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Sample records for adenosine triphosphate binding

  1. Imaging Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP).

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Megha; Dane, Eric; Conley, Jason; Tantama, Mathew

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a universal mediator of metabolism and signaling across unicellular and multicellular species. There is a fundamental interdependence between the dynamics of ATP and the physiology that occurs inside and outside the cell. Characterizing and understanding ATP dynamics provide valuable mechanistic insight into processes that range from neurotransmission to the chemotaxis of immune cells. Therefore, we require the methodology to interrogate both temporal and spatial components of ATP dynamics from the subcellular to the organismal levels in live specimens. Over the last several decades, a number of molecular probes that are specific to ATP have been developed. These probes have been combined with imaging approaches, particularly optical microscopy, to enable qualitative and quantitative detection of this critical molecule. In this review, we survey current examples of technologies available for visualizing ATP in living cells, and identify areas where new tools and approaches are needed to expand our capabilities. PMID:27638696

  2. Imaging Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP).

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Megha; Dane, Eric; Conley, Jason; Tantama, Mathew

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a universal mediator of metabolism and signaling across unicellular and multicellular species. There is a fundamental interdependence between the dynamics of ATP and the physiology that occurs inside and outside the cell. Characterizing and understanding ATP dynamics provide valuable mechanistic insight into processes that range from neurotransmission to the chemotaxis of immune cells. Therefore, we require the methodology to interrogate both temporal and spatial components of ATP dynamics from the subcellular to the organismal levels in live specimens. Over the last several decades, a number of molecular probes that are specific to ATP have been developed. These probes have been combined with imaging approaches, particularly optical microscopy, to enable qualitative and quantitative detection of this critical molecule. In this review, we survey current examples of technologies available for visualizing ATP in living cells, and identify areas where new tools and approaches are needed to expand our capabilities.

  3. Isolated Cerebellar Variant of Adrenoleukodystrophy with a de novo Adenosine Triphosphate-Binding Cassette D1 (ABCD1) Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joon Won; Lee, Sang Mi; Koo, Kyo Yeon; Lee, Young-Mock; Nam, Hyo Suk; Quan, Zhejiu

    2014-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) shows a wide range of phenotypic expression, but clinical presentation as an isolated lesion of the cerebellar white matter and dentate nuclei has not been reported. We report an unusual presentation of X-ALD only with an isolated lesion of the cerebellar white matter and dentate nuclei. The proband, a 37-year-old man presented with bladder incontinence, slurred speech, dysmetria in all limbs, difficulties in balancing, and gait ataxia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed an isolated signal change of white matter around the dentate nucleus in cerebellum. With high level of very long chain fatty acid, gene study showed a de novo mutation in exon 1 at nucleotide position c.277_296dup20 (p.Ala100Cysfs*10) of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette D1 gene. It is advised to consider X-ALD as a differential diagnosis in patients with isolated cerebellar degeneration symptoms. PMID:24954351

  4. Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette member A3 gene mutation in children from one family from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Mukhtar, Gawahir Mohamed Ahmed; Al Otaibi, Wadha Hilal; Al-Mobaireek, Khalid Fahad Abdullah; Al-Saleh, Suhail

    2016-01-01

    Mutation in ABCA3, which is adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette member A3, a member of protein transporter family for phospholipids into the lamellar bodies during synthesis of surfactant, can cause lung disease related to surfactant dysfunction with autosomal recessive pattern. We reported three cases from same family with ABCA3 mutation, their gene, clinical course, and outcomes mentioning that one patient had successful lung transplantation, one started the process of the lung transplantation while the third one died during infancy. We concluded that the patients with ABCA3 gene mutations are increasing in numbers may be due to the availability of the genetic testing and high index of suspicion among physicians. Lung transplantation is the definitive treatment, but availability is limited in our region. PMID:27512515

  5. Optical Aptasensors for Adenosine Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Stella; Lim, Hui Si; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids are among the most researched and applied biomolecules. Their diverse two- and three-dimensional structures in conjunction with their robust chemistry and ease of manipulation provide a rare opportunity for sensor applications. Moreover, their high biocompatibility has seen them being used in the construction of in vivo assays. Various nucleic acid-based devices have been extensively studied as either the principal element in discrete molecule-like sensors or as the main component in the fabrication of sensing devices. The use of aptamers in sensors - aptasensors, in particular, has led to improvements in sensitivity, selectivity, and multiplexing capacity for a wide verity of analytes like proteins, nucleic acids, as well as small biomolecules such as glucose and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This article reviews the progress in the use of aptamers as the principal component in sensors for optical detection of ATP with an emphasis on sensing mechanism, performance, and applications with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. PMID:27446501

  6. Enzymatic regeneration of adenosine triphosphate cofactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Regenerating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by enzymatic process which utilizes carbamyl phosphate as phosphoryl donor is technique used to regenerate expensive cofactors. Process allows complex enzymatic reactions to be considered as candidates for large-scale continuous processes.

  7. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... device that measures the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from platelets following aggregation.... Simultaneous measurements of platelet aggregation and ATP release are used to evaluate platelet...

  8. Chemoelectrical energy conversion of adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Vishnu Baba; Sarles, Stephen Andrew; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-04-01

    Plant and animal cell membranes transport charged species, neutral molecules and water through ion pumps and channels. The energy required for moving species against established concentration and charge gradients is provided by the biological fuel - adenosine triphosphate (ATP) -synthesized within the cell. The adenosine triphosphatase (ATPases) in a plant cell membrane hydrolyze ATP in the cell cytoplasm to pump protons across the cell membrane. This establishes a proton gradient across the membrane from the cell exterior into the cell cytoplasm. This proton motive force stimulates ion channels that transport nutrients and other species into the cell. This article discusses a device that converts the chemical energy stored in adenosine triphosphate into electrical power using a transporter protein, ATPase. The V-type ATPase proteins used in our prototype are extracted from red beet(Beta vulgaris) tonoplast membranes and reconstituted in a bilayer lipid membrane or BLM formed from POPC and POPS lipids. A pH7 medium that can support ATP hydrolysis is provided on both sides of the membrane and ATP is dissolved in the pH7 buffer on one side of the membrane. Hydrolysis of ATP results in the formation of a phosphate ion and adenosine diphosphate. The energy from the reaction activates ATPase in the BLM and moves a proton across the membrane. The charge gradient established across the BLM due to the reaction and ion transport is converted into electrical current by half-cell reference electrodes. The prototype ATPase cell with an effective BLM area of 4.15 mm2 carrying 15 μl of ATPase proteins was observed to develop a steady state peak power output of 70 nW, which corresponds to a specific power of 1.69 μW/cm2 and a current density of 43.4 μA/cm2 of membrane area.

  9. Effects of adenosine triphosphate and alkaline phosphatase on solubilized 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Faure, R; Dussault, J H

    1988-09-01

    The T3-binding activity of salt-extractable nuclear proteins from rat liver was affected when ATP (2-10 mM; pH 8.0) was added concomitantly with T3 in the incubation medium. Scatchard analysis revealed that the equilibrium association constant was significantly reduced [5 mM ATP, 0.3 +/- 0.1 (+/- SE) 10(10) M-1; control, 1.1 +/- 0.15 X 10(10) M-1], but the maximum binding capacity remained unchanged. Similar values of inhibition were obtained when unbound receptors were preincubated with ATP. ATP achieved its maximal effect after 45 min of incubation at 30 C. Dilution experiments indicated that the effect of ATP was reversible. The inhibiting potency of nucleoside triphosphates at pH 8.0 was in the following order: ATP = CTP greater than GTP, whereas UTP had no effect. Nonhydrolyzable analogs of ATP were also inhibitory, and HPLC fractionation showed an approximately 98% recovery of ATP after incubation with nuclear extract. The adenine ring with at least two phosphates was essential, since ADP was as potent as ATP, whereas AMP had no effect. When the pH of the incubation medium was lowered to 7.3, the T3-binding activity was inhibited by ATP in the 0.1-1 mM range. Magnesium (3 mM) greatly increases the ATP effect at pH 7.3, but not at pH 8. The T3-binding activity was also drastically reduced when calf intestine alkaline phosphatase was added concomitantly in the incubation medium. Eight micrograms per ml enzyme were necessary to inhibit the T3 specific binding by 50% (30 C for 45 min). Scatchard analysis showed that the receptor affinity for T3 was decreased (control, 1.1 +/- 0.02 x 10(10) M-1; alkaline phosphatase, 0.41 +/- 0.03 x 10(10) M-1; n = 6), whereas the maximum binding capacity remained unchanged. Incubations performed with increasing concentrations of beta-mercaphoethanol (2.5, 5, 10, and 25 mM) revealed that the phosphatase inhibitory effect is thiol dependent. The inhibition was maximal at 2.5 mM and progressively decreased at 5 and 10 mM. No

  10. Adeno-associated virus Rep78/Rep68 promotes localized melting of the rep binding element in the absence of adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Lou, Hua Jane; Brister, J Rodney; Li, Jianwei Jeffery; Chen, Weijun; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Tan, Weihong

    2004-03-01

    We have applied fluorescence anisotropy and molecular beacon fluorescence methods to study the interactions between the Adeno-associated virus Rep78/Rep68 protein and the 23-bp Rep binding element (RBE). Rep78/Rep68 stably interacted with both the single- and double-stranded conformations of the RBE, but the interaction mechanisms of single- and double-stranded DNA appeared to be fundamentally different. The stoichiometry of Rep78 association with both the separate top and bottom strands of the RBE was 1:1, and the relative dissociation constant (K(D)) values of these associations were calculated to be 2.3x10(-8) and 3.2x10(-8) M, respectively. In contrast, the stoichiometry of Rep78 association with the double-stranded RBE was 2:1, and the dissociation constant was determined to be 4.2x10(-15) M(2). Moreover, Rep78/Rep68 interaction with the 23-bp duplex RBE appeared to cause localized melting of the double-stranded DNA substrate in the absence of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This melting activity showed slower kinetics than binding and may contribute to the initiation of ATP-dependent Rep78 helicase activity.

  11. [Vascular effects of adenosine-triphosphate].

    PubMed

    Colson, P; Saussine, M; Gaba, S; Sequin, J; Chaptal, P A; Roquefeuil, B

    1991-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) on systemic vascular resistances during the hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass phase of cardiac surgery. Twenty patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were randomly divided into an ATP group (n = 10), and a placebo group (n = 10). Anaesthesia was similar for all the patients (diazepam, fentanyl and pancuronium). During the heart arrest phase, and as soon as the arterial pressure, the level in the venous return reservoir, and the pump flow rate had all been in steady state for 5 min, ATP or placebo was injected into the venous line of the oxygenator. Injection speed was doubled every three minutes, twice. The following ATP doses were administered: 0.012, 0.025 and 0.05 mg.kg-1.min-1. The level in the venous return reservoir was kept constant. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pump flow rate (DP) were assessed every half minute. Systemic vascular resistances were calculated with the relationship MAP/DP. Changes in vascular capacitance were directly proportional to changes in DP as the heart had been excluded, and all the blood returned to the pump, the blood volume being kept constant. MAP and DP remained unchanged in the placebo group. In the opposite ATP induced a dose-related systemic vasodilation: MAP decreased from 82.8 +/- 12.5 mmHg (control) to 66.0 +/- 14.8 mmHg, 59.8 +/- 10.6 mmHg, and 49.0 +/- 4.7 mmHg with 0.012, 0.025 and 0.05 mg.kg-1.min-1 ATP respectively. The MAP returned to preinfusion control levels when the ATP infusion was discontinued (90.0 +/- 17.8 mmHg). The DP, and therefore venous return, did not change, neither during ATP infusion, nor after its discontinuation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1854051

  12. Characterization of a multiple endogenously expressed adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters using nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Habicht, K-L; Singh, N S; Khadeer, M A; Shimmo, R; Wainer, I W; Moaddel, R

    2014-04-25

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive form of human astrocytoma, with poor prognosis due to multi-drug resistance to a number of anticancer drugs. The observed multi-drug resistance is primarily due to the efflux activity of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP. The expression of these transporters has been demonstrated in nuclear and cellular membranes of the LN-229 human glioblastoma cell line. Nuclear membrane and cellular membrane fragments from LN-229 cells were immobilized on the IAM stationary phase to create nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns, (NMAC(LN-229)) and (CMAC(LN-229)), respectively. Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP transporters co-immobilized on both columns were characterized and compared by establishing the binding affinities for estrone-3-sulfate (3.8 vs. 3.7μM), verapamil (0.6 vs. 0.7μM) and prazosin (0.099 vs. 0.033μM) on each column and no significant differences were observed. Since the marker ligands had overlapping selectivities, the selective characterization of each transporter was carried out by saturation of the binding sites of the non-targeted transporters. The addition of verapamil (Pgp and MRP1 substrate) to the mobile phase allowed the comparative screening of eight compounds at the nuclear and cellular BCRP using etoposide as the marker ligand. AZT increased the retention of etoposide (+15%), a positive allosteric interaction, on the CMAC(LN-229) column and decreased it (-5%) on the NMAC(LN-229), while the opposite effect was produced by rhodamine. The results indicate that there are differences between the cellular and nuclear membrane expressed BCRP and that NMAC and CMAC columns can be used to probe these differences.

  13. Characterization of a multiple endogenously expressed Adenosine triphosphate-Binding Cassette transporters using nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns

    PubMed Central

    Khadeer, M.A.; Shimmo, R.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive form of human astrocytoma, with poor prognosis due to multi-drug resistance to a number of anticancer drugs. The observed multi-drug resistance is primarily due to the efflux activity of ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP. The expression of these transporters has been demonstrated in nuclear and cellular membranes of the LN-229 human glioblastoma cell line. Nuclear membrane and cellular membrane fragments from LN229 cells were immobilized on the IAM stationary phase to create nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns, (NMAC(LN229)) and (CMAC(LN229)), respectively. Pgp, MRP1and BCRP transporters co-immobilized on both columns was characterized and compared by establishing the binding affinities for estrone-3-sulfate (3.8 vs 3.7μM), verapamil (0.6 vs 0.7μM) and prazosin (0.099 vs 0.033μM) on each column and no significant differences were observed. Since the marker ligands had overlapping selectivities, the selective characterization of each transporter was carried out by saturation of the binding sites of the non-targeted transporters. The addition of verapamil (Pgp and MRP1 substrate) to the mobile phase allowed the comparative screening of 8 compounds at the nuclear and cellular BCRP using etoposide as the marker ligand. AZT increased the retention of etoposide (+15%), a positive allosteric interaction, on the CMAC(LN229) column and decreased it (−5%) on the NMAC(LN229), while the opposite effect was produced by rhodamine. The results indicate that there are differences between the cellular and nuclear membrane expressed BCRP and that NMAC and CMAC columns can be used to probe these differences. PMID:24642394

  14. Dendritic cells phenotype fitting under hypoxia or lipopolysaccharide; adenosine 5′-triphosphate-binding cassette transporters far beyond an efflux pump

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, N; Rama, I; Llaudó, I; Torras, J; Cerezo, G; Cassis, L; Franquesa, M; Merino, A; Benitez-Ribas, D; Cruzado, J M; Herrero-Fresneda, I; Bestard, O; Grinyó, J M

    2013-01-01

    This study examines adenosine 5′-triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as a potential therapeutic target in dendritic cell (DC) modulation under hypoxia and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Functional capacity of dendritic cells (DCs) (mixed lymphocyte reaction: MLR) and maturation of iDCs were evaluated in the presence or absence of specific ABC-transporter inhibitors. Monocyte-derived DCs were cultured in the presence of interleukin (IL)-4/granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Their maturation under hypoxia or LPS conditions was evaluated by assessing the expression of maturation phenotypes using flow cytometry. The effect of ABC transporters on DC maturation was determined using specific inhibitors for multi-drug resistance (MDR1) and multi-drug resistance proteins (MRPs). Depending on their maturation status to elicit T cell alloresponses, the functional capacity of DCs was studied by MLR. Mature DCs showed higher P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expression with confocal microscopy. Up-regulation of maturation markers was observed in hypoxia and LPS-DC, defining two different DC subpopulation profiles, plasmacytoid versus conventional-like, respectively, and different cytokine release T helper type 2 (Th2) versus Th1, depending on the stimuli. Furthermore, hypoxia-DCs induced more B lymphocyte proliferation than control-iDC (56% versus 9%), while LPS-DCs induced more CD8-lymphocyte proliferation (67% versus 16%). ABC transporter-inhibitors strongly abrogated DC maturation [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50): P-glycoprotein inhibition using valspodar (PSC833) 5 μM, CAS 115104-28-4 (MK571) 50 μM and probenecid 2·5 μM], induced significantly less lymphocyte proliferation and reduced cytokine release compared with stimulated-DCs without inhibitors. We conclude that diverse stimuli, hypoxia or LPS induce different profiles in the maturation and functionality of DC. Pgp appears to play a role in these DC events. Thus, ABC

  15. Unexpected Discovery of Dichloroacetate Derived Adenosine Triphosphate Competitors Targeting Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase To Inhibit Cancer Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Lin; Hu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Wen; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-04-14

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) have recently emerged as an attractive target for cancer therapy. Herein, we prepared a series of compounds derived from dichloroacetate (DCA) which inhibited cancer cells proliferation. For the first time, we have successfully developed DCA derived inhibitors that preferentially bind to the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) pocket of PDK isoform 1 (PDK1).

  16. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  20. Adenosine A1( )receptors are selectively coupled to Gα(i-3) in postmortem human brain cortex: Guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding/immunoprecipitation study.

    PubMed

    Odagaki, Yuji; Kinoshita, Masakazu; Ota, Toshio; Meana, J Javier; Callado, Luis F; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-10-01

    By means of guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding assay combined with immunoprecipitation using anti-Gα subunit antibody, we recently reported 5-HT2A receptor- and M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated Gαq activation in rat cerebral cortical membranes (Odagaki et al., 2014). In the present study, this method has been applied to postmortem human brains, with focusing on adenosine receptor-mediated G-protein activation. In the exploratory experiments using a series of agonists and the antibodies specific to each Gα subtypes in the presence of low (10 nM) or high (50 μM) concentration of GDP, the most prominent increases in specific [(35)S]GTPγS binding in the membranes prepared from human prefrontal cortex were obtained for the combinations of adenosine (1mM)/anti-Gαi-3 in the presence of 50 μM GDP as well as 5-HT (100 μM)/anti-Gαq and carbachol (1mM)/anti-Gαq in the presence of 10nM GDP. Adenosine-induced activation of Gαi-3 emerged only when GDP concentrations were increased higher than 10 μM, and the following experiments were performed in the presence of 300 μM GDP. Adenosine increased specific [(35)S]GTPγS binding to Gαi-3 in a concentration-dependent manner to 251.4% of the basal unstimulated binding, with an EC50 of 1.77 μM. The involvement of adenosine A1 receptor was verified by the experiments using selective agonists and antagonists at adenosine A1 or A3 receptor. Among the α subunits of Gi/o class (Gαi-1, Gαi-2, Gαi-3, and Gαo.), only Gαi-3 was activated by 1mM adenosine, indicating that human brain adenosine A1 receptor is coupled preferentially, if not exclusively, to Gαi-3.

  1. Adenosine A1( )receptors are selectively coupled to Gα(i-3) in postmortem human brain cortex: Guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding/immunoprecipitation study.

    PubMed

    Odagaki, Yuji; Kinoshita, Masakazu; Ota, Toshio; Meana, J Javier; Callado, Luis F; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-10-01

    By means of guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding assay combined with immunoprecipitation using anti-Gα subunit antibody, we recently reported 5-HT2A receptor- and M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated Gαq activation in rat cerebral cortical membranes (Odagaki et al., 2014). In the present study, this method has been applied to postmortem human brains, with focusing on adenosine receptor-mediated G-protein activation. In the exploratory experiments using a series of agonists and the antibodies specific to each Gα subtypes in the presence of low (10 nM) or high (50 μM) concentration of GDP, the most prominent increases in specific [(35)S]GTPγS binding in the membranes prepared from human prefrontal cortex were obtained for the combinations of adenosine (1mM)/anti-Gαi-3 in the presence of 50 μM GDP as well as 5-HT (100 μM)/anti-Gαq and carbachol (1mM)/anti-Gαq in the presence of 10nM GDP. Adenosine-induced activation of Gαi-3 emerged only when GDP concentrations were increased higher than 10 μM, and the following experiments were performed in the presence of 300 μM GDP. Adenosine increased specific [(35)S]GTPγS binding to Gαi-3 in a concentration-dependent manner to 251.4% of the basal unstimulated binding, with an EC50 of 1.77 μM. The involvement of adenosine A1 receptor was verified by the experiments using selective agonists and antagonists at adenosine A1 or A3 receptor. Among the α subunits of Gi/o class (Gαi-1, Gαi-2, Gαi-3, and Gαo.), only Gαi-3 was activated by 1mM adenosine, indicating that human brain adenosine A1 receptor is coupled preferentially, if not exclusively, to Gαi-3. PMID:26213104

  2. Vasodilatory responsiveness to adenosine triphosphate in ageing humans

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Brett S; Crecelius, Anne R; Voyles, Wyatt F; Dinenno, Frank A

    2010-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation is reduced with advancing age in humans, as evidenced by blunted vasodilator responsiveness to acetylcholine (ACh). Circulating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been implicated in the control of skeletal muscle vascular tone during mismatches in oxygen delivery and demand (e.g. exercise) via binding to purinergic receptors (P2Y) on the endothelium evoking subsequent vasodilatation, and ageing is typically associated with reductions in muscle blood flow under such conditions. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that ATP-mediated vasodilatation is impaired with age in healthy humans. We measured forearm blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography) and calculated vascular conductance (FVC) responses to local intra-arterial infusions of ACh, ATP, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) before and during ascorbic acid (AA) infusion in 13 young and 13 older adults. The peak increase in FVC to ACh was significantly impaired in older compared with young adults (262 ± 71%vs. 618 ± 97%; P < 0.05), and this difference was abolished during AA infusion (510 ± 82%vs. 556 ± 71%; not significant, NS). In contrast, peak FVC responses were not different between older and young adults to either ATP (675 ± 105%vs. 734 ± 126%) or SNP (1116 ± 111%vs. 1138 ± 148%) and AA infusion did not alter these responses in either age group (both NS). In another group of six young and six older adults, we determined whether vasodilator responses to adenosine and ATP were influenced by P1-receptor blockade via aminophylline. The peak FVC responses to adenosine were not different in young (350 ± 65%) versus older adults (360 ± 80%), and aminophylline blunted these responses by ∼50% in both groups. The peak FVC responses to ATP were again not different in young and older adults, and aminophylline did not impact the vasodilatation in either group. Thus, in contrast to the observed impairments in ACh responses, the vasodilatory response to exogenous ATP is not

  3. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a possible indicator of extraterrestrial biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The ubiquity of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in terrestrial organisms provides the basis for proposing the assay of this vital metabolic intermediate for detecting extraterrestrial biological activity. If an organic carbon chemistry is present on the planets, the occurrence of ATP is possible either from biosynthetic or purely chemical reactions. However, ATP's relative complexity minimizes the probability of abiogenic synthesis. A sensitive technique for the quantitative detection of ATP was developed using the firefly bioluminescent reaction. The procedure was used successfully for the determination of the ATP content of soil and bacteria. This technique is also being investigated from the standpoint of its application in clinical medicine.

  4. Extraction and analysis of adenosine triphosphate from aquatic environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Shultz, David J.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) extraction procedures have been investigated for their applicability to samples from aquatic environments. The cold sulfuric-oxalic acid procedure was best suited to samples consisting of water, periphyton, and sediments. Due to cation and fulvic acid interferences, a spike with a known quantity of ATP was necessary to estimate losses when sediments were extracted. Variable colonization densities for periphyton required that several replicates be extracted to characterize accurately the periphyton community. Extracted samples were stable at room temperature for one to five hours, depending on the ATP concentration, if the pH was below 2. Neutralized samples which were quick frozen and stored at -30C were stable for months. (USGS)

  5. Perfusion pressure control by adenosine triphosphate given during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, K; Kurosawa, H; Horikoshi, S; Miyamoto, H; Suzuki, K

    1993-01-01

    Administration of exogenous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a vasodilator during cardiopulmonary bypass was assessed in consecutive adult patients (n = 24) who demonstrated a high arterial perfusion pressure (mean, > 90 mm Hg). The action of ATP was characterized by rapid induction and stabilization of the blood pressure level. The dose of ATP ranged from 0.68 to 2.68 mg/min. Within 1 minute after the administration, there was a significant reduction in the perfusion pressure from 102 +/- 18 mm Hg (mean +/- standard deviation) to 72 +/- 19 mm Hg. The ATP was then able to maintain the desired pressure of 69 +/- 12 mm Hg at 5 minutes, 67 +/- 12 mm Hg at 10 minutes, and consistent values thereafter. After the ATP administration was discontinued, there was a prompt recovery of pressure without bradyarrhythmia. The frequency and amount of inotropes used were consistent with the control group (n = 26). Although the administration of ATP reduced the increase in serum catecholamine concentration, there were no significant changes in other vasoactive mediators (eicosanoid, angiotensin II, endothelin) between the two groups during cardiopulmonary bypass. There was neither an accumulation of metabolic products (uric acid, phosphate) nor a decrease in the level of divalent cation (Ca2+), which is observed when the cations combine with phosphates or adenosine nucleotides. This study confirmed the efficacy and safety of ATP infusion during cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:8417658

  6. Adenosine triphosphate stress echocardiography in the detection of myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Fukai, T; Koyanagi, S; Tashiro, H; Ichiki, T; Tsutsui, H; Matsumoto, T; Takeshita, A

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess feasibility and safety in the diagnosis of coronary artery in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and myocardial ischemia using adenosine triphosphate (ATP) stress echocardiography. ATP, a product of human myocardial tissue, is more potent than adenosine in increasing coronary blood flow. Like adenosine, ATP also has a short half-life (<10 s). Left ventricular echocardiograms were recorded during step-wise infusions of ATP in 86 patients who underwent coronary angiography and stress thallium 201 scintigraphy. No serious complications occurred with ATP infusion and most of the side effects were mild and transient. Significant coronary artery disease (>75% diameter stenosis) was present in 34 of 48 patients who had normal echocardiograms at rest. The sensitivity and specificity of ATP-induced wall motion abnormalities for coronary artery disease was 65% (22 of 34) and 100% (14 of 14), respectively. The sensitivity was 50% (10 of 20) in those with one-vessel disease and 86% (12 of 14) in those with multivessel disease (P < .05). In patients with normal echocardiograms at rest and without prior myocardial infarction, the sensitivity of ATP stress echocardiography for the detection of myocardial ischemia assessed by 201Tl single proton emission computed tomography was 58%, with a specificity of 76%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 66%. The sensitivity was 43% in those with one-vessel disease, and 86% in those with multivessel disease (P = .05). In patients with prior myocardial infarction, the sensitivity of ATP stress echocardiography for the detection of viable but jeopardized myocardium was 81%, with a specificity of 91%. The patients with well-developed collateral circulation had a higher incidence of developing wall motion abnormality than those without collaterals (70% v 40%, P < .01). ATP stress echocardiography is valuable for the assessment of coronary artery disease in patients with multivessel disease, coronary

  7. Laboratory procedures manual for the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Knust, E. A.; Nibley, D. A.; Vance, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A manual on the procedures and instruments developed for the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) luciferase assay is presented. Data cover, laboratory maintenance, maintenance of bacterial cultures, bacteria measurement, reagents, luciferase procedures, and determination of microbal susceptibility to antibiotics.

  8. Intracellular Adenosine Triphosphate Delivery Enhanced Skin Wound Healing in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianpu; Zhang, Qunwei; Wan, Rong; Mo, Yiqun; Li, Ming; Tseng, Michael T.; Chien, Sufan

    2016-01-01

    Small unilamellar lipid vesicles were used to encapsulate adenosine triphosphate (ATP-vesicles) for intracellular energy delivery. This technique was tested in full-thickness skin wounds in 16 adult rabbits. One ear was rendered ischemic by using a minimally invasive surgery. The other ear served as a normal control. Four circular full-thickness wounds were created on the ventral side of each ear. ATP-vesicles or saline was used and the wounds were covered with Tegaderm (3M, St. Paul, MN). Dressing was changed and digital photos were taken daily until all the wounds were healed. The mean healing times of ATP-vesicles–treated wounds were significantly shorter than that of saline-treated wounds on ischemic and nonischemic ears. Histologic study indicated better-developed granular tissue and reepithelial-ization in the ATP-vesicles–treated wounds. The wounds treated by ATP-vesicles exhibited extremely fast granular tissue growth. More CD31 positive cells were seen in the ATP-vesicles–treated wounds. This preliminary study shows that direct intracellular delivery of ATP can accelerate the healing process of skin wounds on ischemic and nonischemic rabbit ears. The extremely fast granular tissue growth was something never seen or reported in the past. PMID:19158531

  9. Detection of bacteriuria by luciferase assay of adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Thore, A; Anséhn, S; Lundin, A; Bergman, S

    1975-01-01

    A selective method for distinguishing bacterial and nonbacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in clinical bacteriological specimens was studied. The method involved incubation of samples with the detergent Triton X-100 and the ATP-hydrolyzing enzyme apyrase. The incubation selectively destroyed ATP in suspensions of various human cells while not affecting the ATP content in microbial cells. ATP remaining in the sample after incubation was extracted in boiling buffer and assayed by the firefly luciferase assay. Application of the method to 469 clinical urine specimens showed that the ATP level after treatment with Triton/apyrase was correlated to bacterial counts and that the sensitivity of the assay was sufficient for the detection of 10(5) bacteria/ml. The ATP levels per bacterial cell remaining in the urine specimen after treatment with Triton/apyrase were close to values observed in laboratory-grown cultures. The specificity and sensitivity of the luciferase assay for the detection of urinary bacteria and its possible use as a bacteriuria screening method are discussed. PMID:1100645

  10. Cyclization of the phosphate side chain of adenosine triphosphate: formation of monoadenosine 5'-trimetaphosphate.

    PubMed

    Glonek, T; Kleps, R A; Myers, T C

    1974-07-26

    Monoadenosine 5'-trimetaphosphate has been prepared from adeno-sine 5'-triphosphate by a carbodiimide-mediated condensation. The molecule was characterized by (3l)P nuclear magnetic resonance, and its (31)P spectrum was simulated through the assumption of a three-phosphorus spin system. The molecule is highly reactive and is rapidly converted to adenosine triphosphate upon contact with water. PMID:4834364

  11. Behavior and stability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during chlorine disinfection.

    PubMed

    Nescerecka, Alina; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis is a cultivation-independent alternative method for the determination of bacterial viability in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated water. Here we investigated the behavior and stability of ATP during chlorination in detail. Different sodium hypochlorite doses (0-22.4 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure) were applied to an Escherichia coli pure culture suspended in filtered river water. We observed decreasing intracellular ATP with increasing chlorine concentrations, but extracellular ATP concentrations only increased when the chlorine dose exceeded 0.35 mg L(-1). The release of ATP from chlorine-damaged bacteria coincided with severe membrane damage detected with flow cytometry (FCM). The stability of extracellular ATP was subsequently studied in different water matrixes, and we found that extracellular ATP was stable in sterile deionized water and also in chlorinated water until extremely high chlorine doses (≤11.2 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure). In contrast, ATP decreased relatively slowly (k = 0.145 h(-1)) in 0.1 μm filtered river water, presumably due to degradation by either extracellular enzymes or the fraction of bacteria that were able to pass through the filter. Extracellular ATP decreased considerably faster (k = 0.368 h(-1)) during batch growth of a river water bacterial community. A series of growth potential tests showed that extracellular ATP molecules were utilized as a phosphorus source during bacteria proliferation. From the combined data we conclude that ATP released from bacteria at high chlorine doses could promote bacteria regrowth, contributing to biological instability in drinking water distribution systems. PMID:27295623

  12. Adenosine triphosphate inhibits melatonin synthesis in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Souza-Teodoro, Luis Henrique; Dargenio-Garcia, Letícia; Petrilli-Lapa, Camila Lopes; Souza, Ewerton da Silva; Fernandes, Pedro A C M; Markus, Regina P; Ferreira, Zulma S

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is released onto the pinealocyte, along with noradrenaline, from sympathetic neurons and triggers P2Y1 receptors that enhance β-adrenergic-induced N-acetylserotonin (NAS) synthesis. Nevertheless, the biotransformation of NAS into melatonin, which occurs due to the subsequent methylation by acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT; EC 2.1.1.4), has not yet been evaluated in the presence of purinergic stimulation. We therefore evaluated the effects of purinergic signaling on melatonin synthesis induced by β-adrenergic stimulation. ATP increased NAS levels, but, surprisingly, inhibited melatonin synthesis in an inverse, concentration-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that enhanced NAS levels, which depend on phospholipase C (PLC) activity (but not the induction of gene transcription), are a post-translational effect. By contrast, melatonin reduction is related to an ASMT inhibition of expression at both the gene transcription and protein levels. These results were independent of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) translocation. Neither the P2Y1 receptor activation nor the PLC-mediated pathway was involved in the decrease in melatonin, indicating that ATP regulates pineal metabolism through different mechanisms. Taken together, our data demonstrate that purinergic signaling differentially modulates NAS and melatonin synthesis and point to a regulatory role for ATP as a cotransmitter in the control of ASMT, the rate-limiting enzyme in melatonin synthesis. The endogenous production of melatonin regulates defense responses; therefore, understanding the mechanisms involving ASMT regulation might provide novel insights into the development and progression of neurological disorders since melatonin presents anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and neurogenic effects.

  13. Behavior and stability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during chlorine disinfection.

    PubMed

    Nescerecka, Alina; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis is a cultivation-independent alternative method for the determination of bacterial viability in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated water. Here we investigated the behavior and stability of ATP during chlorination in detail. Different sodium hypochlorite doses (0-22.4 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure) were applied to an Escherichia coli pure culture suspended in filtered river water. We observed decreasing intracellular ATP with increasing chlorine concentrations, but extracellular ATP concentrations only increased when the chlorine dose exceeded 0.35 mg L(-1). The release of ATP from chlorine-damaged bacteria coincided with severe membrane damage detected with flow cytometry (FCM). The stability of extracellular ATP was subsequently studied in different water matrixes, and we found that extracellular ATP was stable in sterile deionized water and also in chlorinated water until extremely high chlorine doses (≤11.2 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure). In contrast, ATP decreased relatively slowly (k = 0.145 h(-1)) in 0.1 μm filtered river water, presumably due to degradation by either extracellular enzymes or the fraction of bacteria that were able to pass through the filter. Extracellular ATP decreased considerably faster (k = 0.368 h(-1)) during batch growth of a river water bacterial community. A series of growth potential tests showed that extracellular ATP molecules were utilized as a phosphorus source during bacteria proliferation. From the combined data we conclude that ATP released from bacteria at high chlorine doses could promote bacteria regrowth, contributing to biological instability in drinking water distribution systems.

  14. Ablation of the cholesterol transporter adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G1 reduces adipose cell size and protects against diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, Jana; Meyer, Christoph; Neschen, Susanne; Augustin, Robert; Schmolz, Katja; Kluge, Reinhart; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Jürgens, Hella; Eulenberg, Karsten; Wehr, Roland; Dohrmann, Cord; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schürmann, Annette

    2007-04-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) catalyzes export of cellular cholesterol from macrophages and hepatocytes. Here we identify an additional function of ABCG1 in the regulation of adiposity in screens of the Drosophila melanogaster and the New Zealand obese (NZO) mouse genomes. Insertion of modified transposable elements of the P-family upstream of CG17646, the Drosophila ortholog of Abcg1, generated lines of flies with increased triglyceride stores. In NZO mice, an Abcg1 variant was identified in a suggestive adiposity quantitative trait locus and was associated with higher expression of the gene in white adipose tissue. Targeted disruption of Abcg1 in mice resulted in reduced body weight gain (8.42+/-0.6 g in Abcg1-/- vs. 13.07+/-1.1 g in Abcg1+/+ mice) and adipose tissue mass gain (3.78+/-1.3 g in Abcg1-/- vs. 9.39+/-1.6 g in Abcg1+/+ mice) detected over a period of 12 wk. The reduction of adipose tissue mass in Abcg1-/- mice was associated with markedly decreased size of the adipocytes. In contrast to their wild-type littermates, male Abcg1-/- mice exhibited no high-fat diet-induced impairment of glucose tolerance and fatty liver. Furthermore, Abcg1-/- mice possess decreased food intake and elevated total energy expenditure (Abcg1-/- mice, 748.1+/-5.4 kJ/kg metabolic body mass; Abcg1+/+ mice, 684.3+/-5.0 kJ/kg metabolic body mass; P=0.011), body temperature (Abcg1-/- mice, 37.82+/-0.29 C; Abcg1+/+ mice, 36.83+/-0.24 C; P<0.05), and locomotor activity (Abcg1-/- mice, 3655+/-189 counts/12 h during dark phase; Abcg1+/+ mice, 2445+/-235 counts/12 h during dark phase; P<0.01). Our data indicate a previously unrecognized role of ABCG1 in the regulation of energy balance and triglyceride storage.

  15. Theory of Polymer Entrapped Enzyme Ultramicroelectrodes: Application to Glucose and Adenosine Triphosphate Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kottke, Peter A.; Kranz, Christine; Kwon, Yong Koo; Masson, Jean-Francois; Mizaikoff, Boris; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2010-01-01

    We validate, by comparison with experimental data, a theoretical description of the amperometric response of microbiosensors formed via enzyme entrapment. The utility of the theory is further illustrated with two relevant examples supported by experiments: (1) quantitative detection of glucose and (2) quantitative detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). PMID:20445817

  16. Determination of adenosine triphosphate on marine particulates: synthesis of methods for use on OTEC samples

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.T.; Hartwig, E.O.

    1982-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

  17. Determination of Adenosine Triphosphate on Marine Particulates:Synthesis of Methods for Use on OTEC Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Anthony T.; Hartwig, Eric O.

    1982-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

  18. Nucleoside triphosphate-dependent DNA-binding properties of mos protein.

    PubMed Central

    Seth, A; Priel, E; Vande Woude, G F

    1987-01-01

    We have previously shown that the mos gene product, p40mos, produced in Escherichia coli binds ATP and has ATPase activity. In the present study, we investigated the DNA-binding properties of p40mos and two mos deletion mutant proteins. Nitrocellulose blot protein-DNA binding assays showed that p40mos binds DNA in the presence of Mg2+-ATP and certain other nucleoside triphosphates. Ninety percent of the p40mos-bound DNA is dissociated if the complex is washed in the presence of 1 M NaCl or in the absence of ATP. p40mos-DNA binding is not observed in the presence of AMP or the nonhydrolyzable ATP analog adenosine 5'-[beta, gamma-methylene]-triphosphate; however, in the presence of ADP, p40mos binds DNA at 20% of the level that is observed with ATP. An N-terminal-deletion mutant protein, p19mos, has no DNA-binding activity, whereas a C-terminal-deletion mutant protein, p25mos, does. p25mos contains the ATP-binding domain, binds DNA in the presence of either ADP or ATP, and shows 5% and 45% binding (relative to that in the presence of ATP) in the presence of AMP and adenosine 5'-[beta, gamma-methylene]triphosphate, respectively. These results suggest that the N-terminal domain of p40mos is responsible for nucleoside triphosphate-mediated DNA binding. We also observed differential histone-DNA binding in the presence and absence of ATP. Images PMID:3035537

  19. Obligatory coupling between proton entry and the synthesis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate in Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, P C

    1977-01-01

    Proton influx was measured after imposition of an electrochemical potential difference for protons (delta muH+) across the cell membrane of the anaerobe, Streptococcus lactis. As delta muH+ was increased, there was an approximately parallel increase in proton entry, until delta muH+ attained 175 to 200 mV. At this point, a new pathway became available for proton entry, allowing an abrupt increase in both the rate and extent of H+ influx. This gated response depended upon the value of delta muH+ itself, and not upon the value of either the membrane potential or the pH gradient. For delta muH+ above 175 to 200 mV, elevated proton entry occurred only in cells having a functional membrane-bound Ca2+-stimulated, Mg2+stimulated adenosine 5'-triphosphatase (EC 3.6.1.3). When present, elevated proton entry coincided with the appearance of net synthesis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate catalyzed by this adenosine 5'-triphosphatase. These observations demonstrate that membrane-bound adenosine 5'-triphosphatase catalyzes an obligatory coupling between the inward movement of protons and synthesis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate. PMID:21165

  20. A Graphene and Aptamer Based Liquid Gated FET-Like Electrochemical Biosensor to Detect Adenosine Triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Souvik; Meshik, Xenia; Choi, Min; Farid, Sidra; Datta, Debopam; Lan, Yi; Poduri, Shripriya; Sarkar, Ketaki; Baterdene, Undarmaa; Huang, Ching-En; Wang, Yung Yu; Burke, Peter; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Here we report successful demonstration of a FET-like electrochemical nano-biosensor to accurately detect ultralow concentrations of adenosine triphosphate. As a 2D material, graphene is a promising candidate due to its large surface area, biocompatibility, and demonstrated surface binding chemistries and has been employed as the conducting channel. A short 20-base DNA aptamer is used as the sensing element to ensure that the interaction between the analyte and the aptamer occurs within the Debye length of the electrolyte (PBS). Significant increase in the drain current with progressive addition of ATP is observed whereas for control experiments, no distinct change in the drain current occurs. The sensor is found to be highly sensitive in the nanomolar (nM) to micromolar ( μM) range with a high sensitivity of 2.55 μA (mM) (-1), a detection limit as low as 10 pM, and it has potential application in medical and biological settings to detect low traces of ATP. This simplistic design strategy can be further extended to efficiently detect a broad range of other target analytes.

  1. Structural Determinants for Substrate Binding and Catalysis in Triphosphate Tunnel Metalloenzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Jacobo; Truffault, Vincent; Hothorn, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Triphosphate tunnel metalloenzymes (TTMs) are present in all kingdoms of life and catalyze diverse enzymatic reactions such as mRNA capping, the cyclization of adenosine triphosphate, the hydrolysis of thiamine triphosphate, and the synthesis and breakdown of inorganic polyphosphates. TTMs have an unusual tunnel domain fold that harbors substrate- and metal co-factor binding sites. It is presently poorly understood how TTMs specifically sense different triphosphate-containing substrates and how catalysis occurs in the tunnel center. Here we describe substrate-bound structures of inorganic polyphosphatases from Arabidopsis and Escherichia coli, which reveal an unorthodox yet conserved mode of triphosphate and metal co-factor binding. We identify two metal binding sites in these enzymes, with one co-factor involved in substrate coordination and the other in catalysis. Structural comparisons with a substrate- and product-bound mammalian thiamine triphosphatase and with previously reported structures of mRNA capping enzymes, adenylate cyclases, and polyphosphate polymerases suggest that directionality of substrate binding defines TTM catalytic activity. Our work provides insight into the evolution and functional diversification of an ancient enzyme family. PMID:26221030

  2. Microcontroller-Assisted Compensation of Adenosine Triphosphate Levels: Instrument and Method Development

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jie-Bi; Chen, Ting-Ru; Chen, Yu-Chie; Urban, Pawel L.

    2015-01-01

    In order to ascertain optimum conditions for biocatalytic processes carried out in vitro, we have designed a bio-opto-electronic system which ensures real-time compensation for depletion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in reactions involving transfer of phosphate groups. The system covers ATP concentration range of 2–48 μM. The report demonstrates feasibility of the device operation using apyrase as the ATP-depleting enzyme. PMID:25633338

  3. The inhibition of muscle contraction by adenosine 5' (beta, gamma-imido) triphosphate and by pyrophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Pate, E; Cooke, R

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the inhibition of the contraction of glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle caused by ligands that bind to the ATPase site of myosin. Two ligands, adenosine 5' (beta, gamma-imido) triphosphate (AMPPNP) and pyrophosphate (PPi), decreased the force and stiffness developed in isometric contractions and the velocity of shortening of isotonic contractions. The force exerted by isometric fibers was measured as a function of MgATP in the presence and absence of a constant concentration of the ligands. As the MgATP concentration decreased, the inhibition of tension caused by the ligand increased, reaching approximately 50% at 25 microM MgATP and either 2 mM MgPPi or 2 mM MgAMPPNP. The maximum velocity of shortening was also measured as a function of MgATP concentration in the presence of 1 and 2 mM MgPPi and 2.5 and 5 mM MgAMPPNP. Both ligands acted as pure competitive inhibitors with Ki = 3.0 mM for PPi and 5.1 mM for MgAMPPNP. These data show that both ligands are weak inhibitors of the contraction of fibers. The results provided information on the energetics of actin-myosin-ligand states that occur in the portion of the cross-bridge cycle where MgATP binds to myosin. A simple analysis of the inhibition of velocity suggests that MgAMPPNP binds to the actomyosin complex at this step of the cycle with an effective affinity constant of approximately 2 X 10(2) M-1. PMID:2990586

  4. Interaction of progesterone receptor with immobilized adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Moudgil, V K; Toft, D O

    1977-02-22

    Affinity chromatography has been used to study the binding of ATP to cyto-plasmic progesterone receptors of hen oviduct. A resin which selectively binds the receptor protein was prepared by linking ATP covalently to Sepharose 4B through a 6-carbon bridge of adipic acid dihydrazide. Receptor bound to the affinity resin was recovered in a single peak upon gradient elution with KCl (0.2-1 M) or ATP (0-0.1 M). While affinity chromatography was normally accomplished using the [3H]progesterone receptor complex, the hormone was not necessary for ATP binding under the conditions employed. The chromatography of crude receptor preparations allowed up to 100-fold purification with greater than 80% recovery of the receptor. The semipurified receptor appeared intact when analysed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. The latter procedure separated the receptor into two components, A and B, both of which were capable of binding ATP. Although a specific biochemical role of ATP in hormone receptor action has not been demonstrated, the present studies support this possibility and, in addition, offer a convenient and reliable step for the purification of progesterone receptors. PMID:836885

  5. Fluorescence detection of adenosine triphosphate through an aptamer-molecular beacon multiple probe.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaodan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Yang, Wen; Jia, Hongying; Li, Yamin

    2012-05-01

    An aptamer-molecular beacon (MB) multiple fluorescent probe for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay is proposed in this article. The ATP aptamer was used as a molecular recognition part, and an oligonucleotide (short strand, SS) partially complementary with the aptamer and an MB was used as the other part. In the presence of ATP, the aptamer bound with it, accompanied by the hybridization of MB and SS and the fluorescence recovering. Wherever there is only very weak fluorescence can be measured in the absence of ATP. Based on the relationship of recovering fluorescence and the concentration of ATP, a method for quantifying ATP has been developed. The fluorescence intensity was proportional to the concentration of ATP in the range of 10 to 500 nM with a detection limit of 0.1 nM. Moreover, this method was able to detect ATP with high selectivity in the presence of guanosine triphosphate (GTP), cytidine triphosphate (CTP), and uridine triphosphate (UTP). This method is proved to be simple with high sensitivity, selectivity, and specificity.

  6. Terbium ion-coordinated carbon dots for fluorescent aptasensing of adenosine 5'-triphosphate with unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingdi; Gao, Zhuangqiang; Zhou, Qian; Lin, Youxiu; Lu, Minghua; Tang, Dianping

    2016-12-15

    This work reports on a novel time-resolved fluorescent aptasensing platform for the quantitative monitoring of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) by interaction of dispersive/agglomerate gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with terbium ion-coordinated carbon dots (Tb-CDs). To construct such a fluorescent nanoprobe, Tb-CDs with high-efficient fluorescent intensity are first synthesized by the microwave method with terbium ions (Tb(3+)). The aptasensing system consists of ATP aptamer, AuNP and Tb-CD. The dispersive/agglomerate gold nanoparticles are acquired through the reaction of the aptamer with target ATP. Upon target ATP introduction, the aptamers bind with the analytes to form new aptamer-ATP complexes and coat on the surface of AuNPs to inhibit their aggregation in the high salt solution. In this case, the fluorescent signal of Tb-CDs is quenched by the dispersive AuNPs on the basis of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). At the absence of target analyte, gold nanoparticles tend to aggregate in the high salt state even if the aptamers are present. Thus, the added Tb-CDs maintain their intrinsic fluorescent intensity. Experimental results indicated that the aptasensing system exhibited good fluorescent responses toward ATP in the dynamic range from 40nM to 4.0μM with a detection limit of 8.5nM at 3sblank criterion. The repeatability and intermediate precision is less than 9.5% at three concentrations including 0.04, 0.4 and 2.0μM ATP. The selectivity was acceptable toward guanosine 5'-triphosphate, uridine 5'-triphosphate and cytidine 5'-triphosphate. The methodology was applied to evaluate the blank human serum spiked with target ATP, and the recoveries (at 3 concentration levels) ranged between 97.0% and 103.7%. Importantly, this detection scheme is rapid, simple, cost-effective, and does not require extensive sample preparation or separation.

  7. Enhanced Diffusion of Molecular Motors in the Presence of Adenosine Triphosphate and External Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinagawa, Ryota; Sasaki, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The diffusion of a molecular motor in the presence of a constant external force is considered on the basis of a simple theoretical model. The motor is represented by a Brownian particle moving in a series of parabolic potentials placed periodically on a line, and the potential is switched stochastically from one parabola to another by a chemical reaction, which corresponds to the hydrolysis or synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in motor proteins. It is found that the diffusion coefficient as a function of the force exhibits peaks. The mechanism of this diffusion enhancement and the possibility of observing it in F1-ATPase, a biological rotary motor, are discussed.

  8. Spectroscopic and theoretical investigations of adenosine 5'-diphosphate and adenosine 5'-triphosphate dianions in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Schinle, Florian; Crider, Paul E; Vonderach, Matthias; Weis, Patrick; Hampe, Oliver; Kappes, Manfred M

    2013-05-14

    Doubly deprotonated adenosine 5'-diphosphate ([ADP-2H](2-)) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate ([ATP-2H](2-)) dianions were investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IR-MPD) and photoelectron spectroscopy. Vibrational spectra acquired in the X-H stretch region (X = C, N, O) and augmented by isotope-labelling were compared to density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/TZVPP level. This suggests that in [ATP-2H](2-) the two phosphate groups adjacent to the ribose ring are preferentially deprotonated. Photoelectron spectra recorded at 4.66 and 6.42 eV photon energies revealed adiabatic detachment energies of 1.35 eV for [ADP-2H](2-) and 3.35 eV for [ATP-2H](2-). Repulsive Coulomb barriers were estimated at ~2.2 eV for [ADP-2H](2-) and ~1.9 eV for [ATP-2H](2-). Time-dependent DFT calculations have been used to simulate the photoelectron spectra. Photodetachment occurs primarily from lone pair orbitals on oxygen atoms within the phosphate chain. PMID:23258289

  9. Vascular CD39/ENTPD1 Directly Promotes Tumor Cell Growth by Scavenging Extracellular Adenosine Triphosphate12

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lili; Sun, Xiaofeng; Csizmadia, Eva; Han, Lihui; Bian, Shu; Murakami, Takashi; Wang, Xin; Robson, Simon C; Wu, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is known to boost immune responses in the tumor microenvironment but might also contribute directly to cancer cell death. CD39/ENTPD1 is the dominant ectonucleotidase expressed by endothelial cells and regulatory T cells and catalyzes the sequential hydrolysis of ATP to AMP that is further degraded to adenosine by CD73/ecto-5′-nucleotidase. We have previously shown that deletion of Cd39 results in decreased growth of transplanted tumors in mice, as a result of both defective angiogenesis and heightened innate immune responses (secondary to loss of adenosinergic immune suppression). Whether alterations in local extracellular ATP and adenosine levels as a result of CD39 bioactivity directly affect tumor growth and cytotoxicity has not been investigated to date. We show here that extracellular ATP exerts antitumor activity by directly inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting cancer cell death. ATP-induced antiproliferative effects and cell death are, in large part, mediated through P2X7 receptor signaling. Tumors in Cd39 null mice exhibit increased necrosis in association with P2X7 expression. We further demonstrate that exogenous soluble NTPDase, or CD39 expression by cocultured liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, stimulates tumor cell proliferation and limits cell death triggered by extracellular ATP. Collectively, our findings indicate that local expression of CD39 directly promotes tumor cell growth by scavenging extracellular ATP. Pharmacological or targeted inhibition of CD39 enzymatic activity may find utility as an adjunct therapy in cancer management. PMID:21390184

  10. Intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, and adenosine 5'-monophosphate detection by short-end injection capillary electrophoresis using methylcellulose as the effective electroosmostic flow suppressor.

    PubMed

    Zinellu, Angelo; Sotgia, Salvatore; Pasciu, Valeria; Madeddu, Manuela; Leoni, Giovanni Giuseppe; Naitana, Salvatore; Deiana, Luca; Carru, Ciriaco

    2008-07-01

    We present a new rapid CE method to measure adenine nucleotides adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) in cells. The short-end injection mode allows a decrease in the analysis time by injecting samples at the outlet end of a silica capillary closest to the detection window, reducing the migration distance. Moreover, the use of methylcellulose (MC) as run buffer additive to suppress EOF permits to further reduce the migration times of analytes. Thus, when a capillary with an effective length of 10.2 cm was used with a 60 mmol/L sodium acetate buffer pH 3.80 in the presence of 0.01% of MC, the migration time of analytes were 1.35 min for ATP, 1.85 min for ADP, and 4.64 min for AMP. These conditions gave a good reproducibility for intra- and interassay (CV <4 and 8%, respectively) and all the procedure demonstrated an excellent analytical recovery (from 98.3 to 99 %). The method suitability was proved both on red blood cells and in spermatozoa. We compared our proposed method to a spectrophotometric assay, by measuring ATP levels in 40 spermatozoa samples. The obtained data were analyzed by the Passing and Bablok regression and Bland-Altman test. PMID:18551716

  11. Direct growth of graphene on quartz substrates for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shicai; Man, Baoyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yue, Weiwei; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Mei; Chen, Chuansong; Zhang, Chao

    2014-04-25

    We demonstrate that continuous, uniform graphene films can be directly synthesized on quartz substrates using a two-temperature-zone chemical vapor deposition system and that their layers can be controlled by adjusting the precursor partial pressure. Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirm the formation of monolayer graphene with a grain size of ∼100 nm. Hall measurements show a room-temperature carrier mobility above 1500 cm2 V(-1) s(-1). The optical transmittance and conductance of the graphene films are comparable to those of transferred metal-catalyzed graphene. The method avoids the complicated and skilled post-growth transfer process and allows the graphene to be directly incorporated into a fully functional biosensor for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This device shows a fast response time of a few milliseconds and achieves a high sensitivity to ATP molecules over a very wide range from 0.002 to 5 mM. PMID:24671026

  12. Synthesis of γ-Phosphate-Labeled and Doubly Labeled Adenosine Triphosphate Analogs.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stephan M; Welter, Moritz; Marx, Andreas

    2015-03-09

    This unit describes the synthesis of γ-phosphate-labeled and doubly labeled adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogs and their characterization using the phosphodiesterase I from Crotalus adamanteus (snake venom phosphodiesterase; SVPD). In the key step of the synthesis, ATP or an ATP analog, bearing a linker containing a trifluoroacetamide group attached to the nucleoside, are modified with an azide-containing linker at the terminal phosphate using an alkylation reaction. Subsequently, different labels are introduced to the linkers by transformation of one functional group to an amine and coupling to an N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. Specifically, the Staudinger reaction of the azide is employed as a straightforward means to obtain an amine in the presence of various labels. Furthermore, the fluorescence characteristics of a fluorogenic, doubly labeled ATP analog are investigated following enzymatic cleavage by SVPD.

  13. Effect of cadmium on lake water bacteria as determined by the luciferase assay of adenosine triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Seyfried, P.L.; Horgan, C.B.L.

    1981-10-01

    A firefly luciferase assay of bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was developed to measure the toxic effects of cadmium ions on aquatic organisms. Toxicity was monitored using intracellular (I/C) ATP (in micrograms per litre) as well as plate counts (colony-forming units per millilitre). The bacteria, which belonged mainly to the families Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae, exhibited varying degrees of resistance to up to 100 ppm cadmium when grown in a glucose-salts medium at pH 6.8. Among the organisms tested, cadmium resistance decreased in the following order: Pseudomonas vesicularis > P. aeruginosa > Enterobacter sp. > P. fluorescens > Chromobacter sp. > Serratia sp. A rise in the pH of the growth medium from 5 to 7 resulted in increased toxicity of cadmium.

  14. Direct growth of graphene on quartz substrates for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shicai; Man, Baoyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yue, Weiwei; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Mei; Chen, Chuansong; Zhang, Chao

    2014-04-25

    We demonstrate that continuous, uniform graphene films can be directly synthesized on quartz substrates using a two-temperature-zone chemical vapor deposition system and that their layers can be controlled by adjusting the precursor partial pressure. Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirm the formation of monolayer graphene with a grain size of ∼100 nm. Hall measurements show a room-temperature carrier mobility above 1500 cm2 V(-1) s(-1). The optical transmittance and conductance of the graphene films are comparable to those of transferred metal-catalyzed graphene. The method avoids the complicated and skilled post-growth transfer process and allows the graphene to be directly incorporated into a fully functional biosensor for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This device shows a fast response time of a few milliseconds and achieves a high sensitivity to ATP molecules over a very wide range from 0.002 to 5 mM.

  15. Hybrid integrated biological–solid-state system powered with adenosine triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Roseman, Jared M.; Lin, Jianxun; Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    There is enormous potential in combining the capabilities of the biological and the solid state to create hybrid engineered systems. While there have been recent efforts to harness power from naturally occurring potentials in living systems in plants and animals to power complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuits, here we report the first successful effort to isolate the energetics of an electrogenic ion pump in an engineered in vitro environment to power such an artificial system. An integrated circuit is powered by adenosine triphosphate through the action of Na+/K+ adenosine triphosphatases in an integrated in vitro lipid bilayer membrane. The ion pumps (active in the membrane at numbers exceeding 2 × 106 mm−2) are able to sustain a short-circuit current of 32.6 pA mm−2 and an open-circuit voltage of 78 mV, providing for a maximum power transfer of 1.27 pW mm−2 from a single bilayer. Two series-stacked bilayers provide a voltage sufficient to operate an integrated circuit with a conversion efficiency of chemical to electrical energy of 14.9%. PMID:26638983

  16. Reexamination of magnetic isotope and field effects on adenosine triphosphate production by creatine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Crotty, Darragh; Silkstone, Gary; Poddar, Soumya; Ranson, Richard; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Wilson, Michael T.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of isotopically enriched magnesium on the creatine kinase catalyzed phosphorylation of adenosine diphosphate is examined in two independent series of experiments where adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentrations were determined by a luciferase-linked luminescence end-point assay or a real-time spectrophotometric assay. No increase was observed between the rates of ATP production with natural Mg, 24Mg, and 25Mg, nor was any significant magnetic field effect observed in magnetic fields from 3 to 1,000 mT. Our results are in conflict with those reported by Buchachenko et al. [J Am Chem Soc 130:12868–12869 (2008)], and they challenge these authors’ general claims that a large (two- to threefold) magnetic isotope effect is “universally observable” for ATP-producing enzymes [Her Russ Acad Sci 80:22–28 (2010)] and that “enzymatic phosphorylation is an ion-radical, electron-spin-selective process” [Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:10793–10796 (2005)]. PMID:22198842

  17. Hybrid integrated biological-solid-state system powered with adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Roseman, Jared M; Lin, Jianxun; Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2015-12-07

    There is enormous potential in combining the capabilities of the biological and the solid state to create hybrid engineered systems. While there have been recent efforts to harness power from naturally occurring potentials in living systems in plants and animals to power complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuits, here we report the first successful effort to isolate the energetics of an electrogenic ion pump in an engineered in vitro environment to power such an artificial system. An integrated circuit is powered by adenosine triphosphate through the action of Na(+)/K(+) adenosine triphosphatases in an integrated in vitro lipid bilayer membrane. The ion pumps (active in the membrane at numbers exceeding 2 × 10(6) mm(-2)) are able to sustain a short-circuit current of 32.6 pA mm(-2) and an open-circuit voltage of 78 mV, providing for a maximum power transfer of 1.27 pW mm(-2) from a single bilayer. Two series-stacked bilayers provide a voltage sufficient to operate an integrated circuit with a conversion efficiency of chemical to electrical energy of 14.9%.

  18. Hybrid integrated biological-solid-state system powered with adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Roseman, Jared M; Lin, Jianxun; Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2015-01-01

    There is enormous potential in combining the capabilities of the biological and the solid state to create hybrid engineered systems. While there have been recent efforts to harness power from naturally occurring potentials in living systems in plants and animals to power complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuits, here we report the first successful effort to isolate the energetics of an electrogenic ion pump in an engineered in vitro environment to power such an artificial system. An integrated circuit is powered by adenosine triphosphate through the action of Na(+)/K(+) adenosine triphosphatases in an integrated in vitro lipid bilayer membrane. The ion pumps (active in the membrane at numbers exceeding 2 × 10(6) mm(-2)) are able to sustain a short-circuit current of 32.6 pA mm(-2) and an open-circuit voltage of 78 mV, providing for a maximum power transfer of 1.27 pW mm(-2) from a single bilayer. Two series-stacked bilayers provide a voltage sufficient to operate an integrated circuit with a conversion efficiency of chemical to electrical energy of 14.9%. PMID:26638983

  19. Hybrid integrated biological-solid-state system powered with adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roseman, Jared M.; Lin, Jianxun; Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2015-12-01

    There is enormous potential in combining the capabilities of the biological and the solid state to create hybrid engineered systems. While there have been recent efforts to harness power from naturally occurring potentials in living systems in plants and animals to power complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuits, here we report the first successful effort to isolate the energetics of an electrogenic ion pump in an engineered in vitro environment to power such an artificial system. An integrated circuit is powered by adenosine triphosphate through the action of Na+/K+ adenosine triphosphatases in an integrated in vitro lipid bilayer membrane. The ion pumps (active in the membrane at numbers exceeding 2 × 106 mm-2) are able to sustain a short-circuit current of 32.6 pA mm-2 and an open-circuit voltage of 78 mV, providing for a maximum power transfer of 1.27 pW mm-2 from a single bilayer. Two series-stacked bilayers provide a voltage sufficient to operate an integrated circuit with a conversion efficiency of chemical to electrical energy of 14.9%.

  20. Release of adenosine triphosphate by adenosine diphosphate in whole blood and in erythrocyte suspensions.

    PubMed

    Knöfler, R; Weissbach, G; Kuhlisch, E

    1997-12-01

    In whole blood samples from thrombocytopenic patients, large amounts of ATP were released by ADP, exceeding the level obtained with samples from normal persons by far. Because we suspected that the high potential of ATP in erythrocytes would be the main source for this phenomenon, the release of ATP by ADP was measured in whole blood samples from normal, thrombocytopenic, and leukocytopenic persons and in suspensions of washed erythrocytes. The release was recorded by a Whole Blood Lumi-Aggregometer type 500 VS (Chrono-Log Corporation, Havertown, PA) using the luciferin-luciferase system. Not only in samples from thrombocytopenic persons but also with normal platelet count, increasing amounts of ATP were released with increasing ADP concentrations, finally exceeding the ATP releasable from thrombocytes by thrombin. The amounts of ADP required to match the ATP release of thrombin were closely correlated with the platelet counts in the samples. With lower platelet counts, the release mechanism from erythrocytes could be stimulated more easily by low concentrations of ADP. The binding of ADP to platelets occurred with ostensibly higher affinity. The phenomenon of overshooting ATP release was also observed in samples from extremely leukocytopenic patients. A very large release of ATP was also achieved in suspensions of washed erythrocytes. In this way our hypothesis of ATP release from erythrocytes by ADP was confirmed again. The mechanism of the release from erythrocytes remains unclear. We speculate that its purpose is to regulate extracellular nucleotides in the circulating blood.

  1. Detection of adenosine triphosphate through polymerization-induced aggregation of actin-conjugated gold/silver nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yu-Ju; Shiang, Yen-Chun; Chen, Li-Yi; Hsu, Chia-Lun; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a simple and selective nanosensor for the optical detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using globular actin-conjugated gold/silver nanorods (G-actin-Au/Ag NRs). By simply mixing G-actin and Au/Ag NRs (length ˜56 nm and diameter ˜12 nm), G-actin-Au/Ag NRs were prepared which were stable in physiological solutions (25 mM Tris-HCl, 150 mM NaCl, 5.0 mM KCl, 3.0 mM MgCl2 and 1.0 mM CaCl2; pH 7.4). Introduction of ATP into the G-actin-Au/Ag NR solutions in the presence of excess G-actin induced the formation of filamentous actin-conjugated Au/Ag NR aggregates through ATP-induced polymerization of G-actin. When compared to G-actin-modified spherical Au nanoparticles having a size of 13 nm or 56 nm, G-actin-Au/Ag NRs provided better sensitivity for ATP, mainly because the longitudinal surface plasmon absorbance of the Au/Ag NR has a more sensitive response to aggregation. This G-actin-Au/Ag NR probe provided high sensitivity (limit of detection 25 nM) for ATP with remarkable selectivity (>10-fold) over other adenine nucleotides (adenosine, adenosine monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate) and nucleoside triphosphates (guanosine triphosphate, cytidine triphosphate and uridine triphosphate). It also allowed the determination of ATP concentrations in plasma samples without conducting tedious sample pretreatments; the only necessary step was simple dilution. Our experimental results are in good agreement with those obtained from a commercial luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay. Our simple, sensitive and selective approach appears to have a practical potential for the clinical diagnosis of diseases (e.g. cystic fibrosis) associated with changes in ATP concentrations.

  2. Adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinase in brown fat from newborn rabbits. Changes in the binding of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate after preincubation of the tissue with noradrenaline or incubation of the enzyme with adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, B L

    1975-01-01

    The equilibrium binding of cyclic AMP to a 150-fold purified preparation of protein kinase, when expressed as the reciprocal of bound against the reciprocal of free cyclic AMP, gave a plot consisting of two straight lines. The values of apparent Kb given by these lines were lowered by preincubating the intact tissue with noradrenaline or incubating the enzyme preparation with Mg2+ plus ATP. This effect was reversed by incubating the preparation (which contained some phosphatase impurities) with Mg2+ alone. None of these procedures affected the maximal binding of cyclic AMP. During incubation of the enzyme with Mg2+ plus ATP, the terminal phosphoryl group was incorporated into protein, over 40% being present in the kinase itself. This phosphate was removed during incubation of the preparation with Mg2+ alone. The validity of expressing cyclic AMP binding as a double-reciprocal plot is discussed, and the experimental plots are compared with those derived theoretically. The results suggest that protein kinase in brown fat is present in two forms, one with an apparent Kb for cyclic AMP or approx. 250 nM (dephosphorylation) and one with an apparent Kb of approx. 14 nM (phosphorylated). Preincubation of the tissue with noradrenaline results in phosphorylation of the kinase and an increase from 15 to 45% in the proportion of the higher-affinity form. PMID:179526

  3. Partial separation of platelet and placental adenosine receptors from adenosine A2-like binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnierowicz, S.; Work, C.; Hutchison, K.; Fox, I.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The ubiquitous adenosine A2-like binding protein obscures the binding properties of adenosine receptors assayed with 5'-N-({sup 3}H)ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). To solve this problem, we developed a rapid and simple method to separate adenosine receptors from the adenosine A2-like binding protein. Human platelet and placental membranes were solubilized with 1% 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate. The soluble platelet extract was precipitated with polyethylene glycol and the fraction enriched in adenosine receptors was isolated from the precipitate by differential centrifugation. The adenosine A2-like binding protein was removed from the soluble placental extract with hydroxylapatite and adenosine receptors were precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The specificity of the ({sup 3}H)NECA binding is typical of an adenosine A2 receptor for platelets and an adenosine A1 receptor for placenta. This method leads to enrichment of adenosine A2 receptors for platelets and adenosine A1 receptors for placenta. This provides a useful preparation technique for pharmacologic studies of adenosine receptors.

  4. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. XVIII. Synthesis and preparation of peptides and peptide fragments of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase (adenylate kinase) and their nucleotide-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Hamada, M; Johnson, M S; Russell, G A; Manship, M; Palmieri, R H; Fleming, G; Bredt, D S; Mildvan, A S

    1989-08-01

    Two peptide fragments, derived from the head and tail of rabbit muscle myokinase, were found to possess remarkable and specific ligand-binding properties (Hamada et al., 1979). By initiating systematic syntheses and measurements of equilibrium substrate-binding properties of these two sets of peptides, or portions thereof, which encompass the binding sites for (a) the magnesium complexes of the nucleotide substrates (MgATP2- and MgADP-) and (b) the uncomplexed nucleotide substrates (ADP3- and AMP2-) of rabbit muscle myokinase, some of the requirements for binding of the substrates to ATP-AMP transphosphorylase are being deduced and chemically outlined. One requirement for tight nucleotide binding appears to be a minimum peptide length of 15-25 residues. In addition, Lys-172 and/or Lys-194 may be involved in the binding of epsilon AMP. The syntheses are described as a set of peptides corresponding to residues 31-45, 20-45, 5-45, and 1-45, and a set of peptides corresponding to residues 178-192, 178-194, and 172-194 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase. The ligand-binding properties of the first set of synthetic peptides to the fluorescent ligands: epsilon MgATP/epsilon ATP and epsilon MgADP/epsilon ADP are quantitatively presented in terms of their intrinsic dissociation constants (K'd) and values of N (maximal number of moles bound per mole of peptide); and compared with the peptide fragment MT-I (1-44) obtained from rabbit muscle myokinase (Kuby et al., 1984) and with the native enzyme (Hamada et al., 1979). In addition, the values of N and K'd are given for the second set of synthetic peptides to the fluorescent ligands epsilon AMP and epsilon ADP as well as for the peptide fragments MT-XII(172-194) and CB-VI(126-194) (Kuby et al., 1984) and, in turn, compared with the native enzyme. A few miscellaneous dissociation constants which had been derived kinetically are also given for comparison (e.g., the Ki for epsilon AMP and the value of KMg epsilon ATP obtained for

  5. Exogenous magnesium chloride-adenosine triphosphate administration during reperfusion reduces the extent of necrosis in previously ischemic skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hayes, P G; Liauw, S; Smith, A; Romaschin, A D; Walker, P M

    1990-03-01

    The lower extremity may be exposed to prolonged periods of ischemia, resulting in depletion of intracellular energy stores in the affected skeletal muscle. The role of adenine nucleotide reduction and failure of resynthesis on reperfusion in determining the extent of muscle necrosis was investigated in this study, in addition to the possible beneficial effects of the addition of exogenous adenosine triphosphate-magnesium chloride during early reperfusion. The isolated paired canine gracilis muscle model was used. After 4 hours of normothermic ischemia in group I, a perfusate Krebs-Henseleit solution plus the gradual reintroduction of oxygenated blood flow was compared to standard reperfusion. In group II, a similar infusion protocol was used, with the addition of 2 mmol/L adenosine triphosphate-magnesium chloride and compared to normal reperfusion. Adenosine triphosphate-magnesium chloride resulted in the salvage of skeletal muscle, 57% +/- 12% versus 44% +/- 14% (p less than 0.05, n = 6 pairs). Reperfusion with the solution alone increased the resulting necrosis (42% +/- 13% vs 60% +/- 20%, n = 6 pairs). Adenine nucleotide stores were not increased, but oxygen consumption was increased by magnesium chloride-adenosine triphosphate (p less than 0.05, analysis of variance [ANOVA]). A clear relationship was demonstrated between the fall in energy stores, as measured by a change in energy charge potential from preischemia to end ischemia levels, and the extent of resulting necrosis (p less than 0.01). In summary, the addition of 2 mmol/L to an infusion of Krebs-Henseleit solution during reperfusion results in significant salvage of skeletal muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. A novel conductometric biosensor based on hexokinase for determination of adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Kucherenko, I S; Kucherenko, D Yu; Soldatkin, O O; Lagarde, F; Dzyadevych, S V; Soldatkin, A P

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a simple and inexpensive reusable biosensor for determination of the concentration of adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) in aqueous samples. The biosensor is based on a conductometric transducer which contains two pairs of gold interdigitated electrodes. An enzyme hexokinase was immobilized onto one pair of electrodes, and bovine serum albumin-onto another pair (thus, a differential mode of measurement was used). Conditions of hexokinase immobilization on the transducer by cross-linking via glutaraldehyde were optimized. Influence of experimental conditions (concentration of magnesium ions, ionic strength and concentration of the working buffer) on the biosensor work was studied. The reproducibility of biosensor responses and operational stability of the biosensor were checked during one week. Dry storage at -18 °C was shown to be the best conditions to store the biosensor. The biosensor was successfully applied for measurements of ATP concentration in pharmaceutical samples. The proposed biosensor may be used in future for determination of ATP and/or glucose in water samples. PMID:26838432

  7. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DOE PAGES

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P.; et al

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and proteinmore » degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.« less

  8. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P.; Li, Huilin; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and protein degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.

  9. Aptamer-based electrochemical biosensor for detection of adenosine triphosphate using a nanoporous gold platform.

    PubMed

    Kashefi-Kheyrabadi, Leila; Mehrgardi, Masoud A

    2013-12-01

    In spite of the promising applications of aptamers in the bioassays, the development of aptamer-based electrochemical biosensors with the improved limit of detection has remained a great challenge. A strategy for the amplification of signal, based on application of nanostructures as platforms for the construction of an electrochemical adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptasensor, is introduced in the present manuscript. A sandwich assay is designed by immobilizing a fragment of aptamer on a nanoporous gold electrode (NPGE) and its association to second fragment in the presence of ATP. Consequently, 3, 4-diaminobenzoic acid (DABA), as a molecular reporter, is covalently attached to the amine-label of the second fragment, and the direct oxidation signal of DABA is followed as the analytical signal. The sensor can detect the concentrations of ATP as low as submicromolar scales. Furthermore, 3.2% decrease in signal is observed by keeping the aptasensor at 4 °C for a week in buffer solution, implying a desirable stability. Moreover, analog nucleotides, including GTP, UTP and CTP, do not show serious interferences and this sensor easily detects its target in deproteinized human blood plasma.

  10. Application of firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to antimicrobial drug sensitivity testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Tuttle, S. A.; Schrock, C. G.; Deming, J. W.; Barza, M. J.; Wienstein, L.; Chappelle, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    The development of a rapid method for determining microbial susceptibilities to antibiotics using the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is documented. The reduction of bacterial ATP by an antimicrobial agent was determined to be a valid measure of drug effect in most cases. The effect of 12 antibiotics on 8 different bacterial species gave a 94 percent correlation with the standard Kirby-Buer-Agar disc diffusion method. A 93 percent correlation was obtained when the ATP assay method was applied directly to 50 urine specimens from patients with urinary tract infections. Urine samples were centrifuged first to that bacterial pellets could be suspended in broth. No primary isolation or subculturing was required. Mixed cultures in which one species was predominant gave accurate results for the most abundant organism. Since the method is based on an increase in bacterial ATP with time, the presence of leukocytes did not interfere with the interpretation of results. Both the incubation procedure and the ATP assays are compatible with automation.

  11. Adenosine triphosphate treatment for meconium aspiration-induced pulmonary hypertension in pigs.

    PubMed

    Kääpä, P; Jahnukainen, T; Grönlund, J; Rautanen, M; Halkola, L; Välimäki, I

    1997-07-01

    To investigate the pulmonary haemodynamic effects of meconium aspiration and subsequent adenosine triphosphate (ATP) treatment, 12 anaesthetized and ventilated pigs (wt 24-28 kg) received either ATP or an equal volume of saline into the right heart in doses of 0.02 to 0.80 mumol kg-1 min-1 after intratracheal administration of 2 mL kg-1 of human meconium. Meconium instillation induced significant increases in pulmonary vascular pressures and total and postarterial resistances calculated from pulmonary artery occlusion studies, but did not affect the systemic haemodynamics, except for a fall in heart rate and increase in central venous pressure. Infusion of ATP at the lowest doses (0.02 and 0.08 mumol kg-1 min-1) selectively decreased the pulmonary arterial pressure and vascular resistance and at 0.32 and 0.80 mumol kg-1 min-1 reduced both the pulmonary and systemic resistances. In the lung circulation the increasing doses of ATP reduced preferably the arterial but also the postarterial resistance. Withdrawal of ATP infusion led to a significant rebound effect especially in the postarterial segment of the lung circulation. Meconium aspiration thus induces an acute, predominantly postarterial obstruction in the lung circulation and infusion of ATP at low doses selectively dilates the pulmonary vascular bed and may help to preclude elevation of capillary pressures in meconium aspiration-induced pulmonary hypertension. PMID:9246392

  12. Genetics and complementation of Haemophilus influenzae mutants deficient in adenosine 5'-triphosphate-dependent nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, J; Small, G D; Setlow, J K; Shapanka, R

    1976-01-01

    Eight different mutations in Haemophilus influenzae leading to deficiency in adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent nuclease have been investigated in strains in which the mutations of the originally mutagenized strains have been transferred into the wild type. Sensitivity to mitomycin C and deoxycholate and complementation between extracts and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-dependent ATPase activity have been measured. Genetic crosses have provided information on the relative position of the mutations on the genome. There are three complementation groups, corresponding to three genetic groups. The strains most sensitive to mitomycin and deoxycholate, derived from mutants originally selected on the basis of sensitivity to mitomycin C or methyl methanesulfonate, are in one group. Apparently all these sensitive strains lack DNA-dependent ATPase activity, as does a strain intermediate in sensitivity to deoxycholate, which is the sole representative of another group. There are four strains that are relatively resistant to deoxycholate and mitomycin C, and all of these contain the ATPase activity. Three of these are in the same genetic and complementation group, whereas the other incongruously belongs in the same group as the sensitive strains. It is postulated that there are three cistrons in H. influenzae that code for the three known subunits of the ATP-dependent nuclease. PMID:177397

  13. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P.; Li, Huilin; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and protein degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world's most devastating pathogens. PMID:25831519

  14. [Detection of coronary artery disease by adenosine triphosphate stress echocardiography: comparison with adenosine triphosphate stress thallium myocardial scintigraphy and coronary angiography].

    PubMed

    Harada, M; Okura, K; Nishizawa, S; Inoue, T; Sakai, H; Lee, T; Sugiyama, Y; Suzuki, M; Hirai, H; Yamaguchi, T

    1998-09-01

    The clinical feasibility and usefulness of adenosine triphosphate-2Na (ATP) stress echocardiography for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) were assessed. Two-dimensional echocardiography and thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) during ATP infusion were performed simultaneously in 58 consecutive patients (41 men and 17 women; mean age 66 +/- 12 years) with suspected CAD. ATP was infused intravenously at 0.16 mg/kg/min for 5 min and thallium was injected at 4 min. All patients underwent coronary angiography within 2 weeks of ATP echocardiography and ATP SPECT. An ischemic response during ATP infusion was detected by echocardiography as the development or worsening of a wall motion abnormality compared with the baseline and by SPECT as a perfusion defect that filled totally or partially during redistribution. Significant coronary artery stenosis was defined as > or = 75% diameter stenosis in a major epicardial vessel. The severity of the stenosis was classified as follows: Group A, lesions with significant coronary artery stenosis (> or = 75%, < 90%); Group B, lesions with severe coronary artery stenosis (> or = 90%) without collateral circulation; Group C, lesions with severe coronary artery stenosis (> or = 90%) with collateral circulation. Significant CAD was present in 43 of 58 patients. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ATP echocardiography for detecting significant CAD were 70%, 100% and 78%, respectively, and those of ATP SPECT were 98%, 87% and 95%, respectively. In patients without previous myocardial infarction, the sensitivity of ATP echocardiography was 67%. The sensitivity of ATP echocardiography and ATP SPECT for detecting myocardial ischemia were 59% and 95% in patients with 1-vessel disease, 75% and 100% in those with 2-vessel disease, and 88% and 100% in those with 3-vessel disease, respectively. The induction of wall motion abnormality by ATP echocardiography was highly concordant with ATP

  15. Unique energetic properties of Adenosine Tri-Phosphate in comparison to similar compounds using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraszko, Kevin; Halloran, Thomas; Malinovskaya, Svetlana; Leopold, Philip

    2015-05-01

    Adenosine Tri-Phosphate (ATP) is arguably the most critical compound to all life known on Earth, serving as the main energy transport and storage in cellular biology. Why in particular did nature ``choose'' ATP instead of a similar compound? We are seeking to answer this question by comparing the energetic properties of ATP to similar compounds. We discuss 3-D models for ATP, variants of the molecule based on all of the separate nucleobases, and ATP's twin molecule Adenosine Di-Phosphate. All calculations were done using Density Functional Theory. The results showed that purine compounds like Adenosine and Guanosine produce similar bond angles, making these viable unlike the other nucleobases. We have analyzed the chiral properties of ATP by comparing the ground-state-energies of ATP-cis and ATP-trans and have shown that ATP-cis is the more energetically favorable of the two. This is consistent with observations in nature.

  16. Photoaffinity labeling of myosin subfragment-one-with 3'(2')-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, R.

    1985-01-01

    The photoaffinity analogue 3'(2')-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate (Bz/sub 2/ATP) contains the photoreactive benzophenone group esterified at the 2' or 3' hydroxyl groups of ribose. MgBz/sub 2/ADP has a single binding site on skeletal myosin chymotryptic subfragment-one (SF/sub 1/) with a binding constant of 3.2 x 10/sup 5/ M/sup -1/. Bz/sub 2/ATP is also a substrate for the ATPase activity of SF/sub 1/ in the presence of different cations. The irradiation of SF/sub 1/ with (/sup 3/H)Bz/sub 2/ATP photoinactivates the ATPase activity with concomitant incorporation of the analogue into the enzyme. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of photolabeled SF/sub 1/ after milk trypsin digestion shows that all three tryptic peptides, 25 K, 50K, and 20 K, and both light chains are labeled. The presence of ATP during irradiation reduces labeling of the 50 K peptide only indicating that the other peptides are non-specifically labeled. To reduce the non-specific labeling (/sup 3/H)Bz/sub 2/ATP is trapped on SF/sub 1/ by cross-linking the two reactive thiols, SH/sub 1/ and SH/sub 2/, by N,N'-p-phenylene dimaleimide or Co(II)/Co(III) phenanthroline complexes. The Co(II)/Co(III) phenanthroline modified (/sup 14/C)Bz/sub 2/ATP-SF/sub 1/, after proteolytic digestion, yields five labeled peptides which were purified by gel filtration and high performance liquid chromatography.

  17. Amperometric biosensor system for simultaneous determination of adenosine-5'-triphosphate and glucose.

    PubMed

    Kucherenko, Ivan S; Didukh, Daria Yu; Soldatkin, Oleksandr O; Soldatkin, Alexei P

    2014-06-01

    The majority of biosensors for adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) determination are based on cascades of enzymatic reactions; therefore, they are sensitive to glucose or glycerol (depending on the enzymatic system) as well as to ATP. The presence of unknown concentrations of these substances in the sample greatly complicates the determination of ATP. To overcome this disadvantage of known biosensors, we developed a biosensor system consisting of two biosensors: the first one is based on glucose oxidase and is intended for measuring glucose concentration, and the second one is based on glucose oxidase and hexokinase and is sensitive toward both glucose and ATP. Using glucose concentration measured by the first biosensor, we can analyze the total response to glucose and ATP obtained by the second biosensor. Platinum disc electrodes were used as amperometric transducers. The polyphenilenediamine membrane was deposited onto the surface of platinum electrodes to avoid the response to electroactive substances. The effect of glucose concentration on biosensor determination of ATP was studied. The reproducibility of biosensor responses to glucose and ATP during a day was tested (relative standard deviation, RSD, of responses to glucose was 3-6% and to ATP was 8-12%) as well as storage stability of the biosensors (no decrease of glucose responses and 43% drop of ATP responses during 50 days). The measurements of ATP and glucose in pharmaceutical vials (including mixtures of ATP and glucose) were carried out. It was shown that the developed biosensor system can be used for simultaneous analysis of glucose and ATP concentrations in water solutions.

  18. Amperometric biosensor system for simultaneous determination of adenosine-5'-triphosphate and glucose.

    PubMed

    Kucherenko, Ivan S; Didukh, Daria Yu; Soldatkin, Oleksandr O; Soldatkin, Alexei P

    2014-06-01

    The majority of biosensors for adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) determination are based on cascades of enzymatic reactions; therefore, they are sensitive to glucose or glycerol (depending on the enzymatic system) as well as to ATP. The presence of unknown concentrations of these substances in the sample greatly complicates the determination of ATP. To overcome this disadvantage of known biosensors, we developed a biosensor system consisting of two biosensors: the first one is based on glucose oxidase and is intended for measuring glucose concentration, and the second one is based on glucose oxidase and hexokinase and is sensitive toward both glucose and ATP. Using glucose concentration measured by the first biosensor, we can analyze the total response to glucose and ATP obtained by the second biosensor. Platinum disc electrodes were used as amperometric transducers. The polyphenilenediamine membrane was deposited onto the surface of platinum electrodes to avoid the response to electroactive substances. The effect of glucose concentration on biosensor determination of ATP was studied. The reproducibility of biosensor responses to glucose and ATP during a day was tested (relative standard deviation, RSD, of responses to glucose was 3-6% and to ATP was 8-12%) as well as storage stability of the biosensors (no decrease of glucose responses and 43% drop of ATP responses during 50 days). The measurements of ATP and glucose in pharmaceutical vials (including mixtures of ATP and glucose) were carried out. It was shown that the developed biosensor system can be used for simultaneous analysis of glucose and ATP concentrations in water solutions. PMID:24810180

  19. Selective pulmonary vasodilation by low-dose infusion of adenosine triphosphate in newborn lambs.

    PubMed

    Konduri, G G; Woodard, L L

    1991-07-01

    The systemic and pulmonary vascular effects of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) were investigated in 12 newborn lambs during normoxia and during alveolar hypoxia (10% oxygen, 5% carbon dioxide, and 85% nitrogen). Lambs had catheters in the descending aorta, main pulmonary artery, and were studied after a 3-day recovery. We infused ATP or an equal volume of saline solution (control) into the right atrial line in doses ranging from 0.01 to 2.5 mumol/kg per minute. In normoxic lambs, ATP caused a significant decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance in doses of 0.08 to 2.5 mumol/kg per minute, and in systemic vascular resistance in doses of 0.3 to 2.5 mumol/kg per minute. Infusion of ATP in hypoxic lambs caused decreases in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in all the doses tested. Systemic vascular resistance decreased, and cardiac output and heart rate increased in doses greater than 0.3 mumol/kg per minute in hypoxic lambs during ATP infusion. The effects of ATP in hypoxic lambs were not blocked by propranolol, indomethacin, or theophylline. Plasma ATP levels in left atrial blood samples did not change significantly during the infusion of ATP. We conclude that ATP is a vasodilator in lambs, and its effects are specific for pulmonary circulation at doses of less than or equal to 0.15 mumol/kg per minute. The vasodilator effects of ATP appear to be independent of P1 purinergic and beta-adrenergic mechanisms, and of prostacyclin synthesis. PMID:1906103

  20. Temporal analysis of regional strain rate during adenosine triphosphate stress before and after percutaneous coronary interventions.

    PubMed

    Gunji, Kazue; Takagi, Atsushi; Arai, Kotaro; Ashihara, Kyomi; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2015-05-01

    Regional myocardial ischemia is thought to be characterized by diastolic dysfunction. We aimed to clarify whether temporal analysis of strain rate (SR) index derived from two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography (2DTE) can assess the regional myocardial ischemia or not. Forty-two patients with significant coronary stenoses were referred for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). 2DTE was performed before and a day after PCI. Time from aortic valve closure to peak early diastolic longitudinal SR ∆(TAVC-E SR) was measured both at baseline and during adenosine triphosphate (ATP) infusion. TAVC-E SR was calculated as TAVC-E SR during ATP infusion subtracted by TAVC-E SR at baseline. In forty-five target ischemic regions, TAVC-E SR at baseline was significantly longer than that of control regions (166 ± 28 vs. 136 ± 32 ms, P < 0.0001). TAVC-E SR in target ischemic regions significantly prolonged during ATP stress to 221 ± 37 ms (P < 0.0001), while it did not change in control regions. Immediately after PCI, TAVC-E SR in target regions significantly decreased to 135 ± 27 ms, P < 0.0001 without prolongation during ATP stress. Receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated that ∆TAVC-E SR could assess regional myocardial ischemia by a cutoff criterion of 14 ms with sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 95%. 2DTE-derived TAVC-E SR significantly increased during ATP stress only in ischemic myocardium. This phenomenon disappeared immediately after PCI. Temporal analysis of TAVC-E SR appeared to be useful to assess the regional myocardial ischemia. PMID:24633495

  1. Effect of adenosine triphosphate on left atrial electrogram interval and dominant frequency in human atrial fibrillation☆

    PubMed Central

    Kogawa, Rikitake; Okumura, Yasuo; Watanabe, Ichiro; Kofune, Masayoshi; Nagashima, Koichi; Mano, Hiroaki; Sonoda, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Naoko; Iso, Kazuki; Takahashi, Keiko; Ohkubo, Kimie; Nakai, Toshiko; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Background Complex fractionated atrial electrograms (CFAEs) and high dominant frequency (DF) are targets for atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. Although adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is known to promote AF by shortening the atrial refractory period, its role in the pathogenesis of CFAEs and DF during AF is not fully understood. Methods We recorded electrical activity from a 64-electrode basket catheter placed in the left atrium (LA) of patients with paroxysmal AF (PAF, n=18) or persistent AF (PerAF, n=19) before ablation. Atrial electrogram fractionation intervals (FIs) and DFs were measured from bipolar electrograms of each adjacent electrode pair. Offline mean atrial FIs and DFs were obtained before bolus injection of 30 mg ATP. Peak effect was defined as an R–R interval >3 s. Results With ATP, the mean FI decreased (from 110.4±29.1 ms to 90.5±24.7 ms, P<0.0001) and DF increased (from 6.4±0.6 Hz to 7.1±0.8 Hz, P<0.0001) in all patients. There was no difference in the FI decrease between the two groups (−20.3±20.5 ms vs. −19.6±14.5 ms, P=0.6032), but the increase in DF was significantly greater in PAF patients (1.1±0.8 Hz vs. 0.3±0.6 Hz, P=0.0051). Conclusions ATP shortens atrial FIs and increases DFs in both PAF and PerAF patients. The significant increase in DF in PAF patients suggests that pathophysiologic characteristics related to the frequency of atrial fractionation change as atrial remodeling progresses. PMID:26702319

  2. Distribution of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent hexose kinases in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Delvalle, J A; Asensio, C

    1978-08-01

    A systematic study of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent hexose kinases among microorganisms has been undertaken. Sixteen hexose kinases of five major types were partially purified from 12 microorganisms and characterized with respect to specificity for sugar and nucleotide substrates and Michaelis constants for the sugar substrates. Glucokinase activities that phosphorylate glucose and glucosamine are inhibited by N-acetyl-glucosamine and xylose, were found to be present in the non-sulphur photosynthetic bacteria Rhodospirillum rubrum, the blue-green algae Anacystis montana, and the protists Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (green algae), Hypochytrium catenoides (Hypochytridiomycete) and Saprolegnia Iitoralis (Oomycete). The myxobacteria Stigmatella aurantiaca contains a glucokinase activity with a different specificity pattern. Anacystis and Chlorella, besides their glucokinase activities, contain highly specific fructokinases, although that from Anacystis can also phosphorylate fructosamine; fructokinase from Anacystis has a molecular weight of 20 000, and exhibits a sigmoidal saturation curve for ATP when the Mg2+/ATP ratio is 2; this curve is transformed to a Michaelian one when under the same conditions an excess of Mg2+ (5 mM) is added. Saprolegnia however, besides the glucokinase, contains a mannofructokinase activity that phosphorylates mannose (Km 0.06 mM) and fructose (1 mM). On the other hand, hexokinase, a low specificity enzyme, was detected in the protist Allomyces arbuscula (Chytridiomycete) and in fungi Mucor hiemalis and Phycomyces blakesleeanus (Zygomycetes), and Schizophyllum commune (Basidiomycete). Schizophyllum contains a glucomannokinase activity together with hexokinase activity. The pattern of distribution of ATP-dependent hexose kinases among microorganisms seems to parallel that reported for biosynthetic pathways for lysine. The correlation with other biochemical parameters is also considered.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide decreases adenosine triphosphate levels in aortic rings and leads to vasorelaxation via metabolic inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Levente; Deitch, Edwin A; Szabó, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Aims Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at low concentrations serves as a physiological endogenous vasodilator molecule, while at higher concentrations it can trigger cytotoxic effects. The aim of our study was to elucidate the potential mechanisms responsible for the effects of H2S on vascular tone. Main methods We measured the vascular tone in vitro in precontracted rat thoracic aortic rings and we have tested the effect of different oxygen levels and a variety of inhibitors affecting known vasodilatory pathways. We have also compared the vascular effect of high concentrations of H2S to those of pharmacological inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, we measured adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-levels in the same vascular tissues. Key findings We have found that in rat aortic rings: (1) H2S decreases ATP levels; (2) relaxations to H2S depend on the ambient oxygen concentration; (3) prostaglandins do not take part in the H2S induced relaxations; (4) the 3':5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) – nitric oxide (NO) pathway does not have a role in the relaxations (5) the role of KATP channels is limited, while Cl−/HCO3− channels have a role in the relaxations. (6): We have observed that high concentrations of H2S relax the aortic rings in a fashion similar to sodium cyanide, and both agents reduce cellular ATP levels to a comparable degree. Significance H2S, a new gasotransmitter of emerging importance, leads to relaxation via Cl−/HCO3− channels and metabolic inhibition and the interactions of these two factors depend on the oxygen levels of the tissue. PMID:18790700

  4. Dielectric spectra broadening as a signature for dipole-matrix interaction. III. Water in adenosine monophosphate/adenosine-5'-triphosphate solutions.

    PubMed

    Puzenko, Alexander; Levy, Evgeniya; Shendrik, Andrey; Talary, Mark S; Caduff, Andreas; Feldman, Yuri

    2012-11-21

    In this, the third part of our series on the dielectric spectrum symmetrical broadening of water, we consider the nucleotide aqueous solutions. Where in Parts I [E. Levy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114502 (2012)] and II [E. Levy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114503 (2012)], the dipole-dipole or ion-dipole interaction had a dominant feature, now the interplay between these two types of dipole-matrix interactions will be considered. We present the results of high frequency dielectric measurements of different concentrations of adenosine monophosphate/adenosine-5'-triphosphate aqueous solutions. We observed the Cole-Cole broadening of the main relaxation peak of the solvent in the solutions. Moreover, depending on the nucleotide concentration, we observed both types of dipole-matrix interaction. The 3D trajectory approach (described in detail in Part I) is applied in order to highlight the differences between the two types of interaction.

  5. Molecular structure of tetraaqua adenosine 5'-triphosphate aluminium(III) complex: a study involving Raman spectroscopy, theoretical DFT and potentiometry.

    PubMed

    Tenório, Thaís; Silva, Andréa M; Ramos, Joanna Maria; Buarque, Camilla D; Felcman, Judith

    2013-03-15

    The Alzheimer's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases that affect elderly population, due to the formation of β-amyloid protein aggregate and several symptoms, especially progressive cognitive decline. The result is a decrease in capture of glucose by cells leading to obliteration, meddling in the Krebs cycle, the principal biochemical route to the energy production leading to a decline in the levels of adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Aluminium(III) is connected to Alzheimer's and its ion provides raise fluidity of the plasma membrane, decrease cell viability and aggregation of amyloid plaques. Studies reveal that AlATP complex promotes the formation of reactive fibrils of β-amyloid protein and independent amyloidogenic peptides, suggesting the action of the complex as a chaperone in the role pathogenic process. In this research, one of complexes formed by Al(III) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate in aqueous solution is analyzed by potentiometry, Raman spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The value of the logK(AlATP) found was 9.21±0.01 and adenosine 5'-triphosphate should act as a bidentate ligand in the complex. Raman spectroscopy and potentiometry indicate that donor atoms are the oxygen of the phosphate β and the oxygen of the phosphate γ, the terminal phosphates. Computational calculations using Density Functional Theory, with hybrid functions B3LYP and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set regarding water solvent effects, have confirmed the results. Frontier molecular orbitals, electrostatic potential contour surface, electrostatic potential mapped and Mulliken charges of the title molecule were also investigated.

  6. Molecular structure of tetraaqua adenosine 5'-triphosphate aluminium(III) complex: A study involving Raman spectroscopy, theoretical DFT and potentiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenório, Thaís; Silva, Andréa M.; Ramos, Joanna Maria; Buarque, Camilla D.; Felcman, Judith

    2013-03-01

    The Alzheimer's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases that affect elderly population, due to the formation of β-amyloid protein aggregate and several symptoms, especially progressive cognitive decline. The result is a decrease in capture of glucose by cells leading to obliteration, meddling in the Krebs cycle, the principal biochemical route to the energy production leading to a decline in the levels of adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Aluminium(III) is connected to Alzheimer's and its ion provides raise fluidity of the plasma membrane, decrease cell viability and aggregation of amyloid plaques. Studies reveal that AlATP complex promotes the formation of reactive fibrils of β-amyloid protein and independent amyloidogenic peptides, suggesting the action of the complex as a chaperone in the role pathogenic process. In this research, one of complexes formed by Al(III) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate in aqueous solution is analyzed by potentiometry, Raman spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The value of the log KAlATP found was 9.21 ± 0.01 and adenosine 5'-triphosphate should act as a bidentate ligand in the complex. Raman spectroscopy and potentiometry indicate that donor atoms are the oxygen of the phosphate β and the oxygen of the phosphate γ, the terminal phosphates. Computational calculations using Density Functional Theory, with hybrid functions B3LYP and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set regarding water solvent effects, have confirmed the results. Frontier molecular orbitals, electrostatic potential contour surface, electrostatic potential mapped and Mulliken charges of the title molecule were also investigated.

  7. Assessment of an innovative antimicrobial surface disinfectant in the operating room environment using adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brian D; Spencer, Maureen; Rossi, Peter J; Lee, Cheong J; Brown, Kellie R; Malinowski, Michael; Seabrook, Gary R; Edmiston, Charles E

    2015-03-01

    Terminal cleaning in the operating room is a critical step in preventing the transmission of health care-associated pathogens. The persistent disinfectant activity of a novel isopropyl alcohol/organofunctional silane solution (ISO) was evaluated in 4 operating rooms after terminal cleaning. Adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence documented a significant difference (P < .048) in surface bioburden on IOS-treated surfaces versus controls. RODAC plate cultures revealed a significant (P < .001) reduction in microbial contamination on IOS-treated surfaces compared with controls. Further studies are warranted to validate the persistent disinfectant activity of ISO within selective health care settings. PMID:25728155

  8. Assessment of an innovative antimicrobial surface disinfectant in the operating room environment using adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brian D; Spencer, Maureen; Rossi, Peter J; Lee, Cheong J; Brown, Kellie R; Malinowski, Michael; Seabrook, Gary R; Edmiston, Charles E

    2015-03-01

    Terminal cleaning in the operating room is a critical step in preventing the transmission of health care-associated pathogens. The persistent disinfectant activity of a novel isopropyl alcohol/organofunctional silane solution (ISO) was evaluated in 4 operating rooms after terminal cleaning. Adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence documented a significant difference (P < .048) in surface bioburden on IOS-treated surfaces versus controls. RODAC plate cultures revealed a significant (P < .001) reduction in microbial contamination on IOS-treated surfaces compared with controls. Further studies are warranted to validate the persistent disinfectant activity of ISO within selective health care settings.

  9. Inotropic responses of the frog ventricle to adenosine triphosphate and related changes in endogenous cyclic nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Flitney, F W; Singh, J

    1980-01-01

    1. A study has been made of a well documented but poorly understood response of the isolated frog ventricle to treatment with exogenous adenosine 5' triphosphate (ATP). Measurements of membrane potential, isometric twitch tension and levels of endogenous 3',5'-cyclic nucleotides have been made at various times during the ATP-induced response. 2. ATP elicits a characteristic triphasic response, which comprises an initial, abrupt increase in contractility, rising to a maximum within a few beats (first phase); followed by a period when the twitch amplitude falls, sometimes to below the control level (second phase); and superceded by a more slowly developing and longer-lasting increase in contractile force (third phase). The response is unaffected by atropine, propranolol or phentolamine. However, the prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor indomethacin depresses the first phase and entirely suppresses the third phase. 3. The inotropic effects of ATP are accompanied by changes in the shape of the action potential. These effects are dose-related. The duration of the action potential (D-30mV) and its positive overshoot (O) are increased during all phases of the response, for [ATP]o's up to 10(-5) M. However, at higher [ATP]o's, D-30mV and O ar both reduced during the second phase (but not the first or third phase), when isometric twitch tension is also depressed. The relationship between action potential duration and twitch tension (P) for different [ATP]o's is linear for all three phases of the response, but the slopes of the curves (delta P/delta D) are markedly different, indicating that the sensitivity of the contractile system to membrane depolarization is not constant, but varies continuously throughout the response. 4. ATP has a potent stimulatory effect on the metabolism of endogenous 3',5'-cyclic nucleotides. The time courses of the changes in adenosine 3','5-cyclic monophosphate (3',5'-cyclic AMP) and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (3',5'-cyclic GMP) are

  10. Characterization of adenosine binding proteins in human placental membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized two adenosine binding proteins in human placenta. In membranes, one site is detected with ({sup 3}H) -N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). This site is similar to the adenosine A{sub 2} receptor. We call this site the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. In detergent extracts, the second site is detected and has the characteristics of an adenosine A{sub 1} receptor. The soluble adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site cannot be detected without a rapid assay. Binding to the adenosine A{sub 1} receptor with ({sup 3}H)-2-chloroadenosine and ({sup 3}H)NECA is time dependent, saturable, and reversible. Equilibrium displacement analysis with adenosine agonists reveals an A{sub 1} specificity: 2-chloroadenosine > R-phenylisopropyladenosine > 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine. The antagonist potency order is 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine > isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline. Competition analysis of membranes with the A,-selective ligands ({sup 3}H)-cyclohexyladenosine ({sup 3}H) cylopentylxanthine revealed adenosine A{sub 1} agonist and antagonist potency orders. We have purified the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site is an ubiquitous major cellular protein. It is glycosylated, highly asymmetric, and acidic. The native protein is an homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 98 kDa. The sedimentation coefficient and partial specific volume of the binding complex are 6.9 s and 0.698 ml/g, respectively. The Stokes' radius is 70 {Angstrom}. The native molecular mass of the detergent-protein complex is 230 kDa. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site has an agonist potency order of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine >> R-phenylisopropyladenosine and an antagonist potency order of isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline >> 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine.

  11. An efficient signal-on aptamer-based biosensor for adenosine triphosphate detection using graphene oxide both as an electrochemical and electrochemiluminescence signal indicator.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang; Li, Yuqin; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Yaowen; Gao, Wenhua

    2015-09-01

    An efficient aptasensor was developed in which graphene oxide (GO) was employed as an indicator for both electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) signal generation. The aptasensor was fabricated by self-assembling the ECL probe of a thiolated adenosine triphosphate binding aptamer (ABA) tagged with a Ru complex (Ru(bpy)3(2+) derivatives) onto the surface of gold nanoparticle (AuNP) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). ABA immobilized onto AuNP modified GCE could strongly adsorb GO due to the strong π-π interaction between ABA and graphene oxide; ECL quenching of the Ru complex then takes place because of energy transfer and electron transfer, and a large increase of the electron transfer resistance (Ret) of the electrode. While in the presence of target adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the ABA prefers to form ABA-ATP bioaffinity complexes, which have weak affinity to graphene oxide and keep the graphene oxide away from the electrode surface, thus allowing the ECL signal enhancement, and in conjunction with the decrease of the Ret. Because of the high ECL quenching efficiency, unique structure, and electronic properties of graphene oxide, the Ret and ECL intensity versus the logarithm of ATP concentration was linear in the wide range from 10 pM to 10 nM with an ultra-low detection limit of 6.7 pM to 4.8 pM, respectively. The proposed aptasensor exhibited excellent reproducibility, stability, and outstanding selectivity, and ATP could be effectively distinguished from its analogues. More significantly, this efficient ECL aptasensor strategy based on GO acting both as an electrochemical and ECL signal indicator is general and can be easily extended to other biological binding events.

  12. Oral adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) administration increases blood flow following exercise in animals and humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) stimulates vasodilation by binding to endothelial ATP-selective P2Y2 receptors; a phenomenon, which is posited to be accelerated during exercise. Herein, we used a rat model to examine how different dosages of acute oral ATP administration affected the femoral blood flow response prior to, during, and after an exercise bout. In addition, we performed a single dose chronic administration pilot study in resistance trained athletes. Methods Animal study: Male Wistar rats were gavage-fed the body surface area, species adjusted human equivalent dose (HED) of either 100 mg (n=4), 400 mg (n=4), 1,000 mg (n=5) or 1,600 mg (n=5) of oral ATP as a disodium salt (Peak ATP®, TSI, Missoula, MT). Rats that were not gavage-fed were used as controls (CTL, n=5). Blood flow was monitored continuously: a) 60 min prior to, b) during and c) 90 min following an electrically-evoked leg-kicking exercise. Human Study: In a pilot study, 12 college-aged resistance-trained subjects were given 400 mg of ATP (Peak ATP®, TSI, Missoula, MT) daily for 12 weeks, and prior to an acute arm exercise bout at weeks 1, 4, 8, and 12. Ultrasonography-determined volumetric blood flow and vessel dilation in the brachial artery was measured at rest, at rest 30 minutes after supplementation, and then at 0, 3, and 6 minutes after the exercise. Results Animal Study: Rats fed 1,000 mg HED demonstrated significantly greater recovery blood flow (p < 0.01) and total blood flow AUC values (p < 0.05) compared to CTL rats. Specifically, blood flow was elevated in rats fed 1,000 mg HED versus CTL rats at 20 to 90 min post exercise when examining 10-min blood flow intervals (p < 0.05). When examining within-group differences relative to baseline values, rats fed the 1,000 mg and 1,600 mg HED exhibited the most robust increases in blood flow during exercise and into the recovery period. Human study: At weeks 1, 8, and 12, ATP supplementation significantly increased

  13. Adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase from penicillium chrysogenum. Steady state kinetics of the forward and reverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Farley, J R; Cryns, D F; Yang, Y H; Segel, I H

    1976-07-25

    The kinetic mechanism of ATP sulfurylase was established from initial velocity, product inhibition, and dead-end inhibition studies. In the forward direction, the reaction is steady state ordered, with MgATP=A, sulfate=B, MgPP1=P, and APS=Q.KmA=0.38 mM, Kia=0.71 mM, KmB=0.50 mM. Nitrate and chlorate are competive with sulfate and uncompetitive with MgATP. KiNO3-=0.25 mM; KiC1O3-= 0.15 mM. AMP and various MgATP analogs are competitive with MgATP and mixed-type inhibitors with respect to SO42-. The Ki for AMP is 0.55 mM. The reaction is rapid equilibrium ordered in the reverse direction with Kiq=0.3 to 1.0 muM and Kmp=0.65 muM. Adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) exhibits competitive substrate inhibition (KIQ=0.3 mM). The ratio Vmaxf/Vmaxr is 0.018. In the forward direction the ratio VmaxMoO42-/VmaxSO42- is 20. The Keq at pH 8.0 and 30 degrees calculated from the Haldane equation is 6 X 10(-9) to 3.3 X 10(-8) (depending on the Kiq value chosen). The experimental Keq is about 2.5 X 10(-9). The fact that Vmax/Vmaxr is about 1 million times greater than Keq is consistent with the assumed physiological role of the enzyme (APS synthesis). The mechanistic basis of the ordered binding sequence was probed by multiple inhibition analysis. Dead-end inhibitors competitive with MgATP (such as free ATP, Mg alpha,beta-methylene ATP, CrATP, and CaATP) do not induce substrate inhibition by sulfate or alter the inhibition patterns displayed by nitrate. This result suggests (but does not prove) that catalytic action on MgATP must precede the formation of the sulfate binding site. PMID:819440

  14. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-10-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose. PMID:26434492

  15. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-10-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose.

  16. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose. PMID:26434492

  17. A rapid method for the determination of microbial susceptibility using the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vellend, H.; Tuttle, S. A.; Barza, M.; Weinstein, L.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    Luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was optimized for pure bacteria in broth in order to evaluate if changes in bacterial ATP content could be used as a rapid measure of antibiotic effect on microorganisms. Broth cultures of log phase bacteria were incubated at 310 K (37 C) for 2.5 hours at antimicrobial concentrations which resulted in the best discrimination between sensitive and resistant strains. Eighty-seven strains of 11 bacterial species were studied for their susceptibility to 12 commonly used antimicrobial agents: ampicillin, Penicillin G, nafcillin, carbenicillin, cephalothin, tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, colistin, and chloramplenicol. The major advantage of the ATP system over existing methods of rapid microbial susceptibility testing is that the assay can be made specific for bacterial ATP.

  18. Adenosine Triphosphate-Triggered Release of Macromolecular and Nanoparticle Loads from Aptamer/DNA-Cross-Linked Microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei-Ching; Lu, Chun-Hua; Hartmann, Raimo; Wang, Fuan; Sohn, Yang Sung; Parak, Wolfgang J; Willner, Itamar

    2015-09-22

    The synthesis of stimuli-responsive DNA microcapsules acting as carriers for different payloads, and being dissociated through the formation of aptamer-ligand complexes is described. Specifically, stimuli-responsive anti-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer-cross-linked DNA-stabilized microcapsules loaded with tetramethylrhodamine-modified dextran (TMR-D), CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs), or microperoxidase-11 (MP-11) are presented. In the presence of ATP as trigger, the microcapsules are dissociated through the formation of aptamer-ATP complexes, resulting in the release of the respective loads. Selective unlocking of the capsules is demonstrated, and CTP, GTP, or TTP do not unlock the pores. The ATP-triggered release of MP-11 from the microcapsules enables the MP-11-catalyzed oxidation of Amplex UltraRed by H2O2 to the fluorescent product resorufin. PMID:26266334

  19. [99mTc-MIBI myocardial tomography with intravenous infusion of adenosine triphosphate in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Kumano, S

    1996-02-01

    To evaluate its feasibility, safety and diagnostic accuracy, 99mTc-MIBI myocardial tomography with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) infusion (0.16 mg/kg/min for 5 min) was performed 100 consecutive patients using the stress/rest one day protocol. None of the patients required treatment with aminophylline during the study. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting patients with coronary artery disease were 97% and 71%, respectively. Those for detecting individual coronary lesion (> or = 75% stenosis) were 92% and 89%, respectively. The high hepatic uptake of 99mTc-MIBI causes artifactual perfusion defects in the inferior myocardial wall, particularly on ATP stress images. In order to reduce this artifactual phenomenon, the interval time between injection and stress imaging must be increased. PMID:8721103

  20. Effects of muscular exercise on erythrocyte adenosine triphosphate concentration in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Donatelli, M; Verga, S; Terrizzi, C; Russo, V; Bucalo, M L; Scarpinato, A; Cerasola, G

    1987-01-01

    Type I diabetes mellitus represents a metabolic disorder in which intracellular glycolytic pathway is inhibited by insulin deficiency, with the subsequent decreased availability of energetic substrates such as ATP. Some aspects of the energetic metabolism in response to an intensive demand (muscular exercise) were investigated, in a group of 10 ketotic diabetic patients, by measuring erythrocyte adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and blood glucose, free fatty acids (FFA) and lactate levels. In the diabetic subjects, in comparison with normal subjects, the decreased levels of erythrocyte ATP at rest did not increase after exercise, while the increased levels of FFA at rest did not diminish after exercise. The results show that the impaired erythrocyte glycolysis may produce reduced levels of ATP not only at rest, but also after exercise, when muscular contraction results in a manifold increase in cellular energy requirements. In addition, other metabolic systems providing energy for the exercising muscle, such as FFA utilization, are impaired in the ketotic diabetic patients.

  1. Photoinduced electron transfer between Fe(III) and adenosine triphosphate-BODIPY conjugates: Application to alkaline-phosphatase-linked immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Hui; Yang, Ya-Chun; Shih, Ya-Chen; Hung, Szu-Ying; Lu, Chi-Yu; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2016-03-15

    Fluorescent boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) analogs are often used as sensors for detecting various species because of their relatively high extinction coefficients, outstanding fluorescence quantum yields, photostability, and pH-independent fluorescence. However, there is little-to-no information in the literature that describes the use of BODIPY analogs for detecting alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and inhibition. This study discovered that the fluorescence of BODIPY-conjugated adenosine triphosphate (BODIPY-ATP) was quenched by Fe(III) ions through photoinduced electron transfer. The ALP-catalyzed hydrolysis of BODIPY-ATP resulted in the formation of BODIPY-adenosine and phosphate ions. The fluorescence of the generated BODIPY-adenosine was insensitive to the change in the concentration of Fe(III) ions. Thus, the Fe(III)-induced fluorescence quenching of BODIPY-ATP can be paired with its ALP-mediated dephosphorylation to design a turn-on fluorescence probe for ALP sensing. A method detection limit at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for ALP was estimated to be 0.02 units/L (~6 pM; 1 ng/mL). This probe was used for the screening of ALP inhibitors, including Na3VO4, imidazole, and arginine. Because ALP is widely used in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, the probe was coupled to an ALP-linked immunosorbent assay for the sensitive and selective detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG). The lowest detectable concentration for IgG in this system was 5 ng/mL. Compared with the use of 3,6-fluorescein diphosphate as a signal reporter in an ALP-linked immunosorbent assay, the proposed system provided comparable sensitivity, large linear range, and high stability over temperature and pH changes.

  2. Evidence for a "metabolically inactive" inorganic phosphate pool in adenosine triphosphate synthase reaction using localized 31P saturation transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the rat brain at 11.7 T.

    PubMed

    Tiret, Brice; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Valette, Julien

    2016-09-01

    With the increased spectral resolution made possible at high fields, a second, smaller inorganic phosphate resonance can be resolved on (31)P magnetic resonance spectra in the rat brain. Saturation transfer was used to estimate de novo adenosine triphosphate synthesis reaction rate. While the main inorganic phosphate pool is used by adenosine triphosphate synthase, the second pool is inactive for this reaction. Accounting for this new pool may not only help us understand (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolic profiles better but also better quantify adenosine triphosphate synthesis. PMID:27354096

  3. Evidence for a "metabolically inactive" inorganic phosphate pool in adenosine triphosphate synthase reaction using localized 31P saturation transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the rat brain at 11.7 T.

    PubMed

    Tiret, Brice; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Valette, Julien

    2016-09-01

    With the increased spectral resolution made possible at high fields, a second, smaller inorganic phosphate resonance can be resolved on (31)P magnetic resonance spectra in the rat brain. Saturation transfer was used to estimate de novo adenosine triphosphate synthesis reaction rate. While the main inorganic phosphate pool is used by adenosine triphosphate synthase, the second pool is inactive for this reaction. Accounting for this new pool may not only help us understand (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolic profiles better but also better quantify adenosine triphosphate synthesis.

  4. Calcium and adenosine triphosphate control of cellular pathology: asparaginase-induced pancreatitis elicited via protease-activated receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shuang; Gerasimenko, Julia V.; Tsugorka, Tatiana; Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Gerasimenko, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Exocytotic secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells is elicited by physiological cytosolic Ca2+ signals, occurring as repetitive short-lasting spikes largely confined to the secretory granule region, that stimulate mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. By contrast, sustained global cytosolic Ca2+ elevations decrease ATP levels and cause necrosis, leading to the disease acute pancreatitis (AP). Toxic Ca2+ signals can be evoked by products of alcohol and fatty acids as well as bile acids. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which l-asparaginase evokes AP. Asparaginase is an essential element in the successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common type of cancer affecting children, but AP is a side-effect occurring in about 5–10% of cases. Like other pancreatitis-inducing agents, asparaginase evoked intracellular Ca2+ release followed by Ca2+ entry and also substantially reduced Ca2+ extrusion because of decreased intracellular ATP levels. The toxic Ca2+ signals caused extensive necrosis. The asparaginase-induced pathology depended on protease-activated receptor 2 and its inhibition prevented the toxic Ca2+ signals and necrosis. We tested the effects of inhibiting the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ entry by the Ca2+ channel inhibitor GSK-7975A. This markedly reduced asparaginase-induced Ca2+ entry and also protected effectively against the development of necrosis. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377732

  5. Adenosine triphosphate-competitive mTOR inhibitors: a new class of immunosuppressive agents that inhibit allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Rosborough, B R; Raïch-Regué, D; Liu, Q; Venkataramanan, R; Turnquist, H R; Thomson, A W

    2014-09-01

    The mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is inhibited clinically to suppress T cell function and prevent allograft rejection. mTOR is the kinase subunit of two mTOR-containing complexes, mTOR complex (mTORC) 1 and 2. Although mTORC1 is inhibited by the macrolide immunosuppressant rapamycin (RAPA), its efficacy may be limited by its inability to block mTORC1 completely and its limited effect on mTORC2. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-competitive mTOR inhibitors are an emerging class of mTOR inhibitors that compete with ATP at the mTOR active site and inhibit any mTOR-containing complex. Since this class of compounds has not been investigated for their immunosuppressive potential, our goal was to determine the influence of a prototypic ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor on allograft survival. AZD8055 proved to be a potent suppressor of T cell proliferation. Moreover, a short, 10-day course of the agent successfully prolonged murine MHC-mismatched, vascularized heart transplant survival. This therapeutic effect was associated with increased graft-infiltrating regulatory T cells and reduced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell interferon-γ production. These studies establish for the first time, that ATP-competitive mTOR inhibition can prolong organ allograft survival and warrant further investigation of this next generation mTOR inhibitors.

  6. Controlled injection of a liquid into ultra-high vacuum: Submonolayers of adenosine triphosphate deposited on Cu(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobrado, J. M.; Martín-Gago, J. A.

    2016-10-01

    We have combined a fast-valve device with vacuum technology for implementing a new method that allows introducing liquid solutions in an ultra-high vacuum chamber in the form of very small droplets. This technical development allows the easy deposition of (bio) organic molecules or small nanoparticles on a surface in a fully in-situ process, avoiding possible contamination due to the handle of the material. Moreover, our experimental set-up is suitable for any liquid and does not require any voltage application as in electrospray. We can easily change the operating regime from liquid droplet injection to the formation of a highly dispersive jet of micro-droplets by exclusively adjusting external parameters. Due to the nature of the injection process, the operational protocol makes possible the deposition of delicate molecular species that cannot be thermally sublimated. In particular, we have used this system to study the deposition of adenosine triphosphate on Cu(110). The structure of the layer was analyzed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and the evolution of the signal from the deposited molecule with the number of injections indicates that the molecular coverage can be controlled with submonolayer precision.

  7. Operation mechanism of F(o) F(1)-adenosine triphosphate synthase revealed by its structure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Iino, Ryota; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2013-03-01

    F(o) F(1) -Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase, a complex of two rotary motor proteins, reversibly converts the electrochemical potential of protons across the cell membrane into phosphate transfer potential of ATP to provide the energy currency of the cell. The water-soluble motor is F(1) -ATPase, which possesses ATP synthesis/hydrolysis catalytic sites. Isolated F(1) hydrolyses ATP to rotate the rotary shaft against the stator ring. The membrane-embedded motor is F(o) , which is driven by proton flow down the proton electrochemical potential. In the F(o) F(1) complex, the direction of mechanical rotation, the chemical reaction, and the proton transport are determined by the relative amplitudes between the Gibbs free energy of the ATP hydrolysis reaction and the electrochemical potential of protons across the membrane. Therefore, F(o) F(1) -ATP synthase is a highly efficient molecular device in which the chemical, mechanical, and potential energies are tightly and reversibly converted. In this critical review, we summarize our latest knowledge about the operation mechanism of this sophisticated nanomachine, revealed by its structure and dynamics.

  8. Supplementation of exogenous adenosine 5'-triphosphate enhances mechanical properties of 3D cell-agarose constructs for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gadjanski, Ivana; Yodmuang, Supansa; Spiller, Kara; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-10-01

    Formation of tissue-engineered cartilage is greatly enhanced by mechanical stimulation. However, direct mechanical stimulation is not always a suitable method, and the utilization of mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction might allow for a highly effective and less aggressive alternate means of stimulation. In particular, the purinergic, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-mediated signaling pathway is strongly implicated in mechanotransduction within the articular cartilage. We investigated the effects of transient and continuous exogenous ATP supplementation on mechanical properties of cartilaginous constructs engineered using bovine chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) encapsulated in an agarose hydrogel. For both cell types, we have observed significant increases in equilibrium and dynamic compressive moduli after transient ATP treatment applied in the fourth week of cultivation. Continuous ATP treatment over 4 weeks of culture only slightly improved the mechanical properties of the constructs, without major changes in the total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content. Structure-function analyses showed that transiently ATP-treated constructs, and in particular those based on hMSCs, had the highest level of correlation between compositional and mechanical properties. Transiently treated groups showed intense staining of the territorial matrix for GAGs and collagen type II. These results indicate that transient ATP treatment can improve functional mechanical properties of cartilaginous constructs based on chondrogenic cells and agarose hydrogels, possibly by improving the structural organization of the bulk phase and territorial extracellular matrix (ECM), that is, by increasing correlation slopes between the content of the ECM components (GAG, collagen) and mechanical properties of the construct.

  9. Effects of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) on somatosensory evoked potentials in humans anesthetized with isoflurane and nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Andoh, T; Ohtsuka, T; Okazaki, K; Okutsu, Y; Okumura, F

    1993-08-01

    In order to examine the usefulness of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as an adjuvant to anesthesia for surgery requiring intraoperative somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring, we have studied the effects of ATP on SSEPs in patients anesthetized with isoflurane and nitrous oxide (N2O). A control recording of SSEP was performed while anesthesia was maintained with 0.5% end-tidal concentration of isoflurane in 60% N2O. The recordings were repeated after an ATP infusion had been added to this basal anesthesia at the rates of 100 micrograms.kg bw-1.min-1 and 200 micrograms.kg bw-1.min-1. SSEP was also studied when end-tidal isoflurane concentration was increased to 1.5% after cessation of ATP infusion. An infusion of ATP combined with 0.5% isoflurane and 60% N2O effectively inhibited an increase in blood pressure during surgery. The amplitude of the cortical component of SSEP was lowered by 1.5% isoflurane, which also increased both cortical and spinal latencies as well as central conduction time (CCT). In contrast ATP infusions at both rates induced no significant changes in latencies, amplitude and CCT. The results indicate that ATP infusion combined with 0.5% isoflurane in 60% N2O can be a useful anesthetic technique for intraoperative SSEP monitoring because adequate anesthetic depth can be maintained by a low concentration of anesthetics without further suppression of SSEPs. PMID:8213025

  10. A case of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation with a non-pulmonary vein trigger identified by intravenous adenosine triphosphate infusion

    PubMed Central

    Esato, Masahiro; Nishina, Naoto; Kida, Yoshitomi; Chun, YeongHwa

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman was referred to our institution with frequent chest discomfort and was diagnosed with drug-refractory paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) was performed using a three-dimensional electroanatomic mapping system. After completion of left and right circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (CPVI), an intravenous bolus of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, 20 mg) was administered to evaluate the electric reconduction between the pulmonary vein (PV) and left atrium (LA). Although no PV–LA reconduction was observed, atrial fibrillation (AF) was reproducibly induced. As the duration of AF was very short (<20 s), no further RFCA to the LA was performed. One month later, the patient presented with frequent atrial tachyarrhythmias (ATs), and RFCA was repeated. Although no electric reconduction was observed in the left- or right-sided PVs, incessant ATs and AF were induced after an intravenous bolus administration of ATP. The earliest atrial activation site initiating ATs was consistently identified from electrodes positioned in the superior vena cava (SVC), and both ATs and AF were no longer inducible after electric isolation of the SVC. ATP-induced PV/non-PV ectopy may be a marker of increased susceptibility to autonomic triggers of AF and could potentially predict recurrent AF after CPVI. PMID:26550091

  11. Selective and sensitive turn-on detection of adenosine triphosphate and thrombin based on bifunctional fluorescent oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Du, Zongfeng; Yang, Limin; Tang, Bo

    2013-03-15

    A bifunctional fluorescent oligonucleotide probe for small molecules and protein detection has been developed based on turn on fluorescence response via the target induced structure-switching of molecular beacon. The two loops of this molecular beacon are designed in such a manner that they consist of thrombin (Tmb) aptamer sequence and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer sequence, respectively, which are utilized to sense thrombin and ATP. The oligonucleotide forms double stem-loops in the absence of targets, yielding no fluorescence emission because of the FRET from the excited fluorophore to the proximal quencher. Upon addition of the target, the ATP or Tmb, its specific interaction with loop sequence of the hairpin structure induce the separation of reporter fluorophore and the fluorescence quencher of the molecular beacon, resulting in an increase of fluorescence response. Hence, the separate analysis of ATP and Tmb could be realized through only one designed molecular beacon. The detection limits were estimated to be 25 nM for ATP and 12 nM for Tmb, respectively. The results of this study should substantially broaden the perspective for future development of oligonucleotide probe for analysis of other analytes.

  12. Probing the Interaction at the Nano–Bio Interface Using Raman Spectroscopy: ZnO Nanoparticles and Adenosine Triphosphate Biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of nanobiotechnology, there will be an increase in the interaction between engineered nanomaterials and biomolecules. Nanoconjugates with cells, organelles, and intracellular structures containing DNA, RNA, and proteins establish sequences of nano–bio boundaries that depend on several intricate complex biophysicochemical reactions. Given the complexity of these interactions, and their import in governing life at the molecular level, it is extremely important to begin to understand such nanoparticle–biomaterial association. Here we report a unique method of probing the kinematics between an energy biomolecule, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and hydrothermally synthesized ZnO nanostructures using micro Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy experiments. For the first time we have shown by Raman spectroscopy analysis that the ZnO nanostructures interact strongly with the nitrogen (N7) atom in the adenine ring of the ATP biomolecule. Raman spectroscopy also confirms the importance of nucleotide base NH2 group hydrogen bonding with water molecules and phosphate group ionization and their pH dependence. Calculation of molecular bond force constants from Raman spectroscopy reinforces our experimental data. These data present convincing evidence of pH-dependent interactions between ATP and zinc oxide nanomaterials. Significantly, Raman spectroscopy is able to probe such difficult to study and subtle nano–bio interactions and may be applied to elegantly elucidate the nano–bio interface more generally. PMID:25152799

  13. Rapid detection of Escherichia coli and enterococci in recreational water using an immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bushon, R.N.; Brady, A.M.; Likirdopulos, C.A.; Cireddu, J.V.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to examine a rapid method for detecting Escherichia coli and enterococci in recreational water. Methods and Results: Water samples were assayed for E. coli and enterococci by traditional and immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate (IMS/ATP) methods. Three sample treatments were evaluated for the IMS/ATP method: double filtration, single filtration, and direct analysis. Pearson's correlation analysis showed strong, significant, linear relations between IMS/ATP and traditional methods for all sample treatments; strongest linear correlations were with the direct analysis (r = 0.62 and 0.77 for E. coli and enterococci, respectively). Additionally, simple linear regression was used to estimate bacteria concentrations as a function of IMS/ATP results. The correct classification of water-quality criteria was 67% for E. coli and 80% for enterococci. Conclusions: The IMS/ATP method is a viable alternative to traditional methods for faecal-indicator bacteria. Significance and Impact of the Study: The IMS/ATP method addresses critical public health needs for the rapid detection of faecal-indicator contamination and has potential for satisfying US legislative mandates requiring methods to detect bathing water contamination in 2 h or less. Moreover, IMS/ATP equipment is considerably less costly and more portable than that for molecular methods, making the method suitable for field applications. ?? 2009 The Authors.

  14. Influence of Thromboxane A2 on the Regulation of Adenosine Triphosphate-Sensitive Potassium Channels in Mouse Ventricular Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, In Seok; Cho, Hwa Jin; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Kim, Sang Hyung; Na, Kook Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels play an important role in myocardial protection. We examined the effects of thromboxane A2 on the regulation of KATP channel activity in single ventricular myocytes. Subjects and Methods Single ventricular myocytes were isolated from the hearts of adult Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice by enzymatic digestion. Single channel activity was recorded by excised inside-out and cell-attached patch clamp configurations at −60 mV holding potential during the perfusion of an ATP-free K-5 solution. Results In the excised inside-out patches, the thromboxane A2 analog, U46619, decreased the KATP channel activity in a dose-dependent manner; however, the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist, SQ29548, did not significantly attenuate the inhibitory effect of U46619. In the cell-attached patches, U46619 inhibited dinitrophenol (DNP)-induced KATP channel activity in a dose-dependent manner, and SQ29548 attenuated the inhibitory effects of U46619 on DNP-induced KATP channel activity. Conclusion Thromboxane A2 may inhibit KATP channel activity, and may have a harmful effect on ischemic myocardium. PMID:27482267

  15. Energetics (Adenosine 5′-Triphosphate) of Mycobacterium lepraemurium in Diffusion Chambers Incubated In Vitro and in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dhople, Arvind M.; Hanks, John H.

    1973-01-01

    Adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) measurements and the processing of samples have been refined to a point where the energetics and growth potential of microscopic samples of unwashed host-grown, host-dependent microbes can be investigated. Mycobacterium lepraemurium, the noncultivated agent of murine leprosy, was employed to examine three reports of the slow microscopic growth of this organism in the absence of host cells. A few million bacterial cells were enclosed in Rightsel- and Ito-type diffusion chambers, which were incubated in vitro and in the peritoneal cavities of mice. In the in vitro experiments, a complex medium containing bovine serum and mouse brain extracts, renewed three times a week, did not sustain the energetics of the bacilli. The microscopic counts declined to 72% and the ATP per culture to 9% of the original values. Very different results were obtained from chambers incubated in the peritoneal cavities of mice. The bacterial biomass increased 2.7-fold and the ATP per culture increased 2.5-fold. Because the ATP per cell was 93% of the original, this system is regarded as the first to permit the extracellular growth of a so-called “obligate intracellular microbe.” The results obtained with only 1 × 106 host-grown cells per assay demonstrate a significant biochemical tool for investigating the growth potential of host-grown microbes during the progression, regression, and therapy of disease. PMID:4594117

  16. A new strategy for the detection of adenosine triphosphate by aptamer/quantum dot biosensor based on chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zi-Ming; Yu, Yong; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2012-09-21

    We designed an aptasensor for the detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) based on chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET). An adenosine aptamer was cut into two pieces of ssDNA, which were attached to quantum dots (QDs) and horse radish peroxidase (HRP), respectively. They could reassemble into specific structures in the presence of ATP and then decrease the distance of HRP and QDs. ATP detection can be easily realized according to the fluorescent intensity of QDs, which is excited by CRET between luminol and QDs. Results show that the concentration of ATP is linear relation with the fluorescent intensity of the peak of QDs emission and the linear range for the linear equation is from 50 μM to 231 μM and the detection limit was 185 nM. When the concentration of ATP was 2 mM, the efficiency of CRET is 13.6%. Good specificity for ATP had been demonstrated compared to thymidine triphosphate (TTP), cytidine triphosphate (CTP) and guanosine triphosphate (GTP), when 1 mM of each was added, respectively. This method needs no external light source and can avoid autofluorescence and photobleaching, and ATP can be detected selectively, specifically, and sensitively in a low micromolar range, which means that the strategy reported here can be applicable to the detection of several other target molecules. PMID:22832507

  17. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ triphosphate (ATP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, Khaled; El-Feki, Hafed; Marsan, Olivier; Drouet, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    ATP is a well-known energy supplier in cells. The idea to associate ATP to pharmaceutical formulations/biotechnological devices to promote cells activity by potentially modulating their microenvironment thus appears as an appealing novel approach. Since biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites have shown great promise for biomedical applications (bone regeneration, cells diagnostics/therapeutics, …), thanks to a high surface reactivity and an intrinsically high biocompatibility, the present contribution was aimed at exploring ATP/apatite interactions. ATP adsorption on a synthetic carbonated nanocrystalline apatite preliminarily characterized (by XRD, FTIR, Raman, TG-DTA and SEM-EDX) was investigated in detail, pointing out a good agreement with Sips isothermal features. Adsorption characteristics were compared to those previously obtained on monophosphate nucleotides (AMP, CMP), unveiling some specificities. ATP was found to adsorb effectively onto biomimetic apatite: despite smaller values of the affinity constant KS and the exponential factor m, larger adsorbed amounts were reached for ATP as compared to AMP for any given concentration in solution. m < 1 suggests that the ATP/apatite adsorption process is mostly guided by direct surface bonding rather than through stabilizing intermolecular interactions. Although standard ΔGads ° was estimated to only -4 kJ/mol, the large value of Nmax led to significantly negative effective ΔGads values down to -33 kJ/mol, reflecting the spontaneous character of adsorption process. Vibrational spectroscopy data (FTIR and Raman) pointed out spectral modifications upon adsorption, confirming chemical-like interactions where both the triphosphate group of ATP and its nucleic base were involved. The present study is intended to serve as a basis for future research works involving ATP and apatite nanocrystals/nanoparticles in view of biomedical applications (e.g. bone tissue engineering, intracellular drug delivery, …).

  18. Adenosine triphosphate attenuates renal sympathetic nerve activity through left ventricular chemosensitive receptors.

    PubMed

    Taneyama, C; Benson, K T; Hild, P G; Goto, H

    1997-02-01

    We previously reported that ATP, but not adenosine, administered i.v. attenuates the baroreflex-mediated increase in sympathetic nerve activity in response to arterial hypotension by a vagal afferent mechanism. It was not elucidated in that study which vagal afferent endings are involved. Mongrel dogs were anesthetized with alpha-chloralose, thoracotomy was performed and a 27-gauge hypodermic needle was inserted into the left circumflex coronary artery. The left renal sympathetic nerves were isolated and placed on a bipolar silver electrode for measurement of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Dose-response effects of intracoronary or i.v. infusion of ATP (100, 200 or 400 microg/kg/min) on RSNA and mean arterial pressure were studied in neuraxis-intact and cervically vagotomized dogs. RSNA was increased dose-dependently with decreasing mean arterial pressure during the i.v. ATP infusion. Elevation of RSNA was attenuated by higher intracoronary ATP infusion rates, despite the fact that mean arterial pressure was decreased dose-dependently. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, however, remained unchanged. This suppression of RSNA by the intracoronary ATP infusion was completely abolished by bilateral cervical vagotomy. Our data suggest that ATP attenuates reflex increases in sympathetic nerve activity by possibly stimulating ventricular chemoreceptors with cardiac vagal afferents. PMID:9023265

  19. Initial binding of 2'-deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Painter, G R; Wright, L L; Hopkins, S; Furman, P A

    1991-10-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (EC 2.7.7.49), a heterodimer consisting of two polypeptide chains of molecular weights 66,000 and 51,000, fluoresces due to the presence of 36 tryptophan residues with an emission peak centered at 338 nm. The association of 2'-deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates with the enzyme results in a decrease in the intensity of the tryptophan emission spectrum, which can be used to calculate apparent dissociation constants. The Kd values determined for binding of the four natural 2'-deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates to the free enzyme range from 36.7 +/- 1.8 microM for dTTP to 47.3 +/- 3.9 microM for dATP. The 5'-triphosphate of zidovudine has a Kd of 54.1 +/- 1.3 microM. The enzyme shows no preference for purine or pyrimidine nucleotides. Hill coefficients and the results of dual ligand titration experiments demonstrate that the free enzyme possesses a single dNTP binding site for which the four natural substrates and the 5'-triphosphate of zidovudine compete. The presence of homopolymeric template-primers does not result in selective binding of the complementary 2'-deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphate, indicating that Watson-Crick base pairing is not involved in the initial binding reaction. The major force driving the association of the ligands with the binding site is hydrophobic. Approximately 14% of the binding energy is derived from electrostatic interactions. Although Mg2+ is required for catalytic activity, it is not absolutely required for initial binding.

  20. Allosteric activation of brain hexokinase by magnesium ions and by magnesium ion--adenosine triphosphate complex.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, H S

    1971-11-01

    1. Substrate-saturation curves of brain hexokinase for MgATP(2-) were sigmoidal at sub-saturating concentrations of glucose when the Mg(2+)/ATP ratio was maintained at 1:1. Under identical conditions, except that Mg(2+) was present in excess, hyperbolic curves were observed. 2. The number of binding sites (calculated from Hill plots) is 1.8 at a Mg(2+)/ATP ratio 1:1, and 1.0 with excess of Mg(2+). The apparent K(m) for MgATP(2-) is 6.5x10(-4)m at a Mg(2+)/ATP ratio 1:1, and 3.5x10(-4)m with excess of Mg(2+). 3. Interdependence between substrate-binding sites was indicated by the effects of varying the concentration of glucose. The sigmoidality and deviation from Michaelis-Menten kinetics at a Mg(2+)/ATP ratio 1:1 became less pronounced with increasing glucose concentration. Also, although substrate-saturation curves for glucose were hyperbolic when the Mg(2+)/ATP ratio was 1:1, reciprocal plots were non-linear. These were linear with excess of Mg(2+). 4. High concentrations of Mg(2+) (Mg(2+)/ATP ratios above 5:1) were inhibitory. 5. The results are taken to indicate homotropic co-operative binding of MgATP(2-) and that Mg(2+) is an allosteric activator. Possible implications in regulation are discussed.

  1. On the use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to elucidate the structure of lutetium adenosine mono- and triphosphate complexes.

    PubMed

    Mostapha, S; Berthon, C; Fontaine-Vive, F; Gaysinski, M; Guérin, L; Guillaumont, D; Massi, L; Monfardini, I; Solari, P L; Thomas, O P; Charbonnel, M C; Den Auwer, C

    2014-02-01

    Although the physiological impact of the actinide elements as nuclear toxicants has been widely investigated for half a century, a description of their interactions with biological molecules remains limited. It is however of primary importance to better assess the determinants of actinide speciation in cells and more generally in living organisms to unravel the molecular processes underlying actinide transport and deposition in tissues. The biological pathways of this family of elements in case of accidental contamination or chronic natural exposure (in the case of uranium rich soils for instance) are therefore a crucial issue of public health and of societal impact. Because of the high chemical affinity of those actinide elements for phosphate groups and the ubiquity of such chemical functions in biochemistry, phosphate derivatives are considered as probable targets of these cations. Among them, nucleotides and in particular adenosine mono- (AMP) and triphosphate (ATP) nucleotides occur in more chemical reactions than any other compounds on the earth's surface, except water, and are therefore critical target molecules. In the present study, we are interested in trans-plutonium actinide elements, in particular americium and curium that are more rarely considered in environmental and bioaccumulation studies than early actinides like uranium, neptunium and plutonium. A first step in this strategy is to work with chemical analogues like lanthanides that are not radioactive and therefore allow extended physical chemical characterization to be conducted that are difficult to perform with radioactive materials. We describe herein the interaction of lutetium(III) with adenosine AMP and ATP. With AMP and ATP, insoluble amorphous compounds have been obtained with molar ratios of 1:2 and 1:1, respectively. With an excess of ATP, with 1:2 molar ratio, a soluble complex has been obtained. A combination of spectroscopic techniques (IR, NMR, ESI-MS, EXAFS) together with quantum

  2. Depletion of cellular adenosine triphosphate and hepatocellular damage in rat after subchronic exposure to leachate from anthropogenic recycling site.

    PubMed

    Akintunde, J K; Oboh, G

    2015-11-01

    One of the major hazards arising from recycling sites is the generation of leachate containing mixed metal. This study evaluated the toxic effects of leachate obtained from Elewi Odo municipal auto-battery recycling site (EOMABRSL) on male liver functions using hepatic indices and biomarker of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in rat via the oral route. Concentrations of heavy metals analysis showed that lead, cadmium, nickel, chromium, manganese, and iron were 1.5-, 2-, 2.5-, 1.36-, 19.61-, and 8.89-folds, respectively, higher than acceptable limits set by regulatory authority World Health Organization. Copper, zinc, and cobalt were 5.9-, 300-, and 1.02-folds, respectively, lower than permissible limits. The EOMABRSL was administered at 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100% concentrations to adult male rats for 60 days. Following exposure, plasma and livers were collected for several biochemistry assays. Exposure of animals to EOMABRSL resulted in 27.51, 28.14, 63.93, 28.42, and 40.16% increase in aspartate aminotransferase activity, whereas it elevated alanine aminotransferase activity by 5.35, 22.33, 88.68, 183.02, and 193.08%, respectively, when compared with the control. Similarly, γ-glutamyl transferase activity increased by 111.22, 114.19, 122.96, 573.14, and 437.02%, respectively, when compared with the control. EOMABRSL administration significantly decreased catalase activity and reduced glutathione level and superoxide dismutase with concomitant increase in malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide levels. Also, significant (p < 0.05) decrease in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity (marker of cellular ATP) was observed. Taken together, the hepatotoxicity of EOMABRSL could be due to the depletion of LDH and induction of oxidative damage, which may suggest possible health hazards in subjects with occupational or environmental exposure.

  3. A cascade amplification strategy based on rolling circle amplification and hydroxylamine amplified gold nanoparticles enables chemiluminescence detection of adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Zhang, Tonghuan; Yang, Taoyi; Jin, Nan; Zhao, Yanjun; Fan, Aiping

    2014-08-01

    A highly sensitive and selective chemiluminescent (CL) biosensor for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was developed by taking advantage of the ATP-dependent enzymatic reaction (ATP-DER), the powerful signal amplification capability of rolling circle amplification (RCA), and hydroxylamine-amplified gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The strategy relies on the ability of ATP, a cofactor of T4 DNA ligase, to trigger the ligation-RCA reaction. In the presence of ATP, the T4 DNA ligase catalyzes the ligation reaction between the two ends of the padlock probe, producing a closed circular DNA template that initiates the RCA reaction with phi29 DNA polymerase and dNTP. Therein, many complementary copies of the circular template can be generated. The ATP-DER is eventually converted into a detectable CL signal after a series of processes, including gold probe hybridization, hydroxylamine amplification, and oxidative gold metal dissolution coupled with a simple and sensitive luminol CL reaction. The CL signal is directly proportional to the ATP level. The results showed that the detection limit of the assay is 100 pM of ATP, which compares favorably with those of other ATP detection techniques. In addition, by taking advantage of ATP-DER, the proposed CL sensing system exhibits extraordinary specificity towards ATP and could distinguish the target molecule ATP from its analogues. The proposed method provides a new and versatile platform for the design of novel DNA ligation reaction-based CL sensing systems for other cofactors. This novel ATP-DER based CL sensing system may find wide applications in clinical diagnosis as well as in environmental and biomedical fields.

  4. Use of Adenosine 5′-Triphosphate as an Indicator of the Microbiota Biomass in Rumen Contents

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, C. W.; Lam, K.

    1977-01-01

    A number of techniques were tested for their efficiency in extracting adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) from strained rumen fluid (SRF). Extraction with 0.6 N H2SO4, using a modification of the procedure described by Lee et al. (1971), was the most efficient and was better suited for extracting particulate samples. Neutralized extracts could not be stored frozen before assaying for ATP because large losses were incurred. The inclusion of internal standards was necessary to correct for incomplete recovery of ATP. The ATP concentration in rumen contents from a cow receiving a ration of dried roughage (mainly alfalfa hay) ranged from 31 to 56 μg of ATP per g of contents. Approximately 75% of the ATP was associated with the particulate material. The ATP was primarily of microbial origin, since only traces of ATP were present in the feed and none was found in “cell-free” rumen fluid. Fractionation of the bacterial and protozoal populations in SRF resulted in the isolation of an enriched protozoal fraction with a 10-fold higher ATP concentration than that of the separated rumen bacteria. The ATP pool sizes of nine functionally important rumen bacteria during the exponential phase of growth ranged from 1.1 to 17.6 μg of ATP per mg of dry weight. This information indicates that using ATP as a measure of microbial biomass in rumen contents must be done with caution because of possible variations in the efficiency of extraction of ATP from rumen contents and differences in the concentration of ATP in rumen microbes. PMID:16345203

  5. Lack of correlation between Legionella colonization and microbial population quantification using heterotrophic plate count and adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence measurement.

    PubMed

    Duda, Scott; Baron, Julianne L; Wagener, Marilyn M; Vidic, Radisav D; Stout, Janet E

    2015-07-01

    This investigation compared biological quantification of potable and non-potable (cooling) water samples using pour plate heterotrophic plate count (HPC) methods and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration measurement using bioluminescence. The relationship between these measurements and the presence of Legionella spp. was also examined. HPC for potable and non-potable water were cultured on R2A and PCA, respectively. Results indicated a strong correlation between HPC and ATP measurements in potable water (R = 0.90, p < 0.001). In the make-up water and two cooling towers, the correlations between ATP and HPC were much weaker but statistically significant (make-up water: R = 0.37, p = 0.005; cooling tower 1: R = 0.52, p < 0.001; cooling tower 2: R = 0.54, p < 0.001). For potable and non-potable samples, HPC exhibited higher measurement variability than ATP. However, ATP measurements showed higher microbial concentrations than HPC measurements. Following chlorination of the cooling towers, ATP measurements indicated very low bacterial concentrations (<10 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL) despite high HPC concentrations (>1000 CFU/mL) which consisted primarily of non-tuberculous mycobacteria. HPC concentrations have been suggested to be predictive of Legionella presence, although this has not been proven. Our evaluation showed that HPC or ATP demonstrated a fair predictive capacity for Legionella positivity in potable water (HPC: receiver operating characteristic (ROC) = 0.70; ATP: ROC = 0.78; p = 0.003). However, HPC or ATP correctly classified sites as positive only 64 and 62% of the time, respectively. No correlation between HPC or ATP and Legionella colonization in non-potable water samples was found (HPC: ROC = 0.28; ATP: ROC = 0.44; p = 0.193).

  6. Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Adenosine Triphosphate Stress Whole-Heart Dynamic Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Using 256-Slice Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Akira; Kawaguchi, Naoto; Kido, Teruhito; Inoue, Katsuji; Suzuki, Jun; Ogimoto, Akiyoshi; Funada, Jun-ichi; Higaki, Jitsuo; Miyagawa, Masao; Vembar, Mani; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of the qualitative transmural extent of hypoperfusion areas (HPA) using stress dynamic whole-heart computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging by 256-slice CT with CTP-derived myocardial blood flow (MBF) for the estimation of the severity of coronary artery stenosis. Methods and Results Eleven patients underwent adenosine triphosphate (0.16 mg/kg/min, 5 min) stress dynamic CTP by 256-slice CT (coverage: 8 cm, 0.27 s/rotation), and 9 of the 11 patients underwent coronary angiography (CAG). Stress dynamic CTP (whole–heart datasets over 30 consecutive heart beats in systole without spatial and temporal gaps) was acquired with prospective ECG gating (effective radiation dose: 10.4 mSv). The extent of HPAs was visually graded using a 3-point score (normal, subendocardial, transmural). MBF (ml/100g/min) was measured by deconvolution. Differences in MBF (mean ± standard error) according to HPA and CAG results were evaluated. In 27 regions (3 major coronary territories in 9 patients), 11 coronary stenoses (> 50% reduction in diameter) were observed. In 353 myocardial segments, HPA was significantly related to MBF (P < 0.05; normal 295 ± 94; subendocardial 186 ± 67; and transmural 80 ± 53). Coronary territory analysis revealed a significant relationship between coronary stenosis severity and MBF (P < 0.05; non-significant stenosis [< 50%], 284 ± 97; moderate stenosis [50–70%], 184 ± 74; and severe stenosis [> 70%], 119 ± 69). Conclusion The qualitative transmural extent of HPA using stress whole-heart dynamic CTP imaging by 256-slice CT exhibits a good correlation with quantitative CTP-derived MBF and may aid in assessing the hemodynamic significance of coronary artery disease. PMID:24376774

  7. Depletion of cellular adenosine triphosphate and hepatocellular damage in rat after subchronic exposure to leachate from anthropogenic recycling site.

    PubMed

    Akintunde, J K; Oboh, G

    2015-11-01

    One of the major hazards arising from recycling sites is the generation of leachate containing mixed metal. This study evaluated the toxic effects of leachate obtained from Elewi Odo municipal auto-battery recycling site (EOMABRSL) on male liver functions using hepatic indices and biomarker of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in rat via the oral route. Concentrations of heavy metals analysis showed that lead, cadmium, nickel, chromium, manganese, and iron were 1.5-, 2-, 2.5-, 1.36-, 19.61-, and 8.89-folds, respectively, higher than acceptable limits set by regulatory authority World Health Organization. Copper, zinc, and cobalt were 5.9-, 300-, and 1.02-folds, respectively, lower than permissible limits. The EOMABRSL was administered at 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100% concentrations to adult male rats for 60 days. Following exposure, plasma and livers were collected for several biochemistry assays. Exposure of animals to EOMABRSL resulted in 27.51, 28.14, 63.93, 28.42, and 40.16% increase in aspartate aminotransferase activity, whereas it elevated alanine aminotransferase activity by 5.35, 22.33, 88.68, 183.02, and 193.08%, respectively, when compared with the control. Similarly, γ-glutamyl transferase activity increased by 111.22, 114.19, 122.96, 573.14, and 437.02%, respectively, when compared with the control. EOMABRSL administration significantly decreased catalase activity and reduced glutathione level and superoxide dismutase with concomitant increase in malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide levels. Also, significant (p < 0.05) decrease in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity (marker of cellular ATP) was observed. Taken together, the hepatotoxicity of EOMABRSL could be due to the depletion of LDH and induction of oxidative damage, which may suggest possible health hazards in subjects with occupational or environmental exposure. PMID:25645823

  8. Lack of correlation between Legionella colonization and microbial population quantification using heterotrophic plate count and adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence measurement.

    PubMed

    Duda, Scott; Baron, Julianne L; Wagener, Marilyn M; Vidic, Radisav D; Stout, Janet E

    2015-07-01

    This investigation compared biological quantification of potable and non-potable (cooling) water samples using pour plate heterotrophic plate count (HPC) methods and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration measurement using bioluminescence. The relationship between these measurements and the presence of Legionella spp. was also examined. HPC for potable and non-potable water were cultured on R2A and PCA, respectively. Results indicated a strong correlation between HPC and ATP measurements in potable water (R = 0.90, p < 0.001). In the make-up water and two cooling towers, the correlations between ATP and HPC were much weaker but statistically significant (make-up water: R = 0.37, p = 0.005; cooling tower 1: R = 0.52, p < 0.001; cooling tower 2: R = 0.54, p < 0.001). For potable and non-potable samples, HPC exhibited higher measurement variability than ATP. However, ATP measurements showed higher microbial concentrations than HPC measurements. Following chlorination of the cooling towers, ATP measurements indicated very low bacterial concentrations (<10 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL) despite high HPC concentrations (>1000 CFU/mL) which consisted primarily of non-tuberculous mycobacteria. HPC concentrations have been suggested to be predictive of Legionella presence, although this has not been proven. Our evaluation showed that HPC or ATP demonstrated a fair predictive capacity for Legionella positivity in potable water (HPC: receiver operating characteristic (ROC) = 0.70; ATP: ROC = 0.78; p = 0.003). However, HPC or ATP correctly classified sites as positive only 64 and 62% of the time, respectively. No correlation between HPC or ATP and Legionella colonization in non-potable water samples was found (HPC: ROC = 0.28; ATP: ROC = 0.44; p = 0.193). PMID:26038316

  9. Identification of widespread adenosine nucleotide binding in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Ortega, Corrie; Payne, Samuel H.; Haft, Daniel H.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Lewis, Michael P.; Ollodart, Anja R.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Shukla, Anil K.; Fortuin, Suereta; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Grundner, Christoph; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-01-24

    The annotation of protein function is almost completely performed by in silico approaches. However, computational prediction of protein function is frequently incomplete and error prone. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), ~25% of all genes have no predicted function and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. This lack of functional information severely limits our understanding of Mtb pathogenicity. Current tools for experimental functional annotation are limited and often do not scale to entire protein families. Here, we report a generally applicable chemical biology platform to functionally annotate bacterial proteins by combining activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) and quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics. As an example of this approach for high-throughput protein functional validation and discovery, we experimentally annotate the families of ATP-binding proteins in Mtb. Our data experimentally validate prior in silico predictions of >250 ATPases and adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins, and reveal 73 hypothetical proteins as novel ATP-binding proteins. We identify adenosine cofactor interactions with many hypothetical proteins containing a diversity of unrelated sequences, providing a new and expanded view of adenosine nucleotide binding in Mtb. Furthermore, many of these hypothetical proteins are both unique to Mycobacteria and essential for infection, suggesting specialized functions in mycobacterial physiology and pathogenicity. Thus, we provide a generally applicable approach for high throughput protein function discovery and validation, and highlight several ways in which application of activity-based proteomics data can improve the quality of functional annotations to facilitate novel biological insights.

  10. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) reduces amyloid-β protein misfolding in vitro.

    PubMed

    Coskuner, Orkid; Murray, Ian V J

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating disease of aging that initiates decades prior to clinical manifestation and represents an impending epidemic. Two early features of AD are metabolic dysfunction and changes in amyloid-β protein (Aβ) levels. Since levels of ATP decrease over the course of the disease and Aβ is an early biomarker of AD, we sought to uncover novel linkages between the two. First and remarkably, a GxxxG motif is common between both Aβ (oligomerization motif) and nucleotide binding proteins (Rossmann fold). Second, ATP was demonstrated to protect against Aβ mediated cytotoxicity. Last, there is structural similarity between ATP and amyloid binding/inhibitory compounds such as ThioT, melatonin, and indoles. Thus, we investigated whether ATP alters misfolding of the pathologically relevant Aβ42. To test this hypothesis, we performed computational and biochemical studies. Our computational studies demonstrate that ATP interacts strongly with Tyr10 and Ser26 of Aβ fibrils in solution. Experimentally, both ATP and ADP reduced Aβ misfolding at physiological intracellular concentrations, with thresholds at ~500 μM and 1 mM respectively. This inhibition of Aβ misfolding is specific; requiring Tyr10 of Aβ and is enhanced by magnesium. Last, cerebrospinal fluid ATP levels are in the nanomolar range and decreased with AD pathology. This initial and novel finding regarding the ATP interaction with Aβ and reduction of Aβ misfolding has potential significance to the AD field. It provides an underlying mechanism for published links between metabolic dysfunction and AD. It also suggests a potential role of ATP in AD pathology, as the occurrence of misfolded extracellular Aβ mirrors lowered extracellular ATP levels. Last, the findings suggest that Aβ conformation change may be a sensor of metabolic dysfunction.

  11. Comparison of plate counts, Petrifilm, dipslides, and adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence for monitoring bacteria in cooling-tower waters.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Sherry A; Anderson, James E; Kim, Byung R; Ball, James C

    2009-04-01

    Effective bacterial control in cooling-tower systems requires accurate and timely methods to count bacteria. Plate-count methods are difficult to implement on-site, because they are time- and labor-intensive and require sterile techniques. Several field-applicable methods (dipslides, Petrifilm, and adenosine triphosphate [ATP] bioluminescence) were compared with the plate count for two sample matrices--phosphate-buffered saline solution containing a pure culture of Pseudomonas fluorescens and cooling-tower water containing an undefined mixed bacterial culture. For the pure culture, (1) counts determined on nutrient agar and plate-count agar (PCA) media and expressed as colony-forming units (CFU) per milliliter were equivalent to those on R2A medium (p = 1.0 and p = 1.0, respectively); (2) Petrifilm counts were not significantly different from R2A plate counts (p = 0.99); (3) the dipslide counts were up to 2 log units higher than R2A plate counts, but this discrepancy was not statistically significant (p = 0.06); and (4) a discernable correlation (r2 = 0.67) existed between ATP readings and plate counts. For cooling-tower water samples (n = 62), (1) bacterial counts using R2A medium were higher (but not significant; p = 0.63) than nutrient agar and significantly higher than tryptone-glucose yeast extract (TGE; p = 0.03) and PCA (p < 0.001); (2) Petrifilm counts were significantly lower than nutrient agar or R2A (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001, respectively), but not statistically different from TGE, PCA, and dipslides (p = 0.55, p = 0.69, and p = 0.91, respectively); (3) the dipslide method yielded bacteria counts 1 to 3 log units lower than nutrient agar and R2A (p < 0.001), but was not significantly different from Petrifilm (p = 0.91), PCA (p = 1.00) or TGE (p = 0.07); (4) the differences between dipslides and the other methods became greater with a 6-day incubation time; and (5) the correlation between ATP readings and plate counts varied from system to system, was poor

  12. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate and neuropeptide Y are co-transmitters in conjunction with noradrenaline in the human saphenous vein.

    PubMed

    Racchi, H; Irarrázabal, M J; Howard, M; Morán, S; Zalaquett, R; Huidobro-Toro, J P

    1999-03-01

    1. Human saphenous veins were used to assess the cooperative participation of adenosine 5-triphosphate (ATP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and noradrenaline (NA) in the vasomotor responses elicited following electrical depolarization of the perivascular nerve terminals. Rings from recently dissected human biopsies were mounted to record isometric muscular contractions; the motor activity elicited in the circular muscle layer following electrical depolarization (2.5-20 Hz, 50 V, 0.5 msec) were recorded. 2. Incubation of the biopsies with either 100 nM tetrodotoxin (TTX) or 1 microM guanethidine abolished the vasomotor response elicited by electrical nerve depolarization. The independent application of either ATP or NA to vein rings induced concentration-dependent contractions. 3. Tissue incubation with 30 microM suramin or 10 nM prazosin produced 10 fold rightward displacements of the alpha,beta-methylene ATP and NA concentration-response curves respectively. NPY contracted a limited number of biopsies, the vasoconstriction elicited was completely blocked by 1 microM BIBP 3226. A 5 min incubation of the biopsies with 10-100 nM NPY synergized, in a concentration-dependent fashion, both the ATP and the ATP analogue-induced contractions. Likewise, tissue preincubation with 10 nM NPY potentiated the vasomotor responses evoked with 20-60 nM NA. 4. Neither suramin, BIBP 3226, nor prazosin was individually able to significantly modify the derived frequency-tension curves. In contrast, the co-application of 30 microM suramin and 10 nM prazosin or 30 microM suramin and 1 microM BIBP 3226, elicited a significant (P<0.01) downward displacement of the respective frequency-tension curves. 5. The simultaneous application of the three antagonists-30 microM suramin, 1 microM BIBP 3226 and 10 nM prazosin-caused a significantly greater displacement of the frequency-tension curve than that achieved in experiments using two of these antagonists. 6. Electrically-evoked vasomotor activity is

  13. Microbial group specific uptake kinetics of inorganic phosphate and adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) in the north pacific subtropical gyre.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Karin; Duhamel, Solange; Karl, David M

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the concentration dependent uptake of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) in microbial populations in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). We used radiotracers to measure substrate uptake into whole water communities, differentiated microbial size classes, and two flow sorted groups; Prochlorococcus (PRO) and non-pigmented bacteria (NPB). The Pi concentrations, uptake rates, and Pi pool turnover times (Tt) were (mean, ±SD); 54.9 ± 35.0 nmol L(-1) (n = 22), 4.8 ± 1.9 nmol L(-1) day(-1) (n = 19), and 14.7 ± 10.2 days (n = 19), respectively. Pi uptake into >2 μm cells was on average 12 ± 7% (n = 15) of the total uptake. The kinetic response to Pi (10-500 nmol L(-1)) was small, indicating that the microorganisms were close to their maximum uptake velocity (V(max)). V(max) averaged 8.0 ± 3.6 nmol L(-1) day(-1) (n = 19) in the >0.2 μm group, with half saturation constants (K(m)) of 40 ± 28 nmol L(-1) (n = 19). PRO had three times the cell specific Pi uptake rate of NPB, at ambient concentrations, but when adjusted to cells L(-1) the rates were similar, and these two groups were equally competitive for Pi. The Tt of γ-P-ATP in the >0.2 μm group were shorter than for the Pi pool (4.4 ± 1.0 days; n = 6), but this difference diminished in the larger size classes. The kinetic response to ATP was large in the >0.2 μm class with V(max) exceeding the rates at ambient concentrations (mean 62 ± 27 times; n = 6) with a mean V(max) for γ-P-ATP of 2.8 ± 1.0 nmol L(-1) day(-1), and K(m) at 11.5 ± 5.4 nmol L(-1) (n = 6). The NPB contribution to γ-P-ATP uptake was high (95 ± 3%, n = 4) at ambient concentrations but decreased to ∼50% at the highest ATP amendment. PRO had K(m) values 5-10 times greater than NPB. The above indicates that PRO and NPB were in close competition in terms of Pi

  14. Development and structural analysis of adenosine site binding tankyrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Haikarainen, Teemu; Waaler, Jo; Ignatev, Alexander; Nkizinkiko, Yves; Venkannagari, Harikanth; Obaji, Ezeogo; Krauss, Stefan; Lehtiö, Lari

    2016-01-15

    Tankyrases 1 and 2, the specialized members of the ARTD protein family, are druggable biotargets whose inhibition may have therapeutic potential against cancer, metabolic disease, fibrotic disease, fibrotic wound healing and HSV viral infections. We have previously identified a novel tankyrase inhibitor scaffold, JW55, and showed that it reduces mouse colon adenoma formation in vivo. Here we expanded the scaffold and profiled the selectivity of the compounds against a panel of human ARTDs. The scaffold also enables a fine modulation of selectivity towards either tankyrase 1 or tankyrase 2. In order to get insight about the binding mode of the inhibitors, we solved crystal structures of the compounds in complex with tankyrase 2. The compounds bind to the adenosine pocket of the catalytic domain and cause changes in the protein structure that are modulated by the chemical modifications of the compounds. The structural analysis allows further rational development of this compound class as a potent and selective tankyrase inhibitor. PMID:26706174

  15. Development and structural analysis of adenosine site binding tankyrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Haikarainen, Teemu; Waaler, Jo; Ignatev, Alexander; Nkizinkiko, Yves; Venkannagari, Harikanth; Obaji, Ezeogo; Krauss, Stefan; Lehtiö, Lari

    2016-01-15

    Tankyrases 1 and 2, the specialized members of the ARTD protein family, are druggable biotargets whose inhibition may have therapeutic potential against cancer, metabolic disease, fibrotic disease, fibrotic wound healing and HSV viral infections. We have previously identified a novel tankyrase inhibitor scaffold, JW55, and showed that it reduces mouse colon adenoma formation in vivo. Here we expanded the scaffold and profiled the selectivity of the compounds against a panel of human ARTDs. The scaffold also enables a fine modulation of selectivity towards either tankyrase 1 or tankyrase 2. In order to get insight about the binding mode of the inhibitors, we solved crystal structures of the compounds in complex with tankyrase 2. The compounds bind to the adenosine pocket of the catalytic domain and cause changes in the protein structure that are modulated by the chemical modifications of the compounds. The structural analysis allows further rational development of this compound class as a potent and selective tankyrase inhibitor.

  16. Adenosine 5'-(gamma-thio) triphosphate (ATPgammaS) stimulates both P2Y receptors linked to inositol phosphates production and cAMP accumulation in bovine adrenocortical fasciculata cells.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Haruhisa; Hori, Seiji; Niitsu, Akiyoshi; Kawamura, Masahiro

    2004-01-16

    The study was aimed to investigate the existence of at least two kinds of P2Y receptors linked to steroidogenesis in bovine adrenocortical fasciculata cells (BAFCs). Extracellular nucleotides facilitated steroidogenesis in BAFCs. The potency order was UTP > adenosine 5'-(gamma-thio) triphosphate (ATPgammaS) > ATP > 2-methylthio ATP (2MeSATP) > adenosine 5'-(beta-thio) diphosphate (ADPbetaS) > alpha,beta-methylene ATP (alpha,beta-me-ATP), beta,gamma-methylene ATP (beta,gamma -me-ATP). ATPgammaS (10-100 microM) remarkably stimulated both total inositol phosphates (IPs) production and cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. Competitive displacement experiments by using [35S]ATPgammaS as a radioactive ligand in BAFCs showed that the potency under these unlabelled ligands was ATPgammaS > ATP > ADPbetaS > 2MeSATP > UTP > alpha,beta-me-ATP, beta,gamma-me-ATP. These suggest that two different binding sites of [35S]ATPgammaS, namely P2Y receptors, exist in BAFCs, and that these receptors are linked to steroidogenesis via distinct second messenger systems in the cells.

  17. Macroscopic and Fluorescent Discrimination of Adenosine Triphosphate via Selective Metallo-hydrogel Formation: A Visual, Practical, and Reliable Rehearsal toward Cellular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fang, Weiwei; Liu, Cong; Yu, Fabiao; Liu, Yaoqi; Li, Zhenhua; Chen, Lingxin; Bao, Xiaoling; Tu, Tao

    2016-08-17

    With use of simple terpyridine zinc nitrate complexes, intriguing visual recognition of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) via selective coordination assembly leading to two-component metallo-hydrogel formation has been realized. With intensive fluorescent study and density functional theory calculations, it may be inferred, besides the selective metal-ligand interaction between Zn center and phosphate groups, the intramolecular π-stacking between the planar nucleobases of ATP and the metal-hybrid aromatic ring of pincer complex strongly affected the geometry of the coordinated adducts and possible molecular self-assembly process, which constitute a completely new sensing strategy in comparison with the conventional approaches. Furthermore, in light of extreme sensitivity of pincer zinc complexes toward ATP at micromolar scale (1.85 μM) and remarkable fluorescent enhancement (ca. 44-fold) upon ATP addition, the feasibility of the low cytotoxicity pincer zinc complexes in monitoring ATP in HeLa cells has been fulfilled with confocal fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27420773

  18. The effect of growth phase and medium on the use of the firefly adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay for the quantitation of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, V. N.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    Luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was used as a rapid method to determine the number of bacteria in a urine sample after nonbacterial components were removed. Accurate cellular ATP values, determined when bacteria were grown in an environment similar to that in which they were found, were necessary for the calculation of bacterial titer in urine. Cellular ATP values vary depending on the extraction method, the cell growth phase, and cell growth conditions. ATP per cell values of stationary E. coli grown in urine were two times greater than ATP per cell values of cells grown in trypticase soy broth. Glucose and urea were examined as possible components responsible for the cellular ATP variation.

  19. Simple, fast and selective detection of adenosine triphosphate at physiological pH using unmodified gold nanoparticles as colorimetric probes and metal ions as cross-linkers.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dehua; Xia, Ning; Li, Sujuan; Xu, Chunying; Sun, Ting; Pang, Huan; Liu, Lin

    2012-11-06

    We report a simple, fast and selective colorimetric assay of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as probes and metal ions as cross-linkers. ATP can be assembled onto the surface of AuNPs through interaction between the electron-rich nitrogen atoms and the electron-deficient surface of AuNPs. Accordingly, Cu2+ ions induce a change in the color and UV/Vis absorbance of AuNPs by coordinating to the triphosphate groups and a ring nitrogen of ATP. A detection limit of 50 nM was achieved, which is comparable to or lower than that achievable by the currently used electrochemical, spectroscopic or chromatographic methods. The theoretical simplicity and high selectivity reported herein demonstrated that AuNPs-based colorimetric assay could be applied in a wide variety of fields by rationally designing the surface chemistry of AuNPs. In addition, our results indicate that ATP-modified AuNPs are less stable in Cu2+, Cd2+ or Zn2+-containing solutions due to the formation of the corresponding dimeric metal-ATP complexes.

  20. Reduced rate of adenosine triphosphate synthesis by in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and downregulation of PGC-1beta in distal skeletal muscle following burn.

    PubMed

    Tzika, A Aria; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Padfield, Katie; Wilhelmy, Julie; Mindrinos, Michael N; Yu, Hongue; Cao, Haihui; Zhang, Qunhao; Astrakas, Loukas G; Zhang, Jiangwen; Yu, Yong-Ming; Rahme, Laurence G; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2008-02-01

    Using a mouse model of burn trauma, we tested the hypothesis that severe burn trauma corresponding to 30% of total body surface area (TBSA) causes reduction in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis in distal skeletal muscle. We employed in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in intact mice to assess the rate of ATP synthesis, and characterized the concomitant gene expression patterns in skeletal muscle in burned (30% TBSA) versus control mice. Our NMR results showed a significantly reduced rate of ATP synthesis and were complemented by genomic results showing downregulation of the ATP synthase mitochondrial F1 F0 complex and PGC-1beta gene expression. Our findings suggest that inflammation and muscle atrophy in burns are due to a reduced ATP synthesis rate that may be regulated upstream by PGC-1beta. These findings implicate mitochondrial dysfunction in distal skeletal muscle following burn injury. That PGC-1beta is a highly inducible factor in most tissues and responds to common calcium and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling pathways strongly suggests that it may be possible to develop drugs that can induce PGC-1beta.

  1. Effects of different concentrations of metal ions on degradation of adenosine triphosphate in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fillets stored at 4°C: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Qin, Na; Zhang, Longteng; Lv, Jian; Li, Qingzheng; Luo, Yongkang

    2016-11-15

    The impact of different concentrations of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) on the degradation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the influence of these ions on the activity of adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMP-deaminase) and acid phosphatase (ACP) in common carp fillets (in vivo) during 4°C storage was examined. The content of ATP, inosine monophosphate (IMP), and hypoxanthine (Hx), and the activity of AMP-deaminase and ACP were determined. Results indicated that the effects of different concentrations of six kinds of metal ions on AMP-deaminase and ACP were not the same. Na(+), K(+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) enhanced AMP-deaminase activity, which led to the rapid degradation of ATP and to the generation of a large quantity of IMP within a short time. Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) delayed the change in AMP-deaminase and ACP activity in carp and caused a further delay in the degradation of ATP. Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) inhibited ACP activity, which reduced the decomposition of IMP and the formation of Hx. PMID:27283700

  2. One-step isolation of adenosine triphosphate from crude fermentation broth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by anion-exchange chromatography using supermacroporous cryogel.

    PubMed

    Yun, Junxian; Shen, Shaochuan; Chen, Fang; Yao, Kejian

    2007-12-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an important high-energy compound widely used in biological and therapeutic fields. It can be produced by phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with microbial cells in industrial scale and the effective isolation of ATP from microbial fermentation broth is a challenging work. In this work, we develop a novel one-step method to directly separate ATP from fermentation broth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by anion-exchange chromatography using supermacroporous cryogel. The cryogel bed with tertiary amine groups was prepared by grafting N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) monomer chains onto the matrix of a polyacrylamide-based cryogel in a glass column and its properties of liquid dispersion, water permeability, porosity as well as the ligand density were measured. Chromatographic separation of ATP from the fermentation broth by the cryogel was carried out using deionised water and 0.01 M HCl as running buffer, respectively. The breakthrough characteristics and elution performance in the cryogel bed were revealed and analyzed. The purities of the obtained ATP were analyzed quantitatively by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The maximal purity of ATP by the one-step separation method was 95.5% using 0.01 M HCl as running buffer in this work. The corresponding chromatographic behaviors were investigated and analyzed.

  3. One-step isolation of adenosine triphosphate from crude fermentation broth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by anion-exchange chromatography using supermacroporous cryogel.

    PubMed

    Yun, Junxian; Shen, Shaochuan; Chen, Fang; Yao, Kejian

    2007-12-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an important high-energy compound widely used in biological and therapeutic fields. It can be produced by phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with microbial cells in industrial scale and the effective isolation of ATP from microbial fermentation broth is a challenging work. In this work, we develop a novel one-step method to directly separate ATP from fermentation broth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by anion-exchange chromatography using supermacroporous cryogel. The cryogel bed with tertiary amine groups was prepared by grafting N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) monomer chains onto the matrix of a polyacrylamide-based cryogel in a glass column and its properties of liquid dispersion, water permeability, porosity as well as the ligand density were measured. Chromatographic separation of ATP from the fermentation broth by the cryogel was carried out using deionised water and 0.01 M HCl as running buffer, respectively. The breakthrough characteristics and elution performance in the cryogel bed were revealed and analyzed. The purities of the obtained ATP were analyzed quantitatively by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The maximal purity of ATP by the one-step separation method was 95.5% using 0.01 M HCl as running buffer in this work. The corresponding chromatographic behaviors were investigated and analyzed. PMID:18024244

  4. Effects of oral adenosine 5'-triphosphate and adenosine in enteric-coated capsules on indomethacin-induced permeability changes in the human small intestine: a randomized cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    Bours, Martijn JL; Bos, Hilde J; Meddings, Jon B; Brummer, Robert-Jan M; van den Brandt, Piet A; Dagnelie, Pieter C

    2007-01-01

    Background It is well-known that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause damage to the small bowel associated with disruption of mucosal barrier function. In healthy human volunteers, we showed previously that topical administration of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) by naso-intestinal tube attenuated a rise in small intestinal permeability induced by short-term challenge with the NSAID indomethacin. This finding suggested that ATP may be involved in the preservation of intestinal barrier function. Our current objective was to corroborate the favourable effect of ATP on indomethacin-induced permeability changes in healthy human volunteers when ATP is administered via enteric-coated capsules, which is a more practically feasible mode of administration. Since ATP effects may have been partly mediated through its breakdown to adenosine, effects of encapsulated adenosine were tested also. Methods By ingesting a test drink containing 5 g lactulose and 0.5 g L-rhamnose followed by five-hour collection of total urine, small intestinal permeability was assessed in 33 healthy human volunteers by measuring the urinary lactulose/rhamnose excretion ratio. Urinary excretion of lactulose and L-rhamnose was determined by fluorescent detection high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Basal permeability of the small intestine was assessed as a control condition (no indomethacin, no ATP/adenosine). As a model of increased small intestinal permeability, two dosages of indomethacin were ingested at 10 h (75 mg) and 1 h (50 mg) before ingesting the lactulose/rhamnose test drink. At 1.5 h before indomethacin ingestion, two dosages of placebo, ATP (2 g per dosage) or adenosine (1 g per dosage) were administered via enteric-coated hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) capsules with Eudragit© L30D-55. Results Median urinary lactulose/rhamnose excretion ratio (g/g) in the control condition was 0.032 (interquartile range: 0.022–0.044). Compared to the control condition

  5. Sinus slowing caused by adenosine-5'-triphosphate in patients with and without sick sinus syndrome under various autonomic states.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bi-Hua; Shimizu, Hiroki; Furukawa, Yoshio; Kanemori, Tetsuzou; Ohyanagi, Mitsumasa

    2004-10-01

    Adenosine infusion can potentially be used as a diagnostic test for sick sinus syndrome (SSS) based on its negative chronotropic effects. Whether autonomic tone underlies adenosine's negative chronotropic effects remains unknown. This study was to investigate the bradycardiac response of sinus node to ATP in patients with and without clinical SSS by measuring atrial cycle length (ACL) before and after bolus of ATP in different states of autonomic tone. The negative chronotropic effect of ATP was assessed by comparing the mean ACL before ATP administration with the longest ACL after a bolus of ATP infusion (Delta ACL). Our results showed that Delta ACL in patients with SSS were significantly greater than that without SSS (P<.001) in all 4 states, and IHR in patients with SSS were significantly lower than calculated IHR (P<.0001). Moreover, there was no significant difference in Delta ACL between the 4 states in patients with SSS (P = .99). However, Delta ACL was significantly greater during isoproterenol infusion and after propranolol administration in patients without sinus node dysfunction, comparing with baseline state (P<.01), but not after combination of atropine (P = .33). Our results indicate that the negative chronotropic effect of ATP on sinus node is much more dramatic in patients with SSS, in which the intrinsic disease of sinus node is responsible for the abnormal adenosine-mediated sinus arrest, and this effect is influenced by autonomic tone in patients without sinus node dysfunction but not in patients with SSS. PMID:15484159

  6. Interaction of Beta-Hydroxy-Beta-Methylbutyrate Free Acid and Adenosine Triphosphate on Muscle Mass, Strength, and Power in Resistance Trained Individuals.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Ryan P; Joy, Jordan M; Rathmacher, John A; Baier, Shawn M; Fuller, John C; Shelley, Mack C; Jäger, Ralf; Purpura, Martin; Wilson, Stephanie M C; Wilson, Jacob M

    2016-07-01

    Lowery, RP, Joy, JM, Rathmacher, JA, Baier, SM, Fuller, JC Jr, Shelley, MC II, Jäger, R, Purpura, M, Wilson, SMC, and Wilson, JM. Interaction of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate free acid and adenosine triphosphate on muscle mass, strength, and power in resistance trained individuals. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1843-1854, 2016-Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) supplementation helps maintain performance under high fatiguing contractions and with greater fatigue recovery demands also increase. Current evidence suggests that the free acid form of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB-FA) acts by speeding regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle after high-intensity or prolonged exercise. Therefore, we investigated the effects of 12 weeks of HMB-FA (3 g) and ATP (400 mg) administration on lean body mass (LBM), strength, and power in trained individuals. A 3-phase double-blind, placebo-, and diet-controlled study was conducted. Phases consisted of an 8-week periodized resistance training program (phase 1), followed by a 2-week overreaching cycle (phase 2), and a 2-week taper (phase 3). Lean body mass was increased by a combination of HMB-FA/ATP by 12.7% (p < 0.001). In a similar fashion, strength gains after training were increased in HMB-FA/ATP-supplemented subjects by 23.5% (p < 0.001). Vertical jump and Wingate power were increased in the HMB-FA/ATP-supplemented group compared with the placebo-supplemented group, and the 12-week increases were 21.5 and 23.7%, respectively. During the overreaching cycle, strength and power declined in the placebo group (4.3-5.7%), whereas supplementation with HMB-FA/ATP resulted in continued strength gains (1.3%). In conclusion, HMB-FA and ATP in combination with resistance exercise training enhanced LBM, power, and strength. In addition, HMB-FA plus ATP blunted the typical response to overreaching, resulting in a further increase in strength during that period. It seems that the combination of HMB-FA/ATP could benefit those who

  7. Binding of adenosine and receptor-specific analogues to lymphocytes from control subjects and patients with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Shah, T; Simpson, R J; Webster, A D; Peters, T J

    1987-01-01

    Studies were performed on the binding of tritiated adenosine and its analogues, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) and N6-phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA), to human peripheral blood lymphocytes. These revealed binding only of adenosine (Kd, 1-10 microM, 14,000 binding sites/cell), which was abolished by dipyridamole, a specific adenosine transport inhibitor, suggesting that the binding is to the nucleoside transporter. The absence of high affinity (Kd less than or equal to 1 microM) binding of adenosine or of the two analogues. NECA and PIA suggests that the previously reported effects of adenosine on cAMP formation are not mediated by cell surface specific nucleoside receptors. Binding of adenosine to the carrier in lymphocytes from patients with common variable immunodeficiency was similar to those from control subjects. PMID:2958197

  8. Difference Between Dormant Conduction Sites Revealed by Adenosine Triphosphate Provocation and Unipolar Pace-Capture Sites Along the Ablation Line After Pulmonary Vein Isolation.

    PubMed

    Kogawa, Rikitake; Okumura, Yasuo; Watanabe, Ichiro; Sonoda, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Naoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Iso, Kazuki; Nagashima, Koichi; Ohkubo, Kimie; Nakai, Toshiko; Kunimoto, Satoshi; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Dormant pulmonary vein (PV) conduction revealed by adenosine/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) provocation test and exit block to the left atrium by pacing from the PV side of the ablation line ("pace and ablate" method) are used to ensure durable pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). However, the mechanistic relation between ATP-provoked PV reconnection and the unexcitable gap along the ablation line is unclear.Forty-five patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) (paroxysmal: 31 patients, persistent: 14 patients; age: 61.1 ± 9.7 years) underwent extensive encircling PVI (EEPVI, 179 PVs). After completion of EEPVI, an ATP provocation test (30 mg, bolus injection) and unipolar pacing (output, 10 mA; pulse width, 2 ms) were performed along the previous EEPVI ablation line to identify excitable gaps. Dormant conduction was revealed in 29 (34 sites) of 179 PVs (16.2%) after EEP-VI (22/45 patients). Pace capture was revealed in 59 (89 sites) of 179 PVs (33.0%) after EEPVI (39/45 patients), and overlapping sites, ie, sites showing both dormant conduction and pace capture, were observed in 22 of 179 (12.3%) PVs (17/45 patients).Some of the ATP-provoked dormant PV reconnection sites were identical to the sites with excitable gaps revealed by pace capture, but most of the PV sites were differently distributed, suggesting that the main underling mechanism differs between these two forms of reconnection. These findings also suggest that performance of the ATP provocation test followed by the "pace and ablate" method can reduce the occurrence of chronic PV reconnections.

  9. Flow cytometry and adenosine tri-phosphate analysis: alternative possibilities to evaluate major bacteriological changes in drinking water treatment and distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Vital, Marius; Dignum, Marco; Magic-Knezev, Aleksandra; Ross, Petra; Rietveld, Luuk; Hammes, Frederik

    2012-10-01

    An ever-growing need exists for rapid, quantitative and meaningful methods to quantify and characterize the effect of different treatment steps on the microbiological processes and events that occur during drinking water treatment and distribution. Here we compared cultivation-independent flow cytometry (FCM) and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) analysis with conventional cultivation-based microbiological methods, on water samples from two full-scale treatment and distribution systems. The two systems consist of nearly identical treatment trains, but their raw water quality and pre-treatment differed significantly. All of the drinking water treatment processes affected the microbiological content of the water considerably, but once treated, the finished water remained remarkably stable throughout the distribution system. Both the FCM and ATP data were able to describe the microbiology of the systems accurately, providing meaningful process data when combined with other parameters such as dissolved organic carbon analysis. Importantly, the results highlighted a complimentary value of the two independent methods: while similar trends were mostly observed, variations in ATP-per-cell values between water samples were adequately explained by differences in the FCM fingerprints of the samples. This work demonstrates the value of alternative microbial methods for process/system control, optimization and routine monitoring of the general microbial quality of water during treatment and distribution. PMID:22763289

  10. Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Inhibits Voltage-Sensitive Potassium Currents in Isolated Hensen's Cells and Nifedipine Protects Against Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rui; Liu, Jun; Jia, Zhiying; Wang, Hongyang; Wang, YongAn; Sun, Wei; Wu, Xuan; Zhao, Zhifei; Niu, Baolong; Li, Xingqi; Dai, Guanghai; Li, Jianxiong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is increasing evidence that adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a well-known neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in the central nervous system, plays an important role as an extracellular chemical messenger in the cochlea. MATERIAL AND METHODS Using a whole-cell recording technique, we studied the effects of ATP on isolated Hensen's cells, which are supporting cells in the cochlea, to determine if they are involved in the transduction of ions with hair cells. RESULTS ATP (0.1-10 µM) reduced the potassium current (IK+) in the majority of the recorded Hensen's cells (21 out of 25 cells). An inward current was also induced by high concentrations of ATP (100 µM to 10 mM), which was reversibly blocked by 100 µM suramin (a purinergic antagonist) and blocked by nifedipine (an L-type calcium channel blocker). After the cochleas were perfused with artificial perilymph solutions containing nifedipine and exposed to noise, the amplitude increase in the compound action potential (CAP) threshold and the reduction in cochlear microphonics was lower than when they were exposed to noise alone. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that ATP can block IK+ channels at a low concentration and induce an inward Ca2+ current at high concentrations, which is reversed by purinergic receptors. Nifedipine may have a partially protective effect on noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). PMID:27292522

  11. Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Inhibits Voltage-Sensitive Potassium Currents in Isolated Hensen’s Cells and Nifedipine Protects Against Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Rui; Liu, Jun; Jia, Zhiying; Wang, Hongyang; Wang, YongAn; Sun, Wei; Wu, Xuan; Zhao, Zhifei; Niu, Baolong; Li, Xingqi; Dai, Guanghai; Li, Jianxiong

    2016-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a well-known neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in the central nervous system, plays an important role as an extracellular chemical messenger in the cochlea. Material/Methods Using a whole-cell recording technique, we studied the effects of ATP on isolated Hensen’s cells, which are supporting cells in the cochlea, to determine if they are involved in the transduction of ions with hair cells. Results ATP (0.1–10 μM) reduced the potassium current (IK+) in the majority of the recorded Hensen’s cells (21 out of 25 cells). An inward current was also induced by high concentrations of ATP (100 μM to 10 mM), which was reversibly blocked by 100 μM suramin (a purinergic antagonist) and blocked by nifedipine (an L-type calcium channel blocker). After the cochleas were perfused with artificial perilymph solutions containing nifedipine and exposed to noise, the amplitude increase in the compound action potential (CAP) threshold and the reduction in cochlear microphonics was lower than when they were exposed to noise alone. Conclusions Our results suggest that ATP can block IK+ channels at a low concentration and induce an inward Ca2+ current at high concentrations, which is reversed by purinergic receptors. Nifedipine may have a partially protective effect on noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). PMID:27292522

  12. The role of adenosine triphosphate citrate lyase in the metabolism of acetyl coenzyme a and function of blood platelets in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Michno, Anna; Skibowska, Anna; Raszeja-Specht, Anna; Cwikowska, Justyna; Szutowicz, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    Diabetes is known to increase blood platelet activity. Activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-citrate lyase (ATPCL), acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) content, malonyl dialdehyde (MDA), synthesis, and platelet aggregation in resting conditions and after activation with thrombin were measured in diabetic subjects and in age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. Activities of ATPCL and PDH, acetyl-CoA content, and thrombin-evoked MDA synthesis as well as platelet aggregation in diabetes were 31%, 51%, 62%, 35%, and 21%, respectively, higher than in healthy subjects. In addition, activation of diabetic platelets caused 2 times greater release of acetyl-CoA from their mitochondria than in controls. Both 1.0 mmol/L (-)hydroxycitrate and 0.1 mmol/L SB-204490 decreased acetyl-CoA content in platelet cytoplasm along with suppression of MDA synthesis and platelet aggregation. These inhibitory effects were about 2 times greater in diabetic than in control platelets. The data presented indicate that the ATPCL pathway is operative in human platelets and may be responsible for provision of about 50% of acetyl units from their mitochondrial to cytoplasmic compartment. Increased acetyl-CoA synthesis in diabetic platelets may be the cause of their excessive activity in the course of the disease. ATPCL may be a target for its specific inhibitors as factors decreasing platelet activity. PMID:14681844

  13. Core-shell hollow microspheres of magnetic iron oxide@amorphous calcium phosphate: synthesis using adenosine 5'-triphosphate and application in pH-responsive drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bing-Qiang; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Chen, Feng; Qi, Chao; Zhao, Xin-Yu; Zhao, Jing

    2014-10-01

    Drug nanocarriers with magnetic targeting and pH-responsive drug-release behavior are promising for applications in controlled drug delivery. Magnetic iron oxides show excellent magnetism, but their application in drug delivery is limited by low drug-loading capacity and poor control over drug release. Herein, core-shell hollow microspheres of magnetic iron oxide@amorphous calcium phosphate (MIO@ACP) were prepared and investigated as magnetic, pH-responsive drug nanocarriers. Hollow microspheres of magnetic iron oxide (HMIOs) were prepared by etching solid MIO microspheres in hydrochloric acid/ethanol solution. After loading a drug into the HMIOs, the drug-loaded HMIOs were coated with a protective layer of ACP by using adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) disodium salt (Na2 ATP) as stabilizer, and drug-loaded core-shell hollow microspheres of MIO@ACP (HMIOs/drug/ACP) were obtained. The as-prepared HMIOs/drug/ACP drug-delivery system exhibits superparamagnetism and pH-responsive drug-release behavior. In a medium with pH 7.4, drug release was slow, but it was significantly accelerated at pH 4.5 due to dissolution of the ACP shell. Docetaxel-loaded core-shell hollow microspheres of MIO@ACP exhibited high anticancer activity.

  14. Transcranial low-level laser therapy (810 nm) temporarily inhibits peripheral nociception: photoneuromodulation of glutamate receptors, prostatic acid phophatase, and adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Pires de Sousa, Marcelo Victor; Ferraresi, Cleber; Kawakubo, Masayoshi; Kaippert, Beatriz; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Photobiomodulation or low-level light therapy has been shown to attenuate both acute and chronic pain, but the mechanism of action is not well understood. In most cases, the light is applied to the painful area, but in the present study we applied light to the head. We found that transcranial laser therapy (TLT) applied to mouse head with specific parameters (810 nm laser, [Formula: see text], 7.2 or [Formula: see text]) decreased the reaction to pain in the foot evoked either by pressure (von Frey filaments), cold, or inflammation (formalin injection) or in the tail (evoked by heat). The pain threshold increasing is maximum around 2 h after TLT, remains up to 6 h, and is finished 24 h after TLT. The mechanisms were investigated by quantification of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), immunofluorescence, and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of brain tissues. TLT increased ATP and prostatic acid phosphatase (an endogenous analgesic) and reduced the amount of glutamate receptor (mediating a neurotransmitter responsible for conducting nociceptive information). There was no change in the concentration of tubulin, a constituent of the cytoskeleton, and the H&E staining revealed no tissue damage. This is the first study to show inhibition of peripheral pain due to photobiomodulation of the central nervous system. PMID:26835486

  15. A 31P NMR spectroscopy study of Xenopus laevis heart perfused in vitro with creatinol-O-phosphate, phosphocreatine, adenosine triphosphate, fructose diphosphate and ouabain.

    PubMed

    Olsen, J I; Rossini, P; Schweizer, M P; Bernardi, M; Moretti, V; Re, L; Rossini, L

    1993-09-01

    Xenopus laevis heart was studied by 31P NMR using a 200 MHz proton spectrometer; hearts were perfused, at pH 7.35 and room temperature, with normal oxygenated or K(+)-enriched Ringer. Solution was later added with creatinol-O-phosphate (COP), phosphocreatine (PCr), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FDP) and ouabain. NMR spectra of the heart show organic phosphomono- and phosphodi-esters, inorganic phosphate, PCr, overlapping alpha-ATP/ADP and gamma-ATP/beta-ADP, and beta-ATP signals. Their chemical shift positions and areas showed no significant changes in the course of 1.5 h perfusions with either solution, except in a few preparations, whether the heart was beating or reversibly arrested. While COP reduced the signals in beating hearts, the same spectra exhibited no consistent, substantial changes under PCr, ATP and FDP 1 to 10 mM, pH 7.35 perfusion with either solution, nor when ouabain mumol was added. The spectra are briefly discussed in comparison with those observed in the perfused heart of mammals (mostly rat), and particularly with those obtained in the frog (Rana temporaria) heart, both by analysing the bioenergetic equilibria on the basis of total tissue substrate levels measured in extracts of freeze-clamped tissue, and by evaluating cytochrome-b, flavin and pyridine nucleotide in vitro oxido-reduction read-outs in separate, similar experimental settings.

  16. Comparison of immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate rapid method to traditional culture-based method for E. coli and enterococci enumeration in wastewater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bushon, R.N.; Likirdopulos, C.A.; Brady, A.M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Untreated wastewater samples from California, North Carolina, and Ohio were analyzed by the immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate (IMS/ATP) method and the traditional culture-based method for E. coli and enterococci concentrations. The IMS/ATP method concentrates target bacteria by immunomagnetic separation and then quantifies captured bacteria by measuring bioluminescence induced by release of ATP from the bacterial cells. Results from this method are available within 1 h from the start of sample processing. Significant linear correlations were found between the IMS/ATP results and results from traditional culture-based methods for E. coli and enterococci enumeration for one location in California, two locations in North Carolina, and one location in Ohio (r??values ranged from 0.87 to 0.97). No significant linear relation was found for a second location in California that treats a complex mixture of residential and industrial wastewater. With the exception of one location, IMS/ATP showed promise as a rapid method for the quantification of faecal-indicator organisms in wastewater.

  17. Effects of an ATP analogue, adenosine 5'-[α-thio]-triphosphate, on F1-ATPase rotary catalysis, torque generation, and inhibited intermediated formation.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Ayako; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-13

    F1-ATPase (F1), an important rotary motor protein, converts the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical energy using rotary motion with extremely high efficiency. The energy-conversion mechanism for this molecular motor has been extensively clarified by previous studies, which indicate that the interactions between the catalytic residues and the β- and γ-phosphates of ATP are indispensable for efficient catalysis and torque generation. However, the role of α-phosphate is largely unknown. In this study, we observed the rotation of F1 fuelled with an ATP analogue, adenosine 5'-[α-thio]-triphosphate (ATPαS), in which the oxygen has been substituted with a sulfur ion to perturb the α-phosphate/F1 interactions. In doing so, we have revealed that ATPαS does not appear to have any impact on the kinetic properties of the motor or on torque generation compared to ATP. On the other hand, F1 was observed to lapse into the ADP-inhibited intermediate states when in the presence of ATPαS more severely than in the presence of ATP, suggesting that the α-phosphate group of ATP contributes to the avoidance of ADP-inhibited intermediate formation.

  18. Use of a Sampling Area-Adjusted Adenosine Triphosphate Bioluminescence Assay Based on Digital Image Quantification to Assess the Cleanliness of Hospital Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yu-Huai; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Jiang, Hui-Li; Chang, Chih-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Chang, Dan-Chi; Tu, Hsin-Yu; Chiu, Tan-Yun; Chao, Huei-Jen; Tseng, Chun-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated surfaces play an important role in the transmission of pathogens. We sought to establish a criterion that could indicate "cleanliness" using a sampling area-adjusted adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay. In the first phase of the study, target surfaces were selected for swab sampling before and after daily cleaning; then, an aerobic colony count (ACC) plate assay of bacteria and antibiotic-resistant bacteria was conducted. ATP swabs were also tested, and the ATP readings were reported as relative light units (RLUs). The results of the ACC and ATP assays were adjusted according to the sampling area. During the second phase of the study, a new cleaning process employing sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) was implemented for comparison. Using the criterion of 2.5 colony-forming units (CFU)/cm², 45% of the sampled sites were successfully cleaned during phase one of the study. During phase two, the pass rates of the surface samples (64%) were significantly improved, except under stringent (5 RLU/cm²) and lax (500 RLU) ATP criteria. Using receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, the best cut-off point for an area-adjusted ATP level was 7.34 RLU/cm², which corresponded to culture-assay levels of <2.5 CFU/cm². An area adjustment of the ATP assay improved the degree of correlation with the ACC-assay results from weak to moderate. PMID:27294944

  19. Evaluation of the Relationship between the Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Bioluminescence Assay and the Presence of Bacillus anthracis Spores and Vegetative Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Shawn G.; Sayles, Harlan; Colbert, Erica M.; Hewlett, Angela; Chaika, Oleg; Smith, Philip W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence assay was utilized in laboratory evaluations to determine the presence and concentration of vegetative and spore forms of Bacillus anthracis Sterne 34F2. Methods: Seventeen surfaces from the healthcare environment were selected for evaluation. Surfaces were inoculated with 50 µL of organism suspensions at three concentrations of 104, 106, 108 colony forming units per surface (CFU/surface) of B. anthracis. Culture-based methods and ATP based methods were utilized to determine concentrations. Results: When all concentrations were evaluated together, a positive correlation between log-adjusted CFU and Relative Light Units (RLU) for endospores and vegetative cells was established. When concentrations were evaluated separately, a significant correlation was not demonstrated. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a positive correlation for ATP and culture-based methods for the vegetative cells of B. anthracis. When evaluating the endospores and combining both metabolic states, the ATP measurements and CFU recovered did not correspond to the initial concentrations on the evaluated surfaces. The results of our study show that the low ATP signal which does not correlate well to the CFU results would not make the ATP measuring devises effective in confirming contamination residual from a bioterrorist event. PMID:24879485

  20. Proline modulates the effect of bisphosphonate on calcium levels and adenosine triphosphate production in cell lines derived from bovine Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, A G; Echeverría, C I; Pérez Rojo, F G; Prieto González, E A; Roldán, E J A

    2014-12-01

    Bisphosphonates have been proposed as pharmacological agents against parasite and cancer cell growth. The effect of these compounds on helminthic cell viability and acellular compartment morphology, however, has not yet been studied. The effects of different types of bisphosphonates, namely etidronate (EHDP), pamidronate (APD), alendronate (ABP), ibandronate (IB) and olpadronate (OPD), and their interaction with amiloride, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (D3) and proline were evaluated on a cell line derived from bovine Echinococcus granulousus protoscoleces (EGPE) that forms cystic colonies in agarose. The EGPE cell line allowed testing the effect of bisphosphonates alone and in association with other compounds that could modulate calcium apposition/deposition, and were useful in measuring the impact of these compounds on cell growth, cystic colony formation and calcium storage. Decreased cell growth and cystic colony formation were found with EHDP, IB and OPD, and increased calcium storage with EHDP only. Calcium storage in EGPE cells appeared to be sensitive to the effect of amiloride, D3 and proline. Proline decreased calcium storage and increased colony formation. Changes in calcium storage may be associated with degenerative changes of the cysts, as shown in the in vitro colony model and linked to an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) decrease. In conclusion, bisphosphonates could be suitable tempering drugs to treat cestode infections.

  1. Increased adenosine triphosphate production by peripheral blood CD4+ cells in patients with hematologic malignancies treated with stem cell mobilization agents.

    PubMed

    Manga, Kiran; Serban, Geo; Schwartz, Joseph; Slotky, Ronit; Patel, Nita; Fan, Jianshe; Bai, Xiaolin; Chari, Ajai; Savage, David; Suciu-Foca, Nicole; Colovai, Adriana I

    2010-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is an important therapeutic option for patients with hematologic malignancies. To explore the immunomodulatory effects of HSC mobilization agents, we studied the function and phenotype of CD4(+) T cells from 16 adult patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing HSC mobilization treatment for autologous transplantation. Immune cell function was determined using the Immuknow (Cylex) assay by measuring the amount of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) produced by CD4(+) cells from whole blood. ATP activity measured in G-CSF-treated patients was significantly higher than that measured in healthy individuals or "nonmobilized" patients. In patients treated with G-CSF, CD4(+) T cells were predominantly CD25(low)FOXP3(low), consistent with an activated phenotype. However, T-cell depletion did not abrogate ATP production in blood samples from G-CSF-treated patients, indicating that CD4(+) myeloid cells contributed to the increased ATP levels observed in these patients. There was a significant correlation between ATP activity and patient survival, suggesting that efficient activation of CD4(+) cells during mobilization treatment predicts a low risk of disease relapse. Monitoring immune cell reactivity using the Immuknow assay may assist in the clinical management of patients with hematologic malignancies and optimization of HSC mobilization protocols.

  2. Use of a Sampling Area-Adjusted Adenosine Triphosphate Bioluminescence Assay Based on Digital Image Quantification to Assess the Cleanliness of Hospital Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yu-Huai; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Jiang, Hui-Li; Chang, Chih-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Chang, Dan-Chi; Tu, Hsin-Yu; Chiu, Tan-Yun; Chao, Huei-Jen; Tseng, Chun-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated surfaces play an important role in the transmission of pathogens. We sought to establish a criterion that could indicate “cleanliness” using a sampling area–adjusted adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay. In the first phase of the study, target surfaces were selected for swab sampling before and after daily cleaning; then, an aerobic colony count (ACC) plate assay of bacteria and antibiotic-resistant bacteria was conducted. ATP swabs were also tested, and the ATP readings were reported as relative light units (RLUs). The results of the ACC and ATP assays were adjusted according to the sampling area. During the second phase of the study, a new cleaning process employing sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) was implemented for comparison. Using the criterion of 2.5 colony-forming units (CFU)/cm2, 45% of the sampled sites were successfully cleaned during phase one of the study. During phase two, the pass rates of the surface samples (64%) were significantly improved, except under stringent (5 RLU/cm2) and lax (500 RLU) ATP criteria. Using receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, the best cut-off point for an area-adjusted ATP level was 7.34 RLU/cm2, which corresponded to culture-assay levels of <2.5 CFU/cm2. An area adjustment of the ATP assay improved the degree of correlation with the ACC-assay results from weak to moderate. PMID:27294944

  3. Comparison of immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate rapid method to traditional culture-based method for E. coli and enterococci enumeration in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Bushon, Rebecca N; Likirdopulos, Christina A; Brady, Amie M G

    2009-11-01

    Untreated wastewater samples from California, North Carolina, and Ohio were analyzed by the immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate (IMS/ATP) method and the traditional culture-based method for E. coli and enterococci concentrations. The IMS/ATP method concentrates target bacteria by immunomagnetic separation and then quantifies captured bacteria by measuring bioluminescence induced by release of ATP from the bacterial cells. Results from this method are available within 1h from the start of sample processing. Significant linear correlations were found between the IMS/ATP results and results from traditional culture-based methods for E. coli and enterococci enumeration for one location in California, two locations in North Carolina, and one location in Ohio (r values ranged from 0.87 to 0.97). No significant linear relation was found for a second location in California that treats a complex mixture of residential and industrial wastewater. With the exception of one location, IMS/ATP showed promise as a rapid method for the quantification of faecal-indicator organisms in wastewater.

  4. Relation between QT dispersion and adenosine triphosphate stress thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomographic imaging for detecting myocardial ischemia and scar.

    PubMed

    Teragawa, H; Hirao, H; Muraoka, Y; Yamagata, T; Matsuura, H; Kajiyama, G

    1999-04-15

    It is not known if QT dispersion is useful for detecting coronary artery disease. We investigated whether QT dispersion at baseline and during adenosine triphosphate (ATP) infusion correlate with the imaging patterns obtained from ATP stress thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography (ATP-SPECT). QT dispersion was determined in 169 patients who underwent ATP-SPECT from 12-lead electrocardiograms obtained at baseline and 3 minutes after the beginning of ATP infusion. Based on the results of ATP-SPECT, patients were divided into 4 groups: normal (n = 55), ischemia (n = 38), ischemia and scar (n = 42), and scar (n = 34). Baseline QT dispersions (mean +/- SD) in the normal, ischemia, ischemia and scar, and scar groups were 48 +/- 15, 50 +/- 17, 69 +/- 25, and 70 +/- 24 ms, respectively. Baseline QT dispersion was significantly greater in the groups with myocardial scar. QT dispersions during ATP infusion were 43 +/- 16, 63 +/- 20, 76 +/- 20, and 62 +/- 25 ms in the normal, ischemia, ischemia and scar, and scar groups, respectively. QT dispersion increased with ATP infusion in patients with myocardial ischemia. QT dispersion at baseline and during ATP infusion correlated with the ATP-SPECT imaging pattern. These findings suggest that baseline QT dispersion and ATP-induced changes in QT dispersion may help detect the presence of myocardial ischemia and scar. PMID:10215275

  5. Adenosine triphosphate released from HIV-infected macrophages regulates glutamatergic tone and dendritic spine density on neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B.; Kolson, Dennis L.; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Drewes, Julia; Graham, David R.; Haughey, Norman J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite wide spread use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in developed countries, approximately half of HIV-infected patients will develop impairments in cognitive function. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal dysfunction can be precipitated by HIV-infection of macrophages by mechanisms that involve alterations in innate and adaptive immune responses. HIV-infection of macrophages is known to increase the release of soluble neurotoxins. However, the composition of products released from infected macrophages is complex and not fully known. In this study we provide evidence that ATP and other immuno-/neuromodulatory nucleotides are exported from HIV-infected macrophages and modify neuronal structure. Supernatants collected from HIV-infected macrophages (HIV/MDM) contained large amounts of ATP, ADP, AMP and small amounts of adenosine, in addition to glutamate. Dilutions of these supernatants that were sub-threshold for glutamate receptor activation evoked rapid calcium flux in neurons that were completely inhibited by the enzymatic degradation of ATP, or by blockade of calcium permeable purinergic receptors. Applications of these high-dilution HIV/MDM onto neuronal cultures increased the amount of extracellular glutamate by mechanisms dependent on purinergic receptor activation, and downregulated spine density on neurons by mechanisms dependent on purinergic and glutamate receptor activation. We conclude from these data that ATP released from HIV-infected macrophages downregulates dendritic spine density on neurons by a mechanism that involves purinergic receptor mediated modulation of glutamatergic tone. These data suggest that neuronal function may be depressed in HIV infected individuals by mechanisms that involve macrophage release of ATP that triggers secondary effects on glutamate handling. PMID:23686368

  6. Mechanistic characterization of the 5′-triphosphate-dependent activation of PKR: Lack of 5′-end nucleobase specificity, evidence for a distinct triphosphate binding site, and a critical role for the dsRBD

    PubMed Central

    Toroney, Rebecca; Hull, Chelsea M.; Sokoloski, Joshua E.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    The protein kinase PKR is activated by RNA to phosphorylate eIF-2α, inhibiting translation initiation. Long dsRNA activates PKR via interactions with the dsRNA-binding domain (dsRBD). Weakly structured RNA also activates PKR and does so in a 5′-triphosphate (ppp)–dependent fashion, however relatively little is known about this pathway. We used a mutant T7 RNA polymerase to incorporate all four triphosphate-containing nucleotides into the first position of a largely single-stranded RNA and found absence of selectivity, in that all four transcripts activate PKR. Recognition of 5′-triphosphate, but not the nucleobase at the 5′-most position, makes this RNA-mediated innate immune response sensitive to a broad array of viruses. PKR was neither activated in the presence of γ-GTP nor recognized NTPs other than ATP in activation competition and ITC binding assays. This indicates that the binding site for ATP is selective, which contrasts with the site for the 5′ end of ppp-ssRNA. Activation experiments reveal that short dsRNAs compete with 5′-triphosphate RNAs and heparin for activation, and likewise gel-shift assays reveal that activating 5′-triphosphate RNAs and heparin compete with short dsRNAs for binding to PKR's dsRBD. The dsRBD thus plays a critical role in the activation of PKR by ppp-ssRNA and even heparin. At the same time, cross-linking experiments indicate that ppp-ssRNA interacts with PKR outside of the dsRBD as well. Overall, 5′-triphosphate-containing, weakly structured RNAs activate PKR via interactions with both the dsRBD and a distinct triphosphate binding site that lacks 5′-nucleobase specificity, allowing the innate immune response to provide broad-spectrum protection from pathogens. PMID:22912486

  7. Use of 8-azidoguanosine 5'-(gamma-/sup 32/P)triphosphate as a probe of the guanosine 5'-triphosphate binding protein subunits in bovine rod outer segments

    SciTech Connect

    Kohnken, R.E.; Mc Connell, D.G.

    1985-07-02

    In an in vitro incubation, 8-azidoguanosine 5'-(gamma-/sup 32/P)triphosphate ( (gamma-/sup 32/P)-8-azido-GTP) labeled bleached rhodopsin independent of ultraviolet light. Characterization of this labeling indicated that rhodopsin was phosphorylated with (gamma-/sup 32/P)-8-azido-GTP as a phosphate donor. At low concentrations, ATP increased this labeling activity 5-fold. In the same incubation, (gamma-/sup 32/P)-8-azido-GTP also labeled G alpha (Mr 40 000). This labeling was ultraviolet light dependent. G beta (Mr 35 000) was also labeled dependent for the most part upon ultraviolet light, but a smaller component of labeling appeared to result from phosphorylation. Differential labeling of G alpha and G beta was found to vary intricately with experimental conditions, especially prebleaching of rhodopsin, tonicity of the medium, and the presence or absence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Affinity labeling of G alpha and G beta by (gamma-/sup 32/P)-8-azido-GTP in competition with ATP or GTP was kinetically complex, consistent with possible multiple binding sites for GTP on both subunits. Independent evidence for two or more binding sites on G alpha has been offered by other laboratories, and recently, at least one binding site on G beta and its analogues among the N proteins of adenylate cyclases has been identified.

  8. Usefulness of combined CARTO electroanatomical mapping and manifest entrainment in ablating adenosine triphosphate-sensitive atrial tachycardia originating from the atrioventricular node vicinity

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Ken; Sasaki, Shingo; Kimura, Masaomi; Horiuchi, Daisuke; Sasaki, Kenichi; Itoh, Taihei; Tomita, Hirofumi; Ishida, Yuji; Kinjo, Takahiko

    2016-01-01

    Background By using a noncontact mapping system, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive atrial tachycardia (ATP-AT) originating from the atrioventricular (AV) node vicinity was successfully ablated at the entrance to the slow conduction zone indicated by the manifest entrainment technique. We aimed to prospectively validate the efficacy of the combination of CARTO electroanatomical mapping and manifest entrainment in ablating this ATP-AT. Methods Of the 27 AT patients from January 2013 to March 2014, 6 patients with sustained ATP-AT were studied (age, 67±13 years; tachycardia cycle length, 350±95 ms). We first created the CARTO map during AT, and performed rapid pacing from the anterior right atrial wall (ARAW) and cavotricuspid isthmus (CTI) approximately 30 mm remote from the earliest activation site (EAS). We identified the site where manifest entrainment, defined as the orthodromic capture of the EAS with a long conduction time, was observed, and ablated the site approximately 20 mm remote from the EAS, between the pacing site and the EAS. Results Manifest entrainment was demonstrated in all patients paced from the ARAW (four patients) and from the CTI (two patients). Ablation at the prespecified site terminated AT in 6±3 s, and AT became no longer inducible in all patients. At the successful ablation sites, discrete atrial electrograms were recorded; however, low-amplitude, fractionated electrograms suggestive of slow conduction were not observed in all patients. The atrio-His interval during sinus rhythm remained unchanged (from 96±12 to 89±7 ms, p=NS). During 11±6 months, no patients showed AT recurrence and AV conduction abnormality. Conclusion CARTO mapping- and manifest entrainment-guided ablation strategy is effective and safe in the treatment of ATP-AT. PMID:27092195

  9. In situ amplified electrochemical aptasensing for sensitive detection of adenosine triphosphate by coupling target-induced hybridization chain reaction with the assembly of silver nanotags.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian; Lin, Youxiu; Lin, Yuping; Wei, Qiaohua; Chen, Guonan; Tang, Dianping

    2016-01-01

    Biomolecular immobilization and construction of the sensing platform are usually crucial for the successful development of a high-efficiency detection system. Herein we report on a novel and label-free signal-amplified aptasensing for sensitive electrochemical detection of small molecules (adenosine triphosphate, ATP, used in this case) by coupling with target-induced hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and the assembly of electroactive silver nanotags. The system mainly consisted of two alternating hairpin probes, a partial-pairing trigger-aptamer duplex DNA and a capture probe immobilized on the electrode. Upon target ATP introduction, the analyte attacked the aptamer and released the trigger DNA, which was captured by capture DNA immobilized on the electrode to form a newly partial-pairing double-stranded DNA. Thereafter, the exposed domain at trigger DNA could be utilized as the initator strand to open the hairpin probes in sequence, and propagated a chain reaction of hybridization events between two alternating hairpins to form a long nicked double-helix. The electrochemical signal derived from the assembled silver nanotags on the nicked double-helix. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical aptasensor could exhibit a high sensitivity and a low detection limit, and allowed the detection of ATP at a concentration as low as 0.03 pM. Our design showed a high selectivity for target ATP against its analogs because of the high-specificity ATP-aptamer reaction, and its applicable for monitoring ATP in the spiking serum samples. Improtantly, the distinct advantages of the developed aptasensor make it hold a great potential for the development of simple and robust sensing strategies for the detection of other small molecules by controlling the apatmer sequence.

  10. [Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy after intravenous infusion of adenosine triphosphate disodium: a preliminary study in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, S; Yamashita, S; Suzuki, T; Muramatsu, T; Ide, M; Dohi, Y; Nishimura, K; Miyamae, T

    1991-12-01

    The feasibility and safety of thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy after the intravenous infusion of adenosine triphosphate disodium (ATP) (Adetphos, Kowa) were studied in eight patients with angina pectoris and/or old myocardial infarction. Coronary arteriography (CAG) was performed by the conventional method in all patients. ATP was infused for 5 min and thallium was injected at 3 min after the start of ATP infusion. ATP was given at 0.12 mg/min/kg in two patients (group A), 0.16 mg/min/kg in three patients (group B), 0.20 mg/min/kg in one patient (group C) and 0.28 mg/min/kg in two patients (group D). SPECT images were obtained at 10 min and 180 min after thallium injection. No significant hemodynamic changes were observed in group A and B. Severe hypotension was observed in group C and one member of group D. Chest pain was experienced by one patient in group A, two in group B, one in group C, and both of the two in group D. ST depression on the electrocardiogram (ECG) was documented in one patient each of groups B and C. In one group D patient, the study was discontinued because of complete atrioventricular block persistent for 5 beats. The correlation between thallium imaging and CAG was unclear in group A, reasonable in groups B and C, and obscure in group D because of side effects. None of the patients who developed side effects of ATP were administered sublingual nitroglycerin or intravenous aminophylline. Their symptoms or ECG changes improved spontaneously within 2 min and disappeared within 5 min after termination of infusion. In conclusion, the optimal ATP regimen for this purpose was considered to be a 5 min infusion at 0.16 mg/kg/min and this method was found to be feasible and safe. PMID:1784093

  11. Inactivation efficiency of Escherichia coli and autochthonous bacteria during ozonation of municipal wastewater effluents quantified with flow cytometry and adenosine tri-phosphate analyses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunho; Imminger, Stefanie; Czekalski, Nadine; von Gunten, Urs; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-09-15

    Inactivation kinetics of autochthonous bacteria during ozonation of wastewater effluents were investigated using cultivation-independent flow cytometry (FCM) with total cell count (TCC) and intact cell count (ICC) and intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis. The principles of the methods including ozone inactivation kinetics were demonstrated with laboratory-cultured Escherichia coli spiked into filtered and sterilized wastewater effluent. Both intracellular ATP and ICC decreased with increasing ozone doses, with ICC being the more conservative parameter. The log-inactivation levels (-log(N/N0) of E. coli reached the method detection limits for FCM (∼3) and ATP (∼1.7) at specific ozone doses of ≥0.5 gO3/gDOC. During ozonation of four real wastewater effluents, the log-inactivation of autochthonous bacteria with FCM ICC was 0.3-1.0 for 0.25 gO3/gDOC and increased to 1.1-2.1 for 0.5 gO3/gDOC, but remained at a similar level of 1.5-2.8 for a further increase of the specific ozone doses to 1.0 and 1.5 gO3/gDOC. The FCM data also showed that autochthonous bacteria were composed of communities with high and low ozone reactivity. The inactivation levels measured with intracellular ATP were reasonably correlated to ICC (r(2) = 0.8). Overall, FCM and ATP measurements were demonstrated to be useful tools to monitor the inactivation of autochthonous bacteria during ozonation of municipal wastewater effluents. PMID:27322566

  12. Cysteinyl peptides of rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase labeled by the affinity label 8-((4-bromo-2,3-dioxobutyl)thio)adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmer, S.H.; Colman, R.F. )

    1990-03-13

    The affinity label 8-((4-bromo-2,3-dioxobutyl)thio)adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (8-BDB-TA-5{prime}-TP) reacts covalently with rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase, incorporating 2 mol of reagent/mol of enzyme subunit upon complete inactivation. Protection against inactivation is provided by phosphoenolpyruvate, K{sup +}, and Mn{sup 2+} and only 1 mol of reagent/mol of subunit is incorporated. The authors have now identified the resultant modified residues. After reaction with 8-BDB-TA-5{prime}-TP at pH 7.0, modified enzyme was incubated with ({sup 3}H)NaBH{sub 4} to reduce the carbonyl groups of enzyme-bound 8-BDB-TA-5{prime}-TP and to introduce a radioactive tracer into the modified residues. Following carboxymethylation and digestion with trypsin, the radioactive peptides were separated on a phenylboronate agarose column followed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography in 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid with an acetonitrile gradient. Gas-phase sequencing gave the cysteine-modified peptides Asn{sup 162}-Ile-Cys-Lys{sup 165} and Cys{sup 151}-Asp-Glu-Asn-Ile-Leu-Trp-Leu-Asp-Tyr-Lys{sup 161}, with a smaller amount of Asn{sup 43}-Thr-Gly-Ile-Ile-Cys-Thr-Ile-Gly-Pro-Ala-Ser-Arg{sup 55}. Reaction in the presence of the protectants phosphoenolpyruvate, K{sup +}, and Mn{sup 2+} yielded Asn-Ile-Cys-Lys as the only labeled peptide, indicating that inactivation is caused by modification of Cys{sup 151} and Cys{sup 48}.

  13. Selective Protection of Human Liver Tissue in TNF-Targeting of Cancers of the Liver by Transient Depletion of Adenosine Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, Timo; Klein, Kathrin; Zimmermann, Martina; Speicher, Tobias; Venturelli, Sascha; Berger, Alexander; Bantel, Heike; Königsrainer, Alfred; Schenk, Martin; Weiss, Thomas S.; Wendel, Albrecht; Schwab, Matthias; Bitzer, Michael; Lauer, Ulrich M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) is able to kill cancer cells via receptor-mediated cell death requiring adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Clinical usage of TNF so far is largely limited by its profound hepatotoxicity. Recently, it was found in the murine system that specific protection of hepatocytes against TNF's detrimental effects can be achieved by fructose-mediated ATP depletion therein. Before employing this quite attractive selection principle in a first clinical trial, we here comprehensively investigated the interdependence between ATP depletion and TNF hepatotoxicity in both in vitro and ex vivo experiments based on usage of primary patient tissue materials. Methods Primary human hepatocytes, and both non-tumorous and tumorous patient-derived primary liver tissue slices were used to elucidate fructose-induced ATP depletion and TNF-induced cytotoxicity. Results PHH as well as tissue slices prepared from non-malignant human liver specimen undergoing a fructose-mediated ATP depletion were both demonstrated to be protected against TNF-induced cell death. In contrast, due to tumor-specific overexpression of hexokinase II, which imposes a profound bypass on hepatocytic-specific fructose catabolism, this was not the case for human tumorous liver tissues. Conclusion Normal human liver tissues can be protected transiently against TNF-induced cell death by systemic pretreatment with fructose used in non-toxic/physiologic concentrations. Selective TNF-targeting of primary and secondary tumors of the liver by transient and specific depletion of hepatocytic ATP opens up a new clinical avenue for the TNF-based treatment of liver cancers. PMID:23272249

  14. Cardioprotective Benefits of Adenosine Triphosphate: Sensitive Potassium Channel Opener Diazoxide Are Lost with Administration after the Onset of Stress in Mouse and Human Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Janjua, M Burhan; Makepeace, Carol M; Anastacio, Melissa M; Schuessler, Richard B; Nichols, Colin G; Lawton, Jennifer S

    2014-01-01

    Background Adenosine triphosphate - sensitive (KATP) potassium channel opener diazoxide (DZX) maintains myocyte volume and contractility during stress via an unknown mechanism when administered at the onset of stress. This study was performed to investigate the cardioprotective potential of DZX when added after the onset of the stresses of hyperkalemic cardioplegia, metabolic inhibition, and hypo osmotic stress. Study Design Isolated mouse ventricular and human atrial myocytes were exposed to control Tyrode’s solution (TYR) for 10–20 min, test solution for 30 min (hypothermic hyperkalemic cardioplegia (CPG), CPG + 100uM diazoxide (CPG+DZX), metabolic inhibition (MI), MI+DZX, mild hypo osmotic stress (0.9T), or 0.9T + DZX) with DZX added after 10 or 20 min stress, followed by 20 min re-exposure to TYR (+/− DZX). Myocyte volume (human + mouse) and contractility (mouse) were compared. Results Mouse and human myocytes demonstrated significant swelling during exposure to CPG, MI, and hypo osmotic stress that was not prevented by DZX when administered either at 10 or 20 min after the onset of stress. Contractility following the stress of CPG in mouse myocytes significantly declined when DZX was administered 20 min after the onset of stress (p<0.05 vs. TYR). Contractility following hypo osmotic stress in mouse myocytes was not altered by the addition of DZX. Conclusions To maintain myocyte volume homeostasis and contractility during stress (hyperkalemic cardioplegia, metabolic inhibition, and hypo osmotic stress), KATP channel opener diazoxide requires administration at the onset of stress in this isolated myocyte model. These data have potential implications for any future clinical application of diazoxide. PMID:25158912

  15. A simple, fast, and sensitive assay for the detection of DNA, thrombin, and adenosine triphosphate based on Dual-Hairpin DNA structure.

    PubMed

    He, Xiuping; Wang, Guangfeng; Xu, Gang; Zhu, Yanhong; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2013-11-19

    In the present study, based on multifunctional Dual-Hairpin DNA structure, a simple, fast and high sensitive assay for the detection of DNA, thrombin and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was demonstrated. DNA sequence labeled with methylene blue (MB), which was designed as single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) matching with target DNA, thrombin, or ATP aptamer, hybridized to the adjunct probe and formed the dual-hairpin structure on the electrode. With the hybridization of adjunct probe and the hairpin-like capture probe in the stem region, the dual-hairpin was formed with outer and inner hairpins. By the conjugation of the target probe with the adjunct probe in the outer hairpin, the adjunct probe divorced from the dual-hairpin structure. The adjunct probe with signal molecules MB, attaching near or divorcing far from the electrode, produced electrochemical signal change and efficient electron transfer due to the fact that it was in proximity to the electrode. However, upon hybridization with the perfect match target, the redox label with the target probe was forced away from the modified electrode, thus resulting in the change of the Dual-Hairpin DNA conformation, which enables impedance of the efficient electron transfer of MB and, consequently, a detectable change of the electrochemical response. In addition, another highlight of this biosensor is its regenerability and stability owing to the merits of structure. Also, based on this Dual-Hairpin platform, the detection limits of DNA, thrombin, and ATP were 50 nM, 3 pM, and 30 nM, respectively. Moreover, this pattern also demonstrated excellent regenerability, reproducibility, and stability. Additionally, given to its ease-of-use, simplicity in design, easy operations, as well as regenerability and stability, the proposed approach may be applied as an excellent design prompter in the preparation of other molecular sensors.

  16. Running out of time: the decline of channel activity and nucleotide activation in adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K-channels

    PubMed Central

    Proks, Peter; Puljung, Michael C.; Vedovato, Natascia; Sachse, Gregor; Mulvaney, Rachel; Ashcroft, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    KATP channels act as key regulators of electrical excitability by coupling metabolic cues—mainly intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations—to cellular potassium ion efflux. However, their study has been hindered by their rapid loss of activity in excised membrane patches (rundown), and by a second phenomenon, the decline of activation by Mg-nucleotides (DAMN). Degradation of PI(4,5)P2 and other phosphoinositides is the strongest candidate for the molecular cause of rundown. Broad evidence indicates that most other determinants of rundown (e.g. phosphorylation, intracellular calcium, channel mutations that affect rundown) also act by influencing KATP channel regulation by phosphoinositides. Unfortunately, experimental conditions that reproducibly prevent rundown have remained elusive, necessitating post hoc data compensation. Rundown is clearly distinct from DAMN. While the former is associated with pore-forming Kir6.2 subunits, DAMN is generally a slower process involving the regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits. We speculate that it arises when SUR subunits enter non-physiological conformational states associated with the loss of SUR nucleotide-binding domain dimerization following prolonged exposure to nucleotide-free conditions. This review presents new information on both rundown and DAMN, summarizes our current understanding of these processes and considers their physiological roles. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377720

  17. Cross-linking of myosin subfragment 1 and heavy meromyosin by use of vanadate and a bis(adenosine 5'-triphosphate) analogue.

    PubMed

    Munson, K B; Smerdon, M J; Yount, R G

    1986-11-18

    The synthesis of a divalent ATP analogue [3,3'-dithiobis[3'(2')-O-[6-(propionylamino)hexanoyl]adenosine 5'-triphosphate] (bis22ATP)] is described in which two molecules of ATP are linked via esterification of their 3'(2')-hydroxyls to the linear dicarboxylic acid 3,3'-dithiobis[N-(5-carboxypentyl)-propionamide] [[HO2C(CH2)5NHC(O)(CH2)2S-]2]. This linkage introduces 22 atoms (a maximum of approximately 2.8 nm) between the ribose oxygens of two ATP molecules. Myosin subfragment 1 (SF1) or heavy meromyosin (HMM) readily cleave bis22ATP to bis22ADP. Upon subsequent addition of excess vanadate ion, both enzymes are rapidly inactivated by formation of a stable vanadate-bis22ADP complex at the active site. By adjustment of the reaction conditions, dimers of SF1 or HMM, both cross-linked with bis22ADP-vanadate, could be prepared. Dimers of SF1 could be separated from monomers by sucrose gradient centrifugation but not by gel filtration. These observations imply that the average Stokes radius of the dimer approximates that of the monomer, a result predicted only for monomers linked approximately side by side. Conversely, dimers of HMM were separated from HMM monomers by gel filtration, reflecting an increase in their Stokes radii. This increase, however, prevented resolution of HMM dimers from monomers by sucrose gradient centrifugation. These results and the molecular dimensions of bis22ATP suggest that the 3'-(2')-hydroxyl of ATP is no more than 1.3 nm from the surface of myosin and suggest further in the simplest interpretation that the active site is most likely located near the middle of the heads of myosin. Analytical sedimentation velocity experiments were performed in order to compare the sedimentation coefficient (s0(20),w) of the SF1 dimer formed by cross-linking to values predicted from ellipsoidal models of the dimer. The observed s0(20),w of the dimer was much closer to the range predicted for a side-to-side arrangement of SF1 monomers than the range predicted

  18. Adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) supplements are not orally bioavailable: a randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over trial in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nutritional supplements designed to increase adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) concentrations are commonly used by athletes as ergogenic aids. ATP is the primary source of energy for the cells, and supplementation may enhance the ability to maintain high ATP turnover during high-intensity exercise. Oral ATP supplements have beneficial effects in some but not all studies examining physical performance. One of the remaining questions is whether orally administered ATP is bioavailable. We investigated whether acute supplementation with oral ATP administered as enteric-coated pellets led to increased concentrations of ATP or its metabolites in the circulation. Methods Eight healthy volunteers participated in a cross-over study. Participants were given in random order single doses of 5000 mg ATP or placebo. To prevent degradation of ATP in the acidic environment of the stomach, the supplement was administered via two types of pH-sensitive, enteric-coated pellets (targeted at release in the proximal or distal small intestine), or via a naso-duodenal tube. Blood ATP and metabolite concentrations were monitored by HPLC for 4.5 h (naso-duodenal tube) or 7 h (pellets) post-administration. Areas under the concentration vs. time curve were calculated and compared by paired-samples t-tests. Results ATP concentrations in blood did not increase after ATP supplementation via enteric-coated pellets or naso-duodenal tube. In contrast, concentrations of the final catabolic product of ATP, uric acid, were significantly increased compared to placebo by ~50% after administration via proximal-release pellets (P = 0.003) and naso-duodenal tube (P = 0.001), but not after administration via distal-release pellets. Conclusions A single dose of orally administered ATP is not bioavailable, and this may explain why several studies did not find ergogenic effects of oral ATP supplementation. On the other hand, increases in uric acid after release of ATP in the proximal

  19. Evaluation of the internal thoracic arterial graft patency by the transthoracic Doppler method under continuous intravenous infusion of adenosine triphosphate disodium.

    PubMed

    Fukata, Y; Horike, K; Fujimoto, E; Shimoe, Y; Kanbara, T

    1999-10-01

    Usefulness of the Doppler method under continuous infusion of adenosine triphosphate disodium (ATP) for improvement of accuracy in the diagnosis of the left internal thoracic arterial graft (LITA) patency was examined using transthoracic ultrasonic echocardiography. 1) Influence of ATP on the Doppler velocity in a graft was examined in 7 patients with good LITA grafts using physiological saline as the control. In the ATP group, 80 mg of ATP was dissolved in 20 ml physiological saline and continuously infused at 0.14 mg/kg/min. In the saline group, an equal volume of physiological saline was administered and the blood flow velocity in the LITA was recorded continuously by the transthoracic Doppler method from the supraclavicular fossa approach. Results; ATP administration increased the blood flow velocity in the LITA and the rate of increase was 48.3% for systolic peak velocity, 111% for diastolic peak velocity, 64.4% for systolic time velocity integral and 99% for diastolic time velocity integral indicating particularly high rates of increase in diastolic components. The diastolic/systolic peak velocity ratio or diastolic fraction did not increase significantly. In the saline group, none of the parameters showed a change. 2) Angiographic findings of the LITA were compared with the measurement values of the diastolic components by the Doppler method to examine usefulness of diastolic component measurement with ATP infusion for diagnosis of LITA patency. Subjects were 19 patients with good LITA (group A) and 8 patients with bad LITA (group B). Results; while there were significant differences in the mean baseline diastolic peak velocity, mean diastolic time velocity integral and mean diastolic fraction between the groups, overlapping was seen in individual cases. However, the inter-group differences were more distinct by ATP infusion and the borderline values were 30 cm/sec for diastolic peak velocity and 10 for diastolic time velocity integral. 3) Reliability of the

  20. Transesophageal Doppler echocardiographic assessment of systolic and diastolic coronary blood flow velocities at baseline and during adenosine triphosphate-induced coronary vasodilation in chronic aortic regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Kisanuki, A; Matsushita, R; Murayama, T; Otsuji, Y; Miyazono, Y; Toyonaga, K; Nakao, S; Taira, A; Tanaka, H

    1997-01-01

    Few reports exist on the changes in systolic and diastolic coronary flow velocities (CFVs) at baseline and during coronary vasodilation in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation (AR). We examined the left anterior descending CFVs in 21 patients with AR (11 patients with mild AR and 10 patients with moderate to severe AR), 9 patients without AR (no AR group), and 6 patients who had undergone surgery for moderate to severe AR (postoperation group) with transesophageal Doppler echocardiography. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was infused into a peripheral right arm vein at four different doses (35, 70, 100, and 140 micrograms/kg/min). Coronary flow velocity response in systole and diastole was calculated as the ratio of systolic peak and mean and diastolic peak and mean CFVs during maximal ATP infusion to those at baseline. The systolic peak and mean CFVs and the diastolic peak and mean CFVs at baseline were significantly increased in the moderate to severe group compared with those in the other groups (p < 0.05, respectively). Systolic and diastolic CFVs were significantly increased during ATP infusions in the four groups. No significant differences of systolic and diastolic CFVs were observed among the four groups during maximal ATP infusion. The coronary flow velocity response calculated from the peak and mean diastolic CFVs were significantly decreased in the moderate to severe group (1.6 +/- 0.3 and 1.7 +/- 0.4) compared with those in the other three groups (3.6 +/- 0.7 and 3.2 +/- 1.1 in the no AR group, 2.6 +/- 0.6 and 2.5 +/- 0.4 in the mild group, and 2.5 +/- 0.7 and 2.4 +/- 0.6 in the postoperation group) (p < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, the systolic and diastolic left CFVs at baseline appeared to be significantly increased in patients with moderate to severe chronic AR. However, the velocities during coronary vasodilation by ATP were equal to those in other groups, resulting in a decrease of coronary flow velocity response in systole and diastole

  1. Effects of oral adenosine-5′-triphosphate supplementation on athletic performance, skeletal muscle hypertrophy and recovery in resistance-trained men

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a lack of studies examining the effects of adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) supplementation utilizing a long-term, periodized resistance-training program (RT) in resistance-trained populations. Therefore, we investigated the effects of 12 weeks of 400 mg per day of oral ATP on muscular adaptations in trained individuals. We also sought to determine the effects of ATP on muscle protein breakdown, cortisol, and performance during an overreaching cycle. Methods The study was a 3-phase randomized, double-blind, and placebo- and diet-controlled intervention. Phase 1 was a periodized resistance-training program. Phase 2 consisted of a two week overreaching cycle in which volume and frequency were increased followed by a 2-week taper (Phase 3). Muscle mass, strength, and power were examined at weeks 0, 4, 8, and 12 to assess the chronic effects of ATP; assessment performance variables also occurred at the end of weeks 9 and 10, corresponding to the mid and endpoints of the overreaching cycle. Results There were time (p < 0.001), and group x time effects for increased total body strength (+55.3 ± 6.0 kg ATP vs. + 22.4 ± 7.1 kg placebo, p < 0.001); increased vertical jump power (+ 796 ± 75 ATP vs. 614 ± 52 watts placebo, p < 0.001); and greater ultrasound determined muscle thickness (+4.9 ± 1.0 ATP vs. (2.5 ± 0.6 mm placebo, p < 0.02) with ATP supplementation. During the overreaching cycle, there were group x time effects for strength and power, which decreased to a greater extent in the placebo group. Protein breakdown was also lower in the ATP group. Conclusions Our results suggest oral ATP supplementation may enhance muscular adaptations following 12-weeks of resistance training, and prevent decrements in performance following overreaching. No statistically or clinically significant changes in blood chemistry or hematology were observed. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01508338 PMID

  2. Molecular Determinants of CGS21680 Binding to the Human Adenosine A2A Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Patricia C.; Leslie, Andrew G. W.

    2015-01-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) plays a key role in transmembrane signaling mediated by the endogenous agonist adenosine. Here, we describe the crystal structure of human A2AR thermostabilized in an active-like conformation bound to the selective agonist 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethyl-amino]-5′-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine (CGS21680) at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Comparison of A2AR structures bound to either CGS21680, 5′-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine (NECA), UK432097 [6-(2,2-diphenylethylamino)-9-[(2R,3R,4S,5S)-5-(ethylcarbamoyl)-3,4-dihydroxy-tetrahydrofuran-2-yl]-N-[2-[[1-(2-pyridyl)-4-piperidyl]carbamoylamino]ethyl]purine-2-carboxamide], or adenosine shows that the adenosine moiety of the ligands binds to the receptor in an identical fashion. However, an extension in CGS21680 compared with adenosine, the (2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino group, binds in an extended vestibule formed from transmembrane regions 2 and 7 (TM2 and TM7) and extracellular loops 2 and 3 (EL2 and EL3). The (2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino group makes van der Waals contacts with side chains of amino acid residues Glu169EL2, His264EL3, Leu2677.32, and Ile2747.39, and the amine group forms a hydrogen bond with the side chain of Ser672.65. Of these residues, only Ile2747.39 is absolutely conserved across the human adenosine receptor subfamily. The major difference between the structures of A2AR bound to either adenosine or CGS21680 is that the binding pocket narrows at the extracellular surface when CGS21680 is bound, due to an inward tilt of TM2 in that region. This conformation is stabilized by hydrogen bonds formed by the side chain of Ser672.65 to CGS21680, either directly or via an ordered water molecule. Mutation of amino acid residues Ser672.65, Glu169EL2, and His264EL3, and analysis of receptor activation either in the presence or absence of ligands implicates this region in modulating the level of basal activity of A2AR. PMID:25762024

  3. [The dynamics of the domains of the IP3-binding site of the inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate-sensitive calcium channel, induced by inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate and calcium].

    PubMed

    Veresov, V G; Konev, S V

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of the inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate-sensitive calcium channel after binding of inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate and Ca2+ was analyzed by the Monte Carlo minimization technique. It was shown that the binding of Ca2+ with the unliganded receptor (channel) leads to a turning of the beta-sheet domain relative to the alpha-helical domain with the formation of the receptor conformation that is open for the entry of ions into the cytoplasmic channel vestibule, sterically closed for their passage through the vestibule in the part adjacent to the alpha-helical domains, and unfavourable for subsequent binding of inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate with the receptor. When both co-agonists bind to the receptor, the structure rearrangements induced eliminate both these steric obstacles for the passage of ions through the IP3-binding domain: one at the entrance of the channel cytoplasmic vestibule and the other that is placed deeper in the vestibule near the alpha-domains. The role of the dynamics of the receptor binding core in the IP3-sensitive channel gating is discussed.

  4. Probing adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins with an affinity-labeled nucleotide probe and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Haibo; Wang, Yinsheng

    2007-08-01

    Mass spectrometry combined with chemical labeling strategies has become very important in biological analysis. Herein, we described the application of a biotin-conjugated acyl nucleotide for probing adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins. We demonstrated that the probe reacted specifically with the lysine residue at the nucleotide-binding site of two purified adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins, Escherichia coli recombinase A (RecA) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase-I (YADH-I). A single conjugate peptide with a specifically labeled lysine residue was identified, by using LC-MS/MS, from the tryptic digestion mixture of the reaction products of the nucleotide analogue with RecA or YADH-I. The strategy, which involved labeling reaction, enzymatic digestion, affinity purification, and LC-MS/MS analysis, was relatively simple, fast, and straightforward. The method should be generally applicable for the identification of lysine residues at the nucleotide-binding site of other proteins. The biotin-conjugated acyl nucleotide probe also allowed for the enrichment and identification of nucleotide-binding proteins from complex protein mixtures; we showed that more than 50 adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins could be identified from the whole-cell lysates of HeLa-S3 and WM-266-4 cells.

  5. Probing adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins with an affinity labeled-nucleotide probe and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Haibo; Wang, Yinsheng

    2008-01-01

    Mass spectrometry combined with chemical labeling strategies has become very important in biological analysis. Herein, we described the application of a biotin-conjugated acyl nucleotide for probing adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins. We demonstrated that the probe reacted specifically with the lysine residue at the nucleotide-binding site of two purified adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins, Escherichia coli RecA and Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase-I (YADH-I). A single conjugate peptide with a specifically labeled lysine residue was identified, by using LC-MS/MS, from the tryptic digestion mixture of the reaction products of the nucleotide analog with RecA or YADH-I. The strategy, which involved labeling reaction, enzymatic digestion, affinity purification and LC-MS/MS analysis, was relatively simple, fast and straightforward. The method should be generally applicable for the identification of lysine residues at the nucleotide-binding site of other proteins. The biotin-conjugated acyl nucleotide probe also allowed for the enrichment and identification of nucleotide-binding proteins from complex protein mixtures; we showed that more than 50 adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins could be identified from the whole cell lysates of HeLa-S3 and WM-266-4 cells. PMID:17602667

  6. Ligand Binding and Subtype Selectivity of the Human A2A Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Lane, J. Robert; Lin, Judy Y.; Katritch, Vsevolod; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of the human A2A adenosine receptor bound to the A2A receptor-specific antagonist, ZM241385, was recently determined at 2.6-Å resolution. Surprisingly, the antagonist binds in an extended conformation, perpendicular to the plane of the membrane, and indicates a number of interactions unidentified before in ZM241385 recognition. To further understand the selectivity of ZM241385 for the human A2A adenosine receptor, we examined the effect of mutating amino acid residues within the binding cavity likely to have key interactions and that have not been previously examined. Mutation of Phe-168 to Ala abolishes both agonist and antagonist binding as well as receptor activity, whereas mutation of this residue to Trp or Tyr had only moderate effects. The Met-177 → Ala mutation impeded antagonist but not agonist binding. Finally, the Leu-249 → Ala mutant showed neither agonist nor antagonist binding affinity. From our results and previously published mutagenesis data, we conclude that conserved residues Phe-168(5.29), Glu-169(5.30), Asn-253(6.55), and Leu-249(6.51) play a central role in coordinating the bicyclic core present in both agonists and antagonists. By combining the analysis of the mutagenesis data with a comparison of the sequences of different adenosine receptor subtypes from different species, we predict that the interactions that determine subtype selectivity reside in the more divergent “upper” region of the binding cavity while the “lower” part of the binding cavity is conserved across adenosine receptor subtypes. PMID:20147292

  7. Tubulin sequence region beta 155-174 is involved in binding exchangeable guanosine triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Hesse, J.; Thierauf, M.; Ponstingl, H.

    1987-11-15

    Assembly-competent microtubule protein was directly photoaffinity labeled with (alpha-/sup 32/P)guanosine triphosphate by UV irradiation. The labeled tubulin was digested with trypsin. The radioactive fragments were isolated and sequenced, revealing beta-tubulin residues 155-174 to be the major labeled region. An antibody to a synthetic peptide comprising residues beta 154-165 inhibits GTP incorporation and tubulin polymerization.

  8. Characterization of nitrobenzylthioinosine binding to nucleoside transport sites selective for adenosine in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, J.D.; LaBella, F.S.; Nagy, J.I.

    1985-03-01

    Nucleoside transport sites in rat brain membrane preparations were labeled with (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine ((/sup 3/H) NBI), a potent inhibitor of nucleoside transport systems. The membranes contained a single class of very high affinity binding sites with K/sub D/ and B/sub max/ values of 0.06 nM and 147 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. The displacement of (/sup 3/H)NBI binding by various nucleosides, adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists, and known nucleoside transport inhibitors was examined. The K/sub i/ values (micromolar concentration) of (/sup 3/H)NBI displacement by the nucleosides tested were: adenosine, 3.0; inosine, 160; thymidine, 240; uridine, 390; guanosine, 460; and cytidine, 1000. These nucleosides displayed parallel displacement curves indicating their interaction with a common site labeled by (/sup 3/H)NBI. The nucleobases, hypoxanthine and adenine, exhibited K/sub i/ values of 220 and 3640 microM, respectively. Adenosine receptor agonists exhibited moderate affinities for the (/sup 3/H)NBI site, whereas the adenosine receptor antagonists, caffeine, theophylline, and enprofylline, were ineffective displacers. The K/sub i/ values for cyclohexyladenosine, (+)- and (-)-phenylisopropyladenosine, 2-chloroadenosine, and adenosine 5'-ethylcarboxamide were 0.8, 0.9, 2.6, 12, and 54 microM, respectively. These affinities and the rank order of potencies indicate that (/sup 3/H)NBI does not label any known class of adenosine receptors (i.e., A1, A2, and P). The K/sub i/ values of other nucleoside transport inhibitors were: nitrobenzylthioguanosine, 0.05 nM; dipyridamole, 16 nM; papaverine, 3 microM; and 2'-deoxyadenosine, 22 microM. These results indicate that (/sup 3/H)NBI binds to a nucleoside transporter in brain which specifically recognizes adenosine as its preferred endogenous substrate. This ligand may aid in the identification of CNS neural systems that selectively accumulate adenosine and thereby control adenosinergic function.

  9. The role of bound potassium ions in the hydrolysis of low concentrations of adenosine triphosphate by preparations of membrane fragments from ox brain cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, P. S. G.; Rodnight, R.

    1970-01-01

    1. The intrinsic Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ contents of a preparation of membrane fragments from ox brain were determined by emission flame photometry. 2. Centrifugal washing of the preparation with imidazole-buffered EDTA solutions decreased the bound Na+ from 90±20 to 24±12, the bound K+ from 27±3 to 7±2, the bound Mg2+ from 20±2 to 3±1 and the bound calcium from 8±1 to <1nmol/mg of protein. 3. The activities of the Na++K++Mg2+-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase and the Na+-dependent reaction forming bound phosphate were compared in the unwashed and washed preparations at an ATP concentration of 2.5μm (ATP/protein ratio 12.5pmol/μg). 4. The Na+-dependent hydrolysis of ATP as well as the plateau concentration of bound phosphate and the rate of dephosphorylation were decreased in the washed preparation. The time-course of formation and decline of bound phosphate was fully restored by the addition of 2.5μm-magnesium chloride and 2μm-potassium chloride. Addition of 2.5μm-magnesium chloride alone fully restored the plateau concentration of bound phosphate, but the rate of dephosphorylation was only slightly increased. Na+-dependent ATP hydrolysis was partly restored with 2.5μm-magnesium chloride; addition of K+ in the range 2–10μm-potassium chloride then further restored hydrolysis but not to the control rate. 5. Pretreatment of the washed preparation at 0°C with 0.5nmol of K+/mg of protein so that the final added K+ in the reaction mixture was 0.1μm restored the Na+-dependent hydrolysis of ATP and the time-course of the reaction forming bound phosphate. 6. The binding of [42K]potassium chloride by the washed membrane preparation was examined. Binding in a solution containing 10nmol of K+/mg of protein was linear over a period of 20min and was inhibited by Na+. Half-maximal inhibition of 42K+-binding required a 100-fold excess of sodium chloride. 7. It was concluded (a) that a significant fraction of the apparent Na+-dependent hydrolysis of ATP observed

  10. Microbial Group Specific Uptake Kinetics of Inorganic Phosphate and Adenosine-5′-Triphosphate (ATP) in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    PubMed Central

    Björkman, Karin; Duhamel, Solange; Karl, David M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the concentration dependent uptake of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) in microbial populations in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). We used radiotracers to measure substrate uptake into whole water communities, differentiated microbial size classes, and two flow sorted groups; Prochlorococcus (PRO) and non-pigmented bacteria (NPB). The Pi concentrations, uptake rates, and Pi pool turnover times (Tt) were (mean, ±SD); 54.9 ± 35.0 nmol L−1 (n = 22), 4.8 ± 1.9 nmol L−1 day−1 (n = 19), and 14.7 ± 10.2 days (n = 19), respectively. Pi uptake into >2 μm cells was on average 12 ± 7% (n = 15) of the total uptake. The kinetic response to Pi (10–500 nmol L−1) was small, indicating that the microorganisms were close to their maximum uptake velocity (Vmax). Vmax averaged 8.0 ± 3.6 nmol L−1 day−1 (n = 19) in the >0.2 μm group, with half saturation constants (Km) of 40 ± 28 nmol L−1 (n = 19). PRO had three times the cell specific Pi uptake rate of NPB, at ambient concentrations, but when adjusted to cells L−1 the rates were similar, and these two groups were equally competitive for Pi. The Tt of γ-P-ATP in the >0.2 μm group were shorter than for the Pi pool (4.4 ± 1.0 days; n = 6), but this difference diminished in the larger size classes. The kinetic response to ATP was large in the >0.2 μm class with Vmax exceeding the rates at ambient concentrations (mean 62 ± 27 times; n = 6) with a mean Vmax for γ-P-ATP of 2.8 ± 1.0 nmol L−1 day−1, and Km at 11.5 ± 5.4 nmol L−1 (n = 6). The NPB contribution to γ-P-ATP uptake was high (95 ± 3%, n = 4) at ambient concentrations but decreased to ∼50% at the highest ATP amendment. PRO had Km values 5–10 times greater than NPB. The above indicates that PRO and NPB were in close competition in terms of Pi acquisition

  11. Spatial and Temporal Variability in the Concentration and Turnover of the Inorganic Phosphate and Adenosine-5'-triphosphate pools in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkman, Karin; Church, Matthew; Karl, David

    2015-04-01

    The microbial community's utilization of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as a function of the Pi pool concentration was studied over a multi-year period at Station ALOHA (22.75˚N, 158˚W) in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). Additionally, the spatial variability in these same properties was investigated along an east-west transect from California to Hawaii in the Fall of 2014. We used radiotracer techniques to determine the turnover times of the Pi or ATP pools respectively, and assessed the net production of dissolved organic phosphorus, and Pi hydrolysis rate from ATP. Pi concentrations in the upper water column at Station ALOHA are temporally highly dynamic, with periods of <10 nM-P to near 200 nM-P recorded within the top 50 m over the past decades of observations. During the California to Hawaii transect Pi concentrations showed a similarly large range (<10 to >200 nM-P), emphasizing the spatially and temporally mosaic nature of the upper ocean of this large biome. The Pi-pool turnover time ranged from a few hours to several weeks, and was strongly correlated with measured Pi pool concentrations (r2=0.8; n=30 Station ALOHA; n=15 transect). The calculated Pi uptake rates at Station ALOHA averaged 3.7±1.3 nM-P d-1 (n=30), reflecting the typically low maximum Pi uptake rates of the Prochlorococcus dominated community and the predominantly non-limiting Pi conditions. The Pi uptake rates along the transect were more variable than Station ALOHA (averaging 9.2±4.7 nM=P d-1, n=15), possibly due to a more diverse planktonic community structure, including stations with elevated concentrations of chlorophyll and primary productivity. The turnover time of the dissolved ATP pool was typically substantially shorter than for the Pi-pool (2-5 days at Station ALOHA; 0.3-2.5 days along the transect), likely reflecting its low nanomolar to picomolar ambient pool concentrations. However, at stations with the lowest SRP concentrations the

  12. Adenosine 5′-triphosphate and neuropeptide Y are co-transmitters in conjunction with noradrenaline in the human saphenous vein

    PubMed Central

    Racchi, Héctor; Irarrázabal, Manuel J; Howard, Michel; Morán, Sergio; Zalaquett, Ricardo; Huidobro-Toro, J Pablo

    1999-01-01

    Human saphenous veins were used to assess the cooperative participation of adenosine 5-triphosphate (ATP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and noradrenaline (NA) in the vasomotor responses elicited following electrical depolarization of the perivascular nerve terminals. Rings from recently dissected human biopsies were mounted to record isometric muscular contractions; the motor activity elicited in the circular muscle layer following electrical depolarization (2.5–20 Hz, 50 V, 0.5 msec) were recorded. Incubation of the biopsies with either 100 nM tetrodotoxin (TTX) or 1 μM guanethidine abolished the vasomotor response elicited by electrical nerve depolarization. The independent application of either ATP or NA to vein rings induced concentration-dependent contractions. Tissue incubation with 30 μM suramin or 10 nM prazosin produced 10 fold rightward displacements of the α,β-methylene ATP and NA concentration-response curves respectively. NPY contracted a limited number of biopsies, the vasoconstriction elicited was completely blocked by 1 μM BIBP 3226. A 5 min incubation of the biopsies with 10–100 nM NPY synergized, in a concentration-dependent fashion, both the ATP and the ATP analogue-induced contractions. Likewise, tissue preincubation with 10 nM NPY potentiated the vasomotor responses evoked with 20–60 nM NA. Neither suramin, BIBP 3226, nor prazosin was individually able to significantly modify the derived frequency-tension curves. In contrast, the co-application of 30 μM suramin and 10 nM prazosin or 30 μM suramin and 1 μM BIBP 3226, elicited a significant (P<0.01) downward displacement of the respective frequency-tension curves. The simultaneous application of the three antagonists–30 μM suramin, 1 μM BIBP 3226 and 10 nM prazosin–caused a significantly greater displacement of the frequency-tension curve than that achieved in experiments using two of these antagonists. Electrically-evoked vasomotor activity is

  13. Comparison of the Immunomagnetic Separation/Adenosine Triphosphate Rapid Method and the Modified mTEC Membrane-Filtration Method for Enumeration of Escherichia coli

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brady, Amie M.G.; Bushon, Rebecca N.; Bertke, Erin E.

    2009-01-01

    Water quality at beaches is monitored for fecal indicator bacteria by traditional, culture-based methods that can take 18 to 24 hours to obtain results. A rapid detection method that provides estimated concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria within 1 hour from the start of sample processing would allow beach managers to post advisories or close the beach when the conditions are actually considered unsafe instead of a day later, when conditions may have changed. A rapid method that couples immunomagnetic separation with adenosine triphosphate detection (IMS/ATP rapid method) was evaluated through monitoring of Escherichia coli (E. coli) at three Lake Erie beaches in Ohio (Edgewater and Villa Angela in Cleveland and Huntington in Bay Village). Beach water samples were collected between 4 and 5 days per week during the recreational seasons (May through September) of 2006 and 2007. Composite samples were created in the lab from two point samples collected at each beach and were shown to be comparable substitutes for analysis of two individual samples. E. coli concentrations in composite samples, as determined by the culture-based method, ranged from 4 to 24,000 colony-forming units per 100 milliliters during this study across all beaches. Turbidity also was measured for each sample and ranged from 0.8 to 260 neophelometric turbidity ratio units. Environmental variables were noted at the time of sampling, including number of birds at the beach and wave height. Rainfall amounts were measured at National Weather Service stations at local airports. Turbidity, rainfall, and wave height were significantly related to the culture-based method results each year and for both years combined at each beach. The number of birds at the beach was significantly related to the culture-based method results only at Edgewater during 2006 and during both years combined. Results of the IMS/ATP method were compared to results of the culture-based method for samples by year for each beach

  14. The Binding Site of Human Adenosine Deaminase for Cd26/Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Eva; Arredondo-Vega, Francisco X.; Santisteban, Ines; Kelly, Susan J.; Patel, Dhavalkumar D.; Hershfield, Michael S.

    2000-01-01

    Human, but not murine, adenosine deaminase (ADA) forms a complex with the cell membrane protein CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase IV. CD26-bound ADA has been postulated to regulate extracellular adenosine levels and to modulate the costimulatory function of CD26 on T lymphocytes. Absence of ADA–CD26 binding has been implicated in causing severe combined immunodeficiency due to ADA deficiency. Using human–mouse ADA hybrids and ADA point mutants, we have localized the amino acids critical for CD26 binding to the helical segment 126–143. Arg142 in human ADA and Gln142 in mouse ADA largely determine the capacity to bind CD26. Recombinant human ADA bearing the R142Q mutation had normal catalytic activity per molecule, but markedly impaired binding to a CD26+ ADA-deficient human T cell line. Reduced CD26 binding was also found with ADA from red cells and T cells of a healthy individual whose only expressed ADA has the R142Q mutation. Conversely, ADA with the E217K active site mutation, the only ADA expressed by a severely immunodeficient patient, showed normal CD26 binding. These findings argue that ADA binding to CD26 is not essential for immune function in humans. PMID:11067872

  15. Binary Drugs: Conjugates of Purines and a Peptide That Bind to Both Adenosine and Substance P Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Lipkowski, Andrzej W.; Moody, Terry W.; Padgett, William; Pijl, Evelyn; Kirk, Kenneth L.; Daly, John W.

    2012-01-01

    A “functionalized congener” approach to adenosine receptor antagonists has provided a means to synthesize highly potent peptide conjugates of 1,3-dialkylxanthines. The antagonist XAC, such a functionalized xanthine amine congener, has been attached to a segment derived from the neurotransmitter peptide substance P (SP) to form a binary drug that binds to both receptors with Ki values of 35 nM (central A1-adenosine) and 300 nM (striatal SP). Coupling of the functionalized adenosine agonist N6-[p-(carboxymethyl)phenyl]adenosine to an SP C-terminal peptide also resulted in a binary drug that binds to both receptors. The demonstration that the biochemical properties of two unrelated drugs, both of which act through binding at extracellular receptors, may be combined in the same molecule suggests a novel strategy for drug design. In principle, a combined effect of the two different substances that produce the same final effect (e.g., hypotension by adenosine agonists and by SP analogues) might occur in vivo. Adenosine analogues have analgesic properties, and the binary drug derived from substance P and adenosine agonists or antagonists might provide useful tools for probing interrelationships of SP pathways and sites for the antinociceptive action of adenosine. PMID:2441057

  16. Ab initio molecular dynamics studies on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase triphosphate binding site: implications for nucleoside-analog drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Alber, F; Carloni, P

    2000-12-01

    Quantum-chemical methods are used to shed light on the functional role of residues involved in the resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase against nucleoside-analog drugs. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for models representing the adduct between the triphosphate substrate and the nucleoside binding site. The triphosphate is considered either deprotonated or protonated at the gamma-position. Although the protonated form already experiences large rearrangements in the ps time scale, the fully deprotonated state exhibits a previously unrecognized low-barrier hydrogen bond between Lys65 and gamma-phosphate. Absence of this interaction in Lys65-->Arg HIV-1 RT might play a prominent role in the resistance of this mutant for nucleoside analogs (Gu Z et al., 1994b, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 38:275-281; Zhang D et al., 1994, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 38:282-287). Water molecules present in the active site, not detected in the X-ray structure, form a complex H-bond network. Among these waters, one may be crucial for substrate recognition as it bridges Gln151 and Arg72 with the beta-phosphate. Absence of this stabilizing interaction in Gln151-->Met HIV-1 RT mutant may be a key factor for the known drug resistance of this mutant toward dideoxy-type drugs and AZT (Shirasaka T et al., 1995, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 92:2398-2402: Iversen AK et al., 1996, J Virol 70:1086-1090).

  17. Nucleotide Binding Site Communication in Arabidopsis thaliana Adenosine 5;-Phosphosulfate Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-08-31

    Adenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of adenosine 3{prime}-phosphate 5{prime}-phosphosulfate (PAPS), which is an essential metabolite for sulfur assimilation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Using APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana, we examine the energetics of nucleotide binary and ternary complex formation and probe active site features that coordinate the order of ligand addition. Calorimetric analysis shows that binding can occur first at either nucleotide site, but that initial interaction at the ATP/ADP site was favored and enhanced affinity for APS in the second site by 50-fold. The thermodynamics of the two possible binding models (i.e. ATP first versus APS first) differs and implies that active site structural changes guide the order of nucleotide addition. The ligand binding analysis also supports an earlier suggestion of intermolecular interactions in the dimeric APSK structure. Crystallographic, site-directed mutagenesis, and energetic analyses of oxyanion recognition by the P-loop in the ATP/ADP binding site and the role of Asp136, which bridges the ATP/ADP and APS/PAPS binding sites, suggest how the ordered nucleotide binding sequence and structural changes are dynamically coordinated for catalysis.

  18. Soluble low affinity adenosine A/sub 2/ binding site from human placenta: reconstitution and characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, K.; Prasad, M.; Fox, I.H.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have developed a vesicle reconstitution technique that allows for rapid vacuum filtration assay, and have characterized the soluble A/sub 2/ site from placental membranes. The overall yield of reconstituted binding is 60%. Competition analysis of membranes and reconstituted vesicles yields identical agonist potency orders and affinities: N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) (Kd-330 nM)>2-chloroadenosine (Kd=1.7 ..mu..M) > L-phenylisopropyladenosine (Kd > 1 mM). Equilibrium binding to membranes and reconstituted vesicles of (/sup 3/H)-NECA, an adenosine agonist, was not reduced by guanine nulceotides. HPLC gel permeation chromatography of extracts from membranes preincubated with 5 mM MgCl/sub 2/ and 100 ..mu..M NECA revealed a peak of binding with kD of 0.07. Extracts prepared with either an antagonist or NECA and 100 ..mu..M guanylyl 5'-imidodiphosphate revealed a peak of binding with a kD of 0.09. These data suggest that the adenosine A/sub 2/ receptor retains its binding properties upon reconstitution and may couple to a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein.

  19. Binding of Mn-deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphates to the Active Site of the DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7

    SciTech Connect

    B Akabayov; C Richardson

    2011-12-31

    Divalent metal ions are crucial as cofactors for a variety of intracellular enzymatic activities. Mg{sup 2+}, as an example, mediates binding of deoxyribonucleoside 5'-triphosphates followed by their hydrolysis in the active site of DNA polymerase. It is difficult to study the binding of Mg{sup 2+} to an active site because Mg{sup 2+} is spectroscopically silent and Mg{sup 2+} binds with low affinity to the active site of an enzyme. Therefore, we substituted Mg{sup 2+} with Mn{sup 2+}:Mn{sup 2+} that is not only visible spectroscopically but also provides full activity of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. In order to demonstrate that the majority of Mn{sup 2+} is bound to the enzyme, we have applied site-directed titration analysis of T7 DNA polymerase using X-ray near edge spectroscopy. Here we show how X-ray near edge spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between signal originating from Mn{sup 2+} that is free in solution and Mn{sup 2+} bound to the active site of T7 DNA polymerase. This method can be applied to other enzymes that use divalent metal ions as a cofactor.

  20. Binding of Mn-deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates to the active site of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7

    PubMed Central

    Akabayov, Barak; Richardson, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    Divalent metal ions are crucial as cofactors for a variety of intracellular enzymatic activities. Mg2+, as an example, mediates binding of deoxyribonucleoside 5′-triphosphates followed by their hydrolysis in the active site of DNA polymerase. It is difficult to study the binding of Mg2+ to an active site because Mg2+ is spectroscopically silent and Mg2+ binds with low affinity to the active site of an enzyme. Therefore, we substituted Mg2+ with Mn2+:Mn2+ that is not only visible spectroscopically but also provides full activity of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. In order to demonstrate that the majority of Mn2+ is bound to the enzyme, we have applied site-directed titration analysis of T7 DNA polymerase using X-ray near edge spectroscopy. Here we show how X-ray near edge spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between signal originating from Mn2+ that is free in solution and Mn2+ bound to the active site of T7 DNA polymerase. This method can be applied to other enzymes that use divalent metal ions as a cofactor. PMID:23761703

  1. Characterization of A2A adenosine receptors in human lymphocyte membranes by [3H]-SCH 58261 binding

    PubMed Central

    Varani, Katia; Gessi, Stefania; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Ongini, Ennio; Andrea Borea, Pier

    1997-01-01

    The present study describes for the first time the characterization of the adenosine A2A receptor in human lymphocyte membranes with the new potent and selective antagonist radioligand, [3H]-5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo [4,3-e]-1,2,4 triazolo [1,5-c] pyrimidine, ([3H]-SCH 58261). In addition, both receptor affinity and potency of reference adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists were determined in binding and adenylyl cyclase studies. Saturation experiments revealed a single class of binding sites with Kd and Bmax values of 0.85 nM and 35 fmol mg−1 protein, respectively. A series of adenosine receptor ligands were found to compete for the binding of 0.8 nM [3H]-SCH 58261 to human lymphocyte membranes with a rank order of potency consistent with that typically found for interactions with the A2A-adenosine receptor. In the adenylyl cyclase assay the same compounds exhibited a rank order of potency similar to that observed in binding experiments. Thermodynamic data indicate that [3H]-SCH 58261 binding to human lymphocytes is entropy and enthalpy-driven, a finding in agreement with the thermodynamic behaviour of antagonists for rat striatal A2A-adenosine receptors. It is concluded that in human lymphocyte membranes [3H]-SCH 58261 directly labels binding sites showing the characteristic properties of the adenosine A2A-receptor. The presence of A2A-receptors in peripheral tissue such as human lymphocytes strongly suggests an important role for adenosine in modulating immune and inflammatory responses. PMID:9313951

  2. Binding induced colocalization activated hybridization chain reaction on the surface of magnetic nanobead for sensitive detection of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chunjing; Hou, Zhun; Jiang, Wei; Sang, Lihong; Wang, Lei

    2016-12-15

    Herein, a sensitive and enzyme-free assay for adenosine detection has been developed on the basis of binding induced colocalization activated hybridization chain reaction (HCR) strategy on the surface of magnetic nanobead. First, the recognition probe was fabricated and divided into two parts: the Apt-1 that composed a part of adenosine aptamer and toehold domain, and the Apt-2 that consisted of another part of adenosine aptamer and branch migration domain. The Apt-1 was immobilized on a streptavidin-magnetic nanobead (streptavidin-MNBs) that played the roles of enrichment and separation. Then the recognition event of adenosine could bring the two parts of aptamer together and induce the colocalization of toehold domain and branch migration domain, which could serve as an integrated initiator to trigger the HCR, producing a long nicked double-stranded polymer. Finally, the intercalating dye SYBR Green I was inserted into the polymer, generating an enhanced fluorescence signal. In this strategy, the initiator was divided into two parts and could be suppressed effectively in the absence of adenosine. Utilizing the separated function, the spontaneous hybridization of H1 and H2 could be avoided, and a low background could be acquired. Moreover, through the double amplification of HCR and multimolecules binding of SYBR Green I, highly sensitive and enzyme-free detection were achieved. The detection limit for adenosine detection was 2.0×10(-7)mol/L, which was comparable or superior to the previous aptasensors. Importantly, adenosine analysis in human urines has been performed, and this strategy could significantly distinguish the adenosine content in normal human urines and cancer patient urines, suggesting that this proposed assay will become a reliable and sensitive adenosine detection method in early clinical diagnosis and medical research.

  3. Biosynthesis of thiamine triphosphate and identification of thiamine diphosphate-binding proteins of rat liver hyaloplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Voskoboev, A.I.; Chernikevich, I.P.

    1986-03-10

    The nature of the proteins of rat liver hyaloplasm that bind ThDP* was studied. When injection of (/sup 14/C)thiamine was used as the marker, an electrophoretically homogeneous protein preparations, containing (/sup 14/C)ThDP, identified as transketolase, was isolated from the soluble fraction of the liver. No other nonenzymatic proteins that bind ThDP and might serve as the substrate in the synthesis of ThTP were detected in the hyaloplasm. It was shown that transfer of the phosphate group by rat liver ThDP kinase occurs to the free ThDP, and not to protein-bound ThDP, as was previously asserted.

  4. Adenosine (ADO) receptors in the PC12 phenochromocytoma cell line: characterization by radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.; Abreu, M.; Noronha-Blob, L.

    1986-03-01

    PC12 cells contain an ado-sensitive adenylate cyclase which is exclusively A-2 in nature. Binding of A-1 selective radioligands (Cyclohexylado; CHA and Cyclopentylado; CPA) to PC12 membranes is minimal and irreproducible. In contrast, the non-selective A-1/A-2 agonist NECA (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoado) binds with high affinity to two sites in adenosine-deaminase pretreated PC12 membranes. Using computerized curve fitting, the first site had a Kd value of 5.2 +/- 1.5 nM (mean +/- s.d.; n = 8) and an apparent Bmax of 205 fmoles/mg prot. Due to large increases in non-specific binding, the second site could not be resolved but had a Kd in the range of 1 ..mu..M. Pharmacological analysis of specific NECA binding (5 nM) gave the rank order activity profile: NECA < MECA = 2-CADO > CHA > R-PIA > CPA S-PIA > AMP = ADP = ATP. Binding was also xanthine sensitive with PACPX > 8-PT > 8-PST. The ratio of activity for the R and S diastereomers of PIA was 10, consistent with the labeling of A-2-type ado receptors in the PC12 cell line.

  5. (/sup 3/H)-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine binding to A1 adenosine receptors of intact rat ventricular myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, D.; Lohse, M.J.; Schwabe, U.

    1988-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was the identification of A1 adenosine receptors in intact rat ventricular myocytes, which are thought to mediate the negative inotropic effects of adenosine. The adenosine receptor antagonist (/sup 3/H)-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine was used as radioligand. Binding of the radioligand to intact myocytes was rapid, reversible, and saturable with a binding capacity of 40,000 binding sites per cell. The dissociation constant of the radioligand was 0.48 nM. The adenosine receptor antagonists 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, xanthine amine congener, and theophylline were competitive inhibitors with affinities in agreement with results obtained for A1 receptors in other tissues. Competition experiments using the adenosine receptor agonists R-N(6)-phenylisopropyladenosine, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, and S-N(6)-phenylisopropyladenosine gave monophasic displacement curves with Ki values of 50 nM, 440 nM, and 4,300 nM, which agreed well with the GTP-inducible low affinity state in cardiac membranes. The low affinity for agonists was not due to agonist-induced desensitization, and correlated well with the corresponding IC50 values for the inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation by isoprenaline. It is suggested that only a low affinity state of A1 receptors can be detected in intact rat myocytes due to the presence of high concentrations of guanine nucleotides in intact cells.

  6. Fragment Screening at Adenosine-A3 Receptors in Living Cells Using a Fluorescence-Based Binding Assay

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, Leigh A.; Vernall, Andrea J.; Denman, Jessica L.; Briddon, Stephen J.; Kellam, Barrie; Hill, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise the largest family of transmembrane proteins. For GPCR drug discovery, it is important that ligand affinity is determined in the correct cellular environment and preferably using an unmodified receptor. We developed a live cell high-content screening assay that uses a fluorescent antagonist, CA200645, to determine binding affinity constants of competing ligands at human adenosine-A1 and -A3 receptors. This method was validated as a tool to screen a library of low molecular weight fragments, and identified a hit with submicromolar binding affinity (KD). This fragment was structurally unrelated to substructures of known adenosine receptor antagonists and was optimized to show selectivity for the adenosine-A3 receptor. This technology represents a significant advance that will allow the determination of ligand and fragment affinities at receptors in their native membrane environment. PMID:22999879

  7. A simple, post-additional antioxidant capacity assay using adenosine triphosphate-stabilized 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical cation in a G-quadruplex DNAzyme catalyzed ABTS-H2O2 system.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shu-Min; Liu, Xiao-Fei; Kong, De-Ming; Shen, Han-Xi

    2012-05-15

    The scavenging of 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical cation (ABTS(+)) by antioxidants has been widely used in antioxidant capacity assay. Because of ABTS(+) disproportionation, however, this radical cannot be prepared on a large scale and stored long-term, making it unsuitable for high-throughput detection and screening of antioxidants. We developed a modified "post-additional" antioxidant capacity assay. This method possessed two remarkable features: First, instead of natural peroxidases, an artificial enzyme, G-quadruplex DNAzyme, was used for the preparation of ABTS(+), thus greatly reducing the cost of the assay, and eliminating the strict demand for the storage of enzymes. Second, an ABTS(+) stabilizer, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), was used. In the presence of ATP, the disproportionation of ABTS(+) was effectively inhibited, and the lifetime of this radical cation was prolonged about 6-fold (12 days versus 2 days), making the large-scale preparation of ABTS(+) possible. Utilizing this method, the antioxidant capacities of individual antioxidants and real samples can be quantified and compared easily. In addition, this method can be developed as a high-throughput screening method for antioxidants. The screening results could even be judged by the naked eye, eliminating the need for expensive instruments.

  8. Assessment of myocardial perfusion by harmonic power doppler imaging at rest and during adenosine triphosphate stress: comparison with coronary flow velocity reserve in the left anterior descending coronary arter.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Masaaki; Yoshitani, Hidetoshi; Miyazaki, Chinami; Otani, Shinichiro; Sakamoto, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2002-02-01

    To clarify whether the myocardial perfusion abnormalities observed on harmonic power Doppler imaging (HPDI) during hyperemia are related to a decrease in coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR), HPDI and CFVR were measured in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) territory of 75 patients. During continuous infusion of Levovist, dual-frame triggered apical 4-chamber views were obtained at rest and during adenosine triphosphate (ATP) infusion. The persistence of perfusion defects during ATP infusion or stress-induced defects in the LAD territory was defined as abnormal. Both HPDI and coronary flow velocity recordings of adequate quality were successfully obtained in 73 patients, and 37 patients showed abnormal myocardial perfusion. CFVR was significantly lower in patients with abnormal perfusion than in patients who had normal findings (1.38+/-0.38 vs 2.60+/-0.76, p<0.001). A CFVR less than 1.9 had a sensitivity of 89% (33/37) and a specificity of 89% (32/36) for predicting the presence of abnormal myocardial perfusion. This study demonstrates that myocardial perfusion abnormalities observed during HPDI using ATP stress are closely correlated to a decrease in CFVR and may reflect significant stenosis or microvascular damage in the LAD territory. PMID:11999642

  9. Mass spectrometry-based ligand binding assays on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Massink, A; Holzheimer, M; Hölscher, A; Louvel, J; Guo, D; Spijksma, G; Hankemeier, T; IJzerman, A P

    2015-12-01

    Conventional methods to measure ligand-receptor binding parameters typically require radiolabeled ligands as probes. Despite the robustness of radioligand binding assays, they carry inherent disadvantages in terms of safety precautions, expensive synthesis, special lab requirements, and waste disposal. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a method that can selectively detect ligands without the need of a label. The sensitivity of MS equipment increases progressively, and currently, it is possible to detect low ligand quantities that are usually found in ligand binding assays. We developed a label-free MS ligand binding (MS binding) assay on the adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors (A(1)AR and A(2A)AR), which are well-characterized members of the class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Radioligand binding assays for both receptors are well established, and ample data is available to compare and evaluate the performance of an MS binding assay. 1,3-Dipropyl-8-cyclopentyl-xanthine (DPCPX) and 4-(2-((7-amino-2-(furan-2-yl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]-[1,3,5]triazin-5-yl)amino)ethyl)phenol (ZM-241,385) are high-affinity ligands selective for the A(1)AR and A(2A)AR, respectively. To proof the feasibility of MS binding on the A(1)AR and A(2A)AR, we first developed an MS detection method for unlabeled DPCPX and ZM-241,385. To serve as internal standards, both compounds were also deuterium-labeled. Subsequently, we investigated whether the two unlabeled compounds could substitute for their radiolabeled counterparts as marker ligands in binding experiments, including saturation, displacement, dissociation, and competition association assays. Furthermore, we investigated the accuracy of these assays if the use of internal standards was excluded. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the MS binding assay, even in the absence of a deuterium-labeled internal standard, and provide great promise for the further development of label-free assays based on MS for other GPCRs. PMID

  10. Characterization of the binding of a novel nonxanthine adenosine antagonist radioligand, ( sup 3 H)CGS 15943, to multiple affinity states of the adenosine A1 receptor in the rat cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, M.F.; Williams, M.; Do, U.H.; Sills, M.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The triazoloquinazoline CGS 15943 is the first reported nonxanthine adenosine antagonist that has high affinity for brain adenosine receptors. In the present study, the binding of (3H) CGS 15943 to recognition sites in rat cortical membranes was characterized. Saturation experiments revealed that (3H)CGS 15943 labeled a single class of recognition sites with high affinity and limited capacity. Competition studies revealed that the binding of (3H)CGS 15943 was consistent with the labeling of brain adenosine A1 receptors. Adenosine agonists inhibited 1 nM (3H)CGS 15943 binding with the following order of activity N6-cyclopentyladenosine (IC50 = 15 nM) greater than 2-chloroadenosine greater than (R)-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than 5'-N6-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine greater than (S)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than CGS 21680 greater than CV 1808 (IC50 greater than 10,000 nM). The potency order for adenosine antagonists was CGS 15943 (IC50 = 5 nM) greater than 8-phenyltheophylline greater than 1,3-dipropyl-8-(4-amino-2-chloro)phenylxanthine greater than 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine greater than theophylline = caffeine (IC50 greater than 10,000 nM). Antagonist inhibition curves were steep and best described by a one-site binding model. In contrast, adenosine A1 agonist competition curves were shallow, as indicated by Hill coefficients less than unity. Computer analysis revealed that these inhibition curves were best described by a two-site binding model. Agonist competition curves generated in the presence of 1 mM GTP resulted in a rightward shift and steepening of the inhibition-concentration curves, whereas antagonist binding was not altered in the presence of GTP. The complex binding interactions found with adenosine agonists indicate that (3H)CGS 15943 labels both high and low affinity components of the adenosine A1 receptor in the rat cortex.

  11. The effects of saponin on the binding and functional properties of the human adenosine A1 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, F. R.; Lazareno, S.; Birdsall, N. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. Experiments with adenosine deaminase suggest that adenosine is present in membrane preparations from CHO cells bearing adenosine A1 receptors. 2. Pretreatment of the membranes (ca 0.6 mg protein ml-1) with the permeabilizing agent saponin (100 micrograms ml-1) or addition of saponin (10 micrograms ml-1) to the membranes (0.02-0.08 mg protein ml-1) in the assay, generates homogeneous low affinity agonist binding curves in the presence of GTP and an increased function, assessed by agonist stimulation of [35S]-GTP gamma S binding. The affinity constants for the binding of an agonist and an antagonist are not affected by this saponin treatment. Saponin facilitates the interaction of guanine nucleotides with receptor G-protein complexes, possibly by removing a permeability barrier to access of G-proteins by GTP. However, adenosine is still present in the binding assays after saponin treatment. 3. The agonist binding properties of the human A1 receptor have been characterized. In saponin pretreated membranes, 80-90% of the A1 receptors are capable of forming agonist-receptor-G protein complexes in the absence of GTP. These complexes have a 300-600 fold higher affinity than uncoupled receptors for N6-cyclohexyladenosine. 4. A very slow component is observed in the association and dissociation kinetics of the agonist [3H]-N6-cyclohexyladenosine ([3H]-CHA) and in the association but not dissociation kinetics of the antagonist [3H]-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine ([3H]-DPCPX). The slow association component of [3H]-DPCPX is essentially absent when incubations are carried out in the presence of GTP. The slow dissociation component of [3H]-CHA binding is rapidly disrupted by GTP. 5. It is hypothesized that long-lasting adenosine-receptor-G protein complexes are present in the CHO membrane preparations. The existence of these complexes, resistant to the action of adenosine deaminase but sensitive to GTP, may rationalize the observed kinetics and the increase in 3H

  12. Oral administration of amino acidic supplements improves protein and energy profiles in skeletal muscle of aged rats: elongation of functional performance and acceleration of mitochondrial recovery in adenosine triphosphate after exhaustive exertion.

    PubMed

    Chen Scarabelli, Carol; McCauley, Roy B; Yuan, Zhaokan; Di Rezze, Justin; Patel, David; Putt, Jeff; Raddino, Riccardo; Allebban, Zuhair; Abboud, John; Scarabelli, Gabriele M; Chilukuri, Karuna; Gardin, Julius; Saravolatz, Louis; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Scarabelli, Tiziano M

    2008-06-01

    Sarcopenia is an inevitable age-related degenerative process chiefly characterized by decreased synthesis of muscle proteins and impaired mitochondrial function, leading to progressive loss of muscle mass. Here, we sought to probe whether long-term administration of oral amino acids (AAs) can increase protein and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content in the gastrocnemius muscle of aged rats, enhancing functional performance. To this end, 6- and 24-month-old male Fisher 344 rats were divided into 3 groups: group A (6-month-old rats) and group B (24-month-old rats) were used as adult and senescent control group, respectively, while group C (24-month-old rats) was used as senescent treated group and underwent 1-month oral treatment with a mixture of mainly essential AAs. Untreated senescent animals exhibited a 30% reduction in total and fractional protein content, as well as a 50% reduction in ATP content and production, compared with adult control rats (p <0.001). Long-term supplementation with mixed AAs significantly improved protein and high-energy phosphate content, as well as the rate of mitochondrial ATP production, conforming their values to those of adult control animals (p <0.001). The improved availability of protein and high-energy substrates in the gastrocnemius muscle of treated aged rats paralleled a significant enhancement in functional performance assessed by swim test, with dramatic elongation of maximal exertion times compared with untreated senescent rats (p <0.001). In line with these findings, we observed that, after 6 hours of rest following exhaustive swimming, the recovery in mitochondrial ATP content was approximately 70% in adult control rats, approximately 60% in senescent control rats, and normalized in treated rats as compared with animals of the same age unexposed to maximal exertion (p <0.001). In conclusion, nutritional supplementation with oral AAs improved protein and energy profiles in the gastrocnemius of treated rats, enhancing

  13. Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Accumulation and beta-Adrenergic Binding in Unweighted and Denervated Rat Soleus Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Woolridge, Dale; Tischler, Marc E.

    1992-01-01

    Unweighting, but not denervation, of muscle reportedly "spares" insulin receptors, increasing insulin sensitivity. Unweighting also increases beta-adrenergic responses of carbohydrate metabolism. These differential characteristics were studied further by comparing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and beta-adrenergic binding in normal and 3-day unweighted or denervated soleus muscle. Submaximal amounts of isoproterenol, a p-agonist, increased cAMP accumulation in vitro and in vivo (by intramuscular (IM) injection) to a greater degree (P less than .05) in unweighted muscles. Forskolin or maximal isoproterenol had similar in vitro effects in all muscles, suggesting increased beta-adrenergic sensitivity following unweighting. Increased sensitivity was confirmed by a greater receptor density (B(sub max)) for iodo-125(-)-pindolol in particulate preparations of unweighted (420 x 10(exp -18) mol/mg muscle) than of control or denervated muscles (285 x 10(exp-18) mol/mg muscle). The three dissociation constant (Kd) values were similar (20.3 to 25.8 pmol/L). Total binding capacity (11.4 fmol/muscle) did not change during 3 days of unweighting, but diminished by 30% with denervation. This result illustrates the "sparing" and loss of receptors, respectively, in these two atrophy models. In diabetic animals, IM injection of insulin diminished CAMP accumulation in the presence of theophylline in unweighted muscle (-66% +/- 2%) more than in controls (-42% +'- 6%, P less than .001). These results show that insulin affects CAMP formation in muscle, and support a greater in vivo insulin response following unweighting atrophy. These various data support a role for lysosomal proteolysis in denervation, but not in unweighting, atrophy.

  14. Structural and functional insights into tRNA binding and adenosine N1-methylation by an archaeal Trm10 homologue

    PubMed Central

    Van Laer, Bart; Roovers, Martine; Wauters, Lina; Kasprzak, Joanna M.; Dyzma, Michal; Deyaert, Egon; Kumar Singh, Ranjan; Feller, André; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Droogmans, Louis; Versées, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Purine nucleosides on position 9 of eukaryal and archaeal tRNAs are frequently modified in vivo by the post-transcriptional addition of a methyl group on their N1 atom. The methyltransferase Trm10 is responsible for this modification in both these domains of life. While certain Trm10 orthologues specifically methylate either guanosine or adenosine at position 9 of tRNA, others have a dual specificity. Until now structural information about this enzyme family was only available for the catalytic SPOUT domain of Trm10 proteins that show specificity toward guanosine. Here, we present the first crystal structure of a full length Trm10 orthologue specific for adenosine, revealing next to the catalytic SPOUT domain also N- and C-terminal domains. This structure hence provides crucial insights in the tRNA binding mechanism of this unique monomeric family of SPOUT methyltransferases. Moreover, structural comparison of this adenosine-specific Trm10 orthologue with guanosine-specific Trm10 orthologues suggests that the N1 methylation of adenosine relies on additional catalytic residues. PMID:26673726

  15. Conservation of complete trimethylation of lysine-43 in the rotor ring of c-subunits of metazoan adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthases.

    PubMed

    Walpole, Thomas B; Palmer, David N; Jiang, Huibing; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2015-04-01

    The rotors of ATP synthases turn about 100 times every second. One essential component of the rotor is a ring of hydrophobic c-subunits in the membrane domain of the enzyme. The rotation of these c-rings is driven by a transmembrane proton-motive force, and they turn against a surface provided by another membrane protein, known as subunit a. Together, the rotating c-ring and the static subunit a provide a pathway for protons through the membrane in which the c-ring and subunit a are embedded. Vertebrate and invertebrate c-subunits are well conserved. In the structure of the bovine F1-ATPase-c-ring subcomplex, the 75 amino acid c-subunit is folded into two transmembrane α-helices linked by a short loop. Each bovine rotor-ring consists of eight c-subunits with the N- and C-terminal α-helices forming concentric inner and outer rings, with the loop regions exposed to the phospholipid head-group region on the matrix side of the inner membrane. Lysine-43 is in the loop region and its ε-amino group is completely trimethylated. The role of this modification is unknown. If the trimethylated lysine-43 plays some important role in the functioning, assembly or degradation of the c-ring, it would be expected to persist throughout vertebrates and possibly invertebrates also. Therefore, we have carried out a proteomic analysis of c-subunits across representative species from different classes of vertebrates and from invertebrate phyla. In the twenty-nine metazoan species that have been examined, the complete methylation of lysine-43 is conserved, and it is likely to be conserved throughout the more than two million extant metazoan species. In unicellular eukaryotes and prokaryotes, when the lysine is conserved it is unmethylated, and the stoichiometries of c-subunits vary from 9-15. One possible role for the trimethylated residue is to provide a site for the specific binding of cardiolipin, an essential component of ATP synthases in mitochondria.

  16. Conservation of Complete Trimethylation of Lysine-43 in the Rotor Ring of c-Subunits of Metazoan Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Synthases*

    PubMed Central

    Walpole, Thomas B.; Palmer, David N.; Jiang, Huibing; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M.; Walker, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The rotors of ATP synthases turn about 100 times every second. One essential component of the rotor is a ring of hydrophobic c-subunits in the membrane domain of the enzyme. The rotation of these c-rings is driven by a transmembrane proton-motive force, and they turn against a surface provided by another membrane protein, known as subunit a. Together, the rotating c-ring and the static subunit a provide a pathway for protons through the membrane in which the c-ring and subunit a are embedded. Vertebrate and invertebrate c-subunits are well conserved. In the structure of the bovine F1-ATPase-c-ring subcomplex, the 75 amino acid c-subunit is folded into two transmembrane α-helices linked by a short loop. Each bovine rotor-ring consists of eight c-subunits with the N- and C-terminal α-helices forming concentric inner and outer rings, with the loop regions exposed to the phospholipid head-group region on the matrix side of the inner membrane. Lysine-43 is in the loop region and its ε-amino group is completely trimethylated. The role of this modification is unknown. If the trimethylated lysine-43 plays some important role in the functioning, assembly or degradation of the c-ring, it would be expected to persist throughout vertebrates and possibly invertebrates also. Therefore, we have carried out a proteomic analysis of c-subunits across representative species from different classes of vertebrates and from invertebrate phyla. In the twenty-nine metazoan species that have been examined, the complete methylation of lysine-43 is conserved, and it is likely to be conserved throughout the more than two million extant metazoan species. In unicellular eukaryotes and prokaryotes, when the lysine is conserved it is unmethylated, and the stoichiometries of c-subunits vary from 9–15. One possible role for the trimethylated residue is to provide a site for the specific binding of cardiolipin, an essential component of ATP synthases in mitochondria. PMID:25608518

  17. A High-Affinity Adenosine Kinase from Anopheles Gambiae

    SciTech Connect

    M Cassera; M Ho; E Merino; E Burgos; A Rinaldo-Matthis; S Almo; V Schramm

    2011-12-31

    Genome analysis revealed a mosquito orthologue of adenosine kinase in Anopheles gambiae (AgAK; the most important vector for the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa). P. falciparum are purine auxotrophs and do not express an adenosine kinase but rely on their hosts for purines. AgAK was kinetically characterized and found to have the highest affinity for adenosine (K{sub m} = 8.1 nM) of any known adenosine kinase. AgAK is specific for adenosine at the nucleoside site, but several nucleotide triphosphate phosphoryl donors are tolerated. The AgAK crystal structure with a bound bisubstrate analogue Ap{sub 4}A (2.0 {angstrom} resolution) reveals interactions for adenosine and ATP and the geometry for phosphoryl transfer. The polyphosphate charge is partly neutralized by a bound Mg{sup 2+} ion and an ion pair to a catalytic site Arg. The AgAK structure consists of a large catalytic core in a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich, and a small cap domain in contact with adenosine. The specificity and tight binding for adenosine arise from hydrogen bond interactions of Asn14, Leu16, Leu40, Leu133, Leu168, Phe168, and Thr171 and the backbone of Ile39 and Phe168 with the adenine ring as well as through hydrogen bond interactions between Asp18, Gly64, and Asn68 and the ribosyl 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups. The structure is more similar to that of human adenosine kinase (48% identical) than to that of AK from Toxoplasma gondii (31% identical). With this extraordinary affinity for AgAK, adenosine is efficiently captured and converted to AMP at near the diffusion limit, suggesting an important role for this enzyme in the maintenance of the adenine nucleotide pool. mRNA analysis verifies that AgAK transcripts are produced in the adult insects.

  18. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of purified A2a adenosine receptors in human platelet membranes by [3H]-CGS 21680 binding.

    PubMed Central

    Varani, K.; Gessi, S.; Dalpiaz, A.; Borea, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. The binding properties of human platelet A2a adenosine receptors, assayed with the A2a-selective agonist, [3H]-2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoad enosine ([3H]-CGS 21680), are masked by a non-receptorial component, the adenotin site. In order to separate A2a receptors from adenotin sites, human platelet membranes were solubilized with 1% 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethyl-ammonio]-1-propanesulphonate (CHAPS). The soluble platelet extract was precipitated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and the fraction enriched in adenosine receptors was isolated from the precipitate by differential centrifugation. 2. The present paper describes the binding characteristics of the selective A2a agonist, [3H]-CGS 21680, to this purified platelet membrane preparation. In addition, receptor affinity and potency of several adenosine agonists and antagonists were determined in binding and adenylyl cyclase studies. 3. Saturation experiments revealed a single class of binding site with Kd and Bmax values of 285 nM and 2.07 pmol mg-1 of protein respectively. Adenosine receptor ligands competed for the binding of 50 nM [3H]-CGS 21680 to purified protein, showing a rank order of potency consistent with that typically found for interactions with the A2a adenosine receptors. In the adenylyl cyclase assay the compounds examined exhibited a rank order of potency very close to that observed in binding experiments. 4. Thermodynamic data indicated that [3H]-CGS 21680 binding to the purified receptor is totally entropy-driven in agreement with results obtained in rat striatal A2a adenosine receptors. 5. It is concluded that in the purified platelet membranes there is a CGS 21680 binding site showing the characteristic properties of the A2a receptor. This makes it possible to use this compound for reliable radioligand binding studies on the A2a adenosine receptor of human platelets. PMID:8732278

  19. NMR investigation of the binding between human profilin I and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate, the soluble headgroup of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate.

    PubMed

    Richer, Sarah M; Stewart, Nichole K; Tomaszewski, John W; Stone, Martin J; Oakley, Martha G

    2008-12-23

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P(2)) is involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton through interactions with a number of actin-binding proteins. We present here NMR titration experiments that monitor the interaction between the cytoskeletal protein profilin and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3)), the headgroup of PI(4,5)P(2). These experiments probe the interaction directly, at equilibrium, and with profilin in its native state. We show the binding between profilin and IP(3) can readily be observed at high concentrations, even though profilin does not bind to IP(3) under physiological conditions. Moreover, the titration data using wild-type profilin and an R88L mutant support the existence of at least three headgroup binding sites on profilin, consistent with previous experimentation with intact PI(4,5)P(2). This work suggests that various soluble inositol ligands can serve as effective probes to facilitate in vitro studies of PI-binding proteins that require membrane surfaces for high-affinity binding.

  20. Bound adenosine 5'-triphosphate formation, bound adenosine 5'-diphosphate and inorganic phosphate retention, and inorganic phosphate oxygen exchange by chloroplast adenosinetriphosphatase in the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+.

    PubMed

    Wu, D; Boyer, P D

    1986-06-01

    When the heat-activated chloroplast F1 ATPase hydrolyzes [3H, gamma-32P]ATP, followed by the removal of medium ATP, ADP, and Pi, the enzyme has labeled ATP, ADP, and Pi bound to it in about equal amounts. The total of the bound [3H]ADP and [3H]ATP approaches 1 mol/mol of enzyme. Over a 30-min period, most of the bound [32P]Pi falls off, and the bound [3H]ATP is converted to bound [3H]ADP. Enzyme with such remaining tightly bound ADP will form bound ATP from relatively high concentrations of medium Pi with either Mg2+ or Ca2+ present. The tightly bound ADP is thus at a site that retains a catalytic capacity for slow single-site ATP hydrolysis (or synthesis) and is likely the site that participates in cooperative rapid net ATP hydrolysis. During hydrolysis of 50 microM [3H]ATP in the presence of either Mg2+ or Ca2+, the enzyme has a steady-state level of about one bound [3H]ADP per mole of enzyme. Because bound [3H]ATP is also present, the [3H]ADP is regarded as being present on two cooperating catalytic sites. The formation and levels of bound ATP, ADP, and Pi show that reversal of bound ATP hydrolysis can occur with either Ca2+ or Mg2+ present. They do not reveal why no phosphate oxygen exchange accompanies cleavage of low ATP concentrations with Ca2+ in contrast to Mg2+ with the heat-activated enzyme. Phosphate oxygen exchange does occur with either Mg2+ or Ca2+ present when low ATP concentrations are hydrolyzed with the octyl glucoside activated ATPase. Ligand binding properties of Ca2+ at the catalytic site rather than lack of reversible cleavage of bound ATP may underlie lack of oxygen exchange under some conditions. PMID:2873834

  1. Purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, G C; Schmalstieg, F C; Trimmer, K B; Goldman, A S; Goldblum, R M

    1976-01-01

    Purine and pyrimidine metabolites were measured in erythrocytes, plasma, and urine of a 5-month-old infant with adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) deficiency. Adenosine and adenine were measured using newly devised ion exchange separation techniques and a sensitive fluorescence assay. Plasma adenosine levels were increased, whereas adenosine was normal in erythrocytes and not detectable in urine. Increased amounts of adenine were found in erythrocytes and urine as well as in the plasma. Erythrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate concentrations were normal, but adenosine triphosphate content was greatly elevated. Because of the possibility of pyrimidine starvation, pyrimidine nucleotides (pyrimidine coenzymes) in erythrocytes and orotic acid in urine were measured. Pyrimidine nucleotide concentrations were normal, while orotic acid was not detected. These studies suggest that the immune deficiency associated with adenosine deaminase deficiency may be related to increased amounts of adenine, adenosine, or adenine nucleotides. PMID:1066699

  2. Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor-binding protein released with inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IRBIT) associates with components of the mRNA 3' processing machinery in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and inhibits polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Hélène; Mizutani, Akihiro; Iemura, Shun-Ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Ando, Hideaki; Kuroda, Yukiko; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2009-04-17

    IRBIT is a recently identified protein that modulates the activities of both inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor and pancreas-type Na(+)/HCO(3)(-) cotransporter 1, and the multisite phosphorylation of IRBIT is required for achieving this modulatory action. Here, we report the identification of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF), which is a multi-protein complex involved in 3' processing of mRNA precursors, as an additional binding partner for IRBIT. We found that IRBIT interacted with CPSF and was recruited to an exogenous polyadenylation signal-containing RNA. The main target for IRBIT in CPSF was Fip1 subunit, and the phosphorylation of the serine-rich region of IRBIT was required both for direct association with Fip1 in vitro and for redistribution of Fip1 into the cytoplasm of intact cells. Furthermore, tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), an agent that induces oxidative stress, increased the phosphorylation level of IRBIT in vivo and in parallel enhanced the interaction between IRBIT and CPSF and promoted the cytoplasmic distribution of endogenous Fip1. In addition to CPSF, IRBIT interacted in vitro with poly(A) polymerase (PAP), which is the enzyme recruited by CPSF to elongate the poly(A) tail, and inhibited PAP activity in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. These findings raise the possibility that IRBIT modulates the polyadenylation state of specific mRNAs, both by controlling the cytoplasmic/nuclear partitioning of Fip1 and by inhibiting PAP activity, in response to a stimulus that alters its phosphorylation state.

  3. Molecular mechanism of allosteric modulation at GPCRs: insight from a binding kinetics study at the human A1 adenosine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Venhorst, Suzanne N; Massink, Arnault; van Veldhoven, Jacobus P D; Vauquelin, Georges; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many GPCRs can be allosterically modulated by small-molecule ligands. This modulation is best understood in terms of the kinetics of the ligand–receptor interaction. However, many current kinetic assays require at least the (radio)labelling of the orthosteric ligand, which is impractical for studying a range of ligands. Here, we describe the application of a so-called competition association assay at the adenosine A1 receptor for this purpose. Experimental Approach We used a competition association assay to examine the binding kinetics of several unlabelled orthosteric agonists of the A1 receptor in the absence or presence of two allosteric modulators. We also tested three bitopic ligands, in which an orthosteric and an allosteric pharmacophore were covalently linked with different spacer lengths. The relevance of the competition association assay for the binding kinetics of the bitopic ligands was also explored by analysing simulated data. Key Results The binding kinetics of an unlabelled orthosteric ligand were affected by the addition of an allosteric modulator and such effects were probe- and concentration-dependent. Covalently linking the orthosteric and allosteric pharmacophores into one bitopic molecule had a substantial effect on the overall on- or off-rate. Conclusion and Implications The competition association assay is a useful tool for exploring the allosteric modulation of the human adenosine A1 receptor. This assay may have general applicability to study allosteric modulation at other GPCRs as well. PMID:25040887

  4. A label-free fluorescent molecular beacon based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters for detection of adenosine and adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Guo, Su-Miao; Li, Ying-Ru; Zuo, Peng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2012-06-01

    A simple and reliable fluorescent molecular beacon is developed utilizing DNA-templated silver nanoclusters as a signal indicator and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine deaminase as mechanical activators.

  5. Study of the nucleotide binding site of the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe plasma membrane H+-ATPase using formycin triphosphate-terbium complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ronjat, M.; Lacapere, J.J.; Dufour, J.P.; Dupont, Y.

    1987-03-05

    The plasma membrane of yeasts contains an H+-ATPase similar to the other cation transport ATPases of eukaryotic organisms. This enzyme has been purified and shows H+ transport in reconstituted vesicles. In the presence of Mg2+, formycin triphosphate (FTP) is hydrolyzed by the H+-ATPase and supports H+ transport. When combined with terbium ion, FTP (Tb-FTP) and ATP (Tb-ATP) are no longer hydrolyzed. Competition between Mg-ATP and Tb-FTP for ATP hydrolysis indicates that terbium-associated nucleotides bind to the catalytic site of the H+-ATPase. The fluorescent properties of the Tb-FTP complex were used to study the active site of the H+-ATPase. Fluorescence of Tb-FTP is greatly enhanced upon binding into the nucleotide site of H+-ATPase with a dissociation constant of 1 microM. Tb-ATP, Tb-ADP, and Tb-ITP are competitive inhibitors of Tb-FTP binding with Ki = 4.5, 5.0, and 6.0 microM, respectively. Binding of Tb-FTP is observed only in the presence of an excess of Tb3+ with an activation constant Ka = 25 microM for Tb3+. Analysis of the data reveals that the sites for Tb-FTP and Tb3+ binding are independent entities. In standard conditions these sites would be occupied by Mg-ATP and Mg2+, respectively. These findings suggest an important regulatory role of divalent cations on the activity of H+-ATPase. Replacement of H/sub 2/O by D/sub 2/O in the medium suggests the existence of two types of nucleotide binding sites differing by the hydration state of the Tb3+ ion in the bound Tb-FTP complex.

  6. Purification and characterization of (-)(/sup 125/I)hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine, an adenosine R-site agonist radioligand and theoretical analysis of mixed stereoisomer radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, J.

    1984-11-01

    (-)-N6-(R-4-Hydroxyphenylisopropyl)adenosine (HPIA) was iodinated with NaI and trace /sup 125/I. Mono- and diiodinated reaction products and the starting material were separated by high pressure liquid chromatography and the structures of the reaction products were verified by NMR. (-)-N6-(R-Phenylisopropyl)adenosine (PIA), IHPIA, and I2HPIA decreased rat atrial contractility with ED50 values of 24, 28, and 33 nM, respectively. The contractile effects of these compounds were competitively blocked by theophylline (KI . 7.9 microM), but were not affected by adenosine deaminase. IHPIA also inhibited (-)isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in adipocytes with an ED50 (10 nM) and to an extent (83%) nearly identical to PIA. (/sup 125/I)HPIA prepared using carrier-free /sup 125/I bound to adenosine receptors on membranes from rat cerebral cortex, adipocyte ghosts, and heart ventricles. Binding was inhibited stereospecifically by PIA and by other adenosine analogues and alkylxanthines. The KD of (/sup 125/I)HPIA determined kinetically using brain membranes at 21 degrees was 0.94 nM in good agreement with the equilibrium determination of 1.94 nM. The density of adenosine receptors in brain membranes was found to be 871 fmol/mg of protein. When normalized to protein, the density of receptors in heart membranes and adipocyte ghosts, respectively, was found to be 39- and 2.3-fold less than in brain membranes. It was concluded that (/sup 125/I)HPIA can be rapidly synthesized and purified, binds to adenosine R-sites and is an agonist radioligand resistant to adenosine deaminase. Computer modeling of the equilibrium binding resulting from the use of mixed stereoisomers of a radioligand indicates that the combined use of (-)(/sup 125/I)HPIA and (+)(/sup 125/I)HPIA would result in the generation of nonlinear Scatchard plots.

  7. 28 kDa adenosine-binding proteins of brain and other tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Ravid, K; Rosenthal, R A; Doctrow, S R; Lowenstein, J M

    1989-01-01

    Membranes prepared from calf brain were solubilized and chromatographed on a column containing 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine covalently linked to agarose through the 5'-amino group. When the column was eluted with adenosine, a pure protein emerged with subunit molecular mass of 28 kDa. The protein was extracted from the membranes with sodium cholate, but not with 100 microM-adenosine or 0.5 M-NaCl. A similar 28 kDa protein was isolated from the soluble fraction of calf brain. The yield of membrane-bound and soluble 28 kDa protein per gram of tissue was about the same. The 28 kDa protein was also found in membrane and soluble fractions of rabbit heart, rat liver and vascular smooth muscle from calf aorta. The yield per gram of tissue fell into the order brain greater than heart approximately vascular smooth muscle greater than liver for the 28 kDa protein from the membrane fraction, and brain approximately heart greater than vascular smooth muscle greater than liver for the 28 kDa protein from the soluble fraction. Polyclonal antibodies to pure 28 kDa protein from calf brain membranes cross-reacted with the 28 kDa protein from calf brain soluble fraction and with 28 kDa proteins isolated from other tissues. The 28 kDa protein from calf brain membranes was also eluted from the affinity column by AMP and 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, but at a concentration higher than that at which adenosine eluted the protein, but N6-(R-phenylisopropyl)adenosine, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, ADP, ATP, GTP, NAD+, cyclic AMP and inosine failed to elute the protein at concentrations up to 1 mM. The 28 kDa protein from the soluble fraction was not eluted by 3 mM-AMP or 1 mM-N6-(R-phenylisopropyl)adenosine,-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine or -cyclic AMP. Unexpectedly, the soluble 28 kDa protein was eluted by AMP in the presence of sodium cholate. Soluble 28 kDa protein from calf brain had a KD for adenosine of 12 microM. Membrane 28 kDa protein from calf brain had a KD of 14 microM in the

  8. mu-Opioid receptor-stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(gamma-thio)-triphosphate binding in rat thalamus and cultured cell lines: signal transduction mechanisms underlying agonist efficacy.

    PubMed

    Selley, D E; Sim, L J; Xiao, R; Liu, Q; Childers, S R

    1997-01-01

    G protein activation by different mu-selective opioid agonists was examined in rat thalamus, SK-N-SH cells, and mu-opioid receptor-transfected mMOR-CHO cells using agonist-stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(gamma-thio)-triphosphate ([35S]GTP gamma S) binding to membranes in the presence of excess GDP. [D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly5-ol]Enkephalin (DAMGO) was the most efficacious agonist in rat thalamus and SK-N-SH cells, followed by (in rank order) fentanyl = morphine > > buprenorphine. In mMOR-CHO cells expressing a high density of mu receptors, no differences were observed among DAMGO, morphine or fentanyl, but these agonists were more efficacious than buprenorphine, which was more efficacious than levallorphan. In all three systems, efficacy differences were magnified by increasing GDP concentrations, indicating that the activity state of G proteins can affect agonist efficacy. Scatchard analysis of net agon stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding revealed two major components responsible for agonist efficacy differences. First, differences in the KD values of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding between high efficacy agonists (DAMGO, fentanyl, and morphine) and classic partial agonists (buprenorphine and levallorphan) were observed in all three systems. Second, differences in the Bmax value of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding were observed between DAMGO and morphine or fentanyl in rat thalamus and SK-N-SH cells and between the high efficacy agonists and buprenorphine or levallorphan in all three systems. These results suggest that mu-opioid agonist efficacy is determined by the magnitude of the receptor-mediated affinity shift in the binding of GTP (or[35S]GTP gamma S) versus GDP to the G protein and by the number of G proteins activated per occupied receptor.

  9. Novel fluorescent antagonist as a molecular probe in A(3) adenosine receptor binding assays using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Eszter; Kumar, T Santhosh; Federico, Stephanie; Phan, Khai; Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2012-06-01

    The physiological role of the A(3) adenosine receptor (AR) was explored in cardiac ischaemia, inflammatory diseases and cancer. We report a new fluorophore-conjugated human (h) A(3)AR antagonist for application to cell-based assays in ligand discovery and for receptor imaging. Fluorescent pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-ylamine (pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine, PTP) and triazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-yl)amine (triazolo-quinazoline, TQ) AR antagonists were compared. A chain-extended and click-conjugated Alexa Fluor-488 TQ derivative (MRS5449) displayed a radioligand binding K(i) value of 6.4±2.5nM in hA(3)AR-expressing CHO cell membranes. MRS5449 antagonized hA(3)AR agonist-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner (K(B)=4.8nM). Using flow cytometry (FCM), MRS5449 saturated hA(3)ARs with very high specific-to-nonspecific binding ratio with an equilibrium binding constant 5.15nM, comparable to the K(d) value of 6.65nM calculated from kinetic experiments. K(i) values of known AR antagonists in inhibition of MRS5449 binding in whole cell FCM were consistent with radioligand binding in membranes, but agonist binding was 5-20 fold weaker than obtained with agonist radioligand [(125)I]I-AB-MECA. Further binding analysis of MRS5549 suggested multiple agonist binding states of the A(3)AR. Molecular docking predicted binding modes of these fluorescent antagonists. Thus, MRS5449 is a useful tool for hA(3)AR characterization.

  10. Novel Fluorescent Antagonist as a Molecular Probe in A3 Adenosine Receptor Binding Assays Using Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, Eszter; Kumar, T. Santhosh; Federico, Stephanie; Phan, Khai; Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The physiological role of the A3 adenosine receptor (AR) was explored in cardiac ischaemia, inflammatory diseases and cancer. We report a new fluorophore-conjugated human (h) A3AR antagonist for application to cell-based assays in ligand discovery and for receptor imaging. Fluorescent pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-ylamine (pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine, PTP) and triazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-yl)amine (triazolo-quinazoline, TQ) AR antagonists were compared. A chain-extended and click-conjugated Alexa Fluor-488 TQ derivative (MRS5449) displayed a radioligand binding Ki value of 6.4 ± 2.5 nM in hA3AR-expressing CHO cell membranes. MRS5449 antagonized hA3AR agonist-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner (KB 4.8 nM). Using flow cytometry (FCM), MRS5449 saturated hA3ARs with very high specific-to-nonspecific binding ratio with an equilibrium binding constant 5.15 nM, comparable to the Kd value of 6.65 nM calculated from kinetic experiments. Ki values of known AR antagonists in inhibition of MRS5449 binding in whole cell FCM were consistent with radioligand binding in membranes, but agonist binding was 5–20 fold weaker than obtained with agonist radioligand [125I]I-AB-MECA. Further binding analysis of MRS5549 suggested multiple agonist binding states of the A3AR. Molecular docking predicted binding modes of these fluorescent antagonists. Thus, MRS5449 is a useful tool for hA3AR characterization. PMID:22402302

  11. Adenosine receptor binding of the A1-selective antagonist (/sup 3/H)PD 116,948

    SciTech Connect

    Fergus, J.H.; Bruns, R.F.; Badger, E.W.; Bristol, J.A.; Hartman, J.D.; Santay, L.A.; Hays, S.J.; Huang, C.C.

    1986-03-05

    PD 116,948 (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine) is a potent adenosine (ado) antagonist which is highly selective for the A1 subtype of ado receptor, with an IC50 of 0.8 nM in (/sup 3/H)CHA binding to A1 receptors and 500 nM in (/sup 3/H)NECA binding to A2 receptors. (/sup 3/H)PD 116,948 (117 Ci/mmol) was prepared by reduction of the diallyl analog, and binding was performed at 25/sup 0/C in 2 ml of 50 mM Tris pH 7.7 for 60 min using membranes from 10 mg wet weight of rat whole brain, with 100 ..mu..M N/sup 6/-cyclopentylado used to define nonspecific binding. Under these conditions, (/sup 3/H)PD 116,948 bound to a single site with a K/sub d/ of 0.4 nM and a B/sub max/ of 46 pmol/g wet weight. Under optimal conditions, more than 99% of the binding of (/sup 3/H)PD 116,948 was specific. Affinities of ado agonists and antagonists versus 0.1 nM (/sup 3/H)PD 116,948 were highly consistent with binding to an A1 ado receptor. Substantial amounts of specific binding of (/sup 3/H)PD 116,948 were detected in testes and spleen, and smaller amounts were found in heart. (/sup 3/H)PD 116,948 should be a useful tool for labeling A1 receptors in the brain and other organs.

  12. Two saturable recognition sites for (-) (125I)iodo-N6-(4-hydroxyphenyl-isopropyl)-adenosine binding on purified cardiac sarcolemma

    SciTech Connect

    Hausleithner, V.; Freissmuth, M.; Schuetz, W.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of (-) (125)iodo-N6-(4-hydroxyphenylisopropyl)-adenosine (( /sup 125/I)HPIA) binding to purified sarcolemmal preparations of guinea pig and bovine hearts revealed two classes of binding sites when unlabeled iodo-HPIA (100 mumol/l) was used as non-specific binding marker. In the presence of 1 mmol/l theophylline, however, only the high affinity component was detected. Adenosine receptor agonists caused biphasic displacement of (/sup 125/I)HPIA binding, with a high affinity potency rank order typical of interaction with A1-adenosine receptors. Biphasic competition curves were also observed with 8-phenyltheophylline and isobutylmethylxanthine, whereas the theophylline curve was monophasic up to 1 mmol/l. In brain membranes, specific binding of (/sup 125/I)HPIA as well as of (/sup 3/H)PIA was further reduced when unlabeled iodo-HPIA replaces theophylline as the non-specific binding marker. These results suggest the presence of two (/sup 125/I)HPIA binding sites on cardiac sarcolemma and brain membranes, but receptor function can only be ascribed to the high affinity sites. The low affinity site probably represents an artefact, which is often observed when non-specific binding is defined with the unlabeled counterpart or a structurally related ligand of the radioligand used.

  13. Fluorescence study of binding of adenosine derivatives to phospholipid membranes — effect of serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, Anna; Kłoczko, Magdalena; Sułkowski, Wiesław

    2001-05-01

    To increase stability against serum albumin and to minimize permeability increases caused by interaction with serum albumin, two types of liposomes consisting of various molar ratio lecithin/cholesterol were prepared. The adenosine derivatives were encapsulated in liposome vesicles of two sizes: 100 and 450 nm, prepared by modified reverse-phase evaporation method. The dependence of the stability of liposomes on the presence of serum albumin was studied by use of spectrofluorimetric technique. In the presence of serum albumin the studied ligands encapsulated into various types of liposome vesicles were released and this resulted in a decrease in the fluorescence spectrum of serum albumin in the region of tryptophan emission. Increase in the cholesterol content of the liposomes resulted in decreased leakage of the entrapped drugs, the effect of liposome size on leakage being less important.

  14. Small molecule inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) binding to pleckstrin homology domains

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Benchun; Skidan, Igor; Yang, Jinsheng; Lugovskoy, Alexey; Reibarkh, Mikhail; Long, Kai; Brazell, Tres; Durugkar, Kulbhushan A.; Maki, Jenny; Ramana, C. V.; Schaffhausen, Brian; Wagner, Gerhard; Torchilin, Vladimir; Yuan, Junying; Degterev, Alexei

    2010-01-01

    The PI3-kinase (PI3K) pathway regulates many cellular processes, especially cell metabolism, cell survival, and apoptosis. Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3), the product of PI3K activity and a key signaling molecule, acts by recruiting pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain-containing proteins to cell membranes. Here, we describe a new structural class of nonphosphoinositide small molecule antagonists (PITenins, PITs) of PIP3–PH domain interactions (IC50 ranges from 13.4 to 31 μM in PIP3/Akt PH domain binding assay). PITs inhibit interactions of a number of PIP3-binding PH domains, including those of Akt and PDK1, without affecting several PIP2-selective PH domains. As a result, PITs suppress the PI3K-PDK1-Akt pathway and trigger metabolic stress and apoptosis. A PIT-1 analog displayed significant antitumor activity in vivo, including inhibition of tumor growth and induction of apoptosis. Overall, our studies demonstrate the feasibility of developing specific small molecule antagonists of PIP3 signaling. PMID:21041639

  15. 5'-Substituted Amiloride Derivatives as Allosteric Modulators Binding in the Sodium Ion Pocket of the Adenosine A2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Massink, Arnault; Louvel, Julien; Adlere, Ilze; van Veen, Corine; Huisman, Berend J H; Dijksteel, Gabrielle S; Guo, Dong; Lenselink, Eelke B; Buckley, Benjamin J; Matthews, Hayden; Ranson, Marie; Kelso, Michael; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-05-26

    The sodium ion site is an allosteric site conserved among many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Amiloride 1 and 5-(N,N-hexamethylene)amiloride 2 (HMA) supposedly bind in this sodium ion site and can influence orthosteric ligand binding. The availability of a high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the human adenosine A2A receptor (hA2AAR), in which the allosteric sodium ion site was elucidated, makes it an appropriate model receptor for investigating the allosteric site. In this study, we report the synthesis and evaluation of novel 5'-substituted amiloride derivatives as hA2AAR allosteric antagonists. The potency of the amiloride derivatives was assessed by their ability to displace orthosteric radioligand [(3)H]4-(2-((7-amino-2-(furan-2-yl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]-[1,3,5]triazin-5-yl)amino)ethyl)phenol ([(3)H]ZM-241,385) from both the wild-type and sodium ion site W246A mutant hA2AAR. 4-Ethoxyphenethyl-substituted amiloride 12l was found to be more potent than both amiloride and HMA, and the shift in potency between the wild-type and mutated receptor confirmed its likely binding to the sodium ion site. PMID:27124340

  16. Binding of the Antagonist Caffeine to the Human Adenosine Receptor hA2AR in Nearly Physiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruyin; Rossetti, Giulia; Bauer, Andreas; CarIoni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Lipid composition may significantly affect membrane proteins function, yet its impact on the protein structural determinants is not well understood. Here we present a comparative molecular dynamics (MD) study of the human adenosine receptor type 2A (hA(2A)R) in complex with caffeine--a system of high neuro-pharmacological relevance--within different membrane types. These are POPC, mixed POPC/POPE and cholesterol-rich membranes. 0.8-μs MD simulations unambiguously show that the helical folding of the amphipathic helix 8 depends on membrane contents. Most importantly, the distinct cholesterol binding into the cleft between helix 1 and 2 stabilizes a specific caffeine-binding pose against others visited during the simulation. Hence, cholesterol presence (~33%-50% in synaptic membrane in central nervous system), often neglected in X-ray determination of membrane proteins, affects the population of the ligand binding poses. We conclude that including a correct description of neuronal membranes may be very important for computer-aided design of ligands targeting hA(2A)R and possibly other GPCRs. PMID:25992797

  17. Inhibition of Influenza Virus Ribonucleic Acid Polymerase by Ribavirin Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Bertil; Helgstrand, Erik; Johansson, Nils Gunnar; Larsson, Alf; Misiorny, Alfons; Noren, Jan Olof; Philipson, Lennart; Stenberg, Kjell; Stening, Goran; Stridh, Stig; Öberg, Bo

    1977-01-01

    Ribavirin 5′-triphosphate (RTP), derived from the broad-spectrum antiviral compound ribavirin (Virazole), can selectively inhibit influenza virus ribonucleic acid polymerase in a cell-free assay. Ribavirin and its 5′-monophosphate have no effect on the polymerase. The inhibition is competitive with respect to adenosine 5′-triphosphate and guanosine 5′-triphosphate. RTP also inhibits ApG- and GpC-stimulated influenza virus ribonucleic acid polymerase. Since ribavirin is phosphorylated in the cell, the inhibition of influenza multiplication in the cell may also be caused by RTP. PMID:879760

  18. The CDM superfamily protein MBC directs myoblast fusion through a mechanism that requires phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate binding but is independent of direct interaction with DCrk.

    PubMed

    Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Chen, Mei-Hui; Geisbrecht, Erika R; Abmayr, Susan M

    2006-12-01

    Myoblast city (mbc), a member of the CDM superfamily, is essential in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo for fusion of myoblasts into multinucleate fibers. Using germ line clones in which both maternal and zygotic contributions were eliminated and rescue of the zygotic loss-of-function phenotype, we established that mbc is required in the fusion-competent subset of myoblasts. Along with its close orthologs Dock180 and CED-5, MBC has an SH3 domain at its N terminus, conserved internal domains termed DHR1 and DHR2 (or "Docker"), and C-terminal proline-rich domains that associate with the adapter protein DCrk. The importance of these domains has been evaluated by the ability of MBC mutations and deletions to rescue the mbc loss-of-function muscle phenotype. We demonstrate that the SH3 and Docker domains are essential. Moreover, ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutations that change amino acids within the MBC Docker domain to residues that are conserved in other CDM family members nevertheless eliminate MBC function in the embryo, which suggests that these sites may mediate interactions specific to Drosophila MBC. A functional requirement for the conserved DHR1 domain, which binds to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate, implicates phosphoinositide signaling in myoblast fusion. Finally, the proline-rich C-terminal sites mediate strong interactions with DCrk, as expected. These sites are not required for MBC to rescue the muscle loss-of-function phenotype, however, which suggests that MBC's role in myoblast fusion can be carried out independently of direct DCrk binding.

  19. Colorimetric sensor for triphosphates and their application as a viable staining agent for prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amrita; Shrivastav, Anupama; Jose, D Amilan; Mishra, Sanjiv K; Chandrakanth, C K; Mishra, Sandhya; Das, Amitava

    2008-07-15

    The chromogenic complex 1 x Zn (where 1 is (E)-4-(4-dimethylamino-phenylazo)-N,N-bispyridin-2-ylmethyl-benzenesulfonamide) showed high affinity toward the phosphate ion in tetrabutylammonium phosphate in acetonitrile solution and could preferentially bind to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in aqueous solution at physiological pH. This binding caused a visual change in color, whereas no such change was noticed with other related anions (adenosine monophosphate, adenosine diphosphate, pyrophosphate, and phosphate) of biological significance. Thus, 1 x Zn could be used as a staining agent for different biological cells through binding to the ATP, generated in situ by the mitochondria (in eukaryotes). For prokaryotes (bacteria) the cell membrane takes care of the cells' energy conversion, since they lack mitochondria. ATP is produced in their unique cell structure on the cell membrane, which is not found in any eukaryotes. These stained cells could be viewed with normal light microscopy. This reagent could even be used for distinguishing the gram-positive and the gram-negative bacteria (prokaryotes). This dye was found to be nonlipophilic in nature and nontoxic to living microbes (eukaryotes and prokaryotes). Further, stained cells were found to grow in their respective media, and this confirmed the maintenance of viability of the microbes even after staining, unlike with many other dyes available commercially.

  20. A one-pot synthesis of α-l-threofuranosyl nucleoside triphosphates (tNTPs).

    PubMed

    Sau, Sujay P; Chaput, John C

    2016-07-15

    TNA (α-l-threofuranosyl nucleoside) triphosphates of adenosine (tATP), guanosine (tGTP), cytidine (tCTP), and thymidine (tTTP) were synthesized from their corresponding 3'-O-phosphoramidite derivatives using a novel one-pot reaction that is less moisture sensitive than traditional methods. The chemically synthesized tNTPs, despite containing an unnatural 3'-triphosphate moiety, are similar in thermal stability to natural nucleotide triphosphates. PMID:27246616

  1. A one-pot synthesis of α-l-threofuranosyl nucleoside triphosphates (tNTPs).

    PubMed

    Sau, Sujay P; Chaput, John C

    2016-07-15

    TNA (α-l-threofuranosyl nucleoside) triphosphates of adenosine (tATP), guanosine (tGTP), cytidine (tCTP), and thymidine (tTTP) were synthesized from their corresponding 3'-O-phosphoramidite derivatives using a novel one-pot reaction that is less moisture sensitive than traditional methods. The chemically synthesized tNTPs, despite containing an unnatural 3'-triphosphate moiety, are similar in thermal stability to natural nucleotide triphosphates.

  2. Characterization of the adenosine receptor in cultured embryonic chick atrial myocytes: Coupling to modulation of contractility and adenylate cyclase activity and identification by direct radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, B.T.

    1989-06-01

    Adenosine receptors in a spontaneously contracting atrial myocyte culture from 14-day chick embryos were characterized by radioligand binding studies and by examining the involvement of G-protein in coupling these receptors to a high-affinity state and to the adenylate cyclase and the myocyte contractility. Binding of the antagonist radioligand (3H)-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-diproylxanthine ((3H)CPX) was rapid, reversible and saturable and was to a homogeneous population of sites with a Kd value of 2.1 +/- 0.2 nM and an apparent maximum binding of 26.2 +/- 3 fmol/mg of protein (n = 10, +/- S.E.). Guanyl-5-yl-(beta, gamma-imido)diphosphate had no effect on either the Kd or the maximum binding and CPX reversed the N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and contractility, indicating that (3H) CPX is an antagonist radioligand. Competition curves for (3H) CPX binding by a series of reference adenosine agonists were consistent with labeling of an A1 adenosine receptor and were better fit by a two-site model than by a one-site model. ADP-ribosylation of the G-protein by the endogenous NAD+ in the presence of pertussis toxin shifted the competition curves from bi to monophasic with Ki values similar to those of the KL observed in the absence of prior pertussis intoxication. The adenosine agonists were capable of inhibiting both the adenylate cyclase activity and myocyte contractility in either the absence or the presence of isoproterenol. The A1 adenosine receptor-selective antagonist CPX reversed these agonist effects. The order of ability of the reference adenosine receptor agonists in causing these inhibitory effects was similar to the order of potency of the same agonists in inhibiting the specific (3H)CPX binding (N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine greater than N6-S-phenyl-2-propyladenosine or N-ethyladenosine-5'-uronic acid).

  3. Adenosine diphosphate ribulose in human erythrocytes: a new metabolite with membrane binding properties.

    PubMed

    Franco, L; Guida, L; Zocchi, E; Silvestro, L; Benatti, U; De Flora, A

    1993-02-15

    Incubation of ADPribose with yeast phosphoriboisomerase resulted in the formation of an adenylic nucleotide that was identified with ADPribulose by mass spectrometry. Synthesis of [32P]ADPribulose from [32P]NAD+ by the combined activities of commercial NAD+ glycohydrolase and phosphoriboisomerase allowed us to use it as a labeled internal standard throughout the procedure of purification from trichloroacetic acid extracts of human red blood cells. ADPribulose was purified by means of three sequential reverse phase HPLC separations and its concentration in human erythrocytes was estimated to be 0.11 +/- 0.1 microM. Unsealed erythrocyte ghosts did not transform ADPribulose, which bound to specific membrane proteins with a trichloroacetic and formic acid-resistant binding. The labeled proteins were identified as spectrin, bands 3, 4.1, 4.2 and Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase on the basis of their relative mobilities on SDS-PAGE.

  4. Inhibition of muscarinic K+ current in guinea-pig atrial myocytes by PD 81,723, an allosteric enhancer of adenosine binding to A1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brandts, B; Bünemann, M; Hluchy, J; Sabin, G V; Pott, L

    1997-01-01

    PD 81,723 has been shown to enhance binding of adenosine to A1 receptors by stabilizing G protein-receptor coupling (‘allosteric enhancement'). Evidence has been provided that in the perfused hearts and isolated atria PD 81,723 causes a sensitization to adenosine via this mechanism. We have studied the effect of PD 81,723 in guinea-pig isolated atrial myocytes by use of whole-cell measurement of the muscarinic K+ current (IK(ACh)) activated by different Gi-coupled receptors (A1, M2, sphingolipid). PD 81,273 caused inhibition of IK(ACh) (IC50≃5 μM) activated by either of the three receptors. Receptor-independent IK(ACh) in cells loaded with GTP-γ-S and background IK(ACh), which contributes to the resting conductance of atrial myocytes, were equally sensitive to PD 81,723. At no combination of concentrations of adenosine and PD 81,723 could an enhancing effect be detected. The compound was active from the outside only. Loading of the cells with PD 81,723 (50 μM) via the patch pipette did not affect either IK(ACh) or its sensitivity to adenosine. We suggest that PD 81,723 acts as an inhibitor of inward rectifying K+ channels; this is supported by the finding that ventricular IK1, which shares a large degree of homology with the proteins (GIRK1/GIRK4) forming IK(ACh) but is not G protein-gated, was also blocked by this compound. It is concluded that the functional effects of PD 81,723 described in the literature are not mediated by the A1 adenosine receptor-Gi-IK(ACh) pathway. PMID:9249260

  5. Activation of Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3 by angiotensin II is mediated by inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor-binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    He, Peijian; Klein, Janet; Yun, C Chris

    2010-09-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) stimulates renal tubular reabsorption of NaCl by targeting Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE3. We have shown previously that inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor-binding protein released with inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IRBIT) plays a critical role in stimulation of NHE3 in response to elevated intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). In this study, we investigated the role of IRBIT in mediating NHE3 activation by ANG II. IRBIT is abundantly expressed in the proximal tubules where NHE3 is located. ANG II at physiological concentrations stimulates NHE3 transport activity in a model proximal tubule cell line. ANG II-induced activation of NHE3 was abrogated by knockdown of IRBIT, whereas overexpression of IRBIT enhanced the effect of ANG II on NHE3. ANG II transiently increased binding of IRBIT to NHE3 at 5 min but became dissociated by 45 min. In comparison, it took at least 15 min of ANG II treatment for an increase in NHE3 activity and NHE3 surface expression. The stimulation of NHE3 by ANG II was dependent on changes in [Ca(2+)](i) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases II. Inhibition of CaMKII completely blocked the ANG II-induced binding of IRBIT to NHE3 and the increase in NHE3 surface abundance. Several serine residues of IRBIT are thought to be important for IRBIT binding. Mutations of Ser-68, Ser-71, and Ser-74 of IRBIT decreased binding of IRBIT to NHE3 and its effect on NHE3 activity. In conclusion, our current findings demonstrate that IRBIT is critically involved in mediating activation of NHE3 by ANG II via a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases II-dependent pathway.

  6. Purification and cDNA cloning of the AdoMet-binding subunit of the human mRNA (N6-adenosine)-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Bokar, J A; Shambaugh, M E; Polayes, D; Matera, A G; Rottman, F M

    1997-11-01

    The methylation of internal adenosine residues in eukaryotic mRNA, forming N6-methyladenosine (m6A), is catalyzed by a complex multicomponent enzyme. Previous studies suggested that m6A affects the efficiency of mRNA processing or transport, although the mechanism by which this occurs is not known. As a step toward better understanding the mechanism and function of this ubiquitous posttranscriptional modification, we have shown that HeLa mRNA (N6-adenosine)-methyltransferase requires at least two separate protein factors, MT-A and MT-B, and MT-A contains the AdoMet binding site on a 70-kDa subunit (MT-A70). MT-A70 was purified by conventional chromatography and electrophoresis, and was microsequenced. The peptide sequence was used to design a degenerate oligodeoxynucleotide that in turn was used to isolate the cDNA clone coding for MT-A70 from a HeLa cDNA library. Recombinant MT-A70 was expressed as a fusion protein in bacteria and was used to generate anti-MT-A70 antisera in rabbits. These antisera recognize MT-A70 in HeLa nuclear extracts by western blot and are capable of depleting (N6-adenosine)-methyltransferase activity from HeLa nuclear extract, confirming that MT-A70 is a critical subunit of (N6-adenosine)-methyltransferase. Northern blot analysis reveals that MT-A70 mRNA is present in a wide variety of human tissues and may undergo alternative splicing. MT-A70 cDNA probe hybridizes to a 2.0-kilobase (kb) polyadenylated RNA isolated from HeLa cells, whereas it hybridizes to two predominant RNA species (approximately 2.0 kb and 3.0 kb) using mRNA isolated from six different human tissues. Analysis of the cDNA sequence indicates that it codes for a 580-amino acid protein with a predicted MW = 65 kDa. The predicted protein contains sequences similar to consensus methylation motifs I and II identified in prokaryotic DNA (N6-adenosine)-methyltransferases, suggesting the functional conservation of peptide motifs. MT-A70 also contains a long region of homology to

  7. Photoaffinity labeling of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from Escherichia coli with 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Woody, A Y; Vader, C R; Woody, R W; Haley, B E

    1984-06-19

    A photoaffinity analogue of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8-N3ATP), has been used to elucidate the role of the various subunits involved in forming the active site of Escherichia coli DNA-dependent RNA polymerase. 8-N3ATP was found to be a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme with respect to the incorporation of ATP with Ki = 42 microM, while uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) incorporation was not affected. UV irradiation of the reaction mixture containing RNA polymerase and [gamma-32P]-8-N3ATP induced covalent incorporation of radioactive label into the enzyme. Analysis by gel filtration and nitrocellulose filter binding indicated specific binding. Subunit analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium tetradecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of the labeled enzyme showed that the major incorporation of radioactive label was in beta' and sigma, with minor incorporation in beta and alpha. The same pattern was observed in both the presence and absence of poly[d(A-T)] and poly[d(A-T)] plus ApU. Incorporation of radioactive label in all bands was significantly reduced by 100-150 microM ATP, while 100-200 microM UTP did not show a noticeable effect. Our results indicate major involvement of the beta' and sigma subunits in the active site of RNA polymerase. The observation of a small extent of labeling of the beta and alpha subunits, which was prevented by saturating levels of ATP, suggests that these subunits are in close proximity to the catalytic site.

  8. Adenosine and sleep

    SciTech Connect

    Yanik, G.M. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Behavioral and biochemical approaches have been used to determine the relative contribution of endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors to the sleep-wake cycle in the rat. Adenosine concentrations in specific areas of the rat brain were not affected by 24 hours of total sleep deprivation, or by 24 or 48 hours of REM sleep deprivation. In order to assess the effect of REM sleep deprivation on adenosine A/sub 1/ receptors, /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding was measured. The Bmax values for /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding to membrane preparations of the cortices and corpus striata from 48 hour REM sleep-deprived animals were increased 14.8% and 23%, respectively. These increases were not maintained following the cessation of sleep deprivation and recovered within 2 hours. The results of a 96 hour REM deprivation experiment were similar to those of the 48 hour REM sleep deprivation experiment. However, these increases were not evident in similar structures taken from stress control animals, and conclusively demonstrated that the changes in /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding resulted from REM sleep deprivation and not from stress.

  9. Radioligand binding analysis as a tool for quality control of GPCR production for structural characterization: adenosine A(2a)R as a template for study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Zhang, Minghao; Bertheleme, Nicolas; Kara, Elodie; Strange, Philip G; Byrne, Bernadette

    2012-02-01

    Functional characterization of G protein-coupled receptors is essential to ascertain the suitability of a protein target for downstream studies and to help develop optimal expression and isolation procedures. Radioligand binding analysis is a well-established technique, which allows direct measurement of the amount of functional receptor in a sample. It can be readily applied to both membrane-bound and soluble receptor samples and is an ideal method for monitoring the amount of functional protein at each stage in the expression and isolation process. This unit presents protocols for the radioligand binding analysis of the human adenosine A(2a) receptor and provides examples of how these assays can be used at several stages to help optimize expression, solubilization, and isolation procedures.

  10. A third member of the RNA-specific adenosine deaminase gene family, ADAR3, contains both single- and double-stranded RNA binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C X; Cho, D S; Wang, Q; Lai, F; Carter, K C; Nishikura, K

    2000-01-01

    Members of the double-stranded RNA- (dsRNA) specific adenosine deaminase gene family convert adenosine residues into inosines in dsRNA and are involved in A-to-I RNA editing of transcripts of glutamate receptor (GluR) subunits and serotonin receptor subtype 2C (5-HT(2C)R). We have isolated hADAR3, the third member of this class of human enzyme and investigated its editing site selectivity using in vitro RNA editing assay systems. As originally reported for rat ADAR3 or RED2, purified ADAR3 proteins could not edit GluR-B RNA at the "Q/R" site, the "R/G" site, and the intronic "hot spot" site. In addition, ADAR3 did not edit any of five sites discovered recently within the intracellular loop II region of 5-HT(2C)R RNAs, confirming its total lack of editing activity for currently known substrate RNAs. Filter-binding analyses revealed that ADAR3 is capable of binding not only to dsRNA but also to single-stranded RNA (ssRNA). Deletion mutagenesis identified a region rich in arginine residues located in the N-terminus that is responsible for binding of ADAR3 to ssRNA. The presence of this ssRNA-binding domain as well as its expression in restricted brain regions and postmitotic neurons make ADAR3 distinct from the other two ADAR gene family members, editing competent ADAR1 and ADAR2. ADAR3 inhibited in vitro the activities of RNA editing enzymes of the ADAR gene family, raising the possibility of a regulatory role in RNA editing. PMID:10836796

  11. Novel Alexa Fluor-488 labeled antagonist of the A(2A) adenosine receptor: Application to a fluorescence polarization-based receptor binding assay.

    PubMed

    Kecskés, Miklós; Kumar, T Santhosh; Yoo, Lena; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2010-08-15

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) assay has many advantages over the traditional radioreceptor binding studies. We developed an A(2A) adenosine receptor (AR) FP assay using a newly synthesized fluorescent antagonist of the A(2A)AR (MRS5346), a pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine derivative conjugated to the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor-488. MRS5346 displayed a K(i) value of 111+/-16nM in radioligand binding using [(3)H]CGS21680 and membranes prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing the human A(2A)AR. In a cyclic AMP functional assay, MRS5346 was shown to be an A(2A)AR antagonist. MRS5346 did not show any effect on A(1) and A(3) ARs in binding or the A(2B)AR in a cyclic AMP assay at 10microM. Its suitability as a fluorescent tracer was indicated in an initial observation of an FP signal following A(2A)AR binding. The FP signal was optimal with 20nM MRS5346 and 150microg protein/mL HEK293 membranes. The association and dissociation kinetic parameters were readily determined using this FP assay. The K(d) value of MRS5346 calculated from kinetic parameters was 16.5+/-4.7nM. In FP competition binding experiments using MRS5346 as a tracer, K(i) values of known AR agonists and antagonists consistently agreed with K(i) values from radioligand binding. Thus, this FP assay, which eliminates using radioisotopes, appears to be appropriate for both routine receptor binding and high-throughput screening with respect to speed of analysis, displaceable signal and precision. The approach used in the present study could be generally applicable to other GPCRs.

  12. DNA binding of the cell cycle transcriptional regulator GcrA depends on N6-adenosine methylation in Caulobacter crescentus and other Alphaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Fumeaux, Coralie; Mohapatra, Saswat S; Bompard, Coralie; Brilli, Matteo; Frandi, Antonio; Castric, Vincent; Villeret, Vincent; Viollier, Patrick H; Biondi, Emanuele G

    2013-05-01

    Several regulators are involved in the control of cell cycle progression in the bacterial model system Caulobacter crescentus, which divides asymmetrically into a vegetative G1-phase (swarmer) cell and a replicative S-phase (stalked) cell. Here we report a novel functional interaction between the enigmatic cell cycle regulator GcrA and the N6-adenosine methyltransferase CcrM, both highly conserved proteins among Alphaproteobacteria, that are activated early and at the end of S-phase, respectively. As no direct biochemical and regulatory relationship between GcrA and CcrM were known, we used a combination of ChIP (chromatin-immunoprecipitation), biochemical and biophysical experimentation, and genetics to show that GcrA is a dimeric DNA-binding protein that preferentially targets promoters harbouring CcrM methylation sites. After tracing CcrM-dependent N6-methyl-adenosine promoter marks at a genome-wide scale, we show that these marks recruit GcrA in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we found that, in the presence of a methylated target, GcrA recruits the RNA polymerase to the promoter, consistent with its role in transcriptional activation. Since methylation-dependent DNA binding is also observed with GcrA orthologs from other Alphaproteobacteria, we conclude that GcrA is the founding member of a new and conserved class of transcriptional regulators that function as molecular effectors of a methylation-dependent (non-heritable) epigenetic switch that regulates gene expression during the cell cycle.

  13. Bacterial adenosine triphosphate as a measure of urinary tract infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1971-01-01

    Procedure detects and counts bacteria present in urine samples. Method also determines bacterial levels in other aqueous body fluids including lymph fluid, plasma, blood, spinal fluid, saliva and mucous.

  14. Rapid, quantitative determination of bacteria in water. [adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Thomas, R. R.; Jeffers, E. L.; Deming, J. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A bioluminescent assay for ATP in water borne bacteria is made by adding nitric acid to a water sample with concentrated bacteria to rupture the bacterial cells. The sample is diluted with sterile, deionized water, then mixed with a luciferase-luciferin mixture and the resulting light output of the bioluminescent reaction is measured and correlated with bacteria present. A standard and a blank also are presented so that the light output can be correlated to bacteria in the sample and system noise can be substracted from the readings. A chemiluminescent assay for iron porphyrins in water borne bacteria is made by adding luminol reagent to a water sample with concentrated bacteria and measuring the resulting light output of the chemiluminescent reaction.

  15. Prolonged adenosine triphosphate infusion and exercise hyperemia in humans.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, John R A; Joyner, Michael J; Dinenno, Frank A; Curry, Timothy B; Ranadive, Sushant M

    2016-09-01

    In humans, intra-arterial ATP infusion in limbs mimics many features of exercise hyperemia. However, it remains unknown whether ATP can evoke the prolonged vasodilation seen during exercise. Therefore, we addressed two questions during a continuous 3-h brachial artery infusion of ATP [20 μg·100 ml forearm volume (FAV)(-1)·min(-1)]: 1) would skeletal muscle blood flow remain robust or wane over time (tachyphylaxis); and 2) would the hyperemic response to moderate-intensity exercise performed during the ATP administration be blunted compared with that during control (saline) infusion. Nine participants (25 ± 1 yr) performed one trial consisting of seven bouts of rhythmic handgrip exercise (20 contractions/min at 20% of maximum), two bouts during saline (control), and five bouts during 180 min of continuous ATP infusion. Five minutes of ATP infusion resulted in a 710% increase in forearm vascular conductance (FVC) from control (4.8 ± 0.77 vs. 35.0 ± 5.7 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1)·dl FAV(-1), P < 0.05). Contrary to our expectations, FVC did not wane over time with values of 35.0 ± 5.7 and 36.0 ± 7.7 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1)·dl FAV(-1) (P > 0.05), seen prior to the exercise bouts at 5 vs. 150 min, respectively. During superimposed exercise, FVC increased from 35.0 ± 5.7 to 49.6 ± 5.4 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1)·dl FAV(-1) at 5 min and 36.0 ± 7.7 to 54.5 ± 5.0 at 150 min (P < 0.05). Our findings demonstrate ATP vasodilation is prolonged over time without tachyphylaxis; however, exercise hyperemia responses remain intact. Our results challenge the metabolic theory of exercise hyperemia, suggesting a disconnect between matching of blood flow and metabolic demand. PMID:27445304

  16. Targeted expression of the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R) ligand-binding domain releases Ca2+ via endogenous IP3R channels.

    PubMed

    Várnai, Péter; Balla, András; Hunyady, László; Balla, Tamas

    2005-05-31

    Virtually all functions of a cell are influenced by cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)] increases. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) channels, located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), release Ca(2+) in response to binding of the second messenger, IP(3).IP(3)Rs thus are part of the information chain interpreting external signals and transforming them into cytoplasmic Ca(2+) transients. IP(3)Rs function as tetramers, each unit comprising an N-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD) and a C-terminal channel domain linked by a long regulatory region. It is not yet understood how the binding of IP(3) to the LBD regulates the gating properties of the channel. Here, we use the expression of IP(3) binding protein domains tethered to the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to show that the all-helical domain of the IP(3)R LBD is capable of depleting the ER Ca(2+) pools by opening the endogenous IP(3)Rs, even without IP(3) binding. This effect requires the domain to be within 50 A of the ER membrane and is impaired by the presence of the N-terminal inhibitory segment on the LBD. These findings raise the possibility that the helical domain of the LBD functions as an effector module possibly interacting with the channel domain, thereby being part of the gating mechanisms by which the IP(3)-induced conformational change within the LBD regulates Ca(2+) release.

  17. Binding of a substrate analog to a domain swapping protein: X-ray structure of the complex of bovine seminal ribonuclease with uridylyl(2',5')adenosine.

    PubMed Central

    Vitagliano, L.; Adinolfi, S.; Riccio, A.; Sica, F.; Zagari, A.; Mazzarella, L.

    1998-01-01

    Bovine seminal ribonuclease (BS-RNase) is a unique member of the pancreatic-like ribonuclease superfamily. The native enzyme is a mixture of two dimeric forms with distinct structural features. The most abundant form is characterized by the swapping of N-terminal fragments. In this paper, the crystal structure of the complex between the swapping dimer and uridylyl(2',5')adenosine is reported at 2.06 A resolution. The refined model has a crystallographic R-factor of 0.184 and good stereochemistry. The quality of the electron density maps enables the structure of both the inhibitor and active site residues to be unambiguously determined. The overall architecture of the active site is similar to that of RNase A. The dinucleotide adopts an extended conformation with the pyrimidine and purine base interacting with Thr45 and Asn71, respectively. Several residues (Gln11, His12, Lys41, His119, and Phe120) bind the oxygens of the phosphate group. The structural similarity of the active sites of BS-RNase and RNase A includes some specific water molecules believed to be relevant to catalytic activity. Upon binding of the dinucleotide, small but significant modifications of the tertiary and quaternary structure of the protein are observed. The ensuing correlation of these modifications with the catalytic activity of the enzyme is discussed. PMID:10082366

  18. High affinity P2x-purinoceptor binding sites for [35S]-adenosine 5'-O-[3-thiotriphosphate] in rat vas deferens membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Michel, A. D.; Humphrey, P. P.

    1996-01-01

    1. The binding sites labelled by [35S]-adenosine 5'-O-[3-thiotriphosphate]([35S]-ATP gamma S) at 4 degrees C in rat vas deferens membranes were studied and compared to the sites labelled by [3H]-alpha,beta-methylene ATP ([3H]-alpha beta meATP) to ascertain whether [35S]-ATP gamma S can be used to label the P2x purinoceptor. 2. In the presence of 4 mM CaCl2, the binding of 0.2 nM [35S]-ATP gamma S to vas deferens membranes was increased 3.4 fold, when compared to studies performed in the absence of calcium. However, binding did not appear to be solely to P2x purinoceptors since [35S]-ATP gamma S labelled a heterogeneous population of sites and about 72% of the sites possessed high affinity (pIC50 = 7.5) for guanosine 5'-O-[3-thiotriphosphate] (GTP gamma S). Even in the presence of 1 microM GTP gamma S, to occlude the sites with high affinity for GTP gamma S, the binding of [35S]-ATP gamma S was heterogeneous and since there was also evidence of extensive metabolism of ATP in the presence of calcium, the binding of [35S]-ATP gamma S under these conditions was not studied further. 3. In the absence of calcium ions, [35S]-ATP gamma S bound to a single population of sites (pKD = 9.23; Bmax = 4270 fmol mg-1 protein). Binding reached steady state within 3 h (t1/2 = 38 min), was stable for a further 4 h and was readily reversible upon addition of 10 microM unlabelled ATP gamma S (t1/2 = 45 min). In competition studies the binding of 0.2 nM [35S]-ATP gamma S was inhibited by a number of P2x purinoceptor agonists and antagonists, but not by adenosine receptor agonists, staurosporine (1 microM) or several ATPase inhibitors. The rank order of agonist affinity estimates (pIC50 values) in competing for the [35S]-ATP gamma S binding sites was: ATP (9.01), 2-methylthio- ATP (8.79), ATP gamma S (8.73), alpha beta meATP (7.57), ADP (7.24), beta, gamma-methylene ATP (7.18), L-beta, gamma-methylene ATP (5.83), alpha, beta-methylene ADP (4.36). 4. Affinity estimates (pIC50 values) for

  19. Halobacterial adenosine triphosphatases and the adenosine triphosphatase from Halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, Hordur; Sadler, Martha H.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared from various members of the genus Halobacterium contained a Triton X-l00 activated adenosine triphosphatase. The enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum was unstable in solutions of low ionic strength and maximally active in the presence of 3.5 M NaCl. A variety of nucleotide triphosphates was hydrolyzed. MgADP, the product of ATP hydrolysis, was not hydrolyzed and was a competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum was composed of at least 2 and possibly 4 subunits. The 83-kDa and 60-kDa subunits represented about 90 percent of total protein. The 60-kDa subunit reacted with dicyclohexyl-carbodiimide when inhibition was carried out in an acidic medium. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum, possesses properties of an F(1)F(0) as well as an E(1)E(2) ATPase.

  20. Purification and Properties of Adenosine Diphosphoglucose Pyrophosphorylase from Sweet Corn 1

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Jacob; Cherry, Joe H.

    1972-01-01

    A 40-fold purification of adenosine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase from sweet corn (Zea mays var. Golden Beauty) revealed the enzyme to be specific for adenosine triphosphate. The enzyme has an absolute requirement for Mg2+ and is activated by 3-phosphoglycerate and to a lesser extent by ribose-5-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate. The apparent Km values of the enzyme for glucose-1-phosphate, adenosine triphosphate, pyrophosphate, and adenosine diphosphoglucose are 1.9 × 10−4, 3.2 × 10−5, 3.3 × 10−5, and 6.2 × 10−4m, respectively. Pyrophosphate inhibits adenosine diphosphoglucose synthesis competitively (Ki = 3.8 × 10−7m), while orthophosphate and sulfate appear to inhibit the reacion noncompetitively. These results show that the production of this sugar nucleotide can be controlled by the concentration of pyrophosphate. PMID:16658078

  1. Docosahexaenoic acid induces increases in [Ca2+]i via inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate production and activates protein kinase C gamma and -delta via phosphatidylserine binding site: implication in apoptosis in U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Aires, Virginie; Hichami, Aziz; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Plé, Aude; Rébé, Cédric; Bettaieb, Ali; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2007-12-01

    We investigated, in monocytic leukemia U937 cells, the effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 n-3) on calcium signaling and determined the implication of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) in this pathway. DHA induced dose-dependent increases in [Ca2+]i, which were contributed by intracellular pool, via the production of inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and store-operated Ca2+ (SOC) influx, via opening of Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. Chemical inhibition of PLC, PKCgamma, and PKCdelta, but not of PKCbeta I/II, PKCalpha, or PKCbetaI, significantly diminished DHA-induced increases in [Ca2+]i. In vitro PKC assays revealed that DHA induced a approximately 2-fold increase in PKCgamma and -delta activities, which were temporally correlated with the DHA-induced increases in [Ca2+]i. In cell-free assays, DHA, but not other structural analogs of fatty acids, activated these PKC isoforms. Competition experiments revealed that DHA-induced activation of both the PKCs was dose-dependently inhibited by phosphatidylserine (PS). Furthermore, DHA induced apoptosis via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, followed by caspase-3 activation. Chemical inhibition of PKCgamma/delta and of SOC/CRAC channels significantly attenuated both DHA-stimulated ROS production and caspase-3 activity. Our study suggests that DHA-induced activation of PLC/IP3 pathway and activation of PKCgamma/delta, via its action on PS binding site, may be involved in apoptosis in U937 cells.

  2. Quantification of adenosine triphosphate, adenosine diphosphate, and creatine phosphate in sterlet spermatozoa during maturation.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, P; Dzyuba, B; Fedorova, G; Grabic, R; Cosson, J; Rodina, M

    2015-11-01

    Sturgeon spermatozoa maturation during their passage through the kidney is a prerequisite for initiation of motility. Samples of sterlet () testicular sperm (TS) were matured in vitro by incubation in seminal fluid (SF) or in SF supplemented with carbonyl cyanide -chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP; a respiration uncoupling agent). Sperm was diluted in activation medium (AM) containing 10 m Tris-HCl buffer (pH 8.5) and 0.25% Pluronic, and spermatozoon motility was assessed. Samples were taken and fixed in 3 perchloric acid at 3 points in the incubation process. Quantification of ATP, ADP, and creatine phosphate (CrP) was conducted using liquid chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry. We observed a significant decrease in CrP during artificial maturation of TS in SF. In contrast, ATP and ADP were not significantly affected. Addition of CCCP to SF halted maturation and led to significantly lower CrP whereas ADP significantly increased and ATP was unaffected. Dilution of matured and immature TS with AM led to a significant decrease of ATP and CrP and an increase of ADP compared with their levels before dilution, although immature TS were not motile. Energy dependency of TS maturation in sturgeon was confirmed, which suggests that mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is needed for maturation of sturgeon TS. PMID:26641041

  3. 5'-Triphosphate RNA is the ligand for RIG-I.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Veit; Ellegast, Jana; Kim, Sarah; Brzózka, Krzysztof; Jung, Andreas; Kato, Hiroki; Poeck, Hendrik; Akira, Shizuo; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Schlee, Martin; Endres, Stefan; Hartmann, Gunther

    2006-11-10

    The structural basis for the distinction of viral RNA from abundant self RNA in the cytoplasm of virally infected cells is largely unknown. We demonstrated that the 5'-triphosphate end of RNA generated by viral polymerases is responsible for retinoic acid-inducible protein I (RIG-I)-mediated detection of RNA molecules. Detection of 5'-triphosphate RNA is abrogated by capping of the 5'-triphosphate end or by nucleoside modification of RNA, both occurring during posttranscriptional RNA processing in eukaryotes. Genomic RNA prepared from a negative-strand RNA virus and RNA prepared from virus-infected cells (but not from noninfected cells) triggered a potent interferon-alpha response in a phosphatase-sensitive manner. 5'-triphosphate RNA directly binds to RIG-I. Thus, uncapped 5'-triphosphate RNA (now termed 3pRNA) present in viruses known to be recognized by RIG-I, but absent in viruses known to be detected by MDA-5 such as the picornaviruses, serves as the molecular signature for the detection of viral infection by RIG-I.

  4. Inhibition of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP)-response Element-binding Protein (CREB)-binding Protein (CBP)/β-Catenin Reduces Liver Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Yosuke; Oboki, Keisuke; Imamura, Jun; Kojika, Ekumi; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Saibara, Toshiji; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Kohara, Michinori; Kimura, Kiminori

    2015-11-01

    Wnt/β-catenin is involved in every aspect of embryonic development and in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, and is also implicated in organ fibrosis. However, the role of β-catenin-mediated signaling on liver fibrosis remains unclear. To explore this issue, the effects of PRI-724, a selective inhibitor of the cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP)/β-catenin interaction, on liver fibrosis were examined using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)- or bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced mouse liver fibrosis models. Following repetitive CCl4 administrations, the nuclear translocation of β-catenin was observed only in the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. PRI-724 treatment reduced the fibrosis induced by CCl4 or BDL. C-82, an active form of PRI-724, inhibited the activation of isolated primary mouse quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and promoted cell death in culture-activated HSCs. During the fibrosis resolution period, an increase in F4/80(+) CD11b(+) and Ly6C(low) CD11b(+) macrophages was induced by CCl4 and was sustained for two weeks thereafter, even after having stopped CCl4 treatment. PRI-724 accelerated the resolution of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, and this was accompanied by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-2, and MMP-8 expression in intrahepatic leukocytes. In conclusion, targeting the CBP/β-catenin interaction may become a new therapeutic strategy in treating liver fibrosis. PMID:26870800

  5. Genetic deletion of the adenosine A(2A) receptor prevents nicotine-induced upregulation of α7, but not α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the brain.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Athanasios; Al-Hasani, Ream; Farshim, Pamela; Tubby, Kristina; Berwick, Amy; Ledent, Catherine; Hourani, Susanna; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis

    2013-08-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) modulate cholinergic neurotransmission, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function, and nicotine-induced behavioural effects. To explore the interaction between A(2A) and nAChRs, we examined if the complete genetic deletion of adenosine A(2A)Rs in mice induces compensatory alterations in the binding of different nAChR subtypes, and whether the long-term effects of nicotine on nAChR regulation are altered in the absence of the A(2A)R gene. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure cytisine-sensitive [¹²⁵I]epibatidine and [¹²⁵I]α-bungarotoxin binding to α4β2* and α7 nAChRs, respectively, in brain sections of drug-naïve (n = 6) or nicotine treated (n = 5-7), wild-type and adenosine A(2A)R knockout mice. Saline or nicotine (7.8 mg/kg/day; free-base weight) were administered to male CD1 mice via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps for a period of 14 days. Blood plasma levels of nicotine and cotinine were measured at the end of treatment. There were no compensatory developmental alterations in nAChR subtype distribution or density in drug-naïve A(2A)R knockout mice. In nicotine treated wild-type mice, both α4β2* and α7 nAChR binding sites were increased compared with saline treated controls. The genetic ablation of adenosine A(2A)Rs prevented nicotine-induced upregulation of α7 nAChRs, without affecting α4β2* receptor upregulation. This selective effect was observed at plasma levels of nicotine that were within the range reported for smokers (10-50 ng ml⁻¹). Our data highlight the involvement of adenosine A(2A)Rs in the mechanisms of nicotine-induced α7 nAChR upregulation, and identify A(2A)Rs as novel pharmacological targets for modulating the long-term effects of nicotine on α7 receptors.

  6. Genetic deletion of the adenosine A(2A) receptor prevents nicotine-induced upregulation of α7, but not α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the brain.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Athanasios; Al-Hasani, Ream; Farshim, Pamela; Tubby, Kristina; Berwick, Amy; Ledent, Catherine; Hourani, Susanna; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis

    2013-08-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) modulate cholinergic neurotransmission, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function, and nicotine-induced behavioural effects. To explore the interaction between A(2A) and nAChRs, we examined if the complete genetic deletion of adenosine A(2A)Rs in mice induces compensatory alterations in the binding of different nAChR subtypes, and whether the long-term effects of nicotine on nAChR regulation are altered in the absence of the A(2A)R gene. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure cytisine-sensitive [¹²⁵I]epibatidine and [¹²⁵I]α-bungarotoxin binding to α4β2* and α7 nAChRs, respectively, in brain sections of drug-naïve (n = 6) or nicotine treated (n = 5-7), wild-type and adenosine A(2A)R knockout mice. Saline or nicotine (7.8 mg/kg/day; free-base weight) were administered to male CD1 mice via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps for a period of 14 days. Blood plasma levels of nicotine and cotinine were measured at the end of treatment. There were no compensatory developmental alterations in nAChR subtype distribution or density in drug-naïve A(2A)R knockout mice. In nicotine treated wild-type mice, both α4β2* and α7 nAChR binding sites were increased compared with saline treated controls. The genetic ablation of adenosine A(2A)Rs prevented nicotine-induced upregulation of α7 nAChRs, without affecting α4β2* receptor upregulation. This selective effect was observed at plasma levels of nicotine that were within the range reported for smokers (10-50 ng ml⁻¹). Our data highlight the involvement of adenosine A(2A)Rs in the mechanisms of nicotine-induced α7 nAChR upregulation, and identify A(2A)Rs as novel pharmacological targets for modulating the long-term effects of nicotine on α7 receptors. PMID:23583933

  7. E-NTPDase (ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase) of Leishmania amazonensis inhibits macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Rodrigo Saar; de Carvalho, Luana Cristina Faria; de Souza Vasconcellos, Raphael; Fietto, Juliana Lopes Rangel; Afonso, Luís Carlos Crocco

    2015-04-01

    Leishmania amazonensis, the causal agent of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, is known for its ability to modulate the host immune response. Because a relationship between ectonucleotidase activity and the ability of Leishmania to generate injury in C57BL/6 mice has been demonstrated, in this study we evaluated the involvement of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase) activity of L. amazonensis in the process of infection of J774-macrophages. Our results show that high-activity parasites show increased survival rate in LPS/IFN-γ-activated cells, by inhibiting the host-cell NO production. Conversely, inhibition of E-NTPDase activity reduces the parasite survival rates, an effect associated with increased macrophage NO production. E-NTPDase activity generates substrate for the production of extracellular adenosine, which binds to A2B receptors and reduces IL-12 and TNF-α produced by activated macrophages, thus inhibiting NO production. These results indicate that E-NTPDase activity is important for survival of L. amazonensis within macrophages, showing the role of the enzyme in modulating macrophage response and lower NO production, which ultimately favors infection. Our results point to a new mechanism of L. amazonensis infection that may pave the way for the development of new treatments for this neglected disease. PMID:25554487

  8. KIF1A Alternately Uses Two Loops to Bind Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Ryo; Kikkawa, Masahide; Okada, Yasushi; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2004-07-01

    The motor protein kinesin moves along microtubules, driven by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. However, it remains unclear how kinesin converts the chemical energy into mechanical movement. We report crystal structures of monomeric kinesin KIF1A with three transition-state analogs: adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-vanadate, and ADP-AlFx (aluminofluoride complexes). These structures, together with known structures of the ADP-bound state and the adenylyl-(β,γ-methylene) diphosphate (AMP-PCP)-bound state, show that kinesin uses two microtubule-binding loops in an alternating manner to change its interaction with microtubules during the ATP hydrolysis cycle; loop L11 is extended in the AMP-PNP structure, whereas loop L12 is extended in the ADP structure. ADP-vanadate displays an intermediate structure in which a conformational change in two switch regions causes both loops to be raised from the microtubule, thus actively detaching kinesin.

  9. Evaluation of Adenosine Triphosphate-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1) R219K and C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP) +1059G/C Gene Polymorphisms in Susceptibility to Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Fang; Peng, Dian-Ying; Ling, Mei; Yin, Yong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This meta-analysis investigated the correlation of ABCA1 R219K and C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP) +1059G/C gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to coronary heart disease (CHD). MATERIAL AND METHODS We searched PubMed, Springer link, Wiley, EBSCO, Ovid, Wanfang database, VIP database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases to retrieve published studies by keyword. Searches were filtered using our stringent inclusion and exclusion criteria. Resultant high-quality data collected from the final selected studies were analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2.0 software. Eleven case-control studies involving 3053 CHD patients and 3403 healthy controls met our inclusion criteria. Seven studies were conducted in Asian populations, 3 studies were done in Caucasian populations, and 1 was in an African population. RESULTS Our major finding was that ABCA1 R219K polymorphism increased susceptibility to CHD in allele model (OR=0.729, 95% CI=0.559~0.949, P=0.019) and dominant model (OR=0.698, 95% CI=0.507~0.961, P=0.027). By contrast, we were unable to find any significant association between the CRP +1059G/C polymorphism and susceptibility to CHD (allele model: OR=1.170, 95% CI=0.782~1.751, P=0.444; dominant model: OR=1.175, 95% CI=0.768~1.797, P=0.457). CONCLUSIONS This meta-analysis provides convincing evidence that polymorphism of ABCA1 R219K is associated with susceptibility to CHD while the CRP +1059G/C polymorphism appears to have no correlation with susceptibility to CHD. PMID:27560308

  10. Evaluation of Adenosine Triphosphate-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1) R219K and C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP) +1059G/C Gene Polymorphisms in Susceptibility to Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Fang; Peng, Dian-Ying; Ling, Mei; Yin, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background This meta-analysis investigated the correlation of ABCA1 R219K and CRP +1059G/C gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to coronary heart disease (CHD). Material/Methods We searched PubMed, Springer link, Wiley, EBSCO, Ovid, Wanfang database, VIP database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases to retrieve published studies by keyword. Searches were filtered using our stringent inclusion and exclusion criteria. Resultant high-quality data collected from the final selected studies were analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2.0 software. Eleven case-control studies involving 3053 CHD patients and 3403 healthy controls met our inclusion criteria. Seven studies were conducted in Asian populations, 3 studies were done in Caucasian populations, and 1 was in an African population. Results Our major finding was that ABCA1 R219K polymorphism increased susceptibility to CHD in allele model (OR=0.729, 95% CI=0.559~0.949, P=0.019) and dominant model (OR=0.698, 95% CI=0.507~0.961, P=0.027). By contrast, we were unable to find any significant association between the CRP +1059G/C polymorphism and susceptibility to CHD (allele model: OR=1.170, 95% CI=0.782~1.751, P=0.444; dominant model: OR=1.175, 95% CI=0.768~1.797, P=0.457). Conclusions This meta-analysis provides convincing evidence that polymorphism of ABCA1 R219K is associated with susceptibility to CHD while the CRP +1059G/C polymorphism appears to have no correlation with susceptibility to CHD. PMID:27560308

  11. Evaluation of Adenosine Triphosphate-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1) R219K and C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP) +1059G/C Gene Polymorphisms in Susceptibility to Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Fang; Peng, Dian-Ying; Ling, Mei; Yin, Yong

    2016-08-25

    BACKGROUND This meta-analysis investigated the correlation of ABCA1 R219K and C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP) +1059G/C gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to coronary heart disease (CHD). MATERIAL AND METHODS We searched PubMed, Springer link, Wiley, EBSCO, Ovid, Wanfang database, VIP database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases to retrieve published studies by keyword. Searches were filtered using our stringent inclusion and exclusion criteria. Resultant high-quality data collected from the final selected studies were analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2.0 software. Eleven case-control studies involving 3053 CHD patients and 3403 healthy controls met our inclusion criteria. Seven studies were conducted in Asian populations, 3 studies were done in Caucasian populations, and 1 was in an African population. RESULTS Our major finding was that ABCA1 R219K polymorphism increased susceptibility to CHD in allele model (OR=0.729, 95% CI=0.559~0.949, P=0.019) and dominant model (OR=0.698, 95% CI=0.507~0.961, P=0.027). By contrast, we were unable to find any significant association between the CRP +1059G/C polymorphism and susceptibility to CHD (allele model: OR=1.170, 95% CI=0.782~1.751, P=0.444; dominant model: OR=1.175, 95% CI=0.768~1.797, P=0.457). CONCLUSIONS This meta-analysis provides convincing evidence that polymorphism of ABCA1 R219K is associated with susceptibility to CHD while the CRP +1059G/C polymorphism appears to have no correlation with susceptibility to CHD.

  12. IRBIT, Inositol 1,4,5-Triphosphate (IP3) Receptor-binding Protein Released with IP3, Binds Na+/H+ Exchanger NHE3 and Activates NHE3 Activity in Response to Calcium*

    PubMed Central

    He, Peijian; Zhang, Huanchun; Yun, C. Chris

    2008-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) is a highly versatile second messenger that regulates various cellular processes. Previous studies showed that elevation of intracellular Ca2+ regulates the activity of Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3). However, the effect of Ca2+-dependent signaling on NHE3 activity varies depending on cell types. In this study, we report the identification of IP3 receptor-binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT) as a NHE3 interacting protein and its role in regulation of NHE3 activity. IRBIT bound to the carboxyl-terminal domain of NHE3, which is necessary for acute regulation of NHE3. Ectopic expression of IRBIT resulted in Ca2+-dependent activation of NHE3 activity, whereas silencing of endogenous IRBIT resulted in inhibition of NHE3 activity. Ca2+-dependent stimulation of NHE3 activity was dependent on the binding of IRBIT to NHE3. Previously Ca2+-dependent inhibition of NHE3 was demonstrated in the presence of NHERF2. Co-expression of IRBIT was able to reverse the NHERF2-dependent inhibition of NHE3. We also showed that IRBIT-dependent activation of NHE3 involves exocytic trafficking of NHE3 to the plasma membrane and this activation was blocked by inhibition of calmodulin (CaM) or CaM-dependent kinase II. These results suggest that the overall effect of Ca2+ on NHE3 activity is balanced by IRBIT-dependent activation and NHERF2-dependent inhibition. PMID:18829453

  13. Mechanism of sequence-specific template binding by the DNA primase of bacteriophage T7

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Joo; Zhu, Bin; Hamdan, Samir M.; Richardson, Charles C.

    2010-01-01

    DNA primases catalyze the synthesis of the oligoribonucleotides required for the initiation of lagging strand DNA synthesis. Biochemical studies have elucidated the mechanism for the sequence-specific synthesis of primers. However, the physical interactions of the primase with the DNA template to explain the basis of specificity have not been demonstrated. Using a combination of surface plasmon resonance and biochemical assays, we show that T7 DNA primase has only a slightly higher affinity for DNA containing the primase recognition sequence (5′-TGGTC-3′) than for DNA lacking the recognition site. However, this binding is drastically enhanced by the presence of the cognate Nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Cytosine triphosphate (CTP) that are incorporated into the primer, pppACCA. Formation of the dimer, pppAC, the initial step of sequence-specific primer synthesis, is not sufficient for the stable binding. Preformed primers exhibit significantly less selective binding than that observed with ATP and CTP. Alterations in subdomains of the primase result in loss of selective DNA binding. We present a model in which conformational changes induced during primer synthesis facilitate contact between the zinc-binding domain and the polymerase domain. PMID:20350931

  14. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity.

  15. Isolated noncatalytic and catalytic subunits of F1-ATPase exhibit similar, albeit not identical, energetic strategies for recognizing adenosine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Guillermo; Cano-Sánchez, Patricia; de Gómez-Puyou, Marietta Tuena; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; García-Hernández, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The function of F1-ATPase relies critically on the intrinsic ability of its catalytic and noncatalytic subunits to interact with nucleotides. Therefore, the study of isolated subunits represents an opportunity to dissect elementary energetic contributions that drive the enzyme's rotary mechanism. In this study we have calorimetrically characterized the association of adenosine nucleotides to the isolated noncatalytic α-subunit. The resulting recognition behavior was compared with that previously reported for the isolated catalytic β-subunit (N.O. Pulido, G. Salcedo, G. Pérez-Hernández, C. José-Núñez, A. Velázquez-Campoy, E. García-Hernández, Energetic effects of magnesium in the recognition of adenosine nucleotides by the F1-ATPase β subunit, Biochemistry 49 (2010) 5258-5268). The two subunits exhibit nucleotide-binding thermodynamic signatures similar to each other, characterized by enthalpically-driven affinities in the μM range. Nevertheless, contrary to the catalytic subunit that recognizes MgATP and MgADP with comparable strength, the noncatalytic subunit much prefers the triphosphate nucleotide. Besides, the α-subunit depends more on Mg(II) for stabilizing the interaction with ATP, while both subunits are rather metal-independent for ADP recognition. These binding behaviors are discussed in terms of the properties that the two subunits exhibit in the whole enzyme.

  16. Luciferase-based assay for adenosine: application to S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Emmanuel S; Gulab, Shivali A; Cassera, María B; Schramm, Vern L

    2012-04-17

    S-Adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) catalyzes the reversible conversion of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) to adenosine (ADO) and L-homocysteine, promoting methyltransferase activity by relief of SAH inhibition. SAH catabolism is linked to S-adenosylmethionine metabolism, and the development of SAHH inhibitors is of interest for new therapeutics with anticancer or cholesterol-lowering effects. We have developed a continuous enzymatic assay for adenosine that facilitates high-throughput analysis of SAHH. This luciferase-based assay is 4000-fold more sensitive than former detection methods and is well suited for continuous monitoring of ADO formation in a 96-well-plate format. The high-affinity adenosine kinase from Anopheles gambiae efficiently converts adenosine to adenosine monophosphate (AMP) in the presence of guanosine triphosphate. AMP is converted to adenosine triphosphate and coupled to firefly luciferase. With this procedure, kinetic parameters (K(m), k(cat)) for SAHH were obtained, in good agreement with literature values. Assay characteristics include sustained light output combined with ultrasensitive detection (10(-7) unit of SAHH). The assay is documented with the characterization of slow-onset inhibition for inhibitors of the hydrolase. Application of this assay may facilitate the development of SAHH inhibitors and provide an ultrasensitive detection for the formation of adenosine from other biological reactions.

  17. Modified Nucleoside Triphosphates for in-vitro Selection Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarren, Adolfo; Dellafiore, María; Montserrat, Javier

    2016-05-01

    The development of SELEX (Selective Enhancement of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) provides a powerful tool for the search of functional oligonucleotides with the ability to bind ligands with high affinity and selectivity (aptamers) and for the discovery of nucleic acid sequences with diverse enzymatic activities (ribozymes and DNAzymes). This technique has been extensively applied to the selection of natural DNA or RNA molecules but, in order to improve chemical and structural diversity as well as for particular applications where further chemical or biological stability is necessary, the extension of this strategy to modified oligonucleotides is desirable. Taking into account these needs, this review intends to collect the research carried out during the past years, focusing mainly on the use of modified nucleotides in SELEX and the development of mutant enzymes for broadening nucleoside triphosphates acceptance. In addition, comments regarding the synthesis of modified nucleoside triphosphate will be briefly discussed.

  18. Modified Nucleoside Triphosphates for In-vitro Selection Techniques.

    PubMed

    Dellafiore, María A; Montserrat, Javier M; Iribarren, Adolfo M

    2016-01-01

    The development of SELEX (Selective Enhancement of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) provides a powerful tool for the search of functional oligonucleotides with the ability to bind ligands with high affinity and selectivity (aptamers) and for the discovery of nucleic acid sequences with diverse enzymatic activities (ribozymes and DNAzymes). This technique has been extensively applied to the selection of natural DNA or RNA molecules but, in order to improve chemical and structural diversity as well as for particular applications where further chemical or biological stability is necessary, the extension of this strategy to modified oligonucleotides is desirable. Taking into account these needs, this review intends to collect the research carried out during the past years, focusing mainly on the use of modified nucleotides in SELEX and the development of mutant enzymes for broadening nucleoside triphosphates acceptance. In addition, comments regarding the synthesis of modified nucleoside triphosphate will be briefly discussed.

  19. Modified Nucleoside Triphosphates for In-vitro Selection Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dellafiore, María A.; Montserrat, Javier M.; Iribarren, Adolfo M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of SELEX (Selective Enhancement of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) provides a powerful tool for the search of functional oligonucleotides with the ability to bind ligands with high affinity and selectivity (aptamers) and for the discovery of nucleic acid sequences with diverse enzymatic activities (ribozymes and DNAzymes). This technique has been extensively applied to the selection of natural DNA or RNA molecules but, in order to improve chemical and structural diversity as well as for particular applications where further chemical or biological stability is necessary, the extension of this strategy to modified oligonucleotides is desirable. Taking into account these needs, this review intends to collect the research carried out during the past years, focusing mainly on the use of modified nucleotides in SELEX and the development of mutant enzymes for broadening nucleoside triphosphates acceptance. In addition, comments regarding the synthesis of modified nucleoside triphosphate will be briefly discussed. PMID:27200340

  20. Modified Nucleoside Triphosphates for In-vitro Selection Techniques.

    PubMed

    Dellafiore, María A; Montserrat, Javier M; Iribarren, Adolfo M

    2016-01-01

    The development of SELEX (Selective Enhancement of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) provides a powerful tool for the search of functional oligonucleotides with the ability to bind ligands with high affinity and selectivity (aptamers) and for the discovery of nucleic acid sequences with diverse enzymatic activities (ribozymes and DNAzymes). This technique has been extensively applied to the selection of natural DNA or RNA molecules but, in order to improve chemical and structural diversity as well as for particular applications where further chemical or biological stability is necessary, the extension of this strategy to modified oligonucleotides is desirable. Taking into account these needs, this review intends to collect the research carried out during the past years, focusing mainly on the use of modified nucleotides in SELEX and the development of mutant enzymes for broadening nucleoside triphosphates acceptance. In addition, comments regarding the synthesis of modified nucleoside triphosphate will be briefly discussed. PMID:27200340

  1. A new crystal form of human histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (hHINT1) in complex with adenosine 5′-monophosphate at 1.38 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Dolot, Rafał; Ozga, Magdalena; Włodarczyk, Artur; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Nawrot, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1) represents the most ancient and widespread branch of the histidine triad protein superfamily. HINT1 plays an important role in various biological processes and has been found in many species. Here, the structure of the human HINT1–adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) complex at 1.38 Å resolution obtained from a new monoclinic crystal form is reported. The final structure has R cryst = 0.1207 (R free = 0.1615) and the model exhibits good stereochemical quality. Detailed analysis of the high-resolution data allowed the details of the protein structure to be updated in comparison to the previously published data. PMID:22869114

  2. MOLECULAR PROBES FOR EXTRACELLULAR ADENOSINE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Ukena, Dieter; Padgett, William; Kirk, Kenneth L.; Daly, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Derivatives of adenosine receptor agonists (N6-phenyladenosines) and antagonists (1,3-dialkyl-8-phenylxanthines) bearing functionalized chains suitable for attachment to other molecules have been reported [Jacobson et al., J. med. Chem. 28, 1334 and 1341 (1985)]. The “functionalized congener” approach has been extended to the synthesis of spectroscopic and other probes for adenosine receptors that retain high affinity (Ki ~ 10−9 −10−8 M) in A1-receptor binding. The probes have been synthesized from an antagonist xanthine amine congener (XAC) and an adenosine amine congener (ADAC). [3H]ADAC has been synthesized and found to bind highly specifically to A1-adenosine receptors of rat and calf cerebral cortical membranes with KD values of 1.4 and 0.34 nM respectively. The higher affinity in the bovine brain, seen also with many of the probes derived from ADAC and XAC, is associated with phenyl substituents. The spectroscopic probes contain a reporter group attached at a distal site of the functionalized chain. These bifunctional ligands may contain a spin label (e.g. the nitroxyl radical TEMPO) for electron spin resonance spectroscopy, or a fluorescent dye, including fluorescein and 4-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD), or labels for 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Potential applications of the spectroscopic probes in characterization of adenosine receptors are discussed. PMID:3036153

  3. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  4. Inhibition of Multidrug Resistance-Linked P-Glycoprotein (ABCB1) Function by 5′-Fluorosulfonylbenzoyl 5′-Adenosine: Evidence for an ATP Analog That Interacts With Both Drug-Substrate- and Nucleotide-Binding Sites†

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuma, Shinobu; Chufan, Eduardo; Nandigama, Krishnamachary; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Durell, Stewart R.; Appella, Ettore; Sauna, Zuben E.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2011-01-01

    5′-fluorosulfonylbenzonyl 5′-adenosine (FSBA) is an ATP analog that covalently modifies several residues in the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of several ATPases, kinases and other proteins. P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis for the efflux of amphipathic anticancer agents from cancer cells. We investigated the interactions of FSBA with P-gp to study the catalytic cycle of ATP hydrolysis. Incubation of P-gp with FSBA inhibited ATP hydrolysis (IC50= 0.21 mM) and the binding of 8-azido[α–32P]ATP (IC50= 0.68 mM). In addition, 14C-FSBA crosslinks to P-gp, suggesting that FSBA-mediated inhibition of ATP hydrolysis is irreversible due to covalent modification of P-gp. However, when the NBDs were occupied with a saturating concentration of ATP prior to treatment, FSBA stimulated ATP hydrolysis by P-gp. Furthermore, FSBA inhibited the photocrosslinking of P-gp with [125I]-Iodoaryl-azidoprazosin (IAAP; IC50 = 0.17 mM). As IAAP is a transport substrate for P-gp, this suggests that FSBA affects not only the NBDs, but also the transport-substrate site in the transmembrane domains. Consistent with these results, FSBA blocked efflux of rhodamine 123 from P-gp-expressing cells. Additionally, mass spectrometric analysis identified FSBA crosslinks to residues within or nearby the NBDs but not in the transmembrane domains and docking of FSBA in a homology model of human P-gp NBDs supports the biochemical studies. Thus, FSBA is an ATP analog that interacts with both the drug-binding and ATP-binding sites of P-gp, but fluorosulfonyl-mediated crosslinking is observed only at the NBDs. PMID:21452853

  5. Mapping of the nucleotide-binding sites in the ADP/ATP carrier of beef heart mitochondria by photolabeling with 2-azido[alpha-32P]adenosine diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Dalbon, P; Brandolin, G; Boulay, F; Hoppe, J; Vignais, P V

    1988-07-12

    2-Azido[alpha-32P]adenosine diphosphate (2-azido[alpha-32P]ADP) has been used to photolabel the ADP/ATP carrier in beef heart mitochondria. In reversible binding assays carried out in the dark, this photoprobe was found to inhibit ADP/ATP transport in beef heart mitochondria and to bind to two types of specific sites of the ADP/ATP carrier characterized by high-affinity binding (Kd = 20 microM) and low-affinity binding (Kd = 400 microM). In contrast, it was unable to bind to specific carrier sites in inverted submitochondrial particles. Upon photoirradiation of beef heart mitochondria in the presence of 2-azido[alpha-32P]ADP, the ADP/ATP carrier was covalently labeled. After purification, the photolabeled carrier protein was cleaved chemically by acidolysis or cyanogen bromide and enzymatically with the Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease. In the ADP/ATP carrier protein, which is 297 amino acid residues in length, two discrete regions extending from Phe-153 to Met-200 and from Tyr-250 to Met-281 were labeled by 2-azido[alpha-32P]ADP. The peptide fragments corresponding to these regions were sequenced, and the labeled amino acids were identified. As 2-azido-ADP is not transported into mitochondria and competes against transport of externally added ADP, it is concluded that the two regions of the carrier which are photolabeled are facing the cytosol. Whether the two photolabeled regions are located in a single peptide chain of the carrier or in different peptide chains of an oligomeric structure is discussed.

  6. Mapping of the nucleotide-binding sites in the ADP/ATP carrier of beef heart mitochondria by photolabeling with 2-azido(. cap alpha. -/sup 32/P)adenosine diphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Dalbon, P.; Brandolin, G.; Boulay, F.; Hoppe, J.; Vignais, P.V.

    1988-07-12

    2-Azido(..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)adenosine diphosphate (2-azido(..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)ADP) has been used to photolabel the ADP/ATP carrier in beef heart mitochondria. In reversible binding assays carried out in the dark, this photoprobe was found to inhibit ADP/ATP transport in beef heart mitochondria and to bind to two types of specific sites of the ADP/ATP carrier characterized by high-affinity binding (K/sub d/ = 20 ..mu..M) and low-affinity binding (K/sub d/ = 400 ..mu..M). In contrast, it was unable to bind to specific carrier sites in inverted submitochondrial particles. Upon photoirradiation of beef heart mitochondria in the presence of 2-azido(..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)ADP, the ADP/ATP carrier was covalently labeled. After purification, the photolabeled carrier protein was cleaved chemically by acidolysis or cyanogen bromide and enzymatically with the Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease. In the ADP/ATP carrier protein, which is 297 amino acid residues in length, two discrete regions extending from Phe-153 to Met-200 and from Tyr-250 to Met-281 were labeled by 2-azido(..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)ADP. The peptide fragments corresponding to these regions were sequenced, and the labeled amino acids were identified. As 2-azido-ADP is not transported into mitochondria and competes against transport of externally added ADP, it is concluded that the two regions of the carrier which are photolabeled are facing the cytosol. Whether the two photolabeled regions are located in a single peptide chain of the carrier or in different peptide chains of an oligomeric structure is discussed.

  7. Adenosine diphosphate restricts the protein remodeling activity of the Hsp104 chaperone to Hsp70 assisted disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kłosowska, Agnieszka; Chamera, Tomasz; Liberek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Hsp104 disaggregase provides thermotolerance in yeast by recovering proteins from aggregates in cooperation with the Hsp70 chaperone. Protein disaggregation involves polypeptide extraction from aggregates and its translocation through the central channel of the Hsp104 hexamer. This process relies on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. Considering that Hsp104 is characterized by low affinity towards ATP and is strongly inhibited by adenosine diphosphate (ADP), we asked how Hsp104 functions at the physiological levels of adenine nucleotides. We demonstrate that physiological levels of ADP highly limit Hsp104 activity. This inhibition, however, is moderated by the Hsp70 chaperone, which allows efficient disaggregation by supporting Hsp104 binding to aggregates but not to non-aggregated, disordered protein substrates. Our results point to an additional level of Hsp104 regulation by Hsp70, which restricts the potentially toxic protein unfolding activity of Hsp104 to the disaggregation process, providing the yeast protein-recovery system with substrate specificity and efficiency in ATP consumption. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15159.001 PMID:27223323

  8. Corticotropin-releasing factor binding to peripheral tissue and activation of the adenylate cyclase-adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate system

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, J.R.; Eiden, L.E.; Eskay, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    Specific binding sites for rat corticotropin-releasing factor (rCRF) are present in rat adrenal medulla, ventral prostate, spleen, liver, kidney, and testis and bovine chromaffin cells in culture. Maximal binding of (/sup 125/I)rCRF occurred within 25 min at 4 C and was saturable. Scatchard analysis of rCRF binding to rat adrenal membranes and bovine chromaffin cells revealed the existence of two classes of binding sites. One class had a relatively higher apparent affinity and lower number of binding sites, whereas the other class had a relatively lower affinity and higher number of binding sites. CRF induced a dose-related increase in rat adrenal membrane adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP levels in bovine chromaffin cells. Nanomolar concentrations of rCRF maximally stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in rat adrenal membranes and maximally increased cAMP levels in bovine chromaffin cells to 86% and 130% above control values, respectively. The demonstration of specific CRF-binding sites in a variety of peripheral tissues and the finding that activation of specific CRF-binding sites in adrenal tissue stimulates the adenylate cyclase-cAMP system suggest that CRF may have an important regulatory role in various peripheral tissues.

  9. A Metabolic Immune Checkpoint: Adenosine in Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Within tumors, some areas are less oxygenated than others. Since their home ground is under chronic hypoxia, tumor cells adapt to this condition by activating aerobic glycolysis; however, this hypoxic environment is very harsh for incoming immune cells. Deprivation of oxygen limits availability of energy sources and induces accumulation of extracellular adenosine in tumors. Extracellular adenosine, upon binding with adenosine receptors on the surface of various immune cells, suppresses pro-inflammatory activities. In addition, signaling through adenosine receptors upregulates a number of anti-inflammatory molecules and immunoregulatory cells, leading to the establishment of a long-lasting immunosuppressive environment. Thus, due to hypoxia and adenosine, tumors can discourage antitumor immune responses no matter how the response was induced, whether it was spontaneous or artificially introduced with a therapeutic intention. Preclinical studies have shown the significance of adenosine in tumor survival strategy by demonstrating tumor regression after inactivation of adenosine receptors, inhibition of adenosine-producing enzymes, or reversal of tissue hypoxia. These promising results indicate a potential use of the inhibitors of the hypoxia-adenosine pathway for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27066002

  10. The caffeine-binding adenosine A2A receptor induces age-like HPA-axis dysfunction by targeting glucocorticoid receptor function.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Vânia L; Ferreira, Diana G; Coelho, Joana E; Valadas, Jorge S; Gomes, Rui; Temido-Ferreira, Mariana; Shmidt, Tatiana; Baqi, Younis; Buée, Luc; Müller, Christa E; Hamdane, Malika; Outeiro, Tiago F; Bader, Michael; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Blum, David; Lopes, Luísa V

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is associated with procognitive effects in humans by counteracting overactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), which is upregulated in the human forebrain of aged and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We have previously shown that an anti-A2AR therapy reverts age-like memory deficits, by reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis feedback and corticosterone circadian levels. These observations suggest that A2AR over-activation and glucocorticoid dysfunction are key events in age-related hippocampal deficits; but their direct connection has never been explored. We now show that inducing A2AR overexpression in an aging-like profile is sufficient to trigger HPA-axis dysfunction, namely loss of plasmatic corticosterone circadian oscillation, and promotes reduction of GR hippocampal levels. The synaptic plasticity and memory deficits triggered by GR in the hippocampus are amplified by A2AR over-activation and were rescued by anti-A2AR therapy; finally, we demonstrate that A2AR act on GR nuclear translocation and GR-dependent transcriptional regulation. We provide the first demonstration that A2AR is a major regulator of GR function and that this functional interconnection may be a trigger to age-related memory deficits. This supports the idea that the procognitive effects of A2AR antagonists, namely caffeine, on Alzheimer's and age-related cognitive impairments may rely on its ability to modulate GR actions.

  11. The caffeine-binding adenosine A2A receptor induces age-like HPA-axis dysfunction by targeting glucocorticoid receptor function.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Vânia L; Ferreira, Diana G; Coelho, Joana E; Valadas, Jorge S; Gomes, Rui; Temido-Ferreira, Mariana; Shmidt, Tatiana; Baqi, Younis; Buée, Luc; Müller, Christa E; Hamdane, Malika; Outeiro, Tiago F; Bader, Michael; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Blum, David; Lopes, Luísa V

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is associated with procognitive effects in humans by counteracting overactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), which is upregulated in the human forebrain of aged and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We have previously shown that an anti-A2AR therapy reverts age-like memory deficits, by reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis feedback and corticosterone circadian levels. These observations suggest that A2AR over-activation and glucocorticoid dysfunction are key events in age-related hippocampal deficits; but their direct connection has never been explored. We now show that inducing A2AR overexpression in an aging-like profile is sufficient to trigger HPA-axis dysfunction, namely loss of plasmatic corticosterone circadian oscillation, and promotes reduction of GR hippocampal levels. The synaptic plasticity and memory deficits triggered by GR in the hippocampus are amplified by A2AR over-activation and were rescued by anti-A2AR therapy; finally, we demonstrate that A2AR act on GR nuclear translocation and GR-dependent transcriptional regulation. We provide the first demonstration that A2AR is a major regulator of GR function and that this functional interconnection may be a trigger to age-related memory deficits. This supports the idea that the procognitive effects of A2AR antagonists, namely caffeine, on Alzheimer's and age-related cognitive impairments may rely on its ability to modulate GR actions. PMID:27510168

  12. The caffeine-binding adenosine A2A receptor induces age-like HPA-axis dysfunction by targeting glucocorticoid receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Vânia L.; Ferreira, Diana G.; Coelho, Joana E.; Valadas, Jorge S.; Gomes, Rui; Temido-Ferreira, Mariana; Shmidt, Tatiana; Baqi, Younis; Buée, Luc; Müller, Christa E.; Hamdane, Malika; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Bader, Michael; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H.; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Blum, David; Lopes, Luísa V.

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is associated with procognitive effects in humans by counteracting overactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), which is upregulated in the human forebrain of aged and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. We have previously shown that an anti-A2AR therapy reverts age-like memory deficits, by reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis feedback and corticosterone circadian levels. These observations suggest that A2AR over-activation and glucocorticoid dysfunction are key events in age-related hippocampal deficits; but their direct connection has never been explored. We now show that inducing A2AR overexpression in an aging-like profile is sufficient to trigger HPA-axis dysfunction, namely loss of plasmatic corticosterone circadian oscillation, and promotes reduction of GR hippocampal levels. The synaptic plasticity and memory deficits triggered by GR in the hippocampus are amplified by A2AR over-activation and were rescued by anti-A2AR therapy; finally, we demonstrate that A2AR act on GR nuclear translocation and GR-dependent transcriptional regulation. We provide the first demonstration that A2AR is a major regulator of GR function and that this functional interconnection may be a trigger to age-related memory deficits. This supports the idea that the procognitive effects of A2AR antagonists, namely caffeine, on Alzheimer’s and age-related cognitive impairments may rely on its ability to modulate GR actions. PMID:27510168

  13. ATP-binding sites in brain p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein), a multifunctional AAA ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Zalk, Ran; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2003-01-01

    VCP (valosin-containing protein) or p97 is a member of the AAA family (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities family), a diverse group of proteins sharing a key conserved AAA module containing duplicate putative ATP-binding sites. Although the functions of the AAA family are related to their putative ATP-binding sites, the binding of ATP to these sites has not yet been demonstrated. In the present study, the ATP-binding site(s) of brain VCP was characterized using the photoreactive ATP analogue, BzATP [3'- O -(4-benzoylbenzoyl)ATP]. Photo-activation of Bz-[alpha-(32)P]ATP resulted in its covalent binding to a 97-kDa purified soluble or membrane-associated protein, identified by amino acid sequencing as VCP. Bz-[alpha-(32)P]ATP covalently bound to the purified homo-hexameric VCP with an apparent high affinity (74-111 nM). A molar stoichiometry of 2.23+/-0.14 BzATP bound per homo-hexameric VCP (n =6) was determined using different methods for analysis of radiolabelling and protein determination. Nucleotides inhibited the binding of Bz-[alpha-(32)P]ATP to VCP with the following efficiency: BzATP>ATP>ADP>>adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate>or=adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-methylene]triphosphate, whereas AMP, GTP and CTP were ineffective. VCP was observed to possess very low ATPase activity, with nucleotide specificity similar to that for BzATP binding. Conformational changes induced by an alternating site mechanism for ATP binding are suggested as a molecular mechanism for coupling ATP binding to the diverse activities of the AAA family. PMID:12747802

  14. Thiamin diphosphate in biological chemistry: new aspects of thiamin metabolism, especially triphosphate derivatives acting other than as cofactors.

    PubMed

    Bettendorff, Lucien; Wins, Pierre

    2009-06-01

    Prokaryotes, yeasts and plants synthesize thiamin (vitamin B1) via complex pathways. Animal cells capture the vitamin through specific high-affinity transporters essential for internal thiamin homeostasis. Inside the cells, thiamin is phosphorylated to higher phosphate derivatives. Thiamin diphosphate (ThDP) is the best-known thiamin compound because of its role as an enzymatic cofactor. However, in addition to ThDP, at least three other thiamin phosphates occur naturally in most cells: thiamin monophosphate, thiamin triphosphate (ThTP) and the recently discovered adenosine thiamin triphosphate. It has been suggested that ThTP has a specific neurophysiological role, but recent data favor a much more basic metabolic function. During amino acid starvation, Escherichia coli accumulate ThTP, possibly acting as a signal involved in the adaptation of the bacteria to changing nutritional conditions. In animal cells, ThTP can phosphorylate some proteins, but the physiological significance of this mechanism remains unknown. Adenosine thiamin triphosphate, recently discovered in E. coli, accumulates during carbon starvation and might act as an alarmone. Among the proteins involved in thiamin metabolism, thiamin transporters, thiamin pyrophosphokinase and a soluble 25-kDa thiamin triphosphatase have been characterized at the molecular level, in contrast to thiamin mono- and diphosphatases whose specificities remain to be proven. A soluble enzyme catalyzing the synthesis of adenosine thiamin triphosphate from ThDP and ADP or ATP has been partially characterized in E. coli, but the mechanism of ThTP synthesis remains elusive. The data reviewed here illustrate the complexity of thiamin biochemistry, which is not restricted to the cofactor role of ThDP.

  15. Dietary adenine controls adult lifespan via adenosine nucleotide biosynthesis and AMPK, and regulates the longevity benefit of caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Stenesen, Drew; Suh, Jae Myoung; Seo, Jin; Yu, Kweon; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Jong-Seok; Min, Kyung-Jin; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A common thread among conserved lifespan regulators lies within intertwined roles in metabolism and energy homeostasis. We show that heterozygous mutations of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) biosynthetic enzymes extend Drosophila lifespan. The lifespan benefit of these mutations depends upon increased AMP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to ATP ratios and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Transgenic expression of AMPK in adult fat body or adult muscle, key metabolic tissues, extended lifespan, while AMPK RNAi reduced lifespan. Supplementing adenine, a substrate for AMP biosynthesis, to the diet of long-lived AMP biosynthesis mutants reversed lifespan extension. Remarkably, this simple change in diet also blocked the pro-longevity effects of dietary restriction. These data establish AMP biosynthesis, adenosine nucleotide ratios, and AMPK as determinants of adult lifespan, provide a mechanistic link between cellular anabolism and energy sensing pathways, and indicate that dietary adenine manipulations might alter metabolism to influence animal lifespan. PMID:23312286

  16. Purification of an Ion-Stimulated Adenosine Triphosphatase from Plant Roots: Association with Plasma Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, T. K.; Leonard, R. T.; Bracker, C. E.; Keenan, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    A membrane-bound adenosine triphosphatase (EC 3.6.1.3) that requires Mg++ and that is stimulated by monovalent ions has been purified 7- to 8-fold from homogenates of oat (Avena sativa L. Cult. Goodfield) roots by discontinuous sucrose-gradient centrifugation. The enzyme was substrate specific; adenosine triphosphate was hydrolyzed 25 times more rapidly than other nucleoside triphosphates. The membrane fraction containing adenosine triphosphatase was enriched in plasma membranes, which were identified by the presence of a glucan synthetase (EC 2.4.1.12), a high sterol to phospholipid ratio, and by a stain consisting of periodic acid, chromic acid, and phosphotungstic acid that is specific for plant plasma membranes. Oat-root plasma membranes and the associated adenosine triphosphatase were purified on either a 6-layer discontinuous sucrose gradient or on a simplified gradient consisting of only two sucrose layers. These results represent the first demonstration that plant plasma membranes contain an adenosine triphosphatase that is activated by monovalent ions, and this finding further implicates the enzyme in the absorption of inorganic ions by plant roots. Images PMID:16592027

  17. Synergistic effects of inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate on inositol 2,4,5-triphosphate-stimulated Ca2+ release do not involve direct interaction of inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate with inositol triphosphate-binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Loomis-Husselbee, J W; Cullen, P J; Dreikausen, U E; Irvine, R F; Dawson, A P

    1996-01-01

    We have previously found that for permeabilized L1210 cells, low micromolar concentrations of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 added prior to Ins(2,4,5)P3 enhance the effects of suboptimal concentrations of Ins(2,4,5)P3 in causing Ca2+ release from InsP3-sensitive Ca2+ stores [Cullen, Irvine and Dawson (1990) Biochem J. 271, 549-553]. If this was due either to some conversion of added Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 into Ins(1,4,5)P3 by the 3-phosphatase, or to Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 acting as a weak (or partial) agonist on the InsP3 receptor it would be expected that,in the presence of thimerosal to sensitize the InsP3 receptor, the dose-response curve to Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 would be left-shifted by the same extent as that of Ins(1,4,5)P3. This was found not to be the case; the dose-response curve to Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 was not shifted at all by thimerosal. Furthermore, L-Ins(1,3,4,5)P4, which can displace radiolabelled D-Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 but not D-Ins(1,4,5)P3 from their respective high-affinity binding sites, mimicked the effects of D-Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 in enhancing the slow phase of Ins(2,4,5)P3-stimulated Ca2+ release. Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 caused an increase in magnitude of the slow phase of InsP3-stimulated Ca2+ release leaving the magnitude of the fast phase unaltered, in contrast to increasing Ins(2,4,5)P3 concentrations which increased the size of both phases. In addition, Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 decreased the rate constant for the slow phase of Ca2+ release. These findings point strongly to the conclusion that InsP4 is not working directly via the InsP3 receptor but indirectly via an InsP4 receptor. PMID:8615774

  18. Cyclic 3'-5'-adenosine monophosphate binds to annexin I and regulates calcium-dependent membrane aggregation and ion channel activity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B E; Lee, G; Arispe, N; Pollard, H B

    1995-12-27

    The annexin (Anx) gene family comprises a set of calcium-dependent membrane binding proteins, which have been implicated in a wide variety of cellular processes including membrane fusion and calcium channel activity. We report here that cAMP activates Ca(2+)-dependent aggregation of both phosphatidylserine (PS) liposomes and bovine chromaffin granules driven by [des 1-12]annexin I (lipocortin I, Anx1). The mechanism of cAMP action involves an increase in AnxI-dependent cooperativity on the rate of such a reaction without affecting the corresponding k1/2 values. Cyclic AMP causes the values of the Hill coefficient (nH) for AnxI to change from 3 to 6 in both PS liposomes and chromaffin granules. By contrast, ATP inhibits the rate of aggregation activity without affecting the cooperativity or the extent of aggregation process. We were also able to photolabel Anx1 specifically with an 8-azido analogue of cAMP by a calcium-independent process. Such a process is saturable, yielding a Kd = 0.8 microM by Scatchard analysis. Specific displacement occurs in the presence of cAMP and ATP. Finally, we found that cAMP alters the conductance of calcium channels formed by AnxI in planar lipid bilayers. We interpret these data to indicate that AnxI binds both calcium and cAMP independently, and that both actions have functional consequences. This is the first report of a nucleotide binding function for a member of the annexin gene family.

  19. A selective adenosine sensor derived from a triplex DNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mayurbhai; Dutta, Avishek; Huang, Haidong

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a selective adenosine aptamer sensor using a rational approach. Unlike traditional RNA aptamers developed from SELEX, duplex DNA containing an abasic site can function as a general scaffold to rationally design aptamers for small aromatic molecules. We discovered that abasic site-containing triplex DNA can also function as an aptamer and provide better affinity than duplex DNA aptamers. A novel adenosine aptamer sensor was designed using such a triplex. The aptamer is modified with furano-dU in the binding site to sense the binding. The sensor bound adenosine has a dissociation constant of 400 nM, more than tenfold stronger than the adenosine aptamer developed from SELEX. The binding quenched furano-dU fluorescence by 40%. It was also demonstrated in this study that this sensor is selective for adenosine over uridine, cytidine, guanosine, ATP, and AMP. The detection limit of this sensor is about 50 nM. The sensor can be used to quantify adenosine concentrations between 50 nM and 2 μM. PMID:21547431

  20. Relaxation of isolated taenia coli of guinea-pig by enantiomers of 2-azido analogues of adenosine and adenine nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Cusack, N. J.; Planker, M.

    1979-01-01

    1 2-Azido photoaffinity analogues of adenosine 5'triphosphate (ATP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), and adenosine have been synthesized and tested on guinea-pig taenia coli. 2 2-Azido-ATP and 2-azido-ADP were approximately 20 times more potent than ATP as relaxants of taenia coli, and required prolonged washout times before recovery of the muscle. 3 2-Azido-AMP and 2-azidoadenosine were 2 to 12 times more potent than ATP, but took much longer (up to 100 s) to reach maximal relaxation. This behaviour is different from that of AMP and adenosine which were much less potent than ATP. 4 L-Enantiomers of adenosine and adenine nucleotides were also tested. L-ATP and L-ADP were 3 to 6 times less potent than ATP and ADP, and L-AMP and L-adenosine were inactive. 2-Azido-L-ATP and 2-azido-L-ADP were approximately 120 times less potent than 2-Azido-ATP and 6 times less potent than ATP as relaxants of taenia coli. 2-Azido-L-AMP and 2-azidio-L-adenosine were almost inactive. 5 2-Azido derivatives are photolysed by u.v. irradiation to reactive intermediates. 2-Azido-ATP and 2-azidoadenosine might be suitable photoaffinity ligands for labelling putative P2 and P1 purine receptors respectively. 2-Azido-L-ATP and 2-azido-L-adenosine could be useful controls for nonspecific labelling. PMID:497519

  1. Fluorometric Determination of Adenosine Nucleotide Derivatives as Measures of the Microfouling, Detrital, and Sedimentary Microbial Biomass and Physiological Status

    PubMed Central

    Davis, William M.; White, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Adenosine, adenine, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), AMP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were recovered quantitatively from aqueous portions of lipid extracts of microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial communities. These could be detected quantitatively in the picomolar range by forming their 1-N6-etheno derivatives and analyzing by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Lipid extraction and subsequent analysis allowed the simultaneous measurement of the microbial community structure, total microbial biomass with the quantitative recovery of the adenine-containing cellular components, which were protected from enzymatic destruction. This extraction and fluorescent derivatization method showed equivalency with the luciferin-luciferase method for bacterial ATP measurements. Quick-freezing samples in the field with dry ice-acetone preserved the ATP and energy charge (a ratio of adenosine nucleotides) for analysis at remote laboratories. The metabolic lability of ATP in estuarine detrital and microfouling communities, as well as bacterial monocultures of constant biomass, showed ATP to be a precarious measure of biomass under some conditions. Combinations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides gave better correlations with microbial biomass measured as extractable lipid phosphate in the detrital and microfouling microbial communities than did ATP alone. Stresses such as anoxia or filtration are reflected in the rapid accumulation of intracellular adenosine and the excretion of adenosine and AMP into the surrounding milieu. Increases in AMP and adenosine may prove to be more sensitive indicators of metabolic status than the energy charge. PMID:16345633

  2. N6-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-Adenosine Exhibits Insecticidal Activity against Plutella xylostella via Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ming; Chai, Yiqiu; Chen, Guanjv; Wang, Huidong; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, is one of the most important pests of cruciferous crops. We have earlier shown that N6-(2-hydroxyethyl)-adenosine (HEA) exhibits insecticidal activity against P. xylostella. In the present study we investigated the possible mechanism of insecticidal action of HEA on P. xylostella. HEA is a derivative of adenosine, therefore, we speculated whether it acts via P. xylostella adenosine receptor (PxAdoR). We used RNAi approach to silence PxAdoR gene and used antagonist of denosine receptor (AdoR) to study the insecticidal effect of HEA. We cloned the whole sequence of PxAdoR gene. A BLAST search using NCBI protein database showed a 61% identity with the Drosophila adenosine receptor (DmAdoR) and a 32–35% identity with human AdoR. Though the amino acids sequence of PxAdoR was different compared to other adenosine receptors, most of the amino acids that are known to be important for adenosine receptor ligand binding and signaling were present. However, only 30% binding sites key residues was similar between PxAdoR and A1R. HEA, at a dose of 1 mg/mL, was found to be lethal to the second-instar larvae of P. xylostella, and a significant reduction of mortality and growth inhibition ratio were obtained when HEA was administered to the larvae along with PxAdoR-dsRNA or antagonist of AdoR (SCH58261) for 36, 48, or 60 h. Especially at 48 h, the rate of growth inhibition of the PxAdoR knockdown group was 3.5-fold less than that of the HEA group, and the corrected mortality of SCH58261 group was reduced almost 2-fold compared with the HEA group. Our findings show that HEA may exert its insecticidal activity against P. xylostella larvae via acting on PxAdoR. PMID:27668428

  3. Characterization and regulation of adenosine transport in T84 intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mun, E C; Tally, K J; Matthews, J B

    1998-02-01

    Adenosine release from mucosal sources during inflammation and ischemia activates intestinal epithelial Cl- secretion. Previous data suggest that A2b receptor-mediated Cl- secretory responses may be dampened by epithelial cell nucleoside scavenging. The present study utilizes isotopic flux analysis and nucleoside analog binding assays to directly characterize the nucleoside transport system of cultured T84 human intestinal epithelial cells and to explore whether adenosine transport is regulated by secretory agonists, metabolic inhibition, or phorbol ester. Uptake of adenosine across the apical membrane displayed characteristics of simple diffusion. Kinetic analysis of basolateral uptake revealed a Na(+)-independent, nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI)-sensitive facilitated-diffusion system with low affinity but high capacity for adenosine. NBTI binding studies indicated a single population of high-affinity binding sites basolaterally. Neither forskolin, 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)-adenosine, nor metabolic inhibition significantly altered adenosine transport. However, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate significantly reduced both adenosine transport and the number of specific NBTI binding sites, suggesting that transporter number may be decreased through activation of protein kinase C. This basolateral facilitated adenosine transporter may serve a conventional function in nucleoside salvage and a novel function as a regulator of adenosine-dependent Cl- secretory responses and hence diarrheal disorders.

  4. Adenosine and the Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Vlajkovic, Srdjan M; Housley, Gary D; Thorne, Peter R

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine is a signalling molecule that modulates cellular activity in the central nervous system and peripheral organs via four G protein-coupled receptors designated A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. This review surveys the literature on the role of adenosine in auditory function, particularly cochlear function and its protection from oxidative stress. The specific tissue distribution of adenosine receptors in the mammalian cochlea implicates adenosine signalling in sensory transduction and auditory neurotransmission although functional studies have demonstrated that adenosine stimulates cochlear blood flow, but does not alter the resting and sound-evoked auditory potentials. An interest in a potential otoprotective role for adenosine has recently evolved, fuelled by the capacity of A1 adenosine receptors to prevent cochlear injury caused by acoustic trauma and ototoxic drugs. The balance between A1 and A2A receptors is conceived as critical for cochlear response to oxidative stress, which is an underlying mechanism of the most common inner ear pathologies (e.g. noise-induced and age-related hearing loss, drug ototoxicity). Enzymes involved in adenosine metabolism, adenosine kinase and adenosine deaminase, are also emerging as attractive targets for controlling oxidative stress in the cochlea. Other possible targets include ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine from extracellular ATP, and nucleoside transporters, which regulate adenosine concentrations on both sides of the plasma membrane. Developments of selective adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists that can cross the blood-cochlea barrier are bolstering efforts to develop therapeutic interventions aimed at ameliorating cochlear injury. Manipulations of the adenosine signalling system thus hold significant promise in the therapeutic management of oxidative stress in the cochlea. PMID:20190966

  5. Structural basis of CX-4945 binding to human protein kinase CK2

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Andrew D.; Sheth, Payal R.; Basso, Andrea D.; Paliwal, Sunil; Gray, Kimberly; Fischmann, Thierry O.; Le, Hung V.

    2012-02-07

    Protein kinase CK2 (CK2), a constitutively active serine/threonine kinase, is involved in a variety of roles essential to the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Elevated levels of CK2 expression results in the dysregulation of key signaling pathways that regulate transcription, and has been implicated in cancer. The adenosine-5'-triphosphate-competitive inhibitor CX-4945 has been reported to show broad spectrum anti-proliferative activity in multiple cancer cell lines. Although the enzymatic IC{sub 50} of CX-4945 has been reported, the thermodynamics and structural basis of binding to CK2{alpha} remained elusive. Presented here are the crystal structures of human CK2{alpha} in complex with CX-4945 and adenylyl phosphoramidate at 2.7 and 1.3 {angstrom}, respectively. Biophysical analysis of CX-4945 binding is also described. This data provides the structural rationale for the design of more potent inhibitors against this emerging cancer target.

  6. Direct visualization by electron microscopy of the weakly bound intermediates in the actomyosin adenosine triphosphatase cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, T D; Bhandari, D; Maupin, P; Wachsstock, D; Weeds, A G; Zot, H G

    1993-01-01

    We used a novel stopped-flow/rapid-freezing machine to prepare the transient intermediates in the actin-myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) cycle for direct observation by electron microscopy. We focused on the low affinity complexes of myosin-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and myosin-adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-Pi with actin filaments since the transition from these states to the high affinity actin-myosin-ADP and actin-myosin states is postulated to generate the molecular motion that drives muscle contraction and other types of cellular movements. After rapid freezing and metal replication of mixtures of myosin subfragment-1, actin filaments, and ATP, the structure of the weakly bound intermediates is indistinguishable from nucleotide-free rigor complexes. In particular, the average angle of attachment of the myosin head to the actin filament is approximately 40 degrees in both cases. At all stages in the ATPase cycle, the configuration of most of the myosin heads bound to actin filaments is similar, and the part of the myosin head preserved in freeze-fracture replicas does not tilt by more than a few degrees during the transition from the low affinity to high affinity states. In contrast, myosin heads chemically cross-linked to actin filaments differ in their attachment angles from ordered at 40 degrees without ATP to nearly random in the presence of ATP when viewed by negative staining (Craig, R., L.E. Greene, and E. Eisenberg. 1985. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 82:3247-3251, and confirmed here), freezing in vitreous ice (Applegate, D., and P. Flicker. 1987. J. Biol. Chem. 262:6856-6863), and in replicas of rapidly frozen samples. This suggests that many of the cross-linked heads in these preparations are dissociated from but tethered to the actin filaments in the presence of ATP. These observations suggest that the molecular motion produced by myosin and actin takes place with the myosin head at a point some distance from the actin binding site or does not

  7. Leishmania amazonensis: Biological and biochemical characterization of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase activities.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Carla M; Martins-Duarte, Erica S; Ferraro, Rodrigo B; Fonseca de Souza, André Luíz; Gomes, Marta T; Lopes, Angela H C S; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A; Santos, André L S; Meyer-Fernandes, José R

    2006-09-01

    The presence of Leishmania amazonensis ecto-nucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase activities was demonstrated using antibodies against different NTPDase members by Western blotting, flow cytometry, and immunoelectron microscopy analysis. Living promastigote cells sequentially hydrolyzed the ATP molecule generating ADP, AMP, and adenosine, indicating that this surface enzyme may play a role in the salvage of purines from the extracellular medium. The L. amazonensis ecto-NTPDase activities were insensitive to Triton X-100, but they were enhanced by divalent cations, such as Mg(2+). In addition, the ecto-NTPDase activities decreased with time for 96 h when promastigotes were grown in vitro. On the other hand, these activities increased considerably when measured in living amastigote forms. Furthermore, the treatment with adenosine, a mediator of several relevant biological phenomena, induced a decrease in the reactivity with anti-CD39 antibody, raised against mammalian E-NTPDase, probably because of down regulation in the L. amazonensis ecto-NTPDase expression. Also, adenosine and anti-NTPDase antibodies induced a significant diminishing in the interaction between promastigotes of L. amazonensis and mouse peritoneal macrophages. PMID:16603157

  8. Ectonucleotide Triphosphate Diphosphohydrolase-1 (CD39) Mediates Resistance to Occlusive Arterial Thrombus Formation after Vascular Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huttinger, Zachary M.; Milks, Michael W.; Nickoli, Michael S.; Aurand, William L.; Long, Lawrence C.; Wheeler, Debra G.; Dwyer, Karen M.; d'Apice, Anthony J.F.; Robson, Simon C.; Cowan, Peter J.; Gumina, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Modulation of purinergic signaling, which is critical for vascular homeostasis and the response to vascular injury, is regulated by hydrolysis of proinflammatory ATP and/or ADP by ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 (ENTPD-1; CD39) to AMP, which then is hydrolyzed by ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) to adenosine. We report here that compared with littermate controls (wild type), transgenic mice expressing human ENTPDase-1 were resistant to the formation of an occlusive thrombus after FeCl3-induced carotid artery injury. Treatment of mice with the nonhydrolyzable ADP analog, adenosine-5′-0-(2-thiodiphosphate) trilithium salt, Ado-5′-PP[S], negated the protection from thrombosis, consistent with a role for ADP in platelet recruitment and thrombus formation. ENTPD-1 expression decreased whole-blood aggregation after stimulation by ADP, an effect negated by adenosine-5′-0-(2-thiodiphosphate) trilithium salt, Ado-5′-PP[S] stimulation, and limited the ability to maintain the platelet fibrinogen receptor, glycoprotein αIIb/β3, in a fully activated state, which is critical for thrombus formation. In vivo treatment with a CD73 antagonist, a nonselective adenosine-receptor antagonist, or a selective A2A or A2B adenosine-receptor antagonist, negated the resistance to thrombosis in transgenic mice expressing human ENTPD-1, suggesting a role for adenosine generation and engagement of adenosine receptors in conferring in vivo resistance to occlusive thrombosis in this model. In summary, our findings identify ENTPDase-1 modulation of purinergic signaling as a key determinant of the formation of an occlusive thrombus after vascular injury. PMID:22613024

  9. Activation of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxins by native and recombinant adenosine diphosphate-ribosylation factors, 20-kD guanine nucleotide-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C M; Chang, P P; Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Price, S R; Kunz, B C; Moss, J; Twiddy, E M; Holmes, R K

    1991-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) are responsible in part for "traveler's diarrhea" and related diarrheal illnesses. The family of LTs comprises two serogroups termed LT-I and LT-II; each serogroup includes two or more antigenic variants. The effects of LTs result from ADP ribosylation of Gs alpha, a stimulatory component of adenylyl cyclase; the mechanism of action is identical to that of cholera toxin (CT). The ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of CT is enhanced by 20-kD guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, known as ADP-ribosylation factors or ARFs. These proteins directly activate the CTA1 catalytic unit and stimulate its ADP ribosylation of Gs alpha, other proteins, and simple guanidino compounds (e.g., agmatine). Because of the similarities between CT and LTs, we investigated the effects of purified bovine brain ARF and a recombinant form of bovine ARF synthesized in Escherichia coli on LT activity. ARF enhanced the LT-I-, LT-IIa-, and LT-IIb-catalyzed ADP ribosylation of agmatine, as well as the auto-ADP ribosylation of the toxin catalytic unit. Stimulation of ADP-ribosylagmatine formation by LTs and CT in the presence of ARF was GTP dependent and enhanced by sodium dodecyl sulfate. With agmatine as substrate, LT-IIa and LT-IIb exhibited less than 1% the activity of CT and LT-Ih. CT and LTs catalyzed ADP-ribosyl-Gs alpha formation in a reaction dependent on ARF, GTP, and dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine/cholate. With Gs alpha as substrate, the ADP-ribosyltransferase activities of the toxins were similar, although CT and LT-Ih appeared to be slightly more active than LT-IIa and LT-IIb. Thus, LT-IIa and LT-IIb appear to differ somewhat from CT and LT-Ih in substrate specificity. Responsiveness to stimulation by ARF, GTP, and phospholipid/detergent as well as the specificity of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity are functions of LTs from serogroups LT-I and LT-II that are shared with CT. Images PMID:1902492

  10. Adenosine and Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Bjorness, Theresa E; Greene, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Over the last several decades the idea that adenosine (Ado) plays a role in sleep control was postulated due in large part to pharmacological studies that showed the ability of Ado agonists to induce sleep and Ado antagonists to decrease sleep. A second wave of research involving in vitro cellular analytic approaches and subsequently, the use of neurochemical tools such as microdialysis, identified a population of cells within the brainstem and basal forebrain arousal centers, with activity that is both tightly coupled to thalamocortical activation and under tonic inhibitory control by Ado. Most recently, genetic tools have been used to show that Ado receptors regulate a key aspect of sleep, the slow wave activity expressed during slow wave sleep. This review will briefly introduce some of the phenomenology of sleep and then summarize the effect of Ado levels on sleep, the effect of sleep on Ado levels, and recent experiments using mutant mouse models to characterize the role for Ado in sleep control and end with a discussion of which Ado receptors are involved in such control. When taken together, these various experiments suggest that while Ado does play a role in sleep control, it is a specific role with specific functional implications and it is one of many neurotransmitters and neuromodulators affecting the complex behavior of sleep. Finally, since the majority of adenosine-related experiments in the sleep field have focused on SWS, this review will focus largely on SWS; however, the role of adenosine in REM sleep behavior will be addressed. PMID:20190965

  11. Measurement of Inositol Triphosphate Levels from Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Tabatadze, Nino; Woolley, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Inositol triphosphate (IP3) is an important second messenger that participates in signal transduction pathways in diverse cell types including hippocampal neurons. Stimulation of phospholipase C in response to various stimuli (hormones, growth factors, neurotransmitters, neurotrophins, neuromodulators, odorants, light, etc) results in hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate (PIP2), a phospholipid that is located in the plasma membrane, and leads to the production of IP3 and diacylglycerol. Binding of IP3 to the IP3 receptor (IP3R) induces Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and enables the initiation of intracellular Ca2+-dependent signaling. Here we describe a procedure for the measurement of cellular IP3 levels in tissue homogenates prepared from rat hippocampal slices. PMID:27468425

  12. Rat cardiac myocyte adenosine transport and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, D.A.; Rovetto, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Based on the importance of myocardial adenosine and adenine nucleotide metabolism, the adenosine salvage pathway in ventricular myocytes was studied. Accurate estimates of transport rates, separate from metabolic fllux, were determined. Adenosine influx was constant between 3 and 60 s. Adenosine metabolism maintained intracellular adenosine concentrations < 10% of the extracellular adenosine concentrations and thus unidirectional influx could be measured. Myocytes transported adenosine via saturable and nonsaturable processes. A minimum estimate of the V/sub max/ of myocytic adenosine kinase indicated the saturable component of adenosine influx was independent of adenosine kinase activity. Saturable transport was inhibited by nitrobenzylthioinosine and verapamil. Extracellular adenosine taken up myocytes was rapidly phosphorylated to adenine taken up by myocytes was rapidly phosphorylated to adenine nucleotides. Not all extracellular adenosine, though, was phosphorylated on entering myocytes, since free, as opposed to protein-bound, intracellular adenosine was detected after digitonin extraction of cells in the presence of 1 mM ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid.

  13. Phenyl azide substituted and benzophenone-substituted phosphonamides of 7-methylguanosine 5 prime -triphosphate as photoaffinity probes for protein synthesis initiation factor eIF-4E and a proteolytic fragment containing the cap-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Chavan, A.J.; Rychlik, W.; Watt, D.S.; Rhoads, R.E. ); Blaas, D.; Kuechler, E. )

    1990-06-12

    Three photoactive derivatives of the 7-methylguanosine-containing cap of eukaryotic mRNA were used to investigate protein synthesis initiation factor eIF-4E from human erythrocytes and rabbit reticulocytes. Sensitive and specific labeling of eIF-4E was observed with the previously described probe, ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)-{gamma}-(((4-benzoylphenyl)methyl)amido)-7-methyl-GTP. A second probe was synthesized that was an azidophenyltyrosine derivative of m{sup 7}GTP (({sup 125}I)APTM), the monoanhydride of m{sup 7}GDP with ({sup 125}I)-N-(4-azidophenyl)-2-(phosphoramido)-3-(4-hydroxy-3-iodophenyl)propionamide. This probe allowed rapid and quantitative introduction of radioactivity in the last rather than the first step of synthesis and placed the radioactive label on the protein-proximal side of the weak P-N bond. A dissociation constant of 6.9 {mu}M was determined for ({sup 125}I)APTM, which is comparable to the published values for m{sup 7}GTP. A third probe, an azidophenylglycine derivative of m{sup 7}GTP (({sup 32}P)APGM), the monoanhydride of m{sup 7}GDP with ({sup 32}P)-N-(4-azidophenyl)-2-(phosphoramido)acetamide, was also synthesized and shown to label eIF-4E specifically. Unlike ({sup 32}P)BPM and ({sup 125}I)APTM, however, ({sup 32}P)APGM labeled eIF-4E{sup *} approximately 4-fold more readily than intact eIF-4E. Tryptic and CNBr cleavage suggested that eIF-4E{sup *} consists of a protease-resistant core of eIF-4E that retains the cap-binding site and consists of approximately residues 47-182.

  14. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by nanoparticles through ATP, ADP and adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Baron, L; Gombault, A; Fanny, M; Villeret, B; Savigny, F; Guillou, N; Panek, C; Le Bert, M; Lagente, V; Rassendren, F; Riteau, N; Couillin, I

    2015-01-01

    The NLR pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a major component of the innate immune system, but its mechanism of activation by a wide range of molecules remains largely unknown. Widely used nano-sized inorganic metal oxides such as silica dioxide (nano-SiO2) and titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages similarly to silica or asbestos micro-sized particles. By investigating towards the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation in response to nanoparticles, we show here that active adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and subsequent ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine receptor signalling are required for inflammasome activation. Nano-SiO2 or nano-TiO2 caused a significant increase in P2Y1, P2Y2, A2A and/or A2B receptor expression, whereas the P2X7 receptor was downregulated. Interestingly, IL-1β secretion in response to nanoparticles is increased by enhanced ATP and ADP hydrolysis, whereas it is decreased by adenosine degradation or selective A2A or A2B receptor inhibition. Downstream of these receptors, our results show that nanoparticles activate the NLRP3 inflammasome via activation of PLC-InsP3 and/or inhibition of adenylate cyclase (ADCY)-cAMP pathways. Finally, a high dose of adenosine triggers inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion through adenosine cellular uptake by nucleotide transporters and by its subsequent transformation in ATP by adenosine kinase. In summary, we show for the first time that extracellular adenosine activates the NLRP3 inflammasome by two ways: by interacting with adenosine receptors at nanomolar/micromolar concentrations and through cellular uptake by equilibrative nucleoside transporters at millimolar concentrations. These findings provide new molecular insights on the mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and new therapeutic strategies to control inflammation. PMID:25654762

  15. Vasodilator effects of adenosine on retinal arterioles in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Taisuke; Mori, Asami; Saito, Maki; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2008-02-01

    Adenosine is a potent vasodilator of retinal blood vessels and is implicated to be a major regulator of retinal blood flow during metabolic stress, but little is known about the impact of diabetes on the role of adenosine in regulation of retinal hemodynamics. Therefore, we examined how diabetes affects adenosine-induced vasodilation of retinal arterioles. Male Wistar rats were treated with streptozotocin (80 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), and experiments were performed 6-8 weeks later. Rats were treated with tetrodotoxin (50 microg/kg, intravenously [i.v.]) to eliminate any nerve activity and prevent movement of the eye and infused with methoxamine continuously to maintain adequate systemic circulation. Fundus images were captured with a digital camera that was equipped with a special objective lens, and diameters of retinal arterioles were measured. Adenosine increased diameters of retinal arterioles and decreased systemic blood pressure. These responses were significantly attenuated by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (30 mg/kg, i.v.) and the adenosine triphosphate-dependent K+ (K(ATP)) channel blocker glibenclamide (20 mg/kg, i.v.). The depressor responses to adenosine were reduced in diabetic rats, whereas diabetes did not alter vasodilation of retinal arterioles to adenosine. In contrast, both depressor response and vasodilation of retinal arteriole to acetylcholine were reduced in diabetic rats. The retinal vasodilator responses to adenosine and acetylcholine observed in diabetic rats were diminished by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. There were no differences in the responses to pinacidil, a K(ATP) channel opener, between the diabetic and nondiabetic rats. These results suggest that both the activation of nitric oxide synthase and opening of K(ATP) channels contribute to the vasodilator effects of adenosine in rats in vivo. However, diabetes has no significant impact on the vasodilation mediated by these mechanisms in

  16. Cooperative binding of MgATP and MgADP in the trimeric P(II) protein GlnK2 from Archaeoglobus fulgidus.

    PubMed

    Helfmann, Sarah; Lü, Wei; Litz, Claudia; Andrade, Susana L A

    2010-09-10

    P(II)-like proteins, such as GlnK, found in a wide variety of organisms from prokaryotes to plants constitute a family of cytoplasmic signaling proteins that play a central regulatory role in the assimilation of nitrogen for biosyntheses. They specifically bind and are modulated by effector molecules such as adenosine triphosphate, adenosine diphosphate and 2-oxoglutarate. Their highly conserved, trimeric structure suggests that cooperativity in effector binding might be the basis for the ability to integrate and respond to a wide range of concentrations, but to date no direct quantification of this cooperative behavior has been presented. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus contains three GlnK proteins, functionally associated with ammonium transport proteins (Amt). We have characterized GlnK2 and its interaction with effectors by high-resolution X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry. Binding of adenosine nucleotides resulted in distinct, cooperative behavior for ATP and ADP. While 2-oxoglutarate has been shown to interact with other GlnK proteins, GlnK2 was completely insensitive to this key indicator of a low level of intracellular nitrogen. These findings point to different regulation and modulation patterns and add to our understanding of the flexibility and versatility of the GlnK family of signaling proteins.

  17. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Palmieri, R H; Frischat, A; Fischer, A H; Wu, L H; Maland, L; Manship, M

    1984-05-22

    The total amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been determined, and the single polypeptide chain of 194 amino acid residues starts with N-acetylmethionine and ends with leucyllysine at its carboxyl terminus, in agreement with the earlier data on its amino acid composition [Mahowald, T. A., Noltmann, E. A., & Kuby, S. A. (1962) J. Biol. Chem. 237, 1138-1145] and its carboxyl-terminus sequence [Olson, O. E., & Kuby, S. A. (1964) J. Biol. Chem. 239, 460-467]. Elucidation of the primary structure was based on tryptic and chymotryptic cleavages of the performic acid oxidized protein, cyanogen bromide cleavages of the 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein at its five methionine sites (followed by maleylation of peptide fragments), and tryptic cleavages at its 12 arginine sites of the maleylated 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein. Calf muscle myokinase, whose sequence has also been established, differs primarily from the rabbit muscle myokinase's sequence in the following: His-30 is replaced by Gln-30; Lys-56 is replaced by Met-56; Ala-84 and Asp 85 are replaced by Val-84 and Asn-85. A comparison of the four muscle-type adenylate kinases, whose covalent structures have now been determined, viz., rabbit, calf, porcine, and human [for the latter two sequences see Heil, A., Müller, G., Noda, L., Pinder, T., Schirmer, H., Schirmer, I., & Von Zabern, I. (1974) Eur. J. Biochem. 43, 131-144, and Von Zabern, I., Wittmann-Liebold, B., Untucht-Grau, R., Schirmer, R. H., & Pai, E. F. (1976) Eur. J. Biochem. 68, 281-290], demonstrates an extraordinary degree of homology.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Sperm morphology, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration and swimming velocity: unexpected relationships in a passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Bennison, Clair; Hemmings, Nicola; Brookes, Lola; Slate, Jon; Birkhead, Tim

    2016-08-31

    The relationship between sperm energetics and sperm function is poorly known, but is central to our understanding of the evolution of sperm traits. The aim of this study was to examine how sperm morphology and ATP content affect sperm swimming velocity in the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata We exploited the high inter-male variation in this species and created extra experimental power by increasing the number of individuals with very long or short sperm through artificial selection. We found a pronounced quadratic relationship between total sperm length and swimming velocity, with velocity increasing with length up to a point, but declining in the very longest sperm. We also found an unexpected negative association between midpiece length and ATP content: sperm with a short midpiece generally contained the highest concentration of ATP. Low intracellular ATP is therefore unlikely to explain reduced swimming velocity among the very longest sperm (which tend to have a shorter midpiece). PMID:27559067

  19. The rapid estimation of microbial contamination of raw meat by measurement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

    PubMed

    Stannard, C J; Wood, J M

    1983-12-01

    Bacteria were separated from raw meat homogenate by a simple three-stage process. Centrifugation (10 s at 2000 g) removed coarse particles; stirring with the cation exchange resin Bio-Rex 70 removed smaller particles and filtration through 0.22 micron membranes removed soluble materials. By this process 70-80% of the microbial populations of meat homogenates were consistently isolated on the filters. A linear relationship was found between log10 microbial ATP and log10 colony count of meat over the range 10(5)-10(9) cfu/g. The value of ATP/cfu for meat samples was within the range previously reported for pure cultures. These data indicated that ATP extracted from the filters originated from bacteria in the meat samples. Several samples can be analysed simultaneously in an elapsed time of 20-25 min. The variability associated with estimates of both colony counts and ATP levels has been determined. PMID:6662830

  20. Beneficial effects of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K+ channel opener on liver ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Mateus Antunes; Coelho, Ana Maria Mendonça; Sampietre, Sandra Nassa; Patzina, Rosely Antunes; Pinheiro da Silva, Fabiano; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Machado, Marcel Cerqueira Cesar

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of diazoxide administration on liver ischemia/reperfusion injury. METHODS: Wistar male rats underwent partial liver ischemia performed by clamping the pedicle from the medium and left anterior lateral segments for 1 h under mechanical ventilation. They were divided into 3 groups: Control Group, rats submitted to liver manipulation, Saline Group, rats received saline, and Diazoxide Group, rats received intravenous injection diazoxide (3.5 mg/kg) 15 min before liver reperfusion. 4 h and 24 h after reperfusion, blood was collected for determination of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-10 (IL-10), nitrite/nitrate, creatinine and tumor growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Liver tissues were assembled for mitochondrial oxidation and phosphorylation, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and histologic analysis. Pulmonary vascular permeability and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were also determined. RESULTS: Four hours after reperfusion the diazoxide group presented with significant reduction of AST (2009 ± 257 U/L vs 3523 ± 424 U/L, P = 0.005); ALT (1794 ± 295 U/L vs 3316 ± 413 U/L, P = 0.005); TNF-α (17 ± 9 pg/mL vs 152 ± 43 pg/mL, P = 0.013; IL-6 (62 ± 18 pg/mL vs 281 ± 92 pg/mL); IL-10 (40 ± 9 pg/mL vs 78 ± 10 pg/mL P = 0.03), and nitrite/nitrate (3.8 ± 0.9 μmol/L vs 10.2 ± 2.4 μmol/L, P = 0.025) when compared to the saline group. A significant reduction in liver mitochondrial dysfunction was observed in the diazoxide group compared to the saline group (P < 0.05). No differences in liver MDA content, serum creatinine, pulmonary vascular permeability and MPO activity were observed between groups. Twenty four hours after reperfusion the diazoxide group showed a reduction of AST (495 ± 78 U/L vs 978 ± 192 U/L, P = 0.032); ALT (335 ± 59 U/L vs 742 ± 182 U/L, P = 0.048), and TGF-β1 (11 ± 1 ng/mL vs 17 ± 0.5 ng/mL, P = 0.004) serum levels when compared to the saline group. The control group did not present alterations when compared to the diazoxide and saline groups. CONCLUSION: Diazoxide maintains liver mitochondrial function, increases liver tolerance to ischemia/reperfusion injury, and reduces the systemic inflammatory response. These effects require further evaluation for using in a clinical setting. PMID:25386080

  1. Sodium- and adenosine-triphosphate-dependent calcium movements in membrane vesicles prepared from dog erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, O E; Sjodin, R A

    1984-01-01

    Inside-out vesicles from the membranes of dog erythrocytes were obtained by the method of Lew & Seymour (1982) for study of Ca movements. In the absence of ATP, 45Ca accumulation by the vesicles was inhibited by external Na and stimulated by internal Na. The presence of either MgCl2, quinidine sulphate, or LaCl3 in the incubation medium inhibited 45Ca accumulation in the absence of ATP. The release of 45Ca from 45Ca-loaded vesicles was specifically promoted by Na+ in the absence as well as in the presence of ATP. The accumulation of 45Ca by vesicles was stimulated by ATP and the effect of ATP was entirely dependent on the presence of Mg. The Mg- and ATP-dependent 45Ca accumulation was stimulated by the presence of either K or Na in the medium, was hyperbolically activated by increasing the Ca2+ concentration in the medium, was stimulated by calmodulin and inhibited by orthovanadate (10(-4) M) or LaCl3 (10(-3) M). The data demonstrate the presence of two mechanisms for controlling Ca movements in inside-out vesicles from dog erythrocyte membranes, a Na-dependent one similar to the Na-Ca exchange described for squid axons and cardiac muscle and a Ca pump utilizing ATP with characteristics similar to those described for human erythrocytes and squid axons. PMID:6090650

  2. Ultrasensitive bioluminescent determinations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for investigating the energetics of host-grown microbes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, J. H.; Dhople, A. M.

    1975-01-01

    Stability and optimal concentrations of reagents were studied in bioluminescence assay of ATP levels. Luciferase enzyme was prepared and purified using Sephadex G-100. Interdependencies between enzyme and luciferin concentrations in presence of optimal Mg are illustrated. Optimal ionic strength was confirmed to be 0.05 M for the four buffers tested. Adapted features of the R- and H-systems are summarized, as well as the percentages of ATP pools released from representative microbes by heat and chloroform.

  3. Adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis in rat dental tissues. A histochemical study to differentiate the enzymes involved.

    PubMed

    Mörnstad, H; Sundström, B

    1976-07-19

    The purpose of this study was to try to differentiate histochemically between the various enzymes which may catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP in developing rat dental tissues. Freeze cut and freeze dried sections of molar and incisor teeth were incubated in lead capture-based media at pH 5.0, 7.2 or 9.4 with one of the following substrates: beta-glycerophosphate, AMP, ADP, ATP, AMP-PNP and tetrasodium pyrophosphate. To establish the enzymatic nature of the hydrolysis parallel sections were incubated after prior fixation in either formaldehyde or glutaraldehyde. By comparing the enzymatic stainings obtained with the various substrates and at the different pH:s, it was concluded that ATP can be visibly hydrolyzed in rat dental tissues by alkaline phosphatase (stratum intermedium, apical part of maturation ameloblasts, basal part of all ameloblasts, odontoblasts and subodontoblastic layer), specific ATPase (apical and basal parts of secretory ameloblasts) and ATP pyrophosphatase and/or adenylate cyclase (stratum intermedium, odontoblasts). Acid phosphatase, specific ADPase, 5'-nucleotidase, inorganic pyrophosphatase, 3':5'-cyclic-AMP-phosphodiesterase and adenylate kinase on the other hand, seem not to be engaged in the ATP hydrolysis to such a degree as to complicate the interpretation of the histochemical staining. The alkaline phosphatase part of the ATP hydrolysis appeared to be rather insensitive to aldehyde fixation, while the hydrolysis effected by specific ATPase and ATP pyrophosphatase and/or adenylate cyclase was extinguished after fixation with formaldehyde for 4 h or glutaraldehyde for 10 min.

  4. Adenosine Triphosphate-Sensitive Potassium Channel Kir Subunits Implicated in Cardioprotection by Diazoxide

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Matthew C; Janjua, M Burhan; Kanter, Evelyn M; Makepeace, Carol M; Schuessler, Richard B; Nichols, Colin G; Lawton, Jennifer S

    2015-01-01

    Background ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel openers provide cardioprotection in multiple models. Ion flux at an unidentified mitochondrial KATP channel has been proposed as the mechanism. The renal outer medullary kidney potassium channel subunit, potassium inward rectifying (Kir)1.1, has been implicated as a mitochondrial channel pore-forming subunit. We hypothesized that subunit Kir1.1 is involved in cardioprotection (maintenance of volume homeostasis and contractility) of the KATP channel opener diazoxide (DZX) during stress (exposure to hyperkalemic cardioplegia [CPG]) at the myocyte and mitochondrial levels. Methods and Results Kir subunit inhibitor Tertiapin Q (TPN-Q) was utilized to evaluate response to stress. Mouse ventricular mitochondrial volume was measured in the following groups: isolation buffer; 200 μmol/L of ATP; 100 μmol/L of DZX+200 μmol/L of ATP; or 100 μmol/L of DZX+200 μmol/L of ATP+TPN-Q (500 or 100 nmol/L). Myocytes were exposed to Tyrode’s solution (5 minutes), test solution (Tyrode’s, cardioplegia [CPG], CPG+DZX, CPG+DZX+TPN-Q, Tyrode’s+TPN-Q, or CPG+TPN-Q), N=12 for all (10 minutes); followed by Tyrode’s (5 minutes). Volumes were compared. TPN-Q, with or without DZX, did not alter mitochondrial or myocyte volume. Stress (CPG) resulted in myocyte swelling and reduced contractility that was prevented by DZX. TPN-Q prevented the cardioprotection afforded by DZX (volume homeostasis and maintenance of contractility). Conclusions TPN-Q inhibited myocyte cardioprotection provided by DZX during stress; however, it did not alter mitochondrial volume. Because TPN-Q inhibits Kir1.1, Kir3.1, and Kir3.4, these data support that any of these Kir subunits could be involved in the cardioprotection afforded by diazoxide. However, these data suggest that mitochondrial swelling by diazoxide does not involve Kir1.1, 3.1, or 3.4. PMID:26304939

  5. Sperm morphology, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration and swimming velocity: unexpected relationships in a passerine bird

    PubMed Central

    Bennison, Clair; Brookes, Lola; Slate, Jon; Birkhead, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between sperm energetics and sperm function is poorly known, but is central to our understanding of the evolution of sperm traits. The aim of this study was to examine how sperm morphology and ATP content affect sperm swimming velocity in the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata. We exploited the high inter-male variation in this species and created extra experimental power by increasing the number of individuals with very long or short sperm through artificial selection. We found a pronounced quadratic relationship between total sperm length and swimming velocity, with velocity increasing with length up to a point, but declining in the very longest sperm. We also found an unexpected negative association between midpiece length and ATP content: sperm with a short midpiece generally contained the highest concentration of ATP. Low intracellular ATP is therefore unlikely to explain reduced swimming velocity among the very longest sperm (which tend to have a shorter midpiece). PMID:27559067

  6. P2 purinoceptor saturation by adenosine triphosphate impairs renal autoregulation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Majid, D S; Inscho, E W; Navar, L G

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested a role for P2 purinoceptors on vascular smooth muscle cells in the mechanism of renal autoregulation. Experiments were performed in anesthetized dogs (n = 9) to examine renal blood flow (RBF) autoregulatory efficiency before and after saturation of P2 purinoceptors with acute intra-arterial administration of ATP (1 mg/kg per min). Dogs were pretreated with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor nitro-L-arginine (NLA) (50 microg/kg per min), to avoid endothelial P2 receptor-mediated effects on nitric oxide release caused by the intra-arterial ATP infusions. NLA treatment decreased RBF (5.3+/-0.3 to 3.6+/-0.2 ml/min per g) and sodium excretion (3.6+/-0.4 to 0.9+/-0.2 ml/min per g) without producing significant changes in GFR (0.92+/-0.04 to 0.90+/-0.06 ml/min per g) or RBF autoregulatory efficiency. ATP administration to NLA-treated dogs resulted in further decreases in RBF (2.8+/-0.2 ml/min per g), GFR (0.58+/-0.05 ml/min per g), and sodium excretion (0.6+/-0.2 micromol/min per g). In addition, there was marked impairment of RBF autoregulatory efficiency during ATP infusion. The slopes of the arterial pressure-blood flow relationships at renal arterial pressures of >75 mmHg were significantly altered, from 0.003+/-0.001 to 0.2+/-0.002 ml/min per g per mmHg. Discontinuation of ATP infusion restored RBF autoregulatory efficiency. Norepinephrine (5 microg/kg per min) administration in these NLA-treated dogs decreased RBF (2.5+/-0.3 ml/min per g; n = 4) to a similar extent, compared with ATP, but did not impair RBF autoregulation. These results support the hypothesis that P2 purinoceptors may be involved in mediating autoregulatory adjustments in renal vascular resistance. PMID:10073599

  7. Adenosine triphosphate-dependent copper transport in isolated rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, M; In 't Veld, G; van den Berg, G J; Müller, M; Kuipers, F; Vonk, R J

    1995-01-01

    The process of hepatobiliary copper (Cu) secretion is still poorly understood: Cu secretion as a complex with glutathione and transport via a lysosomal pathway have been proposed. The recent cloning and sequencing of the gene for Wilson disease indicates that Cu transport in liver cells may be mediated by a Cu transporting P-type ATPase. Biochemical evidence for ATP-dependent Cu transport in mammalian systems, however, has not been reported so far. We have investigated Cu transport in rat liver plasma membrane vesicles enriched in canalicular or basolateral membranes in the presence and absence of ATP (4 mM) and an ATP-regenerating system. The presence of ATP clearly stimulated uptake of radiolabeled Cu (64Cu, 10 microM) into canalicular plasma membrane vesicles and, to a lesser extent, also into basolateral plasma membrane vesicles. ATP-dependent Cu transport was dose-dependently inhibited by the P-type ATPase inhibitor vanadate, and showed saturation kinetics with an estimated Km of 8.6 microM and a Vmax of 6.9 nmol/min/mg protein. ATP-stimulated Cu uptake was similar in canalicular membrane vesicles of normal Wistar rats and those of mutant GY rats, expressing a congenital defect in the activity of the ATP-dependent canalicular glutathione-conjugate transporter (cMOAT). These studies demonstrate the presence of an ATP-dependent Cu transporting system in isolated plasma membrane fractions of rat liver distinct from cMOAT. PMID:7814642

  8. Importance of adenosine triphosphate in phospholipase A2-induced rabbit renal proximal tubule cell injury.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, V D; Cieslinski, D A; Humes, H D

    1988-01-01

    The pathogenesis of ischemic renal tubular cell injury involves a complex interaction of different processes, including membrane phospholipid alterations and depletion of high-energy phosphate stores. To assess the role of membrane phospholipid changes due to activation of phospholipases in renal tubule cell injury, suspensions enriched in rabbit renal proximal tubule segments were incubated with exogenous phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Exogenous PLA2 did not produce any significant change in various metabolic parameters reflective of cell injury in control nonhypoxic preparations despite a significant decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and moderate increases in lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE). In contrast, exogenous PLA2 treatment of hypoxic tubules resulted in a severe degree of cell injury, as demonstrated by marked declines in tubule K+ and ATP contents and significant decreases in tubule uncoupled respiratory rates, and was associated with significant phospholipid alterations, including marked declines in phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PE and significant rises in LPC, LPE, and free fatty acids (FFA). The injurious metabolic effects of exogenous PLA2 on hypoxic tubules were reversed by addition of ATP-MgCl2 to the tubules. The protective effect of ATP-MgCl2 was associated with increases in tubule PC and PE contents and declines in LPC, LPE, and FFA contents. These experiments thus indicate that an increase in exogenous PLA2 activity produces renal proximal tubule cell injury when cell ATP levels decline, at which point phospholipid resynthesis cannot keep pace with phospholipid degradation with resulting depletion of phospholipids and accumulation of lipid by-products. High-energy phosphate store depletion appears to be an important condition for exogenous PLA2 activity to induce renal tubule cell injury. PMID:3417866

  9. The concentration of amino acids by yeast cells depleted of adenosine triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, A. A.; Backen, K.; Watson, G.

    1970-01-01

    1. The ATP content of preparations of a strain of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis was lowered below 0.3nmol/mg of yeast by starving the yeast cells in the presence of both antimycin and 5mm-deoxyglucose. 2. When the depleted cells were put at pH4.5 with glycine up to about 20nmol of the amino acid/mg of yeast was absorbed without being chemically modified. The mechanism did not depend on an exchange with endogenous amino acids. 3. The concentration of the absorbed glycine could apparently reach 100–200 times that outside the cells. 4. Replacement of the cellular K+ by Na+ almost stopped amino acid absorption in the presence of antimycin and deoxyglucose, but not in their absence. 5. It is suggested that, when energy metabolism itself had stopped, a purely physical process, namely the movements of H+ and K+ into and out of the yeast respectively, served to concentrate the amino acids in the cells. Both ionic species appear to be co-substrates of the system transporting amino acids. PMID:5495157

  10. Tension in mechanically disrupted mammalian cardiac cells: effects of magnesium adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Best, P M; Donaldson, S K; Kerrick, W G

    1977-01-01

    1. Maximum and submaximum Ca-activated tension in mechanically disrupted rat ventricular fibres was examined in solutions containing 30 micron, 100 micron and 4 mM-MgATP and either 50 micron or 1 mM ionized Mg. 2. In the absence of added Ca, significant amounts of base-line tension (up to 50% of maximum) develop in solutions containing less than 30 micron-MgATP. This effect is Mg-dependent; more tension is produced with 50 micron-Mg than with 1 mM. 3. Increasing the MgATP concentration shifts the pCa-% maximum tension relationship in the direction of increasing Ca required for activation. At 50 micron-Mg the pCa which produces 50% maximum tension is 5-8, 5-3 and 5-5 for the 30 micron, 100 micron and 4 mM-MgATP solutions. The effect of MgATP on position is relatively independent of the Mg concentration. 4. The steepness of the pCa-% maximum tension curve increases as MgATP is elevated to the millimolar range. The Hill coefficients for the different MgATP curves at 50 micron-Mg are 1-1, 1-3 and 3-0. This change in steepness accounts for the slightly lower Ca concentration needed for half-maximum tension as the MgATP concentration is increased to millimolar levels. Raising the Mg concentration to 1 mM greatly diminishes the effect of MgATP on the slope of the pCa-tension relationship. 5. The maximum tnesion a fibre bundle can produce decreases as the amount of MgATP is raised from micromolar to millimolar levels. For 50 muM-Mg, maximum tension drops about 35% as MgATP is raised from 30 micronM to 4 mM. For any concentraiton of MgATP, maximum tension is higher at 1 mM-Mg than at 50 micron-Mg. 6. Existing theories of interaction between myosin heads and the thin filament are sufficient to account for the effects of MgATP on the position of the pCa-tension curves and on maximum tension. The effects on slope are less satisfactorily explained. PMID:850150

  11. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) deficiency is a disorder characterized by abnormal ...

  12. Evidence for a vasopressin receptor-GTP binding protein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Uhing, R.J.; Exton, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    Plasma membranes from the livers of rats were able to hydrolyze the ..gamma..-phosphate from guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP). The rate of GTP hydrolysis could be decreased to 10% of its initial rate by the addition of adenosine-5'-triphosphate with a concomitant decrease in the K/sub m/ for GTP from approx. 10/sup -3/ M to 10/sup -6/ M. The low K/sub m/ GTPase activity was inhibited by the addition of nonhydrolyzable analogs of GTP. In addition, the GTPase activity was stimulated from 10 to 30% over basal by the addition of vasopressin. A dose dependency curve showed that the maximum stimulation was obtained with 10/sup -8/ M vasopressin. Identical results were obtained from plasma membranes that had been solubilized with 1% digitonin. When membranes that had been solubilized in the presence of (Phenylalanyl-3,4,5-/sup 3/H(N))vasopressin were subjected to sucrose gradient centrifugation, the majority of bound (/sup 3/H)vasopressin migrated with an approximate molecular weight of 300,000. Moreover, there was a GTPase activity that migrated with the bound (/sup 3/H)vasopressin. This peak of bound (/sup 3/H)vasopressin was decreased by 90% when the sucrose gradient centrifugation was run in the presence of 10/sup -5/ M guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate). These results support the conclusion that liver plasma membranes contain a GTP-binding protein that can complex with the vasopressin receptor.

  13. Detrimental effects of adenosine signaling in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Weiru; Grenz, Almut; Sun, Hong; Tao, Lijian; Lu, Guangxiu; Alexander, Danny C; Milburn, Michael V; Carter-Dawson, Louvenia; Lewis, Dorothy E; Zhang, Wenzheng; Eltzschig, Holger K; Kellems, Rodney E; Blackburn, Michael R; Juneja, Harinder S; Xia, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia can act as an initial trigger to induce erythrocyte sickling and eventual end organ damage in sickle cell disease (SCD). Many factors and metabolites are altered in response to hypoxia and may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Using metabolomic profiling, we found that the steady-state concentration of adenosine in the blood was elevated in a transgenic mouse model of SCD. Adenosine concentrations were similarly elevated in the blood of humans with SCD. Increased adenosine levels promoted sickling, hemolysis and damage to multiple tissues in SCD transgenic mice and promoted sickling of human erythrocytes. Using biochemical, genetic and pharmacological approaches, we showed that adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR)-mediated induction of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, an erythrocyte-specific metabolite that decreases the oxygen binding affinity of hemoglobin, underlies the induction of erythrocyte sickling by excess adenosine both in cultured human red blood cells and in SCD transgenic mice. Thus, excessive adenosine signaling through the A2BR has a pathological role in SCD. These findings may provide new therapeutic possibilities for this disease. PMID:21170046

  14. Role of 3', 5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate and protein kinase C in the regulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein secretion by thyroid-stimulating hormone in isolated ovine thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J F; Hill, D J; Becks, G P

    1994-05-01

    Isolated sheep thyroid follicles release insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II together with IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). We previously showed that TSH suppresses the biosynthesis and release of IGFBPs in vitro which may increase the tissue availability of IGFs, allowing a synergy with TSH which potentiates both thyroid growth and function. Many of the actions of TSH on thyroid cell function are dependent upon activation of adenylate cyclase, although increased synthesis of inositol trisphosphate and activation of protein kinase C (PKC) have also been implicated. We have now examined whether probable changes in intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) or PKC are involved in TSH-mediated suppression of IGFBP release. Confluent primary cultures of ovine thyroid cells were maintained in serum-free Ham's modified F-12M medium containing transferrin, somatostatin and glycyl-histidyl-lysine (designated 3H), and further supplemented with sodium iodide (10(-8)-10(-3) mol/l), dibutyryl cAMP (0.25-1 mmol/l), forskolin (5-20 mumol/l) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA; 10(-11)-10(-6) mol/l), with or without exposure to TSH (200 microU/ml). The uptake and organification of Na [125I] by cells was examined after test incubations of up to 48 h, and IGFBPs in conditioned media were analysed by ligand blot using 125I-labelled IGF-II. The PKC activity in the cytosol and plasma membrane fractions of cells was measured by phosphorylation of histone using [gamma-32P]ATP, and PKC immunoreactivity was visualized by Western immunoblot analysis. While dibutyryl cAMP or forskolin largely reproduced the stimulatory effect of TSH on iodine organification, they did not mimic the inhibitory effect of TSH on the secretion of IGFBPs of 43, 34, 28 and 19 kDa. Incubation with physiological or pharmacological concentrations of iodide (10(-6)-10(-3) mol/l) for up to 48 h significantly decreased TSH action on iodide uptake and organification but did not alter the

  15. Overexpression of human selenoprotein H in neuronal cells enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and function through activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase B, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein pathway.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Suresh L; Mendelev, Natalia; Kumari, Santosh; Andy Li, P

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is activated by nuclear encoded transcription co-activator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), which is regulated by several upstream factors including protein kinase A and Akt/protein kinase B. We have previously shown that selenoprotein H enhances the levels of nuclear regulators for mitochondrial biogenesis, increases mitochondrial mass and improves mitochondrial respiratory rate, under physiological condition. Furthermore, overexpression of selenoprotein H protects neuronal HT22 cells from ultraviolet B irradiation-induced cell damage by lowering reactive oxygen species production, and inhibiting activation of caspase-3 and -9, as well as p53. The objective of this study is to identify the cell signaling pathways by which selenoprotein H initiates mitochondrial biogenesis. We first confirmed our previous observation that selenoprotein H transfected HT22 cells increased the protein levels of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial biogenesis factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. We then observed that total and phosphorylation of protein kinase A, Akt/protein kinase B and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) were significantly increased in selenoprotein H transfected cells compared to vector transfected HT22 cells. To verify whether the observed stimulating effects on mitochondrial biogenesis pathways are caused by selenoprotein H and mediated through CREB, we knocked down selenoprotein H mRNA level using siRNA and inhibited CREB with napthol AS-E phosphate in selenoprotein H transfected cells and repeated the measurements of the aforementioned biomarkers. Our results revealed that silencing of selenoprotein H not only decreased the protein levels of PGC-1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, but also decreased the total and

  16. Functional interactions between nucleotide binding domains and leukotriene C4 binding sites of multidrug resistance protein 1 (ABCC1).

    PubMed

    Payen, Lea; Gao, Mian; Westlake, Christopher; Theis, Ashley; Cole, Susan P C; Deeley, Roger G

    2005-06-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) is a member of the "C" branch of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. The NH(2)-proximal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of MRP1 differs functionally from its COOH-proximal domain (NBD2). NBD1 displays intrinsic high-affinity ATP binding and little ATPase activity. In contrast, ATP binding to NBD2 is strongly dependent on nucleotide binding by NBD1, and NBD2 is more hydrolytically active. We have demonstrated that occupancy of NBD2 by ATP or ADP markedly decreased substrate binding by MRP1. We have further explored the relationship between nucleotide and substrate binding by examining the effects of various ATP analogs and ADP trapping, as well as mutations in conserved functional elements in the NBDs, on the ability of MRP1 to bind the photoactivatable, high-affinity substrate cysteinyl leukotriene C(4) (LTC(4))(.) Overall, the results support a model in which occupancy of both NBD1 and NBD2 by ATP results in the formation of a low-affinity conformation of the protein. However, nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs (beta,gamma-imidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate and adenylylmethylene diphosphonate) failed to substitute for ATP or adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (ATPgammaS) in decreasing LTC(4) photolabeling. Furthermore, mutations of the signature sequence in either NBD that had no apparent effect on azido-ATP binding abrogated the formation of a low-affinity substrate binding state in the presence of ATP or ATPgammaS. We suggest that the effect of these mutations, and possibly the failure of some ATP analogs to decrease LTC(4) binding, may be attributable to an inability to elicit a conformational change in the NBDs that involves interactions between the signature sequence and the gamma-phosphate of the bound nucleotide.

  17. Dicinnamoylquinides in roasted coffee inhibit the human adenosine transporter.

    PubMed

    de Paulis, Tomas; Schmidt, Dennis E; Bruchey, Aleksandra K; Kirby, Michael T; McDonald, Michael P; Commers, Patricia; Lovinger, David M; Martin, Peter R

    2002-05-10

    Preliminary screening of a minor, non-xanthine constituent of roasted coffee, 3,4-diferuloyl-1,5-quinolactone (DIFEQ), showed inhibition of the adenosine transporter at low micromolar concentration. DIFEQ is a neutral derivative of the chlorogenic acids, i.e. isomeric mono- and di-substituted coumaroyl-, caffeoyl-, and feruloyl-esters of quinic acid, formed in the roasting process of coffee. Displacement of the adenosine transporter antagonist [(3)H](S)-(nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine binding by DIFEQ in cultured U-937 cell preparations, expressing the human adenosine transporter protein (hENT1), showed a K(i) of 0.96+/-0.13 microM. Extracts of regular and decaffeinated coffee showed binding activities equivalent to 30-40 mg DIFEQ per three cups of coffee. Acute administration of a high dose of DIFEQ (100 mg/kg i.p.) reduced open field locomotion in mice for 20 min in correlation with brain levels of DIFEQ. Both 3,4-dicaffeoyl-1,5-quinide and 3,4-dicoumaroyl-1,5-quinide, two close structural analogs of DIFEQ also present in roasted coffee, showed similar affinities for the adenosine transporter, while the corresponding 3- and 4-mono caffeoyl- and feruloyl-quinides were one to two orders of magnitudes less active. This suggests that 3,4-dicinnamoyl-1,5-quinides in coffee could have the potential to raise extra-cellular adenosine levels, thereby counteracting the stimulant effect of caffeine.

  18. Dicinnamoylquinides in roasted coffee inhibit the human adenosine transporter.

    PubMed

    de Paulis, Tomas; Schmidt, Dennis E; Bruchey, Aleksandra K; Kirby, Michael T; McDonald, Michael P; Commers, Patricia; Lovinger, David M; Martin, Peter R

    2002-05-10

    Preliminary screening of a minor, non-xanthine constituent of roasted coffee, 3,4-diferuloyl-1,5-quinolactone (DIFEQ), showed inhibition of the adenosine transporter at low micromolar concentration. DIFEQ is a neutral derivative of the chlorogenic acids, i.e. isomeric mono- and di-substituted coumaroyl-, caffeoyl-, and feruloyl-esters of quinic acid, formed in the roasting process of coffee. Displacement of the adenosine transporter antagonist [(3)H](S)-(nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine binding by DIFEQ in cultured U-937 cell preparations, expressing the human adenosine transporter protein (hENT1), showed a K(i) of 0.96+/-0.13 microM. Extracts of regular and decaffeinated coffee showed binding activities equivalent to 30-40 mg DIFEQ per three cups of coffee. Acute administration of a high dose of DIFEQ (100 mg/kg i.p.) reduced open field locomotion in mice for 20 min in correlation with brain levels of DIFEQ. Both 3,4-dicaffeoyl-1,5-quinide and 3,4-dicoumaroyl-1,5-quinide, two close structural analogs of DIFEQ also present in roasted coffee, showed similar affinities for the adenosine transporter, while the corresponding 3- and 4-mono caffeoyl- and feruloyl-quinides were one to two orders of magnitudes less active. This suggests that 3,4-dicinnamoyl-1,5-quinides in coffee could have the potential to raise extra-cellular adenosine levels, thereby counteracting the stimulant effect of caffeine. PMID:12065074

  19. Activation of in vitro matured pig oocytes using activators of inositol triphosphate or ryanodine receptors.

    PubMed

    Petr, J; Urbánková, D; Tománek, M; Rozinek, J; Jílek, F

    2002-04-15

    In our study, we observed the activation of in vitro matured pig oocytes and their subsequent parthenogenetic cleavage after stimulation of ryanodine receptors (RyR) using ryanodine (Ry), caffeine or cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (cADPri) or after stimulation of inositol triphosphate receptors (IP(3)R) using D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3)). Heparin, a potent blocker of IP(3)R, prevented the activation of porcine oocytes using IP(3), but blockers of RyR (ruthenium red or procaine) prevented activation after stimulation by RyR and stimulation by IP(3)R using IP(3). The drugs were injected into oocytes matured to the stage of metaphase II and activation was determined by assessment of pronuclear formation. The activity of H1 kinase was determined and our results demonstrated a significant drop in H1 activity in the activated oocytes. The cleavage of parthenogenetic embryos progresses to more advanced stages after stimulation by IP(3)R than after stimulation by RyR. Our results could indicate that, in pig oocytes, the calcium released from IP(3)-sensitive stores triggers the calcium release from ryanodine-sensitive intracellular stores, which is necessary for oocyte activation. The calmodulin inhibitors ophiobolin A and W7 reduce the activation of oocytes induced by stimulation of RyR or IP(3)R.

  20. Inhibitors of Ketohexokinase: Discovery of Pyrimidinopyrimidines with Specific Substitution that Complements the ATP-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Attenuation of fructose metabolism by the inhibition of ketohexokinase (KHK; fructokinase) should reduce body weight, free fatty acids, and triglycerides, thereby offering a novel approach to treat diabetes and obesity in response to modern diets. We have identified potent, selective inhibitors of human hepatic KHK within a series of pyrimidinopyrimidines (1). For example, 8, 38, and 47 exhibited KHK IC50 values of 12, 7, and 8 nM, respectively, and also showed potent cellular KHK inhibition (IC50 < 500 nM), which relates to their intrinsic potency vs KHK and their ability to penetrate cells. X-ray cocrystal structures of KHK complexes of 3, 8, and 47 revealed the important interactions within the enzyme's adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding pocket. PMID:24900346

  1. A Multisite-Binding Switchable Fluorescent Probe for Monitoring Mitochondrial ATP Level Fluctuation in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Yuan, Lin; Zeng, Xian; Peng, Juanjuan; Ni, Yong; Er, Jun Cheng; Xu, Wang; Agrawalla, Bikram Keshari; Su, Dongdong; Kim, Beomsue; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-01-26

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), commonly produced in mitochondria, is required by almost all the living organisms; thus fluorescent probes for monitoring mitochondrial ATP levels fluctuation are essential and highly desired. Herein, we report a multisite-binding switchable fluorescent probe, ATP-Red 1, which selectively and rapidly responds to intracellular concentrations of ATP. Live-cell imaging indicated that ATP-Red 1 mainly localized to mitochondria with good biocompatibility and membrane penetration. In particular, with the help of ATP-Red 1, we successfully observed not only the decreased mitochondrial ATP levels in the presence of KCN and starvation state, but also the increased mitochondrial ATP levels in the early stage of cell apoptosis. These results indicate that ATP-Red 1 is a useful tool for investigating ATP-relevant biological processes.

  2. Neurochemical Measurement of Adenosine in Discrete Brain Regions of Five Strains of Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Amar K.; Jiao, Yun; Sample, Kenneth J.; Smeyne, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine (ADO), a non-classical neurotransmitter and neuromodulator, and its metabolites adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), have been shown to play an important role in a number of biochemical processes. Although their signaling is well described, it has been difficult to directly, accurately and simultaneously quantitate these purines in tissue or fluids. Here, we describe a novel method for measuring adenosine (ADO) and its metabolites using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Using this chromatographic technique, we examined baseline levels of ADO and ATP, ADP and AMP in 6 different brain regions of the C57BL/6J mouse: stratum, cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, substantia nigra and cerebellum and compared ADO levels in 5 different strains of mice (C57BL/6J, Swiss-Webster, FVB/NJ, 129P/J, and BALB/c). These studies demonstrate that baseline levels of purines vary significantly among the brain regions as well as between different mouse strains. These dissimilarities in purine concentrations may explain the variable phenotypes among background strains described in neurological disease models. PMID:24642754

  3. Adenosine-Associated Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi; Ghanem, Amyl; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside in every cell. Many critical treatments such as modulating irregular heartbeat (arrhythmias), regulation of central nervous system (CNS) activity, and inhibiting seizural episodes can be carried out using adenosine. Despite the significant potential therapeutic impact of adenosine and its derivatives, the severe side effects caused by their systemic administration have significantly limited their clinical use. In addition, due to adenosine’s extremely short half-life in human blood (less than 10 s), there is an unmet need for sustained delivery systems to enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. In this paper, various adenosine delivery techniques, including encapsulation into biodegradable polymers, cell-based delivery, implantable biomaterials, and mechanical-based delivery systems, are critically reviewed and the existing challenges are highlighted. PMID:26453156

  4. On the ATP binding site of the ε subunit from bacterial F-type ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Krah, Alexander; Takada, Shoji

    2016-04-01

    F-type ATP synthases are reversible machinery that not only synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using an electrochemical gradient across the membrane, but also can hydrolyze ATP to pump ions under certain conditions. To prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis, subunit ε in bacterial ATP synthases changes its conformation from the non-inhibitory down- to the inhibitory up-state at a low cellular ATP concentration. Recently, a crystal structure of the ε subunit in complex with ATP was solved in a non-biologically relevant dimeric form. Here, to derive the functional ATP binding site motif, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. Our results suggest that the ATP binding site markedly differs from the experimental resolved one; we observe a reorientation of several residues, which bind to ATP in the crystal structure. In addition we find that an Mg(2+) ion is coordinated by ATP, replacing interactions of the second chain in the crystal structure. Thus we demonstrate more generally the influence of crystallization effects on ligand binding sites and their respective binding modes. Furthermore, we propose a role for two highly conserved residues to control the ATP binding/unbinding event, which have not been considered before. Additionally our results provide the basis for the rational development of new biosensors based on subunit ε, as shown previously for novel sensors measuring the ATP concentration in cells.

  5. A continuous spectrophotometric assay for monitoring adenosine 5'-monophosphate production.

    PubMed

    First, Eric A

    2015-08-15

    A number of biologically important enzymes release adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a product, including aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterases, ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like ligases, DNA ligases, coenzyme A (CoA) ligases, polyA deadenylases, and ribonucleases. In contrast to the abundance of assays available for monitoring the conversion of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) to ADP, there are relatively few assays for monitoring the conversion of ATP (or cAMP) to AMP. In this article, we describe a homogeneous assay that continuously monitors the production of AMP. Specifically, we have coupled the conversion of AMP to inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) (by AMP deaminase) to the oxidation of IMP (by IMP dehydrogenase). This results in the reduction of oxidized nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to reduced nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NADH), allowing AMP formation to be monitored by the change in the absorbance at 340 nm. Changes in AMP concentrations of 5 μM or more can be reliably detected. The ease of use and relatively low expense make the AMP assay suitable for both high-throughput screening and kinetic analyses. PMID:25957126

  6. Respiratory stimulant effects of adenosine in man after caffeine and enprofylline.

    PubMed Central

    Smits, P; Schouten, J; Thien, T

    1987-01-01

    In a double-blind and randomized study the respiratory stimulant effect of continuous intravenous adenosine infusion was studied after previous administration of caffeine, placebo and enprofylline in 10 healthy young volunteers. After placebo, adenosine induced an increase of minute ventilation (from 6.3 to 12.5 l min-1), tidal volume (from 0.60 to 0.96 l), and breathing rate (from 11.0 to 14.8 min-1). Venous pCO2 fell and pH rose after adenosine. Caffeine significantly reduced the adenosine-induced changes of minute ventilation, tidal volume, venous pCO2 and pH, whereas no changes occurred after enprofylline. Our results suggest that adenosine stimulates respiration in man by binding with specific P1-purinoceptors, which can be blocked by caffeine, but not by enprofylline. PMID:3440102

  7. Localization of calcium stimulated adenosine triphosphatase activity in blood vessels of the skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, S. B.

    1985-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme found in bone forming cells which decreases in certain bones as a result of hypogravity or non-weight bearing. This enzyme can also hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate. Therefore, an effort was made to localize calcium-stimulated ATPase by cytochemistry to determine whether altered bone cell activity might be related to changing calcium levels which occur during hypogravity. The results indicate that Ca(++)-ATPase is largely found along the endothelium and basal lamina of blood vessels, and not found in bone forming cells. This suggests that calcium regulation in the vicinity of bone formation may be modulated by the vasculature of the area.

  8. 5'-Adenosine monophosphate and adenosine metabolism, and adenosine responses in mouse, rat and guinea pig heart.

    PubMed

    Headrick, J P; Peart, J; Hack, B; Garnham, B; Matherne, G P

    2001-11-01

    We examined myocardial 5'-adenosine monophosphate (5'-AMP) catabolism, adenosine salvage and adenosine responses in perfused guinea pig, rat and mouse heart. MVO(2) increased from 71+/-8 microl O(2)/min per g in guinea pig to 138+/-17 and 221+/-15 microl O(2)/min per g in rat and mouse. VO(2)/beat was 0.42+/-0.03, 0.50+/-0.03 and 0.55+/-0.04 microl O(2)/g in guinea pig, rat and mouse, respectively. Resting and peak coronary flows were highest in mouse vs. rat and guinea pig, and peak ventricular pressures and Ca(2+) sensitivity declined as heart mass increased. Net myocardial 5'-AMP dephosphorylation increased significantly as mass declined (3.8+/-0.5, 9.0+/-1.4 and 11.0+/-1.6 nmol/min per g in guinea pig, rat and mouse, respectively). Despite increased 5'-AMP catabolism, coronary venous [adenosine] was similar in guinea pig, rat and mouse (45+/-8, 69+/-10 and 57+/-14 nM, respectively). Comparable venous [adenosine] was achieved by increased salvage vs. deamination: 64%, 41% and 39% of adenosine formed was rephosphorylated while 23%, 46%, and 50% was deaminated in mouse, rat and guinea pig, respectively. Moreover, only 35-45% of inosine and its catabolites derive from 5'-AMP (vs. IMP) dephosphorylation in all species. Although post-ischemic purine loss was low in mouse (due to these adaptations), functional tolerance to ischemia decreased with heart mass. Cardiovascular sensitivity to adenosine also differed between species, with A(1) receptor sensitivity being greatest in mouse while A(2) sensitivity was greatest in guinea pig. In summary: (i) cardiac 5'-AMP dephosphorylation, VO(2), contractility and Ca(2+) sensitivity all increase as heart mass falls; (ii) adaptations in adenosine salvage vs. deamination limit purine loss and yield similar adenosine levels across species; (iii) ischemic tolerance declines with heart mass; and (iv) cardiovascular sensitivity to adenosine varies, with increasing A(2) sensitivity relative to A(1) sensitivity in larger hearts.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency adenosine ...

  10. Insights on Structural Characteristics and Ligand Binding Mechanisms of CDK2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Jingxiao; Gao, Weimin; Zhang, Lilei; Pan, Yanqiu; Zhang, Shuwei; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) is a crucial regulator of the eukaryotic cell cycle. However it is well established that monomeric CDK2 lacks regulatory activity, which needs to be aroused by its positive regulators, cyclins E and A, or be phosphorylated on the catalytic segment. Interestingly, these activation steps bring some dynamic changes on the 3D-structure of the kinase, especially the activation segment. Until now, in the monomeric CDK2 structure, three binding sites have been reported, including the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding site (Site I) and two non-competitive binding sites (Site II and III). In addition, when the kinase is subjected to the cyclin binding process, the resulting structural changes give rise to a variation of the ATP binding site, thus generating an allosteric binding site (Site IV). All the four sites are demonstrated as being targeted by corresponding inhibitors, as is illustrated by the allosteric binding one which is targeted by inhibitor ANS (fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate). In the present work, the binding mechanisms and their fluctuations during the activation process attract our attention. Therefore, we carry out corresponding studies on the structural characterization of CDK2, which are expected to facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of kinase proteins. Besides, the binding mechanisms of CDK2 with its relevant inhibitors, as well as the changes of binding mechanisms following conformational variations of CDK2, are summarized and compared. The summary of the conformational characteristics and ligand binding mechanisms of CDK2 in the present work will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the bioactivities of CDK2. PMID:25918937

  11. Adenosine diphosphate ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase and adenylylation of glutamine synthetase control ammonia excretion in ethylenediamine-resistant mutants of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Tripathi, A K

    2006-10-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a nitrogen-fixing, root-colonizing bacterium that brings about plant-growth-promoting effects mainly because of its ability to produce phytohormones. Ethylenediamine (EDA)-resistant mutants of A. brasilense were isolated and screened for their higher ability to decrease acetylene and release ammonia in the medium. One of the mutants showed considerably higher levels of acetylene decrease and ammonia excretion. Nitrogenase activity of this mutant was relatively resistant to inhibition by NH(4)Cl. Adenosine triphosphate ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase in the mutant did not increase even in presence of 10 mM NH(4)Cl. Although the mutant showed decreased glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, neither the levels of GS synthesized by the mutant nor the NH (4) (+) -binding site in the GS differed from those of the parent. The main reason for the release of ammonia by the mutant seems to be the fixation of higher levels of nitrogen than its GS can assimilate, as well as higher levels of adenylylation of GS, which may decrease ammonia assimilation.

  12. Crystal structures of the Klenow fragment of Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I complexed with deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Kong, Y.; Korolev, S.; Waksman, G.

    1998-01-01

    The crystal structures of the Klenow fragment of the Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I (Klentaq1) complexed with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTP) have been determined to 2.5 A resolution. The dNTPs bind adjacent to the O helix of Klentaq1. The triphosphate moieties are at nearly identical positions in all four complexes and are anchored by three positively charged residues, Arg659, Lys663, and Arg587, and by two polar residues, His639 and Gln613. The configuration of the base moieties in the Klentaq1/dNTP complexes demonstrates variability suggesting that dNTP binding is primarily determined by recognition and binding of the phosphate moiety. However, when superimposed on the Taq polymerase/blunt end DNA complex structure (Eom et al., 1996), two of the dNTP/Klentaq1 structures demonstrate appropriate stacking of the nucleotide base with the 3' end of the DNA primer strand, suggesting that at least in these two binary complexes, the observed dNTP conformations are functionally relevant. PMID:9605316

  13. Adenosine receptor modulation of seizure susceptibility in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Szot, P.

    1987-01-01

    Adenosine is considered to be a neuromodulator or cotransmitter in the periphery and CNS. This neuromodulatory action of adenosine may be observed as an anticonvulsant effect. Dose-response curves for R-phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA), cycohexyladenosine (CHA), 2-chloroadenosine (2-ClAdo), N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) and S-PIA were generated against PTZ seizure thresholds in the rat. The rank order of potency for adenosine agonists to elevate PTZ seizure threshold was R-PIA > 2-ClAdo > NECA > CHA > S-PIA. R-PIA was approximately 80-fold more potent than S-PIA. This 80-fold difference in potency between the diasteriomers of PIA was consistent with an A{sub 1} adenoise receptor-mediated response. The anticonvulsant action of 2-ClAdo was reversed by pretreatment with theoplylline. Chronic administration of theophylline significantly increased the specific binding of {sup 3}H-cyclohexyladenosine in membranes of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of the rat. Chronic exposure to theophylline produced a significant increase in the densities of both the high- and low-affinity forms of A{sub 1} adenosine receptors in the cerebral cortex.

  14. Features of adenosine metabolism of mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Deussen, Andreas; Weichsel, Johannes; Pexa, Annette

    2006-11-01

    Adenosine metabolism and transport were evaluated in the isolated perfused mouse heart and compared with the well-established model of isolated perfused guinea pig heart. Coronary venous release of adenosine under well-oxygenated conditions in the mouse exceeds that in the guinea pig threefold when related to tissue mass. Total myocardial adenosine production rate under this condition was approximately 2 nmol/min per gramme and similar in both species. Coronary resistance vessels of mice are highly sensitive to exogenous adenosine, and the threshold for adenosine-induced vasodilation is approximately 30 nmol/l. Adenosine membrane transport was largely insensitive to nitrobenzyl-thioinosine (NBTI) in mouse heart, which is in contrast to guinea pig and several other species. This indicates the dominance of NBTI-insensitive transporters in mouse heart. For future studies, the assessment of cytosolic and extracellular adenosine metabolism and its relationship with coronary flow will require the use of more effective membrane transport blockers.

  15. Mechanism of A2 adenosine receptor activation. I. Blockade of A2 adenosine receptors by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lohse, M.J.; Klotz, K.N.; Schwabe, U.

    1991-04-01

    It has previously been shown that covalent incorporation of the photoreactive adenosine derivative (R)-2-azido-N6-p-hydroxy-phenylisopropyladenosine ((R)-AHPIA) into the A1 adenosine receptor of intact fat cells leads to a persistent activation of this receptor, resulting in a reduction of cellular cAMP levels. In contrast, covalent incorporation of (R)-AHPIA into human platelet membranes, which contain only stimulatory A2 adenosine receptors, reduces adenylate cyclase stimulation via these receptors. This effect of (R)-AHPIA is specific for the A2 receptor and can be prevented by the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline. Binding studies indicate that up to 90% of A2 receptors can be blocked by photoincorporation of (R)-AHPIA. However, the remaining 10-20% of A2 receptors are sufficient to mediate an adenylate cyclase stimulation of up to 50% of the control value. Similarly, the activation via these 10-20% of receptors occurs with a half-life that is only 2 times longer than that in control membranes. This indicates the presence of a receptor reserve, with respect to both the extent and the rate of adenylate cyclase stimulation. These observations require a modification of the models of receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling.

  16. Aptamer/target binding-induced triple helix forming for signal-on electrochemical biosensing.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yinfei; Liu, Jinquan; He, Dinggen; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Shi, Hui; Wen, Li

    2015-10-01

    Owing to its diversified structures, high affinity, and specificity for binding a wide range of non-nucleic acid targets, aptamer is a useful molecular recognition tool for the design of various biosensors. Herein, we report a new signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform which is based on an aptamer/target binding-induced strand displacement and triple-helix forming. The biosensing platform is composed of a signal transduction probe (STP) modified with a methylene blue (MB) and a sulfhydryl group, a triplex-forming oligonucleotides probe (TFO) and a target specific aptamer probe (Apt). Through hybridization with the TFO probe and the Apt probe, the self-assembled STP on Au electrode via Au-S bonding keeps its rigid structure. The MB on the STP is distal to the Au electrode surface. It is eT off state. Target binding releases the Apt probe and liberates the end of the MB tagged STP to fold back and form a triplex-helix structure with TFO (STP/TFO/STP), allowing MB to approach the Au electrode surface and generating measurable electrochemical signals (eT ON). As test for the feasibility and universality of this signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform, two aptamers which bind to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and human α-thrombin (Tmb), respectively, are selected as models. The detection limit of ATP was 7.2 nM, whereas the detection limit of Tmb was 0.86 nM.

  17. [3H]-SCH 58261 labelling of functional A2A adenosine receptors in human neutrophil membranes

    PubMed Central

    Varani, Katia; Gessi, Stefania; Dionisotti, Silvio; Ongini, Ennio; Andrea Borea, Pier

    1998-01-01

    The present study describes the direct labelling of A2A adenosine receptors in human neutrophil membranes with the potent and selective antagonist radioligand, [3H]-5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4 triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine, ([3H]-SCH 58261). In addition, both receptor affinity and potency of a number of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists were determined in binding, adenylyl cyclase and superoxide anion production assays.Saturation experiments revealed a single class of binding sites with Kd and Bmax values of 1.34 nM and 75 fmol mg−1 protein, respectively. Adenosine receptor ligands competed for the binding of 1 nM [3H]-SCH 58261 to human neutrophil membranes, with a rank order of potency consistent with that typically found for interactions with the A2A adenosine receptors. In the adenylyl cyclase and in the superoxide anion production assays the same compounds exhibited a rank order of potency identical to that observed in binding experiments.Thermodynamic data indicated that [3H]-SCH 58261 binding to human neutrophils is entropy and enthalpy-driven. This finding is in agreement with the thermodynamic behaviour of antagonists binding to rat striatal A2A adenosine receptors.It was concluded that in human neutrophil membranes, [3H]-SCH 58261 directly labels binding sites with pharmacological properties similar to those of A2A adenosine receptors of other tissues. The receptors labelled by [3H]-SCH 58261 mediated the effects of adenosine and adenosine receptor agonists to stimulate cyclic AMP accumulation and inhibition of superoxide anion production in human neutrophils. PMID:9605581

  18. Fluorescent ligands for adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Eszter; Jayasekara, P Suresh; Squarcialupi, Lucia; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Federico, Stephanie; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    Interest is increasing in developing fluorescent ligands for characterization of adenosine receptors (ARs), which hold a promise of usefulness in the drug discovery process. The size of a strategically labeled AR ligand can be greatly increased after the attachment of a fluorophore. The choice of dye moiety (e.g. Alexa Fluor 488), attachment point and linker length can alter the selectivity and potency of the parent molecule. Fluorescent derivatives of adenosine agonists and antagonists (e.g. XAC and other heterocyclic antagonist scaffolds) have been synthesized and characterized pharmacologically. Some are useful AR probes for flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and scanning confocal microscopy. Thus, the approach of fluorescent labeled GPCR ligands, including those for ARs, is a growing dynamic research field.

  19. Agonist Derived Molecular Probes for A2A Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Pannell, Lewis K.; Ji, Xiao-duo; Jarvis, Michael F.; Williams, Michael; Hutchison, Alan J.; Barrington, William W.; Stiles, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    The adenosine agonist 2-(4-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino)-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS21680) was recently reported to be selective for the A2A adenosine receptor subtype, which mediates its hypotensive action. To investigate structurelactivity relationships at a distal site, CGS21680 was derivatized using a functionalized congener approach. The carboxylic group of CGS21680 has been esterified to form a methyl ester, which was then treated with ethylenediamine to produce an amine congener. The amine congener was an intermediate for acylation reactions, in which the reactive acyl species contained a reported group, or the precursor for such. For radioiodination, derivatives of p-hydroxyphenylpropionic, 2-thiophenylacetic, and p-aminophenylacetic acids were prepared. The latter derivative (PAPA-APEC) was iodinated electrophilically using [125I]iodide resulting in a radioligand which was used for studies of competition of binding to striatal A, adenosine receptors in bovine brain. A biotin conjugate and an aryl sulfonate were at least 350-fold selective for A, receptors. For spectroscopic detection, a derivative of the stable free radical tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) was prepared. For irreversible inhibition of receptors, meta- and para-phenylenediisothiocyanate groups were incorporated in the analogs. We have demonstrated that binding at A2A receptors is relatively insensitive to distal structural changes at the 2-position, and we report high affinity molecular probes for receptor characterization by radioactive, spectroscopic and affinity labelling methodology. PMID:2561548

  20. Relevance of the Branch Point Adenosine, Coordination Loop, and 3′ Exon Binding Site for in Vivo Excision of the Sinorhizobium meliloti Group II Intron RmInt1*

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Sánchez, María Dolores; Barrientos-Durán, Antonio; Toro, Nicolás

    2011-01-01

    Excision of the bacterial group II intron RmInt1 has been demonstrated in vivo, resulting in the formation of both intron lariat and putative intron RNA circles. We show here that the bulged adenosine in domain VI of RmInt1 is required for splicing via the branching pathway, but branch site mutants produce small numbers of RNA molecules in which the first G residue of the intron is linked to the last C residue. Mutations in the coordination loop in domain I reduced splicing efficiency, but branched templates clearly predominated among splicing products. We also found that a single substitution at the EBS3 position (G329C), preventing EBS3-IBS3 pairing, resulted in the production of 50 to 100 times more RNA molecules in which the 5′ and 3′ extremities were joined. We provide evidence that these intron molecules may correspond to both, intron circles linked by a 2′-5′ phosphodiester bond, and tandem, head-to-tail intron copies. PMID:21521690

  1. Five putative nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase genes are expressed in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Dos Santos, Odelta; Meirelles, Lúcia Collares; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a protozoan that parasitizes the human urogenital tract causing trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease. The parasite has unique genomic characteristics such as a large genome size and expanded gene families. Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase) is an enzyme responsible for hydrolyzing nucleoside tri- and diphosphates and has already been biochemically characterized in T. vaginalis. Considering the important role of this enzyme in the production of extracellular adenosine for parasite uptake, we evaluated the gene expression of five putative NTPDases in T. vaginalis. We showed that all five putative TvNTPDase genes (TvNTPDase1-5) were expressed by both fresh clinical and long-term grown isolates. The amino acid alignment predicted the presence of the five crucial apyrase conserved regions, transmembrane domains, signal peptides, phosphorylation and catalytic sites. Moreover, a phylogenetic analysis showed that TvNTPDase sequences make up a clade with NTPDases intracellularly located. Biochemical NTPDase activity (ATP and ADP hydrolysis) is responsive to the serum-restrictive conditions and the gene expression of TvNTPDases was mostly increased, mainly TvNTPDase2 and TvNTPDase4, although there was not a clear pattern of expression among them. In summary, the present report demonstrates the gene expression patterns of predicted NTPDases in T. vaginalis.

  2. Nonnucleoside inhibitors of adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2004-01-01

    Adenosine (ADO) is an endogenous inhibitory neuromodulator that increases nociceptive thresholds in response to tissue trauma and inflammation. Adenosine kinase (AK) is a key intracellular enzyme regulating intra- and extracellular concentrations of ADO. AK inhibition selectively amplifies extracellular ADO levels at cell and tissue sites where accelerated release of ADO occurs. AK inhibitors have been shown to provide effective antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and anticonvulsant activity in animal models, thus suggesting their potential therapeutic utility for pain, inflammation, epilepsy and possibly other central and peripheral nervous system diseases associated with cellular trauma and inflammation. This beneficial outcome may potentially lack nonspecific effects associated with the systemic administration of ADO receptor agonists. Until recently all of the reported AK inhibitors contained adenosine-like structural motif. The present review will discuss design, synthesis and analgesic and antiinflammatory properties of the novel nonnucleoside AK inhibitors that do not have close structural resemblance with the natural substrate ADO. Two classes of the nonnucleoside AK inhibitors are built on pyridopyrimidine and alkynylpyrimidine cores.

  3. Upregulation of nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 and ecto-5'-nucleotidase in rat hippocampus after repeated low-dose dexamethasone administration.

    PubMed

    Drakulić, Dunja; Stanojlović, Miloš; Nedeljković, Nadežda; Grković, Ivana; Veličković, Nataša; Guševac, Ivana; Mitrović, Nataša; Buzadžić, Ivana; Horvat, Anica

    2015-04-01

    Although dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid receptor (GR) analog with profound effects on energy metabolism, immune system, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, is widely used therapeutically, its impact on the brain is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of repeated low-dose DEX administration on the activity and expression of the ectonucleotidase enzymes which hydrolyze and therefore control extracellular ATP and adenosine concentrations in the synaptic cleft. Ectonucleotidases tested were ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1-3 (NTPDase1-3) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (eN), whereas the effects were evaluated in two brain areas that show different sensitivity to glucocorticoid action, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex. In the hippocampus, but not in cerebral cortex, modest level of neurodegenerative changes as well as increase in ATP, ADP, and AMP hydrolysis and upregulation of NTPDase1 and eN mRNA expression ensued under the influence of DEX. The observed pattern of ectonucleotidase activation, which creates tissue volume with enhanced capacity for adenosine formation, is the hallmark of the response after different insults to the brain.

  4. Response of Guanosine 5′-Triphosphate Concentration to Nutritional Changes and Its Significance for Bacillus subtilis Sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Juan M.; Dromerick, Alex; Freese, Ernst

    1981-01-01

    We have investigated the changes in the guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP) and P-ribosyl-PP pools in stringent and relaxed strains of Bacillus subtilis under conditions frequently used to initiate sporulation. After a shift-down from a Casamino Acids-glutamate to a glutamate medium (Sterlini-Mandelstam shift-down), the pools of adenosine 5′-triphosphate and P-ribosyl-PP increased in both strains; in the stringent strain, ppGpp and pppGpp increased and GTP decreased rapidly, whereas in the relaxed strain, ppGpp and pppGpp increased only slightly and GTP decreased only slowly and less extensively. The stringent strain sporulated well, whereas the relaxed strain sporulated late and poorly. Addition of decoyinine, an inhibitor of guanosine 5′-monophosphate synthetase, caused a further decrease of GTP and initiated good sporulation of the relaxed strain. After a shift-down from a glucose-lactate to a lactate medium (Ramaley-Burden shift-down) the pool of P-ribosyl-PP (and GTP) decreased in both strains, indicating a shortage of purine precursors. This shift-down also caused a stringent response which prevented the consumption of nucleotides, as shown by the maintenance of adenosine 5′-triphosphate at a high concentration in the stringent strain but not in the relaxed strain. After a delay, the relaxed strain, in which GTP decreased as fast as in the stringent strain, sporulated also as efficiently. In nutrient sporulation medium the stringent strain and, less effectively, the relaxed strain accumulated ppGpp and pppGpp transiently towards the end of exponential growth. Eventually, the P-ribosyl-PP pool decreased drastically in both strains. In all cases the initiation of sporulation was correlated with a significant decrease of GTP. Granaticin, an antibiotic which prevents the charging of leucyl-transfer ribonucleic acid, was used to show that the stringent response inhibited the formation of xanthosine monophosphate from inosine monophosphate. It prevented the

  5. Whether proton transition to the triphosphate tail of ATP occurs at protein kinase environment: A Car-Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Yong; Zou, Jun; Xiang, Ming-Li; Xie, Guo-Bin; Shi, Bing; Wei, Yu-Quan

    Protonation state of the triphosphate tail of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) in protein environment is a fundamental issue, which has significant impact on the mechanism investigation of biochemical processes with ATP involved. Proton transition from surroundings (water molecule coordinating to magnesium, HW; amino group of Lys, HL) to the ATP tail in the catalytic core of protein kinase found recently disproved the commonly accepted deprotonation state of ATP tail. In this account, Car-Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamics (CP-AIMD) method has been employed to examine whether the proton transition occurs. To provide a comparison basis for the dynamics simulations, static quantum mechanics (QM), and combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations have also been carried out. Consistent results have been obtained that complete transition of hydrogen from the surroundings to the triphosphate tail of ATP is not allowed. The most dominant conformations correspond to the ones with HW bonding to O(W) and H-bonding to O(ATP), [O(W)-HW···O(ATP)], HL bonding to N(Lys) and H-bonding to O(ATP), [N(Lys)-HL···O(ATP)]. Metastable structures with one hydrogen atom bonding with two heavy atoms (hydrogen acceptors) were also located by our dynamic simulations. This bonding mode can satisfy the hungering for hydrogen of the two heavy atoms simultaneously.

  6. Structure–Activity Relationships of 9-Alkyladenine and Ribose-Modified Adenosine Derivatives at Rat A3 Adenosine Receptors†

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Siddiqi, Suhaib M.; Olah, Mark E.; Ji, Xiao-duo; Melman, Neli; Bellamkonda, Kamala; Meshulam, Yakov; Stiles, Gary L.; Kim, Hea O.

    2012-01-01

    9-Alkyladenine derivatives and ribose-modified N6-benzyladenosine derivatives were synthesized in an effort to identify selective ligands for the rat A3 adenosine receptor and leads for the development of antagonists. The derivatives contained structural features previously determined to be important for A3 selectivity in adenosine derivatives, such as an N6-(3-iodobenzyl) moiety, and were further substituted at the 2-position with halo, amino, or thio groups. Affinity was determined in radioligand binding assays at rat brain A3 receptors stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, using [125I]AB-MECA (N6-(4-amino-3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5′-(N-methyluronamide)), and at rat brain A1 and A2a receptors using [3H]-N6-PIA ((R)-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine) and [3H]CGS 21680 (2-[[[4-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenyl]ethyl]amino]-5′-(N-ethylcarbamoyl)adenosine), respectively. A series of N6-(3-iodobenzyl) 2-amino derivatives indicated that a small 2-alkylamino group, e.g., methylamino, was favored at A3 receptors. N6-(3-Iodobenzyl)-9-methyl-2-(methylthio)adenine was 61-fold more potent than the corresponding 2-methoxy ether at A3 receptors and of comparable affinity at A1 and A2a receptors, resulting in a 3–6-fold selectivity for A3 receptors. A pair of chiral N6-(3-iodobenzyl) 9-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl) derivatives showed stereoselectivity, with the R-enantiomer favored at A3 receptors by 5.7-fold. 2-Chloro-9-(β-d-erythrofuranosyl)-N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenine had a Ki value at A3 receptors of 0.28 µM. 2-Chloro-9-[2-amino-2,3-dideoxy-β-d-5-(methylcarbamoyl)-arabinofuranosyl]-N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenine was moderately selective for A1 and A3 vs A2a receptors. A 3′-deoxy analogue of a highly A3-selective adenosine derivative retained selectivity in binding and was a full agonist in the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase mediated via cloned rat A3 receptors expressed in CHO cells. The 3′-OH and 4′-CH2OH groups of adenosine are not required for activation at A3 receptors. A

  7. Effects of adenosine on polymorphonuclear leucocyte function, cyclic 3': 5'-adenosine monophosphate, and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Nielson, C. P.; Vestal, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    1. Inhibition of human polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) function by adenosine was studied with respect to effects of adenosine on intracellular cyclic AMP and calcium during the PMN respiratory burst. 2. The adenosine analogue 5'-N-ethylcarboxamide-adenosine (NECA) and L-N6-phenyl-isopropyl-adenosine (L-PIA) inhibited PMN oxygen metabolite generation with relative potencies (NECA greater than adenosine greater than L-PIA) characteristic of an A2 receptor. 3. The respiratory burst was inhibited by adenosine when PMN were activated by calcium ionophore or chemotactic peptide but not when cells where activated by oleoyl-acetyl-glycerol (OAG). 4. Adenosine increased intracellular cyclic AMP during the PMN respiratory burst regardless of whether cells were stimulated by ionophore, chemotactic peptide or OAG. 5. To determine whether the differences in cell inhibition by adenosine were related to differences in intracellular calcium mobilization by each activating agent, calcium was evaluated with the fluorescent probe, indo-1. Adenosine suppressed the increase in intracellular calcium following PMN activation by calcium ionophore or chemotactic peptide. In contrast, calcium did not increase in PMN activated by OAG and adenosine did not affect intracellular calcium changes following this stimulus. 6. These results demonstrate that physiological concentrations of adenosine inhibit the PMN respiratory burst in association with an increase in intracellular cyclic AMP and reduction of intracellular calcium. PMID:2547490

  8. Involvement of adenosine A2a receptor in intraocular pressure decrease induced by 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine or 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine.

    PubMed

    Konno, Takashi; Murakami, Akira; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to clarify the mechanism for the decrease in intraocular pressure by 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives in rabbits. The receptor binding analysis revealed that 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-O-Ado) and 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-CN-Ado) selectively bound to the A(2a) receptor with a high affinity. Ocular hypotensive responses to 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado were inhibited by the adenosine A(2a)-receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine (CSC), but not by the adenosine A(1)-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) or the adenosine A(2b)-receptor antagonist alloxazine. In addition, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado caused an increase in outflow facility, which was inhibited by CSC, but not by DPCPX or alloxazine. Moreover, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado increased cAMP in the aqueous humor, and the 2-O-Ado-induced an increase in cAMP was inhibited by CSC. These results suggest that 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado reduced intraocular pressure via an increase in outflow facility. The ocular hypotension may be mainly mediated through the activation of adenosine A(2a) receptor, although a possible involvement of adenosine A(1) receptor cannot be completely ruled out. 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado are useful lead compounds for the treatment of glaucoma.

  9. Inactivation of B/sub 12/-dependent ribonucleotide reductase by 2'-azido-2'-deoxyarabinofuranosyladenine 5'-triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, G.W.; Stubbe, J.

    1986-05-01

    The Coenzyme B/sub 12/-dependent ribonucleotide triphosphate reductase (RTPR) from Lactobacillus leichmannii is rapidly inactivated by the substrate analog 2-azido-2'-deoxy-arabinofuranosyladenine 5'-triphosphate (N/sub 3/araATP). This reaction has been probed using N/sub 2/ araATP specifically radiolabeled in the sugar and base moieties. Unlike the inactivation of this enzyme by 2'-halo nucleotides, reaction of RTPR with N/sub 3/araATP does not result in formation of PPPi, adenine, or azide ion. Instead, the phosphate, sugar, and base moieties remain bound to the protein after gel filtration of the inactive protein. One equivalent of coenzyme is destroyed during the inactivation, producing 5'-deoxyadenosine and cob(II)alamin. No/sup 3/H/sub 2/O is formed when RTPR is inactivated with (3'-/sup 3/H)N/sub 3/araATP. These results suggest that inactivation occurs either through reaction of an enzyme group with the azido moiety or through formation of a tight-binding product.

  10. Autoradiographic localization of adenosine receptors in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)cyclohexyladenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, R.R.; Synder, S.H.

    1982-09-01

    Adenosine (A1) receptor binding sites have been localized in rat brain by an in vitro light microscopic autoradiographic method. The binding of (/sup 3/H)N6-cyclohexyladenosine to slide-mounted rat brain tissue sections has the characteristics of A1 receptors. It is saturable with high affinity and has appropriate pharmacology and stereospecificity. The highest densities of adenosine receptors occur in the molecular layer of the cerebellum, the molecular and polymorphic layers of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus, the medial geniculate body, certain thalamic nuclei, and the lateral septum. High densities also are observed in certain layers of the cerebral cortex, the piriform cortex, the caudate-putamen, the nucleus accumbens, and the granule cell layer of the cerebellum. Most white matter areas, as well as certain gray matter areas, such as the hypothalamus, have negligible receptor concentrations. These localizations suggest possible central nervous system sites of action of adenosine.

  11. Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Fe-S Targeted Adenosine 5′-Phosphosulfate Reductase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Paritala, Hanumantharao; Suzuki, Yuta; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR) is an iron-sulfur enzyme that is vital for survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during dormancy and is an attractive target for the treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection. The 4Fe-4S cluster is coordinated to APR by sulfur atoms of four cysteine residues, is proximal to substrate, adenosine 5′-phopsphosulfate (APS), and is essential for catalytic activity. Herein, we present an approach for the development of a new class of APR inhibitors. As an initial step, we have employed an improved solid-phase chemistry method to prepare a series of N6-substituted adenosine analogues and their 5′-phosphates as well as adenosine 5′-phosphate diesters bearing different Fe and S binding groups, such as thiols or carboxylic and hydroxamic acid moieties. Evaluation of the resulting compounds indicates a clearly defined spacing requirement between the Fe-S targeting group and adenosine scaffold and that smaller Fe-S targeting groups are better tolerated. Molecular docking analysis suggests that the S atom of the most potent inhibitor may establish a favorable interaction with an S atom in the cluster. In summary, this study showcases an improved solid-phase method that expedites the preparation of adenosine and related 5′-phosphate derivatives and presents a unique Fe-S targeting strategy for the development of APR inhibitors. PMID:25710356

  12. Automated parallel synthesis of 5'-triphosphate oligonucleotides and preparation of chemically modified 5'-triphosphate small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Zlatev, Ivan; Lackey, Jeremy G; Zhang, Ligang; Dell, Amy; McRae, Kathy; Shaikh, Sarfraz; Duncan, Richard G; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Manoharan, Muthiah

    2013-02-01

    A fully automated chemical method for the parallel and high-throughput solid-phase synthesis of 5'-triphosphate and 5'-diphosphate oligonucleotides is described. The desired full-length oligonucleotides were first constructed using standard automated DNA/RNA solid-phase synthesis procedures. Then, on the same column and instrument, efficient implementation of an uninterrupted sequential cycle afforded the corresponding unmodified or chemically modified 5'-triphosphates and 5'-diphosphates. The method was readily translated into a scalable and high-throughput synthesis protocol compatible with the current DNA/RNA synthesizers yielding a large variety of unique 5'-polyphosphorylated oligonucleotides. Using this approach, we accomplished the synthesis of chemically modified 5'-triphosphate oligonucleotides that were annealed to form small-interfering RNAs (ppp-siRNAs), a potentially interesting class of novel RNAi therapeutic tools. The attachment of the 5'-triphosphate group to the passenger strand of a siRNA construct did not induce a significant improvement in the in vitro RNAi-mediated gene silencing activity nor a strong specific in vitro RIG-I activation. The reported method will enable the screening of many chemically modified ppp-siRNAs, resulting in a novel bi-functional RNAi therapeutic platform. PMID:23260577

  13. Regulation of Cardiovascular Development by Adenosine and Adenosine-Mediated Embryo Protection

    PubMed Central

    Rivkees, Scott A.; Wendler, Christopher C.

    2012-01-01

    Few signaling molecules have the potential to influence the developing mammal as the nucleoside adenosine. Adenosine levels increase rapidly with tissue hypoxia and inflammation. Adenosine antagonists include the methlyxanthines caffeine and theophylline. The receptors that transduce adenosine action are the A1, A2a, A2b, and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs). We examined how adenosine acts via A1ARs to influence embryo development. Transgenic mice were studied along with embryo cultures. Embryos lacking A1ARs were markedly growth retarded following intrauterine hypoxia exposure. Studies of mice selectively lacking A1AR in the heart identify the heart as a key site of adenosines embryo protective effects. Studies of isolated embryos showed that adenosine plays a key role in modulating embryo cardiac function, especially in the setting of hypoxia. When pregnant mice were treated during embryogenesis with the adenosine antagonist caffeine, adult mice had abnormal heart function. Adenosine acts via A1ARs to play an essential role in protecting the embryo against intra uterine stress, and adenosine antagonists, including caffeine, may be an unwelcome exposure for the embryo. PMID:22423036

  14. Pyridopyrimidine analogues as novel adenosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G Z; Lee, C; Pratt, J K; Perner, R J; Jiang, M Q; Gomtsyan, A; Matulenko, M A; Mao, Y; Koenig, J R; Kim, K H; Muchmore, S; Yu, H; Kohlhaas, K; Alexander, K M; McGaraughty, S; Chu, K L; Wismer, C T; Mikusa, J; Jarvis, M F; Marsh, K; Kowaluk, E A; Bhagwat, S S; Stewart, A O

    2001-08-20

    A novel series of pyridopyrimidine analogues 9 was identified as potent adenosine kinase inhibitors based on the SAR and computational studies. Substitution of the C7 position of the pyridopyrimidino core with C2' substituted pyridino moiety increased the in vivo potency and enhanced oral bioavailability of these adenosine kinase inhibitors.

  15. Comparison of Activities and Properties of Pyrophosphate and Adenosine Triphosphate-Dependent Phosphofructokinases of Black Gram (Phaseolus mungo) Seeds.

    PubMed

    Ashihara, H; Stupavska, S

    1984-09-01

    Both pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase (PPi-PFKase, EC 2.7.1.90) and ATPdependent phosphofructokinase (ATP-PFKase, EC 2.7. 1.11) were present in dry and germinated black gram seeds. In the absence of fructose-2,6-biphosphate (F2,6BP), the activity of PPi-PFKase expressed as nmol · min(-1) · (pair of cotyledons)(-1) was much lower than that of ATP-PFKase in both dry and germinated seeds. However, PPi-PFKase was activated by F2,6BP and its activity reached the same level as ATP-PFKase activity. ATP-PFKase showed sigmoidal kinetics respective to fructose-6-phosphate (F6P), while PPi-PFKase exhibited hyperbolic kinetics in the presence of F2,6BP. The F6P concentration for half maximal activity of ATP-PFKase (1.5 mM) was nearly 5 times lower than that of PPi-PFKase (7.1 mM). The apparent Km values of PPi-PFKase for PPi and that of ATP-PFKase for ATP were 0.29 mM and 0.23 mM, respectively. Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and citrate inhibited ATP-PFKase activity, but they did not affect PPi-PFKase activity. The activity of PPi-PFKase was inhibited by Pi, while only a little Pi inhibition was observed in the case of ATP-PFKase. These results suggest that the control mechanism of PPi-PFKase and that of ATP-PFKase are quite different. In contrast to pineapple leaves (Carnal, N. W. and C. C. Black, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 86, 20-26, 1979) and caster bean seedlings (Krugar et al., FEBS Lett. 153, 409-412, 1983), PPi-PFKase is not the predominant PFKase activity in black gram seeds.

  16. Effect of freezing rate on motility, adenosine triphosphate content and fertilizability in beluga sturgeon (Huso huso) spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Aramli, Mohammad Sadegh; Golshahi, Karim; Nazari, Rajab Mohammad; Aramli, Salim

    2015-04-01

    Broodstock selection programs are currently underway for sturgeon species. To complement and further these selection programs we need to develop sperm cryopreservation procedures. In the present study, we describe the effects of freezing rate (-10°C, -15°C, -20°C, -30°C and -40°C/min) on gamete quality characteristics (i.e., duration of motility (s), motility percentage (%), ATP content (nmol/10(8) cells), fertilization rate (%), and hatching rate (%)) in beluga sturgeon, Huso huso. After sampling, beluga sturgeon sperm were diluted in an extender composed of 23.4mM sucrose, 0.25 mM KCl, and 30 mM Tris-HCl, pH 8.0 containing 10% methanol and subsequently frozen in a programmable freezer. Sperm frozen at -40°C/min resulted in means for duration of motility (134 s), motility percentage (69%), ATP concentration (4.8 nmol/10(8) cells), fertilization rate (72%) and hatching rate (65%) that were higher (P<0.05) than those for slower cooling rates. Based on our results, -40°C/min was the best freezing rate (among those tested) for cryopreservation of beluga sturgeon sperm.

  17. The adenosine triphosphate inhibition of the pyruvate kinase reaction and its dependence on the total magnesium ion concentration

    PubMed Central

    Holmsen, Holm; Storm, Eva

    1969-01-01

    1. The effects of ATP, PPi and EDTA on the skeletal-muscle pyruvate kinase reaction at various concentrations of magnesium (where `magnesium' refers to total Mg2+, both free and in the form of complexes) were investigated. The reaction rate was determined as the amount of pyruvate formed in a recorded time of incubation. 2. At 44mm-magnesium the Km values for ADP and phosphoenolpyruvate were unaltered by the presence of ATP up to 6·8mm in systems buffered with either tris–hydrochloric acid or glycylglycine–sodium hydroxide, but the Km values were different in these systems. The Km for one substrate was independent of the concentration of the second substrate. 3. At 10mm-magnesium in the tris–hydrochloric acid system ATP inhibited the reaction competitively with respect to ADP and phosphoenolpyruvate. In the glycylglycine–sodium hydroxide system the inhibition appeared to be non-competitive. At 10mm-magnesium the Km values were lower than at 44mm-magnesium and dependent on the system used. 4. In the tris–hydrochloric acid system the reaction rate rose with increasing magnesium concentration up to a maximum at a concentration 10–20 times that of ADP. Further increase inhibited the reaction and at 44mm-magnesium the rate was 25–50% of its maximum. This inhibition paralleled that produced by increasing trimethylammonium chloride concentrations and was not due to a specific effect of the Mg2+ ion. 5. In the presence of 6·8mm-ATP no reaction occurred below 4–6mm-magnesium, and further increase apparently abolished the inhibition as the reaction rate increased and became equal to those obtained in the absence of ATP at 10–25mm-magnesium. Further increase in magnesium concentration gave reaction rates that were slightly higher in the presence of ATP than in its absence. The maximal rate in the presence of ATP was distinctly lower than in its absence. When 6·8mm-PPi or 6·8mm-EDTA was present the variations in reaction rate with rising magnesium concentration were similar to that obtained in the presence of ATP below 6–8mm-magnesium but further increase in the magnesium concentration resulted in an increase in the rate up to a maximum comparable with that of the control. The effect of pure chelation was thus a displacement of the reaction maximum to higher magnesium concentrations without changing the maximal rate. When correction had been made for this effect, ATP gave inhibition at 44mm-magnesium that was competitive with respect to ADP (Ki 2·1×10−2m). This degree of inhibition is far less than was reported earlier and its importance for the mechanism of the pyruvate kinase reaction is discussed. PMID:4308294

  18. Potassium and sodium ions in the glycerinated skeletal muscle. Distribution changes induced by adenosine triphosphate and nondissociable anesthetic substances.

    PubMed

    Dragomir, C T; Barbier, A; Ungureanu, D; Ionescu, V; Pausescu, E; Chirvasie, R; Ghitescu, D; Filipescu, G

    1975-01-01

    Investigation of the ionic behavior of glycerinated muscle fibers showed that the residual structures of this biologic cellular material, lacking functional membranes, are able to discriminate between alkaline ions. The characteristics of the ionic selectivity of the glycerinated fibers change with their functional state and with the presence in the medium of certain nonionic substances. Among the more important features of ionic distribution between the membrane-free fibers and the medium are the following: (1) There is evident adsorption of potassium on the fibers, in the absence of ATP. (2) This adsorption increases in contraction and decreases in relaxation. (3) At high ionic concentrations, in contrast to what occurs at low potassium concentrations, the glycerinated muscle prefers sodium to potassium, but even under these conditions both ions are accumulated in the fibers to far greater levels than in the medium. This strongly suggests a Donnan ionic equilibrium developing parallel to the adsorption process. (4) Nonionic substances of the general anesthetic group markedly alter the ionic selectivity of the glycerinated fibers, probably by their action on the water's physical state. A mechanism is proposed for the observed ionic adsorption specific of the muscle-a mechanism in which actin-myosin coupling plays the cardinal adsorption role. In the general interpretation of the data a synthetic concept is advanced according to which an entire set of processes and factors concurs with the distribution of ions between the muscle and the medium.

  19. Nuclear Overhauser effect studies on the conformation of magnesium adenosine 5'-triphosphate bound to rabbit muscle creatine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Rosevear, P.R.; Powers, V.M.; Dowhan, D.; Mildvan, A.S.; Kenyon, G.L.

    1987-08-25

    Nuclear Overhauser effects were used to determine interproton distances on MgATP bound to rabbit muscle creatine kinase. The internuclear distances were used in a distance geometry program that objectively determines both the conformation of the bound MgATP and its uniqueness. Two classes of structures were found that satisfied the measured interproton distances. Both classes had the same anti glycosidic torsional angle (X = 78 +/- 10/sup 0/) but differed in their ribose ring puckers (O1'-endo or C4'-exo). The uniqueness of the glycosidic torsional angle is consistent with the preference of creatine kinase for adenine nucleotides. One of these conformations of MgATP bound to creatine kinase is indistinguishable from the conformation found for Co(NH/sub 3/)/sub 4/ ATP bound to the catalytic subunit of protein kinase, which also has a high specificity for adenine nucleotides. Distance geometry calculations also suggest that upper limit distances, when low enough (less than or equal to 3.4 A), can be used instead of measured distances to define, within experimental error, the glycosidic torsional angle of bound nucleotides. However, this approach does not permit an evaluation of the ribose ring pucker.

  20. Rate of phosphate release after photoliberation of adenosine 5'-triphosphate in slow and fast skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    He, Z; Stienen, G J; Barends, J P; Ferenczi, M A

    1998-11-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) release was determined by means of a fluorescent Pi-probe in single permeabilized rabbit soleus and psoas muscle fibers. Measurements of Pi release followed photoliberation of approximately 1.5 mM ATP by flash photolysis of NPE-caged ATP in the absence and presence of Ca2+ at 15 degrees C. In the absence of Ca2+, Pi release occurred with a slow rate of 11 +/- 3 microM . s-1 (n = 3) in soleus fibers and 23 +/- 1 microM . s-1 (n = 10) in psoas fibers. At saturating Ca2+ concentrations (pCa 4.5), photoliberation of ATP was followed by rapid force development. The initial rate of Pi release was 0.57 +/- 0.05 mM . s-1 in soleus (n = 13) and 4.7 +/- 0.2 mM . s-1 in psoas (n = 23), corresponding to a rate of Pi release per myosin head of 3.8 s-1 in soleus and 31.5 s-1 in psoas. Pi release declined at a rate of 0.48 s-1 in soleus and of 5.2 s-1 in psoas. Pi release in soleus was slightly faster in the presence of an ATP regenerating system but slower when 0.5 mM ADP was added. The reduction in the rate of Pi release results from an initial redistribution of cross-bridges over different states and a subsequent ADP-sensitive slowing of cross-bridge detachment.

  1. Effect of sodium selenite on the ciliary activity, adenosine triphosphate, and protein synthesis in mouse trachea organ cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Lag, M.; Paulsen, G.; Jonsen, J.

    1984-01-01

    Trachea from albino mice were cut transversely into nearly identical rings and incubated in medium 199 with Hanks salts and HEPES buffer at 37/sup 0/C. Sodium selenite at 0.5-5 mM depressed the ciliary activity. With 1 and 5 mM sodium selenite, a 50% reduction in the activity index was observed after approximately 5 and 1.5 h, respectively. The ATP content in trachea rings was reduced with 0.05-5 mM sodium selenite, and increasing concentrations gave decreasing amount of ATP after incubation for 4 and 21 h. The rate of protein synthesis as determined by incorporation of radioactive leucine was reduced with 0.5 and 2 mM sodium selenite. The synthesis was reduced quickly by 2 mM sodium selenite, which gave a 30% reduction after incubation for 1 h. 16 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  2. Crystal structure of Escherichia coli cytidine triphosphate synthetase, a nucleotide-regulated glutamine amidotransferase/ATP-dependent amidoligase fusion protein and homologue of anticancer and antiparasitic drug targets.

    PubMed

    Endrizzi, James A; Kim, Hanseong; Anderson, Paul M; Baldwin, Enoch P

    2004-06-01

    Cytidine triphosphate synthetases (CTPSs) produce CTP from UTP and glutamine, and regulate intracellular CTP levels through interactions with the four ribonucleotide triphosphates. We solved the 2.3-A resolution crystal structure of Escherichia coli CTPS using Hg-MAD phasing. The structure reveals a nearly symmetric 222 tetramer, in which each bifunctional monomer contains a dethiobiotin synthetase-like amidoligase N-terminal domain and a Type 1 glutamine amidotransferase C-terminal domain. For each amidoligase active site, essential ATP- and UTP-binding surfaces are contributed by three monomers, suggesting that activity requires tetramer formation, and that a nucleotide-dependent dimer-tetramer equilibrium contributes to the observed positive cooperativity. A gated channel that spans 25 A between the glutamine hydrolysis and amidoligase active sites provides a path for ammonia diffusion. The channel is accessible to solvent at the base of a cleft adjoining the glutamine hydrolysis active site, providing an entry point for exogenous ammonia. Guanine nucleotide binding sites of structurally related GTPases superimpose on this cleft, providing insights into allosteric regulation by GTP. Mutations that confer nucleoside drug resistance and release CTP inhibition map to a pocket that neighbors the UTP-binding site and can accommodate a pyrimidine ring. Its location suggests that competitive feedback inhibition is affected via a distinct product/drug binding site that overlaps the substrate triphosphate binding site. Overall, the E. coli structure provides a framework for homology modeling of other CTPSs and structure-based design of anti-CTPS therapeutics. PMID:15157079

  3. The Structural Basis of 5′ Triphosphate Double-stranded RNA Recognition by RIG-I C-terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cheng; Xu, Hengyu; Ranjith-Kumar, C. T.; Brooks, Monica T.; Hou, Tim Y.; Hu, Fuqu; Herr, Andrew B.; Strong, Roland K.; Kao, C. Cheng; Li, Pingwei

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY RIG-I is a cytosolic sensor of viral RNA that plays crucial roles in the induction of type I interferons. The C-terminal domain (CTD) of RIG-I is responsible for the recognition of viral RNA with 5′ triphosphate (5′ ppp). However, the mechanism of viral RNA recognition by RIG-I is still not fully understood. Here we show that RIG-I CTD binds 5′ ppp dsRNA or ssRNA, as well as blunt-ended dsRNA, and exhibits the highest affinity for 5′ ppp dsRNA. Crystal structures of RIG-I CTD bound to 5′ ppp dsRNA with GC- and AU- rich sequences revealed that RIG-I recognizes the termini of the dsRNA and interacts with the 5′ triphosphate through extensive electrostatic interactions. Mutagenesis and RNA binding studies demonstrated that similar binding surfaces are involved in the recognition of different forms of RNA. Mutations of key residues at the RNA binding surface affected RIG-I signaling in cells. PMID:20637642

  4. Time- and dose-related interactions between glucocorticoid and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate on CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-dependent insulin-like growth factor I expression by osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Ji, C.; Chen, Y.; Kim, K.; Centrella, M.

    2000-01-01

    Glucocorticoid has complex effects on osteoblasts. Several of these changes appear to be related to steroid concentration, duration of exposure, or specific effects on growth factor expression or activity within bone. One important bone growth factor, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), is induced in osteoblasts by hormones such as PGE2 that increase intracellular cAMP levels. In this way, PGE2 activates transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-delta (C/EBPdelta) and enhances its binding to a specific control element found in exon 1 in the IGF-I gene. Our current studies show that preexposure to glucocorticoid enhanced C/EBPdelta and C/EBPbeta expression by osteoblasts and thereby potentiated IGF-I gene promoter activation in response to PGE2. Importantly, this directly contrasts with inhibitory effects on IGF-I expression that result from sustained or pharmacologically high levels of glucocorticoid exposure. Consistent with the stimulatory effect of IGF-I on bone protein synthesis, pretreatment with glucocorticoid sensitized osteoblasts to PGE2, and in this context significantly enhanced new collagen and noncollagen protein synthesis. Therefore, pharmacological levels of glucocorticoid may reduce IGF-I expression by osteoblasts and cause osteopenic disease, whereas physiological transient increases in glucocorticoid may permit or amplify the effectiveness of hormones that regulate skeletal tissue integrity. These events appear to converge on the important role of C/EBPdelta and C/EBPbeta on IGF-I expression by osteoblasts.

  5. Human ataxias: a genetic dissection of inositol triphosphate receptor (ITPR1)-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Schorge, Stephanie; van de Leemput, Joyce; Singleton, Andrew; Houlden, Henry; Hardy, John

    2010-05-01

    A persistent mystery about the ataxias has been why mutations in genes--many of which are expressed widely in the brain--primarily cause ataxia, and not, for example, epilepsy or dementia. Why should a polyglutamine stretch in the TATA-binding protein (that is important in all cells) particularly disrupt cerebellar coordination? We propose that advances in the genetics of cerebellar ataxias suggest a rational hypothesis for how so many different genes lead to predominantly cerebellar defects. We argue that the unifying feature of many genes involved in cerebellar ataxias is their impact on the signaling protein ITPR1 (inositiol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor type 1), that underlies coincidence detection in Purkinje cells and could play an important role in cerebellar coordination.

  6. Search for New Purine- and Ribose-Modified Adenosine Analogues as Selective Agonists and Antagonists at Adenosine Receptors†

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Suhaib M.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Esker, John L.; Olah, Mark E.; Ji, Xiao-duo; Melman, Neli; Tiwari, Kamal N.; Secrist, John A.; Schneller, Stewart W.; Cristalli, Gloria; Stiles, Gary L.; Johnson, Carl R.; IJzerman, Ad P.

    2012-01-01

    The binding affinities at rat A1, A2a, and A3 adenosine receptors of a wide range of derivatives of adenosine have been determined. Sites of modification include the purine moiety (1-, 3-, and 7-deaza; halo, alkyne, and amino substitutions at the 2- and 8-positions; and N6-CH2-ring, -hydrazino, and -hydroxylamino) and the ribose moiety (2′-, 3′-, and 5′-deoxy; 2′- and 3′-O-methyl; 2′-deoxy 2′-fluoro; 6′-thio; 5′-uronamide; carbocyclic; 4′- or 3′-methyl; and inversion of configuration). (−)- and (+)-5′-Noraristeromycin were 48- and 21-fold selective, respectively, for A2a vs A1 receptors. 2-Chloro-6′-thioadenosine displayed a Ki value of 20 nM at A2a receptors (15-fold selective vs A1). 2-Chloroadenin-9-yl(β-L-2′-deoxy-6′-thiolyxofuranoside) displayed a Ki value of 8 μM at A1 receptors and appeared to be an antagonist, on the basis of the absence of a GTP-induced shift in binding vs a radiolabeled antagonist (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine). 2-Chloro-2′-deoxyadenosine and 2-chloroadenin-9-yl(β-D-6′-thioarabinoside) were putative partial agonists at A1 receptors, with Ki values of 7.4 and 5.4 μM, respectively. The A2a selective agonist 2-(1-hexynyl)-5′-(N-ethylcarbamoyl)adenosine displayed a Ki value of 26 nM at A3 receptors. The 4′-methyl substitution of adenosine was poorly tolerated, yet when combined with other favorable modifications, potency was restored. Thus, N6-benzyl-4′-methyladenosine-5′-(N-methyluronamide) displayed a Ki value of 604 nM at A3 receptors and was 103- and 88-fold selective vs A1 and A2a receptors, respectively. This compound was a full agonist in the A3-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in transfected CHO cells. The carbocyclic analogue of N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5′-(N-methyluronamide) was 2-fold selective for A3 vs A1 receptors and was nearly inactive at A2a receptors. PMID:7707320

  7. Cloning and expression of an A1 adenosine receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; McVittie, L.D.; Smyk-Randall, E.M.; Nakata, H.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Gerfen, C.R.; Sibley, D.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction technique to selectively amplify guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor cDNA sequences from rat striatal mRNA, using sets of highly degenerate primers derived from transmembrane sequences of previously cloned G protein-coupled receptors. A novel cDNA fragment was identified, which exhibits considerable homology to various members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This fragment was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a rat striatal library. A 2.2-kilobase clone was obtained that encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with seven transmembrane domains, as predicted by hydropathy analysis. Stably transfected mouse A9-L cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells that expressed mRNA for this clone were screened with putative receptor ligands. Saturable and specific binding sites for the A1 adenosine antagonist (3H)-1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine were identified on membranes from transfected cells. The rank order of potency and affinities of various adenosine agonist and antagonist ligands confirmed the identity of this cDNA clone as an A1 adenosine receptor. The high affinity binding of A1 adenosine agonists was shown to be sensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanylyl-5{prime}-imidodiphosphate. In adenylyl cyclase assays, adenosine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production by greater than 50%, in a pharmacologically specific fashion. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses of receptor mRNA in brain tissues revealed two transcripts of 5.6 and 3.1 kilobases, both of which were abundant in cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and thalamus, with lower levels in olfactory bulb, striatum, mesencephalon, and retina. These regional distribution data are in good agreement with previous receptor autoradiographic studies involving the A1 adenosine receptor.

  8. Adenosine Kinase: Exploitation for Therapeutic Gain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine kinase (ADK; EC 2.7.1.20) is an evolutionarily conserved phosphotransferase that converts the purine ribonucleoside adenosine into 5′-adenosine-monophosphate. This enzymatic reaction plays a fundamental role in determining the tone of adenosine, which fulfills essential functions as a homeostatic and metabolic regulator in all living systems. Adenosine not only activates specific signaling pathways by activation of four types of adenosine receptors but it is also a primordial metabolite and regulator of biochemical enzyme reactions that couple to bioenergetic and epigenetic functions. By regulating adenosine, ADK can thus be identified as an upstream regulator of complex homeostatic and metabolic networks. Not surprisingly, ADK dysfunction is involved in several pathologies, including diabetes, epilepsy, and cancer. Consequently, ADK emerges as a rational therapeutic target, and adenosine-regulating drugs have been tested extensively. In recent attempts to improve specificity of treatment, localized therapies have been developed to augment adenosine signaling at sites of injury or pathology; those approaches include transplantation of stem cells with deletions of ADK or the use of gene therapy vectors to downregulate ADK expression. More recently, the first human mutations in ADK have been described, and novel findings suggest an unexpected role of ADK in a wider range of pathologies. ADK-regulating strategies thus represent innovative therapeutic opportunities to reconstruct network homeostasis in a multitude of conditions. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the genetics, biochemistry, and pharmacology of ADK and will then focus on pathologies and therapeutic interventions. Challenges to translate ADK-based therapies into clinical use will be discussed critically. PMID:23592612

  9. The adenosine neuromodulation system in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rial, Daniel; Lara, Diogo R; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2014-01-01

    The management of schizophrenia endophenotypes, namely positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms is still an open goal, justifying the search of novel therapeutic avenues. We now review the evidence supporting the interest in targeting the adenosine modulation system to counteract the core features of schizophrenia. This interest is forwarded by the combined ability of strategies aimed at bolstering adenosine levels together with the increasingly recognized impact of adenosine A2A receptors to control dopaminergic signaling, working memory, and behavioral sensitization; this is further heralded by the suggested clinical effectiveness of therapies increasing extracellular adenosine such as dipyridamole and allopurinol and the emergent recognition of a role for adenosine in neurodevelopment. Finally, the combined role of A1 and A2A receptors in assisting the implementation of adaptive changes and encoding of information salience in neuronal circuits together with the adaptive alterations of A1 and A2A receptor density upon brain dysfunction prompts the novel working hypothesis that the parallel imbalance of adenosine formation and of A1 and A2A receptors blurs the adequate encoding of information salience in neuronal circuits, which we propose to be a core pathogenic feature in the development of schizophrenia endophenotypes. This proposal should also provide a rationale to assist the design of future therapeutic intervention targeting the adenosine modulation system to manage schizophrenia endophenotypes: these should not be based only on an attempt to target adenosine kinase-A1 receptors or only A2A receptors, but should instead simultaneously target these two arms of the adenosine modulation system. PMID:25175974

  10. On the Mg(2+) binding site of the ε subunit from bacterial F-type ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Krah, Alexander; Takada, Shoji

    2015-10-01

    F-type ATP synthases, central energy conversion machines of the cell synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using an electrochemical gradient across the membrane and, reversely, can also hydrolyze ATP to pump ions across the membrane, depending on cellular conditions such as ATP concentration. To prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis, mammalian and bacterial ATP synthases possess different regulatory mechanisms. In bacteria, a low ATP concentration induces a conformational change in the ε subunit from the down- to up-states, which inhibits ATP hydrolysis. Moreover, the conformational change of the ε subunit depends on Mg(2+) concentration in some bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis, but not in others. This diversity makes the ε subunit a potential target for antibiotics. Here, performing molecular dynamics simulations, we identify the Mg(2+) binding site in the ε subunit from B. subtilis as E59 and E86. The free energy analysis shows that the first-sphere bi-dentate coordination of the Mg(2+) ion by the two glutamates is the most stable state. In comparison, we also clarify the reason for the absence of Mg(2+) dependency in the ε subunit from thermophilic Bacillus PS3, despite the high homology to that from B. subtilis. Sequence alignment suggests that this Mg(2+) binding motif is present in the ε subunits of some pathogenic bacteria. In addition we discuss strategies to stabilize an isolated ε subunit carrying the Mg(2+) binding motif by site directed mutagenesis, which also can be used to crystallize Mg(2+) dependent ε subunits in future.

  11. Characterization of human herpesvirus 6A/B U94 as ATPase, helicase, exonuclease and DNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Trempe, Frédéric; Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Wallaschek, Nina; Collin, Vanessa; Gilbert-Girard, Shella; Morissette, Guillaume; Kaufer, Benedikt B.; Flamand, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A) and HHV-6B integrate their genomes into the telomeres of human chromosomes, however, the mechanisms leading to integration remain unknown. HHV-6A/B encode a protein that has been proposed to be involved in integration termed U94, an ortholog of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) Rep68 integrase. In this report, we addressed whether purified recombinant maltose-binding protein (MBP)-U94 fusion proteins of HHV-6A/B possess biological functions compatible with viral integration. We could demonstrate that MBP-U94 efficiently binds both dsDNA and ssDNA containing telomeric repeats using gel shift assay and surface plasmon resonance. MBP-U94 is also able to hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to ADP, providing the energy for further catalytic activities. In addition, U94 displays a 3′ to 5′ exonuclease activity on dsDNA with a preference for 3′-recessed ends. Once the DNA strand reaches 8–10 nt in length, the enzyme dissociates it from the complementary strand. Lastly, MBP-U94 compromises the integrity of a synthetic telomeric D-loop through exonuclease attack at the 3′ end of the invading strand. The preferential DNA binding of MBP-U94 to telomeric sequences, its ability to hydrolyze ATP and its exonuclease/helicase activities suggest that U94 possesses all functions required for HHV-6A/B chromosomal integration. PMID:25999342

  12. Poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-N-methylolacrylamide-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of adenosine phosphates in royal jelly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Zhang, Tianbin; Cheng, Yechun; Jia, Qiong

    2014-07-01

    A polymer monolith microextraction method coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was developed for the determination of adenosine triphosphate, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine monophosphate. The monolithic column was synthesized inside fused-silica capillaries using thermal initiation free-radical polymerization with glycidyl methacrylate as the monomer, ethylene dimethacrylate as the cross-linker, cyclohexanol, and 1-dodecanol as the porogen. N-Methylolacrylamide, an important hydrophilic monomer, was incorporated into the polymerization mixture to enhance the hydrophilicity of the poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) column. The obtained poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-N-methylolacrylamide-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Optimum conditions for the preconcentration and separation of the target adenosines were also investigated. Under the optimum conditions, we obtained acceptable linearities, low limits of detection, and good relative standard deviations. The developed polymer monolith microextraction with high-performance liquid chromatography method exhibited a good performance with recovery values in the range of 76.9-104.7% when applied to the determination of the adenosines in five royal jelly samples.

  13. Exploiting Protein Conformational Change to Optimize Adenosine-Derived Inhibitors of HSP70.

    PubMed

    Cheeseman, Matthew D; Westwood, Isaac M; Barbeau, Olivier; Rowlands, Martin; Dobson, Sarah; Jones, Alan M; Jeganathan, Fiona; Burke, Rosemary; Kadi, Nadia; Workman, Paul; Collins, Ian; van Montfort, Rob L M; Jones, Keith

    2016-05-26

    HSP70 is a molecular chaperone and a key component of the heat-shock response. Because of its proposed importance in oncology, this protein has become a popular target for drug discovery, efforts which have as yet brought little success. This study demonstrates that adenosine-derived HSP70 inhibitors potentially bind to the protein with a novel mechanism of action, the stabilization by desolvation of an intramolecular salt-bridge which induces a conformational change in the protein, leading to high affinity ligands. We also demonstrate that through the application of this mechanism, adenosine-derived HSP70 inhibitors can be optimized in a rational manner. PMID:27119979

  14. Caffeine exposure alters adenosine system and neurochemical markers during retinal development.

    PubMed

    Brito, Rafael; Pereira-Figueiredo, Danniel; Socodato, Renato; Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto; Calaza, Karin C

    2016-08-01

    Evidence points to beneficial properties of caffeine in the adult central nervous system, but teratogenic effects have also been reported. Caffeine exerts most of its effects by antagonizing adenosine receptors, especially A1 and A2A subtypes. In this study, we evaluated the role of caffeine on the expression of components of the adenosinergic system in the developing avian retina and the impact of caffeine exposure upon specific markers for classical neurotransmitter systems. Caffeine exposure (5-30 mg/kg by in ovo injection) to 14-day-old chick embryos increased the expression of A1 receptors and concomitantly decreased A2A adenosine receptors expression after 48 h. Accordingly, caffeine (30 mg/kg) increased [(3) H]-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (A1 antagonist) binding and reduced [(3) H]-ZM241385 (A2A antagonist) binding. The caffeine time-response curve demonstrated a reduction in A1 receptors 6 h after injection, but an increase after 18 and 24 h. In contrast, caffeine exposure increased the expression of A2A receptors from 18 and 24 h. Kinetic assays of [(3) H]-S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine binding to the equilibrative adenosine transporter ENT1 revealed an increase in Bmax with no changes in Kd , an effect accompanied by an increase in adenosine uptake. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a decrease in retinal content of tyrosine hydroxylase, calbindin and choline acetyltransferase, but not Brn3a, after 48 h of caffeine injection. Furthermore, retinas exposed to caffeine had increased levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and cAMP-response element binding protein. Overall, we show an in vivo regulation of the adenosine system, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and cAMP-response element binding protein function and protein expression of specific neurotransmitter systems by caffeine in the developing retina. The beneficial or maleficent effects of caffeine have been demonstrated by the work of different studies. It

  15. Adenosine receptors as drug targets — what are the challenges?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine signalling has long been a target for drug development, with adenosine itself or its derivatives being used clinically since the 1940s. In addition, methylxanthines such as caffeine have profound biological effects as antagonists at adenosine receptors. Moreover, drugs such as dipyridamole and methotrexate act by enhancing the activation of adenosine receptors. There is strong evidence that adenosine has a functional role in many diseases, and several pharmacological compounds specifically targeting individual adenosine receptors — either directly or indirectly — have now entered the clinic. However, only one adenosine receptor-specific agent — the adenosine A2A receptor agonist regadenoson (Lexiscan; Astellas Pharma) — has so far gained approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Here, we focus on the biology of adenosine signalling to identify hurdles in the development of additional pharmacological compounds targeting adenosine receptors and discuss strategies to overcome these challenges. PMID:23535933

  16. Mast Cell Adenosine Receptors Function: A Focus on the A3 Adenosine Receptor and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rudich, Noam; Ravid, Katya; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine is a metabolite, which has long been implicated in a variety of inflammatory processes. Inhaled adenosine provokes bronchoconstriction in asthmatics or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, but not in non-asthmatics. This hyper responsiveness to adenosine appears to be mediated by mast cell activation. These observations have marked the receptor that mediates the bronchoconstrictor effect of adenosine on mast cells (MCs), as an attractive drug candidate. Four subtypes (A1, A2a, A2b, and A3) of adenosine receptors have been cloned and shown to display distinct tissue distributions and functions. Animal models have firmly established the ultimate role of the A3 adenosine receptor (A3R) in mediating hyper responsiveness to adenosine in MCs, although the influence of the A2b adenosine receptor was confirmed as well. In contrast, studies of the A3R in humans have been controversial. In this review, we summarize data on the role of different adenosine receptors in mast cell regulation of inflammation and pathology, with a focus on the common and distinct functions of the A3R in rodent and human MCs. The relevance of mouse studies to the human is discussed. PMID:22675325

  17. Biophysical Mapping of the Adenosine A2A Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to generating information on ligand receptor interactions within the binding pocket of G protein-coupled receptors has been developed, called Biophysical Mapping (BPM). Starting from a stabilized receptor (StaR), minimally engineered for thermostability, additional single mutations are then added at positions that could be involved in small molecule interactions. The StaR and a panel of binding site mutants are captured onto Biacore chips to enable characterization of the binding of small molecule ligands using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurement. A matrix of binding data for a set of ligands versus each active site mutation is then generated, providing specific affinity and kinetic information (KD, kon, and koff) of receptor–ligand interactions. This data set, in combination with molecular modeling and docking, is used to map the small molecule binding site for each class of compounds. Taken together, the many constraints provided by these data identify key protein–ligand interactions and allow the shape of the site to be refined to produce a high quality three-dimensional picture of ligand binding, thereby facilitating structure based drug design. Results of biophysical mapping of the adenosine A2A receptor are presented. PMID:21661720

  18. [Adenosine deaminase in experimental trypanosomiasis: future implications].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguilar, Mary Carmen; Rondón-Mercado, Rocío

    2015-09-01

    The adenosine deaminase represents a control point in the regulation of extracellular adenosine levels, thus playing a critical role in the modulation of purinergic responses to certain pathophysiological events. Several studies have shown that serum and plasma enzyme levels are elevated in some diseases caused by microorganisms, which may represent a compensatory mechanism due to the elevated levels of adenosine and the release of inflammatory mediators. Recent research indicates that adenosine deaminase activity decreases and affects hematological parameters of infected animals with Trypanosoma evansi, so that such alterations could have implications in the pathogenesis of the disease. In addition, the enzyme has been detected in this parasite; allowing the inference that it could be associated with the vital functions of the same, similar to what occurs in mammals. This knowledge may be useful in the association of chemotherapy with specific inhibitors of the enzyme in future studies.

  19. Probing the ATP Site of GRP78 with Nucleotide Triphosphate Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Lu, Hua; Pizarro, Juan C.; Park, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    GRP78, a member of the ER stress protein family, can relocate to the surface of cancer cells, playing key roles in promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. GRP78 consists of two major functional domains: the ATPase and protein/peptide-binding domains. The protein/peptide-binding domain of cell-surface GRP78 has served as a novel functional receptor for delivering cytotoxic agents (e.g., a apoptosis-inducing peptide or taxol) across the cell membrane. Here, we report our study on the ATPase domain of GRP78 (GRP78ATPase), whose potential as a transmembrane delivery system of cytotoxic agents (e.g., ATP-based nucleotide triphosphate analogs) remains unexploited. As the binding of ligands (ATP analogs) to a receptor (GRP78ATPase) is a pre-requisite for internalization, we determined the binding affinities and modes of GRP78ATPase for ADP, ATP and several ATP analogs using surface plasmon resonance and x-ray crystallography. The tested ATP analogs contain one of the following modifications: the nitrogen at the adenine ring 7-position to a carbon atom (7-deazaATP), the oxygen at the β-γ bridge position to a carbon atom (AMPPCP), or the removal of the 2’-OH group (2’-deoxyATP). We found that 7-deazaATP displays an affinity and a binding mode that resemble those of ATP regardless of magnesium ion (Mg++) concentration, suggesting that GRP78 is tolerant to modifications at the 7-position. By comparison, AMPPCP’s binding affinity was lower than ATP and Mg++-dependent, as the removal of Mg++ nearly abolished binding to GRP78ATPase. The AMPPCP-Mg++ structure showed evidence for the critical role of Mg++ in AMPPCP binding affinity, suggesting that while GRP78 is sensitive to modifications at the β-γ bridge position, these can be tolerated in the presence of Mg++. Furthermore, 2’-deoxyATP’s binding affinity was significantly lower than those for all other nucleotides tested, even in the presence of Mg++. The 2’-deoxyATP structure showed the conformation of the

  20. Probing the ATP site of GRP78 with nucleotide triphosphate analogs

    DOE PAGES

    Hughes, Scott J.; Antoshchenko, Tetyana; Chen, Yun; Lu, Hua; Pizarro, Juan C.; Park, Hee -Won

    2016-05-04

    GRP78, a member of the ER stress protein family, can relocate to the surface of cancer cells, playing key roles in promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. GRP78 consists of two major functional domains: the ATPase and protein/peptide-binding domains. The protein/peptide-binding domain of cell-surface GRP78 has served as a novel functional receptor for delivering cytotoxic agents (e.g., a apoptosis-inducing peptide or taxol) across the cell membrane. Here, we report our study on the ATPase domain of GRP78 (GRP78ATPase), whose potential as a transmembrane delivery system of cytotoxic agents (e.g., ATP-based nucleotide triphosphate analogs) remains unexploited. As the binding of ligands (ATPmore » analogs) to a receptor (GRP78ATPase) is a pre-requisite for internalization, we determined the binding affinities and modes of GRP78ATPase for ADP, ATP and several ATP analogs using surface plasmon resonance and x-ray crystallography. The tested ATP analogs contain one of the following modifications: the nitrogen at the adenine ring 7-position to a carbon atom (7-deazaATP), the oxygen at the beta-gamma bridge position to a carbon atom (AMPPCP), or the removal of the 2'-OH group (2'-deoxyATP). We found that 7-deazaATP displays an affinity and a binding mode that resemble those of ATP regardless of magnesium ion (Mg++) concentration, suggesting that GRP78 is tolerant to modifications at the 7-position. By comparison, AMPPCP's binding affinity was lower than ATP and Mg++-dependent, as the removal of Mg++ nearly abolished binding to GRP78ATPase. The AMPPCP-Mg++ structure showed evidence for the critical role of Mg++ in AMPPCP binding affinity, suggesting that while GRP78 is sensitive to modifications at the β-γ bridge position, these can be tolerated in the presence of Mg++. Furthermore, 2'-deoxyATP's binding affinity was significantly lower than those for all other nucleotides tested, even in the presence of Mg++. The 2'-deoxyATP structure showed the conformation of

  1. Circadian rhythm in adenosine A1 receptor of mouse cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, C.; Rosati, A.M.; Traversa, U.; Vertua, R. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to investigate diurnal variation in adenosine A1 receptors binding parameters, Bmax and Kd values of specifically bound N6-cyclohexyl-({sup 3}H)adenosine were determined in the cerebral cortex of mice that had been housed under controlled light-dark cycles for 4 weeks. Significant differences were found for Bmax values measured at 3-hr intervals across a 24-h period, with low Bmax values during the light period and high Bmax values during the dark period. The amplitude between 03.00 and 18.00 hr was 33%. No substantial rhythm was found in the Kd values. It is suggested that the changes in the density of A1 receptors could reflect a physiologically-relevant mechanism by which adenosine exerts its modulatory role in the central nervous system.

  2. Enthalpy and enzyme activity of modified histidine residues of adenosine deaminase and diethyl pyrocarbonate complexes.

    PubMed

    Ataie, G; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Saboury, A A; Hakimelahi, G H; Hwu, J R; Tsay, S C

    2000-03-16

    Kinetic and thermodynamic studies have been made on the effect of diethyl pyrocarbonate as a histidine modifier on the active site of adenosine deaminase in 50 mM sodium phosphate buffer pH 6.8, at 27 degrees C using UV spectrophotometry and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Inactivation of adenosine deaminase by diethyl pyrocarbonate is correlated with modification of histidyl residues. The number of modified histidine residues complexed to active site of adenosine deaminase are equivalent to 4. The number and energy of histidine binding sets are determined by enthalpy curve, which represents triple stages. These stages are composed of 3,1 and 1 sites of histidyl modified residues at diethyl pyrocarbonate concentrations, 0.63, 1.8, 3.3 mM. The heat contents corresponding to the first, second and third sets are found to be 18000, 22000 and 21900 kJ mol(-1) respectively.

  3. Autoradiographic localization of adenosine uptake sites in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine

    SciTech Connect

    Bisserbe, J.C.; Patel, J.; Marangos, P.J.

    1985-02-01

    The adenosine uptake site has been localized in rat brain by an in vitro light microscopic autoradiographic method, using (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine ((/sup 3/H)NBI) as the probe. The binding characteristics of (/sup 3/H)NBI on slide-mounted sections are comparable to those seen in studies performed on brain homogenates. A very high density of uptake sites occurs in the nucleus tractus solitarius, in the superficial layer of the superior colliculus, in several thalamic nuclei, and also in geniculate body nuclei. A high density of sites are also observed in the nucleus accumbens, the caudate putamen, the dorsal tegmentum area, the substantia nigra, and the central gray. The localization of the adenosine uptake site in brain may provide information on the functional activity of the site and suggests the involvement of the adenosine system in the central regulation of cardiovascular function.

  4. Effects of 4-week treatment with lithium and olanzapine on levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 and phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein in the sub-regions of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hammonds, Michael D; Shim, Seong S

    2009-08-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that lithium, the prototype mood stabilizer in the treatment of bipolar disorder, has diverse neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions, and the actions are associated with its efficacy in treating bipolar disorder. It has been suggested that up-regulation of neurotrophic and neuroprotective factors including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) may underlie these neuroplastic actions of the drug. Olanzapine, an atypical anti-psychotic drug, has been shown to be an effective mood stabilizer. Olanzapine also has neurotrophic and neuroprotective actions, and these actions may underlie the efficacy of the drug for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. However, the molecular mechanism by which the drug produces the neuroplastic actions is poorly understood. To understand a common molecular mechanism underlying the neuroplastic actions of lithium and olanzapine, we assessed the effect of 4-week lithium and olanzapine treatment on the levels of BDNF, Bcl-2 and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor involved in expression of BDNF and Bcl-2, in the dentate gyrus and hippocampal area CA1. Our results show that 4-week treatment with both olanzapine and lithium increases the levels of Bcl-2 and CREB in the dentate gyrus and hippocampal area CA1. Four-week lithium treatment up-regulates BDNF in the dentate gyrus, and 4-week olanzapine treatment marginally did so. Neither drug altered BDNF levels in area CA1. These results suggest that the up-regulation of Bcl-2 and CREB may underlie the neuroplastic actions of olanzapine and lithium.

  5. Hyperglycemia alters E-NTPDases, ecto-5'-nucleotidase, and ectosolic and cytosolic adenosine deaminase activities and expression from encephala of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Siebel, Anna Maria; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2016-06-01

    Hyperglycemia is the main feature for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM). Some studies have demonstrated the relationship between DM and dysfunction on neurotransmission systems, such as the purinergic system. In this study, we evaluated the extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis and adenosine deamination activities from encephalic membranes of hyperglycemic zebrafish. A significant decrease in ATP, ADP, and AMP hydrolyses was observed at 111-mM glucose-treated group, which returned to normal levels after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. A significant increase in ecto-adenosine deaminase activity was observed in 111-mM glucose group, which remain elevated after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. The soluble-adenosine deaminase activity was significantly increased just after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. We also evaluated the gene expressions of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases), ecto-5'-nucleotidase, ADA, and adenosine receptors from encephala of adult zebrafish. The entpd 2a.1, entpd 2a.2, entpd 3, and entpd 8 mRNA levels from encephala of adult zebrafish were decreased in 111-mM glucose-treated and glucose withdrawal groups. The gene expressions of adenosine receptors (adora 1 , adora 2aa , adora 2ab , and adora 2b ) were decreased in 111-mM glucose-treated and glucose withdrawal groups. The gene expression of ADA (ada 2a.1) was decreased in glucose withdrawal group. Maltodextrin, used as a control, did not affect the expression of adenosine receptors, ADA and E-NTPDases 2, 3, and 8, while the expression of ecto-5'-nucleotidase was slightly increased and the E-NTPDases 1 decreased. These findings demonstrated that hyperglycemia might affect the ecto-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities and gene expression in zebrafish, probably through a mechanism involving the osmotic effect, suggesting that the modifications caused on purinergic system may also contribute to the diabetes-induced progressive cognitive impairment.

  6. Hyperglycemia alters E-NTPDases, ecto-5'-nucleotidase, and ectosolic and cytosolic adenosine deaminase activities and expression from encephala of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Siebel, Anna Maria; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2016-06-01

    Hyperglycemia is the main feature for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM). Some studies have demonstrated the relationship between DM and dysfunction on neurotransmission systems, such as the purinergic system. In this study, we evaluated the extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis and adenosine deamination activities from encephalic membranes of hyperglycemic zebrafish. A significant decrease in ATP, ADP, and AMP hydrolyses was observed at 111-mM glucose-treated group, which returned to normal levels after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. A significant increase in ecto-adenosine deaminase activity was observed in 111-mM glucose group, which remain elevated after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. The soluble-adenosine deaminase activity was significantly increased just after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. We also evaluated the gene expressions of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases), ecto-5'-nucleotidase, ADA, and adenosine receptors from encephala of adult zebrafish. The entpd 2a.1, entpd 2a.2, entpd 3, and entpd 8 mRNA levels from encephala of adult zebrafish were decreased in 111-mM glucose-treated and glucose withdrawal groups. The gene expressions of adenosine receptors (adora 1 , adora 2aa , adora 2ab , and adora 2b ) were decreased in 111-mM glucose-treated and glucose withdrawal groups. The gene expression of ADA (ada 2a.1) was decreased in glucose withdrawal group. Maltodextrin, used as a control, did not affect the expression of adenosine receptors, ADA and E-NTPDases 2, 3, and 8, while the expression of ecto-5'-nucleotidase was slightly increased and the E-NTPDases 1 decreased. These findings demonstrated that hyperglycemia might affect the ecto-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities and gene expression in zebrafish, probably through a mechanism involving the osmotic effect, suggesting that the modifications caused on purinergic system may also contribute to the diabetes-induced progressive cognitive impairment. PMID:26769247

  7. Adenosine inhibits glutamatergic input to basal forebrain cholinergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hawryluk, J. M.; Ferrari, L. L.; Keating, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine has been proposed as an endogenous homeostatic sleep factor that accumulates during waking and inhibits wake-active neurons to promote sleep. It has been specifically hypothesized that adenosine decreases wakefulness and promotes sleep recovery by directly inhibiting wake-active neurons of the basal forebrain (BF), particularly BF cholinergic neurons. We previously showed that adenosine directly inhibits BF cholinergic neurons. Here, we investigated 1) how adenosine modulates glutamatergic input to BF cholinergic neurons and 2) how adenosine uptake and adenosine metabolism are involved in regulating extracellular levels of adenosine. Our experiments were conducted using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices. We found that in BF cholinergic neurons, adenosine reduced the amplitude of AMPA-mediated evoked glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and decreased the frequency of spontaneous and miniature EPSCs through presynaptic A1 receptors. Thus we have demonstrated that in addition to directly inhibiting BF cholinergic neurons, adenosine depresses excitatory inputs to these neurons. It is therefore possible that both direct and indirect inhibition may synergistically contribute to the sleep-promoting effects of adenosine in the BF. We also found that blocking the influx of adenosine through the equilibrative nucleoside transporters or inhibiting adenosine kinase and adenosine deaminase increased endogenous adenosine inhibitory tone, suggesting a possible mechanism through which adenosine extracellular levels in the basal forebrain are regulated. PMID:22357797

  8. Identification of cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons in the pons expressing phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein as a function of rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Datta, S; Siwek, D F; Stack, E C

    2009-09-29

    Recent studies have shown that in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT), increased neuronal activity and kainate receptor-mediated activation of intracellular protein kinase A (PKA) are important physiological and molecular steps for the generation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. In the present study performed on rats, phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) immunostaining was used as a marker for increased intracellular PKA activation and as a reflection of increased neuronal activity. To identify whether activated cells were either cholinergic or noncholinergic, the PPT and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) cells were immunostained for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in combination with pCREB or c-Fos. The results demonstrated that during high rapid eye movement sleep (HR, approximately 27%), significantly higher numbers of cells expressed pCREB and c-Fos in the PPT, of which 95% of pCREB-expressing cells were ChAT-positive. With HR, the numbers of pCREB-positive cells were also significantly higher in the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF), pontine reticular nucleus oral (PnO), and dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) but very few in the locus coeruleus (LC) and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Conversely, with low rapid eye movement sleep (LR, approximately 2%), the numbers of pCREB expressing cells were very few in the PPT, mPRF, PnO, and SubCD but significantly higher in the LC and DRN. The results of regression analyses revealed significant positive relationships between the total percentages of REM sleep and numbers of ChAT+/pCREB+ (Rsqr=0.98) cells in the PPT and pCREB+ cells in the mPRF (Rsqr=0.88), PnO (Rsqr=0.87), and SubCD (Rsqr=0.84); whereas significantly negative relationships were associated with the pCREB+ cells in the LC (Rsqr=0.70) and DRN (Rsqr=0.60). These results provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that during REM sleep, the PPT cholinergic neurons are active, whereas the LC and DRN neurons are

  9. Sulfur-Containing 1,3-Dialkylxanthine Derivatives as Selective Antagonists at A1-Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kiriasis, Leonidas; Barone, Suzanne; Bradbury, Barton J.; Kammula, Udai; Campagne, Jean Michel; Secunda, Sherrie; Daly, John W.; Neumeyer, John L.; Pfleiderer, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur-containing analogues of 8-substituted xanthines were prepared in an effort to increase selectivity or potency as antagonists at adenosine receptors. Either cyclopentyl or various aryl substituents were utilized at the 8-position, because of the association of these groups with high potency at A1-adenosine receptors. Sulfur was incorporated on the purine ring at positions 2 and/or 6, in the 8-position substituent in the form of 2- or 3-thienyl groups, or via thienyl groups separated from an 8-aryl substituent through an amide-containing chain. The feasibility of using the thienyl group as a prosthetic group for selective iodination via its Hg2+ derivative was explored. Receptor selectivity was determined in binding assays using membrane homogenates from rat cortex [[3H]-N6-(phenylisopropyl) adenosine as radioligand] or striatum [[3H]-5′-(N-ethylcarbamoyl)adenosine as radioligand] for A1- and A2-adenosine receptors, respectively. Generally, 2-thio-8-cycloalkylxanthines were at least as A1 selective as the corresponding oxygen analogue. 2-Thio-8-aryl derivatives tended to be more potent at A2 receptors than the oxygen analogue. 8-[4-[(Carboxymethyl)oxy]phenyl]-1,3-dipropyl-2-thioxanthine ethyl ester was >740-fold A1 selective. PMID:2754711

  10. Extracellular ATP Selectively Upregulates Ecto-Nucleoside Triphosphate Diphosphohydrolase 2 and Ecto-5'-Nucleotidase by Rat Cortical Astrocytes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Brisevac, Dusica; Adzic, Marija; Laketa, Danijela; Parabucki, Ana; Milosevic, Milena; Lavrnja, Irena; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Sévigny, Jean; Kipp, Markus; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda

    2015-11-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) acts as a danger-associated molecular pattern which induces reactive response of astrocytes after brain insult, including morphological remodeling of astrocytes, proliferation, chemotaxis, and release of proinflammatory cytokines. The responses induced by eATP are under control of ecto-nucleotidases, which catalyze sequential hydrolysis of ATP to adenosine. In the mammalian brain, ecto-nucleotidases comprise three enzyme families: ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases 1-3 (NTPDase1-3), ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phospodiesterases 1-3 (NPP1-3), and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (eN), which crucially determine ATP/adenosine ratio in the pericellular milieu. Altered expression of ecto-nucleotidases has been demonstrated in several experimental models of human brain dysfunctions. In the present study, we have explored the pattern of NTPDase1-3, NPP1-3, and eN expression by cultured cortical astrocytes challenged with 1 mmol/L ATP (eATP). At the transcriptional level, eATP upregulated expression of NTPDase1, NTPDase2, NPP2, and eN, while, at translational and functional levels, these were paralleled only by the induction of NTPDase2 and eN. Additionally, eATP altered membrane topology of eN, from clusters localized in membrane domains to continuous distribution along the cell membrane. Our results suggest that eATP, by upregulating NTPDase2 and eN and altering the enzyme membrane topology, affects local kinetics of ATP metabolism and signal transduction that may have important roles in the process related to inflammation and reactive gliosis. PMID:26080748

  11. The effect of exogenous adenosine in patients with neurally-mediated syncope and sick sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brignole, M; Menozzi, C; Alboni, P; Oddone, D; Gianfranchi, L; Gaggioli, G; Lolli, G; Paparella, N

    1994-11-01

    The effects of a 20-mg i.v., bolus of adenosine 5' triphosphate (ATP) on the heart rhythm was studied in 79 patients affected by neurally-mediated syncope (26 cases) or sick sinus syndrome (22 cases) or both syndromes (31 cases) and in 31 healthy control subjects in order to examine the sensitivity of cardiac purinoceptors in such circumstances. During ATP infusion, the sinus cycle lengthened to > 2 seconds in no control, in 1 (4%) patient with neurally-mediated syncope, in 5 (23%) patients with sick sinus syndrome, and in 13 (42%) patients with both neurally-mediated and sick sinus syndromes (P = 0.01). Atrioventricular block occurred in 14 (45%) of controls, in 10 (38%) patients with neurally-mediated syncope, in 4 (18%) patients with sick sinus syndrome, and in 13 (42%) patients with both neurally-mediated syncope and sick sinus syndrome (n.s.). Thus, exogenous ATP exerts different effects on patients with neurally-mediated syncope and patients with sick sinus syndrome. In fact, intrisic disease of the sinus node is necessary to modulate an abnormal adenosine-mediated sinus arrest, whereas patients affected by neurally-mediated syncope alone show a normal sensitivity to the drug administration. The effect of ATP on atrioventricular conduction is greater than that on sinus node and is of similar magnitude in patients and controls; thus the clinical meaning of ATP induced atrioventricular block remains uncertain. PMID:7845845

  12. Adenosine modulation of [Ca2+]i in cerebellar granular cells: multiple adenosine receptors involved.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Javier; Fernández, Mercedes; Ros, Manuel; Blanco, Pablo

    2003-12-01

    Elimination of adenosine by addition of adenosine deaminase (ADA) to the media leads to alterations in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in cerebellar granular cells. Adenosine deaminase brings about increases or decreases in [Ca(2+)](i) depending on the previous activation state of the cell. These effects are dependent on the catalytic activity of adenosine deaminase, since its previous catalytic inactivation with Hg(2+) prevents the above-mentioned changes in intracellular calcium. Extracellular calcium is required for the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) promoted by ADA. This rise is insensitive to thapsigargin, but sensitive to micromolar concentrations of Ni(2+). Toxins specific for L, N and P/Q calcium channels do not overtly reduce this effect. N(6)-Cyclopentyl adenosine (CPA), an A(1) receptor agonist, produces a partial reversion of ADA effects, while CGS21680, A(2A)/A(2B) receptor agonist, slightly enhances them. Expression of A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3) adenosine receptor mRNAs was detected in cerebellar granular cell cultures. These results suggest that adenosine modulate [Ca(2+)](i) in cerebellar granule cells through different adenosine receptor subtypes which, at least in part, seem to act through R-type calcium channels.

  13. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  14. An Efficient Protection-Free One-Pot Chemical Synthesis of Modified Nucleoside-5'-Triphosphates.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Muthian; Senthilvelan, Annamalai; Xiao, Zejun; Kore, Anilkumar R

    2016-07-01

    A simple, reliable, and an efficient "one-pot, three step" chemical method for the synthesis of modified nucleoside triphosphates such as 5-methylcytidine-5'-triphosphate (5-MeCTP), pseudouridine-5'-triphosphate (pseudoUTP) and N(1)-methylpseudouridine-5'-triphosphate (N(1)-methylpseudoUTP) starting from the corresponding nucleoside is described. The overall reaction involves the monophosphorylation of nucleoside, followed by the reaction with pyrophosphate and subsequent hydrolysis of the cyclic intermediate to furnish the corresponding NTP in moderate yields with high purity (>99.5%).

  15. Dynamic Regulation of the Adenosine Kinase Gene during Early Postnatal Brain Development and Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kiese, Katharina; Jablonski, Janos; Boison, Detlev; Kobow, Katja

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous metabolic intermediary and nucleoside adenosine is a “master regulator” in all living systems. Under baseline conditions adenosine kinase (ADK) is the primary enzyme for the metabolic clearance of adenosine. By regulating the availability of adenosine, ADK is a critical upstream regulator of complex homeostatic and metabolic networks. Not surprisingly, ADK dysfunction is involved in several pathologies, including diabetes, epilepsy, and cancer. ADK protein exists in the two isoforms nuclear ADK-L, and cytoplasmic ADK-S, which are subject to dynamic expression changes during brain development and in response to brain injury; however, gene expression changes of the Adk gene as well as regulatory mechanisms that direct the cell-type and isoform specific expression of ADK have never been investigated. Here we analyzed potential gene regulatory mechanisms that may influence Adk expression including DNA promoter methylation, histone modifications and transcription factor binding. Our data suggest binding of transcription factor SP1 to the Adk promoter influences the regulation of Adk expression. PMID:27812320

  16. Parasympathetic depression of vas deferens contraction in the guinea-pig involves adenosine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Kurokawa, M; Tsunoo, A

    1988-01-01

    1. In the guinea-pig pelvic plexus-vas deferens preparation, stimulation of the parasympathetic pelvic nerves contracted the vas deferens then depressed the contractile responses to stimulation of the sympathetic hypogastric nerves. 2. The contraction caused by stimulation of the pelvic nerves was initially phasic then tonic. The contractions were almost abolished by application of hexamethonium to the plexus. The phasic contraction was abolished by alpha,beta-methylene adenosine triphosphate applied to the vas deferens. 3. Conditioning stimulation of the pelvic nerves preferentially depressed the phasic component of test contractions evoked by hypogastric nerve stimulation but did not affect the compound action potentials in postganglionic nerves evoked by test stimulation. 4. When the pelvic plexus was divided into two parts, one with the pelvic nerves and the other with the hypogastric nerves, conditioning stimulation of the pelvic nerves still depressed test contractions evoked by hypogastric nerve stimulation. 5. In the de-ganglionated vas deferens preparation, conditioning stimulation of some postganglionic nerves also depressed contractions evoked by test stimulation of the other postganglionic nerves. 6. 8-Phenyltheophylline (5-20 microM) applied to the vas deferens antagonized the conditioning stimulation-induced depression in both the pelvic plexus-vas deferens and the de-ganglionated preparations. 7. N6-Cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) and N6-(L-2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine at 0.5 microM preferentially inhibited phasic contractions evoked by the postganglionic nerve stimulation. The effect of CHA was antagonized by 8-phenyltheophylline (10 microM). 8. The results indicate that the mechanism underlying the conditioning stimulation-induced depression of phasic contractions operates not in the ganglia, but through activation of adenosine receptors in the vas deferens. PMID:3256614

  17. Adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate phosphohydrolase from yellow lupin seeds: purification to homogeneity and some properties.

    PubMed Central

    Guranowski, A; Starzyńska, E; Brown, P; Blackburn, G M

    1997-01-01

    Adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate phosphohydrolase (EC 3.6.1.14) has been purified to homogeneity from the meal of yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus) seeds. The enzyme is a single polypeptide chain of 25+/-1 kDa. It catalyses the hydrolysis of a nucleoside 5'-tetraphosphate to a nucleoside triphosphate and orthophosphate, and hydrolysis of tripolyphosphate but neither pyrophosphate nor tetraphosphate. A divalent cation, Mg2+, Co2+, Ni2+ or Mn2+, is required for these reactions. The pH optimum for hydrolysis of adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate (p4A) is 8.2, Vmax is 21+/-1.7 micromol/min per mg of protein and the Km for p4A is 3+/-0.6 microM. At saturating p4A concentrations, the rate constant for the reaction is 8.5+/-0.7 s-1 [at 30 degrees C, in 50 mM Hepes/KOH (pH8.2)/5 mM MgCl2/0.1 mM dithiothreitol]. p4A and guanosine 5'-tetraphosphate are hydrolysed at the same rate. Adenosine 5'-pentaphosphate (p5A) is degraded 1/200 as fast and is converted into ATP and two molecules of orthophosphate, which are liberated sequentially. This contrasts with the cleavage of p5A by the lupin diadenosine tetraphosphate hydrolase (EC 3.6.1.17), which gives ATP and pyrophosphate. Zn2+, F- and Ca2+ ions inhibit the hydrolysis of p4A with I50 values of 0.1, 0.12 and 0.2 mM respectively. PMID:9359862

  18. On the Functional Role of the {epsilon} Subunit of the Molecular Motor F-Adenosine Triphosphatase in Lipid Membranes of Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, S. A. Loginov, E. B.

    2010-11-15

    The effect of the e subunit of the molecular motor F-adenosine triphosphatase, which is built into the lipid membrane of a cell, on the dynamics of the rotor ({gamma} subunit), with which this subunit is bound, has been qualitatively considered. It is shown that its structural and conformational features arising during the hydrolysis of 'fuel' adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecules can be explained by the change in the potential within which the rotor is located. As the numerical calculations showed, at a low ATP concentration, the hydrolysis is accompanied by an unstable rotation of the {gamma} subunit and the related proton current. A model is proposed to describe the interaction between the {epsilon} subunit and the lipid order fluctuations caused by the membrane transition to the gel state. It is demonstrated that the rotor rotations become inhomogeneous when this interaction is enhanced with a decrease in the cell temperature.

  19. Palmitoylation of the recombinant human A1 adenosine receptor: enhanced proteolysis of palmitoylation-deficient mutant receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Z; Ni, Y; Szabo, G; Linden, J

    1999-01-01

    Palmitoylation of the recombinant human A(1) adenosine receptor (A(1)AR) expressed in HEK-293 cells is demonstrated by showing that hexahistidine (His(6))/Asp-Tyr-Lys-Asp-Asp-Asp-Asp-Lys (FLAG) (H/F) A(1)ARs, purified to homogeneity from cells metabolically labelled with [(3)H]palmitate, incorporate tritium into a 38-42 kDa receptor glycoprotein. The amount of palmitoylation is not affected by incubation of cells with the A(1)AR-selective agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA). A(1)AR palmitoylation is abolished by treatment with neutral hydroxylamine or by mutation of Cys-309 to Ala (C(309)-->A). Based on Western blotting and pulse-chase experiments with [(35)S]methionine, at least 90% of wild-type receptors are palmitoylated and turn over with a t1/2 of 6.4 h. Of the C(309)-->A mutated receptors, 40% appear to turn over like wild-type receptors, with a t1/2 of 7.1 h, and 60% appear to be rapidly cleaved to form a 25 kDa receptor fragment that turns over with a t1/2 of 0.8 h. In HEK-293 cell lines expressing similar numbers of wild-type or C(309)-->A mutant A(1)Rs, there is little difference in the kinetics of CPA-induced receptor internalization (1 h), down-regulation (24 h), inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, or activation of co-transfected G-protein-activated inward rectifier K(+)/cardiac inward rectifying K(+) (GIRK1/CIR K(+)) channels. Also unaffected by palmitoylation is guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]-triphosphate ([S]GTP)-sensitive binding to membranes by the agonist (125)I-labelled aminobenzyladenosine. The results suggest that palmitoylation has little effect on receptor-effector coupling, agonist-induced internalization or down-regulation. We speculate that palmitoylation may divert newly synthesized A(1)ARs from a pathway leading to rapid degradation. PMID:10455026

  20. How Does Protein Architecture Facilitate the Transduction of ATP Chemical-Bond Energy into Mechanical Work? The Cases of Nitrogenase and ATP Binding-Cassette Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jie-Lou; Beratan, David N.

    2004-01-01

    Transduction of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) chemical-bond energy into work to drive large-scale conformational changes is common in proteins. Two specific examples of ATP-utilizing proteins are the nitrogenase iron protein and the ATP binding-cassette transporter protein, BtuCD. Nitrogenase catalyzes biological nitrogen fixation whereas BtuCD transports vitamin B12 across membranes. Both proteins drive their reactions with ATP. To interpret how the mechanical force generated by ATP binding and hydrolysis is propagated in these proteins, a coarse-grained elastic network model is employed. The analysis shows that subunits of the proteins move against each other in a concerted manner. The lowest-frequency modes of the nitrogenase iron protein and of the ATP binding-cassette transporter BtuCD protein are found to link the functionally critical domains, and these modes are suggested to be responsible for (at least the initial stages) large-scale ATP-coupled conformational changes. PMID:15298939

  1. Reoxygenation, but neither hypoxia nor intermittent ischemia, increases ( sup 125 I)endothelin-1 binding to rat cardiac membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.J.; Gu, X.H.; Casley, D.J.; Nayler, W.G. )

    1990-03-01

    Standard binding techniques were used to establish whether either hypoxia, reoxygenation, perfusion under acidotic conditions, or stunning of the myocardium resembles ischemia and postischemic reperfusion in increasing cardiac membrane ({sup 125}I)endothelin-1 (ET-1) binding site density (Bmax). Membranes from aerobically perfused rat hearts bound ({sup 125}I)ET-1 to a single population of sites, with an affinity (KD) of 0.093 +/- 0.004 nM and a Bmax of 98.8 +/- 5.2 fmol/mg of protein. Bmax was increased (p less than 0.01) after 30 min of global ischemia, and further increased upon reperfusion, without changes in KD or selectivity. Neither three 10 min episodes of ischemia separated by 15 min of perfusion, nor perfusion at pH 6.8 instead of 7.4, nor 60 min of hypoxia altered Bmax, KD, or selectivity. Reoxygenation after 60 min of hypoxia increased Bmax (p less than 0.01) and KD (p less than 0.01) without changing selectivity. These results are interpreted to mean that the ischemia-induced increase in Bmax for ({sup 125}I)ET-1 cannot be explained simply in terms of the ischemia-induced acidosis, or the accompanying reduction in tissue adenosine triphosphate and creatine phosphate.

  2. Determination of adenosine effects and adenosine receptors in murine corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Rita C; Giachini, Fernanda R C; Carneiro, Fernando S; Leite, Romulo; Inscho, Edward W; Webb, R Clinton

    2007-08-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that adenosine, in murine corpora cavernosa, produces direct relaxation of smooth muscle cells and inhibition of contractile responses mediated by sympathetic nerve stimulation. Penes were excised from anesthetized male C57BL/6 mice, dissected, and cavernosal strips were mounted to record isometric force. Adenosine, 2-chloroadenosine (stable analog of adenosine), and 2-phenylaminoadenosine (CV1808) (A2(A)/A2(B) agonist) produced concentration-dependent relaxations of phenylephrine-contracted tissues. Relaxation to 2-chloroadenosine was inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, by 2-(2-furanyl)-7-(2-phenylethyl)-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine (SCH58261; A2(A) antagonist; 10(-9)-10(-6) M) and N-(4-acetylphenyl)-2-[4-(2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-2,6-dioxo-1,3-dipropyl-1H-purin-8-yl)phenoxy]acetamida (MRS1706; A2(B) antagonist; 10(-8)-10(-6) M). The combination of both antagonists abrogated 2-chloroadenosine-induced relaxation. Electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1-32 Hz) of adrenergic nerves produced frequency-dependent contractions that were inhibited by compounds that increase adenosine levels, such as 5'-iodotubercidin (adenosine kinase inhibitor), erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (adenosine deaminase inhibitor), and dipyridamole (inhibitor of adenosine transport). The adenosine A1 receptor agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (C8031) right-shifted contractile responses to EFS, with a significant inhibitory effect at 10(-6) M. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (C101) (10(-7) M) enhanced contractile responses to EFS and eliminated the inhibitory effects of 5'-iodotubercidin. Dipyridamole and 5'-iodotubercidin had no effect on adenosine-mediated relaxation. In summary, adenosine directly relaxes cavernosal smooth muscle cells, by the activation of A2(A)/A2(B) receptor subtypes. In addition, adenosine negatively modulates sympathetic neurotransmission, by A1 receptor

  3. A fragment-based approach to probing adenosine recognition sites by using dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Scott, Duncan E; Dawes, Gwen J; Ando, Michiyo; Abell, Chris; Ciulli, Alessio

    2009-11-23

    A new strategy that combines the concepts of fragment-based drug design and dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) for targeting adenosine recognition sites on enzymes is reported. We demonstrate the use of 5'-deoxy-5'-thioadenosine as a noncovalent anchor fragment in dynamic combinatorial libraries templated by Mycobacterium tuberculosis pantothenate synthetase. A benzyl disulfide derivative was identified upon library analysis by HPLC. Structural and binding studies of protein-ligand complexes by X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry informed the subsequent optimisation of the DCC hit into a disulfide containing the novel meta-nitrobenzyl fragment that targets the pantoate binding site of pantothenate synthetase. Given the prevalence of adenosine-recognition motifs in enzymes, our results provide a proof-of-concept for using this strategy to probe adjacent pockets for a range of adenosine binding enzymes, including other related adenylate-forming ligases, kinases, and ATPases, as well as NAD(P)(H), CoA and FAD(H2) binding proteins.

  4. Adenosine conjugated lipidic nanoparticles for enhanced tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Swami, Rajan; Singh, Indu; Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Naidu, V G M; Khan, Wahid; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Delivering chemotherapeutics by nanoparticles into tumor is impeded majorly by two factors: nonspecific targeting and inefficient penetration. Targeted delivery of anti-cancer agents solely to tumor cells introduces a smart strategy because it enhances the therapeutic index compared with untargeted drugs. The present study was performed to investigate the efficiency of adenosine (ADN) to target solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) to over expressing adenosine receptor cell lines such as human breast cancer and prostate cancer (MCF-7 and DU-145 cells), respectively. SLN were prepared by emulsification and solvent evaporation process using docetaxel (DTX) as drug and were characterized by various techniques like dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimeter and transmission electron microscopy. DTX loaded SLNs were surface modified with ADN, an adenosine receptors ligand using carbodiimide coupling. Conjugation was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy and quantified using phenol-sulfuric acid method. Conjugated SLN were shown to have sustained drug release as compared to unconjugated nanoparticles and drug suspension. Compared with free DTX and unconjugated SLN, ADN conjugated SLN showed significantly higher cytotoxicity of loaded DTX, as evidenced by in vitro cell experiments. The IC50 was 0.41 μg/ml for native DTX, 0.30 μg/ml for unconjugated SLN formulation, and 0.09 μg/ml for ADN conjugated SLN formulation in MCF-7 cell lines. Whereas, in DU-145, there was 2 fold change in IC50 of ADN-SLN as compared to DTX. IC50 was found to be 0.44 μg/ml for free DTX, 0.39 μg/ml for unconjugated SLN and 0.22 μg/ml for ADN-SLN. Annexin assay and cell cycle analysis assay further substantiated the cell cytotoxicity. Fluorescent cell uptake and competitive ligand-receptor binding assay corroborated the receptor mediated endocytosis pathway indicated role of adenosine receptors in internalization of conjugated particles. Pharmacokinetic studies of lipidic

  5. Dideoxy nucleoside triphosphate (ddNTP) analogues: Synthesis and polymerase substrate activities of pyrrolidinyl nucleoside triphosphates (prNTPs).

    PubMed

    Gade, Chandrasekhar Reddy; Dixit, Manjusha; Sharma, Nagendra K

    2016-09-15

    The dideoxynucleoside triphosphates (ddNTPs) terminate the bio-polymerization of DNA and become essential chemical component of DNA sequencing technology which is now basic tool for molecular biology research. In this method the radiolabeled or fluorescent dye labeled ddNTP analogues are being used for DNA sequencing by detection of the terminated DNA fragment after single labeled ddNTP incorporation into DNA under PCR conditions. This report describes the syntheses of rationally designed novel amino-functionalized ddNTP analogue such as Pyrrolidine nucleoside triphosphates (prNTPs), and their polymerase activities with DNA polymerase by LC-MS and Gel-electrophoretic techniques. The Mass and PAGE analyses strongly support the incorporation of prNTPs into DNA oligonucleotide with Therminator DNA polymerase as like control substrate ddNTP. As resultant the DNA oligonucleotide are functionalized as amine group by prNTP incorporation with polymerase. Hence prNTPs provide opportunities to prepare demandable conjugated DNA with other biomolecules/dyes/fluorescence molecule without modifying nucleobase structure. PMID:27377861

  6. Working memory and the homeostatic control of brain adenosine by adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Singer, P; McGarrity, S; Shen, H-Y; Boison, D; Yee, B K

    2012-06-28

    The neuromodulator adenosine maintains brain homeostasis and regulates complex behaviour via activation of inhibitory and excitatory adenosine receptors (ARs) in a brain region-specific manner. AR antagonists such as caffeine have been shown to ameliorate cognitive impairments in animal disease models but their effects on learning and memory in normal animals are equivocal. An alternative approach to reduce AR activation is to lower the extracellular tone of adenosine, which can be achieved by up-regulating adenosine kinase (ADK), the key enzyme of metabolic adenosine clearance. However, mice that globally over-express an Adk transgene ('Adk-tg' mice) were devoid of a caffeine-like pro-cognitive profile; they instead exhibited severe spatial memory deficits. This may be mechanistically linked to cortical/hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction because the motor response to acute MK-801 was also potentiated in Adk-tg mice. Here, we evaluated the extent to which the behavioural phenotypes of Adk-tg mice might be modifiable by up-regulating adenosine levels in the cortex/hippocampus. To this end, we investigated mutant 'fb-Adk-def' mice in which ADK expression was specifically reduced in the telencephalon leading to a selective increase in cortical/hippocampal adenosine, while the rest of the brain remained as adenosine-deficient as in Adk-tg mice. The fb-Adk-def mice showed an even greater impairment in spatial working memory and a more pronounced motor response to NMDAR blockade than Adk-tg mice. These outcomes suggest that maintenance of cortical/hippocampal adenosine homeostasis is essential for effective spatial memory and deviation in either direction is detrimental with increased expression seemingly more disruptive than decreased expression.

  7. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nicholas D; Regan, John M

    2015-12-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD(+), respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP(+), respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190 mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  8. Pain-relieving prospects for adenosine receptors and ectonucleotidases

    PubMed Central

    Zylka, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine receptor agonists have potent antinociceptive effects in diverse preclinical models of chronic pain. In contrast, the efficacy of adenosine or adenosine receptor agonists at treating pain in humans is unclear. Two ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine in nociceptive neurons were recently identified. When injected spinally, these enzymes have long-lasting adenosine A1 receptor (A1R)-dependent antinociceptive effects in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. Furthermore, recent findings indicate that spinal adenosine A2A receptor activation can enduringly inhibit neuropathic pain symptoms. Collectively, these studies suggest the possibility of treating chronic pain in humans by targeting specific adenosine receptor subtypes in anatomically defined regions with agonists or with ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine. PMID:21236731

  9. A terbium(III)-organic framework for highly selective sensing of cytidine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi Juan; He, Rong Xing; Li, Yuan Fang

    2012-11-21

    Highly selective sensing of cytidine triphosphate (CTP) against other triphosphate nucleosides including ATP, GTP and UTP is successfully achieved with a luminescent terbium(III)-organic framework (TbOF) of [Tb(2)(2,3-pzdc)(2)(ox)(H(2)O)(2)](n) (2,3-pzdc(2-) = 2,3-pyrazinedicarboxylate, ox(2-) = oxalate).

  10. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 expression is decreased in preeclamptic placentas.

    PubMed

    Chigusa, Yoshitsugu; Kondoh, Eiji; Mogami, Haruta; Nishimura, Fumitomo; Ujita, Mari; Kawasaki, Kaoru; Fujita, Kohei; Tatsumi, Keiji; Konishi, Ikuo

    2013-08-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific multisystem disorder characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. Accentuated maternal hyperlipidemia, especially high serum levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), is one of the features of preeclampsia. We previously reported that lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) expression was decreased in preeclamptic placentas. Here, we show that decreased LOX-1 expression is associated with low expression of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) in the placenta. The ABCA1 mediates cellular efflux of cholesterol, and liver X receptors (LXRs) are its predominant transcriptional regulators. Both ABCA1 and LXR expressions were significantly lower in preeclamptic placentas than those in normal controls. Oxidized LDL upregulated ABCA1 expression, while LOX-1 blockade resulted in the alleviation of increasing ABCA1 messenger RNA in JAR cells. These results suggest that low LOX-1 expression may lead to insufficient oxLDL uptake, thereby contributing to reduced LXR activation and decreased ABCA1 expression in preeclamptic placentas. PMID:23275468

  11. Ubiquitination and filamentous structure of cytidine triphosphate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Li-Mei; Wang, Pei-Yu; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chakraborty, Archan; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Lin, Yu-Hung

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Living organisms respond to nutrient availability by regulating the activity of metabolic enzymes. Therefore, the reversible post-translational modification of an enzyme is a common regulatory mechanism for energy conservation. Recently, cytidine-5′-triphosphate (CTP) synthase was discovered to form a filamentous structure that is evolutionarily conserved from flies to humans. Interestingly, induction of the formation of CTP synthase filament is responsive to starvation or glutamine depletion. However, the biological roles of this structure remain elusive. We have recently shown that ubiquitination regulates CTP synthase activity by promoting filament formation in Drosophila ovaries during endocycles. Intriguingly, although the ubiquitination process was required for filament formation induced by glutamine depletion, CTP synthase ubiquitination was found to be inversely correlated with filament formation in Drosophila and human cell lines. In this article, we discuss the putative dual roles of ubiquitination, as well as its physiological implications, in the regulation of CTP synthase structure. PMID:27116391

  12. 2-Selenouridine triphosphate synthesis and Se-RNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huiyan; Jiang, Sibo; Caton-Williams, Julianne; Liu, Hehua; Huang, Zhen

    2013-09-01

    2-Selenouridine ((Se)U) is one of the naturally occurring modifications of Se-tRNAs ((Se)U-RNA) at the wobble position of the anticodon loop. Its role in the RNA-RNA interaction, especially during the mRNA decoding, is elusive. To assist the research exploration, herein we report the enzymatic synthesis of the (Se)U-RNA via 2-selenouridine triphosphate ((Se)UTP) synthesis and RNA transcription. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the synthesized (Se)UTP is stable and recognizable by T7 RNA polymerase. Under the optimized conditions, the transcription yield of (Se)U-RNA can reach up to 85% of the corresponding native RNA. Furthermore, the transcribed (Se)U-hammerhead ribozyme has the similar activity as the corresponding native, which suggests usefulness of (Se)U-RNAs in function and structure studies of noncoding RNAs, including the Se-tRNAs.

  13. Adenosine induced coronary spasm – A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Arora, P.; Bhatia, V.; Arora, M.; Kaul, U.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is commonly used as a pharmacological agent in myocardial perfusion imaging, as an antiarrhythmic agent, and in Cath Lab. during PCI for treating no reflow phenomenon. Coronary spasm has been reported following adenosine injection during stress imaging. We report a rare complication with ST segment elevation, following adenosine injection, given for treatment of supraventricular tachycardia. PMID:24581102

  14. Mechanistic studies of ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase from Lactobacillus leichmannii

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of action of the adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl)-dependent ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase (RTPR) was investigated using isotope effect and substrate specificity studies. These experiments were conducted on RTPR purified by a new method from Lactobacillus leichmannii. Isotope effect studies using (3{prime}-{sup 3}H)UTP and (3{prime}-{sup 3}H)ATP demonstrated that the 3{prime} C-H bond of the nucleotide is cleaved in order to cleave the 2{prime} C-OH bond. AdoCbl does not act as a direct H abstractor from the 3{prime} position of the substrate, but instead is thought to act as a radical chain initiator to generate an amino acid radical on the enzyme. Further support for this enzyme mediated cleavage of the 3{prime} C-H bond of the nucleotide and the novel role of AdoCbl came from studies using (3{prime}{sup 3}H)2{prime}-chloro-2{prime}-deoxyuridine 5{prime}-triphosphate ((3{prime}-{sup 3}H)CIUTP). Evidence is presented that during the course of this reaction, the {sup 3}H abstracted from the 3{prime} position of (3{prime}-{sup 3}H)CIUTP was either exchanged with the solvent or returned to the {beta} face of the 2{prime} position to produce (2{prime}{sup 3}H)-2{prime}-deoxy-3{prime}-ketoUTP. This result demonstrates that RTPR is capable of catalyzing a rearrangement reaction. The significance of the RTPR-catalyzed rearrangement with respect to the AdoCbl-dependent enzymes which catalyze rearrangements is discussed.

  15. [Concentration of prostaglandins and cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate in the tissues of rats].

    PubMed

    Komissarenko, V P; Slavnov, V N; Epsheĭn, E V; Malinkovich, V D

    1977-04-01

    The content of prostaglandines (PG) and cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monphosphate (cAMP) was investigated in rat tissues by the radioisotopic method of competitive binding. Maximum quantities of both PG and cAMP were revealed in the same most actively functioning organs: the brain, incretory glands, small intestine. Fatty tissue showed minimum quantities of these substances. Results indicate a close functional relationship between the PG synthesis and adenylatecyclase activity in the body tissues.

  16. Structural and Metabolic Specificity of Methylthiocoformycin for Malarial Adenosine Deaminases

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.; Cassera, M; Madrid, D; Ting, L; Tyler, P; Kim, K; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is a purine auxotroph requiring hypoxanthine as a key metabolic precursor. Erythrocyte adenine nucleotides are the source of the purine precursors, making adenosine deaminase (ADA) a key enzyme in the pathway of hypoxanthine formation. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) is a substrate for most malarial ADAs, but not for human ADA. The catalytic site specificity of malarial ADAs permits methylthiocoformycin (MT-coformycin) to act as a Plasmodium-specific transition state analogue with low affinity for human ADA. The structural basis for MTA and MT-coformycin specificity in malarial ADAs is the subject of speculation. Here, the crystal structure of ADA from Plasmodium vivax (PvADA) in a complex with MT-coformycin reveals an unprecedented binding geometry for 5?-methylthioribosyl groups in the malarial ADAs. Compared to malarial ADA complexes with adenosine or deoxycoformycin, 5?-methylthioribosyl groups are rotated 130 degrees. A hydrogen bonding network between Asp172 and the 3?-hydroxyl of MT-coformycin is essential for recognition of the 5?-methylthioribosyl group. Water occupies the 5?-hydroxyl binding site when MT-coformycin is bound. Mutagenesis of Asp172 destroys the substrate specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Kinetic, mutagenic, and structural analyses of PvADA and kinetic analysis of five other Plasmodium ADAs establish the unique structural basis for its specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Plasmodium gallinaceum ADA does not use MTA as a substrate, is not inhibited by MT-coformycin, and is missing Asp172. Treatment of P. falciparum cultures with coformycin or MT-coformycin in the presence of MTA is effective in inhibiting parasite growth.

  17. Stabilizing effects of G protein on the active conformation of adenosine A1 receptor differ depending on G protein type.

    PubMed

    Tateyama, Michihiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) trigger various cellular and physiological responses upon the ligand binding. The ligand binding induces conformational change in GPCRs which allows G protein to interact with the receptor. The interaction of G protein also affects the active conformation of GPCRs. In this study, we have investigated the effects of Gαi1, Gαo and chimeric Gαqi5 on the active conformation of the adenosine A1 receptor, as each Gα showed difference in the interaction with adenosine A1 receptor. The conformational changes in the adenosine A1 receptor were detected as the agonist-induced decreases in efficiency of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins (FPs) fused at the two intracellular domains of the adenosine A1 receptor. Amplitudes of the agonist-induced FRET decreases were subtle when the FP-tagged adenosine A1 receptor was expressed alone, whereas they were significantly enhanced when co-expressed with Gαi1Gβ1Gγ22 (Gi1) or Gαqi5Gβ1Gγ22 (Gqi5) but not with GαοGβ1Gγ22 (Go). The enhancement of the agonist-induced FRET decrease in the presence of Gqi5 was significantly larger than that of Gi1. Furthermore, the FRET recovery upon the agonist removal in the presence of Gqi5 was significantly slower than that of Gi1. From these results it was revealed that the agonist-bound active conformation of adenosine A1 receptor is unstable without the binding of G protein and that the stabilizing effects of G protein differ depending on the types of G protein.

  18. Trifunctional Agents as a Design Strategy for Tailoring Ligand Properties: Irreversible Inhibitors of A1 Adenosine Receptors†

    PubMed Central

    Boring, Daniel L.; Ji, Xiao-Duo; Zimmet, Jeff; Taylor, Kirk E.; Stiles, Gary L.

    2012-01-01

    The 1,3-phenylene diisothiocyanate conjugate of XAC (8-[4-[[[[(2-aminoethyl)amino]carbonyl]methyl]-oxy]phenyl]-l,3-dipropylxanthine, a potent A1 selective adenosine antagonist) has been characterized as an irreversible inhibitor of A1 adenosine receptors. To further extend this work, a series of analogues were prepared containing a third substituent in the phenyl isothiocyanate ring, incorporated to modify the physiochemical or spectroscopic properties of the conjugate. Symmetrical trifunctional cross-linking reagents bearing two isothiocyanate groups were prepared as general intermediates for cross-linking functionalized congeners and receptors. Xanthine isothiocyanate derivatives containing hydrophilic, fluorescent, or reactive substituents, linked via an amide, thiourea, or methylene group in the 5-position, were synthesized and found to be irreversible inhibitors of A1 adenosine receptors. The effects of the 5-substituent on water solubility and on the A1/A2 selectivity ratio derived from binding assays in rat brain membranes were examined. Inhibition of binding of [3H]-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine and [3H]CGS21680 (2-[[2-[4-(2-carboxyethyl)phenyl]ethyl]amino]adenosine-5′-N-ethylcarboxamide) at central A1 and A2 adenosine receptors, respectively, was measured. A conjugate of XAC and 1,3,5-triisothiocyanatobenzene was 894-fold selective for A1 receptors. Reporter groups, such as fluorescent dyes and a spin-label, were included as chain substituents in the irreversibly binding analogues, which were designed for spectroscopic assays, histochemical characterization, and biochemical characterization of the receptor protein. PMID:1868116

  19. Homodimerization of adenosine A₁ receptors in brain cortex explains the biphasic effects of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Gracia, Eduard; Moreno, Estefania; Cortés, Antoni; Lluís, Carme; Mallol, Josefa; McCormick, Peter J; Canela, Enric I; Casadó, Vicent

    2013-08-01

    Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and proximity ligation assays, we obtained the first direct evidence that adenosine A₁ receptors (A₁Rs) form homomers not only in cell cultures but also in brain cortex. By radioligand binding experiments in the absence or in the presence of the A₁Rs allosteric modulator, adenosine deaminase, and by using the two-state dimer receptor model to fit binding data, we demonstrated that the protomer-protomer interactions in the A₁R homomers account for some of the pharmacological characteristics of agonist and antagonist binding to A₁Rs. These pharmacological properties include the appearance of cooperativity in agonist binding, the change from a biphasic saturation curve to a monophasic curve in self-competition experiments and the molecular cross-talk detected when two different specific molecules bind to the receptor. In this last case, we discovered that caffeine binding to one protomer increases the agonist affinity for the other protomer in the A₁R homomer, a pharmacological characteristic that correlates with the low caffeine concentrations-induced activation of agonist-promoted A₁R signaling. This pharmacological property can explain the biphasic effects reported at low and high concentration of caffeine on locomotor activity.

  20. Effects of adenosine infusion into renal interstitium on renal hemodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowska, D.; Granger, J.P.; Knox, F.G.

    1987-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the hemodynamic effects of exogenous adenosine in the interstitium of the rat kidney. Adenosine or its analogues were infused into the renal interstitium by means of chronically implanted capsules. In fusion of adenosine decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from 0.81 +/- 0.06 to 0.37 +/- 0.06 ml/min while having no effect on renal blood flow (RBF). The metabolically stable analogue, 2-chloradenosine (2-ClAdo), decreased GFR from 0.73 +/- 0.07 to 021 +/- 0.06 ml/min. Interstitial infusion of theophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist, completely abolished the effects of adenosine and 2-ClAdo on GFR. The distribution of adenosine, when infused into the renal interstitium, was determined using radiolabeled 5'-(N-ethyl)-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a metabolically stable adenosine agonist. After continuous infusion, (/sup 3/H)NECA was distributed throughout the kidney. The effects of NECA to reduce GFR were similar to those of adenosine and 2-ClAdo. They conclude that increased levels of adenosine in the renal interstitium markedly decrease GFR without affecting RBF in steady-state conditions. The marked effects of adenosine agonists during their infusion into the renal interstitium and the complete blockade of these effects by theophylline suggest an extracellular action of adenosine.

  1. Synthesis of α-l-Threofuranosyl Nucleoside Triphosphates (tNTPs)

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Keyong; Horhota, Allen; Yu, Biao; Szostak, Jack W.

    2005-01-01

    The α-l-threofuranosyl nucleoside triphosphates of T, G, and D (tTTP, tGTP, and tDTP) were synthesized from the described 2‘-O-DMT-protected derivatives using the Eckstein method, while the corresponding C derivative (tCTP) was prepared from the 2‘-O-acetyl derivative. The prepared α-l-threofuranosyl nucleoside triphosphates, despite being one carbon shorter than the native 2‘-deoxyfuranosyl nucleoside triphosphates, are effective substrates for selected DNA polymerases. PMID:15816733

  2. Adenosine Deaminase Acts as a Natural Antagonist for Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4-Mediated Entry of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Raj, V. Stalin; Smits, Saskia L.; Provacia, Lisette B.; van den Brand, Judith M. A.; Wiersma, Lidewij; Ouwendijk, Werner J. D.; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Spronken, Monique I.; van Amerongen, Geert; Rottier, Peter J. M.; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Bosch, Berend Jan; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) replicates in cells of different species using dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) as a functional receptor. Here we show the resistance of ferrets to MERS-CoV infection and inability of ferret DDP4 to bind MERS-CoV. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids variable in ferret DPP4 thus revealed the functional human DPP4 virus binding site. Adenosine deaminase (ADA), a DPP4 binding protein, competed for virus binding, acting as a natural antagonist for MERS-CoV infection. PMID:24257613

  3. Adenosine deaminase acts as a natural antagonist for dipeptidyl peptidase 4-mediated entry of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Raj, V Stalin; Smits, Saskia L; Provacia, Lisette B; van den Brand, Judith M A; Wiersma, Lidewij; Ouwendijk, Werner J D; Bestebroer, Theo M; Spronken, Monique I; van Amerongen, Geert; Rottier, Peter J M; Fouchier, Ron A M; Bosch, Berend Jan; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Haagmans, Bart L

    2014-02-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) replicates in cells of different species using dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) as a functional receptor. Here we show the resistance of ferrets to MERS-CoV infection and inability of ferret DDP4 to bind MERS-CoV. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids variable in ferret DPP4 thus revealed the functional human DPP4 virus binding site. Adenosine deaminase (ADA), a DPP4 binding protein, competed for virus binding, acting as a natural antagonist for MERS-CoV infection. PMID:24257613

  4. /sup 125/I-labeled 8-phenylxanthine derivatives: antagonist radioligands for adenosine A1 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, J.; Patel, A.; Earl, C.Q.; Craig, R.H.; Daluge, S.M.

    1988-04-01

    A series of 8-phenylxanthine derivatives has been synthesized with oxyacetic acid on the para phenyl position to increase aqueous solubility and minimize nonspecific binding and iodinatable groups on the 1- or 3-position of the xanthine ring. The structure-activity relationship for binding of these compounds to A1 adenosine receptors of bovine and rat brain and A2 receptors of human platelets was examined. The addition of arylamine or photosensitive aryl azide groups to the 3-position of xanthine had little effect on A1 binding affinity with or without iodination, whereas substitutions at the 1-position caused greatly reduced A1 binding affinity. The addition of an aminobenzyl group to the 3-position of the xanthine had little effect on A2 binding affinity, but 3-aminophenethyl substitution decreased A2 binding affinity. Two acidic 3-(arylamino)-8-phenylxanthine derivatives were labeled with /sup 125/I and evaluated as A1 receptor radioligands. The new radioligands bound to A1 receptors with KD values of 1-1.25 nM. Specific binding represented over 80% of total binding. High concentrations of NaCl or other salts increased the binding affinity of acidic but not neutral antagonists, suggesting that interactions between ionized xanthines and receptors may be affected significantly by changes in ionic strength. On the basis of binding studies with these antagonists and isotope dilution with the agonist (/sup 125/I)N6-(4-amino-3-iodobenzyl)adenosine, multiple agonist affinity states of A1 receptors have been identified.

  5. Homology modelling of the human adenosine A2B receptor based on X-ray structures of bovine rhodopsin, the beta2-adrenergic receptor and the human adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Sherbiny, Farag F; Schiedel, Anke C; Maass, Astrid; Müller, Christa E

    2009-11-01

    A three-dimensional model of the human adenosine A2B receptor was generated by means of homology modelling, using the crystal structures of bovine rhodopsin, the beta2-adrenergic receptor, and the human adenosine A2A receptor as templates. In order to compare the three resulting models, the binding modes of the adenosine A2B receptor antagonists theophylline, ZM241385, MRS1706, and PSB601 were investigated. The A2A-based model was much better able to stabilize the ligands in the binding site than the other models reflecting the high degree of similarity between A2A and A2B receptors: while the A2B receptor shares about 21% of the residues with rhodopsin, and 31% with the beta2-adrenergic receptor, it is 56% identical to the adenosine A2A receptor. The A2A-based model was used for further studies. The model included the transmembrane domains, the extracellular and the intracellular hydrophilic loops as well as the terminal domains. In order to validate the usefulness of this model, a docking analysis of several selective and nonselective agonists and antagonists was carried out including a study of binding affinities and selectivities of these ligands with respect to the adenosine A2A and A2B receptors. A common binding site is proposed for antagonists and agonists based on homology modelling combined with site-directed mutagenesis and a comparison between experimental and calculated affinity data. The new, validated A2B receptor model may serve as a basis for developing more potent and selective drugs.

  6. Co-inhibition of CD73 and A2AR Adenosine Signaling Improves Anti-tumor Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Young, Arabella; Ngiow, Shin Foong; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Sult, Erin; Hay, Carl; Blake, Stephen J; Huang, Qihui; Liu, Jing; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Teng, Michele W L; Sachsenmeier, Kris; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-09-12

    Preclinical studies targeting the adenosinergic pathway have gained much attention for their clinical potential in overcoming tumor-induced immunosuppression. Here, we have identified that co-blockade of the ectonucleotidase that generates adenosine CD73 and the A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR) that mediates adenosine signaling in leuokocytes, by using compound gene-targeted mice or therapeutics that target these molecules, limits tumor initiation, growth, and metastasis. This tumor control requires effector lymphocytes and interferon-γ, while antibodies targeting CD73 promote an optimal therapeutic response in vivo when engaging activating Fc receptors. In a two-way mixed leukocyte reaction using a fully human anti-CD73, we demonstrated that Fc receptor binding augmented the production of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:27622332

  7. The adenosine receptor affinities and monoamine oxidase B inhibitory properties of sulfanylphthalimide analogues.

    PubMed

    Van der Walt, Mietha M; Terre'Blanche, Gisella; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2015-04-01

    Based on a report that sulfanylphthalimides are highly potent monoamine oxidase (MAO) B selective inhibitors, the present study examines the adenosine receptor affinities and MAO-B inhibitory properties of a series of 4- and 5-sulfanylphthalimide analogues. Since adenosine antagonists (A1 and A2A subtypes) and MAO-B inhibitors are considered agents for the therapy of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, dual-target-directed drugs that antagonize adenosine receptors and inhibit MAO-B may have enhanced therapeutic value. The results document that the sulfanylphthalimide analogues are selective for the adenosine A1 receptor over the A2A receptor subtype, with a number of compounds also possessing MAO-B inhibitory properties. Among the compounds evaluated, 5-[(4-methoxybenzyl)sulfanyl]phthalimide was found to possess the highest binding affinity to adenosine A1 receptors with a Ki value of 0.369 μM. This compound is reported to also inhibit MAO-B with an IC50 value of 0.020 μM. Such dual-target-directed compounds may act synergistic in the treatment of Parkinson's disease: antagonism of the A1 receptor may facilitate dopamine release, while MAO-B inhibition may reduce dopamine metabolism. Additionally, dual-target-directed compounds may find therapeutic value in Alzheimer's disease: antagonism of the A1 receptor may be beneficial in the treatment of cognitive dysfunction, while MAO-B inhibition may exhibit neuroprotective properties. In neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, dual-target-directed drugs are expected to be advantageous over single-target treatments.

  8. Formation of. beta. ,. gamma. -methylene-7,8-dihydroneopterin 3'-triphosphate from. beta. ,. gamma. -methyleneguanosine 5'-triphosphate by GTP cyclohydrolase I of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Ferre, J.; Jacobson, K.B.

    1984-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I of Escherichia coli converts (..beta..,..gamma..-methylene)GTP to a fluorescent product that is characterized as (..beta..,..gamma..-methylene)dihydroneopterin triphosphate. Interaction between the GTP analog and the enzyme gave a K/sub i/ of 3.0 ..mu..M, which may be compared to the K/sub m/ of 0.1 ..mu..M for GTP. This new analog of dihydroneopterin triphosphate may, in turn, be converted to the same greenish-yellow pteridines (compounds X, X1, and X2) that are obtained from dihydroneopterin triphosphate. Because of its stability to phosphatase action, this analog may be useful for studies in pteridine metabolism. 14 references, 5 figures.

  9. Adenosine Receptors: Expression, Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Sandeep; Brito, Rafael; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) comprise a group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) which mediate the physiological actions of adenosine. To date, four AR subtypes have been cloned and identified in different tissues. These receptors have distinct localization, signal transduction pathways and different means of regulation upon exposure to agonists. This review will describe the biochemical characteristics and signaling cascade associated with each receptor and provide insight into how these receptors are regulated in response to agonists. A key property of some of these receptors is their ability to serve as sensors of cellular oxidative stress, which is transmitted by transcription factors, such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB, to regulate the expression of ARs. Recent observations of oligomerization of these receptors into homo- and heterodimers will be discussed. In addition, the importance of these receptors in the regulation of normal and pathological processes such as sleep, the development of cancers and in protection against hearing loss will be examined. PMID:24477263

  10. The PurR mutation of Drosophila melanogaster confers resistance to purine and 2,6-diaminopurine by elevating adenosine deaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Dutton, F L; Chovnick, A

    1990-01-01

    Media supplemented with purine (7H-imidazo[4,5-d]pyrimidine) or the purine analogue 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) can be employed to select several classes of purine-resistant variants from mutagenized cultures of Drosophila. One class results in elevated resistance to purine and diaminopurine which is correlated with elevated activity of the enzyme adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase = EC 3.5.4.4). The first member of this class, Pur R, maps to position 82 +/- in the right arm of the second chromosome. The Pur R mutation causes an elevation of adenosine deaminase (ADA) enzyme activity, apparently by altering a thermolabile, ADA-specific repressor. Pur R may thus encode a negative regulator of adenosine deaminase activity similar to the ADA-binding protein found in mammalian systems.

  11. Dopamine-functionalized InP/ZnS quantum dots as fluorescence probes for the detection of adenosine in microfluidic chip

    PubMed Central

    Ankireddy, Seshadri Reddy; Kim, Jongsung

    2015-01-01

    Microbeads are frequently used as solid supports for biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids in heterogeneous microfluidic assays. Chip-based, quantum dot (QD)-bead-biomolecule probes have been used for the detection of various types of DNA. In this study, we developed dopamine (DA)-functionalized InP/ZnS QDs (QDs-DA) as fluorescence probes for the detection of adenosine in microfluidic chips. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the QDs-DA is quenched by Zn2+ because of the strong coordination interactions. In the presence of adenosine, Zn2+ cations preferentially bind to adenosine, and the PL intensity of the QDs-DA is recovered. A polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic chip was fabricated, and adenosine detection was confirmed using QDs-DA probes. PMID:26347351

  12. Adenosine-induced worsening of supraventricular tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Kunnumpuram, Georgey Koshy; Patel, Ashfaq

    2012-01-01

    An approximately 20-year-old to 30-year-old patient presented with a haemodynamically stable supraventricular tachycardia . The patient was managed with intravenous adenosine primarily, with two bolus doses of 6 and 12 mg. This, however, caused a rare paradoxical surge of tachycardia with mild haemodynamic compromise. The patient further required a combination of Metoprolol and Verapamil administration to slow down and reverse the arrhythmia. Following this the patient remained stable with no further episodes till discharge. PMID:23230260

  13. Adenosine A2B Receptor: From Cell Biology to Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR's functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases, and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases. PMID:27606311

  14. Adenosine A2B receptor: from cell biology to human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR’s functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases.

  15. Adenosine A2B Receptor: From Cell Biology to Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR's functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases, and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases.

  16. Adenosine A2B Receptor: From Cell Biology to Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR's functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases, and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases. PMID:27606311

  17. Geometry and cooperativity effects in adenosine-carboxylic acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Schlund, Sebastian; Mladenovic, Milena; Basílio Janke, Eline M; Engels, Bernd; Weisz, Klaus

    2005-11-23

    NMR experiments and theoretical investigations were performed on hydrogen bonded complexes of specifically 1- and 7-15N-labeled adenine nucleosides with carboxylic acids. By employing a freonic solvent of CDClF2 and CDF3, NMR spectra were acquired at temperatures as low as 123 K, where the regime of slow hydrogen bond exchange is reached and several higher-order complexes were found to coexist in solution. Unlike acetic acid, chloroacetic acid forms Watson-Crick complexes with the proton largely displaced from oxygen to the nitrogen acceptor in an ion pairing structure. Calculated geometries and chemical shifts of the proton in the hydrogen bridge favorably agree with experimentally determined values if vibrational averaging and solvent effects are taken into account. The results indicate that binding a second acidic ligand at the adenine Hoogsteen site in a ternary complex weakens the hydrogen bond to the Watson-Crick bound carboxylic acid. However, substituting a second adenine nucleobase for a carboxylic acid in the trimolecular complex leads to cooperative binding at Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen faces of adenosine.

  18. Effect of adenosine and adenosine analogs on ( sup 14 C)aminopyrine accumulation by rabbit parietal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ota, S.; Hiraishi, H.; Terano, A.; Mutoh, H.; Kurachi, Y.; Shimada, T.; Ivey, K.J.; Sugimoto, T. )

    1989-12-01

    Adenosine receptors that modulate adenylate cyclase activity have been identified recently in a number of tissues. Adenosine A2 receptor is stimulatory to adenylate cyclase, whereas adenosine A1 receptor is inhibitory to adenylate cyclase. We investigated the effect of adenosine and its analogs on (14C)aminopyrine accumulation by rabbit parietal cells. Rabbit gastric mucosal cells were isolated by enzyme digestion. Parietal cells were enriched by nonlinear percoll gradients. (14C)Aminopyrine accumulation was used as an indicator of acid secretion. The effect of 2-chloroadenosine on histamine-stimulated (14C)aminopyrine accumulation was studied. The effects of N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, 2-chloroadenosine, stable analogs of adenosine, and adenosine on (14C)aminopyrine accumulation were assessed. Cyclic AMP content of parietal cells was determined by radioimmunoassay. Histamine and carbachol, known secretagogues, stimulated (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine did not suppress histamine-stimulated (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine, N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, and adenosine dose dependently increased (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. The order of potency was N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine greater than 2-chloroadenosine greater than adenosine. 8-Phenyltheophylline and theophylline, adenosine-receptor antagonists, or cimetidine did not have significant effects on the increase of AP uptake induced by 2-chloroadenosine. Coadministration of dipyridamole, and adenosine uptake inhibitor, augmented the effect of adenosine on (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine, N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, and adenosine each induced a significant increase in cellular cyclic AMP. We conclude that there may be adenosine A2 receptors on rabbit parietal cells which modulate gastric acid secretion.

  19. Characterization of the Mn2+-stimulated (di)adenosine polyphosphate hydrolase encoded by the Deinococcus radiodurans DR2356 nudix gene.

    PubMed

    Fisher, David I; Cartwright, Jared L; McLennan, Alexander G

    2006-11-01

    The DR2356 nudix hydrolase gene from Deinococcus radiodurans has been cloned and the product expressed as an 18 kDa histidine-tagged protein. The enzyme hydrolysed adenosine and diadenosine polyphosphates, always generating ATP as one of the initial products. ATP and other (deoxy)nucleoside triphosphates were also substrates, yielding (d)NDP and Pi as products. The DR2356 protein was most active at pH 8.6-9.0 and showed a strong preference for Mn(2+) as activating cation. Mg(2+) ions at 15 mM supported only 5% of the activity achieved with 2 mM Mn(2+). K (m) and k (cat) values for diadenosine tetra-, penta- and hexaphosphates were 2.0, 2.4 and 1.1 microM and 11.4, 28.6 and 12.0 s(-1), respectively, while for GTP they were 20.3 microM and 1.8 s(-1), respectively. The K (m )for adenosine 5'-pentaphosphate was <1 microM. Expression analysis showed the DR2356 gene to be induced eight- to ninefold in stationary phase and in cells subjected to slow dehydration plus rehydration. Superoxide (but not peroxide) treatment and rapid dehydration caused a two-to threefold induction. The Mn-requirement and induction in stationary phase suggest that DR2356 may have a specific role in maintenance mode metabolism in stationary phase as Mn(2+) accumulates.

  20. Investigation of protein binding of radiogallium. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, P.B.

    1985-07-25

    The main objective of the contract is to study aspects of the localization of gallium-67 in tumor are reported and compared with a new tumor imaging agent, specifically radiolabeled monoclonal tumor antibody. Our studies have demonstrated that phosphate compounds used in bone imaging do not significantly influence gallium-67 localization, that the adenosine triphosphate cannot be used to enhance gallium-67 uptake in malignant tissue, and that gallium-67 has higher affinity than radiolabeled anti-p97 for melanoma, even in tumors which produce significant amounts of p97 antigen on their cell surface. 23 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Use of adenosine echocardiography for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, W.A. )

    1991-07-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography combined with exercise is sensitive and specific in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) by demonstrating transient abnormalities in wall motion. Frequently, however, patients cannot achieve maximal exercise because of various factors. Pharmacologic stress testing with intravenous adenosine was evaluated as a means of detecting CAD in a noninvasive manner. Patients with suspected CAD underwent echocardiographic imaging and simultaneous thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography during the intravenous administration of 140 micrograms/kg/min of adenosine. An increase in heart rate, decrease in blood pressure, and increase in double product were observed during adenosine administration. Initial observations revealed that wall motion abnormalities were induced by adenosine in areas of perfusion defects. The adenosine infusion was well tolerated, and symptoms disappeared within 1 to 2 minutes after termination of the infusion. Therefore preliminary observations suggest that adenosine echocardiography appears to be useful in the assessment of CAD.

  2. Measurement of plasma adenosine concentration: methodological and physiological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Gewirtz, H.; Brown, P.; Most, A.S.

    1987-05-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that measurements of plasma adenosine concentration made on samples of blood obtained in dipyridamole and EHNA (i.e., stopping solution) may be falsely elevated as a result of ongoing in vitro production and accumulation of adenosine during sample processing. Studies were performed with samples of anticoagulated blood obtained from anesthesized domestic swine. Adenosine concentration of ultra filtrated plasma was determined by HPLC. The following parameters were evaluated: (i) rate of clearance of (/sup 3/H)adenosine added to plasma, (ii) endogenous adenosine concentration of matched blood samples obtained in stopping solution alone, stopping solution plus EDTA, and perchloric acid (PCA), (iii) plasma and erythrocyte endogenous adenosine concentration in nonhemolyzed samples, and (iv) plasma adenosine concentration of samples hemolyzed in the presence of stopping solution alone or stopping solution plus EDTA. We observed that (i) greater than or equal to 95% of (/sup 3/H)adenosine added to plasma is removed from it by formed elements of the blood in less than 20 s, (ii) plasma adenosine concentration of samples obtained in stopping solution alone is generally 10-fold greater than that of matched samples obtained in stopping solution plus EDTA, (iii) deliberate mechanical hemolysis of blood samples obtained in stopping solution alone resulted in substantial augmentation of plasma adenosine levels in comparison with matched nonhemolyzed specimens--addition of EDTA to stopping solution prevented this, and (iv) adenosine content of blood samples obtained in PCA agreed closely with the sum of plasma and erythrocyte adenosine content of samples obtained in stopping solution plus EDTA.

  3. Role of adenosine receptor subtypes in methamphetamine reward and reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Kevin A; Schreiner, Drew C; Levis, Sophia C; O'Neill, Casey E; Bachtell, Ryan K

    2015-02-01

    The neurobiology of methamphetamine (MA) remains largely unknown despite its high abuse liability. The present series of studies explored the role of adenosine receptors on MA reward and reinforcement and identified alterations in the expression of adenosine receptors in dopamine terminal areas following MA administration in rats. We tested whether stimulating adenosine A1 or A2A receptor subtypes would influence MA-induced place preference or MA self-administration on fixed and progressive ratio schedules in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Stimulation of either adenosine A1 or A2A receptors significantly reduced the development of MA-induced place preference. Stimulating adenosine A1, but not A2A, receptors reduced MA self-administration responding. We next tested whether repeated experimenter-delivered MA administration would alter the expression of adenosine receptors in the striatal areas using immunoblotting. We observed no change in the expression of adenosine receptors. Lastly, rats were trained to self-administer MA or saline for 14 days and we detected changes in adenosine A1 and A2A receptor expression using immunoblotting. MA self-administration significantly increased adenosine A1 in the nucleus accumbens shell, caudate-putamen and prefrontal cortex. MA self-administration significantly decreased adenosine A2A receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens shell, but increased A2A receptor expression in the amygdala. These findings demonstrate that MA self-administration produces selective alterations in adenosine receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens shell and that stimulation of adenosine receptors reduces several behavioral indices of MA addiction. Together, these studies shed light onto the neurobiological alterations incurred through chronic MA use that may aid in the development of treatments for MA addiction.

  4. Caffeine intensifies taste of certain sweeteners: role of adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Diaz, C; Beeker, T G

    1986-03-01

    Caffeine, a potent antagonist of adenosine receptors, potentiates the taste of some but not all sweeteners. It significantly enhances the taste of acesulfam-K, neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, d-tryptophan, thaumatin, stevioside, and sodium saccharin. Adenosine reverses the enhancement. Caffeine has no effect on aspartame, sucrose, fructose, and calcium cyclamate. These results suggest that the inhibitory A1 adenosine receptor plays an important local role in modulating the taste intensity of certain sweeteners and that several transduction mechanisms mediate sweet taste.

  5. Adenosine analogs inhibit fighting in isolated male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Palmour, R.M.; Lipowski, C.J.; Simon, C.K.; Ervin, F.R.

    1989-01-01

    The potent adenosine analogs N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) and phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA) inhibit fighting and associated agonistic behaviors in isolated male mice. These effects are reversed by methylxanthines; moderate doses of NECA which inhibit fighting have minimal effects on spontaneous locomotor activity. At very low doses, both NECA and PIA increase fighting in parallel with previously reported increases of motor activity. Brain levels of (/sup 3/H)-NECA and (/sup 3/H)-PIA achieved at behaviorally effective doses suggest an involvement of adenosine receptors. The biochemical mechanism of adenosine receptor action with respect to fighting is unknown, but may include neuromodulatory effects on the release of other, more classical neurotransmitters.

  6. Adenosine signaling: good or bad in erectile function?

    PubMed

    Wen, Jiaming; Xia, Yang

    2012-04-01

    The erectile status of penile tissue is governed largely by the tone of cavernosal smooth muscle cells, which is determined by the balance of vascular relaxants and constrictors. Vascular relaxants play a key role in regulating the tone of cavernosal smooth muscle and thus the initiation and maintenance of penile erection. Early studies drew attention to the potential role of adenosine signaling in this process. However, the serendipitous discovery of the effect of sildenafil on erectile physiology drew more attention toward nitric oxide (NO) as a vasodilator in the process of penile erection, and a recently discovered, unexpected erectile phenotype of adenosine deaminase-deficient mice reemphasizes the importance of adenosine as a key regulatory of erectile status. Adenosine, like NO, is a potent and short-lived vasorelaxant that functions via cyclic nucleotide second messenger signaling to promote smooth muscle relaxation. Recent studies reviewed here show that adenosine functions to relax the corpus cavernosum and promote penile erection. Excess adenosine in penile tissue contributes to the disorder called priapism, and impaired adenosine signaling is associated with erectile dysfunction. More recent research summarized in this review reveals that adenosine functions as a key endogenous vasodilator in the initiation and maintenance of normal penile erection. This new insight highlights adenosine signaling pathways operating in penile tissue as significant therapeutic targets for the treatment of erectile disorders.

  7. Activation of the inositol (1,4,5)-triphosphate calcium gate receptor is required for HIV-1 Gag release.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Lorna S; Medina, Gisselle N; Khan, Mahfuz B; Powell, Michael D; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Carter, Carol A

    2010-07-01

    The structural precursor polyprotein, Gag, encoded by all retroviruses, including the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), is necessary and sufficient for the assembly and release of particles that morphologically resemble immature virus particles. Previous studies have shown that the addition of Ca(2+) to cells expressing Gag enhances virus particle production. However, no specific cellular factor has been implicated as mediator of Ca(2+) provision. The inositol (1,4,5)-triphosphate receptor (IP3R) gates intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Following activation by binding of its ligand, IP3, it releases Ca(2+) from the stores. We demonstrate here that IP3R function is required for efficient release of HIV-1 virus particles. Depletion of IP3R by small interfering RNA, sequestration of its activating ligand by expression of a mutated fragment of IP3R that binds IP3 with very high affinity, or blocking formation of the