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Sample records for adenosine deaminase inhibitor

  1. Adenine arabinoside inhibition of adenovirus replication enhanced by an adenosine deaminase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wigand, R

    1979-01-01

    The inhibition of adenovirus multiplication by adenine arabinoside was determined by yield reduction in one-step multiplication cycle. Inhibition was greatly enhanced by an adenosine deaminase inhibitor (2-deoxycoformycin) in concentrations down to 10 ng/ml. Adenovirus types from four subgroups showed similar results. However, the enhancing effect of adenosine deaminase inhibitor was great in HeLa cells, moderate in human fibroblasts, and negligible in Vero cells. This difference could be explained by different concentrations of adenosine deaminase found in cell homogenates.

  2. [Conformation of adenosine deaminase in complexes with inhibitors: application of selective quenching of fluorescence emission].

    PubMed

    Vermishian, I G; Sharoian, S G; Antonian, A A; Grigorian, N A; Mardanian, S S; Khoetsian, A V; Markarian, Sh A

    2008-01-01

    The effect of inhibitors, 1-deazaadenosine (1-dAdo) and erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA), on the conformation of adenosine deaminase was studied using the method of selective quenching of fluorescence emission by acrylamide, I- and Cs+. Both in free adenosine deaminase and in its complexes with the inhibitors, the wavelength maxima and half-width of the emission characterize the environment of fluorescing tryptophan residues in adenosine deaminase as weak polar with limited access to solvent. The formation of complexes with the ground state inhibitors used did not quench or change the main emission characteristics of tryptophan fluorescence in adenosine deaminase. Small blue shifts of emission maxima were observed upon quenching in all three samples. The Stern-Volmer parameters of tryptophan fluorescence quenching by acrylamide were not essentially influenced by complex formation of the enzyme with the inhibitors: in general, the folding of the enzyme molecule in the complexes is not perturbed. On the contrary, the emission quenching by charged heavy ions, I- and Cs+, in the complexes was hindered in comparison with free adenosine deaminase. In the complex with 1-deazaadenosine, the parameters for quenching by both ions evidence the essential worsening of their interaction with tryptophans. In the complex with erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine, along with the worse quenching by I-, complete prohibition of quenching by Cs+ was observed. These data indicate that the local environments of fluorescing tryptophan residues is substantially distorted compared with free adenosine deaminase, which leads to their screening from charged heavy ions.

  3. PMMA/polysaccharides nanofilm loaded with adenosine deaminase inhibitor for targeted anti-inflammatory drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Redolfi Riva, Eugenio; Desii, Andrea; Sartini, Stefania; La Motta, Concettina; Mazzolai, Barbara; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-10-29

    A novel drug delivery vector, a free-standing polymeric ultrathin film (nanofilm) composed of PMMA and a polysaccharides multilayer, is presented. Chitosan and sodium alginate are alternatively deposited by spin-assisted LbL assembly onto a plasma-treated PMMA thin film. Hydrophobic anti-inflammatory drugs, an adenosine deaminase inhibitor (APP) and its fluorescent dansyl derivate (APP-Dns), are encapsulated inside the LbL multilayer using a simple casting deposition procedure. The resulting drug loaded nanofilm can be suspended in water upon dissolution of a PVA sacrificial layer. Morphological characterization of the nanofilm shows that PMMA/LbL nanofilms possess nanometric thickness (<200 nm) and very low surface roughness (1-2 nm for drug loaded nanofilms and <1 nm for blank nanofilm). Drug loaded films exhibit a diffusion controlled release mechanism following the Korsmayer-Peppas release model, confirmed by the fit of release data with a characteristic power law. Drug release is impaired through the PMMA layer, which acts effectively as a barrier for drug transport. This ultrathin polymer film can find application as a nanopatch for targeted inflammatory drug delivery to treat localized pathologies as inflammatory bowel disease.

  4. Non-linear quantitative structure-activity relationship for adenine derivatives as competitive inhibitors of adenosine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Sadat Hayatshahi, Sayyed Hamed; Khajeh, Khosro

    2005-12-16

    Logistic regression and artificial neural networks have been developed as two non-linear models to establish quantitative structure-activity relationships between structural descriptors and biochemical activity of adenosine based competitive inhibitors, toward adenosine deaminase. The training set included 24 compounds with known k {sub i} values. The models were trained to solve two-class problems. Unlike the previous work in which multiple linear regression was used, the highest of positive charge on the molecules was recognized to be in close relation with their inhibition activity, while the electric charge on atom N1 of adenosine was found to be a poor descriptor. Consequently, the previously developed equation was improved and the newly formed one could predict the class of 91.66% of compounds correctly. Also optimized 2-3-1 and 3-4-1 neural networks could increase this rate to 95.83%.

  5. [Adenosine deaminase in experimental trypanosomiasis: future implications].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguilar, Mary Carmen; Rondón-Mercado, Rocío

    2015-09-01

    The adenosine deaminase represents a control point in the regulation of extracellular adenosine levels, thus playing a critical role in the modulation of purinergic responses to certain pathophysiological events. Several studies have shown that serum and plasma enzyme levels are elevated in some diseases caused by microorganisms, which may represent a compensatory mechanism due to the elevated levels of adenosine and the release of inflammatory mediators. Recent research indicates that adenosine deaminase activity decreases and affects hematological parameters of infected animals with Trypanosoma evansi, so that such alterations could have implications in the pathogenesis of the disease. In addition, the enzyme has been detected in this parasite; allowing the inference that it could be associated with the vital functions of the same, similar to what occurs in mammals. This knowledge may be useful in the association of chemotherapy with specific inhibitors of the enzyme in future studies.

  6. Purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, G C; Schmalstieg, F C; Trimmer, K B; Goldman, A S; Goldblum, R M

    1976-01-01

    Purine and pyrimidine metabolites were measured in erythrocytes, plasma, and urine of a 5-month-old infant with adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) deficiency. Adenosine and adenine were measured using newly devised ion exchange separation techniques and a sensitive fluorescence assay. Plasma adenosine levels were increased, whereas adenosine was normal in erythrocytes and not detectable in urine. Increased amounts of adenine were found in erythrocytes and urine as well as in the plasma. Erythrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate concentrations were normal, but adenosine triphosphate content was greatly elevated. Because of the possibility of pyrimidine starvation, pyrimidine nucleotides (pyrimidine coenzymes) in erythrocytes and orotic acid in urine were measured. Pyrimidine nucleotide concentrations were normal, while orotic acid was not detected. These studies suggest that the immune deficiency associated with adenosine deaminase deficiency may be related to increased amounts of adenine, adenosine, or adenine nucleotides. PMID:1066699

  7. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... This Page Bras J, Guerreiro R, Santo GC. Mutant ADA2 in vasculopathies. N Engl J Med. 2014 ... M, Anikster Y, King MC, Levy-Lahad E. Mutant adenosine deaminase 2 in a polyarteritis nodosa vasculopathy. ...

  8. Adenosine deaminase from Streptomyces coelicolor: recombinant expression, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Pornbanlualap, Somchai; Chalopagorn, Pornchanok

    2011-08-01

    The sequencing of the genome of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) identified seven putative adenine/adenosine deaminases and adenosine deaminase-like proteins, none of which have been biochemically characterized. This report describes recombinant expression, purification and characterization of SCO4901 which had been annotated in data bases as a putative adenosine deaminase. The purified putative adenosine deaminase gives a subunit Mr=48,400 on denaturing gel electrophoresis and an oligomer molecular weight of approximately 182,000 by comparative gel filtration. These values are consistent with the active enzyme being composed of four subunits with identical molecular weights. The turnover rate of adenosine is 11.5 s⁻¹ at 30 °C. Since adenine is deaminated ∼10³ slower by the enzyme when compared to that of adenosine, these data strongly show that the purified enzyme is an adenosine deaminase (ADA) and not an adenine deaminase (ADE). Other adenine nucleosides/nucleotides, including 9-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-adenine (ara-A), 5'-AMP, 5'-ADP and 5'-ATP, are not substrates for the enzyme. Coformycin and 2'-deoxycoformycin are potent competitive inhibitors of the enzyme with inhibition constants of 0.25 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Amino acid sequence alignment of ScADA with ADAs from other organisms reveals that eight of the nine highly conserved catalytic site residues in other ADAs are also conserved in ScADA. The only non-conserved residue is Asn317, which replaces Asp296 in the murine enzyme. Based on these data, it is suggested here that ADA and ADE proteins are divergently related enzymes that have evolved from a common α/β barrel scaffold to catalyze the deamination of different substrates, using a similar catalytic mechanism.

  9. Radioimmunochemical quantitation of human adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed Central

    Daddona, P E; Frohman, M A; Kelley, W N

    1979-01-01

    Markedly reduced or absent adenosine deaminase activity in man is associated with an autosomal recesive form of severe conbined immunodeficiency disease. To further define the genetic nature of this enzyme defect, we have quantitated immunologically active adenosine deaminase (CRM) in the hemolysate of homozygous deficient patients and their heterozygous parents. A highly specific radioimmunoassay was developed capable of detecting 0.05% of normal erythrocyte adenosine deaminase. Hemolysates from nine heterozygotes (five families) showed a wide range in CRM (32--100% of normal) and variable absolute specific activities with several being at least 1 SD BELOW THE NORMAL MEAN. Hemolysates from four unrelated patients showed less than 0.09% adenosine deaminase activity with CRM ranging from less than 0.06 to 5.6% of the normal mean. In conclusion, heterozygote and homozygote hemolysates from five of the eight families analyzed revealed variable levels of CRM suggesting heterogeneous genetic alteration or expression of the silent or defective allele(s) of adenosine deaminase. PMID:468994

  10. Human adenosine deaminase. Distribution and properties.

    PubMed

    Van der Weyden, M B; Kelley, W N

    1976-09-25

    Adenosine deaminase exists in multiple molecular forms in human tissue. One form of the enzyme appears to be "particulate". Three forms of the enzyme are soluble and interconvertible with apparent molecular weights of approximately 36,000, 114,000, and 298,000 (designated small, intermediate, and large, respectively). The small form of adenosine deaminase is convertible to the large form only in the presence of a protein, which has an apparent molecular weight of 200,000 and has no adenosine deaminase activity. This conversion of the small form of the enzyme to the large form occurs at 4 degrees, exhibits a pH optimum of 5.0 to 8.0, and is associated with a loss of conversion activity. The small form of the enzyme predominates in tissue preparations exhibiting the higher enzyme-specific activities and no detectable conversion activity. The large form of adenosine deaminase predominates in tissue extracts exhibiting the lower enzyme specific activities and abundant conversion activity. The small form of adenosine deaminase shows several electrophoretic variants by isoelectric focusing. The electrophoretic heterogeneity observed with the large form of the enzyme is similar to that observed with the small form, with the exception that several additional electrophoretic variants are uniformly identified. No organ specificity is demonstrable for the different electrophoretic forms. The kinetic characteristics of the three soluble molecular species of adenosine deaminase are identical except for pH optimum, which is 5.5 for the intermediate species and 7.0 to 7.4 for the large and small forms.

  11. Structures of Substrate-And Inhibitor-Bound Adenosine Deaminase From a Human Malaria Parasite Show a Dramatic Conformational Change And Shed Light on Drug Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, E.T.; Deng, W.; Krumm, B.E.; Napuli, A.; Mueller, N.; Voorhis, W.C.Van; Buckner, F.S.; Fan, E.; Lauricella, A.; DeTitta, G.; Luft, J.; Zucker, F.; Hol, W.G.J.; Verlinde, C.L.M.J.; Merritt, E.A.

    2009-05-20

    Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasites are deficient in purine biosynthesis, relying instead on the salvage of purines from their host environment. Therefore, interference with the purine salvage pathway is an attractive therapeutic target. The plasmodial enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) plays a central role in purine salvage and, unlike mammalian ADA homologs, has a further secondary role in methylthiopurine recycling. For this reason, plasmodial ADA accepts a wider range of substrates, as it is responsible for deamination of both adenosine and 5{prime}-methylthioadenosine. The latter substrate is not accepted by mammalian ADA homologs. The structural basis for this natural difference in specificity between plasmodial and mammalian ADA has not been well understood. We now report crystal structures of Plasmodium vivax ADA in complex with adenosine, guanosine, and the picomolar inhibitor 2{prime}-deoxycoformycin. These structures highlight a drastic conformational change in plasmodial ADA upon substrate binding that has not been observed for mammalian ADA enzymes. Further, these complexes illuminate the structural basis for the differential substrate specificity and potential drug selectivity between mammalian and parasite enzymes.

  12. Neuroprotective effects of adenosine deaminase in the striatum

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Risa; Satoh, Yasushi; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Nibuya, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catabolizes adenosine and deoxyadenosine. During cerebral ischemia, extracellular adenosine levels increase acutely and adenosine deaminase catabolizes the increased levels of adenosine. Since adenosine is a known neuroprotective agent, adenosine deaminase was thought to have a negative effect during ischemia. In this study, however, we demonstrate that adenosine deaminase has substantial neuroprotective effects in the striatum, which is especially vulnerable during cerebral ischemia. We used temporary oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) to simulate ischemia in rat corticostriatal brain slices. We used field potentials as the primary measure of neuronal damage. For stable and efficient electrophysiological assessment, we used transgenic rats expressing channelrhodopsin-2, which depolarizes neurons in response to blue light. Time courses of electrically evoked striatal field potential (eFP) and optogenetically evoked striatal field potential (optFP) were recorded during and after oxygen/glucose deprivation. The levels of both eFP and optFP decreased after 10 min of oxygen/glucose deprivation. Bath-application of 10 µg/ml adenosine deaminase during oxygen/glucose deprivation significantly attenuated the oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced reduction in levels of eFP and optFP. The number of injured cells decreased significantly, and western blot analysis indicated a significant decrease of autophagic signaling in the adenosine deaminase-treated oxygen/glucose deprivation slices. These results indicate that adenosine deaminase has protective effects in the striatum. PMID:26746865

  13. Laser photobleaching leads to a fluorescence grade adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Parola, A H; Caiolfa, V R; Bar, I; Rosenwaks, S

    1989-09-01

    The enzyme adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase EC 3.5.4.4) from calf intestinal mucosa is commercially available at high purity grade yet, at the sensitivity at which fluorescence studies may be undertaken, a nonpeptidic fluorescence is detectable at lambda exmax = 350 nm and lambda emmax = 420 nm. A sevenfold decrease of this nonpeptidic fluorescence was obtained upon irradiation by the third harmonic (355 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser for 16 min, at 5 mJ/pulse, with a pulse width of 6 ns at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The decline of fluorescence was accompanied by a negligible loss of enzymatic activity. Moreover, the integrity of the protein was ascertained by (i) its fluorescence (lambda exmax = 305 nm, lambda emmax = 335 nm) and lifetime distribution and (ii) its kinetics in the presence of the substrate adenosine and two inhibitors, all of which remained essentially unaltered. Laser photobleaching is a simple way to achieve a fluorescence grade adenosine deaminase.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can affect the muscles used for movement ( skeletal muscles ). In many affected individuals, AMP deaminase deficiency does ... called AMP deaminase. This enzyme is found in skeletal muscles , where it plays a role in producing energy. ...

  15. Demonstration of adenosine deaminase activity in human fibroblast lysosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Lindley, E R; Pisoni, R L

    1993-01-01

    Human fibroblast lysosomes, purified on Percoll density gradients, contain an adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity that accounts for approximately 10% of the total ADA activity in GM0010A human fibroblasts. In assays of lysosomal ADA, the conversion of [3H]adenosine into [3H]inosine was proportional to incubation time and the amount of lysosomal material added to reaction mixtures. Maximal activity was observed between pH 7 and 8, and lysosomal ADA displayed a Km of 37 microM for adenosine at 25 degrees C and pH 5.5. Lysosomal ADA was completely inhibited by 2.5 mM Cu2+ or Hg2+ salts, but not by other bivalent cations (Ba2+, Cd2+, Ca2+, Fe2+, Mg2+, Mn2+ and Zn2+). Coformycin (2.5 mM), deoxycoformycin (0.02 mM), 2'-deoxyadenosine (2.5 mM), 6-methylaminopurine riboside (2.5 mM), 2'-3'-isopropylidene-adenosine (2.5 mM) and erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (0.2 mM) inhibited lysosomal ADA by > 97%. In contrast, 2.5 mM S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine and cytosine were poor inhibitors. Nearly all lysosomal ADA activity is eluted as a high-molecular-mass protein (> 200 kDa) just after the void volume on a Sephacryl S-200 column, and is very heat-stable, retaining 70% of its activity after incubation at 65 degrees C for 80 min. We speculate that compartmentalization of ADA within lysosomes would allow deamination of adenosine to occur without competition by adenosine kinase, which could assist in maintaining cellular energy requirements under conditions of nutritional deprivation. PMID:8452534

  16. [Gene therapy for adenosine deaminase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Yukio; Ariga, Tadashi; Ohtsu, Makoto

    2005-03-01

    A four year-old boy with adenosine deaminase (ADA-) deficient severe combined immunodeficiency(SCID) receiving PEG-ADA was treated under a gene therapy protocol targeting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) in 1995. After eleven infusions of autologous PBLs transduced with retroviral vector LASN encoding ADAcDNA, he exhibited increased levels of the CD8+ T lymphocytes, serum immunoglobulin, specific antibodies and delayed type hypersensitivity skin tests. Follow-up studies also provided evidence of long-term persistence and function of transduced PBLs with improvement in the immune function. However, the therapeutic effect of this gene therapy has been difficult to assess because of the concomitant treatment of PEG-ADA. Two ADA-SCID patients have been currently treated with autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells engineered with a retroviral vector GCsapM-ADA after discontinuation of PEG-ADA. The restoration of intracellular ADA enzymatic activity in lymphocytes and granulocytes resulted in correction of the systemic toxicity and liver function in the absence of PEG-ADA treatment. Both patients are at home where they are clinically well, and they do not experience adversed effect, with follow up being 12 months after CD34+ cells gene therapy.

  17. Attenuation of exercise vasodilatation by adenosine deaminase in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Goonewardene, I P; Karim, F

    1991-01-01

    1. In dogs anaesthetized with sodium pentobarbitone and artificially ventilated, the gracilis muscles were vascularly isolated and perfused at a constant flow of 28.4 +/- 4.6 ml min-1 (100 g muscle tissue)-1 (99.8 +/- 4.5% of maximum free flow, means +/- standard error of the mean (S.E.M.), n = 9). 2. Three to five minutes of electrical stimulation of the cut peripheral end of the obturator nerve (4 Hz, 6 V, 0.2 ms) resulted in muscle contraction (0.61 +/- 0.14 kg (100 g)-1 during solvent infusion and 0.56 +/- 0.10 kg (100 g)-1 during intra-arterial adenosine deaminase infusion (50 U min-1) and an immediate decrease in arterial perfusion pressure from 184.5 +/- 8.1 mmHg to 148.2 +/- 5.7 mmHg (18.7 +/- 3.4% decrease) during solvent infusion, and from 193.5 +/- 7.16 to 142.0 +/- 10.2 mmHg (25.4 +/- 6.1% decrease) during adenosine deaminase infusion 10 s after the commencement of muscle stimulation. After about 5 min of muscle contractions, the arterial perfusion pressure decreased to 120.8 +/- 7.8 mmHg (32.9 +/- 5.8% decrease) during solvent infusion, and to 152.8 +/- 11.2 mmHg (20.9 +/- 5.3% decrease) during adenosine deaminase infusion (i.e. 37.9 +/- 6.2% attenuation of the fall in arterial perfusion pressure). The time taken for 90% recovery of the arterial perfusion pressure was 72.1 +/- 10.9 s during solvent infusion, and 51.5 +/- 9.3 s during adenosine deaminase infusion (P less than 0.05). 3. Adenosine (2 x 10(-3) mol l-1) infusion in the resting muscle during solvent infusion (final concentration in arterial blood 1.3 x 10(-4) +/- 6.0 x 10(-5) mol l-1) resulted in a 34.8 +/- 7.2% fall in arterial perfusion pressure but a fall of only 7.2 +/- 1.8% during adenosine deaminase infusion (50 U min-1; P less than 0.05; n = 5) indicating that adenosine deaminase infused at 50 U min-1 was more than adequate to metabolize endogenous adenosine produced during muscle contractions. 4. These data suggest that adenosine contributes about 40% to the sustained

  18. Quantitative changes in adenosine deaminase isoenzymes in human colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    ten Kate, J; Wijnen, J T; van der Goes, R G; Quadt, R; Griffioen, G; Bosman, F T; Khan, P M

    1984-10-01

    Several reports have suggested that a decrease or absence of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) is consistently associated with cancer. However, in other studies, decreased as well as increased ADCP levels were found. In the present study, we investigated ADCP levels in 37 colorectal adenocarcinomas and correlated the results with clinicopathological characteristics in individual carcinomas. The levels of adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4) and soluble ADCP were determined in tissue samples by, respectively, a spectrophotometric assay and an ADCP specific radioimmunoassay. The values in the individual tumors were compared with their histological characteristics, such as degree of differentiation, nuclear grading, and the preoperative plasma carcinoembryonic antigen levels in the patients. It was found that ADCP was decreased in about a third of the tumors but unaltered or even increased in others. However, there was an overall 40% increase of the adenosine deaminase activity in the tumors compared to normal tissue. There seems to be no simple correlation between any of the clinicopathological parameters and the ADCP or adenosine deaminase levels. Methods detecting ADCP at single cell level might be helpful in exploring its potential use as a cancer-associated marker.

  19. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in murine hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Belmont, J W; MacGregor, G R; Wager-Smith, K; Fletcher, F A; Moore, K A; Hawkins, D; Villalon, D; Chang, S M; Caskey, C T

    1988-01-01

    Multiple replication-defective retrovirus vectors were tested for their ability to transfer and express human adenosine deaminase in vitro and in vivo in a mouse bone marrow transplantation model. High-titer virus production was obtained from vectors by using both a retrovirus long terminal repeat promoter and internal transcriptional units with human c-fos and herpes virus thymidine kinase promoters. After infection of primary murine bone marrow with one of these vectors, human adenosine deaminase was detected in 60 to 85% of spleen colony-forming units and in the blood of 14 of 14 syngeneic marrow transplant recipients. This system offers the opportunity to assess methods for increasing efficiency of gene transfer, for regulation of expression of foreign genes in hematopoietic progenitors, and for long-term measurement of the stability of expression in these cells. Images PMID:3072474

  20. Severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Waqar; Batool, Asma; Ahmed, Tahir Aziz; Bashir, Muhammad Mukarram

    2012-03-01

    Severe Combined Immunodeficiency is the term applied to a group of rare genetic disorders characterised by defective or absent T and B cell functions. Patients usually present in first 6 months of life with respiratory/gastrointestinal tract infections and failure to thrive. Among the various types of severe combined immunodeficiency, enzyme deficiencies are relatively less common. We report the case of a 6 years old girl having severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency.

  1. Adenosine Deaminase Inhibition Prevents Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Induced Enteritis in Mice ▿

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Junqueira, Ana Flávia Torquato; Dias, Adriana Abalen Martins; Vale, Mariana Lima; Spilborghs, Graziela Machado Gruner Turco; Bossa, Aline Siqueira; Lima, Bruno Bezerra; Carvalho, Alex Fiorini; Guerrant, Richard Littleton; Ribeiro, Ronaldo Albuquerque; Brito, Gerly Anne

    2011-01-01

    Toxin A (TxA) is able to induce most of the classical features of Clostridium difficile-associated disease in animal models. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of an inhibitor of adenosine deaminase, EHNA [erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine], on TxA-induced enteritis in C57BL6 mice and on the gene expression of adenosine receptors. EHNA (90 μmol/kg) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) 30 min prior to TxA (50 μg) or PBS injection into the ileal loop. A2A adenosine receptor agonist (ATL313; 5 nM) was injected in the ileal loop immediately before TxA (50 μg) in mice pretreated with EHNA. The animals were euthanized 3 h later. The changes in the tissue were assessed by the evaluation of ileal loop weight/length and secretion volume/length ratios, histological analysis, myeloperoxidase assay (MPO), the local expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2), pentraxin 3 (PTX3), NF-κB, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) by immunohistochemistry and/or quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). The gene expression profiles of A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 adenosine receptors also were evaluated by qRT-PCR. Adenosine deaminase inhibition, by EHNA, reduced tissue injury, neutrophil infiltration, and the levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) as well as the expression of NOS2, NF-κB, and PTX3 in the ileum of mice injected with TxA. ATL313 had no additional effect on EHNA action. TxA increased the gene expression of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors. Our findings show that the inhibition of adenosine deaminase by EHNA can prevent Clostridium difficile TxA-induced damage and inflammation possibly through the A2A adenosine receptor, suggesting that the modulation of adenosine/adenosine deaminase represents an important tool in the management of C. difficile-induced disease. PMID:21115723

  2. Adenosine deaminase deficiency with normal immune function. An acidic enzyme mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Daddona, P E; Mitchell, B S; Meuwissen, H J; Davidson, B L; Wilson, J M; Koller, C A

    1983-01-01

    In most instances, marked deficiency of the purine catabolic enzyme adenosine deaminase results in lymphopenia and severe combined immunodeficiency disease. Over a 2-yr period, we studied a white male child with markedly deficient erythrocyte and lymphocyte adenosine deaminase activity and normal immune function. We have documented that (a) adenosine deaminase activity and immunoreactive protein are undetectable in erythrocytes, 0.9% of normal in lymphocytes, 4% in cultured lymphoblasts, and 14% in skin fibroblasts; (b) plasma adenosine and deoxyadenosine levels are undetectable and deoxy ATP levels are only slightly elevated in lymphocytes and in erythrocytes; (c) no defect in deoxyadenosine metabolism is present in the proband's cultured lymphoblasts; (d) lymphoblast adenosine deaminase has normal enzyme kinetics, absolute specific activity, S20,w, pH optimum, and heat stability; and (e) the proband's adenosine deaminase exhibits a normal apparent subunit molecular weight but an abnormal isoelectric pH. In contrast to the three other adenosine deaminase-deficient healthy subjects who have been described, the proband is unique in demonstrating an acidic, heat-stable protein mutation of the enzyme that is associated with less than 1% lymphocyte adenosine deaminase activity. Residual adenosine deaminase activity in tissues other than lymphocytes may suffice to metabolize the otherwise lymphotoxic enzyme substrate(s) and account for the preservation of normal immune function. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:6603477

  3. Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA, RNA Editing, and Interferon Action

    PubMed Central

    George, Cyril X.; Gan, Zhenji; Liu, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine (A) to inosine (I) editing of RNA that possesses double-stranded (ds) structure. A-to-I RNA editing results in nucleotide substitution, because I is recognized as G instead of A both by ribosomes and by RNA polymerases. A-to-I substitution can also cause dsRNA destabilization, as I:U mismatch base pairs are less stable than A:U base pairs. Three mammalian ADAR genes are known, of which two encode active deaminases (ADAR1 and ADAR2). Alternative promoters together with alternative splicing give rise to two protein size forms of ADAR1: an interferon-inducible ADAR1-p150 deaminase that binds dsRNA and Z-DNA, and a constitutively expressed ADAR1-p110 deaminase. ADAR2, like ADAR1-p110, is constitutively expressed and binds dsRNA. A-to-I editing occurs with both viral and cellular RNAs, and affects a broad range of biological processes. These include virus growth and persistence, apoptosis and embryogenesis, neurotransmitter receptor and ion channel function, pancreatic cell function, and post-transcriptional gene regulation by microRNAs. Biochemical processes that provide a framework for understanding the physiologic changes following ADAR-catalyzed A-to-I ( = G) editing events include mRNA translation by changing codons and hence the amino acid sequence of proteins; pre-mRNA splicing by altering splice site recognition sequences; RNA stability by changing sequences involved in nuclease recognition; genetic stability in the case of RNA virus genomes by changing sequences during viral RNA replication; and RNA-structure-dependent activities such as microRNA production or targeting or protein–RNA interactions. PMID:21182352

  4. Adenosine deaminase 1 and concentrative nucleoside transporters 2 and 3 regulate adenosine on the apical surface of human airway epithelia: implications for inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, Andrew J; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R; van Heusden, Catja A; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Boucher, Richard C; Picher, Maryse

    2007-09-11

    Adenosine is a multifaceted signaling molecule mediating key aspects of innate and immune lung defenses. However, abnormally high airway adenosine levels exacerbate inflammatory lung diseases. This study identifies the mechanisms regulating adenosine elimination from the apical surface of human airway epithelia. Experiments conducted on polarized primary cultures of nasal and bronchial epithelial cells showed that extracellular adenosine is eliminated by surface metabolism and cellular uptake. The conversion of adenosine to inosine was completely inhibited by the adenosine deaminase 1 (ADA1) inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA). The reaction exhibited Km and Vmax values of 24 microM and 0.14 nmol x min(-1) x cm(-2). ADA1 (not ADA2) mRNA was detected in human airway epithelia. The adenosine/mannitol permeability coefficient ratio (18/1) indicated a minor contribution of paracellular absorption. Adenosine uptake was Na+-dependent and was inhibited by the concentrative nucleoside transporter (CNT) blocker phloridzin but not by the equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) blocker dipyridamole. Apparent Km and Vmax values were 17 microM and 7.2 nmol x min(-1) x cm(-2), and transport selectivity was adenosine = inosine = uridine > guanosine = cytidine > thymidine. CNT3 mRNA was detected throughout the airways, while CNT2 was restricted to nasal epithelia. Inhibition of adenosine elimination by EHNA or phloridzin raised apical adenosine levels by >3-fold and stimulated IL-13 and MCP-1 secretion by 6-fold. These responses were reproduced by the adenosine receptor agonist 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)adenosine (NECA) and blocked by the adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-(p-sulfophenyl) theophylline (8-SPT). This study shows that adenosine elimination on human airway epithelia is mediated by ADA1, CNT2, and CNT3, which constitute important regulators of adenosine-mediated inflammation.

  5. Late-onset adenosine deaminase deficiency presenting with Heck's disease.

    PubMed

    Artac, Hasibe; Göktürk, Bahar; Bozdemir, Sefika Elmas; Toy, Hatice; van der Burg, Mirjam; Santisteban, Ines; Hershfield, Michael; Reisli, Ismail

    2010-08-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia, also known as Heck's disease, is a rare but distinctive entity of viral etiology with characteristic clinical and histopathological features. It is a benign, asymptomatic disease of the oral mucosa caused by human papilloma viruses (HPV). Previous studies postulated an association between these lesions and immunodeficiency. Genetic deficiency of adenosine deaminase (ADA) results in varying degrees of immunodeficiency, including neonatal onset severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), and milder, later onset immunodeficiency. We report a 12-year-old girl with the late onset-ADA deficiency presenting with Heck's disease. Our case report should draw attention to the possibility of immunodeficiency in patients with HPV-induced focal epithelial hyperplasia.

  6. Metabolic and functional consequences of inhibiting adenosine deaminase during renal ischemia in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Stromski, M E; van Waarde, A; Avison, M J; Thulin, G; Gaudio, K M; Kashgarian, M; Shulman, R G; Siegel, N J

    1988-01-01

    The concentrations of renal ATP have been measured by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) before, during, and after bilateral renal artery occlusion. Using in vivo NMR, the initial postischemic recovery of ATP increased with the magnitude of the residual nucleotide pool at the end of ischemia. ATP levels after 120 min of reflow correlated with functional recovery at 24 h. In the present study the effect of blocking the degradation of ATP during ischemia upon the postischemic restoration of ATP was investigated. Inhibition of adenosine deaminase by 80% with the tight-binding inhibitor 2'-deoxycoformycin led to a 20% increase in the residual adenine nucleotide pool. This increased the ATP initial recovery after 45 min of ischemia from 52% (in controls) to 62% (in the treated animals), as compared to the basal levels. The inhibition also caused an accelerated postischemic restoration of cellular ATP so that at 120 min it was 83% in treated rats vs. 63% in untreated animals. There was a corresponding improvement in the functional recovery from the insult (increase of 33% in inulin clearance 24 h after the injury). Inhibition of adenosine deaminase during ischemia results in a injury similar to that seen after a shorter period of insult. PMID:3263396

  7. Structural and Metabolic Specificity of Methylthiocoformycin for Malarial Adenosine Deaminases

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.; Cassera, M; Madrid, D; Ting, L; Tyler, P; Kim, K; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is a purine auxotroph requiring hypoxanthine as a key metabolic precursor. Erythrocyte adenine nucleotides are the source of the purine precursors, making adenosine deaminase (ADA) a key enzyme in the pathway of hypoxanthine formation. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) is a substrate for most malarial ADAs, but not for human ADA. The catalytic site specificity of malarial ADAs permits methylthiocoformycin (MT-coformycin) to act as a Plasmodium-specific transition state analogue with low affinity for human ADA. The structural basis for MTA and MT-coformycin specificity in malarial ADAs is the subject of speculation. Here, the crystal structure of ADA from Plasmodium vivax (PvADA) in a complex with MT-coformycin reveals an unprecedented binding geometry for 5?-methylthioribosyl groups in the malarial ADAs. Compared to malarial ADA complexes with adenosine or deoxycoformycin, 5?-methylthioribosyl groups are rotated 130 degrees. A hydrogen bonding network between Asp172 and the 3?-hydroxyl of MT-coformycin is essential for recognition of the 5?-methylthioribosyl group. Water occupies the 5?-hydroxyl binding site when MT-coformycin is bound. Mutagenesis of Asp172 destroys the substrate specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Kinetic, mutagenic, and structural analyses of PvADA and kinetic analysis of five other Plasmodium ADAs establish the unique structural basis for its specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Plasmodium gallinaceum ADA does not use MTA as a substrate, is not inhibited by MT-coformycin, and is missing Asp172. Treatment of P. falciparum cultures with coformycin or MT-coformycin in the presence of MTA is effective in inhibiting parasite growth.

  8. ADA (adenosine deaminase) gene therapy enters the competition

    SciTech Connect

    Culliton, B.J.

    1990-08-31

    Around the world, some 70 children are members of a select and deadly club. Born with an immune deficiency so severe that they will die of infection unless their immune systems can be repaired, they have captured the attention of would-be gene therapists who believe that a handful of these kids--the 15 or 20 who lack functioning levels of the enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA)--could be saved by a healthy ADA gene. A team of gene therapists is ready to put the theory to the test. In April 1987, a team of NIH researchers headed by R. Michael Blaese and W. French Anderson came up with the first formal protocol to introduce a healthy ADA gene into an unhealthy human. After 3 years of line-by-line scrutiny by five review committees, they have permission to go ahead. Two or three children will be treated in the next year, and will be infused with T lymphocytes carrying the gene for ADA. If the experiment works, the ADA gene will begin producing normal amounts of ADA. An interesting feature of ADA deficiency, that makes it ideal for initial gene studies, is that the amount of ADA one needs for a healthy immune system is quite variable. Hence, once inside a patient's T cells, the new ADA gene needs only to express the enzyme in moderate amounts. No precise gene regulation is necessary.

  9. Adenosine deaminase in cell transformation. Biophysical manifestation of membrane dynamics.

    PubMed

    Porat, N; Gill, D; Parola, A H

    1988-10-15

    Cell transformation is associated with a dramatic collapse of a graphic fingerprint characteristic of normal cells, as measured by phase fluorimetry. This is demonstrated on adenosine deaminase (ADA, EC 3.5.4.4), an established malignancy marker. ADA activity is known to decrease markedly in chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF) transformed by Rous sarcoma virus. The high affinity between the catalytic small subunit ADA (SS-ADA) and its membranal complexing protein (ADCP) (which abounds on the plasma membrane of CEF) allowed the hybridization of fluorescent labeled SS-ADA with native ADCP on CEF. Multifrequency differential phase fluorimetry responded remarkably to the state of this hybrid membrane protein. The transformation process is shown to have led to increased membrane fluidity and rotational mobility of ADCP as well as to its reduced availability to SS-ADA binding. The hypothesis of protein vertical sinking into the lipid core of the membrane is now given support by our spectroscopic data. Additional models are considered. A regulatory role is thus suggested for the complexing protein, which may also account for (a) reduced ADA activity in transformed cells and (b) detachment, exclusive to normal cells, upon addition of SS-ADA in excess.

  10. Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency – More Than Just an Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Kathryn V.; Gaspar, Hubert B.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is best known as a form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) that results from mutations in the gene encoding ADA. Affected patients present with clinical and immunological manifestations typical of a SCID. Therapies are currently available that can target these immunological disturbances and treated patients show varying degrees of clinical improvement. However, there is now a growing body of evidence that deficiency of ADA has significant impact on non-immunological organ systems. This review will outline the impact of ADA deficiency on various organ systems, starting with the well-understood immunological abnormalities. We will discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms and also highlight ways in which current treatments could be improved. In doing so, we aim to present ADA deficiency as more than an immunodeficiency and suggest that it should be recognized as a systemic metabolic disorder that affects multiple organ systems. Only by fully understanding ADA deficiency and its manifestations in all organ systems can we aim to deliver therapies that will correct all the clinical consequences. PMID:27579027

  11. Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) immunoreactivity in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    ten Kate, J; van den Ingh, H F; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1986-04-15

    Immunoreactive adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) was studied in 91 human colorectal adenocarcinomas. The expression of ADCP was correlated with that of secretory component (SC) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), with the histological grade and the Dukes' stage of the carcinomas. The histological grade was scored semi-quantitatively according to 5 structural and 4 cytological variables. ADCP expression was observed in 3 different staining patterns, namely: (1) diffuse cytoplasmic (77% of the carcinomas); (2) granular cytoplasmic (13%); and (3) membrane-associated (66%). These patterns were observed alone or in combination. Eleven percent of the carcinomas exhibited no ADCP immunoreactivity. Linear regression analysis showed that the expression of ADCP correlates with that of SC and CEA. However, no significant correlation emerged between the histological parameters or the Dukes' stage and any of the immunohistological parameters. Comparison of the histological characteristics of carcinomas exhibiting little or no ADCP immunoreactivity with those showing extensive immunoreactivity, showed that membranous ADCP immunoreactivity occurs more frequently in well-differentiated carcinomas. Structural parameters showed a better correlation with membranous ADCP expression than the cytological variables. It is concluded that membranous expression of ADCP and CEA are indicators of a high level of differentiation as reflected primarily in the structural characteristics of the tumor.

  12. Distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Dinjens, W N; ten Kate, J; van der Linden, E P; Wijnen, J T; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1989-12-01

    The normal distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human body was investigated quantitatively by ADCP-specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) and qualitatively by immunohistochemistry. In these studies we used a specific rabbit anti-human ADCP antiserum. In all 19 investigated tissues, except erythrocytes, ADCP was found by RIA in the soluble and membrane fractions. From all tissues the membrane fractions contained more ADCP (expressed per mg protein) than the soluble fractions. High membrane ADCP concentrations were found in skin, renal cortex, gastrointestinal tract, and prostate. Immunoperoxidase staining confirmed the predominant membrane-associated localization of the protein. In serous sweat glands, convoluted tubules of renal cortex, bile canaliculi, gastrointestinal tract, lung, pancreas, prostate gland, salivary gland, gallbladder, mammary gland, and uterus, ADCP immunoreactivity was found confined to the luminal membranes of the epithelial cells. These data demonstrate that ADCP is present predominantly in exocrine glands and absorptive epithelia. The localization of ADCP at the secretory or absorptive apex of the cells suggests that the function of ADCP is related to the secretory and/or absorptive process.

  13. Adenosine ecto-deaminase (ecto-ADA) from porcine cerebral cortex synaptic membrane.

    PubMed

    Romanowska, Małgorzata; Ostrowska, Marta; Komoszyński, Michał A

    2007-07-02

    We have purified and investigated the role of adenosine ecto-deaminase (ecto-ADA) in porcine brain synaptic membranes and found a low activity of ecto-ADA in synaptic preparations from the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and medulla oblongata in the presence of purine transport inhibitors (NBTI, dipyridamole and papaverine). The purification procedure with affinity chromatography on epoxy-Toyopearl gel/purine riboside column as a crucial step of purification allowed a 214-fold purification of synaptic ecto-ADA with a yield of 30%. Gel filtration chromatography revealed a molecular mass estimated at 42.4+/-3.9 kDa. The enzyme had a broad optimum pH and was not affected by mono- and divalent cations. Ecto-ADA revealed a low affinity to adenosine (Ado) and 2'-deoxyadenosine (2'-dAdo) (K(M)=286.30+/-40.38 microM and 287.14+/-46.50 microM, respectively). We compared the affinity of ecto-ADA to the substrates with the physiological and pathological concentrations of the extracellular Ado in brains that do not exceed a low micromolar range even during ischemia and hypoxia, and with the affinity of adenosine receptors to Ado not exceeding a low nanomolar (A(1) and A(2A) receptors) or low micromolar (A(2B) and A(3)) range. Taken together, our data suggest that the role of synaptic ecto-ADA in the regulation of the ecto-Ado level in the brain and in the termination of adenosine receptor signaling is questionable. The porcine brain synapses must have other mechanisms for the ecto-Ado removal from the synaptic cleft and synaptic ecto-ADA may also play an extra-enzymatic role in cell adhesion and non-enzymatic regulation of adenosine receptor activity.

  14. Autoimmune dysregulation and purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Aisha Vanessa; Brigida, Immacolata; Carriglio, Nicola; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Genetic defects in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene are among the most common causes for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). ADA-SCID patients suffer from lymphopenia, severely impaired cellular and humoral immunity, failure to thrive, and recurrent infections. Currently available therapeutic options for this otherwise fatal disorder include bone marrow transplantation (BMT), enzyme replacement therapy with bovine ADA (PEG-ADA), or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy (HSC-GT). Although varying degrees of immune reconstitution can be achieved by these treatments, breakdown of tolerance is a major concern in ADA-SCID. Immune dysregulation such as autoimmune hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, hemolytic anemia, and immune thrombocytopenia are frequently observed in milder forms of the disease. However, several reports document similar complications also in patients on long-term PEG-ADA and after BMT or GT treatment. A skewed repertoire and decreased immune functions have been implicated in autoimmunity observed in certain B-cell and/or T-cell immunodeficiencies, but it remains unclear to what extent specific mechanisms of tolerance are affected in ADA deficiency. Herein we provide an overview about ADA-SCID and the autoimmune manifestations reported in these patients before and after treatment. We also assess the value of the ADA-deficient mouse model as a useful tool to study both immune and metabolic disease mechanisms. With focus on regulatory T- and B-cells we discuss the lymphocyte subpopulations particularly prone to contribute to the loss of self-tolerance and onset of autoimmunity in ADA deficiency. Moreover we address which aspects of immune dysregulation are specifically related to alterations in purine metabolism caused by the lack of ADA and the subsequent accumulation of metabolites with immunomodulatory properties.

  15. Adenosine deaminase production by an endophytic bacterium (Lysinibacillus sp.) from Avicennia marina.

    PubMed

    Kathiresan, Kandasamy; Saravanakumar, Kandasamy; Sahu, Sunil Kumar; Sivasankaran, Muthu

    2014-06-01

    The present study was carried out with the following objectives: (1) to isolate the endophytic bacilli strains from the leaves of mangrove plant Avicennia marina, (2) to screen the potential strains for the production of adenosine deaminase, (3) to statistically optimize the factors that influence the enzyme activity in the potent strain, and (4) to identify the potent strain using 16S rRNA sequence and construct its phylogenetic tree. The bacterial strains isolated from the fresh leaves of a mangrove A. marina were assessed for adenosine deaminase activity by plating method. Optimization of reaction process was carried out using response surface methodology of central composite design. The potent strain was identified based on 16S rRNA sequencing and phylogeny. Of five endophytic strains, EMLK1 showed a significant deaminase activity over other four strains. The conditions for maximum activity of the isolated adenosine deaminase are described. The potent strain EMLK1 was identified as Lysinibacillus sp. (JQ710723) being the first report as a mangrove endophyte. Mangrove-derived endophytic bacillus strain Lysinibacillus sp. EMLK1 is proved to be a promising source for the production of adenosine deaminase and this enzyme deserves further studies for purification and its application in disease diagnosis.

  16. Role of adenosine deaminase, ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) and ecto-(non-specific phosphatase) in cyanide-induced adenosine monophosphate catabolism in rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Newby, A C

    1980-01-01

    1. The role of adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4), ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) (EC 3.1.3.5) and ecto-(non-specific phosphatase) in the CN-induced catabolism of adenine nucleotides in intact rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes was investigated by inhibiting the enzymes in situ. 2. KCN (10mM for 90 min) induced a 20-30% fall in ATP concentration accompanied by an approximately equimolar increase in hypoxanthine, ADP, AMP and adenosine concentrations were unchanged, and IMP and inosine remained undetectable ( less than 0.05 nmol/10(7) cells). 3. Cells remained 98% intact, as judged by loss of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27). 4. Pentostatin (30 microM), a specific inhibitor of adenosine deaminase, completely inhibited hypoxanthine production from exogenous adenosine (55 microM), but did not black CN-induced hypoxanthine production or cause adenosine accumulation in intact cells. This implied that IMP rather than adenosine was an intermediate in AMP breakdown in response to cyanide. 5. Antibodies raised against purified plasma-membrane 5'-nucleotidase inhibited the ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) by 95-98%. Non-specific phosphatases were blocked by 10 mM-sodium beta-glycerophosphate. 6. These two agents together blocked hypoxanthine production from exogenous AMP and IMP (200 microM) by more than 90%, but had no effect on production from endogenous substrates. 7. These data suggest that ectophosphatases do not participate in CN-induced catabolism of intracellular AMP in rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes. 8. A minor IMPase, not inhibited by antiserum, was detected in the soluble fraction of disrupted cells. PMID:6249264

  17. Syzygium cumini inhibits adenosine deaminase activity and reduces glucose levels in hyperglycemic patients.

    PubMed

    Bopp, A; De Bona, K S; Bellé, L P; Moresco, R N; Moretto, M B

    2009-08-01

    Syzigium cumini (L.) Skeels from the Myrtaceae family is among the most common medicinal plants used to treat diabetes in Brazil. Leaves, fruits, and barks of S. cumini have been used for their hypoglycemic activity. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is an important enzyme that plays a relevant role in purine and DNA metabolism, immune responses, and peptidase activity. ADA is suggested to be an important enzyme for modulating the bioactivity of insulin, but its clinical significance in diabetes mellitus (DM) has not yet been proven. In this study, we examined the effect of aqueous leaf extracts of S. cumini (L.) (ASC) on ADA activity of hyperglycemic subjects and the activity of total ADA, and its isoenzymes in serum and erythrocytes. The present study indicates that: (i) the ADA activity in hyperglycemic serum was higher than normoglycemic serum and ADA activity was higher when the blood glucose level was more elevated; (ii) ASC (60-1000 microg/mL) in vitro caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of total ADA activity and a decrease in the blood glucose level in serum; (iii) ADA1 and 2 were reduced both in erythrocytes and in hyperglycemic serum. These results suggest that the decrease of ADA activity provoked by ASC may contribute to control adenosine levels and the antioxidant defense system of red cells and could be related to the complex ADA/DPP-IV-CD26 and the properties of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors which serve as important regulators of blood glucose.

  18. Efficient, low-cost protein factories: expression of human adenosine deaminase in baculovirus-infected insect larvae.

    PubMed Central

    Medin, J A; Hunt, L; Gathy, K; Evans, R K; Coleman, M S

    1990-01-01

    Human adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4), a key purine salvage enzyme essential for immune competence, has been overproduced in Spodoptera frugiperda cells and in Trichoplusia ni (cabbage looper) larvae infected with recombinant baculovirus. The coding sequence of human adenosine deaminase was recombined into a baculovirus immediately downstream from the strong polyhedrin gene promoter. Approximately 60 hr after infection of insect cells with the recombinant virus, maximal levels of intracellular adenosine deaminase mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity were detected. The recombinant human adenosine deaminase represented 10% of the total cellular protein and exhibited a specific activity of 70 units/mg of protein in crude homogenate. This specific activity is 70-350 times greater than that exhibited by the enzyme in homogenates of the two most abundant natural sources of human adenosine deaminase, thymus and leukemic cells. When the recombinant virus was injected into insect larvae, the maximum recombinant enzyme was produced 4 days postinfection and represented about 2% of the total insect protein with a specific activity of 10-25 units/mg of protein. The recombinant human adenosine deaminase was purified to homogeneity from both insect cells and larvae and demonstrated to be identical to native adenosine deaminase purified from human cells with respect to molecular weight, interaction with polyclonal anti-adenosine deaminase antibody, and enzymatic properties. A pilot purification yielded 8-9 mg of homogeneous enzyme from 22 larvae. The production of large quantities of recombinant human adenosine deaminase in insect larvae is inexpensive and rapid and eliminates the need for specialized facilities for tissue culture. This method should be applicable to large-scale production of many recombinant proteins. Images PMID:2181448

  19. DNA-templated silver nanoclusters based label-free fluorescent molecular beacon for the detection of adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Ke; Xie, Minhao; Zhu, Xue; Xu, Lan; Yang, Runlin; Huang, Biao; Zhu, Xiaoli

    2014-02-15

    A general and reliable fluorescent molecular beacon is proposed in this work utilizing DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs). The fluorescent molecular beacon has been employed for sensitive determination of the concentration of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and its inhibition. A well-designed oligonucleotide containing three functional regions (an aptamer region for adenosine assembly, a sequence complementary to the region of the adenosine aptamer, and an inserted six bases cytosine-loop) is adopted as the core element in the strategy. The enzymatic reaction of adenosine catalyzed by ADA plays a key role as well in the regulation of the synthesis of the DNA-templated AgNCs, i.e. the signal indicator. The intensity of the fluorescence signal may thereby determine the concentration of the enzyme and its inhibitor. The detection limit of the ADA can be lowered to 0.05 UL(-1). Also, 100 fM of a known inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine hydrochloride (EHNA) is enough to present distinguishable fluorescence emission. Moreover, since the fluorescent signal indicator is not required to be bound with the oligonucleotide, this fluorescent molecular beacon may integrate the advantages of both the label-free and signal-on strategies.

  20. Studies on guanine deaminase and its inhibitors in rat tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S.; Josan, V.; Sanger, K. C. S.; Tewari, K. K.; Krishnan, P. S.

    1967-01-01

    1. In kidney, but not in rat whole brain and liver, guanine-deaminase activity was localized almost exclusively in the 15000g supernatant fraction of iso-osmotic sucrose homogenates. However, as in brain and liver, the enzymic activity recovered in the supernatant was higher than that in the whole homogenate. The particulate fractions of kidney, especially the heavy mitochondria, brought about powerful inhibition of the supernatant guanine-deaminase activity. 2. In spleen, as in kidney, guanine-deaminase activity was localized in the 15000g supernatant fraction of iso-osmotic sucrose homogenates. However, the particulate fractions did not inhibit the activity of the supernatant. 3. Guanine-deaminase activity in rat brain was absent from the cerebellum and present only in the cerebral hemispheres. The inhibitor of guanine deaminase was located exclusively in the cerebellum, where it was associated with the particles sedimenting at 5000g from sucrose homogenates. 4. Homogenates of cerebral hemispheres, the separated cortex or the remaining portion of the hemispheres had significantly higher guanine-deaminase activity than homogenates of whole brain. The enzymic activity of the subcellular particulate fractions was nearly the same. 5. Guanine deaminase was purified from the 15000g supernatant of sucrose homogenates of whole brain. The enzyme separated as two distinct fractions, A and B, on DEAE-cellulose columns. 6. The guanine-deaminase activity of the light-mitochondrial fraction of whole brain was fully exposed and solubilized by treatment with Triton X-100, and partially purified. 7. Tested in the form of crude preparations, the inhibitor from kidney did not act on the brain and liver supernatant enzymes and the inhibitor from cerebellum did not act on kidney enzyme, but the inhibitor from liver acted on both brain and kidney enzyme. 8. The inhibitor of guanine deaminase was purified from the heavy mitochondria of whole brain and liver and the 5000g residue of

  1. Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP): a transformation sensitive protein with potentials of a cancer marker.

    PubMed

    Herbschleb-Voogt, E; Ten Kate, J; Meera Khan, P

    1983-01-01

    Several observations by independent investigators in the past have indicated that adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP), present in considerable quantities in certain human tissues, was absent or decreased in the cancers originated from them. During the present study, electrophoretic analysis of adenosine deaminase (ADA) isozymes and radioimmunoassay for ADCP in the primary fibroblasts and the transformed as well as certain tumor derived cell lines have demonstrated that ADCP present in large quantities in the primary cells was absent or nearly absent in the transformed or tumor-derived cell lines. Though the mechanisms involved are not yet clear, the above observations indicate that ADCP has the potentials of a useful marker in the studies on transformed cells and cancer tissues.

  2. Gene therapy for severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2012-02-01

    The severe combined immunodeficiency caused by the absence of adenosine deaminase (SCID-ADA) was the first monogenic disorder for which gene therapy was developed. Over 30 patients have been treated worldwide using the current protocols, and most of them have experienced clinical benefit; importantly, in the absence of any vector-related complications. In this document, we review the progress made so far in the development and establishment of gene therapy as an alternative form of treatment for ADA-SCID patients.

  3. Evaluation of adenosine deaminase assay for analyzing T-lymphocyte density in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kainthla, Rani Poonam; Kashyap, Rajpal Singh; Prasad, Sweta; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Giridhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F

    2006-01-01

    The proliferative capacity of T cells in response to various stimuli is commonly determined by radioactive assay based on incorporation of [3H]thymidine ([3H]TdR) into newly synthesized DNA. In order to assess techniques for application in laboratories where radioactive facilities are not present, an alternative method was tested. As an alternative, T-cell proliferation was measured by spectrophotometrically analyzing the presence of an enzyme adenosine deaminase in lymphocytes and also using a standard XTT assay. Jurkat (human) T-cell line (clone E6.1) was used for lymphocyte population. The Jurkat cell concentration was adjusted according to different cell densities and enzyme activity was determined. Cells were also seeded in complete medium up to 72 h and harvested for estimation of enzyme activity. A significant correlation between the standard cell-proliferation assay and adenosine deaminase assay was observed. The present study indicates that the assay of adenosine deaminase is a reliable and accurate method for measuring proliferation of T lymphocytes.

  4. Endogenous adenosine is an autacoid feedback inhibitor of chloride transport in the shark rectal gland.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, G G; Aassar, O S; Forrest, J N

    1991-01-01

    The present studies define the physiologic role of endogenous adenosine in the perfused shark rectal gland, a model epithelia for hormone-stimulated chloride transport. Chloride ion secretion, and venous adenosine and inosine concentrations increased in parallel in response to hormone stimulation. From a basal rate of 157 +/- 26 mu eq/h per g, chloride secretion increased to 836 +/- 96 and 2170 +/- 358 with 1 and 10 microM forskolin, venous adenosine increased from 5.0 +/- 1 to 126 +/- 29 and 896 +/- 181 nM, and inosine increased from 30 +/- 9 to 349 +/- 77 and 1719 +/- 454 nM (all P less than 0.01). Nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI), a nucleoside transport inhibitor, completely blocked the release of adenosine and inosine. Inhibition of chloride transport with bumetanide, an inhibitor of the Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransporter, or ouabain, an inhibitor of Na+/K+ ATPase activity, reduced venous adenosine and inosine to basal values. When the interaction of endogenous adenosine with extracellular receptors was prevented by adenosine deaminase, NBTI, or 8-phenyltheophylline, the chloride transport response to secretagogues increased by 1.7-2.3-fold. These studies demonstrate that endogenous adenosine is released in response to hormone-stimulated cellular work and acts at A1 adenosine receptors as a feedback inhibitor of chloride transport. Images PMID:1752953

  5. Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA (ADARs) are both Antiviral and Proviral Dependent upon the Virus

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing, the deamination of adenosine (A) to inosine (I) that occurs in regions of RNA with double-stranded character, is catalyzed by a family of Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA (ADARs). In mammals there are three ADAR genes. Two encode proteins that possess demonstrated deaminase activity: ADAR1, which is interferon-inducible, and ADAR2 which is constitutively expressed. ADAR3, by contrast, has not yet been shown to bean active enzyme. The specificity of the ADAR1 and ADAR2 deaminases ranges from highly site-selective to non-selective, dependent on the duplex structure of the substrate RNA. A-to-I editing is a form of nucleotide substitution editing, because I is decoded as guanosine (G) instead of A by ribosomes during translation and by polymerases during RNA-dependent RNA replication. Additionally, A-to-I editing can alter RNA structure stability as I:U mismatches are less stable than A:U base pairs. Both viral and cellular RNAs are edited by ADARs. A-to-I editing is of broad physiologic significance. Among the outcomes of A-to-I editing are biochemical changes that affect how viruses interact with their hosts, changes that can lead to either enhanced or reduced virus growth and persistence dependent upon the specific virus. PMID:21211811

  6. Repetitive systemic morphine alters activity-dependent plasticity of Schaffer-collateral-CA1 pyramidal cell synapses: involvement of adenosine A1 receptors and adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Sadegh, Mehdi; Fathollahi, Yaghoub

    2014-10-01

    The effectiveness of O-pulse stimulation (TPS) for the reversal of O-pattern primed bursts (PB)-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) were examined at the Schaffer-collateral-CA1 pyramidal cell synapses of hippocampal slices derived from rats chronically treated with morphine (M-T). The results showed that slices derived from both control and M-T rats had normal field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP)-LTP, whereas PS-LTP in slices from M-T rats was significantly greater than that from control slices. When morphine was applied in vitro to slices derived from rats chronically treated with morphine, the augmentation of PS-LTP was not seen. TPS given 30 min after LTP induction failed to reverse the fEPSP- or PS-LTP in both groups of slices. However, TPS delivered in the presence of long-term in vitro morphine caused the PS-LTP reversal. This effect was blocked by the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist CPX (200 nM) and furthermore was enhanced by the adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor EHNA (10 μM). Interestingly, TPS given 30 min after LTP induction in the presence of EHNA (10 μM) can reverse LTP in morphine-exposed control slices in vitro. These results suggest adaptive changes in the hippocampus area CA1 in particular in adenosine system following repetitive systemic morphine. Chronic in vivo morphine increases A1R and reduces ADA activity in the hippocampus. Consequently, adenosine can accumulate because of a stimulus train-induced activity pattern in CA1 area and takes the opportunity to work as an inhibitory neuromodulator and also to enable CA1 to cope with chronic morphine. In addition, adaptive mechanisms are differentially working in the dendrite layer rather than the somatic layer of hippocampal CA1.

  7. Efficient retrovirus-mediated transfer and expression of a human adenosine deaminase gene in diploid skin fibroblasts from an adenosine deaminase-deficient human

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T.D.; Hock, R.A.; Osborne, W.R.A.; Miller, A.D.

    1987-02-01

    Skin fibroblasts might be considered suitable recipients for therapeutic genes to cure several human genetic diseases; however, these cells are resistant to gene transfer by most methods. The authors studied the ability of retroviral vectors to transfer genes into normal human diploid skin fibroblasts. Retroviruses carrying genes for neomycin or hygromycin B resistance conferred drug resistance to greater than 50% of the human fibroblasts after a single exposure to virus-containing medium. This represents at least a 500-fold increase in efficiency over other methods. Transfer was achieved in the absence of helper virus by using amphotropic retrovirus-packaging cells. A retrovirus vector containing a human adenosine deaminase (ADA) cDNA was constructed and used to infect ADA/sup -/ fibroblasts from a patient with ADA deficiency. The infected cells produced 12-fold more ADA enzyme than fibroblasts from normal individuals and were able to rapidly metabolize exogenous deoxyadenosine and adenosine, metabolites that accumulate in plasma in ADA-deficient patients and are responsible for the severe combined immunodeficiency in these patients. These experiments indicate the potential of retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human fibroblasts for gene therapy.

  8. Long-term expression of human adenosine deaminase in vascular smooth muscle cells of rats: A model for gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, C.M.; Miller, A.D. ); Clowes, M.M.; Osborne, W.R.A.; Clowes, A.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  9. Feed-Forward Inhibition of CD73 and Upregulation of Adenosine Deaminase Contribute to the Loss of Adenosine Neuromodulation in Postinflammatory Ileitis

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Dias, Ana Sofia; Pelletier, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Purinergic signalling is remarkably plastic during gastrointestinal inflammation. Thus, selective drugs targeting the “purinome” may be helpful for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. The myenteric neuromuscular transmission of healthy individuals is fine-tuned and controlled by adenosine acting on A2A excitatory receptors. Here, we investigated the neuromodulatory role of adenosine in TNBS-inflamed longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the rat ileum. Seven-day postinflammation ileitis lacks adenosine neuromodulation, which may contribute to acceleration of gastrointestinal transit. The loss of adenosine neuromodulation results from deficient accumulation of the nucleoside at the myenteric synapse despite the fact that the increases in ATP release were observed. Disparity between ATP outflow and adenosine deficit in postinflammatory ileitis is ascribed to feed-forward inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 by high extracellular ATP and/or ADP. Redistribution of NTPDase2, but not of NTPDase3, from ganglion cell bodies to myenteric nerve terminals leads to preferential ADP accumulation from released ATP, thus contributing to the prolonged inhibition of muscle-bound ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and to the delay of adenosine formation at the inflamed neuromuscular synapse. On the other hand, depression of endogenous adenosine accumulation may also occur due to enhancement of adenosine deaminase activity. Both membrane-bound and soluble forms of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and adenosine deaminase were detected in the inflamed myenteric plexus. These findings provide novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory gut motility disorders. PMID:25210228

  10. How We Manage Adenosine Deaminase-Deficient Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (ADA SCID).

    PubMed

    Kohn, Donald B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2017-02-14

    Adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency (ADA SCID) accounts for 10-15% of cases of human SCID. From what was once a uniformly fatal disease, the prognosis for infants with ADA SCID has improved greatly based on the development of multiple therapeutic options, coupled with more frequent early diagnosis due to implementation of newborn screening for SCID. We review the various treatment approaches for ADA SCID including allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from a human leukocyte antigen-matched sibling or family member or from a matched unrelated donor or a haplo-identical donor, autologous HSCT with gene correction of the hematopoietic stem cells (gene therapy-GT), and enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with polyethylene glycol-conjugated adenosine deaminase. Based on growing evidence of safety and efficacy from GT, we propose a treatment algorithm for patients with ADA SCID that recommends HSCT from a matched family donor, when available, as a first choice, followed by GT as the next option, with allogeneic HSCT from an unrelated or haplo-identical donor or long-term ERT as other options.

  11. A 24-Year Enzyme Replacement Therapy in an Adenosine-deaminase-Deficient Patient.

    PubMed

    Tartibi, Hana M; Hershfield, Michael S; Bahna, Sami L

    2016-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a fatal childhood disease unless immune reconstitution is performed early in life, with either hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy. One of its subtypes is caused by adenosine deaminase (ADA) enzyme deficiency, which leads to the accumulation of toxic metabolites that impair lymphocyte development and function. With the development of polyethylene glycol-conjugated adenosine deaminase (PEG-ADA) enzyme replacement therapy, many ADA-deficient children with SCID who could not receive a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy survived and had longer and healthier lives. We report a 24-year course of treatment in a patient who was diagnosed with ADA deficiency at 4 months of age. The patient was treated with PEG-ADA, which was the only therapy available for him. The patient's plasma ADA level was regularly monitored and the PEG-ADA dose adjusted accordingly. This treatment has resulted in near-normalization of lymphocyte counts, and his clinical course has been associated with only minor to moderate infections. Thus far, he has had no manifestations of autoimmune or lymphoproliferative disorders. This patient is among the longest to be maintained on PEG-ADA enzyme replacement therapy.

  12. Expression of a functional human adenosine deaminase in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Singhabahu, Sanjeewa; George, John; Bringloe, David

    2013-06-01

    An inherited disorder, adenosine deaminase deficiency is a form of severe combined immunodeficiency, which is ultimately caused by an absence of adenosine deaminase (ADA), a key enzyme of the purine salvage pathway. The absence of ADA-activity in sufferers eventually results in a dysfunctional immune system due to the build-up of toxic metabolites. To date, this has been treated with mixed success, using PEG-ADA, made from purified bovine ADA coupled to polyethylene glycol. It is likely, however, that an enzyme replacement therapy protocol based on recombinant human ADA would be a more effective treatment for this disease. Therefore, as a preliminary step to produce biologically active human ADA in transgenic tobacco plants a human ADA cDNA has been inserted into a plant expression vector under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter and both human and TMV 5' UTR control regions. Plant vector expression constructs have been used to transform tobacco plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Genomic DNA, RNA and protein blot analyses have demonstrated the integration of the cDNA construct into the plant nuclear genome and the expression of recombinant ADA mRNA and protein in transgenic tobacco leaves. Western blot analysis has also revealed that human and recombinant ADA have a similar size of approximately 41 kDa. ADA-specific activities of between 0.001 and 0.003 units per mg total soluble protein were measured in crude extracts isolated from transformed tobacco plant leaves.

  13. [The involvement of adenosine and adenosine deaminase in experimental myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Stratone, A; Busuioc, A; Roşca, V; Bazgan, L; Popa, M; Hăulică, I

    1989-01-01

    By the ligature of the left coronary artery in the rat anesthetized with nembutal (10 mg/100 i.p.) a significant increase of the 5'-nucleotidase activity (Wooton method) was noticed 10 minutes after the left ventricle infarction (from an average value of 1038.5 +/- 187 mU/g tissue to 1537 +/- 225 mU/g fresh tissue). The adenosine desaminase levels spectrophotometrically determined by Denstedt technique, do not appear significantly modified 10 or 30 minutes after the left ventricle infarction. The chromatographically determined adenosine levels, by HPLC technique, decrease from the average value of 11.63 +/- 1.4 micrograms/mg PT to 8.60 +/- 1.0 micrograms/mg PT 30 minutes after infarction. The observed changes are explained by the conditions of hypoxia in the infarcted ventricle which lead to the raise in adenosine levels by activating the 5'-nucleotidase and their depression by a very fast metabolism of the same substance.

  14. Adenosine potentiates the therapeutic effects of neural stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase against metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonyoung; Seol, Ho Jun; Seong, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jandi; Kim, Yonghyun; Kim, Seung U; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2013-09-01

    Tumor-tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) provide a novel approach with which to deliver targeting therapeutic genes to brain tumors. Previously, we developed a therapeutic strategy against metastatic brain tumors using a human NSC line (F3) expressing cytosine deaminase (F3.CD). F3.CD converts systemically administered 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), a blood-brain barrier permeable nontoxic prodrug, into the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). In this study, we potentiated a therapeutic strategy of treatment with nucleosides in order to chemically facilitate the endogenous conversion of 5-FU to its toxic metabolite 5-FU ribonucleoside (5-FUR). In vitro, 5-FUR showed superior cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-435 cancer cells when compared to 5-FU. Although adenosine had little cytotoxic activity, the addition of adenosine significantly potentiated the in vitro cytotoxicity of 5-FU. When MDA-MB‑435 cells were co-cultured with F3.CD cells, F3.CD cells and 5-FC inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-435 cells more significantly in the presence of adenosine. Facilitated 5-FUR production by F3.CD was confirmed by an HPLC analysis of the conditioned media derived from F3.CD cells treated with 5-FC and adenosine. In vivo systemic adenosine treatment also significantly potentiated the therapeutic effects of F3.CD cells and 5-FC in an MDA-MB-435 metastatic brain tumor model. Simple adenosine addition improved the antitumor activity of the NSCs carrying the therapeutic gene. Our results demonstrated an increased therapeutic potential, and thereby, clinical applicability of NSC-based gene therapy.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) from Arabidopsis thaliana in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Byung Woo; Bingman, Craig A.; Mahnke, Donna K.; Sabina, Richard L.; Phillips, George N. Jr

    2005-08-01

    Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase from A. thaliana has been crystallized in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate. Diffraction data have been collected to 3.34 Å resolution. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) is a eukaryotic enzyme that converts adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) to inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP) and ammonia. AMPD from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAMPD) was cloned into the baculoviral transfer vector p2Bac and co-transfected along with a modified baculoviral genome into Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. The resulting recombinant baculovirus were plaque-purified, amplified and used to overexpress recombinant AtAMPD. Crystals of purified AtAMPD have been obtained to which coformycin 5′-phosphate, a transition-state inhibitor, is bound. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 2}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 131.325, c = 208.254 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Diffraction data were collected to 3.34 Å resolution from a crystal in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate and to 4.05 Å resolution from a crystal of a mercury derivative.

  16. Crystal Structure of Staphylococcus aureus tRNA Adenosine Deaminase TadA in Complex with RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Losey,H.; Ruthenburg, A.; Verdine, G.

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial tRNA adenosine deaminases (TadAs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine at the wobble position of tRNA(Arg2), a process that enables this single tRNA to recognize three different arginine codons in mRNA. In addition, inosine is also introduced at the wobble position of multiple eukaryotic tRNAs. The genes encoding these deaminases are essential in bacteria and yeast, demonstrating the importance of their biological activity. Here we report the crystallization and structure determination to 2.0 A of Staphylococcus aureus TadA bound to the anticodon stem-loop of tRNA(Arg2) bearing nebularine, a non-hydrolyzable adenosine analog, at the wobble position. The cocrystal structure reveals the basis for both sequence and structure specificity in the interactions of TadA with RNA, and it additionally provides insight into the active site architecture that promotes efficient hydrolytic deamination.

  17. Development of gene therapy: potential in severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2010-01-01

    The history of stem cell gene therapy is strongly linked to the development of gene therapy for severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) and especially adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient SCID. Here we discuss the developments achieved in over two decades of clinical and laboratory research that led to the establishment of a protocol for the autologous transplant of retroviral vector-mediated gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells, which has proved to be both successful and, to date, safe. Patients in trials in three different countries have shown long-term immunological and metabolic correction. Nevertheless, improvements to the safety profile of viral vectors are underway and will undoubtedly reinforce the position of stem cell gene therapy as a treatment option for ADA-SCID. PMID:24198507

  18. Development of gene therapy: potential in severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2009-12-22

    The history of stem cell gene therapy is strongly linked to the development of gene therapy for severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) and especially adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient SCID. Here we discuss the developments achieved in over two decades of clinical and laboratory research that led to the establishment of a protocol for the autologous transplant of retroviral vector-mediated gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells, which has proved to be both successful and, to date, safe. Patients in trials in three different countries have shown long-term immunological and metabolic correction. Nevertheless, improvements to the safety profile of viral vectors are underway and will undoubtedly reinforce the position of stem cell gene therapy as a treatment option for ADA-SCID.

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for adenosine deaminase deficient-SCID.

    PubMed

    Aiuti, Alessandro; Brigida, Immacolata; Ferrua, Francesca; Cappelli, Barbara; Chiesa, Robert; Marktel, Sarah; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is a highly attractive strategy for many types of inherited disorders of the immune system. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficient-severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) has been the target of several clinical trials based on the use of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells engineered with retroviral vectors. The introduction of a low intensity conditioning regimen has been a crucial factor in achieving stable engrafment of hematopoietic stem cells and therapeutic levels of ADA-expressing cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that gene therapy for ADA-SCID has favorable safety profile and is effective in restoring normal purine metabolism and immune functions. Stem cell gene therapy combined with appropriate conditioning regimens might be extended to other genetic disorders of the hematopoietic system.

  20. Does adenosine deaminase activity play a role in the early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Turkmen, G G; Karçaaltıncaba, D; Isık, H; Fidancı, V; Kaayalp, D; Tımur, H; Batıoglu, S

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy (EP) is important due to life-threatening consequences in the first trimester of pregnancy. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity in the prediction of EP. Forty-one patients with unruptured ectopic pregnancy comprised the case group and forty-two first trimester pregnant women with shown foetal heart beating in ultrasound comprised the control group. The mean ADA level in EP (10.9 ± 3.0 IU/L) was higher than that in control group (9.2 ± 3.6 IU/L) (p = 0.018). Receiver operating characteristics or ROC curve identified ADA value of 10.95 IU/L as optimal threshold for the prediction of EP with 56% sensitivity and 67% specificity. High ADA levels are valuable in the early diagnosis of EP. However more comprehensive studies are required.

  1. Non-infectious lung disease in patients with adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Booth, C; Algar, V E; Xu-Bayford, J; Fairbanks, L; Owens, C; Gaspar, H B

    2012-06-01

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency is a disorder of purine metabolism manifesting severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID) and systemic abnormalities. Increased levels of the substrate deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP) lead to immunodeficiency and are associated in a murine model with pulmonary insufficiency. We compared a cohort of patients with ADA-SCID and X-linked SCID and found that despite similar radiological and respiratory findings, positive microbiology is significantly less frequent in ADA-SCID patients (p < 0.0005), suggesting a metabolic pathogenesis for the lung disease. Clinicians should be aware of this possibility and correct metabolic abnormalities either through enzyme replacement or haematopoietic stem cell transplant, in addition to treating infectious complications.

  2. Correlation between tumor histology, steroid receptor status, and adenosine deaminase complexing protein immunoreactivity in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Rao, B R; Slotman, B J; Geldof, A A; Dinjens, W N

    1990-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) immunoreactivity was investigated in 40 ovarian tumors and correlated with clinicopathologic parameters, including tumor steroid receptor content. Ten (29%) of 34 common epithelial ovarian carcinomas showed ADCP reactivity. Reactivity for ADCP was seen more frequently in mucinous (100%; p less than 0.001), well-differentiated (73%; p less than 0.001) and Stage I (56%; p less than 0.05) ovarian carcinomas. Furthermore, tumors that contained high levels of androgen receptors and tumors that did not contain estrogen receptors were more frequently ADCP positive (p less than 0.05). However, after stratifying for histologic grade, no correlation between ADCP reactivity and receptor status was found. Determination of ADCP reactivity appears to be of limited value in ovarian cancer.

  3. Diagnostic Value of Adenosine Deaminase and Its Isoforms in Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Larijani, Bagher; Heshmat, Ramin; Ebrahimi-Rad, Mina; Khatami, Shohreh; Valadbeigi, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. In the present study, we have investigated the activity of adenosine deaminase (ADA) as a diagnostic marker in type 2 (or II) diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Design and Methods. The deaminase activity of ADA1 and ADA2 was determined in serum from 33 patients with type 2 (or II) diabetes mellitus and 35 healthy controls. We also determined the proportion of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Results. Our results showed significant differences between total serum ADA (tADA) and ADA2 activities in the diabetic groups with HbA1c < 8 (%) and HbA1c ≥ 8 (%) with respect to the values in healthy individuals (p < 0.001). ADA2 activity in patients with high HbA1c was found to be much higher than that in patients with low HbA1c (p = 0.0001). In addition, total ADA activity showed a significant correlation with HbA1c (r = 0.6, p < 0.0001). Conclusions. Total serum ADA activity, specially that due to ADA2, could be useful test for the diagnosis of type 2 (or II) diabetes mellitus. PMID:28050278

  4. The ADA*2 allele of the adenosine deaminase gene (20q13.11) and recurrent spontaneous abortions: an age-dependent association

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Daniela Prudente Teixeira; Spegiorin, Lígia Cosentino Junqueira Franco; de Mattos, Cinara Cássia Brandão; Oliani, Antonio Helio; Vaz-Oliani, Denise Cristina Mós; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Adenosine deaminase acts on adenosine and deoxyadenosine metabolism and modulates the immune response. The adenosine deaminase G22A polymorphism (20q.11.33) influences the level of adenosine deaminase enzyme expression, which seems to play a key role in maintaining pregnancy. The adenosine deaminase 2 phenotype has been associated with a protective effect against recurrent spontaneous abortions in European Caucasian women. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the G22A polymorphism of the adenosine deaminase gene is associated with recurrent spontaneous abortions in Brazilian women. METHODS: A total of 311 women were recruited to form two groups: G1, with a history of recurrent spontaneous abortions (N = 129), and G2, without a history of abortions (N = 182). Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood with a commercial kit and PCR-RFLP analysis was used to identify the G22A genetic polymorphism. Fisher's exact test and odds ratio values were used to compare the proportions of adenosine deaminase genotypes and alleles between women with and without a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion (p<0.05). The differences between mean values for categorical data were calculated using unpaired t tests. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was assessed with a chi-square test. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were identified for the frequencies of adenosine deaminase genotypes and alleles between the G1 and G2 groups when adjusted for maternal age. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the adenosine deaminase *2 allele is associated with a low risk for recurrent spontaneous abortions, but this association is dependent on older age. PMID:22086524

  5. Platelet aggregation and serum adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity in pregnancy associated with diabetes, hypertension and HIV.

    PubMed

    Leal, Claudio A M; Leal, Daniela B R; Adefegha, Stephen A; Morsch, Vera M; da Silva, José E P; Rezer, João F P; Schrekker, Clarissa M L; Abdalla, Faida H; Schetinger, Maria R C

    2016-07-01

    Platelet aggregation and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity were evaluated in pregnant women living with some disease conditions including hypertension, diabetes mellitus and human immunodeficiency virus infection. The subject population is consisted of 15 non-pregnant healthy women [control group (CG)], 15 women with normal pregnancy (NP), 7 women with hypertensive pregnancy (HP), 10 women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 12 women with human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnancy (HIP) groups. The aggregation of platelets was checked using an optical aggregometer, and serum ADA activity was determined using the colorimetric method. After the addition of 5 µM of agonist adenosine diphosphate, the percentage of platelet aggregation was significantly (p < 0·05) increased in NP, HP, GDM and HIP groups when compared with the CG, while the addition of 10 µM of the same agonist caused significant (p < 0·05) elevations in HP, GDM and HIP groups when compared with CG. Furthermore, ADA activity was significantly (p < 0·05) enhanced in NP, HP, GDM and HIP groups when compared with CG. In this study, the increased platelet aggregation and ADA activity in pregnancy and pregnancy-associated diseases suggest that platelet aggregation and ADA activity could serve as peripheral markers for the development of effective therapy in the maintenance of homeostasis and some inflammatory process in these pathophysiological conditions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Modulatory effect of iron chelators on adenosine deaminase activity and gene expression in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Primon-Barros, Muriel; Rigo, Graziela Vargas; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Santos, Odelta dos; Smiderle, Lisiane; Almeida, Silvana; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-11-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellate protozoan that parasitises the urogenital human tract and causes trichomoniasis. During the infection, the acquisition of nutrients, such as iron and purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, is essential for the survival of the parasite. The enzymes for purinergic signalling, including adenosine deaminase (ADA), which degrades adenosine to inosine, have been characterised in T. vaginalis. In the evaluation of the ADA profile in different T. vaginalis isolates treated with different iron sources or with limited iron availability, a decrease in activity and an increase in ADA gene expression after iron limitation by 2,2-bipyridyl and ferrozine chelators were observed. This supported the hypothesis that iron can modulate the activity of the enzymes involved in purinergic signalling. Under bovine serum limitation conditions, no significant differences were observed. The results obtained in this study allow for the assessment of important aspects of ADA and contribute to a better understanding of the purinergic system in T. vaginalis and the role of iron in establishing infection and parasite survival.

  7. Mixed inhibition of adenosine deaminase activity by 1,3-dinitrobenzene: a model for understanding cell-selective neurotoxicity in chemically-induced energy deprivation syndromes in brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yipei; Liu, Xin; Schneider, Brandon; Zverina, Elaina A; Russ, Kristen; Wijeyesakere, Sanjeeva J; Fierke, Carol A; Richardson, Rudy J; Philbert, Martin A

    2012-02-01

    Astrocytes are acutely sensitive to 1,3-dinitrobenzene (1,3-DNB) while adjacent neurons are relatively unaffected, consistent with other chemically-induced energy deprivation syndromes. Previous studies have investigated the role of astrocytes in protecting neurons from hypoxia and chemical injury via adenosine release. Adenosine is considered neuroprotective, but it is rapidly removed by extracellular deaminases such as adenosine deaminase (ADA). The present study tested the hypothesis that ADA is inhibited by 1,3-DNB as a substrate mimic, thereby preventing adenosine catabolism. ADA was inhibited by 1,3-DNB with an IC(50) of 284 μM, Hill slope, n = 4.8 ± 0.4. Native gel electrophoresis showed that 1,3-DNB did not denature ADA. Furthermore, adding Triton X-100 (0.01-0.05%, wt/vol), Nonidet P-40 (0.0015-0.0036%, wt/vol), or bovine serum albumin (0.05 mg/ml or changing [ADA] (0.2 and 2 nM) did not substantially alter the 1,3-DNB IC(50) value. Likewise, dynamic light scattering showed no particle formation over a (1,3-DNB) range of 149-1043 μM. Kinetics revealed mixed inhibition with 1,3-DNB binding to ADA (K(I) = 520 ± 100 μM, n = 1 ± 0.6) and the ADA-adenosine complex (K(IS) = 262 ± 7 μM, n = 6 ± 0.6, indicating positive cooperativity). In accord with the kinetics, docking predicted binding of 1,3-DNB to the active site and three peripheral sites. In addition, exposure of DI TNC-1 astrocytes to 10-500 μM 1,3-DNB produced concentration-dependent increases in extracellular adenosine at 24 h. Overall, the results demonstrate that 1,3-DNB is a mixed inhibitor of ADA and may thus lead to increases in extracellular adenosine. The finding may provide insights to guide future work on chemically-induced energy deprivation.

  8. Adenosine deaminase activity in serum and lymphocytes of rats infected with Sporothrix schenckii.

    PubMed

    Castro, Verônica S P; Pimentel, Victor C; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Thomé, Gustavo R; Wolkmer, Patrícia; Castro, Jorge L C; Costa, Márcio M; da Silva, Cássia B; Oliveira, Daniele C; Alves, Sydney H; Schetinger, Maria R C; Lopes, Sonia T A; Mazzanti, Cinthia M

    2012-07-01

    Sporotrichosis is a fungal infection of subcutaneous or chronic evolution, inflammatory lesions characterized by their pyogranulomatous aspect, caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a "key" enzyme in the purine metabolism, promoting the deamination of adenosine, an important anti-inflammatory molecule. The increase in ADA activity has been demonstrated in several inflammatory conditions; however, there are no data in the literature associated with this fungal infection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the activity of serum ADA (S-ADA) and lymphocytes (L-ADA) of rats infected with S. schenckii. We used seventy-eight rats divided into two groups. In the first experiment, rats were infected subcutaneously and in the second experiment, infected intraperitoneally. Blood samples for hematologic evaluation and activities of S-ADA and L-ADA were performed at days 15, 30, and 40 post-infection (PI) to assess disease progression. In the second experiment, it was observed an acute decrease in activity of S-ADA and L-ADA (P < 0.05), suggesting a compensatory mechanism in an attempt to protect the host from excessive tissue damage. With chronicity of disease the rats in the first and second experiment at 30 days PI showed an increased activity of L-ADA (P < 0.05), promoting an inflammatory response in an attempt to combat the spread of the agent. Thus, it is suggested that infection with S. schenckii alters the activities of S-ADA in experimentally infected rats, demonstrating the involvement of this enzyme in the pathogenesis of sporotrichosis.

  9. Adenosine deaminase activity level as a tool for diagnosing tuberculous pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Khow-Ean, Nathapol; Booraphun, Suchart; Aekphachaisawat, Noppadol; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2013-07-04

    The yield for using a pleural fluid culture to diagnose tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) is low. Adenosine deaminase activity (ADA) has been shown to have good diagnostic value for TPE. The ADA cutoff point for the diagnosis of TPE is unclear. We attempted to determine the ADA level cutoff point for diagnosing of TPE in Thailand, where tuberculosis is endemic. We reviewed the medical records of patients with newly diagnosed pleural effusion aged >15 years who had a pleural fluid ADAlevel and who underwent a pleural biopsy. The study period was from March 1, 2010 to January 31, 2011. The diagnoses of TPE and malignant pleural effusion (MPE) were based on pathological findings. The diagnostic cutoff level for using ADA to diagnose TPE was determined. Forty-eight patients met study criteria. Of those, 18 patients (37.5%) were diagnosed with TPE. The mean ADA level was significantly higher among patients in the TPE group than in the MPE group (38.2 vs 14.8 U/l, p < 0.001). The cutoff level of 17.5 U/l gave sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio of 88.9%, 73.3%, 3.33, and 0.15, respectively. An ADA level >17.5 U/l had good diagnostic values among TPE patients in our study.

  10. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in mice transplanted with hemopoietic stem cells infected with amphotropic retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Amphotropic recombinant retroviruses were generated carrying sequences encoding human adenosine deaminase (ADA). Transcription of the human ADA gene was under control of a hybrid long terminal repeat in which the enhancer from the Moloney murine leukemia virus was replaced by an enhancer from the F101 host-range mutant of polyoma virus. Hemopoietic stem cells in murine bone marrow were infected with this virus under defined culture conditions. As a result, 59% of day-12 colony forming unit spleen (CFU-S) stem cells became infected without any in vitro selection. Infected CFU-S were shown to express human ADA before transplantation and this expression sustained upon in vivo maturation. Mice transplanted with infected bone marrow exhibited human ADA expression in lymphoid, myeloid, and erythroid cell types. Moreover, human ADA expression persisted in secondary and tertiary transplanted recipients showing that human ADA-expressing cells were derived from pluripotent stem cells. These characteristics of our amphotropic viruses make them promising tools in gene therapy protocols for the treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency caused by ADA deficiency. In this respect it is also relevant that the viral vector that served as backbone for the ADA vector was previously shown to be nonleukemogenic. PMID:1974914

  11. Sequence requirements for transcriptional arrest in exon 1 of the murine adenosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ramamurthy, V; Maa, M C; Harless, M L; Wright, D A; Kellems, R E

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that a transcription arrest site near the 5' end of the murine adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene is significantly involved in the regulation of ADA gene expression. To facilitate the analysis of this transcription arrest site, we have analyzed the transcription products from cloned ADA gene fragments injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes. When genomic fragments spanning the 5' end of the ADA gene were injected into oocytes, a 96-nucleotide (nt) ADA RNA was the major transcription product. The 5' end of this RNA mapped to the transcription initiation site for the ADA gene, and its 3' terminus mapped 7 nt downstream of the translation initiation codon within exon 1. A 300-base-pair fragment of genomic DNA spanning the 5' end of the ADA gene was sufficient to generate the 96-nt transcript which accounted for approximately one-half of the transcription products from injected templates. Deletion of a segment of approximately 65 base pairs, located immediately downstream of the 3' terminus of the 96-nt transcript, resulted in a substantial reduction in the synthesis of the 96-nt transcript and a corresponding increase in the production of larger transcripts. These studies show that the transcriptional apparatus of X. laevis oocytes responds to the transcription arrest site associated with exon 1 of the murine ADA gene and that oocyte injections provide a convenient functional assay for additional mechanistic studies. Images PMID:1690842

  12. Sequence requirements for transcriptional arrest in exon 1 of the human adenosine deaminase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi Chen; Kellems, R.E.; Innis, J.W. ); Sun, Minghua; Wright, D.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that a transcriptional arrest site exists in exon 1 of the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene and that this site may play a role in ADA gene expression. Sequences involved in this process are not known precisely. To further define the template requirements for transcriptional arrest within exon 1 of the human ADA gene, various ADA templates were constructed and their abilities to confer transcriptional arrest were determined following injection into Xenopus oocytes. The exon 1 transcriptional arrest signal functioned downstream of several RNA polymerase II promoters and an RNA polymerase II promoter, implying that the transcriptional arrest site in exon 1 of the ADA gene is promoter independent. They identified a 43-bp DNA fragment which functions as a transcriptional arrest signal. Additional studies showed that the transcriptional arrest site functioned only in the naturally occurring orientation. Therefore, they have identified a 43-bp DNA fragment which functions as a transcriptional arrest signal in an orientation-dependent and promoter-independent manner. On the basis of the authors findings, they hypothesize that tissue-specific expression of the ADA gene is governed by factors that function as antiterminators to promote transcriptional readthrough of the exon 1 transcriptional arrest site.

  13. Activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) on undernourished and renourished rats' thymus.

    PubMed

    Feliu, M S.; Slobodianik, N H.

    2001-02-01

    We studied the effect of administration of a low quality dietary protein, from weaning onwards, on the thymus of undernourished rats and the posterior effect of refeeding with a high quality dietary protein. Changes in thymus weight and the activity of Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) and Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP) on thymus, were determined. Wistar rats were suckled in groups of 14-16 per dam since birth to weaning (23 days) to obtain undernutrition. At weaning, a group of 14-16 rats received pre-cooked maize flour (Protein content: 6.5%) for 18 days. One group was sacrificed (M) and the other rats were refed with the casein diet (Protein content: 20%) during 20 days (R). The age-matched control groups were fed stock diet since 40 (C40) and 60 (C60) days of age, respectively. At the end of the experimental period, body (Bw) and thymus weight were determined. ADA and PNP activities were determined in thymocyte suspensions. Highly significant differences in thymus weight-expressed as mg or mg/Bw(0.75)-and the activity of ADA and PNP were observed in rats fed the experimental diet containing maize flour, when compared to the respective age-matched control. No statistical differences were observed between R and C60.The administration of a high quality dietary protein to undernourished weanling rats is capable to reverse the damage produced by the low quality dietary protein on thymus weight and ADA and PNP thymus activities.

  14. Outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Amel; Booth, Claire; Brightwell, Alex; Allwood, Zoe; Veys, Paul; Rao, Kanchan; Hönig, Manfred; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Gennery, Andrew; Slatter, Mary; Bredius, Robbert; Finocchi, Andrea; Cancrini, Caterina; Aiuti, Alessandro; Porta, Fulvio; Lanfranchi, Arnalda; Ridella, Michela; Steward, Colin; Filipovich, Alexandra; Marsh, Rebecca; Bordon, Victoria; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Al-Mousa, Hamoud; Alsum, Zobaida; Al-Dhekri, Hasan; Al Ghonaium, Abdulaziz; Speckmann, Carsten; Fischer, Alain; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Nichols, Kim E; Grunebaum, Eyal; Al Zahrani, Daifulah; Roifman, Chaim M; Boelens, Jaap; Davies, E Graham; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Notarangelo, Luigi; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2012-10-25

    Deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme adenosine deaminase leads to SCID (ADA-SCID). Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can lead to a permanent cure of SCID; however, little data are available on outcome of HCT for ADA-SCID in particular. In this multicenter retrospective study, we analyzed outcome of HCT in 106 patients with ADA-SCID who received a total of 119 transplants. HCT from matched sibling and family donors (MSDs, MFDs) had significantly better overall survival (86% and 81%) in comparison with HCT from matched unrelated (66%; P < .05) and haploidentical donors (43%; P < .001). Superior overall survival was also seen in patients who received unconditioned transplants in comparison with myeloablative procedures (81% vs 54%; P < .003), although in unconditioned haploidentical donor HCT, nonengraftment was a major problem. Long-term immune recovery showed that regardless of transplant type, overall T-cell numbers were similar, although a faster rate of T-cell recovery was observed after MSD/MFD HCT. Humoral immunity and donor B-cell engraftment was achieved in nearly all evaluable surviving patients and was seen even after unconditioned HCT. These data detail for the first time the outcomes of HCT for ADA-SCID and show that, if patients survive HCT, long-term cellular and humoral immune recovery is achieved.

  15. Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1) Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David N.; Li, Yonghua; Kumar, Rajnish; Burke, Sean A.; Dawson, Rodney; Hioe, Catarina E.; Borkowsky, William; Rom, William N.; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    While exploring the effects of aerosol IFN-γ treatment in HIV-1/tuberculosis co-infected patients, we observed A to G mutations in HIV-1 envelope sequences derived from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of aerosol IFN-γ-treated patients and induction of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) in the BAL cells. IFN-γ induced ADAR1 expression in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) but not T cells. ADAR1 siRNA knockdown induced HIV-1 expression in BAL cells of four HIV-1 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. Similar results were obtained in MDM that were HIV-1 infected in vitro. Over-expression of ADAR1 in transformed macrophages inhibited HIV-1 viral replication but not viral transcription measured by nuclear run-on, suggesting that ADAR1 acts post-transcriptionally. The A to G hyper-mutation pattern observed in ADAR1 over-expressing cells in vitro was similar to that found in the lungs of HIV-1 infected patients treated with aerosol IFN-γ suggesting the model accurately represented alveolar macrophages. Together, these results indicate that ADAR1 restricts HIV-1 replication post-transcriptionally in macrophages harboring HIV-1 provirus. ADAR1 may therefore contribute to viral latency in macrophages. PMID:25272020

  16. Visible integration of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene into the recipient genome after gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Egashira, M; Ariga, T; Kawamura, N; Miyoshi, O; Niikawa, N; Sakiyama, Y

    1998-01-23

    Gene therapy for patients with adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency has become practical in the 1990s, and the exogenous gene has been reported to survive for several years in the recipient genome. To evaluate the integration efficiency of the ADA gene (ADA) into peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of a patient with ADA deficiency who is receiving gene therapy, we performed two-color interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis by using digoxigenin-labeled ADA-cDNA and the biotin-labeled lambda-genomic ADA clone as probes. After each of 9 sequential series of gene therapy, interphase nuclei of 100 mononuclear cells from the patient were analyzed, and those of a LASN-producing cell line were used as a control. FISH signals were detected with rhodamine and FITC for the cDNA and the genomic DNA, respectively. The number of PBL giving a transgene signal grew after the sequential gene therapies, and the proportion of signal-positive cells reached about 10%. Our results indicate that the two-color FISH system can be used as a potential aid to monitor the efficiency of the ADA gene therapy.

  17. Defective B cell tolerance in adenosine deaminase deficiency is corrected by gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Aisha V; Morbach, Henner; Brigida, Immacolata; Ng, Yen-Shing; Aiuti, Alessandro; Meffre, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene defects are among the most common causes of SCID. Restoration of purine metabolism and immune functions can be achieved by enzyme replacement therapy, or more effectively by bone marrow transplant or HSC gene therapy (HSC-GT). However, autoimmune complications and autoantibody production, including anti-nuclear antibodies (ANAs), frequently occur in ADA-SCID patients after treatment. To assess whether ADA deficiency affects the establishment of B cell tolerance, we tested the reactivity of recombinant antibodies isolated from single B cells of ADA-SCID patients before and after HSC-GT. We found that before HSC-GT, new emigrant/transitional and mature naive B cells from ADA-SCID patients contained more autoreactive and ANA-expressing clones, indicative of defective central and peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoints. We further observed impaired B cell receptor (BCR) and TLR functions in B cells after ADA inhibition, which may underlie the defects in B cell tolerance. Strikingly, after HSC-GT, ADA-SCID patients displayed quasi-normal early B cell tolerance checkpoints, as evidenced by restored removal of developing autoreactive and ANA-expressing B cells. Hence, ADA plays an essential role in controlling autoreactive B cell counterselection by regulating BCR and TLR functions.

  18. Hereditary overexpression of adenosine deaminase in erythrocytes: Evidence for a cis-acting mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.H. ); Tartaglia, A.P. ); Mitchell, B.S. )

    1993-10-01

    Overexpression of adenosine deaminase (ADA) in red blood cells is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and causes hemolytic anemia. The increased ADA activity in erythrocytes is due to an increase in steady-state levels of ADA mRNA of normal sequence. Increased ADA mRNA may be due to a cis-acting mutation which results in increased transcription or a loss of down-regulation during erythroid differentiation. Alternatively, it is possible that the mutation is in a trans-acting factor which interacts with normal ADA transcriptional elements to cause overexpression in red blood cells. To discriminate between a cis-acting and a trans-acting mutation, the authors took advantage of a highly polymorphic TAAA repeat located at the tail end of an Alu repeat approximately 1.1 kb upstream of the ADA gene. Using PCR to amplify this region, the authors identified five different alleles in 19 members of the family. All 11 affected individuals had an ADA allele with 12 TAAA repeats, whereas none of the 8 normal individuals did. The authors conclude that this disorder results from a cis-acting mutation in the vicinity of the ADA gene. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Assessment of adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity and oxidative stress in patients with chronic tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Garca, Mehmet Fatih; Demir, Halit; Turan, Mahfuz; Bozan, Nazım; Kozan, Ahmet; Belli, Şeyda Bayel; Arslan, Ayşe; Cankaya, Hakan

    2014-06-01

    To emphasize the effectiveness of adenosine deaminase (ADA) enzyme, which has important roles in the differentiation of lymphoid cells, and oxidative stress in patients with chronic tonsillitis. Serum and tissue samples were obtained from 25 patients who underwent tonsillectomy due to recurrent episodes of acute tonsillitis. In the control group, which also had 25 subjects, only serum samples were taken as obtaining tissue samples would not have been ethically appropriate. ADA enzyme activity, catalase (CAT), carbonic anhydrase (CA), nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in the serum and tissue samples of patients and control group subjects. The serum values of both groups were compared. In addition, the tissue and serum values of patients were compared. Serum ADA activity and the oxidant enzymes MDA and NO values of the patient group were significantly higher than those of the control group (p < 0.001), the antioxidant enzymes CA and CAT values of the patient group were significantly lower than those of the control group (p < 0.001). In addition, while CA, CAT and NO enzyme levels were found to be significantly higher in the tonsil tissue of the patient group when compared to serum levels (p < 0.05), there was no difference between tissue and serum MDA and ADA activity (p > 0.05). Elevated ADA activity may be effective in the pathogenesis of chronic tonsillitis both by impairing tissue structure and contributing to SOR formation.

  20. Elevated erythrocyte adenosine deaminase activity in a patient with primary acquired sideroblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kanno, H; Fujii, H; Tani, K; Morisaki, T; Takahashi, K; Horiuchi, N; Kizaki, M; Ogawa, T; Miwa, S

    1988-03-01

    We report a case of primary acquired sideroblastic anemia (PASA) associated with elevated erythrocyte adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity. The patient was an 85-year-old Japanese male. Analysis of the peripheral blood revealed pancytopenia, and the bone marrow findings showed marked ringed sideroblasts and chromosomal deletion (46XY, 11q-). The erythrocyte ADA activity was 17 times higher than that of normal control, the leukocyte ADA activity was within the normal range, and the plasma ADA activity was 2 times higher than the normal mean. The adenine nucleotides in the patient's erythrocytes were within normal range. According to starch gel electrophoresis, ADA isozyme of the patient was ADA 1. Western blotting showed an increased amount of ADA protein in the patient's erythrocytes. Southern blotting revealed no gene amplification or large structural change. Dot blot analysis of the reticulocyte mRNA showed no increase in the amount of ADA mRNA in the patient's reticulocytes compared with those of reticulocyte-rich controls. We considered that the mechanism of elevated ADA activity in this acquired defect was similar to that found in hereditary hemolytic anemia associated with ADA overproduction.

  1. Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) expression and metastatic potential in prostatic adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Dinjens, W N; Ten Kate, J; Kirch, J A; Tanke, H J; Van der Linden, E P; Van den Ingh, H F; Van Steenbrugge, G J; Meera Khan, P; Bosman, F T

    1990-03-01

    The expression of the adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) was investigated by immunohistochemistry in the normal and hyperplastic human prostate, in 30 prostatic adenocarcinomas, and in seven human prostatic adenocarcinoma cell lines grown as xenografts in athymic nude mice. In the normal and hyperplastic prostate, ADCP was localized exclusively in the apical membrane and the apical cytoplasm of the glandular epithelial cells. In prostatic adenocarcinomas, four distinct ADCP expression patterns were observed: diffuse cytoplasmic, membranous, both cytoplasmic and membranous, and no ADCP expression. The expression patterns were compared with the presence of metastases. We found an inverse correlation between membranous ADCP immunoreactivity and metastatic propensity. Exclusively membranous ADCP immunoreactivity occurred only in non-metastatic tumours. In contrast, the metastatic tumours showed no or diffuse cytoplasmic ADCP immunoreactivity. This suggests that immunohistochemical detection of ADCP might predict the biological behaviour of prostatic cancer. However, the occurrence of membranous ADCP immunoreactivity in the xenograft of a cell line (PC-EW), derived from a prostatic carcinoma metastasis, indicates that not only the tendency to metastasize modulates ADCP expression.

  2. Molecular cloning of cDNA for double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase, a candidate enzyme for nuclear RNA editing.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, U; Wang, Y; Sanford, T; Zeng, Y; Nishikura, K

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned human cDNA encoding double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase (DRADA). DRADA is a ubiquitous nuclear enzyme that converts multiple adenosines to inosines in double-helical RNA substrates without apparent sequence specificity. The A --> I conversion activity of the protein encoded by the cloned cDNA was confirmed by recombinant expression in insect cells. Use of the cloned DNA as a molecular probe documented sequence conservation across mammals and detected a single transcript of 7 kb in RNA of all human tissues analyzed. The deduced primary structure of human DRADA revealed a bipartite nuclear localization signal, three repeats of a double-stranded RNA binding motif, and the presence of sequences conserved in the catalytic center of other deaminases, including a cytidine deaminase involved in the RNA editing of apolipoprotein B. These structural properties are consistent with the enzymatic signature of DRADA, and strengthen the hypothesis that DRADA carries out the RNA editing of transcripts encoding glutamate-gated ion channels in brain. Images PMID:7972084

  3. Somatic cell genetics of adenosine deaminase expression and severe combined immunodeficiency disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Koch, G; Shows, T B

    1980-07-01

    The somatic cell hybrid method has been used to study the number and different types of human genes involved in the expression of adenosine deaminase (ADA; adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) in normal cells and cells from a patient with ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). Genetic and biochemical characterization of ADA in SCID and the ADA tissue-specific isozymes in normal human cells indicates that additional genes, besides the ADA structural gene on chromosome 20, are involved in ADA expression. Human chromosome 6 encodes a gene, ADCP-1, whose presence is necessary for the expression of an ADA-complexing protein in human-mouse somatic cell hybrids [Koch, G. & Shows, T. B. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 3876-3880]. We report the identification of a second gene, ADCP-2, on human chromosome 2, that is also involved in the expression of the ADA-complexing protein. The data indicate that these two ADCP genes must be present in the same cell for that cell to express the complexing protein. Human-mouse somatic cell hybrids, in which the human parental cells were fibroblastss from an individual with ADA-deficient SCID, also required human chromosomes 2 and 6 to express the ADA-complexing protein, indicating that neither ADCP-1 nor ADCP-2 is involved in the ADA deficiency in SCID. The SCID-mouse hybrid cells expressed no human ADA even when human chromosome 20 had been retained. The deficiency of human ADA in these hybrids maps to human chromosome 20, and therefore is not due to the repression or inhibiton of ADA or its product by unlinked genes or gene products. We propose that the expression of the polymeric ADA tissue isozymes in human cells requires at least three genes: ADA on chromosome 20, ADCP-1 on chromosome 6, and ADCP-2 on chromosome 2. A genetic scheme is presented and the different genes involved in ADA expression and their possible functions are discussed.

  4. Adenosine deaminase in CSF and pleural fluid for diagnosis of tubercular meningitis and pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nepal, A K; Gyawali, N; Poudel, B; Mahato, R V; Lamsal, M; Gurung, R; Baral, N; Majhi, S

    2012-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most common infectious diseases in developing countries including Nepal. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis results in poor prognosis of the disease. This study was conducted to estimate diagnostic cut off values of Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and pleural fluid and to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values ofADA in pleural fluid and CSF from patients with tuberculous and non-tuberculous disease. A total of 98 body fluid (CSF: 24, Pleural fluid: 74) specimens were received for the estimation of ADA. ADA activity was measured at 37 degrees C by spectrophotometric method of Guisti and Galanti, 1984 at 625nm wavelength. Among the patients enrolled for the study subjects for which CSF were received (n = 24) included 8 tuberculous meningitis (TBM), and 16 non-tubercular meningitis (NTM). Pleural fluid samples (n = 74) were received from 19 pulmonary TB with pleural effusion, 17 PTB without pleural effusion and 37 of non-tuberculous disease patients. CSF ADA activity were (11. 1 +/- 2.03 IU/L) and (5.3 +/- +1.89 IU/L) (p <00001) in TM and non-NTM groups and Pleural fluid ADA activity were (10 +/- 22.18 IU/L) and (23.79 +/- 11.62 IU/L) (p < 0.001) in PTB and non-TB groups respectively. ADA test in body fluids, which is simple, cost-effective and sensitive, specific for the tubercular disease is recommended to perform before forwarding the cumbersome and expensive procedures like culture and PCR for TB diagnosis.

  5. Adenosine deaminase activity in serum, erythrocytes and lymphocytes of rats infected with Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Alexandre A; Pimentel, Victor C; da Silva, Aleksandro S; de Azevedo, Maria Isabel; Souza, Viviane C G; Wolkmer, Patrícia; Rezer, João F P; Badke, Manoel R T; Leal, Daniela B R; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Monteiro, Silvia G; Lopes, Sonia T A

    2012-04-01

    Leptospirosis is a systemic disease of humans and domestic animals, mainly dogs, cattle and swine. The course of human leptospirosis varies from mild to severe fatal forms and the most severe form of human leptospirosis is principally caused by Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae (L. icterohaemorrhagiae). The enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) plays an important role in the production and differentiation of blood cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of ADA in serum, erythrocytes and lymphocytes of rats infected with L. icterohaemorrhagiae, as compared with non-infected rats. Twenty-four adult rats, divided into two uniform groups (A and B) were used for the enzymatic assays. The animals in Group B were inoculated intraperitoneally with 2×10(8) leptospires/rat, and the rodents in Group A (control) were not-inoculated. Blood collection was performed on days 5 and 15 post-infection (PI) and the blood used to assess the ADA activity. The infection by L.icterohaemorrhagiae altered erythrocyte count, hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit, causing a decrease in all these parameters on day 15 PI. Lymphocytes decreased significantly on day 15 PI, and ADA activity in serum was inhibited in infected rats on days 5 and 15 PI and its activity in erythrocytes were increased on day 5 PI. On day 5 PI, we found an increase in ADA activity in erythrocytes of infected rats. No correlation was observed between hematocrit and erythrocyte ADA activity on days 5 and 15 PI. The ADA activity was inhibited in rats infected on day 15 PI. A positive correlation (r(2)=60) was also observed between the number of lymphocytes and ADA activity in lymphocytes on day 15 PI (P<0.05). In conclusion, our results showed that the ADA activity is altered in serum, lymphocytes and erythrocytes in experimental infection by L.icterohaemorrhagiae in rats, concomitantly with hematological parameters.

  6. Diagnostic value of sputum adenosine deaminase (ADA) level in pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Binesh, Fariba; Jalali, Hadi; Zare, Mohammad Reza; Behravan, Farhad; Tafti, Arefeh Dehghani; Behnaz, Fatemah; Tabatabaee, Mohammad; Shahcheraghi, Seyed Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis is still a considerable health problem in many countries. Rapid diagnosis of this disease is important, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) has been used as a diagnostic test. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of ADA in the sputum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods The current study included 40 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (culture positive, smear ±) and 42 patients with non tuberculosis pulmonary diseases (culture negative). ADA was measured on all of the samples. Results The median value of ADA in non-tuberculosis patients was 2.94 (4.2) U/L and 4.01 (6.54) U/L in tuberculosis patients, but this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.100). The cut-off point of 3.1 U/L had a sensitivity of 61% and a specificity of 53%, the cut-off point of 2.81 U/L had a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 50% and the cut-off point of 2.78 U/L had a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 48%. The positive predictive values for cut-off points of 3.1, 2.81 and 2.78 U/L were 55.7%, 57.44% and 69.23%, respectively. The negative predictive values for the abovementioned cut-off points were 56.75%, 57.14% and 55.88%, respectively. Conclusion Our results showed that sputum ADA test is neither specific nor sensitive. Because of its low sensitivity and specificity, determination of sputum ADA for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis is not recommended. PMID:27482515

  7. Mutations in the human adenosine deaminase gene that affect protein structure and RNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Akeson, A.L.; Wiginton, D.A.; States, C.J.; Perme, C.M.; Dusing, M.R.; Hutton, J.J.

    1987-08-01

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency is one cause of the genetic disease severe combined immunodeficiency. To identify mutations responsible for ADA deficiency, the authors synthesized cDNAs to ADA mRNAs from two cell lines, GM2756 and GM2825A, derived from ADA-deficient immunodeficient patients. Sequence analysis of GM2756 cDNA clones revealed a different point mutation in each allele that causes amino acid changes of alanine to valine and arginine to histidine. One allele of GM2825A also has a point mutation that causes an alanine to valine substitution. The other allele of GM2825A was found to produce an mRNA in which exon 4 had been spliced out but had no other detrimental mutations. S1 nuclease mapping of GM2825A mRNA showed equal abundance of the full-length ADA mRNA and the ADA mRNA that was missing exon 4. Several of the ADA cDNA clones extended 5' of the major initiation start site, indicating multiple start sites for ADA transcription. The point mutations in GM2756 and GM2825A and the absence of exon 4 in GM2825A appear to be directly responsible for the ADA deficiency. Comparison of a number of normal and mutant ADA cDNA sequences showed a number of changes in the third base of codons. These change do not affect the amino acid sequence. Analyses of ADA cDNAs from different cell lines detected aberrant RNA species that either included intron 7 or excluded exon 7. Their presence is a result of aberrant splicing of pre-mRNAs and is not related to mutations that cause ADA deficiency.

  8. Diagnosis of tuberculosis pleurisy with adenosine deaminase (ADA): a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gui, Xuwei; Xiao, Heping

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to determine accuracy and usefulness of adenosine deaminase (ADA) in diagnosis of tuberculosis pleurisy. Medline, Google scholar and Web of Science databases were searched to identify related studies until 2014. Two reviewers independently assessed quality of studies included according to standard Quality Assessment of Diagnosis Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) criteria. The sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio and other parameters of ADA in diagnosis of tuberculosis pleurisy were analyzed with Meta-DiSC1.4 software, and pooled using the random effects model. Twelve studies including 865 tuberculosis pleurisy patients and 1379 non-tuberculosis pleurisy subjects were identified from 110 studies for this meta-analysis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR) and diagnosis odds ratio (DOR) of ADA in the diagnosis of tuberculosis pleurisy were 45.25 (95% CI 27.63-74.08), 0.86 (95% CI 0.84-0.88), 0.88 (95% CI 0.86-0.90), 6.32 (95% CI 4.83-8.26) and 0.15 (95% 0.11-0.22), respectively. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) was 0.9340. Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity and specificity of ADA are high in the diagnosis of tuberculosis pleurisy especially when ADA≥50 (U/L). Thus, ADA is a relatively sensitive and specific marker for tuberculosis pleurisy diagnosis. However, it is cautious to apply these results due to the heterogeneity in study design of these studies. Further studies are required to confirm the optimal cut-off value of ADA.

  9. Correlation study of adenosine deaminase and its isoenzymes in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Lokendra Bahadur; Thapa, Sangita; Subedi, Nuwadatta

    2017-01-01

    Objective Adenosine deaminase (ADA) plays an important role in cell-mediated immunity and modulation of insulin activity. Its clinical and diagnostic significance in Nepalese type 2 diabetes is not yet characterized. So, this study's objective was to determine the isoenzymatic activities of ADA (ADA1, ADA2, and total ADA) and show its correlation with demographic, anthropometric, and biochemical characteristics of type 2 Nepalese subjects with diabetes. Research design and methods This is a hospital-based cross-sectional study including 80 type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and same number of age-matched and sex-matched healthy controls. Data were collected using preformed set of questionnaires and biochemical data were obtained from the laboratory analysis of the patient's blood samples. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS V.20. Results A significantly higher (p<0.001) mean values of body mass index (BMI), fasting blood sugar (FBS), postprandial blood sugar (PPBS), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and lipid profiles except high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were found in type 2 diabetic cases compared with controls. Serum ADA activities were significantly higher in cases compared with controls (p<0.001) showing significant positive correlation (p<0.05) with FBS, PPBS, HbA1c, and alcoholism; while no correlation was found with age, sex, ethnicity, BMI, waist–hip ratio, dietary habits, smoking, and duration of diabetes. Conclusions Serum ADA activities were significantly higher in type 2 diabetic patients compared with controls having significant positive correlation with glycemic parameters. Serum ADA and its isoenzymes could be used as biomarkers for assessing glycemic status in patients with type 2 DM. PMID:28321313

  10. Effects of surfactant, salt and solvent on the structure and activity of adenosine deaminase: molecular dynamic and spectrophotometric studies.

    PubMed

    Ajloo, Davood; Taghizadeh, Elias; Saboury, Ali A; Bazyari, Elahe; Mahnam, Karim

    2008-08-15

    Effects of sodium dodecyl sulfate, dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, methanol and ethanol, on the structure and activity of adenosine deaminase (ADA) were investigated by UV-Vis, circular dichroism spectrophotometry and molecular dynamics (MDs) studies. Relative activity, experimental and computational helix content, total accessible surface area (ASA) and exposed charged surface area (ECSA) were obtained. The relative activity of ADA in the absence and the presence of denaturants were compared with structural results. It was shown that an increase in the surface area and a decrease in the amount of helicity are associated with a decrease in the activity of ADA.

  11. Hyperbilirubinemia and rapid fatal hepatic failure in severe combined immunodeficiency caused by adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA-SCID).

    PubMed

    Kühl, J S; Schwarz, K; Münch, A; Schmugge, M; Pekrun, A; Meisel, C; Wahn, V; Ebell, W; von Bernuth, H

    2011-03-01

    Adenosin deaminase (ADA) deficiency is the cause for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in about 15% of patients with SCID, often presenting as T (-)B (-)NK (-)SCID. Treatment options for ADA-SCID are enzyme replacement, bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy. We here describe the first patient with ADA-SCID and fatal hepatic failure despite bone marrow transplantation from a 10/10 HLA identical related donor. As patients with ADA-SCID may be at yet underestimated increased risk for rapid hepatic failure we speculate whether hepatitis in ADA-SCID should lead to the immediate treatment with enzyme replacement by pegylated ADA.

  12. Antigenicity of UV radiation-induced murine tumors correlates positively with the level of adenosine deaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, S L; Fidler, I J

    1987-01-01

    The specific activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA) in 16 murine tumor cell lines derived from seven UV light-induced neoplasms (melanoma and fibrosarcoma) were determined. In each case, the specific activity of ADA correlated positively with the antigenicity of the tumor cells. Highly antigenic cell lines that regress upon introduction into syngeneic hosts had on average 4- to 6-fold higher ADA specific activities than cell lines of low antigenicity that grow progressively in syngeneic hosts. The antigenic differences are probably not related to intracellular cAMP levels, as the level of cAMP differed only 2-fold between the two groups of cell lines.

  13. Pleural effusion adenosine deaminase: a candidate biomarker to discriminate between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruolin; Wang, Junli; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Maoshui

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Delay in the treatment of pleural infection may contribute to its high mortality. In this retrospective study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural adenosine deaminase in discrimination between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space prior to selecting antibiotics. METHODS: A total of 76 patients were enrolled and grouped into subgroups according to Gram staining: 1) patients with Gram-negative bacterial infections, aged 53.2±18.6 years old, of whom 44.7% had empyemas and 2) patients with Gram-positive bacterial infections, aged 53.5±21.5 years old, of whom 63.1% had empyemas. The pleural effusion was sampled by thoracocentesis and then sent for adenosine deaminase testing, biochemical testing and microbiological culture. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to examine the differences in adenosine deaminase levels between the groups. Correlations between adenosine deaminase and specified variables were also quantified using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural effusion adenosine deaminase. RESULTS: Mean pleural adenosine deaminase levels differed significantly between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space (191.8±32.1 U/L vs 81.0±16.9 U/L, p<0.01). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve was 0.689 (95% confidence interval: 0.570, 0.792, p<0.01) at the cutoff value of 86 U/L. Additionally, pleural adenosine deaminase had a sensitivity of 63.2% (46.0-78.2%); a specificity of 73.7% (56.9-86.6%); positive and negative likelihood ratios of 2.18 and 0.50, respectively; and positive and negative predictive values of 70.6% and 66.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Pleural effusion adenosine deaminase is a helpful alternative biomarker for early and quick discrimination of Gram-negative from Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space

  14. Inhibition of adenosine deaminase (ADA)-mediated metabolism of cordycepin by natural substances.

    PubMed

    Li, Gen; Nakagome, Izumi; Hirono, Shuichi; Itoh, Tomoo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2015-03-01

    Cordycepin, which is an analogue of a nucleoside adenosine, exhibits a wide variety of pharmacological activities including anticancer effects. In this study, ADA1- and ADA2-expressing HEK293 cells were established to determine the major ADA isoform responsible for the deamination of cordycepin. While the metabolic rate of cordycepin deamination was similar between ADA2-expressing and Mock cells, extensive metabolism of cordycepin was observed in the ADA1-expressing cells with K m and V max values of 54.9 μmol/L and 45.8 nmole/min/mg protein. Among five natural substances tested in this study (kaempferol, quercetin, myricetin, naringenin, and naringin), naringin strongly inhibited the deamination of cordycepin with K i values of 58.8 μmol/L in mouse erythrocytes and 168.3 μmol/L in human erythrocytes. A treatment of Jurkat cells with a combination of cordycepin and naringin showed significant cytotoxicity. Our in silico study suggests that not only small molecules such as adenosine derivatives but also bulky molecules like naringin can be a potent ADA1 inhibitor for the clinical usage.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase from Streptococcus pyogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Min-Je; Lee, Won-Ho; Nam, Ki-hyun; Rhee, Kyeong-hee; Lee, Ki-Seog; Kim, Eunice EunKyung; Yu, Myung-Hee; Hwang, Kwang Yeon

    2005-04-01

    The tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase from the pathogenic bacteria S. pyogenes has been overexpressed and crystallized. The tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase from the pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes (spTAD) has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized in the presence of Zn{sup 2+} ion at 295 K using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Flash-cooled crystals of spTAD diffracted to 2.0 Å using 30%(v/v) glycerol as a cryoprotectant. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.0 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 81.042, c = 81.270 Å. The asymmetric unit contains one subunit of spTAD, with a corresponding crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 3.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 62.7%.

  16. Piracetam prevents scopolamine-induced memory impairment and decrease of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities.

    PubMed

    Marisco, Patricia C; Carvalho, Fabiano B; Rosa, Michelle M; Girardi, Bruna A; Gutierres, Jessié M; Jaques, Jeandre A S; Salla, Ana P S; Pimentel, Víctor C; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Leal, Daniela B R; Mello, Carlos F; Rubin, Maribel A

    2013-08-01

    Piracetam improves cognitive function in animals and in human beings, but its mechanism of action is still not completely known. In the present study, we investigated whether enzymes involved in extracellular adenine nucleotide metabolism, adenosine triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase), 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) are affected by piracetam in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of animals subjected to scopolamine-induced memory impairment. Piracetam (0.02 μmol/5 μL, intracerebroventricular, 60 min pre-training) prevented memory impairment induced by scopolamine (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, immediately post-training) in the inhibitory avoidance learning and in the object recognition task. Scopolamine reduced the activity of NTPDase in hippocampus (53 % for ATP and 53 % for ADP hydrolysis) and cerebral cortex (28 % for ATP hydrolysis). Scopolamine also decreased the activity of 5'-nucleotidase (43 %) and ADA (91 %) in hippocampus. The same effect was observed in the cerebral cortex for 5'-nucleotidase (38 %) and ADA (68 %) activities. Piracetam fully prevented scopolamine-induced memory impairment and decrease of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities in synaptosomes from cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In vitro experiments show that piracetam and scopolamine did not alter enzymatic activity in cerebral cortex synaptosomes. Moreover, piracetam prevented scopolamine-induced increase of TBARS levels in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. These results suggest that piracetam-induced improvement of memory is associated with protection against oxidative stress and maintenance of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and ADA activities, and suggest the purinergic system as a putative target of piracetam.

  17. Purification and characterization of a human RNA adenosine deaminase for glutamate receptor B pre-mRNA editing.

    PubMed

    Yang, J H; Sklar, P; Axel, R; Maniatis, T

    1997-04-29

    The glutamate receptor subunit B (GluR-B) pre-mRNA is edited at two adenosine residues, resulting in amino acid changes that alter the electrophysiologic properties of the glutamate receptor. Previous studies showed that these amino acid changes are due to adenosine to inosine conversions in two codons resulting from adenosine deamination. Here, we describe the purification and characterization of an activity from human HeLa cells that efficiently and accurately edits GluR-B pre-mRNA at both of these sites. The purified activity contains a human homolog of the recently reported rat RED1 (rRED1) protein, a member of the family of double-stranded RNA-dependent deaminase proteins. Recombinant human RED1 (hRED1), but not recombinant dsRAD, another member of the family, efficiently edits both the Q/R and R/G sites of GluR-B RNA. We conclude that the GluR-B editing activity present in HeLa cell extracts and the recombinant hRED1 protein are indistinguishable.

  18. The Effect of Acute Exercise upon Adenosin Deaminase Oxidant and Antioxidant Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafkas, M. Emin; Karabulut, Aysun Bay; Sahin, Armagan; Otlu, Onder; Savas, Seyfi; Aytac, Aylin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the changes of MDA, glutation (GSH), Adenozine deaminase (ADA) and superoxidase dismutaze (SOD) levels with exercise training in obese middle-aged women (body mass index, MMI [greater than or equal to] 30.0). Twelve obese middle-aged women participated in this study. The descriptive statistics of some of…

  19. Cryptococcal pleuritis containing a high level of adenosine deaminase in a patient with AIDS: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Yusuke; Kitazawa, Takatoshi; Tatsuno, Keita; Ota, Yasuo; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Cryptococcal infection is the 4th most common opportunistic infection in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Although pleural effusion alone is an unusual presentation, we present a case of cryptococcal pleuritis in an AIDS patient which was initially difficult to discriminate from tuberculous pleuritis because of the high level of pleural adenosine deaminase (ADA). Cryptococcus neoformans was detected in the culture of the pleural effusion after the initiation of antituberculous treatment. High levels of ADA in the pleural fluid can be observed in patients with cryptococcal pleuritis, and longer incubation of pleural fluid should be performed in all patients who present with pleuritis associated with a high ADA level as the only significant finding.

  20. Regulation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate deaminase in the freeze tolerant wood frog, Rana sylvatica

    PubMed Central

    Dieni, Christopher A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2008-01-01

    Background The wood frog, Rana sylvatica, is one of a few vertebrate species that have developed natural freeze tolerance, surviving days or weeks with 65–70% of its total body water frozen in extracellular ice masses. Frozen frogs exhibit no vital signs and their organs must endure multiple stresses, particularly long term anoxia and ischemia. Maintenance of cellular energy supply is critical to viability in the frozen state and in skeletal muscle, AMP deaminase (AMPD) plays a key role in stabilizing cellular energetics. The present study investigated AMPD control in wood frog muscle. Results Wood frog AMPD was subject to multiple regulatory controls: binding to subcellular structures, protein phosphorylation, and effects of allosteric effectors, cryoprotectants and temperature. The percentage of bound AMPD activity increased from 20 to 35% with the transition to the frozen state. Bound AMPD showed altered kinetic parameters compared with the free enzyme (S0.5 AMP was reduced, Hill coefficient fell to ~1.0) and the transition to the frozen state led to a 3-fold increase in S0.5 AMP of the bound enzyme. AMPD was a target of protein phosphorylation. Bound AMPD from control frogs proved to be a low phosphate form with a low S0.5 AMP and was phosphorylated in incubations that stimulated PKA, PKC, CaMK, or AMPK. Bound AMPD from frozen frogs was a high phosphate form with a high S0.5 AMP that was reduced under incubation conditions that stimulated protein phosphatases. Frog muscle AMPD was activated by Mg·ATP and Mg·ADP and inhibited by Mg·GTP, KCl, NaCl and NH4Cl. The enzyme product, IMP, uniquely inhibited only the bound (phosphorylated) enzyme from muscle of frozen frogs. Activators and inhibitors differentially affected the free versus bound enzyme. S0.5 AMP of bound AMPD was also differentially affected by high versus low assay temperature (25 vs 5°C) and by the presence/absence of the natural cryoprotectant (250 mM glucose) that accumulates during freezing

  1. Syzygium cumini extract decrease adenosine deaminase, 5'nucleotidase activities and oxidative damage in platelets of diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    De Bona, Karine S; Bellé, Luziane P; Sari, Marcel H; Thomé, Gustavo; Schetinger, Maria R C; Morsch, Vera M; Boligon, Aline; Athayde, Margareth L; Pigatto, Aline S; Moretto, Maria B

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a chronic metabolic disorder, has assumed epidemic proportions and its long-term complications can have devastating consequences. The oxidative stress in diabetes was greatly increased due to prolonged exposure to hyperglycemia and impairment of oxidant/antioxidant equilibrium. Syzygium cumini is being widely used to treat diabetes by the traditional practitioners over many centuries. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) and 5'-Nucleotidase (5'NT) are enzymes of purine nucleoside metabolism that play an important role in the regulation of adenosine (Ado) levels. In this study, we investigated the effect of Syzygium cumini aqueous leaves extract (ASc) on ADA and 5'NT activities and on parameters of oxidative stress under in vitro conditions, using platelets of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) was assayed by ADA, 5'NT, Catalase (CAT), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) activities and Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels. We observed that ADA, 5'NT activities and TBARS levels were significantly higher when compared to the control group, and ASc (100 and 200 μg/mL) prevented these effects. Our study demonstrates that ASc was able to remove oxidant species generated in diabetic conditions and modulates in the Ado levels. Then, ASc may promote a compensatory response in platelet function, improving the susceptibility-induced by the diabetes mellitus.

  2. Partial resolution of bone lesions. A child with severe combined immunodeficiency disease and adenosine deaminase deficiency after enzyme-replacement therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yulish, B.S.; Stern, R.C.; Polmar, S.H.

    1980-01-01

    A child with severe combined immunodeficiency disease and adenosine deaminase deficiency, with characteristic bone dysplasia, was treated with transfusions of frozen irradiated RBCs as a means of enzyme replacement. This therapy resulted in restoration of immunologic competence and partial resolution of the bone lesions. Although the natural history of these lesions without therapy is not known, enzyme-replacement therapy may have played a role in the resolution of this patient's bone lesions.

  3. Adenosine Deaminase-2–Induced Hyperpermeability in Human Retinal Vascular Endothelial Cells Is Suppressed by MicroRNA-146b-3p

    PubMed Central

    Samra, Yara A.; Saleh, Heba M.; Hussein, Khaled A.; Elsherbiny, Nehal M.; Ibrahim, Ahmed S.; Elmasry, Khaled; Fulzele, Sadanand; El-Shishtawy, Mamdouh M.; Eissa, Laila A.; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Liou, Gregory I.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We recently demonstrated that adenosine deaminase-2 (ADA2) contributes to diabetic retinopathy (DR) via up-regulating the production of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages. Also, microRNA (miR)-146b-3p has the ability to inhibit ADA2. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential role of ADA2 and therapeutic benefit of miR-146b-3p in retinal inflammation and endothelial barrier dysfunction during diabetes. Methods Adenosine deaminase-2 activity was determined by colorimetric method in diabetic human vitreous. Human monocyte cell line U937 was differentiated into macrophages and then treated with amadori glycated albumin (AGA), and conditioned medium (CM) was used to assess the changes in ADA2 activity and TNF-α and IL-6 levels by ELISA. Also, macrophages were transfected with miR-146b-3p before treatment with AGA. Permeability of human retinal endothelial cells (hRECs) was assessed by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) after treatment with macrophage CM. Zonula occludens (ZO)-1 was examined by immuno-fluorescence in hRECs. Leukocyte adhesion was assessed in hRECs by measuring myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression. Results Adenosine deaminase-2 activity was significantly increased in diabetic human vitreous. ADA2 activity and TNF-α and IL-6 levels were significantly increased in human macrophages by AGA treatment. Amadori glycated albumin–treated macrophage CM significantly increased hREC permeability, disrupted ZO-1 pattern, and increased leukocyte adhesion to hRECs through up-regulating ICAM-1. All these changes were reversed by miR-146b-3p. Conclusions Adenosine deaminase-2 is implicated in breakdown of the blood–retinal barrier (BRB) in DR through macrophages-derived cytokines. Therefore, inhibition of ADA2 by miR-146b-3p might be a useful tool to preserve BRB function in DR. PMID:28170537

  4. Host response to polyomavirus infection is modulated by RNA adenosine deaminase ADAR1 but not by ADAR2.

    PubMed

    George, Cyril X; Samuel, Charles E

    2011-08-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the C-6 deamination of adenosine (A) to produce inosine (I), which behaves as guanine (G), thereby altering base pairing in RNAs with double-stranded character. Two genes, adar1 and adar2, are known to encode enzymatically active ADARs in mammalian cells. Furthermore, two size forms of ADAR1 are expressed by alternative promoter usage, a short (p110) nuclear form that is constitutively made and a long (p150) form that is interferon inducible and present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. ADAR2 is also a constitutively expressed nuclear protein. Extensive A-to-G substitution has been described in mouse polyomavirus (PyV) RNA isolated late times after infection, suggesting modification by ADAR. To test the role of ADAR in PyV infection, we used genetically null mouse embryo fibroblast cells deficient in either ADAR1 or ADAR2. The single-cycle yields and growth kinetics of PyV were comparable between adar1(-/-) and adar2(-/-) genetic null fibroblast cells. While large T antigen was expressed to higher levels in adar1(-/-) cells than adar2(-/-) cells, less difference was seen in VP1 protein expression levels between the two knockout MEFs. However, virus-induced cell killing was greatly enhanced in PyV-infected adar1(-/-) cells compared to that of adar2(-/-) cells. Complementation with p110 protected cells from PyV-induced cytotoxicity. UV-irradiated PyV did not display any enhanced cytopathic effect in adar1(-/-) cells. Reovirus and vesicular stomatitis virus single-cycle yields were comparable between adar1(-/-) and adar2(-/-) cells, and neither reovirus nor VSV showed enhanced cytotoxicity in adar1(-/-)-infected cells. These results suggest that ADAR1 plays a virus-selective role in the host response to infection.

  5. Effects of aqueous soybean, mistletoe and red clover extracts on activities of adenosine deaminase and xanthine oxidase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Namuslu, M; Kocaoglu, H; Celik, H T; Avci, A; Devrim, E; Genc, Y; Gocmen, E; Erguder, I B; Durak, I

    2014-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max), mistletoe (Viscum album) and red clover (Trifolium pratence) have been argued to have anti-cancer effects. In the present study it was aimed to investigate possible effects of these plant extracts on the activities of DNA turn-over enzymes, namely adenosine deaminase (ADA) and xanthine oxidase (XO) in cancerous and non-cancerous gastric and colon tissues. For this aim, 6 cancerous and 6 non-cancerous adjacent human gastric tissues, and 7 cancerous and 7 non-cancerous adjacent colon tissues were obtained by surgical operations. Our results suggest that aqueous soybean, mistletoe and red clover extracts may exhibit anti-tumoral activity by depleting hypoxanthine concentration in the cancer cells through XO activation, which may lead to lowered salvage pathway activity necessary for the cancer cells to proliferate in the cancerous colon tissue. Some foods like soybean, mistletoe and red clover may provide nutritional support to medical cancer therapy through inhibiting and/or activating key enzymes in cancer metabolism (Tab. 4, Ref. 33).

  6. A Study on the Serum Adenosine Deaminase Activity in Patients with Typhoid Fever and Other Febrile Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Ketavarapu, Sameera; Ramani G., Uma; Modi, Prabhavathi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) has been suggested to be an important enzyme which is associated with the cell mediated immunity, but its clinical significance in typhoid fever has not yet been characterized. The present study was taken up to evaluate the serum ADA activity in patients of typhoid fever. The levels of ADA were also measured in the patients who were suffering from other febrile illnesses. Material and Method: This was a case control study. The subjects who were included in this study were divided into 3 groups. Group A consisted of 50 normal healthy individuals who served as the controls. Group B consisted of 50 patients, both males and females of all age groups, who were suffering from culture positive typhoid fever. Group C consisted of 50 patients who were suffering from febrile illnesses other than typhoid fever like viral fever, gastro enteritis, malaria, tonsillitis, upper respiratory tract infections, etc. The serum levels of ADA were estimated in all the subjects who were under study. Results: The serum ADA level was found to be increased in the patients of typhoid fever as compared to that in those with other febrile illnesses and in the controls. Conclusion: From the present study, it can be concluded that there was a statistically significant increase in the serum ADA levels in the patients with typhoid. PMID:23730630

  7. Long-term expression of human adenosine deaminase in mice transplanted with retrovirus-infected hematopoietic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, B.; Apperley, J.F.; Orkin, S.H.; Williams, D.A. )

    1989-11-01

    Long-term stable expression of foreign genetic sequences transferred into hematopoietic stem cells by using retroviral vectors constitutes a relevant model for somatic gene therapy. Such stability of expression may depend on vector design, including the presence or absence of specific sequences within the vector, in combination with the nature and efficiency of infection of the hematopoietic target cells. The authors have previously reported successful transfer of human DNA encoding adenosine deaminase (ADA) into CFU-S (colony-forming unit-spleen) stem cells using simplified recombinant retroviral vectors. Human ADA was expressed in CFU-S-derived spleen colonies at levels near to endogenous enzyme. However, because of the lack of an efficient dominant selectable marker and low recombinant viral titers, stability of long-term expression of human ADA was not examined. They report here the development of an efficient method of infection of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) without reliance on in vitro selection. Peripheral blood samples of 100% of mice transplanted with HSC infected by this protocol exhibit expression of human ADA 30 days after transplantation. Some mice (6 of 13) continue to express human ADA in all lineages after complete hematopoietic reconstitution (4 months). The use of recombinant retroviral vectors that efficiently transfer human ADA cDNA into HSC leading to stable expression of functional ADA in reconstituted mice, provides an experimental framework for future development of approaches to somatic gene therapy.

  8. PEG-ADA: an alternative to haploidentical bone marrow transplantation and an adjunct to gene therapy for adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hershfield, M S

    1995-01-01

    PEG-ADA is a long-circulating form of adenosine deaminase (ADA) that has been in use for > 8 years as replacement therapy for severe combined immunodeficiency disease due to ADA deficiency. Treatment with PEG-ADA almost completely corrects metabolic abnormalities, allowing the recovery of a variable degree of immune function. Although not normal, the level of function achieved has in most cases been sufficient to protect against opportunistic and life-threatening infections. PEG-ADA has been used as an alternative for patients who lack an HLA-identical bone marrow donor, but are judged to be at too high a risk for undergoing HLA-haploidentical marrow transplantation. To date, mortality and morbidity with PEG-ADA have been less than for the latter procedure. PEG-ADA has also been an important adjunct to attempts to develop somatic cell gene therapy for ADA deficiency, although its continued use poses a problem for evaluation of the benefit of gene therapy. As a true "orphan drug" developed to treat a very small patient population, the cost per patient of PEG-ADA is very high.

  9. High-yield production of apoplast-directed human adenosine deaminase in transgenic tobacco BY-2 cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Singhabahu, Sanjeewa; George, John; Bringloe, David

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency, where a deleterious mutation in the ADA gene of patients results in a dysfunctional immune system, is ultimately caused by an absence of ADA. Over the last 25 years the disease has been treated with PEG-ADA, made from purified bovine ADA coupled with polyethylene glycol (PEG). However, it is thought that an enzyme replacement therapy protocol based on recombinant human ADA would probably be a more effective treatment. With this end in mind, a human ADA cDNA was inserted into plant expression vectors used to transform tobacco plant cell suspensions. Transgenic calli expressing constructs containing apoplast-directing signals showed significantly higher levels of recombinant ADA expression than calli transformed with cytosolic constructs. The most significant ADA activities, however, were measured in the media of transgenic cell suspensions prepared from high expressing transformed calli: where incorporation of a signal for arabinogalactan addition to ADA led to a recombinant protein yield of approximately 16 mg L(-1) , a 336-fold increase over ADA produced by cell suspensions transformed with a cytosolic construct.

  10. Activity of cholinesterases and adenosine deaminase in blood and serum of rats experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    DA SILVA, A S; PIMENTEL, V C; FIORENZA, A M; FRANÇA, R T; TONIN, A A; JAQUES, J A; LEAL, C A M; DA SILVA, C B; MORSCH, V; SCHETINGER, M R C; LOPES, S T A; MONTEIRO, S G

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the activity of cholinesterases and adenosine deaminase (ADA) in blood and serum of rats infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Twelve adult rats were used in the experiment divided into two uniform groups. Rodents from group A (control group) were non-infected and animals from group B served as infected, receiving intraperitoneally 3.3×107 trypomastigotes/each. Blood collection was performed at days 60 and 120 post-infection (PI) in order to evaluate the hemogram, blood activity of acetylcholinesterase, and serum butyrylcholinesterase and ADA activities. Hematological parameters did not differ between groups. A significant increase (P<0.05) of acetylcholinesterase activity was observed in blood while butyrylcholinesterase had a significant reduction (P<0.01) in serum of infected rats at days 60 and 120 PI. ADA activity in serum showed an inhibition in infected animals when compared to non-infected at day 120 PI. Based on these results, it is possible to conclude that the activity of cholinesterases and ADA were changed in animals infected with T. cruzi. The possible causes of these alterations will be discussed in this paper. PMID:21929880

  11. Gene therapy for adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency: clinical comparison of retroviral vectors and treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Candotti, Fabio; Shaw, Kit L; Muul, Linda; Carbonaro, Denise; Sokolic, Robert; Choi, Christopher; Schurman, Shepherd H; Garabedian, Elizabeth; Kesserwan, Chimene; Jagadeesh, G Jayashree; Fu, Pei-Yu; Gschweng, Eric; Cooper, Aaron; Tisdale, John F; Weinberg, Kenneth I; Crooks, Gay M; Kapoor, Neena; Shah, Ami; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Smogorzewska, Monika; Wayne, Alan S; Rosenblatt, Howard M; Davis, Carla M; Hanson, Celine; Rishi, Radha G; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Yang, Otto O; Balamurugan, Arumugam; Bauer, Gerhard; Ireland, Joanna A; Engel, Barbara C; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Hershfield, Michael S; Blaese, R Michael; Parkman, Robertson; Kohn, Donald B

    2012-11-01

    We conducted a gene therapy trial in 10 patients with adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency using 2 slightly different retroviral vectors for the transduction of patients' bone marrow CD34(+) cells. Four subjects were treated without pretransplantation cytoreduction and remained on ADA enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) throughout the procedure. Only transient (months), low-level (< 0.01%) gene marking was observed in PBMCs of 2 older subjects (15 and 20 years of age), whereas some gene marking of PBMC has persisted for the past 9 years in 2 younger subjects (4 and 6 years). Six additional subjects were treated using the same gene transfer protocol, but after withdrawal of ERT and administration of low-dose busulfan (65-90 mg/m(2)). Three of these remain well, off ERT (5, 4, and 3 years postprocedure), with gene marking in PBMC of 1%-10%, and ADA enzyme expression in PBMC near or in the normal range. Two subjects were restarted on ERT because of poor gene marking and immune recovery, and one had a subsequent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These studies directly demonstrate the importance of providing nonmyeloablative pretransplantation conditioning to achieve therapeutic benefits with gene therapy for ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency.

  12. Dietary Supplementation of Ginger and Turmeric Rhizomes Modulates Platelets Ectonucleotidase and Adenosine Deaminase Activities in Normotensive and Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, Ayodele Jacob; Thomé, Gustavo Roberto; Morsch, Vera Maria; Bottari, Nathieli B; Baldissarelli, Jucimara; de Oliveira, Lizielle Souza; Goularte, Jeferson Ferraz; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Oboh, Ganiyu; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is associated with platelet alterations that could contribute to the development of cardiovascular complications. Several studies have reported antiplatelet aggregation properties of ginger (Zingiber officinale) and turmeric (Curcuma longa) with limited scientific basis. Hence, this study assessed the effect of dietary supplementation of these rhizomes on platelet ectonucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities in Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME) induced hypertensive rats. Animals were divided into seven groups (n = 10): normotensive control rats; induced (l-NAME hypertensive) rats; hypertensive rats treated with atenolol (10 mg/kg/day); normotensive and hypertensive rats treated with 4% supplementation of turmeric or ginger, respectively. After 14 days of pre-treatment, the animals were induced with hypertension by oral administration of l-NAME (40 mg/kg/day). The results revealed a significant (p < 0.05) increase in platelet ADA activity and ATP hydrolysis with a concomitant decrease in ADP and AMP hydrolysis of l-NAME hypertensive rats when compared with the control. However, dietary supplementation with turmeric or ginger efficiently prevented these alterations by modulating the hydrolysis of ATP, ADP and AMP with a concomitant decrease in ADA activity. Thus, these activities could suggest some possible mechanism of the rhizomes against hypertension-derived complications associated to platelet hyperactivity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Circulating type 1 vaccine-derived poliovirus may evolve under the pressure of adenosine deaminases acting on RNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhan; Ma, Tengfei; Liu, Jianzhu; Zhao, Xiaona; Cheng, Ziqiang; Guo, Huijun; Xu, Ruixue; Wang, Shujing

    2015-01-01

    Poliovirus, the causative agent of poliomyelitis, is a human enterovirus and member of the Picornaviridae family. An effective live-attenuated poliovirus vaccine strain (Sabin 1) has been developed and has protected humans from polio. However, a few cases of vaccine virulence reversion have been documented in several countries. For instance, circulating type 1 vaccine-derived poliovirus is a highly pathogenic poliovirus that evolved from an avirulent strain, but the mechanism by which vaccine strains undergo reversion remains unclear. In this study, vaccine strains exhibited A to G/U to C and G to A/C to U hypermutations in the reversed evolution of Sabin 1. Furthermore, the mutation ratios of U to C and C to U were higher than those of other mutation types. Dinucleotide editing context was then analyzed. Results showed that A to G and U to C mutations exhibited preferences similar to adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR). Hence, ADARs may participate in poliovirus vaccine evolution.

  14. Novel deletion and a new missense mutation (Glu 217 Lys) at the catalytic site in two adenosine deaminase alleles of a patient with neonatal onset adenosine deaminase severe combined immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, R.; Nicknam, M.N.; Eng, F.; Yang, D.R.; Borkowsky, W. )

    1992-11-01

    Mutations at the adenosine deaminase (ADA) locus result in a spectrum of disorders, encompassing a fulminant neonatal onset severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and childhood onset immunodeficiency, as well as apparently normal immune function. The extent of accumulation of the toxic metabolite, deoxyATP, correlates directly with severity of disease. The authors have now determined the mutations on both alleles of a child with fulminant, neonatal onset ADA SCID and accumulation of extremely high concentrations of deoxyATP. The genotype was consistent with the severely affected phenotype. One allele carried a large deletion that arose by non-homologous recombination and included the first five exons and promoter region. The second allele carried a missense mutation (G[sup 649]A) resulting in replacement of Glu[sup 217], an amino acid involved in the catalytic site, by Lys and predicting a major alteration in charge. Expression of the mutant cDNA on Cos cells confirmed that the mutation abolished enzyme activity. The authors have previously reported that a missense mutation at the preceding codon is similarly associated with neonatal onset ADA SCID and accumulation of extremely high deoxyATP. These findings suggest that genotype-phenotype correlations may be apparent for ADA SCID, despite the role that random variation in exposure to environmental pathogens may play in the initial phenotype. Such genotype-phenotype correlations may be important to consider in evaluating results of ongoing trials of [open quotes]gene[close quotes] and enzyme replacement therapy. 50 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Effect of a chemical modification on the hydrated adenosine intermediate produced by adenosine deaminase and a model reaction for a potential mechanism of action of 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Groziak, M P; Huan, Z W; Ding, H; Meng, Z; Stevens, W C; Robinson, P D

    1997-10-10

    Using the hydrated adenosine intermediate (6R)-6-amino-1, 6-dihydro-6-hydroxy-9-(beta-D-ribofuranosyl)purine (2) produced by adenosine deaminase (ADA, EC 3.5.4.4) as a starting point, the active site probe and inhibitor platform 5-(formylamino)imidazole riboside (FAIRs, 4) was designed by removal of the-C6(OH)(NH2)-molecular fragment of 2 generated by the early events of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis. FAIRs was synthesized directly from the sodium salt of 5-amino-1-(beta-D-ribofuranosyl)imidazole-4-carboxylic acid (CAIR) along a reaction sequence involving a tandem N-formylation/decarboxylation that may have a mechanistic connection to the Escherichia coli purE-catalyzed constitutional isomerization of N5-CAIR to CAIR. The physical and spectral properties of FAIRs were elucidated, its X-ray crystal and NMR solution structures were determined, and its interaction with ADA was investigated. Crystalline FAIRs exists solely as the Z-formamide rotamer and exhibits many of the same intramolecular hydrogen bonding events known to contribute to the association of Ado to ADA. In water and various organic solvents, however, FAIRs exists as NMR-distinct, slowly interconverting Z and E rotamers. This truncated enzymatic tetrahedral intermediate analog was determined to be a competitive inhibitor of ADA with an apparent Ki binding constant of 40 microM, a value quite close to that (33 microM) of the natural substrate's K(m). The actual species selected for binding by ADA, though, is likely the minor hydroxyimino prototropic form of Z-FAIRs possessing a far lower true Ki value. As the structural features of FAIRs appear well-suited to support its use as a template for constructing active site probes of both ADA and AIR carboxylases, a variety of carbohydrate-protected versions of FAIRs suitable for facile aglycon elaborations were synthesized. The N3-alkylation, N3-borane complexation, and C4-iodination of some of these were investigated in order to assess physicochemical

  16. Characterization of a gene coding for a putative adenosine deaminase-related growth factor by RNA interference in the basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Shuichi; Yamada, Masato; Shibata, Kou; Okuhara, Toru; Yoshida, Masumi; Inatomi, Satoshi; Taguchi, Goro; Shimosaka, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    A full-length cDNA coding for a putative adenosine deaminase (Fv-ada) was isolated from the basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes. Fv-ada encodes a polypeptide consisting of 537 amino acid residues, which has a consensus sequence conserved among adenosine deaminase-related growth factors (ADGF) found in several metazoa, including chordates and insects. Fv-ada transcript was detected at all stages of growth in dikaryotic F. velutipes cells, with a peak at the primordial stage. Heterologous expression of Fv-ada in the yeast Pichia pastoris produced recombinant Fv-ADA that catalyzed the conversion of adenosine to inosine. Dikaryotic mycelia from F. velutipes were transformed with the binary plasmid pFungiway-Fv-ada, which was designed to suppress the expression of Fv-ada through RNA interference. The growth rates of the resulting transformants were retarded in response to the degree of suppression, indicating that Fv-ada plays an important role in the mycelial growth of F. velutipes. These results suggested that ADGF could function as growth factors in fungi, as is seen in other eukaryotes.

  17. Update on the safety and efficacy of retroviral gene therapy for immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cicalese, Maria Pia; Ferrua, Francesca; Castagnaro, Laura; Pajno, Roberta; Barzaghi, Federica; Giannelli, Stefania; Dionisio, Francesca; Brigida, Immacolata; Bonopane, Marco; Casiraghi, Miriam; Tabucchi, Antonella; Carlucci, Filippo; Grunebaum, Eyal; Adeli, Mehdi; Bredius, Robbert G.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Stepensky, Polina; Tezcan, Ilhan; Rolfe, Katie; De Boever, Erika; Reinhardt, Rickey R.; Appleby, Jonathan; Ciceri, Fabio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare, autosomal-recessive systemic metabolic disease characterized by severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). The treatment of choice for ADA-deficient SCID (ADA-SCID) is hematopoietic stem cell transplant from an HLA-matched sibling donor, although <25% of patients have such a donor available. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) partially and temporarily relieves immunodeficiency. We investigated the medium-term outcome of gene therapy (GT) in 18 patients with ADA-SCID for whom an HLA-identical family donor was not available; most were not responding well to ERT. Patients were treated with an autologous CD34+-enriched cell fraction that contained CD34+ cells transduced with a retroviral vector encoding the human ADA complementary DNA sequence (GSK2696273) as part of single-arm, open-label studies or compassionate use programs. Overall survival was 100% over 2.3 to 13.4 years (median, 6.9 years). Gene-modified cells were stably present in multiple lineages throughout follow up. GT resulted in a sustained reduction in the severe infection rate from 1.17 events per person-year to 0.17 events per person-year (n = 17, patient 1 data not available). Immune reconstitution was demonstrated by normalization of T-cell subsets (CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+), evidence of thymopoiesis, and sustained T-cell proliferative capacity. B-cell function was evidenced by immunoglobulin production, decreased intravenous immunoglobulin use, and antibody response after vaccination. All 18 patients reported infections as adverse events; infections of respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts were reported most frequently. No events indicative of leukemic transformation were reported. Trial details were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00598481. PMID:27129325

  18. Preclinical demonstration of lentiviral vector-mediated correction of immunological and metabolic abnormalities in models of adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Carbonaro, Denise A; Zhang, Lin; Jin, Xiangyang; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia; Geiger, Sabine; Carmo, Marlene; Cooper, Aaron; Fairbanks, Lynette; Kaufman, Michael L; Sebire, Neil J; Hollis, Roger P; Blundell, Michael P; Senadheera, Shantha; Fu, Pei-Yu; Sahaghian, Arineh; Chan, Rebecca Y; Wang, Xiaoyan; Cornetta, Kenneth; Thrasher, Adrian J; Kohn, Donald B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2014-03-01

    Gene transfer into autologous hematopoietic stem cells by γ-retroviral vectors (gRV) is an effective treatment for adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). However, current gRV have significant potential for insertional mutagenesis as reported in clinical trials for other primary immunodeficiencies. To improve the efficacy and safety of ADA-SCID gene therapy (GT), we generated a self-inactivating lentiviral vector (LV) with a codon-optimized human cADA gene under the control of the short form elongation factor-1α promoter (LV EFS ADA). In ADA(-/-) mice, LV EFS ADA displayed high-efficiency gene transfer and sufficient ADA expression to rescue ADA(-/-) mice from their lethal phenotype with good thymic and peripheral T- and B-cell reconstitution. Human ADA-deficient CD34(+) cells transduced with 1-5 × 10(7) TU/ml had 1-3 vector copies/cell and expressed 1-2x of normal endogenous levels of ADA, as assayed in vitro and by transplantation into immune-deficient mice. Importantly, in vitro immortalization assays demonstrated that LV EFS ADA had significantly less transformation potential compared to gRV vectors, and vector integration-site analysis by nrLAM-PCR of transduced human cells grown in immune-deficient mice showed no evidence of clonal skewing. These data demonstrated that the LV EFS ADA vector can effectively transfer the human ADA cDNA and promote immune and metabolic recovery, while reducing the potential for vector-mediated insertional mutagenesis.

  19. Update on the safety and efficacy of retroviral gene therapy for immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cicalese, Maria Pia; Ferrua, Francesca; Castagnaro, Laura; Pajno, Roberta; Barzaghi, Federica; Giannelli, Stefania; Dionisio, Francesca; Brigida, Immacolata; Bonopane, Marco; Casiraghi, Miriam; Tabucchi, Antonella; Carlucci, Filippo; Grunebaum, Eyal; Adeli, Mehdi; Bredius, Robbert G; Puck, Jennifer M; Stepensky, Polina; Tezcan, Ilhan; Rolfe, Katie; De Boever, Erika; Reinhardt, Rickey R; Appleby, Jonathan; Ciceri, Fabio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2016-07-07

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare, autosomal-recessive systemic metabolic disease characterized by severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). The treatment of choice for ADA-deficient SCID (ADA-SCID) is hematopoietic stem cell transplant from an HLA-matched sibling donor, although <25% of patients have such a donor available. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) partially and temporarily relieves immunodeficiency. We investigated the medium-term outcome of gene therapy (GT) in 18 patients with ADA-SCID for whom an HLA-identical family donor was not available; most were not responding well to ERT. Patients were treated with an autologous CD34(+)-enriched cell fraction that contained CD34(+) cells transduced with a retroviral vector encoding the human ADA complementary DNA sequence (GSK2696273) as part of single-arm, open-label studies or compassionate use programs. Overall survival was 100% over 2.3 to 13.4 years (median, 6.9 years). Gene-modified cells were stably present in multiple lineages throughout follow up. GT resulted in a sustained reduction in the severe infection rate from 1.17 events per person-year to 0.17 events per person-year (n = 17, patient 1 data not available). Immune reconstitution was demonstrated by normalization of T-cell subsets (CD3(+), CD4(+), and CD8(+)), evidence of thymopoiesis, and sustained T-cell proliferative capacity. B-cell function was evidenced by immunoglobulin production, decreased intravenous immunoglobulin use, and antibody response after vaccination. All 18 patients reported infections as adverse events; infections of respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts were reported most frequently. No events indicative of leukemic transformation were reported. Trial details were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00598481.

  20. Seed specific expression and analysis of recombinant human adenosine deaminase (hADA) in three host plant species.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Ketan M; Loukanina, Natalia N; Polowick, Patricia L; Holbrook, Larry A

    2016-10-01

    The plant seed is a leading platform amongst plant-based storage systems for the production of recombinant proteins. In this study, we compared the activity of human adenosine deaminase (hADA) expressed in transgenic seeds of three different plant species: pea (Pisum sativum L.), Nicotiana benthamiana L. and tarwi (Lupinus mutabilis Sweet). All three species were transformed with the same expression vector containing the hADA gene driven by the seed-specific promoter LegA2 with an apoplast targeting pinII signal peptide. During the study, several independent transgenic lines were generated and screened from each plant species and only lines with a single copy of the gene of interest were used for hADA expression analysis. A stable transgenic canola line expressing the ADA protein, under the control of 35S constitutive promoter was used as both as a positive control and for comparative study with the seed specific promoter. Significant differences were detected in the expression of hADA. The highest activity of the hADA enzyme (Units/g seed) was reported in tarwi (4.26 U/g) followed by pea (3.23 U/g) and Nicotiana benthamiana (1.69 U/g). The expression of mouse ADA in canola was very low in both seed and leaf tissue compared to other host plants, confirming higher activity of seed specific promoter. Altogether, these results suggest that tarwi could be an excellent candidate for the production of valuable recombinant proteins.

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESAT6 and CPF10 Induce Adenosine Deaminase 2 mRNA Expression in Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Mi Jung; Ryu, Suyeon; Kim, Ha-Jeong; Cha, Seung Ick

    2017-01-01

    Background Delayed hypersensitivity plays a large role in the pathogenesis of tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE). Macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) increase the levels of adenosine deaminase2 (ADA2) in the pleural fluid of TPE patients. However, it is as yet unclear whether ADA2 can be produced by macrophages when challenged with MTB antigens alone. This study therefore evaluated the levels of ADA2 mRNA expression, using monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) stimulated with MTB antigens. Methods Purified monocytes from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers were differentiated into macrophages using granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The MDMs were stimulated with early secretory antigenic target protein 6 (ESAT6) and culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP10). The mRNA expression levels for the cat eye syndrome chromosome region, candidate 1 (CECR1) gene encoding ADA2 were then measured. Results CECR1 mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in MDMs stimulated with ESAT6 and CFP10, than in the unstimulated MDMs. When stimulated with ESAT6, M-CSF-treated MDMs showed more pronounced CECR1 mRNA expression than GM-CSF-treated MDMs. Interferon-γ decreased the ESAT6- and CFP10-induced CECR1 mRNA expression in MDMs. CECR1 mRNA expression levels were positively correlated with mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 10, respectively. Conclusion ADA2 mRNA expression increased when MDMs were stimulated with MTB antigens alone. This partly indicates that pleural fluid ADA levels could increase in patients with culture-negative TPE. Our results may be helpful in improving the understanding of TPE pathogenesis. PMID:28119750

  2. RNA editing enzyme adenosine deaminase is a restriction factor for controlling measles virus replication that also is required for embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Simone V.; George, Cyril X.; Welch, Megan J.; Liou, Li-Ying; Hahm, Bumsuk; Lewicki, Hanna; de la Torre, Juan C.; Samuel, Charles E.; Oldstone, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Measles virus (MV), a member of the family Paramyxoviridae and an exclusively human pathogen, is among the most infectious viruses. A progressive fatal neurodegenerative complication, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), occurs during persistent MV infection of the CNS and is associated with biased hypermutations of the viral genome. The observed hypermutations of A-to-G are consistent with conversions catalyzed by the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR1). To evaluate the role of ADAR1 in MV infection, we selectively disrupted expression of the IFN-inducible p150 ADAR1 isoform and found it caused embryonic lethality at embryo day (E) 11–E12. We therefore generated p150-deficient and WT mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells stably expressing the MV receptor signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM or CD150). The p150−/− but not WT MEF cells displayed extensive syncytium formation and cytopathic effect (CPE) following infection with MV, consistent with an anti-MV role of the p150 isoform of ADAR1. MV titers were 3 to 4 log higher in p150−/− cells compared with WT cells at 21 h postinfection, and restoration of ADAR1 in p150−/− cells prevented MV cytopathology. In contrast to infection with MV, p150 disruption had no effect on vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus replication but protected against CPE resulting from infection with Newcastle disease virus, Sendai virus, canine distemper virus, and influenza A virus. Thus, ADAR1 is a restriction factor in the replication of paramyxoviruses and orthomyxoviruses. PMID:21173229

  3. Global regulation of alternative splicing by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR).

    PubMed

    Solomon, Oz; Oren, Shirley; Safran, Michal; Deshet-Unger, Naamit; Akiva, Pinchas; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Cesarkas, Karen; Kabesa, Reut; Amariglio, Ninette; Unger, Ron; Rechavi, Gideon; Eyal, Eran

    2013-05-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is a major mechanism for gene regulation and transcriptome diversity. Despite the extent of the phenomenon, the regulation and specificity of the splicing machinery are only partially understood. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing of pre-mRNA by ADAR enzymes has been linked to splicing regulation in several cases. Here we used bioinformatics approaches, RNA-seq and exon-specific microarray of ADAR knockdown cells to globally examine how ADAR and its A-to-I RNA editing activity influence alternative mRNA splicing. Although A-to-I RNA editing only rarely targets canonical splicing acceptor, donor, and branch sites, it was found to affect splicing regulatory elements (SREs) within exons. Cassette exons were found to be significantly enriched with A-to-I RNA editing sites compared with constitutive exons. RNA-seq and exon-specific microarray revealed that ADAR knockdown in hepatocarcinoma and myelogenous leukemia cell lines leads to global changes in gene expression, with hundreds of genes changing their splicing patterns in both cell lines. This global change in splicing pattern cannot be explained by putative editing sites alone. Genes showing significant changes in their splicing pattern are frequently involved in RNA processing and splicing activity. Analysis of recently published RNA-seq data from glioblastoma cell lines showed similar results. Our global analysis reveals that ADAR plays a major role in splicing regulation. Although direct editing of the splicing motifs does occur, we suggest it is not likely to be the primary mechanism for ADAR-mediated regulation of alternative splicing. Rather, this regulation is achieved by modulating trans-acting factors involved in the splicing machinery.

  4. Synthesis of conformationally locked carbocyclic 1,3-diazepinone nucleosides as inhibitors of cytidine deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Ludek, Olaf R.; Schroeder, Gottfried K.; Wolfenden, Richard; Marquez, Victor E.

    2009-01-01

    We synthesized a series of carbocyclic nucleoside inhibitors of cytidine deaminase (CDA) based on a seven-membered 1,3-diazepin-2-one moiety. In the key step, the seven-membered ring was formed by a ringclosing- metathesis reaction. Therefore, the bis-allylurea moiety had to be protected by benzoylation in order to obtain an orientation suitable for ring closure. To our surprise, the analogue built on a flexible sugar template (4) showed a 100-fold stronger inhibition of CDA than the derivative with the preferred southconformation. PMID:18776552

  5. Tad1p, a yeast tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase, is related to the mammalian pre-mRNA editing enzymes ADAR1 and ADAR2.

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, A; Grosjean, H; Melcher, T; Keller, W

    1998-01-01

    We have identified an RNA-specific adenosine deaminase (termed Tad1p/scADAT1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that selectively converts adenosine at position 37 of eukaryotic tRNAAla to inosine. The activity of purified recombinant Tad1p depends on the conformation of its tRNA substrate and the enzyme was found to be inactive on all other types of RNA tested. Mutant strains in which the TAD1 gene is disrupted are viable but lack Tad1p enzyme activity and their tRNAAla is not modified at position A37. Transformation of the mutant cells with the TAD1 gene restored enzyme activity. Tad1p has significant sequence similarity with the mammalian editing enzymes which act on specific precursor-mRNAs and on long double-stranded RNA. These findings suggest an evolutionary link between pre-mRNA editing and tRNA modification. PMID:9707437

  6. An interaction between glucagon-like peptide-1 and adenosine contributes to cardioprotection of a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor from myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Madoka; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Satoru; Kato, Hisakazu; Asano, Yoshihiro; Shinozaki, Yoshihiro; Mori, Hidezo; Minamino, Tetsuo; Asakura, Masanori; Sugimachi, Masaru; Mochizuki, Naoki; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2015-05-15

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors suppress the metabolism of the potent antihyperglycemic hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). DPP4 was recently shown to provide cardioprotection through a reduction of infarct size, but the mechanism for this remains elusive. Known interactions between DPP4 and adenosine deaminase (ADA) suggest an involvement of adenosine signaling in DPP4 inhibitor-mediated cardioprotection. We tested whether the protective mechanism of the DPP4 inhibitor alogliptin against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury involves GLP-1- and/or adenosine-dependent signaling in canine hearts. In anesthetized dogs, the coronary artery was occluded for 90 min followed by reperfusion for 6 h. A 4-day pretreatment with alogliptin reduced the infarct size from 43.1 ± 2.5% to 17.1 ± 5.0% without affecting collateral flow and hemodynamic parameters, indicating a potent antinecrotic effect. Alogliptin also suppressed apoptosis as demonstrated by the following analysis: 1) reduction in the Bax-to-Bcl2 ratio; 2) cytochrome c release, 3) an increase in Bad phosphorylation in the cytosolic fraction; and 4) terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. This DPP4 inhibitor did not affect blood ADA activity or adenosine concentrations. In contrast, the nonselective adenosine receptor blocker 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline (8SPT) completely blunted the effect of alogliptin. Alogliptin did not affect Erk1/2 phosphorylation, but it did stimulate phosphorylation of Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3β, and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Only 8SPT prevented alogliptin-induced CREB phosphorylation. In conclusion, the DPP4 inhibitor alogliptin suppresses ischemia-reperfusion injury via adenosine receptor- and CREB-dependent signaling pathways.

  7. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of A-286501, a novel orally active adenosine kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Michael F; Yu, Haixia; McGaraughty, Steve; Wismer, Carol T; Mikusa, Joe; Zhu, Chang; Chu, Katharine; Kohlhaas, Kathy; Cowart, Marlon; Lee, Chih Hung; Stewart, Andrew O; Cox, Bryan F; Polakowski, James; Kowaluk, Elizabeth A

    2002-03-01

    Adenosine (ADO) is an inhibitory neuromodulator that can increase nociceptive thresholds in response to noxious stimulation. Inhibition of the ADO-metabolizing enzyme, adenosine kinase (AK) increases extracellular ADO concentrations at sites of tissue trauma and AK inhibitors may have therapeutic potential as analgesic and anti-inflammatory agents. N7-((1'R,2'S,3'R,4'S)-2',3'-dihydroxy-4'-amino-cyclopentyl)-4-amino-5-bromo-pyrrolo[2,3-a]pyrimidine (A-286501) is a novel and potent (IC50=0.47 nM) carbocyclic nucleoside AK inhibitor that has no significant activity (IC50 >100 microM) at other sites of ADO interaction (A1, A2A, A3 receptors, ADO transporter, and ADO deaminase) or other (IC50 value >10 microM) neurotransmitter and peptide receptors, ion channel proteins, neurotransmitter reuptake sites and enzymes, including cyclooxygenases-1 and -2. A-286501 showed equivalent potency to inhibit AK from several mammalian species and kinetic studies revealed that A-286501 was a reversible and competitive inhibitor with respect to ADO and non-competitive with respect to MgATP2-. A-286501 was orally effective to reduce nociception in animal models of acute (thermal), inflammatory (formalin and carrageenan), and neuropathic (L5/L6 nerve ligation and streptozotocin-induced diabetic) pain. A-286501 was particularly potent (ED50=1 micromol/kg, p.o.) to reduce carrageenan-induced inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia as compared to its analgesic actions in other pain models (acute and neuropathic) and its ability to alter hemodynamic function and motor performance. A-286501 was also effective to reduce carrageenan-induced paw edema and myeloperoxidase activity, a measure of neutrophil influx (ED50=10 micromol/kg, p.o.), in the injured paw. The anti-nociceptive effects of A-286501 in the L5/L6 nerve injury model of neuropathic pain (ED50=20 micromol/kg, p.o.) were not blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone, but were blocked by the ADO receptor antagonist, theophylline. Following

  8. Editing of glutamate receptor B subunit ion channel RNAs by four alternatively spliced DRADA2 double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminases.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, F; Chen, C X; Carter, K C; Nishikura, K

    1997-01-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA-specific adenosine deaminase converts adenosine residues into inosines in dsRNA and edits transcripts of certain cellular and viral genes such as glutamate receptor (GluR) subunits and hepatitis delta antigen. The first member of this type of deaminase, DRADA1, has been recently cloned based on the amino acid sequence information derived from biochemically purified proteins. Our search for DRADA1-like genes through expressed sequence tag databases led to the cloning of the second member of this class of enzyme, DRADA2, which has a high degree of sequence homology to DRADA1 yet exhibits a distinctive RNA editing site selectivity. There are four differentially spliced isoforms of human DRADA2. These different isoforms of recombinant DRADA2 proteins, including one which is a human homolog of the recently reported rat RED1, were analyzed in vitro for their GluR B subunit (GluR-B) RNA editing site selectivity. As originally reported for rat RED1, the DRADA2a and -2b isoforms edit GluR-B RNA efficiently at the so-called Q/R site, whereas DRADA1 barely edits this site. In contrast, the R/G site of GluR-B RNA was edited efficiently by the DRADA2a and -2b isoforms as well as DRADA1. Isoforms DRADA2c and -2d, which have a distinctive truncated shorter C-terminal structure, displayed weak adenosine-to-inosine conversion activity but no editing activity tested at three known sites of GluR-B RNA. The possible role of these DRADA2c and -2d isoforms in the regulatory mechanism of RNA editing is discussed. PMID:9111310

  9. Genome organization and transcriptional regulation of Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA gene 1 (ADAR1) in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhicheng; Wang, Binhua; Liu, Yong; Liu, Xiancheng; Mi, Yichuan; Gu, Meihui; Wang, Fang; Wu, Chuxin; Hu, Chengyu

    2015-06-01

    ADAR1, involved in A-to-I RNA editing, belongs to adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) family. A-to-I RNA editing is the most widespread editing phenomenon in higher eukaryotes. In the present study, we cloned and identified the full-length cDNA, complete genomic sequence and the promoter sequence of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) ADAR1 (CiADAR1) by homology cloning strategy and genome walking. CiADAR1 full-length cDNA is comprised of a 5'UTR (43  bp), a 3'UTR (229 bp) and a 4179 bp ORF encoding a polypeptide of 1392 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of CiADAR1 contains two Z-DNA binding domains, three dsRNA binding motifs and a conserved catalytic domain. The complete genomic CiADAR1 has 16 exons and 15 introns. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that CiADAR1 shared high homology with Danio rerio ADAR1 (DrADAR1). RT-PCR showed that CiADAR1 were ubiquitously expressed and significantly up-regulated after stimulation with poly I:C. In spleen and liver, CiADAR1 mRNA reached the peak at 12 h and maintained the highest level during 12-24 h post-injection. CiADAR1 promoter was found to be 1102 bp in length and divided into two distinct regions, the proximal region containing three putative interferon regulatory factor binding elements (IRF-E) and the distal region containing only one IRF-E. To further study the transcriptional regulatory mechanism of CiADAR1, grass carp IRF1 (CiIRF1) and IRF3 (CiIRF3) were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and purified by affinity chromatography with the Ni-NTA His-Bind resin. Then, gel mobility shift assay was employed to analyze the affinity of CiADAR1 promoter sequence with CiIRF1 and CiIRF3 in vitro. The result revealed that CiIRF1 and CiIRF3 bound to CiADAR1 promoter with high affinity, indicating that IRF1 and IRF3 could be the potential transcriptional regulatory factor for CiADAR1. Co-transfection of pcDNA3.1-IRF1 (or pcDNA3.1-IRF3) with pGL3-CiADAR1 into C. idella kidney (CIK) cells showed that both

  10. Spectroscopy and computational studies on the interaction of octyl, dodecyl, and hexadecyl derivatives of anionic and cationic surfactants with adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Ajloo, Davood; Mahmoodabadi, Najmeh; Ghadamgahi, Maryam; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2016-07-01

    Effects of sodium (octyl, dodecyl, hexadecyl) sulfate and their cationic analogous on the structure of adenosine deaminase (ADA) were investigated by fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy as well as molecular dynamics simulation and docking calculation. Root-mean-square derivations, radius of gyration, solvent accessible surface area, and radial distribution function were obtained. The results showed that anionic and cationic surfactants reduce protein stability. Cationic surfactants have more effect on the ADA structure in comparison with anionic surfactants. More concentration and longer surfactants are parallel to higher denaturation. Furthermore, aggregation in the presence of anionic surfactants is more than cationic surfactants. Docking data showed that longer surfactants have more interaction energy and smaller ones bound to the active site.

  11. T-cell lines from 2 patients with adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency showed the restoration of ADA activity resulted from the reversion of an inherited mutation.

    PubMed

    Ariga, T; Oda, N; Yamaguchi, K; Kawamura, N; Kikuta, H; Taniuchi, S; Kobayashi, Y; Terada, K; Ikeda, H; Hershfield, M S; Kobayashi, K; Sakiyama, Y

    2001-05-01

    Inherited deficiency of adenosine deaminase (ADA) results in one of the autosomal recessive forms of severe combined immunodeficiency. This report discusses 2 patients with ADA deficiency from different families, in whom a possible reverse mutation had occurred. The novel mutations were identified in the ADA gene from the patients, and both their parents were revealed to be carriers. Unexpectedly, established patient T-cell lines, not B-cell lines, showed half-normal levels of ADA enzyme activity. Reevaluation of the mutations in these T-cell lines indicated that one of the inherited ADA gene mutations was reverted in both patients. At least one of the patients seemed to possess the revertant cells in vivo; however, the mutant cells might have overcome the revertant after receiving ADA enzyme replacement therapy. These findings may have significant implications regarding the prospects for stem cell gene therapy for ADA deficiency.

  12. Ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (E-NPP) and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities in prostate cancer patients: influence of Gleason score, treatment and bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Vanessa; Maders, Liési D K; Bagatini, Margarete D; Battisti, Iara E; Bellé, Luziane P; Santos, Karen F; Maldonado, Paula A; Thomé, Gustavo R; Schetinger, Maria R C; Morsch, Vera M

    2013-04-01

    The relation between adenine nucleotides and cancer has already been described in literature. Considering that the enzymes ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (E-NPP) and adenosine deaminase (ADA) act together to control nucleotide levels, we aimed to investigate the role of these enzymes in prostate cancer (PCa). E-NPP and ADA activities were determined in serum and platelets of PCa patients and controls. We also verified the influence of the Gleason score, bone metastasis and treatment in the enzyme activities. Platelets and serum E-NPP activity increased, whereas ADA activity in serum decreased in PCa patients. In addition, Gleason score, metastasis and treatment influenced E-NPP and ADA activities. We may propose that E-NPP and ADA are involved in the development of PCa. Moreover, E-NPP and ADA activities are modified in PCa patients with distinct Gleason score, with bone metastasis, as well as in patients under treatment.

  13. A 30-year-old female Behçet’s disease patient with recurrent pleural and pericardial effusion and elevated adenosine deaminase levels: case report

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Kwok, Seung-Ki; Jung, Jung Im; Lee, Kyo-Young; Kim, Tae-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Behçet’s disease is a systemic disease which may involve various organs. We describe a case of a patient diagnosed as pleuropericardial involvement of Behçet’s disease. A 30-year-old woman visited our clinic presented with left pleuritic chest pain for s days. She had been diagnosed as Behçet’s disease and admitted to our clinic due to pericardial and pleural effusion repeatedly in past two years. In the previous studies, effusion analysis revealed to be lympho-dominant exudate with high adenosine deaminase level. Acid-fast bacilli (AFB) culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for mycobacterial tuberculosis (M.TB) were negative in the pericardial tissue, and pathologic finding showed mild endothelitis with micro-thrombi formation in the lumen. The patient had been treated with antituberculous medication for a year. In the current admission, chest computed tomography (CT) again showed left pleural effusion without other significant lesion. Pleural fluid analysis was similar with the previous study. Video-assisted thoracoscopic pleural biopsy was performed to obtain the definite diagnosis. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis as pleuropericardial involvement of Behçet’s disease, and we treated the patient with oral steroid in the out-patient department. Pleuropericardial involvement of Behçet’s disease may mimic TB pleurisy or pericarditis due to high adenosine deaminase (ADA) level in effusion analysis. Clinicians should keep in mind that Behçet’s disease may manifest as pleural or pericardial effusion, and pathologic confirmation could be helpful for the definite diagnosis. PMID:27499994

  14. Molecular characterization of adenosine 5'-monophosphate deaminase--the key enzyme responsible for the umami taste of nori (Porphyra yezoensis Ueda, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Minami, Seiko; Sato, Minoru; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro; Iwamoto, Koji

    2011-12-01

    The enzyme adenosine 5'-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD, EC 3.5.4.6) catalyzes the conversion of adenosine 5'-monophosphate to inosine 5'-mononucleotide (IMP). IMP is generally known as the compound responsible for the umami taste of the edible red alga Porphyra yezoensis Ueda that is known in Japan as nori. Therefore, we suspect that AMPD plays a key role in providing a favorable nori taste. In this study, we undertake the molecular characterization of nori-derived AMPD. The nori AMPD protein has a molecular mass of 55 kDa as estimated from both gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The calculated molecular mass from the amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA is 57.1 kDa. The isoelectric point is 5.71. The coding region of AMPD consists of 1,566 bp encoding 522 amino acids and possesses a transmembrane domain and two N-glycosylation sites. The sequence identity of nori AMPD in human and yeast AMPDs was found to be less than 50% and 20% in DNA and amino acid sequences, respectively. Proline in the conserved motif of [SA]-[LIVM]-[NGS]-[STA]-D-D-P was found to be converted to glutamate. These results indicate that nori AMPD is a novel type of AMPD.

  15. Halogenated pyrrolopyrimidine analogues of adenosine from marine organisms: pharmacological activities and potent inhibition of adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Davies, L P; Jamieson, D D; Baird-Lambert, J A; Kazlauskas, R

    1984-02-01

    Two novel halogenated pyrrolopyrimidine analogues of adenosine, isolated from marine sources, have been examined for pharmacological and biochemical activities. 4-Amino-5-bromo-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine, from a sponge of the genus Echinodictyum, had bronchodilator activity at least as potent as theophylline but with a different biochemical profile; unlike theophylline it had no antagonist activity at CNS adenosine receptors and it was quite a potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake and adenosine kinase in brain tissue. 5'-Deoxy-5-iodotubercidin, isolated from the red alga Hypnea valentiae, caused potent muscle relaxation and hypothermia when injected into mice. This compound was a very potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake into rat and guinea-pig brain slices and an extremely potent inhibitor of adenosine kinase from guinea-pig brain and rat brain and liver. Neither of these two pyrrolopyrimidine analogues was a substrate for, or an inhibitor of, adenosine deaminase. Neither compound appeared to have any direct agonist activity on guinea-pig brain adenosine-stimulated adenylate cyclase (A2 adenosine receptors). 5'-Deoxy-5-iodotubercidin is unique in two respects: it appears to be the first naturally-occurring example of a 5'-deoxyribosyl nucleoside and is the first example of a specifically iodinated nucleoside from natural sources. It may be the most potent adenosine kinase inhibitor yet described and, by virtue of its structure, may prove to be the most specific.

  16. Adenosine Deaminase That Acts on RNA 3 (ADAR3) Binding to Glutamate Receptor Subunit B Pre-mRNA Inhibits RNA Editing in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Eimile; Anderson, Ashley; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron; Hundley, Heather A

    2017-03-10

    RNA editing is a cellular process that precisely alters nucleotide sequences, thus regulating gene expression and generating protein diversity. Over 60% of human transcripts undergo adenosine to inosine RNA editing, and editing is required for normal development and proper neuronal function of animals. Editing of one adenosine in the transcript encoding the glutamate receptor subunit B, glutamate receptor ionotropic AMPA 2 (GRIA2), modifies a codon, replacing the genomically encoded glutamine (Q) with arginine (R); thus this editing site is referred to as the Q/R site. Editing at the Q/R site of GRIA2 is essential, and reduced editing of GRIA2 transcripts has been observed in patients suffering from glioblastoma. In glioblastoma, incorporation of unedited GRIA2 subunits leads to a calcium-permeable glutamate receptor, which can promote cell migration and tumor invasion. In this study, we identify adenosine deaminase that acts on RNA 3 (ADAR3) as an important regulator of Q/R site editing, investigate its mode of action, and detect elevated ADAR3 expression in glioblastoma tumors compared with adjacent brain tissue. Overexpression of ADAR3 in astrocyte and astrocytoma cell lines inhibits RNA editing at the Q/R site of GRIA2 Furthermore, the double-stranded RNA binding domains of ADAR3 are required for repression of RNA editing. As the Q/R site of GRIA2 is specifically edited by ADAR2, we suggest that ADAR3 directly competes with ADAR2 for binding to GRIA2 transcript, inhibiting RNA editing, as evidenced by the direct binding of ADAR3 to the GRIA2 pre-mRNA. Finally, we provide evidence that both ADAR2 and ADAR3 expression contributes to the relative level of GRIA2 editing in tumors from patients suffering from glioblastoma.

  17. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer for the potential therapy of adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency.

    PubMed

    Silver, Jared N; Elder, Melissa; Conlon, Thomas; Cruz, Pedro; Wright, Amy J; Srivastava, Arun; Flotte, Terence R

    2011-08-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare, potentially fatal pediatric disease, which results from mutations within the ADA gene, leading to metabolic abnormalities and ultimately profound immunologic and nonimmunologic defects. In this study, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors based on serotypes 1 and 9 were used to deliver a secretory version of the human ADA (hADA) gene to various tissues to promote immune reconstitution following enzyme expression in a mouse model of ADA deficiency. Here, we report that a single-stranded rAAV vector, pTR2-CB-Igκ-hADA, (1) facilitated successful gene delivery to multiple tissues, including heart, skeletal muscle, and kidney, (2) promoted ectopic expression of hADA, and (3) allowed enhanced serum-based enzyme activity over time. Moreover, the rAAV-hADA vector packaged in serotype 9 capsid drove partial, prolonged, and progressive immune reconstitution in ADA-deficient mice. Overview Summary Gene therapies for severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency (ADA-SCID) over two decades have exclusively involved retroviral vectors targeted to lymphocytes and hematopoietic progenitor cells. These groundbreaking gene therapies represented an unprecedented revolution in clinical medicine but in most cases did not fully correct the immune deficiency and came with the potential risk of insertional mutagenesis. Alternatively, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have gained attention as valuable tools for gene transfer, having demonstrated no pathogenicity in humans, minimal immunogenicity, long-term efficacy, ease of administration, and broad tissue tropism (Muzyczka, 1992 ; Flotte et al., 1993 ; Kessler et al., 1996 ; McCown et al., 1996 ; Lipkowitz et al., 1999 ; Marshall, 2001 ; Chen et al., 2003 ; Conlon and Flotte, 2004 ; Griffey et al., 2005 ; Pacak et al., 2006 ; Stone et al., 2008 ; Liu et al., 2009 ; Choi et al., 2010

  18. Different mechanisms of extracellular adenosine accumulation by reduction of the external Ca(2+) concentration and inhibition of adenosine metabolism in spinal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Ryota; Akao, Sanae; Otsuguro, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Ito, Shigeo

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a neuromodulator in the central nervous system. Astrocytes mainly participate in adenosine production, and extracellular adenosine accumulates under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Inhibition of intracellular adenosine metabolism and reduction of the external Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]e) participate in adenosine accumulation, but the precise mechanisms remain unclear. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying extracellular adenosine accumulation in cultured rat spinal astrocytes. The combination of adenosine kinase and deaminase (ADK/ADA) inhibition and a reduced [Ca(2+)]e increased the extracellular adenosine level. ADK/ADA inhibitors increased the level of extracellular adenosine but not of adenine nucleotides, which was suppressed by inhibition of equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 2. Unlike ADK/ADA inhibition, a reduced [Ca(2+)]e increased the extracellular level not only of adenosine but also of ATP. This adenosine increase was enhanced by ENT2 inhibition, and suppressed by sodium polyoxotungstate (ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase inhibitor). Gap junction inhibitors suppressed the increases in adenosine and adenine nucleotide levels by reduction of [Ca(2+)]e. These results indicate that extracellular adenosine accumulation by ADK/ADA inhibition is due to the adenosine release via ENT2, while that by reduction of [Ca(2+)]e is due to breakdown of ATP released via gap junction hemichannels, after which ENT2 incorporates adenosine into the cells.

  19. Pathologic findings in adenosine deaminase deficient-severe combined immunodeficiency. II. Thymus, spleen, lymph node, and gastrointestinal tract lymphoid tissue alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Ratech, H.; Hirschhorn, R.; Greco, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    Eight autopsies of patients with adenosine deaminase deficient-severe combined immunodeficiency disease (ADA-SCID) were reviewed with special emphasis on the lymphoid tissues. The thymus histology in five cases was remarkably uniform, whether or not prior ADA enzyme replacement or immunologic reconstitution therapy had been administered. Lymph nodes and spleens in all cases examined showed a residual nonlymphoid architectural framework corresponding to usual T and B cell zones found in normals. The development of an extranodal, monoclonal IgA lambda B cell immunoblastic lymphoma as a terminal event in one patient after several years of successful ADA enzyme replacement therapy through multiple red blood cell transfusions is described. In another patient with long-term ADA enzyme replacement, a terminal autoimmune hemolytic anemia developed. Autopsy revealed severe deposits of iron in the B cell zones of the lymph nodes, which is an unusual location. In addition, iron deposits outlined the splenic trabeculae, as well as the ring fibers and bridging fibers of the splenic sinuses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:2596574

  20. Molecular basis for paradoxical carriers of adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency that show extremely low levels of ADA activity in peripheral blood cells without immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Ariga, T; Oda, N; Sanstisteban, I; Arredondo-Vega, F X; Shioda, M; Ueno, H; Terada, K; Kobayashi, K; Hershfield, M S; Sakiyama, Y

    2001-02-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency causes an autosomal recessive form of severe combined immunodeficiency and also less severe phenotypes, depending to a large degree on genotype. In general, ADA activity in cells of carriers is approximately half-normal. Unexpectedly, healthy first-degree relatives of two unrelated ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficient patients (mother and brother in family I; mother in family II) had only 1-2% of normal ADA activity in PBMC, lower than has previously been found in PBMC of healthy individuals with so-called "partial ADA deficiency." The level of deoxyadenosine nucleotides in erythrocytes of these paradoxical carriers was slightly elevated, but much lower than levels found in immunodeficient patients with ADA deficiency. ADA activity in EBV-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and T cell lines established from these carriers was 10-20% of normal. Each of these carriers possessed two mutated ADA alleles. Expression of cloned mutant ADA cDNAs in an ADA-deletion strain of Escherichia coli indicated that the novel mutations G239S and M310T were responsible for the residual ADA activity. ADA activity in EBV-LCL extracts of the paradoxical carriers was much more labile than ADA from normal EBV-LCL. Immunoblotting suggested that this lability was due to denaturation rather than to degradation of the mutant protein. These results further define the threshold level of ADA activity necessary for sustaining immune function.

  1. Ex vivo gene therapy with lentiviral vectors rescues adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient mice and corrects their immune and metabolic defects.

    PubMed

    Mortellaro, Alessandra; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Guerrini, Matteo M; Carlucci, Filippo; Tabucchi, Antonella; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Sanvito, Francesca; Doglioni, Claudio; Di Serio, Clelia; Biasco, Luca; Follenzi, Antonia; Naldini, Luigi; Bordignon, Claudio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2006-11-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is caused by a purine metabolic dysfunction, leading to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and multiple organ damage. To investigate the efficacy of ex vivo gene therapy with self-inactivating lentiviral vectors (LVs) in correcting this complex phenotype, we used an ADA(-/-) mouse model characterized by early postnatal lethality. LV-mediated ADA gene transfer into bone marrow cells combined with low-dose irradiation rescued mice from lethality and restored their growth, as did transplantation of wild-type bone marrow. Mixed chimerism with multilineage engraftment of transduced cells was detected in the long term in animals that underwent transplantation. ADA activity was normalized in lymphocytes and partially corrected in red blood cells (RBCs), resulting in full metabolic detoxification and prevention of severe pulmonary insufficiency. Moreover, gene therapy restored normal lymphoid differentiation and immune functions, including antigen-specific antibody production. Similar degrees of detoxification and immune reconstitution were obtained in mice treated early after birth or after 1 month of enzyme-replacement therapy, mimicking 2 potential applications for ADA-SCID. Overall, this study demonstrates the efficacy of LV gene transfer in correcting both the immunological and metabolic phenotypes of ADA-SCID and supports the future clinical use of this approach.

  2. Activity of cholinesterases, pyruvate kinase and adenosine deaminase in rats experimentally infected by Fasciola hepatica: Influences of these enzymes on inflammatory response and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Baldissera, Matheus D; Bottari, Nathieli B; Mendes, Ricardo E; Schwertz, Claiton I; Lucca, Neuber J; Dalenogare, Diessica; Bochi, Guilherme V; Moresco, Rafael N; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria R C; Rech, Virginia C; Jaques, Jeandre A; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in total blood and liver tissue; butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in serum and liver tissue; adenosine deaminase (ADA) in serum and liver tissue; and pyruvate kinase (PK) in liver tissue of rats experimentally infected by Fasciola hepatica. Animals were divided into two groups with 12 animals each, as follows: group A (uninfected) and group B (infected). Samples were collected at 20 (A1 and B1;n=6 each) and 150 (A2 and B2; n=6 each) days post-infection (PI). Infected animals showed an increase in AChE activity in whole blood and a decrease in AChE activity in liver homogenates (P<0.05) at 20 and 150 days PI. BChE and PK activities were decreased (P<0.05) in serum and liver homogenates of infected animals at 150 days PI. ADA activity was decreased in serum at 20 and 150 days PI, while in liver homogenates it was only decreased at 150 days PI (P<0.05). Aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities in serum were increased (P<0.05), while concentrations of total protein and albumin were decreased (P<0.05) when compared to control. The histological analysis revealed fibrous perihepatitis and necrosis. Therefore, we conclude that the liver fluke is associated with cholinergic and purinergic dysfunctions, which in turn may influence the pathogenesis of the disease.

  3. Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency leads to long-term immunological recovery and metabolic correction.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, H Bobby; Cooray, Samantha; Gilmour, Kimberly C; Parsley, Kathryn L; Zhang, Fang; Adams, Stuart; Bjorkegren, Emma; Bayford, Jinhua; Brown, Lucinda; Davies, E Graham; Veys, Paul; Fairbanks, Lynette; Bordon, Victoria; Petropoulou, Theoni; Petropolou, Theoni; Kinnon, Christine; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-08-24

    Genetic defects in the purine salvage enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) lead to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with profound depletion of T, B, and natural killer cell lineages. Human leukocyte antigen-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers a successful treatment option. However, individuals who lack a matched donor must receive mismatched transplants, which are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for ADA-SCID is available, but the associated suboptimal correction of immunological defects leaves patients susceptible to infection. Here, six children were treated with autologous CD34-positive hematopoietic bone marrow stem and progenitor cells transduced with a conventional gammaretroviral vector encoding the human ADA gene. All patients stopped ERT and received mild chemotherapy before infusion of gene-modified cells. All patients survived, with a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 24 to 84 months). Four of the six patients recovered immune function as a result of engraftment of gene-corrected cells. In two patients, treatment failed because of disease-specific and technical reasons: Both restarted ERT and remain well. Of the four reconstituted patients, three remained off enzyme replacement. Moreover, three of these four patients discontinued immunoglobulin replacement, and all showed effective metabolic detoxification. All patients remained free of infection, and two cleared problematic persistent cytomegalovirus infection. There were no adverse leukemic side effects. Thus, gene therapy for ADA-SCID is safe, with effective immunological and metabolic correction, and may offer a viable alternative to conventional unrelated donor HSCT.

  4. Aqueous seed extract of Syzygium cumini inhibits the dipeptidyl peptidase IV and adenosine deaminase activities, but it does not change the CD26 expression in lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bellé, Luziane Potrich; Bitencourt, Paula Eliete Rodrigues; Abdalla, Faida Husein; Bona, Karine Santos de; Peres, Alessandra; Maders, Liési Diones Konzen; Moretto, Maria Beatriz

    2013-03-01

    Syzygium cumini (Sc) have been intensively studied in the last years due its beneficial effects including anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory potential. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aqueous seed extract of Sc (ASc) in the activity of enzymes involved in lymphocyte functions. To perform this study, we isolated lymphocytes from healthy donors. Lymphocytes were exposed to 10, 30, and 100 mg/mL of ASc during 4 and 6 h and adenosine deaminase (ADA), dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities as well as CD26 expression and cellular viability were evaluated. ASc inhibited the ADA and DPP-IV activities without alteration in the CD26 expression (DPP-IV protein). No alterations were observed in the AChE activity or in the cell viability. These results indicate that the inhibition of the DPP-IV and ADA activities was dependent on the time of exposition to ASc. We suggest that ASc exhibits immunomodulatory properties probably via the pathway of DPP-IV-ADA complex, contributing to the understanding of these proceedings in the purinergic signaling.

  5. Adenosine deaminase, 5'-nucleotidase, xanthine oxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities in gastric juices from patients with gastric cancer, ulcer, and atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Durak, I; Ormeci, N; Akyol, O; Canbolat, O; Kavutçu, M; Bülbül, M

    1994-04-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA), 5'-Nucleotidase (5NT), Xanthine oxidase (XO), Cu-Zn Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Catalase (CAT) activities were determined in gastric juices from patients with gastric cancer, ulcer, gastritis and from healthy subjects. Enzyme activities were given as units per ml gastric juice and units per mg protein in gastric juice. ADA, 5NT and XO activities were found lower and protein concentrations were found higher in the cancer group than controls. There was however no significant difference between Cu-Zn SOD activities of the cancer and control groups. In all groups including control one, we could not find catalase activities in most of the samples. On the other hand, ADA, 5NT activities and protein concentrations in the gastric juice were lower in the gastritis group than control group. In the ulcer group, we found higher Cu-Zn SOD and XO activities and lower 5NT activity and protein concentrations compared with control values. In an attempt to establish statistical correlations between mean enzyme activities, pH and protein concentrations in the gastric juices of the groups, we found noticeable intra and inter-correlations, which indicated possible relations between DNA and free radical metabolizing enzymes.

  6. Role of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on mitomycin C induced clastogenesis: analysis of chromosome aberrations, micronucleus, mitotic index and adenosine deaminase activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Ghassan Mohammad

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to determine whether the caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in combination with mitomycine-C (MMC) can ameliorate MMC-induced clastogenesis in the bone marrow cells of mice. The scoring of chromosomal aberrations, mitotic activity and micronuclei were undertaken in the current study as markers of clastogenicity. The action of CAPE in adenosine deaminase enzyme (ADA) activities of serum, thymus and spleen were also investigated. The animals were orally administered CAPE alone at the doses 5 or 10 mg kg b.wt.(-1) for 5 days then sacrificed 24 hours after the CAPE administration. MMC was administered to mice either alone at a single dose (2 mg kg b.wt.(-1)) by intraperitoneal injection, before or after CAPE treatment. Pre or post - treatment with two doses of CAPE significantly decreased the number of chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei and adapted the mitotic activity reduction in the bone marrow cells of mice induced by MMC when compared with only MMC given group. In addition, combination treatment with MMC caused a significant decrease in the activities of ADA in serum, thymus and spleen. The results of this study showed that ADA activity probably related to high levels of reactive oxygen species. This study concluded that the protective effect of CAPE against MMC clastogenesis resides at least in part, in its antioxidant effects.

  7. Chicken embryo fibroblasts exposed to weak, time-varying magnetic fields share cell proliferation, adenosine deaminase activity, and membrane characteristics of transformed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parola, A.H.; Porat, N.; Kiesow, L.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) exposed to a sinusoidally varying magnetic field (SVMF) (100 Hz, 700 microT, for 24 h) showed a remarkable rise of segmental rotational relaxation rate of adenosine deaminase (ADA, EC 3.5.4.4) as determined by multifrequency phase fluorometry. Pyrene-labeled, small subunit ADA was applied to cultured (normal) CEF, which have available and abundant ADA complexing protein (ADCP) on their plasma membranes. Sine-wave-modulated fluorometry of the pyrene yielded a profile of phase angle vs. modulation frequency. In SVMF-treated cells and in Rous-sarcoma-virus (RSV) transformed cells the differential phase values at low modulation frequencies of the excitation are remarkably reduced. This effect is magnetic rather than thermal, because the temperature was carefully controlled and monitored; nevertheless to further check this matter we studied CEF, infected by the RSV-Ts68 temperature-sensitive mutant (36 degrees C transformed, 41 degrees C revertant). When grown at 36 degrees C in the SVMF, cells did not show the slightest trend towards reversion, as would be expected had there been local heating. Concomitant with the increased segmental rotational relaxation rate of ADA, there was a decrease in fluorescence lifetime and a slight, yet significant, increase in membrane lipid microfluidity. These biophysical observations prompted us to examine the effect of SVMF on cell proliferation and ADA activity (a malignancy marker): higher rates of cell proliferation and reduced specific activity of ADA were observed.

  8. Immunohistochemical localization of adenosine deaminase complexing protein in intestinal mucosa and in colorectal adenocarcinoma as a marker for tumour cell heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Ten Kate, J; Wijnen, J T; Boldewijn, J; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1985-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP), a dimeric glycoprotein, has been reported to be decreased or deficient in transformed or cancer-derived cell lines, indicating its potential significance as an indicator of malignant transformation. A similar deficiency was reported in total homogenates of tumours of colon, kidney, lung and liver. In previous biochemical studies we failed to confirm the consistent reduction in ADCP concentration in cancer tissues. A possible explanation for our findings was thought to be intercellular heterogeneity in ADCP expression in individual tumour cells. To study ADCP expression in individual cells, we developed an immunohistochemical method which was applied to tissue sections. Paraformaldehyde--lysine--periodate (PLP) solution was found to be a suitable fixative. Fixed tissue samples were paraffin-embedded, sectioned and stained for ADCP, using an indirect peroxidase-labelled antibody procedure. The protein was localized in normal colonic mucosa, mainly in the brush border region of the luminal epithelium and in cytoplasmic granules. Intense ADCP immunoreactivity was found also in the basal part of some cells. In cancer cells, three staining patterns were observed: membranous, diffuse cytoplasmic and granular cytoplasmic. The adenocarcinomas exhibited significant intratumour and intertumour heterogeneity in their staining types. Further studies on ADCP expression in colorectal cancer in relation to clinical and histopathological characteristics are warranted in order to fully evaluate the potential significance of ADCP as a cancer associated antigen.

  9. Assignment of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) gene(s) to human chromosome 2 in rodent-human somatic cell hybrids.

    PubMed

    Herbschleb-Voogt, E; Grzeschik, K H; Pearson, P L; Meera Khan, P

    1981-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper indicate that the expression of human adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human-rodent somatic cell hybrids is influenced by the state of confluency of the cells and the background rodent genome. Thus, the complement of the L-cell derived A9 or B82 mouse parent apparently prevents the expression of human ADCP in the interspecific somatic cell hybrids. In the a3, E36, or RAG hybrids the human ADCP expression was not prevented by the rodent genome and was found to be proportional to the degree of confluency of the cell in the culture as in the case of primary human fibroblasts. An analysis of human chromosomes, chromosome specific enzyme markers, and ADCP in a panel of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids optimally maintained and harvested at full confluency has shown that the expression of human ADCP in the mouse (RAG)-human as well as in the hamster (E36 or a3)-human hybrids is determined by a gene(s) in human chromosome 2 and that neither chromosome 6 nor any other of the chromosomes of man carry any gene(s) involved in the formation of human ADCP at least in the Chinese hamster-human hybrids. A series of rodent-human hybrid clones exhibiting a mitotic separation of IDH1 and MDH1 indicated that ADCP is most probably situated between corresponding loci in human chromosome 2.

  10. Exploiting Protein Conformational Change to Optimize Adenosine-Derived Inhibitors of HSP70

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    HSP70 is a molecular chaperone and a key component of the heat-shock response. Because of its proposed importance in oncology, this protein has become a popular target for drug discovery, efforts which have as yet brought little success. This study demonstrates that adenosine-derived HSP70 inhibitors potentially bind to the protein with a novel mechanism of action, the stabilization by desolvation of an intramolecular salt-bridge which induces a conformational change in the protein, leading to high affinity ligands. We also demonstrate that through the application of this mechanism, adenosine-derived HSP70 inhibitors can be optimized in a rational manner. PMID:27119979

  11. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2012-01-01

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. 20/34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access substrate DNA cytosines. PMID:22181350

  12. First-in-class small molecule inhibitors of the single-strand DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3G.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Carpenter, Michael A; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L; Perkins, Angela L; Harki, Daniel A; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J; Pandey, Krishan K; Parniak, Michael A; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Krogan, Nevan J; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A; Harris, Reuben S

    2012-03-16

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. Twenty of 34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access to substrate DNA cytosines.

  13. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2012-04-04

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. Twenty of 34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access to substrate DNA cytosines.

  14. A combination of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay and the detection of adenosine deaminase improves the diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Ou, Qinfang; Zheng, Jian; Shen, Lei; Zhang, Bingyan; Weng, Xinhua; Shao, Lingyun; Gao, Yan; Zhang, Wenhong

    2016-08-03

    The differential diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) and malignant pleural effusion (MPE) remains difficult despite the availability of numerous diagnostic tools. The current study aimed to evaluate the performance of the whole blood QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) assay and conventional laboratory biomarkers in differential diagnosis of TPE and MPE in high tuberculosis prevalence areas. A total of 117 patients with pleural effusions were recruited, including 91 with TPE and 26 with MPE. All of the patients were tested with QFT-GIT, and the conventional biomarkers in both blood and pleural effusion were detected. The level of antigen-stimulated QFT-GIT in the whole blood of TPE patients was significantly higher than that of MPE (2.89 vs 0.33 IU/mL, P<0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of QFT-GIT for the diagnosis of TPE were 93.0% and 60.0%, respectively. Among the biomarkers in blood and pleural effusion, pleural adenosine deaminase (ADA) was the most prominent biomarker, with a cutoff value of 15.35 IU/L. The sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of TPE were 93.4% and 96.2%, respectively. The diagnostic classification tree from the combination of these two biomarkers was 97.8% sensitive and 92.3% specific. Ultimately, the combination of whole blood QFT-GIT with pleural ADA improved both the specificity and positive predictive value to 100%. Thus, QFT-GIT is not superior to pleural ADA in the differential diagnosis of TPE and MPE. Combined whole blood QFT-GIT and pleural ADA detection can improve the diagnosis of TPE.

  15. Somatic mosaicism for a newly identified splice-site mutation in a patient with adenosine deaminase-deficient immunodeficiency and spontaneous clinical recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, R.; Yang, D.R.; Israni, A.; Huie, M.L. ); Ownby, D.R. )

    1994-07-01

    Absent or severely reduced adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity produces inherited immunodeficiency of varying severity, with defects of both cellular and humoral immunity. The authors report somatic mosaicism as the basis for a delayed presentation and unusual course of a currently healthy young adult receiving no therapy. He was diagnosed at age 2[1/2] years because of life-threatening pneumonia, recurrent infections, failure of normal growth, and lymphopenia, but he retained significant cellular immune function. A fibroblast cell line and a B cell line, established at diagnosis, lacked ADA activity and were heteroallelic for a splice-donor-site mutation in IVS 1 (+1GT[yields]CT) and a missense mutation (Arg101Gln). All clones (17/17) isolated from the B cell mRNA carried the missense mutation, indicating that the allele with the splice-site mutation produced unstable mRNA. In striking contrast, a B cell line established at age 16 years expressed 50% of normal ADA; 50% had the missense mutation. Genomic DNA contained the missense mutation but not the splice-site mutation. All three cell lines were identical for multiple polymorphic markers and the presence of a Y chromosome. In vivo somatic mosaicism was demonstrated in genomic DNA from peripheral blood cells obtained at 16 years of age, in that less than half the DNA carried the splice-site mutation (P<.0.02, vs. original B cell line). Consistent with mosaicism, erythrocyte content of the toxic metabolite deoxyATP was only minimally elevated. Somatic mosaicism could have arisen either by somatic mutation or by reversion at the site of mutation. Selection in vivo for ADA normal hematopoietic cells may have played a role in the return to normal health, in the absence of therapy. 57 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Flow cytometry analysis of adenosine deaminase (ADA) expression: a simple and reliable tool for the assessment of ADA-deficient patients before and after gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Otsu, Makoto; Hershfield, Michael S; Tuschong, Laura M; Muul, Linda M; Onodera, Masafumi; Ariga, Tadashi; Sakiyama, Yukio; Candotti, Fabio

    2002-02-10

    Clinical gene therapy trials for adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency have shown limited success of corrective gene transfer into autologous T lymphocytes and CD34(+) cells. In these trials, the levels of gene transduction and expression in hematopoietic cells have been assessed by DNA- or RNA-based assays and measurement of ADA enzyme activity. Although informative, these methods are rarely applied to clonal analysis. The results of these assays therefore provide best estimates of transduction efficiency and gene expression in bulk populations based on the assumption that gene transfer and expression are uniformly distributed among transduced cells. As a useful additional tool for evaluation of ADA gene expression, we have developed a flow cytometry (fluorescence-activated cell sorting, FACS) assay capable of estimating the levels of intracellular ADA on a single-cell basis. We validated this technique with T cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from ADA-deficient patients that showed severely reduced levels of ADA expression (ADA-dull) by FACS and Western blot analyses. After retrovirus-mediated ADA gene transfer, these cells showed clearly distinguishable populations exhibiting ADA expression (ADA-bright), thus allowing estimation of transduction efficiency. By mixing ADA-deficient and normal cells and using enzymatic amplification, we determined that our staining procedure could detect as little as 5% ADA-bright cells. This technique, therefore, will be useful to quickly assess the expression of ADA in hematopoietic cells of severe combined immunodeficient patients and represents an important tool for the follow-up of patients treated in clinical gene transfer protocols.

  17. A 9-yr evaluation of carrier erythrocyte encapsulated adenosine deaminase (ADA) therapy in a patient with adult-type ADA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bax, Bridget E; Bain, Murray D; Fairbanks, Lynette D; Webster, A David B; Ind, Philip W; Hershfield, Michael S; Chalmers, Ronald A

    2007-10-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is an inherited disorder which leads to elevated cellular levels of deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP) and systemic accumulation of its precursor, 2-deoxyadenosine. These metabolites impair lymphocyte function, and inactivate S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) respectively, leading to severe immunodeficiency. Enzyme replacement therapy with polyethylene glycol-conjugated ADA is available, but its efficacy is reduced by anti-ADA neutralising antibody formation. We report here carrier erythrocyte encapsulated native ADA therapy in an adult-type ADA deficient patient. Encapsulated enzyme is protected from antigenic responses and therapeutic activities are sustained. ADA-loaded autologous carrier erythrocytes were prepared using a hypo-osmotic dialysis procedure. Over a 9-yr period 225 treatment cycles were administered at 2-3 weekly intervals. Therapeutic efficacy was determined by monitoring immunological and metabolic parameters. After 9 yr of therapy, erythrocyte dATP concentration ranged between 24 and 44 micromol/L (diagnosis, 234) and SAHH activity between 1.69 and 2.29 nmol/h/mg haemoglobin (diagnosis, 0.34). Erythrocyte ADA activities were above the reference range of 40-100 nmol/h/mg haemoglobin (0 at diagnosis). Initial increases in absolute lymphocyte counts were not sustained; however, despite subnormal circulating CD20(+) cell numbers, serum immunoglobulin levels were normal. The patient tolerated the treatment well. The frequency of respiratory problems was reduced and the decline in the forced expiratory volume in 1 s and vital capacity reduced compared with the 4 yr preceding carrier erythrocyte therapy. Carrier erythrocyte-ADA therapy in an adult patient with ADA deficiency was shown to be metabolically and clinically effective.

  18. Double-stranded-RNA-specific adenosine deaminase 1 (ADAR1) is proposed to contribute to the adaptation of equine infectious anemia virus from horses to donkeys.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Zhang, Xiang; Na, Lei; Wang, Xue-Feng; Fu, Li-Hua; Zhu, Chun-Hui; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a member of the genus Lentivirus of the family Retroviridae. Horses are the most susceptible equids to EIAV infection and are therefore the primary hosts of this virus. In contrast, infected donkeys do not develop clinically active equine infectious anemia (EIA). This phenomenon is similar to what has been observed with HIV-1, which fails to induce AIDS in non-human primates. Interestingly, Shen et al. developed a donkey-tropic pathogenic virus strain (EIAVDV117, DV117) by serially passaging a horse-tropic pathogenic strain, EIAVLN40 (LN40), in donkeys. LN40, which was generated by passaging a field isolate in horses, displayed enhanced virulence in horses but caused no clinical symptoms in donkeys. Infection with DV117 induced acute EIA in nearly 100 % of donkeys. Genomic analysis of DV117 revealed a significantly higher frequency of A-to-G substitutions when compared to LN40. Furthermore, detailed analysis of dinucleotide editing showed that A-to-G mutations had a preference for 5'TpA and 5'ApA. These results strongly implicated the activity of the adenosine deaminase, ADAR1, in this type of mutation. Further investigation demonstrated that overexpression of donkey ADAR1 increased A-to-G mutations within the genome of EIAV. Together with our previous finding that multiple mutations in multiple genes are generated in DV117 during its adaptation from horses to donkeys, the present study suggests that ADAR1-induced A-to-G mutations occur during virus adaption to related new hosts contributing to the alteration of EIAV host tropism.

  19. Curcumin improves episodic memory in cadmium induced memory impairment through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and adenosine deaminase activities in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, Ayodele Jacob; Okonkwo, Princess Kamsy; Faboya, Opeyemi Ayodeji; Onikanni, Sunday Amos; Fadaka, Adewale; Olayide, Israel; Akinyemi, Elizabeth Olufisayo; Oboh, Ganiyu

    2017-02-01

    Curcumin, the main polyphenolic component of turmeric (Curcuma longa) rhizomes has been reported to exert cognitive enhancing potential with limited scientific basis. Hence, this study sought to evaluate the effect of curcumin on cerebral cortex acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities in cadmium (Cd)-induced memory impairment in rats. Animals were divided into six groups (n = 6): saline/vehicle, saline/curcumin 12.5 mg/kg, saline/curcumin 25 mg/kg, Cd/vehicle, Cd/curcumin 12.5 mg/kg, and Cd/curcumin 25 mg/kg. Rats received Cd (2.5 mg/kg) and curcumin (12.5 and 25 mg/kg, respectively) by gavage for 7 days. The results of this study revealed that cerebral cortex AChE and ADA activities were increased in Cd-poisoned rats, and curcumin co-treatment reversed these activities to the control levels. Furthermore, Cd intoxication increased the level of lipid peroxidation in cerebral cortex with a concomitant decreased in functional sulfuhydryl (-SH) group and nitric oxide (NO), a potent neurotransmitter and neuromodulatory agent. However, the co-treatment with curcumin at 12.5 and 25 mg/kg, respectively increased the non-enzymatic antioxidant status and NO in cerebral cortex with a decreased in malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Therefore, inhibition of AChE and ADA activities as well as increased antioxidant status by curcumin in Cd-induced memory dysfunction could suggest some possible mechanism of action for their cognitive enhancing properties.

  20. Combined evaluation of adenosine deaminase level and histopathological findings from pleural biopsy with Cope’s needle for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy

    PubMed Central

    Behrsin, Rodolfo Fred; Junior, Cyro Teixeira da Silva; Cardoso, Gilberto Perez; Barillo, Jorge Luiz; de Souza, Joeber Bernardo Soares; de Araújo, Elizabeth Giestal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Closed needle pleural biopsy (CNPB) has historically been the gold standard procedure for the diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is an efficient biomarker for tuberculosis that is measurable in pleural fluids. Objective: We compared the diagnostic accuracy of the pleural ADA (P-ADA) level and histopathological findings of CNPB specimens in patients with pleural tuberculosis. Methods: This prospective study consisted of two groups of examinations with a proven diagnosis of pleural effusion. The P-ADA level was measured in 218 patients with pleural effusion due to a number of causes, and 157 CNPB specimens underwent histopathological analysis. Results: CNPBs were performed in patients with tuberculosis (n=122) and other diseases: adenocarcinoma (n=23), lymphoma (n=5), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=4), squamous cell carcinoma (n=2), and small cell lung cancer (n=1). According to the ROC curve, the optimal cut-off value of the P-ADA level (Giusti and Galanti colorimetric method) was equal to or greater than 40.0 U/L. The diagnostic accuracy of the P-ADA test was 83.0%, and that of histopathological examination of the CNPB tissue, was 78.8% (AUC=0.293, P=0.7695). The association between the P-ADA assay and pleural histopathology was 24.41 (P<0.0001). The tetrachoric correlation coefficient was 0.563 (high correlation). Conclusion: In Brazil and other countries with a high incidence of tuberculosis, P-ADA activity is an accurate test for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusions, and its use should be encouraged. The high diagnostic performance of the P-ADA test could to aid the diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis and render CNPB unnecessary. PMID:26261621

  1. Correct splicing despite mutation of the invariant first nucleotide of a 5[prime] splice site: A possible basis for disparate clinical phenotypes in siblings with adenosine deaminase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Arredondo-Vega, F.X.; Santisteban, I.; Kelly, S.; Hershfield, M.S. ); Umetsu, D.T. ); Schlossman, C.M.

    1994-05-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency usually causes severe combined immune deficiency in infancy. Milder phenotypes also occur and are associated with less severely impaired deoxyadenosine (dAdo) catabolism. The authors have characterized the mutations responsible for ADA deficiency in siblings with disparity in clinical phenotype. Erythrocyte dAdo nucleotide pool size, which reflects total residual ADA activity, was lower in the older, more mildly affected sib (RG) than in her younger, more severely affected sister (EG). Cultured T cells, fibroblasts, and B lymphoblasts of RG had detectable residual ADA activity, while cells of EG did not. ADA mRNA was undetectable by northern analysis in cells of both patients. Both sibs were found to be compound heterozygotes for the following novel splicing defects: (1) a G[sup +1][yields]A substitution at the 5' splice site of IVS 2 and (2) a complex 17-bp rearrangement of the 3' splice site of IVS 8, which inserted a run of seven purines into the polypyrimidine tract and altered the reading frame of exon 9. PCR-amplified ADA cDNA clones with premature translation stop codons arising from aberrant pre-mRNA splicing were identified, which were consistent with these mutations. However, some cDNA clones from T cells of both patients and from fibroblasts and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cells of RG, were normally spliced at both the exon 2/3 and exon 8/9 junctions. A normal coding sequence was documented for clones from both sibs. The normal cDNA clones did not appear to arise from either contamination or PCR artifact, and mosaicism seems unlikely to have been involved. These findings suggest (1) that a low level of normal pre-mRNA splicing may occur despite mutation of the invariant first nucleotide of the 5' splice sequence and (2) that differences in efficiency of such splicing may account for the difference in residual ADA activity, immune dysfunction, and clinical severity in these siblings. 66 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Effect of zinc supplementation on ecto-adenosine deaminase activity in lambs infected by Haemonchus contortus: highlights on acute phase of disease.

    PubMed

    Baldissera, Matheus D; Pivoto, Felipe L; Bottari, Nathieli B; Tonin, Alexandre A; Machado, Gustavo; Aires, Adelina R; Rocha, José F X; Pelinson, Luana P; Dalenogare, Diéssica P; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Morsch, Vera M; Leal, Marta L R; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2015-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus (order Strongylida) is a common parasitic nematode infecting small ruminants and causing significant economic losses worldwide. It induces innate and adaptive immune responses, which are essential for the clearance of this nematode from the host. Ecto-adenosine deaminase (E-ADA) is an enzyme that plays an important role in the immune system, while Zinc (Zn) has been found playing a critical role in E-ADA catalysis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of Zn supplementation on E-ADA activity in serum of lambs experimentally infected with H.contortus. To reach this purpose 28 male lambs (in average 25 kg) were used. The animals were divided into four groups: A and B composed of healthy animals (uninfected); C and D, infected with H.contortus. Groups B and D were supplemented with Zn Edetate, subcutaneously with 3 mg kg of live weight, on days 11 and 25 post-infection (PI). Blood and fecal samples were collected on the days 11, 25 and 39 PI, in order to assess hematocrit, seric E-ADA, and eggs per gram (EPG) counting, respectively. The animals of groups C and D showed severe hematocrit reduction (days 25 and 39 PI) and were EPG positive (days 11, 25 and 39 PI). On day 41 PI, three animals each group were subjected to necropsy. This procedure showed that animals of groups A and B did not have helminths in abomasum and intestines, while H.contortus were observed in groups C (5782.5 ± 810.9) and D (6185.0 ± 150.0). Infected and untreated animals (group C) showed a reduction in E-ADA activity, but this was not observed when the animals were supplemented with Zn (Group D). Therefore, based on our results, it was possible to observe that Zn supplementation exercised a positive effect on E-ADA activity in lambs infected with H.contortus, and did not allow a reduction in E-ADA activity, as occurred in the group infected and without supplementation. However, Zn supplementation was not able to prevent the worm burden.

  3. Switching of adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitor after hospital discharge among myocardial infarction patients: Insights from the Treatment with Adenosine Diphosphate Receptor Inhibitors: Longitudinal Assessment of Treatment Patterns and Events after Acute Coronary Syndrome (TRANSLATE-ACS) observational study.

    PubMed

    Zettler, Marjorie E; Peterson, Eric D; McCoy, Lisa A; Effron, Mark B; Anstrom, Kevin J; Henry, Timothy D; Baker, Brian A; Messenger, John C; Cohen, David J; Wang, Tracy Y

    2017-01-01

    The reasons for postdischarge adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitor (ADPri) switching among patients with myocardial infarction (MI) are unclear. We sought to describe the incidence and patterns of postdischarge ADPri switching among patients with acute MI treated with percutaneous coronary intervention.

  4. Discovery of bacterial NAD⁺-dependent DNA ligase inhibitors: improvements in clearance of adenosine series.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Suzanne S; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Huynh, Hoan; Lu, Min; Mullen, George B; Chen, Brendan; Albert, Robert; O'Shea, Thomas J; Rooney, Michael T; Hu, Haiqing; Newman, Joseph V; Mills, Scott D

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of clearance of adenosine inhibitors of bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase is discussed. To reduce Cytochrome P-450-mediated metabolic clearance, many strategies were explored; however, most modifications resulted in compounds with reduced antibacterial activity and/or unchanged total clearance. The alkyl side chains of the 2-cycloalkoxyadenosines were fluorinated, and compounds with moderate antibacterial activity and favorable pharmacokinetic properties in rat and dog were identified.

  5. Adenosine signalling mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of the COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Maione, Francesco; Morello, Silvana; Lapucci, Andrea; Paccosi, Sara; Steckel, Bodo; Lavecchia, Antonio; Parenti, Astrid; Iuvone, Teresa; Schrader, Jürgen; Ialenti, Armando; Cicala, Carla

    2016-07-15

    Extracellular adenosine formation from ATP is controlled by ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase/CD39) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (e-5NT/CD73); the latter converts AMP to adenosine and inorganic phosphate, representing the rate limiting step controlling the ratio between extracellular ATP and adenosine. Evidence that cellular expression and activity of CD39 and CD73 may be subject to changes under pathophysiological conditions has identified this pathway as an endogenous modulator in several diseases and was shown to be involved in the molecular mechanism of drugs, such as methotrexate, salicylates , interferon-β. We evaluated whether CD73/adenosine/A2A signalling pathway is involved in nimesulide anti-inflammatory effect, in vivo and in vitro. We found that the adenosine A2A agonist, 4-[2-[[6-amino-9-(N-ethyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamidosyl)-9H-purin-2-yl]amino]ethyl]benzenepropanoic acid hydrochloride (CGS21680, 2mg/kg ip.), inhibited carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema and the effect was reversed by co-administration of the A2A antagonist -(2-[7-amino-2-[2-furyl][1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-yl-amino]ethyl)phenol (ZM241385; 3mg/kg i.p.). Nimesulide (5mg/kg i.p.) anti-inflammatory effect was inhibited by pre-treatment with ZM241385 (3mg/kg i.p.) and by local administration of the CD73 inhibitor, adenosine 5'-(α,β-methylene)diphosphate (APCP; 400μg/paw). Furthermore, we found increased activity of 5'-nucleotidase/CD73 in paws and plasma of nimesulide treated rats, 4h following oedema induction. In vitro, the inhibitory effect of nimesulide on nitrite and prostaglandin E2 production by lipopolysaccharide-activated J774 cell line was reversed by ZM241385 and APCP. Furthermore, nimesulide increased CD73 activity in J774 macrophages while it did not inhibit nitrite accumulation by lipopolysaccharide-activated SiRNA CD73 silenced J774 macrophages. Our data demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effect of nimesulide in part is mediated by CD73

  6. Impact on monoclonal antibody production in murine hybridoma cell cultures of adenosine receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kelso, Geoffrey F; Kazi, Shahid A; Harris, Simon J; Boysen, Reinhard I; Chowdhury, Jamil; Hearn, Milton T W

    2016-01-15

    The effects of different adenosine receptor antagonists and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors on monoclonal antibody (mAb) titer and cell viability of murine hybridoma cells in culture were measured as part of our investigations to discover additives that enhance mAb production. Specific adenosine receptor antagonists and PDE inhibitors were found to enhance or decrease the titer of immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) mAbs relative to negative controls, depending on the specific compound and cell line employed. The observed enhancements or decreases in IgG1 mAb titer appeared to be mainly due to an increase or decrease in specific productivity rates (ngmAb/cell), respectively. The different effects of the selective adenosine antagonists suggest that antagonism at the level of the adenosine A2A and A1 or the adenosine A3 receptors result in either enhancement or suppression of IgG1 mAb production by hybridoma cells. Overall, these studies have identified hitherto unknown activities of specific adenosine antagonists and PDE inhibitors which indicate they may have valuable roles as cell culture additives in industrial biomanufacturing processes designed to enhance the yields of mAbs or other recombinant proteins produced by mammalian cell culture procedures.

  7. Adenosine acts as an inhibitor of lymphoma cell growth: a major role for the A3 adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Fishman, P; Bar-Yehuda, S; Ohana, G; Pathak, S; Wasserman, L; Barer, F; Multani, A S

    2000-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrated several mechanisms exploring the inhibitory effect of low-dose adenosine on lymphoma cell growth. Adenosine, a purine nucleoside present in plasma and other extracellular fluids, acts as a regulatory molecule, by binding to G-protein associated cell-surface receptors, A1, A2 and A3. Recently we showed that low-dose adenosine released by muscle cells, inhibits tumour cell growth and thus attributes to the rarity of muscle metastases. In the present work, a cytostatic effect of adenosine on the proliferation of the Nb2-11C rat lymphoma cell line was demonstrated. This effect was mediated through the induction of cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase and by decreasing the telomeric signal in these cells. Adenosine was found to exert its antiproliferative effect mainly through binding to its A3 receptor. The cytostatic anticancer activity, mediated through the A3 adenosine receptor, turns it into a potential target for the development of anticancer therapies.

  8. Molecular Shape Analysis-Guided Virtual Screening Platform for Adenosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bhutoria, Savita; Das, Ballari; Ghoshal, Nanda

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new application of molecular shape descriptors in hierarchical selection during virtual screening (VS). Here, a structure-based pharmacophore and docking-guided VS protocol have been evolved to identify inhibitors against adenosine kinase (AK). The knowledge gained on the shape requirements has been extrapolated in classifying active and inactive molecules against this target. This classification enabled us to pick the appropriate ligand conformation in the binding site. We have suggested a set of hierarchical filters for VS, from a simple molecular shape analysis (MSA) descriptor-based recursive models to docking scores. This approach permits a systematic study to understand the importance of spatial requirements and limitations for inhibitors against AK. Finally, the guidelines on how to select compounds for AK to achieve success have been highlighted. The utility of this approach has been suggested by giving an example of database screening for plausible active compounds. PMID:27478367

  9. The significance of inhibitor-resistant alkaline phosphatase in the cytochemical demonstration of transport adenosine triphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Firth, J A; Marland, B Y

    1975-08-01

    The hydrolysis of disodium p-nitrophenyl phosphate at pH 9.0 by slices of formaldehydee-fixed rat renal cortex was investigated by colorimetric estimation of the nitrophenol liberated. It was found that three types of activity could be identified on the basis of their responses to inhibitors and cations: (a) alkaline phosphatase sensitive to inhibition by L-tetramisole; (b) potassium-dependent phosphatase, probably identifiable with the phosphatase component of sodium-potassium-dependent transport adenosine triphosphatase (?Na-K-ATPase); and (c) alkaline phosphatase insensitive to L-tetramisole. It was found that in the presence of strontium ions, as used in Na-K-ATPase cytochemistry, the activities of the second and third types of enzyme were approximately equal. The implications of these findings for the cytochemical demonstration of Na-K-ATPase are discussed.

  10. Small-molecule APOBEC3G DNA cytosine deaminase inhibitors based on a 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol scaffold.

    PubMed

    Olson, Margaret E; Li, Ming; Harris, Reuben S; Harki, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that functions in innate immunity against retroviruses and retrotransposons. Although A3G can potently restrict Vif-deficient HIV-1 replication by catalyzing excessive levels of G→A hypermutation, sublethal levels of A3G-catalyzed mutation may contribute to the high level of HIV-1 fitness and its incurable prognosis. To chemically modulate A3G catalytic activity with the goal of decreasing the HIV-1 genomic mutation rate, we synthesized and biochemically evaluated a class of 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol small-molecule inhibitors identified by high-throughput screening. This class of compounds exhibits low-micromolar (3.9-8.2 μM) inhibitory potency and remarkable specificity for A3G versus the related cytosine deaminase, APOBEC3A. Chemical modification of inhibitors, A3G mutational screening, and thiol reactivity studies implicate C321, a residue proximal to the active site, as the critical A3G target for this class of molecules.

  11. Modulation of adenosine signaling prevents scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bortolotto, Josiane Woutheres; Melo, Gabriela Madalena de; Cognato, Giana de Paula; Vianna, Mônica Ryff Moreira; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-02-01

    Adenosine, a purine ribonucleoside, exhibits neuromodulatory and neuroprotective effects in the brain and is involved in memory formation and cognitive function. Adenosine signaling is mediated by adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3); in turn, nucleotide and nucleoside-metabolizing enzymes and adenosine transporters regulate its levels. Scopolamine, a muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist, has profound amnesic effects in a variety of learning paradigms and has been used to induce cognitive deficits in animal models. This study investigated the effects of acute exposure to caffeine (a non-selective antagonist of adenosine receptors A1 and A2A), ZM 241385 (adenosine receptor A2A antagonist), DPCPX (adenosine receptor A1 antagonist), dipyridamole (inhibitor of nucleoside transporters) and EHNA (inhibitor of adenosine deaminase) in a model of pharmacological cognitive impairment induced by scopolamine in adult zebrafish. Caffeine, ZM 241385, DPCPX, dipyridamole, and EHNA were acutely administered independently via i.p. in zebrafish, followed by exposure to scopolamine dissolved in tank water (200μM). These compounds prevented the scopolamine-induced amnesia without impacting locomotor activity or social interaction. Together, these data support the hypothesis that adenosine signaling may modulate memory processing, suggesting that these compounds present a potential preventive strategy against cognitive impairment.

  12. Measles Virus Defective Interfering RNAs Are Generated Frequently and Early in the Absence of C Protein and Can Be Destabilized by Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA-1-Like Hypermutations

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, Christian K.; Mastorakos, George M.; Matchett, William E.; Ma, Xiao; Samuel, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defective interfering RNAs (DI-RNAs) of the viral genome can form during infections of negative-strand RNA viruses and outgrow full-length viral genomes, thereby modulating the severity and duration of infection. Here we document the frequent de novo generation of copy-back DI-RNAs from independent rescue events both for a vaccine measles virus (vac2) and for a wild-type measles virus (IC323) as early as passage 1 after virus rescue. Moreover, vaccine and wild-type C-protein-deficient (C-protein-knockout [CKO]) measles viruses generated about 10 times more DI-RNAs than parental virus, suggesting that C enhances the processivity of the viral polymerase. We obtained the nucleotide sequences of 65 individual DI-RNAs, identified breakpoints and reinitiation sites, and predicted their structural features. Several DI-RNAs possessed clusters of A-to-G or U-to-C transitions. Sequences flanking these mutation sites were characteristic of those favored by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1), which catalyzes in double-stranded RNA the C-6 deamination of adenosine to produce inosine, which is recognized as guanosine, a process known as A-to-I RNA editing. In individual DI-RNAs the transitions were of the same type and occurred on both sides of the breakpoint. These patterns of mutations suggest that ADAR1 edits unencapsidated DI-RNAs that form double-strand RNA structures. Encapsidated DI-RNAs were incorporated into virus particles, which reduced the infectivity of virus stocks. The CKO phenotype was dominant: DI-RNAs derived from vac2 with a CKO suppressed the replication of vac2, as shown by coinfections of interferon-incompetent lymphatic cells with viruses expressing different fluorescent reporter proteins. In contrast, coinfection with a C-protein-expressing virus did not counteract the suppressive phenotype of DI-RNAs. IMPORTANCE Recombinant measles viruses (MVs) are in clinical trials as cancer therapeutics and as vectored vaccines for HIV-AIDS and

  13. Elucidation of the time course of adenosine deaminase APOBEC3G and viral infectivity factor vif in HIV-2287-infected infant macaques

    PubMed Central

    Endsley, Aaron N.; Ho, Rodney J.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the interactions of cellular cytidine deaminase A3G and viral infection factor (vif) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were reported, regulation of A3G after in vivo HIV infection and disease progression is not known. Methods Time courses of plasma virus, CD4+ T lymphocyte Macaca levels, and concentrations of A3G and vif transcripts were determined in infant macaques infected with HIV-2287. These in vivo results were compared with those collected in vitro in HIV-2-infected T cells. Results Human immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques exhibited plasma viremia (≥108 copies/ml) followed by a precipitous CD4+ T-cell (from 40–70 to ≤5%) decline. An initial increase in A3G transcripts coincides with early increases in virus and vif RNA. As virus load continues to increase, A3G RNA decreases but recovers at a later phase as virus level stabilizes. Pearson correlation analysis revealed strong interactions of A3G–CD4, vif–CD4, and A3G–vif. Conclusions There is a time-dependent A3G and vif RNA interaction throughout the course of HIV infection. PMID:22017399

  14. Trifunctional Agents as a Design Strategy for Tailoring Ligand Properties: Irreversible Inhibitors of A1 Adenosine Receptors†

    PubMed Central

    Boring, Daniel L.; Ji, Xiao-Duo; Zimmet, Jeff; Taylor, Kirk E.; Stiles, Gary L.

    2012-01-01

    The 1,3-phenylene diisothiocyanate conjugate of XAC (8-[4-[[[[(2-aminoethyl)amino]carbonyl]methyl]-oxy]phenyl]-l,3-dipropylxanthine, a potent A1 selective adenosine antagonist) has been characterized as an irreversible inhibitor of A1 adenosine receptors. To further extend this work, a series of analogues were prepared containing a third substituent in the phenyl isothiocyanate ring, incorporated to modify the physiochemical or spectroscopic properties of the conjugate. Symmetrical trifunctional cross-linking reagents bearing two isothiocyanate groups were prepared as general intermediates for cross-linking functionalized congeners and receptors. Xanthine isothiocyanate derivatives containing hydrophilic, fluorescent, or reactive substituents, linked via an amide, thiourea, or methylene group in the 5-position, were synthesized and found to be irreversible inhibitors of A1 adenosine receptors. The effects of the 5-substituent on water solubility and on the A1/A2 selectivity ratio derived from binding assays in rat brain membranes were examined. Inhibition of binding of [3H]-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine and [3H]CGS21680 (2-[[2-[4-(2-carboxyethyl)phenyl]ethyl]amino]adenosine-5′-N-ethylcarboxamide) at central A1 and A2 adenosine receptors, respectively, was measured. A conjugate of XAC and 1,3,5-triisothiocyanatobenzene was 894-fold selective for A1 receptors. Reporter groups, such as fluorescent dyes and a spin-label, were included as chain substituents in the irreversibly binding analogues, which were designed for spectroscopic assays, histochemical characterization, and biochemical characterization of the receptor protein. PMID:1868116

  15. In vivo kinetics of transduced cells in peripheral T cell-directed gene therapy: role of CD8+ cells in improved immunological function in an adenosine deaminase (ADA)-SCID patient.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, N; Ariga, T; Ohtsu, M; Kobayashi, I; Yamada, M; Tame, A; Furuta, H; Okano, M; Egashira, M; Niikawa, N; Kobayashi, K; Sakiyama, Y

    1999-08-15

    We previously reported successful peripheral T cell-directed gene therapy in a boy with adenosine deaminase (ADA)-SCID. In the present study, to better understand the reconstitutive effect of this gene therapy on his immunological system, we investigated the in vivo kinetics and functional subsets of T cells in PBL. Apparent immunological improvements were obtained after infusion of transduced cells at more than 4 x 108 cells/kg/therapy/3 mo. Frequency of ADAcDNA-integrated cells in PBL, ADA activity in PBL and clinical improvement showed good correlation, even though CD8+ cells gradually became predominant in PBL. On the basis that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-ADA was maintained at the same dosage as before gene therapy, we consider that his immunological improvement resulted from the gene therapy itself. Most CD3+ cells in PBL after gene therapy expressed TCRalphabeta. Analysis of TCR repertoire based on TCR V region usage revealed no expansion of limited clones in his PBL. The T cell subset cells CD8+CDw60+ and CD8+CD27+CD45RA-, which are reported to provide substantial help to B cells, were maintained throughout the gene therapy. Furthermore, his reconstituted peripheral T cells helped normal B cells to produce substantial IgG in vitro. Expression of both Th1- and Th2-type cytokine genes was induced in his reconstituted T cells at the same comparably high level as in normal subjects. Collectively, these results provide evidence of persistent and distinct functions of transduced cells in this patient's PBL after gene therapy.

  16. Persistence and expression of the adenosine deaminase gene for 12 years and immune reaction to gene transfer components: long-term results of the first clinical gene therapy trial.

    PubMed

    Muul, Linda Mesler; Tuschong, Laura M; Soenen, Sherry Lau; Jagadeesh, G Jayashree; Ramsey, W Jay; Long, Zhifeng; Carter, Charles S; Garabedian, Elizabeth K; Alleyne, Melinna; Brown, Margaret; Bernstein, Wendy; Schurman, Shepherd H; Fleisher, Thomas A; Leitman, Susan F; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Blaese, R Michael; Candotti, Fabio

    2003-04-01

    The first human gene therapy experiment begun in September 1990 used a retroviral vector containing the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) cDNA to transduce mature peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with ADA deficiency, an inherited disorder of immunity. Two patients who had been treated with intramuscular injections of pegylated bovine ADA (PEG-ADA) for 2 to 4 years were enrolled in this trial and each received a total of approximately 10(11) cells in 11 or 12 infusions over a period of about 2 years. No adverse events were observed. During and after treatment, the patients continued to receive PEG-ADA, although at a reduced dose. Ten years after the last cell infusion, approximately 20% of the first patient's lymphocytes still carry and express the retroviral gene, indicating that the effects of gene transfer can be remarkably long lasting. On the contrary, the persistence of gene-marked cells is very low (< 0.1%), and no expression of the transgene is detectable in lymphocytes from the second patient who developed persisting antibodies to components of the gene transfer system. Data collected from these original patients have provided novel information about the longevity of T lymphocytes in humans and persistence of gene expression in vivo from vectors driven by the Moloney murine leukemia virus long-terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. This long-term follow-up has also provided unique evidence supporting the safety of retroviral-mediated gene transfer and illustrates clear examples of both the potential and the pitfalls of gene therapy in humans.

  17. Carrier frequency of a nonsense mutation in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene implies a high incidence of ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in Somalia and a single, common haplotype indicates common ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Juan J; Monaghan, Gemma; Børsting, Claus; Norbury, Gail; Morling, Niels; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2007-05-01

    Inherited adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare metabolic disorder that causes immunodeficiency, varying from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in the majority of cases to a less severe form in a small minority of patients. Five patients of Somali origin from four unrelated families, with severe ADA-SCID, were registered in the Greater London area. Patients and their parents were investigated for the nonsense mutation Q3X (ADA c7C>T), two missense mutations K80R (ADA c239A>G) and R142Q (ADA c425G>A), and a TAAA repeat located at the 3' end of an Alu element (AluVpA) positioned 1.1 kb upstream of the ADA transcription start site. All patients were homozygous for the haplotype ADA-7T/ADA-239G/ADA-425G/AluVpA7. Among 207 Somali immigrants to Denmark, the frequency of ADA c7C>T and the maximum likelihood estimate of the frequency of the haplotype ADA-7T/ADA-239G/ADA-425G/AluVpA7 were both 0.012 (carrier frequency 2.4%). Based on the analysis of AluVpA alleles, the ADA c7C/T mutation was estimated to be approximately 7,100 years old. Approximately 1 out of 5 - 10000 Somali children will be born with ADA deficiency due to an ADA c7C/T mutation, although within certain clans the frequency may be significantly higher. ADA-SCID may be a frequent immunodeficiency disorder in Somalia, but will be underdiagnosed due to the prevailing socioeconomic and nutritional deprivation.

  18. Incomplete factorial search for conditions leading to high quality crystals of Escherichia coli cytidine deaminase complexed to a transition state analog inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Betts, L; Frick, L; Wolfenden, R; Carter, C W

    1989-04-25

    We have used an incomplete factorial design (Carter, C. W., and Carter, C. W., Jr. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 12219-12223) to find conditions for growing high quality crystals of Escherichia coli cytidine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.5). Crystals grow at pH 6.0 in hanging or sitting drops with either 1.6 M ammonium sulfate or 2.4-2.5 M sodium phosphate as precipitant. Both conditions produce crystals with identical morphologies and unit cell constants. The space group is P3(1)21 (or its enantiomorph P3(2)21), and the unit cell constants are a = b = 120.3 A, c = 78.4 A. The asymmetric unit is most reasonably one dimer of 66,000 Mr. The crystal size is very dependent on the supersaturation ratio, S = [initial protein concentration]/[equilibrium protein concentration], exhibiting a maximum at S = 7.7. The largest crystals diffract to at least 2.5 A and have a lifetime of 4 to 5 days in the x-ray beam at room temperature. The enzyme in these crystals is complexed with the transition state analog inhibitor 1-(beta-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-fluoropyrimidin-2-one (5-fluoropyrimidin-2-one riboside). We have collected data from parent crystals and from a heavy atom derivative in which the transition state analog is replaced by the active site directed inhibitor 5-(chloromercuri)cytidine.

  19. Inhibition of AMP deaminase as therapeutic target in cardiovascular pathology.

    PubMed

    Zabielska, Magdalena A; Borkowski, Tomasz; Slominska, Ewa M; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2015-08-01

    AMP deaminase (AMPD; EC 3.5.4.6) catalyzes hydrolysis of the amino group from the adenine ring of AMP resulting in production of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) and ammonia. This reaction helps to maintain healthy cellular energetics by removing excess AMP that accumulates in energy depleted cells. Furthermore, AMPD permits the synthesis of guanine nucleotides from the larger adenylate pool. This enzyme competes with cytosolic 5'-nucleotidases (c5NT) for AMP. Adenosine, a product of c5NT is a vasodilator, antagonizes inotropic effects of catecholamines and exerts anti-platelet, anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activities. The ratio of AMPD/c5NT defines the amount of adenosine produced in adenine nucleotide catabolic pathway. Inhibition of AMPD could alter this ratio resulting in increased adenosine production. Besides the potential effect on adenosine production, elevation of AMP due to inhibition of AMPD could also lead to activation of AMP regulated protein kinase (AMPK) with myriad of downstream events including enhanced energetic metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis and cytoprotection. While the benefits of these processes are well appreciated in cells such as skeletal or cardiac myocytes its role in protection of endothelium could be even more important. Therapeutic use of AMPD inhibition has been limited due to difficulties with obtaining compounds with adequate characteristics. However, endothelium seems to be the easiest target as effective inhibition of AMPD could be achieved at much lower concentration than in the other types of cells. New generation of AMPD inhibitors has recently been established and its testing in context of endothelial and organ protection could provide important basic knowledge and potential therapeutic tools.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorder that damages the immune system and causes severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). People with SCID lack virtually all immune ... Management Formal Diagnostic Criteria (1 link) ACT Sheet: Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) and Conditions Associated with T Cell Lymphoneia ( ...

  1. Adenosine deaminase complexing protein in cancer studies.

    PubMed

    Ten Kate, J; Dinjens, W N; Meera Khan, P; Bosman, F T

    1986-01-01

    ADCP is a dimeric glycoprotein of about 200KD, for which the physiological role is still obscure. This protein occurs mainly in a membrane bound form in various human tissues. In this paper we review the current literature on ADCP in cancer studies. Soluble ADCP was described to be consistently decreased or absent in cancers of lung, liver, kidney and colon. These findings could not be confirmed by immunohistochemical and quantitative biochemical studies in a series of colorectal-, prostatic-, and renal carcinomas. Only in a third of these tumors a decrease could be demonstrated, whereas in the other cases unaltered or even increased amounts were observed. However, in virally transformed human fibroblasts a consistent decrease or complete absence of ADCP was seen, while primary fibroblasts were found to contain high amounts of this protein. Recently, the use of ADCP as a differentiation marker in colonic cancer has been advocated. Furthermore the presence of ADCP in the serum of renal adenocarcinoma patients was found to be indicative of a better chance of five year survival. These studies suggest that ADCP may be a differentiation marker useful for immunohistochemical characterization of colonic and renal carcinomas as well as a serum marker useful for follow-up studies of these types of cancer, analogous to CEA. Finally, ADCP has been found to be selectively expressed by certain T-cell subsets and henceforth may be useful in the studies on leukemias.

  2. Evidence for a substrate cycle between AMP and adenosine in isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bontemps, F; Van den Berghe, G; Hers, H G

    1983-01-01

    The effect of adenosine on the metabolism of prelabeled adenine nucleotides was investigated in isolated hepatocytes. Adenosine caused an approximately equal to 2-fold increase in the ATP content of the cells. This effect was in part counteracted by an increased rate of adenine nucleotide catabolism that could be explained by a stimulation of both AMP deaminase (AMP aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.6) and the cytoplasmic 5'-nucleotidase (5'-ribonucleotide phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.5) because of the increased concentration of ATP. The unexpected finding that labeled adenosine was formed immediately after the addition of the unlabeled nucleoside could be explained by the trapping effect of adenosine. An accumulation of labeled adenosine was observed also in the presence of 5-iodotubercidin, a potent inhibitor of adenosine kinase (ATP:adenosine 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.20). Under these conditions, there was a decrease in the concentration of ATP in the cell and a 2- to 3-fold increase in the rate of formation of allantoin. This formation of adenosine was only slightly decreased by inhibition of the membranous 5'-nucleotidase; it led to the accumulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine in the presence of coformycin and an excess of L-homocysteine. It was concluded that, under basal conditions, the cytoplasmic 5'-nucleotidase present in the liver cell continuously produces adenosine, which is immediately reconverted into AMP by adenosine kinase, without giving rise to allantoin. This futile cycle between AMP and adenosine amounts to at least 20 nmol/min per g of liver and, thus, exceeds the basic rate of allantoin formation. PMID:6304684

  3. Adenosine triphosphate-competitive mTOR inhibitors: a new class of immunosuppressive agents that inhibit allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Rosborough, B R; Raïch-Regué, D; Liu, Q; Venkataramanan, R; Turnquist, H R; Thomson, A W

    2014-09-01

    The mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is inhibited clinically to suppress T cell function and prevent allograft rejection. mTOR is the kinase subunit of two mTOR-containing complexes, mTOR complex (mTORC) 1 and 2. Although mTORC1 is inhibited by the macrolide immunosuppressant rapamycin (RAPA), its efficacy may be limited by its inability to block mTORC1 completely and its limited effect on mTORC2. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-competitive mTOR inhibitors are an emerging class of mTOR inhibitors that compete with ATP at the mTOR active site and inhibit any mTOR-containing complex. Since this class of compounds has not been investigated for their immunosuppressive potential, our goal was to determine the influence of a prototypic ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor on allograft survival. AZD8055 proved to be a potent suppressor of T cell proliferation. Moreover, a short, 10-day course of the agent successfully prolonged murine MHC-mismatched, vascularized heart transplant survival. This therapeutic effect was associated with increased graft-infiltrating regulatory T cells and reduced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell interferon-γ production. These studies establish for the first time, that ATP-competitive mTOR inhibition can prolong organ allograft survival and warrant further investigation of this next generation mTOR inhibitors.

  4. Sensitivity of Tonoplast-Bound Adenosine-Triphosphatase from Hevea to Inhibitors 1

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Bernard

    1983-01-01

    The tonoplast-bound H+-translocating ATPase from Hevea latex was found to be insensitive to vanadate, diethylstilbestrol, and octylguanidine, which are specific inhibitors of the plasma membrane ATPase. The inhibitors of the mitochondrial ATPase, oligomycin and azide, and also rotenone and antimycin A, were all without effect. In contrast, trimethyltin chloride strongly inhibited the activity of Hevea tonoplast ATPase. Among the different carbodiimides tested, which strongly inhibit the Hevea tonoplast ATPase, N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide was the most inhibitory. N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline was also an efficient inhibitor. This unique inhibitor sensitivity of the Hevea tonoplast H+-translocating ATPase suggests that this enzyme differs in its mode of operation from all other known H+-translocating ATPases. PMID:16663354

  5. Inhibition of Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation by Adenosine and Inosine: Studies on Their Relative Contribution and Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Pereira, Jaime; Mezzano, Diego; Alarcón, Marcelo; Caballero, Julio; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background The inhibitory effect of adenosine on platelet aggregation is abrogated after the addition of adenosine-deaminase. Inosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside degraded from adenosine. Objectives The mechanisms of antiplatelet action of adenosine and inosine in vitro and in vivo, and their differential biological effects by molecular modeling were investigated. Results Adenosine (0.5, 1 and 2 mmol/L) inhibited phosphatidylserine exposure from 52±4% in the control group to 44±4 (p<0.05), 29±2 (p<0.01) and 20±3% (p<0.001). P-selectin expression in the presence of adenosine 0.5, 1 and 2 mmol/L was inhibited from 32±4 to 27±2 (p<0.05), 14±3 (p<0.01) and 9±3% (p<0.001), respectively. At the concentrations tested, only inosine to 4 mmol/L had effect on platelet P-selectin expression (p<0.05). Adenosine and inosine inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release stimulated by ADP and collagen. Adenosine and inosine reduced collagen-induced platelet adhesion and aggregate formation under flow. At the same concentrations adenosine inhibited platelet aggregation, decreased the levels of sCD40L and increased intraplatelet cAMP. In addition, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent adenosine receptor A2A antagonist) attenuated the effect of adenosine on platelet aggregation induced by ADP and intraplatelet level of cAMP. Adenosine and inosine significantly inhibited thrombosis formation in vivo (62±2% occlusion at 60 min [n = 6, p<0.01] and 72±1.9% occlusion at 60 min, [n = 6, p<0.05], respectively) compared with the control (98±2% occlusion at 60 min, n = 6). A2A is the adenosine receptor present in platelets; it is known that inosine is not an A2A ligand. Docking of adenosine and inosine inside A2A showed that the main difference is the formation by adenosine of an additional hydrogen bond between the NH2 of the adenine group and the residues Asn253 in H6 and Glu169 in EL2 of the A2A receptor. Conclusion Therefore

  6. Effects of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor and adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener in syngeneic mouse islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Juang, J-H; Kuo, C-H

    2010-12-01

    In the initial days after transplantation, islet grafts may be attacked by cytokines via cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), producing primary nonfunction. In addition, chronic overstimulation of β-cells may impair insulin secretion. To enhance the function of transplanted islets, the present study investigated the effects of rofecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, and NN414 (6-chloro-3-[1-methylcyclopropyl]amino-4H-thieno[3,2-e]-1,2,4-thiadiazine 1,1-dioxide), an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, on islet transplantation. Male inbred C57BL/6 mice were used as donors and recipients. One hundred fifty islets were isolated via collagenase digestion and density gradient, and syngeneically transplanted under the kidney capsule in mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Recipients were treated with or without rofecoxib, 10 mg/kg/d orally, or with or without NN414, 3 mg/kg/d orally, for 4 weeks. After transplantation, recipient body weight, blood glucose concentration, and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance were measured. The grafted kidney was extracted for determination of insulin content at 4 weeks. In the rofecoxib-treated and NN414-treated groups and both control groups, body weight remained stable, and the blood glucose concentration decreased progressively. However, at 4 weeks after transplantation in the groups treated or not treated with rofecoxib or NN414, no significant difference was observed in recipient body weight, blood glucose concentration, and glucose tolerance or in insulin content of the graft. These data indicate that posttransplantation treatment with rofecoxib or NN414 has no beneficial effect on transplantation outcome in diabetic mouse recipients engrafted with a marginal islet mass.

  7. Role of adenosine in postprandial and reactive hyperemia in canine jejunum.

    PubMed

    Sawmiller, D R; Chou, C C

    1992-10-01

    The role of adenosine in postprandial jejunal hyperemia was investigated by determining the effect of placement of predigested food into the jejunal lumen on blood flow and oxygen consumption before and during intra-arterial infusion of dipyridamole (1.5 microM arterial concn) or adenosine deaminase (9 U/ml arterial concn) in anesthetized dogs. Neither drug significantly altered resting jejunal blood flow and oxygen consumption. Before dipyridamole or deaminase, food placement increased blood flow by 30-36%, 26-42%, and 21-46%, and oxygen consumption by 13-22%, 21-22%, and 26-29%, during 0- to 3-, 4- to 7-, and 8- to 11-min placement periods, respectively. Adenosine deaminase abolished the entire 11-min hyperemia, whereas dipyridamole significantly enhanced the initial 7-min hyperemia (45-49%). Both drugs abolished the initial 7-min food-induced increase in oxygen consumption. Dipyridamole attenuated (14%), whereas deaminase did not alter (28%), the increased oxygen consumption that occurred at 8-11 min. Adenosine deaminase also prevented the food-induced increase in venoarterial adenosine concentration difference. In separate series of experiments, luminal placement of food significantly increased jejunal lymphatic adenosine concentration and release. Also, reactive hyperemia was accompanied by an increase in venous adenosine concentration and release. This study provides further evidence to support the thesis that adenosine plays a role in postprandial and reactive hyperemia in the canine jejunum.

  8. Activation of neuronal adenosine A1 receptors suppresses secretory reflexes in the guinea pig colon.

    PubMed

    Cooke, H J; Wang, Y; Liu, C Y; Zhang, H; Christofi, F L

    1999-02-01

    The role of adenosine A1 receptors (A1R) in reflex-evoked short-circuit current (Isc) indicative of chloride secretion was studied in the guinea pig colon. The A1R antagonist 8-cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT) enhanced reflex-evoked Isc. Adenosine deaminase and the nucleoside transport inhibitor S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine enhanced and reduced reflex-induced Isc, respectively. The A1R agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) inhibited reflex-evoked Isc at nanomolar concentrations, and its action was antagonized by CPT. In the presence of either N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptophyl-5-hydroxytryptophan amide to block the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-mediated pathway or piroxicam to block the prostaglandin-mediated pathway, CCPA reduced the residual reflex-evoked Isc. CCPA reduced the response to a 5-HT pulse without affecting the tetrodotoxin-insensitive Isc responses to carbachol or forskolin. Immunoreactivity for A1R was detected in the membrane (10% of neurons) and cytoplasm (90% of neurons) of neural protein gene product 9.5-immunoreactive (or S-100-negative) submucosal neurons, in glia, and in the muscularis mucosa. A1R immunoreactivity in a majority of neurons remained elevated in the cytoplasm despite preincubation with adenosine deaminase or CPT. A1R immunoreactivity colocalized in synaptophysin-immunoreactive presynaptic varicose nerve terminals. The results indicate that endogenous adenosine binding to high-affinity A1R on submucosal neurons acts as a physiological brake to suppress reflex-evoked Isc indicative of chloride secretion.

  9. Site-directed Mutagenesis of Key Residues Unveiled a Novel Allosteric Site on Human Adenosine Kinase for Pyrrolobenzoxa(thia)zepinone Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Savi, Lida; Brindisi, Margherita; Alfano, Gloria; Butini, Stefania; La Pietra, Valeria; Novellino, Ettore; Marinelli, Luciana; Lossani, Andrea; Focher, Federico; Cavella, Caterina; Campiani, Giuseppe; Gemma, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Most nucleoside kinases, besides the catalytic domain, feature an allosteric domain which modulates their activity. Generally, non-substrate analogs, interacting with allosteric sites, represent a major opportunity for developing more selective and safer therapeutics. We recently developed a series of non-nucleoside non-competitive inhibitors of human adenosine kinase (hAK), based on a pyrrolobenzoxa(thia)zepinone scaffold. Based on computational analysis, we hypothesized the existence of a novel allosteric site on hAK, topographically distinct from the catalytic site. In this study, we have adopted a multidisciplinary approach including molecular modeling, biochemical studies, and site-directed mutagenesis to validate our hypothesis. Based on a three-dimensional model of interaction between hAK and our molecules, we designed, cloned, and expressed specific, single and double point mutants of hAK (Q74A, Q78A, H107A, K341A, F338A, and Q74A-F338A). Kinetic characterization of recombinant enzymes indicated that these mutations did not affect enzyme functioning; conversely, mutated enzymes are endowed of reduced susceptibility to our non-nucleoside inhibitors, while maintaining comparable affinity for nucleoside inhibitors to the wild-type enzyme. This study represents the first characterization and validation of a novel allosteric site in hAK and may pave the way to the development of novel selective and potent non-nucleoside inhibitors of hAK endowed with therapeutic potential.

  10. Induction of oral tremor in mice by the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor galantamine: Reversal with adenosine A2A antagonism.

    PubMed

    Podurgiel, Samantha J; Spencer, Tiahna; Kovner, Rotem; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Correa, Merce; Salamone, John D

    2016-01-01

    Tremulous jaw movements (TJMs) have become a commonly used rat model of Parkinsonian tremor. TJMs can be induced by a number of neurochemical conditions that parallel those seen in human Parkinsonism, including DA depletion, DA antagonism, and cholinomimetic administration, and can be reduced by various antiparkinsonian agents. TJMs typically occur in bursts with the peak frequency in the range of 3-7.5 Hz, which is similar to the Parkinsonian tremor frequency range. While the vast majority of this work has been done using rats, current efforts have focused on extending the TJM model to mice. The aim of the present studies was to establish a mouse model of Parkinsonian resting tremor using the anticholinesterase galantamine, and to investigate the effects of adenosine A2A antagonism on galantamine-induced TJMs. Galantamine significantly induced TJMs in a dose-dependent manner (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 mg/kg IP). The TJMs tended to occur in bursts in the 3-7.5 Hz frequency range, with a peak frequency of approximately 6 Hz. Systemic administration of the adenosine A2A antagonist MSX-3 (2.5, 5.0, 10.0 mg/kg) significantly attenuated galantamine-induced TJMs. Co-administration of MSX-3 also altered the local frequency of galantamine-induced TJMs, decreasing the peak frequency from approximately 6 Hz to 5 Hz, though the vast majority of TJMs remained in the frequency range characteristic of Parkinsonian resting tremor. These results indicate that adenosine A2A antagonism is capable of reducing anticholinesterase-induced TJMs in mice. Extending the TJM model to mice gives researchers an additional avenue for investigating drug-induced Parkinsonism and tremorogenesis, and could be a useful addition to the study of motor abnormalities observed in mouse genetic models of Parkinsonism.

  11. Rhodium Complex and Enzyme Couple Mediated Electrochemical Detection of Adenosine.

    PubMed

    Han, Dawoon; Kim, Hyeong-Mook; Chand, Rohit; Kim, Gyumin; Shin, Ik-Soo; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2015-10-01

    Adenosine is one of the nucleoside which plays an important role in signal transduction and neuromodulation. This work proposes a simple electrochemical assay, comprising two enzymes and rhodium complex based electron transfer mediator, for the detection of adenosine. Sequential reaction of adenosine deaminase and L-glutamic dehydrogenase and the supporting cycle between β-NADH and mediator enable quantitative analysis of adenosine. Role of electron transfer mediator is the conveyance of proton from electrode to β-NAD(+) for regeneration of β-NADH. The electrochemical characteristics of electron transfer mediator were also studied. Real-time adenosine detection was carried out using this multiple enzyme based chronoamperometric assay. The analysis results show a low limit of detection (140 μM) and good correspondence between current signal and the adenosine concentration (R (2) = 0.997).

  12. High-Throughput Screening for RecA Inhibitors Using a Transcreener Adenosine 5′-O-Diphosphate Assay

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Eliza J.R.; Janzen, William P.; Kireev, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The activities of the bacterial RecA protein are involved in the de novo development and transmission of antibiotic resistance genes, thus allowing bacteria to overcome the metabolic stress induced by antibacterial agents. RecA is ubiquitous and highly conserved among bacteria, but has only distant homologs in human cells. Together, this evidence points to RecA as a novel and attractive antibacterial drug target. All known RecA functions require the formation of a complex formed by multiple adenosine 5′-O-triphosphate (ATP)-bound RecA monomers on single-stranded DNA. In this complex, RecA hydrolyzes ATP. Although several methods for assessing RecA's ATPase activity have been reported, these assay conditions included relatively high concentrations of enzyme and ATP and thereby restricted the RecA conformational state. Herein, we describe the validation of commercial reagents (Transcreener® adenosine 5′-O-diphosphate [ADP]2 fluorescence polarization assay) for the high-throughput measurement of RecA's ATPase activity with lower concentrations of ATP and RecA. Under optimized conditions, ADP detection by the Transcreener reagent provided robust and reproducible activity data (Z′=0.92). Using the Transcreener assay, we screened 113,477 small molecules against purified RecA protein. In total, 177 small molecules were identified as confirmed hits, of which 79 were characterized by IC50 values ≤10 μM and 35 were active in bioassays with live bacteria. This set of compounds comprises previously unidentified scaffolds for RecA inhibition and represents tractable hit structures for efforts aimed at tuning RecA inhibitory activity in both biochemical and bacteriological assays. PMID:22192312

  13. High-throughput screening for RecA inhibitors using a transcreener adenosine 5'-O-diphosphate assay.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Eliza J R; Janzen, William P; Kireev, Dmitri; Singleton, Scott F

    2012-06-01

    The activities of the bacterial RecA protein are involved in the de novo development and transmission of antibiotic resistance genes, thus allowing bacteria to overcome the metabolic stress induced by antibacterial agents. RecA is ubiquitous and highly conserved among bacteria, but has only distant homologs in human cells. Together, this evidence points to RecA as a novel and attractive antibacterial drug target. All known RecA functions require the formation of a complex formed by multiple adenosine 5'-O-triphosphate (ATP)-bound RecA monomers on single-stranded DNA. In this complex, RecA hydrolyzes ATP. Although several methods for assessing RecA's ATPase activity have been reported, these assay conditions included relatively high concentrations of enzyme and ATP and thereby restricted the RecA conformational state. Herein, we describe the validation of commercial reagents (Transcreener(®) adenosine 5'-O-diphosphate [ADP](2) fluorescence polarization assay) for the high-throughput measurement of RecA's ATPase activity with lower concentrations of ATP and RecA. Under optimized conditions, ADP detection by the Transcreener reagent provided robust and reproducible activity data (Z'=0.92). Using the Transcreener assay, we screened 113,477 small molecules against purified RecA protein. In total, 177 small molecules were identified as confirmed hits, of which 79 were characterized by IC(50) values ≤ 10 μM and 35 were active in bioassays with live bacteria. This set of compounds comprises previously unidentified scaffolds for RecA inhibition and represents tractable hit structures for efforts aimed at tuning RecA inhibitory activity in both biochemical and bacteriological assays.

  14. Altered AMP deaminase activity may extend postmortem glycolysis.

    PubMed

    England, E M; Matarneh, S K; Scheffler, T L; Wachet, C; Gerrard, D E

    2015-04-01

    Postmortem energy metabolism drives hydrogen accumulation in muscle and results in a fairly constant ultimate pH. Extended glycolysis results in adverse pork quality and may be possible with greater adenonucleotide availability postmortem. We hypothesized that slowing adenonucleotide removal by reducing AMP deaminase activity would extend glycolysis and lower the ultimate pH of muscle. Longissimus muscle samples were incorporated into an in vitro system that mimics postmortem glycolysis with or without pentostatin, an AMP deaminase inhibitor. Pentostatin lowered ultimate pH and increased lactate and glucose 6-phosphate with time. Based on these results and that AMPK γ3(R200Q) mutated pigs (RN⁻) produce low ultimate pH pork, we hypothesized AMP deaminase abundance and activity would be lower in RN⁻ muscle than wild-type. RN⁻ muscle contained lower AMP deaminase abundance and activity. These data show that altering adenonucleotide availability postmortem can extend postmortem pH decline and suggest that AMP deaminase activity may, in part, contribute to the low ultimate pH observed in RN⁻ pork.

  15. A1 and A2a receptors mediate inhibitory effects of adenosine on the motor activity of human colon.

    PubMed

    Fornai, M; Antonioli, L; Colucci, R; Ghisu, N; Buccianti, P; Marioni, A; Chiarugi, M; Tuccori, M; Blandizzi, C; Del Tacca, M

    2009-04-01

    Experimental evidence in animal models suggests that adenosine is involved in the regulation of digestive functions. This study examines the influence of adenosine on the contractile activity of human colon. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed A(1) and A(2a) receptor expression in colonic neuromuscular layers. Circular muscle preparations were connected to isotonic transducers to determine the effects of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; A(1) receptor antagonist), ZM 241385 (A(2a) receptor antagonist), CCPA (A(1) receptor agonist) and 2-[(p-2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethyl-carboxamide-adenosine (CGS 21680; A(2a) receptor agonist) on motor responses evoked by electrical stimulation or carbachol. Electrically evoked contractions were enhanced by DPCPX and ZM 241385, and reduced by CCPA and CGS 21680. Similar effects were observed when colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine (noradrenergic blocker), L-732,138, GR-159897 and SB-218795 (NK receptor antagonists). However, in the presence of guanethidine, NK receptor antagonists and N(omega)-propyl-L-arginine (NPA; neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), the effects of DPCPX and CCPA were still evident, while those of ZM 241385 and CGS 21680 no longer occurred. Carbachol-induced contractions were unaffected by A(2a) receptor ligands, but they were enhanced or reduced by DPCPX and CCPA, respectively. When colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine, NK antagonists and atropine, electrically induced relaxations were partly reduced by ZM 241385 or NPA, but unaffected by DPCPX. Dipyridamole or application of exogenous adenosine reduced electrically and carbachol-evoked contractions, whereas adenosine deaminase enhanced such motor responses. In conclusion, adenosine exerts an inhibitory control on human colonic motility. A(1) receptors mediate direct modulating actions on smooth muscle, whereas A(2a) receptors operate through inhibitory nitrergic nerve pathways.

  16. Adenine and adenosine salvage in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Boitz, Jan M; Ullman, Buddy

    2013-08-01

    6-aminopurine metabolism in Leishmania is unique among trypanosomatid pathogens since this genus expresses two distinct routes for adenine salvage: adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) and adenine deaminase (AAH). To evaluate the relative contributions of APRT and AAH, adenine salvage was evaluated in Δaprt, Δaah, and Δaprt/Δaah null mutants of L. donovani. The data confirm that AAH plays the dominant role in adenine metabolism in L. donovani, although either enzyme alone is sufficient for salvage. Adenosine salvage was also evaluated in a cohort of null mutants. Adenosine is also primarily converted to hypoxanthine, either intracellularly or extracellularly, but can also be phosphorylated to the nucleotide level by adenosine kinase when the predominant pathways are genetically or pharmacologically blocked. These data provide genetic verification for the relative contributions of 6-aminopurine metabolizing pathways in L. donovani and demonstrate that all of the pathways can function under appropriate conditions of genetic or pharmacologic perturbation.

  17. Possible mechanism for the inhibition of gastric (H+ + K+)-adenosine triphosphatase by the proton pump inhibitor AG-1749

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaya, H.; Satoh, H.; Kubo, K.; Maki, Y.

    1989-02-01

    Mechanisms related to the inhibition of (H+ + K+)-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) by 2-(((3-methyl-4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)-2-pyridyl)methyl) sulfinyl)-1H-benzimidazole (AG-1749) were studied using canine gastric microsomes. AG-1749 (1-100 microM) inhibited the K+-stimulated ATP hydrolysis and vesicular accumulation of H+. AG-1749 bound to the microsomes concentration-dependently and decreased the number of free SH groups; the binding correlating with the enzyme inhibition. Both the binding and inhibition were antagonized by dithiothreitol. N-ethylmaleimide inhibited the (H+ + K+)-ATPase and decreased the binding of (/sup 14/C)AG-1749 to the microsomes. The inhibitory effect of AG-1749 gradually increased with incubation time, and was enhanced by lowering the pH. AG-2000 and AG-1812, acid-induced rearrangement products of AG-1749, inhibited (H+ + K+)-ATPase potently, rapidly and independently of pH; the inhibition was antagonized by dithiothreitol. We propose that AG-1749 is transformed into its active forms within the acidic compartment of the parietal cells and that the active compounds inhibit (H+ + K+)-ATPase activity by reacting with the SH groups of the enzyme.

  18. Antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, anti-inflammatory and adenosine deaminase– lowering effects of garlic in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahat; Chhatwal, Simran; Arora, Sahiba; Sharma, Sita; Singh, Jaswinder; Singh, Narinder; Bhandari, Vikram; Khurana, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, with long term macrovascular and microvascular complications. The treatment is lifestyle management, exercise, weight control, and antihyperglycemic drugs such as sulfonylureas, biguanides, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, thiazolidinediones, and meglitinide. Recently, a direct association between high levels of C-reactive protein and serum adenosine deaminase levels in patients with uncontrolled diabetes with long-term complications has been seen. This study was conducted to assess the antihyperglycemic, lipid-lowering, anti-inflammatory, and improving glycemic control of garlic in type 2 diabetes patients with obesity. Materials and methods This was an open-label, prospective, comparative study, conducted on 60 patients having type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. The patients were divided into two groups of 30 each, of either sex. Group 1 was given metformin tablets, 500 mg twice a day (BD)/three times a day (TDS), after meals, and group 2 was given metformin tablets, 500 mg BD/TDS, after meals, along with garlic (Allium sativum) capsules, 250 mg BD. Patients were routinely investigated for fasting and postprandial blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), serum adenosine deaminase levels and lipid profile (serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) at the start of the study. Patients were followed up for 12 weeks, with monitoring of fasting and postprandial blood glucose at 2 week intervals, and monitoring of the other parameters at the end of study. Data obtained at the end of the study was statistically analyzed using Student’s t test. Results It was observed that both metformin alone and metformin with garlic reduced fasting blood glucose and postprandial blood glucose significantly, with a greater percentage reduction with metformin plus garlic; however, change in HbA1c levels was not

  19. Phosphorylation of Cytokinin by Adenosine Kinase from Wheat Germ 1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong-Maw; Eckert, Richard L.

    1977-01-01

    Adenosine kinase was partially purified from wheat germ. This enzyme preparation, which was devoid of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase and nearly free of adenosine deaminase but contained adenylate kinase, rapidly phosphorylated adenosine and a cytokinin, N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenosine. Electrophoretic analysis indicated that only N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenosine-monophosphate was formed from the cytokinin while about 55% AMP, 45% ADP, and a trace of ATP were formed from adenosine. The biosynthesized nucleoside monophosphates were quantitatively hydrolyzed to the corresponding nucleosides by 5′-nucleotidase and the isopentenyl side chain of the phosphorylated cytokinin was not cleaved. The enzyme did not catalyze phosphorylation of inosine. The phosphorylation of the cytokinin and adenosine required ATP and Mg2+. The pH optimum was from 6.8 to 7.2 for both the cytokinin and adenosine. At pH 7 and 37 C the Km and Vmax for the cytokinin were 31 μm and 8.3 nmoles per mg protein per minute, and the values for adenosine were 8.7 μm and 46 nmoles per mg protein per minute. Crude enzyme preparations from tobacco callus tissue and wheat germ phosphorylated N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenosine. These preparations also phosphorylated N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenine when 5-phosphorylribose-1-pyrophosphate was present. PMID:16659870

  20. RNA Editing by Adenosine Deaminases That Act on RNA

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Brenda L.

    2007-01-01

    ADARs are RNA editing enzymes that target double-stranded regions of nuclear-encoded RNA and viral RNA. These enzymes are particularly abundant in the nervous system, where they diversify the information encoded in the genome, for example, by altering codons in mRNAs. The functions of ADARs in known substrates suggest that the enzymes serve to fine-tune and optimize many biological pathways, in ways that we are only starting to imagine. ADARs are also interesting in regard to the remarkable double-stranded structures of their substrates and how enzyme specificity is achieved with little regard to sequence. This review summarizes ongoing investigations of the enzyme family and their substrates, focusing on biological function as well as biochemical mechanism. PMID:12045112

  1. The antidepressant-like effect of inosine in the FST is associated with both adenosine A1 and A 2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Kaster, Manuella P; Budni, Josiane; Gazal, Marta; Cunha, Mauricio P; Santos, Adair R S; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2013-09-01

    Inosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside, which is formed during the breakdown of adenosine. The adenosinergic system was already described as capable of modulating mood in preclinical models; we now explored the effects of inosine in two predictive models of depression: the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST). Mice treated with inosine displayed higher anti-immobility in the FST (5 and 50 mg/kg, intraperitoneal route (i.p.)) and in the TST (1 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) when compared to vehicle-treated groups. These antidepressant-like effects started 30 min and lasted for 2 h after intraperitoneal administration of inosine and were not accompanied by any changes in the ambulatory activity in the open-field test. Both adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonists prevented the antidepressant-like effect of inosine in the FST. In addition, the administration of an adenosine deaminase inhibitor (1 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) also caused an antidepressant-like effect in the FST. These results indicate that inosine possesses an antidepressant-like effect in the FST and TST probably through the activation of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, further reinforcing the potential of targeting the purinergic system to the management of mood disorders.

  2. Elevated adenosine signaling via adenosine A2B receptor induces normal and sickle erythrocyte sphingosine kinase 1 activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kaiqi; Zhang, Yujin; Bogdanov, Mikhail V; Wu, Hongyu; Song, Anren; Li, Jessica; Dowhan, William; Idowu, Modupe; Juneja, Harinder S; Molina, Jose G; Blackburn, Michael R; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2015-03-05

    Erythrocyte possesses high sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) activity and is the major cell type supplying plasma sphingosine-1-phosphate, a signaling lipid regulating multiple physiological and pathological functions. Recent studies revealed that erythrocyte SphK1 activity is upregulated in sickle cell disease (SCD) and contributes to sickling and disease progression. However, how erythrocyte SphK1 activity is regulated remains unknown. Here we report that adenosine induces SphK1 activity in human and mouse sickle and normal erythrocytes in vitro. Next, using 4 adenosine receptor-deficient mice and pharmacological approaches, we determined that the A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) is essential for adenosine-induced SphK1 activity in human and mouse normal and sickle erythrocytes in vitro. Subsequently, we provide in vivo genetic evidence that adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency leads to excess plasma adenosine and elevated erythrocyte SphK1 activity. Lowering adenosine by ADA enzyme therapy or genetic deletion of ADORA2B significantly reduced excess adenosine-induced erythrocyte SphK1 activity in ADA-deficient mice. Finally, we revealed that protein kinase A-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation functioning downstream of ADORA2B underlies adenosine-induced erythrocyte SphK1 activity. Overall, our findings reveal a novel signaling network regulating erythrocyte SphK1 and highlight innovative mechanisms regulating SphK1 activity in normal and SCD.

  3. The Role of cGMP on Adenosine A1 Receptor-mediated Inhibition of Synaptic Transmission at the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Isa; Serpa, André; Sebastião, Ana M.; Cascalheira, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Both adenosine A1 receptor and cGMP inhibit synaptic transmission at the hippocampus and recently it was found that A1 receptor increased cGMP levels in hippocampus, but the role of cGMP on A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of synaptic transmission remains to be established. In the present work we investigated if blocking the NOS/sGC/cGMP/PKG pathway using nitric oxide synthase (NOS), protein kinase G (PKG), and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitors modify the A1 receptor effect on synaptic transmission. Neurotransmission was evaluated by measuring the slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) evoked by electrical stimulation at hippocampal slices. N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 15 nM), a selective A1 receptor agonist, reversibly decreased the fEPSPs by 54 ± 5%. Incubation of the slices with an inhibitor of NOS (L-NAME, 200 μM) decreased the CPA effect on fEPSPs by 57 ± 9% in female rats. In males, ODQ (10 μM), an sGC inhibitor, decreased the CPA inhibitory effect on fEPSPs by 23 ± 6%, but only when adenosine deaminase (ADA,1 U/ml) was present; similar results were found in females, where ODQ decreased CPA-induced inhibition of fEPSP slope by 23 ± 7%. In male rats, the presence of the PKG inhibitor (KT5823, 1 nM) decreased the CPA effect by 45.0 ± 9%; similar results were obtained in females, where KT5823 caused a 32 ± 9% decrease on the CPA effect. In conclusion, the results suggest that the inhibitory action of adenosine A1 receptors on synaptic transmission at hippocampus is, in part, mediated by the NOS/sGC/cGMP/PKG pathway. PMID:27148059

  4. Effect of bucladesine, Pentoxifylline, and H-89 as cyclic adenosine monophosphate analog, phosphodiesterase and protein kinase A inhibitor on acute pain.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Forouz; Hosseini-Zare, Mahshid Sadat; Aghajani, Haleh; Seyedi, Yalda; Hosseini-Zare, Maryam Sadat; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2017-03-07

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and its dependent pathway on thermal nociception in a mouse model of acute pain. Here we studied the effect of H-89 (protein kinase A inhibitor), Bucladesine (Db-cAMP) (membrane permeable analog of cAMP) and pentoxifylline (PTX) (non-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor) on pain sensation. Different doses of H-89 (0.05, 0.1 and 0.5 mg/100g), PTX (5, 10 and 20 mg/100g), and Db-cAMP (50, 100 and 300 nM/mouse) were administered intraperitoneally (I.p.) 15 minutes before a tail-flick test. In combination groups, we injected the first and the second compound 30 and 15 minutes before the tail-flick test, respectively. I.p. administration of H-89 and PTX significantly decreased the thermal-induced pain sensation in their low applied doses. Bucladesine, however, decreased the pain sensation in a dose-dependent manner. The highest applied dose of H-89 (0.5 mg/100g) attenuated the anti-nociceptive effect of Db-cAMP in doses of 50 and 100 nM/mouse. Surprisingly, Db-cAMP decreased the anti-nociceptive effect of the lowest dose of H-89 (0.05mg/100g). All applied doses of PTX reduced the effect of 0.05mg/100g H-89 on pain sensation; however, the highest dose of H-89 compromised the anti-nociceptive effect of 20 mg/100g dose of PTX. Co-administration of Db-cAMP and PTX increased the anti-nociceptive effect of each compound on thermal-induced pain. In conclusion, PTX, H-89, and Db-cAMP affect the thermal-induced pain by probably interacting with intracellular cAMP and cGMP signaling pathways and cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Temporal variations of adenosine metabolism in human blood.

    PubMed

    Chagoya de Sánchez, V; Hernández-Muñoz, R; Suárez, J; Vidrio, S; Yáñez, L; Aguilar-Roblero, R; Oksenberg, A; Vega-González, A; Villalobos, L; Rosenthal, L; Fernández-Cancino, F; Drucker-Colín, R; Díaz-Muñoz, M

    1996-08-01

    Eight diurnally active (06:00-23:00 h) subjects were adapted for 2 days to the room conditions where the experiments were performed. Blood sampling for adenosine metabolites and metabolizing enzymes was done hourly during the activity span and every 30 min during sleep. The results showed that adenosine and its catabolites (inosine, hypoxanthine, and uric acid), adenosine synthesizing (S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and 5'-nucleotidase), degrading (adenosine deaminase) and nucleotide-forming (adenosine kinase) enzymes as well as adenine nucleotides (AMP, ADP, and ATP) undergo statistically significant fluctuations (ANOVA) during the 24 h. However, energy charge was invariable. Glucose and lactate chronograms were determined as metabolic indicators. The same data analyzed by the chi-square periodogram and Fourier series indicated ultradian oscillatory periods for all the metabolites and enzymatic activities determined, and 24-h oscillatory components for inosine, hypoxanthine, adenine nucleotides, glucose, and the activities of SAH-hydrolase, 5'-nucleotidase, and adenosine kinase. The single cosinor method showed significant oscillatory components exclusively for lactate. As a whole, these results suggest that adenosine metabolism may play a role as a biological oscillator coordinating and/or modulating the energy homeostasis and physiological status of erythrocytes in vivo and could be an important factor in the distribution of purine rings for the rest of the organism.

  6. Modulation of bladder function by luminal adenosine turnover and A1 receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Prakasam, H. Sandeep; Herrington, Heather; Roppolo, James R.; Jackson, Edwin K.

    2012-01-01

    The bladder uroepithelium transmits information to the underlying nervous and musculature systems, is under constant cyclical strain, expresses all four adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3), and is a site of adenosine production. Although adenosine has a well-described protective effect in several organs, there is a lack of information about adenosine turnover in the uroepithelium or whether altering luminal adenosine concentrations impacts bladder function or overactivity. We observed that the concentration of extracellular adenosine at the mucosal surface of the uroepithelium was regulated by ecto-adenosine deaminase and by equilibrative nucleoside transporters, whereas adenosine kinase and equilibrative nucleoside transporters modulated serosal levels. We further observed that enriching endogenous adenosine by blocking its routes of metabolism or direct activation of mucosal A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), a selective agonist, stimulated bladder activity by lowering the threshold pressure for voiding. Finally, CCPA did not quell bladder hyperactivity in animals with acute cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis but instead exacerbated their irritated bladder phenotype. In conclusion, we find that adenosine levels at both surfaces of the uroepithelium are modulated by turnover, that blocking these pathways or stimulating A1 receptors directly at the luminal surface promotes bladder contractions, and that adenosine further stimulates voiding in animals with cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis. PMID:22552934

  7. Transendothelial transport and metabolism of adenosine and inosine in the intact rat aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, K.; Kelm, M.K.; Buerrig, K.F.S.; Schrader, J.

    1989-06-01

    This study was aimed at defining the role of vascular endothelium in the transport and metabolism of adenosine. For this purpose, endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded isolated rat aortas, perfused at constant flow (2 ml/min), were prelabeled with 3H-adenosine or 3H-inosine for 10 minutes at concentrations of 0.012-100 microM. Sequestration of adenosine by endothelium was determined from radioactivity recovered during selective endothelial cell removal with deoxycholic acid (0.75% for 15 seconds). In the physiological concentration range of adenosine (0.012-1 microM), fractional sequestration by endothelium was 90-92% of the total adenosine incorporation by the aorta. Endothelial sequestration of inosine at 0.1 microM was 85%. At 100 microM adenosine or inosine, fractional sequestration by aortic endothelium was 33% and 39%, respectively. Analysis of the specific radioactivity of adenine nucleotides extracted from prelabeled aortas indicated that most of the adenosine was incorporated into endothelial adenine nucleotides. Incorporation of inosine into endothelial ATP was approximately 15% that of adenosine. Inhibition of aortic adenosine deaminase with erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA) did not influence sequestration of 0.1 microM adenosine, but resulted in a 49% reduction of total endothelial incorporation at 100 microM adenosine. Transfer of radioactive purines from the endothelium to underlying smooth muscle after prelabeling was equivalent to only 1%/hr of total endothelial radioactivity.

  8. Bacterial Ammeline Metabolism via Guanine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Seffernick, Jennifer L.; Dodge, Anthony G.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Bumpus, John A.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2010-01-01

    Melamine toxicity in mammals has been attributed to the blockage of kidney tubules by insoluble complexes of melamine with cyanuric acid or uric acid. Bacteria metabolize melamine via three consecutive deamination reactions to generate cyanuric acid. The second deamination reaction, in which ammeline is the substrate, is common to many bacteria, but the genes and enzymes responsible have not been previously identified. Here, we combined bioinformatics and experimental data to identify guanine deaminase as the enzyme responsible for this biotransformation. The ammeline degradation phenotype was demonstrated in wild-type Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas strains, including E. coli K12 and Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Bioinformatics analysis of these and other genomes led to the hypothesis that the ammeline deaminating enzyme was guanine deaminase. An E. coli guanine deaminase deletion mutant was deficient in ammeline deaminase activity, supporting the role of guanine deaminase in this reaction. Two guanine deaminases from disparate sources (Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 and Homo sapiens) that had available X-ray structures were purified to homogeneity and shown to catalyze ammeline deamination at rates sufficient to support bacterial growth on ammeline as a sole nitrogen source. In silico models of guanine deaminase active sites showed that ammeline could bind to guanine deaminase in a similar orientation to guanine, with a favorable docking score. Other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily that are not guanine deaminases were assayed in vitro, and none had substantial ammeline deaminase activity. The present study indicated that widespread guanine deaminases have a promiscuous activity allowing them to catalyze a key reaction in the bacterial transformation of melamine to cyanuric acid and potentially contribute to the toxicity of melamine. PMID:20023034

  9. Functions and Regulation of RNA Editing by ADAR Deaminases

    PubMed Central

    Nishikura, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    One type of RNA editing converts adenosines to inosines (A→I editing) in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. A→I RNA editing is mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes. A→I RNA editing of protein-coding sequences of a limited number of mammalian genes results in recoding and subsequent alterations of their functions. However, A→I RNA editing most frequently targets repetitive RNA sequences located within introns and 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs). Although the biological significance of noncoding RNA editing remains largely unknown, several possibilities, including its role in the control of endogenous short interfering RNAs (esiRNAs), have been proposed. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed that the biogenesis and functions of certain microRNAs (miRNAs) are regulated by the editing of their precursors. Here, I review the recent findings that indicate new functions for A→I editing in the regulation of noncoding RNAs and for interactions between RNA editing and RNA interference mechanisms. PMID:20192758

  10. Preferential activation of excitatory adenosine receptors at rat hippocampal and neuromuscular synapses by adenosine formed from released adenine nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, R. A.; Correia-de-Sá, P.; Sebastião, A. M.; Ribeiro, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. In the present work, we investigated the action of adenosine originating from extracellular catabolism of adenine nucleotides, in two preparations where synaptic transmission is modulated by both inhibitory A1 and excitatory A(2a)-adenosine receptors, the rat hippocampal Schaffer fibres/CA1 pyramid synapses and the rat innervated hemidiaphragm. 2. Endogenous adenosine tonically inhibited synaptic transmission, since 0.5-2 u ml-1 of adenosine deaminase increased both the population spike amplitude (30 +/- 4%) and field excitatory post-synaptic potential (f.e.p.s.p.) slope (27 +/- 4%) recorded from hippocampal slices and the evoked [3H]-acetylcholine ([3H]-ACh) release from the motor nerve terminals (25 +/- 2%). 3. alpha, beta-Methylene adenosine diphosphate (AOPCP) in concentrations (100-200 microM) that almost completely inhibited the formation of adenosine from the extracellular catabolism of AMP, decreased population spike amplitude by 39 +/- 5% and f.e.p.s.p. slope by 32 +/- 3% in hippocampal slices and [3H]-ACh release from motor nerve terminals by 27 +/- 3%. 4. Addition of exogenous 5'-nucleotidase (5 u ml-1) prevented the inhibitory effect of AOPCP on population spike amplitude and f.e.p.s.p. slope by 43-57%, whereas the P2 antagonist, suramin (100 microM), did not modify the effect of AOPCP. 5. In both preparations, the effect of AOPCP resulted from prevention of adenosine formation since it was no longer evident when accumulation of extracellular adenosine was hindered by adenosine deaminase (0.5-2 u ml-1). The inhibitory effect of AOPCP was still evident when A1 receptors were blocked by 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (2.5-5 nM), but was abolished by the A2 antagonist, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (10 microM). 6. These results suggest that adenosine originating from catabolism of released adenine nucleotides preferentially activates excitatory A2 receptors in hippocampal CAI pyramid synapses and in phrenic motor nerve endings. PMID:8886406

  11. Neurabin scaffolding of adenosine receptor and RGS4 regulates anti-seizure effect of endogenous adenosine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Yin; Cottingham, Christopher; McMahon, Lori; Jiao, Kai; Greengard, Paul; Wang, Qin

    2012-02-22

    Endogenous adenosine is an essential protective agent against neural damage by various insults to the brain. However, the therapeutic potential of adenosine receptor-directed ligands for neuroprotection is offset by side effects in peripheral tissues and organs. An increase in adenosine receptor responsiveness to endogenous adenosine would enhance neuroprotection while avoiding the confounding effects of exogenous ligands. Here we report novel regulation of adenosine-evoked responses by a neural tissue-specific protein, neurabin. Neurabin attenuated adenosine A(1) receptor (A1R) signaling by assembling a complex between the A1R and the regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (RGS4), a protein known to turn off G-protein signaling. Inactivation of the neurabin gene enhanced A1R signaling and promoted the protective effect of adenosine against excitotoxic seizure and neuronal death in mice. Furthermore, administration of a small molecule inhibitor of RGS4 significantly attenuated seizure severity in mice. Notably, the dose of kainate capable of inducing an ∼50% rate of death in wild-type (WT) mice did not affect neurabin-null mice or WT mice cotreated with an RGS4 inhibitor. The enhanced anti-seizure and neuroprotective effect achieved by disruption of the A1R/neurabin/RGS4 complex is elicited by the on-site and on-demand release of endogenous adenosine, and does not require administration of A1R ligands. These data identify neurabin-RGS4 as a novel tissue-selective regulatory mechanism for fine-tuning adenosine receptor function in the nervous system. Moreover, these findings implicate the A1R/neurabin/RGS4 complex as a valid therapeutic target for specifically manipulating the neuroprotective effects of endogenous adenosine.

  12. Discovery of β-D-2'-deoxy-2'-α-fluoro-4'-α-cyano-5-aza-7,9-dideaza adenosine as a potent nucleoside inhibitor of respiratory syncytial virus with excellent selectivity over mitochondrial RNA and DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Michael O; Mackman, Richard; Byun, Daniel; Hui, Hon; Barauskas, Ona; Birkus, Gabriel; Chun, Byoung-Kwon; Doerffler, Edward; Feng, Joy; Karki, Kapil; Lee, Gary; Perron, Michel; Siegel, Dustin; Swaminathan, Swami; Lee, William

    2015-06-15

    Novel 4'-substituted β-d-2'-deoxy-2'-α-fluoro (2'd2'F) nucleoside inhibitors of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are reported. The introduction of 4'-substitution onto 2'd2'F nucleoside analogs resulted in compounds demonstrating potent cell based RSV inhibition, improved inhibition of the RSV polymerase by the nucleoside triphosphate metabolites, and enhanced selectivity over incorporation by mitochondrial RNA and DNA polymerases. Selectivity over the mitochondrial polymerases was found to be extremely sensitive to the specific 4'-substitution and not readily predictable. Combining the most potent and selective 4'-groups from N-nucleoside analogs onto a 2'd2'F C-nucleoside analog resulted in the identification of β-D-2'-deoxy-2'-α-fluoro-4'-α-cyano-5-aza-7,9-dideaza adenosine as a promising nucleoside lead for RSV.

  13. Rescue of the Orphan Enzyme Isoguanine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, Daniel S.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Dangott, Lawrence J.; Almo, Steven C.; Raushel, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from Escherichia coli was shown to catalyze the deamination of isoguanine (2-oxoadenine) to xanthine. Isoguanine is an oxidation product of adenine in DNA that is mutagenic to the cell. The isoguanine deaminase activity in E. coli was partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The active protein was identified by peptide mass fingerprint analysis as cytosine deaminase. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoguanine at pH 7.7 are kcat = 49 s-1, Km = 72 μM, and kcat/Km = 6.7 × 105 M-1 s-1. The kinetic constant for the deamination of cytosine are kcat = 45 s-1, Km = 302 μM, and kcat/Km = 1.5 × 105 M-1 s-1. Under these reaction conditions isoguanine is the better substrate for cytosine deaminase. The three dimensional structure of CDA was determined with isoguanine in the active site. PMID:21604715

  14. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate and adenosine in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stagg, J; Smyth, M J

    2010-09-30

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is actively released in the extracellular environment in response to tissue damage and cellular stress. Through the activation of P2X and P2Y receptors, extracellular ATP enhances tissue repair, promotes the recruitment of immune phagocytes and dendritic cells, and acts as a co-activator of NLR family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes. The conversion of extracellular ATP to adenosine, in contrast, essentially through the enzymatic activity of the ecto-nucleotidases CD39 and CD73, acts as a negative-feedback mechanism to prevent excessive immune responses. Here we review the effects of extracellular ATP and adenosine on tumorigenesis. First, we summarize the functions of extracellular ATP and adenosine in the context of tumor immunity. Second, we present an overview of the immunosuppressive and pro-angiogenic effects of extracellular adenosine. Third, we present experimental evidence that extracellular ATP and adenosine receptors are expressed by tumor cells and enhance tumor growth. Finally, we discuss recent studies, including our own work, which suggest that therapeutic approaches that promote ATP-mediated activation of inflammasomes, or inhibit the accumulation of tumor-derived extracellular adenosine, may constitute effective new means to induce anticancer activity.

  15. A rapid enzymatic assay for high-throughput screening of adenosine-producing strains

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Huina; Zu, Xin; Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a major local regulator of tissue function and industrially useful as precursor for the production of medicinal nucleoside substances. High-throughput screening of adenosine overproducers is important for industrial microorganism breeding. An enzymatic assay of adenosine was developed by combined adenosine deaminase (ADA) with indophenol method. The ADA catalyzes the cleavage of adenosine to inosine and NH3, the latter can be accurately determined by indophenol method. The assay system was optimized to deliver a good performance and could tolerate the addition of inorganic salts and many nutrition components to the assay mixtures. Adenosine could be accurately determined by this assay using 96-well microplates. Spike and recovery tests showed that this assay can accurately and reproducibly determine increases in adenosine in fermentation broth without any pretreatment to remove proteins and potentially interfering low-molecular-weight molecules. This assay was also applied to high-throughput screening for high adenosine-producing strains. The high selectivity and accuracy of the ADA assay provides rapid and high-throughput analysis of adenosine in large numbers of samples. PMID:25580842

  16. Studies of 1-Amino-2,2-difluorocyclopropane-1-carboxylic Acid: Mechanism of Decomposition and Inhibition of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic Acid Deaminase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Hao; Wang, Shao-An; Ruszczycky, Mark W; Chen, Huawei; Li, Keqiang; Murakami, Kazuo; Liu, Hung-wen

    2015-07-02

    1-Amino-2,2-difluorocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (DFACC) is of interest in the study of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase due to the increased reactivity of its cyclopropyl functionality. It is shown that DFACC is unstable under near-physiological conditions where it primarily decomposes via specific-base catalysis to 3-fluoro-2-oxobut-3-enoic acid with a rate constant of 0.18 ± 0.01 min(-1). Upon incubation with ACC deaminase, DFACC is found to be a slow-dissociating inhibitor of ACC deaminase with submicromolar affinity.

  17. Unpredictable Chronic Stress Alters Adenosine Metabolism in Zebrafish Brain.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, F F; Altenhofen, S; Kist, L W; Leite, C E; Bogo, M R; Cognato, G P; Bonan, C D

    2016-05-01

    Stress is considered a risk factor for several human disorders. Despite the broad knowledge of stress responses in mammals, data on the relationship between unpredictable chronic stress (UCS) and its effects on purinergic signaling are limited. ATP hydrolysis by ectonucleotidases is an important source of adenosine, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) contributes to the control of the nucleoside concentrations. Considering that some stress models could affect signaling systems, the objective of this study was to investigate whether UCS alters ectonucleotidase and ADA pathway in zebrafish brain. Additionally, we analyzed ATP metabolism as well as ada1, ada2.1, ada2.2, adaL, and adaasi gene expression in zebrafish brain. Our results have demonstrated that UCS did not alter ectonucleotidase and soluble ADA activities. However, ecto-ADA activity was significantly decreased (26.8%) in brain membranes of animals exposed to UCS when compared to the control group. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analysis did not show significant changes on ADA gene expression after the UCS exposure. The brain ATP metabolism showed a marked increase in adenosine levels (ADO) in animals exposed to UCS. These data suggest an increase on extracellular adenosine levels in zebrafish brain. Since this nucleoside has neuromodulatory and anxiolytic effects, changes in adenosine levels could play a role in counteracting the stress, which could be related to a compensatory mechanism in order to restore the homeostasis.

  18. Maintaining Genome Stability: The Role of Helicases and Deaminases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    of Helicases and Deaminases PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: XiaoJiang Chen CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Southern...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Maintaining Genome Stability: The Role of Helicases and Deaminases 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0391 5c... deaminases . We will focus on AID and APOBEC3G to obtain purified deaminase proteins for the in vitro biochemical, functional, and structural

  19. Maintaining Genome Stability: The Role of Helicases and Deaminases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    W81XWH-05-1-0391 TITLE: Maintaining Genome Stability: The Role of Helicases and Deaminases PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Xiaojiang Chen...Helicases and Deaminases 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0391 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Xiaojiang Chen 5e...crystallize the proteins of deaminases . We will focus on AID and APOBEC3G to obtain purified deaminase proteins for the in vitro biochemical

  20. Isolation and properties of AMP deaminase from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle muscle from the Gulf of California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Marquez-Rios, E; Pacheco-Aguilar, R; Castillo-Yañez, F J; Figueroa-Soto, C G; Ezquerra-Brauer, J M; Gollas-Galvan, T

    2008-09-01

    Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) deaminase was purified from jumbo squid mantle muscle by chromatography in cellulose phosphate, Q-Fast and 5'-AMP sepharose. Specific activity of 2.5U/mg protein, 4.5% recovery and 133.68 purification fold were obtained at the end of the experiment. SDS-PAGE showed a single band with 87kDa molecular mass, native PAGE proved a band of 178kDa, whereas gel filtration detected a 180kDa protein, suggesting the homodimeric nature of this enzyme, in which subunits are not linked by covalent forces. Isoelectric focusing of this enzyme showed a pI of 5.76, which agrees with pI values of AMP deaminase from other invertebrate organisms. AMP deaminase presented a kinetic sigmoidal plot with Vmax of 1.16μM/min/mg, Km of 13mM, Kcat of 3.48μM.s(-1) and a Kcat/Km of 267 (mol/L)(-1).s(-1). The apparent relative low catalytic activity of jumbo squid muscle AMP deaminase in the absence of positive effectors is similar to that reported for homologous enzymes in other invertebrate organisms.

  1. Effect of chronic salt loading on adenosine metabolism and receptor expression in renal cortex and medulla in rats.

    PubMed

    Zou, A P; Wu, F; Li, P L; Cowley, A W

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that chronic salt loading increased renal interstitial adenosine concentrations and desensitized renal effects of adenosine, a phenomenon that could facilitate sodium excretion. However, the mechanisms responsible for the increased adenosine production and decreased adenosine response are poorly understood. This study examined the effects of the dietary high salt intake on adenosine metabolism and receptor expression in the renal cortex and medulla in Sprague Dawley rats. Fluorescent high-performance liquid chromatography analyses were performed to determine adenosine levels in snap-frozen kidney tissues. Comparing rats fed a normal (1% NaCl) versus high salt (4% NaCl) diet, renal adenosine concentrations in rats fed a high salt diet were significantly higher (cortex: 43+/-3 versus 85+/-4, P<0.05; medulla: 183+/-4 versus 302+/-8 nmol/g wet tissue, P<0.05). Increased adenosine concentrations were not associated with changes in the 5'-nucleotidase or adenosine deaminase activity, as determined by quantitative isoelectric focusing and gel electrophoresis. Western blot analyses showed that a high salt diet (4% NaCl for 3 weeks) downregulated A1 receptors (antinatriuretic type), did not alter A2A and A2B receptors (natriuretic type), and upregulated A3 receptors (function unknown) in both renal cortex and medulla. The data show that stimulation of adenosine production and downregulation of A1 receptors with salt loading may play an important role in adaptation in the kidney to promote sodium excretion.

  2. Effect of adenosine and adenosine analogues on cyclic AMP accumulation in cultured mesangial cells and isolated glomeruli of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, A.; Lopez-Novoa, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    1. Changes in intracellular levels of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) were studied in rat isolated glomeruli and cultured glomerular mesangial cells exposed to adenosine and to the preferential A1 receptor agonist N6-R-1-methyl-2-phenylethyl adenosine (R-PIA), or the potent A2 adenosine receptor agonist 5-(N-ethylcarboxamide)adenosine (NECA). 2. Whereas NECA and adenosine triggered a dose-dependent increase in cyclic AMP values with EC50 values of approximately 10(-6) M and 3 x 10(-5) M respectively, R-PIA lowered cyclic AMP levels at concentrations of 10(-6) M or less and increased them at higher concentrations. 3. The time-course of the increase induced by 10(-6) M NECA was slower than that induced by 10(-4) M adenosine. Adenosine produced a maximal stimulation within the first minute, whereas the effect of NECA in both glomeruli and mesangial cells was noticeable only from the second minute of incubation. 4. The effects of the agonists R-PIA and NECA on the cyclic AMP system were blocked respectively by the A1 adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthihe (DPCPX) at 10(-6) M and the A2 antagonist N-(2-dimethylaminoethyl)-N-methyl-4-(2, 3, 6, 7-tetrahydro-2,b-dioxo-1, 3-dipropyl-1H-purin-8-yl) benzene sulphonamide (PD115,199) at 10(-6) M. Theophylline, a known antagonist of adenosine receptors, inhibited the action of adenosine on cyclic AMP in mesangial cells. Dipyridamole, an inhibitor of the uptake of adenosine by the cells, enhanced the response to adenosine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1330173

  3. Effects of different concentrations of metal ions on degradation of adenosine triphosphate in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fillets stored at 4°C: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Qin, Na; Zhang, Longteng; Lv, Jian; Li, Qingzheng; Luo, Yongkang

    2016-11-15

    The impact of different concentrations of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) on the degradation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the influence of these ions on the activity of adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMP-deaminase) and acid phosphatase (ACP) in common carp fillets (in vivo) during 4°C storage was examined. The content of ATP, inosine monophosphate (IMP), and hypoxanthine (Hx), and the activity of AMP-deaminase and ACP were determined. Results indicated that the effects of different concentrations of six kinds of metal ions on AMP-deaminase and ACP were not the same. Na(+), K(+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) enhanced AMP-deaminase activity, which led to the rapid degradation of ATP and to the generation of a large quantity of IMP within a short time. Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) delayed the change in AMP-deaminase and ACP activity in carp and caused a further delay in the degradation of ATP. Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) inhibited ACP activity, which reduced the decomposition of IMP and the formation of Hx.

  4. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Deaminase from Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 Facilitates the Growth of Rice in the Presence of Salt or Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Han, Yunlei; Wang, Rui; Yang, Zhirong; Zhan, Yuhua; Ma, Yao; Ping, Shuzhen; Zhang, Liwen; Lin, Min; Yan, Yongliang

    2015-07-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, which is encoded by some bacteria, can reduce the amount of ethylene, a root elongation inhibitor, and stimulate the growth of plants under various environmental stresses. The presence of ACC deaminase activity and the regulation of ACC in several rhizospheric bacteria have been reported. The nitrogen-fixing Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 is capable of endophytic association with rice plants and promotes the growth of rice. However, the functional identification of ACC deaminase has not been performed. In this study, the proposed effect of ACC deaminase in P. stutzeri A1501 was investigated. Genome mining showed that P. stutzeri A1501 carries a single gene encoding ACC deaminase, designated acdS. The acdS mutant was devoid of ACC deaminase activity and was less resistant to NaCl and NiCl2 compared with the wild-type. Furthermore, inactivation of acdS greatly impaired its nitrogenase activity under salt stress conditions. It was also observed that mutation of the acdS gene led to loss of the ability to promote the growth of rice under salt or heavy metal stress. Taken together, this study illustrates the essential role of ACC deaminase, not only in enhancing the salt or heavy metal tolerance of bacteria but also in improving the growth of plants, and provides a theoretical basis for studying the interaction between plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and plants.

  5. A Metabolic Immune Checkpoint: Adenosine in Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Within tumors, some areas are less oxygenated than others. Since their home ground is under chronic hypoxia, tumor cells adapt to this condition by activating aerobic glycolysis; however, this hypoxic environment is very harsh for incoming immune cells. Deprivation of oxygen limits availability of energy sources and induces accumulation of extracellular adenosine in tumors. Extracellular adenosine, upon binding with adenosine receptors on the surface of various immune cells, suppresses pro-inflammatory activities. In addition, signaling through adenosine receptors upregulates a number of anti-inflammatory molecules and immunoregulatory cells, leading to the establishment of a long-lasting immunosuppressive environment. Thus, due to hypoxia and adenosine, tumors can discourage antitumor immune responses no matter how the response was induced, whether it was spontaneous or artificially introduced with a therapeutic intention. Preclinical studies have shown the significance of adenosine in tumor survival strategy by demonstrating tumor regression after inactivation of adenosine receptors, inhibition of adenosine-producing enzymes, or reversal of tissue hypoxia. These promising results indicate a potential use of the inhibitors of the hypoxia–adenosine pathway for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27066002

  6. Myoadenylate deaminase deficiency. Functional and metabolic abnormalities associated with disruption of the purine nucleotide cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Sabina, R L; Swain, J L; Olanow, C W; Bradley, W G; Fishbein, W N; DiMauro, S; Holmes, E W

    1984-01-01

    To assess the role of the purine nucleotide cycle in human skeletal muscle function, we evaluated 10 patients with AMP deaminase deficiency (myoadenylate deaminase deficiency; MDD). 4 MDD and 19 non-MDD controls participated in an exercise protocol. The latter group was composed of a patient cohort (n = 8) exhibiting a constellation of symptoms similar to those of the MDD patients, i.e., postexertional aches, cramps, and pains; as well as a cohort of normal, unconditioned volunteers (n = 11). The individuals with MDD fatigued after performing only 28% as much work as their non-MDD counterparts. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the four MDD patients and the eight non-MDD patients at rest and following exercise to the point of fatigue. Creatine phosphate content fell to a comparable extent in the MDD (69%) and non-MDD (52%) patients at the onset of fatigue. Following exercise the 34% decrease in ATP content of muscle from the non-MDD subjects was significantly greater than the 6% decrease in ATP noted in muscle from the MDD patients (P = 0.048). Only one of four MDD patients had a measurable drop in ATP compared with seven of eight non-MDD patients. At end-exercise the muscle content of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), a product of AMP deaminase, was 13-fold greater in the non-MDD patients than that observed in the MDD group (P = 0.008). Adenosine content of muscle from the MDD patients increased 16-fold following exercise, while there was only a twofold increase in adenosine content of muscle from the non-MDD patients (P = 0.028). Those non-MDD patients in whom the decrease in ATP content following exercise was measurable exhibited a stoichiometric increase in IMP, and total purine content of the muscle did not change significantly. The one MDD patient in whom the decrease in ATP was measurable, did not exhibit a stoichiometric increase in IMP. Although the adenosine content increased 13-fold in this patient, only 48% of the ATP catabolized could be accounted for

  7. Rescue of the Orphan Enzyme Isoguanine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    D Hitchcock; A Fedorov; E Fedorov; L Dangott; S Almo; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from Escherichia coli was shown to catalyze the deamination of isoguanine (2-oxoadenine) to xanthine. Isoguanine is an oxidation product of adenine in DNA that is mutagenic to the cell. The isoguanine deaminase activity in E. coli was partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration, and anion exchange chromatography. The active protein was identified by peptide mass fingerprint analysis as cytosine deaminase. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoguanine at pH 7.7 are as follows: k{sub cat} = 49 s{sup -1}, K{sub m} = 72 {micro}M, and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 6.7 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The kinetic constants for the deamination of cytosine are as follows: k{sub cat} = 45 s{sup -1}, K{sub m} = 302 {micro}M, and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 1.5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Under these reaction conditions, isoguanine is the better substrate for cytosine deaminase. The three-dimensional structure of CDA was determined with isoguanine in the active site.

  8. Rescue of the orphan enzyme isoguanine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Daniel S; Fedorov, Alexander A; Fedorov, Elena V; Dangott, Lawrence J; Almo, Steven C; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-06-28

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from Escherichia coli was shown to catalyze the deamination of isoguanine (2-oxoadenine) to xanthine. Isoguanine is an oxidation product of adenine in DNA that is mutagenic to the cell. The isoguanine deaminase activity in E. coli was partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration, and anion exchange chromatography. The active protein was identified by peptide mass fingerprint analysis as cytosine deaminase. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoguanine at pH 7.7 are as follows: k(cat) = 49 s(-1), K(m) = 72 μM, and k(cat)/K(m) = 6.7 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). The kinetic constants for the deamination of cytosine are as follows: k(cat) = 45 s(-1), K(m) = 302 μM, and k(cat)/K(m) = 1.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). Under these reaction conditions, isoguanine is the better substrate for cytosine deaminase. The three-dimensional structure of CDA was determined with isoguanine in the active site.

  9. Halobacterial adenosine triphosphatases and the adenosine triphosphatase from Halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, Hordur; Sadler, Martha H.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared from various members of the genus Halobacterium contained a Triton X-l00 activated adenosine triphosphatase. The enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum was unstable in solutions of low ionic strength and maximally active in the presence of 3.5 M NaCl. A variety of nucleotide triphosphates was hydrolyzed. MgADP, the product of ATP hydrolysis, was not hydrolyzed and was a competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum was composed of at least 2 and possibly 4 subunits. The 83-kDa and 60-kDa subunits represented about 90 percent of total protein. The 60-kDa subunit reacted with dicyclohexyl-carbodiimide when inhibition was carried out in an acidic medium. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum, possesses properties of an F(1)F(0) as well as an E(1)E(2) ATPase.

  10. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent phosphoregulation of mitochondrial complex I is inhibited by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Kaleb C. Wallace, Kendall B.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are known to directly inhibit mitochondrial complex I activity as well as various mitochondrial kinases. Recent observations that complex I activity and superoxide production are modulated through cAMP-dependent phosphorylation suggests a mechanism through which NRTIs may affect mitochondrial respiration via kinase-dependent protein phosphorylation. In the current study, we examine the potential for NRTIs to inhibit the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of complex I and the associated NADH:CoQ oxidoreductase activities and rates of superoxide production using HepG2 cells. Phosphoprotein staining of immunocaptured complex I revealed that 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT; 10 and 50 {mu}M), AZT monophosphate (150 {mu}M), and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC; 1 {mu}M) prevented the phosphorylation of the NDUFB11 subunit of complex I. This was associated with a decrease in complex I activity with AZT and AZT monophosphate only. In the presence of succinate, superoxide production was increased with 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI; 10 {mu}M) and ddC (1 {mu}M). In the presence of succinate + cAMP, AZT showed an inverse dose-dependent effect on superoxide production. None of the NRTIs examined inhibit PKA activity suggesting that the observed effects are due to a direct interaction with complex I. These data demonstrate a direct effect of NRTIs on cAMP-dependent regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics independent of DNA polymerase-{gamma} activity; in the case of AZT, these observations may provide a mechanism for the observed long-term toxicity with this drug.

  11. Adenosine receptor neurobiology: overview.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Lee, Chien-fei; Chern, Yijuang

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside that is distributed ubiquitously throughout the body as a metabolic intermediary. In the brain, adenosine functions as an important upstream neuromodulator of a broad spectrum of neurotransmitters, receptors, and signaling pathways. By acting through four G-protein-coupled receptors, adenosine contributes critically to homeostasis and neuromodulatory control of a variety of normal and abnormal brain functions, ranging from synaptic plasticity, to cognition, to sleep, to motor activity to neuroinflammation, and cell death. This review begun with an overview of the gene and genome structure and the expression pattern of adenosine receptors (ARs). We feature several new developments over the past decade in our understanding of AR functions in the brain, with special focus on the identification and characterization of canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways of ARs. We provide an update on functional insights from complementary genetic-knockout and pharmacological studies on the AR control of various brain functions. We also highlight several novel and recent developments of AR neurobiology, including (i) recent breakthrough in high resolution of three-dimension structure of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) in several functional status, (ii) receptor-receptor heterodimerization, (iii) AR function in glial cells, and (iv) the druggability of AR. We concluded the review with the contention that these new developments extend and strengthen the support for A1 and A2ARs in brain as therapeutic targets for neurologic and psychiatric diseases.

  12. [Effects of dopamine and adenosine on regulation of water-electrolyte exchange in Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Bagrov, Ia Iu; Manusova, N B

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine and adenosine both regulate transport of sodium chloride in the renal tubules in mammals. We have studied the effect of dopamine and adenosine on spontaneous activity of contractile vacuole of Amoeba proteous. Both substances stimulated contractile vacuole. The effect of dopamine was suppressed by D2 receptor antagonist, haloperidol, but not by D1 antagonist, SCH 39166. Adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 2.5-dideoxyadenosine, suppressed the effect of dopamine, but not of adenosine. Inhibitor of protein kinase C, staurosporine, in contrast, blocked the effect of adenosine, but not dopamine. Notably, dopamine opposed effect of adenosine and vice versa. These results suggest that similar effects of dopamine and adenosine could be mediated by different intracellulare mechanisms.

  13. Structural and Kinetic Characterization of Escherichia coli TadA, the Wobble-Specific tRNA Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kim,J.; Malashkevich, V.; Roday, S.; Lisbin, M.; Schramm, V.; Almo, S.

    2006-01-01

    The essential tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase catalyzes the deamination of adenosine to inosine at the wobble position of tRNAs. This modification allows for a single tRNA species to recognize multiple synonymous codons containing A, C, or U in the last (3'-most) position and ensures that all sense codons are appropriately decoded. We report the first combined structural and kinetic characterization of a wobble-specific deaminase. The structure of the Escherichia coli enzyme clearly defines the dimer interface and the coordination of the catalytically essential zinc ion. The structure also identifies the nucleophilic water and highlights residues near the catalytic zinc likely to be involved in recognition and catalysis of polymeric RNA substrates. A minimal 19 nucleotide RNA stem substrate has permitted the first steady-state kinetic characterization of this enzyme (k{sub cat} = 13 {+-} 1 min{sup -1} and K{sub M} = 0.83 {+-} 0.22 {micro}M). A continuous coupled assay was developed to follow the reaction at high concentrations of polynucleotide substrates (>10 {micro}M). This work begins to define the chemical and structural determinants responsible for catalysis and substrate recognition and lays the foundation for detailed mechanistic analysis of this essential enzyme.

  14. Correlation of transient adenosine release and oxygen changes in the caudate-putamen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Venton, B Jill

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous nucleoside that modulates important physiological processes, such as vasodilation, in the central nervous system. A rapid, 2-4 s, mode of adenosine signaling has been recently discovered, but the relationship between this type of adenosine and blood flow change has not been characterized. In this study, adenosine and oxygen changes were simultaneously measured using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Oxygen changes occur when there is an increase in local cerebral blood flow and thus are a measure of vasodilation. About 34% of adenosine transients in the rat caudate-putamen are correlated with a subsequent transient change in oxygen. The amount of oxygen was correlated with the concentration of adenosine release and larger adenosine transients (over 0.4 μM) always had subsequent oxygen changes. The average duration of adenosine and oxygen transients was 3.2 and 3.5 s, respectively. On average, the adenosine release starts and peaks 0.2 s prior to the oxygen. The A2a antagonist, SCH442416, decreased the number of both adenosine and oxygen transient events by about 32%. However, the A1 antagonist, DPCPX, did not significantly affect simultaneous adenosine and oxygen release. The nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor l-NAME also did not affect the concentration or number of adenosine and oxygen release events. These results demonstrate that both adenosine and oxygen release are modulated via A2a receptors. The correlation of transient concentrations, time delay between adenosine and oxygen peaks, and effect of A2a receptors suggests that adenosine modulates blood flow on a rapid, sub-second time scale. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on page 10.

  15. Beyond SHM and CSR: AID and related cytidine deaminases in the host response to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Brad R; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2007-01-01

    As the primary effector of immunoglobulin somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR), activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) serves an important function in the adaptive immune response. Recent advances have demonstrated that AID and a group of closely related cytidine deaminases, the APOBEC3 proteins, also act in the innate host response to viral infection. Antiviral activity was first attributed to APOBEC3G as a potent inhibitor of HIV. It is now apparent that the targets of the APOBEC3 proteins extend beyond HIV, with family members acting against a wide variety of viruses as well as host-encoded retrotransposable genetic elements. Although it appears to function through a different mechanism, AID also possesses antiviral properties. Independent of its antibody diversification functions, AID protects against transformation by Abelson murine leukemia virus (Ab-MLV), an oncogenic retrovirus. Additionally, AID has been implicated in the host response to other pathogenic viruses. These emerging roles for the AID/APOBEC cytidine deaminases in viral infection suggest an intriguing evolutionary connection of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms.

  16. Adenosine and sleep

    SciTech Connect

    Yanik, G.M. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Behavioral and biochemical approaches have been used to determine the relative contribution of endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors to the sleep-wake cycle in the rat. Adenosine concentrations in specific areas of the rat brain were not affected by 24 hours of total sleep deprivation, or by 24 or 48 hours of REM sleep deprivation. In order to assess the effect of REM sleep deprivation on adenosine A/sub 1/ receptors, /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding was measured. The Bmax values for /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding to membrane preparations of the cortices and corpus striata from 48 hour REM sleep-deprived animals were increased 14.8% and 23%, respectively. These increases were not maintained following the cessation of sleep deprivation and recovered within 2 hours. The results of a 96 hour REM deprivation experiment were similar to those of the 48 hour REM sleep deprivation experiment. However, these increases were not evident in similar structures taken from stress control animals, and conclusively demonstrated that the changes in /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding resulted from REM sleep deprivation and not from stress.

  17. Adenosine through the A2A adenosine receptor increases IL-1β in the brain contributing to anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Gabriel S.; Darmody, Patrick T.; Walsh, John P.; Moon, Morgan L.; Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Bray, Julie K.; McCusker, Robert H.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most commonly reported psychiatric conditions, but its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Ailments associated with activation of the innate immune system, however, are increasingly linked to anxiety disorders. In adult male mice, we found that adenosine doubled caspase-1 activity in brain by a pathway reliant on ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, protein kinase A (PKA) and the A2A adenosine receptor (AR). In addition, adenosine-dependent activation of caspase-1 increased interleukin (IL)-1β in the brain by two-fold. Peripheral administration of adenosine in wild-type (WT) mice led to a 2.3-fold increase in caspase-1 activity in the amygdala and to a 33% and 42% reduction in spontaneous locomotor activity and food intake, respectively, that were not observed in caspase-1 knockout (KO), IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) KO and A2A AR KO mice or in mice administered a caspase-1 inhibitor centrally. Finally, adenosine administration increased anxiety-like behaviors in WT mice by 28% in the open field test and by 55% in the elevated zero-maze. Caspase-1 KO mice, IL-1R1 KO mice, A2A AR KO mice and WT mice treated with the KATP channel blocker, glyburide, were resistant to adenosine-induced anxiety-like behaviors. Thus, our results indicate that adenosine can act as an anxiogenic by activating caspase-1 and increasing IL-1β in the brain. PMID:24907587

  18. Yeast Cytosine Deaminase Mutants with Increased Thermostability Impart Sensitivity to 5-Fluorocytosine

    PubMed Central

    Stolworthy, Tiffany S.; Korkegian, Aaron M.; Willmon, Candice L.; Ardiani, Andressa; Cundiff, Jennifer; Stoddard, Barry L.; Black, Margaret E.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Prodrug gene therapy (PGT) is a treatment strategy in which tumor cells are transfected with a 'suicide' gene that encodes a metabolic enzyme capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into a potent cytotoxin. One of the most promising PGT enzymes is cytosine deaminase (CD), a microbial salvage enzyme that converts cytosine to uracil. CD also converts 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and RNA function. Over 150 studies of cytosine deaminase-mediated PGT applications have been reported since 2000, all using wild-type enzymes. However, various forms of cytosine deaminase are limited by inefficient turnover of 5FC and/or limited thermostability. In a previous study we stabilized and extended the half-life of yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) by repacking of its hydrophobic core at several positions distant from the active site. Here we report that random mutagenesis of residues selected based on alignment with similar enzymes, followed by selection for enhanced sensitization to 5FC, also produces an enzyme variant (yCD-D92E) with elevated Tm values and increased activity half-life. The new mutation is located at the enzyme's dimer interface, indicating that independent mutational pathways can lead to an increase in the temperature that induces protein unfolding and aggregation in thermal denaturation experiments measured by circular dichroism spectroscopy, and an increase in the half-life of enzyme activity at physiological temperature, as well as more subtle effect on enzyme kinetics. Each independently derived set of mutations significantly improves the enzyme's performance in PGT assays both in cell culture and in animal models. PMID:18291415

  19. Engineering and optimising deaminase fusions for genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Luhan; Briggs, Adrian W.; Chew, Wei Leong; Mali, Prashant; Guell, Marc; Aach, John; Goodman, Daniel Bryan; Cox, David; Kan, Yinan; Lesha, Emal; Soundararajan, Venkataramanan; Zhang, Feng; Church, George

    2016-01-01

    Precise editing is essential for biomedical research and gene therapy. Yet, homology-directed genome modification is limited by the requirements for genomic lesions, homology donors and the endogenous DNA repair machinery. Here we engineered programmable cytidine deaminases and test if we could introduce site-specific cytidine to thymidine transitions in the absence of targeted genomic lesions. Our programmable deaminases effectively convert specific cytidines to thymidines with 13% efficiency in Escherichia coli and 2.5% in human cells. However, off-target deaminations were detected more than 150 bp away from the target site. Moreover, whole genome sequencing revealed that edited bacterial cells did not harbour chromosomal abnormalities but demonstrated elevated global cytidine deamination at deaminase intrinsic binding sites. Therefore programmable deaminases represent a promising genome editing tool in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Future engineering is required to overcome the processivity and the intrinsic DNA binding affinity of deaminases for safer therapeutic applications. PMID:27804970

  20. Differentiation of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase from its homologs is the key for identifying bacteria containing ACC deaminase.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengyi; Chang, Siping; Ye, Shuting; Chen, Mingyue; Lin, Li; Li, Yuanyuan; Li, Shuying; An, Qianli

    2015-10-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase-mediated reduction of ethylene generation in plants under abiotic stresses is a key mechanism by which bacteria can promote plant growth. Misidentification of ACC deaminase and the ACC deaminase structure gene (acdS) can lead to overestimation of the number of bacteria containing ACC deaminase and their function in ecosystems. Previous non-specific amplification of acdS homologs has led to an overestimation of the horizontal transfer of acdS genes. Here, we designed consensus-degenerate hybrid oligonucleotide primers (acdSf3, acdSr3 and acdSr4) based on differentiating the key residues in ACC deaminases from those of homologs for specific amplification of partial acdS genes. PCR amplification, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis identified acdS genes from a wide range of proteobacteria and actinobacteria. PCR amplification and a genomic search did not find the acdS gene in bacteria belonging to Pseudomonas stutzeri or in the genera Enterobacter, Klebsiella or Bacillus. We showed that differentiating the acdS gene and ACC deaminase from their homologs was crucial for the molecular identification of bacteria containing ACC deaminase and for understanding the evolution of the acdS gene. We provide an effective method for screening and identifying bacteria containing ACC deaminase.

  1. Adenosine receptor expression and function in rat striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Preston, Z; Lee, K; Widdowson, L; Freeman, T C; Dixon, A K; Richardson, P J

    2000-06-01

    Cholinergic neurons were identified in rat striatal slices by their size, membrane properties, sensitivity to the NK(1) receptor agonist (Sar(9), Met(O(2))(11)) Substance P, and expression of choline acetyltransferase mRNA. A(1) receptor mRNA was detected in 60% of the neurons analysed, and A(2A) receptor mRNA in 67% (n=15). The A(1) receptor agonist R-N(6)-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine (R-PIA) hyperpolarized cholinergic neurons in a concentration dependent manner sensitive to the A(1) antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 100 nM). In dual stimulus experiments, the A(2A) receptor antagonist 8-(3-chlorostyryl)caffeine (CSC, 500 nM) decreased release of [(3)H]-acetylcholine from striatal slices (S2/S1 0.78+/-0.07 versus 0.95+/-0.05 in control), as did adenosine deaminase (S2/S1 ratio 0.69+/-0.05), whereas the A(1) receptor antagonist DPCPX (100 nM) had no effect (S2/S1 1.05+/-0.14). In the presence of adenosine deaminase the adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist 2-p-((carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino)-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadeno sin e (CGS21680, 10 nM) increased release (S2/S1 ratio 1.03+/-0.05 versus 0.88+/-0.05 in control), an effect blocked by the antagonist CSC (500 nM, S2/S1 0.68+/-0.05, versus 0.73+/-0.08 with CSC alone). The combined superfusion of bicuculline (10 microM), saclofen (1 microM) and naloxone (10 microM) had no effect on the stimulation by CGS21680 (S2/S1 ratio 0.99+/-0.04). The A(1) receptor agonist R-PIA (100 nM) inhibited the release of [(3)H]-acetylcholine (S2/S1 ratio 0.70+/-0.03), an effect blocked by DPCPX (S2/S1 ratio 1.06+/-0.07). It is concluded that both A(1) and A(2A) receptors are expressed on striatal cholinergic neurons where they are functionally active.

  2. Possible mechanism of adenosine protection in carbon tetrachloride acute hepatotoxicity. Role of adenosine by-products and glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Chagoya de Sánchez, V; Hernández-Muñoz, R; Yáñez, L; Vidrio, S; Díaz-Muñoz, M

    1995-02-01

    Adenosine proved to be an effective hepatoprotector increasing the survival rate of rats receiving lethal doses of CCl4. Searching for the mechanism of action, we found that adenosine transiently prevents the necrotic liver damage associated to an acute CCl4 treatment. The antilipoperoxidative action of the nucleoside was evidenced by a decrease of TBA-reactive products and the diene conjugates elicited by the hepatotoxin. Adenosine's protective effect was demonstrated by reverting the decrease of cytochrome P-450 while preserved intact the activity of the microsomal enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase. CCl4 promoted an increase in the oxidant stress through an enhancement in oxidized glutathione levels. This action was also completely counteracted by the nucleoside. Adenosine was unable to prevent CCl4 activation and, even, increased .CCl3 formation in the presence of PBN in vivo. However, in the presence of the nucleoside, irreversible binding of 14CCl4 to the microsomal lipid fraction of the treated animals was decreased. These results suggest that adenosine protective action might be exerted at the level of the propagation reaction following CCl4 activation. Two possible mechanisms were associated to the nucleoside protection: (1) the peroxide-metabolyzed enzymes, GSH-per, showed a marked increase after 30 minutes of adenosine treatment, which was potentiated by the hepatotoxin, suggesting an important role of this enzyme in the nucleoside's action; (2) the adenosine catabolism induced an increase in uric acid level, and allopurinol, a purine metabolism inhibitor, prevented such elevation as well as the antilipoperoxidative action of adenosine and the increase of GSH-per associated with the nucleoside treatment. These facts strongly suggest that the protective effect elicited by adenosine is not a direct one, but rather is related to its catabolic products, such as uric acid, which has been recognized as a free radical scavenger.

  3. Multivalent Induction of Biodegradative Threonine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Yui, Yoshiki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Ito, Seiji; Shizuta, Yutaka; Hayaishi, Osamu

    1977-01-01

    To determine the inducer(s) of the biodegradative threonine deaminase in Escherichia coli, the effects of various amino acids on the synthesis of this enzyme were investigated. The complex medium used hitherto for the enzyme induction can be completely replaced by a synthetic medium composed of 18 natural amino acids. In this synthetic medium, the omission of each of the seven amino acids threonine, serine, aspartic acid, methionine, valine, leucine, and arginine resulted in the greatest loss of enzyme formation. These seven amino acids did not significantly influence the uptake of other amino acids into the cells. Furthermore, they did not stimulate the conversion of inactive enzyme into an active form, since they did not affect the enzyme level in cells in which protein synthesis was inhibited by chloramphenicol. Threonine, serine, aspartic acid, and methionine failed to stimulate enzyme production in cells in which messenger ribonucleic acid synthesis was arrested by rifampin, whereas valine, leucine, and arginine stimulated enzyme synthesis under the same conditions. Therefore, the first four amino acids appear to act as inducers of the biodegradative threonine deaminase in E. coli and the last three amino acids appear to be amplifiers of enzyme production. The term “multivalent induction” has been proposed for this type of induction, i.e., enzyme induction only by the simultaneous presence of several amino acids. PMID:334736

  4. In silico structural and functional analysis of Mesorhizobium ACC deaminase.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Krishnendu; Soren, Tithi; Mitra, Soumik; Maiti, Tushar Kanti

    2017-02-11

    Nodulation is one of the very important processes of legume plants as it is the initiating event of fixing nitrogen. Although ethylene has essential role in normal plant metabolism but it has also negative impact on plants particularly in nodule formation in legume plants. It is also produced due to a variety of biotic or abiotic stresses. 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase is a rhizobial enzyme which cleaves ACC (immediate precursor of ethylene) into α-ketobutyrate and ammonia. As a result, the level of ethylene from the plant cells is decreased and the negative impact of ethylene on nodule formation is reduced. ACC deaminase is widely studied in several plant growth promoting rhizobacterial (PGPR) strains including many legume nodulating bacteria like Mesorhizobium sp. It is an important symbiotic nitrogen fixer belonging to the class - alphaproteobacteria under the order Rhizobiales. ACC deaminase has positive role in Legume-rhizobium symbiosis. Rhizobial ACC deaminase has the potentiality to reduce the adverse effects of ethylene, thereby triggering the nodulation process. The present study describes an in silico comparative structural (secondary structure prediction, homology modeling) and functional analysis of ACC deaminase from Mesorhizobium spp. to explore physico-chemical properties using a number of bio-computational tools. M. loti was selected as a representative species of Mesorhizobium genera for 3D modelling of ACC deaminase protein. Correlation by the phylogenetic relatedness on the basis of both ACC deaminase enzymes and respective acdS genes of different strains of Mesorhizobium has also studied.

  5. Rat cardiac myocyte adenosine transport and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, D.A.; Rovetto, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Based on the importance of myocardial adenosine and adenine nucleotide metabolism, the adenosine salvage pathway in ventricular myocytes was studied. Accurate estimates of transport rates, separate from metabolic fllux, were determined. Adenosine influx was constant between 3 and 60 s. Adenosine metabolism maintained intracellular adenosine concentrations < 10% of the extracellular adenosine concentrations and thus unidirectional influx could be measured. Myocytes transported adenosine via saturable and nonsaturable processes. A minimum estimate of the V/sub max/ of myocytic adenosine kinase indicated the saturable component of adenosine influx was independent of adenosine kinase activity. Saturable transport was inhibited by nitrobenzylthioinosine and verapamil. Extracellular adenosine taken up myocytes was rapidly phosphorylated to adenine taken up by myocytes was rapidly phosphorylated to adenine nucleotides. Not all extracellular adenosine, though, was phosphorylated on entering myocytes, since free, as opposed to protein-bound, intracellular adenosine was detected after digitonin extraction of cells in the presence of 1 mM ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid.

  6. [Gene therapy for adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency: review of the past, the present and the future].

    PubMed

    Ariga, T

    2001-01-01

    ADA deficiency is the first disease being treated by gene therapy. Since the first trial of gene therapy performed ten years ago, more than 10 patients including our case with ADA deficiency have been treated by the gene therapy with different clinical protocols. In contrast to the recent successful report for X-SCID patients, however, no curative effect of gene therapy for ADA deficiency has been achieved at the moment. In this chapter, I would like to review the past, the present and the future of gene therapy for ADA deficiency, and discuss an issue, especially PEG-ADA therapy, regarding the prospect for stem cell gene therapy for the disease.

  7. Pleural effusion: Role of pleural fluid cytology, adenosine deaminase level, and pleural biopsy in diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Biswajit; Sharma, Sudershan Kumar; Negi, Rameshwar Singh; Gupta, Neelam; Jaswal, Virender Mohan Singh; Niranjan, Narsimhalu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study is designed to evaluate the role of pleural fluid analysis in diagnosing pleural diseases and to study the advantages and disadvantages of thoracocentasis and pleural biopsy. Materials and Methods: We prospectively included 66 consecutive indoor patients over a duration of 1 year. Pleural fluid was collected and cytological smears were made from the fluid. Plural biopsy was done in the same patient by Cope needle. Adequate pleural biopsy tissue yielding specific diagnosis was obtained in 47 (71.2%) cases. Results: Tuberculosis was the commonest nonneoplastic lesion followed by chronic nonspecific pleuritis comprising 60% and 33.3% of the nonneoplastic cases respectively and tuberculosis was predominantly diagnosed in the younger age group. Majority (70.8%) of malignancy cases were in the age group of >50-70. Adenocarcinoma was found to be the commonest (66.7%) malignant neoplasm in the pleurae followed by small-cell carcinoma (20.8%). Conclusion: Pleural biopsy is a useful and minimally invasive procedure. It is more sensitive and specific than pleural fluid smears. PMID:27756990

  8. Evidence for an A1-adenosine receptor in the guinea-pig atrium.

    PubMed Central

    Collis, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    1 The purpose of this study was to determine whether the adenosine receptor that mediates a decrease in the force of contraction of the guinea-pig atrium is of the A1- or A2-sub-type. 2 Concentration-response curves to adenosine and a number of 5'- and N6-substituted analogues were constructed and the order of potency of the purines was: 5'-N-cyclopropylcarboxamide adenosine (NCPCA) = 5'-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) greater than N6cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) greater than L-N6-phenylisopropyl adenosine (L-PIA) = 2-chloroadenosine- greater than adenosine greater than D-N6-phenylisopropyl adenosine (D-PIA). 3 The difference in potency between the stereoisomers D- and L-PIA was over 100 fold. 4 The adenosine transport inhibitor, dipyridamole, potentiated submaximal responses to adenosine but had no significant effect on those evoked by the other purines. 5 Theophylline antagonized responses evoked by all purines, and with D-PIA revealed a positive inotropic effect that was abolished by atenolol. 6 The results indicate the existence of an adenosine A1-receptor in the guinea-pig atrium. PMID:6297647

  9. Ticagrelor potentiates adenosine-induced stimulation of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Alsharif, Khalaf F.; Thomas, Mark R.; Judge, Heather M.; Khan, Haroon; Prince, Lynne R.; Sabroe, Ian; Ridger, Victoria C.; Storey, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    In the PLATO study, ticagrelor was associated with fewer pulmonary infections and subsequent deaths than clopidogrel. Neutrophils are a first-line defence against bacterial lung infection; ticagrelor inhibits cellular uptake of adenosine, a known regulator of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. We assessed whether the inhibition of adenosine uptake by ticagrelor influences neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Neutrophils and erythrocytes were isolated from healthy volunteers. Concentration-dependent effects of adenosine on IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were investigated and the involved receptors identified using adenosine receptor antagonists. The modulatory effects of ticagrelor on adenosine-mediated changes in neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae were determined in the presence of erythrocytes to replicate physiological conditions of cellular adenosine uptake. Low-concentration adenosine (10− 8 M) significantly increased IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (% neutrophil chemotaxis: adenosine 28.7% ± 4.4 vs. control 22.6% ± 2.4; p < 0.01) by acting on the high-affinity A1 receptor. Erythrocytes attenuated the effect of adenosine, although this was preserved by ticagrelor and dipyridamole (another inhibitor of adenosine uptake) but not by control or by cangrelor. Similarly, in the presence of erythrocytes, a low concentration of adenosine (10− 8 M) significantly increased neutrophil phagocytic index compared to control when ticagrelor was present (37.6 ± 6.6 vs. 28.0 ± 6.6; p = 0.028) but had no effect in the absence of ticagrelor. We therefore conclude that the inhibition of cellular adenosine reuptake by ticagrelor potentiates the effects of a nanomolar concentration of adenosine on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. This represents a potential mechanism by which ticagrelor could influence host defence against bacterial lung infection. PMID:25869515

  10. Extracellular adenosine levels are associated with the progression and exacerbation of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fayong; Le, Ngoc-Bao; Mills, Tingting; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Molina, Jose G; Davies, Jonathan; Philip, Kemly; Volcik, Kelly A; Liu, Hong; Xia, Yang; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackburn, Michael R

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a devastating lung disease with limited treatment options. The signaling molecule adenosine is produced in response to injury and serves a protective role in early stages of injury and is detrimental during chronic stages of disease such as seen in lung conditions such as pulmonary fibrosis. Understanding the association of extracellular adenosine levels and the progression of pulmonary fibrosis is critical for designing adenosine based approaches to treat pulmonary fibrosis. The goal of this study was to use various models of experimental lung fibrosis to understand when adenosine levels are elevated during pulmonary fibrosis and whether these elevations were associated with disease progression and severity. To accomplish this, extracellular adenosine levels, defined as adenosine levels found in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid, were determined in mouse models of resolvable and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. We found that relative bronchioalveolar lavage fluid adenosine levels are progressively elevated in association with pulmonary fibrosis and that adenosine levels diminish in association with the resolution of lung fibrosis. In addition, treatment of these models with dipyridamole, an inhibitor of nucleoside transporters that potentiates extracellular adenosine levels, demonstrated that the resolution of lung fibrosis is blocked by the failure of adenosine levels to subside. Furthermore, exacerbating adenosine levels led to worse fibrosis in a progressive fibrosis model. Increased adenosine levels were associated with elevation of IL-6 and IL-17, which are important inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary fibrosis. These results demonstrate that extracellular adenosine levels are closely associated with the progression of experimental pulmonary fibrosis and that this signaling pathway may mediate fibrosis by regulating IL-6 and IL-17 production.

  11. Ticagrelor potentiates adenosine-induced stimulation of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Alsharif, Khalaf F; Thomas, Mark R; Judge, Heather M; Khan, Haroon; Prince, Lynne R; Sabroe, Ian; Ridger, Victoria C; Storey, Robert F

    2015-08-01

    In the PLATO study, ticagrelor was associated with fewer pulmonary infections and subsequent deaths than clopidogrel. Neutrophils are a first-line defence against bacterial lung infection; ticagrelor inhibits cellular uptake of adenosine, a known regulator of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. We assessed whether the inhibition of adenosine uptake by ticagrelor influences neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Neutrophils and erythrocytes were isolated from healthy volunteers. Concentration-dependent effects of adenosine on IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were investigated and the involved receptors identified using adenosine receptor antagonists. The modulatory effects of ticagrelor on adenosine-mediated changes in neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae were determined in the presence of erythrocytes to replicate physiological conditions of cellular adenosine uptake. Low-concentration adenosine (10(-8)M) significantly increased IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (% neutrophil chemotaxis: adenosine 28.7%±4.4 vs. control 22.6%±2.4; p<0.01) by acting on the high-affinity A1 receptor. Erythrocytes attenuated the effect of adenosine, although this was preserved by ticagrelor and dipyridamole (another inhibitor of adenosine uptake) but not by control or by cangrelor. Similarly, in the presence of erythrocytes, a low concentration of adenosine (10(-8)M) significantly increased neutrophil phagocytic index compared to control when ticagrelor was present (37.6±6.6 vs. 28.0±6.6; p=0.028) but had no effect in the absence of ticagrelor. We therefore conclude that the inhibition of cellular adenosine reuptake by ticagrelor potentiates the effects of a nanomolar concentration of adenosine on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. This represents a potential mechanism by which ticagrelor could influence host defence against bacterial lung infection.

  12. Mechanical stimulation evokes rapid increases in extracellular adenosine concentration in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ashley E; Nguyen, Michael D; Privman, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2014-07-01

    Mechanical perturbations can release ATP, which is broken down to adenosine. In this work, we used carbon-fiber microelectrodes and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to measure mechanically stimulated adenosine in the brain by lowering the electrode 50 μm. Mechanical stimulation evoked adenosine in vivo (average: 3.3 ± 0.6 μM) and in brain slices (average: 0.8 ± 0.1 μM) in the prefrontal cortex. The release was transient, lasting 18 ± 2 s. Lowering a 15-μm-diameter glass pipette near the carbon-fiber microelectrode produced similar results as lowering the actual microelectrode. However, applying a small puff of artificial cerebral spinal fluid was not sufficient to evoke adenosine. Multiple stimulations within a 50-μm region of a slice did not significantly change over time or damage cells. Chelating calcium with EDTA or blocking sodium channels with tetrodotoxin significantly decreased mechanically evoked adenosine, signifying that the release is activity dependent. An alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptor antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, did not affect mechanically stimulated adenosine; however, the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1,2 and 3 (NTDPase) inhibitor POM-1 significantly reduced adenosine so a portion of adenosine is dependent on extracellular ATP metabolism. Thus, mechanical perturbations from inserting a probe in the brain cause rapid, transient adenosine signaling which might be neuroprotective. We have discovered immediate changes in adenosine concentration in the prefrontal cortex following mechanical stimulation. The adenosine increase lasts only about 20 s. Mechanically stimulated adenosine was activity dependent and mostly because of extracellular ATP metabolism. This rapid, transient increase in adenosine may help protect tissue and would occur during implantation of any electrode, such as during deep brain stimulation.

  13. Dual Effect of Adenosine A1 Receptor Activation on Renal O2 Consumption.

    PubMed

    Babich, Victor; Vadnagara, Komal; Di Sole, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    The high requirement of O2 in the renal proximal tubule stems from a high rate of Na(+) transport. Adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) activation regulates Na(+) transport in this nephron segment. Thus, the effect of the acute activation and the mechanisms of A1R on the rate of O2 consumption were evaluated. The A1R-antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (CPX) and adenosine deaminase (ADA), which metabolize endogenous adenosine, reduced O2 consumption (40-50%). Replacing Na(+) in the buffer reversed the ADA- or CPX-mediated reduction of O2 consumption. Blocking the Na/H-exchanger activity, which decreases O2 usage per se, did not enhance the ADA- or CPX-induced inhibition of O2 consumption. These data indicate that endogenous adenosine increases O2 usage via the activation of Na(+) transport. In the presence of endogenous adenosine, A1R was further activated by the A1R-agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA); CPA inhibited O2 usage (30%) and this effect also depended on Na(+) transport. Moreover, a low concentration of CPA activated O2 usage in tissue pretreated with ADA, whereas a high concentration of CPA inhibited O2 usage; both effects depended on Na(+). Protein kinase C signaling mediated the inhibitory effect of A1R, while adenylyl cyclase mediated its stimulatory effect on O2 consumption. In summary, increasing the local concentrations of adenosine can either activate or inhibit O2 consumption via A1R, and this mechanism depends on Na(+) transport. The inhibition of O2 usage by A1R activation might restore the compromised balance between energy supply and demand under pathophysiological conditions, such as renal ischemia, which results in high adenosine production.

  14. Valerian extract Ze 911 inhibits postsynaptic potentials by activation of adenosine A1 receptors in rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Vissiennon, Z; Sichardt, K; Koetter, U; Brattström, A; Nieber, K

    2006-06-01

    In this study we evaluated the adenosine A1 receptor-mediated effect of valerian extract (Ze 911) on postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) in pyramidal cells of the rat cingulate cortex in a slice preparation. We first observed that N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 0.01 - 10 microM), an adenosine A1 receptor agonist, inhibited PSPs in a concentration-dependent manner. The CPA (10 microM)-induced inhibition was antagonized by 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX, 0.1 microM), an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. Ze 911 concentration dependently (0.1 - 15 mg/mL) inhibited PSPs in the presence of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine (CSC, 0.2 microM) and adenosine deaminase (1 U/mL). The maximal inhibition induced by 10 mg/mL was completely antagonised by DPCPX (0.1 microM), an A1 receptor blocker. The data suggest that activation of adenosine A1 receptors is involved in the pharmacological effects of the valerian extract Ze 911.

  15. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-encoded cytidine deaminase efficiently inactivates cytosine-based anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Vande Voorde, Johan; Vervaeke, Peter; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasmas may colonize tumor tissue in patients. The cytostatic activity of gemcitabine was dramatically decreased in Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected tumor cell cultures compared with non-infected tumor cell cultures. This mycoplasma-driven drug deamination could be prevented by exogenous administration of the cytidine deaminase (CDA) inhibitor tetrahydrouridine, but also by the natural nucleosides or by a purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitor. The M. hyorhinis-encoded CDAHyor gene was cloned, expressed as a recombinant protein and purified. CDAHyor was found to be more catalytically active than its human equivalent and efficiently deaminates (inactivates) cytosine-based anticancer drugs. CDAHyor expression at the tumor site may result in selective drug inactivation and suboptimal therapeutic efficiency.

  16. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing meets cancer.

    PubMed

    Dominissini, Dan; Moshitch-Moshkovitz, Sharon; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon

    2011-11-01

    The role of epigenetics in tumor onset and progression has been extensively addressed. Discoveries in the last decade completely changed our view on RNA. We now realize that its diversity lies at the base of biological complexity. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing emerges a central generator of transcriptome diversity and regulation in higher eukaryotes. It is the posttranscriptional deamination of adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA catalyzed by enzymes of the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) family. Thought at first to be restricted to coding regions of only a few genes, recent bioinformatic analyses fueled by high-throughput sequencing revealed that it is a widespread modification affecting mostly non-coding repetitive elements in thousands of genes. The rise in scope is accompanied by discovery of a growing repertoire of functions based on differential decoding of inosine by the various cellular machineries: when recognized as guanosine, it can lead to protein recoding, alternative splicing or altered microRNA specificity; when recognized by inosine-binding proteins, it can result in nuclear retention of the transcript or its degradation. An imbalance in expression of ADAR enzymes with consequent editing dysregulation is a characteristic of human cancers. These alterations may be responsible for activating proto-oncogenes or inactivating tumor suppressors. While unlikely to be an early initiating 'hit', editing dysregulation seems to contribute to tumor progression and thus should be considered a 'driver mutation'. In this review, we examine the contribution of A-to-I RNA editing to carcinogenesis.

  17. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  18. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  19. Day-night variations of adenosine and its metabolizing enzymes in the brain cortex of the rat--possible physiological significance for the energetic homeostasis and the sleep-wake cycle.

    PubMed

    Chagoya de Sánchez, V; Hernández Múñoz, R; Suárez, J; Vidrio, S; Yáñez, L; Díaz Múñoz, M

    1993-05-28

    The role of adenosine as a metabolic regulator of physiological processes in the brain was studied by measuring its concentrations and the activity of adenosine-metabolizing enzymes: 5'-nucleotidase, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase, adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase in the cerebral cortex of the rat. Other purine compounds, such as, inosine, hypoxanthine and adenine nucleotides were also studied. The purines' pattern was bimodal with high levels of adenosine, inosine and hypoxanthine during the light period reaching their peak at 12.00 h, 08.00 h and 16.00 h, respectively, and small increments during the night between 02.00 h and 04.00 h. The enzymatic activities showed, in general, an unimodal profile with low activity during the day and high activities at night. The adenine nucleotide profile showed a significant diminution between 12.00 h and 24.00 h. The high adenosine level during the day might be due to a diminution of adenine nucleotide and to the low activity of adenosine-metabolizing enzymes, suggesting an accumulation of the nucleoside. The night increase, although of less magnitude, is simultaneous to high activity of adenosine-metabolizing enzymes and could be due to an increased formation of the nucleoside. The present data and the findings from other authors strongly suggest that adenosine in the brain cortex of the rat can participate at least in two physiological processes: regulation of the sleep-wake cycle and replenishment of the adenine nucleotide pool.

  20. Twenty-four-hour changes of S-adenosylmethionine, S-adenosylhomocysteine adenosine and their metabolizing enzymes in rat liver; possible physiological significance in phospholipid methylation.

    PubMed

    Chagoya de Sánchez, V; Hernández-Muñoz, R; Sánchez, L; Vidrio, S; Yáñez, L; Suárez, J

    1991-01-01

    1. The metabolic control of adenosine concentration in the rat liver through the 24-hr cycle is related to the activity of adenosine-metabolizing enzymes [5'-nucleotidase (5'N), adenosine deaminase (A.D.), adenosine kinase (A.K.) and S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAH-H)]. 2. Two peaks of adenosine were observed, one at 12:00 hr caused by high activity of 5'N and SAH-H, and the other at 02:00 hr, caused by a decrease in purine catabolism and purine utilization, low activity of SAH-H and de novo purine formation. 3. The similarity of the adenosine and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) profiles through the 24-hr cycle suggests a role of adenosine in transmethylation reactions, because, during the night (02:00 hr), the metabolic conditions favor the formation and accumulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), with consequent inhibition of transmethylation reactions. 4. In the 24-hr variation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), the lowest ratio of PC/PE was observed at 24:00-02:00 hr when SAH concentration is high, whereas the highest PC/PE ratio occurs at the same time as one of the SAM/SAH ratio maxima.

  1. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent vascular responses to purinergic agonists adenosine triphosphate and uridine triphosphate in the anesthetized mouse.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mrugeshkumar K; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism by which purinergic agonist adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP) decrease systemic arterial pressure in the anesthetized mouse was investigated. Intravenous injections of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP) produced dose-dependent decreases in systemic blood pressure in the mouse. The order of potency was ATP > UTP. Vasodilator responses to ATP and UTP were altered by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram. The vascular responses to ATP and UTP were not altered by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, a cGMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor, or a particular P2 receptor antagonist. These data suggest that ATP and UTP cause a decrease in systemic arterial pressure in the mouse via a cAMP-dependent pathway via a novel P2 receptor linked to adenylate cyclase and that nitric oxide release, prostaglandin synthesis, cGMP, and P2X1, P2Y1, and P2Y4 receptors play little or no role in the vascular effects of these purinergic agonists in the mouse.

  2. Isolation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain deficient in deoxycytidylate deaminase activity and partial characterization of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, E M; Haynes, R H

    1984-01-01

    Deoxycytidylate deaminase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been partially characterized. The yeast enzyme was found to exhibit properties similar to those of dCMP deaminases isolated from higher eucaryotes. A mutant strain completely deficient in dCMP deaminase activity was isolated by selection for resistance to 5-fluoro-2'-deoxycytidylate followed by screening for cross sensitivity to 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridylate, a potent inhibitor of the yeast thymidylate synthetase. We have designated this new allele dcd1 . A strain exhibiting an auxotrophic requirement for dUMP was isolated after mutagenesis of a dcd1 tup7 haploid. Genetic analysis revealed that this auxotrophic phenotype resulted from a combination of the dcd1 allele and a second, unlinked, nuclear mutation that we designated dmp1 . This allele, which by itself conveys no readily discernible phenotype, presumably impairs efficient synthesis of dUMP from UDP. The auxotrophic requirement of dcd1 dmp1 tup7 strains also can be satisfied by exogenous dTMP but not deoxyuridine. PMID:6373725

  3. Adenosine-Associated Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi; Ghanem, Amyl; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside in every cell. Many critical treatments such as modulating irregular heartbeat (arrhythmias), regulation of central nervous system (CNS) activity, and inhibiting seizural episodes can be carried out using adenosine. Despite the significant potential therapeutic impact of adenosine and its derivatives, the severe side effects caused by their systemic administration have significantly limited their clinical use. In addition, due to adenosine’s extremely short half-life in human blood (less than 10 s), there is an unmet need for sustained delivery systems to enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. In this paper, various adenosine delivery techniques, including encapsulation into biodegradable polymers, cell-based delivery, implantable biomaterials, and mechanical-based delivery systems, are critically reviewed and the existing challenges are highlighted. PMID:26453156

  4. Evidence for an A2/Ra adenosine receptor in the guinea-pig trachea

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C.M.; Collis, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    1 An attempt was made to determine whether the extracellular adenosine receptor that mediates relaxation in the guinea-pig trachea is of the A1/Ri or A2/Ra subtype. 2 Dose-response curves to adenosine and a number of 5′- and N6-substituted analogues were constructed for the isolated guinea-pig trachea, contracted with carbachol. 3 The 5′-substituted analogues of adenosine were the most potent compounds tested, the order of potency being 5′-N-cyclopropylcarboxamide adenosine (NCPCA) > 5′-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) > 2-chloroadenosine > L-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine (L-PIA) > adenosine > D-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine (D-PIA). 4 The difference in potency between the stereoisomers D- and L-PIA on the isolated trachea was at the most five fold. 5 Responses to low doses of adenosine and its analogues were attenuated after treatment with either theophylline or 8-phenyltheophylline. The responses to 2-chloroadenosine were affected to a lesser extent than were those to the other purines. 6 Adenosine transport inhibitors, dipyridamole and dilazep, potentiated responses to adenosine, did not affect those to NCPCA, NECA, L-PIA and D-PIA but significantly reduced the responses to high doses of 2-chloroadenosine. 7 Relaxations evoked by 9-β-D-xylofuranosyladenosine which can activate intracellular but not extracellular adenosine receptors, were attenuated by dipyridamole but unaffected by 8-phenyltheophylline. 8 The results support the existence of an extracellular A2/Ra subtype of adenosine receptor and an intracellular purine-sensitive site, both of which mediate relaxation. PMID:6286021

  5. Role of Adenosine Receptor A2A in Traumatic Optic Neuropathies (Addendum)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    diabetic retinopathy. Life Sci. 2013 Jul 30;93(2-3):78-88. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2013.05.024. Epub 2013 Jun 12.PMID:23770229 7 AIMS: This study was...undertaken to determine the effect of an adenosine kinase inhibitor (AKI) in diabetic retinopathy (DR). We have shown previously that adenosine signaling...via A2A receptors (A2AAR) is involved in retinal protection from diabetes -induced inflammation. Here we demonstrate that AKI-enhanced adenosine

  6. Nicotine and ethanol activate protein kinase A synergistically via G(i) betagamma subunits in nucleus accumbens/ventral tegmental cocultures: the role of dopamine D(1)/D(2) and adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuichiro; Yao, Lina; Hopf, F Woodward; Fan, Peidong; Jiang, Zhan; Bonci, Antonello; Diamond, Ivan

    2007-07-01

    Tobacco and alcohol are the most commonly used drugs of abuse and show the most serious comorbidity. The mesolimbic dopamine system contributes significantly to nicotine and ethanol reinforcement, but the underlying cellular signaling mechanisms are poorly understood. Nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors are highly expressed on ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons, with relatively low expression in nucleus accumbens (NAcb) neurons. Because dopamine receptors D(1) and D(2) are highly expressed on NAcb neurons, nicotine could influence NAcb neurons indirectly by activating VTA neurons to release dopamine in the NAcb. To investigate this possibility in vitro, we established primary cultures containing neurons from VTA or NAcb separately or in cocultures. Nicotine increased cAMP response element-mediated gene expression only in cocultures; this increase was blocked by nACh or dopamine D(1) or D(2) receptor antagonists. Furthermore, subthreshold concentrations of nicotine with ethanol increased gene expression in cocultures, and this increase was blocked by nACh, D(2) or adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists, Gbetagamma or protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors, and adenosine deaminase. These results suggest that nicotine activated VTA neurons, causing the release of dopamine, which in turn stimulated both D(1) and D(2) receptors on NAcb neurons. In addition, subthreshold concentrations of nicotine and ethanol in combination also activated NAcb neurons through synergy between D(2) and A(2A) receptors. These data provide a novel cellular mechanism, involving Gbetagamma subunits, A(2A) receptors, and PKA, whereby combined use of tobacco and alcohol could enhance the reinforcing effect in humans as well as facilitate long-term neuroadaptations, increasing the risk for developing coaddiction.

  7. Identification, expression, and characterization of Escherichia coli guanine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Maynes, J T; Yuan, R G; Snyder, F F

    2000-08-01

    Using the human cDNA sequence corresponding to guanine deaminase, the Escherichia coli genome was scanned using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), and a corresponding 439-residue open reading frame of unknown function was identified as having 36% identity to the human protein. The putative gene was amplified, subcloned into the pMAL-c2 vector, expressed, purified, and characterized enzymatically. The 50.2-kDa protein catalyzed the conversion of guanine to xanthine, having a K(m) of 15 microM with guanine and a k(cat) of 3.2 s(-1). The bacterial enzyme shares a nine-residue heavy metal binding site with human guanine deaminase, PG[FL]VDTHIH, and was found to contain approximately 1 mol of zinc per mol of subunit of protein. The E. coli guanine deaminase locus is 3' from an open reading frame which shows homology to a bacterial purine base permease.

  8. Identification, Expression, and Characterization of Escherichia coli Guanine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Maynes, Jason T.; Yuan, Richard G.; Snyder, Floyd F.

    2000-01-01

    Using the human cDNA sequence corresponding to guanine deaminase, the Escherichia coli genome was scanned using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), and a corresponding 439-residue open reading frame of unknown function was identified as having 36% identity to the human protein. The putative gene was amplified, subcloned into the pMAL-c2 vector, expressed, purified, and characterized enzymatically. The 50.2-kDa protein catalyzed the conversion of guanine to xanthine, having a Km of 15 μM with guanine and a kcat of 3.2 s−1. The bacterial enzyme shares a nine-residue heavy metal binding site with human guanine deaminase, PG[FL]VDTHIH, and was found to contain approximately 1 mol of zinc per mol of subunit of protein. The E. coli guanine deaminase locus is 3′ from an open reading frame which shows homology to a bacterial purine base permease. PMID:10913105

  9. Unique properties of Plasmodium falciparum porphobilinogen deaminase.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Viswanathan Arun; Arumugam, Rajavel; Gopalakrishnan, Bulusu; Jyothsna, Yeleswarapu Sri; Rangarajan, Pundi N; Padmanaban, Govindarajan

    2008-01-04

    The hybrid pathway for heme biosynthesis in the malarial parasite proposes the involvement of parasite genome-coded enzymes of the pathway localized in different compartments such as apicoplast, mitochondria, and cytosol. However, knowledge on the functionality and localization of many of these enzymes is not available. In this study, we demonstrate that porphobilinogen deaminase encoded by the Plasmodium falciparum genome (PfPBGD) has several unique biochemical properties. Studies carried out with PfPBGD partially purified from parasite membrane fraction, as well as recombinant PfPBGD lacking N-terminal 64 amino acids expressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells (DeltaPfPBGD), indicate that both the proteins are catalytically active. Surprisingly, PfPBGD catalyzes the conversion of porphobilinogen to uroporphyrinogen III (UROGEN III), indicating that it also possesses uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) activity, catalyzing the next step. This obviates the necessity to have a separate gene for UROS that has not been so far annotated in the parasite genome. Interestingly, DeltaPfP-BGD gives rise to UROGEN III even after heat treatment, although UROS from other sources is known to be heat-sensitive. Based on the analysis of active site residues, a DeltaPfPBGDL116K mutant enzyme was created and the specific activity of this recombinant mutant enzyme is 5-fold higher than DeltaPfPBGD. More interestingly, DeltaPfPBGDL116K catalyzes the formation of uroporphyrinogen I (UROGEN I) in addition to UROGEN III, indicating that with increased PBGD activity the UROS activity of PBGD may perhaps become rate-limiting, thus leading to non-enzymatic cyclization of preuroporphyrinogen to UROGEN I. PfPBGD is localized to the apicoplast and is catalytically very inefficient compared with the host red cell enzyme.

  10. AMP deaminase histochemical activity and immunofluorescent isozyme localization in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. L.; Sabina, R. L.; Ogasawara, N.; Riley, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The cellular distribution of AMP deaminase (AMPda) isozymes was documented for rat soleus and plantaris muscles, utilizing immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoprecipitation methods. AMPda is a ubiquitous enzyme existing as three distinct isozymes, A, B and C, which were initially purified from skeletal muscle, liver (and kidney), and heart, respectively. AMPda-A is primarily concentrated subsarcolemmally and intermyofibrillarly within muscle cells, while isozymes B and C are concentrated within non-myofiber elements of muscle tissue. AMPda-B is principally associated with connective tissues surrounding neural elements and the muscle spindle capsule, and AMPda-C is predominantly associated with circulatory elements, such as arterial and venous walls, capillary endothelium, and red blood cells. These specific localizations, combined with documented differences in kinetic properties, suggest multiple functional roles for the AMPda isozymes or temporal segregation of similar AMPda functions. Linkage of the AMPda substrate with adenosine production pathways at the AMP level and the localization of isozyme-C in vascular tissue suggest a regulatory role in the microcirculation.

  11. Preparation of a dual-enzyme co-immobilized capillary microreactor and simultaneous screening of multiple enzyme inhibitors by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pingtan; Zhao, Shulin; Lu, Xin; Ye, Fanggui; Wang, Hengshan

    2013-08-01

    A CE method based on a dual-enzyme co-immobilized capillary microreactor was developed for the simultaneous screening of multiple enzyme inhibitors. The capillary microreactor was prepared by co-immobilizing adenosine deaminase and xanthine oxidase on the inner wall at the inlet end of the separation capillary. The enzymes were first immobilized on gold nanoparticles, and the functionalized gold nanoparticles were then assembled on the inner wall at the inlet end of the separation capillary treated with polyethyleneimine. With the developed CE method, the substrates and products were baseline separated within 3 min. The activity of the immobilized enzyme can be directly detected by measuring the peak height of the products. A statistical parameter Z' factor was recommended for evaluation of the accuracy of a drug screening system. In the present study, it was calculated to be larger than 0.5, implying a good accuracy. Finally, screening a small compound library containing two known enzyme inhibitors and 20 natural extracts by the proposed method was demonstrated. The known inhibitors were identified, and some natural extracts were found to be positive for two-enzyme inhibition by the present method.

  12. Adenosine receptor targets for pain.

    PubMed

    Sawynok, J

    2016-12-03

    The main focus for the development of adenosine targets as analgesics to date has been A1Rs due to its antinociceptive profile in various preclinical pain models. The usefulness of systemic A1R agonists may be limited by other effects (cardiovascular, motor), but enhanced selectivity for pain might occur with partial agonists, potent and highly selective agonists, or allosteric modulators. A2AR agonists exhibit some peripheral pronociceptive effects, but also act on immune cells to suppress inflammation and on spinal glia to suppress pain signaling and may be useful for inflammatory and neuropathic pain. A2BR agonists exhibit peripheral proinflammatory effects on immune cells, but also spinal antinociceptive effects similar to A2AR agonists. A3Rs are now demonstrated to produce antinociception in several preclinical neuropathic pain models, with mechanistic actions on glial cells, and may be useful for neuropathic pain. Endogenous adenosine levels can be augmented by inhibition of metabolism (via adenosine kinase) or increased generation (via nucleotidases), and these approaches have implications for pain. Endogenous adenosine contributes to antinociception by several pharmacological agents, herbal remedies, acupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, exercise, joint mobilization, and water immersion via spinal and/or peripheral effects, such that this system appears to constitute a major pain regulatory system. Finally, caffeine inhibits A1-, A2A- and A3Rs with similar potency, and dietary caffeine intake will need attention in trials of: (a) agonists and/or modulators acting at these receptors, (b) some pharmacological and herbal analgesics, and (c) manipulations that enhance endogenous adenosine levels, all of which are inhibited by caffeine and/or A1R antagonists in preclinical studies. All adenosine receptors have effects on spinal glial cells in regulating nociception, and gender differences in the involvement of such cells in chronic

  13. Guanine Deaminase Functions as Dihydropterin Deaminase in the Biosynthesis of Aurodrosopterin, a Minor Red Eye Pigment of Drosophila*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaekwang; Park, Sang Ick; Ahn, Chiyoung; Kim, Heuijong; Yim, Jeongbin

    2009-01-01

    Dihydropterin deaminase, which catalyzes the conversion of 7,8-dihydropterin to 7,8-dihydrolumazine, was purified 5850-fold to apparent homogeneity from Drosophila melanogaster. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 48 kDa by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE, indicating that it is a monomer under native conditions. The pI value, temperature, and optimal pH of the enzyme were 5.5, 40 °C, and 7.5, respectively. Interestingly the enzyme had much higher activity for guanine than for 7,8-dihydropterin. The specificity constant (kcat/Km) for guanine (8.6 × 106 m−1·s−1) was 860-fold higher than that for 7,8-dihydropterin (1.0 × 104 m−1·s−1). The structural gene of the enzyme was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis as CG18143, located at region 82A1 on chromosome 3R. The cloned and expressed CG18143 exhibited both 7,8-dihydropterin and guanine deaminase activities. Flies with mutations in CG18143, SUPor-P/Df(3R)A321R1 transheterozygotes, had severely decreased activities in both deaminases compared with the wild type. Among several red eye pigments, the level of aurodrosopterin was specifically decreased in the mutant, and the amount of xanthine and uric acid also decreased considerably to 76 and 59% of the amounts in the wild type, respectively. In conclusion, dihydropterin deaminase encoded by CG18143 plays a role in the biosynthesis of aurodrosopterin by providing one of its precursors, 7,8-dihydrolumazine, from 7,8-dihydropterin. Dihydropterin deaminase also functions as guanine deaminase, an important enzyme for purine metabolism. PMID:19567870

  14. K+ depolarization evokes ATP, adenosine and glutamate release from glia in rat hippocampus: a microelectrode biosensor study

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, A; Andó, RD; Túri, G; Rózsa, B; Sperlágh, B

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE This study was undertaken to characterize the ATP, adenosine and glutamate outflow evoked by depolarization with high K+ concentrations, in slices of rat hippocampus. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We utilized the microelectrode biosensor technique and extracellular electrophysiological recording for the real-time monitoring of the efflux of ATP, adenosine and glutamate. KEY RESULTS ATP, adenosine and glutamate sensors exhibited transient and reversible current during depolarization with 25 mM K+, with distinct kinetics. The ecto-ATPase inhibitor ARL67156 enhanced the extracellular level of ATP and inhibited the prolonged adenosine efflux, suggesting that generation of adenosine may derive from the extracellular breakdown of ATP. Stimulation-evoked ATP, adenosine and glutamate efflux was inhibited by tetrodotoxin, while exposure to Ca2+-free medium abolished ATP and adenosine efflux from hippocampal slices. Extracellular elevation of ATP and adenosine were decreased in the presence of NMDA receptor antagonists, D-AP-5 and ifenprodil, whereas non-NMDA receptor blockade by CNQX inhibited glutamate but not ATP and adenosine efflux. The gliotoxin fluoroacetate and P2X7 receptor antagonists inhibited the K+-evoked ATP, adenosine and glutamate efflux, while carbenoxolone in low concentration and probenecid decreased only the adenosine efflux. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results demonstrated activity-dependent gliotransmitter release in the hippocampus in response to ongoing neuronal activity. ATP and glutamate were released by P2X7 receptor activation into extracellular space. Although the increased extracellular levels of adenosine did derive from released ATP, adenosine might also be released directly via pannexin hemichannels. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Sershen, pp. 1000–1002 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.02072.x PMID:22394324

  15. The ability of denbufylline to inhibit cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and its affinity for adenosine receptors and the adenosine re-uptake site.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, C. D.; Jackman, S. A.; Wilke, R.

    1989-01-01

    1. Denbufylline has been examined for its ability to inhibit cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isoenzymes from rat cardiac ventricle and cerebrum, as well as for its affinity for adenosine A1 and A2 receptors and the re-uptake site. For comparison, SK&F 94120, theophylline and 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX) were examined as phosphodiesterase inhibitors whilst N6-cyclohexyladenosine, R(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamido-adenosine, 2-nitrobenzylthioinosine, theophylline and IBMX were examined for their affinity for adenosine binding sites. 2. This investigation confirmed the presence of four phosphodiesterase activities in rat cardiac ventricle; in rat cerebrum only three were present. 3. Denbufylline selective inhibited one form of Ca2+-independent, low Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. The form inhibited was one of two present in cardiac ventricle and the sole one in cerebrum. This form was not inhibited by cyclic GMP. The inotropic agent SK&F 94120 selectively inhibited the form of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase which was inhibited by cyclic GMP present in cardiac ventricle. Theophylline and IBMX were relatively non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors. 4. Denbufylline was a less potent inhibitor of ligand binding to adenosine receptors than of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. This contrasted with theophylline, which had a higher affinity for adenosine receptors, and IBMX which showed no marked selectivity. Denbufylline, theophylline and IBMX all had a low affinity for the adenosine re-uptake site. 5. Denbufylline is being developed as an agent for the therapy of multi-infarct dementia. The selective inhibition of a particular low Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase may account for the activity of this compound. PMID:2474352

  16. Potentiation by tonic A2a-adenosine receptor activation of CGRP-facilitated [3H]-ACh release from rat motor nerve endings.

    PubMed Central

    Correia-de-Sá, P.; Ribeiro, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effect of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) on [3H]-acetylcholine ([3H]-ACh) release from motor nerve endings and its interaction with presynaptic facilitatory A2a-adenosine and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors was studied on rat phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations loaded with [3H]-choline. 2. CGRP (100-400 nM) increased electrically evoked [3H]-ACh release from phrenic nerve endings in a concentration-dependent manner. 3. The magnitude of CGRP excitation increased with the increase of the stimulation pulse duration from 40 microseconds to 1 ms, keeping the frequency, the amplitude and the train length constants. With 1 ms pulses, the evoked [3H]-ACh release was more intense than with 40 microseconds pulse duration. 4. Both the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium, and the A2a adenosine receptor agonist, CGS 21680C, increased evoked [3H]-ACh release, but only CGS 21680C potentiated the facilitatory effect of CGRP. This potentiation was prevented by the A2a adenosine receptor antagonist, PD 115,199. 5. Adenosine deaminase prevented the excitatory effect of CGRP (400 nM) on [3H]-ACh release. This effect was reversed by the non-hydrolysable A2a-adenosine receptor agonist, CGS 21680C. 6. The nicotinic antagonist, tubocurarine, did not significantly change, whereas the A2-adenosine receptor antagonist, PD 115,199, blocked the CGRP facilitation. The A1-adenosine receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine, potentiated the CGRP excitatory effect. 7. The results suggest that the facilitatory effect of CGRP on evoked [3H]-ACh release from rat phrenic motor nerve endings depends on the presence of endogenous adenosine which tonically activates A2a-adenosine receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8004402

  17. Factors affecting the reactivation of the oligomycin-sensitive adenosine 5'-triphosphatase and the release of ATPase inhibitor protein during the re-energization of intact mitochondria from ischemic cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Rouslin, W

    1987-03-15

    In the present study we examined factors affecting the reversal of the ischemia-induced protonic inhibition of the mitochondrial ATPase described earlier (Rouslin, W. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 9657-9661). It was found that ATPase reactivation and accompanying inhibitor protein release during the re-energization of intact mitochondria isolated from 20-min ischemic canine heart muscle could be blocked completely by either carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) or nigericin but was unaffected by valinomycin at 35 mM K+. At higher K+ concentrations, valinomycin also blocked ATPase reactivation but not quite as completely as did nigericin. These observations suggest that ATPase reactivation and inhibitor protein release are particularly dependent upon either the trans-inner membrane pH gradient (delta pH) or possibly upon matrix pH per se and slightly less dependent upon membrane potential (delta psi) in intact cardiac muscle mitochondria. The addition of FCCP at the end of the re-energization incubations limited partially the extent of both ATPase reactivation and inhibitor protein release. This latter effect appears to have been mediated by a partial reassociation of the inhibitor protein with the enzyme, and it was accentuated (when FCCP was added at the end of the incubations) or mimicked (when FCCP was absent) by lowering the pH of the re-energization medium. A close examination of the first 10 min of the time course of enzyme activation and of inhibitor protein release revealed that while the former process was essentially finished in 1 min or less, the latter required approximately 10 min for completion. This observation led to the proposal of a two-site model of enzyme-inhibitor interaction which is discussed.

  18. Highly Potent and Selective Ectonucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase I Inhibitors Based on an Adenosine 5′-(α or γ)- Thio-(α,β- or β,γ)-methylenetriphosphate Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Nadel, Yael; Lecka, Joanna; Gilad, Yocheved; Ben-David, Gal; Förster, Daniel; Reiser, Georg; Kenigsberg, Sarah; Camden, Jean; Weisman, Gary A.; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Sévigny, Jean; Fischer, Bilha

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-1 (NPP1) activity is associated with chondrocalcinosis, osteoarthritis, and type 2 diabetes. The potential of NPP1 inhibitors as therapeutic agents, and the scarceness of their structure–activity relationship, encouraged us to develop new NPP1 inhibitors. Specifically, we synthesized ATP-α-thio-β,γ- CH2 (1), ATP-α-thio-β,γ-CCl2 (2), ATP-α-CH2-γ-thio (3), and 8-SH-ATP (4) and established their resistance to hydrolysis by NPP1,3 and NTPDase1,2,3,8 (<5% hydrolysis) (NTPDase = ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase). Analogues 1–3 at 100 μM inhibited thymidine 5′-monophosphate p-nitrophenyl ester hydrolysis by NPP1 and NPP3 by >90% and 23–43%, respectively, and only slightly affected (0–40%) hydrolysis of ATP by NTPDase1,2,3,8. Analogue 3 is the most potent NPP1 inhibitor currently known, Ki = 20 nM and IC50 = 0.39 μM. Analogue 2a is a selective NPP1 inhibitor with Ki = 685 nM and IC50 = 0.57 μM. Analogues 1–3 were found mostly to be nonagonists of P2Y1/P2Y2/P2Y11 receptors. Docking analogues 1–3 into the NPP1 model suggested that activity correlates with the number of H-bonds with binding site residues. In conclusion, we propose analogues 2a and 3 as highly promising NPP1 inhibitors. PMID:24846781

  19. Hydroxycarbamide modulates components involved in the regulation of adenosine levels in blood cells from sickle-cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Silva-Pinto, Ana C; Dias-Carlos, Carolina; Saldanha-Araujo, Felipe; Ferreira, Flávia I S; Palma, Patrícia V B; Araujo, Amélia G; Queiroz, Regina H C; Elion, Jacques; Covas, Dimas T; Zago, Marco A; Panepucci, Rodrigo A

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the role of adenosine (ADO) in sickle-cell anemia (SCA). ADO is produced by CD39 and CD73 and converted to inosine by adenosine deaminase (ADA). We evaluated the effects of hydroxycarbamide (HU) treatment on the modulation of adenosine levels in SCA patients. The expressions of CD39, CD73, and CD26 were evaluated by flow cytometry on blood cells in 15 HU-treated and 17 untreated patients and 10 healthy individuals. RNA was extracted from monocytes, and ADA gene expression was quantified by real-time PCR. ADA activity was also evaluated. We found that ADA transcripts were two times higher in monocytes of HU-treated patients, compared with untreated (P = 0.039). Monocytes of HU-treated patients expressed CD26, while monocytes of controls and untreated patients did not (P = 0.023). In treated patients, a lower percentage of T lymphocytes expressed CD39 compared with untreated (P = 0.003), and the percentage of T regulatory (Treg) cells was reduced in the treated group compared with untreated (P = 0.017) and controls (P = 0.0009). Besides, HU-treated patients displayed increased ADA activity, compared with untreated. Our results indicate a novel mechanism of action of HU mediated by the reduction of adenosine levels and its effects on pathophysiological processes in SCA.

  20. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    S Kamat; A Bagaria; D Kumaran; G Holmes-Hampton; H Fan; A Sali; J Sauder; S Burley; P Lindahl; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction

  1. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, S.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Fan, H.; Sali, A.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-03-22

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with kcat and kcat/Km values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the

  2. Vitamins and monothiols efficacy in the restoration of adenosine nucleotide degradation enzymes altered during methylmercury intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, P.P.; Bapu, C.; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    1995-12-31

    Male albino mice were intoxicated with a daily dose of 1 mg/kg of methylmercury chloride (MMC) for 7 days, and were treated thereafter with glutathione, N-acetyl-DL-homocysteine thiolactone, vitamin B complex, and vitamin E, either alone or in combinations for the next 7 days. The animals were sacrificed on the eighth day, with the exception of one group that was kept without toxic exposure for an additional 7 days and sacrificed on the fifteenth day. Brain, spinal cord, kidney, and liver of the animals were examined for changes in adenosine deaminase and 5{prime} nucleotidase. We found a severe inhibition of these enzymes during MMC intoxication and significant recovery during monothiols and vitamins administration, indicating the effectiveness of these agents in methylmercury detoxication. 26 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Polymorphous crystallization and diffraction of threonine deaminase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, D T; Eisenstein, E; Fisher, K E; Zondlo, J; Chinchilla, D; Yu, H D; Dill, J; Winborne, E; Ducote, K; Xiao, G; Gilliland, G L

    1998-05-01

    The biosynthetic threonine deaminase from Escherichia coli, an allosteric tetramer with key regulatory functions, has been crystallized in several crystal forms. Two distinct forms, both belonging to either space group P3121 or P3221, with different sized asymmetric units that both contain a tetramer, grow under identical conditions. Diffraction data sets to 2.8 A resolution (native) and 2. 9 A resolution (isomorphous uranyl derivative) have been collected from a third crystal form in space group I222.

  4. Application of ADA1 as a new marker enzyme in sandwich ELISA to study the effect of adenosine on activated monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengqian; Skaldin, Maksym; Wu, Chengxiang; Lu, Yuanan; Zavialov, Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a valuable technique to detect antigens in biological fluids. Horse radish peroxidase (HRP) is one of the most common enzymes used for signal amplification in ELISA. Despite new advances in technology, such as a large-scale production of recombinant enzymes and availability of new detection systems, limited research is devoted to finding alternative enzymes and their substrates to amplify the ELISA signals. Here, HRP-avidin was substituted with the human adenosine deaminase (hADA1)-streptavidin complex and adenosine as a detection system in commercial ELISA kits. The hADA1 ELISA was successfully used to demonstrate that adenosine, bound to A1 and A3 adenosine receptors, increases cytokine secretion by LPS activated monocytes. We show that hADA1-based ELISA has the same sensitivity, and also provides identical results, as HRP ELISA. In addition, the sensitivity of hADA1-based ELISA could be easily adjusted by changing the adenosine concentration and the incubation time. Therefore, hADA1 could be used as a detection enzyme with any commercial ELISA kit with a wide range of concentration of antigens. PMID:27510152

  5. Excess adenosine A2B receptor signaling contributes to priapism through HIF-1α mediated reduction of PDE5 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chen; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Weiru; Qi, Lin; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackburn, Michael R; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2014-06-01

    Priapism is featured with prolonged and painful penile erection and is prevalent among males with sickle cell disease (SCD). The disorder is a dangerous urological and hematological emergency since it is associated with ischemic tissue damage and erectile disability. Here we report that phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) gene expression and PDE activity is significantly reduced in penile tissues of two independent priapic models: SCD mice and adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient mice. Moreover, using ADA enzyme therapy to reduce adenosine or a specific antagonist to block A(2B) adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling, we successfully attenuated priapism in both ADA(-/-) and SCD mice by restoring penile PDE5 gene expression to normal levels. This finding led us to further discover that excess adenosine signaling via ADORA2B activation directly reduces PDE5 gene expression in a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α)-dependent manner. Overall, we reveal that excess adenosine-mediated ADORA2B signaling underlies reduced penile PDE activity by decreasing PDE5 gene expression in a HIF-1α-dependent manner and provide new insight for the pathogenesis of priapism and novel therapies for the disease.

  6. Pathological overproduction: the bad side of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Borea, Pier Andrea; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Varani, Katia

    2017-03-02

    Adenosine is an endogenous ubiquitous purine nucleoside, which is increased by hypoxia, ischaemia and tissue damage and mediates a number of physiopathological effects by interacting with four GPCRs, identified as A1 , A2A , A2B and A3 . Physiological and acutely increased adenosine is mostly associated with beneficial effects that include vasodilatation and a decrease in inflammation. In contrast, chronic overproduction of adenosine occurs in important pathological states, where long-lasting increases in the nucleoside levels are responsible for the bad side of adenosine associated with chronic inflammation, fibrosis and organ damage. In this review, we describe and critically discuss the pathological overproduction of adenosine and analyse when, where and how adenosine exerts its detrimental effects throughout the body.

  7. Torsades de pointes after adenosine administration.

    PubMed

    Teodorovich, Nicholay; Margolin, Elena; Kogan, Yonatan; Paz, Ofir; Swissa, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine can produce arrhythmias, which are generally short living. It may induce PACs and PVCs, sinus bradycardia, and atrial fibrillation. There have been reports of transient polymorphic VT (torsades de pointes) in patients with LQTS and others in people with normal QT interval. We report a case of a long episode of polymorphic VT induced by adenosine. A 27 year old woman received 6 mg adenosine for PSVT, which terminated and torsades de pointes developed, persisting for 17 seconds and terminated spontaneously. This is the longest described duration of the torsades after adenosine administration in patients with normal QT interval.

  8. Inversion of the allosteric response of Escherichia coli glucosamine-6-P deaminase to N-acetylglucosamine 6-P, by single amino acid replacements.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, David A; Montero-Morán, Gabriela M; Lara-González, Samuel; Calcagno, Mario L

    2004-01-01

    Amino acid replacements in the active site of glucosamine-6-P deaminase from Escherichia coli (GlcN6P deaminase, EC 3.5.99.6) involving the residues D141 and E148 produce atypical allosteric kinetics. These residues are located in the chain segment 139-156 which is part of the active site and which also forms several intersubunit contacts close to the allosteric site. In the D141N and E148Q mutant forms of this deaminase, there is an inversion of the effect of its physiological allosteric effector, N-acetylglucosamine 6-P, which becomes an inhibitor at substrate concentrations above a critical value. For both mutants, this particular point appears at low substrate concentration and the inhibition by the allosteric activator is the dominant effect in velocity versus substrate curves. These effects are analyzed as a particular case of the concerted allosteric model, assuming that the R state, the conformer displaying the higher affinity for the substrate, is the less catalytic state, thus producing an inverted allosteric response.

  9. Partial separation of platelet and placental adenosine receptors from adenosine A2-like binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnierowicz, S.; Work, C.; Hutchison, K.; Fox, I.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The ubiquitous adenosine A2-like binding protein obscures the binding properties of adenosine receptors assayed with 5'-N-({sup 3}H)ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). To solve this problem, we developed a rapid and simple method to separate adenosine receptors from the adenosine A2-like binding protein. Human platelet and placental membranes were solubilized with 1% 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate. The soluble platelet extract was precipitated with polyethylene glycol and the fraction enriched in adenosine receptors was isolated from the precipitate by differential centrifugation. The adenosine A2-like binding protein was removed from the soluble placental extract with hydroxylapatite and adenosine receptors were precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The specificity of the ({sup 3}H)NECA binding is typical of an adenosine A2 receptor for platelets and an adenosine A1 receptor for placenta. This method leads to enrichment of adenosine A2 receptors for platelets and adenosine A1 receptors for placenta. This provides a useful preparation technique for pharmacologic studies of adenosine receptors.

  10. ACTIVATION OF A CRYPTIC D-SERINE DEAMINASE (DSD) GENE FROM PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA 17616

    EPA Science Inventory

    D-serine inhibits growth of P. cepacia 17616; however, resistant mutants able to express an ordinarily cryptic D-serine deaminase (dsd) gene were isolated readily. The resistant strains formed high levels of a D-serine deaminase active on D-threonine as well as D-serine. IS eleme...

  11. Crystal Structure of Schistosoma mansoni Adenosine Phosphorylase/5’-Methylthioadenosine Phosphorylase and Its Importance on Adenosine Salvage Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Torini, Juliana Roberta; Brandão-Neto, José; DeMarco, Ricardo; Pereira, Humberto D'Muniz

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni do not have de novo purine pathways and rely on purine salvage for their purine supply. It has been demonstrated that, unlike humans, the S. mansoni is able to produce adenine directly from adenosine, although the enzyme responsible for this activity was unknown. In the present work we show that S. mansoni 5´-deoxy-5´-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP, E.C. 2.4.2.28) is capable of use adenosine as a substrate to the production of adenine. Through kinetics assays, we show that the Schistosoma mansoni MTAP (SmMTAP), unlike the mammalian MTAP, uses adenosine substrate with the same efficiency as MTA phosphorolysis, which suggests that this enzyme is part of the purine pathway salvage in S. mansoni and could be a promising target for anti-schistosoma therapies. Here, we present 13 SmMTAP structures from the wild type (WT), including three single and one double mutant, and generate a solid structural framework for structure description. These crystal structures of SmMTAP reveal that the active site contains three substitutions within and near the active site when compared to it mammalian counterpart, thus opening up the possibility of developing specific inhibitors to the parasite MTAP. The structural and kinetic data for 5 substrates reveal the structural basis for this interaction, providing substract for inteligent design of new compounds for block this enzyme activity. PMID:27935959

  12. Regulatory factors governing adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Hong, HuiQi; Lin, Jaymie Siqi; Chen, Leilei

    2015-03-31

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, the most prevalent mode of transcript modification in higher eukaryotes, is catalysed by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs). A-to-I editing imposes an additional layer of gene regulation as it dictates various aspects of RNA metabolism, including RNA folding, processing, localization and degradation. Furthermore, editing events in exonic regions contribute to proteome diversity as translational machinery decodes inosine as guanosine. Although it has been demonstrated that dysregulated A-to-I editing contributes to various diseases, the precise regulatory mechanisms governing this critical cellular process have yet to be fully elucidated. However, integration of previous studies revealed that regulation of A-to-I editing is multifaceted, weaving an intricate network of auto- and transregulations, including the involvement of virus-originated factors like adenovirus-associated RNA. Taken together, it is apparent that tipping of any regulatory components will have profound effects on A-to-I editing, which in turn contributes to both normal and aberrant physiological conditions. A complete understanding of this intricate regulatory network may ultimately be translated into new therapeutic strategies against diseases driven by perturbed RNA editing events. Herein, we review the current state of knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms governing A-to-I editing and propose the role of other co-factors that may be involved in this complex regulatory process.

  13. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing mediated by ADARs in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yan-Ru; Qiao, Jun-Jing; Chan, Tim Hon Man; Zhu, Ying-Hui; Li, Fang-Fang; Liu, Haibo; Fei, Jing; Li, Yan; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Chen, Leilei

    2014-02-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), the major histologic form of esophageal cancer, is a heterogeneous tumor displaying a complex variety of genetic and epigenetic changes. Aberrant RNA editing of adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I), as it is catalyzed by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR), represents a common posttranscriptional modification in certain human diseases. In this study, we investigated the status and role of ADARs and altered A-to-I RNA editing in ESCC tumorigenesis. Among the three ADAR enzymes expressed in human cells, only ADAR1 was overexpressed in primary ESCC tumors. ADAR1 overexpression was due to gene amplification. Patients with ESCC with tumoral overexpression of ADAR1 displayed a poor prognosis. In vitro and in vivo functional assays established that ADAR1 functions as an oncogene during ESCC progression. Differential expression of ADAR1 resulted in altered gene-specific editing activities, as reflected by hyperediting of FLNB and AZIN1 messages in primary ESCC. Notably, the edited form of AZIN1 conferred a gain-of-function phenotype associated with aggressive tumor behavior. Our findings reveal that altered gene-specific A-to-I editing events mediated by ADAR1 drive the development of ESCC, with potential implications in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of this disease.

  14. Homozygosity for a novel adenosine deaminase (ADA) nonsense mutation (Q3>X) in a child with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)

    SciTech Connect

    Santisteban, I.; Arrendondo-Vega, F.X.; Kelly, S. |

    1994-09-01

    A Somali girl was diagnosed with ADA-deficient SCID at 7 mo; she responded well to PEG-ADA replacement and is now 3.3 yr old. ADA mRNA was undetectable (Northern) in her cultured T cells, but was present in T cells of her parents and two sibs. All PCR-amplified exon 1 genomic clones from the patient had a C>T transition at bp 7 relative to the start of translation, replacing Gln at codon 3 (AGA) with a termination codon (TGA, Q3>X). Patient cDNA (prepared by RT-PCR with a 5{prime} primer that covered codons 1-7) had a previously described polymorphism, K80>R, but was otherwise normal, indicating that no other coding mutations were present. A predicted new genomic BfaI restriction site was used to establish her homozygosity for Q3>X and to analyze genotypes of family members. We also analyzed the segregation of a variable Alu polyA-associated TAAA repeat (AluVpA) situated 5{prime} of the ADA gene. Three different AluVpA alleles were found, one of which was only present in the father and was not associated with his Q3>X allele. Because the father`s RBCs had only {approximately}15% of normal ADA activity, we analyzed his ADA cDNA. We found a G>A transition at bp 425 that substitutes Gln for Arg142, a solvent-accessible residue, and eliminates a BsmAI site in exon 5. ADA activity of the R142>Q in vitro translation product was 20-25% of wild type ADA translation product, suggesting that R142>Q is a new {open_quote}partial{close_quote} ADA deficiency mutation. As expected, Q3>X mRNA did not yield a detectable in vitro translation product. We conclude that the patient`s father is a compound heterozygote carrying the ADA Q3>X/R142>Q genotype. {open_quote}Partial{close_quote} ADA deficiency unassociated with immunodeficiency is relatively common in individuals of African descent. The present findings and previous observations suggest that {open_quote}partial{close_quote} ADA deficiency may have had an evolutionary advantage.

  15. Role of ascitic fluid adenosine deaminase (ADA) and serum CA-125 in the diagnosis of tuberculous peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Nath, N C; Parvin, R; Rahman, A; Bhuiyan, T M; Rahman, M; Mohsin M N

    2014-12-01

    This cross sectional study was carried out in the department of gastroenterology, BIRDEM, Dhaka from January 2010 to May 2011 to determine the role of ascitic fluid ADA and serum CA-125 in the diagnosis of clinically suspected tubercular peritonitis. Total 30 patients (age 39.69 ± 21.26, 18M/12F) with clinical suspicion of tuberculosis peritonitis were included in this study after analyzing selection criteria. Laparoscopic peritoneal biopsy with 'histopathological diagnosis' was considered gold standard against which accuracics of two biomarkers (ADA & CA-125) were compared. Cut off value of ADA and CA-125 are 24 u/l, 35 U/ml respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of ADA as a diagnostic modality in tuberculos peritonitis were 87.5%, 83.33%, 95.45%, 62.5% and 86.67% respectively where as CA-125 was found to have 83.33% sensitivity, 50% specificity, 86.9% positive predictive value, 42.85% negative predictive value and 76.6% accuracy. Both biomarkers are simple, non-invasive, rapid and relatively cheap diagnostic test where as laparoscopy is an invasive procedure, costly & requires trained staff and not without risk and also not feasible in all the centre in our country. So ascitic fluid ADA and serum CA-125 are important diagnostic test for peritoneal tuberculosis.

  16. New Insights into 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Phylogeny, Evolution and Ecological Significance

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Francisco X.; Rossi, Márcio J.; Soares, Cláudio R. F. S.; McConkey, Brendan J.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this work is the study of the phylogeny, evolution and ecological importance of the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, the activity of which represents one of the most important and studied mechanisms used by plant growth–promoting microorganisms. The ACC deaminase gene and its regulatory elements presence in completely sequenced organisms was verified by multiple searches in diverse databases, and based on the data obtained a comprehensive analysis was conducted. Strain habitat, origin and ACC deaminase activity were taken into account when analyzing the results. In order to unveil ACC deaminase origin, evolution and relationships with other closely related pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes a phylogenetic analysis was also performed. The data obtained show that ACC deaminase is mostly prevalent in some Bacteria, Fungi and members of Stramenopiles. Contrary to previous reports, we show that ACC deaminase genes are predominantly vertically inherited in various bacterial and fungal classes. Still, results suggest a considerable degree of horizontal gene transfer events, including interkingdom transfer events. A model for ACC deaminase origin and evolution is also proposed. This study also confirms the previous reports suggesting that the Lrp-like regulatory protein AcdR is a common mechanism regulating ACC deaminase expression in Proteobacteria, however, we also show that other regulatory mechanisms may be present in some Proteobacteria and other bacterial phyla. In this study we provide a more complete view of the role for ACC deaminase than was previously available. The results show that ACC deaminase may not only be related to plant growth promotion abilities, but may also play multiple roles in microorganism's developmental processes. Hence, exploring the origin and functioning of this enzyme may be the key in a variety of important agricultural and biotechnological applications. PMID:24905353

  17. Effects of iron supplementation on blood adenine deaminase activity and oxidative stress in Trypanosoma evansi infection of rats.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Baldissera, Matheus D; Tonin, Alexandre A; França, Raqueli T; Zanini, Danieli; Leal, Marta L R; Lopes, Sonia T A; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Morsch, Vera M; Monteiro, Silvia G; Guarda, Naiara S; Moresco, Rafael N; Aires, Adelina R; Stefani, Lenita M; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of iron supplementation on oxidative stress and on the activity of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) in rats experimentally infected by Trypanosoma evansi. For this purpose, 20 rats were divided into four experimental groups with five animals each as follows: groups A and B were composed by healthy animals, while animals from groups C and D were infected by T. evansi. Additionally, groups B and D received two subcutaneous doses of iron (60 mg kg(-1)) within an interval of 5 days. Blood samples were drawn on day 8 post infection in order to assess hematological and biochemical variables. Among the main results are: (1) animals from group C showed reduced erythrogram (with tendency to anemia); however the same results were not observed for group D; this might be a direct effect of free iron on trypanosomes which helped to reduce the parasitemia and the damage to erythrocytes caused by the infection; (2) iron supplementation was able to reduce NOx levels by inhibiting iNOS, and thus, providing an antioxidant action and, indirectly, reducing the ALT levels in groups Band D; (3) increase FRAP levels in group D; (4) reduce ADA activity in serum and erythrocytes in group C; however, this supplementation (5) increased the protein oxidation in groups B and D, as well as group C (positive control). Therefore, iron showed antioxidant and oxidant effects on animals that received supplementation; and it maintained the activity of E-ADA stable in infected/supplemented animals.

  18. Inhibitors of phosphodiesterases PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4 do not increase the sinoatrial tachycardia of noradrenaline and prostaglandin PGE₁ in mice.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Tovar, Alejandro; Vargas, María Luisa; Kaumann, Alberto J

    2016-02-01

    Phosphodiesterases PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4 are expressed in murine sinoatrial cells. PDE3 and/or PDE4 reduce heart rate but apparently do not influence the tachycardia mediated through sinoatrial β1- and β2-adrenoceptors despite the high content of sinoatrial cAMP. The function of PDE2 is, however, uncertain. Prostaglandin PGE1 elicits sinoatrial tachycardia through EP receptors, but the control by phosphodiesterases is unknown. We investigated on spontaneously beating right atria of mice the effects of the PDE2 inhibitors Bay 60-7550 and EHNA on basal beating and the tachycardia produced by noradrenaline (3 nM) and PGE1 (1 μM). Bay 60-7550 (1 μM), but not EHNA (10 μM), increased basal sinoatrial beating. EHNA also failed to produce tachycardia in the presence of the adenosine deaminase inhibitor 2'-deoxycoformycin (10 μM), remaining inconclusive whether PDE2 reduces basal sinoatrial beating. Rolipram (10 μM) and cilostamide (300 nM) caused moderate tachycardia. The tachycardia evoked by Bay 60-7550 was similar in the absence and presence of rolipram. Noradrenaline elicited stable tachycardia that was not increased by Bay 60-7550. A stable tachycardia caused by PGE1 was not increased by the inhibitors of PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4. Unlike PDE3 and PDE4 which reduce murine basal sinoatrial beating, a possible effect of PDE2 needs further research. The stable tachycardia produced by noradrenaline and PGE1, together with the lack potentiation by the inhibitors of PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4, suggests that cAMP generated at the receptor compartments is hardly hydrolyzed by these phophodiesterases. Evidence from human volunteers is consistent with this proposal.

  19. Adenosine modulates cell growth in the human breast cancer cells via adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Panjehpour, Mojtaba; Karami-Tehrani, Fatemeh

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine modulates the proliferation, survival, and apoptosis of many different cell types. The present study was performed to investigate the role of adenosine receptors in the human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB468. The biological effects of adenosine on the cells were analyzed by adenylyl cyclase and cell viability assay as well as RT-PCR of adenosine receptors. RT-PCR results show the expression of the transcript of all adenosine receptors in both cell lines. By using adenosine and selective adenosine receptor agonists or antagonists, we found that A3 stimulation reduced cell viability, which was abolished by pretreatment with A3 receptor antagonist. Moreover, we demonstrated that adenosine (natural agonist) triggers a cytotoxic signal via A3 receptor activation that was not seen for other subclasses of adenosine receptors. Intracellular cAMP concentration was changed significantly only for A3 and A2B receptor-selective agonists, which indicates the functional form of these receptors on the cell surface. In conclusion, our findings revealed the role of adenosine receptors in breast cancer cell lines on growth modulation role of A3 and functional form of A2B, although its involvement in cell growth modulation was not seen. Theses findings as well as data by others may provide a possible application of adenosine receptor agonists/antagonists in breast malignancies.

  20. Alterations in the brain adenosine metabolism cause behavioral and neurological impairment in ADA-deficient mice and patients

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Aisha V.; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Fumagalli, Francesca; Bianchi, Veronica; Poliani, Pietro L.; Dallatomasina, Chiara; Riboni, Elisa; Politi, Letterio S.; Tabucchi, Antonella; Carlucci, Filippo; Casiraghi, Miriam; Carriglio, Nicola; Cominelli, Manuela; Forcellini, Carlo Alberto; Barzaghi, Federica; Ferrua, Francesca; Minicucci, Fabio; Medaglini, Stefania; Leocani, Letizia; la Marca, Giancarlo; Notarangelo, Lucia D.; Azzari, Chiara; Comi, Giancarlo; Baldoli, Cristina; Canale, Sabrina; Sessa, Maria; D’Adamo, Patrizia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) deficiency is an autosomal recessive variant of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by systemic accumulation of ADA substrates. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities observed in ADA-SCID patients surviving after stem cell transplantation or gene therapy represent an unresolved enigma in the field. We found significant neurological and cognitive alterations in untreated ADA-SCID patients as well as in two groups of patients after short- and long-term enzyme replacement therapy with PEG-ADA. These included motor dysfunction, EEG alterations, sensorineural hypoacusia, white matter and ventricular alterations in MRI as well as a low mental development index or IQ. Ada-deficient mice were significantly less active and showed anxiety-like behavior. Molecular and metabolic analyses showed that this phenotype coincides with metabolic alterations and aberrant adenosine receptor signaling. PEG-ADA treatment corrected metabolic adenosine-based alterations, but not cellular and signaling defects, indicating an intrinsic nature of the neurological and behavioral phenotype in ADA deficiency. PMID:28074903

  1. Alterations in the brain adenosine metabolism cause behavioral and neurological impairment in ADA-deficient mice and patients.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Aisha V; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Fumagalli, Francesca; Bianchi, Veronica; Poliani, Pietro L; Dallatomasina, Chiara; Riboni, Elisa; Politi, Letterio S; Tabucchi, Antonella; Carlucci, Filippo; Casiraghi, Miriam; Carriglio, Nicola; Cominelli, Manuela; Forcellini, Carlo Alberto; Barzaghi, Federica; Ferrua, Francesca; Minicucci, Fabio; Medaglini, Stefania; Leocani, Letizia; la Marca, Giancarlo; Notarangelo, Lucia D; Azzari, Chiara; Comi, Giancarlo; Baldoli, Cristina; Canale, Sabrina; Sessa, Maria; D'Adamo, Patrizia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2017-01-11

    Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) deficiency is an autosomal recessive variant of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by systemic accumulation of ADA substrates. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities observed in ADA-SCID patients surviving after stem cell transplantation or gene therapy represent an unresolved enigma in the field. We found significant neurological and cognitive alterations in untreated ADA-SCID patients as well as in two groups of patients after short- and long-term enzyme replacement therapy with PEG-ADA. These included motor dysfunction, EEG alterations, sensorineural hypoacusia, white matter and ventricular alterations in MRI as well as a low mental development index or IQ. Ada-deficient mice were significantly less active and showed anxiety-like behavior. Molecular and metabolic analyses showed that this phenotype coincides with metabolic alterations and aberrant adenosine receptor signaling. PEG-ADA treatment corrected metabolic adenosine-based alterations, but not cellular and signaling defects, indicating an intrinsic nature of the neurological and behavioral phenotype in ADA deficiency.

  2. Endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors localized to ganglion cells of the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Braas, K.M.; Zarbin, M.A.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-06-01

    Using specific sensitive antisera against adenosine, we have immunocytochemically localized endogenous adenosine to specific layers of rat, guinea pig, monkey, and human retina. Highest adenosine immunoreactivity was observed in ganglion cells and their processes in the optic nerve fiber layer. Substantial staining was also found throughout the inner plexiform layer and in select cells in the inner nuclear layer. Adenosine A1 receptors, labeled with the agonists L-(/sup 3/H)phenylisopropyladenosine and /sup 125/I-labeled hydroxy-phenylisopropyladenosine, were autoradiographically localized. The highest levels of binding sites occurred in the nerve fiber, ganglion cell, and inner plexiform layers of the retina in all the species examined. The distribution of adenosine A1 receptor sites closely parallels that of retinal neurons and fibers containing immunoreactive adenosine. These results suggest a role for endogenous adenosine as a coneurotransmitter in ganglion cells and their fibers in the optic nerve.

  3. Enzymatic regeneration of adenosine triphosphate cofactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Regenerating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by enzymatic process which utilizes carbamyl phosphate as phosphoryl donor is technique used to regenerate expensive cofactors. Process allows complex enzymatic reactions to be considered as candidates for large-scale continuous processes.

  4. Adenosine phosphonoacetic acid is slowly metabolized by NDP kinase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Morera, S; Pasti, C; Angusti, A; Solaroli, N; Véron, M; Janin, J; Manfredini, S; Deville-Bonne, D

    2005-11-01

    NDP kinase catalyzes the last step in the phosphorylation of nucleotides. It is also involved in the activation by cellular kinases of nucleoside analogs used in antiviral therapies. Adenosine phosphonoacetic acid, a close analog of ADP already proposed as an inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, was found to be a poor substrate for human NDP kinase, as well as a weak inhibitor with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 0.6 mM to be compared to 0.025 mM for ADP. The X-ray structure of a complex of adenosine phosphonoacetic acid and the NDP kinase from Dictyostelium was determined to 2.0 A resolution showing that the analog adopts a binding mode similar to ADP, but that no magnesium ion is present at the active site. As ACP may also interfere with other cellular kinases, its potential as a drug targeting NDP kinase or ribonucleotide reductase is likely to be limited due to strong side effects. The design of new molecules with a narrower specificity and a stronger affinity will benefit from the detailed knowledge of the complex ACP-NDP kinase.

  5. CD73-adenosine: a next-generation target in immuno-oncology.

    PubMed

    Allard, David; Allard, Bertrand; Gaudreau, Pierre-Olivier; Chrobak, Pavel; Stagg, John

    2016-02-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has entered in a new era with the development of first-generation immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting the PD1/PD-L1 and CTLA-4 pathways. In this context, considerable research effort is being deployed to find the next generation of cancer immunotherapeutics. The CD73-adenosine axis constitutes one of the most promising pathways in immuno-oncology. We and others have demonstrated the immunosuppressive role of CD73-adenosine in cancer and established proof-of-concept that the targeted blockade of CD73 or adenosine receptors could effectively promote anti-tumor immunity and enhance the activity of first-generation immune checkpoint blockers. With Phase I clinical trials now underway evaluating anti-CD73 or anti-A2A therapies in cancer patients, we here discuss the fundamental, preclinical and clinical findings related to the role of the CD73-adenosinergic pathway in tumor immunity.

  6. Evidence for two different mechanisms triggering the change in quaternary structure of the allosteric enzyme, glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Jaimes, Ismael; Ramírez-Costa, Montserrat; De Anda-Aguilar, Lorena; Hinojosa-Ocaña, Pilar; Calcagno, Mario L

    2005-02-01

    The generation and propagation of conformational changes associated with ligand binding in the allosteric enzyme glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase (GlcN6P deaminase, EC 3.5.99.6) from Escherichia coli were analyzed by fluorescence measurements. Single-tryptophan mutant forms of the enzyme were constructed on the basis of previous structural and functional evidence and used as structural-change probes. The reporter residues were placed in the active-site lid (position 174) and in the allosteric site (254 and 234); in addition, signals from the natural Trp residues (15 and 224) were also studied as structural probes. The structural changes produced by the occupation of either the allosteric or the active site by site-specific ligands were monitored through changes in the spectral center of mass (SCM) of their steady-state emission fluorescence spectra. Binding of the allosteric activator produces only minimal signals in titration experiments. In contrast, measurable spectral signals were found when the active site was occupied by a dead-end inhibitor. The results reveal that the two binary complexes, enzyme-activator (R(A)) and enzyme-inhibitor (R(S)) complexes, have structural differences and that they also differ from the ternary complex (R(AS)). The mobility of the active-site lid motif is shown to be independent of the allosteric transition. The active-site ligand induces cooperative SCM changes even in the enzyme-activator complex, indicating that the propagation pathway of the conformational relaxation triggered from the active site is different from that involved in the heterotropic activation. Analysis of the complete set of mutants shows that the occupation of the active site generates structural perturbations, which are propagated to the whole of the monomer and extend to the other subunits. The accumulative effect of these propagated changes should be responsible for the change in the sign of the DeltaG degrees ' of the T to R transition associated with

  7. Yeast cytosine deaminase mutants with increased thermostability impart sensitivity to 5-fluorocytosine.

    PubMed

    Stolworthy, Tiffany S; Korkegian, Aaron M; Willmon, Candice L; Ardiani, Andressa; Cundiff, Jennifer; Stoddard, Barry L; Black, Margaret E

    2008-03-28

    Prodrug gene therapy (PGT) is a treatment strategy in which tumor cells are transfected with a 'suicide' gene that encodes a metabolic enzyme capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into a potent cytotoxin. One of the most promising PGT enzymes is cytosine deaminase (CD), a microbial salvage enzyme that converts cytosine to uracil. CD also converts 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to 5-fluorouracil, an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and RNA function. Over 150 studies of CD-mediated PGT applications have been reported since 2000, all using wild-type enzymes. However, various forms of CD are limited by inefficient turnover of 5FC and/or limited thermostability. In a previous study, we stabilized and extended the half-life of yeast CD (yCD) by repacking of its hydrophobic core at several positions distant from the active site. Here we report that random mutagenesis of residues selected based on alignment with similar enzymes, followed by selection for enhanced sensitization to 5FC, also produces an enzyme variant (yCD-D92E) with elevated T(m) values and increased activity half-life. The new mutation is located at the enzyme's dimer interface, indicating that independent mutational pathways can lead to an increase in stability, as well as a more subtle effect on enzyme kinetics. Each independently derived set of mutations significantly improves the enzyme's performance in PGT assays both in cell culture and in animal models.

  8. Melamine Deaminase and Atrazine Chlorohydrolase: 98 Percent Identical but Functionally Different

    PubMed Central

    Seffernick, Jennifer L.; de Souza, Mervyn L.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2001-01-01

    The gene encoding melamine deaminase (TriA) from Pseudomonas sp. strain NRRL B-12227 was identified, cloned into Escherichia coli, sequenced, and expressed for in vitro study of enzyme activity. Melamine deaminase displaced two of the three amino groups from melamine, producing ammeline and ammelide as sequential products. The first deamination reaction occurred more than 10 times faster than the second. Ammelide did not inhibit the first or second deamination reaction, suggesting that the lower rate of ammeline hydrolysis was due to differential substrate turnover rather than product inhibition. Remarkably, melamine deaminase is 98% identical to the enzyme atrazine chlorohydrolase (AtzA) from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP. Each enzyme consists of 475 amino acids and differs by only 9 amino acids. AtzA was shown to exclusively catalyze dehalogenation of halo-substituted triazine ring compounds and had no activity with melamine and ammeline. Similarly, melamine deaminase had no detectable activity with the halo-triazine substrates. Melamine deaminase was active in deamination of a substrate that was structurally identical to atrazine, except for the substitution of an amino group for the chlorine atom. Moreover, melamine deaminase and AtzA are found in bacteria that grow on melamine and atrazine compounds, respectively. These data strongly suggest that the 9 amino acid differences between melamine deaminase and AtzA represent a short evolutionary pathway connecting enzymes catalyzing physiologically relevant deamination and dehalogenation reactions, respectively. PMID:11274097

  9. Homeostatic control of synaptic activity by endogenous adenosine is mediated by adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Diógenes, Maria José; Neves-Tomé, Raquel; Fucile, Sergio; Martinello, Katiuscia; Scianni, Maria; Theofilas, Panos; Lopatár, Jan; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Maggi, Laura; Frenguelli, Bruno G; Limatola, Cristina; Boison, Detlev; Sebastião, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine, a key regulator of neuronal excitability, is metabolized by astrocyte-based enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). We hypothesized that ADK might be an upstream regulator of adenosine-based homeostatic brain functions by simultaneously affecting several downstream pathways. We therefore studied the relationship between ADK expression, levels of extracellular adenosine, synaptic transmission, intrinsic excitability, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent synaptic actions in transgenic mice underexpressing or overexpressing ADK. We demonstrate that ADK: 1) Critically influences the basal tone of adenosine, evaluated by microelectrode adenosine biosensors, and its release following stimulation; 2) determines the degree of tonic adenosine-dependent synaptic inhibition, which correlates with differential plasticity at hippocampal synapses with low release probability; 3) modulates the age-dependent effects of BDNF on hippocampal synaptic transmission, an action dependent upon co-activation of adenosine A2A receptors; and 4) influences GABAA receptor-mediated currents in CA3 pyramidal neurons. We conclude that ADK provides important upstream regulation of adenosine-based homeostatic function of the brain and that this mechanism is necessary and permissive to synaptic actions of adenosine acting on multiple pathways. These mechanistic studies support previous therapeutic studies and implicate ADK as a promising therapeutic target for upstream control of multiple neuronal signaling pathways crucial for a variety of neurological disorders.

  10. Alterations in the adenosine metabolism and CD39/CD73 adenosinergic machinery cause loss of Treg cell function and autoimmunity in ADA-deficient SCID.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Aisha V; Brigida, Immacolata; Carriglio, Nicola; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Clavenna, Daniela; Sanvito, Francesca; Poliani, Pietro L; Gagliani, Nicola; Carlucci, Filippo; Tabucchi, Antonella; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Villa, Anna; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-02-09

    Adenosine acts as anti-inflammatory mediator on the immune system and has been described in regulatory T cell (Treg)-mediated suppression. In the absence of adenosine deaminase (ADA), adenosine and other purine metabolites accumulate, leading to severe immunodeficiency with recurrent infections (ADA-SCID). Particularly ADA-deficient patients with late-onset forms and after enzyme replacement therapy (PEG-ADA) are known to manifest immune dysregulation. Herein we provide evidence that alterations in the purine metabolism interfere with Treg function, thereby contributing to autoimmune manifestations in ADA deficiency. Tregs isolated from PEG-ADA-treated patients are reduced in number and show decreased suppressive activity, whereas they are corrected after gene therapy. Untreated murine ADA(-/-) Tregs show alterations in the plasma membrane CD39/CD73 ectonucleotidase machinery and limited suppressive activity via extracellular adenosine. PEG-ADA-treated mice developed multiple autoantibodies and hypothyroidism in contrast to mice treated with bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy. Tregs isolated from PEG-ADA-treated mice lacked suppressive activity, suggesting that this treatment interferes with Treg functionality. The alterations in the CD39/CD73 adenosinergic machinery and loss of function in ADA-deficient Tregs provide new insights into a predisposition to autoimmunity and the underlying mechanisms causing defective peripheral tolerance in ADA-SCID.

  11. Adenosine induces a cholinergic tracheal reflex contraction in guinea pigs in vivo via an adenosine A1 receptor-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Sandra M; Docherty, Reginald; Robbins, Jon; Spina, Domenico; Page, Clive P

    2008-07-01

    Adenosine induces dyspnea, cough, and airways obstruction in asthma, a phenomenon that also occurs in various sensitized animal models in which a neuronal involvement has been implicated. Although adenosine has been suggested to activate cholinergic nerves, the precise mechanism has not been established. In the present study, the adenosine A(1) receptor agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) induced a cholinergic reflex, causing tracheal smooth muscle contraction that was significantly inhibited by the adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; 100 microg/kg) (P < 0.05) in anesthetized animals. Furthermore, the adenosine A(2) agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl) phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS-21680) induced a small reflex, whereas the A(3) selective agonist N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)-5'-N-methylcarbamoyladenosine (IB-MECA) was without effect. The tracheal reflex induced by CPA was also inhibited by recurrent nerve ligation or muscarinic receptor blockade (P < 0.001), indicating that a cholinergic neuronal mechanism of action accounted for this response. The cholinergic reflex in response to aerosolized CPA was significantly greater in passively sensitized compared with naive guinea pigs (P < 0.01). Chronic capsaicin treatment, which inhibited sensory nerve function, failed to inhibit CPA-induced reflex tracheal contractions in passively sensitized guinea pigs, although the local anesthetic lidocaine inhibited CPA-induced tracheal contractions. The effects of CPA on the reflex response was not dependent on the release of histamine from tissue mast cells or endogenous prostaglandins as shown by the lack of effect of the histamine H(1) receptor antagonist pyrilamine (1 mg/kg) or the cyclooxygenase inhibitor meclofenamic acid (3 mg/kg), respectively. In conclusion, activation of pulmonary adenosine A(1) receptors can stimulate cholinergic reflexes, and these reflexes are increased in allergic guinea pigs.

  12. Adenosine promotes burst activity in guinea-pig geniculocortical neurones through two different ionic mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Pape, H C

    1992-01-01

    1. The mechanisms of action of adenosine were examined in relay neurones of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGND) using in vitro intracellular recording techniques in guinea-pig thalamic slices. 2. Adenosine hyperpolarized LGND relay neurones due to an increase in membrane potassium conductance. The K+ currents generated by near maximal stimulation of adenosine and GABAB receptors were non-additive. 3. Blockage of membrane K+ conductances by barium unmasked a second response to adenosine; an outward shift of the current versus voltage relationship negative to -65 mV associated with an increase in membrane input resistance. The beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline elicited an inward current in the same voltage range, which was inhibited and replaced by an outward current during activation of adenosine receptors. The effects of adenosine were due to a decrease in amplitude and rate of rise of the hyperpolarization-activated cation current, Ih. Maximal reduction by 66% of Ih amplitude occurred near the range of half-activation. 4. Both responses to adenosine were mimicked by the selective A1 receptor agonists N6-cyclopentyladenosine or N6-cyclohexyladenosine, and reversibly blocked by the selective A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX). 5. The decrease in Ih by adenosine may be mediated by an inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity and hence a decrease in the intracellular level of cyclic AMP, since local application of the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine imitated the decrease in Ih. Local application of the adenylyl cyclase stimulant forskolin or 8-bromo-cyclic AMP resulted in an enhancement in Ih, and forskolin inhibited the action on Ih evoked by N6-cyclopentyladenosine. 6. The adenosine-induced effects interacted with the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of LGND neurones in that (i) the hyperpolarization due to an increase in K+ conductance inhibited single spike firing and promoted calcium

  13. Role of glutamate 64 in the activation of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine by yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jifeng; Sklenak, Stepan; Liu, Aizhuo; Felczak, Krzysztof; Wu, Yan; Li, Yue; Yan, Honggao

    2012-01-10

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) catalyzes the hydrolytic deamination of cytosine to uracil as well as the deamination of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. In this study, the role of Glu64 in the activation of the prodrug 5FC was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and computational studies. Steady-state kinetics studies showed that the mutation of Glu64 causes a dramatic decrease in k(cat) and a dramatic increase in K(m), indicating Glu64 is important for both binding and catalysis in the activation of 5FC. (19)F NMR experiments showed that binding of the inhibitor 5-fluoro-1H-pyrimidin-2-one (5FPy) to the wild-type yCD causes an upfield shift, indicating that the bound inhibitor is in the hydrated form, mimicking the transition state or the tetrahedral intermediate in the activation of 5FC. However, binding of 5FPy to the E64A mutant enzyme causes a downfield shift, indicating that the bound 5FPy remains in an unhydrated form in the complex with the mutant enzyme. (1)H and (15)N NMR analysis revealed trans-hydrogen bond D/H isotope effects on the hydrogen of the amide of Glu64, indicating that the carboxylate of Glu64 forms two hydrogen bonds with the hydrated 5FPy. ONIOM calculations showed that the wild-type yCD complex with the hydrated form of the inhibitor 1H-pyrimidin-2-one is more stable than the initial binding complex, and in contrast, with the E64A mutant enzyme, the hydrated inhibitor is no longer favored and the conversion has a higher activation energy, as well. The hydrated inhibitor is stabilized in the wild-type yCD by two hydrogen bonds between it and the carboxylate of Glu64 as revealed by (1)H and (15)N NMR analysis. To explore the functional role of Glu64 in catalysis, we investigated the deamination of cytosine catalyzed by the E64A mutant by ONIOM calculations. The results showed that without the assistance of Glu64, both proton transfers before and

  14. Optical Aptasensors for Adenosine Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Stella; Lim, Hui Si; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids are among the most researched and applied biomolecules. Their diverse two- and three-dimensional structures in conjunction with their robust chemistry and ease of manipulation provide a rare opportunity for sensor applications. Moreover, their high biocompatibility has seen them being used in the construction of in vivo assays. Various nucleic acid-based devices have been extensively studied as either the principal element in discrete molecule-like sensors or as the main component in the fabrication of sensing devices. The use of aptamers in sensors - aptasensors, in particular, has led to improvements in sensitivity, selectivity, and multiplexing capacity for a wide verity of analytes like proteins, nucleic acids, as well as small biomolecules such as glucose and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This article reviews the progress in the use of aptamers as the principal component in sensors for optical detection of ATP with an emphasis on sensing mechanism, performance, and applications with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. PMID:27446501

  15. The Effect of Endogenous Adenosine on Neuronal Activity in Rats: An FDG PET Study

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Soumen; Zhang, Dali; Mzengeza, Shadreck; Ko, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT 2–18F‐fluorodeoxy‐D‐glucose (FDG) is a glucose analog that is taken up by cells and phosphorylated. The amount of FDG accumulated by cells is a measure of the rate of glycolysis, which reflects cellular activity. As the levels and actions of the neuromodulator adenosine are dynamically regulated by neuronal activity, this study was designed to test whether endogenous adenosine affects tissue accumulation of FDG as assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) or by postmortem analysis of tissue radioactivity. Rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8‐cyclopentyl‐1,3‐dipropyl‐xanthine (DPCPX, 3 mg/kg), the adenosine kinase inhibitor ABT‐702 (3 mg/kg), or vehicle 10 minutes prior to an intravenous injection of FDG (15.4 ± 0.7 MBq per rat). Rats were then subjected to a 15 minute static PET scan. Reconstructed images were normalized to FDG PET template for rats and standard uptake values (SUVs) were calculated. To examine the regional effect of active treatment compared to vehicle, statistical parametric mapping analysis was performed. Whole‐brain FDG uptake was not affected by drug treatment. Significant regional hypometabolism was detected, particularly in cerebellum, of DPCPX‐ and ABT‐702 treated rats, relative to vehicle‐treated rats. Thus, endogenous adenosine can affect FDG accumulation although this effect is modest in quiescent rats. PMID:27082948

  16. Adenosine uptake is the major effector of extracellular ATP toxicity in human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Paola de Andrade; Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo Cremonese; Nascimento, Jéssica; Beckenkamp, Aline; Santana, Danielle Bertodo; Kipper, Franciele; Casali, Emerson André; Nejar Bruno, Alessandra; Paccez, Juliano Domiraci; Zerbini, Luiz Fernando; Wink, Marcia Rosângela; Lenz, Guido; Buffon, Andréia

    2014-01-01

    In cervical cancer, HPV infection and disruption of mechanisms involving cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis are strictly linked with tumor progression and invasion. Tumor microenvironment is ATP and adenosine rich, suggesting a role for purinergic signaling in cancer cell growth and death. Here we investigate the effect of extracellular ATP on human cervical cancer cells. We find that extracellular ATP itself has a small cytotoxic effect, whereas adenosine formed from ATP degradation by ectonucleotidases is the main factor responsible for apoptosis induction. The level of P2×7 receptor seemed to define the main cytotoxic mechanism triggered by ATP, since ATP itself eliminated a small subpopulation of cells that express high P2×7 levels, probably through its activation. Corroborating these data, blockage or knockdown of P2×7 only slightly reduced ATP cytotoxicity. On the other hand, cell viability was almost totally recovered with dipyridamole, an adenosine transporter inhibitor. Moreover, ATP-induced apoptosis and signaling—p53 increase, AMPK activation, and PARP cleavage—as well as autophagy induction were also inhibited by dipyridamole. In addition, inhibition of adenosine conversion into AMP also blocked cell death, indicating that metabolization of intracellular adenosine originating from extracellular ATP is responsible for the main effects of the latter in human cervical cancer cells. PMID:25103241

  17. A Comparative Study of Vasorelaxant Effects of ATP, ADP, and Adenosine on the Superior Mesenteric Artery of SHR.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shun; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Ando, Makoto; Kobayashi, Shota; Iguchi, Maika; Taguchi, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated superior mesenteric arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) to determine the relaxation responses induced by ATP, ADP, and adenosine and the relationship between the relaxant effects of these compounds and nitric oxide (NO) or cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived prostanoids. In rat superior mesenteric artery, relaxation induced by ATP and ADP but not by adenosine was completely eliminated by endothelial denudation. In the superior mesenteric arteries isolated from SHR [vs. age-matched control Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY)], a) ATP- and ADP-induced relaxations were weaker, whereas adenosine-induced relaxation was similar in both groups, b) ATP- and ADP-induced relaxations were substantially and partly reduced by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine [a NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor], respectively, c) indomethacin, an inhibitor of COX, increased ATP- and ADP-induced relaxations, d) ADP-induced relaxation was weaker under combined inhibition by NOS and COX, and e) adenosine-induced relaxation was not altered by treatment with these inhibitors. These data indicate that levels of responsiveness to these nucleotides/adenosine vary in the superior mesenteric arteries from SHR and WKY and are differentially modulated by NO and COX-derived prostanoids.

  18. Adenosine Kinase: Exploitation for Therapeutic Gain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine kinase (ADK; EC 2.7.1.20) is an evolutionarily conserved phosphotransferase that converts the purine ribonucleoside adenosine into 5′-adenosine-monophosphate. This enzymatic reaction plays a fundamental role in determining the tone of adenosine, which fulfills essential functions as a homeostatic and metabolic regulator in all living systems. Adenosine not only activates specific signaling pathways by activation of four types of adenosine receptors but it is also a primordial metabolite and regulator of biochemical enzyme reactions that couple to bioenergetic and epigenetic functions. By regulating adenosine, ADK can thus be identified as an upstream regulator of complex homeostatic and metabolic networks. Not surprisingly, ADK dysfunction is involved in several pathologies, including diabetes, epilepsy, and cancer. Consequently, ADK emerges as a rational therapeutic target, and adenosine-regulating drugs have been tested extensively. In recent attempts to improve specificity of treatment, localized therapies have been developed to augment adenosine signaling at sites of injury or pathology; those approaches include transplantation of stem cells with deletions of ADK or the use of gene therapy vectors to downregulate ADK expression. More recently, the first human mutations in ADK have been described, and novel findings suggest an unexpected role of ADK in a wider range of pathologies. ADK-regulating strategies thus represent innovative therapeutic opportunities to reconstruct network homeostasis in a multitude of conditions. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the genetics, biochemistry, and pharmacology of ADK and will then focus on pathologies and therapeutic interventions. Challenges to translate ADK-based therapies into clinical use will be discussed critically. PMID:23592612

  19. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040... Adenosine triphosphate release assay. (a) Identification. An adenosine triphosphate release assay is a device that measures the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from platelets following...

  20. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040... Adenosine triphosphate release assay. (a) Identification. An adenosine triphosphate release assay is a device that measures the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from platelets following...

  1. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040... Adenosine triphosphate release assay. (a) Identification. An adenosine triphosphate release assay is a device that measures the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from platelets following...

  2. Repeated administration of adenosine increases its cardiovascular effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, H; García-Márquez, F; Magos, G A

    1987-01-20

    Hypotensive and negative chronotropic responses to adenosine in anesthetized rats increased after previous administration of the nucleoside. Bradycardia after adenosine in the isolated perfused rat heart was also potentiated after repeated administration at short intervals. This self-potentiation could be due to extracellular accumulation of adenosine and persistent stimulation of receptors caused by saturation or inhibition of cellular uptake of adenosine.

  3. Some aspects of adenosine triphosphate synthesis from adenine and adenosine in human red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Whittam, R.; Wiley, J. S.

    1968-01-01

    1. The synthesis of ATP has been studied in human erythrocytes. Fresh cells showed no net synthesis of ATP when incubated with adenine or adenosine, although labelled adenine was incorporated into ATP in small amounts. 2. Cold-stored cells (3-6 weeks old) became progressively depleted of adenine nucleotides but incubation with adenosine or adenine plus inosine restored the ATP concentration to normal within 4 hr. Incorporation of labelled adenine or adenosine into the ATP of incubated stored cells corresponded to net ATP synthesis by these cells. 3. Synthesis of ATP from adenosine plus adenine together was 75% derived from adenine and only 25% from adenosine, indicating that nucleotide synthesis from adenine inhibits the simultaneous synthesis of nucleotide from adenosine. PMID:5723519

  4. Adenosine receptors as drug targets — what are the challenges?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine signalling has long been a target for drug development, with adenosine itself or its derivatives being used clinically since the 1940s. In addition, methylxanthines such as caffeine have profound biological effects as antagonists at adenosine receptors. Moreover, drugs such as dipyridamole and methotrexate act by enhancing the activation of adenosine receptors. There is strong evidence that adenosine has a functional role in many diseases, and several pharmacological compounds specifically targeting individual adenosine receptors — either directly or indirectly — have now entered the clinic. However, only one adenosine receptor-specific agent — the adenosine A2A receptor agonist regadenoson (Lexiscan; Astellas Pharma) — has so far gained approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Here, we focus on the biology of adenosine signalling to identify hurdles in the development of additional pharmacological compounds targeting adenosine receptors and discuss strategies to overcome these challenges. PMID:23535933

  5. AMP-deaminase from thymus of patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Rybakowska, I; Szydłowska, M; Szrok, S; Bakuła, S; Kaletha, K

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized clinically by skeletal muscle fatigue following the excessive exercise. Interestingly most of MG patients manifest parallely also some abnormalities of the thymus.AMP-deaminase (AMPD) from human thymus was not a subject of studies up to now. In this paper, mRNA expression and some physico-chemical and immunological properties of AMPD purified from the thymus of MG patients were described. Experiments performed identified the liver isozyme (AMPD2) as the main isoform of AMPD expressed in this organ. The activity of AMPD found in this organ was higher than in other human non-(skeletal) muscle tissues indicating on role the enzyme may play in supplying of guanylates required for the intensive multiplication of thymocytes.

  6. Photodynamic therapy-driven induction of suicide cytosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed

    Bil, Jacek; Wlodarski, Pawel; Winiarska, Magdalena; Kurzaj, Zuzanna; Issat, Tadeusz; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Wegiel, Barbara; Dulak, Jozef; Golab, Jakub

    2010-04-28

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of tumors is associated with induction of hypoxia that results in activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Several observations indicate that increased HIFs transcriptional activity in tumor cells is associated with cytoprotective responses that limit cytotoxic effectiveness of PDT. Therefore, we decided to examine whether this cytoprotective mechanism could be intentionally used for designing more efficient tumor cell cytotoxicity. To this end we transfected tumor cells with a plasmid vector carrying a suicide cytosine deaminase gene driven by a promoter containing hypoxia response elements (HRE). The presence of such a genetic molecular beacon rendered tumor cells sensitive to cytotoxic effects of a non-toxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). The results of this study provides a proof of concept that inducible cytoprotective mechanisms can be exploited to render tumor cells more susceptible to cytotoxic effects of prodrugs activated by products of suicide genes.

  7. Glutamate-induced depression of EPSP-spike coupling in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons and modulation by adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Alexandra L; Stone, Trevor W

    2010-04-01

    The presence of high concentrations of glutamate in the extracellular fluid following brain trauma or ischaemia may contribute substantially to subsequent impairments of neuronal function. In this study, glutamate was applied to hippocampal slices for several minutes, producing over-depolarization, which was reflected in an initial loss of evoked population potential size in the CA1 region. Orthodromic population spikes recovered only partially over the following 60 min, whereas antidromic spikes and excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) showed greater recovery, implying a change in EPSP-spike coupling (E-S coupling), which was confirmed by intracellular recording from CA1 pyramidal cells. The recovery of EPSPs was enhanced further by dizocilpine, suggesting that the long-lasting glutamate-induced change in E-S coupling involves NMDA receptors. This was supported by experiments showing that when isolated NMDA-receptor-mediated EPSPs were studied in isolation, there was only partial recovery following glutamate, unlike the composite EPSPs. The recovery of orthodromic population spikes and NMDA-receptor-mediated EPSPs following glutamate was enhanced by the adenosine A1 receptor blocker DPCPX, the A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 or adenosine deaminase, associated with a loss of restoration to normal of the glutamate-induced E-S depression. The results indicate that the long-lasting depression of neuronal excitability following recovery from glutamate is associated with a depression of E-S coupling. This effect is partly dependent on activation of NMDA receptors, which modify adenosine release or the sensitivity of adenosine receptors. The results may have implications for the use of A1 and A2A receptor ligands as cognitive enhancers or neuroprotectants.

  8. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity.

  9. 6-Methoxypurine arabinoside as a selective and potent inhibitor of varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed Central

    Averett, D R; Koszalka, G W; Fyfe, J A; Roberts, G B; Purifoy, D J; Krenitsky, T A

    1991-01-01

    Seven 6-alkoxypurine arabinosides were synthesized and evaluated for in vitro activity against varicella-zoster virus (VZV). The simplest of the series, 6-methoxypurine arabinoside (ara-M), was the most potent, with 50% inhibitory concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 3 microM against eight strains of VZV. This activity was selective. The ability of ara-M to inhibit the growth of a variety of human cell lines was at least 30-fold less (50% effective concentration, greater than 100 microM) than its ability to inhibit the virus. Enzyme studies suggested the molecular basis for these results. Of the seven 6-alkoxypurine arabinosides, ara-M was the most efficient substrate for VZV-encoded thymidine kinase as well as the most potent antiviral agent. In contrast, it was not detectably phosphorylated by any of the three major mammalian nucleoside kinases. Upon direct comparison, ara-M was appreciably more potent against VZV than either acyclovir or adenine arabinoside (ara-A). However, in the presence of an adenosine deaminase inhibitor, the arabinosides of adenine and 6-methoxypurine were equipotent but not equally selective; the adenine congener had a much less favorable in vitro chemotherapeutic index. Again, this result correlated with data from enzyme studies in that ara-A, unlike ara-M, was a substrate for two mammalian nucleoside kinases. Unlike acyclovir and ara-A, ara-M had no appreciable activity against other viruses of the herpes group. The potency and selectivity of ara-M as an anti-VZV agent in vitro justify its further study. PMID:1649571

  10. Metabolic Cooperative Control of Electrolyte Levels by Adenosine Triphosphate in the Frog Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, J.; Ochsenfeld, M. M.; Ling, G. N.

    1971-01-01

    This study examines the effects of metabolic inhibitors on the content of cellular K, Na, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP and K are seen to fall in the inhibited tissues. The ATP content is correlated with the K content. The role of ATP is examined according to a recent biophysical approach. It is suggested that ATP may control the electrolyte levels by inducing conformational changes in the cytoplasmic proteins. PMID:5316285

  11. Characterization of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria isolated from polluted soils and containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Belimov, A A; Safronova, V I; Sergeyeva, T A; Egorova, T N; Matveyeva, V A; Tsyganov, V E; Borisov, A Y; Tikhonovich, I A; Kluge, C; Preisfeld, A; Dietz, K J; Stepanok, V V

    2001-07-01

    Fifteen bacterial strains containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase were isolated from the rhizoplane of pea (Pisum sativum L.) and Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.) grown in different soils and a long-standing sewage sludge contaminated with heavy metals. The isolated strains were characterized and assigned to various genera and species, such as Pseudomonas brassicacearum, Pseudomonas marginalis, Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas sp., Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, Alcaligenes sp., Variovorax paradoxus, Bacillus pumilus, and Rhodococcus sp. by determination of 16S rRNA gene sequences. The root elongation of Indian mustard and rape (Brassica napus var. oleifera L.) germinating seedlings was stimulated by inoculation with 8 and 13 isolated strains, respectively. The bacteria were tolerant to cadmium toxicity and stimulated root elongation of rape seedlings in the presence of 300 microM CdCl2 in the nutrient solution. The effect of ACC-utilising bacteria on root elongation correlated with the impact of aminoethoxyvinylglycine and silver ions, chemical inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis. A significant improvement in the growth of rape caused by inoculation with certain selected strains was also observed in pot experiments, when the plants were cultivated in cadmium-supplemented soil. The biomass of pea cv. Sparkle and its ethylene sensitive mutant E2 (sym5), in particular, was increased through inoculation with certain strains of ACC-utilising bacteria in pot experiments in quartz sand culture. The beneficial effect of the bacteria on plant growth varied significantly depending on individual bacterial strains, plant genotype, and growth conditions. The results suggest that plant growth promoting rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase are present in various soils and offer promise as a bacterial inoculum for improvement of plant growth, particularly under unfavourable environmental conditions.

  12. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  13. Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System–based amperometric detection of dopamine, adenosine, and glutamate for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Agnesi, Filippo; Tye, Susannah J.; Bledsoe, Jonathan M.; Griessenauer, Christoph J.; Kimble, Christopher J.; Sieck, Gary C.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Garris, Paul A.; Blaha, Charles D.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2009-01-01

    Object In a companion study, the authors describe the development of a new instrument named the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS), which couples digital telemetry with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine. In the present study, the authors describe the extended capability of the WINCS to use fixed potential amperometry (FPA) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine, as well as glutamate and adenosine. Compared with other electrochemical techniques such as FSCV or high-speed chronoamperometry, FPA offers superior temporal resolution and, in combination with enzyme-linked biosensors, the potential to monitor nonelectroactive analytes in real time. Methods The WINCS design incorporated a transimpedance amplifier with associated analog circuitry for FPA; a microprocessor; a Bluetooth transceiver; and a single, battery-powered, multilayer, printed circuit board. The WINCS was tested with 3 distinct recording electrodes: 1) a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) to measure dopamine; 2) a glutamate oxidase enzyme-linked electrode to measure glutamate; and 3) a multiple enzyme-linked electrode (adenosine deaminase, nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase) to measure adenosine. Proof-of-principle analyses included noise assessments and in vitro and in vivo measurements that were compared with similar analyses by using a commercial hardwired electrochemical system (EA161 Picostat, eDAQ; Pty Ltd). In urethane-anesthetized rats, dopamine release was monitored in the striatum following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of ascending dopaminergic fibers in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). In separate rat experiments, DBS-evoked adenosine release was monitored in the ventrolateral thalamus. To test the WINCS in an operating room setting resembling human neurosurgery, cortical glutamate release in response to motor cortex stimulation (MCS) was monitored using a large-mammal animal

  14. Adenosine transport systems on dissociated brain cells from mouse, guinea-pig, and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M.E.; Geiger, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    The kinetics and sodium dependence of adenosine transport were determined using an inhibitor-stop method on dissociated cell body preparations obtained from mouse, guinea-pig and rat brain. Transport affinity (KT) values for the high affinity adenosine transport systems KT(H) were significantly different between these three species; mean +/- SEM values were 0.34 +/- 0.1 in mouse, 0.9 +/- 0.2 in rat, and 1.5 +/- 0.5 microM in guinea-pig. The KT values for the low affinity transport system KT(L) were not different between the three species. Brain cells from rat displayed a significantly greater maximal capacity to accumulate (3H)adenosine (Vmax) than did mouse or guinea-pig for the high affinity system, or than did mouse for the low affinity system. When sodium chloride was replaced in the transport medium with choline chloride, the KT(H) values for guinea-pig and rat were both increased by approximately 100%; only in rat did the change reach statistical significance. The sodium-dependence of adenosine transport in mouse brain was clearly absent. The differences between KT(H) values in mouse and those in guinea-pig or rat were accentuated in the absence of sodium. The differences in kinetic values, ionic requirements, and pharmacological characteristics between adenosine transporters in CNS tissues of mouse, guinea-pig and rat may help account for some of the variability noted among species in terms of their physiological responses to adenosine.

  15. Discovery and Structure Determination of the Orphan Enzyme Isoxanthopterin Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Agarwal, R.; Hitchcock, D.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2010-05-25

    Two previously uncharacterized proteins have been identified that efficiently catalyze the deamination of isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The genes encoding these two enzymes, NYSGXRC-9339a (gi|44585104) and NYSGXRC-9236b (gi|44611670), were first identified from DNA isolated from the Sargasso Sea as part of the Global Ocean Sampling Project. The genes were synthesized, and the proteins were subsequently expressed and purified. The X-ray structure of Sgx9339a was determined at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution (Protein Data Bank entry 2PAJ). This protein folds as a distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrel and contains a single zinc ion in the active site. These enzymes are members of the amidohydrolase superfamily and belong to cog0402 within the clusters of orthologous groups (COG). Enzymes in cog0402 have previously been shown to catalyze the deamination of guanine, cytosine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, and 8-oxoguanine. A small compound library of pteridines, purines, and pyrimidines was used to probe catalytic activity. The only substrates identified in this search were isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoxanthopterin with Sgx9339a were determined to be 1.0 s{sup -1}, 8.0 {micro}M, and 1.3 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} (k{sub cat}, K{sub m}, and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, respectively). The active site of Sgx9339a most closely resembles the active site for 8-oxoguanine deaminase (Protein Data Bank entry 2UZ9). A model for substrate recognition of isoxanthopterin by Sgx9339a was proposed on the basis of the binding of guanine and xanthine in the active site of guanine deaminase. Residues critical for substrate binding appear to be conserved glutamine and tyrosine residues that form hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl oxygen at C4, a conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with N5, and another conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl group at C7. These conserved active site

  16. Prevention of RhoA activation and cofilin-mediated actin polymerization mediates the antihypertrophic effect of adenosine receptor agonists in angiotensin II- and endothelin-1-treated cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Asad; Gan, Xiaohong Tracey; Thomas, Ashley; Karmazyn, Morris

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine receptor activation has been shown to be associated with diminution of cardiac hypertrophy and it has been suggested that endogenously produced adenosine may serve to blunt pro-hypertrophic processes. In the present study, we determined the effects of two pro-hypertrophic stimuli, angiotensin II (Ang II, 100 nM) and endothelin-1 (ET-1, 10 nM) on Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA)/Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) activation in cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and whether the latter serves as a target for the anti-hypertrophic effect of adenosine receptor activation. Both hypertrophic stimuli potently increased RhoA activity with peak activation occurring 15-30 min following agonist addition. These effects were associated with significantly increased phosphorylation (inactivation) of cofilin, a downstream mediator of RhoA, an increase in actin polymerization, and increased activation and nuclear import of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase. The ability of both Ang II and ET-1 to activate the RhoA pathway was completely prevented by the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N (6)-cyclopentyladenosine, the A2a receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, the A3 receptor agonist N (6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-methyluronamide as well as the nonspecific adenosine analog 2-chloro adenosine. All effects of specific receptor agonists were prevented by their respective receptor antagonists. Moreover, all adenosine agonists prevented either Ang II- or ET-1-induced hypertrophy, a property shared by the RhoA inhibitor Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 or the actin depolymerizing agent latrunculin B. Our study therefore demonstrates that both Ang II and ET-1 can activate the RhoA pathway and that prevention of the hypertrophic response to both agonists by adenosine receptor activation is mediated by prevention of RhoA stimulation and actin polymerization.

  17. Restriction of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus by Porcine APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases

    PubMed Central

    Dörrschuck, Eva; Fischer, Nicole; Bravo, Ignacio G.; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Kuiper, Heidi; Spötter, Andreas; Möller, Ronny; Cichutek, Klaus; Münk, Carsten; Tönjes, Ralf R.

    2011-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine cells, tissues, and organs shows promise to surmount the shortage of human donor materials. Among the barriers to pig-to-human xenotransplantation are porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) since functional representatives of the two polytropic classes, PERV-A and PERV-B, are able to infect human embryonic kidney cells in vitro, suggesting that a xenozoonosis in vivo could occur. To assess the capacity of human and porcine cells to counteract PERV infections, we analyzed human and porcine APOBEC3 (A3) proteins. This multigene family of cytidine deaminases contributes to the cellular intrinsic immunity and act as potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. Our data show that the porcine A3 gene locus on chromosome 5 consists of the two single-domain genes A3Z2 and A3Z3. The evolutionary relationships of the A3Z3 genes reflect the evolutionary history of mammals. The two A3 genes encode at least four different mRNAs: A3Z2, A3Z3, A3Z2-Z3, and A3Z2-Z3 splice variant A (SVA). Porcine and human A3s have been tested toward their antiretroviral activity against PERV and murine leukemia virus (MuLV) using novel single-round reporter viruses. The porcine A3Z2, A3Z3 and A3Z2-Z3 were packaged into PERV particles and inhibited PERV replication in a dose-dependent manner. The antiretroviral effect correlated with editing by the porcine A3s with a trinucleotide preference for 5′ TGC for A3Z2 and A3Z2-Z3 and 5′ CAC for A3Z3. These results strongly imply that human and porcine A3s could inhibit PERV replication in vivo, thereby reducing the risk of infection of human cells by PERV in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation. PMID:21307203

  18. MOLECULAR PROBES FOR EXTRACELLULAR ADENOSINE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Ukena, Dieter; Padgett, William; Kirk, Kenneth L.; Daly, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Derivatives of adenosine receptor agonists (N6-phenyladenosines) and antagonists (1,3-dialkyl-8-phenylxanthines) bearing functionalized chains suitable for attachment to other molecules have been reported [Jacobson et al., J. med. Chem. 28, 1334 and 1341 (1985)]. The “functionalized congener” approach has been extended to the synthesis of spectroscopic and other probes for adenosine receptors that retain high affinity (Ki ~ 10−9 −10−8 M) in A1-receptor binding. The probes have been synthesized from an antagonist xanthine amine congener (XAC) and an adenosine amine congener (ADAC). [3H]ADAC has been synthesized and found to bind highly specifically to A1-adenosine receptors of rat and calf cerebral cortical membranes with KD values of 1.4 and 0.34 nM respectively. The higher affinity in the bovine brain, seen also with many of the probes derived from ADAC and XAC, is associated with phenyl substituents. The spectroscopic probes contain a reporter group attached at a distal site of the functionalized chain. These bifunctional ligands may contain a spin label (e.g. the nitroxyl radical TEMPO) for electron spin resonance spectroscopy, or a fluorescent dye, including fluorescein and 4-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD), or labels for 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Potential applications of the spectroscopic probes in characterization of adenosine receptors are discussed. PMID:3036153

  19. The adenosine kinase hypothesis of epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev

    2008-01-01

    Current therapies for epilepsy are largely symptomatic and do not affect the underlying mechanisms of disease progression, i.e. epileptogenesis. Given the large percentage of pharmacoresistant chronic epilepsies, novel approaches are needed to understand and modify the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms. Although different types of brain injury (e.g. status epilepticus, traumatic brain injury, stroke) can trigger epileptogenesis, astrogliosis appears to be a homotypic response and hallmark of epilepsy. Indeed, recent findings indicate that epilepsy might be a disease of astrocyte dysfunction. This review focuses on the inhibitory neuromodulator and endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine, which is largely regulated by astrocytes and its key metabolic enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). Recent findings support the “ADK hypothesis of epileptogenesis”: (i) Mouse models of epileptogenesis suggest a sequence of events leading from initial downregulation of ADK and elevation of ambient adenosine as an acute protective response, to changes in astrocytic adenosine receptor expression, to astrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy (i.e. astrogliosis), to consequential overexpression of ADK, reduced adenosine and – finally – to spontaneous focal seizure activity restricted to regions of astrogliotic overexpression of ADK. (ii) Transgenic mice overexpressing ADK display increased sensitivity to brain injury and seizures. (iii) Inhibition of ADK prevents seizures in a mouse model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. (iv) Intrahippocampal implants of stem cells engineered to lack ADK prevent epileptogenesis. Thus, ADK emerges both as a diagnostic marker to predict, as well as a prime therapeutic target to prevent, epileptogenesis. PMID:18249058

  20. Caffeine, adenosine receptors, and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Costenla, Ana Rita; Cunha, Rodrigo A; de Mendonça, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Few studies to date have looked at the effects of caffeine on synaptic plasticity, and those that did used very high concentrations of caffeine, whereas the brain concentrations attained by regular coffee consumption in humans should be in the low micromolar range, where caffeine exerts pharmacological actions mainly by antagonizing adenosine receptors. Accordingly, rats drinking caffeine (1 g/L) for 3 weeks, displayed a concentration of caffeine of circa 22 microM in the hippocampus. It is known that selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonists facilitate, whereas selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists attenuate, long term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus. Although caffeine is a non-selective antagonist of adenosine receptors, it attenuates frequency-induced LTP in hippocampal slices in a manner similar to selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. These effects of low micromolar concentration of caffeine (30 microM) are maintained in aged animals, which is important when a possible beneficial effect for caffeine in age-related cognitive decline is proposed. Future studies will still be required to confirm and detail the involvement of A1 and A2A receptors in the effects of caffeine on hippocampal synaptic plasticity, using both pharmacological and genetic approaches.

  1. Circulating adenosine increases during human experimental endotoxemia but blockade of its receptor does not influence the immune response and subsequent organ injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Preclinical studies have shown that the endogenous nucleoside adenosine prevents excessive tissue injury during systemic inflammation. We aimed to study whether endogenous adenosine also limits tissue injury in a human in vivo model of systemic inflammation. In addition, we studied whether subjects with the common 34C > T nonsense variant (rs17602729) of adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMPD1), which predicts increased adenosine formation, have less inflammation-induced injury. Methods In a randomized double-blinded design, healthy male volunteers received 2 ng/kg E. Coli LPS intravenously with (n = 10) or without (n = 10) pretreatment with the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine (4 mg/kg body weight). In addition, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to 10 subjects heterozygous for the AMPD1 34C > T variant. Results The increase in adenosine levels tended to be more pronounced in the subjects heterozygous for the AMPD1 34C > T variant (71 ± 22%, P=0.04), compared to placebo- (59 ± 29%, P=0.012) and caffeine-treated (53 ± 47%, P=0.29) subjects, but this difference between groups did not reach statistical significance. Also the LPS-induced increase in circulating cytokines was similar in the LPS-placebo, LPS-caffeine and LPS-AMPD1-groups. Endotoxemia resulted in an increase in circulating plasma markers of endothelial activation [intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)], and in subclinical renal injury, measured by increased urinary excretion of tubular injury markers. The LPS-induced increase of these markers did not differ between the three groups. Conclusions Human experimental endotoxemia induces an increase in circulating cytokine levels and subclinical endothelial and renal injury. Although the plasma adenosine concentration is elevated during systemic inflammation, co-administration of caffeine or the presence of the 34C > T variant of AMPD1 does not affect the observed subclinical organ

  2. The role of microorganisms in the degradation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in chill-stored common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fillets.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Zhang, Longteng; Song, Sijia; Wang, Zhiying; Kong, Chunli; Luo, Yongkang

    2017-06-01

    Biochemical and microbial changes after harvest strongly affect the final quality and shelf life of fish and fish products. In this study, the role of microbes in the degradation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and the origin of adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) and acid phosphatase (ACP) in common carp fillets during different stages of chilled storage (at 4°C) were investigated. The content of ATP, ADP, AMP, IMP, HxR, and Hx, the activity of AMPD and ACP, and the total count of viable, Aeromonas, Pseudomonas, H2S-producing bacteria, and lactic acid bacteria were examined. Results indicated that the population of microbial communities in control samples increased with storage time, and Pseudomonas peaked on the 10th day of storage. Changes in AMPD activity were less related to the abundance of microbes during the entire storage period. However, ACP was derived from both fish muscle and microbial secretion during the middle and late stages of storage. Degradation of ATP to IMP was not affected by spoilage bacteria, but the hydrolysis of IMP, and the transformation of HxR to Hx was affected considerably by the spoilage bacteria.

  3. Adenosine (ADO) released during orthodromic stimulation of the frog sympathetic ganglion inhibits phosphatidylinositol turnover (PI) associated with synaptic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Curnish, R.; Bencherif, M.; Rubio, R.; Berne, R.M.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have previously demonstrated that /sup 3/H-purine release was enhanced during synaptic activation of the prelabelled frog sympathetic ganglion. In addition, during orthodromic stimulation, there is an increased /sup 3/H-inositol release (an index of PI) that occurs during the poststimulation period and not during the period of stimulation. They hypothesized that endogenous ADO inhibits PI turnover during orthodromic stimulation. To test this hypothesis (1) they performed experiments to directly measure ADO release in the extracellular fluid by placing the ganglion in a 5 ..mu..l drop of Ringer's and let it come to equilibrium with the interstitial fluid, (2) they destroyed endogenous ADO by suffusing adenosine deaminase (ADA) during the stimulation period. Their results show (1) orthodromic stimulation increases release of ADO into the bathing medium, (2) ADA induced an increase of PI during the stimulation period in contrast to an increase seen only during the poststimulation period when ADA was omitted. They conclude that there is dual control of PI during synaptic activity, a stimulatory effect (cause unknown) and a short lived inhibitory effect that is probably caused by adenosine.

  4. Effect of adenosine on heart rate in isolated muskrat and guinea pig hearts.

    PubMed

    McKean, T A; Sterling, H; Streeby, D R; Lynch, A E; Lacroix, C; Vestal, R E

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the responses of isolated hearts of the diving muskrat with the nondividing guinea pig (GP) to determine the contribution of adenosine (ADO) to the profound bradycardia that was seen in isolated muskrat hearts during exposure to hypoxia. Muskrat hearts were more sensitive than GP hearts to the heart rate-lowering effects of exogenously applied ADO or a stable ADO analogue, (R)-N6-(phenylisopropyl)adenosine. The hearts of both species were unpaced, and the bradycardia appeared to be due to high degree of atrioventricular block. Radioligand binding with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-[3H]dipropylxanthine to A1-ADO receptors was greater in cardiac membranes prepared from GP hearts than from muskrat hearts. Nucleoside transporter antagonist binding was also greater in GP hearts compared with muskrats. This was determined by membrane binding of [3H]-nitrobenzylthioinosine, an antagonist of nucleoside transport. Both muskrat and GP hearts responded to 30 min of hypoxic perfusion by releasing ADO into the coronary effluent; however, the muskrat hearts released approximately five times more than the GP hearts. When hearts were subjected to hypoxia in the presence of ADO deaminase, theophylline, or 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline, the hypoxia-induced bradycardia was blocked in the GP hearts and either slightly reduced or not affected in muskrat hearts. In contrast to GP hearts, muskrat hearts release larger amounts of ADO during hypoxia and are more sensitive to the negative chronotropic effects of exogenously administered ADO; yet the hypoxia-induced bradycardia does not appear to be exclusively mediated by ADO in the muskrat as it is in the isolated GP heart.

  5. Adenosine A1 receptors mediate inhibition of cAMP formation in vitro in the pontine, REM sleep induction zone.

    PubMed

    Marks, Gerald A; Birabil, Christian G; Speciale, Samuel G

    2005-11-09

    Microinjection of adenosine A1 receptor agonist or an inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase into the caudal, oral pontine reticular formation (PnOc) of the rat induces a long-lasting increase in REM sleep. Here, we report significant inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP in dissected pontine tissue slices containing the PnOc incubated with the A1 receptor agonist, cyclohexaladenosine (10(-8) M). These data are consistent with adenosine A1 receptor agonist actions on REM sleep mediated through inhibition of cAMP.

  6. Insulin Restores Gestational Diabetes Mellitus–Reduced Adenosine Transport Involving Differential Expression of Insulin Receptor Isoforms in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Westermeier, Francisco; Salomón, Carlos; González, Marcelo; Puebla, Carlos; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Cifuentes, Fredi; Leiva, Andrea; Casanello, Paola; Sobrevia, Luis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether insulin reverses gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)–reduced expression and activity of human equilibrative nucleoside transporters 1 (hENT1) in human umbilical vein endothelium cells (HUVECs). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Primary cultured HUVECs from full-term normal (n = 44) and diet-treated GDM (n = 44) pregnancies were used. Insulin effect was assayed on hENT1 expression (protein, mRNA, SLC29A1 promoter activity) and activity (initial rates of adenosine transport) as well as endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity (serine1177 phosphorylation, l-citrulline formation). Adenosine concentration in culture medium and umbilical vein blood (high-performance liquid chromatography) as well as insulin receptor A and B expression (quantitative PCR) were determined. Reactivity of umbilical vein rings to adenosine and insulin was assayed by wire myography. Experiments were in the absence or presence of l-NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; NO synthase inhibitor) or ZM-241385 (an A2A-adenosine receptor antagonist). RESULTS Umbilical vein blood adenosine concentration was higher, and the adenosine- and insulin-induced NO/endothelium-dependent umbilical vein relaxation was lower in GDM. Cells from GDM exhibited increased insulin receptor A isoform expression in addition to the reported NO–dependent inhibition of hENT1-adenosine transport and SLC29A1 reporter repression, and increased extracellular concentration of adenosine and NO synthase activity. Insulin reversed all these parameters to values in normal pregnancies, an effect blocked by ZM-241385 and l-NAME. CONCLUSIONS GDM and normal pregnancy HUVEC phenotypes are differentially responsive to insulin, a phenomenon where insulin acts as protecting factor for endothelial dysfunction characteristic of this syndrome. Abnormal adenosine plasma levels, and potentially A2A-adenosine receptors and insulin receptor A, will play crucial roles in this phenomenon in GDM. PMID:21515851

  7. 8-Thioalkyl-adenosine derivatives inhibit Listeria monocytogenes NAD kinase through a novel binding mode.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Julie; Assairi, Liliane; Gelin, Muriel; Huteau, Valérie; Nahori, Marie-Anne; Dussurget, Olivier; Labesse, Gilles; Pochet, Sylvie

    2016-11-29

    Increased resistance of pathogens to existing antibiotics necessitates the search for novel targets to develop potent antimicrobials. Biosynthetic pathways of several cofactors important for bacterial growth, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP), have been proposed as a promising source of antibiotic targets. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide kinases (NADK; EC 2.7.1.23) are attractive for inhibitor development, since they catalyze the phosphorylation of NAD to NADP, which is an essential step of NADP metabolism. We previously synthesized diadenosine derivatives that inhibited NADK from two human pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, in the micromolar range. They behave as NAD mimics with the 5',5'-diphosphate group substituted by a 8,5' thioglycolic bridge. In an attempt to improve inhibitory potency, we designed new NAD mimics based on a single adenosine moiety harboring a larger derivatization attached to the C8 position and a small group at the 5' position. Here we report the synthesis of a series of 8-thioalkyl-adenosine derivatives containing various aryl and heteroaryl moieties and their evaluation as inhibitors of L. monocytogenes NADK1, S. aureus NADK and their human counterpart. Novel, sub-micromolar inhibitors of LmNADK1 were identified. Surprisingly, most LmNADK1 inhibitors demonstrated a high selectivity index against the close staphylococcal ortholog and the human NADK. Structural characterization of enzyme-inhibitor complexes revealed the original binding mode of these novel NAD mimics.

  8. Three-dimensional structure and catalytic mechanism of cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard S; Fedorov, Alexander A; Xu, Chengfu; Fedorov, Elena V; Almo, Steven C; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-06-07

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K(i) of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pK(a) of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pK(a) of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m), consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.

  9. The ONIOM molecular dynamics method for biochemical applications: cytidine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Toshiaki; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2007-03-22

    Abstract We derived and implemented the ONIOM-molecular dynamics (MD) method for biochemical applications. The implementation allows the characterization of the functions of the real enzymes taking account of their thermal motion. In this method, the direct MD is performed by calculating the ONIOM energy and gradients of the system on the fly. We describe the first application of this ONOM-MD method to cytidine deaminase. The environmental effects on the substrate in the active site are examined. The ONIOM-MD simulations show that the product uridine is strongly perturbed by the thermal motion of the environment and dissociates easily from the active site. TM and MA were supported in part by grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. MD was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy DOE. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE.

  10. Three-Dimensional Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Cytosine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    R Hall; A Fedorov; C Xu; E Fedorov; S Almo; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K{sub i} of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pKa of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pKa of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.

  11. A new class of adenosine receptors in brain: Characterization by 2-chloro( sup 3 H)adenosine binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jerome Hsicheng.

    1988-01-01

    Considerable evidence has accumulated in recent years to support a role for adenosine as an important physiological modulator in many mammalian tissues. In brain, adenosine is a potent depressant of neuronal firing and synaptic transmission. The exact mechanisms by which adenosine analogs depress nerve cell activity in the brain are not clear. Despite considerable investigation, neither the A1 nor the A2 adenosine receptors associated with adenylate cyclase have been able to account adequately for the actions of adenosine in brain. It has been proposed that additional adenosine receptors, possibly linked to calcium channels, are present in the central nervous system and are responsible for the physiological actions of adenosine. In this thesis, evidence is provided for the existence of a novel class of adenosine receptors in rat brain. The methods used to identify this new class of receptors involved radioligand binding techniques which have been successfully employed to characterize the properties of many neurotransmitter and drug receptors. 2-Chloro({sup 3}H)adenosine (Cl({sup 3}H)Ado) was selected as the ligand for these experiments since is a water-soluble, metabolically-stable analog of adenosine and a potent depressant of synaptic transmission in brain. The results demonstrate the presence of a distinct class of 2-chloro({sup 3}H)adenosine binding sites in rat forebrain membranes with an apparent K{sub D} of about 10 {mu}M and a B{sub max} of about 60 pmol per mg of protein. Specific 2-chloro ({sup 3}H)adenosine binding is highly specific for adenosine agonists and antagonists. Inhibition of binding by adenosine agonists exhibits an order of potency 2-chloroadenosine > 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine > ({minus})-N{sup 6}-(R-phenylisopropyl)adenosine, which differs from that of both A1 and A2 adenosine receptors.

  12. Click Modification of RNA at Adenosine: Structure and Reactivity of 7-Ethynyl- and 7-Triazolyl-8-aza-7-deazaadenosine in RNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleoside analogues bearing terminal alkynes, including 7-ethynyl-8-aza-7-deazaadenosine (7-EAA), are useful for RNA modification applications. However, although alkyne- and triazole-bearing ribonucleosides are in widespread use, very little information is available on the impact of these modifications on RNA structure. By solving crystal structures for RNA duplexes containing these analogues, we show that, like adenosine, 7-EAA and a triazole derived from 7-EAA base pair with uridine and are well-accommodated within an A-form helix. We show that copper-catalyzed azide/alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reactions with 7-EAA are sensitive to the RNA secondary structure context, with single-stranded sites reacting faster than duplex sites. 7-EAA and its triazole products are recognized in RNA template strands as adenosine by avian myoblastosis virus reverse transcriptase. In addition, 7-EAA in RNA is a substrate for an active site mutant of the RNA editing adenosine deaminase, ADAR2. These studies extend our understanding of the impact of these novel nucleobase analogues and set the stage for their use in probing RNA structure and metabolism. PMID:24896732

  13. The mechanism of adenosine to inosine conversion by the double-stranded RNA unwinding/modifying activity: A high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Polson, A.G.; Crain, P.F.; Pomerantz, S.C.; McCloskey, J.A.; Bass, B.L. )

    1991-12-10

    The authors have used directly combined high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to examine the mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by the double-stranded RNA unwinding/modifying activity. A double-stranded RNA substrate in which all adenosines were uniformly labeled with {sup 13}C was synthesized. An LC/MS analysis of the nucleoside products from the modified, labeled substrate confirmed that adenosine is modified to inosine during the unwinding/modifying reaction. Most importantly, they found that no carbons are exchanged during the reaction. By including H{sub 2} {sup 18}O in the reaction, they showed that water serves efficiently as the oxygen donor in vitro. These results are consistent with a hydrolytic deamination mechanism and rule out a base replacement mechanism. Although the double-stranded RNA unwinding/modifying activity appears to utilize a catalytic mechanism similar to that of adenosine deaminase, coformycin, a transition-state analogue, will not inhibit the unwinding/modifying activity.

  14. Perspective of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) containing ACC deaminase in stress agriculture.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad; Hussain, Sarfraz; Bhatti, Ahmad Saeed

    2007-10-01

    Ethylene is a gaseous plant growth hormone produced endogenously by almost all plants. It is also produced in soil through a variety of biotic and abiotic mechanisms, and plays a key role in inducing multifarious physiological changes in plants at molecular level. Apart from being a plant growth regulator, ethylene has also been established as a stress hormone. Under stress conditions like those generated by salinity, drought, waterlogging, heavy metals and pathogenicity, the endogenous production of ethylene is accelerated substantially which adversely affects the root growth and consequently the growth of the plant as a whole. Certain plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) contain a vital enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, which regulates ethylene production by metabolizing ACC (an immediate precursor of ethylene biosynthesis in higher plants) into alpha-ketobutyrate and ammonia. Inoculation with PGPR containing ACC deaminase activity could be helpful in sustaining plant growth and development under stress conditions by reducing stress-induced ethylene production. Lately, efforts have been made to introduce ACC deaminase genes into plants to regulate ethylene level in the plants for optimum growth, particularly under stressed conditions. In this review, the primary focus is on giving account of all aspects of PGPR containing ACC deaminase regarding alleviation of impact of both biotic and abiotic stresses onto plants and of recent trends in terms of introduction of ACC deaminase genes into plant and microbial species.

  15. Glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from beef kidney is an allosteric system of the V-type.

    PubMed

    Lara-Lemus, R; Calcagno, M L

    1998-10-14

    The enzyme glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from beef kidney has been purified to homogeneity by allosteric-site affinity chromatography. Its amino acid composition and the N-terminal sequence (1-42), were obtained. The amino acid sequence of this segment is essentially identical to the corresponding regions of the human and hamster glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminases. The beef enzyme is a hexamer of 32.5 kDa subunits; this is nearly 2.5 kDa higher than the molecular mass of the homologous enzyme from Escherichia coli. Beef kidney deaminase exhibits a notable difference from the bacterial enzyme in its allosteric activation by N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate This metabolite, which is also is the allosteric activator of the bacterial glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase, activates the enzyme by increasing its kcat without any change in the Km values for glucosamine 6-phosphate, over a wide range of activator concentration. This observation places beef kidney deaminase in the class of V-type allosteric systems.

  16. Regulation of adenosine transport by acute and chronic ethanol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, L.E.; Casso, D.; Diamond, I.; Gordon, A.S. )

    1989-02-09

    Chronic exposure to ethanol results in a desensitization of adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP production. Since adenosine is released by cells and is known to desensitize its own as well as other receptors, it may be involved in ethanol-induced desensitization of adenosine receptor function. Therefore, we have examine the acute and chronic effects of ethanol on the transport of adenosine via the nucleoside transport. Acute exposure to ethanol caused an inhibition of adenosine uptake in S49 lymphoma cells. This decrease in uptake resulted in accumulation of extracellular adenosine after ethanol exposure. The effect of ethanol was specific to nucleoside transport. Uptake of uridine, also transported by the nucleoside transporter, was inhibited by ethanol to the same degree as adenosine uptake, while neither isoleucine nor deoxyglucose uptake was altered by ethanol treatment. Inhibition of adenosine uptake by ethanol was non-competitive and dependent on the concentration of ethanol. After chronic exposure to ethanol, cells became tolerant to the acute effects of ethanol. There was no longer an acute inhibition of adenosine uptake, nor was these accumulation of extracellular adenosine. Chronic ethanol exposure also resulted in a decrease in the absolute rate of adenosine uptake. Binding studies using a high affinity lignad for the nucleoside transporter, nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR), indicate that this decreased uptake was due to a decrease in the maximal number of binding sites. These ethanol-induced changes in adenosine transport may be important for the acute and chronic effects of ethanol.

  17. The role of adenosine in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Anisur

    2009-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system manifested by cognitive and memory deterioration, a variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms, behavioral disturbances, and progressive impairment of daily life activities. Current pharmacotherapies are restricted to symptomatic interventions but do not prevent progressive neuronal degeneration. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are needed to intervene with these progressive pathological processes. In the past several years adenosine, a ubiquitously released purine ribonucleoside, has become important for its neuromodulating capability and its emerging positive experimental effects in neurodegenerative diseases. Recent research suggests that adenosine receptors play important roles in the modulation of cognitive function. The present paper attempts to review published reports and data from different studies showing the evidence of a relationship between adenosinergic function and AD-related cognitive deficits. Epidemiological studies have found an association between coffee (a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist) consumption and improved cognitive function in AD patients and in the elderly. Long-term administration of caffeine in transgenic animal models showed a reduced amyloid burden in brain with better cognitive performance. Antagonists of adenosine A2A receptors mimic these beneficial effects of caffeine on cognitive function. Neuronal cell cultures with amyloid beta in the presence of an A2A receptor antagonist completely prevented amyloid beta-induced neurotoxicity. These findings suggest that the adenosinergic system constitutes a new therapeutic target for AD, and caffeine and A2A receptor antagonists may have promise to manage cognitive dysfunction in AD.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of a novel chitosan based E. coli cytosine deaminase nanocomposite for potential application in prodrug enzyme therapy.

    PubMed

    Yata, Vinod Kumar; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar

    2011-01-01

    Cytosine deaminase is a non-mammalian enzyme of widespread interest for prodrug enzyme therapy due to its ability to convert prodrug 5-fluorocytosine into anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. Cytosine deaminase enzyme has been purified to homogeneity from E. coli K-12 MTCC 1302 strain. K(m) values for cytosine and 5-fluorocytosine were found to be 0.26 mM and 1.82 mM, respectively. We developed a chitosan-entrapped cytosine deaminase nanocomposite. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed an elongated sphere shape nanocomposite with an average size of 80 nm diameter. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results confirmed gel formation and entrapment of cytosine deaminase within the nanocomposite. Sustained release of cytosine deaminase from the nanocomposite up to one week depicted its potential implication in prodrug inducted enzyme therapy.

  19. A Novel Method for Screening Adenosine Receptor Specific Agonists for Use in Adenosine Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Karlie R.; Choi, Uimook; Gao, Ji-Liang; Thompson, Robert D.; Rodman, Larry E.; Malech, Harry L.; Kang, Elizabeth M.

    2017-01-01

    Agonists that target the A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors have potential to be potent treatment options for a number of diseases, including autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Because each of these adenosine receptors plays a distinct role throughout the body, obtaining highly specific receptor agonists is essential. Of these receptors, the adenosine A2AR and A2BR share many sequence and structural similarities but highly differ in their responses to inflammatory stimuli. Our laboratory, using a combination of specially developed cell lines and calcium release analysis hardware, has created a new and faster method for determining specificity of synthetic adenosine agonist compounds for the A2A and A2B receptors in human cells. A2A receptor expression was effectively removed from K562 cells, resulting in the development of a distinct null line. Using HIV-lentivector and plasmid DNA transfection, we also developed A2A and A2B receptor over-expressing lines. As adenosine is known to cause changes in intracellular calcium levels upon addition to cell culture, calcium release can be determined in these cell lines upon compound addition, providing a functional readout of receptor activation and allowing us to isolate the most specific adenosine agonist compounds. PMID:28317879

  20. Adenosine receptors and the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sebastião, Ana M; Ribeiro, Joaquim A

    2009-01-01

    The adenosine receptors (ARs) in the nervous system act as a kind of "go-between" to regulate the release of neurotransmitters (this includes all known neurotransmitters) and the action of neuromodulators (e.g., neuropeptides, neurotrophic factors). Receptor-receptor interactions and AR-transporter interplay occur as part of the adenosine's attempt to control synaptic transmission. A(2A)ARs are more abundant in the striatum and A(1)ARs in the hippocampus, but both receptors interfere with the efficiency and plasticity-regulated synaptic transmission in most brain areas. The omnipresence of adenosine and A(2A) and A(1) ARs in all nervous system cells (neurons and glia), together with the intensive release of adenosine following insults, makes adenosine a kind of "maestro" of the tripartite synapse in the homeostatic coordination of the brain function. Under physiological conditions, both A(2A) and A(1) ARs play an important role in sleep and arousal, cognition, memory and learning, whereas under pathological conditions (e.g., Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, epilepsy, drug addiction, pain, schizophrenia, depression), ARs operate a time/circumstance window where in some circumstances A(1)AR agonists may predominate as early neuroprotectors, and in other circumstances A(2A)AR antagonists may alter the outcomes of some of the pathological deficiencies. In some circumstances, and depending on the therapeutic window, the use of A(2A)AR agonists may be initially beneficial; however, at later time points, the use of A(2A)AR antagonists proved beneficial in several pathologies. Since selective ligands for A(1) and A(2A) ARs are now entering clinical trials, the time has come to determine the role of these receptors in neurological and psychiatric diseases and identify therapies that will alter the outcomes of these diseases, therefore providing a hopeful future for the patients who suffer from these diseases.

  1. Role of nitric oxide in adenosine-induced vasodilation in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, F.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Vasodilation is one of the most prominent effects of adenosine and one of the first to be recognized, but its mechanism of action is not completely understood. In particular, there is conflicting information about the potential contribution of endothelial factors. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of nitric oxide in the vasodilatory effect of adenosine. Forearm blood flow responses to intrabrachial adenosine infusion (125 microg/min) were assessed with venous occlusion plethysmography during intrabrachial infusion of saline or the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) (12.5 mg/min). Intrabrachial infusions of acetylcholine (50 microg/min) and nitroprusside (3 microg/min) were used as a positive and negative control, respectively. These doses were chosen to produce comparable levels of vasodilation. In a separate study, a second saline infusion was administered instead of L-NMMA to rule out time-related effects. As expected, pretreatment with L-NMMA reduced acetylcholine-induced vasodilation; 50 microg/min acetylcholine increased forearm blood flow by 150+/-43% and 51+/-12% during saline and L-NMMA infusion, respectively (P<.01, n=6). In contrast, L-NMMA did not affect the increase in forearm blood flow produced by 3 microg/min nitroprusside (165+/-30% and 248+/-41% during saline and L-NMMA, respectively) or adenosine (173+/-48% and 270+/-75% during saline and L-NMMA, respectively). On the basis of our observations, we conclude that adenosine-induced vasodilation is not mediated by nitric oxide in the human forearm.

  2. Mechanisms of the adenosine A2A receptor-induced sensitization of esophageal C fibers.

    PubMed

    Brozmanova, M; Mazurova, L; Ru, F; Tatar, M; Hu, Y; Yu, S; Kollarik, M

    2016-02-01

    Clinical studies indicate that adenosine contributes to esophageal mechanical hypersensitivity in some patients with pain originating in the esophagus. We have previously reported that the esophageal vagal nodose C fibers express the adenosine A2A receptor. Here we addressed the hypothesis that stimulation of the adenosine A2A receptor induces mechanical sensitization of esophageal C fibers by a mechanism involving transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1). Extracellular single fiber recordings of activity originating in C-fiber terminals were made in the ex vivo vagally innervated guinea pig esophagus. The adenosine A2A receptor-selective agonist CGS21680 induced robust, reversible sensitization of the response to esophageal distention (10-60 mmHg) in a concentration-dependent fashion (1-100 nM). At the half-maximally effective concentration (EC50: ≈3 nM), CGS21680 induced an approximately twofold increase in the mechanical response without causing an overt activation. This sensitization was abolished by the selective A2A antagonist SCH58261. The adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin mimicked while the nonselective protein kinase inhibitor H89 inhibited mechanical sensitization by CGS21680. CGS21680 did not enhance the response to the purinergic P2X receptor agonist α,β-methylene-ATP, indicating that CGS21680 does not nonspecifically sensitize to all stimuli. Mechanical sensitization by CGS21680 was abolished by pretreatment with two structurally different TRPA1 antagonists AP18 and HC030031. Single cell RT-PCR and whole cell patch-clamp studies in isolated esophagus-specific nodose neurons revealed the expression of TRPA1 in A2A-positive C-fiber neurons and demonstrated that CGS21682 potentiated TRPA1 currents evoked by allylisothiocyanate. We conclude that stimulation of the adenosine A2A receptor induces mechanical sensitization of nodose C fibers by a mechanism sensitive to TRPA1 antagonists indicating the involvement of TRPA1.

  3. An adenosine nucleoside analogue NITD008 inhibits EV71 proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shang, Luqing; Wang, Yaxin; Qing, Jie; Shu, Bo; Cao, Lin; Lou, Zhiyong; Gong, Peng; Sun, Yuna; Yin, Zheng

    2014-12-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), one of the major causative agents of Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease (HFMD), causes severe pandemics and hundreds of deaths in the Asia-Pacific region annually and is an enormous public health threat. However, effective therapeutic antiviral drugs against EV71 are rare. Nucleoside analogues have been successfully used in the clinic for the treatment of various viral infections. We evaluated a total of 27 nucleoside analogues and discovered that an adenosine nucleoside analogue NITD008, which has been reported to be an antiviral reagent that specifically inhibits flaviviruses, effectively suppressed the propagation of different strains of EV71 in RD, 293T and Vero cells with a relatively high selectivity index. Triphosphorylated NITD008 (ppp-NITD008) functions as a chain terminator to directly inhibit the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity of EV71, and it does not affect the EV71 VPg uridylylation process. A significant synergistic anti-EV71 effect of NITD008 with rupintrivir (AG7088) (a protease inhibitor) was documented, supporting the potential combination therapy of NITD008 with other inhibitors for the treatment of EV71 infections.

  4. Cancer chemoprevention by an adenosine derivative in a model of cirrhosis-hepatocellular carcinoma induced by diethylnitrosamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Loyden, Gabriela; Pérez-Martínez, Lidia; Vidrio-Gómez, Susana; Pérez-Carreón, Julio Isael; Chagoya de Sánchez, Victoria

    2017-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most common cancers, and approximately 80% develop from cirrhotic livers. We have previously shown that the aspartate salt of adenosine prevents and reverses carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis in rats. Considering the hepatoprotective role of this adenosine derivative in fibrogenesis, we were interested in evaluating its effect in a hepatocarcinogenesis model induced by diethylnitrosamine in rats, where multinodular cancer is preceded by cirrhosis. Rats were injected with diethylnitrosamine for 12 weeks to induce cirrhosis and for 16 weeks to induce hepatocarcinogenesis. Groups of rats were treated with aspartate salt of adenosine from the beginning of carcinogen administration for 12 or 18 weeks total, and another group received the compound from weeks 12 to 18. Fibrogenesis was estimated and the proportion of preneoplastic nodules and tumors was measured. The apoptotic and proliferation rates in liver tissues were evaluated, as well as the expression of cell signaling and cell cycle proteins participating in hepatocarcinogenesis. The adenosine derivative treatment reduced diethylnitrosamine-induced collagen expression and decreased the proportion of nodules positive for the tumor marker γ-glutamyl transferase. This compound down-regulated the expression of thymidylate synthase and hepatocyte growth factor, and augmented the protein level of the cell cycle inhibitor p27; these effects could be part of its chemopreventive mechanism. These findings suggest a hepatoprotective role of aspartate salt of adenosine that could be used as a therapeutic compound in the prevention of liver tumorigenesis as described earlier for hepatic fibrosis.

  5. Protein kinase Cμ mediates adenosine-stimulated steroidogenesis in primary rat adrenal cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Chia; Chen, Ying; Huang, Shih-Horng; Wang, Seu-Mei

    2010-11-05

    Adenosine (Ado), an endogenous nucleoside, can stimulate corticosterone synthesis in adrenal cells via the A(2A)/A(2B) adenosine receptors (ARs). This study evaluated the contribution of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in Ado-induced steroidogenesis. The PKC inhibitor calphostin c blocked Ado-induced steroidogenesis, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-related regulated kinase (ERK)-cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein cascade, and the mRNA expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and CYP11B1. Further analyses revealed that PKCμ was indeed activated by Ado. Moreover, downregulation of PKCμ by small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited Ado-stimulated steroidogenesis and ERK phosphorylation. Finally, inhibition of either A(2A)AR or A(2B)AR led to the suppression of PKCμ phosphorylation. Together, these findings suggest that A(2)AR-PKCμ-MEK signaling mediates Ado-stimulated adrenal steroidogenesis.

  6. Effects of adenosine infusion into renal interstitium on renal hemodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowska, D.; Granger, J.P.; Knox, F.G.

    1987-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the hemodynamic effects of exogenous adenosine in the interstitium of the rat kidney. Adenosine or its analogues were infused into the renal interstitium by means of chronically implanted capsules. In fusion of adenosine decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from 0.81 +/- 0.06 to 0.37 +/- 0.06 ml/min while having no effect on renal blood flow (RBF). The metabolically stable analogue, 2-chloradenosine (2-ClAdo), decreased GFR from 0.73 +/- 0.07 to 021 +/- 0.06 ml/min. Interstitial infusion of theophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist, completely abolished the effects of adenosine and 2-ClAdo on GFR. The distribution of adenosine, when infused into the renal interstitium, was determined using radiolabeled 5'-(N-ethyl)-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a metabolically stable adenosine agonist. After continuous infusion, (/sup 3/H)NECA was distributed throughout the kidney. The effects of NECA to reduce GFR were similar to those of adenosine and 2-ClAdo. They conclude that increased levels of adenosine in the renal interstitium markedly decrease GFR without affecting RBF in steady-state conditions. The marked effects of adenosine agonists during their infusion into the renal interstitium and the complete blockade of these effects by theophylline suggest an extracellular action of adenosine.

  7. Extracellular adenosine 5’-triphosphate concentrations changes in rat spinal cord associated with the activation of urinary bladder afferents. A microdialysis study

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Jeová Nina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine adenosine 5’-triphosphate levels in the interstice of spinal cord L6-S1 segment, under basal conditions or during mechanical and chemical activation of urinary bladder afferents. Methods A microdialysis probe was transversally implanted in the dorsal half of spinal cord L6-S1 segment in female rats. Microdialysate was collected at 15 minutes intervals during 135 minutes, in anesthetized animals. Adenosine 5’-triphosphate concentrations were determined with a bioluminescent assay. In one group of animals (n=7) microdialysate samples were obtained with an empty bladder during a 10-minutes bladder distension to 20 or 40cmH2O with either saline, saline with acetic acid or saline with capsaicin. In another group of animals (n=6) bladder distention was performed and the microdialysis solution contained the ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL 67156. Results Basal extracellular adenosine triphosphate levels were 110.9±35.34fmol/15 minutes, (mean±SEM, n=13), and bladder distention was associated with a significant increase in adenosine 5’-triphosphate levels which was not observed after bladder distention with saline solution containing capsaicin (10µM). Microdialysis with solution containing ARL 67156 (1mM) was associated with significantly higher extracellular adenosine 5’-triphosphate levels and no further increase in adenosine 5’-triphosphate was observed during bladder distension. Conclusion Adenosine 5’-triphosphate was present in the interstice of L6-S1 spinal cord segments, was degraded by ectonucleotidase, and its concentration increased following the activation of bladder mechanosensitive but not of the chemosensitive afferents fibers. Adenosine 5’-triphosphate may originate either from the central endings of bladder mechanosensitive primary afferent neurons, or most likely from intrinsic spinal neurons, or glial cells and its release appears to be modulated by capsaicin activated bladder primary afferent or by adenosine

  8. Extracellular purine metabolism and signaling of CD73-derived adenosine in murine Treg and Teff cells.

    PubMed

    Romio, Michael; Reinbeck, Benjamin; Bongardt, Sabine; Hüls, Sandra; Burghoff, Sandra; Schrader, Jürgen

    2011-08-01

    CD73-derived adenosine acts as potent inhibitor of inflammation, and regulatory T cells (Treg) have been shown to express CD73 as a novel marker. This study explored the role of endogenously formed adenosine in modulating NF-κB activity and cytokine/chemokine release from murine Treg and effector T cells (Teff) including key enzymes/purinergic receptors of extracellular ATP catabolism. Stimulating murine splenocytes and CD4(+) T cells with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 significantly upregulated activated NF-κB in CD73(-/-) T cells (wild type: 4.36 ± 0.21; CD73(-/-): 6.58 ± 0.75; n = 4; P = 0.029). This was associated with an augmented release of proinflammatory cytokines IL-2, TNF-α, and IFN-γ. Similar changes were observed with the CD73 inhibitor APCP (50 μM) on NF-κB and IFN-γ in wild-type CD4(+) T-cells. Treatment of stimulated CD4(+) T-cells with adenosine (25 μM) potently reduced IFN-γ release which is mediated by adenosine A2a receptors (A2aR). AMP (50 μM) also reduced cytokine release which was not inhibited by APCP. In Teff, A2aR activation (CGS21680) potently inhibited the release of IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-12, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), CCL3, and CCL4. However, in Treg, CGS21680 did not alter cytokine/chemokine release. In summary, CD73-derived adenosine tonically inhibits active NF-κB in CD4(+) T-cells, thereby modulating the release of a broad spectrum of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Downregulation of P2X7 and upregulation of CD73 in Treg after antigenic stimulation may be an important mechanism to maintain the ability of Treg to generate immunosuppressive adenosine.

  9. Exploring the Role of TRPV and CGRP in Adenosine Preconditioning and Remote Hind Limb Preconditioning-Induced Cardioprotection in Rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amritpal; Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2017-02-14

    The cardioprotective effects of remote hind limb preconditioning (RIPC) are well known, but mechanisms by which protection occurs still remain to be explored. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the role of TRPV and CGRP in adenosine and remote preconditioning-induced cardioprotection, using sumatriptan, a CGRP release inhibitor and ruthenium red, a TRPV inhibitor, in rats. For remote preconditioning, a pressure cuff was tied around the hind limb of the rat and was inflated with air up to 150 mmHg to produce ischemia in the hind limb and during reperfusion pressure was released. Four cycles of ischemia and reperfusion, each consisting of 5 min of inflation and 5 min of deflation of pressure cuff were used to produce remote limb preconditioning. An ex vivo Langendorff's isolated rat heart model was used to induce ischemia reperfusion injury by 30 min of global ischemia followed by 120 min of reperfusion. RIPC demonstrated a significant decrease in ischemia reperfusion-induced significant myocardial injury in terms of increase in LDH, CK, infarct size and decrease in LVDP, +dp/dtmax and -dp/dtmin. Moreover, pharmacological preconditioning with adenosine produced cardioprotective effects in a similar manner to RIPC. Pretreatment with sumatriptan, a CGRP release blocker, abolished RIPC and adenosine preconditioning-induced cardioprotective effects. Administration of ruthenium red, a TRPV inhibitor, also abolished adenosine preconditioning-induced cardioprotection. It may be proposed that the cardioprotective effects of adenosine and remote preconditioning are possibly mediated through activation of a TRPV channels and consequent, release of CGRP.

  10. Noncoding regions of C. elegans mRNA undergo selective adenosine to inosine deamination and contain a small number of editing sites per transcript.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Emily C; Washburn, Michael C; Major, Francois; Rusch, Douglas B; Hundley, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    ADARs (Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA) "edit" RNA by converting adenosines to inosines within double-stranded regions. The primary targets of ADARs are long duplexes present within noncoding regions of mRNAs, such as introns and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). Because adenosine and inosine have different base-pairing properties, editing within these regions can alter splicing and recognition by small RNAs. However, despite numerous studies identifying multiple editing sites in these genomic regions, little is known about the extent to which editing sites co-occur on individual transcripts or the functional output of these combinatorial editing events. To begin to address these questions, we performed an ultra-deep sequencing analysis of 4 Caenorhabditis elegans 3' UTRs that are known ADAR targets. Synchronous editing events were determined for the long duplexes in vivo. Furthermore, the validity of each editing event was confirmed by sequencing the same regions of mRNA from worms that lack A-to-I editing. This analysis identified a large number of editing sites that can occur within each 3' UTR, but interestingly, each individual transcript contained only a small fraction of these A-to-I editing events. In addition, editing patterns were not random, indicating that an editing event can affect the efficiency of editing at subsequent adenosines. Furthermore, we identified specific sites that can be both positively and negatively correlated with additional sites leading to mutually exclusive editing patterns. These results suggest that editing in noncoding regions is selective and hyper-editing of cellular RNAs is rare.

  11. Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, but not eslicarbazepine, enhance excitatory synaptic transmission onto hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells through an antagonist action at adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Booker, Sam A; Pires, Nuno; Cobb, Stuart; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Vida, Imre

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed the anticonvulsant and seizure generation effects of carbamazepine (CBZ), oxcarbazepine (OXC) and eslicarbazepine (S-Lic) in wild-type mice. Electrophysiological recordings were made to discriminate potential cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying anti- and pro-epileptic actions. The anticonvulsant and pro-convulsant effects were evaluated in the MES, the 6-Hz and the Irwin tests. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were used to investigate the effects on fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal area CA1. The safety window for CBZ, OXC and eslicarbazepine (ED50 value against the MES test and the dose that produces grade 5 convulsions in all mice), was 6.3, 6.0 and 12.5, respectively. At high concentrations the three drugs reduced synaptic transmission. CBZ and OXC enhanced excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at low, therapeutically-relevant concentrations. These effects were associated with no change in inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) resulting in altered balance between excitation and inhibition. S-Lic had no effect on EPSC or IPSC amplitudes over the same concentration range. The CBZ mediated enhancement of EPSCs was blocked by DPCPX, a selective antagonist, and occluded by CCPA, a selective agonist of the adenosine A1 receptor. Furthermore, reduction of endogenous adenosine by application of the enzyme adenosine deaminase also abolished the CBZ- and OXC-induced increase of EPSCs, indicating that the two drugs act as antagonists at native adenosine receptors. In conclusion, CBZ and OXC possess pro-epileptic actions at clinically-relevant concentrations through the enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission. S-Lic by comparison has no such effect on synaptic transmission, explaining its lack of seizure exacerbation.

  12. Decrease in topoisomerase I is responsible for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-dependent somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Maki; Sabouri, Zahra; Sabouri, Somayeh; Kitawaki, Yoko; Pommier, Yves; Abe, Takaya; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Honjo, Tasuku

    2011-11-29

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of the Ig gene require both the transcription of the locus and the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). During CSR, AID decreases the amount of topoisomerase I (Top1); this decrease alters the DNA structure and induces cleavage in the S region. Similarly, Top1 is involved in transcription-associated mutation at dinucleotide repeats in yeast and in triplet-repeat contraction in mammals. Here, we report that the AID-induced decrease in Top1 is critical for SHM. Top1 knockdown or haploinsufficiency enhanced SHM, whereas Top1 overexpression down-regulated it. A specific Top1 inhibitor, camptothecin, suppressed SHM, indicating that Top1's activity is required for DNA cleavage. Nonetheless, suppression of transcription abolished SHM, even in cells with Top1 knockdown, suggesting that transcription is critical. These results are consistent with a model proposed for CSR and triplet instability, in which transcription-induced non-B structure formation is enhanced by Top1 reduction and provides the target for irreversible cleavage by Top1. We speculate that the mechanism for transcription-coupled genome instability was adopted to generate immune diversity when AID evolved.

  13. Combined QM(DFT)/MM molecular dynamics simulations of the deamination of cytosine by yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yuan; Yan, Honggao; Cao, Zexing; Mo, Yirong

    2016-05-15

    Extensive combined quantum mechanical (B3LYP/6-31G*) and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to elucidate the hydrolytic deamination mechanism of cytosine to uracil catalyzed by the yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD). Though cytosine has no direct binding to the zinc center, it reacts with the water molecule coordinated to zinc, and the adjacent conserved Glu64 serves as a general acid/base to shuttle protons from water to cytosine. The overall reaction consists of several proton-transfer processes and nucleophilic attacks. A tetrahedral intermediate adduct of cytosine and water binding to zinc is identified and similar to the crystal structure of yCD with the inhibitor 2-pyrimidinone. The rate-determining step with the barrier of 18.0 kcal/mol in the whole catalytic cycle occurs in the process of uracil departure where the proton transfer from water to Glu64 and nucleophilic attack of the resulting hydroxide anion to C2 of the uracil ring occurs synchronously. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Creation of zebularine-resistant human cytidine deaminase mutants to enhance the chemoprotection of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Hongmei; Qiu, Songbo; Beard, Brian C; Black, Margaret E

    2016-12-01

    Human cytidine deaminase (hCDA) is a biomedically important enzyme able to inactivate cytidine nucleoside analogs such as the antileukemic agent cytosine arabinoside (AraC) and thereby limit antineoplastic efficacy. Potent inhibitors of hCDA have been developed, e.g. zebularine, that when administered in combination with AraC enhance antineoplastic activity. Tandem hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation and combination chemotherapy (zebularine and AraC) could exhibit robust antineoplastic potency, but AraC-based chemotherapy regimens lead to pronounced myelosuppression due to relatively low hCDA activity in HSCs, and this approach could exacerbate this effect. To circumvent the pronounced myelosuppression of zebularine and AraC combination therapy while maintaining antineoplastic potency, zebularine-resistant hCDA variants could be used to gene-modify HSCs prior to transplantation. To achieve this, our approach was to isolate hCDA variants through random mutagenesis in conjunction with selection for hCDA activity and resistance to zebularine in an Escherichia coli genetic complementation system. Here, we report the identification of nine novel variants from a pool of 1.6 × 10(6) transformants that conferred significant zebularine resistance relative to wild-type hCDA2. Several variants revealed significantly higher Ki values toward zebularine when compared with wild-type hCDA values and, as such, are candidates for further exploration for gene-modified HSC transplantation approaches.

  15. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated synaptic responses by adenosine receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R A; Davies, C H

    1997-01-01

    1. Intracellular current clamp recordings were made from CA1 pyramidal neurones in rat hippocampal slices. Experiments were performed in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor antagonists to block all fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. A single stimulus, delivered extracellularly in the stratum oriens, caused a reduction in spike frequency adaptation in response to a depolarizing current step delivered 2 s after the stimulus. A 2- to 10-fold increase in stimulus intensity evoked a slow excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) which was associated with a small increase in input resistance. The peak amplitude of the EPSP occurred approximately 2.5 s after the stimulus and its magnitude (up to 30 mV) and duration (10-50 s) increased with increasing stimulus intensity. 2. The slow EPSP was unaffected by the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist (+)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine ((+)-MCPG; 1000 microM) but was greatly enhanced by the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine (1-5 microM). Both the slow EPSP and the stimulus-evoked reduction in spike frequency adaptation were inhibited by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist atropine (1-5 microM). These results are consistent with these effects being mediated by mAChRs. 3. Both the mAChR-mediated EPSP (EPSPm) and the associated reduction in spike frequency adaptation were reversibly depressed (up to 97%) by either adenosine (100 microM) or its non-hydrolysable analogue 2-chloroadenosine (CADO; 0.1-5.0 microM). These effects were often accompanied by postsynaptic hyperpolarization (up to 8 mV) and a reduction in input resistance (up to 11%). The selective adenosine A1 receptor agonists 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA; 0.1-0.4 microM) and R(-)N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine (R-PIA; 1 microM) both depressed the EPSPm. In contrast, the adenosine A2A receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino-5

  16. Adenosine thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S. )

    1991-07-01

    Pharmacologic coronary vasodilation as an adjunct to myocardial perfusion imaging has become increasingly important in the evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease, in view of the large number of patients who cannot perform an adequate exercise test or in whom contraindications render exercise inappropriate. Adenosine is a very potent coronary vasodilator and when combined with thallium 201 scintigraphy produces images of high quality, with the added advantages of a very short half-life (less than 10 seconds) and the ability to adjust the dose during the infusion, which may enhance safety and curtail the duration of side effects. The reported sensitivity and specificity of adenosine thallium 201 scintigraphy for the detection of coronary artery disease are high and at least comparable with imaging after exercise or dipyridamole administration. 23 refs.

  17. Therapeutic epilepsy research: from pharmacological rationale to focal adenosine augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev; Stewart, Kerry-Ann

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common seizure disorder affecting approximately 70 million people worldwide. Current pharmacotherapy is neuron-centered, frequently accompanied by intolerable side-effects, and fails to be effective in about one third of patients. Therefore, new therapeutic concepts are needed. Recent research suggests an astrocytic basis of epilepsy, presenting the possibility of novel therapeutic targets. In particular, dysfunction of the astrocyte-controlled, endogenous, adenosine-based seizure control system of the brain is implicated in seizure generation. Thus, astrogliosis – a pathological hallmark of the epileptic brain – is associated with upregulation of the adenosine-removing enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK), resulting in focal adenosine deficiency. Both astrogliotic upregulation of ADK in epilepsy and transgenic overexpression of ADK are associated with seizures, and inhibition of ADK prevents seizures in a mouse model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. These findings link adenosine deficiency with seizures and predict that adenosine augmentation therapies (AATs) will likely be effective in preventing seizures. Given the widespread systemic and central side effects of systemically administered AATs, focal AATs (i.e., limited to the astrogliotic lesion) are a necessity. This Commentary will discuss the pharmacological rationale for the development of focal AATs. Additionally, several AAT strategies will be discussed: (1) adenosine released from silk-based brain implants; (2) adenosine released from locally implanted encapsulated cells; (3) adenosine released from stem cell-derived brain implants; and (4) adenosine augmenting gene therapies. Finally, new developments and therapeutic challenges in using focal AATs for epilepsy therapy will critically be evaluated. PMID:19682439

  18. Improved cytotoxic effects of Salmonella-producing cytosine deaminase in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the cytotoxic activity of a Salmonella strain carrying a salicylate-inducible expression system that controls cytosine deaminase production, we have modified both, the vector and the producer bacterium. First, the translation rates of the expression module containing the Escherichia coli codA gene cloned under the control of the Pm promoter have been improved by using the T7 phage gene 10 ribosome binding site sequence and replacing the original GUG start codon by AUG. Second, to increase the time span in which cytosine deaminase may be produced by the bacteria in the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, a 5-fluorouracyl resistant Salmonella strain has been constructed by deleting its upp gene sequence. This new Salmonella strain shows increased cytosine deaminase activity and, after infecting tumour cell cultures, increased cytotoxic and bystander effects under standard induction conditions. In addition, we have generated a purD mutation in the producer strain to control its intracellular proliferation by the presence of adenine and avoid the intrinsic Salmonella cell death induction. This strategy allows the analysis and comparison of the cytotoxic effects of cytosine deaminase produced by different Salmonella strains in tumour cell cultures.

  19. Intracellular localization of human cytidine deaminase. Identification of a functional nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Somasekaram, A; Jarmuz, A; How, A; Scott, J; Navaratnam, N

    1999-10-01

    The cytidine deaminases belong to the family of multisubunit enzymes that catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of their substrate to a corresponding uracil product. They play a major role in pyrimidine nucleoside and nucleotide salvage. The intracellular distribution of cytidine deaminase and related enzymes has previously been considered to be cytosolic. Here we show that human cytidine deaminase (HCDA) is present in the nucleus. A highly specific, affinity purified polyclonal antibody against HCDA was used to analyze the intracellular localization of native HCDA in a variety of mammalian cells by in situ immunochemistry. Native HCDA was found to be present in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm in several cell types. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy indicated a predominantly nuclear localization of FLAG-tagged HCDA overexpressed in these cells. We have identified an amino-terminal bipartite nuclear localization signal that is both necessary and sufficient to direct HCDA and a non-nuclear reporter protein to the nucleus. We also show HCDA binding to the nuclear import receptor, importin alpha. Similar putative bipartite nuclear localization sequences are found in other cytidine/deoxycytidylate deaminases. The results presented here suggest that the pyrimidine nucleotide salvage pathway may operate in the nucleus. This localization may have implications in the regulation of nucleoside and nucleotide metabolism and nucleic acid biosynthesis.

  20. The Janus face of adenosine: antiarrhythmic and proarrhythmic actions.

    PubMed

    Szentmiklosi, A József; Galajda, Zoltán; Cseppento, Ágnes; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Susán, Zsolt; Hegyi, Bence; Nánási, Péter P

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous, endogenous purine involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological regulatory mechanisms. Adenosine has been proposed as an endogenous antiarrhythmic substance to prevent hypoxia/ischemia-induced arrhythmias. Adenosine (and its precursor, ATP) has been used in the therapy of various cardiac arrhythmias over the past six decades. Its primary indication is treatment of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, but it can be effective in other forms of supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias, like sinus node reentry based tachycardia, triggered atrial tachycardia, atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia, or ventricular tachycardia based on a cAMP-mediated triggered activity. The main advantage is the rapid onset and the short half life (1- 10 sec). Adenosine exerts its antiarrhythmic actions by activation of A1 adenosine receptors located in the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes, as well as in activated ventricular myocardium. However, adenosine can also elicit A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptor-mediated global side reactions (flushing, dyspnea, chest discomfort), but it may display also proarrhythmic actions mediated by primarily A1 adenosine receptors (e.g. bradyarrhythmia or atrial fibrillation). To avoid the non-specific global adverse reactions, A1 adenosine receptor- selective full agonists (tecadenoson, selodenoson, trabodenoson) have been developed, which agents are currently under clinical trial. During long-term administration with orthosteric agonists, adenosine receptors can be internalized and desensitized. To avoid desensitization, proarrhythmic actions, or global adverse reactions, partial A1 adenosine receptor agonists, like CVT-2759, were developed. In addition, the pharmacologically "silent" site- and event specific adenosinergic drugs, such as adenosine regulating agents and allosteric modulators, might provide attractive opportunity to increase the effectiveness of beneficial actions of adenosine

  1. Chemoelectrical energy conversion of adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Vishnu Baba; Sarles, Stephen Andrew; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-04-01

    Plant and animal cell membranes transport charged species, neutral molecules and water through ion pumps and channels. The energy required for moving species against established concentration and charge gradients is provided by the biological fuel - adenosine triphosphate (ATP) -synthesized within the cell. The adenosine triphosphatase (ATPases) in a plant cell membrane hydrolyze ATP in the cell cytoplasm to pump protons across the cell membrane. This establishes a proton gradient across the membrane from the cell exterior into the cell cytoplasm. This proton motive force stimulates ion channels that transport nutrients and other species into the cell. This article discusses a device that converts the chemical energy stored in adenosine triphosphate into electrical power using a transporter protein, ATPase. The V-type ATPase proteins used in our prototype are extracted from red beet(Beta vulgaris) tonoplast membranes and reconstituted in a bilayer lipid membrane or BLM formed from POPC and POPS lipids. A pH7 medium that can support ATP hydrolysis is provided on both sides of the membrane and ATP is dissolved in the pH7 buffer on one side of the membrane. Hydrolysis of ATP results in the formation of a phosphate ion and adenosine diphosphate. The energy from the reaction activates ATPase in the BLM and moves a proton across the membrane. The charge gradient established across the BLM due to the reaction and ion transport is converted into electrical current by half-cell reference electrodes. The prototype ATPase cell with an effective BLM area of 4.15 mm2 carrying 15 μl of ATPase proteins was observed to develop a steady state peak power output of 70 nW, which corresponds to a specific power of 1.69 μW/cm2 and a current density of 43.4 μA/cm2 of membrane area.

  2. Role of adenosine in oligodendrocyte precursor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Coppi, Elisabetta; Cellai, Lucrezia; Maraula, Giovanna; Dettori, Ilaria; Melani, Alessia; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Pedata, Felicita

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation and maturation of oligodendroglial cells are postnatal processes that involve specific morphological changes correlated with the expression of stage-specific surface antigens and functional voltage-gated ion channels. A small fraction of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) generated during development are maintained in an immature and slowly proliferative or quiescent state in the adult central nervous system (CNS) representing an endogenous reservoir of immature cells. Adenosine receptors are expressed by OPCs and a key role of adenosine in oligodendrocyte maturation has been recently recognized. As evaluated on OPC cultures, adenosine, by stimulating A1 receptors, promotes oligodendrocyte maturation and inhibits their proliferation; on the contrary, by stimulating A2A receptors, it inhibits oligodendrocyte maturation. A1 and A2A receptor-mediated effects are related to opposite modifications of outward delayed rectifying membrane K+ currents (IK) that are involved in the regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation. Brain A1 and A2A receptors might represent new molecular targets for drugs useful in demyelinating pathologies, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), stroke and brain trauma. PMID:25964740

  3. Creatine, similarly to ketamine, affords antidepressant-like effects in the tail suspension test via adenosine A₁ and A2A receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Mauricio P; Pazini, Francis L; Rosa, Julia M; Ramos-Hryb, Ana B; Oliveira, Ágatha; Kaster, Manuella P; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2015-06-01

    The benefits of creatine supplementation have been reported in a broad range of central nervous systems diseases, including depression. A previous study from our group demonstrated that creatine produces an antidepressant-like effect in the tail suspension test (TST), a predictive model of antidepressant activity. Since depression is associated with a dysfunction of the adenosinergic system, we investigated the involvement of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of creatine in the TST. The anti-immobility effect of creatine (1 mg/kg, po) or ketamine (a fast-acting antidepressant, 1 mg/kg, ip) in the TST was prevented by pretreatment of mice with caffeine (3 mg/kg, ip, nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist), 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) (2 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist), and 4-(2-[7-amino-2-{2-furyl}{1,2,4}triazolo-{2,3-a}{1,3,5}triazin-5-yl-amino]ethyl)-phenol (ZM241385) (1 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist). In addition, the combined administration of subeffective doses of creatine and adenosine (0.1 mg/kg, ip, nonselective adenosine receptor agonist) or inosine (0.1 mg/kg, ip, nucleoside formed by the breakdown of adenosine) reduced immobility time in the TST. Moreover, the administration of subeffective doses of creatine or ketamine combined with N-6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) (0.05 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist), N-6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(methylphenyl)ethyl]adenosine (DPMA) (0.1 mg/kg, ip, selective adenosine A2A receptor agonist), or dipyridamole (0.1 μg/mouse, icv, adenosine transporter inhibitor) produced a synergistic antidepressant-like effect in the TST. These results indicate that creatine, similarly to ketamine, exhibits antidepressant-like effect in the TST probably mediated by the activation of both adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, further reinforcing the potential of targeting the purinergic system to the management of mood disorders.

  4. Effects of adenosine perfusion on the metabolism and contractile activity of Rana ridibunda heart.

    PubMed

    Lazou, A; Beis, I

    1987-01-01

    The effects of adenosine were examined on the isolated perfused heart of the frog Rana ridibunda. Adenosine produced negative chronotropic and inotropic effects on frog ventricle in a concentration-dependent manner. The effects of adenosine on cardiac metabolism were also investigated by measuring the tissue content of adenine nucleotides, lactate, pyruvate, adenosine and inorganic phosphate, during adenosine perfusion. Adenosine had no effect on the tissue content of metabolites. No net synthesis of adenine nucleotides was observed during perfusion with increasing concentrations of adenosine. Lactate output from the heart decreased significantly with adenosine perfusion. Correlation of adenosine effects on cardiac muscle with the effects of hypoxia are discussed.

  5. Adenosine and inflammation: what's new on the horizon?

    PubMed

    Antonioli, Luca; Csóka, Balázs; Fornai, Matteo; Colucci, Rocchina; Kókai, Endre; Blandizzi, Corrado; Haskó, György

    2014-08-01

    Adenosine contributes to the maintenance of tissue integrity by modulating the immune system. Encouraging results have emerged with adenosine receptor ligands for the management of several inflammatory conditions in preclinical and clinical settings. However, therapeutic applications of these drugs are sometimes complicated by the occurrence of serious adverse effects. The scientific community is making intensive efforts to design novel adenosine receptor ligands endowed with greater selectivity or to develop innovative compounds acting as allosteric receptor modulators. In parallel, research is focusing on novel pharmacological entities (designated as adenosine-regulating agents) that can increase, in a site- and event-specific manner, adenosine concentrations at the inflammatory site, thereby minimizing the adverse systemic effects of adenosine.

  6. N6-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-Adenosine Exhibits Insecticidal Activity against Plutella xylostella via Adenosine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ming; Chai, Yiqiu; Chen, Guanjv; Wang, Huidong; Huang, Bo

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, is one of the most important pests of cruciferous crops. We have earlier shown that N6-(2-hydroxyethyl)-adenosine (HEA) exhibits insecticidal activity against P. xylostella. In the present study we investigated the possible mechanism of insecticidal action of HEA on P. xylostella. HEA is a derivative of adenosine, therefore, we speculated whether it acts via P. xylostella adenosine receptor (PxAdoR). We used RNAi approach to silence PxAdoR gene and used antagonist of denosine receptor (AdoR) to study the insecticidal effect of HEA. We cloned the whole sequence of PxAdoR gene. A BLAST search using NCBI protein database showed a 61% identity with the Drosophila adenosine receptor (DmAdoR) and a 32-35% identity with human AdoR. Though the amino acids sequence of PxAdoR was different compared to other adenosine receptors, most of the amino acids that are known to be important for adenosine receptor ligand binding and signaling were present. However, only 30% binding sites key residues was similar between PxAdoR and A1R. HEA, at a dose of 1 mg/mL, was found to be lethal to the second-instar larvae of P. xylostella, and a significant reduction of mortality and growth inhibition ratio were obtained when HEA was administered to the larvae along with PxAdoR-dsRNA or antagonist of AdoR (SCH58261) for 36, 48, or 60 h. Especially at 48 h, the rate of growth inhibition of the PxAdoR knockdown group was 3.5-fold less than that of the HEA group, and the corrected mortality of SCH58261 group was reduced almost 2-fold compared with the HEA group. Our findings show that HEA may exert its insecticidal activity against P. xylostella larvae via acting on PxAdoR.

  7. N6-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-Adenosine Exhibits Insecticidal Activity against Plutella xylostella via Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ming; Chai, Yiqiu; Chen, Guanjv; Wang, Huidong; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, is one of the most important pests of cruciferous crops. We have earlier shown that N6-(2-hydroxyethyl)-adenosine (HEA) exhibits insecticidal activity against P. xylostella. In the present study we investigated the possible mechanism of insecticidal action of HEA on P. xylostella. HEA is a derivative of adenosine, therefore, we speculated whether it acts via P. xylostella adenosine receptor (PxAdoR). We used RNAi approach to silence PxAdoR gene and used antagonist of denosine receptor (AdoR) to study the insecticidal effect of HEA. We cloned the whole sequence of PxAdoR gene. A BLAST search using NCBI protein database showed a 61% identity with the Drosophila adenosine receptor (DmAdoR) and a 32–35% identity with human AdoR. Though the amino acids sequence of PxAdoR was different compared to other adenosine receptors, most of the amino acids that are known to be important for adenosine receptor ligand binding and signaling were present. However, only 30% binding sites key residues was similar between PxAdoR and A1R. HEA, at a dose of 1 mg/mL, was found to be lethal to the second-instar larvae of P. xylostella, and a significant reduction of mortality and growth inhibition ratio were obtained when HEA was administered to the larvae along with PxAdoR-dsRNA or antagonist of AdoR (SCH58261) for 36, 48, or 60 h. Especially at 48 h, the rate of growth inhibition of the PxAdoR knockdown group was 3.5-fold less than that of the HEA group, and the corrected mortality of SCH58261 group was reduced almost 2-fold compared with the HEA group. Our findings show that HEA may exert its insecticidal activity against P. xylostella larvae via acting on PxAdoR. PMID:27668428

  8. Turnover of adenosine in plasma of human and dog blood

    SciTech Connect

    Moeser, G.H.S.; Schrader, J.; Deussen, A.

    1989-04-01

    To determine half-life and turnover of plasma adenosine, heparinized blood from healthy volunteers was incubated with radiolabeled adenosine in the physiological concentration range of 0.1-1 microM. Plasma levels of adenosine in vitro were 82 +/- 14 nM and were similar to those determined immediately after blood collection with a ''stopping solution.'' Dipyridamole (83 microM) and erythro-9(2-hydroxynon-3yl)-adenine (EHNA) (8 microM) did not measurably alter basal adenosine levels but completely blocked the uptake of added adenosine. Inhibition of ecto-5'-nucleotidase with 100 microM alpha, beta-methyleneadenosine 5'-diphosphate (AOPCP) reduced plasma adenosine to 22 +/- 6 nM. For the determination of adenosine turnover, the decrease in specific radioactivity of added (/sup 3/H)adenosine was measured using a dipyridamole-containing stopping solution. Without altering basal adenosine levels, the half-life was estimated to be 0.6 s. Similar experiments were carried out with washed erythrocytes or in the presence of AOPCP, yielding half-lives of 0.7 and 0.9 s, respectively. When the initial adenosine concentration was 1 microM, its specific activity decreased by only 11% within 5 s, whereas total plasma adenosine exponentially decreased with a half-life of 1.5 s. Venous plasma concentrations were measured after relief of a 3-min forearm ischemia. Changes in plasma adenosine did not correlate well with changes in blood flow but were augmented in the presence of dipyridamole.

  9. Amplified fluorescence detection of adenosine via catalyzed hairpin assembly and host-guest interactions between β-cyclodextrin polymer and pyrene.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haihua; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Guo, Qiuping; Huang, Jin; Liu, Jianbo; Song, Chunxia

    2016-04-21

    Nowadays, enzyme-free nucleic acid-based signal amplification strategies are frequently utilized in the design of biosensors due to their excellent sensitivity. Developing more extended analytical methods is fundamental for basic studies in the biological and biomedical fields. Herein, we introduce an enzyme-free amplified detection strategy for the small molecule adenosine. The approach is based on adenosine-aptamer binding triggered catalyzed hairpin assembly and host-guest interactions between β-cyclodextrin polymer (β-CDP) and pyrene. Two hairpin probes (probe H1 and probe H2) and an aptamer-trigger/inhibitor duplex probe were employed in the system and the pyrene-labeled probe H1 was chosen as the signal unit. In the absence of adenosine, the aptamer-trigger was inhibited by the inhibitor strand. The hairpin probes were in the closed hairpin formation without activation of the trigger strand. Pyrene labeled at the 5'-termini of the single-stranded stem of probe H1 could be easily trapped in the hydrophobic cavity of β-CDP because of weak steric hindrance, leading to a significant fluorescence enhancement. Once the hairpin assembly was catalyzed by the adenosine-aptamer binding event, a hybridized DNA duplex H1/H2 was created continuously. Pyrene labeled at the 5'-termini of the DNA duplex H1/H2 finds it difficult to enter the cavity of β-CDP due to steric hindrance, leading to a weaker fluorescence signal. Thus, the target could be detected by this simple mix-and-detect amplification method without a need for expensive and perishable protein enzymes. As low as 42 nM of adenosine was detected by this assay, which is comparable to that of some reported colorimetric methods. Meanwhile, the proposed method was further successfully applied to detect adenosine in human serum samples, showing great potential for adenosine detection from complex fluids.

  10. Cardioprotection with adenosine: 'a riddle wrapped in a mystery'.

    PubMed

    Przyklenk, Karin; Whittaker, Peter

    2005-07-01

    Review of the published literature on adenosine and cardioprotection could lead one to paraphrase the famous words of Sir Winston Churchill (Radio broadcast, 1 October 1939 (in reference to Russia)) and conclude: 'I cannot forecast to you the action of adenosine. It is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. That is, although it is well-established that adenosine can render cardiomyocytes resistant to lethal ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury, new and intriguing insights continue to emerge as to the mechanisms by which adenosine might limit myocardial infarct size.

  11. Adenosine modulates LPS-induced cytokine production in porcine monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ondrackova, Petra; Kovaru, Hana; Kovaru, Frantisek; Leva, Lenka; Faldyna, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Adenosine plays an important role during inflammation, particularly through modulation of monocyte function. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of synthetic adenosine analogs on cytokine production by porcine monocytes. The LPS-stimulated cytokine production was measured by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR. Adenosine receptor expression was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. The present study demonstrates that adenosine analog N-ethylcarboxyamidoadenosine (NECA) down-regulates TNF-α production and up-regulates IL-8 production by LPS-stimulated porcine monocytes. The effect was more pronounced in CD163(-) subset of monocytes compared to the CD163(+) subset. Although both monocyte subsets express mRNA for A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors, the treatment of monocytes with various adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists proved that the effect of adenosine is mediated preferentially via A2A adenosine receptor. Moreover, the study suggests that the effect of NECA on porcine monocytes alters the levels of the cytokines which could play a role in the differentiation of naive T cells into Th17 cells. The results suggest that adenosine plays an important role in modulation of cytokine production by porcine monocytes.

  12. The Role of Adenosine Signaling in Headache: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Nathan T.; Elliott, Melanie B.; Oshinsky, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is the third most prevalent disease on the planet, yet our understanding of its mechanisms and pathophysiology is surprisingly incomplete. Recent studies have built upon decades of evidence that adenosine, a purine nucleoside that can act as a neuromodulator, is involved in pain transmission and sensitization. Clinical evidence and rodent studies have suggested that adenosine signaling also plays a critical role in migraine headache. This is further supported by the widespread use of caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, in several headache treatments. In this review, we highlight evidence that supports the involvement of adenosine signaling in different forms of headache, headache triggers, and basic headache physiology. This evidence supports adenosine A2A receptors as a critical adenosine receptor subtype involved in headache pain. Adenosine A2A receptor signaling may contribute to headache via the modulation of intracellular Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production or 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in neurons and glia to affect glutamatergic synaptic transmission within the brainstem. This evidence supports the further study of adenosine signaling in headache and potentially illuminates it as a novel therapeutic target for migraine. PMID:28335379

  13. An Essential Role for Adenosine Signaling in Alcohol Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, Christina L.; Adams, Chelsea; Knight, Emily J.; Nam, Hyung Wook; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), adenosine plays an important role in regulating neuronal activity and modulates signaling by other neurotransmitters, including GABA, glutamate, and dopamine. Adenosine suppresses neurotransmitter release, reduces neuronal excitability, and regulates ion channel function through activation of four classes of G protein-coupled receptors, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Central adenosine levels are largely controlled by nucleoside transporters, which regulate adenosine levels across the plasma membrane. Adenosine has been shown to modulate cortical glutamate signaling and ventral-tegmental dopaminergic signaling, which are involved in several aspects of alcohol use disorders. Acute ethanol elevates extracellular adenosine levels by selectively inhibiting the type 1 equilibrative nucleoside transporter, ENT1. Raised adenosine levels mediate the ataxic and sedative/hypnotic effects of ethanol through activation of A1 receptors in the cerebellum, striatum, and cerebral cortex. Recently, we have shown that pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of ENT1 reduces the expression of excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2), the primary regulator of extracellular glutamate, in astrocytes. These lines of evidence support a central role for adenosine-mediated glutamate signaling and the involvement of astrocytes in regulating ethanol intoxication and preference. In this paper, we discuss recent findings on the implication of adenosine signaling in alcohol use disorders. PMID:21054262

  14. L-Serine deaminase activity is induced by exposure of Escherichia coli K-12 to DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, E B; Ahmad, D; Walker, C

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis of L-serine deaminase in Escherichia coli K-12 was induced after exposure of cells to a variety of DNA-damaging agents, including UV irradiation, nalidixic acid, and mitomycin C. Synthesis was also induced during growth at high temperature. A mutant constitutive for SOS functions showed an elevated level of L-serine deaminase activity. The response to DNA-damaging agents thus may be mediated via the SOS system. PMID:6813312

  15. Amelioration of high salinity stress damage by plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes that contain ACC deaminase.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shimaila; Charles, Trevor C; Glick, Bernard R

    2014-07-01

    Plant growth and productivity is negatively affected by soil salinity. However, it is predicted that plant growth-promoting bacterial (PGPB) endophytes that contain 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase (E.C. 4.1.99.4) can facilitate plant growth and development in the presence of a number of different stresses. In present study, the ability of ACC deaminase containing PGPB endophytes Pseudomonas fluorescens YsS6, Pseudomonas migulae 8R6, and their ACC deaminase deficient mutants to promote tomato plant growth in the absence of salt and under two different levels of salt stress (165 mM and 185 mM) was assessed. It was evidence that wild-type bacterial endophytes (P. fluorescens YsS6 and P. migulae 8R6) promoted tomato plant growth significantly even in the absence of stress (salinity). Plants pretreated with wild-type ACC deaminase containing endophytic strains were healthier and grew to a much larger size under high salinity stress compared to plants pretreated with the ACC deaminase deficient mutants or no bacterial treatment (control). The plants pretreated with ACC deaminase containing bacterial endophytes exhibit higher fresh and dry biomass, higher chlorophyll contents, and a greater number of flowers and buds than the other treatments. Since the only difference between wild-type and mutant bacterial endophytes was ACC deaminase activity, it is concluded that this enzyme is directly responsible for the different behavior of tomato plants in response to salt stress. The use of PGPB endophytes with ACC deaminase activity has the potential to facilitate plant growth on land that is not normally suitable for the majority of crops due to their high salt contents.

  16. Separation of adenosine diphosphate--adenosine triphosphate-exchange activity from the cerebral microsomal sodium-plus-potassium ion-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Stahl, W L; Sattin, A; McIlwain, H

    1966-05-01

    1. A microsomal fraction from ox cerebral cortex catalysed [(14)C]ADP-ATP exchange at a speed similar to that at which it liberated P(i) from ATP in the presence of Na(+), K(+) and Mg(2+). 2. Repeated washing the fraction with MgATP solutions solubilized most of the exchange activity and left the adenosine triphosphatase insoluble and little changed in activity. The exchange activity was accompanied by negligible adenosine-triphosphatase activity and was enriched by precipitation at chosen pH and by DEAE-Sephadex. At no stage was its activity affected by Na(+), K(+) or ouabain. 3. The washed microsomal fraction was exposed to a variety of reagents; a sodium iodide-cysteine treatment increased both adenosine-triphosphatase and exchange activities, as also did a synthetic zeolite. Preparations were obtained with exchange activities less than 3% of their Na(+)-plus-K(+)-stimulated adenosine-triphosphatase activity. Some contribution to the residual exchange activity was made by an adenylate kinase. 4. Thus over 95% of the microsomal ADP-ATP-exchange activity does not take part in the Na(+)-plus-K(+)-stimulated adenosine-triphosphatase reaction. Participation of some of the residual 3% of the ADP-ATP-exchange activity has not been excluded, but there appears no firm evidence for its participation in the adenosine triphosphatase; the bearing of this conclusion on mechanisms proposed for the Na(+)-plus-K(+)-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase is indicated.

  17. Separation of adenosine diphosphate-adenosine triphosphate–exchange activity from the cerebral microsomal sodium-plus-potassium ion-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, W. L.; Sattin, A.; McIlwain, H.

    1966-01-01

    1. A microsomal fraction from ox cerebral cortex catalysed [14C]ADP–ATP exchange at a speed similar to that at which it liberated Pi from ATP in the presence of Na+, K+ and Mg2+. 2. Repeated washing the fraction with MgATP solutions solubilized most of the exchange activity and left the adenosine triphosphatase insoluble and little changed in activity. The exchange activity was accompanied by negligible adenosine-triphosphatase activity and was enriched by precipitation at chosen pH and by DEAE-Sephadex. At no stage was its activity affected by Na+, K+ or ouabain. 3. The washed microsomal fraction was exposed to a variety of reagents; a sodium iodide–cysteine treatment increased both adenosine-triphosphatase and exchange activities, as also did a synthetic zeolite. Preparations were obtained with exchange activities less than 3% of their Na+-plus-K+-stimulated adenosine-triphosphatase activity. Some contribution to the residual exchange activity was made by an adenylate kinase. 4. Thus over 95% of the microsomal ADP–ATP-exchange activity does not take part in the Na+-plus-K+-stimulated adenosine-triphosphatase reaction. Participation of some of the residual 3% of the ADP–ATP-exchange activity has not been excluded, but there appears no firm evidence for its participation in the adenosine triphosphatase; the bearing of this conclusion on mechanisms proposed for the Na+-plus-K+-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase is indicated. PMID:4223577

  18. Adenosine: Tipping the balance towards hepatic steatosis and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Simon C.; Schuppan, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Fatty liver is commonly associated with alcohol ingestion and abuse. While the molecular pathogenesis of these fatty changes is well understood, the histochemical and pharmacological mechanisms by which ethanol stimulates these molecular changes remain unknown. During ethanol metabolism, adenosine is generated by the enzyme ecto-5′-nucleotidase, and adenosine production and adenosine receptor activation are known to play critical roles in the development of hepatic fibrosis. We therefore investigated whether adenosine and its receptors play a role in the development of alcohol-induced fatty liver. WT mice fed ethanol on the Lieber-DeCarli diet developed hepatic steatosis, including increased hepatic triglyceride content, while mice lacking ecto-5-nucleotidase or adenosine A1 or A2B receptors were protected from developing fatty liver. Similar protection was also seen in WT mice treated with either an adenosine A1 or A2B receptor antagonist. Steatotic livers demonstrated increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis, which was prevented by blockade of adenosine A1 receptors, and decreased expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, which was prevented by blockade of adenosine A2B receptors. In vitro studies supported roles for adenosine A1 receptors in promoting fatty acid synthesis and for A2B receptors in decreasing fatty acid metabolism. These results indicate that adenosine generated by ethanol metabolism plays an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis via both A1 and A2B receptors and suggest that targeting adenosine receptors may be effective in the prevention of alcohol-induced fatty liver. PMID:20395005

  19. Adenosine signaling in normal and sickle erythrocytes and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujin; Xia, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a debilitating hemolytic genetic disorder with high morbidity and mortality affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Although SCD was discovered more than a century ago, no effective mechanism-based prevention and treatment are available due to poorly understood molecular basis of sickling, the fundamental pathogenic process of the disease. SCD patients constantly face hypoxia. One of the best-known signaling molecules to be induced under hypoxic conditions is adenosine. Recent studies demonstrate that hypoxia-mediated elevated adenosine signaling plays an important role in normal erythrocyte physiology. In contrast, elevated adenosine signaling contributes to sickling and multiple life threatening complications including tissue damage, pulmonary dysfunction and priapism. Here, we summarize recent research on the role of adenosine signaling in normal and sickle erythrocytes, progression of the disease and therapeutic implications. In normal erythrocytes, both genetic and pharmacological studies demonstrate that adenosine can enhance 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG) production via A2B receptor (ADORA2B) activation, suggesting that elevated adenosine has an unrecognized role in normal erythrocytes to promote O2 release and prevent acute ischemic tissue injury. However, in sickle erythrocytes, the beneficial role of excessive adenosine-mediated 2,3-BPG induction becomes detrimental by promoting deoxygenation, polymerization of sickle hemoglobin and subsequent sickling. Additionally, adenosine signaling via the A2A receptor (ADORA2A) on invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells inhibits iNKT cell activation and attenuates pulmonary dysfunction in SCD mice. Finally, elevated adenosine coupled with ADORA2BR activation is responsible for priapism, a dangerous complication seen in SCD. Overall, the research reviewed here reveals a differential role of elevated adenosine in normal erythrocytes, sickle erythrocytes, iNK cells and progression

  20. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing controls cathepsin S expression in atherosclerosis by enabling HuR-mediated post-transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Stellos, Konstantinos; Gatsiou, Aikaterini; Stamatelopoulos, Kimon; Perisic Matic, Ljubica; John, David; Lunella, Federica Francesca; Jaé, Nicolas; Rossbach, Oliver; Amrhein, Carolin; Sigala, Frangiska; Boon, Reinier A; Fürtig, Boris; Manavski, Yosif; You, Xintian; Uchida, Shizuka; Keller, Till; Boeckel, Jes-Niels; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Maegdefessel, Lars; Chen, Wei; Schwalbe, Harald; Bindereif, Albrecht; Eriksson, Per; Hedin, Ulf; Zeiher, Andreas M; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2016-10-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, which is catalyzed by a family of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes, is important in the epitranscriptomic regulation of RNA metabolism. However, the role of A-to-I RNA editing in vascular disease is unknown. Here we show that cathepsin S mRNA (CTSS), which encodes a cysteine protease associated with angiogenesis and atherosclerosis, is highly edited in human endothelial cells. The 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the CTSS transcript contains two inverted repeats, the AluJo and AluSx(+) regions, which form a long stem-loop structure that is recognized by ADAR1 as a substrate for editing. RNA editing enables the recruitment of the stabilizing RNA-binding protein human antigen R (HuR; encoded by ELAVL1) to the 3' UTR of the CTSS transcript, thereby controlling CTSS mRNA stability and expression. In endothelial cells, ADAR1 overexpression or treatment of cells with hypoxia or with the inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ and tumor-necrosis-factor-α induces CTSS RNA editing and consequently increases cathepsin S expression. ADAR1 levels and the extent of CTSS RNA editing are associated with changes in cathepsin S levels in patients with atherosclerotic vascular diseases, including subclinical atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, aortic aneurysms and advanced carotid atherosclerotic disease. These results reveal a previously unrecognized role of RNA editing in gene expression in human atherosclerotic vascular diseases.

  1. Assessing the effects of heavy metals in ACC deaminase and IAA production on plant growth-promoting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Mendoza-Hernández José; Stefani, Perea-Vélez Yazmin; Janette, Arriola-Morales; Melani, Martínez-Simón Sara; Gabriela, Pérez-Osorio

    2016-01-01

    This study poses a methodology in order to simultaneously quantify ACC deaminase and IAA levels in the same culture medium. Ten bacterial strains isolated from plant rhizosphere naturally settled in mining residues were chosen. These bacterial strains were characterized as PGPB, and all of them showed at least three characteristics (indole-3 acetic acid and siderophore production, ACC deaminase enzyme activity, and inorganic phosphate solubilization). Taxonomic identification showed that the strains belong to Enterobacter, Serratia, Klebsiella, and Escherichia genera. Similarly, both the ACC deaminase enzyme activity and the IAA synthesis in the presence of Cu, As, Pb, Ni, Cd, and Mn were measured. The results showed that both the ACC deaminase enzyme activity and the IAA synthesis were higher with the Pb, As, and Cu treatments than with the Escherichia N16, Enterobacter K131, Enterobacter N9, and Serratia K120 control treatments. On the other hand, Ni, Cd, and Mn negatively affected both the ACC deaminase enzyme activity and the IAA production on every bacterium except on the Klebsiella Mc173 strain. Serratia K120 bacterium got a positive correlation between ACC deaminase and IAA in the presence of every heavy metal, and it also promoted Helianthus annuus plant growth, showing a potential use in phytoremediation systems.

  2. Expression and characterization of a second L-amino acid deaminase isolated from Proteus mirabilis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jin-Oh; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kwon, Ohsuk; Seong, Su-Il; Kim, Ik-Hwan; Kim, Chul Ho

    2011-04-01

    L-amino acid deaminases catalyze the deamination of natural L-amino acids. Two types of L-amino acid deaminase have been identified in Proteus species. One exhibits high levels of activity toward a wide range of aliphatic and aromatic L-amino acids, typically L-phenylalanine, whereas the other acts on a relatively narrow range of basic L-amino acids, typically L-histidine. In this study, we cloned, expressed, and characterized a second amino acid deaminase, termed Pm1, from P. mirabilis KCTC 2566. Homology alignment of the deduced amino acid sequence of Pm1 demonstrated that the greatest similarity (96%) was with the L-amino acid deaminase (LAD) of P. vulgaris, and that homology with Pma was relatively low (72%). Also, similar to LAD, Pm1 was most active on L-histidine, indicating that Pm1 belongs to the second type of amino acid deaminase. In agreement with this conclusion, the V(max) and K(m) values of Pm1 were 119.7 (μg phenylpyruvic acid/mg/min) and 31.55 mM phenylalanine, respectively, values lower than those of Pma. The Pml deaminase will be very useful industrially in the preparation of commercially valuable materials including urocanic acid and α-oxoglutarate.

  3. HPLC analysis of cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose and adenosine diphosphate ribose: determination of NAD+ metabolites in hippocampal membranes.

    PubMed

    Casabona, G; Sturiale, L; L'Episcopo, M R; Raciti, G; Fazzio, A; Sarpietro, M G; Genazzani, A A; Cambria, A; Nicoletti, F

    1995-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine diphosphate-ribose (cADPR) and ADPR were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on a CarboPac PA-1 column at strong basic pH and quantitated by a pulsed amperometric detector. Although this HPLC method was quite sensitive and highly reproducible, it did not allow the separation of cADPR from guanosine monophosphate (GMP) which, when present, could be removed by ion-affinity chromatography, using gel-immobilized Fe3+ columns. Crude synaptic membranes from rat hippocampi were incubated with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and acidic extracts were subject to HPLC analysis after neutralization. Incubation led to a time-dependent formation of ADPR, which was amplified when membranes were incubated in the presence of guanosine trisphosphate (GTP), guanosine-5'-0-(3-thiotrisphosphate) (GTP-gamma-S) or AlF3. cADPR did not accumulate in detectable amounts and only a minimal proportion (< 5%) of radioactivity originating from [3H]NAD co-eluted with authentic cADPR in extracts from hippocampal membranes. The simultaneous detection of cADPR and ADPR we have described may help the search for inhibitors of cADPR metabolism, which will allow to measure the cADPR that accumulates under basal conditions or in response to extracellular signals.

  4. Aberrant alternative splicing pattern of ADAR2 downregulates adenosine-to-inosine editing in glioma.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Yu; Tian, Nan; Zhao, Xingli; Du, Chao; Han, Liang; Zhang, Haishan

    2015-06-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is the most common type of RNA editing in mammals, and is catalyzed by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs). ADAR2 is the main enzyme responsible for A-to-I editing in humans, and A-to-I underediting at the glutamine (Q)/arginine (R) site of the glutamate receptor subunit B (GluR-B) is associated with the pathogenesis and invasiveness of glioma. The level of ADAR2 mRNA expression and the alternative splicing of the ADAR2 pre-mRNA both affect the catalytic activity of ADAR2. However, reports of ADAR2 mRNA expression in glioma are inconsistent. The mechanism regulating ADAR2 pre-mRNA splicing is also unknown. In this study, we explored the deregulation of A-to-I RNA editing in glioma. We confirmed the underediting at the Q/R site of GluR-B mRNA in the glioma cell lines U87, U251 and A172 compared with that in normal human astrocytes (NHAs) HA1800. However, we demonstrated with reverse transcription (RT-PCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) that the expression of ADAR2 mRNA was not significantly altered in the glioma cell lines. Three alternative splicing sites are utilized in the glioma cell lines and NHAs: the first, located between exons -1 and 1, causes the inclusion of exon 1a; the second causes the removal of exon 2, which encodes two double-stranded RNA-binding domains; and the third, located between exons 4 and 6, causes the inclusion of alternative exon 5a, introducing a 120-nucleotide coding Alu-repeat sequence in frame. However, the expression ratio of two types of transcripts (with and without exon 5a) was altered in the glioma cells. Transcripts with exon 5a, which generate an ADAR2 isoform with ~50% reduced activity, were predominantly expressed in the glioma cell lines, whereas transcripts without exon 5a were predominantly expressed in the NHAs. From these results, we conclude that this aberrant alternative splicing pattern of ADAR2 downregulates A-to-I editing in glioma.

  5. [60]Fullerene derivative modulates adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors gene expression: a possible protective effect against hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter, is involved in learning and memory processes but at higher concentration results excitotoxic causing degeneration and neuronal death. Adenosine is a nucleoside that exhibit neuroprotective effects by modulating of glutamate release. Hypoxic and related oxidative conditions, in which adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors are involved, have been demonstrated to contribute to neurodegenerative processes occurring in certain human pathologies. Results Human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) were used to evaluate the long time (24, 48 and 72 hours) effects of a [60]fullerene hydrosoluble derivative (t3ss) as potential inhibitor of hypoxic insult. Low oxygen concentration (5% O2) caused cell death, which was avoided by t3ss exposure in a concentration dependent manner. In addition, gene expression analysis by real time PCR of adenosine A1, A2A and A2B and metabotropic glutamate 1 and 5 receptors revealed that t3ss significantly increased A1 and mGlu1 expression in hypoxic conditions. Moreover, t3ss prevented the hypoxia-induced increase in A2A mRNA expression. Conclusions As t3ss causes overexpression of adenosine A1 and metabotropic glutamate receptors which have been shown to be neuroprotective, our results point to a radical scavenger protective effect of t3ss through the enhancement of these neuroprotective receptors expression. Therefore, the utility of these nanoparticles as therapeutic target to avoid degeneration and cell death of neurodegenerative diseases is suggested. PMID:25123848

  6. Effect of exogenous adenosine and monensin on glycolytic flux in isolated perfused normoxic rat hearts: role of pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Peltier, S; Burelle, Y; Novel-Chate, V; Demaison, L; Verdys, M; Saks, V; Keriel, C; Leverve, X M

    2005-09-01

    We studied the effect of exogenous adenosine in isolated perfused normoxic rat hearts on glycolytic flux through pyruvate kinase (PK). We compared its effect with that of myxothiazol, an inhibitor of mitochondrial ATP production. Moreover, we tested whether an increase of membrane ionic flux with monensin is linked to a stimulation of glycolytic flux through PK. After a 20-min stabilization period adenosine, myxothiazol or monensin were administrated to the perfusate continuously at various concentrations during 10 min. The contraction was monitored and the lactate production in coronary effluents evaluated. The amount of adenine nucleotides and phosphoenolpyruvate was measured in the frozen hearts. Myxothiazol induced a decrease of the left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP : -40%) together with a stimulation of glycolytic flux secondary to PK activation. In contrast, adenosine primarily reduced heart rate (HR: -30%) with only marginal effects on LVDP. This was associated with an inhibition of glycolysis at the level of PK. The Na+ ionophore monensin affected HR (+14%) and LVDP (+25%). This effect was associated with a stimulation of glycolysis secondary to the stimulation of PK. These results provide new information of action of adenosine in the heart and support the concept of a direct coupling between glycolysis and process regulating sarcolemmal ionic fluxes.

  7. Phosphodiesterase 2 negatively regulates adenosine-induced transcription of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Makuch, Edyta; Kuropatwa, Marianna; Kurowska, Ewa; Ciekot, Jaroslaw; Klopotowska, Dagmara; Matuszyk, Janusz

    2014-07-05

    Adenosine induces expression of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene in PC12 cells. However, it is suggested that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits expression of this gene. Using real-time PCR and luciferase reporter assays we found that ANP significantly decreases the adenosine-induced transcription of the TH gene. Results of measurements of cyclic nucleotide concentrations indicated that ANP-induced accumulation of cGMP inhibits the adenosine-induced increase in cAMP level. Using selective phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) inhibitors and a synthetic cGMP analog activating PDE2, we found that PDE2 is involved in coupling the ANP-triggered signal to the cAMP metabolism. We have established that ANP-induced elevated levels of cGMP as well as cGMP analog stimulate hydrolytic activity of PDE2, leading to inhibition of adenosine-induced transcription of the TH gene. We conclude that ANP mediates negative regulation of TH gene expression via stimulation of PDE2-dependent cAMP breakdown in PC12 cells.

  8. Strategic approaches to drug design. II. Modelling studies on phosphodiesterase substrates and inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A.; Warrington, B. H.; Vinter, J. G.

    1987-07-01

    Modelling studies have been carried out on the phosphodiesterase (PDE) substrates, adenosine- and guanosine-3'5'-cyclic monophosphates, and on a number of non-specific and type III-specific phosphodiesterase inhibitors. These studies have assisted the understanding of PDE substrate differentiation and the design of potent, selective PDE type III inhibitors.

  9. A Cytidine Deaminase Edits C to U in Transfer RNAs in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Randau, Lennart; Stanley, Bradford J.; Kohlway, Andrew; Mechta, Sarah; Xiong, Yong; Söll, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    All canonical transfer RNAs (tRNAs) have a uridine at position 8, involved in maintaining tRNA tertiary structure. However, the hyperthermophilic archaeon Methanopyrus kandleri harbors 30 (out of 34) tRNA genes with cytidine at position 8. Here, we demonstrate C-to-U editing at this location in the tRNA’s tertiary core, and present the crystal structure of a tRNA-specific cytidine deaminase, CDAT8, which has the cytidine deaminase domain linked to a tRNA-binding THUMP domain. CDAT8 is specific for C deamination at position 8, requires only the acceptor stem hairpin for activity, and belongs to a unique family within the “cytidine deaminase–like” superfamily. The presence of this C-to-U editing enzyme guarantees the proper folding and functionality of all M. kandleri tRNAs. PMID:19407206

  10. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is adenosine the common link?

    PubMed

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-10-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the 'adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities' implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic 'comorbidity model', in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain co-morbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions.

  11. Norepinephrines effect on adenosine transport in the proximal straight tubule

    SciTech Connect

    Barfuss, D.W.; McCann, W.P.; Katholi, R.E.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of norepinephrine on C/sup 14/-adenosine transport in the rabbit proximal tubule (S/sub 2/) was studied. The transepithelial transport of adenosine (0.02 mM0 from lumin to bathing solution was measured by its rate of appearance (J/sub A/) in the bathing solution and by its disappearances (J/sub D/) from the luminal fluid. Norepinephrine (0.24 ..mu..M) was added to the bathing solution after a control flux period. After three samples from the experiment period the tubules were quickly harvested and the cellular concentration of C/sup 14/-adenosine was determined. The high cellular adenosine concentration and th marked difference in adenosine appearance rate in the bathing solution compared to the luminal disappearance rate indicates the absorbed adenosine is trapped in the cells. This trapping may be due to adenosine metabolism or difficulty of crossing the basolateral membrane. Whichever is the case, norepinephrine appears to stimulate movement of adenosine or its metabolites into the bathing solution across the basolateral membrane.

  12. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is Adenosine the Common Link?

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the ‘adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities’ implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic ‘comorbidity model’, in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain comorbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions. PMID:25979489

  13. Adenosine signaling promotes hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell emergence.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lili; Tamplin, Owen J; Chen, Michael J; Deng, Qing; Patterson, Shenia; Kim, Peter G; Durand, Ellen M; McNeil, Ashley; Green, Julie M; Matsuura, Shinobu; Ablain, Julien; Brandt, Margot K; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Huttenlocher, Anna; Daley, George Q; Ravid, Katya; Zon, Leonard I

    2015-05-04

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge from aortic endothelium via the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT). The molecular mechanisms that initiate and regulate EHT remain poorly understood. Here, we show that adenosine signaling regulates hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) development in zebrafish embryos. The adenosine receptor A2b is expressed in the vascular endothelium before HSPC emergence. Elevated adenosine levels increased runx1(+)/cmyb(+) HSPCs in the dorsal aorta, whereas blocking the adenosine pathway decreased HSPCs. Knockdown of A2b adenosine receptor disrupted scl(+) hemogenic vascular endothelium and the subsequent EHT process. A2b adenosine receptor activation induced CXCL8 via cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) and mediated hematopoiesis. We further show that adenosine increased multipotent progenitors in a mouse embryonic stem cell colony-forming assay and in embryonic day 10.5 aorta-gonad-mesonephros explants. Our results demonstrate that adenosine signaling plays an evolutionary conserved role in the first steps of HSPC formation in vertebrates.

  14. Adenosine strongly potentiates pressor responses to nicotine in rats.

    PubMed Central

    von Borstel, R W; Renshaw, A A; Wurtman, R J

    1984-01-01

    Intravenous infusion of subhypotensive doses of adenosine strongly potentiates the pressor response of anesthetized rats to nicotine. A dose of nicotine (40 micrograms/kg, i.v.), which, given alone, elicits a peak increase in diastolic pressure of approximately equal to 15 mm Hg, increases pressure by approximately equal to 70 mm Hg when arterial plasma adenosine levels have been increased to 2 microM from a basal concentration of approximately equal to 1 microM. The pressor response to cigarette smoke applied to the lungs is also strongly potentiated during infusion of adenosine. Slightly higher adenosine concentrations (approximately equal to 4 microM) attenuate pressor responses to electrical stimulation of preganglionic sympathetic nerves, or to injections of the alpha-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine, but continue to potentiate pressor responses to nicotine. Low doses (0.25-5 micrograms/kg) of the synthetic adenosine receptor agonists 5'-N-cyclopropylcarboxamidoadenosine, 2-chloroadenosine, and N6-L-phenylisopropyladenosine also potentiate pressor responses to nicotine. Caffeine and theophylline (10 mg/kg) block the potentiating effect of adenosine, and also decrease basal responses to nicotine, suggesting that endogenous adenosine might normally potentiate some nicotine responses. The synergism between nicotine and adenosine appears to take place within sympathetic ganglia. PMID:6591207

  15. Clinical/pharmacological aspect of adenosine A2A receptor antagonist for dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Tomoyuki; Uchida, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine replacement therapy using the dopamine precursor, l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA), with a peripheral dopa decarboxylase inhibitor is the most effective treatment currently available for the symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the long-term use of dopaminergic therapies for PD is often limited by the development of motor response complications, such as dyskinesia. Adenosine A2A receptors are a promising nondopaminergic target for the treatment of PD. The treatment of motor response complications involves combinations of regular and controlled release L-DOPA, perhaps with the addition of a COMT inhibitor or the use of a longer-acting dopamine agonist. However, when dyskinesia is already established, the increase in dopaminergic load produced by the addition of a dopamine agonist can result in an increase in the severity and duration of dyskinesia. Currently, there are no well-tolerated antidyskinesia agents available. Amantadine, which may exert its effects through the inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, shows some effects on established dyskinesia. Dyskinesia has a negative impact on the quality of life of patients, sometimes being more disabling than PD itself. Although some patients prefer experiencing dyskinesia than being in the OFF state and unable to move, alternative, more effective therapies are still required for severe disabling dyskinesia to afford patients an improved quality of life while in the ON state. The mechanisms causing and maintaining the dyskinesia have not been clarified. The application of a nondopaminergic approach to modify the basal ganglial activity would be helpful to better understand and treat dyskinesia. The use of an adenosine A2A receptor may provide one such approach. In this literature review, we will summarize the current knowledge from both clinical and nonclinical studies on the effects of adenosine A2A receptor blockade on dyskinesia.

  16. Adenosine receptors and asthma in humans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C N

    2008-10-01

    According to an executive summary of the GINA dissemination committee report, it is now estimated that approximately 300 million people (5% of the global population or 1 in 20 persons) have asthma. Despite the scientific progress made over the past several decades toward improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma, there is still a great need for improved therapies, particularly oral therapies that enhance patient compliance and that target new mechanisms of action. Adenosine is an important signalling molecule in human asthma. By acting on extracellular G-protein-coupled ARs on a number of different cell types important in the pathophysiology of human asthma, adenosine affects bronchial reactivity, inflammation and airway remodelling. Four AR subtypes (A(1), A(2a), A(2b) and A(3)) have been cloned in humans, are expressed in the lung, and are all targets for drug development for human asthma. This review summarizes what is known about these AR subtypes and their function in human asthma as well as the pros and cons of therapeutic approaches to these AR targets. A number of molecules with high affinity and high selectivity for the human AR subtypes have entered clinical trials or are poised to enter clinical trials as anti-asthma treatments. With the availability of these molecules for testing in humans, the function of ARs in human asthma, as well as the safety and efficacy of approaches to the different AR targets, can now be determined.

  17. Adenosine receptors and dyskinesia in pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    First, the recent progress in the pathogenesis of levodopa-induced dyskinesia was described. Serotonin neurons play an important role in conversion from levodopa to dopamine and in the release of converted dopamine into the striatum in the Parkinsonian state. Since serotonin neurons lack buffering effects on synaptic dopamine concentration, the synaptic dopamine markedly fluctuates depending on the fluctuating levodopa concentration in the serum after taking levodopa. The resultant pulsatile stimulation makes the striatal direct-pathway neurons get potential that releases excessive GABA into the output nuclei of the basal ganglia. When levodopa is administered, the stored GABA is released, the output nuclei become hypoactive, and then dyskinesias emerge. Second, effects of adenosine A2A receptor antagonists on dyskinesia were described. It has been demonstrated that the expression of adenosine A2A receptors is increased in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with dyskinesias, suggesting that blockade of A2A receptors is beneficial for dyskinesias. Preclinical studies have shown that A2A receptor antagonists reduce liability of dyskinesias in PD models. Clinical trials have demonstrated that A2A antagonists increase functional ON-time (ON without troublesome dyskinesia) in PD patients suffering from wearing-off phenomenon, although they may increase dyskinesia in patients with advanced PD.

  18. Targeted base editing in rice and tomato using a CRISPR-Cas9 cytidine deaminase fusion.

    PubMed

    Shimatani, Zenpei; Kashojiya, Sachiko; Takayama, Mariko; Terada, Rie; Arazoe, Takayuki; Ishii, Hisaki; Teramura, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Komatsu, Hiroki; Miura, Kenji; Ezura, Hiroshi; Nishida, Keiji; Ariizumi, Tohru; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-03-27

    We applied a fusion of CRISPR-Cas9 and activation-induced cytidine deaminase (Target-AID) for point mutagenesis at genomic regions specified by single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) in two crop plants. In rice, we induced multiple herbicide-resistance point mutations by multiplexed editing using herbicide selection, while in tomato we generated marker-free plants with homozygous heritable DNA substitutions, demonstrating the feasibility of base editing for crop improvement.

  19. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis reveals a cytosine deaminase mutant with altered substrate preference.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Sheri D; Ireton, Greg C; Stoddard, Barry L; Black, Margaret E

    2004-07-20

    Suicide gene therapy of cancer is a method whereby cancerous tumors can be selectively eradicated while sparing damage to normal tissue. This is accomplished by delivering a gene, encoding an enzyme capable of specifically converting a nontoxic prodrug into a cytotoxin, to cancer cells followed by prodrug administration. The Escherichia coli gene, codA, encodes cytosine deaminase and is introduced into cancer cells followed by administration of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Cytosine deaminase converts 5-FC into cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil, which leads to tumor-cell eradication. One limitation of this enzyme/prodrug combination is that 5-FC is a poor substrate for bacterial cytosine deaminase. The crystal structure of bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) reveals that a loop structure in the active site pocket of wild-type bCD comprising residues 310-320 undergoes a conformational change upon cytosine binding, making several contacts to the pyrimidine ring. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis was used to investigate the structure-function relationship of amino acid residues within this region, especially with regard to substrate specificity. Using an E. coli genetic complementation system, seven active mutants were identified (F310A, G311A, H312A, D314A, V315A, F316A, and P318A). Further characterization of these mutants reveals that mutant F316A is 14-fold more efficient than the wild-type at deaminating cytosine to uracil. The mutant D314A enzyme demonstrates a dramatic decrease in cytosine activity (17-fold) as well as a slight increase in activity toward 5-FC (2-fold), indicating that mutant D314A prefers the prodrug over cytosine by almost 20-fold, suggesting that it may be a superior suicide gene.

  20. Evidence that release of adenosine triphosphate from endothelial cells during increased shear stress is vesicular.

    PubMed

    Bodin, P; Burnstock, G

    2001-12-01

    In response to increased shear stress, vascular endothelial cells release adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by an unknown mechanism. We have investigated this mechanism using different approaches. First, we discovered that quinacrine, used to locate intracellular stores of ATP bound to peptides, displayed a granular fluorescence, typical of vesicular storage. Second, we found that two inhibitors of vesicular transport (monensin and N-ethylmaleimide) produced a highly significant reduction in the release of ATP from vascular endothelial cells in response to increased shear stress. Preliminary experiments using inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, the sulfonylurea receptor, and the multidrug resistance protein showed no involvement of these ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins (previously characterized in endothelial cells) in the mechanism of release of ATP. We suggest, therefore, that the release of ATP from vascular endothelial cells, like that of nerve cells, is probably by vesicular exocytosis.

  1. The Multifaceted Roles of RNA Binding in APOBEC Cytidine Deaminase Functions

    PubMed Central

    Prohaska, Kimberly M.; Bennett, Ryan P.; Salter, Jason D.; Smith, Harold C.

    2014-01-01

    Cytidine deaminases have important roles in the regulation of nucleoside/deoxynucleoside pools for DNA and RNA synthesis. The APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases (named after the first member of the family that was described, Apolipoprotein B mRNA Editing Catalytic Subunit 1, a.k.a. APOBEC1 or A1) is a fascinating group of mutagenic proteins that use RNA and single stranded DNA (ssDNA) as substrates for their cytidine or deoxycytidine deaminase activities. APOBEC proteins and base-modification nucleic acid editing have been the subject of numerous publications, reviews and speculation. These proteins play diverse roles in host cell defense, protecting cells from invading genetic material, enabling the acquired immune response to antigens and changing protein expression at the level of the genetic code in mRNA or DNA. The amazing power these proteins have for interphase cell functions relies on structural and biochemical properties that are beginning to be understood. At the same time, the substrate selectivity of each member in the family and their regulation remains to be elucidated. This review of the APOBEC family will focus on an open question in regulation, namely what role the interactions of these proteins with RNA have in editing substrate recognition or allosteric regulation of DNA mutagenic and host defense activities. PMID:24664896

  2. Cytosine deaminase MX cassettes as positive/negative selectable markers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hartzog, Phillip E; Nicholson, Bradly P; McCusker, John H

    2005-07-30

    We describe positive/negative selectable cytosine deaminase MX cassettes for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The basis of positive selection for cytosine deaminase (Fcy1) activity is that (a) fcy1 strains are unable to grow on medium containing cytosine as a sole nitrogen source and (b) fcy1 ura3 strains are unable to grow on medium containing cytosine as the sole pyrimidine source. Conversely, as 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) is toxic to cytosine deaminase-producing cells, fcy1 strains are resistant to 5FC. FCY1MX and FCA1MX cassettes, containing open reading frames (ORFs) of S. cerevisiae FCY1 and Candida albicans FCA1, respectively, were constructed and used to disrupt targeted genes in S. cerevisiae fcy1 strains. In addition, new direct repeat cassettes, kanPR, FCA1PR, FCY1PR and CaURA3PR, were developed to allow efficient deletion of target genes in cells containing MX3 repeats. Finally, the FCY1- and FCA1MX3 or PR direct repeat cassettes can be readily recycled after 5FC counter-selection on both synthetic and rich media.

  3. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia induced cytosine deaminase expression in microencapsulated E. coli for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Ennis, Riley C; Griswold, Karl E; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-06-10

    Engineered bacterial cells that are designed to express therapeutic enzymes under the transcriptional control of remotely inducible promoters can mediate the de novo conversion of non-toxic prodrugs to their cytotoxic forms. In situ cellular expression of enzymes provides increased stability and control of enzyme activity as compared to isolated enzymes. We have engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli), designed to express cytosine deaminase at elevated temperatures, under the transcriptional control of thermo-regulatory λpL-cI857 promoter cassette which provides a thermal switch to trigger enzyme synthesis. Enhanced cytosine deaminase expression was observed in cultures incubated at 42°C as compared to 30°C, and enzyme expression was further substantiated by spectrophotometric assays indicating enhanced conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil. The engineered cells were subsequently co-encapsulated with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in immunoprotective alginate microcapsules, and cytosine deaminase expression was triggered remotely by alternating magnetic field-induced hyperthermia. The combination of 5-fluorocytosine with AMF-activated microcapsules demonstrated tumor cell cytotoxicity comparable to direct treatment with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Such enzyme-prodrug therapy, based on engineered and immunoisolated E. coli, may ultimately yield an improved therapeutic index relative to monotherapy, as AMF mediated hyperthermia might be expected to pre-sensitize tumors to chemotherapy under appropriate conditions.

  4. Genome-wide target specificities of CRISPR RNA-guided programmable deaminases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daesik; Lim, Kayeong; Kim, Sang-Tae; Yoon, Sun-Heui; Kim, Kyoungmi; Ryu, Seuk-Min; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2017-04-10

    Cas9-linked deaminases, also called base editors, enable targeted mutation of single nucleotides in eukaryotic genomes. However, their off-target activity is largely unknown. Here we modify digested-genome sequencing (Digenome-seq) to assess the specificity of a programmable deaminase composed of a Cas9 nickase (nCas9) and the deaminase APOBEC1 in the human genome. Genomic DNA is treated with the base editor and a mixture of DNA-modifying enzymes in vitro to produce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at uracil-containing sites. Off-target sites are then computationally identified from whole genome sequencing data. Testing seven different single guide RNAs (sgRNAs), we find that the rAPOBEC1-nCas9 base editor is highly specific, inducing cytosine-to-uracil conversions at only 18 ± 9 sites in the human genome for each sgRNA. Digenome-seq is sensitive enough to capture off-target sites with a substitution frequency of 0.1%. Notably, off-target sites of the base editors are often different from those of Cas9 alone, calling for independent assessment of their genome-wide specificities.

  5. Various effects of fluorescent bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas containing ACC deaminase on wheat seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Magnucka, Elżbieta G; Pietr, Stanisław J

    2015-12-01

    The study evaluates the effect of rhizobacteria having 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCd) on the development of wheat seedlings. This enzyme has been proposed to play a key role in microbe-plant association. Three fluorescent pseudomonads containing this deaminase were selected from 70 strains of pseudomonads isolated from rhizosphere of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rape (Brassica napus L.). These bacteria, varied significantly in the ability to both biosynthesize auxins and hydrolyze ACC. Among them, Pseudomonas brassicacearum subsp. brassicacearum strain RZ310 presented the highest activities of ACC deaminase during 96h of growth in liquid Dworkin and Foster (DF) salt medium. Additionally, this rape rhizosphere strain did not produce indoles. Two other isolates, Pseudomonas sp. PO283 and Pseudomonas sp. PO366, secreted auxins only in the presence of their precursor. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and four other protein-encoding genes indicated that these wheat rhizosphere isolates belonged to the fluorescent Pseudomonas group. Moreover, the effects of these strains on wheat seedling growth under in vitro conditions were markedly dependent on both their cell suspensions used to grain inoculation and nutrient conditions. Strains tested had beneficial influence on wheat seedlings mainly at low cell densities. In addition, access to nutrients markedly changed bacteria action on cereal growth. Their presence generally favored the positive effects of pseudomonads on length and the estimated biomasses of wheat coleoptiles. Despite these general rules, impacts of each isolate on the growth parameters of cereal seedlings were unique.

  6. Bacteria with ACC deaminase can promote plant growth and help to feed the world.

    PubMed

    Glick, Bernard R

    2014-01-20

    To feed all of the world's people, it is necessary to sustainably increase agricultural productivity. One way to do this is through the increased use of plant growth-promoting bacteria; recently, scientists have developed a more profound understanding of the mechanisms employed by these bacteria to facilitate plant growth. Here, it is argued that the ability of plant growth-promoting bacteria that produce 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase to lower plant ethylene levels, often a result of various stresses, is a key component in the efficacious functioning of these bacteria. The optimal functioning of these bacteria includes the synergistic interaction between ACC deaminase and both plant and bacterial auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). These bacteria not only directly promote plant growth, they also protect plants against flooding, drought, salt, flower wilting, metals, organic contaminants, and both bacterial and fungal pathogens. While a considerable amount of both basic and applied work remains to be done before ACC deaminase-producing plant growth-promoting bacteria become a mainstay of plant agriculture, the evidence indicates that with the expected shift from chemicals to soil bacteria, the world is on the verge of a major paradigm shift in plant agriculture.

  7. Diguanosinetetraphosphatase from rat liver: Acitivity on diadenosine tetraphosphate and inhibition by adenosine tetraphosphate.

    PubMed

    Lobatón, C D; Vallejo, C G; Sillero, A; Sillero, M A

    1975-01-15

    The hydrolysis of diadenosine tetraphosphate, a compound previously described by others to occur in liver at concentrations of around 0.1 mu M, is carried out by a specific enzyme. This enzyme has been partially purified from rat liver extracts, and the following properties have been found. The Km value for diadenosine tetraphosphate is 2 mu M; the products of hydrolysis are ATP and AMP; the Km value for diguanosine tetraphosphate is 2 mu M; none of the following substances were substrates of the enzyme: diadenosine triphosphate, diguanosine di and triphosphates, adenosine tetraphosphate, ATP, ADP, NAD+, NADP+ and bis-p-nitrophenylphosphate. Cyclic AMP was not an inhibitor of the reaction. The enzyme requires Mg2+ ions, is maximally active at a pH value of approximately 8, and has a molecular weight of 22000 as estimated by filtration on Sephadex G-100. The activation energy of the reaction was of 10250 cal times mol-1 (42886 J times mol-1). Particularly striking is the inhibition by adenosine tetraphosphate (Ki equals 48 nM) and guanosine tetraphosphate (Ki equals 14 nM). Other nucleotides tested were also competitive inhibitors with Ki values in the 10--100 mu M range.

  8. Dinucleosidetetraphosphatase from Ehrlich ascites tumour cells: inhibition by adenosine, guanosine and uridine 5'-tetraphosphates.

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Lobatón, C D; Sillero, M A; Sillero, A

    1982-01-01

    1. An enzyme has been partially purified from Ehrlich ascites tumour cells which specifically hydrolyses dinucleosidetetraphosphates, with Km values of around 2 microM. The products of the hydrolysis are the corresponding nucleoside tri- and monophosphates. Dinucleoside Tri- and diphosphates were not substrates of the reaction. 2. The enzyme requires Mg2+ or Mn2+, is maximally active at a pH value of approx. 7.5 and has a mol, wt of 19,800 as estimated by filtration on Sephadex G-75. Nucleoside mono-, di- and triphosphates were competitive inhibitors of the reaction with Ki values in the 0.1 mM range. 3. Particularly relevant is the inhibition of this enzyme by adenosine and guanosine 5'tetraphosphates. In the course of this investigation, the presence of uridine 5'-tetraphosphate was detected in a commercial preparation of UTP. Adenosine, guanosine and uridine 5'-tetraphosphates were very strong inhibitors of the reaction with Ki values in the nM range.

  9. A High-Affinity Adenosine Kinase from Anopheles Gambiae

    SciTech Connect

    M Cassera; M Ho; E Merino; E Burgos; A Rinaldo-Matthis; S Almo; V Schramm

    2011-12-31

    Genome analysis revealed a mosquito orthologue of adenosine kinase in Anopheles gambiae (AgAK; the most important vector for the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa). P. falciparum are purine auxotrophs and do not express an adenosine kinase but rely on their hosts for purines. AgAK was kinetically characterized and found to have the highest affinity for adenosine (K{sub m} = 8.1 nM) of any known adenosine kinase. AgAK is specific for adenosine at the nucleoside site, but several nucleotide triphosphate phosphoryl donors are tolerated. The AgAK crystal structure with a bound bisubstrate analogue Ap{sub 4}A (2.0 {angstrom} resolution) reveals interactions for adenosine and ATP and the geometry for phosphoryl transfer. The polyphosphate charge is partly neutralized by a bound Mg{sup 2+} ion and an ion pair to a catalytic site Arg. The AgAK structure consists of a large catalytic core in a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich, and a small cap domain in contact with adenosine. The specificity and tight binding for adenosine arise from hydrogen bond interactions of Asn14, Leu16, Leu40, Leu133, Leu168, Phe168, and Thr171 and the backbone of Ile39 and Phe168 with the adenine ring as well as through hydrogen bond interactions between Asp18, Gly64, and Asn68 and the ribosyl 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups. The structure is more similar to that of human adenosine kinase (48% identical) than to that of AK from Toxoplasma gondii (31% identical). With this extraordinary affinity for AgAK, adenosine is efficiently captured and converted to AMP at near the diffusion limit, suggesting an important role for this enzyme in the maintenance of the adenine nucleotide pool. mRNA analysis verifies that AgAK transcripts are produced in the adult insects.

  10. Adenosine reduces postbypass transfusion requirements in humans after heart surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Mentzer, R M; Rahko, P S; Canver, C C; Chopra, P S; Love, R B; Cook, T D; Hegge, M O; Lasley, R D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the effect, if any, of adenosine blood cardioplegia on blood component usage after heart surgery. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The most common cause of nonsurgical postcardiopulmonary bypass bleeding is platelet dysfunction. For this reason, pharmacologic agents are under investigation in an effort to reduce the need for transfusion in this setting. METHODS: A posthoc analysis of blood product usage was performed in data obtained from a Phase I, single center, open label, randomized study performed in 63 patients. The trial was designed to test the safety and tolerance of adenosine when added to blood cardioplegia in increasing doses to enhance myocardial protection. The database provided information regarding the effect of adenosine cardioplegia on venous plasma adenosine concentrations, the amount of platelets, fresh frozen plasma and packed erythrocytes used, and the association between the adenosine dose and postoperative thoracic drainage. RESULTS: The postoperative thoracic drainage at 6 hours, 24 hours, and at the time of chest tube removal in the high-dose adenosine cardioplegia group was 68%, 76%, and 75% of the placebo and low-dose adenosine cardioplegia group (p < 0.05). The highest dose of adenosine studied increased baseline adenosine venous plasma levels 360-fold, from 0.17 +/- 0.09 mumol/L to 42.30 +/- 11.20 mumol/L (p < 0.05). This marked increase was associated with a 68%, 56%, and 58% reduction in platelet, fresh frozen plasma, and packed erythrocyte usage, respectively (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In addition to enhancing the heart's tolerance to ischemia, adenosine-supplemented cardioplegic solution also may reduce bleeding after cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:8857856

  11. Gene therapy for adenosine deaminase–deficient severe combined immune deficiency: clinical comparison of retroviral vectors and treatment plans

    PubMed Central

    Candotti, Fabio; Shaw, Kit L.; Muul, Linda; Carbonaro, Denise; Sokolic, Robert; Choi, Christopher; Schurman, Shepherd H.; Garabedian, Elizabeth; Kesserwan, Chimene; Jagadeesh, G. Jayashree; Fu, Pei-Yu; Gschweng, Eric; Cooper, Aaron; Tisdale, John F.; Weinberg, Kenneth I.; Crooks, Gay M.; Kapoor, Neena; Shah, Ami; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Smogorzewska, Monika; Wayne, Alan S.; Rosenblatt, Howard M.; Davis, Carla M.; Hanson, Celine; Rishi, Radha G.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Yang, Otto O.; Balamurugan, Arumugam; Bauer, Gerhard; Ireland, Joanna A.; Engel, Barbara C.; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Hershfield, Michael S.; Blaese, R. Michael; Parkman, Robertson

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a gene therapy trial in 10 patients with adenosine deaminase (ADA)–deficient severe combined immunodeficiency using 2 slightly different retroviral vectors for the transduction of patients' bone marrow CD34+ cells. Four subjects were treated without pretransplantation cytoreduction and remained on ADA enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) throughout the procedure. Only transient (months), low-level (< 0.01%) gene marking was observed in PBMCs of 2 older subjects (15 and 20 years of age), whereas some gene marking of PBMC has persisted for the past 9 years in 2 younger subjects (4 and 6 years). Six additional subjects were treated using the same gene transfer protocol, but after withdrawal of ERT and administration of low-dose busulfan (65-90 mg/m2). Three of these remain well, off ERT (5, 4, and 3 years postprocedure), with gene marking in PBMC of 1%-10%, and ADA enzyme expression in PBMC near or in the normal range. Two subjects were restarted on ERT because of poor gene marking and immune recovery, and one had a subsequent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These studies directly demonstrate the importance of providing nonmyeloablative pretransplantation conditioning to achieve therapeutic benefits with gene therapy for ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency. PMID:22968453

  12. Breed differences in the biochemical determinism of ultimate pH in breast muscles of broiler chickens--a key role of AMP deaminase?

    PubMed

    El Rammouz, R; Berri, C; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Babilé, R; Fernandez, X

    2004-08-01

    The biochemical determinism of ultimate pH (pHu) was studied in the pectoralis muscle of broiler chickens. Thirty birds of 3 genetic types (a fast-growing standard (FG), a slow-growing French "Label Rouge" (SG), and a heavy line type (HL)) were kept under conventional breeding methods until the usual marketing age (6, 12, and 6 wk for FG, SG, and HL birds, respectively). The birds were divided into 3 different antemortem treatment groups: minimum stress, shackling for a longer time (2 min), and heat stress (exposure to 35 degrees C for 3.5 h and shackling for 2 min before stunning). The birds were slaughtered on the same day. The pHu differed (P < 0.001) among the 3 genetic types, ranking as follows: FG (5.95+/-0.01) > HL (5.85+/-0.02) > SG (5.73+/-0.02). In SG and HL birds, pHu was strongly correlated with muscle glycogen content at slaughter (r = -0.74 and -0.82; P < 0.01 respectively), whereas this correlation was weak in FG birds. Regardless of genetic type, neither buffering capacity nor lactate accumulation significantly contributed to pHu variations (P > 0.05). The activity of adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMPd) was significantly higher in FG chickens (0.98+/-0.31; P < 0.05) than in HL and SG birds (0.46+/-0.24 and 0.34+/-0.18, respectively). Significant correlations were found between AMPd activity, pHu, and glycolytic potential (GP) at slaughter (r = 0.34 and -.29; P < 0.01, respectively). Further research is needed to study in more detail the role of AMPd in the determinism of pHu, particularly in fast-growing broilers.

  13. Methotrexate enhances the anti-inflammatory effect of CF101 via up-regulation of the A3 adenosine receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Ochaion, Avivit; Bar-Yehuda, Sara; Cohn, Shira; Del Valle, Luis; Perez-Liz, Georginia; Madi, Lea; Barer, Faina; Farbstein, Motti; Fishman-Furman, Sari; Reitblat, Tatiana; Reitblat, Alexander; Amital, Howard; Levi, Yair; Molad, Yair; Mader, Reuven; Tishler, Moshe; Langevitz, Pnina; Zabutti, Alexander; Fishman, Pnina

    2006-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) exerts an anti-inflammatory effect via its metabolite adenosine, which activates adenosine receptors. The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) was found to be highly expressed in inflammatory tissues and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). CF101 (IB-MECA), an A3AR agonist, was previously found to inhibit the clinical and pathological manifestations of AIA. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of MTX on A3AR expression level and the efficacy of combined treatment with CF101 and MTX in AIA rats. AIA rats were treated with MTX, CF101, or both agents combined. A3AR mRNA, protein expression and exhibition were tested in paw and PBMC extracts from AIA rats utilizing immunohistochemistry staining, RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. A3AR level was tested in PBMC extracts from patients chronically treated with MTX and healthy individuals. The effect of CF101, MTX and combined treatment on A3AR expression level was also tested in PHA-stimulated PBMCs from healthy individuals and from MTX-treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Combined treatment with CF101 and MTX resulted in an additive anti-inflammatory effect in AIA rats. MTX induced A2AAR and A3AR over-expression in paw cells from treated animals. Moreover, increased A3AR expression level was detected in PBMCs from MTX-treated RA patients compared with cells from healthy individuals. MTX also increased the protein expression level of PHA-stimulated PBMCs from healthy individuals. The increase in A3AR level was counteracted in vitro by adenosine deaminase and mimicked in vivo by dipyridamole, demonstrating that receptor over-expression was mediated by adenosine. In conclusion, the data presented here indicate that MTX induces increased A3AR expression and exhibition, thereby potentiating the inhibitory effect of CF101 and supporting combined use of these drugs to treat RA. PMID:17101059

  14. Adenosine receptors and diabetes: Focus on the A(2B) adenosine receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Merighi, Stefania; Borea, Pier Andrea; Gessi, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    Over the last two decades, diabetes mellitus has become one of the most challenging health problems worldwide. Diabetes mellitus, classified as type I and II, is a pathology concerning blood glucose level in the body. The nucleoside adenosine has long been known to affect insulin secretion, glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism, through activation of four G protein coupled adenosine receptors (ARs), named A1, A2A, A2B and A3. Currently, the novel promising subtype to develop new drugs for diabetes treatment is the A2BAR subtype. The use of selective agonists and antagonists for A2BAR subtype in various diabetic animal models allowed us to identify several effects of A2BAR signaling in cell metabolism. In particular, the focus of this review is to summarize the studies on purinergic signaling associated with diabetes through A2BARs modulation.

  15. Adenosine regulates a chloride channel via protein kinase C and a G protein in a rabbit cortical collecting duct cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Schwiebert, E M; Karlson, K H; Friedman, P A; Dietl, P; Spielman, W S; Stanton, B A

    1992-01-01

    We examined the regulation by adenosine of a 305-pS chloride (Cl-) channel in the apical membrane of a continuous cell line derived from rabbit cortical collecting duct (RCCT-28A) using the patch clamp technique. Stimulation of A1 adenosine receptors by N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) activated the channel in cell-attached patches. Phorbol 12,13-didecanoate and 1-oleoyl 2-acetylglycerol, activators of protein kinase C (PKC), mimicked the effect of CHA, whereas the PKC inhibitor H7 blocked the action of CHA. Stimulation of A1 adenosine receptors also increased the production of diacylglycerol, an activator of PKC. Exogenous PKC added to the cytoplasmic face of inside-out patches also stimulated the Cl- channel. Alkaline phosphatase reversed PKC activation. These results show that stimulation of A1 adenosine receptors activates a 305-pS Cl-channel in the apical membrane by a phosphorylation-dependent pathway involving PKC. In previous studies, we showed that the protein G alpha i-3 activated the 305-pS Cl- channel (Schwiebert et al. 1990. J. Biol. Chem. 265:7725-7728). We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that PKC activates the channel by a G protein-dependent pathway. In inside-out patches, pertussis toxin blocked PKC activation of the channel. In contrast, H7 did not prevent G protein activation of the channel. We conclude that adenosine activates a 305-pS Cl- channel in the apical membrane of RCCT-28A cells by a membrane-delimited pathway involving an A1 adenosine receptor, phospholipase C, diacylglycerol, PKC, and a G protein. Because we have shown, in previous studies, that this Cl- channel participates in the regulatory volume decrease subsequent to cell swelling, adenosine release during ischemic cell swelling may activate the Cl-channel and restore cell volume. Images PMID:1311718

  16. Postsynaptic Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Intrinsic Excitability of Pyramidal Cells in the Rat Basolateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Andrew R.; Ariwodola, Olusegun J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The basolateral amygdala plays a critical role in the etiology of anxiety disorders and addiction. Pyramidal neurons, the primary output cells of this region, display increased firing following exposure to stressors, and it is thought that this increase in excitability contributes to stress responsivity and the expression of anxiety-like behaviors. However, much remains unknown about the underlying mechanisms that regulate the intrinsic excitability of basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons. Methods: Ex vivo gramicidin perforated patch recordings were conducted in current clamp mode where hyper- and depolarizing current steps were applied to basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons to assess the effects of adenosine A2A receptor modulation on intrinsic excitability. Results: Activation of adenosine A2A receptors with the selective A2A receptor agonist CGS-21680 significantly increased the firing rate of basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons in rat amygdala brain slices, likely via inhibition of the slow afterhyperpolarization potential. Both of these A2A receptor-mediated effects were blocked by preapplication of a selective A2A receptor antagonist (ZM-241385) or by intra-pipette infusion of a protein kinase A inhibitor, suggesting a postsynaptic locus of A2A receptors on basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, bath application of the A2A receptor antagonist alone significantly attenuated basolateral amygdala pyramidal cell firing, consistent with a role for tonic adenosine in the regulation of the intrinsic excitability of these neurons. Conclusions: Collectively, these data suggest that adenosine, via activation of A2A receptors, may directly facilitate basolateral amygdala pyramidal cell output, providing a possible balance for the recently described inhibitory effects of adenosine A1 receptor activation on glutamatergic excitation of basolateral amygdala pyramidal cells. PMID:25716780

  17. Ethanol Tolerance Affects Endogenous Adenosine Signaling in Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dali; Xiong, Wei; Jackson, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol has many pharmacological effects, including increases in endogenous adenosine levels and adenosine receptor activity in brain. Ethanol consumption is associated with both positive and negative health outcomes, but tolerance to the behavioral effects of ethanol can lead to increased consumption, which increases the risk of negative health outcomes. The present study was performed to test whether a 7-day treatment with ethanol is linked to reduced adenosine signaling and whether this is a consequence of reduced ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity. Wild-type (CD73+/+) and ecto-5′-nucleotidase-deficient (CD73−/−) mice were treated with ethanol (2 g/kg) or saline for 7 days. In CD73+/+ mice, repeated ethanol treatment reduced the hypothermic and ataxic effects of acute ethanol, indicating the development of tolerance to the acute effects of ethanol. In CD73+/+ mice, this 7-day ethanol treatment led to increased hippocampal synaptic activity and reduced adenosine A1 receptor activity under both basal and low Mg2+ conditions. These effects of ethanol tolerance were associated with an 18% decrease in activity of ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity in hippocampal cell membranes. In contrast, ethanol treatment was not associated with changes in synaptic activity or adenosine signaling in hippocampus from CD73−/− mice. These data indicate that ethanol treatment is associated with a reduction in adenosine signaling through adenosine A1 receptors in hippocampus, mediated, at least in part, via reduced ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity. PMID:27189965

  18. Adenosine 2A receptors in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Vincent, I S; Okusa, M D

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important clinical problem that may lead to death and for those who survive, the sequelae of AKI include loss of quality of life, chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. The incidence of AKI continues to rise without clear successes in humans for the pharmacological prevention of AKI or treatment of established AKI. Dendritic cells and macrophages are critical early initiators of innate immunity in the kidney and orchestrate inflammation subsequent to ischaemia-reperfusion injury. These innate cells are the most abundant leucocytes present in the kidney, and they represent a heterogeneous population of cells that are capable of responding to cues from the microenvironment derived from pathogens or endogenous inflammatory mediators such as cytokines or anti-inflammatory mediators such as adenosine. Lymphocyte subsets such as natural killer T cells and Tregs also play roles in regulating ischaemic injury by promoting and suppressing inflammation respectively. Adenosine, produced in response to IR, is generally considered as a protective signalling molecule and elicits its physiological responses through four distinct adenosine receptors. However, its short half-life, lack of specificity and rapid metabolism limit the use of adenosine as a therapeutic agent. These adenosine receptors play various roles in regulating the activity of the aforementioned hematopoietic cells in elevated levels of adenosine such as during hypoxia. This review focuses on the importance of one receptor, the adenosine 2A subtype, in blocking inflammation associated with AKI.

  19. Characterization of P1 (adenosine) purinoceptors.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Michael F

    2013-10-08

    The purine nucleoside adenosine (ADO) is an important modulator of cellular function in mammalian tissues, modulating cellular function and neuronal excitability via interactions with different cell surface receptor subtypes that are heterogeneously distributed in both the mammalian CNS and peripheral tissues. Four ADO receptor subtypes have been cloned and characterized. Described in this unit are three radioligand binding assays for pharmacological characterization of the high-affinity ADO receptor subtypes A1, A2A, and A3 receptors. Pharmacological characterization of the low-affinity A2B receptor has been enabled by the use of tritiated xanthine PSB-603. Because receptor localization is an important criterion for differentiation of receptor subtypes, a support protocol that describes the methodology for the localization of ADO receptors in rat brain tissue using autoradiography is also included.

  20. A genome-wide identification and analysis of the DYW-deaminase genes in the pentatricopeptide repeat gene family in cotton (Gossypium spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoyuan; Li, Xue; Guo, Liping; Zhang, Xuexian; Qi, Tingxiang; Wang, Hailin; Tang, Huini; Qiao, Xiuqin; Zhang, Jinfa; Xing, Chaozhu; Wu, Jianyong

    2017-01-01

    The RNA editing occurring in plant organellar genomes mainly involves the change of cytidine to uridine. This process involves a deamination reaction, with cytidine deaminase as the catalyst. Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins with a C-terminal DYW domain are reportedly associated with cytidine deamination, similar to members of the deaminase superfamily. PPR genes are involved in many cellular functions and biological processes including fertility restoration to cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in plants. In this study, we identified 227 and 211 DYW deaminase-coding PPR genes for the cultivated tetraploid cotton species G. hirsutum and G. barbadense (2n = 4x = 52), respectively, as well as 126 and 97 DYW deaminase-coding PPR genes in the ancestral diploid species G. raimondii and G. arboreum (2n = 26), respectively. The 227 G. hirsutum PPR genes were predicted to encode 52–2016 amino acids, 203 of which were mapped onto 26 chromosomes. Most DYW deaminase genes lacked introns, and their proteins were predicted to target the mitochondria or chloroplasts. Additionally, the DYW domain differed from the complete DYW deaminase domain, which contained part of the E domain and the entire E+ domain. The types and number of DYW tripeptides may have been influenced by evolutionary processes, with some tripeptides being lost. Furthermore, a gene ontology analysis revealed that DYW deaminase functions were mainly related to binding as well as hydrolase and transferase activities. The G. hirsutum DYW deaminase expression profiles varied among different cotton tissues and developmental stages, and no differentially expressed DYW deaminase-coding PPRs were directly associated with the male sterility and restoration in the CMS-D2 system. Our current study provides an important piece of information regarding the structural and evolutionary characteristics of Gossypium DYW-containing PPR genes coding for deaminases and will be useful for characterizing the DYW deaminase gene

  1. Adenosine and Preexcitation Variants: Reappraisal of Electrocardiographic Changes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hussam; Lupo, Pierpaolo; Foresti, Sara; De Ambroggi, Guido; Epicoco, Gianluca; Fundaliotis, Angelica; Cappato, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    Intravenous adenosine is a short-acting blocker of the atrioventricular node that has been used to unmask subtle or latent preexcitation, and also to enable catheter ablation in selected patients with absent or intermittent preexcitation. Depending on the accessory pathway characteristics, intravenous adenosine may produce specific electrocardiographic changes highly suggestive of the preexcitation variant. Herein, we view different ECG responses to this pharmacological test in various preexcitation patterns that were confirmed by electrophysiological studies. Careful analysis of electrocardiographic changes during adenosine test, with emphasis on P-delta interval, preexcitation degree, and atrioventricular block, can be helpful to diagnose the preexcitation variant/pattern.

  2. Inhibition of adenosine metabolism induces changes in post-ictal depression, respiration, and mortality in genetically epilepsy prone rats.

    PubMed

    Kommajosyula, Srinivasa P; Randall, Marcus E; Faingold, Carl L

    2016-01-01

    A major cause of mortality in epilepsy patients is sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Post-ictal respiratory dysfunction following generalized convulsive seizures is most commonly observed in witnessed cases of human SUDEP. DBA mouse models of SUDEP are induced by audiogenic seizures (AGSz) and show high incidences of seizure-induced death due to respiratory depression. The relatively low incidence of human SUDEP suggests that it may be useful to examine seizure-associated death in an AGSz model that rarely exhibits sudden death, such as genetically epilepsy-prone rats (GEPR-9s). Adenosine is released extensively during seizures and depresses respiration, which may contribute to seizure-induced death. The present study examined the effects of inhibiting adenosine metabolism on the durations of post-ictal depression (PID) and respiratory distress (RD), changes in blood oxygen saturation (% SpO2), and the incidence of post-seizure mortality in GEPR-9s. Systemic administration of adenosine metabolism inhibitors, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA, 30 mg/kg) with 5-Iodotubericidin (5-ITU, 3mg/kg) in GEPR-9s resulted in significant changes in the duration of AGSz-induced PID as compared to vehicle in both genders. These agents also significantly increased the duration of post-seizure RD and significantly decreased the mean% SpO2 after AGSz, as compared to vehicle but only in females. Subsequently, we observed that the incidences of death in both genders 12-48 h post-seizure were significantly greater in drug vs. vehicle treatment. The incidence of death in females was also significantly higher than in males, which is consistent with the elevated seizure sensitivity of female GEPR-9s developmentally. These results support a potentially important role of elevated adenosine levels following generalized seizures in the increased incidence of death in GEPR-9s induced by adenosine metabolism inhibitors. These findings may also be relevant to human SUDEP, in

  3. Isolation and characterization of ACC deaminase-producing fluorescent pseudomonads, to alleviate salinity stress on canola (Brassica napus L.) growth.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Farzad; Khavazi, Kazem; Pazira, Ebrahim; Nejati, Alireza; Rahmani, Hadi Asadi; Sadaghiani, Hasan Rasuli; Miransari, Mohammad

    2009-04-01

    Salinity stress is of great importance in arid and semi-arid areas of the world due to its impact in reducing crop yield. Under salinity stress, the amount of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC), a precursor for ethylene production in plants, increases. Here, we conducted research under the hypothesis that isolated ACC deaminase-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida can alleviate the stressful effects of salinity on canola (Brassica napus L.) growth. The experiments were conducted in the Soil and Water Research Institute, Tehran, Iran. Seven experimental stages were conducted to isolate and characterize ACC deaminase-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens strains and to determine factors enhancing their growth and, consequently, their effects on the germination of canola seeds. Under salinity stress, in 14% of the isolates, ACC deaminase activity was observed, indicating that they were able to utilize ACC as the sole N-source. Bacterial strains differed in their ability to synthesize auxin and hydrogen cyanide compounds, as well as in their ACC deaminase activity. Under salinity stress, the rate of germinating seeds inoculated with the strains of ACC deaminase-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida, and seedling growth was significantly higher. These results indicate the significance of soil biological activities, including the activities of plant growth-promoting bacteria, in the alleviation of soil stresses such as salinity on plant growth.

  4. Selective Phosphodiesterase 4B Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Tripuraneni, Naga Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) is a member of the phosphodiesterase family of proteins that plays a critical role in regulating intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) by controlling its rate of degradation. It has been demonstrated that this isoform is involved in the orchestra of events which includes inflammation, schizophrenia, cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, contractility of the myocardium, and psoriatic arthritis. Phosphodiesterase 4B has constituted an interesting target for drug development. In recent years, a number of PDE4B inhibitors have been developed for their use as therapeutic agents. In this review, an up-to-date status of the inhibitors investigated for the inhibition of PDE4B has been given so that this rich source of structural information of presently known PDE4B inhibitors could be helpful in generating a selective and potent inhibitor of PDE4B. PMID:25853062

  5. Tetanic depression is overcome by tonic adenosine A2A receptor facilitation of L-type Ca2+ influx into rat motor nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Laura; Timóteo, M Alexandrina; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2004-01-01

    Motor nerve terminals possess multiple voltage-sensitive calcium channels operating acetylcholine (ACh) release. In this study, we investigated whether facilitation of neuromuscular transmission by adenosine generated during neuronal firing was operated by Ca2+ influx via ‘prevalent’ P-type or via the recruitment of ‘silent’ L-type channels. The release of [3H]ACh from rat phrenic nerve endings decreased upon increasing the stimulation frequency of the trains (750 pulses) from 5 Hz (83 ± 4 × 103 disintegrations per minute per gram (d.p.m. g−1); n = 11) to 50 Hz (30 ± 3 × 103 d.p.m. g−1; n = 5). The P-type Ca2+ channel blocker, ω-agatoxin IVA (100 nm) reduced (by 40 ± 10%; n = 6) the release of [3H]ACh evoked by 50-Hz trains, while nifedipine (1 μm, an L-type blocker) was inactive. Tetanic depression was overcome (88 ± 6 × 103 d.p.m. g−1; n = 12) by stimulating the phrenic nerve with 50-Hz bursts (five bursts of 150 pulses, 20 s interburst interval). In these conditions, ω-agatoxin IVA (100 nm) failed to affect transmitter release, but nifedipine (1 μm) decreased [3H]ACh release by 21 ± 7% (n = 4). Inactivation of endogenous adenosine with adenosine deaminase (ADA, 0.5 U ml−1) reduced (by 54 ± 8%, n = 5) the release of [3H]ACh evoked with 50-Hz bursts. This effect was opposite to the excitatory actions of adenosine (0.5 mm), S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (5 μm, an adenosine uptake blocker) and CGS 21680C (3 nm, a selective A2A receptor agonist); as the A1 receptor agonist R-N6-phenylisopropyl adenosine (R-PIA, 300 nm) failed to affect the release of [3H]ACh, the results indicate that adenosine generated during 50-Hz bursts exerts an A2A-receptor-mediated tonus. The effects of ADA (0.5 U ml−1) and CGS 21680C (3 nm) were prevented by nifedipine (1 μm). Blocking tonic A2A receptor activation, with ADA (0.5 U ml−1) or 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargyl xanthine (10 μm, an A2A antagonist), recovered ω-agatoxin IVA (100 nm) inhibition and

  6. Identification of two pentatricopeptide repeat genes required for RNA editing and zinc binding by C-terminal cytidine deaminase-like domains.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Michael L; Giang, Karolyn; Berhane, Beniam; Mulligan, R Michael

    2013-12-20

    Many transcripts expressed from plant organelle genomes are modified by C-to-U RNA editing. Nuclear encoded pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are required as RNA binding specificity determinants in the RNA editing mechanism. Bioinformatic analysis has shown that most of the Arabidopsis PPR proteins necessary for RNA editing events include a C-terminal portion that shares structural characteristics with a superfamily of deaminases. The DYW deaminase domain includes a highly conserved zinc binding motif that shares characteristics with cytidine deaminases. The Arabidopsis PPR genes, ELI1 and DOT4, both have DYW deaminase domains and are required for single RNA editing events in chloroplasts. The ELI1 DYW deaminase domain was expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and was shown to bind two zinc atoms per polypeptide. Thus, the DYW deaminase domain binds a zinc metal ion, as expected for a cytidine deaminase, and is potentially the catalytic component of an editing complex. Genetic complementation experiments demonstrate that large portions of the DYW deaminase domain of ELI1 may be eliminated, but the truncated genes retain the ability to restore editing site conversion in a mutant plant. These results suggest that the catalytic activity can be supplied in trans by uncharacterized protein(s) of the editosome.

  7. Extracellular Adenosine Mediates a Systemic Metabolic Switch during Immune Response