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Sample records for adenosine triphosphate binding

  1. Optical Aptasensors for Adenosine Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Stella; Lim, Hui Si; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids are among the most researched and applied biomolecules. Their diverse two- and three-dimensional structures in conjunction with their robust chemistry and ease of manipulation provide a rare opportunity for sensor applications. Moreover, their high biocompatibility has seen them being used in the construction of in vivo assays. Various nucleic acid-based devices have been extensively studied as either the principal element in discrete molecule-like sensors or as the main component in the fabrication of sensing devices. The use of aptamers in sensors - aptasensors, in particular, has led to improvements in sensitivity, selectivity, and multiplexing capacity for a wide verity of analytes like proteins, nucleic acids, as well as small biomolecules such as glucose and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This article reviews the progress in the use of aptamers as the principal component in sensors for optical detection of ATP with an emphasis on sensing mechanism, performance, and applications with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. PMID:27446501

  2. Adenosine triphosphate inhibition of yeast trehalase.

    PubMed

    Panek, A D

    1969-09-01

    Yeast trehalase has been found to be inhibited non-competitively by adenosine triphosphate. Such a biological control could explain the accumulation of trehalose during the stationary phase of the growth curve. PMID:5370287

  3. Enzymatic regeneration of adenosine triphosphate cofactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Regenerating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by enzymatic process which utilizes carbamyl phosphate as phosphoryl donor is technique used to regenerate expensive cofactors. Process allows complex enzymatic reactions to be considered as candidates for large-scale continuous processes.

  4. The N-terminal adenosine triphosphate binding domain of Hsp90 is necessary and sufficient for interaction with estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Bouhouche-Chatelier, L; Chadli, A; Catelli, M G

    2001-10-01

    To understand how the molecular chaperone Hsp90 participates in conformational maturation of the estrogen receptor (ER), we analyzed the interaction of immobilized purified avian Hsp90 with mammalian cytosolic ER. Hsp90 was either immunoadsorbed to BF4 antibody-Sepharose or GST-Hsp90 fusion protein (GST.90) was adsorbed to glutathione-Sepharose. GST.90 was able to retain specifically ER, similarly to immunoadsorbed Hsp90. When cells were treated with estradiol and the hormone treatment was maintained during cell homogenization, binding, and washing steps, GST.90 still interacted efficiently with ER, suggesting that ER may form complexes with Hsp90 even after its activation by hormone and salt extraction from nuclei. The GST.90-ER interaction was consistently reduced in the presence of increasing concentrations of potassium chloride or when cytosolic ER-Hsp90 complexes were previously stabilized by molybdate, indicating that GST.90-ER complexes behave like cytosolic Hsp90-ER complexes. A purified thioredoxin-ER fusion protein was also able to form complexes with GST.90, suggesting that the presence of other chaperones is not required. ER was retained only by GST.90 deletion mutants bearing an intact Hsp90 N-terminal region (1-224), the interaction being more efficient when the charged region A was present in the mutant (1-334). The N-terminal fragment 1-334, devoid of the dimeric GST moiety, was also able to interact with ER, pointing to the monomeric N-terminal adenosine triphosphate binding region of Hsp90 (1-224) as the region necessary and sufficient for interaction. These results contribute to understand the Hsp90-dependent process responsible for conformational competence of ER. PMID:11795466

  5. Dendritic cells phenotype fitting under hypoxia or lipopolysaccharide; adenosine 5'-triphosphate-binding cassette transporters far beyond an efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Lloberas, N; Rama, I; Llaudó, I; Torras, J; Cerezo, G; Cassis, L; Franquesa, M; Merino, A; Benitez-Ribas, D; Cruzado, J M; Herrero-Fresneda, I; Bestard, O; Grinyó, J M

    2013-06-01

    This study examines adenosine 5'-triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as a potential therapeutic target in dendritic cell (DC) modulation under hypoxia and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Functional capacity of dendritic cells (DCs) (mixed lymphocyte reaction: MLR) and maturation of iDCs were evaluated in the presence or absence of specific ABC-transporter inhibitors. Monocyte-derived DCs were cultured in the presence of interleukin (IL)-4/granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Their maturation under hypoxia or LPS conditions was evaluated by assessing the expression of maturation phenotypes using flow cytometry. The effect of ABC transporters on DC maturation was determined using specific inhibitors for multi-drug resistance (MDR1) and multi-drug resistance proteins (MRPs). Depending on their maturation status to elicit T cell alloresponses, the functional capacity of DCs was studied by MLR. Mature DCs showed higher P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expression with confocal microscopy. Up-regulation of maturation markers was observed in hypoxia and LPS-DC, defining two different DC subpopulation profiles, plasmacytoid versus conventional-like, respectively, and different cytokine release T helper type 2 (Th2) versus Th1, depending on the stimuli. Furthermore, hypoxia-DCs induced more B lymphocyte proliferation than control-iDC (56% versus 9%), while LPS-DCs induced more CD8-lymphocyte proliferation (67% versus 16%). ABC transporter-inhibitors strongly abrogated DC maturation [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ): P-glycoprotein inhibition using valspodar (PSC833) 5 μM, CAS 115104-28-4 (MK571) 50 μM and probenecid 2·5 μM], induced significantly less lymphocyte proliferation and reduced cytokine release compared with stimulated-DCs without inhibitors. We conclude that diverse stimuli, hypoxia or LPS induce different profiles in the maturation and functionality of DC. Pgp appears to play a role in these DC events. Thus, ABC

  6. Chemoelectrical energy conversion of adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Vishnu Baba; Sarles, Stephen Andrew; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-04-01

    Plant and animal cell membranes transport charged species, neutral molecules and water through ion pumps and channels. The energy required for moving species against established concentration and charge gradients is provided by the biological fuel - adenosine triphosphate (ATP) -synthesized within the cell. The adenosine triphosphatase (ATPases) in a plant cell membrane hydrolyze ATP in the cell cytoplasm to pump protons across the cell membrane. This establishes a proton gradient across the membrane from the cell exterior into the cell cytoplasm. This proton motive force stimulates ion channels that transport nutrients and other species into the cell. This article discusses a device that converts the chemical energy stored in adenosine triphosphate into electrical power using a transporter protein, ATPase. The V-type ATPase proteins used in our prototype are extracted from red beet(Beta vulgaris) tonoplast membranes and reconstituted in a bilayer lipid membrane or BLM formed from POPC and POPS lipids. A pH7 medium that can support ATP hydrolysis is provided on both sides of the membrane and ATP is dissolved in the pH7 buffer on one side of the membrane. Hydrolysis of ATP results in the formation of a phosphate ion and adenosine diphosphate. The energy from the reaction activates ATPase in the BLM and moves a proton across the membrane. The charge gradient established across the BLM due to the reaction and ion transport is converted into electrical current by half-cell reference electrodes. The prototype ATPase cell with an effective BLM area of 4.15 mm2 carrying 15 μl of ATPase proteins was observed to develop a steady state peak power output of 70 nW, which corresponds to a specific power of 1.69 μW/cm2 and a current density of 43.4 μA/cm2 of membrane area.

  7. Functional expressions of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters during the development of zebrafish embryos and their effects on the detoxification of cadmium chloride and β-naphthoflavone.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huancai; Bai, Pengli; Miao, Peng; Chen, Mingli; Hu, Jun; Deng, Xudong; Yin, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, including ABCB, ABCC and ABCG families represent general biological defenses against environmental toxicants in varieties of marine and freshwater organisms, but their physiological functions at differential developmental stages of zebrafish embryos remain undefined. In this work, functional expressions of typical ABC transporters including P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multiresistance associated protein 1 (Mrp1) and Mrp2 were studied in zebrafish embryos at 4, 24, 48 and 72 h post-fertilization (hpf). As a result, both the gene expressions and activities of Pgp and Mrps increased with the development of embryos. Correspondingly, 4-72 hpf embryos exhibited an increased tolerance to the toxicity caused by cadmium chloride (CdCl2 ) and β-naphthoflavone (BNF) with time. Such a correlation was assumed caused by the involvement of ABC transporters in the detoxification of chemicals. In addition, the assumption was supported by the fact that model efflux inhibitors of Pgp and Mrps such as reversine 205 and MK571 significantly inhibited the efflux of toxicants and increased the toxicity of Cd and BNF in zebrafish embryos. Moreover, exposure to CdCl2 and BNF induced the gene expressions of Pgp and Mrp1 in 72 hpf embryos. Thus, functional expressions of Pgp and Mrps increased with the development of zebrafish embryos, which could cause an increasing tolerance of zebrafish embryos to CdCl2 and BNF. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26387481

  8. Characterization of a multiple endogenously expressed Adenosine triphosphate-Binding Cassette transporters using nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns

    PubMed Central

    Khadeer, M.A.; Shimmo, R.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive form of human astrocytoma, with poor prognosis due to multi-drug resistance to a number of anticancer drugs. The observed multi-drug resistance is primarily due to the efflux activity of ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP. The expression of these transporters has been demonstrated in nuclear and cellular membranes of the LN-229 human glioblastoma cell line. Nuclear membrane and cellular membrane fragments from LN229 cells were immobilized on the IAM stationary phase to create nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns, (NMAC(LN229)) and (CMAC(LN229)), respectively. Pgp, MRP1and BCRP transporters co-immobilized on both columns was characterized and compared by establishing the binding affinities for estrone-3-sulfate (3.8 vs 3.7μM), verapamil (0.6 vs 0.7μM) and prazosin (0.099 vs 0.033μM) on each column and no significant differences were observed. Since the marker ligands had overlapping selectivities, the selective characterization of each transporter was carried out by saturation of the binding sites of the non-targeted transporters. The addition of verapamil (Pgp and MRP1 substrate) to the mobile phase allowed the comparative screening of 8 compounds at the nuclear and cellular BCRP using etoposide as the marker ligand. AZT increased the retention of etoposide (+15%), a positive allosteric interaction, on the CMAC(LN229) column and decreased it (−5%) on the NMAC(LN229), while the opposite effect was produced by rhodamine. The results indicate that there are differences between the cellular and nuclear membrane expressed BCRP and that NMAC and CMAC columns can be used to probe these differences. PMID:24642394

  9. Clinical significance of high-density lipoproteins and the development of atherosclerosis: focus on the role of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette protein A1 transporter.

    PubMed

    Brewer, H Bryan; Santamarina-Fojo, Silvia

    2003-08-21

    Low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol constitute a risk factor for coronary artery disease, and there is evidence that increasing HDL cholesterol levels reduces cardiovascular risk. The phenotype of low HDL cholesterol with or without elevated triglycerides is at least as common in patients hospitalized for cardiovascular disease as is hypercholesterolemia, and it is characteristic of diabetes and the metabolic syndrome, conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Recent studies have elucidated mechanisms by which HDL acts to reduce cardiovascular risk, bolstering the rationale for targeting of HDL in lipid-modifying therapy. In particular, HDL (1) carries excess cholesterol from peripheral cells to the liver for removal in the process termed reverse cholesterol transport, (2) reduces oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and (3) inhibits cytokine-induced expression of cellular adhesion molecules on endothelial cells. Studies of the newly described adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette protein A1 (ABCA1) transporter have established a crucial role for this transporter in modulating the levels of plasma HDL and intracellular cholesterol in the liver as well as in peripheral cells. Elevated levels of intracellular cholesterol stimulate the liver X receptor pathway, enhancing the expression of ABCA1, which increases intracellular trafficking of excess cholesterol to the cell surface for interaction with lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I to form nascent HDL. Nascent HDL facilitates the removal of additional excess cellular cholesterol, which is esterified by lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase with conversion of the nascent HDL to mature spherical HDL. Overexpression of ABCA1 in mice on a regular chow or Western diet results in a marked increase in plasma HDL, increased LDL, and increased transport of cholesterol to the liver. On a high cholesterol/cholate diet, transgenic mice overexpressing ABCA1 have increased HDL

  10. Dendritic cells phenotype fitting under hypoxia or lipopolysaccharide; adenosine 5′-triphosphate-binding cassette transporters far beyond an efflux pump

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, N; Rama, I; Llaudó, I; Torras, J; Cerezo, G; Cassis, L; Franquesa, M; Merino, A; Benitez-Ribas, D; Cruzado, J M; Herrero-Fresneda, I; Bestard, O; Grinyó, J M

    2013-01-01

    This study examines adenosine 5′-triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as a potential therapeutic target in dendritic cell (DC) modulation under hypoxia and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Functional capacity of dendritic cells (DCs) (mixed lymphocyte reaction: MLR) and maturation of iDCs were evaluated in the presence or absence of specific ABC-transporter inhibitors. Monocyte-derived DCs were cultured in the presence of interleukin (IL)-4/granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Their maturation under hypoxia or LPS conditions was evaluated by assessing the expression of maturation phenotypes using flow cytometry. The effect of ABC transporters on DC maturation was determined using specific inhibitors for multi-drug resistance (MDR1) and multi-drug resistance proteins (MRPs). Depending on their maturation status to elicit T cell alloresponses, the functional capacity of DCs was studied by MLR. Mature DCs showed higher P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expression with confocal microscopy. Up-regulation of maturation markers was observed in hypoxia and LPS-DC, defining two different DC subpopulation profiles, plasmacytoid versus conventional-like, respectively, and different cytokine release T helper type 2 (Th2) versus Th1, depending on the stimuli. Furthermore, hypoxia-DCs induced more B lymphocyte proliferation than control-iDC (56% versus 9%), while LPS-DCs induced more CD8-lymphocyte proliferation (67% versus 16%). ABC transporter-inhibitors strongly abrogated DC maturation [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50): P-glycoprotein inhibition using valspodar (PSC833) 5 μM, CAS 115104-28-4 (MK571) 50 μM and probenecid 2·5 μM], induced significantly less lymphocyte proliferation and reduced cytokine release compared with stimulated-DCs without inhibitors. We conclude that diverse stimuli, hypoxia or LPS induce different profiles in the maturation and functionality of DC. Pgp appears to play a role in these DC events. Thus, ABC

  11. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  12. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  13. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  16. Adenosine A1( )receptors are selectively coupled to Gα(i-3) in postmortem human brain cortex: Guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding/immunoprecipitation study.

    PubMed

    Odagaki, Yuji; Kinoshita, Masakazu; Ota, Toshio; Meana, J Javier; Callado, Luis F; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-10-01

    By means of guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding assay combined with immunoprecipitation using anti-Gα subunit antibody, we recently reported 5-HT2A receptor- and M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated Gαq activation in rat cerebral cortical membranes (Odagaki et al., 2014). In the present study, this method has been applied to postmortem human brains, with focusing on adenosine receptor-mediated G-protein activation. In the exploratory experiments using a series of agonists and the antibodies specific to each Gα subtypes in the presence of low (10 nM) or high (50 μM) concentration of GDP, the most prominent increases in specific [(35)S]GTPγS binding in the membranes prepared from human prefrontal cortex were obtained for the combinations of adenosine (1mM)/anti-Gαi-3 in the presence of 50 μM GDP as well as 5-HT (100 μM)/anti-Gαq and carbachol (1mM)/anti-Gαq in the presence of 10nM GDP. Adenosine-induced activation of Gαi-3 emerged only when GDP concentrations were increased higher than 10 μM, and the following experiments were performed in the presence of 300 μM GDP. Adenosine increased specific [(35)S]GTPγS binding to Gαi-3 in a concentration-dependent manner to 251.4% of the basal unstimulated binding, with an EC50 of 1.77 μM. The involvement of adenosine A1 receptor was verified by the experiments using selective agonists and antagonists at adenosine A1 or A3 receptor. Among the α subunits of Gi/o class (Gαi-1, Gαi-2, Gαi-3, and Gαo.), only Gαi-3 was activated by 1mM adenosine, indicating that human brain adenosine A1 receptor is coupled preferentially, if not exclusively, to Gαi-3. PMID:26213104

  17. METABOLIC REGULATION OF ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE SULFURYLASE IN YEAST

    PubMed Central

    de Vito, Peter C.; Dreyfuss, Jacques

    1964-01-01

    de Vito, Peter C. (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.), and Jacques Dreyfuss. Metabolic regulation of adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase in yeast. J. Bacteriol. 88:1341–1348. 1964.—The metabolic regulation of adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase (ATP-sulfurylase) from baker's yeast was studied. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by low concentrations of adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate, 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate, and sulfide. Sulfide ion was a competitive inhibitor of ATP-sulfurylase. Cysteine, methionine, sulfite, and thiosulfate were not inhibitors of the enzyme. ATP-sulfurylase was repressed when yeast was grown in the presence of methionine, and derepressed when yeast was grown in the presence of cysteine. In contrast to these results, the enzyme sulfite reductase was repressed in cysteine-grown cells. Thus, the sulfate-reducing pathway in yeast appears to be regulated at its first step both by feedback inhibition (by sulfide) and by repression (by methionine). Other known controls in the cysteine biosynthetic pathway are discussed. PMID:14234791

  18. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a possible indicator of extraterrestrial biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The ubiquity of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in terrestrial organisms provides the basis for proposing the assay of this vital metabolic intermediate for detecting extraterrestrial biological activity. If an organic carbon chemistry is present on the planets, the occurrence of ATP is possible either from biosynthetic or purely chemical reactions. However, ATP's relative complexity minimizes the probability of abiogenic synthesis. A sensitive technique for the quantitative detection of ATP was developed using the firefly bioluminescent reaction. The procedure was used successfully for the determination of the ATP content of soil and bacteria. This technique is also being investigated from the standpoint of its application in clinical medicine.

  19. Elevated synovial fluid concentration of adenosine triphosphate in dogs with osteoarthritis or sodium urate-induced synovitis of the stifle.

    PubMed

    Torres, Bryan T; Jimenez, David A; Budsberg, Steven C

    2016-07-19

    Adenosine triphosphate has been shown to stimulate nociceptive nerve terminals in joints. Elevated synovial fluid adenosine triphosphate concentrations as well as a correlation between synovial fluid adenosine triphosphate concentrations and osteoarthritic knee pain has been demonstrated in humans, but not yet in dogs. This study documented elevated synovial fluid adenosine triphosphate concentrations in the stifles of dogs with secondary osteoarthritis and urate-induced synovitis, as compared to normal stifles. PMID:27432274

  20. Extraction and analysis of adenosine triphosphate from aquatic environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Shultz, David J.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) extraction procedures have been investigated for their applicability to samples from aquatic environments. The cold sulfuric-oxalic acid procedure was best suited to samples consisting of water, periphyton, and sediments. Due to cation and fulvic acid interferences, a spike with a known quantity of ATP was necessary to estimate losses when sediments were extracted. Variable colonization densities for periphyton required that several replicates be extracted to characterize accurately the periphyton community. Extracted samples were stable at room temperature for one to five hours, depending on the ATP concentration, if the pH was below 2. Neutralized samples which were quick frozen and stored at -30C were stable for months. (USGS)

  1. Laboratory procedures manual for the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Knust, E. A.; Nibley, D. A.; Vance, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A manual on the procedures and instruments developed for the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) luciferase assay is presented. Data cover, laboratory maintenance, maintenance of bacterial cultures, bacteria measurement, reagents, luciferase procedures, and determination of microbal susceptibility to antibiotics.

  2. Oral sucrose for heel lance enhances adenosine triphosphate use in preterm neonates with respiratory distress

    PubMed Central

    Angeles, Danilyn M; Asmerom, Yayesh; Boskovic, Danilo S; Slater, Laurel; Bacot-Carter, Sharon; Bahjri, Khaled; Mukasa, Joseph; Holden, Megan; Fayard, Elba

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of oral sucrose on procedural pain, and on biochemical markers of adenosine triphosphate utilization and oxidative stress in preterm neonates with mild to moderate respiratory distress. Study design: Preterm neonates with a clinically required heel lance that met study criteria (n = 49) were randomized into three groups: (1) control (n = 24), (2) heel lance treated with placebo and non-nutritive sucking (n = 15) and (3) heel lance treated with sucrose and non-nutritive sucking (n = 10). Plasma markers of adenosine triphosphate degradation (hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid) and oxidative stress (allantoin) were measured before and after the heel lance. Pain was measured using the Premature Infant Pain Profile. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance, chi-square and one-way analysis of variance. Results: We found that in preterm neonates who were intubated and/or were receiving ⩾30% FiO2, a single dose of oral sucrose given before a heel lance significantly increased markers of adenosine triphosphate use. Conclusion: We found that oral sucrose enhanced adenosine triphosphate use in neonates who were intubated and/or were receiving ⩾30% FiO2. Although oral sucrose decreased pain scores, our data suggest that it also increased energy use as evidenced by increased plasma markers of adenosine triphosphate utilization. These effects of sucrose, specifically the fructose component, on adenosine triphosphate metabolism warrant further investigation. PMID:26770807

  3. A method of the rapid preparation of adenosine 5'-gamma-[32P] triphosphate by chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Koziołkiewicz, W; Pankowski, J; Janecka, A

    1978-01-01

    A new chemical method for the synthesis of adenosine 5'-gamma-[32P] triphosphate has been developed based on the reaction of adenosine 5'-diphosphate with ethyl chloroformate. The resulting active mixed anhydride was able to react with [32P]-triethylammonium orthophosphate to give gamma-[32P]ATP. PMID:219425

  4. Adenosine triphosphate inhibits melatonin synthesis in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Souza-Teodoro, Luis Henrique; Dargenio-Garcia, Letícia; Petrilli-Lapa, Camila Lopes; Souza, Ewerton da Silva; Fernandes, Pedro A C M; Markus, Regina P; Ferreira, Zulma S

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is released onto the pinealocyte, along with noradrenaline, from sympathetic neurons and triggers P2Y1 receptors that enhance β-adrenergic-induced N-acetylserotonin (NAS) synthesis. Nevertheless, the biotransformation of NAS into melatonin, which occurs due to the subsequent methylation by acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT; EC 2.1.1.4), has not yet been evaluated in the presence of purinergic stimulation. We therefore evaluated the effects of purinergic signaling on melatonin synthesis induced by β-adrenergic stimulation. ATP increased NAS levels, but, surprisingly, inhibited melatonin synthesis in an inverse, concentration-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that enhanced NAS levels, which depend on phospholipase C (PLC) activity (but not the induction of gene transcription), are a post-translational effect. By contrast, melatonin reduction is related to an ASMT inhibition of expression at both the gene transcription and protein levels. These results were independent of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) translocation. Neither the P2Y1 receptor activation nor the PLC-mediated pathway was involved in the decrease in melatonin, indicating that ATP regulates pineal metabolism through different mechanisms. Taken together, our data demonstrate that purinergic signaling differentially modulates NAS and melatonin synthesis and point to a regulatory role for ATP as a cotransmitter in the control of ASMT, the rate-limiting enzyme in melatonin synthesis. The endogenous production of melatonin regulates defense responses; therefore, understanding the mechanisms involving ASMT regulation might provide novel insights into the development and progression of neurological disorders since melatonin presents anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and neurogenic effects. PMID:26732366

  5. Behavior and stability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during chlorine disinfection.

    PubMed

    Nescerecka, Alina; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis is a cultivation-independent alternative method for the determination of bacterial viability in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated water. Here we investigated the behavior and stability of ATP during chlorination in detail. Different sodium hypochlorite doses (0-22.4 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure) were applied to an Escherichia coli pure culture suspended in filtered river water. We observed decreasing intracellular ATP with increasing chlorine concentrations, but extracellular ATP concentrations only increased when the chlorine dose exceeded 0.35 mg L(-1). The release of ATP from chlorine-damaged bacteria coincided with severe membrane damage detected with flow cytometry (FCM). The stability of extracellular ATP was subsequently studied in different water matrixes, and we found that extracellular ATP was stable in sterile deionized water and also in chlorinated water until extremely high chlorine doses (≤11.2 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure). In contrast, ATP decreased relatively slowly (k = 0.145 h(-1)) in 0.1 μm filtered river water, presumably due to degradation by either extracellular enzymes or the fraction of bacteria that were able to pass through the filter. Extracellular ATP decreased considerably faster (k = 0.368 h(-1)) during batch growth of a river water bacterial community. A series of growth potential tests showed that extracellular ATP molecules were utilized as a phosphorus source during bacteria proliferation. From the combined data we conclude that ATP released from bacteria at high chlorine doses could promote bacteria regrowth, contributing to biological instability in drinking water distribution systems. PMID:27295623

  6. Aptamer fluorescence anisotropy sensors for adenosine triphosphate by comprehensive screening tetramethylrhodamine labeled nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang; Lv, Qin; Wang, Hailin

    2015-08-15

    We previously reported a fluorescence anisotropy (FA) approach for small molecules using tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) labeled aptamer. It relies on target-binding induced change of intramolecular interaction between TMR and guanine (G) base. TMR-labeling sites are crucial for this approach. Only terminal ends and thymine (T) bases could be tested for TMR labeling in our previous work, possibly causing limitation in analysis of different targets with this FA strategy. Here, taking the analysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as an example, we demonstrated a success of conjugating TMR on other bases of aptamer adenine (A) or cytosine (C) bases and an achievement of full mapping various labeling sites of aptamers. We successfully constructed aptamer fluorescence anisotropy (FA) sensors for adenosine triphosphate (ATP). We conjugated single TMR on adenine (A), cytosine (C), or thymine (T) bases or terminals of a 25-mer aptamer against ATP and tested FA responses of 14 TMR-labeled aptamer to ATP. The aptamers having TMR labeled on the 16th base C or 23rd base A were screened out and exhibited significant FA-decreasing or FA-increasing responses upon ATP, respectively. These two favorable TMR-labeled aptamers enabled direct FA sensing ATP with a detection limit of 1 µM and the analysis of ATP in diluted serum. The comprehensive screening various TMR labeling sites of aptamers facilitates the successful construction of FA sensors using TMR-labeled aptamers. It will expand application of TMR-G interaction based aptamer FA strategy to a variety of targets. PMID:25814408

  7. Effects of adenosine, adenosine triphosphate and structural analogues on glucagon secretion from the perfused pancreas of rat in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Chapal, J.; Loubatières-Mariani, M. M.; Roye, M.; Zerbib, A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of adenosine, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and structural analogues have been studied on glucagon secretion from the isolated perfused pancreas of the rat in the presence of glucose (2.8 mM). Adenosine induced a transient increase of glucagon secretion. This effect was concentration-dependent in the range of 0.165 to 165 microM. ATP also induced an increase, but the effect was no greater at 165 microM than at 16.5 microM. 2-Chloroadenosine, an analogue more resistant to metabolism or uptake systems than adenosine, was more effective. Among the three structural analogues of ATP or ADP studied, beta, gamma-methylene ATP which can be hydrolyzed into AMP and adenosine had an effect similar to adenosine or ATP at the same concentrations (1.65 and 16.5 microM); in contrast alpha, beta-methylene ATP and alpha, beta-methylene ADP (resistant to hydrolysis into AMP and adenosine) were ineffective. Theophylline (50 microM) a specific blocker of the adenosine receptor, suppressed the glucagon peak induced by adenosine, 2-chloroadenosine, ATP and beta, gamma-methylene ATP (1.65 microM). An inhibitor of 5' nucleotidase, alpha, beta-methylene ADP (16.5 microM), reduced the glucagon increase induced by ATP and did not affect the response to adenosine (1.65 microM). These results support the hypothesis of adenosine receptors (P1-purinoceptors) on the pancreatic glucagon secretory cells and indicate that ATP acts after hydrolysis to adenosine. PMID:6097328

  8. Theory of Polymer Entrapped Enzyme Ultramicroelectrodes: Application to Glucose and Adenosine Triphosphate Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kottke, Peter A.; Kranz, Christine; Kwon, Yong Koo; Masson, Jean-Francois; Mizaikoff, Boris; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2010-01-01

    We validate, by comparison with experimental data, a theoretical description of the amperometric response of microbiosensors formed via enzyme entrapment. The utility of the theory is further illustrated with two relevant examples supported by experiments: (1) quantitative detection of glucose and (2) quantitative detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). PMID:20445817

  9. Identification of a nucleoside triphosphate binding site on calf thymus RNA polymerase II

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, E.; McGuire, P.M.

    1986-01-14

    A nucleoside triphosphate binding site on calf thymus RNA polymerase II was identified by using photoaffinity analogues of adenosine 5'-triphosphate and guanosine 5'-triphosphate. Both radiolabeled 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8-N3ATP) and radiolabeled 8-azidoguanosine 5'-triphosphate (8-N3GTP) bound to a single polypeptide of this enzyme. This polypeptide has a molecular mass of 37 kilodaltons and an isoelectric point of 5.4. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was necessary for photolabeling to occur. In addition, no labeling occurred when the probe was prephotolyzed or when the enzyme was inactivated. Furthermore, photolabeling of the enzyme could be decreased by preincubation with natural substrates. To provide evidence that the radiolabeled polypeptide forms a part of the domain of the nucleoside triphosphate binding site, experiments were performed using unlabeled 8-N3ATP. Although this unlabeled analogue was not a substrate for RNA polymerase II, it photoinactivated the enzyme in the presence of UV irradiation, and it inhibited transcription elongation by the enzyme in a competitive manner in the absence of UV irradiation. As in the case with photolabeling, photoinactivation by 8-N3ATP could be decreased by natural substrates; in both cases, purine ribonucleoside triphosphates were more efficient than pyrimidine nucleoside triphosphates. Furthermore, photoinactivation was saturable at about the same concentration as the inhibition constant for 8-N3ATP. Collectively, these results provide evidence that the radiolabeled polypeptide in calf thymus RNA polymerase II is an essential component for activity and suggest that this polypeptide may be part of this enzyme's purine ribonucleoside triphosphate binding site.

  10. Structural Determinants for Substrate Binding and Catalysis in Triphosphate Tunnel Metalloenzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Jacobo; Truffault, Vincent; Hothorn, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Triphosphate tunnel metalloenzymes (TTMs) are present in all kingdoms of life and catalyze diverse enzymatic reactions such as mRNA capping, the cyclization of adenosine triphosphate, the hydrolysis of thiamine triphosphate, and the synthesis and breakdown of inorganic polyphosphates. TTMs have an unusual tunnel domain fold that harbors substrate- and metal co-factor binding sites. It is presently poorly understood how TTMs specifically sense different triphosphate-containing substrates and how catalysis occurs in the tunnel center. Here we describe substrate-bound structures of inorganic polyphosphatases from Arabidopsis and Escherichia coli, which reveal an unorthodox yet conserved mode of triphosphate and metal co-factor binding. We identify two metal binding sites in these enzymes, with one co-factor involved in substrate coordination and the other in catalysis. Structural comparisons with a substrate- and product-bound mammalian thiamine triphosphatase and with previously reported structures of mRNA capping enzymes, adenylate cyclases, and polyphosphate polymerases suggest that directionality of substrate binding defines TTM catalytic activity. Our work provides insight into the evolution and functional diversification of an ancient enzyme family. PMID:26221030

  11. A Graphene and Aptamer Based Liquid Gated FET-Like Electrochemical Biosensor to Detect Adenosine Triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Souvik; Meshik, Xenia; Choi, Min; Farid, Sidra; Datta, Debopam; Lan, Yi; Poduri, Shripriya; Sarkar, Ketaki; Baterdene, Undarmaa; Huang, Ching-En; Wang, Yung Yu; Burke, Peter; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Here we report successful demonstration of a FET-like electrochemical nano-biosensor to accurately detect ultralow concentrations of adenosine triphosphate. As a 2D material, graphene is a promising candidate due to its large surface area, biocompatibility, and demonstrated surface binding chemistries and has been employed as the conducting channel. A short 20-base DNA aptamer is used as the sensing element to ensure that the interaction between the analyte and the aptamer occurs within the Debye length of the electrolyte (PBS). Significant increase in the drain current with progressive addition of ATP is observed whereas for control experiments, no distinct change in the drain current occurs. The sensor is found to be highly sensitive in the nanomolar (nM) to micromolar ( μM) range with a high sensitivity of 2.55 μA (mM) (-1), a detection limit as low as 10 pM, and it has potential application in medical and biological settings to detect low traces of ATP. This simplistic design strategy can be further extended to efficiently detect a broad range of other target analytes. PMID:26595926

  12. Method for Adenosine 5′-Triphosphate Measurement on Coke Waste Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Russell, James; Gauthier, Joseph J.

    1978-01-01

    Measurement of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) in coke waste activated sludge can provide a simple method for estimating the levels of viable microbes in the sludge. However, the presence of inhibitors such as phenol in the sludge interferes when the luciferin-luciferase method is used to measure ATP. These inhibiting substances can be removed from the sludge before extraction of ATP by washing the cells with dilute sodium dodecyl sulfate. PMID:16345281

  13. A sensitive aptasensor for colorimetric detection of adenosine triphosphate based on the protective effect of ATP-aptamer complexes on unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yuan; Qi, Liang; Lv, Xiao-Jun; Lai, Ting; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2016-04-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the most direct source of energy in organisms. This study is the first to demonstrate that ATP-aptamer complexes provide greater protection for unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) against salt-induced aggregation than either aptamer or ATP alone. This protective effect was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, Zeta potential measurement, and fluorescence polarization techniques. Utilizing controlled particle aggregation/dispersion as a gauge, a sensitive and selective aptasensor for colorimetric detection of ATP was developed using ATP-binding aptamers as the identification element and unmodified AuNPs as the probe. This aptasensor exhibited a good linear relationship between the absorbance and the logarithm concentration of ATP within a 50-1000 nM range. ATP analogs such as guanosine triphosphate, uridine triphosphate and cytidine triphosphate resulted in little or no interference in the determination of ATP. PMID:26638040

  14. The inhibition of muscle contraction by adenosine 5' (beta, gamma-imido) triphosphate and by pyrophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Pate, E; Cooke, R

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the inhibition of the contraction of glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle caused by ligands that bind to the ATPase site of myosin. Two ligands, adenosine 5' (beta, gamma-imido) triphosphate (AMPPNP) and pyrophosphate (PPi), decreased the force and stiffness developed in isometric contractions and the velocity of shortening of isotonic contractions. The force exerted by isometric fibers was measured as a function of MgATP in the presence and absence of a constant concentration of the ligands. As the MgATP concentration decreased, the inhibition of tension caused by the ligand increased, reaching approximately 50% at 25 microM MgATP and either 2 mM MgPPi or 2 mM MgAMPPNP. The maximum velocity of shortening was also measured as a function of MgATP concentration in the presence of 1 and 2 mM MgPPi and 2.5 and 5 mM MgAMPPNP. Both ligands acted as pure competitive inhibitors with Ki = 3.0 mM for PPi and 5.1 mM for MgAMPPNP. These data show that both ligands are weak inhibitors of the contraction of fibers. The results provided information on the energetics of actin-myosin-ligand states that occur in the portion of the cross-bridge cycle where MgATP binds to myosin. A simple analysis of the inhibition of velocity suggests that MgAMPPNP binds to the actomyosin complex at this step of the cycle with an effective affinity constant of approximately 2 X 10(2) M-1. PMID:2990586

  15. Interaction of progesterone receptor with immobilized adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Moudgil, V K; Toft, D O

    1977-02-22

    Affinity chromatography has been used to study the binding of ATP to cyto-plasmic progesterone receptors of hen oviduct. A resin which selectively binds the receptor protein was prepared by linking ATP covalently to Sepharose 4B through a 6-carbon bridge of adipic acid dihydrazide. Receptor bound to the affinity resin was recovered in a single peak upon gradient elution with KCl (0.2-1 M) or ATP (0-0.1 M). While affinity chromatography was normally accomplished using the [3H]progesterone receptor complex, the hormone was not necessary for ATP binding under the conditions employed. The chromatography of crude receptor preparations allowed up to 100-fold purification with greater than 80% recovery of the receptor. The semipurified receptor appeared intact when analysed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. The latter procedure separated the receptor into two components, A and B, both of which were capable of binding ATP. Although a specific biochemical role of ATP in hormone receptor action has not been demonstrated, the present studies support this possibility and, in addition, offer a convenient and reliable step for the purification of progesterone receptors. PMID:836885

  16. 2-Deoxy adenosine triphosphate improves contraction in human end-stage heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Razumova, Maria V.; Racca, Alice W.; Cheng, Yuanhua; Stempien-Otero, April; Regnier, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a novel treatment for heart failure by increasing myocardial 2 deoxy-ATP (dATP). Our studies in rodent models have shown that substitution of dATP for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as the energy substrate in vitro or elevation of dATP in vivo increases myocardial contraction and that small increases in the native dATP pool of heart muscle are sufficient to improve cardiac function. Here we report, for the first time, the effect of dATP on human adult cardiac muscle contraction. We measured the contractile properties of chemically-demembranated multicellular ventricular wall preparations and isolated myofibrils from human subjects with end-stage heart failure. Isometric force was increased at both saturating and physiologic Ca2+ concentrations with dATP compared to ATP. This resulted in an increase in the Ca2+ sensitivity of force (pCa50) by 0.06 pCa units. The rate of force redevelopment (kTR) in demembranated wall muscle was also increased, as was the rate of contractile activation (kACT) in isolated myofibrils, indicating increased cross-bridge binding and cycling compared with ATP in failing human myocardium. These data suggest dATP could increase dP/dT and end systolic pressure in failing human myocardium. Importantly, even though the magnitude and rate of force development was increased, there was no increase in the time to 50% and 90% myofibril relaxation. These data, along with our previous studies in rodent models shows the promise of elevating myocardial dATP to enhance contraction and restore cardiac pump function. These data also support further pre-clinical evaluation of this new approach for treating heart failure. PMID:25498214

  17. Adenosine Triphosphate-Sensitive Potassium Currents in Heart Disease and Cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Colin G

    2016-06-01

    The subunit makeup of the family of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) channels is more complex and labile than thought. The growing association of Kir6.1 and SUR2 variants with specific cardiovascular electrical and contractile derangements and the clear association with Cantu syndrome establish the importance of appropriate activity in normal function of the heart and vasculature. Further studies of such patients will reveal new mutations in KATP subunits and perhaps in proteins that regulate KATP synthesis, trafficking, or location, all of which may ultimately benefit therapeutically from the unique pharmacology of KATP channels. PMID:27261824

  18. Enhanced Diffusion of Molecular Motors in the Presence of Adenosine Triphosphate and External Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinagawa, Ryota; Sasaki, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The diffusion of a molecular motor in the presence of a constant external force is considered on the basis of a simple theoretical model. The motor is represented by a Brownian particle moving in a series of parabolic potentials placed periodically on a line, and the potential is switched stochastically from one parabola to another by a chemical reaction, which corresponds to the hydrolysis or synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in motor proteins. It is found that the diffusion coefficient as a function of the force exhibits peaks. The mechanism of this diffusion enhancement and the possibility of observing it in F1-ATPase, a biological rotary motor, are discussed.

  19. A label-free fluorescent adenosine triphosphate biosensor via overhanging aptamer-triggered enzyme protection and target recycling amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoyin; Zhao, Jian; Dai, Zhihui

    2016-06-20

    Herein, a label-free fluorescent adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptasensor is fabricated with a DNA hairpin and an overhanging aptamer. In the presence of ATP, the overhanging sequences of the aptamer may form preferred substrates of exo III, and thus trigger the enzyme-assisted amplification, which results in the release of G-rich sequences. Free G-rich sequences subsequently generate an enhanced flourescent signal by binding with thioflavin T. However, if ATP is absent, the overhanging sequence can induce steric hindrance and protect the DNA hairpin against the digestion of exo III, significantly reducing the noise of this biosensor. Accordingly, the signal-to-noise ratio of the sensing system is greatly improved, which ensures the desirable analytical performance of the proposed aptasensor both in pure samples and real samples. PMID:27221644

  20. Tween 20-stabilized gold nanoparticles combined with adenosine triphosphate-BODIPY conjugates for the fluorescence detection of adenosine with more than 1000-fold selectivity.

    PubMed

    Hung, Szu-Ying; Shih, Ya-Chen; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2015-02-01

    This study describes the development of a simple, enzyme-free, label-free, sensitive, and selective system for detecting adenosine based on the use of Tween 20-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Tween 20-AuNPs) as an efficient fluorescence quencher for boron dipyrromethene-conjugated adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BODIPY-ATP) and as a recognition element for adenosine. BODIPY-ATP can interact with Tween 20-AuNPs through the coordination between the adenine group of BODIPY-ATP and Au atoms on the NP surface, thereby causing the fluorescence quenching of BODIPY-ATP through the nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) effect. When adenosine attaches to the NP surface, the attached adenosine exhibits additional electrostatic attraction to BODIPY-ATP. As a result, the presence of adenosine enhances the efficiency of AuNPs in fluorescence quenching of BODIPY-ATP. The AuNP-induced fluorescence quenching of BODIPY-ATP progressively increased with an increase in the concentration of adenosine; the detection limit at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for adenosine was determined to be 60nM. The selectivity of the proposed system was more than 1000-fold for adenosine over any adenosine analogs and other nucleotides. The proposed system combined with a phenylboronic acid-containing column was successfully applied to the determination of adenosine in urine. PMID:25604821

  1. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE ATP (ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE) CONTENT OF SUBSURFACE MATERIAL AND THE RATE OF BIODEGRADATION OF ALKYLBENZENES AND CHLOROBENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of biotransformation of toluene in unconsolidated subsurface material from sites at Lula, Oklahoma, USA and Conroe, Texas, USA was compared to the ATP (adenosine triphosphate) content of these materials. The rate of toluene degradation decreased with decreasing ATP conte...

  2. Direct growth of graphene on quartz substrates for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shicai; Man, Baoyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yue, Weiwei; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Mei; Chen, Chuansong; Zhang, Chao

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate that continuous, uniform graphene films can be directly synthesized on quartz substrates using a two-temperature-zone chemical vapor deposition system and that their layers can be controlled by adjusting the precursor partial pressure. Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirm the formation of monolayer graphene with a grain size of ˜100 nm. Hall measurements show a room-temperature carrier mobility above 1500 cm2 V-1 s-1. The optical transmittance and conductance of the graphene films are comparable to those of transferred metal-catalyzed graphene. The method avoids the complicated and skilled post-growth transfer process and allows the graphene to be directly incorporated into a fully functional biosensor for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This device shows a fast response time of a few milliseconds and achieves a high sensitivity to ATP molecules over a very wide range from 0.002 to 5 mM.

  3. Synthesis of γ-Phosphate-Labeled and Doubly Labeled Adenosine Triphosphate Analogs.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stephan M; Welter, Moritz; Marx, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This unit describes the synthesis of γ-phosphate-labeled and doubly labeled adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogs and their characterization using the phosphodiesterase I from Crotalus adamanteus (snake venom phosphodiesterase; SVPD). In the key step of the synthesis, ATP or an ATP analog, bearing a linker containing a trifluoroacetamide group attached to the nucleoside, are modified with an azide-containing linker at the terminal phosphate using an alkylation reaction. Subsequently, different labels are introduced to the linkers by transformation of one functional group to an amine and coupling to an N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. Specifically, the Staudinger reaction of the azide is employed as a straightforward means to obtain an amine in the presence of various labels. Furthermore, the fluorescence characteristics of a fluorogenic, doubly labeled ATP analog are investigated following enzymatic cleavage by SVPD. PMID:25754889

  4. Effect of cadmium on lake water bacteria as determined by the luciferase assay of adenosine triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Seyfried, P.L.; Horgan, C.B.L.

    1981-10-01

    A firefly luciferase assay of bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was developed to measure the toxic effects of cadmium ions on aquatic organisms. Toxicity was monitored using intracellular (I/C) ATP (in micrograms per litre) as well as plate counts (colony-forming units per millilitre). The bacteria, which belonged mainly to the families Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae, exhibited varying degrees of resistance to up to 100 ppm cadmium when grown in a glucose-salts medium at pH 6.8. Among the organisms tested, cadmium resistance decreased in the following order: Pseudomonas vesicularis > P. aeruginosa > Enterobacter sp. > P. fluorescens > Chromobacter sp. > Serratia sp. A rise in the pH of the growth medium from 5 to 7 resulted in increased toxicity of cadmium.

  5. Direct growth of graphene on quartz substrates for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shicai; Man, Baoyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yue, Weiwei; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Mei; Chen, Chuansong; Zhang, Chao

    2014-04-25

    We demonstrate that continuous, uniform graphene films can be directly synthesized on quartz substrates using a two-temperature-zone chemical vapor deposition system and that their layers can be controlled by adjusting the precursor partial pressure. Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirm the formation of monolayer graphene with a grain size of ∼100 nm. Hall measurements show a room-temperature carrier mobility above 1500 cm2 V(-1) s(-1). The optical transmittance and conductance of the graphene films are comparable to those of transferred metal-catalyzed graphene. The method avoids the complicated and skilled post-growth transfer process and allows the graphene to be directly incorporated into a fully functional biosensor for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This device shows a fast response time of a few milliseconds and achieves a high sensitivity to ATP molecules over a very wide range from 0.002 to 5 mM. PMID:24671026

  6. Erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and adenosine-triphosphate in cretins living at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Adams, W H

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of concentrations of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) and adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) in the red cells of cretins and normal controls living at 3,700 m in the Nepal Himalayas has shown that 2,3-DPG and ATP levels were higher in the cretins. A negative correlation between hemoglobin and 2.3-DPG level was found. Chronic hypoxia appears to have provided the additional stress required to differentiate the significance of thyroid hormone deficiency in producing anemia from its effect on 2,3-DPG levels. If thyroid hormone is in fact one regulator of 2,3-DPG, the anemia of hypothyroidism appears to be more significant. This also suggest that the anemia of hypothyroidism, is at least in part, "pathologic" as opposed to "adaptive". PMID:822672

  7. Hybrid integrated biological–solid-state system powered with adenosine triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Roseman, Jared M.; Lin, Jianxun; Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    There is enormous potential in combining the capabilities of the biological and the solid state to create hybrid engineered systems. While there have been recent efforts to harness power from naturally occurring potentials in living systems in plants and animals to power complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuits, here we report the first successful effort to isolate the energetics of an electrogenic ion pump in an engineered in vitro environment to power such an artificial system. An integrated circuit is powered by adenosine triphosphate through the action of Na+/K+ adenosine triphosphatases in an integrated in vitro lipid bilayer membrane. The ion pumps (active in the membrane at numbers exceeding 2 × 106 mm−2) are able to sustain a short-circuit current of 32.6 pA mm−2 and an open-circuit voltage of 78 mV, providing for a maximum power transfer of 1.27 pW mm−2 from a single bilayer. Two series-stacked bilayers provide a voltage sufficient to operate an integrated circuit with a conversion efficiency of chemical to electrical energy of 14.9%. PMID:26638983

  8. Reexamination of magnetic isotope and field effects on adenosine triphosphate production by creatine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Crotty, Darragh; Silkstone, Gary; Poddar, Soumya; Ranson, Richard; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Wilson, Michael T.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of isotopically enriched magnesium on the creatine kinase catalyzed phosphorylation of adenosine diphosphate is examined in two independent series of experiments where adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentrations were determined by a luciferase-linked luminescence end-point assay or a real-time spectrophotometric assay. No increase was observed between the rates of ATP production with natural Mg, 24Mg, and 25Mg, nor was any significant magnetic field effect observed in magnetic fields from 3 to 1,000 mT. Our results are in conflict with those reported by Buchachenko et al. [J Am Chem Soc 130:12868–12869 (2008)], and they challenge these authors’ general claims that a large (two- to threefold) magnetic isotope effect is “universally observable” for ATP-producing enzymes [Her Russ Acad Sci 80:22–28 (2010)] and that “enzymatic phosphorylation is an ion-radical, electron-spin-selective process” [Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:10793–10796 (2005)]. PMID:22198842

  9. Hybrid integrated biological-solid-state system powered with adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Roseman, Jared M; Lin, Jianxun; Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2015-01-01

    There is enormous potential in combining the capabilities of the biological and the solid state to create hybrid engineered systems. While there have been recent efforts to harness power from naturally occurring potentials in living systems in plants and animals to power complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuits, here we report the first successful effort to isolate the energetics of an electrogenic ion pump in an engineered in vitro environment to power such an artificial system. An integrated circuit is powered by adenosine triphosphate through the action of Na(+)/K(+) adenosine triphosphatases in an integrated in vitro lipid bilayer membrane. The ion pumps (active in the membrane at numbers exceeding 2 × 10(6) mm(-2)) are able to sustain a short-circuit current of 32.6 pA mm(-2) and an open-circuit voltage of 78 mV, providing for a maximum power transfer of 1.27 pW mm(-2) from a single bilayer. Two series-stacked bilayers provide a voltage sufficient to operate an integrated circuit with a conversion efficiency of chemical to electrical energy of 14.9%. PMID:26638983

  10. Hybrid integrated biological-solid-state system powered with adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roseman, Jared M.; Lin, Jianxun; Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2015-12-01

    There is enormous potential in combining the capabilities of the biological and the solid state to create hybrid engineered systems. While there have been recent efforts to harness power from naturally occurring potentials in living systems in plants and animals to power complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuits, here we report the first successful effort to isolate the energetics of an electrogenic ion pump in an engineered in vitro environment to power such an artificial system. An integrated circuit is powered by adenosine triphosphate through the action of Na+/K+ adenosine triphosphatases in an integrated in vitro lipid bilayer membrane. The ion pumps (active in the membrane at numbers exceeding 2 × 106 mm-2) are able to sustain a short-circuit current of 32.6 pA mm-2 and an open-circuit voltage of 78 mV, providing for a maximum power transfer of 1.27 pW mm-2 from a single bilayer. Two series-stacked bilayers provide a voltage sufficient to operate an integrated circuit with a conversion efficiency of chemical to electrical energy of 14.9%.

  11. Campylobacter jejuni adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase is an active hexamer that is allosterically controlled by the twisting of a regulatory tail.

    PubMed

    Mittelstädt, Gerd; Moggré, Gert-Jan; Panjikar, Santosh; Nazmi, Ali Reza; Parker, Emily J

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase (ATP-PRT) catalyzes the first committed step of the histidine biosynthesis in plants and microorganisms. Here, we present the functional and structural characterization of the ATP-PRT from the pathogenic ε-proteobacteria Campylobacter jejuni (CjeATP-PRT). This enzyme is a member of the long form (HisGL ) ATP-PRT and is allosterically inhibited by histidine, which binds to a remote regulatory domain, and competitively inhibited by AMP. In the crystalline form, CjeATP-PRT was found to adopt two distinctly different hexameric conformations, with an open homohexameric structure observed in the presence of substrate ATP, and a more compact closed form present when inhibitor histidine is bound. CjeATP-PRT was observed to adopt only a hexameric quaternary structure in solution, contradicting previous hypotheses favoring an allosteric mechanism driven by an oligomer equilibrium. Instead, this study supports the conclusion that the ATP-PRT long form hexamer is the active species; the tightening of this structure in response to remote histidine binding results in an inhibited enzyme. PMID:27191057

  12. Detection of adenosine triphosphate through polymerization-induced aggregation of actin-conjugated gold/silver nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yu-Ju; Shiang, Yen-Chun; Chen, Li-Yi; Hsu, Chia-Lun; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a simple and selective nanosensor for the optical detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using globular actin-conjugated gold/silver nanorods (G-actin-Au/Ag NRs). By simply mixing G-actin and Au/Ag NRs (length ˜56 nm and diameter ˜12 nm), G-actin-Au/Ag NRs were prepared which were stable in physiological solutions (25 mM Tris-HCl, 150 mM NaCl, 5.0 mM KCl, 3.0 mM MgCl2 and 1.0 mM CaCl2; pH 7.4). Introduction of ATP into the G-actin-Au/Ag NR solutions in the presence of excess G-actin induced the formation of filamentous actin-conjugated Au/Ag NR aggregates through ATP-induced polymerization of G-actin. When compared to G-actin-modified spherical Au nanoparticles having a size of 13 nm or 56 nm, G-actin-Au/Ag NRs provided better sensitivity for ATP, mainly because the longitudinal surface plasmon absorbance of the Au/Ag NR has a more sensitive response to aggregation. This G-actin-Au/Ag NR probe provided high sensitivity (limit of detection 25 nM) for ATP with remarkable selectivity (>10-fold) over other adenine nucleotides (adenosine, adenosine monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate) and nucleoside triphosphates (guanosine triphosphate, cytidine triphosphate and uridine triphosphate). It also allowed the determination of ATP concentrations in plasma samples without conducting tedious sample pretreatments; the only necessary step was simple dilution. Our experimental results are in good agreement with those obtained from a commercial luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay. Our simple, sensitive and selective approach appears to have a practical potential for the clinical diagnosis of diseases (e.g. cystic fibrosis) associated with changes in ATP concentrations.

  13. LDL-cholesterol reduction in patients with hypercholesterolemia by modulation of adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Filippov, Sergey; Pinkosky, Stephen L.; Newton, Roger S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the profile of ETC-1002, as shown in preclinical and clinical studies, including LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering activity and beneficial effects on other cardiometabolic risk markers as they relate to the inhibition of adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase and the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase. Recent findings ETC-1002 is an adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase inhibitor/adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activator currently in Phase 2b clinical development. In seven Phase 1 and Phase 2a clinical studies, ETC-1002 dosed once daily for 2–12 weeks has lowered LDL-C and reduced high-sensitivity C-reactive protein by up to 40%, with neutral to positive effects on glucose levels, blood pressure, and body weight. Importantly, use of ETC-1002 in statin-intolerant patients has shown statin-like lowering of LDL-C without the muscle pain and weakness responsible for discontinuation of statin use by many patients. ETC-1002 has also been shown to produce an incremental benefit, lowering LDL-C as an add-on therapy to a low-dose statin. In over 300 individuals in studies of up to 12 weeks, ETC-1002 has been well tolerated with no serious adverse effects. Summary Because adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase play central roles in regulating lipid and glucose metabolism, pharmacological modulation of these two enzymes could provide an important therapeutic alternative for statin-intolerant patients with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24978142

  14. Reciprocal regulation of expression of the human adenosine 5′-triphosphate binding cassette, sub-family A, transporter 2 (ABCA2) promoter by the early growth response-1 (EGR-1) and Sp-family transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Warren; Chen, Zhijian J.; Ile, Kristina E.; Tew, Kenneth D.

    2003-01-01

    The human ABCA2 transporter gene encodes a member of a large family of ATP-binding proteins that transport a variety of macromolecules across biological membranes. We have performed luciferase reporter gene assays with promoter constructs comprising the 5′-flanking region to identify cis-regulatory DNA elements and have mapped the minimal promoter region to 321 bp upstream of the translation start site. We have discovered a functional role for two GC-boxes located in the proximal promoter of the ABCA2 gene that contain overlapping sites for the EGR-1 and Sp1 transcription factors. We observed that oligonucleotides containing overlapping EGR-1/Sp1 sites bind the Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors. When BE(2)-M17 cells were treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, we observed inducible expression and binding of the EGR-1 transcription factor to the two GC-boxes. Transfection of Sp1, Sp3 or Sp4 expression constructs into Drosophila S2 induced a dose-dependent increase in transcriptional activation of the ABCA2 promoter, but transfection of EGR-1 alone failed to activate transcription. When increasing amounts of EGR-1 were transfected into the BE(2)-M17 neuroblastoma cells we observed a dose-dependent decrease in expression of the ABCA2 promoter, although expression of the endogenous ABCA2 gene increased following transfection of EGR-1. PMID:12560508

  15. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P.; et al

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and proteinmore » degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.« less

  16. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P.; Li, Huilin; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and protein degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.

  17. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate release evoked by electrical nerve stimulation from the guinea-pig gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Kusunoki, M; Ishikawa, Y; Kantoh, M; Yamamura, T; Utsunomiya, J

    1987-01-28

    The endogenous release of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) from strips of guinea-pig gallbladder during transmural stimulation (TS) was measured with a firefly luciferine-luciferase reaction. TS (15V, 1 ms, 0.5-5 Hz, for 1 min) caused a rapid and marked increase of ATP release in a frequency-dependent manner. Both ATP release and contractions evoked by TS (15 V, 5 Hz, 1 ms) were completely abolished in Ca-free medium. BaCl2 (3 X 10(-3) M), a direct muscle stimulant, produced almost the same degree of contractile tension as TS (15 V, 5 Hz, 1 ms) while the ATP release induced by BaCl2 was significantly reduced to about 60 percent of that induced by TS. Atropine (10(-6) M) significantly reduced TS-evoked contraction without affecting ATP release. It was suggested, therefore, that some of the ATP release induced by TS was of neural origin. Theophylline (a P1-purinoreceptor antagonist) 10(-6) M, quinidine (a non-specific P2-purinoreceptor antagonist) 10(-6) M and apamin (a potassium channel blocking agent) 10(-8) M had no effects on TS-evoked contraction and ATP release, suggesting the absence of a presynaptic autoregulatory mechanism of ATP release in the guinea-pig gallbladder. PMID:3556400

  18. Production and utilization of dissolved adenosine 5'-triphosphate in marine and freshwater ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Peele, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved adenosine triphosphate (DATP) were influenced primarily by in situ biological processes such as uptake by heterotrophic microorganisms and release by either phytoplankton or zooplankton or through zooplankton-phytoplankton interactions. Rapid turnover of dissolved ATP via uptake by bacterioplankton was observed in an estuary (Sapelo Island, Georgia) and two freshwater lakes (Lake Oglethorpe, Georgia and Lago Lake, Georgia). Turnover times for DATP, based on microbial assimilation of (/sup 3/H)ATP, were on the order of hours to days in all three environments. DATP was not taken up intact by the natural microbial populations; rather, it was degraded to adenine, ribose and inorganic phosphate prior to or during transport. The primary mechanism for DATP uptake was via dephosphorylation of the nucleotide and cleavage of resultant nucleoside to adenine and ribose which then entered the cells by separate transport systems. The rate of DATP assimilation by freshwater microorganisms varied markedly-over a diel cycle. Results from microcosm experiments in which the authors compared the rates of DATP release by phytoplankton (Chlamydomonas sp.) alone, zooplankton (Daphnia sp.) alone or phytoplankton and zooplankton together under feeding conditions supported those hypotheses. Net extracellular release of DATP by Chlamydomonas was negligible in short-term experiments, and in systems containing both Daphnia and Chlamydomonas, changes in DATP over time were approximately 3-fold greater than the sum of changes observed in systems containing either organism alone.

  19. Genetics and complementation of Haemophilus influenzae mutants deficient in adenosine 5'-triphosphate-dependent nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, J; Small, G D; Setlow, J K; Shapanka, R

    1976-01-01

    Eight different mutations in Haemophilus influenzae leading to deficiency in adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent nuclease have been investigated in strains in which the mutations of the originally mutagenized strains have been transferred into the wild type. Sensitivity to mitomycin C and deoxycholate and complementation between extracts and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-dependent ATPase activity have been measured. Genetic crosses have provided information on the relative position of the mutations on the genome. There are three complementation groups, corresponding to three genetic groups. The strains most sensitive to mitomycin and deoxycholate, derived from mutants originally selected on the basis of sensitivity to mitomycin C or methyl methanesulfonate, are in one group. Apparently all these sensitive strains lack DNA-dependent ATPase activity, as does a strain intermediate in sensitivity to deoxycholate, which is the sole representative of another group. There are four strains that are relatively resistant to deoxycholate and mitomycin C, and all of these contain the ATPase activity. Three of these are in the same genetic and complementation group, whereas the other incongruously belongs in the same group as the sensitive strains. It is postulated that there are three cistrons in H. influenzae that code for the three known subunits of the ATP-dependent nuclease. PMID:177397

  20. Application of firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to antimicrobial drug sensitivity testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Tuttle, S. A.; Schrock, C. G.; Deming, J. W.; Barza, M. J.; Wienstein, L.; Chappelle, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    The development of a rapid method for determining microbial susceptibilities to antibiotics using the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is documented. The reduction of bacterial ATP by an antimicrobial agent was determined to be a valid measure of drug effect in most cases. The effect of 12 antibiotics on 8 different bacterial species gave a 94 percent correlation with the standard Kirby-Buer-Agar disc diffusion method. A 93 percent correlation was obtained when the ATP assay method was applied directly to 50 urine specimens from patients with urinary tract infections. Urine samples were centrifuged first to that bacterial pellets could be suspended in broth. No primary isolation or subculturing was required. Mixed cultures in which one species was predominant gave accurate results for the most abundant organism. Since the method is based on an increase in bacterial ATP with time, the presence of leukocytes did not interfere with the interpretation of results. Both the incubation procedure and the ATP assays are compatible with automation.

  1. Fullerene derived molecularly imprinted polymer for chemosensing of adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Piyush S; Dabrowski, Marcin; Noworyta, Krzysztof; Huynh, Tan-Phat; Kc, Chandra B; Sobczak, Janusz W; Pieta, Piotr; D'Souza, Francis; Kutner, Wlodzimierz

    2014-09-24

    For molecular imprinting of oxidatively electroactive analytes by electropolymerization, we used herein reductively electroactive functional monomers. As a proof of concept, we applied C60 fullerene adducts as such for the first time. For that, we derivatized C60 to bear either an uracil or an amide, or a carboxy addend for recognition of the adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) oxidizable analyte with the ATP-templated molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP-ATP). Accordingly, the ATP complex with all of the functional monomers formed in solution was potentiodynamically electropolymerized to deposit an MIP-ATP film either on an Au electrode of the quartz crystal resonator or on a Pt disk electrode for the piezoelectric microgravimetry (PM) or capacitive impedimetry (CI) determination of ATP, respectively, under the flow-injection analysis (FIA) conditions. The apparent imprinting factor for ATP was ∼4.0. After extraction of the ATP template, analytical performance of the resulting chemosensors, including detectability, sensitivity, and selectivity, was characterized. The limit of detection was 0.3 and 0.03mM ATP for the PM and CI chemosensor, respectively. The MIP-ATP film discriminated structural analogues of ATP quite well. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and Langmuir-Freundlich isotherms were fitted to the experimental data of the ATP sorption and sorption stability constants appeared to be nearly independent of the adopted sorption model. PMID:25172817

  2. Adenosine Triphosphate stimulates differentiation and mineralization in human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Cutarelli, Alessandro; Marini, Mario; Tancredi, Virginia; D'Arcangelo, Giovanna; Murdocca, Michela; Frank, Claudio; Tarantino, Umberto

    2016-05-01

    In the last years adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and subsequent purinergic system activation through P2 receptors were investigated highlighting their pivotal role in bone tissue biology. In osteoblasts ATP can regulate several activities like cell proliferation, cell death, cell differentiation and matrix mineralization. Since controversial results exist, in this study we analyzed the ATP effects on differentiation and mineralization in human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. We showed for the first time the altered functional activity of ATP receptors. Despite that, we found that ATP can reduce cell proliferation and stimulate osteogenic differentiation mainly in the early stages of in vitro maturation as evidenced by the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Osteocalcin (OC) genes and by the increased ALP activity. Moreover, we found that ATP can affect mineralization in a biphasic manner, at low concentrations ATP always increases mineral deposition while at high concentrations it always reduces mineral deposition. In conclusion, we show the osteogenic effect of ATP on both early and late stage activities like differentiation and mineralization, for the first time in human osteoblastic cells. PMID:27189526

  3. Adenosine triphosphate quantification as related to cryptobiosis, nematode eggs, and larvae.

    PubMed

    Spurr, H W

    1976-04-01

    Sonification was the most effective method used for disintegrating nematode eggs and larvae for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) determinations. Sensitivity of the assay was sufficient to measure ATP in one larva. Second-stage larvae of Anguina tritici averaged 1 x 10 femtograms (fg) ATP and Meloidogyne incognita eggs, 0.8 x 105 fg ATP. Larvae of Panagrellus redivivus, a saprobe, averaged 12.2 x 105 fg ATP, a measurement which was considerably higher than the ATP levels in plant parasites. Endophytic bacteria and fungi from wheat galls were detected as background organisms associated with A. tritiei activated by hydration. Also, bacteria in suspensions of eggs from M. incognita prepared with NaCIO were measured by the use of butanol extraction and ATP determination. Second-stage A. tritici larvae increased in ATP content within 40 min after being activated from cryptobiosis by hydration. In the cryptobiotic state, larvae had 50% less ATP than when active. ATP concentrations were similar in galls of different ages. Apparently, ATP concentrations do not change during cryptobiosis. Starvation results in a decline in ATP concentration/larva. Subjecting A. tritici larvae to the lethal temperature of 60 C resulted in a three-fold increase in the decay rate of ATP over that of larvae sonified, then heated at 60 C. These results suggest an association between ATP decay and the mechanism that causes death of larvae at elevated temperatures. PMID:19308214

  4. Detection of adenosine 5'-triphosphate by fluorescence variation of oligonucleotide-templated silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jennifer Daneen; Cang, Jinshun; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Yu; Ou, Chung-Mao; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2014-08-15

    Oligonucleotide-templated Ag nanoclusters (DNA-Ag NCs) prepared from AgNO3 using an oligonucleotide (5'-TAACCCCTAACCCCT-3') as a template and NaBH4 as a reducing agent have been used for sensing of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). The fluorescence intensity and emission wavelength of DNA-Ag NCs are dependent on the pH value and ATP concentration. At pH 3.0 and 11.0, ATP shows greater effects on fluorescence of the DNA-Ag NCs. Upon increasing ATP concentration from 10 to 50μM, their emission wavelength at pH 3.0 shifts from 525 to 585nm. At pH 11.0, their fluorescence intensity (510nm) increases upon increasing ATP concentration. The circular dichroism (CD), electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), absorption, and fluorescence results indicate that ATP and pH affect the interactions between DNAs and Ag atoms, resulting in changes in their fluorescence. The DNA-Ag NCs allow detection of ATP over a concentration range of 0.1-10μM, with a limit of detection 33nM. Practicality of the DNA-Ag NCs probe has been validated with the determination of ATP concentrations in the lysate of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells. PMID:24657647

  5. Leptin suppresses adenosine triphosphate-induced impairment of spinal cord astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoman; Qi, Shuang; Sun, Guangfeng; Yang, Li; Han, Jidong; Zhu, Yue; Xia, Maosheng

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes long-term disability and has no clinically effective treatment. After SCI, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) may be released from neuronal cells and astrocytes in large amounts. Our previous studies have shown that the extracellular release of ATP increases the phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2 ) and triggers the rapid release of arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) via the stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the downstream phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2. Leptin, a glycoprotein, induces the activation of the Janus kinase (JAK2)/signal transducers and activators of transcription-3 (Stat3) pathway via the leptin receptor. In this study, we found that 1) prolonged leptin treatment suppressed the ATP-stimulated release of AA and PGE2 from cultured spinal cord astrocytes; 2) leptin elevated the expression of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) via the JAK2/Stat3 signaling pathway; 3) Cav-1 blocked the interaction between Src and EGFR, thereby inhibiting the phosphorylation of EGFR and cPLA2 and attenuating the release of AA or PGE2; 4) pretreatment with leptin decreased ;he level of apoptosis and the release of interleukin-6 from cocultured neurons and astrocytes; and 5) leptin improved the recovery of locomotion in mice after SCI. Our results highlight leptin as a promising therapeutic agent for SCI. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27316329

  6. THE LOCALIZATION BY ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF HELA CELL SURFACE ENZYMES SPLITTING ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE.

    PubMed

    EPSTEIN, M A; HOLT, S J

    1963-11-01

    Cultures of normally proliferating Hela cells have been examined in thin sections by electron microscopy following glutaraldehyde fixation, staining in Wachstein and Meisel's adenosine triphosphate containing medium, postosmication, and embedding in an epoxy resin. The cells were stained in suspension in order to ensure uniform accessibility to reagents. Discrete localization of the enzyme reaction product (lead phosphate) was found at the plasma membranes of about half the cells, but nowhere else. It appeared in the form of an intensely electron-opaque deposit lying close against the outer surface of the cells and varying in amount from a chain of small particles to a dense band about 30 mmicro in width. This opaque reaction product was present over microvilli when absent elsewhere on a cell, was heaviest where microvilli and processes were profuse, and was minimal or lacking where cell surfaces were smooth. These observations are discussed in relation to both the idea that surface enzyme activity varies with the physiological phase of individual cells in a population, and the problem of how such enzyme activity becomes manifest at a given site on a morphologically changing membrane system. PMID:14086759

  7. Measurement and interpretation of microbial adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Hammes, Frederik; Goldschmidt, Felix; Vital, Marius; Wang, Yingying; Egli, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    There is a widespread need for cultivation-free methods to quantify viability of natural microbial communities in aquatic environments. Adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) is the energy currency of all living cells, and therefore a useful indicator of viability. A luminescence-based ATP kit/protocol was optimised in order to detect ATP concentrations as low as 0.0001 nM with a standard deviation of <5%. Using this method, more than 100 water samples from a variety of aquatic environments (drinking water, groundwater, bottled water, river water, lake water and wastewater effluent) were analysed for extracellular ATP and microbial ATP in comparison with flow-cytometric (FCM) parameters. Microbial ATP concentrations ranged between 3% and 97% of total ATP concentrations, and correlated well (R(2)=0.8) with the concentrations of intact microbial cells (after staining with propidium iodide). From this correlation, we calculated an average ATP-per-cell value of 1.75x10(-10)nmol/cell. An even better correlation (R(2)=0.88) was observed between intact biovolume (derived from FCM scatter data) and microbial ATP concentrations, and an average ATP-per-biovolume value of 2.95x10(-9)nmol/microm(3) was calculated. These results support the use of ATP analysis for both routine monitoring and research purposes, and contribute towards a better interpretation of ATP data. PMID:20605621

  8. A novel conductometric biosensor based on hexokinase for determination of adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Kucherenko, I S; Kucherenko, D Yu; Soldatkin, O O; Lagarde, F; Dzyadevych, S V; Soldatkin, A P

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a simple and inexpensive reusable biosensor for determination of the concentration of adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) in aqueous samples. The biosensor is based on a conductometric transducer which contains two pairs of gold interdigitated electrodes. An enzyme hexokinase was immobilized onto one pair of electrodes, and bovine serum albumin-onto another pair (thus, a differential mode of measurement was used). Conditions of hexokinase immobilization on the transducer by cross-linking via glutaraldehyde were optimized. Influence of experimental conditions (concentration of magnesium ions, ionic strength and concentration of the working buffer) on the biosensor work was studied. The reproducibility of biosensor responses and operational stability of the biosensor were checked during one week. Dry storage at -18 °C was shown to be the best conditions to store the biosensor. The biosensor was successfully applied for measurements of ATP concentration in pharmaceutical samples. The proposed biosensor may be used in future for determination of ATP and/or glucose in water samples. PMID:26838432

  9. Galactosylated Chitosan Oligosaccharide Nanoparticles for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell-Targeted Delivery of Adenosine Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiu Liang; Du, Yong Zhong; Yu, Ri Sheng; Liu, Ping; Shi, Dan; Chen, Ying; Wang, Ying; Huang, Fang Fang

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles composed of galactosylated chitosan oligosaccharide (Gal-CSO) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were prepared for hepatocellular carcinoma cell-specific uptake, and the characteristics of Gal-CSO/ATP nanoparticles were evaluated. CSO/ATP nanoparticles were prepared as a control. The average diameter and zeta potential of Gal-CSO/ATP nanoparticles were 51.03 ± 3.26 nm and 30.50 ± 1.25 mV, respectively, suggesting suitable properties for a drug delivery system. Subsequently, the cytotoxicity of Gal-CSO/ATP nanoparticles were examined by the methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, and the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values were calculated with HepG2 (human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line) cells. The results showed that the cytotoxic effect of nanoparticles on HepG2 cells was low. In the meantime, it was also found that the Gal-CSO/ATP nanoparticles could be uptaken by HepG2 cells, due to expression of the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) on their surfaces. The presented results indicate that the Gal-CSO nanoparticles might be very attractive to be used as an intracellular drug delivery carrier for hepatocellular carcinoma cell targeting, thus warranting further in vivo or clinical investigations. PMID:23899789

  10. Partial separation of platelet and placental adenosine receptors from adenosine A2-like binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnierowicz, S.; Work, C.; Hutchison, K.; Fox, I.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The ubiquitous adenosine A2-like binding protein obscures the binding properties of adenosine receptors assayed with 5'-N-({sup 3}H)ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). To solve this problem, we developed a rapid and simple method to separate adenosine receptors from the adenosine A2-like binding protein. Human platelet and placental membranes were solubilized with 1% 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate. The soluble platelet extract was precipitated with polyethylene glycol and the fraction enriched in adenosine receptors was isolated from the precipitate by differential centrifugation. The adenosine A2-like binding protein was removed from the soluble placental extract with hydroxylapatite and adenosine receptors were precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The specificity of the ({sup 3}H)NECA binding is typical of an adenosine A2 receptor for platelets and an adenosine A1 receptor for placenta. This method leads to enrichment of adenosine A2 receptors for platelets and adenosine A1 receptors for placenta. This provides a useful preparation technique for pharmacologic studies of adenosine receptors.

  11. The kinetics of magnesium adenosine triphosphate cleavage in skinned muscle fibres of the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Ferenczi, M A; Homsher, E; Trentham, D R

    1984-01-01

    The time course of magnesium adenosine triphosphate (Mg ATP) cleavage in chemically skinned muscle fibres of the rabbit was measured by a method in which Mg ATP cleavage was initiated by photolytic release of ATP from P3-1-(2-nitro)phenylethyladenosine 5'-triphosphate (caged ATP) and terminated by rapid freezing 50 ms to 8 s later. Up to 5 mM-ATP was released following a single 50 ns laser pulse at 347 nm. Mg ATP cleavage was measured at 19 degrees C in the presence and absence of calcium ions, for fibres near rest length and stretched beyond overlap of the myofilaments. At full overlap and in the absence of calcium (less than 10(-8) M) and nucleotide, the fibres developed rigor tension. Following the laser pulse the tension decreased to that of a relaxed fibre in two distinct phases. The first phase lasted about 40 ms and was followed by a second phase during which tension decreased to zero with an approximately exponential time course with a rate constant of 11 s-1. In the presence of 2 X 10(-5) M-free calcium ions, the initial phase following the laser flash lasted approximately 13 ms, and was followed by an exponential rise of tension with a rate constant of 28 s-1. The active tension reached by the muscle fibres was 54 kN/m2. For fibres stretched beyond overlap, no change in tension was observed following the release of Mg ATP. Under all conditions the time course of Mg ATP cleavage was biphasic, and consisted of a rapid initial burst of ADP formation, complete within 50 ms, followed by a slower steady-state rate of Mg ATP cleavage. The number of molecules of Mg ATP cleaved during the burst was approximately equal to the number of myosin subfragment 1 heads for fibres at full myofilament overlap, and equal to 0.7 molecules per myosin subfragment 1 head for fibres stretched beyond overlap. At full overlap in the presence of calcium ions, the steady-state rate equalled 1.8 mol Mg ATP cleaved per mole myosin subfragment 1 head per second. In all other cases the

  12. Analysis of the effect of the bovine adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G2 single nucleotide polymorphism Y581S on transcellular transport of veterinary drugs using new cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Real, R; González-Lobato, L; Baro, M F; Valbuena, S; de la Fuente, A; Prieto, J G; Alvarez, A I; Marques, M M; Merino, G

    2011-12-01

    In commercial dairy production, the risk of drug residues and environmental pollutants in milk from ruminants has become an outstanding problem. One of the main determinants of active drug secretion into milk is the ATP-binding cassette transporter G2/breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP). It is located in several organs associated with drug absorption, metabolism, and excretion, and its expression is highly induced during lactation in the mammary gland of ruminants, mice, and humans. As a consequence, potential contamination of milk could expose suckling infants to xenotoxins. In cows, a SNP for this protein affecting quality and quantity of milk production has been described previously (Y581S). In this study, our main purpose was to determine whether this polymorphism has an effect on transcellular transport of veterinary drugs because this could alter substrate pharmacokinetics and milk residues. We stably expressed the wild-type bovine ABCG2 and the Y581S variant in Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells (MDCKII) and MEF3.8 cell lines generating cell models in which the functionality of the bovine transporter could be addressed. Functional studies confirmed the greater functional activity in mitoxantrone accumulation assays for the Y581S variant with a greater relative V(MAX) value (P = 0.040) and showed for the first time that the Y581S variant presents greater transcellular transport of the model ABCG2 substrate nitrofurantoin (P = 0.024) and of 3 veterinary antibiotics, the fluoroquinolone agents enrofloxacin (P = 0.035), danofloxacin (P = 0.001), and difloxacin (P = 0.008), identified as new substrates of the bovine ABCG2. In addition, the inhibitory effect of the macrocyclic lactone ivermectin on the activity of wild-type bovine ABCG2 and the Y581S variant was also confirmed, showing a greater inhibitory potency on the wild-type protein at all the concentrations tested (5 μM, P = 0.017; 10 μM, P = 0.001; 25 μM, P = 0.008; and 50 μM, P = 0

  13. Photoaffinity labeling of myosin subfragment-one-with 3'(2')-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, R.

    1985-01-01

    The photoaffinity analogue 3'(2')-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate (Bz/sub 2/ATP) contains the photoreactive benzophenone group esterified at the 2' or 3' hydroxyl groups of ribose. MgBz/sub 2/ADP has a single binding site on skeletal myosin chymotryptic subfragment-one (SF/sub 1/) with a binding constant of 3.2 x 10/sup 5/ M/sup -1/. Bz/sub 2/ATP is also a substrate for the ATPase activity of SF/sub 1/ in the presence of different cations. The irradiation of SF/sub 1/ with (/sup 3/H)Bz/sub 2/ATP photoinactivates the ATPase activity with concomitant incorporation of the analogue into the enzyme. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of photolabeled SF/sub 1/ after milk trypsin digestion shows that all three tryptic peptides, 25 K, 50K, and 20 K, and both light chains are labeled. The presence of ATP during irradiation reduces labeling of the 50 K peptide only indicating that the other peptides are non-specifically labeled. To reduce the non-specific labeling (/sup 3/H)Bz/sub 2/ATP is trapped on SF/sub 1/ by cross-linking the two reactive thiols, SH/sub 1/ and SH/sub 2/, by N,N'-p-phenylene dimaleimide or Co(II)/Co(III) phenanthroline complexes. The Co(II)/Co(III) phenanthroline modified (/sup 14/C)Bz/sub 2/ATP-SF/sub 1/, after proteolytic digestion, yields five labeled peptides which were purified by gel filtration and high performance liquid chromatography.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide decreases adenosine triphosphate levels in aortic rings and leads to vasorelaxation via metabolic inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Levente; Deitch, Edwin A; Szabó, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Aims Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at low concentrations serves as a physiological endogenous vasodilator molecule, while at higher concentrations it can trigger cytotoxic effects. The aim of our study was to elucidate the potential mechanisms responsible for the effects of H2S on vascular tone. Main methods We measured the vascular tone in vitro in precontracted rat thoracic aortic rings and we have tested the effect of different oxygen levels and a variety of inhibitors affecting known vasodilatory pathways. We have also compared the vascular effect of high concentrations of H2S to those of pharmacological inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, we measured adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-levels in the same vascular tissues. Key findings We have found that in rat aortic rings: (1) H2S decreases ATP levels; (2) relaxations to H2S depend on the ambient oxygen concentration; (3) prostaglandins do not take part in the H2S induced relaxations; (4) the 3':5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) – nitric oxide (NO) pathway does not have a role in the relaxations (5) the role of KATP channels is limited, while Cl−/HCO3− channels have a role in the relaxations. (6): We have observed that high concentrations of H2S relax the aortic rings in a fashion similar to sodium cyanide, and both agents reduce cellular ATP levels to a comparable degree. Significance H2S, a new gasotransmitter of emerging importance, leads to relaxation via Cl−/HCO3− channels and metabolic inhibition and the interactions of these two factors depend on the oxygen levels of the tissue. PMID:18790700

  15. Amperometric biosensor system for simultaneous determination of adenosine-5'-triphosphate and glucose.

    PubMed

    Kucherenko, Ivan S; Didukh, Daria Yu; Soldatkin, Oleksandr O; Soldatkin, Alexei P

    2014-06-01

    The majority of biosensors for adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) determination are based on cascades of enzymatic reactions; therefore, they are sensitive to glucose or glycerol (depending on the enzymatic system) as well as to ATP. The presence of unknown concentrations of these substances in the sample greatly complicates the determination of ATP. To overcome this disadvantage of known biosensors, we developed a biosensor system consisting of two biosensors: the first one is based on glucose oxidase and is intended for measuring glucose concentration, and the second one is based on glucose oxidase and hexokinase and is sensitive toward both glucose and ATP. Using glucose concentration measured by the first biosensor, we can analyze the total response to glucose and ATP obtained by the second biosensor. Platinum disc electrodes were used as amperometric transducers. The polyphenilenediamine membrane was deposited onto the surface of platinum electrodes to avoid the response to electroactive substances. The effect of glucose concentration on biosensor determination of ATP was studied. The reproducibility of biosensor responses to glucose and ATP during a day was tested (relative standard deviation, RSD, of responses to glucose was 3-6% and to ATP was 8-12%) as well as storage stability of the biosensors (no decrease of glucose responses and 43% drop of ATP responses during 50 days). The measurements of ATP and glucose in pharmaceutical vials (including mixtures of ATP and glucose) were carried out. It was shown that the developed biosensor system can be used for simultaneous analysis of glucose and ATP concentrations in water solutions. PMID:24810180

  16. Adenosine-5'-triphosphate release by Mannheimia haemolytica, lipopolysaccharide, and interleukin-1 stimulated bovine pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Craddick, Michael; Patel, Rakhi; Lower, Amanda; Highlander, Sarah; Ackermann, Mark; McClenahan, David

    2012-09-15

    Mannheimia haemolytica, one of the agents associated with bovine respiratory disease complex, can cause severe lung pathology including the leakage of vascular products into the airways and alveoli. Previous work by this laboratory has demonstrated that bovine lung endothelial and epithelial cells undergo dramatic permeability increases when exposed to adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP). Therefore, we wanted to determine if ATP levels were elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from calves experimentally infected with M. haemolytica. In addition, cultured bovine pulmonary epithelial (BPE) cells were stimulated with heat-killed and live M. haemolytica bacteria, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and zymosan activated plasma (ZAP) to determine whether they might release extracellular ATP during in vitro infection. Calves experimentally exposed to M. haemolytica had an approximately 2-fold higher level of ATP in their BAL samples compared to control. BPE cells exposed to increasing numbers of heat-killed or live M. haemolytica had significantly increased levels of ATP release as compared to time-matched controls. Finally, BPE cells treated with several concentrations of LPS and IL-1 had increases in ATP release as compared to time-matched controls. This increase appeared to be a result of active ATP secretion by the cells, as cell viability was similar between treated and non-treated cells. Neither ZAP nor LTA induced any ATP release by the cells. In conclusion, ATP levels are elevated in lung secretions from calves infected with M. haemolytica. In addition, lung epithelial cells can actively release ATP when exposed to heat-killed or live M. haemolytica, LPS or IL-1. PMID:22771196

  17. Adenosine triphosphate-induced photoreceptor death and retinal remodeling in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vessey, Kirstan A; Greferath, Ursula; Aplin, Felix P; Jobling, Andrew I; Phipps, Joanna A; Ho, Tracy; De Iongh, Robbert U; Fletcher, Erica L

    2014-01-01

    Many common causes of blindness involve the death of retinal photoreceptors, followed by progressive inner retinal cell remodeling. For an inducible model of retinal degeneration to be useful, it must recapitulate these changes. Intravitreal administration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has recently been found to induce acute photoreceptor death. The aim of this study was to characterize the chronic effects of ATP on retinal integrity. Five-week-old, dark agouti rats were administered 50 mM ATP into the vitreous of one eye and saline into the other. Vision was assessed using the electroretinogram and optokinetic response and retinal morphology investigated via histology. ATP caused significant loss of visual function within 1 day and loss of 50% of the photoreceptors within 1 week. At 3 months, 80% of photoreceptor nuclei were lost, and total photoreceptor loss occurred by 6 months. The degeneration and remodeling were similar to those found in heritable retinal dystrophies and age-related macular degeneration and included inner retinal neuronal loss, migration, and formation of new synapses; Müller cell gliosis, migration, and scarring; blood vessel loss; and retinal pigment epithelium migration. In addition, extreme degeneration and remodeling events, such as neuronal and glial migration outside the neural retina and proliferative changes in glial cells, were observed. These extreme changes were also observed in the 2-year-old P23H rhodopsin transgenic rat model of retinitis pigmentosa. This ATP-induced model of retinal degeneration may provide a valuable tool for developing pharmaceutical therapies or for testing electronic implants aimed at restoring vision. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:2928–2950, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24639102

  18. Adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis mechanism in kinesin studied by combined quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical metadynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Matthew J; Kuo, I-F Will; Hayashi, Shigehiko; Takada, Shoji

    2013-06-19

    Kinesin is a molecular motor that hydrolyzes adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and moves along microtubules against load. While motility and atomic structures have been well-characterized for various members of the kinesin family, not much is known about ATP hydrolysis inside the active site. Here, we study ATP hydrolysis mechanisms in the kinesin-5 protein Eg5 by using combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics metadynamics simulations. Approximately 200 atoms at the catalytic site are treated by a dispersion-corrected density functional and, in total, 13 metadynamics simulations are performed with their cumulative time reaching ~0.7 ns. Using the converged runs, we compute free energy surfaces and obtain a few hydrolysis pathways. The pathway with the lowest free energy barrier involves a two-water chain and is initiated by the Pγ-Oβ dissociation concerted with approach of the lytic water to PγO3-. This immediately induces a proton transfer from the lytic water to another water, which then gives a proton to the conserved Glu270. Later, the proton is transferred back from Glu270 to HPO(4)2- via another hydrogen-bonded chain. We find that the reaction is favorable when the salt bridge between Glu270 in switch II and Arg234 in switch I is transiently broken, which facilitates the ability of Glu270 to accept a proton. When ATP is placed in the ADP-bound conformation of Eg5, the ATP-Mg moiety is surrounded by many water molecules and Thr107 blocks the water chain, which together make the hydrolysis reaction less favorable. The observed two-water chain mechanisms are rather similar to those suggested in two other motors, myosin and F1-ATPase, raising the possibility of a common mechanism. PMID:23751065

  19. Adenosine 5′-Triphosphate Flux Through the North Inlet Marsh System †

    PubMed Central

    Chrzanowski, Thomas H.; Stevenson, L. Harold; Kjerfve, Bjorn

    1979-01-01

    The distribution, fluctuation, and short-term transport of total microbial biomass (measured as adenosine 5′-triphosphate [ATP]) was investigated in a large salt marsh creek. Hourly samples were collected synoptically for 25 h from 10 boats positioned across the 320-m width of the creek. Samples were collected from three depths ranging from 0.2 to 8.0 m. Hourly data obtained from each station were graphed, plotting depth against ATP. Subsequently, interpolated ATP values were generated for every one-tenth depth from the surface to the bottom with the use of an 11-point proportional divider. A total of 2,750 values were generated, and a mean value of 0.865 mg of ATP per m3 was determined. Maximum levels of ATP were found at high tide and minimal values were found at low tide. The distribution of ATP concentrations was found to be complex, with no suggestion of vertical stratification; however, horizontal divisions were apparent. ATP values corrected for direction of flow or velocity indicated two ebb-directed channels; however, when considered in total, there was a net import of ATP through the interface. The total import of ATP for this 25-h sampling period was calculated to be 3.58 kg, corresponding to a net transport of 39.8 mg of ATP per s through the cross section. Results suggest that detailed characterization of a creek transect in terms of ATP or any similar parameter requires the simultaneous measurements of both the concentration of the parameter in question and the velocity at the time and point from which the sample was taken. PMID:16345382

  20. Insertion of proteolipid protein into oligodendrocyte mitochondria regulates extracellular pH and adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Appikatla, Sunita; Bessert, Denise; Lee, Icksoo; Hüttemann, Maik; Mullins, Chadwick; Somayajulu-Nitu, Mallika; Yao, Fayi; Skoff, Robert P

    2014-03-01

    Proteolipid protein (PLP) and DM20, the most abundant myelin proteins, are coded by the human PLP1 and non-human Plp1 PLP gene. Mutations in the PLP1 gene cause Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) with duplications of the native PLP1 gene accounting for 70% of PLP1 mutations. Humans with PLP1 duplications and mice with extra Plp1 copies have extensive neuronal degeneration. The mechanism that causes neuronal degeneration is unknown. We show that native PLP traffics to mitochondria when the gene is duplicated in mice and in humans. This report is the first demonstration of a specific cellular defect in brains of PMD patients; it validates rodent models as ideal models to study PMD. Insertion of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins requires specific import pathways; we show that specific cysteine motifs, part of the Mia40/Erv1 mitochondrial import pathway, are present in PLP and are required for its insertion into mitochondria. Insertion of native PLP into mitochondria of transfected cells acidifies media, partially due to increased lactate; it also increases adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the media. The same abnormalities are found in the extracellular space of mouse brains with extra copies of Plp1. These physiological abnormalities are preventable by mutations in PLP cysteine motifs, a hallmark of the Mia40/Erv1 pathway. Increased extracellular ATP and acidosis lead to neuronal degeneration. Our findings may be the mechanism by which microglia are activated and proinflammatory molecules are upregulated in Plp1 transgenic mice (Tatar et al. (2010) ASN Neuro 2:art:e00043). Manipulation of this metabolic pathway may restore normal metabolism and provide therapy for PMD patients. PMID:24382809

  1. Dielectric spectra broadening as a signature for dipole-matrix interaction. III. Water in adenosine monophosphate/adenosine-5'-triphosphate solutions.

    PubMed

    Puzenko, Alexander; Levy, Evgeniya; Shendrik, Andrey; Talary, Mark S; Caduff, Andreas; Feldman, Yuri

    2012-11-21

    In this, the third part of our series on the dielectric spectrum symmetrical broadening of water, we consider the nucleotide aqueous solutions. Where in Parts I [E. Levy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114502 (2012)] and II [E. Levy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114503 (2012)], the dipole-dipole or ion-dipole interaction had a dominant feature, now the interplay between these two types of dipole-matrix interactions will be considered. We present the results of high frequency dielectric measurements of different concentrations of adenosine monophosphate/adenosine-5'-triphosphate aqueous solutions. We observed the Cole-Cole broadening of the main relaxation peak of the solvent in the solutions. Moreover, depending on the nucleotide concentration, we observed both types of dipole-matrix interaction. The 3D trajectory approach (described in detail in Part I) is applied in order to highlight the differences between the two types of interaction. PMID:23181321

  2. Molecular structure of tetraaqua adenosine 5'-triphosphate aluminium(III) complex: A study involving Raman spectroscopy, theoretical DFT and potentiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenório, Thaís; Silva, Andréa M.; Ramos, Joanna Maria; Buarque, Camilla D.; Felcman, Judith

    2013-03-01

    The Alzheimer's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases that affect elderly population, due to the formation of β-amyloid protein aggregate and several symptoms, especially progressive cognitive decline. The result is a decrease in capture of glucose by cells leading to obliteration, meddling in the Krebs cycle, the principal biochemical route to the energy production leading to a decline in the levels of adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Aluminium(III) is connected to Alzheimer's and its ion provides raise fluidity of the plasma membrane, decrease cell viability and aggregation of amyloid plaques. Studies reveal that AlATP complex promotes the formation of reactive fibrils of β-amyloid protein and independent amyloidogenic peptides, suggesting the action of the complex as a chaperone in the role pathogenic process. In this research, one of complexes formed by Al(III) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate in aqueous solution is analyzed by potentiometry, Raman spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The value of the log KAlATP found was 9.21 ± 0.01 and adenosine 5'-triphosphate should act as a bidentate ligand in the complex. Raman spectroscopy and potentiometry indicate that donor atoms are the oxygen of the phosphate β and the oxygen of the phosphate γ, the terminal phosphates. Computational calculations using Density Functional Theory, with hybrid functions B3LYP and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set regarding water solvent effects, have confirmed the results. Frontier molecular orbitals, electrostatic potential contour surface, electrostatic potential mapped and Mulliken charges of the title molecule were also investigated.

  3. Assessment of an innovative antimicrobial surface disinfectant in the operating room environment using adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brian D; Spencer, Maureen; Rossi, Peter J; Lee, Cheong J; Brown, Kellie R; Malinowski, Michael; Seabrook, Gary R; Edmiston, Charles E

    2015-03-01

    Terminal cleaning in the operating room is a critical step in preventing the transmission of health care-associated pathogens. The persistent disinfectant activity of a novel isopropyl alcohol/organofunctional silane solution (ISO) was evaluated in 4 operating rooms after terminal cleaning. Adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence documented a significant difference (P < .048) in surface bioburden on IOS-treated surfaces versus controls. RODAC plate cultures revealed a significant (P < .001) reduction in microbial contamination on IOS-treated surfaces compared with controls. Further studies are warranted to validate the persistent disinfectant activity of ISO within selective health care settings. PMID:25728155

  4. Plasma adenosine triphosphate and heat shock protein 72 concentrations after aerobic and eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kishiko; Seta, Ryosuke; Shimizu, Takahiko; Shinkai, Shoji; Calderwood, Stuart K; Nakazato, Koichi; Takahashi, Kazue

    2011-01-01

    The endolysosome pathway has been proposed for secretion of heat shock protein (Hsp)72 with a regulatory role for extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Here, we tested the hypothesis that extracellular ATP mediates the increase in plasma Hsp72 after exercise. We measured plasma ATP Hsp72, cathepsin D, norepinephrine, free fatty acid, glucose, and myoglobin in 8 healthy young males (mean +/- SE: age, 22.3 +/- 0.3 years; height, 171.4 +/- 0.8 cm; weight, 68.8 +/- 3.1 kg; body mass index, 23.5 +/- 1.1 kg/cm2; VO2 max, 44.1 +/- 3.8 mL/kg/min) before and at 0, 10, 30, and 60 min after aerobic exercise (cycling) and elbow flexor eccentric exercise. Subjects cycled for 60 min at 70-75% VO2 max (mean +/- SE; 157.4 +/- 6.9 W). Eccentric strength exercise consisted of flexing the elbow joint to 90 degrees with motion speed set at 30 degrees/sec at extension and 10 degrees/sec at flexion. Subjects performed 7 sets of 10 eccentric actions with a set interval of 60 sec. The motion range of the elbow joint was 90 degrees-180 degrees. Compared with the levels of Hsp72 and ATP in plasma after bicycle exercise, those after eccentric exercise did not change. A significant group x time interaction was not observed for Hsp72 or ATP in plasma. A significant correlation was found between Hsp72 and ATP in plasma (r=0.79, P<0.05), but not between Hsp72 and norepinephrine (r=0.64, P=0.09) after bicycle exercise. A significant correlation between ATP and norepinephrine in plasma was found (r=0.89 P<0.01). We used stepwise multiple-regression analysis to determine independent predictors of exercise-induced elevation of eHsp72. Candidate predictor variables for the stepwise multiple-regression analysis were time (Pre, Post, Post10, Post30, Post60), exercise type (aerobic, eccentric), ATP, cathepsin D, norepinephrine, epinephrine, glucose, and FFA. In the regression model for Hsp72 in plasma, increased ATP and glucose were the strongest predictors of increased Hsp72 (ATP: R2=0.213, beta

  5. Inotropic responses of the frog ventricle to adenosine triphosphate and related changes in endogenous cyclic nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Flitney, F W; Singh, J

    1980-01-01

    1. A study has been made of a well documented but poorly understood response of the isolated frog ventricle to treatment with exogenous adenosine 5' triphosphate (ATP). Measurements of membrane potential, isometric twitch tension and levels of endogenous 3',5'-cyclic nucleotides have been made at various times during the ATP-induced response. 2. ATP elicits a characteristic triphasic response, which comprises an initial, abrupt increase in contractility, rising to a maximum within a few beats (first phase); followed by a period when the twitch amplitude falls, sometimes to below the control level (second phase); and superceded by a more slowly developing and longer-lasting increase in contractile force (third phase). The response is unaffected by atropine, propranolol or phentolamine. However, the prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor indomethacin depresses the first phase and entirely suppresses the third phase. 3. The inotropic effects of ATP are accompanied by changes in the shape of the action potential. These effects are dose-related. The duration of the action potential (D-30mV) and its positive overshoot (O) are increased during all phases of the response, for [ATP]o's up to 10(-5) M. However, at higher [ATP]o's, D-30mV and O ar both reduced during the second phase (but not the first or third phase), when isometric twitch tension is also depressed. The relationship between action potential duration and twitch tension (P) for different [ATP]o's is linear for all three phases of the response, but the slopes of the curves (delta P/delta D) are markedly different, indicating that the sensitivity of the contractile system to membrane depolarization is not constant, but varies continuously throughout the response. 4. ATP has a potent stimulatory effect on the metabolism of endogenous 3',5'-cyclic nucleotides. The time courses of the changes in adenosine 3','5-cyclic monophosphate (3',5'-cyclic AMP) and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (3',5'-cyclic GMP) are

  6. Human 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate synthetase (isoform 1, brain): kinetic properties of the adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate kinase domains.

    PubMed

    Lansdon, Eric B; Fisher, Andrew J; Segel, Irwin H

    2004-04-13

    Recombinant human 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) synthetase, isoform 1 (brain), was purified to near-homogeneity from an Escherichia coli expression system and kinetically characterized. The native enzyme, a dimer with each 71 kDa subunit containing an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) sulfurylase and an adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) kinase domain, catalyzes the overall formation of PAPS from ATP and inorganic sulfate. The protein is active as isolated, but activity is enhanced by treatment with dithiothreitol. APS kinase activity displayed the characteristic substrate inhibition by APS (K(I) of 47.9 microM at saturating MgATP). The maximum attainable activity of 0.12 micromol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1) was observed at an APS concentration ([APS](opt)) of 15 microM. The theoretical K(m) for APS (at saturating MgATP) and the K(m) for MgATP (at [APS](opt)) were 4.2 microM and 0.14 mM, respectively. At likely cellular levels of MgATP (2.5 mM) and sulfate (0.4 mM), the overall endogenous rate of PAPS formation under optimum assay conditions was 0.09 micromol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1). Upon addition of pure Penicillium chrysogenum APS kinase in excess, the overall rate increased to 0.47 micromol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1). The kinetic constants of the ATP sulfurylase domain were as follows: V(max,f) = 0.77 micromol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1), K(mA(MgATP)) = 0.15 mM, K(ia(MgATP)) = 1 mM, K(mB(sulfate)) = 0.16 mM, V(max,r) = 18.7 micromol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1), K(mQ(APS)) = 4.8 microM, K(iq(APS)) = 18 nM, and K(mP(PPi)) = 34.6 microM. The (a) imbalance between ATP sulfurylase and APS kinase activities, (b) accumulation of APS in solution during the overall reaction, (c) rate acceleration provided by exogenous APS kinase, and (d) availability of both active sites to exogenous APS all argue against APS channeling. Molybdate, selenate, chromate ("chromium VI"), arsenate, tungstate, chlorate, and perchlorate bind to the ATP sulfurylase domain, with the

  7. Effect of Ca2+ on weak cross-bridge interaction with actin in the presence of adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate).

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, T; Yu, L C; Kuhn, H J; Brenner, B

    1992-01-01

    In the presence of the nucleotide analog adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (ATP[gamma S]), effects of Ca2+ on stiffness and equatorial x-ray diffraction patterns of single skinned fibers of the rabbit psoas muscle were studied. It is shown that cross-bridges in the presence of ATP[gamma S] have properties of the weak-binding states of the ATP hydrolysis cycle. Raising the Ca2+ concentration up to pCa 4.5 has little effect on actin affinity of cross-bridges in the presence of ATP[gamma S]. However, the rate constants for cross-bridge dissociation and reassociation from and to actin are reduced by about 2 orders of magnitude. In addition, nucleotide affinity of the cross-bridge is much smaller at high Ca2+ concentrations. Implications for interpretation of fiber stiffness recorded during isotonic shortening and the rising phase of a tetanus are discussed. PMID:1454820

  8. An efficient signal-on aptamer-based biosensor for adenosine triphosphate detection using graphene oxide both as an electrochemical and electrochemiluminescence signal indicator.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang; Li, Yuqin; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Yaowen; Gao, Wenhua

    2015-09-01

    An efficient aptasensor was developed in which graphene oxide (GO) was employed as an indicator for both electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) signal generation. The aptasensor was fabricated by self-assembling the ECL probe of a thiolated adenosine triphosphate binding aptamer (ABA) tagged with a Ru complex (Ru(bpy)3(2+) derivatives) onto the surface of gold nanoparticle (AuNP) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). ABA immobilized onto AuNP modified GCE could strongly adsorb GO due to the strong π-π interaction between ABA and graphene oxide; ECL quenching of the Ru complex then takes place because of energy transfer and electron transfer, and a large increase of the electron transfer resistance (Ret) of the electrode. While in the presence of target adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the ABA prefers to form ABA-ATP bioaffinity complexes, which have weak affinity to graphene oxide and keep the graphene oxide away from the electrode surface, thus allowing the ECL signal enhancement, and in conjunction with the decrease of the Ret. Because of the high ECL quenching efficiency, unique structure, and electronic properties of graphene oxide, the Ret and ECL intensity versus the logarithm of ATP concentration was linear in the wide range from 10 pM to 10 nM with an ultra-low detection limit of 6.7 pM to 4.8 pM, respectively. The proposed aptasensor exhibited excellent reproducibility, stability, and outstanding selectivity, and ATP could be effectively distinguished from its analogues. More significantly, this efficient ECL aptasensor strategy based on GO acting both as an electrochemical and ECL signal indicator is general and can be easily extended to other biological binding events. PMID:26191542

  9. Determination of adenosine disodium triphosphate (ATP) using oxytetracycline-Eu 3+ as a fluorescence probe by spectrofluorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Faju; Miao, Yanhong; Jiang, Chongqiu

    2005-10-01

    A new spectrofluorimetric method was developed for determination of adenosine disodium triphosphate (ATP). We studied the interactions between oxytetracycline (OTC)-Eu 3+ complex and adenosine disodium triphosphate (ATP) by using UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra. Using oxytetracycline (OTC)-Eu 3+ as a fluorescence probe, under the optimum conditions, ATP can remarkably enhance the fluorescence intensity of the OTC-Eu 3+ complex at λ = 612 nm and the enhanced fluorescence intensity of Eu 3+ ion is in proportion to the concentration of ATP. Optimum conditions for the determination of ATP were also investigated. The linear ranges for ATP are 8.00 × 10 -8-1.50 × 10 -6 mol L -1 with detection limits of 2.67 × 10 -9 mol L -1. This method is simple, practical and relatively free interference from coexisting substances and can be successfully applied to determination of ATP in samples. The mechanism of fluorescence enhancement between oxytetracycline (OTC)-Eu 3+ complex and ATP was also studied.

  10. Nitrogen and phosphorus co-doped graphene quantum dots: synthesis from adenosine triphosphate, optical properties, and cellular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthanarayanan, Arundithi; Wang, Yue; Routh, Parimal; Sk, Mahasin Alam; Than, Aung; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jie; Sun, Handong; Chen, Peng

    2015-04-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are emerging zero-dimensional materials promising a wide spectrum of applications, particularly, as superior fluorescent reporters for bio-imaging and optical sensing. Heteroatom doping can endow GQDs with new or improved photoluminescence properties. Here, we demonstrate a simple strategy for the synthesis of nitrogen and phosphorus co-doped GQDs from a single biomolecule precursor (adenosine triphosphate - ATP). Such ATP-GQDs exhibit high fluorescence quantum yield, strong two-photon upconversion, small molecular weight, high photostability, and good biocompatibility. Furthermore, transferrin conjugated ATP-GQDs have been used for imaging and real-time tracking of transferrin receptors in live cells.Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are emerging zero-dimensional materials promising a wide spectrum of applications, particularly, as superior fluorescent reporters for bio-imaging and optical sensing. Heteroatom doping can endow GQDs with new or improved photoluminescence properties. Here, we demonstrate a simple strategy for the synthesis of nitrogen and phosphorus co-doped GQDs from a single biomolecule precursor (adenosine triphosphate - ATP). Such ATP-GQDs exhibit high fluorescence quantum yield, strong two-photon upconversion, small molecular weight, high photostability, and good biocompatibility. Furthermore, transferrin conjugated ATP-GQDs have been used for imaging and real-time tracking of transferrin receptors in live cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supplementary figures related to characterization, computational studies and protein conjugation. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01519g

  11. Oral adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) administration increases blood flow following exercise in animals and humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) stimulates vasodilation by binding to endothelial ATP-selective P2Y2 receptors; a phenomenon, which is posited to be accelerated during exercise. Herein, we used a rat model to examine how different dosages of acute oral ATP administration affected the femoral blood flow response prior to, during, and after an exercise bout. In addition, we performed a single dose chronic administration pilot study in resistance trained athletes. Methods Animal study: Male Wistar rats were gavage-fed the body surface area, species adjusted human equivalent dose (HED) of either 100 mg (n=4), 400 mg (n=4), 1,000 mg (n=5) or 1,600 mg (n=5) of oral ATP as a disodium salt (Peak ATP®, TSI, Missoula, MT). Rats that were not gavage-fed were used as controls (CTL, n=5). Blood flow was monitored continuously: a) 60 min prior to, b) during and c) 90 min following an electrically-evoked leg-kicking exercise. Human Study: In a pilot study, 12 college-aged resistance-trained subjects were given 400 mg of ATP (Peak ATP®, TSI, Missoula, MT) daily for 12 weeks, and prior to an acute arm exercise bout at weeks 1, 4, 8, and 12. Ultrasonography-determined volumetric blood flow and vessel dilation in the brachial artery was measured at rest, at rest 30 minutes after supplementation, and then at 0, 3, and 6 minutes after the exercise. Results Animal Study: Rats fed 1,000 mg HED demonstrated significantly greater recovery blood flow (p < 0.01) and total blood flow AUC values (p < 0.05) compared to CTL rats. Specifically, blood flow was elevated in rats fed 1,000 mg HED versus CTL rats at 20 to 90 min post exercise when examining 10-min blood flow intervals (p < 0.05). When examining within-group differences relative to baseline values, rats fed the 1,000 mg and 1,600 mg HED exhibited the most robust increases in blood flow during exercise and into the recovery period. Human study: At weeks 1, 8, and 12, ATP supplementation significantly increased

  12. CL316243 induces phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate production in rat adipocytes in an adenosine deaminase-, pertussis toxin-, or wortmannin-sensitive manner.

    PubMed

    Ohsaka, Y; Nomura, Y

    2016-07-18

    The effect of beta(3)-adrenoceptor (beta(3)-AR) agonists on adipocytes treated or not treated with signaling modulators has not been sufficiently elucidated. Using rat epididymal adipocytes (adipocytes) labeled with [(32)P]orthophosphate, we found that treatment with the selective beta(3)-AR agonist CL316243 (CL; 1 microM) induces phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3,4,5-triphosphate (PI[3,4,5]P(3)) production and that this response is inhibited by adenosine deaminase (ADA, an adenosine-degrading enzyme; 2 U/ml), pertussis toxin (PTX, an inactivator of inhibitory guanine-nucleotide-binding protein; 1 microg/ml), or wortmannin (WT, a PI-kinase inhibitor; 3 microM). The results showed that CL induced PI(3,4,5)P(3) production in intact adipocytes and that this production was affected by signaling modulators. Taken together, our findings indicate that CL produces PI(3,4,5)P(3) in an ADA-sensitive, PTX-sensitive, or WT-sensitive manner and will advance understanding of the effect of beta(3)-AR agonists on adipocytes. PMID:26988163

  13. Relaxation of rabbit psoas muscle fibres from rigor by photochemical generation of adenosine-5'-triphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Y E; Hibberd, M G; Trentham, D R

    1984-01-01

    Correlations have been made between the mechanical and biochemical descriptions of muscle relaxation. Skinned muscle fibres in the rigor state were incubated in a solution containing P3-1-(2-nitro)phenylethyladenosine-5'-triphosphate, 'caged ATP', an inert photolabile precursor of ATP, and free Ca2+ concentration less than 10(-8) M. The mechanical response of the fibre was monitored during relaxation initiated by liberating ATP with a pulse of 347 nm light from a frequency-doubled ruby laser. Tension first dropped and then rose briefly, before finally declining to the relaxed level. Stiffness, in phase with a sinusoidal length change, declined monotonically after the laser pulse. Out-of-phase stiffness increased briefly after a delay, then returned to the base line during the final relaxation. The development of the out-of-phase stiffness signal was taken as evidence that during the relaxation some cross-bridges were present with properties similar to those in an active contraction. The tension rise and slower phase of relaxation can be explained by a mechanism in which some of the cross-bridges reattach, generate force and finally detach in the absence of Ca2+ ions. In this model cross-bridge attachment is facilitated by protein co-operativity within the myofilaments. Detailed analysis of the mechanical transients makes other possible models for the initial tension rise unlikely. Stretching or releasing fibres prior to photolysis changed the time course of the early parts of the tension transient without significant effect on the later phases or on stiffness. The tension records from stretch, release and isometric trials converged to a final common time course of relaxation. Analysis of the convergence of tension records provided a means for measuring the cross-bridge detachment rate from the thin filament as a function of ATP concentration. The apparent second-order rate constant for detachment was at least 5 X 10(5) M-1 S-1 at 20-22 degrees C. The final

  14. Adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase from penicillium chrysogenum. Steady state kinetics of the forward and reverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Farley, J R; Cryns, D F; Yang, Y H; Segel, I H

    1976-07-25

    The kinetic mechanism of ATP sulfurylase was established from initial velocity, product inhibition, and dead-end inhibition studies. In the forward direction, the reaction is steady state ordered, with MgATP=A, sulfate=B, MgPP1=P, and APS=Q.KmA=0.38 mM, Kia=0.71 mM, KmB=0.50 mM. Nitrate and chlorate are competive with sulfate and uncompetitive with MgATP. KiNO3-=0.25 mM; KiC1O3-= 0.15 mM. AMP and various MgATP analogs are competitive with MgATP and mixed-type inhibitors with respect to SO42-. The Ki for AMP is 0.55 mM. The reaction is rapid equilibrium ordered in the reverse direction with Kiq=0.3 to 1.0 muM and Kmp=0.65 muM. Adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) exhibits competitive substrate inhibition (KIQ=0.3 mM). The ratio Vmaxf/Vmaxr is 0.018. In the forward direction the ratio VmaxMoO42-/VmaxSO42- is 20. The Keq at pH 8.0 and 30 degrees calculated from the Haldane equation is 6 X 10(-9) to 3.3 X 10(-8) (depending on the Kiq value chosen). The experimental Keq is about 2.5 X 10(-9). The fact that Vmax/Vmaxr is about 1 million times greater than Keq is consistent with the assumed physiological role of the enzyme (APS synthesis). The mechanistic basis of the ordered binding sequence was probed by multiple inhibition analysis. Dead-end inhibitors competitive with MgATP (such as free ATP, Mg alpha,beta-methylene ATP, CrATP, and CaATP) do not induce substrate inhibition by sulfate or alter the inhibition patterns displayed by nitrate. This result suggests (but does not prove) that catalytic action on MgATP must precede the formation of the sulfate binding site. PMID:819440

  15. Identification of the A2 adenosine receptor binding subunit by photoaffinity crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Barrington, W.W.; Jacobson, K.A.; Hutchison, A.J.; Williams, M.; Stiles, G.L. )

    1989-09-01

    A high-affinity iodinated agonist radioligand for the A2 adenosine receptor has been synthesized to facilitate studies of the A2 adenosine receptor binding subunit. The radioligand 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC (125I-labeled 2-(4-(2-(2-((4- aminophenyl)methylcarbonylamino)ethylaminocarbonyl)- ethyl)phenyl)ethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) was synthesized and found to bind to the A2 adenosine receptor in bovine striatal membranes with high affinity (Kd = 1.5 nM) and A2 receptor selectivity. Competitive binding studies reveal the appropriate A2 receptor pharmacologic potency order with 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) greater than (-)-N6-((R)-1-methyl- 2-phenylethyl)adenosine (R-PIA) greater than (+)-N6-((S)-1-methyl-2- phenylethyl)adenosine (S-PIA). Adenylate cyclase assays, in human platelet membranes, demonstrate a dose-dependent stimulation of cAMP production. PAPA-APEC (1 microM) produces a 43% increase in cAMP production, which is essentially the same degree of increase produced by 5'-N- ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (the prototypic A2 receptor agonist). These findings combined with the observed guanine nucleotide-mediated decrease in binding suggest that PAPA-APEC is a full A2 agonist. The A2 receptor binding subunit was identified by photoaffinity-crosslinking studies using 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC and the heterobifunctional crosslinking agent N-succinimidyl 6-(4'-azido-2'-nitrophenylamino)hexanoate (SANPAH). After covalent incorporation, a single specifically radiolabeled protein with an apparent molecular mass of 45 kDa was observed on NaDodSO4/PAGE/autoradiography. Incorporation of 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC into this polypeptide is blocked by agonists and antagonists with the expected potency for A2 receptors and is decreased in the presence of 10(-4) M guanosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imido)triphosphate.

  16. A rapid method for the determination of microbial susceptibility using the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vellend, H.; Tuttle, S. A.; Barza, M.; Weinstein, L.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    Luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was optimized for pure bacteria in broth in order to evaluate if changes in bacterial ATP content could be used as a rapid measure of antibiotic effect on microorganisms. Broth cultures of log phase bacteria were incubated at 310 K (37 C) for 2.5 hours at antimicrobial concentrations which resulted in the best discrimination between sensitive and resistant strains. Eighty-seven strains of 11 bacterial species were studied for their susceptibility to 12 commonly used antimicrobial agents: ampicillin, Penicillin G, nafcillin, carbenicillin, cephalothin, tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, colistin, and chloramplenicol. The major advantage of the ATP system over existing methods of rapid microbial susceptibility testing is that the assay can be made specific for bacterial ATP.

  17. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-10-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose. PMID:26434492

  18. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose. PMID:26434492

  19. Photoinduced electron transfer between Fe(III) and adenosine triphosphate-BODIPY conjugates: Application to alkaline-phosphatase-linked immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Hui; Yang, Ya-Chun; Shih, Ya-Chen; Hung, Szu-Ying; Lu, Chi-Yu; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2016-03-15

    Fluorescent boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) analogs are often used as sensors for detecting various species because of their relatively high extinction coefficients, outstanding fluorescence quantum yields, photostability, and pH-independent fluorescence. However, there is little-to-no information in the literature that describes the use of BODIPY analogs for detecting alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and inhibition. This study discovered that the fluorescence of BODIPY-conjugated adenosine triphosphate (BODIPY-ATP) was quenched by Fe(III) ions through photoinduced electron transfer. The ALP-catalyzed hydrolysis of BODIPY-ATP resulted in the formation of BODIPY-adenosine and phosphate ions. The fluorescence of the generated BODIPY-adenosine was insensitive to the change in the concentration of Fe(III) ions. Thus, the Fe(III)-induced fluorescence quenching of BODIPY-ATP can be paired with its ALP-mediated dephosphorylation to design a turn-on fluorescence probe for ALP sensing. A method detection limit at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for ALP was estimated to be 0.02 units/L (~6 pM; 1 ng/mL). This probe was used for the screening of ALP inhibitors, including Na3VO4, imidazole, and arginine. Because ALP is widely used in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, the probe was coupled to an ALP-linked immunosorbent assay for the sensitive and selective detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG). The lowest detectable concentration for IgG in this system was 5 ng/mL. Compared with the use of 3,6-fluorescein diphosphate as a signal reporter in an ALP-linked immunosorbent assay, the proposed system provided comparable sensitivity, large linear range, and high stability over temperature and pH changes. PMID:26409025

  20. Specific, reversible inactivation of phosphofructokinase by fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. Involvement of adenosine 5'-triphosphate, oleate, and 3-phosphoglycerate.

    PubMed

    Proffitt, R T; Sankaran, L

    1976-06-29

    Optimal conditions necessary for the reversible inactivation of crystalline rabbit muscle phosphofructokinase by homogeneous rabbit liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase have been studied. At higher enzyme levels (to 530 mug/ml of phosphofructokinase) the two proteins were mixed and incubated in a pH 7.5 buffer composed of 50 mM Tris-HC1, 2 mM potassium phosphate, and 0.2 mM dithiothreitol. Aliquots were removed at various times and assayed for enzyme activity. A time dependent inactivation of phosphofructokinase caused by 1-2.3 times its weight of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase was observed at 30, 23, and 0 degree C. This inactivation did not require the presence of adenosine 5'-triphosphate or Mg2+ in the incubation mixture, but an adenosine 5'-triphosphate concentration of 2.7 mM or greater was required in the assay to keep phosphofructokinase in an inactive form. A mixture of activators (inorganic phosphate, (NH4)2SO4, and adenosine 5'-monophosphate), when added to the assay cuvette, restored nearly all of the expected enzyme activity. Incubations with other proteins, including aldolase, at concentrations equal to or greater than the effective quantity of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase had no inhibitory effect on phosphofructokinase activity. Removal of tightly bound fructose 1,6-bisphosphate from phosphofructokinase could not explain this inactivation, since several analyses of crystalline phosphofructokinase averaged less than 0.1 mol of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate/320 000 g of enzyme. Furthermore, the inactivation occurred in the absence of Mg2+ where the complete lack of fructose-1-6-bisphosphatase activity was confirmed directly. At lower phosphofructokinase concentrations (0.2-2 mug/ml) the inactivation was studied directly in the assay cuvette. Higher ratios of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase to phosphofructokinase were necessary in these cases, but oleate and 3-phosphoglycerate acted synergistically with lower amounts of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase to cause

  1. Evidence for a "metabolically inactive" inorganic phosphate pool in adenosine triphosphate synthase reaction using localized 31P saturation transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the rat brain at 11.7 T.

    PubMed

    Tiret, Brice; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Valette, Julien

    2016-09-01

    With the increased spectral resolution made possible at high fields, a second, smaller inorganic phosphate resonance can be resolved on (31)P magnetic resonance spectra in the rat brain. Saturation transfer was used to estimate de novo adenosine triphosphate synthesis reaction rate. While the main inorganic phosphate pool is used by adenosine triphosphate synthase, the second pool is inactive for this reaction. Accounting for this new pool may not only help us understand (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolic profiles better but also better quantify adenosine triphosphate synthesis. PMID:27354096

  2. Online cleanup of accelerated solvent extractions for determination of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) in royal jelly using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiaofeng; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Jinhui; Chen, Fang; Li, Yi; Zhao, Jing

    2009-06-10

    Determination of the levels of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) in royal jelly is important for the study of its pharmacological activities, health benefits, and adenosine phosphate degradation. In this study was developed a novel method to determine ATP, ADP, and AMP levels in royal jelly using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) followed by online cleanup and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode array detection (DAD). The optimum extraction conditions were obtained using an 11 mL ASE cell, ethanol/water (5:5 v/v) as the extraction solvent, 1500 psi, 80 degrees C, a 5 min static time, and a 60% flush volume. Optimum separation of the three compounds was achieved in <25 min using a Waters XBridge Shield RP18 column with 0.05 mol L(-1) NH(4)H(2)PO(4) (pH 5.70) and acetonitrile as the mobile phase. Detection was performed at 257 nm. The method was sensitive (LOD adenosine phosphate extraction procedures (perchloric acid). The results indicate that the two techniques are similar in terms of recovery and reproducibility, but when other factors such as extraction time, environmental protection, and worker's health are considered, ASE is preferable to the classical extraction method. With this ASE-HPLC method, a minisurvey of ATP, ADP, and AMP levels in 15 samples of royal jelly of different origins was performed. Sample results indicated that the AMP concentration was 24.2-2214.4 mg kg(-1), whereas ATP and ADP were not detectable or present only at low levels. PMID:19435312

  3. Heterogeneity of tumor chemosensitivity in ovarian epithelial cancer revealed using the adenosine triphosphate-tumor chemosensitivity assay

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIN; LI, HONGXIA

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis, primarily due to the heterogeneity in chemosensitivity among patients. In the present study, this heterogeneity was evaluated in ovarian epithelial cancer (OEC) using an in vitro adenosine triphosphate tumor chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA). Specimens were collected from 80 patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery. Viable ovarian cancer cells obtained from malignant tissues were tested for sensitivity to paclitaxel (PTX), carboplatin (CBP), topotecan (TPT), gemcitabine (GEM), docetaxel (TXT), etoposide, bleomycin and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide using ATP-TCA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for the clinical chemotherapy sensitivity of OEC were 88.6, 77.8, 83 and 84.8%, respectively. PTX demonstrated the highest sensitivity of all agents tested (82.5% in all specimens, 85.7% in recurrent specimens), followed by CBP (58.8 and 60.7%, respectively). The sensitivities to PTX and docetaxel (P<0.001) were correlated, in addition to those of CBP, TPT and GEM (P<0.001). Early-stage (I/II) and high- to mildly-differentiated OEC specimens revealed a lower chemosensitivity than advanced-stage (III) or low-differentiated specimens, respectively. The present study indicated that ATP-TCA is an effective method for guiding the choice of chemotherapy drugs. Notable heterogeneity of chemosensitivity was observed in the OEC specimens. PMID:26137074

  4. Calcium and adenosine triphosphate control of cellular pathology: asparaginase-induced pancreatitis elicited via protease-activated receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shuang; Gerasimenko, Julia V.; Tsugorka, Tatiana; Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Gerasimenko, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Exocytotic secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells is elicited by physiological cytosolic Ca2+ signals, occurring as repetitive short-lasting spikes largely confined to the secretory granule region, that stimulate mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. By contrast, sustained global cytosolic Ca2+ elevations decrease ATP levels and cause necrosis, leading to the disease acute pancreatitis (AP). Toxic Ca2+ signals can be evoked by products of alcohol and fatty acids as well as bile acids. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which l-asparaginase evokes AP. Asparaginase is an essential element in the successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common type of cancer affecting children, but AP is a side-effect occurring in about 5–10% of cases. Like other pancreatitis-inducing agents, asparaginase evoked intracellular Ca2+ release followed by Ca2+ entry and also substantially reduced Ca2+ extrusion because of decreased intracellular ATP levels. The toxic Ca2+ signals caused extensive necrosis. The asparaginase-induced pathology depended on protease-activated receptor 2 and its inhibition prevented the toxic Ca2+ signals and necrosis. We tested the effects of inhibiting the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ entry by the Ca2+ channel inhibitor GSK-7975A. This markedly reduced asparaginase-induced Ca2+ entry and also protected effectively against the development of necrosis. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377732

  5. Spectroscopic study of the interaction between adenosine disodium triphosphate and gatifloxacin-Al3+ complex and its analytical application.

    PubMed

    Kamruzzaman, Mohammad; Faruqui, A Nayeem; Hossain, Mohammed Ifteker; Lee, Sang Hak

    2015-11-01

    A new and sensitive spectrofluorimetric method has been proposed to determine trace amount of adenosine disodium triphosphate (ATP). The method is based on the fluorimetric interaction between gatifloxacin (GFLX)-aluminium (III) (Al(3+) ) complex and ATP and studied using UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. Weak luminescence spectra of Al(3+) were enhanced after complexation with GFLX at 423 nm upon excitation at 272 nm due to energy transfer from the ligand to the Al(3+) ion. It was observed that the FL emission spectrum of GFLX-Al(3+) was enhanced significantly by the addition of ATP. Under the optimal conditions, the enhancement of FL intensity at 423 nm was responded linearly with the concentration of ATP in the range 1.3 × 10(-10) - 1.0 × 10(-8) mol L(-1) with correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9981. The limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 1.1 × 10(-11) mol L(-1) for ATP with the standard deviation (RSD) of 1.21% for five repeated measurement of 2.3 × 10(-8) mol L(-1) ATP. The presented method is simple, sensitive, free from coexisting interferents and can be applied successfully to determine ATP in the real samples. PMID:25683636

  6. Calcium and adenosine triphosphate control of cellular pathology: asparaginase-induced pancreatitis elicited via protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shuang; Gerasimenko, Julia V; Tsugorka, Tatiana; Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Petersen, Ole H; Gerasimenko, Oleg V

    2016-08-01

    Exocytotic secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells is elicited by physiological cytosolic Ca(2+) signals, occurring as repetitive short-lasting spikes largely confined to the secretory granule region, that stimulate mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. By contrast, sustained global cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations decrease ATP levels and cause necrosis, leading to the disease acute pancreatitis (AP). Toxic Ca(2+) signals can be evoked by products of alcohol and fatty acids as well as bile acids. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which l-asparaginase evokes AP. Asparaginase is an essential element in the successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common type of cancer affecting children, but AP is a side-effect occurring in about 5-10% of cases. Like other pancreatitis-inducing agents, asparaginase evoked intracellular Ca(2+) release followed by Ca(2+) entry and also substantially reduced Ca(2+) extrusion because of decreased intracellular ATP levels. The toxic Ca(2+) signals caused extensive necrosis. The asparaginase-induced pathology depended on protease-activated receptor 2 and its inhibition prevented the toxic Ca(2+) signals and necrosis. We tested the effects of inhibiting the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) entry by the Ca(2+) channel inhibitor GSK-7975A. This markedly reduced asparaginase-induced Ca(2+) entry and also protected effectively against the development of necrosis.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377732

  7. Probing the Interaction at the Nano–Bio Interface Using Raman Spectroscopy: ZnO Nanoparticles and Adenosine Triphosphate Biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of nanobiotechnology, there will be an increase in the interaction between engineered nanomaterials and biomolecules. Nanoconjugates with cells, organelles, and intracellular structures containing DNA, RNA, and proteins establish sequences of nano–bio boundaries that depend on several intricate complex biophysicochemical reactions. Given the complexity of these interactions, and their import in governing life at the molecular level, it is extremely important to begin to understand such nanoparticle–biomaterial association. Here we report a unique method of probing the kinematics between an energy biomolecule, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and hydrothermally synthesized ZnO nanostructures using micro Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy experiments. For the first time we have shown by Raman spectroscopy analysis that the ZnO nanostructures interact strongly with the nitrogen (N7) atom in the adenine ring of the ATP biomolecule. Raman spectroscopy also confirms the importance of nucleotide base NH2 group hydrogen bonding with water molecules and phosphate group ionization and their pH dependence. Calculation of molecular bond force constants from Raman spectroscopy reinforces our experimental data. These data present convincing evidence of pH-dependent interactions between ATP and zinc oxide nanomaterials. Significantly, Raman spectroscopy is able to probe such difficult to study and subtle nano–bio interactions and may be applied to elegantly elucidate the nano–bio interface more generally. PMID:25152799

  8. Label-free fluorescence strategy for sensitive detection of adenosine triphosphate using a loop DNA probe with low background noise.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chunshui; Cai, Zhixiong; Wang, Yiru; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James; Chen, Xi

    2014-07-15

    A simple, rapid, label-free, and ultrasensitive fluorescence strategy for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) detection was developed using a loop DNA probe with low background noise. In this strategy, a loop DNA probe, which is the substrate for both ligation and digestion enzyme reaction, was designed. SYBR green I (SG I), a double-stranded specific dye, was applied for the readout fluorescence signal. Exonuclease I (Exo I) and exonuclease III (Exo III), sequence-independent nucleases, were selected to digest the loop DNA probe in order to minimize the background fluorescence signal. As a result, in the absence of ATP, the loop DNA was completely digested by Exo I and Exo III, leading to low background fluorescence owing to the weak electrostatic interaction between SG I and mononucleotides. On the other hand, ATP induced the ligation of the nicking site, and the sealed loop DNA resisted the digestion of Exo I and ExoIII, resulting in a remarkable increase of fluorescence response. Upon background noise reduction, the sensitivity of the ATP determination was improved significantly, and the detection limitation was found to be 1.2 pM, which is much lower than that in almost all the previously reported methods. This strategy has promise for wide application in the determination of ATP. PMID:24983417

  9. Influence of Thromboxane A2 on the Regulation of Adenosine Triphosphate-Sensitive Potassium Channels in Mouse Ventricular Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, In Seok; Cho, Hwa Jin; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Kim, Sang Hyung; Na, Kook Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels play an important role in myocardial protection. We examined the effects of thromboxane A2 on the regulation of KATP channel activity in single ventricular myocytes. Subjects and Methods Single ventricular myocytes were isolated from the hearts of adult Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice by enzymatic digestion. Single channel activity was recorded by excised inside-out and cell-attached patch clamp configurations at −60 mV holding potential during the perfusion of an ATP-free K-5 solution. Results In the excised inside-out patches, the thromboxane A2 analog, U46619, decreased the KATP channel activity in a dose-dependent manner; however, the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist, SQ29548, did not significantly attenuate the inhibitory effect of U46619. In the cell-attached patches, U46619 inhibited dinitrophenol (DNP)-induced KATP channel activity in a dose-dependent manner, and SQ29548 attenuated the inhibitory effects of U46619 on DNP-induced KATP channel activity. Conclusion Thromboxane A2 may inhibit KATP channel activity, and may have a harmful effect on ischemic myocardium. PMID:27482267

  10. Selective and sensitive turn-on detection of adenosine triphosphate and thrombin based on bifunctional fluorescent oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Du, Zongfeng; Yang, Limin; Tang, Bo

    2013-03-15

    A bifunctional fluorescent oligonucleotide probe for small molecules and protein detection has been developed based on turn on fluorescence response via the target induced structure-switching of molecular beacon. The two loops of this molecular beacon are designed in such a manner that they consist of thrombin (Tmb) aptamer sequence and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer sequence, respectively, which are utilized to sense thrombin and ATP. The oligonucleotide forms double stem-loops in the absence of targets, yielding no fluorescence emission because of the FRET from the excited fluorophore to the proximal quencher. Upon addition of the target, the ATP or Tmb, its specific interaction with loop sequence of the hairpin structure induce the separation of reporter fluorophore and the fluorescence quencher of the molecular beacon, resulting in an increase of fluorescence response. Hence, the separate analysis of ATP and Tmb could be realized through only one designed molecular beacon. The detection limits were estimated to be 25 nM for ATP and 12 nM for Tmb, respectively. The results of this study should substantially broaden the perspective for future development of oligonucleotide probe for analysis of other analytes. PMID:23102434

  11. Rapid detection of Escherichia coli and enterococci in recreational water using an immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bushon, R.N.; Brady, A.M.; Likirdopulos, C.A.; Cireddu, J.V.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to examine a rapid method for detecting Escherichia coli and enterococci in recreational water. Methods and Results: Water samples were assayed for E. coli and enterococci by traditional and immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate (IMS/ATP) methods. Three sample treatments were evaluated for the IMS/ATP method: double filtration, single filtration, and direct analysis. Pearson's correlation analysis showed strong, significant, linear relations between IMS/ATP and traditional methods for all sample treatments; strongest linear correlations were with the direct analysis (r = 0.62 and 0.77 for E. coli and enterococci, respectively). Additionally, simple linear regression was used to estimate bacteria concentrations as a function of IMS/ATP results. The correct classification of water-quality criteria was 67% for E. coli and 80% for enterococci. Conclusions: The IMS/ATP method is a viable alternative to traditional methods for faecal-indicator bacteria. Significance and Impact of the Study: The IMS/ATP method addresses critical public health needs for the rapid detection of faecal-indicator contamination and has potential for satisfying US legislative mandates requiring methods to detect bathing water contamination in 2 h or less. Moreover, IMS/ATP equipment is considerably less costly and more portable than that for molecular methods, making the method suitable for field applications. ?? 2009 The Authors.

  12. A new strategy for the detection of adenosine triphosphate by aptamer/quantum dot biosensor based on chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zi-Ming; Yu, Yong; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2012-09-21

    We designed an aptasensor for the detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) based on chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET). An adenosine aptamer was cut into two pieces of ssDNA, which were attached to quantum dots (QDs) and horse radish peroxidase (HRP), respectively. They could reassemble into specific structures in the presence of ATP and then decrease the distance of HRP and QDs. ATP detection can be easily realized according to the fluorescent intensity of QDs, which is excited by CRET between luminol and QDs. Results show that the concentration of ATP is linear relation with the fluorescent intensity of the peak of QDs emission and the linear range for the linear equation is from 50 μM to 231 μM and the detection limit was 185 nM. When the concentration of ATP was 2 mM, the efficiency of CRET is 13.6%. Good specificity for ATP had been demonstrated compared to thymidine triphosphate (TTP), cytidine triphosphate (CTP) and guanosine triphosphate (GTP), when 1 mM of each was added, respectively. This method needs no external light source and can avoid autofluorescence and photobleaching, and ATP can be detected selectively, specifically, and sensitively in a low micromolar range, which means that the strategy reported here can be applicable to the detection of several other target molecules. PMID:22832507

  13. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ triphosphate (ATP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, Khaled; El-Feki, Hafed; Marsan, Olivier; Drouet, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    ATP is a well-known energy supplier in cells. The idea to associate ATP to pharmaceutical formulations/biotechnological devices to promote cells activity by potentially modulating their microenvironment thus appears as an appealing novel approach. Since biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites have shown great promise for biomedical applications (bone regeneration, cells diagnostics/therapeutics, …), thanks to a high surface reactivity and an intrinsically high biocompatibility, the present contribution was aimed at exploring ATP/apatite interactions. ATP adsorption on a synthetic carbonated nanocrystalline apatite preliminarily characterized (by XRD, FTIR, Raman, TG-DTA and SEM-EDX) was investigated in detail, pointing out a good agreement with Sips isothermal features. Adsorption characteristics were compared to those previously obtained on monophosphate nucleotides (AMP, CMP), unveiling some specificities. ATP was found to adsorb effectively onto biomimetic apatite: despite smaller values of the affinity constant KS and the exponential factor m, larger adsorbed amounts were reached for ATP as compared to AMP for any given concentration in solution. m < 1 suggests that the ATP/apatite adsorption process is mostly guided by direct surface bonding rather than through stabilizing intermolecular interactions. Although standard ΔGads ° was estimated to only -4 kJ/mol, the large value of Nmax led to significantly negative effective ΔGads values down to -33 kJ/mol, reflecting the spontaneous character of adsorption process. Vibrational spectroscopy data (FTIR and Raman) pointed out spectral modifications upon adsorption, confirming chemical-like interactions where both the triphosphate group of ATP and its nucleic base were involved. The present study is intended to serve as a basis for future research works involving ATP and apatite nanocrystals/nanoparticles in view of biomedical applications (e.g. bone tissue engineering, intracellular drug delivery, …).

  14. [Adenosine and its role in physiology].

    PubMed

    Novotný, J

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is not just a major component of adenine nucleotides and ribonucleic acids, but also has its own signaling functions. ExtraceIlular level of adenosine in an organism is strictly maintained through the balance between its formation, degradation and transport. Adenosine is formed by enzymatic degradation of adenosine triphosphate and eliminated by phosphorylation to adenosine monophosphate or by deamination to inosine. Transport of adenosine across the cell membrane is ensured by equilibrative and concentrative nucleoside transporters. All these processes participate in maintenance of adenosine level under normal conditions, but a balanced equilibrium can be disrupted in some pathophysiological situations. Extracellular adenosine as a signaling molecule binds to adenosine receptors, which may trigger via their cognate trimeric G proteins different signaling pathways. In this way, adenosine regulates energy homeostasis and affects the function of various organs. Targeted pharmacological manipulations of specific adenosine receptor subtypes or enzymes involved in its metabolism can potentially be used for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26738245

  15. On the use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to elucidate the structure of lutetium adenosine mono- and triphosphate complexes.

    PubMed

    Mostapha, S; Berthon, C; Fontaine-Vive, F; Gaysinski, M; Guérin, L; Guillaumont, D; Massi, L; Monfardini, I; Solari, P L; Thomas, O P; Charbonnel, M C; Den Auwer, C

    2014-02-01

    Although the physiological impact of the actinide elements as nuclear toxicants has been widely investigated for half a century, a description of their interactions with biological molecules remains limited. It is however of primary importance to better assess the determinants of actinide speciation in cells and more generally in living organisms to unravel the molecular processes underlying actinide transport and deposition in tissues. The biological pathways of this family of elements in case of accidental contamination or chronic natural exposure (in the case of uranium rich soils for instance) are therefore a crucial issue of public health and of societal impact. Because of the high chemical affinity of those actinide elements for phosphate groups and the ubiquity of such chemical functions in biochemistry, phosphate derivatives are considered as probable targets of these cations. Among them, nucleotides and in particular adenosine mono- (AMP) and triphosphate (ATP) nucleotides occur in more chemical reactions than any other compounds on the earth's surface, except water, and are therefore critical target molecules. In the present study, we are interested in trans-plutonium actinide elements, in particular americium and curium that are more rarely considered in environmental and bioaccumulation studies than early actinides like uranium, neptunium and plutonium. A first step in this strategy is to work with chemical analogues like lanthanides that are not radioactive and therefore allow extended physical chemical characterization to be conducted that are difficult to perform with radioactive materials. We describe herein the interaction of lutetium(III) with adenosine AMP and ATP. With AMP and ATP, insoluble amorphous compounds have been obtained with molar ratios of 1:2 and 1:1, respectively. With an excess of ATP, with 1:2 molar ratio, a soluble complex has been obtained. A combination of spectroscopic techniques (IR, NMR, ESI-MS, EXAFS) together with quantum

  16. Diastolic Dysfunction Induced by a High-Fat Diet Is Associated with Mitochondrial Abnormality and Adenosine Triphosphate Levels in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ki-Woon; Kim, Ok-Soon; Chin, Jung Yeon; Kim, Won Ho; Park, Sang Hyun; Choi, Yu Jeong; Shin, Jong Ho; Jung, Kyung Tae; Lim, Do-Seon

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is well-known as a risk factor for heart failure, including diastolic dysfunction. However, this mechanism in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese rats remain controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cardiac dysfunction develops when rats are fed with a HFD for 10 weeks; additionally, we sought to investigate the association between mitochondrial abnormalities, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels and cardiac dysfunction. Methods We examined myocardia in Wistar rats after 10 weeks of HFD (45 kcal% fat, n=6) or standard diet (SD, n=6). Echocardiography, histomorphologic analysis, and electron microscopy were performed. The expression levels of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) subunit genes, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator-1α (PGC1α) and anti-oxidant enzymes were assessed. Markers of oxidative stress damage, mitochondrial DNA copy number and myocardial ATP level were also examined. Results After 10 weeks, the body weight of the HFD group (349.6±22.7 g) was significantly higher than that of the SD group (286.8±14.9 g), and the perigonadal and epicardial fat weights of the HFD group were significantly higher than that of the SD group. Histomorphologic and electron microscopic images were similar between the two groups. However, in the myocardium of the HFD group, the expression levels of OXPHOS subunit NDUFB5 in complex I and PGC1α, and the mitochondrial DNA copy number were decreased and the oxidative stress damage marker 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was increased, accompanied by reduced ATP levels. Conclusion Diastolic dysfunction was accompanied by the mitochondrial abnormality and reduced ATP levels in the myocardium of 10 weeks-HFD-induced rats. PMID:26790384

  17. Depletion of cellular adenosine triphosphate and hepatocellular damage in rat after subchronic exposure to leachate from anthropogenic recycling site.

    PubMed

    Akintunde, J K; Oboh, G

    2015-11-01

    One of the major hazards arising from recycling sites is the generation of leachate containing mixed metal. This study evaluated the toxic effects of leachate obtained from Elewi Odo municipal auto-battery recycling site (EOMABRSL) on male liver functions using hepatic indices and biomarker of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in rat via the oral route. Concentrations of heavy metals analysis showed that lead, cadmium, nickel, chromium, manganese, and iron were 1.5-, 2-, 2.5-, 1.36-, 19.61-, and 8.89-folds, respectively, higher than acceptable limits set by regulatory authority World Health Organization. Copper, zinc, and cobalt were 5.9-, 300-, and 1.02-folds, respectively, lower than permissible limits. The EOMABRSL was administered at 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100% concentrations to adult male rats for 60 days. Following exposure, plasma and livers were collected for several biochemistry assays. Exposure of animals to EOMABRSL resulted in 27.51, 28.14, 63.93, 28.42, and 40.16% increase in aspartate aminotransferase activity, whereas it elevated alanine aminotransferase activity by 5.35, 22.33, 88.68, 183.02, and 193.08%, respectively, when compared with the control. Similarly, γ-glutamyl transferase activity increased by 111.22, 114.19, 122.96, 573.14, and 437.02%, respectively, when compared with the control. EOMABRSL administration significantly decreased catalase activity and reduced glutathione level and superoxide dismutase with concomitant increase in malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide levels. Also, significant (p < 0.05) decrease in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity (marker of cellular ATP) was observed. Taken together, the hepatotoxicity of EOMABRSL could be due to the depletion of LDH and induction of oxidative damage, which may suggest possible health hazards in subjects with occupational or environmental exposure. PMID:25645823

  18. Lack of correlation between Legionella colonization and microbial population quantification using heterotrophic plate count and adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence measurement.

    PubMed

    Duda, Scott; Baron, Julianne L; Wagener, Marilyn M; Vidic, Radisav D; Stout, Janet E

    2015-07-01

    This investigation compared biological quantification of potable and non-potable (cooling) water samples using pour plate heterotrophic plate count (HPC) methods and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration measurement using bioluminescence. The relationship between these measurements and the presence of Legionella spp. was also examined. HPC for potable and non-potable water were cultured on R2A and PCA, respectively. Results indicated a strong correlation between HPC and ATP measurements in potable water (R = 0.90, p < 0.001). In the make-up water and two cooling towers, the correlations between ATP and HPC were much weaker but statistically significant (make-up water: R = 0.37, p = 0.005; cooling tower 1: R = 0.52, p < 0.001; cooling tower 2: R = 0.54, p < 0.001). For potable and non-potable samples, HPC exhibited higher measurement variability than ATP. However, ATP measurements showed higher microbial concentrations than HPC measurements. Following chlorination of the cooling towers, ATP measurements indicated very low bacterial concentrations (<10 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL) despite high HPC concentrations (>1000 CFU/mL) which consisted primarily of non-tuberculous mycobacteria. HPC concentrations have been suggested to be predictive of Legionella presence, although this has not been proven. Our evaluation showed that HPC or ATP demonstrated a fair predictive capacity for Legionella positivity in potable water (HPC: receiver operating characteristic (ROC) = 0.70; ATP: ROC = 0.78; p = 0.003). However, HPC or ATP correctly classified sites as positive only 64 and 62% of the time, respectively. No correlation between HPC or ATP and Legionella colonization in non-potable water samples was found (HPC: ROC = 0.28; ATP: ROC = 0.44; p = 0.193). PMID:26038316

  19. Gating of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channels by Adenosine Triphosphate Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zeltwanger, Shawn; Wang, Fei; Wang, Guo-Tang; Gillis, Kevin D.; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    1999-01-01

    Gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) involves a coordinated action of ATP on two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Previous studies using nonhydrolyzable ATP analogues and NBD mutant CFTR have suggested that nucleotide hydrolysis at NBD1 is required for opening of the channel, while hydrolysis of nucleotides at NBD2 controls channel closing. We studied ATP-dependent gating of CFTR in excised inside-out patches from stably transfected NIH3T3 cells. Single channel kinetics of CFTR gating at different [ATP] were analyzed. The closed time constant (τc) decreased with increasing [ATP] to a minimum value of ∼0.43 s at [ATP] >1.00 mM. The open time constant (τo) increased with increasing [ATP] with a minimal τo of ∼260 ms. Kinetic analysis of K1250A-CFTR, a mutant that abolishes ATP hydrolysis at NBD2, reveals the presence of two open states. A short open state with a time constant of ∼250 ms is dominant at low ATP concentrations (10 μM) and a much longer open state with a time constant of ∼3 min is present at millimolar ATP. These data suggest that nucleotide binding and hydrolysis at NBD1 is coupled to channel opening and that the channel can close without nucleotide interaction with NBD2. A quantitative cyclic gating scheme with microscopic irreversibility was constructed based on the kinetic parameters derived from single-channel analysis. The estimated values of the kinetic parameters suggest that NBD1 and NBD2 are neither functionally nor biochemically equivalent. PMID:10102935

  20. Evidence that adenosine triphosphate or a related nucleotide is the transmitter substance released by non-adrenergic inhibitory nerves in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Burnstock, G; Campbell, G; Satchell, D; Smythe, ANNE

    1997-01-01

    Stimulation of the vagal non-adrenergic inhibitory innervation caused the release of adenosine and inosine into vascular perfusates from the stomachs of guinea-pigs and toads. Stimulation of portions of Auerbach's plexus isolated from turkey gizzard caused the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). ATP, added to solutions perfused through the toad stomach vasculature, was broken down to adenosine, inosine and adenine. Of a series of purine and pyrimidine derivatives tested for inhibitory activity on the guinea-pig isolated taenia coli, ATP and ADP were the most potent. ATP caused inhibition of twelve other gut preparations previously shown to contain non-adrenergic inhibitory nerves. The inhibitory action of ATP was not prevented by tetrodotoxin. Quinidine antagonized relaxations of the guinea-pig taenia coli caused by catecholamines or adrenergic nerve stimulation. Higher concentrations of quinidine antagonized relaxations caused by ATP or non-adrenergic inhibitory nerve stimulation. When tachyphylaxis to ATP had been produced in the rabbit ileum, there was a consistent depression of the responses to non-adrenergic inhibitory nerve stimulation but not of responses to adrenergic nerve stimulation. It is suggested that ATP or a related nucleotide is the transmitter substance released by the non-adrenergic inhibitory innervation of the gut. PMID:9142414

  1. Using an Adenosine Triphosphate Bioluminescent Assay to Determine Effective Antibiotic Combinations against Carbapenem-Resistant Gram Negative Bacteria within 24 Hours

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yiying; Leck, Hui; Lim, Tze Peng; Teo, Jocelyn; Lee, Winnie; Hsu, Li Yang; Koh, Tse Hsien; Tan, Thuan Tong; Tan, Thean-Yen; Kwa, Andrea Lay-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background Current in vitro combination testing methods involve enumeration by bacterial plating, which is labor-intensive and time-consuming. Measurement of bioluminescence, released when bacterial adenosine triphosphate binds to firefly luciferin-luciferase, has been proposed as a surrogate for bacterial counts. We developed an ATP bioluminescent combination testing assay with a rapid turnaround time of 24h to determine effective antibiotic combinations. Methods 100 strains of carbapenem-resistant (CR) GNB [30 Acinetobacter baumannii (AB), 30 Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and 40 Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP)] were used. Bacterial suspensions (105 CFU/ml) were added to 96-well plates containing clinically achievable concentrations of multiple single and two-antibiotic combinations. At 24h, the luminescence intensity of each well was measured. Receiver operator characteristic curves were plotted to determine optimal luminescence threshold (TRLU) to discriminate between inhibitory/non-inhibitory combinations when compared to viable plating. The unweighted accuracy (UA) [(sensitivity + specificity)/2] of TRLU values was determined. External validation was further done using 50 additional CR-GNB. Results Predictive accuracies of TRLU were high for when all antibiotic combinations and species were collectively analyzed (TRLU = 0.81, UA = 89%). When individual thresholds for each species were determined, UA remained high. Predictive accuracy was highest for KP (TRLU = 0.81, UA = 91%), and lowest for AB (TRLU = 0.83, UA = 87%). Upon external validation, high overall accuracy (91%) was observed. The assay distinguished inhibitory/non-inhibitory combinations with UA of 80%, 94% and 93% for AB, PA and KP respectively. Conclusion We developed an assay that is robust at identifying useful combinations with a rapid turn-around time of 24h, and may be employed to guide the timely selection of effective antibiotic combinations. PMID:26460891

  2. Identification of widespread adenosine nucleotide binding in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Ortega, Corrie; Payne, Samuel H.; Haft, Daniel H.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Lewis, Michael P.; Ollodart, Anja R.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Shukla, Anil K.; Fortuin, Suereta; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Grundner, Christoph; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-01-24

    The annotation of protein function is almost completely performed by in silico approaches. However, computational prediction of protein function is frequently incomplete and error prone. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), ~25% of all genes have no predicted function and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. This lack of functional information severely limits our understanding of Mtb pathogenicity. Current tools for experimental functional annotation are limited and often do not scale to entire protein families. Here, we report a generally applicable chemical biology platform to functionally annotate bacterial proteins by combining activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) and quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics. As an example of this approach for high-throughput protein functional validation and discovery, we experimentally annotate the families of ATP-binding proteins in Mtb. Our data experimentally validate prior in silico predictions of >250 ATPases and adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins, and reveal 73 hypothetical proteins as novel ATP-binding proteins. We identify adenosine cofactor interactions with many hypothetical proteins containing a diversity of unrelated sequences, providing a new and expanded view of adenosine nucleotide binding in Mtb. Furthermore, many of these hypothetical proteins are both unique to Mycobacteria and essential for infection, suggesting specialized functions in mycobacterial physiology and pathogenicity. Thus, we provide a generally applicable approach for high throughput protein function discovery and validation, and highlight several ways in which application of activity-based proteomics data can improve the quality of functional annotations to facilitate novel biological insights.

  3. Comparison of plate counts, Petrifilm, dipslides, and adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence for monitoring bacteria in cooling-tower waters.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Sherry A; Anderson, James E; Kim, Byung R; Ball, James C

    2009-04-01

    Effective bacterial control in cooling-tower systems requires accurate and timely methods to count bacteria. Plate-count methods are difficult to implement on-site, because they are time- and labor-intensive and require sterile techniques. Several field-applicable methods (dipslides, Petrifilm, and adenosine triphosphate [ATP] bioluminescence) were compared with the plate count for two sample matrices--phosphate-buffered saline solution containing a pure culture of Pseudomonas fluorescens and cooling-tower water containing an undefined mixed bacterial culture. For the pure culture, (1) counts determined on nutrient agar and plate-count agar (PCA) media and expressed as colony-forming units (CFU) per milliliter were equivalent to those on R2A medium (p = 1.0 and p = 1.0, respectively); (2) Petrifilm counts were not significantly different from R2A plate counts (p = 0.99); (3) the dipslide counts were up to 2 log units higher than R2A plate counts, but this discrepancy was not statistically significant (p = 0.06); and (4) a discernable correlation (r2 = 0.67) existed between ATP readings and plate counts. For cooling-tower water samples (n = 62), (1) bacterial counts using R2A medium were higher (but not significant; p = 0.63) than nutrient agar and significantly higher than tryptone-glucose yeast extract (TGE; p = 0.03) and PCA (p < 0.001); (2) Petrifilm counts were significantly lower than nutrient agar or R2A (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001, respectively), but not statistically different from TGE, PCA, and dipslides (p = 0.55, p = 0.69, and p = 0.91, respectively); (3) the dipslide method yielded bacteria counts 1 to 3 log units lower than nutrient agar and R2A (p < 0.001), but was not significantly different from Petrifilm (p = 0.91), PCA (p = 1.00) or TGE (p = 0.07); (4) the differences between dipslides and the other methods became greater with a 6-day incubation time; and (5) the correlation between ATP readings and plate counts varied from system to system, was poor

  4. The hydrolysis activity of Adenosine triphosphate in myosin: a theoretical analysis of anomeric effects and the nature of transition state

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Cui, Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations with density functional theory are employed to analyze two issues related to the hydrolysis activity of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in myosin. First, we compare the geometrical properties and electronic structure of ATP in the open (post-rigor) and closed (pre-powerstroke) active sites of the myosin motor domain. Compared to both solution and the open active-site cases, the scissile Pγ-O3β bond of ATP in the closed active-site is shown to be substantially elongated. Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis clearly shows that this structural feature is correlated with the stronger anomeric effects in the closed active site, which involve charge transfers from the lone-pairs in the non-bridging oxygen in the γ phosphate to the anti-bonding orbital of the scissile bond. However, an energetic analysis finds that the ATP molecule is not significantly destabilized by the Pγ-O3β bond elongation. Therefore, despite the notable perturbations in the geometry and electronic structure of ATP as its environment changes from solution to the hydrolysis-competent active site, ground state destabilization is unlikely to play a major role in enhancing the hydrolysis activity in myosin. Second, two-dimensional potential energy maps are used to better characterize the energetic landscape near the hydrolysis transition state. The results indicate that the transition state region is energetically flat and a range of structures representative of different mechanisms according to the classical nomenclature (e.g., “associative”, “dissociative” and “concerted”) are very close in energy. Therefore, at least in the case of ATP hydrolysis in myosin, the energetic distinction between different reaction mechanisms following the conventional nomenclature is likely small. This study highlights the importance of (i). explicitly evaluating the relevant energetic properties for determining whether a factor is essential

  5. Randomized clinical trial of adenosine 5'-triphosphate on tumor growth and survival in advanced lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Agteresch, Hendrik J; Burgers, Sjaak A; van der Gaast, Ate; Wilson, J H Paul; Dagnelie, Pieter C

    2003-09-01

    We recently reported that regular infusions of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) inhibited loss of body weight and quality of life in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present paper we investigated whether ATP affects tumor growth and survival in the same group of patients. Fifty-eight NSCLC patients (stage IIIB or IV) were randomly assigned to receive either 10 i.v. 30-h ATP infusions every 2-4 weeks over a 24-week period (n = 28) or no ATP (control patients, n = 30). ATP was given for a median of 6.5 infusions. Differences in time to progression and survival between patients in both groups were tested by means of the log-rank test and Cox regression analysis. Forty-nine patients were evaluable for tumor response. None of the evaluable patients showed a complete or partial response. Median time to progression was 3.9 months [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.3-5.5] in the ATP group compared to 3.0 months (95% CI = 2.4-3.7) in the control group (p = 0.71). Median survival was 5.6 months (95% CI = 1.1-10.1) for the ATP group and 4.7 months (95% CI = 2.6-6.8) for the control group (p = 0.68). ATP treatment was associated with a significant increase in survival in the subgroup of weight-losing patients with stage IIIB NSCLC: in this subgroup, median survival was 9.3 months (95% CI = 2.1-16.5) for ATP-treated patients versus 3.5 months (95% CI = 2.3-4.7) for control patients (between-group difference: p = 0.009). No significant effect of ATP was observed for weight-losing patients with stage IV NSCLC or for weight-stable NSCLC patients. Although ATP as a single therapy does not lead to tumor regression or increased survival in patients with advanced lung cancer, it may prolong survival in weight-losing patients with stage IIIB lung cancer. The latter finding is intriguing, but requires confirmation in larger clinical trials. PMID:14501386

  6. Crystal structures of 7-methylguanosine 5'-triphosphate (m(7)GTP)- and P(1)-7-methylguanosine-P(3)-adenosine-5',5'-triphosphate (m(7)GpppA)-bound human full-length eukaryotic initiation factor 4E: biological importance of the C-terminal flexible region.

    PubMed Central

    Tomoo, Koji; Shen, Xu; Okabe, Koumei; Nozoe, Yoshiaki; Fukuhara, Shoichi; Morino, Shigenobu; Ishida, Toshimasa; Taniguchi, Taizo; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Terashima, Akira; Sasaki, Masahiro; Katsuya, Yoshio; Kitamura, Kunihiro; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Masahide; Miura, Kin-ichiro

    2002-01-01

    The crystal structures of the full-length human eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E complexed with two mRNA cap analogues [7-methylguanosine 5'-triphosphate (m(7)GTP) and P(1)-7-methylguanosine-P(3)-adenosine-5',5'-triphosphate (m(7)GpppA)] were determined at 2.0 A resolution (where 1 A=0.1 nm). The flexibility of the C-terminal loop region of eIF4E complexed with m(7)GTP was significantly reduced when complexed with m(7)GpppA, suggesting the importance of the second nucleotide in the mRNA cap structure for the biological function of eIF4E, especially the fixation and orientation of the C-terminal loop region, including the eIF4E phosphorylation residue. The present results provide the structural basis for the biological function of both N- and C-terminal mobile regions of eIF4E in translation initiation, especially the regulatory function through the switch-on/off of eIF4E-binding protein-eIF4E phosphorylation. PMID:11879179

  7. Involvement of purinergic receptors and NOD-like receptor-family protein 3-inflammasome pathway in the adenosine triphosphate-induced cytokine release from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, Thomas; Victoni, Tatiana; Fautrel, Alain; Robert, Sacha; Gleonnec, Florence; Guezingar, Marie; Couillin, Isabelle; Catros, Véronique; Boichot, Elisabeth; Lagente, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been described as a danger signal activating the NOD-like receptor-family protein 3 (NLRP3)-inflammasome leading to the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-1β, release in the lung. The NLRP3-inflammasome pathway has been previously described to be involved in experimental collagen deposition and the development of pulmonary fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway and P2X7 purinergic receptor in the activation of human macrophages in vitro by ATP. We showed that adenosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate tetralithium salt (ATPγS) and 2',3'-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl) adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BzATP), two stable analogs of ATP, are able to potentiate the release of IL-1β from human monocyte-derived macrophages induced by low concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, in the same conditions no increase in IL-1α and IL-6 was observed. Immunochemistry has shown that human macrophages natively express NLRP3 and purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7 R). NLRP3 and IL-1β mRNA expression were induced from LPS-primed macrophages, but also after 5-h treatment of BzATP as analysed by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. However, other inflammasome pathways (NLRP1, NLRP2, NLRC4, NLRP6 and AIM2) and P2X7 R were not induced by BzATP. We observed that P2X7 R antagonists, A-438079 and A-740003, were able to reduce the release of IL-1β, but not of IL-1α and IL-6 from macrophages stimulated by ATPγS or BzATP. The present results showed the involvement of the P2X7 R-NLRP3 inflammasome pathway in the secretion of IL-1β from ATP-stimulated human macrophages, and suggest that P2X7 R were not involved in IL-1α and IL-6 release. This study also points out that repression of the P2X7 R represents a novel potential therapeutic approach to control fibrosis in lung injury. PMID:24472059

  8. Improved ischemic island skin flap survival with continuous intraarterial infusion of adenosine triphosphate--magnesium chloride and superoxide dismutase: a rat model.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, T J; Sasaki, G H; Khattab, S

    1987-03-01

    Neurovascular island skin flaps are still hampered by occasional necrosis of their most distal aspect. Cells subjected to prolonged hypoxic conditions become intracellularly depleted of needed metabolic substrates and eventually die. Once hypoxic conditions are improved, ischemic tissue suffers further injury from the rapid accumulation of oxygen free radicals. This study showed 53% survival of a standard random flap constructed on the inferior epigastric neurovascular bundle of a rat. Random flap survival increased to 65% after intraarterial infusion of adenosine triphosphate--magnesium chloride (ATP-MgCl2); to 75% after superoxide dismutase infusion; and to 98% after combined ATP-MgCl2 and superoxide dismutase infusion. Neither substrate appeared to act by increasing blood flow to the ischemic tissue. PMID:3296921

  9. Macroscopic and Fluorescent Discrimination of Adenosine Triphosphate via Selective Metallo-hydrogel Formation: A Visual, Practical, and Reliable Rehearsal toward Cellular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fang, Weiwei; Liu, Cong; Yu, Fabiao; Liu, Yaoqi; Li, Zhenhua; Chen, Lingxin; Bao, Xiaoling; Tu, Tao

    2016-08-17

    With use of simple terpyridine zinc nitrate complexes, intriguing visual recognition of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) via selective coordination assembly leading to two-component metallo-hydrogel formation has been realized. With intensive fluorescent study and density functional theory calculations, it may be inferred, besides the selective metal-ligand interaction between Zn center and phosphate groups, the intramolecular π-stacking between the planar nucleobases of ATP and the metal-hybrid aromatic ring of pincer complex strongly affected the geometry of the coordinated adducts and possible molecular self-assembly process, which constitute a completely new sensing strategy in comparison with the conventional approaches. Furthermore, in light of extreme sensitivity of pincer zinc complexes toward ATP at micromolar scale (1.85 μM) and remarkable fluorescent enhancement (ca. 44-fold) upon ATP addition, the feasibility of the low cytotoxicity pincer zinc complexes in monitoring ATP in HeLa cells has been fulfilled with confocal fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27420773

  10. The effect of growth phase and medium on the use of the firefly adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay for the quantitation of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, V. N.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    Luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was used as a rapid method to determine the number of bacteria in a urine sample after nonbacterial components were removed. Accurate cellular ATP values, determined when bacteria were grown in an environment similar to that in which they were found, were necessary for the calculation of bacterial titer in urine. Cellular ATP values vary depending on the extraction method, the cell growth phase, and cell growth conditions. ATP per cell values of stationary E. coli grown in urine were two times greater than ATP per cell values of cells grown in trypticase soy broth. Glucose and urea were examined as possible components responsible for the cellular ATP variation.

  11. Biological effects of exogenous adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate on cultured mammalian cells: Evidence for a receptor mechanism and its regulation by desensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, F.A.

    1989-01-01

    Exogenous adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (ATP) mobilized intracellular calcium in human carcinoma A43l cells and in Swiss 3T3 and 3T6 mouse fibroblasts by increasing inositol trisphosphate similar to well down growth factors (platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), bradykinin (BK), serum). Calcium mobilization was examined by video imaging of fura-2 fluorescence is single cells, following the radioactive isotope {sup 45}Ca, and monitoring the decrease in fluorescence of cells loaded with chlortetracycline. Uridine 5{prime}-triphosphate, but not other nucleotides, mimicked ATP. Single-cell analysis revealed synchronous responses in 10 sec to ATP, BK or serum, while PDGF (3T3) and EGF (A431) produced slower signals with significant cell-to-cell variation. PDGF desensitized 3T3 cells to ATP and BK added 100 sec later but ATP or BK did not desensitized to PDGF. Homologous desensitization was seen with all agonists. Heterologous desensitization was also observed in A431 cells where ATP desensitized to serum, but serum did not to ATP. ATP-stimulated calcium entry was detected after 10 sec in A431 cells, but not in Swiss 3T6 cells. Entry started before significant efflux had occurred and did not fit the capacitance model of Putney. A 2-3 hr ATP pretreatment produced a homologous desensitization state that required 20 hr to disappear, probably due to down-regulation of the putative ATP receptors.

  12. One-step isolation of adenosine triphosphate from crude fermentation broth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by anion-exchange chromatography using supermacroporous cryogel.

    PubMed

    Yun, Junxian; Shen, Shaochuan; Chen, Fang; Yao, Kejian

    2007-12-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an important high-energy compound widely used in biological and therapeutic fields. It can be produced by phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with microbial cells in industrial scale and the effective isolation of ATP from microbial fermentation broth is a challenging work. In this work, we develop a novel one-step method to directly separate ATP from fermentation broth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by anion-exchange chromatography using supermacroporous cryogel. The cryogel bed with tertiary amine groups was prepared by grafting N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) monomer chains onto the matrix of a polyacrylamide-based cryogel in a glass column and its properties of liquid dispersion, water permeability, porosity as well as the ligand density were measured. Chromatographic separation of ATP from the fermentation broth by the cryogel was carried out using deionised water and 0.01 M HCl as running buffer, respectively. The breakthrough characteristics and elution performance in the cryogel bed were revealed and analyzed. The purities of the obtained ATP were analyzed quantitatively by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The maximal purity of ATP by the one-step separation method was 95.5% using 0.01 M HCl as running buffer in this work. The corresponding chromatographic behaviors were investigated and analyzed. PMID:18024244

  13. Effects of different concentrations of metal ions on degradation of adenosine triphosphate in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fillets stored at 4°C: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Qin, Na; Zhang, Longteng; Lv, Jian; Li, Qingzheng; Luo, Yongkang

    2016-11-15

    The impact of different concentrations of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) on the degradation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the influence of these ions on the activity of adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMP-deaminase) and acid phosphatase (ACP) in common carp fillets (in vivo) during 4°C storage was examined. The content of ATP, inosine monophosphate (IMP), and hypoxanthine (Hx), and the activity of AMP-deaminase and ACP were determined. Results indicated that the effects of different concentrations of six kinds of metal ions on AMP-deaminase and ACP were not the same. Na(+), K(+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) enhanced AMP-deaminase activity, which led to the rapid degradation of ATP and to the generation of a large quantity of IMP within a short time. Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) delayed the change in AMP-deaminase and ACP activity in carp and caused a further delay in the degradation of ATP. Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) inhibited ACP activity, which reduced the decomposition of IMP and the formation of Hx. PMID:27283700

  14. Effects of oral adenosine 5'-triphosphate and adenosine in enteric-coated capsules on indomethacin-induced permeability changes in the human small intestine: a randomized cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    Bours, Martijn JL; Bos, Hilde J; Meddings, Jon B; Brummer, Robert-Jan M; van den Brandt, Piet A; Dagnelie, Pieter C

    2007-01-01

    Background It is well-known that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause damage to the small bowel associated with disruption of mucosal barrier function. In healthy human volunteers, we showed previously that topical administration of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) by naso-intestinal tube attenuated a rise in small intestinal permeability induced by short-term challenge with the NSAID indomethacin. This finding suggested that ATP may be involved in the preservation of intestinal barrier function. Our current objective was to corroborate the favourable effect of ATP on indomethacin-induced permeability changes in healthy human volunteers when ATP is administered via enteric-coated capsules, which is a more practically feasible mode of administration. Since ATP effects may have been partly mediated through its breakdown to adenosine, effects of encapsulated adenosine were tested also. Methods By ingesting a test drink containing 5 g lactulose and 0.5 g L-rhamnose followed by five-hour collection of total urine, small intestinal permeability was assessed in 33 healthy human volunteers by measuring the urinary lactulose/rhamnose excretion ratio. Urinary excretion of lactulose and L-rhamnose was determined by fluorescent detection high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Basal permeability of the small intestine was assessed as a control condition (no indomethacin, no ATP/adenosine). As a model of increased small intestinal permeability, two dosages of indomethacin were ingested at 10 h (75 mg) and 1 h (50 mg) before ingesting the lactulose/rhamnose test drink. At 1.5 h before indomethacin ingestion, two dosages of placebo, ATP (2 g per dosage) or adenosine (1 g per dosage) were administered via enteric-coated hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) capsules with Eudragit© L30D-55. Results Median urinary lactulose/rhamnose excretion ratio (g/g) in the control condition was 0.032 (interquartile range: 0.022–0.044). Compared to the control condition

  15. Oligonucleotides labeled with single fluorophores as sensors for deoxynucleotide triphosphate binding by DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Theo T

    2014-01-01

    Oligonucleotides labeled with a single fluorophore (fluorescein or tetramethylrhodamine) have been used previously as fluorogenic substrates for a number of DNA modifying enzymes. Here, it is shown that such molecules can be used as fluorogenic probes to detect the template-dependent binding of deoxynucleotide triphosphates by DNA polymerases. Two polymerases were used in this work: the Klenow fragment of the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I and the Bacillus stearothermophilus polymerase, Bst. When complexes of these polymerases with dye-labeled hairpin-type oligonucleotides were mixed with various deoxynucleotide triphosphates in the presence of Sr²⁺ as the divalent metal cation, the formation of ternary DNA-polymerase-dNTP complexes was detected by concentration-dependent changes in the fluorescence intensities of the dyes. Fluorescein- and tetramethylrhodamine-labeled probes of identical sequences responded differently to the two polymerases. With Bst polymerase, the fluorescence intensities of all probes increased with the next correct dNTP; with Klenow polymerase, tetramethylrhodamine-labeled probes increased their fluorescence, but the intensity of fluorescein-labeled probes decreased on formation of ternary complexes with the correct incoming nucleotides. The use of Sr²⁺ as the divalent metal ion allowed the formation of catalytically inactive ternary complexes and obviated the need for using 2',3'-dideoxy-terminated oligonucleotides as would have been needed in the case of Mg²⁺ as the metal ion. PMID:24096197

  16. WBC27, an adenosine tri-phosphate-binding cassette protein, controls pollen wall formation and patterning in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiao-Ying; Yang, Ke-Zhen; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Lei; Chen, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Qin; Ye, De

    2011-01-01

    In flowering plants, the exine components are derived from tapetum. Despite its importance to sexual plant reproduction, little is known about the translocation of exine materials from tapetum to developing microspores. Here we report functional characterization of the arabidopsis WBC27 gene. WBC27 encodes an adenosine tri-phosphate binding cassette (ABC) transporter and is expressed preferentially in tapetum. Mutation of WBC27 disrupted the exine formation. The wbc27 mutant microspores began to degenerate once released from tetrads and most of the microspores collapsed at the uninucleate stage. Only a small number of wbc27-1 microspores could develop into tricellular pollen grains. These survival pollen grains lacked exine and germinated in the anther before anthesis. All of these results suggest that the ABC transporter, WBC27 plays important roles in the formation of arabidopsis exine, possibly by translocation of lipidic precursors of sporopollenin from tapetum to developing microspores. PMID:21205178

  17. Interaction of Beta-Hydroxy-Beta-Methylbutyrate Free Acid and Adenosine Triphosphate on Muscle Mass, Strength, and Power in Resistance Trained Individuals.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Ryan P; Joy, Jordan M; Rathmacher, John A; Baier, Shawn M; Fuller, John C; Shelley, Mack C; Jäger, Ralf; Purpura, Martin; Wilson, Stephanie M C; Wilson, Jacob M

    2016-07-01

    Lowery, RP, Joy, JM, Rathmacher, JA, Baier, SM, Fuller, JC Jr, Shelley, MC II, Jäger, R, Purpura, M, Wilson, SMC, and Wilson, JM. Interaction of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate free acid and adenosine triphosphate on muscle mass, strength, and power in resistance trained individuals. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1843-1854, 2016-Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) supplementation helps maintain performance under high fatiguing contractions and with greater fatigue recovery demands also increase. Current evidence suggests that the free acid form of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB-FA) acts by speeding regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle after high-intensity or prolonged exercise. Therefore, we investigated the effects of 12 weeks of HMB-FA (3 g) and ATP (400 mg) administration on lean body mass (LBM), strength, and power in trained individuals. A 3-phase double-blind, placebo-, and diet-controlled study was conducted. Phases consisted of an 8-week periodized resistance training program (phase 1), followed by a 2-week overreaching cycle (phase 2), and a 2-week taper (phase 3). Lean body mass was increased by a combination of HMB-FA/ATP by 12.7% (p < 0.001). In a similar fashion, strength gains after training were increased in HMB-FA/ATP-supplemented subjects by 23.5% (p < 0.001). Vertical jump and Wingate power were increased in the HMB-FA/ATP-supplemented group compared with the placebo-supplemented group, and the 12-week increases were 21.5 and 23.7%, respectively. During the overreaching cycle, strength and power declined in the placebo group (4.3-5.7%), whereas supplementation with HMB-FA/ATP resulted in continued strength gains (1.3%). In conclusion, HMB-FA and ATP in combination with resistance exercise training enhanced LBM, power, and strength. In addition, HMB-FA plus ATP blunted the typical response to overreaching, resulting in a further increase in strength during that period. It seems that the combination of HMB-FA/ATP could benefit those who

  18. A Pilot Study to Assess Adenosine 5’-triphosphate Metabolism in Red Blood Cells as a Drug Target for Potential Cardiovascular Protection

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Pollen K.F.; Tinkel, Jodi; Seeto, Dena

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of exercise preconditioning on adenosine 5’triphosphate (ATP) metabolism in red blood cells and cardiovascular protection against injury induced by isoproterenol in vivo. Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats (SDR) were each exercised on a treadmill for 15 minutes at 10 m/min and 10% grade (n = 7) (LowEx), or 14 m/min and 22% grade (n = 8) (VigEx). Two hours after the exercise, each rat received a single dose of isoproterenol (30 mg/kg) by subcutaneous (sc) injection. Two separate groups of SDR were used as control: One received no exercise (n = 10) (NoEx) and the other received no exercise and no isoproterenol (n = 11) (NoIso). Serial blood samples were collected over 5 hours for measurement of ATP and its catabolites by a validated HPLC. Hemodynamic recording was collected continuously for 
the duration of the experiment. Data were analysed using ANOVA and t-tests and difference considered significant at 
p < 0.05. Results: Exercise pre-conditioning (both LowEx and VigEx) reduced mortality after isoproterenol from 50% to < 30% 
(p > 0.05). It attenuated the rebound in blood pressure significantly (p < 0.05 between NoEx vs VigEx), attenuated the increase of RBC adenosine 5’-monophosphate (AMP) concentrations induced by isoproterenol, and also decreased the breakdown of ATP to AMP in the RBC (p < 0.05 vs NoEx). Conclusion: Exercise pre-conditioning decreased the blood pressure rebound and also breakdown of ATP in RBC after isoproterenol which may be exploited further as a drug target for cardiovascular protection and prevention.

  19. Flow cytometry and adenosine tri-phosphate analysis: alternative possibilities to evaluate major bacteriological changes in drinking water treatment and distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Vital, Marius; Dignum, Marco; Magic-Knezev, Aleksandra; Ross, Petra; Rietveld, Luuk; Hammes, Frederik

    2012-10-01

    An ever-growing need exists for rapid, quantitative and meaningful methods to quantify and characterize the effect of different treatment steps on the microbiological processes and events that occur during drinking water treatment and distribution. Here we compared cultivation-independent flow cytometry (FCM) and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) analysis with conventional cultivation-based microbiological methods, on water samples from two full-scale treatment and distribution systems. The two systems consist of nearly identical treatment trains, but their raw water quality and pre-treatment differed significantly. All of the drinking water treatment processes affected the microbiological content of the water considerably, but once treated, the finished water remained remarkably stable throughout the distribution system. Both the FCM and ATP data were able to describe the microbiology of the systems accurately, providing meaningful process data when combined with other parameters such as dissolved organic carbon analysis. Importantly, the results highlighted a complimentary value of the two independent methods: while similar trends were mostly observed, variations in ATP-per-cell values between water samples were adequately explained by differences in the FCM fingerprints of the samples. This work demonstrates the value of alternative microbial methods for process/system control, optimization and routine monitoring of the general microbial quality of water during treatment and distribution. PMID:22763289

  20. In Vitro Adenosine Triphosphate-Based Chemotherapy Response Assay as a Predictor of Clinical Response to Fluorouracil-Based Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hye Youn; Kim, Im-kyung; Kang, Jeonghyun; Sohn, Seung-Kook; Lee, Kang Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the usefulness of the in vitro adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assay (ATP-CRA) for prediction of clinical response to fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II colorectal cancer. Materials and Methods Tumor specimens of 86 patients with pathologically confirmed stage II colorectal adenocarcinoma were tested for chemosensitivity to fluorouracil. Chemosensitivity was determined by cell death rate (CDR) of drug-exposed cells, calculated by comparing the intracellular ATP level with that of untreated controls. Results Among the 86 enrolled patients who underwent radical surgery followed by fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy, recurrence was found in 11 patients (12.7%). The CDR ≥ 20% group was associated with better disease-free survival than the CDR < 20% group (89.4% vs. 70.1%, p=0.027). Multivariate analysis showed that CDR < 20% and T4 stage were poor prognostic factors for disease-free survival after fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusion In stage II colorectal cancer, the in vitro ATP-CRA may be useful in identifying patients likely to benefit from fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26511802

  1. Evaluation of the Relationship between the Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Bioluminescence Assay and the Presence of Bacillus anthracis Spores and Vegetative Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Shawn G.; Sayles, Harlan; Colbert, Erica M.; Hewlett, Angela; Chaika, Oleg; Smith, Philip W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence assay was utilized in laboratory evaluations to determine the presence and concentration of vegetative and spore forms of Bacillus anthracis Sterne 34F2. Methods: Seventeen surfaces from the healthcare environment were selected for evaluation. Surfaces were inoculated with 50 µL of organism suspensions at three concentrations of 104, 106, 108 colony forming units per surface (CFU/surface) of B. anthracis. Culture-based methods and ATP based methods were utilized to determine concentrations. Results: When all concentrations were evaluated together, a positive correlation between log-adjusted CFU and Relative Light Units (RLU) for endospores and vegetative cells was established. When concentrations were evaluated separately, a significant correlation was not demonstrated. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a positive correlation for ATP and culture-based methods for the vegetative cells of B. anthracis. When evaluating the endospores and combining both metabolic states, the ATP measurements and CFU recovered did not correspond to the initial concentrations on the evaluated surfaces. The results of our study show that the low ATP signal which does not correlate well to the CFU results would not make the ATP measuring devises effective in confirming contamination residual from a bioterrorist event. PMID:24879485

  2. An ultrasensitive quantum dots fluorescent polarization immunoassay based on the antibody modified Au nanoparticles amplifying for the detection of adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    He, Yanlong; Tian, Jianniao; Hu, Kun; Zhang, Juanni; Chen, Sheng; Jiang, Yixuan; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2013-11-13

    In this work, an ultrasensitive fluorescent polarization immunoassay (FPIA) method based on the quantum dot/aptamer/antibody/gold nanoparticles ensemble has been developed for the detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). DNA hybridization is formed when ATP is present in the PBS solution containing the DNA-conjugated quantum dots (QDs) and antibody-AuNPs. The substantial sensitivity improvement of the antibody-AuNPs-enhanced method is mainly attributed to the slower rotation of fluorescent unit when QDs-labeled oligonucleotides hybridize with antibody modified the gold nanoparticle. As a result, the fluorescent polarization (FP) values of the system increase significantly. Under the optimal conditions, a linear response with ATP concentration is ranged from 8×10(-12) M to 2.40×10(-4) M. The detection limit reached as low as 1.8 pM. The developed work provides a sensitive and selective immunoassay protocol for ATP detection, which could be applied in more bioanalytical systems. PMID:24176506

  3. Comparison of immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate rapid method to traditional culture-based method for E. coli and enterococci enumeration in wastewater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bushon, R.N.; Likirdopulos, C.A.; Brady, A.M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Untreated wastewater samples from California, North Carolina, and Ohio were analyzed by the immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate (IMS/ATP) method and the traditional culture-based method for E. coli and enterococci concentrations. The IMS/ATP method concentrates target bacteria by immunomagnetic separation and then quantifies captured bacteria by measuring bioluminescence induced by release of ATP from the bacterial cells. Results from this method are available within 1 h from the start of sample processing. Significant linear correlations were found between the IMS/ATP results and results from traditional culture-based methods for E. coli and enterococci enumeration for one location in California, two locations in North Carolina, and one location in Ohio (r??values ranged from 0.87 to 0.97). No significant linear relation was found for a second location in California that treats a complex mixture of residential and industrial wastewater. With the exception of one location, IMS/ATP showed promise as a rapid method for the quantification of faecal-indicator organisms in wastewater.

  4. Use of a Sampling Area-Adjusted Adenosine Triphosphate Bioluminescence Assay Based on Digital Image Quantification to Assess the Cleanliness of Hospital Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yu-Huai; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Jiang, Hui-Li; Chang, Chih-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Chang, Dan-Chi; Tu, Hsin-Yu; Chiu, Tan-Yun; Chao, Huei-Jen; Tseng, Chun-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated surfaces play an important role in the transmission of pathogens. We sought to establish a criterion that could indicate "cleanliness" using a sampling area-adjusted adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay. In the first phase of the study, target surfaces were selected for swab sampling before and after daily cleaning; then, an aerobic colony count (ACC) plate assay of bacteria and antibiotic-resistant bacteria was conducted. ATP swabs were also tested, and the ATP readings were reported as relative light units (RLUs). The results of the ACC and ATP assays were adjusted according to the sampling area. During the second phase of the study, a new cleaning process employing sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) was implemented for comparison. Using the criterion of 2.5 colony-forming units (CFU)/cm², 45% of the sampled sites were successfully cleaned during phase one of the study. During phase two, the pass rates of the surface samples (64%) were significantly improved, except under stringent (5 RLU/cm²) and lax (500 RLU) ATP criteria. Using receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, the best cut-off point for an area-adjusted ATP level was 7.34 RLU/cm², which corresponded to culture-assay levels of <2.5 CFU/cm². An area adjustment of the ATP assay improved the degree of correlation with the ACC-assay results from weak to moderate. PMID:27294944

  5. Use of a Sampling Area-Adjusted Adenosine Triphosphate Bioluminescence Assay Based on Digital Image Quantification to Assess the Cleanliness of Hospital Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yu-Huai; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Jiang, Hui-Li; Chang, Chih-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Chang, Dan-Chi; Tu, Hsin-Yu; Chiu, Tan-Yun; Chao, Huei-Jen; Tseng, Chun-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated surfaces play an important role in the transmission of pathogens. We sought to establish a criterion that could indicate “cleanliness” using a sampling area–adjusted adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay. In the first phase of the study, target surfaces were selected for swab sampling before and after daily cleaning; then, an aerobic colony count (ACC) plate assay of bacteria and antibiotic-resistant bacteria was conducted. ATP swabs were also tested, and the ATP readings were reported as relative light units (RLUs). The results of the ACC and ATP assays were adjusted according to the sampling area. During the second phase of the study, a new cleaning process employing sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) was implemented for comparison. Using the criterion of 2.5 colony-forming units (CFU)/cm2, 45% of the sampled sites were successfully cleaned during phase one of the study. During phase two, the pass rates of the surface samples (64%) were significantly improved, except under stringent (5 RLU/cm2) and lax (500 RLU) ATP criteria. Using receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, the best cut-off point for an area-adjusted ATP level was 7.34 RLU/cm2, which corresponded to culture-assay levels of <2.5 CFU/cm2. An area adjustment of the ATP assay improved the degree of correlation with the ACC-assay results from weak to moderate. PMID:27294944

  6. Development of an immune function assay by measuring intracellular adenosine triphosphate (iATP) levels in mitogen-stimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Hadi; Najafi, Alireza; Khoshroo, Mohammad; Tajik, Nader

    2016-01-01

    We developed an immune function assay for monitoring CD4+ T cells activity based on changes in intracellular adenosine triphosphate (iATP) levels after phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation. Blood samples were obtained from 40 healthy subjects and 30 RTRs and incubated with 5 µg/mL of PHA for 15-18 hr at 37°C and 5% CO2. Afterward, the CD4+ T cells were separated by antibody-coated magnetic beads and lysed. Then, iATP content in unstimulated and stimulated conditions was measured by luciferin-luciferase reaction using a log-log standard curve. The iATP levels showed significant increase in CD4+ T cells in both healthy persons (mean: 550 ± 142 ng/mL vs. 109 ± 54 ng/mL) and RTRs (mean: 394 ± 160 ng/mL vs. 52 ± 37 ng/mL) after PHA stimulation (P < 0.001). However, the iATP production in RTRs was significantly lower than that in healthy individuals; both prior to and after stimulation with PHA (P < 0.001). No gender-specific difference in iATP production was observed between women and men subjects. This rapid and low-cost assay reflects the degree of immune cell function through assessment of CD4+ T cells activation. Thus, it can be used for evaluation of immune system status in immunodeficient individuals as well as in immunosuppressed transplant recipients who needs drug adjustment. PMID:27089103

  7. Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Inhibits Voltage-Sensitive Potassium Currents in Isolated Hensen’s Cells and Nifedipine Protects Against Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Rui; Liu, Jun; Jia, Zhiying; Wang, Hongyang; Wang, YongAn; Sun, Wei; Wu, Xuan; Zhao, Zhifei; Niu, Baolong; Li, Xingqi; Dai, Guanghai; Li, Jianxiong

    2016-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a well-known neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in the central nervous system, plays an important role as an extracellular chemical messenger in the cochlea. Material/Methods Using a whole-cell recording technique, we studied the effects of ATP on isolated Hensen’s cells, which are supporting cells in the cochlea, to determine if they are involved in the transduction of ions with hair cells. Results ATP (0.1–10 μM) reduced the potassium current (IK+) in the majority of the recorded Hensen’s cells (21 out of 25 cells). An inward current was also induced by high concentrations of ATP (100 μM to 10 mM), which was reversibly blocked by 100 μM suramin (a purinergic antagonist) and blocked by nifedipine (an L-type calcium channel blocker). After the cochleas were perfused with artificial perilymph solutions containing nifedipine and exposed to noise, the amplitude increase in the compound action potential (CAP) threshold and the reduction in cochlear microphonics was lower than when they were exposed to noise alone. Conclusions Our results suggest that ATP can block IK+ channels at a low concentration and induce an inward Ca2+ current at high concentrations, which is reversed by purinergic receptors. Nifedipine may have a partially protective effect on noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). PMID:27292522

  8. Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Inhibits Voltage-Sensitive Potassium Currents in Isolated Hensen's Cells and Nifedipine Protects Against Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rui; Liu, Jun; Jia, Zhiying; Wang, Hongyang; Wang, YongAn; Sun, Wei; Wu, Xuan; Zhao, Zhifei; Niu, Baolong; Li, Xingqi; Dai, Guanghai; Li, Jianxiong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is increasing evidence that adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a well-known neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in the central nervous system, plays an important role as an extracellular chemical messenger in the cochlea. MATERIAL AND METHODS Using a whole-cell recording technique, we studied the effects of ATP on isolated Hensen's cells, which are supporting cells in the cochlea, to determine if they are involved in the transduction of ions with hair cells. RESULTS ATP (0.1-10 µM) reduced the potassium current (IK+) in the majority of the recorded Hensen's cells (21 out of 25 cells). An inward current was also induced by high concentrations of ATP (100 µM to 10 mM), which was reversibly blocked by 100 µM suramin (a purinergic antagonist) and blocked by nifedipine (an L-type calcium channel blocker). After the cochleas were perfused with artificial perilymph solutions containing nifedipine and exposed to noise, the amplitude increase in the compound action potential (CAP) threshold and the reduction in cochlear microphonics was lower than when they were exposed to noise alone. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that ATP can block IK+ channels at a low concentration and induce an inward Ca2+ current at high concentrations, which is reversed by purinergic receptors. Nifedipine may have a partially protective effect on noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). PMID:27292522

  9. Use of 8-azidoguanosine 5'-(gamma-/sup 32/P)triphosphate as a probe of the guanosine 5'-triphosphate binding protein subunits in bovine rod outer segments

    SciTech Connect

    Kohnken, R.E.; Mc Connell, D.G.

    1985-07-02

    In an in vitro incubation, 8-azidoguanosine 5'-(gamma-/sup 32/P)triphosphate ( (gamma-/sup 32/P)-8-azido-GTP) labeled bleached rhodopsin independent of ultraviolet light. Characterization of this labeling indicated that rhodopsin was phosphorylated with (gamma-/sup 32/P)-8-azido-GTP as a phosphate donor. At low concentrations, ATP increased this labeling activity 5-fold. In the same incubation, (gamma-/sup 32/P)-8-azido-GTP also labeled G alpha (Mr 40 000). This labeling was ultraviolet light dependent. G beta (Mr 35 000) was also labeled dependent for the most part upon ultraviolet light, but a smaller component of labeling appeared to result from phosphorylation. Differential labeling of G alpha and G beta was found to vary intricately with experimental conditions, especially prebleaching of rhodopsin, tonicity of the medium, and the presence or absence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Affinity labeling of G alpha and G beta by (gamma-/sup 32/P)-8-azido-GTP in competition with ATP or GTP was kinetically complex, consistent with possible multiple binding sites for GTP on both subunits. Independent evidence for two or more binding sites on G alpha has been offered by other laboratories, and recently, at least one binding site on G beta and its analogues among the N proteins of adenylate cyclases has been identified.

  10. Mechanistic characterization of the 5′-triphosphate-dependent activation of PKR: Lack of 5′-end nucleobase specificity, evidence for a distinct triphosphate binding site, and a critical role for the dsRBD

    PubMed Central

    Toroney, Rebecca; Hull, Chelsea M.; Sokoloski, Joshua E.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    The protein kinase PKR is activated by RNA to phosphorylate eIF-2α, inhibiting translation initiation. Long dsRNA activates PKR via interactions with the dsRNA-binding domain (dsRBD). Weakly structured RNA also activates PKR and does so in a 5′-triphosphate (ppp)–dependent fashion, however relatively little is known about this pathway. We used a mutant T7 RNA polymerase to incorporate all four triphosphate-containing nucleotides into the first position of a largely single-stranded RNA and found absence of selectivity, in that all four transcripts activate PKR. Recognition of 5′-triphosphate, but not the nucleobase at the 5′-most position, makes this RNA-mediated innate immune response sensitive to a broad array of viruses. PKR was neither activated in the presence of γ-GTP nor recognized NTPs other than ATP in activation competition and ITC binding assays. This indicates that the binding site for ATP is selective, which contrasts with the site for the 5′ end of ppp-ssRNA. Activation experiments reveal that short dsRNAs compete with 5′-triphosphate RNAs and heparin for activation, and likewise gel-shift assays reveal that activating 5′-triphosphate RNAs and heparin compete with short dsRNAs for binding to PKR's dsRBD. The dsRBD thus plays a critical role in the activation of PKR by ppp-ssRNA and even heparin. At the same time, cross-linking experiments indicate that ppp-ssRNA interacts with PKR outside of the dsRBD as well. Overall, 5′-triphosphate-containing, weakly structured RNAs activate PKR via interactions with both the dsRBD and a distinct triphosphate binding site that lacks 5′-nucleobase specificity, allowing the innate immune response to provide broad-spectrum protection from pathogens. PMID:22912486

  11. Adenosine triphosphate released from HIV-infected macrophages regulates glutamatergic tone and dendritic spine density on neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B.; Kolson, Dennis L.; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Drewes, Julia; Graham, David R.; Haughey, Norman J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite wide spread use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in developed countries, approximately half of HIV-infected patients will develop impairments in cognitive function. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal dysfunction can be precipitated by HIV-infection of macrophages by mechanisms that involve alterations in innate and adaptive immune responses. HIV-infection of macrophages is known to increase the release of soluble neurotoxins. However, the composition of products released from infected macrophages is complex and not fully known. In this study we provide evidence that ATP and other immuno-/neuromodulatory nucleotides are exported from HIV-infected macrophages and modify neuronal structure. Supernatants collected from HIV-infected macrophages (HIV/MDM) contained large amounts of ATP, ADP, AMP and small amounts of adenosine, in addition to glutamate. Dilutions of these supernatants that were sub-threshold for glutamate receptor activation evoked rapid calcium flux in neurons that were completely inhibited by the enzymatic degradation of ATP, or by blockade of calcium permeable purinergic receptors. Applications of these high-dilution HIV/MDM onto neuronal cultures increased the amount of extracellular glutamate by mechanisms dependent on purinergic receptor activation, and downregulated spine density on neurons by mechanisms dependent on purinergic and glutamate receptor activation. We conclude from these data that ATP released from HIV-infected macrophages downregulates dendritic spine density on neurons by a mechanism that involves purinergic receptor mediated modulation of glutamatergic tone. These data suggest that neuronal function may be depressed in HIV infected individuals by mechanisms that involve macrophage release of ATP that triggers secondary effects on glutamate handling. PMID:23686368

  12. The use of antagonists to characterize the receptors mediating depolarization of the rat isolated vagus nerve by alpha, beta-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Trezise, D. J.; Kennedy, I.; Humphrey, P. P.

    1994-01-01

    1. We have previously found that the P2x-purinoceptor agonist, alpha, beta-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate (alpha, beta-methylene ATP), depolarizes the rat cervical vagus nerve, measured with a 'grease-gap' extracellular recording technique. This effect was attenuated by the P2 purinoceptor antagonist, suramin. In the present study we have investigated in more detail the antagonism produced by suramin and have also investigated the actions of two other putative P2 purinoceptor antagonists, cibacron blue and pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2', 5'-disulphonic acid (iso-PPADS). Furthermore, we have studied the interactions between suramin and cibacron blue or iso-PPADS in an attempt to determine whether these antagonists act at a common receptor site. 2. Suramin (1 x 10(-5)-1 x 10(-4) M) produced reversible, concentration-related rightward displacements of the concentration-effect curve to alpha, beta-methylene ATP. Schild analysis of this antagonism yielded a pA2 value of 5.90 with a slope value of 0.47. 3. Cibacron blue (3 x 10(-5)-1 x 10(-4) M) also antagonized depolarizations induced by alpha, beta-methylene ATP. The antagonistic effects of cibacron blue were slow to reach equilibrium but could be readily reversed on washout. At low concentrations for antagonism, cibacron blue (1 x 10(-5) M and 3 x 10(-5) M) produced enhancement of the maximal response to alpha, beta-methylene ATP. At the highest concentration tested (1 x 10(-4) M) the concentration-effect curve to alpha, beta-methylene ATP was shifted to the right in a parallel manner, yielding a pKB estimate of 4.96.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8032652

  13. A simple, fast, and sensitive assay for the detection of DNA, thrombin, and adenosine triphosphate based on Dual-Hairpin DNA structure.

    PubMed

    He, Xiuping; Wang, Guangfeng; Xu, Gang; Zhu, Yanhong; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2013-11-19

    In the present study, based on multifunctional Dual-Hairpin DNA structure, a simple, fast and high sensitive assay for the detection of DNA, thrombin and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was demonstrated. DNA sequence labeled with methylene blue (MB), which was designed as single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) matching with target DNA, thrombin, or ATP aptamer, hybridized to the adjunct probe and formed the dual-hairpin structure on the electrode. With the hybridization of adjunct probe and the hairpin-like capture probe in the stem region, the dual-hairpin was formed with outer and inner hairpins. By the conjugation of the target probe with the adjunct probe in the outer hairpin, the adjunct probe divorced from the dual-hairpin structure. The adjunct probe with signal molecules MB, attaching near or divorcing far from the electrode, produced electrochemical signal change and efficient electron transfer due to the fact that it was in proximity to the electrode. However, upon hybridization with the perfect match target, the redox label with the target probe was forced away from the modified electrode, thus resulting in the change of the Dual-Hairpin DNA conformation, which enables impedance of the efficient electron transfer of MB and, consequently, a detectable change of the electrochemical response. In addition, another highlight of this biosensor is its regenerability and stability owing to the merits of structure. Also, based on this Dual-Hairpin platform, the detection limits of DNA, thrombin, and ATP were 50 nM, 3 pM, and 30 nM, respectively. Moreover, this pattern also demonstrated excellent regenerability, reproducibility, and stability. Additionally, given to its ease-of-use, simplicity in design, easy operations, as well as regenerability and stability, the proposed approach may be applied as an excellent design prompter in the preparation of other molecular sensors. PMID:24079405

  14. Usefulness of combined CARTO electroanatomical mapping and manifest entrainment in ablating adenosine triphosphate-sensitive atrial tachycardia originating from the atrioventricular node vicinity

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Ken; Sasaki, Shingo; Kimura, Masaomi; Horiuchi, Daisuke; Sasaki, Kenichi; Itoh, Taihei; Tomita, Hirofumi; Ishida, Yuji; Kinjo, Takahiko

    2016-01-01

    Background By using a noncontact mapping system, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive atrial tachycardia (ATP-AT) originating from the atrioventricular (AV) node vicinity was successfully ablated at the entrance to the slow conduction zone indicated by the manifest entrainment technique. We aimed to prospectively validate the efficacy of the combination of CARTO electroanatomical mapping and manifest entrainment in ablating this ATP-AT. Methods Of the 27 AT patients from January 2013 to March 2014, 6 patients with sustained ATP-AT were studied (age, 67±13 years; tachycardia cycle length, 350±95 ms). We first created the CARTO map during AT, and performed rapid pacing from the anterior right atrial wall (ARAW) and cavotricuspid isthmus (CTI) approximately 30 mm remote from the earliest activation site (EAS). We identified the site where manifest entrainment, defined as the orthodromic capture of the EAS with a long conduction time, was observed, and ablated the site approximately 20 mm remote from the EAS, between the pacing site and the EAS. Results Manifest entrainment was demonstrated in all patients paced from the ARAW (four patients) and from the CTI (two patients). Ablation at the prespecified site terminated AT in 6±3 s, and AT became no longer inducible in all patients. At the successful ablation sites, discrete atrial electrograms were recorded; however, low-amplitude, fractionated electrograms suggestive of slow conduction were not observed in all patients. The atrio-His interval during sinus rhythm remained unchanged (from 96±12 to 89±7 ms, p=NS). During 11±6 months, no patients showed AT recurrence and AV conduction abnormality. Conclusion CARTO mapping- and manifest entrainment-guided ablation strategy is effective and safe in the treatment of ATP-AT. PMID:27092195

  15. Postischemic Treatment With Ethyl Pyruvate Prevents Adenosine Triphosphate Depletion, Ameliorates Inflammation, and Decreases Thrombosis in a Murine Model of Hind-Limb Ischemia and Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Robert S.; Albadawi, Hassan; Atkins, Marvin D.; Jones, John J.; Conrad, Mark F.; Austen, William G.; Fink, Mitchell P.; Watkins, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Experiments were designed to investigate the effects of ethyl pyruvate (EP) in a murine model of hind-limb ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Methods C57BL6 mice underwent 90 minutes of unilateral ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion using two treatment protocols. For the preischemic treatment (pre-I) protocol, mice (n = 6) were given 300 mg/kg EP before ischemia, followed by 150 mg/kg of EP just before reperfusion and at 6 hours and 12 hours after reperfusion. In a postischemic treatment (post-I) protocol, mice (n = 7) were treated with 300 mg/kg EP at the end of the ischemic period, then 15 minutes later, and 2 hours after reperfusion and 150 mg/kg of EP at 4 hours, 6 hours, 10 hours, 16 hours, and 22 hours after reperfusion. Controls mice for both protocols were treated with lactated Ringers alone at time intervals identical to EP. Skeletal muscle levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), interleukin-1β, keratinocyte chemoattractant protein, and thrombin antithrombin-3 complex were measured. Skeletal muscle architectural integrity was assessed microscopically. Results ATP levels were higher in mice treated with EP compared with controls under the both treatment protocols (p = 0.02). Interleukin-1β, keratinocyte chemoattractant protein, thrombin antithrombin-3 complex (p < 0.05), and the percentage of injured fibers (p < 0.0001) were significantly decreased in treated versus control mice under the both protocols. Conclusion Muscle fiber injury and markers of tissue thrombosis and inflammation were reduced, and ATP was preserved with EP in pre-I and post-I protocols. Further investigation of the efficacy of EP to modulate IR injury in a larger animal model of IR injury is warranted. PMID:21217488

  16. Supplementation of Exogenous Adenosine 5′-Triphosphate Enhances Mechanical Properties of 3D Cell–Agarose Constructs for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gadjanski, Ivana; Yodmuang, Supansa; Spiller, Kara; Bhumiratana, Sarindr

    2013-01-01

    Formation of tissue-engineered cartilage is greatly enhanced by mechanical stimulation. However, direct mechanical stimulation is not always a suitable method, and the utilization of mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction might allow for a highly effective and less aggressive alternate means of stimulation. In particular, the purinergic, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)-mediated signaling pathway is strongly implicated in mechanotransduction within the articular cartilage. We investigated the effects of transient and continuous exogenous ATP supplementation on mechanical properties of cartilaginous constructs engineered using bovine chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) encapsulated in an agarose hydrogel. For both cell types, we have observed significant increases in equilibrium and dynamic compressive moduli after transient ATP treatment applied in the fourth week of cultivation. Continuous ATP treatment over 4 weeks of culture only slightly improved the mechanical properties of the constructs, without major changes in the total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content. Structure–function analyses showed that transiently ATP-treated constructs, and in particular those based on hMSCs, had the highest level of correlation between compositional and mechanical properties. Transiently treated groups showed intense staining of the territorial matrix for GAGs and collagen type II. These results indicate that transient ATP treatment can improve functional mechanical properties of cartilaginous constructs based on chondrogenic cells and agarose hydrogels, possibly by improving the structural organization of the bulk phase and territorial extracellular matrix (ECM), that is, by increasing correlation slopes between the content of the ECM components (GAG, collagen) and mechanical properties of the construct. PMID:23651296

  17. In vitro embryo production efficiency in cattle and its association with oocyte adenosine triphosphate content, quantity of mitochondrial DNA, and mitochondrial DNA haplogroup.

    PubMed

    Tamassia, M; Nuttinck, F; May-Panloup, P; Reynier, P; Heyman, Y; Charpigny, G; Stojkovic, M; Hiendleder, S; Renard, J-P; Chastant-Maillard, S

    2004-08-01

    Mitochondria have a broad range of functions that affect reproduction, and structural as well as quantitative variation in mtDNA has been associated with gamete quality and reproductive success. To investigate the mitochondria effect on in vitro embryo production, we collected oocytes by ultrasound-guided follicular aspiration from donor cows known to differ in the developmental capacity, measured by the blastocyst formation rate, of their oocytes. To evaluate the potential effects of mtDNA and mitochondrial function on oocyte quality, the donor cows' mtDNA control region was sequenced and, after pairwise comparisons of polymorphisms, animals were grouped into two major haplogroups. The number of mtDNA molecules per oocyte was quantified by real-time PCR, and the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content was measured in each oocyte to identify variations between haplogroups. Overall, ATP stocks in oocytes of the two haplogroups differed significantly (P < 0.05; means +/- SEM) both at the germinal vesicle and metaphase II stages (2.8 +/- 0.06 pmol vs. 2.6 +/- 0.07 pmol and 2.9 +/- 0.1 pmol vs. 2.3 +/- 0.06 pmol, respectively). The proportion of development to blastocyst was significantly different between haplogroups (22.3 +/- 2.1 % vs. 36.7 +/- 2.9 %). The number of mtDNA molecules per oocyte was highly variable (377 327 +/- 14 104, ranging from 2.0 x 10(3) to 1.2 x 10(6)) but not significantly different between the two haplogroups; significant differences were observed between animals without any apparent relationship to blastocyst production. These data suggest that mitochondria and mtDNA haplogroup affect the developmental capacity of bovine oocytes in vitro. PMID:15084486

  18. Inactivation efficiency of Escherichia coli and autochthonous bacteria during ozonation of municipal wastewater effluents quantified with flow cytometry and adenosine tri-phosphate analyses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunho; Imminger, Stefanie; Czekalski, Nadine; von Gunten, Urs; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-09-15

    Inactivation kinetics of autochthonous bacteria during ozonation of wastewater effluents were investigated using cultivation-independent flow cytometry (FCM) with total cell count (TCC) and intact cell count (ICC) and intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis. The principles of the methods including ozone inactivation kinetics were demonstrated with laboratory-cultured Escherichia coli spiked into filtered and sterilized wastewater effluent. Both intracellular ATP and ICC decreased with increasing ozone doses, with ICC being the more conservative parameter. The log-inactivation levels (-log(N/N0) of E. coli reached the method detection limits for FCM (∼3) and ATP (∼1.7) at specific ozone doses of ≥0.5 gO3/gDOC. During ozonation of four real wastewater effluents, the log-inactivation of autochthonous bacteria with FCM ICC was 0.3-1.0 for 0.25 gO3/gDOC and increased to 1.1-2.1 for 0.5 gO3/gDOC, but remained at a similar level of 1.5-2.8 for a further increase of the specific ozone doses to 1.0 and 1.5 gO3/gDOC. The FCM data also showed that autochthonous bacteria were composed of communities with high and low ozone reactivity. The inactivation levels measured with intracellular ATP were reasonably correlated to ICC (r(2) = 0.8). Overall, FCM and ATP measurements were demonstrated to be useful tools to monitor the inactivation of autochthonous bacteria during ozonation of municipal wastewater effluents. PMID:27322566

  19. Cysteinyl peptides of rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase labeled by the affinity label 8-((4-bromo-2,3-dioxobutyl)thio)adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmer, S.H.; Colman, R.F. )

    1990-03-13

    The affinity label 8-((4-bromo-2,3-dioxobutyl)thio)adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (8-BDB-TA-5{prime}-TP) reacts covalently with rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase, incorporating 2 mol of reagent/mol of enzyme subunit upon complete inactivation. Protection against inactivation is provided by phosphoenolpyruvate, K{sup +}, and Mn{sup 2+} and only 1 mol of reagent/mol of subunit is incorporated. The authors have now identified the resultant modified residues. After reaction with 8-BDB-TA-5{prime}-TP at pH 7.0, modified enzyme was incubated with ({sup 3}H)NaBH{sub 4} to reduce the carbonyl groups of enzyme-bound 8-BDB-TA-5{prime}-TP and to introduce a radioactive tracer into the modified residues. Following carboxymethylation and digestion with trypsin, the radioactive peptides were separated on a phenylboronate agarose column followed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography in 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid with an acetonitrile gradient. Gas-phase sequencing gave the cysteine-modified peptides Asn{sup 162}-Ile-Cys-Lys{sup 165} and Cys{sup 151}-Asp-Glu-Asn-Ile-Leu-Trp-Leu-Asp-Tyr-Lys{sup 161}, with a smaller amount of Asn{sup 43}-Thr-Gly-Ile-Ile-Cys-Thr-Ile-Gly-Pro-Ala-Ser-Arg{sup 55}. Reaction in the presence of the protectants phosphoenolpyruvate, K{sup +}, and Mn{sup 2+} yielded Asn-Ile-Cys-Lys as the only labeled peptide, indicating that inactivation is caused by modification of Cys{sup 151} and Cys{sup 48}.

  20. Correlation of changes in pain intensity with synovial fluid adenosine triphosphate levels after treatment of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee with high-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Kumahashi, Nobuyuki; Naitou, Kohei; Nishi, Hideyuki; Oae, Kazunori; Watanabe, Yohei; Kuwata, Suguru; Ochi, Mitsuo; Ikeda, Mitsugu; Uchio, Yuji

    2011-06-01

    We sought to determine whether a clinical association exists between osteoarthritis (OA)-associated knee pain and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels in synovial fluid (SF). A total of 28 patients with 28 primary OA knees were included. They routinely received intra-articular injection of high-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (HA) once weekly for 5 weeks (treated group). Eight patients without knee pain who had undergone an operation for anterior or posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction 2 years ago were also examined (control group). SF and blood ATP concentrations, total amount of ATP, total SF volume, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores in all patients were measured and we compared pre-treatment values with those 1 week after the final treatment. We evaluated the correlation of change in total ATP (ΔATP) and change in VAS score (ΔVAS), ΔVAS and change in SF volume (ΔSF), and ATP concentration in SF and blood. In the treated group, SF ATP concentration, total amount of ATP, SF volume, and VAS score were all significantly lower post-treatment than pre-treatment (p = 0.0005, 0.0003, 0.0022, and < 0.0001, respectively). In treated group, ΔVAS was significantly associated with ΔATP (r = 0.56, p = 0.0032), ΔSF was significantly associated with ΔVAS (r = 0.78, p < 0.0001), and total amount of SF ATP and SF volume at pre-treatment were significantly higher than the control group (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001) We demonstrated an association between SF ATP level changes and OA knee pain, which should facilitate a further understanding of OA pain mechanisms. PMID:20627733

  1. Use of an adenosine triphosphate assay, and simultaneous staining with fluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide, to evaluate the effects of cryoprotectants on hard coral (Echinopora spp.) oocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S; Spikings, E; Kuo, F W; Lin, N C; Lin, C

    2010-03-15

    The objective was to examine the effects of cryoprotectants on oocytes of hard corals (Echinopora spp.) to obtain basic knowledge for cryopreservation procedures. Oocytes were exposed to various concentrations of cryoprotectants (0.25 to 5.0M) for 20 min at room temperature (25 degrees C). Two tests were used to assess ovarian follicle viability: fluorescein diacetate (FDA)+propidium iodide (PI) staining, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay. Both FDA+PI staining and ATP assay indicated that cryoprotectant toxicity to oocytes increased in the order methanol, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), propylene glycol (PG), and ethylene glycol (EG). The no observed effect concentrations for Echinopora spp. oocytes were 1.0, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.25 M for methanol, DMSO, PG, and EG, respectively, when assessed with FDA+PI. The ATP assay was more sensitive than FDA+PI staining (P<0.05). Oocyte viability after 1.0M methanol, DMSO, EG, or PG treatment for 20 min at room temperature assessed with FDA+PI tests and ATP assay were 88.9+/-3.1% and 72.2+/-4.4%, 66.2+/-5.0% and 23.2+/-4.9%, 58.9+/-5.4% and 1.1+/-0.7%, and 49.1+/-5.1% and 0.9+/-0.5%, respectively. We inferred that the ATP assay was a valuable measure of cellular injury after cryoprotectant incubation. The results of this study provided a basis for development of protocols to cryopreserve coral oocytes. PMID:20005561

  2. Effects of chronic digitalization on cardiac and renal Na+ + K+-dependent adenosine triphosphate activity and circulating catecholamines in the dog.

    PubMed

    Nechay, B R; Jackson, R E; Ziegler, M G; Neldon, S L; Thompson, J D

    1981-09-01

    To extend our understanding of the mechanism of action of digitalis drugs, we studied electrocardiograms (ECGs), renal function, plasma concentrations of catecholamines, and myocardial and renal Na+ + K+-dependent adenosine triphosphate (Na+ + K+ ATPase) activity in chronically digitalized dogs. Five healthy, male, mongrel dogs received a therapeutic regimen of digoxin (0.1 mg/kg on day 1 in three divided doses followed by 0.025 mg/kg per day) orally for 2-4 months. This resulted in plasma digoxin concentrations of 1.1 to 4.7 ng/ml as determined by radioimmunoassay. Six control dogs received daily gelatin capsules by mouth. ECGs monitored throughout the study showed no changes. Digitalized dogs had elevated plasma norepinephrine concentrations (347 vs. 137 pg/ml in controls) and no change in plasma epinephrine concentrations. Digitalized dogs had elevated glomerular filtration rates (0.74 vs. 0.94 ml/min per g of kidney) without significant changes in renal handling of electrolytes and water. All of the above studies were done without the aid of restraining drugs or infusions. The animals were killed with an overdose of pentobarbital for in vitro studies. In digitalized dogs, microsomal Na+ + K+ ATPase-specific activity was 26 to 33% lower in the renal cortex, medulla, and papilla, and 46% lower in the cardiac left ventricle than in control dogs. Digitalization did not alter the osmolalities of renal tissues. We conclude that chronic reduction Na+ + K+ ATPase activity by one-third dose does not cause abnormalities in renal handling of electrolytes and water, and inhibition of Na+ + K+ ATPase in the left ventricular muscle by one-half is associated with no obvious ECG changes in the dog. Further, elevated plasma norepinephrine concentrations may contribute to both the therapeutic and the toxic effects of digitalis. PMID:6266687

  3. Gating of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channels by adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis. Quantitative analysis of a cyclic gating scheme.

    PubMed

    Zeltwanger, S; Wang, F; Wang, G T; Gillis, K D; Hwang, T C

    1999-04-01

    Gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) involves a coordinated action of ATP on two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Previous studies using nonhydrolyzable ATP analogues and NBD mutant CFTR have suggested that nucleotide hydrolysis at NBD1 is required for opening of the channel, while hydrolysis of nucleotides at NBD2 controls channel closing. We studied ATP-dependent gating of CFTR in excised inside-out patches from stably transfected NIH3T3 cells. Single channel kinetics of CFTR gating at different [ATP] were analyzed. The closed time constant (tauc) decreased with increasing [ATP] to a minimum value of approximately 0.43 s at [ATP] >1.00 mM. The open time constant (tauo) increased with increasing [ATP] with a minimal tauo of approximately 260 ms. Kinetic analysis of K1250A-CFTR, a mutant that abolishes ATP hydrolysis at NBD2, reveals the presence of two open states. A short open state with a time constant of approximately 250 ms is dominant at low ATP concentrations (10 microM) and a much longer open state with a time constant of approximately 3 min is present at millimolar ATP. These data suggest that nucleotide binding and hydrolysis at NBD1 is coupled to channel opening and that the channel can close without nucleotide interaction with NBD2. A quantitative cyclic gating scheme with microscopic irreversibility was constructed based on the kinetic parameters derived from single-channel analysis. The estimated values of the kinetic parameters suggest that NBD1 and NBD2 are neither functionally nor biochemically equivalent. PMID:10102935

  4. Running out of time: the decline of channel activity and nucleotide activation in adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K-channels

    PubMed Central

    Proks, Peter; Puljung, Michael C.; Vedovato, Natascia; Sachse, Gregor; Mulvaney, Rachel; Ashcroft, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    KATP channels act as key regulators of electrical excitability by coupling metabolic cues—mainly intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations—to cellular potassium ion efflux. However, their study has been hindered by their rapid loss of activity in excised membrane patches (rundown), and by a second phenomenon, the decline of activation by Mg-nucleotides (DAMN). Degradation of PI(4,5)P2 and other phosphoinositides is the strongest candidate for the molecular cause of rundown. Broad evidence indicates that most other determinants of rundown (e.g. phosphorylation, intracellular calcium, channel mutations that affect rundown) also act by influencing KATP channel regulation by phosphoinositides. Unfortunately, experimental conditions that reproducibly prevent rundown have remained elusive, necessitating post hoc data compensation. Rundown is clearly distinct from DAMN. While the former is associated with pore-forming Kir6.2 subunits, DAMN is generally a slower process involving the regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits. We speculate that it arises when SUR subunits enter non-physiological conformational states associated with the loss of SUR nucleotide-binding domain dimerization following prolonged exposure to nucleotide-free conditions. This review presents new information on both rundown and DAMN, summarizes our current understanding of these processes and considers their physiological roles. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377720

  5. Running out of time: the decline of channel activity and nucleotide activation in adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K-channels.

    PubMed

    Proks, Peter; Puljung, Michael C; Vedovato, Natascia; Sachse, Gregor; Mulvaney, Rachel; Ashcroft, Frances M

    2016-08-01

    KATP channels act as key regulators of electrical excitability by coupling metabolic cues-mainly intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations-to cellular potassium ion efflux. However, their study has been hindered by their rapid loss of activity in excised membrane patches (rundown), and by a second phenomenon, the decline of activation by Mg-nucleotides (DAMN). Degradation of PI(4,5)P2 and other phosphoinositides is the strongest candidate for the molecular cause of rundown. Broad evidence indicates that most other determinants of rundown (e.g. phosphorylation, intracellular calcium, channel mutations that affect rundown) also act by influencing KATP channel regulation by phosphoinositides. Unfortunately, experimental conditions that reproducibly prevent rundown have remained elusive, necessitating post hoc data compensation. Rundown is clearly distinct from DAMN. While the former is associated with pore-forming Kir6.2 subunits, DAMN is generally a slower process involving the regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits. We speculate that it arises when SUR subunits enter non-physiological conformational states associated with the loss of SUR nucleotide-binding domain dimerization following prolonged exposure to nucleotide-free conditions. This review presents new information on both rundown and DAMN, summarizes our current understanding of these processes and considers their physiological roles.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377720

  6. Effects of oral adenosine-5′-triphosphate supplementation on athletic performance, skeletal muscle hypertrophy and recovery in resistance-trained men

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a lack of studies examining the effects of adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) supplementation utilizing a long-term, periodized resistance-training program (RT) in resistance-trained populations. Therefore, we investigated the effects of 12 weeks of 400 mg per day of oral ATP on muscular adaptations in trained individuals. We also sought to determine the effects of ATP on muscle protein breakdown, cortisol, and performance during an overreaching cycle. Methods The study was a 3-phase randomized, double-blind, and placebo- and diet-controlled intervention. Phase 1 was a periodized resistance-training program. Phase 2 consisted of a two week overreaching cycle in which volume and frequency were increased followed by a 2-week taper (Phase 3). Muscle mass, strength, and power were examined at weeks 0, 4, 8, and 12 to assess the chronic effects of ATP; assessment performance variables also occurred at the end of weeks 9 and 10, corresponding to the mid and endpoints of the overreaching cycle. Results There were time (p < 0.001), and group x time effects for increased total body strength (+55.3 ± 6.0 kg ATP vs. + 22.4 ± 7.1 kg placebo, p < 0.001); increased vertical jump power (+ 796 ± 75 ATP vs. 614 ± 52 watts placebo, p < 0.001); and greater ultrasound determined muscle thickness (+4.9 ± 1.0 ATP vs. (2.5 ± 0.6 mm placebo, p < 0.02) with ATP supplementation. During the overreaching cycle, there were group x time effects for strength and power, which decreased to a greater extent in the placebo group. Protein breakdown was also lower in the ATP group. Conclusions Our results suggest oral ATP supplementation may enhance muscular adaptations following 12-weeks of resistance training, and prevent decrements in performance following overreaching. No statistically or clinically significant changes in blood chemistry or hematology were observed. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01508338 PMID

  7. Adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) supplements are not orally bioavailable: a randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over trial in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nutritional supplements designed to increase adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) concentrations are commonly used by athletes as ergogenic aids. ATP is the primary source of energy for the cells, and supplementation may enhance the ability to maintain high ATP turnover during high-intensity exercise. Oral ATP supplements have beneficial effects in some but not all studies examining physical performance. One of the remaining questions is whether orally administered ATP is bioavailable. We investigated whether acute supplementation with oral ATP administered as enteric-coated pellets led to increased concentrations of ATP or its metabolites in the circulation. Methods Eight healthy volunteers participated in a cross-over study. Participants were given in random order single doses of 5000 mg ATP or placebo. To prevent degradation of ATP in the acidic environment of the stomach, the supplement was administered via two types of pH-sensitive, enteric-coated pellets (targeted at release in the proximal or distal small intestine), or via a naso-duodenal tube. Blood ATP and metabolite concentrations were monitored by HPLC for 4.5 h (naso-duodenal tube) or 7 h (pellets) post-administration. Areas under the concentration vs. time curve were calculated and compared by paired-samples t-tests. Results ATP concentrations in blood did not increase after ATP supplementation via enteric-coated pellets or naso-duodenal tube. In contrast, concentrations of the final catabolic product of ATP, uric acid, were significantly increased compared to placebo by ~50% after administration via proximal-release pellets (P = 0.003) and naso-duodenal tube (P = 0.001), but not after administration via distal-release pellets. Conclusions A single dose of orally administered ATP is not bioavailable, and this may explain why several studies did not find ergogenic effects of oral ATP supplementation. On the other hand, increases in uric acid after release of ATP in the proximal

  8. Effect of extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate on cryopreserved epididymal cat sperm intracellular ATP concentration, sperm quality, and in vitro fertilizing ability.

    PubMed

    Thuwanut, Paweena; Arya, Nlin; Comizzoli, Pierre; Chatdarong, Kaywalee

    2015-09-15

    Intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is essential for supporting sperm function in the fertilization process. During cryopreservation, damage of sperm mitochondrial membrane usually leads to compromised production of intracellular ATP. Recently, extracellular ATP (ATPe) was introduced as a potent activator of sperm motility and fertilizing ability. This study aimed to evaluate (1) levels of intracellular ATP in frozen-thawed epididymal cat sperm after incubation with ATPe and (2) effects of ATPe on epididymal cat sperm parameters after freezing and thawing. Eighteen male cats were included. For each replicate, epididymal sperm from two cats were pooled to one sample (N = 9). Each pooled sample was cryopreserved with the Tris-egg yolk extender into three straws. After thawing, the first and second straws were incubated with 0-, 1.0-, or 2.5-mM ATPe for 10 minutes and evaluated for sperm quality at 10 minutes, 1, 3, and 6 hours after thawing and fertilizing ability. The third straw was evaluated for intracellular ATP concentration in control and with 2.5-mM ATPe treatment. Higher concentration of intracellular sperm ATP was observed in the samples treated with 2.5-mM ATPe compared to the controls (0.339 ± 0.06 μg/2 × 10(6) sperm vs. 0.002 ± 0.003 μg/2 × 10(6) sperm, P ≤ 0.05). In addition, incubation with 2.5-mM ATPe for 10 minutes promoted sperm motility (56.7 ± 5.0 vs. 53.3 ± 4.4%, P ≤ 0.05) and progressive motility (3.1 ± 0.2 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4, P ≤ 0.05), mitochondrial membrane potential (36.4 ± 5.5 vs. 28.7 ± 4.8%, P ≤ 0.05), and blastocyst rate (36.1 ± 7.0 and 28.8 ± 7.4%, P ≤ 0.05) compared with the controls. In contrast, ATPe remarkably interfered acrosome integrity after 6 hours of postthawed incubation. In sum, the present finding that optimal incubation time of postthaw epididymal cat sperm under proper ATPe condition might constitute a rationale for the studies on other endangered wild felids regarding sperm quality and embryo

  9. Association of adenosine receptor gene polymorphisms and in vivo adenosine A1 receptor binding in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Hohoff, Christa; Garibotto, Valentina; Elmenhorst, David; Baffa, Anna; Kroll, Tina; Hoffmann, Alana; Schwarte, Kathrin; Zhang, Weiqi; Arolt, Volker; Deckert, Jürgen; Bauer, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs) and the interacting adenosine A2A receptors are implicated in neurological and psychiatric disorders. Variants within the corresponding genes ADORA1 and ADORA2A were shown associated with pathophysiologic alterations, particularly increased anxiety. It is unknown so far, if these variants might modulate the A1AR distribution and availability in different brain regions. In this pilot study, the influence of ADORA1 and ADORA2A variants on in vivo A1AR binding was assessed with the A1AR-selective positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [(18)F]CPFPX in brains of healthy humans. Twenty-eight normal control subjects underwent PET procedures to calculate the binding potential BPND of [(18)F]CPFPX in cerebral regions and to assess ADORA1 and ADORA2A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) effects on regional BPND data. Our results revealed SNPs of both genes associated with [(18)F]CPFPX binding to the A1AR. The strongest effects that withstood even Bonferroni correction of multiple SNP testing were found in non-smoking subjects (N=22) for ADORA2A SNPs rs2236624 and rs5751876 (corr. Pall<0.05). SNP alleles previously identified at risk for increased anxiety like the rs5751876 T-allele corresponded to consistently higher A1AR availability in all brain regions. Our data indicate for the first time that variation of A1AR availability was associated with ADORA SNPs. The finding of increased A1AR availability in regions of the fear network, particularly in ADORA2A risk allele carriers, strongly warrants evaluation and replication in further studies including individuals with increased anxiety. PMID:24943643

  10. Structure of the nucleotide-binding subunit B of the energy producer A1A0 ATP synthase in complex with adenosine diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Manimekalai, Malathy Sony Subramanian; Grüber, Gerhard

    2008-11-01

    A1A0 ATP synthases are the major energy producers in archaea. Like the related prokaryotic and eukaryotic F1F0 ATP synthases, they are responsible for most of the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate. The catalytic events of A1A0 ATP synthases take place inside the A3B3 hexamer of the A1 domain. Recently, the crystallographic structure of the nucleotide-free subunit B of Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A1A0 ATP synthase has been determined at 1.5 A resolution. To understand more about the nucleotide-binding mechanism, a protocol has been developed to crystallize the subunit B-ADP complex. The crystallographic structure of this complex has been solved at 2.7 A resolution. The ADP occupies a position between the essential phosphate-binding loop and amino-acid residue Phe149, which are involved in the binding of the antibiotic efrapeptin in the related F1F0 ATP synthases. This trapped ADP location is about 13 A distant from its final binding site and is therefore called the transition ADP-binding position. In the trapped ADP position the structure of subunit B adopts a different conformation, mainly in its C-terminal domain and also in the final nucleotide-binding site of the central alphabeta-domain. This atomic model provides insight into how the substrate enters into the nucleotide-binding protein and thereby into the catalytic A3B3 domain. PMID:19020348

  11. Spatial and Temporal Variability in the Concentration and Turnover of the Inorganic Phosphate and Adenosine-5'-triphosphate pools in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkman, Karin; Church, Matthew; Karl, David

    2015-04-01

    The microbial community's utilization of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as a function of the Pi pool concentration was studied over a multi-year period at Station ALOHA (22.75˚N, 158˚W) in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). Additionally, the spatial variability in these same properties was investigated along an east-west transect from California to Hawaii in the Fall of 2014. We used radiotracer techniques to determine the turnover times of the Pi or ATP pools respectively, and assessed the net production of dissolved organic phosphorus, and Pi hydrolysis rate from ATP. Pi concentrations in the upper water column at Station ALOHA are temporally highly dynamic, with periods of <10 nM-P to near 200 nM-P recorded within the top 50 m over the past decades of observations. During the California to Hawaii transect Pi concentrations showed a similarly large range (<10 to >200 nM-P), emphasizing the spatially and temporally mosaic nature of the upper ocean of this large biome. The Pi-pool turnover time ranged from a few hours to several weeks, and was strongly correlated with measured Pi pool concentrations (r2=0.8; n=30 Station ALOHA; n=15 transect). The calculated Pi uptake rates at Station ALOHA averaged 3.7±1.3 nM-P d-1 (n=30), reflecting the typically low maximum Pi uptake rates of the Prochlorococcus dominated community and the predominantly non-limiting Pi conditions. The Pi uptake rates along the transect were more variable than Station ALOHA (averaging 9.2±4.7 nM=P d-1, n=15), possibly due to a more diverse planktonic community structure, including stations with elevated concentrations of chlorophyll and primary productivity. The turnover time of the dissolved ATP pool was typically substantially shorter than for the Pi-pool (2-5 days at Station ALOHA; 0.3-2.5 days along the transect), likely reflecting its low nanomolar to picomolar ambient pool concentrations. However, at stations with the lowest SRP concentrations the

  12. Comparison of the Immunomagnetic Separation/Adenosine Triphosphate Rapid Method and the Modified mTEC Membrane-Filtration Method for Enumeration of Escherichia coli

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brady, Amie M.G.; Bushon, Rebecca N.; Bertke, Erin E.

    2009-01-01

    Water quality at beaches is monitored for fecal indicator bacteria by traditional, culture-based methods that can take 18 to 24 hours to obtain results. A rapid detection method that provides estimated concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria within 1 hour from the start of sample processing would allow beach managers to post advisories or close the beach when the conditions are actually considered unsafe instead of a day later, when conditions may have changed. A rapid method that couples immunomagnetic separation with adenosine triphosphate detection (IMS/ATP rapid method) was evaluated through monitoring of Escherichia coli (E. coli) at three Lake Erie beaches in Ohio (Edgewater and Villa Angela in Cleveland and Huntington in Bay Village). Beach water samples were collected between 4 and 5 days per week during the recreational seasons (May through September) of 2006 and 2007. Composite samples were created in the lab from two point samples collected at each beach and were shown to be comparable substitutes for analysis of two individual samples. E. coli concentrations in composite samples, as determined by the culture-based method, ranged from 4 to 24,000 colony-forming units per 100 milliliters during this study across all beaches. Turbidity also was measured for each sample and ranged from 0.8 to 260 neophelometric turbidity ratio units. Environmental variables were noted at the time of sampling, including number of birds at the beach and wave height. Rainfall amounts were measured at National Weather Service stations at local airports. Turbidity, rainfall, and wave height were significantly related to the culture-based method results each year and for both years combined at each beach. The number of birds at the beach was significantly related to the culture-based method results only at Edgewater during 2006 and during both years combined. Results of the IMS/ATP method were compared to results of the culture-based method for samples by year for each beach

  13. Nucleotide Binding Site Communication in Arabidopsis thaliana Adenosine 5;-Phosphosulfate Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-08-31

    Adenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of adenosine 3{prime}-phosphate 5{prime}-phosphosulfate (PAPS), which is an essential metabolite for sulfur assimilation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Using APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana, we examine the energetics of nucleotide binary and ternary complex formation and probe active site features that coordinate the order of ligand addition. Calorimetric analysis shows that binding can occur first at either nucleotide site, but that initial interaction at the ATP/ADP site was favored and enhanced affinity for APS in the second site by 50-fold. The thermodynamics of the two possible binding models (i.e. ATP first versus APS first) differs and implies that active site structural changes guide the order of nucleotide addition. The ligand binding analysis also supports an earlier suggestion of intermolecular interactions in the dimeric APSK structure. Crystallographic, site-directed mutagenesis, and energetic analyses of oxyanion recognition by the P-loop in the ATP/ADP binding site and the role of Asp136, which bridges the ATP/ADP and APS/PAPS binding sites, suggest how the ordered nucleotide binding sequence and structural changes are dynamically coordinated for catalysis.

  14. Binding of Mn-deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphates to the Active Site of the DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7

    SciTech Connect

    B Akabayov; C Richardson

    2011-12-31

    Divalent metal ions are crucial as cofactors for a variety of intracellular enzymatic activities. Mg{sup 2+}, as an example, mediates binding of deoxyribonucleoside 5'-triphosphates followed by their hydrolysis in the active site of DNA polymerase. It is difficult to study the binding of Mg{sup 2+} to an active site because Mg{sup 2+} is spectroscopically silent and Mg{sup 2+} binds with low affinity to the active site of an enzyme. Therefore, we substituted Mg{sup 2+} with Mn{sup 2+}:Mn{sup 2+} that is not only visible spectroscopically but also provides full activity of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. In order to demonstrate that the majority of Mn{sup 2+} is bound to the enzyme, we have applied site-directed titration analysis of T7 DNA polymerase using X-ray near edge spectroscopy. Here we show how X-ray near edge spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between signal originating from Mn{sup 2+} that is free in solution and Mn{sup 2+} bound to the active site of T7 DNA polymerase. This method can be applied to other enzymes that use divalent metal ions as a cofactor.

  15. Soluble low affinity adenosine A/sub 2/ binding site from human placenta: reconstitution and characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, K.; Prasad, M.; Fox, I.H.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have developed a vesicle reconstitution technique that allows for rapid vacuum filtration assay, and have characterized the soluble A/sub 2/ site from placental membranes. The overall yield of reconstituted binding is 60%. Competition analysis of membranes and reconstituted vesicles yields identical agonist potency orders and affinities: N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) (Kd-330 nM)>2-chloroadenosine (Kd=1.7 ..mu..M) > L-phenylisopropyladenosine (Kd > 1 mM). Equilibrium binding to membranes and reconstituted vesicles of (/sup 3/H)-NECA, an adenosine agonist, was not reduced by guanine nulceotides. HPLC gel permeation chromatography of extracts from membranes preincubated with 5 mM MgCl/sub 2/ and 100 ..mu..M NECA revealed a peak of binding with kD of 0.07. Extracts prepared with either an antagonist or NECA and 100 ..mu..M guanylyl 5'-imidodiphosphate revealed a peak of binding with a kD of 0.09. These data suggest that the adenosine A/sub 2/ receptor retains its binding properties upon reconstitution and may couple to a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein.

  16. (/sup 125/I)Aminobenzyladenosine, a new radioligand with improved specific binding to adenosine receptors in heart

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, J.; Patel, A.; Sadek, S.

    1985-02-01

    The density of adenosine receptors in membranes derived from rat hearts in 25 times lower than the density of receptors in rat brain membranes. Consequently, adenosine radioligands which are useful in brain such as l-(/sup 3/H)phenylisopropyladenosine, (/sup 3/H)cyclohexyladenosine, (/sup 3/H)-2-chloroadenosine and l-(/sup 125/I)hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine are of limited usefulness in heart, due to a high ratio of nonspecific to specific binding. We have synthesized a new radioligand, (/sup 125/I)-N6-4-aminobenzyladenosine, which binds to rat heart membranes with one-sixth the nonspecific binding of the other radioligands. (/sup 125/I)-N6-4-aminobenzyladenosine bound to rat ventricle membranes with a K/sub D/ equivalent to that of l-(/sup 125/I)hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine and a B/sub max/ of 15.2 fmol/mg protein. (/sup 125/I)-N6-4-aminobenzyladenosine bound with a higher affinity to brain (K/sub D/ . 1.93 nM) than to heart membranes (K/sub D/ . 11.6 nM). At the radioligand K/sub D/, 60% of the total (/sup 125/I)-N6-4-aminobenzyladenosine bound to heart membranes was specifically bound. Iodination of aminobenzyladenosine increased its affinity for the adenosine receptor by 22-fold, possibly due to a steric or hydrophobic effect of iodine. The new ligand was found to be a full adenosine agonist based on its ability to inhibit cyclic adenosinemonophosphate accumulation in isolated embryonic chick heart cells and rat adipocytes. (/sup 125/I)-N6-4-Aminobenzyladenosine bound to a single affinity site and was displaced from cardiac and brain adenosine receptors by other adenosine analogues with a potency order of l-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than 5'-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine. These characteristics suggest that the radioligand binds to an Ri adenosine receptor.

  17. Biosynthesis of thiamine triphosphate and identification of thiamine diphosphate-binding proteins of rat liver hyaloplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Voskoboev, A.I.; Chernikevich, I.P.

    1986-03-10

    The nature of the proteins of rat liver hyaloplasm that bind ThDP* was studied. When injection of (/sup 14/C)thiamine was used as the marker, an electrophoretically homogeneous protein preparations, containing (/sup 14/C)ThDP, identified as transketolase, was isolated from the soluble fraction of the liver. No other nonenzymatic proteins that bind ThDP and might serve as the substrate in the synthesis of ThTP were detected in the hyaloplasm. It was shown that transfer of the phosphate group by rat liver ThDP kinase occurs to the free ThDP, and not to protein-bound ThDP, as was previously asserted.

  18. Activation of P2Y1 and P2Y2 nucleotide receptors by adenosine 5′-triphosphate analogues augmented nerve-mediated relaxation of human corpus cavernosum

    PubMed Central

    Gur, Serap; Hellstrom, Wayne J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) is a ubiquitous cellular energy source. We evaluated the effect of ATP and its analogues on nonadrenergic and noncholinergic relaxation in precontracted human corpus cavernosal smooth muscle (HCCSM). Methods We obtained specimens of human corpus cavernosum (HCC) from patients undergoing penile prosthesis surgery (patient age 46–70 yr, n = 17) with prior approval from the local institutional review board. Isolated HCC strips were placed in organ baths containing Krebs solution and functional experiments were conducted. Immunohistochemical localization studies were performed to establish the presence of purinergic P2X1, P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors in HCC. Results The amplitude of relaxation induced by electrical-field stimulation (EFS) on HCC was significantly increased after exposure to ATP (P2X and P2Y agonists), 2-MeSATP (P2Y1 agonist), and uridine 5’ triphosphate (P2Y2 agonist), but not α,β-methylene ATP (P2X1 agonist). The P2X1 antagonist pyridoxal-5’-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2’, 4’-disulfonate, and the nonspecific P2Y antagonist, reactive blue 2, did not inhibit the potentiated response of EFS on HCC. Although immunoreactivity for both P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors was localized abundantly in HCC, there was only low-level immunostaining for the P2X1 receptor. Conclusion These data demonstrate that nerve-mediated relaxation of HCCSM strips precontracted with phenylephrine in organ bath preparations is amplified by stimulating purinergic P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors. Although nucleotides are important regulators of HCCSM tone, these observations suggest an independent purinergic relaxing mechanism in the HCC, separate from the better known nitrergic system. PMID:19672446

  19. Computational study of the binding modes of caffeine to the adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuli; Burger, Steven K; Ayers, Paul W; Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban

    2011-12-01

    Using the recently solved crystal structure of the human adenosine A(2A) receptor, we applied MM/PBSA to compare the binding modes of caffeine with those of the high-affinity selective antagonist ZM241385. MD simulations were performed in the environment of the lipid membrane bilayer. Four low-energy binding modes of caffeine-A(2A) were found, all of which had similar energies. Assuming an equal contribution of each binding mode of caffeine, the computed binding free energy difference between caffeine and ZM241385 is -2.4 kcal/mol, which compares favorably with the experimental value, -3.6 kcal/mol. The configurational entropy contribution of -0.9 kcal/mol from multiple binding modes of caffeine helps explain how a small molecule like caffeine can compete with a significantly larger molecule, ZM241385, which can form many more interactions with the receptor. We also performed residue-wise energy decomposition and found that Phe168, Leu249, and Ile274 contribute most significantly to the binding modes of caffeine and ZM241385. PMID:21970461

  20. (/sup 3/H)-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine binding to A1 adenosine receptors of intact rat ventricular myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, D.; Lohse, M.J.; Schwabe, U.

    1988-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was the identification of A1 adenosine receptors in intact rat ventricular myocytes, which are thought to mediate the negative inotropic effects of adenosine. The adenosine receptor antagonist (/sup 3/H)-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine was used as radioligand. Binding of the radioligand to intact myocytes was rapid, reversible, and saturable with a binding capacity of 40,000 binding sites per cell. The dissociation constant of the radioligand was 0.48 nM. The adenosine receptor antagonists 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, xanthine amine congener, and theophylline were competitive inhibitors with affinities in agreement with results obtained for A1 receptors in other tissues. Competition experiments using the adenosine receptor agonists R-N(6)-phenylisopropyladenosine, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, and S-N(6)-phenylisopropyladenosine gave monophasic displacement curves with Ki values of 50 nM, 440 nM, and 4,300 nM, which agreed well with the GTP-inducible low affinity state in cardiac membranes. The low affinity for agonists was not due to agonist-induced desensitization, and correlated well with the corresponding IC50 values for the inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation by isoprenaline. It is suggested that only a low affinity state of A1 receptors can be detected in intact rat myocytes due to the presence of high concentrations of guanine nucleotides in intact cells.

  1. The opposing effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate, and pertussis toxin on phorbol ester induced inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor stimulated guanylate cyclase in SK-NEP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, M.; Frohlich, E.D.; Cole, F.E. )

    1991-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (ATP) and pertussis toxin (PT) on phorbol ester (PMA) induced inhibition of ANF-stimulated cyclic GMP formation in cells from the human renal cell line, SK-NEP-1. PMA inhibited ANF-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity in particulate membranes by about 65%. Calmodulin reversed this inhibition in a dose dependent manner. ATP potentiated Mg++ but not Mn++ supported guanylate cyclase activity. In PMA treated membranes, ATP potentiating effects were abolished. PMA also inhibited ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation, but pretreatment with PT prevented this PMA inhibition. PT did not affect basal or ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that PMA inhibited ANF stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase in opposition to the activating effects of calmodulin or ATP in SK-NEP-1 cells. The protein kinase C inhibitory effects appeared to be mediated via a PT-sensitive G protein.

  2. A Binding Site Model and Structure-Activity Relationships for the Rat A3 Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    VAN GALEN, PHILIP J. M.; VAN BERGEN, ANDREW H.; GALLO-RODRIGUEZ, CAROLA; MELMAN, NELI; OLAH, MARK E.; IJZERMAN, AD P.; STILES, GARY L.; JACOBSON, KENNETH A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A novel adenosine receptor, the A3 receptor, has recently been cloned. We have systematically investigated the hitherto largely unexplored structure-activity relationships (SARs) for binding at A3 receptors, using 125I-N6-2-(4-aminophenyl)ethyladenosine as a radioligand and membranes from Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the rat A3-cDNA. As is the case for A1 and A2a, receptors, substitutions at the N6 and 5′ positions of adenosine, the prototypic agonist ligand, may yield fairly potent compounds. However, the highest affinity and A3 selectivity is found for N6,5′-disubstituted compounds, in contrast to A1 and A2a receptors. Thus, N6-benzyladenosine-5′-N-ethylcarboxamide is highly potent (Ki, 6.8 nM) and moderately selective (13- and 14-fold versus A1 and A2a). The N6 region of the A3 receptor also appears to tolerate hydrophilic substitutions, in sharp contrast to the other subtypes. Potencies of N6,5′-disubstituted compounds in inhibition of adenylate cyclase via A3 receptors parallel their high affinity in the binding assay. None of the typical xanthine or nonxanthine (A1/A2) antagonists tested show any appreciable affinity for rat A3 receptors. 1,3-Dialkylxanthines did not antagonize the A3 agonist-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase. A His residue in helix 6 that is absent in A3 receptors but present in A1/A2 receptors may be causal in this respect. In a molecular model for the rat A3 receptor, this mutation, together with an increased bulkiness of residues surrounding the ligand, make antagonist binding unfavorable when compared with a previously developed A1 receptor model. Second, this A3 receptor model predicted similarities with A1 and A2 receptors in the binding requirements for the ribose moiety and that xanthine-7-ribosides would bind to rat A3 receptors. This hypothesis was supported experimentally by the moderate affinity (Ki 6 μM) of 7-riboside of 1,3-dibutylxanthine, which appears to be a partial agonist at

  3. Mass spectrometry-based ligand binding assays on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Massink, A; Holzheimer, M; Hölscher, A; Louvel, J; Guo, D; Spijksma, G; Hankemeier, T; IJzerman, A P

    2015-12-01

    Conventional methods to measure ligand-receptor binding parameters typically require radiolabeled ligands as probes. Despite the robustness of radioligand binding assays, they carry inherent disadvantages in terms of safety precautions, expensive synthesis, special lab requirements, and waste disposal. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a method that can selectively detect ligands without the need of a label. The sensitivity of MS equipment increases progressively, and currently, it is possible to detect low ligand quantities that are usually found in ligand binding assays. We developed a label-free MS ligand binding (MS binding) assay on the adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors (A(1)AR and A(2A)AR), which are well-characterized members of the class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Radioligand binding assays for both receptors are well established, and ample data is available to compare and evaluate the performance of an MS binding assay. 1,3-Dipropyl-8-cyclopentyl-xanthine (DPCPX) and 4-(2-((7-amino-2-(furan-2-yl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]-[1,3,5]triazin-5-yl)amino)ethyl)phenol (ZM-241,385) are high-affinity ligands selective for the A(1)AR and A(2A)AR, respectively. To proof the feasibility of MS binding on the A(1)AR and A(2A)AR, we first developed an MS detection method for unlabeled DPCPX and ZM-241,385. To serve as internal standards, both compounds were also deuterium-labeled. Subsequently, we investigated whether the two unlabeled compounds could substitute for their radiolabeled counterparts as marker ligands in binding experiments, including saturation, displacement, dissociation, and competition association assays. Furthermore, we investigated the accuracy of these assays if the use of internal standards was excluded. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the MS binding assay, even in the absence of a deuterium-labeled internal standard, and provide great promise for the further development of label-free assays based on MS for other GPCRs. PMID

  4. Characterization of the binding of a novel nonxanthine adenosine antagonist radioligand, ( sup 3 H)CGS 15943, to multiple affinity states of the adenosine A1 receptor in the rat cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, M.F.; Williams, M.; Do, U.H.; Sills, M.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The triazoloquinazoline CGS 15943 is the first reported nonxanthine adenosine antagonist that has high affinity for brain adenosine receptors. In the present study, the binding of (3H) CGS 15943 to recognition sites in rat cortical membranes was characterized. Saturation experiments revealed that (3H)CGS 15943 labeled a single class of recognition sites with high affinity and limited capacity. Competition studies revealed that the binding of (3H)CGS 15943 was consistent with the labeling of brain adenosine A1 receptors. Adenosine agonists inhibited 1 nM (3H)CGS 15943 binding with the following order of activity N6-cyclopentyladenosine (IC50 = 15 nM) greater than 2-chloroadenosine greater than (R)-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than 5'-N6-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine greater than (S)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than CGS 21680 greater than CV 1808 (IC50 greater than 10,000 nM). The potency order for adenosine antagonists was CGS 15943 (IC50 = 5 nM) greater than 8-phenyltheophylline greater than 1,3-dipropyl-8-(4-amino-2-chloro)phenylxanthine greater than 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine greater than theophylline = caffeine (IC50 greater than 10,000 nM). Antagonist inhibition curves were steep and best described by a one-site binding model. In contrast, adenosine A1 agonist competition curves were shallow, as indicated by Hill coefficients less than unity. Computer analysis revealed that these inhibition curves were best described by a two-site binding model. Agonist competition curves generated in the presence of 1 mM GTP resulted in a rightward shift and steepening of the inhibition-concentration curves, whereas antagonist binding was not altered in the presence of GTP. The complex binding interactions found with adenosine agonists indicate that (3H)CGS 15943 labels both high and low affinity components of the adenosine A1 receptor in the rat cortex.

  5. The RNA binding domain of Pumilio antagonizes poly-adenosine binding protein and accelerates deadenylation.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, Chase A; Raynard, Nathan A; Blewett, Nathan H; Van Etten, Jamie; Goldstrohm, Aaron C

    2014-08-01

    PUF proteins are potent repressors that serve important roles in stem cell maintenance, neurological processes, and embryonic development. These functions are driven by PUF protein recognition of specific binding sites within the 3' untranslated regions of target mRNAs. In this study, we investigated mechanisms of repression by the founding PUF, Drosophila Pumilio, and its human orthologs. Here, we evaluated a previously proposed model wherein the Pumilio RNA binding domain (RBD) binds Argonaute, which in turn blocks the translational activity of the eukaryotic elongation factor 1A. Surprisingly, we found that Argonautes are not necessary for repression elicited by Drosophila and human PUFs in vivo. A second model proposed that the RBD of Pumilio represses by recruiting deadenylases to shorten the mRNA's polyadenosine tail. Indeed, the RBD binds to the Pop2 deadenylase and accelerates deadenylation; however, this activity is not crucial for regulation. Rather, we determined that the poly(A) is necessary for repression by the RBD. Our results reveal that poly(A)-dependent repression by the RBD requires the poly(A) binding protein, pAbp. Furthermore, we show that repression by the human PUM2 RBD requires the pAbp ortholog, PABPC1. Pumilio associates with pAbp but does not disrupt binding of pAbp to the mRNA. Taken together, our data support a model wherein the Pumilio RBD antagonizes the ability of pAbp to promote translation. Thus, the conserved function of the PUF RBD is to bind specific mRNAs, antagonize pAbp function, and promote deadenylation. PMID:24942623

  6. Conservation of Complete Trimethylation of Lysine-43 in the Rotor Ring of c-Subunits of Metazoan Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Synthases*

    PubMed Central

    Walpole, Thomas B.; Palmer, David N.; Jiang, Huibing; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M.; Walker, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The rotors of ATP synthases turn about 100 times every second. One essential component of the rotor is a ring of hydrophobic c-subunits in the membrane domain of the enzyme. The rotation of these c-rings is driven by a transmembrane proton-motive force, and they turn against a surface provided by another membrane protein, known as subunit a. Together, the rotating c-ring and the static subunit a provide a pathway for protons through the membrane in which the c-ring and subunit a are embedded. Vertebrate and invertebrate c-subunits are well conserved. In the structure of the bovine F1-ATPase-c-ring subcomplex, the 75 amino acid c-subunit is folded into two transmembrane α-helices linked by a short loop. Each bovine rotor-ring consists of eight c-subunits with the N- and C-terminal α-helices forming concentric inner and outer rings, with the loop regions exposed to the phospholipid head-group region on the matrix side of the inner membrane. Lysine-43 is in the loop region and its ε-amino group is completely trimethylated. The role of this modification is unknown. If the trimethylated lysine-43 plays some important role in the functioning, assembly or degradation of the c-ring, it would be expected to persist throughout vertebrates and possibly invertebrates also. Therefore, we have carried out a proteomic analysis of c-subunits across representative species from different classes of vertebrates and from invertebrate phyla. In the twenty-nine metazoan species that have been examined, the complete methylation of lysine-43 is conserved, and it is likely to be conserved throughout the more than two million extant metazoan species. In unicellular eukaryotes and prokaryotes, when the lysine is conserved it is unmethylated, and the stoichiometries of c-subunits vary from 9–15. One possible role for the trimethylated residue is to provide a site for the specific binding of cardiolipin, an essential component of ATP synthases in mitochondria. PMID:25608518

  7. Modification and translocation of Rac/Rop guanosine 5'-triphosphate-binding proteins of Scoparia dulcis in response to stimulation with methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Toshiaki; Yamamura, Yoshimi; Kurosaki, Fumiya

    2011-01-01

    Translocation of two Rac/Rop guanosine 5'-triphosphate-binding proteins from Scoparia dulcis, Sdrac-1 and Sdrac-2, was examined employing transformed belladonna which overproduces these proteins as glutathione-S-transferase-tagged forms. The transferase activities of the fused proteins in microsomal fraction of belladonna markedly increased by the incubation with methyl jasmonate either in Sdrac-1 or Sdrac-2 transformant, while low and constant activities were observed in the untreated control. Recombinant Sdrac-2 protein was found to bind to prenyl chain in the presence of cell extracts prepared from methyl jasmonate-treated S. dulcis, however, Sdrac-1 was palmitoylated by the addition of the cell extracts. These results suggest that both Sdrac-1 and Sdrac-2 translocate to plant membranes by the stimulation with methyl jasmonate, however, targeting of these proteins is triggered by the independent modification mechanisms, palmitoylation for Sdrac-1 and prenylation for Sdrac-2. PMID:21628882

  8. Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Accumulation and beta-Adrenergic Binding in Unweighted and Denervated Rat Soleus Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Woolridge, Dale; Tischler, Marc E.

    1992-01-01

    Unweighting, but not denervation, of muscle reportedly "spares" insulin receptors, increasing insulin sensitivity. Unweighting also increases beta-adrenergic responses of carbohydrate metabolism. These differential characteristics were studied further by comparing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and beta-adrenergic binding in normal and 3-day unweighted or denervated soleus muscle. Submaximal amounts of isoproterenol, a p-agonist, increased cAMP accumulation in vitro and in vivo (by intramuscular (IM) injection) to a greater degree (P less than .05) in unweighted muscles. Forskolin or maximal isoproterenol had similar in vitro effects in all muscles, suggesting increased beta-adrenergic sensitivity following unweighting. Increased sensitivity was confirmed by a greater receptor density (B(sub max)) for iodo-125(-)-pindolol in particulate preparations of unweighted (420 x 10(exp -18) mol/mg muscle) than of control or denervated muscles (285 x 10(exp-18) mol/mg muscle). The three dissociation constant (Kd) values were similar (20.3 to 25.8 pmol/L). Total binding capacity (11.4 fmol/muscle) did not change during 3 days of unweighting, but diminished by 30% with denervation. This result illustrates the "sparing" and loss of receptors, respectively, in these two atrophy models. In diabetic animals, IM injection of insulin diminished CAMP accumulation in the presence of theophylline in unweighted muscle (-66% +/- 2%) more than in controls (-42% +'- 6%, P less than .001). These results show that insulin affects CAMP formation in muscle, and support a greater in vivo insulin response following unweighting atrophy. These various data support a role for lysosomal proteolysis in denervation, but not in unweighting, atrophy.

  9. Structural and functional insights into tRNA binding and adenosine N1-methylation by an archaeal Trm10 homologue

    PubMed Central

    Van Laer, Bart; Roovers, Martine; Wauters, Lina; Kasprzak, Joanna M.; Dyzma, Michal; Deyaert, Egon; Kumar Singh, Ranjan; Feller, André; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Droogmans, Louis; Versées, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Purine nucleosides on position 9 of eukaryal and archaeal tRNAs are frequently modified in vivo by the post-transcriptional addition of a methyl group on their N1 atom. The methyltransferase Trm10 is responsible for this modification in both these domains of life. While certain Trm10 orthologues specifically methylate either guanosine or adenosine at position 9 of tRNA, others have a dual specificity. Until now structural information about this enzyme family was only available for the catalytic SPOUT domain of Trm10 proteins that show specificity toward guanosine. Here, we present the first crystal structure of a full length Trm10 orthologue specific for adenosine, revealing next to the catalytic SPOUT domain also N- and C-terminal domains. This structure hence provides crucial insights in the tRNA binding mechanism of this unique monomeric family of SPOUT methyltransferases. Moreover, structural comparison of this adenosine-specific Trm10 orthologue with guanosine-specific Trm10 orthologues suggests that the N1 methylation of adenosine relies on additional catalytic residues. PMID:26673726

  10. A High-Affinity Adenosine Kinase from Anopheles Gambiae

    SciTech Connect

    M Cassera; M Ho; E Merino; E Burgos; A Rinaldo-Matthis; S Almo; V Schramm

    2011-12-31

    Genome analysis revealed a mosquito orthologue of adenosine kinase in Anopheles gambiae (AgAK; the most important vector for the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa). P. falciparum are purine auxotrophs and do not express an adenosine kinase but rely on their hosts for purines. AgAK was kinetically characterized and found to have the highest affinity for adenosine (K{sub m} = 8.1 nM) of any known adenosine kinase. AgAK is specific for adenosine at the nucleoside site, but several nucleotide triphosphate phosphoryl donors are tolerated. The AgAK crystal structure with a bound bisubstrate analogue Ap{sub 4}A (2.0 {angstrom} resolution) reveals interactions for adenosine and ATP and the geometry for phosphoryl transfer. The polyphosphate charge is partly neutralized by a bound Mg{sup 2+} ion and an ion pair to a catalytic site Arg. The AgAK structure consists of a large catalytic core in a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich, and a small cap domain in contact with adenosine. The specificity and tight binding for adenosine arise from hydrogen bond interactions of Asn14, Leu16, Leu40, Leu133, Leu168, Phe168, and Thr171 and the backbone of Ile39 and Phe168 with the adenine ring as well as through hydrogen bond interactions between Asp18, Gly64, and Asn68 and the ribosyl 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups. The structure is more similar to that of human adenosine kinase (48% identical) than to that of AK from Toxoplasma gondii (31% identical). With this extraordinary affinity for AgAK, adenosine is efficiently captured and converted to AMP at near the diffusion limit, suggesting an important role for this enzyme in the maintenance of the adenine nucleotide pool. mRNA analysis verifies that AgAK transcripts are produced in the adult insects.

  11. Bound adenosine 5'-triphosphate formation, bound adenosine 5'-diphosphate and inorganic phosphate retention, and inorganic phosphate oxygen exchange by chloroplast adenosinetriphosphatase in the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+.

    PubMed

    Wu, D; Boyer, P D

    1986-06-01

    When the heat-activated chloroplast F1 ATPase hydrolyzes [3H, gamma-32P]ATP, followed by the removal of medium ATP, ADP, and Pi, the enzyme has labeled ATP, ADP, and Pi bound to it in about equal amounts. The total of the bound [3H]ADP and [3H]ATP approaches 1 mol/mol of enzyme. Over a 30-min period, most of the bound [32P]Pi falls off, and the bound [3H]ATP is converted to bound [3H]ADP. Enzyme with such remaining tightly bound ADP will form bound ATP from relatively high concentrations of medium Pi with either Mg2+ or Ca2+ present. The tightly bound ADP is thus at a site that retains a catalytic capacity for slow single-site ATP hydrolysis (or synthesis) and is likely the site that participates in cooperative rapid net ATP hydrolysis. During hydrolysis of 50 microM [3H]ATP in the presence of either Mg2+ or Ca2+, the enzyme has a steady-state level of about one bound [3H]ADP per mole of enzyme. Because bound [3H]ATP is also present, the [3H]ADP is regarded as being present on two cooperating catalytic sites. The formation and levels of bound ATP, ADP, and Pi show that reversal of bound ATP hydrolysis can occur with either Ca2+ or Mg2+ present. They do not reveal why no phosphate oxygen exchange accompanies cleavage of low ATP concentrations with Ca2+ in contrast to Mg2+ with the heat-activated enzyme. Phosphate oxygen exchange does occur with either Mg2+ or Ca2+ present when low ATP concentrations are hydrolyzed with the octyl glucoside activated ATPase. Ligand binding properties of Ca2+ at the catalytic site rather than lack of reversible cleavage of bound ATP may underlie lack of oxygen exchange under some conditions. PMID:2873834

  12. Purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, G C; Schmalstieg, F C; Trimmer, K B; Goldman, A S; Goldblum, R M

    1976-01-01

    Purine and pyrimidine metabolites were measured in erythrocytes, plasma, and urine of a 5-month-old infant with adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) deficiency. Adenosine and adenine were measured using newly devised ion exchange separation techniques and a sensitive fluorescence assay. Plasma adenosine levels were increased, whereas adenosine was normal in erythrocytes and not detectable in urine. Increased amounts of adenine were found in erythrocytes and urine as well as in the plasma. Erythrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate concentrations were normal, but adenosine triphosphate content was greatly elevated. Because of the possibility of pyrimidine starvation, pyrimidine nucleotides (pyrimidine coenzymes) in erythrocytes and orotic acid in urine were measured. Pyrimidine nucleotide concentrations were normal, while orotic acid was not detected. These studies suggest that the immune deficiency associated with adenosine deaminase deficiency may be related to increased amounts of adenine, adenosine, or adenine nucleotides. PMID:1066699

  13. Cloning and characterization of Sdga gene encoding alpha-subunit of heterotrimeric guanosine 5'-triphosphate-binding protein complex in Scoparia dulcis.

    PubMed

    Shite, Masato; Yamamura, Yoshimi; Hayashi, Toshimitsu; Kurosaki, Fumiya

    2008-11-01

    A homology-based cloning strategy yielded Sdga, a cDNA clone presumably encoding alpha-subunit of heterotrimeric guanosine 5'-triphosphate-binding protein complex, from leaf tissues of Scoparia dulcis. Phylogenetic tree analysis of G-protein alpha-subunits from various biological sources suggested that, unlike in animal cells, classification of Galpha-proteins into specific subfamilies could not be applicable to the proteins from higher plants. Restriction digests of genomic DNA of S. dulcis showed a single hybridized signal in Southern blot analysis, suggesting that Sdga is a sole gene encoding Galpha-subunit in this plant. The expression level of Sdga appeared to be maintained at almost constant level after exposure of the leaves to methyl jasmonate as analyzed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results suggest that Sdga plays roles in methyl jasmonate-induced responses of S. dulcis without a notable change in the transcriptional level. PMID:18981590

  14. Study of the nucleotide binding site of the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe plasma membrane H+-ATPase using formycin triphosphate-terbium complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ronjat, M.; Lacapere, J.J.; Dufour, J.P.; Dupont, Y.

    1987-03-05

    The plasma membrane of yeasts contains an H+-ATPase similar to the other cation transport ATPases of eukaryotic organisms. This enzyme has been purified and shows H+ transport in reconstituted vesicles. In the presence of Mg2+, formycin triphosphate (FTP) is hydrolyzed by the H+-ATPase and supports H+ transport. When combined with terbium ion, FTP (Tb-FTP) and ATP (Tb-ATP) are no longer hydrolyzed. Competition between Mg-ATP and Tb-FTP for ATP hydrolysis indicates that terbium-associated nucleotides bind to the catalytic site of the H+-ATPase. The fluorescent properties of the Tb-FTP complex were used to study the active site of the H+-ATPase. Fluorescence of Tb-FTP is greatly enhanced upon binding into the nucleotide site of H+-ATPase with a dissociation constant of 1 microM. Tb-ATP, Tb-ADP, and Tb-ITP are competitive inhibitors of Tb-FTP binding with Ki = 4.5, 5.0, and 6.0 microM, respectively. Binding of Tb-FTP is observed only in the presence of an excess of Tb3+ with an activation constant Ka = 25 microM for Tb3+. Analysis of the data reveals that the sites for Tb-FTP and Tb3+ binding are independent entities. In standard conditions these sites would be occupied by Mg-ATP and Mg2+, respectively. These findings suggest an important regulatory role of divalent cations on the activity of H+-ATPase. Replacement of H/sub 2/O by D/sub 2/O in the medium suggests the existence of two types of nucleotide binding sites differing by the hydration state of the Tb3+ ion in the bound Tb-FTP complex.

  15. Similarities and differences in affinity and binding modes of tricyclic pyrimido- and pyrazinoxanthines at human and rat adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Ewa; Drabczyńska, Anna; Karcz, Tadeusz; Müller, Christa E; Köse, Meryem; Karolak-Wojciechowska, Janina; Fruziński, Andrzej; Schabikowski, Jakub; Doroz-Płonka, Agata; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-09-15

    A new series of 32 pyrimido- and 5 tetrahydropyrazino[2,1-f]purinediones was obtained and evaluated for their adenosine receptors (ARs) affinities. The 1,3-dibutyl derivative of 9-(4-(2-(dimethylamino)ethoxy)phenyl)-6,7,8,9-tetrahydropyrimido[1,2-f]purine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione was found to be the most potent A1 AR antagonist of the present series, showing selectivity over the other AR subtypes. The structure-activity for the obtained purinediones was established. Docking experiments of the investigated library to homology models of the human and rat A1 and A2A ARs allowed to compare the expected binding modes for selected compounds. The detailed analysis of binding cavities within individual AR subtypes indicated small but significant structural variations that may underlie the observed differences in binding affinities of purinediones at particular subtypes and species. PMID:27485602

  16. A Small Aptamer with Strong and Specific Recognition of the Triphosphate of ATP

    PubMed Central

    Sazani, Peter L.; Larralde, Rosa

    2004-01-01

    We report the in vitro selection of an RNA-based ATP aptamer with the ability to discriminate between adenosine ligands based on their 5‘ phosphorylation state. Previous selection of ATP aptamers yielded molecules that do not significantly discriminate between ligands at the 5‘ position. By applying a selective pressure that demands recognition of the 5‘ triphosphate, we obtained an aptamer that binds to ATP with a Kd of approximately 5 μM, and to AMP with a Kd of approximately 5.5 mM, a difference of 1100-fold. This aptamer demonstrates the ability of small RNAs to interact with negatively charged moieties. PMID:15237981

  17. Molecular mechanism of allosteric modulation at GPCRs: insight from a binding kinetics study at the human A1 adenosine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Venhorst, Suzanne N; Massink, Arnault; van Veldhoven, Jacobus P D; Vauquelin, Georges; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many GPCRs can be allosterically modulated by small-molecule ligands. This modulation is best understood in terms of the kinetics of the ligand–receptor interaction. However, many current kinetic assays require at least the (radio)labelling of the orthosteric ligand, which is impractical for studying a range of ligands. Here, we describe the application of a so-called competition association assay at the adenosine A1 receptor for this purpose. Experimental Approach We used a competition association assay to examine the binding kinetics of several unlabelled orthosteric agonists of the A1 receptor in the absence or presence of two allosteric modulators. We also tested three bitopic ligands, in which an orthosteric and an allosteric pharmacophore were covalently linked with different spacer lengths. The relevance of the competition association assay for the binding kinetics of the bitopic ligands was also explored by analysing simulated data. Key Results The binding kinetics of an unlabelled orthosteric ligand were affected by the addition of an allosteric modulator and such effects were probe- and concentration-dependent. Covalently linking the orthosteric and allosteric pharmacophores into one bitopic molecule had a substantial effect on the overall on- or off-rate. Conclusion and Implications The competition association assay is a useful tool for exploring the allosteric modulation of the human adenosine A1 receptor. This assay may have general applicability to study allosteric modulation at other GPCRs as well. PMID:25040887

  18. Purification and characterization of (-)(/sup 125/I)hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine, an adenosine R-site agonist radioligand and theoretical analysis of mixed stereoisomer radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, J.

    1984-11-01

    (-)-N6-(R-4-Hydroxyphenylisopropyl)adenosine (HPIA) was iodinated with NaI and trace /sup 125/I. Mono- and diiodinated reaction products and the starting material were separated by high pressure liquid chromatography and the structures of the reaction products were verified by NMR. (-)-N6-(R-Phenylisopropyl)adenosine (PIA), IHPIA, and I2HPIA decreased rat atrial contractility with ED50 values of 24, 28, and 33 nM, respectively. The contractile effects of these compounds were competitively blocked by theophylline (KI . 7.9 microM), but were not affected by adenosine deaminase. IHPIA also inhibited (-)isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in adipocytes with an ED50 (10 nM) and to an extent (83%) nearly identical to PIA. (/sup 125/I)HPIA prepared using carrier-free /sup 125/I bound to adenosine receptors on membranes from rat cerebral cortex, adipocyte ghosts, and heart ventricles. Binding was inhibited stereospecifically by PIA and by other adenosine analogues and alkylxanthines. The KD of (/sup 125/I)HPIA determined kinetically using brain membranes at 21 degrees was 0.94 nM in good agreement with the equilibrium determination of 1.94 nM. The density of adenosine receptors in brain membranes was found to be 871 fmol/mg of protein. When normalized to protein, the density of receptors in heart membranes and adipocyte ghosts, respectively, was found to be 39- and 2.3-fold less than in brain membranes. It was concluded that (/sup 125/I)HPIA can be rapidly synthesized and purified, binds to adenosine R-sites and is an agonist radioligand resistant to adenosine deaminase. Computer modeling of the equilibrium binding resulting from the use of mixed stereoisomers of a radioligand indicates that the combined use of (-)(/sup 125/I)HPIA and (+)(/sup 125/I)HPIA would result in the generation of nonlinear Scatchard plots.

  19. Novel Fluorescent Antagonist as a Molecular Probe in A3 Adenosine Receptor Binding Assays Using Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, Eszter; Kumar, T. Santhosh; Federico, Stephanie; Phan, Khai; Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The physiological role of the A3 adenosine receptor (AR) was explored in cardiac ischaemia, inflammatory diseases and cancer. We report a new fluorophore-conjugated human (h) A3AR antagonist for application to cell-based assays in ligand discovery and for receptor imaging. Fluorescent pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-ylamine (pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine, PTP) and triazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-yl)amine (triazolo-quinazoline, TQ) AR antagonists were compared. A chain-extended and click-conjugated Alexa Fluor-488 TQ derivative (MRS5449) displayed a radioligand binding Ki value of 6.4 ± 2.5 nM in hA3AR-expressing CHO cell membranes. MRS5449 antagonized hA3AR agonist-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner (KB 4.8 nM). Using flow cytometry (FCM), MRS5449 saturated hA3ARs with very high specific-to-nonspecific binding ratio with an equilibrium binding constant 5.15 nM, comparable to the Kd value of 6.65 nM calculated from kinetic experiments. Ki values of known AR antagonists in inhibition of MRS5449 binding in whole cell FCM were consistent with radioligand binding in membranes, but agonist binding was 5–20 fold weaker than obtained with agonist radioligand [125I]I-AB-MECA. Further binding analysis of MRS5549 suggested multiple agonist binding states of the A3AR. Molecular docking predicted binding modes of these fluorescent antagonists. Thus, MRS5449 is a useful tool for hA3AR characterization. PMID:22402302

  20. The kinetics of effector binding to phosphofructokinase. The allosteric conformational transition induced by 1,N6-ethenoadenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D; Kellett, G L

    1979-01-01

    1. The fluorescent ATP analogue 1,N6-etheno-ATP is a good substrate and an efficient allosteric inhibitor of rabbit skeletal-muscle phosphofructokinase. 2. Fluorescence energy transfer occurs between bound 1,N6-etheno-ATP and phosphofructokinase. 1,N6-Etheno-ATP fluorescence is enhanced, intrinsic protein fluorescence is quenched, and the excitation spectrum of 1,N6-etheno-ATP fluorescence is characteristic of protein absorption. 3. The binding reaction of 1,N6-etheno-ATP observed by stopped-flow fluorimetry is biphasic. The fast phase results from binding to the catalytic site alone. The slow phase results from the allosteric transition of the R conformation into the T conformation induced by the binding of 1,N6-etheno-ATP to the regulatory site. 4. The fluorescence signal that allows the transition of the R conformation into the T conformation to be observed does not arise from 1,N6-etheno-ATP bound to the regulatory site. It arises instead from 1,N6-etheno-ATP bound to the catalytic site as a consequence of changes at the catalytic site caused by the transition of the R conformation into the T conformation. 5. In the presence of excess of Mg2+, the affinity of 1,N6-etheno-ATP for the regulatory site is very much greater in the T state than in the R state. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 8. PMID:160791

  1. Human Adenosine A2A Receptor Binds Calmodulin with High Affinity in a Calcium-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Piirainen, Henni; Hellman, Maarit; Tossavainen, Helena; Permi, Perttu; Kursula, Petri; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how ligands bind to G-protein-coupled receptors and how binding changes receptor structure to affect signaling is critical for developing a complete picture of the signal transduction process. The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a particularly interesting example, as it has an exceptionally long intracellular carboxyl terminus, which is predicted to be mainly disordered. Experimental data on the structure of the A2AR C-terminus is lacking, because published structures of A2AR do not include the C-terminus. Calmodulin has been reported to bind to the A2AR C-terminus, with a possible binding site on helix 8, next to the membrane. The biological meaning of the interaction as well as its calcium dependence, thermodynamic parameters, and organization of the proteins in the complex are unclear. Here, we characterized the structure of the A2AR C-terminus and the A2AR C-terminus-calmodulin complex using different biophysical methods, including native gel and analytical gel filtration, isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. We found that the C-terminus is disordered and flexible, and it binds with high affinity (Kd = 98 nM) to calmodulin without major conformational changes in the domain. Calmodulin binds to helix 8 of the A2AR in a calcium-dependent manner that can displace binding of A2AR to lipid vesicles. We also predicted and classified putative calmodulin-binding sites in a larger group of G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:25692595

  2. Cloning and characterization of a gene encoding Rac/Rop-like monomeric guanosine 5'-triphosphate-binding protein from Scoparia dulcis.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Toshiaki; Shite, Masato; Yamamura, Yoshimi; Kurosaki, Fumiya

    2009-06-01

    A cDNA clone, designated Sd-racrop (969 bp), was isolated from seedlings of Scoparia dulcis. This gene contains an open reading frame encoding the protein of 197 amino acid residues with high homology to Rac/Rop small guanosine 5'-triphosphate-binding proteins from various plant sources. In Southern hybridization analysis, the restriction digests prepared from genomic DNA of S. dulcis showed a main signal together with a few weakly hybridized bands. The transcriptional level of Sd-racrop showed a transient decrease by exposure of the leaf tissues of S. dulcis to the ethylene-generating reagent 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid. However, an appreciable increase in gene expression was reproducibly observed upon treatment of the plant with methyl jasmonate. These results suggest that the Sd-racrop product plays roles in ethylene- and methyl jasmonate-induced responses of S. dulcis accompanying the change in the transcriptional level, however, the cellular events mediated by this protein toward these external stimuli would be regulated by various mechanisms. PMID:19483328

  3. Adenosine and the adenosine A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, upregulate CD39 and CD73 expression through E2F-1 and CREB in regulatory T cells isolated from septic mice.

    PubMed

    Bao, Rui; Shui, Xianqi; Hou, Jiong; Li, Jinbao; Deng, Xiaoming; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Tao

    2016-09-01

    The number of regulatory T cells (Treg cells) and the expression of ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 (ENTPD1; also known as CD39) and 5'-ectonucleotidase (NT5E; also known as CD73) on the Treg cell surface are increased during sepsis. In this study, to determine the factors leading to the high expression of CD39 and CD73, and the regulation of the CD39/CD73/adenosine pathway in Treg cells under septic conditions, we constructed a mouse model of sepsis and separated the Treg cells using a flow cytometer. The Treg cells isolated from the peritoneal lavage and splenocytes of the mice were treated with adenosine or the specific adenosine A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, and were transfected with specific siRNA targeting E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F-1) or cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB), which are predicted transcription regulatory factors of CD39 or CD73. The regulatory relationships among these factors were then determined by western blot analysis and dual-luciferase reporter assay. In addition, changes in adenosine metabolism were measured in the treated cells. The results revealed that adenosine and CGS21680 significantly upregulated CD39 and CD73 expression (P<0.01). E2F-1 and CREB induced CD39 and CD73 expression, and were upregulated by adenosine and CGS21680. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis and adenosine generation were inhibited by the knockdown of E2F-1 or CREB, and were accelerated in the presence of CGS21680. Based on these results, it can be inferred that adenosine, the adenosine A2A receptor agonist, E2F-1 and CREB are the possible factors contributing to the high expression of CD39 and CD73 on the Treg cell surface during sepsis. Adenosine and its A2A receptor agonist served as the signal transducer factors of the CD39/CD73/adenosine pathway, accelerating adenosine generation. Our study may benefit further research on adenosine metabolism for the treatment of sepsis

  4. Two saturable recognition sites for (-) (125I)iodo-N6-(4-hydroxyphenyl-isopropyl)-adenosine binding on purified cardiac sarcolemma

    SciTech Connect

    Hausleithner, V.; Freissmuth, M.; Schuetz, W.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of (-) (125)iodo-N6-(4-hydroxyphenylisopropyl)-adenosine (( /sup 125/I)HPIA) binding to purified sarcolemmal preparations of guinea pig and bovine hearts revealed two classes of binding sites when unlabeled iodo-HPIA (100 mumol/l) was used as non-specific binding marker. In the presence of 1 mmol/l theophylline, however, only the high affinity component was detected. Adenosine receptor agonists caused biphasic displacement of (/sup 125/I)HPIA binding, with a high affinity potency rank order typical of interaction with A1-adenosine receptors. Biphasic competition curves were also observed with 8-phenyltheophylline and isobutylmethylxanthine, whereas the theophylline curve was monophasic up to 1 mmol/l. In brain membranes, specific binding of (/sup 125/I)HPIA as well as of (/sup 3/H)PIA was further reduced when unlabeled iodo-HPIA replaces theophylline as the non-specific binding marker. These results suggest the presence of two (/sup 125/I)HPIA binding sites on cardiac sarcolemma and brain membranes, but receptor function can only be ascribed to the high affinity sites. The low affinity site probably represents an artefact, which is often observed when non-specific binding is defined with the unlabeled counterpart or a structurally related ligand of the radioligand used.

  5. Mitogenic signaling pathways of growth factors can be distinguished by the involvement of pertussis toxin-sensitive guanosine triphosphate-binding protein and of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, N; Okano, Y; Chatani, Y; Amano, F; Tanaka, E; Nomoto, H; Nozawa, Y; Kohno, M

    1990-01-01

    We have examined the possible involvements of pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein (Gp) and protein kinase C (PKC) in the mitogenic signaling pathways of various growth factors by the use of PT-pretreated and/or 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-pretreated mouse fibroblasts. Effects of PT pretreatment (inactivation of PT-sensitive Gp) and TPA pretreatment (depletion of PKC) on mitogen-induced DNA synthesis varied significantly and systematically in response to growth factors: mitogenic responses of cells to thrombin, bombesin, and bradykinin were almost completely abolished both in PT- and TPA-pretreated cells; responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and vanadate were reduced to approximately 50% both in PT- and TPA-pretreated cells compared with native cells; response to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was not affected in PT-pretreated cells but was inhibited to some extent in TPA-pretreated cells. Thus, growth factors examined have been classified into three groups with regard to the involvements of PT-sensitive Gp and PKC in their signal transduction pathways. Binding of each growth factor to its receptor was not affected significantly by pretreatment of cells with PT or TPA. Inhibitory effects of PT and TPA pretreatment on each mitogen-induced DNA synthesis were not additive, suggesting that the functions of PT-sensitive Gp and PKC lie on an identical signal transduction pathway. Although all three groups of mitogens activated PKC, signaling of each growth factor depends to a varying extent on the function of PKC. Our results indicate that a single peptide growth factor such as EGF, PDGF, or bFGF acts through multiple signaling pathways to induce cell proliferation. Images PMID:2129194

  6. 5'-Substituted Amiloride Derivatives as Allosteric Modulators Binding in the Sodium Ion Pocket of the Adenosine A2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Massink, Arnault; Louvel, Julien; Adlere, Ilze; van Veen, Corine; Huisman, Berend J H; Dijksteel, Gabrielle S; Guo, Dong; Lenselink, Eelke B; Buckley, Benjamin J; Matthews, Hayden; Ranson, Marie; Kelso, Michael; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-05-26

    The sodium ion site is an allosteric site conserved among many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Amiloride 1 and 5-(N,N-hexamethylene)amiloride 2 (HMA) supposedly bind in this sodium ion site and can influence orthosteric ligand binding. The availability of a high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the human adenosine A2A receptor (hA2AAR), in which the allosteric sodium ion site was elucidated, makes it an appropriate model receptor for investigating the allosteric site. In this study, we report the synthesis and evaluation of novel 5'-substituted amiloride derivatives as hA2AAR allosteric antagonists. The potency of the amiloride derivatives was assessed by their ability to displace orthosteric radioligand [(3)H]4-(2-((7-amino-2-(furan-2-yl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]-[1,3,5]triazin-5-yl)amino)ethyl)phenol ([(3)H]ZM-241,385) from both the wild-type and sodium ion site W246A mutant hA2AAR. 4-Ethoxyphenethyl-substituted amiloride 12l was found to be more potent than both amiloride and HMA, and the shift in potency between the wild-type and mutated receptor confirmed its likely binding to the sodium ion site. PMID:27124340

  7. Binding of the Antagonist Caffeine to the Human Adenosine Receptor hA2AR in Nearly Physiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruyin; Rossetti, Giulia; Bauer, Andreas; CarIoni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Lipid composition may significantly affect membrane proteins function, yet its impact on the protein structural determinants is not well understood. Here we present a comparative molecular dynamics (MD) study of the human adenosine receptor type 2A (hA(2A)R) in complex with caffeine--a system of high neuro-pharmacological relevance--within different membrane types. These are POPC, mixed POPC/POPE and cholesterol-rich membranes. 0.8-μs MD simulations unambiguously show that the helical folding of the amphipathic helix 8 depends on membrane contents. Most importantly, the distinct cholesterol binding into the cleft between helix 1 and 2 stabilizes a specific caffeine-binding pose against others visited during the simulation. Hence, cholesterol presence (~33%-50% in synaptic membrane in central nervous system), often neglected in X-ray determination of membrane proteins, affects the population of the ligand binding poses. We conclude that including a correct description of neuronal membranes may be very important for computer-aided design of ligands targeting hA(2A)R and possibly other GPCRs. PMID:25992797

  8. A one-pot synthesis of α-l-threofuranosyl nucleoside triphosphates (tNTPs).

    PubMed

    Sau, Sujay P; Chaput, John C

    2016-07-15

    TNA (α-l-threofuranosyl nucleoside) triphosphates of adenosine (tATP), guanosine (tGTP), cytidine (tCTP), and thymidine (tTTP) were synthesized from their corresponding 3'-O-phosphoramidite derivatives using a novel one-pot reaction that is less moisture sensitive than traditional methods. The chemically synthesized tNTPs, despite containing an unnatural 3'-triphosphate moiety, are similar in thermal stability to natural nucleotide triphosphates. PMID:27246616

  9. Characterization of the adenosine receptor in cultured embryonic chick atrial myocytes: Coupling to modulation of contractility and adenylate cyclase activity and identification by direct radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, B.T.

    1989-06-01

    Adenosine receptors in a spontaneously contracting atrial myocyte culture from 14-day chick embryos were characterized by radioligand binding studies and by examining the involvement of G-protein in coupling these receptors to a high-affinity state and to the adenylate cyclase and the myocyte contractility. Binding of the antagonist radioligand (3H)-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-diproylxanthine ((3H)CPX) was rapid, reversible and saturable and was to a homogeneous population of sites with a Kd value of 2.1 +/- 0.2 nM and an apparent maximum binding of 26.2 +/- 3 fmol/mg of protein (n = 10, +/- S.E.). Guanyl-5-yl-(beta, gamma-imido)diphosphate had no effect on either the Kd or the maximum binding and CPX reversed the N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and contractility, indicating that (3H) CPX is an antagonist radioligand. Competition curves for (3H) CPX binding by a series of reference adenosine agonists were consistent with labeling of an A1 adenosine receptor and were better fit by a two-site model than by a one-site model. ADP-ribosylation of the G-protein by the endogenous NAD+ in the presence of pertussis toxin shifted the competition curves from bi to monophasic with Ki values similar to those of the KL observed in the absence of prior pertussis intoxication. The adenosine agonists were capable of inhibiting both the adenylate cyclase activity and myocyte contractility in either the absence or the presence of isoproterenol. The A1 adenosine receptor-selective antagonist CPX reversed these agonist effects. The order of ability of the reference adenosine receptor agonists in causing these inhibitory effects was similar to the order of potency of the same agonists in inhibiting the specific (3H)CPX binding (N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine greater than N6-S-phenyl-2-propyladenosine or N-ethyladenosine-5'-uronic acid).

  10. RNA Binding-independent Dimerization of Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA and Dominant Negative Effects of Nonfunctional Subunits on Dimer Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Louis; Nishikura, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    RNA editing that converts adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is mediated by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR). ADAR1 and ADAR2 form respective homodimers, and this association is essential for their enzymatic activities. In this investigation, we set out experiments aiming to determine whether formation of the homodimer complex is mediated by an amino acid interface made through protein-protein interactions of two monomers or via binding of the two subunits to a dsRNA substrate. Point mutations were created in the dsRNA binding domains (dsRBDs) that abolished all RNA binding, as tested for two classes of ADAR ligands, long and short dsRNA. The mutant ADAR dimer complexes were intact, as demonstrated by their ability to co-purify in a sequential affinity-tagged purification and also by their elution at the dimeric fraction position on a size fractionation column. Our results demonstrated ADAR dimerization independent of their binding to dsRNA, establishing the importance of protein-protein interactions for dimer formation. As expected, these mutant ADARs could no longer perform their catalytic function due to the loss in substrate binding. Surprisingly, a chimeric dimer consisting of one RNA binding mutant monomer and a wild type partner still abolished its ability to bind and edit its substrate, indicating that ADAR dimers require two subunits with functional dsRBDs for binding to a dsRNA substrate and then for editing activity to occur. PMID:17428802

  11. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein transcriptionally regulates CHCHD2 associated with the molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Rui; Yang, Biao; Gao, Xuesong; Zhang, Jinqian; Sun, Lei; Wang, Peng; Meng, Yixing; Wang, Qi; Liu, Shunai; Cheng, Jun

    2015-06-01

    The function of the novel cell migration‑promoting factor, coiled‑coil‑helix‑coiled‑coil‑helix domain containing 2 (CHCHD2) in liver cancer remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of CHCHD2 in liver carcinogenesis. Immunohistochemistry was performed on patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used for screening differentially expressed genes in the HepG2 cell cDNA library. Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection frequently leads to liver cancer. The HCV NS2 protein is a hydrophobic transmembrane protein that is associated with certain cellular proteins. Detailed characterization of the nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) of the HCV was performed with respect to its role in transregulatory activity in the HepG2 cell lines. A gel electrophoresis mobility shift assay and a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay were used to confirm the presence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element‑binding protein (CREB), a transcriptional factor, which specifically interacts with the CHCHD2 promoter. CHCHD2 was highly expressed in the HCC specimens and was consistent with tumor markers of HCC. CHCHD2 was identified by SSH in the HepG2 cells. NS2 upregulated the expression of CHCHD2 by monitoring its promoter activities. The promoter of CHCHD2 contained 350 bp between nucleotides ‑257 and +93 and was positively regulated by CREB. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that CHCHD2 may be a novel biomarker for HCC and that CREB is important in the transcriptional activation of CHCHD2 by HCV NS2. PMID:25625293

  12. Gonadotropin stimulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate and testosterone production without detectable high-affinity binding sites in purified Leydig cells from rat testis

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, E.S.; Bhalla, V.K. )

    1991-02-01

    Rat testicular interstitial cells were separated by three different gradient-density procedures and, with each, two biochemically and morphologically distinct cell fractions were isolated. The lighter density cells in fraction-I bound iodine 125-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) with high-affinity (apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd, approximately 10{sup {minus} 10} M) without producing either cyclic adenosine monophosphate or testosterone in response to hormone action. The heavier-density cells displayed morphologic features typical of Leydig cells and produced cyclic adenosine monophosphate and testosterone in the presence of hCG without detectable {sup 125}I-labeled hCG high-affinity binding. These cell fractions were further characterized by studies using deglycosylated hCG, a known antagonist to hCG action. Cell concentration-dependent studies with purified Leydig cells revealed that maximal testosterone production was achieved when lower cell concentrations (0.5 x 10(6) cells/250 microliters) were used for in vitro hCG stimulation assays. Under these conditions, the {sup 125}I-labeled hCG binding was barely detectable (2.24 fmol; 2,698 sites/cell). Furthermore, these studies revealed that the hCG-specific binding in Leydig cells is overestimated by the classic method for nonspecific binding correction using excess unlabeled hormone. An alternate method is presented.

  13. Chemical modification of A1 adenosine receptors in rat brain membranes. Evidence for histidine in different domains of the ligand binding site.

    PubMed

    Klotz, K N; Lohse, M J; Schwabe, U

    1988-11-25

    Chemical modification of amino acid residues was used to probe the ligand recognition site of A1 adenosine receptors from rat brain membranes. The effect of treatment with group-specific reagents on agonist and antagonist radioligand binding was investigated. The histidine-specific reagent diethylpyrocarbonate (DEP) induced a loss of binding of the agonist R-N6-[3H] phenylisopropyladenosine ([3H]PIA), which could be prevented in part by agonists, but not by antagonists. DEP treatment induced also a loss of binding of the antagonist [3H]8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine ([3H]DPCPX). Antagonists protected A1 receptors from this inactivation while agonists did not. This result provided evidence for the existence of at least 2 different histidine residues involved in ligand binding. Consistent with a modification of the binding site, DEP did not alter the affinity of [3H]DPCPX, but reduced receptor number. From the selective protection of [3H] PIA and [3H]DPCPX binding from inactivation, it is concluded that agonists and antagonists occupy different domains at the binding site. Sulfhydryl modifying reagents did not influence antagonist binding, but inhibited agonist binding. This effect is explained by modification of the inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein. Pyridoxal 5-phosphate inactivated both [3H]PIA and [3H]DPCPX binding, but the receptors could not be protected from inactivation by ligands. Therefore, no amino group seems to be located at the ligand binding site. In addition, it was shown that no further amino acids with polar side chains are present. The absence of hydrophilic amino acids from the recognition site of the receptor apart from histidine suggests an explanation for the lack of hydrophilic ligands with high affinity for A1 receptors. PMID:3182861

  14. Purification and cDNA cloning of the AdoMet-binding subunit of the human mRNA (N6-adenosine)-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Bokar, J A; Shambaugh, M E; Polayes, D; Matera, A G; Rottman, F M

    1997-11-01

    The methylation of internal adenosine residues in eukaryotic mRNA, forming N6-methyladenosine (m6A), is catalyzed by a complex multicomponent enzyme. Previous studies suggested that m6A affects the efficiency of mRNA processing or transport, although the mechanism by which this occurs is not known. As a step toward better understanding the mechanism and function of this ubiquitous posttranscriptional modification, we have shown that HeLa mRNA (N6-adenosine)-methyltransferase requires at least two separate protein factors, MT-A and MT-B, and MT-A contains the AdoMet binding site on a 70-kDa subunit (MT-A70). MT-A70 was purified by conventional chromatography and electrophoresis, and was microsequenced. The peptide sequence was used to design a degenerate oligodeoxynucleotide that in turn was used to isolate the cDNA clone coding for MT-A70 from a HeLa cDNA library. Recombinant MT-A70 was expressed as a fusion protein in bacteria and was used to generate anti-MT-A70 antisera in rabbits. These antisera recognize MT-A70 in HeLa nuclear extracts by western blot and are capable of depleting (N6-adenosine)-methyltransferase activity from HeLa nuclear extract, confirming that MT-A70 is a critical subunit of (N6-adenosine)-methyltransferase. Northern blot analysis reveals that MT-A70 mRNA is present in a wide variety of human tissues and may undergo alternative splicing. MT-A70 cDNA probe hybridizes to a 2.0-kilobase (kb) polyadenylated RNA isolated from HeLa cells, whereas it hybridizes to two predominant RNA species (approximately 2.0 kb and 3.0 kb) using mRNA isolated from six different human tissues. Analysis of the cDNA sequence indicates that it codes for a 580-amino acid protein with a predicted MW = 65 kDa. The predicted protein contains sequences similar to consensus methylation motifs I and II identified in prokaryotic DNA (N6-adenosine)-methyltransferases, suggesting the functional conservation of peptide motifs. MT-A70 also contains a long region of homology to

  15. Insight into the binding mode and the structural features of the pyrimidine derivatives as human A2A adenosine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihui; Liu, Tianjun; Wang, Xia; Wang, Jinan; Li, Guohui; Li, Yan; Yang, Ling; Wang, Yonghua

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of 278 monocyclic and bicyclic pyrimidine derivatives with human A2A adenosine receptor (AR) was investigated by employing molecular dynamics, thermodynamic analysis and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) approaches. The binding analysis reveals that the pyrimidine derivatives are anchored in TM2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 of A2A AR by the aromatic stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions. The key residues involving Phe168, Glu169, and Asn253 stabilize the monocyclic and bicyclic cores of inhibitors. The thermodynamic analysis by molecular mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) approach also confirms the reasonableness of the binding modes. In addition, the ligand-/receptor-based comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) models of high statistical significance were generated and the resulting contour maps correlate well with the structural features of the antagonists essential for high A2A AR affinity. A minor/bulky group with negative charge at C2/C6 of pyrimidine ring respectively enhances the activity for all these pyrimidine derivatives. Particularly, the higher electron density of the ring in the bicyclic derivatives, the more potent the antagonists. The obatined results might be helpful in rational design of novel candidate of A2A adenosine receptor antagonist for treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:23665268

  16. Adenosine and sleep

    SciTech Connect

    Yanik, G.M. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Behavioral and biochemical approaches have been used to determine the relative contribution of endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors to the sleep-wake cycle in the rat. Adenosine concentrations in specific areas of the rat brain were not affected by 24 hours of total sleep deprivation, or by 24 or 48 hours of REM sleep deprivation. In order to assess the effect of REM sleep deprivation on adenosine A/sub 1/ receptors, /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding was measured. The Bmax values for /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding to membrane preparations of the cortices and corpus striata from 48 hour REM sleep-deprived animals were increased 14.8% and 23%, respectively. These increases were not maintained following the cessation of sleep deprivation and recovered within 2 hours. The results of a 96 hour REM deprivation experiment were similar to those of the 48 hour REM sleep deprivation experiment. However, these increases were not evident in similar structures taken from stress control animals, and conclusively demonstrated that the changes in /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding resulted from REM sleep deprivation and not from stress.

  17. A third member of the RNA-specific adenosine deaminase gene family, ADAR3, contains both single- and double-stranded RNA binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C X; Cho, D S; Wang, Q; Lai, F; Carter, K C; Nishikura, K

    2000-01-01

    Members of the double-stranded RNA- (dsRNA) specific adenosine deaminase gene family convert adenosine residues into inosines in dsRNA and are involved in A-to-I RNA editing of transcripts of glutamate receptor (GluR) subunits and serotonin receptor subtype 2C (5-HT(2C)R). We have isolated hADAR3, the third member of this class of human enzyme and investigated its editing site selectivity using in vitro RNA editing assay systems. As originally reported for rat ADAR3 or RED2, purified ADAR3 proteins could not edit GluR-B RNA at the "Q/R" site, the "R/G" site, and the intronic "hot spot" site. In addition, ADAR3 did not edit any of five sites discovered recently within the intracellular loop II region of 5-HT(2C)R RNAs, confirming its total lack of editing activity for currently known substrate RNAs. Filter-binding analyses revealed that ADAR3 is capable of binding not only to dsRNA but also to single-stranded RNA (ssRNA). Deletion mutagenesis identified a region rich in arginine residues located in the N-terminus that is responsible for binding of ADAR3 to ssRNA. The presence of this ssRNA-binding domain as well as its expression in restricted brain regions and postmitotic neurons make ADAR3 distinct from the other two ADAR gene family members, editing competent ADAR1 and ADAR2. ADAR3 inhibited in vitro the activities of RNA editing enzymes of the ADAR gene family, raising the possibility of a regulatory role in RNA editing. PMID:10836796

  18. Rapid, quantitative determination of bacteria in water. [adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Thomas, R. R.; Jeffers, E. L.; Deming, J. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A bioluminescent assay for ATP in water borne bacteria is made by adding nitric acid to a water sample with concentrated bacteria to rupture the bacterial cells. The sample is diluted with sterile, deionized water, then mixed with a luciferase-luciferin mixture and the resulting light output of the bioluminescent reaction is measured and correlated with bacteria present. A standard and a blank also are presented so that the light output can be correlated to bacteria in the sample and system noise can be substracted from the readings. A chemiluminescent assay for iron porphyrins in water borne bacteria is made by adding luminol reagent to a water sample with concentrated bacteria and measuring the resulting light output of the chemiluminescent reaction.

  19. Bacterial adenosine triphosphate as a measure of urinary tract infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1971-01-01

    Procedure detects and counts bacteria present in urine samples. Method also determines bacterial levels in other aqueous body fluids including lymph fluid, plasma, blood, spinal fluid, saliva and mucous.

  20. Different mechanisms of extracellular adenosine accumulation by reduction of the external Ca(2+) concentration and inhibition of adenosine metabolism in spinal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Ryota; Akao, Sanae; Otsuguro, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Ito, Shigeo

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a neuromodulator in the central nervous system. Astrocytes mainly participate in adenosine production, and extracellular adenosine accumulates under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Inhibition of intracellular adenosine metabolism and reduction of the external Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]e) participate in adenosine accumulation, but the precise mechanisms remain unclear. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying extracellular adenosine accumulation in cultured rat spinal astrocytes. The combination of adenosine kinase and deaminase (ADK/ADA) inhibition and a reduced [Ca(2+)]e increased the extracellular adenosine level. ADK/ADA inhibitors increased the level of extracellular adenosine but not of adenine nucleotides, which was suppressed by inhibition of equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 2. Unlike ADK/ADA inhibition, a reduced [Ca(2+)]e increased the extracellular level not only of adenosine but also of ATP. This adenosine increase was enhanced by ENT2 inhibition, and suppressed by sodium polyoxotungstate (ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase inhibitor). Gap junction inhibitors suppressed the increases in adenosine and adenine nucleotide levels by reduction of [Ca(2+)]e. These results indicate that extracellular adenosine accumulation by ADK/ADA inhibition is due to the adenosine release via ENT2, while that by reduction of [Ca(2+)]e is due to breakdown of ATP released via gap junction hemichannels, after which ENT2 incorporates adenosine into the cells. PMID:26003082

  1. Novel adenosine receptors in rat hippocampus identification and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, J.H.; Mashman, W.E.; DeLorenzo, R.J.

    1985-05-06

    2-chloro(/sup 3/H)adenosine, a stable analog of adenosine, was used to investigate the presence of adenosine receptors in rat hippocampal membranes that may mediate the depressant effects of adenosine on synaptic transmission in this tissue. Equilibrium binding studies reveal the presence of a previously undescribed class of receptors with a K/sub D/ of 4.7 ..mu..M and a Bmax of 130 pmol/mg of protein. Binding is sensitive to alkylxanthines and to a number of adenosine-related compounds. The pharmacological properties of this binding site are distinct from those of the A1 and A2 adenosine receptors associated with adenylate cyclase. The results suggest that this adenosine binding site is a novel central purinergic receptor through which adenosine may regulate hippocampal excitability. 50 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  2. Adenosine transporters.

    PubMed

    Thorn, J A; Jarvis, S M

    1996-06-01

    1. In mammals, nucleoside transport is an important determinant of the pharmacokinetics, plasma and tissue concentration, disposition and in vivo biological activity of adenosine as well as nucleoside analogues used in antiviral and anticancer therapies. 2. Two broad types of adenosine transporter exist, facilitated-diffusion carriers and active processes driven by the transmembrane sodium gradient. 3. Facilitated-diffusion adenosine carriers may be sensitive (es) or insensitive (ei) to nanomolar concentrations of the transport inhibitor nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR). Dipyridamole, dilazep and lidoflazine analogues are also more potent inhibitors of the es carrier than the ei transporter in cells other than those derived from rat tissues. 4. The es transporter has a broad substrate specificity (apparent Km for adenosine approximately 25 microM in many cells at 25 degrees C), is a glycoprotein with an average apparent Mr of 57,000 in human erythrocytes that has been purified to near homogeneity and may exist in situ as a dimer. However, there is increasing evidence to suggest the presence of isoforms of the es transporter in different cells and species, based on kinetic and molecular properties. 5. The ei transporter also has a broad substrate specificity with a lower affinity for some nucleoside permeants than the es carrier, is genetically distinct from es but little information exists as to the molecular properties of the protein. 6. Sodium-dependent adenosine transport is present in many cell types and catalysed by four distinct systems, N1-N4, distinguished by substrate specificity, sodium coupling and tissue distribution. 7. Two genes have been identified which encode sodium-dependent adenosine transport proteins, SNST1 from the sodium/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) gene family and the rat intestinal N2 transporter (cNT1) from a novel gene family including a bacterial nucleoside carrier (NupC). Transcripts of cNT1, which encodes a 648-residue protein, are

  3. Guanosine 5'-triphosphate binding protein (G/sub i/) and two additional pertussis toxin substrates associated with muscarinic receptors in rat heart myocytes: characterization and age dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Moscona-Amir, E.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-07-12

    The coupling of muscarinic receptors with G-proteins was investigated in cultured myocytes prepared from the hearts of newborn rats. The coupling was investigated in both young (5 days after plating) and aged (14 days after plating) cultures, in view of the completely different effects of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) on muscarinic agonist binding to homogenates from young vs aged cultures. Pretreatment of cultures from both ages by Bordetella pertussis toxin (IAP) was found to eliminate any Gpp(NH)p effect on carbamylcholine binding. IAP by itself induced a rightward shift in the carbamylcholine competition curve in homogenates from aged cultures, but no such effect was observed in homogenates from young cultures. IAP-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation of membrane preparations from young and aged cultures revealed major differences between them. Young cultures exhibited a major IAP substrate at 40 kDa, which was also recognized by anti-..cap alpha../sub i/ antibodies, and two novel IAP substrates at 28 and 42 kDa, which were weakly ADP-ribosylated by the toxin and were not recognized with either anti-..cap alpha../sub i/ or anti-..cap alpha../sub 0/ antibodies. In aged cultures, only the 40-kDa band (ribosylated to a lower degree) was detected. The parallel age-dependent changes in the three IAP substrates (28, 40, and 42 kDa) and in the interactions of the G-protein(s) with the muscarinic receptors strongly suggest close association between the two phenomena. All of these age-dependent changes in the G-protein related parameters were prevented by phosphatidylcholine-liposome treatment of the aged cultures. The role of the membrane lipid composition in these phenomena is discussed.

  4. Actinin-1 binds to the C-terminus of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR) and enhances A2BAR cell-surface expression.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Hu, Wenbao; Yu, Xiaojie; Liu, Zhengzhao; Tarran, Robert; Ravid, Katya; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-07-15

    A2BAR (A2B adenosine receptor) has been implicated in several physiological conditions, such as allergic or inflammatory disorders, vasodilation, cell growth and epithelial electrolyte secretion. For mediating the protein-protein interactions of A2BAR, the receptor's C-terminus is recognized to be crucial. In the present study, we unexpectedly found that two point mutations in the A2BAR C-terminus (F297A and R298A) drastically impaired the expression of A2BAR protein by accelerating its degradation. Thus we tested the hypothesis that these two point mutations disrupt A2BAR's interaction with a protein essential for A2BAR stability. Our results show that both mutations disrupted the interaction of A2BAR with actinin-1, an actin-associated protein. Furthermore, actinin-1 binding stabilized the global and cell-surface expression of A2BAR. By contrast, actinin-4, another non-muscle actinin isoform, did not bind to A2BAR. Thus our findings reveal a previously unidentified regulatory mechanism of A2BAR abundance. PMID:27208173

  5. The role of nitric oxide in the phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element-binding protein in the spinal cord after intradermal injection of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Fang, Li; Lin, Qing; Willis, William D

    2002-06-01

    We investigated the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in the phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) in the spinal cord of rats during central sensitization after intradermal capsaicin injection. CREB and phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) were measured by immunoblotting. The level of p-CREB increased by 20 minutes, peaked between 20 and 60 minutes after capsaicin injection, and started to decrease after 150 minutes. CREB itself did not show an obvious change after capsaicin injection. The p-CREB expression on the ipsilateral side of the spinal dorsal horn, but not on the contralateral side, increased significantly after capsaicin injection. The increase in p-CREB induced by capsaicin injection was partially blocked by pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an NO synthase inhibitor, administered through a microdialysis fiber placed across the spinal cord. D-NAME, an inactive form of L-NAME, had no effect. CREB phosphorylation, not the level of CREB, was induced within 20 minutes by microdialysis administration of SIN-1, an NO donor. These results indicate that CREB phosphorylation in the spinal cord results from both endogenous and exogenous NO release and that p-CREB may play a role in central sensitization or in longer-term changes in gene expression induced by strong peripheral noxious stimulation. PMID:14622772

  6. Measurement of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate by competitive binding to salt-dissociated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Døskeland, S O; Haga, H J

    1978-01-01

    An assay for cyclic AMP is described which takes advantage of the high affinity of the dissociated receptor moiety of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase I for the nucleotide. The kinase is kept dissociated by salt (800 mM-NaCl/30mM-EDTA). In the presence of a simply prepared heat-stable protein fraction the binding reagent is stable for the time needed to reach equilibrium of binding. A simple procedure [precipitation with poly-(ethylene glycol) followed by DEAE-cellulose chromatography] is described for the separation of protein kinase I from other binding proteins for cyclic AMP in rabbit skeletal muscle. The sensitivity, precision, reproducibility and specificity of the assay compared favourably with those of other cyclic AMP assays. The main advantage of the present assay is its resistance towards non-specific interference from a number of salts, tissue-culture media and substances found in crude tissue extracts. The reliability of cyclic AMP measurement directly in crude tissue extracts was ensured by removal of the assayable cyclic AMP with cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase digestion or adsorption with antibody against cyclic AMP, by comparison with measurement in tissue extracts purified by chromatography on QAE-Sephadex or sequentially on Dowex 50, and aluminium oxide as well as by dilution and recovery experiments. PMID:213054

  7. Purification and Properties of Adenosine Diphosphoglucose Pyrophosphorylase from Sweet Corn 1

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Jacob; Cherry, Joe H.

    1972-01-01

    A 40-fold purification of adenosine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase from sweet corn (Zea mays var. Golden Beauty) revealed the enzyme to be specific for adenosine triphosphate. The enzyme has an absolute requirement for Mg2+ and is activated by 3-phosphoglycerate and to a lesser extent by ribose-5-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate. The apparent Km values of the enzyme for glucose-1-phosphate, adenosine triphosphate, pyrophosphate, and adenosine diphosphoglucose are 1.9 × 10−4, 3.2 × 10−5, 3.3 × 10−5, and 6.2 × 10−4m, respectively. Pyrophosphate inhibits adenosine diphosphoglucose synthesis competitively (Ki = 3.8 × 10−7m), while orthophosphate and sulfate appear to inhibit the reacion noncompetitively. These results show that the production of this sugar nucleotide can be controlled by the concentration of pyrophosphate. PMID:16658078

  8. Halobacterial adenosine triphosphatases and the adenosine triphosphatase from Halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, Hordur; Sadler, Martha H.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared from various members of the genus Halobacterium contained a Triton X-l00 activated adenosine triphosphatase. The enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum was unstable in solutions of low ionic strength and maximally active in the presence of 3.5 M NaCl. A variety of nucleotide triphosphates was hydrolyzed. MgADP, the product of ATP hydrolysis, was not hydrolyzed and was a competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum was composed of at least 2 and possibly 4 subunits. The 83-kDa and 60-kDa subunits represented about 90 percent of total protein. The 60-kDa subunit reacted with dicyclohexyl-carbodiimide when inhibition was carried out in an acidic medium. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum, possesses properties of an F(1)F(0) as well as an E(1)E(2) ATPase.

  9. Quantification of adenosine triphosphate, adenosine diphosphate, and creatine phosphate in sterlet spermatozoa during maturation.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, P; Dzyuba, B; Fedorova, G; Grabic, R; Cosson, J; Rodina, M

    2015-11-01

    Sturgeon spermatozoa maturation during their passage through the kidney is a prerequisite for initiation of motility. Samples of sterlet () testicular sperm (TS) were matured in vitro by incubation in seminal fluid (SF) or in SF supplemented with carbonyl cyanide -chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP; a respiration uncoupling agent). Sperm was diluted in activation medium (AM) containing 10 m Tris-HCl buffer (pH 8.5) and 0.25% Pluronic, and spermatozoon motility was assessed. Samples were taken and fixed in 3 perchloric acid at 3 points in the incubation process. Quantification of ATP, ADP, and creatine phosphate (CrP) was conducted using liquid chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry. We observed a significant decrease in CrP during artificial maturation of TS in SF. In contrast, ATP and ADP were not significantly affected. Addition of CCCP to SF halted maturation and led to significantly lower CrP whereas ADP significantly increased and ATP was unaffected. Dilution of matured and immature TS with AM led to a significant decrease of ATP and CrP and an increase of ADP compared with their levels before dilution, although immature TS were not motile. Energy dependency of TS maturation in sturgeon was confirmed, which suggests that mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is needed for maturation of sturgeon TS. PMID:26641041

  10. E-NTPDase (ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase) of Leishmania amazonensis inhibits macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Rodrigo Saar; de Carvalho, Luana Cristina Faria; de Souza Vasconcellos, Raphael; Fietto, Juliana Lopes Rangel; Afonso, Luís Carlos Crocco

    2015-04-01

    Leishmania amazonensis, the causal agent of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, is known for its ability to modulate the host immune response. Because a relationship between ectonucleotidase activity and the ability of Leishmania to generate injury in C57BL/6 mice has been demonstrated, in this study we evaluated the involvement of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase) activity of L. amazonensis in the process of infection of J774-macrophages. Our results show that high-activity parasites show increased survival rate in LPS/IFN-γ-activated cells, by inhibiting the host-cell NO production. Conversely, inhibition of E-NTPDase activity reduces the parasite survival rates, an effect associated with increased macrophage NO production. E-NTPDase activity generates substrate for the production of extracellular adenosine, which binds to A2B receptors and reduces IL-12 and TNF-α produced by activated macrophages, thus inhibiting NO production. These results indicate that E-NTPDase activity is important for survival of L. amazonensis within macrophages, showing the role of the enzyme in modulating macrophage response and lower NO production, which ultimately favors infection. Our results point to a new mechanism of L. amazonensis infection that may pave the way for the development of new treatments for this neglected disease. PMID:25554487

  11. (/sup 3/H)Ouabain binding and Na+, K+-ATPase in resealed human red cell ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, D.G.; Lauf, P.K.

    1983-03-01

    The interaction of the cardiac glycoside (/sup 3/H)ouabain with the Na+, K+ pump of resealed human erythrocyte ghosts was investigated. Binding of (/sup 3/H)ouabain to high intracellular Na+ ghosts was studied in high extracellular Na+ media, a condition determined to produce maximal ouabain binding rates. Simultaneous examination of both the number of ouabain molecules bound per ghost and the corresponding inhibition of the Na+, K+-ATPase revealed that one molecule of (/sup 3/H)ouabain inhibited one Na+, K+-ATPase complex. Intracellular magnesium or magnesium plus inorganic phosphate produced the lowest ouabain binding rate. Support of ouabain binding by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was negligible, provided synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through the residual adenylate kinase activity was prevented by the adenylate kinase inhibitor Ap5A. Uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) alone did not support ouabain binding after inhibition of the endogenous nucleoside diphosphokinase by trypan blue and depletion of residual ATP by the incorporation of hexokinase and glucose. ATP acting solely at the high-affinity binding site of the Na+, K+ pump (Km approximately 1 microM) promoted maximal (/sup 3/H)ouabain binding rates. Failure of 5'-adenylyl-beta-gamma-imidophosphate (AMP-PNP) to stimulate significantly the rate of ouabain binding suggests that phosphorylation of the pump was required to expose the ouabain receptor.

  12. Inhibition of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP)-response Element-binding Protein (CREB)-binding Protein (CBP)/β-Catenin Reduces Liver Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Yosuke; Oboki, Keisuke; Imamura, Jun; Kojika, Ekumi; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Saibara, Toshiji; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Kohara, Michinori; Kimura, Kiminori

    2015-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin is involved in every aspect of embryonic development and in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, and is also implicated in organ fibrosis. However, the role of β-catenin-mediated signaling on liver fibrosis remains unclear. To explore this issue, the effects of PRI-724, a selective inhibitor of the cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP)/β-catenin interaction, on liver fibrosis were examined using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)- or bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced mouse liver fibrosis models. Following repetitive CCl4 administrations, the nuclear translocation of β-catenin was observed only in the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. PRI-724 treatment reduced the fibrosis induced by CCl4 or BDL. C-82, an active form of PRI-724, inhibited the activation of isolated primary mouse quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and promoted cell death in culture-activated HSCs. During the fibrosis resolution period, an increase in F4/80+ CD11b+ and Ly6Clow CD11b+ macrophages was induced by CCl4 and was sustained for two weeks thereafter, even after having stopped CCl4 treatment. PRI-724 accelerated the resolution of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, and this was accompanied by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-2, and MMP-8 expression in intrahepatic leukocytes. In conclusion, targeting the CBP/β-catenin interaction may become a new therapeutic strategy in treating liver fibrosis. PMID:26870800

  13. Inhibition of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP)-response Element-binding Protein (CREB)-binding Protein (CBP)/β-Catenin Reduces Liver Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Yosuke; Oboki, Keisuke; Imamura, Jun; Kojika, Ekumi; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Saibara, Toshiji; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Kohara, Michinori; Kimura, Kiminori

    2015-11-01

    Wnt/β-catenin is involved in every aspect of embryonic development and in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, and is also implicated in organ fibrosis. However, the role of β-catenin-mediated signaling on liver fibrosis remains unclear. To explore this issue, the effects of PRI-724, a selective inhibitor of the cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP)/β-catenin interaction, on liver fibrosis were examined using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)- or bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced mouse liver fibrosis models. Following repetitive CCl4 administrations, the nuclear translocation of β-catenin was observed only in the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. PRI-724 treatment reduced the fibrosis induced by CCl4 or BDL. C-82, an active form of PRI-724, inhibited the activation of isolated primary mouse quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and promoted cell death in culture-activated HSCs. During the fibrosis resolution period, an increase in F4/80(+) CD11b(+) and Ly6C(low) CD11b(+) macrophages was induced by CCl4 and was sustained for two weeks thereafter, even after having stopped CCl4 treatment. PRI-724 accelerated the resolution of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, and this was accompanied by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-2, and MMP-8 expression in intrahepatic leukocytes. In conclusion, targeting the CBP/β-catenin interaction may become a new therapeutic strategy in treating liver fibrosis. PMID:26870800

  14. Genetic deletion of the adenosine A(2A) receptor prevents nicotine-induced upregulation of α7, but not α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the brain.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Athanasios; Al-Hasani, Ream; Farshim, Pamela; Tubby, Kristina; Berwick, Amy; Ledent, Catherine; Hourani, Susanna; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis

    2013-08-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) modulate cholinergic neurotransmission, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function, and nicotine-induced behavioural effects. To explore the interaction between A(2A) and nAChRs, we examined if the complete genetic deletion of adenosine A(2A)Rs in mice induces compensatory alterations in the binding of different nAChR subtypes, and whether the long-term effects of nicotine on nAChR regulation are altered in the absence of the A(2A)R gene. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure cytisine-sensitive [¹²⁵I]epibatidine and [¹²⁵I]α-bungarotoxin binding to α4β2* and α7 nAChRs, respectively, in brain sections of drug-naïve (n = 6) or nicotine treated (n = 5-7), wild-type and adenosine A(2A)R knockout mice. Saline or nicotine (7.8 mg/kg/day; free-base weight) were administered to male CD1 mice via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps for a period of 14 days. Blood plasma levels of nicotine and cotinine were measured at the end of treatment. There were no compensatory developmental alterations in nAChR subtype distribution or density in drug-naïve A(2A)R knockout mice. In nicotine treated wild-type mice, both α4β2* and α7 nAChR binding sites were increased compared with saline treated controls. The genetic ablation of adenosine A(2A)Rs prevented nicotine-induced upregulation of α7 nAChRs, without affecting α4β2* receptor upregulation. This selective effect was observed at plasma levels of nicotine that were within the range reported for smokers (10-50 ng ml⁻¹). Our data highlight the involvement of adenosine A(2A)Rs in the mechanisms of nicotine-induced α7 nAChR upregulation, and identify A(2A)Rs as novel pharmacological targets for modulating the long-term effects of nicotine on α7 receptors. PMID:23583933

  15. Photoaffinity labeling of A1-adenosine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.N.; Cristalli, G.; Grifantini, M.; Vittori, S.; Lohse, M.J.

    1985-11-25

    The ligand-binding subunit of the A1-adenosine receptor has been identified by photoaffinity labeling. A photolabile derivative of R-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, R-2-azido-N6-p-hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine (R-AHPIA), has been synthesized as a covalent specific ligand for A1-adenosine receptors. In adenylate cyclase studies with membranes of rat fat cells and human platelets, R-AHPIA has adenosine receptor agonist activity with a more than 60-fold selectivity for the A1-subtype. It competes for (TH)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine binding to A1-receptors of rat brain membranes with a Ki value of 1.6 nM. After UV irradiation, R-AHPIA binds irreversibly to the receptor, as indicated by a loss of (TH)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine binding after extensive washing; the Ki value for this photoinactivation is 1.3 nM. The p-hydroxyphenyl substituent of R-AHPIA can be directly radioiodinated to give a photoaffinity label of high specific radioactivity ( SVI-AHPIA). This compound has a KD value of about 1.5 nM as assessed from saturation and kinetic experiments. Adenosine analogues compete for SVI-AHPIA binding to rat brain membranes with an order of potency characteristic for A1-adenosine receptors. Dissociation curves following UV irradiation at equilibrium demonstrate 30-40% irreversible specific binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicates that the probe is photoincorporated into a single peptide of Mr = 35,000. Labeling of this peptide can be blocked specifically and stereoselectively by adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists in a manner which is typical for the A1-subtype. The results indicate that SVI-AHPIA identifies the ligand-binding subunit of the A1-adenosine receptor, which is a peptide with Mr = 35,000.

  16. Crystal Structure of Tryptophanyl-tRNA Synthetase Complexed with Adenosine-5′ Tetraphosphate: Evidence for Distributed Use of Catalytic Binding Energy in Amino Acid Activation by Class I Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Retailleau, Pascal; Weinreb, Violetta; Hu, Mei; Carter, Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    Tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) is a functionally dimeric ligase, which specifically couples hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and pyrophosphate to the formation of an ester bond between tryptophan and the cognate tRNA. TrpRS from Bacillus stearothermophilus binds the ATP analogue, adenosine-5′ tetraphosphate, AQP, competitively with ATP during pyrophosphate exchange. Estimates of binding affinity from this competitive inhibition and from isothermal titration calorimetry show that AQP binds 200 times more tightly than ATP both under conditions of induced-fit, where binding is coupled to an unfavourable conformational change, and under exchange conditions, where there is no conformational change. These binding data provide an indirect experimental measurement of +3.0 kcal/mole for the conformational free energy change associated with induced-fit assembly of the active site. Thermodynamic parameters derived from the calorimetry reveal very modest enthalpic changes, consistent with binding driven largely by a favorable entropy change. The 2.5 Å structure of the TrpRS:AQP complex, determined de novo by X-ray crystallography, resembles that of the previously described, pre-transition state TrpRS:ATP complexes. The anticodon-binding domain untwists relative to the Rossmann-fold domain by 20% of the way toward the orientation observed for the Products complex. An unexpected tetraphosphate conformation allows the γ̃ and δ̃ phosphate groups to occupy positions equivalent to those occupied by the β̃ and γ̃ phosphates of ATP. The β-phosphate effects a 1.11 Å extension that relocates the α-phosphate toward the tryptophan carboxylate while the PPi mimic moves deeper into the KMSKS loop. This configuration improves interactions between enzyme and nucleotide significantly and uniformly in the adenosine and PPi binding subsites. A new hydrogen bond forms between S194 from the class I KMSKS signature sequence and the PPi mimic. These complementary thermodynamic and

  17. The preparation of adenosine 5′-pyrophosphate by a non-enzymic method

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, R. M. C.; Ford, M.; Eichberg, J.

    1965-01-01

    1. A non-enzymic method for the preparation of adenosine 5′-diphosphate is described, in which the terminal phosphate of adenosine 5′-triphosphate is transferred to methanol in the presence of hydrochloric acid. The final purified product can be obtained in 60% yield. 2. Experiments with [14C]methanol showed that no methylation of the adenosine diphosphate occurs during the reaction. 3. Confirmation that the pyrophosphate moiety of the adenosine diphosphate produced was in the 5′-position was obtained by: (a) periodate oxidation; (b) treatment with apyrase and examination of the resulting adenylic acid isomer by paper chromatography. 4. The method appears to be generally applicable to the preparation of nucleoside 5′-diphosphates from the corresponding nucleoside 5′-triphosphates. PMID:14333545

  18. Evaluation of Adenosine Triphosphate-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1) R219K and C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP) +1059G/C Gene Polymorphisms in Susceptibility to Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Fang; Peng, Dian-Ying; Ling, Mei; Yin, Yong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This meta-analysis investigated the correlation of ABCA1 R219K and C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP) +1059G/C gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to coronary heart disease (CHD). MATERIAL AND METHODS We searched PubMed, Springer link, Wiley, EBSCO, Ovid, Wanfang database, VIP database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases to retrieve published studies by keyword. Searches were filtered using our stringent inclusion and exclusion criteria. Resultant high-quality data collected from the final selected studies were analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2.0 software. Eleven case-control studies involving 3053 CHD patients and 3403 healthy controls met our inclusion criteria. Seven studies were conducted in Asian populations, 3 studies were done in Caucasian populations, and 1 was in an African population. RESULTS Our major finding was that ABCA1 R219K polymorphism increased susceptibility to CHD in allele model (OR=0.729, 95% CI=0.559~0.949, P=0.019) and dominant model (OR=0.698, 95% CI=0.507~0.961, P=0.027). By contrast, we were unable to find any significant association between the CRP +1059G/C polymorphism and susceptibility to CHD (allele model: OR=1.170, 95% CI=0.782~1.751, P=0.444; dominant model: OR=1.175, 95% CI=0.768~1.797, P=0.457). CONCLUSIONS This meta-analysis provides convincing evidence that polymorphism of ABCA1 R219K is associated with susceptibility to CHD while the CRP +1059G/C polymorphism appears to have no correlation with susceptibility to CHD. PMID:27560308

  19. Evaluation of Adenosine Triphosphate-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1) R219K and C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP) +1059G/C Gene Polymorphisms in Susceptibility to Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Fang; Peng, Dian-Ying; Ling, Mei; Yin, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background This meta-analysis investigated the correlation of ABCA1 R219K and CRP +1059G/C gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to coronary heart disease (CHD). Material/Methods We searched PubMed, Springer link, Wiley, EBSCO, Ovid, Wanfang database, VIP database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases to retrieve published studies by keyword. Searches were filtered using our stringent inclusion and exclusion criteria. Resultant high-quality data collected from the final selected studies were analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2.0 software. Eleven case-control studies involving 3053 CHD patients and 3403 healthy controls met our inclusion criteria. Seven studies were conducted in Asian populations, 3 studies were done in Caucasian populations, and 1 was in an African population. Results Our major finding was that ABCA1 R219K polymorphism increased susceptibility to CHD in allele model (OR=0.729, 95% CI=0.559~0.949, P=0.019) and dominant model (OR=0.698, 95% CI=0.507~0.961, P=0.027). By contrast, we were unable to find any significant association between the CRP +1059G/C polymorphism and susceptibility to CHD (allele model: OR=1.170, 95% CI=0.782~1.751, P=0.444; dominant model: OR=1.175, 95% CI=0.768~1.797, P=0.457). Conclusions This meta-analysis provides convincing evidence that polymorphism of ABCA1 R219K is associated with susceptibility to CHD while the CRP +1059G/C polymorphism appears to have no correlation with susceptibility to CHD. PMID:27560308

  20. Adenosine and Ischemic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bruce T.; Swierkosz, Tomasz A.; Herrmann, Howard C.; Kimmel, Stephen; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine is released in large amounts during myocardial ischemia and is capable of exerting potent cardioprotective effects in the heart. Although these observations on adenosine have been known for a long time, how adenosine acts to achieve its anti-ischemic effect remains incompletely understood. However, recent advances on the chemistry and pharmacology of adenosine receptor ligands have provided important and novel information on the function of adenosine receptor subtypes in the cardiovascular system. The development of model systems for the cardiac actions of adenosine has yielded important insights into its mechanism of action and have begun to elucidate the sequence of signalling events from receptor activation to the actual exertion of its cardioprotective effect. The present review will focus on the adenosine receptors that mediate the potent anti-ischemic effect of adenosine, new ligands at the receptors, potential molecular signalling mechanisms downstream of the receptor, mediators for cardioprotection, and possible clinical applications in cardiovascular disorders. PMID:10607860

  1. Modified Nucleoside Triphosphates for In-vitro Selection Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dellafiore, María A.; Montserrat, Javier M.; Iribarren, Adolfo M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of SELEX (Selective Enhancement of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) provides a powerful tool for the search of functional oligonucleotides with the ability to bind ligands with high affinity and selectivity (aptamers) and for the discovery of nucleic acid sequences with diverse enzymatic activities (ribozymes and DNAzymes). This technique has been extensively applied to the selection of natural DNA or RNA molecules but, in order to improve chemical and structural diversity as well as for particular applications where further chemical or biological stability is necessary, the extension of this strategy to modified oligonucleotides is desirable. Taking into account these needs, this review intends to collect the research carried out during the past years, focusing mainly on the use of modified nucleotides in SELEX and the development of mutant enzymes for broadening nucleoside triphosphates acceptance. In addition, comments regarding the synthesis of modified nucleoside triphosphate will be briefly discussed. PMID:27200340

  2. Modified Nucleoside Triphosphates for In-vitro Selection Techniques.

    PubMed

    Dellafiore, María A; Montserrat, Javier M; Iribarren, Adolfo M

    2016-01-01

    The development of SELEX (Selective Enhancement of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) provides a powerful tool for the search of functional oligonucleotides with the ability to bind ligands with high affinity and selectivity (aptamers) and for the discovery of nucleic acid sequences with diverse enzymatic activities (ribozymes and DNAzymes). This technique has been extensively applied to the selection of natural DNA or RNA molecules but, in order to improve chemical and structural diversity as well as for particular applications where further chemical or biological stability is necessary, the extension of this strategy to modified oligonucleotides is desirable. Taking into account these needs, this review intends to collect the research carried out during the past years, focusing mainly on the use of modified nucleotides in SELEX and the development of mutant enzymes for broadening nucleoside triphosphates acceptance. In addition, comments regarding the synthesis of modified nucleoside triphosphate will be briefly discussed. PMID:27200340

  3. Modified Nucleoside Triphosphates for in-vitro Selection Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarren, Adolfo; Dellafiore, María; Montserrat, Javier

    2016-05-01

    The development of SELEX (Selective Enhancement of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) provides a powerful tool for the search of functional oligonucleotides with the ability to bind ligands with high affinity and selectivity (aptamers) and for the discovery of nucleic acid sequences with diverse enzymatic activities (ribozymes and DNAzymes). This technique has been extensively applied to the selection of natural DNA or RNA molecules but, in order to improve chemical and structural diversity as well as for particular applications where further chemical or biological stability is necessary, the extension of this strategy to modified oligonucleotides is desirable. Taking into account these needs, this review intends to collect the research carried out during the past years, focusing mainly on the use of modified nucleotides in SELEX and the development of mutant enzymes for broadening nucleoside triphosphates acceptance. In addition, comments regarding the synthesis of modified nucleoside triphosphate will be briefly discussed.

  4. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity.

  5. Alterations of adenosine A1 receptors in morphine dependence.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Leite-Morris, K A; Sears, M T

    1994-09-19

    The possibility that central adenosine A1 and A2a receptors mediate opiate dependence was examined in morphine-treated mice using radioligand binding methods. Mice treated with morphine for 72 h demonstrated significant increases in naloxone precipitated abstinence behaviors of jumping, wet-dog shakes, teeth chattering, forepaw trends, forepaw tremors and diarrhea compared to vehicle-treated mice. Increased concentrations of cortical adenosine A1 receptor sites, but not striatal adenosine A2a sites, were found in saturation binding studies from morphine-dependent mice. Decreases in cortical A1 agonist binding affinity values along with increases in agonist binding sites were demonstrated in competition binding studies. These results suggest that adaptive changes of upregulation and sensitization of adenosine A1 receptors play a role in mediating the opiate abstinence syndrome. PMID:7820640

  6. Regulation of Lymphocyte Function by Adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Joel; Cekic, Caglar

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine regulates the interaction between lymphocytes and the vasculature and is important for controlling lymphocyte trafficking in response to tissue injury or infection. Adenosine can blunt the effects of T cell receptor (TCR) activation primarily by activating adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) and signaling via cyclic AMP and protein kinase A (PKA). PKA reduces proximal TCR signaling by phosphorylation of C-terminal Src kinase (Csk), nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) and cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB). PKA activation can either enhance or inhibit the survival of T cells depending on the strength and duration of signaling. Inducible enzymes such as CD73 and CD39 regulate adenosine formation and degradation in vivo. The extravasation of lymphocytes through blood vessels is influenced by A2AR-mediated suppression of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM) expression on lymphocytes and diminished production of IFNγ and IFNγ-inducible chemokines that are chemotactic to activated lymphocytes. Adenosine also decreases the barrier function of vascular endothelium by activating A2BRs. In sum, adenosine signaling is influenced by tissue inflammation and injury through induction of receptors and enzymes and has generally inhibitory effects on lymphocyte migration into inflamed tissues due to PKA-mediated effects on adhesion molecules, IFNγ production and endothelial barrier function. PMID:22772752

  7. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  8. Nucleotide triphosphate promiscuity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis dethiobiotin synthetase.

    PubMed

    Salaemae, Wanisa; Yap, Min Y; Wegener, Kate L; Booker, Grant W; Wilce, Matthew C J; Polyak, Steven W

    2015-05-01

    Dethiobiotin synthetase (DTBS) plays a crucial role in biotin biosynthesis in microorganisms, fungi, and plants. Due to its importance in bacterial pathogenesis, and the absence of a human homologue, DTBS is a promising target for the development of new antibacterials desperately needed to combat antibiotic resistance. Here we report the first X-ray structure of DTBS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtDTBS) bound to a nucleotide triphosphate (CTP). The nucleoside base is stabilized in its pocket through hydrogen-bonding interactions with the protein backbone, rather than amino acid side chains. This resulted in the unexpected finding that MtDTBS could utilise ATP, CTP, GTP, ITP, TTP, or UTP with similar Km and kcat values, although the enzyme had the highest affinity for CTP in competitive binding and surface plasmon resonance assays. This is in contrast to other DTBS homologues that preferentially bind ATP primarily through hydrogen-bonds between the purine base and the carboxamide side chain of a key asparagine. Mutational analysis performed alongside in silico experiments revealed a gate-keeper role for Asn175 in Escherichia coli DTBS that excludes binding of other nucleotide triphosphates. Here we provide evidence to show that MtDTBS has a broad nucleotide specificity due to the absence of the gate-keeper residue. PMID:25801336

  9. Transcriptional activation of the nitrogenase promoter in vitro: adenosine nucleotides are required for inhibition of NIFA activity by NIFL.

    PubMed

    Eydmann, T; Söderbäck, E; Jones, T; Hill, S; Austin, S; Dixon, R

    1995-03-01

    The enhancer-binding protein NIFA is required for transcriptional activation of nif promoters by the alternative holoenzyme form of RNA polymerase, which contains the sigma factor sigma 54 (sigma N). NIFA hydrolyzes nucleoside triphosphates to catalyze the isomerization of closed promoter complexes to transcriptionally competent open complexes. The activity of NIFA is antagonized by the regulatory protein NIFL in response to oxygen and fixed nitrogen in vivo. We have investigated the requirement for nucleotides in the formation and stability of open promoter complexes by NIFA and inhibition of its activity by NIFL at the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifH promoter. Open complexes formed by sigma 54-containing RNA polymerase are considerably more stable to heparin challenge in the presence of GTP than in the presence of ATP. This differential stability is most probably a consequence of GTP being the initiating nucleotide at this promoter. Adenosine nucleosides are specifically required for Azotobacter vinelandii NIFL to inhibit open complex formation by native NIFA, and the nucleoside triphosphatase activity of NIFA is strongly inhibited by NIFL under these conditions. We propose a model in which NIFL modulates the activity of NIFA via an adenosine nucleotide switch. PMID:7868590

  10. Adenosine diphosphate restricts the protein remodeling activity of the Hsp104 chaperone to Hsp70 assisted disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kłosowska, Agnieszka; Chamera, Tomasz; Liberek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Hsp104 disaggregase provides thermotolerance in yeast by recovering proteins from aggregates in cooperation with the Hsp70 chaperone. Protein disaggregation involves polypeptide extraction from aggregates and its translocation through the central channel of the Hsp104 hexamer. This process relies on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. Considering that Hsp104 is characterized by low affinity towards ATP and is strongly inhibited by adenosine diphosphate (ADP), we asked how Hsp104 functions at the physiological levels of adenine nucleotides. We demonstrate that physiological levels of ADP highly limit Hsp104 activity. This inhibition, however, is moderated by the Hsp70 chaperone, which allows efficient disaggregation by supporting Hsp104 binding to aggregates but not to non-aggregated, disordered protein substrates. Our results point to an additional level of Hsp104 regulation by Hsp70, which restricts the potentially toxic protein unfolding activity of Hsp104 to the disaggregation process, providing the yeast protein-recovery system with substrate specificity and efficiency in ATP consumption. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15159.001 PMID:27223323

  11. The first nucleotide binding fold of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator can function as an active ATPase.

    PubMed

    Ko, Y H; Pedersen, P L

    1995-09-22

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cell membrane protein called CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) which functions as a regulated Cl- channel. Although it is known that CFTR contains two nucleotide domains, both of which exhibit the capacity to bind ATP, it has not been demonstrated directly whether one or both domains can function as an active ATPase. To address this question, we have studied the first CFTR nucleotide binding fold (NBF1) in fusion with the maltose-binding protein (MBP), which both stabilizes NBF1 and enhances its solubility. Three different ATPase assays conducted on MBP-NBF1 clearly demonstrate its capacity to catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. Significantly, the mutations K464H and K464L in the Walker A consensus motif of NBF1 markedly impair its catalytic capacity. MBP alone exhibits no ATPase activity and MBP-NBF1 fails to catalyze the release of phosphate from AMP or ADP. The Vmax of ATP hydrolysis (approximately 30 nmol/min/mg of protein) is significant and is markedly inhibited by azide and by the ATP analogs 2'-(3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-adenosine-5'-triphosphate and adenosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imido)triphosphate. As inherited mutations within NBF1 account for most cases of cystic fibrosis, results reported here are fundamental to our understanding of the molecular basis of the disease. PMID:7545672

  12. A Metabolic Immune Checkpoint: Adenosine in Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Within tumors, some areas are less oxygenated than others. Since their home ground is under chronic hypoxia, tumor cells adapt to this condition by activating aerobic glycolysis; however, this hypoxic environment is very harsh for incoming immune cells. Deprivation of oxygen limits availability of energy sources and induces accumulation of extracellular adenosine in tumors. Extracellular adenosine, upon binding with adenosine receptors on the surface of various immune cells, suppresses pro-inflammatory activities. In addition, signaling through adenosine receptors upregulates a number of anti-inflammatory molecules and immunoregulatory cells, leading to the establishment of a long-lasting immunosuppressive environment. Thus, due to hypoxia and adenosine, tumors can discourage antitumor immune responses no matter how the response was induced, whether it was spontaneous or artificially introduced with a therapeutic intention. Preclinical studies have shown the significance of adenosine in tumor survival strategy by demonstrating tumor regression after inactivation of adenosine receptors, inhibition of adenosine-producing enzymes, or reversal of tissue hypoxia. These promising results indicate a potential use of the inhibitors of the hypoxia–adenosine pathway for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27066002

  13. Corticotropin-releasing factor binding to peripheral tissue and activation of the adenylate cyclase-adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate system

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, J.R.; Eiden, L.E.; Eskay, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    Specific binding sites for rat corticotropin-releasing factor (rCRF) are present in rat adrenal medulla, ventral prostate, spleen, liver, kidney, and testis and bovine chromaffin cells in culture. Maximal binding of (/sup 125/I)rCRF occurred within 25 min at 4 C and was saturable. Scatchard analysis of rCRF binding to rat adrenal membranes and bovine chromaffin cells revealed the existence of two classes of binding sites. One class had a relatively higher apparent affinity and lower number of binding sites, whereas the other class had a relatively lower affinity and higher number of binding sites. CRF induced a dose-related increase in rat adrenal membrane adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP levels in bovine chromaffin cells. Nanomolar concentrations of rCRF maximally stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in rat adrenal membranes and maximally increased cAMP levels in bovine chromaffin cells to 86% and 130% above control values, respectively. The demonstration of specific CRF-binding sites in a variety of peripheral tissues and the finding that activation of specific CRF-binding sites in adrenal tissue stimulates the adenylate cyclase-cAMP system suggest that CRF may have an important regulatory role in various peripheral tissues.

  14. ATP-binding sites in brain p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein), a multifunctional AAA ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Zalk, Ran; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2003-01-01

    VCP (valosin-containing protein) or p97 is a member of the AAA family (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities family), a diverse group of proteins sharing a key conserved AAA module containing duplicate putative ATP-binding sites. Although the functions of the AAA family are related to their putative ATP-binding sites, the binding of ATP to these sites has not yet been demonstrated. In the present study, the ATP-binding site(s) of brain VCP was characterized using the photoreactive ATP analogue, BzATP [3'- O -(4-benzoylbenzoyl)ATP]. Photo-activation of Bz-[alpha-(32)P]ATP resulted in its covalent binding to a 97-kDa purified soluble or membrane-associated protein, identified by amino acid sequencing as VCP. Bz-[alpha-(32)P]ATP covalently bound to the purified homo-hexameric VCP with an apparent high affinity (74-111 nM). A molar stoichiometry of 2.23+/-0.14 BzATP bound per homo-hexameric VCP (n =6) was determined using different methods for analysis of radiolabelling and protein determination. Nucleotides inhibited the binding of Bz-[alpha-(32)P]ATP to VCP with the following efficiency: BzATP>ATP>ADP>>adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate>or=adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-methylene]triphosphate, whereas AMP, GTP and CTP were ineffective. VCP was observed to possess very low ATPase activity, with nucleotide specificity similar to that for BzATP binding. Conformational changes induced by an alternating site mechanism for ATP binding are suggested as a molecular mechanism for coupling ATP binding to the diverse activities of the AAA family. PMID:12747802

  15. 2-Substituted adenosine derivatives: affinity and efficacy at four subtypes of human adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Mamedova, Liaman K; Chen, Peiran; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2004-11-15

    The affinity and efficacy at four subtypes (A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3)) of human adenosine receptors (ARs) of a wide range of 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were evaluated using radioligand binding assays and a cyclic AMP functional assay in intact CHO cells stably expressing these receptors. Similar to previous studies of the N(6)-position, several 2-substituents were found to be critical structural determinants for the A(3)AR activation. The following adenosine 2-ethers were moderately potent partial agonists (K(i), nM): benzyl (117), 3-chlorobenzyl (72), 2-(3-chlorophenyl)ethyl (41), and 2-(2-naphthyl)ethyl (130). The following adenosine 2-ethers were A(3)AR antagonists: 2,2-diphenylethyl, 2-(2-norbornan)ethyl, R- and S-2-phenylbutyl, and 2-(2-chlorophenyl)ethyl. 2-(S-2-Phenylbutyloxy)adenosine as an A(3)AR antagonist right-shifted the concentration-response curve for the inhibition by NECA of cyclic AMP accumulation with a K(B) value of 212 nM, which is similar to its binding affinity (K(i) = 175 nM). These 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were generally less potent at the A(1)AR in comparison to the A(3)AR, but fully efficacious, with binding K(i) values over 100 nM. The 2-phenylethyl moiety resulted in higher A(3)AR affinity (K(i) in nM) when linked to the 2-position of adenosine through an ether group (54), than when linked through an amine (310) or thioether (1960). 2-[2-(l-Naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (K(i) = 3.8 nM) was found to be the most potent and selective (>50-fold) A(2A) agonist in this series. Mixed A(2A)/A(3)AR agonists have been identified. Interestingly, although most of these compounds were extremely weak at the A(2B)AR, 2-[2-(2-naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (EC(50) = 1.4 microM) and 2-[2-(2-thienyl)-ethyloxy]adenosine (EC(50) = 1.8 microM) were found to be relatively potent A(2B) agonists, although less potent than NECA (EC(50) = 140 nM). PMID:15476669

  16. The caffeine-binding adenosine A2A receptor induces age-like HPA-axis dysfunction by targeting glucocorticoid receptor function.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Vânia L; Ferreira, Diana G; Coelho, Joana E; Valadas, Jorge S; Gomes, Rui; Temido-Ferreira, Mariana; Shmidt, Tatiana; Baqi, Younis; Buée, Luc; Müller, Christa E; Hamdane, Malika; Outeiro, Tiago F; Bader, Michael; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Blum, David; Lopes, Luísa V

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is associated with procognitive effects in humans by counteracting overactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), which is upregulated in the human forebrain of aged and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We have previously shown that an anti-A2AR therapy reverts age-like memory deficits, by reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis feedback and corticosterone circadian levels. These observations suggest that A2AR over-activation and glucocorticoid dysfunction are key events in age-related hippocampal deficits; but their direct connection has never been explored. We now show that inducing A2AR overexpression in an aging-like profile is sufficient to trigger HPA-axis dysfunction, namely loss of plasmatic corticosterone circadian oscillation, and promotes reduction of GR hippocampal levels. The synaptic plasticity and memory deficits triggered by GR in the hippocampus are amplified by A2AR over-activation and were rescued by anti-A2AR therapy; finally, we demonstrate that A2AR act on GR nuclear translocation and GR-dependent transcriptional regulation. We provide the first demonstration that A2AR is a major regulator of GR function and that this functional interconnection may be a trigger to age-related memory deficits. This supports the idea that the procognitive effects of A2AR antagonists, namely caffeine, on Alzheimer's and age-related cognitive impairments may rely on its ability to modulate GR actions. PMID:27510168

  17. The caffeine-binding adenosine A2A receptor induces age-like HPA-axis dysfunction by targeting glucocorticoid receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Vânia L.; Ferreira, Diana G.; Coelho, Joana E.; Valadas, Jorge S.; Gomes, Rui; Temido-Ferreira, Mariana; Shmidt, Tatiana; Baqi, Younis; Buée, Luc; Müller, Christa E.; Hamdane, Malika; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Bader, Michael; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H.; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Blum, David; Lopes, Luísa V.

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is associated with procognitive effects in humans by counteracting overactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), which is upregulated in the human forebrain of aged and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. We have previously shown that an anti-A2AR therapy reverts age-like memory deficits, by reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis feedback and corticosterone circadian levels. These observations suggest that A2AR over-activation and glucocorticoid dysfunction are key events in age-related hippocampal deficits; but their direct connection has never been explored. We now show that inducing A2AR overexpression in an aging-like profile is sufficient to trigger HPA-axis dysfunction, namely loss of plasmatic corticosterone circadian oscillation, and promotes reduction of GR hippocampal levels. The synaptic plasticity and memory deficits triggered by GR in the hippocampus are amplified by A2AR over-activation and were rescued by anti-A2AR therapy; finally, we demonstrate that A2AR act on GR nuclear translocation and GR-dependent transcriptional regulation. We provide the first demonstration that A2AR is a major regulator of GR function and that this functional interconnection may be a trigger to age-related memory deficits. This supports the idea that the procognitive effects of A2AR antagonists, namely caffeine, on Alzheimer’s and age-related cognitive impairments may rely on its ability to modulate GR actions. PMID:27510168

  18. Adenosine inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid release from slices of rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Hollins, C.; Stone, T. W.

    1980-01-01

    1 The effect of purine compounds on the potassium-evoked release of 14C-labelled gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been studied in 400 micrometers slices of rat cerebral cortex in vitro. 2 Adenosine and adenosine 5' monophosphate (AMP) inhibited the release of GABA at 10(-5) to 10(-3) M. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) produced a significant inhibition of release only at 10(-3) M. 3 Theophylline 10(-4) or 10(-3) M reduced the inhibitory effect of adenosine, but did not change basal release of GABA. 4 Dipyridamole 10(-5) M itself reduced evoked GABA release, but did not prevent the inhibitory effect of adenosine, implying that adenosine was acting at an extracellularly directed receptor. 5 Calcium removal or antagonism by verapamil reduced the evoked release of GABA, but adenosine did not produce any further reduction of the calcium-independent release. This may indicate that the inhibitory effect of adenosine on GABA release results from interference with calcium influx or availability within the terminals. PMID:7378648

  19. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment and cortical responses to adenosine and GABA.

    PubMed

    Mally, J; Connick, J H; Stone, T W

    1990-10-22

    The effects of chronic treatment of mice with clonazepam have been examined on the responses of neocortical slices to adenosine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Responses to these agonists were measured as changes in the depolarisation induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). Added to the superfusion medium diazepam blocked responses to adenosine but not 5-HT; this effect was not observed with 2-chloroadenosine or in the presence of 2-hydroxynitrobenzylthioguanosine. GABA was inactive in control slices but chronic treatment with clonazepam induced responses to GABA and enhanced responses to adenosine but not 5-HT. It is suggested that the induction of GABA responses may reflect the up-regulation of GABA receptors, but the increase of adenosine responses by clonazepam implies that there is no simple relationship between adenosine receptor binding and functional responses. PMID:1979931

  20. Dietary adenine controls adult lifespan via adenosine nucleotide biosynthesis and AMPK, and regulates the longevity benefit of caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Stenesen, Drew; Suh, Jae Myoung; Seo, Jin; Yu, Kweon; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Jong-Seok; Min, Kyung-Jin; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A common thread among conserved lifespan regulators lies within intertwined roles in metabolism and energy homeostasis. We show that heterozygous mutations of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) biosynthetic enzymes extend Drosophila lifespan. The lifespan benefit of these mutations depends upon increased AMP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to ATP ratios and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Transgenic expression of AMPK in adult fat body or adult muscle, key metabolic tissues, extended lifespan, while AMPK RNAi reduced lifespan. Supplementing adenine, a substrate for AMP biosynthesis, to the diet of long-lived AMP biosynthesis mutants reversed lifespan extension. Remarkably, this simple change in diet also blocked the pro-longevity effects of dietary restriction. These data establish AMP biosynthesis, adenosine nucleotide ratios, and AMPK as determinants of adult lifespan, provide a mechanistic link between cellular anabolism and energy sensing pathways, and indicate that dietary adenine manipulations might alter metabolism to influence animal lifespan. PMID:23312286

  1. ATP and AMP Mutually Influence Their Interaction with the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) at Separate Binding Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Dong, Qian; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Elcock, Adrian H.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein family. In the presence of ATP and physiologically relevant concentrations of AMP, CFTR exhibits adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). Previous studies suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for this activity. Two other ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome protein, also have adenylate kinase activity. All three ABC adenylate kinases bind and hydrolyze ATP in the absence of other nucleotides. However, little is known about how an ABC adenylate kinase interacts with ATP and AMP when both are present. Based on data from non-ABC adenylate kinases, we hypothesized that ATP and AMP mutually influence their interaction with CFTR at separate binding sites. We further hypothesized that only one of the two CFTR ATP-binding sites is involved in the adenylate kinase reaction. We found that 8-azidoadenosine 5′-triphosphate (8-N3-ATP) and 8-azidoadenosine 5′-monophosphate (8-N3-AMP) photolabeled separate sites in CFTR. Labeling of the AMP-binding site with 8-N3-AMP required the presence of ATP. Conversely, AMP enhanced photolabeling with 8-N3-ATP at ATP-binding site 2. The adenylate kinase active center probe P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate interacted simultaneously with an AMP-binding site and ATP-binding site 2. These results show that ATP and AMP interact with separate binding sites but mutually influence their interaction with the ABC adenylate kinase CFTR. They further indicate that the active center of the adenylate kinase comprises ATP-binding site 2. PMID:23921386

  2. ATP and AMP mutually influence their interaction with the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) adenylate kinase cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) at separate binding sites.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Dong, Qian; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Elcock, Adrian H; Welsh, Michael J

    2013-09-20

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein family. In the presence of ATP and physiologically relevant concentrations of AMP, CFTR exhibits adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP &lrarr2; 2 ADP). Previous studies suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for this activity. Two other ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome protein, also have adenylate kinase activity. All three ABC adenylate kinases bind and hydrolyze ATP in the absence of other nucleotides. However, little is known about how an ABC adenylate kinase interacts with ATP and AMP when both are present. Based on data from non-ABC adenylate kinases, we hypothesized that ATP and AMP mutually influence their interaction with CFTR at separate binding sites. We further hypothesized that only one of the two CFTR ATP-binding sites is involved in the adenylate kinase reaction. We found that 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8-N3-ATP) and 8-azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate (8-N3-AMP) photolabeled separate sites in CFTR. Labeling of the AMP-binding site with 8-N3-AMP required the presence of ATP. Conversely, AMP enhanced photolabeling with 8-N3-ATP at ATP-binding site 2. The adenylate kinase active center probe P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate interacted simultaneously with an AMP-binding site and ATP-binding site 2. These results show that ATP and AMP interact with separate binding sites but mutually influence their interaction with the ABC adenylate kinase CFTR. They further indicate that the active center of the adenylate kinase comprises ATP-binding site 2. PMID:23921386

  3. 2-Substituted adenosine derivatives: affinity and efficacy at four subtypes of human adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Mamedova, Liaman K.; Chen, Peiran; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The affinity and efficacy at four subtypes (A1, A2A, A2B and A3) of human adenosine receptors (ARs) of a wide range of 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were evaluated using radioligand binding assays and a cyclic AMP functional assay in intact CHO cells stably expressing these receptors. Similar to previous studies of the N6-position, several 2-substituents were found to be critical structural determinants for the A3AR activation. The following adenosine 2-ethers were moderately potent partial agonists (Ki, nM): benzyl (117), 3-chlorobenzyl (72), 2-(3-chlorophenyl)ethyl (41), and 2-(2-naphthyl)ethyl (130). The following adenosine 2-ethers were A3AR antagonists: 2,2-diphenylethyl, 2-(2-norbornan)ethyl, R- and S-2-phenylbutyl, and 2-(2-chlorophenyl)ethyl. 2-(S-2-Phenylbutyloxy)a-denosine as an A3AR antagonist right-shifted the concentration–response curve for the inhibition by NECA of cyclic AMP accumulation with a KB value of 212 nM, which is similar to its binding affinity (Ki = 175 nM). These 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were generally less potent at the A1AR in comparison to the A3AR, but fully efficacious, with binding Ki values over 100 nM. The 2-phenylethyl moiety resulted in higher A3AR affinity (Ki in nM) when linked to the 2-position of adenosine through an ether group (54), than when linked through an amine (310) or thioether (1960). 2-[2-(l-Naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (Ki = 3.8 nM) was found to be the most potent and selective (>50-fold) A2A agonist in this series. Mixed A2A/A3AR agonists have been identified. Interestingly, although most of these compounds were extremely weak at the A2BAR, 2-[2-(2-naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (EC50 = 1.4 µM) and 2-[2-(2-thienyl)-ethyloxy]adenosine (EC50 = 1.8 (M) were found to be relatively potent A2B agonists, although less potent than NECA (EC50 = 140 nM). PMID:15476669

  4. Adenosine augments interleukin-10 production by microglial cells through an A2B adenosine receptor-mediated process

    PubMed Central

    Koscsó, Balázs; Csóka, Balázs; Selmeczy, Zsolt; Himer, Leonóra; Pacher, Pál; Virág, László; Haskó, György

    2011-01-01

    Microglia are activated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns and produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Adenosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside and is a ligand of four G protein-coupled adenosine receptors (ARs), which are the A1AR, A2AAR, A2BAR and A3AR. ARs have been shown to suppress TNF-α production by microglia, but their role in regulating IL-10 production has not been studied. Here, we demonstrate that adenosine augments IL-10 production by activated murine microglia while suppressing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Since the order of potency of selective AR agonists in inducing IL-10 production was 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) > N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-adenosine-5′-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) > 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) ≥ 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5′-N-ethyl-carboxamidoadenosine (CGS21680), and the A2BAR antagonist MRS-1754 prevented the effect of NECA, we conclude that the stimulatory effect of adenosine on IL-10 production is mediated by the A2BAR. Mechanistically, adenosine augmented IL-10 mRNA accumulation by a transcriptional process. Using mutant IL-10 promoter constructs we showed that a CREB-binding region in the promoter mediated the augmenting effect of adenosine on IL-10 transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that adenosine induced CREB phosphorylation at the IL-10 promoter. Silencing CREB using lentivirally delivered shRNA blocked the enhancing effect of adenosine on IL-10 production confirming a role for CREB in mediating the stimulatory effect of adenosine on IL-10 production. In addition, adenosine augmented IL-10 production by stimulating p38 MAPK. Collectively, our results establish that A2BARs augment IL-10 production by activated murine microglia. PMID:22116830

  5. Adenosine and Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic organ that undergoes continuous remodeling whilst maintaining a balance between bone formation and resorption. Osteoblasts, which synthesize and mineralize new bone, and osteoclasts, the cells that resorb bone, act in concert to maintain bone homeostasis. In recent years, there has been increasing appreciation of purinergic regulation of bone metabolism. Adenosine, released locally, mediates its physiologic and pharmacologic actions via interactions with G-protein coupled receptors and recent work has indicated that these receptors are involved in the regulation of osteoclast differentiation and function, as well as osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Moreover, adenosine receptors also regulate chondrocyte and cartilage homeostasis. These recent findings underscore the potential therapeutic importance of adenosine receptors in regulating bone physiology and pathology. PMID:23499155

  6. Multiple conformations of the nucleotide site of Kinesin family motors in the triphosphate state.

    PubMed

    Naber, Nariman; Larson, Adam; Rice, Sarah; Cooke, Roger; Pate, Edward

    2011-05-13

    Identifying conformational changes in kinesin family motors associated with nucleotide and microtubule (MT) binding is essential to determining an atomic-level model for force production and motion by the motors. Using the mobility of nucleotide analog spin probes bound at the active sites of kinesin family motors to monitor conformational changes, we previously demonstrated that, in the ADP state, the open nucleotide site closes upon MT binding [Naber, N., Minehardt, T. J., Rice, S., Chen, X., Grammer, J., Matuska, M., et al. (2003). Closing of the nucleotide pocket of kinesin family motors upon binding to microtubules. Science, 300, 798-801]. We now extend these studies to kinesin-1 (K) and ncd (nonclaret disjunctional protein) motors in ATP and ATP-analog states. Our results reveal structural differences between several triphosphate and transition-state analogs bound to both kinesin and ncd in solution. The spectra of kinesin/ncd in the presence of SLADP•AlFx/BeFx and kinesin, with the mutation E236A (K-E236A; does not hydrolyze ATP) bound to ATP, show an open conformation of the nucleotide pocket similar to that seen in the kinesin/ncd•ADP states. In contrast, the triphosphate analogs K•SLAMPPNP and K-E236A•SLAMPPNP induce a more immobilized component of the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum, implying closing of the nucleotide site. The MT-bound states of all of the triphosphate analogs reveal two novel spectral components. The equilibrium between these two components is only weakly dependent on temperature. Both components have more restricted mobility than observed in MT-bound diphosphate states. Thus, the closing of the nucleotide pocket when the diphosphate state binds to MTs is amplified in the triphosphate state, perhaps promoting accelerated ATP hydrolysis. Consistent with this idea, molecular dynamics simulations show a good correlation between our spectroscopic data, X-ray crystallography, and the electron microscopy of MT

  7. Adenosine receptor interactions and anxiolytics.

    PubMed

    Bruns, R F; Katims, J J; Annau, Z; Snyder, S H; Daly, J W

    1983-12-01

    [3H]-N6-cyclohexyladenosine and [3H]-1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine label the A1 subtype of adenosine receptor in brain membranes. The affinities of methylxanthines in competing for A1 adenosine receptors parallel their potencies as locomotor stimulants. The adenosine agonist N6-(phenylisopropyl) adenosine is a potent locomotor depressant. Both diazepam and N6-(L-phenylisopropyl)adenosine cause locomotor stimulation in a narrow range of subdepressant doses. Combined stimulant doses of the two agents depress motor activity, as do larger doses of either one, given separately. Evidence supporting and against the hypothesis that some of the actions of benzodiazepines are mediated via the adenosine system is reviewed. A number of compounds interact with both systems, probably because of physico-chemical similarities between adenosine and diazepam. It is concluded that of the four classic actions of benzodiazepines, the sedative and muscle relaxant (but not anxiolytic or anticonvulsant) actions could possibly be mediated by adenosine. PMID:6199685

  8. Structure of the orthorhombic form of human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Porta, Jason; Kolar, Carol; Kozmin, Stanislav G.; Pavlov, Youri I.; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.

    2006-11-01

    X-ray crystallographic analysis of human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphohydrolase provided the secondary structure and active-site structure at 1.6 Å resolution in an orthorhombic crystal form. The structure gives a framework for future structure–function studies employing site-directed mutagenesis and for the identification of substrate/product-binding sites. The structure of human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphohydrolase (ITPA) has been determined using diffraction data to 1.6 Å resolution. ITPA contributes to the accurate replication of DNA by cleansing cellular dNTP pools of mutagenic nucleotide purine analogs such as dITP or dXTP. A similar high-resolution unpublished structure has been deposited in the Protein Data Bank from a monoclinic and pseudo-merohedrally twinned crystal. Here, cocrystallization of ITPA with a molar ratio of XTP appears to have improved the crystals by eliminating twinning and resulted in an orthorhombic space group. However, there was no evidence for bound XTP in the structure. Comparison with substrate-bound NTPase from a thermophilic organism predicts the movement of residues within helix α1, the loop before α6 and helix α7 to cap off the active site when substrate is bound.

  9. Adenosine in fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Edwin S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous autocoid that regulates a multitude of bodily functions. Its anti-inflammatory actions are well known to rheumatologists since it mediates many of the anti-inflammatory effects of a number of antirheumatic drugs such as methotrexate. However, inflammatory and tissue regenerative responses are intricately linked, with wound healing being a prime example. It has only recently been appreciated that adenosine has a key role in tissue regenerative and fibrotic processes. An understanding of these processes may shed new light on potential therapeutic options in diseases such as scleroderma where tissue fibrosis features prominently. PMID:19949965

  10. Relaxation of isolated taenia coli of guinea-pig by enantiomers of 2-azido analogues of adenosine and adenine nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Cusack, N. J.; Planker, M.

    1979-01-01

    1 2-Azido photoaffinity analogues of adenosine 5'triphosphate (ATP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), and adenosine have been synthesized and tested on guinea-pig taenia coli. 2 2-Azido-ATP and 2-azido-ADP were approximately 20 times more potent than ATP as relaxants of taenia coli, and required prolonged washout times before recovery of the muscle. 3 2-Azido-AMP and 2-azidoadenosine were 2 to 12 times more potent than ATP, but took much longer (up to 100 s) to reach maximal relaxation. This behaviour is different from that of AMP and adenosine which were much less potent than ATP. 4 L-Enantiomers of adenosine and adenine nucleotides were also tested. L-ATP and L-ADP were 3 to 6 times less potent than ATP and ADP, and L-AMP and L-adenosine were inactive. 2-Azido-L-ATP and 2-azido-L-ADP were approximately 120 times less potent than 2-Azido-ATP and 6 times less potent than ATP as relaxants of taenia coli. 2-Azido-L-AMP and 2-azidio-L-adenosine were almost inactive. 5 2-Azido derivatives are photolysed by u.v. irradiation to reactive intermediates. 2-Azido-ATP and 2-azidoadenosine might be suitable photoaffinity ligands for labelling putative P2 and P1 purine receptors respectively. 2-Azido-L-ATP and 2-azido-L-adenosine could be useful controls for nonspecific labelling. PMID:497519

  11. Fluorometric Determination of Adenosine Nucleotide Derivatives as Measures of the Microfouling, Detrital, and Sedimentary Microbial Biomass and Physiological Status

    PubMed Central

    Davis, William M.; White, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Adenosine, adenine, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), AMP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were recovered quantitatively from aqueous portions of lipid extracts of microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial communities. These could be detected quantitatively in the picomolar range by forming their 1-N6-etheno derivatives and analyzing by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Lipid extraction and subsequent analysis allowed the simultaneous measurement of the microbial community structure, total microbial biomass with the quantitative recovery of the adenine-containing cellular components, which were protected from enzymatic destruction. This extraction and fluorescent derivatization method showed equivalency with the luciferin-luciferase method for bacterial ATP measurements. Quick-freezing samples in the field with dry ice-acetone preserved the ATP and energy charge (a ratio of adenosine nucleotides) for analysis at remote laboratories. The metabolic lability of ATP in estuarine detrital and microfouling communities, as well as bacterial monocultures of constant biomass, showed ATP to be a precarious measure of biomass under some conditions. Combinations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides gave better correlations with microbial biomass measured as extractable lipid phosphate in the detrital and microfouling microbial communities than did ATP alone. Stresses such as anoxia or filtration are reflected in the rapid accumulation of intracellular adenosine and the excretion of adenosine and AMP into the surrounding milieu. Increases in AMP and adenosine may prove to be more sensitive indicators of metabolic status than the energy charge. PMID:16345633

  12. Fluorometric determination of adenosine nucleotide derivatives as measures of the microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial biomass and physiological status.

    PubMed

    Davis, W M; White, D C

    1980-09-01

    Adenosine, adenine, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), AMP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were recovered quantitatively from aqueous portions of lipid extracts of microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial communities. These could be detected quantitatively in the picomolar range by forming their 1-N-etheno derivatives and analyzing by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Lipid extraction and subsequent analysis allowed the simultaneous measurement of the microbial community structure, total microbial biomass with the quantitative recovery of the adenine-containing cellular components, which were protected from enzymatic destruction. This extraction and fluorescent derivatization method showed equivalency with the luciferin-luciferase method for bacterial ATP measurements. Quick-freezing samples in the field with dry ice-acetone preserved the ATP and energy charge (a ratio of adenosine nucleotides) for analysis at remote laboratories. The metabolic lability of ATP in estuarine detrital and microfouling communities, as well as bacterial monocultures of constant biomass, showed ATP to be a precarious measure of biomass under some conditions. Combinations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides gave better correlations with microbial biomass measured as extractable lipid phosphate in the detrital and microfouling microbial communities than did ATP alone. Stresses such as anoxia or filtration are reflected in the rapid accumulation of intracellular adenosine and the excretion of adenosine and AMP into the surrounding milieu. Increases in AMP and adenosine may prove to be more sensitive indicators of metabolic status than the energy charge. PMID:16345633

  13. Stimulation of phospholipase D in rabbit platelet membranes by nucleoside triphosphates and by phosphocreatine: roles of membrane-bound GDP, nucleoside diphosphate kinase and creatine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, X T; Sherwood, J L; Haslam, R J

    1994-01-01

    Previous work has shown that guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) and GTP stimulate phospholipase D (PLD) in rabbit platelet membranes and that these effects are greatly enhanced by pretreatment of platelets with phorbol esters that activate protein kinase C [Van der Meulen and Haslam (1990), Biochem. J. 271, 693-700]. In the present study, the effects of Mg2+, various nucleoside triphosphates and phosphocreatine (PCr) were investigated. Platelet membranes containing phospholipids labelled with [3H]glycerol were assayed for PLD in the presence of an optimal Mg2+ concentration (10 mM) by measuring [3H]phosphatidylethanol formation in incubations that included 300 mM ethanol. In membranes from phorbolester-treated platelets, the same maximal increases in PLD activity (5-fold) were seen with 1 microM GTP[S]), and 100 microM GTP. Addition of adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (ATP[S]), ITP, XTP, UTP and CTP had similar stimulatory effects, but only at > or = 1 mM. In contrast, ATP had a biphasic action, causing a maximal (2-fold) stimulation at 10 microM and smaller effects at higher concentrations; the inhibitory component of the action of ATP was blocked by 2 microM staurosporine. Guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate decreased the stimulatory effects of ATP and ATP[S]. UDP, which can inhibit nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK), decreased the activation of PLD by ATP[S], ATP, XTP, CTP and to a lesser extent ITP, but had no effect on the actions of GTP[S] and GTP. Rabbit platelet membranes contained NDPK and addition of [gamma-32P]ATP led to the formation of [32P]GTP in amounts sufficient to explain most or all of the activation of PLD; UDP prevented GTP formation. PCr (0.04-1 mM) also stimulated membrane PLD activity, an effect that was dependent on endogenous membrane-bound creatine kinase (CK). UDP and guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate each inhibited this effect of PCr. The results show that in rabbit platelet membranes, CK, NDPK and the GTP-binding

  14. Leishmania amazonensis: Biological and biochemical characterization of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase activities.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Carla M; Martins-Duarte, Erica S; Ferraro, Rodrigo B; Fonseca de Souza, André Luíz; Gomes, Marta T; Lopes, Angela H C S; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A; Santos, André L S; Meyer-Fernandes, José R

    2006-09-01

    The presence of Leishmania amazonensis ecto-nucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase activities was demonstrated using antibodies against different NTPDase members by Western blotting, flow cytometry, and immunoelectron microscopy analysis. Living promastigote cells sequentially hydrolyzed the ATP molecule generating ADP, AMP, and adenosine, indicating that this surface enzyme may play a role in the salvage of purines from the extracellular medium. The L. amazonensis ecto-NTPDase activities were insensitive to Triton X-100, but they were enhanced by divalent cations, such as Mg(2+). In addition, the ecto-NTPDase activities decreased with time for 96 h when promastigotes were grown in vitro. On the other hand, these activities increased considerably when measured in living amastigote forms. Furthermore, the treatment with adenosine, a mediator of several relevant biological phenomena, induced a decrease in the reactivity with anti-CD39 antibody, raised against mammalian E-NTPDase, probably because of down regulation in the L. amazonensis ecto-NTPDase expression. Also, adenosine and anti-NTPDase antibodies induced a significant diminishing in the interaction between promastigotes of L. amazonensis and mouse peritoneal macrophages. PMID:16603157

  15. Characterization and regulation of adenosine transport in T84 intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mun, E C; Tally, K J; Matthews, J B

    1998-02-01

    Adenosine release from mucosal sources during inflammation and ischemia activates intestinal epithelial Cl- secretion. Previous data suggest that A2b receptor-mediated Cl- secretory responses may be dampened by epithelial cell nucleoside scavenging. The present study utilizes isotopic flux analysis and nucleoside analog binding assays to directly characterize the nucleoside transport system of cultured T84 human intestinal epithelial cells and to explore whether adenosine transport is regulated by secretory agonists, metabolic inhibition, or phorbol ester. Uptake of adenosine across the apical membrane displayed characteristics of simple diffusion. Kinetic analysis of basolateral uptake revealed a Na(+)-independent, nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI)-sensitive facilitated-diffusion system with low affinity but high capacity for adenosine. NBTI binding studies indicated a single population of high-affinity binding sites basolaterally. Neither forskolin, 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)-adenosine, nor metabolic inhibition significantly altered adenosine transport. However, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate significantly reduced both adenosine transport and the number of specific NBTI binding sites, suggesting that transporter number may be decreased through activation of protein kinase C. This basolateral facilitated adenosine transporter may serve a conventional function in nucleoside salvage and a novel function as a regulator of adenosine-dependent Cl- secretory responses and hence diarrheal disorders. PMID:9486178

  16. Multiple Conformations of the Nucleotide Site of Kinesin-Family Motors in the Triphosphate State

    PubMed Central

    Naber, Nariman; Larson, Adam; Rice, Sarah; Cooke, Roger; Pate, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Identifying conformational changes in kinesin-family motors associated with nucleotide and microtubule binding is essential to determining an atomic-level model for force production and motion by the motors. Using the mobility of nucleotide-analog spin probes bound at the active sites of kinesin-family motors to monitor conformational changes, we previously demonstrated that in the ADP state the open nucleotide site closes upon microtubule (MT) binding1. We now extend these studies to kinesin-1 (K) and ncd motors in ATP and ATP-analog states. Our results reveal structural differences between several triphosphate and transition-state analogs bound to both kinesin and ncd in solution. The spectra of kinesin/ncd in the presence of SLADP•AlFx/BeFx and kinesin with the mutation E236A (K-E236A, does not hydrolyze ATP) bound to ATP show an open conformation of the nucleotide pocket similar to that seen in the kinesin/ncd•ADP states. In contrast, the triphosphate/analogs K•SLAMPPNP and K-E236A•SLAMPPNP induce a more immobilized component of the EPR spectrum, implying a closing of the nucleotide site. The MT-bound states of all of the triphosphate-analogs reveal two novel spectral components. The equilibrium between these two components is only weakly dependent on temperature. Both components have lower mobility than those observed in MT-bound diphosphate states. Thus the closing of the nucleotide pocket when the diphosphate state binds to MTs is amplified in the triphosphate state, perhaps promoting accelerated ATP hydrolysis. Consistent with this idea, molecular dynamics simulations show a good correlation between our spectroscopic data, X-ray crystallography, and electron microscopy of MT-bound triphosphate analog states. PMID:21277856

  17. Measurement of Inositol Triphosphate Levels from Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Tabatadze, Nino; Woolley, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Inositol triphosphate (IP3) is an important second messenger that participates in signal transduction pathways in diverse cell types including hippocampal neurons. Stimulation of phospholipase C in response to various stimuli (hormones, growth factors, neurotransmitters, neurotrophins, neuromodulators, odorants, light, etc) results in hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate (PIP2), a phospholipid that is located in the plasma membrane, and leads to the production of IP3 and diacylglycerol. Binding of IP3 to the IP3 receptor (IP3R) induces Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and enables the initiation of intracellular Ca2+-dependent signaling. Here we describe a procedure for the measurement of cellular IP3 levels in tissue homogenates prepared from rat hippocampal slices.

  18. Structural basis of CX-4945 binding to human protein kinase CK2

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Andrew D.; Sheth, Payal R.; Basso, Andrea D.; Paliwal, Sunil; Gray, Kimberly; Fischmann, Thierry O.; Le, Hung V.

    2012-02-07

    Protein kinase CK2 (CK2), a constitutively active serine/threonine kinase, is involved in a variety of roles essential to the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Elevated levels of CK2 expression results in the dysregulation of key signaling pathways that regulate transcription, and has been implicated in cancer. The adenosine-5'-triphosphate-competitive inhibitor CX-4945 has been reported to show broad spectrum anti-proliferative activity in multiple cancer cell lines. Although the enzymatic IC{sub 50} of CX-4945 has been reported, the thermodynamics and structural basis of binding to CK2{alpha} remained elusive. Presented here are the crystal structures of human CK2{alpha} in complex with CX-4945 and adenylyl phosphoramidate at 2.7 and 1.3 {angstrom}, respectively. Biophysical analysis of CX-4945 binding is also described. This data provides the structural rationale for the design of more potent inhibitors against this emerging cancer target.

  19. Phenyl azide substituted and benzophenone-substituted phosphonamides of 7-methylguanosine 5 prime -triphosphate as photoaffinity probes for protein synthesis initiation factor eIF-4E and a proteolytic fragment containing the cap-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Chavan, A.J.; Rychlik, W.; Watt, D.S.; Rhoads, R.E. ); Blaas, D.; Kuechler, E. )

    1990-06-12

    Three photoactive derivatives of the 7-methylguanosine-containing cap of eukaryotic mRNA were used to investigate protein synthesis initiation factor eIF-4E from human erythrocytes and rabbit reticulocytes. Sensitive and specific labeling of eIF-4E was observed with the previously described probe, ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)-{gamma}-(((4-benzoylphenyl)methyl)amido)-7-methyl-GTP. A second probe was synthesized that was an azidophenyltyrosine derivative of m{sup 7}GTP (({sup 125}I)APTM), the monoanhydride of m{sup 7}GDP with ({sup 125}I)-N-(4-azidophenyl)-2-(phosphoramido)-3-(4-hydroxy-3-iodophenyl)propionamide. This probe allowed rapid and quantitative introduction of radioactivity in the last rather than the first step of synthesis and placed the radioactive label on the protein-proximal side of the weak P-N bond. A dissociation constant of 6.9 {mu}M was determined for ({sup 125}I)APTM, which is comparable to the published values for m{sup 7}GTP. A third probe, an azidophenylglycine derivative of m{sup 7}GTP (({sup 32}P)APGM), the monoanhydride of m{sup 7}GDP with ({sup 32}P)-N-(4-azidophenyl)-2-(phosphoramido)acetamide, was also synthesized and shown to label eIF-4E specifically. Unlike ({sup 32}P)BPM and ({sup 125}I)APTM, however, ({sup 32}P)APGM labeled eIF-4E{sup *} approximately 4-fold more readily than intact eIF-4E. Tryptic and CNBr cleavage suggested that eIF-4E{sup *} consists of a protease-resistant core of eIF-4E that retains the cap-binding site and consists of approximately residues 47-182.

  20. Internalization and desensitization of adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Klaasse, Elisabeth C.; de Grip, Willem J.; Beukers, Margot W.

    2007-01-01

    Until now, more than 800 distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified in the human genome. The four subtypes of the adenosine receptor (A1, A2A, A2B and A3 receptor) belong to this large family of GPCRs that represent the most widely targeted pharmacological protein class. Since adenosine receptors are widespread throughout the body and involved in a variety of physiological processes and diseases, there is great interest in understanding how the different subtypes are regulated, as a basis for designing therapeutic drugs that either avoid or make use of this regulation. The major GPCR regulatory pathway involves phosphorylation of activated receptors by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), a process that is followed by binding of arrestin proteins. This prevents receptors from activating downstream heterotrimeric G protein pathways, but at the same time allows activation of arrestin-dependent signalling pathways. Upon agonist treatment, adenosine receptor subtypes are differently regulated. For instance, the A1Rs are not (readily) phosphorylated and internalize slowly, showing a typical half-life of several hours, whereas the A2AR and A2BR undergo much faster downregulation, usually shorter than 1 h. The A3R is subject to even faster downregulation, often a matter of minutes. The fast desensitization of the A3R after agonist exposure may be therapeutically equivalent to antagonist occupancy of the receptor. This review describes the process of desensitization and internalization of the different adenosine subtypes in cell systems, tissues and in vivo studies. In addition, molecular mechanisms involved in adenosine receptor desensitization are discussed. PMID:18368531

  1. Activation of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxins by native and recombinant adenosine diphosphate-ribosylation factors, 20-kD guanine nucleotide-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C M; Chang, P P; Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Price, S R; Kunz, B C; Moss, J; Twiddy, E M; Holmes, R K

    1991-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) are responsible in part for "traveler's diarrhea" and related diarrheal illnesses. The family of LTs comprises two serogroups termed LT-I and LT-II; each serogroup includes two or more antigenic variants. The effects of LTs result from ADP ribosylation of Gs alpha, a stimulatory component of adenylyl cyclase; the mechanism of action is identical to that of cholera toxin (CT). The ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of CT is enhanced by 20-kD guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, known as ADP-ribosylation factors or ARFs. These proteins directly activate the CTA1 catalytic unit and stimulate its ADP ribosylation of Gs alpha, other proteins, and simple guanidino compounds (e.g., agmatine). Because of the similarities between CT and LTs, we investigated the effects of purified bovine brain ARF and a recombinant form of bovine ARF synthesized in Escherichia coli on LT activity. ARF enhanced the LT-I-, LT-IIa-, and LT-IIb-catalyzed ADP ribosylation of agmatine, as well as the auto-ADP ribosylation of the toxin catalytic unit. Stimulation of ADP-ribosylagmatine formation by LTs and CT in the presence of ARF was GTP dependent and enhanced by sodium dodecyl sulfate. With agmatine as substrate, LT-IIa and LT-IIb exhibited less than 1% the activity of CT and LT-Ih. CT and LTs catalyzed ADP-ribosyl-Gs alpha formation in a reaction dependent on ARF, GTP, and dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine/cholate. With Gs alpha as substrate, the ADP-ribosyltransferase activities of the toxins were similar, although CT and LT-Ih appeared to be slightly more active than LT-IIa and LT-IIb. Thus, LT-IIa and LT-IIb appear to differ somewhat from CT and LT-Ih in substrate specificity. Responsiveness to stimulation by ARF, GTP, and phospholipid/detergent as well as the specificity of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity are functions of LTs from serogroups LT-I and LT-II that are shared with CT. Images PMID:1902492

  2. Lactate and Adenosine Triphosphate in the Extender Enhance the Cryosurvival of Rat Epididymal Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Hideaki; Toyomizu, Masaaki; Kikusato, Motoi; Toyama, Natsuki; Sugimura, Satoshi; Hoshino, Yumi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Moisyadi, Stefan; Sato, Eimei

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the cryosurvival of rat epididymal sperm preserved in raffinose–modified Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate–egg yolk extender supplemented with various energy-yielding substrates (glucose, pyruvate, lactate, and ATP) and assessed the effect on sperm oxygen consumption. The incubation of sperm at 37 °C for 10 min in lactate-free extender decreased sperm motility and oxygen consumption before and after thawing compared with those of sperm in glucose- and pyruvate-free mediums. We then focused on the effect of supplementing the extender with lactate (0, 10.79, 21.58, 32.37, and 43.16 mM) and found that sperm frozen and thawed in extender supplemented with 32.37 mM lactate exhibited the highest motility. When we supplemented extender containing 32.37 mM lactate with ATP (0, 0.92, 1.85, 3.70, and 5.55 mM), sperm frozen and thawed in the extender supplemented with 1.85 mM ATP exhibited considerably higher motility and viability than those of sperm frozen and thawed in ATP-free extender. These results provide the first evidence that supplementation of the raffinose-modified Krebs–Ringer bicarbonate–egg yolk extender with 32.37 mM lactate and 1.85 mM ATP increases of number of motile sperm before freezing and enhances the cryosurvival of rat sperm. These supplements to the extender may enhance sperm cryosurvival by improving the metabolic capacity of sperm before freezing. PMID:20353689

  3. Importance of adenosine triphosphate in phospholipase A2-induced rabbit renal proximal tubule cell injury.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, V D; Cieslinski, D A; Humes, H D

    1988-01-01

    The pathogenesis of ischemic renal tubular cell injury involves a complex interaction of different processes, including membrane phospholipid alterations and depletion of high-energy phosphate stores. To assess the role of membrane phospholipid changes due to activation of phospholipases in renal tubule cell injury, suspensions enriched in rabbit renal proximal tubule segments were incubated with exogenous phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Exogenous PLA2 did not produce any significant change in various metabolic parameters reflective of cell injury in control nonhypoxic preparations despite a significant decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and moderate increases in lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE). In contrast, exogenous PLA2 treatment of hypoxic tubules resulted in a severe degree of cell injury, as demonstrated by marked declines in tubule K+ and ATP contents and significant decreases in tubule uncoupled respiratory rates, and was associated with significant phospholipid alterations, including marked declines in phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PE and significant rises in LPC, LPE, and free fatty acids (FFA). The injurious metabolic effects of exogenous PLA2 on hypoxic tubules were reversed by addition of ATP-MgCl2 to the tubules. The protective effect of ATP-MgCl2 was associated with increases in tubule PC and PE contents and declines in LPC, LPE, and FFA contents. These experiments thus indicate that an increase in exogenous PLA2 activity produces renal proximal tubule cell injury when cell ATP levels decline, at which point phospholipid resynthesis cannot keep pace with phospholipid degradation with resulting depletion of phospholipids and accumulation of lipid by-products. High-energy phosphate store depletion appears to be an important condition for exogenous PLA2 activity to induce renal tubule cell injury. PMID:3417866

  4. An adenosine triphosphate-dependent calcium uptake pump in human neutrophil lysosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Klemper, M S

    1985-01-01

    Regulation of the cytosolic free calcium concentration is important to neutrophil function. In these studies, an ATP-dependent calcium uptake pump has been identified in human neutrophil lysosomes. This energy-dependent Ca++ uptake pump has a high affinity for Ca++ (Michaelis constant [Km] Ca++ = 107 nM) and a maximum velocity (Vmax) of 5.3 pmol/mg of protein per min. ATP was the only nucleotide that supported Ca++ uptake by lysosomes. The Km for ATP was 177 microM. ATP-dependent Ca++ uptake by neutrophil lysosomes was temperature- and pH-sensitive with optimal Ca++ pump activity at 37 degrees C and pH 7.0-7.5. Mg++ was also essential for ATP-dependent Ca++ uptake by lysosomes. Azide and antimycin A had no effect on the energy-dependent uptake of Ca++ by neutrophil lysosomes. The chemotactic peptide formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine inhibited ATP-dependent Ca++ accumulation by isolated lysosomes. Butoxycarbonyl-phenylalanine-leucine-phenylalanine-leucine-phenylalanine , a competitive antagonist of the chemotactic peptide, blocked this inhibitory effect. These studies demonstrate the presence of an ATP-dependent Ca++ uptake pump in human neutrophil lysosomes that functions at physiologic intracellular concentrations of Ca++, ATP, and H+ and may be important to regulating neutrophil function by modulating cytosolic Ca++. PMID:3926820

  5. Adenosine Triphosphate-Sensitive Potassium Channel Kir Subunits Implicated in Cardioprotection by Diazoxide

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Matthew C; Janjua, M Burhan; Kanter, Evelyn M; Makepeace, Carol M; Schuessler, Richard B; Nichols, Colin G; Lawton, Jennifer S

    2015-01-01

    Background ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel openers provide cardioprotection in multiple models. Ion flux at an unidentified mitochondrial KATP channel has been proposed as the mechanism. The renal outer medullary kidney potassium channel subunit, potassium inward rectifying (Kir)1.1, has been implicated as a mitochondrial channel pore-forming subunit. We hypothesized that subunit Kir1.1 is involved in cardioprotection (maintenance of volume homeostasis and contractility) of the KATP channel opener diazoxide (DZX) during stress (exposure to hyperkalemic cardioplegia [CPG]) at the myocyte and mitochondrial levels. Methods and Results Kir subunit inhibitor Tertiapin Q (TPN-Q) was utilized to evaluate response to stress. Mouse ventricular mitochondrial volume was measured in the following groups: isolation buffer; 200 μmol/L of ATP; 100 μmol/L of DZX+200 μmol/L of ATP; or 100 μmol/L of DZX+200 μmol/L of ATP+TPN-Q (500 or 100 nmol/L). Myocytes were exposed to Tyrode’s solution (5 minutes), test solution (Tyrode’s, cardioplegia [CPG], CPG+DZX, CPG+DZX+TPN-Q, Tyrode’s+TPN-Q, or CPG+TPN-Q), N=12 for all (10 minutes); followed by Tyrode’s (5 minutes). Volumes were compared. TPN-Q, with or without DZX, did not alter mitochondrial or myocyte volume. Stress (CPG) resulted in myocyte swelling and reduced contractility that was prevented by DZX. TPN-Q prevented the cardioprotection afforded by DZX (volume homeostasis and maintenance of contractility). Conclusions TPN-Q inhibited myocyte cardioprotection provided by DZX during stress; however, it did not alter mitochondrial volume. Because TPN-Q inhibits Kir1.1, Kir3.1, and Kir3.4, these data support that any of these Kir subunits could be involved in the cardioprotection afforded by diazoxide. However, these data suggest that mitochondrial swelling by diazoxide does not involve Kir1.1, 3.1, or 3.4. PMID:26304939

  6. Sperm morphology, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration and swimming velocity: unexpected relationships in a passerine bird

    PubMed Central

    Bennison, Clair; Brookes, Lola; Slate, Jon; Birkhead, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between sperm energetics and sperm function is poorly known, but is central to our understanding of the evolution of sperm traits. The aim of this study was to examine how sperm morphology and ATP content affect sperm swimming velocity in the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata. We exploited the high inter-male variation in this species and created extra experimental power by increasing the number of individuals with very long or short sperm through artificial selection. We found a pronounced quadratic relationship between total sperm length and swimming velocity, with velocity increasing with length up to a point, but declining in the very longest sperm. We also found an unexpected negative association between midpiece length and ATP content: sperm with a short midpiece generally contained the highest concentration of ATP. Low intracellular ATP is therefore unlikely to explain reduced swimming velocity among the very longest sperm (which tend to have a shorter midpiece). PMID:27559067

  7. Sperm morphology, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration and swimming velocity: unexpected relationships in a passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Bennison, Clair; Hemmings, Nicola; Brookes, Lola; Slate, Jon; Birkhead, Tim

    2016-08-31

    The relationship between sperm energetics and sperm function is poorly known, but is central to our understanding of the evolution of sperm traits. The aim of this study was to examine how sperm morphology and ATP content affect sperm swimming velocity in the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata We exploited the high inter-male variation in this species and created extra experimental power by increasing the number of individuals with very long or short sperm through artificial selection. We found a pronounced quadratic relationship between total sperm length and swimming velocity, with velocity increasing with length up to a point, but declining in the very longest sperm. We also found an unexpected negative association between midpiece length and ATP content: sperm with a short midpiece generally contained the highest concentration of ATP. Low intracellular ATP is therefore unlikely to explain reduced swimming velocity among the very longest sperm (which tend to have a shorter midpiece). PMID:27559067

  8. Sodium- and adenosine-triphosphate-dependent calcium movements in membrane vesicles prepared from dog erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, O E; Sjodin, R A

    1984-01-01

    Inside-out vesicles from the membranes of dog erythrocytes were obtained by the method of Lew & Seymour (1982) for study of Ca movements. In the absence of ATP, 45Ca accumulation by the vesicles was inhibited by external Na and stimulated by internal Na. The presence of either MgCl2, quinidine sulphate, or LaCl3 in the incubation medium inhibited 45Ca accumulation in the absence of ATP. The release of 45Ca from 45Ca-loaded vesicles was specifically promoted by Na+ in the absence as well as in the presence of ATP. The accumulation of 45Ca by vesicles was stimulated by ATP and the effect of ATP was entirely dependent on the presence of Mg. The Mg- and ATP-dependent 45Ca accumulation was stimulated by the presence of either K or Na in the medium, was hyperbolically activated by increasing the Ca2+ concentration in the medium, was stimulated by calmodulin and inhibited by orthovanadate (10(-4) M) or LaCl3 (10(-3) M). The data demonstrate the presence of two mechanisms for controlling Ca movements in inside-out vesicles from dog erythrocyte membranes, a Na-dependent one similar to the Na-Ca exchange described for squid axons and cardiac muscle and a Ca pump utilizing ATP with characteristics similar to those described for human erythrocytes and squid axons. PMID:6090650

  9. The rapid estimation of microbial contamination of raw meat by measurement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

    PubMed

    Stannard, C J; Wood, J M

    1983-12-01

    Bacteria were separated from raw meat homogenate by a simple three-stage process. Centrifugation (10 s at 2000 g) removed coarse particles; stirring with the cation exchange resin Bio-Rex 70 removed smaller particles and filtration through 0.22 micron membranes removed soluble materials. By this process 70-80% of the microbial populations of meat homogenates were consistently isolated on the filters. A linear relationship was found between log10 microbial ATP and log10 colony count of meat over the range 10(5)-10(9) cfu/g. The value of ATP/cfu for meat samples was within the range previously reported for pure cultures. These data indicated that ATP extracted from the filters originated from bacteria in the meat samples. Several samples can be analysed simultaneously in an elapsed time of 20-25 min. The variability associated with estimates of both colony counts and ATP levels has been determined. PMID:6662830

  10. The pathway of inorganic-phosphate efflux from isolated liver mitochondria during adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Tyler, D D

    1980-12-15

    1. The distribution of P(i) between mitochondria and suspending medium during uncoupler-stimulated hydrolysis of ATP by rat liver mitochondria [Tyler (1969) Biochem. J.111, 665-678] has been reinvestigated, by using either mersalyl or N-ethylmaleimide as inhibitors of P(i) transport and either buffered sucrose/EDTA or LiCl/EGTA solutions as suspending medium. More than 75% of the total P(i) liberated was retained in mitochondria treated with either inhibitor at all ATP concentrations tested (0.2-2.5mm). With low ATP concentrations and mersalyl-treated mitochondria incubated in sucrose/EDTA, virtually all the P(i) liberated was retained in the mitochondria. 2. Larger amounts of P(i) appeared in the suspending medium during ATPase activity, despite the presence of N-ethylmaleimide, when LiCl/EGTA was used as suspending medium compared with sucrose/EDTA. Two sources of this P(i) were identified: (a) a slow efflux of P(i) from mitochondria to suspending medium despite the presence of N-ethylmaleimide; (b) a slow ATPase activity insensitive to carboxyatractyloside, which was stimulated by added Mg(2+), partially inhibited by oligomycin or efrapeptin and strongly inhibited by EDTA. 3. It is concluded that liver mitochondria preparations contain two distinct forms of ATPase activity. The major activity is associated with coupled mitochondria of controlled permeability to adenine nucleotides and P(i) and is stimulated strongly by uncoupling agents. The minor activity is associated with mitochondria freely permeable to adenine nucleotides and P(i), is unaffected by uncoupling agents and is activated by endogenous or added Mg(2+). 4. When mitochondria treated with mersalyl were incubated in buffered sucrose solution, almost all the P(i) liberated was recovered in the suspending medium, unless inhibitors of P(i)-induced large-amplitude swelling such as EDTA, EGTA, antimycin, rotenone, nupercaine or Mg(2+) were added. Thus the loss of the specific permeability properties of the mitochondrial inner membrane associated with large-amplitude swelling also influences the extent of P(i) retention during ATPase activity. 5. The results confirm the previous conclusion (Tyler, 1969) that the P(i) transporter provides the sole pathway for P(i) efflux during uncoupler-stimulated ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria. It is concluded that more recent hypotheses concerning the influence of Mg(2+) on mersalyl inhibition of the P(i) transporter [Siliprandi, Toninello, Zoccaroto & Bindoli (1975) FEBS Lett. 51, 15-17] and a postulated role of the adenine nucleotide exchange carrier in P(i) efflux [Reynafarje & Lehninger (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.75, 4788-4792] are erroneous and should be discarded. PMID:6453587

  11. [Cardioprotective effects of fluorine-containing activator of adenosine triphosphate-dependent potassium channels flokalin].

    PubMed

    Strutyns'kyĭ, R B

    2009-01-01

    In experiments on isolated Langendorff perfused hearts of guinea pig with modeling of ischemia (20 min) and reperfusion (40 min) the cardioprotective effects of drug form of new fluorine-containing K(ATP) channels opener flokalin were shown. Preliminary preischemic perfusion of isolated heart with new form of flokalin (5 M) for 5 minutes significantly improved the recovery of contractive function of ischemic myocardium at reperfusion. In particular, it considerably reduced time of ischemic heart contract recovery from the beginning of reperfusion. Recovery of systolic and developed pressure was improved and the increasing of end-diastolic pressure in left ventricle of heart was prevented. Vasodilatoric and antiarrhythmic properties of new drug form of flokalin can assist to it's cardioprotective effects. The vasoconstriction of coronary vessels was prevented and number of extrasystoles at reperfusion of ischemic heart was decreased. PMID:19827634

  12. The concentration of amino acids by yeast cells depleted of adenosine triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, A. A.; Backen, K.; Watson, G.

    1970-01-01

    1. The ATP content of preparations of a strain of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis was lowered below 0.3nmol/mg of yeast by starving the yeast cells in the presence of both antimycin and 5mm-deoxyglucose. 2. When the depleted cells were put at pH4.5 with glycine up to about 20nmol of the amino acid/mg of yeast was absorbed without being chemically modified. The mechanism did not depend on an exchange with endogenous amino acids. 3. The concentration of the absorbed glycine could apparently reach 100–200 times that outside the cells. 4. Replacement of the cellular K+ by Na+ almost stopped amino acid absorption in the presence of antimycin and deoxyglucose, but not in their absence. 5. It is suggested that, when energy metabolism itself had stopped, a purely physical process, namely the movements of H+ and K+ into and out of the yeast respectively, served to concentrate the amino acids in the cells. Both ionic species appear to be co-substrates of the system transporting amino acids. PMID:5495157

  13. Some properties of rat-liver glucose--adenosine triphosphate phosphotransferases.

    PubMed

    McLean, P; Brown, J

    1966-09-01

    In normal rat liver hexokinase (EC 2.7.1.1) activity usually accounts for not more than 30% of the total glucose-ATP phosphotransferase activity, the remainder being due to glucokinase (EC 2.7.1.2). In the present work it was found that in normal rat liver the relative activities of these two enzymes were occasionally very different from those usually found even though the total glucose-ATP phosphotransferase activity was within the normal range. In some cases almost the entire glucose-ATP phosphotransferase was accounted for by the low-K(m) enzyme hexokinase. Some properties of this enzyme system are reported. It is suggested that this shift in favour of the low-K(m) enzyme without change in the total glucose-ATP phosphotransferase activity may represent a regulatory mechanism. PMID:5969293

  14. Kinetic properties of adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase of intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kushkevych, I V; Antonyak, H L; Bartoš, M

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of specific activity of ATP sulfurylase and kinetic properties of the enzyme in cell-free extracts of intestinal bacterial strains Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 is presented. The microbiological, biochemical, biophysical and statistical methods were used in the work. The optimal temperature (35°C) and pH 8.0-8.5 for enzyme reaction were determined. An analysis of kinetic properties of ATP sulfurylase has been carried out. Initial (instantaneous) reaction velocity (V0), maximum amount of the product of reaction (Pmax), the reaction time (half saturation period, τ) and maximum velocity of the ATP sulfurylase reaction (Vmax) have been defined. Michaelis constants (Km(Sulfate), Km(ATP), Km(APS), and Km(Pyrophosphate)) of the enzyme reaction were demonstrated for both D. piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 intestinal bacterial strains. PMID:25816613

  15. Ultrasensitive bioluminescent determinations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for investigating the energetics of host-grown microbes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, J. H.; Dhople, A. M.

    1975-01-01

    Stability and optimal concentrations of reagents were studied in bioluminescence assay of ATP levels. Luciferase enzyme was prepared and purified using Sephadex G-100. Interdependencies between enzyme and luciferin concentrations in presence of optimal Mg are illustrated. Optimal ionic strength was confirmed to be 0.05 M for the four buffers tested. Adapted features of the R- and H-systems are summarized, as well as the percentages of ATP pools released from representative microbes by heat and chloroform.

  16. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate is required for the assembly of 11S seed proglobulins in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Y W; Jung, R; Nielsen, N C

    1997-01-01

    Seed protein proglobulins were synthesized from cDNAs in reticulocyte lysates. Most proglobulins were recovered as trimers when translation rates were low, but mostly monomers were recovered at high translation rates. The prevalence of monomers was accompanied by elevated amounts of insoluble protein recovered at the bottom of sucrose density gradients. Apyrase treatment of translation mixtures after synthesis, but before significant assembly occurred, drastically reduced trimer assembly and increased the proportion of insoluble aggregate. These observations indicated that ATP is required for protein folding and/or trimer assembly. The appearance of insoluble aggregated protein when rates of synthesis were elevated or when ATP was absent suggested that protein misfolding had occurred. Trimer assembly was stimulated when wheat germ translation mixtures defective in supporting efficient trimer assembly were supplemented with fractions isolated from endoplasmic reticula of developing pea (Pisum sativum) seeds. Molecular chaperones are likely involved in folding and/or assembly of proglobulin trimers both in reticulocyte lysates and in seeds. Consistent with this hypothesis, trimer formation was reduced when carboxymethylated bovine albumin and alpha-casein, considered to mimic proteins with extended chain and molten globular conformations and thereby compete for Hsp70- and Hsp60-type molecular chaperones, respectively, were introduced into translation mixtures. PMID:9414566

  17. Vasodilator effects of adenosine on retinal arterioles in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Taisuke; Mori, Asami; Saito, Maki; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2008-02-01

    Adenosine is a potent vasodilator of retinal blood vessels and is implicated to be a major regulator of retinal blood flow during metabolic stress, but little is known about the impact of diabetes on the role of adenosine in regulation of retinal hemodynamics. Therefore, we examined how diabetes affects adenosine-induced vasodilation of retinal arterioles. Male Wistar rats were treated with streptozotocin (80 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), and experiments were performed 6-8 weeks later. Rats were treated with tetrodotoxin (50 microg/kg, intravenously [i.v.]) to eliminate any nerve activity and prevent movement of the eye and infused with methoxamine continuously to maintain adequate systemic circulation. Fundus images were captured with a digital camera that was equipped with a special objective lens, and diameters of retinal arterioles were measured. Adenosine increased diameters of retinal arterioles and decreased systemic blood pressure. These responses were significantly attenuated by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (30 mg/kg, i.v.) and the adenosine triphosphate-dependent K+ (K(ATP)) channel blocker glibenclamide (20 mg/kg, i.v.). The depressor responses to adenosine were reduced in diabetic rats, whereas diabetes did not alter vasodilation of retinal arterioles to adenosine. In contrast, both depressor response and vasodilation of retinal arteriole to acetylcholine were reduced in diabetic rats. The retinal vasodilator responses to adenosine and acetylcholine observed in diabetic rats were diminished by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. There were no differences in the responses to pinacidil, a K(ATP) channel opener, between the diabetic and nondiabetic rats. These results suggest that both the activation of nitric oxide synthase and opening of K(ATP) channels contribute to the vasodilator effects of adenosine in rats in vivo. However, diabetes has no significant impact on the vasodilation mediated by these mechanisms in

  18. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by nanoparticles through ATP, ADP and adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Baron, L; Gombault, A; Fanny, M; Villeret, B; Savigny, F; Guillou, N; Panek, C; Le Bert, M; Lagente, V; Rassendren, F; Riteau, N; Couillin, I

    2015-01-01

    The NLR pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a major component of the innate immune system, but its mechanism of activation by a wide range of molecules remains largely unknown. Widely used nano-sized inorganic metal oxides such as silica dioxide (nano-SiO2) and titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages similarly to silica or asbestos micro-sized particles. By investigating towards the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation in response to nanoparticles, we show here that active adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and subsequent ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine receptor signalling are required for inflammasome activation. Nano-SiO2 or nano-TiO2 caused a significant increase in P2Y1, P2Y2, A2A and/or A2B receptor expression, whereas the P2X7 receptor was downregulated. Interestingly, IL-1β secretion in response to nanoparticles is increased by enhanced ATP and ADP hydrolysis, whereas it is decreased by adenosine degradation or selective A2A or A2B receptor inhibition. Downstream of these receptors, our results show that nanoparticles activate the NLRP3 inflammasome via activation of PLC-InsP3 and/or inhibition of adenylate cyclase (ADCY)-cAMP pathways. Finally, a high dose of adenosine triggers inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion through adenosine cellular uptake by nucleotide transporters and by its subsequent transformation in ATP by adenosine kinase. In summary, we show for the first time that extracellular adenosine activates the NLRP3 inflammasome by two ways: by interacting with adenosine receptors at nanomolar/micromolar concentrations and through cellular uptake by equilibrative nucleoside transporters at millimolar concentrations. These findings provide new molecular insights on the mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and new therapeutic strategies to control inflammation. PMID:25654762

  19. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by nanoparticles through ATP, ADP and adenosine.

    PubMed

    Baron, L; Gombault, A; Fanny, M; Villeret, B; Savigny, F; Guillou, N; Panek, C; Le Bert, M; Lagente, V; Rassendren, F; Riteau, N; Couillin, I

    2015-01-01

    The NLR pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a major component of the innate immune system, but its mechanism of activation by a wide range of molecules remains largely unknown. Widely used nano-sized inorganic metal oxides such as silica dioxide (nano-SiO2) and titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages similarly to silica or asbestos micro-sized particles. By investigating towards the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation in response to nanoparticles, we show here that active adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and subsequent ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine receptor signalling are required for inflammasome activation. Nano-SiO2 or nano-TiO2 caused a significant increase in P2Y1, P2Y2, A2A and/or A2B receptor expression, whereas the P2X7 receptor was downregulated. Interestingly, IL-1β secretion in response to nanoparticles is increased by enhanced ATP and ADP hydrolysis, whereas it is decreased by adenosine degradation or selective A2A or A2B receptor inhibition. Downstream of these receptors, our results show that nanoparticles activate the NLRP3 inflammasome via activation of PLC-InsP3 and/or inhibition of adenylate cyclase (ADCY)-cAMP pathways. Finally, a high dose of adenosine triggers inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion through adenosine cellular uptake by nucleotide transporters and by its subsequent transformation in ATP by adenosine kinase. In summary, we show for the first time that extracellular adenosine activates the NLRP3 inflammasome by two ways: by interacting with adenosine receptors at nanomolar/micromolar concentrations and through cellular uptake by equilibrative nucleoside transporters at millimolar concentrations. These findings provide new molecular insights on the mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and new therapeutic strategies to control inflammation. PMID:25654762

  20. Adenosine kinase inhibitors attenuate opiate withdrawal via adenosine receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Coyle, T S

    1998-11-27

    Previous studies have demonstrated a role for adenosine in mediating opiate effects. This study examines the effects of indirect activation of adenosine receptors, via treatment with adenosine kinase inhibitors, on the expression of opiate withdrawal in mice. Mice receive chronic morphine treatment via implantation of subcutaneous morphine pellets (75 mg) for 72 h. Mice then receive parenteral treatment with adenosine kinase inhibitors, either 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine (2, 5, 20, 40 mg/kg, intraperitoneal or i.p.) or iodotubericidin (1, 2, 5 mg/kg, i.p.), followed by naloxone injection and opiate withdrawal signs are measured over 20 min. Both adenosine kinase inhibitors significantly reduce the following opiate withdrawal signs in a dose-dependent manner compared to vehicle: withdrawal jumps, teeth chattering, forepaw tremors, and forepaw treads. Additionally, 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine significantly reduces withdrawal-induced diarrhea and weight loss. Effects of 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine (40 mg/kg) on opiate withdrawal signs appear to be mediated via adenosine receptor activation as they are reversed by pretreatment by adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine (20 mg, i.p.) but not by selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor Ro 20-1724 (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Adenosine receptor activation via adenosine kinase inhibitor treatment attenuates opiate withdrawal and these agents may be generally useful in the treatment of drug withdrawal syndromes. PMID:9865523

  1. Adenosine receptor desensitization and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart; Kelly, Eamonn

    2011-05-01

    As with the majority of G-protein-coupled receptors, all four of the adenosine receptor subtypes are known to undergo agonist-induced regulation in the form of desensitization and trafficking. These processes can limit the ability of adenosine receptors to couple to intracellular signalling pathways and thus reduce the ability of adenosine receptor agonists as well as endogenous adenosine to produce cellular responses. In addition, since adenosine receptors couple to multiple signalling pathways, these pathways may desensitize differentially, while the desensitization of one pathway could even trigger signalling via another. Thus, the overall picture of adenosine receptor regulation can be complex. For all adenosine receptor subtypes, there is evidence to implicate arrestins in agonist-induced desensitization and trafficking, but there is also evidence for other possible forms of regulation, including second messenger-dependent kinase regulation, heterologous effects involving G proteins, and the involvement of non-clathrin trafficking pathways such as caveolae. In this review, the evidence implicating these mechanisms is summarized for each adenosine receptor subtype, and we also discuss those issues of adenosine receptor regulation that remain to be resolved as well as likely directions for future research in this field. PMID:20550943

  2. Evidence for a vasopressin receptor-GTP binding protein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Uhing, R.J.; Exton, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    Plasma membranes from the livers of rats were able to hydrolyze the ..gamma..-phosphate from guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP). The rate of GTP hydrolysis could be decreased to 10% of its initial rate by the addition of adenosine-5'-triphosphate with a concomitant decrease in the K/sub m/ for GTP from approx. 10/sup -3/ M to 10/sup -6/ M. The low K/sub m/ GTPase activity was inhibited by the addition of nonhydrolyzable analogs of GTP. In addition, the GTPase activity was stimulated from 10 to 30% over basal by the addition of vasopressin. A dose dependency curve showed that the maximum stimulation was obtained with 10/sup -8/ M vasopressin. Identical results were obtained from plasma membranes that had been solubilized with 1% digitonin. When membranes that had been solubilized in the presence of (Phenylalanyl-3,4,5-/sup 3/H(N))vasopressin were subjected to sucrose gradient centrifugation, the majority of bound (/sup 3/H)vasopressin migrated with an approximate molecular weight of 300,000. Moreover, there was a GTPase activity that migrated with the bound (/sup 3/H)vasopressin. This peak of bound (/sup 3/H)vasopressin was decreased by 90% when the sucrose gradient centrifugation was run in the presence of 10/sup -5/ M guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate). These results support the conclusion that liver plasma membranes contain a GTP-binding protein that can complex with the vasopressin receptor.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) deficiency is a disorder characterized by abnormal ...

  4. Mechanisms of Product Feedback Regulation and Drug Resistance in Cytidine Triphosphate Synthetases from the Structure of a CTP-Inhibited Complex†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Endrizzi, James A.; Kim, Hanseong; Anderson, Paul M.; Baldwin, Enoch P.

    2010-01-01

    Cytidine triphosphate synthetases (CTPSs) synthesize CTP and regulate its intracellular concentration through direct interactions with the four ribonucleotide triphosphates. In particular, CTP product is a feedback inhibitor that competes with UTP substrate. Selected CTPS mutations that impart resistance to pyrimidine antimetabolite inhibitors also relieve CTP inhibition and cause a dramatic increase in intracellular CTP concentration, indicating that the drugs act by binding to the CTP inhibitory site. Resistance mutations map to a pocket that, although adjacent, does not coincide with the expected UTP binding site in apo Escherichia coli CTPS [EcCTPS; Endrizzi, J. A., et al. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 6447–6463], suggesting allosteric rather than competitive inhibition. Here, bound CTP and ADP were visualized in catalytically active EcCTPS crystals soaked in either ATP and UTP substrates or ADP and CTP products. The CTP cytosine ring resides in the pocket predicted by the resistance mutations, while the triphosphate moiety overlaps the putative UTP triphosphate binding site, explaining how CTP competes with UTP while CTP resistance mutations are acquired without loss of catalytic efficiency. Extensive complementarity and interaction networks at the interfacial binding sites provide the high specificity for pyrimidine triphosphates and mediate nucleotide-dependent tetramer formation. Overall, these results depict a novel product inhibition strategy in which shared substrate and product moieties bind to a single subsite while specificity is conferred by separate subsites. This arrangement allows for independent adaptation of UTP and CTP binding affinities while efficiently utilizing the enzyme surface. PMID:16216072

  5. Adenosine A2A receptor dynamics studied with the novel fluorescent agonist Alexa488-APEC

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Frank; Klutz, Athena; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Schulte, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors, such as the adenosine A2A receptor, are dynamic proteins, which undergo agonist-dependent redistribution from the cell surface to intracellular membranous compartments, such as endosomes. In order to study the kinetics of adenosine A2A receptor redistribution in living cells, we synthesized a novel fluorescent agonist, Alexa488-APEC. Alexa488-APEC binds to adenosine A2A (Ki = 149 ± 27 nM) as well as A3 receptors (Ki= 240 ± 160 nM) but not to adenosine A1 receptors. Further, we characterized the dose-dependent increase in Alexa488-APEC-induced cAMP production as well as cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein phosphorylation, verifying the ligand’s functionality at adenosine A2A but not A2B receptors. In live cell imaging studies, Alexa488-APEC induced adenosine A2A receptor internalization, which was blocked by the competitive reversible antagonist ZM 241385 and hyperosmolaric sucrose. Further, internalized adenosine A2A receptors co-localized with clathrin and Rab5, indicating that agonist stimulation promotes adenosine A2A receptor uptake through a clathrin-dependent mechanism to Rab5-positive endosomes. The basic characterization of Alexa488-APEC provided here showed that it provides a usefultool for tracing adenosine A2A receptors in vitro. PMID:18603240

  6. Demonstration of phosphoryl group transfer indicates that the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) exhibits adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J

    2012-10-19

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a membrane-spanning adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. ABC transporters and other nuclear and cytoplasmic ABC proteins have ATPase activity that is coupled to their biological function. Recent studies with CFTR and two nonmembrane-bound ABC proteins, the DNA repair enzyme Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, challenge the model that the function of all ABC proteins depends solely on their associated ATPase activity. Patch clamp studies indicated that in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), CFTR Cl(-) channel function is coupled to adenylate kinase activity (ATP+AMP <==> 2 ADP). Work with Rad50 and SMC showed that these enzymes catalyze both ATPase and adenylate kinase reactions. However, despite the supportive electrophysiological results with CFTR, there are no biochemical data demonstrating intrinsic adenylate kinase activity of a membrane-bound ABC transporter. We developed a biochemical assay for adenylate kinase activity, in which the radioactive γ-phosphate of a nucleotide triphosphate could transfer to a photoactivatable AMP analog. UV irradiation could then trap the (32)P on the adenylate kinase. With this assay, we discovered phosphoryl group transfer that labeled CFTR, thereby demonstrating its adenylate kinase activity. Our results also suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for adenylate kinase activity. These biochemical data complement earlier biophysical studies of CFTR and indicate that the ABC transporter CFTR can function as an adenylate kinase. PMID:22948143

  7. Demonstration of Phosphoryl Group Transfer Indicates That the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Exhibits Adenylate Kinase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a membrane-spanning adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. ABC transporters and other nuclear and cytoplasmic ABC proteins have ATPase activity that is coupled to their biological function. Recent studies with CFTR and two nonmembrane-bound ABC proteins, the DNA repair enzyme Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, challenge the model that the function of all ABC proteins depends solely on their associated ATPase activity. Patch clamp studies indicated that in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), CFTR Cl− channel function is coupled to adenylate kinase activity (ATP+AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). Work with Rad50 and SMC showed that these enzymes catalyze both ATPase and adenylate kinase reactions. However, despite the supportive electrophysiological results with CFTR, there are no biochemical data demonstrating intrinsic adenylate kinase activity of a membrane-bound ABC transporter. We developed a biochemical assay for adenylate kinase activity, in which the radioactive γ-phosphate of a nucleotide triphosphate could transfer to a photoactivatable AMP analog. UV irradiation could then trap the 32P on the adenylate kinase. With this assay, we discovered phosphoryl group transfer that labeled CFTR, thereby demonstrating its adenylate kinase activity. Our results also suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for adenylate kinase activity. These biochemical data complement earlier biophysical studies of CFTR and indicate that the ABC transporter CFTR can function as an adenylate kinase. PMID:22948143

  8. Detrimental effects of adenosine signaling in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Weiru; Grenz, Almut; Sun, Hong; Tao, Lijian; Lu, Guangxiu; Alexander, Danny C; Milburn, Michael V; Carter-Dawson, Louvenia; Lewis, Dorothy E; Zhang, Wenzheng; Eltzschig, Holger K; Kellems, Rodney E; Blackburn, Michael R; Juneja, Harinder S; Xia, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia can act as an initial trigger to induce erythrocyte sickling and eventual end organ damage in sickle cell disease (SCD). Many factors and metabolites are altered in response to hypoxia and may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Using metabolomic profiling, we found that the steady-state concentration of adenosine in the blood was elevated in a transgenic mouse model of SCD. Adenosine concentrations were similarly elevated in the blood of humans with SCD. Increased adenosine levels promoted sickling, hemolysis and damage to multiple tissues in SCD transgenic mice and promoted sickling of human erythrocytes. Using biochemical, genetic and pharmacological approaches, we showed that adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR)-mediated induction of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, an erythrocyte-specific metabolite that decreases the oxygen binding affinity of hemoglobin, underlies the induction of erythrocyte sickling by excess adenosine both in cultured human red blood cells and in SCD transgenic mice. Thus, excessive adenosine signaling through the A2BR has a pathological role in SCD. These findings may provide new therapeutic possibilities for this disease. PMID:21170046

  9. Role of 3', 5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate and protein kinase C in the regulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein secretion by thyroid-stimulating hormone in isolated ovine thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J F; Hill, D J; Becks, G P

    1994-05-01

    Isolated sheep thyroid follicles release insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II together with IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). We previously showed that TSH suppresses the biosynthesis and release of IGFBPs in vitro which may increase the tissue availability of IGFs, allowing a synergy with TSH which potentiates both thyroid growth and function. Many of the actions of TSH on thyroid cell function are dependent upon activation of adenylate cyclase, although increased synthesis of inositol trisphosphate and activation of protein kinase C (PKC) have also been implicated. We have now examined whether probable changes in intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) or PKC are involved in TSH-mediated suppression of IGFBP release. Confluent primary cultures of ovine thyroid cells were maintained in serum-free Ham's modified F-12M medium containing transferrin, somatostatin and glycyl-histidyl-lysine (designated 3H), and further supplemented with sodium iodide (10(-8)-10(-3) mol/l), dibutyryl cAMP (0.25-1 mmol/l), forskolin (5-20 mumol/l) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA; 10(-11)-10(-6) mol/l), with or without exposure to TSH (200 microU/ml). The uptake and organification of Na [125I] by cells was examined after test incubations of up to 48 h, and IGFBPs in conditioned media were analysed by ligand blot using 125I-labelled IGF-II. The PKC activity in the cytosol and plasma membrane fractions of cells was measured by phosphorylation of histone using [gamma-32P]ATP, and PKC immunoreactivity was visualized by Western immunoblot analysis. While dibutyryl cAMP or forskolin largely reproduced the stimulatory effect of TSH on iodine organification, they did not mimic the inhibitory effect of TSH on the secretion of IGFBPs of 43, 34, 28 and 19 kDa. Incubation with physiological or pharmacological concentrations of iodide (10(-6)-10(-3) mol/l) for up to 48 h significantly decreased TSH action on iodide uptake and organification but did not alter the

  10. Dicinnamoylquinides in roasted coffee inhibit the human adenosine transporter.

    PubMed

    de Paulis, Tomas; Schmidt, Dennis E; Bruchey, Aleksandra K; Kirby, Michael T; McDonald, Michael P; Commers, Patricia; Lovinger, David M; Martin, Peter R

    2002-05-10

    Preliminary screening of a minor, non-xanthine constituent of roasted coffee, 3,4-diferuloyl-1,5-quinolactone (DIFEQ), showed inhibition of the adenosine transporter at low micromolar concentration. DIFEQ is a neutral derivative of the chlorogenic acids, i.e. isomeric mono- and di-substituted coumaroyl-, caffeoyl-, and feruloyl-esters of quinic acid, formed in the roasting process of coffee. Displacement of the adenosine transporter antagonist [(3)H](S)-(nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine binding by DIFEQ in cultured U-937 cell preparations, expressing the human adenosine transporter protein (hENT1), showed a K(i) of 0.96+/-0.13 microM. Extracts of regular and decaffeinated coffee showed binding activities equivalent to 30-40 mg DIFEQ per three cups of coffee. Acute administration of a high dose of DIFEQ (100 mg/kg i.p.) reduced open field locomotion in mice for 20 min in correlation with brain levels of DIFEQ. Both 3,4-dicaffeoyl-1,5-quinide and 3,4-dicoumaroyl-1,5-quinide, two close structural analogs of DIFEQ also present in roasted coffee, showed similar affinities for the adenosine transporter, while the corresponding 3- and 4-mono caffeoyl- and feruloyl-quinides were one to two orders of magnitudes less active. This suggests that 3,4-dicinnamoyl-1,5-quinides in coffee could have the potential to raise extra-cellular adenosine levels, thereby counteracting the stimulant effect of caffeine. PMID:12065074

  11. Inhibitors of Ketohexokinase: Discovery of Pyrimidinopyrimidines with Specific Substitution that Complements the ATP-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Attenuation of fructose metabolism by the inhibition of ketohexokinase (KHK; fructokinase) should reduce body weight, free fatty acids, and triglycerides, thereby offering a novel approach to treat diabetes and obesity in response to modern diets. We have identified potent, selective inhibitors of human hepatic KHK within a series of pyrimidinopyrimidines (1). For example, 8, 38, and 47 exhibited KHK IC50 values of 12, 7, and 8 nM, respectively, and also showed potent cellular KHK inhibition (IC50 < 500 nM), which relates to their intrinsic potency vs KHK and their ability to penetrate cells. X-ray cocrystal structures of KHK complexes of 3, 8, and 47 revealed the important interactions within the enzyme's adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding pocket. PMID:24900346

  12. The Heat Shock Cognate Protein hsc73 Assembles with A1 Adenosine Receptors To Form Functional Modules in the Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sarrió, Sara; Casadó, Vicent; Escriche, Marisol; Ciruela, Francisco; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I.; Lluis, Carmen; Franco, Rafael

    2000-01-01

    A1 adenosine receptors (A1Rs) are G protein-coupled heptaspanning receptors that interact at the outer face of the plasma membrane with cell surface ecto-adenosine deaminase (ecto-ADA). By affinity chromatography the heat shock cognate protein hsc73 was identified as a cytosolic component able to interact with the third intracellular loop of the receptor. As demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance, purified A1Rs interact specifically with hsc73 with a dissociation constant in the nanomolar range (0.5 ± 0.1 nM). The interaction between hsc73 and A1R led to a marked reduction in the binding of the ligands and prevented activation of G proteins, as deduced from 35S-labeled guanosine-5′-O-(3-thio)triphosphate binding assays. Interestingly this effect was stronger than that exerted by guanine nucleotide analogs, which uncouple receptors from G proteins, and was completely prevented by ADA. As assessed by immunoprecipitation a high percentage of A1Rs in cell lysates are coupled to hsc73. A relatively high level of colocalization between A1R and hsc73 was detected in DDT1MF-2 cells by means of confocal microscopy, and no similar results were obtained for other G protein-coupled receptors. Colocalization between hsc73 and A1R was detected in specific regions of rat cerebellum and in the body of cortical neurons but not in dendrites or synapses. Remarkably, agonist-induced receptor internalization leads to the endocytosis of A1Rs by two qualitatively different vesicle types, one in which A1R and hsc73 colocalize and another in which hsc73 is absent. These results open the interesting possibility that signaling via G protein-coupled receptors may be regulated by heat shock proteins. PMID:10866672

  13. Neurochemical measurement of adenosine in discrete brain regions of five strains of inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Pani, Amar K; Jiao, Yun; Sample, Kenneth J; Smeyne, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine (ADO), a non-classical neurotransmitter and neuromodulator, and its metabolites adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), have been shown to play an important role in a number of biochemical processes. Although their signaling is well described, it has been difficult to directly, accurately and simultaneously quantitate these purines in tissue or fluids. Here, we describe a novel method for measuring adenosine (ADO) and its metabolites using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Using this chromatographic technique, we examined baseline levels of ADO and ATP, ADP and AMP in 6 different brain regions of the C57BL/6J mouse: stratum, cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, substantia nigra and cerebellum and compared ADO levels in 5 different strains of mice (C57BL/6J, Swiss-Webster, FVB/NJ, 129P/J, and BALB/c). These studies demonstrate that baseline levels of purines vary significantly among the brain regions as well as between different mouse strains. These dissimilarities in purine concentrations may explain the variable phenotypes among background strains described in neurological disease models. PMID:24642754

  14. Characterization of agonist radioligand interactions with porcine atrial A1 adenosine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Leid, M.; Schimerlik, M.I.; Murray, T.F.

    1988-09-01

    The agonist radioligand (-)-N6-(125I)-p-hydroxyphenylisopropyl-adenosine (( 125I)HPIA) was used to characterize adenosine recognition sites in porcine atrial membranes. (125I)HPIA showed saturable binding to an apparently homogeneous population of sites with a maximum binding capacity of 35 +/- 3 fmol/mg of protein and an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2.5 +/- 0.4 nM. Kinetic experiments were performed to address the molecular mechanism of (125I)HPIA binding in porcine atrial membranes. (125I)HPIA apparently interacts with the cardiac adenosine receptor in a simple bimolecular reaction. A kinetically derived (125I) HPIA dissociation constant (2.4 nM) was in good agreement with that parameter measured at equilibrium. Guanyl nucleotides negatively modulated (125I)HPIA binding by increasing its rate of dissociation. This finding is consonant with the formation of a ternary complex in porcine atrial membranes, consisting of ligand, receptor, and guanyl nucleotide-binding protein. Prototypic adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists inhibited specific binding in a manner consistent with the labeling of an A1 adenosine receptor. The results of these experiments suggest that the adenosine receptor present in porcine atrial membranes, as labeled by (125I)HPIA, is of the A1 subtype.

  15. Possible therapeutic benefits of adenosine-potentiating drugs in reducing age-related degenerative disease in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Scaramuzzi, R J; Baker, D J

    2003-10-01

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous, biologically important molecule that is a precursor of other biologically active molecules. It also is a component of some co-factors and has distinct physiological actions in its own right. Levels are maintained by synthesis from dietary precursors and re-cycling. The daily turnover of adenosine is very high. Adenosine can act either as a hormone by binding to adenosine receptors, four adenosine receptor subtypes have been identified, and as an intracellular modulator, after transport into the cell by membrane transporter proteins. One of the principal intracellular actions of adenosine is inhibition of the enzyme phosphodiesterase. Extracellular adenosine also has specific neuromodulatory actions on dopamine and glutamate. Selective and nonselective agonists and antagonists of adenosine are available. The tasks of developing, evaluating and exploiting the therapeutic potential of these compounds is still in its infancy. Adenosine has actions in the central nervous system (CNS), heart and vascular system, skeletal muscle and the immune system and the presence of receptors suggests potential actions in the gonads and other organs. Adenosine agonists improve tissue perfusion through actions on vascular smooth muscle and erythrocyte fluidity and they can be used to improve the quality of life in aged dogs. This article reviews the therapeutic potential of adenosine-potentiating drugs in the treatment of age-related conditions in companion animals, some of which may be exacerbated by castration or spaying at an early age. PMID:14633184

  16. Adenosine-Associated Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi; Ghanem, Amyl; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside in every cell. Many critical treatments such as modulating irregular heartbeat (arrhythmias), regulation of central nervous system (CNS) activity, and inhibiting seizural episodes can be carried out using adenosine. Despite the significant potential therapeutic impact of adenosine and its derivatives, the severe side effects caused by their systemic administration have significantly limited their clinical use. In addition, due to adenosine’s extremely short half-life in human blood (less than 10 s), there is an unmet need for sustained delivery systems to enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. In this paper, various adenosine delivery techniques, including encapsulation into biodegradable polymers, cell-based delivery, implantable biomaterials, and mechanical-based delivery systems, are critically reviewed and the existing challenges are highlighted. PMID:26453156

  17. On the ATP binding site of the ε subunit from bacterial F-type ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Krah, Alexander; Takada, Shoji

    2016-04-01

    F-type ATP synthases are reversible machinery that not only synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using an electrochemical gradient across the membrane, but also can hydrolyze ATP to pump ions under certain conditions. To prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis, subunit ε in bacterial ATP synthases changes its conformation from the non-inhibitory down- to the inhibitory up-state at a low cellular ATP concentration. Recently, a crystal structure of the ε subunit in complex with ATP was solved in a non-biologically relevant dimeric form. Here, to derive the functional ATP binding site motif, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. Our results suggest that the ATP binding site markedly differs from the experimental resolved one; we observe a reorientation of several residues, which bind to ATP in the crystal structure. In addition we find that an Mg(2+) ion is coordinated by ATP, replacing interactions of the second chain in the crystal structure. Thus we demonstrate more generally the influence of crystallization effects on ligand binding sites and their respective binding modes. Furthermore, we propose a role for two highly conserved residues to control the ATP binding/unbinding event, which have not been considered before. Additionally our results provide the basis for the rational development of new biosensors based on subunit ε, as shown previously for novel sensors measuring the ATP concentration in cells. PMID:26780667

  18. Cloning, expression and pharmacological characterization of rabbit adenosine A1 and A3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hill, R J; Oleynek, J J; Hoth, C F; Kiron, M A; Weng, W; Wester, R T; Tracey, W R; Knight, D R; Buchholz, R A; Kennedy, S P

    1997-01-01

    The role of adenosine A1 and A3 receptors in mediating cardioprotection has been studied predominantly in rabbits, yet the pharmacological characteristics of rabbit adenosine A1 and A3 receptor subtypes are unknown. Thus, the rabbit adenosine A3 receptor was cloned and expressed, and its pharmacology was compared with that of cloned adenosine A1 receptors. Stable transfection of rabbit A1 or A3 cDNAs in Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells resulted in high levels of expression of each of the receptors, as demonstrated by high-affinity binding of the A1/A3 adenosine receptor agonist N6-(4-amino-3-[125I]iodobenzyl)adenosine (125I-ABA). For both receptors, binding of 125I-ABA was inhibited by the GTP analog 5'-guanylimidodiphosphate, and forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation was inhibited by the adenosine receptor agonist (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine. The rank orders of potency of adenosine receptor agonists for inhibition of 125I-ABA binding were as follows: rabbit A1, N6-cyclopentyladenosine = (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine > N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > or = I-ABA > or = N6-2-(4-aminophenyl) ethyladenosine > > N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide > N6-(4-amino-3-benzyl)adenosine; rabbit A3, N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide > or = I-ABA > > N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > N6-2-(4-aminophenyl) ethyladenosine = N6-cyclopentyladenosine = (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine > N6-(4-amino-3-benzyl)adenosine. The adenosine receptor antagonist rank orders were as follow: rabbit A1, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine > 1,3- dipropyl-8-(4-acrylate)phenylxanthine > or = xanthine amine congener > > 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline; rabbit A3, xanthine amine congener > 1,3-dipropyl-8-(4-acrylate)phenylxanthine > or = 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine > > 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline. These observations confirm the identity of the expressed proteins as A1 and A3 receptors. The results will facilitate further in-depth studies of the roles of A1 and A3 receptors in

  19. Regulation of Maltodextrin Phosphorylase Synthesis in Escherichia coli by Cyclic Adenosine 3′, 5′-Monophosphate and Glucose1

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Julie; Weathersbee, Carolyn J.

    1974-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (AMP) stimulates maltodextrin phosphorylase synthesis in Escherichia coli cells induced with maltose. A maximal effect occurs at 2 to 3 mM cyclic AMP. The action of cyclic AMP is specific, inasmuch as adenosine triphosphate, 3′-AMP, 5′-AMP, adenosine, and dibutyryl cyclic AMP are inactive. Glucose, α-methyl glucoside, 2-deoxyglucose, and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate repress maltodextrin phosphorylase synthesis. This repression is reversed by cyclic AMP. The action of cyclic AMP appears to be at the transcriptional level, since cyclic AMP fails to stimulate phosphorylase production in induced cells in which messenger ribonucleic acid synthesis has been arrested by rifampin or by inducer removal. The two other enzymes involved in the metabolism of maltose, amylomaltase and maltose permease, are also induced in this strain of E. coli and affected by glucose and cyclic AMP in a manner similar to phosphorylase. PMID:4358043

  20. Respiratory stimulant effects of adenosine in man after caffeine and enprofylline.

    PubMed Central

    Smits, P; Schouten, J; Thien, T

    1987-01-01

    In a double-blind and randomized study the respiratory stimulant effect of continuous intravenous adenosine infusion was studied after previous administration of caffeine, placebo and enprofylline in 10 healthy young volunteers. After placebo, adenosine induced an increase of minute ventilation (from 6.3 to 12.5 l min-1), tidal volume (from 0.60 to 0.96 l), and breathing rate (from 11.0 to 14.8 min-1). Venous pCO2 fell and pH rose after adenosine. Caffeine significantly reduced the adenosine-induced changes of minute ventilation, tidal volume, venous pCO2 and pH, whereas no changes occurred after enprofylline. Our results suggest that adenosine stimulates respiration in man by binding with specific P1-purinoceptors, which can be blocked by caffeine, but not by enprofylline. PMID:3440102

  1. Localization of calcium stimulated adenosine triphosphatase activity in blood vessels of the skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, S. B.

    1985-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme found in bone forming cells which decreases in certain bones as a result of hypogravity or non-weight bearing. This enzyme can also hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate. Therefore, an effort was made to localize calcium-stimulated ATPase by cytochemistry to determine whether altered bone cell activity might be related to changing calcium levels which occur during hypogravity. The results indicate that Ca(++)-ATPase is largely found along the endothelium and basal lamina of blood vessels, and not found in bone forming cells. This suggests that calcium regulation in the vicinity of bone formation may be modulated by the vasculature of the area.

  2. Efficient Synthesis of 5-Carboxy-2'-Deoxypyrimidine Nucleoside 5'-Triphosphates.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shan-Shan; Sun, Jian; You, Yue-Hai; Chen, Ji-Zong; Liu, Guo-Dong; Sun, Qi

    2016-06-01

    An efficient P(V)-N activation method for the synthesis of 5-carboxy-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-carboxy-2'-deoxycytidine triphosphates directly from the corresponding phosphoropiperidate precursors has been developed. PMID:27104859

  3. Extracellular guanosine regulates extracellular adenosine levels

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dongmei; Jackson, Travis C.; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Gillespie, Delbert G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that extracellular guanosine regulates extracellular adenosine levels. Rat preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cells were incubated with adenosine, guanosine, or both. Guanosine (30 μmol/l) per se had little effect on extracellular adenosine levels. Extracellular adenosine levels 1 h after addition of adenosine (3 μmol/l) were 0.125 ± 0.020 μmol/l, indicating rapid disposition of extracellular adenosine. Extracellular adenosine levels 1 h after addition of adenosine (3 μmol/l) plus guanosine (30 μmol/l) were 1.173 ± 0.061 μmol/l, indicating slow disposition of extracellular adenosine. Cell injury increased extracellular levels of endogenous adenosine and guanosine, and the effects of cell injury on endogenous extracellular adenosine were modulated by altering the levels of endogenous extracellular guanosine with exogenous purine nucleoside phosphorylase (converts guanosine to guanine) or 8-aminoguanosine (inhibits purine nucleoside phosphorylase). Extracellular guanosine also slowed the disposition of extracellular adenosine in rat preglomerular vascular endothelial cells, mesangial cells, cardiac fibroblasts, and kidney epithelial cells and in human aortic and coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells and coronary artery endothelial cells. The effects of guanosine on adenosine levels were not mimicked or attenuated by 5-iodotubericidin (adenosine kinase inhibitor), erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (adenosine deaminase inhibitor), 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide (guanine deaminase inhibitor), aristeromycin (S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitor), low sodium (inhibits concentrative nucleoside transporters), S-(4-nitrobenzyl)−6-thioinosine [inhibits equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) type 1], zidovudine (inhibits ENT type 2), or acadesine (known modulator of adenosine levels). Guanosine also increases extracellular inosine, uridine, thymidine, and cytidine, yet decreases

  4. Conformational changes of P-glycoprotein by nucleotide binding.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G; Pincheira, R; Zhang, M; Zhang, J T

    1997-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is a membrane protein that transports chemotherapeutic drugs, causing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells. Pgp is a member of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily and functions as a transport ATPase. It has been suggested that the conformation of Pgp changes in the catalytic cycle. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by using limited proteolysis as a tool to detect different conformational states trapped by binding of nucleotide ligands and inhibitors. Pgp has high basal ATPase activity; that is, ATP hydrolysis by Pgp is not rigidly associated with drug transport. This activity provides a convenient method for studying the conformational change of Pgp induced by nucleotide ligands, in the absence of drug substrates which may generate complications due to their own binding. Inside-out membrane vesicles containing human Pgp were isolated from multidrug-resistant SKOV/VLB cells and treated with trypsin in the absence or presence of MgATP, Mg-adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate (Mg-p[NH]ppA) and MgADP. Changes in the proteolysis profile of Pgp owing to binding of nucleotides were used to indicate the conformational changes in Pgp. We found that generation of tryptic fragments, including the loop linking transmembrane (TM) regions TM8 and TM9 of Pgp, were stimulated by the binding of Mg-p[NH]ppA, MgATP and MgADP, indicating that the Pgp conformation was changed by the binding of these nucleotides. The effects of nucleotides on Pgp conformation are directly associated with the binding and/or hydrolysis of these ligands. Four conformational states of Pgp were stabilized under different conditions with various ligands and inhibitors. We propose that cycling through these four states couples the Pgp-mediated MgATP hydrolysis to drug transport. PMID:9396736

  5. Insights on Structural Characteristics and Ligand Binding Mechanisms of CDK2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Jingxiao; Gao, Weimin; Zhang, Lilei; Pan, Yanqiu; Zhang, Shuwei; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) is a crucial regulator of the eukaryotic cell cycle. However it is well established that monomeric CDK2 lacks regulatory activity, which needs to be aroused by its positive regulators, cyclins E and A, or be phosphorylated on the catalytic segment. Interestingly, these activation steps bring some dynamic changes on the 3D-structure of the kinase, especially the activation segment. Until now, in the monomeric CDK2 structure, three binding sites have been reported, including the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding site (Site I) and two non-competitive binding sites (Site II and III). In addition, when the kinase is subjected to the cyclin binding process, the resulting structural changes give rise to a variation of the ATP binding site, thus generating an allosteric binding site (Site IV). All the four sites are demonstrated as being targeted by corresponding inhibitors, as is illustrated by the allosteric binding one which is targeted by inhibitor ANS (fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate). In the present work, the binding mechanisms and their fluctuations during the activation process attract our attention. Therefore, we carry out corresponding studies on the structural characterization of CDK2, which are expected to facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of kinase proteins. Besides, the binding mechanisms of CDK2 with its relevant inhibitors, as well as the changes of binding mechanisms following conformational variations of CDK2, are summarized and compared. The summary of the conformational characteristics and ligand binding mechanisms of CDK2 in the present work will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the bioactivities of CDK2. PMID:25918937

  6. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency adenosine ...

  7. The adenosine metabolite inosine is a functional agonist of the adenosine A2A receptor with a unique signaling bias.

    PubMed

    Welihinda, Ajith A; Kaur, Manmeet; Greene, Kelly; Zhai, Yongjiao; Amento, Edward P

    2016-06-01

    Inosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside that is produced by catabolism of adenosine. Adenosine has a short half-life (approximately 10s) and is rapidly deaminated to inosine, a stable metabolite with a half-life of approximately 15h. Resembling adenosine, inosine acting through adenosine receptors (ARs) exerts a wide range of anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects in vivo. The immunomodulatory effects of inosine in vivo, at least in part, are mediated via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), an observation that cannot be explained fully by in vitro pharmacological characterization of inosine at the A2AR. It is unclear whether the in vivo effects of inosine are due to inosine or a metabolite of inosine engaging the A2AR. Here, utilizing a combination of label-free, cell-based, and membrane-based functional assays in conjunction with an equilibrium agonist-binding assay we provide evidence for inosine engagement at the A2AR and subsequent activation of downstream signaling events. Inosine-mediated A2AR activation leads to cAMP production with an EC50 of 300.7μM and to extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation with an EC50 of 89.38μM. Our data demonstrate that inosine produces ERK1/2-biased signaling whereas adenosine produces cAMP-biased signaling at the A2AR, highlighting pharmacological differences between these two agonists. Given the in vivo stability of inosine, our data suggest an additional, previously unrecognized, mechanism that utilizes inosine to functionally amplify and prolong A2AR activation in vivo. PMID:26903141

  8. Adenosine Receptors and Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Lasley, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine receptors are a member of the large family of seven transmembrane spanning G protein coupled receptors (GPCR). The four adenosine receptor subtypes – A1, A2a, A2b, A3 – exert their effects via the activation of one or more heterotrimeric G proteins resulting in the modulation of intracellular signaling. Numerous studies over the past decade have documented the complexity of GPCR signaling at the level of protein-protein interactions as well as through signaling crosstalk. With respect to adenosine receptors the activation of one receptor subtype can have profound direct effects in one cell type, but little or no effect in other cells. There is significant evidence that the compartmentation of subcellular signaling plays a physiological role in the fidelity of GPCR signaling. This compartmentation is evident at the level of the plasma membrane in the form of membrane microdomains such as caveolae and lipid rafts. This review will summarize and critically assess our current understanding of the role of membrane microdomains in regulating adenosine receptor signaling. PMID:20888790

  9. Xanthines as Adenosine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    The natural plant alkaloids caffeine and theophylline were the first adenosine receptor (AR) antagonists described in the literature. They exhibit micromolar affinities and are non-selective. A large number of derivatives and analogs have subsequently been synthesized and evaluated as AR antagonists. Very potent antagonists have thus been developed with selectivity for each of the four AR subtypes. PMID:20859796

  10. Enzymatic Manufacture of Deoxythymidine-5'-Triphosphate with Permeable Intact Cells of E. coli Coexpressing Thymidylate Kinase and Acetate Kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiao; Qian, Yahui; Ding, Qingbao; Ou, Ling

    2015-12-28

    A one-pot process of enzymatic synthesis of deoxythymidine-5'-triphosphate (5'-dTTP) employing whole cells of recombinant Escherichia coli coexpressing thymidylate kinase (TMKase) and acetate kinase (ACKase) was developed. Genes tmk and ack from E. coli were cloned and inserted into pET28a(+), and then transduced into E. coli BL21 (DE3) to form recombinant strain pTA in which TMKase and ACKase were simultaneously overexpressed. It was found that the relative residual specific activities of TMKase and ACKase, in pTA pretreated with 20 mM ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) at 25°C for 30 min, were 94% and 96%, respectively. The yield of 5'-dTTP reached above 94% from 5 mM deoxythymidine 5'-monophosphate (5'-dTMP) and 15 mM acetyl phosphate catalyzed with intact cells of pTA pretreated with EDTA. The process was so effective that only 0.125 mM adenosine-5'- triphosphate was sufficient to deliver the phosphate group from acetyl phosphate to dTMP and dTDP. PMID:26370798

  11. Membrane-permeable Triphosphate Prodrugs of Nucleoside Analogues.

    PubMed

    Gollnest, Tristan; Dinis de Oliveira, Thiago; Rath, Anna; Hauber, Ilona; Schols, Dominique; Balzarini, Jan; Meier, Chris

    2016-04-18

    The metabolic conversion of nucleoside analogues into their triphosphates often proceeds insufficiently. Rate-limitations can be at the mono-, but also at the di- and triphosphorylation steps. We developed a nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) delivery system (TriPPPro-approach). In this approach, NTPs are masked by two bioreversible units at the γ-phosphate. Using a procedure involving H-phosphonate chemistry, a series of derivatives bearing approved, as well as potentially antivirally active, nucleoside analogues was synthesized. The enzyme-triggered delivery of NTPs was demonstrated by pig liver esterase, in human T-lymphocyte cell extracts and by a polymerase chain reaction using a prodrug of thymidine triphosphate. The TriPPPro-compounds of some HIV-inactive nucleoside analogues showed marked anti-HIV activity. For cellular uptake studies, a fluorescent TriPPPro-compound was prepared that delivered the triphosphorylated metabolite to intact CEM cells. PMID:27008042

  12. Aptamer/target binding-induced triple helix forming for signal-on electrochemical biosensing.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yinfei; Liu, Jinquan; He, Dinggen; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Shi, Hui; Wen, Li

    2015-10-01

    Owing to its diversified structures, high affinity, and specificity for binding a wide range of non-nucleic acid targets, aptamer is a useful molecular recognition tool for the design of various biosensors. Herein, we report a new signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform which is based on an aptamer/target binding-induced strand displacement and triple-helix forming. The biosensing platform is composed of a signal transduction probe (STP) modified with a methylene blue (MB) and a sulfhydryl group, a triplex-forming oligonucleotides probe (TFO) and a target specific aptamer probe (Apt). Through hybridization with the TFO probe and the Apt probe, the self-assembled STP on Au electrode via Au-S bonding keeps its rigid structure. The MB on the STP is distal to the Au electrode surface. It is eT off state. Target binding releases the Apt probe and liberates the end of the MB tagged STP to fold back and form a triplex-helix structure with TFO (STP/TFO/STP), allowing MB to approach the Au electrode surface and generating measurable electrochemical signals (eT ON). As test for the feasibility and universality of this signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform, two aptamers which bind to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and human α-thrombin (Tmb), respectively, are selected as models. The detection limit of ATP was 7.2 nM, whereas the detection limit of Tmb was 0.86 nM. PMID:26078174

  13. Regulation of adenosine levels during cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Stephanie; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Dali; Soylu, Hanifi; Sun, Chao; Albensi, Benedict C; Parkinson, Fiona E

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine is a neuromodulator with its level increasing up to 100-fold during ischemic events, and attenuates the excitotoxic neuronal injury. Adenosine is produced both intracellularly and extracellularly, and nucleoside transport proteins transfer adenosine across plasma membranes. Adenosine levels and receptor-mediated effects of adenosine are regulated by intracellular ATP consumption, cellular release of ATP, metabolism of extracellular ATP (and other adenine nucleotides), adenosine influx, adenosine efflux and adenosine metabolism. Recent studies have used genetically modified mice to investigate the relative contributions of intra- and extracellular pathways for adenosine formation. The importance of cortical or hippocampal neurons as a source or a sink of adenosine under basal and hypoxic/ischemic conditions was addressed through the use of transgenic mice expressing human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) under the control of a promoter for neuron-specific enolase. From these studies, we conclude that ATP consumption within neurons is the primary source of adenosine in neuronal cultures, but not in hippocampal slices or in vivo mice exposed to ischemic conditions. PMID:23064722

  14. Novel triphosphate phosphohydrolase activity of Clostridium thermocellum TTM, a member of the triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme superfamily.

    PubMed

    Keppetipola, Niroshika; Jain, Ruchi; Shuman, Stewart

    2007-04-20

    Triphosphate tunnel metalloenzymes (TTMs) are a newly recognized superfamily of phosphotransferases defined by a unique active site residing within an eight-stranded beta barrel. The prototypical members are the eukaryal metal-dependent RNA triphosphatases, which catalyze the initial step in mRNA capping. Little is known about the activities and substrate specificities of the scores of TTM homologs present in bacterial and archaeal proteomes, nearly all of which are annotated as adenylate cyclases. Here we have conducted a biochemical and structure-function analysis of a TTM protein (CthTTM) from the bacterium Clostridium thermocellum. CthTTM is a metal-dependent tripolyphosphatase and nucleoside triphosphatase; it is not an adenylate cyclase. We have identified 11 conserved amino acids in the tunnel that are critical for tripolyphosphatase and ATPase activity. The most salient findings are that (i) CthTTM is 150-fold more active in cleaving tripolyphosphate than ATP and (ii) the substrate specificity of CthTTM can be transformed by a single mutation (K8A) that abolishes tripolyphosphatase activity while strongly stimulating ATP hydrolysis. Our results underscore the plasticity of CthTTM substrate choice and suggest how novel specificities within the TTM superfamily might evolve through changes in the residues that line the tunnel walls. PMID:17303560

  15. Fluorescent Ligands for Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, Eszter; Jayasekara, P Suresh; Squarcialupi, Lucia; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Federico, Stephanie; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Interest is increasing in developing fluorescent ligands for characterization of adenosine receptors (ARs), which hold a promise of usefulness in the drug discovery process. The size of a strategically labeled AR ligand can be greatly increased after the attachment of a fluorophore. The choice of dye moiety (e.g. Alexa Fluor 488), attachment point and linker length can alter the selectivity and potency of the parent molecule. Fluorescent derivatives of adenosine agonists and antagonists (e.g. XAC and other heterocyclic antagonist scaffolds) have been synthesized and characterized pharmacologically. Some are useful AR probes for flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and scanning confocal microscopy. Thus, the approach of fluorescent labeled GPCR ligands, including those for ARs, is a growing dynamic research field. PMID:23200243

  16. Adenosine-induced activation of esophageal nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Ru, F; Surdenikova, L; Brozmanova, M; Kollarik, M

    2011-03-01

    Clinical studies implicate adenosine acting on esophageal nociceptive pathways in the pathogenesis of noncardiac chest pain originating from the esophagus. However, the effect of adenosine on esophageal afferent nerve subtypes is incompletely understood. We addressed the hypothesis that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Whole cell perforated patch-clamp recordings and single-cell RT-PCR analysis were performed on the primary afferent neurons retrogradely labeled from the esophagus in the guinea pig. Extracellular recordings were made from the isolated innervated esophagus. In patch-clamp studies, adenosine evoked activation (inward current) in a majority of putative nociceptive (capsaicin-sensitive) vagal nodose, vagal jugular, and spinal dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons innervating the esophagus. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis indicated that the majority of the putative nociceptive (transient receptor potential V1-positive) neurons innervating the esophagus express the adenosine receptors. The neural crest-derived (spinal DRG and vagal jugular) esophageal nociceptors expressed predominantly the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes-derived vagal nodose nociceptors expressed the adenosine A(1) and/or A(2A) receptors. Consistent with the studies in the cell bodies, adenosine evoked activation (overt action potential discharge) in esophageal nociceptive nerve terminals. Furthermore, the neural crest-derived jugular nociceptors were activated by the selective A(1) receptor agonist CCPA, and the placodes-derived nodose nociceptors were activated by CCPA and/or the selective adenosine A(2A) receptor CGS-21680. In contrast to esophageal nociceptors, adenosine failed to stimulate the vagal esophageal low-threshold (tension) mechanosensors. We conclude that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Our data indicate that the esophageal neural crest-derived nociceptors can be activated via the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes

  17. Modulation of dopamine-mediated facilitation at the neuromuscular junction of Wistar rats: A role for adenosine A1/A2A receptors and P2 purinoceptors.

    PubMed

    Elnozahi, Neveen A; AlQot, Hadir E; Mohy El-Din, Mahmoud M; Bistawroos, Azza E; Abou Zeit-Har, Mohamed S

    2016-06-21

    This study aims to understand how dopamine and the neuromodulators, adenosine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) modulate neuromuscular transmission. Adenosine and ATP are well-recognized for their regulatory effects on dopamine in the central nervous system. However, if similar interactions occur at the neuromuscular junction is unknown. We hypothesize that the activation of adenosine A1/A2A and/or P2 purinoceptors may influence the action of dopamine on neuromuscular transmission. Using the rat phrenic nerve hemi-diaphragm, we assessed the influence of dopamine, adenosine and ATP on the height of nerve-evoked muscle twitches. We investigated how the selective blockade of adenosine A1 receptors (2.5nM DPCPX), adenosine A2A receptors (50nM CSC) and P2 purinoceptors (100μM suramin) modified the effects of dopamine. Dopamine alone increased indirect muscle contractions while adenosine and ATP either enhanced or depressed nerve-evoked muscle twitches in a concentration-dependent manner. The facilitatory effects of 256μM dopamine were significantly reduced to 29.62±2.79% or 53.69±5.45% in the presence of DPCPX or CSC, respectively, relative to 70.03±1.57% with dopamine alone. Alternatively, the action of 256μM dopamine was potentiated from 70.03±1.57, in the absence of suramin, to 86.83±4.36%, in the presence of suramin. It can be concluded that the activation of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and P2 purinoceptors potentially play a central role in the regulation of dopamine effects at the neuromuscular junction. Clinically this study offers new insights for the indirect manipulation of neuromuscular transmission for the treatment of disorders characterized by motor dysfunction. PMID:27060487

  18. 2-Triazole-Substituted Adenosines: A New Class of Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonists, Partial Agonists, and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Cosyn, Liesbet; Palaniappan, Krishnan K.; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Duong, Heng T.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Van Calenbergh, Serge

    2016-01-01

    “Click chemistry” was explored to synthesize two series of 2-(1,2,3-triazolyl)adenosine derivatives (1–14). Binding affinity at the human A1, A2A, and A3ARs (adenosine receptors) and relative efficacy at the A3AR were determined. Some triazol-1-yl analogues showed A3AR affinity in the low nanomolar range, a high ratio of A3/A2A selectivity, and a moderate-to-high A3/A1 ratio. The 1,2,3-triazol-4-yl regiomers typically showed decreased A3AR affinity. Sterically demanding groups at the adenine C2 position tended to reduce relative A3AR efficacy. Thus, several 5′-OH derivatives appeared to be selective A3AR antagonists, i.e., 10, with 260-fold binding selectivity in comparison to the A1AR and displaying a characteristic docking mode in an A3AR model. The corresponding 5′-ethyluronamide analogues generally showed increased A3AR affinity and behaved as full agonists, i.e., 17, with 910-fold A3/A1 selectivity. Thus, N6-substituted 2-(1,2,3-triazolyl)-adenosine analogues constitute a novel class of highly potent and selective nucleoside-based A3AR antagonists, partial agonists, and agonists. PMID:17149867

  19. Osteopontin stimulates gelsolin-associated phosphoinositide levels and phosphatidylinositol triphosphate-hydroxyl kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Chellaiah, M; Hruska, K

    1996-01-01

    Based on previous studies demonstrating activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-hydroxyl kinase (PI3-kinase) and stimulation of a change in cell shape, we examined the effect of osteopontin on the association of phospholipids with gelsolin, an actin-capping/severing protein. Osteopontin stimulated a rapid increase in phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol triphosphate levels associated with gelsolin in Triton-soluble fractions of cell lysates. The increased levels of phosphatidylinositol triphosphate associated with gelsolin were due to stimulation of PI3-kinase activity associated with gelsolin in the Triton-soluble fractions, and they were blocked by the PI3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. Osteopontin stimulated translocation of PI3-kinase from the Triton-insoluble to Triton-soluble gelsolin. Osteopontin also decreased Triton-soluble gelsolin/actin complexes consistent with actin uncapping, and increased F-actin levels, which were also blocked by wortmannin. The osteopontin effects were mediated through binding to the alpha(v)beta 3 integrin. Taken together, our studies indicate that osteopontin/alpha(v)beta 3-mediated changes in gelsolin-associated phosphoinositide levels and PI3-kinase activity are related to stimulation of F-actin formation in osteoclasts. Images PMID:8744948

  20. Automated parallel synthesis of 5'-triphosphate oligonucleotides and preparation of chemically modified 5'-triphosphate small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Zlatev, Ivan; Lackey, Jeremy G; Zhang, Ligang; Dell, Amy; McRae, Kathy; Shaikh, Sarfraz; Duncan, Richard G; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Manoharan, Muthiah

    2013-02-01

    A fully automated chemical method for the parallel and high-throughput solid-phase synthesis of 5'-triphosphate and 5'-diphosphate oligonucleotides is described. The desired full-length oligonucleotides were first constructed using standard automated DNA/RNA solid-phase synthesis procedures. Then, on the same column and instrument, efficient implementation of an uninterrupted sequential cycle afforded the corresponding unmodified or chemically modified 5'-triphosphates and 5'-diphosphates. The method was readily translated into a scalable and high-throughput synthesis protocol compatible with the current DNA/RNA synthesizers yielding a large variety of unique 5'-polyphosphorylated oligonucleotides. Using this approach, we accomplished the synthesis of chemically modified 5'-triphosphate oligonucleotides that were annealed to form small-interfering RNAs (ppp-siRNAs), a potentially interesting class of novel RNAi therapeutic tools. The attachment of the 5'-triphosphate group to the passenger strand of a siRNA construct did not induce a significant improvement in the in vitro RNAi-mediated gene silencing activity nor a strong specific in vitro RIG-I activation. The reported method will enable the screening of many chemically modified ppp-siRNAs, resulting in a novel bi-functional RNAi therapeutic platform. PMID:23260577

  1. The DEAD-box helicase DDX3 substitutes for the cap-binding protein eIF4E to promote compartmentalized translation initiation of the HIV-1 genomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Rubilar, Paulina S; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2013-07-01

    Here, we show a novel molecular mechanism promoted by the DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 for translation of the HIV-1 genomic RNA. This occurs through the adenosine triphosphate-dependent formation of a translation initiation complex that is assembled at the 5' m(7)GTP cap of the HIV-1 mRNA. This is due to the property of DDX3 to substitute for the initiation factor eIF4E in the binding of the HIV-1 m(7)GTP 5' cap structure where it nucleates the formation of a core DDX3/PABP/eIF4G trimeric complex on the HIV-1 genomic RNA. By using RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled to indirect immunofluorescence, we further show that this viral ribonucleoprotein complex is addressed to compartmentalized cytoplasmic foci where the translation initiation complex is assembled. PMID:23630313

  2. Pyrimidine starvation induced by adenosine in fibroblasts and lymphoid cells: role of adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Green, H; Chan, T

    1973-11-23

    In the presence of 10(-4) to 10(-5) molar adenosine, established cell lines of fibroblastic or lymphoid origin die of pyrimidine starvation. Less than lethal concentrations inhibit cell growth. Over a broad concentration range, the effects of adenosine are prevented by providing a suitable pyrimidine source. We suggest that the recently described immune deficiency disease associated with absence of adenosine deaminase may be the result of pyrimidine starvation induced by adenosine nucleotides in cells of the lymphoid system. PMID:4795749

  3. Involvement of adenosine A2a receptor in intraocular pressure decrease induced by 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine or 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine.

    PubMed

    Konno, Takashi; Murakami, Akira; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to clarify the mechanism for the decrease in intraocular pressure by 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives in rabbits. The receptor binding analysis revealed that 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-O-Ado) and 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-CN-Ado) selectively bound to the A(2a) receptor with a high affinity. Ocular hypotensive responses to 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado were inhibited by the adenosine A(2a)-receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine (CSC), but not by the adenosine A(1)-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) or the adenosine A(2b)-receptor antagonist alloxazine. In addition, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado caused an increase in outflow facility, which was inhibited by CSC, but not by DPCPX or alloxazine. Moreover, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado increased cAMP in the aqueous humor, and the 2-O-Ado-induced an increase in cAMP was inhibited by CSC. These results suggest that 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado reduced intraocular pressure via an increase in outflow facility. The ocular hypotension may be mainly mediated through the activation of adenosine A(2a) receptor, although a possible involvement of adenosine A(1) receptor cannot be completely ruled out. 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado are useful lead compounds for the treatment of glaucoma. PMID:15821340

  4. Adenosine signalling mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of the COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Maione, Francesco; Morello, Silvana; Lapucci, Andrea; Paccosi, Sara; Steckel, Bodo; Lavecchia, Antonio; Parenti, Astrid; Iuvone, Teresa; Schrader, Jürgen; Ialenti, Armando; Cicala, Carla

    2016-07-15

    Extracellular adenosine formation from ATP is controlled by ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase/CD39) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (e-5NT/CD73); the latter converts AMP to adenosine and inorganic phosphate, representing the rate limiting step controlling the ratio between extracellular ATP and adenosine. Evidence that cellular expression and activity of CD39 and CD73 may be subject to changes under pathophysiological conditions has identified this pathway as an endogenous modulator in several diseases and was shown to be involved in the molecular mechanism of drugs, such as methotrexate, salicylates , interferon-β. We evaluated whether CD73/adenosine/A2A signalling pathway is involved in nimesulide anti-inflammatory effect, in vivo and in vitro. We found that the adenosine A2A agonist, 4-[2-[[6-amino-9-(N-ethyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamidosyl)-9H-purin-2-yl]amino]ethyl]benzenepropanoic acid hydrochloride (CGS21680, 2mg/kg ip.), inhibited carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema and the effect was reversed by co-administration of the A2A antagonist -(2-[7-amino-2-[2-furyl][1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-yl-amino]ethyl)phenol (ZM241385; 3mg/kg i.p.). Nimesulide (5mg/kg i.p.) anti-inflammatory effect was inhibited by pre-treatment with ZM241385 (3mg/kg i.p.) and by local administration of the CD73 inhibitor, adenosine 5'-(α,β-methylene)diphosphate (APCP; 400μg/paw). Furthermore, we found increased activity of 5'-nucleotidase/CD73 in paws and plasma of nimesulide treated rats, 4h following oedema induction. In vitro, the inhibitory effect of nimesulide on nitrite and prostaglandin E2 production by lipopolysaccharide-activated J774 cell line was reversed by ZM241385 and APCP. Furthermore, nimesulide increased CD73 activity in J774 macrophages while it did not inhibit nitrite accumulation by lipopolysaccharide-activated SiRNA CD73 silenced J774 macrophages. Our data demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effect of nimesulide in part is mediated by CD73

  5. An Adenosine Triphosphate-Phosphate Exchange Catalyzed by a Soluble Enzyme Couple Inhibited by Uncouplers of Oxidative Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Allison, William S.; Benitez, Lita V.

    1972-01-01

    The sulfenic acid form of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.12), which is an acyl phosphatase, will catalyze an acetyl phosphate-Pi exchange reaction. This exchange reaction is reversibly inhibited by the uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation, 2,4-dinitrophenol, m-Cl carbonylcyanide-phenylhydrazone, pentachlorophenol, and 5-chloro-3-tert-butyl-2′-chloro-4′-nitrosalicylanalide, and is irreversibly inhibited by cyanide and dicumarol. An ATP-Pi exchange reaction similar to that catalyzed by mitochondria can be simulated by a system composed of oxidized glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.1.28), 3-phosphoglycerate, ATP, 32Pi, and appropriate cofactors. The ATP-Pi exchange is inhibited by uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. Higher concentrations of uncouplers will also inhibit the ATPase reaction catalyzed by the coupled enzyme system. The exchange reactions catalyzed by the sulfenic acid form of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate are consistent with a sulfenyl carboxylate intermediate. On the basis of these observations, a reaction scheme has been postulated for covalent coupling in oxidative phosphorylation that includes a sulfenyl carboxylate as a nonphosphorylated, high energy intermediate and an acyl phosphate as a phosphorylated, high energy intermediate. PMID:4507619

  6. Effect of freezing rate on motility, adenosine triphosphate content and fertilizability in beluga sturgeon (Huso huso) spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Aramli, Mohammad Sadegh; Golshahi, Karim; Nazari, Rajab Mohammad; Aramli, Salim

    2015-04-01

    Broodstock selection programs are currently underway for sturgeon species. To complement and further these selection programs we need to develop sperm cryopreservation procedures. In the present study, we describe the effects of freezing rate (-10°C, -15°C, -20°C, -30°C and -40°C/min) on gamete quality characteristics (i.e., duration of motility (s), motility percentage (%), ATP content (nmol/10(8) cells), fertilization rate (%), and hatching rate (%)) in beluga sturgeon, Huso huso. After sampling, beluga sturgeon sperm were diluted in an extender composed of 23.4mM sucrose, 0.25 mM KCl, and 30 mM Tris-HCl, pH 8.0 containing 10% methanol and subsequently frozen in a programmable freezer. Sperm frozen at -40°C/min resulted in means for duration of motility (134 s), motility percentage (69%), ATP concentration (4.8 nmol/10(8) cells), fertilization rate (72%) and hatching rate (65%) that were higher (P<0.05) than those for slower cooling rates. Based on our results, -40°C/min was the best freezing rate (among those tested) for cryopreservation of beluga sturgeon sperm. PMID:25707696

  7. CHANGES IN LUNG ATP (ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE) CONCENTRATION IN THE RAT AFTER LOW-LEVEL PHOSGENE EXPOSURE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rats were exposed to phosgene for 4 hrs at concentrations of 0.05 to 1.0 ppm. Lung wet and dry wt and ATP concentration were measured immediately after exposure and for 3 days post-exposure. The accumulation of lavage fluid protein (LFP) was also measured as an index of damage or...

  8. Adenosine triphosphate-dependent asymmetry of anion permeation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P; Hanrahan, J W

    1998-04-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) forms a tightly regulated channel that mediates the passive diffusion of Cl- ions. Here we show, using macroscopic current recording from excised membrane patches, that CFTR also shows significant, but highly asymmetrical, permeability to a broad range of large organic anions. Thus, all large organic anions tested were permeant when present in the intracellular solution under biionic conditions (PX/PCl = 0.048-0.25), whereas most were not measurably permeant when present in the extracellular solution. This asymmetry was not observed for smaller anions. ATPase inhibitors that "lock" CFTR channels in the open state (pyrophosphate, 5'-adenylylimidodiphosphate) disrupted the asymmetry of large anion permeation by allowing their influx from the extracellular solution, which suggests that ATP hydrolysis is required to maintain asymmetric permeability. The ability of CFTR to allow efflux of large organic anions represents a novel function of CFTR. Loss of this function may contribute to the pleiotropic symptoms seen in cystic fibrosis. PMID:9524141

  9. The Relation of the 515 Nanometers Absorbance Change to Adenosine Triphosphate Formation in Chloroplasts and Digitonin Subchloroplast Particles 1

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Joseph; Ke, Bacon; Dilley, Richard A.

    1970-01-01

    The flash-induced absorbance changes at 515 nanometers has been studied in chloroplasts and in digitonin subchloroplast particles of lettuce. The effect of various conditions and uncouplers was tested on the decay kinetics of this absorbance change and on ATP formation in the presence of phenazine methosulphate, either by continuous or flash illumination. It has been found that in chloroplasts, carbonyl cyanide m-chloromethoxyphenylhydrazone and nigericin in the presence of K+ accelerate the decay of the 515 change and inhibit ATP formation. However, under a variety of conditions the rate of decay of the 515 absorbance change was found to be unrelated to ATP formation. Preillumination, addition of valinomycin in the presence of K+, addition of Na+, or divalent cations accelerate the decay of the 515 absorbance change markedly but have no effect on ATP formation. Addition of phosphorylation reagents has no effect on the decay rate beyond that obtained by Mg2+ and inorganic phosphate. NH4Cl, and to some extent atebrin, while inhibiting ATP formation, do not affect the decay of the 515 absorbance change. In digitonin subchloroplast particles the decay kinetics of the absorbance change resemble that of chloroplasts, but the magnitude of the change is smaller. The pH change in this preparation is reduced much more than the 515 absorbance change. According to the chemiosmotic hypothesis, the sum of ΔE(membrane potential) and ΔpH is the driving force for ATP formation. The lack of an increase in ΔE in digitonin subchloroplast particles, which are practically devoid of ΔpH and have a normal ATP-forming activity, is inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis. PMID:16657427

  10. A simple enzymic method for the synthesis of adenosine 5'-[alpha-32P]triphosphate on a preparative scale.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, B R; Voorheis, H P

    1977-01-01

    A simple, rapid and inexpensive method is described for the enzymic synthesis of [alpha-32P]ATP from [32P]Pi on a preparative scale with an overall yield of 53%. The final product contained all of the detectable radioactivity (less than 99.9%) in the alpha position and has been shown to behave identically with commerically availabe [alpha-32P]ATP during the synthesis of 3':5'-cyclic AMP in the reaction catalysed by adenylate cyclase. PMID:851430

  11. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate consumption by smooth muscle as predicted by the coupled four-state crossbridge model.

    PubMed Central

    Hai, C M; Murphy, R A

    1992-01-01

    We have proposed a four-state crossbridge model to explain contraction and the latch state in arterial smooth muscle. Ca(2+)-dependent crossbridge phosphorylation was the only postulated regulatory mechanism and the latchbridge (a dephosphorylated, attached crossbridge) was the only novel element in the model. In this study, we used the model to predict rates of ATP consumption by crossbridge phosphorylation (JPhos) and cycling (JCycle) during isometric and isotonic contractions in arterial smooth muscle; then we compared model predictions with experimental data. The model predicted that JPhos and JCycle were similar in magnitude in isometric contractions, and both increased almost linearly with myosin phosphorylation. The predicted relationship between isometric stress and ATP consumption was quasihyperbolic, but approximately linear when myosin phosphorylation was below 35%, in agreement with most of the available data. Muscle shortening increased the predicted values of JCycle up to 3.7-fold depending on shortening velocity and the level of myosin phosphorylation. The predicted maximum work output per ATP was 7.4-7.8 kJ/mol ATP and was relatively insensitive to changes in myosin phosphorylation. The predicted increase in JCycle with shortening was in agreement with available data, but the model prediction that work output per ATP was insensitive to changes in myosin phosphorylation was unexpected and remains to be tested in future experiments. PMID:1547336

  12. Adenosine triphosphate utilization rates and metabolic pool sizes in intact cells measured by transfer of 18O from water.

    PubMed Central

    Dawis, S M; Walseth, T F; Deeg, M A; Heyman, R A; Graeff, R M; Goldberg, N D

    1989-01-01

    The hydrolytic rates and metabolic pool sizes of ATP were determined in intact cells by monitoring the time courses of 18O incorporation from 18O-water into the gamma-phosphoryl of ATP and orthophosphate. To calculate the rate of ATP hydrolysis, a kinetic model is used to fit the time course of the 18O labeling. The size of the metabolic pool of ATP is calculated from the 18O distribution after isotopic equilibrium has been achieved. Metabolic pools have a binomial distribution of 18O whereas nonmetabolic pools exhibit negligible 18O labeling. The application and limitations of this approach are illustrated with data from isolated toad retinas and human platelets. At 22 degrees C, the time constant of ATP hydrolysis in the dark-adapted toad retina is about 30 s. Under these conditions, over 80% of the retinal ATP is involved in high-energy phosphate metabolism. It is calculated that when cGMP metabolic flux in the photoreceptors is maximally stimulated by light, it accounts for 10% of the ATP utilization by the entire retina. The time constant of ATP hydrolysis in human platelets at 37 degrees C is approximately 1 s, and 60% of the platelet ATP is involved in energy metabolism. PMID:2930826

  13. Autoradiographic localization of adenosine receptors in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)cyclohexyladenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, R.R.; Synder, S.H.

    1982-09-01

    Adenosine (A1) receptor binding sites have been localized in rat brain by an in vitro light microscopic autoradiographic method. The binding of (/sup 3/H)N6-cyclohexyladenosine to slide-mounted rat brain tissue sections has the characteristics of A1 receptors. It is saturable with high affinity and has appropriate pharmacology and stereospecificity. The highest densities of adenosine receptors occur in the molecular layer of the cerebellum, the molecular and polymorphic layers of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus, the medial geniculate body, certain thalamic nuclei, and the lateral septum. High densities also are observed in certain layers of the cerebral cortex, the piriform cortex, the caudate-putamen, the nucleus accumbens, and the granule cell layer of the cerebellum. Most white matter areas, as well as certain gray matter areas, such as the hypothalamus, have negligible receptor concentrations. These localizations suggest possible central nervous system sites of action of adenosine.

  14. Identification of the vaccinia virus gene encoding nucleoside triphosphate phosphohydrolase I, a DNA-dependent ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Broyles, S S; Moss, B

    1987-01-01

    Vaccinia virus encapsidates a DNA-dependent ATPase known as nucleoside triphosphate phosphohydrolase I (NPH I). A bacteriophage lambda gt11 expression library of poxvirus DNA was screened with antibodies specific for NPH I. Positive clones were used to probe restriction fragments of vaccinia virus genomic DNA to locate the NPH I gene. The identity of the open reading frame (ORF) was confirmed by placing it downstream of a bacteriophage T7 promoter, transcribing the ORF in vitro, and translating the RNA in a reticulocyte lysate. A polypeptide of the correct molecular weight, which was recognized by anti-NPH I antibody, was synthesized. Inspection of the deduced amino acid sequence of the NPH I ORF revealed consensus ATP-binding sites. Images PMID:2437324

  15. Effects of adenosine on intrarenal oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Dinour, D; Brezis, M

    1991-11-01

    Although generally a vasodilator, adenosine vasoconstricts cortical vessels in the kidney, reduces glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and increases medullary blood flow, effects likely to improve the medullary O2 deficiency characteristic of mammalian kidneys. To evaluate a possible role of adenosine in medullary O2 balance, we investigated the effect of adenosine upon cortical and medullary tissue PO2. Adenosine was infused into renal interstitium through chronically implanted capsules. Cortical and medullary PO2 were measured using sensitive Clark-type O2 microelectrodes inserted into kidneys of anesthetized rats at the respective depths of 1.8 and 3.7 mm. Infusion of adenosine (0.1-0.5 mumol/min) increased medullary PO2 from 17 +/- 3 (SE) to 40 +/- 5 mmHG (P less than 0.001) and decreased cortical PO2 from 64 +/- 4 to 47 +/- 3 mmHg (P less than 0.001). After the infusion was stopped, PO2 returned to baseline at both sites. Coadministration of adenosine receptor antagonist 8-phenyltheophylline (0.01 mumol/min) prevented both cortical and medullary effects of adenosine. We concluded that adenosine could play an important protective and regulatory role in renal medullary O2 balance. PMID:1951710

  16. Adenosine Neuromodulation and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lusardi, T.A

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule, with widespread activity across all organ systems. There is evidence that adenosine regulation is a significant factor in traumatic brain injury (TBI) onset, recovery, and outcome, and a growing body of experimental work examining the therapeutic potential of adenosine neuromodulation in the treatment of TBI. In the central nervous system (CNS), adenosine (dys)regulation has been demonstrated following TBI, and correlated to several TBI pathologies, including impaired cerebral hemodynamics, anaerobic metabolism, and inflammation. In addition to acute pathologies, adenosine function has been implicated in TBI comorbidities, such as cognitive deficits, psychiatric function, and post-traumatic epilepsy. This review presents studies in TBI as well as adenosine-related mechanisms in co-morbidities of and unfavorable outcomes resulting from TBI. While the exact role of the adenosine system following TBI remains unclear, there is increasing evidence that a thorough understanding of adenosine signaling will be critical to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for the treatment of TBI. PMID:20190964

  17. Effects of pressure and temperature on the binding of RecA protein to single-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Merrin, Jack; Kumar, Pradeep; Libchaber, Albert

    2011-01-01

    The binding and polymerization of RecA protein to DNA is required for recombination, which is an essential function of life. We study the pressure and temperature dependence of RecA binding to single-stranded DNA in the presence of adenosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate (ATP[γ-S]), in a temperature regulated high pressure cell using fluorescence anisotropy. Measurements were possible at temperatures between 5–60 °C and pressures up to 300 MPa. Experiments were performed on Escherichia coli RecA and RecA from a thermophilic bacteria, Thermus thermophilus. For E. coli RecA at a given temperature, binding is a monotonically decreasing and reversible function of pressure. At atmospheric pressure, E. coli RecA binding decreases monotonically up to 42 °C, where a sharp transition to the unbound state indicates irreversible heat inactivation. T. thermophilus showed no such transition within the temperature range of our apparatus. Furthermore, we find that binding occurs for a wider range of pressure and temperature for T. thermophilus compared to E. coli RecA, suggesting a correlation between thermophilicity and barophilicity. We use a two-state model of RecA binding/unbinding to extract the associated thermodynamic parameters. For E. coli, we find that the binding/unbinding phase boundary is hyperbolic. Our results of the binding of RecA from E. coli and T. thermophilus show adaptation to pressure and temperature at the single protein level. PMID:22123983

  18. A conformational analysis of mouse Nalp3 domain structures by molecular dynamics simulations, and binding site analysis.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Bikash R; Maharana, Jitendra; Bhoi, Gopal K; Lenka, Santosh K; Patra, Mahesh C; Dikhit, Manas R; Dubey, Praveen K; Pradhan, Sukanta K; Behera, Bijay K

    2014-05-01

    Scrutinizing various nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) genes in higher eukaryotes is very important for understanding the intriguing mechanism of the host defense against pathogens. The nucleotide-binding domain (NACHT), leucine-rich repeat (LRR), and pyrin domains (PYD)-containing protein 3 (Nalp3), is an intracellular innate immune receptor and is associated with several immune system related disorders. Despite Nalp3's protective role during a pathogenic invasion, the molecular features and structural organization of this crucial protein is poorly understood. Using comparative modeling and molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the structural architecture of Nalp3 domains, and characterized the dynamic and energetic parameters of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding in NACHT, and pathogen-derived ligands muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and imidazoquinoline with LRR domains. The results suggested that walker A, B and extended walker B motifs were the key ATP binding regions in NACHT that mediate self-oligomerization. The analysis of the binding sites of MDP and imidazoquinoline revealed LRR 7-9 to be the most energetically favored site for imidazoquinoline interaction. However, the binding free energy calculations using the Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM/PBSA) method indicated that MDP is incompatible for activating the Nalp3 molecule in its monomeric form, and suggest its complex interaction with NOD2 or other NLRs accounts for MDP recognition. The high binding affinity of ATP with NACHT was correlated to the experimental data for human NLRs. Our binding site prediction for imidazoquinoline in LRR warrants further investigation via in vivo models. This is the first study that provides ligand recognition in mouse Nalp3 and its spatial structural arrangements. PMID:24595807

  19. Time- and dose-related interactions between glucocorticoid and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate on CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-dependent insulin-like growth factor I expression by osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Ji, C.; Chen, Y.; Kim, K.; Centrella, M.

    2000-01-01

    Glucocorticoid has complex effects on osteoblasts. Several of these changes appear to be related to steroid concentration, duration of exposure, or specific effects on growth factor expression or activity within bone. One important bone growth factor, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), is induced in osteoblasts by hormones such as PGE2 that increase intracellular cAMP levels. In this way, PGE2 activates transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-delta (C/EBPdelta) and enhances its binding to a specific control element found in exon 1 in the IGF-I gene. Our current studies show that preexposure to glucocorticoid enhanced C/EBPdelta and C/EBPbeta expression by osteoblasts and thereby potentiated IGF-I gene promoter activation in response to PGE2. Importantly, this directly contrasts with inhibitory effects on IGF-I expression that result from sustained or pharmacologically high levels of glucocorticoid exposure. Consistent with the stimulatory effect of IGF-I on bone protein synthesis, pretreatment with glucocorticoid sensitized osteoblasts to PGE2, and in this context significantly enhanced new collagen and noncollagen protein synthesis. Therefore, pharmacological levels of glucocorticoid may reduce IGF-I expression by osteoblasts and cause osteopenic disease, whereas physiological transient increases in glucocorticoid may permit or amplify the effectiveness of hormones that regulate skeletal tissue integrity. These events appear to converge on the important role of C/EBPdelta and C/EBPbeta on IGF-I expression by osteoblasts.

  20. Cloning and expression of an A1 adenosine receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; McVittie, L.D.; Smyk-Randall, E.M.; Nakata, H.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Gerfen, C.R.; Sibley, D.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction technique to selectively amplify guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor cDNA sequences from rat striatal mRNA, using sets of highly degenerate primers derived from transmembrane sequences of previously cloned G protein-coupled receptors. A novel cDNA fragment was identified, which exhibits considerable homology to various members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This fragment was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a rat striatal library. A 2.2-kilobase clone was obtained that encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with seven transmembrane domains, as predicted by hydropathy analysis. Stably transfected mouse A9-L cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells that expressed mRNA for this clone were screened with putative receptor ligands. Saturable and specific binding sites for the A1 adenosine antagonist (3H)-1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine were identified on membranes from transfected cells. The rank order of potency and affinities of various adenosine agonist and antagonist ligands confirmed the identity of this cDNA clone as an A1 adenosine receptor. The high affinity binding of A1 adenosine agonists was shown to be sensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanylyl-5{prime}-imidodiphosphate. In adenylyl cyclase assays, adenosine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production by greater than 50%, in a pharmacologically specific fashion. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses of receptor mRNA in brain tissues revealed two transcripts of 5.6 and 3.1 kilobases, both of which were abundant in cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and thalamus, with lower levels in olfactory bulb, striatum, mesencephalon, and retina. These regional distribution data are in good agreement with previous receptor autoradiographic studies involving the A1 adenosine receptor.

  1. Probing the ATP Site of GRP78 with Nucleotide Triphosphate Analogs.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Scott J; Antoshchenko, Tetyana; Chen, Yun; Lu, Hua; Pizarro, Juan C; Park, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    GRP78, a member of the ER stress protein family, can relocate to the surface of cancer cells, playing key roles in promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. GRP78 consists of two major functional domains: the ATPase and protein/peptide-binding domains. The protein/peptide-binding domain of cell-surface GRP78 has served as a novel functional receptor for delivering cytotoxic agents (e.g., a apoptosis-inducing peptide or taxol) across the cell membrane. Here, we report our study on the ATPase domain of GRP78 (GRP78ATPase), whose potential as a transmembrane delivery system of cytotoxic agents (e.g., ATP-based nucleotide triphosphate analogs) remains unexploited. As the binding of ligands (ATP analogs) to a receptor (GRP78ATPase) is a pre-requisite for internalization, we determined the binding affinities and modes of GRP78ATPase for ADP, ATP and several ATP analogs using surface plasmon resonance and x-ray crystallography. The tested ATP analogs contain one of the following modifications: the nitrogen at the adenine ring 7-position to a carbon atom (7-deazaATP), the oxygen at the β-γ bridge position to a carbon atom (AMPPCP), or the removal of the 2'-OH group (2'-deoxyATP). We found that 7-deazaATP displays an affinity and a binding mode that resemble those of ATP regardless of magnesium ion (Mg++) concentration, suggesting that GRP78 is tolerant to modifications at the 7-position. By comparison, AMPPCP's binding affinity was lower than ATP and Mg++-dependent, as the removal of Mg++ nearly abolished binding to GRP78ATPase. The AMPPCP-Mg++ structure showed evidence for the critical role of Mg++ in AMPPCP binding affinity, suggesting that while GRP78 is sensitive to modifications at the β-γ bridge position, these can be tolerated in the presence of Mg++. Furthermore, 2'-deoxyATP's binding affinity was significantly lower than those for all other nucleotides tested, even in the presence of Mg++. The 2'-deoxyATP structure showed the conformation of the bound

  2. Probing the ATP Site of GRP78 with Nucleotide Triphosphate Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Lu, Hua; Pizarro, Juan C.; Park, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    GRP78, a member of the ER stress protein family, can relocate to the surface of cancer cells, playing key roles in promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. GRP78 consists of two major functional domains: the ATPase and protein/peptide-binding domains. The protein/peptide-binding domain of cell-surface GRP78 has served as a novel functional receptor for delivering cytotoxic agents (e.g., a apoptosis-inducing peptide or taxol) across the cell membrane. Here, we report our study on the ATPase domain of GRP78 (GRP78ATPase), whose potential as a transmembrane delivery system of cytotoxic agents (e.g., ATP-based nucleotide triphosphate analogs) remains unexploited. As the binding of ligands (ATP analogs) to a receptor (GRP78ATPase) is a pre-requisite for internalization, we determined the binding affinities and modes of GRP78ATPase for ADP, ATP and several ATP analogs using surface plasmon resonance and x-ray crystallography. The tested ATP analogs contain one of the following modifications: the nitrogen at the adenine ring 7-position to a carbon atom (7-deazaATP), the oxygen at the β-γ bridge position to a carbon atom (AMPPCP), or the removal of the 2’-OH group (2’-deoxyATP). We found that 7-deazaATP displays an affinity and a binding mode that resemble those of ATP regardless of magnesium ion (Mg++) concentration, suggesting that GRP78 is tolerant to modifications at the 7-position. By comparison, AMPPCP’s binding affinity was lower than ATP and Mg++-dependent, as the removal of Mg++ nearly abolished binding to GRP78ATPase. The AMPPCP-Mg++ structure showed evidence for the critical role of Mg++ in AMPPCP binding affinity, suggesting that while GRP78 is sensitive to modifications at the β-γ bridge position, these can be tolerated in the presence of Mg++. Furthermore, 2’-deoxyATP’s binding affinity was significantly lower than those for all other nucleotides tested, even in the presence of Mg++. The 2’-deoxyATP structure showed the conformation of the

  3. Probing the ATP site of GRP78 with nucleotide triphosphate analogs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hughes, Scott J.; Antoshchenko, Tetyana; Chen, Yun; Lu, Hua; Pizarro, Juan C.; Park, Hee -Won

    2016-05-04

    GRP78, a member of the ER stress protein family, can relocate to the surface of cancer cells, playing key roles in promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. GRP78 consists of two major functional domains: the ATPase and protein/peptide-binding domains. The protein/peptide-binding domain of cell-surface GRP78 has served as a novel functional receptor for delivering cytotoxic agents (e.g., a apoptosis-inducing peptide or taxol) across the cell membrane. Here, we report our study on the ATPase domain of GRP78 (GRP78ATPase), whose potential as a transmembrane delivery system of cytotoxic agents (e.g., ATP-based nucleotide triphosphate analogs) remains unexploited. As the binding of ligands (ATPmore » analogs) to a receptor (GRP78ATPase) is a pre-requisite for internalization, we determined the binding affinities and modes of GRP78ATPase for ADP, ATP and several ATP analogs using surface plasmon resonance and x-ray crystallography. The tested ATP analogs contain one of the following modifications: the nitrogen at the adenine ring 7-position to a carbon atom (7-deazaATP), the oxygen at the beta-gamma bridge position to a carbon atom (AMPPCP), or the removal of the 2'-OH group (2'-deoxyATP). We found that 7-deazaATP displays an affinity and a binding mode that resemble those of ATP regardless of magnesium ion (Mg++) concentration, suggesting that GRP78 is tolerant to modifications at the 7-position. By comparison, AMPPCP's binding affinity was lower than ATP and Mg++-dependent, as the removal of Mg++ nearly abolished binding to GRP78ATPase. The AMPPCP-Mg++ structure showed evidence for the critical role of Mg++ in AMPPCP binding affinity, suggesting that while GRP78 is sensitive to modifications at the β-γ bridge position, these can be tolerated in the presence of Mg++. Furthermore, 2'-deoxyATP's binding affinity was significantly lower than those for all other nucleotides tested, even in the presence of Mg++. The 2'-deoxyATP structure showed the conformation of

  4. Probing nucleotide-binding effects on backbone dynamics and folding of the nucleotide-binding domain of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Abed, Mona; Millet, Oscar; MacLennan, David H; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2004-01-01

    In muscle cells, SERCA (sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-ATPase) plays a key role in restoring cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels to resting concentrations after transient surges caused by excitation-coupling cycles. The mechanism by which Ca2+ is translocated to the lumen of the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) involves major conformational rearrangements among the three cytoplasmic domains: actuator (A), nucleotide-binding (N) and phosphorylation (P) domains; and within the transmembrane Ca2+-binding domain of SERCA. CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and NMR spectroscopy were used in the present study to probe the conformation and stability of the isolated N domain of SERCA (SERCA-N), in the presence and absence of AMP-PNP (adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate). CD and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy results established that the effects of nucleotide binding were not readily manifested on the global fold and structural stability of SERCA-N. 15N-backbone-relaxation experiments revealed site-specific changes in backbone dynamics that converge on the central beta-sheet domain. Nucleotide binding produced diverse effects on dynamics, with enhanced mobility observed for Ile369, Cys420, Arg467, Asp568, Phe593 and Gly598, whereas rigidifying effects were found for Ser383, Leu419, Thr484 and Thr532. These results demonstrate that the overall fold and backbone motional properties of SERCA-N remained essentially the same in the presence of AMP-PNP, yet revealing evidence for internal counter-balancing effects on backbone dynamics upon binding the nucleotide, which propagate through the central beta-sheet. PMID:14987197

  5. Adenosine Kinase: Exploitation for Therapeutic Gain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine kinase (ADK; EC 2.7.1.20) is an evolutionarily conserved phosphotransferase that converts the purine ribonucleoside adenosine into 5′-adenosine-monophosphate. This enzymatic reaction plays a fundamental role in determining the tone of adenosine, which fulfills essential functions as a homeostatic and metabolic regulator in all living systems. Adenosine not only activates specific signaling pathways by activation of four types of adenosine receptors but it is also a primordial metabolite and regulator of biochemical enzyme reactions that couple to bioenergetic and epigenetic functions. By regulating adenosine, ADK can thus be identified as an upstream regulator of complex homeostatic and metabolic networks. Not surprisingly, ADK dysfunction is involved in several pathologies, including diabetes, epilepsy, and cancer. Consequently, ADK emerges as a rational therapeutic target, and adenosine-regulating drugs have been tested extensively. In recent attempts to improve specificity of treatment, localized therapies have been developed to augment adenosine signaling at sites of injury or pathology; those approaches include transplantation of stem cells with deletions of ADK or the use of gene therapy vectors to downregulate ADK expression. More recently, the first human mutations in ADK have been described, and novel findings suggest an unexpected role of ADK in a wider range of pathologies. ADK-regulating strategies thus represent innovative therapeutic opportunities to reconstruct network homeostasis in a multitude of conditions. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the genetics, biochemistry, and pharmacology of ADK and will then focus on pathologies and therapeutic interventions. Challenges to translate ADK-based therapies into clinical use will be discussed critically. PMID:23592612

  6. Gas-phase protonation thermochemistry of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Touboul, David; Bouchoux, Guy; Zenobi, Renato

    2008-09-18

    The goal of this work was to obtain a detailed insight on the gas-phase protonation energetic of adenosine using both mass spectrometric experiments and quantum chemical calculations. The experimental approach used the extended kinetic method with nanoelectrospray ionization and collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. This method provides experimental values for proton affinity, PA(adenosine) = 979 +/- 1 kJ.mol (-1), and for the "protonation entropy", Delta p S degrees (adenosine) = S degrees (adenosineH +) - S degrees (adenosine) = -5 +/- 5 J.mol (-1).K (-1). The corresponding gas-phase basicity is consequently equal to: GB(adenosine) = 945 +/- 2 kJ.mol (-1) at 298K. Theoretical calculations conducted at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level, including 298 K enthalpy correction, predict a proton affinity value of 974 kJ.mol (-1) after consideration of isodesmic proton transfer reactions with pyridine as the reference base. Moreover, computations clearly showed that N3 is the most favorable protonation site for adenosine, due to a strong internal hydrogen bond involving the hydroxyl group at the 2' position of the ribose sugar moiety, unlike observations for adenine and 2'-deoxyadenosine, where protonation occurs on N1. The existence of negligible protonation entropy is confirmed by calculations (theoretical Delta p S degrees (adenosine) approximately -2/-3 J.mol (-1).K (-1)) including conformational analysis and entropy of hindered rotations. Thus, the calculated protonation thermochemical properties are in good agreement with our experimental measurements. It may be noted that the new PA value is approximately 10 kJ.mol (-1) lower than the one reported in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) database, thus pointing to a correction of the tabulated protonation thermochemistry of adenosine. PMID:18720985

  7. Caffeine exposure alters adenosine system and neurochemical markers during retinal development.

    PubMed

    Brito, Rafael; Pereira-Figueiredo, Danniel; Socodato, Renato; Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto; Calaza, Karin C

    2016-08-01

    Evidence points to beneficial properties of caffeine in the adult central nervous system, but teratogenic effects have also been reported. Caffeine exerts most of its effects by antagonizing adenosine receptors, especially A1 and A2A subtypes. In this study, we evaluated the role of caffeine on the expression of components of the adenosinergic system in the developing avian retina and the impact of caffeine exposure upon specific markers for classical neurotransmitter systems. Caffeine exposure (5-30 mg/kg by in ovo injection) to 14-day-old chick embryos increased the expression of A1 receptors and concomitantly decreased A2A adenosine receptors expression after 48 h. Accordingly, caffeine (30 mg/kg) increased [(3) H]-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (A1 antagonist) binding and reduced [(3) H]-ZM241385 (A2A antagonist) binding. The caffeine time-response curve demonstrated a reduction in A1 receptors 6 h after injection, but an increase after 18 and 24 h. In contrast, caffeine exposure increased the expression of A2A receptors from 18 and 24 h. Kinetic assays of [(3) H]-S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine binding to the equilibrative adenosine transporter ENT1 revealed an increase in Bmax with no changes in Kd , an effect accompanied by an increase in adenosine uptake. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a decrease in retinal content of tyrosine hydroxylase, calbindin and choline acetyltransferase, but not Brn3a, after 48 h of caffeine injection. Furthermore, retinas exposed to caffeine had increased levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and cAMP-response element binding protein. Overall, we show an in vivo regulation of the adenosine system, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and cAMP-response element binding protein function and protein expression of specific neurotransmitter systems by caffeine in the developing retina. The beneficial or maleficent effects of caffeine have been demonstrated by the work of different studies. It

  8. Extracellular ATP Selectively Upregulates Ecto-Nucleoside Triphosphate Diphosphohydrolase 2 and Ecto-5'-Nucleotidase by Rat Cortical Astrocytes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Brisevac, Dusica; Adzic, Marija; Laketa, Danijela; Parabucki, Ana; Milosevic, Milena; Lavrnja, Irena; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Sévigny, Jean; Kipp, Markus; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda

    2015-11-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) acts as a danger-associated molecular pattern which induces reactive response of astrocytes after brain insult, including morphological remodeling of astrocytes, proliferation, chemotaxis, and release of proinflammatory cytokines. The responses induced by eATP are under control of ecto-nucleotidases, which catalyze sequential hydrolysis of ATP to adenosine. In the mammalian brain, ecto-nucleotidases comprise three enzyme families: ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases 1-3 (NTPDase1-3), ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phospodiesterases 1-3 (NPP1-3), and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (eN), which crucially determine ATP/adenosine ratio in the pericellular milieu. Altered expression of ecto-nucleotidases has been demonstrated in several experimental models of human brain dysfunctions. In the present study, we have explored the pattern of NTPDase1-3, NPP1-3, and eN expression by cultured cortical astrocytes challenged with 1 mmol/L ATP (eATP). At the transcriptional level, eATP upregulated expression of NTPDase1, NTPDase2, NPP2, and eN, while, at translational and functional levels, these were paralleled only by the induction of NTPDase2 and eN. Additionally, eATP altered membrane topology of eN, from clusters localized in membrane domains to continuous distribution along the cell membrane. Our results suggest that eATP, by upregulating NTPDase2 and eN and altering the enzyme membrane topology, affects local kinetics of ATP metabolism and signal transduction that may have important roles in the process related to inflammation and reactive gliosis. PMID:26080748

  9. Inhibition of renal Na+, K+-adenosine triphosphatase by gentamicin

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.D.; Trimble, M.E.; Crespo, L.; Holohan, P.D.; Freedman, J.C.; Ross, C.R.

    1984-11-01

    Inhibition of renal Na+,K+-adenosine triphosphatase is an early biochemical manifestation of gentamicin treatment in rats. Studies with isolated, perfused rat kidneys in filtering and nonfiltering modes indicate that gentamicin is transported across the brush border membrane before enzyme inhibition. The drug caused enzyme inhibition (42%) only in filtering kidneys, and this inhibition was blocked by spermine, an inhibitor of gentamicin binding. In purified rat renal basolateral membranes, bound (/sup 3/H)gentamicin was displaced 88% by unlabeled gentamicin. After in vivo exposure to (/sup 3/H)gentamicin, the radioactivity associated with the isolated basolateral membranes was displaced only 46% by unlabeled drug. These results suggest that inhibition of renal Na+,K+-adenosine triphosphatase by gentamicin is probably due to an interaction at the cytoplasmic face of the basolateral membrane. Scatchard plots of (/sup 3/H)gentamicin binding to basolateral and brush border membranes revealed a single class of noninteracting sites in each membrane. Gentamicin did not change the bulk membrane lipid fluidity, as estimated by the fluorescence polarization of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene.

  10. Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetase from Pseudomonas fragi Catalyzes the Synthesis of Adenosine 5′-Polyphosphates and Dinucleoside Polyphosphates†

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Rui; Günther Sillero, Maria A.; Sillero, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    Acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase (EC 6.2.1.8) from Pseudomonas fragi catalyzes the synthesis of adenosine 5′-tetraphosphate (p4A) and adenosine 5′-pentaphosphate (p5A) from ATP and tri- or tetrapolyphosphate, respectively. dATP, adenosine-5′-O-[γ-thiotriphosphate] (ATPγS), adenosine(5′)tetraphospho(5′)adenosine (Ap4A), and adenosine(5′)pentaphospho(5′)adenosine (Ap5A) are also substrates of the reaction yielding p4(d)A in the presence of tripolyphosphate (P3). UTP, CTP, and AMP are not substrates of the reaction. The Km values for ATP and P3 are 0.015 and 1.3 mM, respectively. Maximum velocity was obtained in the presence of MgCl2 or CoCl2 equimolecular with the sum of ATP and P3. The relative rates of synthesis of p4A with divalent cations were Mg = Co > Mn = Zn >> Ca. In the pH range used, maximum and minimum activities were measured at pH values of 5.5 and 8.2, respectively; the opposite was observed for the synthesis of palmitoyl-CoA, with maximum activity in the alkaline range. The relative rates of synthesis of palmitoyl-CoA and p4A are around 10 (at pH 5.5) and around 200 (at pH 8.2). The synthesis of p4A is inhibited by CoA, and the inhibitory effect of CoA can be counteracted by fatty acids. To a lesser extent, the enzyme catalyzes the synthesis also of Ap4A (from ATP), Ap5A (from p4A), and adenosine(5′)tetraphospho(5′)nucleoside (Ap4N) from adequate adenylyl donors (ATP, ATPγS, or octanoyl-AMP) and adequate adenylyl acceptors (nucleoside triphosphates). PMID:9620965

  11. Hyperglycemia alters E-NTPDases, ecto-5'-nucleotidase, and ectosolic and cytosolic adenosine deaminase activities and expression from encephala of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Siebel, Anna Maria; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2016-06-01

    Hyperglycemia is the main feature for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM). Some studies have demonstrated the relationship between DM and dysfunction on neurotransmission systems, such as the purinergic system. In this study, we evaluated the extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis and adenosine deamination activities from encephalic membranes of hyperglycemic zebrafish. A significant decrease in ATP, ADP, and AMP hydrolyses was observed at 111-mM glucose-treated group, which returned to normal levels after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. A significant increase in ecto-adenosine deaminase activity was observed in 111-mM glucose group, which remain elevated after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. The soluble-adenosine deaminase activity was significantly increased just after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. We also evaluated the gene expressions of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases), ecto-5'-nucleotidase, ADA, and adenosine receptors from encephala of adult zebrafish. The entpd 2a.1, entpd 2a.2, entpd 3, and entpd 8 mRNA levels from encephala of adult zebrafish were decreased in 111-mM glucose-treated and glucose withdrawal groups. The gene expressions of adenosine receptors (adora 1 , adora 2aa , adora 2ab , and adora 2b ) were decreased in 111-mM glucose-treated and glucose withdrawal groups. The gene expression of ADA (ada 2a.1) was decreased in glucose withdrawal group. Maltodextrin, used as a control, did not affect the expression of adenosine receptors, ADA and E-NTPDases 2, 3, and 8, while the expression of ecto-5'-nucleotidase was slightly increased and the E-NTPDases 1 decreased. These findings demonstrated that hyperglycemia might affect the ecto-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities and gene expression in zebrafish, probably through a mechanism involving the osmotic effect, suggesting that the modifications caused on purinergic system may also contribute to the diabetes-induced progressive cognitive impairment. PMID:26769247

  12. Circadian rhythm in adenosine A1 receptor of mouse cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, C.; Rosati, A.M.; Traversa, U.; Vertua, R. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to investigate diurnal variation in adenosine A1 receptors binding parameters, Bmax and Kd values of specifically bound N6-cyclohexyl-({sup 3}H)adenosine were determined in the cerebral cortex of mice that had been housed under controlled light-dark cycles for 4 weeks. Significant differences were found for Bmax values measured at 3-hr intervals across a 24-h period, with low Bmax values during the light period and high Bmax values during the dark period. The amplitude between 03.00 and 18.00 hr was 33%. No substantial rhythm was found in the Kd values. It is suggested that the changes in the density of A1 receptors could reflect a physiologically-relevant mechanism by which adenosine exerts its modulatory role in the central nervous system.

  13. Autoradiographic localization of adenosine uptake sites in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine

    SciTech Connect

    Bisserbe, J.C.; Patel, J.; Marangos, P.J.

    1985-02-01

    The adenosine uptake site has been localized in rat brain by an in vitro light microscopic autoradiographic method, using (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine ((/sup 3/H)NBI) as the probe. The binding characteristics of (/sup 3/H)NBI on slide-mounted sections are comparable to those seen in studies performed on brain homogenates. A very high density of uptake sites occurs in the nucleus tractus solitarius, in the superficial layer of the superior colliculus, in several thalamic nuclei, and also in geniculate body nuclei. A high density of sites are also observed in the nucleus accumbens, the caudate putamen, the dorsal tegmentum area, the substantia nigra, and the central gray. The localization of the adenosine uptake site in brain may provide information on the functional activity of the site and suggests the involvement of the adenosine system in the central regulation of cardiovascular function.

  14. An Efficient Protection-Free One-Pot Chemical Synthesis of Modified Nucleoside-5'-Triphosphates.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Muthian; Senthilvelan, Annamalai; Xiao, Zejun; Kore, Anilkumar R

    2016-07-01

    A simple, reliable, and an efficient "one-pot, three step" chemical method for the synthesis of modified nucleoside triphosphates such as 5-methylcytidine-5'-triphosphate (5-MeCTP), pseudouridine-5'-triphosphate (pseudoUTP) and N(1)-methylpseudouridine-5'-triphosphate (N(1)-methylpseudoUTP) starting from the corresponding nucleoside is described. The overall reaction involves the monophosphorylation of nucleoside, followed by the reaction with pyrophosphate and subsequent hydrolysis of the cyclic intermediate to furnish the corresponding NTP in moderate yields with high purity (>99.5%). PMID:27159048

  15. Stable ATP binding mediated by a partial NBD dimer of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2010-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, is an ATP-gated chloride channel. Like other ABC proteins, CFTR encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), NBD1 and NBD2, each accommodating an ATP binding site. It is generally accepted that CFTR's opening-closing cycles, each completed within 1 s, are driven by rapid ATP binding and hydrolysis events in NBD2. Here, by recording CFTR currents in real time with a ligand exchange protocol, we demonstrated that during many of these gating cycles, NBD1 is constantly occupied by a stably bound ATP or 8-N(3)-ATP molecule for tens of seconds. We provided evidence that this tightly bound ATP or 8-N(3)-ATP also interacts with residues in the signature sequence of NBD2, a telltale sign for an event occurring at the NBD1-NBD2 interface. The open state of CFTR has been shown to represent a two-ATP-bound NBD dimer. Our results indicate that upon ATP hydrolysis in NBD2, the channel closes into a "partial NBD dimer" state where the NBD interface remains partially closed, preventing ATP dissociation from NBD1 but allowing the release of hydrolytic products and binding of the next ATP to occur in NBD2. Opening and closing of CFTR can then be coupled to the formation and "partial" separation of the NBD dimer. The tightly bound ATP molecule in NBD1 can occasionally dissociate from the partial dimer state, resulting in a nucleotide-free monomeric state of NBDs. Our data, together with other structural/functional studies of CFTR's NBDs, suggest that this process is poorly reversible, implying that the channel in the partial dimer state or monomeric state enters the open state through different pathways. We therefore proposed a gating model for CFTR with two distinct cycles. The structural and functional significance of our results to other ABC proteins is discussed. PMID:20421370

  16. Inhibition of ATP Synthase by Chlorinated Adenosine Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lisa S.; Nowak, Billie J.; Ayres, Mary L.; Krett, Nancy L.; Rosen, Steven T.; Zhang, Shuxing; Gandhi, Varsha

    2009-01-01

    8-Chloroadenosine (8-Cl-Ado) is a ribonucleoside analogue that is currently in clinical trial for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Based on the decline in cellular ATP pool following 8-Cl-Ado treatment, we hypothesized that 8-Cl-ADP and 8-Cl-ATP may interfere with ATP synthase, a key enzyme in ATP production. Mitochondrial ATP synthase is composed of two major parts; FO intermembrane base and F1 domain, containing α and β subunits. Crystal structures of both α and β subunits that bind to the substrate, ADP, are known in tight binding (αdpβdp) and loose binding (αtpβtp) states. Molecular docking demonstrated that 8-Cl-ADP/8-Cl-ATP occupied similar binding modes as ADP/ATP in the tight and loose binding sites of ATP synthase, respectively, suggesting that the chlorinated nucleotide metabolites may be functional substrates and inhibitors of the enzyme. The computational predictions were consistent with our whole cell biochemical results. Oligomycin, an established pharmacological inhibitor of ATP synthase, decreased both ATP and 8-Cl-ATP formation from exogenous substrates, however, did not affect pyrimidine nucleoside analogue triphosphate accumulation. Synthesis of ATP from ADP was inhibited in cells loaded with 8-Cl-ATP. These biochemical studies are in consent with the computational modeling; in the αtpβtp state 8-Cl-ATP occupies similar binding as ANP, a non-hydrolyzable ATP mimic that is a known inhibitor. Similarly, in the substrate binding site (αdpβdp) 8-Cl-ATP occupies a similar position as ATP mimic ADP-BeF3 −. Collectively, our current work suggests that 8-Cl-ADP may serve as a substrate and the 8-Cl-ATP may be an inhibitor of ATP synthase. PMID:19477165

  17. Cloning of cDNAs encoding mammalian double-stranded RNA-specific adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, M A; Krause, S; Higuchi, M; Hsuan, J J; Totty, N F; Jenny, A; Keller, W

    1995-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-specific adenosine deaminase converts adenosine to inosine in dsRNA. The protein has been purified from calf thymus, and here we describe the cloning of cDNAs encoding both the human and rat proteins as well as a partial bovine clone. The human and rat clones are very similar at the amino acid level except at their N termini and contain three dsRNA binding motifs, a putative nuclear targeting signal, and a possible deaminase motif. Antibodies raised against the protein encoded by the partial bovine clone specifically recognize the calf thymus dsRNA adenosine deaminase. Furthermore, the antibodies can immunodeplete a calf thymus extract of dsRNA adenosine deaminase activity, and the activity can be restored by addition of pure bovine deaminase. Staining of HeLa cells confirms the nuclear localization of the dsRNA-specific adenosine deaminase. In situ hybridization in rat brain slices indicates a widespread distribution of the enzyme in the brain. PMID:7862132

  18. Role of extracellular cysteine residues in the adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    De Filippo, Elisabetta; Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran; Zappe, Lukas; El-Tayeb, Ali; Schiedel, Anke C; Müller, Christa E

    2016-06-01

    The G protein-coupled A2A adenosine receptor represents an important drug target. Crystal structures and modeling studies indicated that three disulfide bonds are formed between ECL1 and ECL2 (I, Cys71(2.69)-Cys159(45.43); II, Cys74(3.22)-Cys146(45.30), and III, Cys77(3.25)-Cys166(45.50)). However, the A2BAR subtype appears to require only disulfide bond III for proper function. In this study, each of the three disulfide bonds in the A2AAR was disrupted by mutation of one of the cysteine residues to serine. The mutant receptors were stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and analyzed in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and radioligand binding studies using structurally diverse agonists: adenosine, NECA, CGS21680, and PSB-15826. Results were rationalized by molecular modeling. The observed effects were dependent on the investigated agonist. Loss of disulfide bond I led to a widening of the orthosteric binding pocket resulting in a strong reduction in the potency of adenosine, but not of NECA or 2-substituted nucleosides. Disruption of disulfide bond II led to a significant reduction in the agonists' efficacy indicating its importance for receptor activation. Disulfide bond III disruption reduced potency and affinity of the small adenosine agonists and NECA, but not of the larger 2-substituted agonists. While all the three disulfide bonds were essential for high potency or efficacy of adenosine, structural modification of the nucleoside could rescue affinity or efficacy at the mutant receptors. At present, it cannot be excluded that formation of the extracellular disulfide bonds in the A2AAR is dynamic. This might add another level of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) modulation, in particular for the cysteine-rich A2A and A2BARs. PMID:26969588

  19. Adenosine receptor agonists attenuate and adenosine receptor antagonists exacerbate opiate withdrawal signs.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Sears, M T

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a role for adenosine in mediating opiate effects. Adenosine receptors and their functions have been shown to be regulated by chronic opiate treatment. This study examines the role of adenosine receptors in the expression of opiate withdrawal behaviors. The effects of single doses of parenterally administered adenosine receptor subtype-selective agonists and antagonists on opiate withdrawal signs in morphine-dependent mice were measured. Mice received subcutaneous morphine pellet treatment for 72 h and then underwent naloxone-precipitated withdrawal after pretreatment with adenosinergic agents. Adenosine agonists attenuated different opiate withdrawal signs. The A1 agonist R-N6(phenylisopropyl)adenosine (0, 0.01, 0.02 mg/kg, IP) significantly reduced wet dog shakes and withdrawal diarrhea, while the A2a-selective agonist 2-p-(2-carboxethyl)phenylethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine or CGS 21680 (0, 0.01, 0.05 mg/kg, IP) significantly inhibited teeth chattering and forepaw treads. Adenosine receptor antagonists enhanced different opiate withdrawal signs. The adenosine A1 antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (0, 1, 10 mg/kg, IP) significantly increased weight loss and the A2 antagonist, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (0, 1 and 10 mg/kg, IP) enhanced wet dog shakes and withdrawal diarrhea. Treatment effects of adenosinergic agents were not due to nonspecific motor effects, as demonstrated by activity monitoring studies. These results support a role for adenosine receptors in the expression of opiate withdrawal and suggest the potential utility of adenosine agonists in its treatment. PMID:8741956

  20. Hexokinase inhibitor screening based on adenosine 5'-diphosphate determination by electrophoretically mediated microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tongdan; Kang, Jingwu

    2009-04-01

    A CE-based method for hexokinase inhibitor screening was developed in the present paper. In this method, hexokinase activity was assayed via electrophoretically mediated microanalysis (EMMA), which combines on-column hexokinase-mediated reaction and measurement of produced adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) via electrophoretical separation and UV detection. Enzyme inhibition can be read out directly from the reduced peak area of ADP in comparison with a reference electropherogram obtained in the absence of any inhibitor. Conditions for on-column enzyme reaction and separation of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and ADP were optimized. The optimal buffer composition for enzymatic reaction was 25 mM HEPES buffer (pH 7.5) containing 5 mM MgCl(2), whereas the optimal buffer composition for separation was 100 mM Tris-phosphate buffer (pH 5.5) containing 0.02% (m/v) hexadimethrine bromide (HDB). Fortunately, discontinuous buffer system can be adapted easily in the EMMA method. The time for separation was reduced dramatically to less than 3 min by reversing the direction of EOF via dynamically coating the capillary wall with the cationic polyelectrolyte HDB. Moreover, the peak tailing of ATP was also reduced by HDB coating. The Z' factor as high as 0.98 was obtained, indicating a high quality of the screening data. The present method is simple, robust and cost-effective. PMID:19306267

  1. Caffeine-induced behavioral stimulation is dose-dependent and associated with A1 adenosine receptor occupancy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Greenblatt, D J; Kent, M A; Cotreau, M M; Arcelin, G; Shader, R I

    1992-05-01

    Caffeine's psychomotor stimulant effects may relate to its blockade of central adenosine receptors. We examined acute caffeine effects on motor activity, adenosine receptor occupancy in vivo, and receptor affinity and density ex vivo. Acute doses of caffeine-sodium benzoate (0, 20, 40, and 60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [0, 0.10, 0.21, 0.31 mu mol/kg]) were given to CD-1 mice and their activity was measured in an animal activity monitor over a 1-hour period. Adenosine receptor occupancy in vivo was quantified in mice 1 hour postdosage, using the high-affinity, A1 receptor selective adenosine antagonist [3H]-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine. Adenosine receptor binding affinities and densities were determined from analyses of binding studies in cortical, hippocampal, and brainstem membranes from treated mice (0 and 40 mg/kg caffeine). Caffeine doses of 20 and 40 mg/kg, corresponding to mean brain concentrations of 5 and 17 micrograms/g, increased all horizontal and vertical motor activity measures and stereotypy counts, as compared to doses of 0 and 60 mg/kg. Additionally, all acute caffeine doses significantly altered specific A1 binding in vivo (decreasing binding between 55% and 73% versus vehicle), presumably as it occupied A1 receptors. Therefore, at doses of 20 and 40 mg/kg, caffeine stimulated motor activity as it occupied A1 receptors; at a dose of 60 mg/kg (mean brain concentration of 26 micrograms/g) caffeine had no stimulant effect even though it appeared to occupy A1 receptors. Acute caffeine dosage did not alter ex vivo adenosine receptor binding affinity or density in any brain regions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1599605

  2. Ubiquitination and filamentous structure of cytidine triphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Pai, Li-Mei; Wang, Pei-Yu; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chakraborty, Archan; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Lin, Yu-Hung

    2016-07-01

    Living organisms respond to nutrient availability by regulating the activity of metabolic enzymes. Therefore, the reversible post-translational modification of an enzyme is a common regulatory mechanism for energy conservation. Recently, cytidine-5'-triphosphate (CTP) synthase was discovered to form a filamentous structure that is evolutionarily conserved from flies to humans. Interestingly, induction of the formation of CTP synthase filament is responsive to starvation or glutamine depletion. However, the biological roles of this structure remain elusive. We have recently shown that ubiquitination regulates CTP synthase activity by promoting filament formation in Drosophila ovaries during endocycles. Intriguingly, although the ubiquitination process was required for filament formation induced by glutamine depletion, CTP synthase ubiquitination was found to be inversely correlated with filament formation in Drosophila and human cell lines. In this article, we discuss the putative dual roles of ubiquitination, as well as its physiological implications, in the regulation of CTP synthase structure. PMID:27116391

  3. Protein contacts and ligand binding in the inward-facing model of human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Pajeva, Ilza K; Hanl, Markus; Wiese, Michael

    2013-05-01

    The primary aim of this work was to analyze the contacts between residues in the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) and at the interface between the transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the NBDs in the inward-open homology model of human P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The analysis revealed communication nets through hydrogen bonding in the NBD and at the NBD-TMD interface of each half involving residues from the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) motifs and the coupling helices of the intracellular loops. Similar networks have been identified in P-gp conformations generated by molecular dynamics simulation. Differences have been recorded in the networking between both halves of P-gp. Many of the residue contacts have also been observed in the X-ray crystal structures of other ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which confirms their validity. Next, possible binding pockets involving residues of importance for the TMD-NBD communication were identified. By studying these pockets, binding sites were suggested for rhodamine 123 (R-site) and prazosin (regulatory site) at the NBD-TMD interface that agreed with the experimental data on their location. Additionally, one more R-site in the protein cavity was proposed, in accordance with the available biochemical data. Together with the previously suggested Hoechst 33342 site (H-site), all sites were interpreted with respect to their effects on the protein ATPase activity, in correspondence with the experimental observations. Several residues involved in key contacts in the P-gp NBDs were proposed for further targeted mutagenesis experiments. PMID:23564544

  4. Adenosine conjugated lipidic nanoparticles for enhanced tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Swami, Rajan; Singh, Indu; Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Naidu, V G M; Khan, Wahid; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Delivering chemotherapeutics by nanoparticles into tumor is impeded majorly by two factors: nonspecific targeting and inefficient penetration. Targeted delivery of anti-cancer agents solely to tumor cells introduces a smart strategy because it enhances the therapeutic index compared with untargeted drugs. The present study was performed to investigate the efficiency of adenosine (ADN) to target solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) to over expressing adenosine receptor cell lines such as human breast cancer and prostate cancer (MCF-7 and DU-145 cells), respectively. SLN were prepared by emulsification and solvent evaporation process using docetaxel (DTX) as drug and were characterized by various techniques like dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimeter and transmission electron microscopy. DTX loaded SLNs were surface modified with ADN, an adenosine receptors ligand using carbodiimide coupling. Conjugation was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy and quantified using phenol-sulfuric acid method. Conjugated SLN were shown to have sustained drug release as compared to unconjugated nanoparticles and drug suspension. Compared with free DTX and unconjugated SLN, ADN conjugated SLN showed significantly higher cytotoxicity of loaded DTX, as evidenced by in vitro cell experiments. The IC50 was 0.41 μg/ml for native DTX, 0.30 μg/ml for unconjugated SLN formulation, and 0.09 μg/ml for ADN conjugated SLN formulation in MCF-7 cell lines. Whereas, in DU-145, there was 2 fold change in IC50 of ADN-SLN as compared to DTX. IC50 was found to be 0.44 μg/ml for free DTX, 0.39 μg/ml for unconjugated SLN and 0.22 μg/ml for ADN-SLN. Annexin assay and cell cycle analysis assay further substantiated the cell cytotoxicity. Fluorescent cell uptake and competitive ligand-receptor binding assay corroborated the receptor mediated endocytosis pathway indicated role of adenosine receptors in internalization of conjugated particles. Pharmacokinetic studies of lipidic

  5. Improving dideoxynucleotide-triphosphate utilisation by the hyper-thermophilic DNA polymerase from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Steven J.; Fogg, Mark J.; Mamone, Anthony; Davis, Maria; Pearl, Laurence H.; Connolly, Bernard A.

    2000-01-01

    Polymerases from the Pol-I family which are able to efficiently use ddNTPs have demonstrated a much improved performance when used to sequence DNA. A number of mutations have been made to the gene coding for the Pol-II family DNA polymerase from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus with the aim of improving ddNTP utilisation. ‘Rational’ alterations to amino acids likely to be near the dNTP binding site (based on sequence homologies and structural information) did not yield the desired level of selectivity for ddNTPs. However, alteration at four positions (Q472, A486, L490 and Y497) gave rise to variants which incorporated ddNTPs better than the wild type, allowing sequencing reactions to be carried out at lowered ddNTP:dNTP ratios. Wild-type Pfu–Pol required a ddNTP:dNTP ratio of 30:1; values of 5:1 (Q472H), 1:3 (L490W), 1:5 (A486Y) and 5:1 (Y497A) were found with the four mutants; A486Y representing a 150-fold improvement over the wild type. A486, L490 and Y497 are on an α-helix that lines the dNTP binding groove, but the side chains of the three amino acids point away from this groove; Q472 is in a loop that connects this α-helix to a second long helix. None of the four amino acids can contact the dNTP directly. Therefore, the increased selectivity for ddNTPs is likely to arise from two factors: (i) small overall changes in conformation that subtly alter the nucleotide triphosphate binding site such that ddNTPs become favoured; (ii) interference with a conformational change that may be critical both for the polymerisation step and discrimination between different nucleotide triphosphates. PMID:10666444

  6. Nucleoside transporter expression and adenosine uptake in the rat cochlea.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul F; Thorne, Peter R; Muñoz, David J B; Wang, Carol J H; Housley, Gary D; Vlajkovic, Srdjan M

    2007-02-12

    Even though extracellular adenosine plays multiple roles in the cochlea, the mechanisms that control extracellular adenosine concentrations in this organ are unclear. This study investigated the expression of nucleoside transporters and adenosine uptake in the rat cochlea. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed the expression of mRNA transcripts for two equilibrative (ENT1 and ENT2) and two concentrative (CNT1 and CNT2) nucleoside transporters. Exogenous adenosine perfused through the cochlear perilymphatic compartment was taken up by cells lining the compartment. Adenosine uptake was sensitive to changes in extracellular Na concentrations and inhibited by nitrobenzylthioinosine (an adenosine uptake blocker). The study suggests that the bi-directional nucleoside transport supports the uptake and recycling of purines and regulates the activation of adenosine receptors by altering adenosine concentrations in cochlear fluid spaces. PMID:17314663

  7. Functionalized Congeners of 1,4-Dihydropyridines as Antagonist Molecular Probes for A3 Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Li, An-Hu; Chang, Louis; Ji, Xiao-duo; Melman, Neli; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    4-Phenylethynyl-6-phenyl-1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives are selective antagonists at human A3 adenosine receptors, with Ki values in a radioligand binding assay vs [125I]AB-MECA [N6-(4-amino-3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methylcarbamoyl-adenosine] in the submicromolar range. In this study, functionalized congeners of 1,4-dihydropyridines were designed as chemically reactive adenosine A3 antagonists, for the purpose of synthesizing molecular probes for this receptor subtype. Selectivity of the new analogues for cloned human A3 adenosine receptors was determined in radioligand binding in comparison to binding at rat brain A1 and A2A receptors. Benzyl ester groups at the 3- and/or 5-positions and phenyl groups at the 2- and/or 6-positions were introduced as potential sites for chain attachment. Structure–activity analysis at A3 adenosine receptors indicated that 3,5-dibenzyl esters, but not 2,6-diphenyl groups, are tolerated in binding. Ring substitution of the 5-benzyl ester with a 4-fluorosulfonyl group provided enhanced A3 receptor affinity resulting in a Ki value of 2.42 nM; however, a long-chain derivative containing terminal amine functionalization at the 4-position of the 5-benzyl ester showed only moderate affinity. This sulfonyl fluoride derivative appeared to bind irreversibly to the human A3 receptor (1 h incubation at 100 nM resulting in the loss of 56% of the specific radioligand binding sites), while the binding of other potent dihydropyridines and other antagonists was generally reversible. At the 3-position of the dihydropyridine ring, an amine-functionalized chain attached at the 4-position of a benzyl ester provided higher A3 receptor affinity than the corresponding 5-position isomer. This amine congener was also used as an intermediate in the synthesis of a biotin conjugate, which bound to A3 receptors with a Ki value of 0.60 μM. PMID:10411465

  8. Structural Insight into Activation Mechanism of Toxoplasma gondii Nucleoside Triphosphate Diphosphohydrolases by Disulfide Reduction*

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Ulrike; Zebisch, Matthias; Krauss, Michel; Sträter, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii produces two nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDase1 and -3). These tetrameric, cysteine-rich enzymes require activation by reductive cleavage of a hitherto unknown disulfide bond. Despite a 97% sequence identity, both isozymes differ largely in their ability to hydrolyze ATP and ADP. Here, we present crystal structures of inactive NTPDase3 as an apo form and in complex with the product AMP to resolutions of 2.0 and 2.2 Å, respectively. We find that the enzyme is present in an open conformation that precludes productive substrate binding and catalysis. The cysteine bridge 258–268 is identified to be responsible for locking of activity. Crystal structures of constitutively active variants of NTPDase1 and -3 generated by mutation of Cys258–Cys268 show that opening of the regulatory cysteine bridge induces a pronounced contraction of the whole tetramer. This is accompanied by a 12° domain closure motion resulting in the correct arrangement of all active site residues. A complex structure of activated NTPDase3 with a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog and the cofactor Mg2+ to a resolution of 2.85 Å indicates that catalytic differences between the NTPDases are primarily dictated by differences in positioning of the adenine base caused by substitution of Arg492 and Glu493 in NTPDase1 by glycines in NTPDase3. PMID:22130673

  9. The roles of initiation factor 2 and guanosine triphosphate in initiation of protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Antoun, Ayman; Pavlov, Michael Y.; Andersson, Kerstin; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2003-01-01

    The role of IF2 from Escherichia coli was studied in vitro using a system for protein synthesis with purified components. Stopped flow experiments with light scattering show that IF2 in complex with guanosine triphosphate (GTP) or a non-cleavable GTP analogue (GDPNP), but not with guanosine diphosphate (GDP), promotes fast association of ribosomal subunits during initiation. Biochemical experiments show that IF2 promotes fast formation of the first peptide bond in the presence of GTP, but not GDPNP or GDP, and that IF2–GDPNP binds strongly to post-initiation ribosomes. We conclude that the GTP form of IF2 accelerates formation of the 70S ribosome from subunits and that GTP hydrolysis accelerates release of IF2 from the 70S ribosome. The results of a recent report, suggesting that GTP and GDP promote initiation equally fast, have been addressed. Our data, indicating that eIF5B and IF2 have similar functions, are used to rationalize the phenotypes of GTPase-deficient mutants of eIF5B and IF2. PMID:14532131

  10. Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-Triphosphate and Cellular Signaling: Implications for Obesity and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Prasenjit; Jain, Sushil K.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) is one of the most important phosphoinositides and is capable of activating a wide range of proteins through its interaction with their specific binding domains. Localization and activation of these effector proteins regulate a number of cellular functions, including cell survival, proliferation, cytoskeletal rearrangement, intracellular vesicle trafficking, and cell metabolism. Phosphoinositides have been investigated as an important agonist-dependent second messenger in the regulation of diverse physiological events depending upon the phosphorylation status of their inositol group. Dysregulation in formation as well as metabolism of phosphoinositides is associated with various pathophysiological disorders such as inflammation, allergy, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and metabolic diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated that the impaired metabolism of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 is a prime mediator of insulin resistance associated with various metabolic diseases including obesity and diabetes. This review examines the current status of the role of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 signaling in the regulation of various cellular functions and the implications of dysregulated PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 signaling in obesity, diabetes, and their associated complications. PMID:25721445

  11. Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli Cytidine Triphosphate Synthetase, a Nucleotide-Regulated Glutamine Amidotransferase/ATP-Dependent Amidoligase Fusion Protein and Homologue of Anticancer and Antiparasitic Drug Targets†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Endrizzi, James A.; Kim, Hanseong; Anderson, Paul M.; Baldwin, Enoch P.

    2010-01-01

    Cytidine triphosphate synthetases (CTPSs) produce CTP from UTP and glutamine, and regulate intracellular CTP levels through interactions with the four ribonucleotide triphosphates. We solved the 2.3-Å resolution crystal structure of Escherichia coli CTPS using Hg-MAD phasing. The structure reveals a nearly symmetric 222 tetramer, in which each bifunctional monomer contains a dethiobiotin synthetase-like amidoligase N-terminal domain and a Type 1 glutamine amidotransferase C-terminal domain. For each amidoligase active site, essential ATP- and UTP-binding surfaces are contributed by three monomers, suggesting that activity requires tetramer formation, and that a nucleotide-dependent dimer–tetramer equilibrium contributes to the observed positive cooperativity. A gated channel that spans 25 Å between the glutamine hydrolysis and amidoligase active sites provides a path for ammonia diffusion. The channel is accessible to solvent at the base of a cleft adjoining the glutamine hydrolysis active site, providing an entry point for exogenous ammonia. Guanine nucleotide binding sites of structurally related GTPases superimpose on this cleft, providing insights into allosteric regulation by GTP. Mutations that confer nucleoside drug resistance and release CTP inhibition map to a pocket that neighbors the UTP-binding site and can accommodate a pyrimidine ring. Its location suggests that competitive feedback inhibition is affected via a distinct product/drug binding site that overlaps the substrate triphosphate binding site. Overall, the E. coli structure provides a framework for homology modeling of other CTPSs and structure-based design of anti-CTPS therapeutics. PMID:15157079

  12. Adenosine metabolism in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, F F; Mendelsohn, J; Seegmiller, J E

    1976-01-01

    The association of a human genetic deficiency of adenosine deaminase activity with combined immunodeficiency prompted a study of the effects of adenosine and of inhibition of adenosine deaminase activity on human lymphocyte transformation and a detailed study of adenosine metabolism throughout phytohemagglutinin-induced blastogenesis. The adenosine deaminase inhibitor, coformycin, at a concentration that inhibited adenosine deaminase activity more than 95%, or 50 muM adenosine, did not prevent blastogenesis by criteria of morphology or thymidine incorporation into acid-precipitable material. The combination of coformycin and adenosine, however, substantially reduced both the viable cell count and the incorporation of thymidine into DNA in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes. Incubation of lymphocytes with phytohemagglutinin for 72 h produced a 12-fold increase in the rate of deamination and a 6-fold increase in phosphorylation of adenosine by intact lymphocytes. There was no change in the apparent affinity for adenosine with either deamination or phosphorylation. The increased rates of metabolism, apparent as early as 3 h after addition of mitogen, may be due to increased entry of the nucleoside into stimulated lymphocytes. Increased adenosine metabolism was not due to changes in total enzyme activity; after 72 h in culture, the ratios of specific activities in extracts of stimulated to unstimulated lymphocytes were essentially unchanged for adenosine kinase, 0.92, and decreased for adenosine deaminase, 0.44. As much as 38% of the initial lymphocyte adenosine deaminase activity accumulated extracellularly after a 72-h culture with phytohemagglutinin. In phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes, the principal route of adenosine metabolism was phosphorylation at less than 5 muM adenosine, and deamination at concentrations greater than 5 muM. In unstimulated lymphocytes, deamination was the principal route of adenosine metabolism over the range of adenosine

  13. Structural and Metabolic Specificity of Methylthiocoformycin for Malarial Adenosine Deaminases

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.; Cassera, M; Madrid, D; Ting, L; Tyler, P; Kim, K; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is a purine auxotroph requiring hypoxanthine as a key metabolic precursor. Erythrocyte adenine nucleotides are the source of the purine precursors, making adenosine deaminase (ADA) a key enzyme in the pathway of hypoxanthine formation. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) is a substrate for most malarial ADAs, but not for human ADA. The catalytic site specificity of malarial ADAs permits methylthiocoformycin (MT-coformycin) to act as a Plasmodium-specific transition state analogue with low affinity for human ADA. The structural basis for MTA and MT-coformycin specificity in malarial ADAs is the subject of speculation. Here, the crystal structure of ADA from Plasmodium vivax (PvADA) in a complex with MT-coformycin reveals an unprecedented binding geometry for 5?-methylthioribosyl groups in the malarial ADAs. Compared to malarial ADA complexes with adenosine or deoxycoformycin, 5?-methylthioribosyl groups are rotated 130 degrees. A hydrogen bonding network between Asp172 and the 3?-hydroxyl of MT-coformycin is essential for recognition of the 5?-methylthioribosyl group. Water occupies the 5?-hydroxyl binding site when MT-coformycin is bound. Mutagenesis of Asp172 destroys the substrate specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Kinetic, mutagenic, and structural analyses of PvADA and kinetic analysis of five other Plasmodium ADAs establish the unique structural basis for its specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Plasmodium gallinaceum ADA does not use MTA as a substrate, is not inhibited by MT-coformycin, and is missing Asp172. Treatment of P. falciparum cultures with coformycin or MT-coformycin in the presence of MTA is effective in inhibiting parasite growth.

  14. Extracellular formation and uptake of adenosine during skeletal muscle contraction in the rat: role of adenosine transporters.

    PubMed

    Lynge, J; Juel, C; Hellsten, Y

    2001-12-01

    1. The existence of adenosine transporters in plasma membrane giant vesicles from rat skeletal muscles and in primary skeletal muscle cell cultures was investigated. In addition, the contribution of intracellularly or extracellularly formed adenosine to the overall extracellular adenosine concentration during muscle contraction was determined in primary skeletal muscle cell cultures. 2. In plasma membrane giant vesicles, the carrier-mediated adenosine transport demonstrated saturation kinetics with Km = 177 +/- 36 microM and Vmax = 1.9 +/- 0.2 nmol x ml(-1) x s(-1) (0.7 nmol (mg protein)(-1) x s(-1)). The existence of an adenosine transporter was further evidenced by the inhibition of the carrier-mediated adenosine transport in the presence of NBMPR (nitrobenzylthioinosine; 72% inhibition) or dipyridamol (64% inhibition; P < 0.05). 3. In primary skeletal muscle cells, the rate of extracellular adenosine accumulation was 5-fold greater (P < 0.05) with electrical stimulation than without electrical stimulation. Addition of the adenosine transporter inhibitor NBMPR led to a 57% larger (P < 0.05) rate of extracellular adenosine accumulation in the electro-stimulated muscle cells compared with control cells, demonstrating that adenosine is taken up by the skeletal muscle cells during contractions. 4. Inhibition of ecto-5'-nucleotidase with AOPCP in electro-stimulated cells resulted in a 70% lower (P < 0.05) rate of extracellular adenosine accumulation compared with control cells, indicating that adenosine to a large extent is formed in the extracellular space during contraction. 5. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an NBMPR-sensitive adenosine transporter in rat skeletal muscle. Our data furthermore demonstrate that the increase in extracellular adenosine observed during electro-stimulation of skeletal muscle is due to production of adenosine in the extracellular space of skeletal muscle and that adenosine is taken up rather than released by the

  15. Synthesis of α-l-Threofuranosyl Nucleoside Triphosphates (tNTPs)

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Keyong; Horhota, Allen; Yu, Biao; Szostak, Jack W.

    2005-01-01

    The α-l-threofuranosyl nucleoside triphosphates of T, G, and D (tTTP, tGTP, and tDTP) were synthesized from the described 2‘-O-DMT-protected derivatives using the Eckstein method, while the corresponding C derivative (tCTP) was prepared from the 2‘-O-acetyl derivative. The prepared α-l-threofuranosyl nucleoside triphosphates, despite being one carbon shorter than the native 2‘-deoxyfuranosyl nucleoside triphosphates, are effective substrates for selected DNA polymerases. PMID:15816733

  16. Inhibition of mammalian RNA polymerase by 5,6-dichlororibofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) and DRB triphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, C; Hausen, P

    1978-01-01

    DRB triphosphate inhibits activity of isolated RNA polymerase B, and, to a lesser extent, that of polymerase A. The same holds true for transcription in isolated nuclei. It does not act as an initiation inhibitor. In all cases, high concentrations of DRB triphosphate are required. Cells do not phosphorylate DRB to a measurable extent. hn RNA resistant to DRB is initiated with both ATP and GTP in the presence of the drug. These experiments render the hypothesis unlikely that DRB triphosphate in the cell specifically interferes with the initiation reaction of polymerase B. PMID:704359

  17. Adenosine reagent-free detection by co-immobilization of adenosine deaminase and phenol red on an optical biostrip.

    PubMed

    Bartzoka, Foteini; Venetsanou, Katerina; Clonis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine detection in human serum is important because this ribonucleoside has established clinical applications, modulating many physiological processes. Furthermore, a simple and cheap detection method is useful in adenosine production processes. Adenosine can be determined enzymatically using either S-adenosyl-homocysteine hydrolase and (3) [H]-adenosine, or adenosine kinase combined with GTP and luciferase, or an amperometric biosensor carrying adenosine deaminase (ADA), purine nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase. We developed a simple and cheap method relying on a transparent biostrip bearing ADA and the indicator phenol red (PR), co-immobilized to polyacrylamide, itself chemically adhered to a derivatized glass strip. The ADA-catalyzed conversion of adenosine to inosine and ammonia leads to a local pH alteration, changing the absorbance maximum of PR (from 425 to 567 nm), which is measured optically. The biostrip shows an analytical range 0.05-1.5 mM adenosine and is reusable when stored at 4 °C. When the biostrip was tested with serum, spiked with adenosine (70 and 100 μM), and filtered for protein and adenosine phosphates depletion, it showed good adenosine recovery. In summary, we show the proof-of-concept that adenosine can be determined reagent-free, at moderate sensitivity on an easy to construct, cheap, and reusable biostrip, based on commercially available molecular entities. PMID:25293641

  18. Kinetic and biochemical characterization of Trypanosoma evansi nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Paulo Henrique Exterchoter; Batista, Franciane; Wagner, Glauber; Magalhães, Maria de Lourdes Borba; Miletti, Luiz Claudio

    2015-06-01

    Nucleoside triphosphate diphospho-hydrolases (NTPDases) catalyze the hydrolysis of several nucleosides tri and diphosphate playing major roles in eukaryotes including purinergic signaling, inflammation, hemostasis, purine salvage and host-pathogen interactions. These enzymes have been recently described in parasites where several evidences indicated their involvement in virulence and infection. Here, we have investigated the presence of NTPDase in the genome of Trypanosoma evansi. Based on the genomic sequence from Trypanosoma brucei, we have amplified an 1812 gene fragment corresponding to the T. evansi NTPDase gene. The protein was expressed in the soluble form and purified to homogeneity and enzymatic assays were performed confirming the enzyme identity. Kinetic parameters and substrate specificity were determined. The dependence of cations on enzymatic activity was investigated indicating the enzyme is stimulated by divalent cations and carbohydrates but inhibited by sodium. Bioinformatic analysis indicates the enzyme is a membrane bound protein facing the extracellular side of the cell with 98% identity to the T. brucei homologous NTPDase gene. PMID:25819299

  19. Formation of. beta. ,. gamma. -methylene-7,8-dihydroneopterin 3'-triphosphate from. beta. ,. gamma. -methyleneguanosine 5'-triphosphate by GTP cyclohydrolase I of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Ferre, J.; Jacobson, K.B.

    1984-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I of Escherichia coli converts (..beta..,..gamma..-methylene)GTP to a fluorescent product that is characterized as (..beta..,..gamma..-methylene)dihydroneopterin triphosphate. Interaction between the GTP analog and the enzyme gave a K/sub i/ of 3.0 ..mu..M, which may be compared to the K/sub m/ of 0.1 ..mu..M for GTP. This new analog of dihydroneopterin triphosphate may, in turn, be converted to the same greenish-yellow pteridines (compounds X, X1, and X2) that are obtained from dihydroneopterin triphosphate. Because of its stability to phosphatase action, this analog may be useful for studies in pteridine metabolism. 14 references, 5 figures.

  20. Directional control of WAVE2 membrane targeting by EB1 and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuhide; Tanaka, Tacu; Suzuki, Katsuo

    2010-03-01

    Membrane targeting of WAVE2 along microtubules is mediated by a motor protein kinesin and requires Pak1, a downstream effector of Rac1. However, the mechanism by which WAVE2 targeting to the leading edge is directionally controlled remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that EB1, a microtubule plus-end-binding protein, constitutively associates with stathmin, a microtubule-destabilizing protein, in human breast cancer cells. Stimulation of the cells with insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) induced Pak1-dependent binding of the EB1-stathmin complex to microtubules that bear WAVE2 and colocalization of the complex with WAVE2 at the leading edge. Depletion of EB1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) abrogated the IGF-I-induced WAVE2 targeting and stathmin binding to microtubules. On the other hand, chemotaxis chamber assays indicated that the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) was locally activated in the region facing toward IGF-I. In addition, IGF-I caused phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)-dependent production of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) near activated IGF-IR and WAVE2 colocalization with it. Collectively, WAVE2-membrane targeting is directionally controlled by binding of the EB1-stathmin complex to WAVE2-bearing microtubules and by the interaction between WAVE2 and PIP3 produced near IGF-IR that is locally activated by IGF-I. PMID:19925864

  1. Neuroprotective effects of adenosine deaminase in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Risa; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Yasushi; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Nibuya, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catabolizes adenosine and deoxyadenosine. During cerebral ischemia, extracellular adenosine levels increase acutely and adenosine deaminase catabolizes the increased levels of adenosine. Since adenosine is a known neuroprotective agent, adenosine deaminase was thought to have a negative effect during ischemia. In this study, however, we demonstrate that adenosine deaminase has substantial neuroprotective effects in the striatum, which is especially vulnerable during cerebral ischemia. We used temporary oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) to simulate ischemia in rat corticostriatal brain slices. We used field potentials as the primary measure of neuronal damage. For stable and efficient electrophysiological assessment, we used transgenic rats expressing channelrhodopsin-2, which depolarizes neurons in response to blue light. Time courses of electrically evoked striatal field potential (eFP) and optogenetically evoked striatal field potential (optFP) were recorded during and after oxygen/glucose deprivation. The levels of both eFP and optFP decreased after 10 min of oxygen/glucose deprivation. Bath-application of 10 µg/ml adenosine deaminase during oxygen/glucose deprivation significantly attenuated the oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced reduction in levels of eFP and optFP. The number of injured cells decreased significantly, and western blot analysis indicated a significant decrease of autophagic signaling in the adenosine deaminase-treated oxygen/glucose deprivation slices. These results indicate that adenosine deaminase has protective effects in the striatum. PMID:26746865

  2. Synthesis of 5′-Methylthio Coformycins: Specific Inhibitors for Malarial Adenosine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Peter C.; Taylor, Erika A.; Fröhlich, Richard F. G.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2008-01-01

    Transition state theory suggests that enzymatic rate acceleration (kcat/knon) is related to the stabilization of the transition state for a given reaction. Chemically stable analogues of a transition state complex are predicted to convert catalytic energy into binding energy. Since transition state stabilization is a function of catalytic efficiency, differences in substrate specificity can be exploited in the design of tight-binding transition state analogue inhibitors. Coformycin and 2′-deoxycoformycin are natural product transition state analogue inhibitors of adenosine deaminases (ADAs). These compounds mimic the tetrahedral geometry of the ADA transition state and bind with picomolar dissociation constants to enzymes from bovine, human, and protozoan sources. The purine salvage pathway in malaria parasites is unique in that Plasmodium falciparum ADA (PfADA) catalyzes the deamination of both adenosine and 5’-methylthioadenosine. In contrast, human adenosine deaminase (HsADA) does not deaminate 5’-methylthioadenosine. 5′-Methylthio coformycin and 5’-meththio-2′-deoxycoformycin were synthesized to be specific transition state mimics of the P. falciparum enzyme. These analogues inhibited PfADA with dissociation constants of 430 and 790 pM, respectively. Remarkably, they gave no detectable inhibition of the human and bovine enzymes. Adenosine deamination is involved in the essential pathway of purine salvage in P. falciparum and prior studies have shown that inhibition of purine salvage results in parasite death. Inhibitors of HsADA are known to cause toxicity in humans and the availability of parasite-specific ADA inhibitors may prevent this side-effect. The potent and P. falciparum-specific inhibitors described here have potential for development as antimalarials without inhibition of host ADA. PMID:17488013

  3. Mutant cycles at CFTR's non-canonical ATP-binding site support little interface separation during gating.

    PubMed

    Szollosi, Andras; Muallem, Daniella R; Csanády, László; Vergani, Paola

    2011-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel belonging to the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. ABC proteins share a common molecular mechanism that couples ATP binding and hydrolysis at two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) to diverse functions. This involves formation of NBD dimers, with ATP bound at two composite interfacial sites. In CFTR, intramolecular NBD dimerization is coupled to channel opening. Channel closing is triggered by hydrolysis of the ATP molecule bound at composite site 2. Site 1, which is non-canonical, binds nucleotide tightly but is not hydrolytic. Recently, based on kinetic arguments, it was suggested that this site remains closed for several gating cycles. To investigate movements at site 1 by an independent technique, we studied changes in thermodynamic coupling between pairs of residues on opposite sides of this site. The chosen targets are likely to interact based on both phylogenetic analysis and closeness on structural models. First, we mutated T460 in NBD1 and L1353 in NBD2 (the corresponding site-2 residues become energetically coupled as channels open). Mutation T460S accelerated closure in hydrolytic conditions and in the nonhydrolytic K1250R background; mutation L1353M did not affect these rates. Analysis of the double mutant showed additive effects of mutations, suggesting that energetic coupling between the two residues remains unchanged during the gating cycle. We next investigated pairs 460-1348 and 460-1375. Although both mutations H1348A and H1375A produced dramatic changes in hydrolytic and nonhydrolytic channel closing rates, in the corresponding double mutants these changes proved mostly additive with those caused by mutation T460S, suggesting little change in energetic coupling between either positions 460-1348 or positions 460-1375 during gating. These results provide independent support for a gating model in which ATP-bound composite site 1 remains

  4. Synthesis and pharmacological characterization of novel xanthine carboxylate amides as A2A adenosine receptor ligands exhibiting bronchospasmolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rakesh; Bansal, Ranju; Rohilla, Suman; Kachler, Sonja; Klotz, Karl-Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The carboxylate amides of 8-phenyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine described herein represent a new series of selective ligands of the adenosine A2A receptors exhibiting bronchospasmolytic activity. The effects of location of 8-phenyl substitutions on the adenosine receptor (AR) binding affinities of the newly synthesized xanthines have also been studied. The compounds displayed moderate to potent binding affinities toward various adenosine receptor subtypes when evaluated through radioligand binding studies. However, most of the compounds showed the maximum affinity for the A2A subtype, some with high selectivity versus all other subtypes. Xanthine carboxylate amide 13b with a diethylaminoethylamino moiety at the para-position of the 8-phenylxanthine scaffold was identified as the most potent A2A adenosine receptor ligand with Ki=0.06μM. Similarly potent and highly A2A-selective are the isovanillin derivatives 16a and 16d. In addition, the newly synthesized xanthine derivatives showed good in vivo bronchospasmolytic activity when tested in guinea pigs. PMID:26851736

  5. Allosteric interactions at adenosine A1 and A3 receptors: new insights into the role of small molecules and receptor dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Stephen J; May, Lauren T; Kellam, Barrie; Woolard, Jeanette

    2014-01-01

    The purine nucleoside adenosine is present in all cells in tightly regulated concentrations. It is released under a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions to facilitate protection and regeneration of tissues. Adenosine acts via specific GPCRs to either stimulate cyclic AMP formation, as exemplified by Gs-protein-coupled adenosine receptors (A2A and A2B), or inhibit AC activity, in the case of Gi/o-coupled adenosine receptors (A1 and A3). Recent advances in our understanding of GPCR structure have provided insights into the conformational changes that occur during receptor activation following binding of agonists to orthosteric (i.e. at the same binding site as an endogenous modulator) and allosteric regulators to allosteric sites (i.e. at a site that is topographically distinct from the endogenous modulator). Binding of drugs to allosteric sites may lead to changes in affinity or efficacy, and affords considerable potential for increased selectivity in new drug development. Herein, we provide an overview of the properties of selective allosteric regulators of the adenosine A1 and A3 receptors, focusing on the impact of receptor dimerization, mechanistic approaches to single-cell ligand-binding kinetics and the effects of A1- and A3-receptor allosteric modulators on in vivo pharmacology. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24024783

  6. The ATP-binding cassette transporter OsABCG15 is required for anther development and pollen fertility in rice.

    PubMed

    Niu, Bai-Xiao; He, Fu-Rong; He, Ming; Ren, Ding; Chen, Le-Tian; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2013-08-01

    Plant male reproductive development is a complex biological process, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here, we characterized a rice (Oryza sativa L.) male sterile mutant. Based on map-based cloning and sequence analysis, we identified a 1,459-bp deletion in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene, OsABCG15, causing abnormal anthers and male sterility. Therefore, we named this mutant osabcg15. Expression analysis showed that OsABCG15 is expressed specifically in developmental anthers from stage 8 (meiosis II stage) to stage 10 (late microspore stage). Two genes CYP704B2 and WDA1, involved in the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids for the establishment of the anther cuticle and pollen exine, were downregulated in osabcg15 mutant, suggesting that OsABCG15 may play a key function in the processes related to sporopollenin biosynthesis or sporopollenin transfer from tapetal cells to anther locules. Consistently, histological analysis showed that osabcg15 mutants developed obvious abnormality in postmeiotic tapetum degeneration, leading to rapid degredation of young microspores. The results suggest that OsABCG15 plays a critical role in exine formation and pollen development, similar to the homologous gene of AtABCG26 in Arabidopsis. This work is helpful to understand the regulatory network in rice anther development. PMID:23570336

  7. Co-inhibition of CD73 and A2AR Adenosine Signaling Improves Anti-tumor Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Young, Arabella; Ngiow, Shin Foong; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Sult, Erin; Hay, Carl; Blake, Stephen J; Huang, Qihui; Liu, Jing; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Teng, Michele W L; Sachsenmeier, Kris; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-09-12

    Preclinical studies targeting the adenosinergic pathway have gained much attention for their clinical potential in overcoming tumor-induced immunosuppression. Here, we have identified that co-blockade of the ectonucleotidase that generates adenosine CD73 and the A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR) that mediates adenosine signaling in leuokocytes, by using compound gene-targeted mice or therapeutics that target these molecules, limits tumor initiation, growth, and metastasis. This tumor control requires effector lymphocytes and interferon-γ, while antibodies targeting CD73 promote an optimal therapeutic response in vivo when engaging activating Fc receptors. In a two-way mixed leukocyte reaction using a fully human anti-CD73, we demonstrated that Fc receptor binding augmented the production of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:27622332

  8. Dopamine-functionalized InP/ZnS quantum dots as fluorescence probes for the detection of adenosine in microfluidic chip

    PubMed Central

    Ankireddy, Seshadri Reddy; Kim, Jongsung

    2015-01-01

    Microbeads are frequently used as solid supports for biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids in heterogeneous microfluidic assays. Chip-based, quantum dot (QD)-bead-biomolecule probes have been used for the detection of various types of DNA. In this study, we developed dopamine (DA)-functionalized InP/ZnS QDs (QDs-DA) as fluorescence probes for the detection of adenosine in microfluidic chips. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the QDs-DA is quenched by Zn2+ because of the strong coordination interactions. In the presence of adenosine, Zn2+ cations preferentially bind to adenosine, and the PL intensity of the QDs-DA is recovered. A polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic chip was fabricated, and adenosine detection was confirmed using QDs-DA probes. PMID:26347351

  9. Silk polymer-based adenosine release: therapeutic potential for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wilz, Andrew; Pritchard, Eleanor M; Li, Tianfu; Lan, Jing-Quan; Kaplan, David L; Boison, Detlev

    2008-09-01

    Adenosine augmentation therapies (AAT) make rational use of the brain's own adenosine-based seizure control system and hold promise for the therapy of refractory epilepsy. In an effort to develop an AAT compatible with future clinical application, we developed a novel silk protein-based release system for adenosine. Adenosine releasing brain implants with target release doses of 0, 40, 200, and 1000ng adenosine per day were prepared by embedding adenosine containing microspheres into nanofilm-coated silk fibroin scaffolds. In vitro, the respective polymers released 0, 33.4, 170.5, and 819.0ng adenosine per day over 14 days. The therapeutic potential of the implants was validated in a dose-response study in the rat model of kindling epileptogenesis. Four days prior to the onset of kindling, adenosine releasing polymers were implanted into the infrahippocampal cleft and progressive acquisition of kindled seizures was monitored over a total of 48 stimulations. We document a dose-dependent retardation of seizure acquisition. In recipients of polymers releasing 819ng adenosine per day, kindling epileptogenesis was delayed by one week corresponding to 18 kindling stimulations. Histological analysis of brain samples confirmed the correct location of implants and electrodes. We conclude that silk-based delivery of around 1000ng adenosine per day is a safe and efficient strategy to suppress seizures. PMID:18514814

  10. Adenosine Signaling During Acute and Chronic Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Xia, Yang; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine is a signaling nucleoside that is produced following tissue injury, particularly injury involving ischemia and hypoxia. The production of extracellular adenosine and its subsequent signaling through adenosine receptors plays an important role in orchestrating injury responses in multiple organs. There are four adenosine receptors that are widely distributed on immune, epithelial, endothelial, neuronal and stromal cells throughout the body. Interestingly, these receptors are subject to altered regulation following injury. Studies in mouse models and human cells and tissues have identified that the production of adenosine and its subsequent signaling through its receptors plays largely beneficial roles in acute disease states, with the exception of brain injury. In contrast, if elevated adenosine levels are sustained beyond the acute injury phase, adenosine responses can become detrimental by activating pathways that promote tissue injury and fibrosis. Understanding when during the course of disease adenosine signaling is beneficial as opposed to detrimental and defining the mechanisms involved will be critical for the advancement of adenosine based therapies for acute and chronic diseases. The purpose of this review is to discuss key observations that define the beneficial and detrimental aspects of adenosine signaling during acute and chronic disease states with an emphasis on cellular processes such as inflammatory cell regulation, vascular barrier function and tissue fibrosis. PMID:23340998

  11. Adenosine diphosphate-degrading activity in placenta.

    PubMed

    Barradas, M; Khokher, M; Hutton, R; Craft, I L; Dandona, P

    1983-02-01

    1. The degradation of ADP by the placenta and umbilical artery was investigated. 2. Supernatants from incubations of finely chopped placental and umbilical arterial tissue were incubated with [14C]ADP for various durations from 0 to 30 min. 3. Products of ADP degradation were separated by thin-layer chromatography and radioactivity incorporated into each product was measured. 4. Placental supernatants induced a more rapid degradation of ADP than the umbilical artery supernatants. The main product of ADP degradation by placental supernatants at 30 min was adenosine, whereas that of umbilical artery was AMP. 5. This conversion by placenta of ADP, a potent platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor, into adenosine, a potent platelet anti-aggregator and vasodilator, may be important in the maintenance of perfusion of the foetoplacental unit. PMID:6822058

  12. Adenosine thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S. )

    1991-07-01

    Pharmacologic coronary vasodilation as an adjunct to myocardial perfusion imaging has become increasingly important in the evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease, in view of the large number of patients who cannot perform an adequate exercise test or in whom contraindications render exercise inappropriate. Adenosine is a very potent coronary vasodilator and when combined with thallium 201 scintigraphy produces images of high quality, with the added advantages of a very short half-life (less than 10 seconds) and the ability to adjust the dose during the infusion, which may enhance safety and curtail the duration of side effects. The reported sensitivity and specificity of adenosine thallium 201 scintigraphy for the detection of coronary artery disease are high and at least comparable with imaging after exercise or dipyridamole administration. 23 refs.

  13. The Crystal Structure of the Leishmania major Deoxyuridine Triphosphate Nucleotidohydrolase in Complex with Nucleotide Analogues, dUMP, and Deoxyuridine*

    PubMed Central

    Hemsworth, Glyn R.; Moroz, Olga V.; Fogg, Mark J.; Scott, Benjamin; Bosch-Navarrete, Cristina; González-Pacanowska, Dolores; Wilson, Keith S.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the Leishmania genus are the causative agents of the life-threatening disease leishmaniasis. New drugs are being sought due to increasing resistance and adverse side effects with current treatments. The knowledge that dUTPase is an essential enzyme and that the all α-helical dimeric kinetoplastid dUTPases have completely different structures compared with the trimeric β-sheet type dUTPase possessed by most organisms, including humans, make the dimeric enzymes attractive drug targets. Here, we present crystal structures of the Leishmania major dUTPase in complex with substrate analogues, the product dUMP and a substrate fragment, and of the homologous Campylobacter jejuni dUTPase in complex with a triphosphate substrate analogue. The metal-binding properties of both enzymes are shown to be dependent upon the ligand identity, a previously unseen characteristic of this family. Furthermore, structures of the Leishmania enzyme in the presence of dUMP and deoxyuridine coupled with tryptophan fluorescence quenching indicate that occupation of the phosphate binding region is essential for induction of the closed conformation and hence for substrate binding. These findings will aid in the development of dUTPase inhibitors as potential new lead anti-trypanosomal compounds. PMID:21454646

  14. Adenosine A2B Receptor: From Cell Biology to Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR's functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases, and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases. PMID:27606311

  15. Adenosine A2B Receptor: From Cell Biology to Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR's functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases, and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases. PMID:27606311

  16. ELECTRON MICROSCOPE OBSERVATIONS ON THE SURFACE ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATASE-LIKE ENZYMES OF HELA CELLS INFECTED WITH HERPES VIRUS.

    PubMed

    EPSTEIN, M A; HOLT, S J

    1963-11-01

    HeLa cells infected with herpes simplex virus have been examined in thin sections by electron microscopy after cytochemical staining for the presence of surface enzymes splitting adenosine triphosphate. As with uninfected HeLa cultures (18), the opaque enzyme reaction product was localized at the plasma membranes of about half the cells, tending to be present where there were microvilli and absent on smooth surfaces. Where mature extracellular herpes particles were found in association with cell membranes showing the enzyme activity, they were invariably likewise stained, and conversely, those mature particles which lay close against cells without reaction product at the surface were themselves free of it. Particles found budding into cytoplasmic vacuoles were also always without opaque deposit since this was never seen at vacuolar membranes, even in cells having the activity at the surface. The enzyme reaction product thus provided a marker indicating the manner in which the particles escape from cells and mature by budding out through cellular membranes, carrying, in the process, a portion of the latter on to themselves to form the outer viral limiting membrane. In some instances, virus particles were observed with more opaque material covering them than was present at the cell membrane with which they were associated. This finding has been taken as evidence for a physiological waxing and waning of surface enzyme activity of adenosine triphosphatase type. The fine structure of the mature extracellular virus as prepared here, using glutaraldehyde fixation, is also recorded. The observations and interpretations are discussed in full. PMID:14086760

  17. Prevalence of unidirectional Na+-dependent adenosine transport and altered potential for adenosine generation in diabetic cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Podgorska, M; Kocbuch, K; Grden, M; Szutowicz, A; Pawelczyk, T

    2006-05-01

    Adenosine is an important physiological regulator of the cardiovascular system. The goal of our study was to assess the expression level of nucleoside transporters (NT) in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes and to examine the activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes. Isolated rat cardiomyocytes displayed the presence of detectable amounts of mRNA for ENT1, ENT2, CNT1, and CNT2. Overall adenosine (10 microM) transport in cardiomyocytes isolated from normal rat was 36 pmol/mg/min. The expression level of equilibrative transporters (ENT1, ENT2) decreased and of concentrative transporters (CNT1, CNT2) increased in myocytes isolated from diabetic rat. Consequently, overall adenosine transport decreased by 30%, whereas Na(+)-dependent adenosine uptake increased 2-fold, and equilibrative transport decreased by 60%. The activity ratio of AMP deaminase/5'-nucleotidase in cytosol of normal cardiomyocytes was 11 and increased to 15 in diabetic cells. The activity of ecto-5'-nucleotidase increased 2-fold in diabetic cells resulting in a rise of the activity ratio of ecto-5'-nucleotidase/adenosine deaminase from 28 to 56.These results indicate that in rat cardiomyocytes diabetes alters activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes in such a way that conversion of AMP to IMP is favored in the cytosolic compartment, whereas the capability to produce adenosine extracellularly is increased. This is accompanied by an increased unidirectional Na(+)-dependent uptake of adenosine and significantly reduced bidirectional adenosine transport. PMID:16369729

  18. ATP- and adenosine-mediated signaling in the central nervous system: adenosine stimulates glutamate release from astrocytes via A2a adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2004-02-01

    Adenosine enhanced intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in astrocytes via A(2a) adenosine receptors involving protein kinase A (PKA) activation. The Ca(2+) rise is inhibited by brefeldin A, an inhibitor of vesicular transport; but not by neomycin and U73122, phospholipase C inhibitors; xestospongin, an IP(3)-receptor inhibitor; ryanodine, a ryanodine-receptor inhibitor; TMB-8, an endoplasmic reticulum calcium-release blocker; octanol, a gap-junction inhibitor; or cadmium, a non-selective, calcium-channel blocker. Adenosine stimulates astrocytic glutamate release via an A(2a) adenosine receptors/PKA pathway, and the release is inhibited by the vesicular transport inhibitors brefeldin A and bafilomycin A1. A(2a) adenosine receptors and the ensuing PKA events, thus, are endowed with vesicular Ca(2+) release from an unknown intracellular calcium store and vesicular glutamate release from astrocytes. PMID:14978344

  19. Use of adenosine echocardiography for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, W.A. )

    1991-07-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography combined with exercise is sensitive and specific in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) by demonstrating transient abnormalities in wall motion. Frequently, however, patients cannot achieve maximal exercise because of various factors. Pharmacologic stress testing with intravenous adenosine was evaluated as a means of detecting CAD in a noninvasive manner. Patients with suspected CAD underwent echocardiographic imaging and simultaneous thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography during the intravenous administration of 140 micrograms/kg/min of adenosine. An increase in heart rate, decrease in blood pressure, and increase in double product were observed during adenosine administration. Initial observations revealed that wall motion abnormalities were induced by adenosine in areas of perfusion defects. The adenosine infusion was well tolerated, and symptoms disappeared within 1 to 2 minutes after termination of the infusion. Therefore preliminary observations suggest that adenosine echocardiography appears to be useful in the assessment of CAD.

  20. Characterization of adenosine receptors involved in adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction in allergic rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    el-Hashim, A.; D'Agostino, B.; Matera, M. G.; Page, C.

    1996-01-01

    1. Recent work has suggested that adenosine may be involved in asthma via the activation of A1 receptors. However, the role of the recently cloned A3 receptor in airways is largely unknown. In the present study, we have investigated the role of the A3 receptor in adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction in allergic rabbits. 2. Aerosol challenge of antigen (Ag) immunized rabbits with the adenosine precursor, adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), resulted in a dose-dependent fall in dynamic compliance (Cdyn). The maximum fall in Cdyn in these rabbits was significantly greater than that in litter matched, sham immunized animals (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the maximum increase in airways resistance (Rt) between Ag and sham immunized rabbits (P > 0.05). 3. Aerosol challenge of Ag immunized rabbits with cyclopentyl-adenosine (CPA) (A1-receptor agonist) elicited a dose-dependent fall in Cdyn in Ag immunized rabbits and the maximum fall in Cdyn in these rabbits was significantly greater than that observed in sham immunized rabbits (P < 0.05). Similarly, CPA induced dose-dependent increases in R1 in Ag immunized rabbits whereas sham immunized rabbits failed to respond to CPA within the same dose range. The maximum increase in RL in Ag immunized rabbits was significantly greater than that of sham immunized rabbits (P < 0.05). 4. Aerosol challenge of either Ag or sham immunized rabbits with the A3 agonist aminophenylethyladenosine (APNEA) did not elicit dose-dependent changes in either RL or Cdyn. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the maximum response, measured by either parameter, between the two animal groups (P > 0.05). 5. These data provide further evidence for a role of the A1 receptor in the airways, but do not support a role for the A3 receptor in adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction in the allergic rabbit. PMID:8937732

  1. Structure, function, and tethering of DNA-binding domains in σ⁵⁴ transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Vidangos, Natasha; Maris, Ann E; Young, Anisa; Hong, Eunmi; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Batchelor, Joseph D; Wemmer, David E

    2013-12-01

    We compare the structure, activity, and linkage of DNA-binding domains (DBDs) from σ(54) transcriptional activators and discuss how the properties of the DBDs and the linker to the neighboring domain are affected by the overall properties and requirements of the full proteins. These transcriptional activators bind upstream of specific promoters that utilize σ(54)-polymerase. Upon receiving a signal the activators assemble into hexamers, which then, through adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis, drive a conformational change in polymerase that enables transcription initiation. We present structures of the DBDs of activators nitrogen regulatory protein C 1 (NtrC1) and Nif-like homolog 2 (Nlh2) from the thermophile Aquifex aeolicus. The structures of these domains and their relationship to other parts of the activators are discussed. These structures are compared with previously determined structures of the DBDs of NtrC4, NtrC, ZraR, and factor for inversion stimulation. The N-terminal linkers that connect the DBDs to the central domains in NtrC1 and Nlh2 were studied and found to be unstructured. Additionally, a crystal structure of full-length NtrC1 was solved, but density of the DBDs was extremely weak, further indicating that the linker between ATPase and DBDs functions as a flexible tether. Flexible linking of ATPase and DBDs is likely necessary to allow assembly of the active hexameric ATPase ring. The comparison of this set of activators also shows clearly that strong dimerization of the DBD only occurs when other domains do not dimerize strongly. PMID:23818155

  2. Role of brainstem adenosine A1 receptors in the cardiovascular response to hypothalamic defence area stimulation in the anaesthetized rat.

    PubMed Central

    St Lambert, J. H.; Dashwood, M. R.; Spyer, K. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The role of centrally located adenosine A1 receptors in the cardiovascular changes associated with the hypothalamic defence response has been investigated by in vitro autoradiography and the intraventricular application of an A1 receptor antagonist. 2. 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), a highly selective adenosine A1 antagonist and its vehicle, ethanol, were administered directly into the posterior portion of the fourth ventricle of alpha-chloralose anaesthetized, paralysed and artificially ventilated rats. 3. DPCPX (0.01 to 0.3 mg kg-1) caused a dose-dependent decrease in the magnitude of the evoked pressor response (from -13 to -23 mmHg) elicited on hypothalamic defence area stimulation at a dose 10 fold lower than that required to produce an equivalent effect following systemic administration whilst ethanol, the vehicle, had no effect. 4. In vitro autoradiography revealed a heterogeneous distribution of adenosine A1 binding sites in the lower brainstem of rats. Image analysis showed the ventrolateral medulla to have the highest density of A1 receptors. Intermediate levels of binding were seen in caudal regions of the nucleus tractus solitarii and the hypoglossal nucleus. 5. These data imply that a proportion of the cardiovascular response to hypothalamic defence area stimulation are produced by the activation of adenosine A1 receptors localized close to the surface of, or adjacent to, the fourth ventricle in the immediate vicinity of the injection site. PMID:8789379

  3. On the Mg(2+) binding site of the ε subunit from bacterial F-type ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Krah, Alexander; Takada, Shoji

    2015-10-01

    F-type ATP synthases, central energy conversion machines of the cell synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using an electrochemical gradient across the membrane and, reversely, can also hydrolyze ATP to pump ions across the membrane, depending on cellular conditions such as ATP concentration. To prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis, mammalian and bacterial ATP synthases possess different regulatory mechanisms. In bacteria, a low ATP concentration induces a conformational change in the ε subunit from the down- to up-states, which inhibits ATP hydrolysis. Moreover, the conformational change of the ε subunit depends on Mg(2+) concentration in some bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis, but not in others. This diversity makes the ε subunit a potential target for antibiotics. Here, performing molecular dynamics simulations, we identify the Mg(2+) binding site in the ε subunit from B. subtilis as E59 and E86. The free energy analysis shows that the first-sphere bi-dentate coordination of the Mg(2+) ion by the two glutamates is the most stable state. In comparison, we also clarify the reason for the absence of Mg(2+) dependency in the ε subunit from thermophilic Bacillus PS3, despite the high homology to that from B. subtilis. Sequence alignment suggests that this Mg(2+) binding motif is present in the ε subunits of some pathogenic bacteria. In addition we discuss strategies to stabilize an isolated ε subunit carrying the Mg(2+) binding motif by site directed mutagenesis, which also can be used to crystallize Mg(2+) dependent ε subunits in future. PMID:26028301

  4. Mapping of the SecA signal peptide binding site and dimeric interface by using the substituted cysteine accessibility method.

    PubMed

    Bhanu, Meera K; Zhao, Ping; Kendall, Debra A

    2013-10-01

    SecA is an ATPase nanomotor critical for bacterial secretory protein translocation. Secretory proteins carry an amino-terminal signal peptide that is recognized and bound by SecA followed by its transfer across the SecYEG translocon. While this process is crucial for the onset of translocation, exactly where the signal peptide interacts with SecA is unclear. SecA protomers also interact among themselves to form dimers in solution, yet the oligomeric interface and the residues involved in dimerization are unknown. To address these issues, we utilized the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM); we generated a library of 23 monocysteine SecA mutants and probed for the accessibility of each mutant cysteine to maleimide-(polyethylene glycol)2-biotin (MPB), a sulfhydryl-labeling reagent, both in the presence and absence of a signal peptide. Dramatic differences in MPB labeling were observed, with a select few mutants located at the preprotein cross-linking domain (PPXD), the helical wing domain (HWD), and the helical scaffold domain (HSD), indicating that the signal peptide binds at the groove formed between these three domains. The exposure of this binding site is varied under different conditions and could therefore provide an ideal mechanism for preprotein transfer into the translocon. We also identified residues G793, A795, K797, and D798 located at the two-helix finger of the HSD to be involved in dimerization. Adenosine-5'-(γ-thio)-triphosphate (ATPγS) alone and, more extensively, in conjunction with lipids and signal peptides strongly favored dimer dissociation, while ADP supports dimerization. This study provides key insight into the structure-function relationships of SecA preprotein binding and dimer dissociation. PMID:23935053

  5. Effect of calcium triphosphate cement on proximal humeral fracture osteosynthesis: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jim; Feerick, Emer; McGarry, Patrick; FitzPatrick, David; Mullett, Hannan

    2013-08-01

    PURPOSE. To measure the effect of void-filling calcium triphosphate cement on the loads at the implant-bone interface of a proximal humeral fracture osteosynthesis using a finite element analysis. METHODS. Finite element models of a 3-part proximal humeral fracture fixed with a plate with and without calcium triphosphate cement augmentation were generated from a quantitative computed tomography dataset of an intact proximal humerus. Material properties were assigned to bone fragments using published expressions relating Young's modulus to local Hounsfield number. Boundary conditions were then applied to the model to replicate the physiological loads. The effect of void-filling calcium triphosphate cement was analysed. RESULTS. When the void was filled with calcium triphosphate cement, the pressure gradient of the bone surrounding the screws in the medial fracture fragment decreased 97% from up to 21.41 to 0.66 MPa. Peak pressure of the fracture planes decreased 95% from 6.10 to 0.30 MPa and occurred along the medial aspect. The mean stress in the screw locking mechanisms decreased 78% from 71.23 to 15.92 MPa. The angled proximal metaphyseal screw had the highest stress. CONCLUSION. Augmentation with calcium triphosphate cement improves initial stability and reduces stress on the implant-bone interface. PMID:24014777

  6. The Second Extracellular Loop of the Adenosine A1 Receptor Mediates Activity of Allosteric Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Dylan P.; McRobb, Fiona M.; Leonhardt, Susan A.; Purdy, Michael; Figler, Heidi; Marshall, Melissa A.; Chordia, Mahendra; Figler, Robert; Linden, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric enhancers of the adenosine A1 receptor amplify signaling by orthosteric agonists. Allosteric enhancers are appealing drug candidates because their activity requires that the orthosteric site be occupied by an agonist, thereby conferring specificity to stressed or injured tissues that produce adenosine. To explore the mechanism of allosteric enhancer activity, we examined their action on several A1 receptor constructs, including (1) species variants, (2) species chimeras, (3) alanine scanning mutants, and (4) site-specific mutants. These findings were combined with homology modeling of the A1 receptor and in silico screening of an allosteric enhancer library. The binding modes of known docked allosteric enhancers correlated with the known structure-activity relationship, suggesting that these allosteric enhancers bind to a pocket formed by the second extracellular loop, flanked by residues S150 and M162. We propose a model in which this vestibule controls the entry and efflux of agonists from the orthosteric site and agonist binding elicits a conformational change that enables allosteric enhancer binding. This model provides a mechanism for the observations that allosteric enhancers slow the dissociation of orthosteric agonists but not antagonists. PMID:24217444

  7. Alpha-carboxy nucleoside phosphonates as universal nucleoside triphosphate mimics

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, Jan; Das, Kalyan; Bernatchez, Jean A.; Martinez, Sergio E.; Ngure, Marianne; Keane, Sarah; Ford, Alan; Maguire, Nuala; Mullins, Niki; John, Jubi; Kim, Youngju; Dehaen, Wim; Vande Voorde, Johan; Liekens, Sandra; Naesens, Lieve; Götte, Matthias; Maguire, Anita R.; Arnold, Eddy

    2015-01-01

    Polymerases have a structurally highly conserved negatively charged amino acid motif that is strictly required for Mg2+ cation-dependent catalytic incorporation of (d)NTP nucleotides into nucleic acids. Based on these characteristics, a nucleoside monophosphonate scaffold, α-carboxy nucleoside phosphonate (α-CNP), was designed that is recognized by a variety of polymerases. Kinetic, biochemical, and crystallographic studies with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase revealed that α-CNPs mimic the dNTP binding through a carboxylate oxygen, two phosphonate oxygens, and base-pairing with the template. In particular, the carboxyl oxygen of the α-CNP acts as the potential equivalent of the α-phosphate oxygen of dNTPs and two oxygens of the phosphonate group of the α-CNP chelate Mg2+, mimicking the chelation by the β- and γ-phosphate oxygens of dNTPs. α-CNPs (i) do not require metabolic activation (phosphorylation), (ii) bind directly to the substrate-binding site, (iii) chelate one of the two active site Mg2+ ions, and (iv) reversibly inhibit the polymerase catalytic activity without being incorporated into nucleic acids. In addition, α-CNPs were also found to selectively interact with regulatory (i.e., allosteric) Mg2+-dNTP-binding sites of nucleos(t)ide-metabolizing enzymes susceptible to metabolic regulation. α-CNPs represent an entirely novel and broad technological platform for the development of specific substrate active- or regulatory-site inhibitors with therapeutic potential. PMID:25733891

  8. An unusual chemical reactivity of Sm site adenosines strongly correlates with proper assembly of core U snRNP particles.

    PubMed

    Hartmuth, K; Raker, V A; Huber, J; Branlant, C; Lührmann, R

    1999-01-01

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNP) U1, U2, U4, and U5 contain a common set of eight Sm proteins that bind to the conserved single-stranded 5'-PuAU3-6GPu-3' (Sm binding site) region of their constituent U snRNA (small nuclear RNA), forming the Sm core RNP. Using native and in vitro reconstituted U1 snRNPs, accessibility of the RNA within the Sm core RNP to chemical structure probes was analyzed. Hydroxyl radical footprinting of in vitro reconstituted U1 snRNP demonstrated that riboses within a large continuous RNA region, including the Sm binding site, were protected. This protection was dependent on the binding of the Sm proteins. In contrast with the riboses, the phosphate groups within the Sm core site were accessible to modifying reagents. The invariant adenosine residue at the 5' end, as well as an adenosine two nucleotides downstream of the Sm binding site, showed an unexpected reactivity with dimethyl sulfate. This novel reactivity could be attributed to N7-methylation of the adenosine and was not observed in naked RNA, indicating that it is an intrinsic property of the RNA- protein interactions within the Sm core RNP. Further, this reactivity was observed concomitantly with formation of the Sm subcore intermediate during Sm core RNP assembly. As the Sm subcore can be viewed as the commitment complex in this assembly pathway, these results suggest that the peculiar reactivity of the Sm site adenosine bases may be diagnostic for proper assembly of the Sm core RNP. Consistent with this idea, a strong correlation was found between the unusual N7-A methylation sensitivity of the Sm core RNP and its ability to be imported into the nucleus of Xenopus laevis oocytes. PMID:9878394

  9. Equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling on the human adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Dijksteel, Gabrielle S; van Duijl, Tirsa; Heezen, Maxime; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-04-01

    Classical evaluation of target selectivity is usually undertaken by measuring the binding affinity of lead compounds against a number of potential targets under equilibrium conditions, without considering the kinetics of the ligand-receptor interaction. In the present study we propose a combined strategy including both equilibrium- and kinetics-based selectivity profiling. The adenosine receptor (AR) was chosen as a prototypical drug target. Six in-house AR antagonists were evaluated in a radioligand displacement assay for their affinity and in a competition association assay for their binding kinetics on three AR subtypes. One of the compounds with a promising kinetic selectivity profile was also examined in a [(35)S]-GTPγS binding assay for functional activity. We found that XAC and LUF5964 were kinetically more selective for the A1R and A3R, respectively, although they are non-selective in terms of their affinity. In comparison, LUF5967 displayed a strong equilibrium-based selectivity for the A1R over the A2AR, yet its kinetic selectivity thereon was less pronounced. In a GTPγS assay, LUF5964 exhibited insurmountable antagonism on the A3R while having a surmountable effect on the A1R, consistent with its kinetic selectivity profile. This study provides evidence that equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling can both be important in the early phases of the drug discovery process. Our proposed combinational strategy could be considered for future medicinal chemistry efforts and aid the design and discovery of different or even better leads for clinical applications. PMID:26930564

  10. Binding Stoichiometry of a Recombinant Selenophosphate Synthetase with One Synonymic Substitution E197D to a Fluorescent Nucleotide Analog of ATP, TNP-ATP.

    PubMed

    Preobrazhenskaya, Y V; Stenko, A I; Shvarts, M V; Lugovtsev, V Y

    2013-01-01

    The transformation of the strain DH5α (TM)-T1(R) with plasmid vector pET11a containing the cloned gene of bacterial selenophosphate synthetase (SPS), selD, from the E. coli BL21-Gold (DE3) strain gives an overproducing strain of SPS with one synonymic substitution, E197D. The transformation efficiency was estimated as 8 × 10(8) CFU/ μ g plasmid DNA. 28 mg of highly purified preparation of recombinant SPS capable of binding TNP-ATP was eluted from DEAE-Sephadex column in amount of 15 % from the total soluble protein in crude extract. The fluorescent derivative of ATP, 2'(3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine-5'-triphosphate (TNP-ATP), was used as a synthetic analog of the substrate for the monitoring and quantitative analysis of the functional activity of SPS. The non-linear regression analysis of the saturation curve of TNP-ATP binding to D197 SPS with GraphPad Prism software fits to a model with 2 distinct binding sites with KDs different in order. The SPS existence in a form of tetramer in given reaction conditions, in accordance with the concentration stoichiometry of 4 moles of TNP-ATP to 1 mole of recombinant protein, is being discussed. The tetramer structure was predicted with molecular modelling software YASARA and modelled in vacuum using steepest descent minimization energy method. We hypothesize here the recombinant SPS exists as a dimer in solution with two active sites capable of ATP binding in each subunit. PMID:24719756

  11. Peroxynitrite-Dependent Zinc Release and Inactivation of Guanosine 5′-Triphosphate Cyclohydrolase 1 Instigate Its Ubiquitination in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Wu, Jiliang; Zhu, Huaiping; Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant degradation of guanosine 5′-triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH1) with consequent deficiency of tetrahydrobiopterin is considered the primary cause for endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. How GTPCH1 becomes susceptible to the degradation remains unknown. We hypothesized that oxidation and release of the zinc ion by peroxynitrite (ONOO−), a potent oxidant generated by nitric oxide and superoxide anions, instigates GTPCH1 ubiquitination and degradation. Zinc contents, GTPCH1 ubiquitination, and GTPCH1 activity were assayed in purified GTPCH1, endothelial cells, and hearts from diabetic mice. Exogenous ONOO− dose-dependently released zinc, inhibited its activity, and increased the ubiquitin binding affinity of GTPCH1 in vitro and in endothelial cells. Consistently, high glucose (30 mmol/L) inhibited GTPCH1 activity with increased ubiquitination, which was inhibited by antioxidants. Furthermore, mutation of the zinc-binding cysteine (141) (C141R or C141A) significantly reduced GTPCH1 activity and reduced its half-life but increased GTPCH1 ubiquitination, indicating an essential role of the zinc ion in maintaining the catalytic activity and stability of GTPCH1. Finally, GTPCH1 ubiquitination and degradation markedly increased in parallel with decreased GTPCH1 activity in the aortas and hearts of diabetic mice, both of which were attenuated by the inhibitors of ONOO− in mice in vivo. Taken together, we conclude that ONOO− releases zinc and inhibits GTPCH1, resulting in its ubiquitination and degradation of the enzyme. PMID:23974923

  12. Adenosine: Tipping the balance towards hepatic steatosis and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Simon C.; Schuppan, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Fatty liver is commonly associated with alcohol ingestion and abuse. While the molecular pathogenesis of these fatty changes is well understood, the histochemical and pharmacological mechanisms by which ethanol stimulates these molecular changes remain unknown. During ethanol metabolism, adenosine is generated by the enzyme ecto-5′-nucleotidase, and adenosine production and adenosine receptor activation are known to play critical roles in the development of hepatic fibrosis. We therefore investigated whether adenosine and its receptors play a role in the development of alcohol-induced fatty liver. WT mice fed ethanol on the Lieber-DeCarli diet developed hepatic steatosis, including increased hepatic triglyceride content, while mice lacking ecto-5-nucleotidase or adenosine A1 or A2B receptors were protected from developing fatty liver. Similar protection was also seen in WT mice treated with either an adenosine A1 or A2B receptor antagonist. Steatotic livers demonstrated increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis, which was prevented by blockade of adenosine A1 receptors, and decreased expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, which was prevented by blockade of adenosine A2B receptors. In vitro studies supported roles for adenosine A1 receptors in promoting fatty acid synthesis and for A2B receptors in decreasing fatty acid metabolism. These results indicate that adenosine generated by ethanol metabolism plays an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis via both A1 and A2B receptors and suggest that targeting adenosine receptors may be effective in the prevention of alcohol-induced fatty liver. PMID:20395005

  13. Vascular and extravascular distribution of the ATP-binding cassette transporters ABCB1 and ABCC1 in aged human brain and pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Hölzl, Gloria; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Hildebrandt, Jens; Trübner, Kurt; Krohn, Markus; Bogerts, Bernhard; Pahnke, Jens

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play an increasing role in the understanding of pathologic peptide deposition in neurodegenerative diseases (NDs), such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. To describe the location of the most important ABC transporters for NDs in human brain tissue, we investigated ABCB1 and ABCC1 immunohistologically in the adult human brain and pituitary. Both transporters have similar but not identical expression patterns. In brain regions with an established blood-brain barrier (BBB), ABCB1 and ABCC1 were ubiquitously expressed in endothelial cells of the microvasculature and in a subset of larger blood vessels (mostly venules). Remarkably, both transporters were also found in fenestrated capillaries in circumventricular organs where the BBB is absent. Moreover, ABCB1 and ABCC1 were also expressed in various non-endothelia cells such as pericytes, astrocytes, choroid plexus epithelia, ventricle ependymal cells, and neurons. With regard to their neuronal expression it was shown that both transporters are located in specific nerve cell populations, which are also immunopositive for three putative cell markers of purinergic cell signalling, namely 5´-nucleotidase, adenosine deaminase and nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-2. Therefore, we speculate that neuronal expression of ABCB1 and ABCC1 might be linked to adenosinergic/purinergic neuromodulation. Lastly, both transporters were observed in multiple adenohypophyseal cells. PMID:25218792

  14. 2-Aminopyrimidines as dual adenosine A1/A2A antagonists.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sarel J; Petzer, Jacobus P; Terre'Blanche, Gisella; Petzer, Anél; van der Walt, Mietha M; Bergh, Jacobus J; Lourens, Anna C U

    2015-11-01

    In this study thirteen 2-aminopyrimidine derivatives were synthesised and screened as potential antagonists of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in order to further investigate the structure activity relationships of this class of compounds. 4-(5-Methylfuran-2-yl)-6-[3-(piperidine-1-carbonyl)phenyl]pyrimidin-2-amine (8m) was identified as a compound with high affinities for both receptors, with an A2AKi value of 6.34 nM and an A1Ki value of 9.54 nM. The effect of selected compounds on the viability of cultured cells was assessed and preliminary results indicate low cytotoxicity. In vivo efficacy at A2A receptors was illustrated for compounds 8k and 8m since these compounds attenuated haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats. A molecular docking study revealed that the interactions between the synthesised compounds and the adenosine A2A binding site most likely involve Phe168 and Asn253, interactions which are similar for structurally related adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. PMID:26462195

  15. A(3) adenosine receptor ligands: history and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, P G; Cacciari, B; Romagnoli, R; Merighi, S; Varani, K; Borea, P A; Spalluto, G

    2000-03-01

    Adenosine regulates many physiological functions through specific cell membrane receptors. On the basis of pharmacological studies and molecular cloning, four different adenosine receptors have been identified and classified as A(1), A(2A), A(2B), and A(3). These adenosine receptors are members of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. While adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptor subtypes have been pharmacologically characterized through the use of selective ligands, the A(3) adenosine receptor subtype is presently under study in order to better understand its physio-pathological functions. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors has been shown to stimulate phospholipase C and D and to inhibit adenylate cyclase. Activation of A(3) adenosine receptors also causes the release of inflammatory mediators such as histamine from mast cells. These mediators are responsible for processes such as inflammation and hypotension. It has also been suggested that the A(3) receptor plays an important role in brain ischemia, immunosuppression, and bronchospasm in several animal models. Based on these results, highly selective A(3) adenosine receptor agonists and/or antagonists have been indicated as potential drugs for the treatment of asthma and inflammation, while highly selective agonists have been shown to possess cardioprotective effects. The updated material related to this field of research has been rationalized and arranged in order to offer an overview of the topic. PMID:10723024

  16. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is adenosine the common link?

    PubMed

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-10-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the 'adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities' implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic 'comorbidity model', in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain co-morbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions. PMID:25979489

  17. Adenosine: Essential for life but licensed to kill

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Vivian; Deshmukh, Mohanish

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Long et al. (Long et al., 2013) report a cell death priming mechanism activated by p53 that senses extracellular adenosine accumulated following chemotherapy or hypoxia, providing a novel connection between adenosine signaling and apoptosis. PMID:25884366

  18. Targeting of Adenosine Receptors in Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Laubach, Victor E.; French, Brent A.; Okusa, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a common clinical problem after transplantation as well as myocardial infarction and stroke. IR initiates an inflammatory response leading to rapid tissue damage. Adenosine, produced in response to IR, is generally considered as a protective signaling molecule and elicits its physiological responses through four distinct adenosine receptors. The short half-life, lack of specificity, and rapid metabolism limits the use of adenosine as a therapeutic agent. Thus intense research efforts have focused on the synthesis and implementation of specific adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists as potential therapeutic agents for a variety of inflammatory conditions including IR injury. Areas covered by this review This review summarizes current knowledge on IR injury with a focus on lung, heart, and kidney, and examines studies that have advanced our understanding of the role of adenosine receptors and the therapeutic potential of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists for the prevention of IR injury. What the reader will gain The reader will gain insight into the role of adenosine receptor signaling in IR injury. Take home message No clinical therapies are currently available that specifically target IR injury; however, targeting of specific adenosine receptors may offer therapeutic strategies in this regard. PMID:21110787

  19. Thermostabilisation of an agonist-bound conformation of the human adenosine A(2A) receptor.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Guillaume; Bennett, Kirstie; Jazayeri, Ali; Tate, Christopher G

    2011-06-10

    The adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that plays a key role in transmembrane signalling mediated by the agonist adenosine. The structure of A(2A)R was determined recently in an antagonist-bound conformation, which was facilitated by the T4 lysozyme fusion in cytoplasmic loop 3 and the considerable stabilisation conferred on the receptor by the bound inverse agonist ZM241385. Unfortunately, the natural agonist adenosine does not sufficiently stabilise the receptor for the formation of diffraction-quality crystals. As a first step towards determining the structure of A(2A)R bound to an agonist, the receptor was thermostabilised by systematic mutagenesis in the presence of the bound agonist [(3)H]5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA). Four thermostabilising mutations were identified that when combined to give mutant A(2A)R-GL26, conferred a greater than 200-fold decrease in its rate of unfolding compared to the wild-type receptor. Pharmacological analysis suggested that A(2A)R-GL26 is stabilised in an agonist-bound conformation because antagonists bind with up to 320-fold decreased affinity. None of the thermostabilising mutations are in the ZM241385 binding pocket, suggesting that the mutations affect ligand binding by altering the conformation of the receptor rather than through direct interactions with ligands. A(2A)R-GL26 shows considerable stability in short-chain detergents, which has allowed its purification and crystallisation. PMID:21501622

  20. Autoradiographic characterization of (+-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-( sup 125 I) iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (( sup 125 I)DOI) binding to 5-HT2 and 5-HT1c receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, N.M.; Mitchell, W.M.; Garlick, R.K.; Glennon, R.A.; Teitler, M.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1990-11-01

    The 5-HT2 (serotonin) receptor has traditionally been labeled with antagonist radioligands such as (3H)ketanserin and (3H)spiperone, which label both agonist high-affinity (guanyl nucleotide-sensitive) and agonist low-affinity (guanyl nucleotide-insensitive) states of this receptor. The hallucinogen 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) is an agonist which labels the high-affinity guanyl nucleotide-sensitive state of brain 5-HT2 receptors selectively. In the present study, conditions for autoradiographic visualization of (+/-)-(125I)DOI-labeled 5-HT2 receptors were optimized and binding to slide-mounted sections was characterized with respect to pharmacology, guanyl nucleotide sensitivity and anatomical distribution. In slide-mounted rat brain sections (+/-)-(125I)DOI binding was saturable, of high affinity (KD approximately 4 nM) and displayed a pharmacologic profile typical of 5-HT2 receptors. Consistent with coupling of 5-HT2 receptors in the high-affinity state to a guanyl nucleotide regulatory protein, (125I)DOI binding was inhibited by guanyl nucleotides but not by adenosine triphosphate. Patterns of autoradiographic distribution of (125I)DOI binding to 5-HT2 receptors were similar to those seen with (3H)ketanserin- and (125I)-lysergic acid diethylamide-labeled 5-HT2 receptors. However, the density of 5-HT2 receptors labeled by the agonist (125I)DOI was markedly lower (30-50%) than that labeled by the antagonist (3H)ketanserin. High densities of (125I)DOI labeling were present in olfactory bulb, anterior regions of cerebral cortex (layer IV), claustrum, caudate putamen, globus pallidus, ventral pallidum, islands of Calleja, mammillary nuclei and inferior olive. Binding in hippocampus, thalamus and hypothalamus was generally sparse.

  1. Adenosine receptors and asthma in humans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C N

    2008-10-01

    According to an executive summary of the GINA dissemination committee report, it is now estimated that approximately 300 million people (5% of the global population or 1 in 20 persons) have asthma. Despite the scientific progress made over the past several decades toward improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma, there is still a great need for improved therapies, particularly oral therapies that enhance patient compliance and that target new mechanisms of action. Adenosine is an important signalling molecule in human asthma. By acting on extracellular G-protein-coupled ARs on a number of different cell types important in the pathophysiology of human asthma, adenosine affects bronchial reactivity, inflammation and airway remodelling. Four AR subtypes (A(1), A(2a), A(2b) and A(3)) have been cloned in humans, are expressed in the lung, and are all targets for drug development for human asthma. This review summarizes what is known about these AR subtypes and their function in human asthma as well as the pros and cons of therapeutic approaches to these AR targets. A number of molecules with high affinity and high selectivity for the human AR subtypes have entered clinical trials or are poised to enter clinical trials as anti-asthma treatments. With the availability of these molecules for testing in humans, the function of ARs in human asthma, as well as the safety and efficacy of approaches to the different AR targets, can now be determined. PMID:18852693

  2. The Role of Adenosine Signaling in Sickle Cell Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Field, Joshua J.; Nathan, David G.; Linden, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Recent data suggest a role for adenosine signaling in the pathogenesis of sickle cell disease (SCD). Signaling through the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has demonstrated beneficial effects in SCD. Activation of A2ARs decreases inflammation in mice and patients with SCD largely by blocking activation of invariant NKT cells. Decreased inflammation may reduce the severity of vaso-occlusive crises. In contrast, adenosine signaling through the A2B receptor (A2BR) may be detrimental for patients with SCD. Priapism and the formation of sickle erythrocytes may be a consequence of A2BR activation on corpus cavernosal cells and erythrocytes, respectively. Whether adenosine signaling predominantly occurs through A2ARs or A2BRs may depend on differing levels of adenosine and disease state (steady state versus crisis). There may be opportunities to develop novel therapeutic approaches targeting A2ARs and/or A2BRs for patients with SCD. PMID:24589267

  3. Chronic hypoxia reduces adenosine A2A receptor-mediated inhibition of calcium current in rat PC12 cells via downregulation of protein kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shuichi; Beitner-Johnson, Dana; Conforti, Laura; Millhorn, David E

    1998-01-01

    Adenosine has been shown to decrease Ca2+ current (ICa) and attenuate the hypoxia-induced enhancement of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in oxygen-sensitive rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. These effects are mediated via the adenosine A2A receptor and protein kinase A (PKA). The current study was undertaken to determine the effects of adenosine on Ca2+ current and hypoxia-induced change in [Ca2+]i during chronic hypoxia.Whole cell patch-clamp studies revealed that the effect of adenosine on ICa was significantly reduced when PC12 cells were exposed to hypoxia (10 % O2) for 24 and 48 h.Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 revealed that the anoxia-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was significantly enhanced when PC12 cells were exposed to 10 % O2 for up to 48 h. In contrast, the inhibitory effects of adenosine on anoxia-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i was significantly blunted in PC12 cells exposed to hypoxia for 48 h.Northern blot analysis revealed that mRNA for the A2A receptor, which is the only adenosine receptor subtype expressed in PC12 cells, was significantly upregulated by hypoxia. Radioligand binding analysis with [3H]CGS21680, a selective A2A receptor ligand, showed that the number of adenosine A2A receptor binding sites was similarly increased during exposure to 10 % O2 for 48 h.PKA enzyme activity was significantly inhibited when PC12 cells were exposed to 10 % O2 for 24 and 48 h. However, we found that hypoxia failed to induce change in adenosine- and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase enzyme activity. Chronic hypoxia also did not alter the immunoreactivity level of the G protein Gsα, an effector of the A2 signalling pathway.Whole cell patch-clamp analysis showed that the effect of 8-bromo-cAMP, an activator of PKA, on ICa was significantly attenuated during 48 h exposure to 10 % O2.We conclude therefore that the reduced effect of adenosine on ICa and [Ca2+]i in PC12 cells exposed to chronic hypoxia is due to hypoxia-induced downregulation of PKA. This

  4. Chronic hypoxia reduces adenosine A2A receptor-mediated inhibition of calcium current in rat PC12 cells via downregulation of protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Beitner-Johnson, D; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1998-10-15

    1. Adenosine has been shown to decrease Ca2+ current (ICa) and attenuate the hypoxia-induced enhancement of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in oxygen-sensitive rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. These effects are mediated via the adenosine A2A receptor and protein kinase A (PKA). The current study was undertaken to determine the effects of adenosine on Ca2+ current and hypoxia-induced change in [Ca2+]i during chronic hypoxia. 2. Whole cell patch-clamp studies revealed that the effect of adenosine on ICa was significantly reduced when PC12 cells were exposed to hypoxia (10 % O2) for 24 and 48 h. 3. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 revealed that the anoxia-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was significantly enhanced when PC12 cells were exposed to 10 % O2 for up to 48 h. In contrast, the inhibitory effects of adenosine on anoxia-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i was significantly blunted in PC12 cells exposed to hypoxia for 48 h. 4. Northern blot analysis revealed that mRNA for the A2A receptor, which is the only adenosine receptor subtype expressed in PC12 cells, was significantly upregulated by hypoxia. Radioligand binding analysis with [3H]CGS21680, a selective A2A receptor ligand, showed that the number of adenosine A2A receptor binding sites was similarly increased during exposure to 10% O2 for 48 h. 5. PKA enzyme activity was significantly inhibited when PC12 cells were exposed to 10% O2 for 24 and 48 h. However, we found that hypoxia failed to induce change in adenosine- and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase enzyme activity. Chronic hypoxia also did not alter the immunoreactivity level of the G protein Gsalpha, an effector of the A2 signalling pathway. 6. Whole cell patch-clamp analysis showed that the effect of 8-bromo-cAMP, an activator of PKA, on ICa was significantly attenuated during 48 h exposure to 10% O2.7. We conclude therefore that the reduced effect of adenosine on ICa and [Ca2+]i in PC12 cells exposed to chronic hypoxia is due to hypoxia

  5. Adenosine to Inosine editing frequency controlled by splicing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Licht, Konstantin; Kapoor, Utkarsh; Mayrhofer, Elisa; Jantsch, Michael F

    2016-07-27

    Alternative splicing and adenosine to inosine (A to I) RNA-editing are major factors leading to co- and post-transcriptional modification of genetic information. Both, A to I editing and splicing occur in the nucleus. As editing sites are frequently defined by exon-intron basepairing, mRNA splicing efficiency should affect editing levels. Moreover, splicing rates affect nuclear retention and will therefore also influence the exposure of pre-mRNAs to the editing-competent nuclear environment. Here, we systematically test the influence of splice rates on RNA-editing using reporter genes but also endogenous substrates. We demonstrate for the first time that the extent of editing is controlled by splicing kinetics when editing is guided by intronic elements. In contrast, editing sites that are exclusively defined by exonic structures are almost unaffected by the splicing efficiency of nearby introns. In addition, we show that editing levels in pre- and mature mRNAs do not match. This phenomenon can in part be explained by the editing state of an RNA influencing its splicing rate but also by the binding of the editing enzyme ADAR that interferes with splicing. PMID:27112566

  6. An adenosine kinase inhibitor, ABT-702, inhibits spinal nociceptive transmission by adenosine release via equilibrative nucleoside transporters in rat.

    PubMed

    Otsuguro, Ken-ichi; Tomonari, Yuki; Otsuka, Saori; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Kon, Yasuhiro; Ito, Shigeo

    2015-10-01

    Adenosine kinase (AK) inhibitor is a potential candidate for controlling pain, but some AK inhibitors have problems of adverse effects such as motor impairment. ABT-702, a non-nucleoside AK inhibitor, shows analgesic effect in animal models of pain. Here, we investigated the effects of ABT-702 on synaptic transmission via nociceptive and motor reflex pathways in the isolated spinal cord of neonatal rats. The release of adenosine from the spinal cord was measured by HPLC. ABT-702 inhibited slow ventral root potentials (sVRPs) in the nociceptive pathway more potently than monosynaptic reflex potentials (MSRs) in the motor reflex pathway. The inhibitory effects of ABT-702 were mimicked by exogenously applied adenosine, blocked by 8CPT (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine), an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, and augmented by EHNA (erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine), an adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor. Equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) inhibitors reversed the effects of ABT-702, but not those of adenosine. ABT-702 released adenosine from the spinal cord, an effect that was also reversed by ENT inhibitors. The ABT-702-facilitated release of adenosine by way of ENTs inhibits nociceptive pathways more potently than motor reflex pathways in the spinal cord via activation of A1 receptors. This feature is expected to lead to good analgesic effects, but, caution may be required for the use of AK inhibitors in the case of ADA dysfunction or a combination with ENT inhibitors. PMID:26066576

  7. Stable ATP binding mediated by a partial NBD dimer of the CFTR chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Li, Min

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, is an ATP-gated chloride channel. Like other ABC proteins, CFTR encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), NBD1 and NBD2, each accommodating an ATP binding site. It is generally accepted that CFTR’s opening–closing cycles, each completed within 1 s, are driven by rapid ATP binding and hydrolysis events in NBD2. Here, by recording CFTR currents in real time with a ligand exchange protocol, we demonstrated that during many of these gating cycles, NBD1 is constantly occupied by a stably bound ATP or 8-N3-ATP molecule for tens of seconds. We provided evidence that this tightly bound ATP or 8-N3-ATP also interacts with residues in the signature sequence of NBD2, a telltale sign for an event occurring at the NBD1–NBD2 interface. The open state of CFTR has been shown to represent a two-ATP–bound NBD dimer. Our results indicate that upon ATP hydrolysis in NBD2, the channel closes into a “partial NBD dimer” state where the NBD interface remains partially closed, preventing ATP dissociation from NBD1 but allowing the release of hydrolytic products and binding of the next ATP to occur in NBD2. Opening and closing of CFTR can then be coupled to the formation and “partial” separation of the NBD dimer. The tightly bound ATP molecule in NBD1 can occasionally dissociate from the partial dimer state, resulting in a nucleotide-free monomeric state of NBDs. Our data, together with other structural/functional studies of CFTR’s NBDs, suggest that this process is poorly reversible, implying that the channel in the partial dimer state or monomeric state enters the open state through different pathways. We therefore proposed a gating model for CFTR with two distinct cycles. The structural and functional significance of our results to other ABC proteins is discussed. PMID:20421370

  8. Chemical synthesis of nucleoside-gamma-[32P]triphosphates of high specific activity.

    PubMed

    Janecka, A; Panusz, H; Pankowski, J; Koziołkiewicz, W

    1980-01-01

    A simple chemical procedure for the preparation of four common ribonucleoside 5-gamma-[32P]triphosphates of high specific activity (up to 10 Ci/mmole) based on the condensation of orthophosphoric acid with the corresponding nucleoside 5-diphosphate in the presence of ethyl chloroformate as well as the methods of purification and identification of the products are described. PMID:7375446

  9. Structural and functional characterization of a noncanonical nucleoside triphosphate pyrophosphatase from Thermotoga maritima

    SciTech Connect

    Awwad, Khaldeyah; Desai, Anna; Smith, Clyde; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2013-02-01

    A 2.15 Å resolution crystal structure of TM0159 with bound IMP and enzyme-kinetic data are presented. This noncanonical nucleoside triphosphatase from T. maritima helps to maintain a correct pool of DNA and RNA precursor molecules. The hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima has a noncanonical nucleoside triphosphatase that catalyzes the conversion of inosine triphosphate (ITP), deoxyinosine triphosphate (dITP) and xanthosine triphosphate (XTP) into inosine monophosphate (IMP), deoxyinosine monophosphate (IMP) and xanthosine monophosphate (XMP), respectively. The k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values determined at 323 and 353 K fall between 1.31 × 10{sup 4} and 7.80 × 10{sup 4} M{sup −1} s{sup −1}. ITP and dITP are slightly preferred over XTP. Activity towards canonical nucleoside triphosphates (ATP and GTP) was not detected. The enzyme has an absolute requirement for Mg{sup 2+} as a cofactor and has a preference for alkaline conditions. A protein X-ray structure of the enzyme with bound IMP was obtained at 2.15 Å resolution. The active site houses a well conserved network of residues that are critical for substrate recognition and catalysis. The crystal structure shows a tetramer with two possible dimer interfaces. One of these interfaces strongly resembles the dimer interface that is found in the structures of other noncanonical nucleoside pyrophosphatases from human (human ITPase) and archaea (Mj0226 and PhNTPase)

  10. Synthesis, DNA Polymerase Incorporation, and Enzymatic Phosphate Hydrolysis of Formamidopyrimidine Nucleoside Triphosphates

    PubMed Central

    Imoto, Shuhei; Patro, Jennifer N.; Jiang, Yu Lin; Oka, Natsuhisa; Greenberg, Marc M.

    2007-01-01

    The nucleoside triphosphates of N6-(2-deoxy-α,β-d-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (Fapy·dGTP) and its C-nucleoside analogue (β-C-Fapy·dGTP) were synthesized. The lability of the formamide group required that nucleoside triphosphate formation be carried out using an umpolung strategy in which pyrophosphate was activated toward nucleophilic attack. The Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I from Escherichia coli accepted Fapy·dGTP and β-C-Fapy·dGTP as substrates much less efficiently than it did dGTP. Subsequent extension of a primer containing either modified nucleotide was less affected compared to when the native nucleotide is present at the 3′-terminus. The specificity constants are sufficiently large that nucleoside triphosphate incorporation could account for the level of Fapy·dG observed in cells if 1% of the dGTP pool is converted to Fapy·dGTP. Similarly, polymerase-mediated introduction of β-C-Fapy·dG could be useful for incorporating useful amounts of this nonhydrolyzable analogue for use as an inhibitor of base excision repair. The kinetic viability of these processes is enhanced by inefficient hydrolysis of Fapy·dGTP and β-C-Fapy·dGTP by MutT, the E. coli enzyme that releases pyrophosphate and the corresponding nucleoside monophosphate upon reaction with structurally related nucleoside triphosphates. PMID:17090045

  11. Synthesis and polymerase incorporation of β,γ-modified α-l-threofuranosyl thymine triphosphate mimics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Meek, Kirsten N; Rangel, Alexandra E; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2016-08-15

    Three β,γ-modified α-l-threofuranosyl nucleoside triphosphates were synthesized. The β,γ-modified tTTPs undergo a single incorporation event with HIV RT but undergo multiple incorporations to form full-length product with engineered thermophilic polymerases. PMID:27422338

  12. Structural and functional characterization of a noncanonical nucleoside triphosphate pyrophosphatase from Thermotoga maritima

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Khaldeyah; Desai, Anna; Smith, Clyde; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2013-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima has a noncanonical nucleoside triphosphatase that catalyzes the conversion of inosine triphosphate (ITP), deoxyinosine triphosphate (dITP) and xanthosine triphosphate (XTP) into inosine monophosphate (IMP), deoxyinosine monophosphate (IMP) and xanthosine monophosphate (XMP), respectively. The k cat/K m values determined at 323 and 353 K fall between 1.31 × 104 and 7.80 × 104  M −1 s−1. ITP and dITP are slightly preferred over XTP. Activity towards canonical nucleoside triphosphates (ATP and GTP) was not detected. The enzyme has an absolute requirement for Mg2+ as a cofactor and has a preference for alkaline conditions. A protein X-ray structure of the enzyme with bound IMP was obtained at 2.15 Å resolution. The active site houses a well conserved network of residues that are critical for substrate recognition and catalysis. The crystal structure shows a tetramer with two possible dimer interfaces. One of these interfaces strongly resembles the dimer interface that is found in the structures of other noncanonical nucleoside pyrophosphatases from human (human ITPase) and archaea (Mj0226 and PhNTPase). PMID:23385455

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase (ATPS) from the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, Olga Yu.; Kladova, Anna V.; Bursakov, Sergey A.; Dias, João M.; Texeira, Susana; Shnyrov, Valery L.; Moura, José J. G.; Moura, Isabel; Romão, Maria J.; Trincão, José

    2008-07-01

    Native zinc-containing ATP sulfurylase from D. desulfuricans ATCC 27774 was purified to homogeneity and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Native zinc/cobalt-containing ATP sulfurylase (ATPS; EC 2.7.7.4; MgATP:sulfate adenylyltransferase) from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 was purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The orthorhombic crystals diffracted to beyond 2.5 Å resolution and the X-ray data collected should allow the determination of the structure of the zinc-bound form of this ATPS. Although previous biochemical studies of this protein indicated the presence of a homotrimer in solution, a dimer was found in the asymmetric unit. Elucidation of this structure will permit a better understanding of the role of the metal in the activity and stability of this family of enzymes.

  14. Adenosine triphosphate infusion increases liver energy status in advanced lung cancer patients: an in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Leij-Halfwerk, Susanne; Agteresch, Hendrik J; Sijens, Paul E; Dagnelie, Pieter C

    2002-02-01

    We recently observed inhibition of weight loss in patients with advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer after intravenous infusion of ATP. Because liver ATP levels were found to be decreased in lung cancer patients with weight loss, the present 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study was aimed at investigating whether ATP infusion restores liver energy status in these patients. Nine patients with advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer (stage IIIB/IV) were studied 1 week before (baseline) and at 22 to 24 hours of continuous ATP infusion (37-75 microg/kg/min). Localized hepatic 31P MR spectra (repetition time 15 seconds), obtained in the overnight-fasted state, were analyzed for ATP and P(i) content. Ten healthy subjects (without ATP infusion) served as control. Liver ATP levels in lung cancer patients increased from 8.8 +/- 0.7% (relative to total MR-detectable phosphate; mean +/- SE) at baseline to 12.2 +/- 0.9% during ATP infusion (P <.05), i.e., a level similar to that in healthy subjects (11.9 +/- 0.9%). The increase in ATP level during ATP infusion was most prominent in patients with > or = 5% weight loss (baseline: 7.9 +/- 0.7%, during ATP infusion: 12.8 +/- 1.0%, P < 0.01). In conclusion, ATP infusion restores hepatic energy levels in patients with advanced lung cancer, especially in weight-losing patients. These changes may contribute to the previously reported beneficial effects of ATP infusion on the nutritional status of lung cancer patients. PMID:11826418

  15. Specific type of interactions in the quaternary system of Cu(II), adenosine 5'-triphosphate, 1,11-diamino-4,8-diazaundecane and uridine.

    PubMed

    Gasowska, Anna; Jastrzab, Renata; Lomozik, Lechoslaw

    2007-10-01

    Complexation reactions in the quaternary system Cu/ATP/3,3,3-tet/Urd have been studied. The stability constants of the complexes of the Cu(ATP)(3,3,3-tet)H(x)(Urd) type have been determined by computer analysis of the potentiometric titration. On the basis of the results of spectroscopic as well as equilibrium studies, the mode of interactions has been proposed. Metal ions coordinate phosphate groups of ATP and nitrogen atoms of polyamine. It has been established that in the conditions of the complex Cu(ATP)(3,3,3-tet) formation, uridine introduced into the Cu(II)/ATP/3,3,3-tet ternary system is involved in hydrogen bonding with the endocyclic nitrogen atoms N(1) and N(7) of the ATP purine ring and formation of the adduct Cu(ATP)(3,3,3-tet)H(Urd) is observed. Introduction of metal ions into the system changes substantially the mode of interactions between complementary base pairs relative to that proposed in the Watson and Crick model. PMID:17606298

  16. Upstream signaling of protein kinase C-epsilon in xenon-induced pharmacological preconditioning. Implication of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate dependent potassium channels and phosphatidylinositol-dependent kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Weber, Nina C; Toma, Octavian; Damla, Halil; Wolter, Jessica I; Schlack, Wolfgang; Preckel, Benedikt

    2006-06-01

    Xenon elicits preconditioning of the myocardium via protein kinase C-epsilon. We determined the implication of (1) the mitochondrial adenosinetriphosphate dependent potassium (K(ATP)) channels and (2) the 3'phosphatidylinositol-dependent kinase-1 (PDK-1) in activating protein kinase C-epsilon. For infarct size measurements, anaesthetized rats were subjected to 25 min of coronary artery occlusion followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Rats received xenon 70% during three 5-min periods before ischaemia with or without the K(ATP) channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate or Wortmannin as PI3K/PDK-1 inhibitor. For Western blot, hearts were excised at five time points after xenon preconditioning (Control, 15, 25, 35, 45 min). Infarct size was reduced from 42+/-6% (mean+/-S.D.) to 27+/-8% after xenon preconditioning (P<0.05). Western blot revealed an increased activation of PKC-epsilon after 45 min and of PDK-1 after 25 min during xenon preconditioning. 5-hydroxydecanoate and Wortmannin blocked both effects. PKC-epsilon is activated downstream of mitochondrial K(ATP) channels and PDK-1. Both pathways are functionally involved in xenon preconditioning. PMID:16716295

  17. Mechanism of the diastolic dysfunction induced by glycolytic inhibition. Does adenosine triphosphate derived from glycolysis play a favored role in cellular Ca2+ homeostasis in ferret myocardium?

    PubMed Central

    Kusuoka, H; Marban, E

    1994-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that glycolysis is especially important for normal diastolic relaxation and for the maintenance of cellular ion homeostasis in myocardium. To elucidate whether the glycolytic flux of ATP contributes to diastolic tone and to the regulation of intracellular Ca2+, myocardial content of sugar phosphates ([SP]) and intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) were measured in isolated, perfused ferret hearts using nuclear magnetic resonance. Glucose and acetate were used as substrates for glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, respectively. Glycogen was effectively depleted after 15-min perfusion with glucagon (2 mg/liter), as verified by the lack of rise in [SP] during exposure to iodoacetate (100 microM) in substrate-free perfusate. Despite the fact that glycolytic flux had been blocked both by iodoacetate and by absence of substrate, end-diastolic left ventricular pressure (EDP) remained unchanged (P > 0.15, n = 6). The subsequent addition of glucose to the perfusate led to SP accumulation and a marked rise in EDP, with a significant correlation between EDP and [SP] (r = 0.86 +/- 0.04, P < 0.01, n = 6). A similar correlation was observed when glucose in the perfusate was replaced by 2-deoxyglucose (r = 0.78 +/- 0.09, P < 0.01, n = 3). Fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of [Ca2+]i verified that EDP faithfully reports changes in diastolic [Ca2+]i under the present experimental conditions. Thus, intracellular Ca2+ overload is caused by the accumulation of SP rather than by the inhibition of glycolysis per se. Glycolysis may appear to be important because its by-products are deleterious, and not necessarily because glycolytically derived ATP plays a favored role in ion homeostasis. PMID:8132761

  18. Potassium- and calcium-induced alterations in lipid interactions of isolated plasma membranes from blastocladiella emersonii. Evidence for an adenosine 5'-triphosphate requirement.

    PubMed

    Leonards, K S; Haug, A

    1981-03-31

    The physical-chemical properties of the isolated plasma membranes from zoospores of the chytridiomycete Blastocladiella emersonii were investigated, with electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, using the spin-label 5-nitroxystearate (5-NS). Both isolated plasma membranes and aqueous dispersion of the lipids extracted from the plasma membranes were spin-labeled and analyzed. Plots of the hyperfine splitting parameter (2T) vs. temperature indicated that the middle break point, TM, initially observed in experiments with spin-labeled zoospores in vivo [Leonards, K. S., & Haug, A. (1980) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 600, 805-816], was the result of a lipid-lipid interaction (glycolipid-glycolipid or glycolipid-neutral lipid) rather than a lipid-protein interaction. This interaction was markedly affected by Ca2+ ions, which interacted directly with the lipid components, increasing TM from 11 +/- 1 (Ca2+ removed by EDTA) to 21 +/- 1 degree C (10 mM Ca2+) in the lipid dispersions and from 12 +/- 1 to 23 +/- 1 degree C in the plasma membrane preparations. The initial ESR studies on spin-labeled zoospores in vivo had also demonstrated that the addition of K+ ions could reverse the Ca2+ ion effect, downshifting TM from 22 +/- 1 to 10 +/- 1 degree C. The addition of of K+ ions to the isolated plasma membrane had no affect on TM, indicating that K+ ions do not simply replace Ca2+ ions but exert their effect indirectly on the membrane. However, after the inclusion of ATP, K+ ions could reverse the Ca2+ ion effect. it was determined that the ATp generated an "energized membrane" state which permitted the K+ ions to reverse the Ca2+ effect. Since K+ ions have been shown to depolarize the membrane potential in both zoospores and isolated zoospore plasma membrane preparations (generated by ATP), were suggest that the K+ ion induced reversal of the Ca2+ ion effect, and therefore the change in the lipid-lipid interactions responsible for TM, is a consequence of the K+ ion induced depolarization of the membrane potential. PMID:6261805

  19. Mechanism of phosphorylation in the lumen of the Golgi apparatus. Translocation of adenosine 5'-triphosphate into Golgi vesicles from rat liver and mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Capasso, J.M.; Keenan, T.W.; Abeijon, C.; Hirschberg, C.B.

    1989-03-25

    The occurrence of phosphorylated secretory proteins such as caseins and vitellogenin and the recent characterization of phosphorylated proteoglycans, in the xylose and protein core, has raised the question of where in the cell and how this phosphorylation occurs. Previous studies have described a casein kinase activity in the lumen of the Golgi apparatus and this organelle as the site of xylose addition to the protein core of proteoglycans. We now report the translocation in vitro of ATP into the lumen of rat liver and mammary gland Golgi vesicles which are sealed and have the same membrane topographical orientation as in vivo. The entire ATP molecule was translocated into the lumen of the Golgi vesicles; this was established by using ATP radiolabeled with tritium in the adenine and gamma-/sup 32/P. Translocation was temperature dependent and saturable, with an apparent Km of 0.9 microM and Vmax of 58 pmol/mg protein/min. Preliminary evidence suggests that translocation of ATP into the vesicles' lumen is coupled to exit of AMP from the lumen. Following translocation of ATP into the lumen of the vesicles, proteins were phosphorylated.

  20. A comparison of certain extracting agents for extraction of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from microorganisms for use in the firefly luciferase ATP assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knust, E. A.; Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1975-01-01

    Firefly luciferase ATP assay is used in clinical and industrial applications, such as determination of urinary infection levels, microbial susceptibility testing, and monitoring of yeast levels in beverages. Three categories of extractants were investigated for their extracting efficiency. They were ionizing organic solvents, nonionizing organic solvents, and inorganic acids. Dimethylsulfoxide and formamide represented the ionizing organic solvents, while n-butanol, chloroform, ethanol, acetone, and methylene chloride were used for the nonionizing organic solvents. Nitric acid and perchloric acid were chosen for the inorganic acids category. Pathogens were tested with each solvent. They included: Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter species, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. These results are shown in graphic representations.

  1. Application of the luciferin-luciferase enzyme system for determination of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to studies on the mechanisms of herbicide action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.john, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    The luciferin-luciferase enzyme system for determination of ATP is valuable for studies on the mechanisms of herbicide action. Investigations using this system have shown that certain herbicides may act by interfering with ATP production or by blocking ATP use, or by both mechanisms.

  2. PREDICTING BIOTRANSFORMATIONS IN THE SUBSURFACE: RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE ATP (ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE) CONTENT OF SUBSURFACE MATERIAL AND THE CAPACITY OF SUBSURFACE ORGANISMS TO DEGRADE TOLUENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deeper subsurface material was collected in a manner that prevented contamination by surface microorganisms. This material was analyzed for ATP content, and for its capacity to degrade toluene, a common organic contaminant of ground water originating from release of petroleum pro...

  3. Chaperoning of the A1-adenosine receptor by endogenous adenosine - an extension of the retaliatory metabolite concept.

    PubMed

    Kusek, Justyna; Yang, Qiong; Witek, Martin; Gruber, Christian W; Nanoff, Christian; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cell-permeable orthosteric ligands can assist folding of G protein-coupled receptors in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); this pharmacochaperoning translates into increased cell surface levels of receptors. Here we used a folding-defective mutant of human A1-adenosine receptor as a sensor to explore whether endogenously produced adenosine can exert a chaperoning effect. This A1-receptor-Y(288)A was retained in the ER of stably transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells but rapidly reached the plasma membrane in cells incubated with an A1 antagonist. This was phenocopied by raising intracellular adenosine levels with a combination of inhibitors of adenosine kinase, adenosine deaminase, and the equilibrative nucleoside transporter: mature receptors with complex glycosylation accumulated at the cell surface and bound to an A1-selective antagonist with an affinity indistinguishable from the wild-type A1 receptor. The effect of the inhibitor combination was specific, because it did not result in enhanced surface levels of two folding-defective human V2-vasopressin receptor mutants, which were susceptible to pharmacochaperoning by their cognate antagonist. Raising cellular adenosine levels by subjecting cells to hypoxia (5% O2) reproduced chaperoning by the inhibitor combination and enhanced surface expression of A1-receptor-Y(288)A within 1 hour. These findings were recapitulated for the wild-type A1 receptor. Taken together, our observations document that endogenously formed adenosine can chaperone its cognate A1 receptor. This results in a positive feedback loop that has implications for the retaliatory metabolite concept of adenosine action: if chaperoning by intracellular adenosine results in elevated cell surface levels of A1 receptors, these cells will be more susceptible to extracellular adenosine and thus more likely to cope with metabolic distress. PMID:25354767

  4. Nucleoside triphosphate pentose ring impact on CFTR gating and hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Aleksandrov, Luba; Riordan, John R

    2002-05-01

    Alterations in the pentose ring of ATP have a major impact on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function. Both 2'- and 3'-deoxy-ATP (dATP) accelerate ion channel openings and stabilize open channel structure better than ATP. Purified wild-type CFTR hydrolyzes dATP. The apparent first-order rate constants for hydrolysis at low substrate concentration are the same for dATP and ATP. This suggests that product release and/or relaxation of the enzyme structure to the initial ligand free state is the rate-limiting step in the CFTR hydrolytic cycle. Circumvention of the normal requirement for protein kinase A phosphorylation of the R-domain for channel activation implies that the impact of the deoxyribonucleotide interaction with the nucleotide binding domains is transmitted to the channel-forming elements of the protein more readily than that of the ribonucleotide. PMID:11997043

  5. SILAC-Pulse Proteolysis: A Mass Spectrometry-Based Method for Discovery and Cross-Validation in Proteome-Wide Studies of Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Jagat; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-12-01

    Reported here is the use of stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and pulse proteolysis (PP) for detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions on the proteomic scale. The incorporation of SILAC into PP enables the PP technique to be used for the unbiased detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions in complex biological mixtures (e.g., cell lysates) without the need for prefractionation. The SILAC-PP technique is demonstrated in two proof-of-principle experiments using proteins in a yeast cell lysate and two test ligands including a well-characterized drug, cyclosporine A (CsA), and a non-hydrolyzable adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue, adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). The well-known tight-binding interaction between CsA and cyclophilin A was successfully detected and quantified in replicate analyses, and a total of 33 proteins from a yeast cell lysate were found to have AMP-PNP-induced stability changes. In control experiments, the method's false positive rate of protein target discovery was found to be in the range of 2.1% to 3.6%. SILAC-PP and the previously reported stability of protein from rates of oxidation (SPROX) technique both report on the same thermodynamic properties of proteins and protein-ligand complexes. However, they employ different probes and mass spectrometry-based readouts. This creates the opportunity to cross-validate SPROX results with SILAC-PP results, and vice-versa. As part of this work, the SILAC-PP results obtained here were cross-validated with previously re