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Sample records for adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins

  1. Identification of widespread adenosine nucleotide binding in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Ortega, Corrie; Payne, Samuel H.; Haft, Daniel H.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Lewis, Michael P.; Ollodart, Anja R.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Shukla, Anil K.; Fortuin, Suereta; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Grundner, Christoph; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-01-24

    The annotation of protein function is almost completely performed by in silico approaches. However, computational prediction of protein function is frequently incomplete and error prone. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), ~25% of all genes have no predicted function and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. This lack of functional information severely limits our understanding of Mtb pathogenicity. Current tools for experimental functional annotation are limited and often do not scale to entire protein families. Here, we report a generally applicable chemical biology platform to functionally annotate bacterial proteins by combining activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) and quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics. As an example of this approach for high-throughput protein functional validation and discovery, we experimentally annotate the families of ATP-binding proteins in Mtb. Our data experimentally validate prior in silico predictions of >250 ATPases and adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins, and reveal 73 hypothetical proteins as novel ATP-binding proteins. We identify adenosine cofactor interactions with many hypothetical proteins containing a diversity of unrelated sequences, providing a new and expanded view of adenosine nucleotide binding in Mtb. Furthermore, many of these hypothetical proteins are both unique to Mycobacteria and essential for infection, suggesting specialized functions in mycobacterial physiology and pathogenicity. Thus, we provide a generally applicable approach for high throughput protein function discovery and validation, and highlight several ways in which application of activity-based proteomics data can improve the quality of functional annotations to facilitate novel biological insights.

  2. Signal transduction by guanine nucleotide binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A M

    1987-01-01

    High affinity binding of guanine nucleotides and the ability to hydrolyze bound GTP to GDP are characteristics of an extended family of intracellular proteins. Subsets of this family include cytosolic initiation and elongation factors involved in protein synthesis, and cytoskeletal proteins such as tubulin (Hughes, S.M. (1983) FEBS Lett. 164, 1-8). A distinct subset of guanine nucleotide binding proteins is membrane-associated; members of this subset include the ras gene products (Ellis, R.W. et al. (1981) Nature 292, 506-511) and the heterotrimeric G-proteins (also termed N-proteins) (Gilman, A.G. (1984) Cell 36, 577-579). Substantial evidence indicates that G-proteins act as signal transducers by coupling receptors (R) to effectors (E). A similar function has been suggested but not proven for the ras gene products. Known G-proteins include Gs and Gi, the G-proteins associated with stimulation and inhibition, respectively, of adenylate cyclase; transducin (TD), the G-protein coupling rhodopsin to cGMP phosphodiesterase in rod photoreceptors (Bitensky, M.W. et al. (1981) Curr. Top. Membr. Transp. 15, 237-271; Stryer, L. (1986) Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 9, 87-119), and Go, a G-protein of unknown function that is highly abundant in brain (Sternweis, P.C. and Robishaw, J.D. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 13806-13813; Neer, E.J. et al. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 14222-14229). G-proteins also participate in other signal transduction pathways, notably that involving phosphoinositide breakdown. In this review, I highlight recent progress in our understanding of the structure, function, and diversity of G-proteins. PMID:2435586

  3. Activation of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxins by native and recombinant adenosine diphosphate-ribosylation factors, 20-kD guanine nucleotide-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C M; Chang, P P; Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Price, S R; Kunz, B C; Moss, J; Twiddy, E M; Holmes, R K

    1991-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) are responsible in part for "traveler's diarrhea" and related diarrheal illnesses. The family of LTs comprises two serogroups termed LT-I and LT-II; each serogroup includes two or more antigenic variants. The effects of LTs result from ADP ribosylation of Gs alpha, a stimulatory component of adenylyl cyclase; the mechanism of action is identical to that of cholera toxin (CT). The ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of CT is enhanced by 20-kD guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, known as ADP-ribosylation factors or ARFs. These proteins directly activate the CTA1 catalytic unit and stimulate its ADP ribosylation of Gs alpha, other proteins, and simple guanidino compounds (e.g., agmatine). Because of the similarities between CT and LTs, we investigated the effects of purified bovine brain ARF and a recombinant form of bovine ARF synthesized in Escherichia coli on LT activity. ARF enhanced the LT-I-, LT-IIa-, and LT-IIb-catalyzed ADP ribosylation of agmatine, as well as the auto-ADP ribosylation of the toxin catalytic unit. Stimulation of ADP-ribosylagmatine formation by LTs and CT in the presence of ARF was GTP dependent and enhanced by sodium dodecyl sulfate. With agmatine as substrate, LT-IIa and LT-IIb exhibited less than 1% the activity of CT and LT-Ih. CT and LTs catalyzed ADP-ribosyl-Gs alpha formation in a reaction dependent on ARF, GTP, and dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine/cholate. With Gs alpha as substrate, the ADP-ribosyltransferase activities of the toxins were similar, although CT and LT-Ih appeared to be slightly more active than LT-IIa and LT-IIb. Thus, LT-IIa and LT-IIb appear to differ somewhat from CT and LT-Ih in substrate specificity. Responsiveness to stimulation by ARF, GTP, and phospholipid/detergent as well as the specificity of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity are functions of LTs from serogroups LT-I and LT-II that are shared with CT. Images PMID:1902492

  4. Global discovery of protein kinases and other nucleotide-binding proteins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins, such as protein kinases, ATPases and GTP-binding proteins, are among the most important families of proteins that are involved in a number of pivotal cellular processes. However, global study of the structure, function, and expression level of nucleotide-binding proteins as well as protein-nucleotide interactions can hardly be achieved with the use of conventional approaches owing to enormous diversity of the nucleotide-binding protein family. Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation, coupled with a variety of nucleotide-binding protein enrichment methods, rendered MS-based proteomics a powerful tool for the comprehensive characterizations of the nucleotide-binding proteome, especially the kinome. Here, we review the recent developments in the use of mass spectrometry, together with general and widely used affinity enrichment approaches, for the proteome-wide capture, identification and quantification of nucleotide-binding proteins, including protein kinases, ATPases, GTPases, and other nucleotide-binding proteins. The working principles, advantages, and limitations of each enrichment platform in identifying nucleotide-binding proteins as well as profiling protein-nucleotide interactions are summarized. The perspectives in developing novel MS-based nucleotide-binding protein detection platform are also discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:601-619, 2016. PMID:25376990

  5. Nucleotide Binding Site Communication in Arabidopsis thaliana Adenosine 5;-Phosphosulfate Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-08-31

    Adenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of adenosine 3{prime}-phosphate 5{prime}-phosphosulfate (PAPS), which is an essential metabolite for sulfur assimilation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Using APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana, we examine the energetics of nucleotide binary and ternary complex formation and probe active site features that coordinate the order of ligand addition. Calorimetric analysis shows that binding can occur first at either nucleotide site, but that initial interaction at the ATP/ADP site was favored and enhanced affinity for APS in the second site by 50-fold. The thermodynamics of the two possible binding models (i.e. ATP first versus APS first) differs and implies that active site structural changes guide the order of nucleotide addition. The ligand binding analysis also supports an earlier suggestion of intermolecular interactions in the dimeric APSK structure. Crystallographic, site-directed mutagenesis, and energetic analyses of oxyanion recognition by the P-loop in the ATP/ADP binding site and the role of Asp136, which bridges the ATP/ADP and APS/PAPS binding sites, suggest how the ordered nucleotide binding sequence and structural changes are dynamically coordinated for catalysis.

  6. Structure of the nucleotide-binding subunit B of the energy producer A1A0 ATP synthase in complex with adenosine diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Manimekalai, Malathy Sony Subramanian; Grüber, Gerhard

    2008-11-01

    A1A0 ATP synthases are the major energy producers in archaea. Like the related prokaryotic and eukaryotic F1F0 ATP synthases, they are responsible for most of the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate. The catalytic events of A1A0 ATP synthases take place inside the A3B3 hexamer of the A1 domain. Recently, the crystallographic structure of the nucleotide-free subunit B of Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A1A0 ATP synthase has been determined at 1.5 A resolution. To understand more about the nucleotide-binding mechanism, a protocol has been developed to crystallize the subunit B-ADP complex. The crystallographic structure of this complex has been solved at 2.7 A resolution. The ADP occupies a position between the essential phosphate-binding loop and amino-acid residue Phe149, which are involved in the binding of the antibiotic efrapeptin in the related F1F0 ATP synthases. This trapped ADP location is about 13 A distant from its final binding site and is therefore called the transition ADP-binding position. In the trapped ADP position the structure of subunit B adopts a different conformation, mainly in its C-terminal domain and also in the final nucleotide-binding site of the central alphabeta-domain. This atomic model provides insight into how the substrate enters into the nucleotide-binding protein and thereby into the catalytic A3B3 domain. PMID:19020348

  7. Transcription profiling of guanine nucleotide binding proteins during developmental regulation, and pesticide response in Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guanine nucleotide binding proteins (GNBP or G-protein) are glycoproteins anchored on the cytoplasmic cell membrane, and are mediators for many cellular processes. Complete cDNA of guanine nucleotide-binding protein gene ß-subunit (SiGNBP) was cloned and sequenced from S. invicta workers. To detect ...

  8. Transduction proteins of olfactory receptor cells: identification of guanine nucleotide binding proteins and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Anholt, R.R.H.; Mumby, S.M.; Stoffers, D.A.; Girard, P.R.; Kuo, J.F.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-02-10

    The authors have analyzed guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) in the olfactory epithelium of Rana catesbeiana using subunit-specific antisera. The olfactory epithelium contained the ..cap alpha.. subunits of three G-proteins, migrating on polyacrylamide gels in SDS with apparent molecular weights of 45,000, 42,000, and 40,000, corresponding to G/sub s/, G/sub i/, and G/sub o/, respectively. A single ..beta.. subunit with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000 was detected. An antiserum against the ..cap alpha.. subunit of retinal transducin failed to detect immunoreactive proteins in olfactory cilia detached from the epithelium. The olfactory cilia appeared to be enriched in immunoreactive G/sub s..cap alpha../ relative to G/sub ichemically bond/ and G/sub ochemically bond/ when compared to membranes prepared from the olfactory epithelium after detachment of the cilia. Bound antibody was detected by autoradiography after incubation with (/sup 125/I)protein. Immunohistochemical studies using an antiserum against the ..beta.. subunit of G-proteins revealed intense staining of the ciliary surface of the olfactory epithelium and of the axon bundles in the lamina propria. In contrast, an antiserum against a common sequence of the ..cap alpha.. subunits preferentially stained the cell membranes of the olfactory receptor cells and the acinar cells of Bowman's glands and the deep submucosal glands. In addition to G-proteins, they have identified protein kinase C in olfactory cilia via a protein kinase C specific antiserum and via phorbol ester binding. However, in contrast to the G-proteins, protein kinase C occurred also in cilia isolated from respiratory epithelium.

  9. Activation of immobilized, biotinylated choleragen AI protein by a 19-kilodalton guanine nucleotide-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Noda, M; Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Bobak, D A; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1989-09-19

    Cholera toxin catalyzes the ADP-ribosylation that results in activation of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein of the adenylyl cyclase system, known as Gs. The toxin also ADP-ribosylates other proteins and simple guanidino compounds and auto-ADP-ribosylates its AI protein (CTA1). All of the ADP-ribosyltransferase activities of CTAI are enhanced by 19-21-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins known as ADP-ribosylation factors, or ARFs. CTAI contains a single cysteine located near the carboxy terminus. CTAI was immobilized through this cysteine by reaction with iodoacetyl-N-biotinyl-hexylenediamine and binding of the resulting biotinylated protein to avidin-agarose. Immobilized CTAI catalyzed the ARF-stimulated ADP-ribosylation of agmatine. The reaction was enhanced by detergents and phospholipid, but the fold stimulation by purified sARF-II from bovine brain was considerably less than that observed with free CTA. ADP-ribosylation of Gsa by immobilized CTAI, which was somewhat enhanced by sARF-II, was much less than predicted on the basis of the NAD:agmatine ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Immobilized CTAI catalyzed its own auto-ADP-ribosylation as well as the ADP-ribosylation of the immobilized avidin and CTA2, with relatively little stimulation by sARF-II. ADP-ribosylation of CTA2 by free CTAI is minimal. These observations are consistent with the conclusion that the cysteine near the carboxy terminus of the toxin is not critical for ADP-ribosyltransferase activity or for its regulation by sARF-II. Biotinylation and immobilization of the toxin through this cysteine may, however, limit accessibility to Gsa or SARF-II, or perhaps otherwise reduce interaction with these proteins whether as substrates or activator. PMID:2514798

  10. Proteome-wide Discovery and Characterizations of Nucleotide-binding Proteins with Affinity-labeled Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Jiang, Xinning; Wang, Yinsheng

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins play pivotal roles in many cellular processes including cell signaling. However, targeted study of sub-proteome of nucleotide-binding proteins, especially protein kinases and GTP-binding proteins, remained challenging. Here, we reported a general strategy in using affinity-labeled chemical probes to enrich, identify, and quantify ATP- and GTP-binding proteins in the entire human proteome. Our results revealed that the ATP/GTP affinity probes facilitated the identification of 100 GTP-binding proteins and 206 kinases with the use of low mg quantities of lysate of HL-60 cells. In combination with the use of SILAC-based quantitative proteomics method, we assessed the ATP/GTP binding selectivities of nucleotide-binding proteins at the global proteome scale. Our results confirmed known and, more importantly, unveiled new ATP/GTP-binding preferences of hundreds of nucleotide-binding proteins. Additionally, our strategy led to the identification of three and one unique nucleotide-binding motifs for kinases and GTP-binding proteins, respectively, and the characterizations of the nucleotide binding selectivities of individual motifs. Our strategy for capturing and characterizing ATP/GTP-binding proteins should be generally applicable for those proteins that can interact with other nucleotides. PMID:23413923

  11. A Nucleotide Phosphatase Activity in the Nucleotide Binding Domain of an Orphan Resistance Protein from Rice*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Pohl, Ehmke; Hussey, Patrick J.; Cann, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Plant resistance proteins (R-proteins) are key components of the plant immune system activated in response to a plethora of different pathogens. R-proteins are P-loop NTPase superfamily members, and current models describe their main function as ATPases in defense signaling pathways. Here we show that a subset of R-proteins have evolved a new function to combat pathogen infection. This subset of R-proteins possesses a nucleotide phosphatase activity in the nucleotide-binding domain. Related R-proteins that fall in the same phylogenetic clade all show the same nucleotide phosphatase activity indicating a conserved function within at least a subset of R-proteins. R-protein nucleotide phosphatases catalyze the production of nucleoside from nucleotide with the nucleotide monophosphate as the preferred substrate. Mutation of conserved catalytic residues substantially reduced activity consistent with the biochemistry of P-loop NTPases. Kinetic analysis, analytical gel filtration, and chemical cross-linking demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding domain was active as a multimer. Nuclear magnetic resonance and nucleotide analogues identified the terminal phosphate bond as the target of a reaction that utilized a metal-mediated nucleophilic attack by water on the phosphoester. In conclusion, we have identified a group of R-proteins with a unique function. This biochemical activity appears to have co-evolved with plants in signaling pathways designed to resist pathogen attack. PMID:22157756

  12. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Blatt, C; Eversole-Cire, P; Cohn, V H; Zollman, S; Fournier, R E; Mohandas, L T; Nesbitt, M; Lugo, T; Jones, D T; Reed, R R

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding alpha-subunit proteins, two different beta subunits, and one gamma subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The beta subunits were also assigned--GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extent of the G alpha gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases with genes corresponding to G proteins. PMID:2902634

  13. Cytosolic Na+ Controls an Epithelial Na+ Channel Via the Go Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Regulatory Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komwatana, P.; Dinudom, A.; Young, J. A.; Cook, D. I.

    1996-07-01

    In tight Na+-absorbing epithelial cells, the rate of Na+ entry through amiloride-sensitive apical membrane Na+ channels is matched to basolateral Na+ extrusion so that cell Na+ concentration and volume remain steady. Control of this process by regulation of apical Na+ channels has been attributed to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration or pH, secondary to changes in cytosolic Na+ concentration, although cytosolic Cl- seems also to be involved. Using mouse mandibular gland duct cells, we now demonstrate that increasing cytosolic Na+ concentration inhibits apical Na+ channels independent of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, pH, or Cl-, and the effect is blocked by GDP-β -S, pertussis toxin, and antibodies against the α -subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Go). In contrast, the inhibitory effect of cytosolic anions is blocked by antibodies to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Gi1/Gi2. It thus appears that apical Na+ channels are regulated by Go and Gi proteins, the activities of which are controlled, respectively, by cytosolic Na+ and Cl-.

  14. Crystal structure of cyclic nucleotide-binding-like protein from Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    He, Zheng; Gao, Yuan; Dong, Jing; Ke, Yuehua; Li, Xuemei; Chen, Zeliang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-12-25

    The cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB)-like protein (CNB-L) from Brucella abortus shares sequence homology with CNB domain-containing proteins. We determined the crystal structure of CNB-L at 2.0 Å resolution in the absence of its C-terminal helix and nucleotide. The 3D structure of CNB-L is in a two-fold symmetric form. Each protomer shows high structure similarity to that of cGMP-binding domain-containing proteins, and likely mimics their nucleotide-free conformation. A key residue, Glu17, mediates the dimerization and prevents binding of cNMP to the canonical ligand-pocket. The structurally observed dimer of CNB-L is stable in solution, and thus is likely to be biologically relevant. PMID:26549229

  15. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted. PMID:26028028

  16. Interactions of. beta. -adrenergic receptors with guanine nucleotide-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors were investigated with radioligand binding assays using the agonists (/sup 3/H)hydroxybenzyl-isoproterenol (/sup 3/H-HBI) and (/sup 3/H)epinephrine (/sup 3/H-EPI), and the antagonist (/sup 125/I)iodopindolol (/sup 125/I-IPIN). Membranes prepared from L6 myoblasts bound (/sup 3/H)HBI, (/sup 3/H)EPI, and (/sup 125/I)IPIN with high affinity and Scatchard plots revealed densities of 222 +/- 23, 111 +/- 7, and 325 +/- 37 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. Binding of (/sup 3/H)HBI and (/sup 3/H)EPI was inhibited allosterically by guanine nucleotides. Membranes prepared from wild-type S49 lymphoma cells bound (/sup 3/H)HBI and (/sup 125/I)IPIN with high affinity and Scatchard plots revealed densities of 48.9 +/- 7.1 and 196 +/- 29 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. Binding of (/sup 3/H)HBI was inhibited allosterically by GTP. Similar results were obtained with membranes prepared from the adenylate cyclase deficient variant of S49 lymphoma cells (cyc-), which does not contain a functional stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (N/sub s/), but does contain a functional inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (N/sub i/). Binding of (/sup 3/H)HBI to membranes prepared from cyc- S49 cells was inhibited by pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin. These results suggest that ..beta..-adrenergic receptors on membranes prepared from cyc- S49 cells interact with N/sub i/ to form a ternary complex composed of agonist, receptor, and N/sub i/.

  17. Myristoylated. cap alpha. subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, J.E.; Mumby, S.M.; Casey, P.J.; Gilman, A.G.; Sefton, B.M.

    1987-11-01

    Antisera directed against specific subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) were used to immunoprecipitate these polypeptides from metabolically labeled cells. This technique detects, in extracts of a human astrocytoma cell line, the ..cap alpha.. subunits of G/sub s/ (stimulatory) (..cap alpha../sub 45/ and ..cap alpha../sub 52/), a 41-kDa subunit of G/sub i/ (inhibitory) (..cap alpha../sub 41/), a 40-kDa protein (..cap alpha../sub 40/), and the 36-kDa ..beta.. subunit. No protein that comigrated with the ..cap alpha.. subunit of G/sup 0/ (unknown function) (..cap alpha../sub 39/) was detected. In cells grown in the presence of (/sup 3/H)myristic acid, ..cap alpha../sub 41/ and ..cap alpha../sub 40/ contained /sup 3/H label, while the ..beta.. subunit did not. Chemical analysis of lipids attached covalently to purified ..cap alpha../sub 41/ and ..cap alpha../sub 39/ from bovine brain also revealed myristic acid. Similar analysis of brain G protein ..beta.. and ..gamma.. subunits and of G/sub t/ (Transducin) subunits (..cap alpha.., ..beta.., and ..gamma..) failed to reveal fatty acids. The fatty acid associated with ..cap alpha../sub 41/ , ..cap alpha../sub 40/, and ..cap alpha../sub 39/ was stable to treatment with base, suggesting that the lipid is linked to the polypeptide via an amide bond. These GTP binding proteins are thus identified as members of a select group of proteins that contains myristic acid covalently attached to the peptide backbone. Myristate may play an important role in stabilizing interactions of G proteins with phospholipid or with membrane-bound proteins.

  18. Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 is a potential prognosis indicator of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Dong, Shuang; Hu, Jiangfeng; Duan, Bensong; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ruiyun; Zhou, Hongmei; Sheng, Haihui; Gao, Hengjun; Li, Shunlong; Zhang, Xianwen

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 (GNL3) is a GIP-binding nuclear protein that has been reported to be involved in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, cellular senescence and tumorigenesis. This study aimed to investigate the expression level of GNL3 in gastric cancer and to evaluate the relationship between its expression and clinical variables and overall survival of gastric cancer patients. The expression level of GNL3 was examined in 89 human gastric cancer samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. GNL3 in gastric cancer tissues was significantly upregulated compared with paracancerous tissues. GNL3 expression in adjacent non-cancerous tissues was associated with sex and tumor size. Survival analyses showed that GNL3 expression in both gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancerous tissues were not related to overall survival. However, in the subgroup of patients with larger tumor size (≥ 6 cm), a close association was found between GNL3 expression in gastric cancer tissues and overall survival. GNL3-positive patients had a shorter survival than GNL3-negative patients. Our study suggests that GNL3 might play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer and serve as a biomarker for poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients. PMID:26722529

  19. The selective phosphorylation of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Receptor-activated signal transduction pathways regulate the responsiveness of cells to external stimuli. These transduction pathways themselves are subject to regulation, most commonly by phosphorylation. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G Proteins), as requisite signal transducing elements for many plasma membrane receptors, are considered likely targets for regulation by phosphorylation. Protein kinase C (PKC) has been shown to phosphorylate the {alpha} subunit of G{sub i} and other G proteins in solution. However, the occurrence of the phosphorylation of G{sub 1} within intact cells in response to activation of PKC has not been rigorously demonstrated. In this thesis, the extent to which the {alpha} subunits of G{sub i} undergo phosphorylation within human platelets in response to activation of PKC was examined by means of radiolabeling and immunoprecipitation. Incubation of platelets with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a potent activator of PKC, promoted the phosphorylation of several proteins within saponin-permeabilized and intact platelets incubated with ({gamma}{sup 32}P)ATP and ({sup 32}P)H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, respectively. None of the phosphoproteins, however, were precipitated by either of two antisera containing antibodies differing in specificities for epitopes within G{sub i{alpha}}-despite precipitation of a substantial fraction of the subunit itself. In contrast, other antisera, containing antibodies specific for the recently describe G{sub z{alpha}}, or antibodies for both G{sub z{alpha}} and G{sub i{alpha}}, precipitated a 40-kDa phosphoprotein.

  20. Architecture of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein and structural changes associated with phosphorylation and nucleotide binding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Zhao, Zhefeng; Birtley, James R; Riordan, John R; Ford, Robert C

    2009-09-01

    We describe biochemical and structural studies of the isolated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. Using electron cryomicroscopy, low resolution three-dimensional structures have been obtained for the non-phosphorylated protein in the absence of nucleotide and for the phosphorylated protein with ATP. In the latter state, the cytosolic nucleotide-binding domains move closer together, forming a more compact packing arrangement. Associated with this is a reorganization within the cylindrical transmembrane domains, consistent with a shift from an inward-facing to outward-facing configuration. A region of density in the non-phosphorylated protein that extends from the bottom of the cytosolic regions up to the transmembrane domains is hypothesised to represent the unique regulatory region of CFTR. These data offer insights into the architecture of this ATP-binding cassette protein, and shed light on the global motions associated with nucleotide binding and priming of the chloride channel via phosphorylation of the regulatory region. PMID:19524678

  1. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein regulation of melatonin receptors in lizard brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkees, S.A.; Carlson, L.L.; Reppert, S.M. )

    1989-05-01

    Melatonin receptors were identified and characterized in crude membrane preparations from lizard brain by using {sup 125}I-labeled melatonin ({sup 125}I-Mel), a potent melatonin agonist. {sup 125}I-Mel binding sites were saturable; Scatchard analysis revealed high-affinity and lower affinity binding sites, with apparent K{sub d} of 2.3 {plus minus} 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} M and 2.06 {plus minus} 0.43 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} M, respectively. Binding was reversible and inhibited by melatonin and closely related analogs but not by serotonin or norepinephrine. Treatment of crude membranes with the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)), significantly reduced the number of high-affinity receptors and increased the dissociation rate of {sup 125}I-Mel from its receptor. Furthermore, GTP({gamma}S) treatment of ligand-receptor complexes solubilized by Triton X-100 also led to a rapid dissociation of {sup 125}I-Mel from solubilized ligand-receptor complexes. Gel filtration chromatography of solubilized ligand-receptor complexes revealed two major peaks of radioactivity corresponding to M{sub r} > 400,000 and M{sub r} ca. 110,000. This elution profile was markedly altered by pretreatment with GTP({gamma}S) before solubilization; only the M{sub r} 110,000 peak was present in GTP({gamma}S)-pretreated membranes. The results strongly suggest that {sup 125}I-mel binding sites in lizard brain are melatonin receptors, with agonist-promoted guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) coupling and that the apparent molecular size of receptors uncoupled from G proteins is about 110,000.

  2. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhongshan; Xiang, Quanju; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Dong, Haohao; He, Chuan; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng; Wang, Wenjian; Dong, Changjiang

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}. • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics.

  3. Role of guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) in vasopressin-induced responses of a vascular smooth muscle cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Nambi, P.; Aiyar, N.; Whitman, M.; Stassen, F.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A-10) carry vascular V1 vasopressin receptors. In these cells, vasopressin inhibits isoproterenol-induced cAMP accumulation and stimulates phosphatidylinositol turnover and Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization. Pretreatment of the cells with phorbol esters resulted in inhibition of the vasopressin-induced responses. The inactive phorbol ester aPDD was ineffective. These data suggested that phorbol ester might cause phosphorylation of the vasopressin receptor and/or coupling protein(s). Here, they studied the role of guanine nucleotide binding proteins by employing the novel radiolabeled vasopressin antagonist (/sup 3/H)-SKF 101926. In competition experiments with cell membranes, Gpp(NH)p shifted the vasopressin curve to the right indicating decreased agonist affinity. Phorbol ester pretreatment abolished the Gpp(NH)p effect. Pretreatment of the cells with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) resulted in inhibition of vasopressin-induced phosphatidyinositol turnover. NEM also abolished the decrease in agonist affinity caused by Gpp(NH)p. These data showed that NEM and phorbol ester pretreatment of smooth muscle cells functionally uncoupled the vasopressin receptors and suggested that vasopressin V1 receptor responses are mediated through guanine nucleotide binding protein(s).

  4. Molecular modeling of the heterodimer of human CFTR's nucleotide-binding domains using a protein-protein docking approach.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-You; Bolser, Diana; Liu, Hao-Yang; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2009-04-01

    We have presented a new protein-protein docking approach to model heterodimeric structures based on the conformations of the monomeric units. The conventional modeling method relies on superimposing two monomeric structures onto the crystal structure of a homologous protein dimer. The resulting structure may exhibit severe backbone clashes at the dimeric interface depending on the backbone dissimilarity between the target and template proteins. Our method overcomes the backbone clashing problem and requires no a priori knowledge of the dimeric structure of a homologous protein. Here we used human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel whose dysfunction causes cystic fibrosis, for illustration. The two intracellular nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR control the opening and closing of the channel. Yet, the structure of the CFTR's NBD1-NBD2 complex has not been experimentally determined. Thus, correct modeling of this heterodimeric structure is valuable for understanding CFTR functions and would have potential applications for drug design for cystic fibrosis treatment. Based on the crystal structure of human CFTR's NBD1, we constructed a model of the NBD1-NBD2 complex. The constructed model is consistent with the dimeric mode observed in the crystal structures of other ABC transporters. To verify our structural model, an ATP substrate was docked into the nucleotide-binding site. The predicted binding mode shows consistency with related crystallographic findings and CFTR functional studies. Finally, genistein, an agent that enhances CFTR activity, though the mechanism for such enhancement is unclear, was docked to the model. Our predictions agreed with genistein's bell-shaped dose-response relationship. Potential mutagenesis experiments were proposed for understanding the potentiation mechanism of genistein and for providing insightful information for drug design targeting at CFTR. The method used in this study can be

  5. Mutagenesis of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli: targeting positions 72 and 82 of the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Belduz, A O; Lee, E J; Harman, J G

    1993-01-01

    The 3', 5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binding pocket of the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli was mutagenized to substitute leucine, glutamine, or aspartate for glutamate 72; and lysine, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, or glutamine for arginine 82. Substitutions were made in wild-type CRP and in a CRP*, or cAMP-independent, form of the protein to assess the effects of the amino acid substitutions on CRP structure. Cells containing the binding pocket residue-substituted forms of CRP were characterized through beta-galactosidase activity and by measurement of cAMP binding activity. This study confirms a role for both glutamate 72 and arginine 82 in cAMP binding and activation of CRP. Glutamine or leucine substitution of glutamate 72 produced forms of CRP having low affinity for the cAMP and unresponsive to the nucleotide. Aspartate substituted for glutamate 72 produced a low affinity cAMP-responsive form of CRP. CRP has a stringent requirement for the positioning of the position 72 glutamate carboxyl group within the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket. Results of this study also indicate that there are differences in the binding requirements of cAMP and cGMP, a competitive inhibitor of cAMP binding to CRP. PMID:8388097

  6. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-2-like 1, a new Annexin A7 interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yue; Meng, Jinyi; Huang, Yuhong; Wu, Jun; Wang, Bo; Ibrahim, Mohammed M.; Tang, Jianwu

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • RACK1 formed a complex with Annexin A7. • Depletion of RACK1 inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion. • RACK1 RNAi abolished RACK1-Annexin A7 interaction. • RACK1-Annexin A7 may play a role in regulating the metastatic potentials. - Abstract: We report for the first time that Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-2-like 1 (RACK1) formed a complex with Annexin A7. Hca-F and Hca-P are a pair of syngeneic mouse hepatocarcinoma cell lines established and maintained in our laboratory. Our previous study showed that both Annexin A7 and RACK1 were expressed higher in Hca-F (lymph node metastasis >70%) than Hca-P (lymph node metastasis <30%). Suppression of Annexin A7 expression in Hca-F cells induced decreased migration and invasion ability. In this study, knockdown of RACK1 by RNA interference (RNAi) had the same impact on metastasis potential of Hca-F cells as Annexin A7 down-regulation. Furthermore, by co-immunoprecipitation and double immunofluorescence confocal imaging, we found that RACK1 was in complex with Annexin A7 in control cells, but not in the RACK1-down-regulated cells, indicating the abolishment of RACK1-Annexin A7 interaction in Hca-F cells by RACK1 RNAi. Taken together, these results suggest that RACK1-Annexin A7 interaction may be one of the means by which RACK1 and Annexin A7 influence the metastasis potential of mouse hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro.

  7. Structural and functional similarities between the nucleotide-binding domains of CFTR and GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Carson, M R; Welsh, M J

    1995-01-01

    The opening and closing of the CFTR Cl- channel are regulated by ATP hydrolysis at its two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). However, the mechanism and functional significance of ATP hydrolysis are unknown. Sequence similarity between the NBDs of CFTR and GTP-binding proteins suggested the NBDs might have a structure and perhaps a function like that of GTP-binding proteins. Based on this similarity, we predicted that the terminal residue of the LSGGQ motif in the NBDs of CFTR corresponds to a highly conserved glutamine residue in GTP-binding proteins that directly catalyzes the GTPase reaction. Mutations of this residue in NBD1 or NBD2, which were predicted to increase or decrease the rate of hydrolysis, altered the duration of channel closed and open times in a specific manner without altering ion conduction properties or ADP-dependent inhibition. These results suggest that the NBDs of CFTR, and consequently other ABC transporters, may have a structure and a function analogous to those of GTP-binding proteins. We conclude that the rates of ATP hydrolysis at NBD1 and at NBD2 determine the duration of the two states of the channel, closed and open, much as the rate of GTP hydrolysis by GTP-binding proteins determines the duration of their active state. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:8599650

  8. Functional reconstitution of prostaglandin E receptor from bovine adrenal medulla with guanine nucleotide binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Negishi, M.; Ito, S.; Yokohama, H.; Hayashi, H.; Katada, T.; Ui, M.; Hayaishi, O.

    1988-05-15

    Prostaglandin E/sub 2/ (PEG/sub 2/) was found to bind specifically to a 100,000 x g pellet prepared from bovine adrenal medulla. The PGE receptor was associated with a GTP-binding protein (G-protein) and could be covalently cross-linked with this G-protein by dithiobis(succinimidyl propionate) in the 100,000 x g pellet. In order to characterize the G-protein associated with the PGE receptor and reconstitute these proteins in phospholipid vesicles, the authors purified the G-protein to apparent homogeneity from the 100,000 x g pellet. The G-protein served as a substrate of pertussis toxin but differed in its ..cap alpha.. subunit from two known pertussis toxin substrate G-proteins (G/sub i/ and G/sub 0/) purified from bovine brain. The molecular weight of the ..cap alpha.. subunit was 40,000, which is between those of G/sub i/ and G/sub 0/. The purified protein was also distinguished immunologically from G/sub i/ and G/sub 0/ and was referred to as G/sub am/. Reconstitution of the PGE receptor with pure C/sub am/, G/sub i/, or G/sub 0/ in phospholipid vesicles resulted in a remarkable restoration of (/sup 3/H)PGE/sub 2/ binding activity in a GTP-dependent manner. The efficiency of these three G-proteins in this capacity was roughly equal. When pertussis toxin- or N-ethylmaleimide-treated G-proteins, instead of the native ones, were reconstituted into vesicles, the restoration of binding activity was no longer observed. These results indicate that the PGE receptor can couple functionally with G/sub am/, G/sub i/, or G/sub 0/ in phospholipid vesicles and suggest that G/sub am/ may be involved in signal transduction of the PGE receptor in bovine adrenal medulla.

  9. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Meisheng; Tran, V.T.; Fong, H.K.W. ); Pandey, S. )

    1991-05-01

    The expression of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was analyzed by RNA blot hybridization and cDNA amplification. Both adult and fetal human RPE cells contain mRNA for multiple G protein {alpha} subunits (G{alpha}) including G{sub s}{alpha}, G{sub i-1}{alpha}, G{sub i-2}{alpha}, G{sub i-3}{alpha}, and G{sub z}{alpha} (or G{sub x}{alpha}), where G{sub s} and G{sub i} are proteins that stimulate or inhibit adenylyl cyclase, respectively, and G{sub z} is a protein that may mediate pertussis toxin-insensitive events. Other G{alpha}-related mRNA transcripts were detected in fetal RPE cells by low-stringency hybridization to G{sub i-2}{alpha} and G{sub s}{alpha} protein-coding cDNA probes. The diversity of G proteins in RPE cells was further studied by cDNA amplification with reverse transcriptase and the polymerase chain reaction. This approach revealed that, besides the above mentioned members of the G{alpha} gene family, at least two other G{alpha} subunits are expressed in RPE cells. Human retinal cDNA clones that encode one of the additional G{alpha} subunits were isolated and characterized. The results indicate that this G{alpha} subunit belongs to a separate subfamily of G proteins that may be insensitive to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

  10. Conformational dynamics of a G-protein α subunit is tightly regulated by nucleotide binding.

    PubMed

    Goricanec, David; Stehle, Ralf; Egloff, Pascal; Grigoriu, Simina; Plückthun, Andreas; Wagner, Gerhard; Hagn, Franz

    2016-06-28

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play a pivotal role in the signal-transduction pathways initiated by G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation. Agonist-receptor binding causes GDP-to-GTP exchange and dissociation of the Gα subunit from the heterotrimeric G protein, leading to downstream signaling. Here, we studied the internal mobility of a G-protein α subunit in its apo and nucleotide-bound forms and characterized their dynamical features at multiple time scales using solution NMR, small-angle X-ray scattering, and molecular dynamics simulations. We find that binding of GTP analogs leads to a rigid and closed arrangement of the Gα subdomain, whereas the apo and GDP-bound forms are considerably more open and dynamic. Furthermore, we were able to detect two conformational states of the Gα Ras domain in slow exchange whose populations are regulated by binding to nucleotides and a GPCR. One of these conformational states, the open state, binds to the GPCR; the second conformation, the closed state, shows no interaction with the receptor. Binding to the GPCR stabilizes the open state. This study provides an in-depth analysis of the conformational landscape and the switching function of a G-protein α subunit and the influence of a GPCR in that landscape. PMID:27298341

  11. Guanine nucleotide binding proteins in zucchini seedlings: Characterization and interactions with the NPA receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Lindeberg, M.; Jacobs, M. )

    1989-04-01

    A microsomal membrane preparation from hypocotyls of dark-grown Cucurbita pepo L. seedlings contains specific high-affinity binding sites for the non-hydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio) triphosphate (GTP-{gamma}-S). Both the binding affinity and the pattern of binding specificity for GTP and GTP analogs are similar to animal G-proteins, and two zucchini membrane proteins are recognized in western blots by antiserum specific for the {sigma} subunit of platelet G{sub s} protein. GTP-{gamma}-S can increase specific naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) binding in zucchini microsomal membrane preparations, with its stimulation increasing with large tissue age. Al{sup +3} and F{sup {minus}} agents known to activate G-proteins - decreased NPA specific binding by ca. 15%. In tests of in vitro auxin transport employing zucchini plasma membrane vesicles, AlF{sup {minus}}{sub 4} strongly inhibited {sup 3}H-indoleacetic acid nor accumulation; GTP-{gamma}-S effects on this system will be discussed.

  12. A potential role for guanine nucleotide-binding protein in the regulation of endosomal proton transport.

    PubMed Central

    Gurich, R W; Codina, J; DuBose, T D

    1991-01-01

    The effects of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) and GTP-gamma-S, known activators of GTP binding proteins, on proton transport were investigated in endosome-enriched vesicles (endosomes). Endosomes were prepared from rabbit renal cortex following the intravenous injection of FITC-dextran. The rate of intravesicular acidification was determined by measuring changes in fluorescence of FITC-dextran. Both GTP and GTP-gamma-S stimulated significantly the initial rate of proton transport. In contrast, GDP-beta-S, which does not activate GTP binding proteins, inhibited proton transport. The rank order of stimulation was GTP-gamma-S greater than GTP greater than control greater than GDP-beta-S. GTP-gamma-S stimulation of proton transport was also observed under conditions in which chloride entry was eliminated, i.e., 0 mM external chloride concentration in the presence of potassium/valinomycin voltage clamping. GTP-gamma-S did not affect proton leak in endosomes as determined by collapse of H+ ATPase-generated pH gradients. ADP ribosylation by treatment of endosomal membranes with pertussis toxin revealed two substrates corresponding to the 39-41 kD region and comigrating with alpha i subunits. Pretreatment of the membranes with pertussis toxin had no effect on proton transport in the absence of GTP or GTP-gamma-S. However, pretreatment with pertussis toxin blocked the stimulation of proton transport by GTP. In contrast, as reported in other membranes by others previously, pertussis toxin did not prevent the stimulation of proton transport by GTP-gamma-S. These findings, taken together, indicate that GTP binding proteins are present in endosomal membranes derived from renal cortex and that activation of G protein by GTP and GTP-gamma-S stimulates proton transport in a rank order identical to that reported for other transport pathways modulated by Gi proteins. Therefore, these studies suggest that G proteins are capable of stimulating the vacuolar H ATPase of endosomes

  13. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D.; Dixon, Christopher H.; Spies, Gerhard B.; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J.; Westerhof, Lotte B.; Gawehns, Fleur K. K.; Knight, Marc R.; Sharples, Gary J.; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. PMID:26306038

  14. Role of Nucleotide Binding and GTPase Domain Dimerization in Dynamin-like Myxovirus Resistance Protein A for GTPase Activation and Antiviral Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Alexej; Graf, Laura; Olal, Daniel; von der Malsburg, Alexander; Gao, Song; Kochs, Georg; Daumke, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Myxovirus resistance (Mx) GTPases are induced by interferon and inhibit multiple viruses, including influenza and human immunodeficiency viruses. They have the characteristic domain architecture of dynamin-related proteins with an N-terminal GTPase (G) domain, a bundle signaling element, and a C-terminal stalk responsible for self-assembly and effector functions. Human MxA (also called MX1) is expressed in the cytoplasm and is partly associated with membranes of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum. It shows a protein concentration-dependent increase in GTPase activity, indicating regulation of GTP hydrolysis via G domain dimerization. Here, we characterized a panel of G domain mutants in MxA to clarify the role of GTP binding and the importance of the G domain interface for the catalytic and antiviral function of MxA. Residues in the catalytic center of MxA and the nucleotide itself were essential for G domain dimerization and catalytic activation. In pulldown experiments, MxA recognized Thogoto virus nucleocapsid proteins independently of nucleotide binding. However, both nucleotide binding and hydrolysis were required for the antiviral activity against Thogoto, influenza, and La Crosse viruses. We further demonstrate that GTP binding facilitates formation of stable MxA assemblies associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes, whereas nucleotide hydrolysis promotes dynamic redistribution of MxA from cellular membranes to viral targets. Our study highlights the role of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis for the intracellular dynamics of MxA during its antiviral action. PMID:25829498

  15. Role of nucleotide binding and GTPase domain dimerization in dynamin-like myxovirus resistance protein A for GTPase activation and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Dick, Alexej; Graf, Laura; Olal, Daniel; von der Malsburg, Alexander; Gao, Song; Kochs, Georg; Daumke, Oliver

    2015-05-15

    Myxovirus resistance (Mx) GTPases are induced by interferon and inhibit multiple viruses, including influenza and human immunodeficiency viruses. They have the characteristic domain architecture of dynamin-related proteins with an N-terminal GTPase (G) domain, a bundle signaling element, and a C-terminal stalk responsible for self-assembly and effector functions. Human MxA (also called MX1) is expressed in the cytoplasm and is partly associated with membranes of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum. It shows a protein concentration-dependent increase in GTPase activity, indicating regulation of GTP hydrolysis via G domain dimerization. Here, we characterized a panel of G domain mutants in MxA to clarify the role of GTP binding and the importance of the G domain interface for the catalytic and antiviral function of MxA. Residues in the catalytic center of MxA and the nucleotide itself were essential for G domain dimerization and catalytic activation. In pulldown experiments, MxA recognized Thogoto virus nucleocapsid proteins independently of nucleotide binding. However, both nucleotide binding and hydrolysis were required for the antiviral activity against Thogoto, influenza, and La Crosse viruses. We further demonstrate that GTP binding facilitates formation of stable MxA assemblies associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes, whereas nucleotide hydrolysis promotes dynamic redistribution of MxA from cellular membranes to viral targets. Our study highlights the role of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis for the intracellular dynamics of MxA during its antiviral action. PMID:25829498

  16. Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that enhance choleragen ADP-ribosyltransferase activity: nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of an ADP-ribosylation factor cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Price, S R; Nightingale, M; Tsai, S C; Williamson, K C; Adamik, R; Chen, H C; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1988-01-01

    Three (two soluble and one membrane) guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that enhance ADP-ribosylation of the Gs alpha stimulatory subunit of the adenylyl cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) complex by choleragen have recently been purified from bovine brain. To further define the structure and function of these ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), we isolated a cDNA clone (lambda ARF2B) from a bovine retinal library by screening with a mixed heptadecanucleotide probe whose sequence was based on the partial amino acid sequence of one of the soluble ARFs from bovine brain. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of lambda ARF2B with sequences of peptides from the ARF protein (total of 60 amino acids) revealed only two differences. Whether these are cloning artifacts or reflect the existence of more than one ARF protein remains to be determined. Deduced amino acid sequences of ARF, Go alpha (the alpha subunit of a G protein that may be involved in regulation of ion fluxes), and c-Ha-ras gene product p21 show similarities in regions believed to be involved in guanine nucleotide binding and GTP hydrolysis. ARF apparently lacks a site analogous to that ADP-ribosylated by choleragen in G-protein alpha subunits. Although both the ARF proteins and the alpha subunits bind guanine nucleotides and serve as choleragen substrates, they must interact with the toxin A1 peptide in different ways. In addition to serving as an ADP-ribose acceptor, ARF interacts with the toxin in a manner that modifies its catalytic properties. PMID:3135549

  17. Role of Nucleotide-binding and Oligomerization Domain 2 Protein (NOD2) in the Development of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    NOD2 (nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain 2) was initially reported as a susceptibility gene for Crohn's disease, with several studies focused on elucidating its molecular mechanism in the progression of Crohn's disease. We now know that NOD2 is an intracellular bacterial sensing receptor, and that MDP-mediated NOD2 activation drives inflammatory signaling. Various mutations in NOD2 have been reported, with NOD2 loss of function being associated with the development of Crohn's disease and other autoimmune diseases. These results suggest that NOD2 not only has an immune stimulatory function, but also an immune regulatory function. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall; its pathologic progression is highly dependent on the immune balance. This immune balance is regulated by infiltrating monocytes and macrophages, both of which express NOD2. These findings indicate a potential role of NOD2 in atherosclerosis. The purpose of this review is to outline the known roles of NOD2 signaling in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:26557013

  18. Molecular modeling of the heterodimer of human CFTR’s nucleotide-binding domains using a protein–protein docking approach

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng-You; Bolser, Diana; Liu, Hao-Yang; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2009-01-01

    We have presented a new protein–protein docking approach to model heterodimeric structures based on the conformations of the monomeric units. The conventional modeling method relies on superimposing two monomeric structures onto the crystal structure of a homologous protein dimer. The resulting structure may exhibit severe backbone clashes at the dimeric interface depending on the backbone dissimilarity between the target and template proteins. Our method overcomes the backbone clashing problem and requires no a priori knowledge of the dimeric structure of a homologous protein. Here we used human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel whose dysfunction causes cystic fibrosis, for illustration. The two intracellular nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR control the opening and closing of the channel. Yet, the structure of the CFTR’s NBD1–NBD2 complex has not been experimentally determined. Thus, correct modeling of this heterodimeric structure is valuable for understanding CFTR functions and would have potential applications for drug design for cystic fibrosis treatment. Based on the crystal structure of human CFTR’s NBD1, we constructed a model of the NBD1–NBD2 complex. The constructed model is consistent with the dimeric mode observed in the crystal structures of other ABC transporters. To verify our structural model, an ATP substrate was docked into the nucleotide-binding site. The predicted binding mode shows consistency with related crystallographic findings and CFTR functional studies. Finally, genistein, an agent that enhances CFTR activity, though the mechanism for such enhancement is unclear, was docked to the model. Our predictions agreed with genistein’s bell-shaped dose-response relationship. Potential mutagenesis experiments were proposed for understanding the potentiation mechanism of genistein and for providing insightful information for drug design targeting at CFTR. The method used in this

  19. TCR and IL-7 Signaling Are Altered in the Absence of Functional GTPase of the Immune Associated Nucleotide Binding Protein 5 (GIMAP5)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi-Lin; Serrano, Daniel; Ghobadi, Farnaz; Mayhue, Marian; Hoebe, Kasper; Ilangumaran, Subburaj; Ramanathan, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    GTPase of the immune associated nucleotide binding protein (GIMAP) family of proteins are expressed essentially in cells of the hematopoietic system. Mutation in the founding member of this gene family, Gimap5, results in the lymphopenic phenotype in Bio-Breeding diabetes prone rats. In mice, deletion of functional Gimap5 gene affects the survival and renewal of hematopoietic stem cells in addition to the defects observed in T cells. Here we show that T cells from OTII TCR-transgenic Gimap5sph/sph mice do not proliferate in response to its cognate antigen. Furthermore, T cells from Gimap5 mutant rats and mice show decreased phosphorylation of STAT5 following stimulation with IL-7. Our results suggest that functional Gimap5 is required for optimal signaling through TCR and IL-7R in T cells. PMID:27023180

  20. Differential expression during development of ADP-ribosylation factors, 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding protein activators of cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Tsuchiya, M; Chang, P P; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1991-05-01

    Cholera toxin exerts its effects on cells in large part through the ADP-ribosylation of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation is enhanced by approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins termed ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), which are allosteric activators of the toxin catalytic unit. Rabbit antiserum against a purified bovine brain ARF (sARF II) reacted on immunoblots with two approximately 20-kDa ARF-like proteins (sARF I and II) in tissue extracts from bovine, rat, frog, and chicken. Levels of ARF were higher in brain than in non-neural tissues. In rat brain, on the second postnatal day, amounts of sARF I and II were similar. By the 10th postnatal day and thereafter, sARF II predominated. Relative levels of ARF determined by immunoreactivity were in agreement with levels assessed in functional assays of cholera toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. Based on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of human and bovine cDNAs, there appear to be at least six different ARF-like genes. Northern blots of rat brain poly(A)+ RNA were hybridized with cDNA and oligonucleotide probes specific for each of the human and bovine ARF genes. From the second to the 27th postnatal day, ARF 3 mRNA increased, whereas mRNAs for ARFs 2 and 4 decreased; and those for ARFs 1, 5, and 6 were apparently unchanged. Partial amino acid sequence of sARF II is consistent with it being either the ARF 1 or 3 gene product. The developmental changes in rat brain ARF parallel neuronal maturation and synapse formation. PMID:1902473

  1. Reconstitution of rate brain /mu/ opioid receptors with purified guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins, G/sub i/ and G/sub o/

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Hiroshi; Harada, Hitoshi; Nozaki, Masakatsu; Katada, Toshiaki; Ui, Michio; Satoh, Masamichi; Takagi, Hiroshi

    1988-09-01

    Reconstitution of purified /mu/ opioid receptors with purified guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) was investigated. The purified /mu/ opioid receptor (pI 5.6) migrated as a single M/sub r/ 58,000 polypeptide by NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE, a value identical to that obtained by affinity cross-linking purified /mu/ receptors. When purified /mu/ receptors were reconstituted with purified G/sub i/, the G protein that mediates the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, the displacement of (/sup 3/H)naloxone binding by (D-Ala/sup 2/,MePhe/sup 4/,Gly-ol/sup 5/)enkephalin was increased 215-fold; this increase was abolished by adding 100 /mu/M guanosine 5'-(/gamma/-thio)triphosphate. Similar increases in agonist displacement of (/sup 3/H)naloxone binding (33-fold) and its abolition by guanosine 5'-(/gamma/-thio)triphosphate were observed with G/sub o/, the G protein of unknown function, but not with the v-Ki-ras protein p.21. The stoichiometry was such that the stimulation of 1 mol of /mu/ receptor led to the binding of (/sup 3/H)guanosine 5'-(/beta/,/gamma/-imido)triphosphate to 2.5 mol of G/sub i/ or to 1.37 mol of G/sub o/. These results suggest that the purified /mu/ opioid receptor is functionally coupled to G/sub i/ and G/sub o/ in the reconstituted phospholipid vesicles.

  2. Conserved Distal Loop Residues in the Hsp104 and ClpB Middle Domain Contact Nucleotide-binding Domain 2 and Enable Hsp70-dependent Protein Disaggregation*

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis, Morgan E.; Sweeny, Elizabeth A.; Snead, David; Leung, Eunice H.; Go, Michelle S.; Gupta, Kushol; Wendler, Petra; Shorter, James

    2014-01-01

    The homologous hexameric AAA+ proteins, Hsp104 from yeast and ClpB from bacteria, collaborate with Hsp70 to dissolve disordered protein aggregates but employ distinct mechanisms of intersubunit collaboration. How Hsp104 and ClpB coordinate polypeptide handover with Hsp70 is not understood. Here, we define conserved distal loop residues between middle domain (MD) helix 1 and 2 that are unexpectedly critical for Hsp104 and ClpB collaboration with Hsp70. Surprisingly, the Hsp104 and ClpB MD distal loop does not contact Hsp70 but makes intrasubunit contacts with nucleotide-binding domain 2 (NBD2). Thus, the MD does not invariably project out into solution as in one structural model of Hsp104 and ClpB hexamers. These intrasubunit contacts as well as those between MD helix 2 and NBD1 are different in Hsp104 and ClpB. NBD2-MD contacts dampen disaggregase activity and must separate for protein disaggregation. We demonstrate that ClpB requires DnaK more stringently than Hsp104 requires Hsp70 for protein disaggregation. Thus, we reveal key differences in how Hsp104 and ClpB coordinate polypeptide handover with Hsp70, which likely reflects differential tuning for yeast and bacterial proteostasis. PMID:24280225

  3. Fish oil attenuates liver injury caused by LPS in weaned pigs associated with inhibition of TLR4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Liu, Yulan; Zhu, Huiling; Hong, Yu; Wu, Zhifeng; Hou, Yongqing; Li, Quan; Ding, Binying; Yi, Dan; Chen, Hongbo

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated whether fish oil exerted a hepatoprotective effect in a LPS-induced liver injury model via regulation of TLR4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein (NOD) signaling pathways. Twenty-four piglets were used in a 2 × 2 factorial design, and the main factors included diet (5% corn oil or 5% fish oil) and immunological challenge (LPS or saline). Fish oil resulted in enrichment of eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and total (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids in liver. Less severe liver injury was observed in pigs fed fish oil, as evidenced by improved serum biochemical parameters and less severe histological liver damage. In addition, higher expression of liver tight junction proteins, and lower hepatocyte proliferation and higher hepatocyte apoptosis were observed in pigs fed fish oil. The improved liver integrity in pigs fed fish oil was concurrent with reduced hepatic mRNA expression of TLR4, myeloid differentiation factor 88, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 and TNF-α receptor-associated factor 6, and NOD1, NOD2 and receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 2, as well as reduced hepatic protein expression of NF-κB p65, leading to reduced hepatic pro-inflammatory mediators. These results indicate that fish oil improves liver integrity partially via inhibition of TLR4 and NOD signaling pathways under an inflammatory condition. PMID:23339927

  4. Expression and Distribution of the Guanine Nucleotide-binding Protein Subunit Alpha-s in Mice Skin Tissues and Its Association with White and Black Coat Colors.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhihong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Zhun; Li, Zhen; Bai, Rui; Yang, Shanshan; Zhao, Min; Pang, Quanhai

    2016-10-01

    Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit alpha-s (Gnαs) is a small subunit of the G protein-couple signaling pathway, which is involved in the formation of coat color. The expression level and distribution of Gnαs were detected by quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), western blot, and immunohistochemistry to investigate the underlying mechanisms of coat color in white and black skin tissues of mice. qPCR and western blot results suggested that Gnαs was expressed at significantly higher levels in black mice compared with that of white mice, and transcripts and protein possessed the same expression in both colors. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated Gnαs staining in the root sheath and dermal papilla in hair follicle of mice skins. The results indicated that the Gnαs gene was expressed in both white and black skin tissues, and the expression level of Gnαs in the two types of color was different. Therefore, Gnαs may be involved in the coat color formation in mice. PMID:26954226

  5. Mutation Analysis of Inhibitory Guanine Nucleotide Binding Protein Alpha (GNAI) Loci in Young and Familial Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Hande; Donner, Iikki; Kivipelto, Leena; Kuismin, Outi; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; De Menis, Ernesto; Karhu, Auli

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are neoplasms of the anterior pituitary lobe and account for 15–20% of all intracranial tumors. Although most pituitary tumors are benign they can cause severe symptoms related to tumor size as well as hypopituitarism and/or hypersecretion of one or more pituitary hormones. Most pituitary adenomas are sporadic, but it has been estimated that 5% of patients have a familial background. Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) predispose to hereditary pituitary neoplasia. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AIP mutations predispose to pituitary tumorigenesis through defective inhibitory GTP binding protein (Gαi) signaling. This finding prompted us to examine whether germline loss-of-function mutations in inhibitory guanine nucleotide (GTP) binding protein alpha (GNAI) loci are involved in genetic predisposition of pituitary tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first time GNAI genes are sequenced in order to examine the occurrence of inactivating germline mutations. Thus far, only somatic gain-of-function hot-spot mutations have been studied in these loci. Here, we have analyzed the coding regions of GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 in a set of young sporadic somatotropinoma patients (n = 32; mean age of diagnosis 32 years) and familial index cases (n = 14), thus in patients with a disease phenotype similar to that observed in AIP mutation carriers. In addition, expression of Gαi proteins was studied in human growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting and non-functional pituitary tumors. No pathogenic germline mutations affecting the Gαi proteins were detected. The result suggests that loss-of-function mutations of GNAI loci are rare or nonexistent in familial pituitary adenomas. PMID:25291362

  6. The product of the cph oncogene is a truncated, nucleotide-binding protein that enhances cellular survival to stress.

    PubMed

    Velasco, J A; Avila, M A; Notario, V

    1999-01-21

    Cph was isolated from neoplastic Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts initiated by 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA), and was shown to be a single copy gene in the hamster genome, conserved from yeast to human cells, expressed in fetal cells and most adult tissues, and acting synergistically with H-ras in the transformation of murine NIH3T3 fibroblasts. We have now isolated Syrian hamster full-length cDNAs for the cph oncogene and proto-oncogene. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that cph was activated in MCA-treated cells by a point-mutational deletion at codon 214, which caused a shift in the normal open reading frame (ORF) and brought a translation termination codon 33 amino acids downstream. While proto-cph encodes a protein (pcph) of 469 amino acids, cph encodes a truncated protein (cph) of 246 amino acids with a new, hydrophobic C-terminus. Similar mechanisms activated cph in other MCA-treated Syrian hamster cells. The cph and proto-cph proteins have partial sequence homology with two protein families: GDP/GTP exchange factors and nucleotide phosphohydrolases. In vitro translated, gel-purified cph proteins did not catalyze nucleotide exchange for H-ras, but were able to bind nucleotide phosphates, in particular ribonucleotide diphosphates such as UDP and GDP. Steady-state levels of cph mRNA increased 6.7-fold in hamster neoplastic cells, relative to a 2.2-fold increase in normal cells, when they were subjected to a nutritional stress such as serum deprivation. Moreover, cph-transformed NIH3T3 cells showed increased survival to various forms of stress (serum starvation, hyperthermia, ionizing radiation), strongly suggesting that cph participates in cellular mechanisms of response to stress. PMID:9989819

  7. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells does not require activation of cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding proteins or adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1990-08-01

    We have previously reported that FSH stimulates flux of 45Ca2+ into cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we show that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin (CT)- or pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein or activation of adenylate cyclase (AC). Significant stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx was observed within 1 min, and maximal response (3.2-fold over basal levels) was achieved within 2 min after exposure to FSH. FSH-stimulated elevations in cellular cAMP paralleled increases in 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a possible coupling of AC activation to 45Ca2+ influx. (Bu)2cAMP, however, was not able to enhance 45Ca2+ uptake over basal levels at a final concentration of 1000 microM, although a concentration-related increase in androstenedione conversion to estradiol was evident. Exposure of Sertoli cells to CT (10 ng/ml) consistently stimulated basal levels of androstenedione conversion to estradiol but had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake. Similarly, CT had no effect on FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake, but potentiated FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis. PT (10 ng/ml) augmented basal and FSH-stimulated estradiol secretion without affecting 45Ca2+ influx. The adenosine analog N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, which binds to Gi-coupled adenosine receptors on Sertoli cells, inhibited FSH-stimulated androgen conversion to estradiol in a dose-related (1-1000 nM) manner, but FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx remained unchanged. Our results show that in contrast to FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis, the flux of 45Ca2+ into Sertoli cells in response to FSH is not mediated either directly or indirectly by CT- or PT-sensitive G protein, nor does it require activation of AC. Our data further suggest that the FSH receptor itself may function as a calcium channel.

  8. Delta-opioid-receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase is transduced specifically by the guanine-nucleotide-binding protein Gi2.

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, F R; Milligan, G

    1990-01-01

    Mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid cells (NG108-15) express an opioid receptor of the delta subclass which both stimulates high-affinity GTPase activity and inhibits adenylate cyclase by interacting with a pertussis-toxin-sensitive guanine-nucleotide-binding protein(s) (G-protein). Four such G-proteins have now been identified without photoreceptor-containing tissues. We have generated anti-peptide antisera against synthetic peptides which correspond to the C-terminal decapeptides of the alpha-subunit of each of these G-proteins and also to the stimulatory G-protein of the adenylate cyclase cascade (Gs). Using these antisera, we demonstrate the expression of three pertussis-toxin-sensitive G-proteins in these cells, which correspond to the products of the Gi2, Gi3 and Go genes, as well as Gs. Gi1, however, is not expressed in detectable amounts. IgG fractions from each of these antisera and from normal rabbit serum were used to attempt to interfere with the interaction of the opioid receptor with the G-protein system by assessing ligand stimulation of high-affinity GTPase activity, inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and conversion of the receptor to a state which displays reduced affinity for agonists. The IgG fraction from the antiserum (AS7) which specifically identifies Gi2 in these cells attenuated the effects of the opioid receptor. This effect was complete and was not mimicked by any of the other antisera. We conclude that the delta-opioid receptor of these cells interacts directly and specifically with Gi2 to cause inhibition of adenylate cyclase, and that Gi2 represents the true Gi of the adenylate cyclase cascade. The ability to measure alterations in agonist affinity for receptors following the use of specific antisera against a range of G-proteins implies that such techniques should be applicable to investigations of the molecular identity of the G-protein(s) which interacts with any receptor. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID

  9. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G. )

    1988-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5{prime}-({alpha}-{sup 32}P)triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an {alpha} subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera.

  10. The Roles of the RIIβ Linker and N-terminal Cyclic Nucleotide-binding Domain in Determining the Unique Structures of the Type IIβ Protein Kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Donald K.; Copps, Jeffrey; Smith-Nguyen, Eric V.; Zhang, Ping; Heller, William T.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is ubiquitously expressed and is responsible for regulating many important cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular cAMP concentrations. The PKA holoenzyme is a tetramer (R2:C2), with a regulatory subunit homodimer (R2) that binds and inhibits two catalytic (C) subunits; binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunit homodimer causes activation of the catalytic subunits. Four different R subunit isoforms exist in mammalian cells, and these confer different structural features, subcellular localization, and biochemical properties upon the PKA holoenzymes they form. The holoenzyme containing RIIβ is structurally unique in that the type IIβ holoenzyme is much more compact than the free RIIβ homodimer. We have used small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure and subunit organization of a holoenzyme containing an RIIβ C-terminal deletion mutant (RIIβ(1–280)), which is missing the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain to better understand the structural organization of the type IIβ holoenzyme and the RIIβ domains that contribute to stabilizing the holoenzyme conformation. Our results demonstrate that compaction of the type IIβ holoenzyme does not require the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain but rather involves large structural rearrangements within the linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the RIIβ homodimer. The structural rearrangements are significantly greater than seen previously with RIIα and are likely to be important in mediating short range and long range interdomain and intersubunit interactions that uniquely regulate the activity of the type IIβ isoform of PKA. PMID:25112875

  11. The microbiota protects against ischemia/reperfusion-induced intestinal injury through nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) signaling.

    PubMed

    Perez-Chanona, Ernesto; Mühlbauer, Marcus; Jobin, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2), an intracellular pattern recognition receptor, induces autophagy on detection of muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a component of microbial cell walls. The role of bacteria and NOD2 signaling toward ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced intestinal injury response is unknown. Herein, we report that I/R-induced intestinal injury in germ-free (GF) C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice is worse than in conventionally derived mice. More important, microbiota-mediated protection against I/R-induced intestinal injury is abrogated in conventionally derived Nod2(-/-) mice and GF Nod2(-/-) mice. Also, WT mice raised in specific pathogen-free (SPF) conditions fared better against I/R-induced injury than SPF Nod2(-/-) mice. Moreover, SPF WT mice i.p. administered 10 mg/kg MDP were protected against injury compared with mice administered the inactive enantiomer, l-MDP, an effect lost in Nod2(-/-) mice. However, MDP administration failed to protect GF mice from I/R-induced intestinal injury compared with control, a phenomenon correlating with undetectable Nod2 mRNA level in the epithelium of GF mice. More important, the autophagy-inducer rapamycin protected Nod2(-/-) mice against I/R-induced injury and increased the levels of LC3(+) puncta in injured tissue of Nod2(-/-) mice. These findings demonstrate that NOD2 protects against I/R and promotes wound healing, likely through the induction of the autophagy response. PMID:25204845

  12. Biochemical characterization and NMR studies of the nucleotide-binding domain 1 of multidrug-resistance-associated protein 1: evidence for interaction between ATP and Trp653.

    PubMed Central

    Ramaen, Odile; Masscheleyn, Sandrine; Duffieux, Francis; Pamlard, Olivier; Oberkampf, Marine; Lallemand, Jean-Yves; Stoven, Véronique; Jacquet, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Multidrug-resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a human ATP-binding cassette transporter that confers cell resistance to antitumour drugs. Its NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) bind/hydrolyse ATP, a key step in the activation of MRP1 function. To relate its intrinsic functional features to the mechanism of action of the full-size transporter, we expressed the N-terminal NBD1 domain (Asn(642) to Ser(871)) in Escherichia coli. NBD1 was highly purified under native conditions and was characterized as a soluble monomer. (15)N-labelling allowed recording of the first two-dimensional NMR spectra of this domain. The NMR study showed that NBD1 was folded, and that Trp(653) was a key residue in the NBD1-ATP interaction. Thus, interaction of NBD1 with ATP/ADP was studied by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. The affinity for ATP and ADP were in the same range (K (d(ATP))=118 microM and K (d(ADP))=139 microM). Binding of nucleotides did not influence the monomeric state of NBD1. The ATPase activity of NBD1 was magnesium-dependent and very low [V (max) and K (m) values of 5x10(-5) pmol of ATP x (pmol NBD1)(-1) x s(-1) and 833 microM ATP respectively]. The present study suggests that NBD1 has a low contribution to the ATPase activity of full-length MRP1 and/or that this activity requires NBD1-NBD2 heterodimer formation. PMID:12954082

  13. Biochemical characterization and NMR studies of the nucleotide-binding domain 1 of multidrug-resistance-associated protein 1: evidence for interaction between ATP and Trp653.

    PubMed

    Ramaen, Odile; Masscheleyn, Sandrine; Duffieux, Francis; Pamlard, Olivier; Oberkampf, Marine; Lallemand, Jean-Yves; Stoven, Véronique; Jacquet, Eric

    2003-12-15

    Multidrug-resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a human ATP-binding cassette transporter that confers cell resistance to antitumour drugs. Its NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) bind/hydrolyse ATP, a key step in the activation of MRP1 function. To relate its intrinsic functional features to the mechanism of action of the full-size transporter, we expressed the N-terminal NBD1 domain (Asn(642) to Ser(871)) in Escherichia coli. NBD1 was highly purified under native conditions and was characterized as a soluble monomer. (15)N-labelling allowed recording of the first two-dimensional NMR spectra of this domain. The NMR study showed that NBD1 was folded, and that Trp(653) was a key residue in the NBD1-ATP interaction. Thus, interaction of NBD1 with ATP/ADP was studied by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. The affinity for ATP and ADP were in the same range (K (d(ATP))=118 microM and K (d(ADP))=139 microM). Binding of nucleotides did not influence the monomeric state of NBD1. The ATPase activity of NBD1 was magnesium-dependent and very low [V (max) and K (m) values of 5x10(-5) pmol of ATP x (pmol NBD1)(-1) x s(-1) and 833 microM ATP respectively]. The present study suggests that NBD1 has a low contribution to the ATPase activity of full-length MRP1 and/or that this activity requires NBD1-NBD2 heterodimer formation. PMID:12954082

  14. DNA sequence polymorphisms within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha (Gsα)-encoding (GNAS) genomic imprinting domain are associated with performance traits

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genes which are epigenetically regulated via genomic imprinting can be potential targets for artificial selection during animal breeding. Indeed, imprinted loci have been shown to underlie some important quantitative traits in domestic mammals, most notably muscle mass and fat deposition. In this candidate gene study, we have identified novel associations between six validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning a 97.6 kb region within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha gene (GNAS) domain on bovine chromosome 13 and genetic merit for a range of performance traits in 848 progeny-tested Holstein-Friesian sires. The mammalian GNAS domain consists of a number of reciprocally-imprinted, alternatively-spliced genes which can play a major role in growth, development and disease in mice and humans. Based on the current annotation of the bovine GNAS domain, four of the SNPs analysed (rs43101491, rs43101493, rs43101485 and rs43101486) were located upstream of the GNAS gene, while one SNP (rs41694646) was located in the second intron of the GNAS gene. The final SNP (rs41694656) was located in the first exon of transcripts encoding the putative bovine neuroendocrine-specific protein NESP55, resulting in an aspartic acid-to-asparagine amino acid substitution at amino acid position 192. Results SNP genotype-phenotype association analyses indicate that the single intronic GNAS SNP (rs41694646) is associated (P ≤ 0.05) with a range of performance traits including milk yield, milk protein yield, the content of fat and protein in milk, culled cow carcass weight and progeny carcass conformation, measures of animal body size, direct calving difficulty (i.e. difficulty in calving due to the size of the calf) and gestation length. Association (P ≤ 0.01) with direct calving difficulty (i.e. due to calf size) and maternal calving difficulty (i.e. due to the maternal pelvic width size) was also observed at the rs43101491 SNP. Following

  15. Partial separation of platelet and placental adenosine receptors from adenosine A2-like binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnierowicz, S.; Work, C.; Hutchison, K.; Fox, I.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The ubiquitous adenosine A2-like binding protein obscures the binding properties of adenosine receptors assayed with 5'-N-({sup 3}H)ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). To solve this problem, we developed a rapid and simple method to separate adenosine receptors from the adenosine A2-like binding protein. Human platelet and placental membranes were solubilized with 1% 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate. The soluble platelet extract was precipitated with polyethylene glycol and the fraction enriched in adenosine receptors was isolated from the precipitate by differential centrifugation. The adenosine A2-like binding protein was removed from the soluble placental extract with hydroxylapatite and adenosine receptors were precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The specificity of the ({sup 3}H)NECA binding is typical of an adenosine A2 receptor for platelets and an adenosine A1 receptor for placenta. This method leads to enrichment of adenosine A2 receptors for platelets and adenosine A1 receptors for placenta. This provides a useful preparation technique for pharmacologic studies of adenosine receptors.

  16. Mutagenesis of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli: targeting positions 83, 127 and 128 of the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, E J; Glasgow, J; Leu, S F; Belduz, A O; Harman, J G

    1994-01-01

    The cyclic 3', 5' adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binding pocket of the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli was mutagenized to substitute cysteine or glycine for serine 83; cysteine, glycine, isoleucine, or serine for threonine 127; and threonine or alanine for serine 128. Cells that expressed the binding pocket residue-substituted forms of CRP were characterized by measurements of beta-galactosidase activity. Purified wild-type and mutant CRP preparations were characterized by measurement of cAMP binding activity and by their capacity to support lacP activation in vitro. CRP structure was assessed by measurement of sensitivity to protease and DTNB-mediated subunit crosslinking. The results of this study show that cAMP interactions with serine 83, threonine 127 and serine 128 contribute to CRP activation and have little effect on cAMP binding. Amino acid substitutions that introduce hydrophobic amino acid side chain constituents at either position 127 or 128 decrease CRP discrimination of cAMP and cGMP. Finally, cAMP-induced CRP structural change(s) that occur in or near the CRP hinge region result from cAMP interaction with threonine 127; substitution of threonine 127 by cysteine, glycine, isoleucine, or serine produced forms of CRP that contained, independently of cAMP binding, structural changes similar to those of the wild-type CRP:cAMP complex. Images PMID:8065899

  17. Role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein in. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cornett, L.E.; Norris, J.S.

    1987-11-01

    In this study the mechanisms involved in ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization at the level of the plasma membrane were investigated. Stimulation of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux from saponin-permeabilized DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells was observed with the addition of either the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine and guanosine-5'-triphosphate or the nonhydrolyzable guanine nucleotide guanylyl-imidodiphosphate. In the presence of (/sup 32/P) NAD, pertussis toxin was found to catalyze ADP-ribosylation of a M/sub r/ = 40,500 (n = 8) peptide in membranes prepared from DDT/sub 1/, MF-2 cells, possibly the ..cap alpha..-subunit of N/sub i/. However, stimulation of unidirectional /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux by phenylephrine was not affected by previous treatment of cells with 100 ng/ml pertussis toxin. These data suggest that the putative guanine nucleotide-binding protein which couples the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor to Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells is not a pertussis toxin substrate and may possibly be an additional member of guanine nucleotide binding protein family.

  18. The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) polymorphism S7N does not affect receptor function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Activation and signal transduction in the Nucleotide binding, leucine-rich repeat containing receptor (NLR) family needs to be tightly regulated in order to control the inflammatory response to exogenous and endogenous danger signals. Phosphorylation is a common cellular mechanism of regulation that has recently been shown to be important in signalling in another family of cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptors, the RIG-I like receptors. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms can alter receptor activity, potentially leading to dysfunction and/or a predisposition to inflammatory barrier diseases. Findings We have computationally analysed the N-terminus of NOD1 and found seven theoretical phosphorylation sites in, or immediately before, the NOD1 Caspase Activation Domain (CARD). Two of these, serine 7 and tyrosine 49 are also found as rare polymorphisms in the African-American population and European-American populations respectively. Mutating serine 7 to either an aspartic acid or an asparagine to mimic the potential impact of phosphorylation or the polymorphism respectively did not affect the response of NOD1 to ligand-mediated NFκB signalling. Conclusions The NOD1 polymorphism S7N does not interfere with receptor function in response to ligand stimulation. PMID:24598002

  19. Phytoestrogens regulate mRNA and protein levels of guanine nucleotide-binding protein, beta-1 subunit (GNB1) in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Naragoni, Srivatcha; Sankella, Shireesha; Harris, Kinesha; Gray, Wesley G

    2009-06-01

    Phytoestrogens (PEs) are non-steroidal ligands, which regulate the expression of number of estrogen receptor-dependent genes responsible for a variety of biological processes. Deciphering the molecular mechanism of action of these compounds is of great importance because it would increase our understanding of the role(s) these bioactive chemicals play in prevention and treatment of estrogen-based diseases. In this study, we applied suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify genes that are regulated by PEs through either the classic nuclear-based estrogen receptor or membrane-based estrogen receptor pathways. SSH, using mRNA from genistein (GE) treated MCF-7 cells as testers, resulted in a significant increase in GNB1 mRNA expression levels as compared with 10 nM 17beta estradiol or the no treatment control. GNB1 mRNA expression was up regulated two- to fivefold following exposure to 100.0 nM GE. Similarly, GNB1 protein expression was up regulated 12- to 14-fold. GE regulation of GNB1 was estrogen receptor-dependent, in the presence of the anti-estrogen ICI-182,780, both GNB1 mRNA and protein expression were inhibited. Analysis of the GNB1 promoter using ChIP assay showed a PE-dependent association of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and beta (ERbeta) to the GNB1 promoter. This association was specific for ERalpha since association was not observed when the cells were co-incubated with GE and the ERalpha antagonist, ICI. Our data demonstrate that the levels of G-protein, beta-1 subunit are regulated by PEs through an estrogen receptor pathway and further suggest that PEs may control the ratio of alpha-subunit to beta/gamma-subunits of the G-protein complex in cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 219: 584-594, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19170076

  20. l-Ala-γ-d-Glu-meso-diaminopimelic Acid (DAP) Interacts Directly with Leucine-rich Region Domain of Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain 1, Increasing Phosphorylation Activity of Receptor-interacting Serine/Threonine-protein Kinase 2 and Its Interaction with Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain 1*

    PubMed Central

    Laroui, Hamed; Yan, Yutao; Narui, Yoshie; Ingersoll, Sarah A.; Ayyadurai, Saravanan; Charania, Moiz A.; Zhou, Feimeng; Wang, Binghe; Salaita, Khalid; Sitaraman, Shanthi V.; Merlin, Didier

    2011-01-01

    The oligopeptide transporter PepT1 expressed in inflamed colonic epithelial cells transports small bacterial peptides, such as muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and l-Ala-γ-d-Glu-meso-diaminopimelic acid (Tri-DAP) into cells. The innate immune system uses various proteins to sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors of which there are more than 20 related family members are present in the cytosol and recognize intracellular ligands. NOD proteins mediate NF-κB activation via receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 2 (RICK or RIPK). The specific ligands for some NOD-like receptors have been identified. NOD type 1 (NOD1) is activated by peptides that contain a diaminophilic acid, such as the PepT1 substrate Tri-DAP. In other words, PepT1 transport activity plays an important role in controlling intracellular loading of ligands for NOD1 in turn determining the activation level of downstream inflammatory pathways. However, no direct interaction between Tri-DAP and NOD1 has been identified. In the present work, surface plasmon resonance and atomic force microscopy experiments showed direct binding between NOD1 and Tri-DAP with a Kd value of 34.5 μm. In contrast, no significant binding was evident between muramyl dipeptide and NOD1. Furthermore, leucine-rich region (LRR)-truncated NOD1 did not interact with Tri-DAP, indicating that Tri-DAP interacts with the LRR domain of NOD1. Next, we examined binding between RICK and NOD1 proteins and found that such binding was significant with a Kd value of 4.13 μm. However, NOD1/RICK binding was of higher affinity (Kd of 3.26 μm) when NOD1 was prebound to Tri-DAP. Furthermore, RICK phosphorylation activity was increased when NOD was prebound to Tri-DAP. In conclusion, we have shown that Tri-DAP interacts directly with the LRR domain of NOD1 and consequently increases RICK/NOD1 association and RICK phosphorylation activity. PMID:21757725

  1. The Type IV Pilus Assembly ATPase PilB of Myxococcus xanthus Interacts with the Inner Membrane Platform Protein PilC and the Nucleotide-binding Protein PilM.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Lisa Franziska; Friedrich, Carmen; Harms, Andrea; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; van der Does, Chris

    2016-03-25

    Type IV pili (T4P) are ubiquitous bacterial cell surface structures, involved in processes such as twitching motility, biofilm formation, bacteriophage infection, surface attachment, virulence, and natural transformation. T4P are assembled by machinery that can be divided into the outer membrane pore complex, the alignment complex that connects components in the inner and outer membrane, and the motor complex in the inner membrane and cytoplasm. Here, we characterize the inner membrane platform protein PilC, the cytosolic assembly ATPase PilB of the motor complex, and the cytosolic nucleotide-binding protein PilM of the alignment complex of the T4P machinery ofMyxococcus xanthus PilC was purified as a dimer and reconstituted into liposomes. PilB was isolated as a monomer and bound ATP in a non-cooperative manner, but PilB fused to Hcp1 ofPseudomonas aeruginosaformed a hexamer and bound ATP in a cooperative manner. Hexameric but not monomeric PilB bound to PilC reconstituted in liposomes, and this binding stimulated PilB ATPase activity. PilM could only be purified when it was stabilized by a fusion with a peptide corresponding to the first 16 amino acids of PilN, supporting an interaction between PilM and PilN(1-16). PilM-N(1-16) was isolated as a monomer that bound but did not hydrolyze ATP. PilM interacted directly with PilB, but only with PilC in the presence of PilB, suggesting an indirect interaction. We propose that PilB interacts with PilC and with PilM, thus establishing the connection between the alignment and the motor complex. PMID:26851283

  2. Prediction of Nucleotide Binding Peptides Using Star Graph Topological Indices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Munteanu, Cristian R; Fernández Blanco, Enrique; Tan, Zhiliang; Santos Del Riego, Antonino; Pazos, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    The nucleotide binding proteins are involved in many important cellular processes, such as transmission of genetic information or energy transfer and storage. Therefore, the screening of new peptides for this biological function is an important research topic. The current study proposes a mixed methodology to obtain the first classification model that is able to predict new nucleotide binding peptides, using only the amino acid sequence. Thus, the methodology uses a Star graph molecular descriptor of the peptide sequences and the Machine Learning technique for the best classifier. The best model represents a Random Forest classifier based on two features of the embedded and non-embedded graphs. The performance of the model is excellent, considering similar models in the field, with an Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUROC) value of 0.938 and true positive rate (TPR) of 0.886 (test subset). The prediction of new nucleotide binding peptides with this model could be useful for drug target studies in drug development. PMID:27491034

  3. Influence of a mutation in the putative nucleotide binding site of the nitrogen regulatory protein NTRC on its positive control function.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, S; Kundrot, C; Dixon, R

    1991-01-01

    A mutation, serine 170 to alanine, in the proposed ATP binding site of the activator protein NTRC prevents transcriptional activation at sigma 54-dependent promoters both in vivo and in vitro. The rate of phosphorylation of the mutant protein by NTRB and the stability of mutant NTRC-phosphate were similar to those of wild-type NTRC. The phosphorylated mutant protein shows only a slight decrease in affinity (around 2-fold) for tandem NTRC binding sites in the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifL promoter suggesting that the mutation primarily influences the positive control function of NTRC. Moreover the mutant protein is trans dominant to the wild-type protein with respect to transcriptional activation at both the glnAp2 and nifL promoters. In vitro footprinting experiments reveal that the mutant protein is unable to catalyse isomerisation of closed promoter complexes between sigma 54-RNA polymerase and the nifL promoter to open promoter complexes. However, the mutant protein retains the ability to increase the occupancy of the -24, -12 region by sigma 54-RNA polymerase, forming closed complexes at the nifL promoter, which are not detectable in the absence of NTRC. These data support a model in which the activator influences the formation of closed complexes at the nifL promoter in addition to its role in catalysing open complex formation. Images PMID:2041769

  4. The Torsin-family AAA+ Protein OOC-5 Contains a Critical Disulfide Adjacent to Sensor-II That Couples Redox State to Nucleotide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Wrabl, James O.; Hayashi, Adam P.; Rose, Lesilee S.

    2008-01-01

    A subgroup of the AAA+ proteins that reside in the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope including human torsinA, a protein mutated in hereditary dystonia, is called the torsin family of AAA+ proteins. A multiple-sequence alignment of this family with Hsp100 proteins of known structure reveals a conserved cysteine in the C-terminus of torsin proteins within the Sensor-II motif. A structural model predicts this cysteine to be a part of an intramolecular disulfide bond, suggesting that it may function as a redox sensor to regulate ATPase activity. In vitro experiments with OOC-5, a torsinA homolog from Caenorhabditis elegans, demonstrate that redox changes that reduce this disulfide bond affect the binding of ATP and ADP and cause an attendant local conformational change detected by limited proteolysis. Transgenic worms expressing an ooc-5 gene with cysteine-to-serine mutations that disrupt the disulfide bond have a very low embryo hatch rate compared with wild-type controls, indicating these two cysteines are essential for OOC-5 function. We propose that the Sensor-II in torsin family proteins is a redox-regulated sensor. This regulatory mechanism may be central to the function of OOC-5 and human torsinA. PMID:18550799

  5. Developmental changes in the role of a pertussis toxin sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein in the rat cardiac alpha sub 1 -adrenergic system

    SciTech Connect

    Han, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    During development, the cardiac alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic chronotropic response changes from positive in the neonate to negative in the adult. This thesis examined the possibility of a developmental change in coupling of a PT-sensitive G-protein to the alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor. Radioligand binding experiments performed with the iodinated alpha{sub 1}-selective radioligand ({sup 125}I)-I-2-({beta}-(4-hydroxphenyl)ethylaminomethyl)tetralone (({sup 125}I)-IBE 2254) demonstrated that the alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor is coupled to a G-protein in both neonatal and adult rat hearts. However, in the neonate the alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor is coupled to a PT-insensitive G-protein, whereas in the adult the alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor is coupled to both a PT-insensitive and a PT-sensitive G-protein. Consistent with the results from binding experiments, PT did not have any effect on the alpha{sub 1}-mediated positive chronotropic response in the neonate, whereas in the adult the alpha{sub 1}-mediated negative chronotropic response was completely converted to a positive one after PT-treatment. This thesis also examined the possibility of an alteration in coupling of the alpha{sub 1}-adrenergic receptor to its effector under certain circumstances such as high potassium (K{sup +}) depolarization in nerve-muscle (NM) co-cultures, a system which has been previously shown to be a convenient in vitro model to study the mature inhibitory alpha{sub 1}-response.

  6. Newly identified motifs in Candida albicans Cdr1 protein nucleotide binding domains are pleiotropic drug resistance subfamily-specific and functionally asymmetric.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Banerjee, Atanu; Shah, Abdul Haseeb; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Sen, Sobhan; Saxena, Ajay Kumar; Monk, Brian C; Cannon, Richard D; Bhatnagar, Rakesh; Mondal, Alok Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of Candida albicans ABC transporters identified conserved related α-helical sequence motifs immediately C-terminal of each Walker A sequence. Despite the occurrence of these motifs in ABC subfamilies of other yeasts and higher eukaryotes, their roles in protein function remained unexplored. In this study we have examined the functional significance of these motifs in the C. albicans PDR transporter Cdr1p. The motifs present in NBD1 and NBD2 were subjected to alanine scanning mutagenesis, deletion, or replacement of an entire motif. Systematic replacement of individual motif residues with alanine did not affect the function of Cdr1p but deletion of the M1-motif in NBD1 (M1-Del) resulted in Cdr1p being trapped within the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast, deletion of the M2-motif in NBD2 (M2-Del) yielded a non-functional protein with normal plasma membrane localization. Replacement of the motif in M1-Del with six alanines (M1-Ala) significantly improved localization of the protein and partially restored function. Conversely, replacement of the motif in M2-Del with six alanines (M2-Ala) did not reverse the phenotype and susceptibility to antifungal substrates of Cdr1p was unchanged. Together, the M1 and M2 motifs contribute to the functional asymmetry of NBDs and are important for maturation of Cdr1p and ATP catalysis, respectively. PMID:27251950

  7. Newly identified motifs in Candida albicans Cdr1 protein nucleotide binding domains are pleiotropic drug resistance subfamily-specific and functionally asymmetric

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Banerjee, Atanu; Shah, Abdul Haseeb; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Sen, Sobhan; Saxena, Ajay Kumar; Monk, Brian C.; Cannon, Richard D.; Bhatnagar, Rakesh; Mondal, Alok Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of Candida albicans ABC transporters identified conserved related α-helical sequence motifs immediately C-terminal of each Walker A sequence. Despite the occurrence of these motifs in ABC subfamilies of other yeasts and higher eukaryotes, their roles in protein function remained unexplored. In this study we have examined the functional significance of these motifs in the C. albicans PDR transporter Cdr1p. The motifs present in NBD1 and NBD2 were subjected to alanine scanning mutagenesis, deletion, or replacement of an entire motif. Systematic replacement of individual motif residues with alanine did not affect the function of Cdr1p but deletion of the M1-motif in NBD1 (M1-Del) resulted in Cdr1p being trapped within the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast, deletion of the M2-motif in NBD2 (M2-Del) yielded a non-functional protein with normal plasma membrane localization. Replacement of the motif in M1-Del with six alanines (M1-Ala) significantly improved localization of the protein and partially restored function. Conversely, replacement of the motif in M2-Del with six alanines (M2-Ala) did not reverse the phenotype and susceptibility to antifungal substrates of Cdr1p was unchanged. Together, the M1 and M2 motifs contribute to the functional asymmetry of NBDs and are important for maturation of Cdr1p and ATP catalysis, respectively. PMID:27251950

  8. The roles of the RIIβ linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in determining the unique structures of the type IIβ protein kinase A: a small angle x-ray and neutron scattering study.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Donald K; Copps, Jeffrey; Smith-Nguyen, Eric V; Zhang, Ping; Heller, William T; Taylor, Susan S

    2014-10-10

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is ubiquitously expressed and is responsible for regulating many important cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular cAMP concentrations. The PKA holoenzyme is a tetramer (R2:C2), with a regulatory subunit homodimer (R2) that binds and inhibits two catalytic (C) subunits; binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunit homodimer causes activation of the catalytic subunits. Four different R subunit isoforms exist in mammalian cells, and these confer different structural features, subcellular localization, and biochemical properties upon the PKA holoenzymes they form. The holoenzyme containing RIIβ is structurally unique in that the type IIβ holoenzyme is much more compact than the free RIIβ homodimer. We have used small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure and subunit organization of a holoenzyme containing an RIIβ C-terminal deletion mutant (RIIβ(1-280)), which is missing the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain to better understand the structural organization of the type IIβ holoenzyme and the RIIβ domains that contribute to stabilizing the holoenzyme conformation. Our results demonstrate that compaction of the type IIβ holoenzyme does not require the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain but rather involves large structural rearrangements within the linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the RIIβ homodimer. The structural rearrangements are significantly greater than seen previously with RIIα and are likely to be important in mediating short range and long range interdomain and intersubunit interactions that uniquely regulate the activity of the type IIβ isoform of PKA. PMID:25112875

  9. The roles of RIIbeta linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in determining the unique structures of Type IIbeta Protein Kinase A. A small angle X-ray and neutron scattering study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Blumenthal, Donald K.; Copps, Jeffrey; Smith-Nguyen, Eric V.; Zhang, Ping; Heller, William T.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2014-08-11

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is ubiquitously expressed and is responsible for regulating many important cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular cAMP concentrations. Moreover, the PKA holoenzyme is a tetramer (R2:C2), with a regulatory subunit homodimer (R2) that binds and inhibits two catalytic (C) subunits; binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunit homodimer causes activation of the catalytic subunits. Four different R subunit isoforms exist in mammalian cells, and these confer different structural features, subcellular localization, and biochemical properties upon the PKA holoenzymes they form. The holoenzyme containing RIIβ is structurally unique in that the type IIβ holoenzyme ismore » much more compact than the free RIIβ homodimer. We have used small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure and subunit organization of a holoenzyme containing an RIIβ C-terminal deletion mutant (RIIβ(1–280)), which is missing the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain to better understand the structural organization of the type IIβ holoenzyme and the RIIβ domains that contribute to stabilizing the holoenzyme conformation. These results demonstrate that compaction of the type IIβ holoenzyme does not require the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain but rather involves large structural rearrangements within the linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the RIIβ homodimer. The structural rearrangements are significantly greater than seen previously with RIIα and are likely to be important in mediating short range and long range interdomain and intersubunit interactions that uniquely regulate the activity of the type IIβ isoform of PKA.« less

  10. The roles of RIIbeta linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in determining the unique structures of Type IIbeta Protein Kinase A. A small angle X-ray and neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, Donald K.; Copps, Jeffrey; Smith-Nguyen, Eric V.; Zhang, Ping; Heller, William T.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2014-08-11

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is ubiquitously expressed and is responsible for regulating many important cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular cAMP concentrations. Moreover, the PKA holoenzyme is a tetramer (R2:C2), with a regulatory subunit homodimer (R2) that binds and inhibits two catalytic (C) subunits; binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunit homodimer causes activation of the catalytic subunits. Four different R subunit isoforms exist in mammalian cells, and these confer different structural features, subcellular localization, and biochemical properties upon the PKA holoenzymes they form. The holoenzyme containing RIIβ is structurally unique in that the type IIβ holoenzyme is much more compact than the free RIIβ homodimer. We have used small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure and subunit organization of a holoenzyme containing an RIIβ C-terminal deletion mutant (RIIβ(1–280)), which is missing the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain to better understand the structural organization of the type IIβ holoenzyme and the RIIβ domains that contribute to stabilizing the holoenzyme conformation. These results demonstrate that compaction of the type IIβ holoenzyme does not require the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain but rather involves large structural rearrangements within the linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the RIIβ homodimer. The structural rearrangements are significantly greater than seen previously with RIIα and are likely to be important in mediating short range and long range interdomain and intersubunit interactions that uniquely regulate the activity of the type IIβ isoform of PKA.

  11. The first nucleotide binding fold of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator can function as an active ATPase.

    PubMed

    Ko, Y H; Pedersen, P L

    1995-09-22

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cell membrane protein called CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) which functions as a regulated Cl- channel. Although it is known that CFTR contains two nucleotide domains, both of which exhibit the capacity to bind ATP, it has not been demonstrated directly whether one or both domains can function as an active ATPase. To address this question, we have studied the first CFTR nucleotide binding fold (NBF1) in fusion with the maltose-binding protein (MBP), which both stabilizes NBF1 and enhances its solubility. Three different ATPase assays conducted on MBP-NBF1 clearly demonstrate its capacity to catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. Significantly, the mutations K464H and K464L in the Walker A consensus motif of NBF1 markedly impair its catalytic capacity. MBP alone exhibits no ATPase activity and MBP-NBF1 fails to catalyze the release of phosphate from AMP or ADP. The Vmax of ATP hydrolysis (approximately 30 nmol/min/mg of protein) is significant and is markedly inhibited by azide and by the ATP analogs 2'-(3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-adenosine-5'-triphosphate and adenosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imido)triphosphate. As inherited mutations within NBF1 account for most cases of cystic fibrosis, results reported here are fundamental to our understanding of the molecular basis of the disease. PMID:7545672

  12. Activation of superoxide formation and lysozyme release in human neutrophils by the synthetic lipopeptide Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4. Involvement of guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins and synergism with chemotactic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, R; Schultz, G; Richter-Freund, M; Metzger, J; Wiesmüller, K H; Jung, G; Bessler, W G; Hauschildt, S

    1990-01-01

    Upon exposure to the bacterial chemotactic peptide fMet-Leu-Phe, human neutrophils release lysozyme and generate superoxide anions (O2.-). The synthetic lipoamino acid N-palmitoyl-S-[2,3-bis(palmitoyloxy)-(2RS)-propyl]-(R)-cysteine (Pam3Cys), which is derived from the N-terminus of bacterial lipoprotein, when attached to Ser-(Lys)4 [giving Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4], activated O2.- formation and lysozyme release in human neutrophils with an effectiveness amounting to about 15% of that of fMet-Leu-Phe. Palmitic acid, muramyl dipeptide, lipopolysaccharide and the lipopeptides Pam3Cys-Ala-Gly, Pam3Cys-Ser-Gly, Pam3Cys-Ser, Pam3Cys-OMe and Pam3Cys-OH did not activate O2.- formation. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins) and functionally uncouples formyl peptide receptors from G-proteins, prevented activation of O2.- formation by fMet-Leu-Phe and inhibited Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4-induced O2.- formation by 85%. Lipopeptide-induced exocytosis was pertussis-toxin-insensitive. O2.- formation induced by Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 and fMet-Leu-Phe was enhanced by cytochalasin B, by a phorbol ester and by a diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor. Addition of activators of adenylate cyclase and removal of extracellular Ca2+ inhibited O2.- formation by fMet-Leu-Phe and Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 to different extents. Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 synergistically enhanced fMet-Leu-Phe-induced O2.- formation and primed neutrophils to respond to the chemotactic peptide at non-stimulatory concentrations. Our data suggest the following. (1) Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 activates neutrophils through G-proteins, involving pertussis-toxin-sensitive and -insensitive processes. (2) The signal transduction pathways activated by fMet-Leu-Phe and Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 are similar but not identical. (3) In inflammatory processes, bacterial lipoproteins and chemotactic peptides may interact synergistically to activate O2.- formation, leading to enhanced bactericidal activity. PMID:2160237

  13. Insights into how nucleotide-binding domains power ABC transport.

    PubMed

    Newstead, Simon; Fowler, Philip W; Bilton, Paul; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Sadler, Peter J; Campopiano, Dominic J; Sansom, Mark S P; Iwata, So

    2009-09-01

    The mechanism by which nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of ABC transporters power the transport of substrates across cell membranes is currently unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of an NBD, FbpC, from the Neisseria gonorrhoeae ferric iron uptake transporter with an unusual and substantial domain swap in the C-terminal regulatory domain. This entanglement suggests that FbpC is unable to open to the same extent as the homologous protein MalK. Using molecular dynamics we demonstrate that this is not the case: both NBDs open rapidly once ATP is removed. We conclude from this result that the closed structures of FbpC and MalK have higher free energies than their respective open states. This result has important implications for our understanding of the mechanism of power generation in ABC transporters, because the unwinding of this free energy ensures that the opening of these two NBDs is also powered. PMID:19748342

  14. Adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate- and guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinases: Possible homologous proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lincoln, Thomas M.; Corbin, Jackie D.

    1977-01-01

    The properties of purified mammalian adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)- and guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinases were compared. Several physical characteristics of the two enzymes were similar, including size, shape, affinity for cyclic nucleotide binding, and Km for ATP. In addition, the amino acid composition of the two proteins indicated a close composition homology (70-90%). Both cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases catalyzed phosphorylation of rat liver pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) and fructose 1,6-diphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11), rabbit skeletal muscle glycogen synthase (EC 2.4.1.11) and phosphorylase b kinase (EC 2.7.1.38), and calf thymus histone H2b. The phosphorylation of several synthetic peptides and of trypsin-sensitive and trypsin-insensitive sites in glycogen synthase suggested similar recognition sites on the protein substrates for the two kinases. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase was the better catalyst with each protein or peptides substrate. The results suggest that the two enzymes evolved from a common ancestral protein. Images PMID:198777

  15. Probing nucleotide-binding effects on backbone dynamics and folding of the nucleotide-binding domain of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Abed, Mona; Millet, Oscar; MacLennan, David H; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2004-01-01

    In muscle cells, SERCA (sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-ATPase) plays a key role in restoring cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels to resting concentrations after transient surges caused by excitation-coupling cycles. The mechanism by which Ca2+ is translocated to the lumen of the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) involves major conformational rearrangements among the three cytoplasmic domains: actuator (A), nucleotide-binding (N) and phosphorylation (P) domains; and within the transmembrane Ca2+-binding domain of SERCA. CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and NMR spectroscopy were used in the present study to probe the conformation and stability of the isolated N domain of SERCA (SERCA-N), in the presence and absence of AMP-PNP (adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate). CD and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy results established that the effects of nucleotide binding were not readily manifested on the global fold and structural stability of SERCA-N. 15N-backbone-relaxation experiments revealed site-specific changes in backbone dynamics that converge on the central beta-sheet domain. Nucleotide binding produced diverse effects on dynamics, with enhanced mobility observed for Ile369, Cys420, Arg467, Asp568, Phe593 and Gly598, whereas rigidifying effects were found for Ser383, Leu419, Thr484 and Thr532. These results demonstrate that the overall fold and backbone motional properties of SERCA-N remained essentially the same in the presence of AMP-PNP, yet revealing evidence for internal counter-balancing effects on backbone dynamics upon binding the nucleotide, which propagate through the central beta-sheet. PMID:14987197

  16. Phosphorylation-dependent changes in nucleotide binding, conformation, and dynamics of the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of the sulfonylurea receptor 2B (SUR2B).

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Elvin D; Alvarez, Claudia P; López-Alonso, Jorge P; Sooklal, Clarissa R; Stagljar, Marijana; Kanelis, Voula

    2015-09-11

    The sulfonylurea receptor 2B (SUR2B) forms the regulatory subunit of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels in vascular smooth muscle. Phosphorylation of the SUR2B nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) by protein kinase A results in increased channel open probability. Here, we investigate the effects of phosphorylation on the structure and nucleotide binding properties of NBD1. Phosphorylation sites in SUR2B NBD1 are located in an N-terminal tail that is disordered. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data indicate that phosphorylation of the N-terminal tail affects multiple residues in NBD1, including residues in the NBD2-binding site, and results in altered conformation and dynamics of NBD1. NMR spectra of NBD1 lacking the N-terminal tail, NBD1-ΔN, suggest that phosphorylation disrupts interactions of the N-terminal tail with the core of NBD1, a model supported by dynamic light scattering. Increased nucleotide binding of phosphorylated NBD1 and NBD1-ΔN, compared with non-phosphorylated NBD1, suggests that by disrupting the interaction of the NBD core with the N-terminal tail, phosphorylation also exposes the MgATP-binding site on NBD1. These data provide insights into the molecular basis by which phosphorylation of SUR2B NBD1 activates KATP channels. PMID:26198630

  17. A Nucleotide Binding Motif in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS4B Mediates HCV RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Einav, Shirit; Elazar, Menashe; Danieli, Tsafi; Glenn, Jeffrey S.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of viral hepatitis. There is no effective therapy for most patients. We have identified a nucleotide binding motif (NBM) in one of the virus's nonstructural proteins, NS4B. This structural motif binds and hydrolyzes GTP and is conserved across HCV isolates. Genetically disrupting the NBM impairs GTP binding and hydrolysis and dramatically inhibits HCV RNA replication. These results have exciting implications for the HCV life cycle and novel antiviral strategies. PMID:15452248

  18. The Blast Resistance Gene Pi37 Encodes a Nucleotide Binding Site–Leucine-Rich Repeat Protein and Is a Member of a Resistance Gene Cluster on Rice Chromosome 1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fei; Chen, Shen; Que, Zhiqun; Wang, Ling; Liu, Xinqiong; Pan, Qinghua

    2007-01-01

    The resistance (R) gene Pi37, present in the rice cultivar St. No. 1, was isolated by an in silico map-based cloning procedure. The equivalent genetic region in Nipponbare contains four nucleotide binding site–leucine-rich repeat (NBS–LRR) type loci. These four candidates for Pi37 (Pi37-1, -2, -3, and -4) were amplified separately from St. No. 1 via long-range PCR, and cloned into a binary vector. Each construct was individually transformed into the highly blast susceptible cultivar Q1063. The subsequent complementation analysis revealed Pi37-3 to be the functional gene, while -1, -2, and -4 are probably pseudogenes. Pi37 encodes a 1290 peptide NBS–LRR product, and the presence of substitutions at two sites in the NBS region (V239A and I247M) is associated with the resistance phenotype. Semiquantitative expression analysis showed that in St. No. 1, Pi37 was constitutively expressed and only slightly induced by blast infection. Transient expression experiments indicated that the Pi37 product is restricted to the cytoplasm. Pi37-3 is thought to have evolved recently from -2, which in turn was derived from an ancestral -1 sequence. Pi37-4 is likely the most recently evolved member of the cluster and probably represents a duplication of -3. The four Pi37 paralogs are more closely related to maize rp1 than to any of the currently isolated rice blast R genes Pita, Pib, Pi9, Pi2, Piz-t, and Pi36. PMID:17947408

  19. Nucleotide-binding mechanisms in pseudokinases

    PubMed Central

    Hammarén, Henrik M.; Virtanen, Anniina T.; Silvennoinen, Olli

    2015-01-01

    Pseudokinases are classified by the lack of one or several of the highly conserved motifs involved in nucleotide (nt) binding or catalytic activity of protein kinases (PKs). Pseudokinases represent ∼10% of the human kinome and they are found in all evolutionary classes of kinases. It has become evident that pseudokinases, which were initially considered somewhat peculiar dead kinases, are important components in several signalling cascades. Furthermore, several pseudokinases have been linked to human diseases, particularly cancer, which is raising interest for therapeutic approaches towards these proteins. The ATP-binding pocket is a well-established drug target and elucidation of the mechanism and properties of nt binding in pseudokinases is of significant interest and importance. Recent studies have demonstrated that members of the pseudokinase family are very diverse in structure as well as in their ability and mechanism to bind nts or perform phosphoryl transfer reactions. This diversity also precludes prediction of pseudokinase function, or the importance of nt binding for said function, based on primary sequence alone. Currently available data indicate that ∼40% of pseudokinases are able to bind nts, whereas only few are able to catalyse occasional phosphoryl transfer. Pseudokinases employ diverse mechanisms to bind nts, which usually occurs at low, but physiological, affinity. ATP binding serves often a structural role but in most cases the functional roles are not precisely known. In the present review, we discuss the various mechanisms that pseudokinases employ for nt binding and how this often low-affinity binding can be accurately analysed. PMID:26589967

  20. A Competitive Nucleotide Binding Inhibitor: In vitro Characterization of Rab7 GTPase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Agola, Jacob O.; Hong, Lin; Surviladze, Zurab; Ursu, Oleg; Waller, Anna; Strouse, J. Jacob; Simpson, Denise S.; Schroeder, Chad E.; Oprea, Tudor I.; Golden, Jennifer E.; Aubé, Jeffrey; Buranda, Tione; Sklar, Larry A.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Mapping the functionality of GTPases through small molecule inhibitors represents an underexplored area in large part due to the lack of suitable compounds. Here we report on the small chemical molecule 2-(benzoylcarbamothioylamino)-5,5-dimethyl-4,7-dihydrothieno[2,3-c]pyran-3-carboxylic acid (PubChem CID 1067700) as an inhibitor of nucleotide binding by Ras-related GTPases. The mechanism of action of this pan-GTPase inhibitor was characterized in the context of the Rab7 GTPase as there are no known inhibitors of Rab GTPases. Bead-based flow cytometry established that CID 1067700 has significant inhibitory potency on Rab7 nucleotide binding with nanomolar inhibitor (Ki) values and an inhibitory response of ≥97% for BODIPY-GTP and BODIPY-GDP binding. Other tested GTPases exhibited significantly lower responses. The compound behaves as a competitive inhibitor of Rab7 nucleotide binding based on both equilibrium binding and dissociation assays. Molecular docking analyses are compatible with CID 1067700 fitting into the nucleotide binding pocket of the GTP-conformer of Rab7. On the GDP-conformer, the molecule has greater solvent exposure and significantly less protein interaction relative to GDP, offering a molecular rationale for the experimental results. Structural features pertinent to CID 1067700 inhibitory activity have been identified through initial structure activity analyses and identified a molecular scaffold that may serve in the generation of more selective probes for Rab7 and other GTPases. Taken together, our study has identified the first competitive GTPase inhibitor and demonstrated the potential utility of the compound for dissecting the enzymology of the Rab7 GTPase as well as serving as a model for other small molecular weight GTPase inhibitors. PMID:22486388

  1. The nucleotide-binding domain of NLRC5 is critical for nuclear import and transactivation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Gagnon, Etienne; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NLRC5 requires an intact NLS for its function as MHC class I transactivator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear presence of NLRC5 is required for MHC class I induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide-binding controls nuclear import and transactivation activity of NLRC5. -- Abstract: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. A member of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) protein family, NLRC5, has recently been identified as a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I and related genes. While a 'master regulator' of MHC class II genes, CIITA, has long been known, NLRC5 specifically associates with and transactivates the proximal promoters of MHC class I genes. In this study, we analyzed the molecular requirements of NLRC5 nuclear import and transactivation activity. We show that NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene induction requires an intact nuclear localization signal and nuclear distribution of NLRC5. In addition, we find that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of NLRC5 is critical not only for nuclear translocation but also for the transactivation of MHC class I genes. Changing the cellular localization of NLRC5 is likely to immediately impact MHC class I expression as well as MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation. NLRC5 may thus provide a promising target for the modulation of MHC class I antigen presentation, especially in the setting of transplant medicine.

  2. A novel family of katanin-like 2 protein isoforms (KATNAL2), interacting with nucleotide-binding proteins Nubp1 and Nubp2, are key regulators of different MT-based processes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ververis, Antonis; Christodoulou, Andri; Christoforou, Maria; Kamilari, Christina; Lederer, Carsten W; Santama, Niovi

    2016-01-01

    Katanins are microtubule (MT)-severing AAA proteins with high phylogenetic conservation throughout the eukaryotes. They have been functionally implicated in processes requiring MT remodeling, such as spindle assembly in mitosis and meiosis, assembly/disassembly of flagella and cilia and neuronal morphogenesis. Here, we uncover a novel family of katanin-like 2 proteins (KATNAL2) in mouse, consisting of five alternatively spliced isoforms encoded by the Katnal2 genomic locus. We further demonstrate that in vivo these isoforms are able to interact with themselves, with each other and moreover directly and independently with MRP/MinD-type P-loop NTPases Nubp1 and Nubp2, which are integral components of centrioles, negative regulators of ciliogenesis and implicated in centriole duplication in mammalian cells. We find KATNAL2 localized on interphase MTs, centrioles, mitotic spindle, midbody and the axoneme and basal body of sensory cilia in cultured murine cells. shRNAi of Katnal2 results in inefficient cytokinesis and severe phenotypes of enlarged cells and nuclei, increased numbers of centrioles and the manifestation of aberrant multipolar mitotic spindles, mitotic defects, chromosome bridges, multinuclearity, increased MT acetylation and an altered cell cycle pattern. Silencing or stable overexpression of KATNAL2 isoforms drastically reduces ciliogenesis. In conclusion, KATNAL2s are multitasking enzymes involved in the same cell type in critically important processes affecting cytokinesis, MT dynamics, and ciliogenesis and are also implicated in cell cycle progression. PMID:26153462

  3. Stimulation of human thyroid growth via the inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein Gi: constitutive expression of the G-protein alpha subunit Gi alpha-1 in autonomous adenoma.

    PubMed Central

    Selzer, E; Wilfing, A; Schiferer, A; Hermann, M; Grubeck-Loebenstein, B; Freissmuth, M

    1993-01-01

    The alpha subunits of the stimulatory and inhibitory G proteins, Gs alpha and Gi alpha, activate transmembrane-signaling systems involved in the control of cell proliferation. We have investigated the pattern of expression of Gi alpha subtypes and Gi alpha-mediated proliferative responses in the human thyroid. Human thyroid membranes contain two subtypes of Gi alpha, Gi alpha-1 and Gi alpha-2, as assessed by using specific antibodies. The expression of Gi alpha-1 is under tight control by thyrotropin in vivo and in primary cultures of thyroid epithelial cells. In contrast, Gi alpha-1 is expressed in the absence of thyrotropin in thyroid autonomous adenoma, an endocrine-active tumor, and its levels are not regulated by thyrotropin in thyroid epithelial cells prepared from these tumors. If thyroid epithelial cells are treated with pertussis toxin to block signal transduction via Gi, the mitogenic response to serum factors is reduced. These observations demonstrate that Gi subtypes transmit growth stimuli in the human thyroid. The constitutive expression of Gi alpha-1 in autonomous adenoma may allow for the unregulated stimulation of thyroid cell proliferation by a yet unidentified signaling pathway and, thus, be causally related to autonomous growth of thyroid cells. Images PMID:8434024

  4. Classification of doubly wound nucleotide binding topologies using automated loop searches.

    PubMed Central

    Swindells, M. B.

    1993-01-01

    A classification is presented of doubly wound alpha/beta nucleotide binding topologies, whose binding sites are located in the cleft formed by a topological switch point. In particular, the switch point loop nearest the N-terminus is used to identify specific structural classes of binding protein. This yields seven structurally distinct loop conformations, which are subsequently used as motifs for scanning the Protein Data Bank. The searches, which are effective at identifying functional relationships within a large database of structures, reveal a remarkable and previously unnoticed similarity between the coenzyme binding sites of flavodoxin and tryptophan synthetase, even though there is no sequence or topological similarity between them. PMID:8298462

  5. Nucleotide binding and allosteric modulation of the second AAA+ domain of ClpB probed by transient kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Werbeck, Nicolas D; Kellner, Julian N; Barends, Thomas R M; Reinstein, Jochen

    2009-08-01

    The bacterial AAA+ chaperone ClpB provides thermotolerance by disaggregating aggregated proteins in collaboration with the DnaK chaperone system. Like many other AAA+ proteins, ClpB is believed to act as a biological motor converting the chemical energy of ATP into molecular motion. ClpB has two ATPase domains, NBD1 and NBD2, on one polypeptide chain. The functional unit of ClpB is a homohexameric ring, with a total of 12 potential nucleotide binding sites. Previously, two separate constructs, one each containing NBD1 or NBD2, have been shown to form a functional complex with chaperone activity when mixed. Here we aimed to elucidate the nucleotide binding properties of the ClpB complex using pre-steady state kinetics and fluorescent nucleotides. For this purpose, we first disassembled the complex and characterized in detail the binding kinetics of a construct comprising NBD2 and the C-terminal domain of ClpB. The monomeric construct bound nucleotides very tightly. ADP bound 2 orders of magnitude more tightly than ATP; this difference in binding affinity resulted almost exclusively from different dissociation rate constants. The nucleotide binding properties of NBD2 changed when this construct was complemented with a construct comprising NBD1 and the middle domain. Our approach shows how complex formation can influence the binding properties of the individual domains and allows us to assign nucleotide binding features of this highly complex, multimeric enzyme to specific domains. PMID:19594134

  6. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange.

    PubMed

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H; Gittens, William H; Townsend, Philip D; Sharples, Gary J; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2016-01-15

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  7. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H.; Gittens, William H.; Townsend, Philip D.; Sharples, Gary J.; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  8. In Silico Screening for Inhibitors of P-Glycoprotein That Target the Nucleotide Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Frances K.; Follit, Courtney A.; Vogel, Pia D.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistances and the failure of chemotherapies are often caused by the expression or overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins such as the multidrug resistance protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp is expressed in the plasma membrane of many cell types and protects cells from accumulation of toxins. P-gp uses ATP hydrolysis to catalyze the transport of a broad range of mostly hydrophobic compounds across the plasma membrane and out of the cell. During cancer chemotherapy, the administration of therapeutics often selects for cells which overexpress P-gp, thereby creating populations of cancer cells resistant to a variety of chemically unrelated chemotherapeutics. The present study describes extremely high-throughput, massively parallel in silico ligand docking studies aimed at identifying reversible inhibitors of ATP hydrolysis that target the nucleotide-binding domains of P-gp. We used a structural model of human P-gp that we obtained from molecular dynamics experiments as the protein target for ligand docking. We employed a novel approach of subtractive docking experiments that identified ligands that bound predominantly to the nucleotide-binding domains but not the drug-binding domains of P-gp. Four compounds were found that inhibit ATP hydrolysis by P-gp. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we showed that at least three of these compounds affected nucleotide binding to the transporter. These studies represent a successful proof of principle demonstrating the potential of targeted approaches for identifying specific inhibitors of P-gp. PMID:25270578

  9. Cloning and sequence analyses of cDNAs for interferon- and virus-induced human Mx proteins reveal that they contain putative guanine nucleotide-binding sites: functional study of the corresponding gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Horisberger, M A; McMaster, G K; Zeller, H; Wathelet, M G; Dellis, J; Content, J

    1990-01-01

    The human protein p78 is induced and accumulated in cells treated with type I interferon or with some viruses. It is the human homolog of the mouse Mx protein involved in resistance to influenza virus. A full-length cDNA clone encoding the human p78 protein was cloned and sequenced. It contained an open reading frame of 662 amino acids, corresponding to a polypeptide with a predicted molecular weight of 75,500, in good agreement with the Mr of 78,000 determined on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels for the purified natural p78 protein. The cloned gene was expressed in vitro and corresponded in size, pI, antigenic determinant(s), and NH2 terminus sequence to the natural p78 protein. A second cDNA was cloned which encoded a 633-amino-acid protein sharing 63% homology with human p78. This p78-related protein was translated in reticulocyte lysates where it shared an antigenic determinant(s) with p78. A putative 5' regulatory region of 83 base pairs contained within the gene promoter region upstream of the presumed p78 mRNA cap site conferred human alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) inducibility to the cat reporter gene. The p78 protein accumulated to high levels in cells treated with IFN-alpha. In contrast, the p78-related protein was not expressed at detectable levels. The rate of decay of p78 levels in diploid cells after a 24-h treatment with IFN-alpha was much slower than the rate of decay of the antiviral state against influenza A virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, suggesting that the p78 protein is probably not involved in an antiviral mechanism. Furthermore, we showed that these proteins, as well as the homologous mouse Mx protein, possess three consensus elements in proper spacing, characteristic of GTP-binding proteins. Images PMID:2154602

  10. Probing the nucleotide-binding site of Escherichia coli succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Joyce, M A; Fraser, M E; Brownie, E R; James, M N; Bridger, W A; Wolodko, W T

    1999-06-01

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS) catalyzes the reversible interchange of purine nucleoside diphosphate, succinyl-CoA, and Pi with purine nucleoside triphosphate, succinate, and CoA via a phosphorylated histidine (H246alpha) intermediate. Two potential nucleotide-binding sites were predicted in the beta-subunit, and have been differentiated by photoaffinity labeling with 8-N3-ATP and by site-directed mutagenesis. It was demonstrated that 8-N3-ATP is a suitable analogue for probing the nucleotide-binding site of SCS. Two tryptic peptides from the N-terminal domain of the beta-subunit were labeled with 8-N3-ATP. These corresponded to residues 107-119beta and 121-146beta, two regions lying along one side of an ATP-grasp fold. A mutant protein with changes on the opposite side of the fold (G53betaV/R54betaE) was unable to be phosphorylated using ATP or GTP, but could be phosphorylated by succinyl-CoA and Pi. A mutant protein designed to probe nucleotide specificity (P20betaQ) had a Km(app) for GTP that was more than 5 times lower than that of wild-type SCS, whereas parameters for the other substrates remained unchanged. Mutations of residues in the C-terminal domain of the beta-subunit designed to distrupt one loop of the Rossmann fold (I322betaA, and R324betaN/D326betaA) had the greatest effect on the binding of succinate and CoA. They did not disrupt the phosphorylation of SCS with nucleotides. It was concluded that the nucleotide-binding site is located in the N-terminal domain of the beta-subunit. This implies that there are two active sites approximately 35 A apart, and that the H246alpha loop moves between them during catalysis. PMID:10353839

  11. Examination of ClpB Quaternary Structure and Linkage to Nucleotide Binding.

    PubMed

    Lin, JiaBei; Lucius, Aaron L

    2016-03-29

    Escherichia coli caseinolytic peptidase B (ClpB) is a molecular chaperone with the unique ability to catalyze protein disaggregation in collaboration with the KJE system of chaperones. Like many AAA+ molecular motors, ClpB assembles into hexameric rings, and this reaction is thermodynamically linked to nucleotide binding. Here we show that ClpB exists in a dynamic equilibrium of monomers, dimers, tetramers, and hexamers in the presence of both limiting and excess ATPγS. We find that ClpB monomer is only able to bind one nucleotide, whereas all 12 sites in the hexameric ring are bound by nucleotide at saturating concentrations. Interestingly, dimers and tetramers exhibit stoichiometries of ∼3 and 7, respectively, which is one fewer than the maximum number of binding sites in the formed oligomer. This observation suggests an open conformation for the intermediates based on the need for an adjacent monomer to fully form the binding pocket. We also report the protein-protein interaction constants for dimers, tetramers, and hexamers and their dependencies on nucleotide. These interaction constants make it possible to predict the concentration of hexamers present and able to bind to cochaperones and polypeptide substrates. Such information is essential for the interpretation of many in vitro studies. Finally, the strategies presented here are broadly applicable to a large number of AAA+ molecular motors that assemble upon nucleotide binding and interact with partner proteins. PMID:26891079

  12. Relationship between nucleotide binding and ion channel gating in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Cui, Liying; Riordan, John R

    2009-06-15

    We have employed rate-equilibrium free energy relationship (REFER) analysis to characterize the dynamic events involved in the allosteric regulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function. A wide range of different hydrolysable and poorly hydrolysable nucleoside triphosphates were used to elucidate the role of ATP hydrolysis in CFTR function. The linearity of the REFER plots and Phi values near unity for all ligands tested implies that CFTR channel gating is a reversible thermally driven process with all structural reorganization in the binding site(s) completed prior to channel opening. This is consistent with the requirement for nucleotide binding for channel opening. However, the channel structural transition from the open to the closed state occurs independently of any events in the binding sites. Similar results were obtained on substitution of amino acids at coupling joints between both nucleotide binding domains (NBD) and cytoplasmic loops (CL) in opposite halves of the protein, indicating that any structural reorganization there also had occurred in the channel closed state. The fact that fractional Phi values were not observed in either of these distant sites suggests that there may not be a deterministic 'lever-arm' mechanism acting between nucleotide binding sites and the channel gate. These findings favour a stochastic coupling between binding and gating in which all structural transitions are thermally driven processes. We speculate that increase of channel open state probability is due to reduction of the number of the closed state configurations available after physical interaction between ligand bound NBDs and the channel. PMID:19403599

  13. Relationship between nucleotide binding and ion channel gating in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Cui, Liying; Riordan, John R

    2009-01-01

    We have employed rate-equilibrium free energy relationship (REFER) analysis to characterize the dynamic events involved in the allosteric regulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function. A wide range of different hydrolysable and poorly hydrolysable nucleoside triphosphates were used to elucidate the role of ATP hydrolysis in CFTR function. The linearity of the REFER plots and Φ values near unity for all ligands tested implies that CFTR channel gating is a reversible thermally driven process with all structural reorganization in the binding site(s) completed prior to channel opening. This is consistent with the requirement for nucleotide binding for channel opening. However, the channel structural transition from the open to the closed state occurs independently of any events in the binding sites. Similar results were obtained on substitution of amino acids at coupling joints between both nucleotide binding domains (NBD) and cytoplasmic loops (CL) in opposite halves of the protein, indicating that any structural reorganization there also had occurred in the channel closed state. The fact that fractional Φ values were not observed in either of these distant sites suggests that there may not be a deterministic ‘lever-arm’ mechanism acting between nucleotide binding sites and the channel gate. These findings favour a stochastic coupling between binding and gating in which all structural transitions are thermally driven processes. We speculate that increase of channel open state probability is due to reduction of the number of the closed state configurations available after physical interaction between ligand bound NBDs and the channel. PMID:19403599

  14. Anion Transport or Nucleotide Binding by Ucp2 Is Indispensable for Ucp2-Mediated Efferocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suho; Moon, Hyunji; Kim, Gayoung; Cho, Jeong Hoon; Dae-Hee, Lee; Ye, Michael B.; Park, Daeho

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and efficient engulfment of apoptotic cells is an essential property of phagocytes for removal of the large number of apoptotic cells generated in multicellular organisms. To achieve this, phagocytes need to be able to continuously uptake apoptotic cells. It was recently reported that uncoupling protein 2 (Ucp2) promotes engulfment of apoptotic cells by increasing the phagocytic capacity, thereby allowing cells to continuously ingest apoptotic cells. However, the functions of Ucp2, beyond its possible role in dissipating the mitochondrial membrane potential, that contribute to elevation of the phagocytic capacity have not been determined. Here, we report that the anion transfer or nucleotide binding activity of Ucp2, as well as its dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, is necessary for Ucp2-mediated engulfment of apoptotic cells. To study these properties, we generated Ucp2 mutations that affected three different functions of Ucp2, namely, dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, transfer of anions, and binding of purine nucleotides. Mutations of Ucp2 that affected the proton leak did not enhance the engulfment of apoptotic cells. Although anion transfer and nucleotide binding mutations did not affect the mitochondrial membrane potential, they exerted a dominant-negative effect on Ucp2-mediated engulfment. Furthermore, none of our Ucp2 mutations increased the phagocytic capacity. We conclude that dissipation of the proton gradient by Ucp2 is not the only determinant of the phagocytic capacity and that anion transfer or nucleotide binding by Ucp2 is also essential for Ucp2-mediated engulfment of apoptotic cells. PMID:26082030

  15. Caffeine inhibits glucose transport by binding at the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Jay M.; Cura, Anthony J.; Lloyd, Kenneth P.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is the primary glucose transport protein of the cardiovascular system and astroglia. A recent study proposes that caffeine uncompetitive inhibition of GLUT1 results from interactions at an exofacial GLUT1 site. Intracellular ATP is also an uncompetitive GLUT1 inhibitor and shares structural similarities with caffeine, suggesting that caffeine acts at the previously characterized endofacial GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site. We tested this by confirming that caffeine uncompetitively inhibits GLUT1-mediated 3-O-methylglucose uptake in human erythrocytes [Vmax and Km for transport are reduced fourfold; Ki(app) = 3.5 mM caffeine]. ATP and AMP antagonize caffeine inhibition of 3-O-methylglucose uptake in erythrocyte ghosts by increasing Ki(app) for caffeine inhibition of transport from 0.9 ± 0.3 mM in the absence of intracellular nucleotides to 2.6 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.5 mM in the presence of 5 mM intracellular ATP or AMP, respectively. Extracellular ATP has no effect on sugar uptake or its inhibition by caffeine. Caffeine and ATP displace the fluorescent ATP derivative, trinitrophenyl-ATP, from the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site, but d-glucose and the transport inhibitor cytochalasin B do not. Caffeine, but not ATP, inhibits cytochalasin B binding to GLUT1. Like ATP, caffeine renders the GLUT1 carboxy-terminus less accessible to peptide-directed antibodies, but cytochalasin B and d-glucose do not. These results suggest that the caffeine-binding site bridges two nonoverlapping GLUT1 endofacial sites—the regulatory, nucleotide-binding site and the cytochalasin B-binding site. Caffeine binding to GLUT1 mimics the action of ATP but not cytochalasin B on sugar transport. Molecular docking studies support this hypothesis. PMID:25715702

  16. Photomodulation of G Protein-Coupled Adenosine Receptors by a Novel Light-Switchable Ligand

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The adenosinergic system operates through G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, which have become promising therapeutic targets for a wide range of pathological conditions. However, the ubiquity of adenosine receptors and the eventual lack of selectivity of adenosine-based drugs have frequently diminished their therapeutic potential. Accordingly, here we aimed to develop a new generation of light-switchable adenosine receptor ligands that change their intrinsic activity upon irradiation, thus allowing the spatiotemporal control of receptor functioning (i.e., receptor activation/inactivation dependent on location and timing). Therefore, we synthesized an orthosteric, photoisomerizable, and nonselective adenosine receptor agonist, nucleoside derivative MRS5543 containing an aryl diazo linkage on the N6 substituent, which in the dark (relaxed isomer) behaved as a full adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) and partial adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) agonist. Conversely, upon photoisomerization with blue light (460 nm), it remained a full A3R agonist but became an A2AR antagonist. Interestingly, molecular modeling suggested that structural differences encountered within the third extracellular loop of each receptor could modulate the intrinsic, receptor subtype-dependent, activity. Overall, the development of adenosine receptor ligands with photoswitchable activity expands the pharmacological toolbox in support of research and possibly opens new pharmacotherapeutic opportunities. PMID:25248077

  17. Characterization of the Catalytic and Nucleotide Binding Properties of the α-Kinase Domain of Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yidai; Ye, Qilu; Jia, Zongchao; Côté, Graham P

    2015-09-25

    The α-kinases are a widely expressed family of serine/threonine protein kinases that exhibit no sequence identity with conventional eukaryotic protein kinases. In this report, we provide new information on the catalytic properties of the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase-A (termed A-CAT). Crystallization of A-CAT in the presence of MgATP yielded structures with AMP or adenosine in the catalytic cleft together with a phosphorylated Asp-766 residue. The results show that the β- and α-phosphoryl groups are transferred either directly or indirectly to the catalytically essential Asp-766. Biochemical assays confirmed that A-CAT hydrolyzed ATP, ADP, and AMP with kcat values of 1.9, 0.6, and 0.32 min(-1), respectively, and showed that A-CAT can use ADP to phosphorylate peptides and proteins. Binding assays using fluorescent 2'/3'-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) analogs of ATP and ADP yielded Kd values for ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine of 20 ± 3, 60 ± 20, 160 ± 60, and 45 ± 15 μM, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu-713, Leu-716, and Lys-645, all of which interact with the adenine base, were critical for nucleotide binding. Mutation of the highly conserved Gln-758, which chelates a nucleotide-associated Mg(2+) ion, eliminated catalytic activity, whereas loss of the highly conserved Lys-722 and Arg-592 decreased kcat values for kinase and ATPase activities by 3-6-fold. Mutation of Asp-663 impaired kinase activity to a much greater extent than ATPase, indicating a specific role in peptide substrate binding, whereas mutation of Gln-768 doubled ATPase activity, suggesting that it may act to exclude water from the active site. PMID:26260792

  18. Crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of mortalin, the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Amick, Joseph; Schlanger, Simon E; Wachnowsky, Christine; Moseng, Mitchell A; Emerson, Corey C; Dare, Michelle; Luo, Wen-I; Ithychanda, Sujay S; Nix, Jay C; Cowan, J A; Page, Richard C; Misra, Saurav

    2014-01-01

    Mortalin, a member of the Hsp70-family of molecular chaperones, functions in a variety of processes including mitochondrial protein import and quality control, Fe-S cluster protein biogenesis, mitochondrial homeostasis, and regulation of p53. Mortalin is implicated in regulation of apoptosis, cell stress response, neurodegeneration, and cancer and is a target of the antitumor compound MKT-077. Like other Hsp70-family members, Mortalin consists of a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and a substrate-binding domain. We determined the crystal structure of the NBD of human Mortalin at 2.8 Å resolution. Although the Mortalin nucleotide-binding pocket is highly conserved relative to other Hsp70 family members, we find that its nucleotide affinity is weaker than that of Hsc70. A Parkinson's disease-associated mutation is located on the Mortalin-NBD surface and may contribute to Mortalin aggregation. We present structure-based models for how the Mortalin-NBD may interact with the nucleotide exchange factor GrpEL1, with p53, and with MKT-077. Our structure may contribute to the understanding of disease-associated Mortalin mutations and to improved Mortalin-targeting antitumor compounds. PMID:24687350

  19. Nucleotide-binding flexibility in ultrahigh-resolution structures of the SRP GTPase Ffh

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, Ursula D.; Focia, Pamela J.; Freymann, Douglas M.

    2008-10-01

    Crystal structures of the Ffh NG GTPase domain at < 1.24 Å resolution reveal multiple overlapping nucleotide binding modes. Two structures of the nucleotide-bound NG domain of Ffh, the GTPase subunit of the bacterial signal recognition particle (SRP), have been determined at ultrahigh resolution in similar crystal forms. One is GDP-bound and one is GMPPCP-bound. The asymmetric unit of each structure contains two protein monomers, each of which exhibits differences in nucleotide-binding conformation and occupancy. The GDP-bound Ffh NG exhibits two binding conformations in one monomer but not the other and the GMPPCP-bound protein exhibits full occupancy of the nucleotide in one monomer but only partial occupancy in the other. Thus, under the same solution conditions, each crystal reveals multiple binding states that suggest that even when nucleotide is bound its position in the Ffh NG active site is dynamic. Some differences in the positioning of the bound nucleotide may arise from differences in the crystal-packing environment and specific factors that have been identified include the relative positions of the N and G domains, small conformational changes in the P-loop, the positions of waters buried within the active site and shifts in the closing loop that packs against the guanine base. However, ‘loose’ binding may have biological significance in promoting facile nucleotide exchange and providing a mechanism for priming the SRP GTPase prior to its activation in its complex with the SRP receptor.

  20. Nucleotide Binding Preference of the Monofunctional Platinum Anticancer-Agent Phenanthriplatin.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Imogen A; Johnstone, Timothy C; Park, Ga Young; Lippard, Stephen J

    2016-05-23

    The monofunctional platinum anticancer agent phenanthriplatin generates covalent adducts with the purine bases guanine and adenine. Preferential nucleotide binding was investigated by using a polymerase stop assay and linear DNA amplification with a 163-base pair DNA double helix. Similarly to cisplatin, phenanthriplatin forms the majority of adducts at guanosine residues, but significant differences in both the number and position of platination sites emerge when comparing results for the two complexes. Notably, the monofunctional complex generates a greater number of polymerase-halting lesions at adenosine residues than does cisplatin. Studies with 9-methyladenine reveal that, under abiological conditions, phenanthriplatin binds to the N(1) or N(7) position of 9-methyladenine in approximately equimolar amounts. By contrast, comparable reactions with 9-methylguanine afforded only the N(7) -bound species. Both of the 9-methyladenine linkage isomers (N(1) and N(7) ) exist as two diastereomeric species, arising from hindered rotation of the aromatic ligands about their respective platinum-nitrogen bonds. Eyring analysis of rate constants extracted from variable-temperature NMR spectroscopic data revealed that the activation energies for ligand rotation in the N(1) -bound platinum complex and the N(7) -linkage isomers are comparable. Finally, a kinetic analysis indicated that phenanthriplatin reacts more rapidly, by a factor of eight, with 9-methylguanine than with 9-methyladenine, suggesting that the distribution of lesions formed on double-stranded DNA is kinetically controlled. In addition, implications for the potent anticancer activity of phenanthriplatin are discussed herein. PMID:27111128

  1. Conformational changes of P-glycoprotein by nucleotide binding.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G; Pincheira, R; Zhang, M; Zhang, J T

    1997-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is a membrane protein that transports chemotherapeutic drugs, causing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells. Pgp is a member of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily and functions as a transport ATPase. It has been suggested that the conformation of Pgp changes in the catalytic cycle. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by using limited proteolysis as a tool to detect different conformational states trapped by binding of nucleotide ligands and inhibitors. Pgp has high basal ATPase activity; that is, ATP hydrolysis by Pgp is not rigidly associated with drug transport. This activity provides a convenient method for studying the conformational change of Pgp induced by nucleotide ligands, in the absence of drug substrates which may generate complications due to their own binding. Inside-out membrane vesicles containing human Pgp were isolated from multidrug-resistant SKOV/VLB cells and treated with trypsin in the absence or presence of MgATP, Mg-adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate (Mg-p[NH]ppA) and MgADP. Changes in the proteolysis profile of Pgp owing to binding of nucleotides were used to indicate the conformational changes in Pgp. We found that generation of tryptic fragments, including the loop linking transmembrane (TM) regions TM8 and TM9 of Pgp, were stimulated by the binding of Mg-p[NH]ppA, MgATP and MgADP, indicating that the Pgp conformation was changed by the binding of these nucleotides. The effects of nucleotides on Pgp conformation are directly associated with the binding and/or hydrolysis of these ligands. Four conformational states of Pgp were stabilized under different conditions with various ligands and inhibitors. We propose that cycling through these four states couples the Pgp-mediated MgATP hydrolysis to drug transport. PMID:9396736

  2. Characterization of agonist radioligand interactions with porcine atrial A1 adenosine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Leid, M.; Schimerlik, M.I.; Murray, T.F.

    1988-09-01

    The agonist radioligand (-)-N6-(125I)-p-hydroxyphenylisopropyl-adenosine (( 125I)HPIA) was used to characterize adenosine recognition sites in porcine atrial membranes. (125I)HPIA showed saturable binding to an apparently homogeneous population of sites with a maximum binding capacity of 35 +/- 3 fmol/mg of protein and an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2.5 +/- 0.4 nM. Kinetic experiments were performed to address the molecular mechanism of (125I)HPIA binding in porcine atrial membranes. (125I)HPIA apparently interacts with the cardiac adenosine receptor in a simple bimolecular reaction. A kinetically derived (125I) HPIA dissociation constant (2.4 nM) was in good agreement with that parameter measured at equilibrium. Guanyl nucleotides negatively modulated (125I)HPIA binding by increasing its rate of dissociation. This finding is consonant with the formation of a ternary complex in porcine atrial membranes, consisting of ligand, receptor, and guanyl nucleotide-binding protein. Prototypic adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists inhibited specific binding in a manner consistent with the labeling of an A1 adenosine receptor. The results of these experiments suggest that the adenosine receptor present in porcine atrial membranes, as labeled by (125I)HPIA, is of the A1 subtype.

  3. LDL-cholesterol reduction in patients with hypercholesterolemia by modulation of adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Filippov, Sergey; Pinkosky, Stephen L.; Newton, Roger S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the profile of ETC-1002, as shown in preclinical and clinical studies, including LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering activity and beneficial effects on other cardiometabolic risk markers as they relate to the inhibition of adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase and the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase. Recent findings ETC-1002 is an adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase inhibitor/adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activator currently in Phase 2b clinical development. In seven Phase 1 and Phase 2a clinical studies, ETC-1002 dosed once daily for 2–12 weeks has lowered LDL-C and reduced high-sensitivity C-reactive protein by up to 40%, with neutral to positive effects on glucose levels, blood pressure, and body weight. Importantly, use of ETC-1002 in statin-intolerant patients has shown statin-like lowering of LDL-C without the muscle pain and weakness responsible for discontinuation of statin use by many patients. ETC-1002 has also been shown to produce an incremental benefit, lowering LDL-C as an add-on therapy to a low-dose statin. In over 300 individuals in studies of up to 12 weeks, ETC-1002 has been well tolerated with no serious adverse effects. Summary Because adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase play central roles in regulating lipid and glucose metabolism, pharmacological modulation of these two enzymes could provide an important therapeutic alternative for statin-intolerant patients with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24978142

  4. Severe MgADP Inhibition of Bacillus subtilis F1-ATPase Is Not Due to the Absence of Nucleotide Binding to the Noncatalytic Nucleotide Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    F1-ATPase from Bacillus subtilis (BF1) is severely suppressed by the MgADP inhibition. Here, we have tested if this is due to the loss of nucleotide binding to the noncatalytic site that is required for the activation. Measurements with a tryptophan mutant of BF1 indicated that the noncatalytic sites could bind ATP normally. Furthermore, the mutant BF1 that cannot bind ATP to the noncatalytic sites showed much lower ATPase activity. It was concluded that the cause of strong MgADP inhibition of BF1 is not the weak nucleotide binding to the noncatalytic sites but the other steps required for the activation. PMID:25244289

  5. Structural and evolutionary divergence of cyclic nucleotide binding domains in eukaryotic pathogens: Implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Smita; Kennedy, Eileen J; Herberg, Friedrich W; Hui, Raymond; Taylor, Susan S; Langsley, Gordon; Kannan, Natarajan

    2015-10-01

    Many cellular functions in eukaryotic pathogens are mediated by the cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domain, which senses second messengers such as cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP. Although CNB domain-containing proteins have been identified in many pathogenic organisms, an incomplete understanding of how CNB domains in pathogens differ from other eukaryotic hosts has hindered the development of selective inhibitors for CNB domains associated with infectious diseases. Here, we identify and classify CNB domain-containing proteins in eukaryotic genomes to understand the evolutionary basis for CNB domain functional divergence in pathogens. We identify 359 CNB domain-containing proteins in 31 pathogenic organisms and classify them into distinct subfamilies based on sequence similarity within the CNB domain as well as functional domains associated with the CNB domain. Our study reveals novel subfamilies with pathogen-specific variations in the phosphate-binding cassette. Analyzing these variations in light of existing structural and functional data provides new insights into ligand specificity and promiscuity and clues for drug design. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. PMID:25847873

  6. Water-mediated forces between the nucleotide binding domains generate the power stroke in an ABC transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa-Hagiya, Tomoka; Yoshida, Norio; Chiba, Shuntaro; Hayashi, Tomohiko; Furuta, Tadaomi; Sohma, Yoshiro; Sakurai, Minoru

    2014-11-01

    ATP binding cassette proteins shuttle a variety of molecules across cell membranes. The substrate transportation process is initiated by the ATP-driven dimerization of nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). Here, the integral-equation theory of liquids was applied to simulated NBD structures to analyze their dimerization process from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and the water-mediated interaction between the NBDs. It was found that a long-range hydration force of enthalpic origin drives the two NBDs to approach from a large separation. In the subsequent step, the water-mediated attraction of entropic origin brings about a structural adjustment between the two NBDs and their tighter contact.

  7. Correctors Rescue CFTR Mutations in Nucleotide-Binding Domain 1 (NBD1) by Modulating Proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; Sabirzhanova, Inna; Rapino, Daniele; Morales, Marcelo M; Guggino, William B; Cebotaru, Liudmila

    2016-03-15

    We evaluated whether small molecule correctors could rescue four nucleotide-binding domain 1 (NBD1) mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene (A455E, S492F, ΔI507, and R560T). We first transfected Cos-7 cells (green monkey kidney cells) with A455E, S492F, ΔI507, or R560T and created HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney cells) cell lines stably expressing these CFTR mutations. The mutants showed lowered protein expression, instability at physiological temperature, and rapid degradation. After treatment with correctors CFFT-002, CFFT-003, C3, C4, and/or C18, the combination of C18+C4 showed the most correction and resulted in increased CFTR residing in the plasma membrane. We found a profound decrease in binding of CFTR to histone deacetylases (HDAC) 6 and 7 and heat shock proteins (Hsps) 27 and 40. Silencing Hsp27 or 40 rescued the mutants, but no additional amount of CFTR was rescued when both proteins were knocked down simultaneously. Thus, CFTR mutations in NBD1 can be rescued by a combination of correctors, and the treatment alters the interaction between mutated CFTR and the endoplasmic reticulum machinery. PMID:26864378

  8. Mutational Analysis of the Arabidopsis Nucleotide Binding Site–Leucine-Rich Repeat Resistance Gene RPS2

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yi; Yuan, Fenghua; Leister, R. Todd; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Katagiri, Fumiaki

    2000-01-01

    Disease resistance proteins containing a nucleotide binding site (NBS) and a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) region compose the largest class of disease resistance proteins. These so-called NBS-LRR proteins confer resistance against a wide variety of phytopathogens. To help elucidate the mechanism by which NBS-LRR proteins recognize and transmit pathogen-derived signals, we analyzed mutant versions of the Arabidopsis NBS-LRR protein RPS2. The RPS2 gene confers resistance against Pseudomonas syringae strains carrying the avirulence gene avrRpt2. The activity of RPS2 derivatives in response to AvrRpt2 was measured by using a functional transient expression assay or by expressing the mutant proteins in transgenic plants. Directed mutagenesis revealed that the NBS and an N-terminal leucine zipper (LZ) motif were critical for RPS2 function. Mutations near the N terminus, including an LZ mutation, resulted in proteins that exhibited a dominant negative effect on wild-type RPS2. Scanning the RPS2 molecule with a small in-frame internal deletion demonstrated that RPS2 does not have a large dispensable region. Overexpression of RPS2 in the transient assay in the absence of avrRpt2 also led to an apparent resistant response, presumably a consequence of a low basal activity of RPS2. The NBS and LZ were essential for this overdose effect, whereas the entire LRR was dispensable. RPS2 interaction with a 75-kD protein (p75) required an N-terminal portion of RPS2 that is smaller than the region required for the overdose effect. These findings illuminate the pathogen recognition mechanisms common among NBS-LRR proteins. PMID:11148296

  9. Tubulin exchanges divalent cations at both guanine nucleotide-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Correia, J J; Beth, A H; Williams, R C

    1988-08-01

    The tubulin heterodimer binds a molecule of GTP at the nonexchangeable nucleotide-binding site (N-site) and either GDP or GTP at the exchangeable nucleotide-binding site (E-site). Mg2+ is known to be tightly linked to the binding of GTP at the E-site (Correia, J. J., Baty, L. T., and Williams, R. C., Jr. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 17278-17284). Measurements of the exchange of Mn2+ for bound Mg2+ (as monitored by atomic absorption and EPR) demonstrate that tubulin which has GDP at the E-site possesses one high affinity metal-binding site and that tubulin which has GTP at the E-site possesses two such sites. The apparent association constants are 0.7-1.1 x 10(6) M-1 for Mg2+ and approximately 4.1-4.9 x 10(7) M-1 for Mn2+. Divalent cations do bind to GDP at the E-site, but with much lower affinity (2.0-2.3 x 10(3) M-1 for Mg2+ and 3.9-6.6 x 10(3) M-1 for Mn2+). These data suggest that divalent cations are involved in GTP binding to both the N- and E-sites of tubulin. The N-site metal exchanges slowly (kapp = 0.020 min-1), suggesting a mechanism involving protein "breathing" or heterodimer dissociation. The N-site metal exchange rate is independent of the concentration of protein and metal, an observation consistent with the possibility that a dynamic breathing process is the rate-limiting step. The exchange of Mn2+ for Mg2+ has no effect on the secondary structure of tubulin at 4 degrees C or on the ability of tubulin to form microtubules. These results have important consequences for the interpretation of distance measurements within the tubulin dimer using paramagnetic ions. They are also relevant to the detailed mechanism of divalent cation release from microtubules after GTP hydrolysis. PMID:3392036

  10. Nucleotides regulate the mechanical hierarchy between subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain of the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Daniela; Merz, Dale R.; Pelz, Benjamin; Theisen, Kelly E.; Yacyshyn, Gail; Mokranjac, Dejana; Dima, Ruxandra I.; Rief, Matthias; Žoldák, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of protein function through ligand-induced conformational changes is crucial for many signal transduction processes. The binding of a ligand alters the delicate energy balance within the protein structure, eventually leading to such conformational changes. In this study, we elucidate the energetic and mechanical changes within the subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of the heat shock protein of 70 kDa (Hsp70) chaperone DnaK upon nucleotide binding. In an integrated approach using single molecule optical tweezer experiments, loop insertions, and steered coarse-grained molecular simulations, we find that the C-terminal helix of the NBD is the major determinant of mechanical stability, acting as a glue between the two lobes. After helix unraveling, the relative stability of the two separated lobes is regulated by ATP/ADP binding. We find that the nucleotide stays strongly bound to lobe II, thus reversing the mechanical hierarchy between the two lobes. Our results offer general insights into the nucleotide-induced signal transduction within members of the actin/sugar kinase superfamily. PMID:26240360

  11. Nucleotides regulate the mechanical hierarchy between subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain of the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Daniela; Merz, Dale R; Pelz, Benjamin; Theisen, Kelly E; Yacyshyn, Gail; Mokranjac, Dejana; Dima, Ruxandra I; Rief, Matthias; Žoldák, Gabriel

    2015-08-18

    The regulation of protein function through ligand-induced conformational changes is crucial for many signal transduction processes. The binding of a ligand alters the delicate energy balance within the protein structure, eventually leading to such conformational changes. In this study, we elucidate the energetic and mechanical changes within the subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of the heat shock protein of 70 kDa (Hsp70) chaperone DnaK upon nucleotide binding. In an integrated approach using single molecule optical tweezer experiments, loop insertions, and steered coarse-grained molecular simulations, we find that the C-terminal helix of the NBD is the major determinant of mechanical stability, acting as a glue between the two lobes. After helix unraveling, the relative stability of the two separated lobes is regulated by ATP/ADP binding. We find that the nucleotide stays strongly bound to lobe II, thus reversing the mechanical hierarchy between the two lobes. Our results offer general insights into the nucleotide-induced signal transduction within members of the actin/sugar kinase superfamily. PMID:26240360

  12. Adenosine kinase inhibition and suppression of RNA silencing by geminivirus AL2 and L2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Buckley, Kenneth J; Yang, Xiaojuan; Buchmann, R Cody; Bisaro, David M

    2005-06-01

    Most plant viruses are initiators and targets of RNA silencing and encode proteins that suppress this adaptive host defense. The DNA-containing geminiviruses are no exception, and the AL2 protein (also known as AC2, C2, and transcriptional activator protein) encoded by members of the genus Begomovirus has been shown to act as a silencing suppressor. Here, a three-component, Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay is used to further examine the silencing suppression activity of AL2 from Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV, a begomovirus) and to determine if the related L2 protein of Beet curly top virus (BCTV, genus Curtovirus) also has suppression activity. We show that TGMV AL2, AL2(1-100) (lacking the transcriptional activation domain), and BCTV L2 can all suppress RNA silencing directed against a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene when silencing is induced by a construct expressing an inverted repeat GFP RNA (dsGFP). We previously found that these viral proteins interact with and inactivate adenosine kinase (ADK), a cellular enzyme important for adenosine salvage and methyl cycle maintenance. Using the GFP-dsGFP system, we demonstrate here that codelivery of a construct expressing an inverted repeat ADK RNA (dsADK), or addition of an ADK inhibitor (the adenosine analogue A-134974), suppresses GFP-directed silencing in a manner similar to the geminivirus proteins. In addition, AL2/L2 suppression phenotypes and nucleic acid binding properties are shown to be different from those of the RNA virus suppressors HC-Pro and p19. These findings provide strong evidence that ADK activity is required to support RNA silencing, and indicate that the geminivirus proteins suppress silencing by a novel mechanism that involves ADK inhibition. Further, since AL2(1-100) is as effective a suppressor as the full-length AL2 protein, activation and silencing suppression appear to be independent activities. PMID:15919897

  13. In vivo phosphorylation of CFTR promotes formation of a nucleotide-binding domain heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Mense, Martin; Vergani, Paola; White, Dennis M; Altberg, Gal; Nairn, Angus C; Gadsby, David C

    2006-01-01

    The human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is a chloride channel, whose dysfunction causes cystic fibrosis. To gain structural insight into the dynamic interaction between CFTR's nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) proposed to underlie channel gating, we introduced target cysteines into the NBDs, expressed the channels in Xenopus oocytes, and used in vivo sulfhydryl-specific crosslinking to directly examine the cysteines' proximity. We tested five cysteine pairs, each comprising one introduced cysteine in the NH2-terminal NBD1 and another in the COOH-terminal NBD2. Identification of crosslinked product was facilitated by co-expression of NH2-terminal and COOH-terminal CFTR half channels each containing one NBD. The COOH-terminal half channel lacked all native cysteines. None of CFTR's 18 native cysteines was found essential for wild type-like, phosphorylation- and ATP-dependent, channel gating. The observed crosslinks demonstrate that NBD1 and NBD2 interact in a head-to-tail configuration analogous to that in homodimeric crystal structures of nucleotide-bound prokaryotic NBDs. CFTR phosphorylation by PKA strongly promoted both crosslinking and opening of the split channels, firmly linking head-to-tail NBD1–NBD2 association to channel opening. PMID:17036051

  14. Cloning and expression of an A1 adenosine receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; McVittie, L.D.; Smyk-Randall, E.M.; Nakata, H.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Gerfen, C.R.; Sibley, D.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction technique to selectively amplify guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor cDNA sequences from rat striatal mRNA, using sets of highly degenerate primers derived from transmembrane sequences of previously cloned G protein-coupled receptors. A novel cDNA fragment was identified, which exhibits considerable homology to various members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This fragment was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a rat striatal library. A 2.2-kilobase clone was obtained that encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with seven transmembrane domains, as predicted by hydropathy analysis. Stably transfected mouse A9-L cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells that expressed mRNA for this clone were screened with putative receptor ligands. Saturable and specific binding sites for the A1 adenosine antagonist (3H)-1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine were identified on membranes from transfected cells. The rank order of potency and affinities of various adenosine agonist and antagonist ligands confirmed the identity of this cDNA clone as an A1 adenosine receptor. The high affinity binding of A1 adenosine agonists was shown to be sensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanylyl-5{prime}-imidodiphosphate. In adenylyl cyclase assays, adenosine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production by greater than 50%, in a pharmacologically specific fashion. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses of receptor mRNA in brain tissues revealed two transcripts of 5.6 and 3.1 kilobases, both of which were abundant in cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and thalamus, with lower levels in olfactory bulb, striatum, mesencephalon, and retina. These regional distribution data are in good agreement with previous receptor autoradiographic studies involving the A1 adenosine receptor.

  15. High-Throughput Screening for Small Molecule Inhibitors of LARG-Stimulated RhoA Nucleotide Binding via a Novel Fluorescence Polarization Assay

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Ferng, Timothy; Rojas, Rafael J.; Larsen, Martha J.; Sondek, John; Neubig, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs) stimulate guanine nucleotide exchange and the subsequent activation of Rho-family proteins in response to extracellular stimuli acting upon cytokine, tyrosine kinase, adhesion, integrin, and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Upon Rho activation, several downstream events occur, such as morphological and cytokskeletal changes, motility, growth, survival, and gene transcription. The RhoGEF Leukemia-Associated RhoGEF (LARG) is a member of the Regulators of G-protein Signaling Homology Domain (RH) family of GEFs originally identified as a result of chromosomal translocation in acute myeloid leukemia. Using a novel fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide binding assay utilizing BODIPY-Texas Red-GTPγS (BODIPY-TR-GTPγS), we performed a ten-thousand compound high-throughput screen for inhibitors of LARG-stimulated RhoA nucleotide binding. Five compounds identified from the high-throughput screen were confirmed in a non-fluorescent radioactive guanine nucleotide binding assay measuring LARG-stimulated [35S] GTPγS binding to RhoA, thus ruling out non-specific fluorescent effects. All five compounds selectively inhibited LARG-stimulated RhoA [35S] GTPγS binding, but had little to no effect upon RhoA or Gαo [35S] GTPγS binding. Therefore, these five compounds should serve as promising starting points for the development of small molecule inhibitors of LARG-mediated nucleotide exchange as both pharmacological tools and therapeutics. In addition, the fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide binding assay described here should serve as a useful approach for both high-throughput screening and general biological applications. PMID:19196702

  16. Identification and mapping of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat resistance gene analogs in bermudagrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-one bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) disease resistance gene homologs (BRGH) were cloned and sequenced from diploid, triploid, and hexaploid bermudagrass using degenerate primers to target the nucleotide binding site (NBS) of the NBS- leucine rich repeat (LRR) resistance gene family. Alignment of ...

  17. Adenosine transporters.

    PubMed

    Thorn, J A; Jarvis, S M

    1996-06-01

    1. In mammals, nucleoside transport is an important determinant of the pharmacokinetics, plasma and tissue concentration, disposition and in vivo biological activity of adenosine as well as nucleoside analogues used in antiviral and anticancer therapies. 2. Two broad types of adenosine transporter exist, facilitated-diffusion carriers and active processes driven by the transmembrane sodium gradient. 3. Facilitated-diffusion adenosine carriers may be sensitive (es) or insensitive (ei) to nanomolar concentrations of the transport inhibitor nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR). Dipyridamole, dilazep and lidoflazine analogues are also more potent inhibitors of the es carrier than the ei transporter in cells other than those derived from rat tissues. 4. The es transporter has a broad substrate specificity (apparent Km for adenosine approximately 25 microM in many cells at 25 degrees C), is a glycoprotein with an average apparent Mr of 57,000 in human erythrocytes that has been purified to near homogeneity and may exist in situ as a dimer. However, there is increasing evidence to suggest the presence of isoforms of the es transporter in different cells and species, based on kinetic and molecular properties. 5. The ei transporter also has a broad substrate specificity with a lower affinity for some nucleoside permeants than the es carrier, is genetically distinct from es but little information exists as to the molecular properties of the protein. 6. Sodium-dependent adenosine transport is present in many cell types and catalysed by four distinct systems, N1-N4, distinguished by substrate specificity, sodium coupling and tissue distribution. 7. Two genes have been identified which encode sodium-dependent adenosine transport proteins, SNST1 from the sodium/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) gene family and the rat intestinal N2 transporter (cNT1) from a novel gene family including a bacterial nucleoside carrier (NupC). Transcripts of cNT1, which encodes a 648-residue protein, are

  18. Analysis of a nucleotide-binding site of 5-lipoxygenase by affinity labelling: binding characteristics and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Y; Hammarberg, T; Radmark, O; Samuelsson, B; Ng, C F; Funk, C D; Loscalzo, J

    2000-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) catalyses the first two steps in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, which are inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid. 5LO activity is stimulated by ATP; however, a consensus ATP-binding site or nucleotide-binding site has not been found in its protein sequence. In the present study, affinity and photoaffinity labelling of 5LO with 5'-p-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine (FSBA) and 2-azido-ATP showed that 5LO bound to the ATP analogues quantitatively and specifically and that the incorporation of either analogue inhibited ATP stimulation of 5LO activity. The stoichiometry of the labelling was 1.4 mol of FSBA/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 1 mol/mol) or 0.94 mol of 2-azido-ATP/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 0.77 mol/mol). Labelling with FSBA prevented further labelling with 2-azido-ATP, indicating that the same binding site was occupied by both analogues. Other nucleotides (ADP, AMP, GTP, CTP and UTP) also competed with 2-azido-ATP labelling, suggesting that the site was a general nucleotide-binding site rather than a strict ATP-binding site. Ca(2+), which also stimulates 5LO activity, had no effect on the labelling of the nucleotide-binding site. Digestion with trypsin and peptide sequencing showed that two fragments of 5LO were labelled by 2-azido-ATP. These fragments correspond to residues 73-83 (KYWLNDDWYLK, in single-letter amino acid code) and 193-209 (FMHMFQSSWNDFADFEK) in the 5LO sequence. Trp-75 and Trp-201 in these peptides were modified by the labelling, suggesting that they were immediately adjacent to the C-2 position of the adenine ring of ATP. Given the stoichiometry of the labelling, the two peptide sequences of 5LO were probably near each other in the enzyme's tertiary structure, composing or surrounding the ATP-binding site of 5LO. PMID:11042125

  19. Functional Linkage of Adenine Nucleotide Binding Sites in Mammalian Muscle 6-Phosphofructokinase*

    PubMed Central

    Brüser, Antje; Kirchberger, Jürgen; Kloos, Marco; Sträter, Norbert; Schöneberg, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    6-Phosphofructokinases (Pfk) are homo- and heterooligomeric, allosteric enzymes that catalyze one of the rate-limiting steps of the glycolysis: the phosphorylation of fructose 6-phosphate at position 1. Pfk activity is modulated by a number of regulators including adenine nucleotides. Recent crystal structures from eukaryotic Pfk revealed several adenine nucleotide binding sites. Herein, we determined the functional relevance of two adenine nucleotide binding sites through site-directed mutagenesis and enzyme kinetic studies. Subsequent characterization of Pfk mutants allowed the identification of the activating (AMP, ADP) and inhibitory (ATP, ADP) allosteric binding sites. Mutation of one binding site reciprocally influenced the allosteric regulation through nucleotides interacting with the other binding site. Such reciprocal linkage between the activating and inhibitory binding sites is in agreement with current models of allosteric enzyme regulation. Because the allosteric nucleotide binding sites in eukaryotic Pfk did not evolve from prokaryotic ancestors, reciprocal linkage of functionally opposed allosteric binding sites must have developed independently in prokaryotic and eukaryotic Pfk (convergent evolution). PMID:22474333

  20. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-10-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose. PMID:26434492

  1. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose. PMID:26434492

  2. Adenosine Receptors Differentially Regulate the Expression of Regulators of G-Protein Signalling (RGS) 2, 3 and 4 in Astrocyte-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eusemann, Till Nicolas; Willmroth, Frank; Fiebich, Bernd; Biber, Knut; van Calker, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    The “regulators of g-protein signalling” (RGS) comprise a large family of proteins that limit by virtue of their GTPase accelerating protein domain the signal transduction of G-protein coupled receptors. RGS proteins have been implicated in various neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia, drug abuse, depression and anxiety and aggressive behaviour. Since conditions associated with a large increase of adenosine in the brain such as seizures or ischemia were reported to modify the expression of some RGS proteins we hypothesized that adenosine might regulate RGS expression in neural cells. We measured the expression of RGS-2,-3, and -4 in both transformed glia cells (human U373 MG astrocytoma cells) and in primary rat astrocyte cultures stimulated with adenosine agonists. Expression of RGS-2 mRNA as well as RGS2 protein was increased up to 30-fold by adenosine agonists in astrocytes. The order of potency of agonists and the blockade by the adenosine A2B-antagonist MRS1706 indicated that this effect was largely mediated by adenosine A2B receptors. However, a smaller effect was observed due to activation of adenosine A2A receptors. In astrocytoma cells adenosine agonists elicited an increase in RGS-2 expression solely mediated by A2B receptors. Expression of RGS-3 was inhibited by adenosine agonists in both astrocytoma cells and astrocytes. However while this effect was mediated by A2B receptors in astrocytoma cells it was mediated by A2A receptors in astrocytes as assessed by the order of potency of agonists and selective blockade by the specific antagonists MRS1706 and ZM241385 respectively. RGS-4 expression was inhibited in astrocytoma cells but enhanced in astrocytes by adenosine agonists. PMID:26263491

  3. Xylazine Activates Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in the Central Nervous System of Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xing-Xing; Yin, Bai-Shuang; Yang, Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Xin; Su, Li-Xue; Fan, Hong-Gang; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Xylazine is a potent analgesic extensively used in veterinary and animal experimentation. Evidence exists that the analgesic effect can be inhibited using adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors. Considering this idea, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the AMPK signaling pathway is involved in the central analgesic mechanism of xylazine in the rat. Xylazine was administrated via the intraperitoneal route. Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem were collected for determination of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα mRNA expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα levels using western blot. The results of our study showed that compared with the control group, xylazine induced significant increases in AMPK activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum after rats received xylazine (P < 0.01). Increased AMPK activities were accompanied with increased phosphorylation levels of LKB1 in corresponding regions of rats. The protein levels of phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα in these regions returned or tended to return to control group levels. However, in the brainstem, phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα protein levels were decreased by xylazine compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicates that xylazine alters the activities of LKB1 and AMPK in the central nervous system of rats, which suggests that xylazine affects the regulatory signaling pathway of the analgesic mechanism in the rat brain. PMID:27049320

  4. Activation of the A2A adenosine G-protein-coupled receptor by conformational selection.

    PubMed

    Ye, Libin; Van Eps, Ned; Zimmer, Marco; Ernst, Oliver P; Prosser, R Scott

    2016-05-12

    Conformational selection and induced fit are two prevailing mechanisms to explain the molecular basis for ligand-based activation of receptors. G-protein-coupled receptors are the largest class of cell surface receptors and are important drug targets. A molecular understanding of their activation mechanism is critical for drug discovery and design. However, direct evidence that addresses how agonist binding leads to the formation of an active receptor state is scarce. Here we use (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance to quantify the conformational landscape occupied by the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), a prototypical class A G-protein-coupled receptor. We find an ensemble of four states in equilibrium: (1) two inactive states in millisecond exchange, consistent with a formed (state S1) and a broken (state S2) salt bridge (known as 'ionic lock') between transmembrane helices 3 and 6; and (2) two active states, S3 and S3', as identified by binding of a G-protein-derived peptide. In contrast to a recent study of the β2-adrenergic receptor, the present approach allowed identification of a second active state for A2AR. Addition of inverse agonist (ZM241385) increases the population of the inactive states, while full agonists (UK432097 or NECA) stabilize the active state, S3', in a manner consistent with conformational selection. In contrast, partial agonist (LUF5834) and an allosteric modulator (HMA) exclusively increase the population of the S3 state. Thus, partial agonism is achieved here by conformational selection of a distinct active state which we predict will have compromised coupling to the G protein. Direct observation of the conformational equilibria of ligand-dependent G-protein-coupled receptor and deduction of the underlying mechanisms of receptor activation will have wide-reaching implications for our understanding of the function of G-protein-coupled receptor in health and disease. PMID:27144352

  5. Adenosine-Activated Nanochannels Inspired by G-Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei; Kong, Xiang-Yu; Xie, Ganhua; Xiao, Kai; Zhang, Zhen; Wen, Liping; Jiang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    A bioinspired adenosine activated nanodevice is demonstrated in which the conformations of the designed aptamer change and cause signal transmission according to the emergence of adenosine. This bioinspired system exhibits very high response ratios (activated/nonactivated ratio up to 614) and excellent stability and reversibility, and shows promising applications in the fields of biosensors, pharmaceutica, and healthcare systems. PMID:26915491

  6. Novel adenosine 3 prime ,5 prime -cyclic monophosphate dependent protein kinases in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.P.C.; Volcani, B.E. )

    1989-08-08

    Two novel adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinases have been isolated from the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis. The kinases, designated I and II, are eluted from DEAE-Sephacel at 0.10 and 0.15 M NaCl. They have a high affinity for cAMP and are activated by micromolar cAMP. They exhibit maximal activity at 5 mM Mg{sup 2+} and pH 8 with the preferred phosphate donor ATP and phosphate acceptor histone H1. They phosphorylate sea urchin sperm histone H1 on a single serine site in the sequence Arg-Lys-Gly-Ser({sup 32}P)-Ser-Asn-Ala-Arg and have an apparent M{sub r} of 75,000 as determined by gel filtration and sucrose density sedimentation. In the kinase I preparation a single protein band with an apparent M{sub r} of about 78,000 is photolabeled with 8-azido({sup 32}P)cAMP and is also phosphorylated with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in a cAMP-dependent manner, after autoradiography following sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. The rate of phosphorylation of the 78,000-dalton band is independent of the enzyme concentration. The results indicate that (i) these diatom cAMP-dependent protein kinases are monomeric proteins, possessing both the cAMP-binding regulatory and catalytic domains on the same polypeptide chain, (ii) the enzymes do not dissociate into smaller species upon activation by binding cAMP, and (iii) self-phosphorylation of the enzymes by an intrapeptide reaction is cAMP dependent. The two diatom cAMP kinases are refractory to the heat-stable protein kinase modulator from rabbit muscle, but they respond differently to proteolytic degradation and to inhibition by arachidonic acid and several microbial alkaloids.

  7. Structures of a minimal human CFTR first nucleotide-binding domain as a monomer, head-to-tail homodimer, and pathogenic mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Atwell, Shane; Brouillette, Christie G.; Conners, Kris; Emtage, Spencer; Gheyi, Tarun; Guggino, William B.; Hendle, Jorg; Hunt, John F.; Lewis, Hal A.; Lu, Frances; Protasevich, Irina I.; Rodgers, Logan A.; Romero, Rich; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Weber, Patricia C.; Wetmore, Diana; Zhang, Feiyu F.; Zhao, Xun

    2010-04-26

    Upon removal of the regulatory insert (RI), the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) can be heterologously expressed and purified in a form that remains stable without solubilizing mutations, stabilizing agents or the regulatory extension (RE). This protein, NBD1 387-646({Delta}405-436), crystallizes as a homodimer with a head-to-tail association equivalent to the active conformation observed for NBDs from symmetric ATP transporters. The 1.7-{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure shows how ATP occupies the signature LSGGQ half-site in CFTR NBD1. The {Delta}F508 version of this protein also crystallizes as a homodimer and differs from the wild-type structure only in the vicinity of the disease-causing F508 deletion. A slightly longer construct crystallizes as a monomer. Comparisons of the homodimer structure with this and previously published monomeric structures show that the main effect of ATP binding at the signature site is to order the residues immediately preceding the signature sequence, residues 542-547, in a conformation compatible with nucleotide binding. These residues likely interact with a transmembrane domain intracellular loop in the full-length CFTR channel. The experiments described here show that removing the RI from NBD1 converts it into a well-behaved protein amenable to biophysical studies yielding deeper insights into CFTR function.

  8. Novel gamma-secretase inhibitors uncover a common nucleotide-binding site in JAK3, SIRT2, and PS1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Schweizer, Claude; Rudinskiy, Nikita; Taylor, David M; Kazantsev, Aleksey; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Fraering, Patrick C

    2010-07-01

    Gamma-secretase is an intramembrane-cleaving protease responsible for the final proteolytic event in the production of the amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta) implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Inhibition of gamma-secretase activity is thus an attractive therapeutic strategy to slow down the pathogenesis of AD. Drugs often target more than one biomolecule because of conserved 3-dimensional structures in prospective protein binding sites. We have capitalized on this phenomenon of nature to identify new gamma-secretase inhibitors. Here we show that 2-hydroxy naphthyl derivatives, a previously identified subclass of NAD(+) analog inhibitors of sirtuin 2 (SIRT2), are direct gamma-secretase inhibitors. Subsequent structure-activity relationship studies further showed that 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde is the minimal pharmacophore for gamma-secretase inhibition. In evaluating target protein determinants of inhibition, we identified a common GXG signature nucleotide-binding site (NBS) shared by the gamma-secretase subunit presenilin-1 C-terminal fragment (PS1-CTF), SIRT2, and Janus kinase 3 (JAK3). Because a detailed 3-dimensional structure of gamma-secretase is beyond our knowledge, we took advantage of the known crystal structure of human JAK3 to model the NBS of the PS1-CTF, which includes the catalytic residue D385. Our results suggest that the flexible PS1-CTF (381)LGLG(384) loop comprises a substrate-docking site capable of recognizing specifically different gamma-secretase substrates. PMID:20237298

  9. Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-1 and -2 Play No Role in Controlling Brucella abortus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Fernanda S.; Carvalho, Natalia B.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Oliveira, Sergio C.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain proteins (NODs) are modular cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the recognition of peptidoglycan-derived molecules. Further, several in vivo studies have demonstrated a role for Nod1 and Nod2 in host defense against bacterial pathogens. Here, we demonstrated that macrophages from NOD1-, NOD2-, and Rip2-deficient mice produced lower levels of TNF-α following infection with live Brucella abortus compared to wild-type mice. Similar reduction on cytokine synthesis was not observed for IL-12 and IL-6. However, NOD1, NOD2, and Rip2 knockout mice were no more susceptible to infection with virulent B. abortus than wild-type mice. Additionally, spleen cells from NOD1-, NOD2-, and Rip2-deficient mice showed unaltered production of IFN-γ compared to C57BL/6 mice. Taken together, this study demonstrates that NOD1, NOD2 and Rip2 are dispensable for the control of B. abortus during in vivo infection. PMID:22203860

  10. Xylazine Activates Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in the Central Nervous System of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xing-Xing; Yin, Bai-Shuang; Yang, Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Xin; Su, Li-Xue; Fan, Hong-Gang; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Xylazine is a potent analgesic extensively used in veterinary and animal experimentation. Evidence exists that the analgesic effect can be inhibited using adenosine 5’-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors. Considering this idea, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the AMPK signaling pathway is involved in the central analgesic mechanism of xylazine in the rat. Xylazine was administrated via the intraperitoneal route. Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem were collected for determination of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα mRNA expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα levels using western blot. The results of our study showed that compared with the control group, xylazine induced significant increases in AMPK activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum after rats received xylazine (P < 0.01). Increased AMPK activities were accompanied with increased phosphorylation levels of LKB1 in corresponding regions of rats. The protein levels of phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα in these regions returned or tended to return to control group levels. However, in the brainstem, phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα protein levels were decreased by xylazine compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicates that xylazine alters the activities of LKB1 and AMPK in the central nervous system of rats, which suggests that xylazine affects the regulatory signaling pathway of the analgesic mechanism in the rat brain. PMID:27049320

  11. Insertion of proteolipid protein into oligodendrocyte mitochondria regulates extracellular pH and adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Appikatla, Sunita; Bessert, Denise; Lee, Icksoo; Hüttemann, Maik; Mullins, Chadwick; Somayajulu-Nitu, Mallika; Yao, Fayi; Skoff, Robert P

    2014-03-01

    Proteolipid protein (PLP) and DM20, the most abundant myelin proteins, are coded by the human PLP1 and non-human Plp1 PLP gene. Mutations in the PLP1 gene cause Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) with duplications of the native PLP1 gene accounting for 70% of PLP1 mutations. Humans with PLP1 duplications and mice with extra Plp1 copies have extensive neuronal degeneration. The mechanism that causes neuronal degeneration is unknown. We show that native PLP traffics to mitochondria when the gene is duplicated in mice and in humans. This report is the first demonstration of a specific cellular defect in brains of PMD patients; it validates rodent models as ideal models to study PMD. Insertion of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins requires specific import pathways; we show that specific cysteine motifs, part of the Mia40/Erv1 mitochondrial import pathway, are present in PLP and are required for its insertion into mitochondria. Insertion of native PLP into mitochondria of transfected cells acidifies media, partially due to increased lactate; it also increases adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the media. The same abnormalities are found in the extracellular space of mouse brains with extra copies of Plp1. These physiological abnormalities are preventable by mutations in PLP cysteine motifs, a hallmark of the Mia40/Erv1 pathway. Increased extracellular ATP and acidosis lead to neuronal degeneration. Our findings may be the mechanism by which microglia are activated and proinflammatory molecules are upregulated in Plp1 transgenic mice (Tatar et al. (2010) ASN Neuro 2:art:e00043). Manipulation of this metabolic pathway may restore normal metabolism and provide therapy for PMD patients. PMID:24382809

  12. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY

    PubMed Central

    BRAVO-TOBAR, Iván Darío; NELLO-PÉREZ, Carlota; FERNÁNDEZ, Alí; MOGOLLÓN, Nora; PÉREZ, Mary Carmen; VERDE, Juan; CONCEPCIÓN, Juan Luis; RODRIGUEZ-BONFANTE, Claudina; BONFANTE-CABARCAS, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA) and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP) in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35), II (n = 29), and III (n = 18). A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease. PMID:26603224

  13. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Tobar, Iván Darío; Nello-Pérez, Carlota; Fernández, Alí; Mogollón, Nora; Pérez, Mary Carmen; Verde, Juan; Concepción, Juan Luis; Rodriguez-Bonfante, Claudina; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA) and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP) in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35), II (n = 29), and III (n = 18). A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease. PMID:26603224

  14. Novel missense mutation in the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of HERG causes long QT syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Satler, C.A.; Walsh, E.P.; Vesely, M.R.

    1996-10-02

    Autosomal-dominant long QT syndrome (LQT) is an inherited disorder, predisposing affected individuals to sudden death from tachyarrhythmias. To identify the gene(s) responsible for LQT, we identified and characterized an LQT family consisting of 48 individuals. DNA was screened with 150 microsatellite polymorphic markers encompassing approximately 70% of the genome. We found evidence for linkage of the LQT phenotype to chromosome 7(q35-36). Marker D7S636 yielded a maximum lod score of 6.93 at a recombination fraction ({theta}) of 0.00. Haplotype analysis further localized the LQT gene within a 6-2-cM interval. HERG encodes a potassium channel which has been mapped to this region. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analyses demonstrated aberrant bands that were unique to all affected individuals. DNA sequencing of the aberrant bands demonstrated a G to A substitution in all affected patients; this point mutation results in the substitution of a highly conserved valine residue with a methionine (V822M) in the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of this potassium channel. The cosegregation of this distinct mutation with LQT demonstrates that HERG is the LQT gene in this pedigree. Furthermore, the location and character of this mutation suggests that the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the potassium channel encoded by HERG plays an important role in normal cardiac repolarization and may decrease susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. 38 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Functions of nucleotide binding subunits in the tonoplast ATPase from Beta vulgaris L

    SciTech Connect

    Manolson, M.F.; Poole, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    Partial purification of NO/sub 3/ sensitive H/sup +/-ATPases from the vacuolar membranes of high plants reveal two prominent polypeptides of approximately 60 and 70 kDa. Both polypeptides appear to contain nucleotide binding sites. The photoactive affinity analog of ATP, BzATP, cannot be hydrolyzed by the tonoplast ATPase but is a potential inhibitor (apparent K/sub I/ = 11 ..mu..M). /sup 32/P-BzATP was shown to specifically photolabel the 60 kDa polypeptide. In contrast, Mandala and Taiz have shown the photoincorporation of /sup 32/P-azidoATP to the 70 kDa polypeptide. This sterically different photoaffinity probe can be hydrolyzed although with a low affinity. Azido and benzophenone derivatives of the product, ADP, are currently being examined with respect to their inhibition kinetics of, and their photoincorporation into, the tonoplast ATPase from Beta vulgaris L. Kinetic data will be integrated with patterns of photoincorporation using analogs of both substrate and product, in order to illuminate the functions of the two nucleotide binding subunits.

  16. G protein-independent neuromodulatory action of adenosine on metabotropic glutamate signalling in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Toshihide; Kawakami, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Kassai, Hidetoshi; Yoshida, Takayuki; Hashimotodani, Yuki; Fredholm, Bertil B; Sekino, Yuko; Aiba, Atsu; Kano, Masanobu

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediating the neuromodulatory actions of adenosine that influence emotional, cognitive, motor, and other functions in the central nervous system (CNS). Previous studies show complex formation between ARs and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in heterologous systems and close colocalization of ARs and mGluRs in several central neurons. Here we explored the possibility of intimate functional interplay between Gi/o protein-coupled A1-subtype AR (A1R) and type-1 mGluR (mGluR1) naturally occurring in cerebellar Purkinje cells. Using a perforated-patch voltage-clamp technique, we found that both synthetic and endogenous agonists for A1R induced continuous depression of a mGluR1-coupled inward current. A1R agonists also depressed mGluR1-coupled intracellular Ca2+ mobilization monitored by fluorometry. A1R indeed mediated this depression because genetic depletion of A1R abolished it. Surprisingly, A1R agonist-induced depression persisted after blockade of Gi/o protein. The depression appeared to involve neither the cAMP-protein kinase A cascade downstream of the alpha subunits of Gi/o and Gs proteins, nor cytoplasmic Ca2+ that is suggested to be regulated by the beta-gamma subunit complex of Gi/o protein. Moreover, A1R did not appear to affect Gq protein which mediates the mGluR1-coupled responses. These findings suggest that A1R modulates mGluR1 signalling without the aid of the major G proteins. In this respect, the A1R-mediated depression of mGluR1 signalling shown here is clearly distinguished from the A1R-mediated neuronal responses described so far. These findings demonstrate a novel neuromodulatory action of adenosine in central neurons. PMID:17379632

  17. [Adenosine and its role in physiology].

    PubMed

    Novotný, J

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is not just a major component of adenine nucleotides and ribonucleic acids, but also has its own signaling functions. ExtraceIlular level of adenosine in an organism is strictly maintained through the balance between its formation, degradation and transport. Adenosine is formed by enzymatic degradation of adenosine triphosphate and eliminated by phosphorylation to adenosine monophosphate or by deamination to inosine. Transport of adenosine across the cell membrane is ensured by equilibrative and concentrative nucleoside transporters. All these processes participate in maintenance of adenosine level under normal conditions, but a balanced equilibrium can be disrupted in some pathophysiological situations. Extracellular adenosine as a signaling molecule binds to adenosine receptors, which may trigger via their cognate trimeric G proteins different signaling pathways. In this way, adenosine regulates energy homeostasis and affects the function of various organs. Targeted pharmacological manipulations of specific adenosine receptor subtypes or enzymes involved in its metabolism can potentially be used for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26738245

  18. Role of cysteine residues in the redox-regulated oligomerization and nucleotide binding to EhRabX3.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Mintu; Datta, Sunando

    2016-08-01

    The enteric protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, an etiological agent of amebiasis, is involved in the adhesion and destruction of human tissues. Worldwide, the parasite causes about 50 million cases of amebiasis and 100,000 deaths annually. EhRabX3, a unique amoebic Rab GTPase with tandem G-domains, possesses an unusually large number of cysteine residues in its N-terminal domain. Crystal structure of EhRabX3 revealed an intra-molecular disulfide bond between C39 and C163 which is critical for maintaining the 3-dimensional architecture and biochemical function of this protein. The remaining six cysteine residues were found to be surface exposed and predicted to be involved in inter-molecular disulfide bonds. In the current study, using biophysical and mutational approaches, we have investigated the role of the cysteine residues in the assembly of EhRabX3 oligomer. The self-association of EhRabX3 is found to be redox sensitive, in vitro. Furthermore, the oligomeric conformation of EhRabX3 failed to bind and exchange the guanine nucleotide, indicating structural re-organization of the active site. Altogether, our results provide valuable insights into the redox-dependent oligomerization of EhRabX3 and its implication on nucleotide binding. PMID:27485554

  19. Nucleotide binding by the widespread high-affinity cyclic di-GMP receptor MshEN domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chuan; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Tu, Zhi-Le; He, Jin; Jones, Christopher J; Sanchez, David Zamorano; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Galperin, Michael Y; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2016-01-01

    C-di-GMP is a bacterial second messenger regulating various cellular functions. Many bacteria contain c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes but lack known c-di-GMP receptors. Recently, two MshE-type ATPases associated with bacterial type II secretion system and type IV pilus formation were shown to specifically bind c-di-GMP. Here we report crystal structure of the MshE N-terminal domain (MshEN1-145) from Vibrio cholerae in complex with c-di-GMP at a 1.37 Å resolution. This structure reveals a unique c-di-GMP-binding mode, featuring a tandem array of two highly conserved binding motifs, each comprising a 24-residue sequence RLGxx(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxG(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxxxLxxxLxxQ that binds half of the c-di-GMP molecule, primarily through hydrophobic interactions. Mutating these highly conserved residues markedly reduces c-di-GMP binding and biofilm formation by V. cholerae. This c-di-GMP-binding motif is present in diverse bacterial proteins exhibiting binding affinities ranging from 0.5 μM to as low as 14 nM. The MshEN domain contains the longest nucleotide-binding motif reported to date. PMID:27578558

  20. Direct or indirect stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors enhances bone regeneration as well as bone morphogenetic protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Wilder, Tuere; Perez-Aso, Miguel; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2015-01-01

    Promoting bone regeneration and repair of bone defects is a need that has not been well met to date. We have previously found that adenosine, acting via A2A receptors (A2AR) promotes wound healing and inhibits inflammatory osteolysis and hypothesized that A2AR might be a novel target to promote bone regeneration. Therefore, we determined whether direct A2AR stimulation or increasing endogenous adenosine concentrations via purine transport blockade with dipyridamole regulates bone formation. We determined whether coverage of a 3 mm trephine defect in a mouse skull with a collagen scaffold soaked in saline, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2; 200 ng), 1 μM CGS21680 (A2AR agonist, EC50 = 160 nM), or 1 μM dipyridamole (EC50 = 32 nM) promoted bone regeneration. Microcomputed tomography examination demonstrated that CGS21680 and dipyridamole markedly enhanced bone regeneration as well as BMP-2 8 wk after surgery (60 ± 2%, 79 ± 2%, and 75 ± 1% bone regeneration, respectively, vs. 32 ± 2% in control, P < 0.001). Blockade by a selective A2AR antagonist (ZM241385, 1 μM) or deletion of A2AR abrogated the effect of CGS21680 and dipyridamole on bone regeneration. Both CGS21680 and dipyridamole treatment increased alkaline phosphatase-positive osteoblasts and diminished tartrate resistance acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts in the defects. In vivo imaging with a fluorescent dye for new bone formation revealed a strong fluorescent signal in treated animals that was equivalent to BMP-2. In conclusion, stimulation of A2AR by specific agonists or by increasing endogenous adenosine levels stimulates new bone formation as well as BMP-2 and represents a novel approach to stimulating bone regeneration.—Mediero, A., Wilder, T., Perez-Aso, M., Cronstein, B. N. Direct or indirect stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors enhances bone regeneration as well as bone morphogenetic protein-2. PMID:25573752

  1. Normal gating of CFTR requires ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains and hydrolysis at the second nucleotide-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Berger, Allan L; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-01-11

    ATP interacts with the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR to control gating. However, it is unclear whether gating involves ATP binding alone, or also involves hydrolysis at each NBD. We introduced phenylalanine residues into nonconserved positions of each NBD Walker A motif to sterically prevent ATP binding. These mutations blocked [alpha-(32)P]8-N(3)-ATP labeling of the mutated NBD and reduced channel opening rate without changing burst duration. Introducing cysteine residues at these positions and modifying with N-ethylmaleimide produced the same gating behavior. These results indicate that normal gating requires ATP binding to both NBDs, but ATP interaction with one NBD is sufficient to support some activity. We also studied mutations of the conserved Walker A lysine residues (K464A and K1250A) that prevent hydrolysis. By combining substitutions that block ATP binding with Walker A lysine mutations, we could differentiate the role of ATP binding vs. hydrolysis at each NBD. The K1250A mutation prolonged burst duration; however, blocking ATP binding prevented the long bursts. These data indicate that ATP binding to NBD2 allowed channel opening and that closing was delayed in the absence of hydrolysis. The corresponding NBD1 mutations showed relatively little effect of preventing ATP hydrolysis but a large inhibition of blocking ATP binding. These data suggest that ATP binding to NBD1 is required for normal activity but that hydrolysis has little effect. Our results suggest that both NBDs contribute to channel gating, NBD1 binds ATP but supports little hydrolysis, and ATP binding and hydrolysis at NBD2 are key for normal gating. PMID:15623556

  2. Normal gating of CFTR requires ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains and hydrolysis at the second nucleotide-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Allan L.; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    ATP interacts with the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR to control gating. However, it is unclear whether gating involves ATP binding alone, or also involves hydrolysis at each NBD. We introduced phenylalanine residues into nonconserved positions of each NBD Walker A motif to sterically prevent ATP binding. These mutations blocked [α-32P]8-N3-ATP labeling of the mutated NBD and reduced channel opening rate without changing burst duration. Introducing cysteine residues at these positions and modifying with N-ethylmaleimide produced the same gating behavior. These results indicate that normal gating requires ATP binding to both NBDs, but ATP interaction with one NBD is sufficient to support some activity. We also studied mutations of the conserved Walker A lysine residues (K464A and K1250A) that prevent hydrolysis. By combining substitutions that block ATP binding with Walker A lysine mutations, we could differentiate the role of ATP binding vs. hydrolysis at each NBD. The K1250A mutation prolonged burst duration; however, blocking ATP binding prevented the long bursts. These data indicate that ATP binding to NBD2 allowed channel opening and that closing was delayed in the absence of hydrolysis. The corresponding NBD1 mutations showed relatively little effect of preventing ATP hydrolysis but a large inhibition of blocking ATP binding. These data suggest that ATP binding to NBD1 is required for normal activity but that hydrolysis has little effect. Our results suggest that both NBDs contribute to channel gating, NBD1 binds ATP but supports little hydrolysis, and ATP binding and hydrolysis at NBD2 are key for normal gating. PMID:15623556

  3. CFTR gating II: Effects of nucleotide binding on the stability of open states.

    PubMed

    Bompadre, Silvia G; Cho, Jeong Han; Wang, Xiaohui; Zou, Xiaoqin; Sohma, Yoshiro; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2005-04-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that ADP inhibits cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) opening by competing with ATP for a binding site presumably in the COOH-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD2). We also found that the open time of the channel is shortened in the presence of ADP. To further study this effect of ADP on the open state, we have used two CFTR mutants (D1370N and E1371S); both have longer open times because of impaired ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. Single-channel kinetic analysis of DeltaR/D1370N-CFTR shows unequivocally that the open time of this mutant channel is decreased by ADP. DeltaR/E1371S-CFTR channels can be locked open by millimolar ATP with a time constant of approximately 100 s, estimated from current relaxation upon nucleotide removal. ADP induces a shorter locked-open state, suggesting that binding of ADP at a second site decreases the locked-open time. To test the functional consequence of the occupancy of this second nucleotide binding site, we changed the [ATP] and performed similar relaxation analysis for E1371S-CFTR channels. Two locked-open time constants can be discerned and the relative distribution of each component is altered by changing [ATP] so that increasing [ATP] shifts the relative distribution to the longer locked-open state. Single-channel kinetic analysis for DeltaR/E1371S-CFTR confirms an [ATP]-dependent shift of the distribution of two locked-open time constants. These results support the idea that occupancy of a second ATP binding site stabilizes the locked-open state. This binding site likely resides in the NH2-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) because introducing the K464A mutation, which decreases ATP binding affinity at NBD1, into E1371S-CFTR shortens the relaxation time constant. These results suggest that the binding energy of nucleotide at NBD1 contributes to the overall energetics of the open channel conformation. PMID:15767296

  4. Structure of the Cyclic Nucleotide-Binding Homology Domain of the hERG Channel and Its Insight into Type 2 Long QT Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Ng, Hui Qi; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2016-01-01

    The human ether-à-go-go related gene (hERG) channel is crucial for the cardiac action potential by contributing to the fast delayed-rectifier potassium current. Mutations in the hERG channel result in type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2). The hERG channel contains a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain (CNBHD) and this domain is required for the channel gating though molecular interactions with the eag domain. Here we present solution structure of the CNBHD of the hERG channel. The structural study reveals that the CNBHD adopts a similar fold to other KCNH channels. It is self-liganded and it contains a short β-strand that blocks the nucleotide-binding pocket in the β-roll. Folding of LQT2-related mutations in this domain was shown to be affected by point mutation. Mutations in this domain can cause protein aggregation in E. coli cells or induce conformational changes. One mutant-R752W showed obvious chemical shift perturbation compared with the wild-type, but it still binds to the eag domain. The helix region from the N-terminal cap domain of the hERG channel showed unspecific interactions with the CNBHD. PMID:27025590

  5. Mutations in the nucleotide binding domain 1 signature motif region rescue processing and functional defects of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator delta f508.

    PubMed

    DeCarvalho, Ana C V; Gansheroff, Lisa J; Teem, John L

    2002-09-27

    The gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a phosphorylation- and nucleotide-regulated chloride channel, is mutated in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Deletion of a phenylalanine at amino acid position 508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) is the most prevalent CF-causing mutation and results in defective protein processing and reduced CFTR function, leading to chloride impermeability in CF epithelia and heterologous systems. Using a STE6/CFTRDeltaF508 chimera system in yeast, we isolated two novel DeltaF508 revertant mutations, I539T and G550E, proximal to and within the conserved ABC signature motif of NBD1, respectively. Western blot and functional analysis in mammalian cells indicate that mutations I539T and G550E each partially rescue the CFTRDeltaF508 defect. Furthermore, a combination of both revertant mutations resulted in a 38-fold increase in CFTRDeltaF508-mediated chloride current, representing 29% of wild type channel activity. The G550E mutation increased the sensitivity of CFTRDeltaF508 and wild type CFTR to activation by cAMP agonists and blocked the enhancement of CFTRDeltaF508 channel activity by 2 mm 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. The data show that the DeltaF508 defect can be significantly rescued by second-site mutations in the nucleotide binding domain 1 region, that includes the LSGGQ consensus motif. PMID:12110684

  6. Structure of the Cyclic Nucleotide-Binding Homology Domain of the hERG Channel and Its Insight into Type 2 Long QT Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Ng, Hui Qi; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2016-01-01

    The human ether-à-go-go related gene (hERG) channel is crucial for the cardiac action potential by contributing to the fast delayed-rectifier potassium current. Mutations in the hERG channel result in type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2). The hERG channel contains a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain (CNBHD) and this domain is required for the channel gating though molecular interactions with the eag domain. Here we present solution structure of the CNBHD of the hERG channel. The structural study reveals that the CNBHD adopts a similar fold to other KCNH channels. It is self-liganded and it contains a short β-strand that blocks the nucleotide-binding pocket in the β-roll. Folding of LQT2-related mutations in this domain was shown to be affected by point mutation. Mutations in this domain can cause protein aggregation in E. coli cells or induce conformational changes. One mutant-R752W showed obvious chemical shift perturbation compared with the wild-type, but it still binds to the eag domain. The helix region from the N-terminal cap domain of the hERG channel showed unspecific interactions with the CNBHD. PMID:27025590

  7. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Buey, Rubén M; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M; Revuelta, José L

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  8. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  9. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  10. Adenosine diphosphate restricts the protein remodeling activity of the Hsp104 chaperone to Hsp70 assisted disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kłosowska, Agnieszka; Chamera, Tomasz; Liberek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Hsp104 disaggregase provides thermotolerance in yeast by recovering proteins from aggregates in cooperation with the Hsp70 chaperone. Protein disaggregation involves polypeptide extraction from aggregates and its translocation through the central channel of the Hsp104 hexamer. This process relies on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. Considering that Hsp104 is characterized by low affinity towards ATP and is strongly inhibited by adenosine diphosphate (ADP), we asked how Hsp104 functions at the physiological levels of adenine nucleotides. We demonstrate that physiological levels of ADP highly limit Hsp104 activity. This inhibition, however, is moderated by the Hsp70 chaperone, which allows efficient disaggregation by supporting Hsp104 binding to aggregates but not to non-aggregated, disordered protein substrates. Our results point to an additional level of Hsp104 regulation by Hsp70, which restricts the potentially toxic protein unfolding activity of Hsp104 to the disaggregation process, providing the yeast protein-recovery system with substrate specificity and efficiency in ATP consumption. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15159.001 PMID:27223323

  11. Plasma adenosine triphosphate and heat shock protein 72 concentrations after aerobic and eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kishiko; Seta, Ryosuke; Shimizu, Takahiko; Shinkai, Shoji; Calderwood, Stuart K; Nakazato, Koichi; Takahashi, Kazue

    2011-01-01

    The endolysosome pathway has been proposed for secretion of heat shock protein (Hsp)72 with a regulatory role for extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Here, we tested the hypothesis that extracellular ATP mediates the increase in plasma Hsp72 after exercise. We measured plasma ATP Hsp72, cathepsin D, norepinephrine, free fatty acid, glucose, and myoglobin in 8 healthy young males (mean +/- SE: age, 22.3 +/- 0.3 years; height, 171.4 +/- 0.8 cm; weight, 68.8 +/- 3.1 kg; body mass index, 23.5 +/- 1.1 kg/cm2; VO2 max, 44.1 +/- 3.8 mL/kg/min) before and at 0, 10, 30, and 60 min after aerobic exercise (cycling) and elbow flexor eccentric exercise. Subjects cycled for 60 min at 70-75% VO2 max (mean +/- SE; 157.4 +/- 6.9 W). Eccentric strength exercise consisted of flexing the elbow joint to 90 degrees with motion speed set at 30 degrees/sec at extension and 10 degrees/sec at flexion. Subjects performed 7 sets of 10 eccentric actions with a set interval of 60 sec. The motion range of the elbow joint was 90 degrees-180 degrees. Compared with the levels of Hsp72 and ATP in plasma after bicycle exercise, those after eccentric exercise did not change. A significant group x time interaction was not observed for Hsp72 or ATP in plasma. A significant correlation was found between Hsp72 and ATP in plasma (r=0.79, P<0.05), but not between Hsp72 and norepinephrine (r=0.64, P=0.09) after bicycle exercise. A significant correlation between ATP and norepinephrine in plasma was found (r=0.89 P<0.01). We used stepwise multiple-regression analysis to determine independent predictors of exercise-induced elevation of eHsp72. Candidate predictor variables for the stepwise multiple-regression analysis were time (Pre, Post, Post10, Post30, Post60), exercise type (aerobic, eccentric), ATP, cathepsin D, norepinephrine, epinephrine, glucose, and FFA. In the regression model for Hsp72 in plasma, increased ATP and glucose were the strongest predictors of increased Hsp72 (ATP: R2=0.213, beta

  12. Inactivation of the first nucleotide-binding fold of the sulfonylurea receptor, and familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.M.; Wohllk, N.; Huang, E.

    1996-09-01

    Familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy is a disorder of glucose homeostasis and is characterized by unregulated insulin secretion and profound hypoglycemia. Loss-of-function mutations in the second nucleotide-binding fold of the sulfonylurea receptor, a subunit of the pancreatic-islet {beta}-cell ATP-dependent potassium channel, has been demonstrated to be causative for persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy. We now describe three additional mutations in the first nucleotide-binding fold of the sulfonylurea-receptor gene. One point mutation disrupts the highly conserved Walker A motif of the first nucleotide-binding-fold region. The other two mutations occur in noncoding sequences required for RNA processing and are predicted to disrupt the normal splicing pathway of the sulfonylurea-receptor mRNA precursor. These data suggest that both nucleotide-binding-fold regions of the sulfortylurea receptor are required for normal regulation of {beta}-cell ATP-dependent potassium channel activity and insulin secretion. 32 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Efficacy of the nucleotide-binding oligomerzation domain 1 inhibitor Nodinhibit-1 on corneal alkali burns in rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xu; Han, Yun; Shao, Yi; Yi, Jing-Lin

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the therapeutic effect of Nodinhibit-1 on alkali-burn-induced corneal neovascularization (CNV) and inflammation. The nucleotide-binding oligomerzation domain 1 (NOD1) is a potent angiogenic gene. METHODS The alkali-burned rat corneas (32 right eyes) were treated with eye drops containing Nodinhibit-1 or phosphate buffered solution (PBS, PH 7.4) only, four times per day. CNV and inflammation were monitored using slit lamp microscopy, and the area of CNV was measured by formula. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was determined by Western blot analysis. The TUNEL assay was used to assess the corneal apoptosis cells. RESULTS Alkali-burn-induced progressive CNV and inflammation in the cornea. After treatment for 7d and 14d, there were statistically significant differences in the CNV areas and inflammatory index on that between two group(P<0.05, respectively). Epithelial defect quantification showed a significant difference between the two groups at days 4 and 7 after the alkali burns (P<0.05). The apoptotic cells on days 1, 4, and 7 between the two groups showed significant differences at all time points (P<0.05, respectively). Compared to that in control group, the protein level of VEGF expression was significantly reduced whereas the PEDF expression was increase in the Nodinhibit-1 groups on day 14 (P<0.05, respectively) CONCLUSION Topical application of 10.0 µg/mL Nodinhibit-1 may have potential effect for the alkali burn-induced CNV and inflammation. The effect of Nodinhibit-1 on CNV may be by regulation the equilibrium of VEGF and PEDF in the wounded cornea. PMID:26558192

  14. Differential interactions of nucleotides at the two nucleotide binding domains of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, L; Mengos, A; Chang, X; Aleksandrov, A; Riordan, J R

    2001-04-20

    After phosphorylation by protein kinase A, gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is regulated by the interaction of ATP with its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). Models of this gating regulation have proposed that ATP hydrolysis at NBD1 and NBD2 may drive channel opening and closing, respectively (reviewed in Nagel, G. (1999) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1461, 263-274). However, as yet there has been little biochemical confirmation of the predictions of these models. We have employed photoaffinity labeling with 8-azido-ATP, which supports channel gating as effectively as ATP to evaluate interactions with each NBD in intact membrane-bound CFTR. Mutagenesis of Walker A lysine residues crucial for azido-ATP hydrolysis to generate the azido-ADP that is trapped by vanadate indicated a greater role of NBD1 than NBD2. Separation of the domains by limited trypsin digestion and enrichment by immunoprecipitation confirmed greater and more stable nucleotide trapping at NBD1. This asymmetry of the two domains in interactions with nucleotides was reflected most emphatically in the response to the nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue, 5'-adenylyl-beta,gamma-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), which in the gating models was proposed to bind with high affinity to NBD2 causing inhibition of ATP hydrolysis there postulated to drive channel closing. Instead we found a strong competitive inhibition of nucleotide hydrolysis and trapping at NBD1 and a simultaneous enhancement at NBD2. This argues strongly that AMP-PNP does not inhibit ATP hydrolysis at NBD2 and thereby questions the relevance of hydrolysis at that domain to channel closing. PMID:11279083

  15. Dual Effects of Adp and Adenylylimidodiphosphate on Cftr Channel Kinetics Show Binding to Two Different Nucleotide Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Weinreich, Frank; Riordan, John R.; Nagel, Georg

    1999-01-01

    The CFTR chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation by protein kinases, especially PKA, and by nucleotides interacting with the two nucleotide binding domains, NBD-A and NBD-B. Giant excised inside-out membrane patches from Xenopus oocytes expressing human epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) were tested for their chloride conductance in response to the application of PKA and nucleotides. Rapid changes in the concentration of ATP, its nonhydrolyzable analogue adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), its photolabile derivative ATP-P3-[1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl]ester, or ADP led to changes in chloride conductance with characteristic time constants, which reflected interaction of CFTR with these nucleotides. The conductance changes of strongly phosphorylated channels were slower than those of partially phosphorylated CFTR. AMP-PNP decelerated relaxations of conductance increase and decay, whereas ATP-P3-[1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl]ester only decelerated the conductance increase upon ATP addition. ADP decelerated the conductance increase upon ATP addition and accelerated the conductance decay upon ATP withdrawal. The results present the first direct evidence that AMP-PNP binds to two sites on the CFTR. The effects of ADP also suggest two different binding sites because of the two different modes of inhibition observed: it competes with ATP for binding (to NBD-A) on the closed channel, but it also binds to channels opened by ATP, which might either reflect binding to NBD-A (i.e., product inhibition in the hydrolysis cycle) or allosteric binding to NBD-B, which accelerates the hydrolysis cycle at NBD-A. PMID:10398692

  16. Dual effects of ADP and adenylylimidodiphosphate on CFTR channel kinetics show binding to two different nucleotide binding sites.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, F; Riordan, J R; Nagel, G

    1999-07-01

    The CFTR chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation by protein kinases, especially PKA, and by nucleotides interacting with the two nucleotide binding domains, NBD-A and NBD-B. Giant excised inside-out membrane patches from Xenopus oocytes expressing human epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) were tested for their chloride conductance in response to the application of PKA and nucleotides. Rapid changes in the concentration of ATP, its nonhydrolyzable analogue adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), its photolabile derivative ATP-P3-[1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl]ester, or ADP led to changes in chloride conductance with characteristic time constants, which reflected interaction of CFTR with these nucleotides. The conductance changes of strongly phosphorylated channels were slower than those of partially phosphorylated CFTR. AMP-PNP decelerated relaxations of conductance increase and decay, whereas ATP-P3-[1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl]ester only decelerated the conductance increase upon ATP addition. ADP decelerated the conductance increase upon ATP addition and accelerated the conductance decay upon ATP withdrawal. The results present the first direct evidence that AMP-PNP binds to two sites on the CFTR. The effects of ADP also suggest two different binding sites because of the two different modes of inhibition observed: it competes with ATP for binding (to NBD-A) on the closed channel, but it also binds to channels opened by ATP, which might either reflect binding to NBD-A (i.e., product inhibition in the hydrolysis cycle) or allosteric binding to NBD-B, which accelerates the hydrolysis cycle at NBD-A. PMID:10398692

  17. A Primary Survey on Bryophyte Species Reveals Two Novel Classes of Nucleotide-Binding Site (NBS) Genes

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jia-Yu; Wang, Yue; Wu, Ping; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Le-Tian; Pan, Xiao-Han; Wang, Bin; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2012-01-01

    Due to their potential roles in pathogen defense, genes encoding nucleotide-binding site (NBS) domain have been particularly surveyed in many angiosperm genomes. Two typical classes were found: one is the TIR-NBS-LRR (TNL) class and the other is the CC-NBS-LRR (CNL) class. It is seldom known, however, what kind of NBS-encoding genes are mainly present in other plant groups, especially the most ancient groups of land plants, that is, bryophytes. To fill this gap of knowledge, in this study, we mainly focused on two bryophyte species: the moss Physcomitrella patens and the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, to survey their NBS-encoding genes. Surprisingly, two novel classes of NBS-encoding genes were discovered. The first novel class is identified from the P. patens genome and a typical member of this class has a protein kinase (PK) domain at the N-terminus and a LRR domain at the C-terminus, forming a complete structure of PK-NBS-LRR (PNL), reminiscent of TNL and CNL classes in angiosperms. The second class is found from the liverwort genome and a typical member of this class possesses an α/β-hydrolase domain at the N-terminus and also a LRR domain at the C-terminus (Hydrolase-NBS-LRR, HNL). Analysis on intron positions and phases also confirmed the novelty of HNL and PNL classes, as reflected by their specific intron locations or phase characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis covering all four classes of NBS-encoding genes revealed a closer relationship among the HNL, PNL and TNL classes, suggesting the CNL class having a more divergent status from the others. The presence of specific introns highlights the chimerical structures of HNL, PNL and TNL genes, and implies their possible origin via exon-shuffling during the quick lineage separation processes of early land plants. PMID:22615795

  18. Binding of sodium and potassium to the sodium pump of pig kidney evaluated from nucleotide-binding behaviour.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, J; Nørby, J G; Ottolenghi, P

    1984-01-01

    Using a rate-dialysis technique at 0-2 degrees C, the affinities of Na+ and K+ for the sodium pump of pig kidney outer medulla were determined from their effects on the binding of ADP to the enzyme. Since all experiments were carried out in the presence of Tris, the enzyme in absence of its specific ligands was assumed to be in a 'sodium-like' conformation. The model used in the analysis of the results assumed the enzyme to be a dimeric structure with two identical high-affinity nucleotide-binding sites. It is concluded from the data that the effects of Na+ and K+ on the binding of nucleotide to either subunit of a nucleotide-free enzyme are identical. The two subunits, taken together, have five identical and non-interacting K+-binding sites (Kdiss = 0.5 mM) whose occupation antagonizes nucleotide binding. The binding of a nucleotide molecule to a nucleotide-free enzyme results in the abolition of K+ binding to two of the five K+-binding sites. The binding of the second molecule of nucleotide prevents the binding of three more K+ ions to the enzyme. These results can explain the K+-induced curvature observed in nucleotide-binding isotherms in Scatchard plots. The two subunits, taken together, have five identical and non-interacting Na+-binding sites (Kdiss = 0.5 mM) whose occupation antagonizes the effects of K+ on nucleotide binding, but does not affect nucleotide binding directly. A few experiments carried out at 18 degrees C indicate that the model applies also at this temperature. It is likely that the cation sites investigated are intracellular ones and it is concluded that the binding of each cation to its site induces a specific conformational change in the neighbourhood of the site itself without affecting the regions around the remaining cation binding sites. PMID:6321716

  19. A structural model for the nucleotide binding domains of the flavocytochrome b-245 beta-chain.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W. R.; Jones, D. T.; Segal, A. W.

    1993-01-01

    NADPH is a system in phagocytic cells that generates O2- and hydrogen peroxide in the endocytic vacuole, both of which are important for killing of the engulfed microbe. Dysfunction of this oxidase results in the syndrome of chronic granulomatous disease, characterized by a profound predisposition to bacterial and fungal infections. A flavocytochrome b is the site of most of the mutations causing this syndrome. The FAD and NADPH binding sites have been located on the beta subunit of this molecule, the C-terminal half of which showed weak sequence similarity to other reductases, including the ferredoxin-NADP reductase (FNR) of known structure. This enabled us to build a model of the nucleotide binding domains of the flavocytochrome using this structure as a template. The model was built initially using a novel automatic modeling method based on distance-matrix projection and then refined using energy minimization with appropriate side-chain torsional constraints. The resulting model rationalized much of the observed sequence conservation and identified a large insertion as a potential regulatory domain. It confirms the inclusion of the neutrophil flavocytochrome b-245 (Cb-245) as a member of the FNR family of reductases and strongly supports its function as the proximal electron transporting component of the NADPH oxidase. PMID:8251942

  20. Two nucleotide binding sites modulate ( sup 3 H) glyburide binding to rat cortex membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Gopalakrishnan, M.; Triggle, D.J.; Janis, R.A. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1991-03-11

    The effects of nucleotides on the binding of the ATP-dependent K{sup +}-channel antagonist ({sup 3}H)glyburide (GLB) to rat cortex membranes were examined. Nucleotide triphosphates (NTPs) and nucleotide diphosphate (NDPs) inhibited the binding of GLB. This effect was dependent on the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT). Inhibition of binding by NTPs, with the exception of ATP{gamma}S, was dependent on the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. GLB binding showed a biphasic response to ADP: up to 3 mM, ADP inhibited binding, and above this concentration GLB binding increased rapidly, and was restored to normal levels by 10 mM ADP. In the presence of Mg{sup 2+}, ADP did not stimulate binding. Saturation analysis in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and increasing concentrations of ADP showed that ADP results primarily in a change of the B{sub max} for GLB binding. The differential effects of NTPS and NDPs indicate that two nucleotide binding sites regulate GLB binding.

  1. Obligate coupling of CFTR pore opening to tight nucleotide-binding domain dimerization.

    PubMed

    Mihályi, Csaba; Töröcsik, Beáta; Csanády, László

    2016-01-01

    In CFTR, the chloride channel mutated in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, ATP-binding-induced dimerization of two cytosolic nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) opens the pore, and dimer disruption following ATP hydrolysis closes it. Spontaneous openings without ATP are rare in wild-type CFTR, but in certain CF mutants constitute the only gating mechanism, stimulated by ivacaftor, a clinically approved CFTR potentiator. The molecular motions underlying spontaneous gating are unclear. Here we correlate energetic coupling between residues across the dimer interface with spontaneous pore opening/closure in single CFTR channels. We show that spontaneous openings are also strictly coupled to NBD dimerization, which may therefore occur even without ATP. Coordinated NBD/pore movements are therefore intrinsic to CFTR: ATP alters the stability, but not the fundamental structural architecture, of open- and closed-pore conformations. This explains correlated effects of phosphorylation, mutations, and drugs on ATP-driven and spontaneous activity, providing insights for understanding CF mutation and drug mechanisms. PMID:27328319

  2. Gating of the CFTR Cl- channel by ATP-driven nucleotide-binding domain dimerisation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sheppard, David N

    2009-05-15

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a fundamental role in fluid and electrolyte transport across epithelial tissues. Based on its structure, function and regulation, CFTR is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. These transporters are assembled from two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). In the vast majority of ABC transporters, the NBDs form a common engine that utilises the energy of ATP hydrolysis to pump a wide spectrum of substrates through diverse transmembrane pathways formed by the MSDs. By contrast, in CFTR the MSDs form a pathway for passive anion flow that is gated by cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis by the NBDs. Here, we consider how the interaction of ATP with two ATP-binding sites, formed by the NBDs, powers conformational changes in CFTR structure to gate the channel pore. We explore how conserved sequences from both NBDs form ATP-binding sites at the interface of an NBD dimer and highlight the distinct roles that each binding site plays during the gating cycle. Knowledge of how ATP gates the CFTR Cl- channel is critical for understanding CFTR's physiological role, its malfunction in disease and the mechanism of action of small molecules that modulate CFTR channel gating. PMID:19332488

  3. Gating of the CFTR Cl− channel by ATP-driven nucleotide-binding domain dimerisation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sheppard, David N

    2009-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a fundamental role in fluid and electrolyte transport across epithelial tissues. Based on its structure, function and regulation, CFTR is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. These transporters are assembled from two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). In the vast majority of ABC transporters, the NBDs form a common engine that utilises the energy of ATP hydrolysis to pump a wide spectrum of substrates through diverse transmembrane pathways formed by the MSDs. By contrast, in CFTR the MSDs form a pathway for passive anion flow that is gated by cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis by the NBDs. Here, we consider how the interaction of ATP with two ATP-binding sites, formed by the NBDs, powers conformational changes in CFTR structure to gate the channel pore. We explore how conserved sequences from both NBDs form ATP-binding sites at the interface of an NBD dimer and highlight the distinct roles that each binding site plays during the gating cycle. Knowledge of how ATP gates the CFTR Cl− channel is critical for understanding CFTR's physiological role, its malfunction in disease and the mechanism of action of small molecules that modulate CFTR channel gating. PMID:19332488

  4. Obligate coupling of CFTR pore opening to tight nucleotide-binding domain dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Mihályi, Csaba; Töröcsik, Beáta; Csanády, László

    2016-01-01

    In CFTR, the chloride channel mutated in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, ATP-binding-induced dimerization of two cytosolic nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) opens the pore, and dimer disruption following ATP hydrolysis closes it. Spontaneous openings without ATP are rare in wild-type CFTR, but in certain CF mutants constitute the only gating mechanism, stimulated by ivacaftor, a clinically approved CFTR potentiator. The molecular motions underlying spontaneous gating are unclear. Here we correlate energetic coupling between residues across the dimer interface with spontaneous pore opening/closure in single CFTR channels. We show that spontaneous openings are also strictly coupled to NBD dimerization, which may therefore occur even without ATP. Coordinated NBD/pore movements are therefore intrinsic to CFTR: ATP alters the stability, but not the fundamental structural architecture, of open- and closed-pore conformations. This explains correlated effects of phosphorylation, mutations, and drugs on ATP-driven and spontaneous activity, providing insights for understanding CF mutation and drug mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18164.001 PMID:27328319

  5. Evidence for a reactive cysteine at the nucleotide binding site of spinach ribulose-5-phosphate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Omnaas, J.; Porter, M.A.; Hartman, F.C.

    1985-02-01

    Ribulose-5-phosphate kinase from spinach was rapidly inactivated by N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate in a bimolecular fashion with a k2 of 2.0 m s at 2C and pH 8.0. Ribulose 5-phosphate had little effect on the rate of inactivation, whereas complete protection was afforded by ADP or ATP. The extent of incorporation as determined with UC-labeled reagent was about 1 molar equivalent per subunit in the presence of ATP with full retention of enzymatic activity, and about 2 molar equivalents per subunit in the completely inactivated enzyme. Amino acid analyses of enzyme derivatized with UC-labeled reagent reveal that all of the covalently incorporated reagent was associated with cysteinyl residues. Hence, two sulfhydryls are reactive, but the inactivation correlates with alkylation of one cysteinyl residue at or near the enzyme's nucleotide binding site. The kinase was also extremely sensitive to the sulfhydryl reagents 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and N-ethylmaleimide. The reactive sulfhydryl groups are likely to be those generated by reduction of a disulfide during activation. 20 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  6. The First Nucleotide Binding Domain of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Is a Site of Stable Nucleotide Interaction, whereas the Second Is a Site of Rapid Turnover.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Luba; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R

    2002-05-01

    As in other adenine nucleotide binding cassette (ABC) proteins the nucleotide binding domains of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) bind and hydrolyze ATP and in some manner regulate CFTR ion channel gating. Unlike some other ABC proteins, however, there are preliminary indications that the two domains of CFTR are nonequivalent in their nucleotide interactions (Szabo, K., Szakacs, G., Hegeds, T., and Sarkadi, B. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 12209-12212; Aleksandrov, L., Mengos, A., Chang, X., Aleksandrov, A., and Riordan, J. R. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 12918-12923). We have now characterized the interactions of the 8-azido-photoactive analogues of ATP, ADP, and 5'-adenyl-beta,gamma-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) with the two domains of functional membrane-bound CFTR. The results show that the two domains appear to act independently in the binding and hydrolysis of 8-azido-ATP. At NBD1 binding does not require a divalent cation. This binding is followed by minimal Mg(2+)-dependent hydrolysis and retention of the hydrolysis product, 8-azido-ADP, but not as a vanadate stabilized post-hydrolysis transition state complex. In contrast, at NBD2, MgN(3)ATP is hydrolyzed as rapidly as it is bound and the nucleoside diphosphate hydrolysis product dissociates immediately. Confirming this characterization of NBD1 as a site of more stable nucleotide interaction and NBD2 as a site of fast turnover, the non-hydrolyzable N(3)AMP-PNP bound preferentially to NBD1. This demonstration of NBD2 as the rapid nucleotide turnover site is consistent with the strong effect on channel gating kinetics of inactivation of this domain by mutagenesis. PMID:11861646

  7. The 2.6 Angstrom Crystal Structure of a Human A[subscript 2A] Adenosine Receptor Bound to an Antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Griffith, Mark T.; Hanson, Michael A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Lane, J. Robert; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2009-01-15

    The adenosine class of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediates the important role of extracellular adenosine in many physiological processes and is antagonized by caffeine. We have determined the crystal structure of the human A{sub 2A} adenosine receptor, in complex with a high-affinity subtype-selective antagonist, ZM241385, to 2.6 angstrom resolution. Four disulfide bridges in the extracellular domain, combined with a subtle repacking of the transmembrane helices relative to the adrenergic and rhodopsin receptor structures, define a pocket distinct from that of other structurally determined GPCRs. The arrangement allows for the binding of the antagonist in an extended conformation, perpendicular to the membrane plane. The binding site highlights an integral role for the extracellular loops, together with the helical core, in ligand recognition by this class of GPCRs and suggests a role for ZM241385 in restricting the movement of a tryptophan residue important in the activation mechanism of the class A receptors.

  8. Chronic hypoxia reduces adenosine A2A receptor-mediated inhibition of calcium current in rat PC12 cells via downregulation of protein kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shuichi; Beitner-Johnson, Dana; Conforti, Laura; Millhorn, David E

    1998-01-01

    Adenosine has been shown to decrease Ca2+ current (ICa) and attenuate the hypoxia-induced enhancement of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in oxygen-sensitive rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. These effects are mediated via the adenosine A2A receptor and protein kinase A (PKA). The current study was undertaken to determine the effects of adenosine on Ca2+ current and hypoxia-induced change in [Ca2+]i during chronic hypoxia.Whole cell patch-clamp studies revealed that the effect of adenosine on ICa was significantly reduced when PC12 cells were exposed to hypoxia (10 % O2) for 24 and 48 h.Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 revealed that the anoxia-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was significantly enhanced when PC12 cells were exposed to 10 % O2 for up to 48 h. In contrast, the inhibitory effects of adenosine on anoxia-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i was significantly blunted in PC12 cells exposed to hypoxia for 48 h.Northern blot analysis revealed that mRNA for the A2A receptor, which is the only adenosine receptor subtype expressed in PC12 cells, was significantly upregulated by hypoxia. Radioligand binding analysis with [3H]CGS21680, a selective A2A receptor ligand, showed that the number of adenosine A2A receptor binding sites was similarly increased during exposure to 10 % O2 for 48 h.PKA enzyme activity was significantly inhibited when PC12 cells were exposed to 10 % O2 for 24 and 48 h. However, we found that hypoxia failed to induce change in adenosine- and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase enzyme activity. Chronic hypoxia also did not alter the immunoreactivity level of the G protein Gsα, an effector of the A2 signalling pathway.Whole cell patch-clamp analysis showed that the effect of 8-bromo-cAMP, an activator of PKA, on ICa was significantly attenuated during 48 h exposure to 10 % O2.We conclude therefore that the reduced effect of adenosine on ICa and [Ca2+]i in PC12 cells exposed to chronic hypoxia is due to hypoxia-induced downregulation of PKA. This

  9. Chronic hypoxia reduces adenosine A2A receptor-mediated inhibition of calcium current in rat PC12 cells via downregulation of protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Beitner-Johnson, D; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1998-10-15

    1. Adenosine has been shown to decrease Ca2+ current (ICa) and attenuate the hypoxia-induced enhancement of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in oxygen-sensitive rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. These effects are mediated via the adenosine A2A receptor and protein kinase A (PKA). The current study was undertaken to determine the effects of adenosine on Ca2+ current and hypoxia-induced change in [Ca2+]i during chronic hypoxia. 2. Whole cell patch-clamp studies revealed that the effect of adenosine on ICa was significantly reduced when PC12 cells were exposed to hypoxia (10 % O2) for 24 and 48 h. 3. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 revealed that the anoxia-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was significantly enhanced when PC12 cells were exposed to 10 % O2 for up to 48 h. In contrast, the inhibitory effects of adenosine on anoxia-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i was significantly blunted in PC12 cells exposed to hypoxia for 48 h. 4. Northern blot analysis revealed that mRNA for the A2A receptor, which is the only adenosine receptor subtype expressed in PC12 cells, was significantly upregulated by hypoxia. Radioligand binding analysis with [3H]CGS21680, a selective A2A receptor ligand, showed that the number of adenosine A2A receptor binding sites was similarly increased during exposure to 10% O2 for 48 h. 5. PKA enzyme activity was significantly inhibited when PC12 cells were exposed to 10% O2 for 24 and 48 h. However, we found that hypoxia failed to induce change in adenosine- and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase enzyme activity. Chronic hypoxia also did not alter the immunoreactivity level of the G protein Gsalpha, an effector of the A2 signalling pathway. 6. Whole cell patch-clamp analysis showed that the effect of 8-bromo-cAMP, an activator of PKA, on ICa was significantly attenuated during 48 h exposure to 10% O2.7. We conclude therefore that the reduced effect of adenosine on ICa and [Ca2+]i in PC12 cells exposed to chronic hypoxia is due to hypoxia

  10. Adenosine receptor desensitization and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart; Kelly, Eamonn

    2011-05-01

    As with the majority of G-protein-coupled receptors, all four of the adenosine receptor subtypes are known to undergo agonist-induced regulation in the form of desensitization and trafficking. These processes can limit the ability of adenosine receptors to couple to intracellular signalling pathways and thus reduce the ability of adenosine receptor agonists as well as endogenous adenosine to produce cellular responses. In addition, since adenosine receptors couple to multiple signalling pathways, these pathways may desensitize differentially, while the desensitization of one pathway could even trigger signalling via another. Thus, the overall picture of adenosine receptor regulation can be complex. For all adenosine receptor subtypes, there is evidence to implicate arrestins in agonist-induced desensitization and trafficking, but there is also evidence for other possible forms of regulation, including second messenger-dependent kinase regulation, heterologous effects involving G proteins, and the involvement of non-clathrin trafficking pathways such as caveolae. In this review, the evidence implicating these mechanisms is summarized for each adenosine receptor subtype, and we also discuss those issues of adenosine receptor regulation that remain to be resolved as well as likely directions for future research in this field. PMID:20550943

  11. On the interactions between nucleotide binding domains and membrane spanning domains in cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator: A molecular dynamic study.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, Luca; Moran, Oscar

    2015-04-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) is a membrane protein whose mutations cause cystic fibrosis, a lethal genetic disease. We performed a molecular dynamic (MD) study of the properties of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD) whose conformational changes, upon ATP binding, are the direct responsible of the gating mechanisms of CFTR. This study was done for the wild type (WT) CFTR and for the two most common mutations, ΔF508, that produces a traffic defect of the protein, and the mutation G551D, that causes a gating defect on CFTR. Using an homology model of the open channel conformation of the CFTR we thus introduced the mutations to the structure. Although the overall structures of the G551D and ΔF508 are quite well conserved, the NBD1-NBD2 interactions are severely modified in both mutants. NBD1 and NBD2 are indeed destabilized with a higher internal energy (Ei) in the ΔF508-CFTR. Differently, Ei does not change in the NBDs of G551D but, while the number of close contacts between NBD1 and NBD2 in ΔF508 is increased, a significant reduction of close contacts is found in the G551D mutated form. Hydrogen bonds formation between NBDs of the two mutated forms is also altered and it is slightly increased for the ΔF508, while are severely reduced in G551D. A consequent modification of the NBDs-ICLs interactions between residues involved in the transduction of the ATP binding and the channel gating is also registered. Indeed, while a major interaction is noticed between NBDs interface and ICL2 and ICL4 in the WT, this interaction is somehow altered in both mutated forms plausibly with effect on channel gating. Thus, single point mutations of the CFTR protein can reasonably results in channel gating defects due to alteration of the interaction mechanisms between the NBDs and NBDs-ICLs interfaces upon ATP-binding process. PMID:25640670

  12. Non-Coding Polymorphisms in Nucleotide Binding Domain 1 in ABCC1 Gene Associate with Transcript Level and Survival of Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kunická, Tereza; Václavíková, Radka; Hlaváč, Viktor; Vrána, David; Pecha, Václav; Rauš, Karel; Trnková, Markéta; Kubáčková, Kateřina; Ambruš, Miloslav; Vodičková, Ludmila; Vodička, Pavel; Souček, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters may cause treatment failure by transporting of anticancer drugs outside of the tumor cells. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 coded by the ABCC1 gene has recently been suggested as a potential prognostic marker in breast cancer patients. This study aimed to explore tagged haplotype covering nucleotide binding domain 1 of ABCC1 in relation with corresponding transcript levels in tissues and clinical phenotype of breast cancer patients. Methods The distribution of twelve ABCC1 polymorphisms was assessed by direct sequencing in peripheral blood DNA (n = 540). Results Tumors from carriers of the wild type genotype in rs35623 or rs35628 exhibited significantly lower levels of ABCC1 transcript than those from carriers of the minor allele (p = 0.003 and p = 0.004, respectively). The ABCC1 transcript levels significantly increased in the order CT-GT>CC-GT>CC-GG for the predicted rs35626-rs4148351 diplotype. Chemotherapy-treated patients carrying the T allele in rs4148353 had longer disease-free survival than those with the GG genotype (p = 0.043). On the other hand, hormonal therapy-treated patients with the AA genotype in rs35628 had significantly longer disease-free survival than carriers of the G allele (p = 0.012). Conclusions Taken together, our study shows that genetic variability in the nucleotide binding domain 1 has a significant impact on the ABCC1 transcript level in the target tissue and may modify survival of breast cancer patients. PMID:25078270

  13. Investigating the role of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors in bacterial lung infection.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, Mary; Kulkarni, Ritwij; Zemans, Rachel L; Downey, Gregory P; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2014-06-15

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) are a persistent and pervasive public health problem worldwide. Pneumonia and other LRTIs will be among the leading causes of death in adults, and pneumonia is the single largest cause of death in children. LRTIs are also an important cause of acute lung injury and acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Because innate immunity is the first line of defense against pathogens, understanding the role of innate immunity in the pulmonary system is of paramount importance. Pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) that recognize microbial-associated molecular patterns are an integral component of the innate immune system and are located in both cell membranes and cytosol. Toll-like receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) are the major sensors at the forefront of pathogen recognition. Although Toll-like receptors have been extensively studied in host immunity, NLRs have diverse and important roles in immune and inflammatory responses, ranging from antimicrobial properties to adaptive immune responses. The lung contains NLR-expressing immune cells such as leukocytes and nonimmune cells such as epithelial cells that are in constant and close contact with invading microbes. This pulmonary perspective addresses our current understanding of the structure and function of NLR family members, highlighting advances and gaps in knowledge, with a specific focus on immune responses in the respiratory tract during bacterial infection. Further advances in exploring cellular and molecular responses to bacterial pathogens are critical to develop improved strategies to treat and prevent devastating infectious diseases of the lung. PMID:24707903

  14. Structural Basis for Nucleotide Binding and Reaction Catalysis in Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Michael L.; McWhorter, William J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-09-17

    Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes the final step of the mevalonate pathway, the Mg{sup 2+}-ATP dependent decarboxylation of mevalonate 5-diphosphate (MVAPP), producing isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Synthesis of IPP, an isoprenoid precursor molecule that is a critical intermediate in peptidoglycan and polyisoprenoid biosynthesis, is essential in Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus spp.), and thus the enzymes of the mevalonate pathway are ideal antimicrobial targets. MDD belongs to the GHMP superfamily of metabolite kinases that have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, yet the crystallization of GHMP kinase ternary complexes has proven to be difficult. To further our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of GHMP kinases with the purpose of developing broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that target the substrate and nucleotide binding sites, we report the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant (S192A and D283A) ternary complexes of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD. Comparison of apo, MVAPP-bound, and ternary complex wild-type MDD provides structural information about the mode of substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Structural characterization of ternary complexes of catalytically deficient MDD S192A and D283A (k{sub cat} decreased 10{sup 3}- and 10{sup 5}-fold, respectively) provides insight into MDD function. The carboxylate side chain of invariant Asp{sup 283} functions as a catalytic base and is essential for the proper orientation of the MVAPP C3-hydroxyl group within the active site funnel. Several MDD amino acids within the conserved phosphate binding loop ('P-loop') provide key interactions, stabilizing the nucleotide triphosphoryl moiety. The crystal structures presented here provide a useful foundation for structure-based drug design.

  15. A new activity of anti-HIV and anti-tumor protein GAP31: DNA adenosine glycosidase - Structural and modeling insight into its functions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui-Guang; Huang, Philip L.; Zhang, Dawei; Sun, Yongtao; Chen, Hao-Chia; Zhang, John; Huang, Paul L.; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Lee-Huang, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  16. A New Activity of Anti-HIV and Anti-tumor Protein GAP31: DNA Adenosine Glycosidase – Structural and Modeling Insight into its Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Huang, P; Zhang, D; Sun, Y; Chen, H; Zhang, J; Huang, P; Kong, X; Lee-Huang, S

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  17. Flow Cytometry for Real-Time Measurement of Guanine Nucleotide Binding and Exchange by Ras-like GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Samantha L.; Tessema, Mathewos; Buranda, Tione; Phlypenko, Olena; Rak, Alexey; Simons, Peter C.; Surviladze, Zurab; Sklar, Larry A.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Ras-like small GTPases cycle between GTP-bound active and GDP-bound inactive conformational states to regulate diverse cellular processes. Despite their importance, detailed kinetic or comparative studies of family members are rarely undertaken due to the lack of real-time assays measuring nucleotide binding or exchange. Here, we report a bead-based, flow cytometric assay that quantitatively measures the nucleotide binding properties of GST-chimeras for prototypical Ras-family members Rab7 and Rho. Measurements are possible in the presence or absence of Mg2+, with magnesium cations principally increasing affinity and slowing nucleotide dissociation rate 8- to 10-fold. GST-Rab7 exhibited a 3-fold higher affinity for GDP relative to GTP that is consistent with a 3-fold slower dissociation rate of GDP. Strikingly, GST-Rab7 had a marked preference for GTP with ribose ring-conjugated BODIPY FL. The more commonly used γ-NH-conjugated BODIPY FL GTP analogue failed to bind to GST-Rab7. In contrast, both BODIPY analogues bound equally well to GST-RhoA and GST-RhoC. Comparisons of the GST-Rab7 and GST-RhoA GTP-binding pockets provide a structural basis for the observed binding differences. In sum, the flow cytometric assay can be used to measure nucleotide binding properties of GTPases in real-time and quantitatively assess differences between GTPases. PMID:18638444

  18. Functional roles of the nucleotide-binding folds in the activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Smit, L S; Wilkinson, D J; Mansoura, M K; Collins, F S; Dawson, D C

    1993-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the traffic ATPase superfamily, possesses two putative nucleotide-binding folds (NBFs). The NBFs are sufficiently similar that sequence alignment of highly conserved regions can be used to identify analogous residues in the two domains. To determine whether this structural homology is paralleled in function, we compared the activation of chloride conductance by forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine in Xenopus oocytes expressing CFTRs bearing mutations in NBF1 or NBF2. Mutation of a conserved glycine in the putative linker domain in either NBF produced virtually identical changes in the sensitivity of chloride conductance to activating conditions, and mutation of this site in both NBFs produced additive effects, suggesting that in the two NBFs this region plays a similar and critical role in the activation process. In contrast, amino acid substitutions in the Walker A and B motifs, thought to form an integral part of the nucleotide-binding pockets, produced strikingly different effects in NBF1 and NBF2. Substitutions for the conserved lysine (Walker A) or aspartate (Walker B) in NBF1 resulted in a marked decrease in sensitivity to activation, whereas the same changes in NBF2 produced an increase in sensitivity. These results are consistent with a model for the activation of CFTR in which both NBF1 and NBF2 are required for normal function but in which either the nature or the exact consequences of nucleotide binding differ for the two domains. PMID:7694298

  19. In Silico Design for Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Agonist from Traditional Chinese Medicine for Treatment of Metabolic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hsin-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a master mediator of metabolic homeostasis. It is considered as a significant millstone to treat metabolic syndromes including obesity, diabetes, and fatty liver. It can sense cellular energy or nutrient status by switching on the catabolic pathways. Investigation of AMPK has new findings recently. AMPK can inhibit cell growth by the way of autophagy. Thus AMPK has become a hot target for small molecular drug design of tumor inhibition. Activation of AMPK must undergo certain extent change of the structure. Through the methods of structure-based virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulation, we attempted to find out appropriate small compounds from the world's largest TCM Database@Taiwan that had the ability to activate the function of AMPK. Finally, we found that two TCM compounds, eugenyl_beta-D-glucopyranoside and 6-O-cinnamoyl-D-glucopyranose, had the qualification to be AMPK agonist. PMID:24899913

  20. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaoping; Meyers, Blake C; Kozik, Alexander; West, Marilyn AL; Morgante, Michele; St Clair, Dina A; Bent, Andrew F; Michelmore, Richard W

    2007-01-01

    Background Nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-encoding genes comprise the largest class of plant disease resistance genes. The 149 NBS-LRR-encoding genes and the 58 related genes that do not encode LRRs represent approximately 0.8% of all ORFs so far annotated in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Despite their prevalence in the genome and functional importance, there was little information regarding expression of these genes. Results We analyzed the expression patterns of ~170 NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis Col-0 using multiple analytical approaches: expressed sequenced tag (EST) representation, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS), microarray analysis, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR, and gene trap lines. Most of these genes were expressed at low levels with a variety of tissue specificities. Expression was detected by at least one approach for all but 10 of these genes. The expression of some but not the majority of NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes was affected by salicylic acid (SA) treatment; the response to SA varied among different accessions. An analysis of previously published microarray data indicated that ten NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes exhibited increased expression in wild-type Landsberg erecta (Ler) after flagellin treatment. Several of these ten genes also showed altered expression after SA treatment, consistent with the regulation of R gene expression during defense responses and overlap between the basal defense response and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Enhancer trap analysis indicated that neither jasmonic acid nor benzothiadiazole (BTH), a salicylic acid analog, induced detectable expression of the five NBS-LRR-encoding genes and one TIR-NBS-encoding gene tested; however, BTH did induce detectable expression of the other TIR-NBS-encoding gene analyzed. Evidence for alternative mRNA polyadenylation sites was observed for many of the tested genes. Evidence for alternative splicing

  1. Adenosine and Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic organ that undergoes continuous remodeling whilst maintaining a balance between bone formation and resorption. Osteoblasts, which synthesize and mineralize new bone, and osteoclasts, the cells that resorb bone, act in concert to maintain bone homeostasis. In recent years, there has been increasing appreciation of purinergic regulation of bone metabolism. Adenosine, released locally, mediates its physiologic and pharmacologic actions via interactions with G-protein coupled receptors and recent work has indicated that these receptors are involved in the regulation of osteoclast differentiation and function, as well as osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Moreover, adenosine receptors also regulate chondrocyte and cartilage homeostasis. These recent findings underscore the potential therapeutic importance of adenosine receptors in regulating bone physiology and pathology. PMID:23499155

  2. Conformational coupling of the nucleotide-binding and the transmembrane domains in ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Wen, Po-Chao; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2011-08-01

    Basic architecture of ABC transporters includes two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). Although the transport process takes place in the TMDs, which provide the substrate translocation pathway across the cell membrane and control its accessibility between the two sides of the membrane, the energy required for the process is provided by conformational changes induced in the NBDs by binding and hydrolysis of ATP. Nucleotide-dependent conformational changes in the NBDs, therefore, need to be coupled to structural changes in the TMDs. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated the structural elements involved in the conformational coupling between the NBDs and the TMDs in the Escherichia coli maltose transporter, an ABC importer for which an intact structure is available both in inward-facing and outward-facing conformations. The prevailing model of coupling is primarily based on a single structural motif, known as the coupling helices, as the main structural element for the NBD-TMD coupling. Surprisingly, we find that in the absence of the NBDs the coupling helices can be conformationally decoupled from the rest of the TMDs, despite their covalent connection. That is, the structural integrity of the coupling helices and their tight coupling to the core of the TMDs rely on the contacts provided by the NBDs. Based on the conformational and dynamical analysis of the simulation trajectories, we propose that the core coupling elements in the maltose transporter involve contributions from several structural motifs located at the NBD-TMD interface, namely, the EAA loops from the TMDs, and the Q-loop and the ENI motifs from the NBDs. These three structural motifs in small ABC importers show a high degree of correlation in motion and mediate the necessary conformational coupling between the core of TMDs and the helical subdomains of NBDs. A comprehensive analysis of the structurally known ABC transporters shows a high degree

  3. Calf-ovary protein kinases dependent on adenosine 3':5' -monophosphate. Analysis by electrophoresis and electro-focusing on polyacrylamide get.

    PubMed

    Salokangas, A; Talmadge, K; Bechtel, E; Eppenberger, U; Chrambach, A

    1977-03-01

    High resolving power and quantitative application polyacrylamide-gel electrophopresis at various pore sizes and electrofocusing provide resolution of a calf-ovarian protein-kinase system at an increased level of magnification, as well as optimal preparative routes. Three protein kinases dependent on adenosine 3':5' -monophosphate are distinguished by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in calf ovarian cytosol. These enzymes which are observed in the pH range 7.5--10.2, appear to be aggregates of a commonsubmit or monomer. The three kinases are, by the criteria of polyacylamide gel electrophoresis, distinct from three adenosine-3':5' -monophosphate-binding proteins found in the calf ovarian system. Analysis by electrofocusing on polyacrylamide gel shows that conventionally purified preparations of the major kinase of cytosol contain an overwhelming majority of contaminant proteins. PMID:191253

  4. A role for the human nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat-containing family member NLRC5 in antiviral responses.

    PubMed

    Neerincx, Andreas; Lautz, Katja; Menning, Maureen; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Zigrino, Paola; Hösel, Marianna; Büning, Hildegard; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Kufer, Thomas A

    2010-08-20

    Proteins of the nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat (NLR)-containing family recently gained attention as important components of the innate immune system. Although over 20 of these proteins are present in humans, only a few members including the cytosolic pattern recognition receptors NOD1, NOD2, and NLRP3 have been analyzed extensively. These NLRs were shown to be pivotal for mounting innate immune response toward microbial invasion. Here we report on the characterization of human NLRC5 and provide evidence that this NLR has a function in innate immune responses. We found that NLRC5 is a cytosolic protein expressed predominantly in hematopoetic cells. NLRC5 mRNA and protein expression was inducible by the double-stranded RNA analog poly(I.C) and Sendai virus. Overexpression of NLRC5 failed to trigger inflammatory responses such as the NF-kappaB or interferon pathways in HEK293T cells. However, knockdown of endogenous NLRC5 reduced Sendai virus- and poly(I.C)-mediated type I interferon pathway-dependent responses in THP-1 cells and human primary dermal fibroblasts. Taken together, this defines a function for NLRC5 in anti-viral innate immune responses. PMID:20538593

  5. Quaternary structure of K[ssubscript ATP] channel SUR2A nucleotide binding domains resolved by synchrotron radiation X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre

    2010-05-25

    Heterodimeric nucleotide binding domains NBD1/NBD2 distinguish the ATP-binding cassette protein SUR2A, a recognized regulatory subunit of cardiac ATP-sensitive K{sup +} (K{sub ATP}) channels. The tandem function of these core domains ensures metabolism-dependent gating of the Kir6.2 channel pore, yet their structural arrangement has not been resolved. Here, purified monodisperse and interference-free recombinant particles were subjected to synchrotron radiation small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in solution. Intensity function analysis of SAXS profiles resolved NBD1 and NBD2 as octamers. Implemented by ab initio simulated annealing, shape determination prioritized an oblong envelope wrapping NBD1 and NBD2 with respective dimensions of 168 x 80 x 37 {angstrom}{sup 3} and 175 x 81 x 37 {angstrom}{sup 3} based on symmetry constraints, validated by atomic force microscopy. Docking crystal structure homology models against SAXS data reconstructed the NBD ensemble surrounding an inner cleft suitable for Kir6.2 insertion. Human heart disease-associated mutations introduced in silico verified the criticality of the mapped protein-protein interface. The resolved quaternary structure delineates thereby a macromolecular arrangement of K{sub ATP} channel SUR2A regulatory domains.

  6. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein transcriptionally regulates CHCHD2 associated with the molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Rui; Yang, Biao; Gao, Xuesong; Zhang, Jinqian; Sun, Lei; Wang, Peng; Meng, Yixing; Wang, Qi; Liu, Shunai; Cheng, Jun

    2015-06-01

    The function of the novel cell migration‑promoting factor, coiled‑coil‑helix‑coiled‑coil‑helix domain containing 2 (CHCHD2) in liver cancer remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of CHCHD2 in liver carcinogenesis. Immunohistochemistry was performed on patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used for screening differentially expressed genes in the HepG2 cell cDNA library. Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection frequently leads to liver cancer. The HCV NS2 protein is a hydrophobic transmembrane protein that is associated with certain cellular proteins. Detailed characterization of the nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) of the HCV was performed with respect to its role in transregulatory activity in the HepG2 cell lines. A gel electrophoresis mobility shift assay and a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay were used to confirm the presence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element‑binding protein (CREB), a transcriptional factor, which specifically interacts with the CHCHD2 promoter. CHCHD2 was highly expressed in the HCC specimens and was consistent with tumor markers of HCC. CHCHD2 was identified by SSH in the HepG2 cells. NS2 upregulated the expression of CHCHD2 by monitoring its promoter activities. The promoter of CHCHD2 contained 350 bp between nucleotides ‑257 and +93 and was positively regulated by CREB. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that CHCHD2 may be a novel biomarker for HCC and that CREB is important in the transcriptional activation of CHCHD2 by HCV NS2. PMID:25625293

  7. Investigating the structure of nucleotide binding sites on the chloroplast F 1-ATPase using electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lösel, Ralf M.; Erbse, Annette H.; Nett, Jürgen H.; Wise, John G.; Berger, Gérard; Girault, Guy; Vogel, Pia D.

    1996-01-01

    The relative structure and binding properties of nucleotide binding sites of the latent, nonactivated chloroplast F 1(CF 1)ATPase have been investigated by employing ESR spectroscopy using 2-N 3-2',3'-SL-ATP (2-N 3-SL-ATP), a spin-labeled photoaffinity analog of ATP. These results are compared to data obtained in analogous experiments using CF 1 that was either depleted of its ɛ-subunit or activated by different methods. Nonactivated (na) CF 1 in complex with 2-N 3-SL-ATP exhibits ESR spectra typical for enzyme-bound spin labels. At increased 2-N 3-SL-ATP concentration, a second spectral component for enzyme-bound spin label is observed. The line-shape of the second signal indicates an environment of the enzyme-bound radical that differs from the spin-labeled nucleotide bound first. It can be explained by an enzyme-bound radical bound in a way that allows for higher mobility, e.g. a nucleotide binding site in an "open" or "loose" conformation. Maximal binding of about 5 mol 2-N 3-SL-ANP per mol of enzyme has been reached. Similar results are obtained when using enzyme that has been either previously depleted of the ɛ-subunit or treated with the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) in the cold. Upon heat-activation of CF 1 in the presence of ATP and the presence or absence of the reducing agent DTT, the line-shape of the ESR spectra is observed to be quite different from the non-heat-treated enzyme forms. The "loose" or "open" nucleotide binding site described above (or at least an environment of the enzyme similar to this site) is observed to be accessible to 2-N 3-SL-ATP even at substoichiometric concentrations of the nucleotide analog. The results presented indicate that the enzyme form of CF 1 generated after heat treatment in the presence of ATP with or without DTT exhibits altered binding specificities mainly with respect to the sequence of occupation of two different types of nucleotide binding sites.

  8. Curcumin inhibits aerobic glycolysis in hepatic stellate cells associated with activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Lian, Naqi; Jin, Huanhuan; Zhang, Feng; Wu, Li; Shao, Jiangjuan; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Shizhong

    2016-07-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is characterized by expression of extracellular matrix and loss of adipogenic phenotype during liver fibrogenesis. Emerging evidence suggests that HSCs adopt aerobic glycolysis during activation. The present work aimed at investigating whether the anti-fibrogenic effects of curcumin was associated with interfering with glycolysis in HSCs. Primary rat HSCs were cultured in vitro. We demonstrated that inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxyglucose or galloflavin reduced the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and α1(I)procollagen at both mRNA and protein levels, and increased the intracellular lipid contents and upregulated the gene and protein expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBPα and PPAR-γ in HSCs. Curcumin at 20 μM produced similar effects. Moreover, curcumin decreased the expression of hexokinase (HK), phosphofructokinase-2 (PFK2), and glucose transporter 4 (glut4), three key glycolytic parameters, at both mRNA and protein levels. Curcumin also reduced lactate production concentration-dependently in HSCs. Furthermore, curcumin increased the phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), but AMPK inhibitor BML-275 significantly abolished the curcumin downregulation of HK, PFK2, and glut4. In addition, curcumin inhibition of α-SMA and α1(I)procollagen was rescued by BML-275, and curcumin upregulation of C/EBPα and PPAR-γ was abrogated by BML-275. These results collectively indicated that curcumin inhibited glycolysis in an AMPK activation-dependent manner in HSCs. We revealed a novel mechanism for curcumin suppression of HSC activation implicated in antifibrotic therapy. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(7):589-596, 2016. PMID:27278959

  9. Structural, biochemical, and functional characterization of the cyclic nucleotide binding homology domain from the mouse EAG1 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Marques-Carvalho, Maria J; Sahoo, Nirakar; Muskett, Frederick W; Vieira-Pires, Ricardo S; Gabant, Guillaume; Cadene, Martine; Schönherr, Roland; Morais-Cabral, João H

    2012-10-12

    KCNH channels are voltage-gated potassium channels with important physiological functions. In these channels, a C-terminal cytoplasmic region, known as the cyclic nucleotide binding homology (CNB-homology) domain displays strong sequence similarity to cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domains. However, the isolated domain does not bind cyclic nucleotides. Here, we report the X-ray structure of the CNB-homology domain from the mouse EAG1 channel. Through comparison with the recently determined structure of the CNB-homology domain from the zebrafish ELK (eag-like K(+)) channel and the CNB domains from the MlotiK1 and HCN (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated) potassium channels, we establish the structural features of CNB-homology domains that explain the low affinity for cyclic nucleotides. Our structure establishes that the "self-liganded" conformation, where two residues of the C-terminus of the domain are bound in an equivalent position to cyclic nucleotides in CNB domains, is a conserved feature of CNB-homology domains. Importantly, we provide biochemical evidence that suggests that there is also an unliganded conformation where the C-terminus of the domain peels away from its bound position. A functional characterization of this unliganded conformation reveals a role of the CNB-homology domain in channel gating. PMID:22732247

  10. Regulation of adenosine levels during cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Stephanie; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Dali; Soylu, Hanifi; Sun, Chao; Albensi, Benedict C; Parkinson, Fiona E

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine is a neuromodulator with its level increasing up to 100-fold during ischemic events, and attenuates the excitotoxic neuronal injury. Adenosine is produced both intracellularly and extracellularly, and nucleoside transport proteins transfer adenosine across plasma membranes. Adenosine levels and receptor-mediated effects of adenosine are regulated by intracellular ATP consumption, cellular release of ATP, metabolism of extracellular ATP (and other adenine nucleotides), adenosine influx, adenosine efflux and adenosine metabolism. Recent studies have used genetically modified mice to investigate the relative contributions of intra- and extracellular pathways for adenosine formation. The importance of cortical or hippocampal neurons as a source or a sink of adenosine under basal and hypoxic/ischemic conditions was addressed through the use of transgenic mice expressing human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) under the control of a promoter for neuron-specific enolase. From these studies, we conclude that ATP consumption within neurons is the primary source of adenosine in neuronal cultures, but not in hippocampal slices or in vivo mice exposed to ischemic conditions. PMID:23064722

  11. The root knot nematode resistance gene Mi from tomato is a member of the leucine zipper, nucleotide binding, leucine-rich repeat family of plant genes.

    PubMed Central

    Milligan, S B; Bodeau, J; Yaghoobi, J; Kaloshian, I; Zabel, P; Williamson, V M

    1998-01-01

    The Mi locus of tomato confers resistance to root knot nematodes. Tomato DNA spanning the locus was isolated as bacterial artificial chromosome clones, and 52 kb of contiguous DNA was sequenced. Three open reading frames were identified with similarity to cloned plant disease resistance genes. Two of them, Mi-1.1 and Mi-1.2, appear to be intact genes; the third is a pseudogene. A 4-kb mRNA hybridizing with these genes is present in tomato roots. Complementation studies using cloned copies of Mi-1.1 and Mi-1.2 indicated that Mi-1.2, but not Mi-1.1, is sufficient to confer resistance to a susceptible tomato line with the progeny of transformants segregating for resistance. The cloned gene most similar to Mi-1.2 is Prf, a tomato gene required for resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. Prf and Mi-1.2 share several structural motifs, including a nucleotide binding site and a leucine-rich repeat region, that are characteristic of a family of plant proteins, including several that are required for resistance against viruses, bacteria, fungi, and now, nematodes. PMID:9707531

  12. Comparative genetics of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat resistance gene homologues in the genomes of two dicotyledons: tomato and arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Q; Liu, Y S; Budai-Hadrian, O; Sela, M; Carmel-Goren, L; Zamir, D; Fluhr, R

    2000-01-01

    The presence of a single resistance (R) gene allele can determine plant disease resistance. The protein products of such genes may act as receptors that specifically interact with pathogen-derived factors. Most functionally defined R-genes are of the nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) supergene family and are present as large multigene families. The specificity of R-gene interactions together with the robustness of plant-pathogen interactions raises the question of their gene number and diversity in the genome. Genomic sequences from tomato showing significant homology to genes conferring race-specific resistance to pathogens were identified by systematically "scanning" the genome using a variety of primer pairs based on ubiquitous NBS motifs. Over 70 sequences were isolated and 10% are putative pseudogenes. Mapping of the amplified sequences on the tomato genetic map revealed their organization as mixed clusters of R-gene homologues that showed in many cases linkage to genetically characterized tomato resistance loci. Interspecific examination within Lycopersicon showed the existence of a null allele. Consideration of the tomato and potato comparative genetic maps unveiled conserved syntenic positions of R-gene homologues. Phylogenetic clustering of R-gene homologues within tomato and other Solanaceae family members was observed but not with R-gene homologues from Arabidopsis thaliana. Our data indicate remarkably rapid evolution of R-gene homologues during diversification of plant families. PMID:10790405

  13. Structural basis for the hydrolysis of ATP by a nucleotide binding subunit of an amino acid ABC transporter from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Devi, Seenivasan Karthiga; Chichili, Vishnu Priyanka Reddy; Jeyakanthan, J; Velmurugan, D; Sivaraman, J

    2015-06-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a major family of small molecule transporter proteins, and their deregulation is associated with several diseases, including cancer. Here, we report the crystal structure of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of an amino acid ABC transporter from Thermus thermophilus (TTHA1159) in its apo form and as a complex with ADP along with functional studies. TTHA1159 is a putative arginine ABC transporter. The apo-TTHA1159 was crystallized in dimeric form, a hitherto unreported form of an apo NBD. Structural comparison of the apo and ADP-Mg(2+) complexes revealed that Phe14 of TTHA1159 undergoes a significant conformational change to accommodate ADP, and that the bound ADP interacts with the P-loop (Gly40-Thr45). Modeling of ATP-Mg(2+):TTHA1159 complex revealed that Gln86 and Glu164 are involved in water-mediated hydrogen bonding contacts and Asp163 in Mg(2+) ion-mediated hydrogen bonding contacts with the γ-phosphate of ATP, consistent with the findings of other ABC transporters. Mutational studies confirmed the necessity of each of these residues, and a comparison of the apo/ADP Mg(2+):TTHA1159 with its ATP-complex model suggests the likelihood of a key conformational change to the Gln86 side chain for ATP hydrolysis. PMID:25916755

  14. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators for the prevention, treatment and potential reversal of pathological pain

    PubMed Central

    Price, Theodore J.; Das, Vaskar; Dussor, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Pathological pain is an enormous medical problem that places a significant burden on patients and can result from an injury that has long since healed or be due to an unidentifiable cause. Although treatments exist, they often either lack efficacy or have intolerable side effects. More importantly, they do not reverse the changes in the nervous system mediating pathological pain, and thus symptoms often return when therapies are discontinued. Consequently, novel therapies are urgently needed that have both improved efficacy and disease-modifying properties. Here we highlight an emerging target for novel pain therapies, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is capable of regulating a variety of cellular processes including protein translation, activity of other kinases, and mitochondrial metabolism, many of which are thought to contribute to pathological pain. Consistent with these properties, preclinical studies show positive, and in some cases disease-modifying effects of either pharmacological activation or genetic regulation of AMPK in models of nerve injury, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), postsurgical pain, inflammatory pain, and diabetic neuropathy. Given the AMPK-activating ability of metformin, a widely prescribed and well-tolerated drug, these preclinical studies provide a strong rationale for both retrospective and prospective human pain trials with this drug. They also argue for the development of novel AMPK activators, whether orthosteric, allosteric, or modulators of events upstream of the kinase. Together, this review will present the case for AMPK as a novel therapeutic target for pain and will discuss future challenges in the path toward development of AMPK-based pain therapeutics. PMID:26521775

  15. Microheterogeneity of adenosine cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinases from mouse brain and heart.

    PubMed Central

    Malkinson, A M; Gharrett, A J; Hogy, L

    1978-01-01

    1. DEAE-cellulose chromatography of mouse brain cytosol indicated the presence of only the type II isoenzyme of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Mouse heart cytosol contained approximately equal amounts of the type I and type II isoenzymes. 2. Both brain and heart type II isoenzymes reassociated after a transient exposure to cyclic AMP, but the heart type I isoenzyme remained dissociated. 3. Elution of brain cytosol continuously exposed to cyclic AMP resolved multiple peaks of protein kinase and cyclic AMP-binding activities. A single peak of kinase and multiple peaks of cyclic AMP-binding activities were found under the same conditions with heart cytosol. Various control experiments suggested that the heterogeneity within the brain type II isoenzymic class had not been caused by proteolysis. 4. Kinetic experiments with unfractionated brain cytosol showed that the binding of cyclic AMP, the dissociation of cyclic AMP from protein and the rate of heat denaturation of the cyclic AMP-binding activity gave results consistent with the presence of multiple binding species. 5. It concluded that the type II isoenzymic peak obtained by DEAE-cellulose chromatography of mouse brain cytosol represents a class of enzymes containing multiple regulatory and catalytic subunits. The two heart cytosol isoenzymes contain a common catalytic subunit. The degree of protein kinase 'microheterogeneity", defined as the presence of multiple regulatory and/or catalytic subunits within a single isoenzymic class, appears to be tissue-specific. PMID:217338

  16. Human adenosine A1 receptor and P2Y2-purinoceptor-mediated activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in transfected CHO cells

    PubMed Central

    Dickenson, John M; Blank, Jonathan L; Hill, Stephen J

    1998-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling pathway can be activated by a variety of heterotrimeric Gi/Go protein-coupled and Gq/G11 protein-coupled receptors. The aims of the current study were: (i) to investigate whether the Gi/Go protein-coupled adenosine A1 receptor activates the MAP kinase pathway in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-A1) and (ii) to determine whether adenosine A1 receptor activation would modulate the MAP kinase response elicited by the endogenous P2Y2 purinoceptor.The selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) stimulated time and concentration-dependent increases in MAP kinase activity in CHO-A1 cells (EC50 7.1±0.4 nM). CPA-mediated increases in MAP kinase activity were blocked by PD 98059 (50 μM; 89±4% inhibition), an inhibitor of MAP kinase kinase 1 (MEKI) activation, and by pre-treating cells with pertussis toxin (to block Gi/Go-dependent pathways).Adenosine A1 receptor-mediated activation of MAP kinase was abolished by pre-treatment with the protein tyrosine inhibitor, genistein (100 μM; 6±10% of control). In contrast, daidzein (100 μM), the inactive analogue of genistein had no significant effect (96±12 of control). MAP kinase responses to CPA (1 μM) were also sensitive to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin (100 nM; 55±8% inhibition) and LY 294002 (30 μM; 40±5% inhibition) but not to the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor Ro 31-8220 (10 μM).Activation of the endogenous P2Y2 purinoceptor with UTP also stimulated time and concentration-dependent increases in MAP kinase activity in CHO-A1 cells (EC50=1.6±0.3 μM). The MAP kinase response to UTP was partially blocked by pertussis toxin (67±3% inhibition) and by the PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220 (10 μM; 45±5% inhibition), indicating the possible involvement of both Gi/Go protein and Gq protein-dependent pathways in the overall response to UTP.CPA and UTP stimulated concentration

  17. The RNA binding domain of Pumilio antagonizes poly-adenosine binding protein and accelerates deadenylation.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, Chase A; Raynard, Nathan A; Blewett, Nathan H; Van Etten, Jamie; Goldstrohm, Aaron C

    2014-08-01

    PUF proteins are potent repressors that serve important roles in stem cell maintenance, neurological processes, and embryonic development. These functions are driven by PUF protein recognition of specific binding sites within the 3' untranslated regions of target mRNAs. In this study, we investigated mechanisms of repression by the founding PUF, Drosophila Pumilio, and its human orthologs. Here, we evaluated a previously proposed model wherein the Pumilio RNA binding domain (RBD) binds Argonaute, which in turn blocks the translational activity of the eukaryotic elongation factor 1A. Surprisingly, we found that Argonautes are not necessary for repression elicited by Drosophila and human PUFs in vivo. A second model proposed that the RBD of Pumilio represses by recruiting deadenylases to shorten the mRNA's polyadenosine tail. Indeed, the RBD binds to the Pop2 deadenylase and accelerates deadenylation; however, this activity is not crucial for regulation. Rather, we determined that the poly(A) is necessary for repression by the RBD. Our results reveal that poly(A)-dependent repression by the RBD requires the poly(A) binding protein, pAbp. Furthermore, we show that repression by the human PUM2 RBD requires the pAbp ortholog, PABPC1. Pumilio associates with pAbp but does not disrupt binding of pAbp to the mRNA. Taken together, our data support a model wherein the Pumilio RBD antagonizes the ability of pAbp to promote translation. Thus, the conserved function of the PUF RBD is to bind specific mRNAs, antagonize pAbp function, and promote deadenylation. PMID:24942623

  18. CL316243 induces phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate production in rat adipocytes in an adenosine deaminase-, pertussis toxin-, or wortmannin-sensitive manner.

    PubMed

    Ohsaka, Y; Nomura, Y

    2016-07-18

    The effect of beta(3)-adrenoceptor (beta(3)-AR) agonists on adipocytes treated or not treated with signaling modulators has not been sufficiently elucidated. Using rat epididymal adipocytes (adipocytes) labeled with [(32)P]orthophosphate, we found that treatment with the selective beta(3)-AR agonist CL316243 (CL; 1 microM) induces phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3,4,5-triphosphate (PI[3,4,5]P(3)) production and that this response is inhibited by adenosine deaminase (ADA, an adenosine-degrading enzyme; 2 U/ml), pertussis toxin (PTX, an inactivator of inhibitory guanine-nucleotide-binding protein; 1 microg/ml), or wortmannin (WT, a PI-kinase inhibitor; 3 microM). The results showed that CL induced PI(3,4,5)P(3) production in intact adipocytes and that this production was affected by signaling modulators. Taken together, our findings indicate that CL produces PI(3,4,5)P(3) in an ADA-sensitive, PTX-sensitive, or WT-sensitive manner and will advance understanding of the effect of beta(3)-AR agonists on adipocytes. PMID:26988163

  19. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  20. Drugs Modulate Interactions between the First Nucleotide-Binding Domain and the Fourth Cytoplasmic Loop of Human P-Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2016-05-24

    Drug substrates stimulate ATPase activity of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) ATP-binding cassette drug pump by an unknown mechanism. Cross-linking analysis was performed to test if drug substrates stimulate P-gp ATPase activity by altering cross-talk at the first transmission interface linking the drug-binding [intracellular loop 4 (S909C)] and first nucleotide-binding domains [NBD1 (V472C or L443C)]. In the absence of lipid (inactive P-gp), only V472C/S909C showed cross-linking. Drugs blocked V472C/S909C cross-linking. In the presence of lipids (active P-gp), drug substrates promoted only L443C/S909C cross-linking. This suggests that drug substrates stimulate ATPase activity through a conformational change that shifts Ser909 away from Val472 and toward Leu443. PMID:27159830

  1. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2010-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  2. Impact of the [delta]F508 Mutation in First Nucleotide-binding Domain of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator on Domain Folding and Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Hal A.; Zhao, Xun; Wang, Chi; Sauder, J. Michael; Rooney, Isabelle; Noland, Brian W.; Lorimer, Don; Kearins, Margaret C.; Conners, Kris; Condon, Brad; Maloney, Peter C.; Guggino, William B.; Hunt, John F.; Emtage, Spencer

    2010-07-19

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), commonly the deletion of residue Phe-508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which results in a severe reduction in the population of functional channels at the epithelial cell surface. Previous studies employing incomplete NBD1 domains have attributed this to aberrant folding of DeltaF508 NBD1. We report structural and biophysical studies on complete human NBD1 domains, which fail to demonstrate significant changes of in vitro stability or folding kinetics in the presence or absence of the DeltaF508 mutation. Crystal structures show minimal changes in protein conformation but substantial changes in local surface topography at the site of the mutation, which is located in the region of NBD1 believed to interact with the first membrane spanning domain of CFTR. These results raise the possibility that the primary effect of DeltaF508 is a disruption of proper interdomain interactions at this site in CFTR rather than interference with the folding of NBD1. Interestingly, increases in the stability of NBD1 constructs are observed upon introduction of second-site mutations that suppress the trafficking defect caused by the DeltaF508 mutation, suggesting that these suppressors might function indirectly by improving the folding efficiency of NBD1 in the context of the full-length protein. The human NBD1 structures also solidify the understanding of CFTR regulation by showing that its two protein segments that can be phosphorylated both adopt multiple conformations that modulate access to the ATPase active site and functional interdomain interfaces.

  3. Functional analysis of the C-terminal boundary of the second nucleotide binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and structural implications.

    PubMed

    Gentzsch, Martina; Aleksandrov, Andrei; Aleksandrov, Luba; Riordan, John R

    2002-09-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contains two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) or ATP-binding cassettes (ABCs) that characterize a large family of membrane transporters. Although the three-dimensional structures of these domains from several ABC proteins have been determined, this is not the case for CFTR, and hence the domains are defined simply on the basis of sequence alignment. The functional C-terminal boundary of NBD1 of CFTR was located by analysis of chloride channel function [Chan, Csanady, Seto-Young, Nairn and Gadsby (2000) J. Gen. Physiol. 116, 163-180]. However, the boundary between the C-terminal end of NBD2 and sequences further downstream in the whole protein, that are important for its cellular localization and endocytotic turnover, has not been defined. We have now done this by assaying the influence of progressive C-terminal truncations on photolabelling of NBD2 by 8-azido-ATP, which reflects hydrolysis, as well as binding, at that domain, and on NBD2-dependent channel gating itself. The boundary defined in this way is between residues 1420 and 1424, which corresponds to the final beta-strand in aligned NBDs whose structures have been determined. Utilization of this information should facilitate the generation of monodisperse NBD2 polypeptides for structural analysis, which until now has not been possible. The established boundary includes within NBD2 a hydrophobic patch of four residues (1413-1416) previously shown to be essential for CFTR maturation and stability [Gentzsch and Riordan (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 1291-1298]. This hydrophobic cluster is conserved in most ABC proteins, and on alignment with ones of known structure constitutes the penultimate beta-strand of the domain which is likely to participate in essential structure-stabilizing beta-sheet formation. PMID:12020354

  4. Functional analysis of the C-terminal boundary of the second nucleotide binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and structural implications.

    PubMed Central

    Gentzsch, Martina; Aleksandrov, Andrei; Aleksandrov, Luba; Riordan, John R

    2002-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contains two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) or ATP-binding cassettes (ABCs) that characterize a large family of membrane transporters. Although the three-dimensional structures of these domains from several ABC proteins have been determined, this is not the case for CFTR, and hence the domains are defined simply on the basis of sequence alignment. The functional C-terminal boundary of NBD1 of CFTR was located by analysis of chloride channel function [Chan, Csanady, Seto-Young, Nairn and Gadsby (2000) J. Gen. Physiol. 116, 163-180]. However, the boundary between the C-terminal end of NBD2 and sequences further downstream in the whole protein, that are important for its cellular localization and endocytotic turnover, has not been defined. We have now done this by assaying the influence of progressive C-terminal truncations on photolabelling of NBD2 by 8-azido-ATP, which reflects hydrolysis, as well as binding, at that domain, and on NBD2-dependent channel gating itself. The boundary defined in this way is between residues 1420 and 1424, which corresponds to the final beta-strand in aligned NBDs whose structures have been determined. Utilization of this information should facilitate the generation of monodisperse NBD2 polypeptides for structural analysis, which until now has not been possible. The established boundary includes within NBD2 a hydrophobic patch of four residues (1413-1416) previously shown to be essential for CFTR maturation and stability [Gentzsch and Riordan (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 1291-1298]. This hydrophobic cluster is conserved in most ABC proteins, and on alignment with ones of known structure constitutes the penultimate beta-strand of the domain which is likely to participate in essential structure-stabilizing beta-sheet formation. PMID:12020354

  5. Structures of 5-Methylthioribose Kinase Reveal Substrate Specificity and Unusual Mode of Nucleotide Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Yip, P.; Cornell, K.; Riscoe, M.; Behr, J.; Guillerm, G.; Howell, P.

    2007-01-01

    The methionine salvage pathway is ubiquitous in all organisms, but metabolic variations exist between bacteria and mammals. 5-Methylthioribose (MTR) kinase is a key enzyme in methionine salvage in bacteria and the absence of a mammalian homolog suggests that it is a good target for the design of novel antibiotics. The structures of the apo-form of Bacillus subtilis MTR kinase, as well as its ADP, ADP-PO4, AMPPCP, and AMPPCP-MTR complexes have been determined. MTR kinase has a bilobal eukaryotic protein kinase fold but exhibits a number of unique features. The protein lacks the DFG motif typically found at the beginning of the activation loop and instead coordinates magnesium via a DXE motif (Asp{sup 250}-Glu{sup 252}). In addition, the glycine-rich loop of the protein, analogous to the 'Gly triad' in protein kinases, does not interact extensively with the nucleotide. The MTR substrate-binding site consists of Asp{sup 233} of the catalytic HGD motif, a novel twin arginine motif (Arg{sup 340}/Arg{sup 341}), and a semi-conserved W-loop, which appears to regulate MTR binding specificity. No lobe closure is observed for MTR kinase upon substrate binding. This is probably because the enzyme lacks the lobe closure/inducing interactions between the C-lobe of the protein and the ribosyl moiety of the nucleotide that are typically responsible for lobe closure in protein kinases. The current structures suggest that MTR kinase has a dissociative mechanism.

  6. Genome-wide comparative analysis reveals possible common ancestors of nucleotide-binding sites domain containing genes in hybrid Citrus sinensis genome and original Citrus clementina genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identified and re-annotated candidate disease resistance (R) genes with nucleotide-binding sites (NBS) domain from a Citrus clementina genome and two complete Citrus sinensis genome sequences (one from the USA and one from China). We found similar numbers of NBS genes from three citrus genomes, r...

  7. Large-Scale Analyses of Angiosperm Nucleotide-Binding Site-Leucine-Rich Repeat Genes Reveal Three Anciently Diverged Classes with Distinct Evolutionary Patterns.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhu-Qing; Xue, Jia-Yu; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Wu, Yue; Hang, Yue-Yu; Wang, Bin; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2016-04-01

    Nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) genes make up the largest plant disease resistance gene family (R genes), with hundreds of copies occurring in individual angiosperm genomes. However, the expansion history of NBS-LRR genes during angiosperm evolution is largely unknown. By identifying more than 6,000 NBS-LRR genes in 22 representative angiosperms and reconstructing their phylogenies, we present a potential framework of NBS-LRR gene evolution in the angiosperm. Three anciently diverged NBS-LRR classes (TNLs, CNLs, and RNLs) were distinguished with unique exon-intron structures and DNA motif sequences. A total of seven ancient TNL, 14 CNL, and two RNL lineages were discovered in the ancestral angiosperm, from which all current NBS-LRR gene repertoires were evolved. A pattern of gradual expansion during the first 100 million years of evolution of the angiosperm clade was observed for CNLs. TNL numbers remained stable during this period but were eventually deleted in three divergent angiosperm lineages. We inferred that an intense expansion of both TNL and CNL genes started from the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. Because dramatic environmental changes and an explosion in fungal diversity occurred during this period, the observed expansions of R genes probably reflect convergent adaptive responses of various angiosperm families. An ancient whole-genome duplication event that occurred in an angiosperm ancestor resulted in two RNL lineages, which were conservatively evolved and acted as scaffold proteins for defense signal transduction. Overall, the reconstructed framework of angiosperm NBS-LRR gene evolution in this study may serve as a fundamental reference for better understanding angiosperm NBS-LRR genes. PMID:26839128

  8. Organic dust augments nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain expression via an NF-κB pathway to negatively regulate inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Kielian, Tammy; Wyatt, Todd A.; Gleason, Angela M.; Stone, Jeremy; Palm, Kelsey; West, William W.; Romberger, Debra J.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) is involved in innate immune responses to peptidoglycan degradation products. Peptidoglycans are important mediators of organic dust-induced airway diseases in exposed agriculture workers; however, the role of NOD2 in response to complex organic dust is unknown. Monocytes/macrophages were exposed to swine facility organic dust extract (ODE), whereupon NOD2 expression was evaluated by real-time PCR and Western blot. ODE induced significant NOD2 mRNA and protein expression at 24 and 48 h, respectively, which was mediated via a NF-κB signaling pathway as opposed to a TNF-α autocrine/paracrine mechanism. Specifically, NF-κB translocation increased rapidly following ODE stimulation as demonstrated by EMSA, and inhibition of the NF-κB pathway significantly reduced ODE-induced NOD2 expression. However, there was no significant reduction in ODE-induced NOD2 gene expression when TNF-α was inhibited or absent. Next, it was determined whether NOD2 regulated ODE-induced inflammatory cytokine production. Knockdown of NOD2 expression by small interfering RNA resulted in increased CXCL8 and IL-6, but not TNF-α production in response to ODE. Similarly, primary lung macrophages from NOD2 knockout mice demonstrated increased IL-6, CXCL1, and CXCL1, but not TNF-α, expression. Lastly, a higher degree of airway inflammation occurred in the absence of NOD2 following acute (single) and repetitive (3 wk) ODE exposure in an established in vivo murine model. In summary, ODE-induced NOD2 expression is directly dependent on NF-κB signaling, and NOD2 is a negative regulator of complex, organic dust-induced inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production in mononuclear phagocytes. PMID:21665963

  9. The Heat Shock Cognate Protein hsc73 Assembles with A1 Adenosine Receptors To Form Functional Modules in the Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sarrió, Sara; Casadó, Vicent; Escriche, Marisol; Ciruela, Francisco; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I.; Lluis, Carmen; Franco, Rafael

    2000-01-01

    A1 adenosine receptors (A1Rs) are G protein-coupled heptaspanning receptors that interact at the outer face of the plasma membrane with cell surface ecto-adenosine deaminase (ecto-ADA). By affinity chromatography the heat shock cognate protein hsc73 was identified as a cytosolic component able to interact with the third intracellular loop of the receptor. As demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance, purified A1Rs interact specifically with hsc73 with a dissociation constant in the nanomolar range (0.5 ± 0.1 nM). The interaction between hsc73 and A1R led to a marked reduction in the binding of the ligands and prevented activation of G proteins, as deduced from 35S-labeled guanosine-5′-O-(3-thio)triphosphate binding assays. Interestingly this effect was stronger than that exerted by guanine nucleotide analogs, which uncouple receptors from G proteins, and was completely prevented by ADA. As assessed by immunoprecipitation a high percentage of A1Rs in cell lysates are coupled to hsc73. A relatively high level of colocalization between A1R and hsc73 was detected in DDT1MF-2 cells by means of confocal microscopy, and no similar results were obtained for other G protein-coupled receptors. Colocalization between hsc73 and A1R was detected in specific regions of rat cerebellum and in the body of cortical neurons but not in dendrites or synapses. Remarkably, agonist-induced receptor internalization leads to the endocytosis of A1Rs by two qualitatively different vesicle types, one in which A1R and hsc73 colocalize and another in which hsc73 is absent. These results open the interesting possibility that signaling via G protein-coupled receptors may be regulated by heat shock proteins. PMID:10866672

  10. Critical role of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor 3 in vascular repair

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaweck, Sebastian; Zimmer, Sebastian; Struck, Rafael; Werner, Nikos; Latz, Eicke; Nickenig, Georg; Ghanem, Alexander

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} NLRP3 is not required for systemic cardiovascular function in healthy mice. {yields} NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and that it does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. {yields} NLRP3 is critical in neointima formation following vascular injury. -- Abstract: Vascular remodeling characterized by hyperproliferative neointima formation is an unfavorable repair process that is triggered by vascular damage. This process is characterized by an increased local inflammatory and proliferative response that critically involves the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}). IL-1{beta} is expressed and cytosolically retained as a procytokine that requires additional processing prior to exerting its pro-inflammatory function. Maturation and release of pro IL-1{beta} is governed by a cytosolic protein scaffold that is known as the inflammasome. Here we show that NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pryin domain containing 3), an important activating component of the inflammasome, is involved in neointima formation after vascular injury. NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. However, neointima development following wire injury of the carotid artery was significantly decreased in NLRP3-deficient mice as compared to wild-type controls. In all, NLRP3 plays a non-redundant role in vascular damage mediated neointima formation. Our data establish NLRP3 as a key player in the response to vascular damage, which could open new avenues to therapeutic intervention.

  11. Adenosine Receptors and Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Lasley, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine receptors are a member of the large family of seven transmembrane spanning G protein coupled receptors (GPCR). The four adenosine receptor subtypes – A1, A2a, A2b, A3 – exert their effects via the activation of one or more heterotrimeric G proteins resulting in the modulation of intracellular signaling. Numerous studies over the past decade have documented the complexity of GPCR signaling at the level of protein-protein interactions as well as through signaling crosstalk. With respect to adenosine receptors the activation of one receptor subtype can have profound direct effects in one cell type, but little or no effect in other cells. There is significant evidence that the compartmentation of subcellular signaling plays a physiological role in the fidelity of GPCR signaling. This compartmentation is evident at the level of the plasma membrane in the form of membrane microdomains such as caveolae and lipid rafts. This review will summarize and critically assess our current understanding of the role of membrane microdomains in regulating adenosine receptor signaling. PMID:20888790

  12. Role of Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing (NOD) 2 in Host Defense during Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hommes, Tijmen J.; van Lieshout, Miriam H.; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Bootsma, Hester J.; Hermans, Peter W.; de Vos, Alex F.; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing (NOD) 2 is a pattern recognition receptor located in the cytosol of myeloid cells that is able to detect peptidoglycan fragments of S. pneumoniae. We here aimed to investigate the role of NOD2 in the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae was studied in NOD2 deficient (Nod2-/-) and wild-type (Wt) alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in vitro. In subsequent in vivo experiments Nod2-/- and Wt mice were inoculated with serotype 2 S. pneumoniae (D39), an isogenic capsule locus deletion mutant (D39Δcps) or serotype 3 S. pneumoniae (6303) via the airways, and bacterial growth and dissemination and the lung inflammatory response were evaluated. Nod2-/- alveolar macrophages and blood neutrophils displayed a reduced capacity to internalize pneumococci in vitro. During pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae D39 Nod2-/- mice were indistinguishable from Wt mice with regard to bacterial loads in lungs and distant organs, lung pathology and neutrophil recruitment. While Nod2-/- and Wt mice also had similar bacterial loads after infection with the more virulent S. pneumoniae 6303 strain, Nod2-/- mice displayed a reduced bacterial clearance of the normally avirulent unencapsulated D39Δcps strain. These results suggest that NOD2 does not contribute to host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia and that the pneumococcal capsule impairs recognition of S. pneumoniae by NOD2. PMID:26673231

  13. Genome-wide identification and evolutionary analysis of nucleotide-binding site-encoding resistance genes in Lotus japonicus (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Song, H; Wang, P F; Li, T T; Xia, H; Zhao, S Z; Hou, L; Zhao, C Z

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding site (NBS) disease resistance genes play a crucial role in plant defense responses against pathogens and insect pests. Many NBS-encoding genes have been detected in Lotus japonicus, an important forage crop in many parts of the world. However, most NBS genes identified so far in L. japonicus were only partial sequences. We identified 45 full-length NBS-encoding genes in the L. japonicus genome, and analyzed gene duplications, motifs, and the molecular phylogeny to further understand the NBS gene family. We found that gene duplication events rarely occur in L. japonicus NBS-encoding (LjNBS) genes. In addition, LjNBS genes were subjected to selection pressure, and codon usage bias was evident. We tested for purifying selection (specifically in the CC-NBS-LRR and TIR-NBS-LRR groups), and found strong purifying selection in the TIR-domain-containing sequences, indicating that the CC-NBS-LRR group is more likely to undergo expansion than the TIR-NBS-LRR group. Moreover, our results showed that both selection and mutation contributed to LjNBS codon usage bias, but mutational bias was the major influence on codon usage. PMID:26662396

  14. Uncovering the dynamic evolution of nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) genes in Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Mei; Shao, Zhu-Qing; Wang, Qiang; Hang, Yue-Yu; Xue, Jia-Yu; Wang, Bin; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2016-02-01

    Plant genomes harbor dozens to hundreds of nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) genes; however, the long-term evolutionary history of these resistance genes has not been fully understood. This study focuses on five Brassicaceae genomes and the Carica papaya genome to explore changes in NBS-LRR genes that have taken place in this Rosid II lineage during the past 72 million years. Various numbers of NBS-LRR genes were identified from Arabidopsis lyrata (198), A. thaliana (165), Brassica rapa (204), Capsella rubella (127), Thellungiella salsuginea (88), and C. papaya (51). In each genome, the identified NBS-LRR genes were found to be unevenly distributed among chromosomes and most of them were clustered together. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that, before and after Brassicaceae speciation events, both toll/interleukin-1 receptor-NBS-LRR (TNL) genes and non-toll/interleukin-1 receptor-NBS-LRR (nTNL) genes exhibited a pattern of first expansion and then contraction, suggesting that both subclasses of NBS-LRR genes were responding to pathogen pressures synchronically. Further, by examining the gain/loss of TNL and nTNL genes at different evolutionary nodes, this study revealed that both events often occurred more drastically in TNL genes. Finally, the phylogeny of nTNL genes suggested that this NBS-LRR subclass is composed of two separate ancient gene types: RPW8-NBS-LRR and Coiled-coil-NBS-LRR. PMID:25926337

  15. Resonance assignment of the ligand-free cyclic nucleotide-binding domain from the murine ion channel HCN2.

    PubMed

    Börger, Claudia; Schünke, Sven; Lecher, Justin; Stoldt, Matthias; Winkhaus, Friederike; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Willbold, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Hyperpolarization activated and cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels as well as cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels are essential for the regulation of cardiac cells, neuronal excitability, and signaling in sensory cells. Both classes are composed of four subunits. Each subunit comprises a transmembrane region, intracellular N- and C-termini, and a C-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). Binding of cyclic nucleotides to the CNBD promotes opening of both CNG and HCN channels. In case of CNG channels, binding of cyclic nucleotides to the CNBD is sufficient to open the channel. In contrast, HCN channels open upon membrane hyperpolarization and their activity is modulated by binding of cyclic nucleotides shifting the activation potential to more positive values. Although several high-resolution structures of CNBDs from HCN and CNG channels are available, the gating mechanism for murine HCN2 channel, which leads to the opening of the channel pore, is still poorly understood. As part of a structural investigation, here, we report the complete backbone and side chain resonance assignments of the murine HCN2 CNBD with part of the C-linker. PMID:25324217

  16. Allosteric Coupling between the Intracellular Coupling Helix 4 and Regulatory Sites of the First Nucleotide-binding Domain of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Jennifer E.; Farber, Patrick J.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), leading to folding and processing defects and to chloride channel gating misfunction. CFTR is regulated by ATP binding to its cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains, NBD1 and NBD2, and by phosphorylation of the NBD1 regulatory insert (RI) and the regulatory extension (RE)/R region. These regulatory effects are transmitted to the rest of the channel via NBD interactions with intracellular domain coupling helices (CL), particularly CL4. Using a sensitive method for detecting inter-residue correlations between chemical shift changes in NMR spectra, an allosteric network was revealed within NBD1, with a construct lacking RI. The CL4-binding site couples to the RI-deletion site and the C-terminal residues of NBD1 that precede the R region in full-length CFTR. Titration of CL4 peptide into NBD1 perturbs the conformational ensemble in these sites with similar titration patterns observed in F508del, the major CF-causing mutant, and in suppressor mutants F494N, V510D and Q637R NBD1, as well as in a CL4-NBD1 fusion construct. Reciprocally, the C-terminal mutation, Q637R, perturbs dynamics in these three sites. This allosteric network suggests a mechanism synthesizing diverse regulatory NBD1 interactions and provides biophysical evidence for the allosteric coupling required for CFTR function. PMID:24058550

  17. Novel adenosine receptors in rat hippocampus identification and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, J.H.; Mashman, W.E.; DeLorenzo, R.J.

    1985-05-06

    2-chloro(/sup 3/H)adenosine, a stable analog of adenosine, was used to investigate the presence of adenosine receptors in rat hippocampal membranes that may mediate the depressant effects of adenosine on synaptic transmission in this tissue. Equilibrium binding studies reveal the presence of a previously undescribed class of receptors with a K/sub D/ of 4.7 ..mu..M and a Bmax of 130 pmol/mg of protein. Binding is sensitive to alkylxanthines and to a number of adenosine-related compounds. The pharmacological properties of this binding site are distinct from those of the A1 and A2 adenosine receptors associated with adenylate cyclase. The results suggest that this adenosine binding site is a novel central purinergic receptor through which adenosine may regulate hippocampal excitability. 50 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  18. Adenosine and Ischemic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bruce T.; Swierkosz, Tomasz A.; Herrmann, Howard C.; Kimmel, Stephen; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine is released in large amounts during myocardial ischemia and is capable of exerting potent cardioprotective effects in the heart. Although these observations on adenosine have been known for a long time, how adenosine acts to achieve its anti-ischemic effect remains incompletely understood. However, recent advances on the chemistry and pharmacology of adenosine receptor ligands have provided important and novel information on the function of adenosine receptor subtypes in the cardiovascular system. The development of model systems for the cardiac actions of adenosine has yielded important insights into its mechanism of action and have begun to elucidate the sequence of signalling events from receptor activation to the actual exertion of its cardioprotective effect. The present review will focus on the adenosine receptors that mediate the potent anti-ischemic effect of adenosine, new ligands at the receptors, potential molecular signalling mechanisms downstream of the receptor, mediators for cardioprotection, and possible clinical applications in cardiovascular disorders. PMID:10607860

  19. Activation of Autophagy and Nucleotide-Binding Domain Leucine-Rich Repeat–Containing-Like Receptor Family, Pyrin Domain–Containing 3 Inflammasome during Leishmania infantum–Associated Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Esch, Kevin J.; Schaut, Robert G.; Lamb, Ian M.; Clay, Gwendolyn; Morais Lima, Ádila L.; do Nascimento, Paulo R.P.; Whitley, Elizabeth M.; Jeronimo, Selma M.B.; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.; Haynes, Joseph S.; Petersen, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major contributor to human and companion animal morbidity and mortality. Renal complications are sequelae of canine and human visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Despite the high incidence of infection-mediated glomerulonephritis, little is known about pathogenesis of VL-associated renal disease. Leishmania infantum–infected dogs are a naturally occurring model of VL-associated glomerulonephritis. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type I [24 of 25 (96%)], with interstitial lymphoplasmacytic nephritis [23 of 25 (92%)], and glomerular and interstitial fibrosis [12 of 25 (48%)] were predominant lesions. An ultrastructural evaluation of glomeruli from animals with VL identified mesangial cell proliferation and interposition. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated significant Leishmania antigen, IgG, and C3b deposition in VL dog glomeruli. Asymptomatic and symptomatic dogs had increased glomerular nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat–containing-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 and autophagosome-associated microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 associated with glomerular lesion severity. Transcriptional analyses from symptomatic dogs confirmed induction of autophagy and inflammasome genes within glomeruli and tubules. On the basis of temporal VL staging, glomerulonephritis was initiated by IgG and complement deposition. This deposition preceded presence of nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat–containing-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3–associated inflammasomes and increased light chain 3 puncta indicative of autophagosomes in glomeruli from dogs with clinical VL and renal failure. These findings indicate potential roles for inflammasome complexes in glomerular damage during VL and autophagy in ensuing cellular responses. PMID:26079813

  20. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  1. Thermodynamics of nucleotide binding to actomyosin V and VI: a positive heat capacity change accompanies strong ADP binding.

    PubMed

    Robblee, James P; Cao, Wenxiang; Henn, Arnon; Hannemann, Diane E; De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2005-08-01

    We have measured the energetics of ATP and ADP binding to single-headed actomyosin V and VI from the temperature dependence of the rate and equilibrium binding constants. Nucleotide binding to actomyosin V and VI can be modeled as two-step binding mechanisms involving the formation of collision complexes followed by isomerization to states with high nucleotide affinity. Formation of the actomyosin VI-ATP collision complex is much weaker and slower than for actomyosin V. A three-step binding mechanism where actomyosin VI isomerizes between two conformations, one competent to bind ATP and one not, followed by rapid ATP binding best accounts for the data. ADP binds to actomyosin V more tightly than actomyosin VI. At 25 degrees C, the strong ADP-binding equilibria are comparable for actomyosin V and VI, and the different overall ADP affinities arise from differences in the ADP collision complex affinity. The actomyosin-ADP isomerization leading to strong ADP binding is entropy driven at >15 degrees C and occurs with a large, positive change in heat capacity (DeltaC(P) degrees ) for both actomyosin V and VI. Sucrose slows ADP binding and dissociation from actomyosin V and VI but not the overall equilibrium constants for strong ADP binding, indicating that solvent viscosity dampens ADP-dependent kinetic transitions, presumably a tail swing that occurs with ADP binding and release. We favor a mechanism where strong ADP binding increases the dynamics and flexibility of the actomyosin complex. The heat capacity (DeltaC(P) degrees ) and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) changes are greater for actomyosin VI than actomyosin V, suggesting different extents of ADP-induced structural rearrangement. PMID:16042401

  2. Thermal unfolding studies show the disease causing F508del mutation in CFTR thermodynamically destabilizes nucleotide-binding domain 1

    PubMed Central

    Protasevich, Irina; Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Atwell, Shane; Zhao, Xun; Emtage, Spencer; Wetmore, Diana; Hunt, John F; Brouillette, Christie G

    2010-01-01

    Misfolding and degradation of CFTR is the cause of disease in patients with the most prevalent CFTR mutation, an in-frame deletion of phenylalanine (F508del), located in the first nucleotide-binding domain of human CFTR (hNBD1). Studies of (F508del)CFTR cellular folding suggest that both intra- and inter-domain folding is impaired. (F508del)CFTR is a temperature-sensitive mutant, that is, lowering growth temperature, improves both export, and plasma membrane residence times. Yet, paradoxically, F508del does not alter the fold of isolated hNBD1 nor did it seem to perturb its unfolding transition in previous isothermal chemical denaturation studies. We therefore studied the in vitro thermal unfolding of matched hNBD1 constructs ±F508del to shed light on the defective folding mechanism and the basis for the thermal instability of (F508del)CFTR. Using primarily differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism, we show for all hNBD1 pairs studied, that F508del lowers the unfolding transition temperature (Tm) by 6–7°C and that unfolding occurs via a kinetically-controlled, irreversible transition in isolated monomers. A thermal unfolding mechanism is derived from nonlinear least squares fitting of comprehensive DSC data sets. All data are consistent with a simple three-state thermal unfolding mechanism for hNBD1 ± F508del: N(±MgATP) ⇄ IT(±MgATP) → AT → (AT)n. The equilibrium unfolding to intermediate, IT, is followed by the rate-determining, irreversible formation of a partially folded, aggregation-prone, monomeric state, AT, for which aggregation to (AT)n and further unfolding occur with no detectable heat change. Fitted parameters indicate that F508del thermodynamically destabilizes the native state, N, and accelerates the formation of AT. PMID:20687133

  3. The specialized Hsp70 (HscA) interdomain linker binds to its nucleotide-binding domain and stimulates ATP hydrolysis in both cis and trans configurations.

    PubMed

    Alderson, T Reid; Kim, Jin Hae; Cai, Kai; Frederick, Ronnie O; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L

    2014-11-25

    Proteins from the isc operon of Escherichia coli constitute the machinery used to synthesize iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters for delivery to recipient apoproteins. Efficient and rapid [2Fe-2S] cluster transfer from the holo-scaffold protein IscU depends on ATP hydrolysis in the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of HscA, a specialized Hsp70-type molecular chaperone with low intrinsic ATPase activity (0.02 min(-1) at 25 °C, henceforth reported in units of min(-1)). HscB, an Hsp40-type cochaperone, binds to HscA and stimulates ATP hydrolysis to promote cluster transfer, yet while the interactions between HscA and HscB have been investigated, the role of HscA's interdomain linker in modulating ATPase activity has not been explored. To address this issue, we created three variants of the 40 kDa NBD of HscA: NBD alone (HscA386), NBD with a partial linker (HscA389), and NBD with the full linker (HscA395). We found that the rate of ATP hydrolysis of HscA395 (0.45 min(-1)) is nearly 15-fold higher than that of HscA386 (0.035 min(-1)), although their apparent affinities for ATP are equivalent. HscA395, which contains the full covalently linked linker peptide, exhibited intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence emission and basal thermostability that were higher than those of HscA386. Furthermore, HscA395 displayed narrower (1)H(N) line widths in its two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N TROSY-HSQC spectrum in comparison to HscA386, indicating that the peptide in the cis configuration binds to and stabilizes the structure of the NBD. The addition to HscA386 of a synthetic peptide with a sequence identical to that of the interdomain linker (L(387)LLDVIPLS(395)) stimulated its ATPase activity and induced widespread NMR chemical shift perturbations indicative of a binding interaction in the trans configuration. PMID:25372495

  4. First Structural View of a Peptide Interacting with the Nucleotide Binding Domain of Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Swetha; Singh, Meetali; Tatu, Utpal; Suguna, Kaza

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of Hsp90 in progression of diseases like cancer, neurological disorders and several pathogen related conditions is well established. Hsp90, therefore, has emerged as an attractive drug target for many of these diseases. Several small molecule inhibitors of Hsp90, such as geldanamycin derivatives, that display antitumor activity, have been developed and are under clinical trials. However, none of these tested inhibitors or drugs are peptide-based compounds. Here we report the first crystal structure of a peptide bound at the ATP binding site of the N-terminal domain of Hsp90. The peptide makes several specific interactions with the binding site residues, which are comparable to those made by the nucleotide and geldanamycin. A modified peptide was designed based on these interactions. Inhibition of ATPase activity of Hsp90 was observed in the presence of the modified peptide. This study provides an alternative approach and a lead peptide molecule for the rational design of effective inhibitors of Hsp90 function. PMID:26599366

  5. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 prompts potent inflammatory stimuli during Neospora caninum infection

    PubMed Central

    Davoli-Ferreira, Marcela; Fonseca, Denise M.; Mota, Caroline M.; Dias, Murilo S.; Lima-Junior, Djalma S.; da Silva, Murilo V.; Quirino, Gustavo F. S.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Silva, João S.; Mineo, Tiago W. P.

    2016-01-01

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite responsible for major economic losses due to abortions in cattle. Innate immune responses are crucial for host resistance against the infection, however the molecules involved in parasite recognition are still poorly understood. Nod2 is a cytosolic receptor that recognizes several pathogens and its role during N. caninum infection has not yet been described. In that sense, we evaluated the role of Nod2 in host response against this parasite. We found that infection of macrophages induced increased expression of Nod2, which colocalized with the parasites’ vacuoles. Nod2-deficient macrophages showed an impaired induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, increased production of modulatory molecules, and failure to restrict parasite replication. In vivo, Nod2-knockout mice showed a reduction of MAPK phosphorylation and proinflammatory cytokines, followed by decreased inflammation in target organs and increment in parasite burden. Surprisingly, these mice were partially resistant to lethal doses of tachyzoites. In addition, these phenomena were not observed in Rip2−/− mice. In conclusion, our study indicates that Nod2-dependent responses account for N. caninum elimination. On the other hand, the inflammatory milieu induced by this innate receptor provoked pathogenesis and death in severe experimental neosporosis. PMID:27377650

  6. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ju Hye; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Yu Jin; Cho, Ju Hyun

    2016-04-01

    NOD1 has important roles in innate immunity as sensor of microbial components derived from bacterial peptidoglycan. In this study, we identified genes encoding components of the NOD1 signaling pathway, including NOD1 (OmNOD1) and RIP2 (OmRIP2) from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and investigated whether OmNOD1 has immunomodulating activity in a rainbow trout hepatoma cell line RTH-149 treated with NOD1-specific ligand (iE-DAP). The deduced amino acid sequence of OmNOD1 contained conserved CARD, NOD and LRR domains. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments indicated that OmNOD1 is involved in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Silencing of OmNOD1 in RTH-149 cells treated with iE-DAP decreased the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. Conversely, overexpression of OmNOD1 resulted in up-regulation of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α expression. In addition, RIP2 inhibitor (gefitinib) significantly decreased the expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by iE-DAP in RTH-149 cells. These findings highlight the important role of NOD1 signaling pathway in fish in eliciting innate immune response. PMID:26876355

  7. Extracellular formation and uptake of adenosine during skeletal muscle contraction in the rat: role of adenosine transporters.

    PubMed

    Lynge, J; Juel, C; Hellsten, Y

    2001-12-01

    1. The existence of adenosine transporters in plasma membrane giant vesicles from rat skeletal muscles and in primary skeletal muscle cell cultures was investigated. In addition, the contribution of intracellularly or extracellularly formed adenosine to the overall extracellular adenosine concentration during muscle contraction was determined in primary skeletal muscle cell cultures. 2. In plasma membrane giant vesicles, the carrier-mediated adenosine transport demonstrated saturation kinetics with Km = 177 +/- 36 microM and Vmax = 1.9 +/- 0.2 nmol x ml(-1) x s(-1) (0.7 nmol (mg protein)(-1) x s(-1)). The existence of an adenosine transporter was further evidenced by the inhibition of the carrier-mediated adenosine transport in the presence of NBMPR (nitrobenzylthioinosine; 72% inhibition) or dipyridamol (64% inhibition; P < 0.05). 3. In primary skeletal muscle cells, the rate of extracellular adenosine accumulation was 5-fold greater (P < 0.05) with electrical stimulation than without electrical stimulation. Addition of the adenosine transporter inhibitor NBMPR led to a 57% larger (P < 0.05) rate of extracellular adenosine accumulation in the electro-stimulated muscle cells compared with control cells, demonstrating that adenosine is taken up by the skeletal muscle cells during contractions. 4. Inhibition of ecto-5'-nucleotidase with AOPCP in electro-stimulated cells resulted in a 70% lower (P < 0.05) rate of extracellular adenosine accumulation compared with control cells, indicating that adenosine to a large extent is formed in the extracellular space during contraction. 5. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an NBMPR-sensitive adenosine transporter in rat skeletal muscle. Our data furthermore demonstrate that the increase in extracellular adenosine observed during electro-stimulation of skeletal muscle is due to production of adenosine in the extracellular space of skeletal muscle and that adenosine is taken up rather than released by the

  8. Adenosine reagent-free detection by co-immobilization of adenosine deaminase and phenol red on an optical biostrip.

    PubMed

    Bartzoka, Foteini; Venetsanou, Katerina; Clonis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine detection in human serum is important because this ribonucleoside has established clinical applications, modulating many physiological processes. Furthermore, a simple and cheap detection method is useful in adenosine production processes. Adenosine can be determined enzymatically using either S-adenosyl-homocysteine hydrolase and (3) [H]-adenosine, or adenosine kinase combined with GTP and luciferase, or an amperometric biosensor carrying adenosine deaminase (ADA), purine nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase. We developed a simple and cheap method relying on a transparent biostrip bearing ADA and the indicator phenol red (PR), co-immobilized to polyacrylamide, itself chemically adhered to a derivatized glass strip. The ADA-catalyzed conversion of adenosine to inosine and ammonia leads to a local pH alteration, changing the absorbance maximum of PR (from 425 to 567 nm), which is measured optically. The biostrip shows an analytical range 0.05-1.5 mM adenosine and is reusable when stored at 4 °C. When the biostrip was tested with serum, spiked with adenosine (70 and 100 μM), and filtered for protein and adenosine phosphates depletion, it showed good adenosine recovery. In summary, we show the proof-of-concept that adenosine can be determined reagent-free, at moderate sensitivity on an easy to construct, cheap, and reusable biostrip, based on commercially available molecular entities. PMID:25293641

  9. WBC27, an adenosine tri-phosphate-binding cassette protein, controls pollen wall formation and patterning in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiao-Ying; Yang, Ke-Zhen; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Lei; Chen, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Qin; Ye, De

    2011-01-01

    In flowering plants, the exine components are derived from tapetum. Despite its importance to sexual plant reproduction, little is known about the translocation of exine materials from tapetum to developing microspores. Here we report functional characterization of the arabidopsis WBC27 gene. WBC27 encodes an adenosine tri-phosphate binding cassette (ABC) transporter and is expressed preferentially in tapetum. Mutation of WBC27 disrupted the exine formation. The wbc27 mutant microspores began to degenerate once released from tetrads and most of the microspores collapsed at the uninucleate stage. Only a small number of wbc27-1 microspores could develop into tricellular pollen grains. These survival pollen grains lacked exine and germinated in the anther before anthesis. All of these results suggest that the ABC transporter, WBC27 plays important roles in the formation of arabidopsis exine, possibly by translocation of lipidic precursors of sporopollenin from tapetum to developing microspores. PMID:21205178

  10. The most common cystic fibrosis-associated mutation destabilizes the dimeric state of the nucleotide-binding domains of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Jih, Kang-Yang; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Bompadre, Silvia G

    2011-06-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that belongs to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. The deletion of the phenylalanine 508 (ΔF508-CFTR) is the most common mutation among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The mutant channels present a severe trafficking defect, and the few channels that reach the plasma membrane are functionally impaired. Interestingly, an ATP analogue, N6-(2-phenylethyl)-2′-deoxy-ATP (P-dATP), can increase the open probability (Po) to ∼0.7, implying that the gating defect of ΔF508 may involve the ligand binding domains, such as interfering with the formation or separation of the dimeric states of the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). To test this hypothesis, we employed two approaches developed for gauging the stability of the NBD dimeric states using the patch-clamp technique. We measured the locked-open time induced by pyrophosphate (PPi), which reflects the stability of the full NBD dimer state, and the ligand exchange time for ATP/N6-(2-phenylethyl)-ATP (P-ATP), which measures the stability of the partial NBD dimer state wherein the head of NBD1 and the tail of NBD2 remain associated. We found that both the PPi-induced locked-open time and the ATP/P-ATP ligand exchange time of ΔF508-CFTR channels are dramatically shortened, suggesting that the ΔF508 mutation destabilizes the full and partial NBD dimer states. We also tested if mutations that have been shown to improve trafficking of ΔF508-CFTR, namely the solubilizing mutation F494N/Q637R and ΔRI (deletion of the regulatory insertion), exert any effects on these newly identified functional defects associated with ΔF508-CFTR. Our results indicate that although these mutations increase the membrane expression and function of ΔF508-CFTR, they have limited impact on the stability of both full and partial NBD dimeric states for ΔF508 channels. The structure-function insights gained from this mechanism may provide clues for future

  11. The most common cystic fibrosis-associated mutation destabilizes the dimeric state of the nucleotide-binding domains of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Jih, Kang-Yang; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Bompadre, Silvia G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that belongs to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. The deletion of the phenylalanine 508 (ΔF508-CFTR) is the most common mutation among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The mutant channels present a severe trafficking defect, and the few channels that reach the plasma membrane are functionally impaired. Interestingly, an ATP analogue, N6-(2-phenylethyl)-2′-deoxy-ATP (P-dATP), can increase the open probability (Po) to ∼0.7, implying that the gating defect of ΔF508 may involve the ligand binding domains, such as interfering with the formation or separation of the dimeric states of the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). To test this hypothesis, we employed two approaches developed for gauging the stability of the NBD dimeric states using the patch-clamp technique. We measured the locked-open time induced by pyrophosphate (PPi), which reflects the stability of the full NBD dimer state, and the ligand exchange time for ATP/N6-(2-phenylethyl)-ATP (P-ATP), which measures the stability of the partial NBD dimer state wherein the head of NBD1 and the tail of NBD2 remain associated. We found that both the PPi-induced locked-open time and the ATP/P-ATP ligand exchange time of ΔF508-CFTR channels are dramatically shortened, suggesting that the ΔF508 mutation destabilizes the full and partial NBD dimer states. We also tested if mutations that have been shown to improve trafficking of ΔF508-CFTR, namely the solubilizing mutation F494N/Q637R and ΔRI (deletion of the regulatory insertion), exert any effects on these newly identified functional defects associated with ΔF508-CFTR. Our results indicate that although these mutations increase the membrane expression and function of ΔF508-CFTR, they have limited impact on the stability of both full and partial NBD dimeric states for ΔF508 channels. The structure–function insights gained from this mechanism may provide clues

  12. Thermal unfolding studies show the disease causing F508del mutation in CFTR thermodynamically destabilizes nucleotide-binding domain 1.

    PubMed

    Protasevich, Irina; Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Atwell, Shane; Zhao, Xun; Emtage, Spencer; Wetmore, Diana; Hunt, John F; Brouillette, Christie G

    2010-10-01

    Misfolding and degradation of CFTR is the cause of disease in patients with the most prevalent CFTR mutation, an in-frame deletion of phenylalanine (F508del), located in the first nucleotide-binding domain of human CFTR (hNBD1). Studies of (F508del)CFTR cellular folding suggest that both intra- and inter-domain folding is impaired. (F508del)CFTR is a temperature-sensitive mutant, that is, lowering growth temperature, improves both export, and plasma membrane residence times. Yet, paradoxically, F508del does not alter the fold of isolated hNBD1 nor did it seem to perturb its unfolding transition in previous isothermal chemical denaturation studies. We therefore studied the in vitro thermal unfolding of matched hNBD1 constructs ±F508del to shed light on the defective folding mechanism and the basis for the thermal instability of (F508del)CFTR. Using primarily differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism, we show for all hNBD1 pairs studied, that F508del lowers the unfolding transition temperature (T(m)) by 6-7°C and that unfolding occurs via a kinetically-controlled, irreversible transition in isolated monomers. A thermal unfolding mechanism is derived from nonlinear least squares fitting of comprehensive DSC data sets. All data are consistent with a simple three-state thermal unfolding mechanism for hNBD1 ± F508del: N(±MgATP) <==> I(T)(±MgATP) → A(T) → (A(T))(n). The equilibrium unfolding to intermediate, I(T), is followed by the rate-determining, irreversible formation of a partially folded, aggregation-prone, monomeric state, A(T), for which aggregation to (A(T))(n) and further unfolding occur with no detectable heat change. Fitted parameters indicate that F508del thermodynamically destabilizes the native state, N, and accelerates the formation of A(T). PMID:20687133

  13. Adenosine A1 receptors heterodimerize with β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors creating novel receptor complexes with altered G protein coupling and signaling.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekera, P Charukeshi; Wan, Tina C; Gizewski, Elizabeth T; Auchampach, John A; Lasley, Robert D

    2013-04-01

    G protein coupled receptors play crucial roles in mediating cellular responses to external stimuli, and increasing evidence suggests that they function as multiple units comprising homo/heterodimers and hetero-oligomers. Adenosine and β-adrenergic receptors are co-expressed in numerous tissues and mediate important cellular responses to the autocoid adenosine and sympathetic stimulation, respectively. The present study was undertaken to examine whether adenosine A1ARs heterodimerize with β1- and/or β2-adrenergic receptors (β1R and β2R), and whether such interactions lead to functional consequences. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies with differentially epitope-tagged A1, β1, and β2 receptors transiently co-expressed in HEK-293 cells indicate that A1AR forms constitutive heterodimers with both β1R and β2R. This heterodimerization significantly influenced orthosteric ligand binding affinity of both β1R and β2R without altering ligand binding properties of A1AR. Receptor-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation significantly increased in cells expressing A1AR/β1R and A1AR/β2R heteromers. β-Receptor-mediated cAMP production was not altered in A1AR/β1R expressing cells, but was significantly reduced in the A1AR/β2R cells. The inhibitory effect of the A1AR on cAMP production was abrogated in both A1AR/β1R and A1AR/β2R expressing cells in response to the A1AR agonist CCPA. Co-immunoprecipitation studies conducted with human heart tissue lysates indicate that endogenous A1AR, β1R, and β2R also form heterodimers. Taken together, our data suggest that heterodimerization between A1 and β receptors leads to altered receptor pharmacology, functional coupling, and intracellular signaling pathways. Unique and differential receptor cross-talk between these two important receptor families may offer the opportunity to fine-tune crucial signaling responses and development of more specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:23291003

  14. Involvement of purinergic receptors and NOD-like receptor-family protein 3-inflammasome pathway in the adenosine triphosphate-induced cytokine release from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, Thomas; Victoni, Tatiana; Fautrel, Alain; Robert, Sacha; Gleonnec, Florence; Guezingar, Marie; Couillin, Isabelle; Catros, Véronique; Boichot, Elisabeth; Lagente, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been described as a danger signal activating the NOD-like receptor-family protein 3 (NLRP3)-inflammasome leading to the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-1β, release in the lung. The NLRP3-inflammasome pathway has been previously described to be involved in experimental collagen deposition and the development of pulmonary fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway and P2X7 purinergic receptor in the activation of human macrophages in vitro by ATP. We showed that adenosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate tetralithium salt (ATPγS) and 2',3'-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl) adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BzATP), two stable analogs of ATP, are able to potentiate the release of IL-1β from human monocyte-derived macrophages induced by low concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, in the same conditions no increase in IL-1α and IL-6 was observed. Immunochemistry has shown that human macrophages natively express NLRP3 and purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7 R). NLRP3 and IL-1β mRNA expression were induced from LPS-primed macrophages, but also after 5-h treatment of BzATP as analysed by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. However, other inflammasome pathways (NLRP1, NLRP2, NLRC4, NLRP6 and AIM2) and P2X7 R were not induced by BzATP. We observed that P2X7 R antagonists, A-438079 and A-740003, were able to reduce the release of IL-1β, but not of IL-1α and IL-6 from macrophages stimulated by ATPγS or BzATP. The present results showed the involvement of the P2X7 R-NLRP3 inflammasome pathway in the secretion of IL-1β from ATP-stimulated human macrophages, and suggest that P2X7 R were not involved in IL-1α and IL-6 release. This study also points out that repression of the P2X7 R represents a novel potential therapeutic approach to control fibrosis in lung injury. PMID:24472059

  15. Aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 activation by adenosine and histamine inhibits ischemic norepinephrine release in cardiac sympathetic neurons: mediation by protein kinase Cε.

    PubMed

    Robador, Pablo A; Seyedi, Nahid; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Koda, Kenichiro; Levi, Roberto

    2012-10-01

    During myocardial ischemia/reperfusion, lipid peroxidation leads to the formation of toxic aldehydes that contribute to ischemic dysfunction. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 (ALDH2) alleviates ischemic heart damage and reperfusion arrhythmias via aldehyde detoxification. Because excessive norepinephrine release in the heart is a pivotal arrhythmogenic mechanism, we hypothesized that neuronal ALDH2 activation might diminish ischemic norepinephrine release. Incubation of cardiac sympathetic nerve endings with acetaldehyde, at concentrations achieved in myocardial ischemia, caused a concentration-dependent increase in norepinephrine release. A major increase in norepinephrine release also occurred when sympathetic nerve endings were incubated in hypoxic conditions. ALDH2 activation substantially reduced acetaldehyde- and hypoxia-induced norepinephrine release, an action prevented by inhibition of ALDH2 or protein kinase Cε (PKCε). Selective activation of G(i/o)-coupled adenosine A(1), A(3), or histamine H(3) receptors markedly inhibited both acetaldehyde- and hypoxia-induced norepinephrine release. These effects were also abolished by PKCε and/or ALDH2 inhibition. Moreover, A(1)-, A(3)-, or H(3)-receptor activation increased ALDH2 activity in a sympathetic neuron model (differentiated PC12 cells stably transfected with H(3) receptors). This action was prevented by the inhibition of PKCε and ALDH2. Our findings suggest the existence in sympathetic neurons of a protective pathway initiated by A(1)-, A(3)-, and H(3)-receptor activation by adenosine and histamine released in close proximity of these terminals. This pathway comprises the sequential activation of PKCε and ALDH2, culminating in aldehyde detoxification and inhibition of hypoxic norepinephrine release. Thus, pharmacological activation of PKCε and ALDH2 in cardiac sympathetic nerves may have significant protective effects by alleviating norepinephrine-induced life-threatening arrhythmias that

  16. GTP but not GDP analogues promote association of ADP-ribosylation factors, 20-kDa protein activators of cholera toxin, with phospholipids and PC-12 cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Walker, M W; Bobak, D A; Tsai, S C; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1992-02-15

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are a family of approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins initially identified by their ability to enhance cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in the presence of GTP. ARFs have been purified from both membrane and cytosolic fractions. ARF purified from bovine brain cytosol requires phospholipid plus detergent for high affinity guanine nucleotide binding and for optimal enhancement of cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. The phospholipid requirements, combined with a putative role for ARF in vesicular transport, suggested that the soluble protein might interact reversibly with membranes. A polyclonal antibody against purified bovine ARF (sARF II) was used to detect ARF by immunoblot in membrane and soluble fractions from rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cell homogenates. ARF was predominantly cytosolic but increased in membranes during incubation of homogenates with nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate), guanylyl-(beta gamma-imido)-diphosphate, and guanylyl-(beta gamma-methylene)-diphosphate, and to a lesser extent, adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate). GTP, GDP, GMP, and ATP were inactive. Cytosolic ARF similarly associated with added phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, or cardiolipin in GTP gamma S-dependent fashion. ARF binding to phosphatidylserine was reversible and coincident with stimulation of cholera toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. These observations may reflect a mechanism by which ARF could cycle between soluble and membrane compartments in vivo. PMID:1737779

  17. Adenosine Monophosphate-activated Protein Kinase Regulates Interleukin-1β Expression and Glial Glutamate Transporter Function in Rodents with Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Maixner, Dylan W.; Yan, Xisheng; Gao, Mei; Yadav, Ruchi; Weng, Han-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroinflammation and dysfunctional glial glutamate transporters (GTs) in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) are implicated in the genesis of neuropathic pain. We determined if adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the SDH regulates these processes in rodents with neuropathic pain. Methods Hind paw withdrawal responses to radiant heat and mechanical stimuli were used to assess nociceptive behaviors. Spinal markers related to neuroinflammation and glial GTs were determined by Western blotting. AMPK activities were manipulated pharmacologically and genetically. Regulation of glial GTs was determined by measuring protein expression and activities of glial GTs. Results AMPK activities were reduced in the SDH of rats (n = 5) with thermal hyperalgesia induced by nerve injury, which were accompanied with the activation of astrocytes, increased production of interleukin-1beta and activities of glycogen synthase kinase 3β, and suppressed protein expression of glial glutamate transporter-1. Thermal hyperalgesia was reversed by spinal activation of AMPK in neuropathic rats (n = 10), and induced by inhibiting spinal AMPK in naïve rats (n = 7 to 8). Spinal AMPKα knockdown (n = 6) and AMPKα1 conditional knockout (n = 6) induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. These genetic alterations mimicked the changes of molecular markers induced by nerve injury. Pharmacological activation of AMPK enhanced glial GT activity in mice with neuropathic pain (n = 8) and attenuated glial glutamate transporter-1 internalization induced by interleukin-1β (n = 4). Conclusion These findings suggest enhancing spinal AMPK activities could be an effective approach for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:25710409

  18. Novel reactivity of Fhit proteins: catalysts for fluorolysis of nucleoside 5'-phosphoramidates and nucleoside 5'-phosphosulfates to generate nucleoside 5'-phosphorofluoridates.

    PubMed

    Wojdyła-Mamoń, Anna M; Zimny, Jarosław; Romanowska, Joanna; Kraszewski, Adam; Stawinski, Jacek; Bieganowski, Paweł; Guranowski, Andrzej

    2015-06-01

    Fragile histidine triad (HIT) proteins (Fhits) occur in all eukaryotes but their function is largely unknown. Human Fhit is presumed to function as a tumour suppressor. Previously, we demonstrated that Fhits catalyse hydrolysis of not only dinucleoside triphosphates but also natural adenosine 5'-phosphoramidate (NH2-pA) and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (SO4-pA) as well as synthetic adenosine 5'-phosphorofluoridate (F-pA). In the present study, we describe an Fhit-catalysed displacement of the amino group of nucleoside 5'-phosphoramidates (NH2-pNs) or the sulfate moiety of nucleoside 5'-phosphosulfates (SO4-pNs) by fluoride anion. This results in transient accumulation of the corresponding nucleoside 5'-phosphorofluoridates (F-pNs). Substrate specificity and kinetic characterization of the fluorolytic reactions catalysed by the human Fhit and other examples of involvement of fluoride in the biochemistry of nucleotides are described. Among other HIT proteins, human histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein (Hint1) catalysed fluorolysis of NH2-pA 20 times and human Hint2 40 times more slowly than human Fhit. PMID:25826698

  19. Regulation of Lymphocyte Function by Adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Joel; Cekic, Caglar

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine regulates the interaction between lymphocytes and the vasculature and is important for controlling lymphocyte trafficking in response to tissue injury or infection. Adenosine can blunt the effects of T cell receptor (TCR) activation primarily by activating adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) and signaling via cyclic AMP and protein kinase A (PKA). PKA reduces proximal TCR signaling by phosphorylation of C-terminal Src kinase (Csk), nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) and cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB). PKA activation can either enhance or inhibit the survival of T cells depending on the strength and duration of signaling. Inducible enzymes such as CD73 and CD39 regulate adenosine formation and degradation in vivo. The extravasation of lymphocytes through blood vessels is influenced by A2AR-mediated suppression of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM) expression on lymphocytes and diminished production of IFNγ and IFNγ-inducible chemokines that are chemotactic to activated lymphocytes. Adenosine also decreases the barrier function of vascular endothelium by activating A2BRs. In sum, adenosine signaling is influenced by tissue inflammation and injury through induction of receptors and enzymes and has generally inhibitory effects on lymphocyte migration into inflamed tissues due to PKA-mediated effects on adhesion molecules, IFNγ production and endothelial barrier function. PMID:22772752

  20. New ribosome-inactivating proteins with polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidase and antiviral activities from Basella rubra L. and bougainvillea spectabilis Willd.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, A; Polito, L; Olivieri, F; Valbonesi, P; Barbieri, L; Battelli, M G; Carusi, M V; Benvenuto, E; Del Vecchio Blanco, F; Di Maro, A; Parente, A; Di Loreto, M; Stirpe, F

    1997-12-01

    New single-chain (type 1) ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were isolated from the seeds of Basella rubra L. (two proteins) and from the leaves of Bougainvillea spectabilis Willd. (one protein). These RIPs inhibit protein synthesis both in a cell-free system, with an IC50 (concentration causing 50% inhibition) in the 10(-10) M range, and by various cell lines, with IC50S in the 10(-8)-10(-6) M range. All three RIPs released adenine not only from rat liver ribosomes but also from Escherichia coli rRNA, polyadenylic acid, herring sperm DNA, and artichoke mottled crinkle virus (AMCV) genomic RNA, thus being polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidases. The proteins from Basella rubra had toxicity to mice similar to that of most type 1 RIPs (Barbieri et al., 1993, Biochim Biophys Acta 1154: 237-282) with an LD50 (concentration that is 50% lethal) < or = 8 mg.kg-1 body weight, whilst the RIP from Bougainvillea spectabilis had an LD50 > 32 mg.kg-1. The N-terminal sequence of the two RIPs from Basella rubra had 80-93% identity, whereas it differed from the sequence of the RIP from Bougainvillea spectabilis. When tested with antibodies against various RIPs, the RIPs from Basella gave some cross-reactivity with sera against dianthin 32, and weak cross-reactivity with momordin I and momorcochin-S, whilst the RIP from Bougainvillea did not cross-react with any antiserum tested. An RIP from Basella rubra and one from Bougainvillea spectabilis were tested for antiviral activity, and both inhibited infection of Nicotiana benthamiana by AMCV. PMID:9421927

  1. New perspectives in signaling mediated by receptors coupled to stimulatory G protein: the emerging significance of cAMP efflux and extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Rosely O.; Duarte, Thiago; Pacini, Enio S. A.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) linked to stimulatory G (Gs) proteins (GsPCRs) mediate increases in intracellular cyclic AMP as consequence of activation of nine adenylyl cyclases , which differ considerably in their cellular distribution and activation mechanisms. Once produced, cyclic AMP may act via distinct intracellular signaling effectors such as protein kinase A and the exchange proteins activated by cAMP (Epacs). More recently, attention has been focused on the efflux of cAMP through a specific transport system named multidrug resistance proteins that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. Outside the cell, cAMP is metabolized into adenosine, which is able to activate four distinct subtypes of adenosine receptors, members of the GPCR family: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Taking into account that this phenomenon occurs in numerous cell types, as consequence of GsPCR activation and increment in intracellular cAMP levels, in this review, we will discuss the impact of cAMP efflux and the extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway on the regulation of GsPCR-induced cell response. PMID:25859216

  2. Effects of air pollutants on innate immunity: The role of Toll-like receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain–like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Rebecca N.; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between exposure to ambient air pollutants and respiratory pathogens have been shown to modify respiratory immune responses. Emerging data suggest key roles for Toll-like receptor (TLR) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain–like receptor (NLR) signaling in pathogen-induced immune responses. Similarly, immune responses elicited by exposure to air pollutants are mediated by specific TLR- and NLR-dependent mechanisms. This review article will summarize current knowledge about how air pollutants modify TLR- and NLR-dependent signaling and host defense responses in the lung. PMID:22196521

  3. Metformin inhibits growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells via liver kinase B-1-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    GUO, QIANQIAN; LIU, ZHIYAN; JIANG, LILI; LIU, MENGJIE; MA, JIEQUN; YANG, CHENGCHENG; HAN, LILI; NAN, KEJUN; LIANG, XUAN

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely administered oral anti-diabetic therapeutic agent, exerts its glucose-lowering effect predominantly via liver kinase B1 (LKB1)-dependent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that metformin possesses potential antitumor effects. However, whether the antitumor effect of metformin is via the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway remains to be determined. In the current study, the effects of metformin on proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 (LKB1-null) and H1299 (LKB1-positive) cells were assessed, and the role of LKB1/AMPK signaling in the anti-growth effects of metformin were investigated. Cell viability was determined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. Metformin inhibited proliferation, induced significant cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase and increased apoptosis in NSCLC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, regardless of the level of LKB1 protein expression. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) did not affect the antiproliferative effect of metformin in the H1299 cells. Metformin stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently suppressed the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream effector, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase in the two cell lines. These effects were abrogated by silencing AMPK with small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, knockdown of AMPK with siRNA inhibited the effect of metformin on cell proliferation in the two cell lines. These results provide evidence that the growth inhibition of metformin in NSCLC cells is mediated by LKB1-independent activation of AMPK, indicating that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of

  4. Silk polymer-based adenosine release: therapeutic potential for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wilz, Andrew; Pritchard, Eleanor M; Li, Tianfu; Lan, Jing-Quan; Kaplan, David L; Boison, Detlev

    2008-09-01

    Adenosine augmentation therapies (AAT) make rational use of the brain's own adenosine-based seizure control system and hold promise for the therapy of refractory epilepsy. In an effort to develop an AAT compatible with future clinical application, we developed a novel silk protein-based release system for adenosine. Adenosine releasing brain implants with target release doses of 0, 40, 200, and 1000ng adenosine per day were prepared by embedding adenosine containing microspheres into nanofilm-coated silk fibroin scaffolds. In vitro, the respective polymers released 0, 33.4, 170.5, and 819.0ng adenosine per day over 14 days. The therapeutic potential of the implants was validated in a dose-response study in the rat model of kindling epileptogenesis. Four days prior to the onset of kindling, adenosine releasing polymers were implanted into the infrahippocampal cleft and progressive acquisition of kindled seizures was monitored over a total of 48 stimulations. We document a dose-dependent retardation of seizure acquisition. In recipients of polymers releasing 819ng adenosine per day, kindling epileptogenesis was delayed by one week corresponding to 18 kindling stimulations. Histological analysis of brain samples confirmed the correct location of implants and electrodes. We conclude that silk-based delivery of around 1000ng adenosine per day is a safe and efficient strategy to suppress seizures. PMID:18514814

  5. The role of nitric oxide in the phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element-binding protein in the spinal cord after intradermal injection of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Fang, Li; Lin, Qing; Willis, William D

    2002-06-01

    We investigated the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in the phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) in the spinal cord of rats during central sensitization after intradermal capsaicin injection. CREB and phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) were measured by immunoblotting. The level of p-CREB increased by 20 minutes, peaked between 20 and 60 minutes after capsaicin injection, and started to decrease after 150 minutes. CREB itself did not show an obvious change after capsaicin injection. The p-CREB expression on the ipsilateral side of the spinal dorsal horn, but not on the contralateral side, increased significantly after capsaicin injection. The increase in p-CREB induced by capsaicin injection was partially blocked by pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an NO synthase inhibitor, administered through a microdialysis fiber placed across the spinal cord. D-NAME, an inactive form of L-NAME, had no effect. CREB phosphorylation, not the level of CREB, was induced within 20 minutes by microdialysis administration of SIN-1, an NO donor. These results indicate that CREB phosphorylation in the spinal cord results from both endogenous and exogenous NO release and that p-CREB may play a role in central sensitization or in longer-term changes in gene expression induced by strong peripheral noxious stimulation. PMID:14622772

  6. Endogenous phosphorylation of microsomal proteins in bovine corpus luteum. Tenfold activation by adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Hardie, D. Grahame; Stansfield, David A.

    1977-01-01

    Free ribosomes and a smooth-microsomal fraction were prepared from bovine corpus luteum. Both preparations will self-phosphorylate when incubated with Mg2+ and ATP, but at low concentrations of Mg2+ and ATP the self-phosphorylation of the smooth-microsomal fraction was much more dependent on cyclic AMP than was that of free ribosomes, stimulation by the nucleotide being up to 10-fold in the former case. The self-phosphorylation of the smooth-microsomal fraction was studied further. The reaction bears similarities to that brought about by soluble cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, being inhibited by Ca2+ and the heat-stable inhibitor protein from skeletal muscle. Cyclic GMP will activate the reaction at concentrations higher than those required for full activation by cyclic AMP. In the presence of cyclic AMP, phosphate bound to protein is found almost exclusively as phosphoserine. Several proteins are phosphorylated, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, and the phosphorylation of all of them is markedly stimulated by cyclic AMP. If the reaction is carried out at high concentrations of Mg2+ and ATP, a distinct cyclic AMP-independent phosphorylation is observed. This activity is not inhibited by the heat-stable inhibitor protein, and phosphate is found esterified with both threonine and serine residues. PMID:195580

  7. Assay of adenosine 3',5' cyclic monophosphate by stimulation of protein kinase: a method not involving radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Handa, A.K.; Bressan, R.A.

    1980-03-01

    In order to meet a need for a cAMP assay which is not subject to interference by compounds in plant extracts, and which is suitable for use on occasions separated by many /sup 32/P half-lives, an assay based on cAMP-dependent protein kinase has been developed which does not require the use of (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. Instead of measuring the cAMP-stimulated increase in the rate of transfer of (..gamma..-/sup 32/P) phosphate from (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP to protein, the rate of loss of ATP from the reaction mixture is determined. The ATP remaining after the protein kinase reaction is assayed by ATP-dependent chemiluminescence of the firefly luciferin-luciferase system. Under conditions of the protein kinase reaction in which a readily measurable decrease in ATP concentration occurs, the logarithm of the concentration of ATP decreases in proportion to the cAMP concentration, i.e., the reaction can be described by the equation: (ATP) = (ATP)/sub 0/ e/sup -(cAMP)kt/. The assay based on this relationship can detect less than 1 pmol of cAMP. The levels of cAMP found with this assay after partial purification of the cAMP from rat tissue, algal cells, and the media in which the cells were grown agreed with measurements made by the cAMP binding-competition assay of Gilman, and the potein kinase stimulation assay based on transfer of (/sup 32/P) phosphate from (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP to protein. All of the enzymes and chemicals required for the assay of cAMP by protein kinase catalyzed loss of ATP can be stored frozen for months, making the assay suitable for occasional use.

  8. Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) as a New Target for Antidiabetic Drugs: A Review on Metabolic, Pharmacological and Chemical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Gruzman, Arie; Babai, Gali; Sasson, Shlomo

    2009-01-01

    In view of the epidemic nature of type 2 diabetes and the substantial rate of failure of current oral antidiabetic drugs the quest for new therapeutics is intensive. The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important regulatory protein for cellular energy balance and is considered a master switch of glucose and lipid metabolism in various organs, especially in skeletal muscle and liver. In skeletal muscles, AMPK stimulates glucose transport and fatty acid oxidation. In the liver, it augments fatty acid oxidation and decreases glucose output, cholesterol and triglyceride synthesis. These metabolic effects induced by AMPK are associated with lowering blood glucose levels in hyperglycemic individuals. Two classes of oral antihyperglycemic drugs (biguanidines and thiazolidinediones) have been shown to exert some of their therapeutic effects by directly or indirectly activating AMPK. However, side effects and an acquired resistance to these drugs emphasize the need for the development of novel and efficacious AMPK activators. We have recently discovered a new class of hydrophobic D-xylose derivatives that activates AMPK in skeletal muscles in a non insulin-dependent manner. One of these derivatives (2,4;3,5-dibenzylidene-D-xylose-diethyl-dithioacetal) stimulates the rate of hexose transport in skeletal muscle cells by increasing the abundance of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4) in the plasma membrane through activation of AMPK. This compound reduces blood glucose levels in diabetic mice and therefore offers a novel strategy of therapeutic intervention strategy in type 2 diabetes. The present review describes various classes of chemically-related compounds that activate AMPK by direct or indirect interactions and discusses their potential for candidate antihyperglycemic drug development. PMID:19557293

  9. Targeting energy metabolic and oncogenic signaling pathways in triple-negative breast cancer by a novel adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuen-Haur; Hsu, En-Chi; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Wang, Dasheng; Kulp, Samuel K; Shapiro, Charles L; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2011-11-11

    The antitumor activities of the novel adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, OSU-53, were assessed in in vitro and in vivo models of triple-negative breast cancer. OSU-53 directly stimulated recombinant AMPK kinase activity (EC(50), 0.3 μM) and inhibited the viability and clonogenic growth of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells with equal potency (IC(50), 5 and 2 μM, respectively) despite lack of LKB1 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. Nonmalignant MCF-10A cells, however, were unaffected. Beyond AMPK-mediated effects on mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and lipogenesis, OSU-53 also targeted multiple AMPK downstream pathways. Among these, the protein phosphatase 2A-dependent dephosphorylation of Akt is noteworthy because it circumvents the feedback activation of Akt that results from mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition. OSU-53 also modulated energy homeostasis by suppressing fatty acid biosynthesis and shifting the metabolism to oxidation by up-regulating the expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, such as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α and the transcription factor nuclear respiratory factor 1. Moreover, OSU-53 suppressed LPS-induced IL-6 production, thereby blocking subsequent Stat3 activation, and inhibited hypoxia-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in association with the silencing of hypoxia-inducible factor 1a and the E-cadherin repressor Snail. In MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice, daily oral administration of OSU-53 (50 and 100 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth by 47-49% and modulated relevant intratumoral biomarkers of drug activity. However, OSU-53 also induced protective autophagy that attenuated its antiproliferative potency. Accordingly, cotreatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine increased the in vivo tumor-suppressive activity of OSU-53. OSU-53 is a potent, orally bioavailable AMPK activator that acts through a broad spectrum of antitumor activities. PMID

  10. Nucleotide binding interactions modulate dNTP selectivity and facilitate 8-oxo-dGTP incorporation by DNA polymerase lambda

    PubMed Central

    Burak, Matthew J.; Guja, Kip E.; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    8-Oxo-7,8,-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine triphosphate (8-oxo-dGTP) is a major product of oxidative damage in the nucleotide pool. It is capable of mispairing with adenosine (dA), resulting in futile, mutagenic cycles of base excision repair. Therefore, it is critical that DNA polymerases discriminate against 8-oxo-dGTP at the insertion step. Because of its roles in oxidative DNA damage repair and non-homologous end joining, DNA polymerase lambda (Pol λ) may frequently encounter 8-oxo-dGTP. Here, we have studied the mechanisms of 8-oxo-dGMP incorporation and discrimination by Pol λ. We have solved high resolution crystal structures showing how Pol λ accommodates 8-oxo-dGTP in its active site. The structures indicate that when mispaired with dA, the oxidized nucleotide assumes the mutagenic syn-conformation, and is stabilized by multiple interactions. Steady-state kinetics reveal that two residues lining the dNTP binding pocket, Ala510 and Asn513, play differential roles in dNTP selectivity. Specifically, Ala510 and Asn513 facilitate incorporation of 8-oxo-dGMP opposite dA and dC, respectively. These residues also modulate the balance between purine and pyrimidine incorporation. Our results shed light on the mechanisms controlling 8-oxo-dGMP incorporation in Pol λ and on the importance of interactions with the incoming dNTP to determine selectivity in family X DNA polymerases. PMID:26220180

  11. Measurement of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate by competitive binding to salt-dissociated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Døskeland, S O; Haga, H J

    1978-01-01

    An assay for cyclic AMP is described which takes advantage of the high affinity of the dissociated receptor moiety of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase I for the nucleotide. The kinase is kept dissociated by salt (800 mM-NaCl/30mM-EDTA). In the presence of a simply prepared heat-stable protein fraction the binding reagent is stable for the time needed to reach equilibrium of binding. A simple procedure [precipitation with poly-(ethylene glycol) followed by DEAE-cellulose chromatography] is described for the separation of protein kinase I from other binding proteins for cyclic AMP in rabbit skeletal muscle. The sensitivity, precision, reproducibility and specificity of the assay compared favourably with those of other cyclic AMP assays. The main advantage of the present assay is its resistance towards non-specific interference from a number of salts, tissue-culture media and substances found in crude tissue extracts. The reliability of cyclic AMP measurement directly in crude tissue extracts was ensured by removal of the assayable cyclic AMP with cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase digestion or adsorption with antibody against cyclic AMP, by comparison with measurement in tissue extracts purified by chromatography on QAE-Sephadex or sequentially on Dowex 50, and aluminium oxide as well as by dilution and recovery experiments. PMID:213054

  12. Anticancer effect of adenosine on gastric cancer via diverse signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Ayako; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells via intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. In the former pathway, adenosine uptake into cells triggers apoptosis, and in the latter pathway, adenosine receptors mediate apoptosis. Extracellular adenosine also induces apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. Extracellular adenosine is transported into cells through an adenosine transporter and converted to AMP by adenosine kinase. In turn, AMP activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is the factor responsible for caspase-independent apoptosis of GT3-TKB gastric cancer cells. Extracellular adenosine, on the other hand, induces caspase-dependent apoptosis of MKN28 and MKN45 gastric cancer cells by two mechanisms. Firstly, AMP, converted from intracellularly transported adenosine, initiates apoptosis, regardless of AMPK. Secondly, the A3 adenosine receptor, linked to Gi/Gq proteins, mediates apoptosis by activating the Gq protein effector, phospholipase Cγ, to produce inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, which activate protein kinase C. Consequently, the mechanisms underlying adenosine-induced apoptosis vary, depending upon gastric cancer cell types. Understand the contribution of each downstream target molecule of adenosine to apoptosis induction may aid the establishment of tailor-made chemotherapy for gastric cancer. PMID:26494951

  13. Anticancer effect of adenosine on gastric cancer via diverse signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Ayako; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2015-10-21

    Extracellular adenosine induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells via intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. In the former pathway, adenosine uptake into cells triggers apoptosis, and in the latter pathway, adenosine receptors mediate apoptosis. Extracellular adenosine also induces apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. Extracellular adenosine is transported into cells through an adenosine transporter and converted to AMP by adenosine kinase. In turn, AMP activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is the factor responsible for caspase-independent apoptosis of GT3-TKB gastric cancer cells. Extracellular adenosine, on the other hand, induces caspase-dependent apoptosis of MKN28 and MKN45 gastric cancer cells by two mechanisms. Firstly, AMP, converted from intracellularly transported adenosine, initiates apoptosis, regardless of AMPK. Secondly, the A3 adenosine receptor, linked to Gi/Gq proteins, mediates apoptosis by activating the Gq protein effector, phospholipase Cγ, to produce inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, which activate protein kinase C. Consequently, the mechanisms underlying adenosine-induced apoptosis vary, depending upon gastric cancer cell types. Understand the contribution of each downstream target molecule of adenosine to apoptosis induction may aid the establishment of tailor-made chemotherapy for gastric cancer. PMID:26494951

  14. Identification, characterization, and hormonal regulation of 3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinases in rat Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Landmark, B F; Fauske, B; Eskild, W; Skålhegg, B; Lohmann, S M; Hansson, V; Jahnsen, T; Beebe, S J

    1991-11-01

    Recent studies have disclosed multiple isoforms of regulatory (R) and catalytic (C) subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) at the protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. The purpose of the present study was to identify, characterize, and quantify individual R subunits in rat Sertoli cells both at the mRNA and protein levels. Unstimulated Sertoli cells contain high levels of R (approximately 9.2 +/- 0.8 pmol/mg protein) and C (approximately 7.3 +/- 0.7 pmol/mg protein). Stimulation with (Bt)2cAMP (0.1 mM) for 24 and 48 h revealed a time-dependent increase in [3H]cAMP-binding activity. During the same time period the catalytic activity remained relatively constant, resulting in an increase in the R/C ratio from approximately 1.3 to 3.0. Using diethylaminoethyl cellulose chromatography, 8-N3-[32P]cAMP photoaffinity labeling, autophosphorylation by gamma-[32P]ATP, and specific antibodies, we show that unstimulated Sertoli cells contain approximately 75% RI alpha, 25% RII alpha, and very low levels of RII beta. Stimulation of Sertoli cells with (Bt)2cAMP (0.1 mM, 48 h) was associated with a 2.1-fold increase in RI alpha (6.6-14 pmol/mg) and a 10- to 20-fold increase in RII beta (less than 0.1-1.1 pmol/mg), with little or no change in RII alpha (1.9-2.3 pmol/mg). Treatment with cAMP was associated with a slight increase in RI/RII ratio (3.3-4.1). mRNA levels for RII beta increased 30- to 50-fold after (Bt)2cAMP stimulation, whereas only minor changes in mRNA levels for RI alpha, RII alpha, and C alpha were observed (1.5- to 2.0-fold). mRNA levels for RI beta, C beta, and C gamma were not detected in either unstimulated or in cAMP-stimulated Sertoli cells. It is concluded that chronic treatment with cAMP changes the relative proportion of R subunits of PKA in a manner reflecting the changing levels in respective mRNAs. Furthermore, such treatment is associated with the appearance of a new PKA R subunit (RII beta), which is absent in untreated Sertoli cells. PMID

  15. Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Overexpression Correlates with Protein Kinase A Activation in Adrenocortical Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wu, Luming; Xie, Jing; Su, Tingwei; Jiang, Lei; Jiang, Yiran; Cao, Yanan; Liu, Jianmin; Ning, Guang; Wang, Weiqing

    2016-01-01

    The association of pathological features of cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs) with somatic driver mutations and their molecular classification remain unclear. In this study, we explored the association between steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) expression and the driver mutations activating cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling to identify the pathological markers of ACAs. Immunohistochemical staining for StAR and mutations in the protein kinase cAMP-activated catalytic subunit alpha (PRKACA), protein kinase cAMP-dependent type I regulatory subunit alpha (PRKAR1A) and guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha stimulating (GNAS) genes were examined in 97 ACAs. The association of StAR expression with the clinical and mutational features of the ACAs was analyzed. ACAs with mutations in PRKACA, GNAS, and PRKAR1A showed strong immunopositive staining for StAR. The concordance between high StAR expression and mutations activating cAMP/PKA signaling in the ACAs was 99.0%. ACAs with high expression of StAR had significantly smaller tumor volume (P < 0.001) and higher urinary cortisol per tumor volume (P = 0.032) than those with low expression of StAR. Our findings suggest that immunohistochemical staining for StAR is a reliable pathological approach for the diagnosis and classification of ACAs with cAMP/PKA signaling-activating mutations. PMID:27606678

  16. Apoptotic effects of extract from Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson by adenosine monosphosphate-activated protein kinase-independent pathway in HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Eun Gyeong; Kim, Guen Tae; Lee, Se Hee; Kim, Sang-Yong; Kim, Young Min

    2016-06-01

    Colon cancer, a common malignancy, can occur due to poor eating habits and increasing age. Consequently, careful regulation of eating habits may serve as a possible method for preventing the occurrence or progression of colon cancer. Extracts of the fruit of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson are well‑known as an effective herbal medicine for the treatment of pain in female genitalia and carbuncle. However, there have been no studies on the apoptotic effects of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson (CME). Adenosine monophosphate‑activated protein kinase (AMPK), the major regulator of energy metabolism, is activated by metabolic stress, including hypoxia and glucose deprivation. Activation of AMPK inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis through the inhibition of phosphorylated (p)‑Akt and control of B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) family members. The pro‑apoptotic proteins Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl‑2‑homologous antagonist killer (Bak), are activated by their translocation to mitochondria from the cytosol. Translocation of Bax/Bak induces outer membrane permeabilization and is likely to lead to apoptosis through cytochrome C release and caspase activity. In the present study, the apoptotic effects and influence on mitochondria‑mediated apoptotic proteins of CME in HCT116 cells were assessed. We hypothesized that CME may have an effect on the inhibition of p‑Akt in an AMPK‑independent pathway. The present study demonstrated that CME induced the release of LDH and apoptosis through its inhibition of p‑Akt to control Bcl‑2 and activate Bax and Bak. Co‑treatment with CME and AMPK inhibitors showed that CME‑induced apoptosis does not occurr through a AMPK‑dependent pathway. Therefore, the present study determined, for the first time, that CME induced apoptosis as a result of causing metabolic stresses due to directly regulation of the de‑phosphorylation of Akt, whereas it did not control the AMPK-dependent pathway in HCT116

  17. ATP- and adenosine-mediated signaling in the central nervous system: adenosine stimulates glutamate release from astrocytes via A2a adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2004-02-01

    Adenosine enhanced intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in astrocytes via A(2a) adenosine receptors involving protein kinase A (PKA) activation. The Ca(2+) rise is inhibited by brefeldin A, an inhibitor of vesicular transport; but not by neomycin and U73122, phospholipase C inhibitors; xestospongin, an IP(3)-receptor inhibitor; ryanodine, a ryanodine-receptor inhibitor; TMB-8, an endoplasmic reticulum calcium-release blocker; octanol, a gap-junction inhibitor; or cadmium, a non-selective, calcium-channel blocker. Adenosine stimulates astrocytic glutamate release via an A(2a) adenosine receptors/PKA pathway, and the release is inhibited by the vesicular transport inhibitors brefeldin A and bafilomycin A1. A(2a) adenosine receptors and the ensuing PKA events, thus, are endowed with vesicular Ca(2+) release from an unknown intracellular calcium store and vesicular glutamate release from astrocytes. PMID:14978344

  18. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation, substrate transporter translocation, and metabolism in the contracting hyperthyroid rat heart.

    PubMed

    Heather, Lisa C; Cole, Mark A; Atherton, Helen J; Coumans, Will A; Evans, Rhys D; Tyler, Damian J; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P; Clarke, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid hormones can modify cardiac metabolism via multiple molecular mechanisms, yet their integrated effect on overall substrate metabolism is poorly understood. Here we determined the effect of hyperthyroidism on substrate metabolism in the isolated, perfused, contracting rat heart. Male Wistar rats were injected for 7 d with T(3) (0.2 mg/kg x d ip). Plasma free fatty acids increased by 97%, heart weights increased by 33%, and cardiac rate pressure product, an indicator of contractile function, increased by 33% in hyperthyroid rats. Insulin-stimulated glycolytic rates and lactate efflux rates were increased by 33% in hyperthyroid rat hearts, mediated by an increased insulin-stimulated translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 to the sarcolemma. This was accompanied by a 70% increase in phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and a 100% increase in phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase, confirming downstream signaling from AMPK. Fatty acid oxidation rates increased in direct proportion to the increased heart weight and rate pressure product in the hyperthyroid heart, mediated by synchronized changes in mitochondrial enzymes and respiration. Protein levels of the fatty acid transporter, fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), were reduced by 24% but were accompanied by a 19% increase in the sarcolemmal content of fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1). Thus, the relationship between fatty acid metabolism, cardiac mass, and contractile function was maintained in the hyperthyroid heart, associated with a sarcolemmal reorganization of fatty acid transporters. The combined effects of T(3)-induced AMPK activation and insulin stimulation were associated with increased sarcolemmal GLUT4 localization and glycolytic flux in the hyperthyroid heart. PMID:19940039

  19. PUGNAc induces protein ubiquitination in C2C12 myotube cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ja-Hye; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Moon, Pyong-Gon; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2015-12-01

    O-linked β-N-acetylglucosaminylation (O-GlcNAcylation) regulates many cellular processes including the cell cycle, cell signaling, and protein trafficking. Dysregulation of O-GlcNAcylation may be involved in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Therefore, it is necessary to identify cellular proteins that are induced by elevated O-GlcNAcylation. Here, using adenosine 5'-triphosphate affinity chromatography, we employed a proteomic approach in order to identify differentially expressed proteins in response to treatment with the O-GlcNAcase inhibitor, O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosylidene)amino-N-phenylcarbamate (PUGNAc), in mouse C2C12 myotube cells. Among 205 selected genes, we identified 68 nucleotide-binding proteins, 14 proteins that have adenosinetriphosphatase activity, and 10 proteins with ligase activity. Upregulation of proteins, including ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, proteasome subunit 20S, cullin-associated NEDD8-dissociated protein 1, ezrin, and downregulation of the protein nucleoside diphosphate kinase B, were confirmed by western blot analysis. In particular, we found that the protein ubiquitination level in C2C12 cells was increased by PUGNAc treatment. This is the first report of quantitative proteomic profiles of myotube cells after treatment with PUGNAc, and our results demonstrate the potential to enhance understanding of the relationship between insulin resistance, O-GlcNAc, and PUGNAc in the future. PMID:26531776

  20. Co-targeting Deoxyribonucleic Acid–Dependent Protein Kinase and Poly(Adenosine Diphosphate-Ribose) Polymerase-1 Promotes Accelerated Senescence of Irradiated Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Arun; Bukczynska, Patricia; Jackson, Susan; Haput, Ygal; Cullinane, Carleen; McArthur, Grant A.; Solomon, Benjamin

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of combined blockade of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) on accelerated senescence in irradiated H460 and A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of KU5788 and AG014699 (inhibitors of DNA-PK and PARP-1, respectively) on clonogenic survival, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), apoptosis, mitotic catastrophe, and accelerated senescence in irradiated cells were examined in vitro. For in vivo experiments, H460 xenografts established in athymic nude mice were treated with BEZ235 (a DNA-PK, ATM, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor) and AG014699 to determine effects on proliferation, DNA DSBs, and accelerated senescence after radiation. Results: Compared with either inhibitor alone, combination treatment with KU57788 and AG014699 reduced postradiation clonogenic survival and significantly increased persistence of Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) foci in irradiated H460 and A549 cells. Notably, these effects coincided with the induction of accelerated senescence in irradiated cells as reflected by positive β-galactosidase staining, G2-M cell-cycle arrest, enlarged and flattened cellular morphology, increased p21 expression, and senescence-associated cytokine secretion. In irradiated H460 xenografts, concurrent therapy with BEZ235 and AG014699 resulted in sustained Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) staining and prominent β-galactosidase activity. Conclusion: Combined DNA-PK and PARP-1 blockade increased tumor cell radiosensitivity and enhanced the prosenescent properties of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. These data provide a rationale for further preclinical and clinical testing of this therapeutic combination.

  1. Human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene transcription: up-regulation by 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K W; Leung, P C

    2001-07-01

    Transient transfection of mouse gonadotrope-derived (alphaT3-1) cells with a 2297 bp human GnRHR promoter-luciferase construct (p2300-LucF) showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in the human gonodotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) promoter activity after forskolin treatment. An average of 4.8-fold increase in promoter activity was observed after 12 h of 10 microM forskolin treatment. This effect was mimicked by administration of cholera toxin, cAMP analog or pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide 38 (PACAP). A specific adenylate cyclase (AC) inhibitor (ACI) or protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (PKAI) pretreatment reversed the forskolin- and PACAP-induced increase in the human GnRHR promoter activity. These results not only confirm the stimulatory effect of Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in human GnRHR promoter activation, but also suggest that hormones or neurotransmitters that activate adenylate cyclase in pituitary gonadotropes may increase the expression of human GnRHR gene in transcriptional level. Progressive 5' deletion assays identified a 412 bp fragment (-577 to 167) in the human GnRHR 5'-flanking region that is essential in maintaining the basal responsiveness to cAMP. Mutagenesis coupled with functional studies have identified two putative AP-1/CREB binding sites, namely hGR-AP/CRE-1 and hGR-AP/CRE-2 that participated in mediating the cAMP-stimulatory effect. Mutation of the putative hGR-AP/CRE-1 and hGR-CRE-2 resulted in a 38 and 32% decrease in the forskolin-induced stimulation. However, mutation of both binding sites did not completely abolish the cAMP-stimulatory effect, suggesting that multiple transcription factor binding sites were involved in full response in cAMP stimulation. The binding of CREB to these motifs was confirmed by gel mobility shift assay and antibody supershift assay. PMID:11476937

  2. Vasoactive intestinal peptide attenuates liver ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice via the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase a pathway.

    PubMed

    Ji, Haofeng; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Yuanxing; Shen, Xiu-Da; Gao, Feng; Nguyen, Terry T; Busuttil, Ronald W; Waschek, James A; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2013-09-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), an exogenous, antigen-independent, local inflammation response, occurs in multiple clinical settings, including liver transplantation, hepatic resection, trauma, and shock. The nervous system maintains extensive crosstalk with the immune system through neuropeptide and peptide hormone networks. This study examined the function and therapeutic potential of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) neuropeptide in a murine model of liver warm ischemia (90 minutes) followed by reperfusion. Liver ischemia/reperfusion (IR) triggered an induction of gene expression of intrinsic VIP; this peaked at 24 hours of reperfusion and coincided with a hepatic self-healing phase. Treatment with the VIP neuropeptide protected livers from IRI; this was evidenced by diminished serum alanine aminotransferase levels and well-preserved tissue architecture and was associated with elevated intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The hepatocellular protection rendered by VIP was accompanied by diminished neutrophil/macrophage infiltration and activation, reduced hepatocyte necrosis/apoptosis, and increased hepatic interleukin-10 (IL-10) expression. Strikingly, PKA inhibition restored liver damage in otherwise IR-resistant VIP-treated mice. In vitro, VIP not only diminished macrophage tumor necrosis factor α/IL-6/IL-12 expression in a PKA-dependent manner but also prevented necrosis/apoptosis in primary mouse hepatocyte cultures. In conclusion, our findings document the importance of VIP neuropeptide-mediated cAMP-PKA signaling in hepatic homeostasis and cytoprotection in vivo. Because the enhancement of neural modulation differentially regulates local inflammation and prevents hepatocyte death, these results provide the rationale for novel approaches to managing liver IRI in transplant patients. PMID:23744729

  3. Effect of the growth stage and cultivar on policosanol profiles of barley sprouts and their adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Woo Duck; Yuk, Heung Joo; Curtis-Long, Marcus J; Jang, Ki Chang; Lee, Jin Hwan; Han, Sang-Ik; Kang, Hang Won; Nam, Min Hee; Lee, Sung-Joon; Lee, Ji Hae; Park, Ki Hun

    2013-02-01

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an intracellular sensor that can regulate glucose levels within the cell. For this reason, it is well-known to be a target for drugs against diabetes and obesity. AMPK was activated significantly by the hexane extract of barley sprouts. This AMPK activation emerges across the growth stages of the sprout, becoming most significant (3 times above the initial stages) 10 days after sprouting. After this time, the activation decreased between 13 and 20 days post-sprouting. Analysis of the hexane extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that the amounts of policosanols (PCs, which are linear, primary aliphatic alcohols with 20-30 carbons) in the plant dramatically increased between 5 days (109.7 mg/100 g) and 10 days (343.7 mg/100 g) post-sprouting and then levels fell back down, reaching 76.4 mg/100 g at 20 days post-sprouting. This trend is consistent with PCs being the active ingredient in the barley plants. We validate this by showing that hexacosanol is an activator of AMPK. The richest cultivar for PCs was found to be the Daejin cultivar. Cultivars had a significant effect on the total PC content (113.2-183.5 mg/100 g) within the plant up to 5 days post-sprouting. However this dependence upon the cultivar was not so apparent at peak stages of PC production (10 days post-sprouting). The most abundant PC in barley sprout, hexacosanol, contributed 62-80% of the total PC content at every stage. These results are valuable to determine the optimal times of harvest to obtain the highest yield of PCs. PMID:23301834

  4. The adipokine adiponectin has potent anti-fibrotic effects mediated via adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase: novel target for fibrosis therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Fibrosis in scleroderma is associated with collagen deposition and myofibroblast accumulation. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ), a master regulator of adipogenesis, inhibits profibrotic responses induced by transforming growth factor-ß (TGF-β), and its expression is impaired in scleroderma. The roles of adiponectin, a PPAR-γ regulated pleiotropic adipokine, in regulating the response of fibroblasts and in mediating the effects of PPAR-γ are unknown. Methods Regulation of fibrotic gene expression and TGF-ß signaling by adiponectin and adenosine monophosphate protein-activated (AMP) kinase agonists were examined in normal fibroblasts in monolayer cultures and in three-dimensional skin equivalents. AdipoR1/2 expression on skin fibroblasts was determined by real-time quantitative PCR. Results Adiponectin, an adipokine directly regulated by PPAR-γ, acts as a potent anti-fibrotic signal in normal and scleroderma fibroblasts that abrogates the stimulatory effects of diverse fibrotic stimuli and reduces elevated collagen gene expression in scleroderma fibroblasts. Adiponectin responses are mediated via AMP kinase, a fuel-sensing cellular enzyme that is necessary and sufficient for down-regulation of fibrotic genes by blocking canonical Smad signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate that endogenous adiponectin accounts, at least in part, for the anti-fibrotic effects exerted by ligands of PPAR-γ. Conclusions These findings reveal a novel link between cellular energy metabolism and extracellular matrix homeostasis converging on AMP kinase. Since the levels of adiponectin as well as its receptor are impaired in scleroderma patients with progressive fibrosis, the present results suggest a potential role for defective adiponectin expression or function in progressive fibrogenesis in scleroderma and other chronic fibrosing conditions. Restoring the adiponectin signaling axis in fibroblasts might, therefore, represent a novel

  5. Mutations that change the position of the putative gamma-phosphate linker in the nucleotide binding domains of CFTR alter channel gating.

    PubMed

    Berger, Allan L; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Hunt, John F; Thomas, Philip J; Welsh, Michael J

    2002-01-18

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that contains conserved nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). In CFTR, the NBDs bind and hydrolyze ATP to open and close the channel. Crystal structures of related NBDs suggest a structural model with an important signaling role for a gamma-phosphate linker peptide that couples bound nucleotide to movement of an alpha-helical subdomain. We mutated two residues in CFTR that the structural model predicts will uncouple effects of nucleotide binding from movement of the alpha-helical subdomain. These residues are Gln-493 and Gln-1291, which may directly connect the ATP gamma-phosphate to the gamma-phosphate linker, and residues Asn-505 and Asn-1303, which may form hydrogen bonds that stabilize the linker. In NBD1, Q493A reduced the frequency of channel opening, suggesting a role for this residue in coupling ATP binding to channel opening. In contrast, N505C increased the frequency of channel opening, consistent with a role for Asn-505 in stabilizing the inactive state of the NBD. In NBD2, Q1291A decreased the effects of pyrophosphate without altering other functions. Mutations of Asn-1303 decreased the rate of channel opening and closing, suggesting an important role for NBD2 in controlling channel burst duration. These findings are consistent with both the bacterial NBD structural model and gating models for CFTR. Our results extend models of nucleotide-induced structural changes from bacterial NBDs to a functional mammalian ATP-binding cassette transporter. PMID:11788611

  6. Study of the nucleotide binding site of the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe plasma membrane H+-ATPase using formycin triphosphate-terbium complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ronjat, M.; Lacapere, J.J.; Dufour, J.P.; Dupont, Y.

    1987-03-05

    The plasma membrane of yeasts contains an H+-ATPase similar to the other cation transport ATPases of eukaryotic organisms. This enzyme has been purified and shows H+ transport in reconstituted vesicles. In the presence of Mg2+, formycin triphosphate (FTP) is hydrolyzed by the H+-ATPase and supports H+ transport. When combined with terbium ion, FTP (Tb-FTP) and ATP (Tb-ATP) are no longer hydrolyzed. Competition between Mg-ATP and Tb-FTP for ATP hydrolysis indicates that terbium-associated nucleotides bind to the catalytic site of the H+-ATPase. The fluorescent properties of the Tb-FTP complex were used to study the active site of the H+-ATPase. Fluorescence of Tb-FTP is greatly enhanced upon binding into the nucleotide site of H+-ATPase with a dissociation constant of 1 microM. Tb-ATP, Tb-ADP, and Tb-ITP are competitive inhibitors of Tb-FTP binding with Ki = 4.5, 5.0, and 6.0 microM, respectively. Binding of Tb-FTP is observed only in the presence of an excess of Tb3+ with an activation constant Ka = 25 microM for Tb3+. Analysis of the data reveals that the sites for Tb-FTP and Tb3+ binding are independent entities. In standard conditions these sites would be occupied by Mg-ATP and Mg2+, respectively. These findings suggest an important regulatory role of divalent cations on the activity of H+-ATPase. Replacement of H/sub 2/O by D/sub 2/O in the medium suggests the existence of two types of nucleotide binding sites differing by the hydration state of the Tb3+ ion in the bound Tb-FTP complex.

  7. Adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase regulates IL-10-mediated anti-inflammatory signaling pathways in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanfang Peipei; Brown, Jonathan R; Sag, Duygu; Zhang, Lihua; Suttles, Jill

    2015-01-15

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a conserved serine/threonine kinase with a critical function in the regulation of metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells. Recently, AMPK has been shown to play an additional role as a regulator of inflammatory activity in leukocytes. Treatment of macrophages with chemical AMPK activators, or forced expression of a constitutively active form of AMPK, results in polarization to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. In addition, we reported previously that stimulation of macrophages with anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10, IL-4, and TGF-β results in rapid activation of AMPK, suggesting that AMPK contributes to the suppressive function of these cytokines. In this study, we investigated the role of AMPK in IL-10-induced gene expression and anti-inflammatory function. IL-10-stimulated wild-type macrophages displayed rapid activation of PI3K and its downstream targets Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC1), an effect that was not seen in macrophages generated from AMPKα1-deficient mice. AMPK activation was not impacted by treatment with either the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or the JAK inhibitor CP-690550, suggesting that IL-10-mediated activation of AMPK is independent of PI3K and JAK activity. IL-10 induced phosphorylation of both Tyr(705) and Ser(727) residues of STAT3 in an AMPKα1-dependent manner, and these phosphorylation events were blocked by inhibition of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β, an upstream activator of AMPK, and by the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, respectively. The impaired STAT3 phosphorylation in response to IL-10 observed in AMPKα1-deficient macrophages was accompanied by reduced suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 expression and an inadequacy of IL-10 to suppress LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Overall, our data demonstrate that AMPKα1 is required for IL-10 activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 and STAT3-mediated anti-inflammatory pathways regulating macrophage

  8. Role of hypothalamic adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase in the impaired counterregulatory response induced by repetitive neuroglucopenia.

    PubMed

    Alquier, Thierry; Kawashima, Junji; Tsuji, Youki; Kahn, Barbara B

    2007-03-01

    Antecedent hypoglycemia blunts counterregulatory responses that normally restore glycemia, a phenomenon known as hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF). The mechanisms leading to impaired counterregulatory responses are largely unknown. Hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a glucose sensor. To determine whether failure to activate AMPK could be involved in the etiology of HAAF, we developed a model of HAAF using repetitive intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) resulting in transient neuroglucopenia in normal rats. Ten minutes after a single icv injection of 2DG, both alpha1- and alpha2-AMPK activities were increased 30-50% in arcuate and ventromedial/dorsomedial hypothalamus but not in other hypothalamic regions, hindbrain, or cortex. Increased AMPK activity persisted in arcuate hypothalamus at 60 min after 2DG injection when serum glucagon and corticosterone levels were increased 2.5- to 3.4-fold. When 2DG was injected icv daily for 4 d, hypothalamic alpha1- and alpha2-AMPK responses were markedly blunted in arcuate hypothalamus, and alpha1-AMPK was also blunted in mediobasal hypothalamus 10 min after 2DG on d 4. Both AMPK isoforms were activated normally in arcuate hypothalamus at 60 min. Counterregulatory hormone responses were impaired by recurrent neuroglucopenia and were partially restored by icv injection of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-beta-D-ribofuranoside, an AMPK activator, before 2DG. Glycogen content increased 2-fold in hypothalamus after recurrent neuroglucopenia, suggesting that glycogen supercompensation could be involved in down-regulating the AMPK glucose-sensing pathway in HAAF. Thus, activation of hypothalamic AMPK may be important for the full counterregulatory hormone response to neuroglucopenia. Furthermore, impaired or delayed AMPK activation in specific hypothalamic regions may play a critical role in the etiology of HAAF. PMID:17185376

  9. Adenosine receptor interactions and anxiolytics.

    PubMed

    Bruns, R F; Katims, J J; Annau, Z; Snyder, S H; Daly, J W

    1983-12-01

    [3H]-N6-cyclohexyladenosine and [3H]-1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine label the A1 subtype of adenosine receptor in brain membranes. The affinities of methylxanthines in competing for A1 adenosine receptors parallel their potencies as locomotor stimulants. The adenosine agonist N6-(phenylisopropyl) adenosine is a potent locomotor depressant. Both diazepam and N6-(L-phenylisopropyl)adenosine cause locomotor stimulation in a narrow range of subdepressant doses. Combined stimulant doses of the two agents depress motor activity, as do larger doses of either one, given separately. Evidence supporting and against the hypothesis that some of the actions of benzodiazepines are mediated via the adenosine system is reviewed. A number of compounds interact with both systems, probably because of physico-chemical similarities between adenosine and diazepam. It is concluded that of the four classic actions of benzodiazepines, the sedative and muscle relaxant (but not anxiolytic or anticonvulsant) actions could possibly be mediated by adenosine. PMID:6199685

  10. Internalization and desensitization of adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Klaasse, Elisabeth C.; de Grip, Willem J.; Beukers, Margot W.

    2007-01-01

    Until now, more than 800 distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified in the human genome. The four subtypes of the adenosine receptor (A1, A2A, A2B and A3 receptor) belong to this large family of GPCRs that represent the most widely targeted pharmacological protein class. Since adenosine receptors are widespread throughout the body and involved in a variety of physiological processes and diseases, there is great interest in understanding how the different subtypes are regulated, as a basis for designing therapeutic drugs that either avoid or make use of this regulation. The major GPCR regulatory pathway involves phosphorylation of activated receptors by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), a process that is followed by binding of arrestin proteins. This prevents receptors from activating downstream heterotrimeric G protein pathways, but at the same time allows activation of arrestin-dependent signalling pathways. Upon agonist treatment, adenosine receptor subtypes are differently regulated. For instance, the A1Rs are not (readily) phosphorylated and internalize slowly, showing a typical half-life of several hours, whereas the A2AR and A2BR undergo much faster downregulation, usually shorter than 1 h. The A3R is subject to even faster downregulation, often a matter of minutes. The fast desensitization of the A3R after agonist exposure may be therapeutically equivalent to antagonist occupancy of the receptor. This review describes the process of desensitization and internalization of the different adenosine subtypes in cell systems, tissues and in vivo studies. In addition, molecular mechanisms involved in adenosine receptor desensitization are discussed. PMID:18368531

  11. Adenosine in fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Edwin S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous autocoid that regulates a multitude of bodily functions. Its anti-inflammatory actions are well known to rheumatologists since it mediates many of the anti-inflammatory effects of a number of antirheumatic drugs such as methotrexate. However, inflammatory and tissue regenerative responses are intricately linked, with wound healing being a prime example. It has only recently been appreciated that adenosine has a key role in tissue regenerative and fibrotic processes. An understanding of these processes may shed new light on potential therapeutic options in diseases such as scleroderma where tissue fibrosis features prominently. PMID:19949965

  12. Malonate in the nucleotide-binding site traps human AKAP18γ/δ in a novel conformational state.

    PubMed

    Bjerregaard-Andersen, Kaare; Østensen, Ellen; Scott, John D; Taskén, Kjetil; Morth, Jens Preben

    2016-08-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are a family of proteins that provide spatiotemporal resolution of protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation. In the myocardium, PKA and AKAP18γ/δ are found in complex with sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2 (SERCA2) and phospholamban (PLB). This macromolecular complex provides a means by which anchored PKA can dynamically regulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) release and re-uptake. For this reason, AKAP18γ/δ presents an interesting drug target with therapeutic potential in cardiovascular disease. The crystal structure of the central domain of human AKAP18γ has been determined at the atomic resolution of 1.25 Å. This first structure of human AKAP18γ is trapped in a novel conformation by a malonate molecule bridging the important R-loop with the 2H phosphoesterase motif. Although the physiological substrate of AKAP18γ is currently unknown, a potential proton wire deep in the central binding crevice has been indentified, leading to bulk solvent below the R-loop. Malonate complexed with AKAP18γ at atomic resolution provides an excellent starting point for structure-guided drug design. PMID:27487922

  13. Adenosine augments interleukin-10 production by microglial cells through an A2B adenosine receptor-mediated process

    PubMed Central

    Koscsó, Balázs; Csóka, Balázs; Selmeczy, Zsolt; Himer, Leonóra; Pacher, Pál; Virág, László; Haskó, György

    2011-01-01

    Microglia are activated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns and produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Adenosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside and is a ligand of four G protein-coupled adenosine receptors (ARs), which are the A1AR, A2AAR, A2BAR and A3AR. ARs have been shown to suppress TNF-α production by microglia, but their role in regulating IL-10 production has not been studied. Here, we demonstrate that adenosine augments IL-10 production by activated murine microglia while suppressing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Since the order of potency of selective AR agonists in inducing IL-10 production was 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) > N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-adenosine-5′-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) > 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) ≥ 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5′-N-ethyl-carboxamidoadenosine (CGS21680), and the A2BAR antagonist MRS-1754 prevented the effect of NECA, we conclude that the stimulatory effect of adenosine on IL-10 production is mediated by the A2BAR. Mechanistically, adenosine augmented IL-10 mRNA accumulation by a transcriptional process. Using mutant IL-10 promoter constructs we showed that a CREB-binding region in the promoter mediated the augmenting effect of adenosine on IL-10 transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that adenosine induced CREB phosphorylation at the IL-10 promoter. Silencing CREB using lentivirally delivered shRNA blocked the enhancing effect of adenosine on IL-10 production confirming a role for CREB in mediating the stimulatory effect of adenosine on IL-10 production. In addition, adenosine augmented IL-10 production by stimulating p38 MAPK. Collectively, our results establish that A2BARs augment IL-10 production by activated murine microglia. PMID:22116830

  14. Adenosine and sleep

    SciTech Connect

    Yanik, G.M. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Behavioral and biochemical approaches have been used to determine the relative contribution of endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors to the sleep-wake cycle in the rat. Adenosine concentrations in specific areas of the rat brain were not affected by 24 hours of total sleep deprivation, or by 24 or 48 hours of REM sleep deprivation. In order to assess the effect of REM sleep deprivation on adenosine A/sub 1/ receptors, /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding was measured. The Bmax values for /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding to membrane preparations of the cortices and corpus striata from 48 hour REM sleep-deprived animals were increased 14.8% and 23%, respectively. These increases were not maintained following the cessation of sleep deprivation and recovered within 2 hours. The results of a 96 hour REM deprivation experiment were similar to those of the 48 hour REM sleep deprivation experiment. However, these increases were not evident in similar structures taken from stress control animals, and conclusively demonstrated that the changes in /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding resulted from REM sleep deprivation and not from stress.

  15. A(3) adenosine receptor ligands: history and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, P G; Cacciari, B; Romagnoli, R; Merighi, S; Varani, K; Borea, P A; Spalluto, G

    2000-03-01

    Adenosine regulates many physiological functions through specific cell membrane receptors. On the basis of pharmacological studies and molecular cloning, four different adenosine receptors have been identified and classified as A(1), A(2A), A(2B), and A(3). These adenosine receptors are members of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. While adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptor subtypes have been pharmacologically characterized through the use of selective ligands, the A(3) adenosine receptor subtype is presently under study in order to better understand its physio-pathological functions. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors has been shown to stimulate phospholipase C and D and to inhibit adenylate cyclase. Activation of A(3) adenosine receptors also causes the release of inflammatory mediators such as histamine from mast cells. These mediators are responsible for processes such as inflammation and hypotension. It has also been suggested that the A(3) receptor plays an important role in brain ischemia, immunosuppression, and bronchospasm in several animal models. Based on these results, highly selective A(3) adenosine receptor agonists and/or antagonists have been indicated as potential drugs for the treatment of asthma and inflammation, while highly selective agonists have been shown to possess cardioprotective effects. The updated material related to this field of research has been rationalized and arranged in order to offer an overview of the topic. PMID:10723024

  16. Dual activity of certain HIT-proteins: A. thaliana Hint4 and C. elegans DcpS act on adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate as hydrolases (forming AMP) and as phosphorylases (forming ADP).

    PubMed

    Guranowski, Andrzej; Wojdyła, Anna Maria; Zimny, Jarosław; Wypijewska, Anna; Kowalska, Joanna; Jemielity, Jacek; Davis, Richard E; Bieganowski, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    Histidine triad (HIT)-family proteins interact with different mono- and dinucleotides and catalyze their hydrolysis. During a study of the substrate specificity of seven HIT-family proteins, we have shown that each can act as a sulfohydrolase, catalyzing the liberation of AMP from adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS or SO(4)-pA). However, in the presence of orthophosphate, Arabidopsis thaliana Hint4 and Caenorhabditis elegans DcpS also behaved as APS phosphorylases, forming ADP. Low pH promoted the phosphorolytic and high pH the hydrolytic activities. These proteins, and in particular Hint4, also catalyzed hydrolysis or phosphorolysis of some other adenylyl-derivatives but at lower rates than those for APS cleavage. A mechanism for these activities is proposed and the possible role of some HIT-proteins in APS metabolism is discussed. PMID:19896942

  17. Clinical significance of high-density lipoproteins and the development of atherosclerosis: focus on the role of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette protein A1 transporter.

    PubMed

    Brewer, H Bryan; Santamarina-Fojo, Silvia

    2003-08-21

    Low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol constitute a risk factor for coronary artery disease, and there is evidence that increasing HDL cholesterol levels reduces cardiovascular risk. The phenotype of low HDL cholesterol with or without elevated triglycerides is at least as common in patients hospitalized for cardiovascular disease as is hypercholesterolemia, and it is characteristic of diabetes and the metabolic syndrome, conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Recent studies have elucidated mechanisms by which HDL acts to reduce cardiovascular risk, bolstering the rationale for targeting of HDL in lipid-modifying therapy. In particular, HDL (1) carries excess cholesterol from peripheral cells to the liver for removal in the process termed reverse cholesterol transport, (2) reduces oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and (3) inhibits cytokine-induced expression of cellular adhesion molecules on endothelial cells. Studies of the newly described adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette protein A1 (ABCA1) transporter have established a crucial role for this transporter in modulating the levels of plasma HDL and intracellular cholesterol in the liver as well as in peripheral cells. Elevated levels of intracellular cholesterol stimulate the liver X receptor pathway, enhancing the expression of ABCA1, which increases intracellular trafficking of excess cholesterol to the cell surface for interaction with lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I to form nascent HDL. Nascent HDL facilitates the removal of additional excess cellular cholesterol, which is esterified by lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase with conversion of the nascent HDL to mature spherical HDL. Overexpression of ABCA1 in mice on a regular chow or Western diet results in a marked increase in plasma HDL, increased LDL, and increased transport of cholesterol to the liver. On a high cholesterol/cholate diet, transgenic mice overexpressing ABCA1 have increased HDL

  18. Adenosine induces G2/M cell-cycle arrest by inhibiting cell mitosis progression.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kun-Zhi; Tang, Bo; Yu, Lu; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Jian-Fa; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2010-01-01

    Cellular adenosine accumulates under stress conditions. Few papers on adenosine are concerned with its function in the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the essential mechanism by which all living things reproduce and the target machinery when cells encounter stresses, so it is necessary to examine the relationship between adenosine and the cell cycle. In the present study, adenosine was found to induce G-2/M cell-cycle arrest. Furthermore, adenosine was found to modulate the expression of some important proteins in the cell cycle, such as cyclin B and p21, and to inhibit the transition of metaphase to anaphase in mitosis. PMID:19947935

  19. Halobacterial adenosine triphosphatases and the adenosine triphosphatase from Halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, Hordur; Sadler, Martha H.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared from various members of the genus Halobacterium contained a Triton X-l00 activated adenosine triphosphatase. The enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum was unstable in solutions of low ionic strength and maximally active in the presence of 3.5 M NaCl. A variety of nucleotide triphosphates was hydrolyzed. MgADP, the product of ATP hydrolysis, was not hydrolyzed and was a competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum was composed of at least 2 and possibly 4 subunits. The 83-kDa and 60-kDa subunits represented about 90 percent of total protein. The 60-kDa subunit reacted with dicyclohexyl-carbodiimide when inhibition was carried out in an acidic medium. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum, possesses properties of an F(1)F(0) as well as an E(1)E(2) ATPase.

  20. The Transmembrane Prolines of the Mitochondrial ADP/ATP Carrier Are Involved in Nucleotide Binding and Transport and Its Biogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Babot, Marion; Blancard, Corinne; Pelosi, Ludovic; Lauquin, Guy J.-M.; Trézéguet, Véronique

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier (Ancp) is a paradigm of the mitochondrial carrier family, which allows cross-talk between mitochondria, where cell energy is mainly produced, and cytosol, where cell energy is mainly consumed. The members of this family share numerous structural and functional characteristics. Resolution of the atomic structure of the bovine Ancp, in a complex with one of its specific inhibitors, revealed interesting features and suggested the involvement of some particular residues in the movements of the protein to perform translocation of nucleotides from one side of the membrane to the other. They correspond to three prolines located in the odd-numbered transmembrane helices (TMH), Pro-27, Pro-132, and Pro-229. The corresponding residues of the yeast Ancp (Pro-43, Ser-147, and Pro-247) were mutated into alanine or leucine, one at a time and analysis of the various mutants evidenced a crucial role of Pro-43 and Pro-247 during nucleotide transport. Beside, replacement of Ser-147 with proline does not inactivate Ancp and this is discussed in view of the conservation of the three prolines at equivalent positions in the Ancp sequences. These prolines belong to the signature sequences of the mitochondrial carriers and we propose they play a dual role in the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier function and biogenesis. Unexpectedly their mutations cause more general effects on mitochondrial biogenesis and morphology, as evidenced by measurements of respiratory rates, cytochrome contents, and also clearly highlighted by fluorescence microscopy. PMID:22334686

  1. Cyclic nucleotide binding and structural changes in the isolated GAF domain of Anabaena adenylyl cyclase, CyaB2

    PubMed Central

    Badireddy, Suguna; Rajendran, Abinaya; Anand, Ganesh Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    GAF domains are a large family of regulatory domains, and a subset are found associated with enzymes involved in cyclic nucleotide (cNMP) metabolism such as adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases. CyaB2, an adenylyl cyclase from Anabaena, contains two GAF domains in tandem at the N-terminus and an adenylyl cyclase domain at the C-terminus. Cyclic AMP, but not cGMP, binding to the GAF domains of CyaB2 increases the activity of the cyclase domain leading to enhanced synthesis of cAMP. Here we show that the isolated GAFb domain of CyaB2 can bind both cAMP and cGMP, and enhanced specificity for cAMP is observed only when both the GAFa and the GAFb domains are present in tandem (GAFab domain). In silico docking and mutational analysis identified distinct residues important for interaction with either cAMP or cGMP in the GAFb domain. Structural changes associated with ligand binding to the GAF domains could not be detected by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments. However, amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) experiments provided insights into the structural basis for cAMP-induced allosteric regulation of the GAF domains, and differences in the changes induced by cAMP and cGMP binding to the GAF domain. Thus, our findings could allow the development of molecules that modulate the allosteric regulation by GAF domains present in pharmacologically relevant proteins. PMID:25922789

  2. Acute exposure to cold rapidly increases the number of nucleotide binding sites, but not proton conductance, in BAT mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, A.G.; Swick, R.W.

    1986-03-01

    Studies on the effect of acute cold exposure of rats on brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenic activity have produced equivocal results. Therefore, the authors have reexamined the response of BAT mitochondria to abrupt changes in environmental temperature. /sup 3/H-GDP binding to BAT mitochondria increased more than 2-fold in 20 min when rats were moved from 27/sup 0/C to 4/sup 0/C. When rats housed at 4/sup 0/C for 2 h were returned to 27/sup 0/C, GDP binding decreased sharply in 20 min and returned to control levels in 2 h. On the other hand, GDP-inhibitable proton conductance, as measured by passive swelling in isotonic K-acetate of KCl buffers, was unaffected by brief cold exposure but more than doubled in rats kept at 4/sup 0/C for 10 days. The authors conclude that GDP-inhibitable swelling may be more indicative of uncoupling protein concentration whereas thermogenic activity is more appropriately indicated by GDP binding. GDP binding to BAT mitochondria from warm and acutely cold treated rats was not altered by prior swelling of the mitochondria nor by freeze-thawing the mitochondria before assay. Therefore, alterations of the number of GDP binding sites may not be a result of conformational changes of the mitochondril membrane.

  3. Genome-Wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Eunyoung; Kim, Seungill; Yeom, Seon-In; Choi, Doil

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI) plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267, 443, and 755 NLR-encoding genes in tomato, potato, and pepper genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis and classification of Solanaceae NLRs revealed that the majority of NLR super family members fell into 14 subgroups, including a TIR-NLR (TNL) subgroup and 13 non-TNL subgroups. Specific subgroups have expanded in each genome, with the expansion in pepper showing subgroup-specific physical clusters. Comparative analysis of duplications showed distinct duplication patterns within pepper and among Solanaceae plants suggesting subgroup- or species-specific gene duplication events after speciation, resulting in divergent evolution. Taken together, genome-wide analysis of NLR family members provide insights into their evolutionary history in Solanaceae. These findings also provide important foundational knowledge for understanding NLR evolution and will empower broader characterization of disease resistance genes to be used for crop breeding. PMID:27559340

  4. Genome-Wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eunyoung; Kim, Seungill; Yeom, Seon-In; Choi, Doil

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI) plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267, 443, and 755 NLR-encoding genes in tomato, potato, and pepper genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis and classification of Solanaceae NLRs revealed that the majority of NLR super family members fell into 14 subgroups, including a TIR-NLR (TNL) subgroup and 13 non-TNL subgroups. Specific subgroups have expanded in each genome, with the expansion in pepper showing subgroup-specific physical clusters. Comparative analysis of duplications showed distinct duplication patterns within pepper and among Solanaceae plants suggesting subgroup- or species-specific gene duplication events after speciation, resulting in divergent evolution. Taken together, genome-wide analysis of NLR family members provide insights into their evolutionary history in Solanaceae. These findings also provide important foundational knowledge for understanding NLR evolution and will empower broader characterization of disease resistance genes to be used for crop breeding. PMID:27559340

  5. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 acts in concert with the cholecystokinin receptor agonist, cerulein, to induce IL-33-dependent chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Sadakane, Y; Yagama, N; Sakurai, T; Ezoe, H; Kudo, M; Chiba, T; Strober, W

    2016-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) fulfills important host-defense functions via its responses to a variety of gut pathogens. Recently, however, we showed that in acute pancreatitis caused by administration of cholecystokinin receptor (CCKR) agonist (cerulein) NOD1 also has a role in inflammation via its responses to gut commensal organisms. In the present study, we explored the long-term outcome of such NOD1 responsiveness in a new model of chronic pancreatitis induced by repeated administration of low doses of cerulein in combination with NOD1 ligand. We found that the development of chronic pancreatitis in this model requires intact NOD1 and type I IFN signaling and that such signaling mediates a macrophage-mediated inflammatory response that supports interleukin (IL)-33 production by acinar cells. The IL-33, in turn, has a necessary role in the induction of IL-13 and TGF-β1, factors causing the fibrotic reaction characteristic of chronic pancreatitis. Interestingly, the Th2 effects of IL-33 were attenuated by the concomitant type I IFN response since the inflammation was marked by clear increases in IFN-γ and TNF-α production but only marginal increases in IL-4 production. These studies establish chronic pancreatitis as an IL-33-dependent inflammation resulting from synergistic interactions between the NOD1 and CCKR signaling pathways. PMID:26813347

  6. Conformational Changes Relevant to Channel Activity and Folding within the first Nucleotide Binding Domain of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Rhea P.; Chong, P. Andrew; Protasevich, Irina I.; Vernon, Robert; Noy, Efrat; Bihler, Hermann; An, Jian Li; Kalid, Ori; Sela-Culang, Inbal; Mense, Martin; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Brouillette, Christie G.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2012-01-01

    Deletion of Phe-508 (F508del) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) leads to defects in folding and channel gating. NMR data on human F508del NBD1 indicate that an H620Q mutant, shown to increase channel open probability, and the dual corrector/potentiator CFFT-001 similarly disrupt interactions between β-strands S3, S9, and S10 and the C-terminal helices H8 and H9, shifting a preexisting conformational equilibrium from helix to coil. CFFT-001 appears to interact with β-strands S3/S9/S10, consistent with docking simulations. Decreases in Tm from differential scanning calorimetry with H620Q or CFFT-001 suggest direct compound binding to a less thermostable state of NBD1. We hypothesize that, in full-length CFTR, shifting the conformational equilibrium to reduce H8/H9 interactions with the uniquely conserved strands S9/S10 facilitates release of the regulatory region from the NBD dimerization interface to promote dimerization and thereby increase channel open probability. These studies enabled by our NMR assignments for F508del NBD1 provide a window into the conformational fluctuations within CFTR that may regulate function and contribute to folding energetics. PMID:22722932

  7. Conformational changes relevant to channel activity and folding within the first nucleotide binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Rhea P; Chong, P Andrew; Protasevich, Irina I; Vernon, Robert; Noy, Efrat; Bihler, Hermann; An, Jian Li; Kalid, Ori; Sela-Culang, Inbal; Mense, Martin; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Brouillette, Christie G; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2012-08-17

    Deletion of Phe-508 (F508del) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) leads to defects in folding and channel gating. NMR data on human F508del NBD1 indicate that an H620Q mutant, shown to increase channel open probability, and the dual corrector/potentiator CFFT-001 similarly disrupt interactions between β-strands S3, S9, and S10 and the C-terminal helices H8 and H9, shifting a preexisting conformational equilibrium from helix to coil. CFFT-001 appears to interact with β-strands S3/S9/S10, consistent with docking simulations. Decreases in T(m) from differential scanning calorimetry with H620Q or CFFT-001 suggest direct compound binding to a less thermostable state of NBD1. We hypothesize that, in full-length CFTR, shifting the conformational equilibrium to reduce H8/H9 interactions with the uniquely conserved strands S9/S10 facilitates release of the regulatory region from the NBD dimerization interface to promote dimerization and thereby increase channel open probability. These studies enabled by our NMR assignments for F508del NBD1 provide a window into the conformational fluctuations within CFTR that may regulate function and contribute to folding energetics. PMID:22722932

  8. Optical Aptasensors for Adenosine Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Stella; Lim, Hui Si; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids are among the most researched and applied biomolecules. Their diverse two- and three-dimensional structures in conjunction with their robust chemistry and ease of manipulation provide a rare opportunity for sensor applications. Moreover, their high biocompatibility has seen them being used in the construction of in vivo assays. Various nucleic acid-based devices have been extensively studied as either the principal element in discrete molecule-like sensors or as the main component in the fabrication of sensing devices. The use of aptamers in sensors - aptasensors, in particular, has led to improvements in sensitivity, selectivity, and multiplexing capacity for a wide verity of analytes like proteins, nucleic acids, as well as small biomolecules such as glucose and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This article reviews the progress in the use of aptamers as the principal component in sensors for optical detection of ATP with an emphasis on sensing mechanism, performance, and applications with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. PMID:27446501

  9. Chaperoning of the A1-adenosine receptor by endogenous adenosine - an extension of the retaliatory metabolite concept.

    PubMed

    Kusek, Justyna; Yang, Qiong; Witek, Martin; Gruber, Christian W; Nanoff, Christian; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cell-permeable orthosteric ligands can assist folding of G protein-coupled receptors in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); this pharmacochaperoning translates into increased cell surface levels of receptors. Here we used a folding-defective mutant of human A1-adenosine receptor as a sensor to explore whether endogenously produced adenosine can exert a chaperoning effect. This A1-receptor-Y(288)A was retained in the ER of stably transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells but rapidly reached the plasma membrane in cells incubated with an A1 antagonist. This was phenocopied by raising intracellular adenosine levels with a combination of inhibitors of adenosine kinase, adenosine deaminase, and the equilibrative nucleoside transporter: mature receptors with complex glycosylation accumulated at the cell surface and bound to an A1-selective antagonist with an affinity indistinguishable from the wild-type A1 receptor. The effect of the inhibitor combination was specific, because it did not result in enhanced surface levels of two folding-defective human V2-vasopressin receptor mutants, which were susceptible to pharmacochaperoning by their cognate antagonist. Raising cellular adenosine levels by subjecting cells to hypoxia (5% O2) reproduced chaperoning by the inhibitor combination and enhanced surface expression of A1-receptor-Y(288)A within 1 hour. These findings were recapitulated for the wild-type A1 receptor. Taken together, our observations document that endogenously formed adenosine can chaperone its cognate A1 receptor. This results in a positive feedback loop that has implications for the retaliatory metabolite concept of adenosine action: if chaperoning by intracellular adenosine results in elevated cell surface levels of A1 receptors, these cells will be more susceptible to extracellular adenosine and thus more likely to cope with metabolic distress. PMID:25354767

  10. Adenosine kinase inhibitors attenuate opiate withdrawal via adenosine receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Coyle, T S

    1998-11-27

    Previous studies have demonstrated a role for adenosine in mediating opiate effects. This study examines the effects of indirect activation of adenosine receptors, via treatment with adenosine kinase inhibitors, on the expression of opiate withdrawal in mice. Mice receive chronic morphine treatment via implantation of subcutaneous morphine pellets (75 mg) for 72 h. Mice then receive parenteral treatment with adenosine kinase inhibitors, either 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine (2, 5, 20, 40 mg/kg, intraperitoneal or i.p.) or iodotubericidin (1, 2, 5 mg/kg, i.p.), followed by naloxone injection and opiate withdrawal signs are measured over 20 min. Both adenosine kinase inhibitors significantly reduce the following opiate withdrawal signs in a dose-dependent manner compared to vehicle: withdrawal jumps, teeth chattering, forepaw tremors, and forepaw treads. Additionally, 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine significantly reduces withdrawal-induced diarrhea and weight loss. Effects of 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine (40 mg/kg) on opiate withdrawal signs appear to be mediated via adenosine receptor activation as they are reversed by pretreatment by adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine (20 mg, i.p.) but not by selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor Ro 20-1724 (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Adenosine receptor activation via adenosine kinase inhibitor treatment attenuates opiate withdrawal and these agents may be generally useful in the treatment of drug withdrawal syndromes. PMID:9865523

  11. Chemical modification of A1 adenosine receptors in rat brain membranes. Evidence for histidine in different domains of the ligand binding site.

    PubMed

    Klotz, K N; Lohse, M J; Schwabe, U

    1988-11-25

    Chemical modification of amino acid residues was used to probe the ligand recognition site of A1 adenosine receptors from rat brain membranes. The effect of treatment with group-specific reagents on agonist and antagonist radioligand binding was investigated. The histidine-specific reagent diethylpyrocarbonate (DEP) induced a loss of binding of the agonist R-N6-[3H] phenylisopropyladenosine ([3H]PIA), which could be prevented in part by agonists, but not by antagonists. DEP treatment induced also a loss of binding of the antagonist [3H]8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine ([3H]DPCPX). Antagonists protected A1 receptors from this inactivation while agonists did not. This result provided evidence for the existence of at least 2 different histidine residues involved in ligand binding. Consistent with a modification of the binding site, DEP did not alter the affinity of [3H]DPCPX, but reduced receptor number. From the selective protection of [3H] PIA and [3H]DPCPX binding from inactivation, it is concluded that agonists and antagonists occupy different domains at the binding site. Sulfhydryl modifying reagents did not influence antagonist binding, but inhibited agonist binding. This effect is explained by modification of the inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein. Pyridoxal 5-phosphate inactivated both [3H]PIA and [3H]DPCPX binding, but the receptors could not be protected from inactivation by ligands. Therefore, no amino group seems to be located at the ligand binding site. In addition, it was shown that no further amino acids with polar side chains are present. The absence of hydrophilic amino acids from the recognition site of the receptor apart from histidine suggests an explanation for the lack of hydrophilic ligands with high affinity for A1 receptors. PMID:3182861

  12. Inhibition of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP)-response Element-binding Protein (CREB)-binding Protein (CBP)/β-Catenin Reduces Liver Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Yosuke; Oboki, Keisuke; Imamura, Jun; Kojika, Ekumi; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Saibara, Toshiji; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Kohara, Michinori; Kimura, Kiminori

    2015-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin is involved in every aspect of embryonic development and in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, and is also implicated in organ fibrosis. However, the role of β-catenin-mediated signaling on liver fibrosis remains unclear. To explore this issue, the effects of PRI-724, a selective inhibitor of the cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP)/β-catenin interaction, on liver fibrosis were examined using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)- or bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced mouse liver fibrosis models. Following repetitive CCl4 administrations, the nuclear translocation of β-catenin was observed only in the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. PRI-724 treatment reduced the fibrosis induced by CCl4 or BDL. C-82, an active form of PRI-724, inhibited the activation of isolated primary mouse quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and promoted cell death in culture-activated HSCs. During the fibrosis resolution period, an increase in F4/80+ CD11b+ and Ly6Clow CD11b+ macrophages was induced by CCl4 and was sustained for two weeks thereafter, even after having stopped CCl4 treatment. PRI-724 accelerated the resolution of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, and this was accompanied by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-2, and MMP-8 expression in intrahepatic leukocytes. In conclusion, targeting the CBP/β-catenin interaction may become a new therapeutic strategy in treating liver fibrosis. PMID:26870800

  13. Inhibition of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP)-response Element-binding Protein (CREB)-binding Protein (CBP)/β-Catenin Reduces Liver Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Yosuke; Oboki, Keisuke; Imamura, Jun; Kojika, Ekumi; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Saibara, Toshiji; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Kohara, Michinori; Kimura, Kiminori

    2015-11-01

    Wnt/β-catenin is involved in every aspect of embryonic development and in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, and is also implicated in organ fibrosis. However, the role of β-catenin-mediated signaling on liver fibrosis remains unclear. To explore this issue, the effects of PRI-724, a selective inhibitor of the cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP)/β-catenin interaction, on liver fibrosis were examined using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)- or bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced mouse liver fibrosis models. Following repetitive CCl4 administrations, the nuclear translocation of β-catenin was observed only in the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. PRI-724 treatment reduced the fibrosis induced by CCl4 or BDL. C-82, an active form of PRI-724, inhibited the activation of isolated primary mouse quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and promoted cell death in culture-activated HSCs. During the fibrosis resolution period, an increase in F4/80(+) CD11b(+) and Ly6C(low) CD11b(+) macrophages was induced by CCl4 and was sustained for two weeks thereafter, even after having stopped CCl4 treatment. PRI-724 accelerated the resolution of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, and this was accompanied by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-2, and MMP-8 expression in intrahepatic leukocytes. In conclusion, targeting the CBP/β-catenin interaction may become a new therapeutic strategy in treating liver fibrosis. PMID:26870800

  14. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) deficiency is a disorder characterized by abnormal ...

  15. Regulation and Function of the Nucleotide Binding Domain Leucine-Rich Repeat-Containing Receptor, Pyrin Domain-Containing-3 Inflammasome in Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seonmin; Suh, Gee-Young; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2016-02-01

    Inflammasomes are specialized inflammatory signaling platforms that govern the maturation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β and IL-18, through the regulation of caspase-1-dependent proteolytic processing. Several nucleotide binding domain leucine-rich repeat-containing receptor (NLR) family members (i.e., NLR family, pyrin domain containing [NLRP] 1, NLRP3, and NLR family, caspase recruitment domain containing-4 [NLRC4]) as well as the pyrin and hemopoietic expression, interferon-inducibility, nuclear localization domain-containing family member, absent in melanoma 2, can form inflammasome complexes in human cells. In particular, the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in response to cellular stresses through a two-component pathway, involving Toll-like receptor 4-ligand interaction (priming) followed by a second signal, such as ATP-dependent P2X purinoreceptor 7 receptor activation. Emerging studies suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome can exert pleiotropic effects in human diseases with potentially both pro- and antipathogenic sequelae. Whereas NLRP3 inflammasome activation can serve as a vital component of host defense against invading bacteria and pathogens, excessive activation of the inflammasome can lead to inflammation-associated tissue injury in the setting of chronic disease. In addition, pyroptosis, an inflammasome-associated mode of cell death, contributes to host defense. Recent research has described the regulation and function of the NLRP3 inflammasome in various pulmonary diseases, including acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis, respiratory infections, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, pulmonary hypertension, cystic fibrosis, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The NLRP3 and related inflammasomes, and their regulated cytokines or receptors, may represent novel diagnostic or therapeutic targets in pulmonary diseases and other diseases in which inflammation contributes to pathogenesis. PMID

  16. Mg2+ -dependent ATP occlusion at the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of CFTR does not require the second (NBD2).

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Luba; Aleksandrov, Andrei; Riordan, John R

    2008-11-15

    ATP binding to the first and second NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) are bivalent-cation-independent and -dependent steps respectively [Aleksandrov, Aleksandrov, Chang and Riordan (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 15419-15425]. Subsequent to the initial binding, Mg(2+) drives rapid hydrolysis at the second site, while promoting non-exchangeable trapping of the nucleotide at the first site. This occlusion at the first site of functional wild-type CFTR is somewhat similar to that which occurs when the catalytic glutamate residues in both of the hydrolytic sites of P-glycoprotein are mutated, which has been proposed to be the result of dimerization of the two NBDs and represents a transient intermediate formed during ATP hydrolysis [Tombline and Senior (2005) J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. 37, 497-500]. To test the possible relevance of this interpretation to CFTR, we have now characterized the process by which NBD1 occludes [(32)P]N(3)ATP (8-azido-ATP) and [(32)P]N(3)ADP (8-azido-ADP). Only N(3)ATP, but not N(3)ADP, can be bound initially at NBD1 in the absence of Mg(2+). Despite the lack of a requirement for Mg(2+) for ATP binding, retention of the NTP at 37 degrees C was dependent on the cation. However, at reduced temperature (4 degrees C), N(3)ATP remains locked in the binding pocket with virtually no reduction over a 1 h period, even in the absence of Mg(2+). Occlusion occurred identically in a DeltaNBD2 construct, but not in purified recombinant NBD1, indicating that the process is dependent on the influence of regions of CFTR in addition to NBD1, but not NBD2. PMID:18605986

  17. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and electron paramagnetic resonance studies on skeletal muscle actin indicate that the metal and nucleotide binding sites are separate.

    PubMed

    Barden, J A; Cooke, R; Wright, P E; dos Remedios, C G

    1980-12-01

    The distance separating the high-affinity binding sites of actin for a divalent metal ion and nucleotide was evaluated by using high-resolution proton NMR and EPR spectroscopy. Replacement of the Ca2+ or Mg2+ bound to the high-affinity divalent cation site of G-actin by trivalent lanthanide ions such as La3+, EU3+, or Gd3+ results in an increase in the mobility of the bound ATP as observed in the NMR spectra of G-actin monomers. Little difference was observed between the spectra obtained in the presence of the diamagnetic La3+ control and the paramagnetic ions Eu3+ and Gd3+ which respectively shift and broaden the proton resonances of amino acids in the vicinity of the binding site. Analysis of the NMR spectra indicates that the metal and nucleotide binding sites are separated by a distance of at least 16 A. In the past, the metal and ATP have been widely assumed to bind as a complex. Further verification that the two sites on actin are physically separated was obtained by using an ATP analogue with a nitroxide spin-label bound at the 6' position of the purine ring. An estimate of the distance was made between the site containing the ATP analogue and the paramagnetic ion, Mn2+, bound to the cation binding site. These EPR experiments were not affected by the state of polymerization of the actin. The data obtained by using this technique support the conclusion stated above, namely, that the cation and nucleotide sites on either G- or F-actin are well separated. PMID:6257295

  18. Docking and 3D-QSAR (quantitative structure activity relationship) studies of flavones, the potent inhibitors of p-glycoprotein targeting the nucleotide binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kothandan, Gugan; Gadhe, Changdev G; Madhavan, Thirumurthy; Choi, Cheol Hee; Cho, Seung Joo

    2011-09-01

    In order to explore the interactions between flavones and P-gp, in silico methodologies such as docking and 3D-QSAR were performed. CoMFA and CoMSIA analyses were done using ligand based and receptor guided alignment schemes. Validation statistics include leave-one-out cross-validated R(2) (q(2)), internal prediction parameter by progressive scrambling (Q(*2)), external prediction with test set. They show that models derived from this study are quite robust. Ligand based CoMFA (q(2) = 0.747, Q(*2) = 0.639, r(pred)(2)=0.802) and CoMSIA model (q(2) = 0.810, Q(*2) = 0.676, r(pred)(2)=0.785) were developed using atom by atom matching. Receptor guided CoMFA (q(2) = 0.712, Q(*2) = 0.497, r(pred)(2) = 0.841) and for CoMSIA (q(2) = 0.805, Q(*2) = 0.589, r(pred)(2) = 0.937) models were developed by docking of highly active flavone into the proposed NBD (nucleotide binding domain) of P-gp. The 3D-QSAR models generated here predicted that hydrophobic and steric parameters are important for activity toward P-gp. Our studies indicate the important amino acid in NBD crucial for binding in accordance with the previous results. This site forms a hydrophobic site. Since flavonoids have potential without toxicity, we propose to inspect this hydrophobic site including Asn1043 and Asp1049 should be considered for future inhibitor design. PMID:21723648

  19. Calmodulin Regulates Human Ether à Go-Go 1 (hEAG1) Potassium Channels through Interactions of the Eag Domain with the Cyclic Nucleotide Binding Homology Domain.

    PubMed

    Lörinczi, Eva; Helliwell, Matthew; Finch, Alina; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Davies, Noel W; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn; Muskett, Frederick W; Mitcheson, John S

    2016-08-19

    The ether à go-go family of voltage-gated potassium channels is structurally distinct. The N terminus contains an eag domain (eagD) that contains a Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain that is preceded by a conserved sequence of 25-27 amino acids known as the PAS-cap. The C terminus contains a region with homology to cyclic nucleotide binding domains (cNBHD), which is directly linked to the channel pore. The human EAG1 (hEAG1) channel is remarkably sensitive to inhibition by intracellular calcium (Ca(2+) i) through binding of Ca(2+)-calmodulin to three sites adjacent to the eagD and cNBHD. Here, we show that the eagD and cNBHD interact to modulate Ca(2+)-calmodulin as well as voltage-dependent gating. Sustained elevation of Ca(2+) i resulted in an initial profound inhibition of hEAG1 currents, which was followed by a phase when current amplitudes partially recovered, but activation gating was slowed and shifted to depolarized potentials. Deletion of either the eagD or cNBHD abolished the inhibition by Ca(2+) i However, deletion of just the PAS-cap resulted in a >15-fold potentiation in response to elevated Ca(2+) i Mutations of residues at the interface between the eagD and cNBHD have been linked to human cancer. Glu-600 on the cNBHD, when substituted with residues with a larger volume, resulted in hEAG1 currents that were profoundly potentiated by Ca(2+) i in a manner similar to the ΔPAS-cap mutant. These findings provide the first evidence that eagD and cNBHD interactions are regulating Ca(2+)-dependent gating and indicate that the binding of the PAS-cap with the cNBHD is required for the closure of the channels upon CaM binding. PMID:27325704

  20. Arf nucleotide binding site opener [ARNO] promotes sequential activation of Arf6, Cdc42 and Rac1 and insulin secretion in INS 832/13 β-cells and rat islets

    PubMed Central

    Jayaram, Bhavaani; Syed, Ismail; Kyathanahalli, Chandrashekara N.; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion [GSIS] involves interplay between small G-proteins and their regulatory factors. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that Arf nucleotide binding site opener [ARNO], a guanine nucleotide exchange factor [GEF] for the small G-protein Arf6, mediates the functional activation of Arf6, and that ARNO/Arf6 signaling axis, in turn, controls the activation of Cdc42 and Rac1, which have been implicated in GSIS. Molecular biological [i.e., expression of inactive mutants or siRNA] and pharmacological approaches were employed to assess the roles for ARNO/Arf6 signaling pathway in insulin secretion in normal rat islets and INS 832/13 cells. Degrees of activation of Arf6 and Cdc42/Rac1 were quantitated by GST-GGA3 and PAK-1 kinase pull-down assays, respectively. ARNO is expressed in INS 832/13 cells, rat islets and human islets. Expression of inactive mutants of Arf6 [Arf6-T27N] or ARNO [ARNO-E156K] or siRNA-ARNO markedly reduced GSIS in isolated β-cells. secinH3, a selective inhibitor of ARNO/Arf6 signaling axis, also inhibited GSIS in INS 832/13 cells and rat islets. Stimulatory concentrations of glucose promoted Arf6 activation, which was inhibited by secinH3 or siRNA-ARNO, suggesting that ARNO/Arf6 signaling cascade is necessary for GSIS. secinH3 or siRNA-ARNO also inhibited glucose-induced activation of Cdc42 and Rac1 suggesting that ARNO/Arf6 might be upstream to Cdc42 and Rac1 activation steps, which are necessary for GSIS. Lastly, co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopic studies suggested increased association between Arf6 and ARNO in glucose-stimulated β-cells. These findings provide the first evidence to implicate ARNO in the sequential activation of Arf6, Cdc42 and Rac1 culminating in GSIS. PMID:21276423

  1. Chemoelectrical energy conversion of adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Vishnu Baba; Sarles, Stephen Andrew; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-04-01

    Plant and animal cell membranes transport charged species, neutral molecules and water through ion pumps and channels. The energy required for moving species against established concentration and charge gradients is provided by the biological fuel - adenosine triphosphate (ATP) -synthesized within the cell. The adenosine triphosphatase (ATPases) in a plant cell membrane hydrolyze ATP in the cell cytoplasm to pump protons across the cell membrane. This establishes a proton gradient across the membrane from the cell exterior into the cell cytoplasm. This proton motive force stimulates ion channels that transport nutrients and other species into the cell. This article discusses a device that converts the chemical energy stored in adenosine triphosphate into electrical power using a transporter protein, ATPase. The V-type ATPase proteins used in our prototype are extracted from red beet(Beta vulgaris) tonoplast membranes and reconstituted in a bilayer lipid membrane or BLM formed from POPC and POPS lipids. A pH7 medium that can support ATP hydrolysis is provided on both sides of the membrane and ATP is dissolved in the pH7 buffer on one side of the membrane. Hydrolysis of ATP results in the formation of a phosphate ion and adenosine diphosphate. The energy from the reaction activates ATPase in the BLM and moves a proton across the membrane. The charge gradient established across the BLM due to the reaction and ion transport is converted into electrical current by half-cell reference electrodes. The prototype ATPase cell with an effective BLM area of 4.15 mm2 carrying 15 μl of ATPase proteins was observed to develop a steady state peak power output of 70 nW, which corresponds to a specific power of 1.69 μW/cm2 and a current density of 43.4 μA/cm2 of membrane area.

  2. Adenosine A2A receptor dynamics studied with the novel fluorescent agonist Alexa488-APEC

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Frank; Klutz, Athena; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Schulte, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors, such as the adenosine A2A receptor, are dynamic proteins, which undergo agonist-dependent redistribution from the cell surface to intracellular membranous compartments, such as endosomes. In order to study the kinetics of adenosine A2A receptor redistribution in living cells, we synthesized a novel fluorescent agonist, Alexa488-APEC. Alexa488-APEC binds to adenosine A2A (Ki = 149 ± 27 nM) as well as A3 receptors (Ki= 240 ± 160 nM) but not to adenosine A1 receptors. Further, we characterized the dose-dependent increase in Alexa488-APEC-induced cAMP production as well as cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein phosphorylation, verifying the ligand’s functionality at adenosine A2A but not A2B receptors. In live cell imaging studies, Alexa488-APEC induced adenosine A2A receptor internalization, which was blocked by the competitive reversible antagonist ZM 241385 and hyperosmolaric sucrose. Further, internalized adenosine A2A receptors co-localized with clathrin and Rab5, indicating that agonist stimulation promotes adenosine A2A receptor uptake through a clathrin-dependent mechanism to Rab5-positive endosomes. The basic characterization of Alexa488-APEC provided here showed that it provides a usefultool for tracing adenosine A2A receptors in vitro. PMID:18603240

  3. Inhibitory effects of total saponin from Korean Red Ginseng on [Ca2+]i mobilization through phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type I in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-Hae; Kwon, Hyuk-Woo; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Rhee, Man Hee; Park, Hwa-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Intracellular Ca2+([Ca2+]i) is a platelet aggregation-inducing molecule. Therefore, understanding the inhibitory mechanism of [Ca2+]i mobilization is very important to evaluate the antiplatelet effect of a substance. This study was carried out to understand the Ca2+-antagonistic effect of total saponin from Korean Red Ginseng (KRG-TS). Methods We investigated the Ca2+-antagonistic effect of KRG-TS on cyclic nucleotides-associated phosphorylation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type I (IP3RI) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in thrombin (0.05 U/mL)-stimulated human platelet aggregation. Results The inhibition of [Ca2+]i mobilization by KRG-TS was increased by a PKA inhibitor (Rp-8-Br-cAMPS), which was more stronger than the inhibition by a cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor (Rp-8-Br-cGMPS). In addition, Rp-8-Br-cAMPS inhibited phosphorylation of PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) (Thr197) by KRG-TS. The phosphorylation of IP3RI (Ser1756) by KRG-TS was very strongly inhibited by Rp-8-Br-cAMPS compared with that by Rp-8-Br-cGMPS. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of [Ca2+]i mobilization by KRG-TS is more strongly dependent on a cAMP/PKA pathway than a cGMP/PKG pathway. KRG-TS also inhibited the release of adenosine triphosphate and serotonin. In addition, only G-Rg3 of protopanaxadiol in KRG-TS inhibited thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Conclusion These results strongly indicate that KRG-TS is a potent beneficial compound that inhibits [Ca2+]i mobilization in thrombin–platelet interactions, which may result in the prevention of platelet aggregation-mediated thrombotic disease. PMID:26869828

  4. Mutation of Walker-A lysine 464 in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator reveals functional interaction between its nucleotide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Powe, Allan C; Al-Nakkash, Layla; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2002-03-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel bears two nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) that control its ATP-dependent gating. Exactly how these NBDs control gating is controversial. To address this issue, we examined channels with a Walker-A lysine mutation in NBD1 (K464A) using the patch clamp technique. K464A mutants have an ATP dependence (EC(50) approximate 60 microM) and opening rate at 2.75 mM ATP (approximately 2.1 s(-1)) similar to wild type (EC(50) approximate 97 microM; approximately 2.0 s(-1)). However, K464A's closing rate at 2.75 mM ATP (approximately 3.6 s(-1)) is faster than that of wild type (approximately 2.1 s(-1)), suggesting involvement of NBD1 in nucleotide-dependent closing. Delay of closing in wild type by adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue, is markedly diminished in K464A mutants due to reduction in AMP-PNP's apparent on-rate and acceleration of its apparent off-rate (approximately 2- and approximately 10-fold, respectively). Since the delay of closing by AMP-PNP is thought to occur via NBD2, K464A's effect on the NBD2 mutant K1250A was examined. In sharp contrast to K464A, K1250A single mutants exhibit reduced opening (approximately 0.055 s(-1)) and closing (approximately 0.006 s(-1)) rates at millimolar [ATP], suggesting a role for K1250 in both opening and closing. At millimolar [ATP], K464A-K1250A double mutants close approximately 5-fold faster (approximately 0.029 s(-1)) than K1250A but open with a similar rate (approximately 0.059 s(-1)), indicating an effect of K464A on NBD2 function. In summary, our results reveal that both of CFTR's functionally asymmetric NBDs participate in nucleotide-dependent closing, which provides important constraints for NBD-mediated gating models. PMID:11882668

  5. Mutation of Walker-A lysine 464 in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator reveals functional interaction between its nucleotide-binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Powe, Allan C; Al-Nakkash, Layla; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2002-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel bears two nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) that control its ATP-dependent gating. Exactly how these NBDs control gating is controversial. To address this issue, we examined channels with a Walker-A lysine mutation in NBD1 (K464A) using the patch clamp technique. K464A mutants have an ATP dependence (EC50 ≈ 60 μm) and opening rate at 2.75 mm ATP (∼ 2.1 s−1) similar to wild type (EC50 ≈ 97 μm; ∼ 2.0 s−1). However, K464A's closing rate at 2.75 mm ATP (∼ 3.6 s−1) is faster than that of wild type (∼ 2.1 s−1), suggesting involvement of NBD1 in nucleotide-dependent closing. Delay of closing in wild type by adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue, is markedly diminished in K464A mutants due to reduction in AMP-PNP's apparent on-rate and acceleration of its apparent off-rate (∼ 2- and ∼ 10-fold, respectively). Since the delay of closing by AMP-PNP is thought to occur via NBD2, K464A's effect on the NBD2 mutant K1250A was examined. In sharp contrast to K464A, K1250A single mutants exhibit reduced opening (∼ 0.055 s−1) and closing (∼ 0.006 s−1) rates at millimolar [ATP], suggesting a role for K1250 in both opening and closing. At millimolar [ATP], K464A-K1250A double mutants close ∼ 5-fold faster (∼ 0.029 s−1) than K1250A but open with a similar rate (∼ 0.059 s−1), indicating an effect of K464A on NBD2 function. In summary, our results reveal that both of CFTR's functionally asymmetric NBDs participate in nucleotide-dependent closing, which provides important constraints for NBD-mediated gating models. PMID:11882668

  6. Modification of Loop 1 Affects the Nucleotide-Binding Properties of Myo1c, The Adaptation Motor in the Inner Ear†

    PubMed Central

    Adamek, Nancy; Lieto-Trivedi, Alena; Geeves, Michael A.; Coluccio, Lynne M.

    2010-01-01

    Myo1c is one of eight members of the mammalian myosin I family of actin-associated molecular motors. In stereocilia of the hair cells in the inner ear, Myo1c presumably serves as the adaptation motor, which regulates the opening and closing of transduction channels. Although there is conservation of sequence and structure among all myosins in the N-terminal motor domain, which contains the nucleotide- and actin-binding sites, some differences include the length and composition of surface loops, including loop 1, which lies near the nucleotide-binding domain. To investigate the role of loop 1, we expressed in insect cells mutants of a truncated form of Myo1c, Myo1c1IQ, as well as chimeras of Myo1c1IQ with the analogous loop from other myosins. We found that replacement of the charged residues in loop 1 with alanines or the whole loop with a series of alanines did not alter the ATPase activity, transient kinetics properties and Ca2+-sensitivity of Myo1c1IQ. Substitution of loop 1 with that of the corresponding region from tonic smooth muscle myosin II (Myo1c1IQ-tonic) or replacement with a single glycine (Myo1c1IQ-G) accelerated ADP release from A.M 2-3-fold in Ca2+, whereas substitution with loop 1 from phasic muscle myosin II (Myo1c1IQ-phasic) accelerated ADP release 35-fold. Motility assays with chimeras containing a single α-helix, or SAH, domain showed that Myo1cSAH-tonic translocated actin in vitro twice as fast as Myo1cSAH-WT and 3-fold faster than Myo1cSAH-G. The studies show that changes induced in Myo1c by modifying loop 1 showed no resemblance to the behaviour of the loop donor myosins or to the changes previously observed with similar Myo1b chimeras. PMID:20039646

  7. Regulation of hERG and hEAG channels by Src and by SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase via an ITIM region in the cyclic nucleotide binding domain.

    PubMed

    Schlichter, Lyanne C; Jiang, Jiahua; Wang, John; Newell, Evan W; Tsui, Florence W L; Lam, Doris

    2014-01-01

    Members of the EAG K(+) channel superfamily (EAG/Kv10.x, ERG/Kv11.x, ELK/Kv12.x subfamilies) are expressed in many cells and tissues. In particular, two prototypes, EAG1/Kv10.1/KCNH1 and ERG1/Kv11.1/KCNH2 contribute to both normal and pathological functions. Proliferation of numerous cancer cells depends on hEAG1, and in some cases, hERG. hERG is best known for contributing to the cardiac action potential, and for numerous channel mutations that underlie 'long-QT syndrome'. Many cells, particularly cancer cells, express Src-family tyrosine kinases and SHP tyrosine phosphatases; and an imbalance in tyrosine phosphorylation can lead to malignancies, autoimmune diseases, and inflammatory disorders. Ion channel contributions to cell functions are governed, to a large degree, by post-translational modulation, especially phosphorylation. However, almost nothing is known about roles of specific tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in regulating K(+) channels in the EAG superfamily. First, we show that tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PP1, and the selective Src inhibitory peptide, Src40-58, reduce the hERG current amplitude, without altering its voltage dependence or kinetics. PP1 similarly reduces the hEAG1 current. Surprisingly, an 'immuno-receptor tyrosine inhibitory motif' (ITIM) is present within the cyclic nucleotide binding domain of all EAG-superfamily members, and is conserved in the human, rat and mouse sequences. When tyrosine phosphorylated, this ITIM directly bound to and activated SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase (PTP-1C/PTPN6/HCP); the first report that a portion of an ion channel is a binding site and activator of a tyrosine phosphatase. Both hERG and hEAG1 currents were decreased by applying active recombinant SHP-1, and increased by the inhibitory substrate-trapping SHP-1 mutant. Thus, hERG and hEAG1 currents are regulated by activated SHP-1, in a manner opposite to their regulation by Src. Given the widespread distribution of these channels, Src and SHP-1, this work

  8. Regulation of hERG and hEAG Channels by Src and by SHP-1 Tyrosine Phosphatase via an ITIM Region in the Cyclic Nucleotide Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Schlichter, Lyanne C.; Jiang, Jiahua; Wang, John; Newell, Evan W.; Tsui, Florence W. L.; Lam, Doris

    2014-01-01

    Members of the EAG K+ channel superfamily (EAG/Kv10.x, ERG/Kv11.x, ELK/Kv12.x subfamilies) are expressed in many cells and tissues. In particular, two prototypes, EAG1/Kv10.1/KCNH1 and ERG1/Kv11.1/KCNH2 contribute to both normal and pathological functions. Proliferation of numerous cancer cells depends on hEAG1, and in some cases, hERG. hERG is best known for contributing to the cardiac action potential, and for numerous channel mutations that underlie ‘long-QT syndrome’. Many cells, particularly cancer cells, express Src-family tyrosine kinases and SHP tyrosine phosphatases; and an imbalance in tyrosine phosphorylation can lead to malignancies, autoimmune diseases, and inflammatory disorders. Ion channel contributions to cell functions are governed, to a large degree, by post-translational modulation, especially phosphorylation. However, almost nothing is known about roles of specific tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in regulating K+ channels in the EAG superfamily. First, we show that tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PP1, and the selective Src inhibitory peptide, Src40-58, reduce the hERG current amplitude, without altering its voltage dependence or kinetics. PP1 similarly reduces the hEAG1 current. Surprisingly, an ‘immuno-receptor tyrosine inhibitory motif’ (ITIM) is present within the cyclic nucleotide binding domain of all EAG-superfamily members, and is conserved in the human, rat and mouse sequences. When tyrosine phosphorylated, this ITIM directly bound to and activated SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase (PTP-1C/PTPN6/HCP); the first report that a portion of an ion channel is a binding site and activator of a tyrosine phosphatase. Both hERG and hEAG1 currents were decreased by applying active recombinant SHP-1, and increased by the inhibitory substrate-trapping SHP-1 mutant. Thus, hERG and hEAG1 currents are regulated by activated SHP-1, in a manner opposite to their regulation by Src. Given the widespread distribution of these channels, Src and SHP-1, this

  9. The A3 adenosine receptor: history and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    By general consensus, the omnipresent purine nucleoside adenosine is considered a major regulator of local tissue function, especially when energy supply fails to meet cellular energy demand. Adenosine mediation involves activation of a family of four G protein-coupled adenosine receptors (ARs): A(1), A(2)A, A(2)B, and A(3). The A(3) adenosine receptor (A(3)AR) is the only adenosine subtype to be overexpressed in inflammatory and cancer cells, thus making it a potential target for therapy. Originally isolated as an orphan receptor, A(3)AR presented a twofold nature under different pathophysiologic conditions: it appeared to be protective/harmful under ischemic conditions, pro/anti-inflammatory, and pro/antitumoral depending on the systems investigated. Until recently, the greatest and most intriguing challenge has been to understand whether, and in which cases, selective A(3) agonists or antagonists would be the best choice. Today, the choice has been made and A(3)AR agonists are now under clinical development for some disorders including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, glaucoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. More specifically, the interest and relevance of these new agents derives from clinical data demonstrating that A(3)AR agonists are both effective and safe. Thus, it will become apparent in the present review that purine scientists do seem to be getting closer to their goal: the incorporation of adenosine ligands into drugs with the ability to save lives and improve human health. PMID:25387804

  10. Role of 3', 5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate and protein kinase C in the regulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein secretion by thyroid-stimulating hormone in isolated ovine thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J F; Hill, D J; Becks, G P

    1994-05-01

    Isolated sheep thyroid follicles release insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II together with IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). We previously showed that TSH suppresses the biosynthesis and release of IGFBPs in vitro which may increase the tissue availability of IGFs, allowing a synergy with TSH which potentiates both thyroid growth and function. Many of the actions of TSH on thyroid cell function are dependent upon activation of adenylate cyclase, although increased synthesis of inositol trisphosphate and activation of protein kinase C (PKC) have also been implicated. We have now examined whether probable changes in intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) or PKC are involved in TSH-mediated suppression of IGFBP release. Confluent primary cultures of ovine thyroid cells were maintained in serum-free Ham's modified F-12M medium containing transferrin, somatostatin and glycyl-histidyl-lysine (designated 3H), and further supplemented with sodium iodide (10(-8)-10(-3) mol/l), dibutyryl cAMP (0.25-1 mmol/l), forskolin (5-20 mumol/l) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA; 10(-11)-10(-6) mol/l), with or without exposure to TSH (200 microU/ml). The uptake and organification of Na [125I] by cells was examined after test incubations of up to 48 h, and IGFBPs in conditioned media were analysed by ligand blot using 125I-labelled IGF-II. The PKC activity in the cytosol and plasma membrane fractions of cells was measured by phosphorylation of histone using [gamma-32P]ATP, and PKC immunoreactivity was visualized by Western immunoblot analysis. While dibutyryl cAMP or forskolin largely reproduced the stimulatory effect of TSH on iodine organification, they did not mimic the inhibitory effect of TSH on the secretion of IGFBPs of 43, 34, 28 and 19 kDa. Incubation with physiological or pharmacological concentrations of iodide (10(-6)-10(-3) mol/l) for up to 48 h significantly decreased TSH action on iodide uptake and organification but did not alter the

  11. [Effects of dopamine and adenosine on regulation of water-electrolyte exchange in Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Bagrov, Ia Iu; Manusova, N B

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine and adenosine both regulate transport of sodium chloride in the renal tubules in mammals. We have studied the effect of dopamine and adenosine on spontaneous activity of contractile vacuole of Amoeba proteous. Both substances stimulated contractile vacuole. The effect of dopamine was suppressed by D2 receptor antagonist, haloperidol, but not by D1 antagonist, SCH 39166. Adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 2.5-dideoxyadenosine, suppressed the effect of dopamine, but not of adenosine. Inhibitor of protein kinase C, staurosporine, in contrast, blocked the effect of adenosine, but not dopamine. Notably, dopamine opposed effect of adenosine and vice versa. These results suggest that similar effects of dopamine and adenosine could be mediated by different intracellulare mechanisms. PMID:25509166

  12. Purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, G C; Schmalstieg, F C; Trimmer, K B; Goldman, A S; Goldblum, R M

    1976-01-01

    Purine and pyrimidine metabolites were measured in erythrocytes, plasma, and urine of a 5-month-old infant with adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) deficiency. Adenosine and adenine were measured using newly devised ion exchange separation techniques and a sensitive fluorescence assay. Plasma adenosine levels were increased, whereas adenosine was normal in erythrocytes and not detectable in urine. Increased amounts of adenine were found in erythrocytes and urine as well as in the plasma. Erythrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate concentrations were normal, but adenosine triphosphate content was greatly elevated. Because of the possibility of pyrimidine starvation, pyrimidine nucleotides (pyrimidine coenzymes) in erythrocytes and orotic acid in urine were measured. Pyrimidine nucleotide concentrations were normal, while orotic acid was not detected. These studies suggest that the immune deficiency associated with adenosine deaminase deficiency may be related to increased amounts of adenine, adenosine, or adenine nucleotides. PMID:1066699

  13. Measles Virus Defective Interfering RNAs Are Generated Frequently and Early in the Absence of C Protein and Can Be Destabilized by Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA-1-Like Hypermutations

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, Christian K.; Mastorakos, George M.; Matchett, William E.; Ma, Xiao; Samuel, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defective interfering RNAs (DI-RNAs) of the viral genome can form during infections of negative-strand RNA viruses and outgrow full-length viral genomes, thereby modulating the severity and duration of infection. Here we document the frequent de novo generation of copy-back DI-RNAs from independent rescue events both for a vaccine measles virus (vac2) and for a wild-type measles virus (IC323) as early as passage 1 after virus rescue. Moreover, vaccine and wild-type C-protein-deficient (C-protein-knockout [CKO]) measles viruses generated about 10 times more DI-RNAs than parental virus, suggesting that C enhances the processivity of the viral polymerase. We obtained the nucleotide sequences of 65 individual DI-RNAs, identified breakpoints and reinitiation sites, and predicted their structural features. Several DI-RNAs possessed clusters of A-to-G or U-to-C transitions. Sequences flanking these mutation sites were characteristic of those favored by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1), which catalyzes in double-stranded RNA the C-6 deamination of adenosine to produce inosine, which is recognized as guanosine, a process known as A-to-I RNA editing. In individual DI-RNAs the transitions were of the same type and occurred on both sides of the breakpoint. These patterns of mutations suggest that ADAR1 edits unencapsidated DI-RNAs that form double-strand RNA structures. Encapsidated DI-RNAs were incorporated into virus particles, which reduced the infectivity of virus stocks. The CKO phenotype was dominant: DI-RNAs derived from vac2 with a CKO suppressed the replication of vac2, as shown by coinfections of interferon-incompetent lymphatic cells with viruses expressing different fluorescent reporter proteins. In contrast, coinfection with a C-protein-expressing virus did not counteract the suppressive phenotype of DI-RNAs. IMPORTANCE Recombinant measles viruses (MVs) are in clinical trials as cancer therapeutics and as vectored vaccines for HIV-AIDS and

  14. Adenosine-Associated Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi; Ghanem, Amyl; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside in every cell. Many critical treatments such as modulating irregular heartbeat (arrhythmias), regulation of central nervous system (CNS) activity, and inhibiting seizural episodes can be carried out using adenosine. Despite the significant potential therapeutic impact of adenosine and its derivatives, the severe side effects caused by their systemic administration have significantly limited their clinical use. In addition, due to adenosine’s extremely short half-life in human blood (less than 10 s), there is an unmet need for sustained delivery systems to enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. In this paper, various adenosine delivery techniques, including encapsulation into biodegradable polymers, cell-based delivery, implantable biomaterials, and mechanical-based delivery systems, are critically reviewed and the existing challenges are highlighted. PMID:26453156

  15. Adenosine deaminase from Streptomyces coelicolor: recombinant expression, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Pornbanlualap, Somchai; Chalopagorn, Pornchanok

    2011-08-01

    The sequencing of the genome of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) identified seven putative adenine/adenosine deaminases and adenosine deaminase-like proteins, none of which have been biochemically characterized. This report describes recombinant expression, purification and characterization of SCO4901 which had been annotated in data bases as a putative adenosine deaminase. The purified putative adenosine deaminase gives a subunit Mr=48,400 on denaturing gel electrophoresis and an oligomer molecular weight of approximately 182,000 by comparative gel filtration. These values are consistent with the active enzyme being composed of four subunits with identical molecular weights. The turnover rate of adenosine is 11.5 s⁻¹ at 30 °C. Since adenine is deaminated ∼10³ slower by the enzyme when compared to that of adenosine, these data strongly show that the purified enzyme is an adenosine deaminase (ADA) and not an adenine deaminase (ADE). Other adenine nucleosides/nucleotides, including 9-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-adenine (ara-A), 5'-AMP, 5'-ADP and 5'-ATP, are not substrates for the enzyme. Coformycin and 2'-deoxycoformycin are potent competitive inhibitors of the enzyme with inhibition constants of 0.25 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Amino acid sequence alignment of ScADA with ADAs from other organisms reveals that eight of the nine highly conserved catalytic site residues in other ADAs are also conserved in ScADA. The only non-conserved residue is Asn317, which replaces Asp296 in the murine enzyme. Based on these data, it is suggested here that ADA and ADE proteins are divergently related enzymes that have evolved from a common α/β barrel scaffold to catalyze the deamination of different substrates, using a similar catalytic mechanism. PMID:21511036

  16. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: the NBF1+R (nucleotide-binding fold 1 and regulatory domain) segment acting alone catalyses a Co2+/Mn2+/Mg2+-ATPase activity markedly inhibited by both Cd2+ and the transition-state analogue orthovanadate.

    PubMed

    Annereau, Jean Philippe; Ko, Young Hee; Pedersen, Peter L

    2003-04-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), a regulated anion channel and member of the ATP-binding-cassette transporter (ABC transporter) superfamily. Of CFTR's five domains, the first nucleotide-binding fold (NBF1) has been of greatest interest both because it is the major 'hotspot' for mutations that cause CF, and because it is connected to a unique regulatory domain (R). However, attempts have failed to obtain a catalytically active NBF1+R protein in the absence of a fusion partner. Here, we report that such a protein can be obtained following its overexpression in bacteria. The pure NBF1+R protein exhibits significant ATPase activity [catalytic-centre activity (turnover number) 6.7 min(-1)] and an apparent affinity for ATP ( K (m), 8.7 microM) higher than reported previously for CFTR or segments thereof. As predicted, the ATPase activity is inhibited by mutations in the Walker A motif. It is also inhibited by vanadate, a transition-state analogue. Surprisingly, however, the best divalent metal activator is Co(2+), followed by Mn(2+) and Mg(2+). In contrast, Ca(2+) is ineffective and Cd(2+) is a potent inhibitor. These novel studies, while demonstrating clearly that CFTR's NBF1+R segment can act independently as an active, vanadate-sensitive ATPase, also identify its unique cation activators and a new inhibitor, thus providing insight into the nature of its active site. PMID:12523935

  17. Characterization and regulation of adenosine transport in T84 intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mun, E C; Tally, K J; Matthews, J B

    1998-02-01

    Adenosine release from mucosal sources during inflammation and ischemia activates intestinal epithelial Cl- secretion. Previous data suggest that A2b receptor-mediated Cl- secretory responses may be dampened by epithelial cell nucleoside scavenging. The present study utilizes isotopic flux analysis and nucleoside analog binding assays to directly characterize the nucleoside transport system of cultured T84 human intestinal epithelial cells and to explore whether adenosine transport is regulated by secretory agonists, metabolic inhibition, or phorbol ester. Uptake of adenosine across the apical membrane displayed characteristics of simple diffusion. Kinetic analysis of basolateral uptake revealed a Na(+)-independent, nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI)-sensitive facilitated-diffusion system with low affinity but high capacity for adenosine. NBTI binding studies indicated a single population of high-affinity binding sites basolaterally. Neither forskolin, 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)-adenosine, nor metabolic inhibition significantly altered adenosine transport. However, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate significantly reduced both adenosine transport and the number of specific NBTI binding sites, suggesting that transporter number may be decreased through activation of protein kinase C. This basolateral facilitated adenosine transporter may serve a conventional function in nucleoside salvage and a novel function as a regulator of adenosine-dependent Cl- secretory responses and hence diarrheal disorders. PMID:9486178

  18. Role of adenosine A2A receptor in cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury: Signaling to phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (pERK1/2).

    PubMed

    Mohamed, R A; Agha, A M; Abdel-Rahman, A A; Nassar, N N

    2016-02-01

    Following brain ischemia reperfusion (IR), the dramatic increase in adenosine activates A2AR to induce further neuronal damage. Noteworthy, A2A antagonists have proven efficacious in halting IR injury, however, the detailed downstream signaling remains elusive. To this end, the present study aimed to investigate the possible involvement of phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK1/2) pathway in mediating protection afforded by the central A2A blockade. Male Wistar rats (250-270 g) subjected to bilateral carotid occlusion for 45 min followed by a 24-h reperfusion period showed increased infarct size corroborating histopathological damage, memory impairment and motor incoordination as well as increased locomotor activity. Those events were mitigated by the unilateral intrahippocampal administration of the selective A2A antagonist SCH58261 via a decrease in pERK1/2 downstream from diacyl glycerol (DAG) signaling. Consequent to pERK1/2 inhibition, reduced hippocampal microglial activation, glial tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) expression, glutamate (Glu), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were evident in animals receiving SCH58261. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) increased following nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf-2). Taken all together, these events suppressed apoptotic pathways via a reduction in cytochrome c (Cyt. c) as well as caspase-3 supporting a crucial role for pERK1/2 inhibition in consequent reduction of inflammatory and excitotoxic cascades as well as correction of the redox imbalance. PMID:26642806

  19. A tyrosine-phosphorylated 55-kilodalton motility-associated bovine sperm protein is regulated by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphates and calcium.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, S; Trautman, K D; Goueli, S A; Carr, D W

    1997-06-01

    Sperm motility is regulated by protein phosphorylation. We have recently shown that a serine/threonine phosphatase system is involved in motility regulation. Two of the components of the phosphatase system, GSK-3 and PP1gamma2, are regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation. During our investigation of sperm tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins we discovered a 55-kDa protein whose tyrosine phosphorylation correlates closely to the motility state of sperm. This protein is tyrosine phosphorylated to a much higher degree in motile caudal than in immotile caput epididymal sperm. Motility inhibition of caudal epididymal sperm by protein kinase A (PKA) anchoring inhibition or by ionomycin-induced calcium overload led to the virtual disappearance of tyrosine phosphorylation of the 55-kDa protein. Conversely, treatment of sperm with motility activators, isobutylmethylxanthine or 8-bromo-cAMP, resulted in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the protein. The protein was present in the soluble 100 000 x g supernatants of sperm extracts and was heat labile. Chromatography through diethylaminoethyl-cellulose and Western blot analysis showed that this 55-kDa protein is not a regulatory subunit of PKA or alpha-tubulin. Our results represent the identification of a soluble protein whose tyrosine phosphorylation varies directly with motility and suggest that motility regulation may involve cross talk between PKA, calcium, and tyrosine kinase pathways. PMID:9166697

  20. Possible therapeutic benefits of adenosine-potentiating drugs in reducing age-related degenerative disease in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Scaramuzzi, R J; Baker, D J

    2003-10-01

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous, biologically important molecule that is a precursor of other biologically active molecules. It also is a component of some co-factors and has distinct physiological actions in its own right. Levels are maintained by synthesis from dietary precursors and re-cycling. The daily turnover of adenosine is very high. Adenosine can act either as a hormone by binding to adenosine receptors, four adenosine receptor subtypes have been identified, and as an intracellular modulator, after transport into the cell by membrane transporter proteins. One of the principal intracellular actions of adenosine is inhibition of the enzyme phosphodiesterase. Extracellular adenosine also has specific neuromodulatory actions on dopamine and glutamate. Selective and nonselective agonists and antagonists of adenosine are available. The tasks of developing, evaluating and exploiting the therapeutic potential of these compounds is still in its infancy. Adenosine has actions in the central nervous system (CNS), heart and vascular system, skeletal muscle and the immune system and the presence of receptors suggests potential actions in the gonads and other organs. Adenosine agonists improve tissue perfusion through actions on vascular smooth muscle and erythrocyte fluidity and they can be used to improve the quality of life in aged dogs. This article reviews the therapeutic potential of adenosine-potentiating drugs in the treatment of age-related conditions in companion animals, some of which may be exacerbated by castration or spaying at an early age. PMID:14633184

  1. Extracellular guanosine regulates extracellular adenosine levels

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dongmei; Jackson, Travis C.; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Gillespie, Delbert G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that extracellular guanosine regulates extracellular adenosine levels. Rat preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cells were incubated with adenosine, guanosine, or both. Guanosine (30 μmol/l) per se had little effect on extracellular adenosine levels. Extracellular adenosine levels 1 h after addition of adenosine (3 μmol/l) were 0.125 ± 0.020 μmol/l, indicating rapid disposition of extracellular adenosine. Extracellular adenosine levels 1 h after addition of adenosine (3 μmol/l) plus guanosine (30 μmol/l) were 1.173 ± 0.061 μmol/l, indicating slow disposition of extracellular adenosine. Cell injury increased extracellular levels of endogenous adenosine and guanosine, and the effects of cell injury on endogenous extracellular adenosine were modulated by altering the levels of endogenous extracellular guanosine with exogenous purine nucleoside phosphorylase (converts guanosine to guanine) or 8-aminoguanosine (inhibits purine nucleoside phosphorylase). Extracellular guanosine also slowed the disposition of extracellular adenosine in rat preglomerular vascular endothelial cells, mesangial cells, cardiac fibroblasts, and kidney epithelial cells and in human aortic and coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells and coronary artery endothelial cells. The effects of guanosine on adenosine levels were not mimicked or attenuated by 5-iodotubericidin (adenosine kinase inhibitor), erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (adenosine deaminase inhibitor), 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide (guanine deaminase inhibitor), aristeromycin (S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitor), low sodium (inhibits concentrative nucleoside transporters), S-(4-nitrobenzyl)−6-thioinosine [inhibits equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) type 1], zidovudine (inhibits ENT type 2), or acadesine (known modulator of adenosine levels). Guanosine also increases extracellular inosine, uridine, thymidine, and cytidine, yet decreases

  2. Dicinnamoylquinides in roasted coffee inhibit the human adenosine transporter.

    PubMed

    de Paulis, Tomas; Schmidt, Dennis E; Bruchey, Aleksandra K; Kirby, Michael T; McDonald, Michael P; Commers, Patricia; Lovinger, David M; Martin, Peter R

    2002-05-10

    Preliminary screening of a minor, non-xanthine constituent of roasted coffee, 3,4-diferuloyl-1,5-quinolactone (DIFEQ), showed inhibition of the adenosine transporter at low micromolar concentration. DIFEQ is a neutral derivative of the chlorogenic acids, i.e. isomeric mono- and di-substituted coumaroyl-, caffeoyl-, and feruloyl-esters of quinic acid, formed in the roasting process of coffee. Displacement of the adenosine transporter antagonist [(3)H](S)-(nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine binding by DIFEQ in cultured U-937 cell preparations, expressing the human adenosine transporter protein (hENT1), showed a K(i) of 0.96+/-0.13 microM. Extracts of regular and decaffeinated coffee showed binding activities equivalent to 30-40 mg DIFEQ per three cups of coffee. Acute administration of a high dose of DIFEQ (100 mg/kg i.p.) reduced open field locomotion in mice for 20 min in correlation with brain levels of DIFEQ. Both 3,4-dicaffeoyl-1,5-quinide and 3,4-dicoumaroyl-1,5-quinide, two close structural analogs of DIFEQ also present in roasted coffee, showed similar affinities for the adenosine transporter, while the corresponding 3- and 4-mono caffeoyl- and feruloyl-quinides were one to two orders of magnitudes less active. This suggests that 3,4-dicinnamoyl-1,5-quinides in coffee could have the potential to raise extra-cellular adenosine levels, thereby counteracting the stimulant effect of caffeine. PMID:12065074

  3. Current status of A1 adenosine receptor allosteric enhancers.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Romeo; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Moorman, Allan R; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is an ubiquitous nucleoside involved in various physiological and pathological functions by stimulating A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs). Allosteric enhancers to A1ARs may represent novel therapeutic agents because they increase the activity of these receptors by mediating a shift to their active form in the A1AR-G protein ternary complex. In this manner, they are able to amplify the action of endogenous adenosine, which is produced in high concentrations under conditions of metabolic stress. A1AR allosteric enhancers could be used as a justifiable alternative to the exogenous agonists that are characterized by receptor desensitization and downregulation. In this review, an analysis of some of the most interesting allosteric modulators of A1ARs has been reported. PMID:26144263

  4. Genetic removal of the A2A adenosine receptor enhances pulmonary inflammation, mucin production, and angiogenesis in adenosine deaminase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Mohsenin, Amir; Mi, Tiejuan; Xia, Yang; Kellems, Rodney E; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Blackburn, Michael R

    2007-09-01

    Adenosine is generated at sites of tissue injury where it serves to regulate inflammation and damage. Adenosine signaling has been implicated in the regulation of pulmonary inflammation and damage in diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; however, the contribution of specific adenosine receptors to key immunoregulatory processes in these diseases is still unclear. Mice deficient in the purine catabolic enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) develop pulmonary inflammation and mucous metaplasia in association with adenosine elevations making them a useful model for assessing the contribution of specific adenosine receptors to adenosine-mediated pulmonary disease. Studies suggest that the A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)R) functions to limit inflammation and promote tissue protection; however, the contribution of A(2A)R signaling has not been examined in the ADA-deficient model of adenosine-mediated lung inflammation. The purpose of the current study was to examine the contribution of A(2A)R signaling to the pulmonary phenotype seen in ADA-deficient mice. This was accomplished by generating ADA/A(2A)R double knockout mice. Genetic removal of the A(2A)R from ADA-deficient mice resulted in enhanced inflammation comprised largely of macrophages and neutrophils, mucin production in the bronchial airways, and angiogenesis, relative to that seen in the lungs of ADA-deficient mice with the A(2A)R. In addition, levels of the chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and CXCL1 were elevated, whereas levels of cytokines such as TNF-alpha and IL-6 were not. There were no compensatory changes in the other adenosine receptors in the lungs of ADA/A(2A)R double knockout mice. These findings suggest that the A(2A)R plays a protective role in the ADA-deficient model of pulmonary inflammation. PMID:17601796

  5. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency adenosine ...

  6. Metformin attenuates graft-versus-host disease via restricting mammalian target of rapamycin/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and promoting adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-autophagy for the balance between T helper 17 and Tregs.

    PubMed

    Park, Min-Jung; Lee, Seon-Yeong; Moon, Su-Jin; Son, Hye-Jin; Lee, Sung-Hee; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Byun, Jae-Kyeong; Shin, Dong Yun; Park, Sung-Hwan; Yang, Chul-Woo; Cho, Mi-La

    2016-07-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), caused by donor T cell-mediated injury to host tissues, is a problem in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. The transition from naïve to effector T cells is accompanied by shift in metabolism main pathway; from glucose oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that is a metabolic sensor that helps maintain cellular energy homeostasis. Although AMPK activation can exert anti-inflammatory properties by negatively regulating pro-inflammatory mediators, its role as a therapeutic potential of graft-versus-host disease development remains unclear. In this study, we found that the intraperitoneal administration of metformin, which activates AMPK signaling significantly, ameliorated the clinical severity of aGHVD and lethality. This was associated with reductions in type I T helper (Th1) and Th17 and rises in Th2 and regulatory T (Treg) cell. The enhanced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation noted during the development of aGVHD was reduced by metformin treatment. Furthermore, metformin-treated Th17 cells became converted into Treg cells via enhanced autophagy. The reduction in mortality associated with metformin treatment was associated with inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway. These results suggest that metformin might be of significant use in the treatment of patients with aGVHD. PMID:27126953

  7. 2012 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship: Structure-Based Approaches to Ligands for G Protein-Coupled Adenosine and P2Y Receptors, From Small Molecules to Nanoconjugates +

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    Adenosine receptor (ARs) and P2Y receptors (P2YRs) that respond to extracellular nucleosides/tides are associated with new directions for therapeutics. The X-ray structures of the A 2A AR complexes with agonists and antagonists are examined in relationship to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily and applied to drug discovery. Much of the data on AR ligand structure from early SAR studies, now is explainable from the A 2A AR X-ray crystallography. The ligand-receptor interactions in related GPCR complexes can be identified by means of modeling approaches, e.g. molecular docking. Thus, molecular recognition in binding and activation processes has been studied effectively using homology modeling and applied to ligand design. Virtual screening has yielded new nonnucleoside AR antagonists, and existing ligands have been improved with knowledge of the receptor interactions. New agonists are being explored for CNS and peripheral therapeutics based on in vivo activity, such as chronic neuropathic pain. Ligands for receptors more distantly related to the X-ray template, i.e. P2YRs, have been introduced and are mainly used as pharmacological tools for elucidating the physiological role of extracellular nucleotides. Other ligand tools for drug discovery include fluorescent probes, radioactive probes, multivalent probes, and functionalized nanoparticles. PMID:23597047

  8. Functional analysis of drug resistance‐associated mutations in the T rypanosoma brucei adenosine transporter 1 (TbAT1) and the proposal of a structural model for the protein

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Jane C.; Tagoe, Daniel N. A.; Eze, Anthonius A.; Krezdorn, Jessica A. M.; Rojas López, Karla E.; Alkhaldi, Abdulsalam A. M.; McDonald, Fiona; Still, Jennifer; Alzahrani, Khalid J.; Settimo, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Summary The T rypanosoma brucei aminopurine transporter P2/TbAT1 has long been implicated in the transport of, and resistance to, the diamidine and melaminophenyl arsenical classes of drugs that form the backbone of the pharmacopoeia against African trypanosomiasis. Genetic alterations including deletions and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been observed in numerous strains and clinical isolates. Here, we systematically investigate each reported mutation and assess their effects on transporter function after expression in a tbat1 −/− T . brucei line. Out of a set of six reported SNPs from a reported ‘resistance allele’, none significantly impaired sensitivity to pentamidine, diminazene or melarsoprol, relative to the TbAT 1‐WT allele, although several combinations, and the deletion of the codon for residue F316, resulted in highly significant impairment. These combinations of SNPs, and ΔF316, also strongly impaired the uptake of [3 H]‐adenosine and [3 H]‐diminazene, identical to the tbat1 −/− control. The TbAT1 protein model predicted that residues F19, D140 and F316 interact with the substrate of the transporter. Mutation of D140 to alanine resulted in an inactive transporter, whereas the mutation F19A produced a transporter with a slightly increased affinity for [3 H]‐diminazene but reduced the uptake rate. The results presented here validate earlier hypotheses of drug binding motifs for TbAT1. PMID:25708978

  9. Diabetic complications within the context of aging: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide redox, insulin C-peptide, sirtuin 1-liver kinase B1-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase positive feedback and forkhead box O3.

    PubMed

    Ido, Yasuo

    2016-07-01

    Recent research in nutritional control of aging suggests that cytosolic increases in the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and decreasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolism plays a central role in controlling the longevity gene products sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3). High nutrition conditions, such as the diabetic milieu, increase the ratio of reduced to oxidized forms of cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide through cascades including the polyol pathway. This redox change is associated with insulin resistance and the development of diabetic complications, and might be counteracted by insulin C-peptide. My research and others' suggest that the SIRT1-liver kinase B1-AMPK cascade creates positive feedback through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthesis to help cells cope with metabolic stress. SIRT1 and AMPK can upregulate liver kinase B1 and FOXO3, key factors that help residential stem cells cope with oxidative stress. FOXO3 directly changes epigenetics around transcription start sites, maintaining the health of stem cells. 'Diabetic memory' is likely a result of epigenetic changes caused by high nutritional conditions, which disturb the quiescent state of residential stem cells and impair tissue repair. This could be prevented by restoring SIRT1-AMPK positive feedback through activating FOXO3. PMID:27181414

  10. Metalloprotease cleavage of the N terminus of the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR37L1 reduces its constitutive activity.

    PubMed

    Coleman, James L J; Ngo, Tony; Schmidt, Johannes; Mrad, Nadine; Liew, Chu Kong; Jones, Nicole M; Graham, Robert M; Smith, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the pharmacology or physiology of GPR37L1, a G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptor that is abundant in the cerebellum. Mice deficient in this receptor exhibit precocious cerebellar development and hypertension. We showed that GPR37L1 coupled to the G protein Gαswhen heterologously expressed in cultured cells in the absence of any added ligand, whereas a mutant receptor that lacked the amino terminus was inactive. Conversely, inhibition of ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteases) enhanced receptor activity, indicating that the presence of the amino terminus is necessary for GPR37L1 signaling. Metalloprotease-dependent processing of GPR37L1 was evident in rodent cerebellum, where we detected predominantly the cleaved, inactive form. However, comparison of the accumulation of cAMP (adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate) in response to phosphodiesterase inhibition in cerebellar slice preparations from wild-type and GPR37L1-null mice showed that some constitutive signaling remained in the wild-type mice. In reporter assays of Gαsor Gαisignaling, the synthetic, prosaposin-derived peptide prosaptide (TX14A) did not increase GPR37L1 activity. Our data indicate that GPR37L1 may be a constitutively active receptor, or perhaps its ligand is present under the conditions that we used for analysis, and that the activity of this receptor is instead controlled by signals that regulate metalloprotease activity in the tissue. PMID:27072655

  11. Alpha-Lipoic acid increases energy expenditure by enhancing adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha signaling in the skeletal muscle of aged mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with aging and diabetes, which decreases respiratory capacity and increases reactive oxygen species. Lipoic acid (LA) possesses antioxidative and antidiabetic properties. Metabolic action of LA is mediated by activation of adenosine monophospha...

  12. Type IV collagen is an activating ligand for the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR126.

    PubMed

    Paavola, Kevin J; Sidik, Harwin; Zuchero, J Bradley; Eckart, Michael; Talbot, William S

    2014-08-12

    GPR126 is an orphan heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is essential for the development of diverse organs. We found that type IV collagen, a major constituent of the basement membrane, binds to Gpr126 and activates its signaling function. Type IV collagen stimulated the production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in rodent Schwann cells, which require Gpr126 activity to differentiate, and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing exogenous Gpr126. Type IV collagen specifically bound to the extracellular amino-terminal region of Gpr126 containing the CUB (complement, Uegf, Bmp1) and pentraxin domains. Gpr126 derivatives lacking the entire amino-terminal region were constitutively active, suggesting that this region inhibits signaling and that ligand binding relieves this inhibition to stimulate receptor activity. A new zebrafish mutation that truncates Gpr126 after the CUB and pentraxin domains disrupted development of peripheral nerves and the inner ear. Thus, our findings identify type IV collagen as an activating ligand for GPR126, define its mechanism of activation, and highlight a previously unrecognized signaling function of type IV collagen in basement membranes. PMID:25118328

  13. Changes in expression of a functional G sub i protein in cultured rat heart cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, I.S.; Gaa, S.T.; Rogers, T.B. )

    1988-07-01

    The muscarinic cholinergic agonist, carbachol, and pertussis toxin were used to examine the functional status of the guanine nucleotide-binding protein that inhibits adenylate cyclase (G{sub i}) in cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes. The isoproterenol stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in myocyte membranes and adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in intact cells (4 days in culture) were insensitive to carbachol. However, in cells cultured for 11 days, carbachol inhibited isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation by 30%. Angiotensin II (ANG II) was also found to inhibit isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation in day 11 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Pertussis toxin treatment reversed the inhibitory effects of both ANG II and carbachol, suggesting a role for G{sub i} in the process. Carbachol binding to membranes from day 4 cells was relatively insensitive to guanine nucleotides when compared with binding to membranes from day 11 or adult cells. Furthermore, pertussis toxin-mediated {sup 32}P incorporation into a 39- to 41-kDa substrate in day 11 membranes was increased 3.2-fold over that measured in day 4 membranes. These findings support the view that, although G{sub i} is expressed, it is nonfunctional in 4-day-old cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes and acquisition of functional G{sub i} is dependent on culture conditions. Furthermore, the ANG II receptor can couple to G{sub i} in heart.

  14. Xanthines as Adenosine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    The natural plant alkaloids caffeine and theophylline were the first adenosine receptor (AR) antagonists described in the literature. They exhibit micromolar affinities and are non-selective. A large number of derivatives and analogs have subsequently been synthesized and evaluated as AR antagonists. Very potent antagonists have thus been developed with selectivity for each of the four AR subtypes. PMID:20859796

  15. Berberine treatment prevents cardiac dysfunction and remodeling through activation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in type 2 diabetic rats and in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenguang; Zhang, Ming; Meng, Zhaojie; Yu, Yang; Yao, Fan; Hatch, Grant M; Chen, Li

    2015-12-15

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is the major cause of death in type 2 diabetic patients. Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid extract from traditional chinese herbs and its hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects make it a promising drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes. We examined if berberine improved cardiac function and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in high fat diet and streptozotocin induced-type 2 diabetic rats in vivo and reduced expression of hypertrophy markers in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells in vitro. Treatment of diabetic animals with berberine partially improved cardiac function and restored fasting blood insulin, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels to that of control. In addition, berberine treatment of diabetic animals increased cardiac 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (AKT) activation and reduced glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) activation compared to control. Palmitate incubation of H9c2 cells resulted in cellular hypertrophy and decreased expression of alpha-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) and increased expression of beta-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) compared to controls. Berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells reduced hypertrophy, increased α-MHC expression and decreased β-MHC expression. In addition, berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells increased AMPK and AKT activation and reduced GSK3β activation. The presence of the AMPK inhibitor Compound C attenuated the effects of berberine. The results strongly indicate that berberine treatment may be protective against the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26522928

  16. Adenosine receptors and asthma in humans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C N

    2008-10-01

    According to an executive summary of the GINA dissemination committee report, it is now estimated that approximately 300 million people (5% of the global population or 1 in 20 persons) have asthma. Despite the scientific progress made over the past several decades toward improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma, there is still a great need for improved therapies, particularly oral therapies that enhance patient compliance and that target new mechanisms of action. Adenosine is an important signalling molecule in human asthma. By acting on extracellular G-protein-coupled ARs on a number of different cell types important in the pathophysiology of human asthma, adenosine affects bronchial reactivity, inflammation and airway remodelling. Four AR subtypes (A(1), A(2a), A(2b) and A(3)) have been cloned in humans, are expressed in the lung, and are all targets for drug development for human asthma. This review summarizes what is known about these AR subtypes and their function in human asthma as well as the pros and cons of therapeutic approaches to these AR targets. A number of molecules with high affinity and high selectivity for the human AR subtypes have entered clinical trials or are poised to enter clinical trials as anti-asthma treatments. With the availability of these molecules for testing in humans, the function of ARs in human asthma, as well as the safety and efficacy of approaches to the different AR targets, can now be determined. PMID:18852693

  17. ATP-Sensitive K+ Channels Regulate the Concentrative Adenosine Transporter CNT2 following Activation by A1 Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Duflot, Sylvie; Riera, Bárbara; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Casadó, Vicent; Norman, Robert I.; Casado, F. Javier; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal

    2004-01-01

    This study describes a novel mechanism of regulation of the high-affinity Na+-dependent adenosine transporter (CNT2) via the activation of A1 adenosine receptors (A1R). This regulation is mediated by the activation of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels. The high-affinity Na+-dependent adenosine transporter CNT2 and A1R are coexpressed in the basolateral domain of the rat hepatocyte plasma membrane and are colocalized in the rat hepatoma cell line FAO. The transient increase in CNT2-mediated transport activity triggered by (−)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine is fully inhibited by KATP channel blockers and mimicked by a KATP channel opener. A1R agonist activation of CNT2 occurs in both hepatocytes and FAO cells, which express Kir6.1, Kir6.2, SUR1, SUR2A, and SUR2B mRNA channel subunits. With the available antibodies against Kir6.X, SUR2A, and SUR2B, it is shown that all of these proteins colocalize with CNT2 and A1R in defined plasma membrane domains of FAO cells. The extent of the purinergic modulation of CNT2 is affected by the glucose concentration, a finding which indicates that glycemia and glucose metabolism may affect this cross-regulation among A1R, CNT2, and KATP channels. These results also suggest that the activation of KATP channels under metabolic stress can be mediated by the activation of A1R. Cell protection under these circumstances may be achieved by potentiation of the uptake of adenosine and its further metabolization to ATP. Mediation of purinergic responses and a connection between the intracellular energy status and the need for an exogenous adenosine supply are novel roles for KATP channels. PMID:15024061

  18. Adenosine-dependent activation of tyrosine hydroxylase is defective in adenosine kinase-deficient PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Erny, R; Wagner, J A

    1984-01-01

    (R)-N6-Phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA) stimulates dopa production 3- to 5-fold in PC12 cells, with a half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 50 nM. This increase can be explained by a stable activation of tyrosine hydroxylase [TyrOHase; L-tyrosine, tetrahydropteridine:oxygen oxidoreductase (3-hydroxylating), EC 1.14.16.2] when it is phosphorylated by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The activation of TyrOHase is mediated by the adenosine-dependent activation of adenylate cyclase (EC50 = 600 nM). PIA (10 microM) is as effective as cholera toxin or dibutyryl cAMP in activating TyrOHase in wild-type cells. Adenosine kinase-deficient mutants of PC12 were found to be resistant to PIA-dependent activation of TyrOHase (EC50 = 100-1000 nM). This phenomenon was explored in detail in one adenosine kinase-deficient mutant and was shown to occur because the mutant was resistant to the adenosine-dependent activation of adenylate cyclase. In this mutant, TyrOHase was activated 14-fold by cholera toxin, suggesting that activated TyrOHase is about 14 times as active as unactivated TyrOHase. These studies with kinase-deficient PC12 cells provide genetic evidence that adenosine-dependent activation of TyrOHase is mediated by acute increases in cAMP. When the adenosine receptor found on PC12 cells is expressed in vivo, it might function as either a presynaptic (i.e., localized on the nerve terminal) or a postsynaptic (i.e., localized on the cell body or dendrite) receptor that regulates rates of transmitter synthesis in response to cell activity. PMID:6146982

  19. Upstream signaling of protein kinase C-epsilon in xenon-induced pharmacological preconditioning. Implication of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate dependent potassium channels and phosphatidylinositol-dependent kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Weber, Nina C; Toma, Octavian; Damla, Halil; Wolter, Jessica I; Schlack, Wolfgang; Preckel, Benedikt

    2006-06-01

    Xenon elicits preconditioning of the myocardium via protein kinase C-epsilon. We determined the implication of (1) the mitochondrial adenosinetriphosphate dependent potassium (K(ATP)) channels and (2) the 3'phosphatidylinositol-dependent kinase-1 (PDK-1) in activating protein kinase C-epsilon. For infarct size measurements, anaesthetized rats were subjected to 25 min of coronary artery occlusion followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Rats received xenon 70% during three 5-min periods before ischaemia with or without the K(ATP) channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate or Wortmannin as PI3K/PDK-1 inhibitor. For Western blot, hearts were excised at five time points after xenon preconditioning (Control, 15, 25, 35, 45 min). Infarct size was reduced from 42+/-6% (mean+/-S.D.) to 27+/-8% after xenon preconditioning (P<0.05). Western blot revealed an increased activation of PKC-epsilon after 45 min and of PDK-1 after 25 min during xenon preconditioning. 5-hydroxydecanoate and Wortmannin blocked both effects. PKC-epsilon is activated downstream of mitochondrial K(ATP) channels and PDK-1. Both pathways are functionally involved in xenon preconditioning. PMID:16716295

  20. Cloning, expression and pharmacological characterization of rabbit adenosine A1 and A3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hill, R J; Oleynek, J J; Hoth, C F; Kiron, M A; Weng, W; Wester, R T; Tracey, W R; Knight, D R; Buchholz, R A; Kennedy, S P

    1997-01-01

    The role of adenosine A1 and A3 receptors in mediating cardioprotection has been studied predominantly in rabbits, yet the pharmacological characteristics of rabbit adenosine A1 and A3 receptor subtypes are unknown. Thus, the rabbit adenosine A3 receptor was cloned and expressed, and its pharmacology was compared with that of cloned adenosine A1 receptors. Stable transfection of rabbit A1 or A3 cDNAs in Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells resulted in high levels of expression of each of the receptors, as demonstrated by high-affinity binding of the A1/A3 adenosine receptor agonist N6-(4-amino-3-[125I]iodobenzyl)adenosine (125I-ABA). For both receptors, binding of 125I-ABA was inhibited by the GTP analog 5'-guanylimidodiphosphate, and forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation was inhibited by the adenosine receptor agonist (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine. The rank orders of potency of adenosine receptor agonists for inhibition of 125I-ABA binding were as follows: rabbit A1, N6-cyclopentyladenosine = (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine > N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > or = I-ABA > or = N6-2-(4-aminophenyl) ethyladenosine > > N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide > N6-(4-amino-3-benzyl)adenosine; rabbit A3, N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide > or = I-ABA > > N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > N6-2-(4-aminophenyl) ethyladenosine = N6-cyclopentyladenosine = (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine > N6-(4-amino-3-benzyl)adenosine. The adenosine receptor antagonist rank orders were as follow: rabbit A1, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine > 1,3- dipropyl-8-(4-acrylate)phenylxanthine > or = xanthine amine congener > > 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline; rabbit A3, xanthine amine congener > 1,3-dipropyl-8-(4-acrylate)phenylxanthine > or = 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine > > 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline. These observations confirm the identity of the expressed proteins as A1 and A3 receptors. The results will facilitate further in-depth studies of the roles of A1 and A3 receptors in

  1. Molecular expression of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 human ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Hajiahmadi, S.; Panjehpour, M.; Aghaei, M.; Mousavi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (A1, A2a, A2b and A3) have several physiological and pathological roles in cancer cell lines. The present study was carried out to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression profile and functional role of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cell lines. The levels of mRNA and protein expression of A1, A2a, A2b and A3 adenosine receptors in the ovarian cancer cell lines were measured by Real-time PCR and western blotting. The functional roles of adenosine receptors were investigated through measurement of cAMP levels after agonist treatment. The mRNA and protein of all adenosine receptors subtypes were expressed in the ovarian cancer cell lines. Our findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 had the most mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, cAMP assay confirmed the functional role of A2b and A3 adenosine receptors. This findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 subtypes are most important adenosine receptors in humn ovarian cancer cell lines. This information provide a strong possibility into the relationship of A2b and A3 adenosine receptor and ovarian cancer. PMID:26430456

  2. Molecular expression of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 human ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hajiahmadi, S; Panjehpour, M; Aghaei, M; Mousavi, S

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (A1, A2a, A2b and A3) have several physiological and pathological roles in cancer cell lines. The present study was carried out to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression profile and functional role of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cell lines. The levels of mRNA and protein expression of A1, A2a, A2b and A3 adenosine receptors in the ovarian cancer cell lines were measured by Real-time PCR and western blotting. The functional roles of adenosine receptors were investigated through measurement of cAMP levels after agonist treatment. The mRNA and protein of all adenosine receptors subtypes were expressed in the ovarian cancer cell lines. Our findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 had the most mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, cAMP assay confirmed the functional role of A2b and A3 adenosine receptors. This findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 subtypes are most important adenosine receptors in humn ovarian cancer cell lines. This information provide a strong possibility into the relationship of A2b and A3 adenosine receptor and ovarian cancer. PMID:26430456

  3. Liver MicroRNA-291b-3p Promotes Hepatic Lipogenesis through Negative Regulation of Adenosine 5'-Monophosphate (AMP)-activated Protein Kinase α1.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangyu; Guo, Jun; Fang, Weiwei; Dou, Lin; Li, Meng; Huang, Xiuqing; Zhou, Shutong; Man, Yong; Tang, Weiqing; Yu, Liqing; Li, Jian

    2016-05-13

    In a microarray study, we found that hepatic miR-291b-3p was significantly increased in leptin-receptor-deficient type 2 mice (db/db), a mouse model of diabetes. The function of miR-291b-3p is unknown. The potential role of miR-291b-3p in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism was explored in this study. High-fat diet (HFD)- and chow-fed mice were injected with an adenovirus expressing a miR-291b-3p inhibitor and a miR-291b-3p mimic through the tail vein. Hepatic lipids and lipogenic gene expression were analyzed. Additionally, gain- and loss-of-function studies were performed in vitro to identify direct targets of miR-291b-3p. MiR-291b-3p expression and the protein levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were increased in the steatotic liver of db/db mice and HFD-fed mice versus their respective controls. Inhibition of hepatic miR-291b-3p expression prevented increases in hepatic lipogenesis and steatosis in HFD-fed mice. The opposite was observed when miR-291b-3p was overexpressed in the livers of chow-fed C57BL/6J wild-type mice. In vitro studies revealed that silencing of miR-291b-3p in NCTC1469 hepatic cells ameliorated oleic acid/palmitic acid mixture-induced elevation of cellular triglycerides. Importantly, we identified AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-α1 as a direct target of miR-291b-3p. Using metformin, an activator of AMPK, we showed that AMPK activation-induced inhibition of hepatic lipid accumulation was accompanied by reduced expression of miR-291b-3p in the liver. Liver miR-291b-3p promoted hepatic lipogenesis and lipid accumulation in mice. AMPKα1 is a direct target of miR-291b-3p. In conclusion, our findings indicate that miR-291b-3p promotes hepatic lipogenesis by suppressing AMPKα1 expression and activity, indicating the therapeutic potential of miR-291b-3p inhibitors in fatty liver disease. PMID:27013659

  4. Early glycogen synthase kinase-3β and protein phosphatase 2A independent tau dephosphorylation during global brain ischaemia and reperfusion following cardiac arrest and the role of the adenosine monophosphate kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Majd, Shohreh; Power, John H T; Koblar, Simon A; Grantham, Hugh J M

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal tau phosphorylation (p-tau) has been shown after hypoxic damage to the brain associated with traumatic brain injury and stroke. As the level of p-tau is controlled by Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK)-3β, Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and Adenosine Monophosphate Kinase (AMPK), different activity levels of these enzymes could be involved in tau phosphorylation following ischaemia. This study assessed the effects of global brain ischaemia/reperfusion on the immediate status of p-tau in a rat model of cardiac arrest (CA) followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We reported an early dephosphorylation of tau at its AMPK sensitive residues, Ser(396) and Ser(262) after 2 min of ischaemia, which did not recover during the first two hours of reperfusion, while the tau phosphorylation at GSK-3β sensitive but AMPK insensitive residues, Ser(202) /Thr(205) (AT8), as well as the total amount of tau remained unchanged. Our data showed no alteration in the activities of GSK-3β and PP2A during similar episodes of ischaemia of up to 8 min and reperfusion of up to 2 h, and 4 weeks recovery. Dephosphorylation of AMPK followed the same pattern as tau dephosphorylation during ischaemia/reperfusion. Catalase, another AMPK downstream substrate also showed a similar pattern of decline to p-AMPK, in ischaemic/reperfusion groups. This suggests the involvement of AMPK in changing the p-tau levels, indicating that tau dephosphorylation following ischaemia is not dependent on GSK-3β or PP2A activity, but is associated with AMPK dephosphorylation. We propose that a reduction in AMPK activity is a possible early mechanism responsible for tau dephosphorylation. PMID:27177932

  5. Conservation and divergence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate–protein kinase A (cAMP–PKA) pathway in two plant‐pathogenic fungi: Fusarium graminearum and F. verticillioides

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Breakspear, Andrew; Zhao, Guoyi; Gao, Lixin; Kistler, H. Corby; Xu, Jin‐Rong

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cyclic adenosine monophosphate–protein kinase A (cAMP–PKA) pathway is a central signalling cascade that transmits extracellular stimuli and governs cell responses through the second messenger cAMP. The importance of cAMP signalling in fungal biology has been well documented and the key conserved components, adenylate cyclase (AC) and the catalytic subunit of PKA (CPKA), have been functionally characterized. However, other genes involved in this signalling pathway and their regulation are not well understood in filamentous fungi. Here, we performed a comparative transcriptomics analysis of AC and CPKA mutants in two closely related fungi: Fusarium graminearum (Fg) and F. verticillioides (Fv). Combining available Fg transcriptomics and phenomics data, we reconstructed the Fg cAMP signalling pathway. We developed a computational program that combines sequence conservation and patterns of orthologous gene expression to facilitate global transcriptomics comparisons between different organisms. We observed highly correlated expression patterns for most orthologues (80%) between Fg and Fv. We also identified a subset of 482 (6%) diverged orthologues, whose expression under all conditions was at least 50% higher in one genome than in the other. This enabled us to dissect the conserved and unique portions of the cAMP–PKA pathway. Although the conserved portions controlled essential functions, such as metabolism, the cell cycle, chromatin remodelling and the oxidative stress response, the diverged portions had species‐specific roles, such as the production and detoxification of secondary metabolites unique to each species. The evolution of the cAMP–PKA signalling pathway seems to have contributed directly to fungal divergence and niche adaptation. PMID:25907134

  6. Fluorescent Ligands for Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, Eszter; Jayasekara, P Suresh; Squarcialupi, Lucia; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Federico, Stephanie; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Interest is increasing in developing fluorescent ligands for characterization of adenosine receptors (ARs), which hold a promise of usefulness in the drug discovery process. The size of a strategically labeled AR ligand can be greatly increased after the attachment of a fluorophore. The choice of dye moiety (e.g. Alexa Fluor 488), attachment point and linker length can alter the selectivity and potency of the parent molecule. Fluorescent derivatives of adenosine agonists and antagonists (e.g. XAC and other heterocyclic antagonist scaffolds) have been synthesized and characterized pharmacologically. Some are useful AR probes for flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and scanning confocal microscopy. Thus, the approach of fluorescent labeled GPCR ligands, including those for ARs, is a growing dynamic research field. PMID:23200243

  7. The functional unit of calcium-plus-magnesium-ion-dependent adenosine triphosphatase from sarcoplasmic reticulum. The aggregational state of the deoxycholate-solubilized protein in an enzymically active form

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Karl E.; Lind, Kirsten E.; Røigaard-Petersen, Hans; Møller, Jesper V.

    1978-01-01

    Vesicles consisting of (Ca2++Mg2+)-dependent ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase), and lipid were prepared from sarcoplasmic reticulum of rabbit skeletal muscle. As with non-ionic detergents [le Maire, Møller & Tanford (1976) Biochemistry 15, 2336–2342] the (Ca2++Mg2+)-dependent ATPase after solubilization by deoxycholate showed a pronounced tendency to form oligomers in gel-chromatographic experiments, when eluted in the presence of deoxycholate and phosphatidylcholine. To evaluate the functional significance of oligomer formation the properties of enzymically active preparations of ATPase, solubilized by deoxycholate, were studied. Such preparations were obtained at a protein concentration of 2.5mg/ml in the presence of a high salt concentration (0.4m-KCl) and sucrose (0.3m) in the solubilization medium. Analytical ultracentrifugation of solubilized ATPase showed one protein boundary moving at the same rate as gel-chromatographically prepared monomeric ATPase (s20,w=6.0S). From simultaneous measurements of the diffusion coefficient an apparent molecular weight of 133000 was calculated, consistent with solubilization of ATPase in predominantly monomeric form. The enzymic activity of deoxycholate-solubilized ATPase when measured directly in the solubilization medium at optimal Ca2+ and MgATP concentrations was about 35–50% of that of vesicular ATPase. The dependence of enzymic activity on MgATP concentration indicated that the solubilized ATPase retained high-affinity binding of MgATP, but the presence of high concentrations of the nucleotide did not stimulate activity further, in contrast with that of vesicular ATPase. The dependence of enzymic activity on the free Ca2+ concentration was essentially the same for both solubilized and vesicular forms, indicating that interaction of ATPase with more than one molecule of Ca2+ is required for enzyme activity. Solubilized enzyme at 20°C was phosphorylated to about the same degree as vesicular ATPase. It is concluded

  8. Adenosine-induced activation of esophageal nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Ru, F; Surdenikova, L; Brozmanova, M; Kollarik, M

    2011-03-01

    Clinical studies implicate adenosine acting on esophageal nociceptive pathways in the pathogenesis of noncardiac chest pain originating from the esophagus. However, the effect of adenosine on esophageal afferent nerve subtypes is incompletely understood. We addressed the hypothesis that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Whole cell perforated patch-clamp recordings and single-cell RT-PCR analysis were performed on the primary afferent neurons retrogradely labeled from the esophagus in the guinea pig. Extracellular recordings were made from the isolated innervated esophagus. In patch-clamp studies, adenosine evoked activation (inward current) in a majority of putative nociceptive (capsaicin-sensitive) vagal nodose, vagal jugular, and spinal dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons innervating the esophagus. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis indicated that the majority of the putative nociceptive (transient receptor potential V1-positive) neurons innervating the esophagus express the adenosine receptors. The neural crest-derived (spinal DRG and vagal jugular) esophageal nociceptors expressed predominantly the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes-derived vagal nodose nociceptors expressed the adenosine A(1) and/or A(2A) receptors. Consistent with the studies in the cell bodies, adenosine evoked activation (overt action potential discharge) in esophageal nociceptive nerve terminals. Furthermore, the neural crest-derived jugular nociceptors were activated by the selective A(1) receptor agonist CCPA, and the placodes-derived nodose nociceptors were activated by CCPA and/or the selective adenosine A(2A) receptor CGS-21680. In contrast to esophageal nociceptors, adenosine failed to stimulate the vagal esophageal low-threshold (tension) mechanosensors. We conclude that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Our data indicate that the esophageal neural crest-derived nociceptors can be activated via the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes

  9. Characteristic molecular vibrations of adenosine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Chee, Hyun Keun; Yang, Jin-San; Joung, Je-Gun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Oh, S June

    2015-02-13

    Although the regulation of membrane receptor activation is known to be crucial for molecular signal transduction, the molecular mechanism underlying receptor activation is not fully elucidated. Here we study the physicochemical nature of membrane receptor behavior by investigating the characteristic molecular vibrations of receptor ligands using computational chemistry and informatics methods. By using information gain, t-tests, and support vector machines, we have identified highly informative features of adenosine receptor (AdoR) ligand and corresponding functional amino acid residues such as Asn (6.55) of AdoR that has informative significance and is indispensable for ligand recognition of AdoRs. These findings may provide new perspectives and insights into the fundamental mechanism of class A G protein-coupled receptor activation. PMID:25622891

  10. Effectors of cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate up-regulating-oxytocin receptors in rabbit amnion cells: isoproterenol, parathyroid hormone-related protein, and potentiation by cortisol.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Y J; Hinko, A; Soloff, M S

    1995-11-01

    Forskolin (FSK; an activator of adenylyl cyclase) and cortisol synergistically increase the concentration of oxytocin receptors (OTRs) in rabbit amnion cells. The aims of this study were to characterize potential physiological regulators of OTR concentrations acting through adenylyl cyclase and to clarify the mechanisms of potentiation by cAMP and cortisol. Both isoproterenol (ISO) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) elevated amnion cell cAMP levels and OTR concentrations. The effects of ISO and PTHrP on OTR were potentiated by cortisol. Cortisol had no effect on the ability of ISO or PTHrP to stimulate adenylyl cyclase activity, and cAMP did not affect the number or affinity of glucocorticoid receptors in whole cells or in cytosol. Adenylyl cyclase activation, however, caused conversion of mifepristone (RU486) from a glucocorticoid antagonist to agonist. Thus, mifepristone elevated OTR receptor concentrations in the presence of FSK. In contrast, a structurally related glucocorticoid antagonist, onapristone (ZK98 299), was unaffected by cAMP. Because glucocorticoid receptors bound to mifepristone are capable of interacting with DNA, whereas onapristone-occupied receptors are not, we conclude that cAMP affects glucocoticoid receptor-DNA interactions, accounting for the synergistic effects of cAMP and cortisol on OTRs. PMID:8527507

  11. Parathyroid hormone induces transcription of collagenase in rat osteoblastic cells by a mechanism using cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and requiring protein synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. K.; Brakenhoff, K. D.; Clohisy, J. C.; Quinn, C. O.; Partridge, N. C.

    1992-01-01

    Collagenase is synthesized and secreted by rat osteoblastic cells in response to PTH. We have previously demonstrated that this effect involves a substantial increase in collagenase mRNA via transcription. Northern blots and nuclear run-on assays were performed to further investigate the induction of collagenase by PTH in the rat osteoblastic cell line UMR 106-01. Detectable amounts of collagenase mRNA were not apparent until 2 h of PTH treatment, showed the greatest abundance at 4 h, and declined to approximately 30% of maximum by 8 h. The changes in the rate of transcription of the collagenase gene in response to PTH paralleled and preceded the changes in the steady state mRNA levels. After an initial lag period of about 1 h, collagenase transcription rates increased from very low levels to a maximal response at 2 h, returning to about 50% of maximum by 10 h. The increased transcriptional rate of the collagenase gene was found to be dependent on the concentration of PTH, with a half-maximal response at approximately 7 x 10(-10) M rat PTH-(1-34) and a maximal effect with a dose of 10(-8) M. The PTH-mediated induction of collagenase transcriptional activity was completely abolished by cycloheximide, while transcription of the beta-actin gene was unaffected by the translation inhibitor. These data suggest that a protein factor(s) is required for PTH-mediated transcriptional induction of collagenase. Since PTH increases intracellular levels of several potential second messengers, agents that mimic these substances were employed to determine which signal transduction pathway is predominant in the PTH-mediated stimulation of collagenase transcription.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  12. Pyrimidine starvation induced by adenosine in fibroblasts and lymphoid cells: role of adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Green, H; Chan, T

    1973-11-23

    In the presence of 10(-4) to 10(-5) molar adenosine, established cell lines of fibroblastic or lymphoid origin die of pyrimidine starvation. Less than lethal concentrations inhibit cell growth. Over a broad concentration range, the effects of adenosine are prevented by providing a suitable pyrimidine source. We suggest that the recently described immune deficiency disease associated with absence of adenosine deaminase may be the result of pyrimidine starvation induced by adenosine nucleotides in cells of the lymphoid system. PMID:4795749

  13. Relationship between Ni(II) and Zn(II) Coordination and Nucleotide Binding by the Helicobacter pylori [NiFe]-Hydrogenase and Urease Maturation Factor HypB*

    PubMed Central

    Sydor, Andrew M.; Lebrette, Hugo; Ariyakumaran, Rishikesh; Cavazza, Christine; Zamble, Deborah B.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogen Helicobacter pylori requires two nickel-containing enzymes, urease and [NiFe]-hydrogenase, for efficient colonization of the human gastric mucosa. These enzymes possess complex metallocenters that are assembled by teams of proteins in multistep pathways. One essential accessory protein is the GTPase HypB, which is required for Ni(II) delivery to [NiFe]-hydrogenase and participates in urease maturation. Ni(II) or Zn(II) binding to a site embedded in the GTPase domain of HypB modulates the enzymatic activity, suggesting a mechanism of regulation. In this study, biochemical and structural analyses of H. pylori HypB (HpHypB) revealed an intricate link between nucleotide and metal binding. HpHypB nickel coordination, stoichiometry, and affinity were modulated by GTP and GDP, an effect not observed for zinc, and biochemical evidence suggests that His-107 coordination to nickel toggles on and off in a nucleotide-dependent manner. These results are consistent with the crystal structure of HpHypB loaded with Ni(II), GDP, and Pi, which reveals a nickel site distinct from that of zinc-loaded Methanocaldococcus jannaschii HypB as well as subtle changes to the protein structure. Furthermore, Cys-142, a metal ligand from the Switch II GTPase motif, was identified as a key component of the signal transduction between metal binding and the enzymatic activity. Finally, potassium accelerated the enzymatic activity of HpHypB but had no effect on the other biochemical properties of the protein. Altogether, this molecular level information about HpHypB provides insight into its cellular function and illuminates a possible mechanism of metal ion discrimination. PMID:24338018

  14. Molecular cloning of a coiled-coil-nucleotide-binding-site-leucine-rich repeat gene from pearl millet and its expression pattern in response to the downy mildew pathogen.

    PubMed

    Veena, Mariswamy; Melvin, Prasad; Prabhu, Sreedhara Ashok; Shailasree, Sekhar; Shetty, Hunthrike Shekar; Kini, Kukkundoor Ramachandra

    2016-03-01

    Downy mildew caused by Sclerospora graminicola is a devastating disease of pearl millet. Based on candidate gene approach, a set of 22 resistance gene analogues were identified. The clone RGPM 301 (AY117410) containing a partial sequence shared 83% similarity to rice R-proteins. A full-length R-gene RGA RGPM 301 of 3552 bp with 2979 bp open reading frame encoding 992 amino acids was isolated by the degenerate primers and rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR) approach. It had a molecular mass of 113.96 kDa and isoelectric point (pI) of 8.71. The sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis grouped it to a non-TIR NBS LRR group. The quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed higher accumulation of the transcripts following inoculation with S. graminicola in the resistant cultivar (IP18296) compared to susceptible cultivar (7042S). Further, significant induction in the transcript levels were observed when treated with abiotic elicitor β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) and biotic elicitor Pseudomonas fluorescens. Exogenous application of phytohormones jasmonic acid or salicylic acid also up-regulated the expression levels of RGA RGPM 301. The treatment of cultivar IP18296 with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) suppressed the levels of RGA RGPM 301. A 3.5 kb RGA RGPM 301 which is a non-TIR NBS-LRR protein was isolated from pearl millet and its up-regulation during downy mildew interaction was demonstrated by qRT-PCR. These studies indicate a role for this RGA in pearl millet downy mildew interaction. PMID:26842722

  15. Airway hyperresponsiveness to adenosine induced by lipopolysaccharide in Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Tigani, B; Hannon, J P; Rondeau, C; Mazzoni, L; Fozard, J R

    2002-01-01

    We have explored the effects of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) on the response of the airways of Brown Norway (BN) rats to adenosine. Comparisons have been drawn with the effects on responses to methacholine and 5-hydroxytryptamine.In vehicle-challenged animals, adenosine, given i.v. was only a weak bronchoconstrictor. In contrast, 1 h following intratracheal administration of LPS, 0.3 mg kg−1, bronchoconstrictor responses to adenosine were markedly and selectively enhanced. At this time point, there were no significant changes in leukocyte numbers, eosinophil peroxidase and myeloperoxidase activities or protein concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Twenty-four hours after challenge, the sensitivity of the airways to both adenosine and methacholine was reduced relative to the earlier time point and there were substantial increases in each marker of inflammation in BAL fluid.The bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine was blocked selectively by methysergide, disodium cromoglycate and the broad-spectrum adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-SPT, but not by DPCPX or ZM 243185, selective antagonists for the A1 and A2A receptors, respectively.Thus, the response to adenosine augmented following LPS is mast cell mediated and involves a receptor which can be blocked by 8-SPT but not by selective A1 or A2A receptor antagonists. It thus bears similarity to the augmented response to adenosine induced by allergen challenge in actively sensitized BN rats. Exposure to LPS could be a factor along with allergen in determining the increased sensitivity of the airways of asthmatics to adenosine. PMID:11976275

  16. Kinetics of nucleotide binding to the β-subunit (AKR6A2) of the voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel

    PubMed Central

    Barski, Oleg A.; Tipparaju, Srinivas M.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-01-01

    The β-subunits of the voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels modulate the kinetics and the gating of Kv channels and assists in channel trafficking and membrane localization. These proteins are members of the AKR6 family. They share a common (α/β)8 barrel structural fold and avidly bind pyridine nucleotides. Low catalytic activity has been reported for these proteins. Kinetic studies with rat Kvβ2 revealed that the chemical step is largely responsible for the rate-limitation but nucleotide exchange could also contribute to the overall rate. Herein we report our investigations on the kinetics of cofactor exchange using nucleotide-free preparations of Kvβ2. Kinetic traces measuring quenching of Kvβ2 fluorescence by NADP+ were consistent with a two-step binding mechanism which includes rapid formation of a loose enzyme:cofactor complex followed by a slow conformational rearrangement to form a tight final complex. Closing of the nucleotide enfolding loop, which in the crystal structure folds over the bound cofactor, provides the structural basis for this rearrangement. The rate of the loop opening required to release the cofactor is similar for NADPH and NADP+ (0.9 min−1) and is of the same order of magnitude as the rate of the chemical step estimated previously from kinetic studies with 4-nitrobenzaldehyde (0.3–0.8 min−1, Tipparaju et al., Biochemistry 47 (2008) 8840–8854). Binding of NADPH is accompanied by a second conformational change that might be responsible for a 4-fold higher affinity observed with the reduced cofactor and the resulting difficulty in removing bound NADPH from the protein. These data provide evidence that nucleotide exchange occurs on a seconds to minutes time scale and set the upper limit for the maximal possible rate of catalysis by Kvβ2. Slow cofactor exchange is consistent with the role of the β-subunit as a metabolic sensor implicated in tonic regulation of potassium currents. PMID:19013139

  17. Potassium Acts as a GTPase-Activating Element on Each Nucleotide-Binding Domain of the Essential Bacillus subtilis EngA

    PubMed Central

    Foucher, Anne-Emmanuelle; Reiser, Jean-Baptiste; Ebel, Christine; Housset, Dominique; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    EngA proteins form a unique family of bacterial GTPases with two GTP-binding domains in tandem, namely GD1 and GD2, followed by a KH (K-homology) domain. They have been shown to interact with the bacterial ribosome and to be involved in its biogenesis. Most prokaryotic EngA possess a high GTPase activity in contrast to eukaryotic GTPases that act mainly as molecular switches. Here, we have purified and characterized the GTPase activity of the Bacillus subtilis EngA and two shortened EngA variants that only contain GD1 or GD2-KH. Interestingly, the GTPase activity of GD1 alone is similar to that of the whole EngA, whereas GD2-KH has a 150-fold lower GTPase activity. At physiological concentration, potassium strongly stimulates the GTPase activity of each protein construct. Interestingly, it affects neither the affinities for nucleotides nor the monomeric status of EngA or the GD1 domain. Thus, potassium likely acts as a chemical GTPase-activating element as proposed for another bacterial GTPase like MnmE. However, unlike MnmE, potassium does not promote dimerization of EngA. In addition, we solved two crystal structures of full-length EngA. One of them contained for the first time a GTP-like analogue bound to GD2 while GD1 was free. Surprisingly, its overall fold was similar to a previously solved structure with GDP bound to both sites. Our data indicate that a significant structural change must occur upon K+ binding to GD2, and a comparison with T. maritima EngA and MnmE structures allowed us to propose a model explaining the chemical basis for the different GTPase activities of GD1 and GD2. PMID:23056455

  18. Effects of adenosine on intrarenal oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Dinour, D; Brezis, M

    1991-11-01

    Although generally a vasodilator, adenosine vasoconstricts cortical vessels in the kidney, reduces glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and increases medullary blood flow, effects likely to improve the medullary O2 deficiency characteristic of mammalian kidneys. To evaluate a possible role of adenosine in medullary O2 balance, we investigated the effect of adenosine upon cortical and medullary tissue PO2. Adenosine was infused into renal interstitium through chronically implanted capsules. Cortical and medullary PO2 were measured using sensitive Clark-type O2 microelectrodes inserted into kidneys of anesthetized rats at the respective depths of 1.8 and 3.7 mm. Infusion of adenosine (0.1-0.5 mumol/min) increased medullary PO2 from 17 +/- 3 (SE) to 40 +/- 5 mmHG (P less than 0.001) and decreased cortical PO2 from 64 +/- 4 to 47 +/- 3 mmHg (P less than 0.001). After the infusion was stopped, PO2 returned to baseline at both sites. Coadministration of adenosine receptor antagonist 8-phenyltheophylline (0.01 mumol/min) prevented both cortical and medullary effects of adenosine. We concluded that adenosine could play an important protective and regulatory role in renal medullary O2 balance. PMID:1951710

  19. Adenosine Neuromodulation and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lusardi, T.A

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule, with widespread activity across all organ systems. There is evidence that adenosine regulation is a significant factor in traumatic brain injury (TBI) onset, recovery, and outcome, and a growing body of experimental work examining the therapeutic potential of adenosine neuromodulation in the treatment of TBI. In the central nervous system (CNS), adenosine (dys)regulation has been demonstrated following TBI, and correlated to several TBI pathologies, including impaired cerebral hemodynamics, anaerobic metabolism, and inflammation. In addition to acute pathologies, adenosine function has been implicated in TBI comorbidities, such as cognitive deficits, psychiatric function, and post-traumatic epilepsy. This review presents studies in TBI as well as adenosine-related mechanisms in co-morbidities of and unfavorable outcomes resulting from TBI. While the exact role of the adenosine system following TBI remains unclear, there is increasing evidence that a thorough understanding of adenosine signaling will be critical to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for the treatment of TBI. PMID:20190964

  20. Enzymatic regeneration of adenosine triphosphate cofactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Regenerating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by enzymatic process which utilizes carbamyl phosphate as phosphoryl donor is technique used to regenerate expensive cofactors. Process allows complex enzymatic reactions to be considered as candidates for large-scale continuous processes.

  1. Mechanism of dysfunction of two nucleotide binding domain mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator that are associated with pancreatic sufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, D N; Ostedgaard, L S; Winter, M C; Welsh, M J

    1995-01-01

    Variability in the severity of cystic fibrosis (CF) is in part due to specific mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. To understand better how mutations in CFTR disrupt Cl- channel function and to learn about the relationship between genotype and phenotype, we studied two CF mutants, A455E and P574H, that are associated with pancreatic sufficiency. A455E and P574H are located close to conserved ATP binding motifs in CFTR. Both mutants generated cAMP-stimulated apical membrane Cl- currents in heterologous epithelial cells, but current magnitudes were reduced compared with wild-type. Patch-clamp analysis revealed that both mutants had normal conductive properties and regulation by phosphorylation and nucleotides. These mutants had normal or increased Cl- channel activity: A455E had an open-state probability (Po) similar to wild-type, and P574H had an increased Po because bursts of activity were prolonged. However, both mutants produced less mature glycosylated protein, although levels were greater than observed with the delta F508 mutant. These changes in channel activity and processing provide a quantitative explanation for the reduced apical Cl- current. These data also dissociate structural requirements for channel function from features that determine processing. Finally, the results suggest that the residual function associated with these two mutants is sufficient to confer a milder clinical phenotype and infer approaches to developing treatments. Images PMID:7534226

  2. The Nucleotide-binding State of Microtubules Modulates Kinesin Processivity and the Ability of Tau to Inhibit Kinesin-mediated Transport*

    PubMed Central

    McVicker, Derrick P.; Chrin, Lynn R.; Berger, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Tau to act as a potent inhibitor of kinesin's processive run length in vitro suggests that it may actively participate in the regulation of axonal transport in vivo. However, it remains unclear how kinesin-based transport could then proceed effectively in neurons, where Tau is expressed at high levels. One potential explanation is that Tau, a conformationally dynamic protein, has multiple modes of interaction with the microtubule, not all of which inhibit kinesin's processive run length. Previous studies support the hypothesis that Tau has at least two modes of interaction with microtubules, but the mechanisms by which Tau adopts these different conformations and their functional consequences have not been investigated previously. In the present study, we have used single molecule imaging techniques to demonstrate that Tau inhibits kinesin's processive run length in an isoform-dependent manner on GDP-microtubules stabilized with either paclitaxel or glycerol/DMSO but not guanosine-5′-((α,β)-methyleno)triphosphate (GMPCPP)-stabilized microtubules. Furthermore, the order of Tau addition to microtubules before or after polymerization has no effect on the ability of Tau to modulate kinesin motility regardless of the stabilizing agent used. Finally, the processive run length of kinesin is reduced on GMPCPP-microtubules relative to GDP-microtubules, and kinesin's velocity is enhanced in the presence of 4-repeat long Tau but not the 3-repeat short isoform. These results shed new light on the potential role of Tau in the regulation of axonal transport, which is more complex than previously recognized. PMID:22039058

  3. Adenosine and the adenosine A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, upregulate CD39 and CD73 expression through E2F-1 and CREB in regulatory T cells isolated from septic mice.

    PubMed

    Bao, Rui; Shui, Xianqi; Hou, Jiong; Li, Jinbao; Deng, Xiaoming; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Tao

    2016-09-01

    The number of regulatory T cells (Treg cells) and the expression of ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 (ENTPD1; also known as CD39) and 5'-ectonucleotidase (NT5E; also known as CD73) on the Treg cell surface are increased during sepsis. In this study, to determine the factors leading to the high expression of CD39 and CD73, and the regulation of the CD39/CD73/adenosine pathway in Treg cells under septic conditions, we constructed a mouse model of sepsis and separated the Treg cells using a flow cytometer. The Treg cells isolated from the peritoneal lavage and splenocytes of the mice were treated with adenosine or the specific adenosine A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, and were transfected with specific siRNA targeting E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F-1) or cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB), which are predicted transcription regulatory factors of CD39 or CD73. The regulatory relationships among these factors were then determined by western blot analysis and dual-luciferase reporter assay. In addition, changes in adenosine metabolism were measured in the treated cells. The results revealed that adenosine and CGS21680 significantly upregulated CD39 and CD73 expression (P<0.01). E2F-1 and CREB induced CD39 and CD73 expression, and were upregulated by adenosine and CGS21680. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis and adenosine generation were inhibited by the knockdown of E2F-1 or CREB, and were accelerated in the presence of CGS21680. Based on these results, it can be inferred that adenosine, the adenosine A2A receptor agonist, E2F-1 and CREB are the possible factors contributing to the high expression of CD39 and CD73 on the Treg cell surface during sepsis. Adenosine and its A2A receptor agonist served as the signal transducer factors of the CD39/CD73/adenosine pathway, accelerating adenosine generation. Our study may benefit further research on adenosine metabolism for the treatment of sepsis

  4. Dietary adenine controls adult lifespan via adenosine nucleotide biosynthesis and AMPK, and regulates the longevity benefit of caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Stenesen, Drew; Suh, Jae Myoung; Seo, Jin; Yu, Kweon; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Jong-Seok; Min, Kyung-Jin; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A common thread among conserved lifespan regulators lies within intertwined roles in metabolism and energy homeostasis. We show that heterozygous mutations of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) biosynthetic enzymes extend Drosophila lifespan. The lifespan benefit of these mutations depends upon increased AMP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to ATP ratios and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Transgenic expression of AMPK in adult fat body or adult muscle, key metabolic tissues, extended lifespan, while AMPK RNAi reduced lifespan. Supplementing adenine, a substrate for AMP biosynthesis, to the diet of long-lived AMP biosynthesis mutants reversed lifespan extension. Remarkably, this simple change in diet also blocked the pro-longevity effects of dietary restriction. These data establish AMP biosynthesis, adenosine nucleotide ratios, and AMPK as determinants of adult lifespan, provide a mechanistic link between cellular anabolism and energy sensing pathways, and indicate that dietary adenine manipulations might alter metabolism to influence animal lifespan. PMID:23312286

  5. Evidence for deactivation of both ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase by adenosine A1 receptor activation in the rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kitakaze, M; Hori, M; Minamino, T; Takashima, S; Komamura, K; Node, K; Kurihara, T; Morioka, T; Sato, H; Inoue, M

    1994-01-01

    Adenosine, an important regulator of many cardiac functions, is produced by ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase. The activity of these enzymes is influenced by several ischemia-sensitive metabolic factors, e.g., ATP, ADP, H+, and inorganic phosphate. However, there is no clear evidence that adenosine itself affects 5'-nucleotidase activity. This study tested whether adenosine decreases the activity of ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from adult male Wistar rats and suspended in the modified Hepes-Tyrode buffer solution. After stabilization, isolated cardiomyocytes were incubated with and without adenosine (10(-9) - 10(-4) M). Ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity was decreased by exogenous adenosine (ectosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity, 20.6 +/- 2.3 vs. 8.6 +/- 1.6 mumol/min per 10(6) cells [P < 0.05]; cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity, 2.47 +/- 0.58 vs. 1.61 +/- 0.54 mumol/min per 10(6) cells [P < 0.05] at 10(-6) M adenosine) after 30 min. The decrease in ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity was inhibited by 8-phenyltheophylline and pertussis toxin, and was mimicked by N6-cyclohexyladenosine, an adenosine A1 receptor agonist. Neither CGS21680C, and A2 receptor agonist, nor cycloheximide deactivated ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase. Thus, we conclude that activation of adenosine A1 receptors is coupled to Gi proteins and attenuates ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity in rat cardiomyocytes. Images PMID:7989602

  6. Maize homologs of HCT, a key enzyme in lignin biosynthesis, bind the NLR Rp1 proteins to modulate the defense response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants, most disease resistance (R) genes encode nucleotide binding leucine-rich-repeat 42 (NLR) proteins that trigger a rapid localized cell death called a hypersensitive response (HR) 43 upon pathogen recognition. The maize NLR protein Rp1-D21 derives from an intragenic 44 recombination between...

  7. Adenosine Kinase: Exploitation for Therapeutic Gain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine kinase (ADK; EC 2.7.1.20) is an evolutionarily conserved phosphotransferase that converts the purine ribonucleoside adenosine into 5′-adenosine-monophosphate. This enzymatic reaction plays a fundamental role in determining the tone of adenosine, which fulfills essential functions as a homeostatic and metabolic regulator in all living systems. Adenosine not only activates specific signaling pathways by activation of four types of adenosine receptors but it is also a primordial metabolite and regulator of biochemical enzyme reactions that couple to bioenergetic and epigenetic functions. By regulating adenosine, ADK can thus be identified as an upstream regulator of complex homeostatic and metabolic networks. Not surprisingly, ADK dysfunction is involved in several pathologies, including diabetes, epilepsy, and cancer. Consequently, ADK emerges as a rational therapeutic target, and adenosine-regulating drugs have been tested extensively. In recent attempts to improve specificity of treatment, localized therapies have been developed to augment adenosine signaling at sites of injury or pathology; those approaches include transplantation of stem cells with deletions of ADK or the use of gene therapy vectors to downregulate ADK expression. More recently, the first human mutations in ADK have been described, and novel findings suggest an unexpected role of ADK in a wider range of pathologies. ADK-regulating strategies thus represent innovative therapeutic opportunities to reconstruct network homeostasis in a multitude of conditions. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the genetics, biochemistry, and pharmacology of ADK and will then focus on pathologies and therapeutic interventions. Challenges to translate ADK-based therapies into clinical use will be discussed critically. PMID:23592612

  8. Gas-phase protonation thermochemistry of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Touboul, David; Bouchoux, Guy; Zenobi, Renato

    2008-09-18

    The goal of this work was to obtain a detailed insight on the gas-phase protonation energetic of adenosine using both mass spectrometric experiments and quantum chemical calculations. The experimental approach used the extended kinetic method with nanoelectrospray ionization and collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. This method provides experimental values for proton affinity, PA(adenosine) = 979 +/- 1 kJ.mol (-1), and for the "protonation entropy", Delta p S degrees (adenosine) = S degrees (adenosineH +) - S degrees (adenosine) = -5 +/- 5 J.mol (-1).K (-1). The corresponding gas-phase basicity is consequently equal to: GB(adenosine) = 945 +/- 2 kJ.mol (-1) at 298K. Theoretical calculations conducted at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level, including 298 K enthalpy correction, predict a proton affinity value of 974 kJ.mol (-1) after consideration of isodesmic proton transfer reactions with pyridine as the reference base. Moreover, computations clearly showed that N3 is the most favorable protonation site for adenosine, due to a strong internal hydrogen bond involving the hydroxyl group at the 2' position of the ribose sugar moiety, unlike observations for adenine and 2'-deoxyadenosine, where protonation occurs on N1. The existence of negligible protonation entropy is confirmed by calculations (theoretical Delta p S degrees (adenosine) approximately -2/-3 J.mol (-1).K (-1)) including conformational analysis and entropy of hindered rotations. Thus, the calculated protonation thermochemical properties are in good agreement with our experimental measurements. It may be noted that the new PA value is approximately 10 kJ.mol (-1) lower than the one reported in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) database, thus pointing to a correction of the tabulated protonation thermochemistry of adenosine. PMID:18720985

  9. Cloning of cDNAs encoding mammalian double-stranded RNA-specific adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, M A; Krause, S; Higuchi, M; Hsuan, J J; Totty, N F; Jenny, A; Keller, W

    1995-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-specific adenosine deaminase converts adenosine to inosine in dsRNA. The protein has been purified from calf thymus, and here we describe the cloning of cDNAs encoding both the human and rat proteins as well as a partial bovine clone. The human and rat clones are very similar at the amino acid level except at their N termini and contain three dsRNA binding motifs, a putative nuclear targeting signal, and a possible deaminase motif. Antibodies raised against the protein encoded by the partial bovine clone specifically recognize the calf thymus dsRNA adenosine deaminase. Furthermore, the antibodies can immunodeplete a calf thymus extract of dsRNA adenosine deaminase activity, and the activity can be restored by addition of pure bovine deaminase. Staining of HeLa cells confirms the nuclear localization of the dsRNA-specific adenosine deaminase. In situ hybridization in rat brain slices indicates a widespread distribution of the enzyme in the brain. PMID:7862132

  10. Adenosine modulates hypoxia-induced responses in rat PC12 cells via the A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Conforti, L; Pun, R Y; Millhorn, D E

    1998-04-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to determine the role of adenosine in mediating the cellular responses to hypoxia in rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells, an oxygen-sensitive clonal cell line. 2. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that PC12 cells express adenosine deaminase (the first catalysing enzyme of adenosine degradation) and the A2A and A2B adenosine receptors, but not the A1 or A3 adenosine receptors. 3. Whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp experiments showed that adenosine attenuated the hypoxia-induced membrane depolarization. The hypoxia-induced suppression of the voltage-sensitive potassium current (IK(V)) was markedly reduced by adenosine. Furthermore, extracellularly applied adenosine increased the peak amplitudes of IK(V) in a concentration-dependent manner. This increase was blocked by pretreatment not only with a non-specific adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT), but also with a selective A2A receptor antagonist, ZM241385. 4. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester (fura-2 AM) revealed that the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ during hypoxic exposure was attenuated significantly by adenosine. Voltage-clamp studies showed that adenosine inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents (ICa) in a concentration-dependent fashion. This inhibition was also abolished by both 8-PT and ZM241385. 5. The modulation of both IK(V) and ICa by adenosine was prevented by intracellular application of an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), PKA inhibitor fragment (6-22) amide. In addition, the effect of adenosine on either IK(V) or ICa was absent in PKA-deficient PC12 cells. 6. These results indicate that the modulatory effects of adenosine on the hypoxia-induced membrane responses of PC12 cells are likely to be mediated via activation of the A2A receptor, and that the PKA pathway is required for these modulatory actions. We propose that this modulation serves to regulate membrane excitability in

  11. Adenosine modulates hypoxia-induced responses in rat PC12 cells via the A2A receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shuichi; Conforti, Laura; Pun, Raymund Y K; Millhorn, David E

    1998-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the role of adenosine in mediating the cellular responses to hypoxia in rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells, an oxygen-sensitive clonal cell line. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that PC12 cells express adenosine deaminase (the first catalysing enzyme of adenosine degradation) and the A2A and A2B adenosine receptors, but not the A1 or A3 adenosine receptors. Whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp experiments showed that adenosine attenuated the hypoxia-induced membrane depolarization. The hypoxia-induced suppression of the voltage-sensitive potassium current (IK(V)) was markedly reduced by adenosine. Furthermore, extracellularly applied adenosine increased the peak amplitudes of IK(V) in a concentration-dependent manner. This increase was blocked by pretreatment not only with a non-specific adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT), but also with a selective A2A receptor antagonist, ZM241385. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester (fura-2 AM) revealed that the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ during hypoxic exposure was attenuated significantly by adenosine. Voltage-clamp studies showed that adenosine inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents (ICa) in a concentration-dependent fashion. This inhibition was also abolished by both 8-PT and ZM241385. The modulation of both IK(V) and ICa by adenosine was prevented by intracellular application of an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), PKA inhibitor fragment (6–22) amide. In addition, the effect of adenosine on either IK(V) or ICa was absent in PKA-deficient PC12 cells. These results indicate that the modulatory effects of adenosine on the hypoxia-induced membrane responses of PC12 cells are likely to be mediated via activation of the A2A receptor, and that the PKA pathway is required for these modulatory actions. We propose that this modulation serves to regulate membrane excitability in PC12 cells and

  12. The Nucleotide-Free State of the Multidrug Resistance ABC Transporter LmrA: Sulfhydryl Cross-Linking Supports a Constant Contact, Head-to-Tail Configuration of the Nucleotide-Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    ABC transporters are integral membrane pumps that are responsible for the import or export of a diverse range of molecules across cell membranes. ABC transporters have been implicated in many phenomena of medical importance, including cystic fibrosis and multidrug resistance in humans. The molecular architecture of ABC transporters comprises two transmembrane domains and two ATP-binding cassettes, or nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), which are highly conserved and contain motifs that are crucial to ATP binding and hydrolysis. Despite the improved clarity of recent structural, biophysical, and biochemical data, the seemingly simple process of ATP binding and hydrolysis remains controversial, with a major unresolved issue being whether the NBD protomers separate during the catalytic cycle. Here chemical cross-linking data is presented for the bacterial ABC multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter LmrA. These indicate that in the absence of nucleotide or substrate, the NBDs come into contact to a significant extent, even at 4°C, where ATPase activity is abrogated. The data are clearly not in accord with an inward-closed conformation akin to that observed in a crystal structure of V. cholerae MsbA. Rather, they suggest a head-to-tail configuration ‘sandwich’ dimer similar to that observed in crystal structures of nucleotide-bound ABC NBDs. We argue the data are more readily reconciled with the notion that the NBDs are in proximity while undergoing intra-domain motions, than with an NBD ‘Switch’ mechanism in which the NBD monomers separate in between ATP hydrolysis cycles. PMID:26120849

  13. Adenosine triphosphate inhibition of yeast trehalase.

    PubMed

    Panek, A D

    1969-09-01

    Yeast trehalase has been found to be inhibited non-competitively by adenosine triphosphate. Such a biological control could explain the accumulation of trehalose during the stationary phase of the growth curve. PMID:5370287

  14. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity.

  15. Protein contacts and ligand binding in the inward-facing model of human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Pajeva, Ilza K; Hanl, Markus; Wiese, Michael

    2013-05-01

    The primary aim of this work was to analyze the contacts between residues in the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) and at the interface between the transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the NBDs in the inward-open homology model of human P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The analysis revealed communication nets through hydrogen bonding in the NBD and at the NBD-TMD interface of each half involving residues from the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) motifs and the coupling helices of the intracellular loops. Similar networks have been identified in P-gp conformations generated by molecular dynamics simulation. Differences have been recorded in the networking between both halves of P-gp. Many of the residue contacts have also been observed in the X-ray crystal structures of other ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which confirms their validity. Next, possible binding pockets involving residues of importance for the TMD-NBD communication were identified. By studying these pockets, binding sites were suggested for rhodamine 123 (R-site) and prazosin (regulatory site) at the NBD-TMD interface that agreed with the experimental data on their location. Additionally, one more R-site in the protein cavity was proposed, in accordance with the available biochemical data. Together with the previously suggested Hoechst 33342 site (H-site), all sites were interpreted with respect to their effects on the protein ATPase activity, in correspondence with the experimental observations. Several residues involved in key contacts in the P-gp NBDs were proposed for further targeted mutagenesis experiments. PMID:23564544

  16. Molecular and functional analyses of a maize autoactive NB-LRR protein identify precise structural requirements for activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant disease resistance is often mediated by nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR or NLR) proteins, which trigger a hypersensitive response (HR), a rapid, localized cell death upon recognition of specific pathogens. The maize NLR-encoding Rp1-D21 gene is the result of an intergenic recomb...

  17. Cytoplasmic and nuclear localizations are important for the hypersensitive response conferred by maize autoactive Rp1-D21 protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance (R-) genes have been isolated from many plant species. Most encode nucleotide binding leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) proteins that trigger a rapid localized programmed cell death termed the hypersensitive response (HR) upon pathogen recognition. Despite their structural similarities, d...

  18. Adenosine receptor agonists attenuate and adenosine receptor antagonists exacerbate opiate withdrawal signs.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Sears, M T

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a role for adenosine in mediating opiate effects. Adenosine receptors and their functions have been shown to be regulated by chronic opiate treatment. This study examines the role of adenosine receptors in the expression of opiate withdrawal behaviors. The effects of single doses of parenterally administered adenosine receptor subtype-selective agonists and antagonists on opiate withdrawal signs in morphine-dependent mice were measured. Mice received subcutaneous morphine pellet treatment for 72 h and then underwent naloxone-precipitated withdrawal after pretreatment with adenosinergic agents. Adenosine agonists attenuated different opiate withdrawal signs. The A1 agonist R-N6(phenylisopropyl)adenosine (0, 0.01, 0.02 mg/kg, IP) significantly reduced wet dog shakes and withdrawal diarrhea, while the A2a-selective agonist 2-p-(2-carboxethyl)phenylethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine or CGS 21680 (0, 0.01, 0.05 mg/kg, IP) significantly inhibited teeth chattering and forepaw treads. Adenosine receptor antagonists enhanced different opiate withdrawal signs. The adenosine A1 antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (0, 1, 10 mg/kg, IP) significantly increased weight loss and the A2 antagonist, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (0, 1 and 10 mg/kg, IP) enhanced wet dog shakes and withdrawal diarrhea. Treatment effects of adenosinergic agents were not due to nonspecific motor effects, as demonstrated by activity monitoring studies. These results support a role for adenosine receptors in the expression of opiate withdrawal and suggest the potential utility of adenosine agonists in its treatment. PMID:8741956

  19. Modulation of GABA-augmented norepinephrine release in female rat brain slices by opioids and adenosine.

    PubMed

    Fiber, J M; Etgen, A M

    2001-07-01

    GABAA receptor activation augments electrically-stimulated release of norepinephrine (NE) from rat brain slices. Because this effect is not observed in synaptoneurosomes, GABA probably acts on inhibitory interneurons to disinhibit NE release. To determine whether opioids or adenosine influence GABA-augmented NE release, hypothalamic and cortical slices from female rats were superfused with GABA or vehicle in the presence and absence of 10 microM morphine or 100 microM adenosine. GABA augments [3H]NE release in the cortex and hypothalamus. Morphine alone has no effect on [3H]NE release, but attenuates GABA augmentation of [3H]NE release in both brain regions. Adenosine alone modestly inhibits [3H]NE release in the cortex, but not in the hypothalamus. Adenosine inhibits GABA-augmented [3H]NE release in both brain regions. The general protein kinase inhibitor H-7, augments [3H]NE release in both brain regions and may have additive effects with GABA in cortical slices. These results implicate opioid and adenosine interneurons and possibly protein kinases in regulating GABAergic influences on NE transmission. PMID:11565619

  20. Adenosine induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via cyclinD1/Cdk4 and Bcl-2/Bax pathways in human ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-3.

    PubMed

    Shirali, Saeid; Aghaei, Mahmoud; Shabani, Mahdi; Fathi, Mojtaba; Sohrabi, Majid; Moeinifard, Marzieh

    2013-04-01

    Adenosine is a regulatory molecule with widespread physiological effects in almost every cells and acts as a potent regulator of cell growth. Adenosine has been shown to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in the several cancer cells via caspase activation and Bcl-2/Bax pathway. The present study was designed to understand the mechanism underlying adenosine-induced apoptosis in the OVCAR-3 human ovarian cancer cells. MTT viability, BrdU and cell counting assays were used to study the cell proliferation effect of adenosine in presence of adenosine deaminase inhibitor and the nucleoside transporter inhibitor. Cell cycle analysis, propidium iodide and annexin V staining, caspase-3 activity assay, cyclinD1, Cdk4, Bcl-2 and Bax protein expressions were assessed to detect apoptosis. Adenosine significantly inhibited cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner in OVCAR-3 cell line. Adenosine induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase via Cdk4/cyclinD1-mediated pathway. Adenosine induced apoptosis, which was determined by Annexin V-FITC staining and increased sub-G1 population. Moreover, down-regulation of Bcl-2 protein expression, up-regulation of Bax protein expression and activation of caspase-3 were observed in response to adenosine treatment. The results of this study suggest that extracellular adenosine induced G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells via cyclinD1/ Cdk4 and Bcl-2/Bax pathways and caspase-3 activation. These data might suggest that adenosine could be used as an agent for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:23345014

  1. Adenosine stimulates DNA fragmentation in human thymocytes by Ca(2+)-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Szondy, Z

    1994-12-15

    Incubation of human thymocytes with an optimum concentration of adenosine and its receptor site agonist, 2-chloroadenosine, induced increases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) (from a resting 0.6 +/- 0.1 to 4.1 +/- 0.2 pmol/10(7) cells within 5 min) and Ca2+ (from the resting 85 +/- 7 nM to a peak of 210 +/- 25 nM) levels and resulted in internucleosomal DNA fragmentation and cell death (apoptosis). Other adenosine analogues were also effective at inducing DNA fragmentation, the order of potency being 2-p-(carboxyethylphenylethylamino)-5'-carboxyamidoadenosine < 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamide)adenosine < or = cyclopentyladenosine < 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA). 2-CA treatment (with an optimum concentration of 40 microM) selectively depleted a thymocyte subpopulation (15-20% of the total cells) which expressed higher levels of the CD3 molecule and which was found mainly in the CD4+CD8+ double positive immature thymocyte population. DNA fragmentation was prevented by the addition of actinomycin D or cycloheximide to the thymocyte suspension, indicating that this process required both mRNA and protein synthesis. Endonuclease activation and cell killing were dependent on an early, sustained increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, most of which was of extracellular origin and was a result of an adenosine-induced inositol trisphosphate release. Other agents known to elevate intracellular cAMP levels by different mechanisms failed to induce similar DNA fragmentation, but enhanced the effect of adenosine. This suggested a supporting role for cAMP in adenosine-induced DNA fragmentation. Phorbol dibutyrate, a protein kinase. C activator, previously shown to inhibit Ca(2+)-dependent DNA fragmentation and cell killing in human thymocytes [McConkey, Hartzell, Jondal and Orrenius (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 13399-13402], at 60 ng/ml concentration also prevented adenosine-induced DNA fragmentation when added prior to adenosine. This suggested a complex cross-talk between the adenosine

  2. Adenosine deaminase in the modulation of immune system and its potential as a novel target for treatment of inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Antonioli, Luca; Colucci, Rocchina; La Motta, Concettina; Tuccori, Marco; Awwad, Oriana; Da Settimo, Federico; Blandizzi, Corrado; Fornai, Matteo

    2012-06-01

    The adenosine pathway is a powerful evolutionarily selected mechanism aimed at a fine modulation of inflammatory responses and protection of tissues from injuries. Adenosine exerts its modulatory effects via interaction with G protein-coupled receptors, designated as A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3). In this regard, extracellular adenosine concentrations are critical in determining its ability of regulating several biological functions. The levels achieved by adenosine in close proximity of its receptors are strictly regulated by a variety of dynamic mechanisms, including intracellular and extracellular biosynthesis, transport and metabolism, based on tissue energy status. In this context, the catabolic enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) represents a critical checkpoint in the regulation of extracellular adenosine levels and, consequently, in the control of receptor stimulation, thus playing a pivotal role in the modulation of purinergic responses to several pathophysiological events, such as chronic pulmonary diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases and sepsis. This article reviews current data on the role played by ADA in the regulation of immune system activity through its modulation of adenosine pathways. Particular attention has been paid to the involvement of ADA in the pathophysiology of relevant inflammatory diseases. In addition, the interest in designing and developing novel ADA inhibitors, as new tools potentially useful for the therapeutic management of inflammatory disorders, has been discussed. PMID:22250650

  3. Photoaffinity labeling of A1-adenosine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.N.; Cristalli, G.; Grifantini, M.; Vittori, S.; Lohse, M.J.

    1985-11-25

    The ligand-binding subunit of the A1-adenosine receptor has been identified by photoaffinity labeling. A photolabile derivative of R-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, R-2-azido-N6-p-hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine (R-AHPIA), has been synthesized as a covalent specific ligand for A1-adenosine receptors. In adenylate cyclase studies with membranes of rat fat cells and human platelets, R-AHPIA has adenosine receptor agonist activity with a more than 60-fold selectivity for the A1-subtype. It competes for (TH)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine binding to A1-receptors of rat brain membranes with a Ki value of 1.6 nM. After UV irradiation, R-AHPIA binds irreversibly to the receptor, as indicated by a loss of (TH)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine binding after extensive washing; the Ki value for this photoinactivation is 1.3 nM. The p-hydroxyphenyl substituent of R-AHPIA can be directly radioiodinated to give a photoaffinity label of high specific radioactivity ( SVI-AHPIA). This compound has a KD value of about 1.5 nM as assessed from saturation and kinetic experiments. Adenosine analogues compete for SVI-AHPIA binding to rat brain membranes with an order of potency characteristic for A1-adenosine receptors. Dissociation curves following UV irradiation at equilibrium demonstrate 30-40% irreversible specific binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicates that the probe is photoincorporated into a single peptide of Mr = 35,000. Labeling of this peptide can be blocked specifically and stereoselectively by adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists in a manner which is typical for the A1-subtype. The results indicate that SVI-AHPIA identifies the ligand-binding subunit of the A1-adenosine receptor, which is a peptide with Mr = 35,000.

  4. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Dessanti, Paola; Zhang, Yang; Allegrini, Simone; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ealick, Steven E.

    2012-03-01

    Adenosine phosphorylase from B. cereus shows a strong preference for adenosine over other 6-oxopurine nucleosides. Mutation of Asp204 to asparagine reduces the efficiency of adenosine cleavage but does not affect inosine cleavage, effectively reversing the substrate specificity. The structures of D204N complexes explain these observations. Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2′-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2′-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2–1.4 Å). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  5. Inhibition of adenosine kinase attenuates inflammation and neurotoxicity in traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saif; Elsherbiny, Nehal M; Bhatia, Kanchan; Elsherbini, Ahmed M; Fulzele, Sadanand; Liou, Gregory I

    2014-12-15

    Traumatic optic neuropathy (TON) is associated with apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells. Local productions of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators from activated microglial cells have been hypothesized to underlie apoptotic processes. We previously demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effect of adenosine, through A2A receptor activation had profound protective influence against retinal injury in traumatic optic neuropathy. This protective effect is limited due to rapid cellular re-uptake of adenosine by equilibrative nucleotside transporter-1 (ENT1) or break down by adenosine kinase (AK), the key enzyme in adenosine clearance pathway. Further, the use of adenosine receptors agonists are limited by systemic side effects. Therefore, we seek to investigate the potential role of amplifying the endogenous ambient level of adenosine by pharmacological inhibition of AK. We tested our hypothesis by comparing TON-induced retinal injury in mice with and without ABT-702 treatment, a selective AK inhibitor (AKI). The retinal-protective effect of ABT-702 was demonstrated by significant reduction of Iba-1, ENT1, TNF-α, IL-6, and iNOS/nNOS protein or mRNA expression in TON as revealed by western blot and real time PCR. TON-induced superoxide anion generation and nitrotyrosine expression were reduced in ABT-702 treated mice retinal sections as determined by immunoflourescence. In addition, ABT-702 attenuated p-ERK1/2 and p-P38 activation in LPS induced activated mouse microglia cells. The results of the present investigation suggested that ABT-702 had a protective role against marked TON-induced retinal inflammation and damage by augmenting the endogenous therapeutic effects of site- and event-specific accumulation of extracellular adenosine. PMID:25457840

  6. Maize homologs of CCoAOMT and HCT, two key enzymes in lignin biosynthesis, form complexes with the NLR Rp1 protein to modulate the defense response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance (R) genes encode nucleotide binding leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) proteins that confer resistance to specific pathogens. Upon pathogen recognition they trigger a defense response that usually includes a so-called hypersensitive response (HR), a rapid localized cell death at the site o...

  7. Nucleoside transporter expression and adenosine uptake in the rat cochlea.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul F; Thorne, Peter R; Muñoz, David J B; Wang, Carol J H; Housley, Gary D; Vlajkovic, Srdjan M

    2007-02-12

    Even though extracellular adenosine plays multiple roles in the cochlea, the mechanisms that control extracellular adenosine concentrations in this organ are unclear. This study investigated the expression of nucleoside transporters and adenosine uptake in the rat cochlea. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed the expression of mRNA transcripts for two equilibrative (ENT1 and ENT2) and two concentrative (CNT1 and CNT2) nucleoside transporters. Exogenous adenosine perfused through the cochlear perilymphatic compartment was taken up by cells lining the compartment. Adenosine uptake was sensitive to changes in extracellular Na concentrations and inhibited by nitrobenzylthioinosine (an adenosine uptake blocker). The study suggests that the bi-directional nucleoside transport supports the uptake and recycling of purines and regulates the activation of adenosine receptors by altering adenosine concentrations in cochlear fluid spaces. PMID:17314663

  8. Role of extracellular cysteine residues in the adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    De Filippo, Elisabetta; Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran; Zappe, Lukas; El-Tayeb, Ali; Schiedel, Anke C; Müller, Christa E

    2016-06-01

    The G protein-coupled A2A adenosine receptor represents an important drug target. Crystal structures and modeling studies indicated that three disulfide bonds are formed between ECL1 and ECL2 (I, Cys71(2.69)-Cys159(45.43); II, Cys74(3.22)-Cys146(45.30), and III, Cys77(3.25)-Cys166(45.50)). However, the A2BAR subtype appears to require only disulfide bond III for proper function. In this study, each of the three disulfide bonds in the A2AAR was disrupted by mutation of one of the cysteine residues to serine. The mutant receptors were stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and analyzed in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and radioligand binding studies using structurally diverse agonists: adenosine, NECA, CGS21680, and PSB-15826. Results were rationalized by molecular modeling. The observed effects were dependent on the investigated agonist. Loss of disulfide bond I led to a widening of the orthosteric binding pocket resulting in a strong reduction in the potency of adenosine, but not of NECA or 2-substituted nucleosides. Disruption of disulfide bond II led to a significant reduction in the agonists' efficacy indicating its importance for receptor activation. Disulfide bond III disruption reduced potency and affinity of the small adenosine agonists and NECA, but not of the larger 2-substituted agonists. While all the three disulfide bonds were essential for high potency or efficacy of adenosine, structural modification of the nucleoside could rescue affinity or efficacy at the mutant receptors. At present, it cannot be excluded that formation of the extracellular disulfide bonds in the A2AAR is dynamic. This might add another level of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) modulation, in particular for the cysteine-rich A2A and A2BARs. PMID:26969588

  9. Adenosine metabolism in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, F F; Mendelsohn, J; Seegmiller, J E

    1976-01-01

    The association of a human genetic deficiency of adenosine deaminase activity with combined immunodeficiency prompted a study of the effects of adenosine and of inhibition of adenosine deaminase activity on human lymphocyte transformation and a detailed study of adenosine metabolism throughout phytohemagglutinin-induced blastogenesis. The adenosine deaminase inhibitor, coformycin, at a concentration that inhibited adenosine deaminase activity more than 95%, or 50 muM adenosine, did not prevent blastogenesis by criteria of morphology or thymidine incorporation into acid-precipitable material. The combination of coformycin and adenosine, however, substantially reduced both the viable cell count and the incorporation of thymidine into DNA in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes. Incubation of lymphocytes with phytohemagglutinin for 72 h produced a 12-fold increase in the rate of deamination and a 6-fold increase in phosphorylation of adenosine by intact lymphocytes. There was no change in the apparent affinity for adenosine with either deamination or phosphorylation. The increased rates of metabolism, apparent as early as 3 h after addition of mitogen, may be due to increased entry of the nucleoside into stimulated lymphocytes. Increased adenosine metabolism was not due to changes in total enzyme activity; after 72 h in culture, the ratios of specific activities in extracts of stimulated to unstimulated lymphocytes were essentially unchanged for adenosine kinase, 0.92, and decreased for adenosine deaminase, 0.44. As much as 38% of the initial lymphocyte adenosine deaminase activity accumulated extracellularly after a 72-h culture with phytohemagglutinin. In phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes, the principal route of adenosine metabolism was phosphorylation at less than 5 muM adenosine, and deamination at concentrations greater than 5 muM. In unstimulated lymphocytes, deamination was the principal route of adenosine metabolism over the range of adenosine

  10. Regulation of photoreceptor gap junction phosphorylation by adenosine in zebrafish retina

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyan; Chuang, Alice Z.; O’Brien, John

    2014-01-01

    Electrical coupling of photoreceptors through gap junctions suppresses voltage noise, routes rod signals into cone pathways, expands the dynamic range of rod photoreceptors in high scotopic and mesopic illumination, and improves detection of contrast and small stimuli. In essentially all vertebrates, connexin 35/36 (gene homologues Cx36 in mammals, Cx35 in other vertebrates) is the major gap junction protein observed in photoreceptors, mediating rod-cone, cone-cone, and possibly rod-rod communication. Photoreceptor coupling is dynamically controlled by the day/night cycle and light/dark adaptation, and is directly correlated with phosphorylation of Cx35/36 at two sites, serine110 and serine 276/293 (homologous sites in teleost fish and mammals respectively). Activity of protein kinase A (PKA) plays a key role during this process. Previous studies have shown that activation of dopamine D4 receptors on photoreceptors inhibits adenylyl cyclase, down-regulates cAMP and PKA activity, and leads to photoreceptor uncoupling, imposing the daytime/light condition. In this study we explored the role of adenosine, a nighttime signal with a high extracellular concentration at night and a low concentration in the day, in regulating photoreceptor coupling by examining photoreceptor Cx35 phosphorylation in zebrafish retina. Adenosine enhanced photoreceptor Cx35 phosphorylation in daytime, but with a complex dose-response curve. Selective pharmacological manipulations revealed that adenosine A2a receptors provide a potent positive drive to phosphorylate photoreceptor Cx35 under the influence of endogenous adenosine at night. A2a receptors can be activated in the daytime as well by micromolar exogenous adenosine. However, the higher affinity adenosine A1 receptors are also present and have an antagonistic though less potent effect. Thus the nighttime/darkness signal adenosine provides a net positive drive on Cx35 phosphorylation at night, working in opposition to dopamine to

  11. Regulation of photoreceptor gap junction phosphorylation by adenosine in zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Chuang, Alice Z; O'Brien, John

    2014-05-01

    Electrical coupling of photoreceptors through gap junctions suppresses voltage noise, routes rod signals into cone pathways, expands the dynamic range of rod photoreceptors in high scotopic and mesopic illumination, and improves detection of contrast and small stimuli. In essentially all vertebrates, connexin 35/36 (gene homologs Cx36 in mammals, Cx35 in other vertebrates) is the major gap junction protein observed in photoreceptors, mediating rod-cone, cone-cone, and possibly rod-rod communication. Photoreceptor coupling is dynamically controlled by the day/night cycle and light/dark adaptation, and is directly correlated with phosphorylation of Cx35/36 at two sites, serine110 and serine 276/293 (homologous sites in teleost fish and mammals, respectively). Activity of protein kinase A (PKA) plays a key role during this process. Previous studies have shown that activation of dopamine D4 receptors on photoreceptors inhibits adenylyl cyclase, down-regulates cAMP and PKA activity, and leads to photoreceptor uncoupling, imposing the daytime/light condition. In this study, we explored the role of adenosine, a nighttime signal with a high extracellular concentration at night and a low concentration in the day, in regulating photoreceptor coupling by examining photoreceptor Cx35 phosphorylation in zebrafish retina. Adenosine enhanced photoreceptor Cx35 phosphorylation in daytime, but with a complex dose-response curve. Selective pharmacological manipulations revealed that adenosine A2a receptors provide a potent positive drive to phosphorylate photoreceptor Cx35 under the influence of endogenous adenosine at night. A2a receptors can be activated in the daytime as well by micromolar exogenous adenosine. However, the higher affinity adenosine A1 receptors are also present and have an antagonistic though less potent effect. Thus, the nighttime/darkness signal adenosine provides a net positive drive on Cx35 phosphorylation at night, working in opposition to dopamine to

  12. Measuring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate level in living cells induced by low-level laser irradiation using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yimei; Zheng, Liqin; Yang, Hongqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies demonstrated that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), an important second messenger, is involved in the mechanism of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) treatment. However, most of these studies obtained the cAMP level in cell culture extracts or supernatant. In this study, the cAMP level in living cells was measured with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The effect of LLLI on cAMP level in living cells with adenosine receptors blocked was explored to identify the role of adenosine receptors in LLLI. The results showed that LLLI increased the cAMP level. Moreover, the rise of cAMP level was light dose dependent but wavelength independent for 658-, 785-, and 830-nm laser light. The results also exhibited that the adenosine receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), modulated the increase of cAMP level induced by LLLI. The cAMP level increased more significantly when the A3 adenosine receptors (A3R) were blocked by A3R antagonist compared with A1 adenosine receptor or A2a adenosine receptor blocked in HEK293T cells after LLLI, which was in good agreement with the adenosine receptors’ expressions. All these results suggested that measuring the cAMP level with BRET could be a useful technique to study the role of GPCRs in living cells under LLLI. PMID:25611980

  13. Measuring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate level in living cells induced by low-level laser irradiation using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Zheng, Liqin; Yang, Hongqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies demonstrated that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), an important second messenger, is involved in the mechanism of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) treatment. However, most of these studies obtained the cAMP level in cell culture extracts or supernatant. In this study, the cAMP level in living cells was measured with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The effect of LLLI on cAMP level in living cells with adenosine receptors blocked was explored to identify the role of adenosine receptors in LLLI. The results showed that LLLI increased the cAMP level. Moreover, the rise of cAMP level was light dose dependent but wavelength independent for 658-, 785-, and 830-nm laser light. The results also exhibited that the adenosine receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), modulated the increase of cAMP level induced by LLLI. The cAMP level increased more significantly when the A3 adenosine receptors (A3R) were blocked by A3R antagonist compared with A1 adenosine receptor or A2a adenosine receptor blocked in HEK293T cells after LLLI, which was in good agreement with the adenosine receptors' expressions. All these results suggested that measuring the cAMP level with BRET could be a useful technique to study the role of GPCRs in living cells under LLLI.

  14. Caffeine exposure alters adenosine system and neurochemical markers during retinal development.

    PubMed

    Brito, Rafael; Pereira-Figueiredo, Danniel; Socodato, Renato; Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto; Calaza, Karin C

    2016-08-01

    Evidence points to beneficial properties of caffeine in the adult central nervous system, but teratogenic effects have also been reported. Caffeine exerts most of its effects by antagonizing adenosine receptors, especially A1 and A2A subtypes. In this study, we evaluated the role of caffeine on the expression of components of the adenosinergic system in the developing avian retina and the impact of caffeine exposure upon specific markers for classical neurotransmitter systems. Caffeine exposure (5-30 mg/kg by in ovo injection) to 14-day-old chick embryos increased the expression of A1 receptors and concomitantly decreased A2A adenosine receptors expression after 48 h. Accordingly, caffeine (30 mg/kg) increased [(3) H]-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (A1 antagonist) binding and reduced [(3) H]-ZM241385 (A2A antagonist) binding. The caffeine time-response curve demonstrated a reduction in A1 receptors 6 h after injection, but an increase after 18 and 24 h. In contrast, caffeine exposure increased the expression of A2A receptors from 18 and 24 h. Kinetic assays of [(3) H]-S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine binding to the equilibrative adenosine transporter ENT1 revealed an increase in Bmax with no changes in Kd , an effect accompanied by an increase in adenosine uptake. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a decrease in retinal content of tyrosine hydroxylase, calbindin and choline acetyltransferase, but not Brn3a, after 48 h of caffeine injection. Furthermore, retinas exposed to caffeine had increased levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and cAMP-response element binding protein. Overall, we show an in vivo regulation of the adenosine system, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and cAMP-response element binding protein function and protein expression of specific neurotransmitter systems by caffeine in the developing retina. The beneficial or maleficent effects of caffeine have been demonstrated by the work of different studies. It

  15. Bench-to-bedside review: Adenosine receptors – promising targets in acute lung injury?

    PubMed Central

    Schepp, Carsten P; Reutershan, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are life-threatening disorders that have substantial adverse effects on outcomes in critically ill patients. ALI/ARDS develops in response to pulmonary or extrapulmonary injury and is characterized by increased leakage from the pulmonary microvasculature and excessive infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells into the lung. Currently, no therapeutic strategies are available to control these fundamental pathophysiological processes in human ALI/ARDS. In a variety of animal models and experimental settings, the purine nucleoside adenosine has been demonstrated to regulate both endothelial barrier integrity and polymorphonuclear cell trafficking in the lung. Adenosine exerts its effects through four G-protein-coupled receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) that are expressed on leukocytes and nonhematopoietic cells, including endothelial and epithelial cells. Each type of adenosine receptor (AR) is characterized by a unique pharmacological and physiological profile. The development of selective AR agonists and antagonists, as well as the generation of gene-deficient mice, has contributed to a growing understanding of the cellular and molecular processes that are critically involved in the development of ALI/ARDS. Adenosine-dependent pathways are involved in both protective and proinflammatory effects, highlighting the need for a detailed characterization of the distinct pathways. This review summarizes current experimental observations on the role of adenosine signaling in the development of acute lung injury and illustrates that adenosine and ARs are promising targets that may be exploited in the development of innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:18828873

  16. Purification and characterization of Plasmodium yoelii adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sarika; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar; Dwivedi, U N

    2011-12-01

    Plasmodium lacks the de novo pathway for purine biosynthesis and relies exclusively on the salvage pathway. Adenosine deaminase (ADA), first enzyme of the pathway, was purified and characterized from Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malarial species, using ion exchange and gel exclusion chromatography. The purified enzyme is a 41 kDa monomer. The enzyme showed K(m) values of 41 μM and 34 μM for adenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine, respectively. Erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine competitively inhibited P. yoelii ADA with K(i) value of 0.5 μM. The enzyme was inhibited by DEPC and protein denaturing agents, urea and GdmCl. Purine analogues significantly inhibited ADA activity. Inhibition by p-chloromercuribenzoate (pCMB) and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) indicated the presence of functional -SH groups. Tryptophan fluorescence maxima of ADA shifted from 339 nm to 357 nm in presence of GdmCl. Refolding studies showed that higher GdmCl concentration irreversibly denatured the purified ADA. Fluorescence quenchers (KI and acrylamide) quenched the ADA fluorescence intensity to the varied degree. The observed differences in kinetic properties of P. yoelii ADA as compared to the erythrocyte enzyme may facilitate in designing specific inhibitors against ADA. PMID:21945268

  17. Distribution of adenosine receptors in human sclera fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Dongmei; Trier, Klaus; Chen, Xiang; Zeng, Junwen; Yang, Xiao; Hu, Jianmin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Systemic treatment with adenosine receptor antagonists has been reported to affect the biochemistry and ultrastructure of rabbit sclera. This study was conducted to determine whether adenosine receptors (ADORs) are present in human scleral fibroblasts (HSF). Methods Primary HSF were cultured in vitro and identified with anti-vimentin, anti-keratin, anti-desmin, and anti-S-100 antibodies. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study the distribution of ADORs in the HSF cell lines and in the frozen human scleral sections. ADOR protein expression in HSF and human sclera was confirmed by western blot analysis of cell lysates. Results ADORs were expressed in both HSF and human sclera. This was confirmed by western blot. ADORA1 expression was concentrated in the nucleus. ADORA2A was concentrated mainly in one side of the cytoplasm, and ADORA2B was found both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. ADORA3 was expressed weakly in the cytoplasm. Conclusions All four subtypes of ADOR were found in HSF and may play a role in scleral remodeling. PMID:18385786

  18. Impact on monoclonal antibody production in murine hybridoma cell cultures of adenosine receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kelso, Geoffrey F; Kazi, Shahid A; Harris, Simon J; Boysen, Reinhard I; Chowdhury, Jamil; Hearn, Milton T W

    2016-01-15

    The effects of different adenosine receptor antagonists and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors on monoclonal antibody (mAb) titer and cell viability of murine hybridoma cells in culture were measured as part of our investigations to discover additives that enhance mAb production. Specific adenosine receptor antagonists and PDE inhibitors were found to enhance or decrease the titer of immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) mAbs relative to negative controls, depending on the specific compound and cell line employed. The observed enhancements or decreases in IgG1 mAb titer appeared to be mainly due to an increase or decrease in specific productivity rates (ngmAb/cell), respectively. The different effects of the selective adenosine antagonists suggest that antagonism at the level of the adenosine A2A and A1 or the adenosine A3 receptors result in either enhancement or suppression of IgG1 mAb production by hybridoma cells. Overall, these studies have identified hitherto unknown activities of specific adenosine antagonists and PDE inhibitors which indicate they may have valuable roles as cell culture additives in industrial biomanufacturing processes designed to enhance the yields of mAbs or other recombinant proteins produced by mammalian cell culture procedures. PMID:26646217

  19. Neuroprotective effects of adenosine deaminase in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Risa; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Yasushi; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Nibuya, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catabolizes adenosine and deoxyadenosine. During cerebral ischemia, extracellular adenosine levels increase acutely and adenosine deaminase catabolizes the increased levels of adenosine. Since adenosine is a known neuroprotective agent, adenosine deaminase was thought to have a negative effect during ischemia. In this study, however, we demonstrate that adenosine deaminase has substantial neuroprotective effects in the striatum, which is especially vulnerable during cerebral ischemia. We used temporary oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) to simulate ischemia in rat corticostriatal brain slices. We used field potentials as the primary measure of neuronal damage. For stable and efficient electrophysiological assessment, we used transgenic rats expressing channelrhodopsin-2, which depolarizes neurons in response to blue light. Time courses of electrically evoked striatal field potential (eFP) and optogenetically evoked striatal field potential (optFP) were recorded during and after oxygen/glucose deprivation. The levels of both eFP and optFP decreased after 10 min of oxygen/glucose deprivation. Bath-application of 10 µg/ml adenosine deaminase during oxygen/glucose deprivation significantly attenuated the oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced reduction in levels of eFP and optFP. The number of injured cells decreased significantly, and western blot analysis indicated a significant decrease of autophagic signaling in the adenosine deaminase-treated oxygen/glucose deprivation slices. These results indicate that adenosine deaminase has protective effects in the striatum. PMID:26746865

  20. (/sup 125/I)Aminobenzyladenosine, a new radioligand with improved specific binding to adenosine receptors in heart

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, J.; Patel, A.; Sadek, S.

    1985-02-01

    The density of adenosine receptors in membranes derived from rat hearts in 25 times lower than the density of receptors in rat brain membranes. Consequently, adenosine radioligands which are useful in brain such as l-(/sup 3/H)phenylisopropyladenosine, (/sup 3/H)cyclohexyladenosine, (/sup 3/H)-2-chloroadenosine and l-(/sup 125/I)hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine are of limited usefulness in heart, due to a high ratio of nonspecific to specific binding. We have synthesized a new radioligand, (/sup 125/I)-N6-4-aminobenzyladenosine, which binds to rat heart membranes with one-sixth the nonspecific binding of the other radioligands. (/sup 125/I)-N6-4-aminobenzyladenosine bound to rat ventricle membranes with a K/sub D/ equivalent to that of l-(/sup 125/I)hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine and a B/sub max/ of 15.2 fmol/mg protein. (/sup 125/I)-N6-4-aminobenzyladenosine bound with a higher affinity to brain (K/sub D/ . 1.93 nM) than to heart membranes (K/sub D/ . 11.6 nM). At the radioligand K/sub D/, 60% of the total (/sup 125/I)-N6-4-aminobenzyladenosine bound to heart membranes was specifically bound. Iodination of aminobenzyladenosine increased its affinity for the adenosine receptor by 22-fold, possibly due to a steric or hydrophobic effect of iodine. The new ligand was found to be a full adenosine agonist based on its ability to inhibit cyclic adenosinemonophosphate accumulation in isolated embryonic chick heart cells and rat adipocytes. (/sup 125/I)-N6-4-Aminobenzyladenosine bound to a single affinity site and was displaced from cardiac and brain adenosine receptors by other adenosine analogues with a potency order of l-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than 5'-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine. These characteristics suggest that the radioligand binds to an Ri adenosine receptor.

  1. Guanine nucleotide binding regulatory proteins and adenylate cyclase in livers of streptozotocin- and BB/Wor-diabetic rats. Immunodetection of Gs and Gi with antisera prepared against synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, C J; Blackmore, P F; Johnson, E H; Wange, R L; Krone, P K; Exton, J H

    1989-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase in liver plasma membranes from streptozotocin-diabetic (STZ) or BB/Wor spontaneously diabetic rats showed increased responsiveness to GTP, glucagon, fluoroaluminate, and cholera toxin. Basal or forskolin-stimulated activity was unchanged in STZ rats, but increased in BB/Wor rats. No change in the alpha-subunit of Gi (alpha i) was observed in STZ or BB/Wor rats using pertussis toxin-stimulated [32P]ADP-ribosylation. Immunodetection using antibodies against the COOH-terminal decapeptides of alpha T and alpha i-3 showed no change in alpha i in STZ rats and a slight decrease in BB/Wor rats. Angiotensin II inhibition of hepatic adenylate cyclase was not altered in either diabetic rat. In both models of diabetes, Gs alpha-subunits were increased as measured by cholera toxin-stimulated [32P]-ADP-ribosylation of 43-47.5-kD peptides, reconstitution with membranes from S49 cyc- cells or immunoreactivity using antibodies against the COOH-terminal decapeptide of alpha s. These data indicate that STZ-diabetes increases hepatic Gs but does not change Gi or adenylate cyclase catalytic activity. In contrast, BB/Wor rats show increased hepatic Gs and adenylate cyclase. These changes could explain the increase in hepatic cAMP and related dysfunctions observed in diabetes. Images PMID:2498395

  2. 2-Substituted adenosine derivatives: affinity and efficacy at four subtypes of human adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Mamedova, Liaman K; Chen, Peiran; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2004-11-15

    The affinity and efficacy at four subtypes (A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3)) of human adenosine receptors (ARs) of a wide range of 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were evaluated using radioligand binding assays and a cyclic AMP functional assay in intact CHO cells stably expressing these receptors. Similar to previous studies of the N(6)-position, several 2-substituents were found to be critical structural determinants for the A(3)AR activation. The following adenosine 2-ethers were moderately potent partial agonists (K(i), nM): benzyl (117), 3-chlorobenzyl (72), 2-(3-chlorophenyl)ethyl (41), and 2-(2-naphthyl)ethyl (130). The following adenosine 2-ethers were A(3)AR antagonists: 2,2-diphenylethyl, 2-(2-norbornan)ethyl, R- and S-2-phenylbutyl, and 2-(2-chlorophenyl)ethyl. 2-(S-2-Phenylbutyloxy)adenosine as an A(3)AR antagonist right-shifted the concentration-response curve for the inhibition by NECA of cyclic AMP accumulation with a K(B) value of 212 nM, which is similar to its binding affinity (K(i) = 175 nM). These 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were generally less potent at the A(1)AR in comparison to the A(3)AR, but fully efficacious, with binding K(i) values over 100 nM. The 2-phenylethyl moiety resulted in higher A(3)AR affinity (K(i) in nM) when linked to the 2-position of adenosine through an ether group (54), than when linked through an amine (310) or thioether (1960). 2-[2-(l-Naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (K(i) = 3.8 nM) was found to be the most potent and selective (>50-fold) A(2A) agonist in this series. Mixed A(2A)/A(3)AR agonists have been identified. Interestingly, although most of these compounds were extremely weak at the A(2B)AR, 2-[2-(2-naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (EC(50) = 1.4 microM) and 2-[2-(2-thienyl)-ethyloxy]adenosine (EC(50) = 1.8 microM) were found to be relatively potent A(2B) agonists, although less potent than NECA (EC(50) = 140 nM). PMID:15476669

  3. Insulin Restores Gestational Diabetes Mellitus–Reduced Adenosine Transport Involving Differential Expression of Insulin Receptor Isoforms in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Westermeier, Francisco; Salomón, Carlos; González, Marcelo; Puebla, Carlos; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Cifuentes, Fredi; Leiva, Andrea; Casanello, Paola; Sobrevia, Luis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether insulin reverses gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)–reduced expression and activity of human equilibrative nucleoside transporters 1 (hENT1) in human umbilical vein endothelium cells (HUVECs). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Primary cultured HUVECs from full-term normal (n = 44) and diet-treated GDM (n = 44) pregnancies were used. Insulin effect was assayed on hENT1 expression (protein, mRNA, SLC29A1 promoter activity) and activity (initial rates of adenosine transport) as well as endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity (serine1177 phosphorylation, l-citrulline formation). Adenosine concentration in culture medium and umbilical vein blood (high-performance liquid chromatography) as well as insulin receptor A and B expression (quantitative PCR) were determined. Reactivity of umbilical vein rings to adenosine and insulin was assayed by wire myography. Experiments were in the absence or presence of l-NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; NO synthase inhibitor) or ZM-241385 (an A2A-adenosine receptor antagonist). RESULTS Umbilical vein blood adenosine concentration was higher, and the adenosine- and insulin-induced NO/endothelium-dependent umbilical vein relaxation was lower in GDM. Cells from GDM exhibited increased insulin receptor A isoform expression in addition to the reported NO–dependent inhibition of hENT1-adenosine transport and SLC29A1 reporter repression, and increased extracellular concentration of adenosine and NO synthase activity. Insulin reversed all these parameters to values in normal pregnancies, an effect blocked by ZM-241385 and l-NAME. CONCLUSIONS GDM and normal pregnancy HUVEC phenotypes are differentially responsive to insulin, a phenomenon where insulin acts as protecting factor for endothelial dysfunction characteristic of this syndrome. Abnormal adenosine plasma levels, and potentially A2A-adenosine receptors and insulin receptor A, will play crucial roles in this phenomenon in GDM. PMID:21515851

  4. 2-Substituted adenosine derivatives: affinity and efficacy at four subtypes of human adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Mamedova, Liaman K.; Chen, Peiran; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The affinity and efficacy at four subtypes (A1, A2A, A2B and A3) of human adenosine receptors (ARs) of a wide range of 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were evaluated using radioligand binding assays and a cyclic AMP functional assay in intact CHO cells stably expressing these receptors. Similar to previous studies of the N6-position, several 2-substituents were found to be critical structural determinants for the A3AR activation. The following adenosine 2-ethers were moderately potent partial agonists (Ki, nM): benzyl (117), 3-chlorobenzyl (72), 2-(3-chlorophenyl)ethyl (41), and 2-(2-naphthyl)ethyl (130). The following adenosine 2-ethers were A3AR antagonists: 2,2-diphenylethyl, 2-(2-norbornan)ethyl, R- and S-2-phenylbutyl, and 2-(2-chlorophenyl)ethyl. 2-(S-2-Phenylbutyloxy)a-denosine as an A3AR antagonist right-shifted the concentration–response curve for the inhibition by NECA of cyclic AMP accumulation with a KB value of 212 nM, which is similar to its binding affinity (Ki = 175 nM). These 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were generally less potent at the A1AR in comparison to the A3AR, but fully efficacious, with binding Ki values over 100 nM. The 2-phenylethyl moiety resulted in higher A3AR affinity (Ki in nM) when linked to the 2-position of adenosine through an ether group (54), than when linked through an amine (310) or thioether (1960). 2-[2-(l-Naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (Ki = 3.8 nM) was found to be the most potent and selective (>50-fold) A2A agonist in this series. Mixed A2A/A3AR agonists have been identified. Interestingly, although most of these compounds were extremely weak at the A2BAR, 2-[2-(2-naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (EC50 = 1.4 µM) and 2-[2-(2-thienyl)-ethyloxy]adenosine (EC50 = 1.8 (M) were found to be relatively potent A2B agonists, although less potent than NECA (EC50 = 140 nM). PMID:15476669

  5. Adenosine Signaling During Acute and Chronic Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Xia, Yang; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine is a signaling nucleoside that is produced following tissue injury, particularly injury involving ischemia and hypoxia. The production of extracellular adenosine and its subsequent signaling through adenosine receptors plays an important role in orchestrating injury responses in multiple organs. There are four adenosine receptors that are widely distributed on immune, epithelial, endothelial, neuronal and stromal cells throughout the body. Interestingly, these receptors are subject to altered regulation following injury. Studies in mouse models and human cells and tissues have identified that the production of adenosine and its subsequent signaling through its receptors plays largely beneficial roles in acute disease states, with the exception of brain injury. In contrast, if elevated adenosine levels are sustained beyond the acute injury phase, adenosine responses can become detrimental by activating pathways that promote tissue injury and fibrosis. Understanding when during the course of disease adenosine signaling is beneficial as opposed to detrimental and defining the mechanisms involved will be critical for the advancement of adenosine based therapies for acute and chronic diseases. The purpose of this review is to discuss key observations that define the beneficial and detrimental aspects of adenosine signaling during acute and chronic disease states with an emphasis on cellular processes such as inflammatory cell regulation, vascular barrier function and tissue fibrosis. PMID:23340998

  6. Physical origins of remarkable thermostabilization by an octuple mutation for the adenosine A2a receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, Yuta; Ogino, Takahiro; Yasuda, Satoshi; Takamuku, Yuuki; Murata, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    It was experimentally showed that the thermal stability of a membrane protein, the adenosine A2a receptor, was remarkably enhanced by an octuple mutation. Here we theoretically prove that the energy decrease arising from the formation of protein intramolecular hydrogen bonds and the solvent-entropy gain upon protein folding are made substantially larger by the mutation, leading to the remarkable enhancement. The solvent is formed by hydrocarbon groups constituting nonpolar chains of the lipid bilayer within a membrane. The mutation modifies geometric characteristics of the structure so that the solvent crowding can be reduced to a larger extent when the protein folds.

  7. Adenosine diphosphate-degrading activity in placenta.

    PubMed

    Barradas, M; Khokher, M; Hutton, R; Craft, I L; Dandona, P

    1983-02-01

    1. The degradation of ADP by the placenta and umbilical artery was investigated. 2. Supernatants from incubations of finely chopped placental and umbilical arterial tissue were incubated with [14C]ADP for various durations from 0 to 30 min. 3. Products of ADP degradation were separated by thin-layer chromatography and radioactivity incorporated into each product was measured. 4. Placental supernatants induced a more rapid degradation of ADP than the umbilical artery supernatants. The main product of ADP degradation by placental supernatants at 30 min was adenosine, whereas that of umbilical artery was AMP. 5. This conversion by placenta of ADP, a potent platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor, into adenosine, a potent platelet anti-aggregator and vasodilator, may be important in the maintenance of perfusion of the foetoplacental unit. PMID:6822058

  8. Adenosine thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S. )

    1991-07-01

    Pharmacologic coronary vasodilation as an adjunct to myocardial perfusion imaging has become increasingly important in the evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease, in view of the large number of patients who cannot perform an adequate exercise test or in whom contraindications render exercise inappropriate. Adenosine is a very potent coronary vasodilator and when combined with thallium 201 scintigraphy produces images of high quality, with the added advantages of a very short half-life (less than 10 seconds) and the ability to adjust the dose during the infusion, which may enhance safety and curtail the duration of side effects. The reported sensitivity and specificity of adenosine thallium 201 scintigraphy for the detection of coronary artery disease are high and at least comparable with imaging after exercise or dipyridamole administration. 23 refs.

  9. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Dessanti, Paola; Zhang, Yang; Allegrini, Simone; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ealick, Steven E.

    2012-10-08

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2{prime}-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2{prime}-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2-1.4 {angstrom}). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  10. Prevalence of unidirectional Na+-dependent adenosine transport and altered potential for adenosine generation in diabetic cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Podgorska, M; Kocbuch, K; Grden, M; Szutowicz, A; Pawelczyk, T

    2006-05-01

    Adenosine is an important physiological regulator of the cardiovascular system. The goal of our study was to assess the expression level of nucleoside transporters (NT) in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes and to examine the activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes. Isolated rat cardiomyocytes displayed the presence of detectable amounts of mRNA for ENT1, ENT2, CNT1, and CNT2. Overall adenosine (10 microM) transport in cardiomyocytes isolated from normal rat was 36 pmol/mg/min. The expression level of equilibrative transporters (ENT1, ENT2) decreased and of concentrative transporters (CNT1, CNT2) increased in myocytes isolated from diabetic rat. Consequently, overall adenosine transport decreased by 30%, whereas Na(+)-dependent adenosine uptake increased 2-fold, and equilibrative transport decreased by 60%. The activity ratio of AMP deaminase/5'-nucleotidase in cytosol of normal cardiomyocytes was 11 and increased to 15 in diabetic cells. The activity of ecto-5'-nucleotidase increased 2-fold in diabetic cells resulting in a rise of the activity ratio of ecto-5'-nucleotidase/adenosine deaminase from 28 to 56.These results indicate that in rat cardiomyocytes diabetes alters activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes in such a way that conversion of AMP to IMP is favored in the cytosolic compartment, whereas the capability to produce adenosine extracellularly is increased. This is accompanied by an increased unidirectional Na(+)-dependent uptake of adenosine and significantly reduced bidirectional adenosine transport. PMID:16369729

  11. Use of adenosine echocardiography for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, W.A. )

    1991-07-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography combined with exercise is sensitive and specific in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) by demonstrating transient abnormalities in wall motion. Frequently, however, patients cannot achieve maximal exercise because of various factors. Pharmacologic stress testing with intravenous adenosine was evaluated as a means of detecting CAD in a noninvasive manner. Patients with suspected CAD underwent echocardiographic imaging and simultaneous thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography during the intravenous administration of 140 micrograms/kg/min of adenosine. An increase in heart rate, decrease in blood pressure, and increase in double product were observed during adenosine administration. Initial observations revealed that wall motion abnormalities were induced by adenosine in areas of perfusion defects. The adenosine infusion was well tolerated, and symptoms disappeared within 1 to 2 minutes after termination of the infusion. Therefore preliminary observations suggest that adenosine echocardiography appears to be useful in the assessment of CAD.

  12. Characterization of adenosine receptors involved in adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction in allergic rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    el-Hashim, A.; D'Agostino, B.; Matera, M. G.; Page, C.

    1996-01-01

    1. Recent work has suggested that adenosine may be involved in asthma via the activation of A1 receptors. However, the role of the recently cloned A3 receptor in airways is largely unknown. In the present study, we have investigated the role of the A3 receptor in adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction in allergic rabbits. 2. Aerosol challenge of antigen (Ag) immunized rabbits with the adenosine precursor, adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), resulted in a dose-dependent fall in dynamic compliance (Cdyn). The maximum fall in Cdyn in these rabbits was significantly greater than that in litter matched, sham immunized animals (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the maximum increase in airways resistance (Rt) between Ag and sham immunized rabbits (P > 0.05). 3. Aerosol challenge of Ag immunized rabbits with cyclopentyl-adenosine (CPA) (A1-receptor agonist) elicited a dose-dependent fall in Cdyn in Ag immunized rabbits and the maximum fall in Cdyn in these rabbits was significantly greater than that observed in sham immunized rabbits (P < 0.05). Similarly, CPA induced dose-dependent increases in R1 in Ag immunized rabbits whereas sham immunized rabbits failed to respond to CPA within the same dose range. The maximum increase in RL in Ag immunized rabbits was significantly greater than that of sham immunized rabbits (P < 0.05). 4. Aerosol challenge of either Ag or sham immunized rabbits with the A3 agonist aminophenylethyladenosine (APNEA) did not elicit dose-dependent changes in either RL or Cdyn. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the maximum response, measured by either parameter, between the two animal groups (P > 0.05). 5. These data provide further evidence for a role of the A1 receptor in the airways, but do not support a role for the A3 receptor in adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction in the allergic rabbit. PMID:8937732

  13. A Metabolic Immune Checkpoint: Adenosine in Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Within tumors, some areas are less oxygenated than others. Since their home ground is under chronic hypoxia, tumor cells adapt to this condition by activating aerobic glycolysis; however, this hypoxic environment is very harsh for incoming immune cells. Deprivation of oxygen limits availability of energy sources and induces accumulation of extracellular adenosine in tumors. Extracellular adenosine, upon binding with adenosine receptors on the surface of various immune cells, suppresses pro-inflammatory activities. In addition, signaling through adenosine receptors upregulates a number of anti-inflammatory molecules and immunoregulatory cells, leading to the establishment of a long-lasting immunosuppressive environment. Thus, due to hypoxia and adenosine, tumors can discourage antitumor immune responses no matter how the response was induced, whether it was spontaneous or artificially introduced with a therapeutic intention. Preclinical studies have shown the significance of adenosine in tumor survival strategy by demonstrating tumor regression after inactivation of adenosine receptors, inhibition of adenosine-producing enzymes, or reversal of tissue hypoxia. These promising results indicate a potential use of the inhibitors of the hypoxia–adenosine pathway for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27066002

  14. Established and emerging fluorescence-based assays for G-protein function: heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunits and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Randall J; Jones, Miller B; Shutes, Adam; Yerxa, Benjamin R; Siderovski, David P; Willard, Francis S

    2003-06-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are molecular switches that couple serpentine receptors to intracellular effector pathways and the regulation of cell physiology. Ligand-bound receptors cause G-protein alpha subunits to bind guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) and activate effector pathways. Signal termination is facilitated by the intrinsic GTPase activity of G-protein alpha subunits. Regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerate the GTPase activity of the G-protein alpha subunit, and thus negatively regulate G-protein-mediated signal transduction. In vitro biochemical assays of heterotrimeric G-proteins commonly include measurements of nucleotide binding, GTPase activity, and interaction with RGS proteins. However, the conventional assays for most of these processes involve radiolabeled guanine nucleotide analogues and scintillation counting. In this article, we focus on fluorescence-based methodologies to study heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunit regulation in vitro. Furthermore, we consider the potential of such techniques in high-throughput screening and drug discovery. PMID:12769684

  15. Systemic oxygenation weakens the hypoxia and Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α-dependent and extracellular adenosine-mediated tumor protection

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, Stephen M.; Kjaergaard, Jorgen; Lukashev, Dmitriy; Belikoff, Bryan; Schreiber, Taylor H.; Sethumadhavan, Shalini; Abbott, Robert; Philbrook, Phaethon; Thayer, Molly; Shujia, Dai; Rodig, Scott; Kutok, Jeffrey L.; Ren, Jin; Ohta, Akio; Podack, Eckhard R.; Karger, Barry; Jackson, Edwin K.; Sitkovsky, Michail

    2014-01-01

    Intratumoral hypoxia and Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α)-dependent CD39/CD73 ecto-enzymes may govern the accumulation of tumor-protecting extracellular adenosine and signaling through the A2A adenosine receptors (A2AR) in tumor microenvironments (TME). Here, we explored the conceptually novel motivation to use supplemental oxygen as a treatment to inhibit the hypoxia/HIF-1α-CD39/CD73-driven accumulation of extracellular adenosine in the TME in order to weaken the tumor protection. We report that hyperoxic breathing (60% O2) decreased the TME hypoxia, as well as levels of HIF-1α and downstream target proteins of HIF-1α in the TME according to proteomics studies in mice. Importantly, oxygenation also down-regulated the expression of adenosine-generating ecto-enzymes and significantly lowered levels of tumor-protecting extracellular adenosine in the TME. Using supplemental oxygen as a tool in studies of the TME, we also identified FHL-1 as a potentially useful marker for the conversion of hypoxic into normoxic TME. Hyperoxic breathing resulted in the up-regulation of antigen-presenting MHC-class I molecules on tumor cells and in the better recognition and increased susceptibility to killing by tumor-reactive cytotoxic T cells. Therapeutic breathing of 60% oxygen resulted in the significant inhibition of growth of established B16.F10 melanoma tumors and prolonged survival of mice. Taken together, the data presented here provide proof-of principle for the therapeutic potential of systemic oxygenation to convert the hypoxic, adenosine-rich and tumor-protecting TME into a normoxic and extracellular adenosine-poor TME that, in turn, may facilitate tumor regression. We propose to explore the combination of supplemental oxygen with existing immunotherapies of cancer. PMID:25120128

  16. Mechanisms of the adenosine A2A receptor-induced sensitization of esophageal C fibers.

    PubMed

    Brozmanova, M; Mazurova, L; Ru, F; Tatar, M; Hu, Y; Yu, S; Kollarik, M

    2016-02-01

    Clinical studies indicate that adenosine contributes to esophageal mechanical hypersensitivity in some patients with pain originating in the esophagus. We have previously reported that the esophageal vagal nodose C fibers express the adenosine A2A receptor. Here we addressed the hypothesis that stimulation of the adenosine A2A receptor induces mechanical sensitization of esophageal C fibers by a mechanism involving transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1). Extracellular single fiber recordings of activity originating in C-fiber terminals were made in the ex vivo vagally innervated guinea pig esophagus. The adenosine A2A receptor-selective agonist CGS21680 induced robust, reversible sensitization of the response to esophageal distention (10-60 mmHg) in a concentration-dependent fashion (1-100 nM). At the half-maximally effective concentration (EC50: ≈3 nM), CGS21680 induced an approximately twofold increase in the mechanical response without causing an overt activation. This sensitization was abolished by the selective A2A antagonist SCH58261. The adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin mimicked while the nonselective protein kinase inhibitor H89 inhibited mechanical sensitization by CGS21680. CGS21680 did not enhance the response to the purinergic P2X receptor agonist α,β-methylene-ATP, indicating that CGS21680 does not nonspecifically sensitize to all stimuli. Mechanical sensitization by CGS21680 was abolished by pretreatment with two structurally different TRPA1 antagonists AP18 and HC030031. Single cell RT-PCR and whole cell patch-clamp studies in isolated esophagus-specific nodose neurons revealed the expression of TRPA1 in A2A-positive C-fiber neurons and demonstrated that CGS21682 potentiated TRPA1 currents evoked by allylisothiocyanate. We conclude that stimulation of the adenosine A2A receptor induces mechanical sensitization of nodose C fibers by a mechanism sensitive to TRPA1 antagonists indicating the involvement of TRPA1. PMID:26564719

  17. Identification of the A2 adenosine receptor binding subunit by photoaffinity crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Barrington, W.W.; Jacobson, K.A.; Hutchison, A.J.; Williams, M.; Stiles, G.L. )

    1989-09-01

    A high-affinity iodinated agonist radioligand for the A2 adenosine receptor has been synthesized to facilitate studies of the A2 adenosine receptor binding subunit. The radioligand 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC (125I-labeled 2-(4-(2-(2-((4- aminophenyl)methylcarbonylamino)ethylaminocarbonyl)- ethyl)phenyl)ethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) was synthesized and found to bind to the A2 adenosine receptor in bovine striatal membranes with high affinity (Kd = 1.5 nM) and A2 receptor selectivity. Competitive binding studies reveal the appropriate A2 receptor pharmacologic potency order with 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) greater than (-)-N6-((R)-1-methyl- 2-phenylethyl)adenosine (R-PIA) greater than (+)-N6-((S)-1-methyl-2- phenylethyl)adenosine (S-PIA). Adenylate cyclase assays, in human platelet membranes, demonstrate a dose-dependent stimulation of cAMP production. PAPA-APEC (1 microM) produces a 43% increase in cAMP production, which is essentially the same degree of increase produced by 5'-N- ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (the prototypic A2 receptor agonist). These findings combined with the observed guanine nucleotide-mediated decrease in binding suggest that PAPA-APEC is a full A2 agonist. The A2 receptor binding subunit was identified by photoaffinity-crosslinking studies using 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC and the heterobifunctional crosslinking agent N-succinimidyl 6-(4'-azido-2'-nitrophenylamino)hexanoate (SANPAH). After covalent incorporation, a single specifically radiolabeled protein with an apparent molecular mass of 45 kDa was observed on NaDodSO4/PAGE/autoradiography. Incorporation of 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC into this polypeptide is blocked by agonists and antagonists with the expected potency for A2 receptors and is decreased in the presence of 10(-4) M guanosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imido)triphosphate.

  18. Stimulation of Glia Reveals Modulation of Mammalian Spinal Motor Networks by Adenosine.

    PubMed

    Acton, David; Miles, Gareth B

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence that glia can release modulators to influence the excitability of neighbouring neurons, the importance of gliotransmission for the operation of neural networks and in shaping behaviour remains controversial. Here we characterise the contribution of glia to the modulation of the mammalian spinal central pattern generator for locomotion, the output of which is directly relatable to a defined behaviour. Glia were stimulated by specific activation of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), an endogenous G-protein coupled receptor preferentially expressed by spinal glia during ongoing activity of the spinal central pattern generator for locomotion. Selective activation of PAR1 by the agonist TFLLR resulted in a reversible reduction in the frequency of locomotor-related bursting recorded from ventral roots of spinal cord preparations isolated from neonatal mice. In the presence of the gliotoxins methionine sulfoximine or fluoroacetate, TFLLR had no effect, confirming the specificity of PAR1 activation to glia. The modulation of burst frequency upon PAR1 activation was blocked by the non-selective adenosine-receptor antagonist theophylline and by the A1-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, but not by the A2A-receptor antagonist SCH5826, indicating production of extracellular adenosine upon glial stimulation, followed by A1-receptor mediated inhibition of neuronal activity. Modulation of network output following glial stimulation was also blocked by the ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL67156, indicating glial release of ATP and its subsequent degradation to adenosine rather than direct release of adenosine. Glial stimulation had no effect on rhythmic activity recorded following blockade of inhibitory transmission, suggesting that glial cell-derived adenosine acts via inhibitory circuit components to modulate locomotor-related output. Finally, the modulation of network output by endogenous adenosine was found to scale with the

  19. Stimulation of Glia Reveals Modulation of Mammalian Spinal Motor Networks by Adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Acton, David; Miles, Gareth B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence that glia can release modulators to influence the excitability of neighbouring neurons, the importance of gliotransmission for the operation of neural networks and in shaping behaviour remains controversial. Here we characterise the contribution of glia to the modulation of the mammalian spinal central pattern generator for locomotion, the output of which is directly relatable to a defined behaviour. Glia were stimulated by specific activation of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), an endogenous G-protein coupled receptor preferentially expressed by spinal glia during ongoing activity of the spinal central pattern generator for locomotion. Selective activation of PAR1 by the agonist TFLLR resulted in a reversible reduction in the frequency of locomotor-related bursting recorded from ventral roots of spinal cord preparations isolated from neonatal mice. In the presence of the gliotoxins methionine sulfoximine or fluoroacetate, TFLLR had no effect, confirming the specificity of PAR1 activation to glia. The modulation of burst frequency upon PAR1 activation was blocked by the non-selective adenosine-receptor antagonist theophylline and by the A1-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, but not by the A2A-receptor antagonist SCH5826, indicating production of extracellular adenosine upon glial stimulation, followed by A1-receptor mediated inhibition of neuronal activity. Modulation of network output following glial stimulation was also blocked by the ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL67156, indicating glial release of ATP and its subsequent degradation to adenosine rather than direct release of adenosine. Glial stimulation had no effect on rhythmic activity recorded following blockade of inhibitory transmission, suggesting that glial cell-derived adenosine acts via inhibitory circuit components to modulate locomotor-related output. Finally, the modulation of network output by endogenous adenosine was found to scale with the

  20. Effects of adenosine, adenosine triphosphate and structural analogues on glucagon secretion from the perfused pancreas of rat in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Chapal, J.; Loubatières-Mariani, M. M.; Roye, M.; Zerbib, A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of adenosine, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and structural analogues have been studied on glucagon secretion from the isolated perfused pancreas of the rat in the presence of glucose (2.8 mM). Adenosine induced a transient increase of glucagon secretion. This effect was concentration-dependent in the range of 0.165 to 165 microM. ATP also induced an increase, but the effect was no greater at 165 microM than at 16.5 microM. 2-Chloroadenosine, an analogue more resistant to metabolism or uptake systems than adenosine, was more effective. Among the three structural analogues of ATP or ADP studied, beta, gamma-methylene ATP which can be hydrolyzed into AMP and adenosine had an effect similar to adenosine or ATP at the same concentrations (1.65 and 16.5 microM); in contrast alpha, beta-methylene ATP and alpha, beta-methylene ADP (resistant to hydrolysis into AMP and adenosine) were ineffective. Theophylline (50 microM) a specific blocker of the adenosine receptor, suppressed the glucagon peak induced by adenosine, 2-chloroadenosine, ATP and beta, gamma-methylene ATP (1.65 microM). An inhibitor of 5' nucleotidase, alpha, beta-methylene ADP (16.5 microM), reduced the glucagon increase induced by ATP and did not affect the response to adenosine (1.65 microM). These results support the hypothesis of adenosine receptors (P1-purinoceptors) on the pancreatic glucagon secretory cells and indicate that ATP acts after hydrolysis to adenosine. PMID:6097328

  1. Adenosine: Tipping the balance towards hepatic steatosis and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Simon C.; Schuppan, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Fatty liver is commonly associated with alcohol ingestion and abuse. While the molecular pathogenesis of these fatty changes is well understood, the histochemical and pharmacological mechanisms by which ethanol stimulates these molecular changes remain unknown. During ethanol metabolism, adenosine is generated by the enzyme ecto-5′-nucleotidase, and adenosine production and adenosine receptor activation are known to play critical roles in the development of hepatic fibrosis. We therefore investigated whether adenosine and its receptors play a role in the development of alcohol-induced fatty liver. WT mice fed ethanol on the Lieber-DeCarli diet developed hepatic steatosis, including increased hepatic triglyceride content, while mice lacking ecto-5-nucleotidase or adenosine A1 or A2B receptors were protected from developing fatty liver. Similar protection was also seen in WT mice treated with either an adenosine A1 or A2B receptor antagonist. Steatotic livers demonstrated increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis, which was prevented by blockade of adenosine A1 receptors, and decreased expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, which was prevented by blockade of adenosine A2B receptors. In vitro studies supported roles for adenosine A1 receptors in promoting fatty acid synthesis and for A2B receptors in decreasing fatty acid metabolism. These results indicate that adenosine generated by ethanol metabolism plays an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis via both A1 and A2B receptors and suggest that targeting adenosine receptors may be effective in the prevention of alcohol-induced fatty liver. PMID:20395005

  2. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP are reduced in lymphocytes from alcoholic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, I.; Wrubel, B.; Estrin, W.; Gordon, A.

    1987-03-01

    Alcoholism causes serious neurologic disease that may be due, in part, to the ability of ethanol to interact with neural cell membranes and change neuronal function. Adenosine receptors are membrane-bound proteins that appear to mediate some of the effects of ethanol in the brain. Human lymphocytes also have adenosine receptors, and their activation causes increases in cAMP levels. To test the hypothesis that basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels in lymphocytes might be abnormal in alcoholism, the authors studied lymphocytes from 10 alcoholic subjects, 10 age- and sex-matched normal individuals, and 10 patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels were reduced 75% in lymphocytes from alcoholic subjects. Also, there was a 76% reduction in ethanol stimulation of cAMP accumulation in lymphocytes from alcoholics. Similar results were demonstrable in isolated T cells. Unlike other laboratory tests examined, these measurements appeared to distinguish alcoholics from normal subjects and from patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Reduced basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP in lymphocytes from alcoholics may reflect a change in cell membranes due either to chronic alcohol abuse or to a genetic predisposition unique to alcoholic subjects.

  3. Adenosine as a Multi-Signalling Guardian Angel in Human Diseases: When, Where and How Does it Exert its Protective Effects?

    PubMed

    Borea, Pier Andrea; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Varani, Katia

    2016-06-01

    The importance of adenosine for human health cannot be overstated. Indeed, this ubiquitous nucleoside is an integral component of ATP, and regulates the function of every tissue and organ in the body. Acting via receptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms [the former mediated via four G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), A1, A2A, A2B, and A3,], it has a significant role in protecting against cell damage in areas of increased tissue metabolism, and combating organ dysfunction in numerous pathological states. Accordingly, raised levels of adenosine have been demonstrated in epilepsy, ischaemia, pain, inflammation, and cancer, in which its behaviour can be likened to that of a guardian angel, even though there are instances in which overproduction of adenosine is pathological. In this review, we condense the current body of knowledge on the issue, highlighting when, where, and how adenosine exerts its protective effects in both the brain and the periphery. PMID:26944097

  4. Dopamine-functionalized InP/ZnS quantum dots as fluorescence probes for the detection of adenosine in microfluidic chip

    PubMed Central

    Ankireddy, Seshadri Reddy; Kim, Jongsung

    2015-01-01

    Microbeads are frequently used as solid supports for biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids in heterogeneous microfluidic assays. Chip-based, quantum dot (QD)-bead-biomolecule probes have been used for the detection of various types of DNA. In this study, we developed dopamine (DA)-functionalized InP/ZnS QDs (QDs-DA) as fluorescence probes for the detection of adenosine in microfluidic chips. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the QDs-DA is quenched by Zn2+ because of the strong coordination interactions. In the presence of adenosine, Zn2+ cations preferentially bind to adenosine, and the PL intensity of the QDs-DA is recovered. A polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic chip was fabricated, and adenosine detection was confirmed using QDs-DA probes. PMID:26347351

  5. Convergence of 3′,5′-Cyclic Adenosine 5′-Monophosphate/Protein Kinase A and Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β/β-Catenin Signaling in Corpus Luteum Progesterone Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Lynn; McDonald, Claudia A.; Jiang, Chao; Maroni, Dulce; Zeleznik, Anthony J.; Wyatt, Todd A.; Hou, Xiaoying; Davis, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Progesterone secretion by the steroidogenic cells of the corpus luteum (CL) is essential for reproduction. Progesterone synthesis is under the control of LH, but the exact mechanism of this regulation is unknown. It is established that LH stimulates the LH receptor/choriogonadotropin receptor, a G-protein coupled receptor, to increase cAMP and activate cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that cAMP/PKA-dependent regulation of the Wnt pathway components glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β and β-catenin contributes to LH-dependent steroidogenesis in luteal cells. We observed that LH via a cAMP/PKA-dependent mechanism stimulated the phosphorylation of GSK3β at N-terminal Ser9 causing its inactivation and resulted in the accumulation of β-catenin. Overexpression of N-terminal truncated β-catenin (Δ90 β-catenin), which lacks the phosphorylation sites responsible for its destruction, significantly augmented LH-stimulated progesterone secretion. In contrast, overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of GSK3β (GSK-S9A) reduced β-catenin levels and inhibited LH-stimulated steroidogenesis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated the association of β-catenin with the proximal promoter of the StAR gene, a gene that expresses the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, which is a cholesterol transport protein that controls a rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. Collectively these data suggest that cAMP/PKA regulation of GSK3β/β-catenin signaling may contribute to the acute increase in progesterone production in response to LH. PMID:19819952

  6. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is adenosine the common link?

    PubMed

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-10-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the 'adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities' implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic 'comorbidity model', in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain co-morbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions. PMID:25979489

  7. Adenosine: Essential for life but licensed to kill

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Vivian; Deshmukh, Mohanish

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Long et al. (Long et al., 2013) report a cell death priming mechanism activated by p53 that senses extracellular adenosine accumulated following chemotherapy or hypoxia, providing a novel connection between adenosine signaling and apoptosis. PMID:25884366

  8. Targeting of Adenosine Receptors in Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Laubach, Victor E.; French, Brent A.; Okusa, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a common clinical problem after transplantation as well as myocardial infarction and stroke. IR initiates an inflammatory response leading to rapid tissue damage. Adenosine, produced in response to IR, is generally considered as a protective signaling molecule and elicits its physiological responses through four distinct adenosine receptors. The short half-life, lack of specificity, and rapid metabolism limits the use of adenosine as a therapeutic agent. Thus intense research efforts have focused on the synthesis and implementation of specific adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists as potential therapeutic agents for a variety of inflammatory conditions including IR injury. Areas covered by this review This review summarizes current knowledge on IR injury with a focus on lung, heart, and kidney, and examines studies that have advanced our understanding of the role of adenosine receptors and the therapeutic potential of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists for the prevention of IR injury. What the reader will gain The reader will gain insight into the role of adenosine receptor signaling in IR injury. Take home message No clinical therapies are currently available that specifically target IR injury; however, targeting of specific adenosine receptors may offer therapeutic strategies in this regard. PMID:21110787

  9. Time- and dose-related interactions between glucocorticoid and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate on CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-dependent insulin-like growth factor I expression by osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Ji, C.; Chen, Y.; Kim, K.; Centrella, M.

    2000-01-01

    Glucocorticoid has complex effects on osteoblasts. Several of these changes appear to be related to steroid concentration, duration of exposure, or specific effects on growth factor expression or activity within bone. One important bone growth factor, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), is induced in osteoblasts by hormones such as PGE2 that increase intracellular cAMP levels. In this way, PGE2 activates transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-delta (C/EBPdelta) and enhances its binding to a specific control element found in exon 1 in the IGF-I gene. Our current studies show that preexposure to glucocorticoid enhanced C/EBPdelta and C/EBPbeta expression by osteoblasts and thereby potentiated IGF-I gene promoter activation in response to PGE2. Importantly, this directly contrasts with inhibitory effects on IGF-I expression that result from sustained or pharmacologically high levels of glucocorticoid exposure. Consistent with the stimulatory effect of IGF-I on bone protein synthesis, pretreatment with glucocorticoid sensitized osteoblasts to PGE2, and in this context significantly enhanced new collagen and noncollagen protein synthesis. Therefore, pharmacological levels of glucocorticoid may reduce IGF-I expression by osteoblasts and cause osteopenic disease, whereas physiological transient increases in glucocorticoid may permit or amplify the effectiveness of hormones that regulate skeletal tissue integrity. These events appear to converge on the important role of C/EBPdelta and C/EBPbeta on IGF-I expression by osteoblasts.

  10. Different mechanisms of extracellular adenosine accumulation by reduction of the external Ca(2+) concentration and inhibition of adenosine metabolism in spinal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Ryota; Akao, Sanae; Otsuguro, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Ito, Shigeo

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a neuromodulator in the central nervous system. Astrocytes mainly participate in adenosine production, and extracellular adenosine accumulates under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Inhibition of intracellular adenosine metabolism and reduction of the external Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]e) participate in adenosine accumulation, but the precise mechanisms remain unclear. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying extracellular adenosine accumulation in cultured rat spinal astrocytes. The combination of adenosine kinase and deaminase (ADK/ADA) inhibition and a reduced [Ca(2+)]e increased the extracellular adenosine level. ADK/ADA inhibitors increased the level of extracellular adenosine but not of adenine nucleotides, which was suppressed by inhibition of equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 2. Unlike ADK/ADA inhibition, a reduced [Ca(2+)]e increased the extracellular level not only of adenosine but also of ATP. This adenosine increase was enhanced by ENT2 inhibition, and suppressed by sodium polyoxotungstate (ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase inhibitor). Gap junction inhibitors suppressed the increases in adenosine and adenine nucleotide levels by reduction of [Ca(2+)]e. These results indicate that extracellular adenosine accumulation by ADK/ADA inhibition is due to the adenosine release via ENT2, while that by reduction of [Ca(2+)]e is due to breakdown of ATP released via gap junction hemichannels, after which ENT2 incorporates adenosine into the cells. PMID:26003082

  11. Purification and characterization of (-)(/sup 125/I)hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine, an adenosine R-site agonist radioligand and theoretical analysis of mixed stereoisomer radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, J.

    1984-11-01

    (-)-N6-(R-4-Hydroxyphenylisopropyl)adenosine (HPIA) was iodinated with NaI and trace /sup 125/I. Mono- and diiodinated reaction products and the starting material were separated by high pressure liquid chromatography and the structures of the reaction products were verified by NMR. (-)-N6-(R-Phenylisopropyl)adenosine (PIA), IHPIA, and I2HPIA decreased rat atrial contractility with ED50 values of 24, 28, and 33 nM, respectively. The contractile effects of these compounds were competitively blocked by theophylline (KI . 7.9 microM), but were not affected by adenosine deaminase. IHPIA also inhibited (-)isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in adipocytes with an ED50 (10 nM) and to an extent (83%) nearly identical to PIA. (/sup 125/I)HPIA prepared using carrier-free /sup 125/I bound to adenosine receptors on membranes from rat cerebral cortex, adipocyte ghosts, and heart ventricles. Binding was inhibited stereospecifically by PIA and by other adenosine analogues and alkylxanthines. The KD of (/sup 125/I)HPIA determined kinetically using brain membranes at 21 degrees was 0.94 nM in good agreement with the equilibrium determination of 1.94 nM. The density of adenosine receptors in brain membranes was found to be 871 fmol/mg of protein. When normalized to protein, the density of receptors in heart membranes and adipocyte ghosts, respectively, was found to be 39- and 2.3-fold less than in brain membranes. It was concluded that (/sup 125/I)HPIA can be rapidly synthesized and purified, binds to adenosine R-sites and is an agonist radioligand resistant to adenosine deaminase. Computer modeling of the equilibrium binding resulting from the use of mixed stereoisomers of a radioligand indicates that the combined use of (-)(/sup 125/I)HPIA and (+)(/sup 125/I)HPIA would result in the generation of nonlinear Scatchard plots.

  12. The Role of Adenosine Signaling in Sickle Cell Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Field, Joshua J.; Nathan, David G.; Linden, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Recent data suggest a role for adenosine signaling in the pathogenesis of sickle cell disease (SCD). Signaling through the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has demonstrated beneficial effects in SCD. Activation of A2ARs decreases inflammation in mice and patients with SCD largely by blocking activation of invariant NKT cells. Decreased inflammation may reduce the severity of vaso-occlusive crises. In contrast, adenosine signaling through the A2B receptor (A2BR) may be detrimental for patients with SCD. Priapism and the formation of sickle erythrocytes may be a consequence of A2BR activation on corpus cavernosal cells and erythrocytes, respectively. Whether adenosine signaling predominantly occurs through A2ARs or A2BRs may depend on differing levels of adenosine and disease state (steady state versus crisis). There may be opportunities to develop novel therapeutic approaches targeting A2ARs and/or A2BRs for patients with SCD. PMID:24589267

  13. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment and cortical responses to adenosine and GABA.

    PubMed

    Mally, J; Connick, J H; Stone, T W

    1990-10-22

    The effects of chronic treatment of mice with clonazepam have been examined on the responses of neocortical slices to adenosine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Responses to these agonists were measured as changes in the depolarisation induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). Added to the superfusion medium diazepam blocked responses to adenosine but not 5-HT; this effect was not observed with 2-chloroadenosine or in the presence of 2-hydroxynitrobenzylthioguanosine. GABA was inactive in control slices but chronic treatment with clonazepam induced responses to GABA and enhanced responses to adenosine but not 5-HT. It is suggested that the induction of GABA responses may reflect the up-regulation of GABA receptors, but the increase of adenosine responses by clonazepam implies that there is no simple relationship between adenosine receptor binding and functional responses. PMID:1979931

  14. Adenosine A2B Receptor: From Cell Biology to Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR's functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases, and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases. PMID:27606311

  15. Adenosine A2B Receptor: From Cell Biology to Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR's functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases, and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases. PMID:27606311

  16. A High-Affinity Adenosine Kinase from Anopheles Gambiae

    SciTech Connect

    M Cassera; M Ho; E Merino; E Burgos; A Rinaldo-Matthis; S Almo; V Schramm

    2011-12-31

    Genome analysis revealed a mosquito orthologue of adenosine kinase in Anopheles gambiae (AgAK; the most important vector for the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa). P. falciparum are purine auxotrophs and do not express an adenosine kinase but rely on their hosts for purines. AgAK was kinetically characterized and found to have the highest affinity for adenosine (K{sub m} = 8.1 nM) of any known adenosine kinase. AgAK is specific for adenosine at the nucleoside site, but several nucleotide triphosphate phosphoryl donors are tolerated. The AgAK crystal structure with a bound bisubstrate analogue Ap{sub 4}A (2.0 {angstrom} resolution) reveals interactions for adenosine and ATP and the geometry for phosphoryl transfer. The polyphosphate charge is partly neutralized by a bound Mg{sup 2+} ion and an ion pair to a catalytic site Arg. The AgAK structure consists of a large catalytic core in a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich, and a small cap domain in contact with adenosine. The specificity and tight binding for adenosine arise from hydrogen bond interactions of Asn14, Leu16, Leu40, Leu133, Leu168, Phe168, and Thr171 and the backbone of Ile39 and Phe168 with the adenine ring as well as through hydrogen bond interactions between Asp18, Gly64, and Asn68 and the ribosyl 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups. The structure is more similar to that of human adenosine kinase (48% identical) than to that of AK from Toxoplasma gondii (31% identical). With this extraordinary affinity for AgAK, adenosine is efficiently captured and converted to AMP at near the diffusion limit, suggesting an important role for this enzyme in the maintenance of the adenine nucleotide pool. mRNA analysis verifies that AgAK transcripts are produced in the adult insects.

  17. An adenosine kinase inhibitor, ABT-702, inhibits spinal nociceptive transmission by adenosine release via equilibrative nucleoside transporters in rat.

    PubMed

    Otsuguro, Ken-ichi; Tomonari, Yuki; Otsuka, Saori; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Kon, Yasuhiro; Ito, Shigeo

    2015-10-01

    Adenosine kinase (AK) inhibitor is a potential candidate for controlling pain, but some AK inhibitors have problems of adverse effects such as motor impairment. ABT-702, a non-nucleoside AK inhibitor, shows analgesic effect in animal models of pain. Here, we investigated the effects of ABT-702 on synaptic transmission via nociceptive and motor reflex pathways in the isolated spinal cord of neonatal rats. The release of adenosine from the spinal cord was measured by HPLC. ABT-702 inhibited slow ventral root potentials (sVRPs) in the nociceptive pathway more potently than monosynaptic reflex potentials (MSRs) in the motor reflex pathway. The inhibitory effects of ABT-702 were mimicked by exogenously applied adenosine, blocked by 8CPT (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine), an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, and augmented by EHNA (erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine), an adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor. Equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) inhibitors reversed the effects of ABT-702, but not those of adenosine. ABT-702 released adenosine from the spinal cord, an effect that was also reversed by ENT inhibitors. The ABT-702-facilitated release of adenosine by way of ENTs inhibits nociceptive pathways more potently than motor reflex pathways in the spinal cord via activation of A1 receptors. This feature is expected to lead to good analgesic effects, but, caution may be required for the use of AK inhibitors in the case of ADA dysfunction or a combination with ENT inhibitors. PMID:26066576

  18. Inhibition of Enterovirus 71 by Adenosine Analog NITD008

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Cheng-Lin; Yeo, Huimin; Ye, Han-Qing; Liu, Si-Qing; Shang, Bao-Di; Gong, Peng; Alonso, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major viral pathogen in China and Southeast Asia. There is no clinically approved vaccine or antiviral therapy for EV71 infection. NITD008, an adenosine analog, is an inhibitor of flavivirus that blocks viral RNA synthesis. Here we report that NITD008 has potent antiviral activity against EV71. In cell culture, the compound inhibits EV71 at a 50% effective concentration of 0.67 μM and a 50% cytotoxic concentration of 119.97 μM. When administered at 5 mg/kg in an EV71 mouse model, the compound reduced viral loads in various organs and completely prevented clinical symptoms and death. To study the antiviral mechanism and drug resistance, we selected escape mutant viruses by culturing EV71 with increasing concentrations of NITD008. Resistance mutations were reproducibly mapped to the viral 3A and 3D polymerase regions. Resistance analysis with recombinant viruses demonstrated that either a 3A or a 3D mutation alone could lead to resistance to NITD008. A combination of both 3A and 3D mutations conferred higher resistance, suggesting a collaborative interplay between the 3A and 3D proteins during viral replication. The resistance results underline the importance of combination therapy required for EV71 treatment. IMPORTANCE Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a major cause of viral encephalitis in children worldwide, especially in the Asia-Pacific region. Vaccines and antivirals are urgently needed to prevent and treat EV71 infections. In this study, we report the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of NITD008 (an adenosine analog) as an inhibitor of EV71. The efficacy results validated the potential of nucleoside analogs as antiviral drugs for EV71 infections. Mechanistically, we showed that mutations in the viral 3A and 3D polymerases alone or in combination could confer resistance to NITD008. The resistance results suggest an intrinsic interaction between viral proteins 3A and 3D during replication, as well as the importance of

  19. Immunosuppression via adenosine receptor activation by adenosine monophosphate released from apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Toshihiko; Urade, Yoshihiro; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is coupled with recruitment of macrophages for engulfment of dead cells, and with compensatory proliferation of neighboring cells. Yet, this death process is silent, and it does not cause inflammation. The molecular mechanisms underlying anti-inflammatory nature of the apoptotic process remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that the culture supernatant of apoptotic cells activated the macrophages to express anti-inflammatory genes such as Nr4a and Thbs1. A high level of AMP accumulated in the apoptotic cell supernatant in a Pannexin1-dependent manner. A nucleotidase inhibitor and A2a adenosine receptor antagonist inhibited the apoptotic supernatant-induced gene expression, suggesting AMP was metabolized to adenosine by an ecto-5’-nucleotidase expressed on macrophages, to activate the macrophage A2a adenosine receptor. Intraperitoneal injection of zymosan into Adora2a- or Panx1-deficient mice produced high, sustained levels of inflammatory mediators in the peritoneal lavage. These results indicated that AMP from apoptotic cells suppresses inflammation as a ‘calm down’ signal. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02172.001 PMID:24668173

  20. Ethanol Tolerance Affects Endogenous Adenosine Signaling in Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dali; Xiong, Wei; Jackson, Michael F; Parkinson, Fiona E

    2016-07-01

    Ethanol has many pharmacological effects, including increases in endogenous adenosine levels and adenosine receptor activity in brain. Ethanol consumption is associated with both positive and negative health outcomes, but tolerance to the behavioral effects of ethanol can lead to increased consumption, which increases the risk of negative health outcomes. The present study was performed to test whether a 7-day treatment with ethanol is linked to reduced adenosine signaling and whether this is a consequence of reduced ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity. Wild-type (CD73(+/+)) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase-deficient (CD73(-/-)) mice were treated with ethanol (2 g/kg) or saline for 7 days. In CD73(+/+) mice, repeated ethanol treatment reduced the hypothermic and ataxic effects of acute ethanol, indicating the development of tolerance to the acute effects of ethanol. In CD73(+/+) mice, this 7-day ethanol treatment led to increased hippocampal synaptic activity and reduced adenosine A1 receptor activity under both basal and low Mg(2+) conditions. These effects of ethanol tolerance were associated with an 18% decrease in activity of ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity in hippocampal cell membranes. In contrast, ethanol treatment was not associated with changes in synaptic activity or adenosine signaling in hippocampus from CD73(-/-) mice. These data indicate that ethanol treatment is associated with a reduction in adenosine signaling through adenosine A1 receptors in hippocampus, mediated, at least in part, via reduced ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity. PMID:27189965