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Sample records for adenosine monophosphate amp-activated

  1. Supplementation of chitosan alleviates high-fat diet-enhanced lipogenesis in rats via adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase activation and inhibition of lipogenesis-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chen-Yuan; Chan, Im-Lam; Yang, Tsung-Han; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Chiang, Meng-Tsan

    2015-03-25

    This study investigated the role of chitosan in lipogenesis in high-fat diet-induced obese rats. The lipogenesis-associated genes and their upstream regulatory proteins were explored. Diet supplementation of chitosan efficiently decreased the increased weights in body, livers, and adipose tissues in high-fat diet-fed rats. Chitosan supplementation significantly raised the lipolysis rate; attenuated the adipocyte hypertrophy, triglyceride accumulation, and lipoprotein lipase activity in epididymal adipose tissues; and decreased hepatic enzyme activities of lipid biosynthesis. Chitosan supplementation significantly activated adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and attenuated high-fat diet-induced protein expressions of lipogenic transcription factors (PPAR-γ and SREBP1c) in livers and adipose tissues. Moreover, chitosan supplementation significantly inhibited the expressions of downstream lipogenic genes (FAS, HMGCR, FATP1, and FABP4) in livers and adipose tissues of high-fat diet-fed rats. These results demonstrate for the first time that chitosan supplementation alleviates high-fat diet-enhanced lipogenesis in rats via AMPK activation and lipogenesis-associated gene inhibition.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency adenosine ...

  3. 5'-Adenosine monophosphate and adenosine metabolism, and adenosine responses in mouse, rat and guinea pig heart.

    PubMed

    Headrick, J P; Peart, J; Hack, B; Garnham, B; Matherne, G P

    2001-11-01

    We examined myocardial 5'-adenosine monophosphate (5'-AMP) catabolism, adenosine salvage and adenosine responses in perfused guinea pig, rat and mouse heart. MVO(2) increased from 71+/-8 microl O(2)/min per g in guinea pig to 138+/-17 and 221+/-15 microl O(2)/min per g in rat and mouse. VO(2)/beat was 0.42+/-0.03, 0.50+/-0.03 and 0.55+/-0.04 microl O(2)/g in guinea pig, rat and mouse, respectively. Resting and peak coronary flows were highest in mouse vs. rat and guinea pig, and peak ventricular pressures and Ca(2+) sensitivity declined as heart mass increased. Net myocardial 5'-AMP dephosphorylation increased significantly as mass declined (3.8+/-0.5, 9.0+/-1.4 and 11.0+/-1.6 nmol/min per g in guinea pig, rat and mouse, respectively). Despite increased 5'-AMP catabolism, coronary venous [adenosine] was similar in guinea pig, rat and mouse (45+/-8, 69+/-10 and 57+/-14 nM, respectively). Comparable venous [adenosine] was achieved by increased salvage vs. deamination: 64%, 41% and 39% of adenosine formed was rephosphorylated while 23%, 46%, and 50% was deaminated in mouse, rat and guinea pig, respectively. Moreover, only 35-45% of inosine and its catabolites derive from 5'-AMP (vs. IMP) dephosphorylation in all species. Although post-ischemic purine loss was low in mouse (due to these adaptations), functional tolerance to ischemia decreased with heart mass. Cardiovascular sensitivity to adenosine also differed between species, with A(1) receptor sensitivity being greatest in mouse while A(2) sensitivity was greatest in guinea pig. In summary: (i) cardiac 5'-AMP dephosphorylation, VO(2), contractility and Ca(2+) sensitivity all increase as heart mass falls; (ii) adaptations in adenosine salvage vs. deamination limit purine loss and yield similar adenosine levels across species; (iii) ischemic tolerance declines with heart mass; and (iv) cardiovascular sensitivity to adenosine varies, with increasing A(2) sensitivity relative to A(1) sensitivity in larger hearts.

  4. A continuous spectrophotometric assay for monitoring adenosine 5'-monophosphate production.

    PubMed

    First, Eric A

    2015-08-15

    A number of biologically important enzymes release adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a product, including aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterases, ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like ligases, DNA ligases, coenzyme A (CoA) ligases, polyA deadenylases, and ribonucleases. In contrast to the abundance of assays available for monitoring the conversion of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) to ADP, there are relatively few assays for monitoring the conversion of ATP (or cAMP) to AMP. In this article, we describe a homogeneous assay that continuously monitors the production of AMP. Specifically, we have coupled the conversion of AMP to inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) (by AMP deaminase) to the oxidation of IMP (by IMP dehydrogenase). This results in the reduction of oxidized nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to reduced nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NADH), allowing AMP formation to be monitored by the change in the absorbance at 340 nm. Changes in AMP concentrations of 5 μM or more can be reliably detected. The ease of use and relatively low expense make the AMP assay suitable for both high-throughput screening and kinetic analyses. PMID:25957126

  5. Adenosine Monophosphate-Based Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Chen, Fei; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Hattori, Nori; Suzuki, Shigeya

    2009-01-01

    A method of rapid detection of bacterial spores is based on the discovery that a heat shock consisting of exposure to a temperature of 100 C for 10 minutes causes the complete release of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) from the spores. This method could be an alternative to the method described in the immediately preceding article. Unlike that method and related prior methods, the present method does not involve germination and cultivation; this feature is an important advantage because in cases in which the spores are those of pathogens, delays involved in germination and cultivation could increase risks of infection. Also, in comparison with other prior methods that do not involve germination, the present method affords greater sensitivity. At present, the method is embodied in a laboratory procedure, though it would be desirable to implement the method by means of a miniaturized apparatus in order to make it convenient and economical enough to encourage widespread use.

  6. Photo protection of RNA building blocks: Adenosine 5‧-monophosphate, cytidine 5‧-monophosphate and cytosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Jakob Brun; Thøgersen, Jan; Jensen, Svend Knak; Keiding, Søren Rud

    2013-04-01

    Photoprotection of the RNA nucleotides adenosine 5'-monophosphate and cytidine 5'-monophosphate, and the nucleobase cytosine was studied using UV pump, IR probe femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The excitation energy is contained in the aromatic ring system, protecting the RNA backbone. All three molecules dissipate the excitation energy by internal conversion and subsequent vibrational relaxation to the electronic ground state in less than 10 ps. In addition, a second deactivation channel is found in cytidine 5'-monophosphate, illustrated by a signal at 1563 cm-1 with a lifetime of 33 ps assigned to an nπ∗ state in agreement with observations in the UV region.

  7. Development of Potent Adenosine Monophosphate Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activators.

    PubMed

    Dokla, Eman M E; Fang, Chun-Sheng; Lai, Po-Ting; Kulp, Samuel K; Serya, Rabah A T; Ismail, Nasser S M; Abouzid, Khaled A M; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we reported the identification of a thiazolidinedione-based adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, compound 1 (N-[4-({3-[(1-methylcyclohexyl)methyl]-2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene}methyl)phenyl]-4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzenesulfonamide), which provided a proof of concept to delineate the intricate role of AMPK in regulating oncogenic signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer cells. In this study, we used 1 as a scaffold to conduct lead optimization, which generated a series of derivatives. Analysis of the antiproliferative and AMPK-activating activities of individual derivatives revealed a distinct structure-activity relationship and identified 59 (N-(3-nitrophenyl)-N'-{4-[(3-{[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methyl}-2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene)methyl]phenyl}urea) as the optimal agent. Relative to 1, compound 59 exhibits multifold higher potency in upregulating AMPK phosphorylation in various cell lines irrespective of their liver kinase B1 (LKB1) functional status, accompanied by parallel changes in the phosphorylation/expression levels of p70S6K, Akt, Foxo3a, and EMT-associated markers. Consistent with its predicted activity against tumors with activated Akt status, orally administered 59 was efficacious in suppressing the growth of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN)-null PC-3 xenograft tumors in nude mice. Together, these findings suggest that 59 has clinical value in therapeutic strategies for PTEN-negative cancer and warrants continued investigation in this regard.

  8. Development of Novel Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Activators

    PubMed Central

    Guh, Jih-Hwa; Chang, Wei-Ling; Yang, Jian; Lee, Su-Lin; Wei, Shuo; Wang, Dasheng; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2010-01-01

    In light of the unique ability of thiazolidinediones to mediate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and suppression of interleukin (IL)-6 production, we conducted a screening of an in-house, thiazolidinedione-based focused compound library to identify novel agents with these dual pharmacological activities. Cell-based assays pertinent to the activation status of AMPK and mammalian homolog of target of rapamycin (i.e., phosphorylation of AMPK and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase, respectively), and IL-6/IL-6 receptor signaling (i.e., IL-6 production and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation, respectively) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated THP-1 human macrophages were used to screen this compound library, which led to the identification of compound 53 (N-{4-[3-(1-Methylcyclohexylmethyl)-2,4-dioxo-thiazolidin-5-ylidene-methyl]-phenyl}-4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-benzenesulfonamide) as the lead agent. Evidence indicates that this drug-induced suppression of LPS-stimulated IL-6 production was attributable to AMPK activation. Furthermore, compound 53-mediated AMPK activation was demonstrated in C-26 colon adenocarcinoma cells, indicating that it is not a cell line-specific event. PMID:20170185

  9. Induction of phosphodiesterase by cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in differentiating Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae.

    PubMed

    Klein, C

    1975-09-25

    Cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate added to the starvation media of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae induces both intracellular and extracellular phosphodiesterase activities of these cells. The induced enzyme activity appears several hours earlier than that in starved cells which have not been induced with cyclic nucleotide. In both cases, the appearance of enzyme is inhibited by cycloheximide, and actinomycin D, and daunomycin. The KmS for the extracellular enzyme(s) of nucleotide-induced and uninduced control cells are identical. The induction of enzyme activity seems specific for cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate since cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate, as well as other nucleotides, have no effect. No differences in the activity or excretion of either N-acetylglucosaminidase or the inhibitory of the extracellular phosphodiesterase are observed between cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate-induced and control cells. A direct activation of phosphodiesterase by cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate can be excluded, since the addition of this nucleotide to cell lysates has no effect on the enzyme activity. PMID:170256

  10. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-10-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose. PMID:26434492

  11. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-10-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose.

  12. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose. PMID:26434492

  13. Effects of adenosine on polymorphonuclear leucocyte function, cyclic 3': 5'-adenosine monophosphate, and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Nielson, C. P.; Vestal, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    1. Inhibition of human polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) function by adenosine was studied with respect to effects of adenosine on intracellular cyclic AMP and calcium during the PMN respiratory burst. 2. The adenosine analogue 5'-N-ethylcarboxamide-adenosine (NECA) and L-N6-phenyl-isopropyl-adenosine (L-PIA) inhibited PMN oxygen metabolite generation with relative potencies (NECA greater than adenosine greater than L-PIA) characteristic of an A2 receptor. 3. The respiratory burst was inhibited by adenosine when PMN were activated by calcium ionophore or chemotactic peptide but not when cells where activated by oleoyl-acetyl-glycerol (OAG). 4. Adenosine increased intracellular cyclic AMP during the PMN respiratory burst regardless of whether cells were stimulated by ionophore, chemotactic peptide or OAG. 5. To determine whether the differences in cell inhibition by adenosine were related to differences in intracellular calcium mobilization by each activating agent, calcium was evaluated with the fluorescent probe, indo-1. Adenosine suppressed the increase in intracellular calcium following PMN activation by calcium ionophore or chemotactic peptide. In contrast, calcium did not increase in PMN activated by OAG and adenosine did not affect intracellular calcium changes following this stimulus. 6. These results demonstrate that physiological concentrations of adenosine inhibit the PMN respiratory burst in association with an increase in intracellular cyclic AMP and reduction of intracellular calcium. PMID:2547490

  14. Histone deacetylases 6 increases the cyclic adenosine monophosphate level and promotes renal cyst growth.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming; Mei, Changlin

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by abnormal enhanced cell proliferation and fluid secretion, which are triggered by increased levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Cebotaru et al. showed that a HDAC6 inhibitor reduced the cAMP level and inhibited cyst formation in Pkd1 knockout mice, which may become a new potential therapeutic agent for ADPKD. This study also raised several intriguing questions that might advance our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of ADPKD. PMID:27312442

  15. Protective mechanisms of adenosine 5'-monophosphate in platelet activation and thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, E; Badimon, L; Caballero, J; Padró, T; Vilahur, G; Alarcón, M; Pérez, P; Palomo, I

    2014-03-01

    Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of acute thrombotic events. We sought to examine adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) mechanisms of action in preventing platelet activation, thrombus formation and platelet-related inflammatory response. We assessed the effect of AMP on 1) P-selectin expression and GPIIb/IIIa activation by flow cytometry; 2) Platelet aggregation and ATP secretion induced by ADP, collagen, TRAP-6, convulxin and thrombin; 3) Platelet rolling and firm adhesion, and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow-controlled conditions; and, 4) Platelet cAMP levels, sP-selectin, sCD40L, IL-1β, TGF-β1 and CCL5 release, PDE3A activity and PKA phosphorylation. The effect of AMP on in vivo thrombus formation was also evaluated in a murine model. The AMP docking with respect to A2 adenosine receptor was determined by homology. AMP concentration-dependently (0.1 to 3 mmol/l) inhibited P-selectin expression and GPIIb/IIIa activation, platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, TRAP-6 and convulxin, and diminished platelet rolling and firm adhesion. Furthermore, AMP induced a marked increase in the rolling speed of leukocytes retained on the platelet surface. At these concentrations AMP significantly decreased inflammatory mediator from platelet, increased intraplatelet cAMP levels and inhibited PDE3A activity. Interestingly, SQ22536, ZM241385 and SCH58261 attenuated the antiplatelet effect of AMP. Docking experiments revealed that AMP had the same orientation that adenosine inside the A2 adenosine receptor binding pocket. These in vitro antithrombotic properties were further supported in an in vivo model of thrombosis. Considering the successful use of combined antiplatelet therapy, AMP may be further developed as a novel antiplatelet agent. PMID:24306059

  16. Adenosine monophosphate deaminase 3 activation shortens erythrocyte half-life and provides malaria resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Hortle, Elinor; Nijagal, Brunda; Bauer, Denis C; Jensen, Lora M; Ahn, Seong Beom; Cockburn, Ian A; Lampkin, Shelley; Tull, Dedreia; McConville, Malcolm J; McMorran, Brendan J; Foote, Simon J; Burgio, Gaetan

    2016-09-01

    The factors that determine red blood cell (RBC) lifespan and the rate of RBC aging have not been fully elucidated. In several genetic conditions, including sickle cell disease, thalassemia, and G6PD deficiency, erythrocyte lifespan is significantly shortened. Many of these diseases are also associated with protection from severe malaria, suggesting a role for accelerated RBC senescence and clearance in malaria resistance. Here, we report a novel, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutation that causes a gain of function in adenosine 5'-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD3). Mice carrying the mutation exhibit rapid RBC turnover, with increased erythropoiesis, dramatically shortened RBC lifespan, and signs of increased RBC senescence/eryptosis, suggesting a key role for AMPD3 in determining RBC half-life. Mice were also found to be resistant to infection with the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi. We propose that resistance to P. chabaudi is mediated by increased RBC turnover and higher rates of erythropoiesis during infection. PMID:27465915

  17. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate waves in dictyostelium discoideum: a demonstration by isotope dilution-fluorography

    SciTech Connect

    Tomchik, K.J.; Devreotes, P.N.

    1981-04-24

    The distribution of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) in fields of aggregating amoebae of Dictyostelium discoidenum was examined by a novel isotope dilution-fluorographic technique. Cellular cyclic AMP was visualized by its competition with exogenous /sup 3/H-labeled cyclic AMP for high-affinity binding sites on protein kinase immobilized on a Millipore filter used to blot the monolayer. The cyclic AMP was distributed in spiral or concentric circular wave patterns which centered on the foci of the aggregations. These patterns were correlated with those of cell shape change that propagate through the monolayers. These observations support the hypothesis that the aggregation process in Dictyostelium is mediated by the periodic relay of cyclic AMP signals and suggest a simple scheme for the dynamics of the aggregation process.

  18. Intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, and adenosine 5'-monophosphate detection by short-end injection capillary electrophoresis using methylcellulose as the effective electroosmostic flow suppressor.

    PubMed

    Zinellu, Angelo; Sotgia, Salvatore; Pasciu, Valeria; Madeddu, Manuela; Leoni, Giovanni Giuseppe; Naitana, Salvatore; Deiana, Luca; Carru, Ciriaco

    2008-07-01

    We present a new rapid CE method to measure adenine nucleotides adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) in cells. The short-end injection mode allows a decrease in the analysis time by injecting samples at the outlet end of a silica capillary closest to the detection window, reducing the migration distance. Moreover, the use of methylcellulose (MC) as run buffer additive to suppress EOF permits to further reduce the migration times of analytes. Thus, when a capillary with an effective length of 10.2 cm was used with a 60 mmol/L sodium acetate buffer pH 3.80 in the presence of 0.01% of MC, the migration time of analytes were 1.35 min for ATP, 1.85 min for ADP, and 4.64 min for AMP. These conditions gave a good reproducibility for intra- and interassay (CV <4 and 8%, respectively) and all the procedure demonstrated an excellent analytical recovery (from 98.3 to 99 %). The method suitability was proved both on red blood cells and in spermatozoa. We compared our proposed method to a spectrophotometric assay, by measuring ATP levels in 40 spermatozoa samples. The obtained data were analyzed by the Passing and Bablok regression and Bland-Altman test. PMID:18551716

  19. Attempts to detect cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in higher plants by three assay methods.

    PubMed

    Bressan, R A; Ross, C W

    1976-01-01

    Endogenous levels of cyclic adenosine-3':5'-monophosphate in coleoptile first leaf segments of oat (Avena sativa L.), potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) callus, and germinating seeds of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were measured with a modified Gilman binding assay and a protein kinase activation assay. The incorporation of adenosine-8-(14)C into compounds with properties similar to those of cyclic AMP was also measured in studies with germinating lettuce seeds. The binding assay proved reliable for mouse and rat liver analyses, but was nonspecific for plant tissues. It responded to various components from lettuce and potato tissues chromatographically similar to but not identical with cyclic AMP. The protein kinase activation assay was much more specific, but it also exhibited positive responses in the presence of compounds not chromatographically identical to cyclic AMP. The concentrations of cyclic AMP in the plant tissues tested were at the lower limits of detection and characterization obtainable with these assays. The estimates of maximal levels were much lower than reported in many previous studies. PMID:16659419

  20. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ monophosphate (AMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, K.; Feki, H. El; Marsan, O.; Drouet, C.

    2015-10-01

    This work investigates the interaction between the nucleotide adenosine 5‧ monophosphate molecule (AMP) and a biomimetic nanocrystalline carbonated apatite as a model for bone mineral. The analogy of the apatite phase used in this work with biological apatite was first pointed out by complementary techniques. AMP adsorption isotherms were then investigated. Obtained data were fitted to a Sips isotherm with an exponent greater than one suggesting positive cooperativity among adsorbed molecules. The data were compared to a previous study relative to the adsorption of another nucleotide, cytidine monophosphate (CMP) onto a similar substrate, evidencing some effect of the chemical nature of the nucleic base. An enhanced adsorption was observed under acidic (pH 6) conditions as opposed to pH 7.4, which parallels the case of DNA adsorption on biomimetic apatite. An estimated standard Gibbs free energy associated to the adsorption process (ΔG°ads ≅ -22 kJ/mol) intermediate between "physisorption" and "chemisorption" was found. The analysis of the solids after adsorption pointed to the preservation of the main characteristics of the apatite substrate but shifts or enhancements of Raman bands attributed to AMP showed the existence of chemical interactions involving both the phosphate and adenine parts of AMP. This contribution adds to the works conducted in view of better understanding the interaction of DNA/RNA and their constitutive nucleotides and the surface of biomimetic apatites. It could prove helpful in disciplines such as bone diagenesis (DNA/apatite interface in aged bones) or nanomedicine (setup of DNA- or RNA-loaded apatite systems). Also, the adsorption of nucleic acids on minerals like apatites could have played a role in the preservation of such biomolecules in the varying conditions known to exist at the origin of life on Earth, underlining the importance of dedicated adsorption studies.

  1. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate ameliorates D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury through an adenosine receptor-independent mechanism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Y; Wang, Z; Yang, P; Wang, T; Xia, L; Zhou, M; Wang, Y; Wang, S; Hua, Z; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    D-galactosamine (GalN)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lethality and acute liver failure is dependent on endogenously produced inflammatory cytokines. Adenosine has been proven to be a central role in the regulation of inflammatory response. It is not entirely clear that which adenosine action is actually crucial to limiting inflammatory tissue destruction. Here we showed that GalN/LPS challenge elevated hepatic adenosine and induced lethality in adenosine receptor-deficient mice with equal efficiency as wild-type mice. In GalN/LPS-treated mice, pretreatment with adenosine 5′-monophosphate (5′-AMP) significantly elevated hepatic adenosine level and reduced mortality through decreasing cytokine and chemokine production. In RAW264.7 cells, 5′-AMP treatment inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines, which is not mediated through adenosine receptors. 5′-AMP failed to attenuate LPS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 nuclear translocation, but reduced LPS-induced recruitment of NF-κB p65 to inflammatory gene promoters and decreased LPS-induced enrichment of H3K4 dimethylation at the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) promoter, which was involved in 5′-AMP-induced elevation of cellular adenosine and a decline of methylation potential. In vitro biochemical analysis revealed that adenosine directly attenuated recruitment of NF-κB to the TNF-α and interleukin-6 promoters. Our findings demonstrate that 5′-AMP-inhibiting inflammatory response is not mediated by adenosine receptors and it may represent a potential protective agent for amelioration of LPS-induced liver injury. PMID:24407238

  2. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and germination of sporangiospores from the fungus Mucor.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, M

    1980-06-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) metabolism was examined in germinating sporangiospores of Mucor genevensis and Mucor mucedo. Exogenous cAMP prevented normal hyphal development from sporangiospores. Internal pools of cAMP fluctuated profoundly during development. Spherical growth of the spores was characterized by large pools of cAMP whereas germ tube emergence and hyphal elongation were characterized by small pools of cAMP. These observations suggest a possible role for cAMP in sporangiospore germination. Adenylate cyclase activities fluctuated significantly during germination with maximum values attained during spherical growth. In contrast, cAMP phosphodiesterase activities remained constant throughout germination. Internal cAMP levels may therefore be regulated by adjustment of adenylate cyclase activities. The binding of cAMP by soluble cell proteins was measured. cAMP-binding activity changed greatly during germination. Dormant and spherically growing spores possessed the highest activities. Developing hyphae contained the lowest activities. Use of the photoaffinity label, 8-azido-[32P]cAMP, in conjunction with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis allowed the identification of a small population of morphogenetic-stage-specific proteins which bind cAMP and may be of regulatory significance to development.

  3. Lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate during and after normal pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    von Mandach, U.; Gubler, H. P.; Engel, G.; Huch, R.; Huch, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The beta 2-sympathomimetics, used to inhibit preterm labour, bind predominantly to beta 2-adrenoceptors, activating adenylate cyclase to form adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), a messenger substance which inhibits the enzyme cascade triggering smooth muscle contraction. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP formation can be used as markers of beta 2-adrenergic effect. 2. The present study addresses the influence of pregnancy on the beta-adrenoceptor system. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) in circulating lymphocytes were determined at three points in gestation (16, 29 and 37 weeks) and 9 weeks post partum in 22 normal pregnancies. (-)-[125Iodo]-cyanopindolol was used as the ligand to identify a homogeneous population of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes. B- and T-cell fractions were estimated from the same samples. 3. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density decreased significantly during gestation until week 37 (P < 0.01), then increased post partum (P < 0.005). Cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) were significantly lower after 16 weeks of gestation than post partum (P < 0.05). 4. The results, which cannot be explained in terms of a shift in the lymphocyte (B- and T-cell) ratio, indicate that beta-adrenoceptor density and function are reduced in normal pregnancy and only return to normal post partum. These findings may be of significance in devising future tocolytic therapy with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:8383562

  4. Xylazine Activates Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in the Central Nervous System of Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xing-Xing; Yin, Bai-Shuang; Yang, Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Xin; Su, Li-Xue; Fan, Hong-Gang; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Xylazine is a potent analgesic extensively used in veterinary and animal experimentation. Evidence exists that the analgesic effect can be inhibited using adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors. Considering this idea, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the AMPK signaling pathway is involved in the central analgesic mechanism of xylazine in the rat. Xylazine was administrated via the intraperitoneal route. Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem were collected for determination of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα mRNA expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα levels using western blot. The results of our study showed that compared with the control group, xylazine induced significant increases in AMPK activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum after rats received xylazine (P < 0.01). Increased AMPK activities were accompanied with increased phosphorylation levels of LKB1 in corresponding regions of rats. The protein levels of phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα in these regions returned or tended to return to control group levels. However, in the brainstem, phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα protein levels were decreased by xylazine compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicates that xylazine alters the activities of LKB1 and AMPK in the central nervous system of rats, which suggests that xylazine affects the regulatory signaling pathway of the analgesic mechanism in the rat brain. PMID:27049320

  5. Adenosine 3′:5′-Cyclic Monophosphate in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Isolation and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Amrhein, Nikolaus; Filner, Philip

    1973-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains a factor that can replace adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in the stimulation of rabbit-muscle protein kinase. The factor cochromatographs and coelectrophoreses with authentic cAMP, and is inactivated by beef heart cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. When C. reinhardtii is exposed to aminophylline (theophylline2 ethylenediamine), the concentration of the factor in the cells increases within 1 hr, from about 25 pmol of cAMP equivalents per g dry weight to more than 250 pmol. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity is present in crude extract of C. reinhardtii and is inhibited by theophylline. We conclude that cAMP occurs in C. reinhardtii and that the endogenous concentration is governed at least in part by a theophylline-sensitive cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. These findings provide a sound basis for attributing the effects of methylxanthines on flagellar function and regeneration in C. reinhardtii to the resultant elevation of endogenous cAMP. PMID:16592076

  6. Control of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate levels by depolarizing agents in fungi.

    PubMed

    Trevillyan, J M; Pall, M L

    1979-05-01

    It has been reported that diverse treatments which depolarize the plasma membrane of Neurospora crassa produce rapid increases in cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels. In the current study, membrane active antibiotics, which are known or putative depolarizing agents, were found to produce similar cyclic AMP increases, not only in N. crassa, but also in the distantly related fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Mucor racemosus. Uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation, which have been found to depolarize Neurospora, also produced cyclic AMP increases in all three fungi. The time course of the cyclic AMP response to these various treatments was similar in all three fungi. The fungal studies and studies on depolarized central nervous tissue suggest that cyclic AMP increases may be produced in response to plasma membrane depolarization in diverse eucaryotic cells. A model is proposed for eucaryotic microorganisms in which membrane depolarization serves as a signal of breakdown of the plasma membrane integrity. The subsequent cyclic AMP increase, in turn, may mediate cellular response to help protect the plasma membrane from chemical and mechanical threats to its integrity.

  7. Adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate levels in Thermomonospora curvata during cellulase biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fennington, G.; Neubauer, D.; Stutzenberger, F.

    1983-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of cellulose requires the synergistic activity of at least three enzymes: exo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.91), endo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.4), and beta-glucosidase (EC3.2.1.21). Despite extensive studies on a variety of cellulolytic bacteria and fungi, the mechanism(s) regulating the biosynthesis of this inducible catabolic enzyme complex remains unknown. The intracellular concentrations of cyclic nucleotides such as adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) have been shown to play a major role in mediating catabolite repression of enzyme biosynthesis. The cAMP acts through a cAMP receptor protein (termed CRP or CAP) which is a dimer having two identical subunits each capable of binding one molecule of cAMP. The N-terminal domain of the CRP binds the cAMP while the C-terminal domain binds to DNA at the promotor region of a cAMP-dependent operon and stimulates transcription by promoting the formation of a preinitiation complex between RNA polymerase and the DNA. Intracellular cAMP levels in E. coli (the prototype organism for such studies) are influenced by the type and availability of carbon source used for growth. High intracellular cAMP levels should lead to higher concentrations of cAMP-CRP complexes which should increase the transcription rates for cAMP-dependent operons (such as the lac operon of beta-galactosidase) and indeed the differential rate of beta-galactosidase biosynthesis correlates to intracellular cAMP levels. In the case of cellulase, catabolite repression by glucose or other readily metabolizable compounds closely controls production in an apparently similar manner and therefore a correlation may exist between enzyme biosynthesis and intracellular cAMP levels. This communication describes the fluctuation in cAMP levels during cellulase induction and repression in the thermophilic actinomycete, Thermomonospora curvata.

  8. Xylazine Activates Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in the Central Nervous System of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xing-Xing; Yin, Bai-Shuang; Yang, Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Xin; Su, Li-Xue; Fan, Hong-Gang; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Xylazine is a potent analgesic extensively used in veterinary and animal experimentation. Evidence exists that the analgesic effect can be inhibited using adenosine 5’-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors. Considering this idea, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the AMPK signaling pathway is involved in the central analgesic mechanism of xylazine in the rat. Xylazine was administrated via the intraperitoneal route. Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem were collected for determination of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα mRNA expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα levels using western blot. The results of our study showed that compared with the control group, xylazine induced significant increases in AMPK activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum after rats received xylazine (P < 0.01). Increased AMPK activities were accompanied with increased phosphorylation levels of LKB1 in corresponding regions of rats. The protein levels of phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα in these regions returned or tended to return to control group levels. However, in the brainstem, phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα protein levels were decreased by xylazine compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicates that xylazine alters the activities of LKB1 and AMPK in the central nervous system of rats, which suggests that xylazine affects the regulatory signaling pathway of the analgesic mechanism in the rat brain. PMID:27049320

  9. Novel adenosine 3 prime ,5 prime -cyclic monophosphate dependent protein kinases in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.P.C.; Volcani, B.E. )

    1989-08-08

    Two novel adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinases have been isolated from the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis. The kinases, designated I and II, are eluted from DEAE-Sephacel at 0.10 and 0.15 M NaCl. They have a high affinity for cAMP and are activated by micromolar cAMP. They exhibit maximal activity at 5 mM Mg{sup 2+} and pH 8 with the preferred phosphate donor ATP and phosphate acceptor histone H1. They phosphorylate sea urchin sperm histone H1 on a single serine site in the sequence Arg-Lys-Gly-Ser({sup 32}P)-Ser-Asn-Ala-Arg and have an apparent M{sub r} of 75,000 as determined by gel filtration and sucrose density sedimentation. In the kinase I preparation a single protein band with an apparent M{sub r} of about 78,000 is photolabeled with 8-azido({sup 32}P)cAMP and is also phosphorylated with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in a cAMP-dependent manner, after autoradiography following sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. The rate of phosphorylation of the 78,000-dalton band is independent of the enzyme concentration. The results indicate that (i) these diatom cAMP-dependent protein kinases are monomeric proteins, possessing both the cAMP-binding regulatory and catalytic domains on the same polypeptide chain, (ii) the enzymes do not dissociate into smaller species upon activation by binding cAMP, and (iii) self-phosphorylation of the enzymes by an intrapeptide reaction is cAMP dependent. The two diatom cAMP kinases are refractory to the heat-stable protein kinase modulator from rabbit muscle, but they respond differently to proteolytic degradation and to inhibition by arachidonic acid and several microbial alkaloids.

  10. Repetitive mechanical strain suppresses macrophage uptake of immunoglobulin G complexes and enhances cyclic adenosine monophosphate synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Mattana, J.; Sankaran, R. T.; Singhal, P. C.

    1995-01-01

    Uptake of immunoglobulin G (IgG) complexes by macrophages (M phi) may play an important role in disease states characterized by increased levels of circulating immune complexes. In sites such as the glomerular mesangium M phi may be subjected to repetitive mechanical strain, although in vitro studies of M phi endocytosis are typically carried out with cells grown on rigid surfaces. We undertook the present study to determine whether repetitive mechanical strain could modulate M phi endocytosis of IgG complexes. IgG complex uptake was significantly diminished in M phi that were subjected to repetitive mechanical strain using parameters corresponding to peak and minimal intraglomerular pressures compared with control, and uptake varied according to the amount of mechanical strain applied. There was no significant difference in surface binding of IgG between M phi subjected to strain and those not. Mechanical strain did not significantly influence the rate of IgG complex degradation. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase and guanylate cyclase activity did not alter the effect of mechanical strain, although this effect was potentiated by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Angiotensin II, which has been shown to reduce adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) production in M phi, significantly attenuated the suppressive effect of mechanical strain on IgG complex uptake as well as another inhibitor of cAMP generation, indomethacin. Enzyme immunoassay demonstrated significantly enhanced levels of cAMP in M phi that were subjected to mechanical strain compared with control, an effect that was potentiated by IBMX and attenuated by angiotensin II and indomethacin. These results demonstrate that repetitive mechanical strain significantly reduces IgG complex uptake by M phi, most likely by enhancing cAMP synthesis. Such an effect might play a significant role in macromolecule handling by M phi in sites in which they are subjected to repetitive mechanical deformation such as

  11. Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Accumulation and beta-Adrenergic Binding in Unweighted and Denervated Rat Soleus Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Woolridge, Dale; Tischler, Marc E.

    1992-01-01

    Unweighting, but not denervation, of muscle reportedly "spares" insulin receptors, increasing insulin sensitivity. Unweighting also increases beta-adrenergic responses of carbohydrate metabolism. These differential characteristics were studied further by comparing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and beta-adrenergic binding in normal and 3-day unweighted or denervated soleus muscle. Submaximal amounts of isoproterenol, a p-agonist, increased cAMP accumulation in vitro and in vivo (by intramuscular (IM) injection) to a greater degree (P less than .05) in unweighted muscles. Forskolin or maximal isoproterenol had similar in vitro effects in all muscles, suggesting increased beta-adrenergic sensitivity following unweighting. Increased sensitivity was confirmed by a greater receptor density (B(sub max)) for iodo-125(-)-pindolol in particulate preparations of unweighted (420 x 10(exp -18) mol/mg muscle) than of control or denervated muscles (285 x 10(exp-18) mol/mg muscle). The three dissociation constant (Kd) values were similar (20.3 to 25.8 pmol/L). Total binding capacity (11.4 fmol/muscle) did not change during 3 days of unweighting, but diminished by 30% with denervation. This result illustrates the "sparing" and loss of receptors, respectively, in these two atrophy models. In diabetic animals, IM injection of insulin diminished CAMP accumulation in the presence of theophylline in unweighted muscle (-66% +/- 2%) more than in controls (-42% +'- 6%, P less than .001). These results show that insulin affects CAMP formation in muscle, and support a greater in vivo insulin response following unweighting atrophy. These various data support a role for lysosomal proteolysis in denervation, but not in unweighting, atrophy.

  12. Adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate- and guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinases: Possible homologous proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lincoln, Thomas M.; Corbin, Jackie D.

    1977-01-01

    The properties of purified mammalian adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)- and guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinases were compared. Several physical characteristics of the two enzymes were similar, including size, shape, affinity for cyclic nucleotide binding, and Km for ATP. In addition, the amino acid composition of the two proteins indicated a close composition homology (70-90%). Both cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases catalyzed phosphorylation of rat liver pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) and fructose 1,6-diphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11), rabbit skeletal muscle glycogen synthase (EC 2.4.1.11) and phosphorylase b kinase (EC 2.7.1.38), and calf thymus histone H2b. The phosphorylation of several synthetic peptides and of trypsin-sensitive and trypsin-insensitive sites in glycogen synthase suggested similar recognition sites on the protein substrates for the two kinases. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase was the better catalyst with each protein or peptides substrate. The results suggest that the two enzymes evolved from a common ancestral protein. Images PMID:198777

  13. The effect of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane on levels of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in two species of insects.

    PubMed

    Bodnaryk, R P

    1976-11-01

    Within 1 h after topical application of a convulsive dose (4 mug per fly, 47 mg/kg) of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) to the adult male of Sarcophaga bullata Parker, guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) levels rose by 71.5% (P less than 0.05) in the head, 159.5% (P less than 0.01) in the thorax, and 23.4% (P greater than 0.05) in the abdomen compared to controls. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels were not significantly affected by the DDT treatment. A convulsive dose (100 mug per larva, 250 mg/kg) of DDT applied to larvae of Mamestra configurata Wlk. caused the whole body level of cyclic GMP to rise by 81.6% (P less than 0.01) after 1 h, and by 95.9% (P less than 0.01) after 3 h. Levels of cyclic AMP were not affected. A hypothesis is advanced suggesting that an abnormally high rate of discharge of acetylcholine (and in the later stages of poisoning, its actual accumulation) at central cholinergic synapses causes cyclic GMP levels to rise, perhaps in post-synaptic cells. The elevated cyclic GMP-cyclic AMP ratio found in DDT-poisoned insects may be of fundamental importance in the complex sequence of events leading to tremor, hyperexcitability, paralysis, and death.

  14. Dielectric spectra broadening as a signature for dipole-matrix interaction. III. Water in adenosine monophosphate/adenosine-5'-triphosphate solutions.

    PubMed

    Puzenko, Alexander; Levy, Evgeniya; Shendrik, Andrey; Talary, Mark S; Caduff, Andreas; Feldman, Yuri

    2012-11-21

    In this, the third part of our series on the dielectric spectrum symmetrical broadening of water, we consider the nucleotide aqueous solutions. Where in Parts I [E. Levy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114502 (2012)] and II [E. Levy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114503 (2012)], the dipole-dipole or ion-dipole interaction had a dominant feature, now the interplay between these two types of dipole-matrix interactions will be considered. We present the results of high frequency dielectric measurements of different concentrations of adenosine monophosphate/adenosine-5'-triphosphate aqueous solutions. We observed the Cole-Cole broadening of the main relaxation peak of the solvent in the solutions. Moreover, depending on the nucleotide concentration, we observed both types of dipole-matrix interaction. The 3D trajectory approach (described in detail in Part I) is applied in order to highlight the differences between the two types of interaction.

  15. Gas-Phase Conformations and Energetics of Protonated 2^'-DEOXYADENOSINE-5^'-MONOPHOSPHATE and ADENOSINE-5^'-MONOPHOSPHATE: Irmpd Action Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ranran; Nei, Y.-W.; He, Chenchen; Hamlow, Lucas; Berden, Giel; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2015-06-01

    Nature uses protonation to alter the structures and reactivities of molecules to facilitate various biological functions and chemical transformations. For example, in nucleobase repair and salvage processes, protonation facilitates nucleobase removal by lowering the activation barrier for glycosidic bond cleavage. Systematic studies of the structures of protonated 2'-deoxyribonucleotides and ribonucleotides may provide insight into the roles protonation plays in altering the nucleobase orientation relative to the glycosidic bond and sugar puckering. In this study, infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy experiments in conjunction with electronic structure calculations are performed to probe the effects of protonation on the structures and stabilities of 2^'-deoxyadenosine-5^'-monophosphate (pdAdo) and adenosine-5^'-monophosphate (pAdo). Photodissociation as a function of IR wavelength is measured to generate the IRMPD action spectra. Geometry optimizations and frequency analyses performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory are used to characterize the stable low-energy structures and to generate their linear IR spectra. Single point energy calculations performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) and MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p) levels of theory provide relative stabilities of the optimized conformations. The structures accessed in the experiments are determined by comparing the calculated linear IR spectra for the stable low-energy conformers computed to the measured IRMPD action spectra. The effects of the 2^'-hydroxyl moiety are elucidated by comparing the structures and IRMPD spectra of [pAdo+H]+ to those of its DNA analogue. Comparisons are also made to the deprotonated forms of these nucleotides and the protonated forms of the analogous nucleosides to elucidate the effects of protonation and the phosphate group on the structures.

  16. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study demonstrates, on the basis of several analyanalytical criteria, that the production and extracellular release of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is widespread among phytoplankton species. The production and release of CAMP varied markedly among different species grown under similar environmental conditions, and intraspecifically during the life cycle of a given algal species. This investigation marks the first time cAMP has been investigated in natural aquatic systems. An examination of epilimnetic lakewater samples from Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan, demonstrated that cAMP existed in both particulate-associated and dissolved forms in these systems.

  17. In Silico Design for Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Agonist from Traditional Chinese Medicine for Treatment of Metabolic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hsin-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a master mediator of metabolic homeostasis. It is considered as a significant millstone to treat metabolic syndromes including obesity, diabetes, and fatty liver. It can sense cellular energy or nutrient status by switching on the catabolic pathways. Investigation of AMPK has new findings recently. AMPK can inhibit cell growth by the way of autophagy. Thus AMPK has become a hot target for small molecular drug design of tumor inhibition. Activation of AMPK must undergo certain extent change of the structure. Through the methods of structure-based virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulation, we attempted to find out appropriate small compounds from the world's largest TCM Database@Taiwan that had the ability to activate the function of AMPK. Finally, we found that two TCM compounds, eugenyl_beta-D-glucopyranoside and 6-O-cinnamoyl-D-glucopyranose, had the qualification to be AMPK agonist. PMID:24899913

  18. [Concentration of prostaglandins and cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate in the tissues of rats].

    PubMed

    Komissarenko, V P; Slavnov, V N; Epsheĭn, E V; Malinkovich, V D

    1977-04-01

    The content of prostaglandines (PG) and cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monphosphate (cAMP) was investigated in rat tissues by the radioisotopic method of competitive binding. Maximum quantities of both PG and cAMP were revealed in the same most actively functioning organs: the brain, incretory glands, small intestine. Fatty tissue showed minimum quantities of these substances. Results indicate a close functional relationship between the PG synthesis and adenylatecyclase activity in the body tissues.

  19. Measuring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate level in living cells induced by low-level laser irradiation using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Zheng, Liqin; Yang, Hongqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies demonstrated that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), an important second messenger, is involved in the mechanism of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) treatment. However, most of these studies obtained the cAMP level in cell culture extracts or supernatant. In this study, the cAMP level in living cells was measured with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The effect of LLLI on cAMP level in living cells with adenosine receptors blocked was explored to identify the role of adenosine receptors in LLLI. The results showed that LLLI increased the cAMP level. Moreover, the rise of cAMP level was light dose dependent but wavelength independent for 658-, 785-, and 830-nm laser light. The results also exhibited that the adenosine receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), modulated the increase of cAMP level induced by LLLI. The cAMP level increased more significantly when the A3 adenosine receptors (A3R) were blocked by A3R antagonist compared with A1 adenosine receptor or A2a adenosine receptor blocked in HEK293T cells after LLLI, which was in good agreement with the adenosine receptors' expressions. All these results suggested that measuring the cAMP level with BRET could be a useful technique to study the role of GPCRs in living cells under LLLI.

  20. Selective Phosphonylation of 5'-Adenosine Monophosphate (5'-AMP) via Pyrophosphite [PPi(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Karl; Bryant, David E.; Marriott, Katie E. R.; Ohara, Shohei; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Kee, Terence P.

    2016-11-01

    We describe here experiments which demonstrate the selective phospho-transfer from a plausibly prebiotic condensed phosphorus (P) salt, pyrophosphite [H2P2O5 2-; PPi(III)], to the phosphate group of 5'-adenosine mono phosphate (5'-AMP). We show further that this P-transfer process is accelerated both by divalent metal ions (M2+) and by organic co-factors such as acetate (AcO-). In this specific case of P-transfer from PPi(III) to 5'-AMP, we show a synergistic enhancement of transfer in the combined presence of M2+ & AcO-. Isotopic labelling studies demonstrate that hydrolysis of the phosphonylated 5'-AMP, [P(III)P(V)-5'-AMP], proceeds via nuceophilic attack of water at the Pi(III) terminus.

  1. Selective Phosphonylation of 5'-Adenosine Monophosphate (5'-AMP) via Pyrophosphite [PPi(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Karl; Bryant, David E.; Marriott, Katie E. R.; Ohara, Shohei; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Kee, Terence P.

    2016-05-01

    We describe here experiments which demonstrate the selective phospho-transfer from a plausibly prebiotic condensed phosphorus (P) salt, pyrophosphite [H2P2O5 2-; PPi(III)], to the phosphate group of 5'-adenosine mono phosphate (5'-AMP). We show further that this P-transfer process is accelerated both by divalent metal ions (M2+) and by organic co-factors such as acetate (AcO-). In this specific case of P-transfer from PPi(III) to 5'-AMP, we show a synergistic enhancement of transfer in the combined presence of M2+ & AcO-. Isotopic labelling studies demonstrate that hydrolysis of the phosphonylated 5'-AMP, [P(III)P(V)-5'-AMP], proceeds via nuceophilic attack of water at the Pi(III) terminus.

  2. An evaluation of short-term corticosteroid response in perennial allergic rhinitis using histamine and adenosine monophosphate nasal challenge

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew M; Sims, Erika J; Orr, Linda C; Robb, Fiona; Lipworth, Brian J

    2003-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the role of AMP nasal challenge as a measure of short-term treatment response in patients receiving intranasal corticosteroids. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) challenge has been shown to be a good inflammatory surrogate in the lower airways, but it has not been properly evaluated as a nasal challenge test. Methods Fourteen patients with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) were randomized to receive 2 weeks treatment with placebo (PL) or 200 µg intranasal mometasone furoate (MF) once daily in a randomized single-blind crossover study. AMP (25–800 mg ml−1) and histamine (0.25–8 mg ml−1) nasal challenge testing were performed after each treatment period with 30% decrease in minimal cross-sectional area (MCA). Domiciliary symptom data were collected. Results There was a significant (P < 0.05) improvement in PC30 MCA and nasal volume with AMP but not with histamine comparing MF vs PL. This amounted to a 2.8 (95% CI 1.5, 4.0) and 0.7 (95% CI −0.5, 1.9) doubling-dose change for AMP and histamine challenges, respectively. There were significant (P < 0.05) improvements in nasal symptoms and quality of life. Conclusions AMP nasal challenge using acoustic rhinometry may be a useful test to assess short-term treatment response in patient with PAR. PMID:12680883

  3. Directed breeding of an Arthrobacter mutant for high-yield production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate by N + ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, He; Chen, Xiaochun; Cao, Jiaming; Fang, Ting; Bai, Jianxin; Xiong, Jian; Ying, Hanjie

    2010-08-01

    To obtain a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) high-yield production strain, Arthrobacter NG-1 was mutated by N + ion implantation with an energy level of 10 keV and dose of 7×10 15 ions/cm 2. Combined with directed screening methods, a xanthine-defective and 8-azaguanine (8-AG)-resistant mutant Arthrobacter A302 was selected. The concentration of cAMP produced by this mutant was 41.7% higher than that of the original strain and reached 9.78 g/L. Through ten-generation investigation, the capability of cAMP production of A302 was found to be stable. Compared with the original strain, the special activities of key enzymes in A302, which influenced the cAMP biosynthesis, was analyzed. IMP dehydrogenase activity was defective, whereas PRPP amidotransferase, sAMP synthetase and adenylate cyclase activities were increased by 61.5%, 147% and 21.7%, respecitively, which might explain the mutagenesis mechanism by N + ions implantation under the enzymatic level.

  4. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study is an investigation into the occurrence and potential functions of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP), a potent and ubiquitous metabolic regulatory molecule in heterotrophic organisms, in phytoplankton and in natural aquatic communities. Laboratory-cultured phytoplankton were grown under both optimal and suboptimal nutrient regimes under constant temperature and illumination regimes. Cellular and extracellular cAMP production, characterized by a number of biochemical techniques, was correlated with growth rate dynamics, chlorophyll a synthesis, /sup 14/C-bicarbonate uptake, alkaline phosphatase activity, and heterocyst formation. The blue-green alga Anabaena flos-aquae was used as a model system in the examination of these metabolic variables. Additionally, this alga was used to test the effects of perturbation of cAMP levels on the aforementioned metabolic variables. Investigations on the occurrence and seasonal dynamics of cAMP in aquatic systems were conducted on Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and on Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan. Putative cAMP from both systems was characterized by several biochemical techniques. Weekly sampling of particulate and dissolved cAMP in the epilimnia of both lakes was correlated with data on the rates of primary productivity, alkaline phosphatase activity, chlorophyll a synthesis and changes in phytoplankton community structure.

  5. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces cardiac hypertrophy by impairing autophagy through the adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sheng; Deng, Yan; Pan, Yue-Ying; Ren, Jie; Jin, Meng; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Zhu, Die; Guo, Xue-Ling; Yuan, Xiao; Shang, Jin; Liu, Hui-Guo

    2016-09-15

    Autophagy is tightly regulated to maintain cardiac homeostasis. Impaired autophagy is closely associated with pathological cardiac hypertrophy. However, the relationship between autophagy and cardiac hypertrophy induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is not known. In the present study, we measured autophagy-related genes and autophagosomes during 10 weeks of CIH in rats, and 6 days in H9C2 cardiomyocytes, and showed that autophagy was impaired. This conclusion was confirmed by the autophagy flux assay. We detected significant hypertrophic changes in myocardium with impaired autophagy. Rapamycin, an autophagy enhancer, attenuated the cardiac hypertrophy induced by CIH. Moreover, silencing autophagy-related gene 5 (ATG5) exerted the opposite effect. The role of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in regulating autophagy under CIH was confirmed using AICAR to upregulate this enzyme and restore autophagy flux. Restoring autophagy by AICAR or rapamycin significantly reversed the hypertrophic changes in cardiomyocytes. To investigate the mechanism of autophagy impairment, we compared phospho (p)-AMPK, p-Akt, cathepsin D, and NFAT3 levels, along with calcineurin activity, between sham and CIH groups. CIH activated calcineurin, and inhibited AMPK and AMPK-mediated autophagy in an Akt- and NFAT3-independent manner. Collectively, these data demonstrated that impaired autophagy induced by CIH through the AMPK pathway contributed to cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27412517

  6. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces cardiac hypertrophy by impairing autophagy through the adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sheng; Deng, Yan; Pan, Yue-Ying; Ren, Jie; Jin, Meng; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Zhu, Die; Guo, Xue-Ling; Yuan, Xiao; Shang, Jin; Liu, Hui-Guo

    2016-09-15

    Autophagy is tightly regulated to maintain cardiac homeostasis. Impaired autophagy is closely associated with pathological cardiac hypertrophy. However, the relationship between autophagy and cardiac hypertrophy induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is not known. In the present study, we measured autophagy-related genes and autophagosomes during 10 weeks of CIH in rats, and 6 days in H9C2 cardiomyocytes, and showed that autophagy was impaired. This conclusion was confirmed by the autophagy flux assay. We detected significant hypertrophic changes in myocardium with impaired autophagy. Rapamycin, an autophagy enhancer, attenuated the cardiac hypertrophy induced by CIH. Moreover, silencing autophagy-related gene 5 (ATG5) exerted the opposite effect. The role of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in regulating autophagy under CIH was confirmed using AICAR to upregulate this enzyme and restore autophagy flux. Restoring autophagy by AICAR or rapamycin significantly reversed the hypertrophic changes in cardiomyocytes. To investigate the mechanism of autophagy impairment, we compared phospho (p)-AMPK, p-Akt, cathepsin D, and NFAT3 levels, along with calcineurin activity, between sham and CIH groups. CIH activated calcineurin, and inhibited AMPK and AMPK-mediated autophagy in an Akt- and NFAT3-independent manner. Collectively, these data demonstrated that impaired autophagy induced by CIH through the AMPK pathway contributed to cardiac hypertrophy.

  7. DNA sequence polymorphism within the bovine adenosine monophosphate deaminase 1 (AMPD1) is associated with production traits in Chinese cattle.

    PubMed

    Wei, C-B; Wang, J-Q; Chen, F-Y; Niu, H; Li, K

    2015-02-06

    The objectives of the present study were to detect an 18-bp deletion mutation in the bovine adenosine monophosphate deaminase 1 (AMPD1) gene and analyze its effect on growth traits in 2 Chinese cattle breeds using DNA sequencing and agarose electrophoresis. The five 19-bp polymerase chain reaction products of the AMPD1 gene exhibited 3 genotypes and 2 alleles: WW: homozygote genotype (wild-type); DD: homozygote genotype (mutant-type); WD: heterozygote genotype. Frequencies of the W allele varied from 66.15-70.35%. The associations between the 18-bp deletion mutation in the AMPD1 gene with production traits in 226 Jia-Xian red cattle was analyzed. The animals with genotype WW showed significantly higher heart girth and body weight than those with genotypes WD and DD at 24 months (P < 0.01). Our results indicate that the deletion mutation in the AMPD1 gene is associated with production traits, and may be used for marker-assisted selection in beef cattle breeding programs.

  8. Estradiol and chlordecone (Kepone) decrease adenosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate concentrations in the ovariectomized immature rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D C; Banerjee, S; Chatterjee, S

    1995-10-01

    Adenosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) has been repeatedly shown to mimic some actions of estrogen in the rat uterus. However, the relationship between estrogens and uterine cAMP remains controversial. The effect of chronic exposure (3 days) to a biologically potent, long-acting estrogen, estradiol benzoate (EB), or the xenoestrogen chlordecone (Kepone), which has a long half-life in the circulation, was examined in ovariectomized immature rats. Both compounds, when administered in doses that provided equal increases in uterine weight, produced equivalent decreases in uterine cAMP content. Although the decrease in cAMP was apparent within 48 hr, it was more pronounced at 72 hr. There was no reduction in cAMP produced in response to direct stimulation of uterine adenylyl cyclase by forskolin, indicating that loss of the enzyme was not a factor in the lowering of cAMP content. The pure anti-estrogen ICI-182,780, in a dose-dependent fashion, prevented the action the estradiol benzoate and chlordecone, suggesting that the lowering of cAMP was dependent on an estrogen receptor. The physiological significance of reduced uterine cAMP with chronic estrogen treatment remains to be determined. PMID:7545817

  9. The expression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator in rat sertoli cells following seminal extract administration

    PubMed Central

    Akmal, Muslim; Siregar, Tongku Nizwan; Wahyuni, Sri; Hamny; Nasution, Mustafa Kamal; Indriati, Wiwik; Panjaitan, Budianto; Aliza, Dwinna

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to determine the effect of seminal vesicle extract on cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator (CREM) expression in rat Sertoli cells. Materials and Methods: This study examined the expression of CREM on 20 male rats (Rattus norvegicus) at 4 months of age, weighing 250-300 g. The rats were divided into four groups: K0, KP1, KP2, and KP3. K0 group was injected with 0.2 ml normal saline; KP1 was injected with 25 mg cloprostenol (Prostavet C, Virbac S. A); KP2 and KP3 were injected with 0.2 and 0.4 ml seminal vesicle extract, respectively. The treatments were conducted 5 times within 12-day interval. At the end of the study, the rats were euthanized by cervical dislocation; then, the testicles were necropsied and processed for histology observation using immunohistochemistry staining. Results: CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells was not altered by the administration of either 0.2 or 0.4 ml seminal vesicle extract. Conclusion: The administration of seminal vesicle extract is unable to increase CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells. PMID:27733803

  10. The effect of polystyrene beads on cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate concentration in leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Manganiello, Vincent; Evans, Warren H.; Stossel, Thomas P.; Mason, Robert J.; Vaughan, Martha

    1971-01-01

    After incubation with polystyrene latex beads for 5 min. the cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) content of human peripheral blood leukocyte suspensions was increased severalfold. Preparations enriched in mononuclear cells and containing only 0-20% polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and no visible platelets exhibited a quantitatively similar response. Purified fractions of cells containing 85-90% PMN responded to polystyrene beads with a much smaller increase in cyclic AMP content. Phagocytosis of paraffin oil emulsion in the unfractionated mixed human leukocyte preparation was associated with little or no change in cyclic AMP levels. There was no change in cyclic AMP content of rabbit alveolar macrophages or guinea pig PMN during phagocytosis of polystyrene beads. All of these observations are consistent with the view that particle uptake per se does not increase cyclic AMP levels in phagocytic cells. It seems probable that the increase in cyclic AMP concentration that results when unfractionated human blood leukocytes are incubated with polystyrene beads occurs in cells other than PMN. PMID:4331596

  11. Role of K(V)LQT1 in cyclic adenosine monophosphate-mediated Cl(-) secretion in human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Mall, M; Wissner, A; Schreiber, R; Kuehr, J; Seydewitz, H H; Brandis, M; Greger, R; Kunzelmann, K

    2000-09-01

    Ion transport defects underlying cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease are characterized by impaired cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent Cl(-) conductance. Activation of Cl(-) secretion in airways depends on simultaneous activation of luminal Cl(-) channels and basolateral K(+) channels. We determined the role of basolateral K(+) conductance in cAMP- dependent Cl(-) secretion in native human airway epithelium obtained from non-CF and CF patients. CF tissues showed typical alterations of short-circuit currents with enhanced amiloride-sensitive Na(+) conductance and defective cAMP-mediated Cl(-) conductance. In non-CF tissues, Cl(-) secretion was significantly inhibited by the chromanol 293B (10 micromol/liter), a specific inhibitor of K(V)LQT1 K(+) channels. Inhibition was increased after cAMP-dependent stimulation. Similar effects were obtained with Ba(2+) (5 mmol/liter). In patch-clamp experiments with a human bronchial epithelial cell line, stimulation with forskolin (10 micromol/liter) simultaneously activated Cl(-) and K(+) conductance. The K(+) conductance was reversibly inhibited by Ba(2+) and 293B. Analysis of reverse-transcribed messenger RNA from non-CF and CF airways showed expression of human K(V)LQT1. We conclude that the K(+) channel K(V)LQT1 is important in maintaining cAMP-dependent Cl(-) secretion in human airways. Activation of K(V)LQT1 in CF airways in parallel with stimulation of residual CF transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channel activity or alternative Cl(-) channels could help to circumvent the secretory defect.

  12. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis: correlation with respiratory atopy.

    PubMed

    Sawai, T; Ikai, K; Uehara, M

    1998-05-01

    We determined the cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from 100 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) aged 13-57 years (mean +/- SD, 29.8 +/- 17.7 years). The correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and clinical parameters such as the severity of eczema and a personal or family predisposition to atopic respiratory diseases (ARD) (asthma or allergic rhinitis) was examined. Although the enzymic activity varied from normal to very high in the AD patients, cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.005) elevated in AD patients (42.1 +/- 22.0 units) as compared with the normal controls (12.4 +/- 5.6) and clinical control subjects (13.4 +/- 9.5). In contrast, we found no correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and the severity of eczema when AD patients were classified into four categories (remission, mild, moderate and severe) according to the extent of their skin involvement. Furthermore, we found that systemic corticosteroid therapy in severe AD patients did not alter the cAMP-PDE activity. cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in those AD patients who had a personal history of ARD (47.2 +/- 11.2) than in AD patients with a family history of ARD (37.2 +/- 17.4) and those without a personal or family history ('pure' AD) (34.4 +/- 19.8). Nevertheless, the cAMP-PDE activity was significantly higher even in 'pure' AD patients than in the controls. These results suggest that an elevation of cAMP-PDE activity is closely related to a predisposition to respiratory atopy, and does not follow inflammation in AD patients. PMID:9666832

  13. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators for the prevention, treatment and potential reversal of pathological pain

    PubMed Central

    Price, Theodore J.; Das, Vaskar; Dussor, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Pathological pain is an enormous medical problem that places a significant burden on patients and can result from an injury that has long since healed or be due to an unidentifiable cause. Although treatments exist, they often either lack efficacy or have intolerable side effects. More importantly, they do not reverse the changes in the nervous system mediating pathological pain, and thus symptoms often return when therapies are discontinued. Consequently, novel therapies are urgently needed that have both improved efficacy and disease-modifying properties. Here we highlight an emerging target for novel pain therapies, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is capable of regulating a variety of cellular processes including protein translation, activity of other kinases, and mitochondrial metabolism, many of which are thought to contribute to pathological pain. Consistent with these properties, preclinical studies show positive, and in some cases disease-modifying effects of either pharmacological activation or genetic regulation of AMPK in models of nerve injury, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), postsurgical pain, inflammatory pain, and diabetic neuropathy. Given the AMPK-activating ability of metformin, a widely prescribed and well-tolerated drug, these preclinical studies provide a strong rationale for both retrospective and prospective human pain trials with this drug. They also argue for the development of novel AMPK activators, whether orthosteric, allosteric, or modulators of events upstream of the kinase. Together, this review will present the case for AMPK as a novel therapeutic target for pain and will discuss future challenges in the path toward development of AMPK-based pain therapeutics. PMID:26521775

  14. Study of the Renal Tubular Interactions of Thyrocalcitonin, Cyclic Adenosine 3′, 5′ -Monophosphate, 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol, and Calcium Ion

    PubMed Central

    Puschett, Jules B.; Beck, William S.; Jelonek, Adam; Fernandez, Pedro C.

    1974-01-01

    Acute clearance studies were performed in thyroparathyroidectomized animals to determine the actions and interactions of thyrocalcitonin (TCT), cyclic adenosine 3′5′-monophosphate (cAMP), 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25HCC), and calcium ion on the reabsorption of phosphate, calcium, sodium, and potassium by the kidney. The infusion of 25HCC in a dosage of 60 U/h to moderately saline-expanded animals (2.5% body weight) induced a fall in the excretion of all of the ions under study after 90-120 min similar to that observed in previous experiments from this laboratory. Mean decrements in fractional excretion were: phosphate, 42.0% (P < 0.005); calcium, 25.0% (P < 0.005); sodium, 23.4% (P < 0.001); and potassium, 14.7% (P < 0.005). The superimposition of either porcine or salmon TCT (1-100 MRC U/h for 2 h) resulted in no further alterations in electrolyte excretion. However, the infusion of TCT during steady-state saline expansion, before the administration of 25HCC, obviated the renal transport effects of the vitamin D metabolite. Both in the latter studies, as well as those in which similar doses of TCT were given to hydropenic animals, the hormone itself failed to induce any consistent alteration in electrolyte excretion. Cyclic AMP (50 mg/h) caused an increase in the excretion of phosphate, sodium, and potassium and no change in calcium excretion. Like TCT, the nucleotide blocked the action of 25HCC on the kidney. Raising the mean level of serum ultrafilterable calcium to 3.02±0.25 mEq/liter from 1.62±0.17 mEq/liter likewise prevented enhanced ionic reabsorption due to 25HCC. PMID:4359939

  15. Estradiol regulation of hypothalamic astrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase activity: role of hindbrain catecholamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Pratistha; Briski, Karen P

    2015-01-01

    Recent work challenges the conventional notion that metabolic monitoring in the brain is the exclusive function of neurons. This study investigated the hypothesis that hypothalamic astrocytes express the ultra-sensitive energy gauge adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and that the ovarian hormone estradiol (E) controls activation of this sensor by insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH). E- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) rats were pretreated by caudal fourth ventricular administration of the catecholamine neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) prior to sc insulin or vehicle injection. Individual astrocytes identified in situ by glial fibrillary acidic protein immunolabeling were laser-microdissected from the ventromedial (VMH), arcuate (ARH), and paraventricular (PVH) nuclei and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), and pooled within each site for Western blot analysis of AMPK and phosphoAMPK (pAMPK) protein expression. In the VMH, baseline astrocyte AMPK and pAMPK levels were respectively increased or decreased in OVX+E versus OVX+O; these profiles did not differ between E and O rats in other hypothalamic loci. In E animals, astrocyte AMPK protein was reduced [VMH] or augmented [PVH; LHA] in response to either 6-OHDA or IIH. IIH increased astrocyte pAMPK expression in each structure in vehicle-, but not 6-OHDA-pretreated E rats. Results provide novel evidence for hypothalamic astrocyte AMPK expression and hindbrain catecholamine-dependent activation of this cell-specific sensor by hypoglycemia in the presence of estrogen. Further research is needed to determine the role of astrocyte AMPK in reactivity of these glia to metabolic imbalance and contribution to restoration of neuro-metabolic stability.

  16. Isolation of novel ribozymes that ligate AMP-activated RNA substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, A. J.; Szostak, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The protein enzymes RNA ligase and DNA ligase catalyze the ligation of nucleic acids via an adenosine-5'-5'-pyrophosphate 'capped' RNA or DNA intermediate. The activation of nucleic acid substrates by adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) may be a vestige of 'RNA world' catalysis. AMP-activated ligation seems ideally suited for catalysis by ribozymes (RNA enzymes), because an RNA motif capable of tightly and specifically binding AMP has previously been isolated. RESULTS: We used in vitro selection and directed evolution to explore the ability of ribozymes to catalyze the template-directed ligation of AMP-activated RNAs. We subjected a pool of 10(15) RNA molecules, each consisting of long random sequences flanking a mutagenized adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer, to ten rounds of in vitro selection, including three rounds involving mutagenic polymerase chain reaction. Selection was for the ligation of an oligonucleotide to the 5'-capped active pool RNA species. Many different ligase ribozymes were isolated; these ribozymes had rates of reaction up to 0.4 ligations per hour, corresponding to rate accelerations of approximately 5 x10(5) over the templated, but otherwise uncatalyzed, background reaction rate. Three characterized ribozymes catalyzed the formation of 3'-5'-phosphodiester bonds and were highly specific for activation by AMP at the ligation site. CONCLUSIONS: The existence of a new class of ligase ribozymes is consistent with the hypothesis that the unusual mechanism of the biological ligases resulted from a conservation of mechanism during an evolutionary replacement of a primordial ribozyme ligase by a more modern protein enzyme. The newly isolated ligase ribozymes may also provide a starting point for the isolation of ribozymes that catalyze the polymerization of AMP-activated oligonucleotides or mononucleotides, which might have been the prebiotic analogs of nucleoside triphosphates.

  17. Role of adenosine deaminase, ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) and ecto-(non-specific phosphatase) in cyanide-induced adenosine monophosphate catabolism in rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Newby, A C

    1980-01-01

    1. The role of adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4), ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) (EC 3.1.3.5) and ecto-(non-specific phosphatase) in the CN-induced catabolism of adenine nucleotides in intact rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes was investigated by inhibiting the enzymes in situ. 2. KCN (10mM for 90 min) induced a 20-30% fall in ATP concentration accompanied by an approximately equimolar increase in hypoxanthine, ADP, AMP and adenosine concentrations were unchanged, and IMP and inosine remained undetectable ( less than 0.05 nmol/10(7) cells). 3. Cells remained 98% intact, as judged by loss of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27). 4. Pentostatin (30 microM), a specific inhibitor of adenosine deaminase, completely inhibited hypoxanthine production from exogenous adenosine (55 microM), but did not black CN-induced hypoxanthine production or cause adenosine accumulation in intact cells. This implied that IMP rather than adenosine was an intermediate in AMP breakdown in response to cyanide. 5. Antibodies raised against purified plasma-membrane 5'-nucleotidase inhibited the ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) by 95-98%. Non-specific phosphatases were blocked by 10 mM-sodium beta-glycerophosphate. 6. These two agents together blocked hypoxanthine production from exogenous AMP and IMP (200 microM) by more than 90%, but had no effect on production from endogenous substrates. 7. These data suggest that ectophosphatases do not participate in CN-induced catabolism of intracellular AMP in rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes. 8. A minor IMPase, not inhibited by antiserum, was detected in the soluble fraction of disrupted cells. PMID:6249264

  18. Muscle A-Kinase Anchoring Protein-α is an Injury-Specific Signaling Scaffold Required for Neurotrophic- and Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate-Mediated Survival.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Cameron, Evan G; Li, Jinliang; Stiles, Travis L; Kritzer, Michael D; Lodhavia, Rahul; Hertz, Jonathan; Nguyen, Tu; Kapiloff, Michael S; Goldberg, Jeffrey L

    2015-12-01

    Neurotrophic factor and cAMP-dependent signaling promote the survival and neurite outgrowth of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after injury. However, the mechanisms conferring neuroprotection and neuroregeneration downstream to these signals are unclear. We now reveal that the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase anchoring protein-α (mAKAPα) is required for the survival and axon growth of cultured primary RGCs. Although genetic deletion of mAKAPα early in prenatal RGC development did not affect RGC survival into adulthood, nor promoted the death of RGCs in the uninjured adult retina, loss of mAKAPα in the adult increased RGC death after optic nerve crush. Importantly, mAKAPα was required for the neuroprotective effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) after injury. These results identify mAKAPα as a scaffold for signaling in the stressed neuron that is required for RGC neuroprotection after optic nerve injury. PMID:26844267

  19. Isolation of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) from lakes of differing trophic status: Correlation with planktonic metabolic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The seasonal dynamics of particulate and dissolved cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) were examined in the epilimnia and littoral zones of two trophically dissimilar lakes. Each cAMP fraction was found in quantities comparable to those reported for cultured phytoplankton species. Both cAMP fractions varied greatly in concentration during the season and between the oligotrophic and hypereutrophic lakes. Increases in phytoplankton community densities were paralleled by weight-specific changes in particulate cAMP levels, depending on the phytoplankton species present. A linear relationship between cellular cAMP levels and in situ primary productivity rates was found in the oligotrophic lake. In both lakes, certain phytoplanktonic associations had particulate cAMP levels linearly related to chlorophyll a content and specific activity of alkaline phosphatase.

  20. Role of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase in α-linolenic acid-induced intestinal lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xihong; Chen, Jingqing; Wu, Weiche; Wang, Xinxia; Wang, Yizhen

    2015-09-28

    n-3 Long-chain PUFA up-regulate intestinal lipid metabolism. However, whether these metabolic effects of PUFA on intestine are mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) remains to be elucidated. To determine the effects of α-linolenic acid (ALA) on intestinal fatty acid (FA) metabolism and whether these effects were affected by AMPK deletion, mice deficient in the catalytic subunit of AMPKα1 or AMPKα2 and wild-type (WT) mice were fed either a high-fat diet (HF) or HF supplemented with ALA (HF-A). The results showed that ALA supplementation decreased serum TAG content in WT mice. ALA also increased mRNA expression of genes (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a, acyl-CoA oxidase 1, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, cytochrome P450 4A10 and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoenzyme 4a) involved in intestinal lipid oxidation and mRNA expression of TAG synthesis-related genes (monoacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2, diacylglycerol O-acyltransferases 1 and 2) in WT mice. Consistent with these, expression levels of phosphorylated AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 were also increased in WT mice after ALA addition. However, in the absence of either AMPKα1 or AMPKα2, ALA supplementation failed to increase intestinal lipid oxidation. In addition, no significant effects of either diet (HF and HF-A) or genotype (WT, AMPKα1(-/-) and AMPKα2(-/-)) on FA uptake in the intestine and faecal TAG output were observed. Our results suggest that AMPK is indispensable for the effects of ALA on intestinal lipid oxidation. PMID:26268732

  1. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation, substrate transporter translocation, and metabolism in the contracting hyperthyroid rat heart.

    PubMed

    Heather, Lisa C; Cole, Mark A; Atherton, Helen J; Coumans, Will A; Evans, Rhys D; Tyler, Damian J; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P; Clarke, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid hormones can modify cardiac metabolism via multiple molecular mechanisms, yet their integrated effect on overall substrate metabolism is poorly understood. Here we determined the effect of hyperthyroidism on substrate metabolism in the isolated, perfused, contracting rat heart. Male Wistar rats were injected for 7 d with T(3) (0.2 mg/kg x d ip). Plasma free fatty acids increased by 97%, heart weights increased by 33%, and cardiac rate pressure product, an indicator of contractile function, increased by 33% in hyperthyroid rats. Insulin-stimulated glycolytic rates and lactate efflux rates were increased by 33% in hyperthyroid rat hearts, mediated by an increased insulin-stimulated translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 to the sarcolemma. This was accompanied by a 70% increase in phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and a 100% increase in phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase, confirming downstream signaling from AMPK. Fatty acid oxidation rates increased in direct proportion to the increased heart weight and rate pressure product in the hyperthyroid heart, mediated by synchronized changes in mitochondrial enzymes and respiration. Protein levels of the fatty acid transporter, fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), were reduced by 24% but were accompanied by a 19% increase in the sarcolemmal content of fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1). Thus, the relationship between fatty acid metabolism, cardiac mass, and contractile function was maintained in the hyperthyroid heart, associated with a sarcolemmal reorganization of fatty acid transporters. The combined effects of T(3)-induced AMPK activation and insulin stimulation were associated with increased sarcolemmal GLUT4 localization and glycolytic flux in the hyperthyroid heart. PMID:19940039

  2. Mulberry leaf polyphenol extract induced apoptosis involving regulation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/fatty acid synthase in a p53-negative hepatocellular carcinoma cell.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tzi-Peng; Lee, Huei-Jane; Ou, Ting-Tsz; Chang, Ya-Ju; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2012-07-11

    The polyphenols in mulberry leaf possess the ability to inhibit cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of tumors. It was reported that the p53 status plays an important role in switching apoptosis and the cell cycle following adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation. In this study, we aimed to detect the effect of the mulberry leaf polyphenol extract (MLPE) on inducing cell death in p53-negative (Hep3B) and p53-positive (Hep3B with transfected p53) hepatocellular carcinoma cells and also to clarify the role of p53 in MLPE-treated cells. After treatment of the Hep3B cells with MLPE, apoptosis was induced via the AMPK/PI3K/Akt and Bcl-2 family pathways. Transient transfection of p53 into Hep3B cells led to switching autophagy instead of apoptosis by MLPE treatment. We demonstrated that acridine orange staining and protein expressions of LC-3 and beclin-1 were increased in p53-transfected cells. These results implied induction of apoptosis or autophagy in MLPE-treated hepatocellular carcinoma cells can be due to the p53 status. We also found MLPE can not only activate AMPK but also diminish fatty acid synthase, a molecular target for cancer inhibition. At present, our results indicate MLPE can play an active role in mediating the cell death of hepatocellular carcinoma cells and the p53 might play an important role in regulating the death mechanisms.

  3. Uric acid induces oxidative stress and growth inhibition by activating adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signal pathways in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongneng; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Hisatome, Ichiro; Li, Youfeng; Cheng, Weijie; Sun, Ning; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Tianliang; Zhu, Yuzhang; Li, Zhi; Jing, Xubin; Zhou, Rui; Cheng, Jidong

    2013-08-15

    Hyperuricaemia is a disorder of purine metabolism, and is strongly associated with insulin resistance and abnormal glucose metabolism. As the producer of insulin, pancreatic β cells might be affected by elevated serum uric acid levels and contribute to the disregulated glucose metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effect of high uric acid on rat pancreatic β cell function. Under high uric acid condition, proliferation of pancreatic β cells was inhibited, production of reactive oxygen species increased, and glucose stimulated insulin secretion was also compromised. Further examination on signal transduction pathways revealed that uric acid-induced ROS is involved in the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Pharmacological inhibition of ERK activation rescued β cells from growth inhibition. More importantly, activation of ERK induced by uric acid is significantly diminished by AMPK inhibitor, indicating ERK as a downstream target of AMPK in response to high uric acid condition. We also investigated the transportation channel for uric acid into pancreatic β cells. While major urate transporter URAT1 is not expressed in β cells, organic anion transporter (OAT) inhibitor successfully blocked the activation of ERK by uric acid. Our data indicate that high uric acid levels induce oxidative damage and inhibit growth of rat pancreatic β cells by activating the AMPK and ERK signal pathways. Hyperuricemia may contribute to abnormal glucose metabolism by causing oxidative damage and function inhibition of pancreatic β cells.

  4. Estrogen regulates energy metabolic pathway and upstream adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase and phosphatase enzyme expression in dorsal vagal complex metabolosensory neurons during glucostasis and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Pratistha; Ibrahim, Baher A; Gujar, Amit D; Briski, Karen P

    2015-02-01

    The ability of estrogen to shield the brain from the bioenergetic insult hypoglycemia is unclear. Estradiol (E) prevents hypoglycemic activation of the energy deficit sensor adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in hindbrain metabolosensory A2 noradrenergic neurons. This study investigates the hypothesis that estrogen regulates A2 AMPK through control of fuel metabolism and/or upstream protein kinase/phosphatase enzyme expression. A2 cells were harvested by laser microdissection after insulin or vehicle (V) injection of E- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized female rats. Cell lysates were evaluated by immunoblot for glycolytic, tricarboxylic acid cycle, respiratory chain, and acetyl-CoA-malonyl-CoA pathway enzymes. A2 phosphofructokinase (PFKL), isocitrate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and ATP synthase subunit profiles were elevated in E/V vs. O/V; hypoglycemia augmented PFKL and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase expression in E only. Hypoglycemia increased A2 Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-β in O and reduced protein phosphatase in both groups. A2 phospho-AMPK levels were equivalent in O/V vs. E/V but elevated during hypoglycemia in O only. These results implicate E in compensatory upregulation of substrate catabolism and corresponding maintenance of energy stability of A2 metabolosensory neurons during hypoglycemia, outcomes that support the potential viability of molecular substrates for hormone action as targets for therapies alleviating hypoglycemic brain injury.

  5. Developmental Competence of Vitrified-Warmed Bovine Oocytes at the Germinal-Vesicle Stage is Improved by Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Modulators during In Vitro Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Ezoe, Kenji; Yabuuchi, Akiko; Tani, Tetsuya; Mori, Chiemi; Miki, Tetsuya; Takayama, Yuko; Beyhan, Zeki; Kato, Yoko; Okuno, Takashi; Kobayashi, Tamotsu; Kato, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation of mature oocytes and embryos has provided numerous benefits in reproductive medicine. Although successful cryopreservation of germinal-vesicle stage (GV) oocytes holds promise for further advances in reproductive biology and clinical embryology fields, reports regarding cryopreservation of immature oocytes are limited. Oocyte survival and maturation rates have improved since vitrification is being performed at the GV stage, but the subsequent developmental competence of GV oocytes is still low. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of supplementation of the maturation medium with cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) modulators on the developmental competence of vitrified-warmed GV bovine oocytes. GV oocytes were vitrified-warmed and cultured to allow for oocyte maturation, and then parthenogenetically activated or fertilized in vitro. Our results indicate that addition of a cAMP modulator forskolin (FSK) or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) to the maturation medium significantly improved the developmental competence of vitrified-warmed GV oocytes. We also demonstrated that vitrification of GV oocytes led to a decline in cAMP levels and maturation-promoting factor (MPF) activity in the oocytes during the initial and final phases of maturation, respectively. Nevertheless, the addition of FSK or IBMX to the maturation medium significantly elevated cAMP levels and MPF activity during IVM. Taken together, our results suggest that the cryopreservation-associated meiotic and developmental abnormalities observed in GV oocytes may be ameliorated by an artificial increase in cAMP levels during maturation culture after warming. PMID:25965267

  6. Medium optimization for the production of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate by Microbacterium sp. no. 205 using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Chun; Bai, Jian-Xin; Cao, Jia-Ming; Li, Zhen-Jiang; Xiong, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Hong, Yuan; Ying, Han-Jie

    2009-01-01

    Response surface methodology was employed to optimize medium composition for the production of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) with Microbacterium sp. no. 205. A fractional factorial design (2(11-7)) was applied to evaluate the effects of different components in the medium. K(2)HPO(4), MgSO(4) and NaF were found to significantly influence on the cAMP production. The steepest ascent method was used to access the optimal region of the medium composition. The concentrations of the three factors were optimized subsequently using central composite design and response surface methodology. The optimal medium composition to achieve the optimal cAMP production was determined (g/L): K(2)HPO(4), 12.78; MgSO(4), 3.53 and NaF, 0.18. The corresponding cAMP concentration was 8.50 g/L, which was about 1.8-fold increase compared with that using the original medium. Validation experiments were also carried out to prove the adequacy and the accuracy of the model obtained. The cAMP fermentation in 5L fermenter reached 9.87 g/L. PMID:18778935

  7. Vasoactive intestinal peptide: A potent stimulator of adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate accumulation in gut carcinoma cell lines in culture*

    PubMed Central

    Laburthe, M.; Rousset, M.; Boissard, C.; Chevalier, G.; Zweibaum, A.; Rosselin, G.

    1978-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a potent and efficient stimulator of adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in a human colon carcinoma cell line, HT 29. cAMP accumulation is sensitive to a concentration of VIP as low as 3×10-12 M. Maximum VIP-induced cAMP levels were observed with 10-9 M VIP and are about 200 times above the basal levels. Half-maximum cAMP production was obtained at 3×10-10 M VIP. 125I-Labeled VIP was found to bind to HT 29 cells; this binding was competitively inhibited by concentrations of unlabeled VIP between 10-10 and 10-7 M. Half-maximum inhibition of binding was observed with 2×10-9 M VIP. Secretin also stimulated cAMP accumulation in HT 29 cells, but its effectiveness was 1/1000 that of VIP. The other peptides tested at 10-7 M, such as insulin, glucagon, bovine pancreatic polypeptide, somatostatin, octapeptide of cholecystokinin, neurotensin, and substance P, did not stimulate cAMP accumulation. Prostaglandin E1 and catecholamines stimulated cAMP production but were 1/2.3 and 1/5.5 as efficient as VIP, respectively. Another malignant cell line from the gut, the human rectal tumor cell line HRT 18, is also sensitive to VIP. In HRT 18 cells, VIP stimulated cAMP accumulation with a maximal effect at 10-8 M; half-maximum stimulation was observed at about 10-9 M. These results demonstrate the presence of VIP receptors in two malignant human intestinal cell lines (HT 29 and HRT 18) in culture and provide a model for studying the action of VIP on cell proliferation. PMID:208077

  8. Activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase blocks cumulus cell expansion through inhibition of protein synthesis during in vitro maturation in Swine.

    PubMed

    Santiquet, Nicolas; Sasseville, Maxime; Laforest, Martin; Guillemette, Christine; Gilchrist, Robert B; Richard, François J

    2014-08-01

    The serine/threonine kinase 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a heterotrimeric protein known as a metabolic switch, is involved in oocyte nuclear maturation in mice, cattle, and swine. The present study analyzed AMPK activation in cumulus cell expansion during in vitro maturation (IVM) of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC). 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) is a well-known activator of AMPK. It inhibited oocyte meiotic resumption in COC. Moreover, cumulus cell expansion did not occur in the presence of AICAR, demonstrating its marked impact on cumulus cells. Activation of AMPK was supported by AICAR-mediated phosphorylation of alpha AMPK subunits. Furthermore, the presence of AICAR increased glucose uptake, a classical response to activation of this metabolic switch in response to depleted cellular energy levels. Neither nuclear maturation nor cumulus expansion was reversed by glucosamine, an alternative substrate in hyaluronic acid synthesis, through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, which ruled out possible depletion of substrates. Both increased gap junction communication and phosphodiesterase activity in COC are dependent on protein synthesis during the initial hours of IVM; however, both were inhibited in the presence of AICAR, which supports the finding that activation of AMPK by AICAR mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. Moreover, this protein synthesis inhibition was equivalent to that of the well-known protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, as observed on cumulus expansion and protein concentration. Finally, the phosphorylation level of selected kinases was investigated. The pattern of raptor phosphorylation is supportive of activation of AMPK-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. In conclusion, AICAR-mediated AMPK activation in porcine COC inhibited cumulus cell expansion and protein synthesis. These results bring new considerations to the importance of this kinase in ovarian

  9. Targeting Energy Metabolic and Oncogenic Signaling Pathways in Triple-negative Breast Cancer by a Novel Adenosine Monophosphate-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activator*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuen-Haur; Hsu, En-Chi; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Wang, Dasheng; Kulp, Samuel K.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2011-01-01

    The antitumor activities of the novel adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, OSU-53, were assessed in in vitro and in vivo models of triple-negative breast cancer. OSU-53 directly stimulated recombinant AMPK kinase activity (EC50, 0.3 μm) and inhibited the viability and clonogenic growth of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells with equal potency (IC50, 5 and 2 μm, respectively) despite lack of LKB1 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. Nonmalignant MCF-10A cells, however, were unaffected. Beyond AMPK-mediated effects on mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and lipogenesis, OSU-53 also targeted multiple AMPK downstream pathways. Among these, the protein phosphatase 2A-dependent dephosphorylation of Akt is noteworthy because it circumvents the feedback activation of Akt that results from mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition. OSU-53 also modulated energy homeostasis by suppressing fatty acid biosynthesis and shifting the metabolism to oxidation by up-regulating the expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, such as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α and the transcription factor nuclear respiratory factor 1. Moreover, OSU-53 suppressed LPS-induced IL-6 production, thereby blocking subsequent Stat3 activation, and inhibited hypoxia-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in association with the silencing of hypoxia-inducible factor 1a and the E-cadherin repressor Snail. In MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice, daily oral administration of OSU-53 (50 and 100 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth by 47–49% and modulated relevant intratumoral biomarkers of drug activity. However, OSU-53 also induced protective autophagy that attenuated its antiproliferative potency. Accordingly, cotreatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine increased the in vivo tumor-suppressive activity of OSU-53. OSU-53 is a potent, orally bioavailable AMPK activator that acts through a broad spectrum of antitumor activities. PMID

  10. Metformin inhibits growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells via liver kinase B-1-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    GUO, QIANQIAN; LIU, ZHIYAN; JIANG, LILI; LIU, MENGJIE; MA, JIEQUN; YANG, CHENGCHENG; HAN, LILI; NAN, KEJUN; LIANG, XUAN

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely administered oral anti-diabetic therapeutic agent, exerts its glucose-lowering effect predominantly via liver kinase B1 (LKB1)-dependent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that metformin possesses potential antitumor effects. However, whether the antitumor effect of metformin is via the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway remains to be determined. In the current study, the effects of metformin on proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 (LKB1-null) and H1299 (LKB1-positive) cells were assessed, and the role of LKB1/AMPK signaling in the anti-growth effects of metformin were investigated. Cell viability was determined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. Metformin inhibited proliferation, induced significant cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase and increased apoptosis in NSCLC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, regardless of the level of LKB1 protein expression. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) did not affect the antiproliferative effect of metformin in the H1299 cells. Metformin stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently suppressed the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream effector, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase in the two cell lines. These effects were abrogated by silencing AMPK with small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, knockdown of AMPK with siRNA inhibited the effect of metformin on cell proliferation in the two cell lines. These results provide evidence that the growth inhibition of metformin in NSCLC cells is mediated by LKB1-independent activation of AMPK, indicating that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of

  11. Vasoactive intestinal peptide attenuates liver ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice via the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase a pathway.

    PubMed

    Ji, Haofeng; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Yuanxing; Shen, Xiu-Da; Gao, Feng; Nguyen, Terry T; Busuttil, Ronald W; Waschek, James A; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2013-09-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), an exogenous, antigen-independent, local inflammation response, occurs in multiple clinical settings, including liver transplantation, hepatic resection, trauma, and shock. The nervous system maintains extensive crosstalk with the immune system through neuropeptide and peptide hormone networks. This study examined the function and therapeutic potential of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) neuropeptide in a murine model of liver warm ischemia (90 minutes) followed by reperfusion. Liver ischemia/reperfusion (IR) triggered an induction of gene expression of intrinsic VIP; this peaked at 24 hours of reperfusion and coincided with a hepatic self-healing phase. Treatment with the VIP neuropeptide protected livers from IRI; this was evidenced by diminished serum alanine aminotransferase levels and well-preserved tissue architecture and was associated with elevated intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The hepatocellular protection rendered by VIP was accompanied by diminished neutrophil/macrophage infiltration and activation, reduced hepatocyte necrosis/apoptosis, and increased hepatic interleukin-10 (IL-10) expression. Strikingly, PKA inhibition restored liver damage in otherwise IR-resistant VIP-treated mice. In vitro, VIP not only diminished macrophage tumor necrosis factor α/IL-6/IL-12 expression in a PKA-dependent manner but also prevented necrosis/apoptosis in primary mouse hepatocyte cultures. In conclusion, our findings document the importance of VIP neuropeptide-mediated cAMP-PKA signaling in hepatic homeostasis and cytoprotection in vivo. Because the enhancement of neural modulation differentially regulates local inflammation and prevents hepatocyte death, these results provide the rationale for novel approaches to managing liver IRI in transplant patients. PMID:23744729

  12. Involvement of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in the influence of timed high-fat evening diet on the hepatic clock and lipogenic gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Zhu, Zengyan; Xie, Meilin; Xue, Jie

    2015-09-01

    A high-fat diet may result in changes in hepatic clock gene expression, but potential mechanisms are not yet elucidated. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recognized as a key regulator of energy metabolism and certain clock genes. Therefore, we hypothesized that AMPK may be involved in the alteration of hepatic clock gene expression under a high-fat environment. This study aimed to examine the effects of timed high-fat evening diet on the activity of hepatic AMPK, clock genes, and lipogenic genes. Mice with hyperlipidemic fatty livers were induced by orally administering high-fat milk via gavage every evening (19:00-20:00) for 6 weeks. Results showed that timed high-fat diet in the evening not only decreased the hepatic AMPK protein expression and activity but also disturbed its circadian rhythm. Accordingly, the hepatic clock genes, including clock, brain-muscle-Arnt-like 1, cryptochrome 2, and period 2, exhibited prominent changes in their expression rhythms and/or amplitudes. The diurnal rhythms of the messenger RNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1α, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 were also disrupted; the amplitude of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorγcoactivator 1α was significantly decreased at 3 time points, and fatty liver was observed. These findings demonstrate that timed high-fat diet at night can change hepatic AMPK protein levels, activity, and circadian rhythm, which may subsequently alter the circadian expression of several hepatic clock genes and finally result in the disorder of hepatic lipogenic gene expression and the formation of fatty liver.

  13. A high isoflavone diet decreases 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation and does not correct selenium-induced elevations in fasting blood glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Michael T; Cardon, Brandon R; Hardman, Jeremy M; Bliss, Tyler A; Brunson, Scott E; Hart, Chris M; Swiss, Maria D; Hepworth, Squire D; Christensen, Merrill J; Hancock, Chad R

    2014-04-01

    Selenium (Se) has been implicated as a micronutrient that decreases adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and may increase diabetes risk by reducing insulin sensitivity. Soy isoflavones (IF) are estrogen-like compounds that have been shown to attenuate insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, adiposity, and increased AMPK activation. We hypothesized that a high IF (HIF) diet would prevent the poor metabolic profile associated with high Se intake. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in basal glucose metabolism and AMPK signaling in response to an HIF diet and/or supplemental Se in a mouse model. Male FVB mice were divided into groups receiving either a control diet with minimal IF (low IF) or an HIF diet. Each dietary group was further subdivided into groups receiving either water or Se at a dose of 3 mg Se/kg body weight daily, as Se-methylselenocysteine (SMSC). After 5 months, mice receiving SMSC had elevated fasting glucose (P < .05) and a tendency for glucose intolerance (P = .08). The increase in dietary IF did not result in improved fasting blood glucose. Interestingly, after 6 months, HIF-fed mice had decreased basal AMPK activation in liver and skeletal muscle tissue (P < .05). Basal glucose metabolism was changed by SMSC supplementation as evidenced by increased fasting blood glucose and glucose intolerance. High dietary IF levels did not protect against aberrant blood glucose. In FVB mice, decreased basal AMPK activation is not the mechanism through which Se exerts its effect. These results suggest that more research must be done to elucidate the role of Se and IF in glucose metabolism.

  14. Airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, adenosine 5-monophosphate, mannitol, eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea and field exercise challenge in elite cross-country skiers

    PubMed Central

    Sue-Chu, Malcolm; Brannan, John D; Anderson, Sandra D; Chew, Nora; Bjermer, Leif

    2010-01-01

    Background Methacholine hyperresponsiveness is prevalent in elite athletes. Comparative studies have hitherto been limited to methacholine, eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea and exercise. This study investigated airway responsiveness to these stimuli as well as to adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) and mannitol, in 58 cross-country ski athletes. Methods Exhaled nitric oxide concentration (FENO), spirometry and bronchial challenge in random order with methacholine, AMP and mannitol were consecutively performed on three study days in the autumn. Specific IgE to eight aeroallergens and a self-completed questionnaire about respiratory symptoms, allergy and asthmatic medication were also performed on day 1. Eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation (EVH) and field exercise tests were randomly performed in 33 of the skiers on two study days in the following winter. Results Of 25 (43%) skiers with airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), 23, five and three skiers were hyperresponsive to methacholine, AMP and mannitol, respectively. Methacholine hyperresponsiveness was more prevalent in subjects without asthma-like symptoms. The FENO was not significantly different in skiers with and without methacholine hyperresponsiveness. Four of 14 skiers with and four of 19 skiers without methacholine hyperresponsiveness were hyperresponsive to EVH or exercise challenge. AHR to any stimulus was present in 16 asymptomatic and nine symptomatic skiers. Asthma-like symptoms were not correlated with AHR to any stimulus. Conclusions Methacholine hyperresponsiveness is more common in asymptomatic skiers and is a poor predictor of hyperresponsiveness to mannitol and hyperpnoea. The low prevalence of hyperresponsiveness to indirect stimuli may suggest differences in the pathogenesis of methacholine hyperresponsiveness in elite skiers and non-athletes. PMID:20460257

  15. Effects of dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate on hypercapnic depression of diaphragmatic contractility in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yoshitaka; Uemura, Aki

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hypercapnia is associated with diaphragm muscle dysfunction that causes a reduction of diaphragmatic force generated for a constant elective myographic activity. No published data are available concerning hypercapnic depression of diaphragmatic contractility during dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophospate (DBcAMP) administration. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of DBcAMP on hypercapnic depression of diaphragmatic contractility in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. Methods: This experimental study was conducted from July to December 2008 at the Department of Anesthesiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan. Adult (aged >5 years) mongrel dogs weighing 10 to 15 kg were randomly divided into 3 equal groups. Hypercapnia (80–90 mm Hg) was induced with 10% carbon dioxide added to the inspired gas. When hypercapnia was established, group 1 was infused with low-dose DBcAMP (0.05 mg/kg/min); group 2 was infused with high-dose DBcAMP (0.2 mg/kg/min); and group 3 received placebo (saline). Study drug was administered intravenously for 60 minutes. Diaphragmatic contractility was assessed by transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) at baseline, induction of hypercapnia, and study drug administration. Results: Twenty-one dogs were divided into 3 groups of 7. There were no significant differences observed at baseline. In the presence of hypercapnia, Pdi (mean [SD], cm H2O) at low- (20-Hz) and high-frequency (100-Hz) stimulation was significantly decreased from baseline in each group (all, P = 0.001). In groups 1 and 2, Pdi at both stimuli was significantly increased during DBcAMP administration compared with hypercapnia-induced values (group 1: 20-Hz, 13.5 [2.2] vs 15.0 [2.4], respectively, P = 0.001, 100-Hz, 21.2 [1.6] vs 22.5 [1.6], P = 0.001; group 2: 20-Hz, 13.7 [1.4] vs 19.2 [1.7], P = 0.001, 100-Hz, 21.0 [2.4] vs 27.2 [2.5], P = 0.001). The Pdi at both stimuli during DBcAMP administration was significantly

  16. Effects of single or combined histamine H1-receptor and leukotriene CysLT1-receptor antagonism on nasal adenosine monophosphate challenge in persistent allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel K C; Jackson, Catherine M; Soutar, Patricia C; Fardon, Thomas C; Lipworth, Brian J

    2004-01-01

    Background The effects of single or combined histamine H1-receptor and leukotriene CysLT1-receptor antagonism on nasal adenosine monophosphate (AMP) challenge in allergic rhinitis are unknown. Objective We elected to study the effects of usual clinically recommended doses of fexofenadine (FEX), montelukast (ML) and FEX + ML combination, compared with placebo (PL), on nasal AMP challenge in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis. Methods Twelve patients with persistent allergic rhinitis (all skin prick positive to house dust mite) were randomized in a double-blind cross-over fashion to receive for 1 week either FEX 180 mg, ML 10 mg, FEX 180 mg +ML 10 mg combination, or PL, with nasal AMP challenge performed 12 h after dosing. There was a 1-week washout period between each randomized treatment. The primary outcome measure was the maximum percentage peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) fall from baseline over a 60-min period after nasal challenge with a single 400 mg ml−1 dose of AMP. The area under the 60-min time–response curve (AUC) and nasal symptoms were measured as secondary outcomes. Results There was significant attenuation (P < 0.05) of the mean maximum percentage PNIF fall from baseline after nasal AMP challenge vs. PL, 48; with FEX, 37; 95% confidence interval for difference 2, 20; ML, 35 (4, 22); and FEX + ML, 32 (7, 24). The AUC (%.min) was also significantly attenuated (P < 0.05) vs. PL, 1893; with FEX, 1306 (30, 1143); ML, 1246 (214, 1078); and FEX + ML, 1153 (251, 1227). There were no significant differences for FEX vs. ML vs. FEX + ML comparing either the maximum or AUC response. The total nasal symptom score (out of 12) was also significantly improved (P < 0.05) vs. PL, 3.3; with FEX, 2.1 (0.3, 2.0); ML, 2.0 (0.5, 1.9); and FEX + ML, 2.5 (0.1, 1.4). Conclusion FEX and ML as monotherapy significantly attenuated the response to nasal AMP challenge and improved nasal symptoms compared with PL, while combination therapy conferred no additional

  17. Dietary effects of adenosine monophosphate to enhance growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Sakhawat; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; Yokoyama, Saichiro; Sony, Nadia Mahjabin

    2016-09-01

    Our study explored the dietary effects of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to enhance growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream. A semi-purified basal diet supplemented with 0% (Control), 0.1% (AMP-0.1), 0.2% (AMP-0.2), 0.4% (AMP-0.4) and 0.8% (AMP-0.8) purified AMP to formulate five experimental diets. Each diet was randomly allocated to triplicate groups of fish (mean initial weight 3.4 g) for 56 days. The results indicated that dietary AMP supplements tended to improve growth performances. One of the best ones was found in diet group AMP-0.2, followed by diet groups AMP-0.1, AMP-0.4 and AMP-0.8. The Apparent digestibility coefficients (dry matter, protein and lipid) also improved by AMP supplementation and the significantly highest dry matter digestibility was observed in diet group AMP-0.2. Fish fed diet groups AMP-0.2 and AMP-0.4 had significantly higher peroxidase and bactericidal activities than fish fed the control diet. Nitro-blue-tetrazolium (NBT) activity was found to be significantly (P < 0.05) greater in fish fed diet groups AMP-0.4 and AMP-0.8. Total serum protein, lysozyme activity and agglutination antibody titer were also increased (P > 0.05) by dietary supplementation. In contrast, catalase activity decreased with AMP supplementation. Moreover, the fish fed AMP supplemented diets had better improvement (P < 0.05) in body lipid contents, condition factor, hematocrit content and glutamyl oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) level than the control group. Supplementation also improved both freshwater and oxidative stress resistances. Interestingly, the fish fed diet groups AMP-0.2 and AMP-0.4 showed the least oxidative stress condition. Finally it is concluded that, dietary AMP supplementation enhanced the growth, digestibility, immune response and stress resistance of red sea bream. The regression analysis revealed that a dietary AMP supplementation between 0.2 and 0.4% supported weight gain and

  18. A new crystal form of human histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (hHINT1) in complex with adenosine 5′-monophosphate at 1.38 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Dolot, Rafał; Ozga, Magdalena; Włodarczyk, Artur; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Nawrot, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1) represents the most ancient and widespread branch of the histidine triad protein superfamily. HINT1 plays an important role in various biological processes and has been found in many species. Here, the structure of the human HINT1–adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) complex at 1.38 Å resolution obtained from a new monoclinic crystal form is reported. The final structure has R cryst = 0.1207 (R free = 0.1615) and the model exhibits good stereochemical quality. Detailed analysis of the high-resolution data allowed the details of the protein structure to be updated in comparison to the previously published data. PMID:22869114

  19. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent phosphoregulation of mitochondrial complex I is inhibited by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Kaleb C. Wallace, Kendall B.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are known to directly inhibit mitochondrial complex I activity as well as various mitochondrial kinases. Recent observations that complex I activity and superoxide production are modulated through cAMP-dependent phosphorylation suggests a mechanism through which NRTIs may affect mitochondrial respiration via kinase-dependent protein phosphorylation. In the current study, we examine the potential for NRTIs to inhibit the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of complex I and the associated NADH:CoQ oxidoreductase activities and rates of superoxide production using HepG2 cells. Phosphoprotein staining of immunocaptured complex I revealed that 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT; 10 and 50 {mu}M), AZT monophosphate (150 {mu}M), and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC; 1 {mu}M) prevented the phosphorylation of the NDUFB11 subunit of complex I. This was associated with a decrease in complex I activity with AZT and AZT monophosphate only. In the presence of succinate, superoxide production was increased with 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI; 10 {mu}M) and ddC (1 {mu}M). In the presence of succinate + cAMP, AZT showed an inverse dose-dependent effect on superoxide production. None of the NRTIs examined inhibit PKA activity suggesting that the observed effects are due to a direct interaction with complex I. These data demonstrate a direct effect of NRTIs on cAMP-dependent regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics independent of DNA polymerase-{gamma} activity; in the case of AZT, these observations may provide a mechanism for the observed long-term toxicity with this drug.

  20. Killer Cell Lectin-like Receptor G1 Inhibits NK Cell Function through Activation of Adenosine 5'-Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase.

    PubMed

    Müller-Durovic, Bojana; Lanna, Alessio; Polaco Covre, Luciana; Mills, Rachel S; Henson, Sian M; Akbar, Arne N

    2016-10-01

    NK cells are the first line of defense against infected and transformed cells. Defective NK cell activity was shown to increase susceptibility for viral infections and reduce tumor immune-surveillance. With age, the incidence of infectious diseases and malignancy rises dramatically, suggesting that impaired NK cell function might contribute to disease in these individuals. We found an increased frequency of NK cells with high expression of the inhibitory killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1) in individuals >70 y. The role of KLRG1 in ageing is not known, and the mechanism of KLRG1-induced inhibition of NK cell function is not fully understood. We report that NK cells with high KLRG1 expression spontaneously activate the metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and that activation of AMPK negatively regulates NK cell function. Pre-existing AMPK activity is further amplified by ligation of KLRG1 in these cells, which leads to internalization of the receptor and allows interaction with AMPK. We show that KLRG1 activates AMPK by preventing its inhibitory dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase-2C rather than inducing de novo kinase activation. Finally, inhibition of KLRG1 or AMPK prevented KLRG1-induced activation of AMPK and reductions in NK cell cytotoxicity, cytokine secretion, proliferation, and telomerase expression. This novel signaling pathway links metabolic sensing, effector function, and cell differentiation with inhibitory receptor signaling that may be exploited to enhance NK cell activity during ageing.

  1. Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

  2. Cyclic 3'-5'-adenosine monophosphate binds to annexin I and regulates calcium-dependent membrane aggregation and ion channel activity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B E; Lee, G; Arispe, N; Pollard, H B

    1995-12-27

    The annexin (Anx) gene family comprises a set of calcium-dependent membrane binding proteins, which have been implicated in a wide variety of cellular processes including membrane fusion and calcium channel activity. We report here that cAMP activates Ca(2+)-dependent aggregation of both phosphatidylserine (PS) liposomes and bovine chromaffin granules driven by [des 1-12]annexin I (lipocortin I, Anx1). The mechanism of cAMP action involves an increase in AnxI-dependent cooperativity on the rate of such a reaction without affecting the corresponding k1/2 values. Cyclic AMP causes the values of the Hill coefficient (nH) for AnxI to change from 3 to 6 in both PS liposomes and chromaffin granules. By contrast, ATP inhibits the rate of aggregation activity without affecting the cooperativity or the extent of aggregation process. We were also able to photolabel Anx1 specifically with an 8-azido analogue of cAMP by a calcium-independent process. Such a process is saturable, yielding a Kd = 0.8 microM by Scatchard analysis. Specific displacement occurs in the presence of cAMP and ATP. Finally, we found that cAMP alters the conductance of calcium channels formed by AnxI in planar lipid bilayers. We interpret these data to indicate that AnxI binds both calcium and cAMP independently, and that both actions have functional consequences. This is the first report of a nucleotide binding function for a member of the annexin gene family.

  3. 3,3'-Diindolylmethane attenuates cardiac H9c2 cell hypertrophy through 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-α.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jing; Wu, Qing-Qing; Zhou, Heng; Zhang, Jie-Yu; Yuan, Yuan; Bian, Zhou-Yan; Deng, Wei; Dai, Jia; Li, Fang-Fang; Xu, Man; Fang, Yi; Tang, Qi-Zhu

    2015-07-01

    3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM) is the major product of the acid-catalyzed condensation of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a component of extracts of Brassica food plants. Numerous studies have suggested that DIM has several beneficial biological activities, including elimination of free radicals, antioxidant and anti-angiogenic effects and activation of apoptosis of various tumor cells. In the present study, an in vitro model was established, using 1 µM angiotensin II (Ang II) in cultured rat cardiac H9c2 cells, to observe the effects of DIM on cardiac hypertrophy. Following 24 h stimulation with DIM (1, 5, and 10 µM) with or without Ang II, cells were characterized by immunofluorescence to analyze cardiac α-actinin expression. Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and molecular markers of cardiac hypertrophy were assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Atrial natriuretic peptide, brain natriuretic peptide and myosin heavy chain β mRNA expression were induced by Ang II in H9c2 cells treated with the optimal concentration of DIM for 6, 12, and 24 h. The levels of phosphorylated and total proteins of the 5' AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways in H9c2 cells treated with DIM for 0, 15, 30, and 60 min induced by Ang II were determined by western blot analysis. The results showed that DIM attenuated cellular hypertrophy in vitro, enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPKα and inhibited the MAPK‑mTOR signaling pathway in response to hypertrophic stimuli. PMID:25816057

  4. Diabetic complications within the context of aging: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide redox, insulin C-peptide, sirtuin 1-liver kinase B1-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase positive feedback and forkhead box O3.

    PubMed

    Ido, Yasuo

    2016-07-01

    Recent research in nutritional control of aging suggests that cytosolic increases in the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and decreasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolism plays a central role in controlling the longevity gene products sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3). High nutrition conditions, such as the diabetic milieu, increase the ratio of reduced to oxidized forms of cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide through cascades including the polyol pathway. This redox change is associated with insulin resistance and the development of diabetic complications, and might be counteracted by insulin C-peptide. My research and others' suggest that the SIRT1-liver kinase B1-AMPK cascade creates positive feedback through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthesis to help cells cope with metabolic stress. SIRT1 and AMPK can upregulate liver kinase B1 and FOXO3, key factors that help residential stem cells cope with oxidative stress. FOXO3 directly changes epigenetics around transcription start sites, maintaining the health of stem cells. 'Diabetic memory' is likely a result of epigenetic changes caused by high nutritional conditions, which disturb the quiescent state of residential stem cells and impair tissue repair. This could be prevented by restoring SIRT1-AMPK positive feedback through activating FOXO3. PMID:27181414

  5. Diabetic complications within the context of aging: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide redox, insulin C-peptide, sirtuin 1-liver kinase B1-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase positive feedback and forkhead box O3.

    PubMed

    Ido, Yasuo

    2016-07-01

    Recent research in nutritional control of aging suggests that cytosolic increases in the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and decreasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolism plays a central role in controlling the longevity gene products sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3). High nutrition conditions, such as the diabetic milieu, increase the ratio of reduced to oxidized forms of cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide through cascades including the polyol pathway. This redox change is associated with insulin resistance and the development of diabetic complications, and might be counteracted by insulin C-peptide. My research and others' suggest that the SIRT1-liver kinase B1-AMPK cascade creates positive feedback through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthesis to help cells cope with metabolic stress. SIRT1 and AMPK can upregulate liver kinase B1 and FOXO3, key factors that help residential stem cells cope with oxidative stress. FOXO3 directly changes epigenetics around transcription start sites, maintaining the health of stem cells. 'Diabetic memory' is likely a result of epigenetic changes caused by high nutritional conditions, which disturb the quiescent state of residential stem cells and impair tissue repair. This could be prevented by restoring SIRT1-AMPK positive feedback through activating FOXO3.

  6. Glycolytic potential and activity of adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK), glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) in steer carcasses with normal (<5.8) or high (>5.9) 24h pH determined in M. longissimus dorsi.

    PubMed

    Apaoblaza, A; Galaz, A; Strobel, P; Ramírez-Reveco, A; Jeréz-Timaure, N; Gallo, C

    2015-03-01

    Muscle glycogen concentration (MGC) and lactate (LA), activity of glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE), glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK) were determined at 0.5h (T0) and 24h (T24) post-mortem in Longissimus dorsi samples from 38 steers that produced high pH (>5.9) and normal pH (<5.8) carcasses at 24h postmortem. MGC, LA and glycolytic potential were higher (P<0.05) in normal pH carcasses. GDE activity was similar (P>0.05) in both pH categories. GP activity increased between T0 and T24 only in normal pH carcasses. AMPK activity was four times higher in normal pH v/s high pH carcasses, without changing its activity over time. Results reinforce the idea that differences in postmortem glycogenolytic/glycolytic flow in L. dorsi of steers showing normal v/s high muscle pH at 24h, could be explained not only by the higher initial MGC in normal pH carcasses, but also by a high and sustained activity of AMPK and an increased GP activity at 24h postmortem.

  7. A long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist increases the expression of muscarine cholinergic subtype‑3 receptors by activating the β2-adrenoceptor cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Hua; Wu, Song-Ze; Wang, Gang; Huang, Ni-Wen; Liu, Chun-Tao

    2015-06-01

    The persistent administration of β2‑adrenergic (β2AR) agonists has been demonstrated to increase the risk of severe asthma, partly due to the induction of tolerance to bronchoprotection via undefined mechanisms. The present study investigated the potential effect of the long‑acting β2‑adrenergic agonist, formoterol, on the expression of muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R) in rat airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Primary rat ASMCs were isolated and characterized following immunostaining with anti‑α‑smooth muscle actin antibodies. The protein expression levels of M3R and phospholipase C‑β1 (PLCβ1) were characterized by western blot analysis and the production of inositol 1,4,5‑trisphosphate (IP3) was determined using an enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. Formoterol increased the protein expression of M3R in rat ASMCs in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner, which was significantly inhibited by the β2AR antagonist, ICI118,551 and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) inhibitor, SQ22,536. The increased protein expression of M3R was positively correlated with increased production of PLCβ1 and IP3. Furthermore, treatment with the glucocorticoid, budesonide, and the PLC inhibitor, U73,122, significantly suppressed the formoterol‑induced upregulated protein expression levels of M3R and PLCβ1 and production of IP3. The present study demonstrated that formoterol mediated the upregulation of M3R in the rat ASMCs by activating the β2AR‑cAMP signaling pathway, resulting in increased expression levels of PLCβ1 and IP3, which are key to inducing bronchoprotection tolerance. Administration of glucocorticoids or a PLC antagonist prevented formoterol‑induced bronchoprotection tolerance by suppressing the protein expression of M3R. PMID:25672589

  8. Direct biochemical measurements of microtubule assembly and disassembly in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The effect of intercellular contact, cold, D2O, and N6,O2'-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    A study was undertaken to develop a means of quantitating the amount of tubulin present as a soluble pool and as intact microtubules in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. A procedure was developed in which these cells grown on monolayer culture in Petri dishes were placed in a "microtubule stabilizing medium" (MTM) consisting of 50% glycerol, 10% dimethylsulfoxide and sodium phosphate magnesium buffer, as described previously by Filner and Behnke. These cells then were homogenized and the homogenate was spun in the ultracentrifuge. Colchicine binding activity was then determined in the supernates and the pellets. The values, when compared with total colchicine binding activity present in replicate homogenates, were used to determine the percentage of tubulin present as intact microtubules. A statistical analysis of thin sections of cells treated with MTM revealed no statistically significant difference between MTM-treated cells and untreated controls. It was further discovered that the relative amount of colchicine binding activity recovered in the high speed pellet varied dramatically, depending upon the cell number of the culture being studied. Preconfluent cultures showed very low colchicine binding activity averaging less than 5%, while confluent and postconfluent cultures often possessed as high as 25% of their total colchicine binding activity in pelletable material. Although cold and D2O treatment had little or no effect on these values, N6,O2'-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate increased them. It is hoped that this study will serve as the basis for a reliable quantitative procedure for measuring microtubule polymerization and depolymerization in vivo. PMID:162792

  9. Berberine treatment prevents cardiac dysfunction and remodeling through activation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in type 2 diabetic rats and in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenguang; Zhang, Ming; Meng, Zhaojie; Yu, Yang; Yao, Fan; Hatch, Grant M; Chen, Li

    2015-12-15

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is the major cause of death in type 2 diabetic patients. Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid extract from traditional chinese herbs and its hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects make it a promising drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes. We examined if berberine improved cardiac function and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in high fat diet and streptozotocin induced-type 2 diabetic rats in vivo and reduced expression of hypertrophy markers in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells in vitro. Treatment of diabetic animals with berberine partially improved cardiac function and restored fasting blood insulin, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels to that of control. In addition, berberine treatment of diabetic animals increased cardiac 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (AKT) activation and reduced glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) activation compared to control. Palmitate incubation of H9c2 cells resulted in cellular hypertrophy and decreased expression of alpha-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) and increased expression of beta-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) compared to controls. Berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells reduced hypertrophy, increased α-MHC expression and decreased β-MHC expression. In addition, berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells increased AMPK and AKT activation and reduced GSK3β activation. The presence of the AMPK inhibitor Compound C attenuated the effects of berberine. The results strongly indicate that berberine treatment may be protective against the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26522928

  10. Berberine treatment prevents cardiac dysfunction and remodeling through activation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in type 2 diabetic rats and in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenguang; Zhang, Ming; Meng, Zhaojie; Yu, Yang; Yao, Fan; Hatch, Grant M; Chen, Li

    2015-12-15

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is the major cause of death in type 2 diabetic patients. Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid extract from traditional chinese herbs and its hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects make it a promising drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes. We examined if berberine improved cardiac function and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in high fat diet and streptozotocin induced-type 2 diabetic rats in vivo and reduced expression of hypertrophy markers in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells in vitro. Treatment of diabetic animals with berberine partially improved cardiac function and restored fasting blood insulin, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels to that of control. In addition, berberine treatment of diabetic animals increased cardiac 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (AKT) activation and reduced glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) activation compared to control. Palmitate incubation of H9c2 cells resulted in cellular hypertrophy and decreased expression of alpha-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) and increased expression of beta-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) compared to controls. Berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells reduced hypertrophy, increased α-MHC expression and decreased β-MHC expression. In addition, berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells increased AMPK and AKT activation and reduced GSK3β activation. The presence of the AMPK inhibitor Compound C attenuated the effects of berberine. The results strongly indicate that berberine treatment may be protective against the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  11. A long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist increases the expression of muscarine cholinergic subtype-3 receptors by activating the β2-adrenoceptor cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YUAN-HUA; WU, SONG-ZE; WANG, GANG; HUANG, NI-WEN; LIU, CHUN-TAO

    2015-01-01

    The persistent administration of β2-adrenergic (β2AR) agonists has been demonstrated to increase the risk of severe asthma, partly due to the induction of tolerance to bronchoprotection via undefined mechanisms. The present study investigated the potential effect of the long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist, formoterol, on the expression of muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R) in rat airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Primary rat ASMCs were isolated and characterized following immunostaining with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibodies. The protein expression levels of M3R and phospholipase C-β1 (PLCβ1) were characterized by western blot analysis and the production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Formoterol increased the protein expression of M3R in rat ASMCs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which was significantly inhibited by the β2AR antagonist, ICI118,551 and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) inhibitor, SQ22,536. The increased protein expression of M3R was positively correlated with increased production of PLCβ1 and IP3. Furthermore, treatment with the glucocorticoid, budesonide, and the PLC inhibitor, U73,122, significantly suppressed the formoterol-induced upregulated protein expression levels of M3R and PLCβ1 and production of IP3. The present study demonstrated that formoterol mediated the upregulation of M3R in the rat ASMCs by activating the β2AR-cAMP signaling pathway, resulting in increased expression levels of PLCβ1 and IP3, which are key to inducing bronchoprotection tolerance. Administration of glucocorticoids or a PLC antagonist prevented formoterol-induced bronchoprotection tolerance by suppressing the protein expression of M3R. PMID:25672589

  12. Early glycogen synthase kinase-3β and protein phosphatase 2A independent tau dephosphorylation during global brain ischaemia and reperfusion following cardiac arrest and the role of the adenosine monophosphate kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Majd, Shohreh; Power, John H T; Koblar, Simon A; Grantham, Hugh J M

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal tau phosphorylation (p-tau) has been shown after hypoxic damage to the brain associated with traumatic brain injury and stroke. As the level of p-tau is controlled by Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK)-3β, Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and Adenosine Monophosphate Kinase (AMPK), different activity levels of these enzymes could be involved in tau phosphorylation following ischaemia. This study assessed the effects of global brain ischaemia/reperfusion on the immediate status of p-tau in a rat model of cardiac arrest (CA) followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We reported an early dephosphorylation of tau at its AMPK sensitive residues, Ser(396) and Ser(262) after 2 min of ischaemia, which did not recover during the first two hours of reperfusion, while the tau phosphorylation at GSK-3β sensitive but AMPK insensitive residues, Ser(202) /Thr(205) (AT8), as well as the total amount of tau remained unchanged. Our data showed no alteration in the activities of GSK-3β and PP2A during similar episodes of ischaemia of up to 8 min and reperfusion of up to 2 h, and 4 weeks recovery. Dephosphorylation of AMPK followed the same pattern as tau dephosphorylation during ischaemia/reperfusion. Catalase, another AMPK downstream substrate also showed a similar pattern of decline to p-AMPK, in ischaemic/reperfusion groups. This suggests the involvement of AMPK in changing the p-tau levels, indicating that tau dephosphorylation following ischaemia is not dependent on GSK-3β or PP2A activity, but is associated with AMPK dephosphorylation. We propose that a reduction in AMPK activity is a possible early mechanism responsible for tau dephosphorylation.

  13. Discovery and Preclinical Characterization of 6-Chloro-5-[4-(1-hydroxycyclobutyl)phenyl]-1H-indole-3-carboxylic Acid (PF-06409577), a Direct Activator of Adenosine Monophosphate-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK), for the Potential Treatment of Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Kimberly O; Kung, Daniel W; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Miller, Russell; Salatto, Christopher T; Ward, Jessica; Withka, Jane M; Bhattacharya, Samit K; Boehm, Markus; Borzilleri, Kris A; Brown, Janice A; Calabrese, Matthew; Caspers, Nicole L; Cokorinos, Emily; Conn, Edward L; Dowling, Matthew S; Edmonds, David J; Eng, Heather; Fernando, Dilinie P; Frisbie, Richard; Hepworth, David; Landro, James; Mao, Yuxia; Rajamohan, Francis; Reyes, Allan R; Rose, Colin R; Ryder, Tim; Shavnya, Andre; Smith, Aaron C; Tu, Meihua; Wolford, Angela C; Xiao, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a protein kinase involved in maintaining energy homeostasis within cells. On the basis of human genetic association data, AMPK activators were pursued for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Identification of an indazole amide high throughput screening (HTS) hit followed by truncation to its minimal pharmacophore provided an indazole acid lead compound. Optimization of the core and aryl appendage improved oral absorption and culminated in the identification of indole acid, PF-06409577 (7). Compound 7 was advanced to first-in-human trials for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  14. Post-meal responses of elongation factor 2 (eEF2) and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to leucine and carbohydrate supplements for regulating protein synthesis duration and energy homeostasis in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gabriel J; Moulton, Christopher J; Garlick, Peter J; Anthony, Tracy G; Layman, Donald K

    2012-11-13

    Previous research demonstrates that the anabolic response of muscle protein synthesis (MPS) to a meal is regulated at the level of translation initiation with signals derived from leucine (Leu) and insulin to activate mTORC1 signaling. Recent evidence suggests that the duration of the meal response is limited by energy status of the cell and inhibition of translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2). This study evaluates the potential to extend the anabolic meal response with post-meal supplements of Leu or carbohydrates. Adult (~256 g) male Sprague-Dawley rats were food deprived for 12 h, then either euthanized before a standard meal (time 0) or at 90 or 180 min post-meal. At 135 min post-meal, rats received one of five oral supplements: 270 mg leucine (Leu270), 80:40:40 mg leucine, isoleucine, and valine (Leu80), 2.63 g carbohydrates (CHO2.6), 1 g carbohydrates (CHO1.0), or water (Sham control). Following the standard meal, MPS increased at 90 min then declined to pre-meal baseline at 180 min. Rats administered Leu270, Leu80, CHO2.6, or CHO1.0 maintained elevated rates of MPS at 180 min, while Sham controls declined from peak values. Leu80 and CHO1.0 treatments maintained MPS, but with values intermediate between Sham controls and Leu270 and CHO2.6 supplements. Consistent with MPS findings, the supplements maintained elongation activity and cellular energy status by preventing increases in AMP/ATP and phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl-CoA carboxylase ACC and eEF2. The impact of the supplements on MPS and cellular energy status was in proportion to the energy content within the individual treatments (i.e., Leu270 > Leu80; CHO2.6 > CHO1.0), but the Leu supplements produced a disproportionate anabolic stimulation of MPS, eEF2 and energy status with significantly lower energy content. In summary, the incongruity between MPS and translation initiation at 180 min reflects a block in translation elongation due to reduced

  15. Role of 3', 5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate and protein kinase C in the regulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein secretion by thyroid-stimulating hormone in isolated ovine thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J F; Hill, D J; Becks, G P

    1994-05-01

    Isolated sheep thyroid follicles release insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II together with IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). We previously showed that TSH suppresses the biosynthesis and release of IGFBPs in vitro which may increase the tissue availability of IGFs, allowing a synergy with TSH which potentiates both thyroid growth and function. Many of the actions of TSH on thyroid cell function are dependent upon activation of adenylate cyclase, although increased synthesis of inositol trisphosphate and activation of protein kinase C (PKC) have also been implicated. We have now examined whether probable changes in intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) or PKC are involved in TSH-mediated suppression of IGFBP release. Confluent primary cultures of ovine thyroid cells were maintained in serum-free Ham's modified F-12M medium containing transferrin, somatostatin and glycyl-histidyl-lysine (designated 3H), and further supplemented with sodium iodide (10(-8)-10(-3) mol/l), dibutyryl cAMP (0.25-1 mmol/l), forskolin (5-20 mumol/l) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA; 10(-11)-10(-6) mol/l), with or without exposure to TSH (200 microU/ml). The uptake and organification of Na [125I] by cells was examined after test incubations of up to 48 h, and IGFBPs in conditioned media were analysed by ligand blot using 125I-labelled IGF-II. The PKC activity in the cytosol and plasma membrane fractions of cells was measured by phosphorylation of histone using [gamma-32P]ATP, and PKC immunoreactivity was visualized by Western immunoblot analysis. While dibutyryl cAMP or forskolin largely reproduced the stimulatory effect of TSH on iodine organification, they did not mimic the inhibitory effect of TSH on the secretion of IGFBPs of 43, 34, 28 and 19 kDa. Incubation with physiological or pharmacological concentrations of iodide (10(-6)-10(-3) mol/l) for up to 48 h significantly decreased TSH action on iodide uptake and organification but did not alter the

  16. Overexpression of human selenoprotein H in neuronal cells enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and function through activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase B, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein pathway.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Suresh L; Mendelev, Natalia; Kumari, Santosh; Andy Li, P

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is activated by nuclear encoded transcription co-activator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), which is regulated by several upstream factors including protein kinase A and Akt/protein kinase B. We have previously shown that selenoprotein H enhances the levels of nuclear regulators for mitochondrial biogenesis, increases mitochondrial mass and improves mitochondrial respiratory rate, under physiological condition. Furthermore, overexpression of selenoprotein H protects neuronal HT22 cells from ultraviolet B irradiation-induced cell damage by lowering reactive oxygen species production, and inhibiting activation of caspase-3 and -9, as well as p53. The objective of this study is to identify the cell signaling pathways by which selenoprotein H initiates mitochondrial biogenesis. We first confirmed our previous observation that selenoprotein H transfected HT22 cells increased the protein levels of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial biogenesis factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. We then observed that total and phosphorylation of protein kinase A, Akt/protein kinase B and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) were significantly increased in selenoprotein H transfected cells compared to vector transfected HT22 cells. To verify whether the observed stimulating effects on mitochondrial biogenesis pathways are caused by selenoprotein H and mediated through CREB, we knocked down selenoprotein H mRNA level using siRNA and inhibited CREB with napthol AS-E phosphate in selenoprotein H transfected cells and repeated the measurements of the aforementioned biomarkers. Our results revealed that silencing of selenoprotein H not only decreased the protein levels of PGC-1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, but also decreased the total and

  17. Heat shock protein 70 and AMP-activated protein kinase contribute to 17-DMAG-dependent protection against heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yung-Chieh; Lam, Kwok-Keung; Peng, Yi-Jen; Lee, Yen-Mei; Yang, Chung-Yu; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Yen, Mao-Hsiung; Cheng, Pao-Yun

    2016-10-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) preconditioning induces thermotolerance, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a role in the process of autophagy. Here, we investigated whether 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG) protected against heat stroke (HS) in rats by up-regulation of Hsp70 and phosphorylated AMPK (pAMPK). To produce HS, male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed in a chamber with an ambient temperature of 42°C. Physiological function (mean arterial pressure, heart rate and core temperature), hepatic and intestinal injury, inflammatory mediators and levels of Hsp70, pAMPK and light chain 3 (LC3B) in hepatic tissue were measured in HS rats or/and rats pre-treated with 17-DMAG. 17-DMAG pre-treatment significantly attenuated hypotension and organ dysfunction induced by HS in rats. The survival time during HS was also prolonged by 17-DMAG treatment. Hsp70 expression was increased, whereas pAMPK levels in the liver were significantly decreased in HS rats. Following pre-treatment with 17-DMAG, Hsp70 protein levels increased further, and pAMPK levels were enhanced. Treatment with an AMPK activator significantly increased the LC3BII/LC3BI ratio as a marker of autophagy in HS rats. Treatment with quercetin significantly suppressed Hsp70 and pAMPK levels and reduced the protective effects of 17-DMAG in HS rats. Both of Hsp70 and AMPK are involved in the 17-DMAG-mediated protection against HS. 17-DMAG may be a promising candidate drug in the clinical setting.

  18. Heat shock protein 70 and AMP-activated protein kinase contribute to 17-DMAG-dependent protection against heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yung-Chieh; Lam, Kwok-Keung; Peng, Yi-Jen; Lee, Yen-Mei; Yang, Chung-Yu; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Yen, Mao-Hsiung; Cheng, Pao-Yun

    2016-10-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) preconditioning induces thermotolerance, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a role in the process of autophagy. Here, we investigated whether 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG) protected against heat stroke (HS) in rats by up-regulation of Hsp70 and phosphorylated AMPK (pAMPK). To produce HS, male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed in a chamber with an ambient temperature of 42°C. Physiological function (mean arterial pressure, heart rate and core temperature), hepatic and intestinal injury, inflammatory mediators and levels of Hsp70, pAMPK and light chain 3 (LC3B) in hepatic tissue were measured in HS rats or/and rats pre-treated with 17-DMAG. 17-DMAG pre-treatment significantly attenuated hypotension and organ dysfunction induced by HS in rats. The survival time during HS was also prolonged by 17-DMAG treatment. Hsp70 expression was increased, whereas pAMPK levels in the liver were significantly decreased in HS rats. Following pre-treatment with 17-DMAG, Hsp70 protein levels increased further, and pAMPK levels were enhanced. Treatment with an AMPK activator significantly increased the LC3BII/LC3BI ratio as a marker of autophagy in HS rats. Treatment with quercetin significantly suppressed Hsp70 and pAMPK levels and reduced the protective effects of 17-DMAG in HS rats. Both of Hsp70 and AMPK are involved in the 17-DMAG-mediated protection against HS. 17-DMAG may be a promising candidate drug in the clinical setting. PMID:27241357

  19. [Cyclic adenosine monophosphate and atherogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, E N

    1977-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia caused a decrease in the activity of adenylcyclase in rabbit liver tissue and in thrombocytes; hypertriglyceridemia, which developed after administration of hydrocortisone, led to an increase in the activity of adenylcyclase and in the content of 3,5-AMP in adipose tissue. Activities of adenylcyclase, phosphodiesterase and content of prostaglandines E1 and F2alpha were measured in thrombocytes of 39 healthy men without any symptoms of of ischemic heart impairment, in 52 patients with coronary atherosclerosis of the III degree (by Myasnikov's classification) as well as in 12 patients during the period of rehabilitation after myocardial infarction. The activity of adenylate cyclase system was impaired in atherosclerosis. This phenomenon might be caused by alteration in concentration of glucocorticoids in the organism.

  20. Purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, G C; Schmalstieg, F C; Trimmer, K B; Goldman, A S; Goldblum, R M

    1976-01-01

    Purine and pyrimidine metabolites were measured in erythrocytes, plasma, and urine of a 5-month-old infant with adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) deficiency. Adenosine and adenine were measured using newly devised ion exchange separation techniques and a sensitive fluorescence assay. Plasma adenosine levels were increased, whereas adenosine was normal in erythrocytes and not detectable in urine. Increased amounts of adenine were found in erythrocytes and urine as well as in the plasma. Erythrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate concentrations were normal, but adenosine triphosphate content was greatly elevated. Because of the possibility of pyrimidine starvation, pyrimidine nucleotides (pyrimidine coenzymes) in erythrocytes and orotic acid in urine were measured. Pyrimidine nucleotide concentrations were normal, while orotic acid was not detected. These studies suggest that the immune deficiency associated with adenosine deaminase deficiency may be related to increased amounts of adenine, adenosine, or adenine nucleotides. PMID:1066699

  1. Cyclic adenosine 5'-diphosphoribose (cADPR) cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate positively function in Ca(2+) elevation in methyl jasmonate-induced stomatal closure, cADPR is required for methyl jasmonate-induced ROS accumulation NO production in guard cells.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M A; Ye, W; Munemasa, S; Nakamura, Y; Mori, I C; Murata, Y

    2014-11-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) signalling shares several signal components with abscisic acid (ABA) signalling in guard cells. Cyclic adenosine 5'-diphosphoribose (cADPR) and cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) are second messengers in ABA-induced stomatal closure. In order to clarify involvement of cADPR and cGMP in MeJA-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana (Col-0), we investigated effects of an inhibitor of cADPR synthesis, nicotinamide (NA), and an inhibitor of cGMP synthesis, LY83583 (LY, 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione), on MeJA-induced stomatal closure. Treatment with NA and LY inhibited MeJA-induced stomatal closure. NA inhibited MeJA-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and nitric oxide (NO) production in guard cells. NA and LY suppressed transient elevations elicited by MeJA in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) in guard cells. These results suggest that cADPR and cGMP positively function in [Ca(2+)]cyt elevation in MeJA-induced stomatal closure, are signalling components shared with ABA-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis, and that cADPR is required for MeJA-induced ROS accumulation and NO production in Arabidopsis guard cells.

  2. Effects of 4-week treatment with lithium and olanzapine on levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 and phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein in the sub-regions of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hammonds, Michael D; Shim, Seong S

    2009-08-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that lithium, the prototype mood stabilizer in the treatment of bipolar disorder, has diverse neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions, and the actions are associated with its efficacy in treating bipolar disorder. It has been suggested that up-regulation of neurotrophic and neuroprotective factors including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) may underlie these neuroplastic actions of the drug. Olanzapine, an atypical anti-psychotic drug, has been shown to be an effective mood stabilizer. Olanzapine also has neurotrophic and neuroprotective actions, and these actions may underlie the efficacy of the drug for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. However, the molecular mechanism by which the drug produces the neuroplastic actions is poorly understood. To understand a common molecular mechanism underlying the neuroplastic actions of lithium and olanzapine, we assessed the effect of 4-week lithium and olanzapine treatment on the levels of BDNF, Bcl-2 and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor involved in expression of BDNF and Bcl-2, in the dentate gyrus and hippocampal area CA1. Our results show that 4-week treatment with both olanzapine and lithium increases the levels of Bcl-2 and CREB in the dentate gyrus and hippocampal area CA1. Four-week lithium treatment up-regulates BDNF in the dentate gyrus, and 4-week olanzapine treatment marginally did so. Neither drug altered BDNF levels in area CA1. These results suggest that the up-regulation of Bcl-2 and CREB may underlie the neuroplastic actions of olanzapine and lithium.

  3. (−)-Epicatechin-3-O-β-d-allopyranoside from Davallia formosana, Prevents Diabetes and Hyperlipidemia by Regulation of Glucose Transporter 4 and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation in High-Fat-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chun-Ching; Wu, Jin-Bin; Jian, Jia-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Ho, Hui-Ya

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine the antidiabetic and lipid-lowering effects of (−)-epicatechin-3-O-β-d-allopyranoside (BB) from the roots and stems of Davallia formosana in mice. Animal treatment was induced by high-fat diet (HFD) or low-fat diet (control diet, CD). After eight weeks of HFD or CD exposure, the HFD mice were treating with BB or rosiglitazone (Rosi) or fenofibrate (Feno) or water through gavage for another four weeks. However, at 12 weeks, the HFD-fed group had enhanced blood levels of glucose, triglyceride (TG), and insulin. BB treatment significantly decreased blood glucose, TG, and insulin levels. Moreover, visceral fat weights were enhanced in HFD-fed mice, accompanied by increased blood leptin concentrations and decreased adiponectin levels, which were reversed by treatment with BB. Muscular membrane protein levels of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) were reduced in HFD-fed mice and significantly enhanced upon administration of BB, Rosi, and Feno. Moreover, BB treatment markedly increased hepatic and skeletal muscular expression levels of phosphorylation of AMP-activated (adenosine monophosphate) protein kinase (phospho-AMPK). BB also decreased hepatic mRNA levels of phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), which are associated with a decrease in hepatic glucose production. BB-exerted hypotriglyceridemic activity may be partly associated with increased mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα), and with reduced hepatic glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) mRNA levels in the liver, which decreased triacylglycerol synthesis. Nevertheless, we demonstrated BB was a useful approach for the management of type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia in this animal model. PMID:26492243

  4. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  5. AMP-activated protein kinase mediates mitochondrial fission in response to energy stress

    PubMed Central

    Courchet, Julien; Lewis, Tommy L.; Losón, Oliver C.; Hellberg, Kristina; Young, Nathan P.; Chen, Hsiuchen; Polleux, Franck; Chan, David C.; Shaw, Reuben J.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria undergo fragmentation in response to electron transport chain (ETC) poisons and mitochondrial DNA–linked disease mutations, yet how these stimuli mechanistically connect to the mitochondrial fission and fusion machinery is poorly understood. We found that the energy-sensing adenosine monophosphate (AMP)–activated protein kinase (AMPK) is genetically required for cells to undergo rapid mitochondrial fragmentation after treatment with ETC inhibitors. Moreover, direct pharmacological activation of AMPK was sufficient to rapidly promote mitochondrial fragmentation even in the absence of mitochondrial stress. A screen for substrates of AMPK identified mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), a mitochondrial outer-membrane receptor for DRP1, the cytoplasmic guanosine triphosphatase that catalyzes mitochondrial fission. Nonphosphorylatable and phosphomimetic alleles of the AMPK sites in MFF revealed that it is a key effector of AMPK-mediated mitochondrial fission. PMID:26816379

  6. Alkaline Phosphatase, Soluble Extracellular Adenine Nucleotides, and Adenosine Production after Infant Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Jesse A.; Urban, Tracy; Tong, Suhong; Twite, Mark; Woodruff, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Decreased alkaline phosphatase activity after infant cardiac surgery is associated with increased post-operative cardiovascular support requirements. In adults undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, alkaline phosphatase infusion may reduce inflammation. Mechanisms underlying these effects have not been explored but may include decreased conversion of extracellular adenine nucleotides to adenosine. Objectives 1) Evaluate the association between alkaline phosphatase activity and serum conversion of adenosine monophosphate to adenosine after infant cardiac surgery; 2) assess if inhibition/supplementation of serum alkaline phosphatase modulates this conversion. Methods and Research Pre/post-bypass serum samples were obtained from 75 infants <4 months of age. Serum conversion of 13C5-adenosine monophosphate to 13C5-adenosine was assessed with/without selective inhibition of alkaline phosphatase and CD73. Low and high concentration 13C5-adenosine monophosphate (simulating normal/stress concentrations) were used. Effects of alkaline phosphatase supplementation on adenosine monophosphate clearance were also assessed. Changes in serum alkaline phosphatase activity were strongly correlated with changes in 13C5-adenosine production with or without CD73 inhibition (r = 0.83; p<0.0001). Serum with low alkaline phosphatase activity (≤80 U/L) generated significantly less 13C5-adenosine, particularly in the presence of high concentration 13C5-adenosine monophosphate (10.4μmol/L vs 12.9μmol/L; p = 0.0004). Inhibition of alkaline phosphatase led to a marked decrease in 13C5-adenosine production (11.9μmol/L vs 2.7μmol/L; p<0.0001). Supplementation with physiologic dose human tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase or high dose bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase doubled 13C5-adenosine monophosphate conversion to 13C5-adenosine (p<0.0001). Conclusions Alkaline phosphatase represents the primary serum ectonucleotidase after infant cardiac surgery and low post

  7. [Isolation of inosine-5'-monophosphate from fish muscles].

    PubMed

    Tugaĭ, V A; Akulin, V N; Epshteĭn, L M

    1987-01-01

    Conditions for transformation of tissue adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP) into inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) with the aid of endogenic AMP-aminohydrolase are developed resting on the studied properties of AMP-aminohydrolase (EC 3.5.4.6) from saltwater fish muscles (one of the enzymes participating in the nucleotide metabolism). Sorption of the nucleotide is performed on the activated charcoals A gamma-3 A gamma-5 which eluate IMP from acid solutions. It reduces the process of isolation, permits application of the acid wash solutions to remove salts; the alkaline ethyl alcohol-aid elution at the subsequent stages accelerates the process of nucleotide concentration by means of vacuum evaporation. The suggested approaches allow developing a simple method of IMP production from fish tissues which diminishes the cost of preparation.

  8. AMP-activated protein kinase is activated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    King, Tanya S; Russe, Otto Quintus; Möser, Christine V; Ferreirós, Nerea; Kynast, Katharina L; Knothe, Claudia; Olbrich, Katrin; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2015-09-01

    AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor, which is activated in stages of increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decrease of inflammatory processes and inhibition of disease progression of diabetes and obesity. A recent study suggested that salicylate, the active metabolite of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) acetyl-salicylic acid (aspirin), is able to activate AMPK pharmacologically. This observation raised the question whether or not other NSAIDs might also act as AMPK activators and whether this action might contribute to their cyclooxygenase (COX)-independent anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated mouse and human neuronal cells and liver tissue of mice after treatment with various NSAIDs. Our results showed that the non-selective acidic NSAIDs ibuprofen and diclofenac induced AMPK activation similar to aspirin while the COX-2 selective drug etoricoxib and the non-opioid analgesic paracetamol, both drugs have no acidic structure, failed to activate AMPK. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK can be activated by specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as salicylic acid, ibuprofen or diclofenac possibly depending on the acidic structure of the drugs. AMPK might therefore contribute to their antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26049010

  9. AMP-activated protein kinase and metabolic control

    PubMed Central

    Viollet, Benoit; Andreelli, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a phylogenetically conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, is a major regulator of cellular and whole-body energy homeostasis that coordinates metabolic pathways in order to balance nutrient supply with energy demand. It is now recognized that pharmacological activation of AMPK improves blood glucose homeostasis, lipid profile and blood pressure in insulin-resistant rodents. Indeed, AMPK activation mimics the beneficial effects of physical activity or those of calorie restriction by acting on multiple cellular targets. In addition it is now demonstrated that AMPK is one of the probable (albeit indirect) targets of major antidiabetic drugs including, the biguanides (metformin) and thiazolidinediones, as well as of insulin sensitizing adipokines (e.g., adiponectin). Taken together, such findings highlight the logic underlying the concept of targeting the AMPK pathway for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21484577

  10. Adenosine Kinase: Exploitation for Therapeutic Gain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine kinase (ADK; EC 2.7.1.20) is an evolutionarily conserved phosphotransferase that converts the purine ribonucleoside adenosine into 5′-adenosine-monophosphate. This enzymatic reaction plays a fundamental role in determining the tone of adenosine, which fulfills essential functions as a homeostatic and metabolic regulator in all living systems. Adenosine not only activates specific signaling pathways by activation of four types of adenosine receptors but it is also a primordial metabolite and regulator of biochemical enzyme reactions that couple to bioenergetic and epigenetic functions. By regulating adenosine, ADK can thus be identified as an upstream regulator of complex homeostatic and metabolic networks. Not surprisingly, ADK dysfunction is involved in several pathologies, including diabetes, epilepsy, and cancer. Consequently, ADK emerges as a rational therapeutic target, and adenosine-regulating drugs have been tested extensively. In recent attempts to improve specificity of treatment, localized therapies have been developed to augment adenosine signaling at sites of injury or pathology; those approaches include transplantation of stem cells with deletions of ADK or the use of gene therapy vectors to downregulate ADK expression. More recently, the first human mutations in ADK have been described, and novel findings suggest an unexpected role of ADK in a wider range of pathologies. ADK-regulating strategies thus represent innovative therapeutic opportunities to reconstruct network homeostasis in a multitude of conditions. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the genetics, biochemistry, and pharmacology of ADK and will then focus on pathologies and therapeutic interventions. Challenges to translate ADK-based therapies into clinical use will be discussed critically. PMID:23592612

  11. cAmp activation of apical membrane Cl(-) channels: theoretical considerations for impedance analysis.

    PubMed

    Păunescu, T G; Helman, S I

    2001-08-01

    Transepithelial electrical impedance analysis provides a sensitive method to evaluate the conductances and capacitances of apical and basolateral plasma membranes of epithelial cells. Impedance analysis is complicated, due not only to the anatomical arrangement of the cells and their paracellular shunt pathways, but also in particular to the existence of audio frequency-dependent capacitances or dispersions. In this paper we explore implications and consequences of anatomically related Maxwell-Wagner and Cole-Cole dielectric dispersions that impose limitations, approximations, and pitfalls of impedance analysis when tissues are studied under widely ranging spontaneous rates of transport, and in particular when apical membrane sodium and chloride channels are activated by adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in A6 epithelia. We develop the thesis that capacitive relaxation processes of any origin lead not only to dependence on frequency of the impedance locus, but also to the appearance of depressed semicircles in Nyquist transepithelial impedance plots, regardless of the tightness or leakiness of the paracellular shunt pathways. Frequency dependence of capacitance precludes analysis of data in traditional ways, where capacitance is assumed constant, and is especially important when apical and/or basolateral membranes exhibit one or more dielectric dispersions.

  12. Investigating real-time activation of adenosine receptors by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Zheng, Liqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2013-02-01

    Adenosine receptors play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes, for example regulating myocardial oxygen consumption and the release of neurotransmitters. The activations of adenosine receptors have been studied by some kinds of techniques, such as western blot, immunohistochemistry, etc. However, these techniques cannot reveal the dynamical response of adenosine receptors under stimulation. In this paper, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique was introduced to study the real-time activation of adenosine receptors by monitoring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level. The results showed that there were significant differences between adenosine receptors on real-time responses under stimulation. Moreover, the dynamics of cAMP level demonstrated that competition between adenosine receptors existed. Taken together, our study indicates that monitoring the dynamics of cAMP level using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique could be one potential approach to investigate the mechanism of competitions between adenosine receptors.

  13. RNA initiation with dinucleoside monophosphates during transcription of bacteriophage T4 DNA with RNA polymerase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, D J; Niyogi, S K

    1973-02-01

    The effects of dinucleoside monophosphates on the transcription of phage T4 DNA by E. coli RNA polymerase have been examined at various concentrations of the sigma subunit and extremely low concentration of ribonucleoside triphosphate. The following conclusions were reached: (i) Labeled specific dinucleoside monophosphates are incorporated as chain initiators. (ii) When the ratio of sigma factor to core enzyme is small, there is a general stimulation by most 5'-guanosyl dinucleoside monophosphates. (iii) When the ratio is increased or holoenzyme is present, ApU, CpA, UpA, and GpU are the most effective stimulators. (iv) At high concentrations of sigma factor, only certain adenosine-containing dinucleoside monophosphates (ApU, CpA, UpA, and ApA) stimulate the reaction. (v) Competition hybridization studies indicate that the RNAs stimulated by dinucleoside monophosphates (ApU, CpA, UpA, and GpU) are of the T4 "early" type. (vi) Studies involving both combinations of stimulatory dinucleoside monophosphates and competitive effects of these compounds on chain initiation by ATP and GTP suggest that the stimulatory dinucleoside monophosphates act as chain initiators and may recognize part of a continuous sequence in a promoter region. Studies based on the incorporation of (3)H-labeled stimulatory dinucleoside monophosphates support the above conclusions.

  14. Functions of AMP-activated protein kinase in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Daval, Marie; Foufelle, Fabienne; Ferré, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is involved in cellular energy homeostasis. Its functions have been extensively studied in muscles and liver. AMPK stimulates pathways which increase energy production (glucose transport, fatty acid oxidation) and switches off pathways which consume energy (lipogenesis, protein synthesis, gluconeogenesis). This has led to the concept that AMPK has an interesting pharmaceutical potential in situations of insulin resistance and it is indeed the target of existing drugs and hormones which improve insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue is a key player in energy metabolism through the release of substrates and hormones involved in metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Activation of AMPK in adipose tissue can be achieved through situations such as fasting and exercise. Leptin and adiponectin as well as hypoglycaemic drugs are activators of adipose tissue AMPK. This activation probably involves changes in the AMP/ATP ratio and the upstream kinase LKB1. When activated, AMPK limits fatty acid efflux from adipocytes and favours local fatty acid oxidation. Since fatty acids have a key role in insulin resistance, especially in muscles, activating AMPK in adipose tissue might be found to be beneficial in insulin-resistant states, particularly as AMPK activation also reduces cytokine secretion in adipocytes. PMID:16709632

  15. Perivascular fat, AMP-activated protein kinase and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Almabrouk, T A M; Ewart, M A; Salt, I P; Kennedy, S

    2014-01-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) is an active endocrine and paracrine organ that modulates vascular function, with implications for the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Adipocytes and stromal cells contained within PVAT produce mediators (adipokines, cytokines, reactive oxygen species and gaseous compounds) with a range of paracrine effects modulating vascular smooth muscle cell contraction, proliferation and migration. However, the modulatory effect of PVAT on the vascular system in diseases, such as obesity, hypertension and atherosclerosis, remains poorly characterized. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates adipocyte metabolism, adipose biology and vascular function, and hence may be a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the vascular complications associated with obesity and T2DM. The role of AMPK in PVAT or the actions of PVAT have yet to be established, however. Activation of AMPK by pharmacological agents, such as metformin and thiazolidinediones, may modulate the activity of PVAT surrounding blood vessels and thereby contribute to their beneficial effect in cardiometabolic diseases. This review will provide a current perspective on how PVAT may influence vascular function via AMPK. We will also attempt to demonstrate how modulating AMPK activity using pharmacological agents could be exploited therapeutically to treat cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:24490856

  16. Activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) slows renal cystogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takiar, Vinita; Nishio, Saori; Seo-Mayer, Patricia; King, J Darwin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Li; Karihaloo, Anil; Hallows, Kenneth R; Somlo, Stefan; Caplan, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    Renal cyst development and expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) involves both fluid secretion and abnormal proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells. The chloride channel of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) participates in secretion of cyst fluid, and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway may drive proliferation of cyst epithelial cells. CFTR and mTOR are both negatively regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin, a drug in wide clinical use, is a pharmacological activator of AMPK. We find that metformin stimulates AMPK, resulting in inhibition of both CFTR and the mTOR pathways. Metformin induces significant arrest of cystic growth in both in vitro and ex vivo models of renal cystogenesis. In addition, metformin administration produces a significant decrease in the cystic index in two mouse models of ADPKD. Our results suggest a possible role for AMPK activation in slowing renal cystogenesis as well as the potential for therapeutic application of metformin in the context of ADPKD. PMID:21262823

  17. Exposure to Hydrogen Peroxide Induces Oxidation and Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W.; Banerjee, Sami; Bae, Hongbeom; Friggeri, Arnaud; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.; Abraham, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Although metabolic conditions associated with an increased AMP/ATP ratio are primary factors in the activation of 5′-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a number of recent studies have shown that increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species can stimulate AMPK activity, even without a decrease in cellular levels of ATP. We found that exposure of recombinant AMPKαβγ complex or HEK 293 cells to H2O2 was associated with increased kinase activity and also resulted in oxidative modification of AMPK, including S-glutathionylation of the AMPKα and AMPKβ subunits. In experiments using C-terminal truncation mutants of AMPKα (amino acids 1–312), we found that mutation of cysteine 299 to alanine diminished the ability of H2O2 to induce kinase activation, and mutation of cysteine 304 to alanine totally abrogated the enhancing effect of H2O2 on kinase activity. Similar to the results obtained with H2O2-treated HEK 293 cells, activation and S-glutathionylation of the AMPKα subunit were present in the lungs of acatalasemic mice or mice treated with the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole, conditions in which intracellular steady state levels of H2O2 are increased. These results demonstrate that physiologically relevant concentrations of H2O2 can activate AMPK through oxidative modification of the AMPKα subunit. The present findings also imply that AMPK activation, in addition to being a response to alterations in intracellular metabolic pathways, is directly influenced by cellular redox status. PMID:20729205

  18. p-HPEA-EDA, a phenolic compound of virgin olive oil, activates AMP-activated protein kinase to inhibit carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Prem; Oh, Won-Keun; Yun, Hyo Jeong; Namgoong, Gwang Mo; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Kwon, Seong-Min; Choi, Hoo-Kyun; Choi, Hong Seok

    2011-04-01

    Phenolic constituents of virgin olive oil are reported to have antitumor activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and specific target proteins of virgin olive oil remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl ligstroside aglycone (p-HPEA-EDA), a phenolic compound of virgin olive oil, inhibits tumor promoter-induced cell transformation in JB6 Cl41 cells and suppress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumorigenicity by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in HT-29 cells. p-HPEA-EDA inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and p90RSK in JB6 Cl41 cells, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation, activator protein-1 transactivation and cell transformation promoted by TPA. Moreover, p-HPEA-EDA strongly inhibited the cell viability and COX-2 expression by activation of AMPK activity in HT-29 cells, resulted from depletion of intracellular adenosine triphosphate. p-HPEA-EDA-induced activation of caspase-3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase, phosphorylation of p53 (Ser15) and DNA fragmentation in HT-29 cells, leading to apoptosis. Importantly, p-HPEA-EDA suppressed the colony formation of HT-29 cells in soft agar. In contrast, Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and Z-DEVD-FMK, a caspase-3 inhibitor, blocked the p-HPEA-EDA-inhibited colony formation in HT-29 cells. In vivo chorioallantoic membrane assay also showed that p-HPEA-EDA-inhibited tumorigenicity of HT-29 cells. These findings revealed that targeted activation of AMPK and inhibition of COX-2 expression by p-HPEA-EDA contribute to the chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential of virgin olive oil against colon cancer cells. PMID:21216846

  19. Dietary adenine controls adult lifespan via adenosine nucleotide biosynthesis and AMPK, and regulates the longevity benefit of caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Stenesen, Drew; Suh, Jae Myoung; Seo, Jin; Yu, Kweon; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Jong-Seok; Min, Kyung-Jin; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A common thread among conserved lifespan regulators lies within intertwined roles in metabolism and energy homeostasis. We show that heterozygous mutations of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) biosynthetic enzymes extend Drosophila lifespan. The lifespan benefit of these mutations depends upon increased AMP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to ATP ratios and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Transgenic expression of AMPK in adult fat body or adult muscle, key metabolic tissues, extended lifespan, while AMPK RNAi reduced lifespan. Supplementing adenine, a substrate for AMP biosynthesis, to the diet of long-lived AMP biosynthesis mutants reversed lifespan extension. Remarkably, this simple change in diet also blocked the pro-longevity effects of dietary restriction. These data establish AMP biosynthesis, adenosine nucleotide ratios, and AMPK as determinants of adult lifespan, provide a mechanistic link between cellular anabolism and energy sensing pathways, and indicate that dietary adenine manipulations might alter metabolism to influence animal lifespan. PMID:23312286

  20. AMP-activated protein kinase and nitric oxide regulate the glucose sensitivity of ventromedial hypothalamic glucose-inhibited neurons.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Beth Ann; Fakira, Kurt A; Song, Zhentao; Beuve, Annie; Routh, Vanessa H

    2009-09-01

    The mechanisms by which glucose regulates the activity of glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) are largely unknown. We have previously shown that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) increases nitric oxide (NO) production in VMH GI neurons. We hypothesized that AMPK-mediated NO signaling is required for depolarization of VMH GI neurons in response to decreased glucose. In support of our hypothesis, inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) or the NO receptor soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) blocked depolarization of GI neurons to decreased glucose from 2.5 to 0.7 mM or to AMPK activation. Conversely, activation of sGC or the cell-permeable analog of cGMP, 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP), enhanced the response of GI neurons to decreased glucose, suggesting that stimulation of NO-sGC-cGMP signaling by AMPK is required for glucose sensing in GI neurons. Interestingly, the AMPK inhibitor compound C completely blocked the effect of sGC activation or 8-Br-cGMP, and 8-Br-cGMP increased VMH AMPKalpha2 phosphorylation. These data suggest that NO, in turn, amplifies AMPK activation in GI neurons. Finally, inhibition of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) conductance blocked depolarization of GI neurons to decreased glucose or AMPK activation, whereas decreased glucose, AMPK activation, and 8-Br-cGMP increased VMH CFTR phosphorylation. We conclude that decreased glucose triggers the following sequence of events leading to depolarization in VMH GI neurons: AMPK activation, nNOS phosphorylation, NO production, and stimulation of sGC-cGMP signaling, which amplifies AMPK activation and leads to closure of the CFTR. PMID:19570894

  1. Rapid activation by 3,5,3'-L-triiodothyronine of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase/acetyl-coenzyme a carboxylase and akt/protein kinase B signaling pathways: relation to changes in fuel metabolism and myosin heavy-chain protein content in rat gastrocnemius muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Pieter; Senese, Rosalba; Cioffi, Federica; Moreno, Maria; Lombardi, Assunta; Silvestri, Elena; Goglia, Fernando; Lanni, Antonia

    2008-12-01

    T3 stimulates metabolic rate in many tissues and induces changes in fuel use. The pathways by which T3 induces metabolic/structural changes related to altered fuel use in skeletal muscle have not been fully clarified. Gastrocnemius muscle (isolated at different time points after a single injection of T3 into hypothyroid rats), displayed rapid inductions of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation (threonine 172; within 6 h) and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase phosphorylation (serine 79; within 12 h). As a consequence, increases occurred in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and carnitine palmitoyl transferase activity. Concomitantly, T3 stimulated signaling toward increased glycolysis through a rapid increase in Akt/protein kinase B (serine 473) phosphorylation (within 6 h) and a directly related increase in the activity of phosphofructokinase. The kinase specificity of the above effects was verified by treatment with inhibitors of AMPK and Akt activity (compound C and wortmannin, respectively). In contrast, glucose transporter 4 translocation to the membrane (activated by T3 within 6 h) was maintained when either AMPK or Akt activity was inhibited. The metabolic changes were accompanied by a decline in myosin heavy-chain Ib protein [causing a shift toward the fast-twitch (glycolytic) phenotype]. The increases in AMPK and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase phosphorylation were transient events, both levels declining from 12 h after the T3 injection, but Akt phosphorylation remained elevated until at least 48h after the injection. These data show that in skeletal muscle, T3 stimulates both fatty acid and glucose metabolism through rapid activations of the associated signaling pathways involving AMPK and Akt/protein kinase B.

  2. Metformin revisited: Does this regulator of AMP-activated protein kinase secondarily affect bone metabolism and prevent diabetic osteopathy.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Antonio Desmond; Cortizo, Ana María; Sedlinsky, Claudia

    2016-03-25

    Patients with long-term type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) can develop skeletal complications or "diabetic osteopathy". These include osteopenia, osteoporosis and an increased incidence of low-stress fractures. In this context, it is important to evaluate whether current anti-diabetic treatments can secondarily affect bone metabolism. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulates multiple metabolic pathways and acts as a sensor of the cellular energy status; recent evidence suggests a critical role for AMPK in bone homeostasis. In addition, AMPK activation is believed to mediate most clinical effects of the insulin-sensitizer metformin. Over the past decade, several research groups have investigated the effects of metformin on bone, providing a considerable body of pre-clinical (in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo) as well as clinical evidence for an anabolic action of metformin on bone. However, two caveats should be kept in mind when considering metformin treatment for a patient with type 2 DM at risk for diabetic osteopathy. In the first place, metformin should probably not be considered an anti-osteoporotic drug; it is an insulin sensitizer with proven macrovascular benefits that can secondarily improve bone metabolism in the context of DM. Secondly, we are still awaiting the results of randomized placebo-controlled studies in humans that evaluate the effects of metformin on bone metabolism as a primary endpoint.

  3. Metformin revisited: Does this regulator of AMP-activated protein kinase secondarily affect bone metabolism and prevent diabetic osteopathy

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Antonio Desmond; Cortizo, Ana María; Sedlinsky, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Patients with long-term type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) can develop skeletal complications or “diabetic osteopathy”. These include osteopenia, osteoporosis and an increased incidence of low-stress fractures. In this context, it is important to evaluate whether current anti-diabetic treatments can secondarily affect bone metabolism. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulates multiple metabolic pathways and acts as a sensor of the cellular energy status; recent evidence suggests a critical role for AMPK in bone homeostasis. In addition, AMPK activation is believed to mediate most clinical effects of the insulin-sensitizer metformin. Over the past decade, several research groups have investigated the effects of metformin on bone, providing a considerable body of pre-clinical (in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo) as well as clinical evidence for an anabolic action of metformin on bone. However, two caveats should be kept in mind when considering metformin treatment for a patient with type 2 DM at risk for diabetic osteopathy. In the first place, metformin should probably not be considered an anti-osteoporotic drug; it is an insulin sensitizer with proven macrovascular benefits that can secondarily improve bone metabolism in the context of DM. Secondly, we are still awaiting the results of randomized placebo-controlled studies in humans that evaluate the effects of metformin on bone metabolism as a primary endpoint. PMID:27022443

  4. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Is Activated as a Consequence of Lipolysis in the Adipocyte

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated in adipocytes during exercise and other states in which lipolysis is stimulated. However, the mechanism(s) responsible for this effect and its physiological relevance are unclear. To examine these questions, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with agents...

  5. Control and localization of rat adrenal cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate. Comparison with adrenal cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, T H; Stowe, N W; Ong, S H; ey, R L; Steiner, A L

    1975-01-01

    Cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP were measured in rat adrenal glands after either hypophysectomy alone or after hypophysectomy and treatment with ACTH. Adrenal cyclic GMP levels rise in acutely hypophysectomized rats to a maximum at 1 h of approximately 200% of control levels; there is a return to base line at 4-12 h after hypophysectomy. In contrast, adrenal cyclic AMP falls immediately to about 50% of control levels after hypophysectomy and remains at approximately 1 pmol per mg tissue. Doses of ACTH beyond the physiological range markedly suppress adrenal cyclic GMP while producing a 50-fold or greater rise in cyclic AMP in hypophysectomized rats. This pattern of adrenal cyclic GMP rise was unchanged in acutely hypophysectomized animals treated with desamethasone. N-6-2'-0 dibutyryl cyclic AMP acted similarly to the effect of ACTH in bringing about a suppression of adrenal cyclic GMP levels. Physiological i.v. pulse doses of ACTH produced a rapid dose related increase in adrenal cyclic GMP. In vitro incubation of quartered adrenal pairs with 500 mU ACTH produced elevated cyclic AMP levels and suppression of cyclic GMP. Whereas adrenal cyclic AMP fell rapidly to 50% of control levels after hypophysectomy and remained at about 1 pmol per mg tissue for 7 days, adrenal cyclic GMP showed a biphasic rhythm in long-term hypophysectomized animals. After an initial peak at 1 h after hypophysectomy, adrenal cyclic GMP declined to baseline at 4-12 h but thereafter progressively rose with time, eventually reaching levels over 1 pmol per mg tissue. Fluorescent immunocytochemical staining of rat adrenal zona fasciculata showed cyclic AMP largely confined to cytoplasmic elements with little fluorescence contained in nuclei. In constant, cyclic GMP was found discretely positioned in nuclei with prominent fluorescence in nucleoli in addition to cytoplasmic localization. It is concluded that in hypophysectomized rats ACTH, either directly or in conjunction with altertion of adrenal cyclic AMP, appears to be one factor which regulates adrenal cyclic GMP. The direction of cyclic GMP change and the different subcellular localization of the nucleotides suggest divergent roles for cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in adrenocortical function. Furthermore, our observations suggest a role for adrenal cyclic GMP in nuclear directed events. Images PMID:167054

  6. Downregulation of the renal outer medullary K(+) channel ROMK by the AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Siraskar, Balasaheb; Huang, Dan Yang; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Siraskar, Gulab; Sopjani, Mentor; Alesutan, Ioana; Kucherenko, Yulia; Almilaji, Ahmad; Devanathan, Vasudharani; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Föller, Michael; Munoz, Carlos; Lang, Florian

    2013-02-01

    The 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated serine/threonine protein kinase (AMPK) is stimulated by energy depletion, increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) activity, oxidative stress, and nitric oxide. AMPK participates in the regulation of the epithelial Na(+) channel ENaC and the voltage-gated K(+) channel KCNE1/KCNQ1. It is partially effective by decreasing PIP(2) formation through the PI3K pathway. The present study explored whether AMPK regulates the renal outer medullary K(+) channel ROMK. To this end, cRNA encoding ROMK was injected into Xenopus oocytes with and without additional injection of constitutively active AMPK(γR70Q) (AMPK(α1)-HA+AMPK(β1)-Flag+AMPKγ1(R70Q)), or of inactive AMPK(αK45R) (AMPK(α1K45R)+AMPK(β1)-Flag+AMPK(γ1)-HA), and the current determined utilizing two-electrode voltage-clamp and single channel patch clamp. ROMK protein abundance was measured utilizing chemiluminescence in Xenopus oocytes and western blot in whole kidney tissue. Moreover, renal Na(+) and K(+) excretion were determined in AMPK(α1)-deficient mice (ampk ( -/- )) and wild-type mice (ampk ( +/+ )) prior to and following an acute K(+) load (111 mM KCl, 30 mM NaHCO(3), 4.7 mM NaCl, and 2.25 g/dl BSA) at a rate of 500 μl/h. As a result, coexpression of AMPK(γR70Q) but not of AMPK(αK45R) significantly decreased the current in ROMK1-expressing Xenopus oocytes. Injection of phosphatidylinositol PI((4,5))P(2) significantly increased the current in ROMK1-expressing Xenopus oocytes, an effect reversed in the presence of AMPK(γR70Q). Under control conditions, no significant differences between ampk ( -/- ) and ampk ( +/+ ) mice were observed in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinary flow rate, serum aldosterone, plasma Na(+), and K(+) concentrations as well as absolute and fractional Na(+) and K(+) excretion. Following an acute K(+) load, GFR, urinary flow rate, serum aldosterone, plasma Na(+), and K(+) concentration were again similar in both genotypes, but renal absolute

  7. Effect of transportation and pre-slaughter water shower spray with resting on AMP-activated protein kinase, glycolysis and meat quality of broilers during summer.

    PubMed

    Xing, Tong; Xu, Xinglian; Jiang, Nannan; Deng, ShaoLin

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of pre-slaughter transport during summer and subsequent water shower spray on stress, postmortem glycolysis, energy metabolism and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in Pectoralis major (PM) muscle of broilers. Results indicated that transport during high ambient temperature induced the release of plasma corticosterone, which significantly affected stress conditions. Moreover, we found a lower energy status in the early postmortem period compared to the control group. AMPK was activated in this situation, following by the rapid glycolysis and accumulation of lactic acid, leading to a high incidence of pale, soft, exudative (PSE)-like meat. Water shower spray with resting after transport relieved the stress situation, recovered energy homeostasis and lessened the deterioration of meat quality. As a key molecular target for the control of energy status, AMPK has a similar potential in regulating postmortem muscle glycolysis of broilers as in mammals. PMID:26315350

  8. Adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate in higher plants: Isolation and characterization of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate from Kalanchoe and Agave.

    PubMed

    Ashton, A R; Polya, G M

    1977-07-01

    1.3':5'-Cyclic AMP was extensively purified from Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Agave americana by neutral alumina and anion- and cation-exchange column chromatography. Inclusion of 3':5'-cyclic [8-3H]AMP from the point of tissue extraction permitted calculation of yields. The purification procedure removed contaminating material that was shown to interfere with the 3':5'-cyclic AMP estimation and characterization procedures. 2. The partially purified 3':5'-cyclic AMP was quantified by means of a radiochemical saturation assay using an ox heart 3':5'-cyclic AMP-binding protein and by an assay involving activation of a mammalian protein kinase. 3. The plant 3':5'-cyclic AMP co-migrated with 3':5'-cyclic [8-3H]AMP on cellulose chromatography, poly(ethyleneimine)-cellulose chromatography and silica-gel t.l.c. developed with several solvent systems. 4. The plant 3':5'-cyclic AMP was degraded by ox heart 3':5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase at the same rates as authentic 3':5'-cyclic AMP. 1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine (1 mM), a specific inhibitor of the 3':5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodieterase, completely inhibited such degradation. 5. The concentrations of 3':5'-cyclic AMP satisfying the above criteria in Kalanchoe and Agave were 2-6 and 1 pmol/g fresh wt. respectively. Possible bacterial contribution to these analyses was estimated to be less than 0.002pmol/g fresh wt. Evidence for the occurrence of 3':5'-cyclic AMP in plants is discussed.

  9. Response of AMP-activated protein kinase and energy metabolism to acute nitrite exposure in the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhixin; Li, Erchao; Xu, Chang; Gan, Lei; Qin, Jian G; Chen, Liqiao

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a prevalent mammalian energy metabolism sensor, but little is known about its role as an energy sensor in fish experiencing stress. We aimed to study AMPK in Oreochromis niloticus on both the molecular and the physical level. We found that the cDNAs encoding the AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 variants of the O. niloticus catalytic α subunit were 1753bp and 2563 bp long and encoded 571 and 557 amino acids, respectively. Both the AMPKα1 and the AMPKα2 isoform possess structural features similar to mammalian AMPKα, including a phosphorylation site at Thr172 in the N-terminus, and exhibit high homology with other fish and vertebrate AMPKα sequences (81.3%-98.1%). mRNA encoding the AMPKα isoforms was widely expressed in various tissues with distinctive patterns. AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 were primarily expressed in the intestines and brain, respectively. Under acute nitrite challenge, the mRNA encoding the AMPKα isoforms, as well as AMPK activity, changed over time. Its recovery period in freshwater, combined with the fact that it is highly conserved, suggests that fish AMPK, like its mammalian orthologues, acts as an energy metabolism sensor. Furthermore, subsequent decreases in AMPK mRNA levels and activity suggested that its action was transient but efficient. Physically, glucose, lactic acid and TGs in plasma, as well as energy materials in the hepatopancreas and muscle, were significantly altered over time, indicating changes in energy metabolism during the experimental period. These data have enabled us to characterize energy utilization in O. niloticus and further illustrate the role of fish AMPK as an energy sensor. This study provides new insight into energy metabolism and sensing by AMPK in teleost and necessitates further study of the multiple physiologic roles of AMPK in fish.

  10. Response of AMP-activated protein kinase and energy metabolism to acute nitrite exposure in the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhixin; Li, Erchao; Xu, Chang; Gan, Lei; Qin, Jian G; Chen, Liqiao

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a prevalent mammalian energy metabolism sensor, but little is known about its role as an energy sensor in fish experiencing stress. We aimed to study AMPK in Oreochromis niloticus on both the molecular and the physical level. We found that the cDNAs encoding the AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 variants of the O. niloticus catalytic α subunit were 1753bp and 2563 bp long and encoded 571 and 557 amino acids, respectively. Both the AMPKα1 and the AMPKα2 isoform possess structural features similar to mammalian AMPKα, including a phosphorylation site at Thr172 in the N-terminus, and exhibit high homology with other fish and vertebrate AMPKα sequences (81.3%-98.1%). mRNA encoding the AMPKα isoforms was widely expressed in various tissues with distinctive patterns. AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 were primarily expressed in the intestines and brain, respectively. Under acute nitrite challenge, the mRNA encoding the AMPKα isoforms, as well as AMPK activity, changed over time. Its recovery period in freshwater, combined with the fact that it is highly conserved, suggests that fish AMPK, like its mammalian orthologues, acts as an energy metabolism sensor. Furthermore, subsequent decreases in AMPK mRNA levels and activity suggested that its action was transient but efficient. Physically, glucose, lactic acid and TGs in plasma, as well as energy materials in the hepatopancreas and muscle, were significantly altered over time, indicating changes in energy metabolism during the experimental period. These data have enabled us to characterize energy utilization in O. niloticus and further illustrate the role of fish AMPK as an energy sensor. This study provides new insight into energy metabolism and sensing by AMPK in teleost and necessitates further study of the multiple physiologic roles of AMPK in fish. PMID:27262938

  11. Pranlukast inhibits renal epithelial cyst progression via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-02-01

    Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1 receptor) antagonists were found to inhibit chloride secretion in human airway epithelial cells. Since chloride secretion in renal epithelial cells, which shares common mechanisms with airway epithelial cells, plays important roles in renal cyst progression in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), this study was aimed to investigate effects of drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst progression and its underlying mechanisms. Effects of CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst growth and formation were determined using Madine Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cyst models. Mechanisms of actions of CysLT1 receptor antagonists were determined using short-circuit current measurement, assays of cell viability and cell proliferation, and immunoblot analysis of signaling proteins. Of the three drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists (montelukast, pranlukast and zafirlukast) tested, pranlukast was the most promising drug that inhibited MDCK cyst growth and formation without affecting cell viability. Its effect was independent of the inhibition of CysLT1 receptors. Instead, it reduced cAMP-activated chloride secretion and proliferation of MDCK cells in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner and had no effect on CFTR protein expression. Interestingly, pranlukast enhanced AMPK activation via calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase beta (CaMKKβ) with consequent activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. These results indicate that pranlukast retards renal epithelial cyst progression by inhibiting cAMP-activated chloride secretion and cell proliferation via CaMKKβ-AMPK-mTOR pathway. Therefore, pranlukast represents a class of known drugs that may have potential utility in PKD treatment. PMID:24360935

  12. Relaxation of isolated taenia coli of guinea-pig by enantiomers of 2-azido analogues of adenosine and adenine nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Cusack, N. J.; Planker, M.

    1979-01-01

    1 2-Azido photoaffinity analogues of adenosine 5'triphosphate (ATP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), and adenosine have been synthesized and tested on guinea-pig taenia coli. 2 2-Azido-ATP and 2-azido-ADP were approximately 20 times more potent than ATP as relaxants of taenia coli, and required prolonged washout times before recovery of the muscle. 3 2-Azido-AMP and 2-azidoadenosine were 2 to 12 times more potent than ATP, but took much longer (up to 100 s) to reach maximal relaxation. This behaviour is different from that of AMP and adenosine which were much less potent than ATP. 4 L-Enantiomers of adenosine and adenine nucleotides were also tested. L-ATP and L-ADP were 3 to 6 times less potent than ATP and ADP, and L-AMP and L-adenosine were inactive. 2-Azido-L-ATP and 2-azido-L-ADP were approximately 120 times less potent than 2-Azido-ATP and 6 times less potent than ATP as relaxants of taenia coli. 2-Azido-L-AMP and 2-azidio-L-adenosine were almost inactive. 5 2-Azido derivatives are photolysed by u.v. irradiation to reactive intermediates. 2-Azido-ATP and 2-azidoadenosine might be suitable photoaffinity ligands for labelling putative P2 and P1 purine receptors respectively. 2-Azido-L-ATP and 2-azido-L-adenosine could be useful controls for nonspecific labelling. PMID:497519

  13. Fluorometric Determination of Adenosine Nucleotide Derivatives as Measures of the Microfouling, Detrital, and Sedimentary Microbial Biomass and Physiological Status

    PubMed Central

    Davis, William M.; White, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Adenosine, adenine, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), AMP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were recovered quantitatively from aqueous portions of lipid extracts of microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial communities. These could be detected quantitatively in the picomolar range by forming their 1-N6-etheno derivatives and analyzing by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Lipid extraction and subsequent analysis allowed the simultaneous measurement of the microbial community structure, total microbial biomass with the quantitative recovery of the adenine-containing cellular components, which were protected from enzymatic destruction. This extraction and fluorescent derivatization method showed equivalency with the luciferin-luciferase method for bacterial ATP measurements. Quick-freezing samples in the field with dry ice-acetone preserved the ATP and energy charge (a ratio of adenosine nucleotides) for analysis at remote laboratories. The metabolic lability of ATP in estuarine detrital and microfouling communities, as well as bacterial monocultures of constant biomass, showed ATP to be a precarious measure of biomass under some conditions. Combinations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides gave better correlations with microbial biomass measured as extractable lipid phosphate in the detrital and microfouling microbial communities than did ATP alone. Stresses such as anoxia or filtration are reflected in the rapid accumulation of intracellular adenosine and the excretion of adenosine and AMP into the surrounding milieu. Increases in AMP and adenosine may prove to be more sensitive indicators of metabolic status than the energy charge. PMID:16345633

  14. Adenosine dry powder inhalation for bronchial challenge testing, part 2: proof of concept in asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Lexmond, Anne J; van der Wiel, Erica; Hagedoorn, Paul; Bult, Wouter; Frijlink, Henderik W; ten Hacken, Nick H T; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-09-01

    Adenosine is an indirect stimulus to assess bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR(2)) in asthma. Bronchial challenge tests are usually performed with nebulised solutions of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP(3)). The nebulised AMP test has several disadvantages, like long administration times and a restrictive maximum concentration that does not result in BHR in all patients. In this study, we investigated the applicability of dry powder adenosine for assessment of BHR in comparison to nebulised AMP. Dry powder adenosine was prepared in doubling doses (0.01-80 mg) derived from the nebulised AMP test with addition of two higher doses. Five asthmatic subjects performed two bronchial challenge tests, one with nebulised AMP following the 2-min tidal breathing method; the second with dry powder adenosine administered with an investigational inhaler and single slow inhalations (inspiratory flow rate 30-40 L/min). All subjects reached a 20% fall in FEV₁(4) with the new adenosine test (PD20(5)) compared to four subjects with the AMP test (PC₂₀(6)). Dry powder adenosine was well tolerated by all subjects and better appreciated than nebulised AMP. In conclusion, this new bronchial challenge test appears to be a safe and convenient alternative to the nebulised AMP test to assess BHR in asthmatic subjects.

  15. Luciferase-based assay for adenosine: application to S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Emmanuel S; Gulab, Shivali A; Cassera, María B; Schramm, Vern L

    2012-04-17

    S-Adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) catalyzes the reversible conversion of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) to adenosine (ADO) and L-homocysteine, promoting methyltransferase activity by relief of SAH inhibition. SAH catabolism is linked to S-adenosylmethionine metabolism, and the development of SAHH inhibitors is of interest for new therapeutics with anticancer or cholesterol-lowering effects. We have developed a continuous enzymatic assay for adenosine that facilitates high-throughput analysis of SAHH. This luciferase-based assay is 4000-fold more sensitive than former detection methods and is well suited for continuous monitoring of ADO formation in a 96-well-plate format. The high-affinity adenosine kinase from Anopheles gambiae efficiently converts adenosine to adenosine monophosphate (AMP) in the presence of guanosine triphosphate. AMP is converted to adenosine triphosphate and coupled to firefly luciferase. With this procedure, kinetic parameters (K(m), k(cat)) for SAHH were obtained, in good agreement with literature values. Assay characteristics include sustained light output combined with ultrasensitive detection (10(-7) unit of SAHH). The assay is documented with the characterization of slow-onset inhibition for inhibitors of the hydrolase. Application of this assay may facilitate the development of SAHH inhibitors and provide an ultrasensitive detection for the formation of adenosine from other biological reactions.

  16. Roles of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in mammalian glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed Central

    Rutter, Guy A; Da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Leclerc, Isabelle

    2003-01-01

    AMPK (5'-AMP-activated protein kinase) is emerging as a metabolic master switch, by which cells in both mammals and lower organisms sense and decode changes in energy status. Changes in AMPK activity have been shown to regulate glucose transport in muscle and glucose production by the liver. Moreover, AMPK appears to be a key regulator of at least one transcription factor linked to a monogenic form of diabetes mellitus. As a result, considerable efforts are now under way to explore the usefulness of AMPK as a therapeutic target for other forms of this disease. Here we review this topic, and discuss new findings which suggest that AMPK may play roles in regulating insulin release and the survival of pancreatic islet beta-cells, and nutrient sensing by the brain. PMID:12839490

  17. Crystal Structure of the Protein Kinase Domain of Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Snf1

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph,M.; Amodeo, G.; Bai, Y.; Tong, L.

    2005-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master metabolic regulator, and is an important target for drug development against diabetes, obesity, and other diseases. AMPK is a hetero-trimeric enzyme, with a catalytic ({alpha}) subunit, and two regulatory ({beta} and {gamma}) subunits. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.2 Angstrom resolution of the protein kinase domain (KD) of the catalytic subunit of yeast AMPK (commonly known as SNF1). The Snf1-KD structure shares strong similarity to other protein kinases, with a small N-terminal lobe and a large C-terminal lobe. Two negative surface patches in the structure may be important for the recognition of the substrates of this kinase.

  18. Past Strategies and Future Directions for Identifying AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Sinnett, Sarah E.; Brenman, Jay E.

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a promising therapeutic target for cancer, type II diabetes, and other illnesses characterized by abnormal energy utilization. During the last decade, numerous labs have published a range of methods for identifying novel AMPK modulators. The current understanding of AMPK structure and regulation, however, has propelled a paradigm shift in which many researchers now consider ADP to be an additional regulatory nucleotide of AMPK. How can the AMPK community apply this new understanding of AMPK signaling to translational research? Recent insights into AMPK structure, regulation, and holoenzyme-sensitive signaling may provide the hindsight needed to clearly evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of past AMPK drug discovery efforts. Improving future strategies for AMPK drug discovery will require pairing the current understanding of AMPK signaling with improved experimental designs. PMID:24583089

  19. Role of CNPase in the oligodendrocytic extracellular 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Jonathan D; Jackson, Travis C; Gillespie, Delbert G; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Bansal, Rashmi; Goebbels, Sandra; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Kochanek, Patrick M; Jackson, Edwin K

    2013-10-01

    Extracellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (3',5'-cAMP) is an endogenous source of localized adenosine production in many organs. Recent studies suggest that extracellular 2',3'-cAMP (positional isomer of 3',5'-cAMP) is also a source of adenosine, particularly in the brain in vivo post-injury. Moreover, in vitro studies show that both microglia and astrocytes can convert extracellular 2',3'-cAMP to adenosine. Here, we examined the ability of primary mouse oligodendrocytes and neurons to metabolize extracellular 2',3'-cAMP and their respective adenosine monophosphates (2'-AMP and 3'-AMP). Cells were also isolated from mice deficient in 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide-3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase). Oligodendrocytes metabolized 2',3'-cAMP to 2'-AMP with 10-fold greater efficiency than did neurons (and also more than previously examined microglia and astrocytes); whereas, the production of 3'-AMP was minimal in both oligodendrocytes and neurons. The production of 2'-AMP from 2',3'-cAMP was reduced by 65% in CNPase -/- versus CNPase +/+ oligodendrocytes. Oligodendrocytes also converted 2'-AMP to adenosine, and this was also attenuated in CNPase -/- oligodendrocytes. Inhibition of classic 3',5'-cAMP-3'-phosphodiesterases with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine did not block metabolism of 2',3'-cAMP to 2'-AMP and inhibition of classic ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) with α,β-methylene-adenosine-5'-diphosphate did not attenuate the conversion of 2'-AMP to adenosine. These studies demonstrate that oligodendrocytes express the extracellular 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway (2',3'-cAMP → 2'-AMP → adenosine). This pathway is more robustly expressed in oligodendrocytes than in all other CNS cell types because CNPase is the predominant enzyme that metabolizes 2',3'-cAMP to 2-AMP in CNS cells. By reducing levels of 2',3'-cAMP (a mitochondrial toxin) and increasing levels of adenosine (a neuroprotectant), oligodendrocytes may protect axons from injury. PMID:23922219

  20. Adenosine and sleep

    SciTech Connect

    Yanik, G.M. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Behavioral and biochemical approaches have been used to determine the relative contribution of endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors to the sleep-wake cycle in the rat. Adenosine concentrations in specific areas of the rat brain were not affected by 24 hours of total sleep deprivation, or by 24 or 48 hours of REM sleep deprivation. In order to assess the effect of REM sleep deprivation on adenosine A/sub 1/ receptors, /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding was measured. The Bmax values for /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding to membrane preparations of the cortices and corpus striata from 48 hour REM sleep-deprived animals were increased 14.8% and 23%, respectively. These increases were not maintained following the cessation of sleep deprivation and recovered within 2 hours. The results of a 96 hour REM deprivation experiment were similar to those of the 48 hour REM sleep deprivation experiment. However, these increases were not evident in similar structures taken from stress control animals, and conclusively demonstrated that the changes in /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding resulted from REM sleep deprivation and not from stress.

  1. Role of adenosine monophosphate in regulation of metabolic pathways of perfused rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, A. R.; Jefferson, L. S.

    1969-01-01

    1. By perfusion of rat livers with 3mm-AMP in the perfusion medium we obtain increased intracellular concentrations of AMP. 2. These high intracellular concentrations of AMP lead to an increased output of glucose and urea into the perfusion medium. 3. The increased output of glucose in livers from fed rats is brought about primarily by an AMP-stimulated breakdown of liver glycogen. In livers from starved rats the increase in glucose output is not as great, reflecting the low contents of glycogen in livers from starved rats. 4. AMP inhibits gluconeogenesis from lactate in perfused livers. In the presence of high concentrations of lactate, however, the counteracting effects of AMP to increase glycogenolysis and to inhibit gluconeogenesis result in little change in the net glucose output. 5. The increased urea output is brought about by increased breakdown of amino acids that are present in the perfusion medium. In livers from starved rats the overall urea production is much higher, indicating increased catabolism of amino acids and other nitrogenous substrates in the absence of carbohydrate substrates. 6. AMP causes an inhibition of incorporation of labelled precursors into protein and nucleic acid. This may result from increased catabolism of precursors of proteins and nucleic acids as reflected by the more rapid breakdown of nitrogenous compounds. In support of this hypothesis, cell-free systems for amino acid incorporation isolated from livers perfused with and without AMP are equally capable of supporting protein synthesis. 7. The labelling pattern of RNA in perfused livers corresponds very closely to those found by pulse-labelling in vivo. AMP in no way alters the qualitative nature of the labelling patterns. 8. We consider these results as supporting evidence for the role of the concentration ratio of AMP to ATP in controlling the metabolic pathways that lead to the formation of ATP. PMID:5774478

  2. Rapid quantification of adenosine cyclic 3',5'-monophosphate by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, M S; Jap, T S; Chiang, H

    1993-01-01

    A reliable and rapid enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for cyclic AMP determination is described. Succinyl cyclic AMP, coupled to human albumin, was injected into rabbit to elicit antibodies to cyclic nucleotide hapten. Succinyl cyclic nucleotide to human albumin as immunogen or the cyclic AMP to porcine thyroglobulin as coating antigen was conjugated by a carbodiimide coupling procedure. The latter conjugate, captured to microplate with coating buffer and blocked with 0.8% gelatin for 30 minutes, was bound to antibody in inverse proportion to free cyclic AMP in a sample or standard. Bound antibody was then quantified with horseradish peroxidase-labelled goat antirabbit immunoglobulin and ABTS (2, 2'-Azinobis (3-ethylbenzthiazolinesulfonic Acid). Our results showed that concentration of both standard and sample cyclic AMP could be measured as low as 2.5 fmol/well (0.05 pmol/ml). The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation for samples were 6.0-8.0% and 8.9-9.5%, respectively. In addition, there was no cross-reaction of the antisera with ADP, ATP, 5'-AMP or cyclic GMP. Short period of incubation at room temperature seems as good as long period of incubation at 4 degrees C. The biological study demonstrated a consistency between increase in platelet-cyclic AMP generation after prostaglandin E1 stimulation and its biological effects. Our approach to ELISA is validated by showing agreement in levels, obtained in parallel by ELISA and RIA, of cyclic AMP content in extracts of prostaglandin E1-stimulated platelet cells.

  3. 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate and adenylate cyclase in phototransduction by limulus ventral photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J E; Kaupp, U B; Malbon, C C

    1984-01-01

    Biochemical and electrophysiological measurements were made on photoreceptor cells from Limulus ventral eyes to investigate the possible role of cyclic AMP and adenylate cyclase in the visual transduction mechanism. Cyclic AMP content in a photoreceptor-enriched fraction (the end organs) of Limulus ventral eyes was approximately 15 pmol/mg protein. The cyclic AMP content was increased by bathing eyes in 1-methyl-3-isobutyl xanthine or forskolin and was increased almost 100-fold when bathed in both. Illumination did not change cyclic AMP content significantly in any of these conditions. Discrete events that can be recorded electrophysiologically occur spontaneously in darkness. An increase in the frequency of discrete events is evoked by dim illumination. The discrete events are a sign of excitation of Limulus photoreceptor cells. Drug-induced changes in the rate of occurrence of discrete events recorded electrophysiologically in darkness were not correlated with changes in cyclic AMP content. Adenylate cyclase activity measured from a small number of pooled photoreceptor clusters was stimulated by fluoride and vanadate ions, hydrolysis-resistant analogues of GTP, cholera toxin and forskolin. The Limulus enzyme is similar pharmacologically to mammalian and avian adenylate cyclases. Activation of adenylate cyclase by drugs was not correlated with changes in the rate of occurrence of discrete events recorded electrophysiologically in darkness. A heat-treated Lubrol extract of membranes from Limulus ventral eyes reconstituted the adenylate cyclase activity of membranes from S49 mouse lymphoma cyc- mutant cells which lack a functional regulatory protein. These findings suggest that Limulus ventral eye photoreceptors contain a regulatory protein that mediates the activation of adenylate cyclase by guanine nucleotides, fluoride or cholera toxin. This regulatory protein is homologous with that found in mammalian and avian adenylate cyclases. Our findings suggest that neither cyclic AMP nor adenylate cyclase activation is a necessary or obligatory component of the excitation mechanism in Limulus ventral photoreceptors. PMID:6207288

  4. Inhibition of cAMP-activated intestinal chloride secretion by diclofenac: cellular mechanism and potential application in cholera.

    PubMed

    Pongkorpsakol, Pawin; Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Srimanote, Potjanee; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic AMP-activated intestinal Cl- secretion plays an important role in pathogenesis of cholera. This study aimed to investigate the effect of diclofenac on cAMP-activated Cl- secretion, its underlying mechanisms, and possible application in the treatment of cholera. Diclofenac inhibited cAMP-activated Cl- secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84) cells with IC50 of ∼ 20 µM. The effect required no cytochrome P450 enzyme-mediated metabolic activation. Interestingly, exposures of T84 cell monolayers to diclofenac, either in apical or basolateral solutions, produced similar degree of inhibitions. Analyses of the apical Cl- current showed that diclofenac reversibly inhibited CFTR Cl- channel activity (IC50 ∼ 10 µM) via mechanisms not involving either changes in intracellular cAMP levels or CFTR channel inactivation by AMP-activated protein kinase and protein phosphatase. Of interest, diclofenac had no effect on Na(+)-K(+) ATPases and Na(+)-K(+)-Cl- cotransporters, but inhibited cAMP-activated basolateral K(+) channels with IC50 of ∼ 3 µM. In addition, diclofenac suppressed Ca(2+)-activated Cl- channels, inwardly rectifying Cl- channels, and Ca(2+)-activated basolateral K(+) channels. Furthermore, diclofenac (up to 200 µM; 24 h of treatment) had no effect on cell viability and barrier function in T84 cells. Importantly, cholera toxin (CT)-induced Cl- secretion across T84 cell monolayers was effectively suppressed by diclofenac. Intraperitoneal administration of diclofenac (30 mg/kg) reduced both CT and Vibrio cholerae-induced intestinal fluid secretion by ∼ 70% without affecting intestinal fluid absorption in mice. Collectively, our results indicate that diclofenac inhibits both cAMP-activated and Ca(2+)-activated Cl- secretion by inhibiting both apical Cl- channels and basolateral K+ channels in intestinal epithelial cells. Diclofenac may be useful in the treatment of cholera and other types of secretory diarrheas resulting from intestinal

  5. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts.

  6. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  7. Adenosine and the Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Vlajkovic, Srdjan M; Housley, Gary D; Thorne, Peter R

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine is a signalling molecule that modulates cellular activity in the central nervous system and peripheral organs via four G protein-coupled receptors designated A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. This review surveys the literature on the role of adenosine in auditory function, particularly cochlear function and its protection from oxidative stress. The specific tissue distribution of adenosine receptors in the mammalian cochlea implicates adenosine signalling in sensory transduction and auditory neurotransmission although functional studies have demonstrated that adenosine stimulates cochlear blood flow, but does not alter the resting and sound-evoked auditory potentials. An interest in a potential otoprotective role for adenosine has recently evolved, fuelled by the capacity of A1 adenosine receptors to prevent cochlear injury caused by acoustic trauma and ototoxic drugs. The balance between A1 and A2A receptors is conceived as critical for cochlear response to oxidative stress, which is an underlying mechanism of the most common inner ear pathologies (e.g. noise-induced and age-related hearing loss, drug ototoxicity). Enzymes involved in adenosine metabolism, adenosine kinase and adenosine deaminase, are also emerging as attractive targets for controlling oxidative stress in the cochlea. Other possible targets include ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine from extracellular ATP, and nucleoside transporters, which regulate adenosine concentrations on both sides of the plasma membrane. Developments of selective adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists that can cross the blood-cochlea barrier are bolstering efforts to develop therapeutic interventions aimed at ameliorating cochlear injury. Manipulations of the adenosine signalling system thus hold significant promise in the therapeutic management of oxidative stress in the cochlea. PMID:20190966

  8. Structure of the DNA Ligase-Adenylate Intermediate: Lysine (ε-amino)-Linked Adenosine Monophosphoramidate*

    PubMed Central

    Gumport, Richard I.; Lehman, I. R.

    1971-01-01

    Proteolytic degradation of the Escherichia coli DNA ligase-adenylate intermediate releases adenosine 5′-monophosphate linked to the ε-amino group of lysine by a phosphoamide bond. Measurements of the rate of hydroxylaminolysis of the ligase-adenylate provide further support for a phosphoamide linkage in the native enzyme. Lysine (ε-amino)-linked adenosine monophosphoramidate has also been isolated from the T4 phage-induced ligase-adenylate intermediate. These results indicate that an initial step of the DNA ligase reaction consists of the nucleophilic attack of the ε-amino group of a lysine residue of the enzyme on the adenylyl phosphorus of DPN or ATP that leads to the formation of enzyme-bound lysine (εamino)-linked adenosine monophosphoramidate. PMID:4944632

  9. Smoke extract impairs adenosine wound healing: implications of smoke-generated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Allen-Gipson, Diane S; Zimmerman, Matthew C; Zhang, Hui; Castellanos, Glenda; O'Malley, Jennifer K; Alvarez-Ramirez, Horacio; Kharbanda, Kusum; Sisson, Joseph H; Wyatt, Todd A

    2013-05-01

    Adenosine concentrations are elevated in the lungs of patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, where it balances between tissue repair and excessive airway remodeling. We previously demonstrated that the activation of the adenosine A2A receptor promotes epithelial wound closure. However, the mechanism by which adenosine-mediated wound healing occurs after cigarette smoke exposure has not been investigated. The present study investigates whether cigarette smoke exposure alters adenosine-mediated reparative properties via its ability to induce a shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance. Using an in vitro wounding model, bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract, were wounded, and were then stimulated with either 10 μM adenosine or the specific A2A receptor agonist, 5'-(N-cyclopropyl)-carboxamido-adenosine (CPCA; 10 μM), and assessed for wound closure. In a subset of experiments, bronchial epithelial cells were infected with adenovirus vectors encoding human superoxide dismutase and/or catalase or control vector. In the presence of 5% smoke extract, significant delay was evident in both adenosine-mediated and CPCA-mediated wound closure. However, cells pretreated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a nonspecific antioxidant, reversed smoke extract-mediated inhibition. We found that cells overexpressing mitochondrial catalase repealed the smoke extract inhibition of CPCA-stimulated wound closure, whereas superoxide dismutase overexpression exerted no effect. Kinase experiments revealed that smoke extract significantly reduced the A2A-mediated activation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase. However, pretreatment with NAC reversed this effect. In conclusion, our data suggest that cigarette smoke exposure impairs A2A-stimulated wound repair via a reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanism, thereby providing a better understanding of adenosine signaling that may direct the development of pharmacological

  10. Loss of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Proinflammatory Response in Unstimulated Abcd1-Knockout Mice Mixed Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suhail, Hamid; Giri, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations and/or deletions in the ABCD1 gene. Similar mutations/deletions can give rise to variable phenotypes ranging from mild adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) to inflammatory fatal cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) via unknown mechanisms. We recently reported the loss of the anti-inflammatory protein adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPKα1) exclusively in ALD patient-derived cells. X-ALD mouse model (Abcd1-knockout (KO) mice) mimics the human AMN phenotype and does not develop the cerebral inflammation characteristic of human ALD. In this study we document that AMPKα1 levels in vivo (in brain cortex and spinal cord) and in vitro in Abcd1-KO mixed glial cells are similar to that of wild type mice. Deletion of AMPKα1 in the mixed glial cells of Abcd1-KO mice induced spontaneous mitochondrial dysfunction (lower oxygen consumption rate and ATP levels). Mitochondrial dysfunction in ALD patient-derived cells and in AMPKα1-deleted Abcd1-KO mice mixed glial cells was accompanied by lower levels of mitochondrial complex (1-V) subunits. More importantly, AMPKα1 deletion induced proinflammatory inducible nitric oxide synthase levels in the unstimulated Abcd1-KO mice mixed glial cells. Taken together, this study provides novel direct evidence for a causal role for AMPK loss in the development of mitochondrial dysfunction and proinflammatory response in X-ALD. PMID:25861159

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase: an emerging drug target to regulate imbalances in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism to treat cardio-metabolic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rai Ajit K.; Pinkosky, Stephen L.; Filippov, Sergey; Hanselman, Jeffrey C.; Cramer, Clay T.; Newton, Roger S.

    2012-01-01

    The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic sensor of energy metabolism at the cellular as well as whole-body level. It is activated by low energy status that triggers a switch from ATP-consuming anabolic pathways to ATP-producing catabolic pathways. AMPK is involved in a wide range of biological activities that normalizes lipid, glucose, and energy imbalances. These pathways are dysregulated in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), which represents a clustering of major cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes, lipid abnormalities, and energy imbalances. Clearly, there is an unmet medical need to find a molecule to treat alarming number of patients with MetS. AMPK, with multifaceted activities in various tissues, has emerged as an attractive drug target to manage lipid and glucose abnormalities and maintain energy homeostasis. A number of AMPK activators have been tested in preclinical models, but many of them have yet to reach to the clinic. This review focuses on the structure-function and role of AMPK in lipid, carbohydrate, and energy metabolism. The mode of action of AMPK activators, mechanism of anti-inflammatory activities, and preclinical and clinical findings as well as future prospects of AMPK as a drug target in treating cardio-metabolic disease are discussed. PMID:22798688

  12. Coffee polyphenol caffeic acid but not chlorogenic acid increases 5'AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin-independent glucose transport in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Satoshi; Egawa, Tatsuro; Ma, Xiao; Oshima, Rieko; Kurogi, Eriko; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2012-11-01

    Chlorogenic acid is an ester of caffeic and quinic acids, and is one of the most widely consumed polyphenols because it is abundant in foods, especially coffee. We explored whether chlorogenic acid and its metabolite, caffeic acid, act directly on skeletal muscle to stimulate 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Incubation of rat epitrochlearis muscles with Krebs buffer containing caffeic acid (≥0.1 mM, ≥30 min) but not chlorogenic acid increased the phosphorylation of AMPKα Thr(172), an essential step for kinase activation, and acetyl CoA carboxylase Ser(79), a downstream target of AMPK, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Analysis of isoform-specific AMPK activity revealed that AMPKα2 activity increased significantly, whereas AMPKα1 activity did not change. This enzyme activation was associated with a reduction in phosphocreatine content and an increased rate of 3-O-methyl-d-glucose transport activity in the absence of insulin. These results suggest that caffeic acid but not chlorogenic acid acutely stimulates skeletal muscle AMPK activity and insulin-independent glucose transport with a reduction of the intracellular energy status. PMID:22227267

  13. Adenosine and Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Bjorness, Theresa E; Greene, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Over the last several decades the idea that adenosine (Ado) plays a role in sleep control was postulated due in large part to pharmacological studies that showed the ability of Ado agonists to induce sleep and Ado antagonists to decrease sleep. A second wave of research involving in vitro cellular analytic approaches and subsequently, the use of neurochemical tools such as microdialysis, identified a population of cells within the brainstem and basal forebrain arousal centers, with activity that is both tightly coupled to thalamocortical activation and under tonic inhibitory control by Ado. Most recently, genetic tools have been used to show that Ado receptors regulate a key aspect of sleep, the slow wave activity expressed during slow wave sleep. This review will briefly introduce some of the phenomenology of sleep and then summarize the effect of Ado levels on sleep, the effect of sleep on Ado levels, and recent experiments using mutant mouse models to characterize the role for Ado in sleep control and end with a discussion of which Ado receptors are involved in such control. When taken together, these various experiments suggest that while Ado does play a role in sleep control, it is a specific role with specific functional implications and it is one of many neurotransmitters and neuromodulators affecting the complex behavior of sleep. Finally, since the majority of adenosine-related experiments in the sleep field have focused on SWS, this review will focus largely on SWS; however, the role of adenosine in REM sleep behavior will be addressed. PMID:20190965

  14. Rat cardiac myocyte adenosine transport and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, D.A.; Rovetto, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Based on the importance of myocardial adenosine and adenine nucleotide metabolism, the adenosine salvage pathway in ventricular myocytes was studied. Accurate estimates of transport rates, separate from metabolic fllux, were determined. Adenosine influx was constant between 3 and 60 s. Adenosine metabolism maintained intracellular adenosine concentrations < 10% of the extracellular adenosine concentrations and thus unidirectional influx could be measured. Myocytes transported adenosine via saturable and nonsaturable processes. A minimum estimate of the V/sub max/ of myocytic adenosine kinase indicated the saturable component of adenosine influx was independent of adenosine kinase activity. Saturable transport was inhibited by nitrobenzylthioinosine and verapamil. Extracellular adenosine taken up myocytes was rapidly phosphorylated to adenine taken up by myocytes was rapidly phosphorylated to adenine nucleotides. Not all extracellular adenosine, though, was phosphorylated on entering myocytes, since free, as opposed to protein-bound, intracellular adenosine was detected after digitonin extraction of cells in the presence of 1 mM ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid.

  15. Role of AMP-activated protein kinase in metabolic depression in animals.

    PubMed

    Rider, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a highly conserved eukaryotic protein serine/threonine kinase that controls cellular and whole body energy homoeostasis. AMPK is activated during energy stress by a rise in AMP:ATP ratio and maintains energy balance by phosphorylating targets to switch on catabolic ATP-generating pathways, while at the same time switching off anabolic ATP-consuming processes. Metabolic depression is a strategy used by many animals to survive environmental stress and has been extensively studied across phylogeny by comparative biochemists and physiologists, but the role of AMPK has only recently been addressed. This review first deals with the evolution of AMPK in eukaryotes (excluding plants and fungi) and its regulation. Changes in adenine nucleotides and AMPK activation are described in animals during environmental energy stress, before considering the involvement of AMPK in controlling β-oxidation, fatty acid synthesis, triacylglycerol mobilization and protein synthesis. Lastly, strategies are presented to validate the role of AMPK in mediating metabolic depression by phosphorylating downstream targets.

  16. Role of the AMP-activated protein kinase in regulating fatty acid metabolism during exercise.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Gregory R

    2009-06-01

    During moderate-intensity exercise, fatty acids are the predominant substrate for working skeletal muscle. The release of fatty acids from adipose tissue stores, combined with the ability of skeletal muscle to actively fine tune the gradient between fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism, depending on substrate availability and energetic demands, requires a coordinated system of metabolic control. Over the past decade, since the discovery that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was increased in accordance with exercise intensity, there has been significant interest in the proposed role of this ancient stress-sensing kinase as a critical integrative switch controlling metabolic responses during exercise. In this review, studies examining the role of AMPK as a regulator of fatty acid metabolism in both adipose tissue and skeletal muscle during exercise will be discussed. Exercise induces activation of AMPK in adipocytes and regulates triglyceride hydrolysis and esterfication through phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and glycerol-3-phosphate acyl-transferase, respectively. In skeletal muscle, exercise-induced activation of AMPK is associated with increases in fatty acid uptake, phosphorylation of HSL, and increased fatty acid oxidation, which is thought to occur via the acetyl-CoA carboxylase-malony-CoA-CPT-1 signalling axis. Despite the importance of AMPK in regulating fatty acid metabolism under resting conditions, recent evidence from transgenic models of AMPK deficiency suggest that alternative signalling pathways may also be important for the control of fatty acid metabolism during exercise.

  17. Ghrelin protects infarcted myocardium by induction of autophagy and AMP-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming-Jie; Kong, Bin; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xin; Huang, He; Maghsoudi, Taneen

    2016-08-01

    The majority of studies have reported that enhancing autophagy in the myocardium is cardioprotective. Here, we tested the hypothesis that ghrelin, a growth hormone-releasing peptide, will protect infarcted myocardium by inducing of autophagy. Myocardial infarction was induced in mice by left coronary artery ligation the surviving mice 24 h after surgical were started on 2 week treatments with one of the following: vehicle, acylated ghrelin(50 mg/kg per day) or acylated ghrelin plus 3-MA(an autophagy inhibitor, 15 mg/kg, per day). We found that ghrelin significantly improved the cardiac function, and autophagy was enhanced by elevated LC3-II/LC-I ratio and mRNA expression of autophagy related protein. In vitro, cultured neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were subjected to simulate ischemia/reperfusion, 3-MA significantly attenuated ghrelin-induced autophagy, which was associated with activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signal pathway. Moreover, ghrelin reduced cell death, and RNAi-mediated knockdown of autophagy protein 5 (Atg5) partly abolished ghrelin's cardioprotective effect. It is the first time to demonstrate that the cardioprotective effect of ghrelin on ischemia myocardium in part through regulating of autophagy signal pathway. PMID:27235554

  18. Regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by natural and synthetic activators

    PubMed Central

    Grahame Hardie, David

    2015-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of cellular energy status that is almost universally expressed in eukaryotic cells. While it appears to have evolved in single-celled eukaryotes to regulate energy balance in a cell-autonomous manner, during the evolution of multicellular animals its role has become adapted so that it also regulates energy balance at the whole body level, by responding to hormones that act primarily on the hypothalamus. AMPK monitors energy balance at the cellular level by sensing the ratios of AMP/ATP and ADP/ATP, and recent structural analyses of the AMPK heterotrimer that have provided insight into the complex mechanisms for these effects will be discussed. Given the central importance of energy balance in diseases that are major causes of morbidity or death in humans, such as type 2 diabetes, cancer and inflammatory disorders, there has been a major drive to develop pharmacological activators of AMPK. Many such activators have been described, and the various mechanisms by which these activate AMPK will be discussed. A particularly large class of AMPK activators are natural products of plants derived from traditional herbal medicines. While the mechanism by which most of these activate AMPK has not yet been addressed, I will argue that many of them may be defensive compounds produced by plants to deter infection by pathogens or grazing by insects or herbivores, and that many of them will turn out to be inhibitors of mitochondrial function. PMID:26904394

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase modulates tau phosphorylation and tau pathology in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Domise, Manon; Didier, Sébastien; Marinangeli, Claudia; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Buée, Luc; Viollet, Benoit; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe; Vingtdeux, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are the pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases commonly known as tauopathies. NFTs result from the intracellular aggregation of abnormally and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Tau functions, which include the regulation of microtubules dynamics, are dependent on its phosphorylation status. As a consequence, any changes in tau phosphorylation can have major impacts on synaptic plasticity and memory. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was deregulated in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients where it co-localized with phosphorylated tau in pre-tangle and tangle-bearing neurons. Besides, it was found that AMPK was a tau kinase in vitro. Here, we find that endogenous AMPK activation in mouse primary neurons induced an increase of tau phosphorylation at multiple sites, whereas AMPK inhibition led to a rapid decrease of tau phosphorylation. We further show that AMPK mice deficient for one of the catalytic alpha subunits displayed reduced endogenous tau phosphorylation. Finally, we found that AMPK deficiency reduced tau pathology in the PS19 mouse model of tauopathy. These results show that AMPK regulates tau phosphorylation in mouse primary neurons as well as in vivo, and thus suggest that AMPK could be a key player in the development of AD pathology. PMID:27230293

  20. Curcumin attenuates diet-induced hepatic steatosis by activating AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Um, Min Young; Hwang, Kwang Hyun; Ahn, Jiyun; Ha, Tae Youl

    2013-09-01

    Curcumin is a well-known component of traditional turmeric (Curcuma longa), which has been reported to prevent obesity and diabetes. However, the effect of curcumin on hepatic lipid metabolism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of curcumin on hepatic steatosis in high-fat/cholesterol diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal diet (ND), HFD or HFD with 0.15% curcumin (HFD+C) for 11 weeks. We found that curcumin significantly lowered the body-weight and adipose tissue weight of mice in the HFD+C group compared with the findings for the HFD group (p < 0.05). The levels of total cholesterol, fasting glucose and insulin in serum were decreased, and HFD-induced impairment of insulin sensitivity was improved by curcumin supplementation (p < 0.05). Curcumin protected against the development of hepatic steatosis by reducing hepatic fat accumulation. Moreover, curcumin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and elevated the gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha. By contrast, curcumin suppressed the HFD-mediated increases in sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1, fatty acid synthase and cluster of differentiation 36 expression. Taken together, these findings indicate that curcumin attenuates HFD-induced hepatic steatosis by regulating hepatic lipid metabolism via AMPK activation, suggesting its use as a therapeutic for hepatic steatosis.

  1. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates the assembly of epithelial tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Li, Ji; Young, Lawrence H.; Caplan, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a sensor of cellular energy status in all eukaryotic cells, is activated by LKB1-dependent phosphorylation. Recent studies indicate that activated LKB1 induces polarity in epithelial cells and that this polarization is accompanied by the formation of tight junction structures. We wished to determine whether AMPK also contributes to the assembly of tight junctions in the epithelial cell polarization process. We found that AMPK is activated during calcium-induced tight junction assembly. Activation of AMPK by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside facilitates tight junction assembly under conditions of normal extracellular Ca2+ concentrations and initiates tight junction assembly in the absence of Ca2+ as revealed by the relocation of zonula occludens 1, the establishment of transepithelial electrical resistance, and the paracellular flux assay. Expression of a dominant negative AMPK construct inhibits tight junction assembly in MDCK cells, and this defect in tight junction assembly can be partially ameliorated by rapamycin. These results suggest that AMPK plays a role in the regulation of tight junction assembly. PMID:17088526

  2. AMP-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE ACTIVATION AS A STRATEGY FOR PROTECTING VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ming-Hui; Wu, Yong

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY 1. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase involved in the regulation of cellular and organismal metabolism. AMPK has a heterotrimeric structure, consisting of a catalytic α-subunit and regulatory β- and γ-subunits, each of which has two or more isoforms that are differentially expressed in various tissues and that arise from distinct genes. The AMPK system acts as a sensor of cellular energy status that is conserved in all eukaryotic cells. In addition, AMPK is activated by physiological stimuli and oxidants. 2. The importance of AMPK in cardiovascular functions is best demonstrated by recent studies showing that widely used drugs, including statins, metformin and rosiglitazone, execute cardiovascular protective effects at least partly through the activation of AMPK. As a consequence, AMPK has been proposed as a candidate target for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of both Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome owing to its central role in the regulation of energy balance; it may also have a role in weight control. 3. In the present brief review, we summarize the recent progress of AMPK signalling and regulation focusing on vascular endothelial cells. We further hypothesize that AMPK is a dual sensor for energy and redox status within a cell and AMPK may be a therapeutic target for protecting vascular endothelial function. PMID:18177481

  3. Latrepirdine is a potent activator of AMP-activated protein kinase and reduces neuronal excitability

    PubMed Central

    Weisová, P; Alvarez, S P; Kilbride, S M; Anilkumar, U; Baumann, B; Jordán, J; Bernas, T; Huber, H J; Düssmann, H; Prehn, J H M

    2013-01-01

    Latrepirdine/Dimebon is a small-molecule compound with attributed neurocognitive-enhancing activities, which has recently been tested in clinical trials for the treatment of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. Latrepirdine has been suggested to be a neuroprotective agent that increases mitochondrial function, however the molecular mechanisms underlying these activities have remained elusive. We here demonstrate that latrepirdine, at (sub)nanomolar concentrations (0.1 nM), activates the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Treatment of primary neurons with latrepirdine increased intracellular ATP levels and glucose transporter 3 translocation to the plasma membrane. Latrepirdine also increased mitochondrial uptake of the voltage-sensitive probe TMRM. Gene silencing of AMPKα or its upstream kinases, LKB1 and CaMKKβ, inhibited this effect. However, studies using the plasma membrane potential indicator DisBAC2(3) demonstrated that the effects of latrepirdine on TMRM uptake were largely mediated by plasma membrane hyperpolarization, precluding a purely ‘mitochondrial' mechanism of action. In line with a stabilizing effect of latrepirdine on plasma membrane potential, pretreatment with latrepirdine reduced spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations as well as glutamate-induced Ca2+ increases in primary neurons, and protected neurons against glutamate toxicity. In conclusion, our experiments demonstrate that latrepirdine is a potent activator of AMPK, and suggest that one of the main pharmacological activities of latrepirdine is a reduction in neuronal excitability. PMID:24150226

  4. AMP-activated protein kinase alpha2 deficiency affects cardiac cardiolipin homeostasis and mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Athéa, Yoni; Viollet, Benoît; Mateo, Philippe; Rousseau, Delphine; Novotova, Marta; Garnier, Anne; Vaulont, Sophie; Wilding, James R.; Grynberg, Alain; Veksler, Vladimir; Hoerter, Jacqueline; Ventura-Clapier, Renée

    2007-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays an important role in controlling energy homeostasis and is envisioned as a promising target to treat metabolic disorders. In the heart, AMPK is involved in short-term regulation and in transcriptional control of proteins involved in energy metabolism. Here, we investigated whether deletion of AMPKα2, the main cardiac catalytic isoform, alters mitochondrial function and biogenesis. Body weight, heart weight and AMPKα1 expression were similar in control littermate and AMPKa2−/− mice. Despite normal oxygen consumption in perfused hearts, maximal oxidative capacity, measured using saponin permeabilized cardiac fibers, was ≈30 % lower in AMPKa2−/− mice with octanoate, pyruvate or glutamate+malate but not with succinate as substrates, showing an impairment at complex-I of the respiratory chain. This effect was associated with a 25% decrease in mitochondrial cardiolipin content, the main mitochondrial membrane phospholipid that is crucial for complex-I activity, and by a 13% decrease in mitochondrial content of linoleic acid, the main fatty acid of cardiolipins. The decrease in cardiolipin content could be explained by mRNA down-regulation of rate limiting enzymes of both cardiolipin synthesis (CDS2) and remodeling (ALCAT1). These data reveal a new role for AMPKα2 subunit in the regulation of cardiac muscle oxidative capacity via cardiolipin homeostasis. PMID:17327449

  5. Unraveling the actions of AMP-activated protein kinase in metabolic diseases: Systemic to molecular insights.

    PubMed

    Weikel, Karen A; Ruderman, Neil B; Cacicedo, José M

    2016-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a critical role both in sensing and regulating cellular energy state. In experimental animals, its activation has been shown to reduce the risk of obesity and diabetes-related co-morbidities such as insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, in humans, AMPK activation alone often does not completely resolve these conditions. Thus, an improved understanding of AMPK action and regulation in metabolic and other diseases is needed. Herein, we provide a brief description of the enzymatic regulation of AMPK and review its role in maintaining energy homeostasis. We then discuss tissue-specific actions of AMPK that become distorted during such conditions as obesity, type 2 diabetes and certain cancers. Finally, we explore recent findings regarding the interactions of AMPK with mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 and the lysosome and discuss how changes in these relationships during overnutrition may lead to AMPK dysfunction. A more thorough understanding of AMPK's molecular interactions during diseases of overnutrition may provide key insights for the development of AMPK-based combinatorial treatments for metabolic disease. PMID:27085772

  6. Regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by natural and synthetic activators.

    PubMed

    Grahame Hardie, David

    2016-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of cellular energy status that is almost universally expressed in eukaryotic cells. While it appears to have evolved in single-celled eukaryotes to regulate energy balance in a cell-autonomous manner, during the evolution of multicellular animals its role has become adapted so that it also regulates energy balance at the whole body level, by responding to hormones that act primarily on the hypothalamus. AMPK monitors energy balance at the cellular level by sensing the ratios of AMP/ATP and ADP/ATP, and recent structural analyses of the AMPK heterotrimer that have provided insight into the complex mechanisms for these effects will be discussed. Given the central importance of energy balance in diseases that are major causes of morbidity or death in humans, such as type 2 diabetes, cancer and inflammatory disorders, there has been a major drive to develop pharmacological activators of AMPK. Many such activators have been described, and the various mechanisms by which these activate AMPK will be discussed. A particularly large class of AMPK activators are natural products of plants derived from traditional herbal medicines. While the mechanism by which most of these activate AMPK has not yet been addressed, I will argue that many of them may be defensive compounds produced by plants to deter infection by pathogens or grazing by insects or herbivores, and that many of them will turn out to be inhibitors of mitochondrial function. PMID:26904394

  7. Sasa borealis extract exerts an antidiabetic effect via activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jung Soo; Chung, Hee Jin; Jang, Min Kyung; Jung, In Ah; Park, Seong Ha; Cho, Su In; Jung, Myeong Ho

    2013-02-01

    Leaf of Sasa borealis, a species of bamboo, has been reported to exhibit anti-hyperglycemic effect. However, its antidiabetic mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we examined whether an extract of S. borealis activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and exerts anti-hyperglycemic effects. Treatment with the S. borealis extract increased insulin signaling and phosphorylation of AMPK and stimulated the expression of its downstream targets, including PPARα, ACO, and CPT-1 in C2C12 cells and PPARα in HepG2 cells. However, inhibition of AMPK activation attenuated insulin signaling and prevented the stimulation of AMPK target genes. The S. borealis extract increased glucose uptake in C2C12 cells and suppressed expression of the gluconeogenic gene, PEPCK in HepG2 cells. The extract significantly reduced blood glucose and triglyceride levels in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The extract enhanced AMPK phosphorylation and increased Glut-4 expression in the skeletal muscle of the mice. These findings demonstrated that the S. borealis extract exerts its anti-hyperglycemic effect through activation of AMPK and enhancement of insulin signaling. PMID:23423690

  8. Sasa borealis extract exerts an antidiabetic effect via activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jung Soo; Chung, Hee Jin; Jang, Min Kyung; Jung, In Ah; Park, Seong Ha; Cho, Su In

    2013-01-01

    Leaf of Sasa borealis, a species of bamboo, has been reported to exhibit anti-hyperglycemic effect. However, its antidiabetic mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we examined whether an extract of S. borealis activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and exerts anti-hyperglycemic effects. Treatment with the S. borealis extract increased insulin signaling and phosphorylation of AMPK and stimulated the expression of its downstream targets, including PPARα, ACO, and CPT-1 in C2C12 cells and PPARα in HepG2 cells. However, inhibition of AMPK activation attenuated insulin signaling and prevented the stimulation of AMPK target genes. The S. borealis extract increased glucose uptake in C2C12 cells and suppressed expression of the gluconeogenic gene, PEPCK in HepG2 cells. The extract significantly reduced blood glucose and triglyceride levels in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The extract enhanced AMPK phosphorylation and increased Glut-4 expression in the skeletal muscle of the mice. These findings demonstrated that the S. borealis extract exerts its anti-hyperglycemic effect through activation of AMPK and enhancement of insulin signaling. PMID:23423690

  9. GSK621 Targets Glioma Cells via Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signalings

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhan, Shi-Kun; Pan, Yi-Xin; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang; Pan, Si-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the anti-glioma cell activity by a novel AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator GSK621. We showed that GSK621 was cytotoxic to human glioma cells (U87MG and U251MG lines), possibly via provoking caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Its cytotoxicity was alleviated by caspase inhibitors. GSK621 activated AMPK to inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and downregulate Tetraspanin 8 (Tspan8) in glioma cells. AMPK inhibition, through shRNA knockdown of AMPKα or introduction of a dominant negative (T172A) AMPKα, almost reversed GSK621-induced AMPK activation, mTOR inhibition and Tspan8 degradation. Consequently, GSK621’s cytotoxicity in glioma cells was also significantly attenuated by AMPKα knockdown or mutation. Further studies showed that GSK621, at a relatively low concentration, significantly potentiated temozolomide (TMZ)’s sensitivity and lethality against glioma cells. We summarized that GSK621 inhibits human glioma cells possibly via activating AMPK signaling. This novel AMPK activator could be a novel and promising anti-glioma cell agent. PMID:27532105

  10. The recruitment of AMP-activated protein kinase to glycogen is regulated by autophosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Miglianico, Marie; Chanda, Dipanjan; Scholz, Roland; Thali, Ramon F; Tuerk, Roland; Stapleton, David I; Gooley, Paul R; Neumann, Dietbert

    2015-05-01

    The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an obligatory αβγ heterotrimeric complex carrying a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) in the β-subunit (AMPKβ) capable of attaching AMPK to glycogen. Nonetheless, AMPK localizes at many different cellular compartments, implying the existence of mechanisms that prevent AMPK from glycogen binding. Cell-free carbohydrate binding assays revealed that AMPK autophosphorylation abolished its carbohydrate-binding capacity. X-ray structural data of the CBM displays the central positioning of threonine 148 within the binding pocket. Substitution of Thr-148 for a phospho-mimicking aspartate (T148D) prevents AMPK from binding to carbohydrate. Overexpression of isolated CBM or β1-containing AMPK in cellular models revealed that wild type (WT) localizes to glycogen particles, whereas T148D shows a diffuse pattern. Pharmacological AMPK activation and glycogen degradation by glucose deprivation but not forskolin enhanced cellular Thr-148 phosphorylation. Cellular glycogen content was higher if pharmacological AMPK activation was combined with overexpression of T148D mutant relative to WT AMPK. In summary, these data show that glycogen-binding capacity of AMPKβ is regulated by Thr-148 autophosphorylation with likely implications in the regulation of glycogen turnover. The findings further raise the possibility of regulated carbohydrate-binding function in a wider variety of CBM-containing proteins.

  11. Nicotine induces negative energy balance through hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Whittle, Andrew J; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; López, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Smokers around the world commonly report increased body weight after smoking cessation as a major factor that interferes with their attempts to quit. Numerous controlled studies in both humans and rodents have reported that nicotine exerts a marked anorectic action. The effects of nicotine on energy homeostasis have been mostly pinpointed in the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms controlling its action are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotine on hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its effect on energy balance. Here we demonstrate that nicotine-induced weight loss is associated with inactivation of hypothalamic AMPK, decreased orexigenic signaling in the hypothalamus, increased energy expenditure as a result of increased locomotor activity, increased thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and alterations in fuel substrate utilization. Conversely, nicotine withdrawal or genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus reversed nicotine-induced negative energy balance. Overall these data demonstrate that the effects of nicotine on energy balance involve specific modulation of the hypothalamic AMPK-BAT axis. These targets may be relevant for the development of new therapies for human obesity. PMID:22315316

  12. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase by tributyltin induces neuronal cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsu, Yusuke; Kotake, Yaichiro Hino, Atsuko; Ohta, Shigeru

    2008-08-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a member of the metabolite-sensing protein kinase family, is activated by energy deficiency and is abundantly expressed in neurons. The environmental pollutant, tributyltin chloride (TBT), is a neurotoxin, and has been reported to decrease cellular ATP in some types of cells. Therefore, we investigated whether TBT activates AMPK, and whether its activation contributes to neuronal cell death, using primary cultures of cortical neurons. Cellular ATP levels were decreased 0.5 h after exposure to 500 nM TBT, and the reduction was time-dependent. It was confirmed that most neurons in our culture system express AMPK, and that TBT induced phosphorylation of AMPK. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, reduced the neurotoxicity of TBT, suggesting that AMPK is involved in TBT-induced cell death. Next, the downstream target of AMPK activation was investigated. Nitric oxide synthase, p38 phosphorylation and Akt dephosphorylation were not downstream of TBT-induced AMPK activation because these factors were not affected by compound C, but glutamate release was suggested to be controlled by AMPK. Our results suggest that activation of AMPK by TBT causes neuronal death through mediating glutamate release.

  13. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates the assembly of epithelial tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Li, Ji; Young, Lawrence H; Caplan, Michael J

    2006-11-14

    AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a sensor of cellular energy status in all eukaryotic cells, is activated by LKB1-dependent phosphorylation. Recent studies indicate that activated LKB1 induces polarity in epithelial cells and that this polarization is accompanied by the formation of tight junction structures. We wished to determine whether AMPK also contributes to the assembly of tight junctions in the epithelial cell polarization process. We found that AMPK is activated during calcium-induced tight junction assembly. Activation of AMPK by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside facilitates tight junction assembly under conditions of normal extracellular Ca2+ concentrations and initiates tight junction assembly in the absence of Ca2+ as revealed by the relocation of zonula occludens 1, the establishment of transepithelial electrical resistance, and the paracellular flux assay. Expression of a dominant negative AMPK construct inhibits tight junction assembly in MDCK cells, and this defect in tight junction assembly can be partially ameliorated by rapamycin. These results suggest that AMPK plays a role in the regulation of tight junction assembly. PMID:17088526

  14. 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase alpha regulates stress granule biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, Hicham; Barisé, Ramla; Stochaj, Ursula

    2015-07-01

    Stress granule (SG) assembly represents a conserved eukaryotic defense strategy against various insults. Although essential for the ability to cope with deleterious conditions, the signaling pathways controlling SG formation are not fully understood. The energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is critical for the cellular stress response. Human cells produce two AMPK catalytic α-subunits with not only partially overlapping, but also unique functions. Here, we provide direct support for structural and functional links between AMPK-α isoforms and SGs. As such, several stressors promote SG association of AMPK-α2, but not AMPK-α1. Multiple lines of evidence link AMPK activity to SG biogenesis. First, pharmacological kinase inhibition interfered with SG formation. Second, AMPK-α knockdown combined with in-depth quantitative SG analysis revealed isoform-specific changes of SG characteristics. Third, overexpression of mutant α-subunits further substantiated that AMPK regulates SG parameters. Finally, we identified the SG-nucleating protein G3BP1 as an AMPK-α2 binding partner. This interaction is stimulated by stress and notably occurs in SGs. Collectively, our data define the master metabolic regulator AMPK as a novel SG constituent that also controls their biogenesis.

  15. AMP-activated protein kinase induces actin cytoskeleton reorganization in epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, Lisa; Carpentier, Sarah; Platek, Anna; Hussain, Nusrat; Gueuning, Marie-Agnes; Vertommen, Didier; Ozkan, Yurda; Sid, Brice; Hue, Louis; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Rider, Mark H.; Horman, Sandrine

    2010-06-04

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a known regulator of cellular and systemic energy balance, is now recognized to control cell division, cell polarity and cell migration, all of which depend on the actin cytoskeleton. Here we report the effects of A769662, a pharmacological activator of AMPK, on cytoskeletal organization and signalling in epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. We show that AMPK activation induced shortening or radiation of stress fibers, uncoupling from paxillin and predominance of cortical F-actin. In parallel, Rho-kinase downstream targets, namely myosin regulatory light chain and cofilin, were phosphorylated. These effects resembled the morphological changes in MDCK cells exposed to hyperosmotic shock, which led to Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK activation via calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-{beta}(CaMKK{beta}), a known upstream kinase of AMPK. Indeed, hypertonicity-induced AMPK activation was markedly reduced by the STO-609 CaMKK{beta} inhibitor, as was the increase in MLC and cofilin phosphorylation. We suggest that AMPK links osmotic stress to the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  16. Oestrogen receptors interact with the α-catalytic subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lipovka, Yulia; Chen, Hao; Vagner, Josef; Price, Theodore J.; Tsao, Tsu-Shuen; Konhilas, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Normal and pathological stressors engage the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signalling axis to protect the cell from energetic pressures. Sex steroid hormones also play a critical role in energy metabolism and significantly modify pathological progression of cardiac disease, diabetes/obesity and cancer. AMPK is targeted by 17β-oestradiol (E2), the main circulating oestrogen, but the mechanism by which E2 activates AMPK is currently unknown. Using an oestrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β) positive (T47D) breast cancer cell line, we validated E2-dependent activation of AMPK that was mediated through ERα (not ERβ) by using three experimental strategies. A series of co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that both ERs associated with AMPK in cancer and striated (skeletal and cardiac) muscle cells. We further demonstrated direct binding of ERs to the α-catalytic subunit of AMPK within the βγ-subunit-binding domain. Finally, both ERs interacted with the upstream liver kinase B 1 (LKB1) kinase complex, which is required for E2-dependent activation of AMPK. We conclude that E2 activates AMPK through ERα by direct interaction with the βγ-binding domain of AMPKα. PMID:26374855

  17. A Cell-Autonomous Molecular Cascade Initiated by AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Represses Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Houssein S.; Bergeron, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Steroid hormones regulate essential physiological processes, and inadequate levels are associated with various pathological conditions. In testosterone-producing Leydig cells, steroidogenesis is strongly stimulated by luteinizing hormone (LH) via its receptor leading to increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) production and expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein, which is essential for the initiation of steroidogenesis. Steroidogenesis then passively decreases with the degradation of cAMP into AMP by phosphodiesterases. In this study, we show that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated following cAMP-to-AMP breakdown in MA-10 and MLTC-1 Leydig cells. Activated AMPK then actively inhibits cAMP-induced steroidogenesis by repressing the expression of key regulators of steroidogenesis, including Star and Nr4a1. Similar results were obtained in Y-1 adrenal cells and in the constitutively steroidogenic R2C cells. We have also determined that maximum AMPK activation following stimulation of steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig cells occurs when steroid hormone production has reached a plateau. Our data identify AMPK as a molecular rheostat that actively represses steroid hormone biosynthesis to preserve cellular energy homeostasis and prevent excess steroid production. PMID:25225331

  18. Nicotine induces negative energy balance through hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Whittle, Andrew J; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; López, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Smokers around the world commonly report increased body weight after smoking cessation as a major factor that interferes with their attempts to quit. Numerous controlled studies in both humans and rodents have reported that nicotine exerts a marked anorectic action. The effects of nicotine on energy homeostasis have been mostly pinpointed in the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms controlling its action are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotine on hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its effect on energy balance. Here we demonstrate that nicotine-induced weight loss is associated with inactivation of hypothalamic AMPK, decreased orexigenic signaling in the hypothalamus, increased energy expenditure as a result of increased locomotor activity, increased thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and alterations in fuel substrate utilization. Conversely, nicotine withdrawal or genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus reversed nicotine-induced negative energy balance. Overall these data demonstrate that the effects of nicotine on energy balance involve specific modulation of the hypothalamic AMPK-BAT axis. These targets may be relevant for the development of new therapies for human obesity.

  19. The Recruitment of AMP-activated Protein Kinase to Glycogen Is Regulated by Autophosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Miglianico, Marie; Chanda, Dipanjan; Scholz, Roland; Thali, Ramon F.; Tuerk, Roland; Stapleton, David I.; Gooley, Paul R.; Neumann, Dietbert

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an obligatory αβγ heterotrimeric complex carrying a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) in the β-subunit (AMPKβ) capable of attaching AMPK to glycogen. Nonetheless, AMPK localizes at many different cellular compartments, implying the existence of mechanisms that prevent AMPK from glycogen binding. Cell-free carbohydrate binding assays revealed that AMPK autophosphorylation abolished its carbohydrate-binding capacity. X-ray structural data of the CBM displays the central positioning of threonine 148 within the binding pocket. Substitution of Thr-148 for a phospho-mimicking aspartate (T148D) prevents AMPK from binding to carbohydrate. Overexpression of isolated CBM or β1-containing AMPK in cellular models revealed that wild type (WT) localizes to glycogen particles, whereas T148D shows a diffuse pattern. Pharmacological AMPK activation and glycogen degradation by glucose deprivation but not forskolin enhanced cellular Thr-148 phosphorylation. Cellular glycogen content was higher if pharmacological AMPK activation was combined with overexpression of T148D mutant relative to WT AMPK. In summary, these data show that glycogen-binding capacity of AMPKβ is regulated by Thr-148 autophosphorylation with likely implications in the regulation of glycogen turnover. The findings further raise the possibility of regulated carbohydrate-binding function in a wider variety of CBM-containing proteins. PMID:25792737

  20. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) deficiency is a disorder characterized by abnormal ...

  1. Hypoxia promotes drug resistance in osteosarcoma cells via activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Changfu; Zhang, Qiao; Yu, Tao; Sun, Shudong; Wang, Wenjun; Liu, Guangyao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Drug resistance has been recognized to be a major obstacle to the chemotherapy for osteosarcoma. And the potential importance of hypoxia as a target to reverse drug resistance in osteosarcoma has been indicated, though the mechanism underlining such role is not clarified. The present study aims to investigate the role of hypoxia in the drug resistance in osteosarcoma cells via activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. Experimental design We investigated the promotion of the resistance to doxorubicin of osteosarcoma MG-63 and U2-os cells in vitro, and then determined the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)α and HIF-1β, the activation and regulatory role of AMPK in the osteosarcoma U2-os cells which were treated with doxorubicin under hypoxia. Results It was demonstrated that hypoxia significantly reduced the sensitivity of MG-63 and U2-os cells to doxorubicin, indicating an inhibited viability reduction and a reduced apoptosis promotion. And such reduced sensitivity was not associated with HIF-1α, though it was promoted by hypoxia in U2-os cells. Interestingly, the AMPK signaling was significantly promoted by hypoxia in the doxorubicin-treated U2-os cells, with a marked upregulation of phosphorylated AMPK (Thr 172) and phosphorylated acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) (Ser 79), which were sensitive to the AMPK activator, AICAR and the AMPK inhibitor, Compound C. Moreover, the promoted AMPK activity by AICAR or the downregulated AMPK activity by Compound C significantly reduced or promoted the sensitivity of U2-os cells to doxorubicin. Conclusion The present study confirmed the AMPK signaling activation in the doxorubicin-treated osteosarcoma cells, in response to hypoxia, and the chemical upregulation or downregulation of AMPK signaling reduced or increased the chemo-sensitivity of osteosarcoma U2-os cells in vitro. Our study implies that AMPK inhibition might be a effective strategy to sensitize osteocarcoma cells to chemotherapy. PMID

  2. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Suppresses Biosynthesis of Glucosylceramide by Reducing Intracellular Sugar Nucleotides*

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Yohei; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The membrane glycolipid glucosylceramide (GlcCer) plays a critical role in cellular homeostasis. Its intracellular levels are thought to be tightly regulated. How cells regulate GlcCer levels remains to be clarified. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a crucial cellular energy sensor, regulates glucose and lipid metabolism to maintain energy homeostasis. Here, we investigated whether AMPK affects GlcCer metabolism. AMPK activators (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribofuranoside and metformin) decreased intracellular GlcCer levels and synthase activity in mouse fibroblasts. AMPK inhibitors or AMPK siRNA reversed these effects, suggesting that GlcCer synthesis is negatively regulated by an AMPK-dependent mechanism. Although AMPK did not affect the phosphorylation or expression of GlcCer synthase, the amount of UDP-glucose, an activated form of glucose required for GlcCer synthesis, decreased under AMPK-activating conditions. Importantly, the UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase Nudt14, which degrades UDP-glucose, generating UMP and glucose 1-phosphate, was phosphorylated and activated by AMPK. On the other hand, suppression of Nudt14 by siRNA had little effect on UDP-glucose levels, indicating that mammalian cells have an alternative UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase that mainly contributes to the reduction of UDP-glucose under AMPK-activating conditions. Because AMPK activators are capable of reducing GlcCer levels in cells from Gaucher disease patients, our findings suggest that reducing GlcCer through AMPK activation may lead to a new strategy for treating diseases caused by abnormal accumulation of GlcCer. PMID:26048992

  3. Augmenting energy expenditure by mitochondrial uncoupling: a role of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Susanne; Keipert, Susanne; Rossmeisl, Martin; Kopecky, Jan

    2012-07-01

    Strategies to prevent and treat obesity aim to decrease energy intake and/or increase energy expenditure. Regarding the increase of energy expenditure, two key intracellular targets may be considered (1) mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, the major site of ATP production, and (2) AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), the master regulator of cellular energy homeostasis. Experiments performed mainly in transgenic mice revealed a possibility to ameliorate obesity and associated disorders by mitochondrial uncoupling in metabolically relevant tissues, especially in white adipose tissue (WAT), skeletal muscle (SM), and liver. Thus, ectopic expression of brown fat-specific mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) elicited major metabolic effects both at the cellular/tissue level and at the whole-body level. In addition to expected increases in energy expenditure, surprisingly complex phenotypic effects were detected. The consequences of mitochondrial uncoupling in WAT and SM are not identical, showing robust and stable obesity resistance accompanied by improvement of lipid metabolism in the case of ectopic UCP1 in WAT, while preservation of insulin sensitivity in the context of high-fat feeding represents the major outcome of muscle UCP1 expression. These complex responses could be largely explained by tissue-specific activation of AMPK, triggered by a depression of cellular energy charge. Experimental data support the idea that (1) while being always activated in response to mitochondrial uncoupling and compromised intracellular energy status in general, AMPK could augment energy expenditure and mediate local as well as whole-body effects; and (2) activation of AMPK alone does not lead to induction of energy expenditure and weight reduction. PMID:22139637

  4. Calcium-Oxidant Signaling Network Regulates AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activation upon Matrix Deprivation*

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, Ananthalakshmy; Amirtham, Usha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been implicated in anoikis resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that activate AMPK upon matrix detachment remain unexplored. In this study, we show that AMPK activation is a rapid and sustained phenomenon upon matrix deprivation, whereas re-attachment to the matrix leads to its dephosphorylation and inactivation. Because matrix detachment leads to loss of integrin signaling, we investigated whether integrin signaling negatively regulates AMPK activation. However, modulation of focal adhesion kinase or Src, the major downstream components of integrin signaling, failed to cause a corresponding change in AMPK signaling. Further investigations revealed that the upstream AMPK kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) contribute to AMPK activation upon detachment. In LKB1-deficient cells, we found AMPK activation to be predominantly dependent on CaMKKβ. We observed no change in ATP levels under detached conditions at early time points suggesting that rapid AMPK activation upon detachment was not triggered by energy stress. We demonstrate that matrix deprivation leads to a spike in intracellular calcium as well as oxidant signaling, and both these intracellular messengers contribute to rapid AMPK activation upon detachment. We further show that endoplasmic reticulum calcium release-induced store-operated calcium entry contributes to intracellular calcium increase, leading to reactive oxygen species production, and AMPK activation. We additionally show that the LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK axis and intracellular calcium levels play a critical role in anchorage-independent cancer sphere formation. Thus, the Ca2+/reactive oxygen species-triggered LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK signaling cascade may provide a quick, adaptable switch to promote survival of metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:27226623

  5. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ had noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems.

  6. 2-Octynoic Acid Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection through Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Darong; Xue, Binbin; Wang, Xiaohong; Yu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Nianli; Gao, Yimin; Liu, Chen; Zhu, Haizhen

    2013-01-01

    Many chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients with current therapy do not clear the virus. It is necessary to find novel treatments. The effect of 2-octynoic acid (2-OA) on HCV infection in human hepatocytes was examined. The mechanism of 2-OA antiviral activity was explored. Our data showed that 2-OA abrogated lipid accumulation in HCV replicon cells and virus-infected hepatocytes. It suppressed HCV RNA replication and infectious virus production with no cytotoxicity to the host cells. 2-OA did not affect hepatitis B virus replication in HepG2.2.15 cells derived from HepG2 cells transfected with full genome of HBV. Further study demonstrated that 2-OA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase in viral-infected cells. Compound C, a specific inhibitor of AMPK, inhibited AMPK activity and reversed the reduction of intracellular lipid accumulation and the antiviral effect of 2-OA. Knockdown of AMPK expression by RNA interference abolished the activation of AMPK by 2-OA and blocked 2-OA antiviral activity. Interestingly, 2-OA induced interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and inhibited microRNA-122 (miR-122) expression in virus-infected hepatocytes. MiR-122 overexpression reversed the antiviral effect of 2-OA. Furthermore, knockdown of AMPK expression reversed both the induction of ISGs and suppression of miR-122 by 2-OA, implying that activated AMPK induces the intracellular innate response through the induction of ISGs and inhibiting miR-122 expression. 2-OA inhibits HCV infection through regulation of innate immune response by activated AMPK. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which active AMPK inhibits HCV infection. 2-OA and its derivatives hold promise for novel drug development for chronic hepatitis C. PMID:23741428

  7. Activation of the AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) by Nitrated Lipids in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Dong, Yunzhou; Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2012-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important regulator of endothelial metabolic and functional homeostasis. Here, we examined the regulation of AMPK by nitrated oleic acid (OA-NO2) and investigated the implications in endothelial function. Treatment of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) with OA-NO2 induced a significant increase in both AMPK-Thr172 phosphorylation and AMPK activity as well as upregulation of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. Pharmacologic inhibition or genetic ablation of HO-1 or HIF-1α abolished OA-NO2-induced AMPK phosphorylation. OA-NO2 induced a dramatic increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation that was abrogated by the HO-1 inhibitor, zinc deuteroporphyrin IX 2,4-bis-ethylene glycol (ZnBG). Inhibition of ERK1/2 using UO126 or PD98059 reduced but did not abolish OA-NO2-induced HIF-1α upregulation, suggesting that OA-NO2/HO-1-initiated HIF-1α induction is partially dependent on ERK1/2 activity. In addition, OA-NO2 enhanced endothelial intracellular Ca2+, an effect that was inhibited by the HIF-1α inhibitor, YC-1, and by HIF-1α siRNA. These results implicate the involvement of HIF-1α. Experiments using the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) inhibitor STO-609, the selective CaMKII inhibitor KN-93, and an isoform-specific siRNA demonstrated that OA-NO2-induced AMPK phosphorylation was dependent on CaMKKβ. Together, these results demonstrate that OA-NO2 activates AMPK in endothelial cells via an HO-1–dependent mechanism that increases HIF-1α protein expression and Ca2+/CaMKKβ activation. PMID:22363546

  8. Palmitoleate Reverses High Fat-induced Proinflammatory Macrophage Polarization via AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK)*

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kenny L.; Pillon, Nicolas J.; Sivaloganathan, Darshan M.; Costford, Sheila R.; Liu, Zhi; Théret, Marine; Chazaud, Benedicte; Klip, Amira

    2015-01-01

    A rise in tissue-embedded macrophages displaying “M1-like” proinflammatory polarization is a hallmark of metabolic inflammation during a high fat diet or obesity. Here we show that bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) from high fat-fed mice retain a memory of their dietary environment in vivo (displaying the elevated proinflammatory genes Cxcl1, Il6, Tnf, Nos2) despite 7-day differentiation and proliferation ex vivo. Notably, 6-h incubation with palmitoleate (PO) reversed the proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion seen in BMDM from high fat-fed mice. BMDM from low fat-fed mice exposed to palmitate (PA) for 18 h ex vivo also showed elevated expression of proinflammatory genes (Cxcl1, Il6, Tnf, Nos2, and Il12b) associated with M1 polarization. Conversely, PO treatment increased anti-inflammatory genes (Mrc1, Tgfb1, Il10, Mgl2) and oxidative metabolism, characteristic of M2 macrophages. Therefore, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids bring about opposite macrophage polarization states. Coincubation of BMDM with both fatty acids counteracted the PA-induced Nos2 expression in a PO dose-dependent fashion. PO also prevented PA-induced IκBα degradation, RelA nuclear translocation, NO production, and cytokine secretion. Mechanistically, PO exerted its anti-inflammatory function through AMP-activated protein kinase as AMP kinase knockout or inhibition by Compound C offset the PO-dependent prevention of PA-induced inflammation. These results demonstrate a nutritional memory of BMDM ex vivo, highlight the plasticity of BMDM polarization in response to saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and identify the potential to reverse diet- and saturated fat-induced M1-like polarization by administering palmitoleate. These findings could have applicability to reverse obesity-linked inflammation in metabolically relevant tissues. PMID:25987561

  9. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase expression in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Brandauer, Josef; Vienberg, Sara G; Andersen, Marianne A; Ringholm, Stine; Risis, Steve; Larsen, Per S; Kristensen, Jonas M; Frøsig, Christian; Leick, Lotte; Fentz, Joachim; Jørgensen, Sebastian; Kiens, Bente; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P; Richter, Erik A; Zierath, Juleen R; Goodyear, Laurie J; Pilegaard, Henriette; Treebak, Jonas T

    2013-01-01

    Deacetylases such as sirtuins (SIRTs) convert NAD to nicotinamide (NAM). Nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (Nampt) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the NAD salvage pathway responsible for converting NAM to NAD to maintain cellular redox state. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) increases SIRT activity by elevating NAD levels. As NAM directly inhibits SIRTs, increased Nampt activation or expression could be a metabolic stress response. Evidence suggests that AMPK regulates Nampt mRNA content, but whether repeated AMPK activation is necessary for increasing Nampt protein levels is unknown. To this end, we assessed whether exercise training- or 5-amino-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR)-mediated increases in skeletal muscle Nampt abundance are AMPK dependent. One-legged knee-extensor exercise training in humans increased Nampt protein by 16% (P < 0.05) in the trained, but not the untrained leg. Moreover, increases in Nampt mRNA following acute exercise or AICAR treatment (P < 0.05 for both) were maintained in mouse skeletal muscle lacking a functional AMPK α2 subunit. Nampt protein was reduced in skeletal muscle of sedentary AMPK α2 kinase dead (KD), but 6.5 weeks of endurance exercise training increased skeletal muscle Nampt protein to a similar extent in both wild-type (WT) (24%) and AMPK α2 KD (18%) mice. In contrast, 4 weeks of daily AICAR treatment increased Nampt protein in skeletal muscle in WT mice (27%), but this effect did not occur in AMPK α2 KD mice. In conclusion, functional α2-containing AMPK heterotrimers are required for elevation of skeletal muscle Nampt protein, but not mRNA induction. These findings suggest AMPK plays a post-translational role in the regulation of skeletal muscle Nampt protein abundance, and further indicate that the regulation of cellular energy charge and nutrient sensing is mechanistically related. PMID:23918774

  10. Berberine regulates AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and inhibits colon tumorigenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Weidong; Hua, Baojin; Saud, Shakir M; Lin, Hongsheng; Hou, Wei; Matter, Matthias S; Jia, Libin; Colburn, Nancy H; Young, Matthew R

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer, a leading cause of cancer death, has been linked to inflammation and obesity. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetes and anti-tumor properties. In the azoxymethane initiated and dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS) promoted colorectal carcinogenesis mouse model, berberine treated mice showed a 60% reduction in tumor number (P = 0.009), a 48% reduction in tumors <2 mm, (P = 0.05); 94% reduction in tumors 2-4 mm, (P = 0.001), and 100% reduction in tumors >4 mm (P = 0.02) compared to vehicle treated mice. Berberine also decreased AOM/DSS induced Ki-67 and COX-2 expression. In vitro analysis showed that in addition to its anti-proliferation activity, berberine also induced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cell lines. Berberine activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a major regulator of metabolic pathways, and inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a downstream target of AMPK. Furthermore, 4E-binding protein-1 and p70 ribosomal S6 kinases, downstream targets of mTOR, were down regulated by berberine treatment. Berberine did not affect Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) activity or the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Berberine inhibited Nuclear Factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activity, reduced the expression of cyclin D1 and survivin, induced phosphorylation of p53 and increased caspase-3 cleavage in vitro. Berberine inhibition of mTOR activity and p53 phosphorylation was found to be AMPK dependent, while inhibition NF-κB was AMPK independent. In vivo, berberine also activated AMPK, inhibited mTOR and p65 phosphorylation and activated caspase-3 cleavage. Our data suggests that berberine suppresses colon epithelial proliferation and tumorigenesis via AMPK dependent inhibition of mTOR activity and AMPK independent inhibition of NF-κB.

  11. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates the Cell Surface Proteome and Integrin Membrane Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Thavarajah, Thanusi; Medvedev, Sergei; Bowden, Peter; Marshall, John G.; Antonescu, Costin N.

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface proteome controls numerous cellular functions including cell migration and adhesion, intercellular communication and nutrient uptake. Cell surface proteins are controlled by acute changes in protein abundance at the plasma membrane through regulation of endocytosis and recycling (endomembrane traffic). Many cellular signals regulate endomembrane traffic, including metabolic signaling; however, the extent to which the cell surface proteome is controlled by acute regulation of endomembrane traffic under various conditions remains incompletely understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key metabolic sensor that is activated upon reduced cellular energy availability. AMPK activation alters the endomembrane traffic of a few specific proteins, as part of an adaptive response to increase energy intake and reduce energy expenditure. How increased AMPK activity during energy stress may globally regulate the cell surface proteome is not well understood. To study how AMPK may regulate the cell surface proteome, we used cell-impermeable biotinylation to selectively purify cell surface proteins under various conditions. Using ESI-MS/MS, we found that acute (90 min) treatment with the AMPK activator A-769662 elicits broad control of the cell surface abundance of diverse proteins. In particular, A-769662 treatment depleted from the cell surface proteins with functions in cell migration and adhesion. To complement our mass spectrometry results, we used other methods to show that A-769662 treatment results in impaired cell migration. Further, A-769662 treatment reduced the cell surface abundance of β1-integrin, a key cell migration protein, and AMPK gene silencing prevented this effect. While the control of the cell surface abundance of various proteins by A-769662 treatment was broad, it was also selective, as this treatment did not change the cell surface abundance of the transferrin receptor. Hence, the cell surface proteome is subject to acute

  12. Palmitoleate Reverses High Fat-induced Proinflammatory Macrophage Polarization via AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK).

    PubMed

    Chan, Kenny L; Pillon, Nicolas J; Sivaloganathan, Darshan M; Costford, Sheila R; Liu, Zhi; Théret, Marine; Chazaud, Benedicte; Klip, Amira

    2015-07-01

    A rise in tissue-embedded macrophages displaying "M1-like" proinflammatory polarization is a hallmark of metabolic inflammation during a high fat diet or obesity. Here we show that bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) from high fat-fed mice retain a memory of their dietary environment in vivo (displaying the elevated proinflammatory genes Cxcl1, Il6, Tnf, Nos2) despite 7-day differentiation and proliferation ex vivo. Notably, 6-h incubation with palmitoleate (PO) reversed the proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion seen in BMDM from high fat-fed mice. BMDM from low fat-fed mice exposed to palmitate (PA) for 18 h ex vivo also showed elevated expression of proinflammatory genes (Cxcl1, Il6, Tnf, Nos2, and Il12b) associated with M1 polarization. Conversely, PO treatment increased anti-inflammatory genes (Mrc1, Tgfb1, Il10, Mgl2) and oxidative metabolism, characteristic of M2 macrophages. Therefore, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids bring about opposite macrophage polarization states. Coincubation of BMDM with both fatty acids counteracted the PA-induced Nos2 expression in a PO dose-dependent fashion. PO also prevented PA-induced IκBα degradation, RelA nuclear translocation, NO production, and cytokine secretion. Mechanistically, PO exerted its anti-inflammatory function through AMP-activated protein kinase as AMP kinase knockout or inhibition by Compound C offset the PO-dependent prevention of PA-induced inflammation. These results demonstrate a nutritional memory of BMDM ex vivo, highlight the plasticity of BMDM polarization in response to saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and identify the potential to reverse diet- and saturated fat-induced M1-like polarization by administering palmitoleate. These findings could have applicability to reverse obesity-linked inflammation in metabolically relevant tissues.

  13. Stimulation of Brain AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates Inflammation and Acute Lung Injury in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mulchandani, Nikhil; Yang, Weng-Lang; Khan, Mohammad Moshahid; Zhang, Fangming; Marambaud, Philippe; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are enormous public health problems with astronomical financial repercussions on health systems worldwide. The central nervous system (CNS) is closely intertwined in the septic process but the underlying mechanism is still obscure. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a ubiquitous energy sensor enzyme and plays a key role in regulation of energy homeostasis and cell survival. In this study, we hypothesized that activation of AMPK in the brain would attenuate inflammatory responses in sepsis, particularly in the lungs. Adult C57BL/6 male mice were treated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR, 20 ng), an AMPK activator, or vehicle (normal saline) by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection, followed by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) at 30 min post-ICV. The septic mice treated with AICAR exhibited elevated phosphorylation of AMPKα in the brain along with reduced serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), compared with the vehicle. Similarly, the expressions of TNF-α, IL-1β, keratinocyte-derived chemokine and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 as well as myeloperoxidase activity in the lungs of AICAR-treated mice were significantly reduced. Moreover, histological findings in the lungs showed improvement of morphologic features and reduction of apoptosis with AICAR treatment. We further found that the beneficial effects of AICAR on septic mice were diminished in AMPKα2 deficient mice, showing that AMPK mediates these effects. In conclusion, our findings reveal a new functional role of activating AMPK in the CNS to attenuate inflammatory responses and acute lung injury in sepsis. PMID:26252187

  14. Lymphocytes accelerate epithelial tight junction assembly: role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK).

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao Xiao; Chen, Hao; Yu, Sidney; Zhang, Li; Caplan, Michael J; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2010-01-01

    The tight junctions (TJs), characteristically located at the apicolateral borders of adjacent epithelial cells, are required for the proper formation of epithelial cell polarity as well as for sustaining the mucosal barrier to the external environment. The observation that lymphocytes are recruited by epithelial cells to the sites of infection [1] suggests that they may play a role in the modulation of epithelial barrier function and thus contribute to host defense. To test the ability of lymphocytes to modulate tight junction assembly in epithelial cells, we set up a lymphocyte-epithelial cell co-culture system, in which Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, a well-established model cell line for studying epithelial TJ assembly [2], were co-cultured with mouse lymphocytes to mimic an infection state. In a typical calcium switch experiment, the TJ assembly in co-culture was found to be accelerated compared to that in MDCK cells alone. This accelaration was found to be mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK activation was independent of changes in cellular ATP levels but it was found to be activated by the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha. Forced suppression of AMPK, either with a chemical inhibitor or by knockdown, abrogated the accelerating effect of lymphocytes on TJ formation. Similar results were also observed in a co-culture with lymphocytes and Calu-3 human airway epithelial cells, suggesting that the activation of AMPK may be a general mechanism underlying lymphocyte-accelerated TJ assembly in different epithelia. These results suggest that signals from lymphocytes, such as cytokines, facilitate TJ assembly in epithelial cells via the activation of AMPK. PMID:20808811

  15. Antithrombin up-regulates AMP-activated protein kinase signalling during myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yina; Wang, Jinli; Gao, Junjie; Yang, Hui; Wang, Yanqing; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Li, Ji; Rezaie, Alireza R

    2015-02-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a protein of the serpin superfamily involved in regulation of the proteolytic activity of the serine proteases of the coagulation system. AT is known to exhibit anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective properties when it binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) on vascular cells. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays an important cardioprotective role during myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R). To determine whether the cardioprotective signaling function of AT is mediated through the AMPK pathway, we evaluated the cardioprotective activities of wild-type AT and its two derivatives, one having high affinity and the other no affinity for heparin, in an acute I/R injury model in C57BL/6J mice in which the left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded. The serpin derivatives were given 5 minutes before reperfusion. The results showed that AT-WT can activate AMPK in both in vivo and ex vivo conditions. Blocking AMPK activity abolished the cardioprotective function of AT against I/R injury. The AT derivative having high affinity for heparin was more effective in activating AMPK and in limiting infraction, but the derivative lacking affinity for heparin was inactive in eliciting AMPK-dependent cardioprotective activity. Activation of AMPK by AT inhibited the inflammatory c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) pathway during I/R. Further studies revealed that the AMPK activity induced by AT also modulates cardiac substrate metabolism by increasing glucose oxidation but inhibiting fatty acid oxidation during I/R. These results suggest that AT binds to HSPGs on heart tissues to invoke a cardioprotective function by triggering cardiac AMPK activation, thereby attenuating JNK inflammatory signalling pathways and modulating substrate metabolism during I/R. PMID:25230600

  16. Neurochemical Measurement of Adenosine in Discrete Brain Regions of Five Strains of Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Amar K.; Jiao, Yun; Sample, Kenneth J.; Smeyne, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine (ADO), a non-classical neurotransmitter and neuromodulator, and its metabolites adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), have been shown to play an important role in a number of biochemical processes. Although their signaling is well described, it has been difficult to directly, accurately and simultaneously quantitate these purines in tissue or fluids. Here, we describe a novel method for measuring adenosine (ADO) and its metabolites using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Using this chromatographic technique, we examined baseline levels of ADO and ATP, ADP and AMP in 6 different brain regions of the C57BL/6J mouse: stratum, cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, substantia nigra and cerebellum and compared ADO levels in 5 different strains of mice (C57BL/6J, Swiss-Webster, FVB/NJ, 129P/J, and BALB/c). These studies demonstrate that baseline levels of purines vary significantly among the brain regions as well as between different mouse strains. These dissimilarities in purine concentrations may explain the variable phenotypes among background strains described in neurological disease models. PMID:24642754

  17. Imaging Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP).

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Megha; Dane, Eric; Conley, Jason; Tantama, Mathew

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a universal mediator of metabolism and signaling across unicellular and multicellular species. There is a fundamental interdependence between the dynamics of ATP and the physiology that occurs inside and outside the cell. Characterizing and understanding ATP dynamics provide valuable mechanistic insight into processes that range from neurotransmission to the chemotaxis of immune cells. Therefore, we require the methodology to interrogate both temporal and spatial components of ATP dynamics from the subcellular to the organismal levels in live specimens. Over the last several decades, a number of molecular probes that are specific to ATP have been developed. These probes have been combined with imaging approaches, particularly optical microscopy, to enable qualitative and quantitative detection of this critical molecule. In this review, we survey current examples of technologies available for visualizing ATP in living cells, and identify areas where new tools and approaches are needed to expand our capabilities. PMID:27638696

  18. Imaging Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP).

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Megha; Dane, Eric; Conley, Jason; Tantama, Mathew

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a universal mediator of metabolism and signaling across unicellular and multicellular species. There is a fundamental interdependence between the dynamics of ATP and the physiology that occurs inside and outside the cell. Characterizing and understanding ATP dynamics provide valuable mechanistic insight into processes that range from neurotransmission to the chemotaxis of immune cells. Therefore, we require the methodology to interrogate both temporal and spatial components of ATP dynamics from the subcellular to the organismal levels in live specimens. Over the last several decades, a number of molecular probes that are specific to ATP have been developed. These probes have been combined with imaging approaches, particularly optical microscopy, to enable qualitative and quantitative detection of this critical molecule. In this review, we survey current examples of technologies available for visualizing ATP in living cells, and identify areas where new tools and approaches are needed to expand our capabilities.

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase attenuates oxLDL uptake in macrophages through PP2A/NF-κB/LOX-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Li, Jin; Zhu, Haibo

    2016-10-01

    The differentiation of macrophages into lipid-laden foam cells is a hallmark in early-stage atherosclerosis. The developmental role of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in a transformation of foam cells, especially in macrophage cholesterol uptake that remains undetermined. Here we demonstrate that AMPK activation in response to IMM-H007 or AICAR resulted in a decrease in macrophage cholesterol uptake and thus inhibited foam cell formation in macrophages mediated by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). This functional change was caused by a downregulation of mRNA and protein expression of LOX-1 but not other scavenger receptors, including scavenger receptor-A (SR-A), CD36 and scavenger receptor-BI (SR-BI). The expression of LOX-1 was regulated by AMPK activation induced decreased phosphorylation of nuclear transcription factor NF-κB, since siRNA interference or dominant negative AMPK overexpression significantly promotes Ser536 dephosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and thus increases LOX-1 expression. Moreover, pharmacological AMPK activation was shown to promote protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity and the specific PP2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, could prevent the effects of IMM-H007 or AICAR on NF-κB and LOX-1. In vivo, pharmacological AMPK activation reduced the lesion size of atherosclerosis and the expression of LOX-1 in aortas in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Our current findings suggest a novel mechanism of LOX-1 regulation by AMPK to attenuate macrophage oxLDL uptake and atherosclerosis. PMID:26297684

  20. Effects of an High-Fat Diet Enriched in Lard or in Fish Oil on the Hypothalamic Amp-Activated Protein Kinase and Inflammatory Mediators.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, Emanuela; Mollica, Maria Pina; Lionetti, Lillà; Cavaliere, Gina; Trinchese, Giovanna; De Filippo, Chiara; Chieffi, Sergio; Gaita, Marcello; Barletta, Antonio; De Luca, Bruno; Crispino, Marianna; Monda, Marcellino

    2016-01-01

    The high fat diet (HFD) rich in lard induces obesity, inflammation and oxidative stress, and the deregulation of hypothalamic nuclei plays an important role in this mechanism. One important factor involved in the food intake and inflammation is adenosine monophosphate-dependent kinase (AMPK), a serine/threonine kinase activated by phosphorylation. Omega (ω)3-polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are dietary compounds known to attenuate the obesity-related diseases, although the molecular mechanisms underlying their actions in the hypothalamus are not completely understood. We hypothesized that the beneficial effects of PUFA may be mediated by AMPK in the hypothalamus. To this aim, rats were fed a control diet (CD), or isocaloric HFD containing either fish oil (FD; rich in ω3-PUFA) or lard for 6 weeks, and the activation of AMPK, inflammatory state (IKKβ, TNF-α) and oxidative stress were analyzed in the hypothalamus. In addition, we also studied serum lipid profile, homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index, and pro-inflammatory parameters. Our results showed, at the hypothalamic level of LD-fed rats, an increase of AMPK activation, inflammation and oxidative stress, while no modifications were detected in FD-fed animals compared to CD. In addition body weight gain, serum lipid profile, pro-inflammatory parameters and insulin resistance were reduced in FD animals compared to LD. In conclusion, our data indicate that the substitution of saturated by unsaturated fatty acids in the diet has beneficial effects on modulation of hypothalamic inflammation and function in obesity, underlying, at hypothalamic level, the interaction among insulin and/or leptin resistance, AMPK activation and hyperphagia.

  1. Caffeine and contraction synergistically stimulate 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin-independent glucose transport in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Satoshi; Egawa, Tatsuro; Kitani, Kazuto; Oshima, Rieko; Ma, Xiao; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2015-10-01

    5'-Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been identified as a key mediator of contraction-stimulated insulin-independent glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Caffeine acutely stimulates AMPK in resting skeletal muscle, but it is unknown whether caffeine affects AMPK in contracting muscle. Isolated rat epitrochlearis muscle was preincubated and then incubated in the absence or presence of 3 mmol/L caffeine for 30 or 120 min. Electrical stimulation (ES) was used to evoke tetanic contractions during the last 10 min of the incubation period. The combination of caffeine plus contraction had additive effects on AMPKα Thr(172) phosphorylation, α-isoform-specific AMPK activity, and 3-O-methylglucose (3MG) transport. In contrast, caffeine inhibited basal and contraction-stimulated Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation. Caffeine significantly delayed muscle fatigue during contraction, and the combination of caffeine and contraction additively decreased ATP and phosphocreatine contents. Caffeine did not affect resting tension. Next, rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of caffeine (60 mg/kg body weight) or saline, and the extensor digitorum longus muscle was dissected 15 min later. ES of the sciatic nerve was performed to evoke tetanic contractions for 5 min before dissection. Similar to the findings from isolated muscles incubated in vitro, the combination of caffeine plus contraction in vivo had additive effects on AMPK phosphorylation, AMPK activity, and 3MG transport. Caffeine also inhibited basal and contraction-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in vivo. These findings suggest that caffeine and contraction synergistically stimulate AMPK activity and insulin-independent glucose transport, at least in part by decreasing muscle fatigue and thereby promoting energy consumption during contraction.

  2. Effects of an High-Fat Diet Enriched in Lard or in Fish Oil on the Hypothalamic Amp-Activated Protein Kinase and Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Viggiano, Emanuela; Mollica, Maria Pina; Lionetti, Lillà; Cavaliere, Gina; Trinchese, Giovanna; De Filippo, Chiara; Chieffi, Sergio; Gaita, Marcello; Barletta, Antonio; De Luca, Bruno; Crispino, Marianna; Monda, Marcellino

    2016-01-01

    The high fat diet (HFD) rich in lard induces obesity, inflammation and oxidative stress, and the deregulation of hypothalamic nuclei plays an important role in this mechanism. One important factor involved in the food intake and inflammation is adenosine monophosphate-dependent kinase (AMPK), a serine/threonine kinase activated by phosphorylation. Omega (ω)3-polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are dietary compounds known to attenuate the obesity-related diseases, although the molecular mechanisms underlying their actions in the hypothalamus are not completely understood. We hypothesized that the beneficial effects of PUFA may be mediated by AMPK in the hypothalamus. To this aim, rats were fed a control diet (CD), or isocaloric HFD containing either fish oil (FD; rich in ω3-PUFA) or lard for 6 weeks, and the activation of AMPK, inflammatory state (IKKβ, TNF-α) and oxidative stress were analyzed in the hypothalamus. In addition, we also studied serum lipid profile, homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index, and pro-inflammatory parameters. Our results showed, at the hypothalamic level of LD-fed rats, an increase of AMPK activation, inflammation and oxidative stress, while no modifications were detected in FD-fed animals compared to CD. In addition body weight gain, serum lipid profile, pro-inflammatory parameters and insulin resistance were reduced in FD animals compared to LD. In conclusion, our data indicate that the substitution of saturated by unsaturated fatty acids in the diet has beneficial effects on modulation of hypothalamic inflammation and function in obesity, underlying, at hypothalamic level, the interaction among insulin and/or leptin resistance, AMPK activation and hyperphagia. PMID:27375435

  3. Houttuynia cordata attenuates lipid accumulation via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun; Koppula, Sushruta

    2014-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata (H. cordata) from the family Saururaceae is a perennial herb native to Southeast Asia. It possesses a range of medicinal properties to treat several disease symptoms including allergic inflammation and anaphylaxis. In the present investigation, we provided the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of H. cordata extract (HCE) in the prevention of high glucose-induced lipid accumulation in human HepG2 hepatocytes. HepG2 cells were pre-treated with various concentrations of HCE (0, 10, 20, 40, and 80 μg/mL) and treated with serum-free medium with normal glucose (5 mM) for 1 h, followed by exposure to high glucose (25 mM D-glucose) for 24 h. HCE significantly and dose-dependently attenuated lipid accumulation in human HepG2 hepatocytes when exposed to high glucose (25 mM D-glucose) (p < 0.05, p < 0.01 and p < 0.001 at 20, 40, and 80 μg/mL concentrations, respectively). Further, HCE attenuated the expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 and glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferases (GPATs). The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was also activated by HCE treatment when exposed to high glucose (25 mM D-glucose) in human HepG2 hepatocytes. This study suggests the hypolipidemic effects of HCE by the inhibition of lipid biosynthesis mediated through AMPK signaling, which may play an active role and can be developed as an anti-obesity agent. PMID:24871657

  4. Caffeine and contraction synergistically stimulate 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin-independent glucose transport in rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Satoshi; Egawa, Tatsuro; Kitani, Kazuto; Oshima, Rieko; Ma, Xiao; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    5′-Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been identified as a key mediator of contraction-stimulated insulin-independent glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Caffeine acutely stimulates AMPK in resting skeletal muscle, but it is unknown whether caffeine affects AMPK in contracting muscle. Isolated rat epitrochlearis muscle was preincubated and then incubated in the absence or presence of 3 mmol/L caffeine for 30 or 120 min. Electrical stimulation (ES) was used to evoke tetanic contractions during the last 10 min of the incubation period. The combination of caffeine plus contraction had additive effects on AMPKα Thr172 phosphorylation, α-isoform-specific AMPK activity, and 3-O-methylglucose (3MG) transport. In contrast, caffeine inhibited basal and contraction-stimulated Akt Ser473 phosphorylation. Caffeine significantly delayed muscle fatigue during contraction, and the combination of caffeine and contraction additively decreased ATP and phosphocreatine contents. Caffeine did not affect resting tension. Next, rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of caffeine (60 mg/kg body weight) or saline, and the extensor digitorum longus muscle was dissected 15 min later. ES of the sciatic nerve was performed to evoke tetanic contractions for 5 min before dissection. Similar to the findings from isolated muscles incubated in vitro, the combination of caffeine plus contraction in vivo had additive effects on AMPK phosphorylation, AMPK activity, and 3MG transport. Caffeine also inhibited basal and contraction-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in vivo. These findings suggest that caffeine and contraction synergistically stimulate AMPK activity and insulin-independent glucose transport, at least in part by decreasing muscle fatigue and thereby promoting energy consumption during contraction. PMID:26471759

  5. Caffeine and contraction synergistically stimulate 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin-independent glucose transport in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Satoshi; Egawa, Tatsuro; Kitani, Kazuto; Oshima, Rieko; Ma, Xiao; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2015-10-01

    5'-Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been identified as a key mediator of contraction-stimulated insulin-independent glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Caffeine acutely stimulates AMPK in resting skeletal muscle, but it is unknown whether caffeine affects AMPK in contracting muscle. Isolated rat epitrochlearis muscle was preincubated and then incubated in the absence or presence of 3 mmol/L caffeine for 30 or 120 min. Electrical stimulation (ES) was used to evoke tetanic contractions during the last 10 min of the incubation period. The combination of caffeine plus contraction had additive effects on AMPKα Thr(172) phosphorylation, α-isoform-specific AMPK activity, and 3-O-methylglucose (3MG) transport. In contrast, caffeine inhibited basal and contraction-stimulated Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation. Caffeine significantly delayed muscle fatigue during contraction, and the combination of caffeine and contraction additively decreased ATP and phosphocreatine contents. Caffeine did not affect resting tension. Next, rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of caffeine (60 mg/kg body weight) or saline, and the extensor digitorum longus muscle was dissected 15 min later. ES of the sciatic nerve was performed to evoke tetanic contractions for 5 min before dissection. Similar to the findings from isolated muscles incubated in vitro, the combination of caffeine plus contraction in vivo had additive effects on AMPK phosphorylation, AMPK activity, and 3MG transport. Caffeine also inhibited basal and contraction-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in vivo. These findings suggest that caffeine and contraction synergistically stimulate AMPK activity and insulin-independent glucose transport, at least in part by decreasing muscle fatigue and thereby promoting energy consumption during contraction. PMID:26471759

  6. AMP-activated protein kinase attenuates oxLDL uptake in macrophages through PP2A/NF-κB/LOX-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Li, Jin; Zhu, Haibo

    2016-10-01

    The differentiation of macrophages into lipid-laden foam cells is a hallmark in early-stage atherosclerosis. The developmental role of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in a transformation of foam cells, especially in macrophage cholesterol uptake that remains undetermined. Here we demonstrate that AMPK activation in response to IMM-H007 or AICAR resulted in a decrease in macrophage cholesterol uptake and thus inhibited foam cell formation in macrophages mediated by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). This functional change was caused by a downregulation of mRNA and protein expression of LOX-1 but not other scavenger receptors, including scavenger receptor-A (SR-A), CD36 and scavenger receptor-BI (SR-BI). The expression of LOX-1 was regulated by AMPK activation induced decreased phosphorylation of nuclear transcription factor NF-κB, since siRNA interference or dominant negative AMPK overexpression significantly promotes Ser536 dephosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and thus increases LOX-1 expression. Moreover, pharmacological AMPK activation was shown to promote protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity and the specific PP2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, could prevent the effects of IMM-H007 or AICAR on NF-κB and LOX-1. In vivo, pharmacological AMPK activation reduced the lesion size of atherosclerosis and the expression of LOX-1 in aortas in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Our current findings suggest a novel mechanism of LOX-1 regulation by AMPK to attenuate macrophage oxLDL uptake and atherosclerosis.

  7. Profiling Hepatic microRNAs in Zebrafish: Fluoxetine Exposure Mimics a Fasting Response That Targets AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK)

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Paul M.; Trudeau, Vance L.; Moon, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the similarities in microRNA profiles between fasted and fluoxetine (FLX) exposed zebrafish and downstream target transcripts and biological pathways. Using a custom designed microarray targeting 270 zebrafish miRNAs, we identified 9 differentially expressed miRNAs targeting transcripts in biological pathways associated with anabolic metabolism, such as adipogenesis, cholesterol biosynthesis, triacylglycerol synthesis, and insulin signaling. Exposure of female zebrafish to 540 ng/L FLX, an environmentally relevant concentration and a known metabolic repressor, increased specific miRNAs indicating greater inhibition of these pathways in spite of continued feeding. Further examination revealed two specific miRNAs, dre-let-7d and dre-miR-140-5p, were predicted in silico to bind to a primary regulator of metabolism, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and more specifically the two isoforms of the catalytic subunit, AMPKα1 and α2, respectively. Real-time analysis of the relative transcript abundance of the α1 and α2 mRNAs indicated a significant inverse relationship between specific miRNA and target transcript. This suggests that AMPK-related pathways may be compromised during FLX exposure as a result of increased miRNA abundance. The mechanism by which FLX regulates miRNA abundance is unknown but may be direct at the liver. The serotonin transporter, slc6a4, is the target of FLX and other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and it was found to be expressed in the liver, although treatment did not alter expression of this transporter. Exposure to FLX disrupts key hepatic metabolic pathways, which may be indicative of reduced overall fitness and these effects may be linked to specific miRNA abundance. This has important implications for the heath of fish because concentrations of SSRIs in aquatic ecosystems are continually increasing. PMID:24751937

  8. Characterization of the effects of metformin on porcine oocyte meiosis and on AMP-activated protein kinase activation in oocytes and cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau-Goeseels, Sylvie; Magyara, Nora; Collignon, Coralie

    2014-05-01

    The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) and metformin (MET) inhibit resumption of meiosis in porcine cumulus-enclosed oocytes. The objective of this study was to characterize the inhibitory effect of MET on porcine oocyte meiosis by: (1) determining the effects of an AMPK inhibitor and of inhibitors of signalling pathways involved in MET-induced AMPK activation in other cell types on MET-mediated meiotic arrest in porcine cumulus-enclosed oocytes; (2) determining whether MET and AICAR treatments lead to increased activation of porcine oocyte and/or cumulus cell AMPK as measured by phosphorylation of its substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase; and (3) determining the effects of inhibition of the AMPK kinase, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK), and Ca2+ chelation on oocyte meiotic maturation and AMPK activation in porcine oocytes and cumulus cells. The AMPK inhibitor compound C (CC; 1 μM) did not reverse the inhibitory effect of AICAR (1 mM) and MET (2 mM) on porcine oocyte meiosis. Additionally, CC had a significant inhibitory effect on its own. eNOS, c-Src and PI-3 kinase pathway inhibitors did not reverse the effect of metformin on porcine oocyte meiosis. The level of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation in oocytes and cumulus cells did not change in response to culture in the presence of MET, AICAR, CC, the CaMKK inhibitor STO-609 or the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM for 3 h, but STO-609 increased the percentage of porcine cumulus-enclosed oocytes (CEO) that remained at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage after 24 h of culture. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of MET and AICAR on porcine oocyte meiosis was probably not mediated through activation of AMPK.

  9. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibits TGF-β-induced fibrogenic responses of hepatic stellate cells by targeting transcriptional coactivator p300.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joong-Yeon; Oh, Min-A; Kim, Won Ho; Sohn, Hee-Young; Park, Sang Ick

    2012-03-01

    Liver fibrosis is a common consequence of various chronic liver injuries, including virus infection and ethanol. Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) contribute to liver fibrosis through the accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins, including type I alpha collagen (COL1A). The activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulates HSCs activation, but its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we report that AMPK inhibits transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-induced fibrogenic property of HSCs by regulating transcriptional coactivator p300. We treated human (LX-2) and rat (CFSC-2G) HSC lines with TGF-β to induce fibrogenic activation of HSCs. Pharmacological activation of AMPK by treatment with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR), metformin, or adiponectin lowered TGF-β-induced expression of COL1A and myofibroblast marker alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Transient transduction of constitutively active AMPKα (caAMPKα) was sufficient to attenuate COL1A and α-SMA expression, whereas an AMPK inhibitor considerably abrogated the inhibitory effect of AICAR on fibrogenic gene expression. Although AMPK significantly suppressed Smad-dependent transcription, it did not affect TGF-β-stimulated phosphorylation, nuclear localization, or DNA-binding activity of Smad2/3. AICAR rather attenuated TGF-β-induced Smad3 interaction with transcriptional coactivator p300 accompanying with reduction of Smad3 acetylation. Moreover, AICAR induced not only physical interaction between AMPK and p300 but also proteasomal degradation of p300 protein. Our data provide substantial evidence that AMPK could be a novel therapeutic target for treatment of liver fibrosis, by demonstrating the underlying mechanism of AMPK-induced antifibrotic function in HSCs.

  10. Adenosine-Associated Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi; Ghanem, Amyl; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside in every cell. Many critical treatments such as modulating irregular heartbeat (arrhythmias), regulation of central nervous system (CNS) activity, and inhibiting seizural episodes can be carried out using adenosine. Despite the significant potential therapeutic impact of adenosine and its derivatives, the severe side effects caused by their systemic administration have significantly limited their clinical use. In addition, due to adenosine’s extremely short half-life in human blood (less than 10 s), there is an unmet need for sustained delivery systems to enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. In this paper, various adenosine delivery techniques, including encapsulation into biodegradable polymers, cell-based delivery, implantable biomaterials, and mechanical-based delivery systems, are critically reviewed and the existing challenges are highlighted. PMID:26453156

  11. Evidence for the Calvin cycle and hexose monophosphate pathway in Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Gale, N L; Beck, J V

    1967-10-01

    The enzymes of the Calvin reductive pentose phosphate cycle and the hexose monophosphate pathway have been demonstrated in cell-free extracts of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. This, together with analyses of the products of CO(2) fixation in cell-free systems, suggests that these pathways are operative in whole cells of this microorganism. Nevertheless, the amount of CO(2) fixed in these cell-free systems was limited by the type and amount of compound added as substrate. The inability of cell extracts to regenerate pentose phosphates and to perpetuate the cyclic fixation of CO(2) is partially attributable to low activity of triose phosphate dehydrogenase under the experimental conditions found to be optimal for the enzymes involved in the utilization of ribose-5-phosphate or ribulose-1,5-diphosphate as substrate for CO(2) incorporation. With the exception of ribulose-1,5-diphosphate, all substrates required the addition of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or adenosine diphosphate (ADP) for CO(2) fixation. Under optimal conditions, with ribose-5-phosphate serving as substrate, each micromole of ATP added resulted in the fixation of 1.5 mumoles of CO(2), whereas each micromole of ADP resulted in 0.5 mumole of CO(2) fixed. These values reflect the activity of adenylate kinase in the extract preparations. The K(m) for ATP in the phosphoribulokinase reaction was 0.91 x 10(-3)m. Kinetic studies conducted with carboxydismutase showed K(m) values of 1.15 x 10(-4)m and 5 x 10(-2)m for ribulose-1,5-diphosphate and bicarbonate, respectively.

  12. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa)

    PubMed Central

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5′-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5′-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  13. Fluoroquinolones as potential photochemotherapeutic agents: covalent addition to guanosine monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Fasani, Elisa; Manet, Ilse; Capobianco, Massimo L; Monti, Sandra; Pretali, Luca; Albini, Angelo

    2010-08-21

    The triplet aryl cation photochemically generated from fluoroquinolones bearing a fluoro atom at position 8 attacks guanosine monophosphate (k(r) > 10(9) M(-1)s(-1)) and forms covalent adducts. The reaction is a model for the implementation of oxygen-independent photochemotherapy. PMID:20571620

  14. Studies on structures of lipid A-monophosphate clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faunce, Chester A.; Reichelt, Hendrik; Paradies, Henrich H.

    2011-03-01

    Single crystalline clusters of lipid A-monophosphate were grown from organic dispersions containing 5-15% (v/v) water at various volume fractions, ϕ, and temperatures. The morphology of the single lipid A-monophosphate crystals was either rhombohedral or hexagonal. The hexagonal crystals were needlelike or cylindrical in shape, with the long dimension parallel to the c axis of the unit cell. The crystalline clusters were studied using electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction. Employing molecular location methods following a Rietveld refinement and whole-pattern refinement revealed two monoclinic crystal structures in the space groups P21 and C2, both converged with RF = 0.179. The two monoclinic crystal structures were packing (hydrocarbon chains) and conformational (sugar) polymorphs. Neither of these two structures had been encountered previously. Only intramolecular hydrogen bonding was observed for the polymorphs, which were located between the amide and the carboxyl groups. Another crystalline structure was found in the volume-fraction range 2.00 × 10-3 ≤ ϕ ≤ 2.50 × 10-3, which displayed hexagonal symmetry. The hexagonal symmetry of the self-assembled lipid A-monophosphate crystalline phase might be reconciled with the monoclinic symmetry found at low-volume-fractions. Therefore, lowering the symmetry from cubic, i.e., Ia overline 3d, to rhombohedral R overline 3 m, and finally to the monoclinic space group C2 was acceptable if the lipid A-monophosphate anion was completely orientationally ordered.

  15. Drugs elevating extracellular adenosine promote regeneration of haematopoietic progenitor cells in severely myelosuppressed mice: their comparison and joint effects with the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Vacek, Antonín; Weiterova, Lenka; Holá, Jirina; Vácha, Jirí

    2002-01-01

    We tested capabilities of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine and of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) given alone or in combination to modulate regeneration from severe myelosuppression resulting from combined exposure of mice to ionizing radiation and carboplatin. Elevation of extracellular adenosine was induced by joint administration of dipyridamole (DP), a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), serving as an adenosine prodrug. DP+AMP, G-CSF or all these drugs in combination were administered in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on day 3 after induction of myelosuppression. Comparable enhancements of haematopoietic regeneration due to elevation of extracellular adenosine or to action of G-CSF were demonstrated as shown by elevated numbers of haematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes/macrophages (GM-CFC) and erythrocytes (BFU-E) in the bone marrow and spleen in early time intervals after termination of the drug treatment, i.e. on days 7 and 10 after induction of myelosuppression. Coadministration of all the drugs further potentiated the restoration of progenitor cell pools in the haematopoietic organs. The effects of the drug treatments on progenitor cells were reflected in the peripheral blood in later time intervals of days 15 and 20 after induction of myelosuppression, especially as significantly elevated numbers of granulocytes and less pronounced elevation of lymphocytes and erythrocytes. The results substantiate the potential of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine for clinical utilization in myelosuppressive states, e.g. those accompanying oncological radio- and chemotherapy.

  16. The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase complex mediates glucose regulation of gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tian; Bendrioua, Loubna; Carmena, David; García-Salcedo, Raúl; Dahl, Peter; Carling, David; Hohmann, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls energy homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Here we expressed hetero-trimeric mammalian AMPK complexes in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking all five genes encoding yeast AMPK/SNF1 components. Certain mammalian complexes complemented the growth defect of the yeast mutant on non-fermentable carbon sources. Phosphorylation of the AMPK α1-subunit was glucose-regulated, albeit not by the Glc7-Reg1/2 phosphatase, which performs this function on yeast AMPK/SNF1. AMPK could take over SNF1 function in glucose derepression. While indirectly acting anti-diabetic drugs had no effect on AMPK in yeast, compound 991 stimulated α1-subunit phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate a remarkable functional conservation of AMPK and that glucose regulation of AMPK may not be mediated by regulatory features of a specific phosphatase.

  17. The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase complex mediates glucose regulation of gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tian; Bendrioua, Loubna; Carmena, David; García-Salcedo, Raúl; Dahl, Peter; Carling, David; Hohmann, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls energy homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Here we expressed hetero-trimeric mammalian AMPK complexes in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking all five genes encoding yeast AMPK/SNF1 components. Certain mammalian complexes complemented the growth defect of the yeast mutant on non-fermentable carbon sources. Phosphorylation of the AMPK α1-subunit was glucose-regulated, albeit not by the Glc7-Reg1/2 phosphatase, which performs this function on yeast AMPK/SNF1. AMPK could take over SNF1 function in glucose derepression. While indirectly acting anti-diabetic drugs had no effect on AMPK in yeast, compound 991 stimulated α1-subunit phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate a remarkable functional conservation of AMPK and that glucose regulation of AMPK may not be mediated by regulatory features of a specific phosphatase. PMID:24815694

  18. Glutathione S-transferases interact with AMP-activated protein kinase: evidence for S-glutathionylation and activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Anna; Zorman, Sarah; Berthier, Alexandre; Polge, Cécile; Ramirez, Sacnicte; Michelland, Sylvie; Sève, Michel; Vertommen, Didier; Rider, Mark; Lentze, Nicolas; Auerbach, Daniel; Schlattner, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular and whole body energy sensor with manifold functions in regulating energy homeostasis, cell morphology and proliferation in health and disease. Here we apply multiple, complementary in vitro and in vivo interaction assays to identify several isoforms of glutathione S-transferase (GST) as direct AMPK binding partners: Pi-family member rat GSTP1 and Mu-family members rat GSTM1, as well as Schistosoma japonicum GST. GST/AMPK interaction is direct and involves the N-terminal domain of the AMPK β-subunit. Complex formation of the mammalian GSTP1 and -M1 with AMPK leads to their enzymatic activation and in turn facilitates glutathionylation and activation of AMPK in vitro. GST-facilitated S-glutathionylation of AMPK may be involved in rapid, full activation of the kinase under mildly oxidative physiological conditions.

  19. Traumatic brain injury decreases AMP-activated protein kinase activity and pharmacological enhancement of its activity improves cognitive outcome.

    PubMed

    Hill, Julia L; Kobori, Nobuhide; Zhao, Jing; Rozas, Natalia S; Hylin, Michael J; Moore, Anthony N; Dash, Pramod K

    2016-10-01

    Prolonged metabolic suppression in the brain is a well-characterized secondary pathology of both experimental and clinical traumatic brain injury (TBI). AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) acts as a cellular energy sensor that, when activated, regulates various metabolic and catabolic pathways to decrease ATP consumption and increase ATP synthesis. As energy availability after TBI is suppressed, we questioned if increasing AMPK activity after TBI would improve cognitive outcome. TBI was delivered using the electromagnetic controlled cortical impact model on male Sprague-Dawley rats (275-300 g) and C57BL/6 mice (20-25 g). AMPK activity within the injured parietal cortex and ipsilateral hippocampus was inferred by western blots using phospho-specific antibodies. The consequences of acute manipulation of AMPK signaling on cognitive function were assessed using the Morris water maze task. We found that AMPK activity is decreased as a result of injury, as indicated by reduced AMPK phosphorylation and corresponding changes in the phosphorylation of its downstream targets: ribosomal protein S6 and Akt Substrate of 160 kDa (AS160). Increasing AMPK activity after injury using the drugs 5-amino-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide or metformin did not affect spatial learning, but significantly improved spatial memory. Taken together, our results suggest that decreased AMPK activity after TBI may contribute to the cellular energy crisis in the injured brain, and that AMPK activators may have therapeutic utility. Increased phosphorylation of Thr172 activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) under conditions of low cellular energy availability. This leads to inhibition of energy consuming, while activating energy generating, processes. Hill et al., present data to indicate that TBI decreases Thr172 phosphorylation and that its stimulation by pharmacological agents offers neuroprotection and improves memory. These results suggest that decreased AMPK phosphorylation after

  20. Features of adenosine metabolism of mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Deussen, Andreas; Weichsel, Johannes; Pexa, Annette

    2006-11-01

    Adenosine metabolism and transport were evaluated in the isolated perfused mouse heart and compared with the well-established model of isolated perfused guinea pig heart. Coronary venous release of adenosine under well-oxygenated conditions in the mouse exceeds that in the guinea pig threefold when related to tissue mass. Total myocardial adenosine production rate under this condition was approximately 2 nmol/min per gramme and similar in both species. Coronary resistance vessels of mice are highly sensitive to exogenous adenosine, and the threshold for adenosine-induced vasodilation is approximately 30 nmol/l. Adenosine membrane transport was largely insensitive to nitrobenzyl-thioinosine (NBTI) in mouse heart, which is in contrast to guinea pig and several other species. This indicates the dominance of NBTI-insensitive transporters in mouse heart. For future studies, the assessment of cytosolic and extracellular adenosine metabolism and its relationship with coronary flow will require the use of more effective membrane transport blockers.

  1. RECIPIENT PRETRANSPLANT INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN NONMYELOABLATIVE HCT

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Risler, Linda J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S.; Boeckh, Michael J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5’- monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T-cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation, but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient’s pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient’s sensitivity to MMF, but confirmatory studies are needed. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  2. Selective activation of adenosine A2A receptors on immune cells by a CD73-dependent prodrug suppresses joint inflammation in experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Ulrich; Burghoff, Sandra; van Lent, Peter L E M; Temme, Sebastian; Galbarz, Lisa; Ding, Zhaoping; El-Tayeb, Ali; Huels, Sandra; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Jacoby, Christoph; Müller, Christa E; van den Berg, Wim B; Schrader, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) agonists are both highly effective anti-inflammatory agents and potent vasodilators. To separate these two activities, we have synthesized phosphorylated A(2A)R agonists (prodrugs) that require the presence of ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) to become activated. In the model of collagen-induced arthritis, 2-(cyclohexylethylthio)adenosine 5'-monophosphate (chet-AMP), but not 2-(cyclohexylethylthio)adenosine (chet-adenosine), potently reduced inflammation as assessed by fluorine-19 ((19)F) magnetic resonance imaging and by histology. The prodrug effect was blunted by inhibition of CD73 and A(2A)R. The selectivity of drug action is due to profound up-regulation of CD73 and adenosine A(2A)R expression in neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes as found in recovered cells from the synovial fluid of arthritic mice. Plasma chet-adenosine was in the subnanomolar range when chet-AMP was applied, whereas concentrations required for vasodilation were about 100 times higher. Thus, chet-AMP is a potent immunosuppressant with negligible vasodilatory activity. These data suggest that phosphorylated A(2A)R agonists may serve as a promising new group of drugs for targeted immunotherapy of inflammation. PMID:22875828

  3. Selective activation of adenosine A2A receptors on immune cells by a CD73-dependent prodrug suppresses joint inflammation in experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Ulrich; Burghoff, Sandra; van Lent, Peter L E M; Temme, Sebastian; Galbarz, Lisa; Ding, Zhaoping; El-Tayeb, Ali; Huels, Sandra; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Jacoby, Christoph; Müller, Christa E; van den Berg, Wim B; Schrader, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) agonists are both highly effective anti-inflammatory agents and potent vasodilators. To separate these two activities, we have synthesized phosphorylated A(2A)R agonists (prodrugs) that require the presence of ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) to become activated. In the model of collagen-induced arthritis, 2-(cyclohexylethylthio)adenosine 5'-monophosphate (chet-AMP), but not 2-(cyclohexylethylthio)adenosine (chet-adenosine), potently reduced inflammation as assessed by fluorine-19 ((19)F) magnetic resonance imaging and by histology. The prodrug effect was blunted by inhibition of CD73 and A(2A)R. The selectivity of drug action is due to profound up-regulation of CD73 and adenosine A(2A)R expression in neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes as found in recovered cells from the synovial fluid of arthritic mice. Plasma chet-adenosine was in the subnanomolar range when chet-AMP was applied, whereas concentrations required for vasodilation were about 100 times higher. Thus, chet-AMP is a potent immunosuppressant with negligible vasodilatory activity. These data suggest that phosphorylated A(2A)R agonists may serve as a promising new group of drugs for targeted immunotherapy of inflammation.

  4. Fluorescent ligands for adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Eszter; Jayasekara, P Suresh; Squarcialupi, Lucia; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Federico, Stephanie; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    Interest is increasing in developing fluorescent ligands for characterization of adenosine receptors (ARs), which hold a promise of usefulness in the drug discovery process. The size of a strategically labeled AR ligand can be greatly increased after the attachment of a fluorophore. The choice of dye moiety (e.g. Alexa Fluor 488), attachment point and linker length can alter the selectivity and potency of the parent molecule. Fluorescent derivatives of adenosine agonists and antagonists (e.g. XAC and other heterocyclic antagonist scaffolds) have been synthesized and characterized pharmacologically. Some are useful AR probes for flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and scanning confocal microscopy. Thus, the approach of fluorescent labeled GPCR ligands, including those for ARs, is a growing dynamic research field.

  5. Two chalcones, 4-hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol, stimulate GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake through the LKB1/AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Fujinami, Aya; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Amano, Akiko; Ishigami, Akihito; Tokuda, Harukuni; Suzuki, Nobutaka; Ito, Fumitake; Mori, Taisuke; Sawada, Morio; Iwasa, Koichi; Kitawaki, Jo; Ohnishi, Katsunori; Tsujikawa, Muneo; Obayashi, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    4-Hydroxyderricin (4HD) and xanthoangelol (XAG) are major components of n-hexane/ethyl acetate (5:1) extract of the yellow-colored stem juice of Angelica keiskei. 4-Hydroxyderricin and XAG have been reported to increase glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4)-dependent glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, but the detailed mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. This present study was aimed at clarifying the detailed mechanism by which 4HD and XAG increase GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Both 4HD and XAG increased glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. 4-Hydroxyderricin and XAG also stimulated the phosphorylation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase. In addition, phosphorylation of liver kinase B1 (LKB1), which acts upstream of AMPK, was also increased by 4HD and XAG treatment. Small interfering RNA knockdown of LKB1 attenuated 4HD- and XAG-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and suppressed glucose uptake. These findings demonstrate that 4HD and XAG can increase GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake through the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. PMID:26077869

  6. Trans-Cinnamic Acid Increases Adiponectin and the Phosphorylation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase through G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Christina; Singh, Shiva P.; Regenhard, Petra; Müller, Ute; Sauerwein, Helga; Mielenz, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin and intracellular 5′adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) are important modulators of glucose and fat metabolism. Cinnamon exerts beneficial effects by improving insulin sensitivity and blood lipids, e.g., through increasing adiponectin concentrations and AMPK activation. The underlying mechanism is unknown. The Gi/Go-protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A stimulates adiponectin secretion after binding its ligand niacin. Trans-cinnamic acid (tCA), a compound of cinnamon is another ligand. We hypothesize whether AMPK activation and adiponectin secretion by tCA is transmitted by GPR signaling. Differentiated 3T3-L1 cells were incubated with pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of Gi/Go-protein-coupling, and treated with different tCA concentrations. Treatment with tCA increased adiponectin and the pAMPK/AMPK ratio (p ≤ 0.001). PTX incubation abolished the increased pAMPK/AMPK ratio and adiponectin secretion. The latter remained increased compared to controls (p ≤ 0.002). tCA treatment stimulated adiponectin secretion and AMPK activation; the inhibitory effect of PTX suggests GPR is involved in tCA stimulated signaling. PMID:24557583

  7. Electron transfer between the QmoABC membrane complex and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Américo G; Santos, André A; Pereira, Inês A C

    2016-04-01

    The dissimilatory adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase (AprAB) is a key enzyme in the sulfate reduction pathway that catalyzes the reversible two electron reduction of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) to sulfite and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). The physiological electron donor for AprAB is proposed to be the QmoABC membrane complex, coupling the quinone-pool to sulfate reduction. However, direct electron transfer between these two proteins has never been observed. In this work we demonstrate for the first time direct electron transfer between the Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 QmoABC complex and AprAB. Cyclic voltammetry conducted with the modified Qmo electrode and AprAB in the electrolyte solution presented the Qmo electrochemical signature with two additional well-defined one electron redox processes, attributed to the AprAB FAD redox behavior. Moreover, experiments performed under catalytic conditions using the QmoABC modified electrode, with AprAB and APS in solution, show a catalytic current peak develop in the cathodic wave, attributed to substrate reduction, and which is not observed in the absence of QmoABC. Substrate dependence conducted with different electrode preparations (with and without immobilized Qmo) demonstrated that the QmoABC complex is essential for efficient electron delivery to AprAB, in order to sustain catalysis. These results confirm the role of Qmo in electron transfer to AprAB. PMID:26768116

  8. Role of AMP-activated protein kinase and carbohydrate response element binding protein in the regulation of energy balance in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimeric enzyme complex playing a key role in maintaining intracellular energy balance and, on the whole animal level, regulating energy expenditure and food intake. Once activated by phosphorylation, AMPK phosphorylates a variety of protein targets tha...

  9. [The secretion of adenosin 3',5'-monophosphate after hydrokinetic and ecbolic stimulation in the canine pancreas (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Teufel, H; Boeckmann, U

    1981-05-01

    The secretion of cAMP is studied in vivo and in the isolated perfused canine pancreas after administration of secretin and CCK or caerulein in comparison with hydrokinetic or ecbolic secretory events as well as with the magnitude and time course of changes in tissue cAMP. 1) The total output of cAMP and pancreatic juice shows a significant and positive correlation after stimulation with secretin. The linear correspondence between cAMP concentration and secretory rates of pancreatic juice beyond 3 ml/5 min and their non-linear, reciprocal correlation at lower rates of fluid secretion point to an active as well as to a passive secretory mechanism for cAMP. 2) CCK and caerulein increase secretion of cAMP too. The output of cAMP however neither corresponds to the time course of protein secretion nor correlates quantitatively with the latter. 3) The behaviour of cAMP secretion and concentration in the pancreatic juice after administration of secretin and CCK or caerulein as well as differs from the changes in tissue cAMP levels. The respective maximum of cAMP output after addition of secretin or ecbolic secretagogues during the greatest decrease in cellular cAMP levels yields on the average about 1% of the estimated reduction in total tissue cAMP content. The results indicate a functional coherence in secretion of pancreatic juice and cAMP but oppose the assumption, that essential amounts of cAMP are released during exocytosis of zymogen granules. The secretion of cAMP may be possibly influenced by cytoplasmatic cAMP levels, but neither reflects the present changes in cellular cAMP nor seems to be of a regulatory importance for the latter.

  10. Nature of the effect of adenosine 5'-monophosphate on the cyanide-insensitive respiration in mitochondria of Moniliella tomentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Vanderleyden, J; Van Den Eynde, E; Verachtert, H

    1980-01-01

    The alternative oxidase of Moniliella tomentosa mitochondria is stimulated by 5'-AMP. This effect may be masked, depending on the isolation procedure of the mitochondria. The preparation of submitochondrial particles results in the expression of the 5'-AMP effect. Two more methods are now described to reveal the 5'-AMP effect whenever it would be masked: (1) switching on the myokinase activity of the mitochondria to deplete them of endogenous 5'-AMP; (2) using detergents (sodium dodecyl sulphate, sodium deoxycholate) in a controlled detergent:protein ratio, or chloroform. The alternative oxidase of detergent-solubilized mitochondria was somewhat less selective towards nucleotides than were intact mitochondria. The effect of nucleotides on quinol oxidation by mitochondrial preparations and on quinol autoxidation was also studied. Mitochondrial oxidation of succinate by the alternative oxidase and autoxidation of quinols behaved similarly in the presence of certain nucleotides. Both reactions were stimulated. Both reactions were also inhibited by salicylhydroxamic acid. These effects on quinol oxidation disappeared when bovine serum albumin or mitochondrial proteins were present. From the results obtained it is not possible to exclude quinol autoxidation as a final step of the alternative oxidase. PMID:7189398

  11. [The secretion of adenosin 3',5'-monophosphate after hydrokinetic and ecbolic stimulation in the canine pancreas (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Teufel, H; Boeckmann, U

    1981-05-01

    The secretion of cAMP is studied in vivo and in the isolated perfused canine pancreas after administration of secretin and CCK or caerulein in comparison with hydrokinetic or ecbolic secretory events as well as with the magnitude and time course of changes in tissue cAMP. 1) The total output of cAMP and pancreatic juice shows a significant and positive correlation after stimulation with secretin. The linear correspondence between cAMP concentration and secretory rates of pancreatic juice beyond 3 ml/5 min and their non-linear, reciprocal correlation at lower rates of fluid secretion point to an active as well as to a passive secretory mechanism for cAMP. 2) CCK and caerulein increase secretion of cAMP too. The output of cAMP however neither corresponds to the time course of protein secretion nor correlates quantitatively with the latter. 3) The behaviour of cAMP secretion and concentration in the pancreatic juice after administration of secretin and CCK or caerulein as well as differs from the changes in tissue cAMP levels. The respective maximum of cAMP output after addition of secretin or ecbolic secretagogues during the greatest decrease in cellular cAMP levels yields on the average about 1% of the estimated reduction in total tissue cAMP content. The results indicate a functional coherence in secretion of pancreatic juice and cAMP but oppose the assumption, that essential amounts of cAMP are released during exocytosis of zymogen granules. The secretion of cAMP may be possibly influenced by cytoplasmatic cAMP levels, but neither reflects the present changes in cellular cAMP nor seems to be of a regulatory importance for the latter. PMID:6265337

  12. 3'5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent up-regulation of phosphodiesterase type 3A in porcine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Sasseville, Maxime; Côté, Nancy; Vigneault, Christian; Guillemette, Christine; Richard, François J

    2007-04-01

    The means by which cumulus cells react to gonadotropin stimulation and regulate the subsequent production and degradation of cAMP are largely unknown. In this article, we report that cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) type 3A (Pde3a) is transcriptionally regulated in porcine cumulus cells by a cAMP-dependent pathway during in vitro maturation (IVM). cAMP-PDE activity was increased in the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) after 10 h of IVM, and 78% of this increase was sensitive to a Pde3-specific inhibitor, cilostamide. Although no variation was observed in the oocyte, cilostamide-sensitive cAMP-PDE activity increased in the cumulus cells after IVM. This was supported by Western blotting, which showed that the intensity of a 135-kDa anti-Pde3a immunoreactive band was increased in COC after IVM. The Pde3a mRNA level was up-regulated 28-fold in the COC after 4 h of IVM and remained high up to 12 h. The mRNA up-regulation and increased activity were inhibited by an RNA synthesis inhibitor, alpha-amanitin. The cilostamide-sensitive increase in PDE activity was inhibited by a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. Pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) caused dose-dependent activation of Pde3. The PMSG-dependent increase in Pde3 activity and Pde3a mRNA were mimicked by the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin or prostaglandin E2. PMSG-dependent Pde3 activation was inhibited by the protein kinase A-specific inhibitor H89. Collectively, our results show for the first time that degradation of the intracellular cyclic nucleotide by Pde3a is transcriptionally up-regulated via a cAMP-dependent pathway in cumulus cells, suggesting that it has a functional role during the ovulatory gonadotropin surge.

  13. Assay of adenosine 3',5' cyclic monophosphate by stimulation of protein kinase: a method not involving radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Handa, A.K.; Bressan, R.A.

    1980-03-01

    In order to meet a need for a cAMP assay which is not subject to interference by compounds in plant extracts, and which is suitable for use on occasions separated by many /sup 32/P half-lives, an assay based on cAMP-dependent protein kinase has been developed which does not require the use of (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. Instead of measuring the cAMP-stimulated increase in the rate of transfer of (..gamma..-/sup 32/P) phosphate from (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP to protein, the rate of loss of ATP from the reaction mixture is determined. The ATP remaining after the protein kinase reaction is assayed by ATP-dependent chemiluminescence of the firefly luciferin-luciferase system. Under conditions of the protein kinase reaction in which a readily measurable decrease in ATP concentration occurs, the logarithm of the concentration of ATP decreases in proportion to the cAMP concentration, i.e., the reaction can be described by the equation: (ATP) = (ATP)/sub 0/ e/sup -(cAMP)kt/. The assay based on this relationship can detect less than 1 pmol of cAMP. The levels of cAMP found with this assay after partial purification of the cAMP from rat tissue, algal cells, and the media in which the cells were grown agreed with measurements made by the cAMP binding-competition assay of Gilman, and the potein kinase stimulation assay based on transfer of (/sup 32/P) phosphate from (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP to protein. All of the enzymes and chemicals required for the assay of cAMP by protein kinase catalyzed loss of ATP can be stored frozen for months, making the assay suitable for occasional use.

  14. The reversal of glucose repressed prodigiosin production in Serratia marcescens by the cyclic 3'5'-adenosine monophosphate inhibitor theophylline.

    PubMed

    Clements-Jewery, S

    1976-04-15

    Glucose was found to cause severe repression of prodigiosin production in Serratia marcescens and a dose related partial reversal was demonstrated by theophylline. It is suggested that this reversal is due to the inhibition of cAMP phosphodiesterase and the concomitant increase in cellular cAMP concentration.

  15. Role of 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate on the epidermal growth factor dependent survival in mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Grinman, Diego Y; Romorini, Leonardo; Presman, Diego M; Rocha-Viegas, Luciana; Coso, Omar A; Davio, Carlos; Pecci, Adali

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been suggested to play a key role in the maintenance of epithelial cell survival during lactation. Previously, we demonstrated that EGF dependent activation of PI3K pathway prevents apoptosis in confluent murine HC11 cells cultured under low nutrient conditions. The EGF protective effect is associated with increased levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-XL. Here, we identify the EGF-dependent mechanism involved in cell survival that converges in the regulation of bcl-X expression by activated CREB. EGF induces Bcl-XL expression through activation of a unique bcl-X promoter, the P1; being not only the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway but also the increase in cAMP levels and the concomitant PKA/CREB activation necessary for both bcl-XL upregulation and apoptosis avoidance. Results presented in this work suggest the existence of a novel connection between the EGF receptor and the adenylate cyclase that would have an impact in preventing apoptosis under low nutrient conditions.

  16. Nonnucleoside inhibitors of adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2004-01-01

    Adenosine (ADO) is an endogenous inhibitory neuromodulator that increases nociceptive thresholds in response to tissue trauma and inflammation. Adenosine kinase (AK) is a key intracellular enzyme regulating intra- and extracellular concentrations of ADO. AK inhibition selectively amplifies extracellular ADO levels at cell and tissue sites where accelerated release of ADO occurs. AK inhibitors have been shown to provide effective antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and anticonvulsant activity in animal models, thus suggesting their potential therapeutic utility for pain, inflammation, epilepsy and possibly other central and peripheral nervous system diseases associated with cellular trauma and inflammation. This beneficial outcome may potentially lack nonspecific effects associated with the systemic administration of ADO receptor agonists. Until recently all of the reported AK inhibitors contained adenosine-like structural motif. The present review will discuss design, synthesis and analgesic and antiinflammatory properties of the novel nonnucleoside AK inhibitors that do not have close structural resemblance with the natural substrate ADO. Two classes of the nonnucleoside AK inhibitors are built on pyridopyrimidine and alkynylpyrimidine cores.

  17. Nucleic acid molecules encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Lange, Bernd M.

    2001-01-01

    A cDNA encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (IPK) from peppermint (Mentha x piperita) has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:1) is provided which codes for the expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (SEQ ID NO:2), from peppermint (Mentha x piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase in plants in order to enhance the production of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or isoprenoids derived therefrom, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or the production of its products.

  18. Optimization of benzoxazole-based inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Kavitha, Mandapati; Zhang, Minjia; Chin, James En Wai; Liu, Xiaoping; Striepen, Boris; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D

    2013-05-23

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an enteric protozoan parasite that has emerged as a major cause of diarrhea, malnutrition, and gastroenteritis and poses a potential bioterrorism threat. C. parvum synthesizes guanine nucleotides from host adenosine in a streamlined pathway that relies on inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). We have previously identified several parasite-selective C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) inhibitors by high-throughput screening. In this paper, we report the structure-activity relationship (SAR) for a series of benzoxazole derivatives with many compounds demonstrating CpIMPDH IC50 values in the nanomolar range and >500-fold selectivity over human IMPDH (hIMPDH). Unlike previously reported CpIMPDH inhibitors, these compounds are competitive inhibitors versus NAD(+). The SAR study reveals that pyridine and other small heteroaromatic substituents are required at the 2-position of the benzoxazole for potent inhibitory activity. In addition, several other SAR conclusions are highlighted with regard to the benzoxazole and the amide portion of the inhibitor, including preferred stereochemistry. An X-ray crystal structure of a representative E·IMP·inhibitor complex is also presented. Overall, the secondary amine derivative 15a demonstrated excellent CpIMPDH inhibitory activity (IC50 = 0.5 ± 0.1 nM) and moderate stability (t1/2 = 44 min) in mouse liver microsomes. Compound 73, the racemic version of 15a, also displayed superb antiparasitic activity in a Toxoplasma gondii strain that relies on CpIMPDH (EC50 = 20 ± 20 nM), and selectivity versus a wild-type T. gondii strain (200-fold). No toxicity was observed (LD50 > 50 μM) against a panel of four mammalian cells lines.

  19. Altered energy state reversibly controls smooth muscle contractile function in human saphenous vein during acute hypoxia-reoxygenation: Role of glycogen, AMP-activated protein kinase, and insulin-independent glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Pyla, Rajkumar; Pichavaram, Prahalathan; Fairaq, Arwa; Park, Mary Anne; Kozak, Mark; Kamath, Vinayak; Patel, Vijay S; Segar, Lakshman

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxia is known to promote vasodilation of coronary vessels through several mediators including cardiac-derived adenosine and endothelium-derived prostanoids and nitric oxide. To date, the impact of endogenous glycogen depletion in vascular smooth muscle and the resultant alterations in cellular energy state (e.g., AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPK) on the contractile response to G protein-coupled receptor agonists (e.g., serotonin, 5-HT) has not yet been studied. In the present study, ex vivo exposure of endothelium-denuded human saphenous vein rings to hypoxic and glucose-deprived conditions during KCl-induced contractions for 30 min resulted in a marked depletion of endogenous glycogen by ∼80% (from ∼1.78 μmol/g under normoxia to ∼0.36 μmol/g under hypoxia). Importantly, glycogen-depleted HSV rings, which were maintained under hypoxia/reoxygenation and glucose-deprived conditions, exhibited significant increases in basal AMPK phosphorylation (∼6-fold ↑) and 5-HT-induced AMPK phosphorylation (∼19-fold ↑) with an accompanying suppression of 5-HT-induced maximal contractile response (∼68% ↓), compared with respective controls. Exposure of glycogen-depleted HSV rings to exogenous D-glucose, but not the inactive glucose analogs, prevented the exaggerated increase in 5-HT-induced AMPK phosphorylation and restored 5-HT-induced maximal contractile response. In addition, the ability of exogenous D-glucose to rescue cellular stress and impaired contractile function occurred through GLUT1-mediated but insulin/GLUT4-independent mechanisms. Together, the present findings from clinically-relevant human saphenous vein suggest that the loss of endogenous glycogen in vascular smooth muscle and the resultant accentuation of AMPK phosphorylation by GPCR agonists may constitute a yet another mechanism of metabolic vasodilation of coronary vessels in ischemic heart disease.

  20. Altered energy state reversibly controls smooth muscle contractile function in human saphenous vein during acute hypoxia-reoxygenation: Role of glycogen, AMP-activated protein kinase, and insulin-independent glucose uptake

    PubMed Central

    Pyla, Rajkumar; Pichavaram, Prahalathan; Fairaq, Arwa; Park, Mary Anne; Kozak, Mark; Kamath, Vinayak; Patel, Vijay S.; Segar, Lakshman

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is known to promote vasodilation of coronary vessels through several mediators including cardiac-derived adenosine and endothelium-derived prostanoids and nitric oxide. To date, the impact of endogenous glycogen depletion in vascular smooth muscle and the resultant alterations in cellular energy state (e.g., AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPK) on the contractile response to G protein-coupled receptor agonists (e.g., serotonin, 5-HT) has not yet been studied. In the present study, ex vivo exposure of endothelium-denuded human saphenous vein rings to hypoxic and glucose-deprived conditions during KCl-induced contractions for 30 min resulted in a marked depletion of endogenous glycogen by ~80% (from ~1.78 μmol/g under normoxia to ~0.36 μmol/g under hypoxia). Importantly, glycogen-depleted HSV rings, which were maintained under hypoxia/reoxygenation and glucose-deprived conditions, exhibited significant increases in basal AMPK phosphorylation (~6-fold ↑) and 5-HT-induced AMPK phosphorylation (~19-fold ↑) with an accompanying suppression of 5-HT-induced maximal contractile response (~68% ↓), compared with respective controls. Exposure of glycogen-depleted HSV rings to exogenous D-glucose, but not the inactive glucose analogs, prevented the exaggerated increase in 5-HT-induced AMPK phosphorylation and restored 5-HT-induced maximal contractile response. In addition, the ability of exogenous D-glucose to rescue cellular stress and impaired contractile function occurred through GLUT1-mediated but insulin/GLUT4-independent mechanisms. Together, the present findings from clinically-relevant human saphenous vein suggest that the loss of endogenous glycogen in vascular smooth muscle and the resultant accentuation of AMPK phosphorylation by GPCR agonists may constitute a yet another mechanism of metabolic vasodilation of coronary vessels in ischemic heart disease. PMID:26212549

  1. Caffeine promotes autophagy in skeletal muscle cells by increasing the calcium-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Mathew, T S; Ferris, R K; Downs, R M; Kinsey, S T; Baumgarner, B L

    2014-10-24

    Caffeine has been shown to promote calcium-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and AMPK-dependent glucose and fatty acid uptake in mammalian skeletal muscle. Though caffeine has been shown to promote autophagy in various mammalian cell lines it is unclear if caffeine-induced autophagy is related to the calcium-dependent activation of AMPK. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of calcium-dependent AMPK activation in regulating caffeine-induced autophagy in mammalian skeletal muscle cells. We discovered that the addition of the AMPK inhibitor Compound C could significantly reduce the expression of the autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3b-II (LC3b-II) and autophagic vesicle accumulation in caffeine treated skeletal muscle cells. Additional experiments using pharmacological inhibitors and RNA interference (RNAi) demonstrated that the calcium/calmodulin-activated protein kinases CaMKKβ and CaMKII contributed to the AMPK-dependent expression of LC3b-II and autophagic vesicle accumulation in a caffeine dose-dependent manner. Our results indicate that in skeletal muscle cells caffeine increases autophagy by promoting the calcium-dependent activation of AMPK.

  2. Skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation parallels metabolic phenotype in leptin transgenic mice under dietary modification.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Hidaka, Shuji; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Yasue, Shintaro; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Ebihara, Ken; Chusho, Hideki; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Taro; Sato, Kenji; Miyanaga, Fumiko; Fujimoto, Muneya; Tomita, Tsutomu; Kusakabe, Toru; Kobayashi, Nozomi; Tanioka, Hideki; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Hosoda, Kiminori; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu; Sakata, Toshiie; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2005-08-01

    Leptin augments glucose and lipid metabolism independent of its effect on satiety. Administration of leptin in rodents increases skeletal muscle beta-oxidation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). We previously reported that, as hyperleptinemic as obese human subjects, transgenic skinny mice overexpressing leptin in liver (LepTg) exhibit enhanced insulin sensitivity and lipid clearance. To assess skeletal muscle AMPK activity in leptin-sensitive and -insensitive states, we examined phosphorylation of AMPK and its target, acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), in muscles from LepTg under dietary modification. Here we show that phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC are chronically augmented in LepTg soleus muscle, with a concomitant increase in the AMP-to-ATP ratio and a significant decrease in tissue triglyceride content. Despite preexisting hyperleptinemia, high-fat diet (HFD)-fed LepTg develop obesity, insulin-resistance, and hyperlipidemia. In parallel, elevated soleus AMPK and ACC phosphorylation in regular diet-fed LepTg is attenuated, and tissue triglyceride content is increased in those given HFD. Of note, substitution of HFD with regular diet causes a robust recovery of soleus AMPK and ACC phosphorylation in LepTg, with a higher rate of body weight reduction and a regain of insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, soleus AMPK and ACC phosphorylation in LepTg changes in parallel with its insulin sensitivity under dietary modification, suggesting a close association between skeletal muscle AMPK activity and sensitivity to leptin.

  3. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators from Myristica fragrans (nutmeg) and their anti-obesity effect.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi Hung; Le, Thi Van Thu; Kang, Hu Won; Chae, Jooyoung; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kwon, Kwang-iI; Seo, Dae Bang; Lee, Sang Jun; Oh, Won Keun

    2010-07-15

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic syndrome including obesity and type-2 diabetes. As part of an ongoing search for new AMPK activators from plants, this study found that the total extract of Myristica fragrans (nutmeg) activated the AMPK enzyme in differentiated C2C12 cells. As active constituents, seven 2,5-bis-aryl-3,4-dimethyltetrahydrofuran lignans, tetrahydrofuroguaiacin B (1), saucernetindiol (2), verrucosin (3), nectandrin B (4), nectandrin A (5), fragransin C(1) (6), and galbacin (7) were isolated from this extract. Among the isolates, compounds 1, 4, and 5 at 5 microM produced strong AMPK stimulation in differentiated C2C12 cells. In addition, the preventive effect of a tetrahydrofuran mixture (THF) on weight gain in a diet-induced animal model was further examined. These results suggest that nutmeg and its active constituents can be used not only for the development of agents to treat obesity and possibly type-2 diabetes but may also be beneficial for other metabolic disorders.

  4. AMP-Activated Kinase Regulates Lipid Droplet Localization and Stability of Adipose Triglyceride Lipase in C. elegans Dauer Larvae.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meng; Roy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Animals have developed diverse mechanisms to adapt to their changing environment. Like many organisms the free-living nematode C. elegans can alternate between a reproductive mode or a diapause-like "dauer" stage during larval development to circumvent harsh environmental conditions. The master metabolic regulator AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is critical for survival during the dauer stage, where it phosphorylates adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL-1) at multiple sites to block lipid hydrolysis and ultimately protect the cellular triglyceride-based energy depot from rapid depletion. However, how the AMPK-mediated phosphorylation affects the function of ATGL-1 has not been characterised at the molecular level. Here we show that AMPK phosphorylation leads to the generation of 14-3-3 binding sites on ATGL-1, which are recognized by the C. elegans 14-3-3 protein orthologue PAR-5. Physical interaction of ATGL-1 with PAR-5 results in sequestration of ATGL-1 away from the lipid droplets and eventual proteasome-mediated degradation. In addition, we also show that the major AMPK phosphorylation site on ATGL-1, Ser 303, is required for both modification of its lipid droplet localization and its degradation. Our data provide mechanistic insight as to how AMPK functions to enhance survival through its ability to protect the accumulated triglyceride deposits from rapid hydrolysis to preserve the energy stores during periods of extended environmental duress. PMID:26098762

  5. Rheum palmatum L. Attenuates High Fat Diet-Induced Hepatosteatosis by Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingxing; Li, Xiumin; Zeng, Xin; Ou, Zhimin; Xue, Mei; Gao, Dehong; Liu, Suhuan; Li, Xuejun; Yang, Shuyu

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common metabolic disorder characterized by the accumulation of excess fat in the liver. Rheum palmatumL. (RP) decoctions have been reported to ameliorate NAFLD. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects and underlying mechanisms of RP in fatty liver disease induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) in rats. Low and high doses of aqueous RP extraction were orally administered to HFD-fed rats for six weeks. Body weight, tissue weight, glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance, hepatic morphology, and liver triglyceride (TG) content were assessed. The effects of RP on the expressions of lipogenic and lipolysis genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. The phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) was determined by Western blotting. Treatment with low-dose RP significantly reduced liver weight, liver TG content, and improved glucose tolerance in HFD-fed rats. Consistently, RP attenuated excess fat accumulation and downregulated the expression of lipogenic genes in the liver. Further, an increased phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC was observed. These findings suggest that low-dose RP alleviates hepatosteatosis, at least in part, by stimulating AMPK activity.

  6. Inhibition of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase at the Allosteric Drug-Binding Site Promotes Islet Insulin Release.

    PubMed

    Scott, John W; Galic, Sandra; Graham, Kate L; Foitzik, Richard; Ling, Naomi X Y; Dite, Toby A; Issa, Samah M A; Langendorf, Chris G; Weng, Qing Ping; Thomas, Helen E; Kay, Thomas W; Birnberg, Neal C; Steinberg, Gregory R; Kemp, Bruce E; Oakhill, Jonathan S

    2015-06-18

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic stress-sensing αβγ heterotrimer responsible for energy homeostasis. Pharmacological inhibition of AMPK is regarded as a therapeutic strategy in some disease settings including obesity and cancer; however, the broadly used direct AMPK inhibitor compound C suffers from poor selectivity. We have discovered a dihydroxyquinoline drug (MT47-100) with novel AMPK regulatory properties, being simultaneously a direct activator and inhibitor of AMPK complexes containing the β1 or β2 isoform, respectively. Allosteric inhibition by MT47-100 was dependent on the β2 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and determined by three non-conserved CBM residues (Ile81, Phe91, Ile92), but was independent of β2-Ser108 phosphorylation. Whereas MT47-100 regulation of total cellular AMPK activity was determined by β1/β2 expression ratio, MT47-100 augmented glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from isolated mouse pancreatic islets via a β2-dependent mechanism. Our findings highlight the therapeutic potential of isoform-specific AMPK allosteric inhibitors. PMID:26091167

  7. Viola mandshurica ethanolic extract prevents high-fat-diet-induced obesity in mice by activating AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yoon-Young; Kim, Dong-Seon; Kim, Ho Kyoung

    2014-07-01

    Viola mandshurica W. Becker has been used as an expectorant, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory agent. We evaluated the effects of V. mandshurica ethanol extract (VME) on high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity in mice. HPLC analysis showed that the VME contained 11.95 ± 0.37 mg/g esculetin and 0.13 ± 0.01 mg/g scopoletin. Orally administered VME decreased the body weight, adipose tissue mass, adipocyte size, and triglyceride and leptin serum concentrations. In contrast, VME increased serum adiponectin concentrations and adiponectin expression levels in epididymal adipose tissues. VME also significantly reversed the HFD-induced elevation of the mRNA and protein levels of lipogenic genes such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, fatty-acid synthase, and adipocyte protein 2. Moreover, VME reversed the HFD-induced inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-coA carboxylase phosphorylation in epididymal adipose tissues. Furthermore, treatment of VME and esculetin in 3T3-L1 cells inhibited adipocyte differentiation and fat accumulation. These results suggest that VME exerts anti-obesity effects in HFD-induced obese mice by activating AMPK and suppressing PPARγ expression in adipose tissues.

  8. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin.

  9. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates Oxidative Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans through the NHR-49 and MDT-15 Transcriptional Regulators.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Arriola, Elizabeth; El Hafidi, Mohammed; Ortega-Cuéllar, Daniel; Carvajal, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Cellular energy regulation relies on complex signaling pathways that respond to fuel availability and metabolic demands. Dysregulation of these networks is implicated in the development of human metabolic diseases such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. In Caenorhabditis elegans the AMP-activated protein kinase, AAK, has been associated with longevity and stress resistance; nevertheless its precise role in energy metabolism remains elusive. In the present study, we find an evolutionary conserved role of AAK in oxidative metabolism. Similar to mammals, AAK is activated by AICAR and metformin and leads to increased glycolytic and oxidative metabolic fluxes evidenced by an increase in lactate levels and mitochondrial oxygen consumption and a decrease in total fatty acids and lipid storage, whereas augmented glucose availability has the opposite effects. We found that these changes were largely dependent on the catalytic subunit AAK-2, since the aak-2 null strain lost the observed metabolic actions. Further results demonstrate that the effects due to AAK activation are associated to SBP-1 and NHR-49 transcriptional factors and MDT-15 transcriptional co-activator, suggesting a regulatory pathway that controls oxidative metabolism. Our findings establish C. elegans as a tractable model system to dissect the relationship between distinct molecules that play a critical role in the regulation of energy metabolism in human metabolic diseases.

  10. Matrine-induced autophagy regulated by p53 through AMP-activated protein kinase in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shan-Bu; He, Xing-Xing; Yao, Shu-Kun

    2015-08-01

    Matrine, one of the main extract components of Sophora flavescens, has been shown to exhibit inhibitory effects on some tumors through autophagy. However, the mechanism underlying the effect of matrine remains unclear. The cultured human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 and SMMC‑7721 were treated with matrine. Signal transduction and gene expression profile were determined. Matrine stimulated autophagy in SMMC‑7721 cells in a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent manner, but in an mTOR-independent manner in HepG2 cells. Next, in HepG2 cells, autophagy induced by matrine was regulated by p53 inactivation through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling transduction, then AMPK suppression switched autophagy to apoptosis. Furthermore, the interferon (IFN)-inducible genes, including interferon α-inducible protein 27 (IFI27) and interferon induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1), which are downstream effector of p53, might be modulated by matrine-induced autophagy. In addition, we found that the p53 protein isoforms, p53β, p53γ, ∆133p53, and ∆133p53γ, due to alternative splicing of intron 9, might be regulated by the p53-mediated autophagy. These results show that matrine induces autophagy in human hepatoma cells through a novel mechanism, which is p53/AMPK signaling pathway involvement in matrine-promoted autophagy.

  11. Inhibition of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase at the Allosteric Drug-Binding Site Promotes Islet Insulin Release.

    PubMed

    Scott, John W; Galic, Sandra; Graham, Kate L; Foitzik, Richard; Ling, Naomi X Y; Dite, Toby A; Issa, Samah M A; Langendorf, Chris G; Weng, Qing Ping; Thomas, Helen E; Kay, Thomas W; Birnberg, Neal C; Steinberg, Gregory R; Kemp, Bruce E; Oakhill, Jonathan S

    2015-06-18

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic stress-sensing αβγ heterotrimer responsible for energy homeostasis. Pharmacological inhibition of AMPK is regarded as a therapeutic strategy in some disease settings including obesity and cancer; however, the broadly used direct AMPK inhibitor compound C suffers from poor selectivity. We have discovered a dihydroxyquinoline drug (MT47-100) with novel AMPK regulatory properties, being simultaneously a direct activator and inhibitor of AMPK complexes containing the β1 or β2 isoform, respectively. Allosteric inhibition by MT47-100 was dependent on the β2 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and determined by three non-conserved CBM residues (Ile81, Phe91, Ile92), but was independent of β2-Ser108 phosphorylation. Whereas MT47-100 regulation of total cellular AMPK activity was determined by β1/β2 expression ratio, MT47-100 augmented glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from isolated mouse pancreatic islets via a β2-dependent mechanism. Our findings highlight the therapeutic potential of isoform-specific AMPK allosteric inhibitors.

  12. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. PMID:27348124

  13. Adiponectin enhances bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell resistance to flow shear stress through AMP-activated protein kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Fan, Chongxi; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dongjin; Deng, Chao; Hu, Wei; Ma, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Di, Shouyi; Qin, Zhigang; Lv, Jianjun; Sun, Yang; Yi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin has been demonstrated to protect the cardiovascular system and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). However, it is unclear whether adiponectin can protect BMSCs against flow shear stress (FSS). In this study, our aim was to explore the effects of adiponectin on BMSCs and to explore the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling in this process. Shear stress significantly inhibits the survival and increases the apoptosis of BMSCs in an intensity-dependent manner. The expression levels of TGF-β, bFGF, VEGF, PDGF, and Bcl2 are simultaneously reduced, and the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and ACC, as well as the expression level of Bax, are increased. Supplementation with adiponectin promotes the survival of BMSCs; reverses the changes in the expression levels of TGF-β, bFGF, VEGF, PDGF, Bcl2, and Bax; and further amplifies the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC. Furthermore, the protective effects of adiponectin can be partially neutralized by AMPK siRNA. In summary, we have demonstrated for the first time that adiponectin can effectively protect BMSCs from FSS and that this effect depends, at least in part, on the activation of AMPK signaling. PMID:27418435

  14. The hypotensive effect of acute and chronic AMP-activated protein kinase activation in normal and hyperlipidemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Fiona H.; Ewart, Marie-Ann; McNaughton, Eilidh; Cooney, Josephine; Spickett, Corinne M.; Kennedy, Simon

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is present in the arterial wall and is activated in response to cellular stressors that raise AMP relative to ADP/ATP. Activation of AMPK in vivo lowers blood pressure but the influence of hyperlipidemia on this response has not been studied. ApoE−/− mice on high fat diet for 6 weeks and age-matched controls were treated with the AMPK activator, AICAR daily for two weeks. Under anesthesia, the carotid artery was cannulated for blood pressure measurements. Aortic tissue was removed for in vitro functional experiments and AMPK activity was measured in artery homogenates by Western blotting. ApoE−/− mice had significantly raised mean arterial pressure; chronic AICAR treatment normalized this but had no effect in normolipidemic mice, whereas acute administration of AICAR lowered mean arterial pressure in both groups. Chronic AICAR treatment increased phosphorylation of AMPK and its downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase in normolipidemic but not ApoE−/− mice. In aortic rings, AMPK activation induced vasodilation and an anticontractile effect, which was attenuated in ApoE−/− mice. This study demonstrates that hyperlipidemia dysregulates the AMPK pathway in the arterial wall but this effect can be reversed by AMPK activation, possibly through improving vessel compliance. PMID:26196300

  15. Oolong, black and pu-erh tea suppresses adiposity in mice via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yoko; Wang, Liuqing; Wang, Lihua; Tanaka, Yuki; Zhang, Tianshun; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that tea has a variety of beneficial impacts on human health, including anti-obesity effects. It is well documented that green tea and its constituent catechins suppress obesity, but the effects of other types of tea on obesity and the potential mechanisms involved are not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigated the suppression of adiposity by oolong, black and pu-erh tea and characterized the underlying molecular mechanism in vivo. We found that the consumption of oolong, black or pu-erh tea for a period of one week significantly decreased visceral fat without affecting body weight in male ICR mice. On a mechanistic level, the consumption of tea enhanced the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in white adipose tissue (WAT). This was accompanied by the induction of WAT protein levels of uncoupling protein 1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1. Our results indicate that oolong, black and pu-erh tea, and in particular, black tea, suppresses adiposity via phosphorylation of the key metabolic regulator AMPK and increases browning of WAT. PMID:25098399

  16. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. PMID:27348124

  17. The imidazoline compound RX871024 promotes insulinoma cell death independent of AMP-activated protein kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zaitseva, Irina I; Zaitsev, Sergei V; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2016-08-01

    We have previously shown that the insulinotropic imidazoline compound RX871024 induces death of insulinoma MIN6 cells, an effect involving stimulation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and caspase 3. It has also been reported that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activates JNK and induces β-cell death. Here we show that RX871024, but not another insulinotropic imidazoline compound (BL11282), suppressed AMPK activity in MIN6 cells. The inhibitory effect of RX871024 on AMPK was supported by the observation that the imidazoline induced lipid droplet formation in the cytoplasm of MIN6 cells. This reflects stimulation of anabolic pathways and inhibition of catabolic pathways in the cell that happen under conditions when AMPK is inhibited. Activation of AMPK by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) elevated basal and cytokine-induced death in primary β-cells and in insulinoma MIN6 cells. RX871024 aggravated AICAR-induced insulinoma MIN6 cell death regardless of the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The specific cytotoxic effect of imidazoline compound RX871024 on insulinoma cell death but not primary β-cell death is independent of its action on AMPK and may suggest the possibility of using this type of compound in the treatment of insulinomas. PMID:27221730

  18. Mechanical stretch activates mammalian target of rapamycin and AMP-activated protein kinase pathways in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Naoya; Kawano, Fuminori; Nakata, Ken

    2015-08-01

    Cellular protein synthesis is believed to be antagonistically regulated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined the relationship between mTOR/p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) and AMPK in response to mechanical stretch. C2C12 myoblasts were grown on a silicone elastomer chamber to confluence and further cultured in differentiation medium for 4 days to form multinucleated myotubes. Cells were subjected to 15% cyclic uniaxial stretch for 4 h at a frequency of 1 Hz. Phosphorylation of p70S6K at threonine 389 and AMPK at threonine 172 of the catalytic α subunit were concomitantly increased by mechanical stretch. Stimulation of the mTOR pathway by adding leucine and insulin increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K without inactivation of AMPK. In contrast, addition of compound C, a pharmacological inhibitor of AMPK, increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K in stretched cells. Activation of AMPK by the addition of 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide ribonucleoside reduced the phosphorylation of p70S6K in response to mechanical stretch. In conclusion, crosstalk between mTOR and AMPK signaling was not tightly regulated in response to physiological stimuli, such as mechanical stress and/or nutrients. However, pharmacological modulation of AMPK influenced the mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway. PMID:25971373

  19. Novel epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) analogs activate AMP-activated protein kinase pathway and target cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Pamu, Sreedhar; Cui, Qiuzhi; Chan, Tak Hang; Dou, Q Ping

    2012-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a critical monitor of cellular energy status and also controls processes related to tumor development, including cell cycle progression, protein synthesis, cell growth and survival. Therefore AMPK as an anti-cancer target has received intensive attention recently. It has been reported that the anti-diabetic drug metformin and some natural compounds, such as quercetin, genistein, capsaicin and green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), can activate AMPK and inhibit cancer cell growth. Indeed, natural products have been the most productive source of leads for the development of anti-cancer drugs but perceived disadvantages, such as low bioavailability and week potency, have limited their development and use in the clinic. In this study we demonstrated that synthetic EGCG analogs 4 and 6 were more potent AMPK activators than metformin and EGCG. Activation of AMPK by these EGCG analogs resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation, up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, down-regulation of mTOR pathway, and suppression of stem cell population in human breast cancer cells. Our findings suggest that novel potent and specific AMPK activators can be discovered from natural and synthetic sources that have potential to be used for anti-cancer therapy in the clinic. PMID:22459208

  20. Dibenzoylmethane Exerts Metabolic Activity through Regulation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK)-Mediated Glucose Uptake and Adipogenesis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nami; Kim, Hong Min; Lee, Eun Soo; Lee, Jung Ok; Lee, Hye Jeong; Lee, Soo Kyung; Moon, Ji Wook; Kim, Ji Hae; Kim, Joong Kwan; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sun Hwa; Chung, Choon Hee; Kim, Hyeon Soo

    2015-01-01

    Dibenzoylmethane (DBM) has been shown to exert a variety of beneficial effects on human health. However, the mechanism of action is poorly understood. In this study, DBM increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and stimulated glucose uptake in a skeletal muscle cell line. Both knockdown of AMPK with siRNA and inhibition with AMPK inhibitor blocked DBM-induced glucose uptake. DBM increased the concentration of intracellular calcium and glucose uptake due to DBM was abolished by STO-609 (a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase inhibitor). DBM stimulated phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), which was blocked by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. The expression of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) was increased by DBM. The translocation of GLUT4 to the plasma membrane was also increased by DBM in AMPK dependently. In addition, DBM suppressed weight gain and prevented fat accumulation in the liver and abdomen in mice fed a high-fat diet. In pre-adipocyte cells, DBM decreased the activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid synthesis. Expression of the adipogenic gene, fatty acid synthase (FAS), was suppressed by DBM in an AMPK-dependent manner. These results showed that the beneficial metabolic effects of DBM might be due to regulation of glucose uptake via AMPK in skeletal muscle and inhibition of adipogenesis in pre-adipocytes. PMID:25756788

  1. Adiponectin enhances bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell resistance to flow shear stress through AMP-activated protein kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lin; Fan, Chongxi; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dongjin; Deng, Chao; Hu, Wei; Ma, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Di, Shouyi; Qin, Zhigang; Lv, Jianjun; Sun, Yang; Yi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin has been demonstrated to protect the cardiovascular system and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). However, it is unclear whether adiponectin can protect BMSCs against flow shear stress (FSS). In this study, our aim was to explore the effects of adiponectin on BMSCs and to explore the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling in this process. Shear stress significantly inhibits the survival and increases the apoptosis of BMSCs in an intensity-dependent manner. The expression levels of TGF-β, bFGF, VEGF, PDGF, and Bcl2 are simultaneously reduced, and the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and ACC, as well as the expression level of Bax, are increased. Supplementation with adiponectin promotes the survival of BMSCs; reverses the changes in the expression levels of TGF-β, bFGF, VEGF, PDGF, Bcl2, and Bax; and further amplifies the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC. Furthermore, the protective effects of adiponectin can be partially neutralized by AMPK siRNA. In summary, we have demonstrated for the first time that adiponectin can effectively protect BMSCs from FSS and that this effect depends, at least in part, on the activation of AMPK signaling. PMID:27418435

  2. AMP-Activated Kinase Regulates Lipid Droplet Localization and Stability of Adipose Triglyceride Lipase in C. elegans Dauer Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Meng; Roy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Animals have developed diverse mechanisms to adapt to their changing environment. Like many organisms the free-living nematode C. elegans can alternate between a reproductive mode or a diapause-like "dauer" stage during larval development to circumvent harsh environmental conditions. The master metabolic regulator AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is critical for survival during the dauer stage, where it phosphorylates adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL-1) at multiple sites to block lipid hydrolysis and ultimately protect the cellular triglyceride-based energy depot from rapid depletion. However, how the AMPK-mediated phosphorylation affects the function of ATGL-1 has not been characterised at the molecular level. Here we show that AMPK phosphorylation leads to the generation of 14-3-3 binding sites on ATGL-1, which are recognized by the C. elegans 14-3-3 protein orthologue PAR-5. Physical interaction of ATGL-1 with PAR-5 results in sequestration of ATGL-1 away from the lipid droplets and eventual proteasome-mediated degradation. In addition, we also show that the major AMPK phosphorylation site on ATGL-1, Ser 303, is required for both modification of its lipid droplet localization and its degradation. Our data provide mechanistic insight as to how AMPK functions to enhance survival through its ability to protect the accumulated triglyceride deposits from rapid hydrolysis to preserve the energy stores during periods of extended environmental duress. PMID:26098762

  3. Resveratrol up-regulates AMPA receptor expression via AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated protein translation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guan; Amato, Stephen; Gilbert, James; Man, Heng-Ye

    2015-08-01

    Resveratrol is a phytoalexin that confers overall health benefits including positive regulation in brain function such as learning and cognition. However, whether and how resveratrol affects synaptic activity remains largely unknown. α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) are glutamatergic receptors that mediate the majority of fast excitatory transmission and synaptic plasticity, and thus play a critical role in higher brain functions, including learning and memory. We find that in rat primary neurons, resveratrol can rapidly increase AMPAR protein level, AMPAR synaptic accumulation and the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission. The resveratrol effect on AMPAR protein expression is independent of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), the conventional downstream target of resveratrol, but rather is mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and subsequent downstream phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling. Application of the AMPK specific activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) mimics the effects of resveratrol on both signaling and AMPAR expression. The resveratrol-induced increase in AMPAR expression results from elevated protein synthesis via regulation of the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E/4G complex. Disruption of the translation initiation complex completely blocks resveratrol-dependent AMPAR up-regulation. These findings indicate that resveratrol may regulate brain function through facilitation of AMPAR biogenesis and synaptic transmission.

  4. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates Oxidative Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans through the NHR-49 and MDT-15 Transcriptional Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Arriola, Elizabeth; EL Hafidi, Mohammed; Ortega-Cuéllar, Daniel; Carvajal, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Cellular energy regulation relies on complex signaling pathways that respond to fuel availability and metabolic demands. Dysregulation of these networks is implicated in the development of human metabolic diseases such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. In Caenorhabditis elegans the AMP-activated protein kinase, AAK, has been associated with longevity and stress resistance; nevertheless its precise role in energy metabolism remains elusive. In the present study, we find an evolutionary conserved role of AAK in oxidative metabolism. Similar to mammals, AAK is activated by AICAR and metformin and leads to increased glycolytic and oxidative metabolic fluxes evidenced by an increase in lactate levels and mitochondrial oxygen consumption and a decrease in total fatty acids and lipid storage, whereas augmented glucose availability has the opposite effects. We found that these changes were largely dependent on the catalytic subunit AAK-2, since the aak-2 null strain lost the observed metabolic actions. Further results demonstrate that the effects due to AAK activation are associated to SBP-1 and NHR-49 transcriptional factors and MDT-15 transcriptional co-activator, suggesting a regulatory pathway that controls oxidative metabolism. Our findings establish C. elegans as a tractable model system to dissect the relationship between distinct molecules that play a critical role in the regulation of energy metabolism in human metabolic diseases. PMID:26824904

  5. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates Oxidative Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans through the NHR-49 and MDT-15 Transcriptional Regulators.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Arriola, Elizabeth; El Hafidi, Mohammed; Ortega-Cuéllar, Daniel; Carvajal, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Cellular energy regulation relies on complex signaling pathways that respond to fuel availability and metabolic demands. Dysregulation of these networks is implicated in the development of human metabolic diseases such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. In Caenorhabditis elegans the AMP-activated protein kinase, AAK, has been associated with longevity and stress resistance; nevertheless its precise role in energy metabolism remains elusive. In the present study, we find an evolutionary conserved role of AAK in oxidative metabolism. Similar to mammals, AAK is activated by AICAR and metformin and leads to increased glycolytic and oxidative metabolic fluxes evidenced by an increase in lactate levels and mitochondrial oxygen consumption and a decrease in total fatty acids and lipid storage, whereas augmented glucose availability has the opposite effects. We found that these changes were largely dependent on the catalytic subunit AAK-2, since the aak-2 null strain lost the observed metabolic actions. Further results demonstrate that the effects due to AAK activation are associated to SBP-1 and NHR-49 transcriptional factors and MDT-15 transcriptional co-activator, suggesting a regulatory pathway that controls oxidative metabolism. Our findings establish C. elegans as a tractable model system to dissect the relationship between distinct molecules that play a critical role in the regulation of energy metabolism in human metabolic diseases. PMID:26824904

  6. Oolong, black and pu-erh tea suppresses adiposity in mice via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yoko; Wang, Liuqing; Wang, Lihua; Tanaka, Yuki; Zhang, Tianshun; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that tea has a variety of beneficial impacts on human health, including anti-obesity effects. It is well documented that green tea and its constituent catechins suppress obesity, but the effects of other types of tea on obesity and the potential mechanisms involved are not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigated the suppression of adiposity by oolong, black and pu-erh tea and characterized the underlying molecular mechanism in vivo. We found that the consumption of oolong, black or pu-erh tea for a period of one week significantly decreased visceral fat without affecting body weight in male ICR mice. On a mechanistic level, the consumption of tea enhanced the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in white adipose tissue (WAT). This was accompanied by the induction of WAT protein levels of uncoupling protein 1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1. Our results indicate that oolong, black and pu-erh tea, and in particular, black tea, suppresses adiposity via phosphorylation of the key metabolic regulator AMPK and increases browning of WAT.

  7. Adiponectin protects the rats liver against chronic intermittent hypoxia induced injury through AMP-activated protein kinase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wenxiao; Zhang, Qiang; Dong, Yanbin; Ding, Ning; Huang, Hanpeng; Zhu, Xianji; Hutchinson, Sean; Gao, Xingya; Zhang, Xilong

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the effect of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) on the liver, the associated mechanisms and the potential therapeutic roles of adiponectin (Ad). Sixty rats were randomly assigned to four groups: the normal control (NC), NC and Ad supplement (NC + Ad), CIH, and CIH and Ad supplement (CIH + Ad) groups. The rats in the CIH and CIH + Ad groups were exposed to a hypoxic environment for 4 months. Rats in the NC + Ad and CIH + Ad groups were also treated with an intravenous injection of Ad (10 ug), twice a week. The plasma levels of hepatic enzymes, serum triglyceride, liver triglyceride, fasting blood glucose and hepatic cell apoptosis in hepatic tissue, were higher in the CIH group than in the NC and NC + Ad groups. However, the Ad supplementation in the CIH + Ad group rescued the hepatic tissue insult by activating the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway. In conclusion, Ad could protect against CIH-induced hepatic injury partly through the AMPK pathway. PMID:27678302

  8. Partial separation of platelet and placental adenosine receptors from adenosine A2-like binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnierowicz, S.; Work, C.; Hutchison, K.; Fox, I.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The ubiquitous adenosine A2-like binding protein obscures the binding properties of adenosine receptors assayed with 5'-N-({sup 3}H)ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). To solve this problem, we developed a rapid and simple method to separate adenosine receptors from the adenosine A2-like binding protein. Human platelet and placental membranes were solubilized with 1% 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate. The soluble platelet extract was precipitated with polyethylene glycol and the fraction enriched in adenosine receptors was isolated from the precipitate by differential centrifugation. The adenosine A2-like binding protein was removed from the soluble placental extract with hydroxylapatite and adenosine receptors were precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The specificity of the ({sup 3}H)NECA binding is typical of an adenosine A2 receptor for platelets and an adenosine A1 receptor for placenta. This method leads to enrichment of adenosine A2 receptors for platelets and adenosine A1 receptors for placenta. This provides a useful preparation technique for pharmacologic studies of adenosine receptors.

  9. PRODUCTION OF EXTRACELLULAR GUANOSINE-5'-MONOPHOSPHATE BY BACILLUS SUBTILIS

    PubMed Central

    Demain, A. L.; Miller, I. M.; Hendlin, D.

    1964-01-01

    Demain, A. L. (Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, Rahway, N.J.), I. M. Miller, and D. Hendlin. Production of extracellular guanosine-5'-monophosphate by Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 88:991–995. 1964.—Wild-type Bacillus subtilis colonies were found to feed purineless mutants. A strain with high feeding capacity was selected for study, with a guanineless mutant of B. subtilis used as the assay organism. The factor was excreted during its growth phase in a complex medium containing starch and soybean meal extract. Nutritional studies led to the development of a defined medium to be used for biochemical studies and to aid in the isolation of the factor. Starch was replaced by maltose and the soybean meal extract by Mn++. Production of the factor was sensitive to the pH of the medium during growth. Practically its entire extracellular accumulation occurred before visible lysis. The factor was identified as guanosine-5'-monophosphate derived by extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis of excreted ribonucleic acid. PMID:14219064

  10. Glucose Availability and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Link Energy Metabolism and Innate Immunity in the Bovine Endometrium.

    PubMed

    Turner, Matthew L; Cronin, James G; Noleto, Pablo G; Sheldon, I Martin

    2016-01-01

    Defences against the bacteria that usually infect the endometrium of postpartum cattle are impaired when there is metabolic energy stress, leading to endometritis and infertility. The endometrial response to bacteria depends on innate immunity, with recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns stimulating inflammation, characterised by secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. How metabolic stress impacts tissue responses to pathogens is unclear, but integration of energy metabolism and innate immunity means that stressing one system might affect the other. Here we tested the hypothesis that homeostatic pathways integrate energy metabolism and innate immunity in bovine endometrial tissue. Glucose deprivation reduced the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 from ex vivo organ cultures of bovine endometrium challenged with the pathogen-associated molecular patterns lipopolysaccharide and bacterial lipopeptide. Endometrial inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide were also reduced by small molecules that activate or inhibit the intracellular sensor of energy, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). However, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin, which is a more global metabolic sensor than AMPK, had little effect on inflammation. Similarly, endometrial inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide were not affected by insulin-like growth factor-1, which is an endocrine regulator of metabolism. Interestingly, the inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide increased endometrial glucose consumption and induced the Warburg effect, which could exacerbate deficits in glucose availability in the tissue. In conclusion, metabolic energy stress perturbed inflammatory responses to pathogen-associated molecular patterns in bovine endometrial tissue, and the most fundamental regulators of cellular energy, glucose availability and AMPK, had the greatest impact on innate immunity. PMID:26974839

  11. Glucose Availability and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Link Energy Metabolism and Innate Immunity in the Bovine Endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Matthew L.; Cronin, James G.; Noleto, Pablo G.; Sheldon, I. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Defences against the bacteria that usually infect the endometrium of postpartum cattle are impaired when there is metabolic energy stress, leading to endometritis and infertility. The endometrial response to bacteria depends on innate immunity, with recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns stimulating inflammation, characterised by secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. How metabolic stress impacts tissue responses to pathogens is unclear, but integration of energy metabolism and innate immunity means that stressing one system might affect the other. Here we tested the hypothesis that homeostatic pathways integrate energy metabolism and innate immunity in bovine endometrial tissue. Glucose deprivation reduced the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 from ex vivo organ cultures of bovine endometrium challenged with the pathogen-associated molecular patterns lipopolysaccharide and bacterial lipopeptide. Endometrial inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide were also reduced by small molecules that activate or inhibit the intracellular sensor of energy, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). However, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin, which is a more global metabolic sensor than AMPK, had little effect on inflammation. Similarly, endometrial inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide were not affected by insulin-like growth factor-1, which is an endocrine regulator of metabolism. Interestingly, the inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide increased endometrial glucose consumption and induced the Warburg effect, which could exacerbate deficits in glucose availability in the tissue. In conclusion, metabolic energy stress perturbed inflammatory responses to pathogen-associated molecular patterns in bovine endometrial tissue, and the most fundamental regulators of cellular energy, glucose availability and AMPK, had the greatest impact on innate immunity. PMID:26974839

  12. Perturbing microtubule integrity blocks AMP-activated protein kinase-induced meiotic resumption in cultured mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ya, Ru; Downs, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important cellular energy sensor that is activated by a low AMP-to-ATP ratio. AMPK is involved in meiotic induction of mouse oocytes and also promotes the completion of maturation, but suppress premature activation. This study was conducted to further examine the activity and localization of AMPK in relation to microtubule (MT) integrity. Immunostaining with tubulin revealed that active AMPK localized with gamma tubulin during metaphase I and II, while it localized at the spindle midzone during anaphase. This discrete localization pattern was dependent on MT integrity. Treatment with nocodazole, which depolymerized spindle MTs, led to disruption of proper spindle pole localization of active AMPK. In contrast, active AMPK was localized at each pole and with small asters when treated with paclitaxel, which induced excessive polymerization of spindle MTs. Disturbing spindle integrity not only influenced active AMPK localization, but also blocked AMPK activity, as both hormone- and AMPK activator- induced oocyte maturation were blocked by MT-disrupting agents. In concert with these data, the treatments inhibited active AMPK germinal vesicle staining as well, which appears before germinal vesicle breakdown (GVB) in meiotically induced oocytes. Targeting actin filament polymerization had only a marginal effect on meiotic induction. Although oocytes stimulated by AMPK activator increased the rate of GVB, spindle formation and PB extrusion, blocking AMPK activity did not influence peripheral movement of the spindle. These data suggest that the meiosis-inducing action and localization of AMPK are regulated by MT spindle integrity during mouse oocyte maturation. PMID:23199370

  13. Energy-Dependent Modulation of Glucagon-Like Signaling in Drosophila via the AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Braco, Jason T.; Gillespie, Emily L.; Alberto, Gregory E.; Brenman, Jay E.; Johnson, Erik C.

    2012-01-01

    Adipokinetic hormone (AKH) is the equivalent of mammalian glucagon, as it is the primary insect hormone that causes energy mobilization. In Drosophila, current knowledge of the mechanisms regulating AKH signaling is limited. Here, we report that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is critical for normal AKH secretion during periods of metabolic challenges. Reduction of AMPK in AKH cells causes a suite of behavioral and physiological phenotypes resembling AKH cell ablations. Specifically, reduced AMPK function increases life span during starvation and delays starvation-induced hyperactivity. Neither AKH cell survival nor gene expression is significantly impacted by reduced AMPK function. AKH immunolabeling was significantly higher in animals with reduced AMPK function; this result is paralleled by genetic inhibition of synaptic release, suggesting that AMPK promotes AKH secretion. We observed reduced secretion in AKH cells bearing AMPK mutations employing a specific secretion reporter, confirming that AMPK functions in AKH secretion. Live-cell imaging of wild-type AKH neuroendocrine cells shows heightened excitability under reduced sugar levels, and this response was delayed and reduced in AMPK-deficient backgrounds. Furthermore, AMPK activation in AKH cells increases intracellular calcium levels in constant high sugar levels, suggesting that the underlying mechanism of AMPK action is modification of ionic currents. These results demonstrate that AMPK signaling is a critical feature that regulates AKH secretion, and, ultimately, metabolic homeostasis. The significance of these findings is that AMPK is important in the regulation of glucagon signaling, suggesting that the organization of metabolic networks is highly conserved and that AMPK plays a prominent role in these networks. PMID:22798489

  14. T3-induced liver AMP-activated protein kinase signaling: Redox dependency and upregulation of downstream targets

    PubMed Central

    Videla, Luis A; Fernández, Virginia; Cornejo, Pamela; Vargas, Romina; Morales, Paula; Ceballo, Juan; Fischer, Alvaro; Escudero, Nicolás; Escobar, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the redox dependency and promotion of downstream targets in thyroid hormone (T3)-induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling as cellular energy sensor to limit metabolic stresses in the liver. METHODS: Fed male Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single ip dose of 0.1 mg T3/kg or T3 vehicle (NaOH 0.1 N; controls) and studied at 8 or 24 h after treatment. Separate groups of animals received 500 mg N-acetylcysteine (NAC)/kg or saline ip 30 min prior T3. Measurements included plasma and liver 8-isoprostane and serum β-hydroxybutyrate levels (ELISA), hepatic levels of mRNAs (qPCR), proteins (Western blot), and phosphorylated AMPK (ELISA). RESULTS: T3 upregulates AMPK signaling, including the upstream kinases Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β and transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase-1, with T3-induced reactive oxygen species having a causal role due to its suppression by pretreatment with the antioxidant NAC. Accordingly, AMPK targets acetyl-CoA carboxylase and cyclic AMP response element binding protein are phosphorylated, with the concomitant carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1α (CPT-1α) activation and higher expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1α and that of the fatty acid oxidation (FAO)-related enzymes CPT-1α, acyl-CoA oxidase 1, and acyl-CoA thioesterase 2. Under these conditions, T3 induced a significant increase in the serum levels of β-hydroxybutyrate, a surrogate marker for hepatic FAO. CONCLUSION: T3 administration activates liver AMPK signaling in a redox-dependent manner, leading to FAO enhancement as evidenced by the consequent ketogenic response, which may constitute a key molecular mechanism regulating energy dynamics to support T3 preconditioning against ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25516653

  15. Role for AMP-activated protein kinase in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and preproinsulin gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Leclerc, Isabelle; Varadi, Aniko; Tsuboi, Takashi; Moule, S Kelly; Rutter, Guy A

    2003-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been implicated in the control of preproinsulin gene expression in pancreatic islet beta-cells [da Silva Xavier, Leclerc, Salt, Doiron, Hardie, Kahn and Rutter (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 4023-4028]. Using pharmacological and molecular strategies to regulate AMPK activity in rat islets and clonal MIN6 beta-cells, we show here that the effects of AMPK are exerted largely upstream of insulin release. Thus forced increases in AMPK activity achieved pharmacologically with 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide riboside (AICAR), or by adenoviral overexpression of a truncated, constitutively active form of the enzyme (AMPK alpha 1.T(172)D), blocked glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In MIN6 cells, activation of AMPK suppressed glucose metabolism, as assessed by changes in total, cytosolic or mitochondrial [ATP] and NAD(P)H, and reduced increases in intracellular [Ca(2+)] caused by either glucose or tolbutamide. By contrast, inactivation of AMPK by expression of a dominant-negative form of the enzyme mutated in the catalytic site (AMPK alpha 1.D(157)A) did not affect glucose-stimulated increases in [ATP], NAD(P)H or intracellular [Ca(2+)], but led to the unregulated release of insulin. These results indicate that inhibition of AMPK by glucose is essential for the activation of insulin secretion by the sugar, and may contribute to the transcriptional stimulation of the preproinsulin gene. Modulation of AMPK activity in the beta-cell may thus represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:12589707

  16. RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) depletes nutrients, inducing phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chengcheng; Hao, Chuncheng; Shao, RuPing; Fang, Bingliang; Correa, Arlene M.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Roth, Jack A.; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Pataer, Apar

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated that RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and its downstream protein p-eIF2α are independent prognostic markers for overall survival in lung cancer. In the current study, we further investigate the interaction between PKR and AMPK in lung tumor tissue and cancer cell lines. We examined PKR protein expression in 55 frozen primary lung tumor tissues by Western blotting and analyzed the association between PKR expression and expresson of 139 proteins on tissue samples examined previously by Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) from the same 55 patients. We observed that biomarkers were either positively (phosphorylated AMP-activated kinaseT172 [p-AMPK]) or negatively (insulin receptor substrate 1, meiotic recombination 11, ATR interacting protein, telomerase, checkpoint kinase 1, and cyclin E1) correlated with PKR. We further confirmed that induction of PKR with expression vectors in lung cancer cells causes activation of the AMPK protein independent of the LKB1, TAK1, and CaMKKβ pathway. We found that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which increases AMP levels and decreases ATP levels, causing AMPK phosphorylation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting AMPK expression with compound C or siRNA enhanced PKR-mediated cell death. We next explored the combination of PKR and p-AMPK expression in NSCLC patients and observed that expression of p-AMPK predicted a poor outcome for adenocarcinoma patients with high PKR expression and a better prognosis for those with low PKR expression. These findings were consistent with our in vitro results. AMPK might rescue cells facing metabolic stresses, such as ATP depletion caused by PKR. Our data indicate that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which induces the phosphorylation of AMPK. AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation. PMID:25798539

  17. AMP-activated protein kinase: a key regulator of energy balance with many roles in human disease.

    PubMed

    Grahame Hardie, D

    2014-12-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of cellular energy status that regulates cellular and whole-body energy balance. A recently reported crystal structure has illuminated the complex regulatory mechanisms by which AMP and ADP cause activation of AMPK, involving phosphorylation by the upstream kinase LKB1. Once activated by falling cellular energy status, AMPK activates catabolic pathways that generate ATP whilst inhibiting anabolic pathways and other cellular processes that consume ATP. A role of AMPK is implicated in many human diseases. Mutations in the γ2 subunit cause heart disease due to excessive glycogen storage in cardiac myocytes, leading to ventricular pre-excitation. AMPK-activating drugs reverse many of the metabolic defects associated with insulin resistance, and recent findings suggest that the insulin-sensitizing effects of the widely used antidiabetic drug metformin are mediated by AMPK. The upstream kinase LKB1 is a tumour suppressor, and AMPK may exert many of its antitumour effects. AMPK activation promotes the oxidative metabolism typical of quiescent cells, rather than the aerobic glycolysis observed in tumour cells and cells involved in inflammation, explaining in part why AMPK activators have both antitumour and anti-inflammatory effects. Salicylate (the major in vivo metabolite of aspirin) activates AMPK, and this could be responsible for at least some of the anticancer and anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin. In addition to metformin and salicylates, novel drugs that modulate AMPK are likely to enter clinical trials soon. Finally, AMPK may be involved in viral infection: downregulation of AMPK during hepatitis C virus infection appears to be essential for efficient viral replication. PMID:24824502

  18. Thromboxane Receptor Activates the AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells via Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Dong, Yunzhou; Xu, Jian; Xie, Zhonglin; Wu, Yong; Song, Ping; Guzman, Melissa; Wu, Jiliang; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2010-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 receptor (TPr) stimulation induces cellular hypertrophy in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs); however, regulation of VSMC hypertrophy remains poorly understood. Here we show that TPr stimulation activates AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), which in turn limits TPr-induced protein synthesis in VSMCs. Exposure of cultured VSMCs to either TPr agonists, IBOP and U46619, or exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) caused time- and dose-dependent AMPK activation, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of both AMPK-Thr172 and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase–Ser79, a downstream enzyme of AMPK, whereas SQ29548, a selective TPr antagonist, significantly attenuated TPr-enhanced AMPK activation. In parallel, both IBOP and U46619 significantly increased the production of reactive oxygen species such as H2O2. Furthermore, adenoviral overexpression of catalase (an H2O2 scavenger) abolished, whereas superoxide dismutase (which catalyzes H2O2 formation) enhanced, IBOP-induced AMPK activation, suggesting that TPr-activated AMPK was mediated by H2O2. Consistently, exposure of VSMCs to either TPr agonists or exogenous H2O2 dose-dependently increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 (at serines 428 and 307), an AMPK kinase, as well as coimmunoprecipitation of AMPK with LKB1. In addition, direct mutagenesis of either Ser428 or Ser307 of LKB1 into alanine, like the kinase-dead LKB1 mutant, abolished both TPr-stimulated AMPK activation and coimmunoprecipitation. Finally, genetic inhibition of AMPK significantly accentuated IBOP-enhanced protein synthesis, whereas adenoviral overexpression of constitutively active AMPK abolished IBOP-enhance protein synthesis in VSMCs. We conclude that TPr stimulation triggers reactive oxygen species–mediated LKB1-dependent AMPK activation, which in return inhibits cellular protein synthesis in VSMCs. PMID:18063812

  19. Reactive Nitrogen Species Is Required for the Activation of the AMP-activated Protein Kinase by Statin in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyoung Chul; Song, Ping; Xie, Zhonglin; Wu, Yong; Xu, Jian; Zhang, Miao; Dong, Yunzhou; Wang, Shuangxi; Lau, Kai; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2008-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is reported to mediate the beneficial effects of statin on the vascular functions, but the biochemical mechanisms are incompletely understood. The aim of the study was to determine how statin activates AMPK. Exposure of confluent bovine aortic endothelial cells to simvastatin (statin) dose-dependently increased phosphorylation of AMPK at Thr172 and activities of AMPK, which was in parallel with increased detection of both LKB1 phosphorylation at Ser428 and LKB1 nuclear export. Furthermore, statin treatment was shown to increase protein kinase C (PKC)-ζ activity and PKC-ζ phosphorylation at Thr410/Thr403. Consistently, inhibition of PKC-ζ either by pharmacological or genetic manipulations abolished statin-enhanced LKB1 phosphorylation at Ser428, blocked LKB1 nucleus export, and prevented the subsequent activation of AMPK. Similarly, in vivo transfection of PKC-ζ-specific small interfering RNA in C57BL/6J mice significantly attenuated statin-enhanced phosphorylation of AMPK-Thr172, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC)-Ser79, and LKB1-Ser428. In addition, statin significantly increased reactive oxygen species, whereas preincubation of mito-TEMPOL, a superoxide dismutase mimetic, abolished statin-enhanced phosphorylation of both AMPK-Thr172 and ACC-Ser79. Finally, in vivo administration of statin increased 3-nitrotyrosine and the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC in C57BL/6J mice but not in mice deficient in endothelial nitric-oxide synthase. Taken together, our data suggest that AMPK activation by statin is peroxynitrite-mediated but PKC-ζ-dependent. PMID:18474592

  20. Stanniocalcin-1 Inhibits Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury via an AMP-Activated Protein Kinase-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jenny Szu-Chin; Huang, Luping; Belousova, Tatiana; Lu, Lianghao; Yang, Yongjie; Reddel, Roger; Chang, Andy; Ju, Huiming; DiMattia, Gabriel; Tong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    AKI is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and cost of care, and therapeutic options remain limited. Reactive oxygen species are critical for the genesis of ischemic AKI. Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) suppresses superoxide generation through induction of uncoupling proteins (UCPs), and transgenic overexpression of STC1 inhibits reactive oxygen species and protects from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) kidney injury. Our observations revealed high AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in STC1 transgenic kidneys relative to wild-type (WT) kidneys; thus, we hypothesized that STC1 protects from I/R kidney injury through activation of AMPK. Baseline activity of AMPK in the kidney correlated with the expression of STCs, such that the highest activity was observed in STC1 transgenic mice followed (in decreasing order) by WT, STC1 knockout, and STC1/STC2 double-knockout mice. I/R in WT kidneys increased AMPK activity and the expression of STC1, UCP2, and sirtuin 3. Inhibition of AMPK by administration of compound C before I/R abolished the activation of AMPK, diminished the expression of UCP2 and sirtuin 3, and aggravated kidney injury but did not affect STC1 expression. Treatment of cultured HEK cells with recombinant STC1 activated AMPK and increased the expression of UCP2 and sirtuin 3, and concomitant treatment with compound C abolished these responses. STC1 knockout mice displayed high susceptibility to I/R, whereas pretreatment of STC1 transgenic mice with compound C restored the susceptibility to I/R kidney injury. These data suggest that STC1 is important for activation of AMPK in the kidney, which mediates STC1-induced expression of UCP2 and sirtuin 3 and protection from I/R. PMID:25012175

  1. Involvement of AMP-activated protein kinase in mediating pyrrolo-1,5-benzoxazepine-induced apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Jennifer C; Butini, Stefania; Campiani, Giuseppe; O'Meara, Anne; Williams, D Clive; Zisterer, Daniela M

    2016-10-01

    Neuroblastoma, a paediatric malignancy of the sympathetic nervous system, accounts for 15 % of childhood cancer deaths. Despite advances in understanding the biology, it remains one of the most difficult paediatric cancers to treat partly due to the development of multidrug resistance. There is thus a compelling demand for new treatment strategies that can bypass resistance mechanisms. The pyrrolo-1,5-benzoxazepine (PBOX) compounds are a series of novel microtubule-targeting agents that potently induce apoptosis in various tumour models. We have previously reported that PBOX compounds induce apoptosis in drug sensitive and multidrug resistant neuroblastoma cells and synergistically enhance apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutics such as carboplatin. In this study we present further data concerning the molecular basis of PBOX-induced apoptosis in neuroblastoma. We demonstrate that PBOX-6 induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and downstream acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) appeared to serve as the upstream signal for AMPK activation as pretreatment of cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine inhibited both AMPK activation and PBOX-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, activation of AMPK by PBOX-6 was found to inhibit mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of PBOX-6 in an in vivo xenograft model of neuroblastoma. This study provides new insights into understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in PBOX-induced cell death in neuroblastoma and further supports their future use as novel anti-cancer agents for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  2. Loss of a neural AMP-activated kinase mimics the effects of elevated serotonin on fat, movement, and hormonal secretions.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Katherine A; Bouagnon, Aude D; Barros, Alexandre G; Lin, Lin; Malard, Leandro; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurélio; Ashrafi, Kaveh

    2014-06-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved master regulator of metabolism and a therapeutic target in type 2 diabetes. As an energy sensor, AMPK activity is responsive to both metabolic inputs, for instance the ratio of AMP to ATP, and numerous hormonal cues. As in mammals, each of two genes, aak-1 and aak-2, encode for the catalytic subunit of AMPK in C. elegans. Here we show that in C. elegans loss of aak-2 mimics the effects of elevated serotonin signaling on fat reduction, slowed movement, and promoting exit from dauer arrest. Reconstitution of aak-2 in only the nervous system restored wild type fat levels and movement rate to aak-2 mutants and reconstitution in only the ASI neurons was sufficient to significantly restore dauer maintenance to the mutant animals. As in elevated serotonin signaling, inactivation of AAK-2 in the ASI neurons caused enhanced secretion of dense core vesicles from these neurons. The ASI neurons are the site of production of the DAF-7 TGF-β ligand and the DAF-28 insulin, both of which are secreted by dense core vesicles and play critical roles in whether animals stay in dauer or undergo reproductive development. These findings show that elevated levels of serotonin promote enhanced secretions of systemic regulators of pro-growth and differentiation pathways through inactivation of AAK-2. As such, AMPK is not only a recipient of hormonal signals but can also be an upstream regulator. Our data suggest that some of the physiological phenotypes previously attributed to peripheral AAK-2 activity on metabolic targets may instead be due to the role of this kinase in neural serotonin signaling. PMID:24921650

  3. Sex-specific regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Guévélou, Eric; Huvet, Arnaud; Galindo-Sánchez, Clara E; Milan, Massimo; Quillien, Virgile; Daniel, Jean-Yves; Quéré, Claudie; Boudry, Pierre; Corporeau, Charlotte

    2013-10-01

    The hermaphrodite Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas displays a high energy allocation to reproduction. We studied the expression of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) during gametogenesis in the gonad and characterized the mRNA sequences of the AMPK subunits: the AMPK alpha mRNA sequence was previously characterized; we identified AMPK beta, AMPK gamma, and mRNAs of putative AMPK-related targets following bioinformatics mining on existing genomic resources. We analyzed the mRNA expression of the AMPK alpha, beta, and gamma subunits in the gonads of male and female oysters through a reproductive cycle, and we quantified the mRNA expression of genes belonging to fatty acid and glucose metabolism. AMPK alpha mRNA levels were more abundant in males at the first stage of gametogenesis, when mitotic activity and the differentiation of germinal cells occur, and were always more abundant in males than in females. Some targets of fatty acid and glucose metabolism appeared to be correlated with the expression of AMPK subunits at the mRNA level. We then analyzed the sex-specific AMPK activity by measuring the phosphorylation of the catalytic AMPK alpha protein and its expression at the protein level. Both the amount of AMPK alpha protein and threonine 172 phosphorylation appeared to be almost totally inhibited in mature female gonads at stage 3, at the time when accumulation of reserves in oocytes was promoted, while it remained at a high level in mature spermatozoa. Its activation might play a sex-dependent role in the management of energy during gametogenesis in oyster.

  4. Specific deletion of AMP-activated protein kinase (α1AMPK) in mouse Sertoli cells modifies germ cell quality.

    PubMed

    Bertoldo, Michael J; Guibert, Edith; Faure, Melanie; Guillou, Florian; Ramé, Christelle; Nadal-Desbarats, Lydie; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Dupont, Joëlle; Froment, Pascal

    2016-03-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important regulator of cellular energy homeostasis which plays a role in fertility. Complete disruption of the AMPK catalytic subunit α1 gene (α1AMPK KO) in male mice results in a decrease in litter size which is associated with the production of altered sperm morphology and motility. Because of the importance of Sertoli cells in the formation of germ cells, we have chosen to selectively disrupt α1AMPK only in the Sertoli cells in mice (Sc-α1AMPK-KO mice). Specific deletion of the α1AMPK gene in Sertoli cells resulted in a 25% reduction in male fertility associated with abnormal spermatozoa with a thin head. No clear alterations in testis morphology or modification in the number of Sertoli cells in vivo were observed, but a dysregulation in energy metabolism in Sertoli cells occurred. We have reported an increase in lactate production, in lipid droplets, and a reduction in ATP production in Sc-α1AMPK-KO Sertoli cells. These perturbations were associated with lower expression of mitochondrial markers (cytochrome c and PGC1-α). In addition another metabolic sensor, the deacetylase SIRT1, had a reduction in expression which is correlated with a decline in deacetylase activity. Finally, expression and localization of junctions forming the blood-testis barrier between Sertoli cells themselves and with germ cells were deregulated in Sc-α1AMPK-KO. In conclusion, these results suggest that dysregulation of the energy sensing machinery exclusively through disruption of α1AMPK in Sertoli cells translates to a reduction in the quality of germ cells and fertility. PMID:26772142

  5. Energy-dependent modulation of glucagon-like signaling in Drosophila via the AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Braco, Jason T; Gillespie, Emily L; Alberto, Gregory E; Brenman, Jay E; Johnson, Erik C

    2012-10-01

    Adipokinetic hormone (AKH) is the equivalent of mammalian glucagon, as it is the primary insect hormone that causes energy mobilization. In Drosophila, current knowledge of the mechanisms regulating AKH signaling is limited. Here, we report that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is critical for normal AKH secretion during periods of metabolic challenges. Reduction of AMPK in AKH cells causes a suite of behavioral and physiological phenotypes resembling AKH cell ablations. Specifically, reduced AMPK function increases life span during starvation and delays starvation-induced hyperactivity. Neither AKH cell survival nor gene expression is significantly impacted by reduced AMPK function. AKH immunolabeling was significantly higher in animals with reduced AMPK function; this result is paralleled by genetic inhibition of synaptic release, suggesting that AMPK promotes AKH secretion. We observed reduced secretion in AKH cells bearing AMPK mutations employing a specific secretion reporter, confirming that AMPK functions in AKH secretion. Live-cell imaging of wild-type AKH neuroendocrine cells shows heightened excitability under reduced sugar levels, and this response was delayed and reduced in AMPK-deficient backgrounds. Furthermore, AMPK activation in AKH cells increases intracellular calcium levels in constant high sugar levels, suggesting that the underlying mechanism of AMPK action is modification of ionic currents. These results demonstrate that AMPK signaling is a critical feature that regulates AKH secretion, and, ultimately, metabolic homeostasis. The significance of these findings is that AMPK is important in the regulation of glucagon signaling, suggesting that the organization of metabolic networks is highly conserved and that AMPK plays a prominent role in these networks. PMID:22798489

  6. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase negatively regulates hydrogen peroxide-stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Benjamin Y; Sartoretto, Juliano L; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Michel, Thomas

    2009-10-13

    Hydrogen peroxide and other reactive oxygen species are intimately involved in endothelial cell signaling. In many cell types, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been implicated in the control of metabolic responses, but the role of endothelial cell redox signaling in the modulation of AMPK remains to be completely defined. We used RNA interference and pharmacological methods to establish that H(2)O(2) is a critical activator of AMPK in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). H(2)O(2) treatment of BAECs rapidly and significantly increases the phosphorylation of AMPK. The EC(50) for H(2)O(2)-promoted phosphorylation of AMPK is 65 + or - 15 microM, within the physiological range of cellular H(2)O(2) concentrations. The Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta (CaMKKbeta) inhibitor STO-609 abolishes H(2)O(2)-dependent AMPK activation, whereas eNOS inhibitors enhance AMPK activation. Similarly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of CaMKKbeta abrogates AMPK activation, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of eNOS leads to a striking increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Cellular imaging studies using the H(2)O(2) biosensor HyPer show that siRNA-mediated eNOS knockdown leads to a marked increase in intracellular H(2)O(2) generation, which is blocked by PEG-catalase. eNOS(-/-) mice show a marked increase in AMPK phosphorylation in liver and lung compared to wild-type mice. Lung endothelial cells from eNOS(-/-) mice also show a significant increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Taken together, these results establish that CaMKKbeta is critically involved in mediating the phosphorylation of AMPK promoted by H(2)O(2) in endothelial cells, and document that eNOS is an important negative regulator of AMPK phosphorylation and intracellular H(2)O(2) generation in endothelial cells. PMID:19805165

  7. Involvement of AMP-activated protein kinase in mediating pyrrolo-1,5-benzoxazepine-induced apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Jennifer C; Butini, Stefania; Campiani, Giuseppe; O'Meara, Anne; Williams, D Clive; Zisterer, Daniela M

    2016-10-01

    Neuroblastoma, a paediatric malignancy of the sympathetic nervous system, accounts for 15 % of childhood cancer deaths. Despite advances in understanding the biology, it remains one of the most difficult paediatric cancers to treat partly due to the development of multidrug resistance. There is thus a compelling demand for new treatment strategies that can bypass resistance mechanisms. The pyrrolo-1,5-benzoxazepine (PBOX) compounds are a series of novel microtubule-targeting agents that potently induce apoptosis in various tumour models. We have previously reported that PBOX compounds induce apoptosis in drug sensitive and multidrug resistant neuroblastoma cells and synergistically enhance apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutics such as carboplatin. In this study we present further data concerning the molecular basis of PBOX-induced apoptosis in neuroblastoma. We demonstrate that PBOX-6 induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and downstream acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) appeared to serve as the upstream signal for AMPK activation as pretreatment of cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine inhibited both AMPK activation and PBOX-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, activation of AMPK by PBOX-6 was found to inhibit mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of PBOX-6 in an in vivo xenograft model of neuroblastoma. This study provides new insights into understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in PBOX-induced cell death in neuroblastoma and further supports their future use as novel anti-cancer agents for the treatment of neuroblastoma. PMID:27334143

  8. Opposing Activity Changes in AMP Deaminase and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in the Hibernating Ground Squirrel

    PubMed Central

    Cicerchi, Christina; Garcia, Gabriela E.; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A.; Trostel, Jessica; Jain, Swati; Mant, Colin T.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Ishimoto, Takuji; Shimada, Michiko; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Jani, Alkesh; Stenvinkel, Peter; Martin, Sandra L.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Hibernating animals develop fatty liver when active in summertime and undergo a switch to a fat oxidation state in the winter. We hypothesized that this switch might be determined by AMP and the dominance of opposing effects: metabolism through AMP deaminase (AMPD2) (summer) and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (winter). Liver samples were obtained from 13-lined ground squirrels at different times during the year, including summer and multiples stages of winter hibernation, and fat synthesis and β-fatty acid oxidation were evaluated. Changes in fat metabolism were correlated with changes in AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid (downstream product of AMPD2), as well as changes in AMPK and intrahepatic β-hydroxybutyrate (a marker of fat oxidation). Hepatic fat accumulation occurred during the summer with relatively increased enzymes associated with fat synthesis (FAS, ACL and ACC) and decreased enoyl CoA hydratase (ECH1) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), rate limiting enzymes of fat oxidation. In summer, AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid levels were high and hepatic AMPK activity was low. In contrast, the active phosphorylated form of AMPK and β-hydroxybutyrate both increased during winter hibernation. Therefore, changes in AMPD2 and AMPK activity were paralleled with changes in fat synthesis and fat oxidation rates during the summer-winter cycle. These data illuminate the opposing forces of metabolism of AMP by AMPD2 and its availability to activate AMPK as a switch that governs fat metabolism in the liver of hibernating ground squirrel. PMID:25856396

  9. Altered content of AMP-activated protein kinase isoforms in skeletal muscle from spinal cord injured subjects.

    PubMed

    Kostovski, Emil; Boon, Hanneke; Hjeltnes, Nils; Lundell, Leonidas S; Ahlsén, Maria; Chibalin, Alexander V; Krook, Anna; Iversen, Per Ole; Widegren, Ulrika

    2013-11-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a pivotal regulator of energy homeostasis. Although downstream targets of AMPK are widely characterized, the physiological factors governing isoform expression of this protein kinase are largely unknown. Nerve/contractile activity has a major impact on the metabolic phenotype of skeletal muscle, therefore likely to influence AMPK isoform expression. Spinal cord injury represents an extreme form of physical inactivity, with concomitant changes in skeletal muscle metabolism. We assessed the influence of longstanding and recent spinal cord injury on protein abundance of AMPK isoforms in human skeletal muscle. We also determined muscle fiber type as a marker of glycolytic or oxidative metabolism. In subjects with longstanding complete injury, protein abundance of the AMPKγ3 subunit, as well as myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIa and IIx, were increased, whereas abundance of the AMPKγ1 subunit and MHC I were decreased. Similarly, abundance of AMPKγ3 and MHC IIa proteins were increased, whereas AMPKα2, -β1, and -γ1 subunits and MHC I abundance was decreased during the first year following injury, reflecting a more glycolytic phenotype of the skeletal muscle. However, in incomplete cervical lesions, partial recovery of muscle function attenuated the changes in the isoform profile of AMPK and MHC. Furthermore, exercise training (electrically stimulated leg cycling) partly normalized mRNA expression of AMPK isoforms. Thus, physical activity affects the relative expression of AMPK isoforms. In conclusion, skeletal muscle abundance of AMPK isoforms is related to physical activity and/or muscle fiber type. Thus, physical/neuromuscular activity is an important determinant of isoform abundance of AMPK and MCH. This further underscores the need for physical activity as part of a treatment regimen after spinal cord injury to maintain skeletal muscle metabolism. PMID:24022865

  10. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates the insulin-induced activation of the nitric oxide synthase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ingrid; Schulz, Christian; Fichtlscherer, Birgit; Kemp, Bruce E; Fisslthaler, Beate; Busse, Rudi

    2003-11-01

    Little is known about the signaling cascades that eventually regulate the activity of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in platelets. Here, we investigated the effects of insulin on the phosphorylation and activation of eNOS in washed human platelets and in endothelial cells. Insulin activated the protein kinase Akt in cultured endothelial cells and increased the phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser(1177) but failed to increase endothelial cyclic GMP levels or to elicit the relaxation of endothelium-intact porcine coronary arteries. In platelets, insulin also elicited the activation of Akt as well as the phosphorylation of eNOS and initiated NO production which was associated with increased cyclic GMP levels and the inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation. The insulin-induced inhibition of aggregation was accompanied by a decreased Ca(2+) response to thrombin and was also prevented by N(omega) nitro-L-arginine. In platelets, but not in endothelial cells, insulin induced the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic stress-sensing kinase which was sensitive to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) inhibitor wortmannin and the AMPK inhibitor iodotubercidin. Moreover, the insulin-mediated inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation was prevented by iodotubercidin. Insulin-independent activation of the AMPK using 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside, increased platelet eNOS phosphorylation, increased cyclic GMP levels and attenuated platelet aggregation. These results highlight the differences in the signal transduction cascade activated by insulin in endothelial cells and platelets, and demonstrate that insulin stimulates the formation of NO in human platelets, in the absence of an increase in Ca(2+), by acti-vating PI3-K and AMPK which phosphorylates eNOS on Ser(1177).

  11. Coenzyme Q10 Attenuates High Glucose-Induced Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction through AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsiao-Ya; Lin, Chih-Pei; Huang, Po-Hsun; Li, Szu-Yuan; Chen, Jia-Shiong; Lin, Feng-Yen; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an antiapoptosis enzyme, is stored in the mitochondria of cells. We investigated whether CoQ10 can attenuate high glucose-induced endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) apoptosis and clarified its mechanism. EPCs were incubated with normal glucose (5 mM) or high glucose (25 mM) environment for 3 days, followed by treatment with CoQ10 (10 μM) for 24 hr. Cell proliferation, nitric oxide (NO) production, and JC-1 assay were examined. The specific signal pathways of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), eNOS/Akt, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were also assessed. High glucose reduced EPC functional activities, including proliferation and migration. Additionally, Akt/eNOS activity and NO production were downregulated in high glucose-stimulated EPCs. Administration of CoQ10 ameliorated high glucose-induced EPC apoptosis, including downregulation of caspase 3, upregulation of Bcl-2, and increase in mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, treatment with CoQ10 reduced reactive oxygen species, enhanced eNOS/Akt activity, and increased HO-1 expression in high glucose-treated EPCs. These effects were negated by administration of AMPK inhibitor. Transplantation of CoQ10-treated EPCs under high glucose conditions into ischemic hindlimbs improved blood flow recovery. CoQ10 reduced high glucose-induced EPC apoptosis and dysfunction through upregulation of eNOS, HO-1 through the AMPK pathway. Our findings provide a potential treatment strategy targeting dysfunctional EPC in diabetic patients.

  12. Apoptotic Cells Activate AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) and Inhibit Epithelial Cell Growth without Change in Intracellular Energy Stores*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vimal A.; Massenburg, Donald; Vujicic, Snezana; Feng, Lanfei; Tang, Meiyi; Litbarg, Natalia; Antoni, Angelika; Rauch, Joyce; Lieberthal, Wilfred; Levine, Jerrold S.

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis plays an indispensable role in the maintenance and development of tissues. We have shown that receptor-mediated recognition of apoptotic target cells by viable kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs) inhibits the proliferation and survival of PTECs. Here, we examined the effect of apoptotic targets on PTEC cell growth (cell size during G1 phase of the cell cycle). Using a cell culture model, we show that apoptotic cells potently activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a highly sensitive sensor of intracellular energy stores. AMPK activation leads to decreased activity of its downstream target, ribosomal protein p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K), and concomitant inhibition of cell growth. Importantly, these events occur without detectable change in intracellular levels of AMP, ADP, or ATP. Inhibition of AMPK, either pharmacologically by compound C or molecularly by shRNA, diminishes the effects of apoptotic targets and largely restores p70S6K activity and cell size to normal levels. Apoptotic targets also inhibit Akt, a second signaling pathway regulating cell growth. Expression of a constitutively active Akt construct partially relieved cell growth inhibition but was less effective than inhibition of AMPK. Inhibition of cell growth by apoptotic targets is dependent on physical interaction between apoptotic targets and PTECs but independent of phagocytosis. We conclude that receptor-mediated recognition of apoptotic targets mimics the effects of intracellular energy depletion, activating AMPK and inhibiting cell growth. By acting as sentinels of environmental change, apoptotic death may enable nearby viable cells, especially nonmigratory epithelial cells, to monitor and adapt to local stresses. PMID:26183782

  13. Opposing activity changes in AMP deaminase and AMP-activated protein kinase in the hibernating ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Lanaspa, Miguel A; Epperson, L Elaine; Li, Nanxing; Cicerchi, Christina; Garcia, Gabriela E; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Trostel, Jessica; Jain, Swati; Mant, Colin T; Rivard, Christopher J; Ishimoto, Takuji; Shimada, Michiko; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Jani, Alkesh; Stenvinkel, Peter; Martin, Sandra L; Johnson, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Hibernating animals develop fatty liver when active in summertime and undergo a switch to a fat oxidation state in the winter. We hypothesized that this switch might be determined by AMP and the dominance of opposing effects: metabolism through AMP deaminase (AMPD2) (summer) and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (winter). Liver samples were obtained from 13-lined ground squirrels at different times during the year, including summer and multiples stages of winter hibernation, and fat synthesis and β-fatty acid oxidation were evaluated. Changes in fat metabolism were correlated with changes in AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid (downstream product of AMPD2), as well as changes in AMPK and intrahepatic β-hydroxybutyrate (a marker of fat oxidation). Hepatic fat accumulation occurred during the summer with relatively increased enzymes associated with fat synthesis (FAS, ACL and ACC) and decreased enoyl CoA hydratase (ECH1) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), rate limiting enzymes of fat oxidation. In summer, AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid levels were high and hepatic AMPK activity was low. In contrast, the active phosphorylated form of AMPK and β-hydroxybutyrate both increased during winter hibernation. Therefore, changes in AMPD2 and AMPK activity were paralleled with changes in fat synthesis and fat oxidation rates during the summer-winter cycle. These data illuminate the opposing forces of metabolism of AMP by AMPD2 and its availability to activate AMPK as a switch that governs fat metabolism in the liver of hibernating ground squirrel.

  14. Genistein, Resveratrol, and 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside Induce Cytochrome P450 4F2 Expression through an AMP-Activated Protein Kinase-Dependent PathwayS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Mei-Hui; Savas, Üzen; Lasker, Jerome M.

    2011-01-01

    Activators of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) increase the expression of the human microsomal fatty acid ω-hydroxylase CYP4F2. A 24-h treatment of either primary human hepatocytes or the human hepatoma cell line HepG2 with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR), which is converted to 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl 5′-monophosphate, an activator of AMPK, caused an average 2.5- or 7-fold increase, respectively, of CYP4F2 mRNA expression but not of CYP4A11 or CYP4F3, CYP4F11, and CYP4F12 mRNA. Activation of CYP4F2 expression by AICAR was significantly reduced in HepG2 cells by an AMPK inhibitor, 6-[4-(2-piperidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-phenyl)]-3-pyridin-4-yl-pyrrazolo[1,5-a]-pyrimidine (compound C) or by transfection with small interfering RNAs for AMPKα isoforms α1 and α2. A 2.5-fold increase in CYP4F2 mRNA expression was observed upon treatment of HepG2 cells with 6,7-dihydro-4-hydroxy-3-(2′-hydroxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl)-6-oxo-thieno[2,3-b]pyridine-5-carbonitrile (A-769662), a direct activator for AMPK. In addition, the indirect activators of AMPK, genistein and resveratrol increased CYP4F2 mRNA expression in HepG2 cells. Pretreatment with compound C or 1,2-dihydro-3H-naphtho[2,1-b]pyran-3-one (splitomicin), an inhibitor of the NAD+ activated deacetylase SIRT1, only partially blocked activation of CYP4F2 expression by resveratrol, suggesting that a SIRT1/AMPK-independent pathway also contributes to increased CYP4F2 expression. Compound C greatly diminished genistein activation of CYP4F2 expression. 7H-benz[de]benzimidazo[2,1-a]isoquinoline-7-one-3-carboxylic acid acetate (STO-609), a calmodulin kinase kinase (CaMKK) inhibitor, reduced the level of expression of CYP4F2 elicited by genistein, suggesting that CaMKK activation contributed to AMPK activation by genistein. Transient transfection studies in HepG2 cells with reporter constructs containing the CYP4F2 proximal promoter demonstrated that AICAR, genistein, and

  15. Regulation of Cardiovascular Development by Adenosine and Adenosine-Mediated Embryo Protection

    PubMed Central

    Rivkees, Scott A.; Wendler, Christopher C.

    2012-01-01

    Few signaling molecules have the potential to influence the developing mammal as the nucleoside adenosine. Adenosine levels increase rapidly with tissue hypoxia and inflammation. Adenosine antagonists include the methlyxanthines caffeine and theophylline. The receptors that transduce adenosine action are the A1, A2a, A2b, and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs). We examined how adenosine acts via A1ARs to influence embryo development. Transgenic mice were studied along with embryo cultures. Embryos lacking A1ARs were markedly growth retarded following intrauterine hypoxia exposure. Studies of mice selectively lacking A1AR in the heart identify the heart as a key site of adenosines embryo protective effects. Studies of isolated embryos showed that adenosine plays a key role in modulating embryo cardiac function, especially in the setting of hypoxia. When pregnant mice were treated during embryogenesis with the adenosine antagonist caffeine, adult mice had abnormal heart function. Adenosine acts via A1ARs to play an essential role in protecting the embryo against intra uterine stress, and adenosine antagonists, including caffeine, may be an unwelcome exposure for the embryo. PMID:22423036

  16. Pyridopyrimidine analogues as novel adenosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G Z; Lee, C; Pratt, J K; Perner, R J; Jiang, M Q; Gomtsyan, A; Matulenko, M A; Mao, Y; Koenig, J R; Kim, K H; Muchmore, S; Yu, H; Kohlhaas, K; Alexander, K M; McGaraughty, S; Chu, K L; Wismer, C T; Mikusa, J; Jarvis, M F; Marsh, K; Kowaluk, E A; Bhagwat, S S; Stewart, A O

    2001-08-20

    A novel series of pyridopyrimidine analogues 9 was identified as potent adenosine kinase inhibitors based on the SAR and computational studies. Substitution of the C7 position of the pyridopyrimidino core with C2' substituted pyridino moiety increased the in vivo potency and enhanced oral bioavailability of these adenosine kinase inhibitors.

  17. Enzymatic regeneration of adenosine triphosphate cofactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Regenerating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by enzymatic process which utilizes carbamyl phosphate as phosphoryl donor is technique used to regenerate expensive cofactors. Process allows complex enzymatic reactions to be considered as candidates for large-scale continuous processes.

  18. Nucleoside monophosphate complex structures of the endonuclease domain from the influenza virus polymerase PA subunit reveal the substrate binding site inside the catalytic center.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cong; Lou, Zhiyong; Guo, Yu; Ma, Ming; Chen, Yutao; Liang, Shuaiyi; Zhang, Liang; Chen, Shoudeng; Li, Xuemei; Liu, Yingfang; Bartlam, Mark; Rao, Zihe

    2009-09-01

    Highly pathogenic influenza virus strains currently in circulation pose a significant risk of a global pandemic. Following the reported crystal structure of the endonuclease domain from the avian influenza virus polymerase PA subunit, here we report the results of a systematic X-ray crystallographic analysis of its complex with adenosine, uridine, and thymidine nucleoside monophosphates (NMPs). Electron density corresponding to the monophosphate moiety of each nucleotide was apparent in each NMP complex and bound to the catalytic metal. A hydrophobic site was found to contribute to nucleoside binding. The NMP complex structures should represent the conformation of the bound product after nuclease cleavage. Moreover, one solvent molecule was found to occupy an equivalent position to the second reported Mn(2+) ion, where it mediates the interaction between bound NMPs and the N-terminal PA domain in the presence of the Mg(2+) ion. The results presented here indicate a possible cleavage mechanism and identify a distinct nucleotide binding pocket. The identification of this binding pocket opens a new avenue for anti-influenza drug discovery, targeting the cap-dependent endonuclease, in response to the worldwide threat of influenza. PMID:19587036

  19. Halobacterial adenosine triphosphatases and the adenosine triphosphatase from Halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, Hordur; Sadler, Martha H.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared from various members of the genus Halobacterium contained a Triton X-l00 activated adenosine triphosphatase. The enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum was unstable in solutions of low ionic strength and maximally active in the presence of 3.5 M NaCl. A variety of nucleotide triphosphates was hydrolyzed. MgADP, the product of ATP hydrolysis, was not hydrolyzed and was a competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum was composed of at least 2 and possibly 4 subunits. The 83-kDa and 60-kDa subunits represented about 90 percent of total protein. The 60-kDa subunit reacted with dicyclohexyl-carbodiimide when inhibition was carried out in an acidic medium. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum, possesses properties of an F(1)F(0) as well as an E(1)E(2) ATPase.

  20. Poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-N-methylolacrylamide-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of adenosine phosphates in royal jelly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Zhang, Tianbin; Cheng, Yechun; Jia, Qiong

    2014-07-01

    A polymer monolith microextraction method coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was developed for the determination of adenosine triphosphate, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine monophosphate. The monolithic column was synthesized inside fused-silica capillaries using thermal initiation free-radical polymerization with glycidyl methacrylate as the monomer, ethylene dimethacrylate as the cross-linker, cyclohexanol, and 1-dodecanol as the porogen. N-Methylolacrylamide, an important hydrophilic monomer, was incorporated into the polymerization mixture to enhance the hydrophilicity of the poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) column. The obtained poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-N-methylolacrylamide-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Optimum conditions for the preconcentration and separation of the target adenosines were also investigated. Under the optimum conditions, we obtained acceptable linearities, low limits of detection, and good relative standard deviations. The developed polymer monolith microextraction with high-performance liquid chromatography method exhibited a good performance with recovery values in the range of 76.9-104.7% when applied to the determination of the adenosines in five royal jelly samples.

  1. Role of adenosine kinase in the control of Streptomyces differentiations: Loss of adenosine kinase suppresses sporulation and actinorhodin biosynthesis while inducing hyperproduction of undecylprodigiosin in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Rajkarnikar, Arishma; Kwon, Hyung-Jin; Suh, Joo-Won

    2007-11-16

    Adenosine kinase (ADK) catalyses phosphorylation of adenosine (Ado) and generates adenosine monophosphate (AMP). ADK gene (adk(Sli), an ortholog of SCO2158) was disrupted in Streptomyces lividans by single crossover-mediated vector integration. The adk(Sli) disruption mutant (Deltaadk(Sli)) was devoid of sporulation and a plasmid copy of adk(Sli) restored sporulation ability in Deltaadk(Sli), thus indicating that loss of adk(Sli) abolishes sporulation in S. lividans. Ado supplementation strongly suppressed sporulation ability in S. lividans wild-type (wt), supporting that disruption of adk(Sli) resulted in Ado accumulation, which in turn suppressed sporulation. Cell-free experiments demonstrated that Deltaadk(Sli) lacked ADK activity and in vitro characterization confirms that adk(Sli) encodes ADK. The intracellular level of Ado was highly elevated while the AMP level was significantly reduced after loss of adk(Sli) while Deltaadk(Sli) displayed no significant derivation from wt in the levels of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Notably, Ado supplementation to wt lowered AMP content, albeit not to the level of Deltaadk(Sli), implying that the reduction of AMP level is partially forced by Ado accumulation in Deltaadk(Sli). In Deltaadk(Sli), actinorhodin (ACT) production was suppressed and undecylprodigiosin (RED) production was dramatically enhanced; however, Ado supplementation failed to exert this differential control. A promoter-probe assay verified repression of actII-orf4 and induction of redD in Deltaadk(Sli), substantiating that unknown metabolic shift(s) of ADK-deficiency evokes differential genetic control on secondary metabolism in S. lividans. The present study is the first report revealing the suppressive role of Ado in Streptomyces development and the differential regulatory function of ADK activity in Streptomyces secondary metabolism, although the underlying mechanism has yet to be elucidated.

  2. Optical Aptasensors for Adenosine Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Stella; Lim, Hui Si; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids are among the most researched and applied biomolecules. Their diverse two- and three-dimensional structures in conjunction with their robust chemistry and ease of manipulation provide a rare opportunity for sensor applications. Moreover, their high biocompatibility has seen them being used in the construction of in vivo assays. Various nucleic acid-based devices have been extensively studied as either the principal element in discrete molecule-like sensors or as the main component in the fabrication of sensing devices. The use of aptamers in sensors - aptasensors, in particular, has led to improvements in sensitivity, selectivity, and multiplexing capacity for a wide verity of analytes like proteins, nucleic acids, as well as small biomolecules such as glucose and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This article reviews the progress in the use of aptamers as the principal component in sensors for optical detection of ATP with an emphasis on sensing mechanism, performance, and applications with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. PMID:27446501

  3. 14-Deoxyandrographolide alleviates ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis through stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Samir; Mukhopadhyay, Sibabrata; Bandhopadhyay, Sukdeb; Sen, Gargi; Biswas, Tuli

    2014-03-01

    Andrographis paniculata (AP) is a traditional medicinal plant of Ayurveda. It grows widely in Asia and is prescribed in the treatment of liver diseases. Here we have investigated the beneficial role of 14-deoxyandrographolide (14-DAG), a bioactive diterpenoid from AP, against alcoholic steatosis in rats. 14-DAG was extracted from aerial parts (leaves and stems) of AP. Rats were fed with ethanol for 8 weeks. Animals were treated with 14-DAG during the last 4 weeks of ethanol treatment. In vitro studies were undertaken in a human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line culture. Hepatosteatosis was assessed from histopathological studies of liver sections. Acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA, and triglyceride contents were determined using commercially available kits. Fatty acid synthesis was evaluated from incorporation of 1-(14)C acetate. Regulation of fatty acid oxidation and lipogenesis were monitored with immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation studies. Ethanol exposure led to hepatotoxicity, as evident from the marked enhancement in the levels of AST and ALT. The values decreased almost to control levels in response to 14-DAG treatment. Results showed that ethanol feeding induced deactivation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) that led to enhanced lipid synthesis and decreased fatty acid oxidation, culminating in hepatic fat accumulation. Treatment with 14-DAG activated AMPK through induction of cyclic AMP-protein kinase A pathway. Activation of AMPK was followed by down-regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and fatty acid synthase, leading to suppression of lipogenesis. This was associated with up-regulation of sirtuin 1 and depletion of malonyl-CoA, in favor of increased fatty acid oxidation. 14-DAG controlled ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis by interfering with dysregulation of lipid metabolism. In conclusion, our results indicated that 14-DAG was capable of preventing the development of fatty liver through AMPK

  4. AMP-activated protein kinase controls exercise training- and AICAR-induced increases in SIRT3 and MnSOD.

    PubMed

    Brandauer, Josef; Andersen, Marianne A; Kellezi, Holti; Risis, Steve; Frøsig, Christian; Vienberg, Sara G; Treebak, Jonas T

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial protein deacetylase sirtuin (SIRT) 3 may mediate exercise training-induced increases in mitochondrial biogenesis and improvements in reactive oxygen species (ROS) handling. We determined the requirement of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) for exercise training-induced increases in skeletal muscle abundance of SIRT3 and other mitochondrial proteins. Exercise training for 6.5 weeks increased SIRT3 (p < 0.01) and superoxide dismutase 2 (MnSOD; p < 0.05) protein abundance in quadriceps muscle of wild-type (WT; n = 13-15), but not AMPK α2 kinase dead (KD; n = 12-13) mice. We also observed a strong trend for increased MnSOD abundance in exercise-trained skeletal muscle of healthy humans (p = 0.051; n = 6). To further elucidate a role for AMPK in mediating these effects, we treated WT (n = 7-8) and AMPK α2 KD (n = 7-9) mice with 5-amino-1-β-D-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR). Four weeks of daily AICAR injections (500 mg/kg) resulted in AMPK-dependent increases in SIRT3 (p < 0.05) and MnSOD (p < 0.01) in WT, but not AMPK α2 KD mice. We also tested the effect of repeated AICAR treatment on mitochondrial protein levels in mice lacking the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α KO; n = 9-10). Skeletal muscle SIRT3 and MnSOD protein abundance was reduced in sedentary PGC-1α KO mice (p < 0.01) and AICAR-induced increases in SIRT3 and MnSOD protein abundance was only observed in WT mice (p < 0.05). Finally, the acetylation status of SIRT3 target lysine residues on MnSOD (K122) or oligomycin-sensitivity conferring protein (OSCP; K139) was not altered in either mouse or human skeletal muscle in response to acute exercise. We propose an important role for AMPK in regulating mitochondrial function and ROS handling in skeletal muscle in response to exercise training. PMID:25852572

  5. AMP-activated protein kinase controls exercise training- and AICAR-induced increases in SIRT3 and MnSOD

    PubMed Central

    Brandauer, Josef; Andersen, Marianne A.; Kellezi, Holti; Risis, Steve; Frøsig, Christian; Vienberg, Sara G.; Treebak, Jonas T.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial protein deacetylase sirtuin (SIRT) 3 may mediate exercise training-induced increases in mitochondrial biogenesis and improvements in reactive oxygen species (ROS) handling. We determined the requirement of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) for exercise training-induced increases in skeletal muscle abundance of SIRT3 and other mitochondrial proteins. Exercise training for 6.5 weeks increased SIRT3 (p < 0.01) and superoxide dismutase 2 (MnSOD; p < 0.05) protein abundance in quadriceps muscle of wild-type (WT; n = 13–15), but not AMPK α2 kinase dead (KD; n = 12–13) mice. We also observed a strong trend for increased MnSOD abundance in exercise-trained skeletal muscle of healthy humans (p = 0.051; n = 6). To further elucidate a role for AMPK in mediating these effects, we treated WT (n = 7–8) and AMPK α2 KD (n = 7–9) mice with 5-amino-1-β-D-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR). Four weeks of daily AICAR injections (500 mg/kg) resulted in AMPK-dependent increases in SIRT3 (p < 0.05) and MnSOD (p < 0.01) in WT, but not AMPK α2 KD mice. We also tested the effect of repeated AICAR treatment on mitochondrial protein levels in mice lacking the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α KO; n = 9–10). Skeletal muscle SIRT3 and MnSOD protein abundance was reduced in sedentary PGC-1α KO mice (p < 0.01) and AICAR-induced increases in SIRT3 and MnSOD protein abundance was only observed in WT mice (p < 0.05). Finally, the acetylation status of SIRT3 target lysine residues on MnSOD (K122) or oligomycin-sensitivity conferring protein (OSCP; K139) was not altered in either mouse or human skeletal muscle in response to acute exercise. We propose an important role for AMPK in regulating mitochondrial function and ROS handling in skeletal muscle in response to exercise training. PMID:25852572

  6. Vascular relaxation and cyclic guanosine monophosphate in hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Y.; DiPiero, A.; Lockette, W.

    1986-03-01

    Isolated aortae from hypertensive rats have a decreased relaxation response to acetylcholine (Ach), A23187, and nitroprusside (SNP). Since cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) has been shown to increase in response to these vasodilators, the authors measured cGMP in response to these agents in isolated aortae from normotensive rats and DOCA, 1K1C, and coarctation induced hypertension. cGMP was measured by radioimmunoassay in vessels after exposure to phenylephrine followed by either Ach, A23187, or SNP. The aortae from the hypertensive rats had decreased basal levels of cGMP and attenuated increases in cGMP in response to Ach and A23187. Rises in cGMP in response to SNP were also attenuated in aortae from the hypertensive rats, even at concentrations which induced similar relaxation in normotensive and hypertensive blood vessels. The data suggest that changes in cGMP do not necessarily reflect changes in endothelium independent vascular relaxation in hypertension.

  7. The adenosine neuromodulation system in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rial, Daniel; Lara, Diogo R; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2014-01-01

    The management of schizophrenia endophenotypes, namely positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms is still an open goal, justifying the search of novel therapeutic avenues. We now review the evidence supporting the interest in targeting the adenosine modulation system to counteract the core features of schizophrenia. This interest is forwarded by the combined ability of strategies aimed at bolstering adenosine levels together with the increasingly recognized impact of adenosine A2A receptors to control dopaminergic signaling, working memory, and behavioral sensitization; this is further heralded by the suggested clinical effectiveness of therapies increasing extracellular adenosine such as dipyridamole and allopurinol and the emergent recognition of a role for adenosine in neurodevelopment. Finally, the combined role of A1 and A2A receptors in assisting the implementation of adaptive changes and encoding of information salience in neuronal circuits together with the adaptive alterations of A1 and A2A receptor density upon brain dysfunction prompts the novel working hypothesis that the parallel imbalance of adenosine formation and of A1 and A2A receptors blurs the adequate encoding of information salience in neuronal circuits, which we propose to be a core pathogenic feature in the development of schizophrenia endophenotypes. This proposal should also provide a rationale to assist the design of future therapeutic intervention targeting the adenosine modulation system to manage schizophrenia endophenotypes: these should not be based only on an attempt to target adenosine kinase-A1 receptors or only A2A receptors, but should instead simultaneously target these two arms of the adenosine modulation system. PMID:25175974

  8. Adenosine receptors as drug targets — what are the challenges?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine signalling has long been a target for drug development, with adenosine itself or its derivatives being used clinically since the 1940s. In addition, methylxanthines such as caffeine have profound biological effects as antagonists at adenosine receptors. Moreover, drugs such as dipyridamole and methotrexate act by enhancing the activation of adenosine receptors. There is strong evidence that adenosine has a functional role in many diseases, and several pharmacological compounds specifically targeting individual adenosine receptors — either directly or indirectly — have now entered the clinic. However, only one adenosine receptor-specific agent — the adenosine A2A receptor agonist regadenoson (Lexiscan; Astellas Pharma) — has so far gained approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Here, we focus on the biology of adenosine signalling to identify hurdles in the development of additional pharmacological compounds targeting adenosine receptors and discuss strategies to overcome these challenges. PMID:23535933

  9. Mast Cell Adenosine Receptors Function: A Focus on the A3 Adenosine Receptor and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rudich, Noam; Ravid, Katya; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine is a metabolite, which has long been implicated in a variety of inflammatory processes. Inhaled adenosine provokes bronchoconstriction in asthmatics or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, but not in non-asthmatics. This hyper responsiveness to adenosine appears to be mediated by mast cell activation. These observations have marked the receptor that mediates the bronchoconstrictor effect of adenosine on mast cells (MCs), as an attractive drug candidate. Four subtypes (A1, A2a, A2b, and A3) of adenosine receptors have been cloned and shown to display distinct tissue distributions and functions. Animal models have firmly established the ultimate role of the A3 adenosine receptor (A3R) in mediating hyper responsiveness to adenosine in MCs, although the influence of the A2b adenosine receptor was confirmed as well. In contrast, studies of the A3R in humans have been controversial. In this review, we summarize data on the role of different adenosine receptors in mast cell regulation of inflammation and pathology, with a focus on the common and distinct functions of the A3R in rodent and human MCs. The relevance of mouse studies to the human is discussed. PMID:22675325

  10. The adenosine salvage pathway as an alternative to mitochondrial production of ATP in maturing mammalian oocytes.

    PubMed

    Scantland, Sara; Tessaro, Irene; Macabelli, Carolina H; Macaulay, Angus D; Cagnone, Gaël; Fournier, Éric; Luciano, Alberto M; Robert, Claude

    2014-09-01

    Although the oocyte is the largest cell in the body and an unavoidable phase in life, its physiology is still poorly understood, and other cell types provide little insight into its unique nature. Even basic cellular functions in the oocyte such as energy metabolism are not yet fully understood. It is known that the mitochondria of the female gamete exhibit an immature form characterized by limited energy production from glucose and oxidative phosphorylation. We show that the bovine oocyte uses alternative means to maintain ATP production during maturation, namely, the adenosine salvage pathway. Meiosis resumption is triggered by destruction of cyclic AMP by phosphodiesterases producing adenosine monophosphate that is converted into ATP by adenylate kinases and creatine kinases. Inhibition of these enzymes decreased ATP production, and addition of their substrates restored ATP production in denuded oocytes. Addition of phosphocreatine to the oocyte maturation medium influenced the phenotype of the resulting blastocysts. We propose a model in which adenylate kinases and creatine kinases act as drivers of ATP production from added AMP during oocyte maturation.

  11. [Adenosine deaminase in experimental trypanosomiasis: future implications].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguilar, Mary Carmen; Rondón-Mercado, Rocío

    2015-09-01

    The adenosine deaminase represents a control point in the regulation of extracellular adenosine levels, thus playing a critical role in the modulation of purinergic responses to certain pathophysiological events. Several studies have shown that serum and plasma enzyme levels are elevated in some diseases caused by microorganisms, which may represent a compensatory mechanism due to the elevated levels of adenosine and the release of inflammatory mediators. Recent research indicates that adenosine deaminase activity decreases and affects hematological parameters of infected animals with Trypanosoma evansi, so that such alterations could have implications in the pathogenesis of the disease. In addition, the enzyme has been detected in this parasite; allowing the inference that it could be associated with the vital functions of the same, similar to what occurs in mammals. This knowledge may be useful in the association of chemotherapy with specific inhibitors of the enzyme in future studies.

  12. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity.

  13. Adenosine inhibits glutamatergic input to basal forebrain cholinergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hawryluk, J. M.; Ferrari, L. L.; Keating, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine has been proposed as an endogenous homeostatic sleep factor that accumulates during waking and inhibits wake-active neurons to promote sleep. It has been specifically hypothesized that adenosine decreases wakefulness and promotes sleep recovery by directly inhibiting wake-active neurons of the basal forebrain (BF), particularly BF cholinergic neurons. We previously showed that adenosine directly inhibits BF cholinergic neurons. Here, we investigated 1) how adenosine modulates glutamatergic input to BF cholinergic neurons and 2) how adenosine uptake and adenosine metabolism are involved in regulating extracellular levels of adenosine. Our experiments were conducted using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices. We found that in BF cholinergic neurons, adenosine reduced the amplitude of AMPA-mediated evoked glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and decreased the frequency of spontaneous and miniature EPSCs through presynaptic A1 receptors. Thus we have demonstrated that in addition to directly inhibiting BF cholinergic neurons, adenosine depresses excitatory inputs to these neurons. It is therefore possible that both direct and indirect inhibition may synergistically contribute to the sleep-promoting effects of adenosine in the BF. We also found that blocking the influx of adenosine through the equilibrative nucleoside transporters or inhibiting adenosine kinase and adenosine deaminase increased endogenous adenosine inhibitory tone, suggesting a possible mechanism through which adenosine extracellular levels in the basal forebrain are regulated. PMID:22357797

  14. Raloxifene induces autophagy-dependent cell death in breast cancer cells via the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Eun; Kim, Yunha; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Kim, Sung-Bae; Suh, Nayoung; Lee, Jung Shin; Choi, Eun Kyung; Koh, Jae-Young; Hwang, Jung Jin; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) that binds to the estrogen receptor (ER), and exhibits potent anti-tumor and autophagy-inducing effects in breast cancer cells. However, the mechanism of raloxifene-induced cell death and autophagy is not well-established. So, we analyzed mechanism underlying death and autophagy induced by raloxifene in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Treatment with raloxifene significantly induced death in MCF-7 cells. Raloxifene accumulated GFP-LC3 puncta and increased the level of autophagic marker proteins, such as LC3-II, BECN1, and ATG12-ATG5 conjugates, indicating activated autophagy. Raloxifene also increased autophagic flux indicators, the cleavage of GFP from GFP-LC3 and only red fluorescence-positive puncta in mRFP-GFP-LC3-expressing cells. An autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), suppressed the level of LC3-II and blocked the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta. Moreover, siRNA targeting BECN1 markedly reversed cell death and the level of LC3-II increased by raloxifene. Besides, raloxifene-induced cell death was not related to cleavage of caspases-7, -9, and PARP. These results indicate that raloxifene activates autophagy-dependent cell death but not apoptosis. Interestingly, raloxifene decreased the level of intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and activated the AMPK/ULK1 pathway. However it was not suppressed the AKT/mTOR pathway. Addition of ATP decreased the phosphorylation of AMPK as well as the accumulation of LC3-II, finally attenuating raloxifene-induced cell death. Our current study demonstrates that raloxifene induces autophagy via the activation of AMPK by sensing decreases in ATP, and that the overactivation of autophagy promotes cell death and thereby mediates the anti-cancer effects of raloxifene in breast cancer cells.

  15. Adenosine modulation of [Ca2+]i in cerebellar granular cells: multiple adenosine receptors involved.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Javier; Fernández, Mercedes; Ros, Manuel; Blanco, Pablo

    2003-12-01

    Elimination of adenosine by addition of adenosine deaminase (ADA) to the media leads to alterations in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in cerebellar granular cells. Adenosine deaminase brings about increases or decreases in [Ca(2+)](i) depending on the previous activation state of the cell. These effects are dependent on the catalytic activity of adenosine deaminase, since its previous catalytic inactivation with Hg(2+) prevents the above-mentioned changes in intracellular calcium. Extracellular calcium is required for the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) promoted by ADA. This rise is insensitive to thapsigargin, but sensitive to micromolar concentrations of Ni(2+). Toxins specific for L, N and P/Q calcium channels do not overtly reduce this effect. N(6)-Cyclopentyl adenosine (CPA), an A(1) receptor agonist, produces a partial reversion of ADA effects, while CGS21680, A(2A)/A(2B) receptor agonist, slightly enhances them. Expression of A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3) adenosine receptor mRNAs was detected in cerebellar granular cell cultures. These results suggest that adenosine modulate [Ca(2+)](i) in cerebellar granule cells through different adenosine receptor subtypes which, at least in part, seem to act through R-type calcium channels.

  16. Nitric oxide and cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in the eye.

    PubMed

    Murad, Ferid

    2008-06-01

    This brief review describes the components and pathways utilized in nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling. Since the discovery of the effects of NO and cGMP on smooth muscle relaxation about 30 years ago, the field has expanded in many directions such that many, but not all, biochemical and biological effects seem to be regulated by these unique signaling molecules. While many of the effects of NO are due to activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) that can be considered the receptor for NO, cGMP, in turn, can activate a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) to phosphorylate an array of proteins. Some of the effects of cGMP can be independent of PKG and are due to effects on ion channels or cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases. Also, some of the effects of NO can be independent of sGC activation. The isoenzymes and macromolecules that participate in these signaling pathways can serve as molecular targets to identify compounds that increase or decrease their activation and thus serve as chemical leads for discovering novel drugs for a variety of diseases. Some examples are given. However, with about 90,000 publications in the field since our first reports in 1977, this brief review can only give the readers a sample of the excitement and opportunities we have found in this cell signaling system.

  17. [Identification of thiamine monophosphate hydrolyzing enzymes in chicken liver].

    PubMed

    Kolos, I K; Makarchikov, A F

    2014-01-01

    In animals, thiamine monophosphate (TMP) is an intermediate on the path of thiamine diphosphate, the coenzyme form of vitamin B1, degradation. The enzymes involved in TMP metabolism in animal tissues are not identified hitherto. The aim of this work was to study TMP hydrolysis in chicken liver. Two phosphatases have been found to contribute to TMP hydrolysis in liver homogenate. The first one, possessing a maximal activity at pH 6.0, is soluble, whereas the second one represents a membrane-bound enzyme with a pH optimum of 9.0. Membrane-bound TMPase activity was enhanced 1.7-fold by 5 mM Mg2+ ions and strongly inhibited by levamisole in uncompetitive manner with K1 of 53 μM, indicating the involvement of alkaline phosphatase. An apparent Km of alkaline phosphatase for TMP was calculated from the Hanes plot to be 0.6 mM. The soluble TMPase has an apparent Km of 0.7 mM; this enzyme is Mg2+ independent and insensitive to levamisole. As estimated by gel filtration on a Toyopearl HW-55 column, the soluble enzyme has a molecular mass of 17.8 kDa, TMPase activity being eluted simultaneously with peaks of flavinmononucleotide and p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity. Thus, TMP appears to be a physiological substrate for a low-molecular weight acid phosphatase, also known as low-molecular-weight protein phosphotyrosine phosphatase.

  18. Phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate is involved in toxoplasma apicoplast biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tawk, Lina; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Montcourrier, Philippe; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Merezegue, Fabrice; Richard, Véronique; Payrastre, Bernard; Meissner, Markus; Vial, Henri J; Roy, Christian; Wengelnik, Kai; Lebrun, Maryse

    2011-02-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause devastating diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. They harbour a plastid-like, non-photosynthetic organelle of algal origin, the apicoplast, which fulfils critical functions for parasite survival. Because of its essential and original metabolic pathways, the apicoplast has become a target for the development of new anti-apicomplexan drugs. Here we show that the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate (PI3P) is involved in apicoplast biogenesis in Toxoplasma gondii. In yeast and mammalian cells, PI3P is concentrated on early endosomes and regulates trafficking of endosomal compartments. Imaging of PI3P in T. gondii showed that the lipid was associated with the apicoplast and apicoplast protein-shuttling vesicles. Interference with regular PI3P function by over-expression of a PI3P specific binding module in the parasite led to the accumulation of vesicles containing apicoplast peripheral membrane proteins around the apicoplast and, ultimately, to the loss of the organelle. Accordingly, inhibition of the PI3P-synthesising kinase interfered with apicoplast biogenesis. These findings point to an unexpected implication for this ubiquitous lipid and open new perspectives on how nuclear encoded proteins traffic to the apicoplast. This study also highlights the possibility of developing specific pharmacological inhibitors of the parasite PI3-kinase as novel anti-apicomplexan drugs. PMID:21379336

  19. Bioconjugation of zirconium uridine monophosphate: application to myoglobin direct electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuanbiao; Jian, Fangfang; Bai, Qian

    2008-03-14

    Porous nano-granule of zirconium uridine monophosphate, Zr(UMP)2.H2O is, for the first time, synthesized under mild experimental conditions and applied to the bioconjugation of myoglobin (Mb) to realize its direct electron transfer. UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopies prove that Mb in the Zr(UMP)2.H2O film maintains its secondary structure similar to the native state. The conjugation film of the Mb-Zr(UMP)2.H2O on the glassy carbon (GC) electrode gives a well-defined and quasi-reversible cyclic voltammogram, which reflects the direct electron transfer of the heme Fe III/Fe II couple of Mb. On the basis of the satisfying bioelectrocatalysis of the nano-conjugation of Mb and genetic substrate, a kind of mediator-free biosensor for H2O2 is developed. The linear range for H2O2 detection is estimated to be 3.92-180.14 microM. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) and the detection limit based on the signal-to-noise ratio of 3 are found to be 196.1 microM and 1.52 microM, respectively. Both the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant and the detection limit herein are much lower than currently reported values from other Mb films. This kind of sensor possesses excellent stability, long-term life (more than 20 days) and good reproducibility. PMID:18180152

  20. Excretion of intracorporeal cadmium with S-benzoylthiamin monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, J.; Kaneda, Y.

    1995-05-01

    Examination was made of the excretion of intracorporeal methylmercury into body hair by the administration of thiamin tetrahydrofurfuryl disulfide (TTFD) which caused significant increase in mercury content in human mustache. The thiamin derivative, S-benzoylthiamin monophosphate (BTMP) failed to have such effect. The mechanism of mercury excretion is thus based on the side chain structure of TTFD, mercaptan. At the start of the 20th century in Japan, many multiparae were found to have itai-itai disease, the main symptom of which is general pain. The cause of this disease was considered cadmium deposition on the bone from sourced such as soil and river water which contaminated rice and cereals. The previous system for mercury was applied based on cadmium content variation in human mustache. Although TTFD worked well in the mercury excretion system, the usual dosage of TTFD administered orally did not cause significant increase in cadmium in the mustache. BTMP appeared to exert effect by generating thiol-type thiamin. Experiments in vitro should be conducted to demonstrate the chelating effects of thiol-type thiamin. It is quite important to find evidence for cadmium excretion from human body. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Bioconjugation of zirconium uridine monophosphate: application to myoglobin direct electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuanbiao; Jian, Fangfang; Bai, Qian

    2008-03-14

    Porous nano-granule of zirconium uridine monophosphate, Zr(UMP)2.H2O is, for the first time, synthesized under mild experimental conditions and applied to the bioconjugation of myoglobin (Mb) to realize its direct electron transfer. UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopies prove that Mb in the Zr(UMP)2.H2O film maintains its secondary structure similar to the native state. The conjugation film of the Mb-Zr(UMP)2.H2O on the glassy carbon (GC) electrode gives a well-defined and quasi-reversible cyclic voltammogram, which reflects the direct electron transfer of the heme Fe III/Fe II couple of Mb. On the basis of the satisfying bioelectrocatalysis of the nano-conjugation of Mb and genetic substrate, a kind of mediator-free biosensor for H2O2 is developed. The linear range for H2O2 detection is estimated to be 3.92-180.14 microM. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) and the detection limit based on the signal-to-noise ratio of 3 are found to be 196.1 microM and 1.52 microM, respectively. Both the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant and the detection limit herein are much lower than currently reported values from other Mb films. This kind of sensor possesses excellent stability, long-term life (more than 20 days) and good reproducibility.

  2. Ag(+)-mediated assembly of 5'-guanosine monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Loo, Kristine; Degtyareva, Natalya; Park, Jihae; Sengupta, Bidisha; Reddish, Michaeal; Rogers, Christopher C; Bryant, Andrea; Petty, Jeffrey T

    2010-04-01

    Polymorphic forms of nucleic acids provide platforms for new nanomaterials, and transition metal cations give access to alternative arrangements of nucleobases by coordinating with electron-rich functional groups. Interaction of Ag(+) with 5'-guanosine monophosphate (5'-GMP) is considered in this work. Ag(+) promotes nucleotide stacking and aggregation, as indicated by the increased viscosity of 5'-GMP solutions with Ag(+), magnification of the circular dichroism response of guanine by Ag(+), and exothermic reactions between Ag(+) and guanine derivatives. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies show that the reaction is favored starting at 10 microM 5'-GMP. Utilizing the exothermic heat change associated with reaction of Ag(+) with 5'-GMP, local structure within the aggregate was assessed. On the basis of the salt dependence of the reaction and comparison with the corresponding nucleoside, the dianionic phosphate of 5'-GMP is one binding site for Ag(+), although this electrostatic interaction is not a dominant contribution to the overall heat change. Another binding site is the N7 on the nucleobase, as determined via studies with 7-deazaguanosine. Besides this binding site, Ag(+) also associates with the O6, as earlier studies deduced from the shift in the carbonyl stretching frequency associated with adduct formation. With these two binding sites on the nucleobase, the empirical stoichiometry of approximately 1 Ag(+):nucleobase derived from the calorimetry studies indicates that Ag(+) coordinates two nucleobases. The proposed structural model is a Ag(+)-mediated guanine dimer within a base stacked aggregate. PMID:20205377

  3. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nicholas D; Regan, John M

    2015-12-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD(+), respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP(+), respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190 mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  4. Crystallization of the glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated protein kinase β subunit and preliminary X-ray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Polekhina, Galina Feil, Susanne C.; Gupta, Abhilasha; O’Donnell, Paul; Stapleton, David; Parker, Michael W.

    2005-01-01

    The glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated kinase β subunit has been crystallized in the presence of β-cyclodextrin. The structure has been determined by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from selenomethionine-substituted protein. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an intracellular energy sensor that regulates metabolism in response to energy demand and supply by adjusting the ATP-generating and ATP-consuming pathways. AMPK potentially plays a critical role in diabetes and obesity as it is known to be activated by metforin and rosiglitazone, drugs used for the treatment of type II diabetes. AMPK is a heterotrimer composed of a catalytic α subunit and two regulatory subunits, β and γ. Mutations in the γ subunit are known to cause glycogen accumulation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias. Recently, a functional glycogen-binding domain (GBD) has been identified in the β subunit. Here, the crystallization of GBD in the presence of β-cyclodextrin is reported together with preliminary X-ray data analysis allowing the determination of the structure by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from a selenomethionine-substituted protein.

  5. MOLECULAR PROBES FOR EXTRACELLULAR ADENOSINE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Ukena, Dieter; Padgett, William; Kirk, Kenneth L.; Daly, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Derivatives of adenosine receptor agonists (N6-phenyladenosines) and antagonists (1,3-dialkyl-8-phenylxanthines) bearing functionalized chains suitable for attachment to other molecules have been reported [Jacobson et al., J. med. Chem. 28, 1334 and 1341 (1985)]. The “functionalized congener” approach has been extended to the synthesis of spectroscopic and other probes for adenosine receptors that retain high affinity (Ki ~ 10−9 −10−8 M) in A1-receptor binding. The probes have been synthesized from an antagonist xanthine amine congener (XAC) and an adenosine amine congener (ADAC). [3H]ADAC has been synthesized and found to bind highly specifically to A1-adenosine receptors of rat and calf cerebral cortical membranes with KD values of 1.4 and 0.34 nM respectively. The higher affinity in the bovine brain, seen also with many of the probes derived from ADAC and XAC, is associated with phenyl substituents. The spectroscopic probes contain a reporter group attached at a distal site of the functionalized chain. These bifunctional ligands may contain a spin label (e.g. the nitroxyl radical TEMPO) for electron spin resonance spectroscopy, or a fluorescent dye, including fluorescein and 4-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD), or labels for 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Potential applications of the spectroscopic probes in characterization of adenosine receptors are discussed. PMID:3036153

  6. Determination of adenosine effects and adenosine receptors in murine corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Rita C; Giachini, Fernanda R C; Carneiro, Fernando S; Leite, Romulo; Inscho, Edward W; Webb, R Clinton

    2007-08-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that adenosine, in murine corpora cavernosa, produces direct relaxation of smooth muscle cells and inhibition of contractile responses mediated by sympathetic nerve stimulation. Penes were excised from anesthetized male C57BL/6 mice, dissected, and cavernosal strips were mounted to record isometric force. Adenosine, 2-chloroadenosine (stable analog of adenosine), and 2-phenylaminoadenosine (CV1808) (A2(A)/A2(B) agonist) produced concentration-dependent relaxations of phenylephrine-contracted tissues. Relaxation to 2-chloroadenosine was inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, by 2-(2-furanyl)-7-(2-phenylethyl)-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine (SCH58261; A2(A) antagonist; 10(-9)-10(-6) M) and N-(4-acetylphenyl)-2-[4-(2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-2,6-dioxo-1,3-dipropyl-1H-purin-8-yl)phenoxy]acetamida (MRS1706; A2(B) antagonist; 10(-8)-10(-6) M). The combination of both antagonists abrogated 2-chloroadenosine-induced relaxation. Electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1-32 Hz) of adrenergic nerves produced frequency-dependent contractions that were inhibited by compounds that increase adenosine levels, such as 5'-iodotubercidin (adenosine kinase inhibitor), erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (adenosine deaminase inhibitor), and dipyridamole (inhibitor of adenosine transport). The adenosine A1 receptor agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (C8031) right-shifted contractile responses to EFS, with a significant inhibitory effect at 10(-6) M. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (C101) (10(-7) M) enhanced contractile responses to EFS and eliminated the inhibitory effects of 5'-iodotubercidin. Dipyridamole and 5'-iodotubercidin had no effect on adenosine-mediated relaxation. In summary, adenosine directly relaxes cavernosal smooth muscle cells, by the activation of A2(A)/A2(B) receptor subtypes. In addition, adenosine negatively modulates sympathetic neurotransmission, by A1 receptor

  7. Detection of adenosine triphosphate through polymerization-induced aggregation of actin-conjugated gold/silver nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yu-Ju; Shiang, Yen-Chun; Chen, Li-Yi; Hsu, Chia-Lun; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a simple and selective nanosensor for the optical detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using globular actin-conjugated gold/silver nanorods (G-actin-Au/Ag NRs). By simply mixing G-actin and Au/Ag NRs (length ˜56 nm and diameter ˜12 nm), G-actin-Au/Ag NRs were prepared which were stable in physiological solutions (25 mM Tris-HCl, 150 mM NaCl, 5.0 mM KCl, 3.0 mM MgCl2 and 1.0 mM CaCl2; pH 7.4). Introduction of ATP into the G-actin-Au/Ag NR solutions in the presence of excess G-actin induced the formation of filamentous actin-conjugated Au/Ag NR aggregates through ATP-induced polymerization of G-actin. When compared to G-actin-modified spherical Au nanoparticles having a size of 13 nm or 56 nm, G-actin-Au/Ag NRs provided better sensitivity for ATP, mainly because the longitudinal surface plasmon absorbance of the Au/Ag NR has a more sensitive response to aggregation. This G-actin-Au/Ag NR probe provided high sensitivity (limit of detection 25 nM) for ATP with remarkable selectivity (>10-fold) over other adenine nucleotides (adenosine, adenosine monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate) and nucleoside triphosphates (guanosine triphosphate, cytidine triphosphate and uridine triphosphate). It also allowed the determination of ATP concentrations in plasma samples without conducting tedious sample pretreatments; the only necessary step was simple dilution. Our experimental results are in good agreement with those obtained from a commercial luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay. Our simple, sensitive and selective approach appears to have a practical potential for the clinical diagnosis of diseases (e.g. cystic fibrosis) associated with changes in ATP concentrations.

  8. Effects of different concentrations of metal ions on degradation of adenosine triphosphate in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fillets stored at 4°C: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Qin, Na; Zhang, Longteng; Lv, Jian; Li, Qingzheng; Luo, Yongkang

    2016-11-15

    The impact of different concentrations of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) on the degradation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the influence of these ions on the activity of adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMP-deaminase) and acid phosphatase (ACP) in common carp fillets (in vivo) during 4°C storage was examined. The content of ATP, inosine monophosphate (IMP), and hypoxanthine (Hx), and the activity of AMP-deaminase and ACP were determined. Results indicated that the effects of different concentrations of six kinds of metal ions on AMP-deaminase and ACP were not the same. Na(+), K(+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) enhanced AMP-deaminase activity, which led to the rapid degradation of ATP and to the generation of a large quantity of IMP within a short time. Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) delayed the change in AMP-deaminase and ACP activity in carp and caused a further delay in the degradation of ATP. Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) inhibited ACP activity, which reduced the decomposition of IMP and the formation of Hx. PMID:27283700

  9. Working memory and the homeostatic control of brain adenosine by adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Singer, P; McGarrity, S; Shen, H-Y; Boison, D; Yee, B K

    2012-06-28

    The neuromodulator adenosine maintains brain homeostasis and regulates complex behaviour via activation of inhibitory and excitatory adenosine receptors (ARs) in a brain region-specific manner. AR antagonists such as caffeine have been shown to ameliorate cognitive impairments in animal disease models but their effects on learning and memory in normal animals are equivocal. An alternative approach to reduce AR activation is to lower the extracellular tone of adenosine, which can be achieved by up-regulating adenosine kinase (ADK), the key enzyme of metabolic adenosine clearance. However, mice that globally over-express an Adk transgene ('Adk-tg' mice) were devoid of a caffeine-like pro-cognitive profile; they instead exhibited severe spatial memory deficits. This may be mechanistically linked to cortical/hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction because the motor response to acute MK-801 was also potentiated in Adk-tg mice. Here, we evaluated the extent to which the behavioural phenotypes of Adk-tg mice might be modifiable by up-regulating adenosine levels in the cortex/hippocampus. To this end, we investigated mutant 'fb-Adk-def' mice in which ADK expression was specifically reduced in the telencephalon leading to a selective increase in cortical/hippocampal adenosine, while the rest of the brain remained as adenosine-deficient as in Adk-tg mice. The fb-Adk-def mice showed an even greater impairment in spatial working memory and a more pronounced motor response to NMDAR blockade than Adk-tg mice. These outcomes suggest that maintenance of cortical/hippocampal adenosine homeostasis is essential for effective spatial memory and deviation in either direction is detrimental with increased expression seemingly more disruptive than decreased expression.

  10. Pain-relieving prospects for adenosine receptors and ectonucleotidases

    PubMed Central

    Zylka, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine receptor agonists have potent antinociceptive effects in diverse preclinical models of chronic pain. In contrast, the efficacy of adenosine or adenosine receptor agonists at treating pain in humans is unclear. Two ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine in nociceptive neurons were recently identified. When injected spinally, these enzymes have long-lasting adenosine A1 receptor (A1R)-dependent antinociceptive effects in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. Furthermore, recent findings indicate that spinal adenosine A2A receptor activation can enduringly inhibit neuropathic pain symptoms. Collectively, these studies suggest the possibility of treating chronic pain in humans by targeting specific adenosine receptor subtypes in anatomically defined regions with agonists or with ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine. PMID:21236731

  11. Adenosine induced coronary spasm – A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Arora, P.; Bhatia, V.; Arora, M.; Kaul, U.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is commonly used as a pharmacological agent in myocardial perfusion imaging, as an antiarrhythmic agent, and in Cath Lab. during PCI for treating no reflow phenomenon. Coronary spasm has been reported following adenosine injection during stress imaging. We report a rare complication with ST segment elevation, following adenosine injection, given for treatment of supraventricular tachycardia. PMID:24581102

  12. Controls of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Signaling Activity by 5’-AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activation With Examples in Human Bladder Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Generally, both lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and hypoxia-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) effects are alleviated through differential posttranslational modification of NF-κB phosphorylation after pretreatment with 5´-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators such as 5´-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) or the hypoglycemic agent metformin. We found that AICAR or metformin acts as a regulator of LPS/NF-κB-or hypoxia/NF-κB-mediated cyclooxygenase induction by an AMPK-dependent mechanism with interactions between p65-NF-κB phosphorylation and acetylation, including in a human bladder cancer cell line (T24). In summary, we highlighted the regulatory interactions of AMPK activity on NF-κB induction, particularly in posttranslational phosphorylation and acetylation of NF-κB under inflammatory conditions or hypoxia environment. PMID:27706018

  13. 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide Riboside Induces Apoptosis Through AMP-activated Protein Kinase-independent and NADPH Oxidase-dependent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wi, Sae Mi; Lee, Ki-Young

    2014-10-01

    It is debatable whether AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation is involved in anti-apoptotic or pro-apoptotic signaling. AICAR treatment increases AMPK-α1 phosphorylation, decreases intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and significantly increases Annexin V-positive cells, DNA laddering, and caspase activity in human myeloid cell. AMPK activation is therefore implicated in apoptosis. However, AMPK-α1-knockdown THP-1 cells are more sensitive to apoptosis than control THP-1 cells are, suggesting that the apoptosis is AMPK-independent. Low doses of AICAR induce cell proliferation, whereas high doses of AICAR suppress cell proliferation. Moreover, these effects are significantly correlated with the downregulation of intracellular ROS, strongly suggesting that AICAR-induced apoptosis is critically associated with the inhibition of NADPH oxidase by AICAR. Collectively, our results demonstrate that in AICAR-induced apoptosis, intracellular ROS levels are far more relevant than AMPK activation.

  14. A cell-based screening identifies compounds from the stem of Momordica charantia that overcome insulin resistance and activate AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsueh-Ling; Huang, Hsin-Kai; Chang, Chi-I; Tsai, Chung-Pao; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2008-08-27

    Treatment of insulin resistance is a critical strategy in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. The crude extracts from all parts of Momordica charantia L. have been reported by many studies for the effective treatment of diabetes and related complications. However, the exact ingredients responsible for the hypoglycemic effect and the underlying mechanism of their actions have not been well characterized because of the lack of a proper assay and screening system. A new cell-based, nonradioactive, and nonfluorescent screening method was demonstrated in this study to screen for natural products from the stem of M. charantia, aiming to identify hypoglycemic components that can overcome cellular insulin resistance. The results suggest triterpenoids being potential hypoglycemic components of the plant and the mechanism underlying their action involving AMP-activated protein kinase.

  15. Body weight management effect of burdock (Arctium lappa L.) root is associated with the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Daih-Huang; Hung, Ming-Chi; Hung, Chao-Ming; Liu, Li-Min; Chen, Fu-An; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Ho, Chi-Tang; Way, Tzong-Der

    2012-10-01

    Burdock (Arcticum lappa L.) root is used in folk medicine and also as a vegetable in Asian countries. In the present study, burdock root treatment significantly reduced body weight in rats. To evaluate the bioactive compounds, we successively extracted the burdock root with ethanol (AL-1), and fractionated it with n-hexane (AL-2), ethyl acetate (AL-3), n-butanol (AL-4), and water (AL-5). Among these fractions, AL-2 contained components with the most effective hypolipidemic potential in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. AL-2 decreased the expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) and inhibited the activity of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) by stimulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) through the LKB1 pathway. Three active compounds were identified from the AL-2, namely α-linolenic acid, methyl α-linolenate, and methyl oleate. These results suggest that burdock root is expected to be useful for body weight management.

  16. Body weight management effect of burdock (Arctium lappa L.) root is associated with the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Daih-Huang; Hung, Ming-Chi; Hung, Chao-Ming; Liu, Li-Min; Chen, Fu-An; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Ho, Chi-Tang; Way, Tzong-Der

    2012-10-01

    Burdock (Arcticum lappa L.) root is used in folk medicine and also as a vegetable in Asian countries. In the present study, burdock root treatment significantly reduced body weight in rats. To evaluate the bioactive compounds, we successively extracted the burdock root with ethanol (AL-1), and fractionated it with n-hexane (AL-2), ethyl acetate (AL-3), n-butanol (AL-4), and water (AL-5). Among these fractions, AL-2 contained components with the most effective hypolipidemic potential in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. AL-2 decreased the expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) and inhibited the activity of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) by stimulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) through the LKB1 pathway. Three active compounds were identified from the AL-2, namely α-linolenic acid, methyl α-linolenate, and methyl oleate. These results suggest that burdock root is expected to be useful for body weight management. PMID:25005949

  17. Design of inhibitors of orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase using bioisosteric replacement and determination of inhibition kinetics.

    PubMed

    Poduch, Ewa; Bello, Angelica M; Tang, Sishi; Fujihashi, Masahiro; Pai, Emil F; Kotra, Lakshmi P

    2006-08-10

    Inhibitors of orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) have applications in RNA viral, parasitic, and other infectious diseases. ODCase catalyzes the decarboxylation of orotidine monophosphate (OMP), producing uridine monophosphate (UMP). Novel inhibitors 6-amino-UMP and 6-cyano-UMP were designed on the basis of the substructure volumes in the substrate OMP and in an inhibitor of ODCase, barbituric acid monophosphate, BMP. A new enzyme assay method using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was developed to investigate the inhibition kinetics of ODCase. The reaction rates were measured by monitoring the heat generated during the decarboxylation reaction of orotidine monophosphate. Kinetic parameters (k(cat) = 21 s(-1) and KM = 5 microM) and the molar enthalpy (DeltaH(app) = 5 kcal/mol) were determined for the decarboxylation of the substrate by ODCase. Competitive inhibition of the enzyme was observed and the inhibition constants (Ki) were determined to be 12.4 microM and 29 microM for 6-aza-UMP and 6-cyano-UMP, respectively. 6-Amino-UMP was found to be among the potent inhibitors of ODCase, having an inhibition constant of 840 nM. We reveal here the first inhibitors of ODCase designed by the principles of bioisosterism and a novel method of using isothermal calorimetry for enzyme inhibition studies.

  18. Effects of adenosine infusion into renal interstitium on renal hemodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowska, D.; Granger, J.P.; Knox, F.G.

    1987-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the hemodynamic effects of exogenous adenosine in the interstitium of the rat kidney. Adenosine or its analogues were infused into the renal interstitium by means of chronically implanted capsules. In fusion of adenosine decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from 0.81 +/- 0.06 to 0.37 +/- 0.06 ml/min while having no effect on renal blood flow (RBF). The metabolically stable analogue, 2-chloradenosine (2-ClAdo), decreased GFR from 0.73 +/- 0.07 to 021 +/- 0.06 ml/min. Interstitial infusion of theophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist, completely abolished the effects of adenosine and 2-ClAdo on GFR. The distribution of adenosine, when infused into the renal interstitium, was determined using radiolabeled 5'-(N-ethyl)-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a metabolically stable adenosine agonist. After continuous infusion, (/sup 3/H)NECA was distributed throughout the kidney. The effects of NECA to reduce GFR were similar to those of adenosine and 2-ClAdo. They conclude that increased levels of adenosine in the renal interstitium markedly decrease GFR without affecting RBF in steady-state conditions. The marked effects of adenosine agonists during their infusion into the renal interstitium and the complete blockade of these effects by theophylline suggest an extracellular action of adenosine.

  19. The role of cyclic AMP and its protein kinase in mediating acetylcholine release and the action of adenosine at frog motor nerve endings.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, J. K.; Silinsky, E. M.; Solsona, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    1. The importance of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and its protein kinase (protein kinase A, PKA) in promoting acetylcholine (ACh) release was studied at frog motor nerve endings. The effects of cyclic AMP-dependent protein phosphorylation on the action of adenosine receptor agonists were also investigated. 2. Cyclic AMP was delivered to a local region of the cytoplasm just beneath the plasma membrane of motor nerve endings using phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) as a vehicle. Cyclic AMP in liposomes produced a parallel reduction in the mean level of evoked ACh release (m) and spontaneous ACh release (miniature endplate potential frequency; m.e.p.p.f) in most experiments. These inhibitory effects of cyclic AMP on quantal ACh release resemble the action of adenosine. 3. The effects of global increases in cytoplasmic cyclic AMP concentrations using lipophilic cyclic AMP analogues were generally different from those observed with cyclic AMP. 8-(4-Chlorophenylthio) cyclic AMP (CPT cyclic AMP) produced approximately two fold increases in m and m.e.p.p.f. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db cyclic AMP) also increased m and m.e.p.p.f, with the effect on m being smaller and more variable. 4. All three cyclic AMP analogues reduced the effects of adenosine receptor agonists on spontaneous and evoked ACh release. 5. The roles of protein phosphorylation in mediating ACh release and the inhibitory effects of adenosine were studied with the protein kinase inhibitor H7. H7 (30-100 microM) produced no consistent effect on evoked or spontaneous ACh release. At these concentrations, however, H7 exerted an unfortunate inhibitory action on the nicotinic ACh receptor/ion channel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2175231

  20. Identification of cytidine 2',3'-cyclic monophosphate and uridine 2',3'-cyclic monophosphate in Pseudomonas fluorescens pfo-1 culture.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Emily; Oberc, Christopher; Ameen, Eve; da Silva, Amanda Mendes; Yan, Hongbin

    2014-09-15

    Cytidine 2',3'-cyclic monophosphate (2',3'-cCMP) and uridine 2',3'-cyclic monophosphate (2',3'-cUMP) were isolated from Pseudomonas fluorescens pfo-1 cell extracts by semi-preparative reverse phase HPLC. The structures of the two compounds were confirmed by NMR and mass spectroscopy against commercially available authentic samples. Concentrations of both intracellular and extracellular 2',3'-cCMP and 2',3'-cUMP were determined. Addition of 2',3'-cCMP and 2',3'-cUMP to P. fluorescens pfo-1 culture did not significantly affect the level of biofilm formation in static liquid cultures. PMID:25139571

  1. Adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinase in brown fat from newborn rabbits. Changes in the binding of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate after preincubation of the tissue with noradrenaline or incubation of the enzyme with adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, B L

    1975-01-01

    The equilibrium binding of cyclic AMP to a 150-fold purified preparation of protein kinase, when expressed as the reciprocal of bound against the reciprocal of free cyclic AMP, gave a plot consisting of two straight lines. The values of apparent Kb given by these lines were lowered by preincubating the intact tissue with noradrenaline or incubating the enzyme preparation with Mg2+ plus ATP. This effect was reversed by incubating the preparation (which contained some phosphatase impurities) with Mg2+ alone. None of these procedures affected the maximal binding of cyclic AMP. During incubation of the enzyme with Mg2+ plus ATP, the terminal phosphoryl group was incorporated into protein, over 40% being present in the kinase itself. This phosphate was removed during incubation of the preparation with Mg2+ alone. The validity of expressing cyclic AMP binding as a double-reciprocal plot is discussed, and the experimental plots are compared with those derived theoretically. The results suggest that protein kinase in brown fat is present in two forms, one with an apparent Kb for cyclic AMP or approx. 250 nM (dephosphorylation) and one with an apparent Kb of approx. 14 nM (phosphorylated). Preincubation of the tissue with noradrenaline results in phosphorylation of the kinase and an increase from 15 to 45% in the proportion of the higher-affinity form. PMID:179526

  2. Differences in responsiveness of intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid: mechanism of arterial relaxation involves cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Wolin, M.S.; McNamara, D.B.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between responses of bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid and cyclic nucleotide levels in order to better understand the mechanism of relaxation elicited by arachidonic acid and acetylcholine. Arachidonic acid relaxed phenylephrine-precontracted arterial rings and elevated both cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP levels in arteries with intact endothelium. In contrast, endothelium-damaged arterial rings contracted to arachidonic acid without demonstrating significant changes in cyclic nucleotide levels. Indomethacin partially inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxation and abolished cyclic AMP accumulation whereas methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, partially inhibited relaxation and abolished cyclic GMP accumulation in response to arachidonic acid. All vessel responses were blocked by a combination of the two inhibitors. Prostaglandin (PG) I2 relaxed arterial rings and elevated cyclic AMP levels whereas PGE2 and PGF2 alpha caused contraction, suggesting that the indomethacin-sensitive component of arachidonic acid-elicited relaxation is due to PGI2 formation and cyclic AMP accumulation. The methylene blue-sensitive component is attributed to an endothelium-dependent but cyclooxygenase-independent generation of a substance causing cyclic GMP accumulation. Intrapulmonary veins contracted to arachidonic acid with no changes in cyclic nucleotide levels and PGI2 was without effect. Homogenates of intrapulmonary artery and vein formed 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, which was inhibited by indomethacin. Thus, bovine intrapulmonary vein may not possess receptors for PGI2.

  3. Adenosine Receptors: Expression, Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Sandeep; Brito, Rafael; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) comprise a group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) which mediate the physiological actions of adenosine. To date, four AR subtypes have been cloned and identified in different tissues. These receptors have distinct localization, signal transduction pathways and different means of regulation upon exposure to agonists. This review will describe the biochemical characteristics and signaling cascade associated with each receptor and provide insight into how these receptors are regulated in response to agonists. A key property of some of these receptors is their ability to serve as sensors of cellular oxidative stress, which is transmitted by transcription factors, such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB, to regulate the expression of ARs. Recent observations of oligomerization of these receptors into homo- and heterodimers will be discussed. In addition, the importance of these receptors in the regulation of normal and pathological processes such as sleep, the development of cancers and in protection against hearing loss will be examined. PMID:24477263

  4. Adenosine-induced worsening of supraventricular tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Kunnumpuram, Georgey Koshy; Patel, Ashfaq

    2012-01-01

    An approximately 20-year-old to 30-year-old patient presented with a haemodynamically stable supraventricular tachycardia . The patient was managed with intravenous adenosine primarily, with two bolus doses of 6 and 12 mg. This, however, caused a rare paradoxical surge of tachycardia with mild haemodynamic compromise. The patient further required a combination of Metoprolol and Verapamil administration to slow down and reverse the arrhythmia. Following this the patient remained stable with no further episodes till discharge. PMID:23230260

  5. Chemoelectrical energy conversion of adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Vishnu Baba; Sarles, Stephen Andrew; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-04-01

    Plant and animal cell membranes transport charged species, neutral molecules and water through ion pumps and channels. The energy required for moving species against established concentration and charge gradients is provided by the biological fuel - adenosine triphosphate (ATP) -synthesized within the cell. The adenosine triphosphatase (ATPases) in a plant cell membrane hydrolyze ATP in the cell cytoplasm to pump protons across the cell membrane. This establishes a proton gradient across the membrane from the cell exterior into the cell cytoplasm. This proton motive force stimulates ion channels that transport nutrients and other species into the cell. This article discusses a device that converts the chemical energy stored in adenosine triphosphate into electrical power using a transporter protein, ATPase. The V-type ATPase proteins used in our prototype are extracted from red beet(Beta vulgaris) tonoplast membranes and reconstituted in a bilayer lipid membrane or BLM formed from POPC and POPS lipids. A pH7 medium that can support ATP hydrolysis is provided on both sides of the membrane and ATP is dissolved in the pH7 buffer on one side of the membrane. Hydrolysis of ATP results in the formation of a phosphate ion and adenosine diphosphate. The energy from the reaction activates ATPase in the BLM and moves a proton across the membrane. The charge gradient established across the BLM due to the reaction and ion transport is converted into electrical current by half-cell reference electrodes. The prototype ATPase cell with an effective BLM area of 4.15 mm2 carrying 15 μl of ATPase proteins was observed to develop a steady state peak power output of 70 nW, which corresponds to a specific power of 1.69 μW/cm2 and a current density of 43.4 μA/cm2 of membrane area.

  6. Effect of adenosine and adenosine analogs on ( sup 14 C)aminopyrine accumulation by rabbit parietal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ota, S.; Hiraishi, H.; Terano, A.; Mutoh, H.; Kurachi, Y.; Shimada, T.; Ivey, K.J.; Sugimoto, T. )

    1989-12-01

    Adenosine receptors that modulate adenylate cyclase activity have been identified recently in a number of tissues. Adenosine A2 receptor is stimulatory to adenylate cyclase, whereas adenosine A1 receptor is inhibitory to adenylate cyclase. We investigated the effect of adenosine and its analogs on (14C)aminopyrine accumulation by rabbit parietal cells. Rabbit gastric mucosal cells were isolated by enzyme digestion. Parietal cells were enriched by nonlinear percoll gradients. (14C)Aminopyrine accumulation was used as an indicator of acid secretion. The effect of 2-chloroadenosine on histamine-stimulated (14C)aminopyrine accumulation was studied. The effects of N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, 2-chloroadenosine, stable analogs of adenosine, and adenosine on (14C)aminopyrine accumulation were assessed. Cyclic AMP content of parietal cells was determined by radioimmunoassay. Histamine and carbachol, known secretagogues, stimulated (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine did not suppress histamine-stimulated (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine, N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, and adenosine dose dependently increased (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. The order of potency was N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine greater than 2-chloroadenosine greater than adenosine. 8-Phenyltheophylline and theophylline, adenosine-receptor antagonists, or cimetidine did not have significant effects on the increase of AP uptake induced by 2-chloroadenosine. Coadministration of dipyridamole, and adenosine uptake inhibitor, augmented the effect of adenosine on (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine, N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, and adenosine each induced a significant increase in cellular cyclic AMP. We conclude that there may be adenosine A2 receptors on rabbit parietal cells which modulate gastric acid secretion.

  7. Low-dose, sublingual AZT-monophosphate therapy for HIV+ patients?

    PubMed

    Johnson, S

    2001-03-01

    AZT concentrations as low as 0.001 mg/l inhibit viral replication, while concentrations above 0.3 mg/l cause considerable damage to erythroid, myeloid progenitor cells and inhibit blastogenesis in mononuclear cells. Furthermore, AZT must be converted first to monophosphate and then to diphosphate and finally to triphosphate by the same enzyme: thymidine kinase (TK). Therefore, large doses of AZT overwhelm TK, causing massive production of monophosphate and reducing the production of di and triphosphate. Yet the recommended dosage of 100 mg AZT every 4 hours results in a peak concentration of 0.5 mg/l and a trough concentration of 0.1 mg/l (harmful to human cells and resulting in reduced production of triphosphate). On the other hand, sublingual administration of 1 mg AZT monophosphate every 8 hours (since the intracellular half life of AZT triphosphate is 3 hours) would be desirable, resulting in more damage to the virus and less harm to the patient. Finally, the small dose of monophosphate ensures that most of the AZT be converted to triphosphate, greatly increasing the efficiency and reducing the likelihood of the virus developing resistance due to reverse transcriptase binding to the similar but non inhibiting mono and diphosphate. PMID:11359372

  8. N6-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-Adenosine Exhibits Insecticidal Activity against Plutella xylostella via Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ming; Chai, Yiqiu; Chen, Guanjv; Wang, Huidong; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, is one of the most important pests of cruciferous crops. We have earlier shown that N6-(2-hydroxyethyl)-adenosine (HEA) exhibits insecticidal activity against P. xylostella. In the present study we investigated the possible mechanism of insecticidal action of HEA on P. xylostella. HEA is a derivative of adenosine, therefore, we speculated whether it acts via P. xylostella adenosine receptor (PxAdoR). We used RNAi approach to silence PxAdoR gene and used antagonist of denosine receptor (AdoR) to study the insecticidal effect of HEA. We cloned the whole sequence of PxAdoR gene. A BLAST search using NCBI protein database showed a 61% identity with the Drosophila adenosine receptor (DmAdoR) and a 32–35% identity with human AdoR. Though the amino acids sequence of PxAdoR was different compared to other adenosine receptors, most of the amino acids that are known to be important for adenosine receptor ligand binding and signaling were present. However, only 30% binding sites key residues was similar between PxAdoR and A1R. HEA, at a dose of 1 mg/mL, was found to be lethal to the second-instar larvae of P. xylostella, and a significant reduction of mortality and growth inhibition ratio were obtained when HEA was administered to the larvae along with PxAdoR-dsRNA or antagonist of AdoR (SCH58261) for 36, 48, or 60 h. Especially at 48 h, the rate of growth inhibition of the PxAdoR knockdown group was 3.5-fold less than that of the HEA group, and the corrected mortality of SCH58261 group was reduced almost 2-fold compared with the HEA group. Our findings show that HEA may exert its insecticidal activity against P. xylostella larvae via acting on PxAdoR. PMID:27668428

  9. Use of adenosine echocardiography for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, W.A. )

    1991-07-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography combined with exercise is sensitive and specific in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) by demonstrating transient abnormalities in wall motion. Frequently, however, patients cannot achieve maximal exercise because of various factors. Pharmacologic stress testing with intravenous adenosine was evaluated as a means of detecting CAD in a noninvasive manner. Patients with suspected CAD underwent echocardiographic imaging and simultaneous thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography during the intravenous administration of 140 micrograms/kg/min of adenosine. An increase in heart rate, decrease in blood pressure, and increase in double product were observed during adenosine administration. Initial observations revealed that wall motion abnormalities were induced by adenosine in areas of perfusion defects. The adenosine infusion was well tolerated, and symptoms disappeared within 1 to 2 minutes after termination of the infusion. Therefore preliminary observations suggest that adenosine echocardiography appears to be useful in the assessment of CAD.

  10. Measurement of plasma adenosine concentration: methodological and physiological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Gewirtz, H.; Brown, P.; Most, A.S.

    1987-05-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that measurements of plasma adenosine concentration made on samples of blood obtained in dipyridamole and EHNA (i.e., stopping solution) may be falsely elevated as a result of ongoing in vitro production and accumulation of adenosine during sample processing. Studies were performed with samples of anticoagulated blood obtained from anesthesized domestic swine. Adenosine concentration of ultra filtrated plasma was determined by HPLC. The following parameters were evaluated: (i) rate of clearance of (/sup 3/H)adenosine added to plasma, (ii) endogenous adenosine concentration of matched blood samples obtained in stopping solution alone, stopping solution plus EDTA, and perchloric acid (PCA), (iii) plasma and erythrocyte endogenous adenosine concentration in nonhemolyzed samples, and (iv) plasma adenosine concentration of samples hemolyzed in the presence of stopping solution alone or stopping solution plus EDTA. We observed that (i) greater than or equal to 95% of (/sup 3/H)adenosine added to plasma is removed from it by formed elements of the blood in less than 20 s, (ii) plasma adenosine concentration of samples obtained in stopping solution alone is generally 10-fold greater than that of matched samples obtained in stopping solution plus EDTA, (iii) deliberate mechanical hemolysis of blood samples obtained in stopping solution alone resulted in substantial augmentation of plasma adenosine levels in comparison with matched nonhemolyzed specimens--addition of EDTA to stopping solution prevented this, and (iv) adenosine content of blood samples obtained in PCA agreed closely with the sum of plasma and erythrocyte adenosine content of samples obtained in stopping solution plus EDTA.

  11. Role of adenosine receptor subtypes in methamphetamine reward and reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Kevin A; Schreiner, Drew C; Levis, Sophia C; O'Neill, Casey E; Bachtell, Ryan K

    2015-02-01

    The neurobiology of methamphetamine (MA) remains largely unknown despite its high abuse liability. The present series of studies explored the role of adenosine receptors on MA reward and reinforcement and identified alterations in the expression of adenosine receptors in dopamine terminal areas following MA administration in rats. We tested whether stimulating adenosine A1 or A2A receptor subtypes would influence MA-induced place preference or MA self-administration on fixed and progressive ratio schedules in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Stimulation of either adenosine A1 or A2A receptors significantly reduced the development of MA-induced place preference. Stimulating adenosine A1, but not A2A, receptors reduced MA self-administration responding. We next tested whether repeated experimenter-delivered MA administration would alter the expression of adenosine receptors in the striatal areas using immunoblotting. We observed no change in the expression of adenosine receptors. Lastly, rats were trained to self-administer MA or saline for 14 days and we detected changes in adenosine A1 and A2A receptor expression using immunoblotting. MA self-administration significantly increased adenosine A1 in the nucleus accumbens shell, caudate-putamen and prefrontal cortex. MA self-administration significantly decreased adenosine A2A receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens shell, but increased A2A receptor expression in the amygdala. These findings demonstrate that MA self-administration produces selective alterations in adenosine receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens shell and that stimulation of adenosine receptors reduces several behavioral indices of MA addiction. Together, these studies shed light onto the neurobiological alterations incurred through chronic MA use that may aid in the development of treatments for MA addiction.

  12. Caffeine intensifies taste of certain sweeteners: role of adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Diaz, C; Beeker, T G

    1986-03-01

    Caffeine, a potent antagonist of adenosine receptors, potentiates the taste of some but not all sweeteners. It significantly enhances the taste of acesulfam-K, neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, d-tryptophan, thaumatin, stevioside, and sodium saccharin. Adenosine reverses the enhancement. Caffeine has no effect on aspartame, sucrose, fructose, and calcium cyclamate. These results suggest that the inhibitory A1 adenosine receptor plays an important local role in modulating the taste intensity of certain sweeteners and that several transduction mechanisms mediate sweet taste.

  13. Combined Treatment of MCF-7 Cells with AICAR and Methotrexate, Arrests Cell Cycle and Reverses Warburg Metabolism through AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) and FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Tamás; Szántó, Magdolna; Abdul-Rahman, Omar; Nagy, Lilla; Dér, Ádám; Kiss, Borbála; Bai, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are characterized by metabolic alterations, namely, depressed mitochondrial oxidation, enhanced glycolysis and pentose phosphate shunt flux to support rapid cell growth, which is called the Warburg effect. In our study we assessed the metabolic consequences of a joint treatment of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with AICAR, an inducer of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) jointly with methotrexate (MTX), a folate-analog antimetabolite that blunts de novo nucleotide synthesis. MCF7 cells, a model of breast cancer cells, were resistant to the individual application of AICAR or MTX, however combined treatment of AICAR and MTX reduced cell proliferation. Prolonged joint application of AICAR and MTX induced AMPK and consequently enhanced mitochondrial oxidation and reduced the rate of glycolysis. These metabolic changes suggest an anti-Warburg rearrangement of metabolism that led to the block of the G1/S and the G2/M transition slowing down cell cycle. The slowdown of cell proliferation was abolished when mitotropic transcription factors, PGC-1α, PGC-1β or FOXO1 were silenced. In human breast cancers higher expression of AMPKα and FOXO1 extended survival. AICAR and MTX exerts similar additive antiproliferative effect on other breast cancer cell lines, such as SKBR and 4T1 cells, too. Our data not only underline the importance of Warburg metabolism in breast cancer cells but nominate the AICAR+MTX combination as a potential cytostatic regime blunting Warburg metabolism. Furthermore, we suggest the targeting of AMPK and FOXO1 to combat breast cancer.

  14. Hypolipidemic activity of Taraxacum mongolicum associated with the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jin; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Lee, Jang-Chang; Chen, Fu-An; Lee, Chih-Hung; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Ho, Chi-Tang; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Huang, Li-Jiau; Way, Tzong-Der

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the hypolipidemic effect and potential mechanisms of T. mongolicum extracts. T. mongolicum was extracted by refluxing three times with water (TM-1), 50% ethanol (TM-2) and 95% ethanol (TM-3). TM-2 contained components with the most effective hypolipidemic potentials in HepG2 cells. Extended administration of TM-2 stimulated a significant reduction in body weight and levels of serum triglyceride LDL-C and total cholesterol in rats. To evaluate the bioactive compounds, we successively fractionated TM-2 with n-hexane (TM-4), dichloromethane (TM-5), ethyl acetate (TM-6), and water (TM-7). TM-4 fraction had the most effective hypolipidemic potential in HepG2 cells, and it decreased the expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) and inhibited the activity of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) through the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Linoleic acid, phytol and tetracosanol are bioactive compounds identified from TM-4. These results suggest that T. mongolicum is expected to be useful for hypolipidemic effects. PMID:24903219

  15. Chronic Glutathione Depletion Confers Protection against Alcohol-induced Steatosis: Implication for Redox Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Singh, Surendra; Matsumoto, Akiko; Manna, Soumen K; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A; Golla, Srujana; Murphy, Robert C; Dong, Hongbin; Song, Byoung-Joon; Gonzalez, Frank J; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is not well established. However, oxidative stress and associated decreases in levels of glutathione (GSH) are known to play a central role in ALD. The present study examines the effect of GSH deficiency on alcohol-induced liver steatosis in Gclm knockout (KO) mice that constitutively have ≈15% normal hepatic levels of GSH. Following chronic (6 week) feeding with an ethanol-containing liquid diet, the Gclm KO mice were unexpectedly found to be protected against steatosis despite showing increased oxidative stress (as reflected in elevated levels of CYP2E1 and protein carbonyls). Gclm KO mice also exhibit constitutive activation of liver AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 target genes, and show enhanced ethanol clearance, altered hepatic lipid profiles in favor of increased levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and concordant changes in expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. In summary, our data implicate a novel mechanism protecting against liver steatosis via an oxidative stress adaptive response that activates the AMPK pathway. We propose redox activation of the AMPK may represent a new therapeutic strategy for preventing ALD. PMID:27403993

  16. Bai-Hu-Jia-Ren-Shen-Tang Decoction Reduces Fatty Liver by Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui-Kang; Hung, Tzu-Min; Huang, Hsiu-Chen; Lee, I-Jung; Chang, Chia-Chuan; Cheng, Jing-Jy; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Huang, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and associated conditions, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), are currently a worldwide health problem. In Asian traditional medicine, Bai-Hu-Jia-Ren-Shen-Tang (BHJRST) is widely used in diabetes patients to reduce thirst. However, whether it has a therapeutic effect on T2DM or NAFLD is not known. The aim of this study was to examine whether BHJRST had a lipid-lowering effect using a HuS-E/2 cell model of fatty liver induced by palmitate and in a db/db mouse model of dyslipidemia. Incubation of HuS-E/2 cells with palmitate markedly increased lipid accumulation and expression of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), which is involved in lipolysis. BHJRST significantly decreased lipid accumulation and increased ATGL levels and phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its primary downstream target, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), which are involved in fatty acid oxidation. Furthermore, after twice daily oral administration for six weeks, BHJRST significantly reduced hepatic fat accumulation in db/db mice, as demonstrated by increased hepatic AMPK and ACC phosphorylation, reduced serum triglyceride levels, and reduced hepatic total lipid content. The results show that BHJRST has a lipid-lowering effect in the liver that is mediated by activation of the AMPK signaling pathway. PMID:26508982

  17. Nobiletin suppresses adipogenesis by regulating the expression of adipogenic transcription factors and the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK).

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngmin; Kim, Younghwa; Ham, Hyeonmi; Park, Yooheon; Jeong, Heon-Sang; Lee, Junsoo

    2011-12-28

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the effect of nobiletin (5,6,7,8,3',4'-hexamethoxyflavone) on adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. To determine the effect of nobiletin on adipogenesis, preadipocyte differentiation was induced in the presence or absence of nobiletin (10-100 μM) for 4 days. The results revealed that nobiletin markedly inhibited lipid accumulation and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity and blocked the expression of adipogenic transcription factors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPα). Moreover, nobiletin significantly increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a major regulator of cellular energy balance, phosphorylation, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. This study also investigated the involvement of AMPK in the expression of a major transcription factor, PPARγ. It was found that pretreatment with compound C, a cell permeable inhibitor of AMPK, abolished the inhibitory effects of nobiletin on PPARγ expression. The results suggest that nobiletin exerts antiadipogenic effects through modulation of the PPARγ and AMPK signaling pathway and, therefore, may be a promising antiobesity agent.

  18. Renoprotective Effects of Metformin are Independent of Organic Cation Transporters 1 & 2 and AMP-activated Protein Kinase in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Michael; Jensen, Jonas B.; Jakobsen, Steen; Jessen, Niels; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Kemp, Bruce E.; Marciszyn, Allison L.; Li, Hui; Pastor-Soler, Núria M.; Hallows, Kenneth R.; Nørregaard, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    The type-2 diabetes drug metformin has proven to have protective effects in several renal disease models. Here, we investigated the protective effects in a 3-day unilateral ureteral obstruction (3dUUO) mouse model. Compared with controls, ureteral obstructed animals displayed increased tubular damage and inflammation. Metformin treatment attenuated inflammation, increased the anti-oxidative response and decreased tubular damage. Hepatic metformin uptake depends on the expression of organic cation transporters (OCTs). To test whether the effects of metformin in the kidney are dependent on these transporters, we tested metformin treatment in OCT1/2−/− mice. Even though exposure of metformin in the kidney was severely decreased in OCT1/2−/− mice when evaluated with [11C]-Metformin and PET/MRI, we found that the protective effects of metformin were OCT1/2 independent when tested in this model. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been suggested as a key mediator of the effects of metformin. When using an AMPK-β1 KO mouse model, the protective effects of metformin still occurred in the 3dUUO model. In conclusion, these results show that metformin has a beneficial effect in early stages of renal disease induced by 3dUUO. Furthermore, these effects appear to be independent of the expression of OCT1/2 and AMPK-β1, the most abundant AMPK-β isoform in the kidney. PMID:27782167

  19. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in response to temperature elevation shows seasonal variation in the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Jost, Jennifer A; Keshwani, Sarah S; Abou-Hanna, Jacob J

    2015-04-01

    Global climate change is affecting ectothermic species, and a variety of studies are needed on thermal tolerances, especially from cellular and physiological perspectives. This study utilized AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key regulator of cellular energy levels, to examine the effects of high water temperatures on zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) physiology. During heating, AMPK activity increased as water temperature increased to a point, and maximum AMPK activity was detected at high, but sublethal, water temperatures. This pattern varied with season, suggesting that cellular mechanisms of seasonal thermal acclimatization affect basic metabolic processes during sublethal heat stress. There was a greater seasonal variation in the water temperature at which maximum AMPK activity was measured than in lethal water temperature. Furthermore, baseline AMPK activity varied significantly across seasons, most likely reflecting altered metabolic states during times of growth and reproduction. In addition, when summer-collected mussels were lab-acclimated to winter and spring water temperatures, patterns of heat stress mirrored those of field-collected animals. These data suggest that water temperature is the main driver of the seasonal variation in physiology. This study concluded that AMPK activity, which reflects changes in energy supply and demand during heat stress, can serve as a sensitive and early indicator of temperature stress in mussels.

  20. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Yuan; Hu, Qing-Qing; Ma, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (PO). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and PO. Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells.

  1. meso-Dihydroguaiaretic acid inhibits hepatic lipid accumulation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Su; Kim, Kyung Jin; Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic lipid accumulation is a major risk factor for dyslipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and insulin resistance. The present study was conducted to evaluate hypolipidemic effects of meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (MDA), anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory compound isolated from the Myristica fragrans HOUTT., by oil red O staining, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and Western blot. MDA significantly inhibited insulin-induced hepatic lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. The lipid-lowering effect of MDA was accompanied by increased expression of proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation and decreased expression of lipid synthetic proteins. In addition, MDA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as determined by phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK. The effects of MDA on lipogenic protein expression were suppressed by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. Taken together, these findings show that MDA inhibits insulin-induced lipid accumulation in human HepG2 cells by suppressing expression of lipogenic proteins through AMPK signaling, suggesting a potent lipid-lowering agent. PMID:21963507

  2. Activation of the AMP-Activated Protein Kinase by Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA, 20:5 n-3) Improves Endothelial Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Zhang, Cheng; Dong, Yunzhou; Wang, Shuangxi; Song, Ping; Viollet, Benoit; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the cardiovascular-protective effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) may be due, in part, to its ability to stimulate the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation. The role of AMPK in EPA-induced eNOS phosphorylation was investigated in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC), in mice deficient of either AMPKα1 or AMPKα2, in eNOS knockout (KO) mice, or in Apo-E/AMPKα1 dual KO mice. EPA-treatment of BAEC increased both AMPK-Thr172 phosphorylation and AMPK activity, which was accompanied by increased eNOS phosphorylation, NO release, and upregulation of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2). Pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of AMPK abolished EPA-enhanced NO release and eNOS phosphorylation in HUVEC. This effect of EPA was absent in the aortas isolated from either eNOS KO mice or AMPKα1 KO mice fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol (HFHC) diet. EPA via upregulation of UCP-2 activates AMPKα1 resulting in increased eNOS phosphorylation and consequent improvement of endothelial function in vivo. PMID:22532857

  3. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei-Wan; Li, Xin-Yuan; Liu, Hui-Bin; Wang, Zi-Rui; Hu, Qing-Qing; Li, Yu-Xia; Song, Bin-Lin; Lou, Jie; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Ma, He-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (P O ). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and P O . Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells. PMID:27635187

  4. Effects of an AMP-activated protein kinase inhibitor, compound C, on adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ye; Zhou, Yi; Xu, Aimin; Wu, Donghai

    2008-09-01

    The role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in adipocyte differentiation is not completely understood. Here we reported that an AMPK inhibitor, compound C, significantly inhibited adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells in a dose dependent manner, and this inhibitory effect was primarily effective in the initial stage of differentiation. Compound C prevented the mitotic clonal expansion (MCE) of preadipocytes, probably by inhibiting expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)beta and delta, and subsequently blocked the expression of C/EBPalpha and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)gamma and transcriptional activation of genes that produce the adipocyte phenotype. AMPK activity was also suppressed by compound C treatment during the early phase of adipogenic differentiation, which indicated that suppressed activation of AMPK by compound C may inhibit the MCE process of preadipocytes. Our results suggest that compound C might serve as a useful molecule in both basic and clinical research on adipogenesis and as a potential lead compound for the treatment of obesity. PMID:18758065

  5. Cinnamon extract enhances glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and C2C12 myocytes by inducing LKB1-AMP-activated protein kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Honma, Natsumi; Kobayashi, Katsuya; Jia, Liu Nan; Hosono, Takashi; Shindo, Kazutoshi; Ariga, Toyohiko; Seki, Taiichiro

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that cinnamon extract (CE) ameliorates type 1 diabetes induced by streptozotocin in rats through the up-regulation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation in both muscle and adipose tissues. This present study was aimed at clarifying the detailed mechanism(s) with which CE increases the glucose uptake in vivo and in cell culture systems using 3T3-L1 adipocytes and C2C12 myotubes in vitro. Specific inhibitors of key enzymes in insulin signaling and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathways, as well as small interference RNA, were used to examine the role of these kinases in the CE-induced glucose uptake. The results showed that CE stimulated the phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. An AMPK inhibitor and LKB1 siRNA blocked the CE-induced glucose uptake. We also found for the first time that insulin suppressed AMPK activation in the adipocyte. To investigate the effect of CE on type 2 diabetes in vivo, we further performed oral glucose tolerance tests and insulin tolerance tests in type 2 diabetes model rats administered with CE. The CE improved glucose tolerance in oral glucose tolerance tests, but not insulin sensitivity in insulin tolerance test. In summary, these results indicate that CE ameliorates type 2 diabetes by inducing GLUT4 translocation via the AMPK signaling pathway. We also found insulin antagonistically regulates the activation of AMPK. PMID:24551069

  6. Chronic Glutathione Depletion Confers Protection against Alcohol-induced Steatosis: Implication for Redox Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Singh, Surendra; Matsumoto, Akiko; Manna, Soumen K.; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Golla, Srujana; Murphy, Robert C.; Dong, Hongbin; Song, Byoung-Joon; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is not well established. However, oxidative stress and associated decreases in levels of glutathione (GSH) are known to play a central role in ALD. The present study examines the effect of GSH deficiency on alcohol-induced liver steatosis in Gclm knockout (KO) mice that constitutively have ≈15% normal hepatic levels of GSH. Following chronic (6 week) feeding with an ethanol-containing liquid diet, the Gclm KO mice were unexpectedly found to be protected against steatosis despite showing increased oxidative stress (as reflected in elevated levels of CYP2E1 and protein carbonyls). Gclm KO mice also exhibit constitutive activation of liver AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway and nuclear factor-erythroid 2–related factor 2 target genes, and show enhanced ethanol clearance, altered hepatic lipid profiles in favor of increased levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and concordant changes in expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. In summary, our data implicate a novel mechanism protecting against liver steatosis via an oxidative stress adaptive response that activates the AMPK pathway. We propose redox activation of the AMPK may represent a new therapeutic strategy for preventing ALD. PMID:27403993

  7. Hypolipidemic activity of Taraxacum mongolicum associated with the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jin; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Lee, Jang-Chang; Chen, Fu-An; Lee, Chih-Hung; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Ho, Chi-Tang; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Huang, Li-Jiau; Way, Tzong-Der

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the hypolipidemic effect and potential mechanisms of T. mongolicum extracts. T. mongolicum was extracted by refluxing three times with water (TM-1), 50% ethanol (TM-2) and 95% ethanol (TM-3). TM-2 contained components with the most effective hypolipidemic potentials in HepG2 cells. Extended administration of TM-2 stimulated a significant reduction in body weight and levels of serum triglyceride LDL-C and total cholesterol in rats. To evaluate the bioactive compounds, we successively fractionated TM-2 with n-hexane (TM-4), dichloromethane (TM-5), ethyl acetate (TM-6), and water (TM-7). TM-4 fraction had the most effective hypolipidemic potential in HepG2 cells, and it decreased the expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) and inhibited the activity of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) through the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Linoleic acid, phytol and tetracosanol are bioactive compounds identified from TM-4. These results suggest that T. mongolicum is expected to be useful for hypolipidemic effects.

  8. In vivo stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase enhanced tubuloglomerular feedback but reduced tubular sodium transport during high dietary NaCl intake.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dan Yang; Gao, Huanhuan; Boini, Krishna M; Osswald, Hartmut; Nürnberg, Bernd; Lang, Florian

    2010-06-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is expressed in the apical membrane of cortical thick ascending limb, distal, and collecting tubules as well as macula densa cells of the kidneys. AMPK is an active modulator of epithelial Na(+) channels, Na(+)-2Cl(-)-K(+) cotransporter, and the ATP-dependent potassium channel. The present experiments explored whether AMPK participates in the regulation of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) and renal tubular sodium handling. To this end, renal clearance and micropuncture experiments were performed in anesthetized rats. Under normal NaCl diet, neither TGF response nor renal fluid and sodium excretion were altered by pharmacological activation of AMPK in vivo. However, under high NaCl diet, the TGF response was significantly enhanced after intravenous or intratubular application of the AMPK activator AICAR. Moreover, AICAR application significantly increased fractional delivery of fluid and sodium to the end of the proximal tubule. High dietary NaCl intake increased the renal transcript levels encoding the AMPK-alpha1 subunit, while it decreased the expression of AMPK-beta1 and AMPK-gamma2 subunits. Immunoblots revealed that high dietary NaCl intake reduced renal expression of activated AMPK by about three times compared to normal NaCl diet whereas additional AICAR application increased AMPK activity. Our results suggest that AMPK regulates tubuloglomerular balance as well as tubular transport upon change of renal work load.

  9. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator inhibit cAMP-activated but not calcium-activated chloride currents.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, J A; McDonald, T V; Nghiem, P T; Lowe, A W; Schulman, H; Gruenert, D C; Stryer, L; Gardner, P

    1992-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) by cAMP-dependent protein kinase leads to chloride flux in epithelial cells. Is CFTR also required for the calcium-dependent activation of chloride channels? We used antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to CFTR to reduce the expression of CFTR in colonic and tracheal epithelial cells. The antisense oligomers were a pair of adjacent 18-mers complementary to nucleotides 1-18 and 19-36 of CFTR mRNA. Sense and misantisense oligomers served as controls. A 48-h antisense treatment reduced the expression of CFTR protein as assayed by immunoprecipitation and autoradiography to 26% of the level in sense-treated T84 cells. Whole-cell patch clamp revealed that a 48-h antisense treatment of T84 and 56FHTE-8o- fetal tracheal epithelial cells reduced the cAMP-activated chloride current to approximately 10% of that in sense-treated cells. The half-life of functional CFTR is less than 24 h in these cells. In contrast, the calcium-activated chloride current was not affected by antisense treatment. Hence, the cAMP and calcium pathways are separate. CFTR is required for the cAMP pathway but not for the calcium pathway. Images PMID:1379720

  10. Inactivation of MARK4, an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-related kinase, leads to insulin hypersensitivity and resistance to diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Tian, Liang; Nie, Jia; Zhang, Hai; Han, Xiao; Shi, Yuguang

    2012-11-01

    MARK4, also known as Par-1d/MarkL1, is a member of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-related family of kinases, which are implicated in the regulation of dynamic biological functions, including glucose and energy homeostasis. However, the physiological function of MARK4 in mammals remains elusive. Here, we investigated a role for MARK4 in regulating energy homeostasis by generating mice with targeted inactivation of the mark4 gene. We show that MARK4 deficiency in mice caused hyperphagia, hyperactivity, and hypermetabolism, leading to protection from diet-induced obesity and its related metabolic complications through up-regulation of brown fat activity. Consequently, MARK4 deficiency mitigated insulin resistance associated with diet-induced obesity by dramatically enhancing insulin-stimulated AKT phosphorylation in major metabolic tissues. Ablation of MARK4 also significantly improved glucose homeostasis by up-regulating the activity and expression of AMPK kinase in key metabolic tissues. Taken together, these data identify a key role of MARK4 in energy metabolism, implicating the kinase as a novel drug target for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:22992738

  11. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Yuan; Hu, Qing-Qing; Ma, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (PO). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and PO. Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells. PMID:27635187

  12. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in response to temperature elevation shows seasonal variation in the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Jost, Jennifer A; Keshwani, Sarah S; Abou-Hanna, Jacob J

    2015-04-01

    Global climate change is affecting ectothermic species, and a variety of studies are needed on thermal tolerances, especially from cellular and physiological perspectives. This study utilized AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key regulator of cellular energy levels, to examine the effects of high water temperatures on zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) physiology. During heating, AMPK activity increased as water temperature increased to a point, and maximum AMPK activity was detected at high, but sublethal, water temperatures. This pattern varied with season, suggesting that cellular mechanisms of seasonal thermal acclimatization affect basic metabolic processes during sublethal heat stress. There was a greater seasonal variation in the water temperature at which maximum AMPK activity was measured than in lethal water temperature. Furthermore, baseline AMPK activity varied significantly across seasons, most likely reflecting altered metabolic states during times of growth and reproduction. In addition, when summer-collected mussels were lab-acclimated to winter and spring water temperatures, patterns of heat stress mirrored those of field-collected animals. These data suggest that water temperature is the main driver of the seasonal variation in physiology. This study concluded that AMPK activity, which reflects changes in energy supply and demand during heat stress, can serve as a sensitive and early indicator of temperature stress in mussels. PMID:25498351

  13. Endogenous Ligand for GPR120, Docosahexaenoic Acid, Exerts Benign Metabolic Effects on the Skeletal Muscles via AMP-activated Protein Kinase Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nami; Lee, Jung Ok; Lee, Hye Jeong; Kim, Hyung Ip; Kim, Joong Kwan; Lee, Yong Woo; Lee, Soo Kyung; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Hyeon Soo

    2015-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an endogenous ligand of G protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120). However, the mechanisms underlying DHA action are poorly understood. In this study, DHA stimulated glucose uptake in the skeletal muscles in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner. GPR120-mediated increase in intracellular Ca2+ was critical for DHA-mediated AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake. In addition, DHA stimulated GLUT4 translocation AMPK-dependently. Inhibition of AMPK and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase blocked DHA-induced glucose uptake. DHA and GW9508, a GPR120 agonist, increased GPR120 expression. DHA-mediated glucose uptake was not observed in GPR120 knockdown conditions. DHA increased AMPK phosphorylation, glucose uptake, and intracellular Ca2+ concentration in primary cultured myoblasts. Taken together, these results indicated that the beneficial metabolic role of DHA was attributed to its ability to regulate glucose via the GPR120-mediated AMPK pathway in the skeletal muscles. PMID:26134561

  14. 24-hydroxyursolic acid from the leaves of the Diospyros kaki (Persimmon) induces apoptosis by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Prem; Oh, Won-Keun; Thuong, Phuong Thien; Cho, Sung Dae; Choi, Hong Seok

    2010-05-01

    There are multiple lines of evidence that persimmon extract and its constituents have potent antitumor activity against human cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of 24-hydroxyursolic acid, a triterpenoid found in persimmon, on antitumor activities are not yet understood. Here, we demonstrate that 24-hydroxyursolic acid inhibited cell proliferation, strongly activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mediated critical anticancer effects by inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX-2) expression in HT-29 cells. In addition, 24-hydroxyursolic acid induced cellular apoptosis by activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), caspase-3, and phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15. It also strongly induced DNA fragmentation in HT-29 cells and thereby significantly inhibited colony formation of HT-29 cells in soft agar. In addition, 24-hydroxyursolic acid blocked the EGF-induced ERKs phosphorylation and led to the inhibition of AP-1 activity and cell transformation in JB6 CL41 cells. Collectively, these findings are the first to reveal a molecular basis for the anticarcinogenic action of 24-hydroxyursolic acid and might account for the reported chemopreventive and chemotherapic effects of persimmon extracts.

  15. Fatal infantile cardiac glycogenosis with phosphorylase kinase deficiency and a mutation in the gamma2-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Akman, Hasan O; Sampayo, James N; Ross, Fiona A; Scott, John W; Wilson, Gregory; Benson, Lee; Bruno, Claudio; Shanske, Sara; Hardie, D Grahame; Dimauro, Salvatore

    2007-10-01

    A 10-wk-old infant girl with severe hypertrophy of the septal and atrial walls by cardiac ultrasound, developed progressive ventricular wall thickening and died of aspiration pneumonia at 5 mo of age. Postmortem examination revealed ventricular hypertrophy and massive atrial wall thickening due to glycogen accumulation. A skeletal muscle biopsy showed increased free glycogen and decreased activity of phosphorylase b kinase (PHK). The report of a pathogenic mutation (R531Q) in the gene (PRKAG2) encoding the gamma2 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in three infants with congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, glycogen storage, and "pseudo PHK deficiency" prompted us to screen this gene in our patient. We found a novel (R384T) heterozygous mutation in PRKAG2, affecting an arginine residue in the N-terminal AMP-binding domain. Like R531Q, this mutation reduces the binding of AMP and ATP to the isolated nucleotide-binding domains, and prevents activation of the heterotrimer by metabolic stress in intact cells. The mutation was not found in DNA from the patient's father, the only available parent, and is likely to have arisen de novo. Our studies confirm that mutations in PRKAG2 can cause fatal infantile cardiomyopathy, often associated with apparent PHK deficiency.

  16. The pivotal role of protein kinase C zeta (PKCzeta) in insulin- and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mediated glucose uptake in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Zhong; Cheung, Stanley C K; Lan, Lin-Lin; Ho, Stanley K S; Chan, Juliana C N; Tong, Peter C Y

    2010-10-01

    Insulin and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signal pathways are involved in the regulation of glucose uptake. The integration of signals between these two pathways to maintain glucose homeostasis remains elusive. In this work, stimulation of insulin and berberine conferred a glucose uptake or surface glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation that was less than simple summation of their effects in insulin-sensitive muscle cells. Using specific inhibitors to key kinases of both pathways and PKCzeta small interference RNA, protein kinase C zeta (PKCzeta) was found to regulate insulin-stimulated protein kinase B (PKB) activation and inhibit AMPK activity on dorsal cell surface. In the presence of berberine, PKCzeta controlled AMPK activation and AMPK blocked PKB activity in perinuclear region. The inhibition effect of PKCzeta on AMPK activation or the arrestment of PKB activity by AMPK still existed in basal condition. These results suggest that there is antagonistic regulation between insulin and AMPK signal pathways, which is mediated by the switch roles of PKCzeta.

  17. Combined Treatment of MCF-7 Cells with AICAR and Methotrexate, Arrests Cell Cycle and Reverses Warburg Metabolism through AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) and FOXO1

    PubMed Central

    Fodor, Tamás; Szántó, Magdolna; Abdul-Rahman, Omar; Nagy, Lilla; Dér, Ádám; Kiss, Borbála; Bai, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are characterized by metabolic alterations, namely, depressed mitochondrial oxidation, enhanced glycolysis and pentose phosphate shunt flux to support rapid cell growth, which is called the Warburg effect. In our study we assessed the metabolic consequences of a joint treatment of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with AICAR, an inducer of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) jointly with methotrexate (MTX), a folate-analog antimetabolite that blunts de novo nucleotide synthesis. MCF7 cells, a model of breast cancer cells, were resistant to the individual application of AICAR or MTX, however combined treatment of AICAR and MTX reduced cell proliferation. Prolonged joint application of AICAR and MTX induced AMPK and consequently enhanced mitochondrial oxidation and reduced the rate of glycolysis. These metabolic changes suggest an anti-Warburg rearrangement of metabolism that led to the block of the G1/S and the G2/M transition slowing down cell cycle. The slowdown of cell proliferation was abolished when mitotropic transcription factors, PGC-1α, PGC-1β or FOXO1 were silenced. In human breast cancers higher expression of AMPKα and FOXO1 extended survival. AICAR and MTX exerts similar additive antiproliferative effect on other breast cancer cell lines, such as SKBR and 4T1 cells, too. Our data not only underline the importance of Warburg metabolism in breast cancer cells but nominate the AICAR+MTX combination as a potential cytostatic regime blunting Warburg metabolism. Furthermore, we suggest the targeting of AMPK and FOXO1 to combat breast cancer. PMID:26919657

  18. Ketogenic diet delays the phase of circadian rhythms and does not affect AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Genzer, Yoni; Dadon, Maayan; Burg, Chen; Chapnik, Nava; Froy, Oren

    2015-12-01

    Ketogenic diet (KD) is used for weight loss or to treat epilepsy. KD leads to liver AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which would be expected to inhibit gluconeogenesis. However, KD leads to increased hepatic glucose output. As AMPK and its active phosphorylated form (pAMPK) show circadian oscillation, this discrepancy could stem from wrong-time-of-day sampling. The effect of KD was tested on mouse clock gene expression, AMPK, mTOR, SIRT1 and locomotor activity for 2 months and compared to low-fat diet (LFD). KD led to 1.5-fold increased levels of blood glucose and insulin. Brain pAMPK/AMPK ratio was 40% higher under KD, whereas that in liver was not affected. KD led to 40% and 20% down-regulation of the ratio of pP70S6K/P70S6K, the downstream target of mTOR, in the brain and liver, respectively. SIRT1 levels were 40% higher in the brain, but 40% lower in the liver of KD-fed mice. Clock genes showed delayed rhythms under KD. In the brain of KD-fed mice, amplitudes of clock genes were down-regulated, whereas 6-fold up-regulation was found in the liver. The metabolic state under KD indicates reduced satiety in the brain and reduced anabolism alongside increased gluconeogenesis in the liver.

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase α2 protects against liver injury from metastasized tumors via reduced glucose deprivation-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shu-Lan; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng; Piao, Chun-Mei; Xian, Ying-Lin; Jia, Li-Xin; Qi, Yong-Fen; Han, Jia-Huai; Zhang, You-Yi; Du, Jie

    2014-03-28

    It is well known that tumors damage affected tissues; however, the specific mechanism underlying such damage remains elusive. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) senses energetic changes and regulates glucose metabolism. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which AMPK promotes metabolic adaptation in the tumor-bearing liver using a murine model of colon cancer liver metastasis. Knock-out of AMPK α2 significantly enhanced tumor-induced glucose deprivation in the liver and increased the extent of liver injury and hepatocyte death. Mechanistically, we observed that AMPK α2 deficiency resulted in elevated reactive oxygen species, reduced mitophagy, and increased cell death in response to tumors or glucose deprivation in vitro. These results imply that AMPK α2 is essential for attenuation of liver injury during tumor metastasis via hepatic glucose deprivation and mitophagy-mediated inhibition of reactive oxygen species production. Therefore, AMPK α2 might represent an important therapeutic target for colon cancer metastasis-induced liver injury. PMID:24515110

  20. Stearoyl lysophosphatidylcholine enhances the phagocytic ability of macrophages through the AMP-activated protein kinase/p38 mitogen activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Quan, Hui; Hur, Young-Hoe; Xin, Chun; Kim, Joung-Min; Choi, Jeong-Il; Kim, Man-Young; Bae, Hong-Beom

    2016-10-01

    A previous study showed that stearoyl lysophosphatidylcholine (sLPC) suppressed extracellular high mobility group box 1 translocation in macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation. In the present study, we investigated whether sLPC-induced AMPK activation could enhance macrophages phagocytosis of bacteria. We found that sLPC increased phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a downstream target of AMPK, in a time- and dose-dependent manner in macrophages. Furthermore, sLPC increased the uptake of FITC-conjugated Escherichia coli by macrophages in a dose-dependent manner, and treatment with an AMPK inhibitor (compound C) or siRNA to AMPKα1 reversed this uptake. sLPC increased the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), but inhibition of AMPK activity with compound C or siRNA to AMPKα1 prevented the sLPC-induced increase in p38 MAPK phosphorylation. SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, decreased sLPC-induced phagocytosis. In vivo, systemic administration of sLPC to mice led to increased AMPK and p38 MAPK activity in the lung and to increased phagocytosis of fluorescent E. coli in bronchoalveolar lavage cells. These results suggest that sLPC increases macrophages phagocytosis through activation of the AMPK/p38 MAPK pathway. Therefore, sLPC is a candidate pharmacological agent for the treatment of bacterial infections in clinically relevant conditions. PMID:27517519

  1. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cross-talks with canonical Wnt signaling via phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Junxing; Yue, Wanfu; Zhu, Mei J.; Sreejayan, Nair; Du, Min

    2010-04-23

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of energy metabolism; its activity is regulated by a plethora of physiological conditions, exercises and many anti-diabetic drugs. Recent studies show that AMPK involves in cell differentiation but the underlying mechanism remains undefined. Wingless Int-1 (Wnt)/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway regulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells through enhancing {beta}-catenin/T-cell transcription factor 1 (TCF) mediated transcription. The objective of this study was to determine whether AMPK cross-talks with Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling through phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin. C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells were used. Chemical inhibition of AMPK and the expression of a dominant negative AMPK decreased phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552. The {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription was correlated with AMPK activity. In vitro, pure AMPK phosphorylated {beta}-catenin at Ser 552 and the mutation of Ser 552 to Ala prevented such phosphorylation, which was further confirmed using [{gamma}-{sup 32}P]ATP autoradiography. In conclusion, AMPK phosphorylates {beta}-catenin at Ser 552, which stabilizes {beta}-catenin, enhances {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription, expanding AMPK from regulation of energy metabolism to cell differentiation and development via cross-talking with the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  2. A Metabolic Immune Checkpoint: Adenosine in Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Within tumors, some areas are less oxygenated than others. Since their home ground is under chronic hypoxia, tumor cells adapt to this condition by activating aerobic glycolysis; however, this hypoxic environment is very harsh for incoming immune cells. Deprivation of oxygen limits availability of energy sources and induces accumulation of extracellular adenosine in tumors. Extracellular adenosine, upon binding with adenosine receptors on the surface of various immune cells, suppresses pro-inflammatory activities. In addition, signaling through adenosine receptors upregulates a number of anti-inflammatory molecules and immunoregulatory cells, leading to the establishment of a long-lasting immunosuppressive environment. Thus, due to hypoxia and adenosine, tumors can discourage antitumor immune responses no matter how the response was induced, whether it was spontaneous or artificially introduced with a therapeutic intention. Preclinical studies have shown the significance of adenosine in tumor survival strategy by demonstrating tumor regression after inactivation of adenosine receptors, inhibition of adenosine-producing enzymes, or reversal of tissue hypoxia. These promising results indicate a potential use of the inhibitors of the hypoxia-adenosine pathway for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27066002

  3. Adenosine analogs inhibit fighting in isolated male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Palmour, R.M.; Lipowski, C.J.; Simon, C.K.; Ervin, F.R.

    1989-01-01

    The potent adenosine analogs N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) and phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA) inhibit fighting and associated agonistic behaviors in isolated male mice. These effects are reversed by methylxanthines; moderate doses of NECA which inhibit fighting have minimal effects on spontaneous locomotor activity. At very low doses, both NECA and PIA increase fighting in parallel with previously reported increases of motor activity. Brain levels of (/sup 3/H)-NECA and (/sup 3/H)-PIA achieved at behaviorally effective doses suggest an involvement of adenosine receptors. The biochemical mechanism of adenosine receptor action with respect to fighting is unknown, but may include neuromodulatory effects on the release of other, more classical neurotransmitters.

  4. Adenosine signaling: good or bad in erectile function?

    PubMed

    Wen, Jiaming; Xia, Yang

    2012-04-01

    The erectile status of penile tissue is governed largely by the tone of cavernosal smooth muscle cells, which is determined by the balance of vascular relaxants and constrictors. Vascular relaxants play a key role in regulating the tone of cavernosal smooth muscle and thus the initiation and maintenance of penile erection. Early studies drew attention to the potential role of adenosine signaling in this process. However, the serendipitous discovery of the effect of sildenafil on erectile physiology drew more attention toward nitric oxide (NO) as a vasodilator in the process of penile erection, and a recently discovered, unexpected erectile phenotype of adenosine deaminase-deficient mice reemphasizes the importance of adenosine as a key regulatory of erectile status. Adenosine, like NO, is a potent and short-lived vasorelaxant that functions via cyclic nucleotide second messenger signaling to promote smooth muscle relaxation. Recent studies reviewed here show that adenosine functions to relax the corpus cavernosum and promote penile erection. Excess adenosine in penile tissue contributes to the disorder called priapism, and impaired adenosine signaling is associated with erectile dysfunction. More recent research summarized in this review reveals that adenosine functions as a key endogenous vasodilator in the initiation and maintenance of normal penile erection. This new insight highlights adenosine signaling pathways operating in penile tissue as significant therapeutic targets for the treatment of erectile disorders.

  5. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... device that measures the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from platelets following aggregation.... Simultaneous measurements of platelet aggregation and ATP release are used to evaluate platelet...

  6. Polymerization of actin in RBL-2H3 cells can be triggered through either the IgE receptor or the adenosine receptor but different signaling pathways are used.

    PubMed Central

    Apgar, J R

    1994-01-01

    Crosslinking of the IgE receptor on rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells using the multivalent antigen DNP-BSA leads to a rapid and sustained increase in the filamentous actin content of the cells. Stimulation of RBL cells through the adenosine receptor also induces a very rapid polymerization of actin, which peaks in 45-60 s and is equivalent in magnitude to the F-actin response elicited through stimulation of the IgE receptor. However, in contrast to the IgE mediated response, which remains elevated for over 30 min, the F-actin increase induced by the adenosine analogue 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)-adenosine (NECA) is relatively transient and returns to baseline values within 5-10 min. While previous work has shown that the polymerization of actin in RBL cells stimulated through the IgE receptor is mediated by protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase inhibitors have no effect on the F-actin response activated through the adenosine receptor. In contrast, pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin completely inhibits the F-actin response to NECA but has relatively little effect on the response induced through the IgE receptor. Stimulation of RBL cells through either receptor causes increased production of phosphatidylinositol mono-phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bis-phosphate (PIP2), which correlates with the F-actin response. Production of PIP and PIP2 may be important downstream signals since these polyphosphoinositides are able to regulate the interaction of gelsolin and profilin with actin. Thus the polymerization of actin can be triggered through either the adenosine receptor or the IgE receptor, but different upstream signaling pathways are being used. The IgE mediated response requires the activation of PKC while stimulation through the adenosine receptor is PKC independent but involves a G protein. PMID:8049523

  7. Introduction to Adenosine Receptors as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine acts as a cytoprotective modulator in response to stress to an organ or tissue. Although short-lived in the circulation, it can activate four sub-types of G protein-coupled adenosine receptors (ARs): A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. The alkylxanthines caffeine and theophylline are the prototypical antagonists of ARs, and their stimulant actions occur primarily through this mechanism. For each of the four AR subtypes, selective agonists and antagonists have been introduced and used to develop new therapeutic drug concepts. ARs are notable among the GPCR family in the number and variety of agonist therapeutic candidates that have been proposed. The selective and potent synthetic AR agonists, which are typically much longer lasting in the body than adenosine, have potential therapeutic applications based on their anti-inflammatory (A2A and A3), cardioprotective (preconditioning by A1 and A3 and postconditioning by A2B), cerebroprotective (A1 and A3), and antinociceptive (A1) properties. Potent and selective AR antagonists display therapeutic potential as kidney protective (A1), antifibrotic (A2A), neuroprotective (A2A), and antiglaucoma (A3) agents. AR agonists for cardiac imaging and positron-emitting AR antagonists are in development for diagnostic applications. Allosteric modulators of A1 and A3 ARs have been described. In addition to the use of selective agonists/antagonists as pharmacological tools, mouse strains in which an AR has been genetically deleted have aided in developing novel drug concepts based on the modulation of ARs. PMID:19639277

  8. Adenosine signaling in normal and sickle erythrocytes and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujin; Xia, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a debilitating hemolytic genetic disorder with high morbidity and mortality affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Although SCD was discovered more than a century ago, no effective mechanism-based prevention and treatment are available due to poorly understood molecular basis of sickling, the fundamental pathogenic process of the disease. SCD patients constantly face hypoxia. One of the best-known signaling molecules to be induced under hypoxic conditions is adenosine. Recent studies demonstrate that hypoxia-mediated elevated adenosine signaling plays an important role in normal erythrocyte physiology. In contrast, elevated adenosine signaling contributes to sickling and multiple life threatening complications including tissue damage, pulmonary dysfunction and priapism. Here, we summarize recent research on the role of adenosine signaling in normal and sickle erythrocytes, progression of the disease and therapeutic implications. In normal erythrocytes, both genetic and pharmacological studies demonstrate that adenosine can enhance 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG) production via A2B receptor (ADORA2B) activation, suggesting that elevated adenosine has an unrecognized role in normal erythrocytes to promote O2 release and prevent acute ischemic tissue injury. However, in sickle erythrocytes, the beneficial role of excessive adenosine-mediated 2,3-BPG induction becomes detrimental by promoting deoxygenation, polymerization of sickle hemoglobin and subsequent sickling. Additionally, adenosine signaling via the A2A receptor (ADORA2A) on invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells inhibits iNKT cell activation and attenuates pulmonary dysfunction in SCD mice. Finally, elevated adenosine coupled with ADORA2BR activation is responsible for priapism, a dangerous complication seen in SCD. Overall, the research reviewed here reveals a differential role of elevated adenosine in normal erythrocytes, sickle erythrocytes, iNK cells and progression

  9. Characterization of adenosine binding proteins in human placental membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized two adenosine binding proteins in human placenta. In membranes, one site is detected with ({sup 3}H) -N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). This site is similar to the adenosine A{sub 2} receptor. We call this site the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. In detergent extracts, the second site is detected and has the characteristics of an adenosine A{sub 1} receptor. The soluble adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site cannot be detected without a rapid assay. Binding to the adenosine A{sub 1} receptor with ({sup 3}H)-2-chloroadenosine and ({sup 3}H)NECA is time dependent, saturable, and reversible. Equilibrium displacement analysis with adenosine agonists reveals an A{sub 1} specificity: 2-chloroadenosine > R-phenylisopropyladenosine > 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine. The antagonist potency order is 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine > isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline. Competition analysis of membranes with the A,-selective ligands ({sup 3}H)-cyclohexyladenosine ({sup 3}H) cylopentylxanthine revealed adenosine A{sub 1} agonist and antagonist potency orders. We have purified the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site is an ubiquitous major cellular protein. It is glycosylated, highly asymmetric, and acidic. The native protein is an homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 98 kDa. The sedimentation coefficient and partial specific volume of the binding complex are 6.9 s and 0.698 ml/g, respectively. The Stokes' radius is 70 {Angstrom}. The native molecular mass of the detergent-protein complex is 230 kDa. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site has an agonist potency order of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine >> R-phenylisopropyladenosine and an antagonist potency order of isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline >> 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine.

  10. Biphasic effects of dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate on synergistic stimulation of DNA synthesis by diacylglycerol, and the ionophore A23187 in guinea pig lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Otani, S.; Matsui-Yuasa, I.; Morisawa, S.

    1987-06-22

    When guinea pig lymphocytes were cultured with 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (OAG) and the ionophore A23187 for 8 h, (TH-thymidine incorporation into the acid-insoluble fraction of the cells was stimulated synergistically. Further addition of dibutyryl cAMP caused a biphasic effect on the synergistic stimulation. Dibutyryl cAMP augmented the synergistic stimulation when A23187 was at the concentration of 0.075 g/ml, but inhibited it when the ionophore was at 0.25 g/ml. At the higher concentration A23187, dibutyryl cAMP stimulated the (TH)thymidine incorporation when culture was for 4 h, but inhibited it when culture was for 8 h. The results were the same when 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was used instead of OAG. Butyrate could replace dibutyryl cAMP for stimulation of (TH)thymidine incorporation in combination with TPA and A23187, but not with OAG and A23187 at the lower ionophore concentration. Dibutyryl cAMP but not butyrate stimulated ornithine decarboxylase induction caused by TPA and A23187. These results suggest that the effect of dibutyryl cAMP on DNA synthesis induced by OAG and A23187 was biphasic and depended on the concentration of A23187 and on the time of culture, and that the stimulation mechanism of butyrate is different from that of dibutyryl cAMP.

  11. Dual specificity and novel structural folding of yeast phosphodiesterase-1 for hydrolysis of second messengers cyclic adenosine and guanosine 3',5'-Monophosphate

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Yuanyuan; Cui, Wenjun; Huang, Manna; Robinson, Howard; Wan, Yiqian; Wang, Yousheng; Ke, Hengming

    2014-08-05

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) decompose second messengers cAMP and cGMP that play critical roles in many physiological processes. PDE1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant yPDE1 has a KM of 110 μM and a kcat of 16.9 s⁻¹ for cAMP and a KM of 105 μM and a kcat of 11.8 s₅⁻¹ for cGMP. Thus, the specificity constant (kcat/KMcAMP)/(kcat/KMcGMP) of 1.4 indicates a dual specificity of yPDE1 for hydrolysis of both cAMP and cGMP. The crystal structures of unliganded yPDE1 and its complex with GMP at 1.31 Å resolution reveal a new structural foldingmore » that is different from those of human PDEs but is partially similar to that of some other metalloenzymes such as metallo-β-lactamase. In spite of their different structures and divalent metals, yPDE1 and human PDEs may share a common mechanism for hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP.« less

  12. Intermedin1-53 attenuates vascular smooth muscle cell calcification by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress via cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jin-Rui; Duan, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Bao-Hong; Teng, Xu; Zhou, Ye-Bo; Liu, Yue; Yu, Yan-Rong; Zhu, Yi; Tang, Chao-Shu; Qi, Yong-Fen

    2013-10-01

    We previously reported that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis participated in vascular calcification. Importantly, a novel paracrine/autocrine peptide intermedin1-53 (IMD1-53) in the vasculature inhibited vascular calcification in rats. But the mechanisms needed to be fully elucidated. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) calcification was induced by CaCl2 and β-glycerophosphate. Tunicamycin (Tm) or dithiothreitol (DTT) was used to induce ER stress. We found that IMD1-53 (10(-7)mol/L) treatment significantly alleviated the protein expression of ER stress hallmarks activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), ATF6, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and GRP94 induced by Tm or DTT. ER stress occurred in early and late calcification of VSMCs but was inhibited by IMD1-53. These inhibitory effects of IMD1-53 were abolished by treatment with the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H89. Pretreatment with IMD1-53 decreased the number of apoptotic VSMCs and downregulated protein expression of cleaved caspase 12 and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in calcified VSMCs. Concurrently, IMD1-53 restored the loss of VSMC lineage markers and ameliorated calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase activity in calcified VSMCs as well. The observation was further verified by Alizarin Red S staining, which showed that IMD1-53 reduced positive red nodules among calcified VSMCs. In conclusion, IMD1-53 attenuated VSMC calcification by inhibiting ER stress through cAMP/PKA signalling.

  13. Parathyroid hormone induces transcription of collagenase in rat osteoblastic cells by a mechanism using cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and requiring protein synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. K.; Brakenhoff, K. D.; Clohisy, J. C.; Quinn, C. O.; Partridge, N. C.

    1992-01-01

    Collagenase is synthesized and secreted by rat osteoblastic cells in response to PTH. We have previously demonstrated that this effect involves a substantial increase in collagenase mRNA via transcription. Northern blots and nuclear run-on assays were performed to further investigate the induction of collagenase by PTH in the rat osteoblastic cell line UMR 106-01. Detectable amounts of collagenase mRNA were not apparent until 2 h of PTH treatment, showed the greatest abundance at 4 h, and declined to approximately 30% of maximum by 8 h. The changes in the rate of transcription of the collagenase gene in response to PTH paralleled and preceded the changes in the steady state mRNA levels. After an initial lag period of about 1 h, collagenase transcription rates increased from very low levels to a maximal response at 2 h, returning to about 50% of maximum by 10 h. The increased transcriptional rate of the collagenase gene was found to be dependent on the concentration of PTH, with a half-maximal response at approximately 7 x 10(-10) M rat PTH-(1-34) and a maximal effect with a dose of 10(-8) M. The PTH-mediated induction of collagenase transcriptional activity was completely abolished by cycloheximide, while transcription of the beta-actin gene was unaffected by the translation inhibitor. These data suggest that a protein factor(s) is required for PTH-mediated transcriptional induction of collagenase. Since PTH increases intracellular levels of several potential second messengers, agents that mimic these substances were employed to determine which signal transduction pathway is predominant in the PTH-mediated stimulation of collagenase transcription.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  14. Conservation and divergence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP–PKA) pathway in two plant-pathogenic fungi: Fusarium graminearum and F. verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-PKA pathway is a central signaling cascade that transmits extracellular stimuli and governs cell responses through the second messenger cAMP. The importance of cAMP signaling in fungal biology has been well documented. Two key conserved components, adenylate cyclase (AC) and ca...

  15. Pretreatment of rats with increased bioavailable berberine attenuates cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury via down regulation of adenosine-5'monophosphate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weijia; Wei, Shengnan; Yu, Yang; Xue, Huan; Yao, Fan; Zhang, Ming; Xiao, Jun; Hatch, Grant M; Chen, Li

    2016-05-15

    Berberine (BBR) exhibits multiple beneficial biological effects. However, poor bioavailability of BBR has limited its clinical application. We previously demonstrated that solid dispersion of BBR with sodium caprate (HGSD) remarkably improves its bioavailability. We examined whether this increased bioavailability of BBR could protect the brain from ischemia-reperfusion (IR) induced injury. Rats treated with HGSD, SC and saline for 7 days then subjected to cerebral ischemia reperfusion by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2h followed 12h reperfusion. Neurological deficit scores, infarct size, SOD, MDA and NO levels were examined. P-AMPK, Bax, cleaved-Caspase-3 in brain was determined. To further probe for the mechanism of beneficial effect of HGSD, PC12 cells were incubated with serum from control or HGSD pretreated animals, incubated with 300μM H2O2 to induce apoptosis. Caspase-3 activity and cell apoptosis was evaluated. HGSD pretreatment significantly attenuated neurological deficit scores, reduced infarct size, increased SOD and decreased MDA and NO after cerebral IR injury compared to controls. Meanwhile, HGSD pretreatment significantly reduced expression of p-AMPK, Bax, cleaved-Caspase-3 after cerebral IR injury. Sodium caprate (100mg/kg/d) pretreatment alone did not exhibit any of these beneficial effects. PC12 cell apoptosis was attenuated when cells were cultured with HGSD serum compared to control. The presence of AMPK activator (AICAR) attenuated whereas AMPK inhibitor (Compound C) augmented the protective effect of HGSD serum on PC12 cell apoptosis.The results indicate that HGSD-pretreatment of rats protects the brain from ischemia-reperfusion injury and the mechanism is due to its anti-apoptotic effect mediated by decreased activation of AMPK. PMID:26957053

  16. Effects of limited exposure of rabbit chondrocyte cultures to parathyroid hormone and dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate on cartilage-characteristic proteoglycan synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Koike, T.; Iwamoto, M.; Kinoshita, M.; Sato, K.; Hiraki, Y.; Suzuki, F.

    1988-05-01

    Treatment of rabbit chondrocyte cultures with PTH or (Bu)2cAMP for 30 h increased by 2- to 3-fold the incorporation of (35S)sulfate and 3H radioactivity with glucosamine as the precursor into large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans characteristically found in cartilage matrix. However, PTH and (Bu)2cAMP did not increase either (35S)sulfate incorporation into small proteoglycans or the incorporation of 3H radioactivity into hyaluronic acid and other glycosaminoglycans. PTH and (Bu)2cAMP also increased the incorporation of (3H) serine into both proteoglycans and total protein. In all cultures described above, the stimulation of (3H)serine incorporation into proteoglycans exceeded that of (3H)serine incorporation into total protein. These data indicate that PTH and (Bu)2cAMP selectively stimulate cartilage proteoglycan synthesis while they increase total protein synthesis. Since cAMP seems to play a mediatory role in the action of PTH, we elected to examine the effects of a limited exposure of chondrocytes to PTH or (Bu)2cAMP on the synthesis of proteoglycans. Treatment with PTH or (Bu)2cAMP for only the initial 2-7 h did not increase the rates of incorporation of (35S)sulfate, the 3H radioactivity with glucosamine, and (3H)serine into proteoglycans, as measured at 30 h, despite the fact that this treatment brought about a rapid and transient rise in the cAMP level. Furthermore, the application of prostaglandin I2 at concentrations that increased cAMP levels in a similar fashion as did PTH did not affect (35S) sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans.

  17. Inhibition of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP)-response Element-binding Protein (CREB)-binding Protein (CBP)/β-Catenin Reduces Liver Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Yosuke; Oboki, Keisuke; Imamura, Jun; Kojika, Ekumi; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Saibara, Toshiji; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Kohara, Michinori; Kimura, Kiminori

    2015-11-01

    Wnt/β-catenin is involved in every aspect of embryonic development and in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, and is also implicated in organ fibrosis. However, the role of β-catenin-mediated signaling on liver fibrosis remains unclear. To explore this issue, the effects of PRI-724, a selective inhibitor of the cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP)/β-catenin interaction, on liver fibrosis were examined using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)- or bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced mouse liver fibrosis models. Following repetitive CCl4 administrations, the nuclear translocation of β-catenin was observed only in the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. PRI-724 treatment reduced the fibrosis induced by CCl4 or BDL. C-82, an active form of PRI-724, inhibited the activation of isolated primary mouse quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and promoted cell death in culture-activated HSCs. During the fibrosis resolution period, an increase in F4/80(+) CD11b(+) and Ly6C(low) CD11b(+) macrophages was induced by CCl4 and was sustained for two weeks thereafter, even after having stopped CCl4 treatment. PRI-724 accelerated the resolution of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, and this was accompanied by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-2, and MMP-8 expression in intrahepatic leukocytes. In conclusion, targeting the CBP/β-catenin interaction may become a new therapeutic strategy in treating liver fibrosis. PMID:26870800

  18. Glial Restricted Precursor Cell Transplant with Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Improved Some Autonomic Functions but Resulted in a Reduced Graft Size after Spinal Cord Contusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nout, Yvette S.; Culp, Esther; Schmidt, Markus H.; Tovar, C. Amy; Pröschel, Christoph; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot; Noble, Mark D.; Beattie, Michael S.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.

    2010-01-01

    Transplantation of glial restricted precursor (GRP) cells has been shown to reduce glial scarring after spinal cord injury (SCI) and, in combination with neuronal restricted precursor (NRP) cells or enhanced expression of neurotrophins, to improve recovery of function after SCI. We hypothesized that combining GRP transplants with rolipram and cAMP would improve functional recovery, similar to that seen after combining Schwann cell transplants with increasing cAMP. A short term study, 1)uninjured control, 2)SCI+vehicle, and 3)SCI+cAMP, showed that spinal cord [cAMP] were increased 14 days after SCI. We used 51 male rats subjected to a thoracic SCI for a 12-week survival study: 1)SCI+vehicle, 2)SCI+GRP, 3)SCI+cAMP, 4)SCI+GRP+cAMP, and 5)uninjured endpoint age-matched control (AM). Rolipram was administered for 2 weeks after SCI. At 9 days after SCI, GRP transplantation and injection of dibutyryl-cAMP into the spinal cord were performed. GRP cells survived, differentiated, and formed extensive transplants that were well integrated with host tissue. Presence of GRP cells increased the amount of tissue in the lesion; however, cAMP reduced the graft size. White matter sparing at the lesion epicenter was not affected. Serotonergic input to the lumbosacral spinal cord was not affected by treatment, but the amount of serotonin immediately caudal to the lesion was reduced in the cAMP groups. Using telemetric monitoring of corpus spongiosum penis pressure we show that the cAMP groups regained the same number of micturitions per 24 hrs when compared to the AM group, however, the frequency of peak pressures was increased in these groups compared to the AM group. In contrast, the GRP groups had similar frequency of peak pressures compared to baseline and the AM group. Animals that received GRP cells regained the same number of erectile events per 24 hrs compared to baseline and the AM group. Since cAMP reduced the GRP transplant graft, and some modest positive effects were seen that could be attributable to both GRP or cAMP, future research is required to determine how cAMP affects survival, proliferation, and / or function of progenitor cells and how this is related to function. cAMP may not always be a desirable addition to a progenitor cell transplantation strategy after SCI. PMID:21040723

  19. Cloning of the cDNA encoding adenosine 5'-monophosphate deaminase 1 and its mRNA expression in Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Keyong; Sun, Shujuan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Baojie; Meng, Xiaolin; Wang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    AMP deaminase catalyzes the conversion of AMP into IMP and ammonia. In the present study, a full-length cDNA of AMPD1 from skeletal muscle of Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus was cloned and characterized. The 2 526 bp cDNA contains a 5'-UTR of 78 bp, a 3'-UTR of 237 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 2 211 bp, which encodes a protein of 736 amino acids. The predicted protein contains a highly conserved AMP deaminase motif (SLSTDDP) and an ATP-binding site sequence (EPLMEEYAIAAQVFK). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AMPD1 and AMPD3 genes originate from the same branch, but are evolutionarily distant from the AMPD2 gene. RT-PCR showed that the flounder AMPD1 gene was expressed only in skeletal muscle. QRT-PCR analysis revealed a statistically significant 2.54 fold higher level of AMPD1 mRNA in adult muscle (750±40 g) compared with juvenile muscle (7.5±2 g) ( P<0.05). HPLC analysis showed that the IMP content in adult muscle (3.35±0.21 mg/g) was also statistically significantly higher than in juvenile muscle (1.08±0.04 mg/g) ( P<0.05). There is a direct relationship between the AMPD1 gene expression level and IMP content in the skeletal muscle of juvenile and adult flounders. These results may provide useful information for quality improvement and molecular breeding of aquatic animals.

  20. Stimulation of cartilage amino acid uptake by growth hormone-dependent factors in serum. Mediation by adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Drezner, M K; Eisenbarth, G S; Neelon, F A; Lebovitz, H E

    1975-02-13

    The effects of growth hormone-dependent serum factors on amino acid transport and on cartilage cyclic AMP levels in embryonic chicken cartilage were studied in vitro. Cartilages incubated in medium containing rat serum showed a significantly greater uptake of alpha-amino [1-14C] isobutyrate or [1-14C] cycloleucine than control cartilages incubated in medium alone. Normal rat serum (5%) added to the incubation medium also caused an increase in cartilage cyclic AMP content (from as little as 23% to as much as 109%). The factors in serum which increase cartilage cyclic AMP and amino acid uptake are growth hormone dependent, since neither growth hormone itself nor serum from hypophysectomized rats restores these serum factors. Studies comparing the ability of sera with varying amounts of growth hormone-dependent factors to stimulate amino-aminoisobutyrate transport and to increase cartilage cyclic AMP show a striking linear correlation between the two effects (r=0.977). Theophylline and prostaglandin E1, WHICH RAISE CARTILAGE CYCLIC AMP also increase amino-aminoisobutyrate transport. Exogenous cyclic AMP, N6-monobutyryl cyclic AMP and n6, 02'-dibutyryl cyclic AMP increase cartilage amino-aminoisobutyrate transport. The data are compatible with the thesis that growth hormone-dependent serum factors increase cartilage amino acid transport by elevating cartilage cyclic AMP.

  1. Arginine vasopressin increases cellular free calcium concentration and adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate production in rat renal papillary collecting tubule cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, S.; Okada, K.; Saito, T.

    1988-09-01

    The role of calcium (Ca) in the cellular action of arginine vasopressin (AVP) was examined in rat renal papillary collecting tubule cells in culture. AVP increased both the cellular free Ca concentration ((Ca2+)i) using fura-2, and cAMP production in a dose-dependent manner. AVP-induced cellular Ca mobilization was totally blocked by the antagonist to the antidiuretic action of AVP, and somewhat weakened by the antagonist to the vascular action of AVP. 1-Deamino-8-D-AVP (dDAVP). an antidiuretic analog of AVP, also increased (Ca2+) significantly. Cellular Ca mobilization was not obtained with cAMP, forskolin (a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase), or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. The early phase of (Ca2+)i depended on the intracellular Ca pool, since an AVP-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was obtained in cells pretreated with Ca-free medium containing 1 mM EGTA, verapamil, or cobalt, which blocked cellular Ca uptake. Also, AVP increased /sup 45/Ca2+ influx during the initial 10 min, which initiated the sustained phase of cellular Ca mobilization. However, cellular cAMP production induced by AVP during the 10-min observation period was diminished in the cells pretreated with Ca-free medium, verapamil, or cobalt, but was still significantly higher than the basal level. This was also diminished by a high Ca concentration in medium. These results indicate that 1) AVP concomitantly regulates cellular free Ca as well as its second messenger cAMP production; 2) AVP-induced elevation of cellular free Ca is dependent on both the cellular Ca pool and extracellular Ca; and 3) there is an optimal level of extracellular Ca to modulate the AVP action in renal papillary collecting tubule cells.

  2. A tyrosine-phosphorylated 55-kilodalton motility-associated bovine sperm protein is regulated by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphates and calcium.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, S; Trautman, K D; Goueli, S A; Carr, D W

    1997-06-01

    Sperm motility is regulated by protein phosphorylation. We have recently shown that a serine/threonine phosphatase system is involved in motility regulation. Two of the components of the phosphatase system, GSK-3 and PP1gamma2, are regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation. During our investigation of sperm tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins we discovered a 55-kDa protein whose tyrosine phosphorylation correlates closely to the motility state of sperm. This protein is tyrosine phosphorylated to a much higher degree in motile caudal than in immotile caput epididymal sperm. Motility inhibition of caudal epididymal sperm by protein kinase A (PKA) anchoring inhibition or by ionomycin-induced calcium overload led to the virtual disappearance of tyrosine phosphorylation of the 55-kDa protein. Conversely, treatment of sperm with motility activators, isobutylmethylxanthine or 8-bromo-cAMP, resulted in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the protein. The protein was present in the soluble 100 000 x g supernatants of sperm extracts and was heat labile. Chromatography through diethylaminoethyl-cellulose and Western blot analysis showed that this 55-kDa protein is not a regulatory subunit of PKA or alpha-tubulin. Our results represent the identification of a soluble protein whose tyrosine phosphorylation varies directly with motility and suggest that motility regulation may involve cross talk between PKA, calcium, and tyrosine kinase pathways. PMID:9166697

  3. Mechanisms involved in 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-mediated inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Dawit A P; Lira, Eduardo C; Baviera, Amanda M; Cao, Peirang; Zanon, Neusa M; Arany, Zoltan; Bedard, Nathalie; Tanksale, Preeti; Wing, Simon S; Lecker, Stewart H; Kettelhut, Isis C; Navegantes, Luiz C C

    2009-12-01

    Although it is well known that catecholamines inhibit skeletal muscle protein degradation, the molecular underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of beta(2)-adrenoceptors (AR) and cAMP in regulating the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in skeletal muscle. We report that increased levels of cAMP in isolated muscles, promoted by the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine was accompanied by decreased activity of the UPS, levels of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, and expression of atrogin-1, a key ubiquitin-protein ligase involved in muscle atrophy. In cultured myotubes, atrogin-1 induction after dexamethasone treatment was completely prevented by isobutylmethylxanthine. Furthermore, administration of clenbuterol, a selective beta(2)-agonist, to mice increased muscle cAMP levels and suppressed the fasting-induced expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, atrogin-1 mRNA being much more responsive to clenbuterol. Moreover, clenbuterol increased the phosphorylation of muscle Akt and Foxo3a in fasted rats. Similar responses were observed in muscles exposed to dibutyryl-cAMP. The stimulatory effect of clenbuterol on cAMP and Akt was abolished in muscles from beta(2)-AR knockout mice. The suppressive effect of beta(2)-agonist on atrogin-1 was not mediated by PGC-1alpha (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1alpha known to be induced by beta(2)-agonists and previously shown to inhibit atrogin-1 expression), because food-deprived PGC-1alpha knockout mice were still sensitive to clenbuterol. These findings suggest that the cAMP increase induced by stimulation of beta(2)-AR in skeletal muscles from fasted mice is possibly the mechanism by which catecholamines suppress atrogin-1 and the UPS, this effect being mediated via phosphorylation of Akt and thus inactivation of Foxo3.

  4. Corticotropin-releasing factor binding to peripheral tissue and activation of the adenylate cyclase-adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate system

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, J.R.; Eiden, L.E.; Eskay, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    Specific binding sites for rat corticotropin-releasing factor (rCRF) are present in rat adrenal medulla, ventral prostate, spleen, liver, kidney, and testis and bovine chromaffin cells in culture. Maximal binding of (/sup 125/I)rCRF occurred within 25 min at 4 C and was saturable. Scatchard analysis of rCRF binding to rat adrenal membranes and bovine chromaffin cells revealed the existence of two classes of binding sites. One class had a relatively higher apparent affinity and lower number of binding sites, whereas the other class had a relatively lower affinity and higher number of binding sites. CRF induced a dose-related increase in rat adrenal membrane adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP levels in bovine chromaffin cells. Nanomolar concentrations of rCRF maximally stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in rat adrenal membranes and maximally increased cAMP levels in bovine chromaffin cells to 86% and 130% above control values, respectively. The demonstration of specific CRF-binding sites in a variety of peripheral tissues and the finding that activation of specific CRF-binding sites in adrenal tissue stimulates the adenylate cyclase-cAMP system suggest that CRF may have an important regulatory role in various peripheral tissues.

  5. Up-regulation of lipolysis genes and increased production of AMP-activated protein kinase protein in the skeletal muscle of rats after resistance training.

    PubMed

    An, Jae-Heung; Yoon, Jin-Hwan; Suk, Min-Hwa; Shin, Yun-A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of lipogenesis- and lipolysis-related genes and proteins in skeletal muscles after 12 weeks of resistance training. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=12) were randomly divided into control (resting) and resistance training groups. A tower-climbing exercise, in which rats climbed to the top of their cage with a weight applied to their tails, used for resistance training. After 12 weeks, rats from the resistance training group had lower body weights (411.66±14.71 g vs. 478.33±24.63 g in the control), there was no significant difference between the two groups in the concentrations of total cholesterol, and high or low density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, the concentration of triglyceride was lower in resistance-trained rats (59.83±14.05 μg/mL vs 93.33±33.89 μg/mL in the control). The mRNA expression levels of the lipogenesis-related genes sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and fatty acid synthase were not significantly different between the resistance-trained and control rats; however, mRNA expression of the lipolysis-related carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 and malonyl-CoA decarboxylase increased significantly with resistance training. AMP-activated protein kinase protein levels also significantly increased in resistance training group compared with in the control group. These results suggested that resistance exercise training contributing to reduced weight gain may be in part be due to increase the lipolysis metabolism and energy expenditure in response to resistance training. PMID:27419110

  6. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Prevents TGF-β1–Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Myofibroblast Activation

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Sachin; Viswanadhapalli, Suryavathi; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Shi, Qian; Barnes, Jeffrey L.; Block, Karen; Gorin, Yves; Abboud, Hanna E.

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β contributes to tubulointerstitial fibrosis. We investigated the mechanism by which TGF-β exerts its profibrotic effects and specifically the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in kidney tubular epithelial cells and interstitial fibroblasts. In proximal tubular epithelial cells, TGF-β1 treatment causes a decrease in AMPK phosphorylation and activation together with increased fibronectin and α-smooth muscle actin expression and decreased in E-cadherin. TGF-β1 causes similar changes in interstitial fibroblasts. Activation of AMPK with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribofuranoside, metformin, or overexpression of constitutively active AMPK markedly attenuated TGF-β1 functions. Conversely, inhibition of AMPK with adenine 9-β-d-arabinofuranoside or siRNA-mediated knockdown of AMPK (official name PRKAA1) mimicked the effect of TGF-β1 and enhanced basal and TGF-β1–induced phenotypic changes. Importantly, we found that tuberin contributed to the protective effects of AMPK and that TGF-β1 promoted cell injury by blocking AMPK-mediated tuberin phosphorylation and activation. In the kidney cortex of TGF-β transgenic mice, the significant decrease in AMPK phosphorylation and tuberin phosphorylation on its AMPK-dependent activating site was associated with an increase in mesenchymal markers and a decrease in E-cadherin. Collectively, the data indicate that TGF-β exerts its profibrotic action in vitro and in vivo via inactivation of AMPK. AMPK and tuberin activation prevent tubulointerstitial injury induced by TGF-β. Activators of AMPK provide potential therapeutic strategy to prevent kidney fibrosis and progressive kidney disease. PMID:26071397

  7. Antcin K, a Triterpenoid Compound from Antrodia camphorata, Displays Antidiabetic and Antihyperlipidemic Effects via Glucose Transporter 4 and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation in Muscles.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Shih, Chun-Ching; Yang, Chang-Syun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to screen firstly the potential effects of antcin K (AnK), the main constituent of the fruiting body of Antrodia camphorata, in vitro and further evaluate the activities and mechanisms in high-fat-diet- (HFD-) induced mice. Following 8-week HFD-induction, mice were treated with AnK, fenofibrate (Feno), metformin (Metf), or vehicle for 4 weeks afterward. In C2C12 myotube cells, the membrane GLUT4 and phospho-Akt expressions were higher in insulin and AnK-treated groups than in the control group. It was observed that AnK-treated mice significantly lowered blood glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, and leptin levels in AnK-treated groups. Of interest, AnK at 40 mg/kg/day dosage displayed both antihyperglycemic effect comparable to Metf (300 mg/kg/day) and antihypertriglyceridemic effect comparable to Feno (250 mg/kg/day). The combination of significantly increased skeletal muscular membrane expression levels of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) but decreased hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase (G6 Pase) mRNA levels by AnK thus contributed to a decrease in blood glucose levels. Furthermore, AnK enhanced phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (phospho-AMPK) expressions in the muscle and liver. Moreover, AnK treatment exhibited inhibition of hepatic fatty acid synthase (FAS) but enhancement of fatty acid oxidation peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) expression coincident with reduced sterol response element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) mRNA levels in the liver may contribute to decreased plasma triglycerides, hepatic steatosis, and total cholesterol levels. The present findings indicate that AnK displays an advantageous therapeutic potential for the management of type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia. PMID:27242912

  8. Ptc1 protein phosphatase 2C contributes to glucose regulation of SNF1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Amparo; Xu, Xinjing; Carlson, Marian

    2013-10-25

    The SNF1/AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs) function in energy regulation in eukaryotic cells. SNF1/AMPKs are αβγ heterotrimers that are activated by phosphorylation of the activation loop Thr on the catalytic subunit. Protein kinases that activate SNF1/AMPK have been identified, but the protein phosphatases responsible for dephosphorylation of the activation loop are less well defined. For Saccharomyces cerevisiae SNF1/AMPK, Reg1-Glc7 protein phosphatase 1 and Sit4 type 2A-related phosphatase function together to dephosphorylate Thr-210 on the Snf1 catalytic subunit during growth on high concentrations of glucose; reg1Δ and sit4Δ single mutations do not impair dephosphorylation when inappropriate glycogen synthesis, also caused by these mutations, is blocked. We here present evidence that Ptc1 protein phosphatase 2C also has a role in dephosphorylation of Snf1 Thr-210 in vivo. The sit4Δ ptc1Δ mutant exhibited partial defects in regulation of the phosphorylation state of Snf1. The reg1Δ ptc1Δ mutant was viable only when expressing mutant Snf1 proteins with reduced kinase activity, and Thr-210 phosphorylation of the mutant SNF1 heterotrimers was substantially elevated during growth on high glucose. This evidence, together with findings on the reg1Δ sit4Δ mutant, indicates that although Reg1-Glc7 plays the major role, all three phosphatases contribute to maintenance of the Snf1 activation loop in the dephosphorylated state during growth on high glucose. Ptc1 has overlapping functions with Reg1-Glc7 and Sit4 in glucose regulation of SNF1/AMPK and cell viability.

  9. Up-regulation of lipolysis genes and increased production of AMP-activated protein kinase protein in the skeletal muscle of rats after resistance training

    PubMed Central

    An, Jae-Heung; Yoon, Jin-Hwan; Suk, Min-Hwa; Shin, Yun-A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of lipogenesis- and lipolysis-related genes and proteins in skeletal muscles after 12 weeks of resistance training. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=12) were randomly divided into control (resting) and resistance training groups. A tower-climbing exercise, in which rats climbed to the top of their cage with a weight applied to their tails, used for resistance training. After 12 weeks, rats from the resistance training group had lower body weights (411.66±14.71 g vs. 478.33±24.63 g in the control), there was no significant difference between the two groups in the concentrations of total cholesterol, and high or low density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, the concentration of triglyceride was lower in resistance-trained rats (59.83±14.05 μg/mL vs 93.33±33.89 μg/mL in the control). The mRNA expression levels of the lipogenesis-related genes sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and fatty acid synthase were not significantly different between the resistance-trained and control rats; however, mRNA expression of the lipolysis-related carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 and malonyl-CoA decarboxylase increased significantly with resistance training. AMP-activated protein kinase protein levels also significantly increased in resistance training group compared with in the control group. These results suggested that resistance exercise training contributing to reduced weight gain may be in part be due to increase the lipolysis metabolism and energy expenditure in response to resistance training. PMID:27419110

  10. AMP-activated Protein Kinase α2 Subunit Is Required for the Preservation of Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity by n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Jelenik, Tomas; Rossmeisl, Martin; Kuda, Ondrej; Jilkova, Zuzana Macek; Medrikova, Dasa; Kus, Vladimir; Hensler, Michal; Janovska, Petra; Miksik, Ivan; Baranowski, Marcin; Gorski, Jan; Hébrard, Sophie; Jensen, Thomas E.; Flachs, Pavel; Hawley, Simon; Viollet, Benoit; Kopecky, Jan

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The induction of obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance by high-fat diet in rodents can be prevented by n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs). We tested a hypothesis whether AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has a role in the beneficial effects of n-3 LC-PUFAs. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Mice with a whole-body deletion of the α2 catalytic subunit of AMPK (AMPKα2−/−) and their wild-type littermates were fed on either a low-fat chow, or a corn oil-based high-fat diet (cHF), or a cHF diet with 15% lipids replaced by n-3 LC-PUFA concentrate (cHF+F). RESULTS Feeding a cHF diet induced obesity, dyslipidemia, hepatic steatosis, and whole-body insulin resistance in mice of both genotypes. Although cHF+F feeding increased hepatic AMPKα2 activity, the body weight gain, dyslipidemia, and the accumulation of hepatic triglycerides were prevented by the cHF+F diet to a similar degree in both AMPKα2−/− and wild-type mice in ad libitum-fed state. However, preservation of hepatic insulin sensitivity by n-3 LC-PUFAs required functional AMPKα2 and correlated with the induction of adiponectin and reduction in liver diacylglycerol content. Under hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic conditions, AMPKα2 was essential for preserving low levels of both hepatic and plasma triglycerides, as well as plasma free fatty acids, in response to the n-3 LC-PUFA treatment. CONCLUSIONS Our results show that n-3 LC-PUFAs prevent hepatic insulin resistance in an AMPKα2-dependent manner and support the role of adiponectin and hepatic diacylglycerols in the regulation of insulin sensitivity. AMPKα2 is also essential for hypolipidemic and antisteatotic effects of n-3 LC-PUFA under insulin-stimulated conditions. PMID:20693347

  11. SIRT1, AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and downstream kinases in response to a single bout of sprint exercise: influence of glucose ingestion.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Borja; Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Fuentes, Teresa; Ponce-González, Jesús Gustavo; Morales-Alamo, David; Olmedillas, Hugo; Guillén-Salgado, José; Santana, Alfredo; Calbet, José A L

    2010-07-01

    This study was designed to examine potential in vivo mechanisms of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation inhibition and its downstream signaling consequences during the recovery period after a single bout of sprint exercise. Sprint exercise induces Thr(172)-AMPK phosphorylation and increased PGC-1alpha mRNA, by an unknown mechanism. Muscle biopsies were obtained in 15 young healthy men in response to a 30-s sprint exercise (Wingate test) randomly distributed into two groups: the fasting (n = 7, C) and the glucose group (n = 8, G), who ingested 75 g of glucose 1 h before exercising to inhibit AMPKalpha phosphorylation. Exercise elicited different patterns of Ser(221)-ACCbeta, Ser(473)-Akt and Thr(642)-AS160 phosphorylation, during the recovery period after glucose ingestion. Thirty minutes after the control sprint, Ser(485)-AMPKalpha1/Ser(491)-AMPKalpha2 phosphorylation was reduced by 33% coinciding with increased Thr(172)-AMPKalpha phosphorylation (both, P < 0.05). Glucose abolished the 30-min Thr(172)-AMPKalpha phosphorylation. Ser(221)-ACCbeta phosphorylation was elevated immediately following and 30 min after exercise in C and G, implying a dissociation between Thr(172)-AMPKalpha and Ser(221)-ACCbeta phosphorylation. Two hours after the sprint, PGC-1alpha protein expression remained unchanged while SIRT1 (its upstream deacetylase) was increased. Glucose ingestion abolished the SIRT1 response without any significant effect on PGC-1alpha protein expression. In conclusion, glucose ingestion prior to a sprint exercise profoundly affects Thr(172)-AMPKalpha phosphorylation and its downstream signaling during the recovery period.

  12. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates CO2-induced alveolar epithelial dysfunction in rats and human cells by promoting Na,K-ATPase endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Vadász, István; Dada, Laura A.; Briva, Arturo; Trejo, Humberto E.; Welch, Lynn C.; Chen, Jiwang; Tóth, Péter T.; Lecuona, Emilia; Witters, Lee A.; Schumacker, Paul T.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Seeger, Werner; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2008-01-01

    Hypercapnia (elevated CO2 levels) occurs as a consequence of poor alveolar ventilation and impairs alveolar fluid reabsorption (AFR) by promoting Na,K-ATPase endocytosis. We studied the mechanisms regulating CO2-induced Na,K-ATPase endocytosis in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and alveolar epithelial dysfunction in rats. Elevated CO2 levels caused a rapid activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in AECs, a key regulator of metabolic homeostasis. Activation of AMPK was mediated by a CO2-triggered increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase-β (CaMKK-β). Chelating intracellular Ca2+ or abrogating CaMKK-β function by gene silencing or chemical inhibition prevented the CO2-induced AMPK activation in AECs. Activation of AMPK or overexpression of constitutively active AMPK was sufficient to activate PKC-ζ and promote Na,K-ATPase endocytosis. Inhibition or downregulation of AMPK via adenoviral delivery of dominant-negative AMPK-α1 prevented CO2-induced Na,K-ATPase endocytosis. The hypercapnia effects were independent of intracellular ROS. Exposure of rats to hypercapnia for up to 7 days caused a sustained decrease in AFR. Pretreatment with a β-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or a cAMP analog ameliorated the hypercapnia-induced impairment of AFR. Accordingly, we provide evidence that elevated CO2 levels are sensed by AECs and that AMPK mediates CO2-induced Na,K-ATPase endocytosis and alveolar epithelial dysfunction, which can be prevented with β-adrenergic agonists and cAMP. PMID:18188452

  13. Specific Deletion of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (α1AMPK) in Murine Oocytes Alters Junctional Protein Expression and Mitochondrial Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Bertoldo, Michael J.; Guibert, Edith; Faure, Melanie; Ramé, Christelle; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Dupont, Joëlle; Froment, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Oogenesis and folliculogenesis are dynamic processes that are regulated by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine signals. These signals are exchanged between the oocyte and the somatic cells of the follicle. Here we analyzed the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important regulator of cellular energy homeostasis, by using transgenic mice deficient in α1AMPK specifically in the oocyte. We found a decrease of 27% in litter size was observed in ZP3-α1AMPK-/- (ZP3-KO) female mice. Following in vitro fertilization, where conditions are stressful for the oocyte and embryo, ZP3-KO oocytes were 68% less likely to pass the 2-cell stage. In vivo and in cumulus-oocyte complexes, several proteins involved in junctional communication, such as connexin37 and N-cadherin were down-regulated in the absence of α1AMPK. While the two signalling pathways (PKA and MAPK) involved in the junctional communication between the cumulus/granulosa cells and the oocyte were stimulated in control oocytes, ZP3-KO oocytes exhibited only low phosphorylation of MAPK or CREB proteins. In addition, MII oocytes deficient in α1AMPK had a 3-fold lower ATP concentration, an increase in abnormal mitochondria, and a decrease in cytochrome C and PGC1α levels, suggesting perturbed energy production by mitochondria. The absence of α1AMPK also induced a reduction in histone deacetylase activity, which was associated with an increase in histone H3 acetylation (K9/K14 residues). Together, the results of the present study suggest that absence of AMPK, modifies oocyte quality through energy processes and oocyte/somatic cell communication. The limited effect observed in vivo could be partly due to a favourable follicle microenvironment where nutrients, growth factors, and adequate cell interaction were present. Whereas in a challenging environment such as that of in vitro culture following IVF, the phenotype is revealed. PMID:25767884

  14. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid protects against high-fat diet-induced fatty liver by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in obese mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Su; Kim, Daeyoung; Jo, Keunae; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} NDGA decreases high-fat diet-induced body weight gain and adiposity. {yields} NDGA reduces high-fat diet-induced triglyceride accumulation in liver. {yields} NDGA improves lipid storage in vitro through altering lipid regulatory proteins. {yields} Inhibition of lipid storage in vivo and in vitro is mediated by AMPK activation. -- Abstract: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease, is strongly associated with metabolic syndrome. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) has been reported to inhibit lipoprotein lipase; however, the effect of NDGA on hepatic lipid metabolism remains unclear. We evaluated body weight, adiposity, liver histology, and hepatic triglyceride content in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed C57BL/6J mice treated with NDGA. In addition, we characterized the underlying mechanism of NDGA's effects in HepG2 hepatocytes by Western blot and RT-PCR analysis. NDGA (100 or 200 mg/kg/day) reduced weight gain, fat pad mass, and hepatic triglyceride accumulation, and improved serum lipid parameters in mice fed a HFD for 8 weeks. NDGA significantly increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in the liver and in HepG2 hepatocytes. NDGA downregulated the level of mature SREBP-1 and its target genes (acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase), but, it upregulated expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){alpha}, PPAR{gamma} coactivator-1, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, and uncoupling protein-2. The specific AMPK inhibitor compound C attenuated the effects of NDGA on expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins in HepG2 hepatocytes. The beneficial effects of NDGA on HFD-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation are mediated through AMPK signaling pathways, suggesting a potential target for preventing NAFLD.

  15. Antiaging Gene Klotho Deficiency Promoted High-Fat Diet-Induced Arterial Stiffening via Inactivation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi; Chen, Jianglei; Sun, Zhongjie

    2016-03-01

    Klotho was originally discovered as an aging-suppressor gene. The objective of this study is to investigate whether klotho gene deficiency affects high-fat diet (HFD)-induced arterial stiffening. Heterozygous Klotho-deficient (KL(+/-)) mice and WT littermates were fed on HFD or normal diet. HFD increased pulse wave velocity within 5 weeks in KL(+/-) mice but not in wild-type mice, indicating that klotho deficiency accelerates and exacerbates HFD-induced arterial stiffening. A greater increase in blood pressure was found in KL(+/-) mice fed on HFD. Protein expressions of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase-α (AMPKα), phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) were decreased, whereas protein expressions of collagen I, transforming growth factor-β1, and Runx2 were increased in aortas of KL(+/-) mice fed on HFD. Interestingly, daily injections of an AMPKα activator, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-3-ribonucleoside, abolished the increases in pulse wave velocity, blood pressure, and blood glucose in KL(+/-) mice fed on HFD. Treatment with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-3-ribonucleoside for 2 weeks not only abolished the downregulation of phosphorylated AMPKα, phosphorylated eNOS, and Mn-SOD levels but also attenuated the increased levels of collagen I, transforming growth factor-β1, Runx2, superoxide, elastic lamellae breaks, and calcification in aortas of KL(+/-) mice fed on HFD. In cultured mouse aortic smooth muscle cells, cholesterol plus KL-deficient serum decreased phosphorylation levels of AMPKα and LKB1 (an important upstream regulator of AMPKα activity) but increased collagen I synthesis, which can be eliminated by activation of AMPKα by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-3-ribonucleoside. In conclusions, Klotho deficiency promoted HFD-induced arterial stiffening and hypertension via downregulation of AMPKα activity. PMID:26781278

  16. β-Guanidinopropionic acid extends the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster via an AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent increase in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Si; Long, Li-Hong; Li, Di; Zhang, Jian-Kang; Jin, Shan; Wang, Fang; Chen, Jian-Guo

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls autophagy through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and Unc-51 like kinase 1 (ULK1/Atg1) signaling, which augments the quality of cellular housekeeping, and that β-guanidinopropionic acid (β-GPA), a creatine analog, leads to a chronic activation of AMPK. However, the relationship between β-GPA and aging remains elusive. In this study, we hypothesized that feeding β-GPA to adult Drosophila produces the lifespan extension via activation of AMPK-dependent autophagy. It was found that dietary administration of β-GPA at a concentration higher than 900 mm induced a significant extension of the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster in repeated experiments. Furthermore, we found that Atg8 protein, the homolog of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3) and a biomarker of autophagy in Drosophila, was significantly upregulated by β-GPA treatment, indicating that autophagic activity plays a role in the effect of β-GPA. On the other hand, when the expression of Atg5 protein, an essential protein for autophagy, was reduced by RNA interference (RNAi), the effect of β-GPA on lifespan extension was abolished. Moreover, we found that AMPK was also involved in this process. β-GPA treatment significantly elevated the expression of phospho-T172-AMPK levels, while inhibition of AMPK by either AMPK-RNAi or compound C significantly attenuated the expression of autophagy-related proteins and lifespan extension in Drosophila. Taken together, our results suggest that β-GPA can induce an extension of the lifespan of Drosophila via AMPK-Atg1-autophagy signaling pathway.

  17. Natural vanadium-containing Jeju ground water stimulates glucose uptake through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in L6 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seung-Lark; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of natural vanadium-containing Jeju ground water on glucose uptake in L6 myotubes and adipogensesis in 3T3 L1 cells. The Jeju ground water samples containing vanadium components were designated as S1 (8.0 ± 0.9 μg/l), S2 (24.0 ± 2.0 μg/l), and S3 (26.0 ± 2.0 μg/l), respectively. To investigate the effects of the Jeju ground water on glucose uptake in L6 myotubes, L6 cells were differentiated in media containing deionized distilled water (DDW group) and the water samples (S1, S2, and S3 groups). After daily changes in cultured media containing the Jeju ground water samples for 1 week, all samples had increased glucose uptake compared to the DDW group and the order of glucose uptake increased in parallel with vanadium content (S3 > S2 > S1). In addition, S3 significantly stimulated the phosphorylation of the Thr-172 residue of the AMP-activated protein kinase-α subunit and the Ser-79 subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase compared to the DDW group. The effect of glucose uptake by S3 was reversed by pretreatment with Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. Interestingly, vanadium pentoxide also increased glucose uptake and activated AMPK activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, as compared to the DDW treated group, S3 treatment inhibited adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells by down regulation of expressions of adipogenic transcription factors. Taken together, these findings suggest that S3 displays beneficial effects in the treatment of diabetes, at least in part through the activation of AMPK activity.

  18. Specific deletion of AMP-activated protein kinase (α1AMPK) in murine oocytes alters junctional protein expression and mitochondrial physiology.

    PubMed

    Bertoldo, Michael J; Guibert, Edith; Faure, Melanie; Ramé, Christelle; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Dupont, Joëlle; Froment, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Oogenesis and folliculogenesis are dynamic processes that are regulated by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine signals. These signals are exchanged between the oocyte and the somatic cells of the follicle. Here we analyzed the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important regulator of cellular energy homeostasis, by using transgenic mice deficient in α1AMPK specifically in the oocyte. We found a decrease of 27% in litter size was observed in ZP3-α1AMPK-/- (ZP3-KO) female mice. Following in vitro fertilization, where conditions are stressful for the oocyte and embryo, ZP3-KO oocytes were 68% less likely to pass the 2-cell stage. In vivo and in cumulus-oocyte complexes, several proteins involved in junctional communication, such as connexin37 and N-cadherin were down-regulated in the absence of α1AMPK. While the two signalling pathways (PKA and MAPK) involved in the junctional communication between the cumulus/granulosa cells and the oocyte were stimulated in control oocytes, ZP3-KO oocytes exhibited only low phosphorylation of MAPK or CREB proteins. In addition, MII oocytes deficient in α1AMPK had a 3-fold lower ATP concentration, an increase in abnormal mitochondria, and a decrease in cytochrome C and PGC1α levels, suggesting perturbed energy production by mitochondria. The absence of α1AMPK also induced a reduction in histone deacetylase activity, which was associated with an increase in histone H3 acetylation (K9/K14 residues). Together, the results of the present study suggest that absence of AMPK, modifies oocyte quality through energy processes and oocyte/somatic cell communication. The limited effect observed in vivo could be partly due to a favourable follicle microenvironment where nutrients, growth factors, and adequate cell interaction were present. Whereas in a challenging environment such as that of in vitro culture following IVF, the phenotype is revealed. PMID:25767884

  19. Role of Deleted in Breast Cancer 1 (DBC1) Protein in SIRT1 Deacetylase Activation Induced by Protein Kinase A and AMP-activated Protein Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Nin, Veronica; Escande, Carlos; Chini, Claudia C.; Giri, Shailendra; Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Matalonga, Jonathan; Lou, Zhenkun; Chini, Eduardo N.

    2012-01-01

    The NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 is a key regulator of several aspects of metabolism and aging. SIRT1 activation is beneficial for several human diseases, including metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity, liver steatosis, and Alzheimer disease. We have recently shown that the protein deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1) is a key regulator of SIRT1 activity in vivo. Furthermore, SIRT1 and DBC1 form a dynamic complex that is regulated by the energetic state of the organism. Understanding how the interaction between SIRT1 and DBC1 is regulated is therefore essential to design strategies aimed to activate SIRT1. Here, we investigated which pathways can lead to the dissociation of SIRT1 and DBC1 and consequently to SIRT1 activation. We observed that PKA activation leads to a fast and transient activation of SIRT1 that is DBC1-dependent. In fact, an increase in cAMP/PKA activity resulted in the dissociation of SIRT1 and DBC1 in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner. Pharmacological AMPK activation led to SIRT1 activation by a DBC1-dependent mechanism. Indeed, we found that AMPK activators promote SIRT1-DBC1 dissociation in cells, resulting in an increase in SIRT1 activity. In addition, we observed that the SIRT1 activation promoted by PKA and AMPK occurs without changes in the intracellular levels of NAD+. We propose that PKA and AMPK can acutely activate SIRT1 by inducing dissociation of SIRT1 from its endogenous inhibitor DBC1. Our experiments provide new insight on the in vivo mechanism of SIRT1 regulation and a new avenue for the development of pharmacological SIRT1 activators targeted at the dissociation of the SIRT1-DBC1 complex. PMID:22553202

  20. Effects of fucoidan on proliferation, AMP-activated protein kinase, and downstream metabolism- and cell cycle-associated molecules in poorly differentiated human hepatoma HLF cells.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Takumi; Hayakawa, Masako; Koga, Hironori; Torimura, Takuji

    2015-05-01

    Survival rates are low in patients with poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide derived from brown seaweed, has anticancer activity; however, the effects of fucoidan on poorly differentiated HCC remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of fucoidan on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a proliferation regulator, and its downstream metabolism- and cell cycle-related molecules in a poorly differentiated human hepatoma HLF cell line. HLF cells were treated with fucoidan (10, 50, or 100 µg/ml; n=4) or phosphate buffered saline (control; n=4) for 96 h. Proliferation was evaluated by counting cells every 24 h. AMPK, TSC2, mTOR, GSK3β, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), ATP-citrate lyase, p53, cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, and CDK6 expression and/or phosphorylation were examined by immunoblotting 24 h after treatment with 100 µg/ml fucoidan. Cell cycle progression was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorter 48 h after treatment. Treatment with 50 or 100 µg/ml fucoidan significantly and dose- and time-dependently suppressed HLF cell proliferation (P<0.0001). Fucoidan induced AMPK phosphorylation on Ser172 24 h after treatment. Although no differences were seen in expression and phosphorylation levels of TSC2, mTOR, GSK3β, ATP-citrate lyase, and p53 between the control and fucoidan-treated HLF cells, fucoidan induced ACC phosphorylation on Ser79. Moreover, fucoidan decreased cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6 expression 24 h after treatment. Furthermore, HLF cells were arrested in the G1/S phase 48 h after fucoidan treatment. We demonstrated that fucoidan suppressed HLF cell proliferation with AMPK phosphorylation. We showed that fucoidan phosphorylated ACC and downregulated cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6 expression. Our findings suggest that fucoidan inhibits proliferation through AMPK-associated suppression of fatty acid synthesis and G1/S transition in HLF cells.

  1. Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Regulates Hippocampal Neuronal pH by Recruiting Na+/H+ Exchanger NHE5 to the Cell Surface*

    PubMed Central

    Jinadasa, Tushare; Szabó, Elöd Z.; Numata, Masayuki; Orlowski, John

    2014-01-01

    Strict regulation of intra- and extracellular pH is an important determinant of nervous system function as many voltage-, ligand-, and H+-gated cationic channels are exquisitely sensitive to transient fluctuations in pH elicited by neural activity and pathophysiologic events such as hypoxia-ischemia and seizures. Multiple Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) are implicated in maintenance of neural pH homeostasis. However, aside from the ubiquitous NHE1 isoform, their relative contributions are poorly understood. NHE5 is of particular interest as it is preferentially expressed in brain relative to other tissues. In hippocampal neurons, NHE5 regulates steady-state cytoplasmic pH, but intriguingly the bulk of the transporter is stored in intracellular vesicles. Here, we show that NHE5 is a direct target for phosphorylation by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor and regulator of cellular energy homeostasis in response to metabolic stresses. In NHE5-transfected non-neuronal cells, activation of AMPK by the AMP mimetic AICAR or by antimycin A, which blocks aerobic respiration and causes acidification, increased cell surface accumulation and activity of NHE5, and elevated intracellular pH. These effects were effectively blocked by the AMPK antagonist compound C, the NHE inhibitor HOE694, and mutation of a predicted AMPK recognition motif in the NHE5 C terminus. This regulatory pathway was also functional in primary hippocampal neurons, where AMPK activation of NHE5 protected the cells from sustained antimycin A-induced acidification. These data reveal a unique role for AMPK and NHE5 in regulating the pH homeostasis of hippocampal neurons during metabolic stress. PMID:24936055

  2. The 5’-AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Is Involved in the Augmentation of Antioxidant Defenses in Cryopreserved Chicken Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Mong Diep; Seigneurin, François; Froment, Pascal; Combarnous, Yves; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Semen cryopreservation is a unique tool for the management of animal genetic diversity. However, the freeze-thaw process causes biochemical and physical alterations which make difficult the restoration of sperm energy-dependent functions needed for fertilization. 5’-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor and regulator of intracellular energy metabolism. Mitochondria functions are known to be severely affected during sperm cryopreservation with deleterious oxidative and peroxidative effects leading to cell integrity and functions damages. The aim of this study was thus to examine the role of AMPK on the peroxidation/antioxidant enzymes defense system in frozen-thawed sperm and its consequences on sperm functions. Chicken semen was diluted in media supplemented with or without AMPK activators (AICAR or Metformin [MET]) or inhibitor (Compound C [CC]) and then cryopreserved. AMPKα phosphorylation, antioxidant enzymes activities, mitochondrial potential, ATP, citrate, viability, acrosome reaction ability (AR) and various motility parameters were negatively affected by the freeze-thaw process while reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and lactate concentration were dramatically increased. AICAR partially restored superoxide dismutase (SOD), Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) and Glutathione Reductase (GR), increased ATP, citrate, and lactate concentration and subsequently decreased the ROS and LPO (malondialdehyde) in frozen-thawed semen. Motility parameters were increased (i.e., + 23% for motility, + 34% for rapid sperm) as well as AR (+ 100%). MET had similar effects as AICAR except that catalase activity was restored and that ATP and mitochondrial potential were further decreased. CC showed effects opposite to AICAR on SOD, ROS, LPO and AR and motility parameters. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that, upon freeze-thaw process, AMPK stimulated intracellular anti-oxidative defense enzymes through ATP regulation, thus

  3. Antcin K, a Triterpenoid Compound from Antrodia camphorata, Displays Antidiabetic and Antihyperlipidemic Effects via Glucose Transporter 4 and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation in Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Shih, Chun-Ching; Yang, Chang-Syun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to screen firstly the potential effects of antcin K (AnK), the main constituent of the fruiting body of Antrodia camphorata, in vitro and further evaluate the activities and mechanisms in high-fat-diet- (HFD-) induced mice. Following 8-week HFD-induction, mice were treated with AnK, fenofibrate (Feno), metformin (Metf), or vehicle for 4 weeks afterward. In C2C12 myotube cells, the membrane GLUT4 and phospho-Akt expressions were higher in insulin and AnK-treated groups than in the control group. It was observed that AnK-treated mice significantly lowered blood glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, and leptin levels in AnK-treated groups. Of interest, AnK at 40 mg/kg/day dosage displayed both antihyperglycemic effect comparable to Metf (300 mg/kg/day) and antihypertriglyceridemic effect comparable to Feno (250 mg/kg/day). The combination of significantly increased skeletal muscular membrane expression levels of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) but decreased hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase (G6 Pase) mRNA levels by AnK thus contributed to a decrease in blood glucose levels. Furthermore, AnK enhanced phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (phospho-AMPK) expressions in the muscle and liver. Moreover, AnK treatment exhibited inhibition of hepatic fatty acid synthase (FAS) but enhancement of fatty acid oxidation peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) expression coincident with reduced sterol response element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) mRNA levels in the liver may contribute to decreased plasma triglycerides, hepatic steatosis, and total cholesterol levels. The present findings indicate that AnK displays an advantageous therapeutic potential for the management of type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia. PMID:27242912

  4. Regulation of endothelial cell cycle by laminar versus oscillatory flow: distinct modes of interactions of AMP-activated protein kinase and Akt pathways.

    PubMed

    Guo, Deliang; Chien, Shu; Shyy, John Y-J

    2007-03-01

    Steady laminar flow in the straight parts of the arterial tree is atheroprotective, whereas disturbed flow with oscillation in branch points and the aortic root are athero-prone, in part, because of the distinct roles of the flow patterns in regulating the cell cycle of vascular endothelial cells (ECs). To elucidate the molecular basis underlying the endothelial cell cycle regulated by distinct flow patterns, we conducted flow-channel experiments to investigate the effects of laminar versus oscillatory flows on activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Akt in ECs. Laminar flow caused a transient activation of both AMPK and Akt, but oscillatory flow activated only Akt, with AMPK being maintained at its basal level. Constitutively active and dominant-negative mutants of AMPK and Akt were used to elucidate further the positive effect of Akt and negative role of AMPK in mediating mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and its target p70S6 kinase (S6K) in response to laminar and oscillatory flows. Measurements of phosphorylation of mTOR Ser2448 and S6K Thr389 showed that AMPK, by counteracting Akt under laminar flow, resulted in a transient activation of S6K. Under oscillatory flow, because of the lack of AMPK activation to effect negative regulation, S6K was activated in a sustained manner. As a functional consequence, AMPK activation attenuated cell cycle progression in response to both laminar and oscillatory flows. In contrast, AMPK inhibition promoted EC cycle progression by decreasing the cell population in the G(0)/G(1) phase and increasing it in the S+G(2)/M phase. In vivo, phosphorylation of the promitotic S6K in mouse thoracic aorta was much less than that in mouse aortic root. In contrast, AMPK phosphorylation was higher in the thoracic aorta. These results provide a molecular mechanism by which laminar versus oscillatory flow regulates the endothelial cell cycle.

  5. Asparagine attenuates intestinal injury, improves energy status and inhibits AMP-activated protein kinase signalling pathways in weaned piglets challenged with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuying; Liu, Yulan; Li, Shuang; Pi, Dingan; Zhu, Huiling; Hou, Yongqing; Shi, Haifeng; Leng, Weibo

    2015-08-28

    The intestine requires a high amount of energy to maintain its health and function; thus, energy deficits in intestinal mucosa may lead to intestinal damage. Asparagine (Asn) is a precursor for many other amino acids such as aspartate, glutamine and glutamate, which can be used to supply energy to enterocytes. In the present study, we hypothesise that dietary supplementation of Asn could alleviate bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal injury via improvement of intestinal energy status. A total of twenty-four weaned piglets were assigned to one of four treatments: (1) non-challenged control; (2) LPS+0 % Asn; (3) LPS+0·5 % Asn; (4) LPS+1·0 % Asn. On day 19, piglets were injected with LPS or saline. At 24 h post-injection, piglets were slaughtered and intestinal samples were collected. Asn supplementation improved intestinal morphology, indicated by higher villus height and villus height:crypt depth ratio, and lower crypt depth. Asn supplementation also increased the ratios of RNA:DNA and protein:DNA as well as disaccharidase activities in intestinal mucosa. In addition, Asn supplementation attenuated bacterial LPS-induced intestinal energy deficits, indicated by increased ATP and adenylate energy charge levels, and decreased AMP:ATP ratio. Moreover, Asn administration increased the activities of key enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, including citrate synthase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. Finally, Asn administration decreased the mRNA abundance of intestinal AMP-activated protein kinase-α1 (AMPKα1), AMPKα2, silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) and PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC1α), and reduced intestinal AMPKα phosphorylation. Collectively, these results indicate that Asn supplementation alleviates bacterial LPS-induced intestinal injury by modulating the AMPK signalling pathway and improving energy status.

  6. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Hien, Tran Thi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-11-15

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  7. A homologue of AMP-activated protein kinase in Drosophila melanogaster is sensitive to AMP and is activated by ATP depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Pan, David A; Hardie, D Grahame

    2002-01-01

    We have identified single genes encoding homologues of the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. Kinase activity could be detected in extracts of a Drosophila cell line using the SAMS peptide, which is a relatively specific substrate for the AMPK/SNF1 kinases in mammals and yeast. Expression of double stranded (ds) RNAs targeted at any of the putative alpha, beta or gamma subunits ablated this activity, and abolished expression of the alpha subunit. The Drosophila kinase (DmAMPK) was activated by AMP in cell-free assays (albeit to a smaller extent than mammalian AMPK), and by stresses that deplete ATP (oligomycin and hypoxia), as well as by carbohydrate deprivation, in intact cells. Using a phosphospecific antibody, we showed that activation was associated with phosphorylation of a threonine residue (Thr-184) within the 'activation loop' of the alpha subunit. We also identified a homologue of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (DmACC) in Drosophila and, using a phosphospecific antibody, showed that the site corresponding to the regulatory AMPK site on the mammalian enzyme became phosphorylated in response to oligomycin or hypoxia. By immunofluorescence microscopy of oligomycin-treated Dmel2 cells using the phosphospecific antibody, the phosphorylated DmAMPK alpha subunit was mainly detected in the nucleus. Our results show that the AMPK system is highly conserved between insects and mammals. Drosophila cells now represent an attractive system to study this pathway, because of the small, well-defined genome and the ability to ablate expression of specific gene products using interfering dsRNAs. PMID:12093363

  8. Green tea epigallocatechin gallate inhibits insulin stimulation of adipocyte glucose uptake via the 67-kilodalton laminin receptor and AMP-activated protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chi-Fen; Tsuei, Yi-Wei; Liu, Chi-Wei; Kao, Chung-Cheng; Shih, Li-Jane; Ho, Low-Tone; Wu, Liang-Yi; Wu, Chi-Peng; Tsai, Pei-Hua; Chang, Hsin-Huei; Ku, Hui-Chen; Kao, Yung-Hsi

    2010-10-01

    Insulin and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) are reported to regulate obesity and fat accumulation, respectively. This study investigated the pathways involved in EGCG modulation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 and C3H10T1/2 adipocytes. EGCG inhibited insulin stimulation of adipocyte glucose uptake in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The concentration of EGCG that decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by 50-60% was approximately 5-10 µM for a period of 2 h. At 10 µM, EGCG and gallic acid were more effective than (-)-epicatechin, (-)-epigallocatechin, and (-)-epicatechin 3-gallate. We identified the EGCG receptor [also known as the 67-kDa laminin receptor (67LR)] in fat cells and extended the findings for this study to clarify whether EGCG-induced changes in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes could be mediated through the 67LR. Pretreatment of adipocytes with a 67LR antibody, but not normal rabbit immunoglobulin, prevented the effects of EGCG on insulin-increased glucose uptake. This suggests that the 67LR mediates the effect of EGCG on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. Moreover, pretreatment with an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor, such as compound C, but not with a glutathione (GSH) activator, such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), blocked the antiinsulin effect of EGCG on adipocyte glucose uptake. These data suggest that EGCG exerts its anti-insulin action on adipocyte glucose uptake via the AMPK, but not the GSH, pathway. The results of this study possibly support that EGCG mediates fat content.

  9. δ-Opioid receptors stimulate the metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase through coincident signaling with G(q/11)-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Olianas, Maria C; Dedoni, Simona; Olianas, Alessandra; Onali, Pierluigi

    2012-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and δ-opioid receptors (DORs) are both involved in controlling cell survival, energy metabolism, and food intake, but little is known on the interaction between these two signaling molecules. Here we show that activation of human DORs stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells increased AMPK activity and AMPK phosphorylation on Thr172. DOR-induced AMPK phosphorylation was prevented by pertussis toxin, reduced by protein kinase A (PKA) activators, and unaffected by PKA, transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and protein kinase C inhibitors. Conversely, the DOR effect was reduced by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) inhibition, apyrase treatment, G(q/11) antagonism, and blockade of P2 purinergic receptors. Apyrase treatment also depressed DOR stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, whereas P2 receptor antagonism blocked DOR stimulation of inositol phosphate accumulation. In SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and primary olfactory bulb neurons, DOR activation failed to affect AMPK phosphorylation per se but potentiated the stimulation by either muscarinic agonists or 2-methyl-thio-ADP. Sequestration of G protein βγ subunits (Gβγ) blocked the DOR potentiation of AMPK phosphorylation induced by oxotremorine-M. In CHO cells, the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide1-β-D-ribonucleoside stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake, whereas pharmacological inhibition of AMPK, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of AMPKα1, and P2Y receptor blockade reduced DOR-stimulated glucose uptake. The data indicate that in different cell systems, DOR activation up-regulates AMPK through a Gβγ-dependent synergistic interaction with G(q/11)-coupled receptors, potentiating Ca(2+) release and CaMKKβ-dependent AMPK phosphorylation. In CHO cells, this coincident signaling mechanism is involved in DOR-induced glucose uptake. PMID:22031472

  10. Nectandrin B, a lignan isolated from nutmeg, inhibits liver X receptor-α-induced hepatic lipogenesis through AMP-activated protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Du Gon; Kim, Eun Kyung; Yang, Jin Won; Song, Jae Sook; Kim, Young-Mi

    2015-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is recognized as the most commonly occurring chronic liver disease. Liver X receptor α (LXRα) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c play a central role in de novo fatty acid synthesis. This study investigated pharmacological effects of nectandrin B, a lignan isolated from nutmeg extract, on hepatic lipogenesis stimulated by LXRα-SREBP-1c-mediated pathway and the possible molecular basis. The reporter gene assay revealed that nectandrin B completely represses LXRα activity enhanced by a synthetic LXRα ligand (T0901317) in HepG2 cells. The inhibitory effect was further supported by the suppression of mRNA expression of LXRα target genes, SREBP-1c and LXRα itself. Nectandrin B also inhibited the increase in SREBP-1c expression promoted by insulin plus high glucose, major contributors to hepatic lipid accumulation. LXRα-SREBP-1c-mediated induction of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 and fatty acid synthase, major genes for de novo lipogenesis, was suppressed by nectandrin B. Moreover, Oil Red O staining showed that nectandrin B notably attenuates LXRα-induced lipid accumulation. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibits the activities of LXRα and SREBP-1c. Nectandrin B strongly activated AMPK signaling in HepG2 cells. Taken together, the suppressive effects of nectandrin B on lipogenic gene expression and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes may be due to its inhibitory effect on the LXRα-SREBP-1c pathway presumably via AMPK activation. These results suggest the potential of nectandrin B as a therapeutic candidate for fatty liver disease. PMID:26790190

  11. Aspirin-induced AMP-activated protein kinase activation regulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Jin Young; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} Aspirin-induced AMPK phosphorylation was greater in VSMC from SHR than WKY. {yields} Aspirin-induced AMPK phosphorylation inhibited proliferation of VSMC from SHR. {yields} Low basal AMPK phosphorylation in SHR elicits increased VSMC proliferation. {yields} Inhibition of AMPK restored decreased VSMC proliferation by aspirin in SHR. {yields} Aspirin exerts anti-proliferative effect through AMPK activation in VSMC from SHR. -- Abstract: Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), used to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, plays an important role in the regulation of cellular proliferation. However, mechanisms responsible for aspirin-induced growth inhibition are not fully understood. Here, we investigated whether aspirin may exert therapeutic effects via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from wistar kyoto rats (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Aspirin increased AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation in a time- and dose-dependent manner in VSMCs from WKY and SHR, but with greater efficacy in SHR. In SHR, a low basal phosphorylation status of AMPK resulted in increased VSMC proliferation and aspirin-induced AMPK phosphorylation inhibited proliferation of VSMCs. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and AMPK siRNA reduced the aspirin-mediated inhibition of VSMC proliferation, this effect was more pronounced in SHR than in WKY. In VSMCs from SHR, aspirin increased p53 and p21 expression and inhibited the expression of cell cycle associated proteins, such as p-Rb, cyclin D, and cyclin E. These results indicate that in SHR VSMCs aspirin exerts anti-proliferative effects through the induction of AMPK phosphorylation.

  12. Norepinephrines effect on adenosine transport in the proximal straight tubule

    SciTech Connect

    Barfuss, D.W.; McCann, W.P.; Katholi, R.E.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of norepinephrine on C/sup 14/-adenosine transport in the rabbit proximal tubule (S/sub 2/) was studied. The transepithelial transport of adenosine (0.02 mM0 from lumin to bathing solution was measured by its rate of appearance (J/sub A/) in the bathing solution and by its disappearances (J/sub D/) from the luminal fluid. Norepinephrine (0.24 ..mu..M) was added to the bathing solution after a control flux period. After three samples from the experiment period the tubules were quickly harvested and the cellular concentration of C/sup 14/-adenosine was determined. The high cellular adenosine concentration and th marked difference in adenosine appearance rate in the bathing solution compared to the luminal disappearance rate indicates the absorbed adenosine is trapped in the cells. This trapping may be due to adenosine metabolism or difficulty of crossing the basolateral membrane. Whichever is the case, norepinephrine appears to stimulate movement of adenosine or its metabolites into the bathing solution across the basolateral membrane.

  13. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is Adenosine the Common Link?

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the ‘adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities’ implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic ‘comorbidity model’, in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain comorbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions. PMID:25979489

  14. Effect of theophylline on adenosine production in the canine myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, J.E.; Steffen, R.P.; Haddy, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    Adenosine is thought to participate in local regulation of coronary blood flow. However, competitive antagonists of adenosine fail to block myocardial active hyperemia. The authors examined the effect of locally administered theophylline on active hyperemia and myocardial adenosine production during intracoronary isoproterenol infusion in the dog heart. Isoproterenol decreased coronary resistance and increased myocardial adenosine production. Infusion of theophylline at a rate that attenuated the vasodilator response to exogenously administered adenosine failed to attenuate the increase in coronary blood flow produced by isoproterenol. However, theophylline plus isoproterenol production greater increases in myocardial adensine production than isoproterenol alone. The curves relating resistance and adenosine in the presence of theophylline fell to the right of those in the absence of theophylline. These findings suggest that the failure of theophylline to attenuate isoproterenol hyperemia in the dog heart results at least in part from an increase in adenosine concentration at the arteriole to a level beyond that blocked by this competitive antagonist and that adenosine may in fact play a role in isoproterenol-induced active hyperemia.

  15. Fluorescence decay studies of modified dinucleoside monophosphates containing 1-N6-ethenoadenosine.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Y; Motoda, Y; Fujisaki, Y; Steiner, R F

    1983-10-01

    Five dinucleoside monophosphates containing 1-N6-ethenoadenosine (epsilon A) have been studied using fluorescence measurements. The fluorescence spectra of these dinucleoside monophosphates are almost the same as the fluorescence spectrum of epsilon AMP. Fluorescence quantum yields of these dimers are greatly reduced compared to that of epsilon AMP. Intramolecular base-base interactions may be responsible for fluorescence quenching. It is found that the fluorescence decay kinetics does not obey a simple decay law but that the decay data can be well described as a sum of three exponentials. This implies that these dimers cannot be characterized as a two-state system, but can be described as systems consisting of three or more conformational states. Sequence effects upon the fluorescence behavior are observed. The fluorescence quenching and decay parameters of Gp epsilon A and Up epsilon A indicate a higher degree of base-base interaction than in their epsilon ApG and epsilon ApU counterparts.

  16. Novel Characteristics of Trypanosoma brucei Guanosine 5'-monophosphate Reductase Distinct from Host Animals.

    PubMed

    Bessho, Tomoaki; Okada, Tetsuya; Kimura, Chihiro; Shinohara, Takahiro; Tomiyama, Ai; Imamura, Akira; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Kazuhiko; Fujimori, Ko; Shuto, Satoshi; Ishibashi, Osamu; Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Inui, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic pathway of purine nucleotides in parasitic protozoa is a potent drug target for treatment of parasitemia. Guanosine 5'-monophosphate reductase (GMPR), which catalyzes the deamination of guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) to inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), plays an important role in the interconversion of purine nucleotides to maintain the intracellular balance of their concentration. However, only a few studies on protozoan GMPR have been reported at present. Herein, we identified the GMPR in Trypanosoma brucei, a causative protozoan parasite of African trypanosomiasis, and found that the GMPR proteins were consistently localized to glycosomes in T. brucei bloodstream forms. We characterized its recombinant protein to investigate the enzymatic differences between GMPRs of T. brucei and its host animals. T. brucei GMPR was distinct in having an insertion of a tandem repeat of the cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domain, which was absent in mammalian and bacterial GMPRs. The recombinant protein of T. brucei GMPR catalyzed the conversion of GMP to IMP in the presence of NADPH, and showed apparent affinities for both GMP and NADPH different from those of its mammalian counterparts. Interestingly, the addition of monovalent cations such as K+ and NH4+ to the enzymatic reaction increased the GMPR activity of T. brucei, whereas none of the mammalian GMPR's was affected by these cations. The monophosphate form of the purine nucleoside analog ribavirin inhibited T. brucei GMPR activity, though mammalian GMPRs showed no or only a little inhibition by it. These results suggest that the mechanism of the GMPR reaction in T. brucei is distinct from that in the host organisms. Finally, we demonstrated the inhibitory effect of ribavirin on the proliferation of trypanosomes in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting the availability of ribavirin to develop a new therapeutic agent against African trypanosomiasis. PMID:26731263

  17. Novel Characteristics of Trypanosoma brucei Guanosine 5'-monophosphate Reductase Distinct from Host Animals

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Chihiro; Shinohara, Takahiro; Tomiyama, Ai; Imamura, Akira; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Kazuhiko; Fujimori, Ko; Shuto, Satoshi; Ishibashi, Osamu; Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Inui, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic pathway of purine nucleotides in parasitic protozoa is a potent drug target for treatment of parasitemia. Guanosine 5’-monophosphate reductase (GMPR), which catalyzes the deamination of guanosine 5’-monophosphate (GMP) to inosine 5’-monophosphate (IMP), plays an important role in the interconversion of purine nucleotides to maintain the intracellular balance of their concentration. However, only a few studies on protozoan GMPR have been reported at present. Herein, we identified the GMPR in Trypanosoma brucei, a causative protozoan parasite of African trypanosomiasis, and found that the GMPR proteins were consistently localized to glycosomes in T. brucei bloodstream forms. We characterized its recombinant protein to investigate the enzymatic differences between GMPRs of T. brucei and its host animals. T. brucei GMPR was distinct in having an insertion of a tandem repeat of the cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domain, which was absent in mammalian and bacterial GMPRs. The recombinant protein of T. brucei GMPR catalyzed the conversion of GMP to IMP in the presence of NADPH, and showed apparent affinities for both GMP and NADPH different from those of its mammalian counterparts. Interestingly, the addition of monovalent cations such as K+ and NH4+ to the enzymatic reaction increased the GMPR activity of T. brucei, whereas none of the mammalian GMPR’s was affected by these cations. The monophosphate form of the purine nucleoside analog ribavirin inhibited T. brucei GMPR activity, though mammalian GMPRs showed no or only a little inhibition by it. These results suggest that the mechanism of the GMPR reaction in T. brucei is distinct from that in the host organisms. Finally, we demonstrated the inhibitory effect of ribavirin on the proliferation of trypanosomes in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting the availability of ribavirin to develop a new therapeutic agent against African trypanosomiasis. PMID:26731263

  18. A High-Affinity Adenosine Kinase from Anopheles Gambiae

    SciTech Connect

    M Cassera; M Ho; E Merino; E Burgos; A Rinaldo-Matthis; S Almo; V Schramm

    2011-12-31

    Genome analysis revealed a mosquito orthologue of adenosine kinase in Anopheles gambiae (AgAK; the most important vector for the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa). P. falciparum are purine auxotrophs and do not express an adenosine kinase but rely on their hosts for purines. AgAK was kinetically characterized and found to have the highest affinity for adenosine (K{sub m} = 8.1 nM) of any known adenosine kinase. AgAK is specific for adenosine at the nucleoside site, but several nucleotide triphosphate phosphoryl donors are tolerated. The AgAK crystal structure with a bound bisubstrate analogue Ap{sub 4}A (2.0 {angstrom} resolution) reveals interactions for adenosine and ATP and the geometry for phosphoryl transfer. The polyphosphate charge is partly neutralized by a bound Mg{sup 2+} ion and an ion pair to a catalytic site Arg. The AgAK structure consists of a large catalytic core in a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich, and a small cap domain in contact with adenosine. The specificity and tight binding for adenosine arise from hydrogen bond interactions of Asn14, Leu16, Leu40, Leu133, Leu168, Phe168, and Thr171 and the backbone of Ile39 and Phe168 with the adenine ring as well as through hydrogen bond interactions between Asp18, Gly64, and Asn68 and the ribosyl 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups. The structure is more similar to that of human adenosine kinase (48% identical) than to that of AK from Toxoplasma gondii (31% identical). With this extraordinary affinity for AgAK, adenosine is efficiently captured and converted to AMP at near the diffusion limit, suggesting an important role for this enzyme in the maintenance of the adenine nucleotide pool. mRNA analysis verifies that AgAK transcripts are produced in the adult insects.

  19. Recipient pretransplant inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Meagan J; Risler, Linda J; Phillips, Brian R; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S; Boeckh, Michael J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5'-monophosphate to xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, nonrelapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient's pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient's sensitivity to MMF. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients.

  20. Substrate distortion contributes to the catalysis of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Fujihashi, Masahiro; Ishida, Toyokazu; Kuroda, Shingo; Kotra, Lakshmi P.; Pai, Emil F.; Miki, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    Orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) accelerates the decarboxylation of orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP) to uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) by 17 orders of magnitude. Eight new crystal structures with ligand analogues combined with computational analyses of the enzyme’s short-lived intermediates and the intrinsic electronic energies to distort the substrate and other ligands improve our understanding of the still controversially discussed reaction mechanism. In their respective complexes, 6-methyl-UMP displays significant distortion of its methyl substituent bond, 6-amino-UMP shows the competition between the K72 and C6 substituents for a position close to D70, and the methyl- and ethyl-ester of OMP both induce rotation of the carboxylate group substituent out of the plane of the pyrimidine ring. MD and QM/MM computations of the enzyme-substrate (ES) complex also show the bond between the carboxylate group and the pyrimidine ring to be distorted with the distortion contributing a 10–15% decrease of the ΔΔG‡ value. These results are consistent with ODCase using both substrate distortion as well as transition state stabilization, primarily exerted by K72, in its catalysis of the OMP decarboxylation reaction. PMID:24151964

  1. Recipient pretransplant inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Meagan J; Risler, Linda J; Phillips, Brian R; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S; Boeckh, Michael J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5'-monophosphate to xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, nonrelapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient's pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient's sensitivity to MMF. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  2. The effect of glucose, insulin and noradrenaline on lipolysis and on the concentrations of adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate and adenosine 5′-triphosphate in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Brian L.; Iliffe, Jill

    1973-01-01

    Glycerol release and tissue concentrations of ATP and cyclic AMP were followed during the incubation of adipose tissue with or without glucose, insulin and noradrenaline. Glucose plus insulin or, to a lesser extent, glucose alone increased the accumulation of glycerol during incubations both with and without noradrenaline by slowing the decline in the rate of glycerol release with time. Insulin alone decreased the accumulation by accelerating the fall in glycerol release. In the absence of noradrenaline, ATP and cyclic AMP concentrations were not significantly affected by insulin or glucose. With noradrenaline or noradrenaline plus insulin the ATP concentration gradually fell. With noradrenaline plus glucose the ATP concentration fell rapidly and then stabilized, or, if insulin was also present, returned to the control value. In the presence of noradrenaline, the concentration of cyclic AMP rose during the first 20min and then fell. Insulin lowered the peak concentration of cyclic AMP, but glucose had no effect either on the peak value or the fall in the concentration of the nucleotide. The increase and fall in the concentration of cyclic AMP with noradrenaline or noradrenaline plus insulin bore similarities to the increase and decline in the lipolytic rate in incubations without glucose. It is proposed that glucose stimulates ATP production by furnishing glycerol 1-phosphate and thus removing free fatty acids, but that it can influence lipolysis by a mechanism which is distinct from any which is mediated by free fatty acids, possibly by inhibiting the inactivation of the lipase. PMID:4353001

  3. Simultaneous interaction with base and phosphate moieties modulates the phosphodiester cleavage of dinucleoside 3',5'-monophosphates by dinuclear Zn2+ complexes of di(azacrown) ligands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Lönnberg, Harri

    2006-08-23

    Five dinucleating ligands (1-5) and one trinucleating ligand (6) incorporating 1,5,9-triazacyclododecan-3-yloxy groups attached to an aromatic scaffold have been synthesized. The ability of the Zn(2+) complexes of these ligands to promote the transesterification of dinucleoside 3',5'-monophosphates to a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate derived from the 3'-linked nucleoside by release of the 5'-linked nucleoside has been studied over a narrow pH range, from pH 5.8 to 7.2, at 90 degrees C. The dinuclear complexes show marked base moiety selectivity. Among the four dinucleotide 3',5'-phosphates studied, viz. adenylyl-3',5'-adenosine (ApA), adenylyl-3',5'-uridine (ApU), uridylyl-3',5'-adenosine (UpA), and uridylyl-3',5'-uridine (UpU), the dimers containing one uracil base (ApU and UpA) are cleaved up to 2 orders of magnitude more readily than those containing either two uracil bases (UpU) or two adenine bases (ApA). The trinuclear complex (6), however, cleaves UpU as readily as ApU and UpA, while the cleavage of ApA remains slow. UV spectrophotometric and (1)H NMR spectroscopic studies with one of the dinucleating ligands (3) verify binding to the bases of UpU and ApU at less than millimolar concentrations, while no interaction with the base moieties of ApA is observed. With ApU and UpA, one of the Zn(2+)-azacrown moieties in all likelihood anchors the cleaving agent to the uracil base of the substrate, while the other azacrown moiety serves as a catalyst for the phosphodiester transesterification. With UpU, two azacrown moieties are engaged in the base moiety binding. The catalytic activity is, hence, lost, but it can be restored by addition of a third azacrown group on the cleaving agent.

  4. Simultaneous interaction with base and phosphate moieties modulates the phosphodiester cleavage of dinucleoside 3',5'-monophosphates by dinuclear Zn2+ complexes of di(azacrown) ligands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Lönnberg, Harri

    2006-08-23

    Five dinucleating ligands (1-5) and one trinucleating ligand (6) incorporating 1,5,9-triazacyclododecan-3-yloxy groups attached to an aromatic scaffold have been synthesized. The ability of the Zn(2+) complexes of these ligands to promote the transesterification of dinucleoside 3',5'-monophosphates to a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate derived from the 3'-linked nucleoside by release of the 5'-linked nucleoside has been studied over a narrow pH range, from pH 5.8 to 7.2, at 90 degrees C. The dinuclear complexes show marked base moiety selectivity. Among the four dinucleotide 3',5'-phosphates studied, viz. adenylyl-3',5'-adenosine (ApA), adenylyl-3',5'-uridine (ApU), uridylyl-3',5'-adenosine (UpA), and uridylyl-3',5'-uridine (UpU), the dimers containing one uracil base (ApU and UpA) are cleaved up to 2 orders of magnitude more readily than those containing either two uracil bases (UpU) or two adenine bases (ApA). The trinuclear complex (6), however, cleaves UpU as readily as ApU and UpA, while the cleavage of ApA remains slow. UV spectrophotometric and (1)H NMR spectroscopic studies with one of the dinucleating ligands (3) verify binding to the bases of UpU and ApU at less than millimolar concentrations, while no interaction with the base moieties of ApA is observed. With ApU and UpA, one of the Zn(2+)-azacrown moieties in all likelihood anchors the cleaving agent to the uracil base of the substrate, while the other azacrown moiety serves as a catalyst for the phosphodiester transesterification. With UpU, two azacrown moieties are engaged in the base moiety binding. The catalytic activity is, hence, lost, but it can be restored by addition of a third azacrown group on the cleaving agent. PMID:16910666

  5. Serum adenosine deaminase activity in cutaneous anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Sunnetcioglu, Mahmut; Karadas, Sevdegul; Aslan, Mehmet; Ceylan, Mehmet Resat; Demir, Halit; Oncu, Mehmet Resit; Karahocagil, Mustafa Kasım; Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Aypak, Cenk

    2014-01-01

    Background Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity has been discovered in several inflammatory conditions; however, there are no data associated with cutaneous anthrax. The aim of this study was to investigate serum ADA activity in patients with cutaneous anthrax. Material/Methods Sixteen patients with cutaneous anthrax and 17 healthy controls were enrolled. We measured ADA activity; peripheral blood leukocyte, lymphocyte, neutrophil, and monocyte counts; erythrocyte sedimentation rate; and C reactive protein levels. Results Serum ADA activity was significantly higher in patients with cutaneous anthrax than in the controls (p<0.001). A positive correlation was observed between ADA activity and lymphocyte counts (r=0.589, p=0.021) in the patient group. Conclusions This study suggests that serum ADA could be used as a biochemical marker in cutaneous anthrax. PMID:24997584

  6. Ethanol Tolerance Affects Endogenous Adenosine Signaling in Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dali; Xiong, Wei; Jackson, Michael F; Parkinson, Fiona E

    2016-07-01

    Ethanol has many pharmacological effects, including increases in endogenous adenosine levels and adenosine receptor activity in brain. Ethanol consumption is associated with both positive and negative health outcomes, but tolerance to the behavioral effects of ethanol can lead to increased consumption, which increases the risk of negative health outcomes. The present study was performed to test whether a 7-day treatment with ethanol is linked to reduced adenosine signaling and whether this is a consequence of reduced ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity. Wild-type (CD73(+/+)) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase-deficient (CD73(-/-)) mice were treated with ethanol (2 g/kg) or saline for 7 days. In CD73(+/+) mice, repeated ethanol treatment reduced the hypothermic and ataxic effects of acute ethanol, indicating the development of tolerance to the acute effects of ethanol. In CD73(+/+) mice, this 7-day ethanol treatment led to increased hippocampal synaptic activity and reduced adenosine A1 receptor activity under both basal and low Mg(2+) conditions. These effects of ethanol tolerance were associated with an 18% decrease in activity of ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity in hippocampal cell membranes. In contrast, ethanol treatment was not associated with changes in synaptic activity or adenosine signaling in hippocampus from CD73(-/-) mice. These data indicate that ethanol treatment is associated with a reduction in adenosine signaling through adenosine A1 receptors in hippocampus, mediated, at least in part, via reduced ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity. PMID:27189965

  7. Ethanol Tolerance Affects Endogenous Adenosine Signaling in Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dali; Xiong, Wei; Jackson, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol has many pharmacological effects, including increases in endogenous adenosine levels and adenosine receptor activity in brain. Ethanol consumption is associated with both positive and negative health outcomes, but tolerance to the behavioral effects of ethanol can lead to increased consumption, which increases the risk of negative health outcomes. The present study was performed to test whether a 7-day treatment with ethanol is linked to reduced adenosine signaling and whether this is a consequence of reduced ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity. Wild-type (CD73+/+) and ecto-5′-nucleotidase-deficient (CD73−/−) mice were treated with ethanol (2 g/kg) or saline for 7 days. In CD73+/+ mice, repeated ethanol treatment reduced the hypothermic and ataxic effects of acute ethanol, indicating the development of tolerance to the acute effects of ethanol. In CD73+/+ mice, this 7-day ethanol treatment led to increased hippocampal synaptic activity and reduced adenosine A1 receptor activity under both basal and low Mg2+ conditions. These effects of ethanol tolerance were associated with an 18% decrease in activity of ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity in hippocampal cell membranes. In contrast, ethanol treatment was not associated with changes in synaptic activity or adenosine signaling in hippocampus from CD73−/− mice. These data indicate that ethanol treatment is associated with a reduction in adenosine signaling through adenosine A1 receptors in hippocampus, mediated, at least in part, via reduced ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity. PMID:27189965

  8. Identification of possible adenosine receptors in vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Doctrow, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Adenosine is a vasodilator and has been implicated in increased blood flow in tissues that undergo energy deficiency. During conditions such as hypoxia and ischemia, adenosine is produced and is said to increase blood flow by relaxing the vascular smooth muscle (VSM) lining the resistance vessels. The goal of this research was to identify receptors that might be responsible for adenosine-mediated VSM relaxation. When an insoluble fraction from calf aortic VSM was incubated with /sup 32/P-ATP, two components were phosphorylated. One was identified as myosin light chain by MW, pl, and immunoprecipitation. The other product was identified as phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (DPI) by tic. Both phosphorylations were inhibited by adenosine and by 5'-chloro-5'-deoxyadenosine (Cl-Ado). DPI production was much more sensitive to the nucleosides than was myosin phosphorylation. Neither inhibition involved change in cAMP production. Phosphatidylinositol (Pl) kinase in the VSM membranes required magnesium, was activated and solubilized by Triton X-100, and phosphorylated both endogenous and exogenous Pl. Cl-Ado inhibited Pl kinase in a manner competitive with respect to ATP and noncompetitive with respect to Pl. Adenosine and adenosine analogs modified in the ribose ring were inhibitors with potencies comparable to that of Cl-Ado. Adenine nucleotides and purine-modified adenosine analogs were weaker inhibitors than Cl-Ado.

  9. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Kinases (CaMKKs) Effects on AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Regulation of Chicken Sperm Functions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Mong Diep; Combarnous, Yves; Praud, Christophe; Duittoz, Anne; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Sperm require high levels of energy to ensure motility and acrosome reaction (AR) accomplishment. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been demonstrated to be strongly involved in the control of these properties. We address here the question of the potential role of calcium mobilization on AMPK activation and function in chicken sperm through the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases (CaMKKs) mediated pathway. The presence of CaMKKs and their substrates CaMKI and CaMKIV was evaluated by western-blotting and indirect immunofluorescence. Sperm were incubated in presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, or of CaMKKs inhibitor (STO-609). Phosphorylations of AMPK, CaMKI, and CaMKIV, as well as sperm functions were evaluated. We demonstrate the presence of both CaMKKs (α and β), CaMKI and CaMKIV in chicken sperm. CaMKKα and CaMKI were localized in the acrosome, the midpiece, and at much lower fluorescence in the flagellum, whereas CaMKKβ was mostly localized in the flagellum and much less in the midpiece and the acrosome. CaMKIV was only present in the flagellum. The presence of extracellular calcium induced an increase in kinases phosphorylation and sperm activity. STO-609 reduced AMPK phosphorylation in the presence of extracellular Ca2+ but not in its absence. STO-609 did not affect CaMKIV phosphorylation but decreased CaMKI phosphorylation and this inhibition was quicker in the presence of extracellular Ca2+ than in its absence. STO-609 efficiently inhibited sperm motility and AR, both in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+. Our results show for the first time the presence of CaMKKs (α and β) and one of its substrate, CaMKI in different subcellular compartments in germ cells, as well as the changes in the AMPK regulation pathway, sperm motility and AR related to Ca2+ entry in sperm through the Ca2+/CaM/CaMKKs/CaMKI pathway. The Ca2+/CaMKKs/AMPK pathway is activated only under conditions of extracellular Ca2+ entry in the cells

  10. Effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines, AMP-activated protein kinase, and heat shock signal molecules in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Min, Li; Cheng, Jian-bo; Shi, Bao-lu; Yang, Hong-jian; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jia-qi

    2015-06-01

    Heat stress affects feed intake, milk production, and endocrine status in dairy cows. The temperature-humidity index (THI) is employed as an index to evaluate the degree of heat stress in dairy cows. However, it is difficult to ascertain whether THI is the most appropriate measurement of heat stress in dairy cows. This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and heat shock signal molecules (heat shock transcription factor (HSF) and heat shock proteins (HSP)) in dairy cows and to research biomarkers to be used for better understanding the meaning of THI as a bioclimatic index. To achieve these objectives, two experiments were performed. The first experiment: eighteen lactating Holstein dairy cows were used. The treatments were: heat stress (HS, THI average=81.7, n=9) and cooling (CL, THI average=53.4, n=9). Samples of HS were obtained on August 16, 2013, and samples of CL were collected on April 7, 2014 in natural conditions. The second experiment: HS treatment cows (n=9) from the first experiment were fed for 8 weeks from August 16, 2013 to October 12, 2013. Samples for moderate heat stress, mild heat stress, and no heat stress were obtained, respectively, according to the physical alterations of the THI. Results showed that heat stress significantly increased the serum adiponectin, AMPK, HSF, HSP27, HSP70, and HSP90 (P<0.05). Adiponectin is strongly associated with AMPK. The increases of adiponectin and AMPK may be one of the mechanisms to maintain homeostasis in heat-stressed dairy cows. When heat stress treatment lasted 8 weeks, a higher expression of HSF and HSP70 was observed under moderate heat stress. Serum HSF and HSP70 are sensitive and accurate in heat stress and they could be potential indicators of animal response to heat stress. We recommend serum HSF and HSP70 as meaningful biomarkers to supplement the THI and evaluate moderate heat

  11. AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK) Activation by AICAR in Human White Adipocytes Derived from Pericardial White Adipose Tissue Stem Cells Induces a Partial Beige-Like Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Rahman, Omar; Kristóf, Endre; Doan-Xuan, Quang-Minh; Vida, András; Nagy, Lilla; Horváth, Ambrus; Simon, József; Maros, Tamás; Szentkirályi, István; Palotás, Lehel; Debreceni, Tamás; Csizmadia, Péter; Szerafin, Tamás; Fodor, Tamás; Szántó, Magdolna; Tóth, Attila; Kiss, Borbála; Bacsó, Zsolt; Bai, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Beige adipocytes are special cells situated in the white adipose tissue. Beige adipocytes, lacking thermogenic cues, morphologically look quite similar to regular white adipocytes, but with a markedly different response to adrenalin. White adipocytes respond to adrenergic stimuli by enhancing lipolysis, while in beige adipocytes adrenalin induces mitochondrial biogenesis too. A key step in the differentiation and function of beige adipocytes is the deacetylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) by SIRT1 and the consequent mitochondrial biogenesis. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an upstream activator of SIRT1, therefore we set out to investigate the role of AMPK in beige adipocyte differentiation using human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) from pericardial adipose tissue. hADMSCs were differentiated to white and beige adipocytes and the differentiation medium of the white adipocytes was supplemented with 100 μM [(2R,3S,4R,5R)-5-(4-Carbamoyl-5-aminoimidazol-1-yl)-3,4-dihydroxyoxolan-2-yl]methyl dihydrogen phosphate (AICAR), a known activator of AMPK. The activation of AMPK with AICAR led to the appearance of beige-like morphological properties in differentiated white adipocytes. Namely, smaller lipid droplets appeared in AICAR-treated white adipocytes in a similar fashion as in beige cells. Moreover, in AICAR-treated white adipocytes the mitochondrial network was more fused than in white adipocytes; a fused mitochondrial system was characteristic to beige adipocytes. Despite the morphological similarities between AICAR-treated white adipocytes and beige cells, functionally AICAR-treated white adipocytes were similar to white adipocytes. We were unable to detect increases in basal or cAMP-induced oxygen consumption rate (a marker of mitochondrial biogenesis) when comparing control and AICAR-treated white adipocytes. Similarly, markers of beige adipocytes such as TBX1, UCP1, CIDEA, PRDM16 and TMEM26 remained the same when

  12. Nitric oxide stress and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase impair β-cell sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2b activity and protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Tong, X; Kono, T; Evans-Molina, C

    2015-01-01

    The sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 2b (SERCA2b) pump maintains a steep Ca2+ concentration gradient between the cytosol and ER lumen in the pancreatic β-cell, and the integrity of this gradient has a central role in regulated insulin production and secretion, maintenance of ER function and β-cell survival. We have previously demonstrated loss of β-cell SERCA2b expression under diabetic conditions. To define the mechanisms underlying this, INS-1 cells and rat islets were treated with the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) combined with or without cycloheximide or actinomycin D. IL-1β treatment led to increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene and protein expression, which occurred concurrently with the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). IL-1β led to decreased SERCA2b mRNA and protein expression, whereas time-course experiments revealed a reduction in protein half-life with no change in mRNA stability. Moreover, SERCA2b protein but not mRNA levels were rescued by treatment with the NOS inhibitor l-NMMA (NG-monomethyl l-arginine), whereas the NO donor SNAP (S-nitroso-N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine) and the AMPK activator AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide) recapitulated the effects of IL-1β on SERCA2b protein stability. Similarly, IL-1β-induced reductions in SERCA2b expression were rescued by pharmacological inhibition of AMPK with compound C or by transduction of a dominant-negative form of AMPK, whereas β-cell death was prevented in parallel. Finally, to determine a functional relationship between NO and AMPK signaling and SERCA2b activity, fura-2/AM (fura-2-acetoxymethylester) Ca2+ imaging experiments were performed in INS-1 cells. Consistent with observed changes in SERCA2b expression, IL-1β, SNAP and AICAR increased cytosolic Ca2+ and decreased ER Ca2+ levels, suggesting congruent modulation of SERCA activity under these conditions. In aggregate, these results show that SERCA2b protein

  13. In Vitro Anti-Echinococcal and Metabolic Effects of Metformin Involve Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Larval Stages of Echinococcus granulosus

    PubMed Central

    Loos, Julia A.; Cumino, Andrea C.

    2015-01-01

    Metformin (Met) is a biguanide anti-hyperglycemic agent, which also exerts antiproliferative effects on cancer cells. This drug inhibits the complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain inducing a fall in the cell energy charge and leading 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation. AMPK is a highly conserved heterotrimeric complex that coordinates metabolic and growth pathways in order to maintain energy homeostasis and cell survival, mainly under nutritional stress conditions, in a Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1)-dependent manner. This work describes for the first time, the in vitro anti-echinococcal effect of Met on Echinococcus granulosus larval stages, as well as the molecular characterization of AMPK (Eg-AMPK) in this parasite of clinical importance. The drug exerted a dose-dependent effect on the viability of both larval stages. Based on this, we proceeded with the identification of the genes encoding for the different subunits of Eg-AMPK. We cloned one gene coding for the catalytic subunit (Eg-ampkɑ) and two genes coding for the regulatory subunits (Eg-ampkβ and Eg-ampkγ), all of them constitutively transcribed in E. granulosus protoscoleces and metacestodes. Their deduced amino acid sequences show all the conserved functional domains, including key amino acids involved in catalytic activity and protein-protein interactions. In protoscoleces, the drug induced the activation of AMPK (Eg-AMPKɑ-P176), possibly as a consequence of cellular energy charge depletion evidenced by assays with the fluorescent indicator JC-1. Met also led to carbohydrate starvation, it increased glucogenolysis and homolactic fermentation, and decreased transcription of intermediary metabolism genes. By in toto immunolocalization assays, we detected Eg-AMPKɑ-P176 expression, both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of cells as in the larval tegument, the posterior bladder and the calcareous corpuscles of control and Met-treated protoscoleces. Interestingly, expression of Eg

  14. Metformin-induced mitochondrial function and ABCD2 up-regulation in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy involves AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaspreet; Olle, Brittany; Suhail, Hamid; Felicella, Michelle M; Giri, Shailendra

    2016-07-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a progressive neurometabolic disease caused by mutations/deletions in the Abcd1 gene. Similar mutations/deletions in the Abcd1 gene often result in diagonally opposing phenotypes of mild adrenomyeloneuropathy and severe neuroinflammatory cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), which suggests involvement of downstream modifier genes. We recently documented the first evidence of loss of AMP-activated protein kinase α1 (AMPKα1) in ALD patient-derived cells. Here, we report the novel loss of AMPKα1 in postmortem brain white matter of patients with ALD phenotype. Pharmacological activation of AMPK can rescue the mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibit the pro-inflammatory response. The FDA approved anti-diabetic drug Metformin, a well-known AMPK activator, induces mitochondrial biogenesis and is documented for its anti-inflammatory role. We observed a dose-dependent activation of AMPKα1 in metformin-treated X-ALD patient-derived fibroblasts. Metformin also induced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and ATP levels in X-ALD patient-derived fibroblasts. Metformin treatment decreased very long chain fatty acid levels and pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expressions in X-ALD patient-derived cells. Abcd2 [adrenoleukodystrophy protein-related protein] levels were increased in metformin-treated X-ALD patient-derived fibroblasts and Abcd1-KO mice primary mixed glial cells. Abcd2 induction was AMPKα1-dependent since metformin failed to induce Abcd2 levels in AMPKα1-KO mice-derived primary mixed glial cells. In vivo metformin (100 mg/Kg) in drinking water for 60 days induced Abcd2 levels and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation protein levels in the brain and spinal cord of Abcd1-KO mice. Taken together, these results provide proof-of-principle for therapeutic potential of metformin as a useful strategy for correcting the metabolic and inflammatory derangements in X-ALD by targeting AMPK. There is no effective therapy for inherited

  15. Metformin-induced mitochondrial function and ABCD2 up-regulation in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy involves AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaspreet; Olle, Brittany; Suhail, Hamid; Felicella, Michelle M; Giri, Shailendra

    2016-07-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a progressive neurometabolic disease caused by mutations/deletions in the Abcd1 gene. Similar mutations/deletions in the Abcd1 gene often result in diagonally opposing phen