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Sample records for adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase

  1. Inhibition of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase attenuates ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Vaschetto, Rosanna; Kuiper, Jan W.; Chiang, Johnson; Haitsma, Jack J.; Juco, Jonathan W.; Uhlig, Stefan; Plötz, Frans B.; Della Corte, Francesco; Zhang, Haibo; Slutsky, Arthur S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation can induce organ injury associated with overwhelming inflammatory responses. Excessive activation of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase enzyme following massive DNA damage may aggravate inflammatory responses. We thus hypothesized that the pharmacological inhibition of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase by PJ-34 will attenuate ventilator-induced lung injury. Methods Anesthetized rats were subjected to intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide at a dose of 6 mg/kg. The animals were then randomized to receive mechanical ventilation at either low tidal volume (6 mL/kg) with 5 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure or high tidal volume (15 mL/kg) with zero positive end-expiratory pressure, in the presence and absence of intravenous administration of PJ-34. Results The high tidal volume ventilation resulted in an increase in poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase activity in the lung. The treatment with PJ-34 maintained a greater oxygenation and a lower airway plateau pressure than the vehicle control group. This was associated with a decreased level of interleukin-6, active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the lung, attenuated leukocyte lung transmigration and reduced pulmonary edema and apoptosis. The administration of PJ-34 also decreased the systemic levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, and attenuated the degree of apoptosis in the kidney. Conclusion The pharmacological inhibition of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase reduces ventilator-induced lung injury and protects kidney function. PMID:18212571

  2. Inhibition of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase using quinazolinone nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hemalatha, K; Madhumitha, G

    2016-09-01

    Poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a group of enzymes with several subtypes and it manages various ailment such as cancer, inflammatory disorders, diabetes mellitus, neuronal injury, HIV infection, Parkinsonism, aging, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Various PARP inhibitors share a common property of bicyclic lactam in its main structural frame. The core moiety containing bicyclic lactam rings are isoquinolinones, dihydroisoquinolinones, quinazolinediones, phthalazinones, quinazolinones, and phenanthridones. The quinazolinone with diverse substituents displayed low nanomolar inhibition. Quinazolinone is an important and vital molecule in the field of medicinal chemistry possessing multitude pharmacological actions. Though the chemistry of quinazolinones has been discussed through centuries, its concise role on PARP inhibition needed a special consideration. The aim of this review is to discover the effect of quinazolinone substitutents and its role in PARP inhibition. This precise review will discuss the effect of quinazolinones on PARP subtypes such as PARP-1, PARP-2, PARP-5a, and PARP-5b. In addition to its pharmacological actions, PARP inhibitors can also act as a chemosensitizing agent, and it is used in combination with the other anticancer agents. This summarization will definitely be a supportive report for the scientist working toward the novelty in the quinazolinone nucleus and its role in PARP inhibition. PMID:27470142

  3. Activation and modulation of cardiac poly-adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase activity in a rat model of brain death.

    PubMed

    Brain, John G; Rostron, Anthony J; Dark, John H; Kirby, John A

    2008-05-15

    DNA damage during transplantation can activate poly-adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase (PARP) resulting in the generation of polymers of adenosine diphosphate-ribose (PAR). Excessive linkage of PAR to nuclear proteins can induce cell death, thereby limiting the function of transplanted organs. This study uses a rat model of brain death to determine the profile of PARP activation and whether mechanisms that lead to cell death can be ameliorated by appropriate donor resuscitation. The expression of PAR-linked nuclear proteins within cardiac myocytes was greatly increased after the induction of donor brain death. Importantly, infusion of noradrenaline or vasopressin to normalize the chronic hypotension produced by brain death reduced the expression of PAR to a level below baseline. These data suggest that chronic hypotension after donor brain death has the potential to limit cardiac function through the activation of PARP; however, this early cause of graft damage can be mitigated by appropriate donor resuscitation. PMID:18475194

  4. The status of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in ovarian cancer, part 1: olaparib.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rowan E; Ledermann, Jonathan A

    2016-08-01

    Poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have shown promising clinical activity in epithelial ovarian cancer. Following the observation in vitro that PARP inhibition is synthetically lethal in tumors with BRCA mutations, PARP inhibition has become the first genotype-directed therapy for BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated ovarian cancer. However, it is becoming clear that PARP inhibition also may have clinical utility in cancers associated with defects or aberrations in DNA repair that are unrelated to BRCA mutations. Deficient DNA repair mechanisms are present in approximately 30% to 50% of high-grade serous ovarian cancers, the most common histologic subtype. Olaparib is the best-studied PARP inhibitor to date, and a number of phase 3 trials with this agent are underway. This article reviews the development of olaparib for ovarian cancer and discusses the current evidence for its use, ongoing studies, future research directions, and the challenges ahead. PMID:27487106

  5. Co-targeting Deoxyribonucleic Acid–Dependent Protein Kinase and Poly(Adenosine Diphosphate-Ribose) Polymerase-1 Promotes Accelerated Senescence of Irradiated Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Arun; Bukczynska, Patricia; Jackson, Susan; Haput, Ygal; Cullinane, Carleen; McArthur, Grant A.; Solomon, Benjamin

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of combined blockade of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) on accelerated senescence in irradiated H460 and A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of KU5788 and AG014699 (inhibitors of DNA-PK and PARP-1, respectively) on clonogenic survival, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), apoptosis, mitotic catastrophe, and accelerated senescence in irradiated cells were examined in vitro. For in vivo experiments, H460 xenografts established in athymic nude mice were treated with BEZ235 (a DNA-PK, ATM, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor) and AG014699 to determine effects on proliferation, DNA DSBs, and accelerated senescence after radiation. Results: Compared with either inhibitor alone, combination treatment with KU57788 and AG014699 reduced postradiation clonogenic survival and significantly increased persistence of Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) foci in irradiated H460 and A549 cells. Notably, these effects coincided with the induction of accelerated senescence in irradiated cells as reflected by positive β-galactosidase staining, G2-M cell-cycle arrest, enlarged and flattened cellular morphology, increased p21 expression, and senescence-associated cytokine secretion. In irradiated H460 xenografts, concurrent therapy with BEZ235 and AG014699 resulted in sustained Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) staining and prominent β-galactosidase activity. Conclusion: Combined DNA-PK and PARP-1 blockade increased tumor cell radiosensitivity and enhanced the prosenescent properties of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. These data provide a rationale for further preclinical and clinical testing of this therapeutic combination.

  6. Blocking Cyclic Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose-mediated Calcium Overload Attenuates Sepsis-induced Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Qian-Yi; Zou, Yu; Zhang, Li-Na; Ai, Mei-Lin; Liu, Wei; Ai, Yu-Hang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a common complication of sepsis that is associated with high mortality. Intracellular Ca2+ overload plays an important role in the pathophysiology of sepsis-induced ALI, and cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (cADPR) is an important regulator of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. The cluster of differentiation 38 (CD38)/cADPR pathway has been found to play roles in multiple inflammatory processes but its role in sepsis-induced ALI is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether the CD38/cADPR signaling pathway is activated in sepsis-induced ALI and whether blocking cADPR-mediated calcium overload attenuates ALI. Methods: Septic rat models were established by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Rats were divided into the sham group, the CLP group, and the CLP+ 8-bromo-cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (8-Br-cADPR) group. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), cADPR, CD38, and intracellular Ca2+ levels in the lung tissues were measured at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after CLP surgery. Lung histologic injury, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were measured. Results: NAD+, cADPR, CD38, and intracellular Ca2+ levels in the lungs of septic rats increased significantly at 24 h after CLP surgery. Treatment with 8-Br-cADPR, a specific inhibitor of cADPR, significantly reduced intracellular Ca2+ levels (P = 0.007), attenuated lung histological injury (P = 0.023), reduced TNF-α and MDA levels (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively) and recovered SOD activity (P = 0.031) in the lungs of septic rats. Conclusions: The CD38/cADPR pathway is activated in the lungs of septic rats, and blocking cADPR-mediated calcium overload with 8-Br-cADPR protects against sepsis-induced ALI. PMID:27411462

  7. Oxidant injury of cells. DNA strand-breaks activate polyadenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase and lead to depletion of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed Central

    Schraufstatter, I U; Hinshaw, D B; Hyslop, P A; Spragg, R G; Cochrane, C G

    1986-01-01

    To determine the biochemical basis of the oxidant-induced injury of cells, we have studied early changes after exposure of P388D1 murine macrophages to hydrogen peroxide. Total intracellular NAD+ levels in P388D1 cells decreased with H2O2 concentrations of 40 microM or higher. Doses of H2O2 between 0.1 and 2.5 mM led to an 80% depletion of NAD within 20 min. With doses of H2O2 of 250 microM or lower, the fall in NAD and, as shown previously, ATP, was reversible. Higher doses of H2O2 that cause ultimate lysis of the cells, induced an irreversible depletion of NAD and ATP. Poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, a nuclear enzyme associated with DNA damage and repair, which catalyzes conversion of NAD to nicotinamide and protein-bound poly-ADP-ribose, was activated by exposure of the cells to concentrations of 40 microM H2O2 or higher. Activation of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase was also observed in peripheral lymphocytes incubated in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Examination of the possibility that DNA alteration was involved was performed by measurement of thymidine incorporation and determination of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) in cells exposed to H2O2. H2O2 at 40 microM or higher inhibited DNA synthesis, and induced SSB within less than 30 s. These results suggest that DNA damage induced within seconds after addition of oxidant may lead to stimulation of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, and a consequent fall in NAD. Excessive stimulation of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase leads to a fall in NAD sufficient to interfere with ATP synthesis. PMID:2937805

  8. The synthesis of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide and poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) in various classes of rat liver nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Haines, M. E.; Johnston, I. R.; Mathias, A. P.; Ridge, D.

    1969-01-01

    1. The activities of NMN adenylyltransferase and an enzyme that synthesizes poly (ADP-ribose) from NAD were investigated in the various classes of rat liver nuclei fractionated by zonal centrifugation. 2. The highest specific activities of these two nuclear enzymes occur in different classes of nuclei. In very young and in mature rats it was shown that a correlation exists between DNA synthesis and NMN adenylyltransferase activity, but in rats of intermediate age this correlation is less evident. The highest activities of the enzyme that catalyses formation of poly (ADP-ribose) are in the nuclei involved in the synthesis of RNA. 3. The significance of these results in relation to NAD metabolism is discussed. PMID:4311824

  9. Presence of phosphorylated O-ribosyl-adenosine in T-psi-stem of yeast methionine initiator tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Desgrès, J; Keith, G; Kuo, K C; Gehrke, C W

    1989-01-01

    We report in this paper on isolation and characterization of two unknown nucleosides G* and [A*] located in the T-psi-stem of yeast methionine initiator tRNA, using the combined means of HPLC protocols, real time UV-absorption spectrum, and post-run mass spectrometry by electron impact or fast atom bombardment. The G* nucleoside in position 65 was identified as unmodified guanosine. The structure of the unknown [A*] in position 64 was characterized as an isomeric form of O-ribosyl-adenosine by comparison of its chromatographic, UV-spectral and mass spectrometric properties with those of authentic O-alpha-ribofuranosyl-(1"----2')-adenosine isolated from biosynthetic poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose). Our studies also brought evidence for the presence of a phosphorylmonoester group located on this new modified nucleoside [A*], when isolated by ion exchange chromatography from enzymic hydrolysis of yeast initiator tRNAMet without phosphatase treatment. PMID:2646591

  10. Adenosine transporters.

    PubMed

    Thorn, J A; Jarvis, S M

    1996-06-01

    1. In mammals, nucleoside transport is an important determinant of the pharmacokinetics, plasma and tissue concentration, disposition and in vivo biological activity of adenosine as well as nucleoside analogues used in antiviral and anticancer therapies. 2. Two broad types of adenosine transporter exist, facilitated-diffusion carriers and active processes driven by the transmembrane sodium gradient. 3. Facilitated-diffusion adenosine carriers may be sensitive (es) or insensitive (ei) to nanomolar concentrations of the transport inhibitor nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR). Dipyridamole, dilazep and lidoflazine analogues are also more potent inhibitors of the es carrier than the ei transporter in cells other than those derived from rat tissues. 4. The es transporter has a broad substrate specificity (apparent Km for adenosine approximately 25 microM in many cells at 25 degrees C), is a glycoprotein with an average apparent Mr of 57,000 in human erythrocytes that has been purified to near homogeneity and may exist in situ as a dimer. However, there is increasing evidence to suggest the presence of isoforms of the es transporter in different cells and species, based on kinetic and molecular properties. 5. The ei transporter also has a broad substrate specificity with a lower affinity for some nucleoside permeants than the es carrier, is genetically distinct from es but little information exists as to the molecular properties of the protein. 6. Sodium-dependent adenosine transport is present in many cell types and catalysed by four distinct systems, N1-N4, distinguished by substrate specificity, sodium coupling and tissue distribution. 7. Two genes have been identified which encode sodium-dependent adenosine transport proteins, SNST1 from the sodium/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) gene family and the rat intestinal N2 transporter (cNT1) from a novel gene family including a bacterial nucleoside carrier (NupC). Transcripts of cNT1, which encodes a 648-residue protein, are

  11. Nucleoside transporter expression and adenosine uptake in the rat cochlea.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul F; Thorne, Peter R; Muñoz, David J B; Wang, Carol J H; Housley, Gary D; Vlajkovic, Srdjan M

    2007-02-12

    Even though extracellular adenosine plays multiple roles in the cochlea, the mechanisms that control extracellular adenosine concentrations in this organ are unclear. This study investigated the expression of nucleoside transporters and adenosine uptake in the rat cochlea. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed the expression of mRNA transcripts for two equilibrative (ENT1 and ENT2) and two concentrative (CNT1 and CNT2) nucleoside transporters. Exogenous adenosine perfused through the cochlear perilymphatic compartment was taken up by cells lining the compartment. Adenosine uptake was sensitive to changes in extracellular Na concentrations and inhibited by nitrobenzylthioinosine (an adenosine uptake blocker). The study suggests that the bi-directional nucleoside transport supports the uptake and recycling of purines and regulates the activation of adenosine receptors by altering adenosine concentrations in cochlear fluid spaces. PMID:17314663

  12. Adenosine and Ischemic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bruce T.; Swierkosz, Tomasz A.; Herrmann, Howard C.; Kimmel, Stephen; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine is released in large amounts during myocardial ischemia and is capable of exerting potent cardioprotective effects in the heart. Although these observations on adenosine have been known for a long time, how adenosine acts to achieve its anti-ischemic effect remains incompletely understood. However, recent advances on the chemistry and pharmacology of adenosine receptor ligands have provided important and novel information on the function of adenosine receptor subtypes in the cardiovascular system. The development of model systems for the cardiac actions of adenosine has yielded important insights into its mechanism of action and have begun to elucidate the sequence of signalling events from receptor activation to the actual exertion of its cardioprotective effect. The present review will focus on the adenosine receptors that mediate the potent anti-ischemic effect of adenosine, new ligands at the receptors, potential molecular signalling mechanisms downstream of the receptor, mediators for cardioprotection, and possible clinical applications in cardiovascular disorders. PMID:10607860

  13. Adenosine and Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic organ that undergoes continuous remodeling whilst maintaining a balance between bone formation and resorption. Osteoblasts, which synthesize and mineralize new bone, and osteoclasts, the cells that resorb bone, act in concert to maintain bone homeostasis. In recent years, there has been increasing appreciation of purinergic regulation of bone metabolism. Adenosine, released locally, mediates its physiologic and pharmacologic actions via interactions with G-protein coupled receptors and recent work has indicated that these receptors are involved in the regulation of osteoclast differentiation and function, as well as osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Moreover, adenosine receptors also regulate chondrocyte and cartilage homeostasis. These recent findings underscore the potential therapeutic importance of adenosine receptors in regulating bone physiology and pathology. PMID:23499155

  14. Adenosine receptor interactions and anxiolytics.

    PubMed

    Bruns, R F; Katims, J J; Annau, Z; Snyder, S H; Daly, J W

    1983-12-01

    [3H]-N6-cyclohexyladenosine and [3H]-1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine label the A1 subtype of adenosine receptor in brain membranes. The affinities of methylxanthines in competing for A1 adenosine receptors parallel their potencies as locomotor stimulants. The adenosine agonist N6-(phenylisopropyl) adenosine is a potent locomotor depressant. Both diazepam and N6-(L-phenylisopropyl)adenosine cause locomotor stimulation in a narrow range of subdepressant doses. Combined stimulant doses of the two agents depress motor activity, as do larger doses of either one, given separately. Evidence supporting and against the hypothesis that some of the actions of benzodiazepines are mediated via the adenosine system is reviewed. A number of compounds interact with both systems, probably because of physico-chemical similarities between adenosine and diazepam. It is concluded that of the four classic actions of benzodiazepines, the sedative and muscle relaxant (but not anxiolytic or anticonvulsant) actions could possibly be mediated by adenosine. PMID:6199685

  15. Adenosine in fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Edwin S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous autocoid that regulates a multitude of bodily functions. Its anti-inflammatory actions are well known to rheumatologists since it mediates many of the anti-inflammatory effects of a number of antirheumatic drugs such as methotrexate. However, inflammatory and tissue regenerative responses are intricately linked, with wound healing being a prime example. It has only recently been appreciated that adenosine has a key role in tissue regenerative and fibrotic processes. An understanding of these processes may shed new light on potential therapeutic options in diseases such as scleroderma where tissue fibrosis features prominently. PMID:19949965

  16. Adenosine and sleep

    SciTech Connect

    Yanik, G.M. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Behavioral and biochemical approaches have been used to determine the relative contribution of endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors to the sleep-wake cycle in the rat. Adenosine concentrations in specific areas of the rat brain were not affected by 24 hours of total sleep deprivation, or by 24 or 48 hours of REM sleep deprivation. In order to assess the effect of REM sleep deprivation on adenosine A/sub 1/ receptors, /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding was measured. The Bmax values for /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding to membrane preparations of the cortices and corpus striata from 48 hour REM sleep-deprived animals were increased 14.8% and 23%, respectively. These increases were not maintained following the cessation of sleep deprivation and recovered within 2 hours. The results of a 96 hour REM deprivation experiment were similar to those of the 48 hour REM sleep deprivation experiment. However, these increases were not evident in similar structures taken from stress control animals, and conclusively demonstrated that the changes in /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding resulted from REM sleep deprivation and not from stress.

  17. Adenosine kinase inhibitors attenuate opiate withdrawal via adenosine receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Coyle, T S

    1998-11-27

    Previous studies have demonstrated a role for adenosine in mediating opiate effects. This study examines the effects of indirect activation of adenosine receptors, via treatment with adenosine kinase inhibitors, on the expression of opiate withdrawal in mice. Mice receive chronic morphine treatment via implantation of subcutaneous morphine pellets (75 mg) for 72 h. Mice then receive parenteral treatment with adenosine kinase inhibitors, either 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine (2, 5, 20, 40 mg/kg, intraperitoneal or i.p.) or iodotubericidin (1, 2, 5 mg/kg, i.p.), followed by naloxone injection and opiate withdrawal signs are measured over 20 min. Both adenosine kinase inhibitors significantly reduce the following opiate withdrawal signs in a dose-dependent manner compared to vehicle: withdrawal jumps, teeth chattering, forepaw tremors, and forepaw treads. Additionally, 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine significantly reduces withdrawal-induced diarrhea and weight loss. Effects of 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine (40 mg/kg) on opiate withdrawal signs appear to be mediated via adenosine receptor activation as they are reversed by pretreatment by adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine (20 mg, i.p.) but not by selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor Ro 20-1724 (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Adenosine receptor activation via adenosine kinase inhibitor treatment attenuates opiate withdrawal and these agents may be generally useful in the treatment of drug withdrawal syndromes. PMID:9865523

  18. Adenosine receptor desensitization and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart; Kelly, Eamonn

    2011-05-01

    As with the majority of G-protein-coupled receptors, all four of the adenosine receptor subtypes are known to undergo agonist-induced regulation in the form of desensitization and trafficking. These processes can limit the ability of adenosine receptors to couple to intracellular signalling pathways and thus reduce the ability of adenosine receptor agonists as well as endogenous adenosine to produce cellular responses. In addition, since adenosine receptors couple to multiple signalling pathways, these pathways may desensitize differentially, while the desensitization of one pathway could even trigger signalling via another. Thus, the overall picture of adenosine receptor regulation can be complex. For all adenosine receptor subtypes, there is evidence to implicate arrestins in agonist-induced desensitization and trafficking, but there is also evidence for other possible forms of regulation, including second messenger-dependent kinase regulation, heterologous effects involving G proteins, and the involvement of non-clathrin trafficking pathways such as caveolae. In this review, the evidence implicating these mechanisms is summarized for each adenosine receptor subtype, and we also discuss those issues of adenosine receptor regulation that remain to be resolved as well as likely directions for future research in this field. PMID:20550943

  19. Glaucocalyxin A inhibits the growth of liver cancer Focus and SMMC-7721 cells

    PubMed Central

    TANG, LISHA; JIN, XIAOFENG; HU, XIAOHUI; HU, XIAODING; LIU, ZULONG; YU, LONG

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most common types of cancer, and hepatoma demonstrates a poor long-term prognosis. The present study reports that glaucocalyxin A (GLA), a natural product isolated from Rabdosia umbrosa, inhibits the growth of the liver cancer Focus and SMMC-7721 cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The present study revealed that GLA arrested the liver cancer cells at the G2/M stage of the cell cycle and led to decreased expression of caspase 3 and the cleavage of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase. Overall, the present study demonstrated that GLA inhibits the growth of liver cancer cells by G2/M stage cell-cycle arrest and cell apoptosis. PMID:26893714

  20. New Strategies for Multimodality Therapy in Treating Locally Advanced Cervix Cancer.

    PubMed

    Verma, Jonathan; Monk, Bradley J; Wolfson, Aaron H

    2016-10-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer of women worldwide. In the developing world, it comprises 12% of all cancers of women. Since 1999, the mainstay of treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) has been concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiation. However, outcomes in this disease remain suboptimal, with long-term progression-free survival and overall survival rates of approximately 60%. There are several new strategies of combined modality treatment under evaluation in LACC, including chemotherapy before and after treatment as well as novel agents such as poly-adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase inhibitors, antiangiogenic blockage, and immunotherapy. We provide a brief overview of these strategies and their potential in the treatment of women with LACC. PMID:27619255

  1. Biosensor reveals multiple sources for mitochondrial NAD⁺.

    PubMed

    Cambronne, Xiaolu A; Stewart, Melissa L; Kim, DongHo; Jones-Brunette, Amber M; Morgan, Rory K; Farrens, David L; Cohen, Michael S; Goodman, Richard H

    2016-06-17

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is an essential substrate for sirtuins and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerases (PARPs), which are NAD(+)-consuming enzymes localized in the nucleus, cytosol, and mitochondria. Fluctuations in NAD(+) concentrations within these subcellular compartments are thought to regulate the activity of NAD(+)-consuming enzymes; however, the challenge in measuring compartmentalized NAD(+) in cells has precluded direct evidence for this type of regulation. We describe the development of a genetically encoded fluorescent biosensor for directly monitoring free NAD(+) concentrations in subcellular compartments. We found that the concentrations of free NAD(+) in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and mitochondria approximate the Michaelis constants for sirtuins and PARPs in their respective compartments. Systematic depletion of enzymes that catalyze the final step of NAD(+) biosynthesis revealed cell-specific mechanisms for maintaining mitochondrial NAD(+) concentrations. PMID:27313049

  2. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) deficiency is a disorder characterized by abnormal ...

  3. [Adenosine and its role in physiology].

    PubMed

    Novotný, J

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is not just a major component of adenine nucleotides and ribonucleic acids, but also has its own signaling functions. ExtraceIlular level of adenosine in an organism is strictly maintained through the balance between its formation, degradation and transport. Adenosine is formed by enzymatic degradation of adenosine triphosphate and eliminated by phosphorylation to adenosine monophosphate or by deamination to inosine. Transport of adenosine across the cell membrane is ensured by equilibrative and concentrative nucleoside transporters. All these processes participate in maintenance of adenosine level under normal conditions, but a balanced equilibrium can be disrupted in some pathophysiological situations. Extracellular adenosine as a signaling molecule binds to adenosine receptors, which may trigger via their cognate trimeric G proteins different signaling pathways. In this way, adenosine regulates energy homeostasis and affects the function of various organs. Targeted pharmacological manipulations of specific adenosine receptor subtypes or enzymes involved in its metabolism can potentially be used for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26738245

  4. Purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, G C; Schmalstieg, F C; Trimmer, K B; Goldman, A S; Goldblum, R M

    1976-01-01

    Purine and pyrimidine metabolites were measured in erythrocytes, plasma, and urine of a 5-month-old infant with adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) deficiency. Adenosine and adenine were measured using newly devised ion exchange separation techniques and a sensitive fluorescence assay. Plasma adenosine levels were increased, whereas adenosine was normal in erythrocytes and not detectable in urine. Increased amounts of adenine were found in erythrocytes and urine as well as in the plasma. Erythrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate concentrations were normal, but adenosine triphosphate content was greatly elevated. Because of the possibility of pyrimidine starvation, pyrimidine nucleotides (pyrimidine coenzymes) in erythrocytes and orotic acid in urine were measured. Pyrimidine nucleotide concentrations were normal, while orotic acid was not detected. These studies suggest that the immune deficiency associated with adenosine deaminase deficiency may be related to increased amounts of adenine, adenosine, or adenine nucleotides. PMID:1066699

  5. Adenosine-Associated Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi; Ghanem, Amyl; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside in every cell. Many critical treatments such as modulating irregular heartbeat (arrhythmias), regulation of central nervous system (CNS) activity, and inhibiting seizural episodes can be carried out using adenosine. Despite the significant potential therapeutic impact of adenosine and its derivatives, the severe side effects caused by their systemic administration have significantly limited their clinical use. In addition, due to adenosine’s extremely short half-life in human blood (less than 10 s), there is an unmet need for sustained delivery systems to enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. In this paper, various adenosine delivery techniques, including encapsulation into biodegradable polymers, cell-based delivery, implantable biomaterials, and mechanical-based delivery systems, are critically reviewed and the existing challenges are highlighted. PMID:26453156

  6. Extracellular guanosine regulates extracellular adenosine levels

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dongmei; Jackson, Travis C.; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Gillespie, Delbert G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that extracellular guanosine regulates extracellular adenosine levels. Rat preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cells were incubated with adenosine, guanosine, or both. Guanosine (30 μmol/l) per se had little effect on extracellular adenosine levels. Extracellular adenosine levels 1 h after addition of adenosine (3 μmol/l) were 0.125 ± 0.020 μmol/l, indicating rapid disposition of extracellular adenosine. Extracellular adenosine levels 1 h after addition of adenosine (3 μmol/l) plus guanosine (30 μmol/l) were 1.173 ± 0.061 μmol/l, indicating slow disposition of extracellular adenosine. Cell injury increased extracellular levels of endogenous adenosine and guanosine, and the effects of cell injury on endogenous extracellular adenosine were modulated by altering the levels of endogenous extracellular guanosine with exogenous purine nucleoside phosphorylase (converts guanosine to guanine) or 8-aminoguanosine (inhibits purine nucleoside phosphorylase). Extracellular guanosine also slowed the disposition of extracellular adenosine in rat preglomerular vascular endothelial cells, mesangial cells, cardiac fibroblasts, and kidney epithelial cells and in human aortic and coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells and coronary artery endothelial cells. The effects of guanosine on adenosine levels were not mimicked or attenuated by 5-iodotubericidin (adenosine kinase inhibitor), erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (adenosine deaminase inhibitor), 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide (guanine deaminase inhibitor), aristeromycin (S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitor), low sodium (inhibits concentrative nucleoside transporters), S-(4-nitrobenzyl)−6-thioinosine [inhibits equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) type 1], zidovudine (inhibits ENT type 2), or acadesine (known modulator of adenosine levels). Guanosine also increases extracellular inosine, uridine, thymidine, and cytidine, yet decreases

  7. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency adenosine ...

  8. AMID Mediates Adenosine-Induced Caspase-Independent HuH-7 Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongqin; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Nagata, Tetsu; Gotoh, Akinobu; Dovat, Sinisa; Song, Chunhua; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: The mechanism underlying extracellular adenosine-induced caspase-independent apoptosis in HuH-7 human hepatoma cells is not fully understood. The present study investigated the role for apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death (AMID) in the pathway. Methods: To see the implication of AMID in adenosine-induced HuH-7 cell apoptosis, real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescent cytochemistry, time-laps GFP monitoring, cell cycle analysis, flow cytometry, Western blotting, cell viability assay, and TUNEL staining were carried out. Results: Adenosine upregulated AMID expression in HuH-7 cells, and translocated AMID from the cytosol into the nucleus. Adenosine induced HuH-7 cell apoptosis, and the effect was further enhanced by overexpressing AMID. Adenosine-induced HuH-7 cell apoptosis, alternatively, was inhibited by knocking-down AMID. Conclusion: The results of the present study provide evidence for AMID as a critical factor for adenosine-induced caspase-independent HuH-7 cell apoptosis. PMID:21325820

  9. Adenosine Receptors and Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Lasley, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine receptors are a member of the large family of seven transmembrane spanning G protein coupled receptors (GPCR). The four adenosine receptor subtypes – A1, A2a, A2b, A3 – exert their effects via the activation of one or more heterotrimeric G proteins resulting in the modulation of intracellular signaling. Numerous studies over the past decade have documented the complexity of GPCR signaling at the level of protein-protein interactions as well as through signaling crosstalk. With respect to adenosine receptors the activation of one receptor subtype can have profound direct effects in one cell type, but little or no effect in other cells. There is significant evidence that the compartmentation of subcellular signaling plays a physiological role in the fidelity of GPCR signaling. This compartmentation is evident at the level of the plasma membrane in the form of membrane microdomains such as caveolae and lipid rafts. This review will summarize and critically assess our current understanding of the role of membrane microdomains in regulating adenosine receptor signaling. PMID:20888790

  10. Xanthines as Adenosine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    The natural plant alkaloids caffeine and theophylline were the first adenosine receptor (AR) antagonists described in the literature. They exhibit micromolar affinities and are non-selective. A large number of derivatives and analogs have subsequently been synthesized and evaluated as AR antagonists. Very potent antagonists have thus been developed with selectivity for each of the four AR subtypes. PMID:20859796

  11. Regulation of adenosine levels during cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Stephanie; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Dali; Soylu, Hanifi; Sun, Chao; Albensi, Benedict C; Parkinson, Fiona E

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine is a neuromodulator with its level increasing up to 100-fold during ischemic events, and attenuates the excitotoxic neuronal injury. Adenosine is produced both intracellularly and extracellularly, and nucleoside transport proteins transfer adenosine across plasma membranes. Adenosine levels and receptor-mediated effects of adenosine are regulated by intracellular ATP consumption, cellular release of ATP, metabolism of extracellular ATP (and other adenine nucleotides), adenosine influx, adenosine efflux and adenosine metabolism. Recent studies have used genetically modified mice to investigate the relative contributions of intra- and extracellular pathways for adenosine formation. The importance of cortical or hippocampal neurons as a source or a sink of adenosine under basal and hypoxic/ischemic conditions was addressed through the use of transgenic mice expressing human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) under the control of a promoter for neuron-specific enolase. From these studies, we conclude that ATP consumption within neurons is the primary source of adenosine in neuronal cultures, but not in hippocampal slices or in vivo mice exposed to ischemic conditions. PMID:23064722

  12. T7-RNA Polymerase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    T7-RNA Polymerase grown on STS-81. Structure-Function Relationships of RNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is the key enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of RNA, a process known as transcription. Principal Investigator's include Dr. Dan Carter, Dr. B.C. Wang, and Dr. John Rose of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  13. Fluorescent Ligands for Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, Eszter; Jayasekara, P Suresh; Squarcialupi, Lucia; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Federico, Stephanie; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Interest is increasing in developing fluorescent ligands for characterization of adenosine receptors (ARs), which hold a promise of usefulness in the drug discovery process. The size of a strategically labeled AR ligand can be greatly increased after the attachment of a fluorophore. The choice of dye moiety (e.g. Alexa Fluor 488), attachment point and linker length can alter the selectivity and potency of the parent molecule. Fluorescent derivatives of adenosine agonists and antagonists (e.g. XAC and other heterocyclic antagonist scaffolds) have been synthesized and characterized pharmacologically. Some are useful AR probes for flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and scanning confocal microscopy. Thus, the approach of fluorescent labeled GPCR ligands, including those for ARs, is a growing dynamic research field. PMID:23200243

  14. Adenosine-induced activation of esophageal nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Ru, F; Surdenikova, L; Brozmanova, M; Kollarik, M

    2011-03-01

    Clinical studies implicate adenosine acting on esophageal nociceptive pathways in the pathogenesis of noncardiac chest pain originating from the esophagus. However, the effect of adenosine on esophageal afferent nerve subtypes is incompletely understood. We addressed the hypothesis that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Whole cell perforated patch-clamp recordings and single-cell RT-PCR analysis were performed on the primary afferent neurons retrogradely labeled from the esophagus in the guinea pig. Extracellular recordings were made from the isolated innervated esophagus. In patch-clamp studies, adenosine evoked activation (inward current) in a majority of putative nociceptive (capsaicin-sensitive) vagal nodose, vagal jugular, and spinal dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons innervating the esophagus. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis indicated that the majority of the putative nociceptive (transient receptor potential V1-positive) neurons innervating the esophagus express the adenosine receptors. The neural crest-derived (spinal DRG and vagal jugular) esophageal nociceptors expressed predominantly the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes-derived vagal nodose nociceptors expressed the adenosine A(1) and/or A(2A) receptors. Consistent with the studies in the cell bodies, adenosine evoked activation (overt action potential discharge) in esophageal nociceptive nerve terminals. Furthermore, the neural crest-derived jugular nociceptors were activated by the selective A(1) receptor agonist CCPA, and the placodes-derived nodose nociceptors were activated by CCPA and/or the selective adenosine A(2A) receptor CGS-21680. In contrast to esophageal nociceptors, adenosine failed to stimulate the vagal esophageal low-threshold (tension) mechanosensors. We conclude that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Our data indicate that the esophageal neural crest-derived nociceptors can be activated via the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes

  15. DNA polymerases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sabine S.; Takata, Kei-ichi; Wood, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    There are fifteen different DNA polymerases encoded in mammalian genomes, which are specialized for replication, repair or the tolerance of DNA damage. New evidence is emerging for lesion-specific and tissue-specific functions of DNA polymerases. Many point mutations that occur in cancer cells arise from the error-generating activities of DNA polymerases. However, the ability of some of these enzymes to bypass DNA damage may actually defend against chromosome instability in cells and at least one DNA polymerase, POLζ, is a suppressor of spontaneous tumorigenesis. Because DNA polymerases can help cancer cells tolerate DNA damage, some of these enzymes may be viable targets for therapeutic strategies. PMID:21258395

  16. Adenosine modulates hypoxia-induced responses in rat PC12 cells via the A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Conforti, L; Pun, R Y; Millhorn, D E

    1998-04-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to determine the role of adenosine in mediating the cellular responses to hypoxia in rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells, an oxygen-sensitive clonal cell line. 2. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that PC12 cells express adenosine deaminase (the first catalysing enzyme of adenosine degradation) and the A2A and A2B adenosine receptors, but not the A1 or A3 adenosine receptors. 3. Whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp experiments showed that adenosine attenuated the hypoxia-induced membrane depolarization. The hypoxia-induced suppression of the voltage-sensitive potassium current (IK(V)) was markedly reduced by adenosine. Furthermore, extracellularly applied adenosine increased the peak amplitudes of IK(V) in a concentration-dependent manner. This increase was blocked by pretreatment not only with a non-specific adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT), but also with a selective A2A receptor antagonist, ZM241385. 4. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester (fura-2 AM) revealed that the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ during hypoxic exposure was attenuated significantly by adenosine. Voltage-clamp studies showed that adenosine inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents (ICa) in a concentration-dependent fashion. This inhibition was also abolished by both 8-PT and ZM241385. 5. The modulation of both IK(V) and ICa by adenosine was prevented by intracellular application of an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), PKA inhibitor fragment (6-22) amide. In addition, the effect of adenosine on either IK(V) or ICa was absent in PKA-deficient PC12 cells. 6. These results indicate that the modulatory effects of adenosine on the hypoxia-induced membrane responses of PC12 cells are likely to be mediated via activation of the A2A receptor, and that the PKA pathway is required for these modulatory actions. We propose that this modulation serves to regulate membrane excitability in

  17. Adenosine modulates hypoxia-induced responses in rat PC12 cells via the A2A receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shuichi; Conforti, Laura; Pun, Raymund Y K; Millhorn, David E

    1998-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the role of adenosine in mediating the cellular responses to hypoxia in rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells, an oxygen-sensitive clonal cell line. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that PC12 cells express adenosine deaminase (the first catalysing enzyme of adenosine degradation) and the A2A and A2B adenosine receptors, but not the A1 or A3 adenosine receptors. Whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp experiments showed that adenosine attenuated the hypoxia-induced membrane depolarization. The hypoxia-induced suppression of the voltage-sensitive potassium current (IK(V)) was markedly reduced by adenosine. Furthermore, extracellularly applied adenosine increased the peak amplitudes of IK(V) in a concentration-dependent manner. This increase was blocked by pretreatment not only with a non-specific adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT), but also with a selective A2A receptor antagonist, ZM241385. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester (fura-2 AM) revealed that the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ during hypoxic exposure was attenuated significantly by adenosine. Voltage-clamp studies showed that adenosine inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents (ICa) in a concentration-dependent fashion. This inhibition was also abolished by both 8-PT and ZM241385. The modulation of both IK(V) and ICa by adenosine was prevented by intracellular application of an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), PKA inhibitor fragment (6–22) amide. In addition, the effect of adenosine on either IK(V) or ICa was absent in PKA-deficient PC12 cells. These results indicate that the modulatory effects of adenosine on the hypoxia-induced membrane responses of PC12 cells are likely to be mediated via activation of the A2A receptor, and that the PKA pathway is required for these modulatory actions. We propose that this modulation serves to regulate membrane excitability in PC12 cells and

  18. Transport mechanisms for adenosine and uridine in primary-cultured rat cortical neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Katsuhito; Nagasawa, Kazuki; Fujimoto, Sadaki

    2005-09-01

    Endogenous adenosine and uridine are important modulators of neural survival and activity. In the present study, we examined transport mechanisms of adenosine and uridine in primary-cultured rat cortical neurons, and compared the results for neurons with those for astrocytes. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction identified the mRNAs for ENT1, ENT2, and CNT2, but not CNT1 and CNT3, in neurons and astrocytes. [3H]Adenosine and [3H]uridine were time-, temperature-, and concentration-dependently taken up into neurons and astrocytes. In kinetic analyses, the uptake of both substrates by neurons and astrocytes consisted of two and one, respectively, saturable transport components. The uptake clearance for both substrates by neurons was greater than that by astrocytes. The relative contribution of the high-affinity major component of both substrates to total uptake was estimated to be approximately 80% in neurons. The uptake of [3H]adenosine and [3H]uridine by both neurons and astrocytes was almost entirely Na+-independent, and sensitive to micro, but not nano, molar concentrations of nitrobenzylmercaptopurine riboside, which are transport characteristics of ENT2. Therefore, it was indicated that adenosine and uridine are more efficiently taken up into neurons than into astrocytes, and ENT2 may predominantly contribute to the transport of the nucleosides as a high-affinity transport system in neurons, as in the case of astrocytes. PMID:16043124

  19. Repeated Electroacupuncture Persistently Elevates Adenosine and Ameliorates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tian-shen; Du, Zhong-heng; Li, Zhi-hui; Xie, Wen-xia; Huang, Ka-te; Chen, Yong; Chen, Zhou-yang; Hu, Huan; Wang, Jun-lu; Fang, Jian-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the effect of repeated electroacupuncture (EA) over 21 days on the adenosine concentration in peripheral blood of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Wistar rats were divided into three groups of 6 animals each: sham-control, CIA-control, and CIA-EA. We determined the adenosine concentration in peripheral blood and assessed pathological changes of ankle joints. Quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine mRNA levels of ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73), adenosine deaminase (ADA), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect expression of ADA and CD73 in synovial tissue. Repeated EA treatment on CIA resulted in the persistence of high concentrations of adenosine in peripheral blood, significantly reduced pathological scores, TNF-α mRNA concentrations, and synovial hyperplasia. Importantly, EA treatment led to a significant increase in CD73 mRNA levels in peripheral blood but was associated with a decrease of CD73 immunostaining in synovial tissue. In addition, EA treatment resulted in a significant decrease of both ADA mRNA levels in peripheral blood and ADA immunostaining in synovial tissue. Thus, repeated EA treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effect on CIA by increasing the concentration of adenosine. The mechanism of EA action may involve the modulation of CD73 and ADA expression levels. PMID:26941824

  20. Pyrimidine starvation induced by adenosine in fibroblasts and lymphoid cells: role of adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Green, H; Chan, T

    1973-11-23

    In the presence of 10(-4) to 10(-5) molar adenosine, established cell lines of fibroblastic or lymphoid origin die of pyrimidine starvation. Less than lethal concentrations inhibit cell growth. Over a broad concentration range, the effects of adenosine are prevented by providing a suitable pyrimidine source. We suggest that the recently described immune deficiency disease associated with absence of adenosine deaminase may be the result of pyrimidine starvation induced by adenosine nucleotides in cells of the lymphoid system. PMID:4795749

  1. Elevated Ecto-5’-nucleotidase-Mediated Increased Renal Adenosine Signaling Via A2B Adenosine Receptor Contributes to Chronic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiru; Zhang, Yujin; Wang, Wei; Dai, Yingbo; Ning, Chen; Luo, Renna; Sun, Kaiqi; Glover, Louise; Grenz, Almut; Sun, Hong; Tao, Lijian; Zhang, Wenzheng; Colgan, Sean P.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Xia, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Hypertension is the most prevalent life-threatening disease worldwide and is frequently associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the molecular basis underlying hypertensive CKD is not fully understood. Objective We sought to identify specific factors and signaling pathways that contribute to hypertensive CKD and thereby exacerbate disease progression. Methods and Results Using high-throughput quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction profiling, we discovered that the expression level of 5′-ectonucleotidase (CD73), a key enzyme that produces extracellular adenosine, was significantly increased in the kidneys of angiotensin II–infused mice, an animal model of hypertensive nephropathy. Genetic and pharmacological studies in mice revealed that elevated CD73-mediated excess renal adenosine preferentially induced A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) production and that enhanced kidney ADORA2B signaling contributes to angiotensin II–induced hypertension. Similarly, in humans, we found that CD73 and ADORA2B levels were significantly elevated in the kidneys of CKD patients compared with normal individuals and were further elevated in hypertensive CKD patients. These findings led us to further discover that elevated renal CD73 contributes to excess adenosine signaling via ADORA2B activation that directly stimulates endothelin-1 production in a hypoxia-inducible factor-α–dependent manner and underlies the pathogenesis of the disease. Finally, we revealed that hypoxia-inducible factor-α is an important factor responsible for angiotensin II–induced CD73 and ADORA2B expression at the transcriptional level. Conclusions Overall, our studies reveal that angiotensin II–induced renal CD73 promotes the production of renal adenosine that is a prominent driver of hypertensive CKD by enhanced ADORA2B signaling–mediated endothelin-1 induction in a hypoxia-inducible factor-α–dependent manner. The inhibition of excess adenosine

  2. Partial separation of platelet and placental adenosine receptors from adenosine A2-like binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnierowicz, S.; Work, C.; Hutchison, K.; Fox, I.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The ubiquitous adenosine A2-like binding protein obscures the binding properties of adenosine receptors assayed with 5'-N-({sup 3}H)ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). To solve this problem, we developed a rapid and simple method to separate adenosine receptors from the adenosine A2-like binding protein. Human platelet and placental membranes were solubilized with 1% 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate. The soluble platelet extract was precipitated with polyethylene glycol and the fraction enriched in adenosine receptors was isolated from the precipitate by differential centrifugation. The adenosine A2-like binding protein was removed from the soluble placental extract with hydroxylapatite and adenosine receptors were precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The specificity of the ({sup 3}H)NECA binding is typical of an adenosine A2 receptor for platelets and an adenosine A1 receptor for placenta. This method leads to enrichment of adenosine A2 receptors for platelets and adenosine A1 receptors for placenta. This provides a useful preparation technique for pharmacologic studies of adenosine receptors.

  3. Eukaryotic TLS polymerases.

    PubMed

    Tomczyk, Przemysław; Synowiec, Ewelina; Wysokiński, Daniel; Woźniak, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    TLS polymerases are able to replicate damaged DNA (called translesion DNA synthesis, TLS). Their presence prevents cell death as a result of violating the integrity of the genome. In vitro, they are mutator, but in vivo are recruited by specific types of DNA damage and usually replicate them in a correct manner. The best-known TLS polymerases belong to the Y family, such as Rev1, κ, η, ι, and polymerase ζ from the B family. There are two mechanisms of TLS polymerases action: polymerase-switching model and the gap-filling model. Selection of the mechanism primarily depends on the phase of the cell cycle. The regulation of these polymerases may take place at the transcriptional level and at level of recruitment to the sites of DNA damage. In the latter case post-translational modification of proteins - ubiquitination and sumoylation, and protein-protein interactions are crucial. PMID:27333922

  4. Inhibition of ribonucleic acid polymerase by a bacteriocin from Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Mossie, K G; Robb, F T; Jones, D T; Woods, D R

    1981-01-01

    The Bacteroides fragilis bacteriocin which inhibits ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase activity had a narrow activity spectrum in vivo and only inhibited the growth of certain B. fragilis strains. In vitro the bacteriocin was not specific and inhibited RNA polymerases from widely diverse bacterial genera. RNA polymerases from rifampin-resistant strains of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Clostridium acetobutylicum were resistant to the bacteriocin in vitro. Purified bacteriocin bound to partially purified RNA polymerase, and both proteins were cosedimented in a glycerol gradient. In the RNA polymerase reaction, the bacteriocin acted as a competitive inhibitor for adenosine, cytidine, and uridine 5'-triphosphates and as a noncompetitive inhibitor for guanosine 5'-triphosphate. The bacteriocin did not inhibit RNA polymerase from chicken embryos. PMID:6177280

  5. Effects of adenosine on intrarenal oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Dinour, D; Brezis, M

    1991-11-01

    Although generally a vasodilator, adenosine vasoconstricts cortical vessels in the kidney, reduces glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and increases medullary blood flow, effects likely to improve the medullary O2 deficiency characteristic of mammalian kidneys. To evaluate a possible role of adenosine in medullary O2 balance, we investigated the effect of adenosine upon cortical and medullary tissue PO2. Adenosine was infused into renal interstitium through chronically implanted capsules. Cortical and medullary PO2 were measured using sensitive Clark-type O2 microelectrodes inserted into kidneys of anesthetized rats at the respective depths of 1.8 and 3.7 mm. Infusion of adenosine (0.1-0.5 mumol/min) increased medullary PO2 from 17 +/- 3 (SE) to 40 +/- 5 mmHG (P less than 0.001) and decreased cortical PO2 from 64 +/- 4 to 47 +/- 3 mmHg (P less than 0.001). After the infusion was stopped, PO2 returned to baseline at both sites. Coadministration of adenosine receptor antagonist 8-phenyltheophylline (0.01 mumol/min) prevented both cortical and medullary effects of adenosine. We concluded that adenosine could play an important protective and regulatory role in renal medullary O2 balance. PMID:1951710

  6. Adenosine Neuromodulation and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lusardi, T.A

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule, with widespread activity across all organ systems. There is evidence that adenosine regulation is a significant factor in traumatic brain injury (TBI) onset, recovery, and outcome, and a growing body of experimental work examining the therapeutic potential of adenosine neuromodulation in the treatment of TBI. In the central nervous system (CNS), adenosine (dys)regulation has been demonstrated following TBI, and correlated to several TBI pathologies, including impaired cerebral hemodynamics, anaerobic metabolism, and inflammation. In addition to acute pathologies, adenosine function has been implicated in TBI comorbidities, such as cognitive deficits, psychiatric function, and post-traumatic epilepsy. This review presents studies in TBI as well as adenosine-related mechanisms in co-morbidities of and unfavorable outcomes resulting from TBI. While the exact role of the adenosine system following TBI remains unclear, there is increasing evidence that a thorough understanding of adenosine signaling will be critical to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for the treatment of TBI. PMID:20190964

  7. Enzymatic regeneration of adenosine triphosphate cofactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Regenerating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by enzymatic process which utilizes carbamyl phosphate as phosphoryl donor is technique used to regenerate expensive cofactors. Process allows complex enzymatic reactions to be considered as candidates for large-scale continuous processes.

  8. Halobacterial adenosine triphosphatases and the adenosine triphosphatase from Halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, Hordur; Sadler, Martha H.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared from various members of the genus Halobacterium contained a Triton X-l00 activated adenosine triphosphatase. The enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum was unstable in solutions of low ionic strength and maximally active in the presence of 3.5 M NaCl. A variety of nucleotide triphosphates was hydrolyzed. MgADP, the product of ATP hydrolysis, was not hydrolyzed and was a competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum was composed of at least 2 and possibly 4 subunits. The 83-kDa and 60-kDa subunits represented about 90 percent of total protein. The 60-kDa subunit reacted with dicyclohexyl-carbodiimide when inhibition was carried out in an acidic medium. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum, possesses properties of an F(1)F(0) as well as an E(1)E(2) ATPase.

  9. Lack of effect of adenosine on the function of rodent osteoblasts and osteoclasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hajjawi, Mark O R; Patel, Jessal J; Corcelli, Michelangelo; Arnett, Timothy R; Orriss, Isabel R

    2016-06-01

    Extracellular ATP, signalling through P2 receptors, exerts well-documented effects on bone cells, inhibiting mineral deposition by osteoblasts and stimulating the formation and resorptive activity of osteoclasts. The aims of this study were to determine the potential osteotropic effects of adenosine, the hydrolysis product of ATP, on primary bone cells in vitro. We determined the effect of exogenous adenosine on (1) the growth, alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) activity and bone-forming ability of osteoblasts derived from the calvariae of neonatal rats and mice and the marrow of juvenile rats and (2) the formation and resorptive activity of osteoclasts from juvenile mouse marrow. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed marked differences in the expression of P1 receptors in osteoblasts from different sources. Whilst mRNA for the A1 and A2B receptors was expressed by all primary osteoblasts, A2A receptor expression was limited to rat bone marrow and mouse calvarial osteoblasts and the A3 receptor to rat bone marrow osteoblasts. We found that adenosine had no detectable effects on cell growth, TNAP activity or bone formation by rodent osteoblasts in vitro. The analogue 2-chloroadenosine, which is hydrolysed more slowly than adenosine, had no effects on rat or mouse calvarial osteoblasts but increased TNAP activity and bone formation by rat bone marrow osteoblasts by 30-50 % at a concentration of 1 μM. Osteoclasts were found to express the A2A, A2B and A3 receptors; however, neither adenosine (≤100 μM) nor 2-chloroadenosine (≤10 μM) had any effect on the formation or resorptive activity of mouse osteoclasts in vitro. These results suggest that adenosine, unlike ATP, is not a major signalling molecule in the bone. PMID:26861849

  10. Cloning and expression of an A1 adenosine receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; McVittie, L.D.; Smyk-Randall, E.M.; Nakata, H.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Gerfen, C.R.; Sibley, D.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction technique to selectively amplify guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor cDNA sequences from rat striatal mRNA, using sets of highly degenerate primers derived from transmembrane sequences of previously cloned G protein-coupled receptors. A novel cDNA fragment was identified, which exhibits considerable homology to various members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This fragment was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a rat striatal library. A 2.2-kilobase clone was obtained that encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with seven transmembrane domains, as predicted by hydropathy analysis. Stably transfected mouse A9-L cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells that expressed mRNA for this clone were screened with putative receptor ligands. Saturable and specific binding sites for the A1 adenosine antagonist (3H)-1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine were identified on membranes from transfected cells. The rank order of potency and affinities of various adenosine agonist and antagonist ligands confirmed the identity of this cDNA clone as an A1 adenosine receptor. The high affinity binding of A1 adenosine agonists was shown to be sensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanylyl-5{prime}-imidodiphosphate. In adenylyl cyclase assays, adenosine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production by greater than 50%, in a pharmacologically specific fashion. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses of receptor mRNA in brain tissues revealed two transcripts of 5.6 and 3.1 kilobases, both of which were abundant in cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and thalamus, with lower levels in olfactory bulb, striatum, mesencephalon, and retina. These regional distribution data are in good agreement with previous receptor autoradiographic studies involving the A1 adenosine receptor.

  11. Optical Aptasensors for Adenosine Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Stella; Lim, Hui Si; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids are among the most researched and applied biomolecules. Their diverse two- and three-dimensional structures in conjunction with their robust chemistry and ease of manipulation provide a rare opportunity for sensor applications. Moreover, their high biocompatibility has seen them being used in the construction of in vivo assays. Various nucleic acid-based devices have been extensively studied as either the principal element in discrete molecule-like sensors or as the main component in the fabrication of sensing devices. The use of aptamers in sensors - aptasensors, in particular, has led to improvements in sensitivity, selectivity, and multiplexing capacity for a wide verity of analytes like proteins, nucleic acids, as well as small biomolecules such as glucose and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This article reviews the progress in the use of aptamers as the principal component in sensors for optical detection of ATP with an emphasis on sensing mechanism, performance, and applications with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. PMID:27446501

  12. Adenosine Kinase: Exploitation for Therapeutic Gain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine kinase (ADK; EC 2.7.1.20) is an evolutionarily conserved phosphotransferase that converts the purine ribonucleoside adenosine into 5′-adenosine-monophosphate. This enzymatic reaction plays a fundamental role in determining the tone of adenosine, which fulfills essential functions as a homeostatic and metabolic regulator in all living systems. Adenosine not only activates specific signaling pathways by activation of four types of adenosine receptors but it is also a primordial metabolite and regulator of biochemical enzyme reactions that couple to bioenergetic and epigenetic functions. By regulating adenosine, ADK can thus be identified as an upstream regulator of complex homeostatic and metabolic networks. Not surprisingly, ADK dysfunction is involved in several pathologies, including diabetes, epilepsy, and cancer. Consequently, ADK emerges as a rational therapeutic target, and adenosine-regulating drugs have been tested extensively. In recent attempts to improve specificity of treatment, localized therapies have been developed to augment adenosine signaling at sites of injury or pathology; those approaches include transplantation of stem cells with deletions of ADK or the use of gene therapy vectors to downregulate ADK expression. More recently, the first human mutations in ADK have been described, and novel findings suggest an unexpected role of ADK in a wider range of pathologies. ADK-regulating strategies thus represent innovative therapeutic opportunities to reconstruct network homeostasis in a multitude of conditions. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the genetics, biochemistry, and pharmacology of ADK and will then focus on pathologies and therapeutic interventions. Challenges to translate ADK-based therapies into clinical use will be discussed critically. PMID:23592612

  13. Gas-phase protonation thermochemistry of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Touboul, David; Bouchoux, Guy; Zenobi, Renato

    2008-09-18

    The goal of this work was to obtain a detailed insight on the gas-phase protonation energetic of adenosine using both mass spectrometric experiments and quantum chemical calculations. The experimental approach used the extended kinetic method with nanoelectrospray ionization and collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. This method provides experimental values for proton affinity, PA(adenosine) = 979 +/- 1 kJ.mol (-1), and for the "protonation entropy", Delta p S degrees (adenosine) = S degrees (adenosineH +) - S degrees (adenosine) = -5 +/- 5 J.mol (-1).K (-1). The corresponding gas-phase basicity is consequently equal to: GB(adenosine) = 945 +/- 2 kJ.mol (-1) at 298K. Theoretical calculations conducted at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level, including 298 K enthalpy correction, predict a proton affinity value of 974 kJ.mol (-1) after consideration of isodesmic proton transfer reactions with pyridine as the reference base. Moreover, computations clearly showed that N3 is the most favorable protonation site for adenosine, due to a strong internal hydrogen bond involving the hydroxyl group at the 2' position of the ribose sugar moiety, unlike observations for adenine and 2'-deoxyadenosine, where protonation occurs on N1. The existence of negligible protonation entropy is confirmed by calculations (theoretical Delta p S degrees (adenosine) approximately -2/-3 J.mol (-1).K (-1)) including conformational analysis and entropy of hindered rotations. Thus, the calculated protonation thermochemical properties are in good agreement with our experimental measurements. It may be noted that the new PA value is approximately 10 kJ.mol (-1) lower than the one reported in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) database, thus pointing to a correction of the tabulated protonation thermochemistry of adenosine. PMID:18720985

  14. Adenosine triphosphate inhibition of yeast trehalase.

    PubMed

    Panek, A D

    1969-09-01

    Yeast trehalase has been found to be inhibited non-competitively by adenosine triphosphate. Such a biological control could explain the accumulation of trehalose during the stationary phase of the growth curve. PMID:5370287

  15. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity.

  16. Regulation of Lymphocyte Function by Adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Joel; Cekic, Caglar

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine regulates the interaction between lymphocytes and the vasculature and is important for controlling lymphocyte trafficking in response to tissue injury or infection. Adenosine can blunt the effects of T cell receptor (TCR) activation primarily by activating adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) and signaling via cyclic AMP and protein kinase A (PKA). PKA reduces proximal TCR signaling by phosphorylation of C-terminal Src kinase (Csk), nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) and cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB). PKA activation can either enhance or inhibit the survival of T cells depending on the strength and duration of signaling. Inducible enzymes such as CD73 and CD39 regulate adenosine formation and degradation in vivo. The extravasation of lymphocytes through blood vessels is influenced by A2AR-mediated suppression of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM) expression on lymphocytes and diminished production of IFNγ and IFNγ-inducible chemokines that are chemotactic to activated lymphocytes. Adenosine also decreases the barrier function of vascular endothelium by activating A2BRs. In sum, adenosine signaling is influenced by tissue inflammation and injury through induction of receptors and enzymes and has generally inhibitory effects on lymphocyte migration into inflamed tissues due to PKA-mediated effects on adhesion molecules, IFNγ production and endothelial barrier function. PMID:22772752

  17. Adenosine receptor agonists attenuate and adenosine receptor antagonists exacerbate opiate withdrawal signs.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Sears, M T

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a role for adenosine in mediating opiate effects. Adenosine receptors and their functions have been shown to be regulated by chronic opiate treatment. This study examines the role of adenosine receptors in the expression of opiate withdrawal behaviors. The effects of single doses of parenterally administered adenosine receptor subtype-selective agonists and antagonists on opiate withdrawal signs in morphine-dependent mice were measured. Mice received subcutaneous morphine pellet treatment for 72 h and then underwent naloxone-precipitated withdrawal after pretreatment with adenosinergic agents. Adenosine agonists attenuated different opiate withdrawal signs. The A1 agonist R-N6(phenylisopropyl)adenosine (0, 0.01, 0.02 mg/kg, IP) significantly reduced wet dog shakes and withdrawal diarrhea, while the A2a-selective agonist 2-p-(2-carboxethyl)phenylethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine or CGS 21680 (0, 0.01, 0.05 mg/kg, IP) significantly inhibited teeth chattering and forepaw treads. Adenosine receptor antagonists enhanced different opiate withdrawal signs. The adenosine A1 antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (0, 1, 10 mg/kg, IP) significantly increased weight loss and the A2 antagonist, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (0, 1 and 10 mg/kg, IP) enhanced wet dog shakes and withdrawal diarrhea. Treatment effects of adenosinergic agents were not due to nonspecific motor effects, as demonstrated by activity monitoring studies. These results support a role for adenosine receptors in the expression of opiate withdrawal and suggest the potential utility of adenosine agonists in its treatment. PMID:8741956

  18. Cordycepin induces apoptosis and autophagy in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH and BE(2)-M17 cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, YIFAN; LI, RONG; ZHU, SHENGLANG; ZHOU, RUYUN; WANG, LEI; DU, JIHUI; WANG, YONG; ZHOU, BEI; MAI, LIWEN

    2015-01-01

    Cordycepin, also termed 3′-deoxyadenosine, is a derivative of the nucleoside adenosine that represents a potential novel class of anticancer drugs targeting the 3′ untranslated region of RNAs. Cordycepin has been reported to induce apoptosis in certain cancer cell lines, but the effects of cordycepin on human neuroblastoma cells have not been studied. In the present study, an MTT assay revealed that cordycepin inhibits the viability of neuroblastoma SK-N-SH and BE(2)-M17 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, cordycepin increases the early-apoptotic cell population of SK-N-SH cells, as determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. The induction of apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells by cordycepin was further confirmed by western blotting, which revealed cleavage of caspase-3 and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase 1 in the SK-N-SH and BE(2)-M17 cells. Cordycepin also induced the formation of a punctate pattern of light-chain 3 (LC3)-associated green fluorescence in the SK-N-SH cells transfected with a pEGFP-LC3 vector. Furthermore, western blotting revealed cleavage of LC3 A/B in cordycepin-treated neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. Taken together, the results indicate that cordycepin significantly increases apoptosis and autophagy in neuroblastoma cells, and may therefore be a drug candidate for neuroblastoma therapy, but requires additional evaluation. PMID:26137103

  19. Pelargonium quercetorum Agnew induces apoptosis without PARP or cytokeratin 18 cleavage in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Aztopal, Nazlihan; Cevatemre, Buse; Sarimahmut, Mehmet; Ari, Ferda; Dere, Egemen; Ozel, Mustafa Zafer; Firat, Mehmet; Ulukaya, Engin

    2016-01-01

    Pelargonium species have various uses in folk medicine as traditional remedies, and several of them have been screened for their biological activity, including anticancer. Pelargonium quercetorum Agnew (P. quercetorum) is traditionally used for its anthelminthic activity. However, little is known about its biological activity or its effect on cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to determine the cytotoxic activity of P. quercetorum extract on lung cancer cell lines with varying properties. Following the analyses of its chemical composition, the cytotoxic activity was screened by the adenosine triphosphate viability test. M30-Apoptosense® and M65 EpiDeath® enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to determine the cell death mode (apoptosis vs. necrosis). For apoptosis, additional methods, including Annexin-V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and Hoechst 33342 staining, were employed. The cleavage of poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was assayed by western blotting to further dissect the apoptosis mechanism. The methanol extract of P. quercetorum caused cytotoxic activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mode of cell death was apoptosis, as evidenced by the positive staining of the cells for Annexin-V-FITC and the presence of pyknotic nuclei. Notably, neither PARP cleavage nor cytokeratin 18 fragmentation were observed. P.quercetorum caused cell death by an apoptosis mechanism that is slightly different from classical apoptosis. Therefore, future in vivo experiments are required for further understanding of the effect of this plant on cancer cells. PMID:27446448

  20. Photoaffinity labeling of A1-adenosine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.N.; Cristalli, G.; Grifantini, M.; Vittori, S.; Lohse, M.J.

    1985-11-25

    The ligand-binding subunit of the A1-adenosine receptor has been identified by photoaffinity labeling. A photolabile derivative of R-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, R-2-azido-N6-p-hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine (R-AHPIA), has been synthesized as a covalent specific ligand for A1-adenosine receptors. In adenylate cyclase studies with membranes of rat fat cells and human platelets, R-AHPIA has adenosine receptor agonist activity with a more than 60-fold selectivity for the A1-subtype. It competes for (TH)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine binding to A1-receptors of rat brain membranes with a Ki value of 1.6 nM. After UV irradiation, R-AHPIA binds irreversibly to the receptor, as indicated by a loss of (TH)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine binding after extensive washing; the Ki value for this photoinactivation is 1.3 nM. The p-hydroxyphenyl substituent of R-AHPIA can be directly radioiodinated to give a photoaffinity label of high specific radioactivity ( SVI-AHPIA). This compound has a KD value of about 1.5 nM as assessed from saturation and kinetic experiments. Adenosine analogues compete for SVI-AHPIA binding to rat brain membranes with an order of potency characteristic for A1-adenosine receptors. Dissociation curves following UV irradiation at equilibrium demonstrate 30-40% irreversible specific binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicates that the probe is photoincorporated into a single peptide of Mr = 35,000. Labeling of this peptide can be blocked specifically and stereoselectively by adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists in a manner which is typical for the A1-subtype. The results indicate that SVI-AHPIA identifies the ligand-binding subunit of the A1-adenosine receptor, which is a peptide with Mr = 35,000.

  1. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  2. Replicative DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Erik; Dixon, Nicholas

    2013-06-01

    In 1959, Arthur Kornberg was awarded the Nobel Prize for his work on the principles by which DNA is duplicated by DNA polymerases. Since then, it has been confirmed in all branches of life that replicative DNA polymerases require a single-stranded template to build a complementary strand, but they cannot start a new DNA strand de novo. Thus, they also depend on a primase, which generally assembles a short RNA primer to provide a 3'-OH that can be extended by the replicative DNA polymerase. The general principles that (1) a helicase unwinds the double-stranded DNA, (2) single-stranded DNA-binding proteins stabilize the single-stranded DNA, (3) a primase builds a short RNA primer, and (4) a clamp loader loads a clamp to (5) facilitate the loading and processivity of the replicative polymerase, are well conserved among all species. Replication of the genome is remarkably robust and is performed with high fidelity even in extreme environments. Work over the last decade or so has confirmed (6) that a common two-metal ion-promoted mechanism exists for the nucleotidyltransferase reaction that builds DNA strands, and (7) that the replicative DNA polymerases always act as a key component of larger multiprotein assemblies, termed replisomes. Furthermore (8), the integrity of replisomes is maintained by multiple protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, many of which are inherently weak. This enables large conformational changes to occur without dissociation of replisome components, and also means that in general replisomes cannot be isolated intact. PMID:23732474

  3. Inhibition of Enterovirus 71 by Adenosine Analog NITD008

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Cheng-Lin; Yeo, Huimin; Ye, Han-Qing; Liu, Si-Qing; Shang, Bao-Di; Gong, Peng; Alonso, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major viral pathogen in China and Southeast Asia. There is no clinically approved vaccine or antiviral therapy for EV71 infection. NITD008, an adenosine analog, is an inhibitor of flavivirus that blocks viral RNA synthesis. Here we report that NITD008 has potent antiviral activity against EV71. In cell culture, the compound inhibits EV71 at a 50% effective concentration of 0.67 μM and a 50% cytotoxic concentration of 119.97 μM. When administered at 5 mg/kg in an EV71 mouse model, the compound reduced viral loads in various organs and completely prevented clinical symptoms and death. To study the antiviral mechanism and drug resistance, we selected escape mutant viruses by culturing EV71 with increasing concentrations of NITD008. Resistance mutations were reproducibly mapped to the viral 3A and 3D polymerase regions. Resistance analysis with recombinant viruses demonstrated that either a 3A or a 3D mutation alone could lead to resistance to NITD008. A combination of both 3A and 3D mutations conferred higher resistance, suggesting a collaborative interplay between the 3A and 3D proteins during viral replication. The resistance results underline the importance of combination therapy required for EV71 treatment. IMPORTANCE Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a major cause of viral encephalitis in children worldwide, especially in the Asia-Pacific region. Vaccines and antivirals are urgently needed to prevent and treat EV71 infections. In this study, we report the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of NITD008 (an adenosine analog) as an inhibitor of EV71. The efficacy results validated the potential of nucleoside analogs as antiviral drugs for EV71 infections. Mechanistically, we showed that mutations in the viral 3A and 3D polymerases alone or in combination could confer resistance to NITD008. The resistance results suggest an intrinsic interaction between viral proteins 3A and 3D during replication, as well as the importance of

  4. Novel adenosine receptors in rat hippocampus identification and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, J.H.; Mashman, W.E.; DeLorenzo, R.J.

    1985-05-06

    2-chloro(/sup 3/H)adenosine, a stable analog of adenosine, was used to investigate the presence of adenosine receptors in rat hippocampal membranes that may mediate the depressant effects of adenosine on synaptic transmission in this tissue. Equilibrium binding studies reveal the presence of a previously undescribed class of receptors with a K/sub D/ of 4.7 ..mu..M and a Bmax of 130 pmol/mg of protein. Binding is sensitive to alkylxanthines and to a number of adenosine-related compounds. The pharmacological properties of this binding site are distinct from those of the A1 and A2 adenosine receptors associated with adenylate cyclase. The results suggest that this adenosine binding site is a novel central purinergic receptor through which adenosine may regulate hippocampal excitability. 50 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  5. Polymerase chain displacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Harris, Claire L; Sanchez-Vargas, Irma J; Olson, Ken E; Alphey, Luke; Fu, Guoliang

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative PCR assays are now the standard method for viral diagnostics. These assays must be specific, as well as sensitive, to detect the potentially low starting copy number of viral genomic material. We describe a new technique, polymerase chain displacement reaction (PCDR), which uses multiple nested primers in a rapid, capped, one-tube reaction that increases the sensitivity of normal quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. Sensitivity was increased by approximately 10-fold in a proof-of-principle test on dengue virus sequence. In PCDR, when extension occurs from the outer primer, it displaces the extension strand produced from the inner primer by utilizing a polymerase that has strand displacement activity. This allows a greater than 2-fold increase of amplification product for each amplification cycle and therefore increased sensitivity and speed over conventional PCR. Increased sensitivity in PCDR would be useful in nucleic acid detection for viral diagnostics. PMID:23384180

  6. Adenosine metabolism in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, F F; Mendelsohn, J; Seegmiller, J E

    1976-01-01

    The association of a human genetic deficiency of adenosine deaminase activity with combined immunodeficiency prompted a study of the effects of adenosine and of inhibition of adenosine deaminase activity on human lymphocyte transformation and a detailed study of adenosine metabolism throughout phytohemagglutinin-induced blastogenesis. The adenosine deaminase inhibitor, coformycin, at a concentration that inhibited adenosine deaminase activity more than 95%, or 50 muM adenosine, did not prevent blastogenesis by criteria of morphology or thymidine incorporation into acid-precipitable material. The combination of coformycin and adenosine, however, substantially reduced both the viable cell count and the incorporation of thymidine into DNA in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes. Incubation of lymphocytes with phytohemagglutinin for 72 h produced a 12-fold increase in the rate of deamination and a 6-fold increase in phosphorylation of adenosine by intact lymphocytes. There was no change in the apparent affinity for adenosine with either deamination or phosphorylation. The increased rates of metabolism, apparent as early as 3 h after addition of mitogen, may be due to increased entry of the nucleoside into stimulated lymphocytes. Increased adenosine metabolism was not due to changes in total enzyme activity; after 72 h in culture, the ratios of specific activities in extracts of stimulated to unstimulated lymphocytes were essentially unchanged for adenosine kinase, 0.92, and decreased for adenosine deaminase, 0.44. As much as 38% of the initial lymphocyte adenosine deaminase activity accumulated extracellularly after a 72-h culture with phytohemagglutinin. In phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes, the principal route of adenosine metabolism was phosphorylation at less than 5 muM adenosine, and deamination at concentrations greater than 5 muM. In unstimulated lymphocytes, deamination was the principal route of adenosine metabolism over the range of adenosine

  7. Extracellular formation and uptake of adenosine during skeletal muscle contraction in the rat: role of adenosine transporters.

    PubMed

    Lynge, J; Juel, C; Hellsten, Y

    2001-12-01

    1. The existence of adenosine transporters in plasma membrane giant vesicles from rat skeletal muscles and in primary skeletal muscle cell cultures was investigated. In addition, the contribution of intracellularly or extracellularly formed adenosine to the overall extracellular adenosine concentration during muscle contraction was determined in primary skeletal muscle cell cultures. 2. In plasma membrane giant vesicles, the carrier-mediated adenosine transport demonstrated saturation kinetics with Km = 177 +/- 36 microM and Vmax = 1.9 +/- 0.2 nmol x ml(-1) x s(-1) (0.7 nmol (mg protein)(-1) x s(-1)). The existence of an adenosine transporter was further evidenced by the inhibition of the carrier-mediated adenosine transport in the presence of NBMPR (nitrobenzylthioinosine; 72% inhibition) or dipyridamol (64% inhibition; P < 0.05). 3. In primary skeletal muscle cells, the rate of extracellular adenosine accumulation was 5-fold greater (P < 0.05) with electrical stimulation than without electrical stimulation. Addition of the adenosine transporter inhibitor NBMPR led to a 57% larger (P < 0.05) rate of extracellular adenosine accumulation in the electro-stimulated muscle cells compared with control cells, demonstrating that adenosine is taken up by the skeletal muscle cells during contractions. 4. Inhibition of ecto-5'-nucleotidase with AOPCP in electro-stimulated cells resulted in a 70% lower (P < 0.05) rate of extracellular adenosine accumulation compared with control cells, indicating that adenosine to a large extent is formed in the extracellular space during contraction. 5. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an NBMPR-sensitive adenosine transporter in rat skeletal muscle. Our data furthermore demonstrate that the increase in extracellular adenosine observed during electro-stimulation of skeletal muscle is due to production of adenosine in the extracellular space of skeletal muscle and that adenosine is taken up rather than released by the

  8. Adenosine reagent-free detection by co-immobilization of adenosine deaminase and phenol red on an optical biostrip.

    PubMed

    Bartzoka, Foteini; Venetsanou, Katerina; Clonis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine detection in human serum is important because this ribonucleoside has established clinical applications, modulating many physiological processes. Furthermore, a simple and cheap detection method is useful in adenosine production processes. Adenosine can be determined enzymatically using either S-adenosyl-homocysteine hydrolase and (3) [H]-adenosine, or adenosine kinase combined with GTP and luciferase, or an amperometric biosensor carrying adenosine deaminase (ADA), purine nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase. We developed a simple and cheap method relying on a transparent biostrip bearing ADA and the indicator phenol red (PR), co-immobilized to polyacrylamide, itself chemically adhered to a derivatized glass strip. The ADA-catalyzed conversion of adenosine to inosine and ammonia leads to a local pH alteration, changing the absorbance maximum of PR (from 425 to 567 nm), which is measured optically. The biostrip shows an analytical range 0.05-1.5 mM adenosine and is reusable when stored at 4 °C. When the biostrip was tested with serum, spiked with adenosine (70 and 100 μM), and filtered for protein and adenosine phosphates depletion, it showed good adenosine recovery. In summary, we show the proof-of-concept that adenosine can be determined reagent-free, at moderate sensitivity on an easy to construct, cheap, and reusable biostrip, based on commercially available molecular entities. PMID:25293641

  9. Internalization and desensitization of adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Klaasse, Elisabeth C.; de Grip, Willem J.; Beukers, Margot W.

    2007-01-01

    Until now, more than 800 distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified in the human genome. The four subtypes of the adenosine receptor (A1, A2A, A2B and A3 receptor) belong to this large family of GPCRs that represent the most widely targeted pharmacological protein class. Since adenosine receptors are widespread throughout the body and involved in a variety of physiological processes and diseases, there is great interest in understanding how the different subtypes are regulated, as a basis for designing therapeutic drugs that either avoid or make use of this regulation. The major GPCR regulatory pathway involves phosphorylation of activated receptors by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), a process that is followed by binding of arrestin proteins. This prevents receptors from activating downstream heterotrimeric G protein pathways, but at the same time allows activation of arrestin-dependent signalling pathways. Upon agonist treatment, adenosine receptor subtypes are differently regulated. For instance, the A1Rs are not (readily) phosphorylated and internalize slowly, showing a typical half-life of several hours, whereas the A2AR and A2BR undergo much faster downregulation, usually shorter than 1 h. The A3R is subject to even faster downregulation, often a matter of minutes. The fast desensitization of the A3R after agonist exposure may be therapeutically equivalent to antagonist occupancy of the receptor. This review describes the process of desensitization and internalization of the different adenosine subtypes in cell systems, tissues and in vivo studies. In addition, molecular mechanisms involved in adenosine receptor desensitization are discussed. PMID:18368531

  10. Neuroprotective effects of adenosine deaminase in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Risa; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Yasushi; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Nibuya, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catabolizes adenosine and deoxyadenosine. During cerebral ischemia, extracellular adenosine levels increase acutely and adenosine deaminase catabolizes the increased levels of adenosine. Since adenosine is a known neuroprotective agent, adenosine deaminase was thought to have a negative effect during ischemia. In this study, however, we demonstrate that adenosine deaminase has substantial neuroprotective effects in the striatum, which is especially vulnerable during cerebral ischemia. We used temporary oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) to simulate ischemia in rat corticostriatal brain slices. We used field potentials as the primary measure of neuronal damage. For stable and efficient electrophysiological assessment, we used transgenic rats expressing channelrhodopsin-2, which depolarizes neurons in response to blue light. Time courses of electrically evoked striatal field potential (eFP) and optogenetically evoked striatal field potential (optFP) were recorded during and after oxygen/glucose deprivation. The levels of both eFP and optFP decreased after 10 min of oxygen/glucose deprivation. Bath-application of 10 µg/ml adenosine deaminase during oxygen/glucose deprivation significantly attenuated the oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced reduction in levels of eFP and optFP. The number of injured cells decreased significantly, and western blot analysis indicated a significant decrease of autophagic signaling in the adenosine deaminase-treated oxygen/glucose deprivation slices. These results indicate that adenosine deaminase has protective effects in the striatum. PMID:26746865

  11. 2-Substituted adenosine derivatives: affinity and efficacy at four subtypes of human adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Mamedova, Liaman K; Chen, Peiran; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2004-11-15

    The affinity and efficacy at four subtypes (A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3)) of human adenosine receptors (ARs) of a wide range of 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were evaluated using radioligand binding assays and a cyclic AMP functional assay in intact CHO cells stably expressing these receptors. Similar to previous studies of the N(6)-position, several 2-substituents were found to be critical structural determinants for the A(3)AR activation. The following adenosine 2-ethers were moderately potent partial agonists (K(i), nM): benzyl (117), 3-chlorobenzyl (72), 2-(3-chlorophenyl)ethyl (41), and 2-(2-naphthyl)ethyl (130). The following adenosine 2-ethers were A(3)AR antagonists: 2,2-diphenylethyl, 2-(2-norbornan)ethyl, R- and S-2-phenylbutyl, and 2-(2-chlorophenyl)ethyl. 2-(S-2-Phenylbutyloxy)adenosine as an A(3)AR antagonist right-shifted the concentration-response curve for the inhibition by NECA of cyclic AMP accumulation with a K(B) value of 212 nM, which is similar to its binding affinity (K(i) = 175 nM). These 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were generally less potent at the A(1)AR in comparison to the A(3)AR, but fully efficacious, with binding K(i) values over 100 nM. The 2-phenylethyl moiety resulted in higher A(3)AR affinity (K(i) in nM) when linked to the 2-position of adenosine through an ether group (54), than when linked through an amine (310) or thioether (1960). 2-[2-(l-Naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (K(i) = 3.8 nM) was found to be the most potent and selective (>50-fold) A(2A) agonist in this series. Mixed A(2A)/A(3)AR agonists have been identified. Interestingly, although most of these compounds were extremely weak at the A(2B)AR, 2-[2-(2-naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (EC(50) = 1.4 microM) and 2-[2-(2-thienyl)-ethyloxy]adenosine (EC(50) = 1.8 microM) were found to be relatively potent A(2B) agonists, although less potent than NECA (EC(50) = 140 nM). PMID:15476669

  12. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Error rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu, Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition. PMID:25197572

  13. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Errormore » rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu , Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition.« less

  14. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Error rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu, Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition. PMID:25197572

  15. Sulfur mustard and respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng Ru; Loke, Weng Keong

    2012-09-01

    Victims exposed to sulfur mustard (HD) in World War I and Iran-Iraq war, and those suffered occupational or accidental exposure have endured discomfort in the respiratory system at early stages after exposure, and marked general physical deterioration at late stages due to pulmonary fibrosis, bronchiolitis obliterans or lung cancer. At molecule levels, significant changes of cytokines and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage and serum, and of selectins (in particular sE-selectin) and soluble Fas ligand in the serum have been reported in recent studies of patients exposed to HD in Iran-Iraq war, suggesting that these molecules may be associated with the pathophysiological development of pulmonary diseases. Experimental studies in rodents have revealed that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, their product peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), nitric oxide synthase, glutathione, poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, activating protein-1 signaling pathway are promising drug targets for preventing HD-induced toxicity, whereas N-acetyl cysteine, tocopherols, melatonin, aprotinin and many other molecules have been proved to be effective in prevention of HD-induced damage to the respiratory system in different animal models. In this paper, we will systemically review clinical and pathophysiological changes of respiratory system in victims exposed to HD in the last century, update clinicians and researchers on the mechanism of HD-induced acute and chronic lung damages, and on the relevant drug targets for future development of antidotes for HD. Further research directions will also be proposed. PMID:22742653

  16. Induction of Apoptosis and Antitumor Activity of Eel Skin Mucus, Containing Lactose-Binding Molecules, on Human Leukemic K562 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Choong-Hwan; Lee, Sook-Hyun; Lee, Sung-Kyun; Ha, Sun-Hyung; Suh, Seok-Jong; Kwon, Kyung-Min; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae; Chang, Young-Chae; Lee, Young-Choon; Kim, Dong-Soo; Chang, Hyeun-Wook; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2015-01-01

    For innate immune defense, lower animals such as fish and amphibian are covered with skin mucus, which acts as both a mechanical and biochemical barrier. Although several mucus sources have been isolated and studied for their biochemical and immunological functions, the precise mechanism(s) of action remains unknown. In the present study, we additionally found the eel skin mucus (ESM) to be a promising candidate for use in anti-tumor therapy. Our results showed that the viability of K562 cells was decreased in a dose-dependent manner by treatment with the isolated ESM. The cleaved forms of caspase-9, caspase-3 and poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase were increased by ESM. The levels of Bax expression and released cytochrome C were also increased after treatment with ESM. Furthermore, during the ESM mediated-apoptosis, phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and p38 but not JNK were increased and cell viabilities of the co-treated cells with ESM and inhibitors of ERK 1/2 or p38 were also increased. In addition, treatment with lactose rescued the ESM-mediated decrease in cell viability, indicating lactose-containing glycans in the leukemia cells acted as a counterpart of the ESM for interaction. Taken together, these results suggest that ESM could induce mitochondria-mediated apoptosis through membrane interaction of the K562 human leukemia cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first observation that ESM has anti-tumor activity in human cells. PMID:26090845

  17. Novel analogs targeting histone deacetylase suppress aggressive thyroid cancer cell growth and induce re-differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jang, S; Yu, X-M; Odorico, S; Clark, M; Jaskula-Sztul, R; Schienebeck, C M; Kupcho, K R; Harrison, A D; Winston-McPherson, G N; Tang, W; Chen, H

    2015-08-01

    To develop novel therapies for aggressive thyroid cancers, we have synthesized a collection of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor analogs named AB1 to AB13, which have different linkers between a metal chelating group and a hydrophobic cap. The purpose of this study was to screen out the most effective compounds and evaluate the therapeutic efficacy. AB2, AB3 and AB10 demonstrated the lowest half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values in one metastatic follicular and two anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines. Treatment with each of the three ABs resulted in an increase in apoptosis markers, including cleaved poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase (PARP) and cleaved caspase 3. Additionally, the expression of cell-cycle regulatory proteins p21(WAF1) and p27(Kip1) increased with the treatment of ABs while cyclin D1 decreased. Furthermore, AB2, AB3 and AB10 were able to induce thyrocyte-specific genes in the three thyroid cancer cell lines indicated by increased expression levels of sodium iodide symporter, paired box gene 8, thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF1), TTF2 and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptors. AB2, AB3 and AB10 suppress thyroid cancer cell growth via cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. They also induce cell re-differentiation, which could make aggressive cancer cells more susceptible to radioactive iodine therapy. PMID:26251030

  18. Hydroxychavicol, a Piper betle leaf component, induces apoptosis of CML cells through mitochondrial reactive oxygen species-dependent JNK and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation and overrides imatinib resistance.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Jayashree B; Mahato, Sanjit K; Joshi, Kalpana; Shinde, Vaibhav; Rakshit, Srabanti; Biswas, Nabendu; Choudhury Mukherjee, Indrani; Mandal, Labanya; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Chowdhury, Avik A; Chaudhuri, Jaydeep; Paul, Kausik; Pal, Bikas C; Vinayagam, Jayaraman; Pal, Churala; Manna, Anirban; Jaisankar, Parasuraman; Chaudhuri, Utpal; Konar, Aditya; Roy, Siddhartha; Bandyopadhyay, Santu

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholic extract of Piper betle (Piper betle L.) leaves was recently found to induce apoptosis of CML cells expressing wild type and mutated Bcr-Abl with imatinib resistance phenotype. Hydroxy-chavicol (HCH), a constituent of the alcoholic extract of Piper betle leaves, was evaluated for anti-CML activity. Here, we report that HCH and its analogues induce killing of primary cells in CML patients and leukemic cell lines expressing wild type and mutated Bcr-Abl, including the T315I mutation, with minimal toxicity to normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. HCH causes early but transient increase of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species-dependent persistent activation of JNK leads to an increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase-mediated nitric oxide generation. This causes loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, cleavage of caspase 9, 3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase leading to apoptosis. One HCH analogue was also effective in vivo in SCID mice against grafts expressing the T315I mutation, although to a lesser extent than grafts expressing wild type Bcr-Abl, without showing significant bodyweight loss. Our data describe the role of JNK-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase-mediated nitric oxide for anti-CML activity of HCH and this molecule merits further testing in pre-clinical and clinical settings. PMID:21943109

  19. Heat Inactivation of Garlic (Allium sativum) Extract Abrogates Growth Inhibition of HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Chintapalli, Renuka; Murray, Matthew J J; Murray, James T

    2016-07-01

    The potential anticancer properties of garlic (Allium sativum) may depend on the method of preparation and its storage. Storage of garlic has not been thoroughly investigated to determine whether anticancer properties are retained. Garlic was prepared and processed to mimic normal options for storage and preparation for consumption. Cytotoxicity was determined by crystal violet assay and mechanisms of cytotoxicity were established by microscopy, SDS-PAGE, and Western immunoblotting. Significant (P < 0.0001) cytotoxicity was observed in all preparations, except with boiled (cooked) garlic. Depending on the method of storage, garlic extract induced either type I or type II programmed cell death, detectable by caspase 9 cleavage, or Poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and LC3-II accumulation, respectively. The conflicting literature on the anticancer properties of garlic may be explained by differences in processing and storage. This study has highlighted that the potency of the antiproliferative properties of cooked garlic, compared to the uncooked form, is diminished in HeLa cells. PMID:27176674

  20. Apoptosis induced in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells by 2′,4′-dihydroxy-6-methoxy-3,5-dimethylchalcone isolated from Eugenia aquea Burm f. leaves

    PubMed Central

    SUBARNAS, ANAS; DIANTINI, AJENG; ABDULAH, RIZKY; ZUHROTUN, ADE; HADISAPUTRI, YUNI E.; PUSPITASARI, IRMA M.; YAMAZAKI, CHIHO; KUWANO, HIROYUKI; KOYAMA, HIROSHI

    2015-01-01

    During a previous study that aimed to identify anticancer agents within primate-consumed plants, the present group identified that Eugenia aquea (E. aquea) possessed potential as a source of anticancer agents. The ethanol extract of E. aquea leaves exhibited strong inhibitory activity against the proliferation of the human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cell line. The inhibition of proliferation was determined using an MTT assay. The present study was performed to isolate the active compound within the E. aquea leaves that generated the aforementioned activity, and resulted in the isolation of 2′,4′-dihydroxy-6-methoxy-3,5-dimethylchalcone, which was identified through the analysis of spectroscopic data. This compound was examined for its inhibitory activity against the MCF-7 cell line using a MTT assay, and the ability of 2′,4′-dihydroxy-6-methoxy-3,5-dimethylchalcone to induce apoptosis through the activation of the poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein was also investigated. The results of the present study revealed that the isolated compound inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, possessed an IC50 of 74.5 µg/ml (250 µM) and promoted apoptosis via the activation of PARP. It was concluded that these results indicated a requirement for additional investigations into 2′,4′-dihydroxy-6-methoxy-3,5-dimethylchalcone in order to provide a basis for the use of this compound in the management of cancer. PMID:26137061

  1. Cordycepin enhances cisplatin apoptotic effect through caspase/MAPK pathways in human head and neck tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Hui; Wang, Jo-Yu; Pan, Bo-Syong; Mu, Yi-Fen; Lai, Meng-Shao; So, Edmund Cheung; Wong, Thian-Sze; Huang, Bu-Miin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The present study aims to investigate whether the combination treatment of cordycepin (an extracted pure compound from Cordyceps sinensis) and cisplatin (a platinum-based chemotherapy drug) has better apoptotic effect in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods The apoptotic influences of cordycepin and/or cisplatin treatments to human OC3, OEC-M1, and FaDu HNSCC cells were investigated by morphological observations, viability assay, flow cytometry assay, and Western blotting methods. Results Data showed that the cell death phenomenon increased as the dosage of cordycepin or cisplatin increased, and it appeared more in cordycepin plus cisplatin cotreatment among three cell lines. Cell survival rates significantly decreased as the dosage of cordycepin or cisplatin increased, and the better apoptotic effects were observed in cotreatment. Cell cycle analysis further demonstrated that percentages of subG1 cells in cordycepin or cisplatin treatments significantly increased, suggesting that cells underwent apoptosis, and cordycepin plus cisplatin induced many more subG1 cells. Furthermore, cordycepin or cisplatin induced caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, and poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase protein cleavages, and stimulated c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38 protein phosphorylations. Moreover, cordycepin plus cisplatin cotreatment significantly activated those proteins with much better effects among three cell lines. Conclusion Cordycepin plus cisplatin have better apoptotic effect by activating caspase activation with possible MAPK pathway involvement in HNSCC cells. PMID:23926438

  2. Loss of ATM kinase activity leads to embryonic lethality in mice.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Pellegrini, Manuela; Lee, Baeck-Seung; Guo, Zhi; Filsuf, Darius; Belkina, Natalya V; You, Zhongsheng; Paull, Tanya T; Sleckman, Barry P; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Nussenzweig, André

    2012-08-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) mutated (ATM) is a key deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage signaling kinase that regulates DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, and apoptosis. The majority of patients with A-T, a cancer-prone neurodegenerative disease, present with null mutations in Atm. To determine whether the functions of ATM are mediated solely by its kinase activity, we generated two mouse models containing single, catalytically inactivating point mutations in Atm. In this paper, we show that, in contrast to Atm-null mice, both D2899A and Q2740P mutations cause early embryonic lethality in mice, without displaying dominant-negative interfering activity. Using conditional deletion, we find that the D2899A mutation in adult mice behaves largely similar to Atm-null cells but shows greater deficiency in homologous recombination (HR) as measured by hypersensitivity to poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase inhibition and increased genomic instability. These results may explain why missense mutations with no detectable kinase activity are rarely found in patients with classical A-T. We propose that ATM kinase-inactive missense mutations, unless otherwise compensated for, interfere with HR during embryogenesis. PMID:22869595

  3. Chelerythrine chloride induces apoptosis in renal cancer HEK-293 and SW-839 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, XIAO-MENG; ZHANG, MENG; FAN, PENG-LI; QIN, YU-HUA; ZHAO, HONG-WEI

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid chelerythrine chloride (CC) has inhibitory effects on various tumors. However, the anticancer activity of CC and its underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated in renal cancer cells. The present study examined the effects of CC on growth inhibition and apoptosis of renal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays revealed that CC markedly suppressed the growth of HEK-293 and human renal cancer SW-839 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The xenograft mouse model, which was performed in nude mice, exhibited a reduced tumor growth following CC treatment. In addition, the present study revealed that CC significantly decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt, which was accompanied by upregulation of p53, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and downregulation of Bcl-2, caspase-3 and PARP. Furthermore, the use of PD98059, a specific mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor, potentiated the proapoptotic effects of CC, which indicated that CC may induce apoptosis in renal cancer cells partly via inhibition of ERK activity. Overall, the results of the present study demonstrated that CC may be developed as a potential anticancer treatment for patients with renal cancer. PMID:27313717

  4. Resolution of the cellular proteome of the nucleocapsid protein from a highly pathogenic isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus identifies PARP-1 as a cellular target whose interaction is critical for virus biology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Lear, Zoe; Hughes, David J; Wu, Weining; Zhou, En-min; Whitehouse, Adrian; Chen, Hongying; Hiscox, Julian A

    2015-03-23

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major threat to the swine industry and food security worldwide. The nucleocapsid (N) protein is a major structural protein of PRRSV. The primary function of this protein is to encapsidate the viral RNA genome, and it is also thought to participate in the modulation of host cell biology and recruitment of cellular factors to facilitate virus infection. In order to the better understand these latter roles the cellular interactome of PRRSV N protein was defined using label free quantitative proteomics. This identified several cellular factors that could interact with the N protein including poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a cellular protein, which can add adenosine diphosphate ribose to a protein. Use of the PARP-1 small molecule inhibitor, 3-AB, in PRRSV infected cells demonstrated that PARP-1 was required and acted as an enhancer factor for virus biology. Serial growth of PRRSV in different concentrations of 3-AB did not yield viruses that were able to grow with wild type kinetics, suggesting that by targeting a cellular protein crucial for virus biology, resistant phenotypes did not emerge. This study provides further evidence that cellular proteins, which are critical for virus biology, can also be targeted to ablate virus growth and provide a high barrier for the emergence of drug resistance. PMID:25614100

  5. Enediyne lidamycin enhances the effect of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, gefitinib, in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells and lung carcinoma H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Li, Liang; Li, Xing-Qi; Liu, Xiu-Jun; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2009-01-01

    Gefitinib, a low-molecular-weight epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is effective in a wide variety of tumor types. Preclinical studies have shown potentiated antitumor efficacies of this agent in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The antitumor antibiotic lidamycin (LDM) showed extremely potent cytotoxicity in vitro and marked therapeutic effect in vivo. In this report, the cytotoxic and biochemical activity of LDM and gefitinib on human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells and human large cell lung cancer H460 cells as a single agent or in combination has been evaluated. In the MTT assay, LDM showed much more potent cytotoxicity than gefitinib to both cell lines. A431 cells with a highly EGFR-expressing level were more sensitive to gefitinib than H460 cells, which expressed EGFR at an intermediate level. LDM plus gefitinib showed potentiation of antiproliferative activity and apoptosis induction, which were associated with downregulation of EGFR signaling pathway and nuclear factor-kappa B expression, and the increase of cleaved poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase in the two cell lines, although to a lesser degree in H460 cells. Combined treatment induced G1 phase arrest similar to that of gefitinib alone in A431 cells and intensified G2/M phase accumulation in H460 cells. The above results indicate that LDM potentiates the effects of gefitinib in both gefitinib sensitive and less sensitive cells in association with enhanced inhibition of EGFR-dependent signaling. PMID:19342999

  6. PARP Inhibitors in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: State of Art and Perspectives of Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Gadducci, Angiolo; Guerrieri, Maria Elena

    2016-05-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) and base excision repair (BER) are two of the major DNA-repair pathways. The proteins encoded by breast-related cancer antigen (BRCA) and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerases (PARP) are involved in HR and BER, respectively. Tumors with HR deficiency, including those in BRCA mutation carriers, are sensitive to BER blockade via PARP inhibitors. These represent novel therapeutic tools for HR-deficient ovarian cancer, able to improve progression-free survival of women with recurrent, platinum-sensitive disease in response to recent platinum-based chemotherapy. More research is needed to assesses whether inhibitors of PARP have any role as maintenance treatment after first-line chemotherapy and as palliative treatment of platinum-resistant disease. Germline BRCA testing should be offered to all patients with ovarian cancer, regardless of age and family history. HR deficiency has been observed not only in germline BRCA mutation carriers, but also in patients with somatic mutations or epigenetic silencing of BRCA, and with loss of function of other genes. Half of all high-grade ovarian carcinomas are HR-deficient, and additional biological and clinical investigations are strongly warranted to identify patients with this subset of tumors. PMID:27127105

  7. Cryptotanshinone from Salviae miltiorrhizae radix inhibits sodium-nitroprusside-induced apoptosis in neuro-2a cells.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Ramalingam; Jung, Hyo Won; Kim, Gun Woo; Kim, Young Shik; Park, Yong-Ki

    2012-08-01

    The root of Salvia miltiorrhiza (Salviae miltiorrhizae radix), a herbal medicine has widely been used for the treatment of pain, miscarriage and oedema. In this study, we evaluated the neuroprotective effect of cryptotanshinone (CRT) from Salviae miltiorrhizae radix on sodium-nitroprusside (SNP)-induced apoptosis in neuro-2a (N2a) cells, and further investigated its action mechanism in signalling pathways. The effects of CRT against SNP-induced toxicity, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) changes, and oxidants/antioxidant defences and apoptotic signalling pathways were investigated in N2a cells. Cryptotanshinone significantly inhibited SNP-induced cell toxicity and the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), and improved MMP in N2a cells. Cryptotanshinone significantly suppressed SNP-induced peroxidation of lipid and protein, and the expression of Gclc mRNA. In the signalling pathway, CRT effectively blocked SNP-induced activation of NF-κB and ERK1/2 and JNK MAPK pathways through the elevation of Akt and cyclic AMP response element binding protein. Furthermore, CRT remarkably reduced the increase of mitochondrial Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol, and the activations of cytosolic procaspase-3 and nuclear inactive poly ADP (adenosine diphosphate)-ribose polymerase by SNP-induced apoptosis. These results indicate that CRT has neuroprotective effects against SNP-induced apoptosis in neuronal cells via the regulation of mitochondrial apoptotic cascades and antiapoptotic cellular signalling pathways. PMID:22228596

  8. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Promotes Autophagy to Facilitate Cisplatin Resistance in Melanoma Cells through the Activation of PARP1.

    PubMed

    Ge, Rui; Liu, Lin; Dai, Wei; Zhang, Weigang; Yang, Yuqi; Wang, Huina; Shi, Qiong; Guo, Sen; Yi, Xiuli; Wang, Gang; Gao, Tianwen; Luan, Qi; Li, Chunying

    2016-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA), a key protein in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, has been shown to promote the resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs by facilitating the DNA repair process. However, the role of XPA in the resistance of melanoma to platinum-based drugs like cisplatin is largely unknown. In this study, we initially found that XPA was expressed at higher levels in cisplatin-resistant melanoma cells than in cisplatin-sensitive ones. Furthermore, the knockdown of XPA not only increased cellular apoptosis but also inhibited cisplatin-induced autophagy, which rendered the melanoma cells more sensitive to cisplatin. Moreover, we discovered that the increased XPA in resistant melanoma cells promoted poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) activation and that the inhibition of PARP1 could attenuate the cisplatin-induced autophagy. Finally, we proved that the inhibition of PARP1 and the autophagy process made resistant melanoma cells more susceptible to cisplatin treatment. Our study shows that XPA can promote cell-protective autophagy in a DNA repair-independent manner by enhancing the activation of PARP1 in melanoma cells resistant to cisplatin and that the XPA-PARP1-mediated autophagy process can be targeted to overcome cisplatin resistance in melanoma chemotherapy. PMID:26880244

  9. Assessment of calpain and caspase systems activities during ageing of two bovine muscles by degradation patterns of αII spectrin and PARP-1.

    PubMed

    Saccà, Elena; Pizzutti, Nicoletta; Corazzin, Mirco; Lippe, Giovanna; Piasentier, Edi

    2016-03-01

    The activities of calpain and caspase systems during ageing in Longissimus lumborum (LL) and Infraspinatus (IS) muscles of Italian Simmental young bulls (Bos taurus) were assessed. Samples from 10 animals were collected within 20 min of exsanguination (T0), after 48 h (T1) and 7 days (T2) post mortem. Calpain and caspase activity were evaluated based on the formation of αII spectrin cleavage products of 145 kDa (SBDP145) and 120 kDa (SBDP120), respectively. Caspase activity was also assessed by the presence of poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) cleavage product. At T0, LL showed higher levels of SBDP145 than IS (P < 0.01), while SBDP120 and PARP-1 degradation products were similar between muscles. At T1, no difference was found in the level of SBDP145 between muscles, while SBDP120 and PARP-1 cleavage products were not detected. At T2 neither αII spectrin nor PARP-1 cleavage products were found. LL and IS showed different proteolysis after slaughter that was influenced more by calpain than caspase activity, which was detectable only in the early post mortem period. PMID:26950517

  10. Role of Biomarkers in the Development of PARP Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Bratati; Dolfi, Sonia C.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Ganesan, Shridar; Hirshfield, Kim M.

    2016-01-01

    Defects in DNA repair lead to genomic instability and play a critical role in cancer development. Understanding the process by which DNA damage repair is altered or bypassed in cancer may identify novel therapeutic targets and lead to improved patient outcomes. Poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) has an important role in DNA repair, and novel therapeutics targeting PARP1 have been developed to treat cancers with defective DNA repair pathways. Despite treatment successes with PARP inhibitors (PARPi), intrinsic and acquired resistances have been observed. Preclinical studies and clinical trials in cancer suggest that combination therapy using PARPi and platinating agents is more effective than monotherapy in circumventing drug resistance mechanisms. Additionally, identification of biomarkers in response to PARPi will lead to improved patient selection for targeted cancer treatment. Recent technological advances have provided the necessary tools to examine many potential avenues to develop such biomarkers. This review examines the mechanistic rationale of PARP inhibition and potential biomarkers in their development for personalized therapy. PMID:26997874

  11. Mouse models of DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Miriam R; Sweasy, Joann B

    2012-12-01

    In 1956, Arthur Kornberg discovered the mechanism of the biological synthesis of DNA and was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1959 for this contribution, which included the isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Now there are 15 known DNA polymerases in mammalian cells that belong to four different families. These DNA polymerases function in many different cellular processes including DNA replication, DNA repair, and damage tolerance. Several biochemical and cell biological studies have provoked a further investigation of DNA polymerase function using mouse models in which polymerase genes have been altered using gene-targeting techniques. The phenotypes of mice harboring mutant alleles reveal the prominent role of DNA polymerases in embryogenesis, prevention of premature aging, and cancer suppression. PMID:23001998

  12. 2-Substituted adenosine derivatives: affinity and efficacy at four subtypes of human adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Mamedova, Liaman K.; Chen, Peiran; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The affinity and efficacy at four subtypes (A1, A2A, A2B and A3) of human adenosine receptors (ARs) of a wide range of 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were evaluated using radioligand binding assays and a cyclic AMP functional assay in intact CHO cells stably expressing these receptors. Similar to previous studies of the N6-position, several 2-substituents were found to be critical structural determinants for the A3AR activation. The following adenosine 2-ethers were moderately potent partial agonists (Ki, nM): benzyl (117), 3-chlorobenzyl (72), 2-(3-chlorophenyl)ethyl (41), and 2-(2-naphthyl)ethyl (130). The following adenosine 2-ethers were A3AR antagonists: 2,2-diphenylethyl, 2-(2-norbornan)ethyl, R- and S-2-phenylbutyl, and 2-(2-chlorophenyl)ethyl. 2-(S-2-Phenylbutyloxy)a-denosine as an A3AR antagonist right-shifted the concentration–response curve for the inhibition by NECA of cyclic AMP accumulation with a KB value of 212 nM, which is similar to its binding affinity (Ki = 175 nM). These 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were generally less potent at the A1AR in comparison to the A3AR, but fully efficacious, with binding Ki values over 100 nM. The 2-phenylethyl moiety resulted in higher A3AR affinity (Ki in nM) when linked to the 2-position of adenosine through an ether group (54), than when linked through an amine (310) or thioether (1960). 2-[2-(l-Naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (Ki = 3.8 nM) was found to be the most potent and selective (>50-fold) A2A agonist in this series. Mixed A2A/A3AR agonists have been identified. Interestingly, although most of these compounds were extremely weak at the A2BAR, 2-[2-(2-naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (EC50 = 1.4 µM) and 2-[2-(2-thienyl)-ethyloxy]adenosine (EC50 = 1.8 (M) were found to be relatively potent A2B agonists, although less potent than NECA (EC50 = 140 nM). PMID:15476669

  13. Silk polymer-based adenosine release: therapeutic potential for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wilz, Andrew; Pritchard, Eleanor M; Li, Tianfu; Lan, Jing-Quan; Kaplan, David L; Boison, Detlev

    2008-09-01

    Adenosine augmentation therapies (AAT) make rational use of the brain's own adenosine-based seizure control system and hold promise for the therapy of refractory epilepsy. In an effort to develop an AAT compatible with future clinical application, we developed a novel silk protein-based release system for adenosine. Adenosine releasing brain implants with target release doses of 0, 40, 200, and 1000ng adenosine per day were prepared by embedding adenosine containing microspheres into nanofilm-coated silk fibroin scaffolds. In vitro, the respective polymers released 0, 33.4, 170.5, and 819.0ng adenosine per day over 14 days. The therapeutic potential of the implants was validated in a dose-response study in the rat model of kindling epileptogenesis. Four days prior to the onset of kindling, adenosine releasing polymers were implanted into the infrahippocampal cleft and progressive acquisition of kindled seizures was monitored over a total of 48 stimulations. We document a dose-dependent retardation of seizure acquisition. In recipients of polymers releasing 819ng adenosine per day, kindling epileptogenesis was delayed by one week corresponding to 18 kindling stimulations. Histological analysis of brain samples confirmed the correct location of implants and electrodes. We conclude that silk-based delivery of around 1000ng adenosine per day is a safe and efficient strategy to suppress seizures. PMID:18514814

  14. Adenosine Signaling During Acute and Chronic Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Xia, Yang; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine is a signaling nucleoside that is produced following tissue injury, particularly injury involving ischemia and hypoxia. The production of extracellular adenosine and its subsequent signaling through adenosine receptors plays an important role in orchestrating injury responses in multiple organs. There are four adenosine receptors that are widely distributed on immune, epithelial, endothelial, neuronal and stromal cells throughout the body. Interestingly, these receptors are subject to altered regulation following injury. Studies in mouse models and human cells and tissues have identified that the production of adenosine and its subsequent signaling through its receptors plays largely beneficial roles in acute disease states, with the exception of brain injury. In contrast, if elevated adenosine levels are sustained beyond the acute injury phase, adenosine responses can become detrimental by activating pathways that promote tissue injury and fibrosis. Understanding when during the course of disease adenosine signaling is beneficial as opposed to detrimental and defining the mechanisms involved will be critical for the advancement of adenosine based therapies for acute and chronic diseases. The purpose of this review is to discuss key observations that define the beneficial and detrimental aspects of adenosine signaling during acute and chronic disease states with an emphasis on cellular processes such as inflammatory cell regulation, vascular barrier function and tissue fibrosis. PMID:23340998

  15. Adenosine diphosphate-degrading activity in placenta.

    PubMed

    Barradas, M; Khokher, M; Hutton, R; Craft, I L; Dandona, P

    1983-02-01

    1. The degradation of ADP by the placenta and umbilical artery was investigated. 2. Supernatants from incubations of finely chopped placental and umbilical arterial tissue were incubated with [14C]ADP for various durations from 0 to 30 min. 3. Products of ADP degradation were separated by thin-layer chromatography and radioactivity incorporated into each product was measured. 4. Placental supernatants induced a more rapid degradation of ADP than the umbilical artery supernatants. The main product of ADP degradation by placental supernatants at 30 min was adenosine, whereas that of umbilical artery was AMP. 5. This conversion by placenta of ADP, a potent platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor, into adenosine, a potent platelet anti-aggregator and vasodilator, may be important in the maintenance of perfusion of the foetoplacental unit. PMID:6822058

  16. Adenosine thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S. )

    1991-07-01

    Pharmacologic coronary vasodilation as an adjunct to myocardial perfusion imaging has become increasingly important in the evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease, in view of the large number of patients who cannot perform an adequate exercise test or in whom contraindications render exercise inappropriate. Adenosine is a very potent coronary vasodilator and when combined with thallium 201 scintigraphy produces images of high quality, with the added advantages of a very short half-life (less than 10 seconds) and the ability to adjust the dose during the infusion, which may enhance safety and curtail the duration of side effects. The reported sensitivity and specificity of adenosine thallium 201 scintigraphy for the detection of coronary artery disease are high and at least comparable with imaging after exercise or dipyridamole administration. 23 refs.

  17. Adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptors in hematopoiesis. 2. Expression of receptor mRNA in resting and lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Streitová, D; Hofer, M; Holá, J; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M

    2010-01-01

    Expression of mRNA for adenosine receptor subtypes A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) in normal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages has been investigated using the method of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results have shown a very low, unquantifiable expression of adenosine A(1) receptor mRNA in both normal and LPS-activated macrophages. The other three adenosine receptor mRNAs have been found to be expressed at various but always quantifiable levels. Activation of the macrophages by LPS induced upregulation of the expression of adenosine receptor A(2a) and A(2b) mRNA, whereas the expression of adenosine receptor A(3) mRNA was downregulated. Unstimulated macrophages exhibited a high expression of the A(2b) adenosine receptor mRNA. The findings are discussed from the point of view of the antiinflammatory and hematopoiesis-stimulating roles of the adenosine receptor signaling. PMID:19249906

  18. Expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide, adenosine A2a receptor and adenosine A1 receptor in experiment rat migraine models

    PubMed Central

    LU, WENXIAN; LI, BIN; CHEN, JINBO; SU, YIPENG; DONG, XIAOMENG; SU, XINYANG; GAO, LIXIANG

    2016-01-01

    A migraine is a disabling neurovascular disorder characterized by a unilateral throbbing headache that lasts from 4 to 72 h. The headache is often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, phonophobia and photophobia, and may be worsened by physical exercise. The trigeminovascular system (TVS) is speculated to have an important role in migraines, although the pathophysiology of this disorder remains to be elucidated. Trigeminal ganglion (TG) and spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) are important components of the TVS. Several clinical cases have provided evidence for the involvement of the brainstem in migraine initiation. Electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (ESTG) in rats can activate TVS during a migraine attack. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is an important vasoactive compound produced following TVS activation. Numerous studies have revealed that adenosine and its receptors have an important role in pain transmission and regulation process. However, only a few studies have examined whether adenosine A2a receptor (A2aR) and adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) are involved in migraine and nociceptive pathways. In the present study, CGRP, A2aR and A1R expression levels were detected in the TG and TNC of ESTG models through reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Tianshu capsule (TSC), a type of Chinese medicine, was also used in the ESTG rat models to examine its influence on the three proteins. Results demonstrated that CGRP, A2aR and A1R mediated pain transmission and the regulation process during migraine and the expression of the three proteins was regulated by TSC. PMID:26998280

  19. Chemoelectrical energy conversion of adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Vishnu Baba; Sarles, Stephen Andrew; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-04-01

    Plant and animal cell membranes transport charged species, neutral molecules and water through ion pumps and channels. The energy required for moving species against established concentration and charge gradients is provided by the biological fuel - adenosine triphosphate (ATP) -synthesized within the cell. The adenosine triphosphatase (ATPases) in a plant cell membrane hydrolyze ATP in the cell cytoplasm to pump protons across the cell membrane. This establishes a proton gradient across the membrane from the cell exterior into the cell cytoplasm. This proton motive force stimulates ion channels that transport nutrients and other species into the cell. This article discusses a device that converts the chemical energy stored in adenosine triphosphate into electrical power using a transporter protein, ATPase. The V-type ATPase proteins used in our prototype are extracted from red beet(Beta vulgaris) tonoplast membranes and reconstituted in a bilayer lipid membrane or BLM formed from POPC and POPS lipids. A pH7 medium that can support ATP hydrolysis is provided on both sides of the membrane and ATP is dissolved in the pH7 buffer on one side of the membrane. Hydrolysis of ATP results in the formation of a phosphate ion and adenosine diphosphate. The energy from the reaction activates ATPase in the BLM and moves a proton across the membrane. The charge gradient established across the BLM due to the reaction and ion transport is converted into electrical current by half-cell reference electrodes. The prototype ATPase cell with an effective BLM area of 4.15 mm2 carrying 15 μl of ATPase proteins was observed to develop a steady state peak power output of 70 nW, which corresponds to a specific power of 1.69 μW/cm2 and a current density of 43.4 μA/cm2 of membrane area.

  20. Polymerase Activity of Pichinde Virus

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Michael F.; Biswal, Nilambar; Rawls, William E.

    1974-01-01

    Pichinde virus, a member of the arenavirus group, was examined for polymerase activity. Purified virus was found to contain RNA-dependent RNA polymerase but not RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity. Since RNase but neither DNase nor actinomycin D inhibited the endogenous polymerase reaction, RNA of the virus appeared to be used as the template. The divalent cations Mg2+ and Mn2+ were required for optimal reactivity. The RNA product was partially resistant to RNase and the resistant portion had a sedimentation coefficient of 22 to 26S in sucrose gradients. PMID:4132669

  1. Prevalence of unidirectional Na+-dependent adenosine transport and altered potential for adenosine generation in diabetic cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Podgorska, M; Kocbuch, K; Grden, M; Szutowicz, A; Pawelczyk, T

    2006-05-01

    Adenosine is an important physiological regulator of the cardiovascular system. The goal of our study was to assess the expression level of nucleoside transporters (NT) in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes and to examine the activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes. Isolated rat cardiomyocytes displayed the presence of detectable amounts of mRNA for ENT1, ENT2, CNT1, and CNT2. Overall adenosine (10 microM) transport in cardiomyocytes isolated from normal rat was 36 pmol/mg/min. The expression level of equilibrative transporters (ENT1, ENT2) decreased and of concentrative transporters (CNT1, CNT2) increased in myocytes isolated from diabetic rat. Consequently, overall adenosine transport decreased by 30%, whereas Na(+)-dependent adenosine uptake increased 2-fold, and equilibrative transport decreased by 60%. The activity ratio of AMP deaminase/5'-nucleotidase in cytosol of normal cardiomyocytes was 11 and increased to 15 in diabetic cells. The activity of ecto-5'-nucleotidase increased 2-fold in diabetic cells resulting in a rise of the activity ratio of ecto-5'-nucleotidase/adenosine deaminase from 28 to 56.These results indicate that in rat cardiomyocytes diabetes alters activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes in such a way that conversion of AMP to IMP is favored in the cytosolic compartment, whereas the capability to produce adenosine extracellularly is increased. This is accompanied by an increased unidirectional Na(+)-dependent uptake of adenosine and significantly reduced bidirectional adenosine transport. PMID:16369729

  2. ATP- and adenosine-mediated signaling in the central nervous system: adenosine stimulates glutamate release from astrocytes via A2a adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2004-02-01

    Adenosine enhanced intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in astrocytes via A(2a) adenosine receptors involving protein kinase A (PKA) activation. The Ca(2+) rise is inhibited by brefeldin A, an inhibitor of vesicular transport; but not by neomycin and U73122, phospholipase C inhibitors; xestospongin, an IP(3)-receptor inhibitor; ryanodine, a ryanodine-receptor inhibitor; TMB-8, an endoplasmic reticulum calcium-release blocker; octanol, a gap-junction inhibitor; or cadmium, a non-selective, calcium-channel blocker. Adenosine stimulates astrocytic glutamate release via an A(2a) adenosine receptors/PKA pathway, and the release is inhibited by the vesicular transport inhibitors brefeldin A and bafilomycin A1. A(2a) adenosine receptors and the ensuing PKA events, thus, are endowed with vesicular Ca(2+) release from an unknown intracellular calcium store and vesicular glutamate release from astrocytes. PMID:14978344

  3. Use of adenosine echocardiography for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, W.A. )

    1991-07-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography combined with exercise is sensitive and specific in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) by demonstrating transient abnormalities in wall motion. Frequently, however, patients cannot achieve maximal exercise because of various factors. Pharmacologic stress testing with intravenous adenosine was evaluated as a means of detecting CAD in a noninvasive manner. Patients with suspected CAD underwent echocardiographic imaging and simultaneous thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography during the intravenous administration of 140 micrograms/kg/min of adenosine. An increase in heart rate, decrease in blood pressure, and increase in double product were observed during adenosine administration. Initial observations revealed that wall motion abnormalities were induced by adenosine in areas of perfusion defects. The adenosine infusion was well tolerated, and symptoms disappeared within 1 to 2 minutes after termination of the infusion. Therefore preliminary observations suggest that adenosine echocardiography appears to be useful in the assessment of CAD.

  4. Characterization of adenosine receptors involved in adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction in allergic rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    el-Hashim, A.; D'Agostino, B.; Matera, M. G.; Page, C.

    1996-01-01

    1. Recent work has suggested that adenosine may be involved in asthma via the activation of A1 receptors. However, the role of the recently cloned A3 receptor in airways is largely unknown. In the present study, we have investigated the role of the A3 receptor in adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction in allergic rabbits. 2. Aerosol challenge of antigen (Ag) immunized rabbits with the adenosine precursor, adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), resulted in a dose-dependent fall in dynamic compliance (Cdyn). The maximum fall in Cdyn in these rabbits was significantly greater than that in litter matched, sham immunized animals (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the maximum increase in airways resistance (Rt) between Ag and sham immunized rabbits (P > 0.05). 3. Aerosol challenge of Ag immunized rabbits with cyclopentyl-adenosine (CPA) (A1-receptor agonist) elicited a dose-dependent fall in Cdyn in Ag immunized rabbits and the maximum fall in Cdyn in these rabbits was significantly greater than that observed in sham immunized rabbits (P < 0.05). Similarly, CPA induced dose-dependent increases in R1 in Ag immunized rabbits whereas sham immunized rabbits failed to respond to CPA within the same dose range. The maximum increase in RL in Ag immunized rabbits was significantly greater than that of sham immunized rabbits (P < 0.05). 4. Aerosol challenge of either Ag or sham immunized rabbits with the A3 agonist aminophenylethyladenosine (APNEA) did not elicit dose-dependent changes in either RL or Cdyn. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the maximum response, measured by either parameter, between the two animal groups (P > 0.05). 5. These data provide further evidence for a role of the A1 receptor in the airways, but do not support a role for the A3 receptor in adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction in the allergic rabbit. PMID:8937732

  5. A Metabolic Immune Checkpoint: Adenosine in Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Within tumors, some areas are less oxygenated than others. Since their home ground is under chronic hypoxia, tumor cells adapt to this condition by activating aerobic glycolysis; however, this hypoxic environment is very harsh for incoming immune cells. Deprivation of oxygen limits availability of energy sources and induces accumulation of extracellular adenosine in tumors. Extracellular adenosine, upon binding with adenosine receptors on the surface of various immune cells, suppresses pro-inflammatory activities. In addition, signaling through adenosine receptors upregulates a number of anti-inflammatory molecules and immunoregulatory cells, leading to the establishment of a long-lasting immunosuppressive environment. Thus, due to hypoxia and adenosine, tumors can discourage antitumor immune responses no matter how the response was induced, whether it was spontaneous or artificially introduced with a therapeutic intention. Preclinical studies have shown the significance of adenosine in tumor survival strategy by demonstrating tumor regression after inactivation of adenosine receptors, inhibition of adenosine-producing enzymes, or reversal of tissue hypoxia. These promising results indicate a potential use of the inhibitors of the hypoxia–adenosine pathway for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27066002

  6. Effects of adenosine, adenosine triphosphate and structural analogues on glucagon secretion from the perfused pancreas of rat in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Chapal, J.; Loubatières-Mariani, M. M.; Roye, M.; Zerbib, A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of adenosine, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and structural analogues have been studied on glucagon secretion from the isolated perfused pancreas of the rat in the presence of glucose (2.8 mM). Adenosine induced a transient increase of glucagon secretion. This effect was concentration-dependent in the range of 0.165 to 165 microM. ATP also induced an increase, but the effect was no greater at 165 microM than at 16.5 microM. 2-Chloroadenosine, an analogue more resistant to metabolism or uptake systems than adenosine, was more effective. Among the three structural analogues of ATP or ADP studied, beta, gamma-methylene ATP which can be hydrolyzed into AMP and adenosine had an effect similar to adenosine or ATP at the same concentrations (1.65 and 16.5 microM); in contrast alpha, beta-methylene ATP and alpha, beta-methylene ADP (resistant to hydrolysis into AMP and adenosine) were ineffective. Theophylline (50 microM) a specific blocker of the adenosine receptor, suppressed the glucagon peak induced by adenosine, 2-chloroadenosine, ATP and beta, gamma-methylene ATP (1.65 microM). An inhibitor of 5' nucleotidase, alpha, beta-methylene ADP (16.5 microM), reduced the glucagon increase induced by ATP and did not affect the response to adenosine (1.65 microM). These results support the hypothesis of adenosine receptors (P1-purinoceptors) on the pancreatic glucagon secretory cells and indicate that ATP acts after hydrolysis to adenosine. PMID:6097328

  7. Adenosine: Tipping the balance towards hepatic steatosis and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Simon C.; Schuppan, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Fatty liver is commonly associated with alcohol ingestion and abuse. While the molecular pathogenesis of these fatty changes is well understood, the histochemical and pharmacological mechanisms by which ethanol stimulates these molecular changes remain unknown. During ethanol metabolism, adenosine is generated by the enzyme ecto-5′-nucleotidase, and adenosine production and adenosine receptor activation are known to play critical roles in the development of hepatic fibrosis. We therefore investigated whether adenosine and its receptors play a role in the development of alcohol-induced fatty liver. WT mice fed ethanol on the Lieber-DeCarli diet developed hepatic steatosis, including increased hepatic triglyceride content, while mice lacking ecto-5-nucleotidase or adenosine A1 or A2B receptors were protected from developing fatty liver. Similar protection was also seen in WT mice treated with either an adenosine A1 or A2B receptor antagonist. Steatotic livers demonstrated increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis, which was prevented by blockade of adenosine A1 receptors, and decreased expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, which was prevented by blockade of adenosine A2B receptors. In vitro studies supported roles for adenosine A1 receptors in promoting fatty acid synthesis and for A2B receptors in decreasing fatty acid metabolism. These results indicate that adenosine generated by ethanol metabolism plays an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis via both A1 and A2B receptors and suggest that targeting adenosine receptors may be effective in the prevention of alcohol-induced fatty liver. PMID:20395005

  8. Antimutator Variants of DNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Alan J.; Williams, Lindsey N.; Preston, Bradley D.

    2011-01-01

    Evolution balances DNA replication speed and accuracy to optimize replicative fitness and genetic stability. There is no selective pressure to improve DNA replication fidelity beyond the background mutation rate from other sources, such as DNA damage. However, DNA polymerases remain amenable to amino-acid substitutions that lower intrinsic error rates. Here, we review these ‘antimutagenic’ changes in DNA polymerases and discuss what they reveal about mechanisms of replication fidelity. Pioneering studies with bacteriophage T4 DNA polymerase (T4 Pol) established the paradigm that antimutator amino-acid substitutions reduce replication errors by increasing proofreading efficiency at the expense of polymerase processivity. The discoveries of antimutator substitutions in proofreading-deficient ‘mutator’ derivatives of bacterial Pols I and III and yeast Pol δ suggest there must be additional antimutagenic mechanisms. Remarkably, many of the affected amino-acid positions from Pol I, Pol III, and Pol δ are similar to the original T4 Pol substitutions. The locations of antimutator substitutions within DNA polymerase structures suggest that they may increase nucleotide selectivity and/or promote dissociation of primer termini from polymerases poised for misincorporation, leading to expulsion of incorrect nucleotides. If misincorporation occurs, enhanced primer dissociation from polymerase domains may improve proofreading in cis by an intrinsic exonuclease or in trans by alternate cellular proofreading activities. Together, these studies reveal that natural selection can readily restore replication error rates to sustainable levels following an adaptive mutator phenotype. PMID:21977975

  9. DNA Polymerase β Ribonucleotide Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, Nisha A.; Beard, William A.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2010-01-01

    DNA polymerases must select nucleotides that preserve Watson-Crick base pairing rules and choose substrates with the correct (deoxyribose) sugar. Sugar discrimination represents a great challenge because ribonucleotide triphosphates are present at much higher cellular concentrations than their deoxy-counterparts. Although DNA polymerases discriminate against ribonucleotides, many therapeutic nucleotide analogs that target polymerases have sugar modifications, and their efficacy depends on their ability to be incorporated into DNA. Here, we investigate the ability of DNA polymerase β to utilize nucleotides with modified sugars. DNA polymerase β readily inserts dideoxynucleoside triphosphates but inserts ribonucleotides nearly 4 orders of magnitude less efficiently than natural deoxynucleotides. The efficiency of ribonucleotide insertion is similar to that reported for other DNA polymerases. The poor polymerase-dependent insertion represents a key step in discriminating against ribonucleotides because, once inserted, a ribonucleotide is easily extended. Likewise, a templating ribonucleotide has little effect on insertion efficiency or fidelity. In contrast to insertion and extension of a ribonucleotide, the chemotherapeutic drug arabinofuranosylcytosine triphosphate is efficiently inserted but poorly extended. These results suggest that the sugar pucker at the primer terminus plays a crucial role in DNA synthesis; a 3′-endo sugar pucker facilitates nucleotide insertion, whereas a 2′-endo conformation inhibits insertion. PMID:20519499

  10. p-HPEA-EDA, a phenolic compound of virgin olive oil, activates AMP-activated protein kinase to inhibit carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Prem; Oh, Won-Keun; Yun, Hyo Jeong; Namgoong, Gwang Mo; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Kwon, Seong-Min; Choi, Hoo-Kyun; Choi, Hong Seok

    2011-04-01

    Phenolic constituents of virgin olive oil are reported to have antitumor activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and specific target proteins of virgin olive oil remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl ligstroside aglycone (p-HPEA-EDA), a phenolic compound of virgin olive oil, inhibits tumor promoter-induced cell transformation in JB6 Cl41 cells and suppress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumorigenicity by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in HT-29 cells. p-HPEA-EDA inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and p90RSK in JB6 Cl41 cells, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation, activator protein-1 transactivation and cell transformation promoted by TPA. Moreover, p-HPEA-EDA strongly inhibited the cell viability and COX-2 expression by activation of AMPK activity in HT-29 cells, resulted from depletion of intracellular adenosine triphosphate. p-HPEA-EDA-induced activation of caspase-3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase, phosphorylation of p53 (Ser15) and DNA fragmentation in HT-29 cells, leading to apoptosis. Importantly, p-HPEA-EDA suppressed the colony formation of HT-29 cells in soft agar. In contrast, Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and Z-DEVD-FMK, a caspase-3 inhibitor, blocked the p-HPEA-EDA-inhibited colony formation in HT-29 cells. In vivo chorioallantoic membrane assay also showed that p-HPEA-EDA-inhibited tumorigenicity of HT-29 cells. These findings revealed that targeted activation of AMPK and inhibition of COX-2 expression by p-HPEA-EDA contribute to the chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential of virgin olive oil against colon cancer cells. PMID:21216846

  11. Adenosine augments interleukin-10 production by microglial cells through an A2B adenosine receptor-mediated process

    PubMed Central

    Koscsó, Balázs; Csóka, Balázs; Selmeczy, Zsolt; Himer, Leonóra; Pacher, Pál; Virág, László; Haskó, György

    2011-01-01

    Microglia are activated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns and produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Adenosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside and is a ligand of four G protein-coupled adenosine receptors (ARs), which are the A1AR, A2AAR, A2BAR and A3AR. ARs have been shown to suppress TNF-α production by microglia, but their role in regulating IL-10 production has not been studied. Here, we demonstrate that adenosine augments IL-10 production by activated murine microglia while suppressing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Since the order of potency of selective AR agonists in inducing IL-10 production was 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) > N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-adenosine-5′-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) > 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) ≥ 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5′-N-ethyl-carboxamidoadenosine (CGS21680), and the A2BAR antagonist MRS-1754 prevented the effect of NECA, we conclude that the stimulatory effect of adenosine on IL-10 production is mediated by the A2BAR. Mechanistically, adenosine augmented IL-10 mRNA accumulation by a transcriptional process. Using mutant IL-10 promoter constructs we showed that a CREB-binding region in the promoter mediated the augmenting effect of adenosine on IL-10 transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that adenosine induced CREB phosphorylation at the IL-10 promoter. Silencing CREB using lentivirally delivered shRNA blocked the enhancing effect of adenosine on IL-10 production confirming a role for CREB in mediating the stimulatory effect of adenosine on IL-10 production. In addition, adenosine augmented IL-10 production by stimulating p38 MAPK. Collectively, our results establish that A2BARs augment IL-10 production by activated murine microglia. PMID:22116830

  12. A(3) adenosine receptor ligands: history and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, P G; Cacciari, B; Romagnoli, R; Merighi, S; Varani, K; Borea, P A; Spalluto, G

    2000-03-01

    Adenosine regulates many physiological functions through specific cell membrane receptors. On the basis of pharmacological studies and molecular cloning, four different adenosine receptors have been identified and classified as A(1), A(2A), A(2B), and A(3). These adenosine receptors are members of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. While adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptor subtypes have been pharmacologically characterized through the use of selective ligands, the A(3) adenosine receptor subtype is presently under study in order to better understand its physio-pathological functions. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors has been shown to stimulate phospholipase C and D and to inhibit adenylate cyclase. Activation of A(3) adenosine receptors also causes the release of inflammatory mediators such as histamine from mast cells. These mediators are responsible for processes such as inflammation and hypotension. It has also been suggested that the A(3) receptor plays an important role in brain ischemia, immunosuppression, and bronchospasm in several animal models. Based on these results, highly selective A(3) adenosine receptor agonists and/or antagonists have been indicated as potential drugs for the treatment of asthma and inflammation, while highly selective agonists have been shown to possess cardioprotective effects. The updated material related to this field of research has been rationalized and arranged in order to offer an overview of the topic. PMID:10723024

  13. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is adenosine the common link?

    PubMed

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-10-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the 'adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities' implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic 'comorbidity model', in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain co-morbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions. PMID:25979489

  14. Adenosine: Essential for life but licensed to kill

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Vivian; Deshmukh, Mohanish

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Long et al. (Long et al., 2013) report a cell death priming mechanism activated by p53 that senses extracellular adenosine accumulated following chemotherapy or hypoxia, providing a novel connection between adenosine signaling and apoptosis. PMID:25884366

  15. Targeting of Adenosine Receptors in Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Laubach, Victor E.; French, Brent A.; Okusa, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a common clinical problem after transplantation as well as myocardial infarction and stroke. IR initiates an inflammatory response leading to rapid tissue damage. Adenosine, produced in response to IR, is generally considered as a protective signaling molecule and elicits its physiological responses through four distinct adenosine receptors. The short half-life, lack of specificity, and rapid metabolism limits the use of adenosine as a therapeutic agent. Thus intense research efforts have focused on the synthesis and implementation of specific adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists as potential therapeutic agents for a variety of inflammatory conditions including IR injury. Areas covered by this review This review summarizes current knowledge on IR injury with a focus on lung, heart, and kidney, and examines studies that have advanced our understanding of the role of adenosine receptors and the therapeutic potential of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists for the prevention of IR injury. What the reader will gain The reader will gain insight into the role of adenosine receptor signaling in IR injury. Take home message No clinical therapies are currently available that specifically target IR injury; however, targeting of specific adenosine receptors may offer therapeutic strategies in this regard. PMID:21110787

  16. Different mechanisms of extracellular adenosine accumulation by reduction of the external Ca(2+) concentration and inhibition of adenosine metabolism in spinal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Ryota; Akao, Sanae; Otsuguro, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Ito, Shigeo

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a neuromodulator in the central nervous system. Astrocytes mainly participate in adenosine production, and extracellular adenosine accumulates under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Inhibition of intracellular adenosine metabolism and reduction of the external Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]e) participate in adenosine accumulation, but the precise mechanisms remain unclear. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying extracellular adenosine accumulation in cultured rat spinal astrocytes. The combination of adenosine kinase and deaminase (ADK/ADA) inhibition and a reduced [Ca(2+)]e increased the extracellular adenosine level. ADK/ADA inhibitors increased the level of extracellular adenosine but not of adenine nucleotides, which was suppressed by inhibition of equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 2. Unlike ADK/ADA inhibition, a reduced [Ca(2+)]e increased the extracellular level not only of adenosine but also of ATP. This adenosine increase was enhanced by ENT2 inhibition, and suppressed by sodium polyoxotungstate (ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase inhibitor). Gap junction inhibitors suppressed the increases in adenosine and adenine nucleotide levels by reduction of [Ca(2+)]e. These results indicate that extracellular adenosine accumulation by ADK/ADA inhibition is due to the adenosine release via ENT2, while that by reduction of [Ca(2+)]e is due to breakdown of ATP released via gap junction hemichannels, after which ENT2 incorporates adenosine into the cells. PMID:26003082

  17. Adenosine receptors and asthma in humans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C N

    2008-10-01

    According to an executive summary of the GINA dissemination committee report, it is now estimated that approximately 300 million people (5% of the global population or 1 in 20 persons) have asthma. Despite the scientific progress made over the past several decades toward improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma, there is still a great need for improved therapies, particularly oral therapies that enhance patient compliance and that target new mechanisms of action. Adenosine is an important signalling molecule in human asthma. By acting on extracellular G-protein-coupled ARs on a number of different cell types important in the pathophysiology of human asthma, adenosine affects bronchial reactivity, inflammation and airway remodelling. Four AR subtypes (A(1), A(2a), A(2b) and A(3)) have been cloned in humans, are expressed in the lung, and are all targets for drug development for human asthma. This review summarizes what is known about these AR subtypes and their function in human asthma as well as the pros and cons of therapeutic approaches to these AR targets. A number of molecules with high affinity and high selectivity for the human AR subtypes have entered clinical trials or are poised to enter clinical trials as anti-asthma treatments. With the availability of these molecules for testing in humans, the function of ARs in human asthma, as well as the safety and efficacy of approaches to the different AR targets, can now be determined. PMID:18852693

  18. The Role of Adenosine Signaling in Sickle Cell Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Field, Joshua J.; Nathan, David G.; Linden, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Recent data suggest a role for adenosine signaling in the pathogenesis of sickle cell disease (SCD). Signaling through the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has demonstrated beneficial effects in SCD. Activation of A2ARs decreases inflammation in mice and patients with SCD largely by blocking activation of invariant NKT cells. Decreased inflammation may reduce the severity of vaso-occlusive crises. In contrast, adenosine signaling through the A2B receptor (A2BR) may be detrimental for patients with SCD. Priapism and the formation of sickle erythrocytes may be a consequence of A2BR activation on corpus cavernosal cells and erythrocytes, respectively. Whether adenosine signaling predominantly occurs through A2ARs or A2BRs may depend on differing levels of adenosine and disease state (steady state versus crisis). There may be opportunities to develop novel therapeutic approaches targeting A2ARs and/or A2BRs for patients with SCD. PMID:24589267

  19. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment and cortical responses to adenosine and GABA.

    PubMed

    Mally, J; Connick, J H; Stone, T W

    1990-10-22

    The effects of chronic treatment of mice with clonazepam have been examined on the responses of neocortical slices to adenosine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Responses to these agonists were measured as changes in the depolarisation induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). Added to the superfusion medium diazepam blocked responses to adenosine but not 5-HT; this effect was not observed with 2-chloroadenosine or in the presence of 2-hydroxynitrobenzylthioguanosine. GABA was inactive in control slices but chronic treatment with clonazepam induced responses to GABA and enhanced responses to adenosine but not 5-HT. It is suggested that the induction of GABA responses may reflect the up-regulation of GABA receptors, but the increase of adenosine responses by clonazepam implies that there is no simple relationship between adenosine receptor binding and functional responses. PMID:1979931

  20. A High-Affinity Adenosine Kinase from Anopheles Gambiae

    SciTech Connect

    M Cassera; M Ho; E Merino; E Burgos; A Rinaldo-Matthis; S Almo; V Schramm

    2011-12-31

    Genome analysis revealed a mosquito orthologue of adenosine kinase in Anopheles gambiae (AgAK; the most important vector for the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa). P. falciparum are purine auxotrophs and do not express an adenosine kinase but rely on their hosts for purines. AgAK was kinetically characterized and found to have the highest affinity for adenosine (K{sub m} = 8.1 nM) of any known adenosine kinase. AgAK is specific for adenosine at the nucleoside site, but several nucleotide triphosphate phosphoryl donors are tolerated. The AgAK crystal structure with a bound bisubstrate analogue Ap{sub 4}A (2.0 {angstrom} resolution) reveals interactions for adenosine and ATP and the geometry for phosphoryl transfer. The polyphosphate charge is partly neutralized by a bound Mg{sup 2+} ion and an ion pair to a catalytic site Arg. The AgAK structure consists of a large catalytic core in a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich, and a small cap domain in contact with adenosine. The specificity and tight binding for adenosine arise from hydrogen bond interactions of Asn14, Leu16, Leu40, Leu133, Leu168, Phe168, and Thr171 and the backbone of Ile39 and Phe168 with the adenine ring as well as through hydrogen bond interactions between Asp18, Gly64, and Asn68 and the ribosyl 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups. The structure is more similar to that of human adenosine kinase (48% identical) than to that of AK from Toxoplasma gondii (31% identical). With this extraordinary affinity for AgAK, adenosine is efficiently captured and converted to AMP at near the diffusion limit, suggesting an important role for this enzyme in the maintenance of the adenine nucleotide pool. mRNA analysis verifies that AgAK transcripts are produced in the adult insects.

  1. An adenosine kinase inhibitor, ABT-702, inhibits spinal nociceptive transmission by adenosine release via equilibrative nucleoside transporters in rat.

    PubMed

    Otsuguro, Ken-ichi; Tomonari, Yuki; Otsuka, Saori; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Kon, Yasuhiro; Ito, Shigeo

    2015-10-01

    Adenosine kinase (AK) inhibitor is a potential candidate for controlling pain, but some AK inhibitors have problems of adverse effects such as motor impairment. ABT-702, a non-nucleoside AK inhibitor, shows analgesic effect in animal models of pain. Here, we investigated the effects of ABT-702 on synaptic transmission via nociceptive and motor reflex pathways in the isolated spinal cord of neonatal rats. The release of adenosine from the spinal cord was measured by HPLC. ABT-702 inhibited slow ventral root potentials (sVRPs) in the nociceptive pathway more potently than monosynaptic reflex potentials (MSRs) in the motor reflex pathway. The inhibitory effects of ABT-702 were mimicked by exogenously applied adenosine, blocked by 8CPT (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine), an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, and augmented by EHNA (erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine), an adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor. Equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) inhibitors reversed the effects of ABT-702, but not those of adenosine. ABT-702 released adenosine from the spinal cord, an effect that was also reversed by ENT inhibitors. The ABT-702-facilitated release of adenosine by way of ENTs inhibits nociceptive pathways more potently than motor reflex pathways in the spinal cord via activation of A1 receptors. This feature is expected to lead to good analgesic effects, but, caution may be required for the use of AK inhibitors in the case of ADA dysfunction or a combination with ENT inhibitors. PMID:26066576

  2. Directed evolution of novel polymerase activities: Mutation of a DNA polymerase into an efficient RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Gang; Chen, Liangjing; Sera, Takashi; Fa, Ming; Schultz, Peter G.; Romesberg, Floyd E.

    2002-01-01

    The creation of novel enzymatic function is of great interest, but remains a challenge because of the large sequence space of proteins. We have developed an activity-based selection method to evolve DNA polymerases with RNA polymerase activity. The Stoffel fragment (SF) of Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I is displayed on a filamentous phage by fusing it to a pIII coat protein, and the substrate DNA template/primer duplexes are attached to other adjacent pIII coat proteins. Phage particles displaying SF polymerases, which are able to extend the attached oligonucleotide primer by incorporating ribonucleoside triphosphates and biotinylated UTP, are immobilized to streptavidin-coated magnetic beads and subsequently recovered. After four rounds of screening an SF library, three SF mutants were isolated and shown to incorporate ribonucleoside triphosphates virtually as efficiently as the wild-type enzyme incorporates dNTP substrates. PMID:12011423

  3. Chaperoning of the A1-adenosine receptor by endogenous adenosine - an extension of the retaliatory metabolite concept.

    PubMed

    Kusek, Justyna; Yang, Qiong; Witek, Martin; Gruber, Christian W; Nanoff, Christian; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cell-permeable orthosteric ligands can assist folding of G protein-coupled receptors in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); this pharmacochaperoning translates into increased cell surface levels of receptors. Here we used a folding-defective mutant of human A1-adenosine receptor as a sensor to explore whether endogenously produced adenosine can exert a chaperoning effect. This A1-receptor-Y(288)A was retained in the ER of stably transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells but rapidly reached the plasma membrane in cells incubated with an A1 antagonist. This was phenocopied by raising intracellular adenosine levels with a combination of inhibitors of adenosine kinase, adenosine deaminase, and the equilibrative nucleoside transporter: mature receptors with complex glycosylation accumulated at the cell surface and bound to an A1-selective antagonist with an affinity indistinguishable from the wild-type A1 receptor. The effect of the inhibitor combination was specific, because it did not result in enhanced surface levels of two folding-defective human V2-vasopressin receptor mutants, which were susceptible to pharmacochaperoning by their cognate antagonist. Raising cellular adenosine levels by subjecting cells to hypoxia (5% O2) reproduced chaperoning by the inhibitor combination and enhanced surface expression of A1-receptor-Y(288)A within 1 hour. These findings were recapitulated for the wild-type A1 receptor. Taken together, our observations document that endogenously formed adenosine can chaperone its cognate A1 receptor. This results in a positive feedback loop that has implications for the retaliatory metabolite concept of adenosine action: if chaperoning by intracellular adenosine results in elevated cell surface levels of A1 receptors, these cells will be more susceptible to extracellular adenosine and thus more likely to cope with metabolic distress. PMID:25354767

  4. Immunosuppression via adenosine receptor activation by adenosine monophosphate released from apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Toshihiko; Urade, Yoshihiro; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is coupled with recruitment of macrophages for engulfment of dead cells, and with compensatory proliferation of neighboring cells. Yet, this death process is silent, and it does not cause inflammation. The molecular mechanisms underlying anti-inflammatory nature of the apoptotic process remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that the culture supernatant of apoptotic cells activated the macrophages to express anti-inflammatory genes such as Nr4a and Thbs1. A high level of AMP accumulated in the apoptotic cell supernatant in a Pannexin1-dependent manner. A nucleotidase inhibitor and A2a adenosine receptor antagonist inhibited the apoptotic supernatant-induced gene expression, suggesting AMP was metabolized to adenosine by an ecto-5’-nucleotidase expressed on macrophages, to activate the macrophage A2a adenosine receptor. Intraperitoneal injection of zymosan into Adora2a- or Panx1-deficient mice produced high, sustained levels of inflammatory mediators in the peritoneal lavage. These results indicated that AMP from apoptotic cells suppresses inflammation as a ‘calm down’ signal. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02172.001 PMID:24668173

  5. Ethanol Tolerance Affects Endogenous Adenosine Signaling in Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dali; Xiong, Wei; Jackson, Michael F; Parkinson, Fiona E

    2016-07-01

    Ethanol has many pharmacological effects, including increases in endogenous adenosine levels and adenosine receptor activity in brain. Ethanol consumption is associated with both positive and negative health outcomes, but tolerance to the behavioral effects of ethanol can lead to increased consumption, which increases the risk of negative health outcomes. The present study was performed to test whether a 7-day treatment with ethanol is linked to reduced adenosine signaling and whether this is a consequence of reduced ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity. Wild-type (CD73(+/+)) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase-deficient (CD73(-/-)) mice were treated with ethanol (2 g/kg) or saline for 7 days. In CD73(+/+) mice, repeated ethanol treatment reduced the hypothermic and ataxic effects of acute ethanol, indicating the development of tolerance to the acute effects of ethanol. In CD73(+/+) mice, this 7-day ethanol treatment led to increased hippocampal synaptic activity and reduced adenosine A1 receptor activity under both basal and low Mg(2+) conditions. These effects of ethanol tolerance were associated with an 18% decrease in activity of ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity in hippocampal cell membranes. In contrast, ethanol treatment was not associated with changes in synaptic activity or adenosine signaling in hippocampus from CD73(-/-) mice. These data indicate that ethanol treatment is associated with a reduction in adenosine signaling through adenosine A1 receptors in hippocampus, mediated, at least in part, via reduced ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity. PMID:27189965

  6. Identification of possible adenosine receptors in vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Doctrow, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Adenosine is a vasodilator and has been implicated in increased blood flow in tissues that undergo energy deficiency. During conditions such as hypoxia and ischemia, adenosine is produced and is said to increase blood flow by relaxing the vascular smooth muscle (VSM) lining the resistance vessels. The goal of this research was to identify receptors that might be responsible for adenosine-mediated VSM relaxation. When an insoluble fraction from calf aortic VSM was incubated with /sup 32/P-ATP, two components were phosphorylated. One was identified as myosin light chain by MW, pl, and immunoprecipitation. The other product was identified as phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (DPI) by tic. Both phosphorylations were inhibited by adenosine and by 5'-chloro-5'-deoxyadenosine (Cl-Ado). DPI production was much more sensitive to the nucleosides than was myosin phosphorylation. Neither inhibition involved change in cAMP production. Phosphatidylinositol (Pl) kinase in the VSM membranes required magnesium, was activated and solubilized by Triton X-100, and phosphorylated both endogenous and exogenous Pl. Cl-Ado inhibited Pl kinase in a manner competitive with respect to ATP and noncompetitive with respect to Pl. Adenosine and adenosine analogs modified in the ribose ring were inhibitors with potencies comparable to that of Cl-Ado. Adenine nucleotides and purine-modified adenosine analogs were weaker inhibitors than Cl-Ado.

  7. Ethanol Tolerance Affects Endogenous Adenosine Signaling in Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dali; Xiong, Wei; Jackson, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol has many pharmacological effects, including increases in endogenous adenosine levels and adenosine receptor activity in brain. Ethanol consumption is associated with both positive and negative health outcomes, but tolerance to the behavioral effects of ethanol can lead to increased consumption, which increases the risk of negative health outcomes. The present study was performed to test whether a 7-day treatment with ethanol is linked to reduced adenosine signaling and whether this is a consequence of reduced ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity. Wild-type (CD73+/+) and ecto-5′-nucleotidase-deficient (CD73−/−) mice were treated with ethanol (2 g/kg) or saline for 7 days. In CD73+/+ mice, repeated ethanol treatment reduced the hypothermic and ataxic effects of acute ethanol, indicating the development of tolerance to the acute effects of ethanol. In CD73+/+ mice, this 7-day ethanol treatment led to increased hippocampal synaptic activity and reduced adenosine A1 receptor activity under both basal and low Mg2+ conditions. These effects of ethanol tolerance were associated with an 18% decrease in activity of ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity in hippocampal cell membranes. In contrast, ethanol treatment was not associated with changes in synaptic activity or adenosine signaling in hippocampus from CD73−/− mice. These data indicate that ethanol treatment is associated with a reduction in adenosine signaling through adenosine A1 receptors in hippocampus, mediated, at least in part, via reduced ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity. PMID:27189965

  8. Characteristic molecular vibrations of adenosine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Chee, Hyun Keun; Yang, Jin-San; Joung, Je-Gun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Oh, S June

    2015-02-13

    Although the regulation of membrane receptor activation is known to be crucial for molecular signal transduction, the molecular mechanism underlying receptor activation is not fully elucidated. Here we study the physicochemical nature of membrane receptor behavior by investigating the characteristic molecular vibrations of receptor ligands using computational chemistry and informatics methods. By using information gain, t-tests, and support vector machines, we have identified highly informative features of adenosine receptor (AdoR) ligand and corresponding functional amino acid residues such as Asn (6.55) of AdoR that has informative significance and is indispensable for ligand recognition of AdoRs. These findings may provide new perspectives and insights into the fundamental mechanism of class A G protein-coupled receptor activation. PMID:25622891

  9. Transcriptional activation of the nitrogenase promoter in vitro: adenosine nucleotides are required for inhibition of NIFA activity by NIFL.

    PubMed

    Eydmann, T; Söderbäck, E; Jones, T; Hill, S; Austin, S; Dixon, R

    1995-03-01

    The enhancer-binding protein NIFA is required for transcriptional activation of nif promoters by the alternative holoenzyme form of RNA polymerase, which contains the sigma factor sigma 54 (sigma N). NIFA hydrolyzes nucleoside triphosphates to catalyze the isomerization of closed promoter complexes to transcriptionally competent open complexes. The activity of NIFA is antagonized by the regulatory protein NIFL in response to oxygen and fixed nitrogen in vivo. We have investigated the requirement for nucleotides in the formation and stability of open promoter complexes by NIFA and inhibition of its activity by NIFL at the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifH promoter. Open complexes formed by sigma 54-containing RNA polymerase are considerably more stable to heparin challenge in the presence of GTP than in the presence of ATP. This differential stability is most probably a consequence of GTP being the initiating nucleotide at this promoter. Adenosine nucleosides are specifically required for Azotobacter vinelandii NIFL to inhibit open complex formation by native NIFA, and the nucleoside triphosphatase activity of NIFA is strongly inhibited by NIFL under these conditions. We propose a model in which NIFL modulates the activity of NIFA via an adenosine nucleotide switch. PMID:7868590

  10. Increased Cortical Extracellular Adenosine Correlates with Seizure Termination

    PubMed Central

    Van Gompel, Jamie J.; Bower, Mark R.; Worrell, Gregory A.; Stead, Matt; Chang, Su-Youne; Goerss, Stephan J.; Kim, Inyong; Bennet, Kevin E.; Meyer, Fredric B.; Marsh, W. Richard; Blaha, Charles D.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Seizures are currently defined by their electrographic features. However, neuronal networks are intrinsically dependent upon neurotransmitters of which little is known regarding their peri-ictal dynamics. Evidence supports adenosine as having a prominent role in seizure termination, as its administration can terminate and reduce seizures in animal models. Further, microdialysis studies in humans suggest adenosine is elevated peri-ictally, but the relationship to the seizure is obscured by its temporal measurement limitations. Because electrochemical techniques can provide vastly superior temporal resolution, we test the hypothesis that extracellular adenosine concentrations rise during seizure termination in an animal model and humans using electrochemistry. Methods White farm swine (n=45) were used in an acute cortical model of epilepsy and 10 human epilepsy patients were studied during intraoperative electrocorticography (Ecog). Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensor (WINCS) based fast scan cyclic voltametry (FSCV) and fixed potential amperometry were obtained utilizing an adenosine specific triangular waveform or biosensors respectively. Results Simultaneous Ecog and electrochemistry demonstrated an average adenosine rise of 260% compared to baseline at 7.5 ± 16.9 seconds with amperometry (n=75 events) and 2.6 ± 11.2 seconds with FSCV (n=15 events) prior to electrographic seizure termination. In agreement with these animal data, adenosine elevation prior to seizure termination in a human patient utilizing FSCV was also seen. Significance Simultaneous Ecog and electrochemical recording supports the hypothesis that adenosine rises prior to seizure termination, suggesting that adenosine itself may be responsible for seizure termination. Future work using intraoperative WINCS based FSCV recording may help to elucidate the precise relationship between adenosine and seizure termination. PMID:24483230

  11. Why do asthmatic subjects respond so strongly to inhaled adenosine?

    PubMed

    Meade, C J; Dumont, I; Worrall, L

    2001-08-01

    Bronchospasm induced by adenosine is blocked by representatives of all the major classes of drugs used in the treatment of asthma. Understanding the mechanism of this bronchospasm may help understand the way these drugs work. Clinical studies have suggested involvement of neural pathways, mast-like cells and mediators such as histamine, serotonin and lipoxygenase products. There is a strong link between responsiveness to adenosine and eosinophilia. In different animal models A1, A2b and A3 adenosine receptor subclasses have all been implicated in inducing bronchospasm. whilst occupation of the A2a receptor generally has no, or the opposite effect. At least two different mechanisms, both involving neural pathways, exist. One, involving the adenosine A1 receptor, functions in mast cell depleted animals; the other requires interaction with a population of mast-like cells activated over A2b or A3 receptors. Not only histamine but also serotonin and lipoxygenase products released from the mast-like cells are potential mediators. In animal models good reactivity to adenosine receptor agonists is generally only found when the animals are first sensitized and exposed to allergen in ways likely to induce an allergic inflammation. An exception is the BDE rat, which reacts to adenosine receptor agonists such as APNEA or NECA even without allergen exposure. This rat strain does however show evidence of spontaneous eosinophilic inflammation in the lung even without immunization. As mast cells both release adenosine and respond to adenosine, adenosine provides a non-specific method of amplifying specific signals resulting from IgE/antigen interaction. This mechanism may not only have a pathological significance in asthma; it may be part of a normal bodily defense response that in asthmatic subjects is inappropriately activated. PMID:11521747

  12. Adenosine reversal of in vivo hepatic responsiveness to insulin.

    PubMed

    McLane, M P; Black, P R; Law, W R; Raymond, R M

    1990-01-01

    Modulation by adenosine of hepatic responsiveness to insulin was investigated in vivo in 10 healthy mongrel dogs of both sexes by determining net hepatic glucose output (NHGO) in response to insulin during the presence or absence of exogenous adenosine infusion. In addition, two separate series of experiments were performed to study the effect of adenosine (n = 7) or glucagon (n = 5) on NHGO. Basal NHGO, quantitated via the Fick principle, was significantly decreased by insulin infusion (4 U/min; 4.8 +/- 0.6 vs. -1.7 +/- 2.6 mg.kg-1.min-1, P less than 0.05). The addition of an intrahepatic arterial infusion of adenosine (10 mumol/min) during insulin infusion caused glucose output to return to basal levels (insulin, -1.7 +/- 2.6 mg.kg-1.min-1; insulin + adenosine, 3.8 +/- 1.6 mg.kg-1.min-1, P less than 0.05). The addition of intrahepatic arterial saline (control) during insulin infusion had no effect on insulin's action (insulin, -1.0 +/- 1.9 mg.kg-1.min-1; insulin + saline, -1.2 +/- 1.6 mg.kg-1.min-1, P greater than 0.05). Hepatic glucose, lactate, and oxygen deliveries were not affected during either insulin or insulin plus adenosine infusion. Intrahepatic arterial infusion of adenosine alone had no effect on NHGO, whereas intrahepatic arterial infusion of glucagon alone stimulated glucose output approximately fivefold (basal, 2.7 +/- 0.4 mg.kg-1.min-1; glucagon, 15.5 +/- 1.2 mg.kg-1.min-1, P less than 0.01). These results show that adenosine completely reversed the inhibition by insulin of NHGO. These data suggest that adenosine may act as a modulator of insulin action on the liver. PMID:2210062

  13. Adenosine deaminase in disorders of purine metabolism and in immune deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Tritsch, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the selection titles are: Adenosine Deaminase Impairment and Ribonucleotide Reductase in Human Cells; Adenosine Deaminase and Malignant Cells; Inhibition of Adenosine Deaminase to Increase the Antitumor Activity of Adenine Nucleoside Analogues; and Molecular Biology of the Adenosine Deaminase Gene and Messenger RNA.

  14. Excess adenosine in murine penile erectile tissues contributes to priapism via A2B adenosine receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Tiejuan; Abbasi, Shahrzad; Zhang, Hong; Uray, Karen; Chunn, Janci L.; Xia, Ling Wei; Molina, Jose G.; Weisbrodt, Norman W.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Xia, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Priapism, abnormally prolonged penile erection in the absence of sexual excitation, is associated with ischemia-mediated erectile tissue damage and subsequent erectile dysfunction. It is common among males with sickle cell disease (SCD), and SCD transgenic mice are an accepted model of the disorder. Current strategies to manage priapism suffer from a poor fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the disorder. Here we report that mice lacking adenosine deaminase (ADA), an enzyme necessary for the breakdown of adenosine, displayed unexpected priapic activity. ADA enzyme therapy successfully corrected the priapic activity both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that it was dependent on elevated adenosine levels. Further genetic and pharmacologic evidence demonstrated that A2B adenosine receptor–mediated (A2BR-mediated) cAMP and cGMP induction was required for elevated adenosine–induced prolonged penile erection. Finally, priapic activity in SCD transgenic mice was also caused by elevated adenosine levels and A2BR activation. Thus, we have shown that excessive adenosine accumulation in the penis contributes to priapism through increased A2BR signaling in both Ada–/– and SCD transgenic mice. These findings provide insight regarding the molecular basis of priapism and suggest that strategies to either reduce adenosine or block A2BR activation may prove beneficial in the treatment of this disorder. PMID:18340377

  15. Genome walking by Klenow polymerase.

    PubMed

    Volpicella, Mariateresa; Leoni, Claudia; Fanizza, Immacolata; Rius, Sebastian; Gallerani, Raffaele; Ceci, Luigi R

    2012-11-15

    Genome walking procedures are all based on a final polymerase chain reaction amplification, regardless of the strategy employed for the synthesis of the substrate molecule. Here we report a modification of an already established genome walking strategy in which a single-strand DNA substrate is obtained by primer extension driven by Klenow polymerase and which results suitable for the direct sequencing of complex eukaryotic genomes. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated by the identification of nucleotide sequences in the case of two gene families (chiA and P1) in the genomes of several maize species. PMID:22922302

  16. Production of RNA by a polymerase protein encapsulated within phospholipid vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Breaker, R. R.; Joyce, G. F.; Deamer, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    Catalyzed polymerization reactions represent a primary anabolic activity of all cells. It can be assumed that early cells carried out such reactions, in which macromolecular catalysts were encapsulated within some type of boundary membrane. In the experiments described here, we show that a template-independent RNA polymerase (polynucleotide phosphorylase) can be encapsulated in dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles without substrate. When the substrate adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was provided externally, long-chain RNA polymers were synthesized within the vesicles. Substrate flux was maximized by maintaining the vesicles at the phase transition temperature of the component lipid. A protease was introduced externally as an additional control. Free enzyme was inactivated under identical conditions. RNA products were visualized in situ by ethidium bromide fluorescence. The products were harvested from the liposomes, radiolabeled, and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Encapsulated catalysts represent a model for primitive cellular systems in which an RNA polymerase was entrapped within a protected microenvironment.

  17. Extracellular Adenosine Mediates a Systemic Metabolic Switch during Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Bajgar, Adam; Kucerova, Katerina; Jonatova, Lucie; Tomcala, Ales; Schneedorferova, Ivana; Okrouhlik, Jan; Dolezal, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Immune defense is energetically costly, and thus an effective response requires metabolic adaptation of the organism to reallocate energy from storage, growth, and development towards the immune system. We employ the natural infection of Drosophila with a parasitoid wasp to study energy regulation during immune response. To combat the invasion, the host must produce specialized immune cells (lamellocytes) that destroy the parasitoid egg. We show that a significant portion of nutrients are allocated to differentiating lamellocytes when they would otherwise be used for development. This systemic metabolic switch is mediated by extracellular adenosine released from immune cells. The switch is crucial for an effective immune response. Preventing adenosine transport from immune cells or blocking adenosine receptor precludes the metabolic switch and the deceleration of development, dramatically reducing host resistance. Adenosine thus serves as a signal that the “selfish” immune cells send during infection to secure more energy at the expense of other tissues. PMID:25915062

  18. Alterations of adenosine A1 receptors in morphine dependence.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Leite-Morris, K A; Sears, M T

    1994-09-19

    The possibility that central adenosine A1 and A2a receptors mediate opiate dependence was examined in morphine-treated mice using radioligand binding methods. Mice treated with morphine for 72 h demonstrated significant increases in naloxone precipitated abstinence behaviors of jumping, wet-dog shakes, teeth chattering, forepaw trends, forepaw tremors and diarrhea compared to vehicle-treated mice. Increased concentrations of cortical adenosine A1 receptor sites, but not striatal adenosine A2a sites, were found in saturation binding studies from morphine-dependent mice. Decreases in cortical A1 agonist binding affinity values along with increases in agonist binding sites were demonstrated in competition binding studies. These results suggest that adaptive changes of upregulation and sensitization of adenosine A1 receptors play a role in mediating the opiate abstinence syndrome. PMID:7820640

  19. Proton transfer in oxidized adenosine self-aggregates.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, Amedeo; Caruso, Tonino; Celentano, Maurizio; La Rocca, Mario Vincenzo; Peluso, Andrea

    2013-10-14

    The UV-vis and the IR spectra of derivativized adenosine in dichloromethane have been recorded during potentiostatic oxidation at an optically transparent thin layer electrode. Oxidized adenosine shows a broad Zundel like absorption extending from 2800 up to 3600 cm(-1), indicating that a proton transfer process is occurring. Theoretical computations predict that proton transfer is indeed favored in oxidized 1:1 self-association complexes and allow to assign all the observed transient spectroscopic signals. PMID:24116647

  20. Nicotinamide augments the survival and incidence of apoptosis in glioma cells following photodynamic therapy in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisland, Stuart K.; Modi, Nayan; Wilson, Brian C.

    2004-10-01

    The ability to customize photodynamic therapy (PDT) parameters with regards to timing and dosing of administered drug and light can be beneficial in determining target specificity and mode of cell death. Sustained, low level PDT or metronomic PDT (mPDT) may afford enhanced apoptotic cell death. This is of particular importance when considering PDT for the treatment of brain tumors as unlike apoptosis, necrotic cell death often leads to inflammation with increased intracranial pressure. The ability, therefore, to 'fine tune' PDT in favour of apoptosis is paramount. We have studied both acute (one time treatment) PDT (aPDT) and mPDT delivery strategies in combination with nicotinamide (NA) in an attempt to maximize the number of tumor cells dieing by apoptosis. Using several different glioma cell lines (9L, U87-MG and CNS-1) we now confirm that NA provides a dose-dependent (0.1-0.5 mM) increase in apoptotic cells following d-aminolevulinic acid-mediated aPDT or mPDT. Furthermore, using the 9L cell line stably transfected with the luciferase gene, NA was shown to delay the depletion of bioluminscence signal in aPDT and mPDT treated cells, inferring that adenosine triphosphate levels are maintained for longer following NA treatment. NA has previously been reported as promoting neuronal and vascular cell survival in normal brain following a number of neurological insults in which reactive oxygen species are implicated including, stroke, Alzheimer's disease and toxin-induced lesions. It is likely that the effects of NA reflect its capacity as an antioxidant as well as its ability to inhibit poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-mediated depletion of ATP. Our results indicate that NA may prove therapeutically advantageous when used in combination with PDT treatment of brain tumors.

  1. Protective effects of sirtuins in cardiovascular diseases: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Winnik, Stephan; Auwerx, Johan; Sinclair, David A.; Matter, Christian M.

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins (Sirt1–Sirt7) comprise a family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent enzymes. While deacetylation reflects their main task, some of them have deacylase, adenosine diphosphate-ribosylase, demalonylase, glutarylase, and desuccinylase properties. Activated upon caloric restriction and exercise, they control critical cellular processes in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and mitochondria to maintain metabolic homeostasis, reduce cellular damage and dampen inflammation—all of which serve to protect against a variety of age-related diseases, including cardiovascular pathologies. This review focuses on the cardiovascular effects of Sirt1, Sirt3, Sirt6, and Sirt7. Most is known about Sirt1. This deacetylase protects from endothelial dysfunction, atherothrombosis, diet-induced obesity, type 2 diabetes, liver steatosis, and myocardial infarction. Sirt3 provides beneficial effects in the context of left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyopathy, oxidative stress, metabolic homeostasis, and dyslipidaemia. Sirt6 is implicated in ameliorating dyslipidaemia, cellular senescence, and left ventricular hypertrophy. Sirt7 plays a role in lipid metabolism and cardiomyopathies. Most of these data were derived from experimental findings in genetically modified mice, where NFκB, Pcsk9, low-density lipoprotein-receptor, PPARγ, superoxide dismutase 2, poly[adenosine diphosphate-ribose] polymerase 1, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase were identified among others as crucial molecular targets and/or partners of sirtuins. Of note, there is translational evidence for a role of sirtuins in patients with endothelial dysfunction, type 1 or type 2 diabetes and longevity. Given the availability of specific Sirt1 activators or pan-sirtuin activators that boost levels of the sirtuin cofactor NAD+, we anticipate that this field will move quickly from bench to bedside. PMID:26112889

  2. The A3 adenosine receptor: history and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    By general consensus, the omnipresent purine nucleoside adenosine is considered a major regulator of local tissue function, especially when energy supply fails to meet cellular energy demand. Adenosine mediation involves activation of a family of four G protein-coupled adenosine receptors (ARs): A(1), A(2)A, A(2)B, and A(3). The A(3) adenosine receptor (A(3)AR) is the only adenosine subtype to be overexpressed in inflammatory and cancer cells, thus making it a potential target for therapy. Originally isolated as an orphan receptor, A(3)AR presented a twofold nature under different pathophysiologic conditions: it appeared to be protective/harmful under ischemic conditions, pro/anti-inflammatory, and pro/antitumoral depending on the systems investigated. Until recently, the greatest and most intriguing challenge has been to understand whether, and in which cases, selective A(3) agonists or antagonists would be the best choice. Today, the choice has been made and A(3)AR agonists are now under clinical development for some disorders including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, glaucoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. More specifically, the interest and relevance of these new agents derives from clinical data demonstrating that A(3)AR agonists are both effective and safe. Thus, it will become apparent in the present review that purine scientists do seem to be getting closer to their goal: the incorporation of adenosine ligands into drugs with the ability to save lives and improve human health. PMID:25387804

  3. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy during maximal coronary artery vasodilation with adenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S.; Mahmarian, J.J. )

    1991-05-21

    Pharmacologic coronary vasodilation as an adjunct to thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy provides an important alternative form of stress that has been increasingly used in patients unable to perform an exercise stress test. Although dipyridamole has traditionally been used for this purpose, there are several compelling reasons why adenosine may be a preferable agent. First, dipyridamole acts by blocking the reuptake and transport of adenosine, which is the effective substance responsible for coronary vasodilation. Second, exogenous adenosine has a very short half-life (less than 2 seconds), which explains its very short duration of action as well as the brief, self-limiting duration of its side effects. Third, the adenosine infusion is controllable and may be increased or decreased as desired. Fourth, the coronary vasodilation induced by the doses of adenosine we recommend (140 micrograms/kg/min) may be more profound than that induced by the standard dipyridamole dose. Our experience to date, with nearly 1,000 patients studied, shows the adenosine thallium-201 test to be practical and well tolerated, with high sensitivity (87%) and specificity (94%) for detecting coronary artery disease.

  4. Detrimental effects of adenosine signaling in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Weiru; Grenz, Almut; Sun, Hong; Tao, Lijian; Lu, Guangxiu; Alexander, Danny C; Milburn, Michael V; Carter-Dawson, Louvenia; Lewis, Dorothy E; Zhang, Wenzheng; Eltzschig, Holger K; Kellems, Rodney E; Blackburn, Michael R; Juneja, Harinder S; Xia, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia can act as an initial trigger to induce erythrocyte sickling and eventual end organ damage in sickle cell disease (SCD). Many factors and metabolites are altered in response to hypoxia and may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Using metabolomic profiling, we found that the steady-state concentration of adenosine in the blood was elevated in a transgenic mouse model of SCD. Adenosine concentrations were similarly elevated in the blood of humans with SCD. Increased adenosine levels promoted sickling, hemolysis and damage to multiple tissues in SCD transgenic mice and promoted sickling of human erythrocytes. Using biochemical, genetic and pharmacological approaches, we showed that adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR)-mediated induction of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, an erythrocyte-specific metabolite that decreases the oxygen binding affinity of hemoglobin, underlies the induction of erythrocyte sickling by excess adenosine both in cultured human red blood cells and in SCD transgenic mice. Thus, excessive adenosine signaling through the A2BR has a pathological role in SCD. These findings may provide new therapeutic possibilities for this disease. PMID:21170046

  5. Adenosine deaminase inhibition enhances the inotropic response mediated by A1 adenosine receptor in hyperthyroid guinea pig atrium.

    PubMed

    Kemeny-Beke, Adam; Jakab, Anita; Zsuga, Judit; Vecsernyes, Miklos; Karsai, Denes; Pasztor, Fanni; Grenczer, Maria; Szentmiklosi, Andras Jozsef; Berta, Andras; Gesztelyi, Rudolf

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that inhibition of adenosine deaminase (ADA) enhances the efficiency of signal-transduction of myocardial A1 adenosine receptors in hyperthyroidism. The inotropic response to N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), a selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist resistant to ADA, was investigated in the absence or presence of erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA), an ADA and cGMP-stimulated 3',5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE2) inhibitor, or of pentostatin (2'-deoxycoformycin; DCF), an exclusive ADA inhibitor, in left atria isolated from eu- or hyperthyroid guinea pigs. Both ADA inhibitors enhanced the effect of CPA only in hyperthyroid atria. EHNA significantly increased the Emax (mean+/-S.E.M.) from 83.8+/-1.2% to 93.4+/-1.2%, while DCF significantly decreased the logEC50 from -7.5+/-0.07 to -7.83+/-0.07 in hyperthyroid samples. Conversely, EHNA also diminished the logEC50 (from -7.5+/-0.07 to -7.65+/-0.07) and DCF also raised the Emax (from 83.8+/-1.2% to 85.7+/-2%) in hyperthyroidism, but these changes were not significant. In conclusion, ADA inhibition moderately but significantly enhanced the efficiency of A(1) adenosine receptor signaling pathway in the hyperthyroid guinea pig atrium. This suggests that elevated intracellular adenosine level caused by ADA inhibition may improve the suppressed responsiveness to A1 adenosine receptor agonists associated with the hyperthyroid state. Alternatively or in addition, the role of decreased concentration of adenosine degradation products cannot be excluded. Furthermore, in the case of EHNA, inhibition of PDE2 also appears to contribute to the enhanced A1 adenosine receptor signaling in the hyperthyroid guinea pig atrium. PMID:17574432

  6. Interstitial adenosine concentration is increased by dipyridamole

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, M.W.; Wangler, R.D.; DeWitt, D.F.; Wang, C.Y.; Bassingthwaighte, J.B.; Sparks, H.V.

    1986-03-01

    The authors used the multiple indicator dilution technique to observe the capillary transport of adenosine (ADO) in isolated guinea pig hearts. Radiolabelled albumin, sucrose and ADO were injected on the arterial side and measured in venous samples collected during the following 20 seconds. Transport parameters calculated from these data include permeability-surface area products (PS) for transendothelial diffusion, endothelial cell (EC) uptake at the lumenal and ablumenal membranes, and EC metabolism. With simultaneous measurements of arterial and venous ADO concentrations and flow, the authors calculated the steady-state interstitial fluid (ISF) ADO concentration. Under control conditions the venous ADO concentration was 7.1 +/- 2.8 nM. The calculated ISF concentration depends on whether they assume the venous ADO comes from the ISF, or directly from ECs. These ISF concentrations are 25 +/- 12 nM and 9.8 +/- 4.0 nM, respectively. During dipyridamole infusion (10 uM) the EC transport parameters became nearly zero. Venous and ISF ADO concentrations increased to 33 +/- 8.9 nM and 169 +/- 42 nM, respectively. The authors conclude that the ISF ADO concentration is 1.5-4 fold higher than the venous concentration at rest, and the ISF concentration increases greatly with dipyridamole.

  7. Poly(A) Polymerase from Vaccinia Virus-Infected Cells I. Partial Purification and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Brakel, Christine; Kates, Joseph R.

    1974-01-01

    Poly(A) polymerase activity is induced during vaccinia virus infection of HeLa cells. The enzyme is maximally induced at 3.5 h postinfection. Partial purification frees the preparation of RNase activity and RNA polymerase activity. ATP is the substrate for poly(A) synthesis. A small amount of poly(A) is produced from added adenosine diphosphate due to the production of ATP by an adenylate kinase present in the preparation. The incorporation of ATP into poly(A) is dependent on divalent cations (Mg2+ or Mn2+) and is not inhibited by UTP, CTP, or GTP. Poly(U) stimulates ATP incorporation; poly(A) and poly(C) have little effect on ATP incorporation, and poly(dT) is extremely inhibitory. RNA prepared from HeLa cells and from the partially purified poly(A) polymerase (the enzyme preparation contains endogenous RNA [Brakel and Kates]) stimulates ATP incorporation by poly(A) polymerase which was subjected to DEAE-cellulose chromatography. RNase's, pancreatic and T1, inhibit the production of poly(A). DNase has little effect. Poly(U) is able to stimulate poly(A) production in the presence of T1 RNase. PMID:4417406

  8. Role of A3 adenosine receptor in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Heng; Zhang, Enshui; Feng, Chang; Zhao, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Neuropathy is the most common diabetic complication. Although the A1 and A2A adenosine receptors are important pharmacological targets in alleviating diabetic neuropathy, the role of the A3 adenosine receptor remains unknown. Because the A3 adenosine receptor regulates pain induced by chronic constriction injury or chemotherapy, its stimulation might also attenuate diabetic neuropathy. This study examines the effects of systemic treatment with the A3 adenosine receptor agonist 1-deoxy-1-[6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamide (IB-MECA) on diabetic neuropathy and explores the putative mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects. We show that IB-MECA alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal hypoalgesia in mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after streptozocin (STZ) treatment. Furthermore, IB-MECA prevented the reduction in sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and sensory nerve conduction velocity in diabetic mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. Similarly, IB-MECA inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and decreased the generation of tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord of mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. These phenomena were associated with reduction of A3 adenosine receptor expression in the spinal cord after long-term diabetes. Our results suggest that the A3 adenosine receptor plays a critical role in regulating diabetic neuropathy and that reduction in A3 adenosine receptor expression/function might contribute to the progression of diabetic neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27319979

  9. Adenosine deaminase from Streptomyces coelicolor: recombinant expression, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Pornbanlualap, Somchai; Chalopagorn, Pornchanok

    2011-08-01

    The sequencing of the genome of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) identified seven putative adenine/adenosine deaminases and adenosine deaminase-like proteins, none of which have been biochemically characterized. This report describes recombinant expression, purification and characterization of SCO4901 which had been annotated in data bases as a putative adenosine deaminase. The purified putative adenosine deaminase gives a subunit Mr=48,400 on denaturing gel electrophoresis and an oligomer molecular weight of approximately 182,000 by comparative gel filtration. These values are consistent with the active enzyme being composed of four subunits with identical molecular weights. The turnover rate of adenosine is 11.5 s⁻¹ at 30 °C. Since adenine is deaminated ∼10³ slower by the enzyme when compared to that of adenosine, these data strongly show that the purified enzyme is an adenosine deaminase (ADA) and not an adenine deaminase (ADE). Other adenine nucleosides/nucleotides, including 9-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-adenine (ara-A), 5'-AMP, 5'-ADP and 5'-ATP, are not substrates for the enzyme. Coformycin and 2'-deoxycoformycin are potent competitive inhibitors of the enzyme with inhibition constants of 0.25 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Amino acid sequence alignment of ScADA with ADAs from other organisms reveals that eight of the nine highly conserved catalytic site residues in other ADAs are also conserved in ScADA. The only non-conserved residue is Asn317, which replaces Asp296 in the murine enzyme. Based on these data, it is suggested here that ADA and ADE proteins are divergently related enzymes that have evolved from a common α/β barrel scaffold to catalyze the deamination of different substrates, using a similar catalytic mechanism. PMID:21511036

  10. Increased adenosine contributes to penile fibrosis, a dangerous feature of priapism, via A2B adenosine receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jiaming; Jiang, Xianzhen; Dai, Yingbo; Zhang, Yujin; Tang, Yuxin; Sun, Hong; Mi, Tiejuan; Phatarpekar, Prasad V.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Xia, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Priapism is a condition of persistent penile erection in the absence of sexual excitation. Of men with sickle cell disease (SCD), 40% display priapism. The disorder is a dangerous and urgent condition, given its association with penile fibrosis and eventual erectile dysfunction. Current strategies to prevent its progression are poor because of a lack of fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms for penile fibrosis in priapism. Here we demonstrate that increased adenosine is a novel causative factor contributing to penile fibrosis in two independent animal models of priapism, adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient mice and SCD transgenic mice. An important finding is that chronic reduction of adenosine by ADA enzyme therapy successfully attenuated penile fibrosis in both mouse models, indicating an essential role of increased adenosine in penile fibrosis and a novel therapeutic possibility for this serious complication. Subsequently, we identified that both mice models share a similar fibrotic gene expression profile in penile tissue (including procollagen I, TGF-β1, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 mRNA), suggesting that they share similar signaling pathways for progression to penile fibrosis. Thus, in an effort to decipher specific cell types and underlying mechanism responsible for adenosine-mediated penile fibrosis, we purified corpus cavernosal fibroblast cells (CCFCs), the major cell type involved in this process, from wild-type mice. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the major receptor expressed in these cells is the adenosine receptor A2BR. Based on this fact, we further purified CCFCs from A2BR-deficient mice and demonstrated that A2BR is essential for excess adenosine-mediated penile fibrosis. Finally, we revealed that TGF-β functions downstream of the A2BR to increase CCFC collagen secretion and proliferation. Overall, our studies identify an essential role of increased adenosine in the pathogenesis of penile fibrosis via A2BR signaling and

  11. A bridge to transcription by RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D; Kornberg, Roger D

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of single amino-acid substitution mutations critical for RNA polymerase function published in Journal of Biology supports a proposed mechanism for polymerase action in which movement of the polymerase 'bridge helix' promotes transcriptional activity in cooperation with a critical substrate-interaction domain, the 'trigger loop'. PMID:19090964

  12. Effect of adenosine on the growth of human T-lymphocyte leukemia cell line MOLT-4.

    PubMed

    Streitová, Denisa; Weiterová, Lenka; Hofer, Michal; Holá, Jirina; Horváth, Viktor; Kozubík, Alois; Znojil, Vladimír

    2007-09-01

    Adenosine has been observed to suppress the growth of MOLT-4 human leukemia cells in vitro. Changes in the cell cycle, especially increased percentage of cells in S phase, prolonged generation time, and induction of apoptosis at higher adenosine concentrations have been found to be responsible for the growth suppression. Dipyridamole, a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, reversed partially but significantly the adenosine-induced growth suppression. It follows from these results that the action of adenosine on the MOLT-4 cells comprises its cellular uptake and intracellular operation. These findings present new data on anticancer efficacy of adenosine. PMID:17882653

  13. Tween 20-stabilized gold nanoparticles combined with adenosine triphosphate-BODIPY conjugates for the fluorescence detection of adenosine with more than 1000-fold selectivity.

    PubMed

    Hung, Szu-Ying; Shih, Ya-Chen; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2015-02-01

    This study describes the development of a simple, enzyme-free, label-free, sensitive, and selective system for detecting adenosine based on the use of Tween 20-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Tween 20-AuNPs) as an efficient fluorescence quencher for boron dipyrromethene-conjugated adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BODIPY-ATP) and as a recognition element for adenosine. BODIPY-ATP can interact with Tween 20-AuNPs through the coordination between the adenine group of BODIPY-ATP and Au atoms on the NP surface, thereby causing the fluorescence quenching of BODIPY-ATP through the nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) effect. When adenosine attaches to the NP surface, the attached adenosine exhibits additional electrostatic attraction to BODIPY-ATP. As a result, the presence of adenosine enhances the efficiency of AuNPs in fluorescence quenching of BODIPY-ATP. The AuNP-induced fluorescence quenching of BODIPY-ATP progressively increased with an increase in the concentration of adenosine; the detection limit at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for adenosine was determined to be 60nM. The selectivity of the proposed system was more than 1000-fold for adenosine over any adenosine analogs and other nucleotides. The proposed system combined with a phenylboronic acid-containing column was successfully applied to the determination of adenosine in urine. PMID:25604821

  14. Unpredictable Chronic Stress Alters Adenosine Metabolism in Zebrafish Brain.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, F F; Altenhofen, S; Kist, L W; Leite, C E; Bogo, M R; Cognato, G P; Bonan, C D

    2016-05-01

    Stress is considered a risk factor for several human disorders. Despite the broad knowledge of stress responses in mammals, data on the relationship between unpredictable chronic stress (UCS) and its effects on purinergic signaling are limited. ATP hydrolysis by ectonucleotidases is an important source of adenosine, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) contributes to the control of the nucleoside concentrations. Considering that some stress models could affect signaling systems, the objective of this study was to investigate whether UCS alters ectonucleotidase and ADA pathway in zebrafish brain. Additionally, we analyzed ATP metabolism as well as ada1, ada2.1, ada2.2, adaL, and adaasi gene expression in zebrafish brain. Our results have demonstrated that UCS did not alter ectonucleotidase and soluble ADA activities. However, ecto-ADA activity was significantly decreased (26.8%) in brain membranes of animals exposed to UCS when compared to the control group. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analysis did not show significant changes on ADA gene expression after the UCS exposure. The brain ATP metabolism showed a marked increase in adenosine levels (ADO) in animals exposed to UCS. These data suggest an increase on extracellular adenosine levels in zebrafish brain. Since this nucleoside has neuromodulatory and anxiolytic effects, changes in adenosine levels could play a role in counteracting the stress, which could be related to a compensatory mechanism in order to restore the homeostasis. PMID:26081145

  15. Dicinnamoylquinides in roasted coffee inhibit the human adenosine transporter.

    PubMed

    de Paulis, Tomas; Schmidt, Dennis E; Bruchey, Aleksandra K; Kirby, Michael T; McDonald, Michael P; Commers, Patricia; Lovinger, David M; Martin, Peter R

    2002-05-10

    Preliminary screening of a minor, non-xanthine constituent of roasted coffee, 3,4-diferuloyl-1,5-quinolactone (DIFEQ), showed inhibition of the adenosine transporter at low micromolar concentration. DIFEQ is a neutral derivative of the chlorogenic acids, i.e. isomeric mono- and di-substituted coumaroyl-, caffeoyl-, and feruloyl-esters of quinic acid, formed in the roasting process of coffee. Displacement of the adenosine transporter antagonist [(3)H](S)-(nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine binding by DIFEQ in cultured U-937 cell preparations, expressing the human adenosine transporter protein (hENT1), showed a K(i) of 0.96+/-0.13 microM. Extracts of regular and decaffeinated coffee showed binding activities equivalent to 30-40 mg DIFEQ per three cups of coffee. Acute administration of a high dose of DIFEQ (100 mg/kg i.p.) reduced open field locomotion in mice for 20 min in correlation with brain levels of DIFEQ. Both 3,4-dicaffeoyl-1,5-quinide and 3,4-dicoumaroyl-1,5-quinide, two close structural analogs of DIFEQ also present in roasted coffee, showed similar affinities for the adenosine transporter, while the corresponding 3- and 4-mono caffeoyl- and feruloyl-quinides were one to two orders of magnitudes less active. This suggests that 3,4-dicinnamoyl-1,5-quinides in coffee could have the potential to raise extra-cellular adenosine levels, thereby counteracting the stimulant effect of caffeine. PMID:12065074

  16. Regulation of Adenosine Deaminase on Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dongchun; Zuo, Aijun; Zhao, Ronglan; Shao, Hui; Kaplan, Henry J; Sun, Deming

    2016-03-15

    Adenosine is an important regulator of the immune response, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibits this regulatory effect by converting adenosine into functionally inactive molecules. Studies showed that adenosine receptor agonists can be anti- or proinflammatory. Clarification of the mechanisms that cause these opposing effects should provide a better guide for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we investigated the effect of ADA on the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) induced by immunizing EAU-prone mice with a known uveitogenic peptide, IRBP1-20. Our results showed that the effective time to administer a single dose of ADA to suppress induction of EAU was 8-14 d postimmunization, shortly before EAU expression; however, ADA treatment at other time points exacerbated disease. ADA preferentially inhibited Th17 responses, and this effect was γδ T cell dependent. Our results demonstrated that the existing immune status strongly influences the anti- or proinflammatory effects of ADA. Our observations should help to improve the design of ADA- and adenosine receptor-targeted therapies. PMID:26856700

  17. Prehospital use of adenosine by ambulance services in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Adams, R.; Bon, V.

    2003-01-01

    Background The prehospital use of adenosine in the treatment of supraventricular arrhythmias has recently been implemented in standard ambulance care. However, establishing the origin and nature of the arrhythmia with certainty is an absolute requirement for using adenosine. Methods The ability of the ambulance nurse to predict supraventricular arrhythmias and the necessity of prehospital treatment of arrhythmias in general was evaluated. To do this, cardiologists at the Academic Medical Centre of Amsterdam were consulted and a literature search by means of an electronic search in Pubmed was performed. The search was complemented by a second survey concerning antagonists of adenosine using the keywords: adenosine and theophylline. Moreover, the Ambulance Nurse textbook, the National Protocol for Ambulance Care as well as the explanatory memorandum to the protocol were consulted. Results No strong indication for the prehospital use of adenosine was found, while detrimental effects of the drug can occur. There is no literature showing the ability of ambulance staff to correctly interpret complex cardiac arrhythmias in the Netherlands; the current ambulance protocol does not prevent an incorrect choice of therapy and medication. Conclusion It is strongly advised against using antiarrhythmic medication for the treatment of tachycardias in a prehospital setting if this treatment can be postponed to the hospital environment. PMID:25696211

  18. Adenosine signaling and the regulation of chronic lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Schneider, Daniel J.; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease are characterized by inflammation and tissue remodeling processes that compromise pulmonary function. Adenosine is produced in the inflamed and damaged lung where it plays numerous roles in the regulation of inflammation and tissue remodeling. Extracellular adenosine serves as an autocrine and paracrine signaling molecule by engaging cell surface adenosine receptors. Preclinical and cellular studies suggest that adenosine plays an anti-inflammatory role in processes associated with acute lung disease, where activation of the A2AR and A2BR have promising implications for the treatment of these disorders. In contrast, there is growing evidence that adenosine signaling through the A1R, A2BR and A3R may serve pro-inflammatory and tissue remodeling functions in chronic lung diseases. This review discusses the current progress of research efforts and clinical trials aimed at understanding the complexities of this signaling pathway as they pertain to the development of treatment strategies for chronic lung diseases. PMID:19426761

  19. Antagonism by theophylline of respiratory inhibition induced by adenosine.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, F L; Millhorn, D E; Kiley, J P

    1985-11-01

    The effects on respiration of an analogue of adenosine, L-2-N6-(phenylisopropyl)adenosine (PIA), and of the methylxanthine, theophylline, were determined in 19 vagotomized glomectomized cats whose end-tidal PCO2 was kept constant by means of a servo-controlled ventilator. Integrated phrenic nerve activity was used to represent respiratory output. Our results show that PIA, whether given systemically or into the third cerebral ventricle, depressed respiration. Systemically administered theophylline stimulated respiration. Theophylline given intravenously, or into the third ventricle not only reversed the depressive effects of previously administered PIA but caused further increases of respiration above the control level. Prior systemic administration of theophylline blocked both respiratory and hypotensive effects of subsequently administered PIA. Effects of either agent on medullary extracellular fluid pH did not explain the results. We conclude that the adenosine analogue PIA, acts to inhibit neurons in the brain that are involved in the control of respiration and that its effects are blocked by theophylline. We suggest that adenosine acts as a tonic modulator of respiration and that theophylline stimulates breathing by competitive antagonism of adenosine at neuronal receptor sites. PMID:4066573

  20. The evolutionary conservation of DNA polymerase. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.A.; Korn, D.; Wang, T.S.F. )

    1988-08-25

    The evolutionary conservation of DNA polymerase {alpha} was assessed by immunological and molecular genetic approaches. Four anti-human KB cell DNA polymerase {alpha} monoclonal antibodies were tested for their ability to recognize a phylogenetically broad array of eukaryotic DNA polymerases. While the single non-neutralizing antibody used in this study recognizes higher mammalian (human, simian, canine, and bovine) polymerases only, three neutralizing antibodies exhibit greater, but variable, extents of cross-reactivity among vertebrate species. Genomic Southern hybridization studies with the cDNA of the human DNA polymerase {alpha} catalytic polypeptide identify the existence of many consensus DNA sequences within the DNA polymerase genes of vertebrate, invertebrate, plant and unicellular organisms. These findings illustrate the differential evolutionary conservation of four unique epitopes on DNA sequences, presumably reflective of critical functional domains, in the DNA polymerase genes from a broad diversity of living forms.

  1. Current status of A1 adenosine receptor allosteric enhancers.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Romeo; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Moorman, Allan R; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is an ubiquitous nucleoside involved in various physiological and pathological functions by stimulating A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs). Allosteric enhancers to A1ARs may represent novel therapeutic agents because they increase the activity of these receptors by mediating a shift to their active form in the A1AR-G protein ternary complex. In this manner, they are able to amplify the action of endogenous adenosine, which is produced in high concentrations under conditions of metabolic stress. A1AR allosteric enhancers could be used as a justifiable alternative to the exogenous agonists that are characterized by receptor desensitization and downregulation. In this review, an analysis of some of the most interesting allosteric modulators of A1ARs has been reported. PMID:26144263

  2. Adenosine deaminase--the non-invasive marker of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pal, Shyamali; Gupta, Sanjoy

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis is the India's biggest health problem especially in rural areas. A quick and dependable investigation is absolutely essential. Adenosine deaminase was estimated from the biological fluids (ascitic/pleural/CSF) with the help of the kit obtained from Tulip India Pvt Ltd. The method is based on the principle of Galati & Giusti colorimetric method. The method is simple, inexpensive and results are also reproducible. Elevation of adenosine deaminase has shown high specificity in all biological fluids. As the estimation principle is based on synthesis of ammonia so there is limitation of the procedure when the site is kidney. Similarly if the site is skin, as fluid cannot be collected from the site, adenosine deaminase estimation is also not possible. PMID:23029824

  3. Stability of Diluted Adenosine Solutions in Polyolefin Infusion Bags

    PubMed Central

    Almagambetova, Elise; Hutchinson, David; Blais, Danielle M.; Zhao, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Background: Intravenous or intracoronary adenosine is used in the cardiac catherization lab to achieve maximal coronary blood flow and determine fractional flow reserve. Objective: To determine the stability of adenosine 10 and 50 µg/mL in either 0.9% sodium chloride injection or 5% dextrose injection in polyolefin infusion bags stored at 2 temperatures, refrigeration (2°C-8°C) or controlled room temperature (20°C-25°C). Methods: Adenosine 10 µg/mL and 50 µg/mL solutions were prepared in 50 mL polyolefin infusion bags containing 0.9% sodium chloride injection or 5% dextrose injection and stored at controlled room temperature or under refrigeration. Each combination of concentration, diluent, and storage was prepared in triplicate. Samples were assayed using stability-indicating, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography immediately at time 0 and at 24 hours, 48 hours, 7 days, and 14 days. Stability was defined as retaining 90% to 110% of the initial adenosine concentration. The samples were also visually inspected against a light background for clarity, color, and the presence of particulate matter. Results: After 14 days, all samples retained 99% to 101% of the initial adenosine concentration. No considerable change in pH or visual appearance was noted. The stability data indicated no significant loss of drug due to chemical degradation or physical interactions during storage. Conclusion: Adenosine solutions of 10 and 50 µg/mL were stable for at least 14 days in 50 mL polyolefin infusion bags of 0.9% sodium chloride injection or 5% dextrose injection stored at controlled room temperature and refrigerated conditions. PMID:24421510

  4. Investigating real-time activation of adenosine receptors by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Zheng, Liqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2013-02-01

    Adenosine receptors play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes, for example regulating myocardial oxygen consumption and the release of neurotransmitters. The activations of adenosine receptors have been studied by some kinds of techniques, such as western blot, immunohistochemistry, etc. However, these techniques cannot reveal the dynamical response of adenosine receptors under stimulation. In this paper, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique was introduced to study the real-time activation of adenosine receptors by monitoring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level. The results showed that there were significant differences between adenosine receptors on real-time responses under stimulation. Moreover, the dynamics of cAMP level demonstrated that competition between adenosine receptors existed. Taken together, our study indicates that monitoring the dynamics of cAMP level using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique could be one potential approach to investigate the mechanism of competitions between adenosine receptors.

  5. Why do premature newborn infants display elevated blood adenosine levels?

    PubMed

    Panfoli, Isabella; Cassanello, Michela; Bruschettini, Matteo; Colella, Marina; Cerone, Roberto; Ravera, Silvia; Calzia, Daniela; Candiano, Giovanni; Ramenghi, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Our preliminary data show high levels of adenosine in the blood of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, positively correlating to their prematurity (i.e. body weight class). This prompted us to look for a mechanism promoting such impressive adenosine increase. We hypothesized a correlation with oxygen challenge. In fact, it is recognized that either oxygen lack or its excess contribute to the pathogenesis of the injuries of prematurity, such as retinopathy (ROP) and periventricular white matter lesions (PWMI). The optimal concentration of oxygen for resuscitation of VLBW infants is currently under revision. We propose that the elevated adenosine blood concentrations of VLBW infants recognizes two sources. The first could be its activity-dependent release from unmyelinated brain axons. Adenosine in this respect would be an end-product of the hypometabolic VLBW newborn unmyelinated axon intensely firing in response to the environmental stimuli consequent to premature birth. Adenosine would be eventually found in the blood due to blood-brain barrier immaturity. In fact, adenosine is the primary activity-dependent signal promoting differentiation of premyelinating oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) into myelinating cells in the Central Nervous System, while inhibiting their proliferation and inhibiting synaptic function. The second, would be the ecto-cellular ATP synthesized by the endothelial cell plasmalemma exposed to ambient oxygen concentrations due to premature breathing, especially in lung. ATP would be rapidly transformed into adenosine by the ectonucleotidase activities such as NTPDase I (CD39), and NT5E (CD73). An ectopic extra-mitochondrial aerobic ATP synthetic ability was reported in many cell plasma-membranes, among which endothelial cells. The potential implications of the cited hypotheses for the neonatology area would be great. The amount of oxygen administration for reviving of newborns would find a molecular basis for its assessment. VLBW

  6. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase in brain: effect on anxiety.

    PubMed

    Beer, B; Chasin, M; Clody, D E; Vogel, J R

    1972-04-28

    Drugs that reduce anxiety may be mediated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate in the brain because (i) potent anxiety-reducing drugs are also potent inhibitors of brain phosphodiesterase activity; (ii) dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate has the ability to reduce anxiety; (iii) the methylxanthines show significant anxiety-reducing effects; (iv) theophylline and chlordiazepoxide produce additive anxiety-reducing activity; and (v) there is a significant correlation between the anxiety-reducing property of drugs and their ability to inhibit phosphodiesterase activity in the brain. PMID:4402069

  7. Role of Adenosine Receptor(s) in the Control of Vascular Tone in the Mouse Pudendal Artery.

    PubMed

    Labazi, Hicham; Tilley, Stephen L; Ledent, Catherine; Mustafa, S Jamal

    2016-03-01

    Activation of adenosine receptors (ARs) has been implicated in the modulation of renal and cardiovascular systems, as well as erectile functions. Recent studies suggest that adenosine-mediated regulation of erectile function is mainly mediated through A2BAR activation. However, no studies have been conducted to determine the contribution of AR subtype in the regulation of the vascular tone of the pudendal artery (PA), the major artery supplying and controlling blood flow to the penis. Our aim was to characterize the contribution of AR subtypes and identify signaling mechanisms involved in adenosine-mediated vascular tone regulation in the PA. We used a DMT wire myograph for muscle tension measurements in isolated PAs from wild-type, A2AAR knockout, A2BAR knockout, and A2A/A2BAR double-knockout mice. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression of the AR subtypes. Data from our pharmacologic and genetic approaches suggest that AR activation-mediated vasodilation in the PA is mediated by both the A2AAR and A2BAR, whereas neither the A1AR nor A3AR play a role in vascular tone regulation of the PA. In addition, we showed that A2AAR- and A2BAR-mediated vasorelaxation requires activation of nitric oxide and potassium channels; however, only the A2AAR-mediated response requires protein kinase A activation. Our data are complemented by mRNA expression showing the expression of all AR subtypes with the exception of the A3AR. AR signaling in the PA may play an important role in mediating erection and represent a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. PMID:26718241

  8. Phosphorylation of adenosine in renal brush-border membrane vesicles by an exchange reaction catalysed by adenosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Sayós, J; Solsona, C; Mallol, J; Lluis, C; Franco, R

    1994-01-01

    Uptake of [3H]adenosine in brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles from either rat or pig kidney leads to an accumulation of intravesicular [3H]AMP. The lack of significant levels of ATP and the presence of AMP in BBM indicated that a phosphotransfer between [3H]adenosine and AMP occurs. The phosphotransfer activity is inhibited by iodotubercidin, which suggests that it is performed by adenosine kinase acting in an ATP-independent manner. The existence of a similar phosphotransferase activity was demonstrated in membrane-free extracts from pig kidney. From the compounds tested it was shown that a variety of mononucleotides could act as phosphate donors. The results suggest that phosphotransfer reactions may be physiologically relevant in kidney. PMID:8110185

  9. Essential role of adenosine, adenosine A1 receptors, and ATP-sensitive K+ channels in cerebral ischemic preconditioning.

    PubMed Central

    Heurteaux, C; Lauritzen, I; Widmann, C; Lazdunski, M

    1995-01-01

    Preconditioning with sublethal ischemia protects against neuronal damage after subsequent lethal ischemic insults in hippocampal neurons. A pharmacological approach using agonists and antagonists at the adenosine A1 receptor as well as openers and blockers of ATP-sensitive K+ channels has been combined with an analysis of neuronal death and gene expression of subunits of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors, HSP70, c-fos, c-jun, and growth factors. It indicates that the mechanism of ischemic tolerance involves a cascade of events including liberation of adenosine, stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors, and, via these receptors, opening of sulfonylurea-sensitive ATP-sensitive K+ channels. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7753861

  10. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2008-01-01

    Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases. PMID:18834537

  11. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2008-01-01

    Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases. This article was reviewed by Eugene Koonin and Mark Ragan. PMID:18834537

  12. ATP-Sensitive K+ Channels Regulate the Concentrative Adenosine Transporter CNT2 following Activation by A1 Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Duflot, Sylvie; Riera, Bárbara; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Casadó, Vicent; Norman, Robert I.; Casado, F. Javier; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal

    2004-01-01

    This study describes a novel mechanism of regulation of the high-affinity Na+-dependent adenosine transporter (CNT2) via the activation of A1 adenosine receptors (A1R). This regulation is mediated by the activation of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels. The high-affinity Na+-dependent adenosine transporter CNT2 and A1R are coexpressed in the basolateral domain of the rat hepatocyte plasma membrane and are colocalized in the rat hepatoma cell line FAO. The transient increase in CNT2-mediated transport activity triggered by (−)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine is fully inhibited by KATP channel blockers and mimicked by a KATP channel opener. A1R agonist activation of CNT2 occurs in both hepatocytes and FAO cells, which express Kir6.1, Kir6.2, SUR1, SUR2A, and SUR2B mRNA channel subunits. With the available antibodies against Kir6.X, SUR2A, and SUR2B, it is shown that all of these proteins colocalize with CNT2 and A1R in defined plasma membrane domains of FAO cells. The extent of the purinergic modulation of CNT2 is affected by the glucose concentration, a finding which indicates that glycemia and glucose metabolism may affect this cross-regulation among A1R, CNT2, and KATP channels. These results also suggest that the activation of KATP channels under metabolic stress can be mediated by the activation of A1R. Cell protection under these circumstances may be achieved by potentiation of the uptake of adenosine and its further metabolization to ATP. Mediation of purinergic responses and a connection between the intracellular energy status and the need for an exogenous adenosine supply are novel roles for KATP channels. PMID:15024061

  13. The adenosine metabolite inosine is a functional agonist of the adenosine A2A receptor with a unique signaling bias.

    PubMed

    Welihinda, Ajith A; Kaur, Manmeet; Greene, Kelly; Zhai, Yongjiao; Amento, Edward P

    2016-06-01

    Inosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside that is produced by catabolism of adenosine. Adenosine has a short half-life (approximately 10s) and is rapidly deaminated to inosine, a stable metabolite with a half-life of approximately 15h. Resembling adenosine, inosine acting through adenosine receptors (ARs) exerts a wide range of anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects in vivo. The immunomodulatory effects of inosine in vivo, at least in part, are mediated via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), an observation that cannot be explained fully by in vitro pharmacological characterization of inosine at the A2AR. It is unclear whether the in vivo effects of inosine are due to inosine or a metabolite of inosine engaging the A2AR. Here, utilizing a combination of label-free, cell-based, and membrane-based functional assays in conjunction with an equilibrium agonist-binding assay we provide evidence for inosine engagement at the A2AR and subsequent activation of downstream signaling events. Inosine-mediated A2AR activation leads to cAMP production with an EC50 of 300.7μM and to extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation with an EC50 of 89.38μM. Our data demonstrate that inosine produces ERK1/2-biased signaling whereas adenosine produces cAMP-biased signaling at the A2AR, highlighting pharmacological differences between these two agonists. Given the in vivo stability of inosine, our data suggest an additional, previously unrecognized, mechanism that utilizes inosine to functionally amplify and prolong A2AR activation in vivo. PMID:26903141

  14. Adenosine-dependent activation of tyrosine hydroxylase is defective in adenosine kinase-deficient PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Erny, R; Wagner, J A

    1984-01-01

    (R)-N6-Phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA) stimulates dopa production 3- to 5-fold in PC12 cells, with a half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 50 nM. This increase can be explained by a stable activation of tyrosine hydroxylase [TyrOHase; L-tyrosine, tetrahydropteridine:oxygen oxidoreductase (3-hydroxylating), EC 1.14.16.2] when it is phosphorylated by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The activation of TyrOHase is mediated by the adenosine-dependent activation of adenylate cyclase (EC50 = 600 nM). PIA (10 microM) is as effective as cholera toxin or dibutyryl cAMP in activating TyrOHase in wild-type cells. Adenosine kinase-deficient mutants of PC12 were found to be resistant to PIA-dependent activation of TyrOHase (EC50 = 100-1000 nM). This phenomenon was explored in detail in one adenosine kinase-deficient mutant and was shown to occur because the mutant was resistant to the adenosine-dependent activation of adenylate cyclase. In this mutant, TyrOHase was activated 14-fold by cholera toxin, suggesting that activated TyrOHase is about 14 times as active as unactivated TyrOHase. These studies with kinase-deficient PC12 cells provide genetic evidence that adenosine-dependent activation of TyrOHase is mediated by acute increases in cAMP. When the adenosine receptor found on PC12 cells is expressed in vivo, it might function as either a presynaptic (i.e., localized on the nerve terminal) or a postsynaptic (i.e., localized on the cell body or dendrite) receptor that regulates rates of transmitter synthesis in response to cell activity. PMID:6146982

  15. Anticancer effect of adenosine on gastric cancer via diverse signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Ayako; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells via intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. In the former pathway, adenosine uptake into cells triggers apoptosis, and in the latter pathway, adenosine receptors mediate apoptosis. Extracellular adenosine also induces apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. Extracellular adenosine is transported into cells through an adenosine transporter and converted to AMP by adenosine kinase. In turn, AMP activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is the factor responsible for caspase-independent apoptosis of GT3-TKB gastric cancer cells. Extracellular adenosine, on the other hand, induces caspase-dependent apoptosis of MKN28 and MKN45 gastric cancer cells by two mechanisms. Firstly, AMP, converted from intracellularly transported adenosine, initiates apoptosis, regardless of AMPK. Secondly, the A3 adenosine receptor, linked to Gi/Gq proteins, mediates apoptosis by activating the Gq protein effector, phospholipase Cγ, to produce inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, which activate protein kinase C. Consequently, the mechanisms underlying adenosine-induced apoptosis vary, depending upon gastric cancer cell types. Understand the contribution of each downstream target molecule of adenosine to apoptosis induction may aid the establishment of tailor-made chemotherapy for gastric cancer. PMID:26494951

  16. Anticancer effect of adenosine on gastric cancer via diverse signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Ayako; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2015-10-21

    Extracellular adenosine induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells via intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. In the former pathway, adenosine uptake into cells triggers apoptosis, and in the latter pathway, adenosine receptors mediate apoptosis. Extracellular adenosine also induces apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. Extracellular adenosine is transported into cells through an adenosine transporter and converted to AMP by adenosine kinase. In turn, AMP activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is the factor responsible for caspase-independent apoptosis of GT3-TKB gastric cancer cells. Extracellular adenosine, on the other hand, induces caspase-dependent apoptosis of MKN28 and MKN45 gastric cancer cells by two mechanisms. Firstly, AMP, converted from intracellularly transported adenosine, initiates apoptosis, regardless of AMPK. Secondly, the A3 adenosine receptor, linked to Gi/Gq proteins, mediates apoptosis by activating the Gq protein effector, phospholipase Cγ, to produce inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, which activate protein kinase C. Consequently, the mechanisms underlying adenosine-induced apoptosis vary, depending upon gastric cancer cell types. Understand the contribution of each downstream target molecule of adenosine to apoptosis induction may aid the establishment of tailor-made chemotherapy for gastric cancer. PMID:26494951

  17. Neuronal transporter and astrocytic ATP exocytosis underlie activity-dependent adenosine release in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Mark J; Dale, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The neuromodulator adenosine plays an important role in many physiological and pathological processes within the mammalian CNS. However, the precise mechanisms of how the concentration of extracellular adenosine increases following neural activity remain contentious. Here we have used microelectrode biosensors to directly measure adenosine release induced by focal stimulation in stratum radiatum of area CA1 in mouse hippocampal slices. Adenosine release was both action potential and Ca2+ dependent and could be evoked with low stimulation frequencies and small numbers of stimuli. Adenosine release required the activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors and could be evoked by local application of glutamate receptor agonists. Approximately 40% of stimulated-adenosine release occurred by translocation of adenosine via equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). This component of release persisted in the presence of the gliotoxin fluoroacetate and thus results from the direct release of adenosine from neurons. A reduction of adenosine release in the presence of NTPDase blockers, in slices from CD73−/− and dn-SNARE mice, provides evidence that a component of adenosine release arises from the extracellular metabolism of ATP released from astrocytes. This component of release appeared to have slower kinetics than the direct ENT-mediated release of adenosine. These data suggest that activity-dependent adenosine release is surprisingly complex and, in the hippocampus, arises from at least two distinct mechanisms with different cellular sources. PMID:23713028

  18. Adenosine transporters and receptors: key elements for retinal function and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos-Rodrigues, Alexandre; Pereira, Mariana R; Brito, Rafael; de Oliveira, Nádia A; Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is an important neuroactive substance in the central nervous system, including in the retina where subclasses of adenosine receptors and transporters are expressed since early stages of development. Here, we review some evidence showing that adenosine plays important functions in the mature as well as in the developing tissue. Adenosine transporters are divided into equilibrative and concentrative, and the major transporter subtype present in the retina is the ENT1. This transporter is responsible for a bidirectional transport of adenosine and the uptake or release of this nucleoside appears to be regulated by different signaling pathways that are also controlled by activation of adenosine receptors. Adenosine receptors are also key players in retina physiology regulating a variety of functions in the mature and developing tissue. Regulation of excitatory neurotransmitter release and neuroprotection are the main functions played be adenosine in the mature tissue, while regulation of cell survival and neurogenesis are some of the functions played by adenosine in developing retina. Since adenosine is neuroprotective against excitotoxic and metabolic dysfunctions observed in neurological and ocular diseases, the search for adenosine-related drugs regulating adenosine transporters and receptors can be important for advancement of therapeutic strategies against these diseases. PMID:25817878

  19. A novel HCV NS3 protease mutation selected by combination treatment of the protease inhibitor boceprevir and NS5B polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chase, Robert; Skelton, Angela; Xia, Ellen; Curry, Stephanie; Liu, Shaotang; McMonagle, Patricia; Huang, H-C; Tong, Xiao

    2009-11-01

    Boceprevir (SCH 503034) is an orally active novel inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease currently in clinical development for the treatment of hepatitis C. In this in vitro study, we demonstrate that combination of boceprevir with a nucleoside analog or a non-nucleoside HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitor was superior to treatment by single agents in inhibiting viral RNA replication in replicon cells. In the presence of boceprevir (at 5xEC(90)), the addition of 2'-C-methyl-adenosine or an indole-N-acetamide targeting the polymerase finger-loop site (at 1xEC(90)) significantly reduced the emergence of resistant replicon colonies. A higher dose (5xEC(90)) of either of the polymerase inhibitors in combination with boceprevir suppressed replicon resistance further to below detectable levels. Sequencing analysis of replicon cells selected by the combination treatment revealed known resistance mutations to the two polymerase inhibitors but no previously reported resistance mutations to boceprevir. Interestingly, a novel mutation (M175L) in the protease domain was identified. The dually resistant replicon cells were monitored for over 30 passages and sensitivity to polymerase inhibitors was found to decrease over time in a manner that correlated with the increasing prevalence of specific resistance mutations. Importantly, these cells remained sensitive to interferon-alpha and different classes of polymerase inhibitors. These findings support the rationale for clinical evaluation of combination treatment of HCV protease and polymerase inhibitors. PMID:19747948

  20. Amelioration of adriamycin and daunorubicin myocardial toxicity by adenosine.

    PubMed

    Newman, R A; Hacker, M P; Krakoff, I H

    1981-09-01

    Primary cultures of rat myocardial cells were used to investigate the dose and time-dependent cellular enzyme release induced by either Adriamycin or daunorubicin, Concentrations of either anthracycline (1.8 or 18 microM) produced significant release of creatine phosphokinase and lactic dehydrogenase from myocardial cells within 24 hr of exposure without a detectable decrease in cell viability. Preincubation of the myocardial cells with varying concentrations of adenosine (10 microM to 1 mM) for 24 hr prior to the addition of anthracycline decreased or prevented drug-induced enzyme release. Other putative myocardial protectants, i.e., N-acetyl-L-cysteine, alpha-tocopherol, or carnitine, were ineffective in preventing anthracycline-induced enzyme release. Although adenosine was an effective myocardial protectant, it had no significant effect on cellular uptake of daunorubicin, nor did adenosine adversely affect the oncolytic activity of daunorubicin against L1210 leukemia cells in vitro. Anthramycin, another oncolytic agent having reported cardiotoxic effects, was also tested in the in vitro system. With this drug, however, no enzyme release was detected at less than lethal doses nor did adenosine have any protective potential against the toxicity of anthramycin. Finally, Adriamycin caused no significant lactic dehydrogenase release when incubated at 1.8 or 18 microM with H9c2 cells, a cell line having primarily skeletal muscle characteristics. This result suggests a specific toxicity of anthracyclines for myocardial but not skeletal muscle cells. PMID:7260911

  1. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  2. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  3. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  4. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  5. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  6. CD39/Adenosine Pathway Is Involved in AIDS Progression

    PubMed Central

    Limou, Sophie; Younas, Mehwish; Kök, Ayrin; Huë, Sophie; Seddiki, Nabila; Hulin, Anne; Delaneau, Olivier; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Herbeck, Joshua T.; Mullins, James I.; Muhtarova, Maria; Bensussan, Armand; Zagury, Jean-François; Lelievre, Jean-Daniel; Lévy, Yves

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 infection is characterized by a chronic activation of the immune system and suppressed function of T lymphocytes. Regulatory CD4+ CD25high FoxP3+CD127low T cells (Treg) play a key role in both conditions. Here, we show that HIV-1 positive patients have a significant increase of Treg-associated expression of CD39/ENTPD1, an ectoenzyme which in concert with CD73 generates adenosine. We show in vitro that the CD39/adenosine axis is involved in Treg suppression in HIV infection. Treg inhibitory effects are relieved by CD39 down modulation and are reproduced by an adenosine-agonist in accordance with a higher expression of the adenosine A2A receptor on patients' T cells. Notably, the expansion of the Treg CD39+ correlates with the level of immune activation and lower CD4+ counts in HIV-1 infected patients. Finally, in a genetic association study performed in three different cohorts, we identified a CD39 gene polymorphism that was associated with down-modulated CD39 expression and a slower progression to AIDS. PMID:21750674

  7. Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; Ferraro, Luca; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Beggiato, Sarah; Pèzzola, Antonella; Bader, Michael; Fuxe, Kjell; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2 A Rs) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1 Rs) are highly expressed in the striatum, where they functionally interact and form A2A /CB1 heteroreceptor complexes. We investigated the effects of CB1 R stimulation in a transgenic rat strain over-expressing A2 A Rs under the control of the neural-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A rats) and in age-matched wild-type (WT) animals. The effects of the CB1 R agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) were significantly lower in NSEA2A rats than in WT animals, as demonstrated by i) electrophysiological recordings of synaptic transmission in corticostriatal slices; ii) the measurement of glutamate outflow from striatal synaptosomes and iii) in vivo experiments on locomotor activity. Moreover, while the effects of WIN were modulated by both A2 A R agonist (CGS 21680) and antagonists (ZM 241385, KW-6002 and SCH-442416) in WT animals, the A2 A R antagonists failed to influence WIN-mediated effects in NSEA2A rats. The present results demonstrate that in rats with genetic neuronal over-expression of A2 A Rs, the effects mediated by CB1 R activation in the striatum are significantly reduced, suggesting a change in the stoichiometry of A2A and CB1 receptors and providing a strategy to dissect the involvement of A2 A R forming or not forming heteromers in the modulation of striatal functions. These findings add additional evidence for the existence of an interaction between striatal A2 A Rs and CB1 Rs, playing a fundamental role in the regulation of striatal functions. We studied A2A -CB1 receptor interaction in transgenic rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A ). In these rats, we demonstrated a reduced effect of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 in the modulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and locomotor activity, while CB1 receptor expression level did not change with respect to WT rats. A reduction in the expression of A2A -CB1

  8. The adenosine system modulates Toll-like receptor function: basic mechanisms, clinical correlates and translational opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, Melanie R. Power; Belderbos, Mirjam E.; Gallington, Leighanne C.; Bont, Louis; Levy, Ofer

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous purine metabolite whose concentration in human blood plasma rises from nanomolar to micromolar during stress or hypoxia. Leukocytes express seven-transmembrane adenosine receptors whose engagement modulates Toll-like receptor-mediated cytokine responses, in part via modulation of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Adenosine congeners are used clinically to treat arrhythmias and apnea of prematurity. Herein we consider the potential of adenosine congeners as innate immune response modifiers to prevent and/or treat infection. PMID:21342073

  9. Adenosine induces G2/M cell-cycle arrest by inhibiting cell mitosis progression.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kun-Zhi; Tang, Bo; Yu, Lu; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Jian-Fa; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2010-01-01

    Cellular adenosine accumulates under stress conditions. Few papers on adenosine are concerned with its function in the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the essential mechanism by which all living things reproduce and the target machinery when cells encounter stresses, so it is necessary to examine the relationship between adenosine and the cell cycle. In the present study, adenosine was found to induce G-2/M cell-cycle arrest. Furthermore, adenosine was found to modulate the expression of some important proteins in the cell cycle, such as cyclin B and p21, and to inhibit the transition of metaphase to anaphase in mitosis. PMID:19947935

  10. Manipulation of adenosine kinase affects sleep regulation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Palchykova, Svitlana; Winsky-Sommerer, Raphaelle; Shen, Hai-Ying; Boison, Detlev; Gerling, Andrea; Tobler, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Sleep and sleep intensity are enhanced by adenosine and its receptor agonists, while adenosine receptor antagonists induce wakefulness. Adenosine kinase (ADK) is the primary enzyme metabolizing adenosine in adult brain. To investigate whether adenosine metabolism or clearance affects sleep we recorded sleep in mice with engineered mutations in Adk. Adk-tg mice over-express a transgene encoding the cytoplasmic isoform of ADK in the brain, but lack the nuclear isoform of the enzyme. Wild-type mice and Adk+/− mice that have a 50% reduction of the cytoplasmic and the nuclear isoforms of ADK served as controls. Adk-tg mice showed a remarkable reduction of EEG power in low frequencies in all vigilance states and in theta activity (6.25–11 Hz) in REM sleep and waking. Adk-tg mice were awake 58 min more per day than wild-type mice and spent significantly less time in REM sleep (102±3 vs 128±3 min in wild-type). After sleep deprivation slow-wave activity (0.75–4 Hz), the intensity component of NREM sleep, increased significantly less in Adk-tg mice and their slow-wave energy was reduced. In contrast, the vigilance states and EEG spectra of Adk+/− and wild-type mice did not differ. Our data suggest that over-expression of the cytoplasmic isoform of ADK is sufficient to alter sleep physiology. ADK might orchestrate neurotransmitter pathways involved in the generation of EEG oscillations and regulation of sleep. PMID:20881134

  11. Xylazine Activates Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in the Central Nervous System of Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xing-Xing; Yin, Bai-Shuang; Yang, Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Xin; Su, Li-Xue; Fan, Hong-Gang; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Xylazine is a potent analgesic extensively used in veterinary and animal experimentation. Evidence exists that the analgesic effect can be inhibited using adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors. Considering this idea, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the AMPK signaling pathway is involved in the central analgesic mechanism of xylazine in the rat. Xylazine was administrated via the intraperitoneal route. Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem were collected for determination of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα mRNA expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα levels using western blot. The results of our study showed that compared with the control group, xylazine induced significant increases in AMPK activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum after rats received xylazine (P < 0.01). Increased AMPK activities were accompanied with increased phosphorylation levels of LKB1 in corresponding regions of rats. The protein levels of phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα in these regions returned or tended to return to control group levels. However, in the brainstem, phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα protein levels were decreased by xylazine compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicates that xylazine alters the activities of LKB1 and AMPK in the central nervous system of rats, which suggests that xylazine affects the regulatory signaling pathway of the analgesic mechanism in the rat brain. PMID:27049320

  12. Gene expression and function of adenosine A(2A) receptor in the rat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    2000-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether rat carotid bodies express adenosine (Ado) A(2A) receptors and whether this receptor is involved in the cellular response to hypoxia. Our results demonstrate that rat carotid bodies express the A(2A) and A(2B) Ado receptor mRNAs but not the A(1) or A(3) receptor mRNAs as determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In situ hybridization confirmed the expression of the A(2A) receptor mRNA. Immunohistochemical studies further showed that the A(2A) receptor is expressed in the carotid body and that it is colocalized with tyrosine hydroxylase in type I cells. Whole cell voltage-clamp studies using isolated type I cells showed that Ado inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) currents and that this inhibition was abolished by the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist ZM-241385. Ca(2+) imaging studies using fura 2 revealed that exposure to severe hypoxia induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in type I cells and that extracellularly applied Ado significantly attenuated the hypoxia-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](i). Taken together, our findings indicate that A(2A) receptors are present in type I cells and that activation of A(2A) receptors modulates Ca(2+) accumulation during hypoxia. This mechanism may play a role in regulating intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and cellular excitability during hypoxia. PMID:10926550

  13. Feed-Forward Inhibition of CD73 and Upregulation of Adenosine Deaminase Contribute to the Loss of Adenosine Neuromodulation in Postinflammatory Ileitis

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Dias, Ana Sofia; Pelletier, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Purinergic signalling is remarkably plastic during gastrointestinal inflammation. Thus, selective drugs targeting the “purinome” may be helpful for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. The myenteric neuromuscular transmission of healthy individuals is fine-tuned and controlled by adenosine acting on A2A excitatory receptors. Here, we investigated the neuromodulatory role of adenosine in TNBS-inflamed longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the rat ileum. Seven-day postinflammation ileitis lacks adenosine neuromodulation, which may contribute to acceleration of gastrointestinal transit. The loss of adenosine neuromodulation results from deficient accumulation of the nucleoside at the myenteric synapse despite the fact that the increases in ATP release were observed. Disparity between ATP outflow and adenosine deficit in postinflammatory ileitis is ascribed to feed-forward inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 by high extracellular ATP and/or ADP. Redistribution of NTPDase2, but not of NTPDase3, from ganglion cell bodies to myenteric nerve terminals leads to preferential ADP accumulation from released ATP, thus contributing to the prolonged inhibition of muscle-bound ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and to the delay of adenosine formation at the inflamed neuromuscular synapse. On the other hand, depression of endogenous adenosine accumulation may also occur due to enhancement of adenosine deaminase activity. Both membrane-bound and soluble forms of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and adenosine deaminase were detected in the inflamed myenteric plexus. These findings provide novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory gut motility disorders. PMID:25210228

  14. Modulation of bladder function by luminal adenosine turnover and A1 receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Prakasam, H. Sandeep; Herrington, Heather; Roppolo, James R.; Jackson, Edwin K.

    2012-01-01

    The bladder uroepithelium transmits information to the underlying nervous and musculature systems, is under constant cyclical strain, expresses all four adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3), and is a site of adenosine production. Although adenosine has a well-described protective effect in several organs, there is a lack of information about adenosine turnover in the uroepithelium or whether altering luminal adenosine concentrations impacts bladder function or overactivity. We observed that the concentration of extracellular adenosine at the mucosal surface of the uroepithelium was regulated by ecto-adenosine deaminase and by equilibrative nucleoside transporters, whereas adenosine kinase and equilibrative nucleoside transporters modulated serosal levels. We further observed that enriching endogenous adenosine by blocking its routes of metabolism or direct activation of mucosal A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), a selective agonist, stimulated bladder activity by lowering the threshold pressure for voiding. Finally, CCPA did not quell bladder hyperactivity in animals with acute cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis but instead exacerbated their irritated bladder phenotype. In conclusion, we find that adenosine levels at both surfaces of the uroepithelium are modulated by turnover, that blocking these pathways or stimulating A1 receptors directly at the luminal surface promotes bladder contractions, and that adenosine further stimulates voiding in animals with cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis. PMID:22552934

  15. Metabolic changes of cultured DRG neurons induced by adenosine using confocal microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqin; Huang, Yimei; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Yang, Hongqin; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2012-12-01

    Adenosine exerts multiple effects on pain transmission in the peripheral nervous system. This study was performed to use confocal microscopy to evaluate whether adenosine could affect dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in vitro and test which adenosine receptor mediates the effect of adenosine on DRG neurons. After adding adenosine with different concentration, we compared the metabolic changes by the real time imaging of calcium and mitochondria membrane potential using confocal microscopy. The results showed that the effect of 500 μM adenosine on the metabolic changes of DRG neurons was more significant than others. Furthermore, four different adenosine receptor antagonists were used to study which receptor mediated the influences of adenosine on the cultured DRG neurons. All adenosine receptor antagonists especially A1 receptor antagonist (DPCPX) had effect on the Ca2+ and mitochondria membrane potential dynamics of DRG neurons. The above studies demonstrated that the effect of adenosine which may be involved in the signal transmission on the sensory neurons was dose-dependent, and all the four adenosine receptors especially the A1R may mediate the transmission.

  16. Oral treatment with herbal formula B401 alleviates penile toxicity in aging mice with manganism

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih-Hsiang; Lin, Ching-Lung; Wang, Sheue-Er; Sheu, Shuenn-Jyi; Chien, Chiang-Ting; Wu, Chung-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to elucidate the roles of nitric oxide synthase activity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis in penile toxicity of aging mice associated with excess manganese (Mn) treatment and to investigate the effect of oral treatment with the herbal formula B401 in this respect. ICR strain mice were divided into two groups: the vehicle (sham group) and the B401 (50 mg/kg) group. The mice were orally treated for 5 days; then a high single dose of MnCl2 (100 mg/kg) was given by intraperitoneal injection to the mice. One day after MnCl2 treatment, corpora cavernosal tissues of both Mn-treated mice and their controls were simultaneously sampled to examine their immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis. Nitric oxide (NO) production, levels of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), expression levels of factors governing angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor), oxidative stress (catalase, superoxide dismutase 2,4-hydroxynonenal), inflammation (tumor necrosis factor alpha), apoptosis (B-cell lymphoma 2 [Bcl-2], Bcl-2-associated X protein [Bax], cleaved poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase [c-PARP], cytochrome C, caspase-12, and caspase-3) were evaluated in penile corpus cavernosum of the mice. We found that penile toxicity in the mice was enhanced under excess Mn treatment through reduction of NOS activity and increase in oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis in the penile cavernous tissue. Furthermore, the penile toxicity in mice with manganism was alleviated by oral B401 treatment through enhancement of both nitric oxide synthesis and angiogenesis, with simultaneous reduction of oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis in penile corpus cavernosum. We suggest that the herbal formula B401 may serve as a potential dietotherapeutic supplement for penile toxicity or dysfunction in aging males. PMID:26064043

  17. Enhanced in vitro antiproliferative effects of EpCAM antibody-functionalized paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles in retinoblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Moutushy; Misra, Ranjita; Harilal, Anju; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2011-01-01

    Background To specifically deliver paclitaxel (PTX) to retinoblastoma (RB) cells, the anionic surface-charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs loaded with paclitaxel were conjugated with epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibody for enhancing site-specific intracellular delivery of paclitaxel against EpCAM overexpressing RB cells. Methods PTX-loaded PLGA NPs were prepared by the oil-in-water single emulsion solvent evaporation method, and the PTX content in NPs was estimated by the reverse phase isocratic mode of high performance liquid chromatography. Ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry was employed for the covalent attachment of monoclonal EpCAM antibody onto the NP surface. In vitro cytotoxicity of native PTX, unconjugated PTX-loaded NPs (PTX-NPs), and EpCAM antibody-conjugated PTX-loaded nanoparticles (PTX-NP-EpCAM) were evaluated on a Y79 RB cell line by a dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, while cellular apoptosis, cysteinyl-aspartic acid protease (caspase)-3 activation, Poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and cell-cycle arrest were quantified by flow cytometry. By employing flow cytometry and fluorescence image analyses, the extent of cellular uptake was comparatively evaluated. Results PTX-NP-EpCAM had superior antiproliferation activity, increased arrested cell population at the G2-M phase, and increased activation of caspase-3, followed by PARP cleavage in parallel with the induction of apoptosis. Increased uptake of PTX-Np-EpCAM by the cells suggests that they were mainly taken up through EpCAM mediated endocytosis. Conclusions EpCAM antibody-functionalized biodegradable NPs for tumor-selective drug delivery and overcoming drug resistance could be an efficient therapeutic strategy for retinoblastoma treatment. PMID:22065926

  18. Adrenomedullin attenuates interleukin-1β-induced inflammation and apoptosis in rat Leydig cells via inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Zhou, Pang-hu; Rao, Ting; Zhang, Xiao-bin; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Li-jun

    2015-12-10

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the protective effects of adrenomedullin (ADM) on interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced inflammation and apoptosis in rat Leydig cells and its underlying molecular mechanisms. Leydig cells were isolated from adult Sprague-Dawley rats. The cell culture was established by adding ADM 2h prior to 24h treatment with IL-1β-induced cytotoxicity. We detected cell viability and concentrations of testosterone, reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and reduced glutathione (GSH). Gene expression levels were measured for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2). Concentrations were detected for nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Apoptosis was assessed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL). Levels of gene expression and protein were detected for Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, and poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase (PARP). Protein levels were measured for nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and IκBα. ADM reduced IL-1β-induced cytotoxicity. ADM pretreatment significantly increased testosterone concentrations and decreased ROS, MDA, and GSH concentrations. ADM pretreatment inhibited IL-1β-induced inflammation in Leydig cells by decreasing the gene expression levels of iNOS and COX-2, as well as the concentrations of NO and PGE2. ADM pretreatment further decreased the number of TUNEL-positive stained Leydig cells, as confirmed by the increase in gene expression and protein levels of Bcl-2 and the decrease of Bax, caspase-3, and PARP levels. Moreover, ADM pretreatment inhibited NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and IκBα phosphorylation and degradation. ADM has potential anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties in IL-1β-induced rat Leydig cells, which might be related to NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26511504

  19. Potassium increases the antitumor effects of ascorbic acid in breast cancer cell lines in vitro

    PubMed Central

    FRAJESE, GIOVANNI VANNI; BENVENUTO, MONICA; FANTINI, MASSIMO; AMBROSIN, ELENA; SACCHETTI, PAMELA; MASUELLI, LAURA; GIGANTI, MARIA GABRIELLA; MODESTI, ANDREA; BEI, ROBERTO

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (A) has been demonstrated to exhibit anti-cancer activity in association with chemotherapeutic agents. Potassium (K) is a regulator of cellular proliferation. In the present study, the biological effects of A and K bicarbonate, alone or in combination (A+K), on breast cancer cell lines were evaluated. The survival of cancer cells was determined by sulforhodamine B cell proliferation assay, while analysis of the cell cycle distribution was conducted via fluorescence-activated cell sorting. In addition, the expression of signaling proteins was analyzed upon treatment. The results indicated that there was a heterogeneous response of the different cell lines to A and K, and the best effects were achieved by A+K and A treatment. The interaction between A+K indicated an additive or synergistic effect. In addition, A+K increased the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase of the cell cycle, and was the most effective treatment in activating the degradation of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1. In the breast cancer cell line MCF-7, A+K induced the appearance of the 18 kDa isoform of B-cell lymphoma-2-associated X protein (Bax), which is a more potent inducer of apoptosis than the full-length Bax-p21. The effects of A and K on the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1 and ERK2 were heterogeneous. In addition, treatment with K, A and A+K inhibited the expression of nuclear factor-κB. Overall, the results of the present study indicated that K potentiated the anti-tumoral effects of A in breast cancer cells in vitro. PMID:27313770

  20. Plumbagin-silver nanoparticle formulations enhance the cellular uptake of plumbagin and its antiproliferative activities.

    PubMed

    Appadurai, Prakash; Rathinasamy, Krishnan

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted much attention in recent years as diagnostics and new drug delivery system in cancer medicine. To study the effects of plumbagin (PLB), a relatively non-toxic napthaquinone isolated from the roots of Plumbago indica in human cervical cancer cell line and developed a formulation to enhance its cytotoxic activities. Silver nanoparticles were synthesised by chemical reduction method and complexed with PLB. Both the AgNPs and the complex PLB-AgNPs were characterised by dynamic light scattering, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The amount of PLB and PLB-AgNPs internalised was determined by ultra-violet-visible spectrophotometer. Cell inhibition was determined by sulphorhodamine B assay. Mitotic index was determined by Wright-Giemsa staining. Apoptosis induction was assessed by western blot using cleaved poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase antibody. The scanning electron microscope analysis indicated an average particle size of 32±8 nm in diameter. Enhanced internalisation of PLB into the HeLa cells was observed in PLB-AgNPs. PLB inhibited proliferation of cells with IC50 value of about 18±0.6 µM and blocked the cells at mitosis in a concentration-dependent manner. PLB also inhibited the post-drug exposure clonogenic survival of cells and induced apoptosis. The antiproliferative, antimitotic and apoptotic activities were also found to be increased when cells were treated with PLB-AgNPs. The authors results support the idea that AgNP could be a promising and effective drug delivery system for enhanced activity of PLB in cancer treatment. PMID:26435279

  1. Flavonoids isolated from Citrus platymamma induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549 human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagappan, Arulkumar; Lee, Ho Jeong; Saralamma, Venu Venkatarame Gowda; Park, Hyeon Soo; Hong, Gyeong Eun; Yumnam, Silvia; Raha, Suchismita; Charles, Shobana Nancy; Shin, Sung Chul; Kim, Eun Hee; Lee, Won Sup; Kim, Gon Sup

    2016-01-01

    Citrus platymamma hort. ex Tanaka belongs to the Rutaceae family and is widely used in folk medicines in Korea due to its anti-proliferative, anti-cancer, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic activities. However, the molecular mechanism of its anti-cancer effect is not well understood. The present study was conducted to elucidate the anti-cancer effect and molecular mechanism of flavonoids from Citrus platymamma (FCP) on A549 cells. FCP displayed concentration-dependent inhibition on A549 cells proliferation. Further, flow cytometry revealed that FCP significantly increased the sub-G1 (apoptotic cell population) and G2/M phase population, and the total number of apoptotic cells, in a dose-dependent manner. Nuclear condensation and fragmentation were also observed upon staining with Hoechst 33342 in FCP-treated A549 cells. Immunoblotting demonstrated a dose-dependent downregulation of cyclin B1, cyclin-dependent kinase 1, cell division cycle 25c, pro-caspases −3, −6, −8 and −9, and poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in FCP-treated A549 cells. In addition, FCP induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent PARP cleavage, and increased the B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2-associated X protein/Bcl-extra large ratio in A549 cells. These findings suggest that FCP induced G2/M arrest and apoptosis of A549 cells. The present study provides evidence that FCP may be useful in the treatment of human lung cancer. PMID:27446443

  2. Nexrutine inhibits azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt formation in rat colon and induced apoptotic cell death in colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Alam, Shamshad; Pal, Anu; Kumar, Rahul; Mir, Snober S; Ansari, Kausar M

    2016-08-01

    Colon cancer is the third most common cause of death in the United States. Therefore, new preventive strategies are warranted for preventing colon cancer. Nexrutine (NX), an herbal extract from Phellodendron amurense, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anti-cancer activity for various tissue specific cancers, but its chemopreventive efficacy has not been evaluated against colon cancer. Here, we explored the mechanism of chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic efficacy of NX against colon cancer. We found that dietary exposure of NX significantly reduced the number of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. In addition, significant inhibition in AOM-induced cell proliferation and reduced expression of the inflammatory markers COX-2, iNOS as well as the proliferative markers PCNA and cyclin D1 were also seen. Moreover, NX exposure significantly enhanced apoptosis in the colon of AOM treated rats. Furthermore, in in vitro studies, NX (2.5, 5, 10 μg/ml, 48 h) decreased cell survival and colony formation while inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in colon adenocarcinoma cells COLO205 and HCT-15. However, NX had minimal cytotoxic effect on IEC-6 normal rat intestinal cells, suggesting its high therapeutic index. NX treatment also modulates the level of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins along with cytochrome c release, cleavage and enhanced expression of poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase as well as the catalytic activity of caspase 3 and caspase 9 in both COLO205 and HCT-15 cells. Based on these in vivo and in vitro findings, we suggest that NX could be useful candidate agent for colon cancer chemoprevention and treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26259065

  3. The Bmi-1 polycomb protein antagonizes the (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate-dependent suppression of skin cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Adhikary, Gautam; Eckert, Richard L

    2010-03-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic regulators of gene expression that enhance cell survival. This regulation is achieved via action of two multiprotein PcG complexes--PRC2 (EED) and PRC1 [B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (Bmi-1)]. These complexes modulate gene expression by increasing histone methylation and reducing acetylation--leading to a closed chromatin conformation. Activity of these proteins is associated with increased cell proliferation and survival. We show increased expression of key PcG proteins in immortalized keratinocytes and skin cancer cell lines. We examine the role of two key PcG proteins, Bmi-1 and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), and the impact of the active agent in green tea, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), on the function of these regulators. EGCG treatment of SCC-13 cells reduces Bmi-1 and Ezh2 level and this is associated with reduced cell survival. The reduction in survival is associated with a global reduction in histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, a hallmark of PRC2 complex action. This change in PcG protein expression is associated with reduced expression of key proteins that enhance progression through the cell cycle [cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin A and cyclin B1] and increased expression of proteins that inhibit cell cycle progression (p21 and p27). Apoptosis is also enhanced, as evidenced by increased caspase 9, 8 and 3 cleavage and increased poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase cleavage. EGCG treatment also increases Bax and suppresses Bcl-xL expression. Vector-mediated enhanced Bmi-1 expression reverses these EGCG-dependent changes. These findings suggest that green tea polyphenols reduce skin tumor cell survival by influencing PcG-mediated epigenetic regulatory mechanisms. PMID:20015867

  4. Celastrol Potentiates Radiotherapy by Impairment of DNA Damage Processing in Human Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Yao; DeSano, Jeffrey T.; Meng Yang; J, Qing; Ljungman, Mats; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Xu Liang

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Celastrol is an active ingredient of traditional herbal medicine and has recently been identified as a potent natural proteasome inhibitor. In the present study, we evaluated the radiosensitizing potential of celastrol in the human prostate cancer PC-3 model. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic assays were performed to determine the radiosensitizing effect of celastrol. Apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry using Annexin V and propidium iodide staining and by a caspase-3 activation assay. DNA damage processing was examined by immunofluorescent staining and Western blot for phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}H2AX). The PC-3 xenograft model in the athymic nude mouse was used for the determination of the in vivo efficacy of celastrol combined with radiotherapy. The tumor samples were also analyzed for apoptosis and angiogenesis. Results: Celastrol sensitized PC-3 cells to ionizing radiation (IR) in a dose- and schedule-dependent manner, in which pretreatment with celastrol for 1 h followed by IR achieved maximal radiosensitization. Celastrol significantly prolonged the presence of IR-induced {gamma}H2AX and increased IR-induced apoptosis. Celastrol, combined with fractionated radiation, significantly inhibited PC-3 tumor growth in vivo without obvious systemic toxicity. The combination treatment increased {gamma}H2AX levels and apoptosis, induced cleavage of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose)polymerase and Mcl-1, and reduced angiogenesis in vivo compared with either treatment alone. Conclusion: Celastrol sensitized PC-3 cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo by impairing DNA damage processing and augmenting apoptosis. Celastrol might represent a promising new adjuvant regimen for the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

  5. Sonoporation induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wenjing; Sit, Wai Hung; Wan, Jennifer M F; Yu, Alfred C H

    2011-12-01

    Despite being a transient biophysical phenomenon, sonoporation is known to disturb the homeostasis of living cells. This work presents new evidence on how sonoporation may lead to antiproliferation effects including cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis through disrupting various cell signaling pathways. Our findings were obtained from sonoporation experiments conducted on HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells (with 1% v/v microbubbles; 1 MHz ultrasound; 0.3 or 0.5MPa peak negative pressure; 10% duty cycle; 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency; 1 min exposure period). Membrane resealing in these sonoporated cells was first verified using scanning electron microscopy. Time-lapse flow cytometry analysis of cellular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contents was then performed at four post-sonoporation time points (4 h, 8 h, 12 h and 24 h). Results indicate that an increasing trend in the apoptotic cell population can be observed for at least 12 h after sonoporation, whilst viable sonoporated cells are found to temporarily accumulate in the G(2)/M (gap-2/mitosis) phase of the cell cycle. Further analysis using western blotting reveals that sonoporation-induced apoptosis involves cleavage of poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase (PARP) proteins: a pro-apoptotic hallmark related to loss of DNA repair functionality. Also, mitochondrial signaling seems to have taken part in triggering this cellular event as the expression of two complementary regulators for mitochondrial release of pro-apoptotic molecules, Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) and Bax (Bcl-2-associated X), are seen to be imbalanced in sonoporated cells. Furthermore, sonoporation is found to induce cell-cycle arrest through perturbing the expression of various cyclin and Cdk (cyclin-dependent kinase) checkpoint proteins that play an enabling role in cell-cycle progression. These bioeffects should be taken into account when using sonoporation for therapeutic purposes. PMID:22033133

  6. Chidamide and 5-flurouracil show a synergistic antitumor effect on human colon cancer xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Qiu, S; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Zheng, Y; Su, X; Chen, B; Chen, H

    2016-01-01

    Chidamide is a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that increases the acetylation of histone H3 by inhibiting the activity of HDAC1 and HDAC2. We previously found that treatment of human colon cancer cells with chidamide led to cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/1 phase in vitro. The present study extended the observations in vivo and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. In nude mice bearing human colon cancer LoVo cell xenografts, chidamide alone or in combination with 5-flurouracil (5-Fu) reduced the expression of HDAC1 and HDAC2, accompanied with increased acetylation of histone H3. Chidamide alone inhibited the tumor growth and induce cell apoptosis in tumor-bearing mice. Combined treatment of chidamide with 5-Fu enhanced the anti-tumor activity of 5-Fu. Western blotting analysis showed that chidamide alone or in combination with 5-Fu upregulated the expressions of cleaved Caspase-3 and cleaved poly-ADP (adenosine diphosphate)-ribose polymerase (PARP). In addition, chidamide alone or in combination with 5-Fu increased the p53, phosphorylated-p53 (p-p53), p21 and γH2AX levels, but suppressed cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) expression in tumor cells. Chidamide alone or in combination with 5-Fu down regulated the expressions of p-AKT, p-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p-p70S6K, p-Raf, and p44/42 mitogen activated protein kinase (Erk1/2), indicating the blockage of these signaling pathways. The results demonstrated that chidamide alone or in combination with 5-Fu exerted anti-tumor activity in nude mice bearing human colon cancer LoVo cell xenografts, and several signaling pathways might be involved in the chidamide-induced tumor growth inhibition and tumor cell apoptosis. PMID:26774139

  7. Tumor-specific apoptotic gene targeting overcomes radiation resistance in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe Y. . E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org; Zhang Xiaochun; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cheung, Rex; Fang Bingliang

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To overcome radiation resistance in esophageal adenocarcinoma by tumor-specific apoptotic gene targeting using tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Methods and Materials: Adenoviral vector Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD with a tumor-specific human telomerase reverse transcription promoter was used to transfer TRAIL gene to human esophageal adenocarcinoma and normal human lung fibroblastic cells (NHLF). Activation of apoptosis was analyzed by Western blot, fluorescent activated cell sorting, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate labeling (TUNEL) assay. A human esophageal adenocarcinoma mouse model was treated with intratumoral injections of Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD plus local radiotherapy. Results: The combination of Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD and radiotherapy increased the cell-killing effect in all esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines but not in NHLF cells. This combination also significantly reduced clonogenic formation (p < 0.05) and increased sub-G1 deoxyribonucleic acid accumulation in cancer cells (p < 0.05). Activation of apoptosis by Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD plus radiotherapy was demonstrated by activation of caspase-9, caspase-8, and caspase-3 and cleaved poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase in vitro and TUNEL assay in vivo. Combined Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD and radiotherapy dramatically inhibited tumor growth and prolonged mean survival in the esophageal adenocarcinoma model to 31.6 days from 16.7 days for radiotherapy alone and 21.5 days for Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD alone (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The combination of tumor-specific TRAIL gene targeting and radiotherapy enhances the effect of suppressing esophageal adenocarcinoma growth and prolonging survival.

  8. Association between Genetic Polymorphisms of DNA Repair Genes and Chromosomal Damage for 1,3-Butadiene-Exposed Workers in a Matched Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Menglong; Sun, Lei; Dong, Xiaomei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Wen-bin; Zhou, Niya; Han, Xue; Zhou, Ziyuan; Cui, Zhihong; Liu, Jing-yi; Cao, Jia; Ao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the association between polymorphisms of DNA repair genes and chromosomal damage of 1,3-butadiene- (BD-) exposed workers. The study was conducted in 45 pairs of occupationally exposed workers in a BD product workshop and matched control workers in an administrative office and a circulatory water workshop in China. Newly developed biomarkers (micronuclei, MNi; nucleoplasmic bridges, NPBs; nuclear buds, NBUDs) in the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) cytome assay were adopted to detect chromosomal damage. PCR and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) are adopted to analyze polymorphisms of DNA repair genes, such as X-ray repair cross-complementing Group 1 (XRCC1), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerases (ADPRT), and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases (APE1). The BD-exposed workers exhibited increased frequencies of MNi and NPBs when compared to subjects in the control group. The results also show that the BD-exposed workers carrying XRCC1 diplotypes TCGA-CCGG (4.25 ± 2.06‰) (FR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.03–4.28) and TCGG-TCGA (5.80 ± 3.56‰) (FR = 2.75, 95% CI: 0.76–2.65) had statistically higher NBUD frequencies than those who carried diplotype TCGG-TCGG (1.89 ± 1.27‰). Our study suggests that polymorphisms of XRCC1 gene may influence chromosomal damage in BD-exposed workers. PMID:26339595

  9. Methyl gallate isolated from Spondias pinnata exhibits anticancer activity against human glioblastoma by induction of apoptosis and sustained extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Dipankar; Ghate, Nikhil Baban; Singh, Sudhir Shankar; Mandal, Nripendranath

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spondias pinnata has been reported for its efficient anticancer effects, but the studies were mostly focused on its extract. Objective: Since its bioactive compounds are largely unknown, this study was designed to characterize the lead components present in it and their anticancer activity against human glioblastoma cell line (U87). Materials and Methods: Major compounds from the ethyl acetate fraction were isolated by column chromatography and their anticancer potentials against U87 cells were evaluated. Furthermore, flow cytometric and immunoblotting analyses were performed to demonstrate the mechanism of apoptosis inducing activity of methyl gallate (MG) against U87 cell line. Results: Four major compounds were isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction. Amongst these, two compounds showed promising activities and with the help of different spectroscopic methods they were identified as gallic acid and MG. Flow cytometric studies revealed that MG-induced apoptosis in U87 cells dose-dependently; the same was confirmed by activation of caspases through cleavage of endogenous substrate poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase. MG treatment also induced the expression of p53 and B-cell lymphoma-2-associated X and cleavage of BH3 interacting-domain with a concomitant decrease in B-cell lymphoma-2 expression. Moreover, MG-induced sustained phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) in U87 cells with no change in the phosphorylation of other mitogen-activated protein kinases (c-Jun N-terminal of stress-activated protein kinases, p38). Conclusion: MG is a potent antioxidant and it induces sustained ERK1/2 activation and apoptosis in human glioblastoma U87, and provide a rationale for evaluation of MG for other brain carcinoma cell lines for the advancement of glioblastoma therapy. PMID:25829764

  10. Guggulsterone inhibits human cholangiocarcinoma Sk-ChA-1 and Mz-ChA-1 cell growth by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis and downregulation of survivin and Bcl-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    ZHONG, FEI; YANG, JING; TONG, ZHU-TING; CHEN, LIU-LIU; FAN, LU-LU; WANG, FANG; ZHA, XIA-LI; LI, JUN

    2015-01-01

    Guggulsterone has recently been reported to demonstrate anti-tumor effects in a variety of cancers. The present study aims to investigate the biological roles and underlying mechanism of the action of guggulsterone in cholangiocarcinoma. The immortalized human cholangiocarcinoma Sk-ChA-1 and Mz-ChA-1 cell lines were treated with various concentrations of the trans isomer of guggulsterone, Z-guggulsterone. Cellular proliferation was determined using the XTT assay. The apoptotic status of cholangiocarcinoma cells was assessed by Hoechst 33258 staining, DNA fragmentation assay and flow cytometry. Specific caspase inhibitor was used to explore the role of caspase in guggulsterone-induced apoptosis. A colorimetric assay was performed to measure the alterations of the activities of caspase-3, -8 and -9. Western blot analysis was used to detect the protein expression of survivin, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein and cleaved poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP). As revealed by the present data, guggulsterone significantly inhibited the growth of the two human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines by inducing cellular apoptosis. In addition, guggulsterone-induced apoptosis of cholangiocarcinoma cells was demonstrated to be partially inhibited by the caspase inhibitors z-VAD-fmk, z-LEHD-fmk and z-IETD-fmk, accompanied by the activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9, accumulation of cleaved PARP and decreased expression of survivin and Bcl-2. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that guggulsterone was able to suppress the proliferation of cholangiocarcinoma by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis and downregulating survivin and Bcl-2. PMID:26622683

  11. Polyphenol-rich sweet potato greens extract inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Karna, Prasanthi; Gundala, Sushma R.; Gupta, Meenakshi V.; Shamsi, Shahab A.; Pace, Ralphenia D.; Yates, Clayton; Narayan, Satya; Aneja, Ritu

    2011-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) leaves or greens, extensively consumed as a vegetable in Africa and Asia, are an excellent source of dietary polyphenols such as anthocyanins and phenolic acids. Here, we show that sweet potato greens extract (SPGE) has the maximum polyphenol content compared with several commercial vegetables including spinach. The polyphenol-rich SPGE exerts significant antiproliferative activity in a panel of prostate cancer cell lines while sparing normal prostate epithelial cells. Mechanistically, SPGE perturbed cell cycle progression, reduced clonogenic survival, modulated cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory molecules and induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells both in vitro and in vivo. SPGE-induced apoptosis has a mitochondrially mediated component, which was attenuated by pretreatment with cyclosporin A. We also observed alterations of apoptosis regulatory molecules such as inactivation of Bcl2, upregulation of BAX, cytochrome c release and activation of downstream apoptotic signaling. SPGE caused DNA degradation as evident by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining of increased concentration of 3′-DNA ends. Furthermore, apoptotic induction was caspase dependent as shown by cleavage of caspase substrate, poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase. Oral administration of 400 mg/kg SPGE remarkably inhibited growth and progression of prostate tumor xenografts by ∼69% in nude mice, as shown by tumor volume measurements and non-invasive real-time bioluminescent imaging. Most importantly, SPGE did not cause any detectable toxicity to rapidly dividing normal tissues such as gut and bone marrow. This is the first report to demonstrate the in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity of sweet potato greens in prostate cancer. PMID:21948980

  12. Neuronal adenosine release, and not astrocytic ATP release, mediates feedback inhibition of excitatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Lovatt, Ditte; Xu, Qiwu; Liu, Wei; Takano, Takahiro; Smith, Nathan A.; Schnermann, Jurgen; Tieu, Kim; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine is a potent anticonvulsant acting on excitatory synapses through A1 receptors. Cellular release of ATP, and its subsequent extracellular enzymatic degradation to adenosine, could provide a powerful mechanism for astrocytes to control the activity of neural networks during high-intensity activity. Despite adenosine's importance, the cellular source of adenosine remains unclear. We report here that multiple enzymes degrade extracellular ATP in brain tissue, whereas only Nt5e degrades AMP to adenosine. However, endogenous A1 receptor activation during cortical seizures in vivo or heterosynaptic depression in situ is independent of Nt5e activity, and activation of astrocytic ATP release via Ca2+ photolysis does not trigger synaptic depression. In contrast, selective activation of postsynaptic CA1 neurons leads to release of adenosine and synaptic depression. This study shows that adenosine-mediated synaptic depression is not a consequence of astrocytic ATP release, but is instead an autonomic feedback mechanism that suppresses excitatory transmission during prolonged activity. PMID:22421436

  13. Polymerase Gamma Disease through the Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saneto, Russell P.; Naviaux, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    The most common group of mitochondrial disease is due to mutations within the mitochondrial DNA polymerase, polymerase gamma 1 ("POLG"). This gene product is responsible for replication and repair of the small mitochondrial DNA genome. The structure-function relationship of this gene product produces a wide variety of diseases that at times, seems…

  14. A global profile of replicative polymerase usage

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Carolin A.; Miyabe, Izumi; Brooks, Tony; Retkute, Renata; Hubank, Mike; Nieduszyski, Conrad A.; Carr, Antony M.

    2014-01-01

    Three eukaryotic DNA polymerases are essential for genome replication. Polα-primase initiates each synthesis event and is rapidly replaced by processive DNA polymerases: Polε replicates the leading strand while Polδ performs lagging strand synthesis. However, it is not known whether this division of labour is maintained across the whole genome or how uniform it is within single replicons. Using S. pombe, we have developed a polymerase usage sequencing (Pu-seq) strategy to map polymerase usage genome–wide. Pu–seq provides direct replication origin location and efficiency data and indirect estimates of replication timing. We confirm that the division of labour is broadly maintained across an entire genome. However, our data suggest a subtle variability in the usage of the two polymerases within individual replicons. We propose this results from occasional leading strand initiation by Polδ followed by exchange for Polε. PMID:25664722

  15. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase in Cervical Cancer Pathogenesis: Mechanism and Potential Role for PARP Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kotsopoulos, Ioannis C; Kucukmetin, Ali; Mukhopadhyay, Asima; Lunec, John; Curtin, Nicola J

    2016-05-01

    Treatment options for disease recurrence of women treated for locally advanced and advanced cervical cancer are very limited-largely palliative chemotherapy. The low efficacy of the currently available drugs raises the need for new targeted agents. Poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors (PARPi) have emerged as a promising class of chemotherapeutic agents in cancers associated with defects in DNA repair. Their therapeutic potential in cervical cancer is currently being evaluated in 3 ongoing clinical trials. Here we review the available information regarding all the aspects of PARP in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical cancer, from expression and the mechanism of action to the role of the polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of the disease, as well as the potential of the inhibitors. We finally propose a new unifying theory regarding the role of PARPs in the development of cervical carcinomas. PMID:26905326

  16. Mitochondrial poly(A) polymerase is involved in tRNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Mario; Rossmanith, Walter; Wahle, Elmar; Rammelt, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Transcription of the mitochondrial genome results in polycistronic precursors, which are processed mainly by the release of tRNAs interspersed between rRNAs and mRNAs. In many metazoan mitochondrial genomes some tRNA genes overlap with downstream genes; in the case of human mitochondria the genes for tRNATyr and tRNACys overlap by one nucleotide. It has previously been shown that processing of the common precursor releases an incomplete tRNATyr lacking the 3′-adenosine. The 3′-terminal adenosine has to be added before addition of the CCA end and subsequent aminoacylation. We show that the mitochondrial poly(A) polymerase (mtPAP) is responsible for this A addition. In vitro, a tRNATyr lacking the discriminator is a substrate for mtPAP. In vivo, an altered mtPAP protein level affected tRNATyr maturation, as shown by sequencing the 3′ ends of mitochondrial tRNAs. Complete repair could be reconstituted in vitro with three enzymes: mtPAP frequently added more than one A to the 3′ end of the truncated tRNA, and either the mitochondrial deadenylase PDE12 or the endonuclease RNase Z trimmed the oligo(A) tail to a single A before CCA addition. An enzyme machinery that evolved primarily for other purposes thus allows to tolerate the frequent evolutionary occurrence of gene overlaps. PMID:26354863

  17. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, Christopher R.; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D. Curtis; Holst, Gregory L.; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L.; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously—each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel. PMID:26339317

  18. Archaeal DNA polymerases in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Likui; Kang, Manyu; Xu, Jiajun; Huang, Yanchao

    2015-08-01

    DNA polymerase (pol) is a ubiquitous enzyme that synthesizes DNA strands in all living cells. In vitro, DNA pol is used for DNA manipulation, including cloning, PCR, site-directed mutagenesis, sequencing, and several other applications. Family B archaeal DNA pols have been widely used for molecular biological methods. Biochemical and structural studies reveal that each archaeal DNA pol has different characteristics with respect to fidelity, processivity and thermostability. Due to their high fidelity and strong thermostability, family B archaeal DNA pols have the extensive application on high-fidelity PCR, DNA sequencing, and site-directed mutagenesis while family Y archaeal DNA pols have the potential for error-prone PCR and random mutagenesis because of their low fidelity and strong thermostability. This information combined with mutational analysis has been used to construct novel DNA pols with altered properties that enhance their use as biotechnological reagents. In this review, we focus on the development and use of family B archaeal DNA pols. PMID:26150245

  19. Protein Affinity Chromatography with Purified Yeast DNA Polymerase α Detects Proteins that Bind to DNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jeff; Formosa, Tim

    1992-02-01

    We have overexpressed the POL1 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified the resulting DNA polymerase α polypeptide in an apparently intact form. We attached the purified DNA polymerase covalently to an agarose matrix and used this matrix to chromatograph extracts prepared from yeast cells. At least six proteins bound to the yeast DNA polymerase α matrix that did not bind to a control matrix. We speculate that these proteins might be DNA polymerase α accessory proteins. Consistent with this interpretation, one of the binding proteins, which we have named POB1 (polymerase one binding), is required for normal chromosome transmission. Mutations in this gene cause increased chromosome loss and an abnormal cell morphology, phenotypes that also occur in the presence of mutations in the yeast α or δ polymerase genes. These results suggest that the interactions detected by polymerase affinity chromatography are biologically relevant and may help to illuminate the architecture of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery.

  20. Adenosine protected against pulmonary edema through transporter- and receptor A2-mediated endothelial barrier enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing; Harrington, Elizabeth O.; Newton, Julie; Casserly, Brian; Radin, Gregory; Warburton, Rod; Zhou, Yang; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that adenosine plus homocysteine enhanced endothelial basal barrier function and protected against agonist-induced barrier dysfunction in vitro through attenuation of RhoA activation by inhibition of isoprenylcysteine-O-carboxyl methyltransferase. In the current study, we tested the effect of elevated adenosine on pulmonary endothelial barrier function in vitro and in vivo. We noted that adenosine alone dose dependently enhanced endothelial barrier function. While adenosine receptor A1 or A3 antagonists were ineffective, an adenosine transporter inhibitor, NBTI, or a combination of DPMX and MRS1754, antagonists for adenosine receptors A2A and A2B, respectively, partially attenuated the barrier-enhancing effect of adenosine. Similarly, inhibition of both A2A and A2B receptors with siRNA also blunted the effect of adenosine on barrier function. Interestingly, inhibition of both transporters and A2A/A2B receptors completely abolished adenosine-induced endothelial barrier enhancement. The adenosine receptor A2A and A2B agonist, NECA, also significantly enhanced endothelial barrier function. These data suggest that both adenosine transporters and A2A and A2B receptors are necessary for exerting maximal effect of adenosine on barrier enhancement. We also found that adenosine enhanced Rac1 GTPase activity and overexpression of dominant negative Rac1 attenuated adenosine-induced increases in focal adhesion complexes. We further demonstrated that elevation of cellular adenosine by inhibition of adenosine deaminase with Pentostatin significantly enhanced endothelial basal barrier function, an effect that was also associated with enhanced Rac1 GTPase activity and with increased focal adhesion complexes and adherens junctions. Finally, using a non-inflammatory acute lung injury (ALI) model induced by α-naphthylthiourea, we found that administration of Pentostatin, which elevated lung adenosine level by 10-fold, not only attenuated the

  1. Sustained adenosine exposure causes lung endothelial apoptosis: a possible contributor to cigarette smoke-induced endothelial apoptosis and lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Sakhatskyy, Pavlo; Newton, Julie; Shamirian, Paul; Hsiao, Vivian; Curren, Sean; Gabino Miranda, Gustavo Andres; Pedroza, Mesias; Blackburn, Michael R.; Rounds, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of emphysema. Cigarette smoke (CS) causes lung EC apoptosis and emphysema. In this study, we show that CS exposure increased lung tissue adenosine levels in mice, an effect associated with increased lung EC apoptosis and the development of emphysema. Adenosine has a protective effect against apoptosis via adenosine receptor-mediated signaling. However, sustained elevated adenosine increases alveolar cell apoptosis in adenosine deaminase-deficient mice. We established an in vitro model of sustained adenosine exposure by incubating lung EC with adenosine in the presence of an adenosine deaminase inhibitor, deoxycoformicin. We demonstrated that sustained adenosine exposure caused lung EC apoptosis via nucleoside transporter-facilitated intracellular adenosine uptake, subsequent activation of p38 and JNK in mitochondria, and ultimately mitochondrial defects and activation of the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Our results suggest that sustained elevated adenosine may contribute to CS-induced lung EC apoptosis and emphysema. Our data also reconcile the paradoxical effects of adenosine on apoptosis, demonstrating that prolonged exposure causes apoptosis via nucleoside transporter-mediated intracellular adenosine signaling, whereas acute exposure protects against apoptosis via activation of adenosine receptors. Inhibition of adenosine uptake may become a new therapeutic target in treatment of CS-induced lung diseases. PMID:23316066

  2. Adenosine-mediated modulation of ventral horn interneurons and spinal motoneurons in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Witts, Emily C; Nascimento, Filipe; Miles, Gareth B

    2015-10-01

    Neuromodulation allows neural networks to adapt to varying environmental and biomechanical demands. Purinergic signaling is known to be an important modulatory system in many parts of the CNS, including motor control circuitry. We have recently shown that adenosine modulates the output of mammalian spinal locomotor control circuitry (Witts EC, Panetta KM, Miles GB. J Neurophysiol 107: 1925-1934, 2012). Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying this adenosine-mediated modulation. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were performed on ventral horn interneurons and motoneurons within in vitro mouse spinal cord slice preparations. We found that adenosine hyperpolarized interneurons and reduced the frequency and amplitude of synaptic inputs to interneurons. Both effects were blocked by the A1-type adenosine receptor antagonist DPCPX. Analysis of miniature postsynaptic currents recorded from interneurons revealed that adenosine reduced their frequency but not amplitude, suggesting that adenosine acts on presynaptic receptors to modulate synaptic transmission. In contrast to interneurons, recordings from motoneurons revealed an adenosine-mediated depolarization. The frequency and amplitude of synaptic inputs to motoneurons were again reduced by adenosine, but we saw no effect on miniature postsynaptic currents. Again these effects on motoneurons were blocked by DPCPX. Taken together, these results demonstrate differential effects of adenosine, acting via A1 receptors, in the mouse spinal cord. Adenosine has a general inhibitory action on ventral horn interneurons while potentially maintaining motoneuron excitability. This may allow for adaptation of the locomotor pattern generated by interneuronal networks while helping to ensure the maintenance of overall motor output. PMID:26311185

  3. Abiotic regioselective phosphorylation of adenosine with borate in formamide.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Hutter, Daniel; Benner, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    Nearly 40 years ago, Schoffstall and his coworkers used formamide as a solvent to permit the phosphorylation of nucleosides by inorganic phosphate to give nucleoside phosphates, which (due to their thermodynamic instability with respect to hydrolysis) cannot be easily created in water by an analogous phosphorylation (the "water problem" in prebiotic chemistry). More recently, we showed that borate could stabilize certain carbohydrates against degradation (the "asphalt problem"). Here, we combine the two concepts to show that borate can work in formamide to guide the reactivity of nucleosides under conditions where they are phosphorylated. Specifically, reaction of adenosine in formamide with inorganic phosphate and pyrophosphate in the presence of borate gives adenosine-5'-phosphate as the only detectable phosphorylated product, with formylation (as opposed to hydrolysis) being the competing reaction. PMID:25826074

  4. Adenosine: an endogenous mediator in the pathogenesis of psoriasis*

    PubMed Central

    Festugato, Moira

    2015-01-01

    It is known that inflammatory and immune responses protect us from the invasion of micro-organisms and eliminate "wastes" from the injured sites, but they may also be responsible for significant tissue damage. Adenosine, as a purine nucleoside, which is produced in inflamed or injured sites, fulfills its role in limiting tissue damage. Although, it may have a pleiotropic effect, which signals it with a proinflammatory state in certain situations, it can be considered a potent anti-inflammatory mediator. The effects of adenosine, which acts through its receptors on T cell, on mast cell and macrophages, on endothelial cells, on neutrophils and dendritic cells, as they indicate TNF-alpha and cytokines, show that this mediator has a central role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. The way it acts in psoriasis will be reviewed in this study. PMID:26734868

  5. Pharmacology of the Adenosine A3 Receptor in the Vasculature and Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ming-Fen; Low, Leanne M.; Rose’Meyer, Roselyn B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Essential hypertension is considered to be a multifactorial disorder and its aetiology has yet to be clearly identified. As the adenosine receptors have a significant role in mediating vasodilation, alterations in their structures or signalling pathways may be involved in the development of hypertension. This study aimed to measure the expression of adenosine A3 receptors in a range of cardiovascular tissues and determine whether they could be altered with essential hypertension, and to functionally test responses to adenosine A3 receptor agonists in coronary blood vessels using the isolated perfused heart preparation. Methods mRNA samples from cardiovascular tissues and a range of blood vessels were collected from 10 week old male spontaneously hypertensive rats and age-gender matched Wistar rats (n = 8). The Langendorff heart perfusion preparation was used to characterise adenosine A3 receptor mediated coronary vasodilation in the rat heart. Results Adenosine A3 receptor agonists induced coronary vasodilation. The expression of adenosine A3 receptors in cardiovascular tissues was altered in a tissue-specific pattern. Specifically, down-regulation of adenosine A3 receptor expression occurred in hypertensive hearts, which might be associated with attenuated vasodilator responses observed in coronary vessels to adenosine A3 receptor agonists. Conclusions This study demonstrated alterations in the expression of adenosine A3 receptors occurred in a tissue specific mode, and reduced adenosine A3 receptor mediated coronary vasodilation in hearts from spontaneously hypertensive rats. Our findings with regard to changes in the adenosine A3 receptor in hypertensive hearts suggest that adenosine A3 receptor might play a role in the physiopathology of essential hypertension and potentially open the way to pharmacologic manipulation of vasomotor activity by the use of adenosine A3 receptor agonists. PMID:26907173

  6. Ticagrelor potentiates adenosine-induced stimulation of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Alsharif, Khalaf F; Thomas, Mark R; Judge, Heather M; Khan, Haroon; Prince, Lynne R; Sabroe, Ian; Ridger, Victoria C; Storey, Robert F

    2015-08-01

    In the PLATO study, ticagrelor was associated with fewer pulmonary infections and subsequent deaths than clopidogrel. Neutrophils are a first-line defence against bacterial lung infection; ticagrelor inhibits cellular uptake of adenosine, a known regulator of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. We assessed whether the inhibition of adenosine uptake by ticagrelor influences neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Neutrophils and erythrocytes were isolated from healthy volunteers. Concentration-dependent effects of adenosine on IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were investigated and the involved receptors identified using adenosine receptor antagonists. The modulatory effects of ticagrelor on adenosine-mediated changes in neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae were determined in the presence of erythrocytes to replicate physiological conditions of cellular adenosine uptake. Low-concentration adenosine (10(-8)M) significantly increased IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (% neutrophil chemotaxis: adenosine 28.7%±4.4 vs. control 22.6%±2.4; p<0.01) by acting on the high-affinity A1 receptor. Erythrocytes attenuated the effect of adenosine, although this was preserved by ticagrelor and dipyridamole (another inhibitor of adenosine uptake) but not by control or by cangrelor. Similarly, in the presence of erythrocytes, a low concentration of adenosine (10(-8)M) significantly increased neutrophil phagocytic index compared to control when ticagrelor was present (37.6±6.6 vs. 28.0±6.6; p=0.028) but had no effect in the absence of ticagrelor. We therefore conclude that the inhibition of cellular adenosine reuptake by ticagrelor potentiates the effects of a nanomolar concentration of adenosine on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. This represents a potential mechanism by which ticagrelor could influence host defence against bacterial lung infection. PMID:25869515

  7. Extracellular adenosine levels are associated with the progression and exacerbation of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fayong; Le, Ngoc-Bao; Mills, Tingting; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Molina, Jose G; Davies, Jonathan; Philip, Kemly; Volcik, Kelly A; Liu, Hong; Xia, Yang; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackburn, Michael R

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a devastating lung disease with limited treatment options. The signaling molecule adenosine is produced in response to injury and serves a protective role in early stages of injury and is detrimental during chronic stages of disease such as seen in lung conditions such as pulmonary fibrosis. Understanding the association of extracellular adenosine levels and the progression of pulmonary fibrosis is critical for designing adenosine based approaches to treat pulmonary fibrosis. The goal of this study was to use various models of experimental lung fibrosis to understand when adenosine levels are elevated during pulmonary fibrosis and whether these elevations were associated with disease progression and severity. To accomplish this, extracellular adenosine levels, defined as adenosine levels found in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid, were determined in mouse models of resolvable and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. We found that relative bronchioalveolar lavage fluid adenosine levels are progressively elevated in association with pulmonary fibrosis and that adenosine levels diminish in association with the resolution of lung fibrosis. In addition, treatment of these models with dipyridamole, an inhibitor of nucleoside transporters that potentiates extracellular adenosine levels, demonstrated that the resolution of lung fibrosis is blocked by the failure of adenosine levels to subside. Furthermore, exacerbating adenosine levels led to worse fibrosis in a progressive fibrosis model. Increased adenosine levels were associated with elevation of IL-6 and IL-17, which are important inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary fibrosis. These results demonstrate that extracellular adenosine levels are closely associated with the progression of experimental pulmonary fibrosis and that this signaling pathway may mediate fibrosis by regulating IL-6 and IL-17 production. PMID:26527068

  8. Ticagrelor potentiates adenosine-induced stimulation of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Alsharif, Khalaf F.; Thomas, Mark R.; Judge, Heather M.; Khan, Haroon; Prince, Lynne R.; Sabroe, Ian; Ridger, Victoria C.; Storey, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    In the PLATO study, ticagrelor was associated with fewer pulmonary infections and subsequent deaths than clopidogrel. Neutrophils are a first-line defence against bacterial lung infection; ticagrelor inhibits cellular uptake of adenosine, a known regulator of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. We assessed whether the inhibition of adenosine uptake by ticagrelor influences neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Neutrophils and erythrocytes were isolated from healthy volunteers. Concentration-dependent effects of adenosine on IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were investigated and the involved receptors identified using adenosine receptor antagonists. The modulatory effects of ticagrelor on adenosine-mediated changes in neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae were determined in the presence of erythrocytes to replicate physiological conditions of cellular adenosine uptake. Low-concentration adenosine (10− 8 M) significantly increased IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (% neutrophil chemotaxis: adenosine 28.7% ± 4.4 vs. control 22.6% ± 2.4; p < 0.01) by acting on the high-affinity A1 receptor. Erythrocytes attenuated the effect of adenosine, although this was preserved by ticagrelor and dipyridamole (another inhibitor of adenosine uptake) but not by control or by cangrelor. Similarly, in the presence of erythrocytes, a low concentration of adenosine (10− 8 M) significantly increased neutrophil phagocytic index compared to control when ticagrelor was present (37.6 ± 6.6 vs. 28.0 ± 6.6; p = 0.028) but had no effect in the absence of ticagrelor. We therefore conclude that the inhibition of cellular adenosine reuptake by ticagrelor potentiates the effects of a nanomolar concentration of adenosine on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. This represents a potential mechanism by which ticagrelor could influence host defence against bacterial lung infection. PMID:25869515

  9. Effects of adenosine metabolism in astrocytes on central nervous system oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-liang; Zhang, Ya-nan; Wang, Zhong-zhuang; Xu, Wei-gang; Li, Run-ping; Zhang, Jun-dong

    2016-03-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is widely used in military operations, especially underwater missions. However, prolonged and continuous inhalation of HBO can cause central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT), which greatly limits HBO's application. The regulation of astrocytes to the metabolism of adenosine is involved in epilepsy. In our study, we aimed to observe the effects of HBO exposure on the metabolism of adenosine in the brain. Furthermore, we aimed to confirm the possible mechanism underlying adenosine's mediation of the CNS-OT. Firstly, anesthetized rats exposed to 5 atm absolute HBO for 80 min. The concentrations of extracellular adenosine, ATP, ADP, and AMP were detected. Secondly, free-moving rats were exposed to HBO at the same pressure for 20 min, and the activities of 5'-nucleotidase and ADK in brain tissues were measured. For the mechanism studies, we observed the effects of a series of different doses of drugs related to adenosine metabolism on the latency of CNS-OT. Results showed HBO exposure could increase adenosine content by inhibiting ADK activity and improving 5'-nucleotidase activity. And adenosine metabolism during HBO exposure may be a protective response against HBO-induced CNS-OT. Moreover, the improvement of adenosine concentration, activation of adenosine A1R, or suppression of ADK and adenosine A2AR, which are involved in the prevention of HBO-induced CNS-OT. This is the first study to demonstrate HBO exposure regulated adenosine metabolism in the brain. Adenosine metabolism and adenosine receptors are related to HBO-induced CNS-OT development. These results will provide new potential targets for the termination or the attenuation of CNS-OT. PMID:26806404

  10. RNA polymerase gene, microorganism having said gene and the production of RNA polymerase by the use of said microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Kotani, Hirokazu; Hiraoka, Nobutsugu; Obayashi, Akira

    1991-01-01

    SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase is produced by cultivating a new microorganism (particularly new strains of Escherichia coli) harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene and recovering SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase from the culture broth. SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene is provided as are new microorganisms harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene.

  11. Adenosine Signaling in Striatal Circuits and Alcohol Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyung Wook; Bruner, Robert C.; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine signaling has been implicated in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorders and other psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Numerous studies have indicated a role for A1 receptors (A1R) in acute ethanol-induced motor incoordination, while A2A receptors (A2AR) mainly regulate the rewarding effect of ethanol in mice. Recent findings have demonstrated that dampened A2AR-mediated signaling in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) promotes ethanol-seeking behaviors. Moreover, decreased A2AR function is associated with decreased CREB activity in the DMS, which enhances goal-oriented behaviors and contributes to excessive ethanol drinking in mice. Interestingly, caffeine, the most commonly used psychoactive substance, is known to inhibit both the A1R and A2AR. This dampened adenosine receptor function may mask some of the acute intoxicating effects of ethanol. Furthermore, based on the fact that A2AR activity plays a role in goal-directed behavior, caffeine may also promote ethanol-seeking behavior. The A2AR is enriched in the striatum and exclusively expressed in striatopallidal neurons, which may be responsible for the regulation of inhibitory behavioral control over drug rewarding processes through the indirect pathway of the basal ganglia circuit. Furthermore, the antagonistic interactions between adenosine and dopamine receptors in the striatum also play an integral role in alcoholism and addiction-related disorders. This review focuses on regulation of adenosine signaling in striatal circuits and the possible implication of caffeine in goal-directed behaviors and addiction. PMID:23912595

  12. Adenosine receptor antagonist and augmented vasodilation during hypoxic exercise.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Madery, Brandon D; Pike, Tasha L; Eisenach, John H; Dietz, Niki M; Joyner, Michael J; Wilkins, Brad W

    2009-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that adenosine contributes to augmented skeletal muscle vasodilation during hypoxic exercise. In separate protocols, subjects performed incremental rhythmic forearm exercise (10% and 20% of maximum) during normoxia and normocapnic hypoxia (80% arterial O2 saturation). In protocol 1 (n = 8), subjects received an intra-arterial administration of saline (control) and aminophylline (adenosine receptor antagonist). In protocol 2 (n = 10), subjects received intra-arterial phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) and combined phentolamine and aminophylline administration. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; in ml x min(-1).100 mmHg(-1)) was calculated from forearm blood flow (in ml/min) and blood pressure (in mmHg). In protocol 1, the change in FVC (DeltaFVC; change from normoxic baseline) during hypoxic exercise with saline was 172 +/- 29 and 314 +/- 34 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1) (10% and 20%, respectively). Aminophylline administration did not affect DeltaFVC during hypoxic exercise at 10% (190 +/- 29 ml x min(-1)x100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.4) or 20% (287 +/- 48 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.3). In protocol 2, DeltaFVC due to hypoxic exercise with phentolamine infusion was 313 +/- 30 and 453 +/- 41 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1) (10% and 20% respectively). DeltaFVC was similar at 10% (352 +/- 39 ml min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.8) and 20% (528 +/- 45 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.2) hypoxic exercise with combined phentolamine and aminophylline. In contrast, DeltaFVC to exogenous adenosine was reduced by aminophylline administration in both protocols (P < 0.05 for both). These observations suggest that adenosine receptor activation is not obligatory for the augmented hyperemia during hypoxic exercise in humans. PMID:19661449

  13. Adenosine signaling in striatal circuits and alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyung Wook; Bruner, Robert C; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2013-09-01

    Adenosine signaling has been implicated in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorders and other psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Numerous studies have indicated a role for A1 receptors (A1R) in acute ethanol-induced motor incoordination, while A2A receptors (A2AR) mainly regulate the rewarding effect of ethanol in mice. Recent findings have demonstrated that dampened A2AR-mediated signaling in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) promotes ethanol-seeking behaviors. Moreover, decreased A2AR function is associated with decreased CREB activity in the DMS, which enhances goal-oriented behaviors and contributes to excessive ethanol drinking in mice. Interestingly, caffeine, the most commonly used psychoactive substance, is known to inhibit both the A1R and A2AR. This dampened adenosine receptor function may mask some of the acute intoxicating effects of ethanol. Furthermore, based on the fact that A2AR activity plays a role in goal-directed behavior, caffeine may also promote ethanol-seeking behavior. The A2AR is enriched in the striatum and exclusively expressed in striatopallidal neurons, which may be responsible for the regulation of inhibitory behavioral control over drug rewarding processes through the indirect pathway of the basal ganglia circuit. Furthermore, the antagonistic interactions between adenosine and dopamine receptors in the striatum also play an integral role in alcoholism and addiction-related disorders. This review focuses on regulation of adenosine signaling in striatal circuits and the possible implication of caffeine in goal-directed behaviors and addiction. PMID:23912595

  14. Anxiolytic activity of adenosine receptor activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Jain, N; Kemp, N; Adeyemo, O; Buchanan, P; Stone, T W

    1995-10-01

    1. Purine analogues have been examined for anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like activity in mice, by use of the elevated plus-maze. 2. The selective A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) had marked anxiolytic-like activity at 10 and 50 microg kg(-1), with no effect on locomotor performance at these doses. 3. The A1 selective adenosine receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (CPX) had no significant effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotor behaviour, but blocked the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. The hydrophilic xanthine, 8-(p-sulphophenyl) theophylline did not prevent anxiolysis by CPA. 4. Caffeine had anxiogenic-like activity at 30 mg kg(-1) which was prevented by CPA at 50 micro kg(-1). 5. The A2 receptor agonist, N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2(2-methylphenyl)-ethyl]adenosine (DPMA) had no effect on anxiety behaviour but depressed locomotor activity at the highest dose tested of 1 mg kg(-1). The A2 receptor antagonist, 1,3-dimethyl-l-propargylxanthine (DMPX) had no effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotion and did not modify the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. 6. Administration of DPMA in combination with anxiolytic doses of CPA prevented the anxiolytic-like activity of the latter. 7. The results suggest that the selective activation of central A1 adenosine receptors induces anxiolytic-like behaviour, while the activation of A2 sites causes locomotor depression and reduces the effects of A1 receptor activation. The absence of any effect of CPX alone suggests that the receptors involved in modulating behaviour in the elevated plus-maze in mice are not activated tonically by endogenous adenosine. PMID:8640355

  15. Anxiolytic activity of adenosine receptor activation in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, N.; Kemp, N.; Adeyemo, O.; Buchanan, P.; Stone, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    1. Purine analogues have been examined for anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like activity in mice, by use of the elevated plus-maze. 2. The selective A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) had marked anxiolytic-like activity at 10 and 50 microg kg(-1), with no effect on locomotor performance at these doses. 3. The A1 selective adenosine receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (CPX) had no significant effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotor behaviour, but blocked the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. The hydrophilic xanthine, 8-(p-sulphophenyl) theophylline did not prevent anxiolysis by CPA. 4. Caffeine had anxiogenic-like activity at 30 mg kg(-1) which was prevented by CPA at 50 micro kg(-1). 5. The A2 receptor agonist, N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2(2-methylphenyl)-ethyl]adenosine (DPMA) had no effect on anxiety behaviour but depressed locomotor activity at the highest dose tested of 1 mg kg(-1). The A2 receptor antagonist, 1,3-dimethyl-l-propargylxanthine (DMPX) had no effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotion and did not modify the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. 6. Administration of DPMA in combination with anxiolytic doses of CPA prevented the anxiolytic-like activity of the latter. 7. The results suggest that the selective activation of central A1 adenosine receptors induces anxiolytic-like behaviour, while the activation of A2 sites causes locomotor depression and reduces the effects of A1 receptor activation. The absence of any effect of CPX alone suggests that the receptors involved in modulating behaviour in the elevated plus-maze in mice are not activated tonically by endogenous adenosine. PMID:8640355

  16. Identification of widespread adenosine nucleotide binding in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Ortega, Corrie; Payne, Samuel H.; Haft, Daniel H.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Lewis, Michael P.; Ollodart, Anja R.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Shukla, Anil K.; Fortuin, Suereta; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Grundner, Christoph; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-01-24

    The annotation of protein function is almost completely performed by in silico approaches. However, computational prediction of protein function is frequently incomplete and error prone. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), ~25% of all genes have no predicted function and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. This lack of functional information severely limits our understanding of Mtb pathogenicity. Current tools for experimental functional annotation are limited and often do not scale to entire protein families. Here, we report a generally applicable chemical biology platform to functionally annotate bacterial proteins by combining activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) and quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics. As an example of this approach for high-throughput protein functional validation and discovery, we experimentally annotate the families of ATP-binding proteins in Mtb. Our data experimentally validate prior in silico predictions of >250 ATPases and adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins, and reveal 73 hypothetical proteins as novel ATP-binding proteins. We identify adenosine cofactor interactions with many hypothetical proteins containing a diversity of unrelated sequences, providing a new and expanded view of adenosine nucleotide binding in Mtb. Furthermore, many of these hypothetical proteins are both unique to Mycobacteria and essential for infection, suggesting specialized functions in mycobacterial physiology and pathogenicity. Thus, we provide a generally applicable approach for high throughput protein function discovery and validation, and highlight several ways in which application of activity-based proteomics data can improve the quality of functional annotations to facilitate novel biological insights.

  17. METABOLIC REGULATION OF ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE SULFURYLASE IN YEAST

    PubMed Central

    de Vito, Peter C.; Dreyfuss, Jacques

    1964-01-01

    de Vito, Peter C. (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.), and Jacques Dreyfuss. Metabolic regulation of adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase in yeast. J. Bacteriol. 88:1341–1348. 1964.—The metabolic regulation of adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase (ATP-sulfurylase) from baker's yeast was studied. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by low concentrations of adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate, 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate, and sulfide. Sulfide ion was a competitive inhibitor of ATP-sulfurylase. Cysteine, methionine, sulfite, and thiosulfate were not inhibitors of the enzyme. ATP-sulfurylase was repressed when yeast was grown in the presence of methionine, and derepressed when yeast was grown in the presence of cysteine. In contrast to these results, the enzyme sulfite reductase was repressed in cysteine-grown cells. Thus, the sulfate-reducing pathway in yeast appears to be regulated at its first step both by feedback inhibition (by sulfide) and by repression (by methionine). Other known controls in the cysteine biosynthetic pathway are discussed. PMID:14234791

  18. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, S.; Richardson, C.

    1997-03-25

    A modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase is disclosed. The modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase. 6 figs.

  19. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase wherein the modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase.

  20. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate ameliorates D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury through an adenosine receptor-independent mechanism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Y; Wang, Z; Yang, P; Wang, T; Xia, L; Zhou, M; Wang, Y; Wang, S; Hua, Z; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    D-galactosamine (GalN)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lethality and acute liver failure is dependent on endogenously produced inflammatory cytokines. Adenosine has been proven to be a central role in the regulation of inflammatory response. It is not entirely clear that which adenosine action is actually crucial to limiting inflammatory tissue destruction. Here we showed that GalN/LPS challenge elevated hepatic adenosine and induced lethality in adenosine receptor-deficient mice with equal efficiency as wild-type mice. In GalN/LPS-treated mice, pretreatment with adenosine 5′-monophosphate (5′-AMP) significantly elevated hepatic adenosine level and reduced mortality through decreasing cytokine and chemokine production. In RAW264.7 cells, 5′-AMP treatment inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines, which is not mediated through adenosine receptors. 5′-AMP failed to attenuate LPS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 nuclear translocation, but reduced LPS-induced recruitment of NF-κB p65 to inflammatory gene promoters and decreased LPS-induced enrichment of H3K4 dimethylation at the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) promoter, which was involved in 5′-AMP-induced elevation of cellular adenosine and a decline of methylation potential. In vitro biochemical analysis revealed that adenosine directly attenuated recruitment of NF-κB to the TNF-α and interleukin-6 promoters. Our findings demonstrate that 5′-AMP-inhibiting inflammatory response is not mediated by adenosine receptors and it may represent a potential protective agent for amelioration of LPS-induced liver injury. PMID:24407238

  1. Genetic removal of the A2A adenosine receptor enhances pulmonary inflammation, mucin production, and angiogenesis in adenosine deaminase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Mohsenin, Amir; Mi, Tiejuan; Xia, Yang; Kellems, Rodney E; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Blackburn, Michael R

    2007-09-01

    Adenosine is generated at sites of tissue injury where it serves to regulate inflammation and damage. Adenosine signaling has been implicated in the regulation of pulmonary inflammation and damage in diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; however, the contribution of specific adenosine receptors to key immunoregulatory processes in these diseases is still unclear. Mice deficient in the purine catabolic enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) develop pulmonary inflammation and mucous metaplasia in association with adenosine elevations making them a useful model for assessing the contribution of specific adenosine receptors to adenosine-mediated pulmonary disease. Studies suggest that the A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)R) functions to limit inflammation and promote tissue protection; however, the contribution of A(2A)R signaling has not been examined in the ADA-deficient model of adenosine-mediated lung inflammation. The purpose of the current study was to examine the contribution of A(2A)R signaling to the pulmonary phenotype seen in ADA-deficient mice. This was accomplished by generating ADA/A(2A)R double knockout mice. Genetic removal of the A(2A)R from ADA-deficient mice resulted in enhanced inflammation comprised largely of macrophages and neutrophils, mucin production in the bronchial airways, and angiogenesis, relative to that seen in the lungs of ADA-deficient mice with the A(2A)R. In addition, levels of the chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and CXCL1 were elevated, whereas levels of cytokines such as TNF-alpha and IL-6 were not. There were no compensatory changes in the other adenosine receptors in the lungs of ADA/A(2A)R double knockout mice. These findings suggest that the A(2A)R plays a protective role in the ADA-deficient model of pulmonary inflammation. PMID:17601796

  2. [Effects of dopamine and adenosine on regulation of water-electrolyte exchange in Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Bagrov, Ia Iu; Manusova, N B

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine and adenosine both regulate transport of sodium chloride in the renal tubules in mammals. We have studied the effect of dopamine and adenosine on spontaneous activity of contractile vacuole of Amoeba proteous. Both substances stimulated contractile vacuole. The effect of dopamine was suppressed by D2 receptor antagonist, haloperidol, but not by D1 antagonist, SCH 39166. Adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 2.5-dideoxyadenosine, suppressed the effect of dopamine, but not of adenosine. Inhibitor of protein kinase C, staurosporine, in contrast, blocked the effect of adenosine, but not dopamine. Notably, dopamine opposed effect of adenosine and vice versa. These results suggest that similar effects of dopamine and adenosine could be mediated by different intracellulare mechanisms. PMID:25509166

  3. Sustained Elevated Adenosine via ADORA2B Promotes Chronic Pain through Neuro-immune Interaction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xia; Adebiyi, Morayo G; Luo, Jialie; Sun, Kaiqi; Le, Thanh-Thuy T; Zhang, Yujin; Wu, Hongyu; Zhao, Shushan; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Liu, Hong; Huang, Aji; Wen, Yuan Edward; Zaika, Oleg L; Mamenko, Mykola; Pochynyuk, Oleh M; Kellems, Rodney E; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackburn, Michael R; Walters, Edgar T; Huang, Dong; Hu, Hongzhen; Xia, Yang

    2016-06-28

    The molecular mechanisms of chronic pain are poorly understood and effective mechanism-based treatments are lacking. Here, we report that mice lacking adenosine deaminase (ADA), an enzyme necessary for the breakdown of adenosine, displayed unexpected chronic mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity due to sustained elevated circulating adenosine. Extending from Ada(-/-) mice, we further discovered that prolonged elevated adenosine contributed to chronic pain behaviors in two additional independent animal models: sickle cell disease mice, a model of severe pain with limited treatment, and complete Freund's adjuvant paw-injected mice, a well-accepted inflammatory model of chronic pain. Mechanistically, we revealed that activation of adenosine A2B receptors on myeloid cells caused nociceptor hyperexcitability and promoted chronic pain via soluble IL-6 receptor trans-signaling, and our findings determined that prolonged accumulated circulating adenosine contributes to chronic pain by promoting immune-neuronal interaction and revealed multiple therapeutic targets. PMID:27320922

  4. 2-Triazole-Substituted Adenosines: A New Class of Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonists, Partial Agonists, and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Cosyn, Liesbet; Palaniappan, Krishnan K.; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Duong, Heng T.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Van Calenbergh, Serge

    2016-01-01

    “Click chemistry” was explored to synthesize two series of 2-(1,2,3-triazolyl)adenosine derivatives (1–14). Binding affinity at the human A1, A2A, and A3ARs (adenosine receptors) and relative efficacy at the A3AR were determined. Some triazol-1-yl analogues showed A3AR affinity in the low nanomolar range, a high ratio of A3/A2A selectivity, and a moderate-to-high A3/A1 ratio. The 1,2,3-triazol-4-yl regiomers typically showed decreased A3AR affinity. Sterically demanding groups at the adenine C2 position tended to reduce relative A3AR efficacy. Thus, several 5′-OH derivatives appeared to be selective A3AR antagonists, i.e., 10, with 260-fold binding selectivity in comparison to the A1AR and displaying a characteristic docking mode in an A3AR model. The corresponding 5′-ethyluronamide analogues generally showed increased A3AR affinity and behaved as full agonists, i.e., 17, with 910-fold A3/A1 selectivity. Thus, N6-substituted 2-(1,2,3-triazolyl)-adenosine analogues constitute a novel class of highly potent and selective nucleoside-based A3AR antagonists, partial agonists, and agonists. PMID:17149867

  5. Mediator Architecture and RNA Polymerase II Interaction.

    PubMed

    Plaschka, Clemens; Nozawa, Kayo; Cramer, Patrick

    2016-06-19

    Integrated structural biology recently elucidated the architecture of Mediator and its position on RNA polymerase II. Here we summarize these achievements and list open questions on Mediator structure and mechanism. PMID:26851380

  6. PAP and NT5E inhibit nociceptive neurotransmission by rapidly hydrolyzing nucleotides to adenosine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) produce extracellular adenosine from the nucleotide AMP in spinal nociceptive (pain-sensing) circuits; however, it is currently unknown if these are the main ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine or how rapidly they generate adenosine. Results We found that AMP hydrolysis, when measured histochemically, was nearly abolished in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and lamina II of spinal cord from Pap/Nt5e double knockout (dKO) mice. Likewise, the antinociceptive effects of AMP, when combined with nucleoside transport inhibitors (dipyridamole or 5-iodotubericidin), were reduced by 80-100% in dKO mice. In addition, we used fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure adenosine production at subsecond resolution within lamina II. Adenosine was maximally produced within seconds from AMP in wild-type (WT) mice but production was reduced >50% in dKO mice, indicating PAP and NT5E rapidly generate adenosine in lamina II. Unexpectedly, we also detected spontaneous low frequency adenosine transients in lamina II with FSCV. Adenosine transients were of short duration (<2 s) and were reduced (>60%) in frequency in Pap-/-, Nt5e-/- and dKO mice, suggesting these ectonucleotidases rapidly hydrolyze endogenously released nucleotides to adenosine. Field potential recordings in lamina II and behavioral studies indicate that adenosine made by these enzymes acts through the adenosine A1 receptor to inhibit excitatory neurotransmission and nociception. Conclusions Collectively, our experiments indicate that PAP and NT5E are the main ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine in nociceptive circuits and indicate these enzymes transform pulsatile or sustained nucleotide release into an inhibitory adenosinergic signal. PMID:22011440

  7. Regulation by equilibrative nucleoside transporter of adenosine outward currents in adult rat spinal dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kawasaki, Yasuhiko; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2004-07-30

    A current response induced by superfusing adenosine was examined in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of adult rat spinal cord slices by using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. In 78% of the neurons examined, adenosine induced an outward current at -70 mV [18.8 +/- 1.1 pA (n = 98) at 1mM] in a dose-dependent manner (EC(50) = 177 microM). A similar current was induced by A(1) agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (1 microM), whereas A(1) antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (1 microM) reversed the adenosine action. The adenosine current reversed its polarity at a potential being close to the equilibrium potential for K(+), and was attenuated by Ba(2+) (100 microM) and 4-aminopyridine (5mM) but not tetraethylammonium (5mM). The adenosine current was enhanced in duration by equilibrative nucleoside-transport (rENT1) inhibitor S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (1 microM) and adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (1 microM), and slowed in falling phase by adenosine kinase (AK) inhibitor iodotubercidine (1 microM). We conclude that a Ba(2+)- and 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K(+) channel in SG neurons is opened via the activation of A(1) receptors by adenosine whose level is possibly regulated by rENT1, adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase. Considering that intrathecally-administered adenosine analogues produce antinociception, the regulatory systems of adenosine may serve as targets for antinociceptive drugs. PMID:15275960

  8. Estimation of skeletal muscle interstitial adenosine during forearm dynamic exercise in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, F.; Heusinkveld, J.; Ballog, R.; Davis, S.; Biaggioni, I.

    2000-01-01

    It has been proposed that adenosine is a metabolic signal that triggers activation of muscle afferents involved in the exercise pressor reflex. Furthermore, exogenous adenosine induces sympathetic activation that mimics the exercise pressor reflex, and blockade of adenosine receptors inhibits sympathetic activation induced by exercise. Thus, we hypothesize that adenosine is released locally by the muscle during exercise. We used microdialysis probes, placed in the flexor digitorium superficialis muscle, to estimate muscle interstitial adenosine levels in humans. We estimated resting in vivo muscle interstitial adenosine concentrations (0.292+/-0.058 micromol/L, n=4) by perfusing increasing concentrations of adenosine to determine the gradient produced in the dialysate. Muscle interstitial adenosine concentrations increased from 0.23+/-0.04 to 0.82+/-0.14 micromol/L (n=14, P<0.001) during intermittent dynamic exercise at 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. Lactate increased from 0.8+/-0.1 to 2.3+/-0.3 mmol/L (P<0.001). Lower intensity (15% maximal voluntary contraction) intermittent dynamic exercise increased adenosine concentrations from 0.104+/-0.02 to 0.42+/-0.16 micromol/L (n=7). The addition of ischemia to this low level of exercise produced a greater increase in adenosine (from 0.095+/-0.02 to 0.48+/-0.2 micromol/L) compared with nonischemic exercise (0. 095+/-0.02 to 0.25+/-0.12 micromol/L). These results indicate that microdialysis is useful in estimating adenosine concentrations and in reflecting changes in muscle interstitial adenosine during dynamic exercise in humans.

  9. Evolving a polymerase for hydrophobic base analogues.

    PubMed

    Loakes, David; Gallego, José; Pinheiro, Vitor B; Kool, Eric T; Holliger, Philipp

    2009-10-21

    Hydrophobic base analogues (HBAs) have shown great promise for the expansion of the chemical and coding potential of nucleic acids but are generally poor polymerase substrates. While extensive synthetic efforts have yielded examples of HBAs with favorable substrate properties, their discovery has remained challenging. Here we describe a complementary strategy for improving HBA substrate properties by directed evolution of a dedicated polymerase using compartmentalized self-replication (CSR) with the archetypal HBA 5-nitroindole (d5NI) and its derivative 5-nitroindole-3-carboxamide (d5NIC) as selection substrates. Starting from a repertoire of chimeric polymerases generated by molecular breeding of DNA polymerase genes from the genus Thermus, we isolated a polymerase (5D4) with a generically enhanced ability to utilize HBAs. The selected polymerase. 5D4 was able to form and extend d5NI and d5NIC (d5NI(C)) self-pairs as well as d5NI(C) heteropairs with all four bases with efficiencies approaching, or exceeding, those of the cognate Watson-Crick pairs, despite significant distortions caused by the intercalation of the d5NI(C) heterocycles into the opposing strand base stack, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Unlike Taq polymerase, 5D4 was also able to extend HBA pairs such as Pyrene: varphi (abasic site), d5NI: varphi, and isocarbostyril (ICS): 7-azaindole (7AI), allowed bypass of a chemically diverse spectrum of HBAs, and enabled PCR amplification with primers comprising multiple d5NI(C)-substitutions, while maintaining high levels of catalytic activity and fidelity. The selected polymerase 5D4 promises to expand the range of nucleobase analogues amenable to replication and should find numerous applications, including the synthesis and replication of nucleic acid polymers with expanded chemical and functional diversity. PMID:19778048

  10. Synthesis and biological evaluation of clitocine analogues as adenosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, C H; Daanen, J F; Jiang, M; Yu, H; Kohlhaas, K L; Alexander, K; Jarvis, M F; Kowaluk, E L; Bhagwat, S S

    2001-09-17

    Adenosine kinase (AK) is the primary enzyme responsible for adenosine metabolism. Inhibition of AK effectively increases extracellular adenosine concentrations and represents an alternative approach to enhance the beneficial actions of adenosine as compared to direct-acting receptor agonists. Clitocine (3), isolated from the mushroom Clitocybe inversa, has been found to be a weak inhibitor of AK. We have prepared a number of analogues of clitocine in order to improve its potency and demonstrated that 5'-deoxy-5'-amino-clitocine (7) improved AK inhibitory potency by 50-fold. PMID:11549437

  11. Characterization and regulation of adenosine transport in T84 intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mun, E C; Tally, K J; Matthews, J B

    1998-02-01

    Adenosine release from mucosal sources during inflammation and ischemia activates intestinal epithelial Cl- secretion. Previous data suggest that A2b receptor-mediated Cl- secretory responses may be dampened by epithelial cell nucleoside scavenging. The present study utilizes isotopic flux analysis and nucleoside analog binding assays to directly characterize the nucleoside transport system of cultured T84 human intestinal epithelial cells and to explore whether adenosine transport is regulated by secretory agonists, metabolic inhibition, or phorbol ester. Uptake of adenosine across the apical membrane displayed characteristics of simple diffusion. Kinetic analysis of basolateral uptake revealed a Na(+)-independent, nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI)-sensitive facilitated-diffusion system with low affinity but high capacity for adenosine. NBTI binding studies indicated a single population of high-affinity binding sites basolaterally. Neither forskolin, 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)-adenosine, nor metabolic inhibition significantly altered adenosine transport. However, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate significantly reduced both adenosine transport and the number of specific NBTI binding sites, suggesting that transporter number may be decreased through activation of protein kinase C. This basolateral facilitated adenosine transporter may serve a conventional function in nucleoside salvage and a novel function as a regulator of adenosine-dependent Cl- secretory responses and hence diarrheal disorders. PMID:9486178

  12. Alkaline Phosphatase, Soluble Extracellular Adenine Nucleotides, and Adenosine Production after Infant Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Jesse A.; Urban, Tracy; Tong, Suhong; Twite, Mark; Woodruff, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Decreased alkaline phosphatase activity after infant cardiac surgery is associated with increased post-operative cardiovascular support requirements. In adults undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, alkaline phosphatase infusion may reduce inflammation. Mechanisms underlying these effects have not been explored but may include decreased conversion of extracellular adenine nucleotides to adenosine. Objectives 1) Evaluate the association between alkaline phosphatase activity and serum conversion of adenosine monophosphate to adenosine after infant cardiac surgery; 2) assess if inhibition/supplementation of serum alkaline phosphatase modulates this conversion. Methods and Research Pre/post-bypass serum samples were obtained from 75 infants <4 months of age. Serum conversion of 13C5-adenosine monophosphate to 13C5-adenosine was assessed with/without selective inhibition of alkaline phosphatase and CD73. Low and high concentration 13C5-adenosine monophosphate (simulating normal/stress concentrations) were used. Effects of alkaline phosphatase supplementation on adenosine monophosphate clearance were also assessed. Changes in serum alkaline phosphatase activity were strongly correlated with changes in 13C5-adenosine production with or without CD73 inhibition (r = 0.83; p<0.0001). Serum with low alkaline phosphatase activity (≤80 U/L) generated significantly less 13C5-adenosine, particularly in the presence of high concentration 13C5-adenosine monophosphate (10.4μmol/L vs 12.9μmol/L; p = 0.0004). Inhibition of alkaline phosphatase led to a marked decrease in 13C5-adenosine production (11.9μmol/L vs 2.7μmol/L; p<0.0001). Supplementation with physiologic dose human tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase or high dose bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase doubled 13C5-adenosine monophosphate conversion to 13C5-adenosine (p<0.0001). Conclusions Alkaline phosphatase represents the primary serum ectonucleotidase after infant cardiac surgery and low post

  13. Molecular vibration-activity relationship in the agonism of adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Chee, Hyun Keun; Oh, S June

    2013-12-01

    The molecular vibration-activity relationship in the receptor-ligand interaction of adenosine receptors was investigated by structure similarity, molecular vibration, and hierarchical clustering in a dataset of 46 ligands of adenosine receptors. The resulting dendrogram was compared with those of another kind of fingerprint or descriptor. The dendrogram result produced by corralled intensity of molecular vibrational frequency outperformed four other analyses in the current study of adenosine receptor agonism and antagonism. The tree that was produced by clustering analysis of molecular vibration patterns showed its potential for the functional classification of adenosine receptor ligands. PMID:24465242

  14. Adenosine A2A receptor dynamics studied with the novel fluorescent agonist Alexa488-APEC

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Frank; Klutz, Athena; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Schulte, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors, such as the adenosine A2A receptor, are dynamic proteins, which undergo agonist-dependent redistribution from the cell surface to intracellular membranous compartments, such as endosomes. In order to study the kinetics of adenosine A2A receptor redistribution in living cells, we synthesized a novel fluorescent agonist, Alexa488-APEC. Alexa488-APEC binds to adenosine A2A (Ki = 149 ± 27 nM) as well as A3 receptors (Ki= 240 ± 160 nM) but not to adenosine A1 receptors. Further, we characterized the dose-dependent increase in Alexa488-APEC-induced cAMP production as well as cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein phosphorylation, verifying the ligand’s functionality at adenosine A2A but not A2B receptors. In live cell imaging studies, Alexa488-APEC induced adenosine A2A receptor internalization, which was blocked by the competitive reversible antagonist ZM 241385 and hyperosmolaric sucrose. Further, internalized adenosine A2A receptors co-localized with clathrin and Rab5, indicating that agonist stimulation promotes adenosine A2A receptor uptake through a clathrin-dependent mechanism to Rab5-positive endosomes. The basic characterization of Alexa488-APEC provided here showed that it provides a usefultool for tracing adenosine A2A receptors in vitro. PMID:18603240

  15. Endogenous adenosine is an autacoid feedback inhibitor of chloride transport in the shark rectal gland.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, G G; Aassar, O S; Forrest, J N

    1991-01-01

    The present studies define the physiologic role of endogenous adenosine in the perfused shark rectal gland, a model epithelia for hormone-stimulated chloride transport. Chloride ion secretion, and venous adenosine and inosine concentrations increased in parallel in response to hormone stimulation. From a basal rate of 157 +/- 26 mu eq/h per g, chloride secretion increased to 836 +/- 96 and 2170 +/- 358 with 1 and 10 microM forskolin, venous adenosine increased from 5.0 +/- 1 to 126 +/- 29 and 896 +/- 181 nM, and inosine increased from 30 +/- 9 to 349 +/- 77 and 1719 +/- 454 nM (all P less than 0.01). Nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI), a nucleoside transport inhibitor, completely blocked the release of adenosine and inosine. Inhibition of chloride transport with bumetanide, an inhibitor of the Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransporter, or ouabain, an inhibitor of Na+/K+ ATPase activity, reduced venous adenosine and inosine to basal values. When the interaction of endogenous adenosine with extracellular receptors was prevented by adenosine deaminase, NBTI, or 8-phenyltheophylline, the chloride transport response to secretagogues increased by 1.7-2.3-fold. These studies demonstrate that endogenous adenosine is released in response to hormone-stimulated cellular work and acts at A1 adenosine receptors as a feedback inhibitor of chloride transport. Images PMID:1752953

  16. Clearance of rapid adenosine release is regulated by nucleoside transporters and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michael D; Ross, Ashley E; Ryals, Matthew; Lee, Scott T; Venton, B Jill

    2015-12-01

    Adenosine is a neuromodulator that regulates neurotransmission in the brain and central nervous system. Recently, spontaneous adenosine release that is cleared in 3-4 sec was discovered in mouse spinal cord slices and anesthetized rat brains. Here, we examined the clearance of spontaneous adenosine in the rat caudate-putamen and exogenously applied adenosine in caudate brain slices. The V max for clearance of exogenously applied adenosine in brain slices was 1.4 ± 0.1 μmol/L/sec. In vivo, the equilibrative nucleoside transport 1 (ENT1) inhibitor, S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI) (1 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased the duration of adenosine, while the ENT1/2 inhibitor, dipyridamole (10 mg/kg, i.p.), did not affect duration. 5-(3-Bromophenyl)-7-[6-(4-morpholinyl)-3-pyrido[2,3-d]byrimidin-4-amine dihydrochloride (ABT-702), an adenosine kinase inhibitor (5 mg/kg, i.p.), increased the duration of spontaneous adenosine release. The adenosine deaminase inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA) (10 mg/kg, i.p.), also increased the duration in vivo. Similarly, NBTI (10 μmol/L), ABT-702 (100 nmol/L), or EHNA (20 μmol/L) also decreased the clearance rate of exogenously applied adenosine in brain slices. The increases in duration for blocking ENT1, adenosine kinase, or adenosine deaminase individually were similar, about 0.4 sec in vivo; thus, the removal of adenosine on a rapid time scale occurs through three mechanisms that have comparable effects. A cocktail of ABT-702, NBTI, and EHNA significantly increased the duration by 0.7 sec, so the mechanisms are not additive and there may be additional mechanisms clearing adenosine on a rapid time scale. The presence of multiple mechanisms for adenosine clearance on a time scale of seconds demonstrates that adenosine is tightly regulated in the extracellular space. PMID:27022463

  17. Molecular Vibration-Activity Relationship in the Agonism of Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Hyun Keun

    2013-01-01

    The molecular vibration-activity relationship in the receptor-ligand interaction of adenosine receptors was investigated by structure similarity, molecular vibration, and hierarchical clustering in a dataset of 46 ligands of adenosine receptors. The resulting dendrogram was compared with those of another kind of fingerprint or descriptor. The dendrogram result produced by corralled intensity of molecular vibrational frequency outperformed four other analyses in the current study of adenosine receptor agonism and antagonism. The tree that was produced by clustering analysis of molecular vibration patterns showed its potential for the functional classification of adenosine receptor ligands. PMID:24465242

  18. Modulation of adenosine signaling prevents scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bortolotto, Josiane Woutheres; Melo, Gabriela Madalena de; Cognato, Giana de Paula; Vianna, Mônica Ryff Moreira; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-02-01

    Adenosine, a purine ribonucleoside, exhibits neuromodulatory and neuroprotective effects in the brain and is involved in memory formation and cognitive function. Adenosine signaling is mediated by adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3); in turn, nucleotide and nucleoside-metabolizing enzymes and adenosine transporters regulate its levels. Scopolamine, a muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist, has profound amnesic effects in a variety of learning paradigms and has been used to induce cognitive deficits in animal models. This study investigated the effects of acute exposure to caffeine (a non-selective antagonist of adenosine receptors A1 and A2A), ZM 241385 (adenosine receptor A2A antagonist), DPCPX (adenosine receptor A1 antagonist), dipyridamole (inhibitor of nucleoside transporters) and EHNA (inhibitor of adenosine deaminase) in a model of pharmacological cognitive impairment induced by scopolamine in adult zebrafish. Caffeine, ZM 241385, DPCPX, dipyridamole, and EHNA were acutely administered independently via i.p. in zebrafish, followed by exposure to scopolamine dissolved in tank water (200μM). These compounds prevented the scopolamine-induced amnesia without impacting locomotor activity or social interaction. Together, these data support the hypothesis that adenosine signaling may modulate memory processing, suggesting that these compounds present a potential preventive strategy against cognitive impairment. PMID:25490060

  19. Adenosine-induced coronary vasospasm following drug-eluting stent implantation

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Nagao, Ken; Hirayama, Atsushi; Kasama, Shu

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of coronary vasospasm during adenosine stress in a patient with a prior drug-eluting stent implantation. The patient had a stent implantation in the left anterior descending coronary artery 3 years ago. Recently, he developed a chest pain and underwent adenosine stress myocardial perfusion single photon emission CT (SPECT). During the adenosine stress, he felt severe chest pain and ST elevation on electrocardiogram. An invasive coronary angiography showed no in-stent restenosis. This phenomenon deemed to be adenosine-induced coronary vasospasm after stent implantation. PMID:24518394

  20. Effects of adenosine and adenosine A2A receptor agonist on motor nerve conduction velocity and nerve blood flow in experimental diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sokindra; Arun, K H S; Kaul, Chaman L; Sharma, Shyam S

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of chronic administration of adenosine and CGS 21680 hydrochloride (adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist) on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), nerve blood flow (NBF) and histology of sciatic nerve in animal model of diabetic neuropathy. Adenosinergic agents were administered for 2 weeks after 6 weeks of streptozotocin-induced (50 mg/kg i.p.) diabetes in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Significant reduction in sciatic MNCV and NBF were observed after 8 weeks in diabetic animals in comparison with control (non diabetic) rats. Adenosine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly improved sciatic MNCV and NBF in diabetic rats. The protective effect of adenosine on MNCV and NBF was completely reversed by theophylline (50 mg/kg, i.p.), a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, suggesting that the adenosine effect was mediated via adenosinergic receptors. CGS 21680 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly improved NBF; however, MNCV was not significantly improved in diabetic rats. At a dose of 1 mg/kg, neither MNCV nor NBF was improved by CGS 21680 in diabetic rats. ZM 241385 (adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist) prevented the effect of CGS 21680 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.). Histological changes observed in sciatic nerve were partially improved by the adenosinergic agents in diabetic rats. Results of the present study, suggest the potential of adenosinergic agents in the therapy of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:15829161

  1. Xylazine Activates Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in the Central Nervous System of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xing-Xing; Yin, Bai-Shuang; Yang, Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Xin; Su, Li-Xue; Fan, Hong-Gang; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Xylazine is a potent analgesic extensively used in veterinary and animal experimentation. Evidence exists that the analgesic effect can be inhibited using adenosine 5’-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors. Considering this idea, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the AMPK signaling pathway is involved in the central analgesic mechanism of xylazine in the rat. Xylazine was administrated via the intraperitoneal route. Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem were collected for determination of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα mRNA expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα levels using western blot. The results of our study showed that compared with the control group, xylazine induced significant increases in AMPK activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum after rats received xylazine (P < 0.01). Increased AMPK activities were accompanied with increased phosphorylation levels of LKB1 in corresponding regions of rats. The protein levels of phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα in these regions returned or tended to return to control group levels. However, in the brainstem, phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα protein levels were decreased by xylazine compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicates that xylazine alters the activities of LKB1 and AMPK in the central nervous system of rats, which suggests that xylazine affects the regulatory signaling pathway of the analgesic mechanism in the rat brain. PMID:27049320

  2. Adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate levels in Thermomonospora curvata during cellulase biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fennington, G.; Neubauer, D.; Stutzenberger, F.

    1983-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of cellulose requires the synergistic activity of at least three enzymes: exo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.91), endo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.4), and beta-glucosidase (EC3.2.1.21). Despite extensive studies on a variety of cellulolytic bacteria and fungi, the mechanism(s) regulating the biosynthesis of this inducible catabolic enzyme complex remains unknown. The intracellular concentrations of cyclic nucleotides such as adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) have been shown to play a major role in mediating catabolite repression of enzyme biosynthesis. The cAMP acts through a cAMP receptor protein (termed CRP or CAP) which is a dimer having two identical subunits each capable of binding one molecule of cAMP. The N-terminal domain of the CRP binds the cAMP while the C-terminal domain binds to DNA at the promotor region of a cAMP-dependent operon and stimulates transcription by promoting the formation of a preinitiation complex between RNA polymerase and the DNA. Intracellular cAMP levels in E. coli (the prototype organism for such studies) are influenced by the type and availability of carbon source used for growth. High intracellular cAMP levels should lead to higher concentrations of cAMP-CRP complexes which should increase the transcription rates for cAMP-dependent operons (such as the lac operon of beta-galactosidase) and indeed the differential rate of beta-galactosidase biosynthesis correlates to intracellular cAMP levels. In the case of cellulase, catabolite repression by glucose or other readily metabolizable compounds closely controls production in an apparently similar manner and therefore a correlation may exist between enzyme biosynthesis and intracellular cAMP levels. This communication describes the fluctuation in cAMP levels during cellulase induction and repression in the thermophilic actinomycete, Thermomonospora curvata.

  3. Resistance analysis and characterization of NITD008 as an adenosine analog inhibitor against hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Qing, Jie; Luo, Rui; Wang, Yaxin; Nong, Junxiu; Wu, Ming; Shao, Yan; Tang, Ruoyi; Yu, Xi; Yin, Zheng; Sun, Yuna

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis disease caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a severe threat to global public health, affecting approximately 3% of the world's population. Sofosbuvir (PSI-7977), a uridine nucleotide analog inhibitor targeting the HCV NS5B polymerase, was approved by FDA at the end of 2013 and represents a key step towards a new era in the management of HCV infection. Previous study identified NITD008, an adenosine nucleoside analog, as the specific inhibitor against dengue virus and showed good antiviral effect on other flaviviruses or enteroviruses. In this report, we systematically analyzed the anti-HCV profile of NITD008, which was discovered to effectively suppress the replication of different strains of HCV in human hepatoma cells with a low nanomolar activity. On genotype 2a virus, or 2a, 1a, and 1b replicon cells, EC50 values were 8.7 nM, 93.3 nM, 60.0 nM and 67.2 nM, and selective index values were >2298.9, >214.4, >333.3, >298.5 respectively. We demonstrated that resistance to NITD008 was conferred by mutation in NS5B (S282T) in the HCV infectious virus genotype 2a (JFH-1). Then, we compared the resistant profiles of NITD008 and PSI-7977, and found that the folds change of EC50 of NITD008 to full replicon cells containing mutation S282T was much bigger than PSI-7977(folds 76.50 vs. 4.52). Analysis of NITD008 cross-resistance against previously reported NS5B drug-selected mutations showed that the resistance pattern of NITD008 was not completely similar to PSI-7977, and meanwhile, S282T resistant mutation to NITD008 emerge more easily in cell culture than PSI-7977. Interestingly, NITD008 displayed significant synergistic effects with the NS5B polymerase inhibitor PSI-7977, however, only additive effects with alpha interferon (IFNα-2b), ribavirin, and an NS3 protease inhibitor. These results verify that NITD008 is an effective analog inhibitor against hepatitis C virus and a good research tool as a supplement to other types of nucleoside analogs. PMID:26724382

  4. Adenosine influences myeloid cells to inhibit aeroallergen sensitization.

    PubMed

    Pei, Hong; Linden, Joel

    2016-05-15

    Agonists of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) suppress the activation of most immune cells and reduce acute inflammatory responses. Asthma is characterized by sensitization in response to initial allergen exposure and by airway hyperreactivity in response to allergen rechallenge. We sought to determine if A2AR activation with CGS-21680 (CGS) is more effective when CGS is administered during sensitization or rechallenge. C57BL/6 wild-type mice and Adora2a(f/f)LysMCre(+/-) mice, which lack A2ARs on myeloid cells, were sensitized with intranasal ovalbumin (OVA) and LPS. Airway sensitization was characterized by a rapid increase in numbers of IL-6(+) and IL-12(+) macrophages and dendritic cells in lungs. A2AR activation with CGS (0.1 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1) sc) only during sensitization reduced numbers of IL-6(+) and IL-12(+) myeloid cells in the lungs and reversed the effects of OVA rechallenge to increase airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. CGS treatment during sensitization also reduced the expansion of lung T helper (Th1 and Th17) cells and increased expansion of regulatory T cells in response to OVA rechallenge. Most of the effects of CGS administered during sensitization were eliminated by myeloid-selective A2AR deletion. Administration of CGS only during OVA rechallenge failed to reduce airway hyperresponsiveness. We conclude that myeloid cells are key targets of adenosine during sensitization and indirectly modify T cell polarization. The results suggest that a clinically useful strategy might be to use A2AR agonists to inhibit sensitization to new aeroallergens. We speculate that adenosine production by macrophages engulfing bacteria contributes to the curious suppression of sensitization in response to early-life infections. PMID:27016586

  5. Inhibition of adenosine kinase by phosphonate and bisphosphonate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae; Singh, Bhag; Gupta, Radhey S

    2006-02-01

    The enzyme adenosine kinase (AK) plays a central role in regulating the intracellular and interstitial concentration of the purine nucleoside adenosine (Ado). In view of the beneficial effects of Ado in protecting tissues from ischemia and other stresses, there is much interest in developing AK inhibitors, which can regulate Ado concentration in a site- and event-specific manner. The catalytic activity of AK from different sources is dependent upon the presence of activators such as phosphate (Pi). In this work we describe several new phosphorylated compounds which either activate or inhibit AK. The compounds acetyl phosphate, carbamoyl phosphate, dihydroxyacetone phosphate and imidodiphosphate were found to stimulate AK activity in a dose-dependent manner comparable to that seen with Pi. In contrast, a number of phosphonate and bisphosphonate derivatives, which included clodronate and etidronate, were found to inhibit the activity of purified AK in the presence of Pi. These AK inhibitors (viz. clodronate, etidronate, phosphonoacetic acid, 2-carboxyethylphosphonic acid, N-(phosphonomethyl)-glycine and N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid), at concentrations at which they inhibited AK, were also shown to inhibit the uptake of (3)H-adenosine and its incorporation into macromolecules in cultured mammalian cells, indicating that they were also inhibiting AK in intact cells. The drug concentrations at which these effects were observed showed limited toxicity to the cultured cells, indicating that these effects are not caused by cellular toxicity. These results indicate that the enzyme AK provides an additional cellular target for the clinically widely used bisphosphonates and related compounds, which could possibly be exploited for a new therapeutic application. Our structure-activity studies on different AK activators and inhibitors also indicate that all of the AK activating compounds have a higher partial positive charge (delta(+)) on the central phosphorous atom in

  6. Outcomes and costs of positron emission tomography: comparison of intravenous adenosine and intravenous dipyridamole.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, M J; Mohiuddin, S M; Hilleman, D E; Lucas, B D; Wadibia, E C

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the cost of intravenous adenosine and intravenous dipyridamole in positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with coronary artery disease. A retrospective, open-label, case-control, cost-effectiveness analysis was performed in the out-patient nuclear medicine department of a university hospital. Thirty-six patients underwent dipyridamole PET, and 72 matched patients underwent adenosine PET. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using a direct cost accounting approach to estimate institutional costs. Key costs evaluated included acquisition cost, administration cost, monitoring cost, cost of management of side effects, and cost of follow-up care. The total cost of adenosine PET and dipyridamole PET was divided by their respective predictive accuracies to provide a total cost adjusted for efficacy. Adenosine increased heart rate and lowered systolic blood pressure to a significantly greater extent than dipyridamole. The number of patients experiencing adverse drug reactions was significantly greater for adenosine (82%) than for dipyridamole (67%), but the frequency of prolonged (> 5 minutes) and late-onset side effects was significantly greater for dipyridamole than for adenosine. The frequency of side effects requiring medical intervention was also significantly greater for dipyridamole (53%) than for adenosine (6%). Although adenosine had a significantly greater acquisition cost than dipyridamole, costs of monitoring, management of side effects, and follow-up care were significantly less for adenosine than for dipyridamole. As a result, the total cost of using dipyridamole is significantly greater ($928.00 per patient) than the total cost of using adenosine ($672.00 per patient). Based on these results, adenosine may be the drug of choice for pharmacologic vasodilation for PET. PMID:9220220

  7. Presynaptic action of adenosine on a 4-aminopyridine-sensitive current in the rat carotid body

    PubMed Central

    Vandier, C; Conway, A F; Landauer, R C; Kumar, P

    1999-01-01

    Plasma adenosine concentration increases during hypoxia to a level that excites carotid body chemoreceptors by an undetermined mechanism. We have examined this further by determining the electrophysiological responses to exogenous adenosine of sinus nerve chemoafferents in vitro and of whole-cell currents in isolated type I cells.Steady-state, single-fibre chemoafferent discharge was increased approximately 5-fold above basal levels by 100 μM adenosine. This adenosine-stimulated discharge was reversibly and increasingly reduced by methoxyverapamil (D600, 100 μM), by application of nickel chloride (Ni2+, 2 mM) and by removal of extracellular Ca2+. These effects strongly suggest a presynaptic, excitatory action of adenosine on type I cells of the carotid body.Adenosine decreased whole-cell outward currents at membrane potentials above -40 mV in isolated type I cells recorded during superfusion with bicarbonate-buffered saline solution at 34–36 °C. This effect was reversible and concentration dependent with a maximal effect at 10 μM.The degree of current inhibition induced by 10 μM adenosine was voltage independent (45.39 ± 2.55% (mean ± s.e.m.) between −40 and +30 mV) and largely (∼75%), but not entirely, Ca2+ independent. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP, 5 mM) decreased the amplitude of the control outward current by 80.60 ± 3.67% and abolished the effect of adenosine.Adenosine was without effect upon currents near the resting membrane potential of approximately −55 mV and did not induce depolarization in current-clamp experiments.We conclude that adenosine acts to inhibit a 4-AP-sensitive current in isolated type I cells of the rat carotid body and suggest that this mechanism contributes to the chemoexcitatory effect of adenosine in the whole carotid body. PMID:10050009

  8. Adenosine conjugated lipidic nanoparticles for enhanced tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Swami, Rajan; Singh, Indu; Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Naidu, V G M; Khan, Wahid; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Delivering chemotherapeutics by nanoparticles into tumor is impeded majorly by two factors: nonspecific targeting and inefficient penetration. Targeted delivery of anti-cancer agents solely to tumor cells introduces a smart strategy because it enhances the therapeutic index compared with untargeted drugs. The present study was performed to investigate the efficiency of adenosine (ADN) to target solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) to over expressing adenosine receptor cell lines such as human breast cancer and prostate cancer (MCF-7 and DU-145 cells), respectively. SLN were prepared by emulsification and solvent evaporation process using docetaxel (DTX) as drug and were characterized by various techniques like dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimeter and transmission electron microscopy. DTX loaded SLNs were surface modified with ADN, an adenosine receptors ligand using carbodiimide coupling. Conjugation was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy and quantified using phenol-sulfuric acid method. Conjugated SLN were shown to have sustained drug release as compared to unconjugated nanoparticles and drug suspension. Compared with free DTX and unconjugated SLN, ADN conjugated SLN showed significantly higher cytotoxicity of loaded DTX, as evidenced by in vitro cell experiments. The IC50 was 0.41 μg/ml for native DTX, 0.30 μg/ml for unconjugated SLN formulation, and 0.09 μg/ml for ADN conjugated SLN formulation in MCF-7 cell lines. Whereas, in DU-145, there was 2 fold change in IC50 of ADN-SLN as compared to DTX. IC50 was found to be 0.44 μg/ml for free DTX, 0.39 μg/ml for unconjugated SLN and 0.22 μg/ml for ADN-SLN. Annexin assay and cell cycle analysis assay further substantiated the cell cytotoxicity. Fluorescent cell uptake and competitive ligand-receptor binding assay corroborated the receptor mediated endocytosis pathway indicated role of adenosine receptors in internalization of conjugated particles. Pharmacokinetic studies of lipidic

  9. Adenosine triphosphatases of thermophilic archaeal double-stranded DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) of double-stranded (ds) DNA archaeal viruses are structurally related to the AAA+ hexameric helicases and translocases. These ATPases have been implicated in viral life cycle functions such as DNA entry into the host, and viral genome packaging into preformed procapsids. We summarize bioinformatical analyses of a wide range of archaeal ATPases, and review the biochemical and structural properties of those archaeal ATPases that have measurable ATPase activity. We discuss their potential roles in genome delivery into the host, virus assembly and genome packaging in comparison to hexameric helicases and packaging motors from bacteriophages. PMID:25105011

  10. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a possible indicator of extraterrestrial biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The ubiquity of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in terrestrial organisms provides the basis for proposing the assay of this vital metabolic intermediate for detecting extraterrestrial biological activity. If an organic carbon chemistry is present on the planets, the occurrence of ATP is possible either from biosynthetic or purely chemical reactions. However, ATP's relative complexity minimizes the probability of abiogenic synthesis. A sensitive technique for the quantitative detection of ATP was developed using the firefly bioluminescent reaction. The procedure was used successfully for the determination of the ATP content of soil and bacteria. This technique is also being investigated from the standpoint of its application in clinical medicine.

  11. Cloning the Horse RNA Polymerase I Promoter and Its Application to Studying Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; He, Dong; Wang, Zengchao; Ou, Shudan; Yuan, Rong; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    An influenza virus polymerase reconstitution assay based on the human, dog, or chicken RNA polymerase I (PolI) promoter has been developed and widely used to study the polymerase activity of the influenza virus in corresponding cell types. Although it is an important member of the influenza virus family and has been known for sixty years, no studies have been performed to clone the horse PolI promoter or to study the polymerase activity of equine influenza virus (EIV) in horse cells. In our study, the horse RNA PolI promoter was cloned from fetal equine lung cells. Using the luciferase assay, it was found that a 500 bp horse RNA PolI promoter sequence was required for efficient transcription. Then, using the developed polymerase reconstitution assay based on the horse RNA PolI promoter, the polymerase activity of two EIV strains was compared, and equine myxovirus resistance A protein was identified as having the inhibiting EIV polymerase activity function in horse cells. Our study enriches our knowledge of the RNA PolI promoter of eukaryotic species and provides a useful tool for the study of influenza virus polymerase activity in horse cells. PMID:27258298

  12. Cloning the Horse RNA Polymerase I Promoter and Its Application to Studying Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Gang; He, Dong; Wang, Zengchao; Ou, Shudan; Yuan, Rong; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    An influenza virus polymerase reconstitution assay based on the human, dog, or chicken RNA polymerase I (PolI) promoter has been developed and widely used to study the polymerase activity of the influenza virus in corresponding cell types. Although it is an important member of the influenza virus family and has been known for sixty years, no studies have been performed to clone the horse PolI promoter or to study the polymerase activity of equine influenza virus (EIV) in horse cells. In our study, the horse RNA PolI promoter was cloned from fetal equine lung cells. Using the luciferase assay, it was found that a 500 bp horse RNA PolI promoter sequence was required for efficient transcription. Then, using the developed polymerase reconstitution assay based on the horse RNA PolI promoter, the polymerase activity of two EIV strains was compared, and equine myxovirus resistance A protein was identified as having the inhibiting EIV polymerase activity function in horse cells. Our study enriches our knowledge of the RNA PolI promoter of eukaryotic species and provides a useful tool for the study of influenza virus polymerase activity in horse cells. PMID:27258298

  13. Characterization of Human RNA Polymerase III Identifies Orthologues for Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA Polymerase III Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ping; Wu, Si; Sun, Yuling; Yuan, Chih-Chi; Kobayashi, Ryuji; Myers, Michael P.; Hernandez, Nouria

    2002-01-01

    Unlike Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase III, human RNA polymerase III has not been entirely characterized. Orthologues of the yeast RNA polymerase III subunits C128 and C37 remain unidentified, and for many of the other subunits, the available information is limited to database sequences with various degrees of similarity to the yeast subunits. We have purified an RNA polymerase III complex and identified its components. We found that two RNA polymerase III subunits, referred to as RPC8 and RPC9, displayed sequence similarity to the RNA polymerase II RPB7 and RPB4 subunits, respectively. RPC8 and RPC9 associated with each other, paralleling the association of the RNA polymerase II subunits, and were thus paralogues of RPB7 and RPB4. Furthermore, the complex contained a prominent 80-kDa polypeptide, which we called RPC5 and which corresponded to the human orthologue of the yeast C37 subunit despite limited sequence similarity. RPC5 associated with RPC53, the human orthologue of S. cerevisiae C53, paralleling the association of the S. cerevisiae C37 and C53 subunits, and was required for transcription from the type 2 VAI and type 3 human U6 promoters. Our results provide a characterization of human RNA polymerase III and show that the RPC5 subunit is essential for transcription. PMID:12391170

  14. RNA polymerase II mediated transcription from the polymerase III promoters in short hairpin RNA expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Rumi, Mohammad; Ishihara, Shunji . E-mail: si360405@med.shimane-u.ac.jp; Aziz, Monowar; Kazumori, Hideaki; Ishimura, Norihisa; Yuki, Takafumi; Kadota, Chikara; Kadowaki, Yasunori; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-13

    RNA polymerase III promoters of human ribonuclease P RNA component H1, human U6, and mouse U6 small nuclear RNA genes are commonly used in short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vectors due their precise initiation and termination sites. During transient transfection of shRNA vectors, we observed that H1 or U6 promoters also express longer transcripts enough to express several reporter genes including firefly luciferase, green fluorescent protein EGFP, and red fluorescent protein JRed. Expression of such longer transcripts was augmented by upstream RNA polymerase II enhancers and completely inhibited by downstream polyA signal sequences. Moreover, the transcription of firefly luciferase from human H1 promoter was sensitive to RNA polymerase II inhibitor {alpha}-amanitin. Our findings suggest that commonly used polymerase III promoters in shRNA vectors are also prone to RNA polymerase II mediated transcription, which may have negative impacts on their targeted use.

  15. Pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidines as adenosine receptor antagonists: Effect of the N-5 bond type on the affinity and selectivity at the four adenosine receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Bolcato, Chiara; Cusan, Claudia; Pastorin, Giorgia; Cacciari, Barbara; Klotz, Karl Norbert; Morizzo, Erika

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, many efforts have been made to search for potent and selective human A3 adenosine antagonists. In particular, one of the most promising human A3 adenosine receptor antagonists is represented by the pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine family. This class of compounds has been strongly investigated from the point of view of structure-activity relationships. In particular, it has been observed that fundamental requisites for having both potency and selectivity at the human A3 adenosine receptors are the presence of a small substituent at the N8 position and an unsubstitued phenyl carbamoyl moiety at the N5 position. In this study, we report the role of the N5-bond type on the affinity and selectivity at the four adenosine receptor subtypes. The observed structure-activity relationships of this class of antagonists are also exhaustively rationalized using the recently published ligand-based homology modeling approach. PMID:18368532

  16. Identification of a nucleoside triphosphate binding site on calf thymus RNA polymerase II

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, E.; McGuire, P.M.

    1986-01-14

    A nucleoside triphosphate binding site on calf thymus RNA polymerase II was identified by using photoaffinity analogues of adenosine 5'-triphosphate and guanosine 5'-triphosphate. Both radiolabeled 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8-N3ATP) and radiolabeled 8-azidoguanosine 5'-triphosphate (8-N3GTP) bound to a single polypeptide of this enzyme. This polypeptide has a molecular mass of 37 kilodaltons and an isoelectric point of 5.4. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was necessary for photolabeling to occur. In addition, no labeling occurred when the probe was prephotolyzed or when the enzyme was inactivated. Furthermore, photolabeling of the enzyme could be decreased by preincubation with natural substrates. To provide evidence that the radiolabeled polypeptide forms a part of the domain of the nucleoside triphosphate binding site, experiments were performed using unlabeled 8-N3ATP. Although this unlabeled analogue was not a substrate for RNA polymerase II, it photoinactivated the enzyme in the presence of UV irradiation, and it inhibited transcription elongation by the enzyme in a competitive manner in the absence of UV irradiation. As in the case with photolabeling, photoinactivation by 8-N3ATP could be decreased by natural substrates; in both cases, purine ribonucleoside triphosphates were more efficient than pyrimidine nucleoside triphosphates. Furthermore, photoinactivation was saturable at about the same concentration as the inhibition constant for 8-N3ATP. Collectively, these results provide evidence that the radiolabeled polypeptide in calf thymus RNA polymerase II is an essential component for activity and suggest that this polypeptide may be part of this enzyme's purine ribonucleoside triphosphate binding site.

  17. Photomodulation of G Protein-Coupled Adenosine Receptors by a Novel Light-Switchable Ligand

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The adenosinergic system operates through G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, which have become promising therapeutic targets for a wide range of pathological conditions. However, the ubiquity of adenosine receptors and the eventual lack of selectivity of adenosine-based drugs have frequently diminished their therapeutic potential. Accordingly, here we aimed to develop a new generation of light-switchable adenosine receptor ligands that change their intrinsic activity upon irradiation, thus allowing the spatiotemporal control of receptor functioning (i.e., receptor activation/inactivation dependent on location and timing). Therefore, we synthesized an orthosteric, photoisomerizable, and nonselective adenosine receptor agonist, nucleoside derivative MRS5543 containing an aryl diazo linkage on the N6 substituent, which in the dark (relaxed isomer) behaved as a full adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) and partial adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) agonist. Conversely, upon photoisomerization with blue light (460 nm), it remained a full A3R agonist but became an A2AR antagonist. Interestingly, molecular modeling suggested that structural differences encountered within the third extracellular loop of each receptor could modulate the intrinsic, receptor subtype-dependent, activity. Overall, the development of adenosine receptor ligands with photoswitchable activity expands the pharmacological toolbox in support of research and possibly opens new pharmacotherapeutic opportunities. PMID:25248077

  18. Spreading depolarization-induced adenosine accumulation reflects metabolic status in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Britta E; Shuttleworth, C William

    2014-01-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD), a pathologic feature of migraine, stroke and traumatic brain injury, is a propagating depolarization of neurons and glia causing profound metabolic demand. Adenosine, the low-energy metabolite of ATP, has been shown to be elevated after SD in brain slices and under conditions likely to trigger SD in vivo. The relationship between metabolic status and adenosine accumulation after SD was tested here, in brain slices and in vivo. In brain slices, metabolic impairment (assessed by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) autofluorescence and O2 availability) was associated with prolonged extracellular direct current (DC) shifts indicating delayed repolarization, and increased adenosine accumulation. In vivo, adenosine accumulation was observed after SD even in otherwise healthy mice. As in brain slices, in vivo adenosine accumulation correlated with DC shift duration and increased when DC shifts were prolonged by metabolic impairment (i.e., hypoglycemia or middle cerebral artery occlusion). A striking pattern of adenosine dynamics was observed during focal ischemic stroke, with nearly all the observed adenosine signals in the periinfarct region occurring in association with SDs. These findings suggest that adenosine accumulation could serve as a biomarker of SD incidence and severity, in a range of clinical conditions. PMID:25160669

  19. A method of the rapid preparation of adenosine 5'-gamma-[32P] triphosphate by chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Koziołkiewicz, W; Pankowski, J; Janecka, A

    1978-01-01

    A new chemical method for the synthesis of adenosine 5'-gamma-[32P] triphosphate has been developed based on the reaction of adenosine 5'-diphosphate with ethyl chloroformate. The resulting active mixed anhydride was able to react with [32P]-triethylammonium orthophosphate to give gamma-[32P]ATP. PMID:219425

  20. Adenosine inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid release from slices of rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Hollins, C.; Stone, T. W.

    1980-01-01

    1 The effect of purine compounds on the potassium-evoked release of 14C-labelled gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been studied in 400 micrometers slices of rat cerebral cortex in vitro. 2 Adenosine and adenosine 5' monophosphate (AMP) inhibited the release of GABA at 10(-5) to 10(-3) M. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) produced a significant inhibition of release only at 10(-3) M. 3 Theophylline 10(-4) or 10(-3) M reduced the inhibitory effect of adenosine, but did not change basal release of GABA. 4 Dipyridamole 10(-5) M itself reduced evoked GABA release, but did not prevent the inhibitory effect of adenosine, implying that adenosine was acting at an extracellularly directed receptor. 5 Calcium removal or antagonism by verapamil reduced the evoked release of GABA, but adenosine did not produce any further reduction of the calcium-independent release. This may indicate that the inhibitory effect of adenosine on GABA release results from interference with calcium influx or availability within the terminals. PMID:7378648

  1. Adenosine-Activated Nanochannels Inspired by G-Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei; Kong, Xiang-Yu; Xie, Ganhua; Xiao, Kai; Zhang, Zhen; Wen, Liping; Jiang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    A bioinspired adenosine activated nanodevice is demonstrated in which the conformations of the designed aptamer change and cause signal transmission according to the emergence of adenosine. This bioinspired system exhibits very high response ratios (activated/nonactivated ratio up to 614) and excellent stability and reversibility, and shows promising applications in the fields of biosensors, pharmaceutica, and healthcare systems. PMID:26915491

  2. Inhibition of renal Na+, K+-adenosine triphosphatase by gentamicin

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.D.; Trimble, M.E.; Crespo, L.; Holohan, P.D.; Freedman, J.C.; Ross, C.R.

    1984-11-01

    Inhibition of renal Na+,K+-adenosine triphosphatase is an early biochemical manifestation of gentamicin treatment in rats. Studies with isolated, perfused rat kidneys in filtering and nonfiltering modes indicate that gentamicin is transported across the brush border membrane before enzyme inhibition. The drug caused enzyme inhibition (42%) only in filtering kidneys, and this inhibition was blocked by spermine, an inhibitor of gentamicin binding. In purified rat renal basolateral membranes, bound (/sup 3/H)gentamicin was displaced 88% by unlabeled gentamicin. After in vivo exposure to (/sup 3/H)gentamicin, the radioactivity associated with the isolated basolateral membranes was displaced only 46% by unlabeled drug. These results suggest that inhibition of renal Na+,K+-adenosine triphosphatase by gentamicin is probably due to an interaction at the cytoplasmic face of the basolateral membrane. Scatchard plots of (/sup 3/H)gentamicin binding to basolateral and brush border membranes revealed a single class of noninteracting sites in each membrane. Gentamicin did not change the bulk membrane lipid fluidity, as estimated by the fluorescence polarization of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene.

  3. Adenosine signaling and the energetic costs of induced immunity.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Brian P

    2015-04-01

    Life history theory predicts that trait evolution should be constrained by competing physiological demands on an organism. Immune defense provides a classic example in which immune responses are presumed to be costly and therefore come at the expense of other traits related to fitness. One strategy for mitigating the costs of expensive traits is to render them inducible, such that the cost is paid only when the trait is utilized. In the current issue of PLOS Biology, Bajgar and colleagues elegantly demonstrate the energetic and life history cost of the immune response that Drosophila melanogaster larvae induce after infection by the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi. These authors show that infection-induced proliferation of defensive blood cells commands a diversion of dietary carbon away from somatic growth and development, with simple sugars instead being shunted to the hematopoetic organ for rapid conversion into the raw energy required for cell proliferation. This metabolic shift results in a 15% delay in the development of the infected larva and is mediated by adenosine signaling between the hematopoietic organ and the central metabolic control organ of the host fly. The adenosine signal thus allows D. melanogaster to rapidly marshal the energy needed for effective defense and to pay the cost of immunity only when infected. PMID:25915419

  4. Adenosine Amine Congener as a Cochlear Rescue Agent

    PubMed Central

    Vlajkovic, Srdjan M.; Chang, Hao; Paek, Song Yee; Chi, Howard H.-T.; Sreebhavan, Sreevalsan; Telang, Ravindra S.; Tingle, Malcolm; Housley, Gary D.; Thorne, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that adenosine amine congener (ADAC), a selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist, can ameliorate noise- and cisplatin-induced cochlear injury. Here we demonstrate the dose-dependent rescue effects of ADAC on noise-induced cochlear injury in a rat model and establish the time window for treatment. Methods. ADAC (25–300 μg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to Wistar rats (8–10 weeks old) at intervals (6–72 hours) after exposure to traumatic noise (8–16 kHz, 110 dB sound pressure level, 2 hours). Hearing sensitivity was assessed using auditory brainstem responses (ABR) before and 12 days after noise exposure. Pharmacokinetic studies investigated ADAC concentrations in plasma after systemic (intravenous) administration. Results. ADAC was most effective in the first 24 hours after noise exposure at doses >50 μg/kg, providing up to 21 dB protection (averaged across 8–28 kHz). Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated a short (5 min) half-life of ADAC in plasma after intravenous administration without detection of degradation products. Conclusion. Our data show that ADAC mitigates noise-induced hearing loss in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but further studies are required to establish its translation as a clinical otological treatment. PMID:25243188

  5. Purification and characterization of Plasmodium yoelii adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sarika; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar; Dwivedi, U N

    2011-12-01

    Plasmodium lacks the de novo pathway for purine biosynthesis and relies exclusively on the salvage pathway. Adenosine deaminase (ADA), first enzyme of the pathway, was purified and characterized from Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malarial species, using ion exchange and gel exclusion chromatography. The purified enzyme is a 41 kDa monomer. The enzyme showed K(m) values of 41 μM and 34 μM for adenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine, respectively. Erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine competitively inhibited P. yoelii ADA with K(i) value of 0.5 μM. The enzyme was inhibited by DEPC and protein denaturing agents, urea and GdmCl. Purine analogues significantly inhibited ADA activity. Inhibition by p-chloromercuribenzoate (pCMB) and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) indicated the presence of functional -SH groups. Tryptophan fluorescence maxima of ADA shifted from 339 nm to 357 nm in presence of GdmCl. Refolding studies showed that higher GdmCl concentration irreversibly denatured the purified ADA. Fluorescence quenchers (KI and acrylamide) quenched the ADA fluorescence intensity to the varied degree. The observed differences in kinetic properties of P. yoelii ADA as compared to the erythrocyte enzyme may facilitate in designing specific inhibitors against ADA. PMID:21945268

  6. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing and human disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing is a post-transcriptional modification that converts adenosines to inosines in both coding and noncoding RNA transcripts. It is catalyzed by ADAR (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) enzymes, which exist throughout the body but are most prevalent in the central nervous system. Inosines exhibit properties that are most similar to those of guanosines. As a result, ADAR-mediated editing can post-transcriptionally alter codons, introduce or remove splice sites, or affect the base pairing of the RNA molecule with itself or with other RNAs. A-to-I editing is a mechanism that regulates and diversifies the transcriptome, but the full biological significance of ADARs is not understood. ADARs are highly conserved across vertebrates and are essential for normal development in mammals. Aberrant ADAR activity has been associated with a wide range of human diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, metabolic diseases, viral infections and autoimmune disorders. ADARs have been shown to contribute to disease pathologies by editing of glutamate receptors, editing of serotonin receptors, mutations in ADAR genes, and by other mechanisms, including recently identified regulatory roles in microRNA processing. Advances in research into many of these diseases may depend on an improved understanding of the biological functions of ADARs. Here, we review recent studies investigating connections between ADAR-mediated RNA editing and human diseases. PMID:24289319

  7. Distribution of adenosine receptors in human sclera fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Dongmei; Trier, Klaus; Chen, Xiang; Zeng, Junwen; Yang, Xiao; Hu, Jianmin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Systemic treatment with adenosine receptor antagonists has been reported to affect the biochemistry and ultrastructure of rabbit sclera. This study was conducted to determine whether adenosine receptors (ADORs) are present in human scleral fibroblasts (HSF). Methods Primary HSF were cultured in vitro and identified with anti-vimentin, anti-keratin, anti-desmin, and anti-S-100 antibodies. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study the distribution of ADORs in the HSF cell lines and in the frozen human scleral sections. ADOR protein expression in HSF and human sclera was confirmed by western blot analysis of cell lysates. Results ADORs were expressed in both HSF and human sclera. This was confirmed by western blot. ADORA1 expression was concentrated in the nucleus. ADORA2A was concentrated mainly in one side of the cytoplasm, and ADORA2B was found both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. ADORA3 was expressed weakly in the cytoplasm. Conclusions All four subtypes of ADOR were found in HSF and may play a role in scleral remodeling. PMID:18385786

  8. Cloning, expression and pharmacological characterization of rabbit adenosine A1 and A3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hill, R J; Oleynek, J J; Hoth, C F; Kiron, M A; Weng, W; Wester, R T; Tracey, W R; Knight, D R; Buchholz, R A; Kennedy, S P

    1997-01-01

    The role of adenosine A1 and A3 receptors in mediating cardioprotection has been studied predominantly in rabbits, yet the pharmacological characteristics of rabbit adenosine A1 and A3 receptor subtypes are unknown. Thus, the rabbit adenosine A3 receptor was cloned and expressed, and its pharmacology was compared with that of cloned adenosine A1 receptors. Stable transfection of rabbit A1 or A3 cDNAs in Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells resulted in high levels of expression of each of the receptors, as demonstrated by high-affinity binding of the A1/A3 adenosine receptor agonist N6-(4-amino-3-[125I]iodobenzyl)adenosine (125I-ABA). For both receptors, binding of 125I-ABA was inhibited by the GTP analog 5'-guanylimidodiphosphate, and forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation was inhibited by the adenosine receptor agonist (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine. The rank orders of potency of adenosine receptor agonists for inhibition of 125I-ABA binding were as follows: rabbit A1, N6-cyclopentyladenosine = (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine > N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > or = I-ABA > or = N6-2-(4-aminophenyl) ethyladenosine > > N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide > N6-(4-amino-3-benzyl)adenosine; rabbit A3, N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide > or = I-ABA > > N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > N6-2-(4-aminophenyl) ethyladenosine = N6-cyclopentyladenosine = (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine > N6-(4-amino-3-benzyl)adenosine. The adenosine receptor antagonist rank orders were as follow: rabbit A1, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine > 1,3- dipropyl-8-(4-acrylate)phenylxanthine > or = xanthine amine congener > > 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline; rabbit A3, xanthine amine congener > 1,3-dipropyl-8-(4-acrylate)phenylxanthine > or = 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine > > 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline. These observations confirm the identity of the expressed proteins as A1 and A3 receptors. The results will facilitate further in-depth studies of the roles of A1 and A3 receptors in

  9. Elevated synovial fluid concentration of adenosine triphosphate in dogs with osteoarthritis or sodium urate-induced synovitis of the stifle.

    PubMed

    Torres, Bryan T; Jimenez, David A; Budsberg, Steven C

    2016-07-19

    Adenosine triphosphate has been shown to stimulate nociceptive nerve terminals in joints. Elevated synovial fluid adenosine triphosphate concentrations as well as a correlation between synovial fluid adenosine triphosphate concentrations and osteoarthritic knee pain has been demonstrated in humans, but not yet in dogs. This study documented elevated synovial fluid adenosine triphosphate concentrations in the stifles of dogs with secondary osteoarthritis and urate-induced synovitis, as compared to normal stifles. PMID:27432274

  10. Purification and Properties of Adenosine Diphosphoglucose Pyrophosphorylase from Sweet Corn 1

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Jacob; Cherry, Joe H.

    1972-01-01

    A 40-fold purification of adenosine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase from sweet corn (Zea mays var. Golden Beauty) revealed the enzyme to be specific for adenosine triphosphate. The enzyme has an absolute requirement for Mg2+ and is activated by 3-phosphoglycerate and to a lesser extent by ribose-5-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate. The apparent Km values of the enzyme for glucose-1-phosphate, adenosine triphosphate, pyrophosphate, and adenosine diphosphoglucose are 1.9 × 10−4, 3.2 × 10−5, 3.3 × 10−5, and 6.2 × 10−4m, respectively. Pyrophosphate inhibits adenosine diphosphoglucose synthesis competitively (Ki = 3.8 × 10−7m), while orthophosphate and sulfate appear to inhibit the reacion noncompetitively. These results show that the production of this sugar nucleotide can be controlled by the concentration of pyrophosphate. PMID:16658078

  11. Respiratory stimulant effects of adenosine in man after caffeine and enprofylline.

    PubMed Central

    Smits, P; Schouten, J; Thien, T

    1987-01-01

    In a double-blind and randomized study the respiratory stimulant effect of continuous intravenous adenosine infusion was studied after previous administration of caffeine, placebo and enprofylline in 10 healthy young volunteers. After placebo, adenosine induced an increase of minute ventilation (from 6.3 to 12.5 l min-1), tidal volume (from 0.60 to 0.96 l), and breathing rate (from 11.0 to 14.8 min-1). Venous pCO2 fell and pH rose after adenosine. Caffeine significantly reduced the adenosine-induced changes of minute ventilation, tidal volume, venous pCO2 and pH, whereas no changes occurred after enprofylline. Our results suggest that adenosine stimulates respiration in man by binding with specific P1-purinoceptors, which can be blocked by caffeine, but not by enprofylline. PMID:3440102

  12. Suppression of adenosine 2a receptor (A2aR)-mediated adenosine signaling improves disease phenotypes in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Seng Kah; Higashimori, Haruki; Tolman, Michaela; Yang, Yongjie

    2015-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disease in which the majority of upper and lower motor neurons are degenerated. Despite intensive efforts to identify drug targets and develop neuroprotective strategies, effective therapeutics for ALS remains unavailable. The identification and characterization of novel targets and pathways remain crucial in the development of ALS therapeutics. Adenosine is a major neuromodulator that actively regulates synaptic transmission. Interestingly, adenosine levels are significantly elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of progressing human ALS patients. In the current study, we showed that adenosine 2a receptor (A2aR), but not adenosine 1 receptor (A1R), is highly enriched in spinal (motor) neurons. A2aR expression is also selectively increased at the symptomatic onset in the spinal cords of SOD1G93A mice and end-stage human ALS spinal cords. Interestingly, we found that direct adenosine treatment is sufficient to induce embryonic stem cell-derived motor neuron (ESMN) cell death in cultures. Subsequent pharmacological inhibition and partial genetic ablation of A2aR (A2aR(+/-)) significantly protect ESMN from SOD1G93A(+) astrocyte-induced cell death and delay disease progression of SOD1G93A mice. Taken together, our results provide compelling novel evidence that A2aR-mediated adenosine signaling contributes to the selective spinal motor neuron degeneration observed in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. PMID:25779930

  13. 2-(1-Hexyn-1-yl)adenosine-induced intraocular hypertension is mediated via K+ channel opening through adenosine A2A receptor in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Konno, Takashi; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-08-22

    The present study was performed to clarify the mechanism of change in intraocular pressure by 2-(1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-H-Ado), a selective adenosine A2 receptor agonist, in rabbits. 2-H-Ado (0.1%, 50 microl)-induced ocular hypertension (E(max): 7.7 mm Hg) was inhibited by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine, ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker glibenclamide or 5-hydroxydecanoic acid, but not by an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, an adenosine A2B receptor antagonist alloxazine or a cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The outflow facility induced by 2-H-Ado seems to be independent of increase in intraocular pressure or ATP-sensitive K+ channel. In contrast, the recovery rate in intraocular pressure decreased by hypertonic saline was accelerated by 2-H-Ado, and this response was dependent on ATP-sensitive K+ channel. These results suggest that 2-H-Ado-induced ocular hypertension is mediated via K+ channel opening through adenosine A2A receptor, and this is probably due to aqueous formation, but independent of change in outflow facility or prostaglandin production. PMID:16023100

  14. Involvement of adenosine A2a receptor in intraocular pressure decrease induced by 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine or 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine.

    PubMed

    Konno, Takashi; Murakami, Akira; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to clarify the mechanism for the decrease in intraocular pressure by 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives in rabbits. The receptor binding analysis revealed that 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-O-Ado) and 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-CN-Ado) selectively bound to the A(2a) receptor with a high affinity. Ocular hypotensive responses to 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado were inhibited by the adenosine A(2a)-receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine (CSC), but not by the adenosine A(1)-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) or the adenosine A(2b)-receptor antagonist alloxazine. In addition, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado caused an increase in outflow facility, which was inhibited by CSC, but not by DPCPX or alloxazine. Moreover, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado increased cAMP in the aqueous humor, and the 2-O-Ado-induced an increase in cAMP was inhibited by CSC. These results suggest that 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado reduced intraocular pressure via an increase in outflow facility. The ocular hypotension may be mainly mediated through the activation of adenosine A(2a) receptor, although a possible involvement of adenosine A(1) receptor cannot be completely ruled out. 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado are useful lead compounds for the treatment of glaucoma. PMID:15821340

  15. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and metabolism of squalenoyl adenosine nanoparticles in mice using dual radio-labeling and radio-HPLC analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Alice; Lepetre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Mougin, Julie; Parrod, Martine; Pieters, Grégory; Garcia-Argote, Sébastien; Loreau, Olivier; Goncalves, Jordan; Chacun, Hélène; Courbebaisse, Yann; Clayette, Pascal; Desmaële, Didier; Rousseau, Bernard; Andrieux, Karine; Couvreur, Patrick

    2015-08-28

    Adenosine is a pleiotropic endogenous nucleoside with potential neuroprotective pharmacological activity. However, clinical use of adenosine is hampered by its extremely fast metabolization. To overcome this limitation, we recently developed a new squalenoyl nanomedicine of adenosine [Squalenoyl-Adenosine (SQAd)] by covalent linkage of this nucleoside to the squalene, a natural lipid. The resulting nanoassemblies (NAs) displayed a dramatic pharmacological activity both in cerebral ischemia and spinal cord injury pre-clinical models. The aim of the present study was to investigate the plasma profile and tissue distribution of SQAd NAs using both Squalenoyl-[(3)H]-Adenosine NAs and [(14)C]-Squalenoyl-Adenosine NAs as respective tracers of adenosine and squalene moieties of the SQAd bioconjugate. This study was completed by radio-HPLC analysis allowing to determine the metabolization profile of SQAd. We report here that SQAd NAs allowed a sustained circulation of adenosine under its prodrug form (SQAd) for at least 1h after intravenous administration, when free adenosine was metabolized within seconds after injection. Moreover, the squalenoylation of adenosine and its formulation as NAs also significantly modified biodistribution, as SQAd NAs were mainly captured by the liver and spleen, allowing a significant release of adenosine in the liver parenchyma. Altogether, these results suggest that SQAd NAs provided a reservoir of adenosine into the bloodstream which may explain the previously observed neuroprotective efficacy of SQAd NAs against cerebral ischemia and spinal cord injury. PMID:26087468

  16. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and metabolism of squalenoyl adenosine nanoparticles in mice using dual radio-labeling and radio-HPLC analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Alice; Lepetre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Mougin, Julie; Parrod, Martine; Pieters, Grégory; Garcia-Argote, Sébastien; Loreau, Olivier; Goncalves, Jordan; Chacun, Hélène; Courbebaisse, Yann; Clayette, Pascal; Desmaële, Didier; Rousseau, Bernard; Andrieux, Karine; Couvreur, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a pleiotropic endogenous nucleoside with potential neuroprotective pharmacological activity. However, clinical use of adenosine is hampered by its extremely fast metabolization. To overcome this limitation, we recently developed a new squalenoyl nanomedicine of adenosine [Squalenoyl-Adenosine (SQAd)] by covalent linkage of this nucleoside to the squalene, a natural lipid. The resulting nanoassemblies (NAs) displayed a dramatic pharmacological activity both in cerebral ischemia and spinal cord injury pre-clinical models. The aim of the present study was to investigate the plasma profile and tissue distribution of SQAd NAs using both Squalenoyl-[3H]-Adenosine NAs and [14C]-Squalenoyl-Adenosine NAs as respective tracers of adenosine and squalene moieties of the SQAd bioconjugate. This study was completed by radio-HPLC analysis allowing to determine the metabolization profile of SQAd. We report here that SQAd NAs allowed a sustained circulation of adenosine under its prodrug form (SQAd) for at least 1 h after intravenous administration, when free adenosine was metabolized within seconds after injection. Moreover, the squalenoylation of adenosine and its formulation as NAs also significantly modified biodistribution, as SQAd NAs were mainly captured by the liver and spleen, allowing a significant release of adenosine in the liver parenchyma. Altogether, these results suggest that SQAd NAs provided a reservoir of adenosine into the bloodstream which may explain the previously observed neuroprotective efficacy of SQAd NAs against cerebral ischemia and spinal cord injury. PMID:26087468

  17. Specificity of synergistic coronary flow enhancement by adenosine and pulsatile perfusion in the dog.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, P; Senzaki, H; Paolocci, N; Isoda, T; Sunagawa, G; Recchia, F A; Kass, D A

    1999-10-01

    1. Coronary flow elevation from enhanced perfusion pulsatility is synergistically amplified by adenosine. This study determined the specificity of this interaction and its potential mechanisms. 2. Mean and phasic coronary flow responses to increasing pulsatile perfusion were assessed in anaesthetized dogs, with the anterior descending coronary artery servoperfused to regulate real-time physiological flow pulsatility at constant mean pressure. Pulsatility was varied between 40 and 100 mmHg. Hearts ejected into the native aorta whilst maintaining stable loading. 3. Increasing pulsatility elevated mean coronary flow +11.5 +/- 1.7 % under basal conditions. Co-infusion of adenosine sufficient to raise baseline flow 66 % markedly amplified this pulsatile perfusion response (+82. 6 +/- 14.3 % increase in mean flow above adenosine baseline), due to a leftward shift of the adenosine-coronary flow response curve at higher pulsatility. Flow augmentation with pulsatility was not linked to higher regional oxygen consumption, supporting direct rather than metabolically driven mechanisms. 4. Neither bradykinin, acetylcholine nor verapamil reproduced the synergistic amplification of mean flow by adenosine and higher pulsatility, despite being administered at doses matching basal flow change with adenosine. 5. ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) activation (pinacidil) amplified the pulse-flow response 3-fold, although this remained significantly less than with adenosine. Co-administration of the phospholipase A2 inhibitor quinacrine virtually eliminated adenosine-induced vasodilatation, yet synergistic interaction between adenosine and pulse perfusion persisted, albeit at a reduced level. 6. Thus, adenosine and perfusion pulsatility specifically interact to enhance coronary flow. This synergy is partially explained by KATP agonist action and additional non-flow-dependent mechanisms, and may be important for modulating flow reserve during exercise or other high output states where

  18. Adenosine regulates the proinflammatory signaling function of thrombin in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hassanian, Seyed Mahdi; Dinarvand, Peyman; Rezaie, Alireza R.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma level of the regulatory metabolite adenosine increases during the activation of coagulation and inflammation. Here we investigated the effect of adenosine on modulation of thrombin-mediated proinflammatory responses in HUVECs. We found that adenosine inhibits the barrier-disruptive effect of thrombin in HUVECs by a concentration-dependent manner. Analysis of cell surface expression of adenosine receptors revealed that A2A and A2B are expressed at the highest level among the four receptor subtypes (A2B>A2A>A1>A3) on HUVECs. The barrier-protective effect of adenosine in response to thrombin was recapitulated by the A2A specific agonist, CGS 21680, and abrogated both by the siRNA knockdown of the A2A receptor and by the A2A-specific antagonists, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261. The thrombin-induced RhoA activation and its membrane translocation were both inhibited by adenosine in a cAMP-dependent manner, providing a molecular mechanism through which adenosine exerts a barrier-protective function. Adenosine also inhibited thrombin-mediated activation of NF-κB and decreased adhesion of monocytic THP-1 cells to stimulated HUVECs via down-regulation of expression of cell surface adhesion molecules, VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin. Moreover, adenosine inhibited thrombin-induced elevated expression of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and HMGB-1; and chemokines, MCP-1, CXCL-1 and CXCL-3. Taken together, these results suggest that adenosine may inhibit thrombin-mediated proinflammatory signaling responses, thereby protecting the endothelium from injury during activation of coagulation and inflammation. PMID:24477600

  19. Real-time monitoring of extracellular adenosine using enzyme-linked microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Hinzman, Jason M; Gibson, Justin L; Tackla, Ryan D; Costello, Mark S; Burmeister, Jason J; Quintero, Jorge E; Gerhardt, Greg A; Hartings, Jed A

    2015-12-15

    Throughout the central nervous system extracellular adenosine serves important neuroprotective and neuromodulatory functions. However, current understanding of the in vivo regulation and effects of adenosine is limited by the spatial and temporal resolution of available measurement techniques. Here, we describe an enzyme-linked microelectrode array (MEA) with high spatial (7500 µm(2)) and temporal (4 Hz) resolution that can selectively measure extracellular adenosine through the use of self-referenced coating scheme that accounts for interfering substances and the enzymatic breakdown products of adenosine. In vitro, the MEAs selectively measured adenosine in a linear fashion (r(2)=0.98±0.01, concentration range=0-15 µM, limit of detection =0.96±0.5 µM). In vivo the limit of detection was 0.04±0.02 µM, which permitted real-time monitoring of the basal extracellular concentration in rat cerebral cortex (4.3±1.5 µM). Local cortical injection of adenosine through a micropipette produced dose-dependent transient increases in the measured extracellular concentration (200 nL: 6.8±1.8 µM; 400 nL: 19.4±5.3 µM) [P<0.001]. Lastly, local injection of dipyridamole, which inhibits transport of adenosine through equilibrative nucleoside transporter, raised the measured extracellular concentration of adenosine by 120% (5.6→12.3 µM) [P<0.001]. These studies demonstrate that MEAs can selectively measure adenosine on temporal and spatial scales relevant to adenosine signaling and regulation in normal and pathologic states. PMID:26183072

  20. Adenosine Deaminase Enzyme Therapy Prevents and Reverses the Heightened Cavernosal Relaxation in Priapism

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jiaming; Jiang, Xianzhen; Dai, Yingbo; Zhang, Yujin; Tang, Yuxin; Sun, Hong; Mi, Tiejuan; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Xia, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Priapism featured with painful prolonged penile erection is dangerous and commonly seen in sickle cell disease (SCD). The preventive approaches or effective treatment options for the disorder are limited because of poor understanding of its pathogenesis. Recent studies have revealed a novel role of excess adenosine in priapism caused by heightened cavernosal relaxation, and therefore present an intriguing mechanism-based therapeutic possibility. Aim The aim of this study was to determine the therapeutic effects of adenosine deaminase (ADA) enzyme therapy to lower adenosine in priapism. Methods Both ADA-deficient mice and SCD transgenic (Tg) mice display priapism caused by excessive adenosine. Thus, we used these two distinct lines of mouse models of priapism as our investigative tools. Specifically, we treated both of these mice with different dosages of polyethylene glycol–modified ADA (PEG–ADA) to reduce adenosine levels in vivo. At the end points of the experiments, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of PEG–ADA treatment by measuring adenosine levels and monitoring the cavernosal relaxation. Main Outcome Measures Adenosine levels in penile tissues were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and cavernosal relaxation was quantified by electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced corporal cavernosal strip (CCS) assays. Results We found that lowering adenosine levels in penile tissues by PEG–ADA treatment from birth in ADA-deficient mice prevented the increased EFS-induced CCS relaxation associated with priapism. Intriguingly, in both ADA-deficient mice and SCD Tg mice with established priapism, we found that normalization of adenosine levels in penile tissues by PEG–ADA treatment relieved the heightened EFS-induced cavernosal relaxation in priapism. Conclusions Our studies have identified that PEG–ADA is a novel, safe, and mechanism-based drug to prevent and correct excess adenosine-mediated increased cavernosal relaxation

  1. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis of escherichia coli RNA polymerase and polymerase-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Heyduk, T; Niedziela-Majka, A

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a technique allowing measurements of atomic-scale distances in diluted solutions of macromolecules under native conditions. This feature makes FRET a powerful tool to study complicated biological assemblies. In this report we review the applications of FRET to studies of transcription initiation by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. The versatility of FRET for studies of a large macromolecular assembly such as RNA polymerase is illustrated by examples of using FRET to address several different aspects of transcription initiation by polymerase. FRET has been used to determine the architecture of polymerase, its complex with single-stranded DNA, and the conformation of promoter fragment bound to polymerase. FRET has been also used as a binding assay to determine the thermodynamics of promoter DNA fragment binding to the polymerase. Functional conformational changes in the specificity subunit of polymerase responsible for the modulation of the promoter binding activity of the enzyme and the mechanistic aspects of the transition from the initiation to the elongation complex were also investigated. PMID:11987181

  2. Directed evolution of DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase and reverse transcriptase activity in a single polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jennifer L; Loakes, David; Jaroslawski, Szymon; Too, Kathleen; Holliger, Philipp

    2006-08-18

    DNA polymerases enable key technologies in modern biology but for many applications, native polymerases are limited by their stringent substrate recognition. Here we describe short-patch compartmentalized self-replication (spCSR), a novel strategy to expand the substrate spectrum of polymerases in a targeted way. spCSR is based on the previously described CSR, but unlike CSR only a short region (a "patch") of the gene under investigation is diversified and replicated. This allows the selection of polymerases under conditions where catalytic activity and processivity are compromised to the extent that full self-replication is inefficient. We targeted two specific motifs involved in substrate recognition in the active site of DNA polymerase I from Thermus aquaticus (Taq) and selected for incorporation of both ribonucleotide- (NTP) and deoxyribonucleotide-triphosphates (dNTPs) using spCSR. This allowed the isolation of multiple variants of Taq with apparent dual substrate specificity. They were able to synthesize RNA, while still retaining essentially wild-type (wt) DNA polymerase activity as judged by PCR. One such mutant (AA40: E602V, A608V, I614M, E615G) was able to incorporate both NTPs and dNTPs with the same catalytic efficiency as the wt enzyme incorporates dNTPs. AA40 allowed the generation of mixed RNA-DNA amplification products in PCR demonstrating DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase as well as reverse transcriptase activity within the same polypeptide. Furthermore, AA40 displayed an expanded substrate spectrum towards other 2'-substituted nucleotides and was able to synthesize nucleic acid polymers in which each base bore a different 2'-substituent. Our results suggest that spCSR will be a powerful strategy for the generation of polymerases with altered substrate specificity for applications in nano- and biotechnology and in the enzymatic synthesis of antisense and RNAi probes. PMID:16859707

  3. Hepatitis B virus: DNA polymerase activity of deletion mutants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Hong, Y B; Jung, G

    1999-02-01

    The hepadnavirus P gene product is a multifunctional protein with priming, DNA- and RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, and RNase H activities. Nested N- or C-terminal deletion mutations and deletions of domain(s) in human HBV polymerase have been made. Wild-type and deletion forms of MBP-fused HBV polymerase were expressed in E. coli, purified by amylose column chromatography, and the DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activities of the purified proteins were compared. Deletion of the terminal protein or spacer regions reduced enzyme activity to 70%, respectively. However, deletion of the RNase H domain affected polymerase activity more than that of the terminal protein or spacer region. The polymerase domain alone or the N-terminal deletion of the polymerase domain still exhibited enzymatic activity. In this report, it is demonstrated that the minimal domain for the polymerizing activity of the HBV polymerase is smaller than the polymerase domain. PMID:10205676

  4. Determining Annealing Temperatures for Polymerase Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.; Enners, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common technique used in high school and undergraduate science teaching. Students often do not fully comprehend the underlying principles of the technique and how optimization of the protocol affects the outcome and analysis. In this molecular biology laboratory, students learn the steps of PCR with an…

  5. Polymerase Chain Reaction for Educational Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Stephen J.; dePamphillis, Claude

    1994-01-01

    Suggests the incorporation of the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique into high school and college biology laboratories. Discusses the following sections: (1) current PCR applications; (2) PCR technique; (3) Manual and Machine PCR; (4) Manual PCR Preparations and Procedure; (5) Materials, Supplies, and Recipes; (6) Primer Selection; and (7)…

  6. A polymerase engineered for bisulfite sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Doug; Christova, Yonka; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Bisulfite sequencing is a key methodology in epigenetics. However, the standard workflow of bisulfite sequencing involves heat and strongly basic conditions to convert the intermediary product 5,6-dihydrouridine-6-sulfonate (dhU6S) (generated by reaction of bisulfite with deoxycytidine (dC)) to uracil (dU). These harsh conditions generally lead to sample loss and DNA damage while milder conditions may result in incomplete conversion of intermediates to uracil. Both can lead to poor recovery of bisulfite-treated DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as either damaged DNA and/or intermediates of bisulfite treatment are poor substrate for standard DNA polymerases. Here we describe an engineered DNA polymerase (5D4) with an enhanced ability to replicate and PCR amplify bisulfite-treated DNA due to an ability to bypass both DNA lesions and bisulfite intermediates, allowing significantly milder conversion conditions and increased sensitivity in the PCR amplification of bisulfite-treated DNA. Incorporation of the 5D4 DNA polymerase into the bisulfite sequencing workflow thus promises significant sensitivity and efficiency gains. PMID:26271989

  7. RNA polymerase and the regulation of transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Reznikoff, W.S.; Gross, C.A.; Burgess, R.R.; Record, M.T.; Dahlberg, J.E.; Wickens, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of eight sections, each containing several papers. The section titles are: RNA Polymerases; Transcription Initiation - Bacterial; Regulation of Bacterial Transcription Initiation; Stable RNA Synthesis in Eukaryotes: Chromatin Structure; Promoters; Enhancers; and the Global Control of Eukaryotic Transcription; Specific Eukaryotic Transcription Factors; Termination of Transcription; and Short Communications.

  8. A movie of RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Alan C M; Cramer, Patrick

    2012-06-22

    We provide here a molecular movie that captures key aspects of RNA polymerase II initiation and elongation. To create the movie, we combined structural snapshots of the initiation-elongation transition and of elongation, including nucleotide addition, translocation, pausing, proofreading, backtracking, arrest, reactivation, and inhibition. The movie reveals open questions about the mechanism of transcription and provides a useful teaching tool. PMID:22726432

  9. A polymerase engineered for bisulfite sequencing.

    PubMed

    Millar, Doug; Christova, Yonka; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-12-15

    Bisulfite sequencing is a key methodology in epigenetics. However, the standard workflow of bisulfite sequencing involves heat and strongly basic conditions to convert the intermediary product 5,6-dihydrouridine-6-sulfonate (dhU6S) (generated by reaction of bisulfite with deoxycytidine (dC)) to uracil (dU). These harsh conditions generally lead to sample loss and DNA damage while milder conditions may result in incomplete conversion of intermediates to uracil. Both can lead to poor recovery of bisulfite-treated DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as either damaged DNA and/or intermediates of bisulfite treatment are poor substrate for standard DNA polymerases. Here we describe an engineered DNA polymerase (5D4) with an enhanced ability to replicate and PCR amplify bisulfite-treated DNA due to an ability to bypass both DNA lesions and bisulfite intermediates, allowing significantly milder conversion conditions and increased sensitivity in the PCR amplification of bisulfite-treated DNA. Incorporation of the 5D4 DNA polymerase into the bisulfite sequencing workflow thus promises significant sensitivity and efficiency gains. PMID:26271989

  10. Role of adenosine signalling and metabolism in β-cell regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Olov

    2014-02-01

    Glucose homeostasis, which is controlled by the endocrine cells of the pancreas, is disrupted in both type I and type II diabetes. Deficiency in the number of insulin-producing β cells – a primary cause of type I diabetes and a secondary contributor of type II diabetes – leads to hyperglycemia and hence an increase in the need for insulin. Although diabetes can be controlled with insulin injections, a curative approach is needed. A potential approach to curing diabetes involves regenerating the β-cell mass, e.g. by increasing β-cell proliferation, survival, neogenesis or transdifferentiation. The nucleoside adenosine and its cognate nucleotide ATP have long been known to affect insulin secretion, but have more recently been shown to increase β-cell proliferation during homeostatic control and regeneration of the β-cell mass. Adenosine is also known to have anti-inflammatory properties, and agonism of adenosine receptors can promote the survival of β-cells in an inflammatory microenvironment. In this review, both intracellular and extracellular mechanisms of adenosine and ATP are discussed in terms of their established and putative effects on β-cell regeneration. - Highlights: • A potential way to cure diabetes is to regenerate the β-cell mass by promoting cell survival, proliferation or neogenesis. • Adenosine may promote β-cell regeneration through several cellular mechanisms. • Adenosine and its cognate nucleotide ATP can each promote β-cell proliferation. • Do adenosine and ATP interact in promoting β-cell proliferation?.

  11. Adenosine, ketogenic diet and epilepsy: the emerging therapeutic relationship between metabolism and brain activity.

    PubMed

    Masino, S A; Kawamura, M; Wasser, C D; Wasser, C A; Pomeroy, L T; Ruskin, D N

    2009-09-01

    For many years the neuromodulator adenosine has been recognized as an endogenous anticonvulsant molecule and termed a "retaliatory metabolite." As the core molecule of ATP, adenosine forms a unique link between cell energy and neuronal excitability. In parallel, a ketogenic (high-fat, low-carbohydrate) diet is a metabolic therapy that influences neuronal activity significantly, and ketogenic diets have been used successfully to treat medically-refractory epilepsy, particularly in children, for decades. To date the key neural mechanisms underlying the success of dietary therapy are unclear, hindering development of analogous pharmacological solutions. Similarly, adenosine receptor-based therapies for epilepsy and myriad other disorders remain elusive. In this review we explore the physiological regulation of adenosine as an anticonvulsant strategy and suggest a critical role for adenosine in the success of ketogenic diet therapy for epilepsy. While the current focus is on the regulation of adenosine, ketogenic metabolism and epilepsy, the therapeutic implications extend to acute and chronic neurological disorders as diverse as brain injury, inflammatory and neuropathic pain, autism and hyperdopaminergic disorders. Emerging evidence for broad clinical relevance of the metabolic regulation of adenosine will be discussed. PMID:20190967

  12. The Role of Adenosine in Pulmonary Vein Isolation: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Dallaglio, Paolo D.; Betts, Timothy R.; Ginks, Matthew; Bashir, Yaver; Anguera, Ignasi; Rajappan, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The cornerstone of atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation is pulmonary vein isolation (PVI), which can be achieved in more than 95% of patients at the end of the procedure. However, AF recurrence rates remain high and are related to recovery of PV conduction. Adenosine testing is used to unmask dormant pulmonary vein conduction (DC). The aim of this study is to review the available literature addressing the role of adenosine testing and determine the impact of ablation at sites of PV reconnection on freedom from AF. Adenosine infusion, by restoring the excitability threshold, unmasks reversible injury that could lead to recovery of PV conduction. The studies included in this review suggest that adenosine is useful to unmask nontransmural lesions at risk of reconnection and that further ablation at sites of DC is associated with improvement in freedom from AF. Nevertheless it has been demonstrated that adenosine is not able to predict all veins at risk of later reconnection, which means that veins without DC are not necessarily at low risk. The role of the waiting period in the setting of adenosine testing has also been analyzed, suggesting that in the acute phase adenosine use should be accompanied by enough waiting time. PMID:26981309

  13. Susceptibility to seizure-induced sudden death in DBA/2 mice is altered by adenosine.

    PubMed

    Faingold, Carl L; Randall, Marc; Kommajosyula, Srinivasa P

    2016-08-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is rare but is an important public health burden due to the number of patient years lost. Respiratory dysfunction following generalized convulsive seizure is a common sequence of events in witnessed SUDEP cases. The DBA/2 mouse model of SUDEP exhibits generalized convulsive audiogenic seizures (AGSz), which result in seizure-induced respiratory arrest (S-IRA) in ∼75% of these animals, while the remaining DBA/2 mice exhibit AGSz without S-IRA. SUDEP induction may involve actions of adenosine, which is released during generalized seizures in animals and patients and is known to depress respiration. This study examined the effects of systemic administration of agents that alter the actions of adenosine on the incidence of S-IRA in DBA/2 mice. DBA/2 mice that consistently exhibited AGSz without S-IRA showed a significantly increased incidence of S-IRA following treatment with 5-iodotubercidin, which blocks adenosine metabolism. Treatment of DBA/2 mice that consistently exhibited AGSz followed by S-IRA with a non-selective adenosine antagonist, caffeine, or an A2A adenosine receptor subtype-selective antagonist (SCH 442416) significantly reduced S-IRA incidence. By contrast, an A1 adenosine receptor antagonist (DPCPX) was not effective in reducing S-IRA incidence. These findings suggest that preventative approaches for SUDEP should consider agents that reduce the actions of adenosine. PMID:27259068

  14. Topical adenosine increases the proportion of thick hair in Caucasian men with androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Tokuro; Ideta, Ritsuro; Ehama, Ritsuko; Yamanishi, Haruyo; Iino, Masato; Nakazawa, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Takashi; Ohyama, Manabu; Kishimoto, Jiro

    2016-05-01

    Adenosine is an effective treatment for androgenetic alopecia (AGA) in Japanese men and women. Adenosine exerts its effects by significantly increasing the proportion of thick hair. In this study, we assessed the clinical outcome of adenosine treatment for 6 months in 38 Caucasian men. The change in proportion of thick hair (≥60 μm) compared with baseline in the adenosine group was significantly higher than that in the placebo group (P < 0.0001). The change in vellus hair proportion (<40 μm) was significantly lower in the adenosine group than that in the placebo group (P = 0.0154). The change in hair density compared with baseline of the adenosine group was also significantly higher compared with that of the placebo group (P = 0.0470). No adverse effects due to treatment were noted during this study by dermatological evaluation. Adenosine is effective in increasing the proportion of thick hair in Caucasian men with AGA as well as in Japanese men and women. PMID:26508659

  15. Evidence for evoked release of adenosine and glutamate from cultured cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schousboe, A.; Frandsen, A.; Drejer, J. )

    1989-09-01

    Evoked release of ({sup 3}H)-D-aspartate which labels the neurotransmitter glutamate pool in cultured cerebellar granule cells was compared with evoked release of adenosine from similar cultures. It was found that both adenosine and (3H)-D-aspartate could be released from the neurons in a calcium dependent manner after depolarization of the cells with either 10-100 microM glutamate or 50 mM KCl. Cultures of cerebellar granule cells treated with 50 microM kainate to eliminate GABAergic neurons behaved in the same way. This together with the observation that cultured astrocytes did not exhibit a calcium dependent, potassium stimulated adenosine release strongly suggest that cerebellar granule cells release adenosine in a neurotransmitter-like fashion together with glutamate which is the classical neurotransmitter of these neurons. Studies of the metabolism of adenosine showed that in the granule cells adenosine is rapidly metabolized to ATP, ADP, and AMP, but in spite of this, adenosine was found to be released preferential to ATP.

  16. Improvement of Cold Tolerance by Selective A1 Adenosine Receptor Antagonists in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T. F.; Li, D. J.; Jacobson, K. A.; Wang, L. C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Previously we have shown that the improvement of cold tolerance by theophylline is due to antagonism at adenosine receptors rather than inhibition of phosphodiesterase. Since theophylline is a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist for both A1 and A2 receptors, the present study investigated the adenosine receptor subtype involved in theophylline’s action. Acute systemic injection of selective A1 receptor antagonists (1,3-dialkyl-8-aryl or 1,3-dialkyl-8-cyclopentyl xanthine derivatives) significantly increased both the total and maximal heat production as well as cold tolerance. In contrast, injection of a relatively selective A2 receptor antagonist, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (compound No. 19), failed to significantly alter the thermogenic response of the rat under cold exposure. Further, the relative effectiveness of these compounds in increasing total thermogenesis was positively correlated with their potency in blocking the A1 adenosine receptor (r= .52, p<0.01), but not in A2 adenosine receptor (r= .20, p<0.2). It is likely that the thermally beneficial effects of adenosine A1 antagonists are due to their attenuation of the inhibitory effects of endogenously released adenosine on lipolysis and glucose utilization, resulting in increased substrate mobilization and utilization for enhanced thermogenesis. PMID:2263650

  17. Expression of adenosine A2b receptor in rat type II and III taste cells.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kentaro; Dohi, Yukari; Yamanaka, Yuri; Miyata, Ai; Tsukamoto, Katsunobu; Yabu, Miharu; Ohishi, Akihiro; Nagasawa, Kazuki

    2014-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 was expressed in taste cells, suggesting the existence of an adenosine signaling system, but whether or not the expression of an adenosine receptor occurs in rat taste buds remains unknown. Therefore, we examined the expression profiles of adenosine receptors and evaluated their functionality in rat circumvallate papillae. Among adenosine receptors, the mRNA for an adenosine A2b receptor (A2bR) was expressed by the rat circumvallate papillae, and its expression level was significantly greater in the circumvallate papillae than in the non-taste lingual epithelium. A2bR-immunoreactivity was detected primarily in type II taste cells, and partial, but significant expression was also observed in type III ones, but there was no immunoreactivity in type I ones. The cAMP generation in isolated epithelium containing taste buds treated with 500 μM adenosine or 10 μM BAY60-6583 was significantly increased compared to in the controls. These findings suggest that adenosine plays a role in signaling transmission via A2bR between taste cells in rats. PMID:24327108

  18. BCX4430 - A broad-spectrum antiviral adenosine nucleoside analog under development for the treatment of Ebola virus disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Raymond; Kotian, Pravin; Warren, Travis; Panchal, Rekha; Bavari, Sina; Julander, Justin; Dobo, Sylvia; Rose, Angela; El-Kattan, Yahya; Taubenheim, Brian; Babu, Yarlagadda; Sheridan, William P

    2016-01-01

    The adenosine nucleoside analog BCX4430 is a direct-acting antiviral drug under investigation for the treatment of serious and life-threatening infections from highly pathogenic viruses, such as the Ebola virus. Cellular kinases phosphorylate BCX4430 to a triphosphate that mimics ATP; viral RNA polymerases incorporate the drug's monophosphate nucleotide into the growing RNA chain, causing premature chain termination. BCX4430 is active in vitro against many RNA viral pathogens, including the filoviruses and emerging infectious agents such as MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV. In vivo, BCX4430 is active after intramuscular, intraperitoneal, and oral administration in a variety of experimental infections. In nonclinical studies involving lethal infections with Ebola virus, Marburg virus, Rift Valley fever virus, and Yellow Fever virus, BCX4430 has demonstrated pronounced efficacy. In experiments conducted in several models, both a reduction in the viral load and an improvement in survival were found to be related to the dose of BCX4430. A Phase 1 clinical trial of intramuscular administration of BCX4430 in healthy subjects is currently ongoing. PMID:27095300

  19. Functional analysis of a stable transcription arrest site in the first intron of the murine adenosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kash, S F; Innis, J W; Jackson, A U; Kellems, R E

    1993-01-01

    Transcription arrest plays a role in regulating the expression of a number of genes, including the murine adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene. We have previously identified two prominent arrest sites at the 5' end of the ADA gene: one in the first exon and one in the first intron (J. W. Innis and R. E. Kellems, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5398-5409, 1991). Here we report the functional characterization of the intron 1 arrest site, located 137 to 145 nucleotides downstream of the cap site. We have determined, using gel filtration, that the intron 1 arrest site is a stable RNA polymerase II pause site and that the transcription elongation factor SII promotes read-through at this site. Additionally, the sequence determinants for the pause are located within a 37-bp fragment encompassing this site (+123 to +158) and can direct transcription arrest in an orientation-dependent manner in the context of the ADA and adenovirus major late promoters. Specific point mutations in this region increase or decrease the relative pausing efficiency. We also show that the sequence determinants for transcription arrest can function when placed an additional 104 bp downstream of their natural position. Images PMID:8474437

  20. Adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate kinase is essential for Arabidopsis viability.

    PubMed

    Mugford, Sarah G; Matthewman, Colette A; Hill, Lionel; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate kinase (APK) provides activated sulfate for sulfation of secondary metabolites, including the glucosinolates. We have successfully isolated three of the four possible triple homozygous mutant combinations of this family. The APK1 isoform alone was sufficient to maintain WT levels of growth and development. Analysis of apk1 apk2 apk3 and apk1 apk3 apk4 mutants suggests that APK3 and APK4 are functionally redundant, despite being located in cytosol and plastids, respectively. We were, however, unable to isolate apk1 apk3 apk4 mutants, most probably because the apk1 apk3 apk4 triple mutant combination is pollen lethal. Therefore, we conclude that APS kinase is essential for plant reproduction and viability. PMID:19903478

  1. N6-adenosine methylation in MiRNAs.

    PubMed

    Berulava, Tea; Rahmann, Sven; Rademacher, Katrin; Klein-Hitpass, Ludgar; Horsthemke, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of N6-adenosine (m6A) has been observed in many different classes of RNA, but its prevalence in microRNAs (miRNAs) has not yet been studied. Here we show that a knockdown of the m6A demethylase FTO affects the steady-state levels of several miRNAs. Moreover, RNA immunoprecipitation with an anti-m6A-antibody followed by RNA-seq revealed that a significant fraction of miRNAs contains m6A. By motif searches we have discovered consensus sequences discriminating between methylated and unmethylated miRNAs. The epigenetic modification of an epigenetic modifier as described here adds a new layer to the complexity of the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. PMID:25723394

  2. N6-Adenosine Methylation in MiRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Berulava, Tea; Rahmann, Sven; Rademacher, Katrin; Klein-Hitpass, Ludgar; Horsthemke, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of N6-adenosine (m6A) has been observed in many different classes of RNA, but its prevalence in microRNAs (miRNAs) has not yet been studied. Here we show that a knockdown of the m6A demethylase FTO affects the steady-state levels of several miRNAs. Moreover, RNA immunoprecipitation with an anti-m6A-antibody followed by RNA-seq revealed that a significant fraction of miRNAs contains m6A. By motif searches we have discovered consensus sequences discriminating between methylated and unmethylated miRNAs. The epigenetic modification of an epigenetic modifier as described here adds a new layer to the complexity of the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. PMID:25723394

  3. Role of adenosine A2B receptors in inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Feoktistov, Igor; Biaggioni, Italo

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in our understanding of the unique role of A2B receptors in the regulation of inflammation, immunity and tissue repair was considerably facilitated with the introduction of new pharmacological and genetic tools. However, it also led to seemingly conflicting conclusions on the role of A2B adenosine receptors in inflammation with some publications indicating pro-inflammatory effects and others suggesting the opposite. This chapter reviews the functions of A2B receptors in various cell types related to inflammation and integrated effects of A2B receptor modulation in several animal models of inflammation. It is argued that translation of current findings into novel therapies would require a better understanding of A2B receptors functions in diverse types of inflammatory responses in various tissues and at different points of their progression. PMID:21586358

  4. Extraction and analysis of adenosine triphosphate from aquatic environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Shultz, David J.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) extraction procedures have been investigated for their applicability to samples from aquatic environments. The cold sulfuric-oxalic acid procedure was best suited to samples consisting of water, periphyton, and sediments. Due to cation and fulvic acid interferences, a spike with a known quantity of ATP was necessary to estimate losses when sediments were extracted. Variable colonization densities for periphyton required that several replicates be extracted to characterize accurately the periphyton community. Extracted samples were stable at room temperature for one to five hours, depending on the ATP concentration, if the pH was below 2. Neutralized samples which were quick frozen and stored at -30C were stable for months. (USGS)

  5. Adenosine Monophosphate-Based Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Chen, Fei; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Hattori, Nori; Suzuki, Shigeya

    2009-01-01

    A method of rapid detection of bacterial spores is based on the discovery that a heat shock consisting of exposure to a temperature of 100 C for 10 minutes causes the complete release of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) from the spores. This method could be an alternative to the method described in the immediately preceding article. Unlike that method and related prior methods, the present method does not involve germination and cultivation; this feature is an important advantage because in cases in which the spores are those of pathogens, delays involved in germination and cultivation could increase risks of infection. Also, in comparison with other prior methods that do not involve germination, the present method affords greater sensitivity. At present, the method is embodied in a laboratory procedure, though it would be desirable to implement the method by means of a miniaturized apparatus in order to make it convenient and economical enough to encourage widespread use.

  6. Structural and Metabolic Specificity of Methylthiocoformycin for Malarial Adenosine Deaminases

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.; Cassera, M; Madrid, D; Ting, L; Tyler, P; Kim, K; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is a purine auxotroph requiring hypoxanthine as a key metabolic precursor. Erythrocyte adenine nucleotides are the source of the purine precursors, making adenosine deaminase (ADA) a key enzyme in the pathway of hypoxanthine formation. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) is a substrate for most malarial ADAs, but not for human ADA. The catalytic site specificity of malarial ADAs permits methylthiocoformycin (MT-coformycin) to act as a Plasmodium-specific transition state analogue with low affinity for human ADA. The structural basis for MTA and MT-coformycin specificity in malarial ADAs is the subject of speculation. Here, the crystal structure of ADA from Plasmodium vivax (PvADA) in a complex with MT-coformycin reveals an unprecedented binding geometry for 5?-methylthioribosyl groups in the malarial ADAs. Compared to malarial ADA complexes with adenosine or deoxycoformycin, 5?-methylthioribosyl groups are rotated 130 degrees. A hydrogen bonding network between Asp172 and the 3?-hydroxyl of MT-coformycin is essential for recognition of the 5?-methylthioribosyl group. Water occupies the 5?-hydroxyl binding site when MT-coformycin is bound. Mutagenesis of Asp172 destroys the substrate specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Kinetic, mutagenic, and structural analyses of PvADA and kinetic analysis of five other Plasmodium ADAs establish the unique structural basis for its specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Plasmodium gallinaceum ADA does not use MTA as a substrate, is not inhibited by MT-coformycin, and is missing Asp172. Treatment of P. falciparum cultures with coformycin or MT-coformycin in the presence of MTA is effective in inhibiting parasite growth.

  7. Vasodilator effects of adenosine on retinal arterioles in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Taisuke; Mori, Asami; Saito, Maki; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2008-02-01

    Adenosine is a potent vasodilator of retinal blood vessels and is implicated to be a major regulator of retinal blood flow during metabolic stress, but little is known about the impact of diabetes on the role of adenosine in regulation of retinal hemodynamics. Therefore, we examined how diabetes affects adenosine-induced vasodilation of retinal arterioles. Male Wistar rats were treated with streptozotocin (80 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), and experiments were performed 6-8 weeks later. Rats were treated with tetrodotoxin (50 microg/kg, intravenously [i.v.]) to eliminate any nerve activity and prevent movement of the eye and infused with methoxamine continuously to maintain adequate systemic circulation. Fundus images were captured with a digital camera that was equipped with a special objective lens, and diameters of retinal arterioles were measured. Adenosine increased diameters of retinal arterioles and decreased systemic blood pressure. These responses were significantly attenuated by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (30 mg/kg, i.v.) and the adenosine triphosphate-dependent K+ (K(ATP)) channel blocker glibenclamide (20 mg/kg, i.v.). The depressor responses to adenosine were reduced in diabetic rats, whereas diabetes did not alter vasodilation of retinal arterioles to adenosine. In contrast, both depressor response and vasodilation of retinal arteriole to acetylcholine were reduced in diabetic rats. The retinal vasodilator responses to adenosine and acetylcholine observed in diabetic rats were diminished by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. There were no differences in the responses to pinacidil, a K(ATP) channel opener, between the diabetic and nondiabetic rats. These results suggest that both the activation of nitric oxide synthase and opening of K(ATP) channels contribute to the vasodilator effects of adenosine in rats in vivo. However, diabetes has no significant impact on the vasodilation mediated by these mechanisms in

  8. Role of Adenosine Signaling on Pentylenetetrazole-Induced Seizures in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Siebel, Anna Maria; Menezes, Fabiano Peres; Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Schaefer, Isabel da Costa; Frantz, Juliana Zanetti; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adenosine is a well-known endogenous modulator of neuronal excitability with anticonvulsant properties. Thus, the modulation exerted by adenosine might be an effective tool to control seizures. In this study, we investigated the effects of drugs that are able to modulate adenosinergic signaling on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in adult zebrafish. The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. The adenosine A1 receptor agonist cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) increased the latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure stage. Both the adenosine A2A receptor agonist and antagonist, CGS 21680 and ZM 241385, respectively, did not promote changes in seizure parameters. Pretreatment with the ecto-5′nucleotidase inhibitor adenosine 5′-(α,β-methylene) diphosphate (AMPCP) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. However, when pretreated with the adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA), or with the nucleoside transporter (NT) inhibitors, dipyridamole and S-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI), animals showed longer latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure status. Finally, our molecular analysis of the c-fos gene expression corroborates these behavioral results. Our findings indicate that the activation of adenosine A1 receptors is an important mechanism to control the development of seizures in zebrafish. Furthermore, the actions of ecto-5′-nucleotidase, ADA, and NTs are directly involved in the control of extracellular adenosine levels and have an important role in the development of seizure episodes in zebrafish. PMID:25560904

  9. Severe hemorrhage attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via NTS adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-09-15

    Selective stimulation of inhibitory A1 and facilitatory A2a adenosine receptor subtypes located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) powerfully inhibits cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) control of regional sympathetic outputs via different mechanisms: direct inhibition of glutamate release and facilitation of an inhibitory neurotransmitter release, respectively. However, it remains unknown whether adenosine naturally released into the NTS has similar inhibitory effects on the CCR as the exogenous agonists do. Our previous study showed that adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hemorrhage and contributes to reciprocal changes of renal (decreases) and adrenal (increases) sympathetic nerve activity observed in this setting. Both A1 and A2a adenosine receptors are involved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that, during severe hemorrhage, CCR control of the two sympathetic outputs is attenuated by adenosine naturally released into the NTS. We compared renal and adrenal sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by right atrial injections of 5HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (2-8 μg/kg) under control conditions, during hemorrhage, and during hemorrhage preceded by blockade of NTS adenosine receptors with bilateral microinjections of 8-(p-sulfophenyl) theophylline (1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats. CCR-mediated inhibition of renal and adrenal sympathetic activity was significantly attenuated during severe hemorrhage despite reciprocal changes in the baseline activity levels, and this attenuation was removed by bilateral blockade of adenosine receptors in the caudal NTS. This confirmed that adenosine endogenously released into the NTS has a similar modulatory effect on integration of cardiovascular reflexes as stimulation of NTS adenosine receptors with exogenous agonists. PMID:25063794

  10. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by nanoparticles through ATP, ADP and adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Baron, L; Gombault, A; Fanny, M; Villeret, B; Savigny, F; Guillou, N; Panek, C; Le Bert, M; Lagente, V; Rassendren, F; Riteau, N; Couillin, I

    2015-01-01

    The NLR pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a major component of the innate immune system, but its mechanism of activation by a wide range of molecules remains largely unknown. Widely used nano-sized inorganic metal oxides such as silica dioxide (nano-SiO2) and titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages similarly to silica or asbestos micro-sized particles. By investigating towards the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation in response to nanoparticles, we show here that active adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and subsequent ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine receptor signalling are required for inflammasome activation. Nano-SiO2 or nano-TiO2 caused a significant increase in P2Y1, P2Y2, A2A and/or A2B receptor expression, whereas the P2X7 receptor was downregulated. Interestingly, IL-1β secretion in response to nanoparticles is increased by enhanced ATP and ADP hydrolysis, whereas it is decreased by adenosine degradation or selective A2A or A2B receptor inhibition. Downstream of these receptors, our results show that nanoparticles activate the NLRP3 inflammasome via activation of PLC-InsP3 and/or inhibition of adenylate cyclase (ADCY)-cAMP pathways. Finally, a high dose of adenosine triggers inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion through adenosine cellular uptake by nucleotide transporters and by its subsequent transformation in ATP by adenosine kinase. In summary, we show for the first time that extracellular adenosine activates the NLRP3 inflammasome by two ways: by interacting with adenosine receptors at nanomolar/micromolar concentrations and through cellular uptake by equilibrative nucleoside transporters at millimolar concentrations. These findings provide new molecular insights on the mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and new therapeutic strategies to control inflammation. PMID:25654762

  11. Airway hyperresponsiveness to adenosine induced by lipopolysaccharide in Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Tigani, B; Hannon, J P; Rondeau, C; Mazzoni, L; Fozard, J R

    2002-01-01

    We have explored the effects of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) on the response of the airways of Brown Norway (BN) rats to adenosine. Comparisons have been drawn with the effects on responses to methacholine and 5-hydroxytryptamine.In vehicle-challenged animals, adenosine, given i.v. was only a weak bronchoconstrictor. In contrast, 1 h following intratracheal administration of LPS, 0.3 mg kg−1, bronchoconstrictor responses to adenosine were markedly and selectively enhanced. At this time point, there were no significant changes in leukocyte numbers, eosinophil peroxidase and myeloperoxidase activities or protein concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Twenty-four hours after challenge, the sensitivity of the airways to both adenosine and methacholine was reduced relative to the earlier time point and there were substantial increases in each marker of inflammation in BAL fluid.The bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine was blocked selectively by methysergide, disodium cromoglycate and the broad-spectrum adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-SPT, but not by DPCPX or ZM 243185, selective antagonists for the A1 and A2A receptors, respectively.Thus, the response to adenosine augmented following LPS is mast cell mediated and involves a receptor which can be blocked by 8-SPT but not by selective A1 or A2A receptor antagonists. It thus bears similarity to the augmented response to adenosine induced by allergen challenge in actively sensitized BN rats. Exposure to LPS could be a factor along with allergen in determining the increased sensitivity of the airways of asthmatics to adenosine. PMID:11976275

  12. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by nanoparticles through ATP, ADP and adenosine.

    PubMed

    Baron, L; Gombault, A; Fanny, M; Villeret, B; Savigny, F; Guillou, N; Panek, C; Le Bert, M; Lagente, V; Rassendren, F; Riteau, N; Couillin, I

    2015-01-01

    The NLR pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a major component of the innate immune system, but its mechanism of activation by a wide range of molecules remains largely unknown. Widely used nano-sized inorganic metal oxides such as silica dioxide (nano-SiO2) and titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages similarly to silica or asbestos micro-sized particles. By investigating towards the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation in response to nanoparticles, we show here that active adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and subsequent ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine receptor signalling are required for inflammasome activation. Nano-SiO2 or nano-TiO2 caused a significant increase in P2Y1, P2Y2, A2A and/or A2B receptor expression, whereas the P2X7 receptor was downregulated. Interestingly, IL-1β secretion in response to nanoparticles is increased by enhanced ATP and ADP hydrolysis, whereas it is decreased by adenosine degradation or selective A2A or A2B receptor inhibition. Downstream of these receptors, our results show that nanoparticles activate the NLRP3 inflammasome via activation of PLC-InsP3 and/or inhibition of adenylate cyclase (ADCY)-cAMP pathways. Finally, a high dose of adenosine triggers inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion through adenosine cellular uptake by nucleotide transporters and by its subsequent transformation in ATP by adenosine kinase. In summary, we show for the first time that extracellular adenosine activates the NLRP3 inflammasome by two ways: by interacting with adenosine receptors at nanomolar/micromolar concentrations and through cellular uptake by equilibrative nucleoside transporters at millimolar concentrations. These findings provide new molecular insights on the mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and new therapeutic strategies to control inflammation. PMID:25654762

  13. Cancer exosomes express CD39 and CD73, which suppress T cells through adenosine production.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Aled; Al-Taei, Saly; Webber, Jason; Mason, Malcolm D; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2011-07-15

    Extracellular adenosine is elevated in cancer tissue, and it negatively regulates local immune responses. Adenosine production from extracellular ATP has attracted attention as a mechanism of regulatory T cell-mediated immune regulation. In this study, we examined whether small vesicles secreted by cancer cells, called exosomes, contribute to extracellular adenosine production and hence modulate immune effector cells indirectly. We found exosomes from diverse cancer cell types exhibit potent ATP- and 5'AMP-phosphohydrolytic activity, partly attributed to exosomally expressed CD39 and CD73, respectively. Comparable levels of activity were seen with exosomes from pleural effusions of mesothelioma patients. In such fluids, exosomes accounted for 20% of the total ATP-hydrolytic activity. Exosomes can perform both hydrolytic steps sequentially to form adenosine from ATP. This exosome-generated adenosine can trigger a cAMP response in adenosine A(2A) receptor-positive but not A(2A) receptor-negative cells. Similarly, significantly elevated cAMP was also triggered in Jurkat cells by adding exosomes with ATP but not by adding exosomes or ATP alone. A proportion of healthy donor T cells constitutively express CD39 and/or CD73. Activation of T cells by CD3/CD28 cross-linking could be inhibited by exogenously added 5'AMP in a CD73-dependent manner. However, 5'AMP converted to adenosine by exosomes inhibits T cell activation independently of T cell CD73 expression. This T cell inhibition was mediated through the adenosine A(2A) receptor. In summary, the data highlight exosome enzymic activity in the production of extracellular adenosine, and this may play a contributory role in negative modulation of T cells in the tumor environment. PMID:21677139

  14. Possible therapeutic benefits of adenosine-potentiating drugs in reducing age-related degenerative disease in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Scaramuzzi, R J; Baker, D J

    2003-10-01

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous, biologically important molecule that is a precursor of other biologically active molecules. It also is a component of some co-factors and has distinct physiological actions in its own right. Levels are maintained by synthesis from dietary precursors and re-cycling. The daily turnover of adenosine is very high. Adenosine can act either as a hormone by binding to adenosine receptors, four adenosine receptor subtypes have been identified, and as an intracellular modulator, after transport into the cell by membrane transporter proteins. One of the principal intracellular actions of adenosine is inhibition of the enzyme phosphodiesterase. Extracellular adenosine also has specific neuromodulatory actions on dopamine and glutamate. Selective and nonselective agonists and antagonists of adenosine are available. The tasks of developing, evaluating and exploiting the therapeutic potential of these compounds is still in its infancy. Adenosine has actions in the central nervous system (CNS), heart and vascular system, skeletal muscle and the immune system and the presence of receptors suggests potential actions in the gonads and other organs. Adenosine agonists improve tissue perfusion through actions on vascular smooth muscle and erythrocyte fluidity and they can be used to improve the quality of life in aged dogs. This article reviews the therapeutic potential of adenosine-potentiating drugs in the treatment of age-related conditions in companion animals, some of which may be exacerbated by castration or spaying at an early age. PMID:14633184

  15. Development of a luminescent G-quadruplex-selective iridium(III) complex for the label-free detection of adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; He, Bingyong; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2016-01-01

    A panel of six luminescent iridium(III) complexes were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to act as G-quadruplex-selective probes. The novel iridium(III) complex 1 was found to be highly selective for G-quadruplex DNA, and was employed for the construction of a label-free G-quadruplex-based adenosine detection assay in aqueous solution. Two different detection strategies were investigated for adenosine detection, and the results showed that initial addition of adenosine to the adenosine aptamer gave superior results. The assay exhibited a linear response for adenosine in the concentration range of 5 to 120 μM (R2 = 0.992), and the limit of detection for adenosine was 5 μM. Moreover, this assay was highly selective for adenosine over other nucleosides, and exhibited potential use for biological sample analysis. PMID:26778273

  16. Development of a luminescent G-quadruplex-selective iridium(III) complex for the label-free detection of adenosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; He, Bingyong; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2016-01-01

    A panel of six luminescent iridium(III) complexes were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to act as G-quadruplex-selective probes. The novel iridium(III) complex 1 was found to be highly selective for G-quadruplex DNA, and was employed for the construction of a label-free G-quadruplex-based adenosine detection assay in aqueous solution. Two different detection strategies were investigated for adenosine detection, and the results showed that initial addition of adenosine to the adenosine aptamer gave superior results. The assay exhibited a linear response for adenosine in the concentration range of 5 to 120 μM (R2 = 0.992), and the limit of detection for adenosine was 5 μM. Moreover, this assay was highly selective for adenosine over other nucleosides, and exhibited potential use for biological sample analysis.

  17. Human DNA polymerase. alpha. : Predicted functional domains and relationships with viral DNA polymerases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.F.; Wong, S.W.; Korn, D. )

    1989-01-01

    The primary sequence of human DNA polymerase {alpha} deduced from the full-length cDNA contains regions of striking similarity to sequences in replicative DNA polymerases from Escherichia coli phages PRD1 and T4, Bacillus phage {phi}19, yeast DNA polymerase I, yeast linear plasmid pGKL1, maize S1 mitochondrial DNA, herpes family viruses, vaccinia virus, and adenovirus. The conservation of these homologous regions across this vast phylogenetic expanse indicates that these prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases may all have evolved from a common primordial gene. Based on the sequence analysis and genetic results from yeast and herpes simplex virus studies, these consensus sequences are suggested to define potential sites that subserve essential roles in the DNA polymerase reaction. Two of these conserved regions appear to participate directly in the active site required for substrate deoxynucleotide interaction. One region toward the carboxyl-terminus has the potential to be the DNA interacting domain is predicted toward the amino-terminus. The provisional assignment of these domains can be used to identify unique or dissimilar features of functionally homologous catalytic sites in viral DBA polymerases of pathogenetic significance and thereby serve to guide more rational antiviral drug design.

  18. A2B adenosine receptors mediate relaxation of the pig intravesical ureter: adenosine modulation of non adrenergic non cholinergic excitatory neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Medardo; Barahona, María Victoria; Bustamante, Salvador; García-Sacristán, Albino; Orensanz, Luis M

    1999-01-01

    The present study was designed to characterize the adenosine receptors involved in the relaxation of the pig intravesical ureter, and to investigate the action of adenosine on the non adrenergic non cholinergic (NANC) excitatory ureteral neurotransmission. In U46619 (10−7  M)-contracted strips treated with the adenosine uptake inhibitor, nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI, 10−6  M), adenosine and related analogues induced relaxations with the following potency order: 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA)=5′-(N-cyclopropyl)-carboxamidoadenosine (CPCA)=2-chloroadenosine (2-CA)>adenosine>cyclopentyladenosine (CPA)=N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-adenosine-5′-N-methylcarboxamide (IB-MECA)=2-[p-(carboxyethyl)-phenylethylamino]-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS21680). Epithelium removal or incubation with indomethacin (3×10−6  M) and L-NG-nitroarginine (L-NOARG, 3×10−5  M), inhibitors of prostanoids and nitric oxide (NO) synthase, respectively, failed to modify the relaxations to adenosine. 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX, 10−8 M) and 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl) [1,2,4]-triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol (ZM 241385, 3×10−8  M and 10−7  M), A1 and A2A receptor selective antagonists, respectively, did not modify the relaxations to adenosine or NECA. 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT, 10−5  M) and DPCPX (10−6  M), which block A1/A2-receptors, reduced such relaxations. In strips treated with guanethidine (10−5  M), atropine (10−7  M), L-NOARG (3×10−5  M) and indomethacin (3×10−6  M), both electrical field stimulation (EFS, 5 Hz) and exogenous ATP (10−4  M) induced contractions of preparations. 8-PT (10−5  M) increased both contractions. DPCPX (10−8  M), NECA (10−4  M), CPCA, (10−4  M) and 2-CA (10−4  M) did not alter the contractions to EFS. The present results suggest that adenosine relaxes the pig intravesical ureter, independently of prostanoids

  19. Association of adenosine receptor gene polymorphisms and in vivo adenosine A1 receptor binding in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Hohoff, Christa; Garibotto, Valentina; Elmenhorst, David; Baffa, Anna; Kroll, Tina; Hoffmann, Alana; Schwarte, Kathrin; Zhang, Weiqi; Arolt, Volker; Deckert, Jürgen; Bauer, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs) and the interacting adenosine A2A receptors are implicated in neurological and psychiatric disorders. Variants within the corresponding genes ADORA1 and ADORA2A were shown associated with pathophysiologic alterations, particularly increased anxiety. It is unknown so far, if these variants might modulate the A1AR distribution and availability in different brain regions. In this pilot study, the influence of ADORA1 and ADORA2A variants on in vivo A1AR binding was assessed with the A1AR-selective positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [(18)F]CPFPX in brains of healthy humans. Twenty-eight normal control subjects underwent PET procedures to calculate the binding potential BPND of [(18)F]CPFPX in cerebral regions and to assess ADORA1 and ADORA2A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) effects on regional BPND data. Our results revealed SNPs of both genes associated with [(18)F]CPFPX binding to the A1AR. The strongest effects that withstood even Bonferroni correction of multiple SNP testing were found in non-smoking subjects (N=22) for ADORA2A SNPs rs2236624 and rs5751876 (corr. Pall<0.05). SNP alleles previously identified at risk for increased anxiety like the rs5751876 T-allele corresponded to consistently higher A1AR availability in all brain regions. Our data indicate for the first time that variation of A1AR availability was associated with ADORA SNPs. The finding of increased A1AR availability in regions of the fear network, particularly in ADORA2A risk allele carriers, strongly warrants evaluation and replication in further studies including individuals with increased anxiety. PMID:24943643

  20. Colony Polymerase Chain Reaction with Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Murray, Johanne M; Watson, Adam T; Carr, Antony M

    2016-01-01

    When screening a large number of individual Schizosaccharomyces pombe strains by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a rapid "colony PCR" approach may be used. Numerous colony PCR protocols are available, and fundamental to them all is that the colony must be fresh (grown overnight) and that as few cells as possible are used. In this protocol, we present three reliable methods for preparing S. pombe cells for colony PCR. PMID:27140919

  1. DNA polymerase mu, a candidate hypermutase?

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, J F; Domínguez, O; Laín de Lera, T; Garcia-Díaz, M; Bernad, A; Blanco, L

    2001-01-01

    A novel DNA polymerase (Pol mu) has been recently identified in human cells. The amino-acid sequence of Pol mu is 42% identical to that of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT), a DNA-independent DNA polymerase that contributes to antigen-receptor diversity. In this paper we review the evidence supporting the role of Pol mu in somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes, a T-dependent process that selectively occurs at germinal centres: (i) preferential expression in secondary lymphoid organs; (ii) expression associated to developing germinal centres; and (iii) very low base discrimination during DNA-dependent DNA polymerization by Pol mu, a mutator phenotype enormously accentuated by the presence of activating Mn2+ ions. Moreover, its similarity to TdT, together with extrapolation to the crystal structure of DNA polymerase beta complexed (Pol beta) with DNA, allows us to discuss the structural basis for the unprecedented error proneness of Pol mu, and to predict that Pol mu is structurally well suited to participate also in DNA end-filling steps occurring both during V(D)J recombination and repair of DNA double-strand breaks that are processed by non-homologous end-joining. PMID:11205337

  2. The preparation of adenosine 5′-pyrophosphate by a non-enzymic method

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, R. M. C.; Ford, M.; Eichberg, J.

    1965-01-01

    1. A non-enzymic method for the preparation of adenosine 5′-diphosphate is described, in which the terminal phosphate of adenosine 5′-triphosphate is transferred to methanol in the presence of hydrochloric acid. The final purified product can be obtained in 60% yield. 2. Experiments with [14C]methanol showed that no methylation of the adenosine diphosphate occurs during the reaction. 3. Confirmation that the pyrophosphate moiety of the adenosine diphosphate produced was in the 5′-position was obtained by: (a) periodate oxidation; (b) treatment with apyrase and examination of the resulting adenylic acid isomer by paper chromatography. 4. The method appears to be generally applicable to the preparation of nucleoside 5′-diphosphates from the corresponding nucleoside 5′-triphosphates. PMID:14333545

  3. Passive targeting of ischemic-reperfused myocardium with adenosine-loaded silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Galagudza, Michael; Korolev, Dmitry; Postnov, Viktor; Naumisheva, Elena; Grigorova, Yulia; Uskov, Ivan; Shlyakhto, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacological agents suggested for infarct size limitation have serious side effects when used at cardioprotective doses which hinders their translation into clinical practice. The solution to the problem might be direct delivery of cardioprotective drugs into ischemic-reperfused myocardium. In this study, we explored the potential of silica nanoparticles for passive delivery of adenosine, a prototype cardioprotective agent, into ischemic-reperfused heart tissue. In addition, the biodegradation of silica nanoparticles was studied both in vitro and in vivo. Immobilization of adenosine on the surface of silica nanoparticles resulted in enhancement of adenosine-mediated infarct size limitation in the rat model. Furthermore, the hypotensive effect of adenosine was attenuated after its adsorption on silica nanoparticles. We conclude that silica nanoparticles are biocompatible materials that might potentially be used as carriers for heart-targeted drug delivery. PMID:22619519

  4. Laboratory procedures manual for the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Knust, E. A.; Nibley, D. A.; Vance, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A manual on the procedures and instruments developed for the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) luciferase assay is presented. Data cover, laboratory maintenance, maintenance of bacterial cultures, bacteria measurement, reagents, luciferase procedures, and determination of microbal susceptibility to antibiotics.

  5. LDL-cholesterol reduction in patients with hypercholesterolemia by modulation of adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Filippov, Sergey; Pinkosky, Stephen L.; Newton, Roger S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the profile of ETC-1002, as shown in preclinical and clinical studies, including LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering activity and beneficial effects on other cardiometabolic risk markers as they relate to the inhibition of adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase and the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase. Recent findings ETC-1002 is an adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase inhibitor/adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activator currently in Phase 2b clinical development. In seven Phase 1 and Phase 2a clinical studies, ETC-1002 dosed once daily for 2–12 weeks has lowered LDL-C and reduced high-sensitivity C-reactive protein by up to 40%, with neutral to positive effects on glucose levels, blood pressure, and body weight. Importantly, use of ETC-1002 in statin-intolerant patients has shown statin-like lowering of LDL-C without the muscle pain and weakness responsible for discontinuation of statin use by many patients. ETC-1002 has also been shown to produce an incremental benefit, lowering LDL-C as an add-on therapy to a low-dose statin. In over 300 individuals in studies of up to 12 weeks, ETC-1002 has been well tolerated with no serious adverse effects. Summary Because adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase play central roles in regulating lipid and glucose metabolism, pharmacological modulation of these two enzymes could provide an important therapeutic alternative for statin-intolerant patients with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24978142

  6. Role of adenosine deaminase, ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) and ecto-(non-specific phosphatase) in cyanide-induced adenosine monophosphate catabolism in rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Newby, A C

    1980-01-01

    1. The role of adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4), ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) (EC 3.1.3.5) and ecto-(non-specific phosphatase) in the CN-induced catabolism of adenine nucleotides in intact rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes was investigated by inhibiting the enzymes in situ. 2. KCN (10mM for 90 min) induced a 20-30% fall in ATP concentration accompanied by an approximately equimolar increase in hypoxanthine, ADP, AMP and adenosine concentrations were unchanged, and IMP and inosine remained undetectable ( less than 0.05 nmol/10(7) cells). 3. Cells remained 98% intact, as judged by loss of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27). 4. Pentostatin (30 microM), a specific inhibitor of adenosine deaminase, completely inhibited hypoxanthine production from exogenous adenosine (55 microM), but did not black CN-induced hypoxanthine production or cause adenosine accumulation in intact cells. This implied that IMP rather than adenosine was an intermediate in AMP breakdown in response to cyanide. 5. Antibodies raised against purified plasma-membrane 5'-nucleotidase inhibited the ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) by 95-98%. Non-specific phosphatases were blocked by 10 mM-sodium beta-glycerophosphate. 6. These two agents together blocked hypoxanthine production from exogenous AMP and IMP (200 microM) by more than 90%, but had no effect on production from endogenous substrates. 7. These data suggest that ectophosphatases do not participate in CN-induced catabolism of intracellular AMP in rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes. 8. A minor IMPase, not inhibited by antiserum, was detected in the soluble fraction of disrupted cells. PMID:6249264

  7. Effect of adenosine on the formation of prostacyclin in the rabbit isolated heart.

    PubMed Central

    Karwatowska-Prokopczuk, E.; Ciabattoni, G.; Wennmalm, A.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of adenosine on cardiac biosynthesis of prostacyclin (PGI2) was investigated. Rabbit hearts were perfused according to Langendorff at controlled pressure (with or without theophylline), or at controlled flow. The content of 6-keto-prostaglandin1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1 alpha, metabolite of PGI2) in the coronary effluent under basal conditions and during infusion of adenosine was determined using a highly specific radioimmunoassay. 2. In other experiments, rings of rabbit aorta were incubated with or without adenosine and the production of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha was analysed as above. 3. Administration of adenosine (10 micron) to hearts perfused at controlled pressure increased the coronary flow by up to 38%. The peak concentration of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha in the effluent exceeded the control by 177% (P less than 0.01), and the total efflux of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha exceeded the control by 179% (P less than 0.001). Theophylline (50 micron) reduced these effects of adenosine by 23%, 43% and 51%, respectively, without influencing the uptake of adenosine into the heart. 4. When adenosine (1-10 micron) was administered to hearts perfused at controlled flow, a dose-dependent decrease in the perfusion pressure, by 27% and 44% respectively, was observed. In parallel, the resulting increase in 6-keto-PGF1 alpha efflux was considerably lower (49% (P less than 0.05) and 43% (NS), respectively). A similar decrease in perfusion pressure induced in the absence of adenosine decreased the efflux of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, by 15% (P less than 0.01) and 32% (P less than 0.001), respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3052678

  8. Sitagliptin attenuates sympathetic innervation via modulating reactive oxygen species and interstitial adenosine in infarcted rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tsung-Ming; Chen, Wei-Ting; Yang, Chen-Chia; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chang, Nen-Chung

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, attenuates arrhythmias through inhibiting nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in post-infarcted normoglycemic rats, focusing on adenosine and reactive oxygen species production. DPP-4 bound adenosine deaminase has been shown to catalyse extracellular adenosine to inosine. DPP-4 inhibitors increased adenosine levels by inhibiting the complex formation. Normoglycemic male Wistar rats were subjected to coronary ligation and then randomized to either saline or sitagliptin in in vivo and ex vivo studies. Post-infarction was associated with increased oxidative stress, as measured by myocardial superoxide, nitrotyrosine and dihydroethidium fluorescent staining. Measurement of myocardial norepinephrine levels revealed a significant elevation in vehicle-treated infarcted rats compared with sham. Compared with vehicle, infarcted rats treated with sitagliptin significantly increased interstitial adenosine levels and attenuated oxidative stress. Sympathetic hyperinnervation was blunted after administering sitagliptin, as assessed by immunofluorescent analysis and western blotting and real-time quantitative RT-PCR of NGF. Arrhythmic scores in the sitagliptin-treated infarcted rats were significantly lower than those in vehicle. Ex vivo studies showed a similar effect of erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (an adenosine deaminase inhibitor) to sitagliptin on attenuated levels of superoxide and NGF. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of sitagliptin on superoxide anion production and NGF levels can be reversed by 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropulxanthine (adenosine A1 receptor antagonist) and exogenous hypoxanthine. Sitagliptin protects ventricular arrhythmias by attenuating sympathetic innervation via adenosine A1 receptor and xanthine oxidase-dependent pathways, which converge through the attenuated formation of superoxide in the non-diabetic infarcted rats. PMID:25388908

  9. Role of adenosine in the sympathetic activation produced by isometric exercise in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, F; Biaggioni, I

    1994-01-01

    Isometric exercise increases sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure. This exercise pressor reflex is partly mediated by metabolic products activating muscle afferents (metaboreceptors). Whereas adenosine is a known inhibitory neuromodulator, there is increasing evidence that it activates afferent nerves. We, therefore, examined the hypothesis that adenosine stimulates muscle afferents and participates in the exercise pressor reflex in healthy volunteers. Intraarterial administration of adenosine into the forearm, during venous occlusion to prevent systemic effects, mimicked the response to exercise, increasing muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, lower limb microneurography) and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) at all doses studied (2, 3, and 4 mg). Heart rate increased only with the highest dose. Intrabrachial adenosine (4 mg) increased MSNA by 96 +/- 25% (n = 6, P < 0.01) and MABP by 12 +/- 3 mmHg (P < 0.01). Adenosine produced forearm discomfort, but equivalent painful stimuli (forearm ischemia and cold exposure) increased MSNA significantly less than adenosine. Furthermore, adenosine receptor antagonism with intrabrachial theophylline (1 microgram/ml forearm per min) blocked the increase in MSNA (92 +/- 15% vs. 28 +/- 6%, n = 7, P < 0.01) and MABP (38 +/- 6 vs. 27 +/- 4 mmHg, P = 0.01) produced by isometric handgrip (30% of maximal voluntary contraction) in the infused arm, but not the contralateral arm. Theophylline did not prevent the increase in heart rate produced by handgrip, a response mediated more by central command than muscle afferent activation. We propose that endogenous adenosine contributes to the activation of muscle afferents involved in the exercise pressor reflex in humans. PMID:8163667

  10. Role of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Bharmal, N H; Leite-Morris, K A; Adams, W R

    1999-10-01

    The role of adenosine receptor-mediated signaling was examined in the alcohol withdrawal syndrome. CD-1 mice received a liquid diet containing ethanol (6.7%, v/v) or a control liquid diet that were abruptly discontinued after 14 days of treatment. Mice consuming ethanol showed a progressive increase in signs of intoxication throughout the drinking period. Following abrupt discontinuation of ethanol diet, mice demonstrated reversible signs of handling-induced hyperexcitability that were maximal between 5-8 h. Withdrawing mice received treatment with adenosine receptor agonists at the onset of peak withdrawal (5.5 h) and withdrawal signs were blindly rated (during withdrawal hours 6 and 7). Adenosine A1-receptor agonist R-N6(phenylisopropyl)adenosine (0.15 and 0.3 mg/ kg) reduced withdrawal signs 0.5 and 1.5 h after drug administration in a dose-dependent fashion. Adenosine A2A-selective agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethyl-amino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.3 mg/kg) reduced withdrawal signs at both time points. In ethanol-withdrawing mice, there were significant decreases in adenosine transporter sites in striatum without changes in cortex or cerebellum. In ethanol-withdrawing mice, there were no changes in adenosine A1 and A2A receptor concentrations in cortex, striatum, or cerebellum. There appears to be a role for adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the treatment of the ethanol withdrawal syndrome. Published by Elsevier Science Inc. PMID:10548160

  11. Ticagrelor Does Not Inhibit Adenosine Transport at Relevant Concentrations: A Randomized Cross-Over Study in Healthy Subjects In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rongen, G. A.; van den Broek, P. H. H.; Bilos, A.; Donders, A. R. T.; Gomes, M. E.; Riksen, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In patients with myocardial infarction, ticagrelor reduces cardiovascular and sepsis-related mortality, and can cause dyspnea. It is suggested that this is caused by adenosine receptor stimulation, because in preclinical studies, ticagrelor blocks the nucleoside transporter and increases cellular ATP release. We now investigated the effects of ticagrelor on the adenosine system in humans in vivo. Experimental Approach In a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over trial in 14 healthy subjects, we have tested whether ticagrelor (180 mg) affects adenosine- and dipyridamole-induced forearm vasodilation, as surrogates of nucleoside uptake inhibition and adenosine formation, respectively. Also, ex vivo uptake of adenosine and uridine in isolated red blood cells was measured. Primary endpoint was adenosine-induced vasodilation. Key Results Ticagrelor did not affect adenosine- or dipyridamole-induced forearm vasodilation. Also, ex vivo uptake of adenosine and uridine in isolated red blood cells was not affected by ticagrelor. In vitro, ticagrelor dose-dependently inhibited nucleoside uptake, but only at supra-physiological concentrations. Conclusion and Implications In conclusion, at relevant plasma concentration, ticagrelor does not affect adenosine transport, nor adenosine formation in healthy subjects. Therefore, it is unlikely that this mechanism is a relevant pleiotropic effect of ticagrelor. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01996735 PMID:26509673

  12. Hypertonic NaCl enhances adenosine release and hormonal cAMP production in mouse thick ascending limb.

    PubMed

    Baudouin-Legros, M; Badou, A; Paulais, M; Hammet, M; Teulon, J

    1995-07-01

    Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), accumulated in the presence of adenosine, was measured in medullary portions of mouse thick ascending limbs of Henle's loop, suspended either in classic extracellular buffer or in the presence of added NaCl. Under control conditions (140 mmol/l NaCl), adenosine (< 10(-5) mol/l) and N6-cyclohexyladenosine, an A1 adenosine receptor agonist, inhibit the cAMP accumulation induced by arginine vasopressin (AVP). On the other hand, high concentrations of adenosine and CGS-21680, an A2 adenosine receptor agonist, stimulate cAMP formation. Addition of NaCl (+300 mmol/l) to extracellular buffer stimulates the release of endogenous adenosine. It also enhances A2 receptor-induced cAMP accumulation but suppresses A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. This hypertonic NaCl medium also potentiates the stimulatory action of AVP on adenylyl cyclase. The modifications of tubular responses to both AVP and A1 and A2 agonists, brought about by hypertonic NaCl, were all inhibited by adenosine deaminase, thereby demonstrating the involvement of endogenous adenosine. Adenosine, the release and the effects of which are modulated by hypertonic NaCl, thus appears to act as an endogenous physiological modulator of kidney medulla function. PMID:7631823

  13. Mutability of DNA polymerase I: implications for the creation of mutant DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ern; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2005-12-01

    DNA polymerases of the Family A catalyze the addition of deoxynucleotides to a primer with high efficiency, processivity, and selectivity-properties that are critical to their function both in nature and in the laboratory. These polymerases tolerate many amino acid substitutions, even in regions that are evolutionarily conserved. This tolerance can be exploited to create DNA polymerases with novel properties and altered substrate specificities, using rational design and molecular evolution. These efforts have focused mainly on the Family A DNA polymerises -Taq, E. coli Pol I, and T7 - because they are widely utilized in biotechnology today. The redesign of polymerases often requires knowledge of the function of specific residues in the protein, including those located in six evolutionarily conserved regions. The most well characterized of these are motifs A and B, which regulate the fidelity of replication and the incorporation of nucleotide analogs such as dideoxynucleotides. Regions that remain to be more thoroughly characterized are motif C, which is critical for catalysis, and motifs 1, 2 and 6, all of which bind to DNA primer or template. Several recently identified mutants with abilities to incorporate nucleotides with bulky adducts have mutations that are not located within conserved regions and warrant further study. Analysis of these mutants will help advance our understanding of how DNA polymerases select bases with high fidelity. PMID:16230053

  14. K+ depolarization evokes ATP, adenosine and glutamate release from glia in rat hippocampus: a microelectrode biosensor study

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, A; Andó, RD; Túri, G; Rózsa, B; Sperlágh, B

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE This study was undertaken to characterize the ATP, adenosine and glutamate outflow evoked by depolarization with high K+ concentrations, in slices of rat hippocampus. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We utilized the microelectrode biosensor technique and extracellular electrophysiological recording for the real-time monitoring of the efflux of ATP, adenosine and glutamate. KEY RESULTS ATP, adenosine and glutamate sensors exhibited transient and reversible current during depolarization with 25 mM K+, with distinct kinetics. The ecto-ATPase inhibitor ARL67156 enhanced the extracellular level of ATP and inhibited the prolonged adenosine efflux, suggesting that generation of adenosine may derive from the extracellular breakdown of ATP. Stimulation-evoked ATP, adenosine and glutamate efflux was inhibited by tetrodotoxin, while exposure to Ca2+-free medium abolished ATP and adenosine efflux from hippocampal slices. Extracellular elevation of ATP and adenosine were decreased in the presence of NMDA receptor antagonists, D-AP-5 and ifenprodil, whereas non-NMDA receptor blockade by CNQX inhibited glutamate but not ATP and adenosine efflux. The gliotoxin fluoroacetate and P2X7 receptor antagonists inhibited the K+-evoked ATP, adenosine and glutamate efflux, while carbenoxolone in low concentration and probenecid decreased only the adenosine efflux. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results demonstrated activity-dependent gliotransmitter release in the hippocampus in response to ongoing neuronal activity. ATP and glutamate were released by P2X7 receptor activation into extracellular space. Although the increased extracellular levels of adenosine did derive from released ATP, adenosine might also be released directly via pannexin hemichannels. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Sershen, pp. 1000–1002 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.02072.x PMID:22394324

  15. The structure and role of RNA polymerases in Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Bzik, D J

    1991-08-01

    During the past few years the characterization of several Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase subunits has revealed potentially significant differences between the corresponding subunits of the host and parasite enzymes(1-3). The largest subunits of P. falciparum RNA polymerase II and III contain enlarged variable domains that separate conserved domains in these subunits. The partially characterized beta and beta '-like subunits of an organellar P. falciparum RNA polymerase also appear to be distinct from the host RNA polymerases. In this review David Bzik discusses the structure and role of RNA polymerases in Plasmodium. PMID:15463499

  16. Cardiac endothelial transport and metabolism of adenosine and inosine

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Lisa M.; Bukowski, Thomas R.; Revkin, James H.; Bassingthwaighte, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of transmembrane flux limitations on cellular metabolism of purine nucleosides was assessed in whole organ studies. Transcapillary transport of the purine nucleosides adenosine (Ado) and inosine (Ino) via paracellular diffusion through interendothelial clefts in parallel with carrier-mediated transendothelial fluxes was studied in isolated, Krebs-Henseleit-perfused rabbit and guinea pig hearts. After injection into coronary inflow, multiple-indicator dilution curves were obtained from coronary outflow for 90 s for 131I-labeled albumin (intravascular reference tracer), [3H]arabinofuranosyl hypoxanthine (AraH; extracellular reference tracer and nonreactive adenosine analog), and either [14C]Ado or [14C]Ino. Ado or Ino was separated from their degradative products, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid, in each outflow sample by HPLC and radioisotope counting. Ado and Ino, but not AraH, permeate the luminal membrane of endothelial cells via a saturable transporter with permeability-surface area product PSecl and also diffuse passively through interendothelial clefts with the same conductance (PSg) as AraH. These parallel conductances were estimated via fitting with an axially distributed, multi-pathway, four-region blood-tissue exchange model. PSg for AraH were ~4 and 2.5 ml · g−1 · min−1 in rabbits and guinea pigs, respectively. In contrast, transplasmalemmal conductances (endothelial PSecl) were ~0.2 ml · g−1 · min−1 for both Ado and Ino in rabbit hearts but ~2 ml · g−1 · min−1 in guinea pig hearts, an order of magnitude different. Purine nucleoside metabolism also differs between guinea pig and rabbit cardiac endothelium. In guinea pig heart, 50% of the tracer Ado bolus was retained, 35% was washed out as Ado, and 15% was lost as effluent metabolites; 25% of Ino was retained, 50% washed out, and 25% was lost as metabolites. In rabbit heart, 45% of Ado was retained and 5% lost as metabolites, and 7% of Ino was retained and 3% lost as

  17. Synaptic mechanisms of adenosine A2A receptor-mediated hyperexcitability in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Rombo, Diogo M; Newton, Kathryn; Nissen, Wiebke; Badurek, Sylvia; Horn, Jacqueline M; Minichiello, Liliana; Jefferys, John G R; Sebastiao, Ana M; Lamsa, Karri P

    2015-05-01

    Adenosine inhibits excitatory neurons widely in the brain through adenosine A1 receptor, but activation of adenosine A2A receptor (A2A R) has an opposite effect promoting discharge in neuronal networks. In the hippocampus A2A R expression level is low, and the receptor's effect on identified neuronal circuits is unknown. Using optogenetic afferent stimulation and whole-cell recording from identified postsynaptic neurons we show that A2A R facilitates excitatory glutamatergic Schaffer collateral synapses to CA1 pyramidal cells, but not to GABAergic inhibitory interneurons. In addition, A2A R enhances GABAergic inhibitory transmission between CA1 area interneurons leading to disinhibition of pyramidal cells. Adenosine A2A R has no direct modulatory effect on GABAergic synapses to pyramidal cells. As a result adenosine A2A R activation alters the synaptic excitation - inhibition balance in the CA1 area resulting in increased pyramidal cell discharge to glutamatergic Schaffer collateral stimulation. In line with this, we show that A2A R promotes synchronous pyramidal cell firing in hyperexcitable conditions where extracellular potassium is elevated or following high-frequency electrical stimulation. Our results revealed selective synapse- and cell type specific adenosine A2A R effects in hippocampal CA1 area. The uncovered mechanisms help our understanding of A2A R's facilitatory effect on cortical network activity. PMID:25402014

  18. Unraveling the role of adenosine in remote ischemic preconditioning-induced cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2016-06-15

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) induced by alternate cycles of preconditioning ischemia and reperfusion protects the heart against sustained ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury. This technique has been translated to clinical levels in patients undergoing various surgical interventions including coronary artery bypass graft surgery, abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, percutaneous coronary intervention and heart valve surgery. Adenosine is a master regulator of energy metabolism and reduces myocardial ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury. Furthermore, adenosine is a critical trigger as well as a mediator in RIPC-induced cardioprotection and scientists have demonstrated the role of adenosine by showing an increase in its levels in the systemic circulation during RIPC delivery. Furthermore, the blockade of cardioprotective effects of RIPC in the presence of specific adenosine receptor blockers and transgenic animals with targeted ablation of A1 receptors has also demonstrated its critical role in RIPC. The studies have shown that adenosine may elicit cardioprotection via activation of neurogenic pathway. The present review describes the possible role and mechanism of adenosine in mediating RIPC-induced cardioprotection. PMID:27157518

  19. Methotrexate inhibits neutrophil function by stimulating adenosine release from connective tissue cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cronstein, B.N.; Eberle, M.A.; Levin, R.I. ); Gruber, H.E. )

    1991-03-15

    Although commonly used to control a variety of inflammatory diseases, the mechanism of action of a low dose of methotrexate remains a mystery. Methotrexate accumulates intracellularly where it may interfere with purine metabolism. Therefore, the authors determined whether a 48-hr pretreatment with methotrexate affected adenosine release from ({sup 14}C)adenine-labeled human fibroblasts and umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methotrexate significantly increased adenosine release by fibroblasts. The effect of methotrexate on adenosine release was not due to cytotoxicity since cells treated with maximal concentrations of methotrexate took up ({sup 14}C)adenine and released {sup 14}C-labeled purine (a measure of cell injury) in a manner identical to control cells. Methotrexate treatment of fibroblasts dramatically inhibited adherence to fibroblasts by both unstimulated neutrophils and stimulated neutrophils. One hypothesis that explains the effect of methotrexate on adenosine release is that, by inhibition of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) transformylase, methotrexate induces the accumulation of AICAR, the nucleoside precursor of which has previously been shown to cause adenosine release from ischemic cardiac tissue. The observation that the antiinflammatory actions of methotrexate are due to the capacity of methotrexate to induce adenosine release may form the basis for the development of an additional class of antiinflammatory drugs.

  20. Functional proteomics of adenosine triphosphatase system in the rat striatum during aging☆

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Ferrari, Federica; Gorini, Antonella

    2012-01-01

    The maximum rates of adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) systems related to energy consumption were systematically evaluated in synaptic plasma membranes isolated from the striata of male Wistar rats aged 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, because of their key role in presynaptic nerve ending homeostasis. The following enzyme activities were evaluated: sodium-potassium-magnesium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+, K+, Mg2+-ATPase); ouabain-insensitive magnesium adenosine triphosphatase (Mg2+-ATPase); sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+, K+-ATPase); direct magnesium adenosine triphosphatase (Mg2+-ATPase); calcium-magnesium adenosine triphosphatase (Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase); and acetylcholinesterase. The results showed that Na+, K+-ATPase decreased at 18 and 24 months, Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase decreased from 6 months, while Mg2+-ATPase was unmodified. Therefore, ATPases vary independently during aging, suggesting that the ATPase enzyme systems are of neuropathological and pharmacological importance. This could be considered as an experimental model to study regeneration processes, because of the age-dependent modifications of specific synaptic plasma membranes. ATPases cause selective changes in some cerebral functions, especially bioenergetic systems. This could be of physiopathological significance, particularly in many central nervous system diseases, where, during regenerative processes, energy availability is essential. PMID:25806051

  1. Oral sucrose for heel lance enhances adenosine triphosphate use in preterm neonates with respiratory distress

    PubMed Central

    Angeles, Danilyn M; Asmerom, Yayesh; Boskovic, Danilo S; Slater, Laurel; Bacot-Carter, Sharon; Bahjri, Khaled; Mukasa, Joseph; Holden, Megan; Fayard, Elba

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of oral sucrose on procedural pain, and on biochemical markers of adenosine triphosphate utilization and oxidative stress in preterm neonates with mild to moderate respiratory distress. Study design: Preterm neonates with a clinically required heel lance that met study criteria (n = 49) were randomized into three groups: (1) control (n = 24), (2) heel lance treated with placebo and non-nutritive sucking (n = 15) and (3) heel lance treated with sucrose and non-nutritive sucking (n = 10). Plasma markers of adenosine triphosphate degradation (hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid) and oxidative stress (allantoin) were measured before and after the heel lance. Pain was measured using the Premature Infant Pain Profile. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance, chi-square and one-way analysis of variance. Results: We found that in preterm neonates who were intubated and/or were receiving ⩾30% FiO2, a single dose of oral sucrose given before a heel lance significantly increased markers of adenosine triphosphate use. Conclusion: We found that oral sucrose enhanced adenosine triphosphate use in neonates who were intubated and/or were receiving ⩾30% FiO2. Although oral sucrose decreased pain scores, our data suggest that it also increased energy use as evidenced by increased plasma markers of adenosine triphosphate utilization. These effects of sucrose, specifically the fructose component, on adenosine triphosphate metabolism warrant further investigation. PMID:26770807

  2. Adenosine as an Adjunct Therapy in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients: Myth or Truth?

    PubMed

    Kassimis, George; Davlouros, Periklis; Patel, Niket; De Maria, Gianluigi; Kallistratos, Manolis S; Kharbanda, Rajesh K; Manolis, Athanasios J; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Banning, Adrian P

    2015-10-01

    Early reperfusion represents the key strategy in ST elevation myocardial infarction. However, reperfusion may induce myocardial damage due to the reperfusion myocardial injury, compromising the full potential of reperfusion therapy and accounting for unfavourable results in high risk patients. Adenosine seems to attenuate ischemia reperfusion injury, and thus represents a promising therapeutic option for treating such patients. However, previous randomized clinical trials have collectively failed to demonstrate whether adenosine can effectively reduce measures of myocardial injury and improve clinical outcome, despite its good basic evidence. The failure of such trials to show a real beneficial action may be in part related to specific factors other than adenosine's clinical efficacy. The purpose of this review is to explain the rationale for the use of adenosine as an adjunctive pharmacological cardio-protective agent following reperfusion of the ischemic myocardium, to address the weakness of previous trials and to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the effect of adenosine administration on reperfusion myocardial injury in patients with myocardial infarction. Although some preclinical and clinical studies point towards the beneficial role of adenosine in the prevention and treatment of no-reflow phenomenon in myocardial infarction, many unanswered questions still remain, including the optimal clinical indication, mode, dosage, duration and timing of application, and the exact mechanisms leading to potential benefits. Clarifying these issues will depend on further properly designed, adequately powered and well conducted clinical trials, which will probably provide us with the definite answers. PMID:26150100

  3. Label-Free Sensing of Adenosine Based on Force Variations Induced by Molecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingfeng; Li, Qing; Colombi Ciacchi, Lucio; Wei, Gang

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple force-based label-free strategy for the highly sensitive sensing of adenosine. An adenosine ssDNA aptamer was bound onto an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe by covalent modification, and the molecular-interface adsorption force between the aptamer and a flat graphite surface was measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). In the presence of adenosine, the molecular recognition between adenosine and the aptamer resulted in the formation of a folded, hairpin-like DNA structure and hence caused a variation of the adsorption force at the graphite/water interface. The sensitive force response to molecular recognition provided an adenosine detection limit in the range of 0.1 to 1 nM. The addition of guanosine, cytidine, and uridine had no significant interference with the sensing of adenosine, indicating a strong selectivity of this sensor architecture. In addition, operational parameters that may affect the sensor, such as loading rate and solution ionic strength, were investigated. PMID:25808841

  4. A2B Adenosine Receptor–Mediated Induction of IL-6 Promotes CKD

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yingbo; Zhang, Weiru; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Yujin; Kellems, Rodney E.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic elevation of adenosine, which occurs in the setting of repeated or prolonged tissue injury, can exacerbate cellular dysfunction, suggesting that it may contribute to the pathogenesis of CKD. Here, mice with chronically elevated levels of adenosine, resulting from a deficiency in adenosine deaminase (ADA), developed renal dysfunction and fibrosis. Both the administration of polyethylene glycol–modified ADA to reduce adenosine levels and the inhibition of the A2B adenosine receptor (A2BR) attenuated renal fibrosis and dysfunction. Furthermore, activation of A2BR promoted renal fibrosis in both mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) and mice subjected to unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). These three mouse models shared a similar profile of profibrotic gene expression in kidney tissue, suggesting that they share similar signaling pathways that lead to renal fibrosis. Finally, both genetic and pharmacologic approaches showed that the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 mediates adenosine-induced renal fibrosis downstream of A2BR. Taken together, these data suggest that A2BR-mediated induction of IL-6 contributes to renal fibrogenesis and shows potential therapeutic targets for CKD. PMID:21511827

  5. Intravenous adenosine (adenoscan) versus exercise in the noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease by SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    LaManna, M.M.; Mohama, R.; Slavich, I.L. 3d.; Lumia, F.J.; Cha, S.D.; Rambaran, N.; Maranhao, V. )

    1990-11-01

    Fifteen patients at a mean age of 58 underwent adenosine and maximal exercise thallium SPECT imaging. All scans were performed 1 week apart and within 4 weeks of cardiac catheterization. SPECT imaging was performed after the infusion of 140 micrograms/kg/min of adenosine for 6 minutes. Mean heart rate increment during adenosine administration was 67 +/- 3.7 to 77 +/- 4.1. Mean blood pressure was 136 +/- 7.2 to 135 +/- 6.2 systolic and 78 +/- 1.8 to 68 +/- 2.6 diastolic. No adverse hemodynamic effects were observed. There were no changes in PR or QRS in intervals. Five stress ECGs were ischemic. No ST changes were observed with adenosine. Although 68% of the patients had symptoms of flushing, light-headedness, and dizziness during adenosine infusion, symptoms resolved within 1 minute of dosage adjustment or termination of the infusion in all but one patient, who required theophylline. Sensitivity for coronary artery detection was 77% and specificity 100%. Concordance between adenoscans and exercise thallium scintigraphy was high (13/15 = 87%). In two patients, there were minor scintigraphic differences. The authors conclude that adenosine is a sensitive, specific, and safe alternative to exercise testing in patients referred for thallium imaging and may be preferable to dipyridamole.

  6. Characterization of agonist radioligand interactions with porcine atrial A1 adenosine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Leid, M.; Schimerlik, M.I.; Murray, T.F.

    1988-09-01

    The agonist radioligand (-)-N6-(125I)-p-hydroxyphenylisopropyl-adenosine (( 125I)HPIA) was used to characterize adenosine recognition sites in porcine atrial membranes. (125I)HPIA showed saturable binding to an apparently homogeneous population of sites with a maximum binding capacity of 35 +/- 3 fmol/mg of protein and an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2.5 +/- 0.4 nM. Kinetic experiments were performed to address the molecular mechanism of (125I)HPIA binding in porcine atrial membranes. (125I)HPIA apparently interacts with the cardiac adenosine receptor in a simple bimolecular reaction. A kinetically derived (125I) HPIA dissociation constant (2.4 nM) was in good agreement with that parameter measured at equilibrium. Guanyl nucleotides negatively modulated (125I)HPIA binding by increasing its rate of dissociation. This finding is consonant with the formation of a ternary complex in porcine atrial membranes, consisting of ligand, receptor, and guanyl nucleotide-binding protein. Prototypic adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists inhibited specific binding in a manner consistent with the labeling of an A1 adenosine receptor. The results of these experiments suggest that the adenosine receptor present in porcine atrial membranes, as labeled by (125I)HPIA, is of the A1 subtype.

  7. Synthetic Nucleotides as Probes of DNA Polymerase Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Jason M.; Beuning, Penny J.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic code is continuously expanding with new nucleobases designed to suit specific research needs. These synthetic nucleotides are used to study DNA polymerase dynamics and specificity and may even inhibit DNA polymerase activity. The availability of an increasing chemical diversity of nucleotides allows questions of utilization by different DNA polymerases to be addressed. Much of the work in this area deals with the A family DNA polymerases, for example, Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I, which are DNA polymerases involved in replication and whose fidelity is relatively high, but more recent work includes other families of polymerases, including the Y family, whose members are known to be error prone. This paper focuses on the ability of DNA polymerases to utilize nonnatural nucleotides in DNA templates or as the incoming nucleoside triphosphates. Beyond the utility of nonnatural nucleotides as probes of DNA polymerase specificity, such entities can also provide insight into the functions of DNA polymerases when encountering DNA that is damaged by natural agents. Thus, synthetic nucleotides provide insight into how polymerases deal with nonnatural nucleotides as well as into the mutagenic potential of nonnatural nucleotides. PMID:22720133

  8. Evidence that sigma factors are components of chloroplast RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Troxler, R F; Zhang, F; Hu, J; Bogorad, L

    1994-01-01

    Plastid genes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase(s), which have been incompletely characterized and have been examined in a limited number of species. Plastid genomes contain rpoA, rpoB, rpoC1, and rpoC2 coding for alpha, beta, beta', and beta" RNA polymerase subunits that are homologous to the alpha, beta, and beta' subunits that constitute the core moiety of RNA polymerase in bacteria. However, genes with homology to sigma subunits in bacteria have not been found in plastid genomes. An antibody directed against the principal sigma subunit of RNA polymerase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was used to probe western blots of purified chloroplast RNA polymerase from maize, rice, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and Cyanidium caldarium. Chloroplast RNA polymerase from maize and rice contained an immunoreactive 64-kD protein. Chloroplast RNA polymerase from C. reinhardtii contained immunoreactive 100- and 82-kD proteins, and chloroplast RNA polymerase from C. caldarium contained an immunoreactive 32-kD protein. The elution profile of enzyme activity of both algal chloroplast RNA polymerases coeluted from DEAE with the respective immunoreactive proteins, indicating that they are components of the enzyme. These results provide immunological evidence for sigma-like factors in chloroplast RNA polymerase in higher plants and algae. PMID:8159791

  9. Online cleanup of accelerated solvent extractions for determination of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) in royal jelly using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiaofeng; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Jinhui; Chen, Fang; Li, Yi; Zhao, Jing

    2009-06-10

    Determination of the levels of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) in royal jelly is important for the study of its pharmacological activities, health benefits, and adenosine phosphate degradation. In this study was developed a novel method to determine ATP, ADP, and AMP levels in royal jelly using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) followed by online cleanup and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode array detection (DAD). The optimum extraction conditions were obtained using an 11 mL ASE cell, ethanol/water (5:5 v/v) as the extraction solvent, 1500 psi, 80 degrees C, a 5 min static time, and a 60% flush volume. Optimum separation of the three compounds was achieved in <25 min using a Waters XBridge Shield RP18 column with 0.05 mol L(-1) NH(4)H(2)PO(4) (pH 5.70) and acetonitrile as the mobile phase. Detection was performed at 257 nm. The method was sensitive (LOD adenosine phosphate extraction procedures (perchloric acid). The results indicate that the two techniques are similar in terms of recovery and reproducibility, but when other factors such as extraction time, environmental protection, and worker's health are considered, ASE is preferable to the classical extraction method. With this ASE-HPLC method, a minisurvey of ATP, ADP, and AMP levels in 15 samples of royal jelly of different origins was performed. Sample results indicated that the AMP concentration was 24.2-2214.4 mg kg(-1), whereas ATP and ADP were not detectable or present only at low levels. PMID:19435312

  10. Mutational clusters generated by non-processive polymerases: A case study using DNA polymerase betain vitro.

    PubMed

    García-Villada, Libertad; Drake, John W

    2010-08-01

    Available DNA mutational spectra reveal that the number of mutants with multiple mutations ("multiples") is usually greater than expected from a random distribution of mutations among mutants. These overloads imply the occurrence of non-random clusters of mutations, probably generated during episodes of low-fidelity DNA synthesis. Excess multiples have been reported not only for viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotic cells but also for the DNA polymerases of phages T4 and RB69 in vitro. In the simplest case of a purified polymerase, non-random clusters may be generated by a subfraction of phenotypic variants able to introduce more errors per cycle of DNA synthesis than the normal enzyme. According to this hypothesis, excess multiples are not expected with non-processive polymerases even if they harbor rare mutator variants. DNA polymerase beta (Pol beta) is a mammalian DNA-repair polymerase with very low processivity. Although several Pol beta mutational spectra have been described, there is conflicting evidence on whether or not excess multiples occur, with spectra based on the HSV-tk system tending to show excess multiples. Excess multiples generated by Pol beta or any of its mutants might imply that the excesses of multiples observed in numerous other systems, especially those with processive polymerases, could be artifactual. Here, the distributions of mutations generated by native and recombinant rat Pol beta and by the Pol beta(Y265C) mutator were analyzed in the M13mp2 lacZalpha system. Our results present no evidence for a significant excess of multiples over the expected numbers with any of the Pol beta enzymes tested in this system. The reported excess of Pol beta-generated multiples in the HSV-tk system may reflect a reduced efficiency of detection of base substitutions that cause weak phenotypes, which in turn may artifactually increase the frequency of multiples. PMID:20627824

  11. ADA (adenosine deaminase) gene therapy enters the competition

    SciTech Connect

    Culliton, B.J.

    1990-08-31

    Around the world, some 70 children are members of a select and deadly club. Born with an immune deficiency so severe that they will die of infection unless their immune systems can be repaired, they have captured the attention of would-be gene therapists who believe that a handful of these kids--the 15 or 20 who lack functioning levels of the enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA)--could be saved by a healthy ADA gene. A team of gene therapists is ready to put the theory to the test. In April 1987, a team of NIH researchers headed by R. Michael Blaese and W. French Anderson came up with the first formal protocol to introduce a healthy ADA gene into an unhealthy human. After 3 years of line-by-line scrutiny by five review committees, they have permission to go ahead. Two or three children will be treated in the next year, and will be infused with T lymphocytes carrying the gene for ADA. If the experiment works, the ADA gene will begin producing normal amounts of ADA. An interesting feature of ADA deficiency, that makes it ideal for initial gene studies, is that the amount of ADA one needs for a healthy immune system is quite variable. Hence, once inside a patient's T cells, the new ADA gene needs only to express the enzyme in moderate amounts. No precise gene regulation is necessary.

  12. Erythrocyte Adenosine Deaminase: Diagnostic Value for Diamond-Blackfan Anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Fargo, John H.; Kratz, Christian P.; Giri, Neelam; Savage, Sharon A.; Wong, Carolyn; Backer, Karen; Alter, Blanche P.; Glader, Bertil

    2012-01-01

    Summary Diamond-Blackfan anaemia (DBA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (IBMFS) characterized by red cell aplasia. Mutations in ribosomal genes are found in more than 50% of cases. Elevated erythrocyte adenosine deaminase (eADA) was first noted in DBA in 1983. In this study we determined the value of eADA for the diagnosis of DBA compared with other IBMFS; the association of eADA in DBA with age, gender or other haematological parameters; and the association with known DBA-related gene mutations. For the diagnosis of DBA compared with non-DBA patients with other bone marrow failure syndromes, eADA had a sensitivity of 84%, specificity 95%, and positive and negative predictive values of 91%. In patients with DBA there was no association between eADA and gender, age, or other haematological parameters. Erythrocyte ADA segregated with, as well as independent of, known DBA gene mutations. While eADA was an excellent confirmatory test for DBA, 16% of patients with classical clinical DBA had a normal eADA. PMID:23252420

  13. Sequence specificity of mRNA N6-adenosine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Csepany, T; Lin, A; Baldick, C J; Beemon, K

    1990-11-25

    The sequence specificity of chicken mRNA N6-adenosine methyltransferase has been investigated in vivo. Localization of six new N6-methyladenosine sites on Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) virion RNA has confirmed our extended consensus sequence for methylation: RGACU, where R is usually a G (7/12). We have also observed A (2/12) and U (3/12) at the -2 position (relative to m6A at +1) but never a C. At the +3 position, the U was observed 10/12 times; an A and a C were observed once each in weakly methylated sequences. The extent of methylation varied between the different sites up to a maximum of about 90%. To test the significance of this consensus sequence, it was altered by site-specific mutagenesis, and methylation was assayed after transfection of mutated RSV DNA into chicken embryo fibroblasts. We found that changing the G at -1 or the U at +3 to any other residue inhibited methylation. However, inhibition of methylation at all four of the major sites in the RSV src gene did not detectably alter the steady-state levels of the three viral RNA species or viral infectivity. Additional mutants that inactivated the src protein kinase activity produced less virus and exhibited relatively less src mRNA in infected cells. PMID:2173695

  14. Adenosine, type 1 receptors: role in proximal tubule Na+ reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Welch, W J

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine type 1 receptor (A1 -AR) antagonists induce diuresis and natriuresis in experimental animals and humans. Much of this effect is due to inhibition of A1 -ARs in the proximal tubule, which is responsible for 60-70% of the reabsorption of filtered Na(+) and fluid. Intratubular application of receptor antagonists indicates that A1 -AR mediates a portion of Na(+) uptake in PT and PT cells, via multiple transport systems, including Na(+) /H(+) exchanger-3 (NHE3), Na(+) /PO4(-) co-transporter and Na(+) -dependent glucose transporter, SGLT. Renal microperfusion and recollection studies have shown that fluid reabsorption is reduced by A1 -AR antagonists and is lower in A1 -AR KO mice, compared to WT mice. Absolute proximal reabsorption (APR) measured by free-flow micropuncture is equivocal, with studies that show either lower APR or similar APR in A1 -AR KO mice, compared to WT mice. Inhibition of A1 -ARs lowers elevated blood pressure in models of salt-sensitive hypertension, partially due to their effects in the proximal tubule. PMID:25345761

  15. Adenosine signaling in reserpine-induced depression in rats.

    PubMed

    Minor, Thomas R; Hanff, Thomas C

    2015-06-01

    A single, 6 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection of reserpine increased floating time during forced swim testing 24h after administration in rats in five experiments. Although such behavioral depression traditionally is attributed to drug-induced depletion of brain monoamines, we examined the potential contribution of adenosine signaling, which is plausibly activated by reserpine treatment and contributes to behavioral depression in other paradigms. Whereas peripheral administration of the highly selective A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (0.5, 1.0, or 5.0mg/kg i.p.) 15 min before swim testing failed to improve performance in reserpine-treated rats, swim deficits were completely reversed by 7 mg/kg of the nonselective receptor antagonist caffeine. Performance deficits were also reversed by the nonselective A2 antagonist 3,7-dimethylxanthine (0, 0.5, 1.0mg/kg i.p.), and the highly selective A2A receptor antagonist (CSC: 8-(3 chlorostyral)caffeine) (0.01, 0.1, or 1.0mg/kg i.p.) in a dose-dependent manner. The highly selective A2B antagonist alloxazine had no beneficial effect on swim performance at any dose under study (0.1, 1.0, and 5.0mg/kg i.p.). PMID:25721738

  16. Getting personal: Endogenous adenosine receptor signaling in lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hillger, J M; Diehl, C; van Spronsen, E; Boomsma, D I; Slagboom, P E; Heitman, L H; IJzerman, A P

    2016-09-01

    Genetic differences between individuals that affect drug action form a challenge in drug therapy. Many drugs target G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and a number of receptor variants have been noted to impact drug efficacy. This, however, has never been addressed in a systematic way, and, hence, we studied real-life genetic variation of receptor function in personalized cell lines. As a showcase we studied adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) signaling in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from a family of four from the Netherlands Twin Register (NTR), using a non-invasive label-free cellular assay. The potency of a partial agonist differed significantly for one individual. Genotype comparison revealed differences in two intron SNPs including rs2236624, which has been associated with caffeine-induced sleep disorders. While further validation is needed to confirm genotype-specific effects, this set-up clearly demonstrated that LCLs are a suitable model system to study genetic influences on A2AR response in particular and GPCR responses in general. PMID:27297283

  17. Adenosine to Inosine editing frequency controlled by splicing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Licht, Konstantin; Kapoor, Utkarsh; Mayrhofer, Elisa; Jantsch, Michael F

    2016-07-27

    Alternative splicing and adenosine to inosine (A to I) RNA-editing are major factors leading to co- and post-transcriptional modification of genetic information. Both, A to I editing and splicing occur in the nucleus. As editing sites are frequently defined by exon-intron basepairing, mRNA splicing efficiency should affect editing levels. Moreover, splicing rates affect nuclear retention and will therefore also influence the exposure of pre-mRNAs to the editing-competent nuclear environment. Here, we systematically test the influence of splice rates on RNA-editing using reporter genes but also endogenous substrates. We demonstrate for the first time that the extent of editing is controlled by splicing kinetics when editing is guided by intronic elements. In contrast, editing sites that are exclusively defined by exonic structures are almost unaffected by the splicing efficiency of nearby introns. In addition, we show that editing levels in pre- and mature mRNAs do not match. This phenomenon can in part be explained by the editing state of an RNA influencing its splicing rate but also by the binding of the editing enzyme ADAR that interferes with splicing. PMID:27112566

  18. Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency – More Than Just an Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Kathryn V.; Gaspar, Hubert B.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is best known as a form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) that results from mutations in the gene encoding ADA. Affected patients present with clinical and immunological manifestations typical of a SCID. Therapies are currently available that can target these immunological disturbances and treated patients show varying degrees of clinical improvement. However, there is now a growing body of evidence that deficiency of ADA has significant impact on non-immunological organ systems. This review will outline the impact of ADA deficiency on various organ systems, starting with the well-understood immunological abnormalities. We will discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms and also highlight ways in which current treatments could be improved. In doing so, we aim to present ADA deficiency as more than an immunodeficiency and suggest that it should be recognized as a systemic metabolic disorder that affects multiple organ systems. Only by fully understanding ADA deficiency and its manifestations in all organ systems can we aim to deliver therapies that will correct all the clinical consequences. PMID:27579027

  19. Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency - More Than Just an Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Kathryn V; Gaspar, Hubert B

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is best known as a form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) that results from mutations in the gene encoding ADA. Affected patients present with clinical and immunological manifestations typical of a SCID. Therapies are currently available that can target these immunological disturbances and treated patients show varying degrees of clinical improvement. However, there is now a growing body of evidence that deficiency of ADA has significant impact on non-immunological organ systems. This review will outline the impact of ADA deficiency on various organ systems, starting with the well-understood immunological abnormalities. We will discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms and also highlight ways in which current treatments could be improved. In doing so, we aim to present ADA deficiency as more than an immunodeficiency and suggest that it should be recognized as a systemic metabolic disorder that affects multiple organ systems. Only by fully understanding ADA deficiency and its manifestations in all organ systems can we aim to deliver therapies that will correct all the clinical consequences. PMID:27579027

  20. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition reverses vascular dysfunction after {gamma}-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, Carsten J. . E-mail: Carsten.Beller@urz.uni-heidelberg.de; Radovits, Tamas; Seres, Leila; Kosse, Jens; Krempien, Robert; Gross, Marie-Luise; Penzel, Roland; Berger, Irina; Huber, Peter E.; Hagl, Siegfried; Szabo, Csaba; Szabo, Gabor

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: The generation of reactive oxygen species during {gamma}-irradiation may induce DNA damage, leading to activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) culminating in endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, we assessed the effect of PARP inhibition on changes in vascular function after acute and short-term irradiation. Methods and Materials: In the acute experiments, aortic rings were exposed to 20 Gy of {gamma}-irradiation. The aortae were harvested after 1 or 7 days. Two additional groups received the ultrapotent PARP inhibitor, INO-1001, for 1 or 7 days after irradiation. The aortic rings were precontracted by phenylephrine and relaxation to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were studied. Results: The vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine was significantly lower both acutely and 1 and 7 days after irradiation. Vasorelaxation to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was not impaired acutely after irradiation. One and seven days after irradiation, vasorelaxation to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was significantly enhanced. Treatment with INO-1001 reversed vascular dysfunction after irradiation. Conclusion: Vascular dysfunction was observed 1 and 7 days after irradiation, as evidenced by reduced vasoconstriction, coupled with endothelium-dependent and -independent hyperrelaxation. PARP inhibition restored vascular function and may, therefore, be suitable to reverse vascular dysfunction after irradiation.

  1. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 attenuates the toxicity of carbon tetrachloride

    PubMed Central

    Banasik, Marek; Stedeford, Todd; Strosznajder, Robert P; Takehashi, Masanori; Tanaka, Seigo; Ueda, Kunihiro

    2011-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is routinely used as a model compound for eliciting centrilobular hepatotoxicity. It can be bioactivated to the trichloromethyl radical, which causes extensive lipid peroxidation and ultimately cell death by necrosis. Overactivation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) can rapidly reduce the levels of (β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and adenosine triphosphate and ultimately promote necrosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether inhibition of PARP-1 could decrease CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity, as measured by degree of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), lipid peroxidation,and oxidative DNA damage. For this purpose, male ICR mice were administered intraperitoneally a hepatotoxic dose of CCl4 with or without 6(5H)-phenanthridinone, a potent inhibitor of PARP-1. Animals treated with CCl4 exhibited extensive poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in centrilobular hepatocytes, elevated serum levels of LDH, and increased lipid peroxidation. In contrast, animals treated concomitantly with CCl4 and 6(5H)-phenanthridinone showed significantly lower levels of poly(ADP-ribosyl) ation, serum LDH, and lipid peroxidation. No changes were observed in the levels of oxidative DNA damage regardless of treatment. These results demonstrated that the hepatotoxicity of CCl4is dependent on the overactivation of PARP-1 and that inhibition of this enzyme attenuates the hepatotoxicity of CCl4. PMID:21395487

  2. Posttranslational Regulation of Human DNA Polymerase ι*

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Justyna; McLenigan, Mary P.; Frank, Ekaterina G.; Dai, Xiaoxia; Yang, Wei; Wang, Yinsheng; Woodgate, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Human DNA polymerases (pols) η and ι are Y-family DNA polymerase paralogs that facilitate translesion synthesis past damaged DNA. Both polη and polι can be monoubiquitinated in vivo. Polη has been shown to be ubiquitinated at one primary site. When this site is unavailable, three nearby lysines may become ubiquitinated. In contrast, mass spectrometry analysis of monoubiquitinated polι revealed that it is ubiquitinated at over 27 unique sites. Many of these sites are localized in different functional domains of the protein, including the catalytic polymerase domain, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen-interacting region, the Rev1-interacting region, and its ubiquitin binding motifs UBM1 and UBM2. Polι monoubiquitination remains unchanged after cells are exposed to DNA-damaging agents such as UV light (generating UV photoproducts), ethyl methanesulfonate (generating alkylation damage), mitomycin C (generating interstrand cross-links), or potassium bromate (generating direct oxidative DNA damage). However, when exposed to naphthoquinones, such as menadione and plumbagin, which cause indirect oxidative damage through mitochondrial dysfunction, polι becomes transiently polyubiquitinated via Lys11- and Lys48-linked chains of ubiquitin and subsequently targeted for degradation. Polyubiquitination does not occur as a direct result of the perturbation of the redox cycle as no polyubiquitination was observed after treatment with rotenone or antimycin A, which both inhibit mitochondrial electron transport. Interestingly, polyubiquitination was observed after the inhibition of the lysine acetyltransferase KATB3/p300. We hypothesize that the formation of polyubiquitination chains attached to polι occurs via the interplay between lysine acetylation and ubiquitination of ubiquitin itself at Lys11 and Lys48 rather than oxidative damage per se. PMID:26370087

  3. Adenosine preconditioning attenuates hepatic reperfusion injury in the rat by preventing the down-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Serracino-Inglott, Ferdinand; Virlos, Ioannis T; Habib, Nagy A; Williamson, Robin CN; Mathie, Robert T

    2002-01-01

    Background Previous work has suggested that in the liver, adenosine preconditioning is mediated by nitric oxide. Whether the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase plays a part in this mechanism has however not yet been investigated. Methods Wistar rats were used (6 in each group) – Groups: (1) sham, (2) ischemia-reperfusion, (3) adenosine + ischemia-reperfusion, (4) endothelial isoform inhibitor + adenosine + ischemia-reperfusion. Results Using immunohistochemistry, this study has revealed a decrease in the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase following hepatic ischemia-reperfusion. This was prevented by adenosine pre-treatment. When an inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase was administered prior to adenosine pre-treatment, pre-conditioning did not occur despite normal expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Conclusions These findings suggest that adenosine attenuates hepatic injury by preventing the downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase that occurs during ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:12241560

  4. Inhibition of Nitro-Oxidative Stress Attenuates Pulmonary and Systemic Injury Induced by High-Tidal Volume Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Caro, Leticia; Nin, Nicolás; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Carolina; Ferruelo, Antonio; El Assar, Mariam; de Paula, Marta; Fernández-Segoviano, Pilar; Esteban, Andrés; Lorente, José A

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms contributing to pulmonary and systemic injury induced by high tidal volume (VT) mechanical ventilation are not well known. We tested the hypothesis that increased peroxynitrite formation is involved in organ injury and dysfunction induced by mechanical ventilation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subject to low- (VT, 9 mL/kg; positive end-expiratory pressure, 5 cmH2O) or high- (VT, 25 mL/kg; positive end-expiratory pressure, 0 cmH2O) VT mechanical ventilation for 120 min, and received 1 of 3 treatments: 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB, 10 mg/kg, intravenous, a poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase [PARP] inhibitor), or the metalloporphyrin manganese(III) tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (MnTMPyP, 5 mg/kg intravenous, a peroxynitrite scavenger), or no treatment (control group), 30 min before starting the mechanical ventilation protocol (n = 8 per group, 6 treatment groups). We measured mean arterial pressure, peak inspiratory airway pressure, blood chemistry, and gas exchange. Oxidation (fluorescence for oxidized dihydroethidium), protein nitration (immunofluorescence and Western blot for 3-nitrotyrosine), PARP protein (Western blot) and gene expression of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) isoforms (quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) were measured in lung and vascular tissue. Lung injury was quantified by light microscopy. High-VT mechanical ventilation was associated with hypotension, increased peak inspiratory airway pressure, worsened oxygenation; oxidation and protein nitration in lung and aortic tissue; increased PARP protein in lung; up-regulation of NOS isoforms in lung tissue; signs of diffuse alveolar damage at histological examination. Treatment with 3AB or MnTMPyP attenuated the high-VT mechanical ventilation-induced changes in pulmonary and cardiovascular function; down-regulated the expression of NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3; decreased oxidation and nitration in lung and aortic tissue; and attenuated

  5. Sleep-Wake Sensitive Mechanisms of Adenosine Release in the Basal Forebrain of Rodents: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Robert Edward; Wu, Houdini Ho Tin; Dale, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine acting in the basal forebrain is a key mediator of sleep homeostasis. Extracellular adenosine concentrations increase during wakefulness, especially during prolonged wakefulness and lead to increased sleep pressure and subsequent rebound sleep. The release of endogenous adenosine during the sleep-wake cycle has mainly been studied in vivo with microdialysis techniques. The biochemical changes that accompany sleep-wake status may be preserved in vitro. We have therefore used adenosine-sensitive biosensors in slices of the basal forebrain (BFB) to study both depolarization-evoked adenosine release and the steady state adenosine tone in rats, mice and hamsters. Adenosine release was evoked by high K+, AMPA, NMDA and mGlu receptor agonists, but not by other transmitters associated with wakefulness such as orexin, histamine or neurotensin. Evoked and basal adenosine release in the BFB in vitro exhibited three key features: the magnitude of each varied systematically with the diurnal time at which the animal was sacrificed; sleep deprivation prior to sacrifice greatly increased both evoked adenosine release and the basal tone; and the enhancement of evoked adenosine release and basal tone resulting from sleep deprivation was reversed by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, 1400 W. These data indicate that characteristics of adenosine release recorded in the BFB in vitro reflect those that have been linked in vivo to the homeostatic control of sleep. Our results provide methodologically independent support for a key role for induction of iNOS as a trigger for enhanced adenosine release following sleep deprivation and suggest that this induction may constitute a biochemical memory of this state. PMID:23326515

  6. Enhanced release of adenosine in rat hind paw following spinal nerve ligation: involvement of capsaicin-sensitive sensory afferents.

    PubMed

    Liu, X J; White, T D; Sawynok, J

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of endogenous adenosine levels by inhibition of adenosine metabolism produces a peripheral antinociceptive effect in a neuropathic pain model. The present study used microdialysis to investigate the neuronal mechanisms modulating extracellular adenosine levels in the rat hind paw following tight ligation of the L5 and L6 spinal nerves. Subcutaneous injection of 50 microl saline into the nerve-injured paw induced a rapid and short-lasting increase in extracellular adenosine levels in the subcutaneous tissues of the rat hind paw ipsilateral to the nerve injury. Saline injection did not increase adenosine levels in sham-operated rats or non-treated rats. The adenosine kinase inhibitor 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine and the adenosine deaminase inhibitor 2'-deoxycoformycin, at doses producing a peripheral antinociceptive effect, did not further enhance subcutaneous adenosine levels in the nerve-injured paw. Systemic pretreatment with capsaicin, a neurotoxin selective for small-diameter sensory afferents, markedly reduced the saline-evoked release of adenosine in rat hind paw following spinal nerve ligation. Systemic pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine, a neurotoxin selective for sympathetic afferent nerves, did not affect release. These results suggest that following nerve injury, peripheral capsaicin-sensitive primary sensory afferent nerve terminals are hypersensitive, and are able to release adenosine following a stimulus that does not normally evoke release in sham-operated or intact rats. Sympathetic postganglionic afferents do not appear to be involved in such release. The lack of effect on such release by the inhibitors of adenosine metabolism suggests an altered peripheral adenosine system following spinal nerve ligation. PMID:12204207

  7. Adenosine deaminase regulates Treg expression in autologous T cell-dendritic cell cocultures from patients infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Naval-Macabuhay, Isaac; Casanova, Víctor; Navarro, Gemma; García, Felipe; León, Agathe; Miralles, Laia; Rovira, Cristina; Martinez-Navio, José M; Gallart, Teresa; Mallol, Josefa; Gatell, José M; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; McCormick, Peter J; Climent, Núria

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells have an important role in immune suppression during HIV-1 infection. As regulatory T cells produce the immunomodulatory molecule adenosine, our aim here was to assess the potential of adenosine removal to revert the suppression of anti-HIV responses exerted by regulatory T cells. The experimental setup consisted of ex vivo cocultures of T and dendritic cells, to which adenosine deaminase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes adenosine, was added. In cells from healthy individuals, adenosine hydrolysis decreased CD4(+)CD25(hi) regulatory T cells. Addition of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, an adenosine receptor agonist, significantly decreased CD4(+)CD25(lo) cells, confirming a modulatory role of adenosine acting via adenosine receptors. In autologous cocultures of T cells with HIV-1-pulsed dendritic cells, addition of adenosine deaminase led to a significant decrease of HIV-1-induced CD4(+)CD25(hi) forkhead box p3(+) cells and to a significant enhancement of the HIV-1-specific CD4(+) responder T cells. An increase in the effector response was confirmed by the enhanced production of CD4(+) and CD8(+) CD25(-)CD45RO(+) memory cell generation and secretion of Th1 cytokines, including IFN-γ and IL-15 and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, and RANTES/CCL5. These ex vivo results show, in a physiologically relevant model, that adenosine deaminase is able to enhance HIV-1 effector responses markedly. The possibility to revert regulatory T cell-mediated inhibition of immune responses by use of adenosine deaminase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes adenosine, merits attention for restoring T lymphocyte function in HIV-1 infection. PMID:26310829

  8. Directed evolution of polymerase function by compartmentalized self-replication.

    PubMed

    Ghadessy, F J; Ong, J L; Holliger, P

    2001-04-10

    We describe compartmentalized self-replication (CSR), a strategy for the directed evolution of enzymes, especially polymerases. CSR is based on a simple feedback loop consisting of a polymerase that replicates only its own encoding gene. Compartmentalization serves to isolate individual self-replication reactions from each other. In such a system, adaptive gains directly (and proportionally) translate into genetic amplification of the encoding gene. CSR has applications in the evolution of polymerases with novel and useful properties. By using three cycles of CSR, we obtained variants of Taq DNA polymerase with 11-fold higher thermostability than the wild-type enzyme or with a >130-fold increased resistance to the potent inhibitor heparin. Insertion of an extra stage into the CSR cycle before the polymerase reaction allows its application to enzymes other than polymerases. We show that nucleoside diphosphate kinase and Taq polymerase can form such a cooperative CSR cycle based on reciprocal catalysis, whereby nucleoside diphosphate kinase produces the substrates required for the replication of its own gene. We also find that in CSR the polymerase genes themselves evolve toward more efficient replication. Thus, polymerase genes and their encoded polypeptides cooperate to maximize postselection copy number. CSR should prove useful for the directed evolution of enzymes, particularly DNA or RNA polymerases, as well as for the design and study of in vitro self-replicating systems mimicking prebiotic evolution and viral replication. PMID:11274352

  9. Directed evolution of polymerase function by compartmentalized self-replication

    PubMed Central

    Ghadessy, Farid J.; Ong, Jennifer L.; Holliger, Philipp

    2001-01-01

    We describe compartmentalized self-replication (CSR), a strategy for the directed evolution of enzymes, especially polymerases. CSR is based on a simple feedback loop consisting of a polymerase that replicates only its own encoding gene. Compartmentalization serves to isolate individual self-replication reactions from each other. In such a system, adaptive gains directly (and proportionally) translate into genetic amplification of the encoding gene. CSR has applications in the evolution of polymerases with novel and useful properties. By using three cycles of CSR, we obtained variants of Taq DNA polymerase with 11-fold higher thermostability than the wild-type enzyme or with a >130-fold increased resistance to the potent inhibitor heparin. Insertion of an extra stage into the CSR cycle before the polymerase reaction allows its application to enzymes other than polymerases. We show that nucleoside diphosphate kinase and Taq polymerase can form such a cooperative CSR cycle based on reciprocal catalysis, whereby nucleoside diphosphate kinase produces the substrates required for the replication of its own gene. We also find that in CSR the polymerase genes themselves evolve toward more efficient replication. Thus, polymerase genes and their encoded polypeptides cooperate to maximize postselection copy number. CSR should prove useful for the directed evolution of enzymes, particularly DNA or RNA polymerases, as well as for the design and study of in vitro self-replicating systems mimicking prebiotic evolution and viral replication. PMID:11274352

  10. Surface for Catalysis by Poliovirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Lyle, John M.; Bullitt, Esther

    2013-01-01

    The poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, 3Dpol, replicates the viral genomic RNA on the surface of virus-induced intracellular membranes. Macromolecular assemblies of 3Dpol form linear array of subunits that propagate along a strong protein-protein interaction called interface-I, as was observed in the crystal structure of wild-type poliovirus polymerase. These “filaments” recur with slight modifications in planar sheets and, with additional modifications that accommodate curvature, in helical tubes of the polymerase, by packing filaments together via a second set of interactions. Periodic variations of subunit orientations within 3Dpol tubes give rise to “ghost reflections” in diffraction patterns computed from electron cryomicrographs of helical arrays. The ghost reflections reveal that polymerase tubes are formed by bundles of 4–6 interface-I filaments, which are then connected to the next bundle of filaments with a perturbation of interface interactions between bundles. While enzymatically inactive polymerase is also capable of oligomerization, much thinner tubes are formed that lack interface-I interactions between adjacent subunits, suggesting that long-range allostery produces conformational changes that extend from the active site to the protein-protein interface. Macromolecular assemblies of poliovirus polymerase show repeated use of flexible interface interactions for polymerase lattice formation, suggesting that adaptability of polymerase-polymerase interactions facilitates RNA replication. In addition, the presence of a positively charged groove identified in polymerase arrays may help position and stabilize the RNA template during replication. PMID:23583774

  11. Chronic hypoxia enhances adenosine release in rat PC12 cells by altering adenosine metabolism and membrane transport.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Zimmermann, H; Millhorn, D E

    2000-02-01

    Acute exposure to hypoxia causes a release of adenosine (ADO) that is inversely related to the O2 levels in oxygen-sensitive pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. In the current study, chronic exposure (48 h) of PC12 cells to moderate hypoxia (5% O2) significantly enhanced the release of ADO during severe, acute hypoxia (1% O2). Investigation into the intra- and extracellular mechanisms underpinning the secretion of ADO in PC12 cells chronically exposed to hypoxia revealed changes in gene expression and activities of several key enzymes associated with ADO production and metabolism, as well as the down-regulation of a nucleoside transporter. Decreases in the enzymatic activities of ADO kinase and ADO deaminase accompanied by an increase in those of cytoplasmic and ecto-5'-nucleotidases bring about an increased capacity to produce intra- and extracellular ADO. This increased potential to generate ADO and decreased capacity to metabolize ADO indicate that PC12 cells shift toward an ADO producer phenotype during hypoxia. The reduced function of the rat equilibrative nucleoside transporter rENT1 also plays a role in controlling extracellular ADO levels. The hypoxia-induced alterations in the ADO metabolic enzymes and the rENT1 transporter seem to increase the extracellular concentration of ADO. The biological significance of this regulation is unclear but is likely to be associated with modulating cellular activity during hypoxia. PMID:10646513

  12. Involvement of Peripheral Adenosine A2 Receptors in Adenosine A1 Receptor–Mediated Recovery of Respiratory Motor Function After Upper Cervical Spinal Cord Hemisection

    PubMed Central

    James, Elysia; Nantwi, Kwaku D

    2006-01-01

    Background/Objective: In an animal model of spinal cord injury, a latent respiratory motor pathway can be pharmacologically activated through central adenosine A1 receptor antagonism to restore respiratory function after cervical (C2) spinal cord hemisection that paralyzes the hemidiaphragm ipsilateral to injury. Although respiration is modulated by central and peripheral mechanisms, putative involvement of peripheral adenosine A2 receptors in functional recovery in our model is untested. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of peripherally located adenosine A2 receptors on recovery of respiratory function after cervical (C2) spinal cord hemisection. Methods: Respiratory activity was electrophysiologically assessed (under standardized recording conditions) in C2-hemisected adult rats with the carotid bodies intact (H-CBI; n =12) or excised (H-CBE; n =12). Animals were administered the adenosine A2 receptor agonist, CGS-21680, followed by the A1 receptor antagonist, 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX), or administered DPCPX alone. Recovered respiratory activity, characterized as drug-induced activity in the previously quiescent left phrenic nerve of C2-hemisected animals in H-CBI and H-CBE rats, was compared. Recovered respiratory activity was calculated by dividing drug-induced activity in the left phrenic nerve by activity in the right phrenic nerve. Results: Administration of CGS-21680 before DPCPX (n = 6) in H-CBI rats induced a significantly greater recovery (58.5 ± 3.6%) than when DPCPX (42.6 ± 4.6%) was administered (n = 6) alone. In H-CBE rats, prior administration of CGS-21680 (n = 6) did not enhance recovery over that induced by DPCPX (n = 6) alone. Recovery in H-CBE rats amounted to 39.7 ± 3.7% and 38.4 + 4.2%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results suggest that adenosine A2 receptors located in the carotid bodies can enhance the magnitude of adenosine A1 receptor–mediated recovery of respiratory function after C2 hemisection

  13. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Dessanti, Paola; Zhang, Yang; Allegrini, Simone; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ealick, Steven E.

    2012-03-01

    Adenosine phosphorylase from B. cereus shows a strong preference for adenosine over other 6-oxopurine nucleosides. Mutation of Asp204 to asparagine reduces the efficiency of adenosine cleavage but does not affect inosine cleavage, effectively reversing the substrate specificity. The structures of D204N complexes explain these observations. Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2′-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2′-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2–1.4 Å). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  14. Mechanism of airway hyperresponsiveness to adenosine induced by allergen challenge in actively sensitized Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Hannon, J P; Tigani, B; Williams, I; Mazzoni, L; Fozard, J R

    2001-01-01

    We have explored the role of allergen sensitization and challenge in defining the response of the airways of the Brown Norway (BN) rat to adenosine. In naïve animals or in rats sensitized to ovalbumin (OA) adenosine induced only weak bronchoconstrictor responses. Challenge of sensitized animals with OA induced a marked airway hyperresponsiveness to adenosine which was not seen with methacholine or bradykinin. The augmented bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine was not affected by acute bivagotomy or atropine nor mimicked by an i.v. injection of capsaicin. It was, however, blocked selectively by disodium cromoglycate methysergide or ketanserin and reduced in animals treated sub-chronically with compound 48/80. The augmented response to adenosine was associated with increases in the plasma concentrations of both histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), which were attenuated by pretreatment with disodium cromoglycate, and degranulation of mast cells in the lung. Parenchymal strips from lungs removed from sensitized rats challenged with OA gave augmented bronchoconstrictor responses to adenosine relative to strips from sensitized animals challenged with saline. Responses were inhibited by methysergide and disodium cromoglycate. These data demonstrate a marked augmentation of the bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine in actively sensitized BN rats challenged with OA. The augmented response is primarily a consequence of mast cell activation, leading to the release of 5-HT, which in turn induces bronchoconstriction. Our data further suggest the involvement of a discrete lung-based population of mast cells containing and releasing mainly 5-HT and brought into play by prior exposure to allergen. PMID:11264245

  15. Angina pectoris-like pain provoked by intravenous adenosine in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sylvén, C; Beermann, B; Jonzon, B; Brandt, R

    1986-07-26

    In a study to characterise the chest pain induced by adenosine this agent was given as a bolus into a peripheral vein to six healthy volunteers (five men) aged 30-44. On the first day the maximum tolerable dose was determined in each case. On the second day three doses of adenosine (one third, two thirds, and the full maximum tolerable dose) and three doses of saline were given single blind in randomised order. Thereafter aminophylline 5 mg/kg was given and the procedure repeated in a different randomised order. On the third day between two thirds and the full maximum tolerable dose was given followed by 10 mg dipyridamole intravenously and a second injection of the same dose of adenosine. Heart rate and atrioventricular blocks were recorded by electrocardiography. One minute after each dose of adenosine the chest pain was scored. The maximum tolerable dose of adenosine ranged from 10.6 to 37.1 mg. All subjects experienced uneasy central chest pain provoking anxiety. The pain radiated to the shoulders, ulnar aspect of the arms, epigastric area, back, and into the throat. The pain began about 20 seconds after the injection and lasted 10-15 seconds. Increasing the dose of adenosine increased the intensity of the pain. Administration of aminophylline reduced the pain significantly. Second degree heart block was recorded in five of the six subjects during the time that the pain was experienced. After aminophylline no block was observed. Dipyridamole increased the intensity of pain. The duration of second degree heart block increased in four of the subjects, and in two of these third degree heart block occurred. These findings suggest that adenosine released from the myocardium during ischaemia induces angina pectoris by stimulating theophylline sensitive receptors. PMID:3089465

  16. Inhibition of adenosine kinase attenuates inflammation and neurotoxicity in traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saif; Elsherbiny, Nehal M; Bhatia, Kanchan; Elsherbini, Ahmed M; Fulzele, Sadanand; Liou, Gregory I

    2014-12-15

    Traumatic optic neuropathy (TON) is associated with apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells. Local productions of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators from activated microglial cells have been hypothesized to underlie apoptotic processes. We previously demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effect of adenosine, through A2A receptor activation had profound protective influence against retinal injury in traumatic optic neuropathy. This protective effect is limited due to rapid cellular re-uptake of adenosine by equilibrative nucleotside transporter-1 (ENT1) or break down by adenosine kinase (AK), the key enzyme in adenosine clearance pathway. Further, the use of adenosine receptors agonists are limited by systemic side effects. Therefore, we seek to investigate the potential role of amplifying the endogenous ambient level of adenosine by pharmacological inhibition of AK. We tested our hypothesis by comparing TON-induced retinal injury in mice with and without ABT-702 treatment, a selective AK inhibitor (AKI). The retinal-protective effect of ABT-702 was demonstrated by significant reduction of Iba-1, ENT1, TNF-α, IL-6, and iNOS/nNOS protein or mRNA expression in TON as revealed by western blot and real time PCR. TON-induced superoxide anion generation and nitrotyrosine expression were reduced in ABT-702 treated mice retinal sections as determined by immunoflourescence. In addition, ABT-702 attenuated p-ERK1/2 and p-P38 activation in LPS induced activated mouse microglia cells. The results of the present investigation suggested that ABT-702 had a protective role against marked TON-induced retinal inflammation and damage by augmenting the endogenous therapeutic effects of site- and event-specific accumulation of extracellular adenosine. PMID:25457840

  17. Mitochondrial Disorders of DNA Polymerase γ Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linsheng; Chan, Sherine S. L.; Wolff, Daynna J.

    2011-01-01

    Context Primary mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the most common causes of inherited disorders predominantly involving the neuromuscular system. Advances in the molecular study of mitochondrial DNA have changed our vision and our approach to primary mitochondrial disorders. Many of the mitochondrial disorders are caused by mutations in nuclear genes and are inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. Among the autosomal inherited mitochondrial disorders, those related to DNA polymerase γ dysfunction are the most common and the best studied. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and being familiar with the recent advances in laboratory diagnosis of this group of mitochondrial disorders are essential for pathologists to interpret abnormal histopathology and laboratory results and to suggest further studies for a definitive diagnosis. Objectives To help pathologists better understand the common clinical syndromes originating from mutations in DNA polymerase γ and its associated proteins and use the stepwise approach of clinical, laboratory, and pathologic diagnosis of these syndromes. Data Sources Review of pertinent published literature and relevant Internet databases. Conclusions Mitochondrial disorders are now better recognized with the development of molecular tests for clinical diagnosis. A cooperative effort among primary physicians, diagnostic pathologists, geneticists, and molecular biologists with expertise in mitochondrial disorders is required to reach a definitive diagnosis. PMID:21732785

  18. Solving the RNA polymerase I structural puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Morcillo, María; Taylor, Nicholas M. I.; Gruene, Tim; Legrand, Pierre; Rashid, Umar J.; Ruiz, Federico M.; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Müller, Christoph W.; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    Details of the RNA polymerase I crystal structure determination provide a framework for solution of the structures of other multi-subunit complexes. Simple crystallographic experiments are described to extract relevant biological information such as the location of the enzyme active site. Knowing the structure of multi-subunit complexes is critical to understand basic cellular functions. However, when crystals of these complexes can be obtained they rarely diffract beyond 3 Å resolution, which complicates X-ray structure determination and refinement. The crystal structure of RNA polymerase I, an essential cellular machine that synthesizes the precursor of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus of eukaryotic cells, has recently been solved. Here, the crucial steps that were undertaken to build the atomic model of this multi-subunit enzyme are reported, emphasizing how simple crystallographic experiments can be used to extract relevant biological information. In particular, this report discusses the combination of poor molecular replacement and experimental phases, the application of multi-crystal averaging and the use of anomalous scatterers as sequence markers to guide tracing and to locate the active site. The methods outlined here will likely serve as a reference for future structural determination of large complexes at low resolution.

  19. Ratcheting of RNA polymerase toward structural principles of RNA polymerase operations

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Shun-ichi; Murayama, Yuko; Svetlov, Vladimir; Nudler, Evgeny; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) performs various tasks during transcription by changing its conformational states, which are gradually becoming clarified. A recent study focusing on the conformational transition of RNAP between the ratcheted and tight forms illuminated the structural principles underlying its functional operations. PMID:26226152

  20. Relaxation of isolated taenia coli of guinea-pig by enantiomers of 2-azido analogues of adenosine and adenine nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Cusack, N. J.; Planker, M.

    1979-01-01

    1 2-Azido photoaffinity analogues of adenosine 5'triphosphate (ATP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), and adenosine have been synthesized and tested on guinea-pig taenia coli. 2 2-Azido-ATP and 2-azido-ADP were approximately 20 times more potent than ATP as relaxants of taenia coli, and required prolonged washout times before recovery of the muscle. 3 2-Azido-AMP and 2-azidoadenosine were 2 to 12 times more potent than ATP, but took much longer (up to 100 s) to reach maximal relaxation. This behaviour is different from that of AMP and adenosine which were much less potent than ATP. 4 L-Enantiomers of adenosine and adenine nucleotides were also tested. L-ATP and L-ADP were 3 to 6 times less potent than ATP and ADP, and L-AMP and L-adenosine were inactive. 2-Azido-L-ATP and 2-azido-L-ADP were approximately 120 times less potent than 2-Azido-ATP and 6 times less potent than ATP as relaxants of taenia coli. 2-Azido-L-AMP and 2-azidio-L-adenosine were almost inactive. 5 2-Azido derivatives are photolysed by u.v. irradiation to reactive intermediates. 2-Azido-ATP and 2-azidoadenosine might be suitable photoaffinity ligands for labelling putative P2 and P1 purine receptors respectively. 2-Azido-L-ATP and 2-azido-L-adenosine could be useful controls for nonspecific labelling. PMID:497519

  1. Rapid adenosine release in the nucleus tractus solitarii during defence response in rats: real-time measurement in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Nicholas; Gourine, Alexander V; Llaudet, Enrique; Bulmer, David; Thomas, Teresa; Spyer, K Michael

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the release of adenosine and inosine from the dorsal surface of the brainstem and from within the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) during the defence response evoked by hypothalamic stimulation in the anaesthetised rat. At the surface of the brainstem, only release of inosine was detected on hypothalamic defence area stimulation. This inosine signal was greatly reduced by addition of the ecto-5′-nucleotidase inhibitor α,β-methylene ADP (200 μM), suggesting that the inosine arose from adenosine that was produced in the extracellular space by the prior release of ATP. By placing a microelectrode biosensor into the NTS under stereotaxic control we have recorded release of adenosine within this nucleus. By contrast to the brainstem surface, a fast increase in adenosine, accompanied only by a much smaller change in inosine levels, was seen following stimulation of the hypothalamic defence area. The release of adenosine following hypothalamic stimulation was mainly confined to a narrow region of the NTS some 500 μm in length around the level of the obex. Interestingly the release of adenosine was depletable: when the defence reaction was evoked at short time intervals, much less adenosine was released on the second stimulus. Our novel techniques have given unprecedented real-time measurement and localisation of adenosine release in vivo and demonstrate that adenosine is released at the right time and in sufficient quantities to contribute to the cardiovascular components of the defence reaction. PMID:12356888

  2. Fluorometric Determination of Adenosine Nucleotide Derivatives as Measures of the Microfouling, Detrital, and Sedimentary Microbial Biomass and Physiological Status

    PubMed Central

    Davis, William M.; White, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Adenosine, adenine, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), AMP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were recovered quantitatively from aqueous portions of lipid extracts of microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial communities. These could be detected quantitatively in the picomolar range by forming their 1-N6-etheno derivatives and analyzing by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Lipid extraction and subsequent analysis allowed the simultaneous measurement of the microbial community structure, total microbial biomass with the quantitative recovery of the adenine-containing cellular components, which were protected from enzymatic destruction. This extraction and fluorescent derivatization method showed equivalency with the luciferin-luciferase method for bacterial ATP measurements. Quick-freezing samples in the field with dry ice-acetone preserved the ATP and energy charge (a ratio of adenosine nucleotides) for analysis at remote laboratories. The metabolic lability of ATP in estuarine detrital and microfouling communities, as well as bacterial monocultures of constant biomass, showed ATP to be a precarious measure of biomass under some conditions. Combinations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides gave better correlations with microbial biomass measured as extractable lipid phosphate in the detrital and microfouling microbial communities than did ATP alone. Stresses such as anoxia or filtration are reflected in the rapid accumulation of intracellular adenosine and the excretion of adenosine and AMP into the surrounding milieu. Increases in AMP and adenosine may prove to be more sensitive indicators of metabolic status than the energy charge. PMID:16345633

  3. Fluorometric determination of adenosine nucleotide derivatives as measures of the microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial biomass and physiological status.

    PubMed

    Davis, W M; White, D C

    1980-09-01

    Adenosine, adenine, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), AMP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were recovered quantitatively from aqueous portions of lipid extracts of microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial communities. These could be detected quantitatively in the picomolar range by forming their 1-N-etheno derivatives and analyzing by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Lipid extraction and subsequent analysis allowed the simultaneous measurement of the microbial community structure, total microbial biomass with the quantitative recovery of the adenine-containing cellular components, which were protected from enzymatic destruction. This extraction and fluorescent derivatization method showed equivalency with the luciferin-luciferase method for bacterial ATP measurements. Quick-freezing samples in the field with dry ice-acetone preserved the ATP and energy charge (a ratio of adenosine nucleotides) for analysis at remote laboratories. The metabolic lability of ATP in estuarine detrital and microfouling communities, as well as bacterial monocultures of constant biomass, showed ATP to be a precarious measure of biomass under some conditions. Combinations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides gave better correlations with microbial biomass measured as extractable lipid phosphate in the detrital and microfouling microbial communities than did ATP alone. Stresses such as anoxia or filtration are reflected in the rapid accumulation of intracellular adenosine and the excretion of adenosine and AMP into the surrounding milieu. Increases in AMP and adenosine may prove to be more sensitive indicators of metabolic status than the energy charge. PMID:16345633

  4. Nonresolving Inflammation in gp91phox-/- Mice, a Model of Human Chronic Granulomatous Disease, Has Lower Adenosine and Cyclic Adenosine 5′-Monophoshate

    PubMed Central

    Rajakariar, Ravindra; Newson, Justine; Jackson, Edwin K.; Sawmynaden, Precilla; Smith, Andrew; Rahman, Farooq; Yaqoob, Muhammad M; Gilroy, Derek W

    2009-01-01

    In chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) there is failure to generate reactive oxygen metabolites resulting in recurrent infections and persistent inflammatory events. As responses to sterile stimuli in murine models of CGD also result in non-resolving inflammation, we investigated whether defects in endogenous counter-regulatory mechanisms and/or pro-resolution pathways contribute to the aetiology of CGD. To this end we carried out a series of experiments finding, in the first instance that adenosine and cAMP, which dampen innate immune-mediated responses, show a biphasic profile in resolving peritonitis; peaking at onset, waning as inflammation progresses and rising again at resolution. We also found elevations in adenosine and cAMP in resolving human peritonitis. In gp91phox-/- mice, an experimental model of CGD, levels of adenosine and cAMP were significantly lower at onset and again at resolution. Corroborating the finding of others, we show that adenosine, signalling through its A2A receptor and therefore elevating cAMP is not only anti-inflammatory but, importantly, it does not impair pro-resolution pathways, properties typical of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Conversely, antagonising the A2A receptor worsens acute inflammation and prolongs resolution. Taking this further, activating the A2A receptor in gp91phox-/- mice was dramatically anti-inflammatory regardless of the phase of the inflammatory response A2A agonists were administered i.e. onset or resolution demonstrating wide and robust pharmacological flexibility that is unlikely to subvert pro-resolution pathways. Therefore, we describe the biphasic profile of adenosine and cAMP throughout the time course of acute inflammation that is dysregulated in CGD. PMID:19234224

  5. The primary structure of Plasmodium falciparum DNA polymerase delta is similar to drug sensitive delta-like viral DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Fox, B A; Bzik, D J

    1991-12-01

    We report the isolation and sequencing of genomic DNA clones that encode the 1094-amino acid catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase delta from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Protein sequence comparison to other DNA polymerases revealed the presence of six highly conserved regions found in alpha-like DNA polymerases from different prokaryotic, viral, and eukaryotic sources. Five additional regions of amino acid sequence similarity that are only conserved in delta and delta-like DNA polymerases, so far, were present in P. falciparum DNA polymerase delta. P. falciparum DNA polymerase delta was highly similar to both Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase delta (DNA polymerase III; CDC2) and Epstein-Barr virus DNA polymerase at the amino acid sequence, and the predicted protein secondary structure levels. The gene that encodes DNA polymerase delta resides as a single copy on chromosome 10, and is expressed as a 4.5-kb mRNA during the trophozoite and schizont stages when parasite chromosomal DNA synthesis is active. PMID:1775172

  6. Adenosine triphosphate inhibits melatonin synthesis in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Souza-Teodoro, Luis Henrique; Dargenio-Garcia, Letícia; Petrilli-Lapa, Camila Lopes; Souza, Ewerton da Silva; Fernandes, Pedro A C M; Markus, Regina P; Ferreira, Zulma S

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is released onto the pinealocyte, along with noradrenaline, from sympathetic neurons and triggers P2Y1 receptors that enhance β-adrenergic-induced N-acetylserotonin (NAS) synthesis. Nevertheless, the biotransformation of NAS into melatonin, which occurs due to the subsequent methylation by acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT; EC 2.1.1.4), has not yet been evaluated in the presence of purinergic stimulation. We therefore evaluated the effects of purinergic signaling on melatonin synthesis induced by β-adrenergic stimulation. ATP increased NAS levels, but, surprisingly, inhibited melatonin synthesis in an inverse, concentration-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that enhanced NAS levels, which depend on phospholipase C (PLC) activity (but not the induction of gene transcription), are a post-translational effect. By contrast, melatonin reduction is related to an ASMT inhibition of expression at both the gene transcription and protein levels. These results were independent of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) translocation. Neither the P2Y1 receptor activation nor the PLC-mediated pathway was involved in the decrease in melatonin, indicating that ATP regulates pineal metabolism through different mechanisms. Taken together, our data demonstrate that purinergic signaling differentially modulates NAS and melatonin synthesis and point to a regulatory role for ATP as a cotransmitter in the control of ASMT, the rate-limiting enzyme in melatonin synthesis. The endogenous production of melatonin regulates defense responses; therefore, understanding the mechanisms involving ASMT regulation might provide novel insights into the development and progression of neurological disorders since melatonin presents anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and neurogenic effects. PMID:26732366

  7. Equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling on the human adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Dijksteel, Gabrielle S; van Duijl, Tirsa; Heezen, Maxime; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-04-01

    Classical evaluation of target selectivity is usually undertaken by measuring the binding affinity of lead compounds against a number of potential targets under equilibrium conditions, without considering the kinetics of the ligand-receptor interaction. In the present study we propose a combined strategy including both equilibrium- and kinetics-based selectivity profiling. The adenosine receptor (AR) was chosen as a prototypical drug target. Six in-house AR antagonists were evaluated in a radioligand displacement assay for their affinity and in a competition association assay for their binding kinetics on three AR subtypes. One of the compounds with a promising kinetic selectivity profile was also examined in a [(35)S]-GTPγS binding assay for functional activity. We found that XAC and LUF5964 were kinetically more selective for the A1R and A3R, respectively, although they are non-selective in terms of their affinity. In comparison, LUF5967 displayed a strong equilibrium-based selectivity for the A1R over the A2AR, yet its kinetic selectivity thereon was less pronounced. In a GTPγS assay, LUF5964 exhibited insurmountable antagonism on the A3R while having a surmountable effect on the A1R, consistent with its kinetic selectivity profile. This study provides evidence that equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling can both be important in the early phases of the drug discovery process. Our proposed combinational strategy could be considered for future medicinal chemistry efforts and aid the design and discovery of different or even better leads for clinical applications. PMID:26930564

  8. Cerebral adenosine A₁ receptors are upregulated in rodent encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Paul, Soumen; Khanapur, Shivashankar; Boersma, Wytske; Sijbesma, Jurgen W; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Elsinga, Philip H; Meerlo, Peter; Doorduin, Janine; Dierckx, Rudi A; van Waarde, Aren

    2014-05-15

    Adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) are implied in the modulation of neuroinflammation. Activation of cerebral A1Rs acts as a brake on the microglial response after traumatic brain injury and has neuroprotective properties in animal models of Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis. Neuroinflammatory processes in turn may affect the expression of A1Rs, but the available data is limited and inconsistent. Here, we applied an animal model of encephalitis to assess how neuroinflammation affects the expression of A1Rs. Two groups of animals were studied: Infected rats (n=7) were intranasally inoculated with herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1, 1 × 10(7) plaque forming units), sham-infected rats (n=6) received only phosphate-buffered saline. Six or seven days later, microPET scans (60 min with arterial blood sampling) were made using the tracer 8-dicyclopropyl-1-(11)C-methyl-3-propyl-xanthine ((11)C-MPDX). Tracer clearance from plasma and partition coefficient (K₁/k₂ estimated from a 2-tissue compartment model fit) were not significantly altered after virus infection. PET tracer distribution volume calculated from a Logan plot was significantly increased in the hippocampus (+37%) and medulla (+27%) of virus infected rats. Tracer binding potential (k₃/k₄ estimated from the model fit) was significantly increased in the cerebellum (+87%) and the medulla (+148%) which may indicate increased A1R expression. This was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis showing a strong increase of A1R immunoreactivity in the cerebellum of HSV-1-infected rats. Both the quantitative PET data and immunohistochemical analysis indicate that A1Rs are upregulated in brain areas where active virus is present. PMID:24513151

  9. Adenosine 2A receptors modulate reward behaviours for methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Chesworth, Rose; Brown, Robyn M; Kim, Jee Hyun; Ledent, Catherine; Lawrence, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    Addiction to methamphetamine (METH) is a global health problem for which there are no approved pharmacotherapies. The adenosine 2A (A2 A ) receptor presents a potential therapeutic target for METH abuse due to its modulatory effects on striatal dopamine and glutamate transmission. Notably, A2 A receptor signalling has been implicated in the rewarding effects of alcohol, cocaine and opiates; yet, the role of this receptor in METH consumption and seeking is essentially unknown. Therefore, the current study used A2 A knockout (KO) mice to assess the role of A2 A in behaviours relevant to METH addiction. METH conditioned place preference was absent in A2 A KO mice compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. Repeated METH treatment produced locomotor sensitization in both genotypes; however, sensitization was attenuated in A2 A KO mice in a dose-related manner. METH intravenous self-administration was intact in A2 A KO mice over a range of doses and schedules of reinforcement. However, the motivation to self-administer was reduced in A2 A KO mice. Regression analysis further supported the observation that the motivation to self-administer METH was reduced in A2 A KO mice even when self-administration was similar to WT mice. Sucrose self-administration was also reduced in A2 A KO mice but only at higher schedules of reinforcement. Collectively, these data suggest that A2 A signalling is critically required to integrate rewarding and motivational properties of both METH and natural rewards. PMID:25612195

  10. Behavior and stability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during chlorine disinfection.

    PubMed

    Nescerecka, Alina; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis is a cultivation-independent alternative method for the determination of bacterial viability in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated water. Here we investigated the behavior and stability of ATP during chlorination in detail. Different sodium hypochlorite doses (0-22.4 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure) were applied to an Escherichia coli pure culture suspended in filtered river water. We observed decreasing intracellular ATP with increasing chlorine concentrations, but extracellular ATP concentrations only increased when the chlorine dose exceeded 0.35 mg L(-1). The release of ATP from chlorine-damaged bacteria coincided with severe membrane damage detected with flow cytometry (FCM). The stability of extracellular ATP was subsequently studied in different water matrixes, and we found that extracellular ATP was stable in sterile deionized water and also in chlorinated water until extremely high chlorine doses (≤11.2 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure). In contrast, ATP decreased relatively slowly (k = 0.145 h(-1)) in 0.1 μm filtered river water, presumably due to degradation by either extracellular enzymes or the fraction of bacteria that were able to pass through the filter. Extracellular ATP decreased considerably faster (k = 0.368 h(-1)) during batch growth of a river water bacterial community. A series of growth potential tests showed that extracellular ATP molecules were utilized as a phosphorus source during bacteria proliferation. From the combined data we conclude that ATP released from bacteria at high chlorine doses could promote bacteria regrowth, contributing to biological instability in drinking water distribution systems. PMID:27295623

  11. Autoimmune Dysregulation and Purine Metabolism in Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Aisha Vanessa; Brigida, Immacolata; Carriglio, Nicola; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Genetic defects in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene are among the most common causes for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). ADA-SCID patients suffer from lymphopenia, severely impaired cellular and humoral immunity, failure to thrive, and recurrent infections. Currently available therapeutic options for this otherwise fatal disorder include bone marrow transplantation (BMT), enzyme replacement therapy with bovine ADA (PEG-ADA), or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy (HSC-GT). Although varying degrees of immune reconstitution can be achieved by these treatments, breakdown of tolerance is a major concern in ADA-SCID. Immune dysregulation such as autoimmune hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, hemolytic anemia, and immune thrombocytopenia are frequently observed in milder forms of the disease. However, several reports document similar complications also in patients on long-term PEG-ADA and after BMT or GT treatment. A skewed repertoire and decreased immune functions have been implicated in autoimmunity observed in certain B-cell and/or T-cell immunodeficiencies, but it remains unclear to what extent specific mechanisms of tolerance are affected in ADA deficiency. Herein we provide an overview about ADA-SCID and the autoimmune manifestations reported in these patients before and after treatment. We also assess the value of the ADA-deficient mouse model as a useful tool to study both immune and metabolic disease mechanisms. With focus on regulatory T- and B-cells we discuss the lymphocyte subpopulations particularly prone to contribute to the loss of self-tolerance and onset of autoimmunity in ADA deficiency. Moreover we address which aspects of immune dysregulation are specifically related to alterations in purine metabolism caused by the lack of ADA and the subsequent accumulation of metabolites with immunomodulatory properties. PMID:22969765

  12. Guanine-rich sequences inhibit proofreading DNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Jing; Sun, Shuhui; Xie, Binghua; Hu, Xuemei; Zhang, Zunyi; Qiu, Mengsheng; Dai, Zhong-Min

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerases with proofreading activity are important for accurate amplification of target DNA. Despite numerous efforts have been made to improve the proofreading DNA polymerases, they are more susceptible to be failed in PCR than non-proofreading DNA polymerases. Here we showed that proofreading DNA polymerases can be inhibited by certain primers. Further analysis showed that G-rich sequences such as GGGGG and GGGGHGG can cause PCR failure using proofreading DNA polymerases but not Taq DNA polymerase. The inhibitory effect of these G-rich sequences is caused by G-quadruplex and is dose dependent. G-rich inhibitory sequence-containing primers can be used in PCR at a lower concentration to amplify its target DNA fragment. PMID:27349576

  13. The Closing Mechanism of DNA Polymerase I at Atomic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bill R; Beese, Lorena S; Parish, Carol A; Wu, Eugene Y

    2015-09-01

    DNA polymerases must quickly and accurately distinguish between similar nucleic acids to form Watson-Crick base pairs and avoid DNA replication errors. Deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) binding to the DNA polymerase active site induces a large conformational change that is difficult to characterize experimentally on an atomic level. Here, we report an X-ray crystal structure of DNA polymerase I bound to DNA in the open conformation with a dNTP present in the active site. We use this structure to computationally simulate the open to closed transition of DNA polymerase in the presence of a Watson-Crick base pair. Our microsecond simulations allowed us to characterize the key steps involved in active site assembly, and propose the sequence of events involved in the prechemistry steps of DNA polymerase catalysis. They also reveal new features of the polymerase mechanism, such as a conserved histidine as a potential proton acceptor from the primer 3'-hydroxyl. PMID:26211612

  14. Adenosine and the adenosine A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, upregulate CD39 and CD73 expression through E2F-1 and CREB in regulatory T cells isolated from septic mice.

    PubMed

    Bao, Rui; Shui, Xianqi; Hou, Jiong; Li, Jinbao; Deng, Xiaoming; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Tao

    2016-09-01

    The number of regulatory T cells (Treg cells) and the expression of ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 (ENTPD1; also known as CD39) and 5'-ectonucleotidase (NT5E; also known as CD73) on the Treg cell surface are increased during sepsis. In this study, to determine the factors leading to the high expression of CD39 and CD73, and the regulation of the CD39/CD73/adenosine pathway in Treg cells under septic conditions, we constructed a mouse model of sepsis and separated the Treg cells using a flow cytometer. The Treg cells isolated from the peritoneal lavage and splenocytes of the mice were treated with adenosine or the specific adenosine A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, and were transfected with specific siRNA targeting E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F-1) or cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB), which are predicted transcription regulatory factors of CD39 or CD73. The regulatory relationships among these factors were then determined by western blot analysis and dual-luciferase reporter assay. In addition, changes in adenosine metabolism were measured in the treated cells. The results revealed that adenosine and CGS21680 significantly upregulated CD39 and CD73 expression (P<0.01). E2F-1 and CREB induced CD39 and CD73 expression, and were upregulated by adenosine and CGS21680. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis and adenosine generation were inhibited by the knockdown of E2F-1 or CREB, and were accelerated in the presence of CGS21680. Based on these results, it can be inferred that adenosine, the adenosine A2A receptor agonist, E2F-1 and CREB are the possible factors contributing to the high expression of CD39 and CD73 on the Treg cell surface during sepsis. Adenosine and its A2A receptor agonist served as the signal transducer factors of the CD39/CD73/adenosine pathway, accelerating adenosine generation. Our study may benefit further research on adenosine metabolism for the treatment of sepsis

  15. Structural basis for the activation of the C. elegans noncanonical cytoplasmic poly(A)-polymerase GLD-2 by GLD-3

    PubMed Central

    Nakel, Katharina; Bonneau, Fabien; Eckmann, Christian R.; Conti, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans germ-line development defective (GLD)-2–GLD-3 complex up-regulates the expression of genes required for meiotic progression. GLD-2–GLD-3 acts by extending the short poly(A) tail of germ-line–specific mRNAs, switching them from a dormant state into a translationally active state. GLD-2 is a cytoplasmic noncanonical poly(A) polymerase that lacks the RNA-binding domain typical of the canonical nuclear poly(A)-polymerase Pap1. The activity of C. elegans GLD-2 in vivo and in vitro depends on its association with the multi-K homology (KH) domain-containing protein, GLD-3, a homolog of Bicaudal-C. We have identified a minimal polyadenylation complex that includes the conserved nucleotidyl-transferase core of GLD-2 and the N-terminal domain of GLD-3, and determined its structure at 2.3-Å resolution. The structure shows that the N-terminal domain of GLD-3 does not fold into the predicted KH domain but wraps around the catalytic domain of GLD-2. The picture that emerges from the structural and biochemical data are that GLD-3 activates GLD-2 both indirectly by stabilizing the enzyme and directly by contributing positively charged residues near the RNA-binding cleft. The RNA-binding cleft of GLD-2 has distinct structural features compared with the poly(A)-polymerases Pap1 and Trf4. Consistently, GLD-2 has distinct biochemical properties: It displays unusual specificity in vitro for single-stranded RNAs with at least one adenosine at the 3′ end. GLD-2 thus appears to have evolved specialized nucleotidyl-transferase properties that match the 3′ end features of dormant cytoplasmic mRNAs. PMID:26124149

  16. Nucleotide binding interactions modulate dNTP selectivity and facilitate 8-oxo-dGTP incorporation by DNA polymerase lambda

    PubMed Central

    Burak, Matthew J.; Guja, Kip E.; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    8-Oxo-7,8,-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine triphosphate (8-oxo-dGTP) is a major product of oxidative damage in the nucleotide pool. It is capable of mispairing with adenosine (dA), resulting in futile, mutagenic cycles of base excision repair. Therefore, it is critical that DNA polymerases discriminate against 8-oxo-dGTP at the insertion step. Because of its roles in oxidative DNA damage repair and non-homologous end joining, DNA polymerase lambda (Pol λ) may frequently encounter 8-oxo-dGTP. Here, we have studied the mechanisms of 8-oxo-dGMP incorporation and discrimination by Pol λ. We have solved high resolution crystal structures showing how Pol λ accommodates 8-oxo-dGTP in its active site. The structures indicate that when mispaired with dA, the oxidized nucleotide assumes the mutagenic syn-conformation, and is stabilized by multiple interactions. Steady-state kinetics reveal that two residues lining the dNTP binding pocket, Ala510 and Asn513, play differential roles in dNTP selectivity. Specifically, Ala510 and Asn513 facilitate incorporation of 8-oxo-dGMP opposite dA and dC, respectively. These residues also modulate the balance between purine and pyrimidine incorporation. Our results shed light on the mechanisms controlling 8-oxo-dGMP incorporation in Pol λ and on the importance of interactions with the incoming dNTP to determine selectivity in family X DNA polymerases. PMID:26220180

  17. A 30-year-old female Behçet’s disease patient with recurrent pleural and pericardial effusion and elevated adenosine deaminase levels: case report

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Kwok, Seung-Ki; Jung, Jung Im; Lee, Kyo-Young; Kim, Tae-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Behçet’s disease is a systemic disease which may involve various organs. We describe a case of a patient diagnosed as pleuropericardial involvement of Behçet’s disease. A 30-year-old woman visited our clinic presented with left pleuritic chest pain for s days. She had been diagnosed as Behçet’s disease and admitted to our clinic due to pericardial and pleural effusion repeatedly in past two years. In the previous studies, effusion analysis revealed to be lympho-dominant exudate with high adenosine deaminase level. Acid-fast bacilli (AFB) culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for mycobacterial tuberculosis (M.TB) were negative in the pericardial tissue, and pathologic finding showed mild endothelitis with micro-thrombi formation in the lumen. The patient had been treated with antituberculous medication for a year. In the current admission, chest computed tomography (CT) again showed left pleural effusion without other significant lesion. Pleural fluid analysis was similar with the previous study. Video-assisted thoracoscopic pleural biopsy was performed to obtain the definite diagnosis. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis as pleuropericardial involvement of Behçet’s disease, and we treated the patient with oral steroid in the out-patient department. Pleuropericardial involvement of Behçet’s disease may mimic TB pleurisy or pericarditis due to high adenosine deaminase (ADA) level in effusion analysis. Clinicians should keep in mind that Behçet’s disease may manifest as pleural or pericardial effusion, and pathologic confirmation could be helpful for the definite diagnosis. PMID:27499994

  18. Adenosine stimulates DNA fragmentation in human thymocytes by Ca(2+)-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Szondy, Z

    1994-12-15

    Incubation of human thymocytes with an optimum concentration of adenosine and its receptor site agonist, 2-chloroadenosine, induced increases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) (from a resting 0.6 +/- 0.1 to 4.1 +/- 0.2 pmol/10(7) cells within 5 min) and Ca2+ (from the resting 85 +/- 7 nM to a peak of 210 +/- 25 nM) levels and resulted in internucleosomal DNA fragmentation and cell death (apoptosis). Other adenosine analogues were also effective at inducing DNA fragmentation, the order of potency being 2-p-(carboxyethylphenylethylamino)-5'-carboxyamidoadenosine < 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamide)adenosine < or = cyclopentyladenosine < 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA). 2-CA treatment (with an optimum concentration of 40 microM) selectively depleted a thymocyte subpopulation (15-20% of the total cells) which expressed higher levels of the CD3 molecule and which was found mainly in the CD4+CD8+ double positive immature thymocyte population. DNA fragmentation was prevented by the addition of actinomycin D or cycloheximide to the thymocyte suspension, indicating that this process required both mRNA and protein synthesis. Endonuclease activation and cell killing were dependent on an early, sustained increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, most of which was of extracellular origin and was a result of an adenosine-induced inositol trisphosphate release. Other agents known to elevate intracellular cAMP levels by different mechanisms failed to induce similar DNA fragmentation, but enhanced the effect of adenosine. This suggested a supporting role for cAMP in adenosine-induced DNA fragmentation. Phorbol dibutyrate, a protein kinase. C activator, previously shown to inhibit Ca(2+)-dependent DNA fragmentation and cell killing in human thymocytes [McConkey, Hartzell, Jondal and Orrenius (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 13399-13402], at 60 ng/ml concentration also prevented adenosine-induced DNA fragmentation when added prior to adenosine. This suggested a complex cross-talk between the adenosine

  19. Astrocyte-derived adenosine is central to the hypnogenic effect of glucose.

    PubMed

    Scharbarg, Emeric; Daenens, Marion; Lemaître, Frédéric; Geoffroy, Hélène; Guille-Collignon, Manon; Gallopin, Thierry; Rancillac, Armelle

    2016-01-01

    Sleep has been hypothesised to maintain a close relationship with metabolism. Here we focus on the brain structure that triggers slow-wave sleep, the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO), to explore the cellular and molecular signalling pathways recruited by an increase in glucose concentration. We used infrared videomicroscopy on ex vivo brain slices to establish that glucose induces vasodilations specifically in the VLPO via the astrocytic release of adenosine. Real-time detection by in situ purine biosensors further revealed that the adenosine level doubles in response to glucose, and triples during the wakefulness period. Finally, patch-clamp recordings uncovered the depolarizing effect of adenosine and its A2A receptor agonist, CGS-21680, on sleep-promoting VLPO neurons. Altogether, our results provide new insights into the metabolically driven release of adenosine. We hypothesise that adenosine adjusts the local energy supply to local neuronal activity in response to glucose. This pathway could contribute to sleep-wake transition and sleep intensity. PMID:26755200

  20. Neurochemical measurement of adenosine in discrete brain regions of five strains of inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Pani, Amar K; Jiao, Yun; Sample, Kenneth J; Smeyne, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine (ADO), a non-classical neurotransmitter and neuromodulator, and its metabolites adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), have been shown to play an important role in a number of biochemical processes. Although their signaling is well described, it has been difficult to directly, accurately and simultaneously quantitate these purines in tissue or fluids. Here, we describe a novel method for measuring adenosine (ADO) and its metabolites using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Using this chromatographic technique, we examined baseline levels of ADO and ATP, ADP and AMP in 6 different brain regions of the C57BL/6J mouse: stratum, cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, substantia nigra and cerebellum and compared ADO levels in 5 different strains of mice (C57BL/6J, Swiss-Webster, FVB/NJ, 129P/J, and BALB/c). These studies demonstrate that baseline levels of purines vary significantly among the brain regions as well as between different mouse strains. These dissimilarities in purine concentrations may explain the variable phenotypes among background strains described in neurological disease models. PMID:24642754

  1. Extracellular Adenosine Production by ecto-5'-Nucleotidase (CD73) Enhances Radiation-Induced Lung Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wirsdörfer, Florian; de Leve, Simone; Cappuccini, Federica; Eldh, Therese; Meyer, Alina V; Gau, Eva; Thompson, Linda F; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Fischer, Ute; Kasper, Michael; Klein, Diana; Ritchey, Jerry W; Blackburn, Michael R; Westendorf, Astrid M; Stuschke, Martin; Jendrossek, Verena

    2016-05-15

    Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis is a severe side effect of thoracic irradiation, but its pathogenesis remains poorly understood and no effective treatment is available. In this study, we investigated the role of the extracellular adenosine as generated by the ecto-5'-nucleotidase CD73 in fibrosis development after thoracic irradiation. Exposure of wild-type C57BL/6 mice to a single dose (15 Gray) of whole thorax irradiation triggered a progressive increase in CD73 activity in the lung between 3 and 30 weeks postirradiation. In parallel, adenosine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were increased by approximately 3-fold. Histologic evidence of lung fibrosis was observed by 25 weeks after irradiation. Conversely, CD73-deficient mice failed to accumulate adenosine in BALF and exhibited significantly less radiation-induced lung fibrosis (P < 0.010). Furthermore, treatment of wild-type mice with pegylated adenosine deaminase or CD73 antibodies also significantly reduced radiation-induced lung fibrosis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CD73 potentiates radiation-induced lung fibrosis, suggesting that existing pharmacologic strategies for modulating adenosine may be effective in limiting lung toxicities associated with the treatment of thoracic malignancies. Cancer Res; 76(10); 3045-56. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26921334

  2. Modulation of GABA-augmented norepinephrine release in female rat brain slices by opioids and adenosine.

    PubMed

    Fiber, J M; Etgen, A M

    2001-07-01

    GABAA receptor activation augments electrically-stimulated release of norepinephrine (NE) from rat brain slices. Because this effect is not observed in synaptoneurosomes, GABA probably acts on inhibitory interneurons to disinhibit NE release. To determine whether opioids or adenosine influence GABA-augmented NE release, hypothalamic and cortical slices from female rats were superfused with GABA or vehicle in the presence and absence of 10 microM morphine or 100 microM adenosine. GABA augments [3H]NE release in the cortex and hypothalamus. Morphine alone has no effect on [3H]NE release, but attenuates GABA augmentation of [3H]NE release in both brain regions. Adenosine alone modestly inhibits [3H]NE release in the cortex, but not in the hypothalamus. Adenosine inhibits GABA-augmented [3H]NE release in both brain regions. The general protein kinase inhibitor H-7, augments [3H]NE release in both brain regions and may have additive effects with GABA in cortical slices. These results implicate opioid and adenosine interneurons and possibly protein kinases in regulating GABAergic influences on NE transmission. PMID:11565619

  3. Squalenoyl Adenosine Nanoparticles provide Neuroprotection after Stroke and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Alice; Yemisci, Müge; Eroglu, Hakan; Lepêtre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Turkoglu, Omer Faruk; Dönmez-Demir, Buket; Caban, Seçil; Fevzi Sargon, Mustafa; Garcia-Argote, Sébastien; Pieters, Grégory; Loreau, Olivier; Rousseau, Bernard; Tagit, Oya; Hildebrandt, Niko; Le Dantec, Yannick; Mougin, Julie; Valetti, Sabrina; Chacun, Hélène; Nicolas, Valérie; Desmaële, Didier; Andrieux, Karine; Capan, Yilmaz; Dalkara, Turgay; Couvreur, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of severe neurological trauma, such as stroke and spinal cord injuries. However, many drugs with potential neuropharmacological activity, like adenosine, are inefficient upon systemic administration because of their fast metabolisation and rapid clearance from the bloodstream. Here, we show that the conjugation of adenosine to the lipid squalene and the subsequent formation of nanoassemblies allow a prolonged circulation of this nucleoside, to provide neuroprotection in mouse stroke and rat spinal cord injury models. The animals receiving systemic administration of squalenoyl adenosine nanoassemblies showed a significant improvement of their neurologic deficit score in the case of cerebral ischaemia, and an early motor recovery of the hindlimbs in the case of spinal cord injury. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that the nanoassemblies were able to extend adenosine circulation and its interaction with the neurovascular unit. This paper shows, for the first time, that a hydrophilic and rapidly metabolised molecule like adenosine may become pharmacologically efficient owing to a single conjugation with the lipid squalene. PMID:25420034

  4. The Effect of Endogenous Adenosine on Neuronal Activity in Rats: An FDG PET Study.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Fiona E; Paul, Soumen; Zhang, Dali; Mzengeza, Shadreck; Ko, Ji Hyun

    2016-07-01

    2-(18) F-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is a glucose analog that is taken up by cells and phosphorylated. The amount of FDG accumulated by cells is a measure of the rate of glycolysis, which reflects cellular activity. As the levels and actions of the neuromodulator adenosine are dynamically regulated by neuronal activity, this study was designed to test whether endogenous adenosine affects tissue accumulation of FDG as assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) or by postmortem analysis of tissue radioactivity. Rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropyl-xanthine (DPCPX, 3 mg/kg), the adenosine kinase inhibitor ABT-702 (3 mg/kg), or vehicle 10 minutes prior to an intravenous injection of FDG (15.4 ± 0.7 MBq per rat). Rats were then subjected to a 15 minute static PET scan. Reconstructed images were normalized to FDG PET template for rats and standard uptake values (SUVs) were calculated. To examine the regional effect of active treatment compared to vehicle, statistical parametric mapping analysis was performed. Whole-brain FDG uptake was not affected by drug treatment. Significant regional hypometabolism was detected, particularly in cerebellum, of DPCPX- and ABT-702 treated rats, relative to vehicle-treated rats. Thus, endogenous adenosine can affect FDG accumulation although this effect is modest in quiescent rats. PMID:27082948

  5. Astrocyte-derived adenosine is central to the hypnogenic effect of glucose

    PubMed Central

    Scharbarg, Emeric; Daenens, Marion; Lemaître, Frédéric; Geoffroy, Hélène; Guille-Collignon, Manon; Gallopin, Thierry; Rancillac, Armelle

    2016-01-01

    Sleep has been hypothesised to maintain a close relationship with metabolism. Here we focus on the brain structure that triggers slow-wave sleep, the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO), to explore the cellular and molecular signalling pathways recruited by an increase in glucose concentration. We used infrared videomicroscopy on ex vivo brain slices to establish that glucose induces vasodilations specifically in the VLPO via the astrocytic release of adenosine. Real-time detection by in situ purine biosensors further revealed that the adenosine level doubles in response to glucose, and triples during the wakefulness period. Finally, patch-clamp recordings uncovered the depolarizing effect of adenosine and its A2A receptor agonist, CGS-21680, on sleep-promoting VLPO neurons. Altogether, our results provide new insights into the metabolically driven release of adenosine. We hypothesise that adenosine adjusts the local energy supply to local neuronal activity in response to glucose. This pathway could contribute to sleep-wake transition and sleep intensity. PMID:26755200

  6. Cloning of cDNAs encoding mammalian double-stranded RNA-specific adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, M A; Krause, S; Higuchi, M; Hsuan, J J; Totty, N F; Jenny, A; Keller, W

    1995-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-specific adenosine deaminase converts adenosine to inosine in dsRNA. The protein has been purified from calf thymus, and here we describe the cloning of cDNAs encoding both the human and rat proteins as well as a partial bovine clone. The human and rat clones are very similar at the amino acid level except at their N termini and contain three dsRNA binding motifs, a putative nuclear targeting signal, and a possible deaminase motif. Antibodies raised against the protein encoded by the partial bovine clone specifically recognize the calf thymus dsRNA adenosine deaminase. Furthermore, the antibodies can immunodeplete a calf thymus extract of dsRNA adenosine deaminase activity, and the activity can be restored by addition of pure bovine deaminase. Staining of HeLa cells confirms the nuclear localization of the dsRNA-specific adenosine deaminase. In situ hybridization in rat brain slices indicates a widespread distribution of the enzyme in the brain. PMID:7862132

  7. Phosphorylation potential and adenosine release during norepinephrine infusion in guinea pig heart

    SciTech Connect

    He, Miao-Xiang; Wangler, R.D.; Dillon, P.F.; Romig, G.D.; Sparks, H.V. )

    1987-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that adenosine released from isolated guinea pig hearts in response to norepinephrine is related to the cellular phosphorylation potential (PP;(ATP)/(ADP)(P{sub i})), where P{sub i} is inorganic phosphate. {sup 31}P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to measure the relative concentrations of P{sub i}, phosphocreatine (PCr), and ATP. After a control period, norepinephrine was infused for 20 min during which {sup 31}P-NMR spectra and samples of venous effluent were collected every minute. With norepinephrine infusion, PCr decreased rapidly to 72% of control by 8 min and then recovered to 80% of control for the remaining 12 min. ATP fell slowly to 70% of control over 20 min. P{sub i} increased to a peak at 2 min, then declined slowly to a steady state from 8 to 20 min. Adenosine release increased at 7 min and then slowly fell to a steady state from 10 to 20 min. There is hyperbolic relationship between adenosine release and PP; when the PP declines, a level is reached below which there is a rapid increase in adenosine release. These data support the hypothesis that adenosine release is regulated by the cellular PP as a closely related variable.

  8. Adenosine receptor antagonists inhibit the development of morphine sensitization in the C57BL/6 mouse.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, S P; Kaplan, G B

    1999-04-01

    We examined the effects of adenosine antagonists on the development of morphine sensitization in C57BL/6 mice. Adenosine antagonists or vehicle were repeatedly co-administered intraperitoneally with morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c.) to mice once every other day for 9 days. Two days later, a 10 mg/kg morphine-only challenge was administered to each group. Consistent with sensitization, mice receiving morphine alone developed enhanced ambulatory activity responses to subsequent morphine administrations and, upon morphine-only challenge, had a significantly greater response to morphine than vehicle pretreated animals. The nonselective adenosine antagonist, caffeine, at 10 and 20 mg/kg but not at 5 mg/kg, attenuated the development of sensitization during co-administration with morphine and also following morphine-only challenge. The adenosine A1 selective antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-(2-amino-4-chlorophenyl)-xanthine (PACPX), at 0.001 and 0.002 mg/kg but not at 0.2 mg/kg, similarly attenuated the development of morphine sensitization. We propose a mechanism which involves an adenosine receptor role in the mesolimbic dopamine system. PMID:10320021

  9. Squalenoyl adenosine nanoparticles provide neuroprotection after stroke and spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, Alice; Yemisci, Müge; Eroglu, Hakan; Lepetre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Turkoglu, Omer Faruk; Dönmez-Demir, Buket; Caban, Seçil; Sargon, Mustafa Fevzi; Garcia-Argote, Sébastien; Pieters, Grégory; Loreau, Olivier; Rousseau, Bernard; Tagit, Oya; Hildebrandt, Niko; Le Dantec, Yannick; Mougin, Julie; Valetti, Sabrina; Chacun, Hélène; Nicolas, Valérie; Desmaële, Didier; Andrieux, Karine; Capan, Yilmaz; Dalkara, Turgay; Couvreur, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    There is an urgent need to develop new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of severe neurological trauma, such as stroke and spinal cord injuries. However, many drugs with potential neuropharmacological activity, such as adenosine, are inefficient upon systemic administration because of their fast metabolization and rapid clearance from the bloodstream. Here, we show that conjugation of adenosine to the lipid squalene and the subsequent formation of nanoassemblies allows prolonged circulation of this nucleoside, providing neuroprotection in mouse stroke and rat spinal cord injury models. The animals receiving systemic administration of squalenoyl adenosine nanoassemblies showed a significant improvement of their neurologic deficit score in the case of cerebral ischaemia, and an early motor recovery of the hindlimbs in the case of spinal cord injury. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that the nanoassemblies were able to extend adenosine circulation and its interaction with the neurovascular unit. This Article shows, for the first time, that a hydrophilic and rapidly metabolized molecule such as adenosine may become pharmacologically efficient owing to a single conjugation with the lipid squalene.

  10. Basic mechanism of transcription by RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Svetlov, Vladimir; Nudler, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    RNA polymerase II-like enzymes carry out transcription of genomes in Eukaryota, Archaea, and some viruses. They also exhibit fundamental similarity to RNA polymerases from bacteria, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. In this review we take an inventory of recent studiesilluminating different steps of basic transcription mechanism, likely common for most multi-subunit RNA polymerases. Through the amalgamation of structural and computational chemistry data we attempt to highlight the most feasible reaction pathway for the two-metal nucleotidyl transfer mechanism, and to evaluate the way catalysis can be linked to translocation in the mechano-chemical cycle catalyzed by RNA polymerase II. PMID:22982365

  11. Conserved structures of mediator and RNA polymerase II holoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Asturias, F J; Jiang, Y W; Myers, L C; Gustafsson, C M; Kornberg, R D

    1999-02-12

    Single particles of the mediator of transcriptional regulation (Mediator) and of RNA polymerase II holoenzyme were revealed by electron microscopy and image processing. Mediator alone appeared compact, but at high pH or in the presence of RNA polymerase II it displayed an extended conformation. Holoenzyme contained Mediator in a fully extended state, partially enveloping the globular polymerase, with points of apparent contact in the vicinity of the polymerase carboxyl-terminal domain and the DNA-binding channel. A similarity in appearance and conformational behavior of yeast and murine complexes indicates a conservation of Mediator structure among eukaryotes. PMID:9974391

  12. High-Throughput Polymerase Fidelity Evolution in Microfluidic Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Jesse; de Paz, Alexandra; Cybulski, Ted; Bhan, Namita; Zhang, Huidan; Weitz, Dave; Tyo, Keith; Kording, Konrad

    Polymerases are technologically important as a tool in molecular biology, and are scientifically important for their role in DNA replication and inheritance. We study large numbers (at least millions) of polymerase mutants by compartmentalizing each gene in a droplet in a microfluidic device. Also in each droplet are in vitro transcription and translation proteins, such that mutant polymerases can be generated to extend their own gene along a known DNA template. Reading the resulting sequence tells us both the mutant gene sequence and the number of and particular errors that the resulting mutant polymerase made during extension. This work is supported by the NIH.

  13. Modification of RNA polymerase IIO subspecies after poliovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, L M; Fernandez-Tomas, C; Dahmus, M E; Gariglio, P

    1987-01-01

    Infection of HeLa cells with poliovirus results in a shutdown of host transcription. In an effort to understand the mechanism(s) that underlies this process, we analyzed the distribution of RNA polymerase IIO before and after viral infection. Analysis of free and chromatin-bound enzyme indicated that there is a significant reduction in RNA polymerase IIO following infection. This observation, together with increasing evidence that transcription is catalyzed by RNA polymerase IIO, supports the hypothesis that poliovirus-induced inhibition of host transcription occurs at the level of RNA chain initiation and involves the direct modification of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:3029396

  14. Involvement of purinergic receptors and NOD-like receptor-family protein 3-inflammasome pathway in the adenosine triphosphate-induced cytokine release from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, Thomas; Victoni, Tatiana; Fautrel, Alain; Robert, Sacha; Gleonnec, Florence; Guezingar, Marie; Couillin, Isabelle; Catros, Véronique; Boichot, Elisabeth; Lagente, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been described as a danger signal activating the NOD-like receptor-family protein 3 (NLRP3)-inflammasome leading to the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-1β, release in the lung. The NLRP3-inflammasome pathway has been previously described to be involved in experimental collagen deposition and the development of pulmonary fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway and P2X7 purinergic receptor in the activation of human macrophages in vitro by ATP. We showed that adenosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate tetralithium salt (ATPγS) and 2',3'-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl) adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BzATP), two stable analogs of ATP, are able to potentiate the release of IL-1β from human monocyte-derived macrophages induced by low concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, in the same conditions no increase in IL-1α and IL-6 was observed. Immunochemistry has shown that human macrophages natively express NLRP3 and purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7 R). NLRP3 and IL-1β mRNA expression were induced from LPS-primed macrophages, but also after 5-h treatment of BzATP as analysed by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. However, other inflammasome pathways (NLRP1, NLRP2, NLRC4, NLRP6 and AIM2) and P2X7 R were not induced by BzATP. We observed that P2X7 R antagonists, A-438079 and A-740003, were able to reduce the release of IL-1β, but not of IL-1α and IL-6 from macrophages stimulated by ATPγS or BzATP. The present results showed the involvement of the P2X7 R-NLRP3 inflammasome pathway in the secretion of IL-1β from ATP-stimulated human macrophages, and suggest that P2X7 R were not involved in IL-1α and IL-6 release. This study also points out that repression of the P2X7 R represents a novel potential therapeutic approach to control fibrosis in lung injury. PMID:24472059

  15. Reduced ability to release adenosine by diabetic rat cardiac fibroblasts due to altered expression of nucleoside transporters

    PubMed Central

    Podgorska, Marzena; Kocbuch, Katarzyna; Grden, Marzena; Szutowicz, Andrzej; Pawelczyk, Tadeusz

    2006-01-01

    Adenosine produced by cardiac cells is known to attenuate the proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs), inhibit collagen synthesis, and protect the myocardium against ischaemic and reperfusion injury. Diabetic patients' hearts exhibit ventricular hypertrophy and demonstrate reduced tolerance to hypoxia or ischaemia. In this study, we characterize the effects of glucose and insulin on processes that determine the release of adenosine from CFs. We showed that during ATP depletion, rat CFs cultured in the absence of insulin release significantly less adenosine compared to cells grown in the presence of insulin. Moreover, under both conditions the quantity of released adenosine depends on glucose concentration. We demonstrate that this is due to altered expression of nucleoside transporters. High glucose (25 mm) induced 85% decrease in nucleoside transporter ENT1 mRNA levels. Decrease of the insulin level below 10−11m resulted in over 3-fold increase in the nucleoside transporter CNT2 mRNA content. Measurements of adenosine transport in CFs cultured in the presence of 5 mm glucose and 10 nm insulin showed that the bidirectional equilibrative adenosine transport accounted for 70% of the overall adenosine uptake. However, cells grown in the presence of high glucose (25 mm) demonstrated 65% decrease of the bidirectional equilibrative adenosine transport. Experiments on CFs cultured in the absence of insulin showed that the unidirectional Na+-dependent adenosine uptake rose in these cells more than 4-fold. These results indicate that the development of diabetes may result in an increased uptake of interstitial adenosine by CFs, and reduction of the ability of these cells to release adenosine during ATP deprivation. PMID:16873415

  16. The adenosine A2B receptor is involved in anion secretion in human pancreatic duct Capan-1 epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Inagaki, A; Novak, I; Matsuda, H

    2016-07-01

    Adenosine modulates a wide variety of biological processes via adenosine receptors. In the exocrine pancreas, adenosine regulates transepithelial anion secretion in duct cells and is considered to play a role in acini-to-duct signaling. To identify the functional adenosine receptors and Cl(-) channels important for anion secretion, we herein performed experiments on Capan-1, a human pancreatic duct cell line, using open-circuit Ussing chamber and gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp techniques. The luminal addition of adenosine increased the negative transepithelial potential difference (V te) in Capan-1 monolayers with a half-maximal effective concentration value of approximately 10 μM, which corresponded to the value obtained on whole-cell Cl(-) currents in Capan-1 single cells. The effects of adenosine on V te, an equivalent short-circuit current (I sc), and whole-cell Cl(-) currents were inhibited by CFTRinh-172, a cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel inhibitor. The adenosine A2B receptor agonist, BAY 60-6583, increased I sc and whole-cell Cl(-) currents through CFTR Cl(-) channels, whereas the A2A receptor agonist, CGS 21680, had negligible effects. The A2B receptor antagonist, PSB 603, inhibited the response of I sc to adenosine. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the A2A and A2B receptors colocalized with Ezrin in the luminal membranes of Capan-1 monolayers and in rat pancreatic ducts. Adenosine elicited the whole-cell Cl(-) currents in guinea pig duct cells. These results demonstrate that luminal adenosine regulates anion secretion by activating CFTR Cl(-) channels via adenosine A2B receptors on the luminal membranes of Capan-1 cells. The present study endorses that purinergic signaling is important in the regulation of pancreatic secretion. PMID:26965147

  17. Impairment of ATP hydrolysis decreases adenosine A1 receptor tonus favoring cholinergic nerve hyperactivity in the obstructed human urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ramos, M; Silva, I; Faria, M; Magalhães-Cardoso, M T; Correia, J; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether reduced adenosine formation linked to deficits in extracellular ATP hydrolysis by NTPDases contributes to detrusor neuromodulatory changes associated with bladder outlet obstruction in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The kinetics of ATP catabolism and adenosine formation as well as the role of P1 receptor agonists on muscle tension and nerve-evoked [(3)H]ACh release were evaluated in mucosal-denuded detrusor strips from BPH patients (n = 31) and control organ donors (n = 23). The neurogenic release of ATP and [(3)H]ACh was higher (P < 0.05) in detrusor strips from BPH patients. The extracellular hydrolysis of ATP and, subsequent, adenosine formation was slower (t (1/2) 73 vs. 36 min, P < 0.05) in BPH detrusor strips. The A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of evoked [(3)H]ACh release by adenosine (100 μM), NECA (1 μM), and R-PIA (0.3 μM) was enhanced in BPH bladders. Relaxation of detrusor contractions induced by acetylcholine required 30-fold higher concentrations of adenosine. Despite VAChT-positive cholinergic nerves exhibiting higher A(1) immunoreactivity in BPH bladders, the endogenous adenosine tonus revealed by adenosine deaminase is missing. Restoration of A1 inhibition was achieved by favoring (1) ATP hydrolysis with apyrase (2 U mL(-1)) or (2) extracellular adenosine accumulation with dipyridamole or EHNA, as these drugs inhibit adenosine uptake and deamination, respectively. In conclusion, reduced ATP hydrolysis leads to deficient adenosine formation and A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of cholinergic nerve activity in the obstructed human bladder. Thus, we propose that pharmacological manipulation of endogenous adenosine levels and/or A(1) receptor activation might be useful to control bladder overactivity in BPH patients. PMID:26521170

  18. Dual phase multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Pemov, Alexander; Bavykin, Sergei

    2008-10-07

    Highly specific and sensitive methods were developed for multiplex amplification of nucleic acids on supports such as microarrays. Based on a specific primer design, methods include five types of amplification that proceed in a reaction chamber simultaneously. These relate to four types of multiplex amplification of a target DNA on a solid support, directed by forward and reverse complex primers immobilized to the support and a fifth type--pseudo-monoplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of multiple targets in solution, directed by a single pair of unbound universal primers. The addition of the universal primers in the reaction mixture increases the yield over the traditional "bridge" amplification on a solid support by approximately ten times. Methods that provide multitarget amplification and detection of as little as 0.45-4.5.times.10.sup.-12 g (equivalent to 10.sup.2-10.sup.3 genomes) of a bacterial genomic DNA are disclosed.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Polymerase Clamp Loaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelch, Brian; Makino, Debora; Simonetta, Kyle; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    Clamp loaders are ATP-driven multiprotein machines that couple ATP hydrolysis to the opening and closing of a circular protein ring around DNA. This ring-shaped clamp slides along DNA, and interacts with numerous proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair and cell cycle control. Recently determined structures of clamp loader complexes from prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases have revealed exciting new details of how these complex AAA+ machines perform this essential clamp loading function. This review serves as background to John Kuriyan's lecture at the 2010 Erice School, and is not meant as a comprehensive review of the contributions of the many scientists who have advanced this field. These lecture notes are derived from recent reviews and research papers from our groups.

  20. Exploring RNA polymerase regulation by NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Drögemüller, Johanna; Strauß, Martin; Schweimer, Kristian; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.; Knauer, Stefan H.; Rösch, Paul

    2015-01-01

    RNA synthesis is a central process in all organisms, with RNA polymerase (RNAP) as the key enzyme. Multisubunit RNAPs are evolutionary related and are tightly regulated by a multitude of transcription factors. Although Escherichia coli RNAP has been studied extensively, only little information is available about its dynamics and transient interactions. This information, however, are crucial for the complete understanding of transcription regulation in atomic detail. To study RNAP by NMR spectroscopy we developed a highly efficient procedure for the assembly of active RNAP from separately expressed subunits that allows specific labeling of the individual constituents. We recorded [1H,13C] correlation spectra of isoleucine, leucine, and valine methyl groups of complete RNAP and the separately labeled β’ subunit within reconstituted RNAP. We further produced all RNAP subunits individually, established experiments to determine which RNAP subunit a certain regulator binds to, and identified the β subunit to bind NusE. PMID:26043358

  1. Is it easy to stop RNA polymerase?

    PubMed

    Artsimovitch, Irina; Vassylyev, Dmitry G

    2006-02-01

    Among transcription factors that bind to bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) and modulate its activity, a number of small molecules irreversibly inhibit RNAP thereby causing cell death. To be of clinical significance such inhibitors must (1) inhibit a broad range of bacterial RNAPs but not affect human cells, (2) penetrate bacterial cell walls and (3) circumvent bacterial resistance mechanisms. Rifamycins, the only class of RNAP inhibitors that have found their way into clinical practice, are widely used in the treatment of tuberculosis and leprosy. However, the practical value of this class of antibiotics is limited by a rapid rise in resistant bacterial isolates. In this review we focus on recent advances in studies of prokaryotic transcription that allow a detailed structural and functional characterization of a number of RNAP/rifamycins complexes, thereby opening new opportunities for the design of superior antibacterial agents. PMID:16479153

  2. Promoter analysis of influenza virus RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Parvin, J D; Palese, P; Honda, A; Ishihama, A; Krystal, M

    1989-01-01

    Influenza virus polymerase, which was prepared depleted of viral RNA, was used to copy small RNA templates prepared from plasmid-encoded sequences. Template constructions containing only the 3' end of genomic RNA were shown to be efficiently copied, indicating that the promoter lay solely within the 15-nucleotide 3' terminus. Sequences not specific for the influenza virus termini were not copied, and, surprisingly, RNAs containing termini identical to those from plus-sense cRNA were copied at low levels. The specificity for recognition of the virus sense promoter was further defined by site-specific mutagenesis. It was also found that increased levels of viral protein were required in order to catalyze both the cap endonuclease-primed and primer-free RNA synthesis from these model templates, as well as from genomic-length RNAs. This finding indicates that the reconstituted system has catalytic properties very similar to those of native viral ribonucleoprotein complexes. Images PMID:2585601

  3. A Cross-chiral RNA Polymerase Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Sczepanski, Jonathan T.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years ago it was shown that the non-enzymatic, template-directed polymerization of activated mononucleotides proceeds readily in a homochiral system, but is severely inhibited by the presence of the opposing enantiomer.1 This finding poses a severe challenge for the spontaneous emergence of RNA-based life, and has led to the suggestion that either RNA was preceded by some other genetic polymer that is not subject to chiral inhibition2 or chiral symmetry was broken through chemical processes prior to the origin of RNA-based life.3,4 Once an RNA enzyme arose that could catalyze the polymerization of RNA, it would have been possible to distinguish among the two enantiomers, enabling RNA replication and RNA-based evolution to occur. It is commonly thought that the earliest RNA polymerase and its substrates would have been of the same handedness, but this is not necessarily the case. Replicating D-and L-RNA molecules may have emerged together, based on the ability of structured RNAs of one handedness to catalyze the templated polymerization of activated mononucleotides of the opposite handedness. Such a cross-chiral RNA polymerase has now been developed using in vitro evolution. The D-RNA enzyme, consisting of 83 nucleotides, catalyzes the joining of L-mono- or oligonucleotide substrates on a complementary L-RNA template, and similarly for the L-enzyme with D-substrates and a D-template. Chiral inhibition is avoided because the 106-fold rate acceleration of the enzyme only pertains to cross-chiral substrates. The enzyme's activity is sufficient to generate full-length copies of its enantiomer through the templated joining of 11 component oligonucleotides. PMID:25363769

  4. Structure of transcribing mammalian RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Bernecky, Carrie; Herzog, Franz; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Cramer, Patrick

    2016-01-28

    RNA polymerase (Pol) II produces messenger RNA during transcription of protein-coding genes in all eukaryotic cells. The Pol II structure is known at high resolution from X-ray crystallography for two yeast species. Structural studies of mammalian Pol II, however, remain limited to low-resolution electron microscopy analysis of human Pol II and its complexes with various proteins. Here we report the 3.4 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of mammalian Pol II in the form of a transcribing complex comprising DNA template and RNA transcript. We use bovine Pol II, which is identical to the human enzyme except for seven amino-acid residues. The obtained atomic model closely resembles its yeast counterpart, but also reveals unknown features. Binding of nucleic acids to the polymerase involves 'induced fit' of the mobile Pol II clamp and active centre region. DNA downstream of the transcription bubble contacts a conserved 'TPSA motif' in the jaw domain of the Pol II subunit RPB5, an interaction that is apparently already established during transcription initiation. Upstream DNA emanates from the active centre cleft at an angle of approximately 105° with respect to downstream DNA. This position of upstream DNA allows for binding of the general transcription elongation factor DSIF (SPT4-SPT5) that we localize over the active centre cleft in a conserved position on the clamp domain of Pol II. Our results define the structure of mammalian Pol II in its functional state, indicate that previous crystallographic analysis of yeast Pol II is relevant for understanding gene transcription in all eukaryotes, and provide a starting point for a mechanistic analysis of human transcription. PMID:26789250

  5. Role of adenosine in the antiepileptic effects of deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Maisa F.; Hamani, Clement; de Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G.; Amorim, Beatriz O.; Macedo, Carlos E.; Fernandes, Maria José S.; Nobrega, José N.; Aarão, Mayra C.; Madureira, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Antônio M.; Andersen, Monica L.; Tufik, Sergio; Mello, Luiz E.; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of anterior thalamic nucleus (AN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of epilepsy, mechanisms responsible for the antiepileptic effects of this therapy remain elusive. As adenosine modulates neuronal excitability and seizure activity in animal models, we hypothesized that this nucleoside could be one of the substrates involved in the effects of AN DBS. We applied 5 days of stimulation to rats rendered chronically epileptic by pilocarpine injections and recorded epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices. We found that slices from animals given DBS had reduced hippocampal excitability and were less susceptible to develop ictal activity. In live animals, AN DBS significantly increased adenosine levels in the hippocampus as measured by microdialysis. The reduced excitability of DBS in vitro was completely abolished in animals pre-treated with A1 receptor antagonists and was strongly potentiated by A1 receptor agonists. We conclude that some of the antiepileptic effects of DBS may be mediated by adenosine. PMID:25324724

  6. Circadian rhythm in adenosine A1 receptor of mouse cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, C.; Rosati, A.M.; Traversa, U.; Vertua, R. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to investigate diurnal variation in adenosine A1 receptors binding parameters, Bmax and Kd values of specifically bound N6-cyclohexyl-({sup 3}H)adenosine were determined in the cerebral cortex of mice that had been housed under controlled light-dark cycles for 4 weeks. Significant differences were found for Bmax values measured at 3-hr intervals across a 24-h period, with low Bmax values during the light period and high Bmax values during the dark period. The amplitude between 03.00 and 18.00 hr was 33%. No substantial rhythm was found in the Kd values. It is suggested that the changes in the density of A1 receptors could reflect a physiologically-relevant mechanism by which adenosine exerts its modulatory role in the central nervous system.

  7. Autoradiographic localization of adenosine receptors in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)cyclohexyladenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, R.R.; Synder, S.H.

    1982-09-01

    Adenosine (A1) receptor binding sites have been localized in rat brain by an in vitro light microscopic autoradiographic method. The binding of (/sup 3/H)N6-cyclohexyladenosine to slide-mounted rat brain tissue sections has the characteristics of A1 receptors. It is saturable with high affinity and has appropriate pharmacology and stereospecificity. The highest densities of adenosine receptors occur in the molecular layer of the cerebellum, the molecular and polymorphic layers of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus, the medial geniculate body, certain thalamic nuclei, and the lateral septum. High densities also are observed in certain layers of the cerebral cortex, the piriform cortex, the caudate-putamen, the nucleus accumbens, and the granule cell layer of the cerebellum. Most white matter areas, as well as certain gray matter areas, such as the hypothalamus, have negligible receptor concentrations. These localizations suggest possible central nervous system sites of action of adenosine.

  8. Autoradiographic localization of adenosine uptake sites in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine

    SciTech Connect

    Bisserbe, J.C.; Patel, J.; Marangos, P.J.

    1985-02-01

    The adenosine uptake site has been localized in rat brain by an in vitro light microscopic autoradiographic method, using (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine ((/sup 3/H)NBI) as the probe. The binding characteristics of (/sup 3/H)NBI on slide-mounted sections are comparable to those seen in studies performed on brain homogenates. A very high density of uptake sites occurs in the nucleus tractus solitarius, in the superficial layer of the superior colliculus, in several thalamic nuclei, and also in geniculate body nuclei. A high density of sites are also observed in the nucleus accumbens, the caudate putamen, the dorsal tegmentum area, the substantia nigra, and the central gray. The localization of the adenosine uptake site in brain may provide information on the functional activity of the site and suggests the involvement of the adenosine system in the central regulation of cardiovascular function.

  9. Structure of the DNA Ligase-Adenylate Intermediate: Lysine (ε-amino)-Linked Adenosine Monophosphoramidate*

    PubMed Central

    Gumport, Richard I.; Lehman, I. R.

    1971-01-01

    Proteolytic degradation of the Escherichia coli DNA ligase-adenylate intermediate releases adenosine 5′-monophosphate linked to the ε-amino group of lysine by a phosphoamide bond. Measurements of the rate of hydroxylaminolysis of the ligase-adenylate provide further support for a phosphoamide linkage in the native enzyme. Lysine (ε-amino)-linked adenosine monophosphoramidate has also been isolated from the T4 phage-induced ligase-adenylate intermediate. These results indicate that an initial step of the DNA ligase reaction consists of the nucleophilic attack of the ε-amino group of a lysine residue of the enzyme on the adenylyl phosphorus of DPN or ATP that leads to the formation of enzyme-bound lysine (εamino)-linked adenosine monophosphoramidate. PMID:4944632

  10. CD73-adenosine: a next-generation target in immuno-oncology.

    PubMed

    Allard, David; Allard, Bertrand; Gaudreau, Pierre-Olivier; Chrobak, Pavel; Stagg, John

    2016-02-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has entered in a new era with the development of first-generation immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting the PD1/PD-L1 and CTLA-4 pathways. In this context, considerable research effort is being deployed to find the next generation of cancer immunotherapeutics. The CD73-adenosine axis constitutes one of the most promising pathways in immuno-oncology. We and others have demonstrated the immunosuppressive role of CD73-adenosine in cancer and established proof-of-concept that the targeted blockade of CD73 or adenosine receptors could effectively promote anti-tumor immunity and enhance the activity of first-generation immune checkpoint blockers. With Phase I clinical trials now underway evaluating anti-CD73 or anti-A2A therapies in cancer patients, we here discuss the fundamental, preclinical and clinical findings related to the role of the CD73-adenosinergic pathway in tumor immunity. PMID:26808918

  11. Contemporaneous isolation of deoxyribonucleic acid-dependent ribonucleic acid polymerase and poly(A) polymerase from rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Gallerani, R; di Istituto; Istituto di, Ch; Saccone, C

    1976-01-01

    1. Poly(A) polymerase and DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from rat liver mitochondria can be completely separated by using two different chromatographic procedures. 2. Poly(A) polymerase can only incorporate ATP into acid-insoluble material and strongly depends on the addition of an endogenous factor (probably containing a mixture of oligoribonucleotides), but it is not stimulated by DNA. 3. RNA polymerase is fully DNA-dependent and rifampicin-sensitive, but was not stimulated by the endogenous factor mentioned above. 4. The chromatographic behaviour of the two enzymes, together with the properties described, suggest that they represent two different protein molecules. PMID:962867

  12. An Overview of Y-Family DNA Polymerases and a Case Study of Human DNA Polymerase η

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Y-Family DNA polymerases specialize in translesion synthesis, bypassing damaged bases that would otherwise block the normal progression of replication forks. Y-Family polymerases have unique structural features that allow them to bind damaged DNA and use a modified template base to direct nucleotide incorporation. Each Y-Family polymerase is unique and has different preferences for lesions to bypass and for dNTPs to incorporate. Y-Family polymerases are also characterized by a low catalytic efficiency, a low processivity, and a low fidelity on normal DNA. Recruitment of these specialized polymerases to replication forks is therefore regulated. The catalytic center of the Y-Family polymerases is highly conserved and homologous to that of high-fidelity and high-processivity DNA replicases. In this review, structural differences between Y-Family and A- and B-Family polymerases are compared and correlated with their functional differences. A time-resolved X-ray crystallographic study of the DNA synthesis reaction catalyzed by the Y-Family DNA polymerase human polymerase η revealed transient elements that led to the nucleotidyl-transfer reaction. PMID:24716551

  13. TATA-binding protein and associated factors in polymerase II and polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, R E; Sharp, P A

    1993-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase I (pol I), pol II, and pol III requires the TATA-binding protein (TBP). This protein functions in association with distinct TBP-associated factors (TAFs) which may specify the nature of the polymerase selected for initiation at a promoter site. In the pol III transcription system, the TBP-TAF complex is a component of the TFIIIB factor. This factor has been resolved into a TBP-TAF complex and another component, both of which are required for reconstitution of transcription by pol III. Neither the TBP-TAF complexes B-TFIID and D-TFIID, which were previously characterized as active for pol II transcription, nor TBP alone can complement pol III transcription reactions that are dependent upon the TBP-TAF subcomponent of TFIIIB. Surprisingly, the TBP-TAF subcomponent of TFIIIB is active in reconstitution of pol II transcription. Images PMID:8247010

  14. Nucleoside transporter subtype expression: effects on potency of adenosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, C J D; Powell, A E; Xiong, W; LaRivière, C G; Baldwin, S A; Cass, C E; Young, J D; Parkinson, F E

    2001-01-01

    Adenosine kinase (AK) inhibitors can enhance adenosine levels and potentiate adenosine receptor activation. As the AK inhibitors 5′ iodotubercidin (ITU) and 5-amino-5′-deoxyadenosine (NH2dAdo) are nucleoside analogues, we hypothesized that nucleoside transporter subtype expression can affect the potency of these inhibitors in intact cells.Three nucleoside transporter subtypes that mediate adenosine permeation of rat cells have been characterized and cloned: equilibrative transporters rENT1 and rENT2 and concentrative transporter rCNT2. We stably transfected rat C6 glioma cells, which express rENT2 nucleoside transporters, with rENT1 (rENT1-C6 cells) or rCNT2 (rCNT2-C6 cells) nucleoside transporters.We tested the effects of ITU and NH2dAdo on [3H]-adenosine uptake and conversion to [3H]-adenine nucleotides in the three cell types. NH2dAdo did not show any cell type selectivity. In contrast, ITU showed significant inhibition of [3H]-adenosine uptake and [3H]-adenine nucleotide formation at concentrations ⩽100 nM in rENT1-C6 cells, while concentrations ⩾3 μM were required for C6 or rCNT2-C6 cells.Nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR; 100 nM), a selective inhibitor of rENT1, abolished the effects of nanomolar concentrations of ITU in rENT1-C6 cells.This study demonstrates that the effects of ITU, but not NH2dAdo, in whole cell assays are dependent upon nucleoside transporter subtype expression. Thus, cellular and tissue differences in expression of nucleoside transporter subtypes may affect the pharmacological actions of some AK inhibitors. PMID:11682452

  15. Alcohol Worsens Acute Lung Injury by Inhibiting Alveolar Sodium Transport through the Adenosine A1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Urich, Daniela; Soberanes, Saul; Manghi, Tomas S.; Chiarella, Sergio E.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Budinger, G. R. Scott; Mutlu, Gökhan M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Alcohol intake increases the risk of acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is associated with poor outcomes in patients who develop these syndromes. No specific therapies are currently available to treat or decrease the risk of ARDS in patients with alcoholism. We have recently shown increased levels of lung adenosine inhibit alveolar fluid clearance, an important predictor of outcome in patients with ARDS. We hypothesized that alcohol might worsen lung injury by increasing lung adenosine levels, resulting in impaired active Na+ transport in the lung. Methods We treated wild-type mice with alcohol administered i.p. to achieve blood alcohol levels associated with moderate to severe intoxication and measured the rate of alveolar fluid clearance and Na,K-ATPase expression in peripheral lung tissue and assessed the effect of alcohol on survival during exposure to hyperoxia. We used primary rat alveolar type II cells to investigate the mechanisms by which alcohol regulates alveolar Na+ transport. Results Exposure to alcohol reduced alveolar fluid clearance, downregulated Na,K-ATPase in the lung tissue and worsened hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Alcohol caused an increase in BAL fluid adenosine levels. A similar increase in lung adenosine levels was observed after exposure to hyperoxia. In primary rat alveolar type II cells alcohol and adenosine decreased the abundance of the Na,K-ATPase at the basolateral membrane via a mechanism that required activation of the AMPK. Conclusions Alcohol decreases alveolar fluid clearance and impairs survival from acute lung injury. Alcohol induced increases in lung adenosine levels may be responsible for reduction in alveolar fluid clearance and associated worsening of lung injury. PMID:22272351

  16. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  17. Effect of adenosine system in the action of oseltamivir on behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Hidemori; Hiromura, Makoto; Shiratani, Tomonori; Kuroki, Hiroaki; Honda, Sinichiro; Kosako, Kazuhiro; Soeda, Shinji; Inoue, Kazuhide; Toda, Akihisa

    2015-07-10

    Abnormal behaviors and death associated with the use of oseltamivir (Tamiflu(®)) have emerged as a major issue in influenza patients. We have previously reported that the mechanisms underlying the effects of caffeine, a non-selective adenosine A1/A2 receptor antagonist, combined with oseltamivir. Oseltamivir is rapidly hydrolyzed to its active form (oseltamivir carboxylate, OCB). In this study, we investigated the effects of an adenosine system and OCB on the action of oseltamivir on mice behavior. Oseltamivir for 1 day (150 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) alone did not affect ambulation at 2 h post-injection. However, caffeine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 1 day increased ambulation. Moreover, caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 3 days increased ambulation, but caffeine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 3 days did not increase. These enhancements were inhibited by an adenosine A2 receptor agonist, CGS21680 (0.2 mg/kg, subcutaneously (s.c.)). Furthermore, an adenosine A2 receptor antagonist, SCH58261 (1 and 3 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 1 day increased ambulation. Moreover, SCH58261 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 3 days increased ambulation, but SCH58261 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 3 days did not. Conversely, in phenobarbital (PB)-treated mice, caffeine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 1 day increased ambulation. Moreover, OCB for 1 day (0.3 μg/mouse intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.)) alone increased ambulation. These findings suggest that the actions of oseltamivir may involve the adenosine systems and its metabolism. Our findings suggest an interaction between the central blockade of adenosine A2 receptors by caffeine and OCB-induced behavioral changes. PMID:25980995

  18. Adenosine enhances myocardial glucose uptake only in the presence of insulin.

    PubMed

    Law, W R; McLane, M P

    1991-09-01

    Better understood in other tissues, the effects of adenosine on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the heart are poorly understood. Under pentobarbital anesthesia, we instrumented mongrel dogs to obtain general hemodynamics (blood pressure and heart rate), and arterial and coronary sinus blood samples for measuring oxygen and glucose concentrations. An electromagnetic blood flow probe around the circumflex coronary artery allowed determinations of blood flow, and calculation of substrate uptake by the heart (Fick principle). Somatostatin (SRIF) was infused intravenously (0.8 micrograms/kg/min) along with 0, 0.5, 1.0, 5.0, or 10 mU/kg/min regular insulin, and variable quantities of glucose to maintain euglycemia. Concomitant with the SRIF, insulin, and glucose infusions, adenosine was infused in logarithmically increasing rates (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 10 or 100 mumol/min) for 30 minutes each into the main left coronary arteries. Insulin infusions increased myocardial glucose uptake in a dose-dependent manner. The heart displayed exquisite sensitivity to insulin, with an ED50 of approximately 14 microU/mL (serum insulin). Adenosine infusions in the absence of insulin (SRIF infusion) increased coronary blood flow, but did not alter myocardial glucose uptake. In the presence of insulin, adenosine increased the maximal value for glucose uptake without changing sensitivity to insulin. These results indicate that adenosine enhances myocardial responsiveness to insulin, with respect to glucose uptake, independent of changes in blood flow. Since glucose can be used for anaerobic metabolism, and adenosine levels are known to increase under situations in which myocardial oxygenation is inadequate, these data have serious implications for conditions such as myocardial ischemia or hypoxia, when glycolytic substrate availability is vital. PMID:1680214

  19. Increase of adenosine plasma levels after oral trimetazidine: a pharmacological preconditioning?

    PubMed

    Blardi, Patrizia; de Lalla, Arianna; Volpi, Luciana; Auteri, Alberto; Di Perri, Tullio

    2002-01-01

    Trimetazidine (1-[2,3,4-trimethoxybenzyl] piperazine) (TMZ) is a cellular anti-ischemic agent able to prevent intracellular ATP decrease, limit intracellular acidosis, protect against oxygen-free radical-induced toxicity and inhibit neutrophil infiltration. However, its definitive mechanism of action had not been identified. Recent studies showed the existence of an endogenous mechanism of cellular protection against ischemia, defined as 'ischemic preconditioning'. This mechanism was related mainly to cellular liberation of adenosine, a nucleoside with protective effects in myocardial ischemia. Since TMZ acts by increasing cell tolerance to ischemia and adenosine is the mediator of ischemic preconditioning, in this study we investigated a possible interaction between TMZ and adenosine. Two groups of patients affected by angina pectoris, were admitted to the study. They received a single oral dose of TMZ. One group was treated, during different sessions, with TMZ 10 and 20 mg, the other group with TMZ 40 and 80 mg. After a 3 day wash-out from drug administration, each group received a placebo. Blood samples were collected at baseline (time 0) and 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 h after drug administration, in order to detect plasma levels of adenosine by a high-performance liquid chromatography method. We observed that the administration of TMZ at doses of 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg induced an increase of adenosine plasma levels of 19, 50, 62 and 62%, respectively. We hypothesized that the activity of TMZ could depend, at least in part, on adenosine mediation and this interaction opens a new interpretation of the drug antischemic effect. PMID:11820865

  20. Role of extracellular cysteine residues in the adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    De Filippo, Elisabetta; Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran; Zappe, Lukas; El-Tayeb, Ali; Schiedel, Anke C; Müller, Christa E

    2016-06-01

    The G protein-coupled A2A adenosine receptor represents an important drug target. Crystal structures and modeling studies indicated that three disulfide bonds are formed between ECL1 and ECL2 (I, Cys71(2.69)-Cys159(45.43); II, Cys74(3.22)-Cys146(45.30), and III, Cys77(3.25)-Cys166(45.50)). However, the A2BAR subtype appears to require only disulfide bond III for proper function. In this study, each of the three disulfide bonds in the A2AAR was disrupted by mutation of one of the cysteine residues to serine. The mutant receptors were stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and analyzed in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and radioligand binding studies using structurally diverse agonists: adenosine, NECA, CGS21680, and PSB-15826. Results were rationalized by molecular modeling. The observed effects were dependent on the investigated agonist. Loss of disulfide bond I led to a widening of the orthosteric binding pocket resulting in a strong reduction in the potency of adenosine, but not of NECA or 2-substituted nucleosides. Disruption of disulfide bond II led to a significant reduction in the agonists' efficacy indicating its importance for receptor activation. Disulfide bond III disruption reduced potency and affinity of the small adenosine agonists and NECA, but not of the larger 2-substituted agonists. While all the three disulfide bonds were essential for high potency or efficacy of adenosine, structural modification of the nucleoside could rescue affinity or efficacy at the mutant receptors. At present, it cannot be excluded that formation of the extracellular disulfide bonds in the A2AAR is dynamic. This might add another level of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) modulation, in particular for the cysteine-rich A2A and A2BARs. PMID:26969588

  1. Interstitial adenosine concentration during norepinephrine infusion in isolated guinea pig hearts

    PubMed Central

    GORMAN, MARK W.; WANGLER, ROGER D.; BASSINGTHWAIGHTE, JAMES B.; MOHRMAN, DAVID E.; WANG, C. Y.; SPARKS, HARVEY V.

    2010-01-01

    This study determined the effect of norepinephrine (NE) on cardiac interstitial fluid adenosine concentration ([ADO]isf). Isolated guinea pig hearts were perfused with a Krebs-Henseleit buffer solution. Radiolabeled albumin, sucrose, and adenosine were injected under control conditions and after 3 and 20 min of NE infusion to obtain multiple indicator dilution curves that were used to determine capillary transport parameters for adenosine. These parameters together with venous adenosine concentrations were used in a mathematical model to calculate [ADO]isf. Capillary transport parameters were not changed significantly by NE infusion. Because of uncertainty regarding two model parameters, two sets of [ADO]isf values were calculated. One set used best-fit values obtained from indicator dilution curves, and a second set used parameters chosen to provide the highest [ADO]isf values consistent with indicator dilution curves. Venous adenosine concentrations were 1.9 ± 0.4 nM under control conditions and 243 ± 110 and 45 ± 25 nM after 3 and 20 min of NE infusion, respectively. Calculated [ADO]isf was 2.6–9.4, 591–1,288, and 166–324 nM, respectively, under these same conditions. We conclude that NE infusion greatly increases [ADO]isf, and adenosine is responsible for most of the vasodilation at 3 min. The subsequent fall in venous concentration is due to a fall in [ADO]isf rather than to decreased capillary permeability. Vascular resistance remained low while [ADO]isf fell, which suggests that additional vasodilators are important during maintained NE infusion. PMID:1887934

  2. The effects of adenosine ligands R-PIA and CPT on ethanol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Gatch, M B; Wallis, C J; Lal, H

    1999-08-01

    The potential anxiogenic or anxiolytic effects of R(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine (R-PIA), an adenosine agonist, and 8-cyclopentyl-1,3,dimethylxanthine (CPT), an adenosine antagonist, were tested during chronic exposure to ethanol and to ethanol-induced withdrawal in rats. Effects on anxiety were measured by the elevated plus maze and dark-light box. Ethanol consumption and preference was tested in an additional experiment. In testing of elevated plus maze performance during withdrawal from ethanol, R-PIA produced no change in the anxiety-related behaviors of total arm entries and percent open arm entries, but produced a significant decrease in percent open arm time. CPT produced at least partial recovery from the anxiogenic effects of ethanol withdrawal on all three measures of elevated plus maze performance, although peak effects were seen at the intermediate dose of CPT (0.08 mg/kg) for total arm entries and percent open arm time. CPT also showed anxiolytic effects at low to intermediate doses (0.04, 0.08 mg/kg) in the dark-light box. CPT did not reduce the preference for ethanol over water or the total consumption of ethanol over a range of ethanol doses. In summary, the adenosine agonist, R-PIA, exacerbated the effects of ethanol withdrawal, whereas the adenosine antagonist, CPT, at least partially blocked the anxiogenic effects produced by ethanol withdrawal. These results suggest that adenosine antagonists, at least at some doses, may be useful for ameliorating the anxiogenic effects produced by ethanol withdrawal, although it does not appear useful for reducing consumption. PMID:10487382

  3. Bench-to-bedside review: Adenosine receptors – promising targets in acute lung injury?

    PubMed Central

    Schepp, Carsten P; Reutershan, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are life-threatening disorders that have substantial adverse effects on outcomes in critically ill patients. ALI/ARDS develops in response to pulmonary or extrapulmonary injury and is characterized by increased leakage from the pulmonary microvasculature and excessive infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells into the lung. Currently, no therapeutic strategies are available to control these fundamental pathophysiological processes in human ALI/ARDS. In a variety of animal models and experimental settings, the purine nucleoside adenosine has been demonstrated to regulate both endothelial barrier integrity and polymorphonuclear cell trafficking in the lung. Adenosine exerts its effects through four G-protein-coupled receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) that are expressed on leukocytes and nonhematopoietic cells, including endothelial and epithelial cells. Each type of adenosine receptor (AR) is characterized by a unique pharmacological and physiological profile. The development of selective AR agonists and antagonists, as well as the generation of gene-deficient mice, has contributed to a growing understanding of the cellular and molecular processes that are critically involved in the development of ALI/ARDS. Adenosine-dependent pathways are involved in both protective and proinflammatory effects, highlighting the need for a detailed characterization of the distinct pathways. This review summarizes current experimental observations on the role of adenosine signaling in the development of acute lung injury and illustrates that adenosine and ARs are promising targets that may be exploited in the development of innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:18828873

  4. Adenosine transport systems on dissociated brain cells from mouse, guinea-pig, and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M.E.; Geiger, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    The kinetics and sodium dependence of adenosine transport were determined using an inhibitor-stop method on dissociated cell body preparations obtained from mouse, guinea-pig and rat brain. Transport affinity (KT) values for the high affinity adenosine transport systems KT(H) were significantly different between these three species; mean +/- SEM values were 0.34 +/- 0.1 in mouse, 0.9 +/- 0.2 in rat, and 1.5 +/- 0.5 microM in guinea-pig. The KT values for the low affinity transport system KT(L) were not different between the three species. Brain cells from rat displayed a significantly greater maximal capacity to accumulate (3H)adenosine (Vmax) than did mouse or guinea-pig for the high affinity system, or than did mouse for the low affinity system. When sodium chloride was replaced in the transport medium with choline chloride, the KT(H) values for guinea-pig and rat were both increased by approximately 100%; only in rat did the change reach statistical significance. The sodium-dependence of adenosine transport in mouse brain was clearly absent. The differences between KT(H) values in mouse and those in guinea-pig or rat were accentuated in the absence of sodium. The differences in kinetic values, ionic requirements, and pharmacological characteristics between adenosine transporters in CNS tissues of mouse, guinea-pig and rat may help account for some of the variability noted among species in terms of their physiological responses to adenosine.

  5. Adenosine A3 receptor activation is neuroprotective against retinal neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Galvao, Joana; Elvas, Filipe; Martins, Tiago; Cordeiro, M Francesca; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2015-11-01

    Death of retinal neural cells, namely retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), is a characteristic of several retinal neurodegenerative diseases. Although the role of adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) in neuroprotection is controversial, A3R activation has been reported to afford protection against several brain insults, with few studies in the retina. In vitro models (retinal neural and organotypic cultures) and animal models [ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) and partial optic nerve transection (pONT)] were used to study the neuroprotective properties of A3R activation against retinal neurodegeneration. The A3R selective agonist (2-Cl-IB-MECA, 1 μM) prevented apoptosis (TUNEL(+)-cells) induced by kainate and cyclothiazide (KA + CTZ) in retinal neural cultures (86.5 ± 7.4 and 37.2 ± 6.1 TUNEL(+)-cells/field, in KA + CTZ and KA + CTZ + 2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively). In retinal organotypic cultures, 2-Cl-IB-MECA attenuated NMDA-induced cell death, assessed by TUNEL (17.3 ± 2.3 and 8.3 ± 1.2 TUNEL(+)-cells/mm(2) in NMDA and NMDA+2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively) and PI incorporation (ratio DIV4/DIV2 3.3 ± 0.3 and 1.3 ± 0.1 in NMDA and NMDA+2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively) assays. Intravitreal 2-Cl-IB-MECA administration afforded protection against I-R injury decreasing the number of TUNEL(+) cells by 72%, and increased RGC survival by 57%. Also, intravitreal administration of 2-Cl-IB-MECA inhibited apoptosis (from 449.4 ± 37.8 to 207.6 ± 48.9 annexin-V(+)-cells) and RGC loss (from 1.2 ± 0.6 to 8.1 ± 1.7 cells/mm) induced by pONT. This study demonstrates that 2-Cl-IB-MECA is neuroprotective to the retina, both in vitro and in vivo. Activation of A3R may have great potential in the management of retinal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by RGC death, as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, and ischemic diseases. PMID:26297614

  6. 75 FR 8981 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Treatment of Glaucoma by Administration of Adenosine A3...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ...,'' filed July 3, 1996 [HHS Ref. No. E-225-1995/1-US-1], PCT Application PCT/US97/01252, entitled... adenosine receptor antagonists,'' filed January 29, 1997 [HHS Ref. No. E-225-1995/2-PCT- 1], U.S. Patent 6.../092,292, entitled ``A3 Adenosine Receptor Antagonists,'' filed July 10, 1998 , PCT Application...

  7. Rat fat-cells have three types of adenosine receptors (Ra, Ri and P). Differential effects of pertussis toxin.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Torner, M L

    1985-01-01

    Activation of rat adipocyte R1 adenosine receptors by phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA) decreased cyclic AMP and lipolysis; this effect was blocked in cells from pertussis-toxin-treated rats. In contrast, the ability of 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine to decrease cyclic AMP was not affected by pertussis-toxin treatment. Addition of adenosine deaminase to the medium in which adipocytes from control animals were incubated resulted in activation of lipolysis. Interestingly, adipocytes from toxin-treated rats (which had an already increased basal lipolysis) responded in an opposite fashion to the addition of adenosine deaminase, i.e. the enzyme decreased lipolysis, which suggested that adenosine might be increasing lipolysis in these cells. Studies with the selective agonists N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) and PIA indicated that adenosine increases lipolysis and cyclic AMP accumulation in these cells and that these actions are mediated through Ra adenosine receptors. Adenosine-mediated accumulation of cyclic AMP was also observed in cells preincubated with pertussis toxin (2 micrograms/ml) for 3 h. In these studies NECA was also more effective than PIA. Our results indicate that there are three types of adenosine receptors in fat-cells, whose actions are affected differently by pertussis toxin, i.e. Ri-mediated actions are abolished, Ra-mediated actions are revealed and P-mediated actions are not affected. PMID:3004405

  8. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism. PMID:25910812

  9. Immunoregulation of IL-6 secretion by endogenous and exogenous adenosine and by exogenous purinergic agonists in splenic tissue slices.

    PubMed

    Straub, Rainer H; Pongratz, Georg; Günzler, Christian; Michna, Andreas; Baier, Simone; Kees, Frieder; Falk, Werner; Schölmerich, Jürgen

    2002-04-01

    In recent years, the role of norepinephrine, opioids, and neuropeptide Y for sympathetic regulation of murine spleen cells has been characterised. In this study, we describe the role of exogenous and endogenous adenosine and exogenous P2X(1) and P2Y(1) agonists for spontaneous splenic IL-6 secretion from spleen slices. The P2X(1) agonist beta,gamma-methylene ATP inhibited IL-6 secretion at 10(-5) M, whereas the P2Y(1) agonist 2-methylthio ATP increased IL-6 secretion at 10(-6) to 10(-8) M. Furthermore, adenosine (at 5 x 10(-8), 10(-7), 5 x 10(-7) M) inhibited IL-6 secretion via A1 adenosine receptors, whereas an A2(A) adenosine receptor agonist increased IL-6 secretion in the presence of 10(-7) M cortisol. To determine the effects of endogenous adenosine, electrical field stimulation was applied in order to release endogenous ATP, which yields adenosine after conversion from ATP. Electrical field stimulation markedly reduced IL-6 secretion, which was attenuated by the A1 antagonist DPCPX but not by the A2 antagonist 8-(3-Chlorostyryl)caffeine. Thus, via A1 adenosine receptors, adenosine was found to be a strong inhibitor of splenic IL-6 secretion. This study further expands our earlier description of the complexity of the local dialogue of sympathetic nerves and macrophages in lymphoid organs. PMID:11960643

  10. Rapid Induction of Ion Pulses in Tomato, Cucumber, and Maize Plants following a Foliar Application of L(+)-Adenosine.

    PubMed Central

    Ries, S.; Savithiry, S.; Wert, V.; Widders, I.

    1993-01-01

    Application of picomole quantities of (+)-adenosine, a plant growth-regulating second messenger elicited by triacontanol, to tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), maize (Zea mays L.), and cucumber (Cucumis sativa L.) foliage, increased Ca2+, Mg2+, and K+ concentrations in the exudate from the stumps of excised plants by 20 to 60% within 5 s after treatment. The change in ionic concentration of the exudate was transitory. When L(+)-adenosine and triacontanol were applied to different tomato plants at the same time, the L(+)-adenosine caused an increase in Ca2+ flux within 3 s, whereas a significant increase from triacontanol was not detectable until 5 min after application. This was expected because triacontanol elicits the formation of L(+)-adenosine. The enantiomer of L(+)-adenosine, D(-)-adenosine, had no effect on the cation concentration in tomato and inhibited the effect of L(+)-adenosine at equimolar or lower concentrations. These observations suggest that L(+)-adenosine acts by eliciting a rapidly propagated signal that increases the concentration of several ions in the apoplast. We postulate that modulations in apoplastic ion concentration, especially increases in Ca2+ concentration, constitute a mechanism by which plants regulate metabolic activity and growth in response to certain stimuli. PMID:12231664

  11. Evidence for deactivation of both ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase by adenosine A1 receptor activation in the rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kitakaze, M; Hori, M; Minamino, T; Takashima, S; Komamura, K; Node, K; Kurihara, T; Morioka, T; Sato, H; Inoue, M

    1994-01-01

    Adenosine, an important regulator of many cardiac functions, is produced by ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase. The activity of these enzymes is influenced by several ischemia-sensitive metabolic factors, e.g., ATP, ADP, H+, and inorganic phosphate. However, there is no clear evidence that adenosine itself affects 5'-nucleotidase activity. This study tested whether adenosine decreases the activity of ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from adult male Wistar rats and suspended in the modified Hepes-Tyrode buffer solution. After stabilization, isolated cardiomyocytes were incubated with and without adenosine (10(-9) - 10(-4) M). Ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity was decreased by exogenous adenosine (ectosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity, 20.6 +/- 2.3 vs. 8.6 +/- 1.6 mumol/min per 10(6) cells [P < 0.05]; cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity, 2.47 +/- 0.58 vs. 1.61 +/- 0.54 mumol/min per 10(6) cells [P < 0.05] at 10(-6) M adenosine) after 30 min. The decrease in ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity was inhibited by 8-phenyltheophylline and pertussis toxin, and was mimicked by N6-cyclohexyladenosine, an adenosine A1 receptor agonist. Neither CGS21680C, and A2 receptor agonist, nor cycloheximide deactivated ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase. Thus, we conclude that activation of adenosine A1 receptors is coupled to Gi proteins and attenuates ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity in rat cardiomyocytes. Images PMID:7989602

  12. Molecular expression of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 human ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Hajiahmadi, S.; Panjehpour, M.; Aghaei, M.; Mousavi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (A1, A2a, A2b and A3) have several physiological and pathological roles in cancer cell lines. The present study was carried out to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression profile and functional role of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cell lines. The levels of mRNA and protein expression of A1, A2a, A2b and A3 adenosine receptors in the ovarian cancer cell lines were measured by Real-time PCR and western blotting. The functional roles of adenosine receptors were investigated through measurement of cAMP levels after agonist treatment. The mRNA and protein of all adenosine receptors subtypes were expressed in the ovarian cancer cell lines. Our findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 had the most mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, cAMP assay confirmed the functional role of A2b and A3 adenosine receptors. This findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 subtypes are most important adenosine receptors in humn ovarian cancer cell lines. This information provide a strong possibility into the relationship of A2b and A3 adenosine receptor and ovarian cancer. PMID:26430456

  13. Molecular expression of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 human ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hajiahmadi, S; Panjehpour, M; Aghaei, M; Mousavi, S

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (A1, A2a, A2b and A3) have several physiological and pathological roles in cancer cell lines. The present study was carried out to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression profile and functional role of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cell lines. The levels of mRNA and protein expression of A1, A2a, A2b and A3 adenosine receptors in the ovarian cancer cell lines were measured by Real-time PCR and western blotting. The functional roles of adenosine receptors were investigated through measurement of cAMP levels after agonist treatment. The mRNA and protein of all adenosine receptors subtypes were expressed in the ovarian cancer cell lines. Our findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 had the most mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, cAMP assay confirmed the functional role of A2b and A3 adenosine receptors. This findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 subtypes are most important adenosine receptors in humn ovarian cancer cell lines. This information provide a strong possibility into the relationship of A2b and A3 adenosine receptor and ovarian cancer. PMID:26430456

  14. Regulation of photoreceptor gap junction phosphorylation by adenosine in zebrafish retina

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyan; Chuang, Alice Z.; O’Brien, John

    2014-01-01

    Electrical coupling of photoreceptors through gap junctions suppresses voltage noise, routes rod signals into cone pathways, expands the dynamic range of rod photoreceptors in high scotopic and mesopic illumination, and improves detection of contrast and small stimuli. In essentially all vertebrates, connexin 35/36 (gene homologues Cx36 in mammals, Cx35 in other vertebrates) is the major gap junction protein observed in photoreceptors, mediating rod-cone, cone-cone, and possibly rod-rod communication. Photoreceptor coupling is dynamically controlled by the day/night cycle and light/dark adaptation, and is directly correlated with phosphorylation of Cx35/36 at two sites, serine110 and serine 276/293 (homologous sites in teleost fish and mammals respectively). Activity of protein kinase A (PKA) plays a key role during this process. Previous studies have shown that activation of dopamine D4 receptors on photoreceptors inhibits adenylyl cyclase, down-regulates cAMP and PKA activity, and leads to photoreceptor uncoupling, imposing the daytime/light condition. In this study we explored the role of adenosine, a nighttime signal with a high extracellular concentration at night and a low concentration in the day, in regulating photoreceptor coupling by examining photoreceptor Cx35 phosphorylation in zebrafish retina. Adenosine enhanced photoreceptor Cx35 phosphorylation in daytime, but with a complex dose-response curve. Selective pharmacological manipulations revealed that adenosine A2a receptors provide a potent positive drive to phosphorylate photoreceptor Cx35 under the influence of endogenous adenosine at night. A2a receptors can be activated in the daytime as well by micromolar exogenous adenosine. However, the higher affinity adenosine A1 receptors are also present and have an antagonistic though less potent effect. Thus the nighttime/darkness signal adenosine provides a net positive drive on Cx35 phosphorylation at night, working in opposition to dopamine to

  15. Postirradiation administration of adenosine monophosphate combined with dipyridamole reduces early cellular damage in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bohacek, J.; Hosek, B.; Pospisil, M. )

    1993-01-01

    The administration of dipyridamole and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) to mice 5 to 25 min after 1 Gy of total-body gamma irradiation was found to decrease cellular damage, as indicated by the thymidine level in plasma and the amount of saline soluble polynucleotides in the thymus. The drug combination used did not influence similar cytotoxic effects of hydrocortisone. Furthermore, it was shown that the addition of dipyridamole and AMP to in vitro irradiated suspensions of thymocytes enhanced the rejoining processes of DNA strand breaks. Receptor-mediated action of extracellular adenosine may be responsible for the therapeutic effects observed.

  16. Regulation of photoreceptor gap junction phosphorylation by adenosine in zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Chuang, Alice Z; O'Brien, John

    2014-05-01

    Electrical coupling of photoreceptors through gap junctions suppresses voltage noise, routes rod signals into cone pathways, expands the dynamic range of rod photoreceptors in high scotopic and mesopic illumination,