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Sample records for adenosine monophosphate levels

  1. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate levels and activities of adenylate cyclase and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase in Pseudomonas and Bacteroides.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, L S; Hylemon, P B; Phibbs, P V

    1977-01-01

    A modified Gilman assay was used to determine the concentrations of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in rapidly filtered cells and in the culture filtrates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli K-12, and Bacteroides fragilis. In P. aeruginosa cultures, levels of cAMP in the filtrate increased with the culture absorbance (3.5 to 19.8 X 10(-9) M) but did not vary significantly with the carbon source used to support growth. Intracellular concentrations (0.8 to 3.2 X 10(-5) M) were substantially higher and did not vary appreciably during growth or with carbon source. Sodium cAMP (5 mM) failed to reverse the catabolite repression of inducible glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) synthesis caused by the addition of 10 mM succinate. Exogenous cAMP also had no discernible effect on the catabolite repression control of inducible mannitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.67). P. aeruginosa was found to contain both soluble cAMP phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.17) and membrane-associated adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) activity, and these were compared to the activities detected in crude extracts of E. coli. B. fragilis crude cell extracts contain neither of these enzyme activities, and little or no cAMP was detected in cells or culture filtrates of this anaerobic bacterium. PMID:187575

  2. Adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate levels in Thermomonospora curvata during cellulase biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fennington, G.; Neubauer, D.; Stutzenberger, F.

    1983-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of cellulose requires the synergistic activity of at least three enzymes: exo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.91), endo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.4), and beta-glucosidase (EC3.2.1.21). Despite extensive studies on a variety of cellulolytic bacteria and fungi, the mechanism(s) regulating the biosynthesis of this inducible catabolic enzyme complex remains unknown. The intracellular concentrations of cyclic nucleotides such as adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) have been shown to play a major role in mediating catabolite repression of enzyme biosynthesis. The cAMP acts through a cAMP receptor protein (termed CRP or CAP) which is a dimer having two identical subunits each capable of binding one molecule of cAMP. The N-terminal domain of the CRP binds the cAMP while the C-terminal domain binds to DNA at the promotor region of a cAMP-dependent operon and stimulates transcription by promoting the formation of a preinitiation complex between RNA polymerase and the DNA. Intracellular cAMP levels in E. coli (the prototype organism for such studies) are influenced by the type and availability of carbon source used for growth. High intracellular cAMP levels should lead to higher concentrations of cAMP-CRP complexes which should increase the transcription rates for cAMP-dependent operons (such as the lac operon of beta-galactosidase) and indeed the differential rate of beta-galactosidase biosynthesis correlates to intracellular cAMP levels. In the case of cellulase, catabolite repression by glucose or other readily metabolizable compounds closely controls production in an apparently similar manner and therefore a correlation may exist between enzyme biosynthesis and intracellular cAMP levels. This communication describes the fluctuation in cAMP levels during cellulase induction and repression in the thermophilic actinomycete, Thermomonospora curvata.

  3. Measuring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate level in living cells induced by low-level laser irradiation using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Zheng, Liqin; Yang, Hongqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies demonstrated that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), an important second messenger, is involved in the mechanism of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) treatment. However, most of these studies obtained the cAMP level in cell culture extracts or supernatant. In this study, the cAMP level in living cells was measured with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The effect of LLLI on cAMP level in living cells with adenosine receptors blocked was explored to identify the role of adenosine receptors in LLLI. The results showed that LLLI increased the cAMP level. Moreover, the rise of cAMP level was light dose dependent but wavelength independent for 658-, 785-, and 830-nm laser light. The results also exhibited that the adenosine receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), modulated the increase of cAMP level induced by LLLI. The cAMP level increased more significantly when the A3 adenosine receptors (A3R) were blocked by A3R antagonist compared with A1 adenosine receptor or A2a adenosine receptor blocked in HEK293T cells after LLLI, which was in good agreement with the adenosine receptors' expressions. All these results suggested that measuring the cAMP level with BRET could be a useful technique to study the role of GPCRs in living cells under LLLI.

  4. Relaxin-induced changes in adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate levels in the human cervix.

    PubMed

    Norström, A; Wiqvist, I

    1985-05-01

    The effects of porcine relaxin on the levels of cAMP in human cervical tissue were studied in vitro. The specimens were obtained by needle biopsy from women undergoing hysterectomy, legal abortion in the first trimester or elective Caesarean section at term, and were incubated in Krebs-Ringer buffer for 15 min in the presence of porcine relaxin (5 micrograms/ml, 3000 GPU/mg). cAMP was determined using a modified protein binding assay. The concentration of cAMP was higher in pregnant than in non-pregnant women. Relaxin stimulated the production of cAMP in the 7th-8th week of gestation and at term but did not significantly alter the cervical cAMP levels in neither non-pregnant women nor in women in the 10th-12th week of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that porcine relaxin reduces collagen synthesis in tissue from the human cervix and lower uterine segment. The present observations indicate that these effects can be mediated by cAMP.

  5. [The ratio of hormones of system "hypophysis - thyroid" with level of dopamine and cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate of males in European north].

    PubMed

    Tipisova, E V; Molodovskaia, I N

    2014-03-01

    The study sampling consisted of 96 males from Arkhangelsk and 52 males from village of Nes. The examination was carried out to find out predominant regulative effect of dopamine on the system "hypophysis - thyroid" depending on territory of residence. In males of Zapolyarye, against the background of higher levels of T4, fT3 and TSH and cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate in blood occurs decreasing of levels of thyroglobulin and dopamine in comparison with males of circumpolar territories in case of registration of positive correlation between levels of dopamine and fT3. In males from circumpolar territories age-related decreasing of range of variations of level of dopamine and fT4 under increase of concentration of TSH was registered. At that, negative correlation between content of dopamine and T4 was registered. The age-related dynamics of alteration of level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate with tendency to increase in males of Zapolyarye at the age of 36-60 years in comparison with age group of 22-35 years.

  6. Adenosine Monophosphate-Based Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Chen, Fei; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Hattori, Nori; Suzuki, Shigeya

    2009-01-01

    A method of rapid detection of bacterial spores is based on the discovery that a heat shock consisting of exposure to a temperature of 100 C for 10 minutes causes the complete release of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) from the spores. This method could be an alternative to the method described in the immediately preceding article. Unlike that method and related prior methods, the present method does not involve germination and cultivation; this feature is an important advantage because in cases in which the spores are those of pathogens, delays involved in germination and cultivation could increase risks of infection. Also, in comparison with other prior methods that do not involve germination, the present method affords greater sensitivity. At present, the method is embodied in a laboratory procedure, though it would be desirable to implement the method by means of a miniaturized apparatus in order to make it convenient and economical enough to encourage widespread use.

  7. Adenosine Monophosphate (AMP)-Activated Protein Kinase: A New Target for Nutraceutical Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Aguilar, Fabiola; Pavillard, Luis E.; Giampieri, Francesca; Bullón, Pedro; Cordero, Mario D.

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important energy sensor which is activated by increases in adenosine monophosphate (AMP)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio and/or adenosine diphosphate (ADP)/ATP ratio, and increases different metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation, glucose transport and mitochondrial biogenesis. In this sense, AMPK maintains cellular energy homeostasis by induction of catabolism and inhibition of ATP-consuming biosynthetic pathways to preserve ATP levels. Several studies indicate a reduction of AMPK sensitivity to cellular stress during aging and this could impair the downstream signaling and the maintenance of the cellular energy balance and the stress resistance. However, several diseases have been related with an AMPK dysfunction. Alterations in AMPK signaling decrease mitochondrial biogenesis, increase cellular stress and induce inflammation, which are typical events of the aging process and have been associated to several pathological processes. In this sense, in the last few years AMPK has been identified as a very interesting target and different nutraceutical compounds are being studied for an interesting potential effect on AMPK induction. In this review, we will evaluate the interaction of the different nutraceutical compounds to induce the AMPK phosphorylation and the applications in diseases such as cancer, type II diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases or cardiovascular diseases. PMID:28146060

  8. Transcriptional regulation of inhibin beta B messenger ribonucleic acid levels in TM.4 or primary rat Sertoli cells by 8-bromo-cyclic adenosine monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Najmabadi, H; Rosenberg, L A; Yuan, Q X; Reyaz, G; Bhasin, S

    1993-04-01

    FSH, a major regulator of inhibin production in the testis, is believed to exert its effects via cAMP second messenger system. Inhibin alpha-subunit gene appears to be regulated by cAMP and has a palindromic cAMP response element sequence TGACGTCA. However, the regulation of the inhibin beta B-subunit gene by cAMP has been less clear. It has been assumed that beta B may not be regulated by cAMP, based mainly on observations that FSH stimulates only alpha, not beta B, mRNA levels, and that the 5'-up-stream regulatory region of the beta B gene does not contain the classical cAMP response element. However, we have observed that 8-bromo-cAMP stimulates beta B mRNA levels in both primary Sertoli (approximately 2-fold) and TM.4 cells (approximately 5-fold). We examined whether this cAMP-induced increase in beta B mRNA levels is the result of increased transcription or altered mRNA stability. Data from nuclear run-on assays demonstrate about a 2-fold increase in relative mRNA synthesis rates in primary Sertoli-cells and about a 4- to 5-fold increase in TM.4 cells. Transfection studies in TM.4 and JEG.3 cell lines with beta B:luciferase chimeric reporter gene constructs containing 1.5 kilobases of the beta B 5'-up-stream regulatory region revealed marked cAMP induction of reporter gene activity in both cell types.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Cyclic 3′,5′-Adenosine Monophosphate Phosphodiesterase of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, L. D.; Monard, D.; Rickenberg, H. V.

    1973-01-01

    The cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP) phosphodiesterase from Escherichia coli has been partially purified. The enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 30,000, a Michaelis constant of 0.5 mM c-AMP, and a pH optimum of 7. The partially purified enzyme requires for activity the presence of a reducing compound and of either iron or a protein which seemingly acts as iron carrier. PMID:4355491

  10. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-based classification of diabetes pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dutta, D; Kalra, S; Sharma, M

    2016-09-21

    The current classification of both diabetes and antidiabetes medication is complex, preventing a treating physician from choosing the most appropriate treatment for an individual patient, sometimes resulting in patient-drug mismatch. We propose a novel, simple systematic classification of drugs, based on their effect on adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is the master regular of energy metabolism, an energy sensor, activated when cellular energy levels are low, resulting in activation of catabolic process, and inactivation of anabolic process, having a beneficial effect on glycemia in diabetes. This listing of drugs makes it easier for students and practitioners to analyze drug profiles and match them with patient requirements. It also facilitates choice of rational combinations, with complementary modes of action. Drugs are classified as stimulators, inhibitors, mixed action, possible action, and no action on AMPK activity. Metformin and glitazones are pure stimulators of AMPK. Incretin-based therapies have a mixed action on AMPK. Sulfonylureas either inhibit AMPK or have no effect on AMPK. Glycemic efficacy of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, sodium glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitor, colesevelam, and bromocriptine may also involve AMPK activation, which warrants further evaluation. Berberine, salicylates, and resveratrol are newer promising agents in the management of diabetes, having well-documented evidence of AMPK stimulation medicated glycemic efficacy. Hence, AMPK-based classification of antidiabetes medications provides a holistic unifying understanding of pharmacotherapy in diabetes. This classification is flexible with a scope for inclusion of promising agents of future.

  11. Xylazine Activates Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in the Central Nervous System of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xing-Xing; Yin, Bai-Shuang; Yang, Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Xin; Su, Li-Xue; Fan, Hong-Gang; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Xylazine is a potent analgesic extensively used in veterinary and animal experimentation. Evidence exists that the analgesic effect can be inhibited using adenosine 5’-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors. Considering this idea, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the AMPK signaling pathway is involved in the central analgesic mechanism of xylazine in the rat. Xylazine was administrated via the intraperitoneal route. Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem were collected for determination of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα mRNA expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα levels using western blot. The results of our study showed that compared with the control group, xylazine induced significant increases in AMPK activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum after rats received xylazine (P < 0.01). Increased AMPK activities were accompanied with increased phosphorylation levels of LKB1 in corresponding regions of rats. The protein levels of phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα in these regions returned or tended to return to control group levels. However, in the brainstem, phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα protein levels were decreased by xylazine compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicates that xylazine alters the activities of LKB1 and AMPK in the central nervous system of rats, which suggests that xylazine affects the regulatory signaling pathway of the analgesic mechanism in the rat brain. PMID:27049320

  12. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent vascular responses to purinergic agonists adenosine triphosphate and uridine triphosphate in the anesthetized mouse.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mrugeshkumar K; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism by which purinergic agonist adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP) decrease systemic arterial pressure in the anesthetized mouse was investigated. Intravenous injections of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP) produced dose-dependent decreases in systemic blood pressure in the mouse. The order of potency was ATP > UTP. Vasodilator responses to ATP and UTP were altered by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram. The vascular responses to ATP and UTP were not altered by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, a cGMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor, or a particular P2 receptor antagonist. These data suggest that ATP and UTP cause a decrease in systemic arterial pressure in the mouse via a cAMP-dependent pathway via a novel P2 receptor linked to adenylate cyclase and that nitric oxide release, prostaglandin synthesis, cGMP, and P2X1, P2Y1, and P2Y4 receptors play little or no role in the vascular effects of these purinergic agonists in the mouse.

  13. Selective adenosine-5'-monophosphate uptake by water-compatible molecularly imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Breton, Florent; Delépée, Raphaël; Jégourel, Damien; Deville-Bonne, Dominique; Agrofoglio, Luigi A

    2008-06-02

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were prepared for adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP), a substrate of AMP-activated protein kinase. The template molecule was formed by the vinylphenylboronate diester of adenosine on which 5'-free hydroxide was protected by tert-butyldimethylsilyl group in order to mimic the steric hindrance of the phosphate moiety of AMP. Molecular imprinting was performed by complexing acrylamide and the template in a highly cross-linked polymer. MIPs were tested in batch experiments with aqueous samples of nucleotides and a number of parameters were investigated. The use of tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) was necessary to obtain a rebinding of nucleotides on MIP. The adsorption of AMP was optimal in 5 mM ammonium acetate buffer solution pH 9.5 for 30 min, with 30 mM of TBAH. The imprinted polymer was selective for AMP towards others nucleotides or deoxi analogues.

  14. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in relation to inhibition of cervical smooth muscle activity in early pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Norström, A; Bryman, I

    1991-08-01

    Contractile activity was registered in strips of cervical tissue obtained by needle biopsy from women in the first trimester of pregnancy. Dibutyryl cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (5 x 10(-6) mol/l), isobutyryl methylxanthine (10(-4) mol/l), and forskolin (10(-5)-10(-4) mol/l), the latter two drugs known to increase the levels of endogenous cAMP, inhibited spontaneous muscle activity. The levels of tissue cAMP were determined in strips during relaxation induced by prostaglandin E2 or purified porcine relaxin and compared with cAMP levels in strips from the same women during contractile activity. Exposure to prostaglandin E2 but not to relaxin was followed by increased levels of cAMP. It is suggested that cAMP has a role as a second messenger in the prostaglandin E2-mediated relaxation of cervical smooth muscle.

  15. Gas-Phase Conformations and Energetics of Protonated 2^'-DEOXYADENOSINE-5^'-MONOPHOSPHATE and ADENOSINE-5^'-MONOPHOSPHATE: Irmpd Action Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ranran; Nei, Y.-W.; He, Chenchen; Hamlow, Lucas; Berden, Giel; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2015-06-01

    Nature uses protonation to alter the structures and reactivities of molecules to facilitate various biological functions and chemical transformations. For example, in nucleobase repair and salvage processes, protonation facilitates nucleobase removal by lowering the activation barrier for glycosidic bond cleavage. Systematic studies of the structures of protonated 2'-deoxyribonucleotides and ribonucleotides may provide insight into the roles protonation plays in altering the nucleobase orientation relative to the glycosidic bond and sugar puckering. In this study, infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy experiments in conjunction with electronic structure calculations are performed to probe the effects of protonation on the structures and stabilities of 2^'-deoxyadenosine-5^'-monophosphate (pdAdo) and adenosine-5^'-monophosphate (pAdo). Photodissociation as a function of IR wavelength is measured to generate the IRMPD action spectra. Geometry optimizations and frequency analyses performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory are used to characterize the stable low-energy structures and to generate their linear IR spectra. Single point energy calculations performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) and MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p) levels of theory provide relative stabilities of the optimized conformations. The structures accessed in the experiments are determined by comparing the calculated linear IR spectra for the stable low-energy conformers computed to the measured IRMPD action spectra. The effects of the 2^'-hydroxyl moiety are elucidated by comparing the structures and IRMPD spectra of [pAdo+H]+ to those of its DNA analogue. Comparisons are also made to the deprotonated forms of these nucleotides and the protonated forms of the analogous nucleosides to elucidate the effects of protonation and the phosphate group on the structures.

  16. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-10-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose.

  17. Effect of ionizing irradiation on the physiological activity of cyclic adenosine monophosphate on smooth muscle preparations.

    PubMed

    Schachinger, L; Michailov, M; Owusa Daaku, S; Prechter, I; Klöter, H; Schippel, C

    1982-01-01

    The effect of ionizing irradiation on the physiological activity of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in smooth muscle preparations from frog lung was studied. cAMP, given as dibutyryl salt (dib-cAMP) inhibited the radiation induced contractions of the muscle in a manner similar to the action of theophylline. In vitro irradiation of dib-cAMP resulted in an alteration of the chemical structure of this substance, i.e., formation of monobutyryl-cAMP and further derivatives as well as a decomposition of the purine structure. There was also a loss of the relaxing activity of irradiated cAMP on the muscle tone of frog lung preparations. The physiologically measured inactivation of dib-cAMP was far more pronounced than the chemical alteration. An inhibitory effect of the reaction products is postulated.

  18. Small molecule adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulators and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sandeep; Blowers, Elizabeth C; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2015-01-08

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor of cellular energy status that plays a key role in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. AMPK is a serine/threonine kinase that is activated by upstream kinases LKB1, CaMKKβ, and Tak1, among others. AMPK exists as αβγ trimeric complexes that are allosterically regulated by AMP, ADP, and ATP. Dysregulation of AMPK has been implicated in a number of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Recent studies have associated roles of AMPK with the development of cancer and neurological disorders, making it a potential therapeutic target to treat human diseases. This review focuses on the structure and function of AMPK, its role in human diseases, and its direct substrates and provides a brief synopsis of key AMPK modulators and their relevance in human diseases.

  19. Metabolic syndrome: adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and malonyl coenzyme A.

    PubMed

    Ruderman, Neil B; Saha, Asish K

    2006-02-01

    The metabolic syndrome can be defined as a state of metabolic dysregulation characterized by insulin resistance, central obesity, and a predisposition to type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, premature atherosclerosis, and other diseases. An increasing body of evidence has linked the metabolic syndrome to abnormalities in lipid metabolism that ultimately lead to cellular dysfunction. We review here the hypothesis that, in many instances, the cause of these lipid abnormalities could be a dysregulation of the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/malonyl coenzyme A (CoA) fuel-sensing and signaling mechanism. Such dysregulation could be reflected by isolated increases in malonyl CoA or by concurrent changes in malonyl CoA and AMPK, both of which would alter intracellular fatty acid partitioning. The possibility is also raised that pharmacological agents and other factors that activate AMPK and/or decrease malonyl CoA could be therapeutic targets.

  20. Attempts to Detect Cyclic Adenosine 3′:5′-Monophosphate in Higher Plants by Three Assay Methods 12

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Ray A.; Ross, Cleon W.; Vandepeute, Jozef

    1976-01-01

    Endogenous levels of cyclic adenosine-3′:5′-monophosphate in coleoptile first leaf segments of oat (Avena sativa L.), potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) callus, and germinating seeds of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were measured with a modified Gilman binding assay and a protein kinase activation assay. The incorporation of adenosine-8-14C into compounds with properties similar to those of cyclic AMP was also measured in studies with germinating lettuce seeds. The binding assay proved reliable for mouse and rat liver analyses, but was nonspecific for plant tissues. It responded to various components from lettuce and potato tissues chromatographically similar to but not identical with cyclic AMP. The protein kinase activation assay was much more specific, but it also exhibited positive responses in the presence of compounds not chromatographically identical to cyclic AMP. The concentrations of cyclic AMP in the plant tissues tested were at the lower limits of detection and characterization obtainable with these assays. The estimates of maximal levels were much lower than reported in many previous studies. PMID:16659419

  1. Alteration of sodium, potassium-adenosine triphosphatase activity in rabbit ciliary processes by cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Delamere, N.A.; Socci, R.R.; King, K.L. )

    1990-10-01

    The response of sodium, potassium-adenosine triphosphatase (Na,K-ATPase) to cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase was examined in membranes obtained from rabbit iris-ciliary body. In the presence of the protein kinase together with 10(-5) M cAMP, Na,K-ATPase activity was reduced. No change in Na,K-ATPase activity was detected in response to the protein kinase without added cAMP. Likewise cAMP alone did not alter Na,K-ATPase activity. Reduction of Na,K-ATPase activity was also observed in the presence of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit. The response of the enzyme to the kinase catalytic subunit was also examined in membranes obtained from rabbit ciliary processes. In the presence of 8 micrograms/ml of the catalytic subunit, ciliary process Na,K-ATPase activity was reduced by more than 50%. To examine whether other ATPases were suppressed by the protein kinase, calcium-stimulated ATPase activity was examined; its activity was stimulated by the catalytic subunit. To test whether the response of the ciliary process Na,K-ATPase is unique, experiments were also performed using membrane preparations from rabbit lens epithelium or rabbit kidney; the catalytic subunit significantly reduced the activity of Na,K-ATPase from the kidney but not the lens. These Na,K-ATPase studies suggest that in the iris-ciliary body, cAMP may alter sodium pump activity. In parallel 86Rb uptake studies, we observed that ouabain-inhibitable potassium uptake by intact pieces of iris-ciliary body was reduced by exogenous dibutryl cAMP or by forskolin.

  2. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ monophosphate (AMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, K.; Feki, H. El; Marsan, O.; Drouet, C.

    2015-10-01

    This work investigates the interaction between the nucleotide adenosine 5‧ monophosphate molecule (AMP) and a biomimetic nanocrystalline carbonated apatite as a model for bone mineral. The analogy of the apatite phase used in this work with biological apatite was first pointed out by complementary techniques. AMP adsorption isotherms were then investigated. Obtained data were fitted to a Sips isotherm with an exponent greater than one suggesting positive cooperativity among adsorbed molecules. The data were compared to a previous study relative to the adsorption of another nucleotide, cytidine monophosphate (CMP) onto a similar substrate, evidencing some effect of the chemical nature of the nucleic base. An enhanced adsorption was observed under acidic (pH 6) conditions as opposed to pH 7.4, which parallels the case of DNA adsorption on biomimetic apatite. An estimated standard Gibbs free energy associated to the adsorption process (ΔG°ads ≅ -22 kJ/mol) intermediate between "physisorption" and "chemisorption" was found. The analysis of the solids after adsorption pointed to the preservation of the main characteristics of the apatite substrate but shifts or enhancements of Raman bands attributed to AMP showed the existence of chemical interactions involving both the phosphate and adenine parts of AMP. This contribution adds to the works conducted in view of better understanding the interaction of DNA/RNA and their constitutive nucleotides and the surface of biomimetic apatites. It could prove helpful in disciplines such as bone diagenesis (DNA/apatite interface in aged bones) or nanomedicine (setup of DNA- or RNA-loaded apatite systems). Also, the adsorption of nucleic acids on minerals like apatites could have played a role in the preservation of such biomolecules in the varying conditions known to exist at the origin of life on Earth, underlining the importance of dedicated adsorption studies.

  3. [Conformation study of cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate and some of its derivatives by means of circular dichroism].

    PubMed

    Tunitskaia, V L; Guliaev, N N; Poletaev, A I; Severin, E S

    1977-04-01

    Circular dichroism spectra of adenosine and cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) and their derivatives, having different substituents in 8-position of heterocycle, are studied, cAMP is suggested to have preferable anti-conformation in the solution, while its derivatives with substituents in 8-position of purine base are preferable in sin-conformation. An exception is 8-(beta aminoethylamine-)cAMP, which has an anti-conformation within pH range from 4.5 to 9.5. This is probably due to the formation of intra-molecular ionic bond between cyclophosphate group and aliphatic amino group of 8-position substituent.

  4. 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mor, Vijay; Unnikrishnan, M K

    2011-09-01

    Lifestyle changes such as physical inactivity combined with calorie-rich, low-fibre diets have triggered an explosive surge in metabolic syndrome, outlined as a cluster of heart attack risk factors such as insulin resistance, raised fasting plasma glucose, abdominal obesity, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. By acting as a master-switch of energy homeostasis and associated pathophysiological phenomena, 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) appears to orchestrate the adaptive physiology of energy deficit, suggesting that the sedentary modern human could be suffering from chronic suboptimal AMPK activation. Addressing individual targets with potent ligands with high specificity may be inappropriate (it has not yielded any molecule superior to the sixty year old metformin) because this strategy cannot address a cluster of interrelated pathologies. However, spices, dietary supplements and nutraceuticals attenuate the multiple symptoms of metabolic syndrome in a collective and perhaps more holistic fashion with fewer adverse events. Natural selection could have favoured races that developed a taste for spices and dietary supplements, most of which are not only antioxidants but also activators of AMPK. The review will outline the various biochemical mechanisms and pathophysiological consequences of AMPK activation involving the cluster of symptoms that embrace metabolic syndrome and beyond. Recent advances that integrate energy homeostasis with a number of overarching metabolic pathways and physiological phenomena, including inflammatory conditions, cell growth and development, malignancy, life span, and even extending into environmental millieu, as in obesity mediated by gut microflora and others will also be outlined.

  5. Metabolism of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and induction of tryptophanase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Botsford, J L

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) metabolism and the induction of tryptophanase and beta-galactosidase was studied in several strains of Escherichia coli grown with succinate, acetate, glycerol, or glucose as the carbon source. No consistent relationship between the intracellular concentration of cyclic AMP in the several strains cultured and the various carbon sources was discerned. In E. coli K-12-1 the induction of tryptophanase was found to vary in the order: succinate greater than acetate greater than glycerol greater than glucose, and that of beta-galactosidase was found in the order: glycerol greater than acetate greater than succinate greater than glucose. Rate of accumulation of cyclic AMP in the culture filtrate was in the order: succinate greater than acetate greater than glycerol greater than glucose. The addition of glycerol to E. coli K-12-1 grown in acetate caused inhibition of tryptophanase and slight inhibition of accumulation of extracellular cyclic AMP. These same conditions caused beta-galactosidase induction to be stimulated. The addition of exogenous cyclic AMP to cultures grown with four different carbon sources had an effect characteristic for each of the two enzymes studied as well as each individual carbon source. The results suggest that there are control elements distinct from cyclic AMP and its receptor protein which respond to the catabolic situation of the cell. PMID:170248

  6. Lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate during and after normal pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    von Mandach, U.; Gubler, H. P.; Engel, G.; Huch, R.; Huch, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The beta 2-sympathomimetics, used to inhibit preterm labour, bind predominantly to beta 2-adrenoceptors, activating adenylate cyclase to form adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), a messenger substance which inhibits the enzyme cascade triggering smooth muscle contraction. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP formation can be used as markers of beta 2-adrenergic effect. 2. The present study addresses the influence of pregnancy on the beta-adrenoceptor system. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) in circulating lymphocytes were determined at three points in gestation (16, 29 and 37 weeks) and 9 weeks post partum in 22 normal pregnancies. (-)-[125Iodo]-cyanopindolol was used as the ligand to identify a homogeneous population of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes. B- and T-cell fractions were estimated from the same samples. 3. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density decreased significantly during gestation until week 37 (P < 0.01), then increased post partum (P < 0.005). Cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) were significantly lower after 16 weeks of gestation than post partum (P < 0.05). 4. The results, which cannot be explained in terms of a shift in the lymphocyte (B- and T-cell) ratio, indicate that beta-adrenoceptor density and function are reduced in normal pregnancy and only return to normal post partum. These findings may be of significance in devising future tocolytic therapy with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:8383562

  7. Lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate during and after normal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    von Mandach, U; Gubler, H P; Engel, G; Huch, R; Huch, A

    1993-02-01

    1. The beta 2-sympathomimetics, used to inhibit preterm labour, bind predominantly to beta 2-adrenoceptors, activating adenylate cyclase to form adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), a messenger substance which inhibits the enzyme cascade triggering smooth muscle contraction. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP formation can be used as markers of beta 2-adrenergic effect. 2. The present study addresses the influence of pregnancy on the beta-adrenoceptor system. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) in circulating lymphocytes were determined at three points in gestation (16, 29 and 37 weeks) and 9 weeks post partum in 22 normal pregnancies. (-)-[125Iodo]-cyanopindolol was used as the ligand to identify a homogeneous population of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes. B- and T-cell fractions were estimated from the same samples. 3. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density decreased significantly during gestation until week 37 (P < 0.01), then increased post partum (P < 0.005). Cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) were significantly lower after 16 weeks of gestation than post partum (P < 0.05). 4. The results, which cannot be explained in terms of a shift in the lymphocyte (B- and T-cell) ratio, indicate that beta-adrenoceptor density and function are reduced in normal pregnancy and only return to normal post partum. These findings may be of significance in devising future tocolytic therapy with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists.

  8. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-induced histone hyperacetylation contributes to its antiproliferative and differentiation-inducing activities.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seungwan; Lee, Yong Gyu; Kim, Ji Hye; Byeon, Se Eun; Rho, Ho Sik; Cho, Jae Youl; Hong, Sungyoul

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetylation is linked to the control of chromatin remodeling, which is involved in cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. It is not fully understood whether cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a representative differentiation-inducing molecule, is able to modulate histone acetylation as part of its anticancer activity. In the present study, we aimed to address this issue using cell-permeable cAMP, i.e. dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) and C6 glioma cells. As reported previously, under the conditions of our studies, treatment with dbcAMP clearly arrested C6 cell proliferation and altered their morphology. Its antiproliferative and differentiation-inducing activity in C6 glioma cells involved upregulation of p219WAF/CIP), p27(kip1), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and Cx43, as well as downregulation of vimentin. Furthermore, dbcAMP modulated the phosphorylation of ERK and Akt in a time-dependent manner and altered the colocalization pattern of phospho-Src and the actin cytoskeleton. Interestingly, dbcAMP upregulated the enzyme activity of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and, in parallel, enhanced cellular acetyllysine levels. Finally, the hyperacetylation-inducing compound, sodium butyrate (NaB), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, displayed similar anticancer activity to dbcAMP. Therefore, our data suggest that antiproliferative and differentiation-inducing activities of dbcAMP may be generated by its enhanced hyperacetylation function.

  9. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study is an investigation into the occurrence and potential functions of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP), a potent and ubiquitous metabolic regulatory molecule in heterotrophic organisms, in phytoplankton and in natural aquatic communities. Laboratory-cultured phytoplankton were grown under both optimal and suboptimal nutrient regimes under constant temperature and illumination regimes. Cellular and extracellular cAMP production, characterized by a number of biochemical techniques, was correlated with growth rate dynamics, chlorophyll a synthesis, /sup 14/C-bicarbonate uptake, alkaline phosphatase activity, and heterocyst formation. The blue-green alga Anabaena flos-aquae was used as a model system in the examination of these metabolic variables. Additionally, this alga was used to test the effects of perturbation of cAMP levels on the aforementioned metabolic variables. Investigations on the occurrence and seasonal dynamics of cAMP in aquatic systems were conducted on Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and on Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan. Putative cAMP from both systems was characterized by several biochemical techniques. Weekly sampling of particulate and dissolved cAMP in the epilimnia of both lakes was correlated with data on the rates of primary productivity, alkaline phosphatase activity, chlorophyll a synthesis and changes in phytoplankton community structure.

  10. Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Accumulation and beta-Adrenergic Binding in Unweighted and Denervated Rat Soleus Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Woolridge, Dale; Tischler, Marc E.

    1992-01-01

    Unweighting, but not denervation, of muscle reportedly "spares" insulin receptors, increasing insulin sensitivity. Unweighting also increases beta-adrenergic responses of carbohydrate metabolism. These differential characteristics were studied further by comparing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and beta-adrenergic binding in normal and 3-day unweighted or denervated soleus muscle. Submaximal amounts of isoproterenol, a p-agonist, increased cAMP accumulation in vitro and in vivo (by intramuscular (IM) injection) to a greater degree (P less than .05) in unweighted muscles. Forskolin or maximal isoproterenol had similar in vitro effects in all muscles, suggesting increased beta-adrenergic sensitivity following unweighting. Increased sensitivity was confirmed by a greater receptor density (B(sub max)) for iodo-125(-)-pindolol in particulate preparations of unweighted (420 x 10(exp -18) mol/mg muscle) than of control or denervated muscles (285 x 10(exp-18) mol/mg muscle). The three dissociation constant (Kd) values were similar (20.3 to 25.8 pmol/L). Total binding capacity (11.4 fmol/muscle) did not change during 3 days of unweighting, but diminished by 30% with denervation. This result illustrates the "sparing" and loss of receptors, respectively, in these two atrophy models. In diabetic animals, IM injection of insulin diminished CAMP accumulation in the presence of theophylline in unweighted muscle (-66% +/- 2%) more than in controls (-42% +'- 6%, P less than .001). These results show that insulin affects CAMP formation in muscle, and support a greater in vivo insulin response following unweighting atrophy. These various data support a role for lysosomal proteolysis in denervation, but not in unweighting, atrophy.

  11. Novel adenosine 3 prime ,5 prime -cyclic monophosphate dependent protein kinases in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.P.C.; Volcani, B.E. )

    1989-08-08

    Two novel adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinases have been isolated from the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis. The kinases, designated I and II, are eluted from DEAE-Sephacel at 0.10 and 0.15 M NaCl. They have a high affinity for cAMP and are activated by micromolar cAMP. They exhibit maximal activity at 5 mM Mg{sup 2+} and pH 8 with the preferred phosphate donor ATP and phosphate acceptor histone H1. They phosphorylate sea urchin sperm histone H1 on a single serine site in the sequence Arg-Lys-Gly-Ser({sup 32}P)-Ser-Asn-Ala-Arg and have an apparent M{sub r} of 75,000 as determined by gel filtration and sucrose density sedimentation. In the kinase I preparation a single protein band with an apparent M{sub r} of about 78,000 is photolabeled with 8-azido({sup 32}P)cAMP and is also phosphorylated with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in a cAMP-dependent manner, after autoradiography following sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. The rate of phosphorylation of the 78,000-dalton band is independent of the enzyme concentration. The results indicate that (i) these diatom cAMP-dependent protein kinases are monomeric proteins, possessing both the cAMP-binding regulatory and catalytic domains on the same polypeptide chain, (ii) the enzymes do not dissociate into smaller species upon activation by binding cAMP, and (iii) self-phosphorylation of the enzymes by an intrapeptide reaction is cAMP dependent. The two diatom cAMP kinases are refractory to the heat-stable protein kinase modulator from rabbit muscle, but they respond differently to proteolytic degradation and to inhibition by arachidonic acid and several microbial alkaloids.

  12. The effects of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and other adenine nucleotides on body temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Dascombe, M J; Milton, A S

    1975-01-01

    1. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), its dibutyryl derivative (Db-cAMP) and other adenine nucleotides have been micro-injected into the hypothalamic region of the unanaesthetized cat and the effects on body temperature, and on behavioural and autonomic thermoregulatory activities observed. 2. Db-cAMP and cAMP both produced hypothermia when applied to the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. With Db-cAMP the hypothermia was shown to be dose dependent between 50 and 500 mug (0-096-0-96 mumole). 3. AMP, ADP and ATP also produced hypothermia when injected into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. 4. The order of relative potencies of the adenine nucleotides with respect both to the hypothermia produced and to the autonomic thermoregulatory effects observed were similar. Db-cAMP was most potent and cAMP least. 5. Micro-injection into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus of many substances including saline produced in most cats a non-specific rise in body temperature apparently the result of tissue damage. Intraperitoneal injection of 4-acetamidophenol (paracetamol 50 mg/kg) reduced or abolished this febrile response. 6. The hypothermic effect of the adenine nucleotides has been compared with the effects produced in these same cats by micro-injections of noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine, a mixture of acetylcholine and physostigmine (1:1), EDTA and excess Ca2+ ions. 7. It is concluded that as Db-cAMP and cAMP both produce hypothermia, it is unlikely that endogenous cAMP in the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus mediates the hyperthermic responses to pyrogens and prostaglandins. PMID:170396

  13. [Cloning of the gene controlling catabolite repression with the participation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in Escherichia coli K-12].

    PubMed

    Lisenkov, A F; Smirnov, Iu V; Sukhodolets, V V

    1983-05-01

    The crp gene coding for cyclic adenosine monophosphate receptor protein has been cloned on the vehicle pBR325 using restriction endonuclease PstI and the recipient strain C600 crp. The pCAP2 hybrid plasmid obtained has a molecular weight 7.0 MD and in the pBR325 with the insertion into a PstI site. Bacterial clones carrying pCAP2 restore Crp+ phenotype, as judged by the capacity of bacteria for utilization of various carbohydrates and by the activity of catabolite sensitive enzymes.

  14. Intraventricular injection of agents that enhance cyclic adenosine monophosphate formation leads to inhibition of proestrous luteinizing hormone surge in rats.

    PubMed

    Taleisnik, S; Haymal, B; Caligaris, L

    1993-09-01

    The effect of increasing hypothalamic levels of 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) on the preovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH) and ovulation was studied in cycling rats. Animals hearing chronically implanted guiding cannulae into the third ventricle were injected with agents known to enhance the cellular levels of cAMP. Hourly blood samples from the unanesthetized, unrestrained rats were obtained between 11.00 and 17.00 h through a plastic cannula inserted into the jugular vein. Intraventricular injections of serotonin (7.5 mg/ml; 2 microliters) in the morning of proestrous blocked the preovulatory surge of LH and ovulation. This effect was assigned to an increased neuronal level of cAMP because it was prevented by a serum anti-cAMP. Third-ventricle injections of 2 microliters of forskolin (0.5 mmol/l), guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate)(2 mmol/l) or dibutyryl-cAMP (1 mmol/l) at 11.00 h on the day of proestrus mimicked the inhibitory effect of serotonin on the proestrous release of LH. It is suggested that serotonin inhibits LH surge by acting directly on LH-releasing hormone neurons and/or on neurons that provide inputs to these neurons involving cAMP as a second messenger. Neurons releasing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) may serve as interneurons sensitive to serotonin, as well as to cAMP, inasmuch as the inhibitory effect of forskolin on the release of LH was partially blocked by the GABA antagonists, picrotoxin and bicuculline.

  15. Effect of electromagnetic field on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in a human mu-opioid receptor cell model.

    PubMed

    Ross, Christina L; Teli, Thaleia; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2016-01-01

    During the cell communication process, endogenous and exogenous signaling affect normal as well as pathological developmental conditions. Exogenous influences such as extra-low-frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) have been shown to effect pain and inflammation by modulating G-protein receptors, down-regulating cyclooxygenase-2 activity, and affecting the calcium/calmodulin/nitric oxide pathway. Investigators have reported changes in opioid receptors and second messengers, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), in opiate tolerance and dependence by showing how repeated exposure to morphine decreases adenylate cyclase activity causing cAMP to return to control levels in the tolerant state, and increase above control levels during withdrawal. Resonance responses to biological systems using exogenous EMF signals suggest that frequency response characteristics of the target can determine the EMF biological response. In our past research we found significant down regulation of inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) using 5 Hz EMF frequency. In this study cAMP was stimulated in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells transfected with human mu-opioid receptors, then exposed to 5 Hz EMF, and outcomes were compared with morphine treatment. Results showed a 23% greater inhibition of cAMP-treating cells with EMF than with morphine. In order to test our results for frequency specific effects, we ran identical experiments using 13 Hz EMF, which produced results similar to controls. This study suggests the use of EMF as a complementary or alternative treatment to morphine that could both reduce pain and enhance patient quality of life without the side-effects of opiates.

  16. Metabolite gene regulation: imidazole and imidazole derivatives which circumvent cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in induction of the Escherichia coli L-arabinose operon.

    PubMed

    Kline, E L; Bankaitis, V A; Brown, C S; Montefiori, D C

    1980-02-01

    Imidazole, histidine, histamine, histidinol phosphate, urocanic acid, or imidazolepropionic acid were shown to induce the L-arabinose operon in the absence of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate. Induction was quantitated by measuring the increased differential rate of synthesis of L-arabinose isomerase in Escherichia coli strains which carried a deletion of the adenyl cyclase gene. The crp gene product (cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate receptor protein) and the araC gene product (P2) were essential for induction of the L-arabinose operon by imidazole and its derivatives. These compounds were unable to circumvent the cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in the induction of the lactose or the maltose operons. The L-arabinose regulon was catabolite repressed upon the addition of glucose to a strain carrying an adenyl cyclase deletion growing in the presence of L-arabinose with imidazole. These results demonstrated that several imidazole derivatives may be involved in metabolite gene regulation (23).

  17. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent mechanisms induce von Willebrand factor expression in the Dami megakaryoblastic cell line.

    PubMed

    Deguine, V; Kerbiriou-Nabias, D; Lecoq, D; Greenberg, S M; Meyer, D; Dosne, A M

    1995-02-01

    It has been proposed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is involved in the differentiation of several cell types and this study analysed whether von Willebrand factor (vWf) synthesis, which is a marker of the megakaryocyte maturation of these cells, would be enhanced by agents acting on cAMP formation. Different compounds known to stimulate cAMP accumulation in cells were used: dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), isobutyl-methylxanthine (IBMX) or pentoxifylline (PTX) and forskolin. Treatments with db-cAMP or IBMX (10-1,000 microM) induced a dose-dependent increase in vWf synthesis. Associations of IBMX with forskolin produced a synergistic enhancement in vWf synthesis. PTX alone did not enhance vWf synthesis but a latent effect was revealed in the presence of forskolin or db-cAMP. The increase in vWf mRNA shown by Northern blot analysis demonstrates that the protein synthesis correlates with the transcript expression after db-cAMP or IBMX treatments. vWf synthesis paralleled the accumulation of cAMP in the cells. Moreover vWf expression induced by combination of IBMX with forskolin was associated with a moderate increase in the percentage of GPIIb/IIIa positive cells and in the ploidy level related to an important inhibition of cell growth. These data provide evidence that agents acting on cAMP metabolism induce vWf synthesis in the Dami megakaryoblastic cells.

  18. Estradiol regulation of hypothalamic astrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase activity: role of hindbrain catecholamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Pratistha; Briski, Karen P

    2015-01-01

    Recent work challenges the conventional notion that metabolic monitoring in the brain is the exclusive function of neurons. This study investigated the hypothesis that hypothalamic astrocytes express the ultra-sensitive energy gauge adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and that the ovarian hormone estradiol (E) controls activation of this sensor by insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH). E- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) rats were pretreated by caudal fourth ventricular administration of the catecholamine neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) prior to sc insulin or vehicle injection. Individual astrocytes identified in situ by glial fibrillary acidic protein immunolabeling were laser-microdissected from the ventromedial (VMH), arcuate (ARH), and paraventricular (PVH) nuclei and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), and pooled within each site for Western blot analysis of AMPK and phosphoAMPK (pAMPK) protein expression. In the VMH, baseline astrocyte AMPK and pAMPK levels were respectively increased or decreased in OVX+E versus OVX+O; these profiles did not differ between E and O rats in other hypothalamic loci. In E animals, astrocyte AMPK protein was reduced [VMH] or augmented [PVH; LHA] in response to either 6-OHDA or IIH. IIH increased astrocyte pAMPK expression in each structure in vehicle-, but not 6-OHDA-pretreated E rats. Results provide novel evidence for hypothalamic astrocyte AMPK expression and hindbrain catecholamine-dependent activation of this cell-specific sensor by hypoglycemia in the presence of estrogen. Further research is needed to determine the role of astrocyte AMPK in reactivity of these glia to metabolic imbalance and contribution to restoration of neuro-metabolic stability.

  19. Airway administration of dexamethasone, 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate, and isobutylmethylxanthine facilitates compensatory lung growth in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Izumi, Yotaro; Kohno, Mitsutomo; Kawamura, Masafumi; Ikeda, Eiji; Nomori, Hiroaki

    2011-03-01

    The combination of dexamethasone, 8-bromo-3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate, and isobutylmethylxanthine, referred to as DCI, has been reported to optimally induce cell differentiation in fetal lung explants and type II epithelial cells. DCI administration is also known to modulate the expression levels of many genes known to be involved in the facilitation of lung growth. Recently, we found that RNA silencing of thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) delayed compensatory lung growth. DCI is also known to induce TTF-1 expression in pulmonary epithelial cells. From these findings, we hypothesized that DCI administration may facilitate compensatory lung growth. In the present study, using a postpneumonectomy lung growth model in 9-wk-old male mice, we found that compensatory lung growth was significantly facilitated by airway administration of DCI immediately following left pneumonectomy, as indicated by the increase in the residual right lung dry weight index. TTF-1 expression was significantly elevated by DCI administration, and transient knockdown of TTF-1 attenuated the facilitation of compensatory lung growth by DCI. These results suggested that DCI facilitated compensatory lung growth, at least in part, through the induction of TTF-1. Morphological analyses suggested that DCI administration increased the number of alveoli, made each of them smaller, and produced a net increase in the calculated surface area of the alveoli per volume of lung. The effect of a single administration was maintained during the observation period, which was 28 days. DCI with further modifications may provide the material to potentially augment residual lung function after resection.

  20. Viscothionin isolated from Korean mistletoe improves nonalcoholic fatty liver disease via the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sokho; Lee, Dongho; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Kim, Jae-Hun; Park, Jong-Heum; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kwon, Jungkee

    2014-12-10

    The present study investigated the effects of viscothionin, a compound isolated from Korean mistletoe (Viscum album coloratum), on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in both in vitro and in vivo models. A connection was discovered between viscothionin and the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway, which is involved in lipid metabolism. Viscothionin was shown to significantly attenuate lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells treated with oleic acid, which induces lipid accumulation. Moreover, the phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase in HepG2 cells was increased by viscothionin treatment. Viscothionin was orally administered to high fat diet-induced obese mice and subsequently histopathological analysis associated with AMPK signaling pathways was evaluated. A significant reduction in the extent of hepatic steatosis was revealed in viscothionin-treated obese mice. Thus, viscothionin mediates its beneficial effects on NAFLD via AMPK signaling pathways, suggesting that it may be a potential target for novel NAFLD treatments.

  1. Host layer buckling in the compounds formed by exfoliation and restacking of cadmium phosphorus trisulphide with adenosine monophosphate included

    SciTech Connect

    Westreich, Philippe . E-mail: pwestreich@alumni.sfu.ca; Yang Datong; Frindt, Robert F.

    2006-03-09

    Exfoliated single layer cadmium phosphorus trisulphide has been combined with the biological molecule adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to form the novel restacked compound Li{sub x}Cd{sub 0.8}PS{sub 3}(AMP){sub z}(H{sub 2}O){sub y}. Composition was determined using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and the structure of these compounds was studied using X-ray diffraction on oriented films. In the 0-80% relative humidity range, for (AMP){sub 0.5}, a host plane spacing near 19.6 A was found. Electron density calculations based on the X-ray diffraction pattern suggest a model for the arrangement of guest AMP molecules between the host layers, with an accompanying water molecule. The calculations also suggest that there is a buckling in the host layer of about {+-}0.6 A.

  2. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    SciTech Connect

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study demonstrates, on the basis of several analyanalytical criteria, that the production and extracellular release of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is widespread among phytoplankton species. The production and release of CAMP varied markedly among different species grown under similar environmental conditions, and intraspecifically during the life cycle of a given algal species. This investigation marks the first time cAMP has been investigated in natural aquatic systems. An examination of epilimnetic lakewater samples from Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan, demonstrated that cAMP existed in both particulate-associated and dissolved forms in these systems.

  3. Electroacupuncture preconditioning attenuates ischemic brain injury by activation of the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Qiang-qiang; Chen, Huai-long; Liu, Yan-li; Yu, Hai-xia; Shi, Fei; Wang, Ming-shan

    2015-01-01

    Electroacupuncture has therapeutic effects on ischemic brain injury, but its mechanism is still poorly understood. In this study, mice were stimulated by electroacupuncture at the Baihui (GV20) acupoint for 30 minutes at 1 mA and 2/15 Hz for 5 consecutive days. A cerebral ischemia model was established by ligating the bilateral common carotid artery for 15 minutes. At 72 hours after injury, neuronal injury in the mouse hippocampus had lessened, and the number of terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive cells reduced after electroacupuncture treatment. Moreover, expression of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) and phosphorylated AMPKα was up-regulated. Intraperitoneal injection of the AMPK antagonist, compound C, suppressed this phenomenon. Our findings suggest that electroacupuncture preconditioning alleviates ischemic brain injury via AMPK activation. PMID:26330828

  4. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase: a central regulator of metabolism with roles in diabetes, cancer, and viral infection.

    PubMed

    Hardie, D G

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor activated by metabolic stresses that inhibit catabolic ATP production or accelerate ATP consumption. Once activated, AMPK switches on catabolic pathways, generating ATP, while inhibiting cell growth and proliferation, thus promoting energy homeostasis. AMPK is activated by the antidiabetic drug metformin, and by many natural products including "nutraceuticals" and compounds used in traditional medicines. Most of these xenobiotics activate AMPK by inhibiting mitochondrial ATP production. AMPK activation by metabolic stress requires the upstream kinase, LKB1, whose tumor suppressor effects may be largely mediated by AMPK. However, many tumor cells appear to have developed mechanisms to reduce AMPK activation and thus escape its growth-restraining effects. A similar phenomenon occurs during viral infection. If we can establish how down-regulation occurs in tumors and virus-infected cells, there may be therapeutic avenues to reverse these effects.

  5. Mitogen-stimulated glucose transport in thymocytes. Possible role of Ca++ and antagonism by adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    The plant lectin, concanavalin A (Con-A), and the ionophore, A-23187 (specific for divalent cations), stimulated glucose transport in rat thymocytes. Con-A stimulation developed more slowly and was somewhat less extensive than that of stimulation developed more slowly and was somewhat less extensive than that of A-23187. Both responses showed saturation dose dependencies. The two responses were poorly additive, suggesting that A-23187 may saturate regulatory processes shared by the two stimulatory mechanisms. Doses of methylisobutylxanthine (MIX) and prostaglandin E2 which raised adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) levels in these cells also antagonized the Con-A stimulation of glucose transport but did not inhibit basal glucose transport or the A-23187 stimulation. Dibutyryl-cAMP and 8-bromo-cAMP also natagonized Con-A stimulation without inhibiting basal glucose transport. MIX antagonized high Con-A doses about as strongly as it did low Con-A doses, suggesting that MIX did not compete in the Con-A binding step or other process saturable by Con-A. [3H-A1Con-A binding was not affected by MIX. The stimulatory effects of Con-A and A-23187 were reduced by reduction of Ca++ in the medium. Both Con-A and A-23187 enhanced 45Ca++ influx and cellular Ca++ content. The A-23187 dose, which was saturating for glucose transport stimulation, enhanced Ca++ influx and cellular Ca++ content more than did the Con-A dose which was saturating for glucose transport stimulation. The dose fo MIX which specifically antagonized Con-A stimulation of glucose transport proved also to reduce Ca++ influx and cellular Ca++ in the presence of Con-A but not in the presence of A-23187. Thus, glucose transport correlates rather well with cellular Ca++. These results are compatible with the view that Ca++ in a cellular compartment can promote glucose transport, the Con-A's enhancement of Ca++ entry contributes to its stimulation of glucose transport, and the MIX antagonized Con-A action at least

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) from Arabidopsis thaliana in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Byung Woo; Bingman, Craig A.; Mahnke, Donna K.; Sabina, Richard L.; Phillips, George N. Jr

    2005-08-01

    Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase from A. thaliana has been crystallized in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate. Diffraction data have been collected to 3.34 Å resolution. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) is a eukaryotic enzyme that converts adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) to inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP) and ammonia. AMPD from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAMPD) was cloned into the baculoviral transfer vector p2Bac and co-transfected along with a modified baculoviral genome into Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. The resulting recombinant baculovirus were plaque-purified, amplified and used to overexpress recombinant AtAMPD. Crystals of purified AtAMPD have been obtained to which coformycin 5′-phosphate, a transition-state inhibitor, is bound. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 2}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 131.325, c = 208.254 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Diffraction data were collected to 3.34 Å resolution from a crystal in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate and to 4.05 Å resolution from a crystal of a mercury derivative.

  7. IMPDH2 genetic polymorphism: a promoter single-nucleotide polymorphism disrupts a cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element.

    PubMed

    Garat, Anne; Cauffiez, Christelle; Hamdan-Khalil, Rima; Glowacki, François; Devos, Aurore; Leclerc, Julie; Lionet, Arnaud; Allorge, Delphine; Lo-Guidice, Jean-Marc; Broly, Franck

    2009-12-01

    Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), which catalyzes a key step in the de novo biosynthesis of guanine nucleotide, is mediated by two highly conserved isoforms, IMPDH1 and IMPDH2. In this study, IMPDH2 genetic polymorphism was investigated in 96 individuals of Caucasian origin. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, comprising one previously described single base-pair substitution in the close vicinity of the consensus donor splice site of intron 7 (IVS7+10T>C), and three novel polymorphisms, one silent substitution in exon 9 (c.915C>G), one single base-pair insertion (g.6971_6972insT) within the 3'-untranslated region of the gene, and one substitution located in the promoter region (c.-95T>G) in a transcription factor binding site CRE(A) (cyclic adenosine monophosphate [cAMP] response element). Considering the nature and location of this latter polymorphism, its functional relevance was examined by transfecting HEK293 and Jurkat cell lines with constructs of the related region of IMPDH2/luciferase reporter gene. The c.-95T>G mutation leads to a significant decrease of luciferase activity (HEK293: 55% decrease, p < 0.05; Jurkat: 65% decrease, p < 0.05) compared with the wild-type promoter sequence and, therefore, is likely to determine interindividual differences in IMPDH2 transcriptional regulation. These results might contribute to a better understanding of the variability in clinical outcome and dose adjustments of certain immunosuppressors that are metabolized through the IMPDH pathway or that are IMPDH inhibitors.

  8. STUDIES ON THE MECHANISM OF ACTION OF CYCLIC 3’,5’-ADENOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE ON STEROID HYDROXYLATIONS IN ADRENAL HOMOGENATES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Cyclic 3’,5’-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic 3’,5’AMP) has recently been shown to stimulate selectively steroid C-11- beta hydroxylase activity in rat...to be mediated via stimulation of alpha- glucan phosphorylase, which in turn led to enhanced production of G-6-P from glycogen and a concomitant...increase in NADPH generation. However, if cyclic 3’,5’-AMP stimulated steroid 11- beta -hydroxylation in adrenal homogenates only by this mechanism, its

  9. Selective Phosphonylation of 5'-Adenosine Monophosphate (5'-AMP) via Pyrophosphite [PPi(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Karl; Bryant, David E.; Marriott, Katie E. R.; Ohara, Shohei; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Kee, Terence P.

    2016-11-01

    We describe here experiments which demonstrate the selective phospho-transfer from a plausibly prebiotic condensed phosphorus (P) salt, pyrophosphite [H2P2O5 2-; PPi(III)], to the phosphate group of 5'-adenosine mono phosphate (5'-AMP). We show further that this P-transfer process is accelerated both by divalent metal ions (M2+) and by organic co-factors such as acetate (AcO-). In this specific case of P-transfer from PPi(III) to 5'-AMP, we show a synergistic enhancement of transfer in the combined presence of M2+ & AcO-. Isotopic labelling studies demonstrate that hydrolysis of the phosphonylated 5'-AMP, [P(III)P(V)-5'-AMP], proceeds via nuceophilic attack of water at the Pi(III) terminus.

  10. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation and suppression of inflammatory response by cell stretching in rabbit synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kunanusornchai, Wanlop; Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2016-12-01

    Joint mobilization is known to be beneficial in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of stretching on adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and its role in modulating inflammation in rabbit synovial fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretching of isolated rabbit synovial fibroblasts for ten min was performed. Stretching-induced AMPK activation, its underlying mechanism, and its anti-inflammatory effect were investigated using Western blot. Static stretching at 20 % of initial length resulted in AMPK activation characterized by expression of phosphorylated AMPK and phosphorylated acetyl-Co A carboxylase. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation peaked 1 h after stretching and declined toward resting activity. Using cell viability assays, static stretching did not appear to cause cellular damage. Activation of AMPK involves Ca(2+) influx via a mechanosensitive L-type Ca(2+) channel, which subsequently raises intracellular Ca(2+) and activates AMPK via Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ). Interestingly, stretching suppressed TNFα-induced expression of COX-2, iNOS, and phosphorylated NF-κB. These effects were prevented by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. These results suggest that mechanical stretching suppressed inflammatory responses in synovial fibroblasts via a L-type Ca(2+)-channel-CaMKKβ-AMPK-dependent pathway which may underlie joint mobilization's ability to alleviate OA symptoms.

  11. Methylene blue induces macroautophagy through 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase pathway to protect neurons from serum deprivation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Luokun; Li, Wenjun; Winters, Ali; Yuan, Fang; Jin, Kunlin; Yang, Shaohua

    2013-01-01

    Methylene blue has been shown to be neuroprotective in multiple experimental neurodegenerative disease models. However, the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects have not been fully elucidated. Previous studies have shown that macroautophagy has multiple beneficial roles for maintaining normal cellular homeostasis and that induction of macroautophagy after myocardial ischemia is protective. In the present study we demonstrated that methylene blue could protect HT22 hippocampal cell death induced by serum deprivation, companied by induction of macroautophagy. We also found that methylene blue-mediated neuroprotection was abolished by macroautophagy inhibition. Interestingly, 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, but not inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, was activated at 12 and 24 h after methylene blue treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Methylene blue-induced macroautophagy was blocked by AMPK inhibitor. Consistent with in vitro data, macroautophagy was induced in the cortex and hippocampus of mouse brains treated with methylene blue. Our findings suggest that methylene blue-induced neuroprotection is mediated, at least in part, by macroautophagy though activation of AMPK signaling.

  12. Adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase and its key role in catabolism: structure, regulation, biological activity, and pharmacological activation.

    PubMed

    Krishan, Sukriti; Richardson, Des R; Sahni, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor, which once activated, plays a role in several processes within the cell to restore energy homeostasis. The protein enhances catabolic pathways, such as β-oxidation and autophagy, to generate ATP, and inhibits anabolic processes that require energy, including fatty acid, cholesterol, and protein synthesis. Due to its key role in the regulation of critical cellular pathways, deregulation of AMPK is associated with the pathology of many diseases, including cancer, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. In fact, AMPK is a target of some pharmacological agents implemented in the treatment of diabetes (metformin and thiazolidinediones) as well as other naturally derived products, such as berberine, which is used in traditional medicine. Due to its critical role in the cell and the pathology of several disorders, research into developing AMPK as a therapeutic target is becoming a burgeoning and exciting field of pharmacological research. A profound understanding of the regulation and activity of AMPK would enhance its development as a promising therapeutic target.

  13. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT SYMPOSIUM: Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and mitochondria in Rendement Napole pig growth.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, T L; Gerrard, D E

    2016-09-01

    The Rendement Napole mutation (RN-), which is well known to influence pork quality, also has a profound impact on metabolic characteristics of muscle. Pigs with RN- possess a SNP in the γ3 subunit of adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK); AMPK, a key energy sensor in skeletal muscle, modulates energy producing and energy consuming pathways to maintain cellular homeostasis. Importantly, AMPK regulates not only acute response to energy stress but also facilitates long-term adaptation via changes in gene and protein expression. The RN- allele increases AMPK activity, which alters the metabolic phenotype of skeletal muscle by increasing mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity. Fibers with greater oxidative capacity typically exhibit increased protein turnover and smaller fiber size, which indicates that RN- pigs may exhibit decreased efficiency and growth potential. However, whole body and muscle growth of RN- pigs appear similar to that of wild-type pigs and despite increased oxidative capacity, fibers maintain the capacity for hypertrophic growth. This indicates that compensatory mechanisms may allow RN- pigs to achieve rates of muscle growth similar to those of wild-type pigs. Intriguingly, lipid oxidation and mitochondria function are enhanced in RN- pig muscle. Thus far, characteristics of RN- muscle are largely based on animals near market weight. To better understand interaction between energy signaling and protein accretion in muscle, further work is needed to define age-dependent relationships between AMPK signaling, metabolism, and muscle growth.

  14. Hypothermia induced by adenosine 5'-monophosphate attenuates early stage injury in an acute gouty arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhimin; Guo, Weiting; Lu, Shulai; Lv, Wenshan; Li, Changgui; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Shihua; Yan, Shengli; Tao, Zhenyin; Wang, Yunlong

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether the hypothermia induced by Adenosine 5'-Monophosphate (5'-AMP) could attenuate early stage injury in a rat acute gouty arthritis model. Ankle joint injection with monosodium urate monohydrate crystals (MSU crystals) in hypothermia rat model which was induced by 5'-AMP and then observe whether hypothermia induced by 5'-AMP could be effectively inhibit the inflammation on acute gouty arthritis in rats. AMP-induced hypothermia has protective effects on our acute gouty arthritis, which was demonstrated by the following criteria: (1) a significant reduction in the ankle swelling (p < 0.001); (2) a significant decrease in the occurrence of leukocyte infiltration and mild hemorrhage; (3) a significant reduction in the presence of serum Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, p < 0.001) and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, p < 0.001); and (4) a significant inhibition in the Nuclear Factor -κappaB (NF-κB) activity (p < 0.001). AMP-induced hypothermia could inhibit acute inflammation reaction and protect the synovial tissue against acute injury in a rat acute gouty arthritis model.

  15. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase attenuates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through regulation of FOXO3a/MAFbx signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baolin; Wu, Qiang; Xiong, Zhaojun; Ma, Yuedong; Yu, Sha; Chen, Dandan; Huang, Shengwen; Dong, Yugang

    2016-09-01

    Control of cardiac muscle mass is thought to be determined by a dynamic balance of protein synthesis and degradation. Recent studies have demonstrated that atrophy-related forkhead box O 3a (FOXO3a)/muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) signaling pathway plays a central role in the modulation of proteolysis and exert inhibitory effect on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation attenuates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by regulating FOXO3a/MAFbx signaling pathway and its downstream protein degradation. The results showed that activation of AMPK with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) attenuated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II (Ang II). The antihypertrophic effects of AICAR were blunted by AMPK inhibitor Compound C. In addition, AMPK dramatically increased the activity of transcription factor FOXO3a, up-regulated the expression of its downstream ubiquitin ligase MAFbx, and enhanced cardiomyocyte proteolysis. Meanwhile, the effects of AMPK on protein degradation and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy were blocked after MAFbx was silenced by transfection of cardiomyocytes with MAFbx-siRNA. These results indicate that AMPK plays an important role in the inhibition of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by activating protein degradation via FOXO3a/MAFbx signaling pathway.

  16. The expression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator in rat sertoli cells following seminal extract administration

    PubMed Central

    Akmal, Muslim; Siregar, Tongku Nizwan; Wahyuni, Sri; Hamny; Nasution, Mustafa Kamal; Indriati, Wiwik; Panjaitan, Budianto; Aliza, Dwinna

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to determine the effect of seminal vesicle extract on cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator (CREM) expression in rat Sertoli cells. Materials and Methods: This study examined the expression of CREM on 20 male rats (Rattus norvegicus) at 4 months of age, weighing 250-300 g. The rats were divided into four groups: K0, KP1, KP2, and KP3. K0 group was injected with 0.2 ml normal saline; KP1 was injected with 25 mg cloprostenol (Prostavet C, Virbac S. A); KP2 and KP3 were injected with 0.2 and 0.4 ml seminal vesicle extract, respectively. The treatments were conducted 5 times within 12-day interval. At the end of the study, the rats were euthanized by cervical dislocation; then, the testicles were necropsied and processed for histology observation using immunohistochemistry staining. Results: CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells was not altered by the administration of either 0.2 or 0.4 ml seminal vesicle extract. Conclusion: The administration of seminal vesicle extract is unable to increase CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells. PMID:27733803

  17. Ratiometric bioluminescence indicators for monitoring cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in live cells based on luciferase-fragment complementation.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Masaki; Nagaoka, Yasutaka; Yamada, Toshimichi; Takakura, Hideo; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2010-11-15

    Bioluminescent indicators for cyclic 3',5'-monophosphate AMP (cAMP) are powerful tools for noninvasive detection with high sensitivity. However, the absolute photon counts are affected substantially by adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and d-luciferin concentrations, limiting temporal analysis in live cells. This report describes a genetically encoded bioluminescent indicator for detecting intracellular cAMP based on complementation of split fragments of two-color luciferase mutants originated from click beetles. A cAMP binding domain of protein kinase A was connected with an engineered carboxy-terminal fragment of luciferase, of which ends were connected with amino-terminal fragments of green luciferase and red luciferase. We demonstrated that the ratio of green to red bioluminescence intensities was less influenced by the changes of ATP and d-luciferin concentrations. We also showed an applicability of the bioluminescent indicator for time-course and quantitative assessments of intracellular cAMP in living cells and mice. The bioluminescent indicator will enable quantitative analysis and imaging of spatiotemporal dynamics of cAMP in opaque and autofluorescent living subjects.

  18. Phenotype, virulence and immunogenicity of Edwardsiella ictaluri cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate receptor protein (Crp) mutants in catfish host.

    PubMed

    Santander, Javier; Mitra, Arindam; Curtiss, Roy

    2011-12-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is an Enterobacteriaceae that causes lethal enteric septicemia in catfish. Being a mucosal facultative intracellular pathogen, this bacterium is an excellent candidate to develop immersion-oral live attenuated vaccines for the catfish aquaculture industry. Deletion of the cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) receptor protein (crp) gene in several Enterobacteriaceae has been utilized in live attenuated vaccines for mammals and birds. Here we characterize the crp gene and report the effect of a crp deletion in E. ictaluri. The E. ictaluri crp gene and encoded protein are similar to other Enterobacteriaceae family members, complementing Salmonella enterica Δcrp mutants in a cAMP-dependent fashion. The E. ictaluri Δcrp-10 in-frame deletion mutant demonstrated growth defects, loss of maltose utilization, and lack of flagella synthesis. We found that the E. ictaluri Δcrp-10 mutant was attenuated, colonized lymphoid tissues, and conferred immune protection against E. ictaluri infection to zebrafish (Danio rerio) and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Evaluation of the IgM titers indicated that bath immunization with the E. ictaluri Δcrp-10 mutant triggered systemic and skin immune responses in catfish. We propose that deletion of the crp gene in E. ictaluri is an effective strategy to develop immersion live attenuated antibiotic-sensitive vaccines for the catfish aquaculture industry.

  19. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate blocks acetaminophen toxicity by increasing ubiquitination-mediated ASK1 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qi; Xu, Xi; Kong, Yi; Zhang, Jianfa

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced liver failure in the world. Hepatic c-jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation is thought to be a consequence of oxidative stress produced during APAP metabolism. Activation of JNK signals causes hepatocellular damage with necrotic and apoptotic cell death. Here we found that APAP caused a feedback increase in plasma adenosine 5′-monophsphate (5′-AMP). We demonstrated that co-administration of APAP and 5′-AMP significantly ameliorated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice, without influences on APAP metabolism and its analgesic function. The mechanism of protection by 5′-AMP was through inhibiting APAP-induced activation of JNK, and attenuating downstream c-jun and c-fos gene expression. This was triggered by attenuating apoptosis signal-regulated kinase 1(ASK1) methylation and increasing ubiquitination-mediated ASK1 protein degradation. Our findings indicate that replacing the current APAP with a safe and functional APAP/5′-AMP formulation could prevent APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:28031524

  20. Separate 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors on the salivary gland of the blowfly are linked to the generation of either cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate or calcium signals.

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, M. J.; Heslop, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    1 5'-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) stimulates the formation of two separate second messengers in the salivary gland of the blowfly. Activation of adenylate cyclase raises adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) whereas the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol (PI) is associated with an increase in calcium permeability. The possibility that these two signal pathways might be controlled by separate 5-HT receptors was studied by testing the specificity of 5-HT analogues and antagonists. 2 The parent compound 5-HT was found to stimulate both cyclic AMP formation and the related parameters of PI hydrolysis and calcium transport with similar dose-response relationships. 3 Certain analogues such as 4- and 5-fluoro-alpha-methyltryptamine were capable of raising cyclic AMP levels and stimulating fluid secretion but did not stimulate the hydrolysis of PI or the entry of calcium. 4 Other analogues, which had chloro or methyl substituents at the 5-position, were found to stimulate the hydrolysis of PI and the transport of calcium at much lower doses than those required to stimulate the formation of cyclic AMP. 5 Antagonists were also found to exert selective effects. Methysergide was a potent inhibitor of PI hydrolysis whereas cinanserin was far more selective in blocking the stimulatory effect of 5-HT on cyclic AMP formation. 6 It is concluded that 5-HT acts on two separate receptors, a 5-HT1 receptor acting through calcium and a 5-HT2 receptor which mediates its effects through cyclic AMP. PMID:6265018

  1. Estrogen regulates energy metabolic pathway and upstream adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase and phosphatase enzyme expression in dorsal vagal complex metabolosensory neurons during glucostasis and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Pratistha; Ibrahim, Baher A; Gujar, Amit D; Briski, Karen P

    2015-02-01

    The ability of estrogen to shield the brain from the bioenergetic insult hypoglycemia is unclear. Estradiol (E) prevents hypoglycemic activation of the energy deficit sensor adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in hindbrain metabolosensory A2 noradrenergic neurons. This study investigates the hypothesis that estrogen regulates A2 AMPK through control of fuel metabolism and/or upstream protein kinase/phosphatase enzyme expression. A2 cells were harvested by laser microdissection after insulin or vehicle (V) injection of E- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized female rats. Cell lysates were evaluated by immunoblot for glycolytic, tricarboxylic acid cycle, respiratory chain, and acetyl-CoA-malonyl-CoA pathway enzymes. A2 phosphofructokinase (PFKL), isocitrate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and ATP synthase subunit profiles were elevated in E/V vs. O/V; hypoglycemia augmented PFKL and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase expression in E only. Hypoglycemia increased A2 Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-β in O and reduced protein phosphatase in both groups. A2 phospho-AMPK levels were equivalent in O/V vs. E/V but elevated during hypoglycemia in O only. These results implicate E in compensatory upregulation of substrate catabolism and corresponding maintenance of energy stability of A2 metabolosensory neurons during hypoglycemia, outcomes that support the potential viability of molecular substrates for hormone action as targets for therapies alleviating hypoglycemic brain injury.

  2. Application and optimization of the tenderization of pig Longissimus dorsi muscle by adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) using the response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shaoying; Wang, Daoying; Zhang, Muhan; Geng, Zhiming; Sun, Chong; Bian, Huan; Xu, Weimin; Zhu, Yongzhi; Liu, Fang; Wu, Haihong

    2016-03-01

    Based on single factor experiments, NaCl concentration, adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) concentration and temperature were selected as independent variables for a three-level Box-Behnken experimental design, and the shear force and cooking loss were response values for regression analysis. According to the statistical models, it showed that all independent variables had significant effects on shear force and cooking loss, and optimal values were at the NaCl concentration of 4.15%, AMP concentration of 22.27 mmol/L and temperature of 16.70°C, which was determined with three-dimensional response surface diagrams and contour plots. Under this condition, the observed shear force and cooking loss were 0.625 kg and 8.07%, respectively, exhibiting a good agreement with their predicted values, showing the good applicability and feasibility of response surface methodology (RSM) for improving pork tenderness. Compared with control pig muscles, AMP combined with NaCl treatment demonstrated significant effects on improvement of meat tenderness and reduction of cooking loss. Therefore, AMP could be regarded as an effective tenderization agent for pork.

  3. Unhydrolyzable analogues of adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate demonstrating growth inhibition and differentiation in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yokozaki, H; Tortora, G; Pepe, S; Maronde, E; Genieser, H G; Jastorff, B; Cho-Chung, Y S

    1992-05-01

    A set of adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) analogues that combine exocyclic sulfur substitutions in the equatorial (Rp) or the axial (Sp) position of the cyclophosphate ring with modifications in the adenine base of cAMP were tested for their effect on the growth of HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells and LS-174T human colon carcinoma cells. Both diasteromeres of the phosphorothioate derivatives were growth inhibitory, exhibiting a concentration inhibiting 50% of cell proliferation of 3-100 microM. Among the analogues tested, Rp-8-Cl-cAMPS and Sp-8-Br-cAMPS were the two most potent. Rp-8-Cl-cAMPS was 5- to 10-fold less potent than 8-Cl-cAMP while Sp-8-Br-cAMPS was approximately 6-fold more potent than 8-Br-cAMP. The growth inhibition was not due to a block in a specific phase of the cell cycle or due to cytotoxicity. Rp-8-Cl-cAMPS enhanced its growth-inhibitory effect when added together with 8-Cl-cAMP and increased differentiation in combination with N6-benzyl-cAMP. The binding kinetics data showed that these Sp and Rp modifications brought about a greater decrease in affinity for Site B than for Site A of RI (the regulatory subunit of type I cAMP-dependent protein kinase) and a substantial decrease of affinity for Site A of RII (the regulatory subunit of type II protein kinase) but only a small decrease in affinity for Site B of RII, indicating the importance of the Site B binding of RII in the growth-inhibitory effect. These results show that the phosphorothioate analogues of cAMP are useful tools to investigate the mechanism of action of cAMP in growth control and differentiation and may have practical implication in the suppression of malignancy.

  4. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators for the prevention, treatment and potential reversal of pathological pain

    PubMed Central

    Price, Theodore J.; Das, Vaskar; Dussor, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Pathological pain is an enormous medical problem that places a significant burden on patients and can result from an injury that has long since healed or be due to an unidentifiable cause. Although treatments exist, they often either lack efficacy or have intolerable side effects. More importantly, they do not reverse the changes in the nervous system mediating pathological pain, and thus symptoms often return when therapies are discontinued. Consequently, novel therapies are urgently needed that have both improved efficacy and disease-modifying properties. Here we highlight an emerging target for novel pain therapies, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is capable of regulating a variety of cellular processes including protein translation, activity of other kinases, and mitochondrial metabolism, many of which are thought to contribute to pathological pain. Consistent with these properties, preclinical studies show positive, and in some cases disease-modifying effects of either pharmacological activation or genetic regulation of AMPK in models of nerve injury, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), postsurgical pain, inflammatory pain, and diabetic neuropathy. Given the AMPK-activating ability of metformin, a widely prescribed and well-tolerated drug, these preclinical studies provide a strong rationale for both retrospective and prospective human pain trials with this drug. They also argue for the development of novel AMPK activators, whether orthosteric, allosteric, or modulators of events upstream of the kinase. Together, this review will present the case for AMPK as a novel therapeutic target for pain and will discuss future challenges in the path toward development of AMPK-based pain therapeutics. PMID:26521775

  5. Atorvastatin and pitavastatin enhance lipoprotein lipase production in L6 skeletal muscle cells through activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Masahiro; Endo, Kei; Saiki, Atsuhito; Miyashita, Yoh; Terai, Kensuke; Murano, Takeyoshi; Watanabe, Fusako; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Shirai, Kohji

    2012-10-01

    Pravastatin and atorvastatin increase the serum level of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mass in vivo but do not increase LPL activity in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in vitro. LPL is mainly produced by adipose tissue and skeletal muscle cells. Metformin enhances LPL in skeletal muscle through adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation but not in adipocytes. This study aimed to examine the effect of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) on LPL production and to investigate the mechanism by which statins enhance skeletal muscle cell LPL production. L6 skeletal muscle cells were incubated with pravastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin or pitavastatin. LPL activity, protein levels and mRNA expression were measured. Atorvastatin and pitavastatin significantly increased LPL activity, protein levels and mRNA expression in L6 skeletal muscle cells at 1 μmol/L, but neither statin had an effect at 10 μmol/L. We measured AMPK to clarify the mechanism by which statins increase LPL production in skeletal muscle cells. At 1 μmol/L, both atorvastatin and pitavastatin enhanced AMPK activity, but this enhancement was abolished when AMPK signaling was blocked by compound C. The increased expressions of LPL protein and mRNA by atorvastatin and pitavastatin were reduced by compound C. In addition, mevalonic acid abolished atorvastatin- and pitavastatin-induced AMPK activation and LPL expression. These results suggest that atorvastatin and pitavastatin increase LPL activity, protein levels and LPL mRNA expression by activating AMPK in skeletal muscle cells.

  6. “cAMP Sponge”: A Buffer for Cyclic Adenosine 3′, 5′-Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Moyer, Mary Pat; Curci, Silvana; Hofer, Aldebaran M.

    2009-01-01

    Background While intracellular buffers are widely used to study calcium signaling, no such tool exists for the other major second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP). Methods/Principal Findings Here we describe a genetically encoded buffer for cAMP based on the high-affinity cAMP-binding carboxy-terminus of the regulatory subunit RIβ of protein kinase A (PKA). Addition of targeting sequences permitted localization of this fragment to the extra-nuclear compartment, while tagging with mCherry allowed quantification of its expression at the single cell level. This construct (named “cAMP sponge”) was shown to selectively bind cAMP in vitro. Its expression significantly suppressed agonist-induced cAMP signals and the downstream activation of PKA within the cytosol as measured by FRET-based sensors in single living cells. Point mutations in the cAMP-binding domains of the construct rendered the chimera unable to bind cAMP in vitro or in situ. Cyclic AMP sponge was fruitfully applied to examine feedback regulation of gap junction-mediated transfer of cAMP in epithelial cell couplets. Conclusions This newest member of the cAMP toolbox has the potential to reveal unique biological functions of cAMP, including insight into the functional significance of compartmentalized signaling events. PMID:19888343

  7. Sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase activity in normal and failing human hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Movsesian, M A; Smith, C J; Krall, J; Bristow, M R; Manganiello, V C

    1991-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was examined in microsomes prepared from the left ventricular myocardium of eight heart transplant recipients with end-stage idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and six unmatched organ donors with normal cardiac function. At cAMP concentrations less than or equal to 1.0 microM, sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was functionally homogeneous. cAMP phosphodiesterase activity was inhibited competitively by cGMP (Ki = 0.031 +/- 0.008 microM) and the cilostamide derivative OPC 3911 (Ki = 0.018 +/- 0.004 microM), but was essentially insensitive to rolipram. Vmax and Km were 781.7 +/- 109.2 nmol/mg per min and 0.188 +/- 0.031 microM, respectively, in microsomes prepared from nonfailing hearts and 793.9 +/- 68.9 nmol/mg per min and 0.150 +/- 0.027 microM in microsomes prepared from failing hearts. Microsomes prepared from nonfailing and failing hearts did not differ with respect to either the ratio of cAMP phosphodiesterase activity to ATP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation activity or the sensitivity of cAMP phosphodiesterase activity to inhibition by OPC 3911. These data suggest that the diminished inotropic efficacy of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in failing human hearts does not result from changes in the level, kinetic properties, or pharmacologic sensitivity of sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated cAMP phosphodiesterase activity. PMID:1647414

  8. Regulation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate deaminase in the freeze tolerant wood frog, Rana sylvatica

    PubMed Central

    Dieni, Christopher A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2008-01-01

    . Conclusion Maintenance of long term viability under the ischemic conditions in frozen muscle requires attention to the control of cellular energetics. Differential regulatory controls on AMPD by mechanisms including binding to muscle proteins, actions allosteric effectors, glucose and temperature effects and reversible phosphorylation adjust enzyme function for an optimal role in controlling cellular adenylate levels in ischemic frozen muscle. Stable modification of AMPD properties via freeze-responsive phosphorylation may contribute both to AMPD control and to coordinating AMPD function with other enzymes of energy metabolism in cold ischemic muscle. PMID:18430211

  9. Metformin inhibits growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells via liver kinase B-1-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    GUO, QIANQIAN; LIU, ZHIYAN; JIANG, LILI; LIU, MENGJIE; MA, JIEQUN; YANG, CHENGCHENG; HAN, LILI; NAN, KEJUN; LIANG, XUAN

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely administered oral anti-diabetic therapeutic agent, exerts its glucose-lowering effect predominantly via liver kinase B1 (LKB1)-dependent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that metformin possesses potential antitumor effects. However, whether the antitumor effect of metformin is via the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway remains to be determined. In the current study, the effects of metformin on proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 (LKB1-null) and H1299 (LKB1-positive) cells were assessed, and the role of LKB1/AMPK signaling in the anti-growth effects of metformin were investigated. Cell viability was determined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. Metformin inhibited proliferation, induced significant cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase and increased apoptosis in NSCLC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, regardless of the level of LKB1 protein expression. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) did not affect the antiproliferative effect of metformin in the H1299 cells. Metformin stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently suppressed the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream effector, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase in the two cell lines. These effects were abrogated by silencing AMPK with small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, knockdown of AMPK with siRNA inhibited the effect of metformin on cell proliferation in the two cell lines. These results provide evidence that the growth inhibition of metformin in NSCLC cells is mediated by LKB1-independent activation of AMPK, indicating that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of

  10. Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) as a New Target for Antidiabetic Drugs: A Review on Metabolic, Pharmacological and Chemical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Gruzman, Arie; Babai, Gali; Sasson, Shlomo

    2009-01-01

    In view of the epidemic nature of type 2 diabetes and the substantial rate of failure of current oral antidiabetic drugs the quest for new therapeutics is intensive. The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important regulatory protein for cellular energy balance and is considered a master switch of glucose and lipid metabolism in various organs, especially in skeletal muscle and liver. In skeletal muscles, AMPK stimulates glucose transport and fatty acid oxidation. In the liver, it augments fatty acid oxidation and decreases glucose output, cholesterol and triglyceride synthesis. These metabolic effects induced by AMPK are associated with lowering blood glucose levels in hyperglycemic individuals. Two classes of oral antihyperglycemic drugs (biguanidines and thiazolidinediones) have been shown to exert some of their therapeutic effects by directly or indirectly activating AMPK. However, side effects and an acquired resistance to these drugs emphasize the need for the development of novel and efficacious AMPK activators. We have recently discovered a new class of hydrophobic D-xylose derivatives that activates AMPK in skeletal muscles in a non insulin-dependent manner. One of these derivatives (2,4;3,5-dibenzylidene-D-xylose-diethyl-dithioacetal) stimulates the rate of hexose transport in skeletal muscle cells by increasing the abundance of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4) in the plasma membrane through activation of AMPK. This compound reduces blood glucose levels in diabetic mice and therefore offers a novel strategy of therapeutic intervention strategy in type 2 diabetes. The present review describes various classes of chemically-related compounds that activate AMPK by direct or indirect interactions and discusses their potential for candidate antihyperglycemic drug development. PMID:19557293

  11. Activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase blocks cumulus cell expansion through inhibition of protein synthesis during in vitro maturation in Swine.

    PubMed

    Santiquet, Nicolas; Sasseville, Maxime; Laforest, Martin; Guillemette, Christine; Gilchrist, Robert B; Richard, François J

    2014-08-01

    The serine/threonine kinase 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a heterotrimeric protein known as a metabolic switch, is involved in oocyte nuclear maturation in mice, cattle, and swine. The present study analyzed AMPK activation in cumulus cell expansion during in vitro maturation (IVM) of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC). 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) is a well-known activator of AMPK. It inhibited oocyte meiotic resumption in COC. Moreover, cumulus cell expansion did not occur in the presence of AICAR, demonstrating its marked impact on cumulus cells. Activation of AMPK was supported by AICAR-mediated phosphorylation of alpha AMPK subunits. Furthermore, the presence of AICAR increased glucose uptake, a classical response to activation of this metabolic switch in response to depleted cellular energy levels. Neither nuclear maturation nor cumulus expansion was reversed by glucosamine, an alternative substrate in hyaluronic acid synthesis, through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, which ruled out possible depletion of substrates. Both increased gap junction communication and phosphodiesterase activity in COC are dependent on protein synthesis during the initial hours of IVM; however, both were inhibited in the presence of AICAR, which supports the finding that activation of AMPK by AICAR mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. Moreover, this protein synthesis inhibition was equivalent to that of the well-known protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, as observed on cumulus expansion and protein concentration. Finally, the phosphorylation level of selected kinases was investigated. The pattern of raptor phosphorylation is supportive of activation of AMPK-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. In conclusion, AICAR-mediated AMPK activation in porcine COC inhibited cumulus cell expansion and protein synthesis. These results bring new considerations to the importance of this kinase in ovarian

  12. Effect of the growth stage and cultivar on policosanol profiles of barley sprouts and their adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Woo Duck; Yuk, Heung Joo; Curtis-Long, Marcus J; Jang, Ki Chang; Lee, Jin Hwan; Han, Sang-Ik; Kang, Hang Won; Nam, Min Hee; Lee, Sung-Joon; Lee, Ji Hae; Park, Ki Hun

    2013-02-06

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an intracellular sensor that can regulate glucose levels within the cell. For this reason, it is well-known to be a target for drugs against diabetes and obesity. AMPK was activated significantly by the hexane extract of barley sprouts. This AMPK activation emerges across the growth stages of the sprout, becoming most significant (3 times above the initial stages) 10 days after sprouting. After this time, the activation decreased between 13 and 20 days post-sprouting. Analysis of the hexane extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that the amounts of policosanols (PCs, which are linear, primary aliphatic alcohols with 20-30 carbons) in the plant dramatically increased between 5 days (109.7 mg/100 g) and 10 days (343.7 mg/100 g) post-sprouting and then levels fell back down, reaching 76.4 mg/100 g at 20 days post-sprouting. This trend is consistent with PCs being the active ingredient in the barley plants. We validate this by showing that hexacosanol is an activator of AMPK. The richest cultivar for PCs was found to be the Daejin cultivar. Cultivars had a significant effect on the total PC content (113.2-183.5 mg/100 g) within the plant up to 5 days post-sprouting. However this dependence upon the cultivar was not so apparent at peak stages of PC production (10 days post-sprouting). The most abundant PC in barley sprout, hexacosanol, contributed 62-80% of the total PC content at every stage. These results are valuable to determine the optimal times of harvest to obtain the highest yield of PCs.

  13. Gonadotropin stimulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate and testosterone production without detectable high-affinity binding sites in purified Leydig cells from rat testis

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, E.S.; Bhalla, V.K. )

    1991-02-01

    Rat testicular interstitial cells were separated by three different gradient-density procedures and, with each, two biochemically and morphologically distinct cell fractions were isolated. The lighter density cells in fraction-I bound iodine 125-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) with high-affinity (apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd, approximately 10{sup {minus} 10} M) without producing either cyclic adenosine monophosphate or testosterone in response to hormone action. The heavier-density cells displayed morphologic features typical of Leydig cells and produced cyclic adenosine monophosphate and testosterone in the presence of hCG without detectable {sup 125}I-labeled hCG high-affinity binding. These cell fractions were further characterized by studies using deglycosylated hCG, a known antagonist to hCG action. Cell concentration-dependent studies with purified Leydig cells revealed that maximal testosterone production was achieved when lower cell concentrations (0.5 x 10(6) cells/250 microliters) were used for in vitro hCG stimulation assays. Under these conditions, the {sup 125}I-labeled hCG binding was barely detectable (2.24 fmol; 2,698 sites/cell). Furthermore, these studies revealed that the hCG-specific binding in Leydig cells is overestimated by the classic method for nonspecific binding correction using excess unlabeled hormone. An alternate method is presented.

  14. Molecular characterization of adenosine 5'-monophosphate deaminase--the key enzyme responsible for the umami taste of nori (Porphyra yezoensis Ueda, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Minami, Seiko; Sato, Minoru; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro; Iwamoto, Koji

    2011-12-01

    The enzyme adenosine 5'-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD, EC 3.5.4.6) catalyzes the conversion of adenosine 5'-monophosphate to inosine 5'-mononucleotide (IMP). IMP is generally known as the compound responsible for the umami taste of the edible red alga Porphyra yezoensis Ueda that is known in Japan as nori. Therefore, we suspect that AMPD plays a key role in providing a favorable nori taste. In this study, we undertake the molecular characterization of nori-derived AMPD. The nori AMPD protein has a molecular mass of 55 kDa as estimated from both gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The calculated molecular mass from the amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA is 57.1 kDa. The isoelectric point is 5.71. The coding region of AMPD consists of 1,566 bp encoding 522 amino acids and possesses a transmembrane domain and two N-glycosylation sites. The sequence identity of nori AMPD in human and yeast AMPDs was found to be less than 50% and 20% in DNA and amino acid sequences, respectively. Proline in the conserved motif of [SA]-[LIVM]-[NGS]-[STA]-D-D-P was found to be converted to glutamate. These results indicate that nori AMPD is a novel type of AMPD.

  15. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate metabolism in synaptic growth, strength, and precision: neural and behavioral phenotype-specific counterbalancing effects between dnc phosphodiesterase and rut adenylyl cyclase mutations.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2012-03-01

    Two classic learning mutants in Drosophila, rutabaga (rut) and dunce (dnc), are defective in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) synthesis and degradation, respectively, exhibiting a variety of neuronal and behavioral defects. We ask how the opposing effects of these mutations on cAMP levels modify subsets of phenotypes, and whether any specific phenotypes could be ameliorated by biochemical counter balancing effects in dnc rut double mutants. Our study at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) demonstrates that dnc mutations caused severe defects in nerve terminal morphology, characterized by unusually large synaptic boutons and aberrant innervation patterns. Interestingly, a counterbalancing effect led to rescue of the aberrant innervation patterns but the enlarged boutons in dnc rut double mutant remained as extreme as those in dnc. In contrast to dnc, rut mutations strongly affect synaptic transmission. Focal loose-patch recording data accumulated over 4 years suggest that synaptic currents in rut boutons were characterized by unusually large temporal dispersion and a seasonal variation in the amount of transmitter release, with diminished synaptic currents in summer months. Experiments with different rearing temperatures revealed that high temperature (29-30°C) decreased synaptic transmission in rut, but did not alter dnc and wild-type (WT). Importantly, the large temporal dispersion and abnormal temperature dependence of synaptic transmission, characteristic of rut, still persisted in dnc rut double mutants. To interpret these results in a proper perspective, we reviewed previously documented differential effects of dnc and rut mutations and their genetic interactions in double mutants on a variety of physiological and behavioral phenotypes. The cases of rescue in double mutants are associated with gradual developmental and maintenance processes whereas many behavioral and physiological manifestations on faster time scales could not be rescued. We discuss

  16. Involvement of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in the influence of timed high-fat evening diet on the hepatic clock and lipogenic gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Zhu, Zengyan; Xie, Meilin; Xue, Jie

    2015-09-01

    A high-fat diet may result in changes in hepatic clock gene expression, but potential mechanisms are not yet elucidated. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recognized as a key regulator of energy metabolism and certain clock genes. Therefore, we hypothesized that AMPK may be involved in the alteration of hepatic clock gene expression under a high-fat environment. This study aimed to examine the effects of timed high-fat evening diet on the activity of hepatic AMPK, clock genes, and lipogenic genes. Mice with hyperlipidemic fatty livers were induced by orally administering high-fat milk via gavage every evening (19:00-20:00) for 6 weeks. Results showed that timed high-fat diet in the evening not only decreased the hepatic AMPK protein expression and activity but also disturbed its circadian rhythm. Accordingly, the hepatic clock genes, including clock, brain-muscle-Arnt-like 1, cryptochrome 2, and period 2, exhibited prominent changes in their expression rhythms and/or amplitudes. The diurnal rhythms of the messenger RNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1α, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 were also disrupted; the amplitude of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorγcoactivator 1α was significantly decreased at 3 time points, and fatty liver was observed. These findings demonstrate that timed high-fat diet at night can change hepatic AMPK protein levels, activity, and circadian rhythm, which may subsequently alter the circadian expression of several hepatic clock genes and finally result in the disorder of hepatic lipogenic gene expression and the formation of fatty liver.

  17. A high isoflavone diet decreases 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation and does not correct selenium-induced elevations in fasting blood glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Michael T; Cardon, Brandon R; Hardman, Jeremy M; Bliss, Tyler A; Brunson, Scott E; Hart, Chris M; Swiss, Maria D; Hepworth, Squire D; Christensen, Merrill J; Hancock, Chad R

    2014-04-01

    Selenium (Se) has been implicated as a micronutrient that decreases adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and may increase diabetes risk by reducing insulin sensitivity. Soy isoflavones (IF) are estrogen-like compounds that have been shown to attenuate insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, adiposity, and increased AMPK activation. We hypothesized that a high IF (HIF) diet would prevent the poor metabolic profile associated with high Se intake. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in basal glucose metabolism and AMPK signaling in response to an HIF diet and/or supplemental Se in a mouse model. Male FVB mice were divided into groups receiving either a control diet with minimal IF (low IF) or an HIF diet. Each dietary group was further subdivided into groups receiving either water or Se at a dose of 3 mg Se/kg body weight daily, as Se-methylselenocysteine (SMSC). After 5 months, mice receiving SMSC had elevated fasting glucose (P < .05) and a tendency for glucose intolerance (P = .08). The increase in dietary IF did not result in improved fasting blood glucose. Interestingly, after 6 months, HIF-fed mice had decreased basal AMPK activation in liver and skeletal muscle tissue (P < .05). Basal glucose metabolism was changed by SMSC supplementation as evidenced by increased fasting blood glucose and glucose intolerance. High dietary IF levels did not protect against aberrant blood glucose. In FVB mice, decreased basal AMPK activation is not the mechanism through which Se exerts its effect. These results suggest that more research must be done to elucidate the role of Se and IF in glucose metabolism.

  18. Purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, G C; Schmalstieg, F C; Trimmer, K B; Goldman, A S; Goldblum, R M

    1976-01-01

    Purine and pyrimidine metabolites were measured in erythrocytes, plasma, and urine of a 5-month-old infant with adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) deficiency. Adenosine and adenine were measured using newly devised ion exchange separation techniques and a sensitive fluorescence assay. Plasma adenosine levels were increased, whereas adenosine was normal in erythrocytes and not detectable in urine. Increased amounts of adenine were found in erythrocytes and urine as well as in the plasma. Erythrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate concentrations were normal, but adenosine triphosphate content was greatly elevated. Because of the possibility of pyrimidine starvation, pyrimidine nucleotides (pyrimidine coenzymes) in erythrocytes and orotic acid in urine were measured. Pyrimidine nucleotide concentrations were normal, while orotic acid was not detected. These studies suggest that the immune deficiency associated with adenosine deaminase deficiency may be related to increased amounts of adenine, adenosine, or adenine nucleotides. PMID:1066699

  19. Role of adenosine deaminase, ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) and ecto-(non-specific phosphatase) in cyanide-induced adenosine monophosphate catabolism in rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Newby, A C

    1980-01-01

    1. The role of adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4), ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) (EC 3.1.3.5) and ecto-(non-specific phosphatase) in the CN-induced catabolism of adenine nucleotides in intact rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes was investigated by inhibiting the enzymes in situ. 2. KCN (10mM for 90 min) induced a 20-30% fall in ATP concentration accompanied by an approximately equimolar increase in hypoxanthine, ADP, AMP and adenosine concentrations were unchanged, and IMP and inosine remained undetectable ( less than 0.05 nmol/10(7) cells). 3. Cells remained 98% intact, as judged by loss of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27). 4. Pentostatin (30 microM), a specific inhibitor of adenosine deaminase, completely inhibited hypoxanthine production from exogenous adenosine (55 microM), but did not black CN-induced hypoxanthine production or cause adenosine accumulation in intact cells. This implied that IMP rather than adenosine was an intermediate in AMP breakdown in response to cyanide. 5. Antibodies raised against purified plasma-membrane 5'-nucleotidase inhibited the ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) by 95-98%. Non-specific phosphatases were blocked by 10 mM-sodium beta-glycerophosphate. 6. These two agents together blocked hypoxanthine production from exogenous AMP and IMP (200 microM) by more than 90%, but had no effect on production from endogenous substrates. 7. These data suggest that ectophosphatases do not participate in CN-induced catabolism of intracellular AMP in rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes. 8. A minor IMPase, not inhibited by antiserum, was detected in the soluble fraction of disrupted cells. PMID:6249264

  20. Application of graphene-ionic liquid-chitosan composite-modified carbon molecular wire electrode for the sensitive determination of adenosine-5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fan; Gong, Shixing; Xu, Li; Zhu, Huanhuan; Sun, Zhenfan; Sun, Wei

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a graphene (GR) ionic liquid (IL) 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and chitosan composite-modified carbon molecular wire electrode (CMWE) was fabricated by a drop-casting method and further applied to the sensitive electrochemical detection of adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP). CMWE was prepared with diphenylacetylene (DPA) as the modifier and the binder. The properties of modified electrode were examined by scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Electrochemical behaviors of AMP was carefully investigated with enhanced responses appeared, which was due to the presence of GR-IL composite on the electrode surface with excellent electrocatalytic ability. A well-defined oxidation peak of AMP appeared at 1.314 V and the electrochemical parameters were calculated by electrochemical methods. Under the selected conditions, the oxidation peak current of AMP was proportional to its concentration in the range from 0.01 μM to 80.0 μM with the detection limit as 3.42 nM (3σ) by differential pulse voltammetry. The proposed method exhibited good selectivity and was applied to the detection of vidarabine monophosphate injection samples with satisfactory results.

  1. Dietary effects of adenosine monophosphate to enhance growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Sakhawat; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; Yokoyama, Saichiro; Sony, Nadia Mahjabin

    2016-09-01

    Our study explored the dietary effects of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to enhance growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream. A semi-purified basal diet supplemented with 0% (Control), 0.1% (AMP-0.1), 0.2% (AMP-0.2), 0.4% (AMP-0.4) and 0.8% (AMP-0.8) purified AMP to formulate five experimental diets. Each diet was randomly allocated to triplicate groups of fish (mean initial weight 3.4 g) for 56 days. The results indicated that dietary AMP supplements tended to improve growth performances. One of the best ones was found in diet group AMP-0.2, followed by diet groups AMP-0.1, AMP-0.4 and AMP-0.8. The Apparent digestibility coefficients (dry matter, protein and lipid) also improved by AMP supplementation and the significantly highest dry matter digestibility was observed in diet group AMP-0.2. Fish fed diet groups AMP-0.2 and AMP-0.4 had significantly higher peroxidase and bactericidal activities than fish fed the control diet. Nitro-blue-tetrazolium (NBT) activity was found to be significantly (P < 0.05) greater in fish fed diet groups AMP-0.4 and AMP-0.8. Total serum protein, lysozyme activity and agglutination antibody titer were also increased (P > 0.05) by dietary supplementation. In contrast, catalase activity decreased with AMP supplementation. Moreover, the fish fed AMP supplemented diets had better improvement (P < 0.05) in body lipid contents, condition factor, hematocrit content and glutamyl oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) level than the control group. Supplementation also improved both freshwater and oxidative stress resistances. Interestingly, the fish fed diet groups AMP-0.2 and AMP-0.4 showed the least oxidative stress condition. Finally it is concluded that, dietary AMP supplementation enhanced the growth, digestibility, immune response and stress resistance of red sea bream. The regression analysis revealed that a dietary AMP supplementation between 0.2 and 0.4% supported weight gain and

  2. The antilipolytic agent 3,5-dimethylpyrazole inhibits insulin release in response to both nutrient secretagogues and cyclic adenosine monophosphate agonists in isolated rat islets.

    PubMed

    Masiello, P; Novelli, M; Bombara, M; Fierabracci, V; Vittorini, S; Prentki, M; Bergamini, E

    2002-01-01

    This study intended to test the hypothesis that intracellular lipolysis in the pancreatic beta cells is implicated in the regulation of insulin secretion stimulated by nutrient secretagogues or cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) agonists. Indeed, although lipid signaling molecules were repeatedly reported to influence beta-cell function, the contribution of intracellular triglycerides to the generation of these molecules has remained elusive. Thus, we have studied insulin secretion of isolated rat pancreatic islets in response to various secretagogues in the presence or absence of 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (DMP), a water-soluble and highly effective antilipolytic agent, as previously shown in vivo. In vitro exposure of islets to DMP resulted in an inhibition (by approximately 50%) of the insulin release stimulated not only by high glucose, but also by another nutrient secretagogue, 2-ketoisocaproate, as well as the cAMP agonists 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and glucagon. The inhibitory effect of DMP, which was not due to alteration of islet glucose oxidation, could be reversed upon addition of sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol, a synthetic diglyceride, which activates protein kinase C. The results provide direct pharmacologic evidence supporting the concept that endogenous beta-cell lipolysis plays an important role in the generation of lipid signaling molecules involved in the control of insulin secretion in response to both fuel stimuli and cAMP agonists.

  3. Effects of Catecholamines and their Interaction with Other Hormones on Cyclic 3′,5′-Adenosine Monophosphate of the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Nama P.; Reed, Sarah W.; Murdaugh, H. V.; Davis, Bernard B.

    1972-01-01

    Catecholamines have several physiological effects on the kidney. These include: (a) stimulation of renin synthesis in the cortex: (b) antidiuresis by beta adrenergic agents; and (c) diuresis by alpha adrenergic stimulation. The role of cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) in the renal actions of catecholamines was evaluated by measuring the effects of several adrenergic agents on cyclic AMP concentration in the dog kidney. Beta adrenergic activity increased cyclic AMP concentration in the renal cortex, a finding consistent with the hypothesis that beta-adrenergic stimulation augments renin synthesis by increasing cyclic AMP generation. Beta adrenergic stimulation, like vasopressin, increased cyclic AMP concentration in the renal medulla. This suggests that beta adrenergic stimulation causes antidiuresis by augmenting cyclic AMP generation in the renal medulla. Alpha adrenergic activity inhibited the effect of vasopressin to stimulate cyclic AMP generation. These results support the hypothesis that the diuretic effect of alpha adrenergic stimulation is mediated by inhibition of the effect of vasopressin to increase cyclic AMP generation. PMID:4335447

  4. Compartmentalized Cyclic Adenosine 3′,5′-Monophosphate at the Plasma Membrane Clusters PDE3A and Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator into Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Penmatsa, Himabindu; Zhang, Weiqiang; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Li, Chunying; Conoley, Veronica G.; Yue, Junming; Bahouth, Suleiman W.; Buddington, Randal K.; Zhang, Guangping; Nelson, Deborah J.; Sonecha, Monal D.; Manganiello, Vincent; Wine, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Formation of multiple-protein macromolecular complexes at specialized subcellular microdomains increases the specificity and efficiency of signaling in cells. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphodiesterase type 3A (PDE3A) physically and functionally interacts with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel. PDE3A inhibition generates compartmentalized cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), which further clusters PDE3A and CFTR into microdomains at the plasma membrane and potentiates CFTR channel function. Actin skeleton disruption reduces PDE3A–CFTR interaction and segregates PDE3A from its interacting partners, thus compromising the integrity of the CFTR-PDE3A–containing macromolecular complex. Consequently, compartmentalized cAMP signaling is lost. PDE3A inhibition no longer activates CFTR channel function in a compartmentalized manner. The physiological relevance of PDE3A–CFTR interaction was investigated using pig trachea submucosal gland secretion model. Our data show that PDE3A inhibition augments CFTR-dependent submucosal gland secretion and actin skeleton disruption decreases secretion. PMID:20089840

  5. Release of the β-Galactosidase-Synthesizing System from Ultraviolet Catabolite Repression by Cyclic 3′,5′-Adenosine Monophosphate, Dark Repair, Photoreactivation, and Cold Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    Recovery from the inhibitory effect of ultraviolet irradiation on the induced synthesis of β-galactosidase was studied in Escherichia coli B/r. When irradiated cells (520 ergs/mm2 at 254 nm) were induced and incubated in minimal medium supplemented with Casamino Acids (conditions of catabolite repression), the ability to form enzyme was greatly reduced for about 100 min and then recovery began. The inhibition observed immediately after ultraviolet irradiation was partially reversed by cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) or by photoreactivation treatment. Inhibition was reduced if the cells were given cold treatment (5 C) before or during irradiation; the kinetics of induced enzyme formation in each case were similar to those of irradiated cells receiving cyclic AMP. These kinetics suggest that the cold treatments, like cyclic AMP, cause the release of the β-galactosidase-synthesizing system from catabolite repression. When irradiated cells were incubated for various times before cyclic AMP or photoreactivation treatment, some reversal of the inhibition of induced enzyme formation was obtained, but by 100 min the treatments were ineffective. Because 100 min was also the time at which dark recovery of enzyme formation began, the recovery process was interpreted to be the result of completion of DNA repair, which, in turn, released the β-galactosidase-synthesizing system from catabolite repression. PMID:4333380

  6. 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside-mediated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation induces protective innate responses in bacterial endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Giri, Shailendra; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-12-01

    The retina is considered to be the most metabolically active tissue in the body. However, the link between energy metabolism and retinal inflammation, as incited by microbial infection such as endophthalmitis, remains unexplored. In this study, using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) endophthalmitis, we demonstrate that the activity (phosphorylation) of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase alpha (AMPKα), a cellular energy sensor and its endogenous substrate; acetyl-CoA carboxylase is down-regulated in the SA-infected retina. Intravitreal administration of an AMPK activator, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR), restored AMPKα and acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation. AICAR treatment reduced both the bacterial burden and intraocular inflammation in SA-infected eyes by inhibiting NF-kB and MAP kinases (p38 and JNK) signalling. The anti-inflammatory effects of AICAR were diminished in eyes pretreated with AMPK inhibitor, Compound C. The bioenergetics (Seahorse) analysis of SA-infected microglia and bone marrow-derived macrophages revealed an increase in glycolysis, which was reinstated by AICAR treatment. AICAR also reduced the expression of SA-induced glycolytic genes, including hexokinase 2 and glucose transporter 1 in microglia, bone marrow-derived macrophages and the mouse retina. Interestingly, AICAR treatment enhanced the bacterial phagocytic and intracellular killing activities of cultured microglia, macrophages and neutrophils. Furthermore, AMPKα1 global knockout mice exhibited increased susceptibility towards SA endophthalmitis, as evidenced by increased inflammatory mediators and bacterial burden and reduced retinal function. Together, these findings provide the first evidence that AMPK activation promotes retinal innate defence in endophthalmitis by modulating energy metabolism and that it can be targeted therapeutically to treat ocular infections.

  7. Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Abates Hyperglycaemia-Induced Neuronal Injury in Experimental Models of Diabetic Neuropathy: Effects on Mitochondrial Biogenesis, Autophagy and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Yerra, Veera Ganesh; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2017-04-01

    Impaired adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK) signalling under hyperglycaemic conditions is known to cause mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic sensory neurons. Facilitation of AMPK signalling is previously reported to ameliorate inflammation and induce autophagic response in various complications related to diabetes. The present study assesses the role of AMPK activation on mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy and neuroinflammation in experimental diabetic neuropathy (DN) using an AMPK activator (A769662). A769662 (15 and 30 mg/kg, i.p) was administered to Sprague-Dawley rats (250-270 g) for 2 weeks after 6 weeks of streptozotocin (STZ) injection (55 mg/kg, i.p.). Behavioural parameters (mechanical/thermal hyperalgesia) and functional characteristics (motor/sensory nerve conduction velocities (MNCV and SNCV) and sciatic nerve blood flow (NBF)) were assessed. For in vitro studies, Neuro2a (N2A) cells were incubated with 25 mM glucose to simulate high glucose condition and then studied for mitochondrial dysfunction and protein expression changes. STZ administration resulted in significant hyperglycaemia (>250 mg/dl) in rats. A769662 treatment significantly improved mechanical/thermal hyperalgesia threshold and enhanced MNCV, SNCV and NBF in diabetic animals. A769662 exposure normalised the mitochondrial superoxide production, membrane depolarisation and markedly increased neurite outgrowth of N2A cells. Further, AMPK activation also abolished the NF-κB-mediated neuroinflammation. A769662 treatment increased Thr-172 phosphorylation of AMPK results in stimulated PGC-1α-directed mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy induction. Our study supports that compromised AMPK signalling in hyperglycaemic conditions causes defective mitochondrial biogenesis ultimately leading to neuronal dysfunction and associated deficits in DN and activation of AMPK can be developed as an attractive therapeutic strategy for the management of DN.

  8. Association study of three single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding 1 gene and major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yange; Bu, Shufang; Liu, Xican; Li, Hengfen

    2015-06-01

    Major depressive disorder is a common chronic emotional disorder, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein 1 (CREB1) is hypothesized to play a role in its pathogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the associations between major depressive disorder and relevant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CREB1 gene. A total of 1,038 subjects of Han Chinese descent were recruited, including 456 patients with major depressive disorder (case group) and 582 healthy volunteers (control group). The frequency distributions of the genotypes and alleles were estimated in the case and control groups, and analyzed for any correlation with major depressive disorder. Three relevant SNP sites in CREB1 were analyzed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and statistical analyses were performed to estimate their use as risk factors for major depressive disorder. The analyses revealed that rs2254137 and rs16839883 in CREB1 showed polymorphisms in the sample population, and the genotype and allele frequencies of rs16839883 differed significantly when comparing the patients and healthy controls (P<0.05). No statistically significant differences were detected in the two SNP sites between the male and female patients (P>0.05). Furthermore, no statistically significant differences were detected in rs2254137 genotype and allele distribution when comparing the male and female patients with their corresponding control groups (P>0.05). However, statistically significant differences were observed in the genotype and allele frequencies of rs16839883 when the male and female patients were compared with their respective controls (P<0.05). Therefore, the results demonstrated that there is a close correlation between the rs16839883 polymorphism in CREB1 and major depressive disorder, which suggests that this SNP site should be further studied as a potential biomarker for major depressive disorder.

  9. Probing the Interaction between a DNA Nucleotide (Adenosine-5'-Monophosphate Disodium) and Surface Active Ionic Liquids by Rotational Relaxation Measurement and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arpita; Banerjee, Pavel; Dutta, Rupam; Kundu, Sangita; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2016-10-02

    This article demonstrates the interaction of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nucleotide, adenosine-5'-monophosphate disodium (AMP) with a cationic surface active ionic liquid (SAIL) 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazoium chloride (C12mimCl) and an anionic SAIL, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium n-octylsulfate ([C4mim][C8SO4]). Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements and 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) studies indicate that substantial interaction is taking place among the DNA nucleotide, AMP and the SAILs. Moreover, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) suggests that SAILs containing micellar assemblies are transformed into larger micellar assemblies in presence of DNA nucleotide. Additionally, the rotational motion of two oppositely charged molecules, Rhodamine 6G perchlorate (R6G) and Fluorescein sodium salt (Fl-Na) have been monitored in these aggregates. The rotational motion of R6G and Fl-Na differs significantly between SAILs micelles, and SAILs-AMP containing larger micellar aggregates. The effect of negatively charged DNA nucleotide (AMP) addition into the cationic and anionic SAILs is more prominent for the cationic charged molecule R6G than that of anionic probe Fl-Na due to the favourable electrostatic interaction between the AMP and cationic R6G. Moreover, the influence of the anionic DNA nucleotide on the cationic and anionic SAIL micelles is monitored through the variation of the lateral diffusion motion of oppositely charged probe molecules (R6G and Fl-Na) inside these aggregates. This variation in diffusion coefficient values also suggests that interaction pattern of these oppositely charged probes are different within the SAILs-nucleotide containing aggregates. Therefore, both rotational and translational diffusion measurements confirm that the DNA nucleotide (AMP) renders more rigid microenvironment within the micellar solution of SAILs.

  10. Why do premature newborn infants display elevated blood adenosine levels?

    PubMed

    Panfoli, Isabella; Cassanello, Michela; Bruschettini, Matteo; Colella, Marina; Cerone, Roberto; Ravera, Silvia; Calzia, Daniela; Candiano, Giovanni; Ramenghi, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Our preliminary data show high levels of adenosine in the blood of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, positively correlating to their prematurity (i.e. body weight class). This prompted us to look for a mechanism promoting such impressive adenosine increase. We hypothesized a correlation with oxygen challenge. In fact, it is recognized that either oxygen lack or its excess contribute to the pathogenesis of the injuries of prematurity, such as retinopathy (ROP) and periventricular white matter lesions (PWMI). The optimal concentration of oxygen for resuscitation of VLBW infants is currently under revision. We propose that the elevated adenosine blood concentrations of VLBW infants recognizes two sources. The first could be its activity-dependent release from unmyelinated brain axons. Adenosine in this respect would be an end-product of the hypometabolic VLBW newborn unmyelinated axon intensely firing in response to the environmental stimuli consequent to premature birth. Adenosine would be eventually found in the blood due to blood-brain barrier immaturity. In fact, adenosine is the primary activity-dependent signal promoting differentiation of premyelinating oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) into myelinating cells in the Central Nervous System, while inhibiting their proliferation and inhibiting synaptic function. The second, would be the ecto-cellular ATP synthesized by the endothelial cell plasmalemma exposed to ambient oxygen concentrations due to premature breathing, especially in lung. ATP would be rapidly transformed into adenosine by the ectonucleotidase activities such as NTPDase I (CD39), and NT5E (CD73). An ectopic extra-mitochondrial aerobic ATP synthetic ability was reported in many cell plasma-membranes, among which endothelial cells. The potential implications of the cited hypotheses for the neonatology area would be great. The amount of oxygen administration for reviving of newborns would find a molecular basis for its assessment. VLBW

  11. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate involvement in hepatic triacylglyceride lipase release from prazosin-stimulated primary cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tetsuya; Morita, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    We recently found that hepatic triglyceride lipase (HTGL) was released from primary cultured rat hepatocytes after treatment with prazosin, an antagonist of alpha-1 adrenoceptors. However, the details of prazosin-induced HTGL release remain uncertain. Here we investigated whether changes in cAMP levels in hepatocytes were related to HTGL release from prazosin-stimulated hepatocytes. When hepatocytes were treated with prazosin, cAMP levels during stimulated release of HTGL increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Stimulated release of HTGL was suppressed by the adenylate cyclase inhibitors MDL-12,330A and 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine. Further, cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) activity in prazosin-stimulated hepatocytes also increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, prazosin-stimulated HTGL release was suppressed by the PKA inhibitors H-89 and KT5720. These results suggest that prazosin-stimulated HTGL release from hepatocytes was due to cAMP production and partly due to subsequent PKA activation in hepatocytes.

  12. New Insights into the Cyclic Di-adenosine Monophosphate (c-di-AMP) Degradation Pathway and the Requirement of the Cyclic Dinucleotide for Acid Stress Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus*

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Lisa; Zeden, Merve S.; Kaever, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide signaling networks are key to facilitate alterations in gene expression, protein function, and enzyme activity in response to diverse stimuli. Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is an important secondary messenger molecule produced by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and is involved in regulating a number of physiological processes including potassium transport. S. aureus must ensure tight control over its cellular levels as both high levels of the dinucleotide and its absence result in a number of detrimental phenotypes. Here we show that in addition to the membrane-bound Asp-His-His and Asp-His-His-associated (DHH/DHHA1) domain-containing phosphodiesterase (PDE) GdpP, S. aureus produces a second cytoplasmic DHH/DHHA1 PDE Pde2. Although capable of hydrolyzing c-di-AMP, Pde2 preferentially converts linear 5′-phosphadenylyl-adenosine (pApA) to AMP. Using a pde2 mutant strain, pApA was detected for the first time in S. aureus, leading us to speculate that this dinucleotide may have a regulatory role under certain conditions. Moreover, pApA is involved in a feedback inhibition loop that limits GdpP-dependent c-di-AMP hydrolysis. Another protein linked to the regulation of c-di-AMP levels in bacteria is the predicted regulator protein YbbR. Here, it is shown that a ybbR mutant S. aureus strain has increased acid sensitivity that can be bypassed by the acquisition of mutations in a number of genes, including the gene coding for the diadenylate cyclase DacA. We further show that c-di-AMP levels are slightly elevated in the ybbR suppressor strains tested as compared with the wild-type strain. With this, we not only identified a new role for YbbR in acid stress resistance in S. aureus but also provide further insight into how c-di-AMP levels impact acid tolerance in this organism. PMID:27834680

  13. New Insights into the Cyclic Di-adenosine Monophosphate (c-di-AMP) Degradation Pathway and the Requirement of the Cyclic Dinucleotide for Acid Stress Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Lisa; Zeden, Merve S; Schuster, Christopher F; Kaever, Volkhard; Gründling, Angelika

    2016-12-30

    Nucleotide signaling networks are key to facilitate alterations in gene expression, protein function, and enzyme activity in response to diverse stimuli. Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is an important secondary messenger molecule produced by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and is involved in regulating a number of physiological processes including potassium transport. S. aureus must ensure tight control over its cellular levels as both high levels of the dinucleotide and its absence result in a number of detrimental phenotypes. Here we show that in addition to the membrane-bound Asp-His-His and Asp-His-His-associated (DHH/DHHA1) domain-containing phosphodiesterase (PDE) GdpP, S. aureus produces a second cytoplasmic DHH/DHHA1 PDE Pde2. Although capable of hydrolyzing c-di-AMP, Pde2 preferentially converts linear 5'-phosphadenylyl-adenosine (pApA) to AMP. Using a pde2 mutant strain, pApA was detected for the first time in S. aureus, leading us to speculate that this dinucleotide may have a regulatory role under certain conditions. Moreover, pApA is involved in a feedback inhibition loop that limits GdpP-dependent c-di-AMP hydrolysis. Another protein linked to the regulation of c-di-AMP levels in bacteria is the predicted regulator protein YbbR. Here, it is shown that a ybbR mutant S. aureus strain has increased acid sensitivity that can be bypassed by the acquisition of mutations in a number of genes, including the gene coding for the diadenylate cyclase DacA. We further show that c-di-AMP levels are slightly elevated in the ybbR suppressor strains tested as compared with the wild-type strain. With this, we not only identified a new role for YbbR in acid stress resistance in S. aureus but also provide further insight into how c-di-AMP levels impact acid tolerance in this organism.

  14. Herkinorin dilates cerebral vessels via kappa opioid receptor and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in a piglet model.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fang; Wang, Zhenhong; Ma, Nan; Riley, John; Armstead, William M; Liu, Renyu

    2013-01-15

    Since herkinorin is the first non-opioid mu agonist derived from salvinorin A that has the ability to induce cerebral vascular dilatation, we hypothesized that herkinorin could have similar vascular dilatation effect via the mu and kappa opioid receptors and the cAMP pathway. The binding affinities of herkinorin to kappa and mu opioid receptors were determined by in-vitro competition binding assays. The cerebral arteries were monitored in piglets equipped with a closed cranial window and the artery responses were recorded before and every 30s after injection of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the presence or absence of the investigated drugs: herkinorion, norbinaltorphimine (NTP), a kappa opioid receptor antagonist, β-funaltrexamine (β-FNA), a mu opioid receptor antagonist, or Rp-8-Br-cAMPS (Rp-cAMPS), an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA). CSF samples were collected before and 10 min after herkinorin and NTP administration for the measurement of cAMP levels. Data were analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Our results show that herkinorin binds to both kappa and mu opioid receptors. Its vasodilation effect is totally abolished by NTP, but is not affected by β-FNA. The levels of cAMP in the CSF elevate after herkinorin administration, but are abolished with NTP administration. The cerebral vasodilative effect of herkinorin is also blunted by Rp-cAMPS. In conclusion, as a non-opioid kappa and mu opioid receptor agonist, herkinorin exhibits cerebral vascular dilatation effect. The dilatation is mediated though the kappa opioid receptor rather than the mu opioid receptor. cAMP signaling also plays an important role in this process.

  15. Targeting myeloid-derived suppressor cells using a novel adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator.

    PubMed

    Trikha, Prashant; Plews, Robert L; Stiff, Andrew; Gautam, Shalini; Hsu, Vincent; Abood, David; Wesolowski, Robert; Landi, Ian; Mo, Xiaokui; Phay, John; Chen, Ching-Shih; Byrd, John; Caligiuri, Michael; Tridandapani, Susheela; Carson, William

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of early myeloid cells that accumulate in the blood and tumors of patients with cancer. MDSC play a critical role during tumor evasion and promote immune suppression through variety of mechanisms, such as the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) and cytokines. AMPactivated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase that regulates energy homeostasis and metabolic stress. However, the role of AMPK in the regulation of MDSC function remains largely unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether treatment of MDSC with OSU-53, a PPAR-inactive derivative that stimulates AMPK kinase, can modulate MDSC function. Our results demonstrate that OSU-53 treatment increases the phosphorylation of AMPK, significantly reduces nitric oxide production, inhibits MDSC migration, and reduces the levels of IL-6 in murine MDSC cell line (MSC2 cells). OSU53 treatment mitigated the immune suppressive functions of murine MDSC, promoting T-cell proliferation. Although OSU-53 had a modest effect on tumor growth in mice inoculated with EMT-6 cells, importantly, administration of OSU53 significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the levels of MDSC in the spleens and tumors. Furthermore, mouse MDSC from EMT-6 tumor-bearing mice and human MDSC isolated from melanoma patients treated with OSU-53 showed a significant reduction in the expression of immune suppressive genes iNOS and arginase. In summary, these results demonstrate a novel role of AMPK in the regulation of MDSC functions and provide a rationale of combining OSU-53 with immune checkpoint inhibitors to augment their response in cancer patients.

  16. Rapid transcriptional down-regulation of c-myc expression during cyclic adenosine monophosphate-promoted differentiation of leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, A; Confer, D L; Schubach, W H

    1987-05-01

    Pharmacologic elevation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) promotes growth arrest and differentiation in a variety of transformed mammalian cells, including the HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cell line. However, mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. Because cellular oncogenes play a pivotal role in regulating proliferation and differentiation, we examined whether cAMP-promoted differentiation of HL-60 was preceded by a decrease in the expression of c-myc, a cellular oncogene both amplified and constitutively expressed in HL-60. We find that cyclic AMP elevation in HL-60 caused by three different pharmacologic regimens is followed by an abrupt, greater than 90% decrease in steady state c-myc mRNA levels within 3 h, well before detectable changes in proliferation and differentiation. This decrease, which occurs despite protein synthetic blockade, is attributable to transcriptional down-regulation of c-myc and is accompanied by changes in chromatin structure near c-myc promoter sites. Our findings establish that cAMP, a ubiquitous intracellular regulatory messenger previously known only to enhance gene transcriptional activity in higher eukaryotic cells, can also suppress transcription of a cellular oncogene, thereby suggesting a potential mechanism for cAMP-promoted differentiation.

  17. Rapid transcriptional down-regulation of c-myc expression during cyclic adenosine monophosphate-promoted differentiation of leukemic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Slungaard, A; Confer, D L; Schubach, W H

    1987-01-01

    Pharmacologic elevation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) promotes growth arrest and differentiation in a variety of transformed mammalian cells, including the HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cell line. However, mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. Because cellular oncogenes play a pivotal role in regulating proliferation and differentiation, we examined whether cAMP-promoted differentiation of HL-60 was preceded by a decrease in the expression of c-myc, a cellular oncogene both amplified and constitutively expressed in HL-60. We find that cyclic AMP elevation in HL-60 caused by three different pharmacologic regimens is followed by an abrupt, greater than 90% decrease in steady state c-myc mRNA levels within 3 h, well before detectable changes in proliferation and differentiation. This decrease, which occurs despite protein synthetic blockade, is attributable to transcriptional down-regulation of c-myc and is accompanied by changes in chromatin structure near c-myc promoter sites. Our findings establish that cAMP, a ubiquitous intracellular regulatory messenger previously known only to enhance gene transcriptional activity in higher eukaryotic cells, can also suppress transcription of a cellular oncogene, thereby suggesting a potential mechanism for cAMP-promoted differentiation. Images PMID:2437157

  18. Estradiol reduces nonclassical transcription at cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate response elements in glioma cells expressing estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Mhyre, Andrew J; Shapiro, Robert A; Dorsa, Daniel M

    2006-04-01

    Estradiol can protect the brain from a variety of insults by activating membrane-initiated signaling pathways, and thereby modulate gene expression and lead to functional changes in neurons. These direct neuronal effects of the hormone have been well documented; however, it is less understood what effects estradiol may have on nonneuronal cells of the central nervous system. There is evidence that estradiol levels can induce the release of glial-derived growth factors and other cytokines, suggesting that estradiol may both directly and indirectly protect neurons. To determine whether 17beta-estradiol (E2) can activate rapid signaling and modulate nonclassical transcription in astrocytes, we stably transfected the C6 rat glioblastoma cell line with human estrogen receptor (ER) alpha (C6ERalpha) or rat ERbeta (C6ERbeta). Introduction of a cAMP response element-luciferase reporter gene into C6, C6ERalpha, and C6ERbeta cells leads to the observation that E2 treatment reduced isoproterenol-stimulated luciferase activity by 35% in C6ERalpha but had no effect on reporter gene expression in C6ERbeta or untransfected C6 cells. A similar effect was seen with a membrane-impermeable estrogen (E2-BSA), suggesting the modulation of nonclassical transcription by estradiol treatment is mediated by the activation of a membrane-initiated signaling pathway. Furthermore, pretreatment with wortmannin (phosphatidylinsositol 3-kinase) or U73122 (phospholipase C) attenuated the E2-induced reduction in nonclassical transcription. We conclude that E2 treatment reduces cAMP response element-mediated transcription in glioma cells expressing ERalpha and that this reduction is dependent on the activation of membrane-initiated signaling. These findings suggest a novel model of estrogen rapid signaling in astrocytes that leads to modulation of nonclassical transcription.

  19. Effect of bucladesine, Pentoxifylline, and H-89 as cyclic adenosine monophosphate analog, phosphodiesterase and protein kinase A inhibitor on acute pain.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Forouz; Hosseini-Zare, Mahshid Sadat; Aghajani, Haleh; Seyedi, Yalda; Hosseini-Zare, Maryam Sadat; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2017-03-07

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and its dependent pathway on thermal nociception in a mouse model of acute pain. Here we studied the effect of H-89 (protein kinase A inhibitor), Bucladesine (Db-cAMP) (membrane permeable analog of cAMP) and pentoxifylline (PTX) (non-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor) on pain sensation. Different doses of H-89 (0.05, 0.1 and 0.5 mg/100g), PTX (5, 10 and 20 mg/100g), and Db-cAMP (50, 100 and 300 nM/mouse) were administered intraperitoneally (I.p.) 15 minutes before a tail-flick test. In combination groups, we injected the first and the second compound 30 and 15 minutes before the tail-flick test, respectively. I.p. administration of H-89 and PTX significantly decreased the thermal-induced pain sensation in their low applied doses. Bucladesine, however, decreased the pain sensation in a dose-dependent manner. The highest applied dose of H-89 (0.5 mg/100g) attenuated the anti-nociceptive effect of Db-cAMP in doses of 50 and 100 nM/mouse. Surprisingly, Db-cAMP decreased the anti-nociceptive effect of the lowest dose of H-89 (0.05mg/100g). All applied doses of PTX reduced the effect of 0.05mg/100g H-89 on pain sensation; however, the highest dose of H-89 compromised the anti-nociceptive effect of 20 mg/100g dose of PTX. Co-administration of Db-cAMP and PTX increased the anti-nociceptive effect of each compound on thermal-induced pain. In conclusion, PTX, H-89, and Db-cAMP affect the thermal-induced pain by probably interacting with intracellular cAMP and cGMP signaling pathways and cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Early glycogen synthase kinase-3β and protein phosphatase 2A independent tau dephosphorylation during global brain ischaemia and reperfusion following cardiac arrest and the role of the adenosine monophosphate kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Majd, Shohreh; Power, John H T; Koblar, Simon A; Grantham, Hugh J M

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal tau phosphorylation (p-tau) has been shown after hypoxic damage to the brain associated with traumatic brain injury and stroke. As the level of p-tau is controlled by Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK)-3β, Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and Adenosine Monophosphate Kinase (AMPK), different activity levels of these enzymes could be involved in tau phosphorylation following ischaemia. This study assessed the effects of global brain ischaemia/reperfusion on the immediate status of p-tau in a rat model of cardiac arrest (CA) followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We reported an early dephosphorylation of tau at its AMPK sensitive residues, Ser(396) and Ser(262) after 2 min of ischaemia, which did not recover during the first two hours of reperfusion, while the tau phosphorylation at GSK-3β sensitive but AMPK insensitive residues, Ser(202) /Thr(205) (AT8), as well as the total amount of tau remained unchanged. Our data showed no alteration in the activities of GSK-3β and PP2A during similar episodes of ischaemia of up to 8 min and reperfusion of up to 2 h, and 4 weeks recovery. Dephosphorylation of AMPK followed the same pattern as tau dephosphorylation during ischaemia/reperfusion. Catalase, another AMPK downstream substrate also showed a similar pattern of decline to p-AMPK, in ischaemic/reperfusion groups. This suggests the involvement of AMPK in changing the p-tau levels, indicating that tau dephosphorylation following ischaemia is not dependent on GSK-3β or PP2A activity, but is associated with AMPK dephosphorylation. We propose that a reduction in AMPK activity is a possible early mechanism responsible for tau dephosphorylation.

  1. Berberine treatment prevents cardiac dysfunction and remodeling through activation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in type 2 diabetic rats and in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenguang; Zhang, Ming; Meng, Zhaojie; Yu, Yang; Yao, Fan; Hatch, Grant M; Chen, Li

    2015-12-15

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is the major cause of death in type 2 diabetic patients. Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid extract from traditional chinese herbs and its hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects make it a promising drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes. We examined if berberine improved cardiac function and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in high fat diet and streptozotocin induced-type 2 diabetic rats in vivo and reduced expression of hypertrophy markers in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells in vitro. Treatment of diabetic animals with berberine partially improved cardiac function and restored fasting blood insulin, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels to that of control. In addition, berberine treatment of diabetic animals increased cardiac 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (AKT) activation and reduced glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) activation compared to control. Palmitate incubation of H9c2 cells resulted in cellular hypertrophy and decreased expression of alpha-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) and increased expression of beta-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) compared to controls. Berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells reduced hypertrophy, increased α-MHC expression and decreased β-MHC expression. In addition, berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells increased AMPK and AKT activation and reduced GSK3β activation. The presence of the AMPK inhibitor Compound C attenuated the effects of berberine. The results strongly indicate that berberine treatment may be protective against the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  2. Comparison of three inhaled non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the airway response to sodium metabisulphite and adenosine 5'-monophosphate challenge in asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M.; Wisniewski, A.; Pavord, I.; Knox, A.; Tattersfield, A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to assess the role of prostaglandins in asthma but their effects on bronchoconstrictor challenges have been inconsistent. The effects of three nebulised nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the airway response to inhaled sodium metabisulphite (MBS) and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) were compared in the same asthmatic subjects to see whether contractile prostaglandins were involved in MBS or AMP induced bronchoconstriction. A possible protective effect of the osmolarity or pH of the inhaled solutions was also assessed. METHODS: Two double blind placebo controlled studies were carried out. In study 1, 15 non-aspirin sensitive patients with mild asthma attended on four occasions and inhaled 5 ml of lysine aspirin (L-aspirin) 900 mg, indomethacin 50 mg, sodium salicylate 800 mg, or saline 20 minutes before an inhaled MBS challenge. On four further occasions 14 of the patients inhaled the same solutions followed by an inhaled AMP challenge. In study 2, 10 of the patients attended on four additional occasions and inhaled 5 ml of 0.9%, 3%, 10%, or 9.5% saline with indomethacin 50 mg 20 minutes before an inhaled MBS challenge. RESULTS: In study 1 inhaled lysine aspirin had a similar effect on MBS and AMP induced bronchoconstriction, increasing the provocative dose causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PD20) by 1.29 (95% CI 0.54 to 2.03) and 1.23 (95% CI 0.53 to 1.93) doubling doses, respectively. Indomethacin increased the MBS PD20 and AMP PD20 by 0.64 (95% CI -0.1 to 1.38) and 0.99 (95% CI 0.29 to 1.69) doubling doses, respectively. Sodium salicylate had no significant effect on either challenge. The two solutions causing most inhibition were the most acidic and the most alkaline. In study 2 inhaled 9.5% saline with indomethacin (osmolarity 3005 mOsm/kg) increased the MBS PD20 by 1.1 doubling doses (95% CI 0.2 to 2.0) compared with only 0.09 (95% CI -0.83 to 1.0) and 0.04 (95% CI -0.88 to 0.95) doubling doses

  3. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  4. Extracellular adenosine levels are associated with the progression and exacerbation of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fayong; Le, Ngoc-Bao; Mills, Tingting; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Molina, Jose G; Davies, Jonathan; Philip, Kemly; Volcik, Kelly A; Liu, Hong; Xia, Yang; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackburn, Michael R

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a devastating lung disease with limited treatment options. The signaling molecule adenosine is produced in response to injury and serves a protective role in early stages of injury and is detrimental during chronic stages of disease such as seen in lung conditions such as pulmonary fibrosis. Understanding the association of extracellular adenosine levels and the progression of pulmonary fibrosis is critical for designing adenosine based approaches to treat pulmonary fibrosis. The goal of this study was to use various models of experimental lung fibrosis to understand when adenosine levels are elevated during pulmonary fibrosis and whether these elevations were associated with disease progression and severity. To accomplish this, extracellular adenosine levels, defined as adenosine levels found in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid, were determined in mouse models of resolvable and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. We found that relative bronchioalveolar lavage fluid adenosine levels are progressively elevated in association with pulmonary fibrosis and that adenosine levels diminish in association with the resolution of lung fibrosis. In addition, treatment of these models with dipyridamole, an inhibitor of nucleoside transporters that potentiates extracellular adenosine levels, demonstrated that the resolution of lung fibrosis is blocked by the failure of adenosine levels to subside. Furthermore, exacerbating adenosine levels led to worse fibrosis in a progressive fibrosis model. Increased adenosine levels were associated with elevation of IL-6 and IL-17, which are important inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary fibrosis. These results demonstrate that extracellular adenosine levels are closely associated with the progression of experimental pulmonary fibrosis and that this signaling pathway may mediate fibrosis by regulating IL-6 and IL-17 production.

  5. A new crystal form of human histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (hHINT1) in complex with adenosine 5′-monophosphate at 1.38 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Dolot, Rafał; Ozga, Magdalena; Włodarczyk, Artur; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Nawrot, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1) represents the most ancient and widespread branch of the histidine triad protein superfamily. HINT1 plays an important role in various biological processes and has been found in many species. Here, the structure of the human HINT1–adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) complex at 1.38 Å resolution obtained from a new monoclinic crystal form is reported. The final structure has R cryst = 0.1207 (R free = 0.1615) and the model exhibits good stereochemical quality. Detailed analysis of the high-resolution data allowed the details of the protein structure to be updated in comparison to the previously published data. PMID:22869114

  6. A new crystal form of human histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (hHINT1) in complex with adenosine 5'-monophosphate at 1.38 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Dolot, Rafał; Ozga, Magdalena; Włodarczyk, Artur; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Nawrot, Barbara

    2012-08-01

    Histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1) represents the most ancient and widespread branch of the histidine triad protein superfamily. HINT1 plays an important role in various biological processes and has been found in many species. Here, the structure of the human HINT1-adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) complex at 1.38 Å resolution obtained from a new monoclinic crystal form is reported. The final structure has R(cryst) = 0.1207 (R(free) = 0.1615) and the model exhibits good stereochemical quality. Detailed analysis of the high-resolution data allowed the details of the protein structure to be updated in comparison to the previously published data.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide decreases adenosine triphosphate levels in aortic rings and leads to vasorelaxation via metabolic inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Levente; Deitch, Edwin A; Szabó, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Aims Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at low concentrations serves as a physiological endogenous vasodilator molecule, while at higher concentrations it can trigger cytotoxic effects. The aim of our study was to elucidate the potential mechanisms responsible for the effects of H2S on vascular tone. Main methods We measured the vascular tone in vitro in precontracted rat thoracic aortic rings and we have tested the effect of different oxygen levels and a variety of inhibitors affecting known vasodilatory pathways. We have also compared the vascular effect of high concentrations of H2S to those of pharmacological inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, we measured adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-levels in the same vascular tissues. Key findings We have found that in rat aortic rings: (1) H2S decreases ATP levels; (2) relaxations to H2S depend on the ambient oxygen concentration; (3) prostaglandins do not take part in the H2S induced relaxations; (4) the 3':5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) – nitric oxide (NO) pathway does not have a role in the relaxations (5) the role of KATP channels is limited, while Cl−/HCO3− channels have a role in the relaxations. (6): We have observed that high concentrations of H2S relax the aortic rings in a fashion similar to sodium cyanide, and both agents reduce cellular ATP levels to a comparable degree. Significance H2S, a new gasotransmitter of emerging importance, leads to relaxation via Cl−/HCO3− channels and metabolic inhibition and the interactions of these two factors depend on the oxygen levels of the tissue. PMID:18790700

  8. Expression of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-Activated protein kinase (AMPK) in ovine testis (Ovis aries): In vivo regulation by nutritional state.

    PubMed

    Taibi, N; Dupont, J; Bouguermouh, Z; Froment, P; Ramé, C; Anane, A; Amirat, Z; Khammar, F

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, we identified AMPK and investigated its potential role in steroidogenesis in vivo in the ovine testis in response to variation in nutritional status (fed control vs. restricted). We performed immunoblotting to show that both active and non-active forms of AMPK exist in ovine testis and liver. In testis, we confirmed these results by immunohistochemistry. We found a correlation between ATP (Adenosine-Triphosphate) levels and the expression of AMPK in liver. Also, low and high caloric diets induce isoform-dependent AMPK expression, with an increase in α2, ß1ß2 and γ1 activity levels. Although the restricted group exhibited an increase in lipid balance, only the triglyceride and HC-VLDL (Cholesterol-Very low density lipoprotein) fractions showed significant differences between groups, suggesting an adaptive mechanism. Moreover, the relatively low rate of non-esterified fatty acid released into the circulation implies re-esterification to compensate for the physiological need. In the fed control group, AMPK activates the production of testosterone in Leydig cells; this is, in turn, associated with an increase in the expression of 3ß-HSD (3 beta hydroxy steroid deshydrogenase), p450scc (Cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme) and StAR (Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein) proteins induced by decreased MAPK ERK½ (Extracellular signal-regulated kinase -Mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation. In contrast, in the restricted group, testosterone secretion was reduced but intracellular cholesterol concentration was not. Furthermore, the combination of high levels of lipoproteins and emergence of the p38 MAP kinase pathway suggest the involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as confirmed by transcriptional repression of the StAR protein. Taken together, these results suggest that AMPK expression is tissue dependent.

  9. Effects of electric stress on glucose metabolism, glucose-stimulated cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate accumulation and 45 Ca++ efflux in isolated pancreatic islets from rats fed with a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Goko, H; Matsuoka, A

    1979-10-01

    The effects of the electric stress on glucose oxidation, cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (AMP) accumulation and 45Ca++ efflux in response to glucose were studied in pancreatic islets isolated from rats fed on a control (C) or a high fat diet (F) for 12 weeks. The half of rats on each diet were subjected to electrical shocks in the random time schedule for 1 hr per day for the last 3 weeks of the feeding period (group C-S and F-S). The remaining rats were not given any shocks (group C-NS and F-NS). The rats in F-S group had the high levels of plasma epinephrine, dopamine and blood glucose. The basal content of cyclic AMP after 20 min of incubation with 2.8 mM glucose was decreased in islets from F-S group without affecting insulin release. After 20 min of incubation with 25 mM glucose, the cyclic AMP content in islets from F-S group, which was identical with that in F-NS group, was only 50% of that in C-S group. Insulin release in response to high glucose was significantly inhibited in islets from F-S group. In spite of a remarkable increase of cyclic AMP content in islets from C-S group, insulin release did not differ from that in C-NS group. Glucose (16.7 mM)-stimulated 45Ca++ efflux from the perfused islets was greatly inhibited by the high fat diet rather than by stress. The rate of glucose oxidation with 16.7 mM glucose was decreased in islets from F-S group. It is suggested that the decreased insulin release in response to glucose provoked by the combined effects of the feeding of a high fat diet and electric stress may be mediated by changes of the adenylate cyclase-cyclic AMP system on the plasma membrane of the B-cell or be related to changes in glucose metabolism in islets.

  10. Post-meal responses of elongation factor 2 (eEF2) and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to leucine and carbohydrate supplements for regulating protein synthesis duration and energy homeostasis in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gabriel J; Moulton, Christopher J; Garlick, Peter J; Anthony, Tracy G; Layman, Donald K

    2012-11-13

    Previous research demonstrates that the anabolic response of muscle protein synthesis (MPS) to a meal is regulated at the level of translation initiation with signals derived from leucine (Leu) and insulin to activate mTORC1 signaling. Recent evidence suggests that the duration of the meal response is limited by energy status of the cell and inhibition of translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2). This study evaluates the potential to extend the anabolic meal response with post-meal supplements of Leu or carbohydrates. Adult (~256 g) male Sprague-Dawley rats were food deprived for 12 h, then either euthanized before a standard meal (time 0) or at 90 or 180 min post-meal. At 135 min post-meal, rats received one of five oral supplements: 270 mg leucine (Leu270), 80:40:40 mg leucine, isoleucine, and valine (Leu80), 2.63 g carbohydrates (CHO2.6), 1 g carbohydrates (CHO1.0), or water (Sham control). Following the standard meal, MPS increased at 90 min then declined to pre-meal baseline at 180 min. Rats administered Leu270, Leu80, CHO2.6, or CHO1.0 maintained elevated rates of MPS at 180 min, while Sham controls declined from peak values. Leu80 and CHO1.0 treatments maintained MPS, but with values intermediate between Sham controls and Leu270 and CHO2.6 supplements. Consistent with MPS findings, the supplements maintained elongation activity and cellular energy status by preventing increases in AMP/ATP and phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl-CoA carboxylase ACC and eEF2. The impact of the supplements on MPS and cellular energy status was in proportion to the energy content within the individual treatments (i.e., Leu270 > Leu80; CHO2.6 > CHO1.0), but the Leu supplements produced a disproportionate anabolic stimulation of MPS, eEF2 and energy status with significantly lower energy content. In summary, the incongruity between MPS and translation initiation at 180 min reflects a block in translation elongation due to reduced

  11. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent phosphoregulation of mitochondrial complex I is inhibited by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Kaleb C. Wallace, Kendall B.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are known to directly inhibit mitochondrial complex I activity as well as various mitochondrial kinases. Recent observations that complex I activity and superoxide production are modulated through cAMP-dependent phosphorylation suggests a mechanism through which NRTIs may affect mitochondrial respiration via kinase-dependent protein phosphorylation. In the current study, we examine the potential for NRTIs to inhibit the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of complex I and the associated NADH:CoQ oxidoreductase activities and rates of superoxide production using HepG2 cells. Phosphoprotein staining of immunocaptured complex I revealed that 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT; 10 and 50 {mu}M), AZT monophosphate (150 {mu}M), and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC; 1 {mu}M) prevented the phosphorylation of the NDUFB11 subunit of complex I. This was associated with a decrease in complex I activity with AZT and AZT monophosphate only. In the presence of succinate, superoxide production was increased with 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI; 10 {mu}M) and ddC (1 {mu}M). In the presence of succinate + cAMP, AZT showed an inverse dose-dependent effect on superoxide production. None of the NRTIs examined inhibit PKA activity suggesting that the observed effects are due to a direct interaction with complex I. These data demonstrate a direct effect of NRTIs on cAMP-dependent regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics independent of DNA polymerase-{gamma} activity; in the case of AZT, these observations may provide a mechanism for the observed long-term toxicity with this drug.

  12. Advanced glycation end-products impair Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase activity in diabetic cardiomyopathy: role of the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/sirtuin 1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qiong; Zhou, Qian-Yi; Liu, Du; Yu, Lun; Zhan, Lin; Li, Xiao-Jing; Peng, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Xiu-Ling; Yuan, Xin-Chu

    2014-02-01

    Decreased Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activity, and both sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) have been reported to be involved in the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). The present study aimed to investigate the advanced glycation end-products (AGE) that impair Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase stability by regulating the AMPK/SIRT1 pathway during progression of DCM. To study type 1 diabetic mellitus (T1DM), a disease model in rats was established by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 65 mg/kg), and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were also cultured. Heart function was detected by Doppler, and SIRT1 and AMPK protein expression were detected by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activity was also monitored. Using in vivo rat models of DCM, we showed that Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activity decreased when both AMPK and SIRT1 expression were downregulated. In vitro, AGE impaired Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activity and decreased the AMPK and SIRT1 expression. Sirtuin 1 overexpression increased Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activity. 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-3-ribonucleoside (AICAR) upregulated SIRT1 expression and increased Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activity, which could be partially abolished by splitomicin. Our results suggest that the dysfunction of DCM is related to AGE-induced Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase activity impairment through a mechanism involving the AMPK/SIRT1 pathway.

  13. Diabetic complications within the context of aging: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide redox, insulin C-peptide, sirtuin 1-liver kinase B1-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase positive feedback and forkhead box O3.

    PubMed

    Ido, Yasuo

    2016-07-01

    Recent research in nutritional control of aging suggests that cytosolic increases in the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and decreasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolism plays a central role in controlling the longevity gene products sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3). High nutrition conditions, such as the diabetic milieu, increase the ratio of reduced to oxidized forms of cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide through cascades including the polyol pathway. This redox change is associated with insulin resistance and the development of diabetic complications, and might be counteracted by insulin C-peptide. My research and others' suggest that the SIRT1-liver kinase B1-AMPK cascade creates positive feedback through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthesis to help cells cope with metabolic stress. SIRT1 and AMPK can upregulate liver kinase B1 and FOXO3, key factors that help residential stem cells cope with oxidative stress. FOXO3 directly changes epigenetics around transcription start sites, maintaining the health of stem cells. 'Diabetic memory' is likely a result of epigenetic changes caused by high nutritional conditions, which disturb the quiescent state of residential stem cells and impair tissue repair. This could be prevented by restoring SIRT1-AMPK positive feedback through activating FOXO3.

  14. Post-Translational Regulation of the Glucose-6-Phosphatase Complex by Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Is a Crucial Determinant of Endogenous Glucose Production and Is Controlled by the Glucose-6-Phosphate Transporter.

    PubMed

    Soty, Maud; Chilloux, Julien; Delalande, François; Zitoun, Carine; Bertile, Fabrice; Mithieux, Gilles; Gautier-Stein, Amandine

    2016-04-01

    The excessive endogenous glucose production (EGP) induced by glucagon participates in the development of type 2 diabetes. To further understand this hormonal control, we studied the short-term regulation by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) of the glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) enzyme, which catalyzes the last reaction of EGP. In gluconeogenic cell models, a 1-h treatment by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin increased G6Pase activity and glucose production independently of any change in enzyme protein amount or G6P content. Using specific inhibitors or protein overexpression, we showed that the stimulation of G6Pase activity involved the protein kinase A (PKA). Results of site-directed mutagenesis, mass spectrometry analyses, and in vitro phosphorylation experiments suggested that the PKA stimulation of G6Pase activity did not depend on a direct phosphorylation of the enzyme. However, the temperature-dependent induction of both G6Pase activity and glucose release suggested a membrane-based mechanism. G6Pase is composed of a G6P transporter (G6PT) and a catalytic unit (G6PC). Surprisingly, we demonstrated that the increase in G6PT activity was required for the stimulation of G6Pase activity by forskolin. Our data demonstrate the existence of a post-translational mechanism that regulates G6Pase activity and reveal the key role of G6PT in the hormonal regulation of G6Pase activity and of EGP.

  15. Genistein promotes insulin action through adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 inhibition in the skeletal muscle of mice fed a high energy diet.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, Elumalai; Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2012-08-01

    Genistein (GEN), a soy isoflavone, exerts insulin-sensitizing actions in animals; however, the underlying mechanisms have not been determined. Because GEN is a known activator of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), we hypothesize that GEN activates insulin signaling through AMPK activation. To test this hypothesis, a high fat-high fructose diet (HFFD)-fed mice model of insulin resistance was administered GEN, and the insulin signaling pathway proteins in the skeletal muscle were examined. Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia observed in HFFD-fed mice were significantly lowered by GEN. GEN increased insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor-β and insulin receptor substrate (IRS) 1 but down-regulated IRS-1 serine phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle of HFFD-fed mice. Furthermore, GEN treatment improved muscle IRS-1-associated phospatidylinositol-3 kinase expression, phosphorylation of Akt at Ser(473), and translocation of glucose transporter subtype 4. Phosphorylation of AMPK at Thr(172) and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) at Ser(79) was augmented, whereas phosphorylation of p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 at Thr(389) was significantly decreased after GEN treatment in the skeletal muscle of HFFD-fed mice. These results suggest that GEN might improve insulin action in the skeletal muscle by targeting AMPK.

  16. A model for the chemical interactions of adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate with the R subunit of protein kinase type I. Refinement of the cyclic phosphate binding moiety of protein kinase type I.

    PubMed

    Jastorff, B; Hoppe, J; Morr, M

    1979-11-01

    The cAMP receptor site in the regulatory subunit of adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase type I was mapped using analogues of cAMP in which the ribose phosphate moiety was systematically modified. Electronical alteration of the cyclophosphate ring at the 3' and 5' positions by sulfur and nitrogen decreased the affinity of these analogues towards the kinase. Substituents at these positions are not tolerated. Testing the separated diastereomers of derivatives in which one of the exocyclic oxygens at the phosphorus has been substituted by sulfur, it was found that one diastereoisomer is preferentially recognized. Based on these results it is proposed that the hydrophylic cyclic phosphate-ribose moiety of cAMP is bound to the kinase via its 3' and 5'-oxygens, the 2'-hydroxy group and the negative charge in a fixed position. Based on our and other published results it is further proposed, that the adenine moiety is bound in a hydrophobic cleft without any hydrogen bond interactions. The chemical interactions between cAMP and the R subunit of protein kinase type I differ from those found for the binding of cAMP to the chemoreceptor of Dictyostelium discoideum [18].

  17. The fruit of Acanthopanax senticosus (Rupr. et Maxim.) Harms improves insulin resistance and hepatic lipid accumulation by modulation of liver adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activity and lipogenic gene expression in high-fat diet-fed obese mice.

    PubMed

    Saito, Tetsuo; Nishida, Miyako; Saito, Masafumi; Tanabe, Akari; Eitsuka, Takahiro; Yuan, Shi-Hua; Ikekawa, Nobuo; Nishida, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Obesity-associated insulin resistance is a major risk factor for most metabolic diseases, including dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes. Acanthopanax senticosus (Rupr. et Maxim.) Harms (Goka) root has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for treatment of diabetes and other conditions; however, little is known about the effects of Goka fruit (GF). Goka fruit is rich in anthocyanin, which has beneficial effects on obesity and insulin resistance via activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). We hypothesized that GF can improve obesity-associated insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether GF improves insulin resistance in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. High-fat diet mice treated with GF (500 and 1000 mg/kg) for 12 weeks showed an improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, as well as reduced plasma insulin and liver lipid accumulation. Moreover, GF administration to HFD mice resulted in down-regulation of fatty acid synthase expression and up-regulation of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase expression in the liver. Notably, AMPK phosphorylation in the liver increased after GF administration. In summary, GF supplementation improved obesity-associated insulin resistance and hepatic lipid accumulation through modulation of AMPK activity and lipid metabolism-associated gene expression.

  18. Glycolytic potential and activity of adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK), glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) in steer carcasses with normal (<5.8) or high (>5.9) 24h pH determined in M. longissimus dorsi.

    PubMed

    Apaoblaza, A; Galaz, A; Strobel, P; Ramírez-Reveco, A; Jeréz-Timaure, N; Gallo, C

    2015-03-01

    Muscle glycogen concentration (MGC) and lactate (LA), activity of glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE), glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK) were determined at 0.5h (T0) and 24h (T24) post-mortem in Longissimus dorsi samples from 38 steers that produced high pH (>5.9) and normal pH (<5.8) carcasses at 24h postmortem. MGC, LA and glycolytic potential were higher (P<0.05) in normal pH carcasses. GDE activity was similar (P>0.05) in both pH categories. GP activity increased between T0 and T24 only in normal pH carcasses. AMPK activity was four times higher in normal pH v/s high pH carcasses, without changing its activity over time. Results reinforce the idea that differences in postmortem glycogenolytic/glycolytic flow in L. dorsi of steers showing normal v/s high muscle pH at 24h, could be explained not only by the higher initial MGC in normal pH carcasses, but also by a high and sustained activity of AMPK and an increased GP activity at 24h postmortem.

  19. Biospecific affinity chromatography of an adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate-stimulated protein kinase (protamine kinase from trout testis) by using immobilized adenine nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Jergil, Bengt; Guilford, Hugh; Mosbach, Klaus

    1974-01-01

    1. Two adenine nucleotides, 8-(6-aminohexyl)aminoadenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate and 8-(6-aminohexyl)amino-AMP, were synthesized. Their structures were established in particular by using mass spectroscopy. 2. Free cyclic AMP and 8-(6-aminohexyl)amino cyclic AMP both stimulate protamine kinase activity at low concentrations, but are inhibitory at concentrations above 0.1mm. AMP is an inhibitor of enzymic activity, whereas neither 8-(6-aminohexyl)amino-AMP nor the earlier synthesized N6-(6-aminohexyl)-AMP is inhibitory. 3. The nucleotides were coupled to Sepharose 4B and used for biospecific chromatography of partially purified protamine kinase. Enzyme applied at high buffer concentrations to the cyclic AMP–Sepharose material was retarded and thereby purified tenfold. At low buffer concentrations the enzyme was adsorbed to the affinity material, and was subsequently released by a pulse of the inhibitor AMP, yielding a 50–100-fold purification. Enzyme applied to immobilized 8-(6-aminohexyl)amino-AMP or N6-(6-aminohexyl)-AMP was eluted together with the main protein peak in the void volume. 4. Protamine kinase eluted from 8-(6-aminohexyl)amino cyclic AMP–Sepharose was no longer activated by cyclic AMP. Results from sucrose gradient centrifugation suggest that a dissociation of the enzyme took place on the immobilized nucleotide. 5. Further information on the mass spectroscopy has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50026 at the British Library (Lending Division) (formerly the National Lending Library for Science and Technology), Boston Spa, Yorks. LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms given in Biochem. J. (1973) 131, 5. PMID:4374933

  20. Differences in responsiveness of intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid: mechanism of arterial relaxation involves cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Wolin, M.S.; McNamara, D.B.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between responses of bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid and cyclic nucleotide levels in order to better understand the mechanism of relaxation elicited by arachidonic acid and acetylcholine. Arachidonic acid relaxed phenylephrine-precontracted arterial rings and elevated both cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP levels in arteries with intact endothelium. In contrast, endothelium-damaged arterial rings contracted to arachidonic acid without demonstrating significant changes in cyclic nucleotide levels. Indomethacin partially inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxation and abolished cyclic AMP accumulation whereas methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, partially inhibited relaxation and abolished cyclic GMP accumulation in response to arachidonic acid. All vessel responses were blocked by a combination of the two inhibitors. Prostaglandin (PG) I2 relaxed arterial rings and elevated cyclic AMP levels whereas PGE2 and PGF2 alpha caused contraction, suggesting that the indomethacin-sensitive component of arachidonic acid-elicited relaxation is due to PGI2 formation and cyclic AMP accumulation. The methylene blue-sensitive component is attributed to an endothelium-dependent but cyclooxygenase-independent generation of a substance causing cyclic GMP accumulation. Intrapulmonary veins contracted to arachidonic acid with no changes in cyclic nucleotide levels and PGI2 was without effect. Homogenates of intrapulmonary artery and vein formed 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, which was inhibited by indomethacin. Thus, bovine intrapulmonary vein may not possess receptors for PGI2.

  1. Opiate-induced Changes in Brain Adenosine Levels and Narcotic Drug Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Manhong; Sahbaie, Peyman; Zheng, Ming; Lobato, Robert; Boison, Detlev; Clark, J. David; Peltz, Gary

    2012-01-01

    We have very little information about the metabolomic changes that mediate neurobehavioral responses, including addiction. It was possible that opioid-induced metabolomic changes in brain could mediate some of the pharmacodynamic effects of opioids. To investigate this, opiate-induced brain metabolomic responses were profiled using a semi-targeted method in C57BL/6 and 129Sv1 mice, which exhibit extreme differences in their tendency to become opiate dependent. Escalating morphine doses (10–40 mg/kg) administered over a 4-day period selectively induced a two-fold decrease (p<0.00005) in adenosine abundance in the brainstem of C57BL/6 mice, which exhibited symptoms of narcotic drug dependence; but did not decrease adenosine abundance in 129Sv1 mice, which do not exhibit symptoms of dependence. Based on this finding, the effect of adenosine on dependence was investigated in genetically engineered mice with alterations in adenosine tone in the brain and in pharmacologic experiments. Morphine withdrawal behaviors were significantly diminished (P<0.0004) in genetically engineered mice with reduced adenosine tone in the brainstem, and by treatment with an adenosine receptor1 (A1) agonist (2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, 0.5 mg/kg) or an A2a receptor (A2a) antagonist (SCH 58261 1 mg/kg). These results indicate that adenosine homeostasis plays a crucial role in narcotic drug responses. Opiate-induced changes in brain adenosine levels may explain many important neurobehavioral features associated with opiate addiction and withdrawal. PMID:23098802

  2. Conservation and divergence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathway in two plant-pathogenic fungi: Fusarium graminearum and F. verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Breakspear, Andrew; Zhao, Guoyi; Gao, Lixin; Kistler, H Corby; Xu, Jin-Rong; Ma, Li-Jun

    2016-02-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathway is a central signalling cascade that transmits extracellular stimuli and governs cell responses through the second messenger cAMP. The importance of cAMP signalling in fungal biology has been well documented and the key conserved components, adenylate cyclase (AC) and the catalytic subunit of PKA (CPKA), have been functionally characterized. However, other genes involved in this signalling pathway and their regulation are not well understood in filamentous fungi. Here, we performed a comparative transcriptomics analysis of AC and CPKA mutants in two closely related fungi: Fusarium graminearum (Fg) and F. verticillioides (Fv). Combining available Fg transcriptomics and phenomics data, we reconstructed the Fg cAMP signalling pathway. We developed a computational program that combines sequence conservation and patterns of orthologous gene expression to facilitate global transcriptomics comparisons between different organisms. We observed highly correlated expression patterns for most orthologues (80%) between Fg and Fv. We also identified a subset of 482 (6%) diverged orthologues, whose expression under all conditions was at least 50% higher in one genome than in the other. This enabled us to dissect the conserved and unique portions of the cAMP-PKA pathway. Although the conserved portions controlled essential functions, such as metabolism, the cell cycle, chromatin remodelling and the oxidative stress response, the diverged portions had species-specific roles, such as the production and detoxification of secondary metabolites unique to each species. The evolution of the cAMP-PKA signalling pathway seems to have contributed directly to fungal divergence and niche adaptation.

  3. Irisin ameliorates hepatic glucose/lipid metabolism and enhances cell survival in insulin-resistant human HepG2 cells through adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    So, Wing Yan; Leung, Po Sing

    2016-09-01

    Irisin is a newly identified myokine that promotes the browning of white adipose tissue, enhances glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and modulates hepatic metabolism. However, the signaling pathways involved in the effects on hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism have not been resolved. This study aimed to examine the role of irisin in the regulation of hepatic glucose/lipid metabolism and cell survival, and whether adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a master metabolic regulator in the liver, is involved in irisin's actions. Human liver-derived HepG2 cells were cultured in normal glucose-normal insulin (NGNI) or high glucose-high insulin (HGHI/insulin-resistant) condition. Hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism was evaluated by glucose output and glycogen content or triglyceride accumulation assays, respectively. Our results showed that irisin stimulated phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA-carboxylase (ACC) via liver kinase B1 (LKB1) rather than Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) in HepG2 cells. Irisin ameliorated hepatic insulin resistance induced by HGHI condition. Irisin reduced hepatic triglyceride content and glucose output, but increased glycogen content, with those effects reversed by dorsomorphin, an AMPK inhibitor. Furthermore, irisin also stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation and promoted cell survival in an AMPK-dependent manner. In conclusion, our data indicate that irisin ameliorates dysregulation of hepatic glucose/lipid metabolism and cell death in insulin-resistant states via AMPK activation. These findings reveal a novel irisin-mediated protective mechanism in hepatic metabolism which provides a scientific basis for irisin as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  4. Differential regulation of kit ligand A (kitlga) expression in the zebrafish ovarian follicle cells--evidence for the existence of a cyclic adenosine 3', 5' monophosphate-mediated binary regulatory system during folliculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kai; Ge, Wei

    2015-02-15

    Kit ligand (Kitl) is an important paracrine factor involved in the activation of primordial follicles from the quiescent pool and in the maintenance of meiotic arrest before germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD). It has been reported that follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulates but luteinizing hormone (LH) suppresses the expression of Kitl in the granulosa cells in mammals. Considering that both gonadotropins signal in the follicle cells mainly by activating cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP) pathway, we are intrigued by how cAMP differentially regulates Kitl expression. In the present study, we demonstrated that both human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) inhibited insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I)-induced Akt phosphorylation and kitlga expression in the zebrafish follicle cells. Further experiments showed that cAMP was involved in regulating the expression of kitlga. However, two cAMP-activated effectors, protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), had converse effects. PKA promoted whereas Epac inhibited the expression of kitlga, as demonstrated by the respective activators. Interestingly, cAMP also appeared to exert differential effects on kitlga expression at different stages of follicle development during folliculogenesis, significantly stimulating kitlga expression at the early growth stage but suppressing it at the full-grown stage before final oocyte maturation, implying a potential mechanism for differential effects of the same pathway at different stages. The inhibitory effect of forskolin (activator of adenylate cyclase) and H89 (inhibitor of PKA) on IGF-I-induced expression of kitlga suggested cross-talk between the cAMP and IGF-I-activated PI3K-Akt pathways. This study, together with our previous findings on IGF-I regulation of kitlga expression, provides important clues to the underlying mechanism that regulates Kit ligand expression during

  5. Muscarinic receptor-independent activation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase in rostral ventrolateral medulla underlies the sympathoexcitatory phase of cardiovascular responses during mevinphos intoxication in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Yi; Wu, Carol H Y; Chan, Samuel H H; Chang, Alice Y W

    2007-05-01

    As inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, clinical presentations of poisoning from organophosphate compounds are generally believed to entail overstimulation by the accumulated acetylcholine on muscarinic receptors at peripheral and central synapses. That some patients still yielded to acute organophosphate poisoning despite repeated dosing of atropine suggests that cellular mechanisms that are independent of muscarinic receptor activation may also be engaged in organophosphate poisoning. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that muscarinic receptor-independent activation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), a medullary site where sympathetic vasomotor tone originates and where the organophosphate poison mevinphos (Mev) acts, is involved in the cardiovascular responses exhibited during organophosphate intoxication. In Sprague-Dawley rats, microinjection bilaterally of Mev (10 nmol) into the RVLM significantly augmented PKA activity in ventrolateral medulla that was not antagonized by coadministration of an equimolar concentration (1 nmol) of atropine or selective muscarinic receptor type M1 (pirenzepine), M2 (methoctramine), M3 (4-diphenyl-acetoxy-N-dimethylpiperidinium), or M4 (tropicamide) inhibitor. Comicroinjection of two selective PKA antagonists (100 pmol), N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide and (9R,10S,12S)-2,3,9,10,11,12-hexahydro-10-hydroxy-9-methyl-1-oxo-9,12-epoxy-1H-diindolol[1,2,3-fg:3',2',1'-kl]pyrrolo[3,4-1][1,6]benzodiazocine-10-carboxylic acid, significantly blunted the initial sympathoexcitatory cardiovascular response and the accompanying augmentation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS I) expression in the ventrolateral medulla exhibited during Mev intoxication; the secondary sympathoinhibitory phase and associated elevation in NOS II expression were unaffected. We conclude that whereas a muscarinic receptor-independent augmentation of PKA

  6. Circadian variations of adenosine level in blood and liver and its possible physiological significance.

    PubMed

    Chagoya de Sánchez, V; Hernández-Muñoz, R; Díaz-Muñoz, M; Villalobos, R; Glender, W; Vidrio, S; Suárez, J; Yañez, L

    1983-09-12

    The role of adenosine as a possible physiological modulator was explored by measuring its concentration in different tissues during a 24-hour period. Initially the circadian variations of adenosine and other purine compounds such as inosine, hypoxanthine, uric acid and adenine nucleotides were studied in the rat blood. A daily cyclic response was observed, with low levels of adenosine from 08.00 - 20.00 h, followed by an increase from this time on. Inosine and hypoxanthine levels were elevated during the day and low at night. The uric acid changes observed indicate that the decrease in purine catabolism coincides with a decrease in inosine and hypoxanthine levels and an increase in adenosine. The blood adenine nucleotides, energy charge and phosphorylation potential remained constant during the day and showed oscillatory changes during the night. Similar studies were made in the liver, a primary source of circulating purines. Liver adenosine was high during the night while inosine and hypoxanthine remained low along the 24 hours. The results suggest that liver purine metabolism might participate in the maintenance and renewal of the blood purine pool and in the energy state of erythrocytes in vivo.

  7. Differential involvement of 3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase in regulation of Fos and tyrosine hydroxylase expression in the heart after naloxone induced morphine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Almela, Pilar; Cerezo, Manuela; González-Cuello, A; Milanés, M Victoria; Laorden, M Luisa

    2007-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that morphine withdrawal induced hyperactivity of the heart by the activation of noradrenergic pathways innervating the left and right ventricle, as evaluated by noradrenaline (NA) turnover and Fos expression. We investigated whether cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) plays a role in this process by estimating changes in PKA immunoreactivity and the influence of inhibitor of PKA on Fos protein expression, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity levels and NA turnover in the left and right ventricle. Dependence on morphine was induced by a 7-day s.c. implantation of morphine pellets. Morphine withdrawal was precipitated on day 8 by an injection of naloxone (5 mg/kg). When opioid withdrawal was precipitated, an increase in PKA immunoreactivity and phospho-CREB (cyclic AMP response element protein) levels were observed in the heart. Moreover, morphine withdrawal induces Fos expression, an enhancement of NA turnover and an increase in the total TH levels. When the selective PKA inhibitor HA-1004 was infused, concomitantly with morphine pellets, it diminished the increase in NA turnover and the total TH levels observed in morphine-withdrawn rats. However, this inhibitor neither modifies the morphine withdrawal induced Fos expression nor the increase of nonphosphorylated TH levels. The present findings indicate that an up-regulated PKA-dependent transduction pathway might contribute to the activation of the cardiac catecholaminergic neurons in response to morphine withdrawal and suggest that Fos is not a target of PKA at heart levels.

  8. Effect of adenosine and adenosine analogues on cyclic AMP accumulation in cultured mesangial cells and isolated glomeruli of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, A.; Lopez-Novoa, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    1. Changes in intracellular levels of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) were studied in rat isolated glomeruli and cultured glomerular mesangial cells exposed to adenosine and to the preferential A1 receptor agonist N6-R-1-methyl-2-phenylethyl adenosine (R-PIA), or the potent A2 adenosine receptor agonist 5-(N-ethylcarboxamide)adenosine (NECA). 2. Whereas NECA and adenosine triggered a dose-dependent increase in cyclic AMP values with EC50 values of approximately 10(-6) M and 3 x 10(-5) M respectively, R-PIA lowered cyclic AMP levels at concentrations of 10(-6) M or less and increased them at higher concentrations. 3. The time-course of the increase induced by 10(-6) M NECA was slower than that induced by 10(-4) M adenosine. Adenosine produced a maximal stimulation within the first minute, whereas the effect of NECA in both glomeruli and mesangial cells was noticeable only from the second minute of incubation. 4. The effects of the agonists R-PIA and NECA on the cyclic AMP system were blocked respectively by the A1 adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthihe (DPCPX) at 10(-6) M and the A2 antagonist N-(2-dimethylaminoethyl)-N-methyl-4-(2, 3, 6, 7-tetrahydro-2,b-dioxo-1, 3-dipropyl-1H-purin-8-yl) benzene sulphonamide (PD115,199) at 10(-6) M. Theophylline, a known antagonist of adenosine receptors, inhibited the action of adenosine on cyclic AMP in mesangial cells. Dipyridamole, an inhibitor of the uptake of adenosine by the cells, enhanced the response to adenosine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1330173

  9. Parathyroid hormone induces transcription of collagenase in rat osteoblastic cells by a mechanism using cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and requiring protein synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. K.; Brakenhoff, K. D.; Clohisy, J. C.; Quinn, C. O.; Partridge, N. C.

    1992-01-01

    Collagenase is synthesized and secreted by rat osteoblastic cells in response to PTH. We have previously demonstrated that this effect involves a substantial increase in collagenase mRNA via transcription. Northern blots and nuclear run-on assays were performed to further investigate the induction of collagenase by PTH in the rat osteoblastic cell line UMR 106-01. Detectable amounts of collagenase mRNA were not apparent until 2 h of PTH treatment, showed the greatest abundance at 4 h, and declined to approximately 30% of maximum by 8 h. The changes in the rate of transcription of the collagenase gene in response to PTH paralleled and preceded the changes in the steady state mRNA levels. After an initial lag period of about 1 h, collagenase transcription rates increased from very low levels to a maximal response at 2 h, returning to about 50% of maximum by 10 h. The increased transcriptional rate of the collagenase gene was found to be dependent on the concentration of PTH, with a half-maximal response at approximately 7 x 10(-10) M rat PTH-(1-34) and a maximal effect with a dose of 10(-8) M. The PTH-mediated induction of collagenase transcriptional activity was completely abolished by cycloheximide, while transcription of the beta-actin gene was unaffected by the translation inhibitor. These data suggest that a protein factor(s) is required for PTH-mediated transcriptional induction of collagenase. Since PTH increases intracellular levels of several potential second messengers, agents that mimic these substances were employed to determine which signal transduction pathway is predominant in the PTH-mediated stimulation of collagenase transcription.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  10. A Biphasic and Brain-Region Selective Down-Regulation of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Concentrations Supports Object Recognition in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Hotte, Maïte; Dauphin, François; Freret, Thomas; Boulouard, Michel; Levallet, Guenaëlle

    2012-01-01

    Background We aimed to further understand the relationship between cAMP concentration and mnesic performance. Methods and Findings Rats were injected with milrinone (PDE3 inhibitor, 0.3 mg/kg, i.p.), rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor, 0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) and/or the selective 5-HT4R agonist RS 67333 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) before testing in the object recognition paradigm. Cyclic AMP concentrations were measured in brain structures linked to episodic-like memory (i.e. hippocampus, prefrontal and perirhinal cortices) before or after either the sample or the testing phase. Except in the hippocampus of rolipram treated-rats, all treatment increased cAMP levels in each brain sub-region studied before the sample phase. After the sample phase, cAMP levels were significantly increased in hippocampus (1.8 fold), prefrontal (1.3 fold) and perirhinal (1.3 fold) cortices from controls rat while decreased in prefrontal cortex (∼0.83 to 0.62 fold) from drug-treated rats (except for milrinone+RS 67333 treatment). After the testing phase, cAMP concentrations were still increased in both the hippocampus (2.76 fold) and the perirhinal cortex (2.1 fold) from controls animals. Minor increase were reported in hippocampus and perirhinal cortex from both rolipram (respectively, 1.44 fold and 1.70 fold) and milrinone (respectively 1.46 fold and 1.56 fold)-treated rat. Following the paradigm, cAMP levels were significantly lower in the hippocampus, prefrontal and perirhinal cortices from drug-treated rat when compared to controls animals, however, only drug-treated rats spent longer time exploring the novel object during the testing phase (inter-phase interval of 4 h). Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that a “pre-sample” early increase in cAMP levels followed by a specific lowering of cAMP concentrations in each brain sub-region linked to the object recognition paradigm support learning efficacy after a middle-term delay. PMID:22359674

  11. Corticotropin-releasing factor binding to peripheral tissue and activation of the adenylate cyclase-adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate system

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, J.R.; Eiden, L.E.; Eskay, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    Specific binding sites for rat corticotropin-releasing factor (rCRF) are present in rat adrenal medulla, ventral prostate, spleen, liver, kidney, and testis and bovine chromaffin cells in culture. Maximal binding of (/sup 125/I)rCRF occurred within 25 min at 4 C and was saturable. Scatchard analysis of rCRF binding to rat adrenal membranes and bovine chromaffin cells revealed the existence of two classes of binding sites. One class had a relatively higher apparent affinity and lower number of binding sites, whereas the other class had a relatively lower affinity and higher number of binding sites. CRF induced a dose-related increase in rat adrenal membrane adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP levels in bovine chromaffin cells. Nanomolar concentrations of rCRF maximally stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in rat adrenal membranes and maximally increased cAMP levels in bovine chromaffin cells to 86% and 130% above control values, respectively. The demonstration of specific CRF-binding sites in a variety of peripheral tissues and the finding that activation of specific CRF-binding sites in adrenal tissue stimulates the adenylate cyclase-cAMP system suggest that CRF may have an important regulatory role in various peripheral tissues.

  12. Daily rhythm in pineal phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity reflects adrenergic/3',5'-cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate induction of the PDE4B2 variant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-So; Bailey, Michael J; Ho, Anthony K; Møller, Morten; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Klein, David C

    2007-04-01

    The pineal gland is a photoneuroendocrine transducer that influences circadian and circannual dynamics of many physiological functions via the daily rhythm in melatonin production and release. Melatonin synthesis is stimulated at night by a photoneural system through which pineal adenylate cyclase is adrenergically activated, resulting in an elevation of cAMP. cAMP enhances melatonin synthesis through actions on several elements of the biosynthetic pathway. cAMP degradation also appears to increase at night due to an increase in phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity, which peaks in the middle of the night. Here, it was found that this nocturnal increase in PDE activity results from an increase in the abundance of PDE4B2 mRNA (approximately 5-fold; doubling time, approximately 2 h). The resulting level is notably higher (>6-fold) than in all other tissues examined, none of which exhibit a robust daily rhythm. The increase in PDE4B2 mRNA is followed by increases in PDE4B2 protein and PDE4 enzyme activity. Results from in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that these changes are due to activation of adrenergic receptors and a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A mechanism. Inhibition of PDE4 activity during the late phase of adrenergic stimulation enhances cAMP and melatonin levels. The evidence that PDE4B2 plays a negative feedback role in adrenergic/cAMP signaling in the pineal gland provides the first proof that cAMP control of PDE4B2 is a physiologically relevant control mechanism in cAMP signaling.

  13. Effects of limited exposure of rabbit chondrocyte cultures to parathyroid hormone and dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate on cartilage-characteristic proteoglycan synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Koike, T.; Iwamoto, M.; Kinoshita, M.; Sato, K.; Hiraki, Y.; Suzuki, F.

    1988-05-01

    Treatment of rabbit chondrocyte cultures with PTH or (Bu)2cAMP for 30 h increased by 2- to 3-fold the incorporation of (35S)sulfate and 3H radioactivity with glucosamine as the precursor into large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans characteristically found in cartilage matrix. However, PTH and (Bu)2cAMP did not increase either (35S)sulfate incorporation into small proteoglycans or the incorporation of 3H radioactivity into hyaluronic acid and other glycosaminoglycans. PTH and (Bu)2cAMP also increased the incorporation of (3H) serine into both proteoglycans and total protein. In all cultures described above, the stimulation of (3H)serine incorporation into proteoglycans exceeded that of (3H)serine incorporation into total protein. These data indicate that PTH and (Bu)2cAMP selectively stimulate cartilage proteoglycan synthesis while they increase total protein synthesis. Since cAMP seems to play a mediatory role in the action of PTH, we elected to examine the effects of a limited exposure of chondrocytes to PTH or (Bu)2cAMP on the synthesis of proteoglycans. Treatment with PTH or (Bu)2cAMP for only the initial 2-7 h did not increase the rates of incorporation of (35S)sulfate, the 3H radioactivity with glucosamine, and (3H)serine into proteoglycans, as measured at 30 h, despite the fact that this treatment brought about a rapid and transient rise in the cAMP level. Furthermore, the application of prostaglandin I2 at concentrations that increased cAMP levels in a similar fashion as did PTH did not affect (35S) sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans.

  14. Arginine vasopressin increases cellular free calcium concentration and adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate production in rat renal papillary collecting tubule cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, S.; Okada, K.; Saito, T.

    1988-09-01

    The role of calcium (Ca) in the cellular action of arginine vasopressin (AVP) was examined in rat renal papillary collecting tubule cells in culture. AVP increased both the cellular free Ca concentration ((Ca2+)i) using fura-2, and cAMP production in a dose-dependent manner. AVP-induced cellular Ca mobilization was totally blocked by the antagonist to the antidiuretic action of AVP, and somewhat weakened by the antagonist to the vascular action of AVP. 1-Deamino-8-D-AVP (dDAVP). an antidiuretic analog of AVP, also increased (Ca2+) significantly. Cellular Ca mobilization was not obtained with cAMP, forskolin (a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase), or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. The early phase of (Ca2+)i depended on the intracellular Ca pool, since an AVP-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was obtained in cells pretreated with Ca-free medium containing 1 mM EGTA, verapamil, or cobalt, which blocked cellular Ca uptake. Also, AVP increased /sup 45/Ca2+ influx during the initial 10 min, which initiated the sustained phase of cellular Ca mobilization. However, cellular cAMP production induced by AVP during the 10-min observation period was diminished in the cells pretreated with Ca-free medium, verapamil, or cobalt, but was still significantly higher than the basal level. This was also diminished by a high Ca concentration in medium. These results indicate that 1) AVP concomitantly regulates cellular free Ca as well as its second messenger cAMP production; 2) AVP-induced elevation of cellular free Ca is dependent on both the cellular Ca pool and extracellular Ca; and 3) there is an optimal level of extracellular Ca to modulate the AVP action in renal papillary collecting tubule cells.

  15. Discovery and Preclinical Characterization of 6-Chloro-5-[4-(1-hydroxycyclobutyl)phenyl]-1H-indole-3-carboxylic Acid (PF-06409577), a Direct Activator of Adenosine Monophosphate-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK), for the Potential Treatment of Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Kimberly O; Kung, Daniel W; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Miller, Russell; Salatto, Christopher T; Ward, Jessica; Withka, Jane M; Bhattacharya, Samit K; Boehm, Markus; Borzilleri, Kris A; Brown, Janice A; Calabrese, Matthew; Caspers, Nicole L; Cokorinos, Emily; Conn, Edward L; Dowling, Matthew S; Edmonds, David J; Eng, Heather; Fernando, Dilinie P; Frisbie, Richard; Hepworth, David; Landro, James; Mao, Yuxia; Rajamohan, Francis; Reyes, Allan R; Rose, Colin R; Ryder, Tim; Shavnya, Andre; Smith, Aaron C; Tu, Meihua; Wolford, Angela C; Xiao, Jun

    2016-09-08

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a protein kinase involved in maintaining energy homeostasis within cells. On the basis of human genetic association data, AMPK activators were pursued for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Identification of an indazole amide high throughput screening (HTS) hit followed by truncation to its minimal pharmacophore provided an indazole acid lead compound. Optimization of the core and aryl appendage improved oral absorption and culminated in the identification of indole acid, PF-06409577 (7). Compound 7 was advanced to first-in-human trials for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  16. Stimulation of cartilage amino acid uptake by growth hormone-dependent factors in serum. Mediation by adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Drezner, M K; Eisenbarth, G S; Neelon, F A; Lebovitz, H E

    1975-02-13

    The effects of growth hormone-dependent serum factors on amino acid transport and on cartilage cyclic AMP levels in embryonic chicken cartilage were studied in vitro. Cartilages incubated in medium containing rat serum showed a significantly greater uptake of alpha-amino [1-14C] isobutyrate or [1-14C] cycloleucine than control cartilages incubated in medium alone. Normal rat serum (5%) added to the incubation medium also caused an increase in cartilage cyclic AMP content (from as little as 23% to as much as 109%). The factors in serum which increase cartilage cyclic AMP and amino acid uptake are growth hormone dependent, since neither growth hormone itself nor serum from hypophysectomized rats restores these serum factors. Studies comparing the ability of sera with varying amounts of growth hormone-dependent factors to stimulate amino-aminoisobutyrate transport and to increase cartilage cyclic AMP show a striking linear correlation between the two effects (r=0.977). Theophylline and prostaglandin E1, WHICH RAISE CARTILAGE CYCLIC AMP also increase amino-aminoisobutyrate transport. Exogenous cyclic AMP, N6-monobutyryl cyclic AMP and n6, 02'-dibutyryl cyclic AMP increase cartilage amino-aminoisobutyrate transport. The data are compatible with the thesis that growth hormone-dependent serum factors increase cartilage amino acid transport by elevating cartilage cyclic AMP.

  17. Adenosine 3',5-cyclic monophosphate phosphodiesterase activity in granulosa cells from Booroola x Romney ewes with and without the F gene.

    PubMed

    McNatty, K P; Heath, D A; Lun, S; Hudson, N L

    1989-02-01

    Granulosa cells from ovarian follicles (greater than or equal to 1 mm diameter) in Booroola ewes which are homozygous (FF) or heterozygous (F+) for the F gene have previously been shown to produce significantly more cAMP in response to FSH or LH than those from similar sized follicles in ewes without the F gene (++). The aim of these studies was to test whether these F gene-specific differences arose because of differences in cAMP-phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) activity. In the first study using 1 mumol cAMP/l as substrate, no F gene-specific effects were noted in cAMP-PDE activity in granulosa cells from small (1-2.5 mm diameter, n = 4 per genotype) or large (greater than or equal to 3 mm diameter, n = 4 per genotype) follicles from FF, F+ or ++ ewes, despite F gene-specific effects in FSH (1 microgram/ml)- and LH (0.1 microgram/ml)-induced cAMP accumulation in these same cell preparations. The overall mean levels of cAMP-PDE across all genotypes in cells from small and large follicles were 0.47 +/- 0.04 (S.E.M., n = 12) and 0.28 +/- 0.03 pmol cAMP/10(6) cells per min respectively; the mean PDE activity in cells from small follicles was significantly (P less than 0.05) higher compared with that in cells from large follicles. In a second study, granulosa cells from each genotype were pooled over all follicle sizes (greater than or equal to 1 mm diameter, one pool per genotype) and the rates of cAMP hydrolysis tested over a range of substrate concentrations (0-16 mumol/l) but no gene-specific differences with respect to the Michaelis constant and maximum velocity were noted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Convergence of 3',5'-cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate/protein kinase A and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta/beta-catenin signaling in corpus luteum progesterone synthesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Lynn; McDonald, Claudia A; Jiang, Chao; Maroni, Dulce; Zeleznik, Anthony J; Wyatt, Todd A; Hou, Xiaoying; Davis, John S

    2009-11-01

    Progesterone secretion by the steroidogenic cells of the corpus luteum (CL) is essential for reproduction. Progesterone synthesis is under the control of LH, but the exact mechanism of this regulation is unknown. It is established that LH stimulates the LH receptor/choriogonadotropin receptor, a G-protein coupled receptor, to increase cAMP and activate cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that cAMP/PKA-dependent regulation of the Wnt pathway components glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta and beta-catenin contributes to LH-dependent steroidogenesis in luteal cells. We observed that LH via a cAMP/PKA-dependent mechanism stimulated the phosphorylation of GSK3beta at N-terminal Ser9 causing its inactivation and resulted in the accumulation of beta-catenin. Overexpression of N-terminal truncated beta-catenin (Delta90 beta-catenin), which lacks the phosphorylation sites responsible for its destruction, significantly augmented LH-stimulated progesterone secretion. In contrast, overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of GSK3beta (GSK-S9A) reduced beta-catenin levels and inhibited LH-stimulated steroidogenesis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated the association of beta-catenin with the proximal promoter of the StAR gene, a gene that expresses the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, which is a cholesterol transport protein that controls a rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. Collectively these data suggest that cAMP/PKA regulation of GSK3beta/beta-catenin signaling may contribute to the acute increase in progesterone production in response to LH.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can affect the muscles used for movement ( skeletal muscles ). In many affected individuals, AMP deaminase deficiency does ... called AMP deaminase. This enzyme is found in skeletal muscles , where it plays a role in producing energy. ...

  20. Elevated nitric oxide and 3’,5’ cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Cíntia; de Moura, Miguel Carneiro; Pedro, Ana Julia; Rocha, Paula

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether serum levels of nitric oxide (NO•) and plasma levels of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and total glutathione (GSH) are altered in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and to examine their correlation with the severity of liver disease. METHODS: Twenty-six patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis were studied. Serum levels of NO• and plasma levels of cGMP and GSH were measured in 7 patients with compensated alcoholic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh A) and 19 patients with advanced cirrhosis (Child-Pugh B and C). The model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score was evaluated. Sixteen healthy volunteers served as controls. Liver enzymes and creatinine levels were also tested. RESULTS: NO• and cGMP levels were higher in patients with Child-Pugh B and C cirrhosis than in Child-Pugh A cirrhosis or controls (NO•: 21.70 ± 8.07 vs 11.70 ± 2.74; 21.70 ± 8.07 vs 7.26 ± 2.47 μmol/L, respectively; P < 0.001) and (cGMP: 20.12 ± 6.62 vs 10.14 ± 2.78; 20.12 ± 6.62 vs 4.95 ± 1.21 pmol/L, respectively; P < 0.001). Total glutathione levels were lower in patients with Child-Pugh B and C cirrhosis than in patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis or controls (16.04 ± 6.06 vs 23.01 ± 4.38 or 16.04 ± 6.06 vs 66.57 ± 26.23 μmol/L, respectively; P < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between NO• and cGMP levels in all patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. A significant negative correlation between reduced glutathione/glutathione disulfide and the MELD score was found in all cirrhotic patients. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest a role for oxidative stress in alcoholic liver cirrhosis, which is more significant in decompensated patients with higher levels of NO• and cGMP and lower GSH levels than in compensated and control patients. Altered mediator levels in decompensated patients may influence the hemodynamic changes in and progression of liver disease. PMID:18186561

  1. Metabolic Cooperative Control of Electrolyte Levels by Adenosine Triphosphate in the Frog Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, J.; Ochsenfeld, M. M.; Ling, G. N.

    1971-01-01

    This study examines the effects of metabolic inhibitors on the content of cellular K, Na, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP and K are seen to fall in the inhibited tissues. The ATP content is correlated with the K content. The role of ATP is examined according to a recent biophysical approach. It is suggested that ATP may control the electrolyte levels by inducing conformational changes in the cytoplasmic proteins. PMID:5316285

  2. Adenosine plasma level correlates with homocysteine and uric acid concentrations in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Fromonot, J; Deharo, P; Bruzzese, L; Cuisset, T; Quilici, J; Bonatti, S; Fenouillet, E; Mottola, G; Ruf, J; Guieu, R

    2016-03-01

    The role of hyperhomocysteinemia in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients remains unclear. The present study evaluated the relationship between homocysteine (HCys), adenosine plasma concentration (APC), plasma uric acid, and CAD severity evaluated using the SYNTAX score. We also evaluated in vitro the influence of adenosine on HCys production by hepatoma cultured cells (HuH7). Seventy-eight patients (mean age ± SD: 66.3 ± 11.3; mean SYNTAX score: 19.9 ± 12.3) and 30 healthy subjects (mean age: 61 ± 13) were included. We incubated HuH7 cells with increasing concentrations of adenosine and addressed the effect on HCys level in cell culture supernatant. Patients vs. controls had higher APC (0.82 ± 0.5 μmol/L vs 0.53 ± 0.14 μmol/L; p < 0.01), HCys (15 ± 7.6 μmol/L vs 6.8 ± 3 μmol/L, p < 0.0001), and uric acid (242.6 ± 97 vs 202 ± 59, p < 0.05) levels. APC was correlated with HCys and uric acid concentrations in patients (Pearson's R = 0.65 and 0.52; p < 0.0001, respectively). The SYNTAX score was correlated with HCys concentration. Adenosine induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in HCys in cell culture. Our data suggest that high APC is associated with HCys and uric acid concentrations in CAD patients. Whether the increased APC participates in atherosclerosis or, conversely, is part of a protective regulation process needs further investigations.

  3. Alpha-Lipoic acid increases energy expenditure by enhancing adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha signaling in the skeletal muscle of aged mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with aging and diabetes, which decreases respiratory capacity and increases reactive oxygen species. Lipoic acid (LA) possesses antioxidative and antidiabetic properties. Metabolic action of LA is mediated by activation of adenosine monophospha...

  4. Hindbrain A2 noradrenergic neuron adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation, upstream kinase/phosphorylase protein expression, and receptivity to hormone and fuel reporters of short-term food deprivation are regulated by estradiol.

    PubMed

    Briski, Karen P; Alenazi, Fahaad S H; Shakya, Manita; Sylvester, Paul W

    2016-09-12

    Estradiol (E) mitigates acute and postacute adverse effects of 12 hr-food deprivation (FD) on energy balance. Hindbrain 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates hyperphagic and hypothalamic metabolic neuropeptide and norepinephrine responses to FD in an E-dependent manner. Energy-state information from AMPK-expressing hindbrain A2 noradrenergic neurons shapes neural responses to metabolic imbalance. Here we investigate the hypothesis that FD causes divergent changes in A2 AMPK activity in E- vs. oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized female rats, alongside dissimilar adjustments in circulating metabolic fuel (glucose, free fatty acids [FFA]) and energy deficit-sensitive hormone (corticosterone, glucagon, leptin) levels. FD decreased blood glucose in oil (O)- but not E-implanted ovariectomized female rats and elevated and reduced glucagon levels in O and E, respectively. FD decreased circulating leptin in O and E, but increased corticosterone and FFA concentrations in E only. Western blot analysis of laser-microdissected A2 neurons showed that glucocorticoid receptor type II and very-long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 protein profiles were amplified in FD/E vs. FD/O. A2 total AMPK protein was elevated without change in activity in FD/O, whereas FD/E exhibited increased AMPK activation along with decreased upstream phosphatase expression. The catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DβH) was increased in FD/O but not FD/E A2 cells. The data show discordance between A2 AMPK activation and glycemic responses to FD; sensor activity was refractory to glucose decrements in FD/O but augmented in FD/E despite stabilized glucose and elevated FFA levels. E-dependent amplification of AMPK activity may reflect adaptive conversion to fatty acid oxidation and/or glucocorticoid stimulation. FD augmentation of A2 DβH protein profiles in FD/O but not FD/E animals suggests that FD may correspondingly regulate NE synthesis vs. metabolism/release in the

  5. Ethologically based resolution of D2-like dopamine receptor agonist-versus antagonist-induced behavioral topography in dopamine- and adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa "knockout" mutants congenic on the C57BL/6 genetic background.

    PubMed

    Nally, Rachel E; Kinsella, Anthony; Tighe, Orna; Croke, David T; Fienberg, Allen A; Greengard, Paul; Waddington, John L

    2004-09-01

    Given the critical role of dopamine- and adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) in the regulation of dopaminergic function, DARPP-32-null mutant mice congenic on the inbred C57BL/6 strain for 10 generations were examined phenotypically for their ethogram of responsivity to the selective D2-like receptor agonist RU 24213 (N-n-propyl-N-phenylethyl-p-3-hydroxyphenylethylamine) and the selective D2-like receptor antagonist YM 09151-2 (cis-N-[1-benzyl-2-methyl-pyrrolidin-3-yl]-5-chloro-2-methoxy-4-methylaminobenzamide), using procedures that resolve all topographies of behavior in the natural repertoire. After vehicle challenge, levels of sniffing and rearing seated were reduced in DARPP-32 mutants; the injection procedure seems to constitute a "stressor" that reveals phenotypic effects of DARPP-32 deletion not apparent under natural conditions. Topographical effects of 0.3 to 10.0 mg/kg RU 24213, primarily induction of sniffing and ponderous locomotion with accompanying reductions in rearing, grooming, sifting and chewing, were not altered to any material extent in DARPP-32-null mice. However, topographical effects of 0.005 to 0.625 mg/kg YM 09151-2, namely, reduction in sniffing, locomotion, rearing, grooming, and chewing but not sifting, were essentially absent in DARPP-32 mutants. Thus, the D2-like receptor agonist-mediated ethogram was essentially conserved, whereas major elements of the corresponding D2-like receptor antagonist-mediated ethogram were essentially absent in DARPP-32-null mice. This suggests some relationship between 1) extent of tonic dopaminergic activation of DARPP-32 mechanisms and 2) compensatory mechanisms consequent to the developmental absence of DARPP-32, which may emerge to act differentially on individual elements of the DARPP-32 system. Critically, the present data indicate that phenotypic effects of a given gene deletion using an agonist acting on the system disrupted cannot be generalized to a

  6. Cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript expression in the rat nucleus accumbens is regulated by adenylyl cyclase and the cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate/protein kinase a second messenger system.

    PubMed

    Jones, Douglas C; Kuhar, Michael J

    2006-04-01

    Cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), a neuropeptide involved in the brain's reward/reinforcement circuit, modulates the effects of psychostimulants, including cocaine. The CART gene has been characterized, and binding sites for multiple transcription factors have been identified within the promoter region, including the cAMP-response element, which serves as a binding site for cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB). CART expression appears to be regulated via cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)/CREB-mediated signaling in cell culture. Therefore, the goal of these studies was to examine the involvement of cAMP/PKA/CREB-mediated signaling in CART mRNA and peptide expression in vivo in the rat nucleus accumbens. Intra-accumbal injections of forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, stimulated the phosphorylation of CREB and increased both CART mRNA and peptide levels, an effect attenuated by inhibition of PKA with H89 [N-(2-[p-bromocinnamylamino]ethyl)-5-isoquinoline-sulfonamide hydrochloride] and adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer (Rp-cAMPS). In addition, Rp-cAMPS alone decreased CART mRNA compared with saline-injected controls, suggesting that CART expression may be tonically regulated by PKA. Under certain conditions, cocaine increases CART mRNA levels; thus, we examined the effects of cocaine on forskolin-induced CART mRNA expression in the rat nucleus accumbens. Cocaine plus forskolin significantly increased CART mRNA over either of the drugs administered independently, suggesting that under conditions of heightened cAMP signaling, cocaine may impact CART gene expression. These results suggest that CART expression in vivo in the rat nucleus accumbens is regulated by adenylyl cyclase and cAMP/PKA-mediating signaling and, likely, through the activation of CREB.

  7. Syzygium cumini inhibits adenosine deaminase activity and reduces glucose levels in hyperglycemic patients.

    PubMed

    Bopp, A; De Bona, K S; Bellé, L P; Moresco, R N; Moretto, M B

    2009-08-01

    Syzigium cumini (L.) Skeels from the Myrtaceae family is among the most common medicinal plants used to treat diabetes in Brazil. Leaves, fruits, and barks of S. cumini have been used for their hypoglycemic activity. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is an important enzyme that plays a relevant role in purine and DNA metabolism, immune responses, and peptidase activity. ADA is suggested to be an important enzyme for modulating the bioactivity of insulin, but its clinical significance in diabetes mellitus (DM) has not yet been proven. In this study, we examined the effect of aqueous leaf extracts of S. cumini (L.) (ASC) on ADA activity of hyperglycemic subjects and the activity of total ADA, and its isoenzymes in serum and erythrocytes. The present study indicates that: (i) the ADA activity in hyperglycemic serum was higher than normoglycemic serum and ADA activity was higher when the blood glucose level was more elevated; (ii) ASC (60-1000 microg/mL) in vitro caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of total ADA activity and a decrease in the blood glucose level in serum; (iii) ADA1 and 2 were reduced both in erythrocytes and in hyperglycemic serum. These results suggest that the decrease of ADA activity provoked by ASC may contribute to control adenosine levels and the antioxidant defense system of red cells and could be related to the complex ADA/DPP-IV-CD26 and the properties of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors which serve as important regulators of blood glucose.

  8. The P2Y12 antagonists, 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate triethylammonium salt and cangrelor (ARC69931MX), can inhibit human platelet aggregation through a Gi-independent increase in cAMP levels.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Subhashini; Mir, Fozia; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Khasawneh, Fadi T; Lam, Stephen C-T; Le Breton, Guy C

    2009-06-12

    ADP plays an integral role in the process of hemostasis by signaling through two platelet G-protein-coupled receptors, P2Y1 and P2Y12. The recent use of antagonists against these two receptors has contributed a substantial body of data characterizing the ADP signaling pathways in human platelets. Specifically, the results have indicated that although P2Y1 receptors are involved in the initiation of platelet aggregation, P2Y12 receptor activation appears to account for the bulk of the ADP-mediated effects. Based on this consideration, emphasis has been placed on the development of a new class of P2Y12 antagonists (separate from clopidogrel and ticlopidine) as an approach to the treatment of thromboembolic disorders. The present work examined the molecular mechanisms by which two of these widely used adenosine-based P2Y12 antagonists (2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate triethylammonium salt (2MeSAMP) and ARC69931MX), inhibit human platelet activation. It was found that both of these compounds raise platelet cAMP to levels that substantially inhibit platelet aggregation. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that this elevation of cAMP did not require Gi signaling or functional P2Y12 receptors but was mediated through activation of a separate G protein-coupled pathway, presumably involving Gs. However, additional experiments revealed that neither 2MeSAMP nor ARC69931MX (cangrelor) increased cAMP through activation of A2a, IP, DP, or EP2 receptors, which are known to couple to Gs. Collectively, these findings indicate that 2MeSAMP and ARC69931MX interact with an unidentified platelet G protein-coupled receptor that stimulates cAMP-mediated inhibition of platelet function. This inhibition is in addition to that derived from antagonism of P2Y12 receptors.

  9. Cold induced changes of adenosine levels in common eelpout (Zoarces viviparus): a role in modulating cytochrome c oxidase expression.

    PubMed

    Eckerle, L G; Lucassen, M; Hirse, T; Pörtner, H O

    2008-04-01

    Exposure of ectothermic organisms to variations in temperatures causes a transient mismatch between energy supply and demand, which needs to be compensated for during acclimation. Adenosine accumulation from ATP breakdown indicates such an imbalance and its reversal reflects a restoration of energy status. We monitored adenosine levels in blood serum and liver of common eelpout (Zoarces viviparus) during cold exposure in vivo. Furthermore, we tested its effect on the pattern of thermal acclimation in hepatocytes isolated from cold- (4 degrees C) versus warm- (11 degrees C) exposed fish. Adenosine levels increased during cold exposure in vivo and reached a transient maximum after 24 h in serum, but remained permanently elevated in liver. Whole animal cold acclimation induced a rise of liver citrate synthase activity by 44+/-15%, but left cytochrome c oxidase activity (COX) and RNA expression of the respective genes unchanged. Cold incubation of hepatocytes from warm-acclimated fish failed to cause an increase of mitochondrial enzyme activities despite increased COX4 mRNA levels. Conversely, warm acclimation of hepatocytes from cold-acclimated fish reduced both enzyme activities and COX2 and COX4 mRNA levels by 26-37%. Adenosine treatment of both warm- and cold-acclimated hepatocytes suppressed COX activities but activated COX mRNA expression. These effects were not receptor mediated. The present findings indicate that adenosine has the potential to regulate mitochondrial functioning in vivo, albeit the pathways resulting in the contrasting effects on expression and activity need to be identified.

  10. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP are reduced in lymphocytes from alcoholic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, I.; Wrubel, B.; Estrin, W.; Gordon, A.

    1987-03-01

    Alcoholism causes serious neurologic disease that may be due, in part, to the ability of ethanol to interact with neural cell membranes and change neuronal function. Adenosine receptors are membrane-bound proteins that appear to mediate some of the effects of ethanol in the brain. Human lymphocytes also have adenosine receptors, and their activation causes increases in cAMP levels. To test the hypothesis that basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels in lymphocytes might be abnormal in alcoholism, the authors studied lymphocytes from 10 alcoholic subjects, 10 age- and sex-matched normal individuals, and 10 patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels were reduced 75% in lymphocytes from alcoholic subjects. Also, there was a 76% reduction in ethanol stimulation of cAMP accumulation in lymphocytes from alcoholics. Similar results were demonstrable in isolated T cells. Unlike other laboratory tests examined, these measurements appeared to distinguish alcoholics from normal subjects and from patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Reduced basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP in lymphocytes from alcoholics may reflect a change in cell membranes due either to chronic alcohol abuse or to a genetic predisposition unique to alcoholic subjects.

  11. Reduced striatal adenosine A2A receptor levels define a molecular subgroup in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Villar-Menéndez, Izaskun; Díaz-Sánchez, Sara; Blanch, Marta; Albasanz, José Luis; Pereira-Veiga, Thais; Monje, Alfonso; Planchat, Luis Maria; Ferrer, Isidre; Martín, Mairena; Barrachina, Marta

    2014-04-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a mental disorder of unknown origin. Some scientific evidence seems to indicate that SZ is not a single disease entity, since there are patient groups with clear symptomatic, course and biomarker differences. SZ is characterized by a hyperdopaminergic state related to high dopamine D2 receptor activity. It has also been proposed that there is a hypoadenosynergic state. Adenosine is a nucleoside widely distributed in the organism with neuromodulative and neuroprotective activity in the central nervous system. In the brain, the most abundant adenosine receptors are A1R and A2AR. In the present report, we characterize the presence of both receptors in human postmortem putamens of patients suffering SZ with real time TaqMan PCR, western blotting and radioligand binding assay. We show that A1R levels remain unchanged with respect to age-matched controls, whereas nearly fifty percent of patients have reduced A2AR, at the transcriptional and translational levels. Moreover, we describe how DNA methylation plays a role in the pathological A2AR levels with the bisulfite-sequencing technique. In fact, an increase in 5-methylcytosine percentage in the 5' UTR region of ADORA2A was found in those SZ patients with reduced A2AR levels. Interestingly, there was a relationship between the A2A/β-actin ratio and motor disturbances as assessed with some items of the PANSS, AIMS and SAS scales. Therefore, there may be a subgroup of SZ patients with reduced striatal A2AR levels accompanied by an altered motor phenotype.

  12. Increased levels of adenosine and ecto 5'-nucleotidase (CD73) activity precede renal alterations in experimental diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Oyarzún, C; Salinas, C; Gómez, D; Jaramillo, K; Pérez, G; Alarcón, S; Podestá, L; Flores, C; Quezada, C; San Martín, R

    The pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN) has not been clearly established, making diagnosis and patient management difficult. Recent studies using experimental diabetic models have implicated adenosine signaling with renal cells dysfunction. Therefore, the study of the biochemical mechanisms that regulate extracellular adenosine availability during DN is of emerging interest. Using streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats we demonstrated that urinary levels of adenosine were early increased. Further analyses showed an increased expression of the ecto 5'-nucleotidase (CD73), which hydrolyzes AMP to adenosine, at the renal proximal tubules and a higher enzymatic activity in tubule extracts. These changes precede the signs of diabetic kidney injury recognized by significant proteinuria, morphological alterations and the presence of the renal fibrosis markers alpha smooth muscle actin and fibronectin, collagen deposits and thickening of the glomerular basement membrane. In the proximal tubule cell line HK2 we identified TGF-β as a key modulator of CD73 activity. Importantly, the increased activity of CD73 could be screened in urinary sediments from diabetic rats. In conclusion, the increase of CD73 activity is a key component in the production of high levels of adenosine and emerges as a new tool for the early diagnosis of tubular injury in diabetic kidney disease.

  13. Adenosine deaminase activity level as a tool for diagnosing tuberculous pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Khow-Ean, Nathapol; Booraphun, Suchart; Aekphachaisawat, Noppadol; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2013-07-04

    The yield for using a pleural fluid culture to diagnose tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) is low. Adenosine deaminase activity (ADA) has been shown to have good diagnostic value for TPE. The ADA cutoff point for the diagnosis of TPE is unclear. We attempted to determine the ADA level cutoff point for diagnosing of TPE in Thailand, where tuberculosis is endemic. We reviewed the medical records of patients with newly diagnosed pleural effusion aged >15 years who had a pleural fluid ADAlevel and who underwent a pleural biopsy. The study period was from March 1, 2010 to January 31, 2011. The diagnoses of TPE and malignant pleural effusion (MPE) were based on pathological findings. The diagnostic cutoff level for using ADA to diagnose TPE was determined. Forty-eight patients met study criteria. Of those, 18 patients (37.5%) were diagnosed with TPE. The mean ADA level was significantly higher among patients in the TPE group than in the MPE group (38.2 vs 14.8 U/l, p < 0.001). The cutoff level of 17.5 U/l gave sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio of 88.9%, 73.3%, 3.33, and 0.15, respectively. An ADA level >17.5 U/l had good diagnostic values among TPE patients in our study.

  14. Increased cyclic guanosine monophosphate production and endothelial nitric oxide synthase level in mononuclear cells from sildenafil citrate-treated patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    García-Cardoso, J; Vela, R; Mahillo, E; Mateos-Cáceres, P J; Modrego, J; Macaya, C; López-Farré, A J

    2010-01-01

    Mononuclear cells express enzymes involved in the NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) generating system, as well as PDE5. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of sildenafil citrate administration on the level of proteins involved in the NO/cGMP generating system in mononuclear cells from patients with ED. Twenty-one patients with ED (International Index of Erectile Function-Erectile Function Domain (IIEF-EFD) 17.9+/-0.8) were enrolled and 100 mg sildenafil citrate on-demand was administered during 12 weeks. All patients showed cardiovascular risk factors. After sildenafil citrate administration, IIEF-EFD score was improved (26+/-1.2 P<0.05). In the mononuclear cells, the protein level of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) was higher after sildenafil citrate treatment. It was accompanied by reduction in the circulating plasma levels of both high-sensitive C-reactive protein and soluble intercellular adhesive molecule-1. The protein level of soluble guanylate cyclase and PDE5 did not change in the mononuclear cells after sildenafil citrate treatment. However, in the mononuclear cells exogenous NO induced a higher cGMP production after 12-weeks sildenafil citrate administration. In conclusion, in mononuclear cells from patients with ED sildenafil citrate administration increased the level of eNOS protein and increased cGMP production in response to NO. Moreover, sildenafil citrate administration reduced the plasma circulating levels of two biomarkers associated with inflammation.

  15. Hydroxycarbamide modulates components involved in the regulation of adenosine levels in blood cells from sickle-cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Silva-Pinto, Ana C; Dias-Carlos, Carolina; Saldanha-Araujo, Felipe; Ferreira, Flávia I S; Palma, Patrícia V B; Araujo, Amélia G; Queiroz, Regina H C; Elion, Jacques; Covas, Dimas T; Zago, Marco A; Panepucci, Rodrigo A

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the role of adenosine (ADO) in sickle-cell anemia (SCA). ADO is produced by CD39 and CD73 and converted to inosine by adenosine deaminase (ADA). We evaluated the effects of hydroxycarbamide (HU) treatment on the modulation of adenosine levels in SCA patients. The expressions of CD39, CD73, and CD26 were evaluated by flow cytometry on blood cells in 15 HU-treated and 17 untreated patients and 10 healthy individuals. RNA was extracted from monocytes, and ADA gene expression was quantified by real-time PCR. ADA activity was also evaluated. We found that ADA transcripts were two times higher in monocytes of HU-treated patients, compared with untreated (P = 0.039). Monocytes of HU-treated patients expressed CD26, while monocytes of controls and untreated patients did not (P = 0.023). In treated patients, a lower percentage of T lymphocytes expressed CD39 compared with untreated (P = 0.003), and the percentage of T regulatory (Treg) cells was reduced in the treated group compared with untreated (P = 0.017) and controls (P = 0.0009). Besides, HU-treated patients displayed increased ADA activity, compared with untreated. Our results indicate a novel mechanism of action of HU mediated by the reduction of adenosine levels and its effects on pathophysiological processes in SCA.

  16. Responsiveness of renal glomeruli to adenosine in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats dependent on hyperglycaemia level.

    PubMed

    Szczepańska-Konkel, M; Jankowski, M; Stiepanow-Trzeciak, A; Rudzik, A; Pawełczyk, T; Angielski, S

    2003-03-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in response to adenosine precursor, NAD, and glomeruli contractility in response to adenosine were evaluated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats with severe (blood glucose 27.8 +/- 1.2 mmol/L) and moderate hyperglycaemia (18.2 +/- 0.9 mmol/L) compared with nondiabetic (ND)-rats. In anaesthetised rats, basal GFR was greater in moderately diabetic rats compared with severely diabetic rats (p < 0.05) and ND-rats (p < 0.02). Intravenous infusion of 5 nmol x min(-1) x kg(-1) NAD reduced GFR and renal plasma flow (RPF) in diabetic rats but had no effect on these parameters in ND-rats. Moreover, NAD-induced reduction of GFR and RPF was greater in rats with severe diabetes (41% and 30%, respectively) than in with moderate diabetes (25% and 26%, respectively). Theophylline (0.2 micromol x min(-1) x kg(-1) ) abolished renal response to NAD. Isolated glomeruli contraction in response to adenosine, assessed by glomerular 3H-inulin space reduction, was lowered in moderately diabetic-group and enhanced in severely diabetic-group. compared with ND-group (p < 0.05). Adenosine A1-receptor antagonist DPCPX inhibited adenosine-induced glomeruli contraction. This differential response of diabetic renal glomeruli to adenosine suggests that impaired glomerular contractility in response to adenosine could be responsible for hyperfiltration in moderate diabets, whereas, the increased adenosine-dependent contractility of glomeruli in severe diabetes may increase the risk of acute renal failure in this condition.

  17. Cyclic adenosine 3'-5'-monophosphate (cAMP) exerts proliferative and anti-proliferative effects in pituitary cells of different types by activating both cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac).

    PubMed

    Vitali, E; Peverelli, E; Giardino, E; Locatelli, M; Lasio, G B; Beck-Peccoz, P; Spada, A; Lania, A G; Mantovani, G

    2014-03-05

    In the pituitary the activation of cyclic adenosine 3'-5'-monophosphate (cAMP) dependent pathways generates proliferative signals in somatotrophs, whereas in pituitary cells of other lineages its effect remains uncertain. Moreover, the specific role of the two main cAMP effectors, protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac), has not been defined. Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cAMP on pituitary adenomatous cells proliferation and to identify PKA and Epac differential involvement. We found that cAMP increased DNA synthesis and cyclin D1 expression in somatotropinomas, whereas it reduced both parameters in prolactinomas and nonfunctioning adenomas, these effects being replicated in corresponding cell lines. Moreover, the divergent cAMP effects were mimicked by Epac and PKA analogs, which activated Rap1 and CREB, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that cAMP exerted opposite effects on different pituitary cell types proliferation, these effects being mediated by both Epac and PKA.

  18. Effects of hypocretin (orexin) neuronal loss on sleep and extracellular adenosine levels in the basal forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Rodriguez, Eric; Liu, Meng; Blanco-Centurion, Carlos; Shiromani, Priyattam J.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons containing the neuropeptide hypocretin (orexin) are localized only in the lateral hypothalamus from where they innervate multiple regions implicated in arousal, including the basal forebrain. HCRT activation of downstream arousal neurons is likely to stimulate release of endogenous factors. One such factor is adenosine (AD), which in the basal forebrain increases with waking and decreases with sleep, and is hypothesized to regulate the waxing and waning of sleep drive. Does loss of HCRT neurons affect AD levels in the basal forebrain? Is the increased sleep that accompanies HCRT loss a consequence of higher AD levels in the basal forebrain? In the present study, we investigate these questions by lesioning the HCRT neurons (hypocretin-2-saporin) and measuring sleep and extracellular levels of AD in the basal forebrain. In separate groups of rats, the neurotoxin HCRT2-SAP or saline were administered locally to the lateral hypothalamus and 80 days later AD and sleep were assessed. Rats given the neurotoxin had a 94% loss of the HCRT neurons. These rats awake less at night, and had more REM sleep, which is consistent with a HCRT hypofunction. These rats also had more sleep after brief periods of sleep deprivation. However, in the lesioned rats, AD levels did not increase with 6h sleep deprivation, whereas such an increase in AD occurred in rats without lesion of the HCRT neurons. These findings indicate that AD levels do not increase with waking in rats with a HCRT lesion, and that the increased sleep in these rats occurs independently of AD levels in the basal forebrain. PMID:18783368

  19. Antigenicity of UV radiation-induced murine tumors correlates positively with the level of adenosine deaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, S L; Fidler, I J

    1987-01-01

    The specific activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA) in 16 murine tumor cell lines derived from seven UV light-induced neoplasms (melanoma and fibrosarcoma) were determined. In each case, the specific activity of ADA correlated positively with the antigenicity of the tumor cells. Highly antigenic cell lines that regress upon introduction into syngeneic hosts had on average 4- to 6-fold higher ADA specific activities than cell lines of low antigenicity that grow progressively in syngeneic hosts. The antigenic differences are probably not related to intracellular cAMP levels, as the level of cAMP differed only 2-fold between the two groups of cell lines.

  20. Microcontroller-assisted compensation of adenosine triphosphate levels: instrument and method development.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie-Bi; Chen, Ting-Ru; Chen, Yu-Chie; Urban, Pawel L

    2015-01-30

    In order to ascertain optimum conditions for biocatalytic processes carried out in vitro, we have designed a bio-opto-electronic system which ensures real-time compensation for depletion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in reactions involving transfer of phosphate groups. The system covers ATP concentration range of 2-48 μM. The report demonstrates feasibility of the device operation using apyrase as the ATP-depleting enzyme.

  1. Neurochemical Measurement of Adenosine in Discrete Brain Regions of Five Strains of Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Amar K.; Jiao, Yun; Sample, Kenneth J.; Smeyne, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine (ADO), a non-classical neurotransmitter and neuromodulator, and its metabolites adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), have been shown to play an important role in a number of biochemical processes. Although their signaling is well described, it has been difficult to directly, accurately and simultaneously quantitate these purines in tissue or fluids. Here, we describe a novel method for measuring adenosine (ADO) and its metabolites using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Using this chromatographic technique, we examined baseline levels of ADO and ATP, ADP and AMP in 6 different brain regions of the C57BL/6J mouse: stratum, cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, substantia nigra and cerebellum and compared ADO levels in 5 different strains of mice (C57BL/6J, Swiss-Webster, FVB/NJ, 129P/J, and BALB/c). These studies demonstrate that baseline levels of purines vary significantly among the brain regions as well as between different mouse strains. These dissimilarities in purine concentrations may explain the variable phenotypes among background strains described in neurological disease models. PMID:24642754

  2. Time- and dose-related interactions between glucocorticoid and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate on CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-dependent insulin-like growth factor I expression by osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Ji, C.; Chen, Y.; Kim, K.; Centrella, M.

    2000-01-01

    Glucocorticoid has complex effects on osteoblasts. Several of these changes appear to be related to steroid concentration, duration of exposure, or specific effects on growth factor expression or activity within bone. One important bone growth factor, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), is induced in osteoblasts by hormones such as PGE2 that increase intracellular cAMP levels. In this way, PGE2 activates transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-delta (C/EBPdelta) and enhances its binding to a specific control element found in exon 1 in the IGF-I gene. Our current studies show that preexposure to glucocorticoid enhanced C/EBPdelta and C/EBPbeta expression by osteoblasts and thereby potentiated IGF-I gene promoter activation in response to PGE2. Importantly, this directly contrasts with inhibitory effects on IGF-I expression that result from sustained or pharmacologically high levels of glucocorticoid exposure. Consistent with the stimulatory effect of IGF-I on bone protein synthesis, pretreatment with glucocorticoid sensitized osteoblasts to PGE2, and in this context significantly enhanced new collagen and noncollagen protein synthesis. Therefore, pharmacological levels of glucocorticoid may reduce IGF-I expression by osteoblasts and cause osteopenic disease, whereas physiological transient increases in glucocorticoid may permit or amplify the effectiveness of hormones that regulate skeletal tissue integrity. These events appear to converge on the important role of C/EBPdelta and C/EBPbeta on IGF-I expression by osteoblasts.

  3. Phosphorylation of Cytokinin by Adenosine Kinase from Wheat Germ 1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong-Maw; Eckert, Richard L.

    1977-01-01

    Adenosine kinase was partially purified from wheat germ. This enzyme preparation, which was devoid of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase and nearly free of adenosine deaminase but contained adenylate kinase, rapidly phosphorylated adenosine and a cytokinin, N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenosine. Electrophoretic analysis indicated that only N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenosine-monophosphate was formed from the cytokinin while about 55% AMP, 45% ADP, and a trace of ATP were formed from adenosine. The biosynthesized nucleoside monophosphates were quantitatively hydrolyzed to the corresponding nucleosides by 5′-nucleotidase and the isopentenyl side chain of the phosphorylated cytokinin was not cleaved. The enzyme did not catalyze phosphorylation of inosine. The phosphorylation of the cytokinin and adenosine required ATP and Mg2+. The pH optimum was from 6.8 to 7.2 for both the cytokinin and adenosine. At pH 7 and 37 C the Km and Vmax for the cytokinin were 31 μm and 8.3 nmoles per mg protein per minute, and the values for adenosine were 8.7 μm and 46 nmoles per mg protein per minute. Crude enzyme preparations from tobacco callus tissue and wheat germ phosphorylated N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenosine. These preparations also phosphorylated N6-(δ2-isopentenyl)adenine when 5-phosphorylribose-1-pyrophosphate was present. PMID:16659870

  4. Developmental and diurnal dynamics of Pax4 expression in the mammalian pineal gland: nocturnal down-regulation is mediated by adrenergic-cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate signaling.

    PubMed

    Rath, Martin F; Bailey, Michael J; Kim, Jong-So; Ho, Anthony K; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Coon, Steven L; Møller, Morten; Klein, David C

    2009-02-01

    Pax4 is a homeobox gene that is known to be involved in embryonic development of the endocrine pancreas. In this tissue, Pax4 counters the effects of the related protein, Pax6. Pax6 is essential for development of the pineal gland. In this study we report that Pax4 is strongly expressed in the pineal gland and retina of the rat. Pineal Pax4 transcripts are low in the fetus and increase postnatally; Pax6 exhibits an inverse pattern of expression, being more strongly expressed in the fetus. In the adult the abundance of Pax4 mRNA exhibits a diurnal rhythm in the pineal gland with maximal levels occurring late during the light period. Sympathetic denervation of the pineal gland by superior cervical ganglionectomy prevents the nocturnal decrease in pineal Pax4 mRNA. At night the pineal gland is adrenergically stimulated by release of norepinephrine from the sympathetic innervation; here, we found that treatment with adrenergic agonists suppresses pineal Pax4 expression in vivo and in vitro. This suppression appears to be mediated by cAMP, a second messenger of norepinephrine in the pineal gland, based on the observation that treatment with a cAMP mimic reduces pineal Pax4 mRNA levels. These findings suggest that the nocturnal decrease in pineal Pax4 mRNA is controlled by the sympathetic neural pathway that controls pineal function acting via an adrenergic-cAMP mechanism. The daily changes in Pax4 expression may influence gene expression in the pineal gland.

  5. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 attenuates PDGF-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration via the cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anuran; Wu, Bian; Chen, Mian; Conte, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Resolvin D1 (RvD1) is a specialized pro-resolving lipid mediator that has been previously shown to attenuate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, a key process in the development of intimal hyperplasia. We sought to investigate the role of the cAMP/PKA pathway in mediating the effects of the aspirin-triggered epimer 17R-RvD1 (AT-RvD1) on VSMC migration. Methods VSMCs were harvested from human saphenous veins. VSMCs were analyzed for intracellular cAMP levels and PKA activity after exposure to AT-RvD1. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced migration and cytoskeletal changes in VSMCs were observed through scratch, Transwell, and cell shape assays in the presence or absence of a PKA inhibitor (Rp-8-Br-cAMP). Further investigation of the pathways involved in AT-RvD1 signaling was performed by measuring Rac1 activity, vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation and paxillin translocation. Finally, we examined the role of RvD1 receptors (GPR32 and ALX/FPR2) in AT-RvD1 induced effects on VSMC migration and PKA activity. Results Treatment with AT-RvD1 induced a significant increase in cAMP levels and PKA activity in VSMCs at 5 minutes and 30 minutes, respectively. AT-RvD1 attenuated PDGF-induced VSMC migration and cytoskeletal rearrangements. These effects were attenuated by the PKA inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMP, suggesting cAMP/PKA involvement. Treatment of VSMC with AT-RvD1 inhibited PDGF-stimulated Rac1 activity, increased VASP phosphorylation, and attenuated paxillin localization to focal adhesions; these effects were negated by the addition of Rp-8-Br-cAMP. The effects of AT-RvD1 on VSMC migration and PKA activity were attenuated by blocking ALX/FPR2, suggesting an important role of this G-protein coupled receptor. Conclusions Our results suggest that AT-RvD1 attenuates PDGF-induced VSMC migration via ALX/FPR2 and cAMP/PKA. Interference with Rac1, VASP and paxillin function appear to mediate the downstream effects

  6. Cryptococcal pleuritis containing a high level of adenosine deaminase in a patient with AIDS: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Yusuke; Kitazawa, Takatoshi; Tatsuno, Keita; Ota, Yasuo; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Cryptococcal infection is the 4th most common opportunistic infection in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Although pleural effusion alone is an unusual presentation, we present a case of cryptococcal pleuritis in an AIDS patient which was initially difficult to discriminate from tuberculous pleuritis because of the high level of pleural adenosine deaminase (ADA). Cryptococcus neoformans was detected in the culture of the pleural effusion after the initiation of antituberculous treatment. High levels of ADA in the pleural fluid can be observed in patients with cryptococcal pleuritis, and longer incubation of pleural fluid should be performed in all patients who present with pleuritis associated with a high ADA level as the only significant finding.

  7. Diagnostic value of sputum adenosine deaminase (ADA) level in pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Binesh, Fariba; Jalali, Hadi; Zare, Mohammad Reza; Behravan, Farhad; Tafti, Arefeh Dehghani; Behnaz, Fatemah; Tabatabaee, Mohammad; Shahcheraghi, Seyed Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis is still a considerable health problem in many countries. Rapid diagnosis of this disease is important, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) has been used as a diagnostic test. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of ADA in the sputum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods The current study included 40 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (culture positive, smear ±) and 42 patients with non tuberculosis pulmonary diseases (culture negative). ADA was measured on all of the samples. Results The median value of ADA in non-tuberculosis patients was 2.94 (4.2) U/L and 4.01 (6.54) U/L in tuberculosis patients, but this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.100). The cut-off point of 3.1 U/L had a sensitivity of 61% and a specificity of 53%, the cut-off point of 2.81 U/L had a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 50% and the cut-off point of 2.78 U/L had a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 48%. The positive predictive values for cut-off points of 3.1, 2.81 and 2.78 U/L were 55.7%, 57.44% and 69.23%, respectively. The negative predictive values for the abovementioned cut-off points were 56.75%, 57.14% and 55.88%, respectively. Conclusion Our results showed that sputum ADA test is neither specific nor sensitive. Because of its low sensitivity and specificity, determination of sputum ADA for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis is not recommended. PMID:27482515

  8. A facile and sensitive method for quantification of cyclic nucleotide monophosphates in mammalian organs: basal levels of eight cNMPs and identification of 2',3'-cIMP.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xin; Fontaine, Benjamin M; Strobel, Fred; Weinert, Emily E

    2014-12-12

    A sensitive, versatile and economical method to extract and quantify cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs) using LC-MS/MS, including both 3',5'-cNMPs and 2',3'-cNMPs, in mammalian tissues and cellular systems has been developed. Problems, such as matrix effects from complex biological samples, are addressed and have been optimized. This protocol allows for comparison of multiple cNMPs in the same system and was used to examine the relationship between tissue levels of cNMPs in a panel of rat organs. In addition, the study reports the first identification and quantification of 2',3'-cIMP. The developed method will allow for quantification of cNMPs levels in cells and tissues with varying disease states, which will provide insight into the role(s) and interplay of cNMP signalling pathways.

  9. A Facile and Sensitive Method for Quantification of Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates in Mammalian Organs: Basal Levels of Eight cNMPs and Identification of 2',3'-cIMP

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xin; Fontaine, Benjamin M.; Strobel, Fred; Weinert, Emily E.

    2014-01-01

    A sensitive, versatile and economical method to extract and quantify cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs) using LC-MS/MS, including both 3',5'-cNMPs and 2',3'-cNMPs, in mammalian tissues and cellular systems has been developed. Problems, such as matrix effects from complex biological samples, are addressed and have been optimized. This protocol allows for comparison of multiple cNMPs in the same system and was used to examine the relationship between tissue levels of cNMPs in a panel of rat organs. In addition, the study reports the first identification and quantification of 2',3'-cIMP. The developed method will allow for quantification of cNMPs levels in cells and tissues with varying disease states, which will provide insight into the role(s) and interplay of cNMP signalling pathways. PMID:25513747

  10. Adenosine Kinase: Exploitation for Therapeutic Gain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine kinase (ADK; EC 2.7.1.20) is an evolutionarily conserved phosphotransferase that converts the purine ribonucleoside adenosine into 5′-adenosine-monophosphate. This enzymatic reaction plays a fundamental role in determining the tone of adenosine, which fulfills essential functions as a homeostatic and metabolic regulator in all living systems. Adenosine not only activates specific signaling pathways by activation of four types of adenosine receptors but it is also a primordial metabolite and regulator of biochemical enzyme reactions that couple to bioenergetic and epigenetic functions. By regulating adenosine, ADK can thus be identified as an upstream regulator of complex homeostatic and metabolic networks. Not surprisingly, ADK dysfunction is involved in several pathologies, including diabetes, epilepsy, and cancer. Consequently, ADK emerges as a rational therapeutic target, and adenosine-regulating drugs have been tested extensively. In recent attempts to improve specificity of treatment, localized therapies have been developed to augment adenosine signaling at sites of injury or pathology; those approaches include transplantation of stem cells with deletions of ADK or the use of gene therapy vectors to downregulate ADK expression. More recently, the first human mutations in ADK have been described, and novel findings suggest an unexpected role of ADK in a wider range of pathologies. ADK-regulating strategies thus represent innovative therapeutic opportunities to reconstruct network homeostasis in a multitude of conditions. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the genetics, biochemistry, and pharmacology of ADK and will then focus on pathologies and therapeutic interventions. Challenges to translate ADK-based therapies into clinical use will be discussed critically. PMID:23592612

  11. Identification of a novel phosphatase with high affinity for nucleotides monophosphate from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Cabello-Díaz, Juan Miguel; Quiles, Francisco Antonio; Lambert, Rocío; Pineda, Manuel; Piedras, Pedro

    2012-04-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seedlings accumulate ureides derived from purines after germination. The first step in the conversion of purines to ureides is the removal of the 5'-phosphate group by a phosphatase that has not been established yet. Two main phosphatase activities were detected in the embryonic axes of common bean using inosine monophosphate as substrate in an in-gel assay. Both activities differed in their sensitive to the common phosphatase inhibitor molybdate, with the molybdate-resistant as the first enzyme induced after radicle protrusion. The molybdate-resistant phosphatase has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and this is the first enzyme which shows this resistance purified and characterized from plant tissues. The native enzyme was a monomer of 55 kDa and it showed highest activity with nucleotides as substrates, with the K(m) values in the micromolar range. Among nucleotides, the highest specific constant (V(max)/K(m)) was observed for adenosine monophosphate. Furthermore, the enzyme was inhibited by nucleosides, the products of the enzymatic reaction, with maximum effect for adenosine. Common bean seedlings imbibed in the presence of adenosine monophosphate in vivo showed the highest molybdate-resistant phosphatase activity in the axes in addition to increased ureide content. The data presented suggests that purified phosphatase is involved in nucleotide metabolism in embryonic axes from common bean.

  12. The Role of Adenosine Signaling in Headache: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Nathan T.; Elliott, Melanie B.; Oshinsky, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is the third most prevalent disease on the planet, yet our understanding of its mechanisms and pathophysiology is surprisingly incomplete. Recent studies have built upon decades of evidence that adenosine, a purine nucleoside that can act as a neuromodulator, is involved in pain transmission and sensitization. Clinical evidence and rodent studies have suggested that adenosine signaling also plays a critical role in migraine headache. This is further supported by the widespread use of caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, in several headache treatments. In this review, we highlight evidence that supports the involvement of adenosine signaling in different forms of headache, headache triggers, and basic headache physiology. This evidence supports adenosine A2A receptors as a critical adenosine receptor subtype involved in headache pain. Adenosine A2A receptor signaling may contribute to headache via the modulation of intracellular Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production or 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in neurons and glia to affect glutamatergic synaptic transmission within the brainstem. This evidence supports the further study of adenosine signaling in headache and potentially illuminates it as a novel therapeutic target for migraine. PMID:28335379

  13. Uptake of intact nucleoside monophosphates by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J.

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, E G; McCabe, J B; Barke, J I

    1985-01-01

    The degraded nucleic acids and ribosomes of its prey cell provide Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J with a source of ribonucleoside monophosphates and deoxyribonucleoside monophosphates for biosynthesis and respiration. We demonstrate that bdellovibrios, in contrast to almost all other bacteria, take up these nucleoside monophosphates into the cell in an intact, phosphorylated form. In this way they are able to assimilate more effectively the cellular contents of their prey. Studies with UMP and dTMP demonstrate that they are transported and accumulated against a concentration gradient, achieving internal levels at least 10 times the external levels. Treatment of the bdellovibrios with azide or carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone eliminates their ability to either transport or maintain accumulated UMP and suggests the presence of a freely reversible exchange mechanism. There are at least two separate classes of transport systems for nucleoside monophosphates, each exhibiting partial specificity for either ribonucleoside monophosphates or deoxyribonucleoside monophosphates. Kinetic analyses of UMP transport in different developmental stages of strain 109J indicate that each stage expresses a single, saturable uptake system with a distinct apparent substrate affinity constant (Kt) of 104 microM in attack phase cells and 35 microM in prematurely released growth phase filaments. The capacity for transport of UMP by the growth phase filaments was 2.4 times that of the attack phase cells. These data, in addition to the apparent lack of environmental control of UMP transport capacity in attack phase cells, suggest that there are two transport systems for UMP in bdellovibrios and that the high-affinity, high-capacity growth phase system is developmentally regulated. PMID:4030692

  14. Fluorescence detection of adenosine triphosphate in an aqueous solution using a combination of copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Kataev, Evgeny; Arnold, René; Rüffer, Tobias; Lang, Heinrich

    2012-08-06

    Fluorescent ligands have been designed to form ternary complexes with a Cu(II) cation and phosphates in a buffer solution at physiological pH 7.4. It has been shown that a combination of two different ligands and CuCl(2) allows one to achieve high adenosine triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate, adenosine 5'-monophosphate selectivity, and ratiometric fluorescence sensing, while separately each ligand complex does not have such properties.

  15. GABAB and adenosine receptors mediate enhancement of the K+ current, IAHP, by reducing adenylyl cyclase activity in rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gerber, U; Gähwiler, B H

    1994-11-01

    1. Gamma-aminobuturic acid-B (GABAB) and adenosine A1 receptors, which are expressed in hippocampal pyramidal cells, are linked to pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins known to be coupled negatively to the enzyme adenylyl cyclase. This study investigates the electrophysiological consequences of adenylyl cyclase inhibition in response to stimulation of these receptors. 2. Single-electrode voltage-clamp recordings were obtained from CA3 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal slice cultures in presence of tetrodotoxin. The calcium-dependent potassium current (IAHP), which is very sensitive to intracellular levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used as an electrophysiological indicator of adenylyl cyclase activity. 3. Application of baclofen (10 microM), a selective agonist at GABAB receptors, or adenosine (50 microM) each resulted in a transient decrease followed by a significant enhancement in the amplitude of evoked IAHP. The initial reduction in amplitude of IAHP probably reflects inadequacies in voltage clamp of electronically distant dendritic sites, due to the shunting caused by concomitant activation of potassium conductance by baclofen/adenosine. Comparable increases in membrane conductance in response to the GABAA agonist, muscimol, caused a similar reduction in IAHP. The enhancement of IAHP is consistent with an inhibition of constitutively active adenylyl cyclase. 4. The receptor mediating the responses to adenosine was identified as belonging to the A1 subtype on the basis of its sensitivity to the selective antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Role of adenosine A(2A) receptors in modulating synaptic functions and brain levels of BDNF: a possible key mechanism in the pathophysiology of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Tebano, Maria Teresa; Martire, Alberto; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; Popoli, Patrizia

    2010-09-01

    In the last few years, accumulating evidence has shown the existence of an important cross-talk between adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Not only are A(2A)Rs involved in the mechanism of transactivation of BDNF receptor TrkB, they also modulate the effect of BDNF on synaptic transmission, playing a facilitatory and permissive role. The cAMP-PKA pathway, the main transduction system operated by A(2A)Rs, is involved in such effects. Furthermore, a basal tonus of A(2A)Rs is required to allow the regulation of BDNF physiological levels in the brain, as demonstrated by the reduced protein levels measured in A(2A)Rs KO mice. The crucial role of adenosine A(2A)Rs in the maintenance of synaptic functions and BDNF levels will be reviewed here and discussed in the light of possible implications for Huntington's disease therapy, in which a joint impairment of BDNF and A(2A)Rs seems to play a pathogenetic role.

  17. Endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors localized to ganglion cells of the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Braas, K.M.; Zarbin, M.A.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-06-01

    Using specific sensitive antisera against adenosine, we have immunocytochemically localized endogenous adenosine to specific layers of rat, guinea pig, monkey, and human retina. Highest adenosine immunoreactivity was observed in ganglion cells and their processes in the optic nerve fiber layer. Substantial staining was also found throughout the inner plexiform layer and in select cells in the inner nuclear layer. Adenosine A1 receptors, labeled with the agonists L-(/sup 3/H)phenylisopropyladenosine and /sup 125/I-labeled hydroxy-phenylisopropyladenosine, were autoradiographically localized. The highest levels of binding sites occurred in the nerve fiber, ganglion cell, and inner plexiform layers of the retina in all the species examined. The distribution of adenosine A1 receptor sites closely parallels that of retinal neurons and fibers containing immunoreactive adenosine. These results suggest a role for endogenous adenosine as a coneurotransmitter in ganglion cells and their fibers in the optic nerve.

  18. Pathological overproduction: the bad side of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Borea, Pier Andrea; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Varani, Katia

    2017-03-02

    Adenosine is an endogenous ubiquitous purine nucleoside, which is increased by hypoxia, ischaemia and tissue damage and mediates a number of physiopathological effects by interacting with four GPCRs, identified as A1 , A2A , A2B and A3 . Physiological and acutely increased adenosine is mostly associated with beneficial effects that include vasodilatation and a decrease in inflammation. In contrast, chronic overproduction of adenosine occurs in important pathological states, where long-lasting increases in the nucleoside levels are responsible for the bad side of adenosine associated with chronic inflammation, fibrosis and organ damage. In this review, we describe and critically discuss the pathological overproduction of adenosine and analyse when, where and how adenosine exerts its detrimental effects throughout the body.

  19. The Effect of Adenosine A2A and A2B Antagonists on Tracheal Responsiveness, Serum Levels of Cytokines and Lung Inflammation in Guinea Pig Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Pejman, Laleh; Omrani, Hasan; Mirzamohammadi, Zahra; Shahbazfar, Amir Ali; Khalili, Majid; Keyhanmanesh, Rana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Nowadays adenosine is specified as an important factor in the pathophysiology of asthma. For determining the effect of different A2 receptors, in this investigation the effect of single dose of selective adenosine A2A and A2B antagonists (ZM241385 and MRS1706) on different inflammatory parameters; tracheal responsiveness to methacholine and ovalbumin, total and differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), blood levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ and lung pathology of guinea pig model of asthma were assessed. Methods: All mentioned parameters were evaluated in two sensitized groups of guinea pigs pretreated with A2A and A2B antagonists (S+Anta A2A, S+Anta A2B) compared with sensitized (S) and control (C) groups. Results: The tracheal responsiveness to methacholine and OA, total cell and eosinophil and basophil count in BAL, blood IL-4 level and pathological changes in pre-treated group with MRS1706 (S+Anta A2B) was significantly lower than those of sensitized group (p<0.01 to p<0.05). In pretreated group with Anta A2A(S+Anta A2A), all the above changes were reversed. Conclusion: These results showed a preventive effect of A2B antagonist (MRS1706) on tracheal responsiveness to methacholine and OA, total and differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage, blood cytokines and pathological changes. Administration of ZM241385, selective A2A antagonist, deteriorated the induction effect of ovalbumin. PMID:24511476

  20. Adenosine receptor targets for pain.

    PubMed

    Sawynok, J

    2016-12-03

    The main focus for the development of adenosine targets as analgesics to date has been A1Rs due to its antinociceptive profile in various preclinical pain models. The usefulness of systemic A1R agonists may be limited by other effects (cardiovascular, motor), but enhanced selectivity for pain might occur with partial agonists, potent and highly selective agonists, or allosteric modulators. A2AR agonists exhibit some peripheral pronociceptive effects, but also act on immune cells to suppress inflammation and on spinal glia to suppress pain signaling and may be useful for inflammatory and neuropathic pain. A2BR agonists exhibit peripheral proinflammatory effects on immune cells, but also spinal antinociceptive effects similar to A2AR agonists. A3Rs are now demonstrated to produce antinociception in several preclinical neuropathic pain models, with mechanistic actions on glial cells, and may be useful for neuropathic pain. Endogenous adenosine levels can be augmented by inhibition of metabolism (via adenosine kinase) or increased generation (via nucleotidases), and these approaches have implications for pain. Endogenous adenosine contributes to antinociception by several pharmacological agents, herbal remedies, acupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, exercise, joint mobilization, and water immersion via spinal and/or peripheral effects, such that this system appears to constitute a major pain regulatory system. Finally, caffeine inhibits A1-, A2A- and A3Rs with similar potency, and dietary caffeine intake will need attention in trials of: (a) agonists and/or modulators acting at these receptors, (b) some pharmacological and herbal analgesics, and (c) manipulations that enhance endogenous adenosine levels, all of which are inhibited by caffeine and/or A1R antagonists in preclinical studies. All adenosine receptors have effects on spinal glial cells in regulating nociception, and gender differences in the involvement of such cells in chronic

  1. Antidepressant effect of electroacupuncture regulates signal targeting in the brain and increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dong-mei; Tu, Ya; Liu, Ping; Jiao, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Electroacupuncture improves depressive behavior faster and with fewer adverse effects than antidepressant medication. However, the antidepressant mechanism of electroacupuncture remains poorly understood. Here, we established a rat model of chronic unpredicted mild stress, and then treated these rats with electroacupuncture at Yintang (EX-HN3) and Baihui (DU20) with sparse waves at 2 Hz and 0.6 mA for 30 minutes, once a day. We found increased horizontal and vertical activity, and decreased immobility time, at 2 and 4 weeks after treatment. Moreover, levels of neurotransmitters (5-hydroxytryptamine, glutamate, and γ-aminobutyric acid) and protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor-related proteins (TrkB, protein kinase A, and phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein) were increased in the hippocampus. Similarly, protein kinase A and TrkB mRNA levels were increased, and calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II levels decreased. These findings suggest that electroacupuncture increases phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels by regulating multiple targets in the cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein signaling pathway, thereby promoting nerve regeneration, and exerting an antidepressive effect. PMID:27904490

  2. Homeostatic control of synaptic activity by endogenous adenosine is mediated by adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Diógenes, Maria José; Neves-Tomé, Raquel; Fucile, Sergio; Martinello, Katiuscia; Scianni, Maria; Theofilas, Panos; Lopatár, Jan; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Maggi, Laura; Frenguelli, Bruno G; Limatola, Cristina; Boison, Detlev; Sebastião, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine, a key regulator of neuronal excitability, is metabolized by astrocyte-based enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). We hypothesized that ADK might be an upstream regulator of adenosine-based homeostatic brain functions by simultaneously affecting several downstream pathways. We therefore studied the relationship between ADK expression, levels of extracellular adenosine, synaptic transmission, intrinsic excitability, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent synaptic actions in transgenic mice underexpressing or overexpressing ADK. We demonstrate that ADK: 1) Critically influences the basal tone of adenosine, evaluated by microelectrode adenosine biosensors, and its release following stimulation; 2) determines the degree of tonic adenosine-dependent synaptic inhibition, which correlates with differential plasticity at hippocampal synapses with low release probability; 3) modulates the age-dependent effects of BDNF on hippocampal synaptic transmission, an action dependent upon co-activation of adenosine A2A receptors; and 4) influences GABAA receptor-mediated currents in CA3 pyramidal neurons. We conclude that ADK provides important upstream regulation of adenosine-based homeostatic function of the brain and that this mechanism is necessary and permissive to synaptic actions of adenosine acting on multiple pathways. These mechanistic studies support previous therapeutic studies and implicate ADK as a promising therapeutic target for upstream control of multiple neuronal signaling pathways crucial for a variety of neurological disorders.

  3. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate and adenosine in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stagg, J; Smyth, M J

    2010-09-30

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is actively released in the extracellular environment in response to tissue damage and cellular stress. Through the activation of P2X and P2Y receptors, extracellular ATP enhances tissue repair, promotes the recruitment of immune phagocytes and dendritic cells, and acts as a co-activator of NLR family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes. The conversion of extracellular ATP to adenosine, in contrast, essentially through the enzymatic activity of the ecto-nucleotidases CD39 and CD73, acts as a negative-feedback mechanism to prevent excessive immune responses. Here we review the effects of extracellular ATP and adenosine on tumorigenesis. First, we summarize the functions of extracellular ATP and adenosine in the context of tumor immunity. Second, we present an overview of the immunosuppressive and pro-angiogenic effects of extracellular adenosine. Third, we present experimental evidence that extracellular ATP and adenosine receptors are expressed by tumor cells and enhance tumor growth. Finally, we discuss recent studies, including our own work, which suggest that therapeutic approaches that promote ATP-mediated activation of inflammasomes, or inhibit the accumulation of tumor-derived extracellular adenosine, may constitute effective new means to induce anticancer activity.

  4. A 30-year-old female Behçet’s disease patient with recurrent pleural and pericardial effusion and elevated adenosine deaminase levels: case report

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Kwok, Seung-Ki; Jung, Jung Im; Lee, Kyo-Young; Kim, Tae-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Behçet’s disease is a systemic disease which may involve various organs. We describe a case of a patient diagnosed as pleuropericardial involvement of Behçet’s disease. A 30-year-old woman visited our clinic presented with left pleuritic chest pain for s days. She had been diagnosed as Behçet’s disease and admitted to our clinic due to pericardial and pleural effusion repeatedly in past two years. In the previous studies, effusion analysis revealed to be lympho-dominant exudate with high adenosine deaminase level. Acid-fast bacilli (AFB) culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for mycobacterial tuberculosis (M.TB) were negative in the pericardial tissue, and pathologic finding showed mild endothelitis with micro-thrombi formation in the lumen. The patient had been treated with antituberculous medication for a year. In the current admission, chest computed tomography (CT) again showed left pleural effusion without other significant lesion. Pleural fluid analysis was similar with the previous study. Video-assisted thoracoscopic pleural biopsy was performed to obtain the definite diagnosis. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis as pleuropericardial involvement of Behçet’s disease, and we treated the patient with oral steroid in the out-patient department. Pleuropericardial involvement of Behçet’s disease may mimic TB pleurisy or pericarditis due to high adenosine deaminase (ADA) level in effusion analysis. Clinicians should keep in mind that Behçet’s disease may manifest as pleural or pericardial effusion, and pathologic confirmation could be helpful for the definite diagnosis. PMID:27499994

  5. Dual recognition unit strategy improves the specificity of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer biosensor for cerebral ATP assay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ping; He, Xiulan; Zhang, Li; Mao, Lanqun

    2015-01-20

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer has been widely used as a recognition unit for biosensor development; however, its relatively poor specificity toward ATP against adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP) essentially limits the application of the biosensors in real systems, especially in the complex cerebral system. In this study, for the first time, we demonstrate a dual recognition unit strategy (DRUS) to construct a highly selective and sensitive ATP biosensor by combining the recognition ability of aptamer toward A nucleobase and of polyimidazolium toward phosphate. The biosensors are constructed by first confining the polyimidazolium onto a gold surface by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP), and then the aptamer onto electrode surface by electrostatic self-assembly to form dual-recognition-unit-functionalized electrodes. The constructed biosensor based on DRUS not only shows an ultrahigh sensitivity toward ATP with a detection limit down to the subattomole level but also an ultrahigh selectivity toward ATP without interference from ADP and AMP. The constructed biosensor is used for selective and sensitive sensing of the extracellular ATP in the cerebral system by combining in vivo microdialysis and can be used as a promising neurotechnology to probing cerebral ATP concentration.

  6. Nitrite-induced methemoglobinaemia affects blood ionized and total magnesium level by hydrolysis of plasma adenosine triphosphate in rat.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mizanur; Kim, Shang-Jin; Kim, Gi-Beum; Hong, Chul-Un; Lee, Young-Up; Kim, Sung-Zoo; Kim, Jin-Shang; Kang, Hyung-Sub

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of sodium nitrite (NaNO(2))-induced methemoglobinaemia on plasma ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and corresponding changes of blood-ionized magnesium (iMg(2+)) as well as total magnesium (tMg(2+)) in a time-dependent manner. This study was performed on male Sprague-Dawley rats to which NaNO(2) was injected (10 mg/kg i.p.) to induce methemoglobinaemia. Methemoglobin (MetHb) in blood was measured before (0 min.) and after 10, 30, 60 and 120 min. of NaNO(2) injection. At respective time points, the tMg(2+), blood ions and gases were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry and ion selective electrode, respectively. Haematological parameters were checked by automatic blood cell count, and blood films were observed under light microscope. Plasma ATP was measured by bioluminescence assay using a luminometer, and plasma proteins were measured by an automatic analyser. Blood cell count (RBC, WBC and platelet), haematocrit, and haemoglobin were found to be decreased with the advancement of MetHb concentration. With the gradual increase of MetHb concentration, the plasma ATP decreased and blood iMg(2+) and plasma tMg(2+) increased significantly as time passed by in comparison with the pre-drug values. A significant decrease of the ratio of ionized calcium to iMg(2+), Na(+) and increase of K(+) was observed. In conclusion, NaNO(2)-induced methemoglobinaemia is a cause of hydrolysis of plasma ATP which is responsible for the increase of blood iMg(2+) and plasma tMg(2+) in rats.

  7. Influence of experimental canine ehrlichiosis on the E-ADA activity and purine levels in serum and possible functional correlations with pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Munhoz, Thiago D; Faria, Joice L M; Vargas-Hérnandez, Giovanni; Machado, Rosangela Z; Luz, Nathalia C; Moritz, Cesar E J; Casali, Emerson A; Bottari, Nathieli B; Stefani, Lenita M; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela

    2013-10-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate adenosine deaminase activity and purines levels in serum of dogs experimentally infected by Ehrlichia canis. Banked serum samples of dogs divided into two groups with five animals each: healthy animals and animals infected by E. canis. The concentration of purines (adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), adenosine monophosphate (AMP), adenosine, inosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid), and adenosine deaminase (E-ADA) activity in sera were evaluated. Samples were collected on days 12 and 30 post-infection (PI). The E-ADA activity showed a significant reduction on day 12 PI, and increased on day 30 PI in dogs infected with E. canis. On day 12, an increase in seric concentration of ATP, ADP and adenosine was verified, and different levels of hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid had a drastic reduction in infected compared healthy dogs (P<0.05). However, on day 30 PI, the levels of seric ADP and AMP decreased, unlike the concentration of xanthine and uric acid that increased significantly in infected dogs (P<0.05). Therefore, the activity of E-ADA and purine levels are altered in experimental canine ehrlichiosis, probably with the purpose of modulating the pathogenesis of the disease related to immune response, oxidative stress and coagulation disorders in acute phase.

  8. Different mechanisms of extracellular adenosine accumulation by reduction of the external Ca(2+) concentration and inhibition of adenosine metabolism in spinal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Ryota; Akao, Sanae; Otsuguro, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Ito, Shigeo

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a neuromodulator in the central nervous system. Astrocytes mainly participate in adenosine production, and extracellular adenosine accumulates under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Inhibition of intracellular adenosine metabolism and reduction of the external Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]e) participate in adenosine accumulation, but the precise mechanisms remain unclear. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying extracellular adenosine accumulation in cultured rat spinal astrocytes. The combination of adenosine kinase and deaminase (ADK/ADA) inhibition and a reduced [Ca(2+)]e increased the extracellular adenosine level. ADK/ADA inhibitors increased the level of extracellular adenosine but not of adenine nucleotides, which was suppressed by inhibition of equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 2. Unlike ADK/ADA inhibition, a reduced [Ca(2+)]e increased the extracellular level not only of adenosine but also of ATP. This adenosine increase was enhanced by ENT2 inhibition, and suppressed by sodium polyoxotungstate (ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase inhibitor). Gap junction inhibitors suppressed the increases in adenosine and adenine nucleotide levels by reduction of [Ca(2+)]e. These results indicate that extracellular adenosine accumulation by ADK/ADA inhibition is due to the adenosine release via ENT2, while that by reduction of [Ca(2+)]e is due to breakdown of ATP released via gap junction hemichannels, after which ENT2 incorporates adenosine into the cells.

  9. Neuroprotective effects of adenosine deaminase in the striatum

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Risa; Satoh, Yasushi; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Nibuya, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catabolizes adenosine and deoxyadenosine. During cerebral ischemia, extracellular adenosine levels increase acutely and adenosine deaminase catabolizes the increased levels of adenosine. Since adenosine is a known neuroprotective agent, adenosine deaminase was thought to have a negative effect during ischemia. In this study, however, we demonstrate that adenosine deaminase has substantial neuroprotective effects in the striatum, which is especially vulnerable during cerebral ischemia. We used temporary oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) to simulate ischemia in rat corticostriatal brain slices. We used field potentials as the primary measure of neuronal damage. For stable and efficient electrophysiological assessment, we used transgenic rats expressing channelrhodopsin-2, which depolarizes neurons in response to blue light. Time courses of electrically evoked striatal field potential (eFP) and optogenetically evoked striatal field potential (optFP) were recorded during and after oxygen/glucose deprivation. The levels of both eFP and optFP decreased after 10 min of oxygen/glucose deprivation. Bath-application of 10 µg/ml adenosine deaminase during oxygen/glucose deprivation significantly attenuated the oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced reduction in levels of eFP and optFP. The number of injured cells decreased significantly, and western blot analysis indicated a significant decrease of autophagic signaling in the adenosine deaminase-treated oxygen/glucose deprivation slices. These results indicate that adenosine deaminase has protective effects in the striatum. PMID:26746865

  10. The Macrophage A2b Adenosine Receptor Regulates Tissue Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Koupenova, Milka; Carroll, Shannon; Ravid, Katya

    2014-01-01

    High fat diet (HFD)-induced type 2 diabetes continues to be an epidemic with significant risk for various pathologies. Previously, we identified the A2b adenosine receptor (A2bAR), an established regulator of inflammation, as a regulator of HFD-induced insulin resistance. In particular, HFD was associated with vast upregulation of liver A2bAR in control mice, and while mice lacking this receptor showed augmented liver inflammation and tissue insulin resistance. As the A2bAR is expressed in different tissues, here, we provide the first lead to cellular mechanism by demonstrating that the receptor's influence on tissue insulin sensitivity is mediated via its expression in macrophages. This was shown using a newly generated transgenic mouse model expressing the A2bAR gene in the macrophage lineage on an otherwise A2bAR null background. Reinstatement of macrophage A2bAR expression in A2bAR null mice fed HFD restored insulin tolerance and tissue insulin signaling to the level of control mice. The molecular mechanism for this effect involves A2bAR-mediated changes in cyclic adenosine monophosphate in macrophages, reducing the expression and release of inflammatory cytokines, which downregulate insulin receptor-2. Thus, our results illustrate that macrophage A2bAR signaling is needed and sufficient for relaying the protective effect of the A2bAR against HFD-induced tissue inflammation and insulin resistance in mice. PMID:24892847

  11. Adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate in higher plants: Isolation and characterization of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate from Kalanchoe and Agave.

    PubMed

    Ashton, A R; Polya, G M

    1977-07-01

    1.3':5'-Cyclic AMP was extensively purified from Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Agave americana by neutral alumina and anion- and cation-exchange column chromatography. Inclusion of 3':5'-cyclic [8-3H]AMP from the point of tissue extraction permitted calculation of yields. The purification procedure removed contaminating material that was shown to interfere with the 3':5'-cyclic AMP estimation and characterization procedures. 2. The partially purified 3':5'-cyclic AMP was quantified by means of a radiochemical saturation assay using an ox heart 3':5'-cyclic AMP-binding protein and by an assay involving activation of a mammalian protein kinase. 3. The plant 3':5'-cyclic AMP co-migrated with 3':5'-cyclic [8-3H]AMP on cellulose chromatography, poly(ethyleneimine)-cellulose chromatography and silica-gel t.l.c. developed with several solvent systems. 4. The plant 3':5'-cyclic AMP was degraded by ox heart 3':5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase at the same rates as authentic 3':5'-cyclic AMP. 1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine (1 mM), a specific inhibitor of the 3':5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodieterase, completely inhibited such degradation. 5. The concentrations of 3':5'-cyclic AMP satisfying the above criteria in Kalanchoe and Agave were 2-6 and 1 pmol/g fresh wt. respectively. Possible bacterial contribution to these analyses was estimated to be less than 0.002pmol/g fresh wt. Evidence for the occurrence of 3':5'-cyclic AMP in plants is discussed.

  12. Molecular basis for paradoxical carriers of adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency that show extremely low levels of ADA activity in peripheral blood cells without immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Ariga, T; Oda, N; Sanstisteban, I; Arredondo-Vega, F X; Shioda, M; Ueno, H; Terada, K; Kobayashi, K; Hershfield, M S; Sakiyama, Y

    2001-02-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency causes an autosomal recessive form of severe combined immunodeficiency and also less severe phenotypes, depending to a large degree on genotype. In general, ADA activity in cells of carriers is approximately half-normal. Unexpectedly, healthy first-degree relatives of two unrelated ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficient patients (mother and brother in family I; mother in family II) had only 1-2% of normal ADA activity in PBMC, lower than has previously been found in PBMC of healthy individuals with so-called "partial ADA deficiency." The level of deoxyadenosine nucleotides in erythrocytes of these paradoxical carriers was slightly elevated, but much lower than levels found in immunodeficient patients with ADA deficiency. ADA activity in EBV-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and T cell lines established from these carriers was 10-20% of normal. Each of these carriers possessed two mutated ADA alleles. Expression of cloned mutant ADA cDNAs in an ADA-deletion strain of Escherichia coli indicated that the novel mutations G239S and M310T were responsible for the residual ADA activity. ADA activity in EBV-LCL extracts of the paradoxical carriers was much more labile than ADA from normal EBV-LCL. Immunoblotting suggested that this lability was due to denaturation rather than to degradation of the mutant protein. These results further define the threshold level of ADA activity necessary for sustaining immune function.

  13. [Adenosine deaminase in experimental trypanosomiasis: future implications].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguilar, Mary Carmen; Rondón-Mercado, Rocío

    2015-09-01

    The adenosine deaminase represents a control point in the regulation of extracellular adenosine levels, thus playing a critical role in the modulation of purinergic responses to certain pathophysiological events. Several studies have shown that serum and plasma enzyme levels are elevated in some diseases caused by microorganisms, which may represent a compensatory mechanism due to the elevated levels of adenosine and the release of inflammatory mediators. Recent research indicates that adenosine deaminase activity decreases and affects hematological parameters of infected animals with Trypanosoma evansi, so that such alterations could have implications in the pathogenesis of the disease. In addition, the enzyme has been detected in this parasite; allowing the inference that it could be associated with the vital functions of the same, similar to what occurs in mammals. This knowledge may be useful in the association of chemotherapy with specific inhibitors of the enzyme in future studies.

  14. Development of an immune function assay by measuring intracellular adenosine triphosphate (iATP) levels in mitogen-stimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Hadi; Najafi, Alireza; Khoshroo, Mohammad; Tajik, Nader

    2016-01-01

    We developed an immune function assay for monitoring CD4+ T cells activity based on changes in intracellular adenosine triphosphate (iATP) levels after phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation. Blood samples were obtained from 40 healthy subjects and 30 RTRs and incubated with 5 µg/mL of PHA for 15-18 hr at 37°C and 5% CO2. Afterward, the CD4+ T cells were separated by antibody-coated magnetic beads and lysed. Then, iATP content in unstimulated and stimulated conditions was measured by luciferin-luciferase reaction using a log-log standard curve. The iATP levels showed significant increase in CD4+ T cells in both healthy persons (mean: 550 ± 142 ng/mL vs. 109 ± 54 ng/mL) and RTRs (mean: 394 ± 160 ng/mL vs. 52 ± 37 ng/mL) after PHA stimulation (P < 0.001). However, the iATP production in RTRs was significantly lower than that in healthy individuals; both prior to and after stimulation with PHA (P < 0.001). No gender-specific difference in iATP production was observed between women and men subjects. This rapid and low-cost assay reflects the degree of immune cell function through assessment of CD4+ T cells activation. Thus, it can be used for evaluation of immune system status in immunodeficient individuals as well as in immunosuppressed transplant recipients who needs drug adjustment.

  15. Properties of enzyme fraction A from Chlorella and copurification of 3' (2'), 5'-biphosphonucleoside 3' (2')-phosphohydrolase, adenosine 5'phosphosulfate sulfohydrolase and adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate cyclase activities.

    PubMed

    Lik-Shing Tsang, M; Schiff, J A

    1976-05-17

    Enzyme fraction A from Chlorella which catalyzes the formation of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate from adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phosphosulfate is further characterized. Fraction A is found to contain an Mg2+ -activated and Ca2+ -inhibited 3' (2')-nucleotidase specific for 3' (2'), 5'-biphosphonucleosides. This activity has been named 3' (2), 5'-biphosphonucleoside 3' (2')-phosphohydrolase. The A fraction is also found to contain an activity which catalyzes the formation of adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) from adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate cyclase). Under the same conditions of assay, 5'-ATP and 5'-ADP are not substrated for cyclic AMP formation. Unlike the 3' (2'), 5'-biphosphonucleoside 3' (2')-phosphohydrolase activity, the adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate cyclase activity does not require Mg2+, requires NH+4 or Na+, and is not inhibited by Ca2+. The A fraction also contains an adenosine 5'-phospho sulfate sulfohydrolase activity which forms 5'-AMP and sulfate. The three activities remain together during purification and acrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified preparation yields a pattern where only one protein band has all three activities. The phosphohydrolase can be separated from the other two activities by affinity chromatography on agarose-hexyl-adenosine 3'n5'-bisphosphate yielding a phosphohydrolase preparation showing a single band on gel electrophoresis. The adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate cyclase may provide an alternate route of cyclic AMP formation from sulfate via ATP sulfurylase, but its regulatory significance in Chlorella, if any, remains to be demonstrated. In sulfate reduction, the phosphohydrolase may serve to provide a readily utilized pool of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate as needed by the adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase. The cyclase and sulfohydrolase activities would be regarded as side reactions incidental to this pathway, but may be of importance in other metabolic and regulatory reactions.

  16. Effects of adenosine infusion into renal interstitium on renal hemodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowska, D.; Granger, J.P.; Knox, F.G.

    1987-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the hemodynamic effects of exogenous adenosine in the interstitium of the rat kidney. Adenosine or its analogues were infused into the renal interstitium by means of chronically implanted capsules. In fusion of adenosine decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from 0.81 +/- 0.06 to 0.37 +/- 0.06 ml/min while having no effect on renal blood flow (RBF). The metabolically stable analogue, 2-chloradenosine (2-ClAdo), decreased GFR from 0.73 +/- 0.07 to 021 +/- 0.06 ml/min. Interstitial infusion of theophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist, completely abolished the effects of adenosine and 2-ClAdo on GFR. The distribution of adenosine, when infused into the renal interstitium, was determined using radiolabeled 5'-(N-ethyl)-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a metabolically stable adenosine agonist. After continuous infusion, (/sup 3/H)NECA was distributed throughout the kidney. The effects of NECA to reduce GFR were similar to those of adenosine and 2-ClAdo. They conclude that increased levels of adenosine in the renal interstitium markedly decrease GFR without affecting RBF in steady-state conditions. The marked effects of adenosine agonists during their infusion into the renal interstitium and the complete blockade of these effects by theophylline suggest an extracellular action of adenosine.

  17. Circulating adenosine increases during human experimental endotoxemia but blockade of its receptor does not influence the immune response and subsequent organ injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Preclinical studies have shown that the endogenous nucleoside adenosine prevents excessive tissue injury during systemic inflammation. We aimed to study whether endogenous adenosine also limits tissue injury in a human in vivo model of systemic inflammation. In addition, we studied whether subjects with the common 34C > T nonsense variant (rs17602729) of adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMPD1), which predicts increased adenosine formation, have less inflammation-induced injury. Methods In a randomized double-blinded design, healthy male volunteers received 2 ng/kg E. Coli LPS intravenously with (n = 10) or without (n = 10) pretreatment with the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine (4 mg/kg body weight). In addition, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to 10 subjects heterozygous for the AMPD1 34C > T variant. Results The increase in adenosine levels tended to be more pronounced in the subjects heterozygous for the AMPD1 34C > T variant (71 ± 22%, P=0.04), compared to placebo- (59 ± 29%, P=0.012) and caffeine-treated (53 ± 47%, P=0.29) subjects, but this difference between groups did not reach statistical significance. Also the LPS-induced increase in circulating cytokines was similar in the LPS-placebo, LPS-caffeine and LPS-AMPD1-groups. Endotoxemia resulted in an increase in circulating plasma markers of endothelial activation [intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)], and in subclinical renal injury, measured by increased urinary excretion of tubular injury markers. The LPS-induced increase of these markers did not differ between the three groups. Conclusions Human experimental endotoxemia induces an increase in circulating cytokine levels and subclinical endothelial and renal injury. Although the plasma adenosine concentration is elevated during systemic inflammation, co-administration of caffeine or the presence of the 34C > T variant of AMPD1 does not affect the observed subclinical organ

  18. Transcranial low-level laser therapy (810 nm) temporarily inhibits peripheral nociception: photoneuromodulation of glutamate receptors, prostatic acid phophatase, and adenosine triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Pires de Sousa, Marcelo Victor; Ferraresi, Cleber; Kawakubo, Masayoshi; Kaippert, Beatriz; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Photobiomodulation or low-level light therapy has been shown to attenuate both acute and chronic pain, but the mechanism of action is not well understood. In most cases, the light is applied to the painful area, but in the present study we applied light to the head. We found that transcranial laser therapy (TLT) applied to mouse head with specific parameters (810 nm laser, 300  mW/cm2, 7.2 or 36  J/cm2) decreased the reaction to pain in the foot evoked either by pressure (von Frey filaments), cold, or inflammation (formalin injection) or in the tail (evoked by heat). The pain threshold increasing is maximum around 2 h after TLT, remains up to 6 h, and is finished 24 h after TLT. The mechanisms were investigated by quantification of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), immunofluorescence, and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of brain tissues. TLT increased ATP and prostatic acid phosphatase (an endogenous analgesic) and reduced the amount of glutamate receptor (mediating a neurotransmitter responsible for conducting nociceptive information). There was no change in the concentration of tubulin, a constituent of the cytoskeleton, and the H&E staining revealed no tissue damage. PMID:26835486

  19. Combined evaluation of adenosine deaminase level and histopathological findings from pleural biopsy with Cope’s needle for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy

    PubMed Central

    Behrsin, Rodolfo Fred; Junior, Cyro Teixeira da Silva; Cardoso, Gilberto Perez; Barillo, Jorge Luiz; de Souza, Joeber Bernardo Soares; de Araújo, Elizabeth Giestal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Closed needle pleural biopsy (CNPB) has historically been the gold standard procedure for the diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is an efficient biomarker for tuberculosis that is measurable in pleural fluids. Objective: We compared the diagnostic accuracy of the pleural ADA (P-ADA) level and histopathological findings of CNPB specimens in patients with pleural tuberculosis. Methods: This prospective study consisted of two groups of examinations with a proven diagnosis of pleural effusion. The P-ADA level was measured in 218 patients with pleural effusion due to a number of causes, and 157 CNPB specimens underwent histopathological analysis. Results: CNPBs were performed in patients with tuberculosis (n=122) and other diseases: adenocarcinoma (n=23), lymphoma (n=5), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=4), squamous cell carcinoma (n=2), and small cell lung cancer (n=1). According to the ROC curve, the optimal cut-off value of the P-ADA level (Giusti and Galanti colorimetric method) was equal to or greater than 40.0 U/L. The diagnostic accuracy of the P-ADA test was 83.0%, and that of histopathological examination of the CNPB tissue, was 78.8% (AUC=0.293, P=0.7695). The association between the P-ADA assay and pleural histopathology was 24.41 (P<0.0001). The tetrachoric correlation coefficient was 0.563 (high correlation). Conclusion: In Brazil and other countries with a high incidence of tuberculosis, P-ADA activity is an accurate test for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusions, and its use should be encouraged. The high diagnostic performance of the P-ADA test could to aid the diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis and render CNPB unnecessary. PMID:26261621

  20. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels in paracetamol-induced cell injury in the rat in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Martin, F L; McLean, A E

    1995-12-15

    We have investigated the relationship between ATP levels and the onset and progression of cell injury induced by paracetamol overdose both in vivo and in vitro. Liver slices obtained from phenobarbitone-induced and non-induced rats were used in a model in vitro system. Slices were exposed to paracetamol (2-10 mM), for 120 min and then incubated without paracetamol for a further 240 min. ATP levels are reduced upon exposure to paracetamol in liver slices from both phenobarbitone-induced and non-induced rats. Cell injury, as quantified by measuring leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and potassium (K+), does not become apparent until 240 min, some 120 min after exposure to paracetamol had ended. This irreversible cell injury is not observed in liver slices from non-induced rats. For in vivo studies rats were phenobarbitone-induced and received i.p. injections of 800 mg/kg body weight paracetamol. Hepatic ATP levels were measured and are found to drop sharply by 3 h post-injection. Development of irreversible hepatic cell injury was assessed by measuring serum enzyme (ALT) activity. ALT levels do not rise until 12 h have elapsed. Paracetamol in overdose gives rise to ATP depletion in liver cells, that is early, independent of paracetamol metabolism and probably spread throughout the lobule. In contrast cell injury is found late and only in our phenobarbitone-induced rats. No cell injury is observed in liver slices from non-induced rats. This suggests that while the level of ATP depletion which is observed may be a necessary part of cell injury by paracetamol, it is not a sufficient cause.

  1. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate affects the response of human macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dubois-Colas, Nicolas; Petit-Jentreau, Laetitia; Barreiro, Luis B; Durand, Sylvère; Soubigou, Guillaume; Lecointe, Cécile; Klibi, Jihène; Rezaï, Keyvan; Lokiec, François; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Gicquel, Brigitte; Tailleux, Ludovic

    2014-09-01

    Granulomas are the hallmark of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. As the host fails to control the bacteria, the center of the granuloma exhibits necrosis resulting from the dying of infected macrophages. The release of the intracellular pool of nucleotides into the surrounding medium may modulate the response of newly infected macrophages, although this has never been investigated. Here, we show that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) indirectly modulates the expression of 272 genes in human macrophages infected with M. tuberculosis and that it induces their alternative activation. ATP is rapidly hydrolyzed by the ecto-ATPase CD39 into adenosine monophosphate (AMP), and it is AMP that regulates the macrophage response through the adenosine A2A receptor. Our findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for the purinergic pathway in the host response to M. tuberculosis. Dampening inflammation through signaling via the adenosine A2A receptor may limit tissue damage but may also favor bacterial immune escape.

  2. Resistance to aspirin is increased by ST-elevation myocardial infarction and correlates with adenosine diphosphate levels

    PubMed Central

    Borna, Catharina; Lazarowski, Eduardo; van Heusden, Catharina; Öhlin, Hans; Erlinge, David

    2005-01-01

    Background To be fully activated platelets are dependent on two positive feedback loops; the formation of thromboxane A2 by cyclooxygenase in the platelets and the release of ADP. We wanted to evaluate the effect of aspirin on platelet function in patients with acute coronary syndromes and we hypothesized that increased levels of ADP in patients with acute coronary syndromes could contribute to aspirin resistance. Methods Platelet activity in 135 patients admitted for chest pain was assessed with PFA-100. An epinephrine-collagen cartridge (EPI-COLL) was used for the detection of aspirin resistance together with an ADP-collagen cartridge (ADP-COLL). ADP was measured with hplc from antecubital vein samples. Three subgroups were compared: chest pain with no sign of cardiac disease (NCD), NonST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and STEMI. Results Platelet activation was increased for the STEMI group compared NCD. Aspirin resistance defined as <193 sec in EPI-COLL was 9.7 % in NCD, and increased to 26.0 % (n.s.) in NSTEMI and 83.3 % (p < 0.001) in STEMI. Chronic aspirin treatment significantly reduced platelet aggregation in NCD and NSTEMI, but it had no effect in STEMI. Plasma levels of ADP were markedly increased in STEMI (905 ± 721 nmol/l, p < 0.01), but not in NSTEMI (317 ± 245), compared to NCD (334 ± 271, mean ± SD). ADP levels correlated with increased platelet activity measured with ADP-COLL (r = -0.30, p < 0.05). Aspirin resistant patients (EPI-COLL < 193 sec) had higher ADP levels compared to aspirin responders (734 ± 807 vs. 282 ± 187 nmol/l, mean ± SD, p < 0.05). Conclusion Platelets are activated and aspirin resistance is more frequent in STEMI, probably due to a general activation of platelets. ADP levels are increased in STEMI and correlates with platelet activation. Increased levels of ADP could be one reason for increased platelet activity and aspirin resistance. PMID:16045804

  3. Defective cyclic guanosine monophosphate-gated calcium channels and the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Roddie C; Oda, Yuko; Szepietowski, Jacek C; Behne, Martin J; Mauro, Theodora

    2003-01-01

    A positive association between intake of calcium channel blockers and psoriasis has been observed recently. Intake of blockers of voltage-gated calcium ion channels is associated with outbreaks of psoriasis after a latent period in patients with and without a previous family history of psoriasis. This suggests that interfering with calcium influx may trigger psoriasis. Calcium influx also occurs via cyclic guanosine monophosphate-gated channels; human keratinocytes contain functional and non-functional (splice variants) versions of these channels. We show here that keratinocytes and skin from psoriatic individuals express higher levels of mRNA encoding a non-functional cyclic guanosine monophosphate-gated calcium channel and that high expression of the splice variant by transfection of cells in culture leads to loss of protein expression for the functional cyclic guanosine monophosphate-gated Ca2+ channels.

  4. An Essential Role for Adenosine Signaling in Alcohol Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, Christina L.; Adams, Chelsea; Knight, Emily J.; Nam, Hyung Wook; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), adenosine plays an important role in regulating neuronal activity and modulates signaling by other neurotransmitters, including GABA, glutamate, and dopamine. Adenosine suppresses neurotransmitter release, reduces neuronal excitability, and regulates ion channel function through activation of four classes of G protein-coupled receptors, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Central adenosine levels are largely controlled by nucleoside transporters, which regulate adenosine levels across the plasma membrane. Adenosine has been shown to modulate cortical glutamate signaling and ventral-tegmental dopaminergic signaling, which are involved in several aspects of alcohol use disorders. Acute ethanol elevates extracellular adenosine levels by selectively inhibiting the type 1 equilibrative nucleoside transporter, ENT1. Raised adenosine levels mediate the ataxic and sedative/hypnotic effects of ethanol through activation of A1 receptors in the cerebellum, striatum, and cerebral cortex. Recently, we have shown that pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of ENT1 reduces the expression of excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2), the primary regulator of extracellular glutamate, in astrocytes. These lines of evidence support a central role for adenosine-mediated glutamate signaling and the involvement of astrocytes in regulating ethanol intoxication and preference. In this paper, we discuss recent findings on the implication of adenosine signaling in alcohol use disorders. PMID:21054262

  5. Turnover of adenosine in plasma of human and dog blood

    SciTech Connect

    Moeser, G.H.S.; Schrader, J.; Deussen, A.

    1989-04-01

    To determine half-life and turnover of plasma adenosine, heparinized blood from healthy volunteers was incubated with radiolabeled adenosine in the physiological concentration range of 0.1-1 microM. Plasma levels of adenosine in vitro were 82 +/- 14 nM and were similar to those determined immediately after blood collection with a ''stopping solution.'' Dipyridamole (83 microM) and erythro-9(2-hydroxynon-3yl)-adenine (EHNA) (8 microM) did not measurably alter basal adenosine levels but completely blocked the uptake of added adenosine. Inhibition of ecto-5'-nucleotidase with 100 microM alpha, beta-methyleneadenosine 5'-diphosphate (AOPCP) reduced plasma adenosine to 22 +/- 6 nM. For the determination of adenosine turnover, the decrease in specific radioactivity of added (/sup 3/H)adenosine was measured using a dipyridamole-containing stopping solution. Without altering basal adenosine levels, the half-life was estimated to be 0.6 s. Similar experiments were carried out with washed erythrocytes or in the presence of AOPCP, yielding half-lives of 0.7 and 0.9 s, respectively. When the initial adenosine concentration was 1 microM, its specific activity decreased by only 11% within 5 s, whereas total plasma adenosine exponentially decreased with a half-life of 1.5 s. Venous plasma concentrations were measured after relief of a 3-min forearm ischemia. Changes in plasma adenosine did not correlate well with changes in blood flow but were augmented in the presence of dipyridamole.

  6. Fluorometric Determination of Adenosine Nucleotide Derivatives as Measures of the Microfouling, Detrital, and Sedimentary Microbial Biomass and Physiological Status

    PubMed Central

    Davis, William M.; White, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Adenosine, adenine, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), AMP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were recovered quantitatively from aqueous portions of lipid extracts of microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial communities. These could be detected quantitatively in the picomolar range by forming their 1-N6-etheno derivatives and analyzing by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Lipid extraction and subsequent analysis allowed the simultaneous measurement of the microbial community structure, total microbial biomass with the quantitative recovery of the adenine-containing cellular components, which were protected from enzymatic destruction. This extraction and fluorescent derivatization method showed equivalency with the luciferin-luciferase method for bacterial ATP measurements. Quick-freezing samples in the field with dry ice-acetone preserved the ATP and energy charge (a ratio of adenosine nucleotides) for analysis at remote laboratories. The metabolic lability of ATP in estuarine detrital and microfouling communities, as well as bacterial monocultures of constant biomass, showed ATP to be a precarious measure of biomass under some conditions. Combinations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides gave better correlations with microbial biomass measured as extractable lipid phosphate in the detrital and microfouling microbial communities than did ATP alone. Stresses such as anoxia or filtration are reflected in the rapid accumulation of intracellular adenosine and the excretion of adenosine and AMP into the surrounding milieu. Increases in AMP and adenosine may prove to be more sensitive indicators of metabolic status than the energy charge. PMID:16345633

  7. Adenosine dry powder inhalation for bronchial challenge testing, part 2: proof of concept in asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Lexmond, Anne J; van der Wiel, Erica; Hagedoorn, Paul; Bult, Wouter; Frijlink, Henderik W; ten Hacken, Nick H T; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-09-01

    Adenosine is an indirect stimulus to assess bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR(2)) in asthma. Bronchial challenge tests are usually performed with nebulised solutions of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP(3)). The nebulised AMP test has several disadvantages, like long administration times and a restrictive maximum concentration that does not result in BHR in all patients. In this study, we investigated the applicability of dry powder adenosine for assessment of BHR in comparison to nebulised AMP. Dry powder adenosine was prepared in doubling doses (0.01-80 mg) derived from the nebulised AMP test with addition of two higher doses. Five asthmatic subjects performed two bronchial challenge tests, one with nebulised AMP following the 2-min tidal breathing method; the second with dry powder adenosine administered with an investigational inhaler and single slow inhalations (inspiratory flow rate 30-40 L/min). All subjects reached a 20% fall in FEV₁(4) with the new adenosine test (PD20(5)) compared to four subjects with the AMP test (PC₂₀(6)). Dry powder adenosine was well tolerated by all subjects and better appreciated than nebulised AMP. In conclusion, this new bronchial challenge test appears to be a safe and convenient alternative to the nebulised AMP test to assess BHR in asthmatic subjects.

  8. Adenosine receptor neurobiology: overview.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Lee, Chien-fei; Chern, Yijuang

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside that is distributed ubiquitously throughout the body as a metabolic intermediary. In the brain, adenosine functions as an important upstream neuromodulator of a broad spectrum of neurotransmitters, receptors, and signaling pathways. By acting through four G-protein-coupled receptors, adenosine contributes critically to homeostasis and neuromodulatory control of a variety of normal and abnormal brain functions, ranging from synaptic plasticity, to cognition, to sleep, to motor activity to neuroinflammation, and cell death. This review begun with an overview of the gene and genome structure and the expression pattern of adenosine receptors (ARs). We feature several new developments over the past decade in our understanding of AR functions in the brain, with special focus on the identification and characterization of canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways of ARs. We provide an update on functional insights from complementary genetic-knockout and pharmacological studies on the AR control of various brain functions. We also highlight several novel and recent developments of AR neurobiology, including (i) recent breakthrough in high resolution of three-dimension structure of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) in several functional status, (ii) receptor-receptor heterodimerization, (iii) AR function in glial cells, and (iv) the druggability of AR. We concluded the review with the contention that these new developments extend and strengthen the support for A1 and A2ARs in brain as therapeutic targets for neurologic and psychiatric diseases.

  9. Overexpression, purification and crystallographic analysis of a unique adenosine kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yimin; Long, Mary C.; Ranganathan, Senthil; Escuyer, Vincent; Parker, William B.; Li, Rongbao

    2005-06-01

    Adenosine kinase from M. tuberculosis has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized in the presence of adenosine. Structure determination using molecular replacement with diffraction data collected at 2.2 Å reveals a dimeric structure. Adenosine kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the only prokaryotic adenosine kinase that has been isolated and characterized. The enzyme catalyzes the phosphorylation of adenosine to adenosine monophosphate and is involved in the activation of 2-methyladenosine, a compound that has demonstrated selective activity against M. tuberculosis. The mechanism of action of 2-methyladenosine is likely to be different from those of current tuberculosis treatments and this compound (or other adenosine analogs) may prove to be a novel therapeutic intervention for this disease. The M. tuberculosis adenosine kinase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the enzyme was purified with activity comparable to that reported previously. The protein was crystallized in the presence of adenosine using the vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted X-rays to high resolution and a complete data set was collected to 2.2 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belonged to space group P3{sub 1}21, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.2, c = 111.6 Å, and contained a single protein molecule in the asymmetric unit. An initial structural model of the protein was obtained by the molecular-replacement method, which revealed a dimeric structure. The monomers of the dimer were related by twofold crystallographic symmetry. An understanding of how the M. tuberculosis adenosine kinase differs from the human homolog should aid in the design of more potent and selective antimycobacterial agents that are selectively activated by this enzyme.

  10. Adenosine deaminase 1 and concentrative nucleoside transporters 2 and 3 regulate adenosine on the apical surface of human airway epithelia: implications for inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, Andrew J; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R; van Heusden, Catja A; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Boucher, Richard C; Picher, Maryse

    2007-09-11

    Adenosine is a multifaceted signaling molecule mediating key aspects of innate and immune lung defenses. However, abnormally high airway adenosine levels exacerbate inflammatory lung diseases. This study identifies the mechanisms regulating adenosine elimination from the apical surface of human airway epithelia. Experiments conducted on polarized primary cultures of nasal and bronchial epithelial cells showed that extracellular adenosine is eliminated by surface metabolism and cellular uptake. The conversion of adenosine to inosine was completely inhibited by the adenosine deaminase 1 (ADA1) inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA). The reaction exhibited Km and Vmax values of 24 microM and 0.14 nmol x min(-1) x cm(-2). ADA1 (not ADA2) mRNA was detected in human airway epithelia. The adenosine/mannitol permeability coefficient ratio (18/1) indicated a minor contribution of paracellular absorption. Adenosine uptake was Na+-dependent and was inhibited by the concentrative nucleoside transporter (CNT) blocker phloridzin but not by the equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) blocker dipyridamole. Apparent Km and Vmax values were 17 microM and 7.2 nmol x min(-1) x cm(-2), and transport selectivity was adenosine = inosine = uridine > guanosine = cytidine > thymidine. CNT3 mRNA was detected throughout the airways, while CNT2 was restricted to nasal epithelia. Inhibition of adenosine elimination by EHNA or phloridzin raised apical adenosine levels by >3-fold and stimulated IL-13 and MCP-1 secretion by 6-fold. These responses were reproduced by the adenosine receptor agonist 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)adenosine (NECA) and blocked by the adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-(p-sulfophenyl) theophylline (8-SPT). This study shows that adenosine elimination on human airway epithelia is mediated by ADA1, CNT2, and CNT3, which constitute important regulators of adenosine-mediated inflammation.

  11. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate acutely inhibits and chronically stimulates Na/H antiporter in OKP cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cano, A; Preisig, P; Alpern, R J

    1993-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone, dopamine, alpha-adrenergic catecholamines, and angiotensin II regulate renal Na excretion, at least in part through modulation of acute cyclic (c)AMP-induced proximal tubule Na/H antiporter inhibition. The present studies examined the effect of chronic increases in cell cAMP on Na/H antiporter activity in OKP cells. Whereas 8-bromo cAMP acutely inhibited Na/H antiporter activity, chronic application for 6 h led to a 24% increase in Na/H antiporter activity measured 16-20 h after cAMP removal. This chronic persistent activation of the Na/H antiporter required > 2 h exposure. This effect was not a nonspecific effect of 8-bromo cAMP, in that addition of forskolin or forskolin + 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine for 6 h also led to a chronic persistent increase in Na/H antiporter activity. Inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide prevented 8-bromo cAMP-induced Na/H antiporter stimulation. Although 8-bromo cAMP addition decreased cell pH by 0.15-0.20 pH U, Na/H antiporter stimulation could be dissociated from cell acidification. In summary, while cAMP acutely inhibits Na/H antiporter activity, it chronically increases antiporter activity. This chronic activation occurs with exogenous addition or endogenous generation of cAMP. These results imply that for hormones that modulate renal Na excretion and proximal tubule Na/H antiporter activity via cAMP and protein kinase A, acute effects may not predict chronic effects. PMID:7691881

  12. Chemoattraction and chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum: myxamoeba cannot read spatial gradients of cyclic adenosine monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Vicker, M G; Schill, W; Drescher, K

    1984-06-01

    Myxamoebae of the morphogenetic cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum are thought to be able to accurately read and respond to directional information in spatial gradients of cyclic AMP. We examined the spatial and temporal mechanisms proposed for chemotaxis by comparing the behavior of spreading or evenly distributed cell populations after exposure to well-defined spatial gradients. The effects of gradient generation on cells were avoided by using predeveloped gradients. Qualitatively different responses were obtained using (a) isotropic, (b) static spatial, or (c) temporal (impulse) gradients in a simple chamber of penetrable micropore filters. We simulated models of chemotaxis and chemokinesis to aid our interpretations. The attractive and locomotory responses of populations were maximally stimulated by 0.05 microM cyclic AMP, provided that cellular phosphodiesterase was inhibited. But a single impulse of cyclic AMP during gradient development caused a greater and qualitatively different attraction. Attraction in spatial gradients was only transient, in that populations eventually developed a random distribution when confined to a narrow territory. Populations never accumulated nor lost their random distribution even in extremely steep spatial gradients. Attraction in spatial gradients was inducible only in spreading populations, not randomly distributed ones. Thus, spatial gradients effect biased-random locomotion: i.e., chemokinesis without adaptation. Cells cannot read gradients; the reaction of the cells is stochastic. Spatial gradients do not cause chemotaxis, which probably requires a sharp stimulant concentration increase (a temporal gradient) as a pulse or impulse. The results also bear on concepts of how embryonic cells might be able to decipher the positional information in a morphogen spatial gradient during development.

  13. Chemoattraction and chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum: myxamoeba cannot read spatial gradients of cyclic adenosine monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Myxamoebae of the morphogenetic cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum are thought to be able to accurately read and respond to directional information in spatial gradients of cyclic AMP. We examined the spatial and temporal mechanisms proposed for chemotaxis by comparing the behavior of spreading or evenly distributed cell populations after exposure to well-defined spatial gradients. The effects of gradient generation on cells were avoided by using predeveloped gradients. Qualitatively different responses were obtained using (a) isotropic, (b) static spatial, or (c) temporal (impulse) gradients in a simple chamber of penetrable micropore filters. We simulated models of chemotaxis and chemokinesis to aid our interpretations. The attractive and locomotory responses of populations were maximally stimulated by 0.05 microM cyclic AMP, provided that cellular phosphodiesterase was inhibited. But a single impulse of cyclic AMP during gradient development caused a greater and qualitatively different attraction. Attraction in spatial gradients was only transient, in that populations eventually developed a random distribution when confined to a narrow territory. Populations never accumulated nor lost their random distribution even in extremely steep spatial gradients. Attraction in spatial gradients was inducible only in spreading populations, not randomly distributed ones. Thus, spatial gradients effect biased-random locomotion: i.e., chemokinesis without adaptation. Cells cannot read gradients; the reaction of the cells is stochastic. Spatial gradients do not cause chemotaxis, which probably requires a sharp stimulant concentration increase (a temporal gradient) as a pulse or impulse. The results also bear on concepts of how embryonic cells might be able to decipher the positional information in a morphogen spatial gradient during development. PMID:6327727

  14. Isolation of a glycogen synthase I kinase that is independent of adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Schlender, K K; Reimann, E M

    1975-01-01

    Three protein kinases (ATP:protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37) were detected when the soluble fraction of rabbit kidney medulla was chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose with a linear NaC1 gradient. The first two kinases eluted (Peak 1 and Peak II) were cyclic-AMP-dependent, wheras Peak III was cyclic-AMP-independent. A procedure was developed to separate the catalytic subunit of Peak II cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase (representing the bulk of the histone kinase activity) from Peak III protein kinase. In contrast to the catalytic subunit, Peak III protein kinase phosphorylated casein more rapidly than histone. Peak III was insensitive to the heat-stable protein inhibitor of cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinases and appeared to have a higher requirement for ATP than did the catalytic subunit. Peak III catalyzed the conversion of glycogen synthase (UDPglucose:glycogen alpha-4-glucosyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.11) from the I (glucose-6-phosphate-independent) to the D (glucose-6-phosphate-dependent) form. This conversion was dependent on Mg-2+ and ATP and was unaffected by cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, or the protein inhibitor. Glycogen synthase I in the soluble fraction of kidney medulla could be converted to the D form by endogenous glycogen synthase I kinase if Mg-2+ and ATP were added. Most of this glycogen synthase I kinase activity was unaffected by cyclic AMP or by the protein inhibitor, suggesting that Peak III may be of major importance in the regulation of glycogen synthase in vivo. PMID:166380

  15. Coordinatively Unsaturated Lanthanide(III) Helicates: Luminescence Sensors for Adenosine Monophosphate in Aqueous Media.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Jashobanta; Arunachalam, Rajendran; Subramanian, Palani S; Suresh, Eringathodi; Valkonen, Arto; Rissanen, Kari; Albrecht, Markus

    2016-08-08

    Coordinatively unsaturated double-stranded helicates [(H2 L)2 Eu2 (NO3 )2 (H2 O)4 ](NO3 )4 , [(H2 L)2 Tb2 (H2 O)6 ](NO3 )6 , and [(H2 L)2 Tb2 (H2 O)6 ]Cl6 (H2 L=butanedioicacid-1,4-bis[2-(2-pyridinylmethylene)hydrazide]) are easily obtained by self-assembly from the ligand and the corresponding lanthanide(III) salts. The complexes are characterized by X-ray crystallography showing the helical arrangement of the ligands. Co-ligands at the metal ions can be easily substituted by appropriate anions. A specific luminescence response of AMP in presence of ADP, ATP, and other anions is observed. Specificity is assigned to the perfect size match of AMP to bridge the two metal centers and to replace quenching co-ligands in the coordination sphere.

  16. Magnesium sulphate increases lymphocyte adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Von Mandach, U; Bürgi, M; Huch, R; Huch, A

    1993-01-01

    We determined the effect of i.v. magnesium sulphate, which is often combined with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists for tocolytic therapy, on lymphocyte cyclic AMP production, extracellular magnesium and blood calcium concentrations. Sixteen healthy volunteers received i.v. magnesium sulphate 1 g h-1 over 8 h; seven volunteers also had infusion of NaCl 18 mg h-1 as control. Venous blood was taken pre- and post-infusion to determine basal lymphocyte cyclic AMP and the increase evoked by 0.1 mM isoprenaline, as well as serum and plasma concentrations of total and non-protein-bound magnesium and calcium. Following magnesium sulphate there was a significant rise in the isoprenaline-evoked increase in cyclic AMP (P < 0.05) and in the magnesium concentrations (P < 0.01) and a decrease in the free calcium concentration (P < 0.01). PMID:8385975

  17. Magnesium sulphate increases lymphocyte adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate in humans.

    PubMed

    Von Mandach, U; Bürgi, M; Huch, R; Huch, A

    1993-03-01

    We determined the effect of i.v. magnesium sulphate, which is often combined with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists for tocolytic therapy, on lymphocyte cyclic AMP production, extracellular magnesium and blood calcium concentrations. Sixteen healthy volunteers received i.v. magnesium sulphate 1 g h-1 over 8 h; seven volunteers also had infusion of NaCl 18 mg h-1 as control. Venous blood was taken pre- and post-infusion to determine basal lymphocyte cyclic AMP and the increase evoked by 0.1 mM isoprenaline, as well as serum and plasma concentrations of total and non-protein-bound magnesium and calcium. Following magnesium sulphate there was a significant rise in the isoprenaline-evoked increase in cyclic AMP (P < 0.05) and in the magnesium concentrations (P < 0.01) and a decrease in the free calcium concentration (P < 0.01).

  18. Glicentin and oxyntomodulin modulate both the phosphoinositide and cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathways in gastric myocytes.

    PubMed

    Rodier, G; Magous, R; Mochizuki, T; Le Nguyen, D; Martinez, J; Bali, J P; Bataille, D; Jarrousse, C; Geneviève, R

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the transduction pathways mediating the contractile effect of two glucagon-containing peptides, glicentin (GLIC) and oxyntomodulin (OXM), on smooth muscle cells isolated from rabbit antrum. Low concentrations of GLIC induced a biphasic and rapid (first phase at 5-8 sec) Ins(1,4,5)P3 production. By comparison, higher concentrations of OXM or OXM(19-37) were required to obtain biphasic time-courses of Ins(1,4,5)P3 production. In a Ca2+ free medium, the first phase of Ins(1,4,5)P3 production induced by GLIC or OXM was maintained, while the second phase disappeared. In saponin-permeabilized cells, all three peptides induced cell contraction with similar efficacies and potencies. Exogenous Ins(1,4,5)P3 mimicked the contractile effect of the peptides and heparin, which inhibits the Ins(1,4,5)P3 binding to its receptor, prevented contraction stimulated by each effector. We conclude that a Ca2+ mobilization from the intracellular stores is essential in the contractile effects of GLIC and OXM. Using the fluo-3 probe, a [Ca2+]i increase was observed in the presence of GLIC, OXM, or OXM(19-37). The three peptides reduced by 30-40% the cAMP content of cells stimulated by forskolin. This effect was pertussis toxin sensitive as demonstrated with OXM(19-37). Our data constitute important clues for the existence in smooth muscle cells of receptor(s) specific for the GLIC/OXM hormones, coupled via G protein(s) to both Ca2+ and cAMP pathways.

  19. Adenosine modulates LPS-induced cytokine production in porcine monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ondrackova, Petra; Kovaru, Hana; Kovaru, Frantisek; Leva, Lenka; Faldyna, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Adenosine plays an important role during inflammation, particularly through modulation of monocyte function. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of synthetic adenosine analogs on cytokine production by porcine monocytes. The LPS-stimulated cytokine production was measured by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR. Adenosine receptor expression was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. The present study demonstrates that adenosine analog N-ethylcarboxyamidoadenosine (NECA) down-regulates TNF-α production and up-regulates IL-8 production by LPS-stimulated porcine monocytes. The effect was more pronounced in CD163(-) subset of monocytes compared to the CD163(+) subset. Although both monocyte subsets express mRNA for A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors, the treatment of monocytes with various adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists proved that the effect of adenosine is mediated preferentially via A2A adenosine receptor. Moreover, the study suggests that the effect of NECA on porcine monocytes alters the levels of the cytokines which could play a role in the differentiation of naive T cells into Th17 cells. The results suggest that adenosine plays an important role in modulation of cytokine production by porcine monocytes.

  20. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts.

  1. Radioimmunochemical quantitation of human adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed Central

    Daddona, P E; Frohman, M A; Kelley, W N

    1979-01-01

    Markedly reduced or absent adenosine deaminase activity in man is associated with an autosomal recesive form of severe conbined immunodeficiency disease. To further define the genetic nature of this enzyme defect, we have quantitated immunologically active adenosine deaminase (CRM) in the hemolysate of homozygous deficient patients and their heterozygous parents. A highly specific radioimmunoassay was developed capable of detecting 0.05% of normal erythrocyte adenosine deaminase. Hemolysates from nine heterozygotes (five families) showed a wide range in CRM (32--100% of normal) and variable absolute specific activities with several being at least 1 SD BELOW THE NORMAL MEAN. Hemolysates from four unrelated patients showed less than 0.09% adenosine deaminase activity with CRM ranging from less than 0.06 to 5.6% of the normal mean. In conclusion, heterozygote and homozygote hemolysates from five of the eight families analyzed revealed variable levels of CRM suggesting heterogeneous genetic alteration or expression of the silent or defective allele(s) of adenosine deaminase. PMID:468994

  2. Adenosine and sleep

    SciTech Connect

    Yanik, G.M. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Behavioral and biochemical approaches have been used to determine the relative contribution of endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors to the sleep-wake cycle in the rat. Adenosine concentrations in specific areas of the rat brain were not affected by 24 hours of total sleep deprivation, or by 24 or 48 hours of REM sleep deprivation. In order to assess the effect of REM sleep deprivation on adenosine A/sub 1/ receptors, /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding was measured. The Bmax values for /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding to membrane preparations of the cortices and corpus striata from 48 hour REM sleep-deprived animals were increased 14.8% and 23%, respectively. These increases were not maintained following the cessation of sleep deprivation and recovered within 2 hours. The results of a 96 hour REM deprivation experiment were similar to those of the 48 hour REM sleep deprivation experiment. However, these increases were not evident in similar structures taken from stress control animals, and conclusively demonstrated that the changes in /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding resulted from REM sleep deprivation and not from stress.

  3. A Novel Method for Screening Adenosine Receptor Specific Agonists for Use in Adenosine Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Karlie R.; Choi, Uimook; Gao, Ji-Liang; Thompson, Robert D.; Rodman, Larry E.; Malech, Harry L.; Kang, Elizabeth M.

    2017-01-01

    Agonists that target the A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors have potential to be potent treatment options for a number of diseases, including autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Because each of these adenosine receptors plays a distinct role throughout the body, obtaining highly specific receptor agonists is essential. Of these receptors, the adenosine A2AR and A2BR share many sequence and structural similarities but highly differ in their responses to inflammatory stimuli. Our laboratory, using a combination of specially developed cell lines and calcium release analysis hardware, has created a new and faster method for determining specificity of synthetic adenosine agonist compounds for the A2A and A2B receptors in human cells. A2A receptor expression was effectively removed from K562 cells, resulting in the development of a distinct null line. Using HIV-lentivector and plasmid DNA transfection, we also developed A2A and A2B receptor over-expressing lines. As adenosine is known to cause changes in intracellular calcium levels upon addition to cell culture, calcium release can be determined in these cell lines upon compound addition, providing a functional readout of receptor activation and allowing us to isolate the most specific adenosine agonist compounds. PMID:28317879

  4. Adenine and adenosine salvage in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Boitz, Jan M; Ullman, Buddy

    2013-08-01

    6-aminopurine metabolism in Leishmania is unique among trypanosomatid pathogens since this genus expresses two distinct routes for adenine salvage: adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) and adenine deaminase (AAH). To evaluate the relative contributions of APRT and AAH, adenine salvage was evaluated in Δaprt, Δaah, and Δaprt/Δaah null mutants of L. donovani. The data confirm that AAH plays the dominant role in adenine metabolism in L. donovani, although either enzyme alone is sufficient for salvage. Adenosine salvage was also evaluated in a cohort of null mutants. Adenosine is also primarily converted to hypoxanthine, either intracellularly or extracellularly, but can also be phosphorylated to the nucleotide level by adenosine kinase when the predominant pathways are genetically or pharmacologically blocked. These data provide genetic verification for the relative contributions of 6-aminopurine metabolizing pathways in L. donovani and demonstrate that all of the pathways can function under appropriate conditions of genetic or pharmacologic perturbation.

  5. The breakdown of adenosine triphosphate in the contraction cycle of the frog sartorius muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mommaerts, W. F. H. M.; Wallner, A.

    1967-01-01

    1. It is confirmed that a fluorodinitrobenzene (FDNB)-treated frog sartorius muscle does not split phosphorylcreatine in the course of its contraction cycle, but does use adenosine triphosphate (ATP). 2. Good stoicheiometric relations between the diminution of ATP and the formation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP), adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and phosphate are obtained, and in a 0·2 sec tetanus at 0° C the net break-down of ATP amounts to 0·27, the total equivalent break-down to 0·34 μmoles/g. 3. There is no difference in this quantity between muscles interrupted at the height of contraction and those that have also relaxed, and, in experiments specifically designed to determine relaxation metabolism separately, no such metabolism is found. Thus, all the ATP-break-down occurs in the contraction phase. PMID:6065882

  6. Adenosine Signaling Increases Proinflammatory and Profibrotic Mediators through Activation of a Functional Adenosine 2B Receptor in Renal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Patrick F; Farrell, Francis X; Morel, Diane; Law, William; Murphy, Suzanne

    2016-07-01

    Interstitial renal fibrosis is a major pathophysiological manifestation of patients diagnosed with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), Diabetic Nephropathy (DN) and other inflammatory diseases. Adenosine signaling is an innate autocrine and paracrine cellular signaling pathway involving several key mediators that are elevated in the blood and kidneys of patients with DN. In these studies, we hypothesized that extracellular adenosine signals through one or more functional adenosine GPCRs on renal fibroblasts which increases profibrotic and proinflammatory mediators by inducing an activated fibroblast phenotype. Utilizing the renal fibroblast cell line NRK-49F, the presence and relative abundance of adenosine receptors (AR) A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 were quantified by RT-PCR. Under normal homeostatic conditions, only AR1 and AR2B were detected. The functionality of each receptor was then assessed by receptor specific pharmacological agonism and antagonism and assessed for modulation of the GPCR associated secondary messenger molecule, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Agonism of the AR2B receptor resulted in increased intracellular cAMP while agonism of the AR1 receptor inhibited cAMP modulation. Upon direct agonism of the AR2B receptor, transcripts for profibrotic and inflammatory mediators including SMA-α, IL-6, TGF-β, CTGF, and fibronectin were elevated between 2-4 fold. These data indicate that renal fibroblasts express a functional AR1 receptor that inhibits cAMP upon stimulation, leading to a functional AR2B receptor that increases cAMP upon stimulation and also induces an activated fibroblast phenotype resulting in increased fibrotic and inflammatory mediators.

  7. Adenosine signaling promotes hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell emergence.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lili; Tamplin, Owen J; Chen, Michael J; Deng, Qing; Patterson, Shenia; Kim, Peter G; Durand, Ellen M; McNeil, Ashley; Green, Julie M; Matsuura, Shinobu; Ablain, Julien; Brandt, Margot K; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Huttenlocher, Anna; Daley, George Q; Ravid, Katya; Zon, Leonard I

    2015-05-04

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge from aortic endothelium via the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT). The molecular mechanisms that initiate and regulate EHT remain poorly understood. Here, we show that adenosine signaling regulates hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) development in zebrafish embryos. The adenosine receptor A2b is expressed in the vascular endothelium before HSPC emergence. Elevated adenosine levels increased runx1(+)/cmyb(+) HSPCs in the dorsal aorta, whereas blocking the adenosine pathway decreased HSPCs. Knockdown of A2b adenosine receptor disrupted scl(+) hemogenic vascular endothelium and the subsequent EHT process. A2b adenosine receptor activation induced CXCL8 via cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) and mediated hematopoiesis. We further show that adenosine increased multipotent progenitors in a mouse embryonic stem cell colony-forming assay and in embryonic day 10.5 aorta-gonad-mesonephros explants. Our results demonstrate that adenosine signaling plays an evolutionary conserved role in the first steps of HSPC formation in vertebrates.

  8. Adenosine strongly potentiates pressor responses to nicotine in rats.

    PubMed Central

    von Borstel, R W; Renshaw, A A; Wurtman, R J

    1984-01-01

    Intravenous infusion of subhypotensive doses of adenosine strongly potentiates the pressor response of anesthetized rats to nicotine. A dose of nicotine (40 micrograms/kg, i.v.), which, given alone, elicits a peak increase in diastolic pressure of approximately equal to 15 mm Hg, increases pressure by approximately equal to 70 mm Hg when arterial plasma adenosine levels have been increased to 2 microM from a basal concentration of approximately equal to 1 microM. The pressor response to cigarette smoke applied to the lungs is also strongly potentiated during infusion of adenosine. Slightly higher adenosine concentrations (approximately equal to 4 microM) attenuate pressor responses to electrical stimulation of preganglionic sympathetic nerves, or to injections of the alpha-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine, but continue to potentiate pressor responses to nicotine. Low doses (0.25-5 micrograms/kg) of the synthetic adenosine receptor agonists 5'-N-cyclopropylcarboxamidoadenosine, 2-chloroadenosine, and N6-L-phenylisopropyladenosine also potentiate pressor responses to nicotine. Caffeine and theophylline (10 mg/kg) block the potentiating effect of adenosine, and also decrease basal responses to nicotine, suggesting that endogenous adenosine might normally potentiate some nicotine responses. The synergism between nicotine and adenosine appears to take place within sympathetic ganglia. PMID:6591207

  9. [The involvement of adenosine and adenosine deaminase in experimental myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Stratone, A; Busuioc, A; Roşca, V; Bazgan, L; Popa, M; Hăulică, I

    1989-01-01

    By the ligature of the left coronary artery in the rat anesthetized with nembutal (10 mg/100 i.p.) a significant increase of the 5'-nucleotidase activity (Wooton method) was noticed 10 minutes after the left ventricle infarction (from an average value of 1038.5 +/- 187 mU/g tissue to 1537 +/- 225 mU/g fresh tissue). The adenosine desaminase levels spectrophotometrically determined by Denstedt technique, do not appear significantly modified 10 or 30 minutes after the left ventricle infarction. The chromatographically determined adenosine levels, by HPLC technique, decrease from the average value of 11.63 +/- 1.4 micrograms/mg PT to 8.60 +/- 1.0 micrograms/mg PT 30 minutes after infarction. The observed changes are explained by the conditions of hypoxia in the infarcted ventricle which lead to the raise in adenosine levels by activating the 5'-nucleotidase and their depression by a very fast metabolism of the same substance.

  10. Rat cardiac myocyte adenosine transport and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, D.A.; Rovetto, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Based on the importance of myocardial adenosine and adenine nucleotide metabolism, the adenosine salvage pathway in ventricular myocytes was studied. Accurate estimates of transport rates, separate from metabolic fllux, were determined. Adenosine influx was constant between 3 and 60 s. Adenosine metabolism maintained intracellular adenosine concentrations < 10% of the extracellular adenosine concentrations and thus unidirectional influx could be measured. Myocytes transported adenosine via saturable and nonsaturable processes. A minimum estimate of the V/sub max/ of myocytic adenosine kinase indicated the saturable component of adenosine influx was independent of adenosine kinase activity. Saturable transport was inhibited by nitrobenzylthioinosine and verapamil. Extracellular adenosine taken up myocytes was rapidly phosphorylated to adenine taken up by myocytes was rapidly phosphorylated to adenine nucleotides. Not all extracellular adenosine, though, was phosphorylated on entering myocytes, since free, as opposed to protein-bound, intracellular adenosine was detected after digitonin extraction of cells in the presence of 1 mM ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid.

  11. High homocysteine levels prevent via H2 S the CoCl2 -induced alteration of lymphocyte viability.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, Laurie; Fenouillet, Emmanuel; Fromonot, Julien; Durand-Gorde, Josée-Martine; Condo, Jocelyne; Kipson, Nathalie; Mottola, Giovanna; Deharo, Pierre; Guieu, Régis; Ruf, Jean

    2016-08-01

    High homocysteine (HCy) levels are associated with lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory responses that are sometimes in turn related to hypoxia. Because adenosine is a potent lymphocyte suppressor produced in hypoxic conditions and shares metabolic pathways with HCy, we addressed the influence of high HCy levels on the hypoxia-induced, adenosine-mediated, alteration of lymphocyte viability. We treated mitogen-stimulated human lymphocytes isolated from healthy individuals and the human lymphoma T-cell line CEM with cobalt chloride (CoCl2 )to reproduce hypoxia. We found that CoCl2 -altered cell viability was dose-dependently reversed using HCy. In turn, the HCy effect was inhibited using DL-propargylglycine, a specific inhibitor of the hydrogen sulphide (H2 S)-synthesizing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase involved in HCy catabolism. We then addressed the intracellular metabolic pathway of adenosine and HCy, and the role of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2 A R). We observed that: (i) hypoxic conditions lowered the intracellular concentration of HCy by increasing adenosine production, which resulted in high A2 A R expression and 3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate production; (ii) increasing intracellular HCy concentration reversed the hypoxia-induced adenosinergic signalling despite high adenosine concentration by promoting both S-adenosylhomocysteine and H2 S production; (iii) DL-propargylglycine that inhibits H2 S production abolished the HCy effect. Together, these data suggest that high HCy levels prevent, via H2 S production and the resulting down-regulation of A2 A R expression, the hypoxia-induced adenosinergic alteration of lymphocyte viability. We point out the relevance of these mechanisms in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Adenosine reduces postbypass transfusion requirements in humans after heart surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Mentzer, R M; Rahko, P S; Canver, C C; Chopra, P S; Love, R B; Cook, T D; Hegge, M O; Lasley, R D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the effect, if any, of adenosine blood cardioplegia on blood component usage after heart surgery. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The most common cause of nonsurgical postcardiopulmonary bypass bleeding is platelet dysfunction. For this reason, pharmacologic agents are under investigation in an effort to reduce the need for transfusion in this setting. METHODS: A posthoc analysis of blood product usage was performed in data obtained from a Phase I, single center, open label, randomized study performed in 63 patients. The trial was designed to test the safety and tolerance of adenosine when added to blood cardioplegia in increasing doses to enhance myocardial protection. The database provided information regarding the effect of adenosine cardioplegia on venous plasma adenosine concentrations, the amount of platelets, fresh frozen plasma and packed erythrocytes used, and the association between the adenosine dose and postoperative thoracic drainage. RESULTS: The postoperative thoracic drainage at 6 hours, 24 hours, and at the time of chest tube removal in the high-dose adenosine cardioplegia group was 68%, 76%, and 75% of the placebo and low-dose adenosine cardioplegia group (p < 0.05). The highest dose of adenosine studied increased baseline adenosine venous plasma levels 360-fold, from 0.17 +/- 0.09 mumol/L to 42.30 +/- 11.20 mumol/L (p < 0.05). This marked increase was associated with a 68%, 56%, and 58% reduction in platelet, fresh frozen plasma, and packed erythrocyte usage, respectively (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In addition to enhancing the heart's tolerance to ischemia, adenosine-supplemented cardioplegic solution also may reduce bleeding after cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:8857856

  13. Structure of Staphylococcus aureus cytidine monophosphate kinase in complex with cytidine 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Ren, Jingshan; Lockyer, Michael; Charles, Ian; Hawkins, Alastair R; Stammers, David K

    2006-08-01

    The crystal structure of Staphylococcus aureus cytidine monophosphate kinase (CMK) in complex with cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP) has been determined at 2.3 angstroms resolution. The active site reveals novel features when compared with two orthologues of known structure. Compared with the Streptococcus pneumoniae CMK solution structure of the enzyme alone, S. aureus CMK adopts a more closed conformation, with the NMP-binding domain rotating by approximately 16 degrees towards the central pocket of the molecule, thereby assembling the active site. Comparing Escherichia coli and S. aureus CMK-CMP complex structures reveals differences within the active site, including a previously unreported indirect interaction of CMP with Asp33, the replacement of a serine residue involved in the binding of CDP by Ala12 in S. aureus CMK and an additional sulfate ion in the E. coli CMK active site. The detailed understanding of the stereochemistry of CMP binding to CMK will assist in the design of novel inhibitors of the enzyme. Inhibitors are required to treat the widespread hospital infection methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), currently a major public health concern.

  14. Modulation of bladder function by luminal adenosine turnover and A1 receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Prakasam, H. Sandeep; Herrington, Heather; Roppolo, James R.; Jackson, Edwin K.

    2012-01-01

    The bladder uroepithelium transmits information to the underlying nervous and musculature systems, is under constant cyclical strain, expresses all four adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3), and is a site of adenosine production. Although adenosine has a well-described protective effect in several organs, there is a lack of information about adenosine turnover in the uroepithelium or whether altering luminal adenosine concentrations impacts bladder function or overactivity. We observed that the concentration of extracellular adenosine at the mucosal surface of the uroepithelium was regulated by ecto-adenosine deaminase and by equilibrative nucleoside transporters, whereas adenosine kinase and equilibrative nucleoside transporters modulated serosal levels. We further observed that enriching endogenous adenosine by blocking its routes of metabolism or direct activation of mucosal A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), a selective agonist, stimulated bladder activity by lowering the threshold pressure for voiding. Finally, CCPA did not quell bladder hyperactivity in animals with acute cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis but instead exacerbated their irritated bladder phenotype. In conclusion, we find that adenosine levels at both surfaces of the uroepithelium are modulated by turnover, that blocking these pathways or stimulating A1 receptors directly at the luminal surface promotes bladder contractions, and that adenosine further stimulates voiding in animals with cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis. PMID:22552934

  15. Possible mechanism of adenosine protection in carbon tetrachloride acute hepatotoxicity. Role of adenosine by-products and glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Chagoya de Sánchez, V; Hernández-Muñoz, R; Yáñez, L; Vidrio, S; Díaz-Muñoz, M

    1995-02-01

    Adenosine proved to be an effective hepatoprotector increasing the survival rate of rats receiving lethal doses of CCl4. Searching for the mechanism of action, we found that adenosine transiently prevents the necrotic liver damage associated to an acute CCl4 treatment. The antilipoperoxidative action of the nucleoside was evidenced by a decrease of TBA-reactive products and the diene conjugates elicited by the hepatotoxin. Adenosine's protective effect was demonstrated by reverting the decrease of cytochrome P-450 while preserved intact the activity of the microsomal enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase. CCl4 promoted an increase in the oxidant stress through an enhancement in oxidized glutathione levels. This action was also completely counteracted by the nucleoside. Adenosine was unable to prevent CCl4 activation and, even, increased .CCl3 formation in the presence of PBN in vivo. However, in the presence of the nucleoside, irreversible binding of 14CCl4 to the microsomal lipid fraction of the treated animals was decreased. These results suggest that adenosine protective action might be exerted at the level of the propagation reaction following CCl4 activation. Two possible mechanisms were associated to the nucleoside protection: (1) the peroxide-metabolyzed enzymes, GSH-per, showed a marked increase after 30 minutes of adenosine treatment, which was potentiated by the hepatotoxin, suggesting an important role of this enzyme in the nucleoside's action; (2) the adenosine catabolism induced an increase in uric acid level, and allopurinol, a purine metabolism inhibitor, prevented such elevation as well as the antilipoperoxidative action of adenosine and the increase of GSH-per associated with the nucleoside treatment. These facts strongly suggest that the protective effect elicited by adenosine is not a direct one, but rather is related to its catabolic products, such as uric acid, which has been recognized as a free radical scavenger.

  16. Ethanol Tolerance Affects Endogenous Adenosine Signaling in Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dali; Xiong, Wei; Jackson, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol has many pharmacological effects, including increases in endogenous adenosine levels and adenosine receptor activity in brain. Ethanol consumption is associated with both positive and negative health outcomes, but tolerance to the behavioral effects of ethanol can lead to increased consumption, which increases the risk of negative health outcomes. The present study was performed to test whether a 7-day treatment with ethanol is linked to reduced adenosine signaling and whether this is a consequence of reduced ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity. Wild-type (CD73+/+) and ecto-5′-nucleotidase-deficient (CD73−/−) mice were treated with ethanol (2 g/kg) or saline for 7 days. In CD73+/+ mice, repeated ethanol treatment reduced the hypothermic and ataxic effects of acute ethanol, indicating the development of tolerance to the acute effects of ethanol. In CD73+/+ mice, this 7-day ethanol treatment led to increased hippocampal synaptic activity and reduced adenosine A1 receptor activity under both basal and low Mg2+ conditions. These effects of ethanol tolerance were associated with an 18% decrease in activity of ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity in hippocampal cell membranes. In contrast, ethanol treatment was not associated with changes in synaptic activity or adenosine signaling in hippocampus from CD73−/− mice. These data indicate that ethanol treatment is associated with a reduction in adenosine signaling through adenosine A1 receptors in hippocampus, mediated, at least in part, via reduced ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity. PMID:27189965

  17. Adenosine 2A receptors in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Vincent, I S; Okusa, M D

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important clinical problem that may lead to death and for those who survive, the sequelae of AKI include loss of quality of life, chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. The incidence of AKI continues to rise without clear successes in humans for the pharmacological prevention of AKI or treatment of established AKI. Dendritic cells and macrophages are critical early initiators of innate immunity in the kidney and orchestrate inflammation subsequent to ischaemia-reperfusion injury. These innate cells are the most abundant leucocytes present in the kidney, and they represent a heterogeneous population of cells that are capable of responding to cues from the microenvironment derived from pathogens or endogenous inflammatory mediators such as cytokines or anti-inflammatory mediators such as adenosine. Lymphocyte subsets such as natural killer T cells and Tregs also play roles in regulating ischaemic injury by promoting and suppressing inflammation respectively. Adenosine, produced in response to IR, is generally considered as a protective signalling molecule and elicits its physiological responses through four distinct adenosine receptors. However, its short half-life, lack of specificity and rapid metabolism limit the use of adenosine as a therapeutic agent. These adenosine receptors play various roles in regulating the activity of the aforementioned hematopoietic cells in elevated levels of adenosine such as during hypoxia. This review focuses on the importance of one receptor, the adenosine 2A subtype, in blocking inflammation associated with AKI.

  18. Proline modulates the effect of bisphosphonate on calcium levels and adenosine triphosphate production in cell lines derived from bovine Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, A G; Echeverría, C I; Pérez Rojo, F G; Prieto González, E A; Roldán, E J A

    2014-12-01

    Bisphosphonates have been proposed as pharmacological agents against parasite and cancer cell growth. The effect of these compounds on helminthic cell viability and acellular compartment morphology, however, has not yet been studied. The effects of different types of bisphosphonates, namely etidronate (EHDP), pamidronate (APD), alendronate (ABP), ibandronate (IB) and olpadronate (OPD), and their interaction with amiloride, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (D3) and proline were evaluated on a cell line derived from bovine Echinococcus granulousus protoscoleces (EGPE) that forms cystic colonies in agarose. The EGPE cell line allowed testing the effect of bisphosphonates alone and in association with other compounds that could modulate calcium apposition/deposition, and were useful in measuring the impact of these compounds on cell growth, cystic colony formation and calcium storage. Decreased cell growth and cystic colony formation were found with EHDP, IB and OPD, and increased calcium storage with EHDP only. Calcium storage in EGPE cells appeared to be sensitive to the effect of amiloride, D3 and proline. Proline decreased calcium storage and increased colony formation. Changes in calcium storage may be associated with degenerative changes of the cysts, as shown in the in vitro colony model and linked to an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) decrease. In conclusion, bisphosphonates could be suitable tempering drugs to treat cestode infections.

  19. Fast-scan Cyclic Voltammetry for the Characterization of Rapid Adenosine Release

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Michael D.; Venton, B. Jill

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a signaling molecule and downstream product of ATP that acts as a neuromodulator. Adenosine regulates physiological processes, such as neurotransmission and blood flow, on a time scale of minutes to hours. Recent developments in electrochemical techniques, including fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), have allowed direct detection of adenosine with sub-second temporal resolution. FSCV studies have revealed a novel mode of rapid signaling that lasts only a few seconds. This rapid release of adenosine can be evoked by electrical or mechanical stimulations or it can be observed spontaneously without stimulation. Adenosine signaling on this time scale is activity dependent; however, the mode of release is not fully understood. Rapid adenosine release modulates oxygen levels and evoked dopamine release, indicating that adenosine may have a rapid modulatory role. In this review, we outline how FSCV can be used to detect adenosine release, compare FSCV with other techniques used to measure adenosine, and present an overview of adenosine signaling that has been characterized using FSCV. These studies point to a rapid mode of adenosine modulation, whose mechanism and function will continue to be characterized in the future. PMID:26900429

  20. Fast-scan Cyclic Voltammetry for the Characterization of Rapid Adenosine Release.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michael D; Venton, B Jill

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a signaling molecule and downstream product of ATP that acts as a neuromodulator. Adenosine regulates physiological processes, such as neurotransmission and blood flow, on a time scale of minutes to hours. Recent developments in electrochemical techniques, including fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), have allowed direct detection of adenosine with sub-second temporal resolution. FSCV studies have revealed a novel mode of rapid signaling that lasts only a few seconds. This rapid release of adenosine can be evoked by electrical or mechanical stimulations or it can be observed spontaneously without stimulation. Adenosine signaling on this time scale is activity dependent; however, the mode of release is not fully understood. Rapid adenosine release modulates oxygen levels and evoked dopamine release, indicating that adenosine may have a rapid modulatory role. In this review, we outline how FSCV can be used to detect adenosine release, compare FSCV with other techniques used to measure adenosine, and present an overview of adenosine signaling that has been characterized using FSCV. These studies point to a rapid mode of adenosine modulation, whose mechanism and function will continue to be characterized in the future.

  1. Intracerebral adenosine infusion improves neurological outcome after transient focal ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Hisashi; Mori, Atsushi; Shimada, Jun; Mitsumoto, Yasuhide; Kikuchi, Tetsuro

    2002-04-01

    Second Institute of New Drug Research, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tokushima, Japan In order to elucidate the role of adenosine in brain ischemia, the possible protective effects of adenosine on ischemic brain injury were investigated in a rat model of brain ischemia both in vitro and in vivo. Exogenous adenosine dose-dependently rescued cortical neuronal cells from injury after glucose deprivation in vitro. Adenosine (1 mM) also significantly reduced hypoglycemia/hypoxia-induced glutamate release from the hippocampal slice. In a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), extracellular adenosine concentration was increased immediately after occlusion, and then returned to the baseline by 30 min after reperfusion. Adenosine infusion through a microdialysis probe into the ipsilateral striatum (1 mM adenosine, 2 microl min(-1), total 4.5 h from the occlusion to 3 h after reperfusion) showed a significant improvement in the neurological outcome, and about 25% reduction of infarct volume, although the effect did not reach statistical significance, compared with the vehicle-treated group at 20 h after 90 min of MCAO. These results demonstrated the neuroprotective effect of adenosine against ischemic brain injury both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting the possible therapeutic application of adenosine regulating agents, which inhibit adenosine uptake or metabolism to enhance or maintain extracellular endogenous adenosine levels, for stroke treatment.

  2. Activity-Dependent Adenosine Release May Be Linked to Activation of Na+-K+ ATPase: An In Vitro Rat Study

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Robert Edward; Dale, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    In the brain, extracellular adenosine increases as a result of neuronal activity. The mechanisms by which this occurs are only incompletely understood. Here we investigate the hypothesis that the Na+ influxes associated with neuronal signalling activate the Na+-K+ ATPase which, by consuming ATP, generates intracellular adenosine that is then released via transporters. By measuring adenosine release directly with microelectrode biosensors, we have demonstrated that AMPA-receptor evoked adenosine release in basal forebrain and cortex depends on extracellular Na+. We have simultaneously imaged intracellular Na+ and measured adenosine release. The accumulation of intracellular Na+ during AMPA receptor activation preceded adenosine release by some 90 s. By removing extracellular Ca2+, and thus preventing indiscriminate neuronal activation, we used ouabain to test the role of the Na+-K+ ATPase in the release of adenosine. Under conditions which caused a Na+ influx, brief applications of ouabain increased the accumulation of intracellular Na+ but conversely rapidly reduced extracellular adenosine levels. In addition, ouabain greatly reduced the amount of adenosine released during application of AMPA. Our data therefore suggest that activity of the Na+-K+ ATPase is directly linked to the efflux of adenosine and could provide a universal mechanism that couples adenosine release to neuronal activity. The Na+-K+ ATPase-dependent adenosine efflux is likely to provide adenosine-mediated activity-dependent negative feedback that will be important in many diverse functional contexts including the regulation of sleep. PMID:24489921

  3. Adenosine A2 receptors modulate haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats.

    PubMed

    Mandhane, S N; Chopde, C T; Ghosh, A K

    1997-06-11

    The effect of adenosine A1 and A2 receptor agonists and antagonists was investigated on haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats. Pretreatment (i.p.) with the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, theophylline, or the selective adenosine A2 receptor antagonist, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX), significantly reversed haloperidol-induced catalepsy, whereas the selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonists, 8-phenyltheophylline and 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine produced no effect. Similar administration of the adenosine A2 receptor agonists, 5'-(N-cyclopropyl)-carboxamidoadenosine and 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), and the mixed agonists with predominantly A1 site of action, N6-(2-phenylisopropyl) adenosine or 2-chloroadenosine, potentiated haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Higher doses of the adenosine agonists produced catalepsy when given alone. However, N6-cyclopentyladenosine, a highly selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist, was ineffective in these respects. The per se cataleptic effect of adenosine agonists was blocked by DMPX and the centrally acting anticholinergic agent, scopolamine. Scopolamine also attenuated the potentiation of haloperidol-induced catalepsy by adenosine agonists. Further, i.c.v. administration of NECA and DMPX produced a similar effect as that produced after their systemic administration. These findings demonstrate the differential influence of adenosine A1 and A2 receptors on haloperidol-induced catalepsy and support the hypothesis that the functional interaction between adenosine and dopamine mechanisms might occur through adenosine A2 receptors at the level of cholinergic neurons. The results suggest that adenosine A2, but not A1, receptor antagonists may be of potential use in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  4. Adenosine promotes vascular barrier function in hyperoxic lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Jonathan; Karmouty‐Quintana, Harry; Le, Thuy T.; Chen, Ning‐Yuan; Weng, Tingting; Luo, Fayong; Molina, Jose; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hyperoxic lung injury is characterized by cellular damage from high oxygen concentrations that lead to an inflammatory response in the lung with cellular infiltration and pulmonary edema. Adenosine is a signaling molecule that is generated extracellularly by CD73 in response to injury. Extracellular adenosine signals through cell surface receptors and has been found to be elevated and plays a protective role in acute injury situations. In particular, ADORA2B activation is protective in acute lung injury. However, little is known about the role of adenosine signaling in hyperoxic lung injury. We hypothesized that hyperoxia‐induced lung injury leads to CD73‐mediated increases in extracellular adenosine, which is protective through ADORA2B signaling pathways. To test this hypothesis, we exposed C57BL6, CD73−/−, and Adora2B−/− mice to 95% oxygen or room air and examined markers of pulmonary inflammation, edema, and monitored lung histology. Hyperoxic exposure caused pulmonary inflammation and edema in association with elevations in lung adenosine levels. Loss of CD73‐mediated extracellular adenosine production exacerbated pulmonary edema without affecting inflammatory cell counts. Furthermore, loss of the ADORA2B had similar results with worsening of pulmonary edema following hyperoxia exposure without affecting inflammatory cell infiltration. This loss of barrier function correlated with a decrease in occludin in pulmonary vasculature in CD73−/− and Adora2B−/− mice following hyperoxia exposure. These results demonstrate that exposure to a hyperoxic environment causes lung injury associated with an increase in adenosine concentration, and elevated adenosine levels protect vascular barrier function in hyperoxic lung injury through the ADORA2B‐dependent regulation of occludin. PMID:25263205

  5. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa)

    PubMed Central

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5′-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5′-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  6. Adenosine-Associated Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi; Ghanem, Amyl; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside in every cell. Many critical treatments such as modulating irregular heartbeat (arrhythmias), regulation of central nervous system (CNS) activity, and inhibiting seizural episodes can be carried out using adenosine. Despite the significant potential therapeutic impact of adenosine and its derivatives, the severe side effects caused by their systemic administration have significantly limited their clinical use. In addition, due to adenosine’s extremely short half-life in human blood (less than 10 s), there is an unmet need for sustained delivery systems to enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. In this paper, various adenosine delivery techniques, including encapsulation into biodegradable polymers, cell-based delivery, implantable biomaterials, and mechanical-based delivery systems, are critically reviewed and the existing challenges are highlighted. PMID:26453156

  7. Inotropic responses of the frog ventricle to adenosine triphosphate and related changes in endogenous cyclic nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Flitney, F W; Singh, J

    1980-01-01

    1. A study has been made of a well documented but poorly understood response of the isolated frog ventricle to treatment with exogenous adenosine 5' triphosphate (ATP). Measurements of membrane potential, isometric twitch tension and levels of endogenous 3',5'-cyclic nucleotides have been made at various times during the ATP-induced response. 2. ATP elicits a characteristic triphasic response, which comprises an initial, abrupt increase in contractility, rising to a maximum within a few beats (first phase); followed by a period when the twitch amplitude falls, sometimes to below the control level (second phase); and superceded by a more slowly developing and longer-lasting increase in contractile force (third phase). The response is unaffected by atropine, propranolol or phentolamine. However, the prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor indomethacin depresses the first phase and entirely suppresses the third phase. 3. The inotropic effects of ATP are accompanied by changes in the shape of the action potential. These effects are dose-related. The duration of the action potential (D-30mV) and its positive overshoot (O) are increased during all phases of the response, for [ATP]o's up to 10(-5) M. However, at higher [ATP]o's, D-30mV and O ar both reduced during the second phase (but not the first or third phase), when isometric twitch tension is also depressed. The relationship between action potential duration and twitch tension (P) for different [ATP]o's is linear for all three phases of the response, but the slopes of the curves (delta P/delta D) are markedly different, indicating that the sensitivity of the contractile system to membrane depolarization is not constant, but varies continuously throughout the response. 4. ATP has a potent stimulatory effect on the metabolism of endogenous 3',5'-cyclic nucleotides. The time courses of the changes in adenosine 3','5-cyclic monophosphate (3',5'-cyclic AMP) and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (3',5'-cyclic GMP) are

  8. Estimation of skeletal muscle interstitial adenosine during forearm dynamic exercise in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, F.; Heusinkveld, J.; Ballog, R.; Davis, S.; Biaggioni, I.

    2000-01-01

    It has been proposed that adenosine is a metabolic signal that triggers activation of muscle afferents involved in the exercise pressor reflex. Furthermore, exogenous adenosine induces sympathetic activation that mimics the exercise pressor reflex, and blockade of adenosine receptors inhibits sympathetic activation induced by exercise. Thus, we hypothesize that adenosine is released locally by the muscle during exercise. We used microdialysis probes, placed in the flexor digitorium superficialis muscle, to estimate muscle interstitial adenosine levels in humans. We estimated resting in vivo muscle interstitial adenosine concentrations (0.292+/-0.058 micromol/L, n=4) by perfusing increasing concentrations of adenosine to determine the gradient produced in the dialysate. Muscle interstitial adenosine concentrations increased from 0.23+/-0.04 to 0.82+/-0.14 micromol/L (n=14, P<0.001) during intermittent dynamic exercise at 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. Lactate increased from 0.8+/-0.1 to 2.3+/-0.3 mmol/L (P<0.001). Lower intensity (15% maximal voluntary contraction) intermittent dynamic exercise increased adenosine concentrations from 0.104+/-0.02 to 0.42+/-0.16 micromol/L (n=7). The addition of ischemia to this low level of exercise produced a greater increase in adenosine (from 0.095+/-0.02 to 0.48+/-0.2 micromol/L) compared with nonischemic exercise (0. 095+/-0.02 to 0.25+/-0.12 micromol/L). These results indicate that microdialysis is useful in estimating adenosine concentrations and in reflecting changes in muscle interstitial adenosine during dynamic exercise in humans.

  9. Adenosine deaminase deficiency with normal immune function. An acidic enzyme mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Daddona, P E; Mitchell, B S; Meuwissen, H J; Davidson, B L; Wilson, J M; Koller, C A

    1983-01-01

    In most instances, marked deficiency of the purine catabolic enzyme adenosine deaminase results in lymphopenia and severe combined immunodeficiency disease. Over a 2-yr period, we studied a white male child with markedly deficient erythrocyte and lymphocyte adenosine deaminase activity and normal immune function. We have documented that (a) adenosine deaminase activity and immunoreactive protein are undetectable in erythrocytes, 0.9% of normal in lymphocytes, 4% in cultured lymphoblasts, and 14% in skin fibroblasts; (b) plasma adenosine and deoxyadenosine levels are undetectable and deoxy ATP levels are only slightly elevated in lymphocytes and in erythrocytes; (c) no defect in deoxyadenosine metabolism is present in the proband's cultured lymphoblasts; (d) lymphoblast adenosine deaminase has normal enzyme kinetics, absolute specific activity, S20,w, pH optimum, and heat stability; and (e) the proband's adenosine deaminase exhibits a normal apparent subunit molecular weight but an abnormal isoelectric pH. In contrast to the three other adenosine deaminase-deficient healthy subjects who have been described, the proband is unique in demonstrating an acidic, heat-stable protein mutation of the enzyme that is associated with less than 1% lymphocyte adenosine deaminase activity. Residual adenosine deaminase activity in tissues other than lymphocytes may suffice to metabolize the otherwise lymphotoxic enzyme substrate(s) and account for the preservation of normal immune function. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:6603477

  10. Drugs elevating extracellular adenosine promote regeneration of haematopoietic progenitor cells in severely myelosuppressed mice: their comparison and joint effects with the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Vacek, Antonín; Weiterova, Lenka; Holá, Jirina; Vácha, Jirí

    2002-01-01

    We tested capabilities of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine and of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) given alone or in combination to modulate regeneration from severe myelosuppression resulting from combined exposure of mice to ionizing radiation and carboplatin. Elevation of extracellular adenosine was induced by joint administration of dipyridamole (DP), a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), serving as an adenosine prodrug. DP+AMP, G-CSF or all these drugs in combination were administered in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on day 3 after induction of myelosuppression. Comparable enhancements of haematopoietic regeneration due to elevation of extracellular adenosine or to action of G-CSF were demonstrated as shown by elevated numbers of haematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes/macrophages (GM-CFC) and erythrocytes (BFU-E) in the bone marrow and spleen in early time intervals after termination of the drug treatment, i.e. on days 7 and 10 after induction of myelosuppression. Coadministration of all the drugs further potentiated the restoration of progenitor cell pools in the haematopoietic organs. The effects of the drug treatments on progenitor cells were reflected in the peripheral blood in later time intervals of days 15 and 20 after induction of myelosuppression, especially as significantly elevated numbers of granulocytes and less pronounced elevation of lymphocytes and erythrocytes. The results substantiate the potential of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine for clinical utilization in myelosuppressive states, e.g. those accompanying oncological radio- and chemotherapy.

  11. Unpredictable Chronic Stress Alters Adenosine Metabolism in Zebrafish Brain.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, F F; Altenhofen, S; Kist, L W; Leite, C E; Bogo, M R; Cognato, G P; Bonan, C D

    2016-05-01

    Stress is considered a risk factor for several human disorders. Despite the broad knowledge of stress responses in mammals, data on the relationship between unpredictable chronic stress (UCS) and its effects on purinergic signaling are limited. ATP hydrolysis by ectonucleotidases is an important source of adenosine, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) contributes to the control of the nucleoside concentrations. Considering that some stress models could affect signaling systems, the objective of this study was to investigate whether UCS alters ectonucleotidase and ADA pathway in zebrafish brain. Additionally, we analyzed ATP metabolism as well as ada1, ada2.1, ada2.2, adaL, and adaasi gene expression in zebrafish brain. Our results have demonstrated that UCS did not alter ectonucleotidase and soluble ADA activities. However, ecto-ADA activity was significantly decreased (26.8%) in brain membranes of animals exposed to UCS when compared to the control group. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analysis did not show significant changes on ADA gene expression after the UCS exposure. The brain ATP metabolism showed a marked increase in adenosine levels (ADO) in animals exposed to UCS. These data suggest an increase on extracellular adenosine levels in zebrafish brain. Since this nucleoside has neuromodulatory and anxiolytic effects, changes in adenosine levels could play a role in counteracting the stress, which could be related to a compensatory mechanism in order to restore the homeostasis.

  12. Spinal serotonin 5-HT7 and adenosine A1 receptors, as well as peripheral adenosine A1 receptors, are involved in antinociception by systemically administered amitriptyline.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jean; Reid, Allison R; Sawynok, Jana

    2013-01-05

    The present study explored a link between spinal 5-HT(7) and adenosine A(1) receptors in antinociception by systemic amitriptyline in normal and adenosine A(1) receptor knock-out mice using the 2% formalin test. In normal mice, antinociception by systemic amitriptyline 3mg/kg was blocked by intrathecal administration of the selective adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) 10 nmol. Blockade was also seen in adenosine A(1) receptor +/+ mice, but not in -/- mice lacking these receptors. In both normal and adenosine A(1) receptor +/+ mice, the selective 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]pyrrolidine hydrochloride (SB269970) 3 μg blocked antinociception by systemic amitriptyline, but it did not prevent antinociception in adenosine A(1) receptor -/- mice. In normal mice, flinching was unaltered when the selective 5-HT(7) receptor agonist (2S)-(+)-5-(1,3,5-trimethylpyrazol-4-yl)-2-(dimethylamino)tetralin (AS-19) 20 μg was administered alone, but increased when co-administered intrathecally with DPCPX 10 nmol or SB269970 3 μg. Intrathecal AS-19 decreased flinching in adenosine A(1) receptor +/+ mice compared to -/- mice. Systemic amitriptyline appears to reduce nociception by activating spinal adenosine A(1) receptors secondarily to 5-HT(7) receptors. Spinal actions constitute only one aspect of antinociception by amitriptyline, as intraplantar DPCPX 10 nmol blocked antinociception by systemic amitriptyline in normal and adenosine A(1) receptor +/+, but not -/- mice. Adenosine A(1) receptor interactions are worthy of attention, as chronic oral caffeine (0.1, 0.3g/L, doses considered relevant to human intake levels) blocked antinociception by systemic amitriptyline in normal mice. In conclusion, adenosine A(1) receptors contribute to antinociception by systemic amitriptyline in both spinal and peripheral compartments.

  13. Fast determination of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and its catabolites in royal jelly using ultraperformance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ling; Xue, XiaoFeng; Zhou, JinHui; Li, Yi; Zhao, Jing; Wu, LiMing

    2012-09-12

    To obtain insight into the metabolic regulation of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) in royal jelly and to determine whether ATP and its catabolites can be used as objective parameters to evaluate the freshness and quality of royal jelly (RJ), a rapid ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method has been developed for feasible separation and quantitation of ATP and its catabolites in RJ, namely, adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), inosine monophosphate (IMP), inosine (HxR), and hypoxanthine (Hx). The analytes in the sample were extracted using 5% precooled perchloric acid. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Waters Acquity UPLC system with a Waters BEH Shield RP18 column and gradient elution based on a mixture of two solvents: solvent A, 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.5); and solvent B, acetonitrile. The recoveries were in the range of 86.0-102.3% with RSD of no more than 3.6%. The correlation coefficients of six analytes were high (r(2) ≥ 0.9988) and within the test ranges. The limits of detection and quantification for the investigated compounds were lower, at 0.36-0.68 and 1.22-2.30 mg/kg, respectively. The overall intra- and interday RSDs were no more than 1.8%. The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of the analytes in samples. The results showed that ATP in RJ sequentially degrades to ADP, AMP, IMP, HxR, and Hx during storage.

  14. Modulation of adenosine signaling prevents scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bortolotto, Josiane Woutheres; Melo, Gabriela Madalena de; Cognato, Giana de Paula; Vianna, Mônica Ryff Moreira; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-02-01

    Adenosine, a purine ribonucleoside, exhibits neuromodulatory and neuroprotective effects in the brain and is involved in memory formation and cognitive function. Adenosine signaling is mediated by adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3); in turn, nucleotide and nucleoside-metabolizing enzymes and adenosine transporters regulate its levels. Scopolamine, a muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist, has profound amnesic effects in a variety of learning paradigms and has been used to induce cognitive deficits in animal models. This study investigated the effects of acute exposure to caffeine (a non-selective antagonist of adenosine receptors A1 and A2A), ZM 241385 (adenosine receptor A2A antagonist), DPCPX (adenosine receptor A1 antagonist), dipyridamole (inhibitor of nucleoside transporters) and EHNA (inhibitor of adenosine deaminase) in a model of pharmacological cognitive impairment induced by scopolamine in adult zebrafish. Caffeine, ZM 241385, DPCPX, dipyridamole, and EHNA were acutely administered independently via i.p. in zebrafish, followed by exposure to scopolamine dissolved in tank water (200μM). These compounds prevented the scopolamine-induced amnesia without impacting locomotor activity or social interaction. Together, these data support the hypothesis that adenosine signaling may modulate memory processing, suggesting that these compounds present a potential preventive strategy against cognitive impairment.

  15. Correlation between adenosine triphosphate levels, dopamine release and electrical activity in the carotid body: support for the metabolic hypothesis of chemoreception.

    PubMed

    Obeso, A; Almaraz, L; Gonzalez, C

    1985-11-25

    An unsolved issue for the arterial chemoreceptors is the mechanism by which hypoxia and other natural stimuli lead to an increase of activity in the carotid sinus nerve. According to the 'metabolic hypothesis', the hypoxic activation of the carotid body (CB) is mediated by a decrease of the ATP levels in the type I cells, which then release a neurotransmitter capable of exciting the sensory nerve endings. Using an in vitro preparation of cat CB, we report that ATP levels in the CB do in fact decrease when the organs are exposed to moderate, short lasting hypoxia (5 min 20% O2). Additionally, we found that decreases in ATP levels induced by 2-deoxyglucose (2 mM) or sodium cyanide (0.1 mM) are closely correlated with dopamine release from type I cells and electrical activity in the carotid sinus nerve elicited by these agents. The possible cause-effect relationship of these events is discussed.

  16. RECIPIENT PRETRANSPLANT INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN NONMYELOABLATIVE HCT

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Risler, Linda J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S.; Boeckh, Michael J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5’- monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T-cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation, but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient’s pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient’s sensitivity to MMF, but confirmatory studies are needed. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  17. Increased striatal adenosine A2A receptor levels is an early event in Parkinson's disease-related pathology and it is potentially regulated by miR-34b.

    PubMed

    Villar-Menéndez, Izaskun; Porta, Sílvia; Buira, Sandra P; Pereira-Veiga, Thais; Díaz-Sánchez, Sara; Albasanz, José Luis; Ferrer, Isidre; Martín, Mairena; Barrachina, Marta

    2014-09-01

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a G-protein coupled receptor that stimulates adenylyl cyclase activity. In the brain, A2ARs are found highly enriched in striatal GABAergic medium spiny neurons, related to the control of voluntary movement. Pharmacological modulation of A2ARs is particularly useful in Parkinson's disease (PD) due to their property of antagonizing dopamine D2 receptor activity. Increases in A2AR levels have been described in PD patients showing an important loss of dopaminergic denervation markers, but no data have been reported about A2AR levels in incidental PD brains. In the present report, we show that increased A2ARs protein levels were also detected in the putamen of incidental PD cases (Braak PD stages 1-2) with respect to age-matched controls. By contrast, A2ARs mRNA levels remained unchanged, suggesting that posttranslational mechanisms could be involved in the regulation of A2ARs. It has been described how miR-34b/c downregulation is an early event in PD cases. We found that miR-34b levels are also significantly reduced in the putamen of incidental PD cases and along disease progression. Given that 3'UTR of A2AR contains a predicted target site for miR-34b, the potential role of this miRNA in protein A2AR levels was assessed. In vitro studies revealed that endogenous A2AR protein levels increased when miR-34b function was blocked using a specific anti-miR-34b. Moreover, using a luciferase reporter assay with point mutations in a miR-34b predicted binding site within the 3'UTR region of A2AR mRNA abolished the effect of the miRNA using a miR-34b mimic. In addition, we showed a reduced percentage of DNA methylation in the 5'UTR region of ADORA2A in advanced PD cases. Overall, these findings reveal that increased A2AR protein levels occur in asymptomatic PD patients and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying A2AR expression levels along the progression of this neurodegenerative disease.

  18. Adenosine receptors and diabetes: Focus on the A(2B) adenosine receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Merighi, Stefania; Borea, Pier Andrea; Gessi, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    Over the last two decades, diabetes mellitus has become one of the most challenging health problems worldwide. Diabetes mellitus, classified as type I and II, is a pathology concerning blood glucose level in the body. The nucleoside adenosine has long been known to affect insulin secretion, glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism, through activation of four G protein coupled adenosine receptors (ARs), named A1, A2A, A2B and A3. Currently, the novel promising subtype to develop new drugs for diabetes treatment is the A2BAR subtype. The use of selective agonists and antagonists for A2BAR subtype in various diabetic animal models allowed us to identify several effects of A2BAR signaling in cell metabolism. In particular, the focus of this review is to summarize the studies on purinergic signaling associated with diabetes through A2BARs modulation.

  19. Potassium Aspartate Attenuates Brain Injury Induced by Controlled Cortical Impact in Rats Through Increasing Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Levels, Na+/K+-ATPase Activity and Reducing Brain Edema

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yi; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yumei; Su, Yujin; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Potassium aspartate (PA), as an electrolyte supplement, is widely used in clinical practice. In our previous study, we found PA had neuroprotective effects against apoptosis after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats. In this study, we examine whether PA has protective effects on traumatic brain injury (TBI). Material/Methods TBI was induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI) in rats. Vehicle treatment (control) or PA treatment was administered intraperitoneally at 30 minutes after CCI. The modified neurological severity score (mNSS) and cortical lesion volume were examined. Brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity were measured, as well as brain ATP contents, lactic acid levels, and Na+/K+-ATPase activities. Results We found that CCI induced cortical injury in rats. Acute PA treatment at the dose of 62.5 mg/kg and 125 mg/kg significantly improved neurological deficits (p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively) and decreased the cortical lesion volume (p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively) compared with vehicle-only treatment. PA treatment at the dose of 125 mg/kg attenuated brain edema and ameliorated BBB integrity. In addition, PA treatment significantly reduced the loss of ATP (p<0.01), reduced lactic acid levels (p<0.001), and increased the activity of Na+/K+-ATPase (p<0.01). Conclusions Our results indicate PA has neuroprotective effects on TBI through increasing ATP levels, Na+/K+-ATPase activity, and reducing brain edema. It provides experimental evidence for the clinical application of PA. PMID:27959885

  20. Effect of phentolamine on the hyperemic response to adenosine in patients with microvascular disease.

    PubMed

    Aarnoudse, Wilbert; Geven, Maartje; Barbato, Emanuele; Botman, Kees-joost; De Bruyne, Bernard; Pijls, Nico H J

    2005-12-15

    For accurate measurement of the fractional flow reserve (FFR) of the myocardium, the presence of maximum hyperemia is of paramount importance. It has been suggested that the hyperemic effect of the conventionally used hyperemic stimulus, adenosine, could be submaximal in patients who have microvascular dysfunction and that adding alpha-blocking agents could augment the hyperemic response in these patients. We studied the effect of the nonselective alpha-blocking agent phentolamine, which was administered in addition to adenosine after achieving hyperemia, in patients who had microvascular disease and those who did not. Thirty patients who were referred for percutaneous coronary intervention were selected. Of these 30 patients, 15 had strong indications for microvascular disease and 15 did not. FFR was measured using intracoronary adenosine, intravenous adenosine, and intracoronary papaverine before and after intracoronary administration of the nonselective alpha blocker phentolamine. In patients who did not have microvascular disease, no differences in hyperemic response to adenosine were noted, whether or not alpha blockade was given before adenosine administration; FFR levels before and after phentolamine were 0.76 and 0.75, respectively, using intracoronary adenosine (p = 0.10) and 0.75 and 0.74, respectively, using intravenous adenosine (p = 0.20). In contrast, in patients who had microvascular disease, some increase in hyperemic response was observed after administration of phentolamine; FFR levels decreased from 0.74 to 0.70 using intracoronary adenosine (p = 0.003) and from 0.75 to 0.72 using intravenous adenosine (p = 0.04). Although statistically significant, the observed further decrease in microvascular resistance after addition of phentolamine was small and did not affect clinical decision making in any patient. In conclusion, when measuring FFR, routinely adding an alpha-blocking agent to adenosine does not affect clinical decision making.

  1. Adenosine hypothesis of schizophrenia –opportunities for pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev; Singer, Philipp; Shen, Hai-Ying; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K.

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia based on the dopamine hypothesis remains unsatisfactory for the negative and cognitive symptoms of the disease. Enhancing N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) function is expected to alleviate such persistent symptoms, but successful development of novel clinically effective compounds remains challenging. Adenosine is a homeostatic bioenergetic network modulator that is able to affect complex networks synergistically at different levels (receptor dependent pathways, biochemistry, bioenergetics, and epigenetics). By affecting brain dopamine and glutamate activities it represents a promising candidate for restoring the functional imbalance in these neurotransmitter systems believed to underlie the genesis of schizophrenia symptoms, as well as restoring homeostasis of bioenergetics. Suggestion of an adenosine hypothesis of schizophrenia further posits that adenosinergic dysfunction might contribute to the emergence of multiple neurotransmitter dysfunctionscharacteristic of schizophrenia via diverse mechanisms. Given the importance of adenosine in early brain development and regulation of brain immune response, it also bears direct relevance to the aetiology of schizophrenia. Here, we provide an overview of the rationale and evidence in support of the therapeutic potential of multiple adenosinergic targets, including the high-affinity adenosine receptors (A1R and A2AR), and the regulatory enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). Key preliminary clinical data and preclinical findings are reviewed. PMID:21315743

  2. Quantitative changes in adenosine deaminase isoenzymes in human colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    ten Kate, J; Wijnen, J T; van der Goes, R G; Quadt, R; Griffioen, G; Bosman, F T; Khan, P M

    1984-10-01

    Several reports have suggested that a decrease or absence of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) is consistently associated with cancer. However, in other studies, decreased as well as increased ADCP levels were found. In the present study, we investigated ADCP levels in 37 colorectal adenocarcinomas and correlated the results with clinicopathological characteristics in individual carcinomas. The levels of adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4) and soluble ADCP were determined in tissue samples by, respectively, a spectrophotometric assay and an ADCP specific radioimmunoassay. The values in the individual tumors were compared with their histological characteristics, such as degree of differentiation, nuclear grading, and the preoperative plasma carcinoembryonic antigen levels in the patients. It was found that ADCP was decreased in about a third of the tumors but unaltered or even increased in others. However, there was an overall 40% increase of the adenosine deaminase activity in the tumors compared to normal tissue. There seems to be no simple correlation between any of the clinicopathological parameters and the ADCP or adenosine deaminase levels. Methods detecting ADCP at single cell level might be helpful in exploring its potential use as a cancer-associated marker.

  3. Nucleic acid molecules encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Lange, Bernd M.

    2001-01-01

    A cDNA encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (IPK) from peppermint (Mentha x piperita) has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:1) is provided which codes for the expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (SEQ ID NO:2), from peppermint (Mentha x piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase in plants in order to enhance the production of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or isoprenoids derived therefrom, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or the production of its products.

  4. Adenosine Receptor Regulation of Coronary Blood Flow in Ossabaw Miniature SwineS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xin; Mokelke, Eric A.; Neeb, Zachary P.; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Edwards, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine clearly regulates coronary blood flow (CBF); however, contributions of specific adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes (A1, A2A, A2B, A3) to CBF in swine have not been determined. ARs generally decrease (A1, A3) or increase (A2A, A2B) cyclic adenosine monophosphate, a major mediator of vasodilation. We hypothesized that A1 antagonism potentiates coronary vasodilation and coronary stent deployment in dyslipidemic Ossabaw swine elicits impaired vasodilation to adenosine that is associated with increased A1/A2A expression. The left main coronary artery was accessed with a guiding catheter allowing intracoronary infusions. After placement of a flow wire into the left circumflex coronary artery the responses to bolus infusions of adenosine were obtained. Steady-state infusion of AR-specific agents was achieved by using a small catheter fed over the flow wire in control pigs. CBF was increased by the A2-nonselective agonist 2-phenylaminoadenosine (CV1808) in a dose-dependent manner. Baseline CBF was increased by the highly A1-selective antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), but not changed by other AR-specific agents. The nonselective A2 antagonist 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine and A2A-selective antagonist 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol (ZM241385) abolished adenosine-induced CBF, whereas A2B and A3 antagonism had no effect. Dyslipidemia and stenting decreased adenosine-induced CBF ∼70%, whereas A1, A2A, and A2B mRNA were up-regulated in dyslipidemic versus control >5-fold and there was no change in the ratio of A1/A2A protein in microvessels distal to the stent. In control Ossabaw swine A1 antagonism by DPCPX positively regulated basal CBF. Impaired adenosine-induced CBF after stenting in dyslipidemia is most likely caused by the altered balance between A1 and A2A signaling, not receptor expression. PMID:20855445

  5. Optimization of benzoxazole-based inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Kavitha, Mandapati; Zhang, Minjia; Chin, James En Wai; Liu, Xiaoping; Striepen, Boris; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an enteric protozoan parasite that has emerged as a major cause of diarrhea, malnutrition and gastroenteritis as well as posing a potential bioterrorism threat. C. parvum synthesizes guanine nucleotides from host adenosine in a streamlined pathway that relies on inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). We have previously identified several parasite-selective C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) inhibitors by high-throughput screening. In this paper, we report the structure-activity relationship (SAR) for a series of benzoxazole derivatives with many compounds demonstrating CpIMPDH IC50 values in the nanomolar range and > 500-fold selectivity over human IMPDH (hIMPDH). Unlike previously reported CpIMPDH inhibitors, these compounds are competitive inhibitors versus NAD+. The SAR study reveals that pyridine and other small heteroaromatic substituents are required at the 2-position of the benzoxazole for potent inhibitory activity. In addition, several other SAR conclusions are highlighted with regard to the benzoxazole and the amide portion of the inhibitor, including preferred stereochemistry. An x-ray crystal structure of a representative E•IMP•inhibitor complex is also presented. Overall, the secondary amine derivative 15a (Q67) demonstrated excellent CpIMPDH inhibitory activity (IC50 = 0.5 ± 0.1 nM) and moderate stability (t1/2 = 44 min) in mouse liver microsomes. Compound 73, the racemic version of 15a, also displayed superb antiparasitic activity in a Toxoplasma gondii strain that relies on CpIMPDH (EC50 = 20 ± 20 nM), and selectivity versus a wild-type T. gondii strain (200-fold). No toxicity was observed (LD50 > 50 μM) against a panel of four mammalian cells lines. PMID:23668331

  6. Cardiovascular selectivity of adenosine receptor agonists in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Gerencer, R. Z.; Finegan, B. A.; Clanachan, A. S.

    1992-01-01

    1. In order to determine the relevance of adenosine (Ado) receptor classification obtained from in vitro methods to the cardiovascular actions of Ado agonists in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA, 400 fold A1-selective), 5'-N-ethyl-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA, A1 approximately A2) and 2-phenylaminoadenosine (PAA, 5 fold A2-selective) were compared in open-chest, fentanyl-pentobarbitone anaesthetized dogs. 2. Graded doses of CHA (10 to 1000 micrograms kg-1), NECA (0.5 to 100 micrograms kg-1) or PAA (0.1 to 20 micrograms kg-1) were administered intravenously and changes in haemodynamics and myocardial contractility were assessed 10 min following each dose. The effects of graded infusions of AMP (200 to 1000 micrograms kg-1 min-1) were also evaluated. 3. AMP and each of the Ado analogues (NECA > PAA > CHA) increased the systemic vascular conductance index (SVCI) in a dose-dependent manner and reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP). At doses causing similar increases in SVCI, these agonists caused (i) similar reflex increases in heart rate (HR) and cardiac index (CI) and decreases in AV conduction interval (AVi) and (ii) similar increases in coronary vascular conductance (CVC). 4. After cardiac autonomic blockade with atropine (0.2 mg kg-1) and propranolol (1 mg kg-1), AMP, CHA and PAA still increased SVCI and CVC and decreased MAP. CHA and PAA had no marked effects on HR, CI or AVi. As in the absence of cardiac autonomic blockade, equieffective vasodilator doses of CHA and PAA had identical effects on CVC, CI and AVi.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1467827

  7. Phosphorylation of adenosine in renal brush-border membrane vesicles by an exchange reaction catalysed by adenosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Sayós, J; Solsona, C; Mallol, J; Lluis, C; Franco, R

    1994-01-01

    Uptake of [3H]adenosine in brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles from either rat or pig kidney leads to an accumulation of intravesicular [3H]AMP. The lack of significant levels of ATP and the presence of AMP in BBM indicated that a phosphotransfer between [3H]adenosine and AMP occurs. The phosphotransfer activity is inhibited by iodotubercidin, which suggests that it is performed by adenosine kinase acting in an ATP-independent manner. The existence of a similar phosphotransferase activity was demonstrated in membrane-free extracts from pig kidney. From the compounds tested it was shown that a variety of mononucleotides could act as phosphate donors. The results suggest that phosphotransfer reactions may be physiologically relevant in kidney. PMID:8110185

  8. Properties of adenyl cyclase and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate receptor protein-deficient mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S

    1976-01-01

    Several spontaneous cya and crp mutants of Escherichia coli have been selected as clones simultaneously resistant to phage lambda and nalidixic acid and characterized. Both cya and crp mutants have been found to grow as cocci with increased doubling times. They have increased resistance to some mutagens (methylmethanesulfonate, ultraviolet light, gamma rays), antibiotics (nalidixic acid, ampicillin), phages (lambda, T6), sublethal heat and hypotonic shock, and decreased resistance to neutral detergents (sodium dodecyl sulfate, sodium deoxycholate), a protein synthesis inhibitor (streptomycin), and a respiratory inhibitor (sodium azide). The nature of changes in cell parameters indicate fundamental alterations in the envelope structure of the cya and crp mutant cells. The new cya and crp mutants have been found to be multiply carbohydrate negative and nonmotile in conformity with similar previously isolated mutants. Studies of revertants and phi80 cya+ and phi80 cya transductants indicated that the pleiotropic phenotype is related to a single mutational event at the cya or the crp locus in the mutants. Images PMID:173710

  9. Modulation of calcium channels of twitch skeletal muscle fibres of the frog by adrenaline and cyclic adenosine monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Arreola, J; Calvo, J; García, M C; Sánchez, J A

    1987-01-01

    1. Modulation of fast and slow Ca2+ channels of frog skeletal muscle by adrenaline (10(-6) to 10(-5) M) and cyclic AMP was investigated using intracellular voltage recordings in intact fibres and a voltage-clamp technique in cut fibres. 2. In tetraethylammonium (TEA), Cl(-)-free Ringer solution, adrenaline increased the maximum rate of rise of Ca2+ spikes by 85% and in a similar solution, peak slow Ca2+ current (ICa,s) by 51%. 3. Application of cyclic AMP to the cut ends of fibres, produced a relative increase of ICa,s of ca. 24%. The effect was maintained for ca. 2 h. 4. Changes in the time course of ICa,s were produced by adrenaline and cyclic AMP: the limiting values of time-to-peak current measured as a function of membrane potential were lower (ca. 41% in adrenaline and ca. 34% in cyclic AMP) than those found in control experiments. Also, ICa,s decayed faster in the presence of adrenaline or cyclic AMP. These changes can be explained by exhaustion of Ca2+ in the lumen of transverse tubular system and do not require the assumption of kinetic variations. 5. Fast Ca2+ currents (ICa,f) which could not be blocked by nifedipine were also recorded. Cyclic AMP greatly increased the amplitude of ICa,f but had no obvious effects on ICa,f kinetics. 6. Application of catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase by diffusion or by pressure injection also increased the amplitude of ICa,s and ICa,f. Pressure injection brought about modifications in the time course of ICa,s that cannot be explained by depletion of Ca2+. 7. Mechanical experiments were performed on single fibres. Nominally Ca2+-free solutions prevented the development and the maintenance of positive inotropic effect of adrenaline on twitch tension. Development of twitch potentiation was dependent upon the frequency of stimulation. Adrenaline was practically ineffective if no stimulation was applied. 8. It is concluded that both populations of Ca2+ channels are modulated by adrenergic stimulation probably via cyclic AMP, and that twitch potentiation may be mediated by a Ca2+ entry through Ca2+ channels. PMID:2451739

  10. Adenylate nucleotide levels and energy charge in Arthrobacter crystallopoietes during growth and starvation.

    PubMed

    Leps, W T; Ensign, J C

    1979-07-01

    The adenylate nucleotide concentrations, based on internal water space, were determined in cells of Arthrobacter crystallopoietes during growth and starvation and the energy charge of the cells was calculated. The energy charge of spherical cells rose during the first 10 h of growth, then remained nearly constant for as long as 20 h into the stationary phase. The energy charge of rod-shaped cells rose during the first 4 h of growth, then remained constant during subsequent growth and decreased in the stationary growth phase. Both spherical and rod-shaped cells excreted adenosine monophosphate but not adenosine triphosphate or adenosine diphosphate during starvation. The intracellular energy charge of spherical cells declined during the initial 10 h and then remained constant for 1 week of starvation at a value of 0.78. The intracellular energy charge of rod-shaped cells declined during the first 24 h of starvation, remained constant for the next 80 h, then decreased to a value of 0.73 after a total of 168 h starvation. Both cell forms remained more than 90% viable during this time. Addition of a carbon and energy source to starving cells resulted in an increase in the ATP concentration and as a result the energy charge increased to the smae levels as found during growth.

  11. K+ depolarization evokes ATP, adenosine and glutamate release from glia in rat hippocampus: a microelectrode biosensor study

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, A; Andó, RD; Túri, G; Rózsa, B; Sperlágh, B

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE This study was undertaken to characterize the ATP, adenosine and glutamate outflow evoked by depolarization with high K+ concentrations, in slices of rat hippocampus. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We utilized the microelectrode biosensor technique and extracellular electrophysiological recording for the real-time monitoring of the efflux of ATP, adenosine and glutamate. KEY RESULTS ATP, adenosine and glutamate sensors exhibited transient and reversible current during depolarization with 25 mM K+, with distinct kinetics. The ecto-ATPase inhibitor ARL67156 enhanced the extracellular level of ATP and inhibited the prolonged adenosine efflux, suggesting that generation of adenosine may derive from the extracellular breakdown of ATP. Stimulation-evoked ATP, adenosine and glutamate efflux was inhibited by tetrodotoxin, while exposure to Ca2+-free medium abolished ATP and adenosine efflux from hippocampal slices. Extracellular elevation of ATP and adenosine were decreased in the presence of NMDA receptor antagonists, D-AP-5 and ifenprodil, whereas non-NMDA receptor blockade by CNQX inhibited glutamate but not ATP and adenosine efflux. The gliotoxin fluoroacetate and P2X7 receptor antagonists inhibited the K+-evoked ATP, adenosine and glutamate efflux, while carbenoxolone in low concentration and probenecid decreased only the adenosine efflux. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results demonstrated activity-dependent gliotransmitter release in the hippocampus in response to ongoing neuronal activity. ATP and glutamate were released by P2X7 receptor activation into extracellular space. Although the increased extracellular levels of adenosine did derive from released ATP, adenosine might also be released directly via pannexin hemichannels. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Sershen, pp. 1000–1002 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.02072.x PMID:22394324

  12. Astrocyte-derived adenosine is central to the hypnogenic effect of glucose.

    PubMed

    Scharbarg, Emeric; Daenens, Marion; Lemaître, Frédéric; Geoffroy, Hélène; Guille-Collignon, Manon; Gallopin, Thierry; Rancillac, Armelle

    2016-01-12

    Sleep has been hypothesised to maintain a close relationship with metabolism. Here we focus on the brain structure that triggers slow-wave sleep, the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO), to explore the cellular and molecular signalling pathways recruited by an increase in glucose concentration. We used infrared videomicroscopy on ex vivo brain slices to establish that glucose induces vasodilations specifically in the VLPO via the astrocytic release of adenosine. Real-time detection by in situ purine biosensors further revealed that the adenosine level doubles in response to glucose, and triples during the wakefulness period. Finally, patch-clamp recordings uncovered the depolarizing effect of adenosine and its A2A receptor agonist, CGS-21680, on sleep-promoting VLPO neurons. Altogether, our results provide new insights into the metabolically driven release of adenosine. We hypothesise that adenosine adjusts the local energy supply to local neuronal activity in response to glucose. This pathway could contribute to sleep-wake transition and sleep intensity.

  13. [Protective effect of adenosine receptor agonists in a model of spinal cord injury in rats].

    PubMed

    Sufianova, G Z; Usov, L A; Sufianov, A A; Perelomov, Iu P; Raevskaia, L Iu; Shapkin, A G

    2002-01-01

    Possibilities of the neuroprotector therapy using adenosine and cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), an adenosine receptor agonist, were studied on a model of spinal cord injury by compression in rats (most closely reproducing the analogous clinical pathological process in humans). The model was induced by slow, graded compression of the spinal cord at the thoracic level. Adenosine and CPA were introduced 60 min before injury by subcutaneous injections in a dose of 300 and 2.5 micrograms/kg, respectively. The protective effect was judged by comparing the neurological, electromyographic, and histopathological changes in animals with the model injury and in the control group (adenosine and CPA background). The A1-agonist CPA injections produced a pronounced, statistically significant neuroprotector effect on the given spinal cord injury model in rats. The neuroprotective effect of adenosine was significant but not as strong. It is concluded that it is expedient to use A-agonists in clinics.

  14. Caffeine and propranolol block the increase in rat pineal melatonin production produced by stimulation of adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Babey, A M; Palmour, R M; Young, S N

    1994-07-18

    The adenosine agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) injected i.p. during the light period increased rat pineal melatonin levels and this increase was blocked by simultaneous administration of the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine. A single dose of the adenosine A1 agonist cyclopentyladenosine had no effect on nocturnal melatonin production. The NECA-stimulated increase was also blocked by the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol. Given alone, neither caffeine nor propranolol had any effect on melatonin levels. The results point to an intermediate role for beta-adrenergic receptors in the adenosine-stimulated increase of melatonin production.

  15. Effect of chronic salt loading on adenosine metabolism and receptor expression in renal cortex and medulla in rats.

    PubMed

    Zou, A P; Wu, F; Li, P L; Cowley, A W

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that chronic salt loading increased renal interstitial adenosine concentrations and desensitized renal effects of adenosine, a phenomenon that could facilitate sodium excretion. However, the mechanisms responsible for the increased adenosine production and decreased adenosine response are poorly understood. This study examined the effects of the dietary high salt intake on adenosine metabolism and receptor expression in the renal cortex and medulla in Sprague Dawley rats. Fluorescent high-performance liquid chromatography analyses were performed to determine adenosine levels in snap-frozen kidney tissues. Comparing rats fed a normal (1% NaCl) versus high salt (4% NaCl) diet, renal adenosine concentrations in rats fed a high salt diet were significantly higher (cortex: 43+/-3 versus 85+/-4, P<0.05; medulla: 183+/-4 versus 302+/-8 nmol/g wet tissue, P<0.05). Increased adenosine concentrations were not associated with changes in the 5'-nucleotidase or adenosine deaminase activity, as determined by quantitative isoelectric focusing and gel electrophoresis. Western blot analyses showed that a high salt diet (4% NaCl for 3 weeks) downregulated A1 receptors (antinatriuretic type), did not alter A2A and A2B receptors (natriuretic type), and upregulated A3 receptors (function unknown) in both renal cortex and medulla. The data show that stimulation of adenosine production and downregulation of A1 receptors with salt loading may play an important role in adaptation in the kidney to promote sodium excretion.

  16. Ameliorative effect of adenosine on hypoxia-reoxygenation injury in LLC-PK1, a porcine kidney cell line.

    PubMed

    Yonehana, T; Gemba, M

    1999-06-01

    We studied the effects of adenosine on injury caused by hypoxia and reoxygenation in LLC-PK1 cells. Lactate dehydrogenase and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase were released from cells exposed to hypoxia for 6 hr and then reoxygenation for 1 hr. The addition of adenosine at 100 microM to the medium before hypoxia began significantly decreased enzyme leakage into medium during both hypoxia and reoxygenation. The adenosine A1-receptor agonist, R(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine (R-PIA), at the concentration of 100 microM, did not affect enzyme release, but the adenosine A2-receptor agonist 2-p-[2-car-boxyethyl]phenethyl-amino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido-adenosi ne hydrochloride (CGS 21680) at the concentration of 100 nM, suppressed the injury caused by hypoxia and reoxygenation. There were decreases in cAMP contents and ATP levels in LLC-PK1 cells injured by hypoxia and reoxygenation. Adenosine (100 microM) restored ATP levels in the cells during reoxygenation. With adenosine, the intracellular cAMP level was increased prominently during reoxygenation. These results suggest that adenosine protects LLC-PK1 cells from injury caused by hypoxia and reoxygenation by increasing the intracellular cAMP level via adenosine A2 receptor.

  17. Photo-electrochemical Bioanalysis of Guanosine Monophosphate Using Coupled Enzymatic Reactions at a CdS/ZnS Quantum Dot Electrode.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Nadeem; Khan, Nazimuddin; Völkner, Johannes; Widdascheck, Felix; del Pino, Pablo; Witte, Gregor; Riedel, Marc; Lisdat, Fred; Konrad, Manfred; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2015-11-18

    A photo-electrochemical sensor for the specific detection of guanosine monophosphate (GMP) is demonstrated, based on three enzymes combined in a coupled reaction assay. The first reaction involves the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent conversion of GMP to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) by guanylate kinase, which warrants substrate specificity. The reaction products ADP and GDPare co-substrates for the enzymatic conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate in a second reaction mediated by pyruvate kinase. Pyruvate in turn is the co-substrate for lactate dehydrogenase that generates lactate via oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form) NADH to NAD(+). This third enzymatic reaction is electrochemically detected. For this purpose a CdS/ZnS quantum dot (QD) electrode is illuminated and the photocurrent response under fixed potential conditions is evaluated. The sequential enzyme reactions are first evaluated in solution. Subsequently, a sensor for GMP is constructed using polyelectrolytes for enzyme immobilization.

  18. HPLC analysis of cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose and adenosine diphosphate ribose: determination of NAD+ metabolites in hippocampal membranes.

    PubMed

    Casabona, G; Sturiale, L; L'Episcopo, M R; Raciti, G; Fazzio, A; Sarpietro, M G; Genazzani, A A; Cambria, A; Nicoletti, F

    1995-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine diphosphate-ribose (cADPR) and ADPR were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on a CarboPac PA-1 column at strong basic pH and quantitated by a pulsed amperometric detector. Although this HPLC method was quite sensitive and highly reproducible, it did not allow the separation of cADPR from guanosine monophosphate (GMP) which, when present, could be removed by ion-affinity chromatography, using gel-immobilized Fe3+ columns. Crude synaptic membranes from rat hippocampi were incubated with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and acidic extracts were subject to HPLC analysis after neutralization. Incubation led to a time-dependent formation of ADPR, which was amplified when membranes were incubated in the presence of guanosine trisphosphate (GTP), guanosine-5'-0-(3-thiotrisphosphate) (GTP-gamma-S) or AlF3. cADPR did not accumulate in detectable amounts and only a minimal proportion (< 5%) of radioactivity originating from [3H]NAD co-eluted with authentic cADPR in extracts from hippocampal membranes. The simultaneous detection of cADPR and ADPR we have described may help the search for inhibitors of cADPR metabolism, which will allow to measure the cADPR that accumulates under basal conditions or in response to extracellular signals.

  19. Torsades de pointes after adenosine administration.

    PubMed

    Teodorovich, Nicholay; Margolin, Elena; Kogan, Yonatan; Paz, Ofir; Swissa, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine can produce arrhythmias, which are generally short living. It may induce PACs and PVCs, sinus bradycardia, and atrial fibrillation. There have been reports of transient polymorphic VT (torsades de pointes) in patients with LQTS and others in people with normal QT interval. We report a case of a long episode of polymorphic VT induced by adenosine. A 27 year old woman received 6 mg adenosine for PSVT, which terminated and torsades de pointes developed, persisting for 17 seconds and terminated spontaneously. This is the longest described duration of the torsades after adenosine administration in patients with normal QT interval.

  20. Partial separation of platelet and placental adenosine receptors from adenosine A2-like binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnierowicz, S.; Work, C.; Hutchison, K.; Fox, I.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The ubiquitous adenosine A2-like binding protein obscures the binding properties of adenosine receptors assayed with 5'-N-({sup 3}H)ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). To solve this problem, we developed a rapid and simple method to separate adenosine receptors from the adenosine A2-like binding protein. Human platelet and placental membranes were solubilized with 1% 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate. The soluble platelet extract was precipitated with polyethylene glycol and the fraction enriched in adenosine receptors was isolated from the precipitate by differential centrifugation. The adenosine A2-like binding protein was removed from the soluble placental extract with hydroxylapatite and adenosine receptors were precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The specificity of the ({sup 3}H)NECA binding is typical of an adenosine A2 receptor for platelets and an adenosine A1 receptor for placenta. This method leads to enrichment of adenosine A2 receptors for platelets and adenosine A1 receptors for placenta. This provides a useful preparation technique for pharmacologic studies of adenosine receptors.

  1. Inhibition of Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation by Adenosine and Inosine: Studies on Their Relative Contribution and Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Pereira, Jaime; Mezzano, Diego; Alarcón, Marcelo; Caballero, Julio; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background The inhibitory effect of adenosine on platelet aggregation is abrogated after the addition of adenosine-deaminase. Inosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside degraded from adenosine. Objectives The mechanisms of antiplatelet action of adenosine and inosine in vitro and in vivo, and their differential biological effects by molecular modeling were investigated. Results Adenosine (0.5, 1 and 2 mmol/L) inhibited phosphatidylserine exposure from 52±4% in the control group to 44±4 (p<0.05), 29±2 (p<0.01) and 20±3% (p<0.001). P-selectin expression in the presence of adenosine 0.5, 1 and 2 mmol/L was inhibited from 32±4 to 27±2 (p<0.05), 14±3 (p<0.01) and 9±3% (p<0.001), respectively. At the concentrations tested, only inosine to 4 mmol/L had effect on platelet P-selectin expression (p<0.05). Adenosine and inosine inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release stimulated by ADP and collagen. Adenosine and inosine reduced collagen-induced platelet adhesion and aggregate formation under flow. At the same concentrations adenosine inhibited platelet aggregation, decreased the levels of sCD40L and increased intraplatelet cAMP. In addition, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent adenosine receptor A2A antagonist) attenuated the effect of adenosine on platelet aggregation induced by ADP and intraplatelet level of cAMP. Adenosine and inosine significantly inhibited thrombosis formation in vivo (62±2% occlusion at 60 min [n = 6, p<0.01] and 72±1.9% occlusion at 60 min, [n = 6, p<0.05], respectively) compared with the control (98±2% occlusion at 60 min, n = 6). A2A is the adenosine receptor present in platelets; it is known that inosine is not an A2A ligand. Docking of adenosine and inosine inside A2A showed that the main difference is the formation by adenosine of an additional hydrogen bond between the NH2 of the adenine group and the residues Asn253 in H6 and Glu169 in EL2 of the A2A receptor. Conclusion Therefore

  2. Adenosine modulates cell growth in the human breast cancer cells via adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Panjehpour, Mojtaba; Karami-Tehrani, Fatemeh

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine modulates the proliferation, survival, and apoptosis of many different cell types. The present study was performed to investigate the role of adenosine receptors in the human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB468. The biological effects of adenosine on the cells were analyzed by adenylyl cyclase and cell viability assay as well as RT-PCR of adenosine receptors. RT-PCR results show the expression of the transcript of all adenosine receptors in both cell lines. By using adenosine and selective adenosine receptor agonists or antagonists, we found that A3 stimulation reduced cell viability, which was abolished by pretreatment with A3 receptor antagonist. Moreover, we demonstrated that adenosine (natural agonist) triggers a cytotoxic signal via A3 receptor activation that was not seen for other subclasses of adenosine receptors. Intracellular cAMP concentration was changed significantly only for A3 and A2B receptor-selective agonists, which indicates the functional form of these receptors on the cell surface. In conclusion, our findings revealed the role of adenosine receptors in breast cancer cell lines on growth modulation role of A3 and functional form of A2B, although its involvement in cell growth modulation was not seen. Theses findings as well as data by others may provide a possible application of adenosine receptor agonists/antagonists in breast malignancies.

  3. Poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-N-methylolacrylamide-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of adenosine phosphates in royal jelly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Zhang, Tianbin; Cheng, Yechun; Jia, Qiong

    2014-07-01

    A polymer monolith microextraction method coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was developed for the determination of adenosine triphosphate, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine monophosphate. The monolithic column was synthesized inside fused-silica capillaries using thermal initiation free-radical polymerization with glycidyl methacrylate as the monomer, ethylene dimethacrylate as the cross-linker, cyclohexanol, and 1-dodecanol as the porogen. N-Methylolacrylamide, an important hydrophilic monomer, was incorporated into the polymerization mixture to enhance the hydrophilicity of the poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) column. The obtained poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-N-methylolacrylamide-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Optimum conditions for the preconcentration and separation of the target adenosines were also investigated. Under the optimum conditions, we obtained acceptable linearities, low limits of detection, and good relative standard deviations. The developed polymer monolith microextraction with high-performance liquid chromatography method exhibited a good performance with recovery values in the range of 76.9-104.7% when applied to the determination of the adenosines in five royal jelly samples.

  4. Enzymatic regeneration of adenosine triphosphate cofactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Regenerating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by enzymatic process which utilizes carbamyl phosphate as phosphoryl donor is technique used to regenerate expensive cofactors. Process allows complex enzymatic reactions to be considered as candidates for large-scale continuous processes.

  5. The A2B adenosine receptor impairs the maturation and immunogenicity of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jeffrey M; Ross, William G; Agbai, Oma N; Frazier, Renea; Figler, Robert A; Rieger, Jayson; Linden, Joel; Ernst, Peter B

    2009-04-15

    The endogenous purine nucleoside adenosine is an important antiinflammatory mediator that contributes to the control of CD4(+) T cell responses. While adenosine clearly has direct effects on CD4(+) T cells, it remains to be determined whether actions on APC such as dendritic cells (DC) are also important. In this report we characterize DC maturation and function in BMDC stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of the nonselective adenosine receptor agonist NECA (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine). We found that NECA inhibited TNF-alpha and IL-12 in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas IL-10 production was increased. NECA-treated BMDC also expressed reduced levels of MHC class II and CD86 and were less effective at stimulating CD4(+) T cell proliferation and IL-2 production compared with BMDC exposed to vehicle control. Based on real-time RT-PCR, the A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)AR) and A(2B)AR were the predominant adenosine receptors expressed in BMDC. Using adenosine receptor subtype selective antagonists and BMDC derived from A(2A)AR(-/-) and A(2B)AR(-/-)mice, it was shown that NECA modulates TNF-alpha, IL-12, IL-10, and CD86 responses predominantly via A(2B)AR. These data indicate that engagement of A(2B)AR modifies murine BMDC maturation and suggest that adenosine regulates CD4(+) T cell responses by selecting for DC with impaired immunogencity.

  6. Adenosine Generated in the Bone Marrow Niche Through a CD38-Mediated Pathway Correlates With Progression of Human Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Horenstein, Alberto L; Quarona, Valeria; Toscani, Denise; Costa, Federica; Chillemi, Antonella; Pistoia, Vito; Giuliani, Nicola; Malavasi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Human myeloma cells express CD38 at high levels and grow in hypoxic niches inside the bone marrow. Myeloma cells respond to hypoxia with metabolic changes leading to aerobic glycolysis, thus reducing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and increasing NAD+. Our hypothesis is that these conditions favor the enzymatic pathways involved in the production of adenosine in the niche. Within the niche, NAD+ is able to activate a discontinuous adenosinergic pathway that relies upon CD38, CD203a and CD73 or TRACP, according to the environmental pH. The observed variability in adenosine concentrations in bone marrow aspirates is a result of the interactions taking place among myeloma and other cells in the bone marrow niche. A pilot study showed that adenosine profiles differ during disease progression. Adenosine levels were significantly higher in the bone marrow plasma of patients with symptomatic myeloma and correlated with ISS staging, suggesting that adenosine is produced in the myeloma niche at micromolar levels by an ectoenzymatic network centered on CD38. Adenosine levels increase with disease aggressiveness, a finding that supports adenosine as a potential marker of myeloma progression. PMID:27761584

  7. Cellular levels of feedback regulator of adenylate cyclase and the effect of epinephrine and insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, R j; Russell, T R; Asakawa, T; Sutherland, E W

    1975-01-01

    We have obtained direct evidence that shows the cellular formation and subsequent release of a potent inhibitor (feedback regulator) of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by adipocytes, upon stimulation with epinephrine. The appearance of such a feedback regulator in adipocytes preceded its release into the medium. During a 30 min incubation, intracellular regulator levels rose rapidly and reached 39-61 units/g of adipocyte at 10 min. Release of inhibitor into the medium increased slowly and was 11-16 units/g of adipocyte at 10 min. Upon continued incubation, the cells at 30 min contained 30-41 units/g of ingibitor, slightly less than the content at 30 min; meanwhile, the medium content rose more than 3-fold. The inhibitor from both locations appeared to have the same characteristics, judging from the purification procedures and the biological activities on hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase. Adenylate cyclase was inhibited by the feedback regulator in vitro when either epinephrine, corticotropin (ACTH), or glucagon was used as activator. The site of action of this inhibitor is therefore most likely beyond the specific hormone receptors. A new in vitro action of insulin has been found. Insulin, 50-500 microunits/ml, inhibited the formation and release of this factor from isolated rat or hamster adipocytes by 29-81% after these cells were stimulated by hormones that raise intracellular adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate. This factor enhaced the effect of insulin in lowering the adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate levels in fresh rat adipocytes. A reduced formation of such a factor may modify the metabolic events in adipocytes, and some as yet unexplained effects of insulin could therefore be linked to the metabolic effects of this factor. PMID:174073

  8. Suppression of adenosine 2a receptor (A2aR)-mediated adenosine signaling improves disease phenotypes in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Seng Kah; Higashimori, Haruki; Tolman, Michaela; Yang, Yongjie

    2015-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disease in which the majority of upper and lower motor neurons are degenerated. Despite intensive efforts to identify drug targets and develop neuroprotective strategies, effective therapeutics for ALS remains unavailable. The identification and characterization of novel targets and pathways remain crucial in the development of ALS therapeutics. Adenosine is a major neuromodulator that actively regulates synaptic transmission. Interestingly, adenosine levels are significantly elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of progressing human ALS patients. In the current study, we showed that adenosine 2a receptor (A2aR), but not adenosine 1 receptor (A1R), is highly enriched in spinal (motor) neurons. A2aR expression is also selectively increased at the symptomatic onset in the spinal cords of SOD1G93A mice and end-stage human ALS spinal cords. Interestingly, we found that direct adenosine treatment is sufficient to induce embryonic stem cell-derived motor neuron (ESMN) cell death in cultures. Subsequent pharmacological inhibition and partial genetic ablation of A2aR (A2aR(+/-)) significantly protect ESMN from SOD1G93A(+) astrocyte-induced cell death and delay disease progression of SOD1G93A mice. Taken together, our results provide compelling novel evidence that A2aR-mediated adenosine signaling contributes to the selective spinal motor neuron degeneration observed in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS.

  9. Suppression of adenosine 2a receptor (A2aR)-mediated adenosine signaling improves disease phenotypes in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Seng kah; Higashimori, Haruki; Tolman, Michaela; Yang, Yongjie

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disease in which the majority of upper and lower motor neurons are degenerated. Despite intensive efforts to identify drug targets and develop neuroprotective strategies, effective therapeutics for ALS remains unavailable. The identification and characterization of novel targets and pathways remain crucial in the development of ALS therapeutics. Adenosine is a major neuromodulator that actively regulates synaptic transmission. Interestingly, adenosine levels are significantly elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of progressing human ALS patients. In the current study, we showed that adenosine 2a receptor (A2aR), but not adenosine 1 receptor (A1R), is highly enriched in spinal (motor) neurons. A2aR expression is also selectively increased at the symptomatic onset in the spinal cords of SOD1G93A mice and end-stage human ALS spinal cords. Interestingly, we found that direct adenosine treatment is sufficient to induce embryonic stem cell-derived motor neuron (ESMN) cell death in cultures. Subsequent pharmacological inhibition and partial genetic ablation of A2aR (A2aR+/−) significantly protect ESMN from SOD1G93A+ astrocyte-induced cell death and delay disease progression of SOD1G93A mice. Taken together, our results provide compelling novel evidence that A2aR-mediated adenosine signaling contributes to the selective spinal motor neuron degeneration observed in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. PMID:25779930

  10. Halobacterial adenosine triphosphatases and the adenosine triphosphatase from Halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, Hordur; Sadler, Martha H.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared from various members of the genus Halobacterium contained a Triton X-l00 activated adenosine triphosphatase. The enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum was unstable in solutions of low ionic strength and maximally active in the presence of 3.5 M NaCl. A variety of nucleotide triphosphates was hydrolyzed. MgADP, the product of ATP hydrolysis, was not hydrolyzed and was a competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum was composed of at least 2 and possibly 4 subunits. The 83-kDa and 60-kDa subunits represented about 90 percent of total protein. The 60-kDa subunit reacted with dicyclohexyl-carbodiimide when inhibition was carried out in an acidic medium. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum, possesses properties of an F(1)F(0) as well as an E(1)E(2) ATPase.

  11. Halogenated pyrrolopyrimidine analogues of adenosine from marine organisms: pharmacological activities and potent inhibition of adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Davies, L P; Jamieson, D D; Baird-Lambert, J A; Kazlauskas, R

    1984-02-01

    Two novel halogenated pyrrolopyrimidine analogues of adenosine, isolated from marine sources, have been examined for pharmacological and biochemical activities. 4-Amino-5-bromo-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine, from a sponge of the genus Echinodictyum, had bronchodilator activity at least as potent as theophylline but with a different biochemical profile; unlike theophylline it had no antagonist activity at CNS adenosine receptors and it was quite a potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake and adenosine kinase in brain tissue. 5'-Deoxy-5-iodotubercidin, isolated from the red alga Hypnea valentiae, caused potent muscle relaxation and hypothermia when injected into mice. This compound was a very potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake into rat and guinea-pig brain slices and an extremely potent inhibitor of adenosine kinase from guinea-pig brain and rat brain and liver. Neither of these two pyrrolopyrimidine analogues was a substrate for, or an inhibitor of, adenosine deaminase. Neither compound appeared to have any direct agonist activity on guinea-pig brain adenosine-stimulated adenylate cyclase (A2 adenosine receptors). 5'-Deoxy-5-iodotubercidin is unique in two respects: it appears to be the first naturally-occurring example of a 5'-deoxyribosyl nucleoside and is the first example of a specifically iodinated nucleoside from natural sources. It may be the most potent adenosine kinase inhibitor yet described and, by virtue of its structure, may prove to be the most specific.

  12. Separation of N2-ethyl-2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-monophosphate and four native deoxyribonucleoside monophosphates using capillary zone electrophoresis with polyethylene glycol as buffer additive.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Y; Inagaki, S; Goto, M; Sako, M

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the separation of five deoxyribonucleoside monophosphates: 2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-monophosphate (dGMP), 2'-deoxyadenosine-5'-monophosphate (dAMP), 2'-deoxycytosine-5'-monophosphate (dCMP), 2'-deoxythymidine-5'-monophosphate (dTMP) and a dGMP adduct possessing N2-ethyl-guanine, which has been noted in relation to mutagenesis of alcohol, using capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). The concentration of polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a modifier and the pH of the running solutions can efficiently control the observed separation. Interaction of PEG with analytes was quantitatively evaluated. PEG worked effectively as a hydrophobic selector in these separations. The values of pKa of the acidic-NH-groups in the base moieties of dGMP, dTMP, and the dGMP adduct are close to that of boric acid used as buffer of the running solutions. The control of their charge was facilitated, enabling improved separations. A more sufficient and fast separation was achieved by both optimization of pH of the running solutions and PEG concentration compared with that obtained by pH control alone. On-line concentration using a stacking method followed by the PEG-assisted CZE was briefly studied.

  13. Optical Aptasensors for Adenosine Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Stella; Lim, Hui Si; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids are among the most researched and applied biomolecules. Their diverse two- and three-dimensional structures in conjunction with their robust chemistry and ease of manipulation provide a rare opportunity for sensor applications. Moreover, their high biocompatibility has seen them being used in the construction of in vivo assays. Various nucleic acid-based devices have been extensively studied as either the principal element in discrete molecule-like sensors or as the main component in the fabrication of sensing devices. The use of aptamers in sensors - aptasensors, in particular, has led to improvements in sensitivity, selectivity, and multiplexing capacity for a wide verity of analytes like proteins, nucleic acids, as well as small biomolecules such as glucose and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This article reviews the progress in the use of aptamers as the principal component in sensors for optical detection of ATP with an emphasis on sensing mechanism, performance, and applications with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. PMID:27446501

  14. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040... Adenosine triphosphate release assay. (a) Identification. An adenosine triphosphate release assay is a device that measures the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from platelets following...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040... Adenosine triphosphate release assay. (a) Identification. An adenosine triphosphate release assay is a device that measures the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from platelets following...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040... Adenosine triphosphate release assay. (a) Identification. An adenosine triphosphate release assay is a device that measures the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from platelets following...

  17. Repeated administration of adenosine increases its cardiovascular effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, H; García-Márquez, F; Magos, G A

    1987-01-20

    Hypotensive and negative chronotropic responses to adenosine in anesthetized rats increased after previous administration of the nucleoside. Bradycardia after adenosine in the isolated perfused rat heart was also potentiated after repeated administration at short intervals. This self-potentiation could be due to extracellular accumulation of adenosine and persistent stimulation of receptors caused by saturation or inhibition of cellular uptake of adenosine.

  18. Dinucleosidetetraphosphatase from Ehrlich ascites tumour cells: inhibition by adenosine, guanosine and uridine 5'-tetraphosphates.

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Lobatón, C D; Sillero, M A; Sillero, A

    1982-01-01

    1. An enzyme has been partially purified from Ehrlich ascites tumour cells which specifically hydrolyses dinucleosidetetraphosphates, with Km values of around 2 microM. The products of the hydrolysis are the corresponding nucleoside tri- and monophosphates. Dinucleoside Tri- and diphosphates were not substrates of the reaction. 2. The enzyme requires Mg2+ or Mn2+, is maximally active at a pH value of approx. 7.5 and has a mol, wt of 19,800 as estimated by filtration on Sephadex G-75. Nucleoside mono-, di- and triphosphates were competitive inhibitors of the reaction with Ki values in the 0.1 mM range. 3. Particularly relevant is the inhibition of this enzyme by adenosine and guanosine 5'tetraphosphates. In the course of this investigation, the presence of uridine 5'-tetraphosphate was detected in a commercial preparation of UTP. Adenosine, guanosine and uridine 5'-tetraphosphates were very strong inhibitors of the reaction with Ki values in the nM range.

  19. Some aspects of adenosine triphosphate synthesis from adenine and adenosine in human red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Whittam, R.; Wiley, J. S.

    1968-01-01

    1. The synthesis of ATP has been studied in human erythrocytes. Fresh cells showed no net synthesis of ATP when incubated with adenine or adenosine, although labelled adenine was incorporated into ATP in small amounts. 2. Cold-stored cells (3-6 weeks old) became progressively depleted of adenine nucleotides but incubation with adenosine or adenine plus inosine restored the ATP concentration to normal within 4 hr. Incorporation of labelled adenine or adenosine into the ATP of incubated stored cells corresponded to net ATP synthesis by these cells. 3. Synthesis of ATP from adenosine plus adenine together was 75% derived from adenine and only 25% from adenosine, indicating that nucleotide synthesis from adenine inhibits the simultaneous synthesis of nucleotide from adenosine. PMID:5723519

  20. Expression of adenosine receptors in monocytes from patients with bronchial asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yuryeva, Ksenia; Saltykova, Irina; Ogorodova, Ludmila; Kirillova, Natalya; Kulikov, Evgeny; Korotkaya, Elena; Iakovleva, Yulia; Feoktistov, Igor; Sazonov, Alexey; Ryzhov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is generated from adenosine triphosphate, which is released by stressed and damaged cells. Adenosine levels are significantly increased in patients with bronchial asthma (BA) and mediate mast cell degranulation and bronchoconstriction. Over the last decade, increasing evidence has shown that adenosine can modulate the innate immune response during monocytes differentiation towards mature myeloid cells. These adenosine-differentiated myeloid cells, characterized by co-expression of monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cell markers such as CD14 and CD209, produce high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, thus contributing to the pathogenesis of BA and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We found that expression of ADORA2A and ADORA2B are increased in monocytes obtained from patients with BA, and are associated with the generation of CD14posCD209pos pro-inflammatory cells. A positive correlation between expression of ADORA2B and IL-6 was identified in human monocytes and may explain the increased expression of IL-6 mRNA in asthmatics. Taken together, our results suggest that monocyte-specific expression of A2 adenosine receptors plays an important role in pro-inflammatory activation of human monocytes, thus contributing to the progression of asthma. PMID:26232643

  1. Unraveling the role of adenosine in remote ischemic preconditioning-induced cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2016-06-15

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) induced by alternate cycles of preconditioning ischemia and reperfusion protects the heart against sustained ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury. This technique has been translated to clinical levels in patients undergoing various surgical interventions including coronary artery bypass graft surgery, abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, percutaneous coronary intervention and heart valve surgery. Adenosine is a master regulator of energy metabolism and reduces myocardial ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury. Furthermore, adenosine is a critical trigger as well as a mediator in RIPC-induced cardioprotection and scientists have demonstrated the role of adenosine by showing an increase in its levels in the systemic circulation during RIPC delivery. Furthermore, the blockade of cardioprotective effects of RIPC in the presence of specific adenosine receptor blockers and transgenic animals with targeted ablation of A1 receptors has also demonstrated its critical role in RIPC. The studies have shown that adenosine may elicit cardioprotection via activation of neurogenic pathway. The present review describes the possible role and mechanism of adenosine in mediating RIPC-induced cardioprotection.

  2. CD73-Dependent Generation of Adenosine and Endothelial Adora2b Signaling Attenuate Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tak, Eunyoung; Ridyard, Douglas; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Zimmerman, Michael; Werner, Tilmann; Wang, Xiaoxin X.; Shabeka, Uladzimir; Seo, Seong-Wook; Christians, Uwe; Klawitter, Jost; Moldovan, Radu; Garcia, Gabriela; Levi, Moshe; Haase, Volker; Ravid, Katya; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide phosphohydrolysis by the ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) is the main source for extracellular generation of adenosine. Extracellular adenosine subsequently signals through four distinct adenosine A receptors (Adora1, Adora2a, Adora2b, or Adora3). Here, we hypothesized a functional role for CD73-dependent generation and concomitant signaling of extracellular adenosine during diabetic nephropathy. CD73 transcript and protein levels were elevated in the kidneys of diabetic mice. Genetic deletion of CD73 was associated with more severe diabetic nephropathy, whereas treatment with soluble nucleotidase was therapeutic. Transcript levels of renal adenosine receptors showed a selective induction of Adora2b during diabetic nephropathy. In a transgenic reporter mouse, Adora2b expression localized to the vasculature and increased after treatment with streptozotocin. Adora2b−/− mice experienced more severe diabetic nephropathy, and studies in mice with tissue-specific deletion of Adora2b in tubular epithelia or vascular endothelia implicated endothelial Adora2b signaling in protection from diabetic nephropathy. Finally, treatment with a selective Adora2b agonist (BAY 60–6583) conveyed potent protection from diabetes-associated kidney disease. Taken together, these findings implicate CD73-dependent production of extracellular adenosine and endothelial Adora2b signaling in kidney protection during diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24262796

  3. Polarized fibronectin secretion induced by adenosine regulates bacterial–epithelial interaction in human intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is a multifunctional protein that plays important roles in many biological processes including cell adhesion and migration, wound healing and inflammation. Cellular FNs are produced by a wide variety of cell types including epithelial cells, which secrete them and often organize them into extensive extracellular matrices at their basal surface. However, regulation of FN synthesis and the polarity of FN secretion by intestinal epithelial cells have not been investigated. In the present study we investigated the role of adenosine, whose levels are up-regulated during inflammation, in modulating FN synthesis, the polarity of FN secretion and the downstream effects of the secreted FN. Polarized monolayers of T84 cells were used as an intestinal epithelial model. Adenosine added to either the apical or basolateral aspect of the cells led to a time- and dose-dependent accumulation of FN in the culture supernatants, polarized to the apical compartment and reached maximal levels 24 h after apical or basolateral addition of adenosine. Confocal microscopy confirmed that FN localized to the apical domain of model intestinal epithelial cells stimulated with apical or basolateral adenosine. The induction of FN was significantly down-regulated in response to the adenosine receptor antagonist alloxazine and was inhibited by cycloheximide. Moreover, adenosine increased FN promoter activity (3.5-fold compared with unstimulated controls) indicating that FN induction is, in part, transcriptionally regulated. Interestingly, we demonstrated that adenosine, as well as apical FN, significantly enhanced the adherence and invasion of Salmonella typhimurium into cultured epithelial cells. In summary, we have shown for the first time that FN, a classic extracellular matrix protein, is secreted into the apical compartment of epithelial cells in response to adenosine. FN may be a critical host factor that modulates adherence and invasion of bacteria, thus playing a key role

  4. Adenosine stimulates anabolic metabolism in developing castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Flörchinger, Martin; Zimmermann, Marc; Traub, Michaela; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2006-01-01

    In previous experiments it was shown that Castor-bean (Ricinus communis) endosperm releases carbohydrates, amino acids and nucleoside derivatives, which are subsequently imported into the developing cotyledons (Kombrink and Beevers in Plant Physiol 73:370-376, 1983). To investigate the importance of the most prominent nucleoside adenosine for the metabolism of growing Ricinus seedlings, we supplied adenosine to cotyledons of 5-days-old seedlings after removal of the endosperm. This treatment led to a 16% increase in freshweight of intact seedlings within 16 h, compared to controls. Using detached cotyledons, we followed uptake of radiolabelled adenosine and identified 40% of label in solubles (mostly ATP and ADP), 46% incorporation in RNA and 2.5% in DNA, indicating a highly active salvage pathway. About 7% of freshly imported adenosine entered the phloem, which indicates a major function of adenosine for cotyledon metabolism. Import and conversion of adenosine improved the energy content of cotyledons as revealed by a substantially increased ATP/ADP ratio. This effect was accompanied by slight increases in respiratory activity, decreased levels of hexose phosphates and increased levels of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and triose phosphates. These alterations indicate a stimulation of glycolytic flux by activation of phosphofructokinase, and accordingly we determined a higher activity of this enzyme. Furthermore the rate of [(14)C]-sucrose driven starch biosynthesis in developing castor-bean is significantly increased by feeding of adenosine. In conclusion, our data indicate that adenosine imported from mobilizing endosperm into developing castor-bean cotyledons fulfils an important function as it promotes anabolic reactions in this rapidly developing tissue.

  5. Adenosine receptors as drug targets — what are the challenges?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine signalling has long been a target for drug development, with adenosine itself or its derivatives being used clinically since the 1940s. In addition, methylxanthines such as caffeine have profound biological effects as antagonists at adenosine receptors. Moreover, drugs such as dipyridamole and methotrexate act by enhancing the activation of adenosine receptors. There is strong evidence that adenosine has a functional role in many diseases, and several pharmacological compounds specifically targeting individual adenosine receptors — either directly or indirectly — have now entered the clinic. However, only one adenosine receptor-specific agent — the adenosine A2A receptor agonist regadenoson (Lexiscan; Astellas Pharma) — has so far gained approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Here, we focus on the biology of adenosine signalling to identify hurdles in the development of additional pharmacological compounds targeting adenosine receptors and discuss strategies to overcome these challenges. PMID:23535933

  6. [Identification of thiamine monophosphate hydrolyzing enzymes in chicken liver].

    PubMed

    Kolos, I K; Makarchikov, A F

    2014-01-01

    In animals, thiamine monophosphate (TMP) is an intermediate on the path of thiamine diphosphate, the coenzyme form of vitamin B1, degradation. The enzymes involved in TMP metabolism in animal tissues are not identified hitherto. The aim of this work was to study TMP hydrolysis in chicken liver. Two phosphatases have been found to contribute to TMP hydrolysis in liver homogenate. The first one, possessing a maximal activity at pH 6.0, is soluble, whereas the second one represents a membrane-bound enzyme with a pH optimum of 9.0. Membrane-bound TMPase activity was enhanced 1.7-fold by 5 mM Mg2+ ions and strongly inhibited by levamisole in uncompetitive manner with K1 of 53 μM, indicating the involvement of alkaline phosphatase. An apparent Km of alkaline phosphatase for TMP was calculated from the Hanes plot to be 0.6 mM. The soluble TMPase has an apparent Km of 0.7 mM; this enzyme is Mg2+ independent and insensitive to levamisole. As estimated by gel filtration on a Toyopearl HW-55 column, the soluble enzyme has a molecular mass of 17.8 kDa, TMPase activity being eluted simultaneously with peaks of flavinmononucleotide and p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity. Thus, TMP appears to be a physiological substrate for a low-molecular weight acid phosphatase, also known as low-molecular-weight protein phosphotyrosine phosphatase.

  7. [The inhibiting effect of 8-Cl-adenosine-3',5'-cyclophosphate on the growth of melanoma B-16 in mice].

    PubMed

    Nesterov, M V; Baranova, L A; Sologub, V K; Khropov, Iu V; Severin, E S

    1992-01-01

    A site-selective analogue of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate 8-chloro-adenosine-3',5'-cyclophosphate was studied for its effects on the growth of transplanted murine melanoma B-16. When the agent was given to the mice, a substantial effect on the growth of the tumor was produced by a number of factors, which included the route of administration, concentration of the agent, the time and duration of therapy. Intraperitoneal injections of the agent in a dose of 20 mg/kg/day which were made during three consecutive days, beginning from day 5 after tumor transplantation caused a 58% decrease in tumor growth as compared to the controls. An examination of tumour biopsy specimen revealed that after a course of the injections there was a significant suppression of the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, type I, and a drastic increase in that of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, type II.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... This Page Bras J, Guerreiro R, Santo GC. Mutant ADA2 in vasculopathies. N Engl J Med. 2014 ... M, Anikster Y, King MC, Levy-Lahad E. Mutant adenosine deaminase 2 in a polyarteritis nodosa vasculopathy. ...

  9. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity.

  10. Adenosine-activated potassium current in smooth muscle cells isolated from the pig coronary artery.

    PubMed Central

    Dart, C; Standen, N B

    1993-01-01

    1. The perforated patch technique with nystatin or amphotericin was used to record whole cell currents activated by adenosine in smooth muscle cells isolated enzymatically from pig coronary arteries. 2. Adenosine (5-40 microM) activated an outward current at a holding potential of 0 mV in 5 mM [K+]o and an inward current at -60 mV in 143 mM [K+]o. The dependence of the reversal potential for the adenosine-activated current on [K+]o suggests that it flows through K+ channels, while its current-voltage relation is consistent with the channels showing little voltage dependence. 3. The adenosine-activated current was inhibited by the sulphonylurea glibenclamide (5 microM) and by phencyclidine (5 microM). It was unaffected by charybdotoxin (50 nM) or apamin (100 nM), blockers of large and small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels respectively. 4. At -60 mV in 143 mM K+ solution, openings of single channels passing a current of just over -2 pA could sometimes be detected in the absence of adenosine. Openings became more frequent after the application of adenosine, with several levels then being detected. Openings of channels with a larger conductance were sometimes also seen in the presence of adenosine. Fluctuation analysis gave somewhat lower estimates of unitary current than did direct measurements. 5. The effect of adenosine could be mimicked by the A1 receptor agonist CCPA (2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine), while the A2 agonist CGS 21680 (2-p-(2-carboxethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine hydrochloride) was without effect. The response to adenosine was inhibited by the A1 antagonist DPCPX (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine), but was unaffected by the A2 antagonist CGS 15943A (5-amino-9-chloro-2-(2-furanyl)-1,2,4- triazolo[1,5-C]quinazoline monomethanesulphonate). 6. Our results suggest that adenosine acts at an A1 receptor to activate K+ channels. We consider it most likely that these are ATP-dependent K+ channels. We discuss the mechanism by

  11. Biochemical analysis of the modular enzyme inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Nimmesgern, E; Black, J; Futer, O; Fulghum, J R; Chambers, S P; Brummel, C L; Raybuck, S A; Sintchak, M D

    1999-11-01

    Two prominent domains have been identified in the X-ray crystal structure of inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a core domain consisting of an alpha/beta barrel which contains the active site and an inserted subdomain whose structure is less well defined. The core domain encompassing amino acids 1-108 and 244-514 of wild-type human IMPDH (II) connected by the tetrapeptide linker Ile-Arg-Thr-Gly was expressed. The subdomain including amino acids 99-244 of human wild-type IMPDH (II) was expressed as a His-tagged fusion protein, where the His-tag was removable by enterokinase cleavage. These two proteins as well as wild-type human IMPDH (II), all proteins expressed in Escherichia coli, have been purified to apparent homogeneity. Both the wild-type and core domain proteins are tetrameric and have very similar enzymatic activities. In contrast, the subdomain migrates as a monomer or dimer on a gel filtration column and lacks enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectropolarimetry indicates that the core domain retains secondary structure very similar to full-length IMPDH, with 30% alpha-helix and 30% beta-sheet vs 33% alpha-helix and 29% beta-sheet for wild-type protein. Again, the subdomain protein is distinguished from both wild-type and core domain proteins by its content of secondary structure, with only 15% each of alpha-helix and beta-sheet. These studies demonstrate that the core domain of IMPDH expressed separately is both structurally intact and enzymatically active. The availability of the modules of IMPDH will aid in dissecting the architecture of this enzyme of the de novo purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway, which is an important target for immunosuppressive and antiviral drugs.

  12. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nicholas D; Regan, John M

    2015-12-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD(+), respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP(+), respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190 mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  13. Involvement of nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in the antidepressant-like effects of adenosine in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Kaster, Manuella Pinto; Rosa, Angelo Oscar; Santos, Adair R S; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2005-12-01

    We have previously shown that an acute administration of adenosine produces an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test (FST) and in the tail suspension test in mice. In this work we investigated the contribution of the nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway to adenosine's antidepressant-like effect in the FST since this signalling pathway is assumed to play an important role in depression. The effect of adenosine (10 mg/kg i.p.) was prevented by pre-treatment with L-arginine (750 mg/kg i.p.), S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP, 25 microg/site i.c.v), or sildenafil (5 mg/kg i.p.), but not with D-arginine (750 mg/kg i.p.). Treatment of mice with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine ( L-NNA, 0.03 and 0.3 mg/kg i.p.), Methylene Blue (18 mg/kg i.p.), or ODQ (30 pmol/site i.c.v.) potentiated the effect of adenosine (1 mg/kg i.p.) in the FST. The reduction of immobility time elicited by adenosine (10 mg/kg i.p.) in the FST was prevented by pre-treatment with sildenafil (0.5 and 5 mg/kg i.p.). Together the results indicate that the effect of adenosine in the FST appears to be mediated through an interaction with the NO-cGMP pathway.

  14. [Gene therapy for adenosine deaminase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Yukio; Ariga, Tadashi; Ohtsu, Makoto

    2005-03-01

    A four year-old boy with adenosine deaminase (ADA-) deficient severe combined immunodeficiency(SCID) receiving PEG-ADA was treated under a gene therapy protocol targeting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) in 1995. After eleven infusions of autologous PBLs transduced with retroviral vector LASN encoding ADAcDNA, he exhibited increased levels of the CD8+ T lymphocytes, serum immunoglobulin, specific antibodies and delayed type hypersensitivity skin tests. Follow-up studies also provided evidence of long-term persistence and function of transduced PBLs with improvement in the immune function. However, the therapeutic effect of this gene therapy has been difficult to assess because of the concomitant treatment of PEG-ADA. Two ADA-SCID patients have been currently treated with autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells engineered with a retroviral vector GCsapM-ADA after discontinuation of PEG-ADA. The restoration of intracellular ADA enzymatic activity in lymphocytes and granulocytes resulted in correction of the systemic toxicity and liver function in the absence of PEG-ADA treatment. Both patients are at home where they are clinically well, and they do not experience adversed effect, with follow up being 12 months after CD34+ cells gene therapy.

  15. Dissecting striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions. New clues from rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Ferré, Sergi; Sebastião, Ana Maria

    2016-03-01

    This Editorial highlights a study by Chiodi et al. () showing that the effects mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) activation in the striatum are significantly reduced in rats with neuronal over-expression of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). Two hypotheses are derived from that study. Hypothesis A: two subpopulations of pre-synaptic CB1R in corticostriatal glutamatergic terminals exist, one forming and another not forming heteromers with A2AR. Hypothesis B: CB1R are predominantly forming heteromers with A2AR. In the case of hypothesis A, the A2AR might be required for CB1R-A2AR heteromeric signaling, whereas non-heteromeric CB1R activity is inhibited by A2ARs. In the case of hypothesis B, up-regulation of A2ARs may perturb heteromeric stoichiometry, thus reducing CB1R functioning. In any case, pre-synaptic striatal A2AR-CB1R heteromers emerge as important targets of the effects of cannabinoids demonstrated at the neuronal and behavioral level. Read the highlighted article 'Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors' on page 907.

  16. Adenosine promotes burst activity in guinea-pig geniculocortical neurones through two different ionic mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Pape, H C

    1992-01-01

    1. The mechanisms of action of adenosine were examined in relay neurones of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGND) using in vitro intracellular recording techniques in guinea-pig thalamic slices. 2. Adenosine hyperpolarized LGND relay neurones due to an increase in membrane potassium conductance. The K+ currents generated by near maximal stimulation of adenosine and GABAB receptors were non-additive. 3. Blockage of membrane K+ conductances by barium unmasked a second response to adenosine; an outward shift of the current versus voltage relationship negative to -65 mV associated with an increase in membrane input resistance. The beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline elicited an inward current in the same voltage range, which was inhibited and replaced by an outward current during activation of adenosine receptors. The effects of adenosine were due to a decrease in amplitude and rate of rise of the hyperpolarization-activated cation current, Ih. Maximal reduction by 66% of Ih amplitude occurred near the range of half-activation. 4. Both responses to adenosine were mimicked by the selective A1 receptor agonists N6-cyclopentyladenosine or N6-cyclohexyladenosine, and reversibly blocked by the selective A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX). 5. The decrease in Ih by adenosine may be mediated by an inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity and hence a decrease in the intracellular level of cyclic AMP, since local application of the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine imitated the decrease in Ih. Local application of the adenylyl cyclase stimulant forskolin or 8-bromo-cyclic AMP resulted in an enhancement in Ih, and forskolin inhibited the action on Ih evoked by N6-cyclopentyladenosine. 6. The adenosine-induced effects interacted with the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of LGND neurones in that (i) the hyperpolarization due to an increase in K+ conductance inhibited single spike firing and promoted calcium

  17. Neurabin scaffolding of adenosine receptor and RGS4 regulates anti-seizure effect of endogenous adenosine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Yin; Cottingham, Christopher; McMahon, Lori; Jiao, Kai; Greengard, Paul; Wang, Qin

    2012-02-22

    Endogenous adenosine is an essential protective agent against neural damage by various insults to the brain. However, the therapeutic potential of adenosine receptor-directed ligands for neuroprotection is offset by side effects in peripheral tissues and organs. An increase in adenosine receptor responsiveness to endogenous adenosine would enhance neuroprotection while avoiding the confounding effects of exogenous ligands. Here we report novel regulation of adenosine-evoked responses by a neural tissue-specific protein, neurabin. Neurabin attenuated adenosine A(1) receptor (A1R) signaling by assembling a complex between the A1R and the regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (RGS4), a protein known to turn off G-protein signaling. Inactivation of the neurabin gene enhanced A1R signaling and promoted the protective effect of adenosine against excitotoxic seizure and neuronal death in mice. Furthermore, administration of a small molecule inhibitor of RGS4 significantly attenuated seizure severity in mice. Notably, the dose of kainate capable of inducing an ∼50% rate of death in wild-type (WT) mice did not affect neurabin-null mice or WT mice cotreated with an RGS4 inhibitor. The enhanced anti-seizure and neuroprotective effect achieved by disruption of the A1R/neurabin/RGS4 complex is elicited by the on-site and on-demand release of endogenous adenosine, and does not require administration of A1R ligands. These data identify neurabin-RGS4 as a novel tissue-selective regulatory mechanism for fine-tuning adenosine receptor function in the nervous system. Moreover, these findings implicate the A1R/neurabin/RGS4 complex as a valid therapeutic target for specifically manipulating the neuroprotective effects of endogenous adenosine.

  18. Adenosine accelerates the healing of diabetic ischemic ulcers by improving autophagy of endothelial progenitor cells grown on a biomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen; Wu, Yangxiao; Li, Li; Yang, Mingcan; Shen, Lei; Liu, Ge; Tan, Ju; Zeng, Wen; Zhu, Chuhong

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) seeded on biomaterials can effectively promote diabetic ischemic wound healing. However, the function of transplanted EPCs is negatively affected by a high-glucose and ischemic microenvironment. Our experiments showed that EPC autophagy was inhibited and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was increased in diabetic patients, while adenosine treatment decreased the energy requirements and increased the autophagy levels of EPCs. In animal experiments, we transplanted a biomaterial seeded with EPCs onto the surface of diabetic wounds and found that adenosine-stimulated EPCs effectively promoted wound healing. Increased microvascular genesis and survival of the transplanted cells were also observed in the adenosine-stimulated groups. Interestingly, our study showed that adenosine increased the autophagy of the transplanted EPCs seeded onto the biomaterial and maintained EPC survival at 48 and 96 hours. Moreover, we observed that adenosine induced EPC differentiation through increasing the level of autophagy. In conclusion, our study indicated that adenosine-stimulated EPCs seeded onto a biomaterial significantly improved wound healing in diabetic mice; mechanistically, adenosine might maintain EPC survival and differentiation by increasing high glucose-inhibited EPC autophagy and maintaining cellular energy metabolism. PMID:26108983

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a hypermodified nucleoside wyosine and its 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Golankiewicz, B; Zielonacka-Lis, E; Folkman, W

    1985-01-01

    The rates of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a hypermodified nucleoside, wyosine and its 5'-monophosphate were determined at various pH, temperature and buffer concentrations. The results show that despite distinct differences in structure and the glycosyl bond stability, the hydrolysis of wyosine proceeds via cleavage of the C-N bond by A-1 mechanism, analogously to simple nucleosides. Unlike majority of other monophosphates studied so far, wyosine 5'-monophosphate is not more stable than respective nucleoside. PMID:4000960

  20. Effects of different concentrations of metal ions on degradation of adenosine triphosphate in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fillets stored at 4°C: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Qin, Na; Zhang, Longteng; Lv, Jian; Li, Qingzheng; Luo, Yongkang

    2016-11-15

    The impact of different concentrations of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) on the degradation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the influence of these ions on the activity of adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMP-deaminase) and acid phosphatase (ACP) in common carp fillets (in vivo) during 4°C storage was examined. The content of ATP, inosine monophosphate (IMP), and hypoxanthine (Hx), and the activity of AMP-deaminase and ACP were determined. Results indicated that the effects of different concentrations of six kinds of metal ions on AMP-deaminase and ACP were not the same. Na(+), K(+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) enhanced AMP-deaminase activity, which led to the rapid degradation of ATP and to the generation of a large quantity of IMP within a short time. Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) delayed the change in AMP-deaminase and ACP activity in carp and caused a further delay in the degradation of ATP. Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) inhibited ACP activity, which reduced the decomposition of IMP and the formation of Hx.

  1. Detection of adenosine triphosphate through polymerization-induced aggregation of actin-conjugated gold/silver nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yu-Ju; Shiang, Yen-Chun; Chen, Li-Yi; Hsu, Chia-Lun; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a simple and selective nanosensor for the optical detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using globular actin-conjugated gold/silver nanorods (G-actin-Au/Ag NRs). By simply mixing G-actin and Au/Ag NRs (length ˜56 nm and diameter ˜12 nm), G-actin-Au/Ag NRs were prepared which were stable in physiological solutions (25 mM Tris-HCl, 150 mM NaCl, 5.0 mM KCl, 3.0 mM MgCl2 and 1.0 mM CaCl2; pH 7.4). Introduction of ATP into the G-actin-Au/Ag NR solutions in the presence of excess G-actin induced the formation of filamentous actin-conjugated Au/Ag NR aggregates through ATP-induced polymerization of G-actin. When compared to G-actin-modified spherical Au nanoparticles having a size of 13 nm or 56 nm, G-actin-Au/Ag NRs provided better sensitivity for ATP, mainly because the longitudinal surface plasmon absorbance of the Au/Ag NR has a more sensitive response to aggregation. This G-actin-Au/Ag NR probe provided high sensitivity (limit of detection 25 nM) for ATP with remarkable selectivity (>10-fold) over other adenine nucleotides (adenosine, adenosine monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate) and nucleoside triphosphates (guanosine triphosphate, cytidine triphosphate and uridine triphosphate). It also allowed the determination of ATP concentrations in plasma samples without conducting tedious sample pretreatments; the only necessary step was simple dilution. Our experimental results are in good agreement with those obtained from a commercial luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay. Our simple, sensitive and selective approach appears to have a practical potential for the clinical diagnosis of diseases (e.g. cystic fibrosis) associated with changes in ATP concentrations.

  2. Detection of adenosine triphosphate through polymerization-induced aggregation of actin-conjugated gold/silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Ju; Shiang, Yen-Chun; Chen, Li-Yi; Hsu, Chia-Lun; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-11-08

    We have developed a simple and selective nanosensor for the optical detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using globular actin-conjugated gold/silver nanorods (G-actin-Au/Ag NRs). By simply mixing G-actin and Au/Ag NRs (length ~56 nm and diameter ~12 nm), G-actin-Au/Ag NRs were prepared which were stable in physiological solutions (25 mM Tris-HCl, 150 mM NaCl, 5.0 mM KCl, 3.0 mM MgCl2 and 1.0 mM CaCl2; pH 7.4). Introduction of ATP into the G-actin-Au/Ag NR solutions in the presence of excess G-actin induced the formation of filamentous actin-conjugated Au/Ag NR aggregates through ATP-induced polymerization of G-actin. When compared to G-actin-modified spherical Au nanoparticles having a size of 13 nm or 56 nm, G-actin-Au/Ag NRs provided better sensitivity for ATP, mainly because the longitudinal surface plasmon absorbance of the Au/Ag NR has a more sensitive response to aggregation. This G-actin-Au/Ag NR probe provided high sensitivity (limit of detection 25 nM) for ATP with remarkable selectivity (>10-fold) over other adenine nucleotides (adenosine, adenosine monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate) and nucleoside triphosphates (guanosine triphosphate, cytidine triphosphate and uridine triphosphate). It also allowed the determination of ATP concentrations in plasma samples without conducting tedious sample pretreatments; the only necessary step was simple dilution. Our experimental results are in good agreement with those obtained from a commercial luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay. Our simple, sensitive and selective approach appears to have a practical potential for the clinical diagnosis of diseases (e.g. cystic fibrosis) associated with changes in ATP concentrations.

  3. MOLECULAR PROBES FOR EXTRACELLULAR ADENOSINE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Ukena, Dieter; Padgett, William; Kirk, Kenneth L.; Daly, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Derivatives of adenosine receptor agonists (N6-phenyladenosines) and antagonists (1,3-dialkyl-8-phenylxanthines) bearing functionalized chains suitable for attachment to other molecules have been reported [Jacobson et al., J. med. Chem. 28, 1334 and 1341 (1985)]. The “functionalized congener” approach has been extended to the synthesis of spectroscopic and other probes for adenosine receptors that retain high affinity (Ki ~ 10−9 −10−8 M) in A1-receptor binding. The probes have been synthesized from an antagonist xanthine amine congener (XAC) and an adenosine amine congener (ADAC). [3H]ADAC has been synthesized and found to bind highly specifically to A1-adenosine receptors of rat and calf cerebral cortical membranes with KD values of 1.4 and 0.34 nM respectively. The higher affinity in the bovine brain, seen also with many of the probes derived from ADAC and XAC, is associated with phenyl substituents. The spectroscopic probes contain a reporter group attached at a distal site of the functionalized chain. These bifunctional ligands may contain a spin label (e.g. the nitroxyl radical TEMPO) for electron spin resonance spectroscopy, or a fluorescent dye, including fluorescein and 4-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD), or labels for 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Potential applications of the spectroscopic probes in characterization of adenosine receptors are discussed. PMID:3036153

  4. The adenosine kinase hypothesis of epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev

    2008-01-01

    Current therapies for epilepsy are largely symptomatic and do not affect the underlying mechanisms of disease progression, i.e. epileptogenesis. Given the large percentage of pharmacoresistant chronic epilepsies, novel approaches are needed to understand and modify the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms. Although different types of brain injury (e.g. status epilepticus, traumatic brain injury, stroke) can trigger epileptogenesis, astrogliosis appears to be a homotypic response and hallmark of epilepsy. Indeed, recent findings indicate that epilepsy might be a disease of astrocyte dysfunction. This review focuses on the inhibitory neuromodulator and endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine, which is largely regulated by astrocytes and its key metabolic enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). Recent findings support the “ADK hypothesis of epileptogenesis”: (i) Mouse models of epileptogenesis suggest a sequence of events leading from initial downregulation of ADK and elevation of ambient adenosine as an acute protective response, to changes in astrocytic adenosine receptor expression, to astrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy (i.e. astrogliosis), to consequential overexpression of ADK, reduced adenosine and – finally – to spontaneous focal seizure activity restricted to regions of astrogliotic overexpression of ADK. (ii) Transgenic mice overexpressing ADK display increased sensitivity to brain injury and seizures. (iii) Inhibition of ADK prevents seizures in a mouse model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. (iv) Intrahippocampal implants of stem cells engineered to lack ADK prevent epileptogenesis. Thus, ADK emerges both as a diagnostic marker to predict, as well as a prime therapeutic target to prevent, epileptogenesis. PMID:18249058

  5. Caffeine, adenosine receptors, and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Costenla, Ana Rita; Cunha, Rodrigo A; de Mendonça, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Few studies to date have looked at the effects of caffeine on synaptic plasticity, and those that did used very high concentrations of caffeine, whereas the brain concentrations attained by regular coffee consumption in humans should be in the low micromolar range, where caffeine exerts pharmacological actions mainly by antagonizing adenosine receptors. Accordingly, rats drinking caffeine (1 g/L) for 3 weeks, displayed a concentration of caffeine of circa 22 microM in the hippocampus. It is known that selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonists facilitate, whereas selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists attenuate, long term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus. Although caffeine is a non-selective antagonist of adenosine receptors, it attenuates frequency-induced LTP in hippocampal slices in a manner similar to selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. These effects of low micromolar concentration of caffeine (30 microM) are maintained in aged animals, which is important when a possible beneficial effect for caffeine in age-related cognitive decline is proposed. Future studies will still be required to confirm and detail the involvement of A1 and A2A receptors in the effects of caffeine on hippocampal synaptic plasticity, using both pharmacological and genetic approaches.

  6. Resonant Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy of Anionic Nucleotide Monophosphate Clusters.

    PubMed

    Ligare, Marshall R; Rijs, Anouk M; Berden, Giel; Kabeláč, Martin; Nachtigallova, Dana; Oomens, Jos; de Vries, Mattanjah S

    2015-06-25

    We report mid-infrared spectra and potential energy surfaces of four anionic, 2'-deoxynucleotide-5'-monophosphates (dNMPs) and the ionic DNA pairs [dGMP-dCMP-H](1-), [dAMP-dTMP-H](1-) with a total charge of the complex equal to -1. We recorded IR action spectra by resonant IR multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) using the FELIX free electron laser. The potential energy surface study employed an on-the-fly molecular dynamics quenching method (MD/Q), using a semiempirical AM1 method, followed by an optimization of the most stable structures using density functional theory. By employing infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy in combination with high-level computational methods, we aim at a better understanding of the hydrogen bonding competition between the phosphate moieties and the nucleobases. We find that, unlike in multimer double stranded DNA structures, the hydrogen bonds in these isolated nucleotide pairs are predominantly formed between the phosphate groups. This intermolecular interaction appears to exceed the stabilization energy resulting from base pairing and directs the overall cluster structure and alignment.

  7. Adenosine Deaminase Inhibition Prevents Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Induced Enteritis in Mice ▿

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Junqueira, Ana Flávia Torquato; Dias, Adriana Abalen Martins; Vale, Mariana Lima; Spilborghs, Graziela Machado Gruner Turco; Bossa, Aline Siqueira; Lima, Bruno Bezerra; Carvalho, Alex Fiorini; Guerrant, Richard Littleton; Ribeiro, Ronaldo Albuquerque; Brito, Gerly Anne

    2011-01-01

    Toxin A (TxA) is able to induce most of the classical features of Clostridium difficile-associated disease in animal models. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of an inhibitor of adenosine deaminase, EHNA [erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine], on TxA-induced enteritis in C57BL6 mice and on the gene expression of adenosine receptors. EHNA (90 μmol/kg) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) 30 min prior to TxA (50 μg) or PBS injection into the ileal loop. A2A adenosine receptor agonist (ATL313; 5 nM) was injected in the ileal loop immediately before TxA (50 μg) in mice pretreated with EHNA. The animals were euthanized 3 h later. The changes in the tissue were assessed by the evaluation of ileal loop weight/length and secretion volume/length ratios, histological analysis, myeloperoxidase assay (MPO), the local expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2), pentraxin 3 (PTX3), NF-κB, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) by immunohistochemistry and/or quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). The gene expression profiles of A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 adenosine receptors also were evaluated by qRT-PCR. Adenosine deaminase inhibition, by EHNA, reduced tissue injury, neutrophil infiltration, and the levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) as well as the expression of NOS2, NF-κB, and PTX3 in the ileum of mice injected with TxA. ATL313 had no additional effect on EHNA action. TxA increased the gene expression of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors. Our findings show that the inhibition of adenosine deaminase by EHNA can prevent Clostridium difficile TxA-induced damage and inflammation possibly through the A2A adenosine receptor, suggesting that the modulation of adenosine/adenosine deaminase represents an important tool in the management of C. difficile-induced disease. PMID:21115723

  8. Lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy and vascular function: Role of the nitric oxide-phosphodiesterase type 5-cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Yukihito

    2017-03-22

    It is well known that there is an association of lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy with cardiovascular disease, suggesting that lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. Vascular function, including endothelial function and vascular smooth muscle function, is involved in the pathogenesis, maintenance and development of atherosclerosis, leading to cardiovascular events. Vascular dysfunction per se should also contribute to lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy. Both lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy and vascular dysfunction have cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, aging, obesity and smoking. Inactivation of the phosphodiesterase type 5-cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate-nitric oxide pathway causes lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy through an enhancement of sympathetic nervous activity, endothelial dysfunction, increase in Rho-associated kinase activity and vasoconstriction, and decrease in blood flow of pelvic viscera. Both endogenous nitric oxide and exogenous nitric oxide act as vasodilators on vascular smooth muscle cells through an increase in the content of cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate, which is inactivated by phosphodiesterase type 5. In a clinical setting, phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors are widely used in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors might have beneficial effects on vascular function through not only inhibition of cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate degradation, but also increases in testosterone levels and nitric oxide bioavailability, increase in the number and improvement of the function of endothelial progenitor cells, and decrease in insulin resistance. In the present review, the relationships between lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy, the

  9. Human adenosine deaminase. Distribution and properties.

    PubMed

    Van der Weyden, M B; Kelley, W N

    1976-09-25

    Adenosine deaminase exists in multiple molecular forms in human tissue. One form of the enzyme appears to be "particulate". Three forms of the enzyme are soluble and interconvertible with apparent molecular weights of approximately 36,000, 114,000, and 298,000 (designated small, intermediate, and large, respectively). The small form of adenosine deaminase is convertible to the large form only in the presence of a protein, which has an apparent molecular weight of 200,000 and has no adenosine deaminase activity. This conversion of the small form of the enzyme to the large form occurs at 4 degrees, exhibits a pH optimum of 5.0 to 8.0, and is associated with a loss of conversion activity. The small form of the enzyme predominates in tissue preparations exhibiting the higher enzyme-specific activities and no detectable conversion activity. The large form of adenosine deaminase predominates in tissue extracts exhibiting the lower enzyme specific activities and abundant conversion activity. The small form of adenosine deaminase shows several electrophoretic variants by isoelectric focusing. The electrophoretic heterogeneity observed with the large form of the enzyme is similar to that observed with the small form, with the exception that several additional electrophoretic variants are uniformly identified. No organ specificity is demonstrable for the different electrophoretic forms. The kinetic characteristics of the three soluble molecular species of adenosine deaminase are identical except for pH optimum, which is 5.5 for the intermediate species and 7.0 to 7.4 for the large and small forms.

  10. A new class of adenosine receptors in brain: Characterization by 2-chloro( sup 3 H)adenosine binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jerome Hsicheng.

    1988-01-01

    Considerable evidence has accumulated in recent years to support a role for adenosine as an important physiological modulator in many mammalian tissues. In brain, adenosine is a potent depressant of neuronal firing and synaptic transmission. The exact mechanisms by which adenosine analogs depress nerve cell activity in the brain are not clear. Despite considerable investigation, neither the A1 nor the A2 adenosine receptors associated with adenylate cyclase have been able to account adequately for the actions of adenosine in brain. It has been proposed that additional adenosine receptors, possibly linked to calcium channels, are present in the central nervous system and are responsible for the physiological actions of adenosine. In this thesis, evidence is provided for the existence of a novel class of adenosine receptors in rat brain. The methods used to identify this new class of receptors involved radioligand binding techniques which have been successfully employed to characterize the properties of many neurotransmitter and drug receptors. 2-Chloro({sup 3}H)adenosine (Cl({sup 3}H)Ado) was selected as the ligand for these experiments since is a water-soluble, metabolically-stable analog of adenosine and a potent depressant of synaptic transmission in brain. The results demonstrate the presence of a distinct class of 2-chloro({sup 3}H)adenosine binding sites in rat forebrain membranes with an apparent K{sub D} of about 10 {mu}M and a B{sub max} of about 60 pmol per mg of protein. Specific 2-chloro ({sup 3}H)adenosine binding is highly specific for adenosine agonists and antagonists. Inhibition of binding by adenosine agonists exhibits an order of potency 2-chloroadenosine > 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine > ({minus})-N{sup 6}-(R-phenylisopropyl)adenosine, which differs from that of both A1 and A2 adenosine receptors.

  11. Adenosine uptake is the major effector of extracellular ATP toxicity in human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Paola de Andrade; Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo Cremonese; Nascimento, Jéssica; Beckenkamp, Aline; Santana, Danielle Bertodo; Kipper, Franciele; Casali, Emerson André; Nejar Bruno, Alessandra; Paccez, Juliano Domiraci; Zerbini, Luiz Fernando; Wink, Marcia Rosângela; Lenz, Guido; Buffon, Andréia

    2014-01-01

    In cervical cancer, HPV infection and disruption of mechanisms involving cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis are strictly linked with tumor progression and invasion. Tumor microenvironment is ATP and adenosine rich, suggesting a role for purinergic signaling in cancer cell growth and death. Here we investigate the effect of extracellular ATP on human cervical cancer cells. We find that extracellular ATP itself has a small cytotoxic effect, whereas adenosine formed from ATP degradation by ectonucleotidases is the main factor responsible for apoptosis induction. The level of P2×7 receptor seemed to define the main cytotoxic mechanism triggered by ATP, since ATP itself eliminated a small subpopulation of cells that express high P2×7 levels, probably through its activation. Corroborating these data, blockage or knockdown of P2×7 only slightly reduced ATP cytotoxicity. On the other hand, cell viability was almost totally recovered with dipyridamole, an adenosine transporter inhibitor. Moreover, ATP-induced apoptosis and signaling—p53 increase, AMPK activation, and PARP cleavage—as well as autophagy induction were also inhibited by dipyridamole. In addition, inhibition of adenosine conversion into AMP also blocked cell death, indicating that metabolization of intracellular adenosine originating from extracellular ATP is responsible for the main effects of the latter in human cervical cancer cells. PMID:25103241

  12. The impact of adenosine and A(2B) receptors on glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rüsing, D; Müller, C E; Verspohl, E J

    2006-12-01

    Adenosine and adenosine receptor antagonists are involved in glucose homoeostasis. The participating receptors are not known, mainly due to a lack of specific agonists and antagonists, but are reasonable targets for anti-diabetic therapy. The stable, albeit nonselective, adenosine analogue NECA (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) (10 microM) reduced glucose-stimulated insulin release from INS-1 cells. This was mimicked by A(1)-(CHA), A(2A)-(CGS-21680) and A(3)-receptor agonists (Cl-IB-MECA). Two newly synthesized A(2B)-receptor antagonists, PSB-53 and PSB-1115, counteracted the inhibitory effect of NECA. These in-vitro effects were mirrored by in-vivo data with respect to CHA, CGS and Cl-IB-MECA. Distinct concentrations of either PSB-53 or PSB-1115 reversed the decrease in plasma insulin induced by NECA. This was not mimicked by a corresponding change in blood glucose. The effect of PSB-1115 was also obvious in diabetic GotoKakizaki rats: plasma insulin was increased whereas blood glucose was unchanged. During most experiments the effects on blood glucose were not impressive probably because of the physiologically necessary homoeostasis. The adenosine levels were not different in normal Wistar rats and in diabetic GotoKakzaki rats. Altogether the A(2B)-receptor antagonists showed an anti-diabetic potential mainly by increasing plasma insulin levels under conditions when the adenosine tonus was elevated in-vivo and increased insulin release in-vitro.

  13. Cocaine exposure modulates dopamine and adenosine signaling in the fetal brain

    PubMed Central

    Kubrusly, Regina C. C.; Bhide, Pradeep G.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to cocaine during the fetal period can produce significant lasting changes in the structure and function of the brain. Cocaine exerts its effects on the developing brain by blocking monoamine transporters and impairing monoamine receptor signaling. Dopamine is a major central target of cocaine. In a mouse model, we show that cocaine exposure from embryonic day 8 (E8) to E14 produces significant reduction in dopamine transporter activity, attenuation of dopamine D1-receptor function and upregulation of dopamine D2-receptor function. Cocaine’s effects on the D1-receptor are at the level of protein expression as well as activity. The cocaine exposure also produces significant increases in basal cAMP levels in the striatum and cerebral cortex. The increase in the basal cAMP levels was independent of dopamine receptor activity. In contrast, blocking the adenosine A2a receptor downregulated of the basal cAMP levels in the cocaine-exposed brain to physiological levels, suggesting the involvement of adenosine receptors in mediating cocaine’s effects on the embryonic brain. In support of this suggestion, we found that the cocaine exposure downregulated adenosine transporter function. We also found that dopamine D2- and adenosine A2a-receptors antagonize each other’s function in the embryonic brain in a manner consistent with their interactions in the mature brain. Thus, our data show that prenatal cocaine exposure produces direct effects on both the dopamine and adenosine systems. Furthermore, the dopamine D2 and adenosine A2a receptor interactions in the embryonic brain discovered in this study unveil a novel substrate for cocaine’s effects on the developing brain. PMID:19765599

  14. Addition of cysteamine to thymine and thymidine monophosphate, initiated by. gamma. -irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grachev, S.A.; Kropachev, E.V.; Litvyakova, G.I.

    1986-04-20

    On radiolysis of deaerated solutions containing thymine and cysteamine, or thymidine monophosphate and cysteamine, coupling products of these compounds are formed resulting from the addition of cysteamine to the double bond of the base. The radiochemical yields of the coupling products are dependent on the ratio of the concentration thymine (T) to that of cysteamine (RSH), or of thymidine monophosphate (TMP) to cysteamine in the irradiated solutions, and are at a maximum when (T)/(RSH) = 5-10, and (TMP)/(RSH) = 15-20. The mode of formation of coupling products involves reaction of H-, OH-, and e/sub aq//sup -/-adducts of thymine or thymidine monophosphate with cysteamine thiyl radicals.

  15. Regulation of adenosine transport by acute and chronic ethanol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, L.E.; Casso, D.; Diamond, I.; Gordon, A.S. )

    1989-02-09

    Chronic exposure to ethanol results in a desensitization of adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP production. Since adenosine is released by cells and is known to desensitize its own as well as other receptors, it may be involved in ethanol-induced desensitization of adenosine receptor function. Therefore, we have examine the acute and chronic effects of ethanol on the transport of adenosine via the nucleoside transport. Acute exposure to ethanol caused an inhibition of adenosine uptake in S49 lymphoma cells. This decrease in uptake resulted in accumulation of extracellular adenosine after ethanol exposure. The effect of ethanol was specific to nucleoside transport. Uptake of uridine, also transported by the nucleoside transporter, was inhibited by ethanol to the same degree as adenosine uptake, while neither isoleucine nor deoxyglucose uptake was altered by ethanol treatment. Inhibition of adenosine uptake by ethanol was non-competitive and dependent on the concentration of ethanol. After chronic exposure to ethanol, cells became tolerant to the acute effects of ethanol. There was no longer an acute inhibition of adenosine uptake, nor was these accumulation of extracellular adenosine. Chronic ethanol exposure also resulted in a decrease in the absolute rate of adenosine uptake. Binding studies using a high affinity lignad for the nucleoside transporter, nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR), indicate that this decreased uptake was due to a decrease in the maximal number of binding sites. These ethanol-induced changes in adenosine transport may be important for the acute and chronic effects of ethanol.

  16. Squalenoyl nucleoside monophosphate nanoassemblies: new prodrug strategy for the delivery of nucleotide analogues.

    PubMed

    Caron, Joachim; Reddy, L Harivardhan; Lepêtre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Wack, Séverine; Clayette, Pascal; Rogez-Kreuz, Christine; Yousfi, Rahima; Couvreur, Patrick; Desmaële, Didier

    2010-05-01

    4-(N)-1,1',2-trisnor-squalenoyldideoxycytidine monophosphate (SQddC-MP) and 4-(N)-1,1',2-trisnor-squalenoylgemcitabine monophosphate (SQdFdC-MP) were synthesized using phosphoramidite chemistry. These amphiphilic molecules self-assembled to about hundred nanometers size nanoassemblies in aqueous medium. Nanoassemblies of SQddC-MP displayed significant anti-HIV activity whereas SQdFdC-MP nanoassemblies displayed promising anticancer activity on leukemia cells. These results suggested that squalene conjugate of negatively charged nucleotide analogues efficiently penetrated within cells. Thus, we propose a new prodrug strategy for improved delivery of nucleoside analogues to ameliorate their biological efficacy.

  17. Efficient, low-cost protein factories: expression of human adenosine deaminase in baculovirus-infected insect larvae.

    PubMed Central

    Medin, J A; Hunt, L; Gathy, K; Evans, R K; Coleman, M S

    1990-01-01

    Human adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4), a key purine salvage enzyme essential for immune competence, has been overproduced in Spodoptera frugiperda cells and in Trichoplusia ni (cabbage looper) larvae infected with recombinant baculovirus. The coding sequence of human adenosine deaminase was recombined into a baculovirus immediately downstream from the strong polyhedrin gene promoter. Approximately 60 hr after infection of insect cells with the recombinant virus, maximal levels of intracellular adenosine deaminase mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity were detected. The recombinant human adenosine deaminase represented 10% of the total cellular protein and exhibited a specific activity of 70 units/mg of protein in crude homogenate. This specific activity is 70-350 times greater than that exhibited by the enzyme in homogenates of the two most abundant natural sources of human adenosine deaminase, thymus and leukemic cells. When the recombinant virus was injected into insect larvae, the maximum recombinant enzyme was produced 4 days postinfection and represented about 2% of the total insect protein with a specific activity of 10-25 units/mg of protein. The recombinant human adenosine deaminase was purified to homogeneity from both insect cells and larvae and demonstrated to be identical to native adenosine deaminase purified from human cells with respect to molecular weight, interaction with polyclonal anti-adenosine deaminase antibody, and enzymatic properties. A pilot purification yielded 8-9 mg of homogeneous enzyme from 22 larvae. The production of large quantities of recombinant human adenosine deaminase in insect larvae is inexpensive and rapid and eliminates the need for specialized facilities for tissue culture. This method should be applicable to large-scale production of many recombinant proteins. Images PMID:2181448

  18. The Effect of Endogenous Adenosine on Neuronal Activity in Rats: An FDG PET Study

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Soumen; Zhang, Dali; Mzengeza, Shadreck; Ko, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT 2–18F‐fluorodeoxy‐D‐glucose (FDG) is a glucose analog that is taken up by cells and phosphorylated. The amount of FDG accumulated by cells is a measure of the rate of glycolysis, which reflects cellular activity. As the levels and actions of the neuromodulator adenosine are dynamically regulated by neuronal activity, this study was designed to test whether endogenous adenosine affects tissue accumulation of FDG as assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) or by postmortem analysis of tissue radioactivity. Rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8‐cyclopentyl‐1,3‐dipropyl‐xanthine (DPCPX, 3 mg/kg), the adenosine kinase inhibitor ABT‐702 (3 mg/kg), or vehicle 10 minutes prior to an intravenous injection of FDG (15.4 ± 0.7 MBq per rat). Rats were then subjected to a 15 minute static PET scan. Reconstructed images were normalized to FDG PET template for rats and standard uptake values (SUVs) were calculated. To examine the regional effect of active treatment compared to vehicle, statistical parametric mapping analysis was performed. Whole‐brain FDG uptake was not affected by drug treatment. Significant regional hypometabolism was detected, particularly in cerebellum, of DPCPX‐ and ABT‐702 treated rats, relative to vehicle‐treated rats. Thus, endogenous adenosine can affect FDG accumulation although this effect is modest in quiescent rats. PMID:27082948

  19. Phosphorylation potential and adenosine release during norepinephrine infusion in guinea pig heart

    SciTech Connect

    He, Miao-Xiang; Wangler, R.D.; Dillon, P.F.; Romig, G.D.; Sparks, H.V. )

    1987-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that adenosine released from isolated guinea pig hearts in response to norepinephrine is related to the cellular phosphorylation potential (PP;(ATP)/(ADP)(P{sub i})), where P{sub i} is inorganic phosphate. {sup 31}P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to measure the relative concentrations of P{sub i}, phosphocreatine (PCr), and ATP. After a control period, norepinephrine was infused for 20 min during which {sup 31}P-NMR spectra and samples of venous effluent were collected every minute. With norepinephrine infusion, PCr decreased rapidly to 72% of control by 8 min and then recovered to 80% of control for the remaining 12 min. ATP fell slowly to 70% of control over 20 min. P{sub i} increased to a peak at 2 min, then declined slowly to a steady state from 8 to 20 min. Adenosine release increased at 7 min and then slowly fell to a steady state from 10 to 20 min. There is hyperbolic relationship between adenosine release and PP; when the PP declines, a level is reached below which there is a rapid increase in adenosine release. These data support the hypothesis that adenosine release is regulated by the cellular PP as a closely related variable.

  20. Astrocyte-derived adenosine is central to the hypnogenic effect of glucose

    PubMed Central

    Scharbarg, Emeric; Daenens, Marion; Lemaître, Frédéric; Geoffroy, Hélène; Guille-Collignon, Manon; Gallopin, Thierry; Rancillac, Armelle

    2016-01-01

    Sleep has been hypothesised to maintain a close relationship with metabolism. Here we focus on the brain structure that triggers slow-wave sleep, the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO), to explore the cellular and molecular signalling pathways recruited by an increase in glucose concentration. We used infrared videomicroscopy on ex vivo brain slices to establish that glucose induces vasodilations specifically in the VLPO via the astrocytic release of adenosine. Real-time detection by in situ purine biosensors further revealed that the adenosine level doubles in response to glucose, and triples during the wakefulness period. Finally, patch-clamp recordings uncovered the depolarizing effect of adenosine and its A2A receptor agonist, CGS-21680, on sleep-promoting VLPO neurons. Altogether, our results provide new insights into the metabolically driven release of adenosine. We hypothesise that adenosine adjusts the local energy supply to local neuronal activity in response to glucose. This pathway could contribute to sleep-wake transition and sleep intensity. PMID:26755200

  1. The role of adenosine in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Anisur

    2009-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system manifested by cognitive and memory deterioration, a variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms, behavioral disturbances, and progressive impairment of daily life activities. Current pharmacotherapies are restricted to symptomatic interventions but do not prevent progressive neuronal degeneration. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are needed to intervene with these progressive pathological processes. In the past several years adenosine, a ubiquitously released purine ribonucleoside, has become important for its neuromodulating capability and its emerging positive experimental effects in neurodegenerative diseases. Recent research suggests that adenosine receptors play important roles in the modulation of cognitive function. The present paper attempts to review published reports and data from different studies showing the evidence of a relationship between adenosinergic function and AD-related cognitive deficits. Epidemiological studies have found an association between coffee (a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist) consumption and improved cognitive function in AD patients and in the elderly. Long-term administration of caffeine in transgenic animal models showed a reduced amyloid burden in brain with better cognitive performance. Antagonists of adenosine A2A receptors mimic these beneficial effects of caffeine on cognitive function. Neuronal cell cultures with amyloid beta in the presence of an A2A receptor antagonist completely prevented amyloid beta-induced neurotoxicity. These findings suggest that the adenosinergic system constitutes a new therapeutic target for AD, and caffeine and A2A receptor antagonists may have promise to manage cognitive dysfunction in AD.

  2. Arabidopsis TH2 Encodes the Orphan Enzyme Thiamin Monophosphate Phosphatase[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Niehaus, Thomas D.; Hasnain, Ghulam; Gidda, Satinder K.; Nguyen, Thuy N.D.; Anderson, Erin M.; Brown, Greg; Yakunin, Alexander F.; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Gregory, Jesse F.

    2016-01-01

    To synthesize the cofactor thiamin diphosphate (ThDP), plants must first hydrolyze thiamin monophosphate (ThMP) to thiamin, but dedicated enzymes for this hydrolysis step were unknown and widely doubted to exist. The classical thiamin-requiring th2-1 mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana was shown to reduce ThDP levels by half and to increase ThMP levels 5-fold, implying that the THIAMIN REQUIRING2 (TH2) gene product could be a dedicated ThMP phosphatase. Genomic and transcriptomic data indicated that TH2 corresponds to At5g32470, encoding a HAD (haloacid dehalogenase) family phosphatase fused to a TenA (thiamin salvage) family protein. Like the th2-1 mutant, an insertional mutant of At5g32470 accumulated ThMP, and the thiamin requirement of the th2-1 mutant was complemented by wild-type At5g32470. Complementation tests in Escherichia coli and enzyme assays with recombinant proteins confirmed that At5g32470 and its maize (Zea mays) orthologs GRMZM2G148896 and GRMZM2G078283 are ThMP-selective phosphatases whose activity resides in the HAD domain and that the At5g32470 TenA domain has the expected thiamin salvage activity. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that alternative translation start sites direct the At5g32470 protein to the cytosol and potentially also to mitochondria. Our findings establish that plants have a dedicated ThMP phosphatase and indicate that modest (50%) ThDP depletion can produce severe deficiency symptoms. PMID:27677881

  3. Investigation of dissociative electron attachment to 2'-deoxycytidine-3'-monophosphate using DFT method and time dependent wave packet approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Somnath; B, Renjith; Mishra, Manoj K.; Sarma, Manabendra

    2012-08-01

    Effect of electron correlation on single strand breaks (SSBs) induced by low energy electron (LEE) has been investigated in a fragment excised from a DNA, viz., 2'-deoxycytidine-3'-monophosphate [3'-dCMPH] molecule in gas phase at DFT-B3LYP/6-31+G(d) accuracy level and using local complex potential based time dependent wave packet (LCP-TDWP) approach. The results obtained, in conjunction with our earlier investigation, show the possibility of SSB at very low energy (0.15 eV) where the LEE transfers from π* to σ* resonance state which resembles a SN2 type mechanism. In addition, for the first time, an indication of quantum mechanical tunneling in strand breaking is seen from the highest anionic bound vibrational state (χ5), which may have a substantial role during DNA damage.

  4. Adenosine receptors and the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sebastião, Ana M; Ribeiro, Joaquim A

    2009-01-01

    The adenosine receptors (ARs) in the nervous system act as a kind of "go-between" to regulate the release of neurotransmitters (this includes all known neurotransmitters) and the action of neuromodulators (e.g., neuropeptides, neurotrophic factors). Receptor-receptor interactions and AR-transporter interplay occur as part of the adenosine's attempt to control synaptic transmission. A(2A)ARs are more abundant in the striatum and A(1)ARs in the hippocampus, but both receptors interfere with the efficiency and plasticity-regulated synaptic transmission in most brain areas. The omnipresence of adenosine and A(2A) and A(1) ARs in all nervous system cells (neurons and glia), together with the intensive release of adenosine following insults, makes adenosine a kind of "maestro" of the tripartite synapse in the homeostatic coordination of the brain function. Under physiological conditions, both A(2A) and A(1) ARs play an important role in sleep and arousal, cognition, memory and learning, whereas under pathological conditions (e.g., Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, epilepsy, drug addiction, pain, schizophrenia, depression), ARs operate a time/circumstance window where in some circumstances A(1)AR agonists may predominate as early neuroprotectors, and in other circumstances A(2A)AR antagonists may alter the outcomes of some of the pathological deficiencies. In some circumstances, and depending on the therapeutic window, the use of A(2A)AR agonists may be initially beneficial; however, at later time points, the use of A(2A)AR antagonists proved beneficial in several pathologies. Since selective ligands for A(1) and A(2A) ARs are now entering clinical trials, the time has come to determine the role of these receptors in neurological and psychiatric diseases and identify therapies that will alter the outcomes of these diseases, therefore providing a hopeful future for the patients who suffer from these diseases.

  5. Molecular Determinants of CGS21680 Binding to the Human Adenosine A2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Guillaume; Edwards, Patricia C; Leslie, Andrew G W; Tate, Christopher G

    2015-06-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A(2A)R) plays a key role in transmembrane signaling mediated by the endogenous agonist adenosine. Here, we describe the crystal structure of human A2AR thermostabilized in an active-like conformation bound to the selective agonist 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethyl-amino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine (CGS21680) at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Comparison of A(2A)R structures bound to either CGS21680, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine (NECA), UK432097 [6-(2,2-diphenylethylamino)-9-[(2R,3R,4S,5S)-5-(ethylcarbamoyl)-3,4-dihydroxy-tetrahydrofuran-2-yl]-N-[2-[[1-(2-pyridyl)-4-piperidyl]carbamoylamino]ethyl]purine-2-carboxamide], or adenosine shows that the adenosine moiety of the ligands binds to the receptor in an identical fashion. However, an extension in CGS21680 compared with adenosine, the (2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino group, binds in an extended vestibule formed from transmembrane regions 2 and 7 (TM2 and TM7) and extracellular loops 2 and 3 (EL2 and EL3). The (2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino group makes van der Waals contacts with side chains of amino acid residues Glu169(EL2), His264(EL3), Leu267(7.32), and Ile274(7.39), and the amine group forms a hydrogen bond with the side chain of Ser67(2.65). Of these residues, only Ile274(7.39) is absolutely conserved across the human adenosine receptor subfamily. The major difference between the structures of A(2A)R bound to either adenosine or CGS21680 is that the binding pocket narrows at the extracellular surface when CGS21680 is bound, due to an inward tilt of TM2 in that region. This conformation is stabilized by hydrogen bonds formed by the side chain of Ser67(2.65) to CGS21680, either directly or via an ordered water molecule. Mutation of amino acid residues Ser67(2.65), Glu169(EL2), and His264(EL3), and analysis of receptor activation either in the presence or absence of ligands implicates this region in modulating the level of basal activity of A(2A)R.

  6. Role of adenosine in the antiepileptic effects of deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Maisa F.; Hamani, Clement; de Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G.; Amorim, Beatriz O.; Macedo, Carlos E.; Fernandes, Maria José S.; Nobrega, José N.; Aarão, Mayra C.; Madureira, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Antônio M.; Andersen, Monica L.; Tufik, Sergio; Mello, Luiz E.; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of anterior thalamic nucleus (AN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of epilepsy, mechanisms responsible for the antiepileptic effects of this therapy remain elusive. As adenosine modulates neuronal excitability and seizure activity in animal models, we hypothesized that this nucleoside could be one of the substrates involved in the effects of AN DBS. We applied 5 days of stimulation to rats rendered chronically epileptic by pilocarpine injections and recorded epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices. We found that slices from animals given DBS had reduced hippocampal excitability and were less susceptible to develop ictal activity. In live animals, AN DBS significantly increased adenosine levels in the hippocampus as measured by microdialysis. The reduced excitability of DBS in vitro was completely abolished in animals pre-treated with A1 receptor antagonists and was strongly potentiated by A1 receptor agonists. We conclude that some of the antiepileptic effects of DBS may be mediated by adenosine. PMID:25324724

  7. Extracellular adenosine concentrations during in vitro ischaemia in rat hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Latini, Serena; Bordoni, Francesca; Pedata, Felicita; Corradetti, Renato

    1999-01-01

    The application of an ischaemic insult in hippocampal slices results in the depression of synaptic transmission, mainly attributed to the activation of A1 adenosine receptors by adenosine released in the extracellular space. To estimate the concentration of endogenous adenosine acting at the receptor level during an ischaemic episode, we recorded field e.p.s.ps (fe.p.s.ps) from hippocampal slices, and evaluated the ability of the selective A1 receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), to reverse the fe.p.s.p. depression induced by in vitro ischaemia. A relationship between the IC50 of an antagonist and the endogenous concentration of a neurotransmitter has been used for pharmacological analysis. The complete and reversible depression of fe.p.s.p. in the CA1 region induced by 5 min ischaemia was decreased in the presence of DPCPX (50–500 nM). 8-Phenyltheophylline (10 μM) abolished the depression of fe.p.s.ps during the ischaemic period, while a small (peak effect 12±4%) decrease in fe.p.s.ps was observed during the initial phase of reperfusion. In the time-interval of maximal depression of fe.p.s.ps., IC50 and adenosine concentration changed as function of time with a good degree of correlation. The maximal value of adenosine concentration was 30 μM. Our data provide an estimation of the adenosine concentration reached at the receptor level during an ischaemic episode, with a higher time discrimination (15 s) than that achieved with any biochemical approach. This estimation may be useful in order to establish appropriate concentrations of purinergic compounds to be tested for their pharmacological effects during an ischaemic episode. PMID:10401564

  8. The role of microorganisms in the degradation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in chill-stored common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fillets.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Zhang, Longteng; Song, Sijia; Wang, Zhiying; Kong, Chunli; Luo, Yongkang

    2017-06-01

    Biochemical and microbial changes after harvest strongly affect the final quality and shelf life of fish and fish products. In this study, the role of microbes in the degradation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and the origin of adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) and acid phosphatase (ACP) in common carp fillets during different stages of chilled storage (at 4°C) were investigated. The content of ATP, ADP, AMP, IMP, HxR, and Hx, the activity of AMPD and ACP, and the total count of viable, Aeromonas, Pseudomonas, H2S-producing bacteria, and lactic acid bacteria were examined. Results indicated that the population of microbial communities in control samples increased with storage time, and Pseudomonas peaked on the 10th day of storage. Changes in AMPD activity were less related to the abundance of microbes during the entire storage period. However, ACP was derived from both fish muscle and microbial secretion during the middle and late stages of storage. Degradation of ATP to IMP was not affected by spoilage bacteria, but the hydrolysis of IMP, and the transformation of HxR to Hx was affected considerably by the spoilage bacteria.

  9. Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; Ferraro, Luca; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Beggiato, Sarah; Pèzzola, Antonella; Bader, Michael; Fuxe, Kjell; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2 A Rs) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1 Rs) are highly expressed in the striatum, where they functionally interact and form A2A /CB1 heteroreceptor complexes. We investigated the effects of CB1 R stimulation in a transgenic rat strain over-expressing A2 A Rs under the control of the neural-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A rats) and in age-matched wild-type (WT) animals. The effects of the CB1 R agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) were significantly lower in NSEA2A rats than in WT animals, as demonstrated by i) electrophysiological recordings of synaptic transmission in corticostriatal slices; ii) the measurement of glutamate outflow from striatal synaptosomes and iii) in vivo experiments on locomotor activity. Moreover, while the effects of WIN were modulated by both A2 A R agonist (CGS 21680) and antagonists (ZM 241385, KW-6002 and SCH-442416) in WT animals, the A2 A R antagonists failed to influence WIN-mediated effects in NSEA2A rats. The present results demonstrate that in rats with genetic neuronal over-expression of A2 A Rs, the effects mediated by CB1 R activation in the striatum are significantly reduced, suggesting a change in the stoichiometry of A2A and CB1 receptors and providing a strategy to dissect the involvement of A2 A R forming or not forming heteromers in the modulation of striatal functions. These findings add additional evidence for the existence of an interaction between striatal A2 A Rs and CB1 Rs, playing a fundamental role in the regulation of striatal functions. We studied A2A -CB1 receptor interaction in transgenic rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A ). In these rats, we demonstrated a reduced effect of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 in the modulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and locomotor activity, while CB1 receptor expression level did not change with respect to WT rats. A reduction in the expression of A2A -CB1

  10. Deciphering the photochemical mechanisms describing the UV-induced processes occurring in solvated guanine monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Altavilla, Salvatore F.; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Conti, Irene; Rivalta, Ivan; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The photophysics and photochemistry of water-solvated guanine monophosphate (GMP) are here characterized by means of a multireference quantum-chemical/molecular mechanics theoretical approach (CASPT2//CASSCF/AMBER) in order to elucidate the main photo-processes occurring upon UV-light irradiation. The effect of the solvent and of the phosphate group on the energetics and structural features of this system are evaluated for the first time employing high-level ab initio methods and thoroughly compared to those in vacuo previously reported in the literature and to the experimental evidence to assess to which extent they influence the photoinduced mechanisms. Solvated electronic excitation energies of solvated GMP at the Franck-Condon (FC) region show a red shift for the ππ* La and Lb states, whereas the energy of the oxygen lone-pair nπ* state is blue-shifted. The main photoinduced decay route is promoted through a ring-puckering motion along the bright lowest-lying La state toward a conical intersection (CI) with the ground state, involving a very shallow stationary point along the minimum energy pathway in contrast to the barrierless profile found in gas-phase, the point being placed at the end of the minimum energy path (MEP) thus endorsing its ultrafast deactivation in accordance with time-resolved transient and photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. The role of the nπ* state in the solvated system is severely diminished as the crossings with the initially populated La state and also with the Lb state are placed too high energetically to partake prominently in the deactivation photo-process. The proposed mechanism present in solvated and in vacuo DNA/RNA chromophores validates the intrinsic photostability mechanism through CI-mediated non-radiative processes accompanying the bright excited-state population toward the ground state and subsequent relaxation back to the FC region. PMID:25941671

  11. Involvement of Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate-Dependent Protein Kinase I in Renal Antifibrotic Effects of Serelaxin

    PubMed Central

    Wetzl, Veronika; Schinner, Elisabeth; Kees, Frieder; Hofmann, Franz; Faerber, Lothar; Schlossmann, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Kidney fibrosis has shown to be ameliorated through the involvement of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and its dependent protein kinase I (cGKI). Serelaxin, the recombinant form of human relaxin-II, increases cGMP levels and has shown beneficial effects on kidney function in acute heart failure patients. Antifibrotic properties of serelaxin are supposed to be mediated via relaxin family peptide receptor 1 and subsequently enhanced nitric oxide/cGMP to inhibit transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. This study examines the involvement of cGKI in the antifibrotic signaling of serelaxin. Methods and Results: Kidney fibrosis was induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction in wildtype (WT) and cGKI knock-out (KO) mice. After 7 days, renal antifibrotic effects of serelaxin were assessed. Serelaxin treatment for 7 days significantly increased cGMP in the kidney of WT and cGKI-KO. In WT, renal fibrosis was reduced through decreased accumulation of collagen1A1, total collagen, and fibronectin. The profibrotic connective tissue growth factor as well as myofibroblast differentiation were reduced and matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 were positively modulated after treatment. Moreover, Smad2 as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) phosphorylation were decreased, whereas phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5a phosphorylation was increased. However, these effects were not observed in cGKI-KO. Conclusion: Antifibrotic renal effects of serelaxin are mediated via cGMP/cGKI to inhibit Smad2- and ERK1-dependent TGF-β signaling and increased PDE5a phosphorylation. PMID:27462268

  12. Different Characteristics and Nucleotide Binding Properties of Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMPDH) Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Elaine C.; Gunter, Jennifer H.; Webster, Julie A.; Schieber, Nicole L.; Oorschot, Viola; Parton, Robert G.; Whitehead, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a rate-limiting enzyme in de novo guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, clustered into macrostructures in response to decreased nucleotide levels and that there were differences between the IMPDH isoforms, IMPDH1 and IMPDH2. We hypothesised that the Bateman domains, which are present in both isoforms and serve as energy-sensing/allosteric modules in unrelated proteins, would contribute to isoform-specific differences and that mutations situated in and around this domain in IMPDH1 which give rise to retinitis pigmentosa (RP) would compromise regulation. We employed immuno-electron microscopy to investigate the ultrastructure of IMPDH macrostructures and live-cell imaging to follow clustering of an IMPDH2-GFP chimera in real-time. Using a series of IMPDH1/IMPDH2 chimera we demonstrated that the propensity to cluster was conferred by the N-terminal 244 amino acids, which includes the Bateman domain. A protease protection assay suggested isoform-specific purine nucleotide binding characteristics, with ATP protecting IMPDH1 and AMP protecting IMPDH2, via a mechanism involving conformational changes upon nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain without affecting IMPDH catalytic activity. ATP binding to IMPDH1 was confirmed in a nucleotide binding assay. The RP-causing mutation, R224P, abolished ATP binding and nucleotide protection and this correlated with an altered propensity to cluster. Collectively these data demonstrate that (i) the isoforms are differentially regulated by AMP and ATP by a mechanism involving the Bateman domain, (ii) communication occurs between the Bateman and catalytic domains and (iii) the RP-causing mutations compromise such regulation. These findings support the idea that the IMPDH isoforms are subject to distinct regulation and that regulatory defects contribute to human disease. PMID:23236438

  13. Deciphering the photochemical mechanisms describing the UV-induced processes occurring in solvated guanine monophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altavilla, Salvatore; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Conti, Irene; Rivalta, Ivan; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The photophysics and photochemistry of water-solvated guanine monophosphate (GMP) are here characterized by means of a multireference quantum-chemical/molecular mechanics theoretical approach (CASPT2//CASSCF/AMBER) in order to elucidate the main photo-processes occurring upon UV-light irradiation. The effect of the solvent and of the phosphate group on the energetics and structural features of this system are evaluated for the first time employing high-level ab initio methods and thoroughly compared to those in vacuo previously reported in the literature and to the experimental evidence to assess to which extent they influence the photoinduced mechanisms. Solvated electronic excitation energies of solvated GMP at the Franck-Condon (FC) region show a red shift for the ππ* La and Lb states, whereas the energy of the oxygen lone-pair nπ* state is blue-shifted. The main photoinduced decay route is promoted through a ring-puckering motion along the bright lowest-lying La state towards a conical intersection (CI) with the ground state, involving a very shallow stationary point along the minimum energy pathway in contrast to the barrierless profile found in gas-phase, the point being placed at the end of the minimum energy path (MEP) thus endorsing its ultrafast deactivation in accordance with time-resolved transient and photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. The role of the nπ* state in the solvated system is severely diminished as the crossings with the initially populated La state and also with the Lb state are placed too high energetically to partake prominently in the deactivation photo-process. The proposed mechanism present in solvated and in vacuo DNA/RNA chromophores validates the intrinsic photostability mechanism through CI-mediated non-radiative processes accompanying the bright excited-state population towards the ground state and subsequent relaxation back to the FC region.

  14. Characterization of [125I]ZM 241385 binding to adenosine A2A receptors in the pineal of sheep brain.

    PubMed

    Yan, X; Koos, B J; Kruger, L; Linden, J; Murray, T F

    2006-06-22

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous neuromodulator and homeostatic regulator that exerts its physiologic actions through activation of A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3) adenosine receptor subtypes. In the central nervous system, adenosine's action in neurons is manifested in its modulation of tonic inhibitory control. Adenosine released in the brain during hypoxia has critical depressant effects on breathing in fetal and newborn mammals, an action suggested to be mediated by A(2A) receptors in the posteromedial thalamus. In an effort to more accurately define the spatial distribution of adenosine A(2A) receptors in fetal sheep diencephalon, we have used a receptor autoradiographic technique utilizing an iodinated radioligand [(125)I]ZM 241385, which has greater sensitivity and resolution than the tritiated compound. The distribution of ligand binding sites in the fetal sheep diencephalon indicated that the highest levels of binding were in select thalamic nuclei, including those implicated in hypoxic depression of fetal breathing, and the pineal. Given the high density of labeled A(2A) receptors in the pineal, these sites were characterized more fully in homogenate radioligand binding assays. These data indicate that [(125)I]ZM 241385 binding sites display a pharmacological signature consistent with that of adenosine A(2A) receptors and are expressed at similar levels in fetal, lamb and adult ovine brain. The adenosine A(2A) receptor pharmacologic signature of the [(125)I]ZM 241385 binding site in pineal cell membranes generalized to the site characterized in membranes derived from other portions of the lamb thalamus, including the sector involved in hypoxic inhibition of fetal breathing. These results have important implications for the functional roles of adenosine A(2A) receptors in the thalamus and pineal of sheep brain.

  15. [Influence of ADP-ribose, AMP and adenosine on bioelectric activity of hibernating ground squirrel atrium and papillary muscle].

    PubMed

    Kuz'min, V S; Abramochkin, D V; Sukhova, G S; Rozenshtraukh, L V

    2008-01-01

    The aim of work was to investigate effects of adenosine, AMP and ADP-ribose (1x10(-5)) on bioelectric activity of atrium and papillary muscle of nonhibernating (rat) and hibernating (Yakutian ground squirrel) animals. Action potential (AP) was registered with use of standard microelectrode technique. AP duration (APD) at level of 90% repolarisation in rat atrium in control experiments was 30+/-5 ms, APD at level of 50% repolarisation was 12+/-2 ms. APD at level of 90% repolarisation in rat papillary muscle was 56+/-7 ms, at level of 50% repolarisation was 18+/-2 ms. APD at level of 90% repolarisation in ground squirrel atrium was 77+/-6, APD at level of 50% repolarisation was 38+/-6 ms. APD at level of 90% repolarisation in ground squirrel papillary muscle was 105+/-9 ms, APD at level of 50% repolarisation was 42+/-8 ms. Purine nucleotides and nucleoside, that were tested in work, except ADP-ribose, act as inhibitory factors and decrease APD both in rat and hibernating ground squirrel heart. ADP-ribose decreases APD in papillary muscle of hibernator but did not in its atrium. In ground squirrel atrium AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 50% repolarisation by 10+/-3% and 18+/-3% respectively. AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 90% repolarisation by 9+/-2% and 11+/-2% respectively. In ground squirrel papillary muscle ADP-ribose, AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 50% repolarisation by 26+/-8%, 23+/-8% and 26+/-7%. ADP-ribose, AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 90% repolarisation by 12+/-3%, 10+/-3%, 13+/-3%. Thus, decrease of APD in ground squirrel papillary muscle at level of 90% repolarisation during nucleotides and adenosine action was 2-2.5 fold less, than the rat.

  16. Correlation between airway epithelium-induced relaxation of rat aorta in the co-axial bioassay and cyclic nucleotide levels.

    PubMed

    Hay, D W; Muccitelli, R M; Page, C P; Spina, D

    1992-04-01

    1. In co-axial bioassays, in the presence of indomethacin, addition of histamine (100 microM) or methacholine (100 microM) to guinea-pig trachea produced an epithelium-dependent relaxation of precontracted rat aorta which was associated with an approximately 2 fold elevation in tissue levels of guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP). Removal of the airway epithelium abolished the histamine-induced relaxation of rat aorta and the associated increase in intracellular cyclic GMP. 2. Epithelium-dependent relaxation was not associated with altered adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels in rat aorta. Unstimulated intact or denuded guinea-pig trachea also did not affect the levels of cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP in rat aorta. 3. Methylene blue (10 microM) abolished the methacholine-induced, endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF)-mediated rise in intracellular cyclic GMP in rat endothelium-intact aorta alone. In contrast, methylene blue (10 microM) did not affect the methacholine-induced epithelium-dependent rise in intracellular cyclic GMP in rat endothelium-denuded aorta in the co-axial bioassay. 4. Relaxation of the rat aorta without endothelium was associated with increased levels of cyclic GMP (but not cyclic AMP) in response to sodium nitroprusside (5 nM) and of cyclic AMP (but not cyclic GMP) in response to isoprenaline (1 microM). 5. These results provide evidence that the postulated epithelium-derived inhibitory factor (EpDIF) may produce relaxation of vascular tissue via elevation in cyclic GMP levels. Furthermore, some data suggest that EpDIF may act by stimulation of the particulate, rather than the soluble form of guanylate cyclase.

  17. Cloning and expression of an A1 adenosine receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; McVittie, L.D.; Smyk-Randall, E.M.; Nakata, H.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Gerfen, C.R.; Sibley, D.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction technique to selectively amplify guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor cDNA sequences from rat striatal mRNA, using sets of highly degenerate primers derived from transmembrane sequences of previously cloned G protein-coupled receptors. A novel cDNA fragment was identified, which exhibits considerable homology to various members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This fragment was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a rat striatal library. A 2.2-kilobase clone was obtained that encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with seven transmembrane domains, as predicted by hydropathy analysis. Stably transfected mouse A9-L cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells that expressed mRNA for this clone were screened with putative receptor ligands. Saturable and specific binding sites for the A1 adenosine antagonist (3H)-1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine were identified on membranes from transfected cells. The rank order of potency and affinities of various adenosine agonist and antagonist ligands confirmed the identity of this cDNA clone as an A1 adenosine receptor. The high affinity binding of A1 adenosine agonists was shown to be sensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanylyl-5{prime}-imidodiphosphate. In adenylyl cyclase assays, adenosine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production by greater than 50%, in a pharmacologically specific fashion. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses of receptor mRNA in brain tissues revealed two transcripts of 5.6 and 3.1 kilobases, both of which were abundant in cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and thalamus, with lower levels in olfactory bulb, striatum, mesencephalon, and retina. These regional distribution data are in good agreement with previous receptor autoradiographic studies involving the A1 adenosine receptor.

  18. Adenosine A1 and A3 receptors protect astrocytes from hypoxic damage.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Olga; Shang, Mingmei; Tonazzini, Ilaria; Daré, Elisabetta; Fredholm, Bertil B

    2008-10-31

    Brain levels of adenosine are elevated during hypoxia. Through effects on adenosine receptors (A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3)) on astrocytes, adenosine can influence functions such as glutamate uptake, reactive gliosis, swelling, as well as release of neurotrophic and neurotoxic factors having an impact on the outcome of metabolic stress. We have studied the roles of these receptors in astrocytes by evaluating their susceptibility to damage induced by oxygen deprivation or exposure to the hypoxia mimic cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)). Hypoxia caused ATP breakdown and purine release, whereas CoCl(2) (0.8 mM) mainly reduced ATP by causing cell death in human D384 astrocytoma cells. Further experiments were conducted in primary astrocytes prepared from specific adenosine receptor knock-out (KO) and wild type (WT) mice. In WT cells purine release following CoCl(2) exposure was mainly due to nucleotide release, whereas hypoxia-induced intracellular ATP breakdown followed by nucleoside efflux. N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), an unselective adenosine receptor agonist, protected from cell death following hypoxia. Cytotoxicity was more pronounced in A(1)R KO astrocytes and tended to be higher in WT cells in the presence of the A(1) receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX). Genetic deletion of A(2A) receptor resulted in less prominent effects. A(3)R KO glial cells were more affected by hypoxia than WT cells. Accordingly, the A(3) receptor agonist 2-chloro-N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)-N-methyl-5'-carbamoyladenosine (CL-IB-MECA) reduced ATP depletion caused by hypoxic conditions. It also reduced apoptosis in human astroglioma D384 cells after oxygen deprivation. In conclusion, the data point to a cytoprotective role of adenosine mediated by both A(1) and A(3) receptors in primary mouse astrocytes.

  19. Visual and Plasmon Resonance Absorption Sensor for Adenosine Triphosphate Based on the High Affinity between Phosphate and Zr(IV)

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Wenjing; Liu, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Wei; Halawa, Mohamed Ibrahim; Xu, Guobao

    2016-01-01

    Zr(IV) can form phosphate and Zr(IV) (–PO32−–Zr4+–) complex owing to the high affinity between Zr(IV) with phosphate. Zr(IV) can induce the aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), while adenosine triphosphate(ATP) can prevent Zr(IV)-induced aggregation of AuNPs. Herein, a visual and plasmon resonance absorption (PRA)sensor for ATP have been developed using AuNPs based on the high affinity between Zr(IV)with ATP. AuNPs get aggregated in the presence of certain concentrations of Zr(IV). After the addition of ATP, ATP reacts with Zr(IV) and prevents AuNPs from aggregation, enabling the detection of ATP. Because of the fast interaction of ATP with Zr(IV), ATP can be detected with a detection limit of 0.5 μM within 2 min by the naked eye. Moreover, ATP can be detected by the PRA technique with higher sensitivity. The A520nm/A650nm values in PRA spectra increase linearly with the concentrations of ATP from 0.1 μM to 15 μM (r = 0.9945) with a detection limit of 28 nM. The proposed visual and PRA sensor exhibit good selectivity against adenosine, adenosine monophosphate, guanosine triphosphate, cytidine triphosphate and uridine triphosphate. The recoveries for the analysis of ATP in synthetic samples range from 95.3% to 102.0%. Therefore, the proposed novel sensor for ATP is promising for real-time or on-site detection of ATP. PMID:27754349

  20. Visual and Plasmon Resonance Absorption Sensor for Adenosine Triphosphate Based on the High Affinity between Phosphate and Zr(IV).

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenjing; Liu, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Wei; Halawa, Mohamed Ibrahim; Xu, Guobao

    2016-10-12

    Zr(IV) can form phosphate and Zr(IV) (-PO₃(2-)-Zr(4+)-) complex owing to the high affinity between Zr(IV) with phosphate. Zr(IV) can induce the aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), while adenosine triphosphate(ATP) can prevent Zr(IV)-induced aggregation of AuNPs. Herein, a visual and plasmon resonance absorption (PRA)sensor for ATP have been developed using AuNPs based on the high affinity between Zr(IV)with ATP. AuNPs get aggregated in the presence of certain concentrations of Zr(IV). After the addition of ATP, ATP reacts with Zr(IV) and prevents AuNPs from aggregation, enabling the detection of ATP. Because of the fast interaction of ATP with Zr(IV), ATP can be detected with a detection limit of 0.5 μM within 2 min by the naked eye. Moreover, ATP can be detected by the PRA technique with higher sensitivity. The A520nm/A650nm values in PRA spectra increase linearly with the concentrations of ATP from 0.1 μM to 15 μM (r = 0.9945) with a detection limit of 28 nM. The proposed visual and PRA sensor exhibit good selectivity against adenosine, adenosine monophosphate, guanosine triphosphate, cytidine triphosphate and uridine triphosphate. The recoveries for the analysis of ATP in synthetic samples range from 95.3% to 102.0%. Therefore, the proposed novel sensor for ATP is promising for real-time or on-site detection of ATP.

  1. Erythrocytes retain hypoxic adenosine response for faster acclimatization upon re-ascent

    PubMed Central

    Song, Anren; Zhang, Yujin; Han, Leng; Yegutkin, Gennady G.; Liu, Hong; Sun, Kaiqi; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Li, Jessica; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Iriyama, Takayuki; Weng, Tingting; Zhao, Shushan; Wang, Wei; Wu, Hongyu; Nemkov, Travis; Subudhi, Andrew W.; Jameson-Van Houten, Sonja; Julian, Colleen G.; Lovering, Andrew T.; Hansen, Kirk C.; Zhang, Hong; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Dowhan, William; Jin, Jianping; Kellems, Rodney E.; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Blackburn, Michael; Roach, Robert C.; Xia, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Faster acclimatization to high altitude upon re-ascent is seen in humans; however, the molecular basis for this enhanced adaptive response is unknown. We report that in healthy lowlanders, plasma adenosine levels are rapidly induced by initial ascent to high altitude and achieved even higher levels upon re-ascent, a feature that is positively associated with quicker acclimatization. Erythrocyte equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (eENT1) levels are reduced in humans at high altitude and in mice under hypoxia. eENT1 deletion allows rapid accumulation of plasma adenosine to counteract hypoxic tissue damage in mice. Adenosine signalling via erythrocyte ADORA2B induces PKA phosphorylation, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of eENT1. Reduced eENT1 resulting from initial hypoxia is maintained upon re-ascent in humans or re-exposure to hypoxia in mice and accounts for erythrocyte hypoxic memory and faster acclimatization. Our findings suggest that targeting identified purinergic-signalling network would enhance the hypoxia adenosine response to counteract hypoxia-induced maladaptation. PMID:28169986

  2. Adenosine thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S. )

    1991-07-01

    Pharmacologic coronary vasodilation as an adjunct to myocardial perfusion imaging has become increasingly important in the evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease, in view of the large number of patients who cannot perform an adequate exercise test or in whom contraindications render exercise inappropriate. Adenosine is a very potent coronary vasodilator and when combined with thallium 201 scintigraphy produces images of high quality, with the added advantages of a very short half-life (less than 10 seconds) and the ability to adjust the dose during the infusion, which may enhance safety and curtail the duration of side effects. The reported sensitivity and specificity of adenosine thallium 201 scintigraphy for the detection of coronary artery disease are high and at least comparable with imaging after exercise or dipyridamole administration. 23 refs.

  3. Therapeutic epilepsy research: from pharmacological rationale to focal adenosine augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev; Stewart, Kerry-Ann

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common seizure disorder affecting approximately 70 million people worldwide. Current pharmacotherapy is neuron-centered, frequently accompanied by intolerable side-effects, and fails to be effective in about one third of patients. Therefore, new therapeutic concepts are needed. Recent research suggests an astrocytic basis of epilepsy, presenting the possibility of novel therapeutic targets. In particular, dysfunction of the astrocyte-controlled, endogenous, adenosine-based seizure control system of the brain is implicated in seizure generation. Thus, astrogliosis – a pathological hallmark of the epileptic brain – is associated with upregulation of the adenosine-removing enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK), resulting in focal adenosine deficiency. Both astrogliotic upregulation of ADK in epilepsy and transgenic overexpression of ADK are associated with seizures, and inhibition of ADK prevents seizures in a mouse model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. These findings link adenosine deficiency with seizures and predict that adenosine augmentation therapies (AATs) will likely be effective in preventing seizures. Given the widespread systemic and central side effects of systemically administered AATs, focal AATs (i.e., limited to the astrogliotic lesion) are a necessity. This Commentary will discuss the pharmacological rationale for the development of focal AATs. Additionally, several AAT strategies will be discussed: (1) adenosine released from silk-based brain implants; (2) adenosine released from locally implanted encapsulated cells; (3) adenosine released from stem cell-derived brain implants; and (4) adenosine augmenting gene therapies. Finally, new developments and therapeutic challenges in using focal AATs for epilepsy therapy will critically be evaluated. PMID:19682439

  4. The Janus face of adenosine: antiarrhythmic and proarrhythmic actions.

    PubMed

    Szentmiklosi, A József; Galajda, Zoltán; Cseppento, Ágnes; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Susán, Zsolt; Hegyi, Bence; Nánási, Péter P

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous, endogenous purine involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological regulatory mechanisms. Adenosine has been proposed as an endogenous antiarrhythmic substance to prevent hypoxia/ischemia-induced arrhythmias. Adenosine (and its precursor, ATP) has been used in the therapy of various cardiac arrhythmias over the past six decades. Its primary indication is treatment of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, but it can be effective in other forms of supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias, like sinus node reentry based tachycardia, triggered atrial tachycardia, atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia, or ventricular tachycardia based on a cAMP-mediated triggered activity. The main advantage is the rapid onset and the short half life (1- 10 sec). Adenosine exerts its antiarrhythmic actions by activation of A1 adenosine receptors located in the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes, as well as in activated ventricular myocardium. However, adenosine can also elicit A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptor-mediated global side reactions (flushing, dyspnea, chest discomfort), but it may display also proarrhythmic actions mediated by primarily A1 adenosine receptors (e.g. bradyarrhythmia or atrial fibrillation). To avoid the non-specific global adverse reactions, A1 adenosine receptor- selective full agonists (tecadenoson, selodenoson, trabodenoson) have been developed, which agents are currently under clinical trial. During long-term administration with orthosteric agonists, adenosine receptors can be internalized and desensitized. To avoid desensitization, proarrhythmic actions, or global adverse reactions, partial A1 adenosine receptor agonists, like CVT-2759, were developed. In addition, the pharmacologically "silent" site- and event specific adenosinergic drugs, such as adenosine regulating agents and allosteric modulators, might provide attractive opportunity to increase the effectiveness of beneficial actions of adenosine

  5. Sustained release carrier for adenosine triphosphate as signaling molecule.

    PubMed

    Wischke, Christian; Weigel, Judith; Bulavina, Larisa; Lendlein, Andreas

    2014-12-10

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a molecule with a fascinating variety of intracellular and extracellular biological functions that go far beyond energy metabolism. Due to its limited passive diffusion through biological membranes, controlled release systems may allow to interact with ATP-mediated extracellular processes. In this study, two release systems were explored to evaluate the capacity for either long-term or short-term release: (i) Poly[(rac-lactide)-co-glycolide] (PLGA) implant rods were capable of ATP release over days to weeks, depending on the PLGA molecular weight and end-group capping, but were also associated with partial hydrolytic degradation of ATP to ADP and AMP, but not adenosine. (ii) Thermosensitive methylcellulose hydrogels with a gelation occurring at body temperature allowed combining adjustable loading levels and the capacity for injection, with injection forces less than 50N even for small 27G needles. Finally, a first in vitro study illustrated purinergic-triggered response of primary murine microglia to ATP released from hydrogels, demonstrating the potential relevance for biomedical applications.

  6. Chemoelectrical energy conversion of adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Vishnu Baba; Sarles, Stephen Andrew; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-04-01

    Plant and animal cell membranes transport charged species, neutral molecules and water through ion pumps and channels. The energy required for moving species against established concentration and charge gradients is provided by the biological fuel - adenosine triphosphate (ATP) -synthesized within the cell. The adenosine triphosphatase (ATPases) in a plant cell membrane hydrolyze ATP in the cell cytoplasm to pump protons across the cell membrane. This establishes a proton gradient across the membrane from the cell exterior into the cell cytoplasm. This proton motive force stimulates ion channels that transport nutrients and other species into the cell. This article discusses a device that converts the chemical energy stored in adenosine triphosphate into electrical power using a transporter protein, ATPase. The V-type ATPase proteins used in our prototype are extracted from red beet(Beta vulgaris) tonoplast membranes and reconstituted in a bilayer lipid membrane or BLM formed from POPC and POPS lipids. A pH7 medium that can support ATP hydrolysis is provided on both sides of the membrane and ATP is dissolved in the pH7 buffer on one side of the membrane. Hydrolysis of ATP results in the formation of a phosphate ion and adenosine diphosphate. The energy from the reaction activates ATPase in the BLM and moves a proton across the membrane. The charge gradient established across the BLM due to the reaction and ion transport is converted into electrical current by half-cell reference electrodes. The prototype ATPase cell with an effective BLM area of 4.15 mm2 carrying 15 μl of ATPase proteins was observed to develop a steady state peak power output of 70 nW, which corresponds to a specific power of 1.69 μW/cm2 and a current density of 43.4 μA/cm2 of membrane area.

  7. Differential Expression of Adenosine A1 and A2A Receptors After Upper Cervical (C2) Spinal Cord Hemisection in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Theodor; Kreipke, Christian; Alilain, Warren; Nantwi, Kwaku D

    2007-01-01

    Background: In an animal model of spinal cord injury, a latent respiratory motor pathway can be pharmacologically activated via adenosine receptors to restore respiratory function after cervical (C2) spinal cord hemisection that paralyzes the hemidiaphragm ipsilateral to injury. Although spinal phrenic motoneurons immunopositive for adenosine receptors have been demonstrated (C3–C5), it is unclear if adenosine receptor protein levels are altered after C2 hemisection and theophylline administration. Objective: To assess the effects of C2 spinal cord hemisection and theophylline administration on the expression of adenosine receptor proteins. Methods: Adenosine A1 and A2A receptor protein levels were assessed in adult rats classified as (a) noninjured and theophylline treated, (b) C2 hemisected, (c) C2 hemisected and administered theophylline orally (3× daily) for 3 days only, and (d) C2 hemisected and administered theophylline (3× daily for 3 days) and assessed 12 days after drug administration. Assessment of A1 protein levels was carried out via immunohistochemistry and A2A protein levels by densitometry. Results: Adenosine A1 protein levels decreased significantly (both ipsilateral and contralateral to injury) after C2 hemisection; however, the decrease was attenuated in hemisected and theophylline-treated animals. Attenuation in adenosine A1 receptor protein levels persisted when theophylline administration was stopped for 12 days prior to assessment. Adenosine A2A protein levels were unchanged by C2 hemisection; however, theophylline reduced the levels within the phrenic motoneurons. Furthermore, the decrease in A2A levels persisted 12 days after theophylline was withdrawn. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that theophylline mitigates the effects of C2 hemisection by attenuating the C2 hemisection–induced decrease in A1 protein levels. Furthermore, A2A protein levels are unaltered by C2 hemisection but decrease after continuous or interrupted theophylline

  8. A3 Adenosine Receptors Modulate Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Expression in Human A375 Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Merighi, Stefania; Benini, Annalisa; Mirandola, Prisco; Gessi, Stefania; Varani, Katia; Leung, Edward; MacLennan, Stephen; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key regulator of genes crucial to many aspects of cancer biology. The purine nucleoside, adenosine, accumulates within many tissues under hypoxic conditions, including that of tumors. Because the levels of both HIF-1 and adenosine are elevated within the hypoxic environment of solid tumors, we investigated whether adenosine may regulate HIF-1. Here we show that, under hypoxic conditions (< 2% O2), adenosine upregulates HIF-1α protein expression in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner, exclusively through the A3 receptor subtype. The response to adenosine was generated at the cell surface because the inhibition of A3 receptor expression, by using small interfering RNA, abolished nucleoside effects. A3 receptor stimulation in hypoxia also increases angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) protein accumulation through the induction of HIF-1α. In particular, we found that A3 receptor stimulation activates p44/p42 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases, which are required for A3-induced increase of HIF-1α and Ang-2. Collectively, these results suggest a cooperation between hypoxic and adenosine signals that ultimately may lead to the increase in HIF-1-mediated effects in cancer cells. PMID:16242072

  9. Impact on monoclonal antibody production in murine hybridoma cell cultures of adenosine receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kelso, Geoffrey F; Kazi, Shahid A; Harris, Simon J; Boysen, Reinhard I; Chowdhury, Jamil; Hearn, Milton T W

    2016-01-15

    The effects of different adenosine receptor antagonists and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors on monoclonal antibody (mAb) titer and cell viability of murine hybridoma cells in culture were measured as part of our investigations to discover additives that enhance mAb production. Specific adenosine receptor antagonists and PDE inhibitors were found to enhance or decrease the titer of immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) mAbs relative to negative controls, depending on the specific compound and cell line employed. The observed enhancements or decreases in IgG1 mAb titer appeared to be mainly due to an increase or decrease in specific productivity rates (ngmAb/cell), respectively. The different effects of the selective adenosine antagonists suggest that antagonism at the level of the adenosine A2A and A1 or the adenosine A3 receptors result in either enhancement or suppression of IgG1 mAb production by hybridoma cells. Overall, these studies have identified hitherto unknown activities of specific adenosine antagonists and PDE inhibitors which indicate they may have valuable roles as cell culture additives in industrial biomanufacturing processes designed to enhance the yields of mAbs or other recombinant proteins produced by mammalian cell culture procedures.

  10. Role of adenosine in oligodendrocyte precursor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Coppi, Elisabetta; Cellai, Lucrezia; Maraula, Giovanna; Dettori, Ilaria; Melani, Alessia; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Pedata, Felicita

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation and maturation of oligodendroglial cells are postnatal processes that involve specific morphological changes correlated with the expression of stage-specific surface antigens and functional voltage-gated ion channels. A small fraction of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) generated during development are maintained in an immature and slowly proliferative or quiescent state in the adult central nervous system (CNS) representing an endogenous reservoir of immature cells. Adenosine receptors are expressed by OPCs and a key role of adenosine in oligodendrocyte maturation has been recently recognized. As evaluated on OPC cultures, adenosine, by stimulating A1 receptors, promotes oligodendrocyte maturation and inhibits their proliferation; on the contrary, by stimulating A2A receptors, it inhibits oligodendrocyte maturation. A1 and A2A receptor-mediated effects are related to opposite modifications of outward delayed rectifying membrane K+ currents (IK) that are involved in the regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation. Brain A1 and A2A receptors might represent new molecular targets for drugs useful in demyelinating pathologies, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), stroke and brain trauma. PMID:25964740

  11. The mechanisms of citrate on regulating the distribution of carbon flux in the biosynthesis of uridine 5'-monophosphate by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Li, Shuya; Xiong, Jian; Li, Zhenjiang; Bai, Jianxin; Zhang, Lei; Ye, Qi; Ouyang, Pingkai; Ying, Hanjie

    2010-03-01

    A whole cell biocatalytic process for uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) production from orotic acid by Saccharomyces cerevisiae was developed. The concentration of UMP was increased by 23% when 1 g l(-1) sodium citrate was fed into the broth. Effects of citrate addition on UMP production were investigated. Glucose-6-phosphate pool was elevated by onefold, while FBP and pyruvate were decreased by 42% and 40%, respectively. Organic acid pools such as acetate and succinate were averagely decreased by 30% and 49%. The results demonstrated that manipulation of citrate levels could be used as a novel tool to regulate the metabolic fluxes distribution among glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and TCA cycle.

  12. Effects of adenosine perfusion on the metabolism and contractile activity of Rana ridibunda heart.

    PubMed

    Lazou, A; Beis, I

    1987-01-01

    The effects of adenosine were examined on the isolated perfused heart of the frog Rana ridibunda. Adenosine produced negative chronotropic and inotropic effects on frog ventricle in a concentration-dependent manner. The effects of adenosine on cardiac metabolism were also investigated by measuring the tissue content of adenine nucleotides, lactate, pyruvate, adenosine and inorganic phosphate, during adenosine perfusion. Adenosine had no effect on the tissue content of metabolites. No net synthesis of adenine nucleotides was observed during perfusion with increasing concentrations of adenosine. Lactate output from the heart decreased significantly with adenosine perfusion. Correlation of adenosine effects on cardiac muscle with the effects of hypoxia are discussed.

  13. Role of renal medullary adenosine in the control of blood flow and sodium excretion.

    PubMed

    Zou, A P; Nithipatikom, K; Li, P L; Cowley, A W

    1999-03-01

    This study determined the levels of adenosine in the renal medullary interstitium using microdialysis and fluorescence HPLC techniques and examined the role of endogenous adenosine in the control of medullary blood flow and sodium excretion by infusing the specific adenosine receptor antagonists or agonists into the renal medulla of anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Renal cortical and medullary blood flows were measured using laser-Doppler flowmetry. Analysis of microdialyzed samples showed that the adenosine concentration in the renal medullary interstitial dialysate averaged 212 +/- 5.2 nM, which was significantly higher than 55.6 +/- 5.3 nM in the renal cortex (n = 9). Renal medullary interstitial infusion of a selective A1 antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; 300 pmol. kg-1. min-1, n = 8), did not alter renal blood flows, but increased urine flow by 37% and sodium excretion by 42%. In contrast, renal medullary infusion of the selective A2 receptor blocker 3, 7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX; 150 pmol. kg-1. min-1, n = 9) decreased outer medullary blood flow (OMBF) by 28%, inner medullary blood flows (IMBF) by 21%, and sodium excretion by 35%. Renal medullary interstitial infusion of adenosine produced a dose-dependent increase in OMBF, IMBF, urine flow, and sodium excretion at doses from 3 to 300 pmol. kg-1. min-1 (n = 7). These effects of adenosine were markedly attenuated by the pretreatment of DMPX, but unaltered by DPCPX. Infusion of a selective A3 receptor agonist, N6-benzyl-5'-(N-ethylcarbonxamido)adenosine (300 pmol. kg-1. min-1, n = 6) into the renal medulla had no effect on medullary blood flows or renal function. Glomerular filtration rate and arterial pressure were not changed by medullary infusion of any drugs. Our results indicate that endogenous medullary adenosine at physiological concentrations serves to dilate medullary vessels via A2 receptors, resulting in a natriuretic response that overrides the tubular A1 receptor

  14. Altered Hypoxic-Adenosine Axis and Metabolism in Group III Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morales, Luis J; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Weng, Tingting; Luo, Fayong; Davies, Jonathan; Philip, Kemly; Volcik, Kelly A; Melicoff, Ernestina; Amione-Guerra, Javier; Bunge, Raquel R; Bruckner, Brian A; Loebe, Matthias; Eltzschig, Holger K; Pandit, Lavannya M; Blackburn, Michael R; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Group III pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a highly prevalent and deadly lung disorder with limited treatment options other than transplantation. Group III PH affects patients with ongoing chronic lung injury, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Between 30 and 40% of patients with IPF are diagnosed with PH. The diagnosis of PH has devastating consequences to these patients, leading to increased morbidity and mortality, yet the molecular mechanisms involved in the development of PH in patients with chronic lung disease remain elusive. Our hypothesis was that the hypoxic-adenosinergic system is enhanced in patients with group III PH compared with patients with IPF with no PH. Explanted lung tissue was analyzed for markers of the hypoxic-adenosine axis, including expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1A, adenosine A2B receptor, CD73, and equilibrative nucleotide transporter-1. In addition, we assessed whether altered mitochondrial metabolism was present in these samples. Increased expression of HIF-1A was observed in tissues from patients with group III PH. These changes were consistent with increased evidence of adenosine accumulation in group III PH. A novel observation of our study was of evidence suggesting altered mitochondrial metabolism in lung tissue from group III PH leading to increased succinate levels that are able to further stabilize HIF-1A. Our data demonstrate that the hypoxic-adenosine axis is up-regulated in group III PH and that subsequent succinate accumulation may play a part in the development of group III PH.

  15. Adenosine and inflammation: what's new on the horizon?

    PubMed

    Antonioli, Luca; Csóka, Balázs; Fornai, Matteo; Colucci, Rocchina; Kókai, Endre; Blandizzi, Corrado; Haskó, György

    2014-08-01

    Adenosine contributes to the maintenance of tissue integrity by modulating the immune system. Encouraging results have emerged with adenosine receptor ligands for the management of several inflammatory conditions in preclinical and clinical settings. However, therapeutic applications of these drugs are sometimes complicated by the occurrence of serious adverse effects. The scientific community is making intensive efforts to design novel adenosine receptor ligands endowed with greater selectivity or to develop innovative compounds acting as allosteric receptor modulators. In parallel, research is focusing on novel pharmacological entities (designated as adenosine-regulating agents) that can increase, in a site- and event-specific manner, adenosine concentrations at the inflammatory site, thereby minimizing the adverse systemic effects of adenosine.

  16. Rhodium Complex and Enzyme Couple Mediated Electrochemical Detection of Adenosine.

    PubMed

    Han, Dawoon; Kim, Hyeong-Mook; Chand, Rohit; Kim, Gyumin; Shin, Ik-Soo; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2015-10-01

    Adenosine is one of the nucleoside which plays an important role in signal transduction and neuromodulation. This work proposes a simple electrochemical assay, comprising two enzymes and rhodium complex based electron transfer mediator, for the detection of adenosine. Sequential reaction of adenosine deaminase and L-glutamic dehydrogenase and the supporting cycle between β-NADH and mediator enable quantitative analysis of adenosine. Role of electron transfer mediator is the conveyance of proton from electrode to β-NAD(+) for regeneration of β-NADH. The electrochemical characteristics of electron transfer mediator were also studied. Real-time adenosine detection was carried out using this multiple enzyme based chronoamperometric assay. The analysis results show a low limit of detection (140 μM) and good correspondence between current signal and the adenosine concentration (R (2) = 0.997).

  17. N6-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-Adenosine Exhibits Insecticidal Activity against Plutella xylostella via Adenosine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ming; Chai, Yiqiu; Chen, Guanjv; Wang, Huidong; Huang, Bo

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, is one of the most important pests of cruciferous crops. We have earlier shown that N6-(2-hydroxyethyl)-adenosine (HEA) exhibits insecticidal activity against P. xylostella. In the present study we investigated the possible mechanism of insecticidal action of HEA on P. xylostella. HEA is a derivative of adenosine, therefore, we speculated whether it acts via P. xylostella adenosine receptor (PxAdoR). We used RNAi approach to silence PxAdoR gene and used antagonist of denosine receptor (AdoR) to study the insecticidal effect of HEA. We cloned the whole sequence of PxAdoR gene. A BLAST search using NCBI protein database showed a 61% identity with the Drosophila adenosine receptor (DmAdoR) and a 32-35% identity with human AdoR. Though the amino acids sequence of PxAdoR was different compared to other adenosine receptors, most of the amino acids that are known to be important for adenosine receptor ligand binding and signaling were present. However, only 30% binding sites key residues was similar between PxAdoR and A1R. HEA, at a dose of 1 mg/mL, was found to be lethal to the second-instar larvae of P. xylostella, and a significant reduction of mortality and growth inhibition ratio were obtained when HEA was administered to the larvae along with PxAdoR-dsRNA or antagonist of AdoR (SCH58261) for 36, 48, or 60 h. Especially at 48 h, the rate of growth inhibition of the PxAdoR knockdown group was 3.5-fold less than that of the HEA group, and the corrected mortality of SCH58261 group was reduced almost 2-fold compared with the HEA group. Our findings show that HEA may exert its insecticidal activity against P. xylostella larvae via acting on PxAdoR.

  18. N6-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-Adenosine Exhibits Insecticidal Activity against Plutella xylostella via Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ming; Chai, Yiqiu; Chen, Guanjv; Wang, Huidong; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, is one of the most important pests of cruciferous crops. We have earlier shown that N6-(2-hydroxyethyl)-adenosine (HEA) exhibits insecticidal activity against P. xylostella. In the present study we investigated the possible mechanism of insecticidal action of HEA on P. xylostella. HEA is a derivative of adenosine, therefore, we speculated whether it acts via P. xylostella adenosine receptor (PxAdoR). We used RNAi approach to silence PxAdoR gene and used antagonist of denosine receptor (AdoR) to study the insecticidal effect of HEA. We cloned the whole sequence of PxAdoR gene. A BLAST search using NCBI protein database showed a 61% identity with the Drosophila adenosine receptor (DmAdoR) and a 32–35% identity with human AdoR. Though the amino acids sequence of PxAdoR was different compared to other adenosine receptors, most of the amino acids that are known to be important for adenosine receptor ligand binding and signaling were present. However, only 30% binding sites key residues was similar between PxAdoR and A1R. HEA, at a dose of 1 mg/mL, was found to be lethal to the second-instar larvae of P. xylostella, and a significant reduction of mortality and growth inhibition ratio were obtained when HEA was administered to the larvae along with PxAdoR-dsRNA or antagonist of AdoR (SCH58261) for 36, 48, or 60 h. Especially at 48 h, the rate of growth inhibition of the PxAdoR knockdown group was 3.5-fold less than that of the HEA group, and the corrected mortality of SCH58261 group was reduced almost 2-fold compared with the HEA group. Our findings show that HEA may exert its insecticidal activity against P. xylostella larvae via acting on PxAdoR. PMID:27668428

  19. Insulin Restores Gestational Diabetes Mellitus–Reduced Adenosine Transport Involving Differential Expression of Insulin Receptor Isoforms in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Westermeier, Francisco; Salomón, Carlos; González, Marcelo; Puebla, Carlos; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Cifuentes, Fredi; Leiva, Andrea; Casanello, Paola; Sobrevia, Luis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether insulin reverses gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)–reduced expression and activity of human equilibrative nucleoside transporters 1 (hENT1) in human umbilical vein endothelium cells (HUVECs). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Primary cultured HUVECs from full-term normal (n = 44) and diet-treated GDM (n = 44) pregnancies were used. Insulin effect was assayed on hENT1 expression (protein, mRNA, SLC29A1 promoter activity) and activity (initial rates of adenosine transport) as well as endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity (serine1177 phosphorylation, l-citrulline formation). Adenosine concentration in culture medium and umbilical vein blood (high-performance liquid chromatography) as well as insulin receptor A and B expression (quantitative PCR) were determined. Reactivity of umbilical vein rings to adenosine and insulin was assayed by wire myography. Experiments were in the absence or presence of l-NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; NO synthase inhibitor) or ZM-241385 (an A2A-adenosine receptor antagonist). RESULTS Umbilical vein blood adenosine concentration was higher, and the adenosine- and insulin-induced NO/endothelium-dependent umbilical vein relaxation was lower in GDM. Cells from GDM exhibited increased insulin receptor A isoform expression in addition to the reported NO–dependent inhibition of hENT1-adenosine transport and SLC29A1 reporter repression, and increased extracellular concentration of adenosine and NO synthase activity. Insulin reversed all these parameters to values in normal pregnancies, an effect blocked by ZM-241385 and l-NAME. CONCLUSIONS GDM and normal pregnancy HUVEC phenotypes are differentially responsive to insulin, a phenomenon where insulin acts as protecting factor for endothelial dysfunction characteristic of this syndrome. Abnormal adenosine plasma levels, and potentially A2A-adenosine receptors and insulin receptor A, will play crucial roles in this phenomenon in GDM. PMID:21515851

  20. Polymerization of actin in RBL-2H3 cells can be triggered through either the IgE receptor or the adenosine receptor but different signaling pathways are used.

    PubMed Central

    Apgar, J R

    1994-01-01

    Crosslinking of the IgE receptor on rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells using the multivalent antigen DNP-BSA leads to a rapid and sustained increase in the filamentous actin content of the cells. Stimulation of RBL cells through the adenosine receptor also induces a very rapid polymerization of actin, which peaks in 45-60 s and is equivalent in magnitude to the F-actin response elicited through stimulation of the IgE receptor. However, in contrast to the IgE mediated response, which remains elevated for over 30 min, the F-actin increase induced by the adenosine analogue 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)-adenosine (NECA) is relatively transient and returns to baseline values within 5-10 min. While previous work has shown that the polymerization of actin in RBL cells stimulated through the IgE receptor is mediated by protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase inhibitors have no effect on the F-actin response activated through the adenosine receptor. In contrast, pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin completely inhibits the F-actin response to NECA but has relatively little effect on the response induced through the IgE receptor. Stimulation of RBL cells through either receptor causes increased production of phosphatidylinositol mono-phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bis-phosphate (PIP2), which correlates with the F-actin response. Production of PIP and PIP2 may be important downstream signals since these polyphosphoinositides are able to regulate the interaction of gelsolin and profilin with actin. Thus the polymerization of actin can be triggered through either the adenosine receptor or the IgE receptor, but different upstream signaling pathways are being used. The IgE mediated response requires the activation of PKC while stimulation through the adenosine receptor is PKC independent but involves a G protein. PMID:8049523

  1. Extracellular adenosine 5’-triphosphate concentrations changes in rat spinal cord associated with the activation of urinary bladder afferents. A microdialysis study

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Jeová Nina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine adenosine 5’-triphosphate levels in the interstice of spinal cord L6-S1 segment, under basal conditions or during mechanical and chemical activation of urinary bladder afferents. Methods A microdialysis probe was transversally implanted in the dorsal half of spinal cord L6-S1 segment in female rats. Microdialysate was collected at 15 minutes intervals during 135 minutes, in anesthetized animals. Adenosine 5’-triphosphate concentrations were determined with a bioluminescent assay. In one group of animals (n=7) microdialysate samples were obtained with an empty bladder during a 10-minutes bladder distension to 20 or 40cmH2O with either saline, saline with acetic acid or saline with capsaicin. In another group of animals (n=6) bladder distention was performed and the microdialysis solution contained the ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL 67156. Results Basal extracellular adenosine triphosphate levels were 110.9±35.34fmol/15 minutes, (mean±SEM, n=13), and bladder distention was associated with a significant increase in adenosine 5’-triphosphate levels which was not observed after bladder distention with saline solution containing capsaicin (10µM). Microdialysis with solution containing ARL 67156 (1mM) was associated with significantly higher extracellular adenosine 5’-triphosphate levels and no further increase in adenosine 5’-triphosphate was observed during bladder distension. Conclusion Adenosine 5’-triphosphate was present in the interstice of L6-S1 spinal cord segments, was degraded by ectonucleotidase, and its concentration increased following the activation of bladder mechanosensitive but not of the chemosensitive afferents fibers. Adenosine 5’-triphosphate may originate either from the central endings of bladder mechanosensitive primary afferent neurons, or most likely from intrinsic spinal neurons, or glial cells and its release appears to be modulated by capsaicin activated bladder primary afferent or by adenosine

  2. Adrenocorticotropin and adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate stimulate de novo synthesis of adrenal phosphatidic acid by a cycloheximide-sensitive, CA++-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Farese, R.V.; Sabir, M.A.; Larson, R.E.

    1981-12-01

    We tested further our postulate that enhanced de novo synthesis of phosphatidic acid is responsible for ACTH- and cAMP-induced increases in adrenal phospholipids in the phosphatidate polyphosphoinositide pathway. During incubation of adrenal sections or cells in vitro, ACTH and cAMP increased the concentrations of and incorporation of (3H)glycerol and (14C)palmitate into phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, two major phospholipids which are derived from phosphatidic acid, but are extrinsic to the inositide pathway. Thus, it is unlikely that ACTH and cAMP increase inositide phospholipids at the expense of other phospholipids. Similar to previously reported effects on phosphatidic acid and inositide phospholipids, cycloheximide blocked the effects of ACTH and cAMP on phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. In addition, Ca++ was required for these effects, as well as for cAMP-induced increases in phosphatidic acid, inositide phospholipids, and steroidogenesis. Our findings strongly suggest that ACTH, via cAMP, stimulates de novo phosphatidate synthesis by a cycloheximide-sensitive, Ca++-dependent process, and this stimulation causes a rapid generalized increase in adrenal phospholipids. Moreover, the increased incorporation of labeled glycerol and palmitate into phospholipids suggests that ACTH and cAMP may stimulate the glycerol-3'-PO4 acyltransferase reaction. This stimulatory effect may play a central role in the steroidogenic and trophic actions of ACTH and cAMP.

  3. Conservation and divergence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP–PKA) pathway in two plant-pathogenic fungi: Fusarium graminearum and F. verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-PKA pathway is a central signaling cascade that transmits extracellular stimuli and governs cell responses through the second messenger cAMP. The importance of cAMP signaling in fungal biology has been well documented. Two key conserved components, adenylate cyclase (AC) and ca...

  4. Glial Restricted Precursor Cell Transplant with Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Improved Some Autonomic Functions but Resulted in a Reduced Graft Size after Spinal Cord Contusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nout, Yvette S.; Culp, Esther; Schmidt, Markus H.; Tovar, C. Amy; Pröschel, Christoph; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot; Noble, Mark D.; Beattie, Michael S.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.

    2010-01-01

    Transplantation of glial restricted precursor (GRP) cells has been shown to reduce glial scarring after spinal cord injury (SCI) and, in combination with neuronal restricted precursor (NRP) cells or enhanced expression of neurotrophins, to improve recovery of function after SCI. We hypothesized that combining GRP transplants with rolipram and cAMP would improve functional recovery, similar to that seen after combining Schwann cell transplants with increasing cAMP. A short term study, 1)uninjured control, 2)SCI+vehicle, and 3)SCI+cAMP, showed that spinal cord [cAMP] were increased 14 days after SCI. We used 51 male rats subjected to a thoracic SCI for a 12-week survival study: 1)SCI+vehicle, 2)SCI+GRP, 3)SCI+cAMP, 4)SCI+GRP+cAMP, and 5)uninjured endpoint age-matched control (AM). Rolipram was administered for 2 weeks after SCI. At 9 days after SCI, GRP transplantation and injection of dibutyryl-cAMP into the spinal cord were performed. GRP cells survived, differentiated, and formed extensive transplants that were well integrated with host tissue. Presence of GRP cells increased the amount of tissue in the lesion; however, cAMP reduced the graft size. White matter sparing at the lesion epicenter was not affected. Serotonergic input to the lumbosacral spinal cord was not affected by treatment, but the amount of serotonin immediately caudal to the lesion was reduced in the cAMP groups. Using telemetric monitoring of corpus spongiosum penis pressure we show that the cAMP groups regained the same number of micturitions per 24 hrs when compared to the AM group, however, the frequency of peak pressures was increased in these groups compared to the AM group. In contrast, the GRP groups had similar frequency of peak pressures compared to baseline and the AM group. Animals that received GRP cells regained the same number of erectile events per 24 hrs compared to baseline and the AM group. Since cAMP reduced the GRP transplant graft, and some modest positive effects were seen that could be attributable to both GRP or cAMP, future research is required to determine how cAMP affects survival, proliferation, and / or function of progenitor cells and how this is related to function. cAMP may not always be a desirable addition to a progenitor cell transplantation strategy after SCI. PMID:21040723

  5. Specific inhibition by prostaglandins E2 and I2 of histamine-stimulated [14C]aminopyrine accumulation and cyclic adenosine monophosphate generation by isolated canine parietal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Soll, A H

    1980-01-01

    The effects of prostaglandins E2 and I2 on accumulation of [14C]aminopyrine and the generation of cyclic AMP by fractions of dispersed canine gastric mucosal cells, enriched in their content of parietal cells, have been studied. The parietal cell content of the fractions was enriched to between 43 and 70% using an elutriator rotor. The accumulation of [14C]aminopyrine was used as the index of parietal cell response to stimulation. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 0.1 nM-0.1 mM) inhibited histamine stimulated aminopyrine uptake but did not block the response to carbachol, gastrin, or dibuturyl cyclic AMP. PGE2 did, however, inhibit aminopyrine uptake stimulated by carbachol and gastrin when the response to these agents was potentiated by histamine. PGE2 (0.1 NM-0.1 mM) inhibited histamine-stimulated cyclic AMP production in a dose-dependent fashion with maximal inhibition at 1 microM PGE2. Prostacyclin also inhibited both histamine-stimulated aminopyrine accumulation and histamine-stimulated cyclic AMP production. In the absence of added histamine, PGE2 in concentrations above 1 microM and prostacyclin in concentrations above 10 microM stimulated cyclic AMP production, probably by acting on the nonparietal cells as shown in previous studies. These present data are consistent with the hypothesis that prostaglandins E2 and I2 inhibit the response of isolated parietal cells to histamine by specifically blocking histamine-stimulated cyclic AMP production. PMID:6154063

  6. Adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK), a mediator of estradiol-induced apoptosis in long-term estrogen deprived breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyan; Wang, Ji-Ping; Santen, Richard J; Yue, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Estrogens stimulate growth of hormone-dependent breast cancer but paradoxically induce tumor regress under certain circumstances. We have shown that long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED) enhances the sensitivity of hormone dependent breast cancer cells to estradiol (E2) so that physiological concentrations of estradiol induce apoptosis in these cells. E2-induced apoptosis involve both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways but precise mechanisms remain unclear. We found that exposure of LTED MCF-7 cells to E2 activated AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK). In contrast, E2 inhibited AMPK activation in wild type MCF-7 cells where E2 prevents apoptosis. As a result of AMPK activation, the transcriptional activity of FoxO3, a downstream factor of AMPK, was up-regulated in E2 treatment of LTED. Increased activity of FoxO3 was demonstrated by up-regulation of three FoxO3 target genes, Bim, Fas ligand (FasL), and Gadd45α. Among them, Bim and FasL mediate intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis respectively and Gadd45α causes cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. To further confirm the role of AMPK in apoptosis, we used AMPK activator AICAR in wild type MCF-7 cells and examined apoptosis, proliferation and expression of Bim, FasL, and Gadd45α. The effects of AICAR on these parameters recapitulated those observed in E2-treated LTED cells. Activation of AMPK by AICAR also increased expression of Bax in MCF-7 cells and its localization to mitochondria, which is a required process for apoptosis. These results reveal that AMPK is an important factor mediating E2-induced apoptosis in LTED cells, which is implicative of therapeutic potential for relapsing breast cancer after hormone therapy.

  7. Dual specificity and novel structural folding of yeast phosphodiesterase-1 for hydrolysis of second messengers cyclic adenosine and guanosine 3',5'-Monophosphate

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Yuanyuan; Cui, Wenjun; Huang, Manna; ...

    2014-08-05

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) decompose second messengers cAMP and cGMP that play critical roles in many physiological processes. PDE1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant yPDE1 has a KM of 110 μM and a kcat of 16.9 s⁻¹ for cAMP and a KM of 105 μM and a kcat of 11.8 s₅⁻¹ for cGMP. Thus, the specificity constant (kcat/KMcAMP)/(kcat/KMcGMP) of 1.4 indicates a dual specificity of yPDE1 for hydrolysis of both cAMP and cGMP. The crystal structures of unliganded yPDE1 and its complex with GMP at 1.31 Å resolution reveal a new structural foldingmore » that is different from those of human PDEs but is partially similar to that of some other metalloenzymes such as metallo-β-lactamase. In spite of their different structures and divalent metals, yPDE1 and human PDEs may share a common mechanism for hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP.« less

  8. Dual Specificity and Novel Structural Folding of Yeast Phosphodiesterase-1 for Hydrolysis of Second Messengers Cyclic Adenosine and Guanosine 3′,5′-Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) decompose second messengers cAMP and cGMP that play critical roles in many physiological processes. PDE1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant yPDE1 has a KM of 110 μM and a kcat of 16.9 s–1 for cAMP and a KM of 105 μM and a kcat of 11.8 s–1 for cGMP. Thus, the specificity constant (kcat/KMcAMP)/(kcat/KMcGMP) of 1.4 indicates a dual specificity of yPDE1 for hydrolysis of both cAMP and cGMP. The crystal structures of unliganded yPDE1 and its complex with GMP at 1.31 Å resolution reveal a new structural folding that is different from those of human PDEs but is partially similar to that of some other metalloenzymes such as metallo-β-lactamase. In spite of their different structures and divalent metals, yPDE1 and human PDEs may share a common mechanism for hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP. PMID:25050706

  9. Glial restricted precursor cell transplant with cyclic adenosine monophosphate improved some autonomic functions but resulted in a reduced graft size after spinal cord contusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Nout, Yvette S; Culp, Esther; Schmidt, Markus H; Tovar, C Amy; Pröschel, Christoph; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot; Noble, Mark D; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of glial restricted precursor (GRP) cells has been shown to reduce glial scarring after spinal cord injury (SCI) and, in combination with neuronal restricted precursor (NRP) cells or enhanced expression of neurotrophins, to improve recovery of function after SCI. We hypothesized that combining GRP transplants with rolipram and cAMP would improve functional recovery, similar to that seen after combining Schwann cell transplants with increasing cAMP. A short term study, (1) uninjured control, (2) SCI+vehicle, and (3) SCI+cAMP, showed that spinal cord [cAMP] was increased 14days after SCI. We used 51 male rats subjected to a thoracic SCI for a 12-week survival study: (1) SCI+vehicle, (2) SCI+GRP, (3) SCI+cAMP, (4) SCI+GRP+cAMP, and (5) uninjured endpoint age-matched control (AM). Rolipram was administered for 2weeks after SCI. At 9days after SCI, GRP transplantation and injection of dibutyryl-cAMP into the spinal cord were performed. GRP cells survived, differentiated, and formed extensive transplants that were well integrated with host tissue. Presence of GRP cells increased the amount of tissue in the lesion; however, cAMP reduced the graft size. White matter sparing at the lesion epicenter was not affected. Serotonergic input to the lumbosacral spinal cord was not affected by treatment, but the amount of serotonin immediately caudal to the lesion was reduced in the cAMP groups. Using telemetric monitoring of corpus spongiosum penis pressure we show that the cAMP groups regained the same number of micturitions per 24hours when compared to the AM group, however, the frequency of peak pressures was increased in these groups compared to the AM group. In contrast, the GRP groups had similar frequency of peak pressures compared to baseline and the AM group. Animals that received GRP cells regained the same number of erectile events per 24hours compared to baseline and the AM group. Since cAMP reduced the GRP transplant graft, and some modest positive effects were seen that could be attributable to both GRP or cAMP, future research is required to determine how cAMP affects survival, proliferation, and/or function of progenitor cells and how this is related to function. cAMP may not always be a desirable addition to a progenitor cell transplantation strategy after SCI.

  10. Prognostic value of coexistence of abnormal expression of micro-RNA-200b and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element-binding protein 1 in human astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-qing; Yao, Qing-he; Kuang, Yong-qin; Ma, Yuan; Yang, Li-bin; Huang, Hai-dong; Cheng, Jing-ming; Yang, Tao; Liu, En-yu; Liang, Liang; Fan, Ke-xia; Zhao, Kai; Xia, Xun; Gu, Jian-wen

    2014-10-01

    Our aim was to investigate the expression of micro-RNA-200b (miR-200b) and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 1 (CREB-1) in astrocytoma and its efficacy for predicting outcome. Both miR-200b and CREB-1 messenger RNA expression was measured in 122 astrocytomas and 30 nonneoplastic brain specimens by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Expression of miR-200b was significantly lower in astrocytoma than in nonneoplastic brain (P < .001), whereas CREB-1 messenger RNA expression was significantly elevated in the tumors (P < .001). Both miR-200b down-regulation and CREB-1 up-regulation were significantly associated with advanced pathologic grade (P = .002 and P = .006, respectively). Low miR-200b expression correlated negatively with Karnofsky performance score (P = .03), and high CREB-1 expression correlated positively with mean tumor diameter (P = .03). By Kaplan-Meier analysis, low miR-200b, high CREB-1, and coexistence of abnormal miR-200b and CREB-1 expression (low miR-200b/high CREB-1) were predictive of shorter progression-free survival and overall survival in both grade III and grade IV astrocytoma. By multivariate analysis, only low miR-200b/high CREB-1 expression was an independent prognostic factor for poor prognosis in astrocytoma of advanced grade. Both miR-200b and CREB-1 may play important cooperative roles in the progression of human astrocytoma. The efficacy of miR-200b and CREB-1 together as a predictor of prognosis in astrocytoma patients is shown for the first time.

  11. Cardioprotection with adenosine: 'a riddle wrapped in a mystery'.

    PubMed

    Przyklenk, Karin; Whittaker, Peter

    2005-07-01

    Review of the published literature on adenosine and cardioprotection could lead one to paraphrase the famous words of Sir Winston Churchill (Radio broadcast, 1 October 1939 (in reference to Russia)) and conclude: 'I cannot forecast to you the action of adenosine. It is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma'. That is, although it is well-established that adenosine can render cardiomyocytes resistant to lethal ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury, new and intriguing insights continue to emerge as to the mechanisms by which adenosine might limit myocardial infarct size.

  12. A Metabolic Immune Checkpoint: Adenosine in Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Within tumors, some areas are less oxygenated than others. Since their home ground is under chronic hypoxia, tumor cells adapt to this condition by activating aerobic glycolysis; however, this hypoxic environment is very harsh for incoming immune cells. Deprivation of oxygen limits availability of energy sources and induces accumulation of extracellular adenosine in tumors. Extracellular adenosine, upon binding with adenosine receptors on the surface of various immune cells, suppresses pro-inflammatory activities. In addition, signaling through adenosine receptors upregulates a number of anti-inflammatory molecules and immunoregulatory cells, leading to the establishment of a long-lasting immunosuppressive environment. Thus, due to hypoxia and adenosine, tumors can discourage antitumor immune responses no matter how the response was induced, whether it was spontaneous or artificially introduced with a therapeutic intention. Preclinical studies have shown the significance of adenosine in tumor survival strategy by demonstrating tumor regression after inactivation of adenosine receptors, inhibition of adenosine-producing enzymes, or reversal of tissue hypoxia. These promising results indicate a potential use of the inhibitors of the hypoxia–adenosine pathway for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27066002

  13. Novel Characteristics of Trypanosoma brucei Guanosine 5'-monophosphate Reductase Distinct from Host Animals

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Chihiro; Shinohara, Takahiro; Tomiyama, Ai; Imamura, Akira; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Kazuhiko; Fujimori, Ko; Shuto, Satoshi; Ishibashi, Osamu; Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Inui, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic pathway of purine nucleotides in parasitic protozoa is a potent drug target for treatment of parasitemia. Guanosine 5’-monophosphate reductase (GMPR), which catalyzes the deamination of guanosine 5’-monophosphate (GMP) to inosine 5’-monophosphate (IMP), plays an important role in the interconversion of purine nucleotides to maintain the intracellular balance of their concentration. However, only a few studies on protozoan GMPR have been reported at present. Herein, we identified the GMPR in Trypanosoma brucei, a causative protozoan parasite of African trypanosomiasis, and found that the GMPR proteins were consistently localized to glycosomes in T. brucei bloodstream forms. We characterized its recombinant protein to investigate the enzymatic differences between GMPRs of T. brucei and its host animals. T. brucei GMPR was distinct in having an insertion of a tandem repeat of the cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domain, which was absent in mammalian and bacterial GMPRs. The recombinant protein of T. brucei GMPR catalyzed the conversion of GMP to IMP in the presence of NADPH, and showed apparent affinities for both GMP and NADPH different from those of its mammalian counterparts. Interestingly, the addition of monovalent cations such as K+ and NH4+ to the enzymatic reaction increased the GMPR activity of T. brucei, whereas none of the mammalian GMPR’s was affected by these cations. The monophosphate form of the purine nucleoside analog ribavirin inhibited T. brucei GMPR activity, though mammalian GMPRs showed no or only a little inhibition by it. These results suggest that the mechanism of the GMPR reaction in T. brucei is distinct from that in the host organisms. Finally, we demonstrated the inhibitory effect of ribavirin on the proliferation of trypanosomes in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting the availability of ribavirin to develop a new therapeutic agent against African trypanosomiasis. PMID:26731263

  14. Day-night variations of adenosine and its metabolizing enzymes in the brain cortex of the rat--possible physiological significance for the energetic homeostasis and the sleep-wake cycle.

    PubMed

    Chagoya de Sánchez, V; Hernández Múñoz, R; Suárez, J; Vidrio, S; Yáñez, L; Díaz Múñoz, M

    1993-05-28

    The role of adenosine as a metabolic regulator of physiological processes in the brain was studied by measuring its concentrations and the activity of adenosine-metabolizing enzymes: 5'-nucleotidase, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase, adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase in the cerebral cortex of the rat. Other purine compounds, such as, inosine, hypoxanthine and adenine nucleotides were also studied. The purines' pattern was bimodal with high levels of adenosine, inosine and hypoxanthine during the light period reaching their peak at 12.00 h, 08.00 h and 16.00 h, respectively, and small increments during the night between 02.00 h and 04.00 h. The enzymatic activities showed, in general, an unimodal profile with low activity during the day and high activities at night. The adenine nucleotide profile showed a significant diminution between 12.00 h and 24.00 h. The high adenosine level during the day might be due to a diminution of adenine nucleotide and to the low activity of adenosine-metabolizing enzymes, suggesting an accumulation of the nucleoside. The night increase, although of less magnitude, is simultaneous to high activity of adenosine-metabolizing enzymes and could be due to an increased formation of the nucleoside. The present data and the findings from other authors strongly suggest that adenosine in the brain cortex of the rat can participate at least in two physiological processes: regulation of the sleep-wake cycle and replenishment of the adenine nucleotide pool.

  15. Recipient pretransplant inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Meagan J; Risler, Linda J; Phillips, Brian R; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S; Boeckh, Michael J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5'-monophosphate to xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, nonrelapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient's pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient's sensitivity to MMF. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients.

  16. Elevated adenosine signaling via adenosine A2B receptor induces normal and sickle erythrocyte sphingosine kinase 1 activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kaiqi; Zhang, Yujin; Bogdanov, Mikhail V; Wu, Hongyu; Song, Anren; Li, Jessica; Dowhan, William; Idowu, Modupe; Juneja, Harinder S; Molina, Jose G; Blackburn, Michael R; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2015-03-05

    Erythrocyte possesses high sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) activity and is the major cell type supplying plasma sphingosine-1-phosphate, a signaling lipid regulating multiple physiological and pathological functions. Recent studies revealed that erythrocyte SphK1 activity is upregulated in sickle cell disease (SCD) and contributes to sickling and disease progression. However, how erythrocyte SphK1 activity is regulated remains unknown. Here we report that adenosine induces SphK1 activity in human and mouse sickle and normal erythrocytes in vitro. Next, using 4 adenosine receptor-deficient mice and pharmacological approaches, we determined that the A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) is essential for adenosine-induced SphK1 activity in human and mouse normal and sickle erythrocytes in vitro. Subsequently, we provide in vivo genetic evidence that adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency leads to excess plasma adenosine and elevated erythrocyte SphK1 activity. Lowering adenosine by ADA enzyme therapy or genetic deletion of ADORA2B significantly reduced excess adenosine-induced erythrocyte SphK1 activity in ADA-deficient mice. Finally, we revealed that protein kinase A-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation functioning downstream of ADORA2B underlies adenosine-induced erythrocyte SphK1 activity. Overall, our findings reveal a novel signaling network regulating erythrocyte SphK1 and highlight innovative mechanisms regulating SphK1 activity in normal and SCD.

  17. A2BR Adenosine Receptor Modulates Sweet Taste in Circumvallate Taste Buds

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dan; Shultz, Nicole; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Ravid, Katya; Kinnamon, Sue C.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    In response to taste stimulation, taste buds release ATP, which activates ionotropic ATP receptors (P2X2/P2X3) on taste nerves as well as metabotropic (P2Y) purinergic receptors on taste bud cells. The action of the extracellular ATP is terminated by ectonucleotidases, ultimately generating adenosine, which itself can activate one or more G-protein coupled adenosine receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Here we investigated the expression of adenosine receptors in mouse taste buds at both the nucleotide and protein expression levels. Of the adenosine receptors, only A2B receptor (A2BR) is expressed specifically in taste epithelia. Further, A2BR is expressed abundantly only in a subset of taste bud cells of posterior (circumvallate, foliate), but not anterior (fungiform, palate) taste fields in mice. Analysis of double-labeled tissue indicates that A2BR occurs on Type II taste bud cells that also express Gα14, which is present only in sweet-sensitive taste cells of the foliate and circumvallate papillae. Glossopharyngeal nerve recordings from A2BR knockout mice show significantly reduced responses to both sucrose and synthetic sweeteners, but normal responses to tastants representing other qualities. Thus, our study identified a novel regulator of sweet taste, the A2BR, which functions to potentiate sweet responses in posterior lingual taste fields. PMID:22253866

  18. Separation of adenosine diphosphate--adenosine triphosphate-exchange activity from the cerebral microsomal sodium-plus-potassium ion-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Stahl, W L; Sattin, A; McIlwain, H

    1966-05-01

    1. A microsomal fraction from ox cerebral cortex catalysed [(14)C]ADP-ATP exchange at a speed similar to that at which it liberated P(i) from ATP in the presence of Na(+), K(+) and Mg(2+). 2. Repeated washing the fraction with MgATP solutions solubilized most of the exchange activity and left the adenosine triphosphatase insoluble and little changed in activity. The exchange activity was accompanied by negligible adenosine-triphosphatase activity and was enriched by precipitation at chosen pH and by DEAE-Sephadex. At no stage was its activity affected by Na(+), K(+) or ouabain. 3. The washed microsomal fraction was exposed to a variety of reagents; a sodium iodide-cysteine treatment increased both adenosine-triphosphatase and exchange activities, as also did a synthetic zeolite. Preparations were obtained with exchange activities less than 3% of their Na(+)-plus-K(+)-stimulated adenosine-triphosphatase activity. Some contribution to the residual exchange activity was made by an adenylate kinase. 4. Thus over 95% of the microsomal ADP-ATP-exchange activity does not take part in the Na(+)-plus-K(+)-stimulated adenosine-triphosphatase reaction. Participation of some of the residual 3% of the ADP-ATP-exchange activity has not been excluded, but there appears no firm evidence for its participation in the adenosine triphosphatase; the bearing of this conclusion on mechanisms proposed for the Na(+)-plus-K(+)-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase is indicated.

  19. Separation of adenosine diphosphate-adenosine triphosphate–exchange activity from the cerebral microsomal sodium-plus-potassium ion-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, W. L.; Sattin, A.; McIlwain, H.

    1966-01-01

    1. A microsomal fraction from ox cerebral cortex catalysed [14C]ADP–ATP exchange at a speed similar to that at which it liberated Pi from ATP in the presence of Na+, K+ and Mg2+. 2. Repeated washing the fraction with MgATP solutions solubilized most of the exchange activity and left the adenosine triphosphatase insoluble and little changed in activity. The exchange activity was accompanied by negligible adenosine-triphosphatase activity and was enriched by precipitation at chosen pH and by DEAE-Sephadex. At no stage was its activity affected by Na+, K+ or ouabain. 3. The washed microsomal fraction was exposed to a variety of reagents; a sodium iodide–cysteine treatment increased both adenosine-triphosphatase and exchange activities, as also did a synthetic zeolite. Preparations were obtained with exchange activities less than 3% of their Na+-plus-K+-stimulated adenosine-triphosphatase activity. Some contribution to the residual exchange activity was made by an adenylate kinase. 4. Thus over 95% of the microsomal ADP–ATP-exchange activity does not take part in the Na+-plus-K+-stimulated adenosine-triphosphatase reaction. Participation of some of the residual 3% of the ADP–ATP-exchange activity has not been excluded, but there appears no firm evidence for its participation in the adenosine triphosphatase; the bearing of this conclusion on mechanisms proposed for the Na+-plus-K+-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase is indicated. PMID:4223577

  20. Role of Adenosine Receptor A2A in Traumatic Optic Neuropathies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    functional and histological changes asso ciated with diabetic nephropathy in wild type diabetic mice but not in the A2AAR−/− diabetic mice (Awad et al...the beginning of streptozotocin induced diabetes at the age of eight weeks. This treatment , previously demonstrated to increase free adenosine levels in...and it was not affected by ABT 702 treatment Blood glucose levels were higher in diabetic mice compared with non diabetic groups and they were not

  1. Adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate kinase is essential for Arabidopsis viability.

    PubMed

    Mugford, Sarah G; Matthewman, Colette A; Hill, Lionel; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2010-01-04

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate kinase (APK) provides activated sulfate for sulfation of secondary metabolites, including the glucosinolates. We have successfully isolated three of the four possible triple homozygous mutant combinations of this family. The APK1 isoform alone was sufficient to maintain WT levels of growth and development. Analysis of apk1 apk2 apk3 and apk1 apk3 apk4 mutants suggests that APK3 and APK4 are functionally redundant, despite being located in cytosol and plastids, respectively. We were, however, unable to isolate apk1 apk3 apk4 mutants, most probably because the apk1 apk3 apk4 triple mutant combination is pollen lethal. Therefore, we conclude that APS kinase is essential for plant reproduction and viability.

  2. Adenosine: Tipping the balance towards hepatic steatosis and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Simon C.; Schuppan, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Fatty liver is commonly associated with alcohol ingestion and abuse. While the molecular pathogenesis of these fatty changes is well understood, the histochemical and pharmacological mechanisms by which ethanol stimulates these molecular changes remain unknown. During ethanol metabolism, adenosine is generated by the enzyme ecto-5′-nucleotidase, and adenosine production and adenosine receptor activation are known to play critical roles in the development of hepatic fibrosis. We therefore investigated whether adenosine and its receptors play a role in the development of alcohol-induced fatty liver. WT mice fed ethanol on the Lieber-DeCarli diet developed hepatic steatosis, including increased hepatic triglyceride content, while mice lacking ecto-5-nucleotidase or adenosine A1 or A2B receptors were protected from developing fatty liver. Similar protection was also seen in WT mice treated with either an adenosine A1 or A2B receptor antagonist. Steatotic livers demonstrated increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis, which was prevented by blockade of adenosine A1 receptors, and decreased expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, which was prevented by blockade of adenosine A2B receptors. In vitro studies supported roles for adenosine A1 receptors in promoting fatty acid synthesis and for A2B receptors in decreasing fatty acid metabolism. These results indicate that adenosine generated by ethanol metabolism plays an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis via both A1 and A2B receptors and suggest that targeting adenosine receptors may be effective in the prevention of alcohol-induced fatty liver. PMID:20395005

  3. Adenosine signaling in normal and sickle erythrocytes and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujin; Xia, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a debilitating hemolytic genetic disorder with high morbidity and mortality affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Although SCD was discovered more than a century ago, no effective mechanism-based prevention and treatment are available due to poorly understood molecular basis of sickling, the fundamental pathogenic process of the disease. SCD patients constantly face hypoxia. One of the best-known signaling molecules to be induced under hypoxic conditions is adenosine. Recent studies demonstrate that hypoxia-mediated elevated adenosine signaling plays an important role in normal erythrocyte physiology. In contrast, elevated adenosine signaling contributes to sickling and multiple life threatening complications including tissue damage, pulmonary dysfunction and priapism. Here, we summarize recent research on the role of adenosine signaling in normal and sickle erythrocytes, progression of the disease and therapeutic implications. In normal erythrocytes, both genetic and pharmacological studies demonstrate that adenosine can enhance 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG) production via A2B receptor (ADORA2B) activation, suggesting that elevated adenosine has an unrecognized role in normal erythrocytes to promote O2 release and prevent acute ischemic tissue injury. However, in sickle erythrocytes, the beneficial role of excessive adenosine-mediated 2,3-BPG induction becomes detrimental by promoting deoxygenation, polymerization of sickle hemoglobin and subsequent sickling. Additionally, adenosine signaling via the A2A receptor (ADORA2A) on invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells inhibits iNKT cell activation and attenuates pulmonary dysfunction in SCD mice. Finally, elevated adenosine coupled with ADORA2BR activation is responsible for priapism, a dangerous complication seen in SCD. Overall, the research reviewed here reveals a differential role of elevated adenosine in normal erythrocytes, sickle erythrocytes, iNK cells and progression

  4. 6-Phosphofructokinase and ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase in methylotrophic Bacillus methanolicus ribulose monophosphate cycle.

    PubMed

    Le, Simone Balzer; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan; Haugen, Tone; Nærdal, Ingemar; Brautaset, Trygve

    2017-02-17

    D-Ribulose-5-phosphate-3-epimerase (RPE) and 6-phosphofructokinase (PFK) catalyse two reactions in the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) cycle in Bacillus methanolicus. The B. methanolicus wild-type strain MGA3 possesses two putative rpe and pfk genes encoded on plasmid pBM19 (rpe1-MGA3 and pfk1-MGA3) and on the chromosome (rpe2-MGA3 and pfk2-MGA3). The wild-type strain PB1 also encodes putative rpe and pfk genes on plasmid pBM20 (rpe1-PB1 and pfk1-PB1*); however, it only harbours a chromosomal pfk gene (pfk2-PB1). Transcription of the plasmid-encoded genes was 10-fold to 15-fold upregulated in cells growing on methanol compared to mannitol, while the chromosomal genes were transcribed at similar levels under both conditions in both strains. All seven gene products were recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli, purified and biochemically characterized. All three RPEs were active as hexamers, catalytically stimulated by Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) and displayed similar K' values (56-75 μM) for ribulose 5-phosphate. Rpe2-MGA3 showed displayed 2-fold lower V max (49 U/mg) and a significantly reduced thermostability compared to the two Rpe1 proteins. Pfk1-PB1* was shown to be non-functional. The PFKs were active both as octamers and as tetramers, were catalytically stimulated by Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), and displayed similar thermostabilities. The PFKs have similar K m values for fructose 6-phosphate (0.61-0.94 μM) and for ATP (0.38-0.82 μM), while Pfk1-MGA3 had a 2-fold lower V max (6.3 U/mg) compared to the two Pfk2 proteins. Our results demonstrate that MGA3 and PB1 exert alternative solutions to plasmid-dependent methylotrophy, including genetic organization, regulation, and biochemistry of RuMP cycle enzymes.

  5. Covalent binding of 4-carbamoylbenzenediazonium chloride to deoxyguanine bases of DNA resulting in apparent irreversible inhibition of Poly(adenosine diphosphoribose) polymerase at the nicotinamide binding site

    SciTech Connect

    McLick, J.; Bauer, P.I.; Hakam, A.; Kun, E.

    1987-04-21

    The poly(adenosine diphosphoribose) polymerase activity of isolated liver nuclei was inhibited by 4-carbamoylbenzenediazonium chloride, referred to as 4-diazoniobenzamide, an effect that was dependent on the time of incubation and the concentration of the diazonium compound, with inhibition following first-order kinetics. The inhibition was not reversed by reisolation of nuclie and centrifugal washing, whereas the inhibition by benzamide or 4-aminobenzamide was completely reversible under these conditions. Simultaneous incubation of 4-diazoniobenzamide with benzamide prevented enzyme inhibition. The 4-diazoniobenzoic acid analogue was not inhibitory. The mechanism of action of 4-diazoniobenzamide was traced to a specific covalent binding to (/sup 14/C) dGMP of DNA to form N/sup 2/-((4-carbamoylphenyl)azo)-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-monophosphate. Coenzymic DNA, by tight association with the polymerase protein, fixes the -C(O)NH/sub 2/ moiety of the adduct at the (/sup 32/P) nicotinamide-binding site of the enzyme.

  6. Adenosine kinase modulates root gravitropism and cap morphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Young, Li-Sen; Harrison, Benjamin R; Narayana Murthy, U M; Moffatt, Barbara A; Gilroy, Simon; Masson, Patrick H

    2006-10-01

    Adenosine kinase (ADK) is a key enzyme that regulates intra- and extracellular levels of adenosine, thereby modulating methyltransferase reactions, production of polyamines and secondary compounds, and cell signaling in animals. Unfortunately, little is known about ADK's contribution to the regulation of plant growth and development. Here, we show that ADK is a modulator of root cap morphogenesis and gravitropism. Upon gravistimulation, soluble ADK levels and activity increase in the root tip. Mutation in one of two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ADK genes, ADK1, results in cap morphogenesis defects, along with alterations in root sensitivity to gravistimulation and slower kinetics of root gravitropic curvature. The kinetics defect can be partially rescued by adding spermine to the growth medium, whereas the defects in cap morphogenesis and gravitropic sensitivity cannot. The root morphogenesis and gravitropism defects of adk1-1 are accompanied by altered expression of the PIN3 auxin efflux facilitator in the cap and decreased expression of the auxin-responsive DR5-GUS reporter. Furthermore, PIN3 fails to relocalize to the bottom membrane of statocytes upon gravistimulation. Consequently, adk1-1 roots cannot develop a lateral auxin gradient across the cap, necessary for the curvature response. Interestingly, adk1-1 does not affect gravity-induced cytoplasmic alkalinization of the root statocytes, suggesting either that ADK1 functions between cytoplasmic alkalinization and PIN3 relocalization in a linear pathway or that the pH and PIN3-relocalization responses to gravistimulation belong to distinct branches of the pathway. Our data are consistent with a role for ADK and the S-adenosyl-L-methionine pathway in the control of root gravitropism and cap morphogenesis.

  7. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is adenosine the common link?

    PubMed

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-10-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the 'adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities' implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic 'comorbidity model', in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain co-morbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions.

  8. Norepinephrines effect on adenosine transport in the proximal straight tubule

    SciTech Connect

    Barfuss, D.W.; McCann, W.P.; Katholi, R.E.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of norepinephrine on C/sup 14/-adenosine transport in the rabbit proximal tubule (S/sub 2/) was studied. The transepithelial transport of adenosine (0.02 mM0 from lumin to bathing solution was measured by its rate of appearance (J/sub A/) in the bathing solution and by its disappearances (J/sub D/) from the luminal fluid. Norepinephrine (0.24 ..mu..M) was added to the bathing solution after a control flux period. After three samples from the experiment period the tubules were quickly harvested and the cellular concentration of C/sup 14/-adenosine was determined. The high cellular adenosine concentration and th marked difference in adenosine appearance rate in the bathing solution compared to the luminal disappearance rate indicates the absorbed adenosine is trapped in the cells. This trapping may be due to adenosine metabolism or difficulty of crossing the basolateral membrane. Whichever is the case, norepinephrine appears to stimulate movement of adenosine or its metabolites into the bathing solution across the basolateral membrane.

  9. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is Adenosine the Common Link?

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the ‘adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities’ implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic ‘comorbidity model’, in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain comorbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions. PMID:25979489

  10. A2a and a2b adenosine receptors affect HIF-1α signaling in activated primary microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Merighi, Stefania; Borea, Pier Andrea; Stefanelli, Angela; Bencivenni, Serena; Castillo, Carlos Alberto; Varani, Katia; Gessi, Stefania

    2015-05-15

    Microglia are central nervous system (CNS)-resident immune cells, that play a crucial role in neuroinflammation. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), the main transcription factor of hypoxia-inducible genes, is also involved in the immune response, being regulated in normoxia by inflammatory mediators. Adenosine is an ubiquitous nucleoside that has an influence on many immune properties of microglia through interaction with four receptor subtypes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether adenosine may affect microglia functions by acting on HIF-1α modulation. Primary murine microglia were activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without adenosine, adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists and HIF-1α accumulation and downstream genes regulation were determined. Adenosine increased LPS-induced HIF-1α accumulation leading to an increase in HIF-1α target genes involved in cell metabolism [glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1)] and pathogens killing [inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS)] but did not induce HIF-1α dependent genes related to angiogenesis [vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)] and inflammation [tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)]. The stimulatory effect of adenosine on HIF-1α and its target genes was essentially exerted by activation of A2A through p44/42 and A2B subtypes via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore the nucleoside raised VEGF and decreased TNF-α levels, by activating A2B subtypes. In conclusion adenosine increases GLUT-1 and iNOS gene expression in a HIF-1α-dependent way, through A2A and A2B receptors, suggesting their role in the regulation of microglial cells function following injury. However, inhibition of TNF-α adds an important anti-inflammatory effect only for the A2B subtype. GLIA 2015.

  11. Adenosine inhibits voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx in cone photoreceptor terminals of the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Stella, Salvatore L; Hu, Wanda D; Vila, Alejandro; Brecha, Nicholas C

    2007-04-01

    Endogenous adenosine has already been shown to inhibit transmitter release from the rod synapse by suppressing Ca(2+) influx through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. However, it is not clear how adenosine modulates the cone synapse. Cone photoreceptors, like rod photoreceptors, also possess L-type Ca(2+) channels that regulate the release of L-glutamate. To assess the impact of adenosine on Ca(2+) influx though voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in cone terminals, whole-cell perforated-patch clamp recording and Ca(2+) imaging with fluo-4 were used on isolated cones and salamander retinal slices. Synaptic markers (VAMP and piccolo) and activity-dependent dye labeling revealed that tiger salamander cone terminals contain a broad, vesicle-filled cytoplasmic extension at the base of the somatic compartment, which is unlike rod terminals that contain one or more thin axons, each terminating in a large bulbous synaptic terminal. The spatiotemporal Ca(2+) responses of the cone terminals do not differ significantly from the Ca(2+) responses of the soma or inner segment like that observed in rods. Whole-cell recording of cone I(Ca) and Ca(2+) imaging of synaptic terminals in cones demonstrate that adenosine inhibited both I(Ca) and the depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) increase in cone terminals in a dose-dependent manner from 1 to 50 muM. These results indicate that, as in rods, adenosine's ability to suppress voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels at the cone synapse will limit the amount of L-glutamate released. Therefore, adenosine has an inhibitory effect on L-glutamate release at the first synapse, which likely favors elevated adenosine levels in the dark or during dark-adapted conditions.

  12. Activation of A1, A2A, or A3 adenosine receptors attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Gazoni, Leo M.; Walters, Dustin M.; Unger, Eric B.; Linden, Joel; Kron, Irving L.; Laubach, Victor E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Adenosine and the activation of specific adenosine receptors are implicated in the attenuation of inflammation and organ ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. We hypothesized that activation of A1, A2A, or A3 adenosine receptors would provide protection against lung IR injury. Methods Using an isolated, ventilated, blood-perfused rabbit lung model, lungs underwent 18 hours cold ischemia followed by 2 hours reperfusion. Lungs were administered either vehicle, adenosine, or selective A1, A2A, or A3 receptor agonists (CCPA, ATL-313, or IB-MECA, respectively) alone or with their respective antagonists (DPCPX, ZM241385, or MRS1191) during reperfusion. Results Compared to the vehicle-treated control group, treatment with A1, A2A, or A3 agonists significantly improved function (increased lung compliance and oxygenation and decreased pulmonary artery pressure), decreased neutrophil infiltration by myeloperoxidase activity, decreased edema, and reduced TNF-α production. Adenosine treatment was also protective but not to the level of the agonists. When each agonist was paired with its respective antagonist, all protective effects were blocked. The A2A agonist reduced pulmonary artery pressure and myeloperoxidase activity and increased oxygenation to a greater degree than the A1 or A3 agonists. Conclusions Selective activation of A1, A2A, or A3 adenosine receptors provides significant protection against lung IR injury. The decreased elaboration of the potent proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-α, and decreased neutrophil sequestration likely contribute to the overall improvement in pulmonary function. These results provide evidence for the therapeutic potential of specific adenosine receptor agonists in lung transplant recipients. PMID:20398911

  13. Adenosine receptors and asthma in humans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C N

    2008-10-01

    According to an executive summary of the GINA dissemination committee report, it is now estimated that approximately 300 million people (5% of the global population or 1 in 20 persons) have asthma. Despite the scientific progress made over the past several decades toward improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma, there is still a great need for improved therapies, particularly oral therapies that enhance patient compliance and that target new mechanisms of action. Adenosine is an important signalling molecule in human asthma. By acting on extracellular G-protein-coupled ARs on a number of different cell types important in the pathophysiology of human asthma, adenosine affects bronchial reactivity, inflammation and airway remodelling. Four AR subtypes (A(1), A(2a), A(2b) and A(3)) have been cloned in humans, are expressed in the lung, and are all targets for drug development for human asthma. This review summarizes what is known about these AR subtypes and their function in human asthma as well as the pros and cons of therapeutic approaches to these AR targets. A number of molecules with high affinity and high selectivity for the human AR subtypes have entered clinical trials or are poised to enter clinical trials as anti-asthma treatments. With the availability of these molecules for testing in humans, the function of ARs in human asthma, as well as the safety and efficacy of approaches to the different AR targets, can now be determined.

  14. Adenosine receptors and dyskinesia in pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    First, the recent progress in the pathogenesis of levodopa-induced dyskinesia was described. Serotonin neurons play an important role in conversion from levodopa to dopamine and in the release of converted dopamine into the striatum in the Parkinsonian state. Since serotonin neurons lack buffering effects on synaptic dopamine concentration, the synaptic dopamine markedly fluctuates depending on the fluctuating levodopa concentration in the serum after taking levodopa. The resultant pulsatile stimulation makes the striatal direct-pathway neurons get potential that releases excessive GABA into the output nuclei of the basal ganglia. When levodopa is administered, the stored GABA is released, the output nuclei become hypoactive, and then dyskinesias emerge. Second, effects of adenosine A2A receptor antagonists on dyskinesia were described. It has been demonstrated that the expression of adenosine A2A receptors is increased in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with dyskinesias, suggesting that blockade of A2A receptors is beneficial for dyskinesias. Preclinical studies have shown that A2A receptor antagonists reduce liability of dyskinesias in PD models. Clinical trials have demonstrated that A2A antagonists increase functional ON-time (ON without troublesome dyskinesia) in PD patients suffering from wearing-off phenomenon, although they may increase dyskinesia in patients with advanced PD.

  15. Role of nitric oxide in adenosine-induced vasodilation in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, F.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Vasodilation is one of the most prominent effects of adenosine and one of the first to be recognized, but its mechanism of action is not completely understood. In particular, there is conflicting information about the potential contribution of endothelial factors. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of nitric oxide in the vasodilatory effect of adenosine. Forearm blood flow responses to intrabrachial adenosine infusion (125 microg/min) were assessed with venous occlusion plethysmography during intrabrachial infusion of saline or the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) (12.5 mg/min). Intrabrachial infusions of acetylcholine (50 microg/min) and nitroprusside (3 microg/min) were used as a positive and negative control, respectively. These doses were chosen to produce comparable levels of vasodilation. In a separate study, a second saline infusion was administered instead of L-NMMA to rule out time-related effects. As expected, pretreatment with L-NMMA reduced acetylcholine-induced vasodilation; 50 microg/min acetylcholine increased forearm blood flow by 150+/-43% and 51+/-12% during saline and L-NMMA infusion, respectively (P<.01, n=6). In contrast, L-NMMA did not affect the increase in forearm blood flow produced by 3 microg/min nitroprusside (165+/-30% and 248+/-41% during saline and L-NMMA, respectively) or adenosine (173+/-48% and 270+/-75% during saline and L-NMMA, respectively). On the basis of our observations, we conclude that adenosine-induced vasodilation is not mediated by nitric oxide in the human forearm.

  16. Adenosine ecto-deaminase (ecto-ADA) from porcine cerebral cortex synaptic membrane.

    PubMed

    Romanowska, Małgorzata; Ostrowska, Marta; Komoszyński, Michał A

    2007-07-02

    We have purified and investigated the role of adenosine ecto-deaminase (ecto-ADA) in porcine brain synaptic membranes and found a low activity of ecto-ADA in synaptic preparations from the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and medulla oblongata in the presence of purine transport inhibitors (NBTI, dipyridamole and papaverine). The purification procedure with affinity chromatography on epoxy-Toyopearl gel/purine riboside column as a crucial step of purification allowed a 214-fold purification of synaptic ecto-ADA with a yield of 30%. Gel filtration chromatography revealed a molecular mass estimated at 42.4+/-3.9 kDa. The enzyme had a broad optimum pH and was not affected by mono- and divalent cations. Ecto-ADA revealed a low affinity to adenosine (Ado) and 2'-deoxyadenosine (2'-dAdo) (K(M)=286.30+/-40.38 microM and 287.14+/-46.50 microM, respectively). We compared the affinity of ecto-ADA to the substrates with the physiological and pathological concentrations of the extracellular Ado in brains that do not exceed a low micromolar range even during ischemia and hypoxia, and with the affinity of adenosine receptors to Ado not exceeding a low nanomolar (A(1) and A(2A) receptors) or low micromolar (A(2B) and A(3)) range. Taken together, our data suggest that the role of synaptic ecto-ADA in the regulation of the ecto-Ado level in the brain and in the termination of adenosine receptor signaling is questionable. The porcine brain synapses must have other mechanisms for the ecto-Ado removal from the synaptic cleft and synaptic ecto-ADA may also play an extra-enzymatic role in cell adhesion and non-enzymatic regulation of adenosine receptor activity.

  17. Cloning of two adenosine receptor subtypes from mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, D L; Walker, L L; Heinemann, S

    1994-05-01

    Adenosine potentiates the stimulated release of mast cell mediators. Pharmacologic studies suggest the presence of two adenosine receptors, one positively coupled to adenylate cyclase and the other coupled to phospholipase C activation. To identify mast cell adenosine receptor subtypes, cDNAs for the A1 and A2a adenosine receptors were obtained by screening a mouse brain cDNA library with the use of PCR-derived probes. Mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell cDNA libraries were constructed and screened with the use of A1 and A2a cDNA probes, which revealed the presence of A2a, but not A1, receptor clones. A putative A2b receptor was identified by using low stringency mast cell library screening. Northern blotting of mast cell poly(A)+ RNA with the use of receptor subtype probes labeled single mRNA bands of 2.4 kb and 1.8 kb for the A2a and A2b receptors, respectively. In situ cells. An A2a receptor-specific agonist failed to enhance mast cell mediator release, which suggests that the secretory process is modulated through the A2b and/or another receptor subtype. By using RNase protection assays, we found that mast cells that had been cultured in the presence of N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine for 24 h exhibited a decrease in both A2a and A2b receptor RNA levels. Cells that had been cultured for 1 to 2 days in the presence of dexamethasone demonstrated increased amounts of A2a receptor mRNA, but no identifiable change in A2b receptor mRNA. Mast cells possess at least two adenosine receptor subtypes that may be differentially regulated.

  18. A High-Affinity Adenosine Kinase from Anopheles Gambiae

    SciTech Connect

    M Cassera; M Ho; E Merino; E Burgos; A Rinaldo-Matthis; S Almo; V Schramm

    2011-12-31

    Genome analysis revealed a mosquito orthologue of adenosine kinase in Anopheles gambiae (AgAK; the most important vector for the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa). P. falciparum are purine auxotrophs and do not express an adenosine kinase but rely on their hosts for purines. AgAK was kinetically characterized and found to have the highest affinity for adenosine (K{sub m} = 8.1 nM) of any known adenosine kinase. AgAK is specific for adenosine at the nucleoside site, but several nucleotide triphosphate phosphoryl donors are tolerated. The AgAK crystal structure with a bound bisubstrate analogue Ap{sub 4}A (2.0 {angstrom} resolution) reveals interactions for adenosine and ATP and the geometry for phosphoryl transfer. The polyphosphate charge is partly neutralized by a bound Mg{sup 2+} ion and an ion pair to a catalytic site Arg. The AgAK structure consists of a large catalytic core in a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich, and a small cap domain in contact with adenosine. The specificity and tight binding for adenosine arise from hydrogen bond interactions of Asn14, Leu16, Leu40, Leu133, Leu168, Phe168, and Thr171 and the backbone of Ile39 and Phe168 with the adenine ring as well as through hydrogen bond interactions between Asp18, Gly64, and Asn68 and the ribosyl 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups. The structure is more similar to that of human adenosine kinase (48% identical) than to that of AK from Toxoplasma gondii (31% identical). With this extraordinary affinity for AgAK, adenosine is efficiently captured and converted to AMP at near the diffusion limit, suggesting an important role for this enzyme in the maintenance of the adenine nucleotide pool. mRNA analysis verifies that AgAK transcripts are produced in the adult insects.

  19. The ADA*2 allele of the adenosine deaminase gene (20q13.11) and recurrent spontaneous abortions: an age-dependent association

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Daniela Prudente Teixeira; Spegiorin, Lígia Cosentino Junqueira Franco; de Mattos, Cinara Cássia Brandão; Oliani, Antonio Helio; Vaz-Oliani, Denise Cristina Mós; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Adenosine deaminase acts on adenosine and deoxyadenosine metabolism and modulates the immune response. The adenosine deaminase G22A polymorphism (20q.11.33) influences the level of adenosine deaminase enzyme expression, which seems to play a key role in maintaining pregnancy. The adenosine deaminase 2 phenotype has been associated with a protective effect against recurrent spontaneous abortions in European Caucasian women. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the G22A polymorphism of the adenosine deaminase gene is associated with recurrent spontaneous abortions in Brazilian women. METHODS: A total of 311 women were recruited to form two groups: G1, with a history of recurrent spontaneous abortions (N = 129), and G2, without a history of abortions (N = 182). Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood with a commercial kit and PCR-RFLP analysis was used to identify the G22A genetic polymorphism. Fisher's exact test and odds ratio values were used to compare the proportions of adenosine deaminase genotypes and alleles between women with and without a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion (p<0.05). The differences between mean values for categorical data were calculated using unpaired t tests. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was assessed with a chi-square test. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were identified for the frequencies of adenosine deaminase genotypes and alleles between the G1 and G2 groups when adjusted for maternal age. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the adenosine deaminase *2 allele is associated with a low risk for recurrent spontaneous abortions, but this association is dependent on older age. PMID:22086524

  20. Increased erythropoiesis of beta-thalassaemia/Hb E proerythroblasts is mediated by high basal levels of ERK1/2 activation.

    PubMed

    Wannatung, Tirawat; Lithanatudom, Pathrapol; Leecharoenkiat, Amporn; Svasti, Saovaros; Fucharoen, Suthat; Smith, Duncan R

    2009-09-01

    Beta-thalassaemia is one of the most common inherited anaemias, arising from a partial or complete loss of beta-globin chain synthesis. In severe cases, marked bone marrow erythroid hyperplasia, believed to result from erythropoietin (EPO)-mediated feedback from the anaemic condition is common, however, as yet, no study has investigated EPO-mediated signal transduction in thalassaemic erythroid cells. Using proerythroblasts generated from peripheral blood circulating CD34+ haematopoietic progenitor cells, the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (MAPK/ERKs) pathway was examined under conditions of steady state growth, cytokine deprivation and post-EPO stimulation. Levels of cellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and Ca2+ were determined as was the degree of erythroid expansion. A significantly higher basal level of phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was observed in beta-thalassaemia/Hb E proerythroblasts as compared to normal controls, which was coupled with significantly higher levels of both cAMP and Ca2+. Modulation of either cAMP or Ca2+ or direct inhibition of MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) reduced basal levels of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, as well as significantly reducing the level of erythroid expansion. These results suggest that, in contrast to current models, hyper proliferation of beta-thalassaemia/Hb E proerythroblasts is an intrinsic process driven by higher basal levels of ERK1/2 phosphorylation resulting from deregulation of levels of cAMP and Ca2+.

  1. Cancer chemoprevention by an adenosine derivative in a model of cirrhosis-hepatocellular carcinoma induced by diethylnitrosamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Loyden, Gabriela; Pérez-Martínez, Lidia; Vidrio-Gómez, Susana; Pérez-Carreón, Julio Isael; Chagoya de Sánchez, Victoria

    2017-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most common cancers, and approximately 80% develop from cirrhotic livers. We have previously shown that the aspartate salt of adenosine prevents and reverses carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis in rats. Considering the hepatoprotective role of this adenosine derivative in fibrogenesis, we were interested in evaluating its effect in a hepatocarcinogenesis model induced by diethylnitrosamine in rats, where multinodular cancer is preceded by cirrhosis. Rats were injected with diethylnitrosamine for 12 weeks to induce cirrhosis and for 16 weeks to induce hepatocarcinogenesis. Groups of rats were treated with aspartate salt of adenosine from the beginning of carcinogen administration for 12 or 18 weeks total, and another group received the compound from weeks 12 to 18. Fibrogenesis was estimated and the proportion of preneoplastic nodules and tumors was measured. The apoptotic and proliferation rates in liver tissues were evaluated, as well as the expression of cell signaling and cell cycle proteins participating in hepatocarcinogenesis. The adenosine derivative treatment reduced diethylnitrosamine-induced collagen expression and decreased the proportion of nodules positive for the tumor marker γ-glutamyl transferase. This compound down-regulated the expression of thymidylate synthase and hepatocyte growth factor, and augmented the protein level of the cell cycle inhibitor p27; these effects could be part of its chemopreventive mechanism. These findings suggest a hepatoprotective role of aspartate salt of adenosine that could be used as a therapeutic compound in the prevention of liver tumorigenesis as described earlier for hepatic fibrosis.

  2. A Comparative Study of Vasorelaxant Effects of ATP, ADP, and Adenosine on the Superior Mesenteric Artery of SHR.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shun; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Ando, Makoto; Kobayashi, Shota; Iguchi, Maika; Taguchi, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated superior mesenteric arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) to determine the relaxation responses induced by ATP, ADP, and adenosine and the relationship between the relaxant effects of these compounds and nitric oxide (NO) or cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived prostanoids. In rat superior mesenteric artery, relaxation induced by ATP and ADP but not by adenosine was completely eliminated by endothelial denudation. In the superior mesenteric arteries isolated from SHR [vs. age-matched control Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY)], a) ATP- and ADP-induced relaxations were weaker, whereas adenosine-induced relaxation was similar in both groups, b) ATP- and ADP-induced relaxations were substantially and partly reduced by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine [a NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor], respectively, c) indomethacin, an inhibitor of COX, increased ATP- and ADP-induced relaxations, d) ADP-induced relaxation was weaker under combined inhibition by NOS and COX, and e) adenosine-induced relaxation was not altered by treatment with these inhibitors. These data indicate that levels of responsiveness to these nucleotides/adenosine vary in the superior mesenteric arteries from SHR and WKY and are differentially modulated by NO and COX-derived prostanoids.

  3. Potential therapeutic relevance of adenosine A2B and A2A receptors in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Popoli, Patrizia; Pepponi, Rita

    2012-09-01

    Adenosine A2B and, much more importantly, adenosine A2A receptors modulate many physiological and pathological processes in the brain. In this review, the most recent evidence concerning the role of such receptors and their potential therapeutic relevance is discussed. The low affinity of A2B receptors for adenosine implies that they might represent a good therapeutic target, since they are activated only under pathological conditions (when adenosine levels raise up to micromolar concentrations). The availability of selective ligands for A2B receptors would allow exploration of such an hypothesis. Since adenosine A2A receptors mediate both potentially neuroprotective and potentially neurotoxic effects, their role in neurodegenerative diseases is highly controversial. Nevertheless, A2A receptor antagonists have shown clear antiparkinsonian effects, and a great interest exists on the role of A2A receptors in Alzheimer's disease, brain ischaemia, spinal cord injury, drug addiction and other conditions. In order to establish whether such receptors represent a target for CNS diseases, at least two conditions are needed: the full comprehension of A2A-dependent mechanisms and the availability of ligands capable of discriminating among the different receptor populations.

  4. Electroacupuncture-induced neuroprotection against focal cerebral ischemia in the rat is mediated by adenosine A1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qin-xue; Geng, Wu-jun; Zhuang, Xiu-xiu; Wang, Hong-fa; Mo, Yun-chang; Xin, He; Chen, Jiang-fan; Wang, Jun-lu

    2017-01-01

    The activation of adenosine A1 receptors is important for protecting against ischemic brain injury and pretreatment with electroacupuncture has been shown to mitigate ischemic brain insult. The aim of this study was to test whether the adenosine A1 receptor mediates electroacupuncture pretreatment-induced neuroprotection against ischemic brain injury. We first performed 30 minutes of electroacupuncture pretreatment at the Baihui acupoint (GV20), delivered with a current of 1 mA, a frequency of 2/15 Hz, and a depth of 1 mm. High-performance liquid chromatography found that adenosine triphosphate and adenosine levels peaked in the cerebral cortex at 15 minutes and 120 minutes after electroacupuncture pretreatment, respectively. We further examined the effect of 15 or 120 minutes electroacupuncture treatment on ischemic brain injury in a rat middle cerebral artery-occlusion model. We found that at 24 hours reperfusion,120 minutes after electroacupuncture pretreatment, but not for 15 minutes, significantly reduced behavioral deficits and infarct volumes. Last, we demonstrated that the protective effect gained by 120 minutes after electroacupuncture treatment before ischemic injury was abolished by pretreatment with the A1-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Our results suggest that pretreatment with electroacupuncture at the Baihui acupoint elicits protection against transient cerebral ischemia via action at adenosine A1 receptors.

  5. Synthesis and antimetabolic properties of 4,5-substituted pyrimidine 2'-deoxynucleosides and their 5'-monophosphates.

    PubMed

    Kulikowski, T; Bretner, M; Dzik, J M; Zieliński, Z; Cieśla, J; Rode, W; Vilpo, J A; Shugar, D

    1987-01-01

    Reaction of the reagent of Lawesson, 2,4-bis(p-methoxyphenyl)-1,3,4-dithiadiphosphatane-2,4-disulfide, with blocked uracil nucleosides in dioxane leads to quantitative thionation at C(4). With the bases, thionation occurs at C(4) and, with two equivalents of the reagent, at C(2) and C(4). Enzymatic phosphorylation of 4-thio-FdUrd gave the 5'-monophosphate, which was further converted with NH2OH to N4-hydroxy-FdCMP. Both nucleotides were examined as potential inhibitors of thymidylate synthase, and 4-thio-FdUrd for cytotoxic activities vs monkey and human leukemic cell lines.

  6. Fluorescent Sensing of Guanine and Guanosine Monophosphate with Conjugated Receptors Incorporating Aniline and Naphthyridine Moieties.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shao-Hung; Phang, Riping; Fang, Jim-Min

    2016-04-15

    Ethyne-linked naphthyridine-aniline conjugated molecules are selective sensors of decylguanine in dichloromethane and guanosine monophosphate in water (Kass = 16,000 M(-1)). The 2-acetamido-1,8-naphthyridine moiety binds with guanine in a DAA-ADD triply hydrogen-bonded motif. The aniline moiety enhances an electron-donating effect, and the substituent is tuned to attain extra hydrogen bonds, π-π stacking, and electrostatic interactions. The proposed binding modes are supported by a Job plot, ESI-MS, (1)H NMR, UV-vis, and fluorescence spectral analyses.

  7. Rate and Equilibrium Constants for an Enzyme Conformational Change during Catalysis by Orotidine 5'-Monophosphate Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Goryanova, Bogdana; Goldman, Lawrence M; Ming, Shonoi; Amyes, Tina L; Gerlt, John A; Richard, John P

    2015-07-28

    The caged complex between orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ScOMPDC) and 5-fluoroorotidine 5'-monophosphate (FOMP) undergoes decarboxylation ∼300 times faster than the caged complex between ScOMPDC and the physiological substrate, orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP). Consequently, the enzyme conformational changes required to lock FOMP at a protein cage and release product 5-fluorouridine 5'-monophosphate (FUMP) are kinetically significant steps. The caged form of ScOMPDC is stabilized by interactions between the side chains from Gln215, Tyr217, and Arg235 and the substrate phosphodianion. The control of these interactions over the barrier to the binding of FOMP and the release of FUMP was probed by determining the effect of all combinations of single, double, and triple Q215A, Y217F, and R235A mutations on kcat/Km and kcat for turnover of FOMP by wild-type ScOMPDC; its values are limited by the rates of substrate binding and product release, respectively. The Q215A and Y217F mutations each result in an increase in kcat and a decrease in kcat/Km, due to a weakening of the protein-phosphodianion interactions that favor fast product release and slow substrate binding. The Q215A/R235A mutation causes a large decrease in the kinetic parameters for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of OMP, which are limited by the rate of the decarboxylation step, but much smaller decreases in the kinetic parameters for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of FOMP, which are limited by the rate of enzyme conformational changes. By contrast, the Y217A mutation results in large decreases in kcat/Km for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of both OMP and FOMP, because of the comparable effects of this mutation on rate-determining decarboxylation of enzyme-bound OMP and on the rate-determining enzyme conformational change for decarboxylation of FOMP. We propose that kcat = 8.2 s(-1) for decarboxylation of FOMP by the Y217A mutant is equal to the rate constant for cage formation from the

  8. Recent advances on the enantioselective synthesis of C-nucleosides inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH).

    PubMed

    Merino, Pedro; Ghirardello, Mattia; Tejero, Tomas; Delso, Ignacio; Matute, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This review will describe the recent advances in the synthesis of C-nucleosides with inhibitory activity of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. The review will cover synthetic approaches of structural analogues showing modifications in the furanose ring as well as in the heterocyclic base. Heterocyclic sugar nucleoside analogues in which the furanose ring has been replaced by a different heterocyclic ring including aza analogues, thioanalogues as well as dioxolanyl and isoxazolidinyl analogues are also considered.

  9. Virtual and experimental high-throughput screening (HTS) in search of novel inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase II (IMPDH II) inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkern, Torsten; Prabhu, Arati; Kharkar, Prashant S.; Goebel, Heike; Rolser, Edith; Burckhard-Boer, Waltraud; Arumugam, Premkumar; Makhija, Mahindra T.

    2012-11-01

    IMPDH (Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase) catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the de novo biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. IMPDH inhibition in sensitive cell types (e.g., lymphocytes) blocks proliferation (by blocking RNA and DNA synthesis as a result of decreased cellular levels of guanine nucleotides). This makes it an interesting target for cancer and autoimmune disorders. Currently available IMPDH inhibitors such as mycophenolic acid (MPA, uncompetitive inhibitor) and nucleoside analogs (e.g., ribavirin, competitive inhibitor after intracellular activation by phosphorylation) have unfavorable tolerability profiles which limit their use. Hence, the quest for novel IMPDH inhibitors continues. In the present study, a ligand-based virtual screening using IMPDH inhibitor pharmacophore models was performed on in-house compound collection. A total of 50,000 virtual hits were selected for primary screen using in vitro IMPDH II inhibition up to 10 μM. The list of 2,500 hits (with >70 % inhibition) was further subjected to hit confirmation for the determination of IC50 values. The hits obtained were further clustered using maximum common substructure based formalism resulting in 90 classes and 7 singletons. A thorough inspection of these yielded 7 interesting classes in terms of mini-SAR with IC50 values ranging from 0.163 μM to little over 25 μM. The average ligand efficiency was found to be 0.3 for the best class. The classes thus discovered represent structurally novel chemotypes which can be taken up for further development.

  10. Temporal variations of adenosine metabolism in human blood.

    PubMed

    Chagoya de Sánchez, V; Hernández-Muñoz, R; Suárez, J; Vidrio, S; Yáñez, L; Aguilar-Roblero, R; Oksenberg, A; Vega-González, A; Villalobos, L; Rosenthal, L; Fernández-Cancino, F; Drucker-Colín, R; Díaz-Muñoz, M

    1996-08-01

    Eight diurnally active (06:00-23:00 h) subjects were adapted for 2 days to the room conditions where the experiments were performed. Blood sampling for adenosine metabolites and metabolizing enzymes was done hourly during the activity span and every 30 min during sleep. The results showed that adenosine and its catabolites (inosine, hypoxanthine, and uric acid), adenosine synthesizing (S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and 5'-nucleotidase), degrading (adenosine deaminase) and nucleotide-forming (adenosine kinase) enzymes as well as adenine nucleotides (AMP, ADP, and ATP) undergo statistically significant fluctuations (ANOVA) during the 24 h. However, energy charge was invariable. Glucose and lactate chronograms were determined as metabolic indicators. The same data analyzed by the chi-square periodogram and Fourier series indicated ultradian oscillatory periods for all the metabolites and enzymatic activities determined, and 24-h oscillatory components for inosine, hypoxanthine, adenine nucleotides, glucose, and the activities of SAH-hydrolase, 5'-nucleotidase, and adenosine kinase. The single cosinor method showed significant oscillatory components exclusively for lactate. As a whole, these results suggest that adenosine metabolism may play a role as a biological oscillator coordinating and/or modulating the energy homeostasis and physiological status of erythrocytes in vivo and could be an important factor in the distribution of purine rings for the rest of the organism.

  11. Characterization of P1 (adenosine) purinoceptors.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Michael F

    2013-10-08

    The purine nucleoside adenosine (ADO) is an important modulator of cellular function in mammalian tissues, modulating cellular function and neuronal excitability via interactions with different cell surface receptor subtypes that are heterogeneously distributed in both the mammalian CNS and peripheral tissues. Four ADO receptor subtypes have been cloned and characterized. Described in this unit are three radioligand binding assays for pharmacological characterization of the high-affinity ADO receptor subtypes A1, A2A, and A3 receptors. Pharmacological characterization of the low-affinity A2B receptor has been enabled by the use of tritiated xanthine PSB-603. Because receptor localization is an important criterion for differentiation of receptor subtypes, a support protocol that describes the methodology for the localization of ADO receptors in rat brain tissue using autoradiography is also included.

  12. Long-term expression of human adenosine deaminase in vascular smooth muscle cells of rats: A model for gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, C.M.; Miller, A.D. ); Clowes, M.M.; Osborne, W.R.A.; Clowes, A.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  13. Adenosine as a Multi-Signalling Guardian Angel in Human Diseases: When, Where and How Does it Exert its Protective Effects?

    PubMed

    Borea, Pier Andrea; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Varani, Katia

    2016-06-01

    The importance of adenosine for human health cannot be overstated. Indeed, this ubiquitous nucleoside is an integral component of ATP, and regulates the function of every tissue and organ in the body. Acting via receptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms [the former mediated via four G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), A1, A2A, A2B, and A3,], it has a significant role in protecting against cell damage in areas of increased tissue metabolism, and combating organ dysfunction in numerous pathological states. Accordingly, raised levels of adenosine have been demonstrated in epilepsy, ischaemia, pain, inflammation, and cancer, in which its behaviour can be likened to that of a guardian angel, even though there are instances in which overproduction of adenosine is pathological. In this review, we condense the current body of knowledge on the issue, highlighting when, where, and how adenosine exerts its protective effects in both the brain and the periphery.

  14. Adenosine and Preexcitation Variants: Reappraisal of Electrocardiographic Changes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hussam; Lupo, Pierpaolo; Foresti, Sara; De Ambroggi, Guido; Epicoco, Gianluca; Fundaliotis, Angelica; Cappato, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    Intravenous adenosine is a short-acting blocker of the atrioventricular node that has been used to unmask subtle or latent preexcitation, and also to enable catheter ablation in selected patients with absent or intermittent preexcitation. Depending on the accessory pathway characteristics, intravenous adenosine may produce specific electrocardiographic changes highly suggestive of the preexcitation variant. Herein, we view different ECG responses to this pharmacological test in various preexcitation patterns that were confirmed by electrophysiological studies. Careful analysis of electrocardiographic changes during adenosine test, with emphasis on P-delta interval, preexcitation degree, and atrioventricular block, can be helpful to diagnose the preexcitation variant/pattern.

  15. Adenosine through the A2A adenosine receptor increases IL-1β in the brain contributing to anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Gabriel S.; Darmody, Patrick T.; Walsh, John P.; Moon, Morgan L.; Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Bray, Julie K.; McCusker, Robert H.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most commonly reported psychiatric conditions, but its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Ailments associated with activation of the innate immune system, however, are increasingly linked to anxiety disorders. In adult male mice, we found that adenosine doubled caspase-1 activity in brain by a pathway reliant on ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, protein kinase A (PKA) and the A2A adenosine receptor (AR). In addition, adenosine-dependent activation of caspase-1 increased interleukin (IL)-1β in the brain by two-fold. Peripheral administration of adenosine in wild-type (WT) mice led to a 2.3-fold increase in caspase-1 activity in the amygdala and to a 33% and 42% reduction in spontaneous locomotor activity and food intake, respectively, that were not observed in caspase-1 knockout (KO), IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) KO and A2A AR KO mice or in mice administered a caspase-1 inhibitor centrally. Finally, adenosine administration increased anxiety-like behaviors in WT mice by 28% in the open field test and by 55% in the elevated zero-maze. Caspase-1 KO mice, IL-1R1 KO mice, A2A AR KO mice and WT mice treated with the KATP channel blocker, glyburide, were resistant to adenosine-induced anxiety-like behaviors. Thus, our results indicate that adenosine can act as an anxiogenic by activating caspase-1 and increasing IL-1β in the brain. PMID:24907587

  16. Basal adenosine modulates the functional properties of AMPA receptors in mouse hippocampal neurons through the activation of A1R A2AR and A3R

    PubMed Central

    Di Angelantonio, Silvia; Bertollini, Cristina; Piccinin, Sonia; Rosito, Maria; Trettel, Flavia; Pagani, Francesca; Limatola, Cristina; Ragozzino, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a widespread neuromodulator within the CNS and its extracellular level is increased during hypoxia or intense synaptic activity, modulating pre- and postsynaptic sites. We studied the neuromodulatory action of adenosine on glutamatergic currents in the hippocampus, showing that activation of multiple adenosine receptors (ARs) by basal adenosine impacts postsynaptic site. Specifically, the stimulation of both A1R and A3R reduces AMPA currents, while A2AR has an opposite potentiating effect. The effect of ARs stimulation on glutamatergic currents in hippocampal cultures was investigated using pharmacological and genetic approaches. A3R inhibition by MRS1523 increased GluR1-Ser845 phosphorylation and potentiated AMPA current amplitude, increasing the apparent affinity for the agonist. A similar effect was observed blocking A1R with DPCPX or by genetic deletion of either A3R or A1R. Conversely, impairment of A2AR reduced AMPA currents, and decreased agonist sensitivity. Consistently, in hippocampal slices, ARs activation by AR agonist NECA modulated glutamatergic current amplitude evoked by AMPA application or afferent fiber stimulation. Opposite effects of AR subtypes stimulation are likely associated to changes in GluR1 phosphorylation and represent a novel mechanism of physiological modulation of glutamatergic transmission by adenosine, likely acting in normal conditions in the brain, depending on the level of extracellular adenosine and the distribution of AR subtypes. PMID:26528137

  17. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated synaptic responses by adenosine receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R A; Davies, C H

    1997-01-01

    '-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680; 0.5-1.0 microM) did not significantly affect the EPSPm. 4. The selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; 0.2 microM) fully reversed the depressant effects of both adenosine (100 microM) and CADO (1 microM) on the EPSPm and the stimulus-evoked reductions in spike frequency adaptation. 5. DPCPX (0.2 microM) alone caused a small but variable mean increase in the EPSPm of 22 +/- 19% and enabled activation of an EPSPm by a previously subthreshold stimulus. In contrast, the selective adenosine kinase inhibitor 5-iodotubercidin (5-IT; 10 microM) inhibited the EPSPm by 74 +/- 10%, an effect that was reversed by DPCPX. 6. The concentration-response relationship for the depressant action of CADO on the EPSPm more closely paralleled that for its presynaptic depressant action on glutamate-mediated EPSPs than that for postsynaptic hyperpolarization. The respective mean IC50 and EC50 concentrations for these effects were 0.3, 0.8 and 3.0 microM. 7. CADO (1-5 microM) did not have a significant effect on the postsynaptic depolarization, increase in input resistance and reduction in spike frequency adaptation evoked by carbachol (0.5-3.0 microM). All these effects were abolished by atropine (1 microM). 8. These data provide good evidence for an adenosine A1 receptor-mediated inhibitio