMP signaling. Our results might have implications for therapeutic prevention of cell death in cardiac pathologies. PMID:27100892

  15. P2Y12-ADP receptor antagonists: Days of future and past

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Marc; Paganelli, Franck; Bonello, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of the therapeutic arsenal in coronary artery disease. Thanks to a better understanding in physiology, pharmacology and pharmacogenomics huge progress were made in the field of platelet reactivity inhibition thus allowing the expansion of percutaneous coronary intervention. Stent implantation requires the combination of two antiplatelet agents acting in a synergistic way. Asprin inhibit the cyclo-oxygenase pathway of platelet activation while clopidogrel is a P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-receptor antagonist. This dual antiplatelet therapy has dramatically improved the prognosis of stented patients. However, due to pharmacological limitations of clopidogrel (interindividual variability in its biological efficacy, slow onset of action, mild platelet reactivity inhibition) ischemic recurrences remained high following stent implantation especially in acute coronary syndrome patients. Thus, more potent P2Y12-ADP receptor inhibitors were developped including prasugrel, ticagrelor and more recently cangrelor to overcome these pitfalls. These new agents reduced the rate of thrombotic events in acute coronary syndrome patients at the cost of an increased bleeding risk. The abundance in antiplatelet agents allow us to tailor our strategy based on the thrombotic/bleeding profile of each patient. Recently, the ACCOAST trial cast a doubt on the benefit of pre treatment in non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. The aim of the present review is to summarize the results of the main studies dealing with antiplatelet therapy in stented/acute coronary syndromes patients. PMID:27231519

  16. Sam68 Is Required for DNA Damage Responses via Regulating Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Andrea; Wier, Eric M.; Wen, Matthew G.; Kamenyeva, Olena; Xia, Xue; Koo, Lily Y.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid and robust synthesis of polymers of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose (PAR) chains, primarily catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), is crucial for cellular responses to DNA damage. However, the precise mechanisms through which PARP1 is activated and PAR is robustly synthesized are not fully understood. Here, we identified Src-associated substrate during mitosis of 68 kDa (Sam68) as a novel signaling molecule in DNA damage responses (DDRs). In the absence of Sam68, DNA damage-triggered PAR production and PAR-dependent DNA repair signaling were dramatically diminished. With serial cellular and biochemical assays, we demonstrated that Sam68 is recruited to and significantly overlaps with PARP1 at DNA lesions and that the interaction between Sam68 and PARP1 is crucial for DNA damage-initiated and PARP1-conferred PAR production. Utilizing cell lines and knockout mice, we illustrated that Sam68-deleted cells and animals are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA-damaging agents. Together, our findings suggest that Sam68 plays a crucial role in DDR via regulating DNA damage-initiated PAR production. PMID:27635653

  17. 8-OH-DPAT facilitated memory consolidation and increased hippocampal and cortical cAMP production.

    PubMed

    Manuel-Apolinar, L; Meneses, A

    2004-01-05

    Animals were submitted to an associative learning task named Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping (P/I-A) and treated with selective 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor agonists and antagonists. Next, they were sacrificed, their brains removed, dissected and changes on cortical and hippocampal cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production were determined. Results revealed that, the 8-OH-DPAT treatment facilitated memory consolidation of autoshaping and that effect was blocked completely by WAY100635 and partially by DR4004. WAY100635 or DR4004 alone had no effect on autoshaping. The cAMP results were complex and yielded no clear relationship to the memory results. Thus, cortical and hippocampal increased on cAMP production was observed following administration of the 5-HT(1A/7) agonist 8-OH-DPAT. The memory effect was, completely or partially, reversed by the selective antagonists WAY100635 (5-HT1A) or DR4004 (5-HT7), respectively.

  18. Pharmacological targeting of AKAP-directed compartmentalized cAMP signalling.

    PubMed

    Dema, Alessandro; Perets, Ekaterina; Schulz, Maike Svenja; Deák, Veronika Anita; Klussmann, Enno

    2015-12-01

    The second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) can bind and activate protein kinase A (PKA). The cAMP/PKA system is ubiquitous and involved in a wide array of biological processes and therefore requires tight spatial and temporal regulation. Important components of the safeguard system are the A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), a heterogeneous family of scaffolding proteins defined by its ability to directly bind PKA. AKAPs tether PKA to specific subcellular compartments, and they bind further interaction partners to create local signalling hubs. The recent discovery of new AKAPs and advances in the field that shed light on the relevance of these hubs for human disease highlight unique opportunities for pharmacological modulation. This review exemplifies how interference with signalling, particularly cAMP signalling, at such hubs can reshape signalling responses and discusses how this could lead to novel pharmacological concepts for the treatment of disease with an unmet medical need such as cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  19. The cyclic AMP signaling pathway: Exploring targets for successful drug discovery (Review)

    PubMed Central

    YAN, KUO; GAO, LI-NA; CUI, YUAN-LU; ZHANG, YI; ZHOU, XIN

    2016-01-01

    During development of disease, complex intracellular signaling pathways regulate an intricate series of events, including resistance to external toxins, the secretion of cytokines and the production of pathological phenomena. Adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) is a nucleotide that acts as a key second messenger in numerous signal transduction pathways. cAMP regulates various cellular functions, including cell growth and differentiation, gene transcription and protein expression. This review aimed to provide an understanding of the effects of the cAMP signaling pathway and the associated factors on disease occurrence and development by examining the information from a new perspective. These novel insights aimed to promote the development of novel therapeutic approaches and aid in the development of new drugs. PMID:27035868

  20. Termination of cAMP signals by Ca2+ and Gαi via extracellular Ca2+ sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gerbino, Andrea; Ruder, Warren C.; Curci, Silvana; Pozzan, Tullio; Zaccolo, Manuela; Hofer, Aldebaran M.

    2005-01-01

    Termination of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling via the extracellular Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaR) was visualized in single CaR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells using ratiometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer–dependent cAMP sensors based on protein kinase A and Epac. Stimulation of CaR rapidly reversed or prevented agonist-stimulated elevation of cAMP through a dual mechanism involving pertussis toxin–sensitive Gαi and the CaR-stimulated increase in intracellular [Ca2+]. In parallel measurements with fura-2, CaR activation elicited robust Ca2+ oscillations that increased in frequency in the presence of cAMP, eventually fusing into a sustained plateau. Considering the Ca2+ sensitivity of cAMP accumulation in these cells, lack of oscillations in [cAMP] during the initial phases of CaR stimulation was puzzling. Additional experiments showed that low-frequency, long-duration Ca2+ oscillations generated a dynamic staircase pattern in [cAMP], whereas higher frequency spiking had no effect. Our data suggest that the cAMP machinery in HEK cells acts as a low-pass filter disregarding the relatively rapid Ca2+ spiking stimulated by Ca2+-mobilizing agonists under physiological conditions. PMID:16247029

  1. cAMP controls the balance of the propulsive forces generated by the two flagella of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, Yu; Yoshimura, Kenjiro

    2015-08-01

    The motility of cilia and flagella of eukaryotic cells is controlled by second messengers such as Ca(2+), cAMP, and cGMP. In this study, the cAMP-dependent control of flagellar bending of Chlamydomonas is investigated by applying cAMP through photolysis of 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl adenosine 3',5'-cyclicmonophosphate (caged cAMP). When cAMP is applied to demembranated and reactivated cells, cells begin to swim with a larger helical path. This change is due to a larger turn about the axis normal to the anterior-posterior axis, indicating an increased imbalance in the propulsive forces generated by the cis-flagellum (flagellum nearer to the eyespot) and trans-flagellum (flagellum farther from the eyespot). Consistently, when cAMP is applied to isolated axonemes, some axonemes show attenuated motility whereas others do not. Axonemes from uni1 mutants, which have only trans-flagella, do not respond to cAMP. These observations indicate that cAMP controls the balance of the forces generated by cis- and trans-flagella in Chlamydomonas.

  2. CREB modulates calcium signaling in cAMP-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linxia; Liu, Li; Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Calcium signaling has a versatile role in many important cellular functions. Despite its importance, regulation of calcium signaling in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) has not been explored extensively. Our previous study revealed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) enabled BMSCs to generate calcium signal upon stimulation by dopamine, KCl and glutamate. Concurrently, cAMP transiently activated the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in BMSCs. Activity of CREB can be modulated by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathway, however, whether the calcium signaling observed in cAMP-induced BMSCs requires CREB has not been investigated. In an effort to uncover the role of CREB in the generation of calcium signaling in response to modulators such as dopamine and KCl, we knocked down CREB activity in BMSCs. Our study indicated that BMSCs, but not its close relative fibroblasts, are responsive to dopamine and KCl after cAMP treatment. Calcium signal elicited by dopamine depends, in part, on calcium influx whereas that elicited by KCl depends completely on calcium influx. Knock-down of CREB activity significantly reduced or abolished the cAMP-induced calcium response, and reintroducing a constitutively active CREB partially restored the calcium response.

  3. The Mucosal Adjuvant Cyclic di-AMP Exerts Immune Stimulatory Effects on Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Libanova, Rimma; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic di-nucleotide bis-(3′,5′)-cyclic dimeric adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a candidate mucosal adjuvant with proven efficacy in preclinical models. It was shown to promote specific humoral and cellular immune responses following mucosal administration. To date, there is only fragmentary knowledge on the cellular and molecular mode of action of c-di-AMP. Here, we report on the identification of dendritic cells and macrophages as target cells of c-di-AMP. We show that c-di-AMP induces the cell surface up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory molecules as well as the production of interferon-β. Those responses were characterized by in vitro experiments with murine and human immune cells and in vivo studies in mice. Analyses of dendritic cell subsets revealed conventional dendritic cells as principal responders to stimulation by c-di-AMP. We discuss the impact of the reported antigen presenting cell activation on the previously observed adjuvant effects of c-di-AMP in mouse immunization studies. PMID:24755640

  4. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can affect the muscles used for movement ( skeletal muscles ). In many affected individuals, AMP deaminase deficiency does ... called AMP deaminase. This enzyme is found in skeletal muscles , where it plays a role in producing energy. ...

  5. Pathological overproduction: the bad side of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Borea, Pier Andrea; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Varani, Katia

    2017-03-02

    Adenosine is an endogenous ubiquitous purine nucleoside, which is increased by hypoxia, ischaemia and tissue damage and mediates a number of physiopathological effects by interacting with four GPCRs, identified as A1 , A2A , A2B and A3 . Physiological and acutely increased adenosine is mostly associated with beneficial effects that include vasodilatation and a decrease in inflammation. In contrast, chronic overproduction of adenosine occurs in important pathological states, where long-lasting increases in the nucleoside levels are responsible for the bad side of adenosine associated with chronic inflammation, fibrosis and organ damage. In this review, we describe and critically discuss the pathological overproduction of adenosine and analyse when, where and how adenosine exerts its detrimental effects throughout the body.

  6. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent mechanisms induce von Willebrand factor expression in the Dami megakaryoblastic cell line.

    PubMed

    Deguine, V; Kerbiriou-Nabias, D; Lecoq, D; Greenberg, S M; Meyer, D; Dosne, A M

    1995-02-01

    It has been proposed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is involved in the differentiation of several cell types and this study analysed whether von Willebrand factor (vWf) synthesis, which is a marker of the megakaryocyte maturation of these cells, would be enhanced by agents acting on cAMP formation. Different compounds known to stimulate cAMP accumulation in cells were used: dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), isobutyl-methylxanthine (IBMX) or pentoxifylline (PTX) and forskolin. Treatments with db-cAMP or IBMX (10-1,000 microM) induced a dose-dependent increase in vWf synthesis. Associations of IBMX with forskolin produced a synergistic enhancement in vWf synthesis. PTX alone did not enhance vWf synthesis but a latent effect was revealed in the presence of forskolin or db-cAMP. The increase in vWf mRNA shown by Northern blot analysis demonstrates that the protein synthesis correlates with the transcript expression after db-cAMP or IBMX treatments. vWf synthesis paralleled the accumulation of cAMP in the cells. Moreover vWf expression induced by combination of IBMX with forskolin was associated with a moderate increase in the percentage of GPIIb/IIIa positive cells and in the ploidy level related to an important inhibition of cell growth. These data provide evidence that agents acting on cAMP metabolism induce vWf synthesis in the Dami megakaryoblastic cells.

  7. The pleiotropic role of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (EPAC1) in cancer: implications for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Almahariq, Muayad; Mei, Fang C; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    The pleiotropic second messenger adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) regulates a myriad of biological processes under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (EPAC1) mediates the intracellular functions of cAMP by acting as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Ras-like Rap small GTPases. Recent studies suggest that EPAC1 plays important roles in immunomodulation, cancer cell migration/metastasis, and metabolism. These results, coupled with the successful development of EPAC-specific small molecule inhibitors, identify EPAC1 as a promising therapeutic target for cancer treatments.

  8. Regulatory mechanisms of cAMP levels as a multiple target for antiplatelet activity and less bleeding risk.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván

    2014-08-01

    Platelet activation is a critical component of atherothrombosis. The multiple pathways of platelet activation limit the effect of specific receptor/pathway inhibitors, resulting in limited clinical efficacy. Recent research has confirmed that combination therapy results in enhanced antithrombotic efficacy without increasing bleeding risk. In this way, the best-known inhibitor and turn off signaling in platelet activation is cAMP. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of regulation of intraplatelet cAMP levels, a) platelet-dependent pathway: Gi/Gs protein-coupled receptors, phosphodiesterase inhibition and activation of PPARs and b) platelet-independent pathway: inhibition of adenosine uptake by erythrocytes. With respect to the association between intraplatelet cAMP levels and bleeding risk it is possible to establish that compounds/drugs with pleitropic effect for increased intraplatelet cAMP level could have an antithrombotic activity with less risk of bleeding.

  9. Cloning and expression of an A1 adenosine receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; McVittie, L.D.; Smyk-Randall, E.M.; Nakata, H.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Gerfen, C.R.; Sibley, D.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction technique to selectively amplify guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor cDNA sequences from rat striatal mRNA, using sets of highly degenerate primers derived from transmembrane sequences of previously cloned G protein-coupled receptors. A novel cDNA fragment was identified, which exhibits considerable homology to various members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This fragment was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a rat striatal library. A 2.2-kilobase clone was obtained that encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with seven transmembrane domains, as predicted by hydropathy analysis. Stably transfected mouse A9-L cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells that expressed mRNA for this clone were screened with putative receptor ligands. Saturable and specific binding sites for the A1 adenosine antagonist (3H)-1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine were identified on membranes from transfected cells. The rank order of potency and affinities of various adenosine agonist and antagonist ligands confirmed the identity of this cDNA clone as an A1 adenosine receptor. The high affinity binding of A1 adenosine agonists was shown to be sensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanylyl-5{prime}-imidodiphosphate. In adenylyl cyclase assays, adenosine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production by greater than 50%, in a pharmacologically specific fashion. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses of receptor mRNA in brain tissues revealed two transcripts of 5.6 and 3.1 kilobases, both of which were abundant in cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and thalamus, with lower levels in olfactory bulb, striatum, mesencephalon, and retina. These regional distribution data are in good agreement with previous receptor autoradiographic studies involving the A1 adenosine receptor.

  10. Torsades de pointes after adenosine administration.

    PubMed

    Teodorovich, Nicholay; Margolin, Elena; Kogan, Yonatan; Paz, Ofir; Swissa, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine can produce arrhythmias, which are generally short living. It may induce PACs and PVCs, sinus bradycardia, and atrial fibrillation. There have been reports of transient polymorphic VT (torsades de pointes) in patients with LQTS and others in people with normal QT interval. We report a case of a long episode of polymorphic VT induced by adenosine. A 27 year old woman received 6 mg adenosine for PSVT, which terminated and torsades de pointes developed, persisting for 17 seconds and terminated spontaneously. This is the longest described duration of the torsades after adenosine administration in patients with normal QT interval.

  11. Newly synthesized cAMP is integrated at a membrane protein complex signalosome to ensure receptor response specificity.

    PubMed

    Guinzberg, Raquel; Díaz-Cruz, Antonio; Acosta-Trujillo, Carlos; Vilchis-Landeros, María Magdalena; Vázquez-Meza, Héctor; Lozano-Flores, Carlos; Chiquete-Felix, Natalia; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Piña, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP within the cell is required to achieve receptor-specific responses. The mechanism through which the cell selects a specific response to newly synthesized cAMP is not fully understood. In hepatocyte plasma membranes, we identified two functional and independent cAMP-responsive signaling protein macrocomplexes that produce, use, degrade, and regulate their own nondiffusible (sequestered) cAMP pool to achieve their specific responses. Each complex responds to the stimulation of an adenosine G protein-coupled receptor (Ado-GPCR), bound to either A2A or A2B , but not simultaneously to both. Each isoprotein involved in each signaling cascade was identified by measuring changes in cAMP levels after receptor activation, and its participation was confirmed by antibody-mediated inactivation. A2A -Ado-GPCR selective stimulation activates adenylyl cyclase 6 (AC6), which is bound to AKAP79/150, to synthesize cAMP which is used by two other AKAP79/150-tethered proteins: protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphodiesterase 3A (PDE3A). In contrast, A2B -Ado-GPCR stimulation activates D-AKAP2-attached AC5 to generate cAMP, which is channeled to two other D-AKAP2-tethered proteins: guanine-nucleotide exchange factor 2 (Epac2) and PDE3B. In both cases, prior activation of PKA or Epac2 with selective cAMP analogs prevents de novo cAMP synthesis. In addition, we show that cAMP does not diffuse between these protein macrocomplexes or 'signalosomes'. Evidence of coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization of some proteins belonging to each signalosome is presented. Each signalosome constitutes a minimal functional signaling unit with its own machinery to synthesize and regulate a sequestered cAMP pool. Thus, each signalosome is devoted to ensure the transmission of a unique and unequivocal message through the cell.

  12. Partial separation of platelet and placental adenosine receptors from adenosine A2-like binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnierowicz, S.; Work, C.; Hutchison, K.; Fox, I.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The ubiquitous adenosine A2-like binding protein obscures the binding properties of adenosine receptors assayed with 5'-N-({sup 3}H)ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). To solve this problem, we developed a rapid and simple method to separate adenosine receptors from the adenosine A2-like binding protein. Human platelet and placental membranes were solubilized with 1% 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate. The soluble platelet extract was precipitated with polyethylene glycol and the fraction enriched in adenosine receptors was isolated from the precipitate by differential centrifugation. The adenosine A2-like binding protein was removed from the soluble placental extract with hydroxylapatite and adenosine receptors were precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The specificity of the ({sup 3}H)NECA binding is typical of an adenosine A2 receptor for platelets and an adenosine A1 receptor for placenta. This method leads to enrichment of adenosine A2 receptors for platelets and adenosine A1 receptors for placenta. This provides a useful preparation technique for pharmacologic studies of adenosine receptors.

  13. Coordinatively Unsaturated Lanthanide(III) Helicates: Luminescence Sensors for Adenosine Monophosphate in Aqueous Media.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Jashobanta; Arunachalam, Rajendran; Subramanian, Palani S; Suresh, Eringathodi; Valkonen, Arto; Rissanen, Kari; Albrecht, Markus

    2016-08-08

    Coordinatively unsaturated double-stranded helicates [(H2 L)2 Eu2 (NO3 )2 (H2 O)4 ](NO3 )4 , [(H2 L)2 Tb2 (H2 O)6 ](NO3 )6 , and [(H2 L)2 Tb2 (H2 O)6 ]Cl6 (H2 L=butanedioicacid-1,4-bis[2-(2-pyridinylmethylene)hydrazide]) are easily obtained by self-assembly from the ligand and the corresponding lanthanide(III) salts. The complexes are characterized by X-ray crystallography showing the helical arrangement of the ligands. Co-ligands at the metal ions can be easily substituted by appropriate anions. A specific luminescence response of AMP in presence of ADP, ATP, and other anions is observed. Specificity is assigned to the perfect size match of AMP to bridge the two metal centers and to replace quenching co-ligands in the coordination sphere.

  14. Experiment definition studies for AMPS Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, H.

    1975-01-01

    The electrical charging of the space shuttle orbiter is discussed in relation to the AMPS Spacelab payload along with an operations research technique for the selection of AMPS Spacelab experiments. Experiments proposed for AMPS include: hydromagnetic wave experiments; bistatic sounder of AMPS wake; and an artificial meteor gun. Experiment objectives and instrument functions are given for all experiments.

  15. Inhibition of phosphorylation of cardiac troponin-I by adenosine and 5'-chloro 5'-deoxyadenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, R.; Lowenstein, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Adenosine inhibits the positive inotropic and chronotropic effects of catecholamines on the heart. Incubation of a crude contractile protein fraction from rat heart with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP results in the phosphorylation of several proteins by endogenous protein kinases. The adenosine analog 5'-chloro 5'-deoxyadenosine inhibits the phosphorylation of a 29 kDa protein in this preparation. The protein has been identified as cardiac troponin-I (cTn-I) by 2 dimensional gel electrophoresis, with a non-equilibrium pH gradient in the first direction and SDS-PAGE in the second, using purified cTn-I as standard. Addition of catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase to the crude contractile fraction increases phosphorylation of cTn-I; this increase is inhibited by 5'-chloro 5'-deoxyadenosine and adenosine. Phosphorylation of purified cTn-I by the catalytic subunit is also inhibited by 5'-chloro 5'-deoxyadenosine. Fifty percent inhibition of phosphorylation by either endogenous or exogenous kinase was observed at approximately 50 ..mu..M 5'-chloro 5'-deoxyadenosine or adenosine, a concentration within the intracellular range during hypoxia.

  16. PD98059 and U0126 activate AMP-activated protein kinase by increasing the cellular AMP:ATP ratio and not via inhibition of the MAP kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Dokladda, Kanchana; Green, Kevin A; Pan, David A; Hardie, D Grahame

    2005-01-03

    The MAP kinase pathway inhibitor U0126 caused phosphorylation and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and increased phosphorylation of its downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase, in HEK293 cells. This effect only occurred in cells expressing the upstream kinase, LKB1. Of two other widely used MAP kinase pathway inhibitors not closely related in structure to U0126, PD98059 also activated AMPK but PD184352 did not. U0126 and PD98059, but not PD184352, also increased the cellular ADP:ATP and AMP:ATP ratios, accounting for their ability to activate AMPK. These results suggest the need for caution in interpreting experiments conducted using U0126 and PD98059.

  17. ADP-ribosylation of histones by ARTD1: an additional module of the histone code?

    PubMed

    Hottiger, Michael O

    2011-06-06

    ADP-ribosylation is a covalent post-translational protein modification catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases and is involved in important processes such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, replication or transcription. Histones are ADP-ribosylated by ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin-like 1 at specific amino acid residues, in particular lysines, of the histones tails. Specific ADP-ribosyl hydrolases and poly-ADP-ribose glucohydrolases degrade the ADP-ribose polymers. The ADP-ribose modification is read by zinc finger motifs or macrodomains, which then regulate chromatin structure and transcription. Thus, histone ADP-ribosylation may be considered an additional component of the histone code.

  18. Protein kinase Cμ mediates adenosine-stimulated steroidogenesis in primary rat adrenal cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Chia; Chen, Ying; Huang, Shih-Horng; Wang, Seu-Mei

    2010-11-05

    Adenosine (Ado), an endogenous nucleoside, can stimulate corticosterone synthesis in adrenal cells via the A(2A)/A(2B) adenosine receptors (ARs). This study evaluated the contribution of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in Ado-induced steroidogenesis. The PKC inhibitor calphostin c blocked Ado-induced steroidogenesis, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-related regulated kinase (ERK)-cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein cascade, and the mRNA expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and CYP11B1. Further analyses revealed that PKCμ was indeed activated by Ado. Moreover, downregulation of PKCμ by small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited Ado-stimulated steroidogenesis and ERK phosphorylation. Finally, inhibition of either A(2A)AR or A(2B)AR led to the suppression of PKCμ phosphorylation. Together, these findings suggest that A(2)AR-PKCμ-MEK signaling mediates Ado-stimulated adrenal steroidogenesis.

  19. ADP Analysis project for the Human Resources Management Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tureman, Robert L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The ADP (Automated Data Processing) Analysis Project was conducted for the Human Resources Management Division (HRMD) of NASA's Langley Research Center. The three major areas of work in the project were computer support, automated inventory analysis, and an ADP study for the Division. The goal of the computer support work was to determine automation needs of Division personnel and help them solve computing problems. The goal of automated inventory analysis was to find a way to analyze installed software and usage on a Macintosh. Finally, the ADP functional systems study for the Division was designed to assess future HRMD needs concerning ADP organization and activities.

  20. LACIE ADP/PI joint case study: ADP analysis guidelines. [using ERTS 1 photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minter, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    The procedure is described which was used to train automatic data processing (ADP) analysts to process ERTS 1 imagery from a 5 nm by 6 nm area in Delisle, Canada, and to estimate wheat acreage using training fields provided by photointerpreters. The exercise also served to evaluate and test current large area crop inventory experiment (LACIE) procedures.

  1. Cultured megakaryocytes: changes in the cytoskeleton after ADP-induced spreading

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Megakaryocytes from guinea pig bone marrow were isolated and maintained in liquid culture and were treated with ADP, thrombin, arachidonic acid, or collagen. Megakaryocytes spread with an active ruffled membrane in response to ADP (1-100 microM), thrombin (1.0 U/ml), and arachidonic acid (50 microM) but responded to collagen surfaces only if fibronectin was added to the cultures. Spreading could be blocked completely by dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dibutyryl cAMP) or isobutylmethylxanthine at 1 mM, as well as by cytochalasin D (2 microgram/ml), but not by colchicine up to 1 mg/ml. The distribution of contractile proteins was examined by immunofluorescence. In untreated, spherical cells, staining with antimyosin, antifilamin, anti-alpha- actinin, or with fluorescein-labeled subfragment 1 (FITC-S1) was diffuse and unpatterned. With antitubulin antibody, however, microtubules were seen in a dense array throughout the unspread cells. In actively ruffling spreading cells, myosin, filamin, and actin were visualized in the region of the ruffled membrane while alpha-actinin was seen most prominently in a band located proximal to the inner part of the ruffle. In fully spread cells, actin, myosin, filamin, and alpha- actinin were seen in filaments that filled the cytoplasm. Antimyosin and anti-alpha-actinin staining of the filaments was periodic with approximately 1 micrometer center-to-center spacing. Actin, filamin, and alpha-actinin were also identified in punctate spots throughout the spread cytoplasm. Microtubules were absent from the ruffle but filled the cytoplasm of fully spread cells. Rings, 1.5-2.5 micrometer in diameter, were seen with antitubulin in 13% of the spread cells. Our results show that megakaryocytes respond to platelet agonists, but typically by spreading, rather than extending, filopodia. From the changes in localization of contractile proteins and from time-lapse cinematography, we propose a model for cell spreading. PMID:6801061

  2. KW-3902, a selective high affinity antagonist for adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, H.; Ichimura, M.; Takeda, M.; Kanda, T.; Shimada, J.; Suzuki, F.; Kase, H.

    1996-01-01

    1. We demonstrate that 8-(noradamantan-3-yl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine (KW-3902) is a very potent and selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, assessed by radioligand binding and cyclic AMP response in cells. 2. In rat forebrain adenosine A1 receptors labelled with [3H]-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), KW-3902 had a Ki value of 0.19 nM, whereas it showed a Ki value of 170 nM in rat striatal A2A receptors labelled with [3H]-2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoad enosine (CGS21680), indicating 890 fold A1 receptor selectivity versus the A2A receptor. KW-3902 at 10 microM showed no effect on recombinant rat A3 receptors expressed on CHO cells. 3. Saturation studies with [3H]-KW-3902 revealed that it bound with high affinity (Kd = 77 pM) and limited capacity (Bmax = 470 fmol mg-1 of protein) to a single class of recognition sites. A high positive correlation was observed between the pharmacological profile of adenosine ligands inhibiting the binding of [3H]-KW-3902 and that of [3H]-CHA. 4. KW-3902 showed potent A1 antagonism against the inhibition of forskolin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation in DDT1 MF-2 cells by the A1-selective agonist, cyclopentyladenosine with a dissociation constant (KB value) of 0.34 nM. KW-3902 antagonized 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine-elicited cyclic AMP accumulation via A2B receptors with a KB value of 52 nM. 5. KW-3902 exhibited marked species-dependent differences in the binding affinities. The highest affinity was for the rat A1 receptor (ki = 0.19 nM) and these values for guinea-pig and dog A1 receptors were 1.3 and 10 nM, respectively. PMID:8732272

  3. Polyphosphate-dependent synthesis of ATP and ADP by the family-2 polyphosphate kinases in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nocek, Boguslaw; Kochinyan, Samvel; Proudfoot, Michael; Brown, Greg; Evdokimova, Elena; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Edwards, Aled M; Savchenko, Alexei; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2008-11-18

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a linear polymer of tens or hundreds of phosphate residues linked by high-energy bonds. It is found in all organisms and has been proposed to serve as an energy source in a pre-ATP world. This ubiquitous and abundant biopolymer plays numerous and vital roles in metabolism and regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, but the underlying molecular mechanisms for most activities of polyP remain unknown. In prokaryotes, the synthesis and utilization of polyP are catalyzed by 2 families of polyP kinases, PPK1 and PPK2, and polyphosphatases. Here, we present structural and functional characterization of the PPK2 family. Proteins with a single PPK2 domain catalyze polyP-dependent phosphorylation of ADP to ATP, whereas proteins containing 2 fused PPK2 domains phosphorylate AMP to ADP. Crystal structures of 2 representative proteins, SMc02148 from Sinorhizobium meliloti and PA3455 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, revealed a 3-layer alpha/beta/alpha sandwich fold with an alpha-helical lid similar to the structures of microbial thymidylate kinases, suggesting that these proteins share a common evolutionary origin and catalytic mechanism. Alanine replacement mutagenesis identified 9 conserved residues, which are required for activity and include the residues from both Walker A and B motifs and the lid. Thus, the PPK2s represent a molecular mechanism, which potentially allow bacteria to use polyP as an intracellular energy reserve for the generation of ATP and survival.

  4. Endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors localized to ganglion cells of the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Braas, K.M.; Zarbin, M.A.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-06-01

    Using specific sensitive antisera against adenosine, we have immunocytochemically localized endogenous adenosine to specific layers of rat, guinea pig, monkey, and human retina. Highest adenosine immunoreactivity was observed in ganglion cells and their processes in the optic nerve fiber layer. Substantial staining was also found throughout the inner plexiform layer and in select cells in the inner nuclear layer. Adenosine A1 receptors, labeled with the agonists L-(/sup 3/H)phenylisopropyladenosine and /sup 125/I-labeled hydroxy-phenylisopropyladenosine, were autoradiographically localized. The highest levels of binding sites occurred in the nerve fiber, ganglion cell, and inner plexiform layers of the retina in all the species examined. The distribution of adenosine A1 receptor sites closely parallels that of retinal neurons and fibers containing immunoreactive adenosine. These results suggest a role for endogenous adenosine as a coneurotransmitter in ganglion cells and their fibers in the optic nerve.

  5. Development and application of an LC-MS/MS method for measuring the effect of (partial) agonists on cAMP accumulation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Goutier, W; Spaans, P A; van der Neut, M A W; McCreary, A C; Reinders, J H

    2010-04-30

    Cyclic-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) plays an important role in cell signalling and is widely used as a marker for receptor activation and as a target for treating various diseases. In this paper we present the development and validation of a new method for the determination of cAMP and ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and other nucleotides in a biological system by combining zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The HILIC-MS/MS method was developed for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of cAMP and ATP, and was validated by assessment of linearity (over a range from 0.5 to 100nM for cAMP and 50 nM to 50 microM for ATP (r(2)>0.999)), resolution, limit of detection (0.5 and 50 nM for cAMP and ATP, respectively) and reproducibility. Furthermore, the method was validated and applied in vitro to determine cAMP accumulation in biological samples. The effect of several dopamine D(2) (partial) agonists and antagonists on cAMP accumulation was assessed by determination of the cAMP/ATP ratio in cells transfected with the human dopamine D(2L) receptor. Quinpirole, dopamine and ropinirole produced agonist effects on cAMP accumulation, with a potency of quinpirole>ropinirole>dopamine. Lisuride, terguride and bifeprunox were found to be partial agonists with efficacies of lisuride>terguride>bifeprunox. As expected, haloperidol, (-)-sulpiride and LY-741626 were antagonists. These results demonstrate that the present analytical method was robust, fast, sensitive, and selective. Moreover, it showed utility in determining cAMP/ATP in biological systems and the ability to study the effect of (partial) agonists and antagonists which makes it a useful tool for drug discovery.

  6. Attempts to Detect Cyclic Adenosine 3′:5′-Monophosphate in Higher Plants by Three Assay Methods 12

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Ray A.; Ross, Cleon W.; Vandepeute, Jozef

    1976-01-01

    Endogenous levels of cyclic adenosine-3′:5′-monophosphate in coleoptile first leaf segments of oat (Avena sativa L.), potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) callus, and germinating seeds of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were measured with a modified Gilman binding assay and a protein kinase activation assay. The incorporation of adenosine-8-14C into compounds with properties similar to those of cyclic AMP was also measured in studies with germinating lettuce seeds. The binding assay proved reliable for mouse and rat liver analyses, but was nonspecific for plant tissues. It responded to various components from lettuce and potato tissues chromatographically similar to but not identical with cyclic AMP. The protein kinase activation assay was much more specific, but it also exhibited positive responses in the presence of compounds not chromatographically identical to cyclic AMP. The concentrations of cyclic AMP in the plant tissues tested were at the lower limits of detection and characterization obtainable with these assays. The estimates of maximal levels were much lower than reported in many previous studies. PMID:16659419

  7. Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent endonuclease and ADP-ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, K; Tanaka, Y; Kamiya, T

    1983-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the inhibition of Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent endonuclease by ADP-ribosylation was studied by using purified bull seminal plasma Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent endonuclease, endonuclease-stimulating proteins, and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The activity of an essentially homogeneous preparation of the endonuclease was markedly suppressed by its preincubation with NAD+, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase, DNA, and Mg2+. These four components of the incubation mixture were all essential for the suppression of the activity. Analyses of the initial and the chased reaction product by Sephadex G-100 column chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent endonuclease was ADP-ribosylated during the incubation and its activity was markedly inhibited by the elongation of the ADP-ribose polymer covalently attached to the endonuclease. When the suppressed enzymes were mildly treated with an alkaline pH of 10.0, the activity was restored almost to the level of the unmodified control sample. These facts indicate that the linkage between the enzyme and poly(ADP-ribose) is hydrolyzed at this pH, and that the liberated polymer itself does not appreciably affect the endonuclease activity. These results also suggest that an electric repulsion between negative charges on DNA and poly(ADP-ribose) attached to Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent endonuclease is the basis for the observed suppression of the enzyme by ADP-ribosylation. Though histone H2B and H1 are shown to be as good endonuclease-stimulators (1) as they are good acceptors of ADP-ribose in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase reaction (2), ADP-ribosylation of these two proteins did not affect their endonuclease-stimulating ability appreciably, at least under the conditions used.

  8. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study demonstrates, on the basis of several analyanalytical criteria, that the production and extracellular release of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is widespread among phytoplankton species. The production and release of CAMP varied markedly among different species grown under similar environmental conditions, and intraspecifically during the life cycle of a given algal species. This investigation marks the first time cAMP has been investigated in natural aquatic systems. An examination of epilimnetic lakewater samples from Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan, demonstrated that cAMP existed in both particulate-associated and dissolved forms in these systems.

  9. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study is an investigation into the occurrence and potential functions of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP), a potent and ubiquitous metabolic regulatory molecule in heterotrophic organisms, in phytoplankton and in natural aquatic communities. Laboratory-cultured phytoplankton were grown under both optimal and suboptimal nutrient regimes under constant temperature and illumination regimes. Cellular and extracellular cAMP production, characterized by a number of biochemical techniques, was correlated with growth rate dynamics, chlorophyll a synthesis, /sup 14/C-bicarbonate uptake, alkaline phosphatase activity, and heterocyst formation. The blue-green alga Anabaena flos-aquae was used as a model system in the examination of these metabolic variables. Additionally, this alga was used to test the effects of perturbation of cAMP levels on the aforementioned metabolic variables. Investigations on the occurrence and seasonal dynamics of cAMP in aquatic systems were conducted on Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and on Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan. Putative cAMP from both systems was characterized by several biochemical techniques. Weekly sampling of particulate and dissolved cAMP in the epilimnia of both lakes was correlated with data on the rates of primary productivity, alkaline phosphatase activity, chlorophyll a synthesis and changes in phytoplankton community structure.

  10. Ratiometric bioluminescence indicators for monitoring cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in live cells based on luciferase-fragment complementation.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Masaki; Nagaoka, Yasutaka; Yamada, Toshimichi; Takakura, Hideo; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2010-11-15

    Bioluminescent indicators for cyclic 3',5'-monophosphate AMP (cAMP) are powerful tools for noninvasive detection with high sensitivity. However, the absolute photon counts are affected substantially by adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and d-luciferin concentrations, limiting temporal analysis in live cells. This report describes a genetically encoded bioluminescent indicator for detecting intracellular cAMP based on complementation of split fragments of two-color luciferase mutants originated from click beetles. A cAMP binding domain of protein kinase A was connected with an engineered carboxy-terminal fragment of luciferase, of which ends were connected with amino-terminal fragments of green luciferase and red luciferase. We demonstrated that the ratio of green to red bioluminescence intensities was less influenced by the changes of ATP and d-luciferin concentrations. We also showed an applicability of the bioluminescent indicator for time-course and quantitative assessments of intracellular cAMP in living cells and mice. The bioluminescent indicator will enable quantitative analysis and imaging of spatiotemporal dynamics of cAMP in opaque and autofluorescent living subjects.

  11. Killer toxin for sake yeast: properties and effects of adenosine 5'-diphosphate and calcium ion on killing action.

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, H; Shinmyo, A; Enatsu, T

    1977-01-01

    The killer character of strain isolated from the main mash of sake brewing which produces a killer substance for sake yeast was transmitted to hybrids of the strain and a standard strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through a cytoplasmic determinant. The character was eliminated at 41 degrees C by incubation followed by growth at 30 degrees C. The killer strain produced the killer toxin in a growth-associated manner. A preparation of crude killer toxin extract showed first-order inactivation and a linear Arrhenius plot between 25 and 40 degrees C, with an activation of energy of 55.0 kcal/mol. Addition of 1% of synthetic polymer protected the toxin from inactivation by agitation but not by heat. Enhancement of the killer action toward sensitive yeast cells by only the nucleotide adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) was observed after plating on agar medium as well as after incubation in liquid medium. The addition of CaCl2 reversed the enhancing effect of ADP on killing activity. This action of CaCl2 was inhibited by cycloheximide, suggesting that protein synthesis is required for recovery of toxin-induced cells in the presence of CaCl2. Further, CaCl2 overcame the decrease in the intracellular level of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) enhanced by ADP in killer-treated cells and also inhibited leakage of ATP from the cells with immediate response. The mode of killing action is discussed in terms of a transient state of the cells and the action of ADP and CaCl2. PMID:14107

  12. 2',3'-cAMP hydrolysis by metal-dependent phosphodiesterases containing DHH, EAL, and HD domains is non-specific: Implications for PDE screening.

    PubMed

    Rao, Feng; Qi, Yaning; Murugan, Elavazhagan; Pasunooti, Swathi; Ji, Qiang

    2010-07-30

    The recent report of 2',3'-cAMP isolated from rat kidney is the first proof of its biological existence, which revived interest in this mysterious molecule. 2',3'-cAMP serves as an extracellular adenosine source, but how it is degraded remains unclear. Here, we report that 2',3'-cAMP can be hydrolyzed by six phosphodiesterases containing three different families of hydrolytic domains, generating invariably 3'-AMP but not 2'-AMP. The catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) of each enzyme against 2',3'-cAMP correlates with that against the widely used non-specific substrate bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate (bis-pNPP), indicating that 2',3'-cAMP is a previously unknown non-specific substrate for PDEs. Furthermore, we show that the exclusive formation of 3'-AMP is due to the P-O2' bond having lower activation energy and is not the result of steric exclusion at enzyme active site. Our analysis provides mechanistic basis to dissect protein function when 2',3'-cAMP hydrolysis is observed.

  13. Triple negative breast cancer development can be selectively suppressed by sustaining an elevated level of cellular cyclic AMP through simultaneously blocking its efflux and decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Li, Yue; Zhu, Jessica Y.; Fang, Dongdong; Ding, Han-Fei; Dong, Zheng; Jing, Qing; Su, Shi-Bing; Huang, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the highest mortality among all breast cancer types and lack of targeted therapy is a key factor contributing to its high mortality rate. In this study, we show that 8-bromo-cAMP, a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) analog at high concentration (> 1 mM) selectively suppresses TNBC cell growth. However, commonly-used cAMP-elevating agents such as adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin and pan phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) are ineffective. Inability of cAMP elevating agents to inhibit TNBC cell growth is due to rapid diminution of cellular cAMP through efflux and decomposition. By performing bioinformatics analyses with publically available gene expression datasets from breast cancer patients/established breast cancer cell lines and further validating using specific inhibitors/siRNAs, we reveal that multidrug resistance-associated protein 1/4 (MRP1/4) mediate rapid cAMP efflux while members PDE4 subfamily facilitate cAMP decomposition. When cAMP clearance is prevented by specific inhibitors, forskolin blocks TNBC's in vitro cell growth by arresting cell cycle at G1/S phase. Importantly, cocktail of forskolin, MRP inhibitor probenecid and PDE4 inhibitor rolipram suppresses TNBC in vivo tumor development. This study suggests that a TNBC-targeted therapeutic strategy can be developed by sustaining an elevated level of cAMP through simultaneously blocking its efflux and decomposition. PMID:27901486

  14. Sustained delivery of dbcAMP by poly(propylene carbonate) micron fibers promotes axonal regenerative sprouting and functional recovery after spinal cord hemisection.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tongliang; Ni, Shilei; Li, Xingang; Yao, Jun; Qi, Hongxu; Fan, Xiaoyong; Wang, Jiangang

    2013-11-13

    This study describes the use of poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) electrospun fibers as vehicle for the sustained delivery of dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dbcAMP) to the hemisected spinal cord. The dbcAMP and PPC were uniformly mixed with acetonitrile; then, electrospinning was used to generate micron fibers. The release of dbcAMP was assessed by ELISA in vitro. Our results showed that the encapsulation of dbcAMP in the fibers led to stable and prolonged release in vitro. The PPC micron fibers containing dbcAMP and the PPC micron fibers without dbcAMP were then implanted into the hemisected thoracic spinal cord, followed by testing of the functional recovery and immunohistochemistry. Compared with the control group, sustained delivery of dbcAMP promoted axonal regenerative sprouting and functional recovery and reduced glial scar formation, and the PPC micron fibers without dbcAMP did not have these effects. Our findings demonstrated the feasibility of using PPC electrospun fibers containing dbcAMP for spinal cord injury. The approach described here also will provide a platform for the potential delivery of other axon-growth-promoting or scar-inhibiting agents.

  15. Compartmentalisation of cAMP-dependent signalling in blood platelets: The role of lipid rafts and actin polymerisation.

    PubMed

    Raslan, Zaher; Naseem, Khalid M

    2015-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) inhibits blood platelets through the activation of membrane adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated signalling. However, the molecular mechanism controlling cAMP signalling in blood platelet remains unclear, and in particular how individual isoforms of AC and protein kinase A (PKA) are coordinated to target distinct substrates in order to modulate platelet activation. In this study, we demonstrate that lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton may play a key role in regulating platelet responses to cAMP downstream of PGI2. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD) increased platelet sensitivity to PGI2 and forskolin, a direct AC cyclase activator, resulting in greater inhibition of collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation. In contrast, platelet inhibition by the direct activator of PKA, 8-CPT-6-Phe-cAMP was unaffected by MβCD treatment. Consistent with the functional data, lipid raft disruption increased PGI2-stimulated cAMP formation and proximal PKA-mediated signalling events. Platelet inhibition, cAMP formation and phosphorylation of PKA substrates in response to PGI2 were also increased in the presence of cytochalasin D, indicating a role for actin cytoskeleton in signalling in response to PGI2. A potential role for lipid rafts in cAMP signalling is strengthened by our finding that a pool of ACV/VI and PKA was partitioned into lipid rafts. Our data demonstrate partial compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling machinery in platelets, where lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton regulate the inhibitory effects induced by PGI2. The increased platelet sensitivity to cAMP-elevating agents signalling upon raft and cytoskeleton disruption suggests that these compartments act to restrain basal cAMP signalling.

  16. Ultrastructural localization of 5'AMP odorant receptor sites on the dendrites of olfactory receptor neurons of the spiny lobster.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, D N; Simmons, R B; Burgess, M F; Derby, C D; Nishikawa, M; Olson, K S

    1993-07-01

    A unique probe--biotinylated adenosine-5'-monophosphate (5'AMP-biotin)--was used in transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies to localize 5'AMP odorant binding sites on the dendrites of olfactory receptor neurons in the aesthetasc sensilla of the spiny lobster, Panulirus argus. This probe is capable of both binding to and exciting 5'AMP-sensitive olfactory receptor neurons, as revealed through biochemical and electrophysiological assays. TEM studies showed that 5'AMP-biotin binding sites are distributed along the entire dendritic region that is exposed to odorants, including the transitional zone (between the inner and outer dendritic segments, including the ciliary segment) and all of the outer dendritic segment. The density of 5'AMP binding sites per micron2 of membrane is similar along the length of the olfactory dendrite. However, the relative number of 5'AMP-biotin binding sites per micron2 of sensillar area diminishes in the distal 30% of the aesthetasc due to a decrease in the amount of dendritic membrane in that region. The distribution of these 5'AMP binding sites is therefore much more extensive than that of enzymes that inactivate 5'AMP--5'ectonucleotidase/phosphatase--which are restricted to the transitional zone (Gleeson et al., 1991). Taken together, these results suggest that 5'AMP-biotin is labeling 5'AMP-specific olfactory receptor sites that are located along the entire outer dendritic segment and that can be coupled to olfactory transduction. This study represents the first in situ localization of specific olfactory receptor sites using a specific, functionally defined ligand.

  17. Regulation of photoreceptor gap junction phosphorylation by adenosine in zebrafish retina

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyan; Chuang, Alice Z.; O’Brien, John

    2014-01-01

    Electrical coupling of photoreceptors through gap junctions suppresses voltage noise, routes rod signals into cone pathways, expands the dynamic range of rod photoreceptors in high scotopic and mesopic illumination, and improves detection of contrast and small stimuli. In essentially all vertebrates, connexin 35/36 (gene homologues Cx36 in mammals, Cx35 in other vertebrates) is the major gap junction protein observed in photoreceptors, mediating rod-cone, cone-cone, and possibly rod-rod communication. Photoreceptor coupling is dynamically controlled by the day/night cycle and light/dark adaptation, and is directly correlated with phosphorylation of Cx35/36 at two sites, serine110 and serine 276/293 (homologous sites in teleost fish and mammals respectively). Activity of protein kinase A (PKA) plays a key role during this process. Previous studies have shown that activation of dopamine D4 receptors on photoreceptors inhibits adenylyl cyclase, down-regulates cAMP and PKA activity, and leads to photoreceptor uncoupling, imposing the daytime/light condition. In this study we explored the role of adenosine, a nighttime signal with a high extracellular concentration at night and a low concentration in the day, in regulating photoreceptor coupling by examining photoreceptor Cx35 phosphorylation in zebrafish retina. Adenosine enhanced photoreceptor Cx35 phosphorylation in daytime, but with a complex dose-response curve. Selective pharmacological manipulations revealed that adenosine A2a receptors provide a potent positive drive to phosphorylate photoreceptor Cx35 under the influence of endogenous adenosine at night. A2a receptors can be activated in the daytime as well by micromolar exogenous adenosine. However, the higher affinity adenosine A1 receptors are also present and have an antagonistic though less potent effect. Thus the nighttime/darkness signal adenosine provides a net positive drive on Cx35 phosphorylation at night, working in opposition to dopamine to

  18. Protein kinase A mediates adenosine A2a receptor modulation of neurotransmitter release via synapsin I phosphorylation in cultured cells from medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Joao Paulo Pontes; Almeida, Marina Gomes; Castilho-Martins, Emerson Augusto; Costa, Maisa Aparecida; Fior-Chadi, Debora Rejane

    2014-08-01

    Synaptic transmission is an essential process for neuron physiology. Such process is enabled in part due to modulation of neurotransmitter release. Adenosine is a synaptic modulator of neurotransmitter release in the Central Nervous System, including neurons of medulla oblongata, where several nuclei are involved with neurovegetative reflexes. Adenosine modulates different neurotransmitter systems in medulla oblongata, specially glutamate and noradrenaline in the nucleus tractussolitarii, which are involved in hypotensive responses. However, the intracellular mechanisms involved in this modulation remain unknown. The adenosine A2a receptor modulates neurotransmitter release by activating two cAMP protein effectors, the protein kinase A and the exchange protein activated by cAMP. Therefore, an in vitro approach (cultured cells) was carried out to evaluate modulation of neurotransmission by adenosine A2a receptor and the signaling intracellular pathway involved. Results show that the adenosine A2a receptor agonist, CGS 21680, increases neurotransmitter release, in particular, glutamate and noradrenaline and such response is mediated by protein kinase A activation, which in turn increased synapsin I phosphorylation. This suggests a mechanism of A2aR modulation of neurotransmitter release in cultured cells from medulla oblongata of Wistar rats and suggest that protein kinase A mediates this modulation of neurotransmitter release via synapsin I phosphorylation.

  19. Regulation of rhythmic melatonin production in pineal cells of chick embryo by cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Macková, M; Lamosová, D; Zeman, M

    1998-05-01

    The pineal cells of chick embryos incubated in vitro exhibited a daily rhythm of melatonin synthesis under a 12:12 light:dark (LD) cycle at the embryonic days 16 and 19. In order to elucidate whether cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)--a component of the melatonin generating system--is already at work in the embryonic period, we measured the effects of forskolin and isobuthylmethylxantine (IBMX) on melatonin production, cAMP efflux and accumulation. Forskolin (after 10, 20, 30, 45, 60 and 90 min of administration) and IBMX (6 h), when applied during the light phase of LD cycle, stimulated melatonin production and cAMP efflux and accumulation during the embryonic period (at days 16 and 19 fo development). Our results suggest that the biochemical pathway involving cAMP, which controls melatonin production in the postnatal period, is developed before hatching and already on embryonic day 19 works in a way similar to that in post-hatched chicks. Differences in response to cAMP stimulation between 16- and 19-day-old pinealocytes seem to be mostly quantitative.

  20. Modulation of cAMP metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its effect on host infection.

    PubMed

    Barba, Jeannette; Alvarez, Angel H; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto

    2010-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the single most relevant bacterial infectious agent as Tuberculosis is estimated to affect one-third of the world population. Like other microorganisms, M. tuberculosis needs to sense and adapt to changes in the several niches where it is found, ranging from the environment to a number of host-adapted programs, including infection of cell types such as macrophages, dendritic cells, epithelial cells and adipocytes. A strategy commonly used by cells to respond to such changes consists of producing small molecules known as second messengers. 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is one of the best-studied second messengers in many organisms, and in recent years its participation during the M. tuberculosis infection cycle has just begun to be thoroughly considered. In this work, we aimed to provide a perspective of how cAMP metabolism proceeds in M. tuberculosis, which genes are activated in response to cAMP signaling in this organism, and discuss the evidence for bacterially produced cAMP use during infection. Furthermore, key issues needing to be addressed for better understanding cAMP physiology in slow-growing pathogenic mycobacteria are presented.

  1. Evidence for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from female pituitaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, G.A.; Baldwin, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    Sodium flufenamate, which inhibited gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-stimulated increases in adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used to evaluate the potential role of cAMP as a mediator of GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion. Quartered pituitaries from diestrous II female rats were perifused at 37/sup 0/C, and sequential effluent fractions were collected every 10 min. Administration of GnRH resulted in a characteristic biphasic response for both luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), whereas 5 ..mu..M cycloheximide inhibited the secondary augmented responses (phase II) of both hormones. Infusions of 0.1 mM flufenamate inhibited GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion in a manner similar to that of cycloheximide, whereas the administration of 5 mM dibutyryl cAMP in combination with GnRH and flufenamate resulted in the restoration of LH and FSH secretion. The dibutyryl cAMP-restored response appeared to be protein synthesis dependent and specific for cAMP. These results suggest that although the cyclic nucleotide is not involved in the acute release of LH and FSH, it does appear to play a pivotal but indirect role in phase II release of the hormones, by effects involving the stimulation of de novo protein synthesis.

  2. ADP-ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Jouanneau, Y.; Roby, C.; Meyer, C.M.; Vignais, P.M. )

    1989-07-25

    In the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, nitrogenase is regulated by a reversible covalent modification of Fe protein or dinitrogenase reductase (Rc2). The linkage of the modifying group to inactive Rc2 was found to be sensitive to alkali and to neutral hydroxylamine. Complete release of the modifying group was achieved by incubation of inactive Rc2 in 0.4 or 1 M hydroxylamine. After hydroxylamine treatment of the Rc2 preparation, the modifying group could be isolated and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The modifying group comigrated with ADP-ribose on both ion-exchange HPLC and thin-layer chromatography. Analyses by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry provided further evidence that the modifying group was ADP-ribose. The NMR spectrum of inactive Rc2 exhibited signals characteristic of ADP-ribose; integration of these signals allowed calculation of a molar ration ADP-ribose/Rc2 of 0.63. A hexapeptide carrying the ADP-ribose moiety was purified from a subtilisin digest of inactive Rc2. The structure of this peptide, determined by amino acid analysis and sequencing, is Gly-Arg(ADP-ribose)-Gly-Val-Ile-Thr. This structure allows identification of the binding site for ADP-ribose as Arg 101 of the polypeptide chain of Rc2. It is concluded that nitrogenase activity in R. capsulatus is regulated by reversible ADP-ribosylation of a specific arginyl residue of dinitrogenase reductase.

  3. ADP-MAS: A Math and Science Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of La Raza, Washington, DC.

    This curriculum, Academia del Pueblo-Math and Science (ADP-MAS), is an outgrowth of the National Council of La Raza's Project EXCEL, a supplemental educational enrichment model for at-risk Latino students to be operated by Latino community-based organizations or public institutions, including schools with substantial Latino populations. ADP-MAS…

  4. Effects of Catecholamines and their Interaction with Other Hormones on Cyclic 3′,5′-Adenosine Monophosphate of the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Nama P.; Reed, Sarah W.; Murdaugh, H. V.; Davis, Bernard B.

    1972-01-01

    Catecholamines have several physiological effects on the kidney. These include: (a) stimulation of renin synthesis in the cortex: (b) antidiuresis by beta adrenergic agents; and (c) diuresis by alpha adrenergic stimulation. The role of cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) in the renal actions of catecholamines was evaluated by measuring the effects of several adrenergic agents on cyclic AMP concentration in the dog kidney. Beta adrenergic activity increased cyclic AMP concentration in the renal cortex, a finding consistent with the hypothesis that beta-adrenergic stimulation augments renin synthesis by increasing cyclic AMP generation. Beta adrenergic stimulation, like vasopressin, increased cyclic AMP concentration in the renal medulla. This suggests that beta adrenergic stimulation causes antidiuresis by augmenting cyclic AMP generation in the renal medulla. Alpha adrenergic activity inhibited the effect of vasopressin to stimulate cyclic AMP generation. These results support the hypothesis that the diuretic effect of alpha adrenergic stimulation is mediated by inhibition of the effect of vasopressin to increase cyclic AMP generation. PMID:4335447

  5. Increased levels of adenosine and ecto 5'-nucleotidase (CD73) activity precede renal alterations in experimental diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Oyarzún, C; Salinas, C; Gómez, D; Jaramillo, K; Pérez, G; Alarcón, S; Podestá, L; Flores, C; Quezada, C; San Martín, R

    The pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN) has not been clearly established, making diagnosis and patient management difficult. Recent studies using experimental diabetic models have implicated adenosine signaling with renal cells dysfunction. Therefore, the study of the biochemical mechanisms that regulate extracellular adenosine availability during DN is of emerging interest. Using streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats we demonstrated that urinary levels of adenosine were early increased. Further analyses showed an increased expression of the ecto 5'-nucleotidase (CD73), which hydrolyzes AMP to adenosine, at the renal proximal tubules and a higher enzymatic activity in tubule extracts. These changes precede the signs of diabetic kidney injury recognized by significant proteinuria, morphological alterations and the presence of the renal fibrosis markers alpha smooth muscle actin and fibronectin, collagen deposits and thickening of the glomerular basement membrane. In the proximal tubule cell line HK2 we identified TGF-β as a key modulator of CD73 activity. Importantly, the increased activity of CD73 could be screened in urinary sediments from diabetic rats. In conclusion, the increase of CD73 activity is a key component in the production of high levels of adenosine and emerges as a new tool for the early diagnosis of tubular injury in diabetic kidney disease.

  6. Analysis of the cGMP/cAMP interactome using a chemical proteomics approach in mammalian heart tissue validates sphingosine kinase type 1-interacting protein as a genuine and highly abundant AKAP.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Arjen; Poh, Mee Kian; van Veen, Toon A B; van Breukelen, Bas; Vos, Marc A; Heck, Albert J R

    2006-06-01

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates cAMP and cGMP play an essential role in many signaling pathways. To analyze which proteins do interact with these second messenger molecules, we developed a chemical proteomics approach using cAMP and cGMP immobilized onto agarose beads, via flexible linkers in the 2- and 8-position of the nucleotide. Optimization of the affinity pull-down procedures in lysates of HEK293 cells revealed that a large variety of proteins could be pulled down specifically. Identification of these proteins by mass spectrometry showed that many of these proteins were indeed genuine cAMP or cGMP binding proteins. However, additionally many of the pulled-down proteins were more abundant AMP/ADP/ATP, GMP/GDP/GTP, or general DNA/RNA binding proteins. Therefore, a sequential elution protocol was developed, eluting proteins from the beads using solutions containing ADP, GDP, cGMP, and/or cAMP, respectively. Using this protocol, we were able to sequentially and selectively elute ADP, GDP, and DNA binding proteins. The fraction left on the beads was further enriched, for cAMP/cGMP binding proteins. Transferring this protocol to the analysis of the cGMP/cAMP "interactome" in rat heart ventricular tissue enabled the specific pull-down of known cAMP/cGMP binding proteins such as cAMP and cGMP dependent protein kinases PKA and PKG, several phosphodiesterases and 6 AKAPs, that interact with PKA. Among the latter class of proteins was the highly abundant sphingosine kinase type1-interating protein (SKIP), recently proposed to be a potential AKAP. Further bioinformatics analysis endorses that SKIP is indeed a genuine PKA interacting protein, which is highly abundant in heart ventricular tissue.

  7. Halogenated pyrrolopyrimidine analogues of adenosine from marine organisms: pharmacological activities and potent inhibition of adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Davies, L P; Jamieson, D D; Baird-Lambert, J A; Kazlauskas, R

    1984-02-01

    Two novel halogenated pyrrolopyrimidine analogues of adenosine, isolated from marine sources, have been examined for pharmacological and biochemical activities. 4-Amino-5-bromo-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine, from a sponge of the genus Echinodictyum, had bronchodilator activity at least as potent as theophylline but with a different biochemical profile; unlike theophylline it had no antagonist activity at CNS adenosine receptors and it was quite a potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake and adenosine kinase in brain tissue. 5'-Deoxy-5-iodotubercidin, isolated from the red alga Hypnea valentiae, caused potent muscle relaxation and hypothermia when injected into mice. This compound was a very potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake into rat and guinea-pig brain slices and an extremely potent inhibitor of adenosine kinase from guinea-pig brain and rat brain and liver. Neither of these two pyrrolopyrimidine analogues was a substrate for, or an inhibitor of, adenosine deaminase. Neither compound appeared to have any direct agonist activity on guinea-pig brain adenosine-stimulated adenylate cyclase (A2 adenosine receptors). 5'-Deoxy-5-iodotubercidin is unique in two respects: it appears to be the first naturally-occurring example of a 5'-deoxyribosyl nucleoside and is the first example of a specifically iodinated nucleoside from natural sources. It may be the most potent adenosine kinase inhibitor yet described and, by virtue of its structure, may prove to be the most specific.

  8. Homeostatic control of synaptic activity by endogenous adenosine is mediated by adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Diógenes, Maria José; Neves-Tomé, Raquel; Fucile, Sergio; Martinello, Katiuscia; Scianni, Maria; Theofilas, Panos; Lopatár, Jan; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Maggi, Laura; Frenguelli, Bruno G; Limatola, Cristina; Boison, Detlev; Sebastião, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine, a key regulator of neuronal excitability, is metabolized by astrocyte-based enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). We hypothesized that ADK might be an upstream regulator of adenosine-based homeostatic brain functions by simultaneously affecting several downstream pathways. We therefore studied the relationship between ADK expression, levels of extracellular adenosine, synaptic transmission, intrinsic excitability, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent synaptic actions in transgenic mice underexpressing or overexpressing ADK. We demonstrate that ADK: 1) Critically influences the basal tone of adenosine, evaluated by microelectrode adenosine biosensors, and its release following stimulation; 2) determines the degree of tonic adenosine-dependent synaptic inhibition, which correlates with differential plasticity at hippocampal synapses with low release probability; 3) modulates the age-dependent effects of BDNF on hippocampal synaptic transmission, an action dependent upon co-activation of adenosine A2A receptors; and 4) influences GABAA receptor-mediated currents in CA3 pyramidal neurons. We conclude that ADK provides important upstream regulation of adenosine-based homeostatic function of the brain and that this mechanism is necessary and permissive to synaptic actions of adenosine acting on multiple pathways. These mechanistic studies support previous therapeutic studies and implicate ADK as a promising therapeutic target for upstream control of multiple neuronal signaling pathways crucial for a variety of neurological disorders.

  9. Lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate during and after normal pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    von Mandach, U.; Gubler, H. P.; Engel, G.; Huch, R.; Huch, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The beta 2-sympathomimetics, used to inhibit preterm labour, bind predominantly to beta 2-adrenoceptors, activating adenylate cyclase to form adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), a messenger substance which inhibits the enzyme cascade triggering smooth muscle contraction. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP formation can be used as markers of beta 2-adrenergic effect. 2. The present study addresses the influence of pregnancy on the beta-adrenoceptor system. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) in circulating lymphocytes were determined at three points in gestation (16, 29 and 37 weeks) and 9 weeks post partum in 22 normal pregnancies. (-)-[125Iodo]-cyanopindolol was used as the ligand to identify a homogeneous population of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes. B- and T-cell fractions were estimated from the same samples. 3. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density decreased significantly during gestation until week 37 (P < 0.01), then increased post partum (P < 0.005). Cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) were significantly lower after 16 weeks of gestation than post partum (P < 0.05). 4. The results, which cannot be explained in terms of a shift in the lymphocyte (B- and T-cell) ratio, indicate that beta-adrenoceptor density and function are reduced in normal pregnancy and only return to normal post partum. These findings may be of significance in devising future tocolytic therapy with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:8383562

  10. Lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate during and after normal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    von Mandach, U; Gubler, H P; Engel, G; Huch, R; Huch, A

    1993-02-01

    1. The beta 2-sympathomimetics, used to inhibit preterm labour, bind predominantly to beta 2-adrenoceptors, activating adenylate cyclase to form adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), a messenger substance which inhibits the enzyme cascade triggering smooth muscle contraction. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP formation can be used as markers of beta 2-adrenergic effect. 2. The present study addresses the influence of pregnancy on the beta-adrenoceptor system. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) in circulating lymphocytes were determined at three points in gestation (16, 29 and 37 weeks) and 9 weeks post partum in 22 normal pregnancies. (-)-[125Iodo]-cyanopindolol was used as the ligand to identify a homogeneous population of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes. B- and T-cell fractions were estimated from the same samples. 3. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density decreased significantly during gestation until week 37 (P < 0.01), then increased post partum (P < 0.005). Cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) were significantly lower after 16 weeks of gestation than post partum (P < 0.05). 4. The results, which cannot be explained in terms of a shift in the lymphocyte (B- and T-cell) ratio, indicate that beta-adrenoceptor density and function are reduced in normal pregnancy and only return to normal post partum. These findings may be of significance in devising future tocolytic therapy with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists.

  11. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate blocks acetaminophen toxicity by increasing ubiquitination-mediated ASK1 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qi; Xu, Xi; Kong, Yi; Zhang, Jianfa

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced liver failure in the world. Hepatic c-jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation is thought to be a consequence of oxidative stress produced during APAP metabolism. Activation of JNK signals causes hepatocellular damage with necrotic and apoptotic cell death. Here we found that APAP caused a feedback increase in plasma adenosine 5′-monophsphate (5′-AMP). We demonstrated that co-administration of APAP and 5′-AMP significantly ameliorated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice, without influences on APAP metabolism and its analgesic function. The mechanism of protection by 5′-AMP was through inhibiting APAP-induced activation of JNK, and attenuating downstream c-jun and c-fos gene expression. This was triggered by attenuating apoptosis signal-regulated kinase 1(ASK1) methylation and increasing ubiquitination-mediated ASK1 protein degradation. Our findings indicate that replacing the current APAP with a safe and functional APAP/5′-AMP formulation could prevent APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:28031524

  12. Laboratory Evaluation of Adenylate Energy Charge as a Test for Stress in Mytilus edulis and Nephtys incisa Treated with Dredged Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    concentrations of three adenine nucleotides, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), which are...that all trace metals but iron were eliminated and the concentration of the vitamins thiamin and B12 were doubled. Adenylate Extraction 13. The adductor

  13. Phosphorylation of Rap1 by cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase (PKA) Creates a Binding Site for KSR to Sustain ERK Activation by cAMP.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Maho; Li, Yanping; Dillon, Tara J; Stork, Philip J S

    2017-01-27

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an important mediator of hormonal stimulation of cell growth and differentiation through its activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. Two small G proteins, Ras and Rap1 have been proposed to mediate this activation. Using HEK293 cells as a model system, we have recently shown that both Ras and Rap1 are required for cAMP signaling to ERKs. However, cAMP-dependent Ras signaling to ERKs is transient and rapidly terminated by PKA phosphorylation of the Raf isoforms C-Raf and B-Raf. In contrast, cAMP-dependent Rap1 signaling to ERKs and Rap1 is potentiated by PKA. We show that this is due to sustained binding of B-Raf to Rap1. One of the targets of PKA is Rap1 itself, directly phosphorylating Rap1a on serine 180 and Rap1b on serine 179. We show that these phosphorylations create potential binding sites for the adaptor protein 14-3-3 that links Rap1 to the scaffold protein KSR. These results suggest that Rap1 activation of ERKs requires PKA phosphorylation and KSR binding. Because KSR and B-Raf exist as heterodimers within the cell, this binding also brings B-Raf to Rap1, allowing Rap1 to couple to ERKs through B-Raf binding to Rap1 independently of its Ras-binding domain.

  14. Optical Aptasensors for Adenosine Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Stella; Lim, Hui Si; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids are among the most researched and applied biomolecules. Their diverse two- and three-dimensional structures in conjunction with their robust chemistry and ease of manipulation provide a rare opportunity for sensor applications. Moreover, their high biocompatibility has seen them being used in the construction of in vivo assays. Various nucleic acid-based devices have been extensively studied as either the principal element in discrete molecule-like sensors or as the main component in the fabrication of sensing devices. The use of aptamers in sensors - aptasensors, in particular, has led to improvements in sensitivity, selectivity, and multiplexing capacity for a wide verity of analytes like proteins, nucleic acids, as well as small biomolecules such as glucose and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This article reviews the progress in the use of aptamers as the principal component in sensors for optical detection of ATP with an emphasis on sensing mechanism, performance, and applications with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. PMID:27446501

  15. Adenosine Kinase: Exploitation for Therapeutic Gain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine kinase (ADK; EC 2.7.1.20) is an evolutionarily conserved phosphotransferase that converts the purine ribonucleoside adenosine into 5′-adenosine-monophosphate. This enzymatic reaction plays a fundamental role in determining the tone of adenosine, which fulfills essential functions as a homeostatic and metabolic regulator in all living systems. Adenosine not only activates specific signaling pathways by activation of four types of adenosine receptors but it is also a primordial metabolite and regulator of biochemical enzyme reactions that couple to bioenergetic and epigenetic functions. By regulating adenosine, ADK can thus be identified as an upstream regulator of complex homeostatic and metabolic networks. Not surprisingly, ADK dysfunction is involved in several pathologies, including diabetes, epilepsy, and cancer. Consequently, ADK emerges as a rational therapeutic target, and adenosine-regulating drugs have been tested extensively. In recent attempts to improve specificity of treatment, localized therapies have been developed to augment adenosine signaling at sites of injury or pathology; those approaches include transplantation of stem cells with deletions of ADK or the use of gene therapy vectors to downregulate ADK expression. More recently, the first human mutations in ADK have been described, and novel findings suggest an unexpected role of ADK in a wider range of pathologies. ADK-regulating strategies thus represent innovative therapeutic opportunities to reconstruct network homeostasis in a multitude of conditions. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the genetics, biochemistry, and pharmacology of ADK and will then focus on pathologies and therapeutic interventions. Challenges to translate ADK-based therapies into clinical use will be discussed critically. PMID:23592612

  16. AMP-activated protein kinase: a target for drugs both ancient and modern.

    PubMed

    Hardie, D Grahame; Ross, Fiona A; Hawley, Simon A

    2012-10-26

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of cellular energy status. It is activated, by a mechanism requiring the tumor suppressor LKB1, by metabolic stresses that increase cellular ADP:ATP and/or AMP:ATP ratios. Once activated, it switches on catabolic pathways that generate ATP, while switching off biosynthetic pathways and cell-cycle progress. These effects suggest that AMPK activators might be useful for treatment and/or prevention of type 2 diabetes and cancer. Indeed, AMPK is activated by the drugs metformin and salicylate, the latter being the major breakdown product of aspirin. Metformin is widely used to treat diabetes, while there is epidemiological evidence that both metformin and aspirin provide protection against cancer. We review the mechanisms of AMPK activation by these and other drugs, and by natural products derived from traditional herbal medicines.

  17. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040... Adenosine triphosphate release assay. (a) Identification. An adenosine triphosphate release assay is a device that measures the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from platelets following...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040... Adenosine triphosphate release assay. (a) Identification. An adenosine triphosphate release assay is a device that measures the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from platelets following...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040... Adenosine triphosphate release assay. (a) Identification. An adenosine triphosphate release assay is a device that measures the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from platelets following...

  20. Repeated administration of adenosine increases its cardiovascular effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, H; García-Márquez, F; Magos, G A

    1987-01-20

    Hypotensive and negative chronotropic responses to adenosine in anesthetized rats increased after previous administration of the nucleoside. Bradycardia after adenosine in the isolated perfused rat heart was also potentiated after repeated administration at short intervals. This self-potentiation could be due to extracellular accumulation of adenosine and persistent stimulation of receptors caused by saturation or inhibition of cellular uptake of adenosine.

  1. Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetase from Pseudomonas fragi Catalyzes the Synthesis of Adenosine 5′-Polyphosphates and Dinucleoside Polyphosphates†

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Rui; Günther Sillero, Maria A.; Sillero, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    Acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase (EC 6.2.1.8) from Pseudomonas fragi catalyzes the synthesis of adenosine 5′-tetraphosphate (p4A) and adenosine 5′-pentaphosphate (p5A) from ATP and tri- or tetrapolyphosphate, respectively. dATP, adenosine-5′-O-[γ-thiotriphosphate] (ATPγS), adenosine(5′)tetraphospho(5′)adenosine (Ap4A), and adenosine(5′)pentaphospho(5′)adenosine (Ap5A) are also substrates of the reaction yielding p4(d)A in the presence of tripolyphosphate (P3). UTP, CTP, and AMP are not substrates of the reaction. The Km values for ATP and P3 are 0.015 and 1.3 mM, respectively. Maximum velocity was obtained in the presence of MgCl2 or CoCl2 equimolecular with the sum of ATP and P3. The relative rates of synthesis of p4A with divalent cations were Mg = Co > Mn = Zn >> Ca. In the pH range used, maximum and minimum activities were measured at pH values of 5.5 and 8.2, respectively; the opposite was observed for the synthesis of palmitoyl-CoA, with maximum activity in the alkaline range. The relative rates of synthesis of palmitoyl-CoA and p4A are around 10 (at pH 5.5) and around 200 (at pH 8.2). The synthesis of p4A is inhibited by CoA, and the inhibitory effect of CoA can be counteracted by fatty acids. To a lesser extent, the enzyme catalyzes the synthesis also of Ap4A (from ATP), Ap5A (from p4A), and adenosine(5′)tetraphospho(5′)nucleoside (Ap4N) from adequate adenylyl donors (ATP, ATPγS, or octanoyl-AMP) and adequate adenylyl acceptors (nucleoside triphosphates). PMID:9620965

  2. Insights into glycogen metabolism in chemolithoautotrophic bacteria from distinctive kinetic and regulatory properties of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Machtey, Matías; Kuhn, Misty L; Flasch, Diane A; Aleanzi, Mabel; Ballicora, Miguel A; Iglesias, Alberto A

    2012-11-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is a chemolithoautotroph that obtains energy by oxidizing ammonia in the presence of oxygen and fixes CO(2) via the Benson-Calvin cycle. Despite its environmental and evolutionary importance, very little is known about the regulation and metabolism of glycogen, a source of carbon and energy storage. Here, we cloned and heterologously expressed the genes coding for two major putative enzymes of the glycogen synthetic pathway in N. europaea, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and glycogen synthase. In other bacteria, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase catalyzes the regulatory step of the synthetic pathway and glycogen synthase elongates the polymer. In starch synthesis in plants, homologous enzymes play similar roles. We purified to homogeneity the recombinant ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from N. europaea and characterized its kinetic, regulatory, and oligomeric properties. The enzyme was allosterically activated by pyruvate, oxaloacetate, and phosphoenolpyruvate and inhibited by AMP. It had a broad thermal and pH stability and used different divalent metal ions as cofactors. Depending on the cofactor, the enzyme was able to accept different nucleotides and sugar phosphates as alternative substrates. However, characterization of the recombinant glycogen synthase showed that only ADP-Glc elongates the polysaccharide, indicating that ATP and glucose-1-phosphate are the physiological substrates of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. The distinctive properties with respect to selectivity for substrates and activators of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were in good agreement with the metabolic routes operating in N. europaea, indicating an evolutionary adaptation. These unique properties place the enzyme in a category of its own within the family, highlighting the unique regulation in these organisms.

  3. Insights into Glycogen Metabolism in Chemolithoautotrophic Bacteria from Distinctive Kinetic and Regulatory Properties of ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase from Nitrosomonas europaea

    PubMed Central

    Machtey, Matías; Kuhn, Misty L.; Flasch, Diane A.; Aleanzi, Mabel; Ballicora, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is a chemolithoautotroph that obtains energy by oxidizing ammonia in the presence of oxygen and fixes CO2 via the Benson-Calvin cycle. Despite its environmental and evolutionary importance, very little is known about the regulation and metabolism of glycogen, a source of carbon and energy storage. Here, we cloned and heterologously expressed the genes coding for two major putative enzymes of the glycogen synthetic pathway in N. europaea, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and glycogen synthase. In other bacteria, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase catalyzes the regulatory step of the synthetic pathway and glycogen synthase elongates the polymer. In starch synthesis in plants, homologous enzymes play similar roles. We purified to homogeneity the recombinant ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from N. europaea and characterized its kinetic, regulatory, and oligomeric properties. The enzyme was allosterically activated by pyruvate, oxaloacetate, and phosphoenolpyruvate and inhibited by AMP. It had a broad thermal and pH stability and used different divalent metal ions as cofactors. Depending on the cofactor, the enzyme was able to accept different nucleotides and sugar phosphates as alternative substrates. However, characterization of the recombinant glycogen synthase showed that only ADP-Glc elongates the polysaccharide, indicating that ATP and glucose-1-phosphate are the physiological substrates of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. The distinctive properties with respect to selectivity for substrates and activators of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were in good agreement with the metabolic routes operating in N. europaea, indicating an evolutionary adaptation. These unique properties place the enzyme in a category of its own within the family, highlighting the unique regulation in these organisms. PMID:22961847

  4. Activation of Th1 and Tc1 cell adenosine A2A receptors directly inhibits IL-2 secretion in vitro and IL-2-driven expansion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Andreas A; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jung, Unsu; Foley, Jason; Borenstein, Todd; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Fowler, Daniel H

    2005-06-15

    To evaluate the direct effect of adenosine on cytokine-polarized effector T cells, murine type 1 helper T cells (Th1) and type 1 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (Tc1) and Th2/Tc2 cells were generated using an antigen-presenting cell (APC)-free method. Tc1 and Tc2 cells had similar adenosine signaling, as measured by intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) increase upon adenosine A(2A) receptor agonism by CGS21680 (CGS). CGS greatly reduced Tc1 and Tc2 cell interleukin 2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion, with nominal effect on interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion. Tc2 cell IL-4 and IL-5 secretion was not reduced by CGS, and IL-10 secretion was moderately reduced. Agonist-mediated inhibition of IL-2 and TNF-alpha secretion occurred via A(2A) receptors, with no involvement of A(1), A(2B), or A(3) receptors. Adenosine agonist concentrations that abrogated cytokine secretion did not inhibit Tc1 or Tc2 cell cytolytic function. Adenosine modulated effector T cells in vivo, as CGS administration reduced CD4(+)Th1 and CD8(+)Tc1 cell expansion to alloantigen and, in a separate model, reduced antigen-specific CD4(+) Th1 cell numbers. Remarkably, agonist-mediated T-cell inhibition was abrogated by in vivo IL-2 therapy. Adenosine receptor activation therefore preferentially inhibits type I cytokine secretion, most notably IL-2. Modulation of adenosine receptors may thus represent a suitable target primarily for inflammatory conditions mediated by Th1 and Tc1 cells.

  5. A new activity of anti-HIV and anti-tumor protein GAP31: DNA adenosine glycosidase - Structural and modeling insight into its functions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui-Guang; Huang, Philip L.; Zhang, Dawei; Sun, Yongtao; Chen, Hao-Chia; Zhang, John; Huang, Paul L.; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Lee-Huang, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  6. A New Activity of Anti-HIV and Anti-tumor Protein GAP31: DNA Adenosine Glycosidase – Structural and Modeling Insight into its Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Huang, P; Zhang, D; Sun, Y; Chen, H; Zhang, J; Huang, P; Kong, X; Lee-Huang, S

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  7. Some aspects of adenosine triphosphate synthesis from adenine and adenosine in human red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Whittam, R.; Wiley, J. S.

    1968-01-01

    1. The synthesis of ATP has been studied in human erythrocytes. Fresh cells showed no net synthesis of ATP when incubated with adenine or adenosine, although labelled adenine was incorporated into ATP in small amounts. 2. Cold-stored cells (3-6 weeks old) became progressively depleted of adenine nucleotides but incubation with adenosine or adenine plus inosine restored the ATP concentration to normal within 4 hr. Incorporation of labelled adenine or adenosine into the ATP of incubated stored cells corresponded to net ATP synthesis by these cells. 3. Synthesis of ATP from adenosine plus adenine together was 75% derived from adenine and only 25% from adenosine, indicating that nucleotide synthesis from adenine inhibits the simultaneous synthesis of nucleotide from adenosine. PMID:5723519

  8. Adenosine receptors as drug targets — what are the challenges?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine signalling has long been a target for drug development, with adenosine itself or its derivatives being used clinically since the 1940s. In addition, methylxanthines such as caffeine have profound biological effects as antagonists at adenosine receptors. Moreover, drugs such as dipyridamole and methotrexate act by enhancing the activation of adenosine receptors. There is strong evidence that adenosine has a functional role in many diseases, and several pharmacological compounds specifically targeting individual adenosine receptors — either directly or indirectly — have now entered the clinic. However, only one adenosine receptor-specific agent — the adenosine A2A receptor agonist regadenoson (Lexiscan; Astellas Pharma) — has so far gained approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Here, we focus on the biology of adenosine signalling to identify hurdles in the development of additional pharmacological compounds targeting adenosine receptors and discuss strategies to overcome these challenges. PMID:23535933

  9. Chromosomal protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in pancreatic nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Aubin, R J; Dam, V T; Miclette, J; Brousseau, Y; Poirier, G G

    1982-03-01

    When pancreatic chromatin fragments were prepared and resolved in the presence of 80 mM NaCl, endogenous poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity was found to be maximal in nucleosome periodicities of four to five units and did not respond to any further increases in nucleosomal architecture. Furthermore, in nucleosome complexities spanning 1 through 14 and over unit lengths, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis on acid-urea and acid-urea-Triton gels has shown pancreatic histone H1 to be the only actively ADP-ribosylated histone species. The extent of ADP-ribosylation of histone H1 was also demonstrated to retard the protein's mobility in acid-urea, acid-urea-Triton, and lithium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels and to consist of at least 12 distinct ADP-ribosylated species extractable in all nucleosome complexities studied. Finally, extraction and subsequent electrophoresis of total chromosomal proteins in the presence of lithium dodecyl sulfate also evidenced heavy ADP-ribosylation at the level of nonhistone chromosomal proteins of the high mobility group comigrating in the core histone region, as well as in the topmost region of the gels where poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase was found to form a poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated aggregate.

  10. Glycation and glycoxidation of histones by ADP-ribose.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Laurean, D; Jacobson, E L; Jacobson, M K

    1996-05-03

    The reaction of long lived proteins with reducing sugars has been implicated in the pathophysiology of aging and age-related diseases. A likely intranuclear source of reducing sugar is ADP-ribose, which is generated following DNA damage from the turnover of ADP-ribose polymers. In this study, ADP-ribose has been shown to be a potent histone glycation and glycoxidation agent in vitro. Incubation of ADP-ribose with histones H1, H2A, H2B, and H4 at pH 7.5 resulted in the formation of ketoamine glycation conjugates. Incubation of histone H1 with ADP-ribose also rapidly resulted in the formation of protein carboxymethyllysine residues, protein-protein cross-links, and highly fluorescent products with properties similar to the advanced glycosylation end product pentosidine. The formation of glycoxidation products was related to the degradation of ketoamine glycation conjugates by two different pathways. One pathway resulted in the formation of protein carboxymethyllysine residues and release of an ADP moiety containing a glyceric acid fragment. A second pathway resulted in the release of ADP, and it is postulated that this pathway is involved in the formation of histone-histone cross-links and fluorescent advanced glycosylation end products.

  11. Creatine kinase inhibits ADP-induced platelet aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Horjus, D. L.; Nieuwland, R.; Boateng, K. B.; Schaap, M. C. L.; van Montfrans, G. A.; Clark, J. F.; Sturk, A.; Brewster, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Bleeding risk with antiplatelet therapy is an increasing clinical challenge. However, the inter-individual variation in this risk is poorly understood. We assessed whether the level of plasma creatine kinase, the enzyme that utilizes ADP and phosphocreatine to rapidly regenerate ATP, may modulate bleeding risk through a dose-dependent inhibition of ADP-induced platelet activation. Exogenous creatine kinase (500 to 4000 IU/L, phosphocreatine 5 mM) added to human plasma induced a dose-dependent reduction to complete inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Accordingly, endogenous plasma creatine kinase, studied in 9 healthy men (mean age 27.9 y, SE 3.3; creatine kinase 115 to 859 IU/L, median 358), was associated with reduced ADP-induced platelet aggregation (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, −0.6; p < 0.05). After exercise, at an endogenous creatine kinase level of 4664, ADP-induced platelet aggregation was undetectable, normalizing after rest, with a concomitant reduction of creatine kinase to normal values. Thus, creatine kinase reduces ADP-induced platelet activation. This may promote bleeding, in particular when patients use platelet P2Y12 ADP receptor inhibitors. PMID:25298190

  12. Effects of different concentrations of metal ions on degradation of adenosine triphosphate in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fillets stored at 4°C: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Qin, Na; Zhang, Longteng; Lv, Jian; Li, Qingzheng; Luo, Yongkang

    2016-11-15

    The impact of different concentrations of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) on the degradation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the influence of these ions on the activity of adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMP-deaminase) and acid phosphatase (ACP) in common carp fillets (in vivo) during 4°C storage was examined. The content of ATP, inosine monophosphate (IMP), and hypoxanthine (Hx), and the activity of AMP-deaminase and ACP were determined. Results indicated that the effects of different concentrations of six kinds of metal ions on AMP-deaminase and ACP were not the same. Na(+), K(+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) enhanced AMP-deaminase activity, which led to the rapid degradation of ATP and to the generation of a large quantity of IMP within a short time. Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) delayed the change in AMP-deaminase and ACP activity in carp and caused a further delay in the degradation of ATP. Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) inhibited ACP activity, which reduced the decomposition of IMP and the formation of Hx.

  13. The small molecule PKA-specific cyclic AMP analogue as an inducer of osteoblast-like cells differentiation and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kevin W-H; Kan, Ho Man; Ashe, Keshia M; Laurencin, Cato T

    2012-01-01

    Osteoblastic differentiation is an important landmark for bone formation, bone repair and regeneration; however, it is a very complex process controlled by different signalling mechanisms. Several groups have reported that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signalling system is responsible for regulating osteoblast cell differentiation. Nonetheless, to date, the principle role of the cAMP molecules related to this process remains controversial. Moreover, the underlying cAMP-dependent signalling cascade governing the osteoblastic differentiation has not been clarified. In this study we investigated the roles of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signalling in proliferation, differentiation and mineralization of osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells, using the PKA-specific small molecule cAMP analogue, 6-Bnz-cAMP, at 100 µM. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, runt transcription factor 2 (Runx2), osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin (OCN) protein expressions were used as osteoblast-specific markers to demonstrate osteoblastic differentiation. Further, calcium measurement of the extracellular matrix was employed as the hallmark of matrix mineralization or calcification. We report here that activation of PKA by the small molecule 6-Bnz-cAMP induces osteoblastic differentiation and matrix mineralization of osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. Moreover, 6-Bnz-cAMP does not induce cytotoxicity to the cells, as revealed by our cell proliferation studies. Therefore, based on these findings, we propose that the PKA-specific small molecule 6-Bnz-cAMP may serve as a novel bone-inducing growth factor for repairing and regenerating bone tissues during bone-regenerative engineering.

  14. Selective enhancement of wnt4 expression by cyclic AMP-associated cooperation between rat central astrocytes and microglia.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Masatoshi; Urasaki, Tomoka; Ochiai, Hiroyuki; Matsuoka, Kohei; Takeo, Shin; Harada, Tomoki; Ohsugi, Yoshihito; Inoue, Atsuko

    2015-11-13

    The wnt protein family has important members involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and plasticity expression; however, little is known about its biosynthesis processes. On the other hand, an increase in the intracerebral cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP) level leads to synaptic plasticity via the de novo synthesis of any protein. Here, the effect of dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP), a membrane permeability cAMP analog, on the wnt family was investigated in rat primary-cultured glial cells containing astrocytes and microglia. Among wnt3a, 4, 5a, 7a and 11 mRNA, only wnt4 expression was increased by longer treatment (24 h), compared with short treatment (2 h), with dbcAMP in a concentration-dependent manner, and its effect reached statistical significance at 1 mM. In cultures of isolated astrocytes or microglia, wnt4 expression was not affected by 1 mM dbcAMP for 24 h, and microglial wnt4 protein was undetectable even when cells were treated with the drug. Mixed glial cells treated for 24 h with 1 mM dbcAMP showed significantly increased wnt4 protein, as well as mRNA. Immunofluorescence manifested that cells that expressed wnt4 protein were astrocytes, but not microglia. Intraperitoneal injection of 1.25 mg/kg rolipram, a phosphodiesterase (PDE) IV inhibitor that can pass through the blood brain barrier and inhibits cAMP degradation specifically, showed a tendency to increase wnt4 expression in the adult rat brain after 24 h, and the increases in wnt4 mRNA and protein levels reached statistical significance in the hippocampus and striatum, respectively. This is the first finding to help elucidate the selective biosynthesis of central wnt4 through cAMP-stimulated microglia and astrocytes interaction.

  15. Nitric oxide-dependent vasodilatation of rabbit femoral artery by beta(2)-adrenergic stimulation or cyclic AMP elevation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, B; Li, J; Gao, L; Ferro, A

    2000-03-01

    Some studies suggest that beta-adrenoceptor-mediated vasorelaxation is in part mediated through nitric oxide (NO) release. We wished to determine the contribution of the L-arginine / NO system to vasodilatation in response to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation with isoprenaline or cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) elevation with forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP in vivo, using a rabbit femoral artery constant perfusion model. Baseline femoral artery pressure was similar in rabbits receiving isoprenaline, forskolin or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Isoprenaline, forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP each decreased femoral artery pressure in a dose-dependent manner. The doses (mol kg(-1)) of isoprenaline, forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP which decreased pressure by 10% from baseline, expressed as a negative logarithm (-log ED(10)) were: 10.0+/-0.2, 9.5+/-0.1 and 4.9+/-0.1 respectively (P<0.0001 for each). Use of beta-adrenoceptor subtype-selective antagonists showed that the vascular response to isoprenaline was purely due to stimulation of the beta(2)-adrenoceptor subtype. Injection of 1 micromol kg(-1) N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) did not alter baseline pressure. However, it abolished the pressure response to isoprenaline (P<0.0001), and significantly attenuated the pressure responses to forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP: -log ED(10) values for forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP, in the presence of L-NAME, were 7.9+/-0.1 and 3.5+/-0.3 respectively (P<0.0001 for each, as compared with values in the absence of L-NAME). These results indicate that beta(2)-adrenergic stimulation and cylic AMP elevation activate the L-arginine/NO system in rabbit femoral artery in vivo, and that NO generation contributes importantly to the changes in vascular tone induced by agents which modulate beta-adrenoceptors or cyclic AMP.

  16. [Adenosine deaminase in experimental trypanosomiasis: future implications].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguilar, Mary Carmen; Rondón-Mercado, Rocío

    2015-09-01

    The adenosine deaminase represents a control point in the regulation of extracellular adenosine levels, thus playing a critical role in the modulation of purinergic responses to certain pathophysiological events. Several studies have shown that serum and plasma enzyme levels are elevated in some diseases caused by microorganisms, which may represent a compensatory mechanism due to the elevated levels of adenosine and the release of inflammatory mediators. Recent research indicates that adenosine deaminase activity decreases and affects hematological parameters of infected animals with Trypanosoma evansi, so that such alterations could have implications in the pathogenesis of the disease. In addition, the enzyme has been detected in this parasite; allowing the inference that it could be associated with the vital functions of the same, similar to what occurs in mammals. This knowledge may be useful in the association of chemotherapy with specific inhibitors of the enzyme in future studies.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... This Page Bras J, Guerreiro R, Santo GC. Mutant ADA2 in vasculopathies. N Engl J Med. 2014 ... M, Anikster Y, King MC, Levy-Lahad E. Mutant adenosine deaminase 2 in a polyarteritis nodosa vasculopathy. ...

  18. Effect of adenosine triphosphate and some derivatives on cerebral blood flow and metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, T; Harper, A M; MacKenzie, E T; Thomson, E M

    1979-01-01

    1. Responses of cerebral blood vessels to peri- and intravascular doses of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and some derivatives were studied in cat and baboon. 2. Perivascular application of ATP to cat pial arterioles gave a threshold dilatory effect at a concentration of 10(-11) M. This figure is comparable to the amount of ATP calculated to be released from electrically stimulated brain slices. 3. It is concluded that adenine nucleotides have a major role to play in the local control of cerebral blood flow. 4. Intracarotid injection of ATP showed a calculated threshold effect at 4 x 10(8) M in the cat and 4 x 10(-9) M in the baboon. 5. The threshold response of the vasculature to intracarotid adenosine lay between 4 x 10(-7) M and 4 x 10(-6) M in the baboon. Little effect was produced with AMP, pyrophosphate and inorganic phosphate. 6. Intracarotid ATP increased the oxygen consumption of the baboon brain parenchyma. This effect was attributed in part to an elevation of the cellular cyclic AMP levels. 7. Osmotic disruption of the blood-brain barrier in baboon did not affect the vasodilatory or metabolic effect of intracarotid ATP. 8. It is postulated that circulating purine compounds mediate a form of metabolic communication inthe body. Also, release of purine compounds from active local nerves might influence cerebral blood flow. PMID:119042

  19. A2A adenosine receptors are up-regulated in lymphocytes from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Corciulo, Carmen; Targa, Martina; Casetta, Ilaria; Gentile, Mauro; Granieri, Enrico; Borea, Pier Andrea; Popoli, Patrizia; Varani, Katia

    2013-09-01

    Adenosine, a purine nucleoside interacting with A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs), is a potent endogenous modulator of inflammatory and neuronal processes involved in the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, ARs were investigated in lymphocytes from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and compared with age-matched healthy subjects. In ALS patients A2AARs were analysed by using RT-PCR, Western blotting and saturation binding experiments. The effect of A2AAR stimulation on cyclic AMP levels was evaluated in lymphocytes from ALS patients and healthy subjects. An up-regulation of A2AARs was observed in ALS patients with respect to healthy subjects while A1, A2B and A3AR affinity and density did not change. In ALS patients, the A2AAR density values correlated with the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) scores. Furthermore, the stimulation of A2AARs mediated a significant increase in cyclic AMP levels in lymphocytes from ALS patients, with a higher potency than in lymphocytes from healthy subjects. In conclusion, the positive correlation between A2AAR density and ALSFRS-R scores could indicate a possible protective effect of this receptor subtype, representing an interesting starting point for the study of alternative therapeutic approaches for ALS based on A2AAR modulation.

  20. Activation of K+ channels in renal medullary vesicles by cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.B.; McDonald, G.A.; Mehta, P.; Andreoli, T.E. )

    1989-07-01

    ADH, acting through cAMP, increases the potassium conductance of apical membranes of mouse medullary thick ascending limbs of Henle. The present studies tested whether exposure of renal medullary apical membranes in vitro to the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase resulted in an increase in potassium conductance. Apical membrane vesicles prepared from rabbit outer renal medulla demonstrated bumetanide- and chloride-sensitive {sup 22}Na+ uptake and barium-sensitive, voltage-dependent {sup 86}Rb+ influx. When vesicles were loaded with purified catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (150 mU/ml), 1 mM ATP, and 50 mM KCl, the barium-sensitive {sup 86}Rb+ influx increased from 361 {plus minus} 138 to 528 {plus minus} 120 pM/mg prot.30 sec (P less than 0.01). This increase was inhibited completely when heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor (1 microgram/ml) was also present in the vesicle solutions. The stimulation of {sup 86}Rb+ uptake by protein kinase required ATP rather than ADP. It also required opening of the vesicles by hypotonic shock, presumably to allow the kinase free access to the cytoplasmic face of the membranes. We conclude that cAMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated phosphorylation of apical membranes from the renal medulla increases the potassium conductance of these membranes. This mechanism may account for the ADH-mediated increase in potassium conductance in the mouse mTALH.

  1. Adenosine signalling mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of the COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Maione, Francesco; Morello, Silvana; Lapucci, Andrea; Paccosi, Sara; Steckel, Bodo; Lavecchia, Antonio; Parenti, Astrid; Iuvone, Teresa; Schrader, Jürgen; Ialenti, Armando; Cicala, Carla

    2016-07-15

    Extracellular adenosine formation from ATP is controlled by ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase/CD39) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (e-5NT/CD73); the latter converts AMP to adenosine and inorganic phosphate, representing the rate limiting step controlling the ratio between extracellular ATP and adenosine. Evidence that cellular expression and activity of CD39 and CD73 may be subject to changes under pathophysiological conditions has identified this pathway as an endogenous modulator in several diseases and was shown to be involved in the molecular mechanism of drugs, such as methotrexate, salicylates , interferon-β. We evaluated whether CD73/adenosine/A2A signalling pathway is involved in nimesulide anti-inflammatory effect, in vivo and in vitro. We found that the adenosine A2A agonist, 4-[2-[[6-amino-9-(N-ethyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamidosyl)-9H-purin-2-yl]amino]ethyl]benzenepropanoic acid hydrochloride (CGS21680, 2mg/kg ip.), inhibited carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema and the effect was reversed by co-administration of the A2A antagonist -(2-[7-amino-2-[2-furyl][1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-yl-amino]ethyl)phenol (ZM241385; 3mg/kg i.p.). Nimesulide (5mg/kg i.p.) anti-inflammatory effect was inhibited by pre-treatment with ZM241385 (3mg/kg i.p.) and by local administration of the CD73 inhibitor, adenosine 5'-(α,β-methylene)diphosphate (APCP; 400μg/paw). Furthermore, we found increased activity of 5'-nucleotidase/CD73 in paws and plasma of nimesulide treated rats, 4h following oedema induction. In vitro, the inhibitory effect of nimesulide on nitrite and prostaglandin E2 production by lipopolysaccharide-activated J774 cell line was reversed by ZM241385 and APCP. Furthermore, nimesulide increased CD73 activity in J774 macrophages while it did not inhibit nitrite accumulation by lipopolysaccharide-activated SiRNA CD73 silenced J774 macrophages. Our data demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effect of nimesulide in part is mediated by CD73

  2. Type 2 Diabetes and ADP Receptor Blocker Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Samoš, Matej; Fedor, Marián; Kovář, František; Mokáň, Michal; Bolek, Tomáš; Galajda, Peter; Kubisz, Peter; Mokáň, Marián

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with several abnormalities in haemostasis predisposing to thrombosis. Moreover, T2D was recently connected with a failure in antiplatelet response to clopidogrel, the most commonly used ADP receptor blocker in clinical practice. Clopidogrel high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) was repeatedly associated with the risk of ischemic adverse events. Patients with T2D show significantly higher residual platelet reactivity on ADP receptor blocker therapy and are more frequently represented in the group of patients with HTPR. This paper reviews the current knowledge about possible interactions between T2D and ADP receptor blocker therapy. PMID:26824047

  3. Viral Macro Domains Reverse Protein ADP-Ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changqing; Debing, Yannick; Jankevicius, Gytis; Neyts, Johan; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ADP-ribosylation is a posttranslational protein modification in which ADP-ribose is transferred from NAD+ to specific acceptors to regulate a wide variety of cellular processes. The macro domain is an ancient and highly evolutionarily conserved protein domain widely distributed throughout all kingdoms of life, including viruses. The human TARG1/C6orf130, MacroD1, and MacroD2 proteins can reverse ADP-ribosylation by acting on ADP-ribosylated substrates through the hydrolytic activity of their macro domains. Here, we report that the macro domain from hepatitis E virus (HEV) serves as an ADP-ribose-protein hydrolase for mono-ADP-ribose (MAR) and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) chain removal (de-MARylation and de-PARylation, respectively) from mono- and poly(ADP)-ribosylated proteins, respectively. The presence of the HEV helicase in cis dramatically increases the binding of the macro domain to poly(ADP-ribose) and stimulates the de-PARylation activity. Abrogation of the latter dramatically decreases replication of an HEV subgenomic replicon. The de-MARylation activity is present in all three pathogenic positive-sense, single-stranded RNA [(+)ssRNA] virus families which carry a macro domain: Coronaviridae (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and human coronavirus 229E), Togaviridae (Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus), and Hepeviridae (HEV), indicating that it might be a significant tropism and/or pathogenic determinant. IMPORTANCE Protein ADP-ribosylation is a covalent posttranslational modification regulating cellular protein activities in a dynamic fashion to modulate and coordinate a variety of cellular processes. Three viral families, Coronaviridae, Togaviridae, and Hepeviridae, possess macro domains embedded in their polyproteins. Here, we show that viral macro domains reverse cellular ADP-ribosylation, potentially cutting the signal of a viral infection in the cell. Various poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases which are notorious guardians of cellular

  4. Arginine-Specific Mono ADP-Ribosylation In Vitro of Antimicrobial Peptides by ADP-Ribosylating Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Castagnini, Marta; Picchianti, Monica; Talluri, Eleonora; Biagini, Massimiliano; Del Vecchio, Mariangela; Di Procolo, Paolo; Norais, Nathalie; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Balducci, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Among the several toxins used by pathogenic bacteria to target eukaryotic host cells, proteins that exert ADP-ribosylation activity represent a large and studied family of dangerous and potentially lethal toxins. These proteins alter cell physiology catalyzing the transfer of the ADP-ribose unit from NAD to cellular proteins involved in key metabolic pathways. In the present study, we tested the capability of four of these toxins, to ADP-ribosylate α- and β- defensins. Cholera toxin (CT) from Vibrio cholerae and heat labile enterotoxin (LT) from Escherichia coli both modified the human α-defensin (HNP-1) and β- defensin-1 (HBD1), as efficiently as the mammalian mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase-1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S was inactive on both HNP-1 and HBD1. Neisseria meningitidis NarE poorly recognized HNP-1 as a substrate but it was completely inactive on HBD1. On the other hand, HNP-1 strongly influenced NarE inhibiting its transferase activity while enhancing auto-ADP-ribosylation. We conclude that only some arginine-specific ADP-ribosylating toxins recognize defensins as substrates in vitro. Modifications that alter the biological activities of antimicrobial peptides may be relevant for the innate immune response. In particular, ADP-ribosylation of antimicrobial peptides may represent a novel escape mechanism adopted by pathogens to facilitate colonization of host tissues. PMID:22879887

  5. Arginine-specific mono ADP-ribosylation in vitro of antimicrobial peptides by ADP-ribosylating toxins.

    PubMed

    Castagnini, Marta; Picchianti, Monica; Talluri, Eleonora; Biagini, Massimiliano; Del Vecchio, Mariangela; Di Procolo, Paolo; Norais, Nathalie; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Balducci, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Among the several toxins used by pathogenic bacteria to target eukaryotic host cells, proteins that exert ADP-ribosylation activity represent a large and studied family of dangerous and potentially lethal toxins. These proteins alter cell physiology catalyzing the transfer of the ADP-ribose unit from NAD to cellular proteins involved in key metabolic pathways. In the present study, we tested the capability of four of these toxins, to ADP-ribosylate α- and β- defensins. Cholera toxin (CT) from Vibrio cholerae and heat labile enterotoxin (LT) from Escherichia coli both modified the human α-defensin (HNP-1) and β- defensin-1 (HBD1), as efficiently as the mammalian mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase-1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S was inactive on both HNP-1 and HBD1. Neisseria meningitidis NarE poorly recognized HNP-1 as a substrate but it was completely inactive on HBD1. On the other hand, HNP-1 strongly influenced NarE inhibiting its transferase activity while enhancing auto-ADP-ribosylation. We conclude that only some arginine-specific ADP-ribosylating toxins recognize defensins as substrates in vitro. Modifications that alter the biological activities of antimicrobial peptides may be relevant for the innate immune response. In particular, ADP-ribosylation of antimicrobial peptides may represent a novel escape mechanism adopted by pathogens to facilitate colonization of host tissues.

  6. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Palmieri, R H; Frischat, A; Fischer, A H; Wu, L H; Maland, L; Manship, M

    1984-05-22

    The total amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been determined, and the single polypeptide chain of 194 amino acid residues starts with N-acetylmethionine and ends with leucyllysine at its carboxyl terminus, in agreement with the earlier data on its amino acid composition [Mahowald, T. A., Noltmann, E. A., & Kuby, S. A. (1962) J. Biol. Chem. 237, 1138-1145] and its carboxyl-terminus sequence [Olson, O. E., & Kuby, S. A. (1964) J. Biol. Chem. 239, 460-467]. Elucidation of the primary structure was based on tryptic and chymotryptic cleavages of the performic acid oxidized protein, cyanogen bromide cleavages of the 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein at its five methionine sites (followed by maleylation of peptide fragments), and tryptic cleavages at its 12 arginine sites of the maleylated 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein. Calf muscle myokinase, whose sequence has also been established, differs primarily from the rabbit muscle myokinase's sequence in the following: His-30 is replaced by Gln-30; Lys-56 is replaced by Met-56; Ala-84 and Asp 85 are replaced by Val-84 and Asn-85. A comparison of the four muscle-type adenylate kinases, whose covalent structures have now been determined, viz., rabbit, calf, porcine, and human [for the latter two sequences see Heil, A., Müller, G., Noda, L., Pinder, T., Schirmer, H., Schirmer, I., & Von Zabern, I. (1974) Eur. J. Biochem. 43, 131-144, and Von Zabern, I., Wittmann-Liebold, B., Untucht-Grau, R., Schirmer, R. H., & Pai, E. F. (1976) Eur. J. Biochem. 68, 281-290], demonstrates an extraordinary degree of homology.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Hepatic gene expression profiling of 5′-AMP-induced hypometabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Takao; Van Oort-Jansen, Anita; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Loose, David S.; Lee, Cheng Chi

    2011-01-01

    There is currently much interest in clinical applications of therapeutic hypothermia. Hypothermia can be a consequence of hypometabolism. We have recently established a procedure for the induction of a reversible deep hypometabolic state in mice using 5′-adenosine monophosphate (5′-AMP) in conjunction with moderate ambient temperature. The current study aims at investigating the impact of this technology at the gene expression level in a major metabolic organ, the liver. Our findings reveal that expression levels of the majority of genes in liver are not significantly altered by deep hypometabolism. However, among those affected by hypometabolism, more genes are differentially upregulated than downregulated both in a deep hypometabolic state and in the early arousal state. These altered gene expression levels during 5′-AMP induced hypometabolism are largely restored to normal levels within 2 days of the treatment. Our data also suggest that temporal control of circadian genes is largely stalled during deep hypometabolism. PMID:21224422

  8. Aging of the rat adrenocortical cell: response to ACTH and cyclic AMP in vitro.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S; Carsia, R V

    1983-03-01

    To study intrinsic age-related changes in adrenocortical steroid production, cells isolated from rats of different ages (3 to 24 months) were used. Acute (2 hour) corticosterone production in response to stimulation by adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) was measured by radioimmunoassay. With age, adrenocortical cells lose much of their ability to produce corticosterone in the absence or presence of ACTH or cAMP. The loss is progressive from 6 to 24 months of age. Analysis of the data suggests that from 6 to 12 months, an intracellular steroidogenic lesion develops; in addition there may be a loss in ACTH receptors on the plasma membrane. After 12 months these defects increase and are accompanied by a decrease in receptor sensitivity to ACTH.

  9. Growth rate regulation of lac operon expression in Escherichia coli is cyclic AMP dependent.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jong-Tar; Chang, Yu-Jen; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2003-10-23

    In contrast to the ribosomal RNA gene expression increasing with growth rate, transcription of the lac operon is downregulated by cell growth rate. In continuous culture, growth rate regulation of lac promoter was independent of carbon substrate used and its location on the chromosome. Since the lac operon is activated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which decreases with increasing cell growth rate, expression of plac-lacZ reporter fusion was analyzed in cya mutant under various growth conditions. The results demonstrated that expression of plac-lacZ in cya mutant was both lower and growth rate independent. In addition, ppGpp (guanosine tetraphosphate) was not involved in the mechanism of growth rate regulation of the lac promoter. Thus, the results of this study indicate that cAMP mediates the growth rate-dependent regulation of lac operon expression in Escherichia coli.

  10. [The inhibiting effect of 8-Cl-adenosine-3',5'-cyclophosphate on the growth of melanoma B-16 in mice].

    PubMed

    Nesterov, M V; Baranova, L A; Sologub, V K; Khropov, Iu V; Severin, E S

    1992-01-01

    A site-selective analogue of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate 8-chloro-adenosine-3',5'-cyclophosphate was studied for its effects on the growth of transplanted murine melanoma B-16. When the agent was given to the mice, a substantial effect on the growth of the tumor was produced by a number of factors, which included the route of administration, concentration of the agent, the time and duration of therapy. Intraperitoneal injections of the agent in a dose of 20 mg/kg/day which were made during three consecutive days, beginning from day 5 after tumor transplantation caused a 58% decrease in tumor growth as compared to the controls. An examination of tumour biopsy specimen revealed that after a course of the injections there was a significant suppression of the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, type I, and a drastic increase in that of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, type II.

  11. Vascular CD39/ENTPD1 Directly Promotes Tumor Cell Growth by Scavenging Extracellular Adenosine Triphosphate12

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lili; Sun, Xiaofeng; Csizmadia, Eva; Han, Lihui; Bian, Shu; Murakami, Takashi; Wang, Xin; Robson, Simon C; Wu, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is known to boost immune responses in the tumor microenvironment but might also contribute directly to cancer cell death. CD39/ENTPD1 is the dominant ectonucleotidase expressed by endothelial cells and regulatory T cells and catalyzes the sequential hydrolysis of ATP to AMP that is further degraded to adenosine by CD73/ecto-5′-nucleotidase. We have previously shown that deletion of Cd39 results in decreased growth of transplanted tumors in mice, as a result of both defective angiogenesis and heightened innate immune responses (secondary to loss of adenosinergic immune suppression). Whether alterations in local extracellular ATP and adenosine levels as a result of CD39 bioactivity directly affect tumor growth and cytotoxicity has not been investigated to date. We show here that extracellular ATP exerts antitumor activity by directly inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting cancer cell death. ATP-induced antiproliferative effects and cell death are, in large part, mediated through P2X7 receptor signaling. Tumors in Cd39 null mice exhibit increased necrosis in association with P2X7 expression. We further demonstrate that exogenous soluble NTPDase, or CD39 expression by cocultured liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, stimulates tumor cell proliferation and limits cell death triggered by extracellular ATP. Collectively, our findings indicate that local expression of CD39 directly promotes tumor cell growth by scavenging extracellular ATP. Pharmacological or targeted inhibition of CD39 enzymatic activity may find utility as an adjunct therapy in cancer management. PMID:21390184

  12. Hypothermia induced by adenosine 5'-monophosphate attenuates early stage injury in an acute gouty arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhimin; Guo, Weiting; Lu, Shulai; Lv, Wenshan; Li, Changgui; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Shihua; Yan, Shengli; Tao, Zhenyin; Wang, Yunlong

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether the hypothermia induced by Adenosine 5'-Monophosphate (5'-AMP) could attenuate early stage injury in a rat acute gouty arthritis model. Ankle joint injection with monosodium urate monohydrate crystals (MSU crystals) in hypothermia rat model which was induced by 5'-AMP and then observe whether hypothermia induced by 5'-AMP could be effectively inhibit the inflammation on acute gouty arthritis in rats. AMP-induced hypothermia has protective effects on our acute gouty arthritis, which was demonstrated by the following criteria: (1) a significant reduction in the ankle swelling (p < 0.001); (2) a significant decrease in the occurrence of leukocyte infiltration and mild hemorrhage; (3) a significant reduction in the presence of serum Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, p < 0.001) and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, p < 0.001); and (4) a significant inhibition in the Nuclear Factor -κappaB (NF-κB) activity (p < 0.001). AMP-induced hypothermia could inhibit acute inflammation reaction and protect the synovial tissue against acute injury in a rat acute gouty arthritis model.

  13. Adenosine diphosphate restricts the protein remodeling activity of the Hsp104 chaperone to Hsp70 assisted disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kłosowska, Agnieszka; Chamera, Tomasz; Liberek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Hsp104 disaggregase provides thermotolerance in yeast by recovering proteins from aggregates in cooperation with the Hsp70 chaperone. Protein disaggregation involves polypeptide extraction from aggregates and its translocation through the central channel of the Hsp104 hexamer. This process relies on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. Considering that Hsp104 is characterized by low affinity towards ATP and is strongly inhibited by adenosine diphosphate (ADP), we asked how Hsp104 functions at the physiological levels of adenine nucleotides. We demonstrate that physiological levels of ADP highly limit Hsp104 activity. This inhibition, however, is moderated by the Hsp70 chaperone, which allows efficient disaggregation by supporting Hsp104 binding to aggregates but not to non-aggregated, disordered protein substrates. Our results point to an additional level of Hsp104 regulation by Hsp70, which restricts the potentially toxic protein unfolding activity of Hsp104 to the disaggregation process, providing the yeast protein-recovery system with substrate specificity and efficiency in ATP consumption. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15159.001 PMID:27223323

  14. ADP-ribosylation of proteins: Enzymology and biological significance

    SciTech Connect

    Althaus, F.R.; Richter, C.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the molecular and biological consequences of the posttranslational modification of proteins with ADP-ribose monomers and polymers. Part one focuses on chromatin-associated poly ADP-ribosylation reactions which have evolved in higher eukaryotes as modulators of chromatin functions. The significance of poly ADP-ribosylation in DNA repair, carcinogenesis, and gene expression during terminal differentiation is discussed. Part two reviews mono ADP-ribosylation reactions which are catalyzed by prokaryotic and eukaryotic enzymes. Consideration is given to the action of bacterial toxins, such as cholera toxin, pertussis toxin, and diphtheria toxin. These toxins have emerged as tools for the molecular probing of proteins involved in signal transduction and protein biosynthesis.

  15. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  16. Proteomic and Metabolic Analyses of S49 Lymphoma Cells Reveal Novel Regulation of Mitochondria by cAMP and Protein Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Wilderman, Andrea; Guo, Yurong; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Perkins, Guy; Zhang, Lingzhi; Murphy, Anne N; Taylor, Susan S; Insel, Paul A

    2015-09-04

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), acting via protein kinase A (PKA), regulates many cellular responses, but the role of mitochondria in such responses is poorly understood. To define such roles, we used quantitative proteomic analysis of mitochondria-enriched fractions and performed functional and morphologic studies of wild-type (WT) and kin(-) (PKA-null) murine S49 lymphoma cells. Basally, 75 proteins significantly differed in abundance between WT and kin(-) S49 cells. WT, but not kin(-), S49 cells incubated with the cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine cAMP (CPT-cAMP) for 16 h have (a) increased expression of mitochondria-related genes and proteins, including ones in pathways of branched-chain amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and (b) increased maximal capacity of respiration on branched-chain keto acids and fatty acids. CPT-cAMP also regulates the cellular rate of ATP-utilization, as the rates of both ATP-linked respiration and proton efflux are decreased in WT but not kin(-) cells. CPT-cAMP protected WT S49 cells from glucose or glutamine deprivation, In contrast, CPT-cAMP did not protect kin(-) cells or WT cells treated with the PKA inhibitor H89 from glutamine deprivation. Under basal conditions, the mitochondrial structure of WT and kin(-) S49 cells is similar. Treatment with CPT-cAMP produced apoptotic changes (i.e. decreased mitochondrial density and size and loss of cristae) in WT, but not kin(-) cells. Together, these findings show that cAMP acts via PKA to regulate multiple aspects of mitochondrial function and structure. Mitochondrial perturbation thus likely contributes to cAMP/PKA-mediated cellular responses.

  17. Adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclohexyl-adenosine induced phosphorylation of delta opioid receptor and desensitization of its signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yun; Tao, Yi-min; Sun, Jian-feng; Wang, Yu-hua; Xu, Xue-jun; Chen, Jie; Chi, Zhi-qiang; Liu, Jing-gen

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To define the effect of adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) on delta opioid receptor (DOR)-mediated signal transduction. Methods: CHO cells stably expressing HA-tagged A1R and DOR-CFP fusion protein were used. The localization of receptors was observed using confocal microscope. DOR-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase was measured using cyclic AMP assay. Western blots were employed to detect the phosphorylation of Akt and the DOR. The effect of A1R agonist N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) on DOR down-regulation was assessed using radioligand binding assay. Results: CHA 1 μmol/L time-dependently attenuated DOR agonist [D-Pen2,5]enkephalin (DPDPE)-induced inhibition of intracellular cAMP accumulation with a t1/2=2.56 (2.09–3.31) h. Pretreatment with 1 μmol/L CHA for 24 h caused a right shift of the dose-response curve of DPDPE-mediated inhibition of cAMP accumulation, with a significant increase in EC50 but no change in Emax. Pretreatment with 1 μmol/L CHA for 1 h also induced a significant attenuation of DPDPE-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt. Moreover, CHA time-dependently phosphorylated DOR (Ser363), and this effect was inhibited by A1R antagonist 1,3-Dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX) but not by DOR antagonist naloxone. However, CHA failed to produce the down-regulation of DOR, as neither receptor affinity (Kd) nor receptor density (Bmax) of DOR showed significant change after chronic CHA exposure. Conclusion: Activation of A1R by its agonist caused heterologous desensitization of DOR-mediated inhibition of intracellular cAMP accumulation and phosphorylation of Akt. Activation of A1R by its agonist also induced heterologous phosphorylation but not down-regulation of DOR. PMID:20562901

  18. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - past and present.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Chris

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins.

  19. Phosphodiesterase DosP increases persistence by reducing cAMP which reduces the signal indole.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Brian W; Osbourne, Devon O; Hu, Ying; Benedik, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2015-03-01

    Persisters are bacteria that are highly tolerant to antibiotics due to their dormant state and are of clinical significance owing to their role in infections. Given that the population of persisters increases in biofilms and that cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is an intracellular signal that increases biofilm formation, we sought to determine whether c-di-GMP has a role in bacterial persistence. By examining the effect of 30 genes from Escherichia coli, including diguanylate cyclases that synthesize c-di-GMP and phosphodiesterases that breakdown c-di-GMP, we determined that DosP (direct oxygen sensing phosphodiesterase) increases persistence by over a thousand fold. Using both transcriptomic and proteomic approaches, we determined that DosP increases persistence by decreasing tryptophanase activity and thus indole. Corroborating this effect, addition of indole reduced persistence. Despite the role of DosP as a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, the decrease in tryptophanase activity was found to be a result of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) phosphodiesterase activity. Corroborating this result, the reduction of cAMP via CpdA, a cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, increased persistence and reduced indole levels similarly to DosP. Therefore, phosphodiesterase DosP increases persistence by reducing the interkingdom signal indole via reduction of the global regulator cAMP.

  20. New perspectives in cyclic AMP-mediated axon growth and guidance: The emerging epoch of Epac.

    PubMed

    Peace, Andrew G; Shewan, Derryck A

    2011-03-10

    In the search for a cure to brain and spinal cord injury much has been learned about the inhibitory environment of the central nervous system (CNS), and yet a clinical therapy remains elusive. In recent years great advances have been made in understanding intracellular molecular mechanisms that transduce cell surface receptor-mediated signals that neurons receive from their environment. Many of these signalling pathways share common mechanisms, which presents the possibility that manipulating activities of key cell signalling molecules such as those regulated by 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) might allow axons to simultaneously overcome the inhibitory effects of a number of extracellular ligands. The identification of Epac, a novel direct intracellular target for cAMP, has opened up a new avenue of research that is beginning to explain how cAMP can mediate a range of neuronal functions including distinct axon growth and guidance decisions. With current research tools that allow more specific activation of proteins or knock-down of their expression, as well as quantitation of protein activities in live cells, it is already becoming clear that Epac plays highly important roles in the development and function of the nervous system. Here, we focus on emerging evidence that Epac mediates cAMP-regulated axon growth and chemoattraction, and thus represents a novel target for overcoming axon growth inhibition and promoting CNS regeneration.

  1. Independent AMP and NAD signaling regulates C2C12 differentiation and metabolic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia George; Burkholder, Thomas J

    2016-12-01

    The balance of ATP production and consumption is reflected in adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) content and has been associated with phenotypic plasticity in striated muscle. Some studies have suggested that AMPK-dependent plasticity may be an indirect consequence of increased NAD synthesis and SIRT1 activity. The primary goal of this study was to assess the interaction of AMP- and NAD-dependent signaling in adaptation of C2C12 myotubes. Changes in myotube developmental and metabolic gene expression were compared following incubation with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) and nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) to activate AMPK- and NAD-related signaling. AICAR showed no effect on NAD pool or nampt expression but significantly reduced histone H3 acetylation and GLUT1, cytochrome C oxidase subunit 2 (COX2), and MYH3 expression. In contrast, NMN supplementation for 24 h increased NAD pool by 45 % but did not reduce histone H3 acetylation nor promote mitochondrial gene expression. The combination of AMP and NAD signaling did not induce further metabolic adaptation, but NMN ameliorated AICAR-induced myotube reduction. We interpret these results as indication that AMP and NAD contribute to C2C12 differentiation and metabolic adaptation independently.

  2. PET measurements of cAMP-mediated phosphodiesterase-4 with (R)-[11C]rolipram.

    PubMed

    Kenk, Miran; Thomas, Adam; Lortie, Mireille; Dekemp, Rob; Beanlands, Rob S; Dasilva, Jean N

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is the common second messenger in signal-transduction cascades originating at a number of monoamine receptors involved in neurotransmission, cardiac function and smooth muscle contraction. Altered regulation of cAMP synthesis (at receptors, G-protein subunits or adenylyl cyclase) and breakdown by phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes have been implicated in a number of pathologies. The PDE4 inhibitor (R)-rolipram, and the less active (S)- enantiomer, have been labeled with carbon-11 and characterized by in vivo and in vitro experiments for use in the evaluation of altered PDE4 levels in the brain and cardiac tissues. (R)-[11C]Rolipram has been shown to bind selectively to PDE4 over other PDE isozymes, with specific binding reflecting approximately 80 and 40% of the total detected radioactivity in the rat brain and the heart, respectively. Tracer retention in PDE4-rich tissues is increased by cAMP-elevating treatments, as detected by in vivo PET studies and ex vivo biodistribution experiments. In vivo PET imaging studies display strong region-specific signal in the brain and heart, as evaluated in rats, pigs, monkeys and humans. Impaired cAMP-mediated signaling was observed in animal models of aging, obesity, anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity and myocardial infarction using (R)-[11C]rolipram. Given the critical role of cAMP in multiple hormonal pathways, the good safety profile and well-characterized pharmacokinetics, (R)-[11C]rolipram PET imaging provides a novel tool for serial monitoring of cAMP-mediated signaling at the PDE4 level, yielding insight into pathological progression with potential for directing therapy.

  3. AIP inactivation leads to pituitary tumorigenesis through defective Gαi-cAMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, I; Heliövaara, E; Raitila, A; Rautiainen, M-R; Mehine, M; Katainen, R; Donner, I; Aittomäki, V; Lehtonen, H J; Ahlsten, M; Kivipelto, L; Schalin-Jäntti, C; Arola, J; Hautaniemi, S; Karhu, A

    2015-02-26

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) is a tumor-suppressor gene underlying the pituitary adenoma predisposition. Thus far, the exact molecular mechanisms by which inactivated AIP exerts its tumor-promoting action have been unclear. To better understand the role of AIP in pituitary tumorigenesis, we performed gene expression microarray analysis to examine changes between Aip wild-type and knockout mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cell lines. Transcriptional analyses implied that Aip deficiency causes a dysfunction in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling, as well as impairments in signaling cascades associated with developmental and immune-inflammatory responses. In vitro experiments showed that AIP deficiency increases intracellular cAMP concentrations in both MEF and murine pituitary adenoma cell lines. Based on knockdown of various G protein α subunits, we concluded that AIP deficiency leads to elevated cAMP concentrations through defective Gαi-2 and Gαi-3 proteins that normally inhibit cAMP synthesis. Furthermore, immunostaining of Gαi-2 revealed that AIP deficiency is associated with a clear reduction in Gαi-2 protein expression levels in human and mouse growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary adenomas, thus indicating defective Gαi signaling in these tumors. By contrast, all prolactin-secreting tumors showed prominent Gαi-2 protein levels, irrespective of Aip mutation status. We additionally observed reduced expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and cAMP response element-binding protein levels in mouse and human AIP-deficient somatotropinomas. This study implies for the first time that a failure to inhibit cAMP synthesis through dysfunctional Gαi signaling underlies the development of GH-secreting pituitary adenomas in AIP mutation carriers.

  4. Nutrition and Training Influences on the Regulation of Mitochondrial Adenosine Diphosphate Sensitivity and Bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Graham P

    2017-03-01

    Since the seminal finding almost 50 years ago that exercise training increases mitochondrial content in skeletal muscle, a considerable amount of research has been dedicated to elucidate the mechanisms inducing mitochondrial biogenesis. The discovery of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α as a major regulator of exercise-induced gene transcription was instrumental in beginning to understand the signals regulating this process. However, almost two decades after its discovery, our understanding of the signals inducing mitochondrial biogenesis remain poorly defined, limiting our insights into possible novel training modalities in elite athletes that can increase the oxidative potential of muscle. In particular, the role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species has received very little attention; however, several lifestyle interventions associated with an increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species coincide with the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, the diminishing returns of exercise training are associated with reductions in exercise-induced, mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species. Therefore, research focused on altering redox signaling in elite athletes may prove to be effective at inducing mitochondrial biogenesis and augmenting training regimes. In the context of exercise performance, the biological effect of increasing mitochondrial content is an attenuated rise in free cytosolic adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and subsequently decreased carbohydrate flux at a given power output. Recent evidence has shown that mitochondrial ADP sensitivity is a regulated process influenced by nutritional interventions, acute exercise, and exercise training. This knowledge raises the potential to improve mitochondrial bioenergetics in the absence of changes in mitochondrial content. Elucidating the mechanisms influencing the acute regulation of mitochondrial ADP sensitivity could have performance benefits in athletes

  5. The cAMP-producing agonist beraprost inhibits human vascular smooth muscle cell migration via exchange protein directly activated by cAMP

    PubMed Central

    McKean, Jenny S.; Murray, Fiona; Gibson, George; Shewan, Derryck A.; Tucker, Steven J.; Nixon, Graeme F.

    2015-01-01

    Aims During restenosis, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) migrate from the vascular media to the developing neointima. Preventing VSMC migration is therefore a therapeutic target for restenosis. Drugs, such as prostacyclin analogues, that increase the intracellular concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) can inhibit VSMC migration, but the mechanisms via which this occurs are unknown. Two main downstream mediators of cAMP are protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac). This study has examined the effects of the prostacyclin analogue beraprost on VSMC migration and investigated the intracellular pathways involved. Methods and results In a chemotaxis chamber, human saphenous vein VSMC migrated towards a platelet-derived growth-factor-BB (PDGF) chemogradient. Incubation with therapeutically relevant concentrations of cAMP-producing agonist beraprost significantly decreased PDGF-induced migration. Direct activation of either PKA or Epac inhibited migration whereas inhibition of PKA did not prevent the anti-migratory effect of beraprost. Direct activation of Epac also prevented hyperplasia in ex vivo serum-treated human veins. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we demonstrated that beraprost activated Epac but not PKA. The mechanisms of this Epac-mediated effect involved activation of Rap1 with subsequent inhibition of RhoA. Cytoskeletal rearrangement at the leading edge of the cell was consequently inhibited. Interestingly, Epac1 was localized to the leading edge of migrating VSMC. Conclusions These results indicate that therapeutically relevant concentrations of beraprost can inhibit VSMC migration via a previously unknown mechanism involving the cAMP mediator Epac. This may provide a novel target that could blunt neointimal formation. PMID:26092100

  6. Inhibitory effects of benzodiazepines on the adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated secretion of interleukin-8 in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Kristina; Xifró, Rosa Altarcheh; Hartweg, Julia Lisa; Spitzlei, Petra; Meis, Kirsten; Molderings, Gerhard J; von Kügelgen, Ivar

    2013-01-30

    The activation of adenosine A(2B) receptors in human mast cells causes pro-inflammatory responses such as the secretion of interleukin-8. There is evidence for an inhibitory effect of benzodiazepines on mast cell mediated symptoms in patients with systemic mast cell activation disease. Therefore, we investigated the effects of benzodiazepines on adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated interleukin-8 production in human mast cell leukaemia (HMC1) cells by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The adenosine analogue N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, 0.3-3 μM) increased interleukin-8 production about 5-fold above baseline. This effect was attenuated by the adenosine A(2B) receptor antagonist MRS1754 (N-(4-cyanophenyl)-2-{4-(2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-2,6-dioxo-1,3-dipropyl-1H-purin-8-yl)phenoxy}-acetamide) 1 μM. In addition, diazepam, 4'-chlorodiazepam and flunitrazepam (1-30 μM) markedly reduced NECA-induced interleukin-8 production in that order of potency, whereas clonazepam showed only a modest inhibition. The inhibitory effect of diazepam was not altered by flumazenil 10 μM or PK11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide) 10 μM. Diazepam attenuated the NECA-induced expression of mRNA encoding for interleukin-8. Moreover, diazepam and flunitrazepam reduced the increasing effects of NECA on cAMP-response element- and nuclear factor of activated t-cells-driven luciferase reporter gene activities in HMC1 cells. Neither diazepam nor flunitrazepam affected NECA-induced increases in cellular cAMP levels in CHO Flp-In cells stably expressing recombinant human adenosine A(2B) receptors, excluding a direct action of benzodiazepines on human adenosine A(2B) receptors. In conclusion, this is the first study showing an inhibitory action of benzodiazepines on adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated interleukin-8 production in human mast (HMC1) cells. The rank order of potency indicates the involvement of an atypical benzodiazepine binding site.

  7. Structure-based Mechanism of ADP-ribosylation by Sirtuins

    SciTech Connect

    Hawse, William F.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2009-12-01

    Sirtuins comprise a family of enzymes found in all organisms, where they play a role in diverse processes including transcriptional silencing, aging, regulation of transcription, and metabolism. The predominant reaction catalyzed by these enzymes is NAD{sup +}-dependent lysine deacetylation, although some sirtuins exhibit a weaker ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Although the Sir2 deacetylation mechanism is well established, much less is known about the Sir2 ADP-ribosylation reaction. We have studied the ADP-ribosylation activity of a bacterial sirtuin, Sir2Tm, and show that acetylated peptides containing arginine or lysine 2 residues C-terminal to the acetyl lysine, the +2 position, are preferentially ADP-ribosylated at the +2 residue. A structure of Sir2Tm bound to the acetylated +2 arginine peptide shows how this arginine could enter the active site and react with a deacetylation reaction intermediate to yield an ADP-ribosylated peptide. The new biochemical and structural studies presented here provide mechanistic insights into the Sir2 ADP-ribosylation reaction and will aid in identifying substrates of this reaction.

  8. Regulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling by ADP-ribosylation*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yukihide; Papoutsoglou, Panagiotis; Maturi, Varun; Tsubakihara, Yutaro; Hottiger, Michael O.; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    We previously established a mechanism of negative regulation of transforming growth factor β signaling mediated by the nuclear ADP-ribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and the deribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), which dynamically regulate ADP-ribosylation of Smad3 and Smad4, two central signaling proteins of the pathway. Here we demonstrate that the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway can also be regulated by the opposing actions of PARP1 and PARG. PARG positively contributes to BMP signaling and forms physical complexes with Smad5 and Smad4. The positive role PARG plays during BMP signaling can be neutralized by PARP1, as demonstrated by experiments where PARG and PARP1 are simultaneously silenced. In contrast to PARG, ectopic expression of PARP1 suppresses BMP signaling, whereas silencing of endogenous PARP1 enhances signaling and BMP-induced differentiation. The two major Smad proteins of the BMP pathway, Smad1 and Smad5, interact with PARP1 and can be ADP-ribosylated in vitro, whereas PARG causes deribosylation. The overall outcome of this mode of regulation of BMP signal transduction provides a fine-tuning mechanism based on the two major enzymes that control cellular ADP-ribosylation. PMID:27129221

  9. Regulatory T Cells from Colon Cancer Patients Inhibit Effector T-cell Migration through an Adenosine-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sundström, Patrik; Stenstad, Hanna; Langenes, Veronica; Ahlmanner, Filip; Theander, Lisa; Ndah, Tapuka Gordon; Fredin, Kamilla; Börjesson, Lars; Gustavsson, Bengt; Bastid, Jérémy; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne

    2016-03-01

    T cell-mediated immunity is a major component of antitumor immunity. In order to be efficient, effector T cells must leave the circulation and enter into the tumor tissue. Regulatory T cells (Treg) from gastric cancer patients, but not from healthy volunteers, potently inhibit migration of conventional T cells through activated endothelium. In this study, we compared T cells from colon cancer patients and healthy donors to determine the mechanisms used by Tregs from cancer patients to inhibit conventional T-cell migration. Our results showed that circulating Tregs from cancer patients expressed high levels of CD39, an ectoenzyme mediating hydrolysis of ATP to AMP, as a rate-determining first step in the generation of immunosuppressive adenosine. Tumor-associated Tregs expressed even more CD39, and we therefore examined the importance of adenosine in Treg-mediated inhibition of T-cell transendothelial migration in vitro. Exogenous adenosine significantly reduced migration of conventional T cells from healthy volunteers, and blocking either adenosine receptors or CD39 enzymatic activity during transmigration restored the ability of conventional T cells from cancer patients to migrate. Adenosine did not directly affect T cells or endothelial cells, but reduced the ability of monocytes to activate the endothelium. Taken together, our results indicate that Treg-derived adenosine acts on monocytes and contributes to reduced transendothelial migration of effector T cells into tumors. This effect of Tregs is specific for cancer patients, and our results indicate that Tregs may affect not only T-cell effector functions but also their migration into tumors.

  10. Amps particle accelerator definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Particle Accelerator System of the AMPS (Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space) payload is a series of charged particle accelerators to be flown with the Space Transportation System Shuttle on Spacelab missions. In the configuration presented, the total particle accelerator system consists of an energetic electron beam, an energetic ion accelerator, and both low voltage and high voltage plasma acceleration devices. The Orbiter is illustrated with such a particle accelerator system.

  11. Neurabin scaffolding of adenosine receptor and RGS4 regulates anti-seizure effect of endogenous adenosine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Yin; Cottingham, Christopher; McMahon, Lori; Jiao, Kai; Greengard, Paul; Wang, Qin

    2012-02-22

    Endogenous adenosine is an essential protective agent against neural damage by various insults to the brain. However, the therapeutic potential of adenosine receptor-directed ligands for neuroprotection is offset by side effects in peripheral tissues and organs. An increase in adenosine receptor responsiveness to endogenous adenosine would enhance neuroprotection while avoiding the confounding effects of exogenous ligands. Here we report novel regulation of adenosine-evoked responses by a neural tissue-specific protein, neurabin. Neurabin attenuated adenosine A(1) receptor (A1R) signaling by assembling a complex between the A1R and the regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (RGS4), a protein known to turn off G-protein signaling. Inactivation of the neurabin gene enhanced A1R signaling and promoted the protective effect of adenosine against excitotoxic seizure and neuronal death in mice. Furthermore, administration of a small molecule inhibitor of RGS4 significantly attenuated seizure severity in mice. Notably, the dose of kainate capable of inducing an ∼50% rate of death in wild-type (WT) mice did not affect neurabin-null mice or WT mice cotreated with an RGS4 inhibitor. The enhanced anti-seizure and neuroprotective effect achieved by disruption of the A1R/neurabin/RGS4 complex is elicited by the on-site and on-demand release of endogenous adenosine, and does not require administration of A1R ligands. These data identify neurabin-RGS4 as a novel tissue-selective regulatory mechanism for fine-tuning adenosine receptor function in the nervous system. Moreover, these findings implicate the A1R/neurabin/RGS4 complex as a valid therapeutic target for specifically manipulating the neuroprotective effects of endogenous adenosine.

  12. Agile manufacturing prototyping system (AMPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, P.

    1998-05-09

    The Agile Manufacturing Prototyping System (AMPS) is being integrated at Sandia National Laboratories. AMPS consists of state of the industry flexible manufacturing hardware and software enhanced with Sandia advancements in sensor and model based control; automated programming, assembly and task planning; flexible fixturing; and automated reconfiguration technology. AMPS is focused on the agile production of complex electromechanical parts. It currently includes 7 robots (4 Adept One, 2 Adept 505, 1 Staubli RX90), conveyance equipment, and a collection of process equipment to form a flexible production line capable of assembling a wide range of electromechanical products. This system became operational in September 1995. Additional smart manufacturing processes will be integrated in the future. An automated spray cleaning workcell capable of handling alcohol and similar solvents was added in 1996 as well as parts cleaning and encapsulation equipment, automated deburring, and automated vision inspection stations. Plans for 1997 and out years include adding manufacturing processes for the rapid prototyping of electronic components such as soldering, paste dispensing and pick-and-place hardware.

  13. Intraventricular injection of agents that enhance cyclic adenosine monophosphate formation leads to inhibition of proestrous luteinizing hormone surge in rats.

    PubMed

    Taleisnik, S; Haymal, B; Caligaris, L

    1993-09-01

    The effect of increasing hypothalamic levels of 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) on the preovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH) and ovulation was studied in cycling rats. Animals hearing chronically implanted guiding cannulae into the third ventricle were injected with agents known to enhance the cellular levels of cAMP. Hourly blood samples from the unanesthetized, unrestrained rats were obtained between 11.00 and 17.00 h through a plastic cannula inserted into the jugular vein. Intraventricular injections of serotonin (7.5 mg/ml; 2 microliters) in the morning of proestrous blocked the preovulatory surge of LH and ovulation. This effect was assigned to an increased neuronal level of cAMP because it was prevented by a serum anti-cAMP. Third-ventricle injections of 2 microliters of forskolin (0.5 mmol/l), guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate)(2 mmol/l) or dibutyryl-cAMP (1 mmol/l) at 11.00 h on the day of proestrus mimicked the inhibitory effect of serotonin on the proestrous release of LH. It is suggested that serotonin inhibits LH surge by acting directly on LH-releasing hormone neurons and/or on neurons that provide inputs to these neurons involving cAMP as a second messenger. Neurons releasing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) may serve as interneurons sensitive to serotonin, as well as to cAMP, inasmuch as the inhibitory effect of forskolin on the release of LH was partially blocked by the GABA antagonists, picrotoxin and bicuculline.

  14. Differential modulation of evoked and spontaneous glycine release from rat spinal cord glycinergic terminals by the cyclic AMP/protein kinase A transduction cascade.

    PubMed

    Katsurabayashi, Shutaro; Kubota, Hisahiko; Moorhouse, Andrew J; Akaike, Norio

    2004-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying cyclic AMP modulation of action potential-dependent and -independent (spontaneous) release of glycine from terminals synapsing onto sacral dorsal commissural nucleus neurons of lamina X were studied in spinal cord slices using conventional patch-clamp recordings. 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and forskolin increased the amplitude of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) in a sensitive manner to protein kinase A (PKA) inhibition (with KT-5720). Direct activation (with adenosine 3',5'-cyclic-monophosphothioate, Sp-isomer) and inhibition (with adenosine 3',5'-cyclic-monophosphothioate, Rp-isomer) of PKA increased and decreased the eIPSC amplitude, respectively. Paired pulse experiments and direct injection of PKA inhibitor fragment 6-22 amide (PKI(6-22)) into the recording neuron revealed that these effects on eIPSC amplitude occurred presynaptically, indicating that evoked glycine release is regulated by presynaptic cAMP via changes in PKA activity. Increasing cAMP also increased spontaneous release of glycine, causing an increased frequency of miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs). In contrast to the effects on evoked release, this response was not solely mediated via PKA, as it was not occluded by PKA inhibition, and both direct inhibition and direct activation of PKA actually enhanced mIPSC frequency. Direct inhibition of cAMP (with SQ 22536) did, however, reduce mIPSC frequency. These results suggest cAMP modulation of evoked and spontaneous release involves different presynaptic mechanisms and proteins.

  15. Kinetics of the phosphotransferase reaction of the catalytic subunit of the tick salivary gland cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, S.D.; Essenberg, R.C.; Sauer, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    The catalytic subunit of the cAMP dependent protein kinase was purified 100-fold from tick salivary glands. The enzyme mechanism of the phosphotransferase reaction catalyzed by this subunit was investigated. Highly purified enzyme did not show ATP-ase activity in the absence of protein substrates. Initial velocities were measured using histone H-1 or a synthetic heptapeptide, Kemptide, as P/sub i/ acceptors and (..gamma..-/sup 32/P) ATP as a phosphodonor. Patterns were consistent with a sequential, but not a ping pong mechanism. At high concentration (>2Km), histone showed substrate inhibition which was noncompetitive versus ATP. Product inhibition by Mg.ADP was competitive versus ATP and noncompetitive with respect to H-1. Phosphohistone on the other hand was noncompetitive with respect to H-1, but gave parabolic competitive inhibition against ATP. Dead-end inhibition by AMP-PNP, an analogue of ATP, was competitive and noncompetitive against ATP and H-1, respectively. The inhibitory of cAMP dependent protein kinase was noncompetitive with ATP and competitive with histone. These studies strongly suggest that the tick salivary gland protein kinase has a sequential mechanism with primarily ordered addition of ATP followed by protein substrate and ordered release of phosphoprotein and ADP, but some random character.

  16. cAMP induction by ouabain promotes endothelin-1 secretion via MAPK/ERK signaling in beating rabbit atria.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li-Qun; Li, Ping; Zhang, Qiu-Li; Hong, Lan; Liu, Li-Ping; Cui, Xun; Cui, Bai-Ri

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) participates in the regulation of numerous cellular functions, including the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (sodium pump). Ouabain, used in the treatment of several heart diseases, is known to increase cAMP levels but its effects on the atrium are not understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of ouabain on the regulation of atrial cAMP production and its roles in atrial endothelin-1 (ET-1) secretion in isolated perfused beating rabbit atria. Our results showed that ouabain (3.0 µmol/L) significantly increased atrial dynamics and cAMP levels during recovery period. The ouabain-increased atrial dynamics was blocked by KB-R7943 (3.0 µmol/L), an inhibitor for reverse mode of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchangers (NCX), but did not by L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine (1.0 µmol/L) or protein kinase A (PKA) selective inhibitor H-89 (3.0 µmol/L). Ouabain also enhanced atrial intracellular cAMP production in response to forskolin and theophyline (100.0 µmol/L), an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase, potentiated the ouabain-induced increase in cAMP. Ouabain and 8-Bromo-cAMP (0.5 µmol/L) markedly increased atrial ET-1 secretion, which was blocked by H-89 and by PD98059 (30 µmol/L), an inhibitor of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) without changing ouabain-induced atrial dynamics. Our results demonstrated that ouabain increases atrial cAMP levels and promotes atrial ET-1 secretion via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK signaling pathway. These findings may explain the development of cardiac hypertrophy in response to digitalis-like compounds.

  17. Inhibition by simulated ischemia or hypoxia of delayed afterdepolarizations provoked by cyclic AMP: significance for ischemic and reperfusion arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Saman, S; Coetzee, W A; Opie, L H

    1988-02-01

    Controversy exists about the role of an increased level of tissue cyclic adenosine 3'-5' monophosphate (cAMP) in the genesis of early ischemic ventricular arrhythmias. Evidence for an arrhythmogenic role for cAMP was proposed by Podzuweit et al. (1978) and Opie et al. (1979) who argued that ischemic ventricular fibrillation was associated with increased levels of tissue cAMP in the ischemic zone. Lubbe et al. (1978) found that infusion of dibutyryl (dBcAMP), or the beta-adrenergic stimulant epinephrine, or the phosphodiesterase inhibitor theophylline, all produced a marked fall in the ventricular fibrillation threshold and an increase in the duration of the vulnerable period of the isolated perfused rat heart. In contrast, Muller et al. (1986) recently showed that prevention of ventricular fibrillation by beta-adrenergic blockade is not directly associated with decreased levels of cAMP, while Manning et al. (1985) used forskolin to stimulate adenylate cyclase and found that the markedly elevated tissue cAMP levels in the rat heart did not promote ischemic or reperfusion arrhythmias. Some of these contradictions could be resolved if the electrophysiological mechanisms by which increased levels of cAMP might predispose to arrhythmias were better understood. It is known that intracellular injection of cAMP into cardiac myocytes can enhance delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs; Matsuda et al. 1982) and that DADs may explain certain arrhythmias such as those evoked by digitalis toxicity (Ferrier, 1977) or reperfusion (Ferrier et al. 1985).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Consensus and future directions on the definition of high on-treatment platelet reactivity to adenosine diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Bonello, Laurent; Tantry, Udaya S; Marcucci, Rossella; Blindt, Ruediger; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Becker, Richard; Bhatt, Deepak L; Cattaneo, Marco; Collet, Jean Philippe; Cuisset, Thomas; Gachet, Christian; Montalescot, Gilles; Jennings, Lisa K; Kereiakes, Dean; Sibbing, Dirk; Trenk, Dietmar; Van Werkum, Jochem W; Paganelli, Franck; Price, Matthew J; Waksman, Ron; Gurbel, Paul A

    2010-09-14

    The addition of clopidogrel to aspirin treatment reduces ischemic events in a wide range of patients with cardiovascular disease. However, recurrent ischemic event occurrence during dual antiplatelet therapy, including stent thrombosis, remains a major concern. Platelet function measurements during clopidogrel treatment demonstrated a variable and overall modest level of P2Y(12) inhibition. High on-treatment platelet reactivity to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was observed in selected patients. Multiple studies have now demonstrated a clear association between high on-treatment platelet reactivity to ADP measured by multiple methods and adverse clinical event occurrence. However, the routine measurement of platelet reactivity has not been widely implemented and recommended in the guidelines. Reasons for the latter include: 1) a lack of consensus on the optimal method to quantify high on-treatment platelet reactivity and the cutoff value associated with clinical risk; and 2) limited data to support that alteration of therapy based on platelet function measurements actually improves outcomes. This review provides a consensus opinion on the definition of high on-treatment platelet reactivity to ADP based on various methods reported in the literature and proposes how this measurement may be used in the future care of patients.

  19. Structure and function of the ARH family of ADP-ribosyl-acceptor hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Masato; Kato, Jiro; Moss, Joel

    2014-11-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational protein modification, in which ADP-ribose is transferred from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to specific acceptors, thereby altering their activities. The ADP-ribose transfer reactions are divided into mono- and poly-(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Cellular ADP-ribosylation levels are tightly regulated by enzymes that transfer ADP-ribose to acceptor proteins (e.g., ADP-ribosyltransferases, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP)) and those that cleave the linkage between ADP-ribose and acceptor (e.g., ADP-ribosyl-acceptor hydrolases (ARH), poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolases (PARG)), thereby constituting an ADP-ribosylation cycle. This review summarizes current findings related to the ARH family of proteins. This family comprises three members (ARH1-3) with similar size (39kDa) and amino acid sequence. ARH1 catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of mono-(ADP-ribosyl)ated arginine. ARH3 hydrolyzes poly-(ADP-ribose) (PAR) and O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. The different substrate specificities of ARH1 and ARH3 contribute to their unique roles in the cell. Based on a phenotype analysis of ARH1(-/-) and ARH3(-/-) mice, ARH1 is involved in the action by bacterial toxins as well as in tumorigenesis. ARH3 participates in the degradation of PAR that is synthesized by PARP1 in response to oxidative stress-induced DNA damage; this hydrolytic reaction suppresses PAR-mediated cell death, a pathway termed parthanatos.

  20. MOLECULAR PROBES FOR EXTRACELLULAR ADENOSINE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Ukena, Dieter; Padgett, William; Kirk, Kenneth L.; Daly, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Derivatives of adenosine receptor agonists (N6-phenyladenosines) and antagonists (1,3-dialkyl-8-phenylxanthines) bearing functionalized chains suitable for attachment to other molecules have been reported [Jacobson et al., J. med. Chem. 28, 1334 and 1341 (1985)]. The “functionalized congener” approach has been extended to the synthesis of spectroscopic and other probes for adenosine receptors that retain high affinity (Ki ~ 10−9 −10−8 M) in A1-receptor binding. The probes have been synthesized from an antagonist xanthine amine congener (XAC) and an adenosine amine congener (ADAC). [3H]ADAC has been synthesized and found to bind highly specifically to A1-adenosine receptors of rat and calf cerebral cortical membranes with KD values of 1.4 and 0.34 nM respectively. The higher affinity in the bovine brain, seen also with many of the probes derived from ADAC and XAC, is associated with phenyl substituents. The spectroscopic probes contain a reporter group attached at a distal site of the functionalized chain. These bifunctional ligands may contain a spin label (e.g. the nitroxyl radical TEMPO) for electron spin resonance spectroscopy, or a fluorescent dye, including fluorescein and 4-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD), or labels for 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Potential applications of the spectroscopic probes in characterization of adenosine receptors are discussed. PMID:3036153

  1. Radioimmunochemical quantitation of human adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed Central

    Daddona, P E; Frohman, M A; Kelley, W N

    1979-01-01

    Markedly reduced or absent adenosine deaminase activity in man is associated with an autosomal recesive form of severe conbined immunodeficiency disease. To further define the genetic nature of this enzyme defect, we have quantitated immunologically active adenosine deaminase (CRM) in the hemolysate of homozygous deficient patients and their heterozygous parents. A highly specific radioimmunoassay was developed capable of detecting 0.05% of normal erythrocyte adenosine deaminase. Hemolysates from nine heterozygotes (five families) showed a wide range in CRM (32--100% of normal) and variable absolute specific activities with several being at least 1 SD BELOW THE NORMAL MEAN. Hemolysates from four unrelated patients showed less than 0.09% adenosine deaminase activity with CRM ranging from less than 0.06 to 5.6% of the normal mean. In conclusion, heterozygote and homozygote hemolysates from five of the eight families analyzed revealed variable levels of CRM suggesting heterogeneous genetic alteration or expression of the silent or defective allele(s) of adenosine deaminase. PMID:468994

  2. The adenosine kinase hypothesis of epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev

    2008-01-01

    Current therapies for epilepsy are largely symptomatic and do not affect the underlying mechanisms of disease progression, i.e. epileptogenesis. Given the large percentage of pharmacoresistant chronic epilepsies, novel approaches are needed to understand and modify the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms. Although different types of brain injury (e.g. status epilepticus, traumatic brain injury, stroke) can trigger epileptogenesis, astrogliosis appears to be a homotypic response and hallmark of epilepsy. Indeed, recent findings indicate that epilepsy might be a disease of astrocyte dysfunction. This review focuses on the inhibitory neuromodulator and endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine, which is largely regulated by astrocytes and its key metabolic enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). Recent findings support the “ADK hypothesis of epileptogenesis”: (i) Mouse models of epileptogenesis suggest a sequence of events leading from initial downregulation of ADK and elevation of ambient adenosine as an acute protective response, to changes in astrocytic adenosine receptor expression, to astrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy (i.e. astrogliosis), to consequential overexpression of ADK, reduced adenosine and – finally – to spontaneous focal seizure activity restricted to regions of astrogliotic overexpression of ADK. (ii) Transgenic mice overexpressing ADK display increased sensitivity to brain injury and seizures. (iii) Inhibition of ADK prevents seizures in a mouse model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. (iv) Intrahippocampal implants of stem cells engineered to lack ADK prevent epileptogenesis. Thus, ADK emerges both as a diagnostic marker to predict, as well as a prime therapeutic target to prevent, epileptogenesis. PMID:18249058

  3. Caffeine, adenosine receptors, and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Costenla, Ana Rita; Cunha, Rodrigo A; de Mendonça, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Few studies to date have looked at the effects of caffeine on synaptic plasticity, and those that did used very high concentrations of caffeine, whereas the brain concentrations attained by regular coffee consumption in humans should be in the low micromolar range, where caffeine exerts pharmacological actions mainly by antagonizing adenosine receptors. Accordingly, rats drinking caffeine (1 g/L) for 3 weeks, displayed a concentration of caffeine of circa 22 microM in the hippocampus. It is known that selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonists facilitate, whereas selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists attenuate, long term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus. Although caffeine is a non-selective antagonist of adenosine receptors, it attenuates frequency-induced LTP in hippocampal slices in a manner similar to selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. These effects of low micromolar concentration of caffeine (30 microM) are maintained in aged animals, which is important when a possible beneficial effect for caffeine in age-related cognitive decline is proposed. Future studies will still be required to confirm and detail the involvement of A1 and A2A receptors in the effects of caffeine on hippocampal synaptic plasticity, using both pharmacological and genetic approaches.

  4. CD73-mediated adenosine production promotes stem cell-like properties in mouse Tc17 cells.

    PubMed

    Flores-Santibáñez, Felipe; Fernández, Dominique; Meza, Daniel; Tejón, Gabriela; Vargas, Leonardo; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Arredondo, Sebastián; Guixé, Victoria; Rosemblatt, Mario; Bono, María Rosa; Sauma, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The CD73 ectonucleotidase catalyses the hydrolysis of AMP to adenosine, an immunosuppressive molecule. Recent evidence has demonstrated that this ectonucleotidase is up-regulated in T helper type 17 cells when generated in the presence of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and hence CD73 expression is related to the acquisition of immunosuppressive potential by these cells. TGF-β is also able to induce CD73 expression in CD8(+) T cells but the function of this ectonucleotidase in CD8(+) T cells is still unknown. Here, we show that Tc17 cells present high levels of the CD73 ectonucleotidase and produce adenosine; however, they do not suppress the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells. Interestingly, we report that adenosine signalling through A2A receptor favours interleukin-17 production and the expression of stem cell-associated transcription factors such as tcf-7 and lef-1 but restrains the acquisition of Tc1-related effector molecules such as interferon-γ and Granzyme B by Tc17 cells. Within the tumour microenvironment, CD73 is highly expressed in CD62L(+) CD127(+) CD8(+) T cells (memory T cells) and is down-regulated in GZMB(+) KLRG1(+) CD8(+) T cells (terminally differentiated T cells), demonstrating that CD73 is expressed in memory/naive cells and is down-regulated during differentiation. These data reveal a novel function of CD73 ectonucleotidase in arresting CD8(+) T-cell differentiation and support the idea that CD73-driven adenosine production by Tc17 cells may promote stem cell-like properties in Tc17 cells.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms for cAMP-Mediated Immunoregulation in T cells – Role of Anchored Protein Kinase A Signaling Units

    PubMed Central

    Wehbi, Vanessa L.; Taskén, Kjetil

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway is one of the most common and versatile signal pathways in eukaryotic cells. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) target PKA to specific substrates and distinct subcellular compartments providing spatial and temporal specificity for mediation of biological effects channeled through the cAMP/PKA pathway. In the immune system, cAMP is a potent negative regulator of T cell receptor-mediated activation of effector T cells (Teff) acting through a proximal PKA/Csk/Lck pathway anchored via a scaffold consisting of the AKAP Ezrin holding PKA, the linker protein EBP50, and the anchoring protein phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains holding Csk. As PKA activates Csk and Csk inhibits Lck, this pathway in response to cAMP shuts down proximal T cell activation. This immunomodulating pathway in Teff mediates clinically important responses to regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression and inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins (PGs), adrenergic stimuli, adenosine, and a number of other ligands. A major inducer of T cell cAMP levels is PG E2 (PGE2) acting through EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors. PGE2 plays a crucial role in the normal physiological control of immune homeostasis as well as in inflammation and cancer immune evasion. Peripherally induced Tregs express cyclooxygenase-2, secrete PGE2, and elicit the immunosuppressive cAMP pathway in Teff as one tumor immune evasion mechanism. Moreover, a cAMP increase can also be induced by indirect mechanisms, such as intercellular transfer between T cells. Indeed, Treg, known to have elevated levels of intracellular cAMP, may mediate their suppressive function by transferring cAMP to Teff through gap junctions, which we speculate could also be regulated by PKA/AKAP complexes. In this review, we present an updated overview on the influence of cAMP-mediated immunoregulatory mechanisms acting through localized cAMP signaling and the therapeutical

  6. Self-assembled copper(II) metallacycles derived from asymmetric Schiff base ligands: efficient hosts for ADP/ATP in phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Pandey, Rampal; Kumar, Ashish; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Dubey, Mrigendra; Mohammed, Akbar; Mobin, Shaikh M; Pandey, Daya Shankar

    2015-10-21

    Novel asymmetric Schiff base ligands 2-{[3-(3-hydroxy-1-methyl-but-2-enylideneamino)-2,4,6-trimethylphenylimino]-methyl}-phenol (H2L(1)) and 1-{[3-(3-hydroxy-1-methyl-but-2-enylideneamino)-2,4,6-trimethylphenylimino]-methyl}-naphthalen-2-ol (H2L(2)) possessing dissimilar N,O-chelating sites and copper(ii) metallacycles (CuL(1))4 (1) and (CuL(2))4 (2) based on these ligands have been described. The ligands and complexes have been thoroughly characterized by satisfactory elemental analyses, and spectral (IR, (1)H, (13)C NMR, ESI-MS, UV/vis) and electrochemical studies. Structures of H2L(2) and 1 have been unambiguously determined by X-ray single crystal analyses. The crystal structure of H2L(2) revealed the presence of two distinct N,O-chelating sites on dissimilar cores (naphthalene and β-ketoaminato groups) offering a diverse coordination environment. Metallacycles 1 and 2 having a cavity created by four Cu(ii) centres coordinated in a homo- and heteroleptic fashion with respective ligands act as efficient hosts for adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) respectively, over other nucleoside polyphosphates (NPPs). The disparate sensitivity of these metallacycles toward ADP and ATP has been attributed to the size of the ligands assuming diverse dimensions and spatial orientations. These are attuned for π-π stacking and electrostatic interactions suitable for different guest molecules under analogous conditions, metallacycle 1 offers better orientation for ADP, while 2 for ATP. The mechanism of the host-guest interaction has been investigated by spectral and electrochemical studies and supported by molecular docking studies.

  7. Phylogenetic and biochemical evidence supports the recruitment of an ADP-glucose translocator for the export of photosynthate during plastid endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Colleoni, Christophe; Linka, Marc; Deschamps, Philippe; Handford, Michael G; Dupree, Paul; Weber, Andreas P M; Ball, Steven G

    2010-12-01

    The acquisition of photosynthesis by eukaryotic cells through enslavement of a cyanobacterium represents one of the most remarkable turning points in the history of life on Earth. In addition to endosymbiotic gene transfer, the acquisition of a protein import apparatus and the coordination of gene expression between host and endosymbiont genomes, the establishment of a metabolic connection was crucial for a functional endosymbiosis. It was previously hypothesized that the first metabolic connection between both partners of endosymbiosis was achieved through insertion of a host-derived metabolite transporter into the cyanobacterial plasma membrane. Reconstruction of starch metabolism in the common ancestor of photosynthetic eukaryotes suggested that adenosine diphosphoglucose (ADP-Glc), a bacterial-specific metabolite, was likely to be the photosynthate, which was exported from the early cyanobiont. However, extant plastid transporters that have evolved from host-derived endomembrane transporters do not transport ADP-Glc but simple phosphorylated sugars in exchange for orthophosphate. We now show that those eukaryotic nucleotide sugar transporters, which define the closest relatives to the common ancestor of extant plastid envelope carbon translocators, possess an innate ability for transporting ADP-Glc. Such an unexpected ability would have been required to establish plastid endosymbiosis.

  8. Extracellular purine metabolism and signaling of CD73-derived adenosine in murine Treg and Teff cells.

    PubMed

    Romio, Michael; Reinbeck, Benjamin; Bongardt, Sabine; Hüls, Sandra; Burghoff, Sandra; Schrader, Jürgen

    2011-08-01

    CD73-derived adenosine acts as potent inhibitor of inflammation, and regulatory T cells (Treg) have been shown to express CD73 as a novel marker. This study explored the role of endogenously formed adenosine in modulating NF-κB activity and cytokine/chemokine release from murine Treg and effector T cells (Teff) including key enzymes/purinergic receptors of extracellular ATP catabolism. Stimulating murine splenocytes and CD4(+) T cells with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 significantly upregulated activated NF-κB in CD73(-/-) T cells (wild type: 4.36 ± 0.21; CD73(-/-): 6.58 ± 0.75; n = 4; P = 0.029). This was associated with an augmented release of proinflammatory cytokines IL-2, TNF-α, and IFN-γ. Similar changes were observed with the CD73 inhibitor APCP (50 μM) on NF-κB and IFN-γ in wild-type CD4(+) T-cells. Treatment of stimulated CD4(+) T-cells with adenosine (25 μM) potently reduced IFN-γ release which is mediated by adenosine A2a receptors (A2aR). AMP (50 μM) also reduced cytokine release which was not inhibited by APCP. In Teff, A2aR activation (CGS21680) potently inhibited the release of IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-12, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), CCL3, and CCL4. However, in Treg, CGS21680 did not alter cytokine/chemokine release. In summary, CD73-derived adenosine tonically inhibits active NF-κB in CD4(+) T-cells, thereby modulating the release of a broad spectrum of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Downregulation of P2X7 and upregulation of CD73 in Treg after antigenic stimulation may be an important mechanism to maintain the ability of Treg to generate immunosuppressive adenosine.

  9. Rolipram stimulates angiogenesis and attenuates neuronal apoptosis through the cAMP/cAMP-responsive element binding protein pathway following ischemic stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shouye; Cao, Qingwen; Xu, Peng; Ji, Wenchen; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Yuelin

    2016-03-01

    Rolipram, a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, can activate the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) pathway to facilitate functional recovery following ischemic stroke. However, to date, the effects of rolipram on angiogenesis and cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal apoptosis are yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, the aim was to reveal the effect of rolipram on the angiogenesis and neuronal apoptosis following brain cerebral ischemia. Rat models of ischemic stroke were established following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and rolipram was administered for three, seven and 14 days. The results were examined using behavioral tests, triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining, immunostaining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) to evaluate the effects of rolipram therapy on functional outcome, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Western blot analysis was used to show the phosphorylated- (p-)CREB protein level in the ischemic hemisphere. The rolipram treatment group exhibited a marked reduction in infarct size and modified neurological severity score compared with the vehicle group, and rolipram treatment significantly promoted the microvessel density in the ischemic boundary region and increased p-CREB protein levels in the ischemic hemisphere. Furthermore, a significant reduction in the number of TUNEL-positive cells was observed in the rolipram group compared with the vehicle group. These findings suggest that rolipram has the ability to attenuate cerebral ischemic injury, stimulate angiogenesis and reduce neuronal apoptosis though the cAMP/CREB pathway.

  10. Stereochemical control over Mn(II)-Thio versus Mn(II)-Oxy coordination in adenosine 5 prime -O-(1-thiodiphosphate) complexes at the active site of creatine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Smithers, G.W.; Sammons, R.D.; Goodhart, P.J.; LoBrutto, R.; Reed, G.H. )

    1989-02-21

    The stereochemical configurations of the Mn(II) complexes with the resolved epimers of adenosine 5{prime}-O-(1-thiodiphosphate) (ADP{alpha}S), bound at the active site of creatine kinase, have been determined in order to assess the relative strengths of enzymic stereoselectivity versus Lewis acid/base preferences in metal-ligand binding. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data have been obtained for Mn(II) in anion-stabilized, dead-end (transition-state analogue) complexes, in ternary enzyme-Mn{sup II}ADP{alpha}S complexes, and in the central complexes of the equilibrium mixture. The modes of coordination of Mn(II) at P{sub alpha} in the nitrate-stabilized, dead-end complexes with each epimer of ADP{alpha}S were ascertained by EPR measurements with (R{sub p})-({alpha}-{sup 17}O)ADP{alpha}S and (S{sub p})-({alpha}-{sup 17}O)ADP{alpha}S. A reduction in the magnitude of the {sup 55}Mn hyperfine coupling constant in the spectrum for the complex containing (S{sub p})-ADP{alpha}S is indicative of Mn(II)-thio coordination at P{sub alpha}. The results indicate that a strict discrimination for a unique configuration of the metal-nucleotide substrate is expressed upon binding of all of the substrates to form the active complex (or an analogue thereof). This enzymic stereoselectivity provides sufficient binding energy to overcome an intrinsic preference for the hard Lewis acid Mn(II) to coordinate to the hard Lewis base oxygen.

  11. Adenine and adenosine salvage in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Boitz, Jan M; Ullman, Buddy

    2013-08-01

    6-aminopurine metabolism in Leishmania is unique among trypanosomatid pathogens since this genus expresses two distinct routes for adenine salvage: adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) and adenine deaminase (AAH). To evaluate the relative contributions of APRT and AAH, adenine salvage was evaluated in Δaprt, Δaah, and Δaprt/Δaah null mutants of L. donovani. The data confirm that AAH plays the dominant role in adenine metabolism in L. donovani, although either enzyme alone is sufficient for salvage. Adenosine salvage was also evaluated in a cohort of null mutants. Adenosine is also primarily converted to hypoxanthine, either intracellularly or extracellularly, but can also be phosphorylated to the nucleotide level by adenosine kinase when the predominant pathways are genetically or pharmacologically blocked. These data provide genetic verification for the relative contributions of 6-aminopurine metabolizing pathways in L. donovani and demonstrate that all of the pathways can function under appropriate conditions of genetic or pharmacologic perturbation.

  12. Human adenosine deaminase. Distribution and properties.

    PubMed

    Van der Weyden, M B; Kelley, W N

    1976-09-25

    Adenosine deaminase exists in multiple molecular forms in human tissue. One form of the enzyme appears to be "particulate". Three forms of the enzyme are soluble and interconvertible with apparent molecular weights of approximately 36,000, 114,000, and 298,000 (designated small, intermediate, and large, respectively). The small form of adenosine deaminase is convertible to the large form only in the presence of a protein, which has an apparent molecular weight of 200,000 and has no adenosine deaminase activity. This conversion of the small form of the enzyme to the large form occurs at 4 degrees, exhibits a pH optimum of 5.0 to 8.0, and is associated with a loss of conversion activity. The small form of the enzyme predominates in tissue preparations exhibiting the higher enzyme-specific activities and no detectable conversion activity. The large form of adenosine deaminase predominates in tissue extracts exhibiting the lower enzyme specific activities and abundant conversion activity. The small form of adenosine deaminase shows several electrophoretic variants by isoelectric focusing. The electrophoretic heterogeneity observed with the large form of the enzyme is similar to that observed with the small form, with the exception that several additional electrophoretic variants are uniformly identified. No organ specificity is demonstrable for the different electrophoretic forms. The kinetic characteristics of the three soluble molecular species of adenosine deaminase are identical except for pH optimum, which is 5.5 for the intermediate species and 7.0 to 7.4 for the large and small forms.

  13. A new class of adenosine receptors in brain: Characterization by 2-chloro( sup 3 H)adenosine binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jerome Hsicheng.

    1988-01-01

    Considerable evidence has accumulated in recent years to support a role for adenosine as an important physiological modulator in many mammalian tissues. In brain, adenosine is a potent depressant of neuronal firing and synaptic transmission. The exact mechanisms by which adenosine analogs depress nerve cell activity in the brain are not clear. Despite considerable investigation, neither the A1 nor the A2 adenosine receptors associated with adenylate cyclase have been able to account adequately for the actions of adenosine in brain. It has been proposed that additional adenosine receptors, possibly linked to calcium channels, are present in the central nervous system and are responsible for the physiological actions of adenosine. In this thesis, evidence is provided for the existence of a novel class of adenosine receptors in rat brain. The methods used to identify this new class of receptors involved radioligand binding techniques which have been successfully employed to characterize the properties of many neurotransmitter and drug receptors. 2-Chloro({sup 3}H)adenosine (Cl({sup 3}H)Ado) was selected as the ligand for these experiments since is a water-soluble, metabolically-stable analog of adenosine and a potent depressant of synaptic transmission in brain. The results demonstrate the presence of a distinct class of 2-chloro({sup 3}H)adenosine binding sites in rat forebrain membranes with an apparent K{sub D} of about 10 {mu}M and a B{sub max} of about 60 pmol per mg of protein. Specific 2-chloro ({sup 3}H)adenosine binding is highly specific for adenosine agonists and antagonists. Inhibition of binding by adenosine agonists exhibits an order of potency 2-chloroadenosine > 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine > ({minus})-N{sup 6}-(R-phenylisopropyl)adenosine, which differs from that of both A1 and A2 adenosine receptors.

  14. Regulation of cyclic AMP synthesis and degradation is modified in rat liver at late gestation.

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, C; Ruiz, P; Satrustegui, J; Andres, A; Carrascosa, J M

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is known to play a key role in regulating insulin action, and it is well documented that in several cases of physiological insulin resistance its concentration is increased. Since late pregnancy in the rat is associated with liver insulin resistance, we have studied possible alterations of some cellular mechanisms regulating the cAMP metabolism. (1) Liver cAMP concentration was shown to be increased by some 30% and 50% at 18 and 22 days of pregnancy respectively, compared with virgins. (2) Basal adenylate cyclase activity was higher only in the 18-days-pregnant rat, and the forskolin-stimulated maximal activity was similar in the three groups of animals. (3) alpha s protein is decreased in term-pregnant rats; however, coupling between Gs and adenylate cyclase is only impaired in the 18-days-pregnant animals, and stimulation by glucagon is impaired in both groups of pregnant animals. (4) Gi-2 protein was shown to be unable to elicit the tonic inhibition of adenylate cyclase in pregnant rats, although it was only decreased at 22 days of gestation. The increased alpha i-2 level detected by immunoblotting at 18 days of gestation did not correlate with its decreased ADP-ribosylation, suggesting that the protein is somehow modified at this stage. (5) Pregnancy is associated with a decrease in membrane phosphodiesterase activity. Our results show that late pregnancy is associated with increases in liver cAMP levels that might be involved in eliciting the characteristic insulin-resistant state, and suggest that mechanisms leading to these increments are changing during this phase of gestation. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1326941

  15. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-10-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose.

  16. Interrogating cyclic AMP signaling using optical approaches.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jason Y; Falcone, Jeffrey L; Curci, Silvana; Hofer, Aldebaran M

    2017-03-01

    Optical reporters for cAMP represent a fundamental advancement in our ability to investigate the dynamics of cAMP signaling. These fluorescent sensors can measure changes in cAMP in single cells or in microdomains within cells as opposed to whole populations of cells required for other methods of measuring cAMP. The first optical cAMP reporters were FRET-based sensors utilizing dissociation of purified regulatory and catalytic subunits of PKA, introduced by Roger Tsien in the early 1990s. The utility of these sensors was vastly improved by creating genetically encoded versions that could be introduced into cells with transfection, the first of which was published in the year 2000. Subsequently, improved sensors have been developed using different cAMP binding platforms, optimized fluorescent proteins, and targeting motifs that localize to specific microdomains. The most common sensors in use today are FRET-based sensors designed around an Epac backbone. These rely on the significant conformational changes in Epac when it binds cAMP, altering the signal between FRET pairs flanking Epac. Several other strategies for optically interrogating cAMP have been developed, including fluorescent translocation reporters, dimerization-dependent FP based biosensors, BRET (bioluminescence resonance energy transfer)-based sensors, non-FRET single wavelength reporters, and sensors based on bacterial cAMP-binding domains. Other newly described mammalian cAMP-binding proteins such as Popdc and CRIS may someday be exploited in sensor design. With the proliferation of engineered fluorescent proteins and the abundance of cAMP binding targets in nature, the field of optical reporters for cAMP should continue to see rapid refinement in the coming years.

  17. Direct visualization by electron microscopy of the weakly bound intermediates in the actomyosin adenosine triphosphatase cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, T D; Bhandari, D; Maupin, P; Wachsstock, D; Weeds, A G; Zot, H G

    1993-01-01

    We used a novel stopped-flow/rapid-freezing machine to prepare the transient intermediates in the actin-myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) cycle for direct observation by electron microscopy. We focused on the low affinity complexes of myosin-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and myosin-adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-Pi with actin filaments since the transition from these states to the high affinity actin-myosin-ADP and actin-myosin states is postulated to generate the molecular motion that drives muscle contraction and other types of cellular movements. After rapid freezing and metal replication of mixtures of myosin subfragment-1, actin filaments, and ATP, the structure of the weakly bound intermediates is indistinguishable from nucleotide-free rigor complexes. In particular, the average angle of attachment of the myosin head to the actin filament is approximately 40 degrees in both cases. At all stages in the ATPase cycle, the configuration of most of the myosin heads bound to actin filaments is similar, and the part of the myosin head preserved in freeze-fracture replicas does not tilt by more than a few degrees during the transition from the low affinity to high affinity states. In contrast, myosin heads chemically cross-linked to actin filaments differ in their attachment angles from ordered at 40 degrees without ATP to nearly random in the presence of ATP when viewed by negative staining (Craig, R., L.E. Greene, and E. Eisenberg. 1985. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 82:3247-3251, and confirmed here), freezing in vitreous ice (Applegate, D., and P. Flicker. 1987. J. Biol. Chem. 262:6856-6863), and in replicas of rapidly frozen samples. This suggests that many of the cross-linked heads in these preparations are dissociated from but tethered to the actin filaments in the presence of ATP. These observations suggest that the molecular motion produced by myosin and actin takes place with the myosin head at a point some distance from the actin binding site or does not

  18. ADP1 Affects Plant Architecture by Regulating Local Auxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shibai; Qin, Genji; Novák, Ondřej; Pěnčík, Aleš; Ljung, Karin; Aoyama, Takashi; Liu, Jingjing; Murphy, Angus; Gu, Hongya; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Qu, Li-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Plant architecture is one of the key factors that affect plant survival and productivity. Plant body structure is established through the iterative initiation and outgrowth of lateral organs, which are derived from the shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem, after embryogenesis. Here we report that ADP1, a putative MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) transporter, plays an essential role in regulating lateral organ outgrowth, and thus in maintaining normal architecture of Arabidopsis. Elevated expression levels of ADP1 resulted in accelerated plant growth rate, and increased the numbers of axillary branches and flowers. Our molecular and genetic evidence demonstrated that the phenotypes of plants over-expressing ADP1 were caused by reduction of local auxin levels in the meristematic regions. We further discovered that this reduction was probably due to decreased levels of auxin biosynthesis in the local meristematic regions based on the measured reduction in IAA levels and the gene expression data. Simultaneous inactivation of ADP1 and its three closest homologs led to growth retardation, relative reduction of lateral organ number and slightly elevated auxin level. Our results indicated that ADP1-mediated regulation of the local auxin level in meristematic regions is an essential determinant for plant architecture maintenance by restraining the outgrowth of lateral organs. PMID:24391508

  19. ADP1 affects plant architecture by regulating local auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruixi; Li, Jieru; Li, Shibai; Qin, Genji; Novák, Ondřej; Pěnčík, Aleš; Ljung, Karin; Aoyama, Takashi; Liu, Jingjing; Murphy, Angus; Gu, Hongya; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Qu, Li-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Plant architecture is one of the key factors that affect plant survival and productivity. Plant body structure is established through the iterative initiation and outgrowth of lateral organs, which are derived from the shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem, after embryogenesis. Here we report that ADP1, a putative MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) transporter, plays an essential role in regulating lateral organ outgrowth, and thus in maintaining normal architecture of Arabidopsis. Elevated expression levels of ADP1 resulted in accelerated plant growth rate, and increased the numbers of axillary branches and flowers. Our molecular and genetic evidence demonstrated that the phenotypes of plants over-expressing ADP1 were caused by reduction of local auxin levels in the meristematic regions. We further discovered that this reduction was probably due to decreased levels of auxin biosynthesis in the local meristematic regions based on the measured reduction in IAA levels and the gene expression data. Simultaneous inactivation of ADP1 and its three closest homologs led to growth retardation, relative reduction of lateral organ number and slightly elevated auxin level. Our results indicated that ADP1-mediated regulation of the local auxin level in meristematic regions is an essential determinant for plant architecture maintenance by restraining the outgrowth of lateral organs.

  20. Identification of the platelet ADP receptor targeted by antithrombotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hollopeter, G; Jantzen, H M; Vincent, D; Li, G; England, L; Ramakrishnan, V; Yang, R B; Nurden, P; Nurden, A; Julius, D; Conley, P B

    2001-01-11

    Platelets have a crucial role in the maintenance of normal haemostasis, and perturbations of this system can lead to pathological thrombus formation and vascular occlusion, resulting in stroke, myocardial infarction and unstable angina. ADP released from damaged vessels and red blood cells induces platelet aggregation through activation of the integrin GPIIb-IIIa and subsequent binding of fibrinogen. ADP is also secreted from platelets on activation, providing positive feedback that potentiates the actions of many platelet activators. ADP mediates platelet aggregation through its action on two G-protein-coupled receptor subtypes. The P2Y1 receptor couples to Gq and mobilizes intracellular calcium ions to mediate platelet shape change and aggregation. The second ADP receptor required for aggregation (variously called P2Y(ADP), P2Y(AC), P2Ycyc or P2T(AC)) is coupled to the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase through Gi. The molecular identity of the Gi-linked receptor is still elusive, even though it is the target of efficacious antithrombotic agents, such as ticlopidine and clopidogrel and AR-C66096 (ref. 9). Here we describe the cloning of this receptor, designated P2Y12, and provide evidence that a patient with a bleeding disorder has a defect in this gene. Cloning of the P2Y12 receptor should facilitate the development of better antiplatelet agents to treat cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Reprogramming cellular events by poly(ADP-ribose)-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pic, Émilie; Ethier, Chantal; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Masson, Jean-Yves; Poirier, Guy G.; Gagné, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). These enzymes covalently modify glutamic, aspartic and lysine amino acid side chains of acceptor proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose (ADPr) units. The poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) polymers formed alter the physico-chemical characteristics of the substrate with functional consequences on its biological activities. Recently, non-covalent binding to pADPr has emerged as a key mechanism to modulate and coordinate several intracellular pathways including the DNA damage response, protein stability and cell death. In this review, we describe the basis of non-covalent binding to pADPr that has led to the emerging concept of pADPr-responsive signaling pathways. This review emphasizes the structural elements and the modular strategies developed by pADPr-binding proteins to exert a fine-tuned control of a variety of pathways. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions are highly regulated processes, both spatially and temporally, for which at least four specialized pADPr-binding modules accommodate different pADPr structures and reprogram protein functions. In this review, we highlight the role of well-characterized and newly discovered pADPr-binding modules in a diverse set of physiological functions. PMID:23268355

  2. Selective β2 adrenergic agonist increases Cx43 and miR-451 expression via cAMP-Epac.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Hossein; Khaksarian, Mojtaba; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Soleimani, Masoud; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Eftekhari, Sanaz; Soleimani, Mansooreh; Mousavizadeh, Kazem; Estiri, Hajar; Ahmadi, Sedighesadat; Hadjighassem, Mahmoud Reza

    2014-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that connexin 43 (Cx43) and microRNAs have significant roles in glioma. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is suggested to be a regulator of connexins and microRNAs. However, it remains elusive whether cAMP and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac2), have a regulatory effect on Cx43 and microRNA-451 (miR-451) in astrocytoma cells. We treated 1321N1 astrocytoma cells with a selective β2 adrenergic agonist and a selective Epac activator with and without adenyl cyclase and protein kinase A inhibition. Cx43 and miR-451 expression were measured. Next, we evaluated the effect of miR-451 overexpression on Cx43 expression. Cell proliferation was measured using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results demonstrated that cAMP-Epac2 increased Cx43 and miR-451 expression. However, the alteration of miR-451 expression required a higher dose of drugs. Overexpression of miR-451 had no significant effect on Cx43 expression. The MTT assay showed that cAMP-Epac stimulation and miR-451 overexpression had a synergic inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. These findings may expand our understanding of the molecular biology of glioma and provide new potential therapeutic targets.

  3. cAMP Signaling Regulates Synchronised Growth of Symbiotic Epichloë Fungi with the Host Grass Lolium perenne

    PubMed Central

    Voisey, Christine R.; Christensen, Michael T.; Johnson, Linda J.; Forester, Natasha T.; Gagic, Milan; Bryan, Gregory T.; Simpson, Wayne R.; Fleetwood, Damien J.; Card, Stuart D.; Koolaard, John P.; Maclean, Paul H.; Johnson, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    The seed-transmitted fungal symbiont, Epichloë festucae, colonizes grasses by infecting host tissues as they form on the shoot apical meristem (SAM) of the seedling. How this fungus accommodates the complexities of plant development to successfully colonize the leaves and inflorescences is unclear. Since adenosine 3′, 5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent signaling is often essential for host colonization by fungal pathogens, we disrupted the cAMP cascade by insertional mutagenesis of the E. festucae adenylate cyclase gene (acyA). Consistent with deletions of this gene in other fungi, acyA mutants had a slow radial growth rate in culture, and hyphae were convoluted and hyper-branched suggesting that fungal apical dominance had been disrupted. Nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) staining of hyphae showed that cAMP disruption mutants were impaired in their ability to synthesize superoxide, indicating that cAMP signaling regulates accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Despite significant defects in hyphal growth and ROS production, E. festucae ΔacyA mutants were infectious and capable of forming symbiotic associations with grasses. Plants infected with E. festucae ΔacyA were marginally less robust than the wild-type (WT), however hyphae were hyper-branched, and leaf tissues heavily colonized, indicating that the tight regulation of hyphal growth normally observed in maturing leaves requires functional cAMP signaling. PMID:27833620

  4. cAMP Signaling Regulates Synchronised Growth of Symbiotic Epichloë Fungi with the Host Grass Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Voisey, Christine R; Christensen, Michael T; Johnson, Linda J; Forester, Natasha T; Gagic, Milan; Bryan, Gregory T; Simpson, Wayne R; Fleetwood, Damien J; Card, Stuart D; Koolaard, John P; Maclean, Paul H; Johnson, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    The seed-transmitted fungal symbiont, Epichloë festucae, colonizes grasses by infecting host tissues as they form on the shoot apical meristem (SAM) of the seedling. How this fungus accommodates the complexities of plant development to successfully colonize the leaves and inflorescences is unclear. Since adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent signaling is often essential for host colonization by fungal pathogens, we disrupted the cAMP cascade by insertional mutagenesis of the E. festucae adenylate cyclase gene (acyA). Consistent with deletions of this gene in other fungi, acyA mutants had a slow radial growth rate in culture, and hyphae were convoluted and hyper-branched suggesting that fungal apical dominance had been disrupted. Nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) staining of hyphae showed that cAMP disruption mutants were impaired in their ability to synthesize superoxide, indicating that cAMP signaling regulates accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Despite significant defects in hyphal growth and ROS production, E. festucae ΔacyA mutants were infectious and capable of forming symbiotic associations with grasses. Plants infected with E. festucae ΔacyA were marginally less robust than the wild-type (WT), however hyphae were hyper-branched, and leaf tissues heavily colonized, indicating that the tight regulation of hyphal growth normally observed in maturing leaves requires functional cAMP signaling.

  5. Isolation and properties of AMP deaminase from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle muscle from the Gulf of California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Marquez-Rios, E; Pacheco-Aguilar, R; Castillo-Yañez, F J; Figueroa-Soto, C G; Ezquerra-Brauer, J M; Gollas-Galvan, T

    2008-09-01

    Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) deaminase was purified from jumbo squid mantle muscle by chromatography in cellulose phosphate, Q-Fast and 5'-AMP sepharose. Specific activity of 2.5U/mg protein, 4.5% recovery and 133.68 purification fold were obtained at the end of the experiment. SDS-PAGE showed a single band with 87kDa molecular mass, native PAGE proved a band of 178kDa, whereas gel filtration detected a 180kDa protein, suggesting the homodimeric nature of this enzyme, in which subunits are not linked by covalent forces. Isoelectric focusing of this enzyme showed a pI of 5.76, which agrees with pI values of AMP deaminase from other invertebrate organisms. AMP deaminase presented a kinetic sigmoidal plot with Vmax of 1.16μM/min/mg, Km of 13mM, Kcat of 3.48μM.s(-1) and a Kcat/Km of 267 (mol/L)(-1).s(-1). The apparent relative low catalytic activity of jumbo squid muscle AMP deaminase in the absence of positive effectors is similar to that reported for homologous enzymes in other invertebrate organisms.

  6. Inhibin alpha gene expression in human trophoblasts is regulated by interactions between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Depoix, Christophe L; Debiève, Frédéric; Hubinont, Corinne

    2014-11-01

    Inhibin α (Inha) gene expression is regulated, in rat granulosa cells, via a cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-response element (CRE) found in a region of the promoter that is homologous to the human INHA promoter. We previously found that during in vitro cytotrophoblast differentiation, human INHA gene expression was regulated by TFAP2A via association with an AP-2 site located upstream of this CRE. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the human INHA gene was also regulated by cAMP in trophoblasts, and to investigate the possible crosstalk between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways in the regulation of INHA gene expression. Treatment with cAMP or forskolin increased INHA mRNA expression by 7- and 2-fold in primary cytotrophoblasts and choriocarcinoma-derived BeWo cells, respectively. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 reduced forskolin-induced luciferase activity by ∼40% in BeWo cells transfected with an INHA promoter-driven luciferase reporter vector. TFAP2 overexpression increased basal luciferase activity, whereas the dominant repressor KCREB abolished it. Surprisingly, mutation of the CRE also eliminated the TFAP2-induced transcription, although TFAP2 overexpression was still able to increase forskolin-induced luciferase activity when the AP-2 binding site, but not the CRE site, was mutated. Thus, INHA gene expression is upregulated by cAMP via CRE in human trophoblasts, and TFAP2 regulates this expression by interacting with CRE.

  7. cAMP and forskolin decrease. gamma. -aminobutyric acid-gated chloride flux in rat brain synaptoneurosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Heuschneider, G.; Schwartz, R.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The effects of the cyclic nucleotide cAMP on {gamma}-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channel function were investigated. The membrane-permeant cAMP analog N{sup 6}, O{sup 2{prime}}-dibutyryladenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate inhibited muscimol-induced {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} uptake into rat cerebral cortical synaptoneurosomes in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibition was due to a decrease in the maximal effect of muscimol, with no change in potency. Similar effects were observed with 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate, 8-bromoadenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate, and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine. The effect of endogenous cAMP accumulation on the {gamma}-aminobutyric acid-gated Cl{sup {minus}} channel was studied with forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase. Under identical conditions, in the intact synaptoneurosomes, forskolin inhibited muscimol-induced {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} uptake and generated cAMP with similar potencies. Surprisingly, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, which does not activate adenylate cyclase, also inhibited the muscimol response, suggesting that forskolin and its lipophilic derivatives may interact with the Cl{sup {minus}} channel directly. The data suggest that {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA{sub A}) receptor function in brain can be regulated by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation.

  8. cAMP levels in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle after an acute bout of aerobic exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, A.; Booth, F. W.; Kirby, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    The present study examined whether exercise duration was associated with elevated and/or sustained elevations of postexercise adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) by measuring cAMP levels in skeletal muscle for up to 4 h after acute exercise bouts of durations that are known to either produce (60 min) or not produce (10 min) mitochondrial proliferation after chronic training. Treadmill-acclimatized, but untrained, rats were run at 22 m/min for 0 (control), 10, or 60 min and were killed at various postexercise (0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h) time points. Fast-twitch white and red (quadriceps) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles were quickly excised, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and assayed for cAMP with a commercial kit. Unexpectedly, cAMP contents in all three muscles were similar to control (nonexercise) at most (21 of 30) time points after a single 10- or 60-min run. Values at 9 of 30 time points were significantly different from control (P < 0.05); i.e., 3 time points were significantly higher than control and 6 were significantly less than control. These data suggest that the cAMP concentration of untrained skeletal muscle after a single bout of endurance-type exercise is not, by itself, associated with exercise duration.

  9. Reduced expression of cytochrome oxidases largely explains cAMP inhibition of aerobic growth in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jianhua; Meng, Qiu; Fu, Huihui; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial growth under aerobic conditions by elevated levels of cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), first revealed more than 50 years ago, was attributed to accumulation of toxic methylglyoxal (MG). Here, we report a Crp-dependent mechanism rather than MG accumulation that accounts for the phenotype in Shewanella oneidensis, an emerging research model for the bacterial physiology. We show that a similar phenotype can be obtained by removing CpdA, a cAMP phosphodiesterase that appears more effective than its Escherichia coli counterpart. Although production of heme c and cytochromes c is correlated well with cAMP levels, neither is sufficient for the retarded growth. Quantities of overall cytochromes c increased substantially in the presence of elevated cAMP, a phenomenon resembling cells respiring on non-oxygen electron acceptors. In contrast, transcription of Crp-dependent genes encoding both cytochromes bd and cbb3 oxidases is substantially repressed under the same condition. Overall, our results suggest that cAMP of elevated levels drives cells into a low-energetic status, under which aerobic respiration is inhibited. PMID:27076065

  10. Gene expression and cAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Y; Reich, E

    1985-01-01

    By comparing the 5'-flanking region of the porcine gene for the urokinase form of plasminogen activator with those of other cAMP-regulated genes, we identify a 29-nucleotide sequence that is tentatively proposed as the cAMP-regulatory unit. Homologous sequences are present (i) in the cAMP-regulated rat tyrosine aminotransferase, prolactin, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase genes and (ii) 5' to the transcription initiation sites of cAMP-regulated Escherichia coli genes. From this we conclude that the expression of cAMP-responsive genes in higher eukaryotes may be controlled, as in E. coli, by proteins that form complexes with cAMP and then show sequence-specific DNA-binding properties. The complex formed by cAMP and the regulatory subunit of the type II mammalian protein kinase might be one candidate for this function. Based on several homologies we suggest that this subunit may have retained both the DNA-binding specificity and transcription-regulating properties in addition to the nucleotide-binding domains of the bacterial cAMP-binding protein. If this were so, dissociation of protein kinase by cAMP would activate two processes: (i) protein phosphorylation by the catalytic subunit and (ii) transcription regulation by the regulatory subunit. PMID:2991882

  11. Calcium regulates motility and protein phosphorylation by changing cAMP and ATP concentrations in boar sperm in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinhong; Wang, Lirui; Li, Yuhua; Zhao, Na; Zhen, Linqing; Fu, Jieli; Yang, Qiangzhen

    2016-09-01

    Considering the importance of calcium (Ca(2+)) in regulating sperm capacitation, hyperactivation and acrosome reaction, little is known about the molecular mechanism of action of this ion in this process. In the present study, assessment of the molecular mechanism from the perspective of energy metabolism occurred. Sperm motility variables were determined using computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) and the phosphorylation of PKA substrates, tyrosine residues and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) were analyzed by Western blot. Moreover, intracellular sperm-specific glyceraldehyde 3-phosphatedehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity, 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentrations were assessed in boar sperm treated with Ca(2+). Results of the present study indicated that, under greater extracellular Ca(2+)concentrations (≥3.0mM), sperm motility and protein phosphorylation were inhibited. Interestingly, these changes were correlated with that of GAPDH activity, AMPK phosphorylation, cAMP and ATP concentrations. The negative effects of Ca(2+) on these intracellular processes were attenuated by addition of the calmodulin (CaM) inhibitor W7 and the inhibitor of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK), KN-93. In the presence of greater extracellular Ca(2+), however, the phosphorylation pathway was suppressed by H-89. Taken together, these results suggested that Ca(2+) had a dual role in regulating boar sperm motility and protein phosphorylation due to the changes of cAMP and ATP concentrations, in response to cAMP-mediated signal transduction and the Ca(2+) signaling cascade. The present study provided some novel insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of Ca(2+) on boar sperm as well as the involvement of energy metabolism in this mechanism.

  12. Separate 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors on the salivary gland of the blowfly are linked to the generation of either cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate or calcium signals.

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, M. J.; Heslop, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    1 5'-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) stimulates the formation of two separate second messengers in the salivary gland of the blowfly. Activation of adenylate cyclase raises adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) whereas the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol (PI) is associated with an increase in calcium permeability. The possibility that these two signal pathways might be controlled by separate 5-HT receptors was studied by testing the specificity of 5-HT analogues and antagonists. 2 The parent compound 5-HT was found to stimulate both cyclic AMP formation and the related parameters of PI hydrolysis and calcium transport with similar dose-response relationships. 3 Certain analogues such as 4- and 5-fluoro-alpha-methyltryptamine were capable of raising cyclic AMP levels and stimulating fluid secretion but did not stimulate the hydrolysis of PI or the entry of calcium. 4 Other analogues, which had chloro or methyl substituents at the 5-position, were found to stimulate the hydrolysis of PI and the transport of calcium at much lower doses than those required to stimulate the formation of cyclic AMP. 5 Antagonists were also found to exert selective effects. Methysergide was a potent inhibitor of PI hydrolysis whereas cinanserin was far more selective in blocking the stimulatory effect of 5-HT on cyclic AMP formation. 6 It is concluded that 5-HT acts on two separate receptors, a 5-HT1 receptor acting through calcium and a 5-HT2 receptor which mediates its effects through cyclic AMP. PMID:6265018

  13. Platelet collagen receptor integrin alpha2beta1 activation involves differential participation of ADP-receptor subtypes P2Y1 and P2Y12 but not intracellular calcium change.

    PubMed

    Jung, S M; Moroi, M

    2001-06-01

    In agonist-induced platelet activation, the collagen platelet receptor integrin alpha2beta1 is activated to high-affinity states through ADP involvement [Jung, S.M. & Moroi, M. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 8016-8026]. Here we determined the ADP-receptor subtypes involved and their relative contributions to alpha2beta1 activation (assessed by soluble-collagen binding) using the P2Y12 antagonist AR-C69931MX and P2Y1 antagonists adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate (Ado(3,5)PP) and adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phosphosulfate (AdoPPS). All three inhibited alpha2beta1 activation induced by low or high ADP, low thrombin, or low collagen-related peptide (CRP) concentrations; however, AR-C69931MX was markedly more inhibitory than the P2Y1 antagonists, suggesting the greater contribution of P2Y12. Inhibition patterns by various combinations of AR-C69931MX, AdoPPS, and wortmannin suggested that P2Y1 and P2Y12 mediate alpha2beta1 activation through different pathways, with possible involvement of phosphoinositide 3-kinase in both. Low concentrations of the acetoxy-methyl derivative of 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid (calcium chelator) markedly decreased alpha2beta1 activation by low thrombin or CRP, but did not affect that by low or high ADP. Measurements of intracellular Ca2+ level (fluorimetric method) and alpha2beta1 activation (soluble-collagen binding) in the same platelet preparation indicated that alpha2beta1 activation via ADP receptors was independent of intracellular Ca2+ release. Our data indicate that integrin alpha2beta1 activation by ADP occurs through an inside-out signaling mechanism involving differential contributions by P2Y1 and P2Y12 wherein each contributes to some portion of the activation, with the stronger contribution of P2Y12. Furthermore, intracellular Ca2+ increase is not directly related to integrin alpha2beta1 activation, meaning that it is separate from the calcium mobilization pathways that these two ADP receptors are involved in.

  14. Effect of low frequency electromagnetic fields on A2A adenosine receptors in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Varani, Katia; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Iannotta, Valeria; Cattabriga, Elena; Spisani, Susanna; Cadossi, Ruggero; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2002-01-01

    The present study describes the effect of low frequency, low energy, pulsing electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on A2A adenosine receptors in human neutrophils.Saturation experiments performed using a high affinity adenosine antagonist [3H]-ZM 241385 revealed a single class of binding sites in control and in PEMF-treated human neutrophils with similar affinity (KD=1.05±0.10 and 1.08±0.12 nM, respectively). Furthermore, after 1 h of exposure to PEMFs the receptor density was statistically increased (P<0.01) (Bmax =126±10 and 215±15 fmol mg−1 protein, respectively).The effect of PEMFs was specific to the A2A adenosine receptors. This effect was also intensity, time and temperature dependent.In the adenylyl cyclase assays the A2A receptor agonists, HE-NECA and NECA, increased cyclic AMP accumulation in untreated human neutrophils with an EC50 value of 43 (40 – 47) and 255 (228 – 284) nM, respectively. The capability of HE-NECA and NECA to stimulate cyclic AMP levels in human neutrophils was increased (P<0.01) after exposure to PEMFs with an EC50 value of 10(8 – 13) and 61(52 – 71) nM, respectively.In the superoxide anion (O2−) production assays HE-NECA and NECA inhibited the generation of O2− in untreated human neutrophils, with an EC50 value of 3.6(3.1 – 4.2) and of 23(20 – 27) nM, respectively. Moreover, in PEMF-treated human neutrophils, the same compounds show an EC50 value of 1.6(1.2 – 2.1) and of 6.0(4.7 – 7.5) nM respectively.These results indicate the presence of significant alterations in the expression and in the functionality of adenosine A2A receptors in human neutrophils treated with PEMFs. PMID:11976268

  15. Ratiometric detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in water and real-time monitoring of apyrase activity with a tripodal zinc complex.

    PubMed

    Butler, Stephen J

    2014-11-24

    Two tripodal fluorescent probes Zn⋅L(1,2) have been synthesised, and their anion-binding capabilities were examined by using fluorescence spectroscopy. Probe Zn⋅L(1) allows the selective and ratiometric detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) at physiological pH, even in the presence of several competing anions, such as ADP, phosphate and bicarbonate. The probe was applied to the real-time monitoring of the apyrase-catalysed hydrolysis of ATP, in a medium that mimics an extracellular fluid.

  16. Consensus and update on the definition of on-treatment platelet reactivity to adenosine diphosphate associated with ischemia and bleeding.

    PubMed

    Tantry, Udaya S; Bonello, Laurent; Aradi, Daniel; Price, Matthew J; Jeong, Young-Hoon; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Stone, Gregg W; Curzen, Nick; Geisler, Tobias; Ten Berg, Jurrien; Kirtane, Ajay; Siller-Matula, Jolanta; Mahla, Elisabeth; Becker, Richard C; Bhatt, Deepak L; Waksman, Ron; Rao, Sunil V; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Marcucci, Rossella; Reny, Jean-Luc; Trenk, Dietmar; Sibbing, Dirk; Gurbel, Paul A

    2013-12-17

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and a P2Y12 receptor blocker is a key strategy to reduce platelet reactivity and to prevent thrombotic events in patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. In an earlier consensus document, we proposed cutoff values for high on-treatment platelet reactivity to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) associated with post-percutaneous coronary intervention ischemic events for various platelet function tests (PFTs). Updated American and European practice guidelines have issued a Class IIb recommendation for PFT to facilitate the choice of P2Y12 receptor inhibitor in selected high-risk patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention, although routine testing is not recommended (Class III). Accumulated data from large studies underscore the importance of high on-treatment platelet reactivity to ADP as a prognostic risk factor. Recent prospective randomized trials of PFT did not demonstrate clinical benefit, thus questioning whether treatment modification based on the results of current PFT platforms can actually influence outcomes. However, there are major limitations associated with these randomized trials. In addition, recent data suggest that low on-treatment platelet reactivity to ADP is associated with a higher risk of bleeding. Therefore, a therapeutic window concept has been proposed for P2Y12 inhibitor therapy. In this updated consensus document, we review the available evidence addressing the relation of platelet reactivity to thrombotic and bleeding events. In addition, we propose cutoff values for high and low on-treatment platelet reactivity to ADP that might be used in future investigations of personalized antiplatelet therapy.

  17. Molecular insight into the specific binding of ADP-ribose to the nsP3 macro domains of chikungunya and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses: molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Nunthaboot, Nadtanet; Malaisree, Maturos; Kaiyawet, Nopporn; Yotmanee, Pathumwadee; Meeprasert, Arthitaya; Hannongbua, Supot

    2010-11-01

    The outbreaks of chikungunya (CHIKV) and venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEEV) viral infections in humans have emerged or re-emerged in various countries of "Africa and southeast Asia", and "central and south America", respectively. At present, no drug or vaccine is available for the treatment and therapy of both viral infections, but the non-structural protein, nsP3, is a potential target for the design of potent inhibitors that fit at the adenosine-binding site of its macro domain. Here, so as to understand the fundamental basis of the particular interactions between the ADP-ribose bound to the nsP3 amino acid residues at the binding site, molecular dynamics simulations were applied. The results show that these two nsP3 domains share a similar binding pattern for accommodating the ADP-ribose. The ADP-ribose phosphate unit showed the highest degree of stabilization through hydrogen bond interactions with the nsP3 V33 residue and the consequent amino acid residues 110-114. The adenine base of ADP-ribose was specifically recognized by the conserved nsP3 residue D10. Additionally, the ribose and the diphosphate units were found to play more important roles in the CHIKV nsP3-ADP-ribose complex, while the ter-ribose was more important in the VEEV complex. The slightly higher binding affinity of ADP-ribose toward the nsP3 macro domain of VEEV, as predicted by the simulation results, is in good agreement with previous experimental data. These simulation results provide useful information to further assist in drug design and development for these two important viruses.

  18. Cooperation of Adenosine with Macrophage Toll-4 Receptor Agonists Leads to Increased Glycolytic Flux through the Enhanced Expression of PFKFB3 Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-García, Almudena; Monsalve, Eva; Novellasdemunt, Laura; Navarro-Sabaté, Àurea; Manzano, Anna; Rivero, Samuel; Castrillo, Antonio; Casado, Marta; Laborda, Jorge; Bartrons, Ramón; Díaz-Guerra, María José M.

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages activated through Toll receptor triggering increase the expression of the A2A and A2B adenosine receptors. In this study, we show that adenosine receptor activation enhances LPS-induced pfkfb3 expression, resulting in an increase of the key glycolytic allosteric regulator fructose 2,6-bisphosphate and the glycolytic flux. Using shRNA and differential expression of A2A and A2B receptors, we demonstrate that the A2A receptor mediates, in part, the induction of pfkfb3 by LPS, whereas the A2B receptor, with lower adenosine affinity, cooperates when high adenosine levels are present. pfkfb3 promoter sequence deletion analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, and inhibition by shRNAs demonstrated that HIF1α is a key transcription factor driving pfkfb3 expression following macrophage activation by LPS, whereas synergic induction of pfkfb3 expression observed with the A2 receptor agonists seems to depend on Sp1 activity. Furthermore, levels of phospho-AMP kinase also increase, arguing for increased PFKFB3 activity by phosphorylation in long term LPS-activated macrophages. Taken together, our results show that, in macrophages, endogenously generated adenosine cooperates with bacterial components to increase PFKFB3 isozyme activity, resulting in greater fructose 2,6-bisphosphate accumulation. This process enhances the glycolytic flux and favors ATP generation helping to develop and maintain the long term defensive and reparative functions of the macrophages. PMID:21464136

  19. Allosteric interactions at adenosine A1 and A3 receptors: new insights into the role of small molecules and receptor dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Stephen J; May, Lauren T; Kellam, Barrie; Woolard, Jeanette

    2014-01-01

    The purine nucleoside adenosine is present in all cells in tightly regulated concentrations. It is released under a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions to facilitate protection and regeneration of tissues. Adenosine acts via specific GPCRs to either stimulate cyclic AMP formation, as exemplified by Gs-protein-coupled adenosine receptors (A2A and A2B), or inhibit AC activity, in the case of Gi/o-coupled adenosine receptors (A1 and A3). Recent advances in our understanding of GPCR structure have provided insights into the conformational changes that occur during receptor activation following binding of agonists to orthosteric (i.e. at the same binding site as an endogenous modulator) and allosteric regulators to allosteric sites (i.e. at a site that is topographically distinct from the endogenous modulator). Binding of drugs to allosteric sites may lead to changes in affinity or efficacy, and affords considerable potential for increased selectivity in new drug development. Herein, we provide an overview of the properties of selective allosteric regulators of the adenosine A1 and A3 receptors, focusing on the impact of receptor dimerization, mechanistic approaches to single-cell ligand-binding kinetics and the effects of A1- and A3-receptor allosteric modulators on in vivo pharmacology. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24024783

  20. GABAB and adenosine receptors mediate enhancement of the K+ current, IAHP, by reducing adenylyl cyclase activity in rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gerber, U; Gähwiler, B H

    1994-11-01

    1. Gamma-aminobuturic acid-B (GABAB) and adenosine A1 receptors, which are expressed in hippocampal pyramidal cells, are linked to pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins known to be coupled negatively to the enzyme adenylyl cyclase. This study investigates the electrophysiological consequences of adenylyl cyclase inhibition in response to stimulation of these receptors. 2. Single-electrode voltage-clamp recordings were obtained from CA3 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal slice cultures in presence of tetrodotoxin. The calcium-dependent potassium current (IAHP), which is very sensitive to intracellular levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used as an electrophysiological indicator of adenylyl cyclase activity. 3. Application of baclofen (10 microM), a selective agonist at GABAB receptors, or adenosine (50 microM) each resulted in a transient decrease followed by a significant enhancement in the amplitude of evoked IAHP. The initial reduction in amplitude of IAHP probably reflects inadequacies in voltage clamp of electronically distant dendritic sites, due to the shunting caused by concomitant activation of potassium conductance by baclofen/adenosine. Comparable increases in membrane conductance in response to the GABAA agonist, muscimol, caused a similar reduction in IAHP. The enhancement of IAHP is consistent with an inhibition of constitutively active adenylyl cyclase. 4. The receptor mediating the responses to adenosine was identified as belonging to the A1 subtype on the basis of its sensitivity to the selective antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. The family of bacterial ADP-ribosylating exotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, K M; Barbieri, J T

    1995-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria utilize a variety of virulence factors that contribute to the clinical manifestation of their pathogenesis. Bacterial ADP-ribosylating exotoxins (bAREs) represent one family of virulence factors that exert their toxic effects by transferring the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD onto specific eucaryotic target proteins. The observations that some bAREs ADP-ribosylate eucaryotic proteins that regulate signal transduction, like the heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins and the low-molecular-weight GTP-binding proteins, has extended interest in bAREs beyond the bacteriology laboratory. Molecular studies have shown that bAREs possess little primary amino acid homology and have diverse quaternary structure-function organization. Underlying this apparent diversity, biochemical and crystallographic studies have shown that several bAREs have conserved active-site structures and possess a conserved glutamic acid within their active sites. PMID:7704894

  2. Regulation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate deaminase in the freeze tolerant wood frog, Rana sylvatica

    PubMed Central

    Dieni, Christopher A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2008-01-01

    Background The wood frog, Rana sylvatica, is one of a few vertebrate species that have developed natural freeze tolerance, surviving days or weeks with 65–70% of its total body water frozen in extracellular ice masses. Frozen frogs exhibit no vital signs and their organs must endure multiple stresses, particularly long term anoxia and ischemia. Maintenance of cellular energy supply is critical to viability in the frozen state and in skeletal muscle, AMP deaminase (AMPD) plays a key role in stabilizing cellular energetics. The present study investigated AMPD control in wood frog muscle. Results Wood frog AMPD was subject to multiple regulatory controls: binding to subcellular structures, protein phosphorylation, and effects of allosteric effectors, cryoprotectants and temperature. The percentage of bound AMPD activity increased from 20 to 35% with the transition to the frozen state. Bound AMPD showed altered kinetic parameters compared with the free enzyme (S0.5 AMP was reduced, Hill coefficient fell to ~1.0) and the transition to the frozen state led to a 3-fold increase in S0.5 AMP of the bound enzyme. AMPD was a target of protein phosphorylation. Bound AMPD from control frogs proved to be a low phosphate form with a low S0.5 AMP and was phosphorylated in incubations that stimulated PKA, PKC, CaMK, or AMPK. Bound AMPD from frozen frogs was a high phosphate form with a high S0.5 AMP that was reduced under incubation conditions that stimulated protein phosphatases. Frog muscle AMPD was activated by Mg·ATP and Mg·ADP and inhibited by Mg·GTP, KCl, NaCl and NH4Cl. The enzyme product, IMP, uniquely inhibited only the bound (phosphorylated) enzyme from muscle of frozen frogs. Activators and inhibitors differentially affected the free versus bound enzyme. S0.5 AMP of bound AMPD was also differentially affected by high versus low assay temperature (25 vs 5°C) and by the presence/absence of the natural cryoprotectant (250 mM glucose) that accumulates during freezing

  3. The role of adenosine in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Anisur

    2009-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system manifested by cognitive and memory deterioration, a variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms, behavioral disturbances, and progressive impairment of daily life activities. Current pharmacotherapies are restricted to symptomatic interventions but do not prevent progressive neuronal degeneration. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are needed to intervene with these progressive pathological processes. In the past several years adenosine, a ubiquitously released purine ribonucleoside, has become important for its neuromodulating capability and its emerging positive experimental effects in neurodegenerative diseases. Recent research suggests that adenosine receptors play important roles in the modulation of cognitive function. The present paper attempts to review published reports and data from different studies showing the evidence of a relationship between adenosinergic function and AD-related cognitive deficits. Epidemiological studies have found an association between coffee (a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist) consumption and improved cognitive function in AD patients and in the elderly. Long-term administration of caffeine in transgenic animal models showed a reduced amyloid burden in brain with better cognitive performance. Antagonists of adenosine A2A receptors mimic these beneficial effects of caffeine on cognitive function. Neuronal cell cultures with amyloid beta in the presence of an A2A receptor antagonist completely prevented amyloid beta-induced neurotoxicity. These findings suggest that the adenosinergic system constitutes a new therapeutic target for AD, and caffeine and A2A receptor antagonists may have promise to manage cognitive dysfunction in AD.

  4. Dabigatran and rivaroxaban do not affect AA- and ADP-induced platelet aggregation in patients receiving concomitant platelet inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Christoph B; Weik, Patrick; Meyer, Melanie; Weber, Susanne; Diehl, Philipp; Bode, Christoph; Moser, Martin; Zhou, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Dabigatran and rivaroxaban are novel, vitamin K-independent oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and act via antagonism of the coagulation factor (F) IIa (dabigatran) or FXa (rivaroxaban), respectively. Compared to vitamin-K-antagonists, NOACs have shown non-inferiority of risk and benefit in patients with non valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). In clinical practice there is increasing use of NOACs combined with platelet inhibitors in patients with AF and coronary artery disease. However, whether NOACs affect the function of platelet inhibitors remains incompletely known. This observational study aimed to assess the platelet function in patients receiving dabigatran or rivaroxaban and concomitant platelet inhibitors. A single centre observational study was performed analysing the platelet aggregation of patients treated with dabigatran or rivaroxaban with or without concomitant platelet inhibitors. Measurements before the initiation of NOAC therapy served as the respective control group. Platelet aggregation was measured by multiple electrode aggregometry and was induced with adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 6.5 µM) and arachidonic acid (AA, 0.5 mM), respectively. In order to evaluate whether NOACs interact with platelet inhibition by ASA or the P2Y12-antagonist clopidogrel, 87 patients were grouped according to their concomitant antiplatelet medication. Comparing the ADP- and AA-induced platelet aggregation in patients without concomitant platelet inhibitors (n = 45) no significant differences under therapy with dabigatran (d) or rivaroxaban (r) compared to the control group (c) were observed. In patients taking clopidogrel as a concomitant platelet inhibitor (n = 21), neither dabigatran nor rivaroxaban affected the ADP-induced platelet aggregation (c 20 ± 11, d 21 ± 14, r 18 ± 8 AU*min, p = 0.200). Patients receiving dabigatran or rivaroxaban in combination with ASA (n = 42; 21 ASA only, 21 ASA + clopidogrel) showed no significant differences of the AA

  5. β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide acts at prejunctional adenosine A1 receptors to suppress inhibitory musculomotor neurotransmission in guinea pig colon and human jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Xia, Yun; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Needleman, Bradley J.; Mikami, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrodes were used to record neurogenic inhibitory junction potentials in the intestinal circular muscle coat. Electrical field stimulation was used to stimulate intramural neurons and evoke contraction of the smooth musculature. Exposure to β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD) did not alter smooth muscle membrane potential in guinea pig colon or human jejunum. ATP, ADP, β-NAD, and adenosine, as well as the purinergic P2Y1 receptor antagonists MRS 2179 and MRS 2500 and the adenosine A1 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, each suppressed inhibitory junction potentials in guinea pig and human preparations. β-NAD suppressed contractile force of twitch-like contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in guinea pig and human preparations. P2Y1 receptor antagonists did not reverse this action. Stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine suppressed the force of twitch contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in like manner to the action of β-NAD. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine suppressed the inhibitory action of β-NAD on the force of electrically evoked contractions. The results do not support an inhibitory neurotransmitter role for β-NAD at intestinal neuromuscular junctions. The data suggest that β-NAD is a ligand for the adenosine A1 receptor subtype expressed by neurons in the enteric nervous system. The influence of β-NAD on intestinal motility emerges from adenosine A1 receptor-mediated suppression of neurotransmitter release at inhibitory neuromuscular junctions. PMID:25813057

  6. Berberine attenuates cAMP-induced lipolysis via reducing the inhibition of phosphodiesterase in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Libin; Wang, Xiao; Yang, Ying; Wu, Ling; Li, Fengying; Zhang, Rong; Yuan, Guoyue; Wang, Ning; Chen, Mingdao; Ning, Guang

    2011-04-01

    Berberine, a hypoglycemic agent, has been shown to decrease plasma free fatty acids (FFAs) level in insulin-resistant rats. In the present study, we explored the mechanism responsible for the antilipolytic effect of berberine in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. It was shown that berberine attenuated lipolysis induced by catecholamines, cAMP-raising agents, and a hydrolyzable cAMP analog, but not by tumor necrosis factor α and a nonhydrolyzable cAMP analog. Unlike insulin, the inhibitory effect of berberine on lipolysis in response to isoproterenol was not abrogated by wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, but additive to that of PD98059, an extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase inhibitor. Prior exposure of adipocytes to berberine decreased the intracellular cAMP production induced by isoproterenol, forskolin, and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), along with hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) Ser-563 and Ser-660 dephosphorylation, but had no effect on perilipin phosphorylation. Berberine stimulated HSL Ser-565 as well as adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. However, compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, did not reverse the regulatory effect of berberine on HSL Ser-563, Ser-660, and Ser-565 phosphorylation, nor the antilipolytic effect of berberine. Knockdown of AMPK using RNA interference also failed to restore berberine-suppressed lipolysis. cAMP-raising agents increased AMPK activity, which was not additive to that of berberine. Stimulation of adipocytes with berberine increased phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3B and PDE4 activity measured by hydrolysis of (3)[H]cAMP. These results suggest that berberine exerts an antilipolytic effect mainly by reducing the inhibition of PDE, leading to a decrease in cAMP and HSL phosphorylation independent of AMPK pathway.

  7. A Novel Method for Screening Adenosine Receptor Specific Agonists for Use in Adenosine Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Karlie R.; Choi, Uimook; Gao, Ji-Liang; Thompson, Robert D.; Rodman, Larry E.; Malech, Harry L.; Kang, Elizabeth M.

    2017-01-01

    Agonists that target the A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors have potential to be potent treatment options for a number of diseases, including autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Because each of these adenosine receptors plays a distinct role throughout the body, obtaining highly specific receptor agonists is essential. Of these receptors, the adenosine A2AR and A2BR share many sequence and structural similarities but highly differ in their responses to inflammatory stimuli. Our laboratory, using a combination of specially developed cell lines and calcium release analysis hardware, has created a new and faster method for determining specificity of synthetic adenosine agonist compounds for the A2A and A2B receptors in human cells. A2A receptor expression was effectively removed from K562 cells, resulting in the development of a distinct null line. Using HIV-lentivector and plasmid DNA transfection, we also developed A2A and A2B receptor over-expressing lines. As adenosine is known to cause changes in intracellular calcium levels upon addition to cell culture, calcium release can be determined in these cell lines upon compound addition, providing a functional readout of receptor activation and allowing us to isolate the most specific adenosine agonist compounds. PMID:28317879

  8. ADP Bid Protests: Better Disclosure and Accountability of Settlements Needed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    but Few A With Mosey S -7 The.Census Bureaus expeice and concern about ossCA’s bid 1rotest procedures prompted.a DN Aft•ment of Commerce official in...GAO/GGD-S-13 ADP Bid Protest Settlements * 4 r 0 @ Appendix I ADP Bid Protests Fil With the GSBCA and£ G O From April to September 30, 18N General...J. Socolar Special Assistant to the Comptroller General General Accounting Office 蚉 G Street, N.V. Vashington, D.C. 20548 Subject: Analysis of

  9. Early exposure to caffeine affects gene expression of adenosine receptors, DARPP-32 and BDNF without affecting sensibility and morphology of developing zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Menezes, Fabiano Peres; Nazario, Luiza Reali; Pohlmann, Julhana Bianchini; de Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Fazenda, Lidiane; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine receptors are the most important biochemical targets of caffeine, a common trimethylxanthine found in food and beverages. Adenosine plays modulatory action during the development through adenosine receptors and their intracellular pathways activation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate if caffeine gave to zebrafish in the very first steps of development is able to affect its direct targets, through the adenosine receptors mRNA expression evaluation, and latter indirect targets, through evaluation of the pattern of dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression. Here, we demonstrate that zebrafish express adenosine receptor subtypes (A1, A2A1, A2A2 and A2B) since 24h post-fertilization (hpf) and that caffeine exposure is able to affect the expression of these receptors. Caffeine exposure from 1 hpf is able to increase A1 expression at 72-96 hpf and A2A1 expression at 72 hpf. No alterations occurred in A2A2 and A2B expression after caffeine treatment. DARPP-32, a phosphoprotein involved in adenosine intracellular pathway is also expressed since 24 hpf and early exposure to caffeine increased DARPP-32 expression at 168 hpf. We also evaluate the expression of BDNF as one of the targets of adenosine intracellular pathway activation. BDNF was also expressed since 24 hpf and caffeine treatment increased its expression at 48 and 72 hpf. No morphological alterations induced by caffeine treatment were registered by the check of general body features and total body length. Assessment of tactile sensibility also demonstrated no alterations by caffeine treatment. Altogether, these results suggest that caffeine is able to affect expression of its cellular targets since early phases of development in zebrafish without affect visible features. The up-regulation of direct and indirect targets of caffeine presents as a compensatory mechanism of maintenance of adenosinergic modulation during the developmental phase.

  10. Adenosine receptors and the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sebastião, Ana M; Ribeiro, Joaquim A

    2009-01-01

    The adenosine receptors (ARs) in the nervous system act as a kind of "go-between" to regulate the release of neurotransmitters (this includes all known neurotransmitters) and the action of neuromodulators (e.g., neuropeptides, neurotrophic factors). Receptor-receptor interactions and AR-transporter interplay occur as part of the adenosine's attempt to control synaptic transmission. A(2A)ARs are more abundant in the striatum and A(1)ARs in the hippocampus, but both receptors interfere with the efficiency and plasticity-regulated synaptic transmission in most brain areas. The omnipresence of adenosine and A(2A) and A(1) ARs in all nervous system cells (neurons and glia), together with the intensive release of adenosine following insults, makes adenosine a kind of "maestro" of the tripartite synapse in the homeostatic coordination of the brain function. Under physiological conditions, both A(2A) and A(1) ARs play an important role in sleep and arousal, cognition, memory and learning, whereas under pathological conditions (e.g., Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, epilepsy, drug addiction, pain, schizophrenia, depression), ARs operate a time/circumstance window where in some circumstances A(1)AR agonists may predominate as early neuroprotectors, and in other circumstances A(2A)AR antagonists may alter the outcomes of some of the pathological deficiencies. In some circumstances, and depending on the therapeutic window, the use of A(2A)AR agonists may be initially beneficial; however, at later time points, the use of A(2A)AR antagonists proved beneficial in several pathologies. Since selective ligands for A(1) and A(2A) ARs are now entering clinical trials, the time has come to determine the role of these receptors in neurological and psychiatric diseases and identify therapies that will alter the outcomes of these diseases, therefore providing a hopeful future for the patients who suffer from these diseases.

  11. An ecto-enzyme from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius strain 7 which catalyzes hydrolysis of inorganic pyrophosphate, ATP, and ADP: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Amano, T; Wakagi, T; Oshima, T

    1993-09-01

    Membranes of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, a thermoacidophilic archaebacterium, show novel enzymatic activities to hydrolyze PPi, ATP, and ADP at an optimal pH of 3, equal to the growth optimum. The activity increased by about 2-fold on addition of PPi and/or Pi to the growth medium, when yeast extract and casamino acids were removed. The enzyme which hydrolyzes PPi at pH 3 was solubilized and purified by successive chromatographies. The final preparation showed a 26 kDa single band on SDS-PAGE, and a molecular mass of 35 kDa on gel permeation chromatography. The Km and Vmax for PPi were 0.16 mM and 33 mumol Pi released/min/mg at 55 degrees C. ATP and ADP were also good substrates. Divalent cations were not essential for activity. Substrate inhibition at more than 5 mM PPi, ATP or ADP was observed. AMP, glucose-6-phosphate, and p-nitrophenyl phosphate were not hydrolyzed at all. The activity was 4-fold stimulated by addition of the lipid fraction extracted from the organism.

  12. Effects of adenosine infusion into renal interstitium on renal hemodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowska, D.; Granger, J.P.; Knox, F.G.

    1987-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the hemodynamic effects of exogenous adenosine in the interstitium of the rat kidney. Adenosine or its analogues were infused into the renal interstitium by means of chronically implanted capsules. In fusion of adenosine decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from 0.81 +/- 0.06 to 0.37 +/- 0.06 ml/min while having no effect on renal blood flow (RBF). The metabolically stable analogue, 2-chloradenosine (2-ClAdo), decreased GFR from 0.73 +/- 0.07 to 021 +/- 0.06 ml/min. Interstitial infusion of theophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist, completely abolished the effects of adenosine and 2-ClAdo on GFR. The distribution of adenosine, when infused into the renal interstitium, was determined using radiolabeled 5'-(N-ethyl)-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a metabolically stable adenosine agonist. After continuous infusion, (/sup 3/H)NECA was distributed throughout the kidney. The effects of NECA to reduce GFR were similar to those of adenosine and 2-ClAdo. They conclude that increased levels of adenosine in the renal interstitium markedly decrease GFR without affecting RBF in steady-state conditions. The marked effects of adenosine agonists during their infusion into the renal interstitium and the complete blockade of these effects by theophylline suggest an extracellular action of adenosine.

  13. Neuroprotective effects of adenosine deaminase in the striatum

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Risa; Satoh, Yasushi; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Nibuya, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catabolizes adenosine and deoxyadenosine. During cerebral ischemia, extracellular adenosine levels increase acutely and adenosine deaminase catabolizes the increased levels of adenosine. Since adenosine is a known neuroprotective agent, adenosine deaminase was thought to have a negative effect during ischemia. In this study, however, we demonstrate that adenosine deaminase has substantial neuroprotective effects in the striatum, which is especially vulnerable during cerebral ischemia. We used temporary oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) to simulate ischemia in rat corticostriatal brain slices. We used field potentials as the primary measure of neuronal damage. For stable and efficient electrophysiological assessment, we used transgenic rats expressing channelrhodopsin-2, which depolarizes neurons in response to blue light. Time courses of electrically evoked striatal field potential (eFP) and optogenetically evoked striatal field potential (optFP) were recorded during and after oxygen/glucose deprivation. The levels of both eFP and optFP decreased after 10 min of oxygen/glucose deprivation. Bath-application of 10 µg/ml adenosine deaminase during oxygen/glucose deprivation significantly attenuated the oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced reduction in levels of eFP and optFP. The number of injured cells decreased significantly, and western blot analysis indicated a significant decrease of autophagic signaling in the adenosine deaminase-treated oxygen/glucose deprivation slices. These results indicate that adenosine deaminase has protective effects in the striatum. PMID:26746865

  14. p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K mediates cAMP-PKA and estrogens biological effects on growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, C; Di Domenico, M; Porcellini, A; Cuozzo, C; De Gregorio, G; Santillo, M R; Agnese, S; Di Stasio, R; Feliciello, A; Migliaccio, A; Avvedimento, E V

    2007-03-29

    Cyclic adenosine 3'5' monophosphate (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA) cooperate with phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase (PI3K) signals in the control of growth and survival. To determine the molecular mechanism(s) involved, we identified and mutagenized a specific serine (residue 83) in p85alpha(PI3K), which is phosphorylated in vivo and in vitro by PKA. Expression of p85alpha(PI3K) mutants (alanine or aspartic substitutions) significantly altered the biological responses of the cells to cAMP. cAMP protection from anoikis was reduced in cells expressing the alanine version p85alpha(PI3K). These cells did not arrest in G1 in the presence of cAMP, whereas cells expressing the aspartic mutant p85D accumulated in G1 even in the absence of cAMP. S phase was still efficiently inhibited by cAMP in cells expressing both mutants. The binding of PI3K to Ras p21 was greatly reduced in cells expressing p85A in the presence or absence of cAMP. Conversely, expression of the aspartic mutant stimulated robustly the binding of PI3K to p21 Ras in the presence of cAMP. Mutation in the Ser 83 inhibited cAMP, but not PDGF stimulation of PI3K. Conversely, the p85D aspartic mutant amplified cAMP stimulation of PI3K activity. Phosphorylation of Ser 83 by cAMP-PKA in p85alpha(PI3K) was also necessary for estrogen signaling as expression of p85A or p85D mutants inhibited or amplified, respectively, the binding of estrogen receptor to p85alpha and AKT phosphorylation induced by estrogens. The data presented indicate that: (1) phosphorylation of Ser 83 in p85alpha(PI3K) is critical for cAMP-PKA induced G1 arrest and survival in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts; (2) this site is necessary for amplification of estrogen signals by cAMP-PKA and related receptors. Finally, these data suggest a general mechanism of PI3K regulation by cAMP, operating in various cell types and under different conditions.

  15. Three Yersinia enterocolitica AmpD Homologs Participate in the Multi-Step Regulation of Chromosomal Cephalosporinase, AmpC

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Xin; Chen, Yuhuang; Hao, Huijing; Li, Xu; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Li, Chuchu; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Shihe; Jing, Huaiqi

    2016-01-01

    In many gram negative bacilli, AmpD plays a key role in both cell well-recycling pathway and β-lactamase regulation, inactivation of the ampD causes the accumulation of 1,6-anhydromuropeptides, and results in the ampC overproduction. In Yersinia enterocolitica, the regulation of ampC expression may also rely on the ampR-ampC system, the role of AmpD in this species is still unknown. In this study, three AmpD homologs (AmpD1, AmpD2, and AmpD3) have been identified in complete sequence of strain Y. enterocolitica subsp. palearctica 105.5R(r). To understand the role of three AmpD homologs, several mutant strains were constructed and analyzed where a rare ampC regulation mechanism was observed: low-effective ampD2 and ampD3 cooperate with the high-effective ampD1 in the three levels regulation of ampC expression. Enterobacteriaceae was used to be supposed to regulate ampC expression by two steps, three steps regulation was only observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we first reported that Enterobacteriaceae Y. enterocolitica can also possess a three steps stepwise regulation mechanism, regulating the ampC expression precisely. PMID:27588018

  16. Three Yersinia enterocolitica AmpD Homologs Participate in the Multi-Step Regulation of Chromosomal Cephalosporinase, AmpC.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Xin; Chen, Yuhuang; Hao, Huijing; Li, Xu; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Li, Chuchu; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Shihe; Jing, Huaiqi

    2016-01-01

    In many gram negative bacilli, AmpD plays a key role in both cell well-recycling pathway and β-lactamase regulation, inactivation of the ampD causes the accumulation of 1,6-anhydromuropeptides, and results in the ampC overproduction. In Yersinia enterocolitica, the regulation of ampC expression may also rely on the ampR-ampC system, the role of AmpD in this species is still unknown. In this study, three AmpD homologs (AmpD1, AmpD2, and AmpD3) have been identified in complete sequence of strain Y. enterocolitica subsp. palearctica 105.5R(r). To understand the role of three AmpD homologs, several mutant strains were constructed and analyzed where a rare ampC regulation mechanism was observed: low-effective ampD2 and ampD3 cooperate with the high-effective ampD1 in the three levels regulation of ampC expression. Enterobacteriaceae was used to be supposed to regulate ampC expression by two steps, three steps regulation was only observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we first reported that Enterobacteriaceae Y. enterocolitica can also possess a three steps stepwise regulation mechanism, regulating the ampC expression precisely.

  17. The alpha-glycosidic bonds of poly(ADP-ribose) are acid-labile.

    PubMed

    Panzeter, P L; Zweifel, B; Althaus, F R

    1992-04-15

    The poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation system of higher eukaryotes produces multiple ADP-ribose polymers of distinct sizes which exhibit different binding affinities for histones. Although precipitation with trichloroacetic acid (TCA) is the standard procedure for isolation of poly(ADP-ribose) from biological material, we show here that poly(ADP-ribose) is not stable under acidic conditions. Storage of poly(ADP-ribose) as TCA pellets results in acid hydrolysis of polymers, the extent of which is dependent on storage time and temperature. The alpha-glycosidic, inter-residue bonds are the preferred sites of attack, thus reducing polymer sizes by integral numbers of ADP-ribose to yield artefactually more and smaller polymers than originally present. Therefore, poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation studies involving TCA precipitation, histone extraction with acids, or acidic incubations of ADP-ribose polymers must account for the impact of acids on resulting polymer populations.

  18. Adenosine Stimulate Proliferation and Migration in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gallardo, Miriam; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Sandoval, Alejandro; Felix, Ricardo; Monjaraz, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the adenosine (Ado) receptors may play crucial roles in tumor progression. Here, we show that Ado increases proliferation and migration in a triple negative breast cancer model, the MDA-MB 231 cell line. The use of specific agonists and antagonists evidenced that these effects depend on the activation of the A2B receptor, which then triggers an intracellular response mediated by the adenylate cyclase/PKA/cAMP signaling pathway. Ado also increases the expression of NaV1.5 channels, a potential biomarker in breast cancer. Together, these data suggest important roles of the A2B receptors and NaV1.5 channels in the Ado-induced increase in proliferation and migration of the MDA-MB 231 cells.

  19. Adenosine Stimulate Proliferation and Migration in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Gallardo, Miriam; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Sandoval, Alejandro; Monjaraz, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the adenosine (Ado) receptors may play crucial roles in tumor progression. Here, we show that Ado increases proliferation and migration in a triple negative breast cancer model, the MDA-MB 231 cell line. The use of specific agonists and antagonists evidenced that these effects depend on the activation of the A2B receptor, which then triggers an intracellular response mediated by the adenylate cyclase/PKA/cAMP signaling pathway. Ado also increases the expression of NaV1.5 channels, a potential biomarker in breast cancer. Together, these data suggest important roles of the A2B receptors and NaV1.5 channels in the Ado-induced increase in proliferation and migration of the MDA-MB 231 cells. PMID:27911956

  20. Inhibition of microsomal lipid peroxidation by cytosolic protein in presence of ADP and high concentration of Fe2+.

    PubMed

    Ramasarma, T; Muakkassah-Kelly, S; Hochstein, P

    1984-12-06

    Microsomal lipid peroxidation induced by NADPH, but not by ascorbate, was found to be inhibited by liver cytosol. This inhibition was not dependent on glutathione and was enhanced by ADP in presence of Fe2+ at a concentration of 50 microM or higher. ATP was also effective, but not AMP or cyclic AMP. The cytosolic factor appeared to be a protein as it was heat-labile (greater than 70 degrees C), was non-dialyzable and was precipitated by ammonium sulfate and acetone. It was stable for several months in frozen state and also when heated at 50 degrees C for 10 min. The inhibition by the cytosolic protein was obtained by producing a lag in the activity of lipid peroxidation and was reversed by ceruloplasmin but not by catalase, cytochrome c, hemoglobin or superoxide dismutase. This inhibitory effect by cytosol was limited to formation of lipid peroxides whereas oxygen uptake and NADPH oxidation remained unaffected. Regulation of lipid peroxidation by nucleotide-Fe complexes and cytosolic proteins is indicated by these studies.

  1. Kinetic studies of rat liver hexokinase D ('glucokinase') in non-co-operative conditions show an ordered mechanism with MgADP as the last product to be released.

    PubMed Central

    Monasterio, Octavio; Cárdenas, María Luz

    2003-01-01

    The kinetic mechanism of rat liver hexokinase D ('glucokinase') was studied under non-co-operative conditions with 2-deoxyglucose as substrate, chosen to avoid uncertainties derived from the co-operativity observed with the physiological substrate, glucose. The enzyme shows hyperbolic kinetics with respect to both 2-deoxyglucose and MgATP(2-), and the reaction follows a ternary-complex mechanism with K (m)=19.2+/-2.3 mM for 2-deoxyglucose and 0.56+/-0.05 mM for MgATP(2-). Product inhibition by MgADP(-) was mixed with respect to MgATP(2-) and was largely competitive with respect to 2-deoxyglucose, suggesting an ordered mechanism with 2-deoxyglucose as first substrate and MgADP(-) as last product. Dead-end inhibition by N -acetylglucosamine, AMP and the inert complex CrATP [the complex of ATP with chromium in the 3+ oxidation state, i.e. Cr(III)-ATP], studied with respect to both substrates, also supports an ordered mechanism with 2-deoxyglucose as first substrate. AMP appears to bind both to the free enzyme and to the E*dGlc complex. Experiments involving protection against inactivation by 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) support the existence of the E*MgADP(-) and E*AMP complexes suggested by the kinetic studies. MgADP(-), AMP, 2-deoxyglucose, glucose and mannose were strong protectors, supporting the existence of binary complexes with the enzyme. Glucose 6-phosphate failed to protect, even at concentrations as high as 100 mM, and MgATP(2-) protected only slightly (12%). The inactivation results support the postulated ordered mechanism with 2-deoxyglucose as first substrate and MgADP(-) as last product. In addition, the straight-line dependence observed when the reciprocal value of the inactivation constant was plotted against the sugar-ligand concentration supports the view that there is just one sugar-binding site in hexokinase D. PMID:12513690

  2. RNA aptamer based electrochemical biosensor for sensitive and selective detection of cAMP.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fulin; Xie, Qingyun; Xu, Mingfei; Wang, Shouyu; Zhou, Jiyong; Liu, Fei

    2015-04-15

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an important small biological molecule associated with the healthy state of living organism. In order to realize highly sensitive and specific detection of cAMP, here an RNA aptamer and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) based biosensor enhanced by gold nanoparticles electrodeposited on the surface of gold electrode is designed. The designed aptasensor has a wide effective measuring range from 50pM to 250pM with a detection limit of 50pM in PBS buffer, and an effective measuring range from 50nM to 1μM with a detection limit of 50nM in serum. The designed biosensor is also able to detect cAMP with high sensitivity, specificity, and stability. Since the biosensor can be easily fabricated with low cost and repeatedly used for at least two times, it owns great potential in wide application fields such as clinical test and food inspection, etc.

  3. Antidiabetic sulfonylureas and cAMP cooperatively activate Epac2A.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshimasa; Shibasaki, Tadao; Takahashi, Harumi; Sugawara, Kenji; Ono, Aika; Inoue, Naoko; Furuya, Toshio; Seino, Susumu

    2013-10-22

    Sulfonylureas are widely used drugs for treating insulin deficiency in patients with type 2 diabetes. Sulfonylureas bind to the regulatory subunit of the pancreatic β cell potassium channel that controls insulin secretion. Sulfonylureas also bind to and activate Epac2A, a member of the Epac family of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-binding proteins that promote insulin secretion through activation of the Ras-like guanosine triphosphatase Rap1. Using molecular docking simulation, we identified amino acid residues in one of two cyclic nucleotide-binding domains, cNBD-A, in Epac2A predicted to mediate the interaction with sulfonylureas. We confirmed the importance of the identified residues by site-directed mutagenesis and analysis of the response of the mutants to sulfonylureas using two assays: changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of an Epac2A-FRET biosensor and direct sulfonylurea-binding experiments. These residues were also required for the sulfonylurea-dependent Rap1 activation by Epac2A. Binding of sulfonylureas to Epac2A depended on the concentration of cAMP and the structures of the drugs. Sulfonylureas and cAMP cooperatively activated Epac2A through binding to cNBD-A and cNBD-B, respectively. Our data suggest that sulfonylureas stabilize Epac2A in its open, active state and provide insight for the development of drugs that target Epac2A.

  4. Off-target effect of the Epac agonist 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP on P2Y12 receptors in blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Herfindal, Lars; Nygaard, Gyrid; Kopperud, Reidun; Krakstad, Camilla; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Selheim, Frode

    2013-08-09

    The primary target of the cAMP analogue 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP is exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac). Here we tested potential off-target effects of the Epac activator on blood platelet activation signalling. We found that the Epac analogue 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP inhibits agonist-induced-GPCR-stimulated, but not collagen-stimulated, P-selectin surface expression on Epac1 deficient platelets. In human platelets, 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP inhibited P-selectin expression elicited by the PKC activator PMA. This effect was abolished in the presence of the extracellular ADP scavenger system CP/CPK. In silico modelling of 8-pCPT-2'O-Me-cAMP binding into the purinergic platelet receptor P2Y12 revealed that the analogue docks similar to the P2Y12 antagonist 2MeSAMP. The 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP analogue per se, did not provoke Rap 1 (Rap 1-GTP) activation or phosphorylation on the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) at Ser-157. In addition, the protein kinase A (PKA) antagonists Rp-cAMPS and Rp-8-Br-cAMPS failed to block the inhibitory effect of 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP on thrombin- and TRAP-induced Rap 1 activation, thus suggesting that PKA is not involved. We conclude that the 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP analogue is able to inhibit agonist-induced-GPCR-stimulated P-selectin independent from Epac1; the off-target effect of the analogue appears to be mediated by antagonistic P2Y12 receptor binding. This has implications when using cAMP analogues on specialised system involving such receptors. We found, however that the Epac agonist 8-Br-2'-O-Me-cAMP did not affect platelet activation at similar concentrations.

  5. Mapping the Free Energy Landscape of PKA Inhibition and Activation: A Double-Conformational Selection Model for the Tandem cAMP-Binding Domains of PKA RIα.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Madoka; McNicholl, Eric Tyler; Ramkissoon, Avinash; Moleschi, Kody; Taylor, Susan S; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Protein Kinase A (PKA) is the major receptor for the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) secondary messenger in eukaryotes. cAMP binds to two tandem cAMP-binding domains (CBD-A and -B) within the regulatory subunit of PKA (R), unleashing the activity of the catalytic subunit (C). While CBD-A in RIα is required for PKA inhibition and activation, CBD-B functions as a "gatekeeper" domain that modulates the control exerted by CBD-A. Preliminary evidence suggests that CBD-B dynamics are critical for its gatekeeper function. To test this hypothesis, here we investigate by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) the two-domain construct RIα (91-379) in its apo, cAMP2, and C-bound forms. Our comparative NMR analyses lead to a double conformational selection model in which each apo CBD dynamically samples both active and inactive states independently of the adjacent CBD within a nearly degenerate free energy landscape. Such degeneracy is critical to explain the sensitivity of CBD-B to weak interactions with C and its high affinity for cAMP. Binding of cAMP eliminates this degeneracy, as it selectively stabilizes the active conformation within each CBD and inter-CBD contacts, which require both cAMP and W260. The latter is contributed by CBD-B and mediates capping of the cAMP bound to CBD-A. The inter-CBD interface is dispensable for intra-CBD conformational selection, but is indispensable for full activation of PKA as it occludes C-subunit recognition sites within CBD-A. In addition, the two structurally homologous cAMP-bound CBDs exhibit marked differences in their residual dynamics profiles, supporting the notion that conservation of structure does not necessarily imply conservation of dynamics.

  6. The characteristics of hepatic Gsα-cAMP axis in HSHF diet-fed obese insulin resistance rats and genetic diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Xue, Nina; Wei, Chen; Zhang, Lihong; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Lili

    2017-03-04

    Stimulatory G protein α-subunit (Gsα) mediated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signal is required for elevated hepatic glucose production (HGP) in diabetic patients. However, it remains obscure of the exact characteristics of hepatic Gsα-cAMP signal axis (including Gsα, glucagon receptor, β2-adrenergic receptor, cAMP, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase) in insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In current study, we investigated the changing characteristics of hepatic Gsα-cAMP signal axis and blood glucose in high-sugar-high-fat (HSHF)-diet-induced IR wistar rats and db/db diabetic mice. As expected, the HSHF-diet rats were characterized by hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance. According to a threshold (1.7) of HOMA-R, the process of IR in HSHF-diet rats could be divided into slight and high IR stages, with the week-23 as the cut-off point. In early slight IR stage, key molecules expressions of hepatic Gsα-cAMP signal axis in HSHF-diet rats were up-regulated with significantly elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG) from 18 to 23 weeks. Unexpectedly, in high IR stage, hepatic Gsα-cAMP signal axis was recovered comparatively to that of normal chow-diet rats, and no significant differences in FBG levels were found. However, in diabetic db/db mice, up-regulation of hepatic Gsα-cAMP signal axis was responsible for its severely increased fasting hyperglycaemia. Our data revealed a positive correlation between hepatic Gsα-cAMP signal axis and FBG in slight IR stage of HSHF-diet rats and diabetic db/db mice. The current finding thus suggested hepatic Gsα-cAMP signal axis plays a central role in regulating of FBG during the occurrence and development of T2DM.

  7. Macroalgae culture to treat anaerobic digestion piggery effluent (ADPE).

    PubMed

    Nwoba, Emeka Godfrey; Moheimani, Navid Reza; Ubi, Benjamin Ewa; Ogbonna, James Chukwuma; Vadiveloo, Ashiwin; Pluske, John R; Huisman, John Marinus

    2017-03-01

    Environmental consequences of high productivity piggeries are significant and can result in negative environmental impacts, hence bioremediation techniques (in particular using macroalgae) are therefore of great interest. Here, the growth potential of several freshwater macroalgae in anaerobic digestion piggery effluent (ADPE), their nutrient removal rates and biochemical composition of the biomass were investigated under outdoor climatic conditions. A consortium of two macroalgae, Rhizoclonium sp. and Ulothrix sp. was isolated and could efficiently grow in the ADPE. Maximum ammonium removal rate (30.6±6.50mg NH4(+)-NL(-1)d(-1)) was achieved at ADPE concentration equivalent to 248mgNH4(+)-NL(-1). Mean biomass productivity of 31.1±1.14g ash-free dry weight (AFDW) m(-2)d(-1) was achieved. Total carbohydrate and protein contents ranged between 42.8-54.8 and 43.4-45.0% AFDW, respectively, while total lipid content was very low. The study indicates the potential use of this macroalgal consortium for treating ADPE as well as source of animal feed production.

  8. 7 CFR 272.10 - ADP/CIS Model Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... those which result in effective programs or in cost effective reductions in errors and improvements in...) transferable system is incompatible with it; the State agency's data base management software is incompatible with the transferable system; the State agency's ADP experts are not familiar with the...

  9. 7 CFR 272.10 - ADP/CIS Model Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... those which result in effective programs or in cost effective reductions in errors and improvements in...) transferable system is incompatible with it; the State agency's data base management software is incompatible with the transferable system; the State agency's ADP experts are not familiar with the...

  10. 7 CFR 272.10 - ADP/CIS Model Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... those which result in effective programs or in cost effective reductions in errors and improvements in...) transferable system is incompatible with it; the State agency's data base management software is incompatible with the transferable system; the State agency's ADP experts are not familiar with the...

  11. 7 CFR 272.10 - ADP/CIS Model Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... those which result in effective programs or in cost effective reductions in errors and improvements in...) transferable system is incompatible with it; the State agency's data base management software is incompatible with the transferable system; the State agency's ADP experts are not familiar with the...

  12. 7 CFR 272.10 - ADP/CIS Model Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR PARTICIPATING STATE AGENCIES § 272.10 ADP/CIS... automate their food stamp program operations and computerize their systems for obtaining,...

  13. ADP correspondence system: Unsolicited proposal evaluation tracking application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, W. A.; Goodwin, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    A complete description of a correspondence control system, designed to be used by non-ADP clerical personnel is provided. In addition to operating instructions, sufficient design and conceptual information is provided to allow use or adaption of the system in related applications. The complete COBOL program and documentation are available.

  14. A genetically encoded fluorescent reporter of ATP/ADP ratio

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Jim; Hung, Yin Pun; Yellen, Gary

    2008-01-01

    A fluorescent sensor of adenylate nucleotides was constructed by combining a circularly permuted variant of green fluorescent protein with a bacterial regulatory protein, GlnK1, from Methanococcus jannaschii. The affinity for Mg-ATP is below 100 nM, as seen for the other members of the bacterial PII regulator family – a surprisingly high affinity given normal intracellular [ATP] in the millimolar range. ADP binds to the same site, competing with Mg-ATP but producing a smaller change in fluorescence. With normal physiological concentrations of ATP and ADP, the binding site is saturated, but competition between the two substrates causes the sensor to behave as a nearly ideal reporter of the ATP/ADP concentration ratio. This principle for sensing the ratio of two analytes by competition at a high affinity site probably underlies the normal functioning of PII regulatory proteins. The engineered sensor, Perceval, can be used to monitor the ATP/ADP ratio during live cell imaging. PMID:19122669

  15. The role of mechanical forces and adenosine in the regulation of intestinal enterochromaffin cell serotonin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chin, A.; Svejda, B.; Gustafsson, B. I.; Granlund, A. B.; Sandvik, A. K.; Timberlake, A.; Sumpio, B.; Pfragner, R.; Modlin, I. M.

    2012-01-01

    Enterochromaffin (EC) cells of the diffuse neuroendocrine cell system secrete serotonin (5-HT) with activation of gut motility, secretion, and pain. These cells express adenosine (ADORA) receptors and are considered to function as mechanosensors. Physiological pathways mediating mechanosensitivity and adenosine responsiveness remain to be fully elucidated, as do their roles in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and neoplasia. Pure (98–99%) FACS-sorted normal and IBD human EC cells and neoplastic EC cells (KRJ-I) were studied. IBD-EC cells and KRJ-I overexpressed ADORA2B. NECA, a general ADORA receptor agonist, stimulated, whereas the A2B receptor antagonist MRS1754 inhibited, 5-HT release (EC50 = 1.8 × 10−6 M; IC50 = 3.7 × 10−8 M), which was associated with corresponding alterations in intracellular cAMP levels and pCREB (Ser133). Mechanical stimulation using a rhythmic flex model induced transcription and activation of Tph1 (tryptophan hydroxylase) and VMAT1 (vesicular monoamine transporter 1) and the release of 5-HT, which could be inhibited by MRS1754 and amplified by NECA. Secretion was also inhibited by H-89 (PKA inhibitor) while Tph1 and VMAT1 transcription was regulated by PKA/MAPK and PI3K-mediated signaling. Normal and IBD-EC cells also responded to NECA and mechanical stimulation with PKA activation, cAMP production, and 5-HT release, effects reversible by MRS1754. EC cells express stimulatory ADORA2B, and rhythmic stretch induces A2B activation, PKA/MAPK/IP3-dependent transcription, and PKA-dependent secretion of 5-HT synthesis and secretion. Receptor expression is amplified in IBD and neoplasia, and 5-HT release is increased. Determination of factors that regulate EC cell function are necessary for understanding its role as a mechanosensory cell and to facilitate the development of agents that can selectively target cell function in EC cell-associated disease. PMID:22038827

  16. Changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana Proteome Implicate cAMP in Biotic and Abiotic Stress Responses and Changes in Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Alqurashi, May; Gehring, Chris; Marondedze, Claudius

    2016-06-01

    The second messenger 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is increasingly recognized as having many different roles in plant responses to environmental stimuli. To gain further insights into these roles, Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was treated with 100 nM of cell permeant 8-bromo-cAMP for 5 or 10 min. Here, applying mass spectrometry and comparative proteomics, 20 proteins were identified as differentially expressed and we noted a specific bias in proteins with a role in abiotic stress, particularly cold and salinity, biotic stress as well as proteins with a role in glycolysis. These findings suggest that cAMP is sufficient to elicit specific stress responses that may in turn induce complex changes to cellular energy homeostasis.

  17. Changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana Proteome Implicate cAMP in Biotic and Abiotic Stress Responses and Changes in Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Alqurashi, May; Gehring, Chris; Marondedze, Claudius

    2016-01-01

    The second messenger 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is increasingly recognized as having many different roles in plant responses to environmental stimuli. To gain further insights into these roles, Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was treated with 100 nM of cell permeant 8-bromo-cAMP for 5 or 10 min. Here, applying mass spectrometry and comparative proteomics, 20 proteins were identified as differentially expressed and we noted a specific bias in proteins with a role in abiotic stress, particularly cold and salinity, biotic stress as well as proteins with a role in glycolysis. These findings suggest that cAMP is sufficient to elicit specific stress responses that may in turn induce complex changes to cellular energy homeostasis. PMID:27258261

  18. American Diploma Project (ADP) End-of-Course Exams: 2010 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achieve, Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    To assess the raised expectations of college and career readiness for all students, a group of American Diploma Project (ADP) Network states formed the ADP Assessment Consortium in 2005. The Consortium created Algebra I and II end-of-course exams, based in large part on Achieve's ADP mathematics benchmarks, which would provide an honest assessment…

  19. Inhibition of the cAMP/PKA/CREB Pathway Contributes to the Analgesic Effects of Electroacupuncture in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in a Rat Pain Memory Model

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Liu, Bo-Yi; Shen, Zui; Fang, Fang; Wang, Jia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Pain memory is considered as endopathic factor underlying stubborn chronic pain. Our previous study demonstrated that electroacupuncture (EA) can alleviate retrieval of pain memory. This study was designed to observe the different effects between EA and indomethacin (a kind of nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAIDs) in a rat pain memory model. To explore the critical role of protein kinase A (PKA) in pain memory, a PKA inhibitor was microinjected into anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in model rats. We further investigated the roles of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), PKA, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway in pain memory to explore the potential molecular mechanism. The results showed that EA alleviates the retrieval of pain memory while indomethacin failed. Intra-ACC microinjection of a PKA inhibitor blocked the occurrence of pain memory. EA reduced the activation of cAMP, PKA, and CREB and the coexpression levels of cAMP/PKA and PKA/CREB in the ACC of pain memory model rats, but indomethacin failed. The present findings identified a critical role of PKA in ACC in retrieval of pain memory. We propose that the proper mechanism of EA on pain memory is possibly due to the partial inhibition of cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway by EA. PMID:28090359

  20. Inhibitory effect of luteolin on the odorant-induced cAMP level in HEK293 cells expressing the olfactory receptor.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yeo Cho; Hwang, Jin-Teak; Sung, Mi-Jeong; Wang, Shuaiyu; Munkhtugs, Davaatseren; Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Park, Jae-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Luteolin is a flavonoid in many fruits and vegetables. Although luteolin has important biological functions, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and neuroprotective activities, little is known about the functions of luteolin in the olfactory system. Various odorants can be detected and distinguished by using several molecular processes, including the binding of odorants to odorant receptors, activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC), changes of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and Ca(2+) levels in olfactory sensory neurons, as well as changes in membrane potentials and the transmission of electric signals to the brain. Because AC-cAMP signal transduction plays a pivotal role in the olfactory system, we evaluated the effects of luteolin on the AC-cAMP pathway that had been stimulated by the odorant eugenol. We demonstrated that eugenol caused an upregulation of the cAMP level and the phosphorylation of phosphokinase A (PKA, a downstream target of cAMP) in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells expressing the murine eugenol receptor. This upregulation significantly decreased in the presence of luteolin, suggesting that luteolin inhibited the odorant-induced production of cAMP and affected the downstream phosphorylation of PKA.

  1. Effect of the dB-c-AMP and forskolin on /sup 45/Ca influx, net Ca uptake and tension on rabbit aortic smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    The effect of dibutiryl-adenosine-3',5'-cyclic-monophosphate (dB-c-AMP) and forskolin on aortic tension and /sup 45/Ca influx were measured. dB-c-AMP reduced both the rate of force development and the maximal tension achieved in solutions containing various K/sup +/ concentrations. Stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx was also reduced however to a lesser extent than was the tension. Forskolin showed more marked effects of a similar nature. Thus, both these agents which increase intracellular c-AMP caused a rightward shift in the curve expressing force(ordinate) as a function of Ca influx (abscissa). Consequently, they found that dB-c-AMP stimulated more net Ca to be taken up by the sarcoplasmic reticulum(SR) at the same influx rate. The conclusion that c-AMP produced these effects by stimulating Ca uptake into the superficial SR was supported by the finding that dB-c-AMP increased the amount of Ca taken up into a caffeine releasable fraction.

  2. Extracellular Nucleotide Hydrolysis in Dermal and Limbal Mesenchymal Stem Cells: a Source of Adenosine Production.

    PubMed

    Naasani, Liliana I Sous; Rodrigues, Cristiano; de Campos, Rafael Paschoal; Beckenkamp, Liziane Raquel; Iser, Isabele C; Bertoni, Ana Paula Santin; Wink, Márcia R

    2017-01-24

    Human Limbal (L-MSCs) and Dermal Mesenchymal Stem Cell (D-MSCs) possess many properties that increase their therapeutic potential in ophthalmology and dermatology. It is known that purinergic signaling plays a role in many aspects of mesenchymal stem cells physiology. They release and respond to purinergic ligands, altering proliferation, migration, differentiation and apoptosis. Therefore, more information on these processes would be crucial for establishing future clinical applications using their differentiation potential, but without undesirable side effects. This study evaluated and compared the expression of ecto-nucleotidases, the enzymatic activity of degradation of extracellular nucleotides and the metabolism of extracellular ATP in D-MSCs and L-MSCs, isolated from discard tissues of human skin and sclerocorneal rims. The D-MSCs and L-MSCs showed a differentiation potential into osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic lineages and the expression of markers CD105(+) , CD44(+) , CD14(-) , CD34(-) , CD45(-) , as expected. Both cells hydrolyzed low levels of extracellular ATP and high levels of AMP, leading to adenosine accumulation that can regulate inflammation and tissue repair. These cells expressed mRNA for ENTPD1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 and CD73 that corresponded to the observed enzymatic activities. Thus, considering the degradation of ATP and adenosine production, limbal MSCs are very similar to dermal MSCs, indicating that from the aspect of extracellular nucleotide metabolism L-MSCs are very similar to the characterized D-MSCs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Adenosine thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S. )

    1991-07-01

    Pharmacologic coronary vasodilation as an adjunct to myocardial perfusion imaging has become increasingly important in the evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease, in view of the large number of patients who cannot perform an adequate exercise test or in whom contraindications render exercise inappropriate. Adenosine is a very potent coronary vasodilator and when combined with thallium 201 scintigraphy produces images of high quality, with the added advantages of a very short half-life (less than 10 seconds) and the ability to adjust the dose during the infusion, which may enhance safety and curtail the duration of side effects. The reported sensitivity and specificity of adenosine thallium 201 scintigraphy for the detection of coronary artery disease are high and at least comparable with imaging after exercise or dipyridamole administration. 23 refs.

  4. Therapeutic epilepsy research: from pharmacological rationale to focal adenosine augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev; Stewart, Kerry-Ann

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common seizure disorder affecting approximately 70 million people worldwide. Current pharmacotherapy is neuron-centered, frequently accompanied by intolerable side-effects, and fails to be effective in about one third of patients. Therefore, new therapeutic concepts are needed. Recent research suggests an astrocytic basis of epilepsy, presenting the possibility of novel therapeutic targets. In particular, dysfunction of the astrocyte-controlled, endogenous, adenosine-based seizure control system of the brain is implicated in seizure generation. Thus, astrogliosis – a pathological hallmark of the epileptic brain – is associated with upregulation of the adenosine-removing enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK), resulting in focal adenosine deficiency. Both astrogliotic upregulation of ADK in epilepsy and transgenic overexpression of ADK are associated with seizures, and inhibition of ADK prevents seizures in a mouse model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. These findings link adenosine deficiency with seizures and predict that adenosine augmentation therapies (AATs) will likely be effective in preventing seizures. Given the widespread systemic and central side effects of systemically administered AATs, focal AATs (i.e., limited to the astrogliotic lesion) are a necessity. This Commentary will discuss the pharmacological rationale for the development of focal AATs. Additionally, several AAT strategies will be discussed: (1) adenosine released from silk-based brain implants; (2) adenosine released from locally implanted encapsulated cells; (3) adenosine released from stem cell-derived brain implants; and (4) adenosine augmenting gene therapies. Finally, new developments and therapeutic challenges in using focal AATs for epilepsy therapy will critically be evaluated. PMID:19682439

  5. Chemoelectrical energy conversion of adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Vishnu Baba; Sarles, Stephen Andrew; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-04-01

    Plant and animal cell membranes transport charged species, neutral molecules and water through ion pumps and channels. The energy required for moving species against established concentration and charge gradients is provided by the biological fuel - adenosine triphosphate (ATP) -synthesized within the cell. The adenosine triphosphatase (ATPases) in a plant cell membrane hydrolyze ATP in the cell cytoplasm to pump protons across the cell membrane. This establishes a proton gradient across the membrane from the cell exterior into the cell cytoplasm. This proton motive force stimulates ion channels that transport nutrients and other species into the cell. This article discusses a device that converts the chemical energy stored in adenosine triphosphate into electrical power using a transporter protein, ATPase. The V-type ATPase proteins used in our prototype are extracted from red beet(Beta vulgaris) tonoplast membranes and reconstituted in a bilayer lipid membrane or BLM formed from POPC and POPS lipids. A pH7 medium that can support ATP hydrolysis is provided on both sides of the membrane and ATP is dissolved in the pH7 buffer on one side of the membrane. Hydrolysis of ATP results in the formation of a phosphate ion and adenosine diphosphate. The energy from the reaction activates ATPase in the BLM and moves a proton across the membrane. The charge gradient established across the BLM due to the reaction and ion transport is converted into electrical current by half-cell reference electrodes. The prototype ATPase cell with an effective BLM area of 4.15 mm2 carrying 15 μl of ATPase proteins was observed to develop a steady state peak power output of 70 nW, which corresponds to a specific power of 1.69 μW/cm2 and a current density of 43.4 μA/cm2 of membrane area.

  6. Role of adenosine in oligodendrocyte precursor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Coppi, Elisabetta; Cellai, Lucrezia; Maraula, Giovanna; Dettori, Ilaria; Melani, Alessia; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Pedata, Felicita

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation and maturation of oligodendroglial cells are postnatal processes that involve specific morphological changes correlated with the expression of stage-specific surface antigens and functional voltage-gated ion channels. A small fraction of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) generated during development are maintained in an immature and slowly proliferative or quiescent state in the adult central nervous system (CNS) representing an endogenous reservoir of immature cells. Adenosine receptors are expressed by OPCs and a key role of adenosine in oligodendrocyte maturation has been recently recognized. As evaluated on OPC cultures, adenosine, by stimulating A1 receptors, promotes oligodendrocyte maturation and inhibits their proliferation; on the contrary, by stimulating A2A receptors, it inhibits oligodendrocyte maturation. A1 and A2A receptor-mediated effects are related to opposite modifications of outward delayed rectifying membrane K+ currents (IK) that are involved in the regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation. Brain A1 and A2A receptors might represent new molecular targets for drugs useful in demyelinating pathologies, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), stroke and brain trauma. PMID:25964740

  7. An adenosine kinase exists in Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris and is involved in extracellular polysaccharide production, cell motility, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guang-Tao; Tang, Yong-Qin; Li, Cai-Yue; Li, Rui-Fang; An, Shi-Qi; Feng, Jia-Xun; He, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Dong-Jie; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2009-06-01

    Adenosine kinase (ADK) is a purine salvage enzyme and a typical housekeeping enzyme in eukaryotes which catalyzes the phosphorylation of adenosine to form AMP. Since prokaryotes synthesize purines de novo and no endogenous ADK activity is detectable in Escherichia coli, ADK has long been considered to be rare in bacteria. To date, only two prokaryotes, both of which are gram-positive bacteria, have been reported to contain ADK. Here we report that the gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris, the causal agent of black rot of crucifers, possesses a gene (designated adk(Xcc)) encoding an ADK (named ADK(Xcc)), and we demonstrate genetically that the ADK(Xcc) is involved in extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production, cell motility, and pathogenicity of X. campestris pv. campestris. adk(Xcc) was overexpressed as a His(6)-tagged protein in E. coli, and the purified His(6)-tagged protein exhibited ADK activity. Mutation of adk(Xcc) did not affect bacterial growth in rich and minimal media but led to an accumulation of intracellular adenosine and diminutions of intracellular ADK activity and ATP level, as well as EPS. The adk(Xcc) mutant displayed significant reductions in bacterial growth and virulence in the host plant.

  8. Effects of adenosine perfusion on the metabolism and contractile activity of Rana ridibunda heart.

    PubMed

    Lazou, A; Beis, I

    1987-01-01

    The effects of adenosine were examined on the isolated perfused heart of the frog Rana ridibunda. Adenosine produced negative chronotropic and inotropic effects on frog ventricle in a concentration-dependent manner. The effects of adenosine on cardiac metabolism were also investigated by measuring the tissue content of adenine nucleotides, lactate, pyruvate, adenosine and inorganic phosphate, during adenosine perfusion. Adenosine had no effect on the tissue content of metabolites. No net synthesis of adenine nucleotides was observed during perfusion with increasing concentrations of adenosine. Lactate output from the heart decreased significantly with adenosine perfusion. Correlation of adenosine effects on cardiac muscle with the effects of hypoxia are discussed.

  9. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhard, Catherine; Staehli, Barbara E.; Shi, Yi; Camici, Giovanni G.; Akhmedov, Alexander; Hoegger, Lisa; Lohmann, Christine; Matter, Christian M.; Hassa, Paul O.; Hottiger, Michael O.; Malinski, Tadeusz; Luescher, Thomas F.; and others

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear enzyme PARP-1 is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PARP-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This effect is mediated through inhibition of vasoconstrictor prostanoid production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus, PARP-1 may play a protective role as antioxidant defense mechanism. -- Abstract: Background: Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key feature of vascular disease. Activation of the nuclear enzyme poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Methods: PARP-1(-/-) and PARP-1(+/+) mice were injected with paraquat (PQ; 10 mg/kg i.p.) to induce intracellular oxidative stress. Aortic rings were suspended in organ chambers for isometric tension recording to analyze vascular function. Results: PQ treatment markedly impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-), but not PARP-1(+/+) mice (p < 0.0001). Maximal relaxation was 45% in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice compared to 79% in PARP-1(+/+) mice. In contrast, endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were not altered. After PQ treatment, L-NAME enhanced contractions to norepinephrine by 2.0-fold in PARP-1(-/-) mice, and those to acetylcholine by 3.3-fold, respectively, as compared to PARP-1(+/+) mice. PEG-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and PEG-catalase prevented the effect of PQ on endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.001 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+) mice. Indomethacin restored endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.05 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+). Conclusion: PARP-1 protects from acute intracellular oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction by inhibiting ROS induced production of vasoconstrictor prostanoids.

  10. The ARTT motif and a unified structural understanding of substrate recognition in ADP-ribosylating bacterial toxins and eukaryotic ADP-ribosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Han, Seungil; Tainer, John A

    2002-02-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a widely occurring and biologically critical covalent chemical modification process in pathogenic mechanisms, intracellular signaling systems, DNA repair, and cell division. The reaction is catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases, which transfer the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to a target protein with nicotinamide release. A family of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic enzymes has been termed the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases, in distinction to the poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases, which catalyze the addition of multiple ADP-ribose groups to the carboxyl